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Sample records for dark field sdf

  1. The role of side stream dark field microvasculature imaging in a rare case of vancomycin-resistant enterococcal endocarditis complicated by heparin-induced thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Bechar, Janak; Polesello, Luigi; Lombrano, Maria; Martinelli, Giampaolo; Luckraz, Heyman

    2016-01-01

    Sidestream dark field (SDF) imaging allows direct visualization of microvascular architecture and function. We examine the role of an SDF imaging device in visualizing the sub-lingual microvasculature as a surrogate for splanchnic microperfusion. We demonstrate good correlation between current monitoring techniques and the SDF imaging device in a rare case of vancomycin-resistant enterococcal (VRE) sepsis along with heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT). To the best of our knowledge, VRE endocarditis with concurrent HIT has not been described in literature. The role of SDF imaging may predict the earlier need for escalation of care, improving morbidity and mortality. PMID:26750702

  2. Correction method for influence of tissue scattering for sidestream dark-field oximetry using multicolor LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurata, Tomohiro; Oda, Shigeto; Kawahira, Hiroshi; Haneishi, Hideaki

    2016-10-01

    We have previously proposed an estimation method of intravascular oxygen saturation (SO_2) from the images obtained by sidestream dark-field (SDF) imaging (we call it SDF oximetry) and we investigated its fundamental characteristics by Monte Carlo simulation. In this paper, we propose a correction method for scattering by the tissue and performed experiments with turbid phantoms as well as Monte Carlo simulation experiments to investigate the influence of the tissue scattering in the SDF imaging. In the estimation method, we used modified extinction coefficients of hemoglobin called average extinction coefficients (AECs) to correct the influence from the bandwidth of the illumination sources, the imaging camera characteristics, and the tissue scattering. We estimate the scattering coefficient of the tissue from the maximum slope of pixel value profile along a line perpendicular to the blood vessel running direction in an SDF image and correct AECs using the scattering coefficient. To evaluate the proposed method, we developed a trial SDF probe to obtain three-band images by switching multicolor light-emitting diodes and obtained the image of turbid phantoms comprised of agar powder, fat emulsion, and bovine blood-filled glass tubes. As a result, we found that the increase of scattering by the phantom body brought about the decrease of the AECs. The experimental results showed that the use of suitable values for AECs led to more accurate SO_2 estimation. We also confirmed the validity of the proposed correction method to improve the accuracy of the SO_2 estimation.

  3. Field Flows of Dark Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Cahn, Robert N.; de Putter, Roland; Linder, Eric V.

    2008-07-08

    Scalar field dark energy evolving from a long radiation- or matter-dominated epoch has characteristic dynamics. While slow-roll approximations are invalid, a well defined field expansion captures the key aspects of the dark energy evolution during much of the matter-dominated epoch. Since this behavior is determined, it is not faithfully represented if priors for dynamical quantities are chosen at random. We demonstrate these features for both thawing and freezing fields, and for some modified gravity models, and unify several special cases in the literature.

  4. Description of dark energy and dark matter by vector fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meierovich, Boris E.

    A simple Lagrangian (with squared covariant divergence of a vector field as a kinetic term) turned out an adequate tool for oscopic description of dark sector. The zero-mass field acts as the dark energy. Its energy-momentum tensor is a simple additive to the cosmological constant. Space-like and time-like massive vector fields describe two different forms of dark matter. The space-like field is attractive. It is responsible for the observed plateau in galaxy rotation curves. The time-like massive field displays repulsive elasticity. In balance with dark energy and ordinary matter it provides a four-parametric diversity of regular solutions of the Einstein equations describing different possible cosmological and oscillating non-singular scenarios of evolution of the Universe. In particular, the singular "big bang" turns into a regular inflation-like transition from contraction to expansion with accelerated expansion at late times. The fine-tuned Friedman-Robertson-Walker singular solution is a particular limiting case at the boundary of existence of regular oscillating solutions (in the absence of vector fields). The simplicity of the general covariant expression for the energy-momentum tensor allows analyzing the main properties of the dark sector analytically, avoiding unnecessary model assumptions.

  5. Halos of unified dark matter scalar field

    SciTech Connect

    Bertacca, Daniele; Bartolo, Nicola; Matarrese, Sabino E-mail: nicola.bartolo@pd.infn.it

    2008-05-15

    We investigate the static and spherically symmetric solutions of Einstein's equations for a scalar field with a non-canonical kinetic term, assumed to provide both the dark matter and dark energy components of the Universe. In particular, we give a prescription to obtain solutions (dark halos) whose rotation curve v{sub c}(r) is in good agreement with observational data. We show that there exist suitable scalar field Lagrangians that allow us to describe the cosmological background evolution and the static solutions with a single dark fluid.

  6. Turbulent Combustion in SDF Explosions

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, A L; Bell, J B; Beckner, V E

    2009-11-12

    A heterogeneous continuum model is proposed to describe the dispersion and combustion of an aluminum particle cloud in an explosion. It combines the gas-dynamic conservation laws for the gas phase with a continuum model for the dispersed phase, as formulated by Nigmatulin. Inter-phase mass, momentum and energy exchange are prescribed by phenomenological models. It incorporates a combustion model based on the mass conservation laws for fuel, air and products; source/sink terms are treated in the fast-chemistry limit appropriate for such gasdynamic fields, along with a model for mass transfer from the particle phase to the gas. The model takes into account both the afterburning of the detonation products of the C-4 booster with air, and the combustion of the Al particles with air. The model equations were integrated by high-order Godunov schemes for both the gas and particle phases. Numerical simulations of the explosion fields from 1.5-g Shock-Dispersed-Fuel (SDF) charge in a 6.6 liter calorimeter were used to validate the combustion model. Then the model was applied to 10-kg Al-SDF explosions in a an unconfined height-of-burst explosion. Computed pressure histories are compared with measured waveforms. Differences are caused by physical-chemical kinetic effects of particle combustion which induce ignition delays in the initial reactive blast wave and quenching of reactions at late times. Current simulations give initial insights into such modeling issues.

  7. Can dark matter be a scalar field?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jesus, J. F.; Pereira, S. H.; Malatrasi, J. L. G.; Andrade-Oliveira, F.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we study a real scalar field as a possible candidate to explain the dark matter in the universe. In the context of a free scalar field with quadratic potential, we have used Union 2.1 SN Ia observational data jointly with a Planck prior over the dark matter density parameter to set a lower limit on the dark matter mass as m>=0.12H0‑1 eV (c=hbar=1). For the recent value of the Hubble constant indicated by the Hubble Space Telescope, namely H0=73±1.8 km s‑1Mpc‑1, this leads to m>=1.56×10‑33 eV at 99.7% c.l. Such value is much smaller than m~ 10‑22 eV previously estimated for some models. Nevertheless, it is still in agreement with them once we have not found evidences for a upper limit on the scalar field dark matter mass from SN Ia analysis. In practice, it confirms free real scalar field as a viable candidate for dark matter in agreement with previous studies in the context of density perturbations, which include scalar field self interaction.

  8. Can dark matter be a scalar field?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jesus, J. F.; Pereira, S. H.; Malatrasi, J. L. G.; Andrade-Oliveira, F.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we study a real scalar field as a possible candidate to explain the dark matter in the universe. In the context of a free scalar field with quadratic potential, we have used Union 2.1 SN Ia observational data jointly with a Planck prior over the dark matter density parameter to set a lower limit on the dark matter mass as m>=0.12H0-1 eV (c=hbar=1). For the recent value of the Hubble constant indicated by the Hubble Space Telescope, namely H0=73±1.8 km s-1Mpc-1, this leads to m>=1.56×10-33 eV at 99.7% c.l. Such value is much smaller than m~ 10-22 eV previously estimated for some models. Nevertheless, it is still in agreement with them once we have not found evidences for a upper limit on the scalar field dark matter mass from SN Ia analysis. In practice, it confirms free real scalar field as a viable candidate for dark matter in agreement with previous studies in the context of density perturbations, which include scalar field self interaction.

  9. Dark Field Microscopy for Analytical Laboratory Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Augspurger, Ashley E.; Stender, Anthony S.; Marchuk, Kyle; Greenbowe, Thomas J.; Fang, Ning

    2014-01-01

    An innovative and inexpensive optical microscopy experiment for a quantitative analysis or an instrumental analysis chemistry course is described. The students have hands-on experience with a dark field microscope and investigate the wavelength dependence of localized surface plasmon resonance in gold and silver nanoparticles. Students also…

  10. Symplectic gauge fields and dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asorey, J.; Asorey, M.; García-Álvarez, D.

    2015-11-01

    The dynamics of symplectic gauge fields provides a consistent framework for fundamental interactions based on spin-3 gauge fields. One remarkable property is that symplectic gauge fields only have minimal couplings with gravitational fields and not with any other field of the Standard Model. Interactions with ordinary matter and radiation can only arise from radiative corrections. In spite of the gauge nature of symplectic fields they acquire a mass by the Coleman-Weinberg mechanism which generates Higgs-like mass terms where the gravitational field is playing the role of a Higgs field. Massive symplectic gauge fields weakly interacting with ordinary matter are natural candidates for the dark matter component of the Universe.

  11. Dark-field differential dynamic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Bayles, Alexandra V; Squires, Todd M; Helgeson, Matthew E

    2016-02-28

    Differential dynamic microscopy (DDM) is an emerging technique to measure the ensemble dynamics of colloidal and complex fluid motion using optical microscopy in systems that would otherwise be difficult to measure using other methods. To date, DDM has successfully been applied to linear space invariant imaging modes including bright-field, fluorescence, confocal, polarised, and phase-contrast microscopy to study diverse dynamic phenomena. In this work, we show for the first time how DDM analysis can be extended to dark-field imaging, i.e. a linear space variant (LSV) imaging mode. Specifically, we present a particle-based framework for describing dynamic image correlations in DDM, and use it to derive a correction to the image structure function obtained by DDM that accounts for scatterers with non-homogeneous intensity distributions as they move within the imaging plane. To validate the analysis, we study the Brownian motion of gold nanoparticles, whose plasmonic structure allows for nanometer-scale particles to be imaged under dark-field illumination, in Newtonian liquids. We find that diffusion coefficients of the nanoparticles can be reliably measured by dark-field DDM, even under optically dense concentrations where analysis via multiple-particle tracking microrheology fails. These results demonstrate the potential for DDM analysis to be applied to linear space variant forms of microscopy, providing access to experimental systems unavailable to other imaging modes. PMID:26822331

  12. Galactic dark matter in the phantom field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ming-Hsun; Yang, Kwei-Chou

    2012-12-01

    We investigate the possibility that the galactic dark matter exists in a scenario where the phantom field is responsible for the dark energy. We obtain the statically and spherically approximate solution for this kind of galaxy system with a supermassive black hole at its center. The solution of the metric functions is satisfied with gtt=-grr-1. Constrained by the observation of the rotational stars moving in circular orbits with nearly constant tangential speed in a spiral galaxy, the background of the phantom field which is spatially inhomogeneous has an exponential potential. To avoid the well-known quantum instability of the vacuum at high frequencies, the phantom field defined in an effective theory is valid only at low energies. Under this assumption, we further investigate the following properties. The absorption cross section of the low-energy S-wave excitations of the phantom field into the central black hole is shown to be the horizontal area of the central black hole. Because the infalling phantom particles have a total negative energy, the accretion of the phantom energy is related to the decrease of the black hole mass, which is estimated to be much less than a solar mass in the lifetime of the Universe. Using a simple model with the cold dark matter very weakly coupled to the “low-frequency” phantom particles that are generated from the background, we show that these two densities can be quasistable in the galaxy.

  13. Dark Field Microscopy for Analytical Laboratory Courses

    SciTech Connect

    Augspurger, Ashley E; Stender, Anthony S; Marchuk, Kyle; Greenbowe, Thomas J; Fang, Ning

    2014-06-10

    An innovative and inexpensive optical microscopy experiment for a quantitative analysis or an instrumental analysis chemistry course is described. The students have hands-on experience with a dark field microscope and investigate the wavelength dependence of localized surface plasmon resonance in gold and silver nanoparticles. Students also observe and measure individual crystal growth during a replacement reaction between copper and silver nitrate. The experiment allows for quantitative, qualitative, and image data analyses for undergraduate students.

  14. Scalar field dark matter and the Higgs field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertolami, O.; Cosme, Catarina; Rosa, João G.

    2016-08-01

    We discuss the possibility that dark matter corresponds to an oscillating scalar field coupled to the Higgs boson. We argue that the initial field amplitude should generically be of the order of the Hubble parameter during inflation, as a result of its quasi-de Sitter fluctuations. This implies that such a field may account for the present dark matter abundance for masses in the range 10-6-10-4eV, if the tensor-to-scalar ratio is within the range of planned CMB experiments. We show that such mass values can naturally be obtained through either Planck-suppressed non-renormalizable interactions with the Higgs boson or, alternatively, through renormalizable interactions within the Randall-Sundrum scenario, where the dark matter scalar resides in the bulk of the warped extra-dimension and the Higgs is confined to the infrared brane.

  15. The effective field theory of dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubitosi, Giulia; Piazza, Federico; Vernizzi, Filippo

    2013-02-01

    We propose a universal description of dark energy and modified gravity that includes all single-field models. By extending a formalism previously applied to inflation, we consider the metric universally coupled to matter fields and we write in terms of it the most general unitary gauge action consistent with the residual unbroken symmetries of spatial diffeomorphisms. Our action is particularly suited for cosmological perturbation theory: the background evolution depends on only three operators. All other operators start at least at quadratic order in the perturbations and their effects can be studied independently and systematically. In particular, we focus on the properties of a few operators which appear in non-minimally coupled scalar-tensor gravity and galileon theories. In this context, we study the mixing between gravity and the scalar degree of freedom. We assess the quantum and classical stability, derive the speed of sound of fluctuations and the renormalization of the Newton constant. The scalar can always be de-mixed from gravity at quadratic order in the perturbations, but not necessarily through a conformal rescaling of the metric. We show how to express covariant field-operators in our formalism and give several explicit examples of dark energy and modified gravity models in our language. Finally, we discuss the relation with the covariant EFT methods recently appeared in the literature.

  16. Dark-field optical coherence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pache, C.; Villiger, M. L.; Lasser, T.

    2010-02-01

    Many solutions have been proposed to produce phase quantitative images of biological cell samples. Among these, Spectral Domain Phase Microscopy combines the fast imaging speed and high sensitivity of Optical Coherence Microscopy (OCM) in the Fourier domain with the high phase stability of common-path interferometry. We report on a new illumination scheme for OCM that enhances the sensitivity for backscattered light and detects the weak sample signal, otherwise buried by the signal from specular reflection. With the use of a Bessel-like beam, a dark-field configuration was realized. Sensitivity measurements for three different illumination configurations were performed to compare our method to standard OCM and extended focus OCM. Using a well-defined scattering and reflecting object, we demonstrated an attenuation of -40 dB of the DC-component and a relative gain of 30 dB for scattered light, compared to standard OCM. In a second step, we applied this technique, referred to as dark-field Optical Coherence Microscopy (dfOCM), to living cells. Chinese hamster ovarian cells were applied in a drop of medium on a coverslide. The cells of ~15 μm in diameter and even internal cell structures were visualized in the acquired tomograms.

  17. Signal decomposition for X-ray dark-field imaging.

    PubMed

    Kaeppler, Sebastian; Bayer, Florian; Weber, Thomas; Maier, Andreas; Anton, Gisela; Hornegger, Joachim; Beckmann, Matthias; Fasching, Peter A; Hartmann, Arndt; Heindl, Felix; Michel, Thilo; Oezguel, Gueluemser; Pelzer, Georg; Rauh, Claudia; Rieger, Jens; Schulz-Wendtland, Ruediger; Uder, Michael; Wachter, David; Wenkel, Evelyn; Riess, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Grating-based X-ray dark-field imaging is a new imaging modality. It allows the visualization of structures at micrometer scale due to small-angle scattering of the X-ray beam. However, reading darkfield images is challenging as absorption and edge-diffraction effects also contribute to the dark-field signal, without adding diagnostic value. In this paper, we present a novel--and to our knowledge the first--algorithm for isolating small-angle scattering in dark-field images, which greatly improves their interpretability. To this end, our algorithm utilizes the information available from the absorption and differential phase images to identify clinically irrelevant contributions to the dark-field image. Experimental results on phantom and ex-vivo breast data promise a greatly enhanced diagnostic value of dark-field images.

  18. Visible and Dark Fermions in Multi-Spinor Field Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sogami, Ikuo S.

    Why fundamental fermions exist in the modes of three families of quarks and leptons with the color and electroweak gauge symmetry? Is it possible to generalize the Standard Model so as to accommodate some degrees of freedom of dark matter in it? As an attempt to elucidate these basic problems, I have developed a new unified field theory of chiral multi-spinor fields which have three family modes of ordinary quarks and leptons and one additional family of dark quarks and leptons.

  19. Artifacts in X-ray Dark-Field Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Modregger, P.; Wang, Z.; Pinzer, B.; Thuering, T.; Stampanoni, M.

    2011-09-09

    Grating-based x-ray imaging provides three principle kinds of contrast: absorption, phase, and dark-field. Due to the availability of tomographic reconstruction algorithms for the dark-field contrast, it is now possible to take advantage of quantitative scatter information. However, the published algorithm is based on several assumptions that might be violated in reality. We use numerical simulations in order to identify artifacts in the reconstructions, which is crucial for the interpretation of experimental data.

  20. Study of Several Potentials as Scalar Field Dark Matter Candidates

    SciTech Connect

    Matos, Tonatiuh; Vazquez-Gonzalez, Alberto; Magan a, Juan

    2008-12-04

    In this work we study several scalar field potentials as a plausible candidate to be the dark matter in the universe. The main idea is the following; if the scalar field is an ultralight boson particle, it condensates like a Bose-Einstein system at very early times and forms the basic structure of the Universe. Real scalar fields collapse in equilibrium configurations which oscillate in space-time (oscillatons). The cosmological behavior of the field equations are solved using the dynamical system formalism. We use the current cosmological parameters as constraints for the free parameters of the scalar field potentials. We are able to reproduce very well the cosmological predictions of the standard {lambda}CDM model with some scalar field potentials. Therefore, scalar field dark matter seems to be a good alternative to be the nature of the dark matter of the universe.

  1. Effective field theory of dark matter: a global analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liem, Sebastian; Bertone, Gianfranco; Calore, Francesca; de Austri, Roberto Ruiz; Tait, Tim M. P.; Trotta, Roberto; Weniger, Christoph

    2016-09-01

    We present global fits of an effective field theory description of real, and complex scalar dark matter candidates. We simultaneously take into account all possible dimension 6 operators consisting of dark matter bilinears and gauge invariant combinations of quark and gluon fields. We derive constraints on the free model parameters for both the real (five parameters) and complex (seven) scalar dark matter models obtained by combining Planck data on the cosmic microwave background, direct detection limits from LUX, and indirect detection limits from the Fermi Large Area Telescope. We find that for real scalars indirect dark matter searches disfavour a dark matter particle mass below 100 GeV. For the complex scalar dark matter particle current data have a limited impact due to the presence of operators that lead to p-wave annihilation, and also do not contribute to the spin-independent scattering cross-section. Although current data are not informative enough to strongly constrain the theory parameter space, we demonstrate the power of our formalism to reconstruct the theoretical parameters compatible with an actual dark matter detection, by assuming that the excess of gamma rays observed by the Fermi Large Area Telescope towards the Galactic centre is entirely due to dark matter annihilations. Please note that the excess can very well be due to astrophysical sources such as millisecond pulsars. We find that scalar dark matter interacting via effective field theory operators can in principle explain the Galactic centre excess, but that such interpretation is in strong tension with the non-detection of gamma rays from dwarf galaxies in the real scalar case. In the complex scalar case there is enough freedom to relieve the tension.

  2. Heavy dark matter annihilation from effective field theory.

    PubMed

    Ovanesyan, Grigory; Slatyer, Tracy R; Stewart, Iain W

    2015-05-29

    We formulate an effective field theory description for SU(2)_{L} triplet fermionic dark matter by combining nonrelativistic dark matter with gauge bosons in the soft-collinear effective theory. For a given dark matter mass, the annihilation cross section to line photons is obtained with 5% precision by simultaneously including Sommerfeld enhancement and the resummation of electroweak Sudakov logarithms at next-to-leading logarithmic order. Using these results, we present more accurate and precise predictions for the gamma-ray line signal from annihilation, updating both existing constraints and the reach of future experiments.

  3. Electromagnetic Effects in SDF Explosions

    SciTech Connect

    Reichenbach, H; Neuwald, P; Kuhl, A L

    2010-02-12

    The notion of high ion and electron concentrations in the detonation of aluminized explosive mixtures has aroused some interest in electro-magnetic effects that the SDF charges might generate when detonated. Motivated by this interest we have started to investigate whether significant electro-magnetic effects show up in our small-scale experiments. However, the design of instrumentation for this purpose is far from straightforward, since there are a number of open questions. Thus the main aim of the feasibility tests is to find - if possible - a simple and reliable method that can be used as a diagnostic tool for electro-magnetic effects. SDF charges with a 0.5-g PETN booster and a filling of 1 g aluminum flakes have been investigated in three barometric bomb calorimeters with volumes ranging from 6.3 l to of 6.6 l. Though similar in volume, the barometric bombs differed in the length-to-diameter ratio. The tests were carried out with the bombs filled with either air or nitrogen at ambient pressure. The comparison of the test in air to those in nitrogen shows that the combustion of TNT detonation products or aluminum generates a substantial increase of the quasi-steady overpressure in the bombs. Repeated tests in the same configuration resulted in some scatter of the experimental results. The most likely reason is that the aluminum combustion in most or all cases is incomplete and that the amount of aluminum actually burned varies from test to test. The mass fraction burned apparently decreases with increasing aspect ratio L/D. Thus an L/D-ratio of about 1 is optimal for the performance of shock-dispersed-fuel combustion. However, at an L/D-ratio of about 5 the combustion still yields appreciable overpressure in excess of the detonation. For a multi-burst scenario in a tunnel environment with a number of SDF charges distributed along a tunnel section a spacing of 5 tunnel diameter and a fuel-specific volume of around 7 l/g might provide an acceptable compromise

  4. Nonrelativistic approach for cosmological scalar field dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ureña-López, L. Arturo

    2014-07-01

    We derive nonrelativistic equations of motion for the formation of cosmological structure in a scalar field dark matter (SFDM) model corresponding to a complex scalar field endowed with a quadratic scalar potential. Starting with the equations of motion written in the Newtonian gauge of scalar perturbations, we separate out the involved fields into relativistic and nonrelativistic parts and find the equations of motion for the latter that can be used to build up the full solution. One important assumption will be that the SFDM field is in the regime of fast oscillations, under which its behavior in the homogeneous regime is exactly that of cold dark matter. The resultant equations are quite similar to the Schrödinger-Poisson system of Newtonian boson stars plus relativistic leftovers, and they can be used to study the formation of cosmological structure in SFDM models, and others alike, to ultimately prove their viability as complete dark matter models.

  5. Analyzing Microchips With Dark-Field Negative Photomicrography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suszko, S. F.

    1985-01-01

    Inverse development process yields fine details. Photomicrographic technique produces images of integrated-circuit chips. Technique based on dark-field illumination: (chip lit with bright central spot of light and photographed by light scattered or diffracted from spot. Reveals more about microstructure patterns related to photoresist masking than more conventional bright-field method.

  6. Unified dark energy and dark matter from a scalar field different from quintessence

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Changjun; Kunz, Martin; Liddle, Andrew R.; Parkinson, David

    2010-02-15

    We explore unification of dark matter and dark energy in a theory containing a scalar field of non-Lagrangian type, obtained by direct insertion of a kinetic term into the energy-momentum tensor. This scalar is different from quintessence, having an equation of state between -1 and 0 and a zero sound speed in its rest frame. We solve the equations of motion for an exponential potential via a rewriting as an autonomous system, and demonstrate the observational viability of the scenario, for sufficiently small exponential potential parameter {lambda}, by comparison to a compilation of kinematical cosmological data.

  7. Quantum Dynamics of Dark and Dark-Bright Solitons beyond the Mean-Field Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krönke, Sven; Schmelcher, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Dark solitons are well-known excitations in one-dimensional repulsively interacting Bose-Einstein condensates, which feature a characteristical phase-jump across a density dip and form stability in the course of their dynamics. While these objects are stable within the celebrated Gross-Pitaevskii mean-field theory, the situation changes dramatically in the full many-body description: The condensate being initially in a dark soliton state dynamically depletes and the density notch fills up with depleted atoms. We analyze this process in detail with a particular focus on two-body correlations and the fate of grey solitons (dark solitons with finite density in the notch) and thereby complement the existing results in the literature. Moreover, we extend these studies to mixtures of two repulsively interacting bosonic species with a dark-bright soliton (dark soliton in one component filled with localized atoms of the other component) as the initial state. All these many-body quantum dynamics simulations are carried out with the recently developed multi-layer multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree method for bosons (ML-MCTDHB).

  8. Higgs particles interacting via a scalar Dark Matter field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Yajnavalkya; Darewych, Jurij

    2016-07-01

    We study a system of two Higgs particles, interacting via a scalar Dark Matter mediating field. The variational method in the Hamiltonian formalism of QFT is used to derive relativistic wave equations for the two-Higgs system, using a truncated Fock-space trial state. Approximate solutions of the two-body equations are used to examine the existence of Higgs bound states.

  9. Dwarf galaxies in multistate scalar field dark matter halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Medina, L. A.; Robles, V. H.; Matos, T.

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the velocity dispersion for eight of the Milky Way dwarf spheroidal satellites in the context of finite temperature scalar field dark matter. In this model the finite temperature allows the scalar field to be in configurations that possess excited states, a feature that has proved to be necessary in order to explain the asymptotic rotational velocities found in low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies. In this work we show that excited states are not only important in large galaxies but also have visible effects in dwarf spheroidals. Additionally, we stress that contrary to previous works where the scalar field dark matter halos are consider to be purely Bose-Einstein condensates, the inclusion of excited states in these halo configurations provides a consistent framework capable of describing LSB and dwarf galaxies of different sizes without arriving to contradictions within the scalar field dark matter model. Using this new framework we find that the addition of excited states accounts very well for the raise in the velocity dispersion in Milky Way dwarf spheroidal galaxies improving the fit compared to the one obtained assuming all the dark matter to be in the form of a Bose-Einstein condensate.

  10. Dark matter deprivation in the field elliptical galaxy NGC 7507

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, Richard R.; Salinas, Ricardo; Richtler, Tom

    2015-02-01

    Context. Previous studies have shown that the kinematics of the field elliptical galaxy NGC 7507 do not necessarily require dark matter. This is troubling because, in the context of ΛCDM cosmologies, all galaxies should have a large dark matter component. Aims: Our aims are to determine the rotation and velocity dispersion profile out to larger radii than do previous studies, and, therefore, more accurately estimate of the dark matter content of the galaxy. Methods: We use penalised pixel-fitting software to extract velocities and velocity dispersions from GMOS slit mask spectra. Using Jeans and MONDian modelling, we then produce models with the goal of fitting the velocity dispersion data. Results: NGC 7507 has a two-component stellar halo, with the outer halo counter rotating with respect to the inner halo, with a kinematic boundary at a radius of ~110'' (~12.4 kpc). The velocity dispersion profile exhibits an increase at ~70'' (~7.9 kpc), reminiscent of several other elliptical galaxies. Our best fit models are those under mild anisotropy, which include ~100 times less dark matter than predicted by ΛCDM, although mildly anisotropic models that are completely dark matter free fit the measured dynamics almost equally well. Our MONDian models, both isotropic and anisotropic, systematically fail to reproduce the measured velocity dispersions at almost all radii. Conclusions: The counter-rotating outer halo implies a merger remnant, as does the increase in velocity dispersion at ~70''. From simulations it seems plausible that the merger that caused the increase in velocity dispersion was a spiral-spiral merger. Our Jeans models are completely consistent with a no dark matter scenario, however, some dark matter can be accommodated, although at much lower concentrations than predicted by ΛCDM simulations. This indicates that NGC 7507 may be a dark matter free elliptical galaxy. Regardless of whether NGC 7507 is completely dark matter free or very dark matter poor

  11. Disformal scalar fields and the dark sector of the universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zumalacárregui, M.; Koivisto, T. S.; Mota, D. F.; Ruiz-Lapuente, P.

    2010-05-01

    Disformal transformations have proven to be very useful to devise models of the dark sector. In the present paper we apply such transformation to a single scalar field theory as a way to drive the field into a slow roll phase. The canonical scalar field Lagrangian, when coupled to a disformal metric, turns out to have relations to bimetric dark matter theories and to describe many specific dark energy models at various limits, thus providing a surprisingly simple parametrisation of a wide variety of models including tachyon, Chaplygin gas, K-essence and dilatonic ghost condensate. We investigate the evolution of the background and linear perturbations in disformal quintessence in order to perform a full comparison of the predictions with the cosmological data. The dynamics of the expansion, in particular the mechanism of the transition to accelerating phase, is described in detail. We then study the effects of disformal quintessence on cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies and large scale structures (LSS). A likelihood analysis using the latest data on wide-ranging SNIa, CMB and LSS observations is performed allowing variations in six cosmological parameters and the two parameters specifying the model. We find that while a large region of parameter space remains compatible with observations, models featuring either too much early dark energy or too slow transition to acceleration are ruled out.

  12. Dark matter effective field theory scattering in direct detection experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Schneck, K.

    2015-05-01

    We examine the consequences of the effective field theory (EFT) of dark matter–nucleon scattering for current and proposed direct detection experiments. Exclusion limits on EFT coupling constants computed using the optimum interval method are presented for SuperCDMS Soudan, CDMS II, and LUX, and the necessity of combining results from multiple experiments in order to determine dark matter parameters is discussed. We demonstrate that spectral differences between the standard dark matter model and a general EFT interaction can produce a bias when calculating exclusion limits and when developing signal models for likelihood and machine learning techniques. We also discuss the implications of the EFT for the next-generation (G2) direct detection experiments and point out regions of complementarity in the EFT parameter space.

  13. Dark matter effective field theory scattering in direct detection experiments

    DOE PAGES

    Schneck, K.

    2015-05-01

    We examine the consequences of the effective field theory (EFT) of dark matter–nucleon scattering for current and proposed direct detection experiments. Exclusion limits on EFT coupling constants computed using the optimum interval method are presented for SuperCDMS Soudan, CDMS II, and LUX, and the necessity of combining results from multiple experiments in order to determine dark matter parameters is discussed. We demonstrate that spectral differences between the standard dark matter model and a general EFT interaction can produce a bias when calculating exclusion limits and when developing signal models for likelihood and machine learning techniques. We also discuss the implicationsmore » of the EFT for the next-generation (G2) direct detection experiments and point out regions of complementarity in the EFT parameter space.« less

  14. Dark matter effective field theory scattering in direct detection experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneck, K.; Cabrera, B.; Cerdeño, D. G.; Mandic, V.; Rogers, H. E.; Agnese, R.; Anderson, A. J.; Asai, M.; Balakishiyeva, D.; Barker, D.; Basu Thakur, R.; Bauer, D. A.; Billard, J.; Borgland, A.; Brandt, D.; Brink, P. L.; Bunker, R.; Caldwell, D. O.; Calkins, R.; Chagani, H.; Chen, Y.; Cooley, J.; Cornell, B.; Crewdson, C. H.; Cushman, P.; Daal, M.; Di Stefano, P. C. F.; Doughty, T.; Esteban, L.; Fallows, S.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Godfrey, G. L.; Golwala, S. R.; Hall, J.; Harris, H. R.; Hofer, T.; Holmgren, D.; Hsu, L.; Huber, M. E.; Jardin, D. M.; Jastram, A.; Kamaev, O.; Kara, B.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kennedy, A.; Leder, A.; Loer, B.; Lopez Asamar, E.; Lukens, P.; Mahapatra, R.; McCarthy, K. A.; Mirabolfathi, N.; Moffatt, R. A.; Morales Mendoza, J. D.; Oser, S. M.; Page, K.; Page, W. A.; Partridge, R.; Pepin, M.; Phipps, A.; Prasad, K.; Pyle, M.; Qiu, H.; Rau, W.; Redl, P.; Reisetter, A.; Ricci, Y.; Roberts, A.; Saab, T.; Sadoulet, B.; Sander, J.; Schnee, R. W.; Scorza, S.; Serfass, B.; Shank, B.; Speller, D.; Toback, D.; Upadhyayula, S.; Villano, A. N.; Welliver, B.; Wilson, J. S.; Wright, D. H.; Yang, X.; Yellin, S.; Yen, J. J.; Young, B. A.; Zhang, J.; SuperCDMS Collaboration

    2015-05-01

    We examine the consequences of the effective field theory (EFT) of dark matter-nucleon scattering for current and proposed direct detection experiments. Exclusion limits on EFT coupling constants computed using the optimum interval method are presented for SuperCDMS Soudan, CDMS II, and LUX, and the necessity of combining results from multiple experiments in order to determine dark matter parameters is discussed. We demonstrate that spectral differences between the standard dark matter model and a general EFT interaction can produce a bias when calculating exclusion limits and when developing signal models for likelihood and machine learning techniques. We also discuss the implications of the EFT for the next-generation (G2) direct detection experiments and point out regions of complementarity in the EFT parameter space.

  15. Dark matter effective field theory scattering in direct detection experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Schneck, K.; Cabrera, B.; Cerdeño, D. G.; Mandic, V.; Rogers, H. E.; Agnese, R.; Anderson, A. J.; Asai, M.; Balakishiyeva, D.; Barker, D.; Basu Thakur, R.; Bauer, D. A.; Billard, J.; Borgland, A.; Brandt, D.; Brink, P. L.; Bunker, R.; Caldwell, D. O.; Calkins, R.; Chagani, H.; Chen, Y.; Cooley, J.; Cornell, B.; Crewdson, C. H.; Cushman, P.; Daal, M.; Di Stefano, P. C. F.; Doughty, T.; Esteban, L.; Fallows, S.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Godfrey, G. L.; Golwala, S. R.; Hall, J.; Harris, H. R.; Hofer, T.; Holmgren, D.; Hsu, L.; Huber, M. E.; Jardin, D. M.; Jastram, A.; Kamaev, O.; Kara, B.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kennedy, A.; Leder, A.; Loer, B.; Lopez Asamar, E.; Lukens, P.; Mahapatra, R.; McCarthy, K. A.; Mirabolfathi, N.; Moffatt, R. A.; Morales Mendoza, J. D.; Oser, S. M.; Page, K.; Page, W. A.; Partridge, R.; Pepin, M.; Phipps, A.; Prasad, K.; Pyle, M.; Qiu, H.; Rau, W.; Redl, P.; Reisetter, A.; Ricci, Y.; Roberts, A.; Saab, T.; Sadoulet, B.; Sander, J.; Schnee, R. W.; Scorza, S.; Serfass, B.; Shank, B.; Speller, D.; Toback, D.; Upadhyayula, S.; Villano, A. N.; Welliver, B.; Wilson, J. S.; Wright, D. H.; Yang, X.; Yellin, S.; Yen, J. J.; Young, B. A.; Zhang, J.

    2015-05-18

    We examine the consequences of the effective field theory (EFT) of dark matter-nucleon scattering for current and proposed direct detection experiments. Exclusion limits on EFT coupling constants computed using the optimum interval method are presented for SuperCDMS Soudan, CDMS II, and LUX, and the necessity of combining results from multiple experiments in order to determine dark matter parameters is discussed. Here. we demonstrate that spectral differences between the standard dark matter model and a general EFT interaction can produce a bias when calculating exclusion limits and when developing signal models for likelihood and machine learning techniques. In conclusion, we discuss the implications of the EFT for the next-generation (G2) direct detection experiments and point out regions of complementarity in the EFT parameter space.

  16. Stromal cell-derived factor-1 alpha (SDF-1α) improves neural recovery after spinal cord contusion in rats.

    PubMed

    Zendedel, Adib; Nobakht, Maliheh; Bakhtiyari, Mehrdad; Beyer, Cordian; Kipp, Markus; Baazm, Maryam; Joghataie, Mohammad Taghi

    2012-09-14

    Stromal cell-derived factor-1 alpha (SDF-1α) is an important cytokine, implicated in the control of stem cell trafficking and bone marrow-derived stem cell mobilization. Generally, SDF-1α regulates multiple physiological processes such as embryonic development and organ homeostasis. There is also good evidence that SDF-1α and its receptor CXCR4(1) are key regulators of neurorepair processes after brain ischemia and spinal cord injury. In this study, we investigated the influence of chronic intrathecal delivery of SDF-1α after spinal cord contusion. After contusion T9, male Wistar rats at the age of 12 weeks were intrathecally treated with SDF-1α in different doses (100, 500 and 1000 ng/ml) via an osmotic pump for 28 days. Thereafter, animals were subjected to an open field locomotor test. Behavioral scores were significantly higher in SDF-1α treated animals compared to placebo-treated groups. In addition, we evaluated histopathological changes in the spinal cord in the presence or absence of SDF-1α. Chronic delivery of SDF-1α decreased numbers of apoptotic cells, boosted astroglia and microglia response, induced angiogenesis, and potentiated the number of proliferating cells in a dose-dependent manner. These results clearly indicate an improved functional CNS long-term recovery after spinal cord injury. This behavioral restoration was paralleled by a reduction of apoptosis and changes in neuroinflammatory cells.

  17. Effective field theory of dark matter from membrane inflationary paradigm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, Sayantan; Dasgupta, Arnab

    2016-09-01

    In this article, we have studied the cosmological and particle physics constraints on dark matter relic abundance from effective field theory of inflation from tensor-to-scalar ratio (r), in case of Randall-Sundrum single membrane (RSII) paradigm. Using semi-analytical approach we establish a direct connection between the dark matter relic abundance (ΩDMh2) and primordial gravity waves (r), which establishes a precise connection between inflation and generation of dark matter within the framework of effective field theory in RSII membrane. Further assuming the UV completeness of the effective field theory perfectly holds good in the prescribed framework, we have explicitly shown that the membrane tension, σ ≤ O(10-9) Mp4, bulk mass scale M5 ≤ O(0.04 - 0.05) Mp, and cosmological constant Λ˜5 ≥ - O(10-15) Mp5, in RSII membrane plays the most significant role to establish the connection between dark matter and inflation, using which we have studied the features of various mediator mass scale suppressed effective field theory "relevant operators" induced from the localized s, t and u channel interactions in RSII membrane. Taking a completely model independent approach, we have studied an exhaustive list of tree-level Feynman diagrams for dark matter annihilation within the prescribed setup and to check the consistency of the obtained results, further we apply the constraints as obtained from recently observed Planck 2015 data and Planck + BICEP2 + Keck Array joint data sets. Using all of these derived results we have shown that to satisfy the bound on, ΩDMh2 = 0.1199 ± 0.0027, as from Planck 2015 data, it is possible to put further stringent constraint on r within, 0.01 ≤ r ≤ 0.12, for thermally averaged annihilation cross-section of dark matter, < σv > ≈ O(10-28 - 10-27) cm3 / s, which are very useful to constrain various membrane inflationary models.

  18. EUV Dark-Field Microscopy for Defect Inspection

    SciTech Connect

    Juschkin, L.; Maryasov, A.; Herbert, S.; Aretz, A.; Bergmann, K.; Lebert, R.

    2011-09-09

    An actinic EUV microscope for defect detection on mask blanks for operation in dark field using a table-top discharge-produced plasma source has been developed. Several test structures (pits and bumps) on multilayer mirrors were investigated by our Schwarzschild objective-based EUV microscope at 13.5-nm wavelength and then characterized with an atomic force microscope. Possible defect-detection limits with large field of view and moderate magnification are discussed in terms of required irradiation dose and system performance.

  19. Spherical collapse of dark matter haloes in tidal gravitational fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reischke, Robert; Pace, Francesco; Meyer, Sven; Schäfer, Björn Malte

    2016-08-01

    We study the spherical collapse model in the presence of external gravitational tidal shear fields for different dark energy scenarios and investigate the impact on the mass function and cluster number counts. While previous studies of the influence of shear and rotation on δc have been performed with heuristically motivated models, we try to avoid this model dependence and sample the external tidal shear values directly from the statistics of the underlying linearly evolved density field based on first order Lagrangian perturbation theory. Within this self-consistent approach, in the sense that we restrict our treatment to scales where linear theory is still applicable, only fluctuations larger than the scale of the considered objects are included into the sampling process which naturally introduces a mass dependence of δc. We find that shear effects are predominant for smaller objects and at lower redshifts, i. e. the effect on δc is at or below the percent level for the ΛCDM model. For dark energy models we also find small but noticeable differences, similar to ΛCDM. The virial overdensity ΔV is nearly unaffected by the external shear. The now mass dependent δc is used to evaluate the mass function for different dark energy scenarios and afterwards to predict cluster number counts, which indicate that ignoring the shear contribution can lead to biases of the order of 1σ in the estimation of cosmological parameters like Ωm, σ8 or w.

  20. Spherical collapse of dark matter haloes in tidal gravitational fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reischke, Robert; Pace, Francesco; Meyer, Sven; Schäfer, Björn Malte

    2016-11-01

    We study the spherical collapse model in the presence of external gravitational tidal shear fields for different dark energy scenarios and investigate the impact on the mass function and cluster number counts. While previous studies of the influence of shear and rotation on δc have been performed with heuristically motivated models, we try to avoid this model dependence and sample the external tidal shear values directly from the statistics of the underlying linearly evolved density field based on first-order Lagrangian perturbation theory. Within this self-consistent approach, in the sense that we restrict our treatment to scales where linear theory is still applicable, only fluctuations larger than the scale of the considered objects are included into the sampling process which naturally introduces a mass dependence of δc. We find that shear effects are predominant for smaller objects and at lower redshifts, i. e. the effect on δc is at or below the percent level for the ΛCDM model. For dark energy models we also find small but noticeable differences, similar to ΛCDM. The virial overdensity ΔV is nearly unaffected by the external shear. The now mass dependent δc is used to evaluate the mass function for different dark energy scenarios and afterwards to predict cluster number counts, which indicate that ignoring the shear contribution can lead to biases of the order of 1σ in the estimation of cosmological parameters like Ωm, σ8 or w.

  1. Axion Dark Matter Coupling to Resonant Photons via Magnetic Field.

    PubMed

    McAllister, Ben T; Parker, Stephen R; Tobar, Michael E

    2016-04-22

    We show that the magnetic component of the photon field produced by dark matter axions via the two-photon coupling mechanism in a Sikivie haloscope is an important parameter passed over in previous analysis and experiments. The interaction of the produced photons will be resonantly enhanced as long as they couple to the electric or magnetic mode structure of the haloscope cavity. For typical haloscope experiments the electric and magnetic couplings are equal, and this has implicitly been assumed in past sensitivity calculations. However, for future planned searches such as those at high frequency, which synchronize multiple cavities, the sensitivity will be altered due to different magnetic and electric couplings. We define the complete electromagnetic form factor and discuss its implications for current and future dark matter axion searches over a wide range of masses. PMID:27152793

  2. Axion Dark Matter Coupling to Resonant Photons via Magnetic Field.

    PubMed

    McAllister, Ben T; Parker, Stephen R; Tobar, Michael E

    2016-04-22

    We show that the magnetic component of the photon field produced by dark matter axions via the two-photon coupling mechanism in a Sikivie haloscope is an important parameter passed over in previous analysis and experiments. The interaction of the produced photons will be resonantly enhanced as long as they couple to the electric or magnetic mode structure of the haloscope cavity. For typical haloscope experiments the electric and magnetic couplings are equal, and this has implicitly been assumed in past sensitivity calculations. However, for future planned searches such as those at high frequency, which synchronize multiple cavities, the sensitivity will be altered due to different magnetic and electric couplings. We define the complete electromagnetic form factor and discuss its implications for current and future dark matter axion searches over a wide range of masses.

  3. Axion Dark Matter Coupling to Resonant Photons via Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAllister, Ben T.; Parker, Stephen R.; Tobar, Michael E.

    2016-04-01

    We show that the magnetic component of the photon field produced by dark matter axions via the two-photon coupling mechanism in a Sikivie haloscope is an important parameter passed over in previous analysis and experiments. The interaction of the produced photons will be resonantly enhanced as long as they couple to the electric or magnetic mode structure of the haloscope cavity. For typical haloscope experiments the electric and magnetic couplings are equal, and this has implicitly been assumed in past sensitivity calculations. However, for future planned searches such as those at high frequency, which synchronize multiple cavities, the sensitivity will be altered due to different magnetic and electric couplings. We define the complete electromagnetic form factor and discuss its implications for current and future dark matter axion searches over a wide range of masses.

  4. Effective field theory of dark energy: a dynamical analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Frusciante, Noemi; Raveri, Marco; Silvestri, Alessandra E-mail: mraveri@sissa.it

    2014-02-01

    The effective field theory (EFT) of dark energy relies on three functions of time to describe the dynamics of background cosmology. The viability of these functions is investigated here by means of a thorough dynamical analysis. While the system is underdetermined, and one can always find a set of functions reproducing any expansion history, we are able to determine general compatibility conditions for these functions by requiring a viable background cosmology. In particular, we identify a set of variables that allows us to transform the non-autonomous system of equations into an infinite-dimensional one characterized by a significant recursive structure. We then analyze several autonomous sub-systems, obtained truncating the original one at increasingly higher dimension, that correspond to increasingly general models of dark energy and modified gravity. Furthermore, we exploit the recursive nature of the system to draw some general conclusions on the different cosmologies that can be recovered within the EFT formalism and the corresponding compatibility requirements for the EFT functions. The machinery that we set up serves different purposes. It offers a general scheme for performing dynamical analysis of dark energy and modified gravity models within the model independent framework of EFT; the general results, obtained with this technique, can be projected into specific models, as we show in one example. It also can be used to determine appropriate ansätze for the three EFT background functions when studying the dynamics of cosmological perturbations in the context of large scale structure tests of gravity.

  5. Dark-field circular depolarization optical coherence microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Kalpesh; Zhang, Pengfei; Yeo, Eugenia Li Ling; Kah, James Chen Yong; Chen, Nanguang

    2013-01-01

    Optical coherence microscopy (OCM) is a widely used structural imaging modality. To extend its application in molecular imaging, gold nanorods are widely used as contrast agents for OCM. However, they very often offer limited sensitivity as a result of poor signal to background ratio. Here we experimentally demonstrate that a novel OCM implementation based on dark-field circular depolarization detection can efficiently detect circularly depolarized signal from gold nanorods and at the same time efficiently suppress the background signals. This results into a significant improvement in signal to background ratio. PMID:24049689

  6. MAGNETIC FIELDS IN HIGH-MASS INFRARED DARK CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Pillai, T.; Kauffmann, J.; Tan, J. C.; Goldsmith, P. F.; Carey, S. J.; Menten, K. M.

    2015-01-20

    High-mass stars are cosmic engines known to dominate the energetics in the Milky Way and other galaxies. However, their formation is still not well understood. Massive, cold, dense clouds, often appearing as infrared dark clouds (IRDCs), are the nurseries of massive stars. No measurements of magnetic fields in IRDCs in a state prior to the onset of high-mass star formation (HMSF) have previously been available, and prevailing HMSF theories do not consider strong magnetic fields. Here, we report observations of magnetic fields in two of the most massive IRDCs in the Milky Way. We show that IRDCs G11.11–0.12 and G0.253+0.016 are strongly magnetized and that the strong magnetic field is as important as turbulence and gravity for HMSF. The main dense filament in G11.11–0.12 is perpendicular to the magnetic field, while the lower density filament merging onto the main filament is parallel to the magnetic field. The implied magnetic field is strong enough to suppress fragmentation sufficiently to allow HMSF. Other mechanisms reducing fragmentation, such as the entrapment of heating from young stars via high-mass surface densities, are not required to facilitate HMSF.

  7. Precision Higgs Physics, Effective Field Theory, and Dark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henning, Brian Quinn

    The recent discovery of the Higgs boson calls for detailed studies of its properties. As precision measurements are indirect probes of new physics, the appropriate theoretical framework is effective field theory. In the first part of this thesis, we present a practical three-step procedure of using the Standard Model effective field theory (SM EFT) to connect ultraviolet (UV) models of new physics with weak scale precision observables. With this procedure, one can interpret precision measurements as constraints on the UV model concerned. We give a detailed explanation for calculating the effective action up to one-loop order in a manifestly gauge covariant fashion. The covariant derivative expansion dramatically simplifies the process of matching a UV model with the SM EFT, and also makes available a universal formalism that is easy to use for a variety of UV models. A few general aspects of renormalization group running effects and choosing operator bases are discussed. Finally, we provide mapping results between the bosonic sector of the SM EFT and a complete set of precision electroweak and Higgs observables to which present and near future experiments are sensitive. With a detailed understanding of how to use the SM EFT, we then turn to applications and study in detail two well-motivated test cases. The first is singlet scalar field that enables the first-order electroweak phase transition for baryogenesis; the second example is due to scalar tops in the MSSM. We find both Higgs and electroweak measurements are sensitive probes of these cases. The second part of this thesis centers around dark matter, and consists of two studies. In the first, we examine the effects of relic dark matter annihilations on big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN). The magnitude of these effects scale simply with the dark matter mass and annihilation cross-section, which we derive. Estimates based on these scaling behaviors indicate that BBN severely constrains hadronic and radiative dark

  8. Unified Dark Matter scalar field models with fast transition

    SciTech Connect

    Bertacca, Daniele; Bruni, Marco; Piattella, Oliver F.; Pietrobon, Davide E-mail: marco.bruni@port.ac.uk E-mail: davide.pietrobon@jpl.nasa.gov

    2011-02-01

    We investigate the general properties of Unified Dark Matter (UDM) scalar field models with Lagrangians with a non-canonical kinetic term, looking specifically for models that can produce a fast transition between an early Einstein-de Sitter CDM-like era and a later Dark Energy like phase, similarly to the barotropic fluid UDM models in JCAP01(2010)014. However, while the background evolution can be very similar in the two cases, the perturbations are naturally adiabatic in fluid models, while in the scalar field case they are necessarily non-adiabatic. The new approach to building UDM Lagrangians proposed here allows to escape the common problem of the fine-tuning of the parameters which plague many UDM models. We analyse the properties of perturbations in our model, focusing on the the evolution of the effective speed of sound and that of the Jeans length. With this insight, we can set theoretical constraints on the parameters of the model, predicting sufficient conditions for the model to be viable. An interesting feature of our models is that what can be interpreted as w{sub DE} can be < −1 without violating the null energy conditions.

  9. Spatially multiplexed dark-field microspectrophotometry for nanoplasmonics

    PubMed Central

    Pini, V.; Kosaka, P. M.; Ruz, J. J.; Malvar, O.; Encinar, M.; Tamayo, J.; Calleja, M.

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring the effect of the substrate on the local surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of metallic nanoparticles is key for deepening our understanding of light-matter interactions at the nanoscale. This coupling gives rise to shifts of the LSPR as well as changes in the scattering pattern shape. The problem requires of high-throughput techniques that present both high spatial and spectral resolution. We present here a technique, referred to as Spatially Multiplexed Micro-Spectrophotometry (SMMS), able to perform polarization-resolved spectral and spatial analysis of the scattered light over large surface areas. The SMMS technique provides three orders of magnitude faster spectroscopic analysis than conventional dark-field microspectrophotometry, with the capability for mapping the spatial distribution of the scattered light intensity with lateral resolution of 40 nm over surface areas of 0.02 mm2. We show polarization-resolved dark-field spectral analysis of hundreds of gold nanoparticles deposited on a silicon surface. The technique allows determining the effect of the substrate on the LSPR of single nanoparticles and dimers and their scattering patterns. This is applied for rapid discrimination and counting of monomers and dimers of nanoparticles. In addition, the diameter of individual nanoparticles can be rapidly assessed with 1 nm accuracy. PMID:26953042

  10. Spatially multiplexed dark-field microspectrophotometry for nanoplasmonics.

    PubMed

    Pini, V; Kosaka, P M; Ruz, J J; Malvar, O; Encinar, M; Tamayo, J; Calleja, M

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring the effect of the substrate on the local surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of metallic nanoparticles is key for deepening our understanding of light-matter interactions at the nanoscale. This coupling gives rise to shifts of the LSPR as well as changes in the scattering pattern shape. The problem requires of high-throughput techniques that present both high spatial and spectral resolution. We present here a technique, referred to as Spatially Multiplexed Micro-Spectrophotometry (SMMS), able to perform polarization-resolved spectral and spatial analysis of the scattered light over large surface areas. The SMMS technique provides three orders of magnitude faster spectroscopic analysis than conventional dark-field microspectrophotometry, with the capability for mapping the spatial distribution of the scattered light intensity with lateral resolution of 40 nm over surface areas of 0.02 mm(2). We show polarization-resolved dark-field spectral analysis of hundreds of gold nanoparticles deposited on a silicon surface. The technique allows determining the effect of the substrate on the LSPR of single nanoparticles and dimers and their scattering patterns. This is applied for rapid discrimination and counting of monomers and dimers of nanoparticles. In addition, the diameter of individual nanoparticles can be rapidly assessed with 1 nm accuracy.

  11. Spatially multiplexed dark-field microspectrophotometry for nanoplasmonics.

    PubMed

    Pini, V; Kosaka, P M; Ruz, J J; Malvar, O; Encinar, M; Tamayo, J; Calleja, M

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring the effect of the substrate on the local surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of metallic nanoparticles is key for deepening our understanding of light-matter interactions at the nanoscale. This coupling gives rise to shifts of the LSPR as well as changes in the scattering pattern shape. The problem requires of high-throughput techniques that present both high spatial and spectral resolution. We present here a technique, referred to as Spatially Multiplexed Micro-Spectrophotometry (SMMS), able to perform polarization-resolved spectral and spatial analysis of the scattered light over large surface areas. The SMMS technique provides three orders of magnitude faster spectroscopic analysis than conventional dark-field microspectrophotometry, with the capability for mapping the spatial distribution of the scattered light intensity with lateral resolution of 40 nm over surface areas of 0.02 mm(2). We show polarization-resolved dark-field spectral analysis of hundreds of gold nanoparticles deposited on a silicon surface. The technique allows determining the effect of the substrate on the LSPR of single nanoparticles and dimers and their scattering patterns. This is applied for rapid discrimination and counting of monomers and dimers of nanoparticles. In addition, the diameter of individual nanoparticles can be rapidly assessed with 1 nm accuracy. PMID:26953042

  12. Annular dark field transmission electron microscopy for protein structure determination.

    PubMed

    Koeck, Philip J B

    2016-02-01

    Recently annular dark field (ADF) transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has been advocated as a means of recording images of biological specimens with better signal to noise ratio (SNR) than regular bright field images. I investigate whether and how such images could be used to determine the three-dimensional structure of proteins given that an ADF aperture with a suitable pass-band can be manufactured and used in practice. I develop an approximate theory of ADF-TEM image formation for weak amplitude and phase objects and test this theory using computer simulations. I also test whether these simulated images can be used to calculate a three-dimensional model of the protein using standard software and discuss problems and possible ways to overcome these. PMID:26656466

  13. Large-scale magnetic fields, dark energy, and QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, Federico R.; Zhitnitsky, Ariel R.

    2010-08-15

    Cosmological magnetic fields are being observed with ever increasing correlation lengths, possibly reaching the size of superclusters, therefore disfavoring the conventional picture of generation through primordial seeds later amplified by galaxy-bound dynamo mechanisms. In this paper we put forward a fundamentally different approach that links such large-scale magnetic fields to the cosmological vacuum energy. In our scenario the dark energy is due to the Veneziano ghost (which solves the U(1){sub A} problem in QCD). The Veneziano ghost couples through the triangle anomaly to the electromagnetic field with a constant which is unambiguously fixed in the standard model. While this interaction does not produce any physical effects in Minkowski space, it triggers the generation of a magnetic field in an expanding universe at every epoch. The induced energy of the magnetic field is thus proportional to cosmological vacuum energy: {rho}{sub EM{approx_equal}}B{sup 2{approx_equal}}(({alpha}/4{pi})){sup 2{rho}}{sub DE}, {rho}{sub DE} hence acting as a source for the magnetic energy {rho}{sub EM}. The corresponding numerical estimate leads to a magnitude in the nG range. There are two unique and distinctive predictions of our proposal: an uninterrupted active generation of Hubble size correlated magnetic fields throughout the evolution of the Universe; the presence of parity violation on the enormous scales 1/H, which apparently has been already observed in CMB. These predictions are entirely rooted into the standard model of particle physics.

  14. Research on Field Emission and Dark Current in ILC Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Kexin; Li, Yongming; Palczewski, Ari; Geng, Rongli

    2013-09-01

    Field emission and dark current are issues of concern for SRF cavity performance and SRF linac operation. Complete understanding and reliable control of the issue are still needed, especially in full-scale multi-cell cavities. Our work aims at developing a generic procedure for finding an active field emitter in a multi-cell cavity and benchmarking the procedure through cavity vertical test. Our ultimate goal is to provide feedback to cavity preparation and cavity string assembly in order to reduce or eliminate filed emission in SRF cavities. Systematic analysis of behaviors of field emitted electrons is obtained by ACE3P developed by SLAC. Experimental benchmark of the procedure was carried out in a 9-cell cavity vertical test at JLab. The energy spectrum of Bremsstrahlung X-rays is measured using a NaI(Tl) detector. The end-point energy in the X-ray energy spectrum is taken as the highest kinetic electron energy to predict longitudinal position of the active field emitter. Angular location of the field emitter is determined by an array of silicon diodes around irises of the cavity. High-resolution optical inspection was conducted at the predicted field emitter location.

  15. Interpretation of dark-field contrast and particle-size selectivity in grating interferometers

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, Susanna K.; Pai, Vinay; Auxier, Julie; Stein, Ashley F.; Bennett, Eric E.; Kemble, Camille K.; Xiao Xianghui; Lee, Wah-Keat; Morgan, Nicole Y.; Wen, Han Harald

    2011-08-01

    In grating-based x-ray phase sensitive imaging, dark-field contrast refers to the extinction of the interference fringes due to small-angle scattering. For configurations where the sample is placed before the beamsplitter grating, the dark-field contrast has been quantified with theoretical wave propagation models. Yet when the grating is placed before the sample, the dark-field contrast has only been modeled in the geometric optics regime. Here we attempt to quantify the dark-field effect in the grating-before-sample geometry with first-principle wave calculations and understand the associated particle-size selectivity. We obtain an expression for the dark-field effect in terms of the sample material's complex refractive index, which can be verified experimentally without fitting parameters. A dark-field computed tomography experiment shows that the particle-size selectivity can be used to differentiate materials of identical x-ray absorption.

  16. Dark energy or modified gravity? An effective field theory approach

    SciTech Connect

    Bloomfield, Jolyon; Flanagan, Éanna É.; Park, Minjoon; Watson, Scott E-mail: eef3@cornell.edu E-mail: gswatson@syr.edu

    2013-08-01

    We take an Effective Field Theory (EFT) approach to unifying existing proposals for the origin of cosmic acceleration and its connection to cosmological observations. Building on earlier work where EFT methods were used with observations to constrain the background evolution, we extend this program to the level of the EFT of the cosmological perturbations — following the example from the EFT of Inflation. Within this framework, we construct the general theory around an assumed background which will typically be chosen to mimic ΛCDM, and identify the parameters of interest for constraining dark energy and modified gravity models with observations. We discuss the similarities to the EFT of Inflation, but we also identify a number of subtleties including the relationship between the scalar perturbations and the Goldstone boson of the spontaneously broken time translations. We present formulae that relate the parameters of the fundamental Lagrangian to the speed of sound, anisotropic shear stress, effective Newtonian constant, and Caldwell's varpi parameter, emphasizing the connection to observations. It is anticipated that this framework will be of use in constraining individual models, as well as for placing model-independent constraints on dark energy and modified gravity model building.

  17. Is the effective field theory of dark energy effective?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linder, Eric V.; Sengör, Gizem; Watson, Scott

    2016-05-01

    The effective field theory of cosmic acceleration systematizes possible contributions to the action, accounting for both dark energy and modifications of gravity. Rather than making model dependent assumptions, it includes all terms, subject to the required symmetries, with four (seven) functions of time for the coefficients. These correspond respectively to the Horndeski and general beyond Horndeski class of theories. We address the question of whether this general systematization is actually effective, i.e. useful in revealing the nature of cosmic acceleration when compared with cosmological data. The answer is no and yes: there is no simple time dependence of the free functions—assumed forms in the literature are poor fits, but one can derive some general characteristics in early and late time limits. For example, we prove that the gravitational slip must restore to general relativity in the de Sitter limit of Horndeski theories, and why it doesn't more generally. We also clarify the relation between the tensor and scalar sectors, and its important relation to observations; in a real sense the expansion history H(z) or dark energy equation of state w(z) is 1/5 or less of the functional information! In addition we discuss the de Sitter, Horndeski, and decoupling limits of the theory utilizing Goldstone techniques.

  18. Directional x-ray dark-field imaging of strongly ordered systems

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Torben Haugaard; Feidenhans'l, Robert; Bech, Martin; Pfeiffer, Franz; Zanette, Irene; Weitkamp, Timm; David, Christian; Rutishauser, Simon; Deyhle, Hans; Reznikova, Elena; Mohr, Juergen

    2010-12-01

    Recently a novel grating based x-ray imaging approach called directional x-ray dark-field imaging was introduced. Directional x-ray dark-field imaging yields information about the local texture of structures smaller than the pixel size of the imaging system. In this work we extend the theoretical description and data processing schemes for directional dark-field imaging to strongly scattering systems, which could not be described previously. We develop a simple scattering model to account for these recent observations and subsequently demonstrate the model using experimental data. The experimental data includes directional dark-field images of polypropylene fibers and a human tooth slice.

  19. Development of hard X-ray dark-field microscope using full-field optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takano, Hidekazu; Azuma, Hiroaki; Shimomura, Sho; Tsuji, Takuya; Tsusaka, Yoshiyuki; Kagoshima, Yasushi

    2016-10-01

    We develop a dark-field X-ray microscope using full-field optics based on a synchrotron beamline. Our setup consists of a condenser system and a microscope objective with an angular acceptance larger than that of the condenser. The condenser system is moved downstream from its regular position such that the focus of the condenser is behind the objective. The dark-field microscope optics are configured by excluding the converging beam from the condenser at the focal point. The image properties of the system are evaluated by observing and calculating a Siemens star test chart with 10 keV X-rays. Our setup allows easy switching to bright-field imaging.

  20. Some properties of dark matter field in the complex octonion space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Zi-Hua

    2015-12-01

    The paper aims to consider the electromagnetic adjoint-field in the complex octonion space as the dark matter field, describing some properties of the dark matter, especially the origin, particle category, existence region, force and so forth. Since Maxwell applied the algebra of quaternions to depict the electromagnetic theory, some scholars adopt the complex quaternion and octonion to study the physics property of electromagnetic and gravitational fields. In the paper, by means of the octonion operator, it is found that the gravitational field accompanies with one adjoint-field, whose property is partly similar to that of electromagnetic field. The electromagnetic field accompanies with another adjoint-field, whose feature is partly similar to that of gravitational field. As a result, the electromagnetic adjoint-field can be chosen as one candidate of the dark matter field. According to the electromagnetic adjoint-field, it is able to predict a few properties of the dark matter, for instance, the particle category, interaction intensity, interaction distance, existence region and so forth. The study reveals that the dark matter particle and the gravitational resource will be influenced by the gravitational strength and force. The dark matter field is capable of making a contribution to physics quantities of gravitational field, including the angular momentum, torque, energy, force and so on. Further, there may be comparatively more chances to discover the dark matter in some regions with the ultrastrong field strength, surrounding the neutral star, white dwarf, galactic nucleus, black hole, astrophysical jet and so on.

  1. How the scalar field of unified dark matter models can cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Bertacca, Daniele; Bartolo, Nicola; Matarrese, Sabino; Diaferio, Antonaldo E-mail: nicola.bartolo@pd.infn.it E-mail: sabino.matarrese@pd.infn.it

    2008-10-15

    We use scalar field Lagrangians with a non-canonical kinetic term to obtain unified dark matter models where both the dark matter and the dark energy, the latter mimicking a cosmological constant, are described by the scalar field itself. In this framework, we propose a technique for reconstructing models where the effective speed of sound is small enough that the scalar field can cluster. These models avoid the strong time evolution of the gravitational potential and the large integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect which have been serious drawbacks of models considered previously. Moreover, these unified dark matter scalar field models can be easily generalized to behave as dark matter plus a dark energy component behaving like any type of quintessence fluid.

  2. Quantum Field Theory and Gravity: Black Holes and Dark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heo, Junseong

    1998-11-01

    This thesis examines the various field theory related issues motivated by the gravitational phenomena. Black Holes with quantum degrees of freedom, non-abelian generalization of vortex solutions, and WIMP detection rates for the ongoing experimental search for dark matter are explored. We derive a close relation between the Minkowski signature approach and the Euclidean formalism in the construction of quantum degrees of freedom on a Black hole solution. We demonstrate the benefit of a physically transparent energy momentum consideration and extend the previous analysis on Hawking temperature shifts. Specifically we clear up the issue of thick string limit behavior that obscures the direct intuition and draw an analogy that brings the instanton solutions in flat two dimensional planes to Euclidean vortex solutions in the black hole background. These considerations lead to the question on the various possibilities of non-abelian solutions which supply the seed for the source of quantum hair in general context. We construct an explicit non-abelian vortex solution with a remnant Z3 discrete symmetry and consider its new interaction properties distinct from the known abelian solution behavior. Dark Matter direct search experiments are now in operation yet the expected event rate is very low and the previously available theoretical formalism could not tell the differences among different halo models. We present a derivation of angle dependent differential event rates which allows this possibility, and enables the confirmation of detection of a galactic halo WIMP signal with a smaller number of experimental signals. It may open up realistic methods to distinguish one halo model from another.

  3. Extension of Standard Model in multi-spinor field formalism — Visible and dark sectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sogami, Ikuo S.

    2016-06-01

    With multi-spinor fields which behave as triple-tensor products of the Dirac spinors, the Standard Model is extended so as to embrace three families of ordinary quarks and leptons in the visible sector and an additional family of exotic quarks and leptons in the dark sector of our Universe. Apart from the gauge and Higgs fields of the Standard Model symmetry G, new gauge and Higgs fields of a symmetry isomorphic to G are postulated to exist in the dark sector. It is the bi-quadratic interaction between visible and dark Higgs fields that opens a main portal to the dark sector. Breakdowns of the visible and dark electroweak symmetries result in the Higgs boson with mass 125 GeV and a new boson which can be related to the diphoton excess around 750 GeV. Subsequent to a common inflationary phase and a reheating period, the visible and dark sectors follow weakly-interacting paths of thermal histories. We propose scenarios for dark matter in which no dark nuclear reaction takes place. A candidate for the main component of the dark matter is a stable dark hadron with spin 3/2, and the upper limit of its mass is estimated to be 15.1 GeV/c2.

  4. Holographic Ricci dark energy: Current observational constraints, quintom feature, and the reconstruction of scalar-field dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xin

    2009-05-01

    In this work, we consider the cosmological constraints on the holographic Ricci dark energy proposed by Gao et al. [Phys. Rev. DPRVDAQ1550-7998 79, 043511 (2009)10.1103/PhysRevD.79.043511], by using the observational data currently available. The main characteristic of holographic Ricci dark energy is governed by a positive numerical parameter α in the model. When α<1/2, the holographic Ricci dark energy will exhibit a quintomlike behavior; i.e., its equation of state will evolve across the cosmological-constant boundary w=-1. The parameter α can be determined only by observations. Thus, in order to characterize the evolving feature of dark energy and to predict the fate of the Universe, it is of extraordinary importance to constrain the parameter α by using the observational data. In this paper, we derive constraints on the holographic Ricci dark energy model from the latest observational data including the Union sample of 307 type Ia supernovae, the shift parameter of the cosmic microwave background given by the five-year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe observations, and the baryon acoustic oscillation measurement from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The joint analysis gives the best-fit results (with 1σ uncertainty): α=0.359-0.025+0.024 and Ωm0=0.318-0.024+0.026. That is to say, according to the observations, the holographic Ricci dark energy takes on the quintom feature. Finally, in light of the results of the cosmological constraints, we discuss the issue of the scalar-field dark energy reconstruction, based on the scenario of the holographic Ricci vacuum energy.

  5. Complex dark-field contrast in grating-based x-ray phase contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yi; Tang, Xiangyang

    2015-03-01

    Without assuming that the sub-pixel microstructures of an object to be imaged distribute in space randomly, we investigate the influence of the object's microstructures on grating-based x-ray phase contrast imaging. Our theoretical analysis and 3D computer simulation study based on the paraxial Fresnel-Kirchhoff theory show that the existing dark-field contrast can be generalized into a complex dark-field contrast in a way such that its imaginary part quantifies the effect of the object's sub-pixel microstructures on the phase of intensity oscillations. A method based on the phase-attenuation duality that holds for soft tissues to be imaged at high x-ray energies is proposed to retrieve the imaginary part of the complex dark-field contrast for imaging. In comparison to the existing dark-field contrast, the imaginary part of complex dark-field contrast exhibits significantly stronger selectivity on the shape of the object's sub-pixel microstructures. Thus the x-ray imaging corresponding to the imaginary part of complex dark-field contrast can provide additional and complementary information to that corresponding to the attenuation contrast, phase contrast and the existing dark-field contrast.

  6. Is Sextans dwarf galaxy in a scalar field dark matter halo?

    SciTech Connect

    Lora, V.; Magaña, Juan E-mail: juan.magana@uv.cl

    2014-09-01

    The Bose-Einstein condensate/scalar field dark matter model, considers that the dark matter is composed by spinless-ultra-light particles which can be described by a scalar field. This model is an alternative model to the Λ-cold dark matter paradigm, and therefore should be studied at galactic and cosmological scales. Dwarf spheroidal galaxies have been very useful when studying any dark matter theory, because the dark matter dominates their dynamics. In this paper we study the Sextans dwarf spheroidal galaxy, embedded in a scalar field dark matter halo. We explore how the dissolution time-scale of the stellar substructures in Sextans, constrain the mass, and the self-interacting parameter of the scalar field dark matter boson. We find that for masses in the range (0.12< m{sub φ}<8) ×10{sup -22} eV, scalar field dark halos without self-interaction would have cores large enough to explain the longevity of the stellar substructures in Sextans, and small enough mass to be compatible with dynamical limits. If the self-interacting parameter is distinct to zero, then the mass of the boson could be as high as m{sub φ}≈2×10{sup -21} eV, but it would correspond to an unrealistic low mass for the Sextans dark matter halo . Therefore, the Sextans dwarf galaxy could be embedded in a scalar field/BEC dark matter halo with a preferred self-interacting parameter equal to zero.

  7. Quantification of the sensitivity range in neutron dark-field imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Betz, B.; Harti, R. P.; Hovind, J.; Kaestner, A.; Lehmann, E.; Grünzweig, C.; Strobl, M.; Van Swygenhoven, H.

    2015-12-15

    In neutron grating interferometry, the dark-field image visualizes the scattering properties of samples in the small-angle and ultra-small-angle scattering range. These angles correspond to correlation lengths from several hundred nanometers up to several tens of micrometers. In this article, we present an experimental study that demonstrates the potential of quantitative neutron dark-field imaging. The dark-field signal for scattering from different particle sizes and concentrations of mono-dispersive polystyrene particles in aqueous solution is compared to theoretical predictions and the good agreement between measurements and calculations underlines the quantitative nature of the measured values and reliability of the technique with neutrons.

  8. Dark matter effective field theory scattering in direct detection experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Schneck, K.; Cabrera, B.; Cerdeno, D. G.; Mandic, V.; Rogers, H. E.; Agnese, R.; Anderson, A. J.; Asai, M.; Balakishiyeva, D.; Barker, D.; Basu Thakur, R.; Bauer, D. A.; Billard, J.; Borgland, A.; Brandt, D.; Brink, P. L.; Bunker, R.; Caldwell, D. O.; Calkins, R.; Chagani, H.; Chen, Y.; Cooley, J.; Cornell, B.; Crewdson, C. H.; Cushman, Priscilla B.; Daal, M.; Di Stefano, P. C.; Doughty, T.; Esteban, L.; Fallows, S.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Godfrey, G. L.; Golwala, S. R.; Hall, Jeter C.; Harris, H. R.; Hofer, T.; Holmgren, D.; Hsu, L.; Huber, M. E.; Jardin, D. M.; Jastram, A.; Kamaev, O.; Kara, B.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kennedy, A.; Leder, A.; Loer, B.; Lopez Asamar, E.; Lukens, W.; Mahapatra, R.; McCarthy, K. A.; Mirabolfathi, N.; Moffatt, R. A.; Morales Mendoza, J. D.; Oser, S. M.; Page, K.; Page, W. A.; Partridge, R.; Pepin, M.; Phipps, A.; Prasad, K.; Pyle, M.; Qiu, H.; Rau, W.; Redl, P.; Reisetter, A.; Ricci, Y.; Roberts, A.; Saab, T.; Sadoulet, B.; Sander, J.; Schnee, R. W.; Scorza, S.; Serfass, B.; Shank, B.; Speller, D.; Toback, D.; Upadhyayula, S.; Villano, A. N.; Welliver, B.; Wilson, J. S.; Wright, D. H.; Yang, X.; Yellin, S.; Yen, J. J.; Young, B. A.; Zhang, J.

    2015-05-01

    We examine the consequences of the effective eld theory (EFT) of dark matter-nucleon scattering or current and proposed direct detection experiments. Exclusion limits on EFT coupling constants computed using the optimum interval method are presented for SuperCDMS Soudan, CDMS II, and LUX, and the necessity of combining results from multiple experiments in order to determine dark matter parameters is discussed. We demonstrate that spectral di*erences between the standard dark matter model and a general EFT interaction can produce a bias when calculating exclusion limits and when developing signal models for likelihood and machine learning techniques. We also discuss the implications of the EFT for the next-generation (G2) direct detection experiments and point out regions of complementarity in the EFT parameter space.

  9. Enzyme catalysis enhanced dark-field imaging as a novel immunohistochemical method.

    PubMed

    Fan, Lin; Tian, Yanyan; Yin, Rong; Lou, Doudou; Zhang, Xizhi; Wang, Meng; Ma, Ming; Luo, Shouhua; Li, Suyi; Gu, Ning; Zhang, Yu

    2016-04-28

    Conventional immunohistochemistry is limited to subjective judgment based on human experience and thus it is clinically required to develop a quantitative immunohistochemical detection. 3,3'-Diaminobenzidin (DAB) aggregates, a type of staining product formed by conventional immunohistochemistry, were found to have a special optical property of dark-field imaging for the first time, and the mechanism was explored. On this basis, a novel immunohistochemical method based on dark-field imaging for detecting HER2 overexpressed in breast cancer was established, and the quantitative analysis standard and relevant software for measuring the scattering intensity was developed. In order to achieve a more sensitive detection, the HRP (horseradish peroxidase)-labeled secondary antibodies conjugated gold nanoparticles were constructed as nanoprobes to load more HRP enzymes, resulting in an enhanced DAB deposition as a dark-field label. Simultaneously, gold nanoparticles also act as a synergistically enhanced agent due to their mimicry of enzyme catalysis and dark-field scattering properties. PMID:26786242

  10. Reconstruction of scalar and vectorial components in X-ray dark-field tomography

    PubMed Central

    Bayer, Florian L.; Hu, Shiyang; Maier, Andreas; Weber, Thomas; Anton, Gisela; Michel, Thilo; Riess, Christian P.

    2014-01-01

    Grating-based X-ray dark-field imaging is a novel technique for obtaining image contrast for object structures at size scales below setup resolution. Such an approach appears particularly beneficial for medical imaging and nondestructive testing. It has already been shown that the dark-field signal depends on the direction of observation. However, up to now, algorithms for fully recovering the orientation dependence in a tomographic volume are still unexplored. In this publication, we propose a reconstruction method for grating-based X-ray dark-field tomography, which models the orientation-dependent signal as an additional observable from a standard tomographic scan. In detail, we extend the tomographic volume to a tensorial set of voxel data, containing the local orientation and contributions to dark-field scattering. In our experiments, we present the first results of several test specimens exhibiting a heterogeneous composition in microstructure, which demonstrates the diagnostic potential of the method. PMID:25136091

  11. Observing the setting and hardening of cementitious materials by X-ray dark-field radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Prade, F.; Chabior, M.; Malm, F.; Grosse, C.U.; Pfeiffer, F.

    2015-08-15

    Novel X-ray imaging methods expand conventional attenuation-based X-ray radiography by the phase- and the dark-field contrasts. While weakly absorbing structures in the specimen can be better visualized in phase contrast, the dark-field contrast provides information about morphological sub-pixel microstructures. Here we report an application of dark-field X-ray radiography for imaging the time-resolved setting process in fresh cement. Our results demonstrate that the microstructural changes within the cement result in a decreasing dark-field signal. We quantify this imaging signal with a time-dependent dark-field scatter coefficient and show its good correlation with the compressional wave velocity. We further present images based on a pixel-wise analysis of the scattering signal and a corresponding logistic fit. These images emphasize the benefit of dark-field imaging of cementitious materials as it provides two dimensional spatial information on the processes within the sample while other established testing techniques only provide information on the bulk average.

  12. Four-wave dark-field electron holography for imaging strain fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denneulin, T.; Hÿtch, M.

    2016-06-01

    Strain characterization by transmission electron microscopy is an active area of research especially for microelectronics applications. Two-wave dark-field electron holography (DFEH) was previously introduced as a reliable strain mapping technique. Here, DFEH with four electron waves was investigated in order to image equi-displacement lines as amplitude modulations of the holographic fringes. Two perpendicular electrostatic biprisms are used to interfere three reference waves diffracted by a substrate and one object wave diffracted by an epitaxially strained region. This technique provides a different way to represent the displacement field. It might be helpful to obtain information about the strain state during in situ experiments. A dummy p-MOSFET device with embedded SiGe source and drain is used for experimental demonstration.

  13. Multi-Dimensional Effective Field Theory Analysis for Direct Detection of Dark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Hannah; SuperCDMS Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    Experiments like the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) attempt to find dark matter (non-luminous matter that makes up approximately 80% of the matter in the universe) through direct detection of interactions between dark matter and a target material. The Effective Field Theory (EFT) approach increases the number of considered interactions between dark matter and the normal, target matter from two (spin independent and spin dependent interactions) to eleven operators with four possible interference terms. These additional operators allow for a more complete analysis of complimentary direct dark matter searches; however, the higher dimensional likelihoods necessary to span an increase in operators requires a clever computational tool such as MultiNest. I present here analyses of published and projected data from CDMS (Si and Ge targets) and LUX (liquid Xe target) assuming operator parameter spaces ranging from 3 - 5 dimensions and folding in information on energy-dependent backgrounds when possible.

  14. Quadractic Model of Thermodynamic States in SDF Explosions

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, A L; Khasainov, B

    2007-05-04

    We study the thermodynamic states encountered during Shock-Dispersed-Fuel (SDF) explosions. Such explosions contain up to six components: three fuels (PETN, TNT and Aluminum) and their products corresponding to stoichiometric combustion with air. We establish the loci in thermodynamic state space that correctly describes the behavior of the components. Results are fit with quadratic functions that serve as fast equations of state suitable for 3D numerical simulations of SDF explosions.

  15. Stream depletion in alluvial valleys using the SDF semianalytical model.

    PubMed

    Miller, Calvin D; Durnford, Deanna; Halstead, Mary R; Altenhofen, Jon; Flory, Val

    2007-01-01

    A semianalytical method commonly used for quantifying stream depletion caused by ground water pumping was reviewed for applicability in narrow alluvial aquifers. This stream depletion factor (SDF) method is based on the analytic Glover model, but uses a numerical model-derived input parameter, called the SDF, to partly account for mathematically nonideal conditions such as variable transmissivity and nearby aquifer boundaries. Using the SDF can improve and simplify depletion estimates. However, the method's approximations introduce error that increases with proximity to the impermeable aquifer boundary. This article reviews the history of the method and its assumptions. New stream depletion response curves are presented as functions of well position within bounded aquifers. A simple modification to modeled SDF values is proposed that allows the impermeable boundary to be accounted for with image wells, but without overaccounting for boundary effects that are already reflected in modeled SDFs. It is shown that SDFs for locations closer to the river than to the aquifer boundary do not reflect impermeable-boundary effects, and thus need no modification, and boundary effects in the other portion of the aquifer follow a predictable removable pattern. This method is verified by comparing response curves using modified SDFs with response curves from an extensively calibrated numerical model of a managed ground water recharge site. The modification improves SDF-based stream depletion estimates in bounded aquifers while still benefiting from the additional information contained in SDF maps and retaining their value as standardized references for water rights administration.

  16. The effective field theory of dark matter direct detection

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzpatrick, A. Liam; Katz, Emanuel; Haxton, Wick; Lubbers, Nicholas; Xu, Yiming E-mail: haxton@berkeley.edu E-mail: nlubbers@bu.edu

    2013-02-01

    We extend and explore the general non-relativistic effective theory of dark matter (DM) direct detection. We describe the basic non-relativistic building blocks of operators and discuss their symmetry properties, writing down all Galilean-invariant operators up to quadratic order in momentum transfer arising from exchange of particles of spin 1 or less. Any DM particle theory can be translated into the coefficients of an effective operator and any effective operator can be simply related to most general description of the nuclear response. We find several operators which lead to novel nuclear responses. These responses differ significantly from the standard minimal WIMP cases in their relative coupling strengths to various elements, changing how the results from different experiments should be compared against each other. Response functions are evaluated for common DM targets — F, Na, Ge, I, and Xe — using standard shell model techniques. We point out that each of the nuclear responses is familiar from past studies of semi-leptonic electroweak interactions, and thus potentially testable in weak interaction studies. We provide tables of the full set of required matrix elements at finite momentum transfer for a range of common elements, making a careful and fully model-independent analysis possible. Finally, we discuss embedding non-relativistic effective theory operators into UV models of dark matter.

  17. Effective field theory treatment of the neutrino background in direct dark matter detection experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dent, James B.; Dutta, Bhaskar; Newstead, Jayden L.; Strigari, Louis E.

    2016-04-01

    Distinguishing a dark matter interaction from an astrophysical neutrino-induced interaction will be major challenge for future direct dark matter searches. In this paper, we consider this issue within nonrelativistic effective field theory (EFT), which provides a well-motivated theoretical framework for determining nuclear responses to dark matter scattering events. We analyze the nuclear energy recoil spectra from the different dark matter-nucleon EFT operators, and compare them to the nuclear recoil energy spectra that are predicted to be induced by astrophysical neutrino sources. We determine that for 11 of the 14 possible operators, the dark matter-induced recoil spectra can be cleanly distinguished from the corresponding neutrino-induced recoil spectra with moderate-size detector technologies that are now being pursued, e.g., these operators would require 0.5 tonne years to be distinguished from the neutrino background for low mass dark matter. Our results imply that in most models detectors with good energy resolution will be able to distinguish a dark matter signal from a neutrino signal, without the need for much larger detectors that must rely on additional information from timing or direction. In addition we calculate up-to-date exclusion limits in the EFT model space using data from the LUX experiment.

  18. Stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) as a target in liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Liepelt, Anke; Tacke, Frank

    2016-08-01

    The chemokine stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) or CXCL12 is constitutively expressed in healthy liver. However, its expression increases following acute or chronic liver injury. Liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSEC), hepatic stellate cells (HSC), and malignant hepatocytes are important sources of SDF-1/CXCL12 in liver diseases. CXCL12 is able to activate two chemokine receptors with different downstream signaling pathways, CXCR4 and CXCR7. CXCR7 expression is relevant on LSEC, while HSC, mesenchymal stem cells, and tumor cells mainly respond via CXCR4. Here, we summarize recent developments in the field of liver diseases involving this chemokine and its receptors. SDF-1-dependent signaling contributes to modulating acute liver injury and subsequent tissue regeneration. By activating HSC and recruiting mesenchymal cells from bone marrow, CXCL12 can promote liver fibrosis progression, while CXCL12-CXCR7 interactions endorse proregenerative responses in chronic injury. Moreover, the SDF-1 pathway is linked to development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) by promoting tumor growth, angiogenesis, and HCC metastasis. High hepatic CXCR4 expression has been suggested as a biomarker indicating poor prognosis of HCC patients. Tumor-infiltrating myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) also express CXCR4 and migrate toward CXCL12. Thus CXCL12 inhibition might not only directly block HCC growth but also modulate the tumor microenvironment (angiogenesis, MDSC), thereby sensitizing HCC patients to conventional or emerging novel cancer therapies (e.g., sorafenib, regorafenib, nivolumab, pembrolizumab). We herein summarize the current knowledge on the complex interplay between CXCL12 and CXCR4/CXCR7 in liver diseases and discuss approaches on the therapeutic targeting of these axes in hepatitis, fibrosis, and liver cancer. PMID:27313175

  19. Diurnal and seasonal variation in light and dark respiration in field-grown Eucalyptus pauciflora.

    PubMed

    Way, Danielle A; Holly, Chris; Bruhn, Dan; Ball, Marilyn C; Atkin, Owen K

    2015-08-01

    Respiration from vegetation is a substantial part of the global carbon cycle and the responses of plant respiration to daily and seasonal fluctuations in temperature and light must be incorporated in models of terrestrial respiration to accurately predict these CO2 fluxes. We investigated how leaf respiration (R) responded to changes in leaf temperature (T(leaf)) and irradiance in field-grown saplings of an evergreen tree (Eucalyptus pauciflora Sieb. ex Spreng). Seasonal shifts in the thermal sensitivity of leaf R in the dark (R(dark)) and in the light (R(light)) were assessed by allowing T(leaf) to vary over the day in field-grown leaves over a year. The Q10 of R (i.e., the relative increase in R for a 10 °C increase in T(leaf)) was similar for R(light) and R(dark) and had a value of ∼ 2.5; there was little seasonal change in the Q10 of either R(light) or R(dark), indicating that we may be able to use similar functions to model short-term temperature responses of R in the dark and in the light. Overall, rates of R(light) were lower than those of R(dark), and the ratio of R(light)/R(dark) tended to increase with rising T(leaf), such that light suppression of R was reduced at high T(leaf) values, in contrast to earlier work with this species. Our results suggest we cannot assume that R(light)/R(dark) decreases with increasing T(leaf) on daily timescales, and highlights the need for a better mechanistic understanding of what regulates light suppression of R in leaves.

  20. Small-animal dark-field radiography for pulmonary emphysema evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaroshenko, Andre; Meinel, Felix G.; Hellbach, Katharina; Bech, Martin; Velroyen, Astrid; Müller, Mark; Bamberg, Fabian; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Reiser, Maximilian F.; Yildirim, Ali Ã.-.; Eickelberg, Oliver; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2014-03-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide and emphysema is one of its main components. The disorder is characterized by irreversible destruction of the alveolar walls and enlargement of distal airspaces. Despite the severe changes in the lung tissue morphology, conventional chest radiographs have only a limited sensitivity for the detection of mild to moderate emphysema. X-ray dark-field is an imaging modality that can significantly increase the visibility of lung tissue on radiographic images. The dark-field signal is generated by coherent, small-angle scattering of x-rays on the air-tissue interfaces in the lung. Therefore, morphological changes in the lung can be clearly visualized on dark-field images. This is demonstrated by a preclinical study with a small-animal emphysema model. To generate a murine model of pulmonary emphysema, a female C57BL/6N mouse was treated with a single orotracheal application of porcine pancreatic elastase (80 U/kg body weight) dissolved in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). Control mouse received PBS. The mice were imaged using a small-animal dark-field scanner. While conventional x-ray transmission radiography images revealed only subtle indirect signs of the pulmonary disorder, the difference between healthy and emphysematous lungs could be clearly directly visualized on the dark-field images. The dose applied to the animals is compatible with longitudinal studies. The imaging results correlate well with histology. The results of this study reveal the high potential of dark-field radiography for clinical lung imaging.

  1. Enzyme catalysis enhanced dark-field imaging as a novel immunohistochemical method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Lin; Tian, Yanyan; Yin, Rong; Lou, Doudou; Zhang, Xizhi; Wang, Meng; Ma, Ming; Luo, Shouhua; Li, Suyi; Gu, Ning; Zhang, Yu

    2016-04-01

    Conventional immunohistochemistry is limited to subjective judgment based on human experience and thus it is clinically required to develop a quantitative immunohistochemical detection. 3,3'-Diaminobenzidin (DAB) aggregates, a type of staining product formed by conventional immunohistochemistry, were found to have a special optical property of dark-field imaging for the first time, and the mechanism was explored. On this basis, a novel immunohistochemical method based on dark-field imaging for detecting HER2 overexpressed in breast cancer was established, and the quantitative analysis standard and relevant software for measuring the scattering intensity was developed. In order to achieve a more sensitive detection, the HRP (horseradish peroxidase)-labeled secondary antibodies conjugated gold nanoparticles were constructed as nanoprobes to load more HRP enzymes, resulting in an enhanced DAB deposition as a dark-field label. Simultaneously, gold nanoparticles also act as a synergistically enhanced agent due to their mimicry of enzyme catalysis and dark-field scattering properties.Conventional immunohistochemistry is limited to subjective judgment based on human experience and thus it is clinically required to develop a quantitative immunohistochemical detection. 3,3'-Diaminobenzidin (DAB) aggregates, a type of staining product formed by conventional immunohistochemistry, were found to have a special optical property of dark-field imaging for the first time, and the mechanism was explored. On this basis, a novel immunohistochemical method based on dark-field imaging for detecting HER2 overexpressed in breast cancer was established, and the quantitative analysis standard and relevant software for measuring the scattering intensity was developed. In order to achieve a more sensitive detection, the HRP (horseradish peroxidase)-labeled secondary antibodies conjugated gold nanoparticles were constructed as nanoprobes to load more HRP enzymes, resulting in an enhanced DAB

  2. Recombination era magnetic fields from axion dark matter

    DOE PAGES

    Banik, Nilanjan; Christopherson, Adam J.

    2016-02-04

    We introduce a new mechanism for generating magnetic fields in the recombination era. This Harrison-like mechanism utilizes vorticity in baryons that is sourced through the Bose-Einstein condensate of axions via gravitational interactions. The magnetic fields generated are on galactic scales ~10 kpc and have a magnitude of the order of B~10–23G today. Lastly, the field has a greater magnitude than those generated from other mechanisms relying on second-order perturbation theory, and is sufficient to provide a seed for battery mechanisms.

  3. Recombination era magnetic fields from axion dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banik, Nilanjan; Christopherson, Adam J.

    2016-02-01

    We introduce a new mechanism for generating magnetic fields in the recombination era. This Harrison-like mechanism utilizes vorticity in baryons that is sourced through the Bose-Einstein condensate of axions via gravitational interactions. The magnetic fields generated are on galactic scales ˜10 kpc and have a magnitude of the order of B ˜1 0-23G today. The field has a greater magnitude than those generated from other mechanisms relying on second-order perturbation theory, and is sufficient to provide a seed for battery mechanisms.

  4. A generalized quantitative interpretation of dark-field contrast for highly concentrated microsphere suspensions

    PubMed Central

    Gkoumas, Spyridon; Villanueva-Perez, Pablo; Wang, Zhentian; Romano, Lucia; Abis, Matteo; Stampanoni, Marco

    2016-01-01

    In X-ray grating interferometry, dark-field contrast arises due to partial extinction of the detected interference fringes. This is also called visibility reduction and is attributed to small-angle scattering from unresolved structures in the imaged object. In recent years, analytical quantitative frameworks of dark-field contrast have been developed for highly diluted monodisperse microsphere suspensions with maximum 6% volume fraction. These frameworks assume that scattering particles are separated by large enough distances, which make any interparticle scattering interference negligible. In this paper, we start from the small-angle scattering intensity equation and, by linking Fourier and real-space, we introduce the structure factor and thus extend the analytical and experimental quantitative interpretation of dark-field contrast, for a range of suspensions with volume fractions reaching 40%. The structure factor accounts for interparticle scattering interference. Without introducing any additional fitting parameters, we successfully predict the experimental values measured at the TOMCAT beamline, Swiss Light Source. Finally, we apply this theoretical framework to an experiment probing a range of system correlation lengths by acquiring dark-field images at different energies. This proposed method has the potential to be applied in single-shot-mode using a polychromatic X-ray tube setup and a single-photon-counting energy-resolving detector. PMID:27734931

  5. A generalized quantitative interpretation of dark-field contrast for highly concentrated microsphere suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gkoumas, Spyridon; Villanueva-Perez, Pablo; Wang, Zhentian; Romano, Lucia; Abis, Matteo; Stampanoni, Marco

    2016-10-01

    In X-ray grating interferometry, dark-field contrast arises due to partial extinction of the detected interference fringes. This is also called visibility reduction and is attributed to small-angle scattering from unresolved structures in the imaged object. In recent years, analytical quantitative frameworks of dark-field contrast have been developed for highly diluted monodisperse microsphere suspensions with maximum 6% volume fraction. These frameworks assume that scattering particles are separated by large enough distances, which make any interparticle scattering interference negligible. In this paper, we start from the small-angle scattering intensity equation and, by linking Fourier and real-space, we introduce the structure factor and thus extend the analytical and experimental quantitative interpretation of dark-field contrast, for a range of suspensions with volume fractions reaching 40%. The structure factor accounts for interparticle scattering interference. Without introducing any additional fitting parameters, we successfully predict the experimental values measured at the TOMCAT beamline, Swiss Light Source. Finally, we apply this theoretical framework to an experiment probing a range of system correlation lengths by acquiring dark-field images at different energies. This proposed method has the potential to be applied in single-shot-mode using a polychromatic X-ray tube setup and a single-photon-counting energy-resolving detector.

  6. Simplified models vs. effective field theory approaches in dark matter searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Simone, Andrea; Jacques, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    In this review we discuss and compare the usage of simplified models and Effective Field Theory (EFT) approaches in dark matter searches. We provide a state of the art description on the subject of EFTs and simplified models, especially in the context of collider searches for dark matter, but also with implications for direct and indirect detection searches, with the aim of constituting a common language for future comparisons between different strategies. The material is presented in a form that is as self-contained as possible, so that it may serve as an introductory review for the newcomer as well as a reference guide for the practitioner.

  7. Are black holes a serious threat to scalar field dark matter models?

    SciTech Connect

    Barranco, Juan; Degollado, Juan Carlos; Bernal, Argelia; Diez-Tejedor, Alberto; Megevand, Miguel; Alcubierre, Miguel; Nunez, Dario; Sarbach, Olivier

    2011-10-15

    Classical scalar fields have been proposed as possible candidates for the dark matter component of the universe. Given the fact that supermassive black holes seem to exist at the center of most galaxies, in order to be a viable candidate for the dark matter halo a scalar field configuration should be stable in the presence of a central black hole, or at least be able to survive for cosmological time scales. In the present work we consider a scalar field as a test field on a Schwarzschild background, and study under which conditions one can obtain long-lived configurations. We present a detailed study of the Klein-Gordon equation in the Schwarzschild space-time, both from an analytical and numerical point of view, and show that indeed there exist quasistationary solutions that can remain surrounding a black hole for large time scales.

  8. Properties and uncertainties of scalar field models of dark energy with barotropic equation of state

    SciTech Connect

    Novosyadlyj, Bohdan; Sergijenko, Olga; Apunevych, Stepan; Pelykh, Volodymyr

    2010-11-15

    The dynamics of expansion and large scale structure formation in the multicomponent Universe with dark energy modeled by the minimally coupled scalar field with generalized linear barotropic equation of state are analyzed. It is shown that the past dynamics of expansion and future of the Universe - eternal accelerated expansion or turnaround and collapse - are completely defined by the current energy density of a scalar field and relation between its current and early equation of state parameters. The clustering properties of such models of dark energy and their imprints in the power spectrum of matter density perturbations depend on the same relation and, additionally, on the 'effective sound speed' of a scalar field, defined by its Lagrangian. It is concluded that such scalar fields with different values of these parameters are distinguishable in principle. This gives the possibility to constrain them by confronting the theoretical predictions with the corresponding observational data. For that we have used the 7-year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe data on cosmic microwave background anisotropies, the Union2 data set on Supernovae Ia and the seventh data release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey data on luminous red galaxies space distribution. Using the Markov Chain Monte Carlo technique the marginalized posterior and mean likelihood distributions are computed for the scalar fields with two different Lagrangians: Klein-Gordon and Dirac-Born-Infeld ones. The properties of such scalar field models of dark energy with best fitting parameters and uncertainties of their determination are also analyzed in the paper.

  9. Dark-field hyperspectral X-ray imaging.

    PubMed

    Egan, Christopher K; Jacques, Simon D M; Connolley, Thomas; Wilson, Matthew D; Veale, Matthew C; Seller, Paul; Cernik, Robert J

    2014-05-01

    In recent times, there has been a drive to develop non-destructive X-ray imaging techniques that provide chemical or physical insight. To date, these methods have generally been limited; either requiring raster scanning of pencil beams, using narrow bandwidth radiation and/or limited to small samples. We have developed a novel full-field radiographic imaging technique that enables the entire physio-chemical state of an object to be imaged in a single snapshot. The method is sensitive to emitted and scattered radiation, using a spectral imaging detector and polychromatic hard X-radiation, making it particularly useful for studying large dense samples for materials science and engineering applications. The method and its extension to three-dimensional imaging is validated with a series of test objects and demonstrated to directly image the crystallographic preferred orientation and formed precipitates across an aluminium alloy friction stir weld section.

  10. Dark-field hyperspectral X-ray imaging

    PubMed Central

    Egan, Christopher K.; Jacques, Simon D. M.; Connolley, Thomas; Wilson, Matthew D.; Veale, Matthew C.; Seller, Paul; Cernik, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    In recent times, there has been a drive to develop non-destructive X-ray imaging techniques that provide chemical or physical insight. To date, these methods have generally been limited; either requiring raster scanning of pencil beams, using narrow bandwidth radiation and/or limited to small samples. We have developed a novel full-field radiographic imaging technique that enables the entire physio-chemical state of an object to be imaged in a single snapshot. The method is sensitive to emitted and scattered radiation, using a spectral imaging detector and polychromatic hard X-radiation, making it particularly useful for studying large dense samples for materials science and engineering applications. The method and its extension to three-dimensional imaging is validated with a series of test objects and demonstrated to directly image the crystallographic preferred orientation and formed precipitates across an aluminium alloy friction stir weld section. PMID:24808753

  11. No-go theorem for static scalar field dark matter halos with no Noether charges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diez-Tejedor, Alberto; Gonzalez-Morales, Alma X.

    2013-09-01

    Classical scalar fields have been considered as a possible effective description of dark matter. We show that, for any metric theory of gravity, no static, spherically symmetric, regular, spatially localized, attractive, stable spacetime configuration can be sourced by the coherent excitation of a scalar field with positive definite energy density and no Noether charges. In the weak field regime, the result also applies for configurations with a repulsive gravitational potential. This extends Derrick’s theorem to the case of a general (noncanonical) scalar field, including the self-gravitational effects. Some possible ways out are briefly discussed.

  12. The effect of tidal fields on the shapes and kinematics of dark halos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubinski, John

    1993-01-01

    We have carried out a series of N-body simulations to investigate the effect of tidal shear on the structure and kinematics of dark halos. We simulate the collapse of density perturbations using a tree code as described in Dubinski & Carlberg (1991). Density peaks are selected from a random realization of a CDM density field and used as the initial conditions for N-body simulations. We use an experimental approach to examine the effects of tidal shear on collapse. The cosmological tidal field is treated as an external time dependent potential whose strength and orientation can be varied freely. We examine the effects of the tidal field with two experiments. In the first experiment, we simulate a sample of 14 dark halos from the collapse of density peaks in the presence of a 1(sigma) tidal field. In the second experiment, we use the same initial conditions though the tidal field is turned off allowing an experimental control for comparison to highlight the influence of tidal shear on the development of the structure and kinematics of the dark halos.

  13. Effects of Electromagnetic Field on the Dynamics of Bianchi Type VI0 Universe with Anisotropic Dark Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharif, M.; Zubair, M.

    Spatially homogeneous and anisotropic Bianchi type VI0 cosmological models with cosmological constant are investigated in the presence of anisotropic dark energy. We examine the effects of electromagnetic field on the dynamics of the universe and anisotropic behavior of dark energy. The law of variation of the mean Hubble parameter is used to find exact solutions of the Einstein field equations. We find that electromagnetic field promotes anisotropic behavior of dark energy which becomes isotropic for future evolution. It is concluded that the isotropic behavior of the universe model is seen even in the presence of electromagnetic field and anisotropic fluid.

  14. Quantum field theory in curved spacetime and the dark matter problem

    SciTech Connect

    Grib, A. A.; Pavlov, Yu. V.

    2007-11-14

    Quantum field theory in nonstationary curved Friedmann spacetime leads to the phenomenon of creation of massive particles. The hypothesis that in the end of inflation gravitation creates from vacuum superheavy particles decaying on quarks and leptons leading to the observed baryon charge is investigated. Taking the complex scalar field for these particles in analogy with K{sup 0}-meson theory one obtains two components - the long living and short living ones, so that the long living component after breaking the Grand Unification symmetry has a long life time and is observed today as dark matter. The hypothesis that ultra high energy cosmic rays occur as manifestation of superheavy dark matter is considered and some experimental possibilities of the proposed scheme are analyzed.

  15. Dark-field X-ray imaging of unsaturated water transport in porous materials

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, F. E-mail: michele.griffa@empa.ch; Di Bella, C.; Lura, P.; Prade, F.; Herzen, J.; Sarapata, A.; Pfeiffer, F.; Griffa, M. E-mail: michele.griffa@empa.ch; Jerjen, I.

    2014-10-13

    We introduce in this Letter an approach to X-ray imaging of unsaturated water transport in porous materials based upon the intrinsic X-ray scattering produced by the material microstructural heterogeneity at a length scale below the imaging system spatial resolution. The basic principle for image contrast creation consists in a reduction of such scattering by permeation of the porosity by water. The implementation of the approach is based upon X-ray dark-field imaging via Talbot-Lau interferometry. The proof-of-concept is provided by performing laboratory-scale dark-field X-ray radiography of mortar samples during a water capillary uptake experiment. The results suggest that the proposed approach to visualizing unsaturated water transport in porous materials is complementary to neutron and magnetic resonance imaging and alternative to standard X-ray imaging, the latter requiring the use of contrast agents because based upon X-ray attenuation only.

  16. Scalar field pressure in induced gravity with Higgs potential and dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezares-Roder, Nils M.; Nandan, Hemwati; Dehnen, Heinz

    2010-10-01

    A model of induced gravity with a Higgs potential is investigated in detail in view of the pressure components related to the scalar-field excitations. The physical consequences emerging as an artifact due to the presence of these pressure terms are analysed in terms of the constraints parting from energy density, solar-relativistic effects and galactic dynamics along with the dark matter halos.

  17. Post-Flash Calibration Darks for the Advanced Camera for Surveys Wide Field Channel (ACS/WFC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogaz, S.; Anderson, J.; Golimowski, D.

    2015-06-01

    We present a summary and analysis of the changes made to the ACS/WFC dark reference files. As of January 15, 2015 the ACS team has begun to produce post- flashed dark reference files for the Wide Field Channel (WFC). This change was made to combat the charge transfer efficiency (CTE) losses caused by radiation damage that the two WFC CCDs have suffered since being put into orbit by artificially increasing the background in the dark images. This has resulted in several changes to the reference file pipeline, and an improved calibration dark.

  18. Combined cosmological tests of a bivalent tachyonic dark energy scalar field model

    SciTech Connect

    Keresztes, Zoltán; Gergely, László Á. E-mail: gergely@physx.u-szeged.hu

    2014-11-01

    A recently investigated tachyonic scalar field dark energy dominated universe exhibits a bivalent future: depending on initial parameters can run either into a de Sitter exponential expansion or into a traversable future soft singularity followed by a contraction phase. We also include in the model (i) a tiny amount of radiation, (ii) baryonic matter (Ω{sub b}h{sup 2} = 0.022161, where the Hubble constant is fixed as h = 0.706) and (iii) cold dark matter (CDM). Out of a variety of six types of evolutions arising in a more subtle classification, we identify two in which in the past the scalar field effectively degenerates into a dust (its pressure drops to an insignificantly low negative value). These are the evolutions of type IIb converging to de Sitter and type III hitting the future soft singularity. We confront these background evolutions with various cosmological tests, including the supernova type Ia Union 2.1 data, baryon acoustic oscillation distance ratios, Hubble parameter-redshift relation and the cosmic microwave background (CMB) acoustic scale. We determine a subset of the evolutions of both types which at 1σ confidence level are consistent with all of these cosmological tests. At perturbative level we derive the CMB temperature power spectrum to find the best agreement with the Planck data for Ω{sub CDM} = 0.22. The fit is as good as for the ΛCDM model at high multipoles, but the power remains slightly overestimated at low multipoles, for both types of evolutions. The rest of the CDM is effectively generated by the tachyonic field, which in this sense acts as a combined dark energy and dark matter model.

  19. Simulation of RF Cavity Dark Current In Presence of Helical Magnetic Field

    SciTech Connect

    Romanov, Gennady; Kashikhin, Vladimir; /Fermilab

    2012-05-01

    In order to produce muon beam of high enough quality to be used for a Muon Collider, its large phase space must be cooled several orders of magnitude. This task can be accomplished by ionization cooling. Ionization cooling consists of passing a high-emittance muon beam alternately through regions of low Z material, such as liquid hydrogen, and very high accelerating RF cavities within a multi-Tesla solenoidal focusing channel. But first high power tests of RF cavity with beryllium windows in solenoidal magnetic field showed a dramatic drop in accelerating gradient due to RF breakdowns. It has been concluded that external magnetic fields parallel to RF electric field significantly modifies the performance of RF cavities. However, magnetic field in Helical Cooling Channel has a strong dipole component in addition to solenoidal one. The dipole component essentially changes electron motion in a cavity compare to pure solenoidal case, making dark current less focused at field emission sites. The simulation of dark current dynamic in HCC performed with CST Studio Suit is presented in this paper.

  20. Simulation of RF Cavity Dark Current in Presence of Helical Magnetic Field

    SciTech Connect

    Romanov, Gennady; Kashikhin, Vladimir; /Unlisted

    2010-09-01

    In order to produce muon beam of high enough quality to be used for a Muon Collider, its large phase space must be cooled several orders of magnitude. This task can be accomplished by ionization cooling. Ionization cooling consists of passing a high-emittance muon beam alternately through regions of low Z material, such as liquid hydrogen, and very high accelerating RF cavities within a multi-Tesla solenoidal focusing channel. But first high power tests of RF cavity with beryllium windows in solenoidal magnetic field showed a dramatic drop in accelerating gradient due to RF breakdowns. It has been concluded that external magnetic fields parallel to RF electric field significantly modifies the performance of RF cavities. However, magnetic field in Helical Cooling Channel has a strong dipole component in addition to solenoidal one. The dipole component essentially changes electron motion in a cavity compare to pure solenoidal case, making dark current less focused at field emission sites. The simulation of dark current dynamic in HCC performed with CST Studio Suit is presented in this paper.

  1. Einstein's Gravitational Field Approach to Dark Matter and Dark Energy-Geometric Particle Decay into the Vacuum Energy Generating Higgs Boson and Heavy Quark Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, Walter James

    2015-08-01

    During an interview at the Niels Bohr Institute David Bohm stated, "according to Einstein, particles should eventually emerge as singularities, or very strong regions of stable pulses of (the gravitational) field" [1]. Starting from this premise, we show spacetime, indeed, manifests stable pulses (n-valued gravitons) that decay into the vacuum energy to generate all three boson masses (including Higgs), as well as heavy-quark mass; and all in precise agreement with the 2010 CODATA report on fundamental constants. Furthermore, our relativized quantum physics approach (RQP) answers to the mystery surrounding dark energy, dark matter, accelerated spacetime, and why ordinary matter dominates over antimatter.

  2. Extending depth of field for hybrid imaging systems via the use of both dark and dot point spread functions.

    PubMed

    Nhu, L V; Fan, Zhigang; Chen, Shouqian; Dang, Fanyang

    2016-09-10

    In this paper, we propose one method based on the use of both dark and dot point spread functions (PSFs) to extend depth of field in hybrid imaging systems. Two different phase modulations of two phase masks are used to generate both dark and dot PSFs. The quartic phase mask (QPM) is used to generate the dot PSF. A combined phase mask between the QPM and the angle for generating the dark PSF is investigated. The simulation images show that the proposed method can produce superior imaging performance of hybrid imaging systems in extending the depth of field. PMID:27661372

  3. Extending depth of field for hybrid imaging systems via the use of both dark and dot point spread functions.

    PubMed

    Nhu, L V; Fan, Zhigang; Chen, Shouqian; Dang, Fanyang

    2016-09-10

    In this paper, we propose one method based on the use of both dark and dot point spread functions (PSFs) to extend depth of field in hybrid imaging systems. Two different phase modulations of two phase masks are used to generate both dark and dot PSFs. The quartic phase mask (QPM) is used to generate the dot PSF. A combined phase mask between the QPM and the angle for generating the dark PSF is investigated. The simulation images show that the proposed method can produce superior imaging performance of hybrid imaging systems in extending the depth of field.

  4. Ultrafast dark-field surface inspection with hybrid-dispersion laser scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazaki, Akio; Kim, Chanju; Chan, Jacky; Mahjoubfar, Ata; Goda, Keisuke; Watanabe, Masahiro; Jalali, Bahram

    2014-06-01

    High-speed surface inspection plays an important role in industrial manufacturing, safety monitoring, and quality control. It is desirable to go beyond the speed limitation of current technologies for reducing manufacturing costs and opening a new window onto a class of applications that require high-throughput sensing. Here, we report a high-speed dark-field surface inspector for detection of micrometer-sized surface defects that can travel at a record high speed as high as a few kilometers per second. This method is based on a modified time-stretch microscope that illuminates temporally and spatially dispersed laser pulses on the surface of a fast-moving object and detects scattered light from defects on the surface with a sensitive photodetector in a dark-field configuration. The inspector's ability to perform ultrafast dark-field surface inspection enables real-time identification of difficult-to-detect features on weakly reflecting surfaces and hence renders the method much more practical than in the previously demonstrated bright-field configuration. Consequently, our inspector provides nearly 1000 times higher scanning speed than conventional inspectors. To show our method's broad utility, we demonstrate real-time inspection of the surface of various objects (a non-reflective black film, transparent flexible film, and reflective hard disk) for detection of 10 μm or smaller defects on a moving target at 20 m/s within a scan width of 25 mm at a scan rate of 90.9 MHz. Our method holds promise for improving the cost and performance of organic light-emitting diode displays for next-generation smart phones, lithium-ion batteries for green electronics, and high-efficiency solar cells.

  5. Ultrafast dark-field surface inspection with hybrid-dispersion laser scanning

    SciTech Connect

    Yazaki, Akio; Kim, Chanju; Chan, Jacky; Mahjoubfar, Ata; Goda, Keisuke; Watanabe, Masahiro; Jalali, Bahram

    2014-06-23

    High-speed surface inspection plays an important role in industrial manufacturing, safety monitoring, and quality control. It is desirable to go beyond the speed limitation of current technologies for reducing manufacturing costs and opening a new window onto a class of applications that require high-throughput sensing. Here, we report a high-speed dark-field surface inspector for detection of micrometer-sized surface defects that can travel at a record high speed as high as a few kilometers per second. This method is based on a modified time-stretch microscope that illuminates temporally and spatially dispersed laser pulses on the surface of a fast-moving object and detects scattered light from defects on the surface with a sensitive photodetector in a dark-field configuration. The inspector's ability to perform ultrafast dark-field surface inspection enables real-time identification of difficult-to-detect features on weakly reflecting surfaces and hence renders the method much more practical than in the previously demonstrated bright-field configuration. Consequently, our inspector provides nearly 1000 times higher scanning speed than conventional inspectors. To show our method's broad utility, we demonstrate real-time inspection of the surface of various objects (a non-reflective black film, transparent flexible film, and reflective hard disk) for detection of 10 μm or smaller defects on a moving target at 20 m/s within a scan width of 25 mm at a scan rate of 90.9 MHz. Our method holds promise for improving the cost and performance of organic light-emitting diode displays for next-generation smart phones, lithium-ion batteries for green electronics, and high-efficiency solar cells.

  6. Scalar field dark matter: Nonspherical collapse and late-time behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernal, Argelia; Guzmán, F. Siddhartha

    2006-09-01

    We show the evolution of nonspherically symmetric balls of a self-gravitating scalar field in the Newtonian regime or equivalently an ideal self-gravitating condensed Bose gas. In order to do so, we use a finite differencing approximation of the Schrödinger-Poisson (SP) system of equations with axial symmetry in cylindrical coordinates. Our results indicate: (i) that spherically symmetric ground state equilibrium configurations are stable against nonspherical perturbations and (ii) that such configurations of the SP system are late-time attractors for nonspherically symmetric initial profiles of the scalar field, which is a generalization of such behavior for spherically symmetric initial profiles. Our system and the boundary conditions used, work as a model of scalar field dark matter collapse after the turnaround point. In such case, we have found that the scalar field overdensities tolerate nonspherical contributions to the profile of the initial fluctuation.

  7. DARK MATTER, MAGNETIC FIELDS, AND THE ROTATION CURVE OF THE MILKY WAY

    SciTech Connect

    Ruiz-Granados, B.; Battaner, E.; Florido, E.; Calvo, J.; Rubino-Martin, J. A.

    2012-08-20

    The study of the disk rotation curve of our Galaxy at large distances provides an interesting scenario for us to test whether magnetic fields should be considered as a non-negligible dynamical ingredient. By assuming a bulge, an exponential disk for the stellar and gaseous distributions, and a dark halo and disk magnetic fields, we fit the rotation velocity of the Milky Way. In general, when the magnetic contribution is added to the dynamics, a better description of the rotation curve is obtained. Our main conclusion is that magnetic fields should be taken into account for the Milky Way dynamics. Azimuthal magnetic field strengths of B{sub {phi}} {approx} 2 {mu}G at distances of {approx}2 R{sub 0}(16 kpc) are able to explain the rise-up for the rotation curve in the outer disk.

  8. The polyketide MPBD initiates the SDF-1 signaling cascade that coordinates terminal differentiation in Dictyostelium.

    PubMed

    Anjard, Christophe; Su, Yongxuan; Loomis, William F

    2011-07-01

    Dictyostelium uses a wide array of chemical signals to coordinate differentiation as it switches from a unicellular to a multicellular organism. MPBD, the product of the polyketide synthase encoded by stlA, regulates stalk and spore differentiation by rapidly stimulating the release of the phosphopeptide SDF-1. By analyzing specific mutants affected in MPBD or SDF-1 production, we delineated a signal transduction cascade through the membrane receptor CrlA coupled to Gα1, leading to the inhibition of GskA so that the precursor of SDF-1 is released. It is then processed by the extracellular protease of TagB on prestalk cells. SDF-1 apparently acts through the adenylyl cyclase ACG to activate the cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) and trigger the production of more SDF-1. This signaling cascade shows similarities to the SDF-2 signaling pathway, which acts later to induce rapid spore encapsulation. PMID:21602484

  9. The development and characterization of SDF1α-elastin-like-peptide nanoparticles for wound healing.

    PubMed

    Yeboah, Agnes; Cohen, Rick I; Faulknor, Renea; Schloss, Rene; Yarmush, Martin L; Berthiaume, Francois

    2016-06-28

    Chronic skin wounds are characterized by poor re-epithelialization, angiogenesis and granulation. Previous work has demonstrated that topical stromal cell-derived growth factor-1 (SDF1) promotes neovascularization, resulting in faster re-epithelialization of skin wounds in diabetic mice. However, the clinical usefulness of such bioactive peptides is limited because they are rapidly degraded in the wound environment due to high levels of proteases. Here, we describe the development of a recombinant fusion protein comprised of SDF1 and an elastin-like peptide that confers the ability to self-assemble into nanoparticles. The fusion protein and recombinant human SDF1 showed similar binding characteristics, as indicated by the measured equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd) for the binding of free SDF1 or the fusion protein to the CXCR4 receptor. The biological activity of SDF1-ELP, as measured by intracellular calcium release in HL60 cells was dose dependent, and also very similar to that of free SDF1. In contrast, the biological activity of SDF1-ELP in vivo was significantly superior to that of free SDF1. When applied to full thickness skin wounds in diabetic mice, wounds treated with SDF1-ELP nanoparticles were 95% closed by day 21, and fully closed by day 28, while wounds treated with free SDF1, ELP alone, or vehicle were only 80% closed by day 21, and took 42days to fully close. In addition, the SDF1-ELP nanoparticles significantly increased the epidermal and dermal layer of the healed wound, as compared to the other groups. These results indicate that SDF1-ELP fusion protein nanoparticles are promising agents for the treatment of chronic skin wounds. PMID:27094603

  10. The development and characterization of SDF1α-elastin-like-peptide nanoparticles for wound healing.

    PubMed

    Yeboah, Agnes; Cohen, Rick I; Faulknor, Renea; Schloss, Rene; Yarmush, Martin L; Berthiaume, Francois

    2016-06-28

    Chronic skin wounds are characterized by poor re-epithelialization, angiogenesis and granulation. Previous work has demonstrated that topical stromal cell-derived growth factor-1 (SDF1) promotes neovascularization, resulting in faster re-epithelialization of skin wounds in diabetic mice. However, the clinical usefulness of such bioactive peptides is limited because they are rapidly degraded in the wound environment due to high levels of proteases. Here, we describe the development of a recombinant fusion protein comprised of SDF1 and an elastin-like peptide that confers the ability to self-assemble into nanoparticles. The fusion protein and recombinant human SDF1 showed similar binding characteristics, as indicated by the measured equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd) for the binding of free SDF1 or the fusion protein to the CXCR4 receptor. The biological activity of SDF1-ELP, as measured by intracellular calcium release in HL60 cells was dose dependent, and also very similar to that of free SDF1. In contrast, the biological activity of SDF1-ELP in vivo was significantly superior to that of free SDF1. When applied to full thickness skin wounds in diabetic mice, wounds treated with SDF1-ELP nanoparticles were 95% closed by day 21, and fully closed by day 28, while wounds treated with free SDF1, ELP alone, or vehicle were only 80% closed by day 21, and took 42days to fully close. In addition, the SDF1-ELP nanoparticles significantly increased the epidermal and dermal layer of the healed wound, as compared to the other groups. These results indicate that SDF1-ELP fusion protein nanoparticles are promising agents for the treatment of chronic skin wounds.

  11. Icosahedral stereographic projections in three dimensions for use in dark field TEM.

    PubMed

    Bourdillon, Antony J

    2013-08-01

    Thermodynamics require that rapidly cooled crystals and quasicrystals are relatively defective. Yet, without convenient 3-dimensional indexation both at crystal poles and in diffraction planes, or Kikuchi maps, it is difficult to identify the defects by dark field transmission electron microscopy. For two phase Al6Mn, these maps are derived. They relate i-Al6Mn to the standard face centered cubic, matrix crystals. An example of their usefulness in determining interfacial characteristics is described. Indices are integral powers on an irrational number.

  12. Quantitative readout of optically encoded gold nanorods using an ordinary dark-field microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercatelli, Raffaella; Ratto, Fulvio; Centi, Sonia; Soria, Silvia; Romano, Giovanni; Matteini, Paolo; Quercioli, Franco; Pini, Roberto; Fusi, Franco

    2013-09-01

    In this paper we report on a new use for dark-field microscopy in order to retrieve two-dimensional maps of optical parameters of a thin sample such as a cryptograph, a histological section, or a cell monolayer. In particular, we discuss the construction of quantitative charts of light absorbance and scattering coefficients of a polyvinyl alcohol film that was embedded with gold nanorods and then etched using a focused mode-locked Ti:Sapphire oscillator. Individual pulses from this laser excite plasmonic oscillations of the gold nanorods, thus triggering plastic deformations of the particles and their environment, which are confined within a few hundred nm of the light focus. In turn, these deformations modify the light absorbance and scattering landscape, which can be measured with optical resolution in a dark-field microscope equipped with an objective of tuneable numerical aperture. This technique may prove to be valuable for various applications, such as the fast readout of optically encoded data or to model functional interactions between light and biological tissue at the level of cellular organelles, including the photothermolysis of cancer.In this paper we report on a new use for dark-field microscopy in order to retrieve two-dimensional maps of optical parameters of a thin sample such as a cryptograph, a histological section, or a cell monolayer. In particular, we discuss the construction of quantitative charts of light absorbance and scattering coefficients of a polyvinyl alcohol film that was embedded with gold nanorods and then etched using a focused mode-locked Ti:Sapphire oscillator. Individual pulses from this laser excite plasmonic oscillations of the gold nanorods, thus triggering plastic deformations of the particles and their environment, which are confined within a few hundred nm of the light focus. In turn, these deformations modify the light absorbance and scattering landscape, which can be measured with optical resolution in a dark-field

  13. Laboratory constraints on chameleon dark energy and power-law fields

    SciTech Connect

    Steffen, Jason H.; Upadhye, Amol; Baumbaugh, Al; Chou, Aaron S.; Mazur, Peter O.; Tomlin, Ray; Weltman, Amanda; Wester, William; /Fermilab

    2010-10-01

    We report results from the GammeV Chameleon Afterglow Search - a search for chameleon particles created via photon/chameleon oscillations within a magnetic field. This experiment is sensitive to a wide class of chameleon power-law models and dark energy models not previously explored. These results exclude five orders of magnitude in the coupling of chameleons to photons covering a range of four orders of magnitude in chameleon effective mass and, for individual chameleon models, exclude between 4 and 12 orders of magnitude in chameleon couplings to matter.

  14. Dark energy, non-minimal couplings and the origin of cosmic magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Jiménez, Jose Beltrán; Maroto, Antonio L. E-mail: maroto@fis.ucm.es

    2010-12-01

    In this work we consider the most general electromagnetic theory in curved space-time leading to linear second order differential equations, including non-minimal couplings to the space-time curvature. We assume the presence of a temporal electromagnetic background whose energy density plays the role of dark energy, as has been recently suggested. Imposing the consistency of the theory in the weak-field limit, we show that it reduces to standard electromagnetism in the presence of an effective electromagnetic current which is generated by the momentum density of the matter/energy distribution, even for neutral sources. This implies that in the presence of dark energy, the motion of large-scale structures generates magnetic fields. Estimates of the present amplitude of the generated seed fields for typical spiral galaxies could reach 10{sup −9} G without any amplification. In the case of compact rotating objects, the theory predicts their magnetic moments to be related to their angular momenta in the way suggested by the so called Schuster-Blackett conjecture.

  15. Study of parametrized dark energy models with a general non-canonical scalar field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamon, Abdulla Al; Das, Sudipta

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we consider various dark energy models in the framework of a non-canonical scalar field with a Lagrangian density of the form {L}(φ , X)=f(φ )X{left(X/M^{4_{Pl}}right) }^{α -1} - V(φ ), which provides the standard canonical scalar field model for α =1 and f(φ )=1. In this particular non-canonical scalar field model, we carry out the analysis for α =2. We then obtain cosmological solutions for constant as well as variable equation of state parameter (ω _{φ }(z)) for dark energy. We also perform the data analysis for three different functional forms of ω _{φ }(z) by using the combination of SN Ia, BAO, and CMB datasets. We have found that for all the choices of ω _{φ }(z), the SN Ia + CMB/BAO dataset favors the past decelerated and recent accelerated expansion phase of the universe. Furthermore, using the combined dataset, we have observed that the reconstructed results of ω _{φ }(z) and q(z) are almost choice independent and the resulting cosmological scenarios are in good agreement with the Λ CDM model (within the 1σ confidence contour). We have also derived the form of the potentials for each model and the resulting potentials are found to be a quartic potential for constant ω _{φ } and a polynomial in φ for variable ω _{φ }.

  16. Quantitative Neutron Dark-field Imaging through Spin-Echo Interferometry

    PubMed Central

    Strobl, Markus; Sales, Morten; Plomp, Jeroen; Bouwman, Wim G.; Tremsin, Anton S.; Kaestner, Anders; Pappas, Catherine; Habicht, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Neutron dark-field imaging constitutes a seminal progress in the field of neutron imaging as it combines real space resolution capability with information provided by one of the most significant neutron scattering techniques, namely small angle scattering. The success of structural characterizations bridging the gap between macroscopic and microscopic features has been enabled by the introduction of grating interferometers so far. The induced interference pattern, a spatial beam modulation, allows for mapping of small-angle scattering signals and hence addressing microstructures beyond direct spatial resolution of the imaging system with high efficiency. However, to date the quantification in the small angle scattering regime is severely limited by the monochromatic approach. To overcome such drawback we here introduce an alternative and more flexible method of interferometric beam modulation utilizing a spin-echo technique. This novel method facilitates straightforward quantitative dark-field neutron imaging, i.e. the required quantitative microstructural characterization combined with real space image resolution. For the first time quantitative microstructural reciprocal space information from small angle neutron scattering becomes available together with macroscopic image information creating the potential to quantify several orders of magnitude in structure sizes simultaneously. PMID:26560644

  17. Controlling the transition of bright and dark states via scanning dressing field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Peiying; Zheng, Huaibin; Zhang, Yiqi; Sun, Jia; Li, Changbiao; Huang, Gaoping; Zhang, Zhaoyang; Li, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Yanpeng

    2013-03-01

    We report the transitions between the bright and dark states of singly-dressed four-wave mixing (FWM) and doubly-dressed FWMs, and the corresponding probe transmissions by scanning the dressing field frequency detuning in a five-level atomic system. Moreover, doubly-dressed six-wave mixing with avoided-crossing plots and triple-dressed eight-wave mixing with the comparison of scanning probe field and dressing field are studied. Such controlled transitions of the nonlinear optical signals can be realizable not only in atomic vapors but also in solid medium. The investigations maybe have potential applications in optical communication, quantum information processing and optoelectronic devices, and maybe also provide a sensitive probe method to study the dressing effect.

  18. On a dark-field signal generated by micrometer-sized calcifications in phase-contrast mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Thilo; Rieger, Jens; Anton, Gisela; Bayer, Florian; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Durst, Jürgen; Fasching, Peter A.; Haas, Wilhelm; Hartmann, Arndt; Pelzer, Georg; Radicke, Marcus; Rauh, Claudia; Ritter, André; Sievers, Peter; Schulz-Wendtland, Rüdiger; Uder, Michael; Wachter, David L.; Weber, Thomas; Wenkel, Evelyn; Zang, Andrea

    2013-04-01

    We show that a distribution of micrometer-sized calcifications in the human breast which are not visible in clinical x-ray mammography at diagnostic dose levels can produce a significant dark-field signal in a grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging setup with a tungsten anode x-ray tube operated at 40 kVp. A breast specimen with invasive ductal carcinoma was investigated immediately after surgery by Talbot-Lau x-ray interferometry with a design energy of 25 keV. The sample contained two tumors which were visible in ultrasound and contrast-agent enhanced MRI but invisible in clinical x-ray mammography, in specimen radiography and in the attenuation images obtained with the Talbot-Lau interferometer. One of the tumors produced significant dark-field contrast with an exposure of 0.85 mGy air-kerma. Staining of histological slices revealed sparsely distributed grains of calcium phosphate with sizes varying between 1 and 40 μm in the region of this tumor. By combining the histological investigations with an x-ray wave-field simulation we demonstrate that a corresponding distribution of grains of calcium phosphate in the form of hydroxylapatite has the ability to produce a dark-field signal which would—to a substantial degree—explain the measured dark-field image. Thus we have found the appearance of new information (compared to attenuation and differential phase images) in the dark-field image. The second tumor in the same sample did not contain a significant fraction of these very fine calcification grains and was invisible in the dark-field image. We conclude that some tumors which are invisible in x-ray absorption mammography might be detected in the x-ray dark-field image at tolerable dose levels.

  19. Cone of Darkness: Finding Blank-sky Positions for Multi-object Wide-field Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorente, N. P. F.

    2014-05-01

    We present the Cone of Darkness, an application to automatically configure blank-sky positions for a series of stacked, wide-field observations, such as those carried out by the SAMI instrument on the Anglo-Australian Telescope (AAT). The Sydney-AAO Multi-object Integral field spectrograph (SAMI) uses a plug-plate to mount its 13×61 core imaging fibre bundles (hexabundles) in the optical plane at the telescope's prime focus. To make the most efficient use of each plug-plate, several observing fields are typically stacked to produce a single plate. When choosing blank-sky positions for the observations it is most effective to select these such that one set of 26 holes gives valid sky positions for all fields on the plate. However, when carried out manually this selection process is tedious and includes a significant risk of error. The Cone of Darkness software aims to provide uniform blank-sky position coverage over the field of observation, within the limits set by the distribution of target positions and the chosen input catalogs. This will then facilitate the production of the best representative median sky spectrum for use in sky subtraction. The application, written in C++, is configurable, making it usable for a range of instruments. Given the plate characteristics and the positions of target holes, the software segments the unallocated space on the plate and determines the position which best fits the uniform distribution requirement. This position is checked, for each field, against the selected catalog using a TAP ADQL search. The process is then repeated until the desired number of sky positions is attained.

  20. Cosmological constraints on Bose-Einstein-condensed scalar field dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bohua; Rindler-Daller, Tanja; Shapiro, Paul R.

    2014-04-01

    Despite the great successes of the cold dark matter (CDM) model in explaining a wide range of observations of the global evolution and the formation of galaxies and large-scale structure in the Universe, the origin and microscopic nature of dark matter is still unknown. The most common form of CDM considered to date is that of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), but, so far, attempts to detect WIMPs directly or indirectly have not yet succeeded, and the allowed range of particle parameters has been significantly restricted. Some of the cosmological predictions for this kind of CDM are even in apparent conflict with observations (e.g., cuspy-cored halos and an overabundance of satellite dwarf galaxies). For these reasons, it is important to consider the consequences of different forms of CDM. We focus here on the hypothesis that the dark matter is comprised, instead, of ultralight bosons that form a Bose-Einstein condensate, described by a complex scalar field, for which particle number per unit comoving volume is conserved. We start from the Klein-Gordon and Einstein field equations to describe the evolution of the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universe in the presence of this kind of dark matter. We find that, in addition to the radiation-, matter-, and Λ-dominated phases familiar from the standard CDM model, there is an earlier phase of scalar-field domination, which is special to this model. In addition, while WIMP CDM is nonrelativistic at all times after it decouples, the equation of state of Bose-Einstein condensed scalar field dark matter (SFDM) is found to be relativistic at early times, evolving from stiff (p ¯=ρ ¯) to radiationlike (p ¯=ρ ¯/3), before it becomes nonrelativistic and CDM-like at late times (p ¯=0). The timing of the transitions between these phases and regimes is shown to yield fundamental constraints on the SFDM model parameters, particle mass m, and self-interaction coupling strength λ. We show that SFDM is compatible with

  1. EVOLUTION OF A DWARF SATELLITE GALAXY EMBEDDED IN A SCALAR FIELD DARK MATTER HALO

    SciTech Connect

    Robles, Victor H.; Matos, T.; Lora, V.; Sánchez-Salcedo, F. J. E-mail: vlora@ari.uni-heidelberg.de

    2015-09-10

    The cold dark matter (CDM) model has two unsolved issues: simulations overpredict the satellite abundance around the Milky Way (MW) and it disagrees with observations of the central densities of dwarf galaxies which prefer constant density (core) profiles. One alternative explanation known as the scalar field dark matter (SFDM) model, assumes that dark matter is a scalar field of mass (∼10{sup −22} eV/c{sup 2}); this model can reduce the overabundance issue due to the lack of halo formation below a mass scale of ∼10{sup 8}M{sub ⊙} and successfully fits the density distribution in dwarfs. One of the attractive features of the model is predicting core profiles in halos, although the determination of the core sizes is set by fitting the observational data. We perform N-body simulations to explore the influence of tidal forces over a stellar distribution embedded in an SFDM halo orbiting a MW-like SFDM host halo with a disk. Our simulations intend to test the viability of SFDM as an alternative model by comparing the tidal effects that result in this paradigm with those obtained in the CDM for similar mass halos. We found that galaxies in subhalos with core profiles and high central densities survive for 10 Gyr. The same occurs for galaxies in low density subhalos located far from the host disk influence, whereas satellites in low density DM halos and in tight orbits can eventually be stripped of stars. We conclude that SFDM shows consistency with results from the CDM for dwarf galaxies, but naturally offer a possibility to solve the missing satellite problem.

  2. Evolution of a Dwarf Satellite Galaxy Embedded in a Scalar Field Dark Matter Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robles, Victor H.; Lora, V.; Matos, T.; Sánchez-Salcedo, F. J.

    2015-09-01

    The cold dark matter (CDM) model has two unsolved issues: simulations overpredict the satellite abundance around the Milky Way (MW) and it disagrees with observations of the central densities of dwarf galaxies which prefer constant density (core) profiles. One alternative explanation known as the scalar field dark matter (SFDM) model, assumes that dark matter is a scalar field of mass (˜10-22 eV/c2); this model can reduce the overabundance issue due to the lack of halo formation below a mass scale of ˜108M⊙ and successfully fits the density distribution in dwarfs. One of the attractive features of the model is predicting core profiles in halos, although the determination of the core sizes is set by fitting the observational data. We perform N-body simulations to explore the influence of tidal forces over a stellar distribution embedded in an SFDM halo orbiting a MW-like SFDM host halo with a disk. Our simulations intend to test the viability of SFDM as an alternative model by comparing the tidal effects that result in this paradigm with those obtained in the CDM for similar mass halos. We found that galaxies in subhalos with core profiles and high central densities survive for 10 Gyr. The same occurs for galaxies in low density subhalos located far from the host disk influence, whereas satellites in low density DM halos and in tight orbits can eventually be stripped of stars. We conclude that SFDM shows consistency with results from the CDM for dwarf galaxies, but naturally offer a possibility to solve the missing satellite problem.

  3. Dark-field hyperlens for high-contrast sub-wavelength imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Repän, Taavi; Zhukovsky, Sergei; Lavrinenko, Andrei; Willatzen, Morten

    2016-04-01

    By now superresolution imaging using hyperbolic metamaterial (HMM) structures - hyperlenses - has been demonstrated both theoretically and experimentally. The hyperlens operation relies on the fact that HMM allows propagation of waves with very large transverse wavevectors, which would be evanescent in common isotropic media (thus giving rise to the diffraction limit). However, nearly all hyperlenses proposed so far have been suitable only for very strong scatterers - such as holes in a metal film. When weaker scatterers, dielectric objects for example, are imaged then incident light forms a very strong background, and weak scatterers are not visible due to a poor contrast. We propose a so-called dark-field hyperlens, which would be suitable for imaging of weakly scattering objects. By designing parameters of the HMM, we managed to obtain its response in such way that the hyperlens structure exhibits a cut-off for waves with small transverse wavevectors (low-k waves). This allows the structure to filter out the background illumination, which is contained in low-k waves. We numerically demonstrate that our device achieves superresolution imaging while providing the strong contrast for weak dielectric scatterers. These findings hold a great promise for dark-field superresolution, which could be important in real-time dynamic nanoscopy of label-free biological objects for example.

  4. Dark-field X-ray microscopy for multiscale structural characterization

    PubMed Central

    Simons, H.; King, A.; Ludwig, W.; Detlefs, C.; Pantleon, W.; Schmidt, S.; Snigireva, I.; Snigirev, A.; Poulsen, H. F.

    2015-01-01

    Many physical and mechanical properties of crystalline materials depend strongly on their internal structure, which is typically organized into grains and domains on several length scales. Here we present dark-field X-ray microscopy; a non-destructive microscopy technique for the three-dimensional mapping of orientations and stresses on lengths scales from 100 nm to 1 mm within embedded sampling volumes. The technique, which allows ‘zooming’ in and out in both direct and angular space, is demonstrated by an annealing study of plastically deformed aluminium. Facilitating the direct study of the interactions between crystalline elements is a key step towards the formulation and validation of multiscale models that account for the entire heterogeneity of a material. Furthermore, dark-field X-ray microscopy is well suited to applied topics, where the structural evolution of internal nanoscale elements (for example, positioned at interfaces) is crucial to the performance and lifetime of macro-scale devices and components thereof. PMID:25586429

  5. Dark-field spectral imaging microscope for localized surface plasmon resonance-based biosensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yim, Sang-Youp; Park, Jin-Ho; Kim, Min-Gon

    2015-07-01

    Localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of metal nanoparticles makes red-shift of extinction wavelength with an increase in the refractive index at the surface of the metal nanoparticles. Since biomolecules bound to the metal nanoparticle's surface induce refractive index change, biosensing based on LSPR effect can be possible by monitoring scattering or absorption spectrum changes. Generally, however, conventional method detects ensemble averaged LSPR signal of a huge number of metal nanoparticles. Here, we have constructed a dark-field spectral imaging microscope in order to monitor the scattering spectra of individual metal nanoparticles, simultaneously. Gold nanorod (GNR) and aptamer are employed to detect ochratoxin A (OTA) related to a carcinogenic illness. An aptamer-target binding mechanism promotes wavelength shift of extinction spectra due to refractive index change within sensing volume of GNR by structural change of aptamer. A number of GNRs can be identified in a dark-field LSPR image, simultaneously. A typical spectrum of a GNR exhibits red-shift after target binding of molecules and OTA detection is extended to the very low concentration of 1 pM level.

  6. Experimental quantification of annular dark-field images in scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lebeau, James M; Stemmer, Susanne

    2008-11-01

    This paper reports on a method to obtain atomic resolution Z-contrast (high-angle annular dark-field) images with intensities normalized to the incident beam. The procedure bypasses the built-in signal processing hardware of the microscope to obtain the large dynamic range necessary for consecutive measurements of the incident beam and the intensities in the Z-contrast image. The method is also used to characterize the response of the annular dark-field detector output, including conditions that avoid saturation and result in a linear relationship between the electron flux reaching the detector and its output. We also characterize the uniformity of the detector response across its entire area and determine its size and shape, which are needed as input for image simulations. We present normalized intensity images of a SrTiO(3) single crystal as a function of thickness. Averaged, normalized atom column intensities and the background intensity are extracted from these images. The results from the approach developed here can be used for direct, quantitative comparisons with image simulations without any need for scaling. PMID:18707809

  7. Photometric Calibrations of Standard Star Fields for the Dark Energy Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyatt, Samuel; Tucker, D. L.; Smith, A.

    2014-01-01

    The Dark Energy Survey (DES) is a 5000 square deg grizY imaging survey to be conducted using the new 3 square deg (2. 2-diameter) wide-field mosaic camera (DECam) on the CTIO Blanco 4-m telescope. The primary scientific goal of the DES is to constrain dark energy cosmological parameters via four complementary methods: galaxy cluster counting, weak lensing, galaxy angular correlations, and Type Ia supernovae, supported by precision photometric redshifts. Here, we describe code developed to calibrate additional standard star fields in the DES natural grizY system, and we describe our initial results using the data obtained during the DES Science Verification Phase. Some of these standard stars will be used to supplement those currently being used for nightly calibrations. Others are to be used as local tertiary standards scattered throughout the DES footprint in order to anchor the DES global relative calibrations against large-scale spatial gradients, as well as to tie the whole DES data set to an initial absolute flux scale.

  8. Grating-based X-ray Dark-field Computed Tomography of Living Mice

    PubMed Central

    Velroyen, A.; Yaroshenko, A.; Hahn, D.; Fehringer, A.; Tapfer, A.; Müller, M.; Noël, P.B.; Pauwels, B.; Sasov, A.; Yildirim, A.Ö.; Eickelberg, O.; Hellbach, K.; Auweter, S.D.; Meinel, F.G.; Reiser, M.F.; Bech, M.; Pfeiffer, F.

    2015-01-01

    Changes in x-ray attenuating tissue caused by lung disorders like emphysema or fibrosis are subtle and thus only resolved by high-resolution computed tomography (CT). The structural reorganization, however, is of strong influence for lung function. Dark-field CT (DFCT), based on small-angle scattering of x-rays, reveals such structural changes even at resolutions coarser than the pulmonary network and thus provides access to their anatomical distribution. In this proof-of-concept study we present x-ray in vivo DFCTs of lungs of a healthy, an emphysematous and a fibrotic mouse. The tomographies show excellent depiction of the distribution of structural – and thus indirectly functional – changes in lung parenchyma, on single-modality slices in dark field as well as on multimodal fusion images. Therefore, we anticipate numerous applications of DFCT in diagnostic lung imaging. We introduce a scatter-based Hounsfield Unit (sHU) scale to facilitate comparability of scans. In this newly defined sHU scale, the pathophysiological changes by emphysema and fibrosis cause a shift towards lower numbers, compared to healthy lung tissue. PMID:26629545

  9. Femtosecond dark-field imaging with an X-ray free electron laser.

    PubMed

    Martin, A V; Loh, N D; Hampton, C Y; Sierra, R G; Wang, F; Aquila, A; Bajt, S; Barthelmess, M; Bostedt, C; Bozek, J D; Coppola, N; Epp, S W; Erk, B; Fleckenstein, H; Foucar, L; Frank, M; Graafsma, H; Gumprecht, L; Hartmann, A; Hartmann, R; Hauser, G; Hirsemann, H; Holl, P; Kassemeyer, S; Kimmel, N; Liang, M; Lomb, L; Maia, F R N C; Marchesini, S; Nass, K; Pedersoli, E; Reich, C; Rolles, D; Rudek, B; Rudenko, A; Schulz, J; Shoeman, R L; Soltau, H; Starodub, D; Steinbrener, J; Stellato, F; Strüder, L; Ullrich, J; Weidenspointner, G; White, T A; Wunderer, C B; Barty, A; Schlichting, I; Bogan, M J; Chapman, H N

    2012-06-01

    The emergence of femtosecond diffractive imaging with X-ray lasers has enabled pioneering structural studies of isolated particles, such as viruses, at nanometer length scales. However, the issue of missing low frequency data significantly limits the potential of X-ray lasers to reveal sub-nanometer details of micrometer-sized samples. We have developed a new technique of dark-field coherent diffractive imaging to simultaneously overcome the missing data issue and enable us to harness the unique contrast mechanisms available in dark-field microscopy. Images of airborne particulate matter (soot) up to two microns in length were obtained using single-shot diffraction patterns obtained at the Linac Coherent Light Source, four times the size of objects previously imaged in similar experiments. This technique opens the door to femtosecond diffractive imaging of a wide range of micrometer-sized materials that exhibit irreproducible complexity down to the nanoscale, including airborne particulate matter, small cells, bacteria and gold-labeled biological samples.

  10. Femtosecond dark-field imaging with an X-ray free electron laser.

    PubMed

    Martin, A V; Loh, N D; Hampton, C Y; Sierra, R G; Wang, F; Aquila, A; Bajt, S; Barthelmess, M; Bostedt, C; Bozek, J D; Coppola, N; Epp, S W; Erk, B; Fleckenstein, H; Foucar, L; Frank, M; Graafsma, H; Gumprecht, L; Hartmann, A; Hartmann, R; Hauser, G; Hirsemann, H; Holl, P; Kassemeyer, S; Kimmel, N; Liang, M; Lomb, L; Maia, F R N C; Marchesini, S; Nass, K; Pedersoli, E; Reich, C; Rolles, D; Rudek, B; Rudenko, A; Schulz, J; Shoeman, R L; Soltau, H; Starodub, D; Steinbrener, J; Stellato, F; Strüder, L; Ullrich, J; Weidenspointner, G; White, T A; Wunderer, C B; Barty, A; Schlichting, I; Bogan, M J; Chapman, H N

    2012-06-01

    The emergence of femtosecond diffractive imaging with X-ray lasers has enabled pioneering structural studies of isolated particles, such as viruses, at nanometer length scales. However, the issue of missing low frequency data significantly limits the potential of X-ray lasers to reveal sub-nanometer details of micrometer-sized samples. We have developed a new technique of dark-field coherent diffractive imaging to simultaneously overcome the missing data issue and enable us to harness the unique contrast mechanisms available in dark-field microscopy. Images of airborne particulate matter (soot) up to two microns in length were obtained using single-shot diffraction patterns obtained at the Linac Coherent Light Source, four times the size of objects previously imaged in similar experiments. This technique opens the door to femtosecond diffractive imaging of a wide range of micrometer-sized materials that exhibit irreproducible complexity down to the nanoscale, including airborne particulate matter, small cells, bacteria and gold-labeled biological samples. PMID:22714377

  11. Interaction of Gravitational field and Brans-Dicke field in R/W universe containing Dark Energy like fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priyokumar Singh, Kangujam; Manihar Singh, Koijam; Dewri, Mukunda

    2016-04-01

    On studying some new models of Robertson-Walker universes with a Brans-Dicke scalar field, it is found that most of these universes contain a dark energy like fluid which confirms the present scenario of the expansion of the universe. In one of the cases, the exact solution of the field equations gives a universe with a false vacuum, while in another it reduces to that of dust distribution in the Brans-Dicke cosmology when the cosmological constant is not in the picture. In one particular model it is found that the universe may undergo a Big Rip in the future, and thus it will be very interesting to investigate such models further.

  12. Thermodynamic Model of Aluminum Combustion in SDF Explosions

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, . L

    2006-06-19

    Thermodynamic states encountered during combustion of Aluminum powder in Shock-Dispersed-Fuel (SDF) explosions were analyzed with the Cheetah code. Results are displayed in the Le Chatelier diagram: the locus of states of specific internal energy versus temperature. Accuracy of the results was confirmed by comparing the fuel and products curves with the heats of detonation and combustion, and species composition as measured in bomb calorimeter experiments. Results were fit with analytic functions u = f(T) suitable for specifying the thermodynamic properties required for gas-dynamic models of combustion in explosions.

  13. Dark field nanoparticle tracking analysis for size characterization of plasmonic and non-plasmonic particles.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Thorsten; Lipinski, Hans-Gerd; Wiemann, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Dark field microscopy is a widely unknown method to measure the particle size distribution of diffusing nanoparticles by particle tracking. Here we demonstrate that by using the surface plasmonic resonance of Au nanoparticles, size differences of ca. 20 nm can be identified within the particle size distribution. For that purpose, we developed a software tool which helps to analyze color videos of diffusing nanoparticles retrieved from CCD or CMOS cameras. Polystyrene beads with a diameter of 100 and 200 nm were used to compare the results to those obtained with a well-established laser-based particle tracking system. The methodology will be discussed in the light of recent developments in the emerging field of optical nanoparticle tracking.

  14. Annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (ADF-STEM) tomography of polymer systems.

    PubMed

    Lu, Kangbo; Sourty, Erwan; Loos, Joachim

    2010-08-01

    We have utilized bright-field conventional transmission electron microscopy tomography and annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (ADF-STEM) tomography to characterize a well-defined carbon black (CB)-filled polymer nanocomposite with known CB volume concentration. For both imaging methods, contrast can be generated between the CB and the surrounding polymer matrix. The involved contrast mechanisms, in particular for ADF-STEM, will be discussed in detail. The obtained volume reconstructions were analysed and the CB volume concentrations were carefully determined from the reconstructed data. For both imaging modes, the measured CB volume concentrations are substantially different and only quantification based on the ADF-STEM data revealed about the same value as the known CB loading. Moreover, when applying low-convergence angles for imaging ADF-STEM tomography, data can be obtained of micrometre-thick samples.

  15. Selective Migration of Subpopulations of Bone Marrow Cells along an SDF-1α and ATP Gradient

    PubMed Central

    Laupheimer, Michael; Skorska, Anna; Große, Jana; Tiedemann, Gudrun; Steinhoff, Gustav; David, Robert; Lux, Cornelia A.

    2014-01-01

    Both stem cell chemokine stromal cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1α) and extracellular nucleotides such as adenosine triphosphate (ATP) are increased in ischemic myocardium. Since ATP has been reported to influence cell migration, we analysed the migratory response of bone marrow cells towards a combination of SDF-1 and ATP. Total nucleated cells (BM-TNCs) were isolated from bone marrow of cardiac surgery patients. Migration assays were performed in vitro. Subsequently, migrated cells were subjected to multicolor flow cytometric analysis of CD133, CD34, CD117, CD184, CD309, and CD14 expression. BM-TNCs migrated significantly towards a combination of SDF-1 and ATP. The proportions of CD34+ cells as well as subpopulations coexpressing multiple stem cell markers were selectively enhanced after migration towards SDF-1 or SDF-1 + ATP. After spontaneous migration, significantly fewer stem cells and CD184+ cells were detected. Direct incubation with SDF-1 led to a reduction of CD184+ but not stem cell marker-positive cells, while incubation with ATP significantly increased CD14+ percentage. In summary, we found that while a combination of SDF-1 and ATP elicited strong migration of BM-TNCs in vitro, only SDF-1 was responsible for selective attraction of hematopoietic stem cells. Meanwhile, spontaneous migration of stem cells was lower compared to BM-TNCs or monocytes. PMID:25610653

  16. Dark-field microscopy visualization of unstained axonal pathways using oil of wintergreen.

    PubMed

    Senatorov, Vladimir V

    2002-01-15

    Despite enormous progress in the development of new morphological techniques, there is still not a simple technique for visualization of the fiber architecture in the mammalian brain. To develop such a technique, thick (400-600 microm) sections of the rat, mice, calf or postmortal human brain were fixed in paraformaldehyde, dehydrated in a series of ethanol and finally immersed in methyl salicylate. The major principle of this newly developed method was to make the neural tissue transparent, and then utilize the ability of neuronal fibers to deflect and deviate light directed from the side to render them visible. Dark-field illumination was used to create illuminating rays of light arriving at an angle exceeding the collecting angle of the objective lens, thus causing only the axonal pathways to be visible as a bright silver silhouette against a dark background. As a result, a three-dimensional structure of the whole white matter of the brain slice became clearly viewable. This technique worked equally well for mammalian brain frontal, sagittal and horizontal sections, as well as for the spinal cord sections. The method was appropriate for verification of axonal fiber courses in brain slice preparations used in electrophysiological experiments, including special applications, such as visualization of axonal bundles within neural transplants. Due to its simplicity, the technique can be successfully used even in an amateur laboratory having basic microscopy equipment and reagents.

  17. Overlapping and Distinct Role of CXCR7-SDF-1/ITAC and CXCR4-SDF-1 Axes in Regulating Metastatic Behavior of Human Rhabdomyosarcomas

    PubMed Central

    Grymula, Katarzyna; Tarnowski, Maciej; Wysoczynski, Marcin; Drukala, Justyna; Barr, Frederic G.; Ratajczak, Janina; Kucia, Magdalena; Ratajczak, Mariusz Z

    2010-01-01

    We have demonstrated that the α-chemokine stromal-derived factor (SDF)-1-CXCR4 axis plays an important role in rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) metastasis. With the recent descriptionof CXCR7, a new receptor for SDF-1 that also binds the interferon-inducible T-cell alpha chemoattractant (ITAC) chemokine, we became interested in the role of the CXCR7-SDF-1/ITAC axis in RMS progression. To address this issue, we evaluated 6 highly metastatic alveolar (A)RMS and 3 less metastatic embryonal (E)RMS cell lines and found that all these cell lines express CXCR7. While CXCR4 was expressed at a much higher level by highly metastatic ARMS lines, CXCR7 was present at a high level on ERMS lines. We also noticed that CXCR7 expression on RMS cells was downregulated in hypoxic conditions. More importantly, the CXCR7 receptor on RMS cell lines was functional after stimulation with ITAC and SDF-1 as evidenced by mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)p42/44 and AKT phosphorylation as well as CXCR7 internalization, chemotaxis, cell motility, and adhesion assays. Similarly to CXCR4, signaling from activated CXCR7 was not associated with increased RMS proliferation or cell survival. Moreover, CXCR7+ RMS cells responded to SDF-1 and I-TAC in the presence of CXCR4 antagonists (T140, AMD3100). Furthermore, while intravenous injection of RMS cells with overexpressed CXCR7 resulted in increased seeding efficiency of tumor cells to bone marrow, CXCR7 downregulation showed the opposite effect. In conclusion, the CXCR7-SDF-1/ITAC axis is involved in the progression of RMS; targeting of the CXCR4-SDF-1 axis alone without simultaneous blockage of CXCR7 will be an inefficient strategy for inhibiting SDF-1-mediated pro-metastatic responses of RMS cells. PMID:20162608

  18. AMR Code Simulations of Turbulent Combustion in Confined and Unconfined SDF Explosions

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, A L; Bell, J B; Beckner, V

    2009-05-29

    A heterogeneous continuum model is proposed to describe the dispersion and combustion of an aluminum particle cloud in an explosion. It combines the gas-dynamic conservation laws for the gas phase with a continuum model for the dispersed phase, as formulated by Nigmatulin. Inter-phase mass, momentum and energy exchange are prescribed by phenomenological models. It incorporates a combustion model based on the mass conservation laws for fuel, air and products; source/sink terms are treated in the fast-chemistry limit appropriate for such gas dynamic fields, along with a model for mass transfer from the particle phase to the gas. The model takes into account both the afterburning of the detonation products of the booster with air, and the combustion of the Al particles with air. The model equations were integrated by high-order Godunov schemes for both the gas and particle phases. Numerical simulations of the explosion fields from 1.5-g Shock-Dispersed-Fuel (SDF) charge in a 6.6 liter calorimeter were used to validate the combustion model. Then the model was applied to 10-kg Al-SDF explosions in a vented two-room structure and in an unconfined height-of-burst explosion. Computed pressure histories are in reasonable (but not perfect) agreement with measured waveforms. Differences are caused by physical-chemical kinetic effects of particle combustion which induce ignition delays in the initial reactive blast wave and quenching of reactions at late times. Current simulations give initial insights into such modeling issues.

  19. High-contrast multilayer imaging of biological organisms through dark-field digital refocusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faridian, Ahmad; Pedrini, Giancarlo; Osten, Wolfgang

    2013-08-01

    We have developed an imaging system to extract high contrast images from different layers of biological organisms. Utilizing a digital holographic approach, the system works without scanning through layers of the specimen. In dark-field illumination, scattered light has the main contribution in image formation, but in the case of coherent illumination, this creates a strong speckle noise that reduces the image quality. To remove this restriction, the specimen has been illuminated with various speckle-fields and a hologram has been recorded for each speckle-field. Each hologram has been analyzed separately and the corresponding intensity image has been reconstructed. The final image has been derived by averaging over the reconstructed images. A correlation approach has been utilized to determine the number of speckle-fields required to achieve a desired contrast and image quality. The reconstructed intensity images in different object layers are shown for different sea urchin larvae. Two multimedia files are attached to illustrate the process of digital focusing.

  20. High-contrast multilayer imaging of biological organisms through dark-field digital refocusing.

    PubMed

    Faridian, Ahmad; Pedrini, Giancarlo; Osten, Wolfgang

    2013-08-01

    We have developed an imaging system to extract high contrast images from different layers of biological organisms. Utilizing a digital holographic approach, the system works without scanning through layers of the specimen. In dark-field illumination, scattered light has the main contribution in image formation, but in the case of coherent illumination, this creates a strong speckle noise that reduces the image quality. To remove this restriction, the specimen has been illuminated with various speckle-fields and a hologram has been recorded for each speckle-field. Each hologram has been analyzed separately and the corresponding intensity image has been reconstructed. The final image has been derived by averaging over the reconstructed images. A correlation approach has been utilized to determine the number of speckle-fields required to achieve a desired contrast and image quality. The reconstructed intensity images in different object layers are shown for different sea urchin larvae. Two multimedia files are attached to illustrate the process of digital focusing. PMID:23942634

  1. On the visibility of "heavy" atoms in dark-field STEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shannon, M. D.; Nellist, P. D.; Nicolosi, V.; Shannon, G. B.; Shmeliov, A.

    2012-07-01

    One of the most useful and apparently straightforward attributes of annular dark-field (ADF) STEM imaging is the ability to image heavy atoms on relatively light substrates using Z-contrast (High-Angle ADF) imaging. From multislice calculations, however, some isolated heavy atoms, e.g. Re, can go undetected in a thin Co matrix in standard aberration-corrected HAADF-STEM imaging of catalyst nanoparticles oriented accurately on a zone-axis [2]. More recently simultaneous Medium-Angle and High-Angle ADF imaging of a few layers of BN has shown experimentally that some adatoms are invisible in MAADF whilst exhibiting very strong contrast in HAADF. Simulations confirm that this can occur for atoms such as sodium. In both situations HOLZ ring imaging can be used to extract additional information.

  2. Dark field X-ray microscopy: the effects of condenser/detector aperture.

    PubMed

    Vogt, S; Chapman, H N; Jacobsen, C; Medenwaldt, R

    2001-03-01

    In order to visualize the functionality of a biological cell, it is often desirable to label specific proteins. In this work we concentrate on the optical theory of visualizing colloidal gold labels with soft X-ray microscopes, where scattering from small gold spheres used as labels dominates the image. Using numerical simulations of bright and dark field imaging, we compare different configurations of condenser and objective lenses in transmission X-ray microscopes, and configurations of detector and objective lens in scanning transmission X-ray microscopes. It is verified that the contrast of small, closely spaced features is strongly affected by changes in these configurations; the optimum situation is to have the condenser aperture (in TXM) or detector aperture (in STXM) equal to 3/2 that of the objective numerical aperture. PMID:11310539

  3. Dark-field microspectroscopic analysis of gold nanorods in spiral Ganglion neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yong, J.; Brown, W. G. A.; Needham, K.; Nayagam, B. A.; Yu, A.; McArthur, S. L.; Stoddart, P. R.

    2013-12-01

    Heterogeneous samples of spiral ganglion neuron primary cells were incubated with gold nanorods in order to investigate the photothermal processes induced by exposure to 780 nm laser light. Dark-field microspectroscopy was used to analyze the distribution and spectrum of nanorods in the neurons. The scattering data showed a typical gold nanorod spectrum, while a shift in the peak position suggested changes in the refractive index of the nanorod environment. The relationship between gold nanorods distribution and local temperature has also been examined with an open pipette microelectrode placed in the surrounding bath of the neurons. These temperature measurements confirm that the gold nanorods provide efficient localized heating under 780 nm laser exposure.

  4. Analyzing Carbohydrate-Protein Interaction Based on Single Plasmonic Nanoparticle by Conventional Dark Field Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Jin, Hong-Ying; Li, Da-Wei; Zhang, Na; Gu, Zhen; Long, Yi-Tao

    2015-06-10

    We demonstrated a practical method to analyze carbohydrate-protein interaction based on single plasmonic nanoparticles by conventional dark field microscopy (DFM). Protein concanavalin A (ConA) was modified on large sized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), and dextran was conjugated on small sized AuNPs. As the interaction between ConA and dextran resulted in two kinds of gold nanoparticles coupled together, which caused coupling of plasmonic oscillations, apparent color changes (from green to yellow) of the single AuNPs were observed through DFM. Then, the color information was instantly transformed into a statistic peak wavelength distribution in less than 1 min by a self-developed statistical program (nanoparticleAnalysis). In addition, the interaction between ConA and dextran was proved with biospecific recognition. This approach is high-throughput and real-time, and is a convenient method to analyze carbohydrate-protein interaction at the single nanoparticle level efficiently. PMID:25985863

  5. High energy X-ray phase and dark-field imaging using a random absorption mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongchang; Kashyap, Yogesh; Cai, Biao; Sawhney, Kawal

    2016-07-01

    High energy X-ray imaging has unique advantage over conventional X-ray imaging, since it enables higher penetration into materials with significantly reduced radiation damage. However, the absorption contrast in high energy region is considerably low due to the reduced X-ray absorption cross section for most materials. Even though the X-ray phase and dark-field imaging techniques can provide substantially increased contrast and complementary information, fabricating dedicated optics for high energies still remain a challenge. To address this issue, we present an alternative X-ray imaging approach to produce transmission, phase and scattering signals at high X-ray energies by using a random absorption mask. Importantly, in addition to the synchrotron radiation source, this approach has been demonstrated for practical imaging application with a laboratory-based microfocus X-ray source. This new imaging method could be potentially useful for studying thick samples or heavy materials for advanced research in materials science.

  6. High contrast hollow-cone dark field transmission electron microscopy for nanocrystalline grain size quantification.

    PubMed

    Yao, Bo; Sun, Tik; Warren, Andrew; Heinrich, Helge; Barmak, Katayun; Coffey, Kevin R

    2010-04-01

    In this paper, we describe hollow-cone dark field (HCDF) transmission electron microscopy (TEM) imaging, with a slightly convergent beam, as an improved technique that is suitable to form high contrast micrographs for nanocrystalline grain size quantification. We also examine the various factors that influence the HCDF TEM image quality, including the conditions of microscopy (alignment, focus and objective aperture size), the properties of the materials imaged (e.g., atomic number, strain, defects), and the characteristics of the TEM sample itself (e.g., thickness, ion milling artifacts). Sample preparation was found to be critical and an initial thinning by wet etching of the substrate (for thin film samples) or tripod polishing (for bulk samples), followed by low-angle ion milling was found to be the preferred approach for preparing high-quality electron transparent samples for HCDF imaging. PMID:20018512

  7. X-ray refraction-contrast computed tomography images using dark-field imaging optics

    SciTech Connect

    Sunaguchi, Naoki; Yuasa, Tetsuya; Huo, Qingkai; Ichihara, Shu; Ando, Masami

    2010-10-11

    If an x-ray beam containing internal information derived from sample soft tissue is incident upon a Laue-case analyzer, the beam will subsequently split into a forwardly diffracted beam and a separate diffracted beam. Using these beams acquired simultaneously, a refraction-contrast computed tomography (CT) imaging system for biomedical use with lower radiation dose can be easily realized, and has a high depicting capability on the soft tissues compared with conventional x-ray CT based on absorption contrast principles. In this paper, we propose an imaging system using dark-field imaging for CT measurement based on a tandem system of Bragg- and Laue-case crystals with two two-dimensional detectors, along with a data-processing method to extract information on refraction from the measured entangled intensities by use of rocking curve fitting with polynomial functions. Reconstructed images of soft tissues are presented and described.

  8. Two-dimensional misorientation mapping by rocking dark-field transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tyutyunnikov, Dmitry; Mitsuhara, Masatoshi; Koch, Christoph T

    2015-12-01

    In this paper we introduce an approach for precise orientation mapping of crystalline specimens by means of transmission electron microscopy. We show that local orientation values can be reconstructed from experimental dark-field image data acquired at different specimen tilts and multiple Bragg reflections. By using the suggested method it is also possible to determine the orientation of the tilt axis with respect to the image or diffraction pattern. The method has been implemented to automatically acquire the necessary data and then map crystal orientation for a given region of interest. We have applied this technique to a specimen prepared from a Ni-based super-alloy CMSX-4. The functionality and limitations of our method are discussed and compared to those of other techniques available. PMID:26255118

  9. Unscrambling Mixed Elements using High Angle Annular Dark Field Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Bos, Karel H. W.; De Backer, Annick; Martinez, Gerardo T.; Winckelmans, Naomi; Bals, Sara; Nellist, Peter D.; Van Aert, Sandra

    2016-06-01

    The development of new nanocrystals with outstanding physicochemical properties requires a full three-dimensional (3D) characterization at the atomic scale. For homogeneous nanocrystals, counting the number of atoms in each atomic column from high angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy images has been shown to be a successful technique to get access to this 3D information. However, technologically important nanostructures often consist of more than one chemical element. In order to extend atom counting to heterogeneous materials, a new atomic lensing model is presented. This model takes dynamical electron diffraction into account and opens up new possibilities for unraveling the 3D composition at the atomic scale. Here, the method is applied to determine the 3D structure of Au@Ag core-shell nanorods, but it is applicable to a wide range of heterogeneous complex nanostructures.

  10. Atomic-resolution defect contrast in low angle annular dark-field STEM

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, Patrick J.; De Graef, M.; Kovarik, Libor; Agrawal, A.; Windl, W.; Mills, M. J.

    2012-05-01

    While traditional high-resolution STEM is performed by exclusively collecting electrons which have been scattered to high angles (i.e., HAADF), the present contribution will focus on small-angle scattered electrons, as in low angle annular dark-field (LAADF) STEM. This unique imaging mode allows one to image defect contrast while maintaining directly interpretable atomic resolution. By simply adjusting the microscope camera length, and thus the acceptance angle of the annular detector, it is possible to transition between Z-contrast and defect contrast. Both LAADF and HAADF experimental and computational results are discussed in regards to zone axis imaging of a y/y1Ni-superalloy; various length scales are explored. Electron de-channeling is observed while the probe is placed over defected regions of crystal.

  11. Peccei-Quinn field for inflation, baryogenesis, dark matter, and much more

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barenboim, Gabriela; Park, Wan-Il

    2016-05-01

    We propose a scenario of brane cosmology in which the Peccei-Quinn field plays the role of the inflaton and solves simultaneously many cosmological and phenomenological issues such as the generation of a heavy Majorana mass for the right-handed neutrinos needed for seesaw mechanism, MSSM μ-parameter, the right amount of baryon number asymmetry and dark matter relic density at the present universe, together with an axion solution to the strong CP problem without the domain wall obstacle. Interestingly, the scales of the soft SUSY-breaking mass parameter and those of the breaking of U(1)PQ symmetry are lower bounded at O (10) TeV and O (1011) GeV, respectively.

  12. Unscrambling Mixed Elements using High Angle Annular Dark Field Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    van den Bos, Karel H W; De Backer, Annick; Martinez, Gerardo T; Winckelmans, Naomi; Bals, Sara; Nellist, Peter D; Van Aert, Sandra

    2016-06-17

    The development of new nanocrystals with outstanding physicochemical properties requires a full three-dimensional (3D) characterization at the atomic scale. For homogeneous nanocrystals, counting the number of atoms in each atomic column from high angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy images has been shown to be a successful technique to get access to this 3D information. However, technologically important nanostructures often consist of more than one chemical element. In order to extend atom counting to heterogeneous materials, a new atomic lensing model is presented. This model takes dynamical electron diffraction into account and opens up new possibilities for unraveling the 3D composition at the atomic scale. Here, the method is applied to determine the 3D structure of Au@Ag core-shell nanorods, but it is applicable to a wide range of heterogeneous complex nanostructures.

  13. Effect of light-dark changes on the locomotor activity in open field in adult rats and opossums.

    PubMed

    Klejbor, I; Ludkiewicz, B; Turlejski, K

    2013-11-01

    There have been no reports on how the light-dark changes determine the locomotor activity of animals in the group of high reactivity (HR) and low reactivity (LR). In the present study we have compared selected parameters of the locomotor activity of the HR and the LR groups of the laboratory opossums and Wistar rats during consecutive, light and dark phases in the open field test. Sixty male Wistar adult rats, at an average weight of 350 g each, and 24 adult Monodelphis opossums of both sexes at an average weight of 120 g each were used. The animals' activity for 2 h daily between the hours of 17:30 and 19:30, in line with the natural light-dark cycle were recorded and then analysed using VideoTrack ver.2.0 (Vievpoint France). According to our results, we noted that a change of the experimental conditions from light to dark involves an increase in the locomotor activity in rats and opossums of the HR group, while there is no effect on the activity of the rats and opossums in the LR group. Locomotor activity in the HR rats, both in the light and dark conditions is characterised by a consistent pattern of change - higher activity in the first stage of the recording and a slowdown (habituation) in the second phase of the observation. The locomotor activity of the opossum, during both light and dark conditions, was observed to be at a consistently high level compared to the rats.

  14. Alignments of Dark Matter Halos with Large-scale Tidal Fields: Mass and Redshift Dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Sijie; Wang, Huiyuan; Mo, H. J.; Shi, Jingjing

    2016-07-01

    Large-scale tidal fields estimated directly from the distribution of dark matter halos are used to investigate how halo shapes and spin vectors are aligned with the cosmic web. The major, intermediate, and minor axes of halos are aligned with the corresponding tidal axes, and halo spin axes tend to be parallel with the intermediate axes and perpendicular to the major axes of the tidal field. The strengths of these alignments generally increase with halo mass and redshift, but the dependence is only on the peak height, ν \\equiv {δ }{{c}}/σ ({M}{{h}},z). The scaling relations of the alignment strengths with the value of ν indicate that the alignment strengths remain roughly constant when the structures within which the halos reside are still in a quasi-linear regime, but decreases as nonlinear evolution becomes more important. We also calculate the alignments in projection so that our results can be compared directly with observations. Finally, we investigate the alignments of tidal tensors on large scales, and use the results to understand alignments of halo pairs separated at various distances. Our results suggest that the coherent structure of the tidal field is the underlying reason for the alignments of halos and galaxies seen in numerical simulations and in observations.

  15. New Trans-Neptunian Objects in the Dark Energy Survey Supernova Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerdes, David W.

    2015-05-01

    The Dark Energy Survey (DES) observes ten separate 3 sq. deg. fields approximately weekly for six months each year. Although intended primarily to detect Type Ia supernovae, this data set provides a rich time series that is well suited for the detection of objects in the outer solar system, which move slowly enough that they can remain in the same field of view for weeks, months, or even across multiple DES observing seasons. Because the supernova fields have ecliptic latitudes ranging from -15 to -45 degrees, DES is particularly sensitive to the dynamically hot population of Kuiper Belt objects, as well as detached/inner Oort cloud objects. Here I report the results of a search for new trans-Neptunian objects in the first two seasons of DES data, to limiting magnitudes of r~23.8 in the eight shallow fields and ~24.5 in the two deep fields. The 22 objects discovered to date include two new Neptune trojans, a number of objects in mean motion resonances with Neptune, two objects with orbital inclinations above 45 degrees, a Uranian resonator, and several distant scattered disk objects including one with an orbital period of nearly 6000 years. This latter object is among the half-dozen longest-period trans-Neptunian objects known, and like the other such objects has an argument of perihelion near zero degrees. I will discuss the properties and orbital dynamics of objects discovered to date, and will also discuss prospects for extending the search to the full 5000 sq. deg. DES wide survey.

  16. The gravity of dark vortices: effective field theory for branes and strings carrying localized flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, C. P.; Diener, R.; Williams, M.

    2015-11-01

    A Nielsen-Olesen vortex usually sits in an environment that expels the flux that is confined to the vortex, so flux is not present both inside and outside. We construct vortices for which this is not true, where the flux carried by the vortex also permeates the `bulk' far from the vortex. The idea is to mix the vortex's internal gauge flux with an external flux using off-diagonal kinetic mixing. Such `dark' vortices could play a phenomenological role in models with both cosmic strings and a dark gauge sector. When coupled to gravity they also provide explicit ultra-violet completions for codimension-two brane-localized flux, which arises in extra-dimensional models when the same flux that stabilizes extra-dimensional size is also localized on space-filling branes situated around the extra dimensions. We derive simple formulae for observables such as defect angle, tension, localized flux and on-vortex curvature when coupled to gravity, and show how all of these are insensitive to much of the microscopic details of the solutions, and are instead largely dictated by low-energy quantities. We derive the required effective description in terms of a world-sheet brane action, and derive the matching conditions for its couplings. We consider the case where the dimensions transverse to the bulk compactify, and determine how the on- and off-vortex curvatures and other bulk features depend on the vortex properties. We find that the brane-localized flux does not gravitate, but just renormalizes the tension in a magnetic-field independent way. The existence of an explicit UV completion puts the effective description of these models on a more precise footing, verifying that brane-localized flux can be consistent with sensible UV physics and resolving some apparent paradoxes that can arise with a naive (but commonly used) delta-function treatment of the brane's localization within the bulk.

  17. SDF-1 enhances wound healing of critical-sized calvarial defects beyond self-repair capacity.

    PubMed

    Jin, Qiming; Giannobile, William V

    2014-01-01

    Host blood circulating stem cells are an important cell source that participates in the repair of damaged tissues. The clinical challenge is how to improve the recruitment of circulating stem cells into the local wound area and enhance tissue regeneration. Stromal-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) has been shown to be a potent chemoattractant of blood circulating stem cells into the local wound microenvironment. In order to investigate effects of SDF-1 on bone development and the repair of a large bone defect beyond host self-repair capacity, the BMP-induced subcutaneous ectopic bone formation and calvarial critical-sized defect murine models were used in this preclinical study. A dose escalation of SDF-1 were loaded into collagen scaffolds containing BMP, VEGF, or PDGF, and implanted into subcutaneous sites at mouse dorsa or calvarial critical-sized bone defects for 2 and 4 weeks. The harvested biopsies were examined by microCT and histology. The results demonstrated that while SDF-1 had no effect in the ectopic bone model in promoting de novo osteogenesis, however, in the orthotopic bone model of the critical-sized defects, SDF-1 enhanced calvarial critical-sized bone defect healing similar to VEGF, and PDGF. These results suggest that SDF-1 plays a role in the repair of large critical-sized defect where more cells are needed while not impacting de novo bone formation, which may be associated with the functions of SDF-1 on circulating stem cell recruitment and angiogenesis.

  18. Low-dose radiation augments vasculogenesis signaling through HIF-1-dependent and -independent SDF-1 induction.

    PubMed

    Lerman, Oren Z; Greives, Matthew R; Singh, Sunil P; Thanik, Vishal D; Chang, Christopher C; Seiser, Natalie; Brown, Daniel J; Knobel, Denis; Schneider, Robert J; Formenti, Silvia C; Saadeh, Pierre B; Levine, Jamie P

    2010-11-01

    The inflammatory response to ionizing radiation (IR) includes a proangiogenic effect that could be counterproductive in cancer but can be exploited for treating impaired wound healing. We demonstrate for the first time that IR stimulates hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) up-regulation in endothelial cells (ECs), a HIF-1α-independent up-regulation of stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1), as well as endothelial migration, all of which are essential for angiogenesis. 5 Gray IR-induced EC HIF-1α and SDF-1 expression was greater when combined with hypoxia suggesting an additive effect. While small interfering RNA silencing of HIF-1α mRNA and abolition of HIF-1α protein induction down-regulated SDF-1 induction by hypoxia alone, it had little effect on SDF-1 induction by IR, demonstrating an independent pathway. SDF-1-mediated EC migration in hypoxic and/or radiation-treated media showed IR induced strong SDF-1-dependent migration of ECs, augmented by hypoxia. IR activates a novel pathway stimulating EC migration directly through the expression of SDF-1 independent of HIF-1α induction. These observations might be exploited for stimulation of wound healing or controlling tumor angiogenesis. PMID:20631377

  19. The CXCR4/SDF1 axis improves muscle regeneration through MMP-10 activity.

    PubMed

    Bobadilla, Miriam; Sainz, Neira; Abizanda, Gloria; Orbe, Josune; Rodriguez, José Antonio; Páramo, José Antonio; Prósper, Felipe; Pérez-Ruiz, Ana

    2014-06-15

    The CXCR4/SDF1 axis participates in various cellular processes, including cell migration, which is essential for skeletal muscle repair. Although increasing evidence has confirmed the role of CXCR4/SDF1 in embryonic muscle development, the function of this pathway during adult myogenesis remains to be fully elucidated. In addition, a role for CXCR4 signaling in muscle maintenance and repair has only recently emerged. Here, we have demonstrated that CXCR4 and stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF1) are up-regulated in injured muscle, suggesting their involvement in the repair process. In addition, we found that notexin-damaged muscles showed delayed muscle regeneration on treatment with CXCR4 agonist (AMD3100). Accordingly, small-interfering RNA-mediated silencing of SDF1 or CXCR4 in injured muscles impaired muscle regeneration, whereas the addition of SDF1 ligand accelerated repair. Furthermore, we identified that CXCR4/SDF1-regulated muscle repair was dependent on matrix metalloproteinase-10 (MMP-10) activity. Thus, our findings support a model in which MMP-10 activity modulates CXCR4/SDF1 signaling, which is essential for efficient skeletal muscle regeneration. PMID:24548137

  20. The CXCR4/SDF1 Axis Improves Muscle Regeneration Through MMP-10 Activity

    PubMed Central

    Bobadilla, Miriam; Sainz, Neira; Abizanda, Gloria; Orbe, Josune; Rodriguez, José Antonio; Páramo, José Antonio; Prósper, Felipe

    2014-01-01

    The CXCR4/SDF1 axis participates in various cellular processes, including cell migration, which is essential for skeletal muscle repair. Although increasing evidence has confirmed the role of CXCR4/SDF1 in embryonic muscle development, the function of this pathway during adult myogenesis remains to be fully elucidated. In addition, a role for CXCR4 signaling in muscle maintenance and repair has only recently emerged. Here, we have demonstrated that CXCR4 and stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF1) are up-regulated in injured muscle, suggesting their involvement in the repair process. In addition, we found that notexin-damaged muscles showed delayed muscle regeneration on treatment with CXCR4 agonist (AMD3100). Accordingly, small-interfering RNA-mediated silencing of SDF1 or CXCR4 in injured muscles impaired muscle regeneration, whereas the addition of SDF1 ligand accelerated repair. Furthermore, we identified that CXCR4/SDF1-regulated muscle repair was dependent on matrix metalloproteinase-10 (MMP-10) activity. Thus, our findings support a model in which MMP-10 activity modulates CXCR4/SDF1 signaling, which is essential for efficient skeletal muscle regeneration. PMID:24548137

  1. SDF-1 Enhances Wound Healing of Critical-Sized Calvarial Defects beyond Self-Repair Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Qiming; Giannobile, William V.

    2014-01-01

    Host blood circulating stem cells are an important cell source that participates in the repair of damaged tissues. The clinical challenge is how to improve the recruitment of circulating stem cells into the local wound area and enhance tissue regeneration. Stromal-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) has been shown to be a potent chemoattractant of blood circulating stem cells into the local wound microenvironment. In order to investigate effects of SDF-1 on bone development and the repair of a large bone defect beyond host self-repair capacity, the BMP-induced subcutaneous ectopic bone formation and calvarial critical-sized defect murine models were used in this preclinical study. A dose escalation of SDF-1 were loaded into collagen scaffolds containing BMP, VEGF, or PDGF, and implanted into subcutaneous sites at mouse dorsa or calvarial critical-sized bone defects for 2 and 4 weeks. The harvested biopsies were examined by microCT and histology. The results demonstrated that while SDF-1 had no effect in the ectopic bone model in promoting de novo osteogenesis, however, in the orthotopic bone model of the critical-sized defects, SDF-1 enhanced calvarial critical-sized bone defect healing similar to VEGF, and PDGF. These results suggest that SDF-1 plays a role in the repair of large critical-sized defect where more cells are needed while not impacting de novo bone formation, which may be associated with the functions of SDF-1 on circulating stem cell recruitment and angiogenesis. PMID:24800841

  2. Visualization of neonatal lung injury associated with mechanical ventilation using x-ray dark-field radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaroshenko, Andre; Pritzke, Tina; Koschlig, Markus; Kamgari, Nona; Willer, Konstantin; Gromann, Lukas; Auweter, Sigrid; Hellbach, Katharina; Reiser, Maximilian; Eickelberg, Oliver; Pfeiffer, Franz; Hilgendorff, Anne

    2016-04-01

    Mechanical ventilation (MV) and supplementation of oxygen-enriched gas, often needed in postnatal resuscitation procedures, are known to be main risk factors for impaired pulmonary development in the preterm and term neonates. Unfortunately, current imaging modalities lack in sensitivity for the detection of early stage lung injury. The present study reports a new imaging approach for diagnosis and staging of early lung injury induced by MV and hyperoxia in neonatal mice. The imaging method is based on the Talbot-Lau x-ray grating interferometry that makes it possible to quantify the x-ray small-angle scattering on the air-tissue interfaces. This so-called dark-field signal revealed increasing loss of x-ray small-angle scattering when comparing images of neonatal mice undergoing hyperoxia and MV-O2 with animals kept at room air. The changes in the dark field correlated well with histologic findings and provided superior differentiation than conventional x-ray imaging and lung function testing. The results suggest that x-ray dark-field radiography is a sensitive tool for assessing structural changes in the developing lung. In the future, with further technical developments x-ray dark-field imaging could be an important tool for earlier diagnosis and sensitive monitoring of lung injury in neonates requiring postnatal oxygen or ventilator therapy.

  3. Time resolved X-ray Dark-Field Tomography Revealing Water Transport in a Fresh Cement Sample

    PubMed Central

    Prade, Friedrich; Fischer, Kai; Heinz, Detlef; Meyer, Pascal; Mohr, Jürgen; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2016-01-01

    Grating-based X-ray dark-field tomography is a promising technique for biomedical and materials research. Even if the resolution of conventional X-ray tomography does not suffice to resolve relevant structures, the dark-field signal provides valuable information about the sub-pixel microstructural properties of the sample. Here, we report on the potential of X-ray dark-field imaging to be used for time-resolved three-dimensional studies. By repeating consecutive tomography scans on a fresh cement sample, we were able to study the hardening dynamics of the cement paste in three dimensions over time. The hardening of the cement was accompanied by a strong decrease in the dark-field signal pointing to microstructural changes within the cement paste. Furthermore our results hint at the transport of water from certain limestone grains, which were embedded in the sample, to the cement paste during the process of hardening. This is indicated by an increasing scattering signal which was observed for two of the six tested limestone grains. Electron microscopy images revealed a distinct porous structure only for those two grains which supports the following interpretation of our results. When the water filled pores of the limestone grains empty during the experiment the scattering signal of the grains increases. PMID:27357449

  4. Visualization of neonatal lung injury associated with mechanical ventilation using x-ray dark-field radiography

    PubMed Central

    Yaroshenko, Andre; Pritzke, Tina; Koschlig, Markus; Kamgari, Nona; Willer, Konstantin; Gromann, Lukas; Auweter, Sigrid; Hellbach, Katharina; Reiser, Maximilian; Eickelberg, Oliver; Pfeiffer, Franz; Hilgendorff, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation (MV) and supplementation of oxygen-enriched gas, often needed in postnatal resuscitation procedures, are known to be main risk factors for impaired pulmonary development in the preterm and term neonates. Unfortunately, current imaging modalities lack in sensitivity for the detection of early stage lung injury. The present study reports a new imaging approach for diagnosis and staging of early lung injury induced by MV and hyperoxia in neonatal mice. The imaging method is based on the Talbot-Lau x-ray grating interferometry that makes it possible to quantify the x-ray small-angle scattering on the air-tissue interfaces. This so-called dark-field signal revealed increasing loss of x-ray small-angle scattering when comparing images of neonatal mice undergoing hyperoxia and MV-O2 with animals kept at room air. The changes in the dark field correlated well with histologic findings and provided superior differentiation than conventional x-ray imaging and lung function testing. The results suggest that x-ray dark-field radiography is a sensitive tool for assessing structural changes in the developing lung. In the future, with further technical developments x-ray dark-field imaging could be an important tool for earlier diagnosis and sensitive monitoring of lung injury in neonates requiring postnatal oxygen or ventilator therapy. PMID:27072871

  5. Time resolved X-ray Dark-Field Tomography Revealing Water Transport in a Fresh Cement Sample.

    PubMed

    Prade, Friedrich; Fischer, Kai; Heinz, Detlef; Meyer, Pascal; Mohr, Jürgen; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2016-01-01

    Grating-based X-ray dark-field tomography is a promising technique for biomedical and materials research. Even if the resolution of conventional X-ray tomography does not suffice to resolve relevant structures, the dark-field signal provides valuable information about the sub-pixel microstructural properties of the sample. Here, we report on the potential of X-ray dark-field imaging to be used for time-resolved three-dimensional studies. By repeating consecutive tomography scans on a fresh cement sample, we were able to study the hardening dynamics of the cement paste in three dimensions over time. The hardening of the cement was accompanied by a strong decrease in the dark-field signal pointing to microstructural changes within the cement paste. Furthermore our results hint at the transport of water from certain limestone grains, which were embedded in the sample, to the cement paste during the process of hardening. This is indicated by an increasing scattering signal which was observed for two of the six tested limestone grains. Electron microscopy images revealed a distinct porous structure only for those two grains which supports the following interpretation of our results. When the water filled pores of the limestone grains empty during the experiment the scattering signal of the grains increases. PMID:27357449

  6. Time resolved X-ray Dark-Field Tomography Revealing Water Transport in a Fresh Cement Sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prade, Friedrich; Fischer, Kai; Heinz, Detlef; Meyer, Pascal; Mohr, Jürgen; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2016-06-01

    Grating-based X-ray dark-field tomography is a promising technique for biomedical and materials research. Even if the resolution of conventional X-ray tomography does not suffice to resolve relevant structures, the dark-field signal provides valuable information about the sub-pixel microstructural properties of the sample. Here, we report on the potential of X-ray dark-field imaging to be used for time-resolved three-dimensional studies. By repeating consecutive tomography scans on a fresh cement sample, we were able to study the hardening dynamics of the cement paste in three dimensions over time. The hardening of the cement was accompanied by a strong decrease in the dark-field signal pointing to microstructural changes within the cement paste. Furthermore our results hint at the transport of water from certain limestone grains, which were embedded in the sample, to the cement paste during the process of hardening. This is indicated by an increasing scattering signal which was observed for two of the six tested limestone grains. Electron microscopy images revealed a distinct porous structure only for those two grains which supports the following interpretation of our results. When the water filled pores of the limestone grains empty during the experiment the scattering signal of the grains increases.

  7. Defects evaluation system for spherical optical surfaces based on microscopic scattering dark-field imaging method.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yihui; Yang, Yongying; Li, Chen; Wu, Fan; Chai, Huiting; Yan, Kai; Zhou, Lin; Li, Yang; Liu, Dong; Bai, Jian; Shen, Yibing

    2016-08-10

    In the field of automatic optical inspection, it is imperative to measure the defects on spherical optical surfaces. So a novel spherical surface defect evaluation system is established in this paper to evaluate defects on optical spheres. In order to ensure the microscopic scattering dark-field imaging of optical spheres with different surface shape and radius of curvature, illumination with variable aperture angle is employed. In addition, the scanning path of subapertures along the parallels and meridians is planned to detect the large optical spheres. Since analysis shows that the spherical defect information could be lost in the optical imaging, the three-dimensional correction based on a pin-hole model is proposed to recover the actual spherical defects from the captured two-dimensional images. Given the difficulty of subaperture stitching and defect feature extraction in three-dimensional (3D) space after the correction, the 3D subapertures are transformed into a plane to be spliced through geometric projection. Then, methods of the surface integral and calibration are applied to quantitatively evaluate the spherical defects. Furthermore, the 3D panorama of defect distribution on the spherical optical components can be displayed through the inverse projective reconstruction. Finally, the evaluation results are compared with the OLYMPUS microscope, testifying to the micrometer resolution, and the detection error is less than 5%. PMID:27534456

  8. New trans-Neptunian Objects in the Dark Energy Survey Supernova Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerdes, David; Dark Energy Survey Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The Dark Energy Survey (DES) observes ten separate 3 sq. deg. fields approximately weekly for six months each year. Although intended primarily to detect Type Ia supernovae, this data set provides a rich time series that is well suited for the detection of objects in the outer solar system, which move slowly enough that they can remain in the same field of view for weeks, months, or even across multiple DES observing seasons. With ecliptic latitudes ranging from -15 to -45 degrees, DES is particularly sensitive to the dynamically hot population of Kuiper Belt object, as well as detached/inner Oort cloud objects. Here I report the results of a search for new trans-Neptunian objects in the first two seasons of DES data. The objects discovered to date include a new Neptune trojan, a number of objects in mean motion resonances with Neptune, an object with an orbital inclination of 48 degrees, and several distant scattered disk objects including one with an orbital period of nearly 1200 years. I will also discuss prospects for extending the search to the full 5000 sq. deg. DES wide survey.

  9. Effective field theory and keV lines from dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Krall, Rebecca; Reece, Matthew; Roxlo, Thomas E-mail: mreece@physics.harvard.edu

    2014-09-01

    We survey operators that can lead to a keV photon line from dark matter decay or annihilation. We are motivated in part by recent claims of an unexplained 3.5 keV line in galaxy clusters and in Andromeda, but our results could apply to any hypothetical line observed in this energy range. We find that given the amount of flux that is observable, explanations in terms of decay are more plausible than annihilation, at least if the annihilation is directly to Standard Model states rather than intermediate particles. The decay case can be explained by a scalar or pseudoscalar field coupling to photons suppressed by a scale not far below the reduced Planck mass, which can be taken as a tantalizing hint of high-scale physics. The scalar case is particularly interesting from the effective field theory viewpoint, and we discuss it at some length. Because of a quartically divergent mass correction, naturalness strongly suggests the theory should be cut off at or below the 1000 TeV scale. The most plausible such natural UV completion would involve supersymmetry. These bottom-up arguments reproduce expectations from top-down considerations of the physics of moduli. A keV line could also arise from the decay of a sterile neutrino, in which case a renormalizable UV completion exists and no direct inference about high-scale physics is possible.

  10. Frequency-Induced Bulk Magnetic Domain-Wall Freezing Visualized by Neutron Dark-Field Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betz, B.; Rauscher, P.; Harti, R. P.; Schäfer, R.; Van Swygenhoven, H.; Kaestner, A.; Hovind, J.; Lehmann, E.; Grünzweig, C.

    2016-08-01

    We use neutron dark-field imaging to visualize and interpret the response of bulk magnetic domain walls to static and dynamic magnetic excitations in (110)-Goss textured iron silicon high-permeability steel alloy. We investigate the domain-wall motion under the influence of an external alternating sinusoidal magnetic field. In particular, we perform scans combining varying levels of dcoffset (0 - 30 A /m ) , oscillation amplitude Aac (0 - 1500 A /m ) , and frequency fac ((0 - 200 Hz ) . By increasing amplitude Aac while maintaining constant values of dcoffset and fac , we record the transition from a frozen domain-wall structure to a mobile one. Vice versa, increasing fac while keeping Aac and dcoffset constant led to the reverse transition from a mobile domain-wall structure into a frozen one. We show that varying both Aac and fac shifts the position of the transition region. Furthermore, we demonstrate that higher frequencies require higher oscillation amplitudes to overcome the freezing phenomena. The fundamental determination and understanding of the frequency-induced freezing process in high-permeability steel alloys is of high interest to the further development of descriptive models for bulk macromagnetic phenomena. Likewise, the efficiency of transformers can be improved based on our results, since these alloys are used as transformer core material.

  11. Controlled Release of Collagen-Binding SDF-1α Improves Cardiac Function after Myocardial Infarction by Recruiting Endogenous Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jie; Zhao, Yannan; Li, Qingguo; Chen, Bing; Hou, Xianglin; Xiao, Zhifeng; Dai, Jianwu

    2016-01-01

    Stromal cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1α) is a well-characterized chemokine that mobilizes stem cells homing to the ischemic heart, which is beneficial for cardiac regeneration. However, clinically administered native SDF-1α diffuses quickly, thus decreasing its local concentration, and results in side effects. Thus, a controlled release system for SDF-1α is required to produce an effective local concentration in the ischemic heart. In this study, we developed a recombinant chemokine, consisting of SDF-1α and a collagen-binding domain, which retains both the SDF-1α and collagen-binding activity (CBD-SDF-1α). In an in vitro assay, CBD-SDF-1α could specifically bind to a collagen gel and achieve sustained release. An intramyocardial injection of CBD-SDF-1α after acute myocardial infarction demonstrated that the protein was largely tethered in the ischemic area and that controlled release had been achieved. Furthermore, CBD-SDF-1α enhanced the recruitment of c-kit positive (c-kit+) stem cells, increased capillary density and improved cardiac function, whereas NAT-SDF-1α had no such beneficial effects. Our findings demonstrate that CBD-SDF-1α can specifically bind to collagen and achieve controlled release both in vitro and in vivo. Local delivery of this protein could mobilize endogenous stem cells homing to the ischemic heart and improve cardiac function after myocardial infarction. PMID:27226084

  12. Electrospun Collagen Fibers with Spatial Patterning of SDF1α for the Guidance of Neural Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoran; Liang, Hui; Sun, Jie; Zhuang, Yan; Xu, Bai; Dai, Jianwu

    2015-08-26

    Producing gradients of biological cues into nerve conduits is crucial for nerve guidance and regeneration. Herein, the fabrication of gradients of stromal cell-derived factor-1α (SDF1α) on electrospun collagen mats is reported using an electrohydrodynamic jet printing technique. The fabrication of various SDF1α gradated patterns on collagen fibrous mats is successfully demonstrated including shallow continuous gradient, steep continuous gradient, and step gradient by controlling the processing parameters. The SDF1α graded collagen scaffolds show a long-term stable gradient, as SDF1α is fused with a unique peptide of collagen binding domain (CBD), and CBD-SDF1α can specifically bind to the collagen mat. Such graded scaffolds exhibit sustained release of SDF1α. Further examination of neural stem cell (NSC) response to the CBD-SDF1α gradients with various patterns show that the NSCs can sense the CBD-SDF1α gradients, display a polarized morphology, and tend to migrate toward the region with a higher CBD-SDF1α content. The collagen mats with CBD-SDF1α gradients guide gradual distribution of NSCs, and NSC-differentiated neurons and astrocytes after seeding for 1 and 7 d. This new class of CBD-SDF1α gradient scaffolds can potentially be employed for guided nerve regeneration.

  13. Dark matter and dark radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ackerman, Lotty; Buckley, Matthew R.; Carroll, Sean M.; Kamionkowski, Marc

    2009-01-15

    We explore the feasibility and astrophysical consequences of a new long-range U(1) gauge field ('dark electromagnetism') that couples only to dark matter, not to the standard model. The dark matter consists of an equal number of positive and negative charges under the new force, but annihilations are suppressed if the dark-matter mass is sufficiently high and the dark fine-structure constant {alpha}-circumflex is sufficiently small. The correct relic abundance can be obtained if the dark matter also couples to the conventional weak interactions, and we verify that this is consistent with particle-physics constraints. The primary limit on {alpha}-circumflex comes from the demand that the dark matter be effectively collisionless in galactic dynamics, which implies {alpha}-circumflex < or approx. 10{sup -3} for TeV-scale dark matter. These values are easily compatible with constraints from structure formation and primordial nucleosynthesis. We raise the prospect of interesting new plasma effects in dark-matter dynamics, which remain to be explored.

  14. A laboratory 8 keV transmission full-field x-ray microscope with a polycapillary as condenser for bright and dark field imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumbach, S.; Kanngießer, B.; Malzer, W.; Stiel, H.; Wilhein, T.

    2015-08-01

    This article introduces a laboratory setup of a transmission full-field x-ray microscope at 8 keV photon energy. The microscope operates in bright and dark field imaging mode with a maximum field of view of 50 μm. Since the illumination geometry determines whether the sample is illuminated homogeneously and moreover, if different imaging methods can be applied, the condenser optic is one of the most significant parts. With a new type of x-ray condenser, a polycapillary optic, we realized bright field imaging and for the first time dark field imaging at 8 keV photon energy in a laboratory setup. A detector limited spatial resolution of 210 nm is measured on x-ray images of Siemens star test patterns.

  15. A laboratory 8 keV transmission full-field x-ray microscope with a polycapillary as condenser for bright and dark field imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Baumbach, S. Wilhein, T.; Kanngießer, B.; Malzer, W.; Stiel, H.

    2015-08-15

    This article introduces a laboratory setup of a transmission full-field x-ray microscope at 8 keV photon energy. The microscope operates in bright and dark field imaging mode with a maximum field of view of 50 μm. Since the illumination geometry determines whether the sample is illuminated homogeneously and moreover, if different imaging methods can be applied, the condenser optic is one of the most significant parts. With a new type of x-ray condenser, a polycapillary optic, we realized bright field imaging and for the first time dark field imaging at 8 keV photon energy in a laboratory setup. A detector limited spatial resolution of 210 nm is measured on x-ray images of Siemens star test patterns.

  16. Influence of spatial and temporal coherences on atomic resolution high angle annular dark field imaging.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Andreas; Belz, Jürgen; Knaub, Nikolai; Jandieri, Kakhaber; Volz, Kerstin

    2016-10-01

    Aberration-corrected (scanning) transmission electron microscopy ((S)TEM) has become a widely used technique when information on the chemical composition is sought on an atomic scale. To extract the desired information, complementary simulations of the scattering process are inevitable. Often the partial spatial and temporal coherences are neglected in the simulations, although they can have a huge influence on the high resolution images. With the example of binary gallium phosphide (GaP) we elucidate the influence of the source size and shape as well as the chromatic aberration on the high angle annular dark field (HAADF) intensity. We achieve a very good quantitative agreement between the frozen phonon simulation and experiment for different sample thicknesses when a Lorentzian source distribution is assumed and the effect of the chromatic aberration is considered. Additionally the influence of amorphous layers introduced by the preparation of the TEM samples is discussed. Taking into account these parameters, the intensity in the whole unit cell of GaP, i.e. at the positions of the different atomic columns and in the region between them, is described correctly. With the knowledge of the decisive parameters, the determination of the chemical composition of more complex, multinary materials becomes feasible.

  17. High energy X-ray phase and dark-field imaging using a random absorption mask.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongchang; Kashyap, Yogesh; Cai, Biao; Sawhney, Kawal

    2016-01-01

    High energy X-ray imaging has unique advantage over conventional X-ray imaging, since it enables higher penetration into materials with significantly reduced radiation damage. However, the absorption contrast in high energy region is considerably low due to the reduced X-ray absorption cross section for most materials. Even though the X-ray phase and dark-field imaging techniques can provide substantially increased contrast and complementary information, fabricating dedicated optics for high energies still remain a challenge. To address this issue, we present an alternative X-ray imaging approach to produce transmission, phase and scattering signals at high X-ray energies by using a random absorption mask. Importantly, in addition to the synchrotron radiation source, this approach has been demonstrated for practical imaging application with a laboratory-based microfocus X-ray source. This new imaging method could be potentially useful for studying thick samples or heavy materials for advanced research in materials science. PMID:27466217

  18. Single-Cell Quantification of Cytosine Modifications by Hyperspectral Dark-Field Imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaolei; Cui, Yi; Irudayaraj, Joseph

    2015-12-22

    Epigenetic modifications on DNA, especially on cytosine, play a critical role in regulating gene expression and genome stability. It is known that the levels of different cytosine derivatives are highly dynamic and are regulated by a variety of factors that act on the chromatin. Here we report an optical methodology based on hyperspectral dark-field imaging (HSDFI) using plasmonic nanoprobes to quantify the recently identified cytosine modifications on DNA in single cells. Gold (Au) and silver (Ag) nanoparticles (NPs) functionalized with specific antibodies were used as contrast-generating agents due to their strong local surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) properties. With this powerful platform we have revealed the spatial distribution and quantity of 5-carboxylcytosine (5caC) at the different stages in cell cycle and demonstrated that 5caC was a stably inherited epigenetic mark. We have also shown that the regional density of 5caC on a single chromosome can be mapped due to the spectral sensitivity of the nanoprobes in relation to the interparticle distance. Notably, HSDFI enables an efficient removal of the scattering noises from nonspecifically aggregated nanoprobes, to improve accuracy in the quantification of different cytosine modifications in single cells. Further, by separating the LSPR fingerprints of AuNPs and AgNPs, multiplex detection of two cytosine modifications was also performed. Our results demonstrate HSDFI as a versatile platform for spatial and spectroscopic characterization of plasmonic nanoprobe-labeled nuclear targets at the single-cell level for quantitative epigenetic screening. PMID:26505210

  19. Optical Clearing Delivers Ultrasensitive Hyperspectral Dark-Field Imaging for Single-Cell Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yi; Wang, Xiaolei; Ren, Wen; Liu, Jing; Irudayaraj, Joseph

    2016-03-22

    A single-cell optical clearing methodology is developed and demonstrated in hyperspectral dark-field microscopy (HSDFM) and imaging of plasmonic nanoprobes. Our strategy relies on a combination of delipidation and refractive index (RI) matching with highly biocompatible and affordable agents. Before applying the RI-matching solution, the delipidation step by using a mild solvent effectively eliminates those high-density, lipid-enriched granular structures which emit strong scattering. Upon treatment, the background scattering from cellular organelles could be repressed to a negligible level while the scattering signals from plasmonic nanomaterials increase, leading to a significant improvement of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). With this method established, the versatility and applicability of HSDFM are greatly enhanced. In our demonstration, quantitative mapping of the dimerization-activated receptor kinase HER2 is achieved in a single cancer cell by a nonfluorescent approach. High-resolution imaging for oncogenic mRNAs, namely ER, PR, and HER2, is performed with single labeling. More importantly, in situ multiplex detection of mRNA and protein is made possible by HSDFM since it overcomes the difficulties of complex staining and signal imbalance suffered by the conventional optical imaging. Last, we show that with optical clearing, characterization of intracellularly grown gold particulates is accomplished at an unprecedented spatiotemporal resolution. Taken together, the uniqueness of optical clearing and HSDFM is expected to open ample avenues for single-cell studies and biomedical engineering. PMID:26895095

  20. Relativistic and nonrelativistic annihilation of dark matter: a sanity check using an effective field theory approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannoni, Mirco

    2016-03-01

    We find an exact formula for the thermally averaged cross section times the relative velocity < σ v_{text {rel}} rangle with relativistic Maxwell-Boltzmann statistics. The formula is valid in the effective field theory approach when the masses of the annihilation products can be neglected compared with the dark matter mass and cut-off scale. The expansion at x=m/T≫ 1 directly gives the nonrelativistic limit of < σ v_{text {rel}}rangle , which is usually used to compute the relic abundance for heavy particles that decouple when they are nonrelativistic. We compare this expansion with the one obtained by expanding the total cross section σ (s) in powers of the nonrelativistic relative velocity v_r. We show the correct invariant procedure that gives the nonrelativistic average < σ _{nr} v_r rangle _{nr} coinciding with the large x expansion of < σ v_{text {rel}}rangle in the comoving frame. We explicitly formulate flux, cross section, thermal average, collision integral of the Boltzmann equation in an invariant way using the true relativistic relative v_text {rel}, showing the uselessness of the Møller velocity and further elucidating the conceptual and numerical inconsistencies related with its use.

  1. Influence of spatial and temporal coherences on atomic resolution high angle annular dark field imaging.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Andreas; Belz, Jürgen; Knaub, Nikolai; Jandieri, Kakhaber; Volz, Kerstin

    2016-10-01

    Aberration-corrected (scanning) transmission electron microscopy ((S)TEM) has become a widely used technique when information on the chemical composition is sought on an atomic scale. To extract the desired information, complementary simulations of the scattering process are inevitable. Often the partial spatial and temporal coherences are neglected in the simulations, although they can have a huge influence on the high resolution images. With the example of binary gallium phosphide (GaP) we elucidate the influence of the source size and shape as well as the chromatic aberration on the high angle annular dark field (HAADF) intensity. We achieve a very good quantitative agreement between the frozen phonon simulation and experiment for different sample thicknesses when a Lorentzian source distribution is assumed and the effect of the chromatic aberration is considered. Additionally the influence of amorphous layers introduced by the preparation of the TEM samples is discussed. Taking into account these parameters, the intensity in the whole unit cell of GaP, i.e. at the positions of the different atomic columns and in the region between them, is described correctly. With the knowledge of the decisive parameters, the determination of the chemical composition of more complex, multinary materials becomes feasible. PMID:27391526

  2. High energy X-ray phase and dark-field imaging using a random absorption mask

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongchang; Kashyap, Yogesh; Cai, Biao; Sawhney, Kawal

    2016-01-01

    High energy X-ray imaging has unique advantage over conventional X-ray imaging, since it enables higher penetration into materials with significantly reduced radiation damage. However, the absorption contrast in high energy region is considerably low due to the reduced X-ray absorption cross section for most materials. Even though the X-ray phase and dark-field imaging techniques can provide substantially increased contrast and complementary information, fabricating dedicated optics for high energies still remain a challenge. To address this issue, we present an alternative X-ray imaging approach to produce transmission, phase and scattering signals at high X-ray energies by using a random absorption mask. Importantly, in addition to the synchrotron radiation source, this approach has been demonstrated for practical imaging application with a laboratory-based microfocus X-ray source. This new imaging method could be potentially useful for studying thick samples or heavy materials for advanced research in materials science. PMID:27466217

  3. CMB-galaxy correlation in Unified Dark Matter scalar field cosmologies

    SciTech Connect

    Bertacca, Daniele; Bartolo, Nicola; Matarrese, Sabino; Raccanelli, Alvise; Piattella, Oliver F.; Pietrobon, Davide; Giannantonio, Tommaso E-mail: alvise.raccanelli@port.ac.uk E-mail: davide.pietrobon@jpl.nasa.gov E-mail: sabino.matarrese@pd.infn.it

    2011-03-01

    We present an analysis of the cross-correlation between the CMB and the large-scale structure (LSS) of the Universe in Unified Dark Matter (UDM) scalar field cosmologies. We work out the predicted cross-correlation function in UDM models, which depends on the speed of sound of the unified component, and compare it with observations from six galaxy catalogues (NVSS, HEAO, 2MASS, and SDSS main galaxies, luminous red galaxies, and quasars). We sample the value of the speed of sound and perform a likelihood analysis, finding that the UDM model is as likely as the ΛCDM, and is compatible with observations for a range of values of c{sub ∞} (the value of the sound speed at late times) on which structure formation depends. In particular, we obtain an upper bound of c{sub ∞}{sup 2} ≤ 0.009 at 95% confidence level, meaning that the ΛCDM model, for which c{sub ∞}{sup 2} = 0, is a good fit to the data, while the posterior probability distribution peaks at the value c{sub ∞}{sup 2} = 10{sup −4} . Finally, we study the time dependence of the deviation from ΛCDM via a tomographic analysis using a mock redshift distribution and we find that the largest deviation is for low-redshift sources, suggesting that future low-z surveys will be best suited to constrain UDM models.

  4. Differential phase-contrast dark-field electron holography for strain mapping.

    PubMed

    Denneulin, Thibaud; Houdellier, Florent; Hÿtch, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Strain mapping is an active area of research in transmission electron microscopy. Here we introduce a dark-field electron holographic technique that shares several aspects in common with both off-axis and in-line holography. Two incident and convergent plane waves are produced in front of the specimen thanks to an electrostatic biprism in the condenser system of a transmission electron microscope. The interference of electron beams diffracted by the illuminated crystal is then recorded in a defocused plane. The differential phase recovered from the hologram is directly proportional to the strain in the sample. The strain can be quantified if the separation of the images due to the defocus is precisely determined. The present technique has the advantage that the derivative of the phase is measured directly which allows us to avoid numerical differentiation. The distribution of the noise in the reconstructed strain maps is isotropic and more homogeneous. This technique was used to investigate different samples: a Si/SiGe superlattice, transistors with SiGe source/drain and epitaxial PZT thin films. PMID:26476802

  5. Dark field optical imaging reveals vascular changes in an inducible hamster cheek pouch model during carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Fangyao; Morhard, Robert; Murphy, Helen A.; Zhu, Caigang; Ramanujam, Nimmi

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we propose a low-cost cross-polarized dark field microscopy system for in vivo vascular imaging to detect head and neck cancer. A simple-to-use Gabor-filter-based image processing technique was developed to objectively and automatically quantify several important vascular features, including tortuosity, length, diameter and area fraction, from vascular images. Simulations were performed to evaluate the accuracies of vessel segmentation and feature extraction for our algorithm. Sensitivity and specificity for vessel segmentation of the Gabor masks both remained above 80% at all contrast levels when compared to gold-standard masks. Errors for vascular feature extraction were under 5%. Moreover, vascular contrast and vessel diameter were identified to be the two primary factors which affected the segmentation accuracies. After our algorithm was validated, we monitored the blood vessels in an inducible hamster cheek pouch carcinogen model over 17 weeks and quantified vascular features during carcinogenesis. A significant increase in vascular tortuosity and a significant decrease in vessel length were observed during carcinogenesis. PMID:27699096

  6. Dark field optical imaging reveals vascular changes in an inducible hamster cheek pouch model during carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Fangyao; Morhard, Robert; Murphy, Helen A.; Zhu, Caigang; Ramanujam, Nimmi

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we propose a low-cost cross-polarized dark field microscopy system for in vivo vascular imaging to detect head and neck cancer. A simple-to-use Gabor-filter-based image processing technique was developed to objectively and automatically quantify several important vascular features, including tortuosity, length, diameter and area fraction, from vascular images. Simulations were performed to evaluate the accuracies of vessel segmentation and feature extraction for our algorithm. Sensitivity and specificity for vessel segmentation of the Gabor masks both remained above 80% at all contrast levels when compared to gold-standard masks. Errors for vascular feature extraction were under 5%. Moreover, vascular contrast and vessel diameter were identified to be the two primary factors which affected the segmentation accuracies. After our algorithm was validated, we monitored the blood vessels in an inducible hamster cheek pouch carcinogen model over 17 weeks and quantified vascular features during carcinogenesis. A significant increase in vascular tortuosity and a significant decrease in vessel length were observed during carcinogenesis.

  7. Bino variations: Effective field theory methods for dark matter direct detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berlin, Asher; Robertson, Denis S.; Solon, Mikhail P.; Zurek, Kathryn M.

    2016-05-01

    We apply effective field theory methods to compute bino-nucleon scattering, in the case where tree-level interactions are suppressed and the leading contribution is at loop order via heavy flavor squarks or sleptons. We find that leading log corrections to fixed-order calculations can increase the bino mass reach of direct detection experiments by a factor of 2 in some models. These effects are particularly large for the bino-sbottom coannihilation region, where bino dark matter as heavy as 5-10 TeV may be detected by near future experiments. For the case of stop- and selectron-loop mediated scattering, an experiment reaching the neutrino background will probe thermal binos as heavy as 500 and 300 GeV, respectively. We present three key examples that illustrate in detail the framework for determining weak scale coefficients, and for mapping onto a low-energy theory at hadronic scales, through a sequence of effective theories and renormalization group evolution. For the case of a squark degenerate with the bino, we extend the framework to include a squark degree of freedom at low energies using heavy particle effective theory, thus accounting for large logarithms through a "heavy-light current." Benchmark predictions for scattering cross sections are evaluated, including complete leading order matching onto quark and gluon operators, and a systematic treatment of perturbative and hadronic uncertainties.

  8. Three-dimensional characteristics of alveolar macrophages in vitro observed by dark field microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swarat, Dominic; Wiemann, Martin; Lipinski, Hans-Gerd

    2014-05-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AM) are cells from immune defense inside the lung. They engulf particles in vacuoles from the outer membrane. Volume and surface are important parameters to characterize the particle uptake. AM change their shape within a few seconds, therefore it is hard to obtain by confocal laser scanning microscopy, which is commonly used to generate 3D-images. So we used an intensified dark field microscopy (DFM) as an alternative method to generate contrast rich AM gray tone image slices used for 3D-reconstructions of AM cells by VTK software applications. From these 3D-reconstructions approximate volume and surface data of the AM were obtained and compared to values found in the literature. Finally, simple geometrical 3D-models of the AM were created and compared to real data. Averaged volume and surface data from the DFM images are close to values found in the literature. Furthermore, calculation of volume and surface data from DFM images could be done faster if simplified geometrical 3D-models of the cells were used.

  9. Cosmological Constraints on Bose-Einstein-Condensed Scalar Field Dark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, B.; Rindler-Daller, T.; Shapiro, P. R.

    2013-10-01

    We focus on the hypothesis that the darkmatter is comprised of ultralight bosons that form a Bose-Einstein Condensate (BEC), described by a complex scalar field. We calculate the evolution of the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) universe in the presence of the BEC scalar field dark matter (SFDM).We find that, while WIMP CDM is non-relativistic at all times after it decouples, the equation of state of SFDM is found to be relativistic at early times, evolving from stiff (p¯ =r¯ ) to radiation-like (p¯ =r¯/3), before it becomes non-relativistic and CDM-like at late times (p¯ = 0. The stiff phase is a distinctive feature of our model. The timing of the transitions between these phases and regimes is shown to yield fundamental constraints on the SFDM model parameters, particle mass m and self-interaction coupling strength l . We show that SFDM is compatible with observations of the evolving background universe, by deriving the range of particle parameters required to match observations of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and the abundances of the light elements produced by Big Bang nucleosynthesis (BBN), including Neff, the effective number of neutrino species, and the epoch of matter-radiation equality zeq. This yields m ≥ 2.4× 10-21eV/c2 and 9.5×10-19eV-1cm3 ≤l /(mc2)2 ≤ 4×10-17eV-1cm3. Indeed, our model can accommodate current observations in which Neff is higher at the BBN epoch than at zeq, probed by the CMB, which is otherwise unexplained by the standard CDM model involving WIMPs.

  10. Human progenitor cell recruitment via SDF-1α coacervate-laden PGS vascular grafts.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kee-Won; Johnson, Noah R; Gao, Jin; Wang, Yadong

    2013-12-01

    Host cell recruitment is crucial for vascular graft remodeling and integration into the native blood vessel; it is especially important for cell-free strategies which rely on host remodeling. Controlled release of growth factors from vascular grafts may enhance host cell recruitment. Stromal cell-derived factor (SDF)-1α has been shown to induce host progenitor cell migration and recruitment; however, its potential in regenerative therapies is often limited due to its short half-life in vivo. This report describes a coacervate drug delivery system for enhancing progenitor cell recruitment into an elastomeric vascular graft by conferring protection of SDF-1α. Heparin and a synthetic polycation are used to form a coacervate, which is incorporated into poly(glycerol sebacate) (PGS) scaffolds. In addition to protecting SDF-1α, the coacervate facilitates uniform scaffold coating. Coacervate-laden scaffolds have high SDF-1α loading efficiency and provide sustained release under static and physiologically-relevant flow conditions with minimal initial burst release. In vitro assays showed that coacervate-laden scaffolds enhance migration and infiltration of human endothelial and mesenchymal progenitor cells by maintaining a stable SDF-1α gradient. These results suggest that SDF-1α coacervate-laden scaffolds show great promise for in situ vascular regeneration.

  11. Autophagy in SDF-1α-mediated DPSC migration and pulp regeneration.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing-Wen; Zhang, Yu-Feng; Wan, Chun-Yan; Sun, Zhe-Yi; Nie, Shuai; Jian, Shu-Juan; Zhang, Lu; Song, Guang-Tai; Chen, Zhi

    2015-03-01

    Critical morphological requirements for pulp regeneration are tissues replete with vascularisation, neuron formation, and dentin deposition. Autophagy was recently shown to be related to angiogenesis, neural differentiation, and osteogenesis. The present study aimed to investigate the involvement of autophagy in stromal cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1α)-mediated dental pulp stem cell (DPSC) migration and pulp regeneration, and identify its presence during pulp revascularisation of pulpectomised dog teeth with complete apical closure. In vitro studies showed that SDF-1α enhanced DPSCs migration and optimised focal adhesion formation and stress fibre assembly, which were accompanied by autophagy. Moreover, autophagy inhibitors significantly suppressed, whereas autophagy activator substantially augmented SDF-1α-stimulated DPSCs migration. Furthermore, after ectopic transplantation of tooth fragment/silk fibroin scaffold with DPSCs into nude mice, pulp-like tissues with vascularity, well-organised fibrous matrix formation, and new dentin deposition along the dentinal wall were generated in SDF-1α-loaded samples accompanied by autophagy. More importantly, in a pulp revascularisation model in situ, SDF-1α-loaded silk fibroin scaffolds improved the de novo ingrowth of pulp-like tissues in pulpectomised mature dog teeth, which correlated with the punctuated LC3 and Atg5 expressions, indicating autophagy. Our findings provide novel insights into the pulp regeneration mechanism, and SDF-1α shows promise for future clinical application in pulp revascularisation.

  12. Autophagy in SDF-1α-mediated DPSC migration and pulp regeneration.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing-Wen; Zhang, Yu-Feng; Wan, Chun-Yan; Sun, Zhe-Yi; Nie, Shuai; Jian, Shu-Juan; Zhang, Lu; Song, Guang-Tai; Chen, Zhi

    2015-03-01

    Critical morphological requirements for pulp regeneration are tissues replete with vascularisation, neuron formation, and dentin deposition. Autophagy was recently shown to be related to angiogenesis, neural differentiation, and osteogenesis. The present study aimed to investigate the involvement of autophagy in stromal cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1α)-mediated dental pulp stem cell (DPSC) migration and pulp regeneration, and identify its presence during pulp revascularisation of pulpectomised dog teeth with complete apical closure. In vitro studies showed that SDF-1α enhanced DPSCs migration and optimised focal adhesion formation and stress fibre assembly, which were accompanied by autophagy. Moreover, autophagy inhibitors significantly suppressed, whereas autophagy activator substantially augmented SDF-1α-stimulated DPSCs migration. Furthermore, after ectopic transplantation of tooth fragment/silk fibroin scaffold with DPSCs into nude mice, pulp-like tissues with vascularity, well-organised fibrous matrix formation, and new dentin deposition along the dentinal wall were generated in SDF-1α-loaded samples accompanied by autophagy. More importantly, in a pulp revascularisation model in situ, SDF-1α-loaded silk fibroin scaffolds improved the de novo ingrowth of pulp-like tissues in pulpectomised mature dog teeth, which correlated with the punctuated LC3 and Atg5 expressions, indicating autophagy. Our findings provide novel insights into the pulp regeneration mechanism, and SDF-1α shows promise for future clinical application in pulp revascularisation. PMID:25617122

  13. SDF-1 liposomes promote sustained cell proliferation in mouse diabetic wounds.

    PubMed

    Olekson, Melissa A Przyborowski; Faulknor, Renea; Bandekar, Amey; Sempkowski, Michelle; Hsia, Henry C; Berthiaume, François

    2015-09-01

    Chronic skin wounds are a common complication of diabetes. When standard wound care fails to heal such wounds, a promising approach consists of using decellularized matrices and other porous scaffold materials to promote the restoration of skin. Proper revascularization is critical for the efficacy of such materials in regenerative medicine. Stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) is a chemokine known to play a key role for angiogenesis in ischemic tissues. Herein we developed nanosized SDF-1 liposomes, which were then incorporated into decellularized dermis scaffolds used for skin wound healing applications. SDF-1 peptide associated with liposomes with an efficiency of 80%, and liposomes were easily dispersed throughout the acellular dermis. Acellular dermis spiked with SDF-1 liposomes exhibited more persistent cell proliferation in the dermis, especially in CD31(+) areas, compared to acellular dermis spiked with free SDF-1, which resulted in increased improved wound closure at day 21, and increased granulation tissue thickness at day 28. SDF-1 liposomes may increase the performance of a variety of decellularized matrices used in tissue engineering.

  14. Unimodular bimode gravity and the coherent scalar-graviton field as galaxy dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirogov, Yu. F.

    2012-06-01

    An explicit violation of the general gauge invariance/relativity is adopted as the origin of dark matter and dark energy in the context of gravitation. The violation of the local scale invariance alone, with the residual unimodular one, is considered. Besides the four-volume preserving deformation mode—the transverse-tensor graviton—the metric comprises a compression mode—the scalar graviton, or the systolon. A unimodular invariant and general covariant metric theory of the bimode/scalar-tensor gravity is consistently worked out. To reduce the primordial ambiguity of the theory a dynamical global symmetry is imposed, with its subsequent spontaneous breaking revealed. The static spherically symmetric case in empty space, except possibly for the origin, is studied. A three-parameter solution describing a new static space structure—the dark lacuna—is constructed. It enjoys the property of gravitational confinement, with the logarithmic potential of gravitational attraction at the periphery, and results in asymptotically flat rotation curves. Comprising a super-massive dark fracture (a scalar-modified black hole) at the origin surrounded by a cored dark halo, the dark lacunas are proposed as a prototype model of galaxies, implying an ultimate account for the distributed non-gravitational matter and putative asphericity or rotation.

  15. NMRFAM-SDF: a protein structure determination framework.

    PubMed

    Dashti, Hesam; Lee, Woonghee; Tonelli, Marco; Cornilescu, Claudia C; Cornilescu, Gabriel; Assadi-Porter, Fariba M; Westler, William M; Eghbalnia, Hamid R; Markley, John L

    2015-08-01

    The computationally demanding nature of automated NMR structure determination necessitates a delicate balancing of factors that include the time complexity of data collection, the computational complexity of chemical shift assignments, and selection of proper optimization steps. During the past two decades the computational and algorithmic aspects of several discrete steps of the process have been addressed. Although no single comprehensive solution has emerged, the incorporation of a validation protocol has gained recognition as a necessary step for a robust automated approach. The need for validation becomes even more pronounced in cases of proteins with higher structural complexity, where potentially larger errors generated at each step can propagate and accumulate in the process of structure calculation, thereby significantly degrading the efficacy of any software framework. This paper introduces a complete framework for protein structure determination with NMR--from data acquisition to the structure determination. The aim is twofold: to simplify the structure determination process for non-NMR experts whenever feasible, while maintaining flexibility by providing a set of modules that validate each step, and to enable the assessment of error propagations. This framework, called NMRFAM-SDF (NMRFAM-Structure Determination Framework), and its various components are available for download from the NMRFAM website (http://nmrfam.wisc.edu/software.htm).

  16. Searching for an Oscillating Massive Scalar Field as a Dark Matter Candidate Using Atomic Hyperfine Frequency Comparisons.

    PubMed

    Hees, A; Guéna, J; Abgrall, M; Bize, S; Wolf, P

    2016-08-01

    We use 6 yrs of accurate hyperfine frequency comparison data of the dual rubidium and caesium cold atom fountain FO2 at LNE-SYRTE to search for a massive scalar dark matter candidate. Such a scalar field can induce harmonic variations of the fine structure constant, of the mass of fermions, and of the quantum chromodynamic mass scale, which will directly impact the rubidium/caesium hyperfine transition frequency ratio. We find no signal consistent with a scalar dark matter candidate but provide improved constraints on the coupling of the putative scalar field to standard matter. Our limits are complementary to previous results that were only sensitive to the fine structure constant and improve them by more than an order of magnitude when only a coupling to electromagnetism is assumed. PMID:27541455

  17. Searching for an Oscillating Massive Scalar Field as a Dark Matter Candidate Using Atomic Hyperfine Frequency Comparisons.

    PubMed

    Hees, A; Guéna, J; Abgrall, M; Bize, S; Wolf, P

    2016-08-01

    We use 6 yrs of accurate hyperfine frequency comparison data of the dual rubidium and caesium cold atom fountain FO2 at LNE-SYRTE to search for a massive scalar dark matter candidate. Such a scalar field can induce harmonic variations of the fine structure constant, of the mass of fermions, and of the quantum chromodynamic mass scale, which will directly impact the rubidium/caesium hyperfine transition frequency ratio. We find no signal consistent with a scalar dark matter candidate but provide improved constraints on the coupling of the putative scalar field to standard matter. Our limits are complementary to previous results that were only sensitive to the fine structure constant and improve them by more than an order of magnitude when only a coupling to electromagnetism is assumed.

  18. Searching for an Oscillating Massive Scalar Field as a Dark Matter Candidate Using Atomic Hyperfine Frequency Comparisons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hees, A.; Guéna, J.; Abgrall, M.; Bize, S.; Wolf, P.

    2016-08-01

    We use 6 yrs of accurate hyperfine frequency comparison data of the dual rubidium and caesium cold atom fountain FO2 at LNE-SYRTE to search for a massive scalar dark matter candidate. Such a scalar field can induce harmonic variations of the fine structure constant, of the mass of fermions, and of the quantum chromodynamic mass scale, which will directly impact the rubidium/caesium hyperfine transition frequency ratio. We find no signal consistent with a scalar dark matter candidate but provide improved constraints on the coupling of the putative scalar field to standard matter. Our limits are complementary to previous results that were only sensitive to the fine structure constant and improve them by more than an order of magnitude when only a coupling to electromagnetism is assumed.

  19. A new microscope optics for laser dark-field illumination applied to high precision two dimensional measurement of specimen displacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noda, Naoki; Kamimura, Shinji

    2008-02-01

    With conventional light microscopy, precision in the measurement of the displacement of a specimen depends on the signal-to-noise ratio when we measure the light intensity of magnified images. This implies that, for the improvement of precision, getting brighter images and reducing background light noise are both inevitably required. For this purpose, we developed a new optics for laser dark-field illumination. For the microscopy, we used a laser beam and a pair of axicons (conical lenses) to get an optimal condition for dark-field observations. The optics was applied to measuring two dimensional microbead displacements with subnanometer precision. The bandwidth of our detection system overall was 10kHz. Over most of this bandwidth, the observed noise level was as small as 0.1nm/√Hz.

  20. Dust Properties and Magnetic Fields in MSX Infrared-Dark Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carey, S. J.; Feldman, P. A.; Redman, R. O.; Egan, M. P.; Mizuno, D.; Kuchar, T.; Price, S.

    1999-12-01

    The Midcourse Space Experiment (MSX) infrared-dark clouds (IRDCs) are a population of a few thousand molecular cores that have been identified by their substantial mid-infrared (8-25 μ m) extinctions in the MSX Galactic Plane survey images (Egan et al. 1998, ApJL, 494, L199). Subsequent observations have revealed IRDCs to contain cold (T < 15 K), dense (n 106 cm-3) molecular gas (Carey et al. 1998, ApJ, 508, 721). The IRDCs are distributed along spiral arms and are located near but do not contain star formation tracers such as HII regions and H2O maser emission. Continuum maps at 450 and 850 μ m taken with SCUBA on the JCMT reveal bright knots of emission within the envelope of emission associated with the IRDCs. Many IRDCs are filamentary in nature. The bright emission knots have HCO+ and CO line profiles indicative of outflow and/or infall with several sources exhibiting the blue-red asymmetry characteristic of infall. The IRDCs appear to be large, cold molecular cores in the earliest stages of star formation. We present a detailed comparison of the extinction at 8 μ m derived from the soon-to-be released MSX Galactic Plane survey images ( 18'' resolution) to the 450/850 μ m emission (14'' resolution). The morphologies of the submillimeter emission and mid-infrared extinction are in good agreement. From the comparison, we will determine the dust column density and constrain dust temperature and emissivity. In addition, we present very recent polarimetric imaging of IRDCs at 850 μ m. A relatively high degree of polarization at 850 μ m is seen, suggesting that a well-ordered magnetic field may be present within most IRDCs. In general, the magnetic fields thread the filaments with a more complicated structure near the embedded sources. We will examine the structure of the magnetic field and the star formation properties of IRDCs using the mid-infrared and submillimeter images, submillimeter polarimetry and CO and HCO+ line maps.

  1. Inflation, dark matter, and dark energy in the string landscape.

    PubMed

    Liddle, Andrew R; Ureña-López, L Arturo

    2006-10-20

    We consider the conditions needed to unify the description of dark matter, dark energy, and inflation in the context of the string landscape. We find that incomplete decay of the inflaton field gives the possibility that a single field is responsible for all three phenomena. By contrast, unifying dark matter and dark energy into a single field, separate from the inflaton, appears rather difficult.

  2. Single-Cell Quantification of Cytosine Modifications by Hyperspectral Dark-Field Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaolei; Cui, Yi; Irudayaraj, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic modifications on DNA, especially on cytosine, play a critical role in regulating gene expression and genome stability. It is known that the levels of different cytosine derivatives are highly dynamic and are regulated by a variety of factors that act on the chromatin. Here we report an optical methodology based on hyperspectral dark-field imaging (HSDFI) using plasmonic nanoprobes to quantify the recently identified cytosine modifications on DNA in single cells. Gold (Au) and silver (Ag) nanoparticles (NPs) functionalized with specific antibodies were used as contrast-generating agents due to their strong Local Surface Plasmon Resonance (LSPR) properties. With this powerful platform we have revealed the spatial distribution and quantity of 5-carboxylcytosine (5caC) at the different stages in cell cycle, and demonstrated that 5caC was a stably inherited epigenetic mark. We have also shown that the regional density of 5caC on a single chromosome can be mapped due to the spectral sensitivity of the nanoprobes in relation to the inter-particle distance. Notably, HSDFI enables an efficient removal of the scattering noises from non-specifically aggregated nanoprobes, to improve accuracy in the quantification of different cytosine modifications in single cells. Further, by separating the LSPR fingerprints of AuNPs and AgNPs, multiplex detection of two cytosine modifications was also performed. Our results demonstrate HSDFI as a versatile platform for spatial and spectroscopic characterization of plasmonic nanoprobe-labeled nuclear targets at the single-cell level for quantitative epigenetic screening. PMID:26505210

  3. Quantitative high-angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy for materials science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrova, Rumyana V.

    Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) has been widely used for characterization of materials; to identify micro- and nano-structures within a sample and to analyze crystal and defect structures. High-angle annular dark field (HAADF) STEM imaging using atomic number (Z) contrast has proven capable of resolving atomic structures with better than 2 A lateral resolution. In this work, the HAADF STEM imaging mode is used in combination with multislice simulations. This combination is applied to the investigation of the temperature dependence of the intensity collected by the HAADF detector in silicon, and to convergent beam electron diffraction (CBED) to measure the degree of chemical order in intermetallic nanoparticles. The experimental and simulation results on the high-angle scattering of 300 keV electrons in crystalline silicon provide a new contribution to the understanding of the temperature dependence of the HAADF intensity. In the case of 300 keV, the average high-angle scattered intensity slightly decreases as the temperature increases from 100 K to 300 K, and this is different from the temperature dependence at 100 keV and 200 keV where HAADF intensity increases with temperature, as had been previously reported by other workers. The L10 class of hard magnetic materials has attracted continuous attention as a candidate for high-density magnetic recording media, as this phase is known to have large magnetocrystalline anisotropy, with magnetocrystalline anisotropy constant, Ku, strongly dependent on the long-range chemical order parameter, S. A new method is developed to assess the degree of chemical order in small FePt L1 0 nanoparticles by implementing a CBED diffraction technique. Unexpectedly, the degree of order of individual particles is highly variable and not a simple function of particle size or sample composition. The particle-to-particle variability observed is an important new aspect to the understanding of phase transformations in

  4. Evolution of dark state of an open atomic system in constant intensity laser field

    SciTech Connect

    Krmpot, A. J.; Radonjic, M.; Cuk, S. M.; Nikolic, S. N.; Grujic, Z. D.; Jelenkovic, B. M.

    2011-10-15

    We studied experimentally and theoretically the evolution of open atomic systems in the constant intensity laser field. The study is performed by analyzing the line shapes of Hanle electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) obtained in different segments of a laser beam cross section of constant intensity, i.e., a {Pi}-shaped laser beam. Such Hanle EIT resonances were measured using a small movable aperture placed just in front of the photodetector, i.e., after the entire laser beam had passed through the vacuum Rb cell. The laser was locked to the open transition F{sub g}=2{yields}F{sub e}=1 at the D{sub 1} line of {sup 87}Rb with laser intensities between 0.5 and 4 mW/cm{sup 2}. This study shows that the profile of the laser beam determines the processes governing the development of atomic states during the interaction. The resonances obtained near the beam center are narrower than those obtained near the beam edge, but the significant changes of the linewidths occur only near the beam edge, i.e., right after the atom enters the beam. The Hanle EIT resonances obtained near the beam center exhibit two pronounced minima next to the central maximum. The theoretical model reveals that the occurrence of these transmission minima is a joint effect of the preparation of atoms into the dark state and the optical pumping into the uncoupled ground level F{sub g}=1. The appearance of the transmission minima, although similar to that observed in the wings of a Gaussian beam [A. J. Krmpot et al., Opt. Express 17, 22491 (2009)], is of an entirely different nature for the {Pi}-shaped laser beam.

  5. Dark-Field Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy via Detection of Forward-Scattered Helium Ions with a Microchannel Plate.

    PubMed

    Woehl, Taylor J; White, Ryan M; Keller, Robert R

    2016-06-01

    A microchannel plate was used as an ion sensitive detector in a commercial helium ion microscope (HIM) for dark-field transmission imaging of nanomaterials, i.e. scanning transmission ion microscopy (STIM). In contrast to previous transmission HIM approaches that used secondary electron conversion holders, our new approach detects forward-scattered helium ions on a dedicated annular shaped ion sensitive detector. Minimum collection angles between 125 mrad and 325 mrad were obtained by varying the distance of the sample from the microchannel plate detector during imaging. Monte Carlo simulations were used to predict detector angular ranges at which dark-field images with atomic number contrast could be obtained. We demonstrate atomic number contrast imaging via scanning transmission ion imaging of silica-coated gold nanoparticles and magnetite nanoparticles. Although the resolution of STIM is known to be degraded by beam broadening in the substrate, we imaged magnetite nanoparticles with high contrast on a relatively thick silicon nitride substrate. We expect this new approach to annular dark-field STIM will open avenues for more quantitative ion imaging techniques and advance fundamental understanding of underlying ion scattering mechanisms leading to image formation.

  6. Dark-Field Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy via Detection of Forward-Scattered Helium Ions with a Microchannel Plate.

    PubMed

    Woehl, Taylor J; White, Ryan M; Keller, Robert R

    2016-06-01

    A microchannel plate was used as an ion sensitive detector in a commercial helium ion microscope (HIM) for dark-field transmission imaging of nanomaterials, i.e. scanning transmission ion microscopy (STIM). In contrast to previous transmission HIM approaches that used secondary electron conversion holders, our new approach detects forward-scattered helium ions on a dedicated annular shaped ion sensitive detector. Minimum collection angles between 125 mrad and 325 mrad were obtained by varying the distance of the sample from the microchannel plate detector during imaging. Monte Carlo simulations were used to predict detector angular ranges at which dark-field images with atomic number contrast could be obtained. We demonstrate atomic number contrast imaging via scanning transmission ion imaging of silica-coated gold nanoparticles and magnetite nanoparticles. Although the resolution of STIM is known to be degraded by beam broadening in the substrate, we imaged magnetite nanoparticles with high contrast on a relatively thick silicon nitride substrate. We expect this new approach to annular dark-field STIM will open avenues for more quantitative ion imaging techniques and advance fundamental understanding of underlying ion scattering mechanisms leading to image formation. PMID:27153003

  7. Dark-Field Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy via Direct Detection of Transmitted Helium Ions with a Multichannel Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woehl, Taylor; White, Ryan; Keller, Robert

    A multichannel plate was used as an ion sensitive transmission detector in a commercial helium ion microscope for annular dark-field imaging of nanomaterials, i.e. scanning transmission ion microscopy. In contrast to previous transmission helium ion microscopy approaches that used secondary electron conversion holders, our new approach directly detects transmitted helium ions on an annular detector. Monte Carlo simulations are used to predict detector collection angles at which annular dark-field images with atomic number contrast are obtained. We demonstrate atomic number contrast imaging via scanning transmission ion imaging of silica-coated gold nanoparticles and magnetite nanoparticles. While the resolution of this transmission technique is limited by beam broadening in the substrate, we image magnetite nanoparticles with high contrast on a relatively thick silicon nitride substrate. We expect this new approach to annular dark-field scanning transmission ion microscopy will open avenues for more quantitative ion imaging techniques, such as direct mass-thickness determination, and advance fundamental understanding of underlying ion scattering mechanisms leading to image formation.

  8. Homing in hematopoietic stem cells: focus on regulatory role of CXCR7 on SDF1a/CXCR4 axis

    PubMed Central

    Asri, Amir; Sabour, Javid; Atashi, Amir; Soleimani, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) form a rare population of multipotent stem cells, which give rise to all hematopoietic lineages. HSCs home to bone marrow niches and circulate between blood and bone marrow. Many factors, especially SDF1a, affect the circulation of HSCs, but these have not been fully recognized. SDF1a has been shown to bind CXCR7 in addition to CXCR4 and can also function as SDF1a/CXCR4 modulator. CXCR7 plays a role in HSCs homing via SDF1a gradient and is a mediator of CXCR4/SDF1a axis. This review describes the current concepts and questions concerning CXCR7/CXCR4/SDF1a axis as an important key in hematopoietic stem cells homing with particular emphasis on CXCR7 receptor. Homing of HSCs is an essential step for successful hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. PMID:27092040

  9. SDF-1/CXCR4 signaling preserves microvascular integrity and renal function in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li-Hao; Advani, Suzanne L; Thai, Kerri; Kabir, M Golam; Sood, Manish M; Gibson, Ian W; Yuen, Darren A; Connelly, Kim A; Marsden, Philip A; Kelly, Darren J; Gilbert, Richard E; Advani, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    The progressive decline of renal function in chronic kidney disease (CKD) is characterized by both disruption of the microvascular architecture and the accumulation of fibrotic matrix. One angiogenic pathway recently identified as playing an essential role in renal vascular development is the stromal cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1)/CXCR4 pathway. Because similar developmental processes may be recapitulated in the disease setting, we hypothesized that the SDF-1/CXCR4 system would regulate microvascular health in CKD. Expression of CXCR4 was observed to be increased in the kidneys of subtotally nephrectomized (SNx) rats and in biopsies from patients with secondary focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS), a rodent model and human correlate both characterized by aberration of the renal microvessels. A reno-protective role for local SDF-1/CXCR4 signaling was indicated by i) CXCR4-dependent glomerular eNOS activation following acute SDF-1 administration; and ii) acceleration of renal function decline, capillary loss and fibrosis in SNx rats treated with chronic CXCR4 blockade. In contrast to the upregulation of CXCR4, SDF-1 transcript levels were decreased in SNx rat kidneys as well as in renal fibroblasts exposed to the pro-fibrotic cytokine transforming growth factor β (TGF-β), the latter effect being attenuated by histone deacetylase inhibition. Increased renal SDF-1 expression was, however, observed following the treatment of SNx rats with the ACE inhibitor, perindopril. Collectively, these observations indicate that local SDF-1/CXCR4 signaling functions to preserve microvascular integrity and prevent renal fibrosis. Augmentation of this pathway, either purposefully or serendipitously with either novel or existing therapies, may attenuate renal decline in CKD. PMID:24637920

  10. Scavenger deterrent factor (SDF) from symbiotic bacteria of entomopathogenic nematodes.

    PubMed

    Gulcu, Baris; Hazir, Selcuk; Kaya, Harry K

    2012-07-01

    " (SDF).

  11. Scavenger deterrent factor (SDF) from symbiotic bacteria of entomopathogenic nematodes.

    PubMed

    Gulcu, Baris; Hazir, Selcuk; Kaya, Harry K

    2012-07-01

    " (SDF). PMID:22446508

  12. Wide-field infrared survey explorer observations of young stellar objects in the Lynds 1509 dark cloud in Auriga

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wilson M.; McCollum, Bruce; Fajardo-Acosta, Sergio; Padgett, Deborah L.; Terebey, Susan; Angione, John; Rebull, Luisa M.; Leisawitz, David

    2014-06-01

    The Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) has uncovered a striking cluster of young stellar object (YSO) candidates associated with the L1509 dark cloud in Auriga. The WISE observations, at 3.4 μm, 4.6 μm, 12 μm, and 22 μm, show a number of objects with colors consistent with YSOs, and their spectral energy distributions suggest the presence of circumstellar dust emission, including numerous Class I, flat spectrum, and Class II objects. In general, the YSOs in L1509 are much more tightly clustered than YSOs in other dark clouds in the Taurus-Auriga star forming region, with Class I and flat spectrum objects confined to the densest aggregates, and Class II objects more sparsely distributed. We estimate a most probable distance of 485-700 pc, and possibly as far as the previously estimated distance of 2 kpc.

  13. Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer Observations of Young Stellar Objects in the Lynds 1509 Dark Cloud in Auriga

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Wilson M.; Padgett, Deborah L.; Terebey, Susan; Angione, John; Rebull, Luisa M.; McCollum, Bruce; Fajardo-Acosta, Sergio; Leisawitz, David

    2015-01-01

    The Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) has uncovered a striking cluster of young stellar object (YSO) candidates associated with the L1509 dark cloud in Auriga. The WISE observations, at 3.4, 4.6, 12, and 22 microns, show a number of objects with colors consistent with YSOs, and their spectral energy distributions suggest the presence of circumstellar dust emission, including numerous Class I, flat spectrum, and Class II objects. In general, the YSOs in L1509 are much more tightly clustered than YSOs in other dark clouds in the Taurus-Auriga star forming region, with Class I and flat spectrum objects confined to the densest aggregates, and Class II objects more sparsely distributed. We estimate a most probable distance of 485-700 pc, and possibly as far as the previously estimated distance of 2 kpc.

  14. Signalling mechanisms of SDF-induced endothelial cell proliferation and migration

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhlmann, Christoph Ruediger Wolfram . E-mail: Chr_Kuhlmann@web.de; Schaefer, Christian Alexander; Reinhold, Lars; Tillmanns, Harald; Erdogan, Ali

    2005-10-07

    The aim of our study was to investigate the effect of stromal-derived factor-1-{alpha} (SDF-1-{alpha}) on endothelial angiogenic effects. SDF-1-{alpha} (50 ng/ml) increased the number of cultured endothelial cells from 33,653 {+-} 1183 to 55,398 {+-} 2741, which significantly reduced by adding the BK{sub Ca}-inhibitor iberiotoxin, or the endothelial nitric oxide synthase-blocker, L-NMMA (n = 24, p < 0.05). Using the 'Fences'-assay a significant increase of HUVEC migration induced by SDF-1-{alpha} was reported, which was blocked by the addition of iberiotoxin or L-NMMA (n = 12, p < 0.05). BK{sub Ca} open-state probability (NPo) was analysed using the patch-clamp technique and NPo was increased from 0.003 (control) to 0.052 (SDF-1-{alpha}; n = 10, p < 0.05). NO synthesis was measured using a cGMP-radioimmunoassay. A significant increase of cGMP levels from 0.952 pmol/mg protein to 2.179 pmol/mg protein was observed, that was abolished by L-NMMA and significantly reduced by iberiotoxin (n = 15, p < 0.05). SDF-1-{alpha} increases endothelial proliferation and migration involving the activation of BK{sub Ca} and an increased production of NO.

  15. Vascular smooth muscle cell apoptosis promotes transplant arteriosclerosis through inducing the production of SDF-1α.

    PubMed

    Li, J; Liu, S; Li, W; Hu, S; Xiong, J; Shu, X; Hu, Q; Zheng, Q; Song, Z

    2012-08-01

    Transplant arteriosclerosis is a leading cause of late allograft loss. Medial smooth muscle cell (SMC) apoptosis is considered to be an important event in transplant arteriosclerosis. However, the precise contribution of medial SMC apoptosis to transplant arteriosclerosis and the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. We transferred wild-type p53 to induce apoptosis of cultured SMCs. We found that apoptosis induces the production of SDF-1α from apoptotic and neighboring viable cells, resulting in increased SDF-1α in the culture media. Conditioned media from Ltv-p53-transferred SMCs activated PI3K/Akt/mTOR and MAPK/Erk signaling in a SDF-1α-dependent manner and thereby promoted mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) migration and proliferation. In a rat aorta transplantation model, lentivirus-mediated BclxL transfer selectively inhibits medial SMC apoptosis in aortic allografts, resulting in a remarkable decrease of SDF-1α both in allograft media and in blood plasma, associated with diminished recruitment of CD90(+)CD105(+) double-positive cells and impaired neointimal formation. Systemic administration of rapamycin or PD98059 also attenuated MSC recruitment and neointimal formation in the aortic allografts. These results suggest that medial SMC apoptosis is critical for the development of transplant arteriosclerosis through inducing SDF-1α production and that MSC recruitment represents a major component of vascular remodeling, constituting a relevant target and mechanism for therapeutic interventions.

  16. Platelet-derived SDF1 primes pulmonary capillary vascular niche to drive lung alveolar regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Rafii, Shahin; Chavez, Deebly; Shido, Koji; Rabbany, Sina Y.; Ding, Bi-Sen

    2016-01-01

    The lung alveoli regenerate after surgical removal of the left lobe by pneumonectomy (PNX). How this alveolar regrowth/regeneration is initiated remains unknown. We found that activated platelets trigger lung regeneration by supplying stromal cell-derived-factor1 (SDF1/CXCL12). After PNX, platelets stimulate SDF1-receptor CXCR4 and CXCR7 on pulmonary capillary endothelial cells (PCECs) to deploy membrane-type metalloproteinase MMP14, stimulating proliferation of alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) and neo-alveolarization. In mice lacking platelets or platelet Sdf1, PNX-induced alveologenesis was diminished. Reciprocally, infusion of Sdf1+/+ but not Sdf1-deficient platelets rescued lung regeneration in platelet-depleted mice. Endothelial-specific ablation of Cxcr4 and Cxcr7 in adult mice similarly impeded lung regeneration. Notably, mice with endothelial-specific Mmp14 deletion (Mmp14iΔEC/iΔEC) exhibited impaired expansion of AECs but not PCECs, which could not be rescued by platelet infusion. Therefore, platelets prime PCECs to initiate lung regeneration, extending beyond their hemostatic contribution. Therapeutic targeting of this hemo-vascular niche could enable regenerative therapy for lung diseases. PMID:25621952

  17. SDF-1 inhibition targets the bone marrow niche for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Roccaro, Aldo M.; Sacco, Antonio; Purschke, Werner G.; Moschetta, Michele; Buchner, Klaus; Maasch, Christian; Zboralski, Dirk; Zöllner, Stefan; Vonhoff, Stefan; Mishima, Yuji; Maiso, Patricia; Reagan, Michaela R.; Lonardi, Silvia; Ungari, Marco; Facchetti, Fabio; Eulberg, Dirk; Kruschinski, Anna; Vater, Axel; Rossi, Giuseppe; Klussmann, Sven; Ghobrial, Irene M.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Bone marrow (BM) metastasis remains one of the main causes of death associated with solid tumors as well as with Multiple Myeloma (MM). Targeting the BM niche to prevent or modulate metastasis has not been successful to date. Here we show that stromal cell derived factor-1 (SDF-1/CXCL12) is highly expressed in active MM, as well as in BM sites of tumor metastasis, and report on the discovery of the high affinity anti-SDF-1 PEGylated mirror-image l-oligonucleotide (olaptesed-pegol). In vivo confocal imaging showed that SDF-1 levels are increased within MM cell-colonized BM areas. Using in vivo murine and xenograft mouse models, we document that in vivo SDF-1 neutralization within BM niches leads to a microenvironment that is less receptive for MM cells and reduces MM cell homing and growth, thereby inhibiting MM disease progression. Targeting of SDF-1 represents a valid strategy for preventing or disrupting colonization of the BM by MM cells. PMID:25263552

  18. Ex Vivo Perfusion-Simulation Measurements of Microbubbles as a Scattering Contrast Agent for Grating-Based X-Ray Dark-Field Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Velroyen, Astrid; Bech, Martin; Tapfer, Arne; Yaroshenko, Andre; Müller, Mark; Paprottka, Philipp; Ingrisch, Michael; Cyran, Clemens C.; Auweter, Sigrid D.; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Reiser, Maximilian F.; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2015-01-01

    The investigation of dedicated contrast agents for x-ray dark-field imaging, which exploits small-angle scattering at microstructures for contrast generation, is of strong interest in analogy to the common clinical use of high-atomic number contrast media in conventional attenuation-based imaging, since dark-field imaging has proven to provide complementary information. Therefore, agents consisting of gas bubbles, as used in ultrasound imaging for example, are of particular interest. In this work, we investigate an experimental contrast agent based on microbubbles consisting of a polyvinyl-alcohol shell with an iron oxide coating, which was originally developed for multimodal imaging and drug delivery. Its performance as a possible contrast medium for small-animal angiography was examined using a mouse carcass to realistically consider attenuating and scattering background signal. Subtraction images of dark field, phase contrast and attenuation were acquired for a concentration series of 100%, 10% and 1.3% to mimic different stages of dilution in the contrast agent in the blood vessel system. The images were compared to the gold-standard iodine-based contrast agent Solutrast, showing a good contrast improvement by microbubbles in dark-field imaging. This study proves the feasibility of microbubble-based dark-field contrast-enhancement in presence of scattering and attenuating mouse body structures like bone and fur. Therefore, it suggests a strong potential of the use of polymer-based microbubbles for small-animal dark-field angiography. PMID:26134130

  19. The stimulatory effects of caffeine with oseltamivir (Tamiflu) on light-dark behavior and open-field behavior in mice.

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Hidemori; Toda, Akihisa; Imoto, Masumi; Nishimura, Satoko; Kuroki, Hiroaki; Soeda, Shinji; Shimeno, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Shigenori; Eyanagi, Reiko

    2010-01-22

    Abnormal behaviors and death associated with the use of oseltamivir (Tamiflu) have emerged as a major issue in influenza patients taking the drug. Here, we investigated the mechanisms underlying the effects of oseltamivir on the behavior of mice using light-dark and open-field preference tests. Oseltamivir (75 and 150 mg/kg, intraperitoneally (i.p.)) alone affected neither time spent in the open area in the light-dark preference test nor ambulation in the open-field test at 2h post-injection. However, a non-selective adenosine A(1)/A(2) receptor antagonist, caffeine (10mg/kg, i.p.) in combination with oseltamivir (150 mg/kg, i.p.) increased time spent in the open area in the light-dark preference test. This enhancement was not inhibited by a benzodiazepine receptor antagonist, flumazenil (10-20mg/kg, subcutaneously (s.c.)). Enhancement of ambulation in the open-field test was also observed when caffeine (10mg/kg, i.p.) was combined with oseltamivir (150 mg/kg, i.p.). This enhancement was inhibited by a dopamine D(2) receptor antagonist, haloperidol (0.1mg/kg, s.c.). Furthermore, an adenosine A(2) receptor antagonist, SCH58261 (3mg/kg, i.p.) in combination with oseltamivir (150 mg/kg, i.p.) increased ambulation in the open-field test, while an adenosine A(1) receptor antagonist, DPCPX (1-3mg/kg, i.p.) did not. These findings suggest that the actions of oseltamivir may involve the dopamine and adenosine systems. Our findings suggest that due to the interaction between central blockade of adenosine A(2) receptors by caffeine, and oseltamivir-induced behavioral changes, patients being treated with oseltamivir should be closely monitored.

  20. Ontogeny and adolescent alcohol exposure in Wistar rats: open field conflict, light/dark box and forced swim test.

    PubMed

    Desikan, Anita; Wills, Derek N; Ehlers, Cindy L

    2014-07-01

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated that heavy drinking and alcohol abuse and dependence peak during the transition between late adolescence and early adulthood. Studies in animal models have demonstrated that alcohol exposure during adolescence can cause a modification in some aspects of behavioral development, causing the "adolescent phenotype" to be retained into adulthood. However, the "adolescent phenotype" has not been studied for a number of behavioral tests. The objective of the present study was to investigate the ontogeny of behaviors over adolescence/young adulthood in the light/dark box, open field conflict and forced swim test in male Wistar rats. These data were compared to previously published data from rats that received intermittent alcohol vapor exposure during adolescence (AIE) to test whether they retained the "adolescent phenotype" in these behavioral tests. Three age groups of rats were tested (post-natal day (PD) 34-42; PD55-63; PD69-77). In the light/dark box test, younger rats escaped the light box faster than older adults, whereas AIE rats returned to the light box faster and exhibited more rears in the light than controls. In the open field conflict test, both younger and AIE rats had shorter times to first enter the center, spent more time in the center of the field, were closer to the food, and consumed more food than controls. In the forced swim test no clear developmental pattern emerged. The results of the light/dark box and the forced swim test do not support the hypothesis that adolescent ethanol vapor exposure can "lock-in" all adolescent phenotypes. However, data from the open field conflict test suggest that the adolescent and the AIE rats both engaged in more "disinhibited" and food motivated behaviors. These data suggest that, in some behavioral tests, AIE may result in a similar form of behavioral disinhibition to what is seen in adolescence. PMID:24785000

  1. Ontogeny and adolescent alcohol exposure in Wistar rats: open field conflict, light/dark box and forced swim test

    PubMed Central

    Desikan, Anita; Wills, Derek N.; Ehlers, Cindy L.

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated that heavy drinking and alcohol abuse and dependence peak during the transition between late adolescence and early adulthood. Studies in animal models have demonstrated that alcohol exposure during adolescence can cause a modification in some aspects of behavioral development, causing the “adolescent phenotype” to be retained into adulthood. However, the “adolescent phenotype” has not been studied for a number of behavioral tests. The objective of the present study was to investigate the ontogeny of behaviors over adolescence/young adulthood in the light/dark box, open field conflict and forced swim test in male Wistar rats. These data were compared to previously published data from rats that received intermittent alcohol vapor exposure during adolescence (AIE) to test whether they retained the “adolescent phenotype” in these behavioral tests. Three age groups of rats were tested (post-natal day (PD) 34–42; PD55-63; PD69-77). In the light/dark box test, younger rats escaped the light box faster than older adults, whereas AIE rats returned to the light box faster and exhibited more rears in the light than controls. In the open field conflict test, both younger and AIE rats had shorter times to first enter the center, spent more time in the center of the field, were closer to the food, and consumed more food than controls. In the forced swim test no clear developmental pattern emerged. The results of the light/dark box and the forced swim test do not support the hypothesis that adolescent ethanol vapor exposure can “lock-in” all adolescent phenotypes. However, data from the open field conflict test suggest that the adolescent and the AIE rats both engaged in more “disinhibited” and food motivated behaviors. These data suggest that, in some behavioral tests, AIE may result in a similar form of behavioral disinhibition to what is seen in adolescence. PMID:24785000

  2. Ontogeny and adolescent alcohol exposure in Wistar rats: open field conflict, light/dark box and forced swim test.

    PubMed

    Desikan, Anita; Wills, Derek N; Ehlers, Cindy L

    2014-07-01

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated that heavy drinking and alcohol abuse and dependence peak during the transition between late adolescence and early adulthood. Studies in animal models have demonstrated that alcohol exposure during adolescence can cause a modification in some aspects of behavioral development, causing the "adolescent phenotype" to be retained into adulthood. However, the "adolescent phenotype" has not been studied for a number of behavioral tests. The objective of the present study was to investigate the ontogeny of behaviors over adolescence/young adulthood in the light/dark box, open field conflict and forced swim test in male Wistar rats. These data were compared to previously published data from rats that received intermittent alcohol vapor exposure during adolescence (AIE) to test whether they retained the "adolescent phenotype" in these behavioral tests. Three age groups of rats were tested (post-natal day (PD) 34-42; PD55-63; PD69-77). In the light/dark box test, younger rats escaped the light box faster than older adults, whereas AIE rats returned to the light box faster and exhibited more rears in the light than controls. In the open field conflict test, both younger and AIE rats had shorter times to first enter the center, spent more time in the center of the field, were closer to the food, and consumed more food than controls. In the forced swim test no clear developmental pattern emerged. The results of the light/dark box and the forced swim test do not support the hypothesis that adolescent ethanol vapor exposure can "lock-in" all adolescent phenotypes. However, data from the open field conflict test suggest that the adolescent and the AIE rats both engaged in more "disinhibited" and food motivated behaviors. These data suggest that, in some behavioral tests, AIE may result in a similar form of behavioral disinhibition to what is seen in adolescence.

  3. SDF-1/CXCR4 axis induces apoptosis of human degenerative nucleus pulposus cells via the NF-κB pathway

    PubMed Central

    LIU, ZONGCHAO; MA, CHUAN; SHEN, JIELIANG; WANG, DAWU; HAO, JIE; HU, ZHENMING

    2016-01-01

    Intervertebral disc degeneration (IVDD) is a major cause of lower back pain, and increased cell apoptosis is a key characteristic of IVDD. The present study aimed to investigate the effects and mechanism of the stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1)/C-X-C motif chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) axis on apoptosis in human degenerative nucleus pulposus cells (NPCs). The expression levels of SDF-1 and CXCR4 in human intervertebral discs (IVD) were determined using immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis. Apoptosis of primary cultured NPCs was quantified by Annexin V/propidium iodide staining following stimulation with SDF-1 and knockdown of CXCR4 using small interfering RNA (siRNA). The association with the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling pathway was investigated using CXCR4-siRNA and NF-κB inhibitor, pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC), treatment. The results demonstrated that SDF-1 and its receptor, CXCR4, were upregulated in degenerative IVD samples compared with normal samples. Stimulation with SDF-1 increased the level of apoptosis in cultured NPCs, and conversely, the apoptosis level was suppressed post-transfection with CXCR4 siRNA compared with SDF-1 stimulation alone. Furthermore, SDF-1 treatment increased the level of phosphorylated NF-κB subunit P65, which was downregulated following CXCR4 siRNA and PDTC treatment. In addition, CXCR4 siRNA and PDTC inhibited the nuclear translocation of P65, which was induced by SDF-1. Taken together, SDF-1-mediated apoptosis was suppressed by NF-κB inhibition using PDTC. In conclusion, the SDF-1/CXCR4 axis promoted cell apoptosis in human degenerative NPCs via the NF-κB pathway, thus suggesting that SDF-1/CXCR signaling may be a therapeutic target for the treatment of degenerative IVD diseases. PMID:27220474

  4. Observation of two new L4 Neptune Trojans in the Dark Energy Survey supernova fields

    DOE PAGES

    Gerdes, D. W.

    2016-01-28

    We report the discovery of the eighth and ninth known Trojans in stable orbits around Neptune's leading Lagrange point, L4. The objects 2014 QO441 and 2014 QP441 were detected in data obtained during the 2013-14 and 2014-15 observing seasons by the Dark Energy Survey, using the Dark Energy Camera (DECam) on the 4-meter Blanco telescope at Cerro Tololo Inter- American Observatory. Both are in high-inclination orbits (18.8° and 19.4° respectively). Furthermore, with an eccentricity of 0.104, 2014 QO441 has the most eccentric orbit of the eleven known stable Neptune Trojans. We describe the search procedure and investigate the objects' long-termmore » dynamical stability and physical properties.« less

  5. Observation of Two New L4 Neptune Trojans in the Dark Energy Survey Supernova Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerdes, D. W.; Jennings, R. J.; Bernstein, G. M.; Sako, M.; Adams, F.; Goldstein, D.; Kessler, R.; Hamilton, S.; Abbott, T.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Capozzi, D.; Carnero Rosell, A.; Carrasco Kind, M.; Carretero, J.; Cunha, C. E.; D'Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; DePoy, D. L.; Desai, S.; Dietrich, J. P.; Doel, P.; Eifler, T. F.; Fausti Neto, A.; Flaugher, B.; Frieman, J.; Gaztanaga, E.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gutierrez, G.; Honscheid, K.; James, D. J.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Li, T. S.; Maia, M. A. G.; March, M.; Martini, P.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Nichol, R. C.; Nord, B.; Ogando, R.; Plazas, A. A.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Sanchez, E.; Santiago, B.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarlé, G.; Thaler, J.; Walker, A. R.; Wester, W.; Zhang, Y.; DES Collaboration

    2016-02-01

    We report the discovery of the eighth and ninth known Trojans in stable orbits around Neptune’s leading Lagrange point, L4. The objects 2014 QO441 and 2014 QP441 were detected in data obtained during the 2013-14 and 2014-15 observing seasons by the Dark Energy Survey, using the Dark Energy Camera (DECam) on the 4-m Blanco telescope at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory. Both are in high-inclination orbits (18.°8 and 19.°4, respectively). With an eccentricity of 0.104, 2014 QO441 has the most eccentric orbit of the 11 known stable Neptune Trojans. Here we describe the search procedure and investigate the objects’ long-term dynamical stability and physical properties.

  6. SDF1 induction by acidosis from principal cells regulates intercalated cell subtype distribution

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, George J.; Gao, XiaoBo; Tsuruoka, Shuichi; Purkerson, Jeffrey M.; Peng, Hu; D’Agati, Vivette; Picard, Nicolas; Eladari, Dominique; Al-Awqati, Qais

    2015-01-01

    The nephron cortical collecting duct (CCD) is composed of principal cells, which mediate Na, K, and water transport, and intercalated cells (ICs), which are specialized for acid-base transport. There are two canonical IC forms: acid-secreting α-ICs and HCO3-secreting β-ICs. Chronic acidosis increases α-ICs at the expense of β-ICs, thereby increasing net acid secretion by the CCD. We found by growth factor quantitative PCR array that acidosis increases expression of mRNA encoding SDF1 (or CXCL12) in kidney cortex and isolated CCDs from mouse and rabbit kidney cortex. Exogenous SDF1 or pH 6.8 media increased H+ secretion and decreased HCO3 secretion in isolated perfused rabbit CCDs. Acid-dependent changes in H+ and HCO3 secretion were largely blunted by AMD3100, which selectively blocks the SDF1 receptor CXCR4. In mice, diet-induced chronic acidosis increased α-ICs and decreased β-ICs. Additionally, IC-specific Cxcr4 deletion prevented IC subtype alterations and magnified metabolic acidosis. SDF1 was transcriptionally regulated and a target of the hypoxia-sensing transcription factor HIF1α. IC-specific deletion of Hif1a produced no effect on mice fed an acid diet, as α-ICs increased and β-ICs decreased similarly to that observed in WT littermates. However, Hif1a deletion in all CCD cells prevented acidosis-induced IC subtype distribution, resulting in more severe acidosis. Cultured principal cells exhibited an HIF1α-dependent increase of Sdf1 transcription in response to media acidification. Thus, our results indicate that principal cells respond to acid by producing SDF1, which then acts on adjacent ICs. PMID:26517693

  7. Wide-Field Lensing Mass Maps from Dark Energy Survey Science Verification Data.

    PubMed

    Chang, C; Vikram, V; Jain, B; Bacon, D; Amara, A; Becker, M R; Bernstein, G; Bonnett, C; Bridle, S; Brout, D; Busha, M; Frieman, J; Gaztanaga, E; Hartley, W; Jarvis, M; Kacprzak, T; Kovács, A; Lahav, O; Lin, H; Melchior, P; Peiris, H; Rozo, E; Rykoff, E; Sánchez, C; Sheldon, E; Troxel, M A; Wechsler, R; Zuntz, J; Abbott, T; Abdalla, F B; Allam, S; Annis, J; Bauer, A H; Benoit-Lévy, A; Brooks, D; Buckley-Geer, E; Burke, D L; Capozzi, D; Carnero Rosell, A; Carrasco Kind, M; Castander, F J; Crocce, M; D'Andrea, C B; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Dietrich, J P; Doel, P; Eifler, T F; Evrard, A E; Fausti Neto, A; Flaugher, B; Fosalba, P; Gruen, D; Gruendl, R A; Gutierrez, G; Honscheid, K; James, D; Kent, S; Kuehn, K; Kuropatkin, N; Maia, M A G; March, M; Martini, P; Merritt, K W; Miller, C J; Miquel, R; Neilsen, E; Nichol, R C; Ogando, R; Plazas, A A; Romer, A K; Roodman, A; Sako, M; Sanchez, E; Sevilla, I; Smith, R C; Soares-Santos, M; Sobreira, F; Suchyta, E; Tarle, G; Thaler, J; Thomas, D; Tucker, D; Walker, A R

    2015-07-31

    We present a mass map reconstructed from weak gravitational lensing shear measurements over 139  deg2 from the Dark Energy Survey science verification data. The mass map probes both luminous and dark matter, thus providing a tool for studying cosmology. We find good agreement between the mass map and the distribution of massive galaxy clusters identified using a red-sequence cluster finder. Potential candidates for superclusters and voids are identified using these maps. We measure the cross-correlation between the mass map and a magnitude-limited foreground galaxy sample and find a detection at the 6.8σ level with 20 arc min smoothing. These measurements are consistent with simulated galaxy catalogs based on N-body simulations from a cold dark matter model with a cosmological constant. This suggests low systematics uncertainties in the map. We summarize our key findings in this Letter; the detailed methodology and tests for systematics are presented in a companion paper. PMID:26274409

  8. Wide-Field Lensing Mass Maps from Dark Energy Survey Science Verification Data.

    PubMed

    Chang, C; Vikram, V; Jain, B; Bacon, D; Amara, A; Becker, M R; Bernstein, G; Bonnett, C; Bridle, S; Brout, D; Busha, M; Frieman, J; Gaztanaga, E; Hartley, W; Jarvis, M; Kacprzak, T; Kovács, A; Lahav, O; Lin, H; Melchior, P; Peiris, H; Rozo, E; Rykoff, E; Sánchez, C; Sheldon, E; Troxel, M A; Wechsler, R; Zuntz, J; Abbott, T; Abdalla, F B; Allam, S; Annis, J; Bauer, A H; Benoit-Lévy, A; Brooks, D; Buckley-Geer, E; Burke, D L; Capozzi, D; Carnero Rosell, A; Carrasco Kind, M; Castander, F J; Crocce, M; D'Andrea, C B; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Dietrich, J P; Doel, P; Eifler, T F; Evrard, A E; Fausti Neto, A; Flaugher, B; Fosalba, P; Gruen, D; Gruendl, R A; Gutierrez, G; Honscheid, K; James, D; Kent, S; Kuehn, K; Kuropatkin, N; Maia, M A G; March, M; Martini, P; Merritt, K W; Miller, C J; Miquel, R; Neilsen, E; Nichol, R C; Ogando, R; Plazas, A A; Romer, A K; Roodman, A; Sako, M; Sanchez, E; Sevilla, I; Smith, R C; Soares-Santos, M; Sobreira, F; Suchyta, E; Tarle, G; Thaler, J; Thomas, D; Tucker, D; Walker, A R

    2015-07-31

    We present a mass map reconstructed from weak gravitational lensing shear measurements over 139  deg2 from the Dark Energy Survey science verification data. The mass map probes both luminous and dark matter, thus providing a tool for studying cosmology. We find good agreement between the mass map and the distribution of massive galaxy clusters identified using a red-sequence cluster finder. Potential candidates for superclusters and voids are identified using these maps. We measure the cross-correlation between the mass map and a magnitude-limited foreground galaxy sample and find a detection at the 6.8σ level with 20 arc min smoothing. These measurements are consistent with simulated galaxy catalogs based on N-body simulations from a cold dark matter model with a cosmological constant. This suggests low systematics uncertainties in the map. We summarize our key findings in this Letter; the detailed methodology and tests for systematics are presented in a companion paper.

  9. Wide-Field Lensing Mass Maps from Dark Energy Survey Science Verification Data

    DOE PAGES

    Chang, C.

    2015-07-29

    We present a mass map reconstructed from weak gravitational lensing shear measurements over 139 deg2 from the Dark Energy Survey science verification data. The mass map probes both luminous and dark matter, thus providing a tool for studying cosmology. We also find good agreement between the mass map and the distribution of massive galaxy clusters identified using a red-sequence cluster finder. Potential candidates for superclusters and voids are identified using these maps. We measure the cross-correlation between the mass map and a magnitude-limited foreground galaxy sample and find a detection at the 6.8σ level with 20 arc min smoothing. Thesemore » measurements are consistent with simulated galaxy catalogs based on N-body simulations from a cold dark matter model with a cosmological constant. This suggests low systematics uncertainties in the map. Finally, we summarize our key findings in this Letter; the detailed methodology and tests for systematics are presented in a companion paper.« less

  10. Wide-Field Lensing Mass Maps from Dark Energy Survey Science Verification Data

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.

    2015-07-29

    We present a mass map reconstructed from weak gravitational lensing shear measurements over 139 deg2 from the Dark Energy Survey science verification data. The mass map probes both luminous and dark matter, thus providing a tool for studying cosmology. We also find good agreement between the mass map and the distribution of massive galaxy clusters identified using a red-sequence cluster finder. Potential candidates for superclusters and voids are identified using these maps. We measure the cross-correlation between the mass map and a magnitude-limited foreground galaxy sample and find a detection at the 6.8σ level with 20 arc min smoothing. These measurements are consistent with simulated galaxy catalogs based on N-body simulations from a cold dark matter model with a cosmological constant. This suggests low systematics uncertainties in the map. Finally, we summarize our key findings in this Letter; the detailed methodology and tests for systematics are presented in a companion paper.

  11. Real-time scattered light dark-field microscopic imaging of the dynamic degradation process of sodium dimethyldithiocarbamate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Gang; Gao, Peng Fei; Liu, Hui; Huang, Cheng Zhi

    2015-12-01

    Single nanoparticle analysis (SNA) technique with the aid of a dark-field microscopic imaging (iDFM) technique has attracted wide attention owing to its high sensitivity. Considering that the degradation of pesticides can bring about serious problems in food and the environment, and that the real-time monitoring of the dynamic degradation process of pesticides can help understand and define their degradation mechanisms, herein we real-time monitored the decomposition dynamics of sodium dimethyldithiocarbamate (NaDDC) under neutral and alkaline conditions by imaging single silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) under a dark-field microscope (DFM); the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) scattering signals were measured at a single nanoparticle level. As a result, the chemical mechanism of the degradation of NaDDC under neutral and alkaline conditions was proposed, and the inhibition effects of metal ions including Zn(ii) and Cu(ii) were investigated in order to understand the decomposition process in different environments. It was found that Cu(ii) forms the most stable complex with NaDDC with a stoichiometric ratio of 1 : 2, which greatly reduces the toxicity.Single nanoparticle analysis (SNA) technique with the aid of a dark-field microscopic imaging (iDFM) technique has attracted wide attention owing to its high sensitivity. Considering that the degradation of pesticides can bring about serious problems in food and the environment, and that the real-time monitoring of the dynamic degradation process of pesticides can help understand and define their degradation mechanisms, herein we real-time monitored the decomposition dynamics of sodium dimethyldithiocarbamate (NaDDC) under neutral and alkaline conditions by imaging single silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) under a dark-field microscope (DFM); the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) scattering signals were measured at a single nanoparticle level. As a result, the chemical mechanism of the degradation of Na

  12. Direct imaging of light elements by annular dark-field aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lotnyk, Andriy Poppitz, David; Gerlach, Jürgen W.; Rauschenbach, Bernd

    2014-02-17

    In this report, we show that an annular dark-field detector in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope allows the direct observation of light element columns in crystalline lattices. At specific imaging conditions, an enhancement of the intensities of light element columns in the presence of heavy element columns is observed. Experimental results are presented for imaging the nitrogen and carbon atomic columns at the GaN-SiC interface and within the GaN and SiC compounds. The crystal polarity of GaN at the interface is identified. The obtained findings are discussed and are well supported by image simulations.

  13. Direct imaging of Guinier-Preston zones by high-angle annular detector dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Konno, T J; Kawasaki, M; Hiraga, K

    2001-01-01

    We report atomic resolution imaging of Cu-planar precipitates in aged Al-Cu alloys, known as Guinier-Preston (GP) zones, by high-angle annular detector dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy. Single layered GP-I zones as small as 2 nm in length were resolved among densely populated GP-I zones, whereas double layered GP zones were clearly identified. The images of GP-II zones showed not only the commonly accepted structure, in which single Cu layers are separated by three Al layers, but also a variant, in which double Cu layers are separated by a single Al layer. PMID:11347711

  14. Direct imaging of light elements by annular dark-field aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotnyk, Andriy; Poppitz, David; Gerlach, Jürgen W.; Rauschenbach, Bernd

    2014-02-01

    In this report, we show that an annular dark-field detector in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope allows the direct observation of light element columns in crystalline lattices. At specific imaging conditions, an enhancement of the intensities of light element columns in the presence of heavy element columns is observed. Experimental results are presented for imaging the nitrogen and carbon atomic columns at the GaN-SiC interface and within the GaN and SiC compounds. The crystal polarity of GaN at the interface is identified. The obtained findings are discussed and are well supported by image simulations.

  15. SDF-1/CXCL12 modulates mitochondrial respiration of immature blood cells in a bi-phasic manner.

    PubMed

    Messina-Graham, Steven; Broxmeyer, Hal

    2016-05-01

    SDF-1/CXCL12 is a potent chemokine required for the homing and engraftment of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Previous data from our group has shown that in an SDF-1/CXCL12 transgenic mouse model, lineage(-) Sca-1(+) c-Kit(+) (LSK) bone marrow cells have reduced mitochondrial membrane potential versus wild-type. These results suggested that SDF-1/CXCL12 may function to keep mitochondrial respiration low in immature blood cells in the bone marrow. Low mitochondrial metabolism helps to maintain low levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which can influence differentiation. To test whether SDF-1/CXCL12 regulates mitochondrial metabolism, we employed the human leukemia cell line HL-60, that expresses high levels of the SDF-1/CXCL12 receptor, CXCR4, as a model of hematopoietic progenitor cells in vitro. We treated HL-60 cells with SDF-1/CXCL12 for 2 and 24h. Oxygen consumption rates (OCR), mitochondrial-associated ATP production, mitochondrial mass, and mitochondrial membrane potential of HL-60 cells were significantly reduced at 2h and increased at 24h as compared to untreated control cells. These biphasic effects of SDF-1/CXCL12 were reproduced with lineage negative primary mouse bone marrow cells, suggesting a novel function of SDF-1/CXCL12 in modulating mitochondrial respiration by regulating mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, ATP production and mitochondrial content. PMID:27067482

  16. Tunable Controlled Release of Bioactive SDF-1α via Protein Specific Interactions within Fibrin/Nanoparticle Composites

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, D.; Fauer, C.; Mulleneux, H.L.; Stabenfeldt, S. E.

    2015-01-01

    The chemokine, stromal cell-derived factor 1α (SDF-1α), is a key regulator of the endogenous neural progenitor/stem cell-mediated regenerative response after neural injury. Increased and sustained bioavailability of SDF-1α in the peri-injury region is hypothesized to modulate this endogenous repair response. Here, we describe poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) nanoparticles capable of releasing bioactive SDF-1α in a sustained manner over 60days after a burst of 23%. Moreover, we report a biphasic cellular response to SDF-1α concentrations thus the large initial burst release in an in vivo setting may result in supratherapeutic concentrations of SDF-1α. Specific protein-protein interactions between SDF-1α and fibrin (as well as its monomer, fibrinogen) were exploited to control the magnitude of the burst release. Nanoparticles embedded in fibrin significantly reduced the amount of SDF-1α released after 72 hrs as a function of fibrin density. Therefore, the nanoparticle/fibrin composites represented a means to independently tune the magnitude of the burst phase release from the nanoparticles while perserving a bioactive depot of SDF-1α for release over 60days. PMID:26660666

  17. The effect of delivering the chemokine SDF-1α in a matrix-bound manner on myogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Sadir, Rabia; Almodovar, Jorge; Mertani, Hichem C.; Bruckert, Franz; Albiges-Rizo, Corinne; Weidenhaupt, Marianne; Lortat-Jacob, Hugues; Picart, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Several chemokines are important in muscle myogenesis and in the recruitment of muscle precursors during muscle regeneration. Among these, the SDF-1α chemokine (CXCL12) is a potent chemoattractant known to be involved in muscle repair. SDF-1α was loaded in polyelectrolyte multilayer films made of poly(l-lysine) and hyaluronan to be delivered locally to myoblast cells in a matrix-bound manner. The adsorbed amounts of SDF-1α were tuned over a large range from 100 ng/cm2 to 5 μg/cm2, depending on the initial concentration of SDF-1α in solution, its pH, and on the film crosslinking extent. Matrix-bound SDF-1α induced a striking increase in myoblast spreading, which was revealed when it was delivered from weakly crosslinked films. It also significantly enhanced cell migration in a dose-dependent manner, which again depended on its presentation by the biopolymeric film. The low-crosslinked film was the most efficient in boosting cell migration. Furthermore, matrix-bound SDF-1α also increased the expression of myogenic markers but the fusion index decreased in a dose-dependent manner with the adsorbed amount of SDF-1α. At high adsorbed amounts of SDF-1α, a large number of Troponin T-positive cells had only one nucleus. Overall, this work reveals the importance of the presentation mode of SDF-1α to emphasize its effect on myogenic processes. These films may be further used to provide insight into the role of SDF-1α presented by a biomaterial in physiological or pathological processes. PMID:24612919

  18. Comparison of Magnetic Field Structures on Different Scales in and around the Filamentary Dark Cloud GF 9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poidevin, F.; Bastien, P.

    2006-10-01

    New visible polarization data combined with existing IR and FIR polarization data are used to study how the magnetic field threading the filamentary molecular cloud GF 9 connects to larger structures in its general environment. When visible and NIR polarization data are combined, no evidence is found for a plateau in the polarization above extinction AV~1.3, as seen in dark clouds in Taurus. This lack of saturation effect suggests that even in the denser parts of GF 9 magnetic fields can be probed. The visible polarization is smooth and has a well-defined orientation. In the core region, the IR and FIR data are also well defined, but each with a different direction. A multiscale analysis of the magnetic field shows that on the scale of a few times the mean radial dimension of the molecular cloud, it is as if the magnetic field were ``blind'' to the spatial distribution of the filaments, while on smaller scales in the core region, multiwavelength polarimetry shows a rotation of the magnetic field lines in these denser phases. Finally, the Chandrasekhar and Fermi method is used to evaluate the magnetic field strength, indicating that the core region is approximately magnetically critical. A global interpretation suggests that in the core region an original poloidal field could have been twisted by a rotating elongated (core+envelope) structure. There is no evidence for turbulence, and ambipolar diffusion does not seem to be effective at the present time.

  19. The Magnetic Field of the L1544 Starless Dark Cloud, Traced Using Near-Infrared Background Starlight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemens, Dan P.; Goldsmith, Paul; Tassis, Konstantinos

    2016-06-01

    What roles do interstellar magnetic fields play in star formation processes? We have studied the B-field of L1544, a dark cloud with a starless dense core showing active gas infall, and located only 140 pc away in Taurus, via deep near-infrared (NIR) imaging polarimetry with the Mimir instrument. We find the B-field orientations in the plane of the sky change significantly at L1544, mimicking its shape and extent. The elongated spine of L1544 is also where the dispersion of NIR linear polarization position angles is smallest, suggesting strengthening of the B-field. Archival WISE, SCUPOL, Herschel, and Planck data were analyzed to characterize dust extinction and emission across L1544 and the field around it. Three-dimensional modeling, constrained through matching two-dimensional integrated model properties to observed dust distributions, led us to develop maps of effective gas mass densities and non-thermal gas velocity dispersions. These were combined with the NIR polarimetry, under the Chandrasekhar & Fermi (1953) approach, to yield a map of B-field strength across the entire 400 sq-arcmin region surveyed. The trends of B-field strength with gas volume density, mass-to-flux ratio with radius, and plane-of-sky B-field strengths with Zeeman-traced line-of-sight B-field strengths were found and compared to previous published work to establish the role of B-fields in L1544. We find field strengths in the 3 - 30 uG range, quite similar to the OH Zeeman values found by Crutcher et al. (2009) for L1544.This work was partially supported by grants to Boston University from NSF (AST-0907790, 1412269) and NASA (NNX15AE51G).

  20. Dark-field X-ray ptychography: Towards high-resolution imaging of thick and unstained biological specimens

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Akihiro; Shimomura, Kei; Hirose, Makoto; Burdet, Nicolas; Takahashi, Yukio

    2016-01-01

    The phase shift of light or electrons in objects is now necessary for probing weak-phase objects such as unstained biological specimens. Optical microscopy (OM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) have been used to observe weak-phase objects. However, conventional OM has low spatial resolution and TEM is limited to thin specimens. Here, we report on the development of dark-field X-ray ptychography, which combines X-ray ptychography and X-ray in-line holography, to observe weak-phase objects with a phase resolution better than 0.01 rad, a spatial resolution better than 15 nm, and a field of view larger than 5 μm. We apply this method to the observation of both the outline and magnetosomes of the magnetotactic bacteria MO-1. Observation of thick samples with high resolution is expected to find broad applications in not only biology but also materials science. PMID:27734961

  1. Simulations of x-ray speckle-based dark-field and phase-contrast imaging with a polychromatic beam

    SciTech Connect

    Zdora, Marie-Christine; Thibault, Pierre; Pfeiffer, Franz; Zanette, Irene

    2015-09-21

    Following the first experimental demonstration of x-ray speckle-based multimodal imaging using a polychromatic beam [I. Zanette et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112(25), 253903 (2014)], we present a simulation study on the effects of a polychromatic x-ray spectrum on the performance of this technique. We observe that the contrast of the near-field speckles is only mildly influenced by the bandwidth of the energy spectrum. Moreover, using a homogeneous object with simple geometry, we characterize the beam hardening artifacts in the reconstructed transmission and refraction angle images, and we describe how the beam hardening also affects the dark-field signal provided by speckle tracking. This study is particularly important for further implementations and developments of coherent speckle-based techniques at laboratory x-ray sources.

  2. Dark-field X-ray ptychography: Towards high-resolution imaging of thick and unstained biological specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Akihiro; Shimomura, Kei; Hirose, Makoto; Burdet, Nicolas; Takahashi, Yukio

    2016-10-01

    The phase shift of light or electrons in objects is now necessary for probing weak-phase objects such as unstained biological specimens. Optical microscopy (OM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) have been used to observe weak-phase objects. However, conventional OM has low spatial resolution and TEM is limited to thin specimens. Here, we report on the development of dark-field X-ray ptychography, which combines X-ray ptychography and X-ray in-line holography, to observe weak-phase objects with a phase resolution better than 0.01 rad, a spatial resolution better than 15 nm, and a field of view larger than 5 μm. We apply this method to the observation of both the outline and magnetosomes of the magnetotactic bacteria MO-1. Observation of thick samples with high resolution is expected to find broad applications in not only biology but also materials science.

  3. High-angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy on carbon-based functional polymer systems.

    PubMed

    Sourty, Erwan; van Bavel, Svetlana; Lu, Kangbo; Guerra, Ralph; Bar, Georg; Loos, Joachim

    2009-06-01

    Two purely carbon-based functional polymer systems were investigated by bright-field conventional transmission electron microscopy (CTEM) and high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM). For a carbon black (CB) filled polymer system, HAADF-STEM provides high contrast between the CB agglomerates and the polymer matrix so that details of the interface organization easily can be revealed and assignment of the CB phase is straightforward. For a second system, the functional polymer blend representing the photoactive layer of a polymer solar cell, details of its nanoscale organization could be observed that were not accessible with CTEM. By varying the camera length in HAADF-STEM imaging, the contrast can be enhanced between crystalline and amorphous compounds due to diffraction contrast so that nanoscale interconnections between domains are identified. In general, due to its incoherent imaging characteristics HAADF-STEM allows for reliable interpretation of the data obtained.

  4. HIV-1-infected macrophages induce astrogliosis by SDF-1{alpha} and matrix metalloproteinases

    SciTech Connect

    Okamoto, Mika; Wang, Xin; Baba, Masanori . E-mail: baba@m.kufm.kagoshima-u.ac.jp

    2005-11-04

    Brain macrophages/microglia and astrocytes are known to be involved in the pathogenesis of HIV-1-associated dementia (HAD). To clarify their interaction and contribution to the pathogenesis, HIV-1-infected or uninfected macrophages were used as a model of brain macrophages/microglia, and their effects on human astrocytes in vitro were examined. The culture supernatants of HIV-1-infected or uninfected macrophages induced significant astrocyte proliferation, which was annihilated with a neutralizing antibody to stromal cell-derived factor (SDF)-1{alpha} or a matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibitor. In these astrocytes, CXCR4, MMP, and tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinase mRNA expression and SDF-1{alpha} production were significantly up-regulated. The supernatants of infected macrophages were always more effective than those of uninfected cells. Moreover, the enhanced production of SDF-1{alpha} was suppressed by the MMP inhibitor. These results indicate that the activated and HIV-1-infected macrophages can indirectly induce astrocyte proliferation through up-regulating SDF-1{alpha} and MMP production, which implies a mechanism of astrogliosis in HAD.

  5. On the origin and nature of the grating interferometric dark-field contrast obtained with low-brilliance x-ray sources.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Thomas; Zuber, Marcus; Trimborn, Barbara; Farago, Tomas; Meyer, Pascal; Kunka, Danays; Albrecht, Frederic; Kreuer, Sascha; Volk, Thomas; Fiederle, Michael; Baumbach, Tilo

    2016-05-01

    The x-ray dark-field contrast accessible via grating interferometry is sensitive to features at length scales well below what is resolvable by a detector system. It is commonly explained as arising from small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS), and can be implemented both at synchrotron beamlines and with low-brilliance sources such as x-ray tubes. Here, we demonstrate that for tube based setups the underlying process of image formation can be fundamentally different. For focal spots or detector pixels that comprise multiple grating periods, we show that dark-field images contain a strong artificial and system-specific component not arising from SAXS. Based on experiments carried out with a nanofocus x-ray tube and the example of an excised rat lung, we demonstrate that the dark-field contrast observed for porous media transforms into a differential phase contrast for large geometric magnifications. Using a photon counting detector with an adjustable point spread function, we confirm that a dark-field image can indeed be formed by an intra-pixel differential phase contrast that cannot be resolved as such due to a dephasing between the periodicities of the absorption grating and the Talbot carpet. Our findings are further corroborated by a link between the strength of this pseudo-dark-field contrast and our x-ray tube's focal spot size in a three-grating setup. These results must not be ignored when measurements are intended to be reproducible across systems. PMID:27046451

  6. On the origin and nature of the grating interferometric dark-field contrast obtained with low-brilliance x-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Thomas; Zuber, Marcus; Trimborn, Barbara; Farago, Tomas; Meyer, Pascal; Kunka, Danays; Albrecht, Frederic; Kreuer, Sascha; Volk, Thomas; Fiederle, Michael; Baumbach, Tilo

    2016-05-01

    The x-ray dark-field contrast accessible via grating interferometry is sensitive to features at length scales well below what is resolvable by a detector system. It is commonly explained as arising from small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS), and can be implemented both at synchrotron beamlines and with low-brilliance sources such as x-ray tubes. Here, we demonstrate that for tube based setups the underlying process of image formation can be fundamentally different. For focal spots or detector pixels that comprise multiple grating periods, we show that dark-field images contain a strong artificial and system-specific component not arising from SAXS. Based on experiments carried out with a nanofocus x-ray tube and the example of an excised rat lung, we demonstrate that the dark-field contrast observed for porous media transforms into a differential phase contrast for large geometric magnifications. Using a photon counting detector with an adjustable point spread function, we confirm that a dark-field image can indeed be formed by an intra-pixel differential phase contrast that cannot be resolved as such due to a dephasing between the periodicities of the absorption grating and the Talbot carpet. Our findings are further corroborated by a link between the strength of this pseudo-dark-field contrast and our x-ray tube’s focal spot size in a three-grating setup. These results must not be ignored when measurements are intended to be reproducible across systems.

  7. Analysis of CCR5 and SDF-1 genetic variants and HIV infection in Indian population.

    PubMed

    Gupta, A; Padh, Harish

    2015-08-01

    HIV-1 infection and progression exhibits interindividual variation. The polymorphism in the chemokine receptors CCR5 and CXCR4, the principal coreceptors for HIV-1 and their ligands like SDF-1 have a profound effect in altering the HIV-1 disease progression rate. A single nucleotide polymorphism designated SDF1-3'UTR-801G-A has been associated with resistance to HIV-1 infection or delayed progression to AIDS. In this study, the SDF1-3'A polymorphism, CCR5∆32 polymorphism and CCR5 promoter polymorphism at positions 58934 G/T, 59029 G/A, 59353 T/C, 59356 C/T, 59402 A/G and 59653 C/T were analysed in Indian population. The polymorphisms in HIV-1 patients and healthy individuals were evaluated by conventional PCR, RFLP-PCR and direct sequencing techniques. The CCR5∆32 mutant allele was found to be almost absent in Indian population. The analysis of the CCR5-59356C/T polymorphism revealed a trend towards an association of the C allele with an increased risk of HIV-1 infection. The frequency of allele CCR5-59356C was higher in HIV-1 patients (100%) as compared to healthy control subjects (89%, P = 0.003). The correlation of SDF1-3'A and CCR5 promoter CCR5-58934G/T, CCR5-59029G/A, CCR5-59353T/C, CCR5-59402 A/G and CCR5-59653C/T polymorphisms and protection to HIV-1 infection and progression to AIDS was found to be nonsignificant. Nine haplotypes with more than 1% frequency were detected but were not significant in their protective role against HIV. Comparative analysis with global populations showed a noteworthy difference in CCR5 and SDF-1 polymorphisms' frequency distribution, indicating the ethnic variability of Indians. Although susceptibility to infections cannot be completely dependent on one or few genetic variants, it is important to remember that SDF-1 and CCR5 variants have been correlated globally with HIV-1 infection and disease progression. In the light of that, higher frequency of SDF-1 variants in the Indian population is noteworthy.

  8. Distribution of CCR5delta32, CCR2-64I and SDF1-3'A and plasma levels of SDF-1 in HIV-1 seronegative North Indians.

    PubMed

    Verma, Romsha; Gupta, Radha Ballabh; Singh, Kalpana; Bhasin, Rama; Anand Shukla, Abhay; Chauhan, Shyam S; Luthra, Kalpana

    2007-03-01

    Host genetic factors play an important role in susceptibility to HIV-1 infection and progression to AIDS. Mutations in genes encoding chemokine receptors and their ligands, viz., CCR5delta32, CCR2-64I and SDF1-3'A are implicated to have protective effects against HIV-1 infection and/or disease progression. The distribution of these gene polymorphisms and their role in the course of the disease varies between individuals of different racial, ethnic and risk groups. We have examined the allelic frequencies of CCR5delta32, CCR2-64I and SDF1-3'A in 500 healthy North Indians tested seronegative for HIV-1, by PCR-RFLP. The plasma levels of stromal derived factor (SDF-1) protein were estimated in 75 individuals using ELISA kit. Frequencies of CCR5delta32, CCR2-64I and SDF1-3'A alleles in 500 individuals were 1.5%, 9.1% and 20.4%, respectively. The SDF1-3'A homozygosity was confirmed by PCR product cloning and sequencing. The relative hazard values calculated on the basis of the three locus genotype of each individual revealed high relative hazard values (>0.9). The plasma levels of SDF-1 ranged from 1.77 to 3.42 ng/ml and were comparable between the three genotypes of SDF-1. This is the first study to assess the plasma level of SDF-1 protein in Asian Indians. Low frequency of the protective allele CCR5delta32 observed in this study suggests high vulnerability of North Indians to HIV-1 infection. The precise role of SDF1-3'A in HIV-1 infection needs to be elucidated.

  9. Galaxies and dark matter - a free-form mass analysis of Hubble Frontier Field clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Liliya L. R.; Sebesta, Kevin; Saha, Prasenjit; Mohammed, Irshad; Liesenborgs, Jori

    2015-08-01

    Centers of galaxy clusters are the densest regions in the Universe, and the most likely places to find anomalous behavior of dark matter: either purely gravitational effects like dynamical friction, or more exotic ones, like self-scattering. We use a genetic algorithm based optimization method (GRALE) to recover mass distribution in HFF clusters using gravitational lensing. We correlate the total mass with the visible galaxies, and also examine the regions around the most massive central galaxies. Our results imply that mass and light are not perfectly correlated. We suggest further ways of testing these results. We also use our reconstructions to examine the line of sight distribution of mass in the directions of HFF clusters.

  10. SDF1 Polymorphisms Influence Outcome in Patients with Symptomatic Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rath, Dominik; Schaeffeler, Elke; Winter, Stefan; Hewer, Jens; Müller, Karin; Droppa, Michal; Stimpfle, Fabian; Gawaz, Meinrad; Schwab, Matthias; Geisler, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    Background SDF1 and its cognate receptors CXCR4 and CXCR7 are involved in myocardial repair and are associated with outcome in cardiovascular patients. Hence, we aimed to investigate clinically significant SDF1 SNPs for their prognostic impact in patients with cardiovascular disease. Methods and Results Genotyping for selected SDF1 variants (rs1065297, rs2839693, rs1801157, rs266087, rs266085 and rs266089 was performed in patients (n = 872) who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention. Carriers of variant rs2839693 and rs266089 showed significantly higher cumulative event-free survival compared with non-carriers. All other polymorphisms had no relevant influence on outcome. Multivariate Cox regression analysis showed a significant correlation of these SNPs with cardiovascular outcome after inclusion of clinical and prognostic relevant variables (hazard ratio (HR) 0.51 (95% CI 0.30–0.88), p = 0.015 and [HR 0.51 (95% CI 0.30–0.88), p = 0.016, respectively). In addition, multivariate Cox regression with SDF1 haplotypes revealed a significantly reduced risk for the haplotype carrying the minor alleles of rs2839693 and rs266089 (HR 0.47 (95% CI 0.27–0.84), p = 0.011). Conclusion Distinct SDF1 polymorphisms are associated with improved cardiovascular prognosis in CAD patients. Further studies are warranted to validate these results and to better describe the endogenous regeneration potential in carriers of these SNPs. Targeted, genotype guided therapeutic approaches to foster myocardial regeneration and thus cardiovascular prognosis should be evaluated in future. PMID:27607427

  11. CXCR4/SDF1 interaction inhibits the primordial to primary follicle transition in the neonatal mouse ovary.

    PubMed

    Holt, Janet E; Jackson, Andrew; Roman, Shaun D; Aitken, R John; Koopman, Peter; McLaughlin, Eileen A

    2006-05-15

    The molecular mechanisms behind the entry of the primordial follicle into the growing follicle pool remain poorly understood. To investigate this process further, a microarray-based comparison was undertaken between 2-day postpartum mouse ovaries consisting of primordial follicles/naked oocytes only and those with both primordial follicles and newly activated follicles (7-day postpartum). Gene candidates identified included the chemoattractive cytokine stromal derived factor-1 (SDF1) and its receptor CXCR4. SDF1 and CXCR4 have been implicated in a variety of physiological processes including the migration of embryonic germ cells to the gonads. SDF1-alpha expression increased with the developmental stage of the follicle. Embryonic expression was found to be dichotomous post-germ cell migration, with low expression in the female. Immunohistochemical studies nonetheless indicate that the autocrine pattern of expression ligand and receptor begins during embryonic life. Addition of recombinant SDF1-alpha to neonatal mouse ovaries in vitro resulted in significantly higher follicle densities than for control ovaries. TUNEL analysis indicated no detectable difference in populations of apoptotic cells of treated or control ovaries. Treated ovaries also contained a significantly lower percentage of activated follicles as determined by measurement of oocyte diameter and morphological analysis. Treatment of cultured ovaries with an inhibitor of SDF1-alpha, AMD3100, ablated the effect of SDF1-alpha. By retaining follicles in an unactivated state, SDF1/CXCR4 signaling may play an important role in maintaining the size and longevity of the primordial follicle pool. PMID:16545793

  12. After-pulsing, cross-talk, dark-count, and gain of MPPC under 7-T static magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Yoshiyuki; Nishikido, Fumihiko; Kokuryo, Daisuke; Yamaya, Taiga

    2016-07-01

    Multi-pixel photon counters (MPPCs) have been used instead of photomultiplier tubes for positron emission tomography combined with magnetic resonance (PET-MR). However, the effects of the magnetic field (MF) on the intrinsic properties-gain, cross-talk, after-pulsing, and dark-count-have not been sufficiently investigated. Therefore, we measured these properties for two types of MPPCs-S10931-50P and S12572-50P-in a static 7-T MF. These properties were measured with a pulse-shape analysis using pulse data acquired by a digital oscilloscope in the presence of the MF (w/MF) and the absence of the MF (w/o MF) by changing the supplied over-voltages (from 0.95 to 2.1 V for S10931 and from 2.1 to 3.3 V for S12572). No significant differences between the w/MF and w/o MF cases were observed for either MPPC, suggesting that the gain, cross-talk, after-pulsing, and dark-count are insensitive to a 7-T MF. The present work shows that constant MPPC performance is expected under a strong MF and demonstrates positive results for PET-MR. PMID:27188511

  13. On the validity of the effective field theory for dark matter searches at the LHC part III: analysis for the t-channel

    SciTech Connect

    Busoni, Giorgio; Simone, Andrea De; Jacques, Thomas; Morgante, Enrico; Riotto, Antonio E-mail: andrea.desimone@sissa.it E-mail: enrico.morgante@unige.ch

    2014-09-01

    We extend our recent analysis of the limitations of the effective field theory approach to studying dark matter at the LHC, by investigating the case in which Dirac dark matter couples to standard model quarks via t-channel exchange of a heavy scalar mediator. We provide analytical results for the validity of the effective field theory description, for both √s = 8 TeV and 14 TeV. We make use of a MonteCarlo event generator to assess the validity of our analytical conclusions. We also point out the general trend that in the regions where the effective field theory is valid, the dark matter relic abundance is typically large.

  14. Dose limited reliability of quantitative annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy for nano-particle atom-counting.

    PubMed

    De Backer, A; Martinez, G T; MacArthur, K E; Jones, L; Béché, A; Nellist, P D; Van Aert, S

    2015-04-01

    Quantitative annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy (ADF STEM) has become a powerful technique to characterise nano-particles on an atomic scale. Because of their limited size and beam sensitivity, the atomic structure of such particles may become extremely challenging to determine. Therefore keeping the incoming electron dose to a minimum is important. However, this may reduce the reliability of quantitative ADF STEM which will here be demonstrated for nano-particle atom-counting. Based on experimental ADF STEM images of a real industrial catalyst, we discuss the limits for counting the number of atoms in a projected atomic column with single atom sensitivity. We diagnose these limits by combining a thorough statistical method and detailed image simulations.

  15. New scheme for calculation of annular dark-field STEM image including both elastically diffracted and TDS waves.

    PubMed

    Mitsuishi, K; Takeguchi, M; Yasuda, H; Furuya, K

    2001-01-01

    A new scheme of calculation of high-angle annular dark-field STEM image, capable of including both elastically diffracted and thermal diffuse scattering waves, has been presented by a combination of Pennycook's and Nakamura's methods. The new scheme has been demonstrated for image simulations of Si(011) as functions of thickness, defocus values and detector angles. In the present method, the TDS electron intensities are treated in the same way as in Pennycook's method, having a clear physical picture of its origin and reflecting the atom configuration in the systems. For the case of Si(011), it has been confirmed that at the detector angle of 60 to 160 mrad, which is usually applied, the image becomes highly incoherent, and even the image formed only from SOLZ beams becomes incoherent at the detector angle. At a low detector angle, however, the image has coherent features indicating the necessity of a simulation for individual systems.

  16. Variable-angle high-angle annular dark-field imaging: application to three-dimensional dopant atom profiling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jack Y; Hwang, Jinwoo; Isaac, Brandon J; Stemmer, Susanne

    2015-07-24

    Variable-angle high-angle annular dark-field (HAADF) imaging in scanning transmission electron microscopy is developed for precise and accurate determination of three-dimensional (3D) dopant atom configurations. Gd-doped SrTiO3 films containing Sr columns containing zero, one, or two Gd dopant atoms are imaged in HAADF mode using two different collection angles. Variable-angle HAADF significantly increases both the precision and accuracy of 3D dopant profiling. Using image simulations, it is shown that the combined information from the two detectors reduces the uncertainty in the dopant depth position measurement and can uniquely identify certain atomic configurations that are indistinguishable with a single detector setting. Additional advances and applications are discussed.

  17. Impact of the phase defect structure on an actinic dark-field blank inspection signal and wafer printability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amano, Tsuyoshi; Murachi, Tetsunori; Yamane, Takeshi; Arisawa, Yukiyasu; Terasawa, Tsuneo

    2012-03-01

    A variety of phase defects (PDs) such as programmed bump and pit PDs, and native bump and pit PDs were detected by a dark-field ABI (Actinic Blank Inspection) tool. Among the PDs, some of them seemed to grow and propagate in an angular direction, away from substrate surface as was found by a TEM analysis. This presentation reports on the influence of 3-D phase defect on wafer printability, and on defect detection signals of an ABI tool. The result shows that the impact of the inclination angle on printing performance was quite significant when the PDs were not covered with the absorber pattern. On the other hand, the defect detection signal intensity was negligibly small in the case where the inclination angle was less than 9 degrees. However, ABI with its high magnification optics can pinpoint the PD's actual location as defined by the EUV light, rather than the ones that are not so clearly define by the surface topography.

  18. Electrokinetic Evaluation of Individual Exosomes by On-Chip Microcapillary Electrophoresis with Laser Dark-Field Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Kei; Kobayashi, Masashi; Hanamura, Nami; Akagi, Takanori; Kosaka, Nobuyoshi; Ochiya, Takahiro; Ichiki, Takanori

    2013-06-01

    Cell-secreted nanovesicles called exosomes are expected as a promising candidate biomarker of various diseases. Toward the future application of exosomes as a disease biomarker for low-invasive diagnostics, challenges remain in the development of sensitive and precise analysis methods for exosomes. In this study, we performed the electrokinetic evaluation of individual exosomes by the combined use of on-chip microcapillary electrophoresis and laser dark-field microscopy. We extracted exosomes from six types of human cell cultured in a serum-free medium by differential ultracentrifugation and their zeta potential (electrophoretic mobility) were evaluated. We demonstrated that the proposed electrophoresis apparatus is particularly suitable for the tracking analysis of the electrophoretic migration of individual exosomes and enables the accurate evaluation of the zeta potential distribution of exosomes, for the first time. From the experimental results, we found that there is a strong correlation between the average zeta potentials of exosomes and their cells of origin.

  19. Variable-angle high-angle annular dark-field imaging: application to three-dimensional dopant atom profiling

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jack Y.; Hwang, Jinwoo; Isaac, Brandon J.; Stemmer, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Variable-angle high-angle annular dark-field (HAADF) imaging in scanning transmission electron microscopy is developed for precise and accurate determination of three-dimensional (3D) dopant atom configurations. Gd-doped SrTiO3 films containing Sr columns containing zero, one, or two Gd dopant atoms are imaged in HAADF mode using two different collection angles. Variable-angle HAADF significantly increases both the precision and accuracy of 3D dopant profiling. Using image simulations, it is shown that the combined information from the two detectors reduces the uncertainty in the dopant depth position measurement and can uniquely identify certain atomic configurations that are indistinguishable with a single detector setting. Additional advances and applications are discussed. PMID:26206489

  20. Beam tracking approach for single-shot retrieval of absorption, refraction, and dark-field signals with laboratory x-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vittoria, Fabio A.; Kallon, Gibril K. N.; Basta, Dario; Diemoz, Paul C.; Robinson, Ian K.; Olivo, Alessandro; Endrizzi, Marco

    2015-06-01

    We present the translation of the beam tracking approach for x-ray phase-contrast and dark-field imaging, recently demonstrated using synchrotron radiation, to a laboratory setup. A single absorbing mask is used before the sample, and a local Gaussian interpolation of the beam at the detector is used to extract absorption, refraction, and dark-field signals from a single exposure of the sample. Multiple exposures can be acquired when high resolution is needed, as shown here. A theoretical analysis of the effect of polychromaticity on the retrieved signals, and of the artifacts this might cause when existing retrieval methods are used, is also discussed.

  1. The role of SDF-1-CXCR4/CXCR7 axis in biological behaviors of adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Qiang; Zhang, Aijun; Tao, Changbo; Li, Xueyang; Jin, Peisheng

    2013-11-22

    Highlights: •SDF-1 pretreating increased the levels of CXCR4, CXCR7 in ADSCs. •SDF-1 improved cells paracrine migration and proliferation abilities. •CXCR4 and CXCR7 could function in ADSCs paracrine, migration and proliferation. -- Abstract: Numerous studies have reported that CXCR4 and CXCR7 play an essential, but differential role in stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1)-inducing cell chemotaxis, viability and paracrine actions of BMSCs. Adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADSCs) have been suggested to be potential seed cells for clinical application instead of bone marrow derived stroma cell (BMSCs). However, the function of SDF-1/CXCR4 and SDF-1/CXCR7 in ADSCs is not well understood. This study was designed to analyze the effect of SDF-1/CXCR4 and SDF-1/CXCR7 axis on ADSCs biological behaviors in vitro. Using Flow cytometry and Western blot methods, we found for the first time that CXCR4/CXCR7 expression was increased after treatment with SDF-1 in ADSCs. SDF-1 promoted ADSCs paracrine, proliferation and migration abilities. CXCR4 or CXCR7 antibody suppressed ADSCs paracrine action induced by SDF-1. The migration of ADSCs can be abolished by CXCR4 antibody, while the proliferation of ADSCs was only downregulated by CXCR7 antibody. Our study indicated that the angiogenesis of ADSCs is, at least partly, mediated by SDF-1/CXCR4 and SDF-1/CXCR7 axis. However, only binding of SDF-1/CXCR7 was required for proliferation of ADSCs, and CXCR7 was required for migration of ADSCs induced by SDF-1. Our studies provide evidence that the activation of either axis may be helpful to improve the effectiveness of ADSCs-based stem cell therapy.

  2. Analysis of dark albedo features on a southern polar dune field of Mars.

    PubMed

    Horváth, András; Kereszturi, Akos; Bérczi, Szaniszló; Sik, András; Pócs, Tamás; Gánti, Tibor; Szathmáry, Eörs

    2009-01-01

    We observed 20-200 m sized low-albedo seepage-like streaks and their annual change on defrosting polar dunes in the southern hemisphere of Mars, based on the Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC), High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC), and High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) images. The structures originate from dark spots and can be described as elongated or flowlike and, at places, branching streaks. They frequently have another spotlike structure at their end. Their overall appearance and the correlation between their morphometric parameters suggest that some material is transported downward from the spots and accumulates at the bottom of the dune's slopes. Here, we present possible scenarios for the origin of such streaks, including dry avalanche, liquid CO(2), liquid H(2)O, and gas-phase CO(2). Based on their morphology and the currently known surface conditions of Mars, no model interprets the streaks satisfactorily. The best interpretation of only the morphology and morphometric characteristics is only given by the model that implies some liquid water. The latest HiRISE images are also promising and suggest liquid flow. We suggest, with better knowledge of sub-ice temperatures that result from extended polar solar insolation and the heat insulator capacity of water vapor and water ice, future models and measurements may show that ephemeral water could appear and flow under the surface ice layer on the dunes today. PMID:19203240

  3. Analysis of dark albedo features on a southern polar dune field of Mars.

    PubMed

    Horváth, András; Kereszturi, Akos; Bérczi, Szaniszló; Sik, András; Pócs, Tamás; Gánti, Tibor; Szathmáry, Eörs

    2009-01-01

    We observed 20-200 m sized low-albedo seepage-like streaks and their annual change on defrosting polar dunes in the southern hemisphere of Mars, based on the Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC), High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC), and High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) images. The structures originate from dark spots and can be described as elongated or flowlike and, at places, branching streaks. They frequently have another spotlike structure at their end. Their overall appearance and the correlation between their morphometric parameters suggest that some material is transported downward from the spots and accumulates at the bottom of the dune's slopes. Here, we present possible scenarios for the origin of such streaks, including dry avalanche, liquid CO(2), liquid H(2)O, and gas-phase CO(2). Based on their morphology and the currently known surface conditions of Mars, no model interprets the streaks satisfactorily. The best interpretation of only the morphology and morphometric characteristics is only given by the model that implies some liquid water. The latest HiRISE images are also promising and suggest liquid flow. We suggest, with better knowledge of sub-ice temperatures that result from extended polar solar insolation and the heat insulator capacity of water vapor and water ice, future models and measurements may show that ephemeral water could appear and flow under the surface ice layer on the dunes today.

  4. A divergence-free parametrization of deceleration parameter for scalar field dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Mamon, Abdulla; Das, Sudipta

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we have considered a spatially flat FRW universe filled with pressureless matter and dark energy (DE). We have considered a phenomenological parametrization of the deceleration parameter q(z) and from this, we have reconstructed the equation-of-state (EoS) for DE ωϕ(z). This divergence-free parametrization of the deceleration parameter is inspired from one of the most popular parametrization of the DE EoS given by Barboza and Alcaniz [see E. M. Barboza and J. S. Alcaniz, Phys. Lett. B 666 (2008) 415]. Using the combination of datasets (Type Ia Supernova (SN Ia) + Hubble + baryonic acoustic oscillations/cosmic microwave background (BAO/CMB)), we have constrained the transition redshift zt (at which the universe switches from a decelerating to an accelerating phase) and have found the best fit value of zt. We have also compared the reconstructed results of q(z) and ωϕ(z) and have found that the results are compatible with a ΛCDM universe if we consider SN Ia + Hubble data, but inclusion of BAO/CMB data makes q(z) and ωϕ(z) incompatible with ΛCDM model. The potential term for the present toy model is found to be functionally similar to a Higgs potential.

  5. Between Fan Pilgrimage and Dark Tourism: Competing Agendas in Overseas Field Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMorran, Chris

    2015-01-01

    An overseas field learning itinerary can be a powerful pedagogical tool for both directing student attention and complicating preexisting spatial narratives. However, one must beware of using the itinerary to replace one narrative with another. This paper examines the itinerary negotiation for a 15-day overseas field module conducted three…

  6. Nonlinear spinor field in isotropic space-time and dark energy models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Bijan

    2016-07-01

    Within the scope of the isotropic FRW cosmological model the role of nonlinear spinor field in the evolution of the Universe is studied. It is found that unlike in anisotropic cosmological models in the present case the spinor field does not possess nontrivial non-diagonal components of energy-momentum tensor, consequently it does not impose any additional restrictions on the components of the spinor field or metric function. The spinor description of different matter was given and the evolution of the Universe corresponding to these sources is illustrated. In the framework of a three-fluid system the utility of spinor description of matter is established.

  7. Comparing the Evolution of the Galaxy Disk Sizes with Cold Dark Matter Models: The Hubble Deep Field.

    PubMed

    Giallongo; Menci; Poli; D'Odorico; Fontana

    2000-02-20

    The intrinsic sizes of the field galaxies with IFields are shown as a function of their redshifts and absolute magnitudes using photometric redshifts derived from the multicolor catalogs and are compared with the cold dark matter (CDM) predictions. Extending to the lower luminosities and to the higher z that our previous analysis performed on the NTT field alone, we find the distribution of the galaxy disk sizes at different cosmic epochs is within the range predicted by typical CDM models. However, the observed size distribution of faint (MB>-19) galaxies is skewed with respect to the CDM predictions, and an excess of small-size disks (Rd<2 kpc) is already present at z approximately 0.5. The excess persists up to z approximately 3 and involves brighter galaxies. Such an excess may be reduced if luminosity-dependent effects, like starburst activity in interacting galaxies, are included in the physical mechanisms governing the star formation history in CDM models. PMID:10655168

  8. On the reach of perturbative methods for dark matter density fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldauf, Tobias; Schaan, Emmanuel; Zaldarriaga, Matias

    2016-03-01

    We study the mapping from Lagrangian to Eulerian space in the context of the Effective Field Theory (EFT) of Large Scale Structure. We compute Lagrangian displacements with Lagrangian Perturbation Theory (LPT) and perform the full non-perturbative transformation from displacement to density. When expanded up to a given order, this transformation reproduces the standard Eulerian Perturbation Theory (SPT) at the same order. However, the full transformation from displacement to density also includes higher order terms. These terms explicitly resum long wavelength motions, thus making the resulting density field better correlated with the true non-linear density field. As a result, the regime of validity of this approach is expected to extend that of the Eulerian EFT, and match that of the IR-resummed Eulerian EFT. This approach thus effectively enables a test of the IR-resummed EFT at the field level. We estimate the size of stochastic, non-perturbative contributions to the matter density power spectrum. We find that in our highest order calculation, at redshift z = 0 the power spectrum of the density field is reproduced with an accuracy of 1% (10%) up to k = 0.25 hMpc-1 (k = 0.46 hMpc-1). We believe that the dominant source of the remaining error is the stochastic contribution. Unfortunately, on these scales the stochastic term does not yet scale as k4 as it does in the very low k regime. Thus, modeling this contribution might be challenging.

  9. Dark-to-arc transition in field emission dominated atmospheric microdischarges

    SciTech Connect

    Tholeti, Siva Sashank; Semnani, Abbas; Peroulis, Dimitrios; Alexeenko, Alina A.

    2015-08-15

    We study the voltage-current characteristics of gas discharges driven by field emission of electrons at the microscale. Particle-in-cell with Monte Carlo collision calculations are first verified by comparison with breakdown voltage measurements and then used to investigate atmospheric discharges in nitrogen at gaps from 1 to 10 μm. The results indicate the absence of the classical glow discharge regime because field electron emission replaces secondary electron emission as the discharge sustaining mechanism. Additionally, the onset of arcing is significantly delayed due to rarefied effects in electron transport. While field emission reduces the breakdown voltage, the power required to sustain an arc of the same density in microgaps is as much as 30% higher than at macroscale.

  10. A study of the starless dark cloud LDN 1570: Distance, dust properties, and magnetic field geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eswaraiah, C.; Maheswar, G.; Pandey, A. K.; Jose, J.; Ramaprakash, A. N.; Bhatt, H. C.

    2013-08-01

    Aims: We aim to map the magnetic field geometry and to study the dust properties of the starless cloud, L1570, using multi-wavelength optical polarimetry and photometry of the stars projected on the cloud. Methods: The direction of the magnetic field component parallel to the plane of the sky of a cloud can be obtained using polarimetry of the stars projected on and located behind the cloud. It is believed that the unpolarized light from the stars background to the cloud undergoes selective extinction while passing through non-spherical dust grains that are aligned with their minor axes parallel to the cloud magnetic field. The emerging light becomes partially plane polarized. The observed polarization vectors trace the direction of the projected magnetic field of the cloud. We made R-band imaging polarimetry of the stars projected on a cloud, L1570, to trace the magnetic field orientation. We also made multi-wavelength polarimetric and photometric observations to constrain the properties of dust in L1570. Results: We estimated a distance of 394 ± 70 pc to the cloud using 2MASS JHKs colors. Using the values of the Serkowski parameters, σ1, overlineɛ, λmax, and the position of the stars on the near-infrared color-color diagram, we identified 13 stars that could possibly have intrinsic polarization and/or rotation in their polarization angles. One star, 2MASS J06075075+1934177, which is a B4Ve spectral type, shows diffuse interstellar bands in the spectrum in addition to the Hα line in emission. There is an indication for slightly bigger dust grains toward L1570 on the basis of the dust grain size-indicators such as λmax and RV values. The magnetic field lines are found to be parallel to the cloud structures seen in the 250 μm images (also in the 8 μm and 12 μm shadow images) of L1570. Based on the magnetic field geometry, the cloud structure, and the complex velocity structure, we conclude that L1570 is in the process of formation due to the converging flow

  11. [Effect of genotype and day or night time of testing on mice behavior in the light-dark box and the open-field tests].

    PubMed

    Morozova, M V; Kulikov, A V

    2010-01-01

    The light-dark box (LDB) and the open-field (OF) tests are widespread experimental models for studying locomotion and anxiety in laboratory rats and mice. The fact that rodents are nocturnal animals and more active at night raises a critical question of whether behavioral experiments carried out in the light phase are methodologically correct. Parameters of behavior of four mouse strains (C57BL/6J, DBA2/J, AKR/J and CBA/LacJ) in the light-dark box and open-field tests in the light and dark phases were compared. No significant influence of the phase of testing on anxiety in LDB and OF tests was revealed. In the OF test CBA mice showed increased locomotor activity, whereas AKR and C57BL/6 mice showed increased defecation in the dark phase. It was concluded that: 1) the phase of testing is not crucial for the expression of anxiety in LDB and OF; 2) the sensitivity to the phase of testing depends on the genotype; 3) the indices of behavior in the genotypes sensitive to the phase of testing (locomotion in the CBA and defecation in the AKR and C57BL/6 mouse strains) are increased in the dark phase.

  12. Dipeptidyl Peptidase-4 Regulation of SDF-1/CXCR4 Axis: Implications for Cardiovascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Jixin; Rajagopalan, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP4) is a ubiquitously expressed protease that regulates diverse number of physiological functions. As a dipeptidase, it exerts its catalytic effects on proteins/peptides with proline, alanine, or serine in the penultimate (P1) amino acid residue from the amino terminus. The evidence to date supports an important effect of DPP4 in catalytic cleavage of incretin peptides and this perhaps represents the main mechanism by which DPP4 inhibition improves glycemic control. DPP4 also plays an important role in the degradation of multiple chemokines of which stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1, also known as CXCL12) is perhaps an increasingly recognized target, given its importance in processes, such as hematopoiesis, angiogenesis, and stem cell homing. In the current review, we will summarize the importance of DPP4-mediated enzymatic processing of cytokines/chemokines with an emphasis on SDF-1 and resultant implications for cardiovascular physiology and disease. PMID:26441982

  13. Dipeptidyl Peptidase-4 Regulation of SDF-1/CXCR4 Axis: Implications for Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Jixin; Rajagopalan, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP4) is a ubiquitously expressed protease that regulates diverse number of physiological functions. As a dipeptidase, it exerts its catalytic effects on proteins/peptides with proline, alanine, or serine in the penultimate (P1) amino acid residue from the amino terminus. The evidence to date supports an important effect of DPP4 in catalytic cleavage of incretin peptides and this perhaps represents the main mechanism by which DPP4 inhibition improves glycemic control. DPP4 also plays an important role in the degradation of multiple chemokines of which stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1, also known as CXCL12) is perhaps an increasingly recognized target, given its importance in processes, such as hematopoiesis, angiogenesis, and stem cell homing. In the current review, we will summarize the importance of DPP4-mediated enzymatic processing of cytokines/chemokines with an emphasis on SDF-1 and resultant implications for cardiovascular physiology and disease. PMID:26441982

  14. Diagnostic Potential of Evaluation of SDF-1α and sRAGE Levels in Threatened Premature Labor

    PubMed Central

    Rajewska, Aleksandra; Budkowska, Marta; Kwiatkowski, Sebastian; Torbé, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Preterm birth remains the most prevalent cause of neonatal morbidity. This study aimed to evaluate the diagnostic value of SDF-1α, resistin, secretory RAGE (sRAGE), and endogenous secretory RAGE (esRAGE) in preterm labor. A total of 211 pregnant women participated in the study. Group A contained 72 women between 22 and 36 weeks of gestation, with premature labor, who finally had preterm birth. Group B contained 66 women in labor between 37 and 41 weeks of gestation. Women in group A had lower SDF-1α and sRAGE levels than those in group B. Moreover, in group A, SDF-1α and sRAGE levels were correlated with the latency period from the occurrence of premature labor symptoms until delivery. Sensitivity and specificity of studied parameters for prediction of preterm birth were 95% and 40% for SDF-1α and 51.3% and 93.5% for sRAGE, respectively. The prognostic value of plasma SDF-1α and sRAGE levels was comparable with that of cervical length ultrasound measurement and serum C-reactive protein levels. We conclude that SDF-1α and sRAGE appear to play a major role in the diagnosis of preterm birth and its evaluation could be convenient and useful for predicting preterm birth. PMID:27556030

  15. Epigenetically silenced GNG4 inhibits SDF1α/CXCR4 signaling in mesenchymal glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Jagriti; Patil, Vikas; Mondal, Baisakhi; Shukla, Sudhanshu; Hegde, Alangar S.; Arivazhagan, Arimappamagan; Santosh, Vani; Somasundaram, Kumaravel

    2016-01-01

    The most common and aggressive form of primary brain tumor in adults is glioblastoma (GBM). From the global DNA methylation profiling study, previously published from our laboratory, we identified Guanine Nucleotide binding-protein Gamma subunit 4 (GNG4) to be one of the most hyper methylated and down regulated genes in GBM. GBM derived cell lines showed reduced GNG4 transcript levels, which could be reversed by methylation inhibitor treatment. Bisulphite sequencing confirmed the methylation status in glioblastoma tumor tissue and GBM derived cell lines. Overexpression of GNG4 was found to inhibit proliferation and colony formation of GBM cell lines and in vitro transformation of immortalized human astrocytes, thus suggesting a potential tumor suppressor role of GNG4 in GBM. Correlation of GNG4 transcript levels with that of all GPCRs from TCGA data revealed chemokine receptors as the potential target of GNG4. Furthermore, exogenous over expression of GNG4 inhibited SDF1α/CXCR4-dependent chemokine signaling as seen by reduced pERK and pJNK and GBM cell migration. The inhibitory association between GNG4 and SDF1α/CXCR4 was more evident in mesenchymal subtype of GBM. Thus, this study identifies GNG4 as an inhibitor of SDF1α/CXCR4-dependent signaling and emphasizes the significance of epigenetic inactivation of GNG4 in glioblastoma, especially in mesenchymal subtype. PMID:27382437

  16. Preparation and characterization of SDF-1α-chitosan-dextran sulfate nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Bader, Andrew R; Li, Tina; Wang, Weiping; Kohane, Daniel S; Loscalzo, Joseph; Zhang, Ying-Yi

    2015-01-01

    Chitosan (CS) and dextran sulfate (DS) are charged polysaccharides (glycans), which form polyelectrolyte complex-based nanoparticles when mixed under appropriate conditions. The glycan nanoparticles are useful carriers for protein factors, which facilitate the in vivo delivery of the proteins and sustain their retention in the targeted tissue. The glycan polyelectrolyte complexes are also ideal for protein delivery, as the incorporation is carried out in aqueous solution, which reduces the likelihood of inactivation of the proteins. Proteins with a heparin-binding site adhere to dextran sulfate readily, and are, in turn, stabilized by the binding. These particles are also less inflammatory and toxic when delivered in vivo. In the protocol described below, SDF-1α (Stromal cell-derived factor-1α), a stem cell homing factor, is first mixed and incubated with dextran sulfate. Chitosan is added to the mixture to form polyelectrolyte complexes, followed by zinc sulfate to stabilize the complexes with zinc bridges. The resultant SDF-1α-DS-CS particles are measured for size (diameter) and surface charge (zeta potential). The amount of the incorporated SDF-1α is determined, followed by measurements of its in vitro release rate and its chemotactic activity in a particle-bound form. PMID:25650558

  17. The role of tyrosine sulfation in the dimerization of the CXCR4:SDF-1 complex

    PubMed Central

    Rapp, Chaya; Snow, Sara; Laufer, Talya; McClendon, Christopher L

    2013-01-01

    Oligomerization of G protein-coupled receptors is a recognized mode of regulation of receptor activities, with alternate oligomeric states resulting in different signaling functions. The CXCR4 chemokine receptor is a G protein-coupled receptor that is post-translationally modified by tyrosine sulfation at three sites on its N-terminus (Y7, Y12, Y21), leading to enhanced affinity for its ligand, stromal cell derived factor (SDF-1, also called CXCL12). The complex has been implicated in cancer metastasis and is a therapeutic target in cancer treatment. Using molecular dynamics simulation of NMR-derived structures of the CXCR4 N-terminus in complex with SDF-1, and calculations of electrostatic binding energies for these complexes, we address the role of tyrosine sulfation in this complex. Our results show that sulfation stabilizes the dimeric state of the CXCR4:SDF-1 complex through hydrogen bonding across the dimer interface, conformational changes in residues at the dimer interface, and an enhancement in electrostatic binding energies associated with dimerization. These findings suggest a mechanism through which post-translational modifications such as tyrosine sulfation might regulate downstream function through modulation of the oligomeric state of the modified system. PMID:23740770

  18. Einstein-Cartan Gravity with Torsion Field Serving as an Origin for the Cosmological Constant or Dark Energy Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, A. N.; Wellenzohn, M.

    2016-09-01

    We analyse the Einstein-Cartan gravity in its standard form { R }=R+{{ K }}2, where { R } {and} R are the Ricci scalar curvatures in the Einstein-Cartan and Einstein gravity, respectively, and {{ K }}2 is the quadratic contribution of torsion in terms of the contorsion tensor { K }. We treat torsion as an external (or background) field and show that its contribution to the Einstein equations can be interpreted in terms of the torsion energy-momentum tensor, local conservation of which in a curved spacetime with an arbitrary metric or an arbitrary gravitational field demands a proportionality of the torsion energy-momentum tensor to a metric tensor, a covariant derivative of which vanishes owing to the metricity condition. This allows us to claim that torsion can serve as an origin for the vacuum energy density, given by the cosmological constant or dark energy density in the universe. This is a model-independent result that may explain the small value of the cosmological constant, which is a long-standing problem in cosmology. We show that the obtained result is valid also in the Poincaré gauge gravitational theory of Kibble, where the Einstein-Hilbert action can be represented in the same form: { R }=R+{{ K }}2.

  19. Coupling dark energy to dark matter inhomogeneities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marra, Valerio

    2016-09-01

    We propose that dark energy in the form of a scalar field could effectively couple to dark matter inhomogeneities. Through this coupling energy could be transferred to/from the scalar field, which could possibly enter an accelerated regime. Though phenomenological, this scenario is interesting as it provides a natural trigger for the onset of the acceleration of the universe, since dark energy starts driving the expansion of the universe when matter inhomogeneities become sufficiently strong. Here we study a possible realization of this idea by coupling dark energy to dark matter via the linear growth function of matter perturbations. The numerical results show that it is indeed possible to obtain a viable cosmology with the expected series of radiation, matter and dark-energy dominated eras. In particular, the current density of dark energy is given by the value of the coupling parameters rather than by very special initial conditions for the scalar field. In other words, this model-unlike standard models of cosmic late acceleration-does not suffer from the so-called "coincidence problem" and its related fine tuning of initial conditions.

  20. Resonant SIMP dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Soo-Min; Lee, Hyun Min

    2016-07-01

    We consider a resonant SIMP dark matter in models with two singlet complex scalar fields charged under a local dark U(1)D. After the U(1)D is broken down to a Z5 discrete subgroup, the lighter scalar field becomes a SIMP dark matter which has the enhanced 3 → 2 annihilation cross section near the resonance of the heavier scalar field. Bounds on the SIMP self-scattering cross section and the relic density can be fulfilled at the same time for perturbative couplings of SIMP. A small gauge kinetic mixing between the SM hypercharge and dark gauge bosons can be used to make SIMP dark matter in kinetic equilibrium with the SM during freeze-out.

  1. The association between SDF-1 G801A polymorphism and non-small cell lung cancer risk in a Chinese Han population

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Weiguo; Cui, Rong; Yu, Huapeng

    2015-01-01

    Background: SDF-1 G801A polymorphism is reported to correlate with cancer susceptibility. However, the association between SDF-1 G801A polymorphism and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) risk in Chinese populations remains unknown. Material and methods: A total of 408 NSCLC patients and 303 health controls included in this study. Restriction length fragment polymorphism (RFLP) analysis was used to assess the frequencies of SDF-1 G801A polymorphic variant. Results: No significant association was found between SDF-1 G801A polymorphism and NSCLC risk (OR=1.268, 95% CI 0.811-2.583, P=0.361). Furthermore, SDF-1 G801A polymorphism was not correlated with histological type (P=0.697) and TNM stage (P=0.276). Conclusion: SDF-1 G801A polymorphism was not a risk factor for NSCLC in Chinese Han population. PMID:26550369

  2. Dark matter in cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luković, Vladimir; Cabella, Paolo; Vittorio, Nicola

    2014-07-01

    In this paper we review the main theoretical and experimental achievements in the field of dark matter from the cosmological and astrophysical point of view. We revisit it from the very first surveys of local astrophysical matter, up to the stringent constraints on matter properties, coming from the last release of data on cosmological scales. To bring closer and justify the idea of dark matter, we will go across methods and tools for measuring dark matter characteristics, and in some cases a combination of methods that provide one of the greatest direct proofs for dark matter, such as Bullet cluster.

  3. Atomic scale dynamics of a solid state chemical reaction directly determined by annular dark-field electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Pennycook, Timothy J; Jones, Lewys; Pettersson, Henrik; Coelho, João; Canavan, Megan; Mendoza-Sanchez, Beatriz; Nicolosi, Valeria; Nellist, Peter D

    2014-12-22

    Dynamic processes, such as solid-state chemical reactions and phase changes, are ubiquitous in materials science, and developing a capability to observe the mechanisms of such processes on the atomic scale can offer new insights across a wide range of materials systems. Aberration correction in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) has enabled atomic resolution imaging at significantly reduced beam energies and electron doses. It has also made possible the quantitative determination of the composition and occupancy of atomic columns using the atomic number (Z)-contrast annular dark-field (ADF) imaging available in STEM. Here we combine these benefits to record the motions and quantitative changes in the occupancy of individual atomic columns during a solid-state chemical reaction in manganese oxides. These oxides are of great interest for energy-storage applications such as for electrode materials in pseudocapacitors. We employ rapid scanning in STEM to both drive and directly observe the atomic scale dynamics behind the transformation of Mn3O4 into MnO. The results demonstrate we now have the experimental capability to understand the complex atomic mechanisms involved in phase changes and solid state chemical reactions.

  4. Improved In vivo Assessment of Pulmonary Fibrosis in Mice using X-Ray Dark-Field Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaroshenko, Andre; Hellbach, Katharina; Yildirim, Ali Önder; Conlon, Thomas M.; Fernandez, Isis Enlil; Bech, Martin; Velroyen, Astrid; Meinel, Felix G.; Auweter, Sigrid; Reiser, Maximilian; Eickelberg, Oliver; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2015-12-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a chronic and progressive lung disease with a median life expectancy of 4-5 years after initial diagnosis. Early diagnosis and accurate monitoring of IPF are limited by a lack of sensitive imaging techniques that are able to visualize early fibrotic changes at the epithelial-mesenchymal interface. Here, we report a new x-ray imaging approach that directly visualizes the air-tissue interfaces in mice in vivo. This imaging method is based on the detection of small-angle x-ray scattering that occurs at the air-tissue interfaces in the lung. Small-angle scattering is detected with a Talbot-Lau interferometer, which provides the so-called x-ray dark-field signal. Using this imaging modality, we demonstrate-for the first time-the quantification of early pathogenic changes and their correlation with histological changes, as assessed by stereological morphometry. The presented radiography method is significantly more sensitive in detecting morphological changes compared with conventional x-ray imaging, and exhibits a significantly lower radiation dose than conventional x-ray CT. As a result of the improved imaging sensitivity, this new imaging modality could be used in future to reduce the number of animals required for pulmonary research studies.

  5. Localized surface plasmon resonance of single silver nanoparticles studied by dark-field optical microscopy and spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Wei; Huang, Tao; Xu, Xiao-Hong Nancy; Elsayed-Ali, Hani E.

    2011-02-01

    Localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of Ag nanoparticles (NPs) with different shapes and disk-shaped Ag NP pairs with varying interparticle distance is studied using dark-field optical microscopy and spectroscopy (DFOMS). Disk-, square-, and triangular-shaped Ag NPs were fabricated on indium tin oxide-coated glass substrates by electron beam lithography. The LSPR spectra collected from single Ag NPs within 5×5 arrays using DFOMS exhibited pronounced redshifts as the NP shape changed from disk to square and to triangular. The shape-dependent experimental LSPR spectra are in good agreement with simulations using the discrete dipole approximation model, although there are small deviations in the peak wavelengths for square- and triangular-shaped NPs. The LSPR spectra of disk-shaped Ag NP pairs with varying interparticle distances were acquired from five different locations across the pair axis. It was clearly observed that the LSPR wavelength redshifts as the interparticle distance decreases, indicating a strong interaction when two Ag NPs are close to each other.

  6. Modelling of AlAs/GaAs interfacial structures using high-angle annular dark field (HAADF) image simulations.

    PubMed

    Robb, Paul D; Finnie, Michael; Craven, Alan J

    2012-07-01

    High angle annular dark field (HAADF) image simulations were performed on a series of AlAs/GaAs interfacial models using the frozen-phonon multislice method. Three general types of models were considered-perfect, vicinal/sawtooth and diffusion. These were chosen to demonstrate how HAADF image measurements are influenced by different interfacial structures in the technologically important III-V semiconductor system. For each model, interfacial sharpness was calculated as a function of depth and compared to aberration-corrected HAADF experiments of two types of AlAs/GaAs interfaces. The results show that the sharpness measured from HAADF imaging changes in a complicated manner with thickness for complex interfacial structures. For vicinal structures, it was revealed that the type of material that the probe projects through first of all has a significant effect on the measured sharpness. An increase in the vicinal angle was also shown to generate a wider interface in the random step model. The Moison diffusion model produced an increase in the interface width with depth which closely matched the experimental results of the AlAs-on-GaAs interface. In contrast, the interface width decreased as a function of depth in the linear diffusion model. Only in the case of the perfect model was it possible to ascertain the underlying structure directly from HAADF image analysis.

  7. Super-resolution of fluorescence-free plasmonic nanoparticles using enhanced dark-field illumination based on wavelength-modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Peng; Lee, Seungah; Yu, Hyunung; Fang, Ning; Ho Kang, Seong

    2015-06-01

    Super-resolution imaging of fluorescence-free plasmonic nanoparticles (NPs) was achieved using enhanced dark-field (EDF) illumination based on wavelength-modulation. Indistinguishable adjacent EDF images of 103-nm gold nanoparticles (GNPs), 40-nm gold nanorods (GNRs), and 80-nm silver nanoparticles (SNPs) were modulated at their wavelengths of specific localized surface plasmon scattering. The coordinates (x, y) of each NP were resolved by fitting their point spread functions with a two-dimensional Gaussian. The measured localization precisions of GNPs, GNRs, and SNPs were 2.5 nm, 5.0 nm, and 2.9 nm, respectively. From the resolved coordinates of NPs and the corresponding localization precisions, super-resolution images were reconstructed. Depending on the spontaneous polarization of GNR scattering, the orientation angle of GNRs in two-dimensions was resolved and provided more elaborate localization information. This novel fluorescence-free super-resolution method was applied to live HeLa cells to resolve NPs and provided remarkable sub-diffraction limit images.

  8. Super-resolution of fluorescence-free plasmonic nanoparticles using enhanced dark-field illumination based on wavelength-modulation

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Peng; Lee, Seungah; Yu, Hyunung; Fang, Ning; Ho Kang, Seong

    2015-06-15

    Super-resolution imaging of fluorescence-free plasmonic nanoparticles (NPs) was achieved using enhanced dark-field (EDF) illumination based on wavelength-modulation. Indistinguishable adjacent EDF images of 103-nm gold nanoparticles (GNPs), 40-nm gold nanorods (GNRs), and 80-nm silver nanoparticles (SNPs) were modulated at their wavelengths of specific localized surface plasmon scattering. The coordinates (x, y) of each NP were resolved by fitting their point spread functions with a two-dimensional Gaussian. The measured localization precisions of GNPs, GNRs, and SNPs were 2.5 nm, 5.0 nm, and 2.9 nm, respectively. From the resolved coordinates of NPs and the corresponding localization precisions, super-resolution images were reconstructed. Depending onmore » the spontaneous polarization of GNR scattering, the orientation angle of GNRs in two-dimensions was resolved and provided more elaborate localization information. This novel fluorescence-free super-resolution method was applied to live HeLa cells to resolve NPs and provided remarkable subdiffraction limit images.« less

  9. Optical Dark-Field and Electron Energy Loss Imaging and Spectroscopy of Symmetry-Forbidden Modes in Loaded Nanogap Antennas.

    PubMed

    Brintlinger, Todd; Herzing, Andrew A; Long, James P; Vurgaftman, Igor; Stroud, Rhonda; Simpkins, B S

    2015-06-23

    We have produced large numbers of hybrid metal-semiconductor nanogap antennas using a scalable electrochemical approach and systematically characterized the spectral and spatial character of their plasmonic modes with optical dark-field scattering, electron energy loss spectroscopy with principal component analysis, and full wave simulations. The coordination of these techniques reveal that these nanostructures support degenerate transverse modes which split due to substrate interactions, a longitudinal mode which scales with antenna length, and a symmetry-forbidden gap-localized transverse mode. This gap-localized transverse mode arises from mode splitting of transverse resonances supported on both antenna arms and is confined to the gap load enabling (i) delivery of substantial energy to the gap material and (ii) the possibility of tuning the antenna resonance via active modulation of the gap material's optical properties. The resonant position of this symmetry-forbidden mode is sensitive to gap size, dielectric strength of the gap material, and is highly suppressed in air-gapped structures which may explain its absence from the literature to date. Understanding the complex modal structure supported on hybrid nanosystems is necessary to enable the multifunctional components many seek.

  10. Enhanced dark field microscopy for rapid artifact-free detection of nanoparticle binding to Candida albicans cells and hyphae.

    PubMed

    Weinkauf, Heidi; Brehm-Stecher, Byron F

    2009-06-01

    We surveyed a panel of 13 metal nanoparticle (NP) catalysts for their antifungal activities against Candida albicans ATCC 90028. Initial characterization using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) suggested that our ability to detect NP binding to Candida surfaces with this method was impeded by preparation artifacts. As an alternative method for visualizing NP binding, we used an enhanced dark field illumination system (CytoViva) attached to a standard light microscope. When viewed using this system, all NP produced intense optical signals due to resonant light scattering. To assay binding, NP were allowed to interact with C. albicans hyphae and cells in spent RPMI broth for 15 min with gentle inversion, followed by viewing with the CytoViva system. The antifungal efficacy of NP preparations was determined separately using a 24-h broth microdilution test. For single-metal NP, observations of binding at 15 min made via CytoViva corresponded to antifungal efficacy at 24 h, with the most antifungal NP yielding complete coverage of hyphal surfaces. Our work suggests the utility of visual screening using the CytoViva system for rapid, simple and artifact-free viewing of NP-cell interactions in support of antimicrobial screening efforts. This approach provides a quick and accessible alternative to SEM for imaging of NP-cell interactions.

  11. Super-resolution of fluorescence-free plasmonic nanoparticles using enhanced dark-field illumination based on wavelength-modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Peng; Lee, Seungah; Yu, Hyunung; Fang, Ning; Ho Kang, Seong

    2015-06-15

    Super-resolution imaging of fluorescence-free plasmonic nanoparticles (NPs) was achieved using enhanced dark-field (EDF) illumination based on wavelength-modulation. Indistinguishable adjacent EDF images of 103-nm gold nanoparticles (GNPs), 40-nm gold nanorods (GNRs), and 80-nm silver nanoparticles (SNPs) were modulated at their wavelengths of specific localized surface plasmon scattering. The coordinates (x, y) of each NP were resolved by fitting their point spread functions with a two-dimensional Gaussian. The measured localization precisions of GNPs, GNRs, and SNPs were 2.5 nm, 5.0 nm, and 2.9 nm, respectively. From the resolved coordinates of NPs and the corresponding localization precisions, super-resolution images were reconstructed. Depending on the spontaneous polarization of GNR scattering, the orientation angle of GNRs in two-dimensions was resolved and provided more elaborate localization information. This novel fluorescence-free super-resolution method was applied to live HeLa cells to resolve NPs and provided remarkable subdiffraction limit images.

  12. Complete polarization characterization of single plasmonic nanoparticle enabled by a novel Dark-field Mueller matrix spectroscopy system

    PubMed Central

    Chandel, Shubham; Soni, Jalpa; Ray, Subir kumar; Das, Anwesh; Ghosh, Anirudha; Raj, Satyabrata; Ghosh, Nirmalya

    2016-01-01

    Information on the polarization properties of scattered light from plasmonic systems are of paramount importance due to fundamental interest and potential applications. However, such studies are severely compromised due to the experimental difficulties in recording full polarization response of plasmonic nanostructures. Here, we report on a novel Mueller matrix spectroscopic system capable of acquiring complete polarization information from single isolated plasmonic nanoparticle/nanostructure. The outstanding issues pertaining to reliable measurements of full 4 × 4 spectroscopic scattering Mueller matrices from single nanoparticle/nanostructures are overcome by integrating an efficient Mueller matrix measurement scheme and a robust eigenvalue calibration method with a dark-field microscopic spectroscopy arrangement. Feasibility of quantitative Mueller matrix polarimetry and its potential utility is illustrated on a simple plasmonic system, that of gold nanorods. The demonstrated ability to record full polarization information over a broad wavelength range and to quantify the intrinsic plasmon polarimetry characteristics via Mueller matrix inverse analysis should lead to a novel route towards quantitative understanding, analysis/interpretation of a number of intricate plasmonic effects and may also prove useful towards development of polarization-controlled novel sensing schemes. PMID:27212687

  13. Super-resolution of fluorescence-free plasmonic nanoparticles using enhanced dark-field illumination based on wavelength-modulation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peng; Lee, Seungah; Yu, Hyunung; Fang, Ning; Ho Kang, Seong

    2015-01-01

    Super-resolution imaging of fluorescence-free plasmonic nanoparticles (NPs) was achieved using enhanced dark-field (EDF) illumination based on wavelength-modulation. Indistinguishable adjacent EDF images of 103-nm gold nanoparticles (GNPs), 40-nm gold nanorods (GNRs), and 80-nm silver nanoparticles (SNPs) were modulated at their wavelengths of specific localized surface plasmon scattering. The coordinates (x, y) of each NP were resolved by fitting their point spread functions with a two-dimensional Gaussian. The measured localization precisions of GNPs, GNRs, and SNPs were 2.5 nm, 5.0 nm, and 2.9 nm, respectively. From the resolved coordinates of NPs and the corresponding localization precisions, super-resolution images were reconstructed. Depending on the spontaneous polarization of GNR scattering, the orientation angle of GNRs in two-dimensions was resolved and provided more elaborate localization information. This novel fluorescence-free super-resolution method was applied to live HeLa cells to resolve NPs and provided remarkable sub-diffraction limit images. PMID:26074302

  14. Impact of field-enhanced band-traps-band tunneling on the dark current generation in germanium p-i-n photodetector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ang, Kah-Wee; Ng, Joseph Weisheng; Lo, Guo-Qiang; Kwong, Dim-Lee

    2009-06-01

    This letter investigates the impact of field-enhanced band-traps-band tunneling on the dark current generation in germanium (Ge) p-i-n photodetector. We show that the existence of defect-induced traps within the forbidden gap forms the underlying leakage mechanism. Enhancing the electric field intensity is found to reduce the activation energy that governs the leakage generation rates. In the presence of enlarged band-bending, the dark current generation is further aggravated by the enhancement in electrons and holes tunneling from the resulting deep levels into the conduction and valence bands, respectively. Such field-enhanced band tunneling effect becomes increasingly prominent with a downsizing of the detector's depletion width, which imposes a design trade-off between leakage generation and bandwidth enhancement.

  15. An inexpensive approach for bright-field and dark-field imaging by scanning transmission electron microscopy in scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Patel, Binay; Watanabe, Masashi

    2014-02-01

    Scanning transmission electron microscopy in scanning electron microscopy (STEM-in-SEM) is a convenient technique for soft materials characterization. Various specimen-holder geometries and detector arrangements have been used for bright-field (BF) STEM-in-SEM imaging. In this study, to further the characterization potential of STEM-IN-SEM, a new specimen holder has been developed to facilitate direct detection of BF signals and indirect detection of dark-field (DF) signals without the need for substantial instrument modification. DF imaging is conducted with the use of a gold (Au)-coated copper (Cu) plate attached to the specimen holder which directs highly scattered transmitted electrons to an off-axis yttrium-aluminum-garnet (YAG) detector. A hole in the copper plate allows for BF imaging with a transmission electron (TE) detector. The inclusion of an Au-coated Cu plate enhanced DF signal intensity. Experiments validating the acquisition of true DF signals revealed that atomic number (Z) contrast may be achieved for materials with large lattice spacing. However, materials with small lattice spacing still exhibit diffraction contrast effects in this approach. The calculated theoretical fine probe size is 1.8 nm. At 30 kV, in this indirect approach, DF spatial resolution is limited to 3.2 nm as confirmed experimentally. PMID:24423133

  16. An inexpensive approach for bright-field and dark-field imaging by scanning transmission electron microscopy in scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Patel, Binay; Watanabe, Masashi

    2014-02-01

    Scanning transmission electron microscopy in scanning electron microscopy (STEM-in-SEM) is a convenient technique for soft materials characterization. Various specimen-holder geometries and detector arrangements have been used for bright-field (BF) STEM-in-SEM imaging. In this study, to further the characterization potential of STEM-IN-SEM, a new specimen holder has been developed to facilitate direct detection of BF signals and indirect detection of dark-field (DF) signals without the need for substantial instrument modification. DF imaging is conducted with the use of a gold (Au)-coated copper (Cu) plate attached to the specimen holder which directs highly scattered transmitted electrons to an off-axis yttrium-aluminum-garnet (YAG) detector. A hole in the copper plate allows for BF imaging with a transmission electron (TE) detector. The inclusion of an Au-coated Cu plate enhanced DF signal intensity. Experiments validating the acquisition of true DF signals revealed that atomic number (Z) contrast may be achieved for materials with large lattice spacing. However, materials with small lattice spacing still exhibit diffraction contrast effects in this approach. The calculated theoretical fine probe size is 1.8 nm. At 30 kV, in this indirect approach, DF spatial resolution is limited to 3.2 nm as confirmed experimentally.

  17. Activation and Regulation of NLRP3 Inflammasome by Intrathecal Application of SDF-1a in a Spinal Cord Injury Model.

    PubMed

    Zendedel, Adib; Johann, Sonja; Mehrabi, Soraya; Joghataei, Mohammad-Taghi; Hassanzadeh, Gholamreza; Kipp, Markus; Beyer, Cordian

    2016-07-01

    Stromal cell-derived factor-1 alpha (SDF-1a) or CXCL12 is an important cytokine with multiple functions in the brain during development and in adulthood. The inflammatory response initiated by spinal cord injury (SCI) involves the processing of interleukin-1beta (IL-1ß) and IL-18 mediated by caspase-1 which is under the control of an intracellular multiprotein complex termed inflammasome. Using an SCI rat model, we found improved functional long-term recovery which is paralleled by a reduction of apoptosis after intrathecal treatment with SDF-1a. An intriguing aspect is that SDF-1a changed the number of neuroinflammatory cells in the damaged area. We further examined the cellular localization and sequential expression of several inflammasomes during SCI at 6 h, 24 h, 3 days, and 7 days as well as the role of SDF-1a as a regulatory factor for inflammasomes. Using 14-week old male Wistar rats, spinal cord contusion was applied at the thoracic segment 9, and animals were subsequently treated with SDF-1a via intrathecal application through an osmotic pump. SCI temporally increased the expression of the inflammasomes NLRP3, ASC, the inflammatory marker tumor necrosis factor-a (TNF-a), interleukin-1ß (IL-1β) and IL-18. SDF-1a significantly reduced the levels of IL-18, IL-1b, TNF-a, NLRP3, ASC, and caspase-1. Immunofluorescence double-labeling demonstrated that microglia and neurons are major sources of the ASC and NLRP3 respectivley. Our data provide clear evidence that SCI stimulates a complex scenario of inflammasome activation at the injured site and that SDF-1a-mediated neuroprotection presumably depends on the attenuation of the inflammasome complex.

  18. Chemokine SDF-1 enhances circulating CD34(+) cell proliferation in synergy with cytokines: possible role in progenitor survival.

    PubMed

    Lataillade, J J; Clay, D; Dupuy, C; Rigal, S; Jasmin, C; Bourin, P; Le Bousse-Kerdilès, M C

    2000-02-01

    The chemokine stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1), and its receptor, CXCR-4, have been implicated in the homing and mobilization of human CD34(+) cells. We show here that SDF-1 may also be involved in hematopoiesis, promoting the proliferation of human CD34(+) cells purified from normal adult peripheral blood (PB). CXCR-4 was expressed on PB CD34(+) cells. The amount of CXCR-4 on PB CD34(+) cells was 10 times higher when CD34(+) cells were purified following overnight incubation. CXCR-4 overexpression was correlated with a primitive PB CD34(+) cell subset defined by a CD34(high) CD38(low)CD71(low)c-Kit(low)Thy-1(+) antigenic profile. The functional significance of CXCR-4 expression was ascertained by assessing the promoting effect of SDF-1alpha on cell cycle, proliferation, and colony formation. SDF-1 alone increased the percentage of CD34(+) cells in the S+G(2)/M phases and sustained their survival. In synergy with cytokines, SDF-1 increased PB CD34(+) and CD34(high)CD38(low) cell expansion and colony formation. SDF-1 also stimulated the growth of colonies derived from primitive progenitors released from quiescence by anti-TGF-beta treatment. Thus, our results shed new light on the potential role of this chemokine in the stem cell engraftment process, which involves migration, adhesion, and proliferation. Furthermore, both adhesion-induced CXCR-4 overexpression and SDF-1 stimulating activity may be of clinical relevance for improving cell therapy settings in stem cell transplantation.

  19. LyMAS: Predicting Large-scale Lyα Forest Statistics from the Dark Matter Density Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peirani, Sébastien; Weinberg, David H.; Colombi, Stéphane; Blaizot, Jérémy; Dubois, Yohan; Pichon, Christophe

    2014-03-01

    We describe Lyα Mass Association Scheme (LyMAS), a method of predicting clustering statistics in the Lyα forest on large scales from moderate-resolution simulations of the dark matter (DM) distribution, with calibration from high-resolution hydrodynamic simulations of smaller volumes. We use the "Horizon-MareNostrum" simulation, a 50 h -1 Mpc comoving volume evolved with the adaptive mesh hydrodynamic code RAMSES, to compute the conditional probability distribution P(Fs |δ s ) of the transmitted flux Fs , smoothed (one-dimensionally, 1D) over the spectral resolution scale, on the DM density contrast δ s , smoothed (three-dimensionally, 3D) over a similar scale. In this study we adopt the spectral resolution of the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) at z = 2.5, and we find optimal results for a DM smoothing length σ = 0.3 h -1 Mpc (comoving). In its simplest form, LyMAS draws randomly from the hydro-calibrated P(Fs |δ s ) to convert DM skewers into Lyα forest pseudo-spectra, which are then used to compute cross-sightline flux statistics. In extended form, LyMAS exactly reproduces both the 1D power spectrum and one-point flux distribution of the hydro simulation spectra. Applied to the MareNostrum DM field, LyMAS accurately predicts the two-point conditional flux distribution and flux correlation function of the full hydro simulation for transverse sightline separations as small as 1 h -1 Mpc, including redshift-space distortion effects. It is substantially more accurate than a deterministic density-flux mapping ("Fluctuating Gunn-Peterson Approximation"), often used for large-volume simulations of the forest. With the MareNostrum calibration, we apply LyMAS to 10243 N-body simulations of a 300 h -1 Mpc and 1.0 h -1 Gpc cube to produce large, publicly available catalogs of mock BOSS spectra that probe a large comoving volume. LyMAS will be a powerful tool for interpreting 3D Lyα forest data, thereby transforming measurements from BOSS and

  20. LyMAS: Predicting large-scale Lyα forest statistics from the dark matter density field

    SciTech Connect

    Peirani, Sébastien; Colombi, Stéphane; Dubois, Yohan; Pichon, Christophe; Weinberg, David H.; Blaizot, Jérémy

    2014-03-20

    We describe Lyα Mass Association Scheme (LyMAS), a method of predicting clustering statistics in the Lyα forest on large scales from moderate-resolution simulations of the dark matter (DM) distribution, with calibration from high-resolution hydrodynamic simulations of smaller volumes. We use the 'Horizon-MareNostrum' simulation, a 50 h {sup –1} Mpc comoving volume evolved with the adaptive mesh hydrodynamic code RAMSES, to compute the conditional probability distribution P(F{sub s} |δ {sub s}) of the transmitted flux F{sub s} , smoothed (one-dimensionally, 1D) over the spectral resolution scale, on the DM density contrast δ {sub s}, smoothed (three-dimensionally, 3D) over a similar scale. In this study we adopt the spectral resolution of the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) at z = 2.5, and we find optimal results for a DM smoothing length σ = 0.3 h {sup –1} Mpc (comoving). In its simplest form, LyMAS draws randomly from the hydro-calibrated P(F{sub s} |δ {sub s}) to convert DM skewers into Lyα forest pseudo-spectra, which are then used to compute cross-sightline flux statistics. In extended form, LyMAS exactly reproduces both the 1D power spectrum and one-point flux distribution of the hydro simulation spectra. Applied to the MareNostrum DM field, LyMAS accurately predicts the two-point conditional flux distribution and flux correlation function of the full hydro simulation for transverse sightline separations as small as 1 h {sup –1} Mpc, including redshift-space distortion effects. It is substantially more accurate than a deterministic density-flux mapping ({sup F}luctuating Gunn-Peterson Approximation{sup )}, often used for large-volume simulations of the forest. With the MareNostrum calibration, we apply LyMAS to 1024{sup 3} N-body simulations of a 300 h {sup –1} Mpc and 1.0 h {sup –1} Gpc cube to produce large, publicly available catalogs of mock BOSS spectra that probe a large comoving volume. LyMAS will be a powerful

  1. Inhibition of SDF-1α/CXCR4 Signalling in Subchondral Bone Attenuates Post-Traumatic Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yonghui; Liu, Hui; Zhang, Xuejun; Xu, Fei; Qin, Liang; Cheng, Peng; Huang, Hui; Guo, Fengjing; Yang, Qing; Chen, Anmin

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies showed that SDF-1α is a catabolic factor that can infiltrate cartilage, decrease proteoglycan content, and increase MMP-13 activity. Inhibiting the SDF-1α/CXCR4 signalling pathway can attenuate the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA). Recent studies have also shown that SDF-1α enhances chondrocyte proliferation and maturation. These results appear to be contradictory. In the current study, we used a destabilisation OA animal model to investigate the effects of SDF-1α/CXCR4 signalling in the tibial subchondral bone and the OA pathological process. Post-traumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA) mice models were prepared by transecting the anterior cruciate ligament (ACLT), or a sham surgery was performed, in a total of 30 mice. Mice were treated with phosphate buffer saline (PBS) or AMD3100 (an inhibitor of CXCR4) and sacrificed at 30 days post ACLT or sham surgery. Tibial subchondral bone status was quantified by micro-computed tomography (μCT). Knee-joint histology was analysed to examine the articular cartilage and joint degeneration. The levels of SDF-1α and collagen type I c-telopeptidefragments (CTX-I) were quantified by ELISA. Bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMCs) were used to clarify the effects of SDF-1α on osteoclast formation and activity in vivo. μCT analysis revealed significant loss of trabecular bone from tibial subchondral bone post-ACLT, which was effectively prevented by AMD3100. AMD3100 could partially prevent bone loss and articular cartilage degeneration. Serum biomarkers revealed an increase in SDF-1α and bone resorption, which were also reduced by AMD3100. SDF-1α can promote osteoclast formation and the expression oftartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP), cathepsin K (CK), and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 in osteoclasts by activating the MAPK pathway, including ERK and p38, but not JNK. In conclusion, inhibition of SDF-1α/CXCR4signalling was able to prevent trabecular bone loss and attenuated cartilage degeneration in

  2. Inhibition of SDF-1α/CXCR4 Signalling in Subchondral Bone Attenuates Post-Traumatic Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yonghui; Liu, Hui; Zhang, Xuejun; Xu, Fei; Qin, Liang; Cheng, Peng; Huang, Hui; Guo, Fengjing; Yang, Qing; Chen, Anmin

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies showed that SDF-1α is a catabolic factor that can infiltrate cartilage, decrease proteoglycan content, and increase MMP-13 activity. Inhibiting the SDF-1α/CXCR4 signalling pathway can attenuate the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA). Recent studies have also shown that SDF-1α enhances chondrocyte proliferation and maturation. These results appear to be contradictory. In the current study, we used a destabilisation OA animal model to investigate the effects of SDF-1α/CXCR4 signalling in the tibial subchondral bone and the OA pathological process. Post-traumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA) mice models were prepared by transecting the anterior cruciate ligament (ACLT), or a sham surgery was performed, in a total of 30 mice. Mice were treated with phosphate buffer saline (PBS) or AMD3100 (an inhibitor of CXCR4) and sacrificed at 30 days post ACLT or sham surgery. Tibial subchondral bone status was quantified by micro-computed tomography (μCT). Knee-joint histology was analysed to examine the articular cartilage and joint degeneration. The levels of SDF-1α and collagen type I c-telopeptidefragments (CTX-I) were quantified by ELISA. Bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMCs) were used to clarify the effects of SDF-1α on osteoclast formation and activity in vivo. μCT analysis revealed significant loss of trabecular bone from tibial subchondral bone post-ACLT, which was effectively prevented by AMD3100. AMD3100 could partially prevent bone loss and articular cartilage degeneration. Serum biomarkers revealed an increase in SDF-1α and bone resorption, which were also reduced by AMD3100. SDF-1α can promote osteoclast formation and the expression oftartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP), cathepsin K (CK), and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 in osteoclasts by activating the MAPK pathway, including ERK and p38, but not JNK. In conclusion, inhibition of SDF-1α/CXCR4signalling was able to prevent trabecular bone loss and attenuated cartilage degeneration in

  3. Mesenchymal stem cells regulate mechanical properties of human degenerated nucleus pulposus cells through SDF-1/CXCR4/AKT axis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ming-Han; Bian, Bai-Shi-Jiao; Cui, Xiang; Liu, Lan-Tao; Liu, Huan; Huang, Bo; Cui, You-Hong; Bian, Xiu-Wu; Zhou, Yue

    2016-08-01

    Transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) into the degenerated intervertebral disc (IVD) has shown promise for decelerating or arresting IVD degeneration. Cellular mechanical properties play crucial roles in regulating cell-matrix interactions, potentially reflecting specific changes that occur based on cellular phenotype and behavior. However, the effect of co-culturing of MSCs with nucleus pulposus cells (NPCs) on the mechanical properties of NPCs remains unknown. In our study, we demonstrated that co-culture of degenerated NPCs with MSCs resulted in significantly decreased mechanical moduli (elastic modulus, relaxed modulus, and instantaneous modulus) and increased biological activity (proliferation and expression of matrix genes) in degenerated NPCs, but not normal NPCs. SDF-1, CXCR4 ligand, was highly expressed in MSCs when co-cultured with degenerated NPCs. Inhibition of SDF-1 using CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100 or knocking-down CXCR4 in degenerated NPCs abolished the MSCs-induced decrease in the mechanical moduli and increased biological activity of degenerated NPCs, suggesting a crucial role for SDF-1/CXCR4 signaling. AKT and FAK inhibition attenuated the MSCs- or SDF-1-induced decrease in the mechanical moduli of degenerated NPCs. In conclusion, it was demonstrated in vitro that MSCs regulate the mechanical properties of degenerated NPCs through SDF-1/CXCR4/AKT signaling. These findings highlight a possible mechanical mechanism for MSCs-induced modulation with degenerated NPCs, which may be applicable to MSCs-based therapy for disc degeneration.

  4. Assessment of mouse anxiety-like behavior in the light-dark box and open-field arena: role of equipment and procedure.

    PubMed

    Kulesskaya, Natalia; Voikar, Vootele

    2014-06-22

    Light-dark box and open field are conventional tests for assessment of anxiety-like behavior in the laboratory mice, based on approach-avoidance conflict. However, except the basic principles, variations in the equipment and procedures are very common. Therefore, contribution of certain methodological issues in different settings was investigated. Three inbred strains (C57BL/6, 129/Sv, DBA/2) and one outbred stock (ICR) of mice were used in the experiments. An effect of initial placement of mice either in the light or dark compartment was studied in the light-dark test. Moreover, two tracking systems were applied - position of the animals was detected either by infrared sensors in square box (1/2 dark) or by videotracking in rectangular box (1/3 dark). Both approaches revealed robust and consistent strain differences in the exploratory behavior. In general, C57BL/6 and ICR mice showed reduced anxiety-like behavior as compared to 129/Sv and DBA/2 strains. However, the latter two strains differed markedly in their behavior. DBA/2 mice displayed high avoidance of the light compartment accompanied by thigmotaxis, whereas the hypoactive 129 mice spent a significant proportion of time in risk-assessment behavior at the opening between two compartments. Starting from the light side increased the time spent in the light compartment and reduced the latency to the first transition. In the open field arena, black floor promoted exploratory behavior - increased time and distance in the center and increased rearing compared to white floor. In conclusion, modifications of the apparatus and procedure had significant effects on approach-avoidance behavior in general whereas the strain rankings remained unaffected.

  5. Oxidation-state sensitive imaging of cerium dioxide by atomic-resolution low-angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Johnston-Peck, Aaron C; Winterstein, Jonathan P; Roberts, Alan D; DuChene, Joseph S; Qian, Kun; Sweeny, Brendan C; Wei, Wei David; Sharma, Renu; Stach, Eric A; Herzing, Andrew A

    2016-03-01

    Low-angle annular dark field (LAADF) scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) imaging is presented as a method that is sensitive to the oxidation state of cerium ions in CeO2 nanoparticles. This relationship was validated through electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), in situ measurements, as well as multislice image simulations. Static displacements caused by the increased ionic radius of Ce(3+) influence the electron channeling process and increase electron scattering to low angles while reducing scatter to high angles. This process manifests itself by reducing the high-angle annular dark field (HAADF) signal intensity while increasing the LAADF signal intensity in close proximity to Ce(3+) ions. This technique can supplement STEM-EELS and in so doing, relax the experimental challenges associated with acquiring oxidation state information at high spatial resolutions. PMID:26744830

  6. Oxidation-state sensitive imaging of cerium dioxide by atomic-resolution low-angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Johnston-Peck, Aaron C; Winterstein, Jonathan P; Roberts, Alan D; DuChene, Joseph S; Qian, Kun; Sweeny, Brendan C; Wei, Wei David; Sharma, Renu; Stach, Eric A; Herzing, Andrew A

    2016-03-01

    Low-angle annular dark field (LAADF) scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) imaging is presented as a method that is sensitive to the oxidation state of cerium ions in CeO2 nanoparticles. This relationship was validated through electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), in situ measurements, as well as multislice image simulations. Static displacements caused by the increased ionic radius of Ce(3+) influence the electron channeling process and increase electron scattering to low angles while reducing scatter to high angles. This process manifests itself by reducing the high-angle annular dark field (HAADF) signal intensity while increasing the LAADF signal intensity in close proximity to Ce(3+) ions. This technique can supplement STEM-EELS and in so doing, relax the experimental challenges associated with acquiring oxidation state information at high spatial resolutions.

  7. Electric-field-induced switchable dark conglomerate phases in a bent-core liquid crystal exhibiting reverse columnar phases.

    PubMed

    Deepa, G B; Radhika, S; Sadashiva, B K; Pratibha, R

    2013-06-01

    Electric-field-induced transitions into switchable dark conglomerate (DC) phases from two types of reverse columnar mesophases have been observed in the bent-core (BC) compound 2,7-naphthylene bis[4-(3-methyl-4-n-tetradecyloxybenzoyloxy)] benzoate. Optical and x-ray studies show that the higher temperature columnar phase corresponds to the orthogonal B(1rev) phase, whereas the lower temperature columnar phase is a variant of the B(1revtilt) phase. As the layer fragments in this phase are modulated in order to relieve the steric hindrance caused by an anticlinic tilting in adjacent blocks, it has been named B(1revtiltM). The shape of the chiral domains are different in the DC phases viz. DC-B(1rev) and DC-B(1revtiltM) obtained by applying the electric field in the B(1rev) and B(1revtiltM) phases, respectively. While the chiral domains in the DC-B(1rev) phase appear similar to those observed in other DC phases, the shape of the domains in the DC-B(1revtiltM) phase appear to have some similarity to the domains in the banana leaf texture in the B(1revtiltM) phase implying that the detailed structure in this DC phase may be different. Optical observations, electro-optics, and dielectric studies show that the DC-B(1rev) and DC-B(1revtiltM) phases are both switchable and possess a local SmC(S)P(F) type of structure. As the temperature is decreased the switching behavior changes from ferroelectric to antiferroelectric. The temperature at which this changeover starts occurring coincides with the temperature at which the layer modulation occurs to overcome anticlinic tilt and the B(1rev) to B(1revtiltM) phase transition takes place without the application of the electric field. The change in switching behavior is attributed to a transformation into flat layers with the SmC(A)P(A) type of structure as also evidenced by the nucleation of bright regions alongside the chiral domains.

  8. Nanoscale strain distributions in embedded SiGe semiconductor devices revealed by precession electron diffraction and dual lens dark field electron holography

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y. Y.; Cooper, D.; Bernier, N.; Rouviere, J.; Murray, C. E.; Bruley, J.

    2015-01-26

    The detailed strain distributions produced by embedded SiGe stressor structures are measured at high spatial resolution with high precision, with dual lens dark field electron holography and precession electron diffraction. Shear strain and lattice rotation within the crystalline lattice are observed at the boundaries between the SiGe and Si regions. The experimental results are compared to micromechanical modeling simulations to understand the mechanisms of elastic relaxation on all the modes of deformation at a sub-micron length scale.

  9. Dark matter superfluid and DBI dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Rong-Gen; Wang, Shao-Jiang

    2016-01-01

    It was shown recently that, without jeopardizing the success of the Λ cold dark matter model on cosmic scales, the modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND) can be derived as an emergent phenomenon when axionlike dark matter particles condense into superfluid on the galactic scales. We propose in this paper a Dirac-Born-Infeld (DBI) scalar field conformally coupled to the matter components. To maintain the success of MOND phenomenon of dark matter superfluid on the galactic scales, the fifth force introduced by the DBI scalar should be screened on the galactic scales. It turns out that the screening effect naturally leads to a simple explanation for a longstanding puzzle that the MOND critical acceleration coincides with present Hubble scale. This galactic coincidence problem is solved, provided that the screened DBI scalar also plays the role of dark energy on the cosmic scales.

  10. Dark Matters

    ScienceCinema

    Joseph Silk

    2016-07-12

    One of the greatest mysteries in the cosmos is that it is mostly dark.  Astronomers and particle physicists today are seeking to unravel the nature of this mysterious, but pervasive dark matter which has profoundly influenced the formation of structure in the universe.  I will describe the complex interplay between galaxy formation and dark matter detectability and review recent attempts to measure particle dark matter by direct and indirect means.

  11. Dark Matters

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph Silk

    2009-09-23

    One of the greatest mysteries in the cosmos is that it is mostly dark.  Astronomers and particle physicists today are seeking to unravel the nature of this mysterious, but pervasive dark matter which has profoundly influenced the formation of structure in the universe.  I will describe the complex interplay between galaxy formation and dark matter detectability and review recent attempts to measure particle dark matter by direct and indirect means.

  12. Fingerprinting dark energy

    SciTech Connect

    Sapone, Domenico; Kunz, Martin

    2009-10-15

    Dark energy perturbations are normally either neglected or else included in a purely numerical way, obscuring their dependence on underlying parameters like the equation of state or the sound speed. However, while many different explanations for the dark energy can have the same equation of state, they usually differ in their perturbations so that these provide a fingerprint for distinguishing between different models with the same equation of state. In this paper we derive simple yet accurate approximations that are able to characterize a specific class of models (encompassing most scalar-field models) which is often generically called 'dark energy'. We then use the approximate solutions to look at the impact of the dark energy perturbations on the dark matter power spectrum and on the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect in the cosmic microwave background radiation.

  13. sdf1 Expression Reveals a Source of Perivascular-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Lund, Troy C.; Patrinostro, Xiaobai; Kramer, Ashley C.; Stadem, Paul; Higgins, LeeAnn; Markowski, Todd W.; Wroblewski, Matt S.; Lidke, Diane S.; Tolar, Jakub; Blazar, Bruce R.

    2014-01-01

    There is accumulating evidence that mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have their origin as perivascular cells (PVC) in vivo, but precisely identifying them has been a challenge, as they have no single definitive marker and are rare. We have developed a fluorescent transgenic vertebrate model in which PVC can be visualized in vivo based upon sdf1 expression in the zebrafish. Prospective isolation and culture of sdf1DsRed PVC demonstrated properties consistent with MSC including prototypical cell surface marker expression; mesodermal differentiation into adipogenic, osteogenic and chondrogenic lineages; and the ability to support hematopoietic cells. Global proteomic studies performed by 2-dimensional liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry revealed a high degree of similarity to human MSC and discovery of novel markers (CD99, CD151 and MYOF) that were previously unknown to be expressed by hMSC. Dynamic in vivo imaging during fin regeneration showed that PVC may arise from undifferentiated mesenchyme providing evidence of a PVC – MSC relationship. This is the first model, established in zebrafish, in which MSC can be visualized in vivo and will allow us to better understand their function in a native environment. PMID:24905975

  14. Dark matters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steigman, Gary

    The observational evidence for dark matter in the universe is reviewed. Constraints on the baryon density from primordial nucleosynthesis are presented and compared to the dynamical estimates of the mass on various scales. Baryons can account for the observed luminous mass as well as some, perhaps most, of the 'observed' dark mass. However if, as inflation/naturalness suggest, the total density of the universe is equal to the critical density, then nonbaryonic dark matter is required. The assets and liabilities of, as well as the candidates for, hot and cold dark matter are outlined. At present, there is no completely satisfactory candidate for nonbaryonic dark matter.

  15. Beam tracking approach for single–shot retrieval of absorption, refraction, and dark-field signals with laboratory  x-ray sources

    SciTech Connect

    Vittoria, Fabio A. Diemoz, Paul C.; Olivo, Alessandro; Kallon, Gibril K. N.; Basta, Dario; Endrizzi, Marco; Robinson, Ian K.

    2015-06-01

    We present the translation of the beam tracking approach for x-ray phase-contrast and dark-field imaging, recently demonstrated using synchrotron radiation, to a laboratory setup. A single absorbing mask is used before the sample, and a local Gaussian interpolation of the beam at the detector is used to extract absorption, refraction, and dark–field signals from a single exposure of the sample. Multiple exposures can be acquired when high resolution is needed, as shown here. A theoretical analysis of the effect of polychromaticity on the retrieved signals, and of the artifacts this might cause when existing retrieval methods are used, is also discussed.

  16. Cold dark matter halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubinski, John Joseph

    The dark halos arising in the Cold Dark Matter (CDM) cosmology are simulated to investigate the relationship between the structure and kinematics of dark halos and galaxies. Realistic cosmological initial conditions and tidal field boundary conditions are used in N-body simulations of the collapse of density peaks to form dark halos. The core radii of dark halos are no greater than the softening radius, rs = 1.4 kpc. The density profiles can be fit with an analytical Hernquist (1990) profile with an effective power law which varies between -1 in the center to -4 at large radii. The rotation curves of dark halos resemble the flat rotation curves of spiral galaxies in the observed range, 1.5 approximately less than r approximately less than 30 kpc. The halos are strongly triaxial and very flat with (c/a) = 0.50 and (b/a) = 0.71. The distribution of ellipticities for dark halos reaches a maximum at epsilon = 0.5 in contrast to the distribution for elliptical galaxies which peaks at epsilon = 0.2 suggesting that ellipticals are much rounder than dark halos. Dark halos are generally flatter than their progenitor density peaks. The final shape and orientation of a dark halo are largely determined by tidal torquing and are sensitive to changes in the strength and orientation of a tidal field. Dark halos are pressure supported objects with negligible rotational support as indicated by the mean dimensionless spin, lamda = 0.042 +/- 0.024. The angular momentum vector tends to align with the true minor axis of dark halos. Elliptical galaxies have a similar behavior implied by the observation of the tendency for alignment of the rotation vector and the apparent minor axis. The origin of this behavior may be traced to the tendency for tidal torques to misalign with the major axis of a density peak. Tidal torques are found to isotropize the velocity ellipsoids of dark halos at large radii, contrary to the expectation of radially anisotropic velocity ellipsoids in cold collapse

  17. Dilaton-assisted dark matter.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yang; Carena, Marcela; Lykken, Joseph

    2009-12-31

    A dilaton could be the dominant messenger between standard model fields and dark matter. The measured dark matter relic abundance relates the dark matter mass and spin to the conformal breaking scale. The dark matter-nucleon spin-independent cross section is predicted in terms of the dilaton mass. We compute the current constraints on the dilaton from LEP and Tevatron experiments, and the gamma-ray signal from dark matter annihilation to dilatons that could be observed by Fermi Large Area Telescope.

  18. Dilaton-Assisted Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Bai Yang; Lykken, Joseph; Carena, Marcela

    2009-12-31

    A dilaton could be the dominant messenger between standard model fields and dark matter. The measured dark matter relic abundance relates the dark matter mass and spin to the conformal breaking scale. The dark matter-nucleon spin-independent cross section is predicted in terms of the dilaton mass. We compute the current constraints on the dilaton from LEP and Tevatron experiments, and the gamma-ray signal from dark matter annihilation to dilatons that could be observed by Fermi Large Area Telescope.

  19. Long-term administration of AMD3100, an antagonist of SDF-1/CXCR4 signaling, alters fracture repair.

    PubMed

    Toupadakis, Chrisoula A; Wong, Alice; Genetos, Damian C; Chung, Dai-Jung; Murugesh, Deepa; Anderson, Matthew J; Loots, Gabriela G; Christiansen, Blaine A; Kapatkin, Amy S; Yellowley, Clare E

    2012-11-01

    Fracture healing involves rapid stem and progenitor cell migration, homing, and differentiation. SDF-1 (CXCL12) is considered a master regulator of CXCR4-positive stem and progenitor cell trafficking to sites of ischemic (hypoxic) injury and regulates their subsequent differentiation into mature reparative cells. In this study, we investigated the role of SDF-1/CXCR4 signaling in fracture healing where vascular disruption results in hypoxia and SDF-1 expression. Mice were injected with AMD3100, a CXCR4 antagonist, or vehicle twice daily until euthanasia with the intent to impair stem cell homing to the fracture site and/or their differentiation. Fracture healing was evaluated using micro-computed tomography, histology, quantitative PCR, and mechanical testing. AMD3100 administration resulted in a significantly reduced hyaline cartilage volume (day 14), callus volume (day 42) and mineralized bone volume (day 42) and reduced expression of genes associated with endochondral ossification including collagen Type 1 alpha 1, collagen Type 2 alpha 1, vascular endothelial growth factor, Annexin A5, nitric oxide synthase 2, and mechanistic target of rapamycin. Our data suggest that the SDF-1/CXCR4 signaling plays a central role in bone healing possibly by regulating the recruitment and/or differentiation of stem and progenitor cells.

  20. Long-Term Administration of AMD3100, an Antagonist of SDF-1/CXCR4 Signaling, Alters Fracture Repair

    PubMed Central

    Toupadakis, Chrisoula A.; Wong, Alice; Genetos, Damian C.; Chung, Dai-Jung; Murugesh, Deepa; Anderson, Matthew J.; Loots, Gabriela G.; Christiansen, Blaine A.; Kapatkin, Amy S.; Yellowley, Clare E.

    2013-01-01

    Fracture healing involves rapid stem and progenitor cell migration, homing, and differentiation. SDF-1 (CXCL12) is considered a master regulator of CXCR4-positive stem and progenitor cell trafficking to sites of ischemic (hypoxic) injury and regulates their subsequent differentiation into mature reparative cells. In this study, we investigated the role of SDF-1/CXCR4 signaling in fracture healing where vascular disruption results in hypoxia and SDF-1 expression. Mice were injected with AMD3100, a CXCR4 antagonist, or vehicle twice daily until euthanasia with the intent to impair stem cell homing to the fracture site and/or their differentiation. Fracture healing was evaluated using micro-computed tomography, histology, quantitative PCR, and mechanical testing. AMD3100 administration resulted in a significantly reduced hyaline cartilage volume (day 14), callus volume (day 42) and mineralized bone volume (day 42) and reduced expression of genes associated with endochondral ossification including collagen Type 1 alpha 1, collagen Type 2 alpha 1, vascular endothelial growth factor, Annexin A5, nitric oxide synthase 2, and mechanistic target of rapamycin. Our data suggest that the SDF-1/CXCR4 signaling plays a central role in bone healing possibly by regulating the recruitment and/or differentiation of stem and progenitor cells. PMID:22592891

  1. Dark strings

    SciTech Connect

    Vachaspati, Tanmay

    2009-09-15

    Recent astrophysical observations have motivated novel theoretical models of the dark matter sector. A class of such models predicts the existence of GeV scale cosmic strings that communicate with the standard model sector by Aharonov-Bohm interactions with electrically charged particles. We discuss the cosmology of these 'dark strings' and investigate possible observational signatures. More elaborate dark sector models are argued to contain hybrid topological defects that may also have observational signatures.

  2. Cosmological properties and reconstruction of scalar field models of the Holographic Dark Energy model with Granda-Oliveros cut-off in Kaluza-Klein cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasqua, Antonio; Chattopadhyay, Surajit; Assaf, Khudhair A.; Salako, Ines G.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we study the properties of the Holographic Dark Energy (HDE) model in the context of Kaluza-Klein (KK) cosmology with infrared cut-off given by the recently proposed by Granda-Oliveros cut-off, which contains a term proportional to the time derivative of the Hubble parameter and one proportional to the Hubble parameter squared. Moreover, this cut-off is characterized by two free parameters which are the proportional constants of the two terms of the cut-off. We derive the expression of the Equation of State (EoS) parameter ωD and of the deceleration parameter q for both non-interacting and interacting Dark Sectors and in the limiting case of a flat Dark Dominated Universe. Moreover, we study the squared speed of the sound vs2 and the statefinder diagnostic \\{r,s\\} in order to understand the cosmological properties of the model considered. We also develop a correspondence between the model considered and three scalar field models: the tachyon, the k-essence and the quintessence ones.

  3. Functional response to SDF1α through over-expression of CXCR4 on adult subventricular zone progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xian Shuang; Chopp, Michael; Santra, Manoranjan; Hozeska-Solgot, Ann; Zhang, Rui Lan; Wang, Lei; Teng, Hua; Liu, Mei; Zhang, Zheng Gang

    2008-01-01

    The chemokine receptor CXCR4 and its ligand, stromal cell derived factor-1α (SDF1α) regulate neuroblast migration towards the ischemic boundary after stroke. Using loss-and gain-function, we investigated the biological effect of CXCR4/SDF1α on neural progenitor cells. Neural progenitor cells, from the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the adult rat, were transfected with rat CXCR4-pLEGFP-C1 and pSIREN-RetroQ-CXCR4-siRNA retroviral vectors. Migration assay analysis showed that inhibition of CXCR4 by siRNA significantly reduced cell migration compared to the empty vector, indicating that CXCR4 mediated neural progenitor cell motility. When neural progenitor cells were cultured in growth medium containing bFGF (20 ng/ml), over-expression of CXCR4 significantly reduced the cell proliferation as measured by the number of bromodeoxyuridine+ (BrdU+) cells (26.4%) compared with the number in the control group (54.0%). Addition of a high concentration of SDF1α (500 ng/ml) into the progenitor cells with over-expression of CXCR4 reversed the cell proliferation back to the control levels (57.6%). Immunostaining analysis showed that neither over-expression nor inhibition of CXCR4 altered the population of neurons and astrocytes, when neural progenitor cells were cultured in differentiation medium. These in vitro results suggest that CXCR4/SDF1α primarily regulates adult neural progenitor cell motility but not differentiation, while over-expression of CXCR4 in the absence of SDF1α decreases neural progenitor cell proliferation. PMID:18598677

  4. Synergistic effects of SDF-1α chemokine and hyaluronic acid release from degradable hydrogels on directing bone marrow derived cell homing to the myocardium

    PubMed Central

    Purcell, Brendan P.; Elser, Jeremy A.; Mu, Anbin; Margulies, Kenneth B.; Burdick, Jason A.

    2012-01-01

    Poor cell engraftment in the myocardium is a limiting factor towards the use of bone marrow-derived cells (BMCs) to treat myocardial infarction (MI). In order to enhance the engraftment of circulating BMCs in the myocardium following MI, we have developed in situ forming hyaluronic acid (HA) hydrogels with degradable crosslinks to sustain the release of recombinant stromal cell-derived factor-1 alpha (rSDF-1α) and HA to the injured myocardium. Both rSDF-1α and the crosslinkable HA macromer stimulate BMC chemotaxis up to 4-fold in vitro through CXCR4 and CD44 receptor signaling, respectively. Moreover, the HA macromer binds rSDF-1α with a dissociation constant of 36 ± 5 µM through electrostatic interaction. When formed into hydrogels via photoinitiated crosslinking, release of encapsulated rSDF-1α and crosslinked HA was sustained for 7 days, and these molecules significantly increased BMC chemotaxis in vitro. When applied to the heart following experimental MI in mice, the HA gel containing rSDF-1α significantly increased the number of systemically infused BMCs in the heart by ~8.5 fold after 7 days, likely through both systemic and local effects of released molecules. We conclude that sustained release of rSDF-1α and HA from our engineered HA hydrogels enhances BMC homing to the remodeling myocardium better than delivery of rSDF-1α alone. PMID:22835643

  5. The SDF-1 rs1801157 Polymorphism is Associated with Cancer Risk: An Update Pooled Analysis and FPRP Test of 17,876 Participants

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Xiang; Ma, Yao; Deng, Huajiang; Wang, Xixi; Liu, Sitong; Yan, Zhipeng; Peng, Shifeng; Fan, Hong

    2016-01-01

    The stromal cell derived factor-1 (SDF-1) rs1801157 gene polymorphism has been implicated in susceptibility to cancer, but the results were inconclusive. The current study was to precisely investigate the association between SDF-1 rs1801157 polymorphism and cancer risk using meta-analysis and the false positive report probability (FPRP) test. All 17,876 participants were included in the study. The meta-analysis results indicated a significant association between the SDF-1 rs1801157 polymorphism and cancer risk. By subgroup analyses, the results detected that the SDF-1 rs1801157 polymorphism was associated with cancer susceptibility among Asians and Caucasians. Additionally, we also found significant associations between the SDF-1 rs1801157 polymorphism and susceptibility to different types of cancer. However, to avoid a “false positive report”, we further investigated the significant associations observed in the present meta-analysis using the FPRP test. Interestingly, the results of the FPRP test indicated that only 4 gene models were truly associated with cancer risk, especially in Asians. Moreover, we confirmed that the SDF-1 rs1801157 gene polymorphism was only associated with lung and urologic cancer risk. In summary, this study suggested that the SDF-1 rs1801157 polymorphism may serve as a risk factor for cancer development among Asians, especially an increased risk of urologic and lung cancers. PMID:27265091

  6. Boron concentration profiling by high angle annular dark field-scanning transmission electron microscopy in homoepitaxial δ-doped diamond layers

    SciTech Connect

    Araújo, D.; Alegre, M. P.; Piñero, J. C.; Fiori, A.; Bustarret, E.; Jomard, F.

    2013-07-22

    To develop further diamond related devices, the concentration and spatial location of dopants should be controlled down to the nanometer scale. Scanning transmission electron microscopy using the high angle annular dark field mode is shown to be sensitive to boron doping in diamond epilayers. An analytical procedure is described, whereby local boron concentrations above 10{sup 20} cm{sup −3} were quantitatively derived down to nanometer resolution from the signal dependence on thickness and boron content. Experimental boron local doping profiles measured on diamond p{sup −}/p{sup ++}/p{sup −} multilayers are compared to macroscopic profiles obtained by secondary ion mass spectrometry, avoiding reported artefacts.

  7. A dark-field microscope for background-free detection of resonance fluorescence from single semiconductor quantum dots operating in a set-and-forget mode.

    PubMed

    Kuhlmann, Andreas V; Houel, Julien; Brunner, Daniel; Ludwig, Arne; Reuter, Dirk; Wieck, Andreas D; Warburton, Richard J

    2013-07-01

    Optically active quantum dots, for instance self-assembled InGaAs quantum dots, are potentially excellent single photon sources. The fidelity of the single photons is much improved using resonant rather than non-resonant excitation. With resonant excitation, the challenge is to distinguish between resonance fluorescence and scattered laser light. We have met this challenge by creating a polarization-based dark-field microscope to measure the resonance fluorescence from a single quantum dot at low temperature. We achieve a suppression of the scattered laser exceeding a factor of 10(7) and background-free detection of resonance fluorescence. The same optical setup operates over the entire quantum dot emission range (920-980 nm) and also in high magnetic fields. The major development is the outstanding long-term stability: once the dark-field point has been established, the microscope operates for days without alignment. The mechanical and optical designs of the microscope are presented, as well as exemplary resonance fluorescence spectroscopy results on individual quantum dots to underline the microscope's excellent performance.

  8. A dark-field microscope for background-free detection of resonance fluorescence from single semiconductor quantum dots operating in a set-and-forget mode

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhlmann, Andreas V.; Houel, Julien; Warburton, Richard J.; Brunner, Daniel; Ludwig, Arne; Reuter, Dirk; Wieck, Andreas D.

    2013-07-15

    Optically active quantum dots, for instance self-assembled InGaAs quantum dots, are potentially excellent single photon sources. The fidelity of the single photons is much improved using resonant rather than non-resonant excitation. With resonant excitation, the challenge is to distinguish between resonance fluorescence and scattered laser light. We have met this challenge by creating a polarization-based dark-field microscope to measure the resonance fluorescence from a single quantum dot at low temperature. We achieve a suppression of the scattered laser exceeding a factor of 10{sup 7} and background-free detection of resonance fluorescence. The same optical setup operates over the entire quantum dot emission range (920–980 nm) and also in high magnetic fields. The major development is the outstanding long-term stability: once the dark-field point has been established, the microscope operates for days without alignment. The mechanical and optical designs of the microscope are presented, as well as exemplary resonance fluorescence spectroscopy results on individual quantum dots to underline the microscope's excellent performance.

  9. Unified dark energy-dark matter model with inverse quintessence

    SciTech Connect

    Ansoldi, Stefano; Guendelman, Eduardo I. E-mail: guendel@bgu.ac.il

    2013-05-01

    We consider a model where both dark energy and dark matter originate from the coupling of a scalar field with a non-canonical kinetic term to, both, a metric measure and a non-metric measure. An interacting dark energy/dark matter scenario can be obtained by introducing an additional scalar that can produce non constant vacuum energy and associated variations in dark matter. The phenomenology is most interesting when the kinetic term of the additional scalar field is ghost-type, since in this case the dark energy vanishes in the early universe and then grows with time. This constitutes an ''inverse quintessence scenario'', where the universe starts from a zero vacuum energy density state, instead of approaching it in the future.

  10. Plasmon-induced transparency in metamaterials: Active near field coupling between bright superconducting and dark metallic mode resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Wei; Singh, Ranjan; Zhang, Caihong; Han, Jiaguang; Tonouchi, Masayoshi; Zhang, Weili

    2013-09-01

    Structured plasmonic metamaterial devices offer the design flexibility to be size scaled for operation across the electromagnetic spectrum and are extremely attractive for generating electromagnetically induced transparency and slow-light behaviors via coupling of bright and dark subwavelength resonators. Here, we experimentally demonstrate a thermally active superconductor-metal coupled resonator based hybrid terahertz metamaterial on a sapphire substrate that shows tunable transparency and slow light behavior as the metamaterial chip is cooled below the high-temperature superconducting phase transition temperature. This hybrid metamaterial opens up the avenues for designing micro-sized active circuitry with switching, modulation, and "slowing down terahertz light" capabilities.

  11. Voids of dark energy

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, Sourish; Maor, Irit

    2007-03-15

    We investigate the clustering properties of a dynamical dark energy component. In a cosmic mix of a pressureless fluid and a light scalar field, we follow the linear evolution of spherical matter perturbations. We find that the scalar field tends to form underdensities in response to the gravitationally collapsing matter. We thoroughly investigate these voids for a variety of initial conditions, explain the physics behind their formation, and consider possible observational implications. Detection of dark energy voids will clearly rule out the cosmological constant as the main source of the present acceleration.

  12. Wide-field lensing mass maps from Dark Energy Survey science verification data: Methodology and detailed analysis

    DOE PAGES

    Vikram, V.

    2015-07-29

    Weak gravitational lensing allows one to reconstruct the spatial distribution of the projected mass density across the sky. These “mass maps” provide a powerful tool for studying cosmology as they probe both luminous and dark matter. In this paper, we present a weak lensing mass map reconstructed from shear measurements in a 139 deg2 area from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) science verification data. We compare the distribution of mass with that of the foreground distribution of galaxies and clusters. The overdensities in the reconstructed map correlate well with the distribution of optically detected clusters. We demonstrate that candidate superclustersmore » and voids along the line of sight can be identified, exploiting the tight scatter of the cluster photometric redshifts. We cross-correlate the mass map with a foreground magnitude-limited galaxy sample from the same data. Our measurement gives results consistent with mock catalogs from N-body simulations that include the primary sources of statistical uncertainties in the galaxy, lensing, and photo-z catalogs. The statistical significance of the cross-correlation is at the 6.8σ level with 20 arcminute smoothing. We find that the contribution of systematics to the lensing mass maps is generally within measurement uncertainties. In this study, we analyze less than 3% of the final area that will be mapped by the DES; the tools and analysis techniques developed in this paper can be applied to forthcoming larger data sets from the survey.« less

  13. Wide-field lensing mass maps from Dark Energy Survey science verification data: Methodology and detailed analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Vikram, V.

    2015-07-29

    Weak gravitational lensing allows one to reconstruct the spatial distribution of the projected mass density across the sky. These “mass maps” provide a powerful tool for studying cosmology as they probe both luminous and dark matter. In this paper, we present a weak lensing mass map reconstructed from shear measurements in a 139 deg2 area from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) science verification data. We compare the distribution of mass with that of the foreground distribution of galaxies and clusters. The overdensities in the reconstructed map correlate well with the distribution of optically detected clusters. We demonstrate that candidate superclusters and voids along the line of sight can be identified, exploiting the tight scatter of the cluster photometric redshifts. We cross-correlate the mass map with a foreground magnitude-limited galaxy sample from the same data. Our measurement gives results consistent with mock catalogs from N-body simulations that include the primary sources of statistical uncertainties in the galaxy, lensing, and photo-z catalogs. The statistical significance of the cross-correlation is at the 6.8σ level with 20 arcminute smoothing. We find that the contribution of systematics to the lensing mass maps is generally within measurement uncertainties. In this study, we analyze less than 3% of the final area that will be mapped by the DES; the tools and analysis techniques developed in this paper can be applied to forthcoming larger data sets from the survey.

  14. Wide-field lensing mass maps from Dark Energy Survey science verification data: Methodology and detailed analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vikram, V.; Chang, C.; Jain, B.; Bacon, D.; Amara, A.; Becker, M. R.; Bernstein, G.; Bonnett, C.; Bridle, S.; Brout, D.; Busha, M.; Frieman, J.; Gaztanaga, E.; Hartley, W.; Jarvis, M.; Kacprzak, T.; Kovács, A.; Lahav, O.; Leistedt, B.; Lin, H.; Melchior, P.; Peiris, H.; Rozo, E.; Rykoff, E.; Sánchez, C.; Sheldon, E.; Troxel, M. A.; Wechsler, R.; Zuntz, J.; Abbott, T.; Abdalla, F. B.; Armstrong, R.; Banerji, M.; Bauer, A. H.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Capozzi, D.; Carnero Rosell, A.; Carrasco Kind, M.; Castander, F. J.; Crocce, M.; Cunha, C. E.; D'Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; DePoy, D. L.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Estrada, J.; Evrard, A. E.; Fausti Neto, A.; Fernandez, E.; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Gerdes, D.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Honscheid, K.; James, D.; Kent, S.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Li, T. S.; Maia, M. A. G.; Makler, M.; March, M.; Marshall, J.; Martini, P.; Merritt, K. W.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Neilsen, E.; Nichol, R. C.; Nord, B.; Ogando, R.; Plazas, A. A.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Sevilla, I.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thaler, J.; Thomas, D.; Walker, A. R.; Weller, J.

    2015-07-01

    Weak gravitational lensing allows one to reconstruct the spatial distribution of the projected mass density across the sky. These "mass maps" provide a powerful tool for studying cosmology as they probe both luminous and dark matter. In this paper, we present a weak lensing mass map reconstructed from shear measurements in a 139 deg2 area from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) science verification data. We compare the distribution of mass with that of the foreground distribution of galaxies and clusters. The overdensities in the reconstructed map correlate well with the distribution of optically detected clusters. We demonstrate that candidate superclusters and voids along the line of sight can be identified, exploiting the tight scatter of the cluster photometric redshifts. We cross-correlate the mass map with a foreground magnitude-limited galaxy sample from the same data. Our measurement gives results consistent with mock catalogs from N -body simulations that include the primary sources of statistical uncertainties in the galaxy, lensing, and photo-z catalogs. The statistical significance of the cross-correlation is at the 6.8 σ level with 20 arcminute smoothing. We find that the contribution of systematics to the lensing mass maps is generally within measurement uncertainties. In this work, we analyze less than 3% of the final area that will be mapped by the DES; the tools and analysis techniques developed in this paper can be applied to forthcoming larger data sets from the survey.

  15. Dark coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Gavela, M.B.; Hernández, D.; Honorez, L. Lopez; Mena, O.; Rigolin, S. E-mail: d.hernandez@uam.es E-mail: omena@ific.uv.es

    2009-07-01

    The two dark sectors of the universe—dark matter and dark energy—may interact with each other. Background and linear density perturbation evolution equations are developed for a generic coupling. We then establish the general conditions necessary to obtain models free from non-adiabatic instabilities. As an application, we consider a viable universe in which the interaction strength is proportional to the dark energy density. The scenario does not exhibit ''phantom crossing'' and is free from instabilities, including early ones. A sizeable interaction strength is compatible with combined WMAP, HST, SN, LSS and H(z) data. Neutrino mass and/or cosmic curvature are allowed to be larger than in non-interacting models. Our analysis sheds light as well on unstable scenarios previously proposed.

  16. Dark Matter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lincoln, Don

    2013-01-01

    It's a dark, dark universe out there, and I don't mean because the night sky is black. After all, once you leave the shadow of the Earth and get out into space, you're surrounded by countless lights glittering everywhere you look. But for all of Sagan's billions and billions of stars and galaxies, it's a jaw-dropping fact that the ordinary kind of…

  17. Stem cell homing and angiomyogenesis in transplanted hearts are enhanced by combined intramyocardial SDF-1α delivery and endogenous cytokine signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Tiemin; Zhang, Dongsheng; Millard, Ronald W.; Ashraf, Muhammad; Wang, Yigang

    2009-01-01

    We used a heterotopic transplanted working heart model to probe the collaborative role of bone marrow-derived progenitor cells (BPCs) and stromal cell-derived factor (SDF)-1α in attenuating tissue remodeling in recipient and transplanted hearts. BPCs from male transgenic rats expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP+ BPCs, 2 × 106 cells) were injected intravenously into myeloablated female rats. One month later, heterotopic heart transplantation was performed. The left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) of the recipient heart was occluded permanently. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs; 2 × 106 cells) with a null gene (null group) or overexpressing SDF-1α (SDF-1α group) were injected intramyocardially in the LAD perfusion region of both recipient and transplanted hearts. Recipient and transplanted hearts (n = 10 hearts/group) were harvested 21 days later for analysis. The survival of transplanted hearts was assessed daily by palpation in additional animals (n = 7). Five days after LAD occlusion, subpopulations of GFP+ BPCs in the circulation were significantly higher in the SDF-1α group. Y chromosome, 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine, Ki67-positive nuclei, newly formed vessels, and GFP+ cells significantly increased in transplanted hearts of the SDF-1α group at 21 days after the injection of MSCs overexpressing SDF-1α, whereas fewer TUNEL-positive nuclei were found. The survival of transplanted hearts was also markedly increased in the SDF-1α group (P < 0.05). Supplementation of endogenous cytokines released from the ischemic myocardium with exogenous MSCs overexpressing SDF-1α significantly increased BPC homing to acutely ischemic recipient and progressively ischemic transplanted hearts. BPC recruitment resulted in the regeneration of new cardiomyocytes and blood vessels and extended survival of the transplanted hearts. PMID:19181961

  18. Dark GPC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bañas, Andrew R.; Villangca, Mark J.; Palima, Darwin; Glückstad, Jesper

    2016-03-01

    Generalized Phase Contrast (GPC) is an efficient method for efficiently shaping light into speckle-free contiguous optical distributions useful in diverse applications such as static beam shaping, optical manipulation and recently, for excitation in two-photon optogenetics. GPC typically results in a 3x intensified user defined input mask shape against a dark background. In this work, we emphasize GPC's capability of optimal destructive interference, normally used to create the dark background surrounding the shaped light. We also study input parameters wherein the locations of light and darkness are interchanged with respect to typical GPC output, thus resulting to a well-defined structured darkness. The conditions that give destructive interference for the output are then applied to near-arbitrary shapes. Preliminary experimental results are presented using dynamic spatial light modulator to form scaled arbitrary darkness shapes. Supporting demonstrations that reverse the light and dark regions of amplitude-modulated input are also presented as a related case of structuring destructive interference. Our analysis and experimental demonstrations show a simplified approach in the generation of extended regions of destructive interference within coherent beams.

  19. DC and Wave Electric Fields and Other Plasma Parameters Observed on Two Sounding Rockets in the Dark Cusp during IMF BZ North and South Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfaff, R. F.; Bounds, S.; Acuna, M.; Maynard, N. C.; Moen, J.; Egeland, A.; Holtet, J.; Maseide, K.; Sandholt, P. E.; Soraas, F.

    1999-01-01

    Two Black Brant IX sounding rockets were launched into the dark, dayside cusp near magnetic noon on December 2 and 3, 1997, from Ny Alesund, Spitzbergen at 79degN reaching altitudes of approximately 450 km. Real-time ground-based and Wind (interplanetary magnetic field) IMF data were used to determine the launch conditions. The first launch, with Bz north conditions, crossed into and back out of an open field region with merging poleward of the projected trajectory. The second flight, into Bz south conditions, was timed to coincide with an enhancement in the merging rate from a increase in the negative Bz, while the (Defense Meteorological Satellite Program) DMSP F13 satellite was situated slightly to the north of the rocket trajectory. Each payload returned DC electric and magnetic fields, plasma waves, energetic particles, photometer data, and thermal plasma data. Data from both flights will be shown, with an emphasis on the DC electric field results. In particular, the data gathered on December 2, 1997 will be used to discuss ionospheric signatures of merging and the open/closed character of the the cusp/low latitude boundary layer. In contrast, the data gathered on December 3, 1997 shows evidence of pulsed electric field structures which will be examined in the context of cusp plasma entry processes. Both data sets returned a rich variety of plasma waves, as well as optical emissions and thermal plasma data.

  20. Gα13 and Rho mediate endosomal trafficking of CXCR4 into Rab11+ vesicles upon SDF-1 stimulation1

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ashok; Kremer, Kimberly N.; Dominguez, Daniel; Tadi, Madhavi; Hedin, Karen E.

    2011-01-01

    CXCR4, like other G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), signals via heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide binding proteins (G proteins) to regulate gene transcription, migration, development, growth and transformation. We describe here a formerly-uncharacterized function of a G protein: a role in receptor trafficking. We previously showed that CXCR4 and the TCR physically associate and form a heterodimer upon SDF-1 stimulation in human T cells in order to prolong ERK activation, and thereby lead to gene-upregulation and cytokine secretion. The CXCR4-TCR heterodimers occur both on the cell surface and in an intracellular compartment in response to SDF-1. Neither the intracellular compartment to which the CXCR4-TCR heterodimers localize nor the mechanism for localization has been elucidated. Here, we characterize molecular mechanisms required for post-endocytic trafficking of CXCR4. Upon SDF-1 stimulation, CXCR4 localizes to Rab11+ vesicles, a recycling compartment, near the MTOC and Golgi apparatus. This trafficking requires the CXCR4 carboxyl-terminal tail domain but not the CXCR4 ubiquitination sites. The TCR also constitutively localizes to this Rab11+ compartment. Trafficking of CXCR4 into the Rab11+, TCR-containing endosomes requires actin polymerization. Furthermore, either inhibiting Rho activation or depleting Gα13 prevented trafficking of CXCR4 into the Rab11+ endosomes without hindering the ability of CXCR4 to endocytose. These results indicate that, upon SDF-1 treatment, Gα13 and Rho mediate the actin polymerization necessary for trafficking CXCR4 into the Rab11+, recycling endosomal compartment which also contains constitutively recycling TCR and thus CXCR4-TCR heterodimers. This is the first time that Gα13 has been described to mediate receptor trafficking. PMID:21148034

  1. Stromal cell-derived factor-1{alpha} (SDF-1{alpha}/CXCL12) stimulates ovarian cancer cell growth through the EGF receptor transactivation

    SciTech Connect

    Porcile, Carola; Bajetto, Adriana . E-mail: bajetto@cba.unige.it; Barbieri, Federica; Barbero, Simone; Bonavia, Rudy; Biglieri, Marianna; Pirani, Paolo; Florio, Tullio . E-mail: florio@cba.unige.it; Schettini, Gennaro

    2005-08-15

    Ovarian cancer (OC) is the leading cause of death in gynecologic diseases in which there is evidence for a complex chemokine network. Chemokines are a family of proteins that play an important role in tumor progression influencing cell proliferation, angiogenic/angiostatic processes, cell migration and metastasis, and, finally, regulating the immune cells recruitment into the tumor mass. We previously demonstrated that astrocytes and glioblastoma cells express both the chemokine receptor CXCR4 and its ligand stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1), and that SDF-1{alpha} treatment induced cell proliferation, supporting the hypothesis that chemokines may play an important role in tumor cells' growth in vitro. In the present study, we report that CXCR4 and SDF-1 are expressed in OC cell lines. We demonstrate that SDF-1{alpha} induces a dose-dependent proliferation in OC cells, by the specific interaction with CXCR4 and a biphasic activation of ERK1/2 and Akt kinases. Our results further indicate that CXCR4 activation induces EGF receptor (EGFR) phosphorylation that in turn was linked to the downstream intracellular kinases activation, ERK1/2 and Akt. In addition, we provide evidence for cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase (c-Src) involvement in the SDF-1/CXCR4-EGFR transactivation. These results suggest a possible important 'cross-talk' between SDF-1/CXCR4 and EGFR intracellular pathways that may link signals of cell proliferation in ovarian cancer.

  2. PTH/SDF-1α cotherapy induces CD90+CD34− stromal cells migration and promotes tissue regeneration in a rat periodontal defect model

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fang; Du, Lingqian; Ge, Shaohua

    2016-01-01

    Stromal cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1α) is a key stem cell homing factor that is crucial for recruitment of stem cells to many diseased organs. However, the therapeutic activity of SDF-1α is potentially limited by N-terminal cleavage at position-2 proline by a cell surface protein CD26/dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-IV). Parathyroid hormone (PTH) is a DPP-IV inhibitor and has been suggested as a promising agent for periodontal tissue repair. The purpose of this study was to explore the effects of a cell-free system comprising SDF-1α and scaffold plus PTH systemic application on periodontal tissue regeneration in vivo. The results showed that PTH/SDF-1α cotherapy improved the quantity of regenerated bone and resulted in better organization of ligament interface. We further investigated the possible mechanisms, and found that PTH/SDF-1α cotherapy enhanced CD90+CD34− stromal cells migration in vivo, increased the number of CXCR4 + cells in periodontal defects, induced early bone osteoclastogenesis and enhanced the expression of runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and collagen I (Col I) in newly formed bone tissue. In conclusion, this cell-free tissue engineering system with local administration of SDF-1α and systemic application of PTH could be employed to induce CD90+CD34− stromal cells recruitment and promote periodontal tissue regeneration. PMID:27480134

  3. Differential effects of subchronic phencyclidine on anxiety in the light-enhanced startle-, light/dark exploration- and open field tests.

    PubMed

    Enkel, Thomas; Thomas, Mara; Bartsch, Dusan

    2013-04-15

    Subchronic treatment with the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonist phencyclidine (PCP) is a valuable approach to model the symptomatology of schizophrenia, a multi-facetted psychiatric disorder, in rodents. We addressed the question whether subchronic PCP (scPCP) treatment (5 mg/kg bidaily for 7 days) would affect anxiety in rats, since contradictory findings have been reported so far. Anxiety-like behaviour was assessed using the light-enhanced startle paradigm (LES), a method which measures the effect of the natural aversion to light on the startle reflex and does not depend on motivated behaviour or exploratory drive. For comparison, anxiety-like behaviour was measured in the light-dark exploration test (LDT) and in an open field environment (OFT). The scPCP-treatment did not affect baseline startle reactivity or light-enhanced startle, suggesting normal anxiety levels in treated animals. Further, normal anxiety-like behaviour was also found in the OFT. In the LDT, scPCP treated rats displayed shorter latencies to enter the lit compartment and shuttled more between the dark and lit compartments, behaviours indicative of decreased anxiety and/or increased exploratory activity. Our findings therefore suggest that the effects of scPCP-treatment on anxiety-like behaviour are task-dependent and recommend the additional use of tests independent from exploratory drive or other motivated behaviours, such as the LES paradigm.

  4. Single-Stage Operation of Hybrid Dark-Photo Fermentation to Enhance Biohydrogen Production through Regulation of System Redox Condition: Evaluation with Real-Field Wastewater.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Rashmi; Nikhil, G N; Mohan, S Venkata

    2015-01-01

    Harnessing hydrogen competently through wastewater treatment using a particular class of biocatalyst is indeed a challenging issue. Therefore, biohydrogen potential of real-field wastewater was evaluated by hybrid fermentative process in a single-stage process. The cumulative hydrogen production (CHP) was observed to be higher with distillery wastewater (271 mL) than with dairy wastewater (248 mL). Besides H₂ production, the hybrid process was found to be effective in wastewater treatment. The chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency was found higher in distillery wastewater (56%) than in dairy wastewater (45%). Co-culturing photo-bacterial flora assisted in removal of volatile fatty acids (VFA) wherein 63% in distillery wastewater and 68% in case of dairy wastewater. Voltammograms illustrated dominant reduction current and low cathodic Tafel slopes supported H₂ production. Overall, the augmented dark-photo fermentation system (ADPFS) showed better performance than the control dark fermentation system (DFS). This kind of holistic approach is explicitly viable for practical scale-up operation. PMID:25927577

  5. A Stringent Limit on the Warm Dark Matter Particle Masses from the Abundance of z = 6 Galaxies in the Hubble Frontier Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menci, N.; Grazian, A.; Castellano, M.; Sanchez, N. G.

    2016-07-01

    We show that the recently measured UV luminosity functions of ultra-faint lensed galaxies at z ≈ 6 in the Hubble Frontier Fields provide an unprecedented probe for the mass m X of the warm dark matter (WDM) candidates independent of baryonic physics. Comparing the measured abundance of the faintest galaxies with the maximum number density of dark matter halos in WDM cosmologies sets a robust limit of m X ≥ 2.9 keV for the mass of thermal relic WDM particles at a 1σ confidence level, m X ≥ 2.4 keV at 2σ, and m X ≥ 2.1 keV at 3σ. These constraints are independent of the baryonic physics involved in galaxy formation and constitute the tightest constraints on WDM particle mass derived to date. We discuss the impact of our results on the production mechanism of sterile neutrinos. In particular, if sterile neutrinos are responsible for the 3.5 keV line reported in observations of X-ray clusters, our results firmly rule out the Dodelson-Widrow production mechanism and yield m sterile ≳ 6.1 keV for sterile neutrinos produced via the Shi-Fuller mechanism.

  6. A Stringent Limit on the Warm Dark Matter Particle Masses from the Abundance of z = 6 Galaxies in the Hubble Frontier Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menci, N.; Grazian, A.; Castellano, M.; Sanchez, N. G.

    2016-07-01

    We show that the recently measured UV luminosity functions of ultra-faint lensed galaxies at z ≈ 6 in the Hubble Frontier Fields provide an unprecedented probe for the mass m X of the warm dark matter (WDM) candidates independent of baryonic physics. Comparing the measured abundance of the faintest galaxies with the maximum number density of dark matter halos in WDM cosmologies sets a robust limit of m X ≥ 2.9 keV for the mass of thermal relic WDM particles at a 1σ confidence level, m X ≥ 2.4 keV at 2σ, and m X ≥ 2.1 keV at 3σ. These constraints are independent of the baryonic physics involved in galaxy formation and constitute the tightest constraints on WDM particle mass derived to date. We discuss the impact of our results on the production mechanism of sterile neutrinos. In particular, if sterile neutrinos are responsible for the 3.5 keV line reported in observations of X-ray clusters, our results firmly rule out the Dodelson–Widrow production mechanism and yield m sterile ≳ 6.1 keV for sterile neutrinos produced via the Shi–Fuller mechanism.

  7. Single-Stage Operation of Hybrid Dark-Photo Fermentation to Enhance Biohydrogen Production through Regulation of System Redox Condition: Evaluation with Real-Field Wastewater

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Rashmi; Nikhil, G. N.; Mohan, S. Venkata

    2015-01-01

    Harnessing hydrogen competently through wastewater treatment using a particular class of biocatalyst is indeed a challenging issue. Therefore, biohydrogen potential of real-field wastewater was evaluated by hybrid fermentative process in a single-stage process. The cumulative hydrogen production (CHP) was observed to be higher with distillery wastewater (271 mL) than with dairy wastewater (248 mL). Besides H2 production, the hybrid process was found to be effective in wastewater treatment. The chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency was found higher in distillery wastewater (56%) than in dairy wastewater (45%). Co-culturing photo-bacterial flora assisted in removal of volatile fatty acids (VFA) wherein 63% in distillery wastewater and 68% in case of dairy wastewater. Voltammograms illustrated dominant reduction current and low cathodic Tafel slopes supported H2 production. Overall, the augmented dark-photo fermentation system (ADPFS) showed better performance than the control dark fermentation system (DFS). This kind of holistic approach is explicitly viable for practical scale-up operation. PMID:25927577

  8. SDF-1α-induced dual pairs of E-selectin/ligand mediate endothelial progenitor cell homing to critical ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhao-Jun; Tian, Runxia; Li, Yan; Zhang, Leiming; Shao, Hongwei; Yang, Cuixia; Velazquez, Omaida C.

    2016-01-01

    Homing of endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) to the ischemic tissues is a key event in neovascularization and tissue regeneration. In response to ischemic insult, injured tissues secrete several chemo-cytokines, including stromal cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1α), which triggers mobilization and homing of bone marrow-derived EPC (BMD-EPC). We previously reported that SDF-1α-induced EPC homing is mediated by a panel of adhesion molecules highly or selectively expressed on the activated endothelium in ischemic tissues, including E-selectin. Elevated E-selectin on wound vasculature serve as docking sites for circulating EPC, which express counterpart E-selectin ligands. Here, we show that SDF-1α presented in wound tissue and released into circulation can act both locally and remotely to induce ischemic tissue endothelium and BMD-EPC to express both E-selectin and its ligands. By performing BM transplantation using E-selectin−/− and E-selectin+/+ mice as the donors and recipients respectively, we demonstrate that upregulated dual E-selectin/ligand pairs reciprocally expressed on ischemic tissue endothelium and BMD-EPC act as double-locks to secure targeted EPC- endothelium interactions by which to facilitate EPC homing and promote neovascularization and tissue repair. These findings describe a novel mechanism for BMD-EPC homing and indicate that dual E-selectin/ligand pairs may be effective targets/tools for therapeutic neovascularization and targeted cell delivery. PMID:27713493

  9. Direct Renin Inhibition with Aliskiren Improves Ischemia-Induced Neovasculogenesis in Diabetic Animals via the SDF-1 Related Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ting-Ting; Wu, Tao-Cheng; Huang, Po-Hsun; Lin, Chih-Pei; Chen, Jia-Shiong; Lin, Liang-Yu; Lin, Shing-Jong; Chen, Jaw-Wen

    2015-01-01

    Objective Aliskiren is a direct renin inhibitor which is suggested to modify proangiogenic cells in addition to lower blood pressure. Given that angiogenesis is impaired in the presence of diabetes mellitus, we would like to investigate whether and how aliskiren enhances endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and improves ischemic-induced neovasculogenesis by an effect independent of blood pressure reduction in diabetic animals. Methods Streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice were administered with either aliskiren (5 or 25 mg/kg/day) using an osmotic pump or hydralazine (2 or 10 mg/kg/day) given in drinking water for two weeks prior to a hind-limb ischemia surgery. Laser Doppler imaging and flow cytometry were used to evaluate the degree of neovasculogenesis and the circulating levels of EPCs, respectively. Results In streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice, aliskiren enhanced the recovery of limb perfusion and capillary density, increased the number of circulating Sca-1+/Flk-1+ EPC-like cells, and elevated the levels of the plasma vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and stromal cell-derived factor (SDF)-1α in a dose-dependent manner, whereas there were no such effects in hydralazine-treated mice. Intraperitoneal administration of anti-SDF-1 neutralizing monoclonal antibodies abolished the effects of aliskiren. Conclusions Independent of the reduction of blood pressure, aliskiren enhanced ischemia-induced neovasculogenesis in a dose-dependent manner via VEGF/SDF-1α related mechanisms in diabetic mice. PMID:26305217

  10. Interacting dark sector with transversal interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Chimento, Luis P.; Richarte, Martín G.

    2015-03-26

    We investigate the interacting dark sector composed of dark matter, dark energy, and dark radiation for a spatially flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) background by introducing a three-dimensional internal space spanned by the interaction vector Q and solve the source equation for a linear transversal interaction. Then, we explore a realistic model with dark matter coupled to a scalar field plus a decoupled radiation term, analyze the amount of dark energy in the radiation era and find that our model is consistent with the recent measurements of cosmic microwave background anisotropy coming from Planck along with the future constraints achievable by CMBPol experiment.

  11. A two measure model of dark energy and dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Guendelman, Eduardo; Singleton, Douglas; Yongram, N. E-mail: dougs@csufresno.edu

    2012-11-01

    In this work we construct a unified model of dark energy and dark matter. This is done with the following three elements: a gravitating scalar field, φ with a non-conventional kinetic term, as in the string theory tachyon; an arbitrary potential, V(φ); two measures — a metric measure ((−g){sup 1/2}) and a non-metric measure (Φ). The model has two interesting features: (i) For potentials which are unstable and would give rise to tachyonic scalar field, this model can stabilize the scalar field. (ii) The form of the dark energy and dark matter that results from this model is fairly insensitive to the exact form of the scalar field potential.

  12. p53 status in stromal fibroblasts modulates tumor growth in an SDF1-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Addadi, Yoseph; Moskovits, Neta; Granot, Dorit; Lozano, Guillermina; Carmi, Yaron; Apte, Ron N.; Neeman, Michal; Oren, Moshe

    2010-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor exerts a variety of cell-autonomous effects that are aimed to thwart tumor development. In addition, however, there is growing evidence for cell non-autonomous tumor suppressor effects of p53. In the present study, we investigated the impact of stromal p53 on tumor growth. Specifically, we found that ablation of p53 in fibroblasts enabled them to promote more efficiently the growth of tumors initiated by PC3 prostate cancer-derived cells. This stimulatory effect was dependent on the increased expression of the chemokine SDF-1 in the p53-deficient fibroblasts. Notably, fibroblasts harboring mutant p53 protein were more effective than p53-null fibroblasts in promoting tumor growth. The presence of either p53-null or p53-mutant fibroblasts led also to a markedly elevated rate of metastatic spread of the PC3 tumors. These findings implicate p53 in a cell non-autonomous tumor suppressor role within stromal fibroblasts, through suppressing the production of tumor-stimulatory factors by these cells. Moreover, expression of mutant p53 by tumor stroma fibroblasts might exert a gain of function effect, further accelerating tumor development. PMID:20952507

  13. The Spectroscopy of Neutron-Rich sdf-Shell Nuclei Using the CLARA-PRISMA Setup

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, X.; Hodsdon, A.; Chapman, R.; Burns, M.; Keyes, K.; Ollier, J.; Papenberg, A.; Spohr, K.; Azaiez, F.; Ibrahim, F.; Stanoiu, M.; Haas, F.; Caurier, E.; Curien, D.; Nowacki, F.; Salsac, M.-D.; Bazzacco, D.; Beghini, S.; Farnea, E.; Menegazzo, R.

    2006-08-14

    Since the discovery of the breakdown of shell effects in very neutron-rich N=20 and 28 nuclei, studies of the properties of nuclei far from stability have been of intense interest since they provide a unique opportunity to increase our understanding of nuclear interactions in extreme conditions and often challenge our theoretical models.Deep-inelastic processes can be used to populated high spin states of neutron-rich nuclei. In the deep-inelastic processes, an equilibration in N/Z between the target and projectile nuclei is achieved. For most heavy neutron-rich target nuclei, the N/Z ratio is 1.5 - 1.6, while for the possible neutron-rich sdf-shell projectile it is about 1.2. Thus by using deep-inelastic processes one can populate neutron-rich nuclei around N=20 and N=28.New results for the spectroscopy of neutron-rich N=22 36Si and 37P are presented here.

  14. Hybrid plasmonic gap modes in metal film-coupled dimers and their physical origins revealed by polarization resolved dark field spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guang-Can; Zhang, Yong-Liang; Lei, Dang Yuan

    2016-03-01

    Plasmonic gap modes sustained by metal film-coupled nanostructures have recently attracted extensive research attention due to flexible control over their spectral response and significantly enhanced field intensities at the particle-film junction. In this work, by adopting an improved dark field spectroscopy methodology - polarization resolved spectral decomposition and colour decoding - we are able to ``visualize'' and distinguish unambiguously the spectral and far field radiation properties of the complex plasmonic gap modes in metal film-coupled nanosphere monomers and dimers. Together with full-wave numerical simulation results, it is found that while the monomer-film system supports two hybridized dipole-like plasmon modes having different oscillating orientations and resonance strengths, the scattering spectrum of the dimer-film system features two additional peaks, one strong yet narrow resonant mode corresponding to a bonding dipolar moment and one hybridized higher order resonant mode, both polarized along the dimer axis. In particular, we demonstrate that the polarization dependent scattering radiation of the film-coupled nanosphere dimer can be used to optically distinguish from monomers and concurrently determine the spatial orientation of the dimer with significantly improved accuracy at the single-particle level, illustrating a simple yet highly sensitive plasmon resonance based nanometrology method.Plasmonic gap modes sustained by metal film-coupled nanostructures have recently attracted extensive research attention due to flexible control over their spectral response and significantly enhanced field intensities at the particle-film junction. In this work, by adopting an improved dark field spectroscopy methodology - polarization resolved spectral decomposition and colour decoding - we are able to ``visualize'' and distinguish unambiguously the spectral and far field radiation properties of the complex plasmonic gap modes in metal film

  15. DC and Wave Electric Fields and Other Plasma Parameters Observed on Two Sounding Rockets in the Dark Cusp during IMF Bz North and South Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfaff, R. F.; Acuna, M.; Bounds, S.; Farrell, W.; Freudenreich, W.; Lepping, R.; Vondrak, R.; Maynard, N. C.; Moen, J.; Egeland, A.

    1999-01-01

    Two Black Brant IX sounding rockets were launched into the dark, dayside cusp near magnetic noon on December 2 and 3, 1997, from Ny Alesund, Spitzbergen at 79 deg N reaching altitudes of about 450 km. Real-time ground-based and Wind IMF data were used to determine the launch conditions. The first launch, with Bz north conditions, crossed into and back out of an open field region with merging poleward of the projected trajectory. The second flight, into Bz south conditions, was timed to coincide with an enhancement in the merging rate from a increase in the negative Bz, while the DMSP Fl 3 satellite was situated slightly to the north of the rocket trajectory. Each payload returned DC electric and magnetic fields, plasma waves, energetic particles, photometer data, and thermal plasma data. Data from both flights will be shown, with an emphasis on the DC electric field results. In particular, the data gathered on December 2, 1997 will be used to discuss ionospheric signatures of merging and the open/closed character of the the cusp/low latitude boundary layer. In contrast, the data gathered on December 3, 1997 shows evidence of pulsed electric field structures which will be examined in the context of cusp plasma entry processes. Both data sets returned a rich variety of plasma waves, as well as optical emissions and thermal plasma data.

  16. DC and Wave Electric Fields and Other Plasma Parameters Observed on Two Sounding Rockets in the Dark Cusp During IMF Bz North and South Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfaff, R. F.; Acuna, M.; Bounds, S.; Farrell, W.; Freudenreich, H.; Lepping, R.; Vondrak, R.; Maynard, N. C.; Moen, J.; Egeland, A.

    1997-01-01

    Two Black Brant IX sounding rockets were launched into the dark, dayside cusp near magnetic noon on December 2 and 3, 1997, from Ny Alesund, Spitzbergen at 79 N reaching altitudes of approximately 450 km. Real-time ground-based and Wind IMF data were used to determine the launch conditions. The first launch, with Bz north conditions, crossed into and back out of an open field region with merging poleward of the projected trajectory. The second flight, into Bz south conditions, was timed to coincide with an enhancement in the merging rate from a increase in the negative Bz, while the DMSP F13 satellite was situated slightly to the north of the rocket trajectory. Each payload returned DC electric and magnetic fields, plasma waves, energetic particles, photometer data, and thermal plasma data. Data from both flights will be shown, with an emphasis on the DC electric field results. In particular, the data gathered on December 2, 1997 will be used to discuss ionospheric signatures of merging and the open/closed character of the the cusp/low latitude boundary layer. In contrast, the data gathered on December 3, 1997 shows evidence of pulsed electric field structures which will be examined in the context of cusp plasma entry processes. Both data sets returned a rich variety of plasma waves, as well as optical emissions and thermal plasma data.

  17. The dark side of plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Gómez, D E; Teo, Z Q; Altissimo, M; Davis, T J; Earl, S; Roberts, A

    2013-08-14

    Plasmonic dark modes are pure near-field modes that can arise from the plasmon hybridization in a set of interacting nanoparticles. When compared to bright modes, dark modes have longer lifetimes due to their lack of a net dipole moment, making them attractive for a number of applications. We demonstrate the excitation and optical detection of a collective dark plasmonic mode from individual plasmonic trimers. The trimers consist of triangular arrangements of gold nanorods, and due to this symmetry, the lowest-energy dark plasmonic mode can interact with radially polarized light. The experimental data presented confirm the excitation of this mode, and its assignment is supported with an electrostatic approximation wherein these dark modes are described in terms of plasmon hybridization. The strong confinement of energy in these modes and their associated near fields hold great promise for achieving strong coupling to single photon emitters.

  18. Post eye-opening maturation of visual receptive field diameters in the superior colliculus of normal- and dark-reared rats.

    PubMed

    Binns, K E; Salt, T E

    1997-04-18

    When the rat's eyes open (P14) the retino-collicular projection is largely mature but the cortico-collicular afferents are naive and mature considerably in the following week. At P14, single units in the superior colliculus' superficial grey layer (SGS) had discrete receptive fields (RFs) (diameter = 15 +/- 1.6 degrees) which expanded with age, reaching 30 +/- 2.6 degrees at P21, possibly reflecting the increasing influence of the visual cortex, whose RFs are known to be enlarged at P21. Subsequently SGS RFs retracted to 13 +/- 1.3 degrees by P23. Dark-reared (DR) rats followed a similar but delayed developmental pattern, such that RFs were still large (27 +/- 3.4 degrees) at P24. By P30 however the RFs of DR rats were the same as those of normal adults. Thus visual experience accelerates the emergence of normal RFs in the SGS.

  19. Precision improvement in dark-field microscopy imaging by using gold nanoparticles as an internal reference: a combined theoretical and experimental study.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jun; Liu, Yue; Gao, Peng Fei; Zou, Hong Yan; Huang, Cheng Zhi

    2016-04-28

    Low accuracy is a big obstacle in the dark-field microscopy imaging (iDFM) technique in practical applications. In order to reduce the deviations and fluctuations in the observed or snapped scattered light in the iDFM technique caused by unavoidable measurement errors, bare gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were introduced as an internal reference (IR). The feasibility of using AuNPs as the IR in iDFM in theory was verified. The function of the IR in improving the precision of the acquired data through post data analysis was identified by three kinds of experiments: monitoring the oxidation process of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) at room temperature, quantifying the level of glucose with AgNPs used as probes and quantifying the change in the light intensity of AuNPs after the plasmon resonance energy transfer (PRET) between AuNPs and tetramethylrhodamine (TAMRA). PMID:27065307

  20. Dark-field-based observation of single-nanoparticle dynamics on a supported lipid bilayer for in situ analysis of interacting molecules and nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Kwang; Kim, Sungi; Nam, Jwa-Min

    2015-01-12

    Observation of single plasmonic nanoparticles in reconstituted biological systems allows us to obtain snapshots of dynamic processes between molecules and nanoparticles with unprecedented spatiotemporal resolution and single-molecule/single-particle-level data acquisition. This Concept is intended to introduce nanoparticle-tethered supported lipid bilayer platforms that allow for the dynamic confinement of nanoparticles on a two-dimensional fluidic surface. The dark-field-based long-term, stable, real-time observation of freely diffusing plasmonic nanoparticles on a lipid bilayer enables one to extract a broad range of information about interparticle and molecular interactions throughout the entire reaction period. Herein, we highlight important developments in this context to provide ideas on how molecular interactions can be interpreted by monitoring dynamic behaviors and optical signals of laterally mobile nanoparticles.

  1. Measurement of indium concentration profiles and segregation efficiencies from high-angle annular dark field-scanning transmission electron microscopy images.

    PubMed

    Mehrtens, Thorsten; Müller, Knut; Schowalter, Marco; Hu, Dongzhi; Schaadt, Daniel M; Rosenauer, Andreas

    2013-08-01

    We investigated segregation of indium in an InxGa1-xAs/GaAs heterostructure via high-angle annular dark field-scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM), where contrast strongly depends on the nuclear charges of the scattering atoms (Z-contrast). Indium concentration maps have been deduced from HAADF-STEM images by comparing normalized measured intensities with multislice simulations in the frozen lattice approach. Segregation coefficients were derived following the segregation model of Muraki et al.. This is demonstrated for HAADF-STEM images recorded in [100] and [110] zone-axes. Determined indium concentrations and segregation coefficients are compared with results from composition analysis by lattice fringe analysis (CELFA) measurements and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX).

  2. Quantitative composition determination at the atomic level using model-based high-angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Martinez, G T; Rosenauer, A; De Backer, A; Verbeeck, J; Van Aert, S

    2014-02-01

    High angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF STEM) images provide sample information which is sensitive to the chemical composition. The image intensities indeed scale with the mean atomic number Z. To some extent, chemically different atomic column types can therefore be visually distinguished. However, in order to quantify the atomic column composition with high accuracy and precision, model-based methods are necessary. Therefore, an empirical incoherent parametric imaging model can be used of which the unknown parameters are determined using statistical parameter estimation theory (Van Aert et al., 2009, [1]). In this paper, it will be shown how this method can be combined with frozen lattice multislice simulations in order to evolve from a relative toward an absolute quantification of the composition of single atomic columns with mixed atom types. Furthermore, the validity of the model assumptions are explored and discussed.

  3. The effect of probe inaccuracies on the quantitative model-based analysis of high angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy images.

    PubMed

    Martinez, G T; De Backer, A; Rosenauer, A; Verbeeck, J; Van Aert, S

    2014-08-01

    Quantitative structural and chemical information can be obtained from high angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF STEM) images when using statistical parameter estimation theory. In this approach, we assume an empirical parameterized imaging model for which the total scattered intensities of the atomic columns are estimated. These intensities can be related to the material structure or composition. Since the experimental probe profile is assumed to be known in the description of the imaging model, we will explore how the uncertainties in the probe profile affect the estimation of the total scattered intensities. Using multislice image simulations, we analyze this effect for Cs corrected and non-Cs corrected microscopes as a function of inaccuracies in cylindrically symmetric aberrations, such as defocus and spherical aberration of third and fifth order, and non-cylindrically symmetric aberrations, such as 2-fold and 3-fold astigmatism and coma.

  4. Nonthermal dark matter in mirage mediation

    SciTech Connect

    Nagai, Minoru; Nakayama, Kazunori

    2007-12-15

    In mirage-mediation models there exists a modulus field whose mass is O(1000) TeV and its late decay may significantly change the standard thermal relic scenario of the dark matter. We study nonthermal production of the dark matter directly from the modulus decay, and find that for some parameter regions nonthermally produced neutralinos can become the dark matter.

  5. Extraction of structural and chemical information from high angle annular dark-field image by an improved peaks finding method.

    PubMed

    Yin, Wenhao; Huang, Rong; Qi, Ruijuan; Duan, Chungang

    2016-09-01

    With the development of spherical aberration (Cs) corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), high angle annular dark filed (HAADF) imaging technique has been widely applied in the microstructure characterization of various advanced materials with atomic resolution. However, current qualitative interpretation of the HAADF image is not enough to extract all the useful information. Here a modified peaks finding method was proposed to quantify the HAADF-STEM image to extract structural and chemical information. Firstly, an automatic segmentation technique including numerical filters and watershed algorithm was used to define the sub-areas for each atomic column. Then a 2D Gaussian fitting was carried out to determine the atomic column positions precisely, which provides the geometric information at the unit-cell scale. Furthermore, a self-adaptive integration based on the column position and the covariance of statistical Gaussian distribution were performed. The integrated intensities show very high sensitivity on the mean atomic number with improved signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio. Consequently, the polarization map and strain distributions were rebuilt from a HAADF-STEM image of the rhombohedral and tetragonal BiFeO3 interface and a MnO2 monolayer in LaAlO3 /SrMnO3 /SrTiO3 heterostructure was discerned from its neighbor TiO2 layers. Microsc. Res. Tech. 79:820-826, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27324521

  6. On the Collective Magnetic Field Strength and Vector Structure of Dark Umbral Cores Measured by the Hinode Spectropolarimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schad, T. A.

    2014-05-01

    We study 7530 sunspot umbrae and pores measured by the Hinode Spectropolarimeter (SP) between November 2006 and November 2012. We primarily seek confirmation of the long term secular decrease in the mean magnetic field strength of sunspot umbrae found by Penn and Livingston ( IAU Symp. 273, 126, 2011) between 1998 and 2011. The excellent SP photometric properties and full vector magnetic field determinations from full-Stokes Milne-Eddington inversions are used to address the interrelated properties of the magnetic field strength and brightness temperature for all umbral cores. We find non-linear relationships between magnetic field strength and umbral temperature (and continuum contrast), as well as between umbral radius and magnetic field strength. Using disambiguated vector data, we find that the azimuths measured in the umbral cores reflect an organization weakly influenced by Joy's law. The large selection of umbrae displays a log-normal size spectrum similar to earlier solar cycles. Influenced by the amplitude of the solar cycle and the non-linear relationship between umbral size and core magnetic field strength, the distribution of core magnetic field strengths, fit most effectively with a skew-normal distribution, shows a weak solar cycle dependence. Yet, the mean magnetic field strength does not show a significant long term trend.

  7. Practical aspects of strain measurement in thin SiGe layers by (004) dark-field electron holography in Lorentz mode.

    PubMed

    Denneulin, T; Cooper, D; Rouviere, J L

    2014-07-01

    Dark-field electron holography (DFEH) is a powerful transmission electron microscopy technique for mapping strain with nanometer resolution and high precision. However the technique can be difficult to set up if some practical steps are not respected. In this article, several measurements were performed on thin Si(1-x)Gex layers using (004) DFEH in Lorentz mode. Different practical aspects are discussed such as sample preparation, reconstruction of the holograms and interpretation of the strain maps in terms of sensitivity and accuracy. It was shown that the measurements are not significantly dependent on the preparation tool. Good results can be obtained using both FIB and mechanical polishing. Usually the most important aspect is a precise control of the thickness of the sample. A problem when reconstructing (004) dark-field holograms is the relatively high phase gradient that characterises the strained regions. It can be difficult to perform reconstructions with high sensitivity in both strained and unstrained regions. Here we introduce simple methods to minimise the noise in the different regions using a specific mask shape in Fourier space or by combining several reconstructions. As a test, DFEH was applied to the characterization of eight Si(1-x)Gex samples with different Ge concentrations. The sensitivity of the strain measured in the layers varies between 0.08% and 0.03% for spatial resolutions of 3.5-7 nm. The results were also compared to finite element mechanical simulations. A good accuracy of ±0.1% between experiment and simulation was obtained for strains up to 1.5% and ±0.25% for strains up to 2.5%.

  8. Precision improvement in dark-field microscopy imaging by using gold nanoparticles as an internal reference: a combined theoretical and experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jun; Liu, Yue; Gao, Peng Fei; Zou, Hong Yan; Huang, Cheng Zhi

    2016-04-01

    Low accuracy is a big obstacle in the dark-field microscopy imaging (iDFM) technique in practical applications. In order to reduce the deviations and fluctuations in the observed or snapped scattered light in the iDFM technique caused by unavoidable measurement errors, bare gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were introduced as an internal reference (IR). The feasibility of using AuNPs as the IR in iDFM in theory was verified. The function of the IR in improving the precision of the acquired data through post data analysis was identified by three kinds of experiments: monitoring the oxidation process of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) at room temperature, quantifying the level of glucose with AgNPs used as probes and quantifying the change in the light intensity of AuNPs after the plasmon resonance energy transfer (PRET) between AuNPs and tetramethylrhodamine (TAMRA).Low accuracy is a big obstacle in the dark-field microscopy imaging (iDFM) technique in practical applications. In order to reduce the deviations and fluctuations in the observed or snapped scattered light in the iDFM technique caused by unavoidable measurement errors, bare gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were introduced as an internal reference (IR). The feasibility of using AuNPs as the IR in iDFM in theory was verified. The function of the IR in improving the precision of the acquired data through post data analysis was identified by three kinds of experiments: monitoring the oxidation process of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) at room temperature, quantifying the level of glucose with AgNPs used as probes and quantifying the change in the light intensity of AuNPs after the plasmon resonance energy transfer (PRET) between AuNPs and tetramethylrhodamine (TAMRA). Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr08837b

  9. Water deficit in field-grown Gossypium hirsutum primarily limits net photosynthesis by decreasing stomatal conductance, increasing photorespiration, and increasing the ratio of dark respiration to gross photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Chastain, Daryl R; Snider, John L; Collins, Guy D; Perry, Calvin D; Whitaker, Jared; Byrd, Seth A

    2014-11-01

    Much effort has been expended to improve irrigation efficiency and drought tolerance of agronomic crops; however, a clear understanding of the physiological mechanisms that interact to decrease source strength and drive yield loss has not been attained. To elucidate the underlying mechanisms contributing to inhibition of net carbon assimilation under drought stress, three cultivars of Gossypium hirsutum were grown in the field under contrasting irrigation regimes during the 2012 and 2013 growing season near Camilla, Georgia, USA. Physiological measurements were conducted on three sample dates during each growing season (providing a broad range of plant water status) and included, predawn and midday leaf water potential (ΨPD and ΨMD), gross and net photosynthesis, dark respiration, photorespiration, and chlorophyll a fluorescence. End-of-season lint yield was also determined. ΨPD ranged from -0.31 to -0.95MPa, and ΨMD ranged from -1.02 to -2.67MPa, depending upon irrigation regime and sample date. G. hirsutum responded to water deficit by decreasing stomatal conductance, increasing photorespiration, and increasing the ratio of dark respiration to gross photosynthesis, thereby limiting PN and decreasing lint yield (lint yield declines observed during the 2012 growing season only). Conversely, even extreme water deficit, causing a 54% decline in PN, did not negatively affect actual quantum yield, maximum quantum yield, or photosynthetic electron transport. It is concluded that PN is primarily limited in drought-stressed G. hirsutum by decreased stomatal conductance, along with increases in respiratory and photorespiratory carbon losses, not inhibition or down-regulation of electron transport through photosystem II. It is further concluded that ΨPD is a reliable indicator of drought stress and the need for irrigation in field-grown cotton.

  10. Water deficit in field-grown Gossypium hirsutum primarily limits net photosynthesis by decreasing stomatal conductance, increasing photorespiration, and increasing the ratio of dark respiration to gross photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Chastain, Daryl R; Snider, John L; Collins, Guy D; Perry, Calvin D; Whitaker, Jared; Byrd, Seth A

    2014-11-01

    Much effort has been expended to improve irrigation efficiency and drought tolerance of agronomic crops; however, a clear understanding of the physiological mechanisms that interact to decrease source strength and drive yield loss has not been attained. To elucidate the underlying mechanisms contributing to inhibition of net carbon assimilation under drought stress, three cultivars of Gossypium hirsutum were grown in the field under contrasting irrigation regimes during the 2012 and 2013 growing season near Camilla, Georgia, USA. Physiological measurements were conducted on three sample dates during each growing season (providing a broad range of plant water status) and included, predawn and midday leaf water potential (ΨPD and ΨMD), gross and net photosynthesis, dark respiration, photorespiration, and chlorophyll a fluorescence. End-of-season lint yield was also determined. ΨPD ranged from -0.31 to -0.95MPa, and ΨMD ranged from -1.02 to -2.67MPa, depending upon irrigation regime and sample date. G. hirsutum responded to water deficit by decreasing stomatal conductance, increasing photorespiration, and increasing the ratio of dark respiration to gross photosynthesis, thereby limiting PN and decreasing lint yield (lint yield declines observed during the 2012 growing season only). Conversely, even extreme water deficit, causing a 54% decline in PN, did not negatively affect actual quantum yield, maximum quantum yield, or photosynthetic electron transport. It is concluded that PN is primarily limited in drought-stressed G. hirsutum by decreased stomatal conductance, along with increases in respiratory and photorespiratory carbon losses, not inhibition or down-regulation of electron transport through photosystem II. It is further concluded that ΨPD is a reliable indicator of drought stress and the need for irrigation in field-grown cotton. PMID:25151126

  11. Magnetization Response of the Bulk and Supplementary Magnetic Domain Structure in High-Permeability Steel Laminations Visualized In Situ by Neutron Dark-Field Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betz, B.; Rauscher, P.; Harti, R. P.; Schäfer, R.; Irastorza-Landa, A.; Van Swygenhoven, H.; Kaestner, A.; Hovind, J.; Pomjakushina, E.; Lehmann, E.; Grünzweig, C.

    2016-08-01

    Industrial transformer cores are composed of stacked high-permeability steel laminations (HPSLs). The performance and degree of efficiency of transformers are directly determined by the magnetic properties of each HPSL. In this article, we show how the neutron dark-field image (DFI) allows for the in situ visualization of the locally resolved response of the bulk and supplementary magnetic domain structures in HPSLs under the influence of externally applied magnetic fields. In particular, we investigate the domain formation and growth along the initial magnetization curve up to the saturated state. For decreasing field, we visualize the recurrence of the hysteretic domain structure down to the remanent state. Additionally, the DFI allows us to derive a correlation between the grain orientation and the corresponding volume and supplementary domain structure. Furthermore, we visualize the influence of the insulation coating, introducing desired tensile stresses on the domain structures. To compare our DFI findings to traditional methods, we perform complementary surface-sensitive magneto-optical Kerr-microscopy investigations.

  12. Is it safe? Voles in an unfamiliar dark open-field divert from optimal security by abandoning a familiar shelter and not visiting a central start point.

    PubMed

    Eilam, David

    2010-01-01

    Open-field behavior is a common tool in studying exploration and navigation, as well as emotions and motivations. However, it has been suggested that this behavior might be parsimoniously interpreted as directed to optimize security, with no need to interpret the animal's mental state. This latter view was challenged here by providing voles with presumably sense of optimal security. For this, voles were introduced into a dark open-field inside a familiar shelter in which they previously lived in their home cage. Voles then emerged either to locomote only in the vicinity of the shelter, or to travel further out to explore the entire arena and only later to return to the shelter. While their staying near the shelter confirms the notion of optimizing security, their traveling further out along the perimeter negates this notion. This divergence of behavior under the same security conditions illustrates that open-field behavior, which is a multi-faceted and dynamic process, is also affected by an emotional component. That is, safety is a subjective emotional state dictated by various inputs and, therefore, the resulting dynamic behavior, which is the ultimate output of the central nervous system, may vary beyond the possibility of being parsimoniously interpreted by only one factor. In a similar vein, we show that the impact of the start point on the paths of locomotion is not an intrinsic property of that point, but depends on its physical location. PMID:19744526

  13. Mesenchymal stem cells and endothelial progenitor cells accelerate intra-aneurysmal tissue organization after treatment with SDF-1α-coated coils.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yuyuan; Lu, Ziming; Chen, Chengwei; Cui, Xubo; Liu, Yaqi; Zheng, Tao; Jiang, Xiaodan; Zeng, Chi; Quan, Daping; Wang, Qiujing

    2016-04-01

    Recurrences of aneurysms remain the major drawback of detachable coils for the endovascular treatment of intracranial aneurysms. The aim of the present study is to develop new modified coils, coating the surface of platinum coils with silk fibroin (SF) consisting of stromal cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1α), and evaluate its acceleration of organization of cavities and reduction of lumen size in a rat aneurysm model. The morphological characteristics of SDF-1α-coated coils were examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Fifty experimental aneurysms were created and randomly divided into five groups: three groups were embolized with SDF-1α-coated coils (8 mm) and two of these groups need transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) or endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs); one group was embolized with bare coils (8 mm) and another group severed as control. After coil implantation for 14 or 28 days, the coils were harvested and histological analysis was performed. SEM photographs showed that SF/SDF-1α-coated coils have uniform size and a thin film compared with bare coils. In the group treated with SDF-1α-coated coils, tissue organization was accelerated and the proliferation of α-smooth muscle actin positive cells was promoted in the aneurysmal sac. Compared with unmodified coils, on day 28, tissue organization was significantly greater in the group treated with SDF-1α-coated coils and MSC or EPC transplantation. These results suggest that SDF-1α-coated coils with MSC or EPC transplantation may be beneficial in the aneurysm healing and endothelialization at the orifice of embolized aneurysm. PMID:27125512

  14. Inflation, Dark Matter, Dark Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolb, Edward W.

    2005-06-01

    Remarkable 20th-century cosmological discoveries and theoretical ideas led to the development of the present cosmological "standard model." In this lecture I will focus on one of the more recent ideas that may now be regarded as part of the framework of the standard big-bang model; namely, that structure in the universe results from the growth of small seed density fluctuations produced during the inflationary universe. In order to complete this picture, I will also discuss the idea that the present mass density is dominated by dark matter and that there is now a preponderance of dark energy.

  15. An extended action for the effective field theory of dark energy: a stability analysis and a complete guide to the mapping at the basis of EFTCAMB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frusciante, Noemi; Papadomanolakis, Georgios; Silvestri, Alessandra

    2016-07-01

    We present a generalization of the effective field theory (EFT) formalism for dark energy and modified gravity models to include operators with higher order spatial derivatives. This allows the extension of the EFT framework to a wider class of gravity theories such as Hořava gravity. We present the corresponding extended action, both in the EFT and the Arnowitt-Deser-Misner (ADM) formalism, and proceed to work out a convenient mapping between the two, providing a self contained and general procedure to translate a given model of gravity into the EFT language at the basis of the Einstein-Boltzmann solver EFTCAMB. Putting this mapping at work, we illustrate, for several interesting models of dark energy and modified gravity, how to express them in the ADM notation and then map them into the EFT formalism. We also provide for the first time, the full mapping of GLPV models into the EFT framework. We next perform a thorough analysis of the physical stability of the generalized EFT action, in absence of matter components. We work out viability conditions that correspond to the absence of ghosts and modes that propagate with a negative speed of sound in the scalar and tensor sector, as well as the absence of tachyonic modes in the scalar sector. Finally, we extend and generalize the phenomenological basis in terms of α-functions introduced to parametrize Horndeski models, to cover all theories with higher order spatial derivatives included in our extended action. We elaborate on the impact of the additional functions on physical quantities, such as the kinetic term and the speeds of propagation for scalar and tensor modes.

  16. Expression of platelet-bound stromal-cell derived factor-1 (SDF-1) and number of CD34(+) progenitor cells in patients with congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Jorbenadze, Rezo; Schleicher, Erwin; Bigalke, Boris; Stellos, Konstantinos; Gawaz, Meinrad

    2014-01-01

    Platelet-bound stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) plays a crucial role in attachment of circulating CD34(+) progenitor cells to the vascular wall, facilitating tissue healing after injury. However there is no evidence about expression of platelet-bound SDF-1 in patients with congestive heart failure (CHF). The aim of our study was to evaluate expression of platelet-bound SDF-1 and number of CD34(+) progenitor cells in patients with CHF. Forty-eight patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and 61 patients with ischaemic cardiomyopathy (ICM) were consecutively enrolled into the study. Blood taken from 109 consecutive patients was studied for surface expression of platelet-bound SDF-1 and number of CD34(+) progenitor cells by flow cytometry. The highest expression of platelet-bound SDF-1 was observed in patients with severe impairment of left ventricular systolic function compared with patients with mild or moderate impairment of left ventricular systolic function (mild vs. moderate vs. severe impairment of left ventricular systolic function: MFI ± SD: 35.6 ± 34 vs. 101.45 ± 73 vs. 124.86 ± 86.7, Kruskal-Wallis p < 0.001). Similar to platelet-bound SDF-1 number of CD34(+) progenitor cells was the highest in severe impairment of left ventricular systolic function (mild vs. moderate vs. severe impairment of left ventricular systolic function: mean ± SD: 260.4 ± 177.5 vs. 580.7 ± 340.5 vs. 640.82 ± 370.6, Kruskal-Wallis p < 0.001). Platelet-bound SDF-1 expression was associated with number of circulating CD34(+) progenitor cells (r = 0.454, p < 0.001) in patients with CHF. Expression of platelet-bound SDF-1 and number of CD34(+) cells were higher in patients with DCM compared with patients with ICM (p < 0.001 for both) and inversely correlated with age and aspirin therapy. Platelet-bound SDF-1 and CD34(+) progenitor cells are especially increased in patients with severe impairment of left

  17. Exploration in a dark open field: a shift from directional to positional progression and a proposed model of acquiring spatial information.

    PubMed

    Avni, Reut; Zadicario, Pazit; Eilam, David

    2006-08-10

    Exploration in a dark open field undergoes three progressive changes: (i) an initial phase of spending equal amounts of time in various zones of the arena changes to staying in the corners, and ultimately spending most of the time in one corner; (ii) travel paths are first circular and scattered all over the arena, but gradually become anchored to one corner at which they start and end; (iii) traveled distance gradually decreases to that of the initial level seen in a lit open field. Altogether, rodents shift from a 'looping' exploration mechanism with feeble coupling with the environment, to 'home base' exploration which is firmly anchored to the environment. This shift also involves switching from momentary and sporadic to repeated returns to a specific, presumably familiar place, to which the animal navigates back from various other places. We suggest that this switching illustrates navigation first by directional and then by positional environmental cues, as hypothesized in the 'parallel map theory'. We also suggest that the transition from looping to home base behavior is part of a hierarchal construction of space representation via three modes of spatial information processing: (i) piloting--sequential processing, based on moving from one landmark to the next; (ii) orienting--parallel processing, based on moving from one point to the next, with the same starting and ending point; (iii) navigating--continuous processing, based on continuously updating the position in relation to several locations in the environment (map navigation).

  18. A model based iterative reconstruction algorithm for high angle annular dark field-scanning transmission electron microscope (HAADF-STEM) tomography.

    PubMed

    Venkatakrishnan, S V; Drummy, Lawrence F; Jackson, Michael A; De Graef, Marc; Simmons, Jeff; Bouman, Charles A

    2013-11-01

    High angle annular dark field (HAADF)-scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) data is increasingly being used in the physical sciences to research materials in 3D because it reduces the effects of Bragg diffraction seen in bright field TEM data. Typically, tomographic reconstructions are performed by directly applying either filtered back projection (FBP) or the simultaneous iterative reconstruction technique (SIRT) to the data. Since HAADF-STEM tomography is a limited angle tomography modality with low signal to noise ratio, these methods can result in significant artifacts in the reconstructed volume. In this paper, we develop a model based iterative reconstruction algorithm for HAADF-STEM tomography. We combine a model for image formation in HAADF-STEM tomography along with a prior model to formulate the tomographic reconstruction as a maximum a posteriori probability (MAP) estimation problem. Our formulation also accounts for certain missing measurements by treating them as nuisance parameters in the MAP estimation framework. We adapt the iterative coordinate descent algorithm to develop an efficient method to minimize the corresponding MAP cost function. Reconstructions of simulated as well as experimental data sets show results that are superior to FBP and SIRT reconstructions, significantly suppressing artifacts and enhancing contrast. PMID:23955748

  19. Production of stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1)and expression of CXCR4 in human bone marrow endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Hwan-Jung; Jo, Deog-Yeon

    2003-01-01

    This study investigated the production of stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) and the expression of CXCR4 in human bone marrow endothelial cells (BMECs). Human BMEC cell line BMEC-1 cells expressed SDF-1 mRNA, and conditioned medium induced chemoattraction of CD34+ cells. Migration was not inhibited by pretreating the input cells with pertussis toxin, indicating that the chemoattractive activity was not dependent on SDF-1. Three-day culture of BMEC-1 and primary human BMEC cells produced 1,710+/-204 and 1,050+/-153 pg/mL SDF-1alpha, respectively, which was much less than primary human BM stromal cells (29,536+/-532 pg/ mL). By immuno-histochemistry, CXCR4 was detected in the endothelial cells lining sinusoids, arterioles, and venules in the bone marrow. However, cultured BMECs and BMEC-1 cells did not express CXCR4 on their surfaces. These results indicate that BMECs produce and release small amounts of SDF-1 and express CXCR4 in vivo only. PMID:14555820

  20. Immature leukemic CD34+CXCR4+ cells from CML patients have lower integrin-dependent migration and adhesion in response to the chemokine SDF-1.

    PubMed

    Peled, Amnon; Hardan, Izhar; Trakhtenbrot, Luba; Gur, Eyal; Magid, Michal; Darash-Yahana, Merav; Cohen, Ninette; Grabovsky, Valentin; Franitza, Suzana; Kollet, Orit; Lider, Ofer; Alon, Ronen; Rechavi, Gideon; Lapidot, Tsvee

    2002-01-01

    Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), a malignant myeloproliferative disorder originating from a pluripotent stem cell expressing the bcr-abl oncogene, is characterized by abnormal release of the expanded, malignant stem cell clone from the bone marrow (BM) into the circulation. Moreover, immature CD34+ CML cells have lower adhesion to stromal cells and fibronectin as well as lower engraftment potential in severe combined immunedeficient (SCID) and nonobese diabetic (NOD)/SCID mice than normal CD34+ cells. We report in this study that leukemic Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph+)CD34+ cells from newly diagnosed CML patients that express the chemokine receptor CXCR4 migrate in response to stromal-derived factor-1 (SDF-1). However, normal Ph-CD34+CXCR4+ cells derived from the same patient have significantly higher migration levels toward SDF-1. In contrast to their transwell migration potential, the SDF-1-mediated integrin-dependent polarization and migration of the Ph+CD34+CXCR4+ cells through extracellular matrix-like gels were significantly lower than for normal cells. Concomitantly, binding of these cells to vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 or fibronectin, in the presence of SDF-1, was also substantially lower. These findings suggest a major role for SDF-1-mediated, integrin-dependent BM retention of Ph+CD34+ cells. PMID:12004084

  1. Unparticle dark energy

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, D.-C.; Stojkovic, Dejan; Dutta, Sourish

    2009-09-15

    We examine a dark energy model where a scalar unparticle degree of freedom plays the role of quintessence. In particular, we study a model where the unparticle degree of freedom has a standard kinetic term and a simple mass potential, the evolution is slowly rolling and the field value is of the order of the unparticle energy scale ({lambda}{sub u}). We study how the evolution of w depends on the parameters B (a function of unparticle scaling dimension d{sub u}), the initial value of the field {phi}{sub i} (or equivalently, {lambda}{sub u}) and the present matter density {omega}{sub m0}. We use observational data from type Ia supernovae, baryon acoustic oscillations and the cosmic microwave background to constrain the model parameters and find that these models are not ruled out by the observational data. From a theoretical point of view, unparticle dark energy model is very attractive, since unparticles (being bound states of fundamental fermions) are protected from radiative corrections. Further, coupling of unparticles to the standard model fields can be arbitrarily suppressed by raising the fundamental energy scale M{sub F}, making the unparticle dark energy model free of most of the problems that plague conventional scalar field quintessence models.

  2. Dark scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahonen, Pasi; Alahuhta, Petteri; Daskala, Barbara; Delaitre, Sabine; Hert, Paul De; Lindner, Ralf; Maghiros, Ioannis; Moscibroda, Anna; Schreurs, Wim; Verlinden, Michiel

    In this chapter, we present four "dark scenarios" that highlight the key socio-economic, legal, technological and ethical risks to privacy, identity, trust, security and inclusiveness posed by new AmI technologies. We call them dark scenarios, because they show things that could go wrong in an AmI world, because they present visions of the future that we do not want to become reality. The scenarios expose threats and vulnerabilities as a way to inform policy-makers and planners about issues they need to take into account in developing new policies or updating existing legislation. Before presenting the four scenarios and our analysis of each, we describe the process of how we created the scenarios as well as the elements in our methodology for analysing the scenarios.

  3. Dark matter

    PubMed Central

    Peebles, P. James E.

    2015-01-01

    The evidence for the dark matter (DM) of the hot big bang cosmology is about as good as it gets in natural science. The exploration of its nature is now led by direct and indirect detection experiments, to be complemented by advances in the full range of cosmological tests, including judicious consideration of the rich phenomenology of galaxies. The results may confirm ideas about DM already under discussion. If we are lucky, we also will be surprised once again. PMID:24794526

  4. Dark matter.

    PubMed

    Peebles, P James E

    2015-10-01

    The evidence for the dark matter (DM) of the hot big bang cosmology is about as good as it gets in natural science. The exploration of its nature is now led by direct and indirect detection experiments, to be complemented by advances in the full range of cosmological tests, including judicious consideration of the rich phenomenology of galaxies. The results may confirm ideas about DM already under discussion. If we are lucky, we also will be surprised once again.

  5. Dark matter.

    PubMed

    Peebles, P James E

    2015-10-01

    The evidence for the dark matter (DM) of the hot big bang cosmology is about as good as it gets in natural science. The exploration of its nature is now led by direct and indirect detection experiments, to be complemented by advances in the full range of cosmological tests, including judicious consideration of the rich phenomenology of galaxies. The results may confirm ideas about DM already under discussion. If we are lucky, we also will be surprised once again. PMID:24794526

  6. Cosmology with interaction in the dark sector

    SciTech Connect

    Costa, F. E. M.; Barboza, E. M. Jr.; Alcaniz, J. S.

    2009-06-15

    Unless some unknown symmetry in nature prevents or suppresses a nonminimal coupling in the dark sector, the dark energy field may interact with the pressureless component of dark matter. In this paper, we investigate some cosmological consequences of a general model of interacting dark matter-dark energy characterized by a dimensionless parameter {epsilon}. We derive a coupled scalar field version for this general class of scenarios and carry out a joint statistical analysis involving type Ia supernovae data (Legacy and Constitution sets), measurements of baryon acoustic oscillation peaks at z=0.20 (2dFGRS) and z=0.35 (SDSS), and measurements of the Hubble evolution H(z). For the specific case of vacuum decay (w=-1), we find that, although physically forbidden, a transfer of energy from dark matter to dark energy is favored by the data.

  7. Dynamics of Dark Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Copeland, Edmund J.

    2007-11-20

    I briefly review attempts that have been made to model dark energy. These include models of a cosmological constant, dynamical models where a scalar field may be responsible for the observed late time acceleration through to the possibility that we are not fully in control of the gravity sector and the acceleration may be some manifestation of modified gravity. In all cases we will see some degree of fine tuning is required with the current models.

  8. Asymmetric condensed dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguirre, Anthony; Diez-Tejedor, Alberto

    2016-04-01

    We explore the viability of a boson dark matter candidate with an asymmetry between the number densities of particles and antiparticles. A simple thermal field theory analysis confirms that, under certain general conditions, this component would develop a Bose-Einstein condensate in the early universe that, for appropriate model parameters, could survive the ensuing cosmological evolution until now. The condensation of a dark matter component in equilibrium with the thermal plasma is a relativistic process, hence the amount of matter dictated by the charge asymmetry is complemented by a hot relic density frozen out at the time of decoupling. Contrary to the case of ordinary WIMPs, dark matter particles in a condensate must be lighter than a few tens of eV so that the density from thermal relics is not too large. Big-Bang nucleosynthesis constrains the temperature of decoupling to the scale of the QCD phase transition or above. This requires large dark matter-to-photon ratios and very weak interactions with standard model particles.

  9. EMMPRIN regulates tumor growth and metastasis by recruiting bone marrow-derived cells through paracrine signaling of SDF-1 and VEGF.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yanke; Gou, Xingchun; Kong, Derek Kai; Wang, Xiaofei; Wang, Jianhui; Chen, Zeming; Huang, Chen; Zhou, Jiangbing

    2015-10-20

    EMMPRIN, a cell adhesion molecule highly expressed in a variety of tumors, is associated with poor prognosis in cancer patients. Mechanistically, EMMPRIN has been characterized to contribute to tumor development and progression by controlling the expression of MMPs and VEGF. In the present study, by using fluorescently labeled bone marrow-derived cells (BMDCs), we found that the down-regulation of EMMPRIN expression in cancer cells reduces tumor growth and metastasis, and is associated with the reduced recruitment of BMDCs. Further protein profiling studies suggest that EMMPRIN controls BMDC recruitment through regulating the secretion of soluble factors, notably, VEGF and SDF-1. We demonstrate that the expression and secretion of SDF-1 in tumor cells are regulated by EMMPRIN. This study reveals a novel mechanism by which EMMPRIN promotes tumor growth and metastasis by recruitment of BMDCs through controlling secretion and paracrine signaling of SDF-1 and VEGF.

  10. Elucidating a Key Component of Cancer Metastasis: CXCL12 (SDF-1α) Binding to CXCR4

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The chemotactic signaling induced by the binding of chemokine CXCL12 (SDF-1α) to chemokine receptor CXCR4 is of significant biological importance and is a potential therapeutic axis against HIV-1. However, as CXCR4 is overexpressed in certain cancer cells, the CXCL12:CXCR4 signaling is involved in tumor metastasis, progression, angiogenesis, and survival. Motivated by the pivotal role of the CXCL12:CXCR4 axis in cancer, we employed a comprehensive set of computational tools, predominantly based on free energy calculations and molecular dynamics simulations, to obtain insights into the molecular recognition of CXCR4 by CXCL12. We report, what is to our knowledge, the first computationally derived CXCL12:CXCR4 complex structure which is in remarkable agreement with experimental findings and sheds light into the functional role of CXCL12 and CXCR4 residues which are associated with binding and signaling. Our results reveal that the CXCL12 N-terminal domain is firmly bound within the CXCR4 transmembrane domain, and the central 24–50 residue domain of CXCL12 interacts with the upper N-terminal domain of CXCR4. The stability of the CXCL12:CXCR4 complex structure is attributed to an abundance of nonpolar and polar intermolecular interactions, including salt bridges formed between positively charged CXCL12 residues and negatively charged CXCR4 residues. The success of the computational protocol can mainly be attributed to the nearly exhaustive docking conformational search, as well as the heterogeneous dielectric implicit water-membrane-water model used to simulate and select the optimum conformations. We also recently utilized this protocol to elucidate the binding of an HIV-1 gp120 V3 loop in complex with CXCR4, and a comparison between the molecular recognition of CXCR4 by CXCL12 and the HIV-1 gp120 V3 loop shows that both CXCL12 and the HIV-1 gp120 V3 loop share the same CXCR4 binding pocket, as they mostly interact with the same CXCR4 residues. PMID:24660779

  11. Scalar graviton as dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Pirogov, Yu. F.

    2015-06-15

    The basics of the theory of unimodular bimode gravity built on the principles of unimodular gauge invariance/relativity and general covariance are exposed. Besides the massless tensor graviton of General Relativity, the theory includes an (almost) massless scalar graviton treated as the gravitational dark matter. A spherically symmetric vacuum solution describing the coherent scalar-graviton field for the soft-core dark halos, with the asymptotically flat rotation curves, is demonstrated as an example.

  12. Three dimensional design of silver nanoparticle assemblies embedded in dielectrics for Raman spectroscopy enhancement and dark-field imaging.

    PubMed

    Carles, Robert; Farcau, Cosmin; Bonafos, Caroline; Benassayag, Gérard; Bayle, Maxime; Benzo, Patrizio; Groenen, Jesse; Zwick, Antoine

    2011-11-22

    A strategy to design and fabricate hybrid metallic-dielectric substrates for optical spectroscopy and imaging is proposed. Different architectures consisting of three-dimensional patterns of metallic nanoparticles embedded in dielectric layers are conceived to simultaneously exploit the optical interference phenomenon in stratified media and localized surface plasmon resonances on metal nanoparticles. These structures are based on a simultaneous control of opto-electronic properties at three scales (3S) (~2/20/200 nm) and along three directions (3D). By ultralow energy ion implantation through a microfabricated stencil we precisely control the size, density, and location of silver nanoparticles embedded in silica/silicon thin films. Elastic (Rayleigh) and inelastic (Raman) scattering imaging assisted by simulations were used to analyze the optical response of these "3S-3D" patterned layers. The reflectance contrast is strongly enhanced when resonance conditions between the stationary electromagnetic field in the dielectric matrix and the localized plasmon resonance in the silver nanoparticles are realized. The potential of these 3S-3D metal-dielectric structures as surface-enhanced Raman scattering substrates is demonstrated. These novel kinds of plasmonic-photonic architectures are reproducible and stable; they preserve flat and chemically uniform surfaces, offering opportunities for the development of efficient and reusable substrates for optical spectroscopy and imaging enhancement. PMID:21988138

  13. Analysis of dark matter and dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yongquan, Han

    2016-05-01

    As the law of unity of opposites of the Philosophy tells us, the bright material exists, the dark matter also exists. Dark matter and dark energy should allow the law of unity of opposites. The Common attributes of the matter is radiation, then common attributes of dark matter must be absorb radiation. Only the rotation speed is lower than the speed of light radiation, can the matter radiate, since the speed of the matter is lower than the speed of light, so the matter is radiate; The rotate speed of the dark matter is faster than the light , so the dark matter doesn't radiate, it absorbs radiation. The energy that the dark matter absorb radiation produced (affect the measurement of time and space distribution of variations) is dark energy, so the dark matter produce dark energy only when it absorbs radiation. Dark matter does not radiate, two dark matters does not exist inevitably forces, and also no dark energy. Called the space-time ripples, the gravitational wave is bent radiation, radiation particles should be graviton, graviton is mainly refers to the radiation particles whose wavelength is small. Dark matter, dark energy also confirms the existence of the law of symmetry.

  14. Nonamplification Sandwich Assay Platform for Sensitive Nucleic Acid Detection Based on AuNPs Enumeration with the Dark-Field Microscope.

    PubMed

    Li, Tian; Xu, Xiao; Zhang, Guoqing; Lin, Ruoyun; Chen, Yang; Li, Chenxi; Liu, Feng; Li, Na

    2016-04-19

    A simple and efficient assay platform with high sensitivity, convenient implementation, and moderate cost in reagents and instrumentation is most appropriate for routine applications. On the basis of the gold nanoparticle (AuNP) enumeration signal readout mode established in our laboratory, we have developed a nonamplification sandwich assay for nucleic acid detection with the 3 fM limit of detection for a sequence related to Alzheimer's disease. This AuNP counting based method takes advantages of the distinctive and strong localized surface plasmon resonance light scattering with the dark-field microscope and magnetic separation. It is shown that the presence of 20 nM random DNA sequence or calf thymus DNA with a mass up to 10(6)-fold of the targets do not significantly interfere with the assay signal. The spike recoveries of Hela cell lysate sample at 109.3% for 20 pM target and 110.5% for 100 pM target indicate the potential of this proposed method in practical sample applications. This nonamplification sandwich assay platform in principle is applicable to other assays such as the immunoassay and thus would be expected to find a breadth of applications that can make the best use of the simplicity and sensitivity. PMID:27023372

  15. Simultaneous Maximum-Likelihood Reconstruction of Absorption Coefficient, Refractive Index and Dark-Field Scattering Coefficient in X-Ray Talbot-Lau Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Ritter, André; Anton, Gisela; Weber, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    A maximum-likelihood reconstruction technique for X-ray Talbot-Lau tomography is presented. This technique allows the iterative simultaneous reconstruction of discrete distributions of absorption coefficient, refractive index and a dark-field scattering coefficient. This technique avoids prior phase retrieval in the tomographic projection images and thus in principle allows reconstruction from tomographic data with less than three phase steps per projection. A numerical phantom is defined which is used to evaluate convergence of the technique with regard to photon statistics and with regard to the number of projection angles and phase steps used. It is shown that the use of a random phase sampling pattern allows the reconstruction even for the extreme case of only one single phase step per projection. The technique is successfully applied to measured tomographic data of a mouse. In future, this reconstruction technique might also be used to implement enhanced imaging models for X-ray Talbot-Lau tomography. These enhancements might be suited to correct for example beam hardening and dispersion artifacts and improve overall image quality of X-ray Talbot-Lau tomography. PMID:27695126

  16. Multislice frozen phonon high angle annular dark-field image simulation study of Mo-V-Nb-Te-O complex oxidation catalyst "M1".

    PubMed

    Blom, Douglas A

    2012-01-01

    Multislice frozen phonon calculations were performed on a model structure of a complex oxide which has potential use as an ammoxidation catalyst. The structure has 11 cation sites in the framework, several of which exhibit mixed Mo/V substitution. In this paper the sensitivity of high-angle annular dark-field (HAADF) imaging to partial substitution of V for Mo in this structure is reported. While the relationship between the average V content in an atom column and the HAADF image intensity is not independent of thickness, it is a fairly weak function of thickness suggesting that HAADF STEM imaging in certain cases can provide a useful starting point for Rietveld refinements of mixed occupancy in complex materials. The thermal parameters of the various cations and oxygen anions in the model affect the amount of thermal diffuse scattering and therefore the intensity in the HAADF images. For complex materials where the structure has been derived via powder Rietveld refinement, the uncertainty in the thermal parameters may limit the accuracy of HAADF image simulations. With the current interest in quantitative microscopy, simulations need to accurately describe the electron scattering to the very high angles often subtended by a HAADF detector. For this system approximately 15% of the scattering occurs above 200 mrad at 200 kV. To simulate scattering to such high angles, very fine sampling of the projected potential is necessary which increases the computational cost of the simulation.

  17. Annealed Si/SiGeC Superlattices Studied by Dark-Field Electron Holography, ToF-SIMS and Infrared Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Denneulin, T.; Py, M.; Barnes, J. P.; Rochat, N.; Hartmann, J. M.; Cooper, D.; Rouviere, J. L.

    2011-11-10

    Si/SiGeC superlattices are used in the construction of new generation devices such as multichannel transistors. The incorporation of C in the SiGe layers allows for a better control of the strain and the Ge content. However the formation of {beta}-SiC clusters during annealing at high temperature limits the thermal stability of the alloy. It leads to a strong modification of the strain due to the reduction of the substitutional carbon content. Here, we investigated the behavior of Si/SiGeC superlattices that have been annealed using different characterization techniques: dark-field electron holography for the evaluation of strain; infrared spectroscopy and ToF-SIMS for the determination of the composition. It was found that after annealing at 1050 deg. C, the reduction of the substitutional C proportion leads to a recovery of the perpendicular strain in the superlattice. It was also proposed that the local arrangement of C atoms in a third nearest neighbor configuration is an intermediary step during the formation of the SiC clusters.

  18. Measurement of specimen thickness and composition in Al(x)Ga(1-x)N/GaN using high-angle annular dark field images.

    PubMed

    Rosenauer, Andreas; Gries, Katharina; Müller, Knut; Pretorius, Angelika; Schowalter, Marco; Avramescu, Adrian; Engl, Karl; Lutgen, Stephan

    2009-08-01

    In scanning transmission electron microscopy using a high-angle annular dark field detector, image intensity strongly depends on specimen thickness and composition. In this paper we show that measurement of image intensities relative to the intensity of the incoming electron beam allows direct comparison with simulated image intensities, and thus quantitative measurement of specimen thickness and composition. Simulations were carried out with the frozen lattice and absorptive potential multislice methods. The radial inhomogeneity of the detector was measured and taken into account. Using a focused ion beam (FIB) prepared specimen we first demonstrate that specimen thicknesses obtained in this way are in very good agreement with a direct measurement of the thickness of the lamella by scanning electron microscopy in the FIB. In the second step we apply this method to evaluate the composition of Al(x)Ga(1-x)N/GaN layers. We measured ratios of image intensities obtained in regions with unknown and with known Al-concentration x, respectively. We show that estimation of the specimen thickness combined with evaluation of intensity ratios allows quantitative measurement of the composition x. In high-resolution images we find that the image intensity is well described by simulation if the simulated image is convoluted with a Gaussian with a half-width at half-maximum of 0.07 nm. PMID:19497670

  19. Efficient decoding of 2D structured illumination with linear phase stepping in X-ray phase contrast and dark-field imaging.

    PubMed

    Harmon, Katherine J; Bennett, Eric E; Gomella, Andrew A; Wen, Han

    2014-01-01

    The ability to map the phase distribution and lateral coherence of an x-ray wavefront offers the potential for imaging the human body through phase contrast, without the need to deposit significant radiation energy. The classic means to achieve this goal is structured illumination, in which a periodic intensity modulation is introduced into the image, and changes in the phase distribution of the wavefront are detected as distortions of the modulation pattern. Two-dimensional periodic patterns are needed to fully characterize a transverse wavefront. Traditionally, the information in a 2D pattern is retrieved at high resolution by acquiring multiple images while shifting the pattern over a 2D matrix of positions. Here we describe a method to decode 2D periodic patterns with single-axis phase stepping, without either a loss of information or increasing the number of sampling steps. The method is created to reduce the instrumentation complexity of high-resolution 2D wavefront sensing in general. It is demonstrated with motionless electromagnetic phase stepping and a flexible processing algorithm in x-ray dark-field and phase contrast imaging.

  20. SDF1-CXCR4 signaling: A new player involved in DiGeorge/22q11-deletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Duband, Jean-Loup; Escot, Sophie; Fournier-Thibault, Claire

    2016-01-01

    The DiGeorge/22q11-deletion syndrome (22q11DS), also known as velocardiofacial syndrome, is a congenital disease causing numerous structural and behavioral disorders, including cardiac outflow tract anomalies, craniofacial dysmorphogenesis, parathyroid and thymus hypoplasia, and mental disorders. It results from a unique chromosomal microdeletion on the 22q11.2 region in which the transcriptional activator TBX1 is decisive for the occurrence of the disease. During embryogenesis, Tbx1 is required for patterning of pharyngeal region giving rise to structures of the face, neck and chest. Genetic and developmental studies demonstrated that the severity and variability of the syndrome are determined by Tbx1 targets involved in pharyngeal neural crest cell migration and survival. Recently, we demonstrated that the chemokine Sdf1/Cxcl12 and its receptor Cxcr4 are genetically downstream of Tbx1 during pharyngeal development and that reduction of CXCR4 signaling results in defects which recapitulate the major morphological anomalies of 22q11DS, supporting the possibility of a pivotal role for the SDF1/CXCR4 axis in its etiology. PMID:27500073

  1. Ibrutinib inhibits CD20 upregulation on CLL B cells mediated by the CXCR4/SDF-1 axis.

    PubMed

    Pavlasova, Gabriela; Borsky, Marek; Seda, Vaclav; Cerna, Katerina; Osickova, Jitka; Doubek, Michael; Mayer, Jiri; Calogero, Raffaele; Trbusek, Martin; Pospisilova, Sarka; Davids, Matthew S; Kipps, Thomas J; Brown, Jennifer R; Mraz, Marek

    2016-09-22

    Agents targeting B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling-associated kinases such as Bruton tyrosine kinase (BTK) or phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase can induce mobilization of neoplastic B cells from the lymphoid tissues into the blood, which makes them potentially ideal to combine with anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies (such as rituximab, obinutuzumab, or ofatumumab) for treatment of B-cell lymphomas and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Here we show that interactions between leukemia cells and stromal cells (HS-5) upregulate CD20 on CLL cells and that administering ibrutinib downmodulates CD20 (MS4A1) expression in vivo. We observed that CLL cells that have recently exited the lymph node microenvironment and moved into the peripheral blood (CXCR4(dim)CD5(bright) subpopulation) have higher cell surface levels of CD20 than the cells circulating in the bloodstream for a longer time (CXCR4(bright)CD5(dim) cells). We found that CD20 is directly upregulated by CXCR4 ligand stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1α, CXCL12) produced by stromal cells, and BTK-inhibitor ibrutinib and CXCR4-inhibitor plerixafor block SDF-1α-mediated CD20 upregulation. Ibrutinib also downmodulated Mcl1 levels in CLL cells in vivo and in coculture with stromal cells. Overall, our study provides a first detailed mechanistic explanation of CD20 expression regulation in the context of chemokine signaling and microenvironmental interactions, which may have important implications for microenvironment-targeting therapies.

  2. SDF-1α stiffens myeloma bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells through the activation of RhoA-ROCK-Myosin II

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Dong Soon; Stark, Daniel J.; Raphael, Robert M.; Wen, Jianguo; Su, Jing; Zhou, Xiaobo; Chang, Chung-Che; Zu, Youli

    2015-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a B lymphocyte malignancy that remains incurable despite extensive research efforts. This is due, in part, to frequent disease recurrences associated with the persistence of myeloma cancer stem cells (mCSCs). Bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSCs) play critical roles in supporting mCSCs through genetic or biochemical alterations. Previously, we identified mechanical distinctions between BMSCs isolated from MM patients (mBMSCs) and those present in the BM of healthy individuals (nBMSCs). These properties of mBMSC contributed to their ability to preferentially support mCSCs. To further illustrate mechanisms underlying the differences between mBMSCs and nBMSCs, here we report that (i) mBMSCs express an abnormal, constitutively high level of phosphorylated Myosin II, which leads to stiffer membrane mechanics, (ii) mBMSCs are more sensitive to SDF-1α-induced activation of MYL2 through the G(i./o)-PI3K-RhoA-ROCK-Myosin II signaling pathway, affecting Young’s modulus in BMSCs and (iii) activated Myosin II confers increased cell contractile potential, leading to enhanced collagen matrix remodeling and promoting the cell–cell interaction between mCSCs and mBMSCs. Together, our findings suggest that interfering with SDF-1α signaling may serve as a new therapeutic approach for eliminating mCSCs by disrupting their interaction with mBMSCs. PMID:25137150

  3. SDF1-CXCR4 signaling: A new player involved in DiGeorge/22q11-deletion syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Duband, Jean-Loup; Escot, Sophie; Fournier-Thibault, Claire

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The DiGeorge/22q11-deletion syndrome (22q11DS), also known as velocardiofacial syndrome, is a congenital disease causing numerous structural and behavioral disorders, including cardiac outflow tract anomalies, craniofacial dysmorphogenesis, parathyroid and thymus hypoplasia, and mental disorders. It results from a unique chromosomal microdeletion on the 22q11.2 region in which the transcriptional activator TBX1 is decisive for the occurrence of the disease. During embryogenesis, Tbx1 is required for patterning of pharyngeal region giving rise to structures of the face, neck and chest. Genetic and developmental studies demonstrated that the severity and variability of the syndrome are determined by Tbx1 targets involved in pharyngeal neural crest cell migration and survival. Recently, we demonstrated that the chemokine Sdf1/Cxcl12 and its receptor Cxcr4 are genetically downstream of Tbx1 during pharyngeal development and that reduction of CXCR4 signaling results in defects which recapitulate the major morphological anomalies of 22q11DS, supporting the possibility of a pivotal role for the SDF1/CXCR4 axis in its etiology. PMID:27500073

  4. Decoupling dark energy from matter

    SciTech Connect

    Brax, Philippe; Davis, Anne-Christine; Martin, Jérôme E-mail: c.vandebruck@sheffield.ac.uk E-mail: jmartin@iap.fr

    2009-09-01

    We examine the embedding of dark energy in high energy models based upon supergravity and extend the usual phenomenological setting comprising an observable sector and a hidden supersymmetry breaking sector by including a third sector leading to the acceleration of the expansion of the universe. We find that gravitational constraints on the non-existence of a fifth force naturally imply that the dark energy sector must possess an approximate shift symmetry. When exact, the shift symmetry provides an example of a dark energy sector with a runaway potential and a nearly massless dark energy field whose coupling to matter is very weak, contrary to the usual lore that dark energy fields must couple strongly to matter and lead to gravitational inconsistencies. Moreover, the shape of the potential is stable under one-loop radiative corrections. When the shift symmetry is slightly broken by higher order terms in the Kähler potential, the coupling to matter remains small. However, the cosmological dynamics are largely affected by the shift symmetry breaking operators leading to the appearance of a minimum of the scalar potential such that dark energy behaves like an effective cosmological constant from very early on in the history of the universe.

  5. Skew-flavored dark matter

    DOE PAGES

    Agrawal, Prateek; Chacko, Zackaria; Fortes, Elaine C. F. S.; Kilic, Can

    2016-05-10

    We explore a novel flavor structure in the interactions of dark matter with the Standard Model. We consider theories in which both the dark matter candidate, and the particles that mediate its interactions with the Standard Model fields, carry flavor quantum numbers. The interactions are skewed in flavor space, so that a dark matter particle does not directly couple to the Standard Model matter fields of the same flavor, but only to the other two flavors. This framework respects minimal flavor violation and is, therefore, naturally consistent with flavor constraints. We study the phenomenology of a benchmark model in whichmore » dark matter couples to right-handed charged leptons. In large regions of parameter space, the dark matter can emerge as a thermal relic, while remaining consistent with the constraints from direct and indirect detection. The collider signatures of this scenario include events with multiple leptons and missing energy. In conclusion, these events exhibit a characteristic flavor pattern that may allow this class of models to be distinguished from other theories of dark matter.« less

  6. Dark D-brane cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Koivisto, Tomi; Wills, Danielle; Zavala, Ivonne E-mail: d.e.wills@durham.ac.uk

    2014-06-01

    Disformally coupled cosmologies arise from Dirac-Born-Infeld actions in Type II string theories, when matter resides on a moving hidden sector D-brane. Since such matter interacts only very weakly with the standard model particles, this scenario can provide a natural origin for the dark sector of the universe with a clear geometrical interpretation: dark energy is identified with the scalar field associated to the D-brane's position as it moves in the internal space, acting as quintessence, while dark matter is identified with the matter living on the D-brane, which can be modelled by a perfect fluid. The coupling functions are determined by the (warped) extra-dimensional geometry, and are thus constrained by the theory. The resulting cosmologies are studied using both dynamical system analysis and numerics. From the dynamical system point of view, one free parameter controls the cosmological dynamics, given by the ratio of the warp factor and the potential energy scales. The disformal coupling allows for new scaling solutions that can describe accelerating cosmologies alleviating the coincidence problem of dark energy. In addition, this scenario may ameliorate the fine-tuning problem of dark energy, whose small value may be attained dynamically, without requiring the mass of the dark energy field to be unnaturally low.

  7. Constraints on Cosmic Rays, Magnetic Fields, and Dark Matter from Gamma-Ray Observations of the Coma Cluster of Galaxies with VERITAS and Fermi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arlen, T.; Aune, T.; Beilicke, M.; Benbow, W.; Bouvier, A.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Byrum, K.; Cannon, A.; Cesarini, A.; Ciupik, L.; Collins-Hughes, E.; Connolly, M. P.; Cui, W.; Dickherber, R.; Dumm, J.; Falcone, A.; Federici, S.; Feng, Q.; Finley, J. P.; Finnegan, G.; Fortson, L.; Furniss, A.; Galante, N.; Gall, D.; Godambe, S.; Griffin, S.; Grube, J.; Gyuk, G.; Holder, J.; Huan, H.; Hughes, G.; Humensky, T. B.; Imran, A.; Kaaret, P.; Karlsson, N.; Kertzman, M.; Khassen, Y.; Kieda, D.; Krawczynski, H.; Krennrich, F.; Lee, K.; Madhavan, A. S.; Maier, G.; Majumdar, P.; McArthur, S.; McCann, A.; Moriarty, P.; Mukherjee, R.; Nelson, T.; O'Faoláin de Bhróithe, A.; Ong, R. A.; Orr, M.; Otte, A. N.; Park, N.; Perkins, J. S.; Pohl, M.; Prokoph, H.; Quinn, J.; Ragan, K.; Reyes, L. C.; Reynolds, P. T.; Roache, E.; Ruppel, J.; Saxon, D. B.; Schroedter, M.; Sembroski, G. H.; Skole, C.; Smith, A. W.; Telezhinsky, I.; Tešić, G.; Theiling, M.; Thibadeau, S.; Tsurusaki, K.; Varlotta, A.; Vivier, M.; Wakely, S. P.; Ward, J. E.; Weinstein, A.; Welsing, R.; Williams, D. A.; Zitzer, B.; Pfrommer, C.; Pinzke, A.

    2012-10-01

    Observations of radio halos and relics in galaxy clusters indicate efficient electron acceleration. Protons should likewise be accelerated and, on account of weak energy losses, can accumulate, suggesting that clusters may also be sources of very high energy (VHE; E > 100 GeV) gamma-ray emission. We report here on VHE gamma-ray observations of the Coma galaxy cluster with the VERITAS array of imaging Cerenkov telescopes, with complementing Fermi Large Area Telescope observations at GeV energies. No significant gamma-ray emission from the Coma Cluster was detected. Integral flux upper limits at the 99% confidence level were measured to be on the order of (2-5) × 10-8 photons m -2 s -1 (VERITAS, >220 GeV) and ~2 × 10-6 photons m -2 s -1 (Fermi, 1-3 GeV), respectively. We use the gamma-ray upper limits to constrain cosmic rays (CRs) and magnetic fields in Coma. Using an analytical approach, the CR-to-thermal pressure ratio is constrained to be <16% from VERITAS data and <1.7% from Fermi data (averaged within the virial radius). These upper limits are starting to constrain the CR physics in self-consistent cosmological cluster simulations and cap the maximum CR acceleration efficiency at structure formation shocks to be <50%. Alternatively, this may argue for non-negligible CR transport processes such as CR streaming and diffusion into the outer cluster regions. Assuming that the radio-emitting electrons of the Coma halo result from hadronic CR interactions, the observations imply a lower limit on the central magnetic field in Coma of ~(2-5.5) μG, depending on the radial magnetic field profile and on the gamma-ray spectral index. Since these values are below those inferred by Faraday rotation measurements in Coma (for most of the parameter space), this renders the hadronic model a very plausible explanation of the Coma radio halo. Finally, since galaxy clusters are dark matter (DM) dominated, the VERITAS upper limits have been used to place constraints on the

  8. Improved Photometry of Sloan Digital Sky Survey Crowded-Field Images: Structure and Dark Matter Content in the Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy Leo I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolčić, V.; Zucker, D. B.; Bell, E. F.; Coleman, M. G.; Rix, H. W.; Schinnerer, E.; Ivezić, Ž.; Kniazev, A.

    2007-11-01

    We explore how well crowded-field point-source photometry can be accomplished with Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data. For this purpose, we present a photometric pipeline based on DoPHOT and tuned for analyzing crowded-field images from the SDSS. Using Monte Carlo simulations we show that the completeness of source extraction is above 80% to an i-band AB magnitude of lesssim21 and a stellar surface density of ~200 arcmin-2. Hence, a specialized data pipeline can be efficiently used for, e.g., nearby resolved galaxies in SDSS images, where the standard SDSS photometric package Photo, when applied in normal survey mode, gives poor results. We apply our pipeline to an area of ~3.55 deg2 around the dwarf spheroidal galaxy (dSph) Leo I and construct a high signal-to-noise ratio star count map of Leo I via an optimized filter in color-magnitude space (g, r, i). This filter reduces the foreground contamination by ~80% and enhances the central stellar surface density contrast of the dwarf by a factor of gtrsim4, making this study the deepest wide-field study of the Leo I dSph based on accurate CCD photometry. Although the radial surface density profile deviates from the best-fit empirical King model toward outer radii, we find no evidence for tidal debris out to a stellar surface density of 4 × 10-3 of the central value. We determine the total luminosity of Leo I and model its mass using the spherical and isotropic Jeans equation. Assuming that mass follows light, we constrain a lower limit on the total mass of the dSph to be (1.7 ± 0.2) × 107 Modot. On the other hand, if the mass in Leo I is dominated by a constant-density dark matter (DM) halo, then the mass within the central 12‧ is (2 ± 0.6) × 108 Modot. This leads to a mass-to-light ratio of Gt6 in I-band solar units, and possibly >75 if the DM halo dominates the mass and extends further out than 12‧. In summary, our results show that Leo I is a symmetric, relaxed, and bound system; this supports the idea

  9. Constraints on Cosmic Rays, Magnetic Fields, and Dark Matter from Gamma-ray Observations of the Coma Cluster of Galaxies with VERITAS and FERMI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arlen, T.; Aune, T.; Beilicke, M.; Benbow, W.; Bouvier, A.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Byrum, K.; Cannon, A.; Cesarini, A.; Ciupik, L.; Collins-Hughes, E.; Connolly, M. P.; Cui, W.; Dickherber, R.; Dumm, J.; Falcone, A.; Federici, S.; Feng, Q.; Finley, J. P.; Finnegan, G.; Fortson, L.; Furniss, A.; Galante, N.; Perkins, J. S.

    2012-01-01

    Observations of radio halos and relics in galaxy clusters indicate efficient electron acceleration. Protons should likewise be accelerated and, on account of weak energy losses, can accumulate, suggesting that clusters may also be sources of very high energy (VHE; E greater than100 GeV) gamma-ray emission. We report here on VHE gamma-ray observations of the Coma galaxy cluster with the VERITAS array of imaging Cerenkov telescopes, with complementing Fermi Large Area Telescope observations at GeV energies. No significant gamma-ray emission from the Coma Cluster was detected. Integral flux upper limits at the 99 confidence level were measured to be on the order of (2-5) x 10(sup -8) photons m(sup -2) s(sup -1) (VERITAS,greater than 220 GeV) and approximately 2 x 10(sup -6) photons m(sup -2) s(sup -1) (Fermi, 1-3 GeV), respectively. We use the gamma-ray upper limits to constrain cosmic rays (CRs) and magnetic fields in Coma. Using an analytical approach, the CR-to-thermal pressure ratio is constrained to be less than 16% from VERITAS data and less than 1.7% from Fermi data (averaged within the virial radius). These upper limits are starting to constrain the CR physics in self-consistent cosmological cluster simulations and cap the maximum CR acceleration efficiency at structure formation shocks to be 50. Alternatively, this may argue for non-negligible CR transport processes such as CR streaming and diffusion into the outer cluster regions. Assuming that the radio-emitting electrons of the Coma halo result from hadronic CR interactions, the observations imply a lower limit on the central magnetic field in Coma of approximately (2-5.5)microG, depending on the radial magnetic field profile and on the gamma-ray spectral index. Since these values are below those inferred by Faraday rotation measurements in Coma (for most of the parameter space), this renders the hadronic model a very plausible explanation of the Coma radio halo. Finally, since galaxy clusters are dark

  10. CONSTRAINTS ON COSMIC RAYS, MAGNETIC FIELDS, AND DARK MATTER FROM GAMMA-RAY OBSERVATIONS OF THE COMA CLUSTER OF GALAXIES WITH VERITAS AND FERMI

    SciTech Connect

    Arlen, T.; Aune, T.; Bouvier, A.; Beilicke, M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Dickherber, R.; Benbow, W.; Byrum, K.; Cannon, A.; Collins-Hughes, E.; Cesarini, A.; Connolly, M. P.; Ciupik, L.; Cui, W.; Feng, Q.; Finley, J. P.; Dumm, J.; Falcone, A.; Federici, S. E-mail: christoph.pfrommer@h-its.org; and others

    2012-10-01

    Observations of radio halos and relics in galaxy clusters indicate efficient electron acceleration. Protons should likewise be accelerated and, on account of weak energy losses, can accumulate, suggesting that clusters may also be sources of very high energy (VHE; E > 100 GeV) gamma-ray emission. We report here on VHE gamma-ray observations of the Coma galaxy cluster with the VERITAS array of imaging Cerenkov telescopes, with complementing Fermi Large Area Telescope observations at GeV energies. No significant gamma-ray emission from the Coma Cluster was detected. Integral flux upper limits at the 99% confidence level were measured to be on the order of (2-5) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8} photons m {sup -2} s {sup -1} (VERITAS, >220 GeV) and {approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} photons m {sup -2} s {sup -1} (Fermi, 1-3 GeV), respectively. We use the gamma-ray upper limits to constrain cosmic rays (CRs) and magnetic fields in Coma. Using an analytical approach, the CR-to-thermal pressure ratio is constrained to be <16% from VERITAS data and <1.7% from Fermi data (averaged within the virial radius). These upper limits are starting to constrain the CR physics in self-consistent cosmological cluster simulations and cap the maximum CR acceleration efficiency at structure formation shocks to be <50%. Alternatively, this may argue for non-negligible CR transport processes such as CR streaming and diffusion into the outer cluster regions. Assuming that the radio-emitting electrons of the Coma halo result from hadronic CR interactions, the observations imply a lower limit on the central magnetic field in Coma of {approx}(2-5.5) {mu}G, depending on the radial magnetic field profile and on the gamma-ray spectral index. Since these values are below those inferred by Faraday rotation measurements in Coma (for most of the parameter space), this renders the hadronic model a very plausible explanation of the Coma radio halo. Finally, since galaxy clusters are dark matter (DM

  11. Light's Darkness

    ScienceCinema

    Padgett, Miles [University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland

    2016-07-12

    Optical vortices and orbital angular momentum are currently topical subjects in the optics literature. Although seemingly esoteric, they are, in fact, the generic state of light and arise whenever three or more plane waves interfere. To be observed by eye the light must be monochromatic. Laser speckle is one such example, where the optical energy circulates around each black spot, giving a local orbital angular momentum. This talk with report three on-going studies. First, when considering a volume of interfering waves, the laser specs map out threads of complete darkness embedded in the light. Do these threads form loops? Links? Or even knots? Second, when looking through a rapidly spinning window, the image of the world on the other side is rotated: true or false? Finally, the entanglement of orbital angular momentum states means measuring how the angular position of one photons sets the angular momentum of another: is this an angular version of the EPR (Einstein, Podolsky, and Rosen) paradox?

  12. Relationship between ethanol-induced activity and anxiolysis in the open field, elevated plus maze, light-dark box, and ethanol intake in adolescent rats

    PubMed Central

    Acevedo, María Belén; Nizhnikov, Michael E.; Molina, Juan C.; Pautassi, Ricardo Marcos

    2014-01-01

    It is yet unclear if ethanol-induced motor stimulation in the open field (OF) merely reflects psychomotor stimulating effects of the drug or if this stimulation is driven or modulated by ethanol’s antianxiety properties. In the present study, adolescent rats were administered with different ethanol doses or remained untreated. They were sequentially assessed in the OF, elevated plus maze (EPM), and light-dark box (LDB) and then assessed for ethanol intake. The aims were to assess the relationship between measures of ethanol-induced activity and anxiolysis, analyze ethanol intake as a function of prior ethanol exposure, and associate behavioral responsiveness in these apparatus with ethanol intake during adolescence. The results suggested that the enhanced exploration of the OF observed after 2.5 and 3.25 g/kg ethanol reflected a motor-stimulating effect that appeared to be relatively independent of anxiolysis. The 1.25 g/kg dose induced motor stimulation in the OF and anti-anxiety effects in the EPM, but these effects were relatively independent. The 0.5 g/kg ethanol dose exerted significant anxiolytic effects in the EPM in the absence of stimulating effects in the OF. A multivariate regression analysis indicated that adolescents with a higher frequency of rearing behavior in the OF, higher percentage of open arm entries in the EPM, and lower propensity to enter the central area of the OF exhibited greater ethanol intake. These results indicate that the OF is a valid procedure for the measurement of ethanol-induced stimulation, and provide information towards characterizing subpopulations of adolescents at risk for initiating alcohol drinking. PMID:24583190

  13. Augmented 3D super-resolution of fluorescence-free nanoparticles using enhanced dark-field illumination based on wavelength-modulation and a least-cubic algorithm.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Kim, Kyungsoo; Lee, Seungah; Chakkarapani, Suresh Kumar; Fang, Ning; Kang, Seong Ho

    2016-09-13

    Augmented three-dimensional (3D) subdiffraction-limited resolution of fluorescence-free single-nanoparticles was achieved with wavelength-dependent enhanced dark-field (EDF) illumination and a least-cubic algorithm. Various plasmonic nanoparticles on a glass slide (i.e., gold nanoparticles, GNPs; silver nanoparticles, SNPs; and gold nanorods, GNRs) were imaged and sliced in the z-direction to a thickness of 10 nm. Single-particle images were then compared with simulation data. The 3D coordinates of individual GNP, SNP, and GNR nanoparticles (x, y, z) were resolved by fitting the data with 3D point spread functions using a least-cubic algorithm and collation. Final, 3D super-resolution microscopy (SRM) images were obtained by resolving 3D coordinates and their Cramér-Rao lower bound-based localization precisions in an image space (530 nm × 530 nm × 300 nm) with a specific voxel size (2.5 nm × 2.5 nm × 5 nm). Compared with the commonly used least-square method, the least-cubic method was more useful for finding the center in asymmetric cases (i.e., nanorods) with high precision and accuracy. This novel 3D fluorescence-free SRM technique was successfully applied to resolve the positions of various nanoparticles on glass and gold nanospots (in vitro) as well as in a living single cell (in vivo) with subdiffraction limited resolution in 3D.

  14. Augmented 3D super-resolution of fluorescence-free nanoparticles using enhanced dark-field illumination based on wavelength-modulation and a least-cubic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Peng; Kim, Kyungsoo; Lee, Seungah; Chakkarapani, Suresh Kumar; Fang, Ning; Kang, Seong Ho

    2016-09-01

    Augmented three-dimensional (3D) subdiffraction-limited resolution of fluorescence-free single-nanoparticles was achieved with wavelength-dependent enhanced dark-field (EDF) illumination and a least-cubic algorithm. Various plasmonic nanoparticles on a glass slide (i.e., gold nanoparticles, GNPs; silver nanoparticles, SNPs; and gold nanorods, GNRs) were imaged and sliced in the z-direction to a thickness of 10 nm. Single-particle images were then compared with simulation data. The 3D coordinates of individual GNP, SNP, and GNR nanoparticles (x, y, z) were resolved by fitting the data with 3D point spread functions using a least-cubic algorithm and collation. Final, 3D super-resolution microscopy (SRM) images were obtained by resolving 3D coordinates and their Cramér-Rao lower bound-based localization precisions in an image space (530 nm × 530 nm × 300 nm) with a specific voxel size (2.5 nm × 2.5 nm × 5 nm). Compared with the commonly used least-square method, the least-cubic method was more useful for finding the center in asymmetric cases (i.e., nanorods) with high precision and accuracy. This novel 3D fluorescence-free SRM technique was successfully applied to resolve the positions of various nanoparticles on glass and gold nanospots (in vitro) as well as in a living single cell (in vivo) with subdiffraction limited resolution in 3D.

  15. Quantification of Cancer Biomarkers in Serum Using Scattering-Based Quantitative Single Particle Intensity Measurement with a Dark-Field Microscope.

    PubMed

    Poon, Chung-Yan; Wei, Lin; Xu, Yueling; Chen, Bo; Xiao, Lehui; Li, Hung-Wing

    2016-09-01

    In this work, we developed a simple yet robust single particle scattering intensity measurement method for the quantification of cancer-related biomarkers. The design is based on the plasmonic coupling effect between noble metal nanoparticles. First, the primary and secondary antibodies were conjugated onto the surface of 60 nm gold nanoparticles (AuNPs, act as capture probes) and 50 nm silver nanoparticles (AgNPs, act as signal amplification probes) respectively. In the presence of corresponding antigen, a sandwiched immunocomplex was formed, resulting a significantly enhanced scattering intensity in contrast to that of individual probes. By measuring the intensity change of the particles with a dark-field microscope (DFM), the amount of target protein could be accurately quantified. As a proof of concept experiment, quantification of three types of antigens, including carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and alpha fetoprotein (AFP) by this platform was demonstrated with limit of detection (LOD) of 1.7, 3.3, and 5.9 pM, respectively, with a linear dynamic range of 0 to 300 pM. Furthermore, to elucidate the potential in clinical application, the content of antigens in a serum sample was also quantified directly without additional sample pretreatment. In order to validate the reliability of this method, the measured result was also compared with that obtained by regular enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit, showing good consistency between these two data sets. Therefore, owing to the simplicity and accuracy of this method, it could be potentially applied for massive disease screening in clinical assay in the future. PMID:27514775

  16. Augmented 3D super-resolution of fluorescence-free nanoparticles using enhanced dark-field illumination based on wavelength-modulation and a least-cubic algorithm.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Kim, Kyungsoo; Lee, Seungah; Chakkarapani, Suresh Kumar; Fang, Ning; Kang, Seong Ho

    2016-01-01

    Augmented three-dimensional (3D) subdiffraction-limited resolution of fluorescence-free single-nanoparticles was achieved with wavelength-dependent enhanced dark-field (EDF) illumination and a least-cubic algorithm. Various plasmonic nanoparticles on a glass slide (i.e., gold nanoparticles, GNPs; silver nanoparticles, SNPs; and gold nanorods, GNRs) were imaged and sliced in the z-direction to a thickness of 10 nm. Single-particle images were then compared with simulation data. The 3D coordinates of individual GNP, SNP, and GNR nanoparticles (x, y, z) were resolved by fitting the data with 3D point spread functions using a least-cubic algorithm and collation. Final, 3D super-resolution microscopy (SRM) images were obtained by resolving 3D coordinates and their Cramér-Rao lower bound-based localization precisions in an image space (530 nm × 530 nm × 300 nm) with a specific voxel size (2.5 nm × 2.5 nm × 5 nm). Compared with the commonly used least-square method, the least-cubic method was more useful for finding the center in asymmetric cases (i.e., nanorods) with high precision and accuracy. This novel 3D fluorescence-free SRM technique was successfully applied to resolve the positions of various nanoparticles on glass and gold nanospots (in vitro) as well as in a living single cell (in vivo) with subdiffraction limited resolution in 3D. PMID:27619347

  17. Augmented 3D super-resolution of fluorescence-free nanoparticles using enhanced dark-field illumination based on wavelength-modulation and a least-cubic algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peng; Kim, Kyungsoo; Lee, Seungah; Chakkarapani, Suresh Kumar; Fang, Ning; Kang, Seong Ho

    2016-01-01

    Augmented three-dimensional (3D) subdiffraction-limited resolution of fluorescence-free single-nanoparticles was achieved with wavelength-dependent enhanced dark-field (EDF) illumination and a least-cubic algorithm. Various plasmonic nanoparticles on a glass slide (i.e., gold nanoparticles, GNPs; silver nanoparticles, SNPs; and gold nanorods, GNRs) were imaged and sliced in the z-direction to a thickness of 10 nm. Single-particle images were then compared with simulation data. The 3D coordinates of individual GNP, SNP, and GNR nanoparticles (x, y, z) were resolved by fitting the data with 3D point spread functions using a least-cubic algorithm and collation. Final, 3D super-resolution microscopy (SRM) images were obtained by resolving 3D coordinates and their Cramér-Rao lower bound-based localization precisions in an image space (530 nm × 530 nm × 300 nm) with a specific voxel size (2.5 nm × 2.5 nm × 5 nm). Compared with the commonly used least-square method, the least-cubic method was more useful for finding the center in asymmetric cases (i.e., nanorods) with high precision and accuracy. This novel 3D fluorescence-free SRM technique was successfully applied to resolve the positions of various nanoparticles on glass and gold nanospots (in vitro) as well as in a living single cell (in vivo) with subdiffraction limited resolution in 3D. PMID:27619347

  18. Effects of PB-EPCs on Homing Ability of Rabbit BMSCs via Endogenous SDF-1 and MCP-1

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Hanxiao; Zhao, Xian; Yuan, Ruihong; Dai, Xiaoming; Li, Yisong; Liu, Liu

    2015-01-01

    Traumas, infections, tumors, and some congenital malformations can lead to bone defects or even bone loss. The goal of the present study was to investigate whether inclusion of endothelial progenitor cells derived from peripheral blood (PB–EPCs) in cell-seeded partially deproteinized bone (PDPB) implants would stimulate recruitment of systemically injected bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) to the implant. Methods: BMSCs were injected intravenously with lentiviral expression vector expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) for tracing. Recruitment of eGFP-positive BMSCs was tested for the following implant configurations: 1) seeded with both BMSC and PB-EPC, 2) BMSC alone, 3) PB-EPC alone, and 4) unseeded PDPB. Protein and mRNA levels of endogenous stromal-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) and its receptor CXCR4, as well as monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) and its receptor CCR2, were evaluated on the 8th week. Immunohistochemical staining was performed to determine eGFP-positive areas at the defective sites. Masson’s trichrome staining was conducted to observe the distribution of collagen deposition and evaluate the extent of osteogenesis. Results: The mRNA and protein levels of SDF-1 and CXCR4 in the co-culture group were higher than those in other groups (p < 0.05) 8 weeks after the surgery. MCP-1 mRNA level in the co-culture group was also higher than that in the other groups (p < 0.05). Immunohistochemical assays revealed that the area covered by eGFP-positive cells was larger in the co-culture group than in the other groups (p < 0.05) after 4 weeks. Masson’s trichrome staining revealed better osteogenic potential of the co-culture group compared to the other groups (p < 0.05). Conclusion: These experiments demonstrate an association between PB-EPC and BMSC recruitment mediated by the SDF-1/CXCR4 axis that can enhance repair of bone defects. PMID:26660527

  19. Quantitative annular dark-field STEM images of a silicon crystal using a large-angle convergent electron probe with a 300-kV cold field-emission gun.

    PubMed

    Kim, Suhyun; Oshima, Yoshifumi; Sawada, Hidetaka; Kaneyama, Toshikatsu; Kondo, Yukihito; Takeguchi, Masaki; Nakayama, Yoshiko; Tanishiro, Yasumasa; Takayanagi, Kunio

    2011-01-01

    Annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscope (ADF-STEM) images of an Si (001) crystal were obtained by using an aberration-corrected electron microscope, at 30-mrad convergent probe and cold field-emission gun at 300 kV. The intensity of ADF-STEM images, that is, the number of scattered electrons relative to the incident electrons, obtained for specimen thickness from 10 to 50 nm was compared quantitatively with  absorptive multi-slice simulation. The column and background intensities were analyzed by column-by-column two-dimensional Gaussian fitting. These intensities were found to increase linearly with the sample thicknesses. However, the simulated image gave higher column intensity and lower background intensity for all the sample thickness. We found that experimental images were reproduced by the simulation with Gaussian convolution of 70 pm full-width at half-maximum for all the sample thicknesses from 10 to 50 nm. The possible factors accounted for this Gaussian convolution is discussed.

  20. Sequential and sustained release of SDF-1 and BMP-2 from silk fibroin-nanohydroxyapatite scaffold for the enhancement of bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Yanxia; Gu, Yong; Xu, Yun; Liu, Yong; Li, Bin; Chen, Liang

    2016-11-01

    In this study, a cell-free bone tissue engineering system based on a silk fibroin (SF)/nano-hydroxyapatite (nHAp) scaffold was developed, in which two bioactive molecules, stromal cell derived factor-1 (SDF-1) and bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2), were embedded and released in a sequential and controlled manner to facilitate cell recruitment and bone formation, respectively. BMP-2 was initially loaded into SF microspheres, and these BMP-2 containing microspheres were subsequently encapsulated into the SF/nHAp scaffolds, which were successively functionalized with SDF-1 via physical adsorption. The results indicated rapid initial release of SDF-1 during the first few days, followed by slow and sustained release of BMP-2 for as long as three weeks. The composite scaffold significantly promoted the recruitment of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) and osteogenic differentiation of them in vitro. Further, the in vivo studies using D-Luciferin-labeled BMSCs indicated that implantation of this composite scaffold markedly promoted the recruitment of BMSCs to the implanted sites. Enhanced bone regeneration was identified at 12 weeks' post-implantation. Taken together, our findings suggested that the sequential and sustained release of SDF-1 and BMP-2 from the SF/nHAp scaffolds resulted in a synergistic effect on bone regeneration. Such a composite system, therefore, shows promising potential for cell-free bone tissue engineering applications. PMID:27566869

  1. Dark matter and the equivalence principle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frieman, Joshua A.; Gradwohl, Ben-Ami

    1993-01-01

    A survey is presented of the current understanding of dark matter invoked by astrophysical theory and cosmology. Einstein's equivalence principle asserts that local measurements cannot distinguish a system at rest in a gravitational field from one that is in uniform acceleration in empty space. Recent test-methods for the equivalence principle are presently discussed as bases for testing of dark matter scenarios involving the long-range forces between either baryonic or nonbaryonic dark matter and ordinary matter.

  2. Dipolar dark matter with massive bigravity

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchet, Luc; Heisenberg, Lavinia

    2015-12-14

    Massive gravity theories have been developed as viable IR modifications of gravity motivated by dark energy and the problem of the cosmological constant. On the other hand, modified gravity and modified dark matter theories were developed with the aim of solving the problems of standard cold dark matter at galactic scales. Here we propose to adapt the framework of ghost-free massive bigravity theories to reformulate the problem of dark matter at galactic scales. We investigate a promising alternative to dark matter called dipolar dark matter (DDM) in which two different species of dark matter are separately coupled to the two metrics of bigravity and are linked together by an internal vector field. We show that this model successfully reproduces the phenomenology of dark matter at galactic scales (i.e. MOND) as a result of a mechanism of gravitational polarisation. The model is safe in the gravitational sector, but because of the particular couplings of the matter fields and vector field to the metrics, a ghost in the decoupling limit is present in the dark matter sector. However, it might be possible to push the mass of the ghost beyond the strong coupling scale by an appropriate choice of the parameters of the model. Crucial questions to address in future work are the exact mass of the ghost, and the cosmological implications of the model.

  3. Dipolar dark matter with massive bigravity

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchet, Luc; Heisenberg, Lavinia E-mail: laviniah@kth.se

    2015-12-01

    Massive gravity theories have been developed as viable IR modifications of gravity motivated by dark energy and the problem of the cosmological constant. On the other hand, modified gravity and modified dark matter theories were developed with the aim of solving the problems of standard cold dark matter at galactic scales. Here we propose to adapt the framework of ghost-free massive bigravity theories to reformulate the problem of dark matter at galactic scales. We investigate a promising alternative to dark matter called dipolar dark matter (DDM) in which two different species of dark matter are separately coupled to the two metrics of bigravity and are linked together by an internal vector field. We show that this model successfully reproduces the phenomenology of dark matter at galactic scales (i.e. MOND) as a result of a mechanism of gravitational polarisation. The model is safe in the gravitational sector, but because of the particular couplings of the matter fields and vector field to the metrics, a ghost in the decoupling limit is present in the dark matter sector. However, it might be possible to push the mass of the ghost beyond the strong coupling scale by an appropriate choice of the parameters of the model. Crucial questions to address in future work are the exact mass of the ghost, and the cosmological implications of the model.

  4. Constraining the dark fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Kunz, Martin; Liddle, Andrew R.; Parkinson, David; Gao Changjun

    2009-10-15

    Cosmological observations are normally fit under the assumption that the dark sector can be decomposed into dark matter and dark energy components. However, as long as the probes remain purely gravitational, there is no unique decomposition and observations can only constrain a single dark fluid; this is known as the dark degeneracy. We use observations to directly constrain this dark fluid in a model-independent way, demonstrating, in particular, that the data cannot be fit by a dark fluid with a single constant equation of state. Parametrizing the dark fluid equation of state by a variety of polynomials in the scale factor a, we use current kinematical data to constrain the parameters. While the simplest interpretation of the dark fluid remains that it is comprised of separate dark matter and cosmological constant contributions, our results cover other model types including unified dark energy/matter scenarios.

  5. CD138-negative myeloma cells regulate mechanical properties of bone marrow stromal cells through SDF-1/CXCR4/AKT signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Dan; Guo, Xinyi; Su, Jing; Chen, Ruoying; Berenzon, Dmitriy; Guthold, Martin; Bonin, Keith; Zhao, Weiling; Zhou, Xiaobo

    2014-01-01

    As the second most prevalent hematologic malignancy, multiple myeloma (MM) remains incurable and relapses due to intrinsic or acquired drug resistance. Therefore, new therapeutic strategies that target molecular mechanisms responsible for drug resistance are attractive. Interactions of tumor cells with their surrounding microenvironment impact tumor initiation, progression and metastasis, as well as patient prognosis. This cross-talk is bidirectional. Tumor cells can also attract or activate tumor-associated stromal cells by releasing cytokines to facilitate their growth, invasion and metastasis. The effect of myeloma cells on bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) has not been well studied. In our study, we found that higher stiffness of BMSCs was not a unique characteristic of BMSCs from MM patients (M-BMSCs). BMSCs from MGUS (Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance) patients were also stiffer than the BMSCs from healthy volunteers (N-BMSCs). The stiffness of M-BMSCs was enhanced when cocultured with myeloma cells. In contrast, no changes were seen in myeloma cell-primed MGUS- and N-BMSCs. Interestingly, our data indicated that CD138− myeloma cells, but not CD138+ cells, regulated M-BMSC stiffness. SDF-1 was highly expressed in the CD138− myeloma subpopulation compared with that in CD138+ cells. Inhibition of SDF-1 using AMD3100 or knocking-down CXCR4 in M-BMSCs blocked CD138− myeloma cells-induced increase in M-BMSC stiffness, suggesting a crucial role of SDF-1/CXCR4. AKT inhibition attenuated SDF-1-induced increases in M-BMSC stiffness. These findings demonstrate, for the first time, CD138− myeloma cell-directed cross-talk with BMSCs and reveal that CD138− myeloma cells regulate M-BMSC stiffness through SDF-1/CXCR4/AKT signaling. PMID:25450979

  6. THE DARK MOLECULAR GAS

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfire, Mark G.; Hollenbach, David; McKee, Christopher F. E-mail: dhollenbach@seti.or

    2010-06-20

    The mass of molecular gas in an interstellar cloud is often measured using line emission from low rotational levels of CO, which are sensitive to the CO mass, and then scaling to the assumed molecular hydrogen H{sub 2} mass. However, a significant H{sub 2} mass may lie outside the CO region, in the outer regions of the molecular cloud where the gas-phase carbon resides in C or C{sup +}. Here, H{sub 2} self-shields or is shielded by dust from UV photodissociation, whereas CO is photodissociated. This H{sub 2} gas is 'dark' in molecular transitions because of the absence of CO and other trace molecules, and because H{sub 2} emits so weakly at temperatures 10 K dark mass and find that the fraction of the molecular mass in this dark component is remarkably constant ({approx}0.3 for average visual extinction through the cloud A-bar{sub V{approx_equal}}8) and insensitive to the incident ultraviolet radiation field strength, the internal density distribution, and the mass of the molecular cloud as long as A-bar{sub V}, or equivalently, the product of the average hydrogen nucleus column and the metallicity through the cloud, is constant. We also find that the dark mass fraction increases with decreasing A-bar{sub V}, since relatively more molecular H{sub 2} material lies outside the CO region in this case.

  7. Role of SDF-1 (CXCL12) in regulating hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells traffic into the liver during extramedullary hematopoiesis induced by G-CSF, AMD3100 and PHZ.

    PubMed

    Mendt, Mayela; Cardier, Jose E

    2015-12-01

    The stromal cell derived factor 1 (SDF-1/CXCL12) plays an essential role in the homing of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) to bone marrow (BM). It is not known whether SDF-1 may also regulate the homing of HSPCs to the liver during extramedullary hematopoiesis (EMH). Here, we investigated the possible role of SDF-1 in attracting HSPCs to the liver during experimental EMH induced by the hematopoietic mobilizers G-CSF, AMD3100 and phenylhydrazine (PHZ). Mice treated with G-CSF, AMD3100 and PHZ showed a significant increase in the expression of SDF-1 in the liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) microenvironments. Liver from mice treated with the hematopoietic mobilizers showed HSPCs located adjacent to the LSEC microenvironments, expressing high levels of SDF-1. An inverse relationship was found between the hepatic SDF-1 levels and those in the BM. In vitro, LSEC monolayers induced the migration of HSPCs, and this effect was significantly reduced by AMD3100. In conclusion, our results provide the first evidence showing that SDF-1 expressed by LSEC can be a major player in the recruitment of HSPCs to the liver during EMH induced by hematopoietic mobilizers.

  8. Dark Sky Protection and Education - Izera Dark Sky Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berlicki, Arkadiusz; Kolomanski, Sylwester; Mrozek, Tomasz; Zakowicz, Grzegorz

    2015-08-01

    Darkness of the night sky is a natural component of our environment and should be protected against negative effects of human activities. The night darkness is necessary for balanced life of plants, animals and people. Unfortunately, development of human civilization and technology has led to the substantial increase of the night-sky brightness and to situation where nights are no more dark in many areas of the World. This phenomenon is called "light pollution" and it can be rank among such problems as chemical pollution of air, water and soil. Besides the environment, the light pollution can also affect e.g. the scientific activities of astronomers - many observatories built in the past began to be located within the glow of city lights making the night observations difficult, or even impossible.In order to protect the natural darkness of nights many so-called "dark sky parks" were established, where the darkness is preserved, similar to typical nature reserves. The role of these parks is not only conservation but also education, supporting to make society aware of how serious the problem of the light pollution is.History of the dark sky areas in Europe began on November 4, 2009 in Jizerka - a small village situated in the Izera Mountains, when Izera Dark Sky Park (IDSP) was established - it was the first transboundary dark sky park in the World. The idea of establishing that dark sky park in the Izera Mountains originated from a need to give to the society in Poland and Czech Republic the knowledge about the light pollution. Izera Dark Sky Park is a part of the astro-tourism project "Astro Izery" that combines tourist attraction of Izera Valley and astronomical education under the wonderful starry Izera sky. Besides the IDSP, the project Astro Izery consists of the set of simple astronomical instruments (gnomon, sundial), natural educational trail "Solar System Model", and astronomical events for the public. In addition, twice a year we organize a 3-4 days

  9. Dark matter and global symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mambrini, Yann; Profumo, Stefano; Queiroz, Farinaldo S.

    2016-09-01

    General considerations in general relativity and quantum mechanics are known to potentially rule out continuous global symmetries in the context of any consistent theory of quantum gravity. Assuming the validity of such considerations, we derive stringent bounds from gamma-ray, X-ray, cosmic-ray, neutrino, and CMB data on models that invoke global symmetries to stabilize the dark matter particle. We compute up-to-date, robust model-independent limits on the dark matter lifetime for a variety of Planck-scale suppressed dimension-five effective operators. We then specialize our analysis and apply our bounds to specific models including the Two-Higgs-Doublet, Left-Right, Singlet Fermionic, Zee-Babu, 3-3-1 and Radiative See-Saw models. Assuming that (i) global symmetries are broken at the Planck scale, that (ii) the non-renormalizable operators mediating dark matter decay have O (1) couplings, that (iii) the dark matter is a singlet field, and that (iv) the dark matter density distribution is well described by a NFW profile, we are able to rule out fermionic, vector, and scalar dark matter candidates across a broad mass range (keV-TeV), including the WIMP regime.

  10. Dark matter axions

    SciTech Connect

    Sikivie, P. |

    1992-09-01

    The physics of axions is briefly reviewed theoretically, and various constraints on the axion mass are recounted. Then the two main contributions to the present cosmological axion energy density, that due to the realignment of the vacuum during the QCD phase transition and that from axions radiated by cosmic axion strings, are discussed. Next, two detection schemes for axions that are sensitive to different mass ranges, an electromagnetic cavity permeated by a strong magnetic field and a system of superconducting wires embedded in a material transparent to microwave radiation, are described. Finally, the phase space structure of cold dark matter galactic halos is considered. (RWR)

  11. Dark matter axions

    SciTech Connect

    Sikivie, P. . Inst. for Theoretical Physics Florida Univ., Gainesville, FL . Dept. of Physics)

    1992-01-01

    The physics of axions is briefly reviewed theoretically, and various constraints on the axion mass are recounted. Then the two main contributions to the present cosmological axion energy density, that due to the realignment of the vacuum during the QCD phase transition and that from axions radiated by cosmic axion strings, are discussed. Next, two detection schemes for axions that are sensitive to different mass ranges, an electromagnetic cavity permeated by a strong magnetic field and a system of superconducting wires embedded in a material transparent to microwave radiation, are described. Finally, the phase space structure of cold dark matter galactic halos is considered. (RWR)

  12. Dark sector shining through 750 GeV dark Higgs boson at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, P.; Nomura, Takaaki

    2016-07-01

    We consider a dark sector with SU(3)C × U(1)Y × U(1)X and three families of dark fermions that are chiral under dark U(1)X gauge symmetry, whereas scalar dark matter X is the SM singlet. U(1)X dark symmetry is spontaneously broken by nonzero VEV of dark Higgs field < Φ >, generating the masses of dark fermions and dark photon Z‧. The resulting dark Higgs boson ϕ can be produced at the LHC by dark quark loop (involving 3 generations) and will decay into a pair of photon through charged dark fermion loop. Its decay width can be easily ∼ 45 GeV due to its possible decays into a pair of dark photon, which is not strongly constrained by the current LHC searches pp → ϕ →Z‧Z‧ followed by Z‧ decays into the SM fermion pairs. The scalar DM can achieve thermal relic density without conflict with direct detection bound or the invisible ϕ decay into a pair of DM.

  13. Fractality of light's darkness.

    PubMed

    O'Holleran, Kevin; Dennis, Mark R; Flossmann, Florian; Padgett, Miles J

    2008-02-01

    Natural light fields are threaded by lines of darkness. For monochromatic light, the phenomenon is familiar in laser speckle, i.e., the black points that appear in the scattered light. These black points are optical vortices that extend as lines throughout the volume of the field. We establish by numerical simulations, supported by experiments, that these vortex lines have the fractal properties of a Brownian random walk. Approximately 73% of the lines percolate through the optical beam, the remainder forming closed loops. Our statistical results are similar to those of vortices in random discrete lattice models of cosmic strings, implying that the statistics of singularities in random optical fields exhibit universal behavior. PMID:18352372

  14. Collision of Bose Condensate Dark Matter structures

    SciTech Connect

    Guzman, F. S.

    2008-12-04

    The status of the scalar field or Bose condensate dark matter model is presented. Results about the solitonic behavior in collision of structures is presented as a possible explanation to the recent-possibly-solitonic behavior in the bullet cluster merger. Some estimates about the possibility to simulate the bullet cluster under the Bose Condensate dark matter model are indicated.

  15. Cosmological constraints on superconducting dark energy models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keresztes, Zoltán; Gergely, László Á.; Harko, Tiberiu; Liang, Shi-Dong

    2015-12-01

    We consider cosmological tests of a scalar-vector-tensor gravitational model, in which the dark energy is included in the total action through a gauge-invariant, electromagnetic type contribution. The ground state of dark energy, corresponding to a constant potential V , is a Bose-Einstein type condensate with spontaneously broken U(1) symmetry. In other words, dark energy appears as a massive vector field emerging from a superposition of a massless vector and a scalar field, the latter corresponding to the Goldstone boson. Two particular cosmological models, corresponding to pure electric and pure magnetic type potentials, respectively, are confronted with type IA supernovae and Hubble parameter data. In the electric case, a good fit is obtained along a narrow inclined stripe in the Ωm-ΩV parameter plane, which includes the Λ cold dark matter limit as the best fit. The other points on this admissible region represent superconducting dark energy as a sum of a cosmological constant and a time-evolving contribution. In the magnetic case the cosmological test selects either (i) parameter ranges of the superconducting dark energy allowing for the standard baryonic sector plus dark matter or (ii) a unified superconducting dark matter and dark energy model, additionally including only the baryonic sector.

  16. Short communication: SDF1-3'A gene mutation is correlated with increased susceptibility to HIV type 1 infection by sexual transmission in Han Chinese.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yueyun; Wang, Xiaohui; Peng, Ji; Chen, Lin; Cheng, Jinquan; Nie, Shaofa; Feng, Tiejian; Zhao, Guanglu; Zhao, Jin; Shi, Xiangdong

    2008-11-01

    Limited information is available on host genetic polymorphisms that confer resistance to HIV-1 infection in Han Chinese who persistently remain seronegative (HEPS) despite high exposure to HIV-1 through unprotected sexual activity with known HIV-1-seropositive spouses or long-term sexual partners. The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation of CCR5-Delta32, CCR2b-64I, and SDF1-3'A polymorphisms with susceptibility to HIV-1 infection through sexual transmission in Han Chinese. A cross-sectional study was used to analyze the differences in allelic frequencies of CCR5-Delta32, CCR2b-64I, and SDF1-3'A among HEPS, healthy HIV-unexposed individuals, and HIV-1-seropositive individuals. Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis was used for genotype determination. The CCR5-Delta32 mutation was not detected in the three groups (n = 260). The allelic frequencies of CCR2b-64I were 21.57%, 21.63%, and 22.12% in the three groups, respectively. There was no significant difference among the three groups in CCR2b-64I distribution. The allelic frequencies of SDF1-3'A were 20.19%, 28.37%, and 29.33% in the three groups, respectively. There was a significant difference in the allelic distribution of SDF1-3'A between HEPS and healthy HIV-unexposed individuals (p = 0.023), as well as between HEPS and HIV-1-seropositive individuals (p = 0.049). Statistical analysis showed that the allelic distributions on CCR2b-64I and SDF1-3'A were in equilibrium according to the Hardy-Weinberg equation. The mutant genotypes of CCR5-Delta32 and CCR2b-64I were not correlated with HIV-1 infection through sexual transmission in Han Chinese. SDF1- 3'A was associated with a high risk of HIV-1 infection through sexual transmission in Han Chinese. PMID:18928397

  17. THE DARK ENERGY CAMERA

    SciTech Connect

    Flaugher, B.; Diehl, H. T.; Alvarez, O.; Angstadt, R.; Annis, J. T.; Buckley-Geer, E. J.; Honscheid, K.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Bonati, M.; Antonik, M.; Brooks, D.; Ballester, O.; Cardiel-Sas, L.; Beaufore, L.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bernstein, R. A.; Bigelow, B.; Boprie, D.; Campa, J.; Castander, F. J.; Collaboration: DES Collaboration; and others

    2015-11-15

    The Dark Energy Camera is a new imager with a 2.°2 diameter field of view mounted at the prime focus of the Victor M. Blanco 4 m telescope on Cerro Tololo near La Serena, Chile. The camera was designed and constructed by the Dark Energy Survey Collaboration and meets or exceeds the stringent requirements designed for the wide-field and supernova surveys for which the collaboration uses it. The camera consists of a five-element optical corrector, seven filters, a shutter with a 60 cm aperture, and a charge-coupled device (CCD) focal plane of 250 μm thick fully depleted CCDs cooled inside a vacuum Dewar. The 570 megapixel focal plane comprises 62 2k × 4k CCDs for imaging and 12 2k × 2k CCDs for guiding and focus. The CCDs have 15 μm × 15 μm pixels with a plate scale of 0.″263 pixel{sup −1}. A hexapod system provides state-of-the-art focus and alignment capability. The camera is read out in 20 s with 6–9 electron readout noise. This paper provides a technical description of the camera's engineering, construction, installation, and current status.

  18. The Dark Energy Camera

    SciTech Connect

    Flaugher, B.

    2015-04-11

    The Dark Energy Camera is a new imager with a 2.2-degree diameter field of view mounted at the prime focus of the Victor M. Blanco 4-meter telescope on Cerro Tololo near La Serena, Chile. The camera was designed and constructed by the Dark Energy Survey Collaboration, and meets or exceeds the stringent requirements designed for the wide-field and supernova surveys for which the collaboration uses it. The camera consists of a five element optical corrector, seven filters, a shutter with a 60 cm aperture, and a CCD focal plane of 250-μm thick fully depleted CCDs cooled inside a vacuum Dewar. The 570 Mpixel focal plane comprises 62 2k x 4k CCDs for imaging and 12 2k x 2k CCDs for guiding and focus. The CCDs have 15μm x 15μm pixels with a plate scale of 0.263" per pixel. A hexapod system provides state-of-the-art focus and alignment capability. The camera is read out in 20 seconds with 6-9 electrons readout noise. This paper provides a technical description of the camera's engineering, construction, installation, and current status.

  19. (Mainly) axion dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baer, Howard

    2016-06-01

    The strong CP problem of QCD is at heart a problem of naturalness: why is the FF ˜ term highly suppressed in the QCD Lagrangian when it seems necessary to explain why there are three and not four light pions? The most elegant solution posits a spontaneously broken Peccei-Quinn (PQ) symmetry which requires the existence of the axion field a. The axion field settles to the minimum of its potential thus removing the offensive term but giving rise to the physical axion whose coherent oscillations can make up the cold dark matter. Only now are experiments such as ADMX beginning to explore QCD axion parameter space. Since a bonafide scalar particle- the Higgs boson- has been discovered, one might expect its mass to reside at the axion scale fa ˜ 1011 GeV. The Higgs mass is elegantly stabilized by supersymmetry: in this case the axion is accompanied by its axino and saxion superpartners. Requiring naturalness also in the electroweak sector implies higgsino-like WIMPs so then we expect mixed axion-WIMP dark matter. Ultimately we would expect detection of both an axion and a WIMP while signals for light higgsinos may show up at LHC and must show up at ILC.

  20. The Dark Energy Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flaugher, B.; Diehl, H. T.; Honscheid, K.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Alvarez, O.; Angstadt, R.; Annis, J. T.; Antonik, M.; Ballester, O.; Beaufore, L.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bernstein, R. A.; Bigelow, B.; Bonati, M.; Boprie, D.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E. J.; Campa, J.; Cardiel-Sas, L.; Castander, F. J.; Castilla, J.; Cease, H.; Cela-Ruiz, J. M.; Chappa, S.; Chi, E.; Cooper, C.; da Costa, L. N.; Dede, E.; Derylo, G.; DePoy, D. L.; de Vicente, J.; Doel, P.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Eiting, J.; Elliott, A. E.; Emes, J.; Estrada, J.; Fausti Neto, A.; Finley, D. A.; Flores, R.; Frieman, J.; Gerdes, D.; Gladders, M. D.; Gregory, B.; Gutierrez, G. R.; Hao, J.; Holland, S. E.; Holm, S.; Huffman, D.; Jackson, C.; James, D. J.; Jonas, M.; Karcher, A.; Karliner, I.; Kent, S.; Kessler, R.; Kozlovsky, M.; Kron, R. G.; Kubik, D.; Kuehn, K.; Kuhlmann, S.; Kuk, K.; Lahav, O.; Lathrop, A.; Lee, J.; Levi, M. E.; Lewis, P.; Li, T. S.; Mandrichenko, I.; Marshall, J. L.; Martinez, G.; Merritt, K. W.; Miquel, R.; Muñoz, F.; Neilsen, E. H.; Nichol, R. C.; Nord, B.; Ogando, R.; Olsen, J.; Palaio, N.; Patton, K.; Peoples, J.; Plazas, A. A.; Rauch, J.; Reil, K.; Rheault, J.-P.; Roe, N. A.; Rogers, H.; Roodman, A.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Schindler, R. H.; Schmidt, R.; Schmitt, R.; Schubnell, M.; Schultz, K.; Schurter, P.; Scott, L.; Serrano, S.; Shaw, T. M.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Stefanik, A.; Stuermer, W.; Suchyta, E.; Sypniewski, A.; Tarle, G.; Thaler, J.; Tighe, R.; Tran, C.; Tucker, D.; Walker, A. R.; Wang, G.; Watson, M.; Weaverdyck, C.; Wester, W.; Woods, R.; Yanny, B.; DES Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    The Dark Energy Camera is a new imager with a 2.°2 diameter field of view mounted at the prime focus of the Victor M. Blanco 4 m telescope on Cerro Tololo near La Serena, Chile. The camera was designed and constructed by the Dark Energy Survey Collaboration and meets or exceeds the stringent requirements designed for the wide-field and supernova surveys for which the collaboration uses it. The camera consists of a five-element optical corrector, seven filters, a shutter with a 60 cm aperture, and a charge-coupled device (CCD) focal plane of 250 μm thick fully depleted CCDs cooled inside a vacuum Dewar. The 570 megapixel focal plane comprises 62 2k × 4k CCDs for imaging and 12 2k × 2k CCDs for guiding and focus. The CCDs have 15 μm × 15 μm pixels with a plate scale of 0.″263 pixel-1. A hexapod system provides state-of-the-art focus and alignment capability. The camera is read out in 20 s with 6-9 electron readout noise. This paper provides a technical description of the camera's engineering, construction, installation, and current status.

  1. EDITORIAL: Focus on Dark Matter and Particle Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aprile, Elena; Profumo, Stefano

    2009-10-01

    The quest for the nature of dark matter has reached a historical point in time, with several different and complementary experiments on the verge of conclusively exploring large portions of the parameter space of the most theoretically compelling particle dark matter models. This focus issue on dark matter and particle physics brings together a broad selection of invited articles from the leading experimental and theoretical groups in the field. The leitmotif of the collection is the need for a multi-faceted search strategy that includes complementary experimental and theoretical techniques with the common goal of a sound understanding of the fundamental particle physical nature of dark matter. These include theoretical modelling, high-energy colliders and direct and indirect searches. We are confident that the works collected here present the state of the art of this rapidly changing field and will be of interest to both experts in the topic of dark matter as well as to those new to this exciting field. Focus on Dark Matter and Particle Physics Contents DARK MATTER AND ASTROPHYSICS Scintillator-based detectors for dark matter searches I S K Kim, H J Kim and Y D Kim Cosmology: small-scale issues Joel R Primack Big Bang nucleosynthesis and particle dark matter Karsten Jedamzik and Maxim Pospelov Particle models and the small-scale structure of dark matter Torsten Bringmann DARK MATTER AND COLLIDERS Dark matter in the MSSM R C Cotta, J S Gainer, J L Hewett and T G Rizzo The role of an e+e- linear collider in the study of cosmic dark matter M Battaglia Collider, direct and indirect detection of supersymmetric dark matter Howard Baer, Eun-Kyung Park and Xerxes Tata INDIRECT PARTICLE DARK MATTER SEARCHES:EXPERIMENTS PAMELA and indirect dark matter searches M Boezio et al An indirect search for dark matter using antideuterons: the GAPS experiment C J Hailey Perspectives for indirect dark matter search with AMS-2 using cosmic-ray electrons and positrons B Beischer, P von

  2. Toward electroweak scale cold dark matter with local dark gauge symmetry and beyond the DM EFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Pyungwon

    2016-06-01

    In this talk, I describe a class of electroweak (EW) scale dark matter (DM) models where its stability or longevity are the results of underlying dark gauge symmetries: stable due to unbroken local dark gauge symmetry or topology, or long-lived due to the accidental global symmetry of dark gauge theories. Compared with the usual phenomenological dark matter models (including DM EFT or simplified DM models), DM models with local dark gauge symmetries include dark gauge bosons, dark Higgs bosons and sometimes excited dark matter. And dynamics among these fields are completely fixed by local gauge principle. The idea of singlet portals including the Higgs portal can thermalize these hidden sector dark matter very efficiently, so that these DM could be easily thermal DM. I also discuss the limitation of the usual DM effective field theory or simplified DM models without the full SM gauge symmetry, and emphasize the importance of the full SM gauge symmetry and renormalizability especially for collider searches for DM.

  3. Observational constraints on holographic tachyonic dark energy in interaction with dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Micheletti, Sandro M. R.

    2010-05-01

    We discuss an interacting tachyonic dark energy model in the context of the holographic principle. The potential of the holographic tachyon field in interaction with dark matter is constructed. The model results are compared with CMB shift parameter, baryonic acoustic oscilations, lookback time and the Constitution supernovae sample. The coupling constant of the model is compatible with zero, but dark energy is not given by a cosmological constant.

  4. DARK FLUID: A UNIFIED FRAMEWORK FOR MODIFIED NEWTONIAN DYNAMICS, DARK MATTER, AND DARK ENERGY

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Hongsheng; Li Baojiu E-mail: b.li@damtp.cam.ac.u

    2010-03-20

    Empirical theories of dark matter (DM) like modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND) gravity and of dark energy (DE) like f(R) gravity were motivated by astronomical data. But could these theories be branches rooted from a more general and hence generic framework? Here we propose a very generic Lagrangian of such a framework based on simple dimensional analysis and covariant symmetry requirements, and explore various outcomes in a top-down fashion. The desired effects of quintessence plus cold DM particle fields or MOND-like scalar field(s) are shown to be largely achievable by one vector field only. Our framework preserves the covariant formulation of general relativity, but allows the expanding physical metric to be bent by a single new species of dark fluid flowing in spacetime. Its non-uniform stress tensor and current vector are simple functions of a vector field with variable norm, not coupled with the baryonic fluid and the four-vector potential of the photon fluid. The dark fluid framework generically branches into a continuous spectrum of theories with DE and DM effects, including the f(R) gravity, tensor-vector-scalar-like theories, Einstein-Aether, and nuLAMBDA theories as limiting cases. When the vector field degenerates into a pure scalar field, we obtain the physics for quintessence. Choices of parameters can be made to pass Big Bang nucleosynthesis, parameterized post-Newtonian, and causality constraints. In this broad setting we emphasize the non-constant dynamical field behind the cosmological constant effect, and highlight plausible corrections beyond the classical MOND predictions.

  5. Stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF1)-dependent recruitment of bone marrow-derived renal endothelium-like cells in a mouse model of acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    OHNISHI, Hiroyuki; MIZUNO, Shinya; MIZUNO-HORIKAWA, Yoko; KATO, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Ischemic acute kidney injury (AKI) is the most key pathological event for accelerating progression to chronic kidney disease through vascular endothelial injury or dysfunction. Thus, it is critical to elucidate the molecular mechanism of endothelial protection and regeneration. Emerging evidence indicates that bone marrow-derived cells (BMCs) contribute to tissue reconstitution in several types of organs post-injury, but little is known whether and how BMCs contribute to renal endothelial reconstitution, especially in an early-stage of AKI. Using a mouse model of ischemic AKI, we provide evidence that incorporation of BMCs in vascular components (such as endothelial and smooth muscle cells) becomes evident within four days after renal ischemia and reperfusion, associated with an increase in stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF1) in endothelium and that in CXCR4/SDF1-receptor in BMCs. Notably, anti-CXCR4 antibody decreased the numbers of infiltrated BMCs and BMC-derived endothelium-like cells, but not of BMC-derived smooth muscle cell-like cells. These results suggest that reconstitution of renal endothelium post-ischemia partially depends on a paracrine loop of SDF1-CXCR4 between resident endothelium and BMCs. Such a chemokine ligand-receptor system may be attributable for selecting a cellular lineage (s), required for renal vascular protection, repair and homeostasis, even in an earlier phase of AKI. PMID:25833353

  6. The dark side of cosmology: dark matter and dark energy.

    PubMed

    Spergel, David N

    2015-03-01

    A simple model with only six parameters (the age of the universe, the density of atoms, the density of matter, the amplitude of the initial fluctuations, the scale dependence of this amplitude, and the epoch of first star formation) fits all of our cosmological data . Although simple, this standard model is strange. The model implies that most of the matter in our Galaxy is in the form of "dark matter," a new type of particle not yet detected in the laboratory, and most of the energy in the universe is in the form of "dark energy," energy associated with empty space. Both dark matter and dark energy require extensions to our current understanding of particle physics or point toward a breakdown of general relativity on cosmological scales.

  7. The dark side of cosmology: dark matter and dark energy.

    PubMed

    Spergel, David N

    2015-03-01

    A simple model with only six parameters (the age of the universe, the density of atoms, the density of matter, the amplitude of the initial fluctuations, the scale dependence of this amplitude, and the epoch of first star formation) fits all of our cosmological data . Although simple, this standard model is strange. The model implies that most of the matter in our Galaxy is in the form of "dark matter," a new type of particle not yet detected in the laboratory, and most of the energy in the universe is in the form of "dark energy," energy associated with empty space. Both dark matter and dark energy require extensions to our current understanding of particle physics or point toward a breakdown of general relativity on cosmological scales. PMID:25745164

  8. Dark stars: a review.

    PubMed

    Freese, Katherine; Rindler-Daller, Tanja; Spolyar, Douglas; Valluri, Monica

    2016-06-01

    Dark stars are stellar objects made (almost entirely) of hydrogen and helium, but powered by the heat from dark matter annihilation, rather than by fusion. They are in hydrostatic and thermal equilibrium, but with an unusual power source. Weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), among the best candidates for dark matter, can be their own antimatter and can annihilate inside the star, thereby providing a heat source. Although dark matter constitutes only [Formula: see text]0.1% of the stellar mass, this amount is sufficient to power the star for millions to billions of years. Thus, the first phase of stellar evolution in the history of the Universe may have been dark stars. We review how dark stars come into existence, how they grow as long as dark matter fuel persists, and their stellar structure and evolution. The studies were done in two different ways, first assuming polytropic interiors and more recently using the MESA stellar evolution code; the basic results are the same. Dark stars are giant, puffy (∼10 AU) and cool (surface temperatures  ∼10 000 K) objects. We follow the evolution of dark stars from their inception at  ∼[Formula: see text] as they accrete mass from their surroundings to become supermassive stars, some even reaching masses  >[Formula: see text] and luminosities  >[Formula: see text], making them detectable with the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope. Once the dark matter runs out and the dark star dies, it may collapse to a black hole; thus dark stars may provide seeds for the supermassive black holes observed throughout the Universe and at early times. Other sites for dark star formation may exist in the Universe today in regions of high dark matter density such as the centers of galaxies. The current review briefly discusses dark stars existing today, but focuses on the early generation of dark stars. PMID:27214049

  9. Dark stars: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freese, Katherine; Rindler-Daller, Tanja; Spolyar, Douglas; Valluri, Monica

    2016-06-01

    Dark stars are stellar objects made (almost entirely) of hydrogen and helium, but powered by the heat from dark matter annihilation, rather than by fusion. They are in hydrostatic and thermal equilibrium, but with an unusual power source. Weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), among the best candidates for dark matter, can be their own antimatter and can annihilate inside the star, thereby providing a heat source. Although dark matter constitutes only ≲ 0.1% of the stellar mass, this amount is sufficient to power the star for millions to billions of years. Thus, the first phase of stellar evolution in the history of the Universe may have been dark stars. We review how dark stars come into existence, how they grow as long as dark matter fuel persists, and their stellar structure and evolution. The studies were done in two different ways, first assuming polytropic interiors and more recently using the MESA stellar evolution code; the basic results are the same. Dark stars are giant, puffy (˜10 AU) and cool (surface temperatures  ˜10 000 K) objects. We follow the evolution of dark stars from their inception at  ˜1{{M}⊙} as they accrete mass from their surroundings to become supermassive stars, some even reaching masses  >{{10}6}{{M}⊙} and luminosities  >{{10}10}{{L}⊙} , making them detectable with the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope. Once the dark matter runs out and the dark star dies, it may collapse to a black hole; thus dark stars may provide seeds for the supermassive black holes observed throughout the Universe and at early times. Other sites for dark star formation may exist in the Universe today in regions of high dark matter density such as the centers of galaxies. The current review briefly discusses dark stars existing today, but focuses on the early generation of dark stars.

  10. Light chiral dark sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harigaya, Keisuke; Nomura, Yasunori

    2016-08-01

    An interesting possibility for dark matter is a scalar particle of mass of order 10 MeV-1 GeV, interacting with a U (1 ) gauge boson (dark photon) which mixes with the photon. We present a simple and natural model realizing this possibility. The dark matter arises as a composite pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone boson (dark pion) in a non-Abelian gauge sector, which also gives a mass to the dark photon. For a fixed non-Abelian gauge group, S U (N ) , and a U (1 ) charge of the constituent dark quarks, the model has only three free parameters: the dynamical scale of the non-Abelian gauge theory, the gauge coupling of the dark photon, and the mixing parameter between the dark and standard model photons. In particular, the gauge symmetry of the model does not allow any mass term for the dark quarks, and the stability of the dark pion is understood as a result of an accidental global symmetry. The model has a significant parameter space in which thermal relic dark pions comprise all of the dark matter, consistently with all experimental and cosmological constraints. In a corner of the parameter space, the discrepancy of the muon g -2 between experiments and the standard model prediction can also be ameliorated due to a loop contribution of the dark photon. Smoking-gun signatures of the model include a monophoton signal from the e+e- collision into a photon and a "dark rho meson." Observation of two processes in e+e- collision—the mode into the dark photon and that into the dark rho meson—would provide strong evidence for the model.

  11. Dark stars: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freese, Katherine; Rindler-Daller, Tanja; Spolyar, Douglas; Valluri, Monica

    2016-06-01

    Dark stars are stellar objects made (almost entirely) of hydrogen and helium, but powered by the heat from dark matter annihilation, rather than by fusion. They are in hydrostatic and thermal equilibrium, but with an unusual power source. Weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), among the best candidates for dark matter, can be their own antimatter and can annihilate inside the star, thereby providing a heat source. Although dark matter constitutes only ≲ 0.1% of the stellar mass, this amount is sufficient to power the star for millions to billions of years. Thus, the first phase of stellar evolution in the history of the Universe may have been dark stars. We review how dark stars come into existence, how they grow as long as dark matter fuel persists, and their stellar structure and evolution. The studies were done in two different ways, first assuming polytropic interiors and more recently using the MESA stellar evolution code; the basic results are the same. Dark stars are giant, puffy (∼10 AU) and cool (surface temperatures  ∼10 000 K) objects. We follow the evolution of dark stars from their inception at  ∼1{{M}ȯ} as they accrete mass from their surroundings to become supermassive stars, some even reaching masses  >{{10}6}{{M}ȯ} and luminosities  >{{10}10}{{L}ȯ} , making them detectable with the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope. Once the dark matter runs out and the dark star dies, it may collapse to a black hole; thus dark stars may provide seeds for the supermassive black holes observed throughout the Universe and at early times. Other sites for dark star formation may exist in the Universe today in regions of high dark matter density such as the centers of galaxies. The current review briefly discusses dark stars existing today, but focuses on the early generation of dark stars.

  12. Dark stars: a review.

    PubMed

    Freese, Katherine; Rindler-Daller, Tanja; Spolyar, Douglas; Valluri, Monica

    2016-06-01

    Dark stars are stellar objects made (almost entirely) of hydrogen and helium, but powered by the heat from dark matter annihilation, rather than by fusion. They are in hydrostatic and thermal equilibrium, but with an unusual power source. Weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), among the best candidates for dark matter, can be their own antimatter and can annihilate inside the star, thereby providing a heat source. Although dark matter constitutes only [Formula: see text]0.1% of the stellar mass, this amount is sufficient to power the star for millions to billions of years. Thus, the first phase of stellar evolution in the history of the Universe may have been dark stars. We review how dark stars come into existence, how they grow as long as dark matter fuel persists, and their stellar structure and evolution. The studies were done in two different ways, first assuming polytropic interiors and more recently using the MESA stellar evolution code; the basic results are the same. Dark stars are giant, puffy (∼10 AU) and cool (surface temperatures  ∼10 000 K) objects. We follow the evolution of dark stars from their inception at  ∼[Formula: see text] as they accrete mass from their surroundings to become supermassive stars, some even reaching masses  >[Formula: see text] and luminosities  >[Formula: see text], making them detectable with the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope. Once the dark matter runs out and the dark star dies, it may collapse to a black hole; thus dark stars may provide seeds for the supermassive black holes observed throughout the Universe and at early times. Other sites for dark star formation may exist in the Universe today in regions of high dark matter density such as the centers of galaxies. The current review briefly discusses dark stars existing today, but focuses on the early generation of dark stars.

  13. Unified Dark Matter and Dark Energy Description in a Chiral Cosmological Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbyazov, Renat R.; Chervon, Sergey V.

    2013-03-01

    We show the way of dark matter and dark energy presentation via ansatzs on the kinetic energies of the fields in the two-component chiral cosmological model (CCM). To connect a kinetic interaction of dark matter and dark energy with observational data the reconstruction procedure for the chiral metric component h22 and the potential of (self-)interaction V has been developed. The reconstruction of h22 and V for the early and later inflation have been performed. The proposed model is confronted to ΛCDM model as well.

  14. Generalizing a unified model of dark matter, dark energy, and inflation with a noncanonical kinetic term

    SciTech Connect

    De-Santiago, Josue; Cervantes-Cota, Jorge L.

    2011-03-15

    We study a unification model for dark energy, dark matter, and inflation with a single scalar field with noncanonical kinetic term. In this model, the kinetic term of the Lagrangian accounts for the dark matter and dark energy, and at early epochs, a quadratic potential accounts for slow roll inflation. The present work is an extension to the work by Bose and Majumdar [Phys. Rev. D 79, 103517 (2009).] with a more general kinetic term that was proposed by Chimento in Phys. Rev. D 69, 123517 (2004). We demonstrate that the model is viable at the background and linear perturbation levels.

  15. Diphoton resonance confronts dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Soo-Min; Kang, Yoo-Jin; Lee, Hyun Min

    2016-07-01

    As an interpretation of the 750 GeV diphoton excesses recently reported by both ATLAS and CMS collaborations, we consider a simple extension of the Standard Model with a Dirac fermion dark matter where a singlet complex scalar field mediates between dark matter and SM particles via effective couplings to SM gauge bosons and/or Higgs-portal. In this model, we can accommodate the diphoton events through the direct and/or cascade decays of pseudo-scalar and real scalar partners of the complex scalar field. We show that mono-jet searches and gamma-ray observations are complementary in constraining the region where the width of the diphoton resonance can be enhanced due to the couplings of the resonance to dark matter and the correct relic density is obtained. In the case of cascade decay of the resonance, the effective couplings of singlet scalars can be smaller, but the model is still testable by the future discrimination between single photon and photon-jet at the LHC as well as the gamma-ray searches for the cascade annihilation of dark matter.

  16. Nonthermal Supermassive Dark Matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, Daniel J. H.; Kolb, Edward W.; Riotto, Antonio

    1999-01-01

    We discuss several cosmological production mechanisms for nonthermal supermassive dark matter and argue that dark matter may he elementary particles of mass much greater than the weak scale. Searches for dark matter should ma be limited to weakly interacting particles with mass of the order of the weak scale, but should extend into the supermassive range as well.

  17. NUV Detector Dark Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Wei

    2010-09-01

    Perform routine monitoring of MAMA detector dark current. The main purpose isto look for evidence of a change in the dark rates, both to track on-orbit timedependence and to check for a detector problem developing. The spatial distribution of dark rates on the detector and the effect of SAA will also be studied.

  18. NUV Detector Dark Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ely, Justin

    2013-10-01

    Perform routine monitoring of MAMA detector dark current. The main purpose isto look for evidence of a change in the dark rates, both to track on-orbit timedependence and to check for a detector problem developing. The spatial distribution of dark rates on the detector and the effect of SAA will also be studied.

  19. NUV Detector Dark Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ely, Justin

    2012-10-01

    Perform routine monitoring of MAMA detector dark current. The main purpose isto look for evidence of a change in the dark rates, both to track on-orbit timedependence and to check for a detector problem developing. The spatial distribution of dark rates on the detector and the effect of SAA will also be studied.

  20. NUV Detector Dark Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Colin

    2011-10-01

    Perform routine monitoring of MAMA detector dark current. The main purpose isto look for evidence of a change in the dark rates, both to track on-orbit timedependence and to check for a detector problem developing. The spatial distribution of dark rates on the detector and the effect of SAA will also be studied.

  1. Detecting dark matter through dark photons from the Sun: Charged particle signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jonathan L.; Smolinsky, Jordan; Tanedo, Philip

    2016-06-01

    Dark matter may interact with the Standard Model through the kinetic mixing of dark photons, A', with Standard Model photons. Such dark matter will accumulate in the Sun and annihilate into dark photons. The dark photons may then leave the Sun and decay into pairs of charged Standard Model particles that can be detected by the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS). The directionality of this "dark sunshine" is distinct from all astrophysical backgrounds, providing an opportunity for unambiguous dark matter discovery by AMS. We perform a complete analysis of this scenario including Sommerfeld enhancements of dark matter annihilation and the effect of the Sun's magnetic field on the signal, and we define a set of cuts to optimize the signal probability. With the three years of data already collected, AMS may discover dark matter with mass 1 TeV ≲mX≲10 TeV , dark photon masses mA'˜O (100 ) MeV , and kinetic mixing parameters 10-11≲ɛ ≲10-8. The proposed search extends beyond existing beam dump and supernova bounds, and it is complementary to direct detection, probing the same region of parameter space.

  2. Supersymmetry, nonthermal dark matter, and precision cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Easther, Richard; Galvez, Richard; Özsoy, Ogan; Watson, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Within the minimal supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM), LHC bounds suggest that scalar superpartner masses are far above the electroweak scale. Given a high superpartner mass, nonthermal dark matter is a viable alternative to WIMP dark matter generated via freezeout. In the presence of moduli fields, nonthermal dark matter production is associated with a long matter-dominated phase, modifying the spectral index and primordial tensor amplitude relative to those in a thermalized primordial universe. Nonthermal dark matter can have a higher self-interaction cross section than its thermal counterpart, enhancing astrophysical bounds on its annihilation signals. We constrain the contributions to the neutralino mass from the bino, wino and Higgsino using existing astrophysical bounds and direct detection experiments for models with nonthermal neutralino dark matter. Using these constraints we quantify the expected change to inflationary observables resulting from the nonthermal phase.

  3. Hidden SU (N ) glueball dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soni, Amarjit; Zhang, Yue

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the possibility that the dark matter candidate is from a pure non-Abelian gauge theory of the hidden sector, motivated in large part by its elegance and simplicity. The dark matter is the lightest bound state made of the confined gauge fields, the hidden glueball. We point out that this simple setup is capable of providing rich and novel phenomena in the dark sector, especially in the parameter space of large N . They include self-interacting and warm dark matter scenarios, Bose-Einstein condensation leading to massive dark stars possibly millions of times heavier than our sun giving rise to gravitational lensing effects, and indirect detections through higher dimensional operators as well as interesting collider signatures.

  4. Effect of SDF-1/CXCR4 axis on the migration of transplanted bone mesenchymal stem cells mobilized by erythropoietin toward lesion sites following spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    LI, JUN; GUO, WEICHUN; XIONG, MIN; HAN, HENG; CHEN, JIE; MAO, DAN; TANG, BING; YU, HUALONG; ZENG, YUN

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence has indicated that the stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1)/CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) axis plays a crucial role in the recruitment of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) into lesion sites in animal models. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of the SDF-1/CXCR4 axis on the migration of transplanted BMSCs mobilized by erythropoietin (EPO) toward the lesion site following spinal cord injury (SCI). A model of SCI was established in rats using the modified Allen's test. In the EPO group, EPO was administered at a distance of 2 mm cranially and then 2 mm caudally from the site of injury. In the BMSC group, 10 μl of BMSC suspension was administered in the same manner. In the BMSC + EPO group, both BMSCs and EPO were administered as described above. In the BMSC + EPO + AMD3100 group, in addition to the injection of BMSCs and EPO, AMD3100 (a chemokine receptor antagonist) was administered. The Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan (BBB) Locomotor Rating Scale and a grid walk test were used to estimate the neurological recovery following SCI. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was performed to assess the tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and SDF-1 expression levels. An immunofluorescence assay was performed to identify the distribution of the BMSCs in the injured spinal cord. A Transwell migration assay was performed to examine BMSC migration. A terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay was performed to detect the apoptotic index (AI). Western blot analysis was performed to measure the expression levels of erythropoietin receptor (EPOR) and CXCR4. Significant improvements in locomotor function were detected in the BMSC + EPO group compared with the BMSC group (P<0.05). GFP-labeled BMSCs were observed and were located at the lesion sites. Additionally, EPO significantly decreased the TNF-α levels and increased the SDF-1 levels in the injured spinal cord (P<0.05). The AI in the

  5. Dark energy and dark matter from hidden symmetry of gravity model with a non-Riemannian volume form

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guendelman, Eduardo; Nissimov, Emil; Pacheva, Svetlana

    2015-10-01

    We show that dark energy and dark matter can be described simultaneously by ordinary Einstein gravity interacting with a single scalar field provided the scalar field Lagrangian couples in a symmetric fashion to two different spacetime volume forms (covariant integration measure densities) on the spacetime manifold - one standard Riemannian given by √{-g} (square root of the determinant of the pertinent Riemannian metric) and another non-Riemannian volume form independent of the Riemannian metric, defined in terms of an auxiliary antisymmetric tensor gauge field of maximal rank. Integration of the equations of motion of the latter auxiliary gauge field produce an a priori arbitrary integration constant that plays the role of a dynamically generated cosmological constant or dark energy. Moreover, the above modified scalar field action turns out to possess a hidden Noether symmetry whose associated conserved current describes a pressureless "dust" fluid which we can identify with the dark matter completely decoupled from the dark energy. The form of both the dark energy and dark matter that results from the above class of models is insensitive to the specific form of the scalar field Lagrangian. By adding an appropriate perturbation, which breaks the above hidden symmetry and along with this couples dark matter and dark energy, we also suggest a way to obtain growing dark energy in the present universe's epoch without evolution pathologies.

  6. The Dark Matter Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Robert H.

    2014-02-01

    1. Introduction; 2. Early history of the dark matter hypothesis; 3. The stability of disk galaxies: the dark halo solutions; 4. Direct evidence: extended rotation curves of spiral galaxies; 5. The maximum disk: light traces mass; 6. Cosmology and the birth of astroparticle physics; 7. Clusters revisited: missing mass found; 8. CDM confronts galaxy rotation curves; 9. The new cosmology: dark matter is not enough; 10. An alternative to dark matter: Modified Newtonian Dynamics; 11. Seeing dark matter: the theory and practice of detection; 12. Reflections: a personal point of view; Appendix; References; Index.

  7. Alternative to particle dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoury, Justin

    2015-01-01

    We propose an alternative to particle dark matter that borrows ingredients of modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND) while adding new key components. The first new feature is a dark matter fluid, in the form of a scalar field with small equation of state and sound speed. This component is critical in reproducing the success of cold dark matter for the expansion history and the growth of linear perturbations, but does not cluster significantly on nonlinear scales. Instead, the missing mass problem on nonlinear scales is addressed by a modification of the gravitational force law. The force law approximates MOND at large and intermediate accelerations, and therefore reproduces the empirical success of MOND at fitting galactic rotation curves. At ultralow accelerations, the force law reverts to an inverse-square law, albeit with a larger Newton's constant. This latter regime is important in galaxy clusters and is consistent with their observed isothermal profiles, provided the characteristic acceleration scale of MOND is mildly varying with scale or mass, such that it is 12 times higher in clusters than in galaxies. We present an explicit relativistic theory in terms of two scalar fields. The first scalar field is governed by a Dirac-Born-Infeld action and behaves as a dark matter fluid on large scales. The second scalar field also has single-derivative interactions and mediates a fifth force that modifies gravity on nonlinear scales. Both scalars are coupled to matter via an effective metric that depends locally on the fields. The form of this effective metric implies the equality of the two scalar gravitational potentials, which ensures that lensing and dynamical mass estimates agree. Further work is needed in order to make both the acceleration scale of MOND and the fraction at which gravity reverts to an inverse-square law explicitly dynamical quantities, varying with scale or mass.

  8. Heavy spin-2 Dark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babichev, Eugeny; Marzola, Luca; Raidal, Martti; Schmidt-May, Angnis; Urban, Federico; Veermäe, Hardi; von Strauss, Mikael

    2016-09-01

    We provide further details on a recent proposal addressing the nature of the dark sectors in cosmology and demonstrate that all current observations related to Dark Matter can be explained by the presence of a heavy spin-2 particle. Massive spin-2 fields and their gravitational interactions are uniquely described by ghost-free bimetric theory, which is a minimal and natural extension of General Relativity. In this setup, the largeness of the physical Planck mass is naturally related to extremely weak couplings of the heavy spin-2 field to baryonic matter and therefore explains the absence of signals in experiments dedicated to Dark Matter searches. It also ensures the phenomenological viability of our model as we confirm by comparing it with cosmological and local tests of gravity. At the same time, the spin-2 field possesses standard gravitational interactions and it decays universally into all Standard Model fields but not into massless gravitons. Matching the measured DM abundance together with the requirement of stability constrains the spin-2 mass to be in the 1 to 100 TeV range.

  9. Dark-disk universe.

    PubMed

    Fan, JiJi; Katz, Andrey; Randall, Lisa; Reece, Matthew

    2013-05-24

    We point out that current constraints on dark matter imply only that the majority of dark matter is cold and collisionless. A subdominant fraction of dark matter could have much stronger interactions. In particular, it could interact in a manner that dissipates energy, thereby cooling into a rotationally supported disk, much as baryons do. We call this proposed new dark matter component double-disk dark matter (DDDM). We argue that DDDM could constitute a fraction of all matter roughly as large as the fraction in baryons, and that it could be detected through its gravitational effects on the motion of stars in galaxies, for example. Furthermore, if DDDM can annihilate to gamma rays, it would give rise to an indirect detection signal distributed across the sky that differs dramatically from that predicted for ordinary dark matter. DDDM and more general partially interacting dark matter scenarios provide a large unexplored space of testable new physics ideas.

  10. Dark-disk universe.

    PubMed

    Fan, JiJi; Katz, Andrey; Randall, Lisa; Reece, Matthew

    2013-05-24

    We point out that current constraints on dark matter imply only that the majority of dark matter is cold and collisionless. A subdominant fraction of dark matter could have much stronger interactions. In particular, it could interact in a manner that dissipates energy, thereby cooling into a rotationally supported disk, much as baryons do. We call this proposed new dark matter component double-disk dark matter (DDDM). We argue that DDDM could constitute a fraction of all matter roughly as large as the fraction in baryons, and that it could be detected through its gravitational effects on the motion of stars in galaxies, for example. Furthermore, if DDDM can annihilate to gamma rays, it would give rise to an indirect detection signal distributed across the sky that differs dramatically from that predicted for ordinary dark matter. DDDM and more general partially interacting dark matter scenarios provide a large unexplored space of testable new physics ideas. PMID:23745856

  11. Embrace the Dark Side: Advancing the Dark Energy Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suchyta, Eric

    The Dark Energy Survey (DES) is an ongoing cosmological survey intended to study the properties of the accelerated expansion of the Universe. In this dissertation, I present work of mine that has advanced the progress of DES. First is an introduction, which explores the physics of the cosmos, as well as how DES intends to probe it. Attention is given to developing the theoretical framework cosmologists use to describe the Universe, and to explaining observational evidence which has furnished our current conception of the cosmos. Emphasis is placed on the dark sector - dark matter and dark energy - the content of the Universe not explained by the Standard Model of particle physics. As its name suggests, the Dark Energy Survey has been specially designed to measure the properties of dark energy. DES will use a combination of galaxy cluster, weak gravitational lensing, angular clustering, and supernovae measurements to derive its state of the art constraints, each of which is discussed in the text. The work described in this dissertation includes science measurements directly related to the first three of these probes. The dissertation presents my contributions to the readout and control system of the Dark Energy Camera (DECam); the name of this software is SISPI. SISPI uses client-server and publish-subscribe communication patterns to coordinate and command actions among the many hardware components of DECam - the survey instrument for DES, a 570 megapixel CCD camera, mounted at prime focus of the Blanco 4-m Telescope. The SISPI work I discuss includes coding applications for DECam's filter changer mechanism and hexapod, as well as developing the Scripts Editor, a GUI application for DECam users to edit and export observing sequence SISPI can load and execute. Next, the dissertation describes the processing of early DES data, which I contributed. This furnished the data products used in the first-completed DES science analysis, and contributed to improving the

  12. Distinguishing dynamical dark matter at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dienes, Keith R.; Su, Shufang; Thomas, Brooks

    2012-09-01

    Dynamical dark matter (DDM) is a new framework for dark-matter physics in which the dark sector comprises an ensemble of individual component fields which collectively conspire to act in ways that transcend those normally associated with dark matter. Because of its nontrivial structure, this DDM ensemble—unlike most traditional dark-matter candidates—cannot be characterized in terms of a single mass, decay width, or set of scattering cross sections, but must instead be described by parameters which describe the collective behavior of its constituents. Likewise, the components of such an ensemble need not be stable so long as lifetimes are balanced against cosmological abundances across the ensemble as a whole. In this paper, we investigate the prospects for identifying a DDM ensemble at the LHC and for distinguishing such a dark-matter candidate from the candidates characteristic of traditional dark-matter models. In particular, we focus on DDM scenarios in which the component fields of the ensemble are produced at colliders alongside some number of standard-model particles via the decays of additional heavy fields. The invariant-mass distributions of these standard-model particles turn out to possess several unique features that cannot be replicated in most traditional dark-matter models. We demonstrate that in many situations it is possible to differentiate between a DDM ensemble and a traditional dark-matter candidate on the basis of such distributions. Moreover, many of our results also apply more generally to a variety of other extensions of the standard model which involve multiple stable or metastable neutral particles.

  13. The darkness of spin-0 dark radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, M.C. David

    2015-01-01

    We show that the scattering of a general spin-0 sector of dark radiation off the pre-recombination thermal plasma results in undetectably small spectral distortions of the Cosmic Microwave Background.

  14. The effect of SDF-1α on low dose BMP-2 mediated bone regeneration by release from heparinized mineralized collagen type I matrix scaffolds in a murine critical size bone defect model.

    PubMed

    Zwingenberger, Stefan; Langanke, Robert; Vater, Corina; Lee, Geoffrey; Niederlohmann, Eik; Sensenschmidt, Markus; Jacobi, Angela; Bernhardt, Ricardo; Muders, Michael; Rammelt, Stefan; Knaack, Sven; Gelinsky, Michael; Günther, Klaus-Peter; Goodman, Stuart B; Stiehler, Maik

    2016-09-01

    The treatment of critical size bone defects represents a challenge. The growth factor bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2) is clinically established but has potentially adverse effects when used at high doses. The aim of this study was to evaluate if stromal derived factor-1 alpha (SDF-1α) and BMP-2 released from heparinized mineralized collagen type I matrix (MCM) scaffolds have a cumulative effect on bone regeneration. MCM scaffolds were functionalized with heparin, loaded with BMP-2 and/or SDF-1α and implanted into a murine critical size femoral bone defect (control group, low dose BMP-2 group, low dose BMP-2 + SDF-1α group, and high dose BMP-2 group). After 6 weeks, both the low dose BMP-2 + SDF-1α group (5.8 ± 0.6 mm³, p = 0.0479) and the high dose BMP-2 group (6.5 ± 0.7 mm³, p = 0.008) had a significantly increased regenerated bone volume compared to the control group (4.2 ± 0.5 mm³). There was a higher healing score in the low dose BMP-2 + SDF-1α group (median grade 8; Q1-Q3 7-9; p = 0.0357) than in the low dose BMP-2 group (7; Q1-Q3 5-9) histologically. This study showed that release of BMP-2 and SDF-1α from heparinized MCM scaffolds allows for the reduction of the applied BMP-2 concentration since SDF-1α seems to enhance the osteoinductive potential of BMP-2. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2126-2134, 2016.

  15. Updated galactic radio constraints on Dark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirelli, Marco; Taoso, Marco

    2016-07-01

    We perform a detailed analysis of the synchrotron signals produced by dark matter annihilations and decays. We consider different set-ups for the propagation of electrons and positrons, the galactic magnetic field and dark matter properties. We then confront these signals with radio and microwave maps, including Planck measurements, from a frequency of 22 MHz up to 70 GHz. We derive two sets of constraints: conservative and progressive, the latter based on a modeling of the astrophysical emission. Radio and microwave constraints are complementary to those obtained with other indirect detection methods, especially for dark matter annihilating into leptonic channels.

  16. Dark Forces and Light Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Hooper, Dan; Weiner, Neal; Xue, Wei

    2012-09-01

    We consider a simple class of models in which the dark matter, X, is coupled to a new gauge boson, phi, with a relatively low mass (m_phi \\sim 100 MeV-3 GeV). Neither the dark matter nor the new gauge boson have tree-level couplings to the Standard Model. The dark matter in this model annihilates to phi pairs, and for a coupling of g_X \\sim 0.06 (m_X/10 GeV)^1/2 yields a thermal relic abundance consistent with the cosmological density of dark matter. The phi's produced in such annihilations decay through a small degree of kinetic mixing with the photon to combinations of Standard Model leptons and mesons. For dark matter with a mass of \\sim10 GeV, the shape of the resulting gamma-ray spectrum provides a good fit to that observed from the Galactic Center, and can also provide the very hard electron spectrum required to account for the observed synchrotron emission from the Milky Way's radio filaments. For kinetic mixing near the level naively expected from loop-suppressed operators (epsilon \\sim 10^{-4}), the dark matter is predicted to scatter elastically with protons with a cross section consistent with that required to accommodate the signals reported by DAMA/LIBRA, CoGeNT and CRESST-II.

  17. The Effect of Incorporation of SDF-1α into PLGA Scaffolds on Stem Cell Recruitment and the Inflammatory Response

    PubMed Central

    Thevenot, Paul; Nair, Ashwin; Shen, Jinhui; Lotfi, Parisa; Ko, Cheng Yu; Tang, Liping

    2010-01-01

    Despite significant advances in the understanding of tissue responses to biomaterials, most implants are still plagued by inflammatory responses which can lead to fibrotic encapsulation. This is of dire consequence in tissue engineering, where seeded cells and bioactive components are separated from the native tissue, limiting the regenerative potential of the design. Additionally, these interactions prevent desired tissue integration and angiogenesis, preventing functionality of the design. Recent evidence supports that mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) and hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) can have beneficial effects which alter the inflammatory responses and improve healing. The purpose of this study was to examine whether stem cells could be targeted to the site of biomaterial implantation and whether increasing local stem cell responses could improve the tissue response to PLGA scaffold implants. Through incorporation of SDF-1α through factor adsorption and mini-osmotic pump delivery, the host-derived stem cell response can be improved resulting in 3X increase in stem cell populations at the interface for up to 2 weeks. These interactions were found to significantly alter the acute mast cell responses, reducing the number of mast cells and degranulated mast cells near the scaffold implants. This led to subsequent downstream reduction in the inflammatory cell responses, and through altered mast cell activation and stem cell participation, increased angiogenesis and decreased fibrotic responses to the scaffold implants. These results support that enhanced recruitment of autologous stem cells can improve the tissue responses to biomaterial implants through modifying/bypassing inflammatory cell responses and jumpstarting stem cell participation in healing at the implant interface. PMID:20185171

  18. Superheavy dark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel Chung

    2000-05-25

    If there exists fields of mass of the order of 10{sup 13} GeV and large field inflation occurs, their interaction with classical gravitation will generate enough particles to give the universe critical density today regardless of their nongravitational coupling. In the standard dark matter scenarios, WIMPs are usually considered to have once been in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE), and their present abundance is determined by their self-annihilation cross section. In that case, unitarity and the lower bound on the age of the universe constrains the mass of the relic to be less than 500 TeV. On the other hand, if the DM particles never attained LTE in the past, self-annihilation cross section does not determine their abundance. For example, axions, which may never have been in LTE, can have their abundance determined by the dynamics of the phase transition associated with the breaking of U(1){sub PQ}. These nonthermal relics (ones that never obtained LTE) are typically light. However, there are mechanisms that can produce superheavy (many orders of magnitude greater than the weak scale) nonthermal relics. Some of this is reviewed in reference 2. Although not known at the time when this talk was given, it is now known that if the DM fields are coupled to the inflaton field, then the mass of the DM particles that can be naturally produced in significant abundance after inflation can be as large as 10{sup {minus}3} M{sub Pl} (paper in preparation). The author discusses the gravitational production mechanism which is a generic consequence of any large field inflationary phase ending.

  19. Flooded Dark Matter and S level rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randall, Lisa; Scholtz, Jakub; Unwin, James

    2016-03-01

    Most dark matter models set the dark matter relic density by some interaction with Standard Model particles. Such models generally assume the existence of Standard Model particles early on, with the dark matter relic density a later consequence of those interactions. Perhaps a more compelling assumption is that dark matter is not part of the Standard Model sector and a population of dark matter too is generated at the end of inflation. This democratic assumption about initial conditions does not necessarily provide a natural value for the dark matter relic density, and furthermore superficially leads to too much entropy in the dark sector relative to ordinary matter. We address the latter issue by the late decay of heavy particles produced at early times, thereby associating the dark matter relic density with the lifetime of a long-lived state. This paper investigates what it would take for this scenario to be compatible with observations in what we call Flooded Dark Matter (FDM) models and discusses several interesting consequences. One is that dark matter can be very light and furthermore, light dark matter is in some sense the most natural scenario in FDM as it is compatible with larger couplings of the decaying particle. A related consequence is that the decay of the field with the smallest coupling and hence the longest lifetime dominates the entropy and possibly the matter content of the Universe, a principle we refer to as "Maximum Baroqueness". We also demonstrate that the dark sector should be colder than the ordinary sector, relaxing the most stringent free-streaming constraints on light dark matter candidates. We will discuss the potential implications for the core-cusp problem in a follow-up paper. The FDM framework will furthermore have interesting baryogenesis implications. One possibility is that dark matter is like the baryon asymmetry and both are simultaneously diluted by a late entropy dump. Alternatively, FDM is compatible with an elegant non

  20. Neutrinos and dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Ibarra, Alejandro

    2015-07-15

    Neutrinos could be key particles to unravel the nature of the dark matter of the Universe. On the one hand, sterile neutrinos in minimal extensions of the Standard Model are excellent dark matter candidates, producing potentially observable signals in the form of a line in the X-ray sky. On the other hand, the annihilation or the decay of dark matter particles produces, in many plausible dark matter scenarios, a neutrino flux that could be detected at neutrino telescopes, thus providing non-gravitational evidence for dark matter. More conservatively, the non-observation of a significant excess in the neutrino fluxes with respect to the expected astrophysical backgrounds can be used to constrain dark matter properties, such as the self-annihilation cross section, the scattering cross section with nucleons and the lifetime.

  1. Interaction between bosonic dark matter and stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brito, Richard; Cardoso, Vitor; Macedo, Caio F. B.; Okawa, Hirotada; Palenzuela, Carlos

    2016-02-01

    We provide a detailed analysis of how bosonic dark matter "condensates" interact with compact stars, extending significantly the results of a recent Letter [1]. We focus on bosonic fields with mass mB , such as axions, axion-like candidates and hidden photons. Self-gravitating bosonic fields generically form "breathing" configurations, where both the spacetime geometry and the field oscillate, and can interact and cluster at the center of stars. We construct stellar configurations formed by a perfect fluid and a bosonic condensate, and which may describe the late stages of dark matter accretion onto stars, in dark-matter-rich environments. These composite stars oscillate at a frequency which is a multiple of f =2.5 ×1014(mBc2/eV ) Hz . Using perturbative analysis and numerical relativity techniques, we show that these stars are generically stable, and we provide criteria for instability. Our results also indicate that the growth of the dark matter core is halted close to the Chandrasekhar limit. We thus dispel a myth concerning dark matter accretion by stars: dark matter accretion does not necessarily lead to the destruction of the star, nor to collapse to a black hole. Finally, we argue that stars with long-lived bosonic cores may also develop in other theories with effective mass couplings, such as (massless) scalar-tensor theories.

  2. Clumpy cold dark matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silk, Joseph; Stebbins, Albert

    1993-01-01

    A study is conducted of cold dark matter (CDM) models in which clumpiness will inhere, using cosmic strings and textures suited to galaxy formation. CDM clumps of 10 million solar mass/cu pc density are generated at about z(eq) redshift, with a sizable fraction surviving. Observable implications encompass dark matter cores in globular clusters and in galactic nuclei. Results from terrestrial dark matter detection experiments may be affected by clumpiness in the Galactic halo.

  3. Interacting warm dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Cruz, Norman; Palma, Guillermo; Zambrano, David; Avelino, Arturo E-mail: guillermo.palma@usach.cl E-mail: avelino@fisica.ugto.mx

    2013-05-01

    We explore a cosmological model composed by a dark matter fluid interacting with a dark energy fluid. The interaction term has the non-linear λρ{sub m}{sup α}ρ{sub e}{sup β} form, where ρ{sub m} and ρ{sub e} are the energy densities of the dark matter and dark energy, respectively. The parameters α and β are in principle not constrained to take any particular values, and were estimated from observations. We perform an analytical study of the evolution equations, finding the fixed points and their stability properties in order to characterize suitable physical regions in the phase space of the dark matter and dark energy densities. The constants (λ,α,β) as well as w{sub m} and w{sub e} of the EoS of dark matter and dark energy respectively, were estimated using the cosmological observations of the type Ia supernovae and the Hubble expansion rate H(z) data sets. We find that the best estimated values for the free parameters of the model correspond to a warm dark matter interacting with a phantom dark energy component, with a well goodness-of-fit to data. However, using the Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC) we find that this model is overcame by a warm dark matter – phantom dark energy model without interaction, as well as by the ΛCDM model. We find also a large dispersion on the best estimated values of the (λ,α,β) parameters, so even if we are not able to set strong constraints on their values, given the goodness-of-fit to data of the model, we find that a large variety of theirs values are well compatible with the observational data used.

  4. Uncoupled Dark States Can Inherit Polaritonic Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Ballestero, Carlos; Feist, Johannes; Gonzalo Badía, Eduardo; Moreno, Esteban; Garcia-Vidal, Francisco J.

    2016-10-01

    When a collection of quantum emitters interacts with an electromagnetic field, the whole system can enter into the collective strong coupling regime in which hybrid light-matter states, i.e., polaritons can be created. Only a small portion of excitations in the emitters are coupled to the light field, and there are many dark states that, in principle, retain their pure excitonic nature. Here we theoretically demonstrate that these dark states can have a delocalized character, which is inherent to polaritons, despite the fact that they do not have a photonic component. This unexpected behavior only appears when the electromagnetic field displays a discrete spectrum. In this case, when the main loss mechanism in the hybrid system stems from the radiative losses of the light field, dark states are even more efficient than polaritons in transferring excitations across the structure.

  5. DESTINY, The Dark Energy Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pasquale, Bert A.; Woodruff, Robert A.; Benford, Dominic J.; Lauer, Tod

    2007-01-01

    We have proposed the development of a low-cost space telescope, Destiny, as a concept for the NASA/DOE Joint Dark Energy Mission. Destiny is a 1.65m space telescope, featuring a near-infrared (0.85-1.7m) survey camera/spectrometer with a moderate flat-field field of view (FOV). Destiny will probe the properties of dark energy by obtaining a Hubble diagram based on Type Ia supernovae and a large-scale mass power spectrum derived from weak lensing distortions of field galaxies as a function of redshift.

  6. Dark matter and cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Schramm, D.N.

    1992-03-01

    The cosmological dark matter problem is reviewed. The Big Bang Nucleosynthesis constraints on the baryon density are compared with the densities implied by visible matter, dark halos, dynamics of clusters, gravitational lenses, large-scale velocity flows, and the {Omega} = 1 flatness/inflation argument. It is shown that (1) the majority of baryons are dark; and (2) non-baryonic dark matter is probably required on large scales. It is also noted that halo dark matter could be either baryonic or non-baryonic. Descrimination between cold'' and hot'' non-baryonic candidates is shown to depend on the assumed seeds'' that stimulate structure formation. Gaussian density fluctuations, such as those induced by quantum fluctuations, favor cold dark matter, whereas topological defects such as strings, textures or domain walls may work equally or better with hot dark matter. A possible connection between cold dark matter, globular cluster ages and the Hubble constant is mentioned. Recent large-scale structure measurements, coupled with microwave anisotropy limits, are shown to raise some questions for the previously favored density fluctuation picture. Accelerator and underground limits on dark matter candidates are also reviewed.

  7. Searching for dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateo, Mario

    1994-01-01

    Three teams of astronomers believe they have independently found evidence for dark matter in our galaxy. A brief history of the search for dark matter is presented. The use of microlensing-event observation for spotting dark matter is described. The equipment required to observe microlensing events and three groups working on dark matter detection are discussed. The three groups are the Massive Compact Halo Objects (MACHO) Project team, the Experience de Recherche d'Objets Sombres (EROS) team, and the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment (OGLE) team. The first apparent detections of microlensing events by the three teams are briefly reported.

  8. Dark U (1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chia-Feng; Ma, Ernest; Yuan, Tzu-Chiang

    2015-06-01

    In this talk we will explore the possibility of adding a local U(1) dark sector to the standard model with the Higgs boson as a portal connecting the visible standard model sector and the dark one. We will discuss existing experimental constraint on the model parameters from the invisible width of Higgs decay. Implications of such a dark U(1) sector on phenomenology at the Large Hardon Collider will be addressed. In particular, detailed results for the non-standard signals of multi-lepton-jets that arise from this simple dark sector will be presented.

  9. Dark matter and cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Schramm, D.N.

    1992-03-01

    The cosmological dark matter problem is reviewed. The Big Bang Nucleosynthesis constraints on the baryon density are compared with the densities implied by visible matter, dark halos, dynamics of clusters, gravitational lenses, large-scale velocity flows, and the {Omega} = 1 flatness/inflation argument. It is shown that (1) the majority of baryons are dark; and (2) non-baryonic dark matter is probably required on large scales. It is also noted that halo dark matter could be either baryonic or non-baryonic. Descrimination between ``cold`` and ``hot`` non-baryonic candidates is shown to depend on the assumed ``seeds`` that stimulate structure formation. Gaussian density fluctuations, such as those induced by quantum fluctuations, favor cold dark matter, whereas topological defects such as strings, textures or domain walls may work equally or better with hot dark matter. A possible connection between cold dark matter, globular cluster ages and the Hubble constant is mentioned. Recent large-scale structure measurements, coupled with microwave anisotropy limits, are shown to raise some questions for the previously favored density fluctuation picture. Accelerator and underground limits on dark matter candidates are also reviewed.

  10. Gravity resonance spectroscopy constrains dark energy and dark matter scenarios.

    PubMed

    Jenke, T; Cronenberg, G; Burgdörfer, J; Chizhova, L A; Geltenbort, P; Ivanov, A N; Lauer, T; Lins, T; Rotter, S; Saul, H; Schmidt, U; Abele, H

    2014-04-18

    We report on precision resonance spectroscopy measurements of quantum states of ultracold neutrons confined above the surface of a horizontal mirror by the gravity potential of Earth. Resonant transitions between several of the lowest quantum states are observed for the first time. These measurements demonstrate that Newton's inverse square law of gravity is understood at micron distances on an energy scale of 10-14  eV. At this level of precision, we are able to provide constraints on any possible gravitylike interaction. In particular, a dark energy chameleon field is excluded for values of the coupling constant β>5.8×108 at 95% confidence level (C.L.), and an attractive (repulsive) dark matter axionlike spin-mass coupling is excluded for the coupling strength gsgp>3.7×10-16 (5.3×10-16) at a Yukawa length of λ=20  μm (95% C.L.).

  11. Imperfect Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Mirzagholi, Leila; Vikman, Alexander E-mail: alexander.vikman@lmu.de

    2015-06-01

    We consider cosmology of the recently introduced mimetic matter with higher derivatives (HD). Without HD this system describes irrotational dust—Dark Matter (DM) as we see it on cosmologically large scales. DM particles correspond to the shift-charges—Noether charges of the shifts in the field space. Higher derivative corrections usually describe a deviation from the thermodynamical equilibrium in the relativistic hydrodynamics. Thus we show that mimetic matter with HD corresponds to an imperfect DM which: i) renormalises the Newton's constant in the Friedmann equations, ii) has zero pressure when there is no extra matter in the universe, iii) survives the inflationary expansion which puts the system on a dynamical attractor with a vanishing shift-charge, iv) perfectly tracks any external matter on this attractor, v) can become the main (and possibly the only) source of DM, provided the shift-symmetry in the HD terms is broken during some small time interval in the radiation domination époque. In the second part of the paper we present a hydrodynamical description of general anisotropic and inhomogeneous configurations of the system. This imperfect mimetic fluid has an energy flow in the field's rest frame. We find that in the Eckart and in the Landau-Lifshitz frames the mimetic fluid possesses nonvanishing vorticity appearing already at the first order in the HD. Thus, the structure formation and gravitational collapse should proceed in a rather different fashion from the simple irrotational DM models.

  12. Dark energy and extended dark matter halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernin, A. D.; Teerikorpi, P.; Valtonen, M. J.; Dolgachev, V. P.; Domozhilova, L. M.; Byrd, G. G.

    2012-03-01

    The cosmological mean matter (dark and baryonic) density measured in the units of the critical density is Ωm = 0.27. Independently, the local mean density is estimated to be Ωloc = 0.08-0.23 from recent data on galaxy groups at redshifts up to z = 0.01-0.03 (as published by Crook et al. 2007, ApJ, 655, 790 and Makarov & Karachentsev 2011, MNRAS, 412, 2498). If the lower values of Ωloc are reliable, as Makarov & Karachentsev and some other observers prefer, does this mean that the Local Universe of 100-300 Mpc across is an underdensity in the cosmic matter distribution? Or could it nevertheless be representative of the mean cosmic density or even be an overdensity due to the Local Supercluster therein. We focus on dark matter halos of groups of galaxies and check how much dark mass the invisible outer layers of the halos are able to host. The outer layers are usually devoid of bright galaxies and cannot be seen at large distances. The key factor which bounds the size of an isolated halo is the local antigravity produced by the omnipresent background of dark energy. A gravitationally bound halo does not extend beyond the zero-gravity surface where the gravity of matter and the antigravity of dark energy balance, thus defining a natural upper size of a system. We use our theory of local dynamical effects of dark energy to estimate the maximal sizes and masses of the extended dark halos. Using data from three recent catalogs of galaxy groups, we show that the calculated mass bounds conform with the assumption that a significant amount of dark matter is located in the invisible outer parts of the extended halos, sufficient to fill the gap between the observed and expected local matter density. Nearby groups of galaxies and the Virgo cluster have dark halos which seem to extend up to their zero-gravity surfaces. If the extended halo is a common feature of gravitationally bound systems on scales of galaxy groups and clusters, the Local Universe could be typical or even

  13. Asymmetric Dark Matter and Dark Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Blennow, Mattias; Martinez, Enrique Fernandez; Mena, Olga; Redondo, Javier; Serra, Paolo E-mail: enfmarti@cern.ch E-mail: redondo@mppmu.mpg.de

    2012-07-01

    Asymmetric Dark Matter (ADM) models invoke a particle-antiparticle asymmetry, similar to the one observed in the Baryon sector, to account for the Dark Matter (DM) abundance. Both asymmetries are usually generated by the same mechanism and generally related, thus predicting DM masses around 5 GeV in order to obtain the correct density. The main challenge for successful models is to ensure efficient annihilation of the thermally produced symmetric component of such a light DM candidate without violating constraints from collider or direct searches. A common way to overcome this involves a light mediator, into which DM can efficiently annihilate and which subsequently decays into Standard Model particles. Here we explore the scenario where the light mediator decays instead into lighter degrees of freedom in the dark sector that act as radiation in the early Universe. While this assumption makes indirect DM searches challenging, it leads to signals of extra radiation at BBN and CMB. Under certain conditions, precise measurements of the number of relativistic species, such as those expected from the Planck satellite, can provide information on the structure of the dark sector. We also discuss the constraints of the interactions between DM and Dark Radiation from their imprint in the matter power spectrum.

  14. Downregulation of CXCR4 by SDF-KDEL in SBC-5 cells inhibits their migration in vitro and organ metastasis in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ningqiang; Pang, Hailin; Shen, Weiwei; Zhang, Feng; Cui, Zaoxun; Wang, Junyan; Wang, Jianlin; Liu, Lili; Zhang, Helong

    2015-02-01

    Metastasis is the principal cause of morbidity and mortality in cancer patients. The master genes that govern organ-selective metastasis remain elusive. We compared the expression levels of C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4) in the human small cell lung cancer (SCLC) cells, SBC-5 and SBC-3, by flow cytometric analysis and found that CXCR4 was expressed at markedly higher levels in the SBC-5 cells which can produce multiple organ metastasis, particularly bone metastasis compared to the SBC-3 cells. Stromal-derived-factor-1 (SDF-1)-CXCR4 has been shown to regulate cell migration and metastasis in a various types of cancer; however, the roles of SDF-1-CXCR4 in the organ-selective metastasis of SCLC in vivo remain to be elucidated. Thus, in this study, we constructed a phenotype of SBC-5 cells in which CXCR4 was knocked out using the intrakine strategy and found that the downregulation of CXCR4 inhibited cell migration and invasion, but did not affect cell proliferation or apoptosis in vitro. In in vivo experiments, the knockout of CXCR4 suppressed the development of metastastic lesions in the lungs, liver and bone, but did not decrease metastasis to the kidneys. Our data demonstrate that CXCR4 is a candidate gene involved in the development of metastastic lesions in specific organs, such as the lungs, bone and liver, which can secrete high concentrations of SDF-1, the sole ligand of CXCR4. Thus, CXCR4 may prove to be a promising target for the prevention and effective treatment of metastastic lesions due to SCLC.

  15. Transmyocardial drilling revascularization combined with heparinized bFGF-incorporating stent activates resident cardiac stem cells via SDF-1/CXCR4 axis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Guang-Wei; Wen, Ti; Gu, Tian-Xiang; Li-Ling, Jesse; Wang, Chun; Zhao, Ye; Liu, Jing; Wang, Ying; Liu, Tian-Jun; Lue, Feng

    2012-02-15

    Objective: To investigate whether transmyocardial drilling revascularization combined with heparinized basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF)-incorporating degradable stent implantation (TMDRSI) can promote myocardial regeneration after acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Methods: A model of AMI was generated by ligating the mid-third of left anterior descending artery (LAD) of miniswine. After 6 h, the animals were divided into none-treatment (control) group (n = 6) and TMDRSI group (n = 6). For TMDRSI group, two channels with 3.5 mm in diameter were established by a self-made drill in the AMI region, into which a stent was implanted. Expression of stromal cell-derived factor-1{sub {alpha}} (SDF-1{sub {alpha}}) and CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4), cardiac stem cell (CSC)-mediated myocardial regeneration, myocardial apoptosis, myocardial viability, and cardiac function were assessed at various time-points. Results: Six weeks after the operation, CSCs were found to have differentiated into cardiomyocytes to repair the infarcted myocardium, and all above indices showed much improvement in the TMDRSI group compared with the control group (P < 0.001). Conclusions: The new method has shown to be capable of promoting CSCs proliferation and differentiation into cardiomyocytes through activating the SDF-1/CXCR4 axis, while inhibiting myocardial apoptosis, thereby enhancing myocardial regeneration following AMI and improving cardiac function. This may provide a new strategy for myocardial regeneration following AMI. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effects of TMDR and bFGF-stent on myocardial regeneration were studied in a pig model of AMI. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TMDR and bFGF-stent implantation activated CSCs via the SDF-1/CXCR4 axis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CSC-mediated myocardial regeneration improved cardiac function. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It may be a new therapeutic strategy for AMI.

  16. Low-magnitude high-frequency vibration enhanced mesenchymal stem cell recruitment in osteoporotic fracture healing through the SDF-1/CXCR4 pathway.

    PubMed

    Wei, F Y; Chow, S K; Leung, K S; Qin, J; Guo, A; Yu, O L; Li, G; Cheung, W H

    2016-01-01

    Low-magnitude high-frequency vibration (LMHFV) has been proven to promote osteoporotic fracture healing. Mechanical stimulation was reported to enhance SDF-1/CXCR4 signalling in mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). We hypothesised that LMHFV promoted osteoporotic fracture healing by enhancing MSC migration through the SDF-1/CXCR4 pathway. 152 ovariectomised SD-rats received closed femoral fracture in groups of vibration+MSC (VMG) (20 min/d, 5 d/week), vibration+MSC+AMD3100 (VMAG; AMD, a CXCR4 inhibitor) (1 mg/kg/d, intraperitoneal), MSC (MG) (1 × 106 MSC, intracardiac) or control (CG) for a treatment duration of 2, 4 or 8 weeks. MSC migration was evaluated by ex-vivo green fluorescent protein signal in the callus; and fracture healing was examined by weekly radiographs, endpoint computed-tomography and mechanical test. At week-2 and week-4, ex-vivo callus GFP intensity of VMG was significantly higher than other groups (p < 0.05). From week-2 to week-3, both callus width and callus area in VMG were significantly larger; and from week-7 to week-8, smaller than other groups (p < 0.05). At week-8, high-density bone volume fraction, bone volume fraction, bone mineral density and stiffness in VMG were significantly higher than other 3 groups (p < 0.05). This study demonstrated that LMHFV promoted MSC migration and fracture healing in osteoporotic rats. This effect was attenuated by CXCR4 inhibitor, providing strong evidence that SDF-1-mediated MSC migration was one of the important mechanisms through which LMHFV enhanced fracture healing. PMID:27215741

  17. Recruitment of transplanted dermal multipotent stem cells to sites of injury in rats with combined radiation and wound injury by interaction of SDF-1 and CXCR4.

    PubMed

    Zong, Zhao-Wen; Cheng, Tian-Min; Su, Yong-Ping; Ran, Xin-Ze; Shen, Yue; Li, Nan; Ai, Guo-Ping; Dong, Shi-Wu; Xu, Hui

    2008-10-01

    Systemic transplantation of dermal multipotent stem cells has been shown to accelerate both hematopoietic recovery and wound healing in rats with combined radiation and wound injury. In the present study, we explored the mechanisms governing the recruitment of dermal multipotent stem cells to the sites of injury in rats with combined injury. Male dermal multipotent stem cells were transplanted into female rats, and using quantitative real-time PCR for the sex-determining region of Y chromosome, it was found that the amounts of dermal multipotent stem cells in irradiated bone marrow and wounded skin were far greater than those in normal bone marrow and skin (P < 0.01). However, incubation of dermal multipotent stem cells with AMD3100 before transplantation, which specifically blocks binding of stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1) to its receptor CXCR4, diminished the recruitment of dermal multipotent stem cells to the irradiated bone marrow and wounded skin by 58 +/- 4% and 60 +/- 4%, respectively (P < 0.05). In addition, it was confirmed that the expression of SDF-1 in irradiated bone marrow and wounded skin was up-regulated compared to that in their normal counterparts, and in vitro analysis revealed that irradiated bone marrow and wounded skin extracts had a strong chemotactic effect on dermal multipotent stem cells but that the effect decreased significantly when dermal multipotent stem cells were preincubated with AMD3100 (P < 0.05). These data suggest that transplanted dermal multipotent stem cells were recruited more frequently to the irradiated bone marrow and wounded skin than normal bone marrow and skin and that the interactions of SDF-1 and CXCR4 played a crucial role in this process.

  18. Intergrowth structure of α-phase in β-type TmAlB4 compound studied by high-angle annular detector dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yubuta, Kunio; Mori, Takao; Leithe-Jasper, Andreas; Borrmann, Horst; Grin, Yuri; Okada, Shigeru; Shishido, Toetsu

    2014-11-01

    Nanostructure of a ThMoB4-type (β-type) TmAlB4 compound, in which YCrB4-type (α-type) domains are locally intergrown, is studied by high-angle annular detector dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM). Z-contrast images by HAADF-STEM directly represent the arrangements of Tm atoms located at centers of heptagonal atomic columns of B atoms as bright dots, and give us detailed information of intergrowth of type domains in the matrix of the β-type phase, which coherently occurs. Structural and bonding analyses for β-TmAlB4 point out the closeness in atomic interactions and energy of the α- and β-type structures which support the easy formation of such nanostructure intergrowths. From combination between HAADF-STEM and electronic structure calculation, a detailed local crystal structure with intrinsic building defects is effectively revealed.

  19. An in situ probe for on-line monitoring of cell density and viability on the basis of dark field microscopy in conjunction with image processing and supervised machine learning.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ning; You, Jia; Friehs, Karl; Flaschel, Erwin; Nattkemper, Tim Wilhelm

    2007-08-15

    Fermentation industries would benefit from on-line monitoring of important parameters describing cell growth such as cell density and viability during fermentation processes. For this purpose, an in situ probe has been developed, which utilizes a dark field illumination unit to obtain high contrast images with an integrated CCD camera. To test the probe, brewer's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is chosen as the target microorganism. Images of the yeast cells in the bioreactors are captured, processed, and analyzed automatically by means of mechatronics, image processing, and machine learning. Two support vector machine based classifiers are used for separating cells from background, and for distinguishing live from dead cells afterwards. The evaluation of the in situ experiments showed strong correlation between results obtained by the probe and those by widely accepted standard methods. Thus, the in situ probe has been proved to be a feasible device for on-line monitoring of both cell density and viability with high accuracy and stability.

  20. Systemic neutralization of IL-17A significantly reduces breast cancer associated metastasis in arthritic mice by reducing CXCL12/SDF-1 expression in the metastatic niches

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background IL-17A is a pro-inflammatory cytokine that is normally associated with autoimmune arthritis and other pro-inflammatory conditions. Recently, IL-17A has emerged as a critical factor in enhancing breast cancer (BC)-associated metastases. We generated immune competent arthritic mouse models that develop spontaneous BC-associated bone and lung metastasis. Using these models, we have previously shown that neutralization of IL-17A resulted in significant reduction in metastasis. However, the underlying mechanism/s remains unknown. Methods We have utilized two previously published mouse models for this study: 1) the pro-arthritic mouse model (designated SKG) injected with metastatic BC cell line (4T1) in the mammary fat pad, and 2) the PyV MT mice that develop spontaneous mammary gland tumors injected with type II collagen to induce autoimmune arthritis. Mice were treated with anti-IL-17A neutralizing antibody and monitored for metastasis and assessed for pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines associated with BC-associated metastasis. Results We first corroborate our previous finding that in vivo neutralization of IL-17A significantly reduced metastasis to the bones and lungs in both models. Next, we report that treatment with anti-IL17A antibody significantly reduced the expression of a key chemokine, CXCL12 (also known as stromal derived factor-1 (SDF - 1)) in the bones and lungs of treated mice. CXCL12 is a ligand for CXCR4 (expressed on BC cells) and their interaction is known to be critical for metastasis. Interestingly, levels of CXCR4 in the tumor remained unchanged with treatment. Consequently, protein lysates derived from the bones and lungs of treated mice were significantly less chemotactic for the BC cells than lysates from untreated mice; and addition of exogenous SDF-1 to the lysates from treated mice completely restored BC cell migration. In addition, cytokines such as IL-6 and M-CSF were significantly reduced in the lung and bone lysates