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Sample records for dark stars dark

  1. Dark stars: a review.

    PubMed

    Freese, Katherine; Rindler-Daller, Tanja; Spolyar, Douglas; Valluri, Monica

    2016-06-01

    Dark stars are stellar objects made (almost entirely) of hydrogen and helium, but powered by the heat from dark matter annihilation, rather than by fusion. They are in hydrostatic and thermal equilibrium, but with an unusual power source. Weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), among the best candidates for dark matter, can be their own antimatter and can annihilate inside the star, thereby providing a heat source. Although dark matter constitutes only [Formula: see text]0.1% of the stellar mass, this amount is sufficient to power the star for millions to billions of years. Thus, the first phase of stellar evolution in the history of the Universe may have been dark stars. We review how dark stars come into existence, how they grow as long as dark matter fuel persists, and their stellar structure and evolution. The studies were done in two different ways, first assuming polytropic interiors and more recently using the MESA stellar evolution code; the basic results are the same. Dark stars are giant, puffy (∼10 AU) and cool (surface temperatures  ∼10 000 K) objects. We follow the evolution of dark stars from their inception at  ∼[Formula: see text] as they accrete mass from their surroundings to become supermassive stars, some even reaching masses  >[Formula: see text] and luminosities  >[Formula: see text], making them detectable with the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope. Once the dark matter runs out and the dark star dies, it may collapse to a black hole; thus dark stars may provide seeds for the supermassive black holes observed throughout the Universe and at early times. Other sites for dark star formation may exist in the Universe today in regions of high dark matter density such as the centers of galaxies. The current review briefly discusses dark stars existing today, but focuses on the early generation of dark stars. PMID:27214049

  2. Dark stars: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freese, Katherine; Rindler-Daller, Tanja; Spolyar, Douglas; Valluri, Monica

    2016-06-01

    Dark stars are stellar objects made (almost entirely) of hydrogen and helium, but powered by the heat from dark matter annihilation, rather than by fusion. They are in hydrostatic and thermal equilibrium, but with an unusual power source. Weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), among the best candidates for dark matter, can be their own antimatter and can annihilate inside the star, thereby providing a heat source. Although dark matter constitutes only ≲ 0.1% of the stellar mass, this amount is sufficient to power the star for millions to billions of years. Thus, the first phase of stellar evolution in the history of the Universe may have been dark stars. We review how dark stars come into existence, how they grow as long as dark matter fuel persists, and their stellar structure and evolution. The studies were done in two different ways, first assuming polytropic interiors and more recently using the MESA stellar evolution code; the basic results are the same. Dark stars are giant, puffy (˜10 AU) and cool (surface temperatures  ˜10 000 K) objects. We follow the evolution of dark stars from their inception at  ˜1{{M}⊙} as they accrete mass from their surroundings to become supermassive stars, some even reaching masses  >{{10}6}{{M}⊙} and luminosities  >{{10}10}{{L}⊙} , making them detectable with the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope. Once the dark matter runs out and the dark star dies, it may collapse to a black hole; thus dark stars may provide seeds for the supermassive black holes observed throughout the Universe and at early times. Other sites for dark star formation may exist in the Universe today in regions of high dark matter density such as the centers of galaxies. The current review briefly discusses dark stars existing today, but focuses on the early generation of dark stars.

  3. Dark stars: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freese, Katherine; Rindler-Daller, Tanja; Spolyar, Douglas; Valluri, Monica

    2016-06-01

    Dark stars are stellar objects made (almost entirely) of hydrogen and helium, but powered by the heat from dark matter annihilation, rather than by fusion. They are in hydrostatic and thermal equilibrium, but with an unusual power source. Weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), among the best candidates for dark matter, can be their own antimatter and can annihilate inside the star, thereby providing a heat source. Although dark matter constitutes only ≲ 0.1% of the stellar mass, this amount is sufficient to power the star for millions to billions of years. Thus, the first phase of stellar evolution in the history of the Universe may have been dark stars. We review how dark stars come into existence, how they grow as long as dark matter fuel persists, and their stellar structure and evolution. The studies were done in two different ways, first assuming polytropic interiors and more recently using the MESA stellar evolution code; the basic results are the same. Dark stars are giant, puffy (∼10 AU) and cool (surface temperatures  ∼10 000 K) objects. We follow the evolution of dark stars from their inception at  ∼1{{M}ȯ} as they accrete mass from their surroundings to become supermassive stars, some even reaching masses  >{{10}6}{{M}ȯ} and luminosities  >{{10}10}{{L}ȯ} , making them detectable with the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope. Once the dark matter runs out and the dark star dies, it may collapse to a black hole; thus dark stars may provide seeds for the supermassive black holes observed throughout the Universe and at early times. Other sites for dark star formation may exist in the Universe today in regions of high dark matter density such as the centers of galaxies. The current review briefly discusses dark stars existing today, but focuses on the early generation of dark stars.

  4. Dark stars: a review.

    PubMed

    Freese, Katherine; Rindler-Daller, Tanja; Spolyar, Douglas; Valluri, Monica

    2016-06-01

    Dark stars are stellar objects made (almost entirely) of hydrogen and helium, but powered by the heat from dark matter annihilation, rather than by fusion. They are in hydrostatic and thermal equilibrium, but with an unusual power source. Weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), among the best candidates for dark matter, can be their own antimatter and can annihilate inside the star, thereby providing a heat source. Although dark matter constitutes only [Formula: see text]0.1% of the stellar mass, this amount is sufficient to power the star for millions to billions of years. Thus, the first phase of stellar evolution in the history of the Universe may have been dark stars. We review how dark stars come into existence, how they grow as long as dark matter fuel persists, and their stellar structure and evolution. The studies were done in two different ways, first assuming polytropic interiors and more recently using the MESA stellar evolution code; the basic results are the same. Dark stars are giant, puffy (∼10 AU) and cool (surface temperatures  ∼10 000 K) objects. We follow the evolution of dark stars from their inception at  ∼[Formula: see text] as they accrete mass from their surroundings to become supermassive stars, some even reaching masses  >[Formula: see text] and luminosities  >[Formula: see text], making them detectable with the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope. Once the dark matter runs out and the dark star dies, it may collapse to a black hole; thus dark stars may provide seeds for the supermassive black holes observed throughout the Universe and at early times. Other sites for dark star formation may exist in the Universe today in regions of high dark matter density such as the centers of galaxies. The current review briefly discusses dark stars existing today, but focuses on the early generation of dark stars.

  5. Condensate dark matter stars

    SciTech Connect

    Li, X.Y.; Harko, T.; Cheng, K.S. E-mail: harko@hkucc.hku.hk

    2012-06-01

    We investigate the structure and stability properties of compact astrophysical objects that may be formed from the Bose-Einstein condensation of dark matter. Once the critical temperature of a boson gas is less than the critical temperature, a Bose-Einstein Condensation process can always take place during the cosmic history of the universe. Therefore we model the dark matter inside the star as a Bose-Einstein condensate. In the condensate dark matter star model, the dark matter equation of state can be described by a polytropic equation of state, with polytropic index equal to one. We derive the basic general relativistic equations describing the equilibrium structure of the condensate dark matter star with spherically symmetric static geometry. The structure equations of the condensate dark matter stars are studied numerically. The critical mass and radius of the dark matter star are given by M{sub crit} ≈ 2(l{sub a}/1fm){sup 1/2}(m{sub χ}/1 GeV){sup −3/2}M{sub s}un and R{sub crit} ≈ 1.1 × 10{sup 6}(l{sub a}/1 fm){sup 1/2}(m{sub χ}/1 GeV){sup −3/2} cm respectively, where l{sub a} and m{sub χ} are the scattering length and the mass of dark matter particle, respectively.

  6. Dark Energy Stars

    SciTech Connect

    Chapline, G

    2005-03-08

    Event horizons and closed time-like curves cannot exist in the real world for the simple reason that they are inconsistent with quantum mechanics. Following ideas originated by Robert Laughlin, Pawel Mazur, Emil Mottola, David Santiago, and the speaker it is now possible to describe in some detail what happens physically when one approaches and crosses a region of space-time where classical general relativity predicts there should be an infinite red shift surface. This quantum critical physics provides a new perspective on a variety of enigmatic astrophysical phenomena including supernovae explosions, gamma ray bursts, positron emission, and dark matter.

  7. Interaction between bosonic dark matter and stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brito, Richard; Cardoso, Vitor; Macedo, Caio F. B.; Okawa, Hirotada; Palenzuela, Carlos

    2016-02-01

    We provide a detailed analysis of how bosonic dark matter "condensates" interact with compact stars, extending significantly the results of a recent Letter [1]. We focus on bosonic fields with mass mB , such as axions, axion-like candidates and hidden photons. Self-gravitating bosonic fields generically form "breathing" configurations, where both the spacetime geometry and the field oscillate, and can interact and cluster at the center of stars. We construct stellar configurations formed by a perfect fluid and a bosonic condensate, and which may describe the late stages of dark matter accretion onto stars, in dark-matter-rich environments. These composite stars oscillate at a frequency which is a multiple of f =2.5 ×1014(mBc2/eV ) Hz . Using perturbative analysis and numerical relativity techniques, we show that these stars are generically stable, and we provide criteria for instability. Our results also indicate that the growth of the dark matter core is halted close to the Chandrasekhar limit. We thus dispel a myth concerning dark matter accretion by stars: dark matter accretion does not necessarily lead to the destruction of the star, nor to collapse to a black hole. Finally, we argue that stars with long-lived bosonic cores may also develop in other theories with effective mass couplings, such as (massless) scalar-tensor theories.

  8. Dark matter heating in strange stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xi; Wang, Wen; Zheng, XiaoPing

    2014-04-01

    We study the effect of dark matter heating on the temperature of typical strange star (SS hereafter) ( M = 1.4 M⊙, R = 10 km) in normal phase (NSS hereafter) and in a possible existing colour-flavour locked (CFL)phase (CSS hereafter). For NSS, the influence of dark matter heating is ignored until roughly 107 yr. After 107 yr, the dark matter heating is dominant that significantly delays the star cooling, which maintains a temperature much higher than that predicted by standard cooling model for old stars. Especially for CSS, the emissivity of dark matter will play a leading role after roughly 104 yr, which causes the temperature to rise. This leads to the plateau of surface temperature appearing in ˜106.5 yr which is earlier than that of NSS (˜107 yr).

  9. Accretion of dark matter by stars.

    PubMed

    Brito, Richard; Cardoso, Vitor; Okawa, Hirotada

    2015-09-11

    Searches for dark matter imprints are one of the most active areas of current research. We focus here on light fields with mass m_{B}, such as axions and axionlike candidates. Using perturbative techniques and full-blown nonlinear numerical relativity methods, we show the following. (i) Dark matter can pile up in the center of stars, leading to configurations and geometries oscillating with a frequency that is a multiple of f=2.5×10^{14}(m_{B}c^{2}/eV)  Hz. These configurations are stable throughout most of the parameter space, and arise out of credible mechanisms for dark-matter capture. Stars with bosonic cores may also develop in other theories with effective mass couplings, such as (massless) scalar-tensor theories. We also show that (ii) collapse of the host star to a black hole is avoided by efficient gravitational cooling mechanisms.

  10. Accretion of dark matter by stars.

    PubMed

    Brito, Richard; Cardoso, Vitor; Okawa, Hirotada

    2015-09-11

    Searches for dark matter imprints are one of the most active areas of current research. We focus here on light fields with mass m_{B}, such as axions and axionlike candidates. Using perturbative techniques and full-blown nonlinear numerical relativity methods, we show the following. (i) Dark matter can pile up in the center of stars, leading to configurations and geometries oscillating with a frequency that is a multiple of f=2.5×10^{14}(m_{B}c^{2}/eV)  Hz. These configurations are stable throughout most of the parameter space, and arise out of credible mechanisms for dark-matter capture. Stars with bosonic cores may also develop in other theories with effective mass couplings, such as (massless) scalar-tensor theories. We also show that (ii) collapse of the host star to a black hole is avoided by efficient gravitational cooling mechanisms. PMID:26406817

  11. Tier 3 DarkStar on Ramp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The Lockheed Martin/Boeing Tier III- (minus) unpiloted aerial vehicle is inspected by NASA personnel September 14, 1995, following its arrival at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The Tier III Minus project utilized Dryden ground facilities during the flight test program. The vehicle was developed by Lockheed Martin Skunk Works and Boeing Defense and Space Group to satisfy a goal of the Defense Airborne Reconnaissance Office (DARO) to supply responsive and sustained surveillance and reconnaissance data from anywhere within enemy territory, day or night, in all types of weather. Dubbed DarkStar, it had a wing span of 69 feet and was designed to fly above 45,000 feet at subsonic speeds on missions lasting more than eight hours. The first DarkStar prototype made its first flight on March 29, 1996. At the begininning of its second flight, on April 22, 1996, it crashed on takeoff, and was destroyed. The DarkStar's unusual shape was dictated by the requirement to orbit its target conducting surveillance while still remaining stealthy. Whereas aircraft like the F-117 are designed to be more stealthy from the front, the DarkStar is designed to be more stealthy from the sides.

  12. Possible dark energy imprints in the gravitational wave spectrum of mixed neutron-dark-energy stars

    SciTech Connect

    Yazadjiev, Stoytcho S.; Doneva, Daniela D. E-mail: daniela.doneva@uni-tuebingen.de

    2012-03-01

    In the present paper we study the oscillation spectrum of neutron stars containing both ordinary matter and dark energy in different proportions. Within the model we consider, the equilibrium configurations are numerically constructed and the results show that the properties of the mixed neuron-dark-energy star can differ significantly when the amount of dark energy in the stars is varied. The oscillations of the mixed neuron-dark-energy stars are studied in the Cowling approximation. As a result we find that the frequencies of the fundamental mode and the higher overtones are strongly affected by the dark energy content. This can be used in the future to detect the presence of dark energy in the neutron stars and to constrain the dark-energy models.

  13. Stars Spring up Out of the Darkness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for movie of Stars Spring up Out of the Darkness

    This artist's animation illustrates the universe's early years, from its explosive formation to its dark ages to its first stars and mini-galaxies.

    Scientists using NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope found patches of infrared light splattered across the sky that might be the collective glow of clumps of the universe's first objects. Astronomers do not know if these first objects were stars or 'quasars,' which are black holes voraciously consuming surrounding gas.

    The movie begins with a flash of color that represents the birth of the universe, an explosion called the Big Bang that occurred about 13.7 billion years ago. A period of darkness ensues, where gas begins to clump together.

    The universe's first stars are then shown springing up out of the gas clumps, flooding the universe with light, an event that probably happened about a few hundred million years after the Big Bang. Though these first stars formed out of gas alone, their deaths seeded the universe with the dusty heavy chemical elements that helped create future generations of stars.

    The first stars, called Population III stars (our star is a Population I star), were much bigger and brighter than any in our nearby universe, with masses about 1,000 times that of our sun. They grouped together into mini-galaxies, which then merged to form galaxies like our own mature Milky Way galaxy.

    The first quasars, not shown here, ultimately became the centers of powerful galaxies that are more common in the distant universe.

  14. Star formation in Lynds dark clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spuck, Tim; Rebull, Luisa

    2008-03-01

    Recent research on star formation in large molecular cloud complexes, such as the Cepheus Flare (Kun 1995), Orion, Perseus (Rebull et al. 2007), and Taurus molecular clouds, have included studies of a number of Lynds dark nebulae (LDN). Less attention has been given to isolated Lynds clouds. Both LDN 981 and LDN 425 are smaller, more isolated, dark molecular clouds that could contain regions of active star formation within them -- they both are associated with IRAS sources, and based on prior shallow surveys, they both have a YSO candidate in the neigborhood. Spitzer observations with IRAC and MIPS will allow us to see deep inside the cloud, deeper than any prior observations could see, and reveal any hidden star formation that is ongoing in these clouds. This project is part of the Spitzer Teachers Program.

  15. Constraining decaying dark matter with neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-García, M. Ángeles; Silk, Joseph

    2015-05-01

    The amount of decaying dark matter, accumulated in the central regions in neutron stars together with the energy deposition rate from decays, may set a limit on the neutron star survival rate against transitions to more compact objects provided nuclear matter is not the ultimate stable state of matter and that dark matter indeed is unstable. More generally, this limit sets constraints on the dark matter particle decay time, τχ. We find that in the range of uncertainties intrinsic to such a scenario, masses (mχ /TeV) ≳ 9 ×10-4 or (mχ /TeV) ≳ 5 ×10-2 and lifetimes τχ ≲1055 s and τχ ≲1053 s can be excluded in the bosonic or fermionic decay cases, respectively, in an optimistic estimate, while more conservatively, it decreases τχ by a factor ≳1020. We discuss the validity under which these results may improve with other current constraints.

  16. Main sequence stars with asymmetric dark matter.

    PubMed

    Iocco, Fabio; Taoso, Marco; Leclercq, Florent; Meynet, Georges

    2012-02-10

    We study the effects of feebly or nonannihilating weakly interacting dark matter (DM) particles on stars that live in DM environments denser than that of our Sun. We find that the energy transport mechanism induced by DM particles can produce unusual conditions in the cores of main sequence stars, with effects which can potentially be used to probe DM properties. We find that solar mass stars placed in DM densities of ρ(χ)≥10(2) GeV/cm(3) are sensitive to spin-dependent scattering cross section σ(SD)≥10(-37) cm(2) and a DM particle mass as low as m(χ)=5 GeV, accessing a parameter range weakly constrained by current direct detection experiments.

  17. On the capture of dark matter by neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Güver, Tolga; Erkoca, Arif Emre; Sarcevic, Ina; Reno, Mary Hall E-mail: aeerkoca@gmail.com E-mail: ina@physics.arizona.edu

    2014-05-01

    We calculate the number of dark matter particles that a neutron star accumulates over its lifetime as it rotates around the center of a galaxy, when the dark matter particle is a self-interacting boson but does not self-annihilate. We take into account dark matter interactions with baryonic matter and the time evolution of the dark matter sphere as it collapses within the neutron star. We show that dark matter self-interactions play an important role in the rapid accumulation of dark matter in the core of the neutron star. We consider the possibility of determining an exclusion region of the parameter space for dark matter mass and dark matter interaction cross section with the nucleons as well as dark matter self-interaction cross section, based on the observation of old neutron stars. We show that for a dark matter density of 10{sup 3} GeV/cm{sup 3}and dark matter mass m{sub χ} ∼< 10 GeV, there is a potential exclusion region for dark matter interactions with nucleons that is three orders of magnitude more stringent than without self-interactions. The potential exclusion region for dark matter self-interaction cross sections is many orders of magnitude stronger than the current Bullet Cluster limit. For example, for high dark matter density regions, we find that for m{sub χ} ∼ 10 GeV when the dark matter interaction cross section with the nucleons ranges from σ{sub χn} ∼ 10{sup −52} cm{sup 2} to σ{sub χn} ∼ 10{sup −57} cm{sup 2}, the dark matter self-interaction cross section limit is σ{sub χχ} ∼< 10{sup −33} cm{sup 2}, which is about ten orders of magnitude stronger than the Bullet Cluster limit.

  18. Dark matter and the first stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spolyar, Douglas

    The first stars in the universe (Pop. III stars) mark the birth of the visible and dynamical universe, which we are familiar with: stars galaxies, clusters, etc. They are also important for reionizing the universe, creating the metals needed for subsequent populations of stars and not to mention us. They are possible seeds for super massive black holes which power quasars and are found at the center of galaxies such as the Milky Way galaxy. In this thesis, we argue that if DM is a Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP), then DM can be an important heat source for the first stars. WIMPs are arguably from a particle physics perspective the most popular DM candidate and are being looked for in numerous experiments such as LHC, CDMS, and GLAST. DM heating would dramatically change the nature of the first stars. Stars powered by DM are larger and cooler than typical Pop. III stars. These differences would alter the metals and abundances produced by the first stars, the ionization history of the universe, and alter the formation of later stellar populations. Effects caused by stars powered by dark matter may also be tested with 21 cm line Tomography, JWST, 30 meter telescopes, Planck, and GLAST. This thesis has been written with an anthology in mind. Thus the thesis will be organized into an introduction followed by a series of papers which will illuminate the effects which DM can have on the first stars. The first paper will argue that DM can dramatically change the formation of the first stars. The second paper discusses DM capture as an important source of DM for the first stars. The third paper tests the effectiveness of the Blumenthal method. The fourth and fifth papers look at the effects of DM upon the evolution of Pop. III stars. As a note, primordial black holes are also a popular DM candidate. The final paper looks at primordial black hole's effect upon the first stars. Thus, we argue that DM in the guise of WIMPs and primordial black holes can dramatically

  19. Quark matter and fermionic dark matter compact stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samanta, Chhanda; Mukhopadhyay, Somenath; Basu, Devasish Narayan

    2016-03-01

    Compact stars, made of quark matter and fermionic dark matter with arbitrary masses and interaction strengths, are studied by solving the Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff equation of general relativity. The mass-radius relation for quark matter compact stars is obtained from the MIT bag model equation of state (EoS) with thin crust for different bag constants. The EoS of non-self-annihilating dark matter for an interacting Fermi gas with dark matter particle of 1-100 GeV mass is studied. For sufficiently strong interactions, the maximum stable mass of compact stars and its radius are controlled by the parameter of the interaction, both increasing linearly with the interaction strength. The mass-radius relation for compact stars made of strongly interacting fermions shows that the radius remains approximately constant for a wide range of compact stars.

  20. Black holes, pregalactic stars, and the dark matter problem

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, B.J.

    1985-06-01

    We review the different ways in which black holes might form and discuss their various astrophysical and cosmological consequences. We then consider the various constraints on the form of the dark matter and conclude that black holes could have a significant cosmological density only if they are of primordial origin or remnants of a population of pregalactic stars. This leads us to discuss the other cosmological effects of primordial black holes and pregalactic stars. 239 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  1. Light dark matter scattering in outer neutron star crusts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cermeño, Marina; Pérez-García, M. Ángeles; Silk, Joseph

    2016-09-01

    We calculate for the first time the phonon excitation rate in the outer crust of a neutron star due to scattering from light dark matter (LDM) particles gravitationally boosted into the star. We consider dark matter particles in the sub-GeV mass range scattering off a periodic array of nuclei through an effective scalar-vector interaction with nucleons. We find that LDM effects cause a modification of the net number of phonons in the lattice as compared to the standard thermal result. In addition, we estimate the contribution of LDM to the ion-ion thermal conductivity in the outer crust and find that it can be significantly enhanced at large densities. Our results imply that for magnetized neutron stars the LDM-enhanced global conductivity in the outer crust will tend to reduce the anisotropic heat conduction between perpendicular and parallel directions to the magnetic field.

  2. Dark matter, neutron stars, and strange quark matter.

    PubMed

    Perez-Garcia, M Angeles; Silk, Joseph; Stone, Jirina R

    2010-10-01

    We show that self-annihilating weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) dark matter accreted onto neutron stars may provide a mechanism to seed compact objects with long-lived lumps of strange quark matter, or strangelets, for WIMP masses above a few GeV. This effect may trigger a conversion of most of the star into a strange star. We use an energy estimate for the long-lived strangelet based on the Fermi-gas model combined with the MIT bag model to set a new limit on the possible values of the WIMP mass that can be especially relevant for subdominant species of massive neutralinos.

  3. Dark Matter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lincoln, Don

    2013-01-01

    It's a dark, dark universe out there, and I don't mean because the night sky is black. After all, once you leave the shadow of the Earth and get out into space, you're surrounded by countless lights glittering everywhere you look. But for all of Sagan's billions and billions of stars and galaxies, it's a jaw-dropping fact that the ordinary kind of…

  4. Effect of Population III multiplicity on dark star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stacy, Athena; Pawlik, Andreas H.; Bromm, Volker; Loeb, Abraham

    2012-03-01

    We numerically study the mutual interaction between dark matter (DM) and Population III (Pop III) stellar systems in order to explore the possibility of Pop III dark stars within this physical scenario. We perform a cosmological simulation, initialized at z˜ 100, which follows the evolution of gas and DM. We analyse the formation of the first minihalo at z˜ 20 and the subsequent collapse of the gas to densities of 1012 cm-3. We then use this simulation to initialize a set of smaller scale 'cut-out' simulations in which we further refine the DM to have spatial resolution similar to that of the gas. We test multiple DM density profiles, and we employ the sink particle method to represent the accreting star-forming region. We find that, for a range of DM configurations, the motion of the Pop III star-disc system serves to separate the positions of the protostars with respect to the DM density peak, such that there is insufficient DM to influence the formation and evolution of the protostars for more than ˜5000 years. In addition, the star-disc system causes gravitational scattering of the central DM to lower densities, further decreasing the influence of DM over time. Any DM-powered phase of Pop III stars will thus be very short-lived for the typical multiple system, and DM will not serve to significantly prolong the life of Pop III stars.

  5. Effect of Population III Multiplicity on Dark Star Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stacy, Athena; Pawlik, Andreas H.; Bromm, Volker; Loeb, Abraham

    2012-01-01

    We numerically study the mutual interaction between dark matter (DM) and Population III (Pop III) stellar systems in order to explore the possibility of Pop III dark stars within this physical scenario. We perform a cosmological simulation, initialized at z approx. 100, which follows the evolution of gas and DM. We analyze the formation of the first mini halo at z approx. 20 and the subsequent collapse of the gas to densities of 10(exp 12)/cu cm. We then use this simulation to initialize a set of smaller-scale 'cut-out' simulations in which we further refine the DM to have spatial resolution similar to that of the gas. We test multiple DM density profiles, and we employ the sink particle method to represent the accreting star-forming region. We find that, for a range of DM configurations, the motion of the Pop III star-disk system serves to separate the positions of the protostars with respect to the DM density peak, such that there is insufficient DM to influence the formation and evolution of the protostars for more than approx. 5000 years. In addition, the star-disk system causes gravitational scattering of the central DM to lower densities, further decreasing the influence of DM over time. Any DM-powered phase of Pop III stars will thus be very short-lived for the typical multiple system, and DM will not serve to significantly prolong the life of Pop III stars.

  6. The WIMP Capture Process for Dark Stars in the Early Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivertsson, Sofia; Gondolo, Paolo

    2011-03-01

    The first stars to form in the universe may have been dark stars, powered by dark matter annihilation instead of nuclear fusion. The initial amount of dark matter gathered by the star gravitationally can sustain it only for a limited period of time. It has been suggested that capture of additional dark matter from the environment can prolong the dark star phase even to the present day. Here we show that this capture process is ineffective to prolong the life of the first generation of dark stars. We construct a Monte Carlo simulation that follows each weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) in the dark matter halo as its orbit responds to the formation and evolution of the dark star, as it scatters off the star's nuclei, and as it annihilates inside the star. A rapid depletion of the WIMPs on orbits that cross the star causes the demise of the first generation of dark stars. We suggest that a second generation of dark stars may in principle survive much longer through capture. We comment on the effect of relaxing our assumptions.

  7. Carbon star radial velocities and dark matter in the universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jura, M.

    1986-01-01

    Optical radial velocities of carbon stars in the Milky Way are compared to center-of-mass velocities derived from CO radio emission produced in their circumstellar envelopes. It seems that there is an intrinsic velocity dispersion in the optically measured radial velocities. If the carbon stars in the dwarf spheroidals behave in a fashion similar to those in the Milky Way, then the use of their optical radial velocities to infer the mass-to-light ratio of dwarf spheroidal galaxies and the nature of the dark matter in the universe is suspect. Measurement of the radial velocities of K giants may possibly avoid these uncertainties associated with atmospheric motions.

  8. Dark Matter Capture and Annihilation on the First Stars: Preliminary Estimates

    SciTech Connect

    Iocco, Fabio

    2008-05-02

    Assuming that Dark Matter is dominated by WIMPs, it accretes by gravitational attraction and scattering over baryonic material and annihilates inside celestial objects, giving rise to a 'Dark Luminosity' which may potentially affect the evolution of stars. We estimate the Dark Luminosity achieved by different kinds of stars in a halo with DM properties characteristic of the ones where the first star formation episode occurs. We find that either massive, metal-free and small, galactic-like stars can achieve Dark Luminosities comparable or exceeding their nuclear ones. This might have dramatic effects over the evolution of the very first stars, known as Population III.

  9. Dark Matter Capture and Annihilation on the First Stars: Preliminary Estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iocco, Fabio

    2008-04-01

    Assuming that dark matter is dominated by WIMPs, it accretes by gravitational attraction and scattering over baryonic material and annihilates inside celestial objects, giving rise to a "dark luminosity" which may potentially affect the evolution of stars. We estimate the dark luminosity achieved by different kinds of stars in a halo with DM properties characteristic of the ones where the first star formation episode occurs. We find that both massive, metal-free and small, galactic-like stars can achieve dark luminosities comparable to or exceeding those due to their nuclear burning. This might have dramatic effects over the evolution of the very first stars, known as Population III.

  10. Star Formation in Lynds Dark Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Chelen H.; Bemis, G. E.; Paulsen, K. M.; Yueh, N. J.; Rebull, L. M.; DeWolf, C.; DeWolf, T.; Brock, S.; Boerna, J.; Schaefers, J.; McDonald, D. W.; McDonald, J.; Troudt, B.; Wilkinson, B.; Guastella, P.; Peter, A.; Wassmer, W.; Haber, R.; Scaramucci, A.; Spuck, T. S.; Butchart, J.; Holcomb, A.; Karns, B.; Kennedy, S.; Siegel, R.; Weiser, S.; Connelley, M.

    2009-01-01

    Our team observed two Lynds clouds (LDN 425 and LDN 981) using the Spitzer Space Telescope IRAC (3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8 microns), and MIPS (24 microns). A preliminary literature search provided IRAS data indicating star formation may be taking place in LDN 425 and LDN 981. The goals of this project were to further explore the known young stellar objects (YSOs) in the two clouds and to search for additional embedded YSOs. In this poster we present our observational methods and the results of our observations including SEDs, color-color diagrams, and color composite images. This research was made possible through the Spitzer Space Telescope Research Program for Teachers and Students and was funded by the Spitzer Science Center (SSC) and the National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO). Please see our companion education posters by McDonald et al. titled "Spitzer - Hot and Colorful Student Activities" and Guastella et al. entitled "Research Based Astronomy in The Secondary Classroom: Lessons Developed for Investigating YSOs Using APT, Excel, and MOPEX".

  11. Light versus dark in strong-lens galaxies: dark matter haloes that are rounder than their stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruderer, Claudio; Read, Justin I.; Coles, Jonathan P.; Leier, Dominik; Falco, Emilio E.; Ferreras, Ignacio; Saha, Prasenjit

    2016-02-01

    We measure the projected density profile, shape and alignment of the stellar and dark matter mass distribution in 11 strong-lens galaxies. We find that the projected dark matter density profile - under the assumption of a Chabrier stellar initial mass function - shows significant variation from galaxy to galaxy. Those with an outermost image beyond ˜10 kpc are very well fit by a projected Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) profile; those with images within 10 kpc appear to be more concentrated than NFW, as expected if their dark haloes contract due to baryonic cooling. We find that over several half-light radii, the dark matter haloes of these lenses are rounder than their stellar mass distributions. While the haloes are never more elliptical than edm = 0.2, their stars can extend to e* > 0.2. Galaxies with high dark matter ellipticity and weak external shear show strong alignment between light and dark; those with strong shear (γ ≳ 0.1) can be highly misaligned. This is reassuring since isolated misaligned galaxies are expected to be unstable. Our results provide a new constraint on galaxy formation models. For a given cosmology, these must explain the origin of both very round dark matter haloes and misaligned strong-lens systems.

  12. Dark Stars: Improved Models and First Pulsation Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rindler-Daller, T.; Montgomery, M. H.; Freese, K.; Winget, D. E.; Paxton, B.

    2015-02-01

    We use the stellar evolution code MESA to study dark stars (DSs). DSs, which are powered by dark matter (DM) self-annihilation rather than by nuclear fusion, may be the first stars to form in the universe. We compute stellar models for accreting DSs with masses up to 106 M ⊙. The heating due to DM annihilation is self-consistently included, assuming extended adiabatic contraction of DM within the minihalos in which DSs form. We find remarkably good overall agreement with previous models, which assumed polytropic interiors. There are some differences in the details, with positive implications for observability. We found that, in the mass range of 104-105 M ⊙, our DSs are hotter by a factor of 1.5 than those in Freese et al., are smaller in radius by a factor of 0.6, denser by a factor of three to four, and more luminous by a factor of two. Our models also confirm previous results, according to which supermassive DSs are very well approximated by (n = 3)-polytropes. We also perform a first study of DS pulsations. Our DS models have pulsation modes with timescales ranging from less than a day to more than two years in their rest frames, at z ~ 15, depending on DM particle mass and overtone number. Such pulsations may someday be used to identify bright, cool objects uniquely as DSs; if properly calibrated, they might, in principle, also supply novel standard candles for cosmological studies.

  13. Tier 3- DarkStar on ramp from above

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The Lockheed Martin/Boeing Tier III- (minus) unpiloted aerial vehicle is inspected by NASA personnel September 14, 1995, following its arrival at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The Tier III Minus project used Dryden ground facilities during the flight test program. The vehicle was developed by Lockheed Martin Skunk Works and Boeing Defense and Space Group to satisfy a goal of the Defense Airborne Reconnaissance Office to supply responsive and sustained data from anywhere within enemy territory, day or night, in all types of weather. Dubbed DarkStar, the vehicle, with a wing span of 69 feet, was designed to fly above 45,000 feet at subsonic speeds on missions lasting more than eight hours. The first DarkStar prototype (article #695) made its first flight on March 29, 1996. At the begininning of its second flight, on April 22, 1996, it crashed on takeoff, and was destroyed. The second Darkstar prototype (article #696) made five flights between June 29, 1998 and January 9, 1999. The program was cancelled on January 28, 1999.

  14. Tier 3- DarkStar engine run on ramp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The Lockheed Martin/Boeing Tier III- (minus) unpiloted aerial vehicle undergoing an engine run on the ramp at, following its arrival at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The Tier III Minus project used Dryden ground facilities during the flight test program. The vehicle was developed by Lockheed Martin Skunk Works and Boeing Defense and Space Group to satisfy a goal of the Defense Airborne Reconnaissance Office to supply responsive and sustained data from anywhere within enemy territory, day or night, in all types of weather. Dubbed DarkStar, the vehicle, with a wing span of 69 feet, was designed to fly above 45,000 feet at subsonic speeds on missions lasting more than eight hours. The first DarkStar prototype (article #695) made its first flight on March 29, 1996. At the begininning of its second flight, on April 22, 1996, it crashed on takeoff, and was destroyed. More than two years passed before the second Darkstar prototype (article #696) took to the air on June 29, 1998. The vehicle made a total of five flights, the last on January 9, 1999. The program was cancelled on January 28, 1999.

  15. White Dwarf Stars in the HET Dark Energy Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castanheira, Barbara; Winget, D.; Gebhardt, K.; Allende Prieto, C.; Shetrone, M.; Odewahn, S.; Montgomery, M. H.

    2012-01-01

    In this poster, we present the project that will survey all white dwarf stars observed in the Hobby-Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment (HETDEX) and the Visible Integral-field Replicable Unit Spectrograph (VIRUS) observations in parallel mode. The final product will be a unique magnitude-limited catalog of as many as 10,000 stars. Since we will use data from an Integral-field Units, our survey will be free of the selection biases that plagued preceding surveys, e.g. the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The critical advantages of our program are our ability to produce a white dwarf luminosity function five magnitudes fainter than the one derived from the Palomar-Green survey and with a similar number of faint stars as the one from SDSS. Our project will help to derive a more precise age of the Galactic disk, and will provide fundamental information about the white dwarf population and the star formation history of the Milky Way, impacting the white dwarf field and many other fields of astronomy.

  16. Dark matter and the first stars: a new phase of stellar evolution.

    PubMed

    Spolyar, Douglas; Freese, Katherine; Gondolo, Paolo

    2008-02-01

    A mechanism is identified whereby dark matter (DM) in protostellar halos dramatically alters the current theoretical framework for the formation of the first stars. Heat from neutralino DM annihilation is shown to overwhelm any cooling mechanism, consequently impeding the star formation process and possibly leading to a new stellar phase. A "dark star" may result: a giant ( greater, similar 1 AU) hydrogen-helium star powered by DM annihilation instead of nuclear fusion. Observational consequences are discussed.

  17. Russell Lecture: Dark Star Formation and Cooling Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynden-Bell, D.; Tout, C. A.

    2001-09-01

    Optically thin cooling gas at most temperatures above 30 K will make condensations by pressure, pushing material into cool, dense regions. This works without gravity. Cooling condensations will flatten and become planar/similarity solutions. Most star formation may start from cooling condensations, where gravity is only important in the later stages. The idea that some of the dark matter could be pristine white dwarfs that condensed slowly onto planetary-sized seeds without firing nuclear reactions is found lacking. However, recent observations indicate 50 times more halo white dwarfs than have previously been acknowledged, enough to make the halo fraction observed as MACHOs. A cosmological census shows that only 1% of the mass of the universe is of known constitution.

  18. Strange Quark Stars as a Probe of Dark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Hao; Chen, Lie-Wen

    2016-11-01

    We demonstrate that the observation of old strange quark stars (SQSs) can set important limits on the scattering cross-sections {σ }q between light quarks and non-interacting scalar dark matter (DM). By analyzing a set of 1403 solitary pulsar-like compact stars in the Milky Way, we find that the old solitary pulsar PSR J1801-0857D can set the most stringent upper limits on {σ }q or the cross-sections {σ }p between DM and protons. By converting {σ }q into {σ }p based on effective operator analyses, we show that the resulting {σ }p limit, by assuming PSR J1801-0857D is an SQS, is comparable with that of the current direct detection experiments in terrestrial labs but weaker by several orders of magnitude than that obtained by assuming PSR J1801-0857D is a neutron star (NS), which requires an extremely small {σ }p far beyond the limits of direct detection experiments. Our findings imply that old pulsars are more likely to be identified as SQSs than as NSs in future terrestrial experiments observing scalar DM.

  19. Dark Matters

    ScienceCinema

    Joseph Silk

    2016-07-12

    One of the greatest mysteries in the cosmos is that it is mostly dark.  Astronomers and particle physicists today are seeking to unravel the nature of this mysterious, but pervasive dark matter which has profoundly influenced the formation of structure in the universe.  I will describe the complex interplay between galaxy formation and dark matter detectability and review recent attempts to measure particle dark matter by direct and indirect means.

  20. Dark Matters

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph Silk

    2009-09-23

    One of the greatest mysteries in the cosmos is that it is mostly dark.  Astronomers and particle physicists today are seeking to unravel the nature of this mysterious, but pervasive dark matter which has profoundly influenced the formation of structure in the universe.  I will describe the complex interplay between galaxy formation and dark matter detectability and review recent attempts to measure particle dark matter by direct and indirect means.

  1. Dark matter capture in the first stars: a power source and limit on stellar mass

    SciTech Connect

    Freese, Katherine; Spolyar, Douglas; Aguirre, Anthony E-mail: dspolyar@physics.ucsc.edu

    2008-11-15

    The annihilation of weakly interacting massive particles can provide an important heat source for the first (Pop III, 'Pop' standing for 'population') stars, potentially leading to a new phase of stellar evolution known as a 'dark star'. When dark matter (DM) capture via scattering off baryons is included, the luminosity from DM annihilation may dominate over the luminosity due to fusion, depending on the DM density and scattering cross section. The influx of DM due to capture may thus prolong the dark star phase of stellar evolution as long as the ambient DM density is high enough. Comparison of DM luminosity with the Eddington luminosity for the star may constrain the stellar mass of zero-metallicity stars. Alternatively, if sufficiently massive Pop III stars are found, they might be used to bound dark matter properties.

  2. Observing supermassive dark stars with James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilie, Cosmin; Freese, Katherine; Valluri, Monica; Iliev, Ilian T.; Shapiro, Paul R.

    2012-05-01

    We study the capability of theJames Webb Space Telescope (JWST) to detect supermassive dark stars (SMDSs). If the first stars are powered by dark matter (DM) heating in triaxial DM haloes, they may grow to be very large (>106 M⊙) and very bright (>109 L⊙). These SMDSs would be visible in deep imaging with JWST and even Hubble Space Telescope (HST). We use sensitivity limits from previous HST surveys to place bounds on the numbers of SMDSs that may be detected in future JWST imaging surveys. We showed that SMDS in the mass range 106-107 M⊙ are bright enough to be detected in all the wavelength bands of the NIRCam on JWST (but not in the less sensitive MIRI camera at higher wavelengths). If SMDSs exist at z˜ 10, 12 and 14, they will be detectable as J-, H- or K-band dropouts, respectively. With a total survey area of 150 arcmin2 (assuming a multiyear deep parallel survey with JWST), we find that typically the number of 106 M⊙ SMDSs found as H- or K-band dropouts is ˜105fSMDS, where the fraction of early DM haloes hosting DS is likely to be small, fSMDS≪ 1. If the SMDS survive down to z= 10 where HST bounds apply, then the observable number of SMDSs as H- or K-band dropouts with JWST is ˜1-30. While individual SMDS are bright enough to be detected by JWST, standard Population III stars (without DM annihilation) are not, and would only be detected in first galaxies with total stellar masses of 106-108 M⊙. Differentiating first galaxies at z > 10 from SMDSs would be possible with spectroscopy: the SMDS (which are too cool produce significant nebular emission) will have only absorption lines, while the galaxies are likely to produce emission lines as well. Of particular interest would be the He II emission lines at ?m as well as Hα lines which would be signatures of early galaxies rather than SMDSs. The detection of SMDSs with JWST would not only provide alternative evidence for weakly interacting massive particles, but also provide a possible pathway for

  3. Dark matters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steigman, Gary

    The observational evidence for dark matter in the universe is reviewed. Constraints on the baryon density from primordial nucleosynthesis are presented and compared to the dynamical estimates of the mass on various scales. Baryons can account for the observed luminous mass as well as some, perhaps most, of the 'observed' dark mass. However if, as inflation/naturalness suggest, the total density of the universe is equal to the critical density, then nonbaryonic dark matter is required. The assets and liabilities of, as well as the candidates for, hot and cold dark matter are outlined. At present, there is no completely satisfactory candidate for nonbaryonic dark matter.

  4. A particle dark matter footprint on the first generation of stars

    SciTech Connect

    Lopes, Ilídio; Silk, Joseph E-mail: silk@astro.ox.ac.uk

    2014-05-01

    Dark matter particles with properties identical to those of dark matter candidates hinted at by several international collaborations dedicated to the experimental detection of dark matter (DAMA, COGENT, CRESST, and CDMS-II, although not, most notably, by LUX), which also have a dark matter asymmetry that is identical to the observed baryon asymmetry (Planck and Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe), may produce a significant impact on the evolution of the first generation of low-metallicity stars. The lifetimes of these stars in different phases of stellar evolution are significantly extended, namely, in the pre-main sequence, main sequence, and red giant phases. In particular, intermediate-mass stars in the red giant phase experience significant changes in their luminosity and chemical composition. The annihilations of dark matter particles affect the interior of the star in such a way that the 3α reaction becomes less efficient in the production of carbon and oxygen. This dark matter effect contradicts the excess of carbon and other metals observed today in stars of low mass and low metallicity. Hence, we can impose an upper limit on the dark matter halo density, and therefore on the redshift, at which the first generation of low-metallicity stars formed.

  5. Gravitational microlensing as a method of detecting disk dark matter and faint disk stars

    SciTech Connect

    Griest, K.; Alcock, C.; Axelrod, T.S.; Bennett, D.P.; Cook, K.H. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA )

    1991-05-01

    Gravitational microlensing of stars in the Galactic bulge is proposed as a method of probing the mass density of disk objects in the 0.001 to 0.1 solar mass range. A substantial rate is found if disk dark matter of this form exists, and even without any dark matter, a significant microlensing rate is found, owing to the faint low-mass disk stars which are known to exist. Such a search would provide new information on the disk dark matter question, probe the low-end stellar mass function, and also search for halo dark matter, all with rates comparable to those expected for the ongoing LMC microlensing halo dark matter searches. 17 refs.

  6. Dark strings

    SciTech Connect

    Vachaspati, Tanmay

    2009-09-15

    Recent astrophysical observations have motivated novel theoretical models of the dark matter sector. A class of such models predicts the existence of GeV scale cosmic strings that communicate with the standard model sector by Aharonov-Bohm interactions with electrically charged particles. We discuss the cosmology of these 'dark strings' and investigate possible observational signatures. More elaborate dark sector models are argued to contain hybrid topological defects that may also have observational signatures.

  7. Dark matter and dark energy: The critical questions

    SciTech Connect

    Michael S. Turner

    2002-11-19

    Stars account for only about 0.5% of the content of the Universe; the bulk of the Universe is optically dark. The dark side of the Universe is comprised of: at least 0.1% light neutrinos; 3.5% {+-} 1% baryons; 29% {+-} 4% cold dark matter; and 66% {+-} 6% dark energy. Now that we have characterized the dark side of the Universe, the challenge is to understand it. The critical questions are: (1) What form do the dark baryons take? (2) What is (are) the constituent(s) of the cold dark matter? (3) What is the nature of the mysterious dark energy that is causing the Universe to speed up.

  8. Dark matter and dark radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ackerman, Lotty; Buckley, Matthew R.; Carroll, Sean M.; Kamionkowski, Marc

    2009-01-15

    We explore the feasibility and astrophysical consequences of a new long-range U(1) gauge field ('dark electromagnetism') that couples only to dark matter, not to the standard model. The dark matter consists of an equal number of positive and negative charges under the new force, but annihilations are suppressed if the dark-matter mass is sufficiently high and the dark fine-structure constant {alpha}-circumflex is sufficiently small. The correct relic abundance can be obtained if the dark matter also couples to the conventional weak interactions, and we verify that this is consistent with particle-physics constraints. The primary limit on {alpha}-circumflex comes from the demand that the dark matter be effectively collisionless in galactic dynamics, which implies {alpha}-circumflex < or approx. 10{sup -3} for TeV-scale dark matter. These values are easily compatible with constraints from structure formation and primordial nucleosynthesis. We raise the prospect of interesting new plasma effects in dark-matter dynamics, which remain to be explored.

  9. Dying Stars Indicate Lots of Dark Matter in Giant Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1994-04-01

    result is that these measurements also allow an estimate of how much of this giant galaxy is in the form of dark matter. From the large spread in the observed velocities of the 37 planetary nebulae, it is apparent that the total mass of NGC 1399 must be very large, and that no more than 10 percent of this mass is contained in the stars and gas we observe in it. In other words: the remaining 90 percent of the mass of NGC 1399 must consist of dark, ``invisible'' matter. This is another very clear observational confirmation of the apparent presence of dark matter in the Universe, already indicated by various other types of astronomical investigations. Although many suggestions have been made about the nature of this dark matter, nothing is known for sure at this moment. The most important implication of the existence of dark matter is that its gravitational attraction may be sufficient to ultimately stop the current expansion of the Universe. If so, the Universe will later begin to contract and probably end its present phase in a ``Big Crunch'', many billions of years from now. 1 Magda Arnaboldi Gnidica and Ken C. Freeman (Mt. Stromlo Observatory, Canberra ACT, Australia), Xiaohui Hui (Astronomy Department, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California, U.S.A.), Massimo Capaccioli (Dipartimento di Astronomia, Universita' di Padova, Padova, and Osservatorio Astronomico di Capodimonte, Napoli, Italy) and Holland Ford (Physics and Astronomy Department, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, U.S.A.) 2 Planetary Nebulae are formed when stars like our Sun are about to die and throw off a great shining shell of gas. This gives them the appearance of a small nebula surrounding a central star, and this is why they are called ``planetary'', although they have nothing to do with planets. 3 This light is emitted at wavelength 500.7 nm by doubly ionised oxygen atoms ([O III]) FIGURE CAPTION ESO PR PHOTO 05/94: PLANETARY NEBULAE IN NGC 1399 This photo shows some of

  10. Dark-disk universe.

    PubMed

    Fan, JiJi; Katz, Andrey; Randall, Lisa; Reece, Matthew

    2013-05-24

    We point out that current constraints on dark matter imply only that the majority of dark matter is cold and collisionless. A subdominant fraction of dark matter could have much stronger interactions. In particular, it could interact in a manner that dissipates energy, thereby cooling into a rotationally supported disk, much as baryons do. We call this proposed new dark matter component double-disk dark matter (DDDM). We argue that DDDM could constitute a fraction of all matter roughly as large as the fraction in baryons, and that it could be detected through its gravitational effects on the motion of stars in galaxies, for example. Furthermore, if DDDM can annihilate to gamma rays, it would give rise to an indirect detection signal distributed across the sky that differs dramatically from that predicted for ordinary dark matter. DDDM and more general partially interacting dark matter scenarios provide a large unexplored space of testable new physics ideas.

  11. Dark-disk universe.

    PubMed

    Fan, JiJi; Katz, Andrey; Randall, Lisa; Reece, Matthew

    2013-05-24

    We point out that current constraints on dark matter imply only that the majority of dark matter is cold and collisionless. A subdominant fraction of dark matter could have much stronger interactions. In particular, it could interact in a manner that dissipates energy, thereby cooling into a rotationally supported disk, much as baryons do. We call this proposed new dark matter component double-disk dark matter (DDDM). We argue that DDDM could constitute a fraction of all matter roughly as large as the fraction in baryons, and that it could be detected through its gravitational effects on the motion of stars in galaxies, for example. Furthermore, if DDDM can annihilate to gamma rays, it would give rise to an indirect detection signal distributed across the sky that differs dramatically from that predicted for ordinary dark matter. DDDM and more general partially interacting dark matter scenarios provide a large unexplored space of testable new physics ideas. PMID:23745856

  12. Enhancement of dark matter capture by neutron stars in binary systems.

    PubMed

    Brayeur, Lionel; Tinyakov, Peter

    2012-08-10

    We study the capture of dark matter particles by neutron stars in close binary systems. By performing a direct numerical simulation, we find that there is a sizable amplification of the rate of dark matter capture by each of the companions. In the case of the binary pulsar PSR J1906+0746 with the orbital period of 4 hours the amplification factor is approximately equal to 3.5. This amplification can be attributed to the energy loss by dark matter particles resulting from their gravitational scattering off moving companions.

  13. The dark side of cosmology: dark matter and dark energy.

    PubMed

    Spergel, David N

    2015-03-01

    A simple model with only six parameters (the age of the universe, the density of atoms, the density of matter, the amplitude of the initial fluctuations, the scale dependence of this amplitude, and the epoch of first star formation) fits all of our cosmological data . Although simple, this standard model is strange. The model implies that most of the matter in our Galaxy is in the form of "dark matter," a new type of particle not yet detected in the laboratory, and most of the energy in the universe is in the form of "dark energy," energy associated with empty space. Both dark matter and dark energy require extensions to our current understanding of particle physics or point toward a breakdown of general relativity on cosmological scales.

  14. The dark side of cosmology: dark matter and dark energy.

    PubMed

    Spergel, David N

    2015-03-01

    A simple model with only six parameters (the age of the universe, the density of atoms, the density of matter, the amplitude of the initial fluctuations, the scale dependence of this amplitude, and the epoch of first star formation) fits all of our cosmological data . Although simple, this standard model is strange. The model implies that most of the matter in our Galaxy is in the form of "dark matter," a new type of particle not yet detected in the laboratory, and most of the energy in the universe is in the form of "dark energy," energy associated with empty space. Both dark matter and dark energy require extensions to our current understanding of particle physics or point toward a breakdown of general relativity on cosmological scales. PMID:25745164

  15. Dark coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Gavela, M.B.; Hernández, D.; Honorez, L. Lopez; Mena, O.; Rigolin, S. E-mail: d.hernandez@uam.es E-mail: omena@ific.uv.es

    2009-07-01

    The two dark sectors of the universe—dark matter and dark energy—may interact with each other. Background and linear density perturbation evolution equations are developed for a generic coupling. We then establish the general conditions necessary to obtain models free from non-adiabatic instabilities. As an application, we consider a viable universe in which the interaction strength is proportional to the dark energy density. The scenario does not exhibit ''phantom crossing'' and is free from instabilities, including early ones. A sizeable interaction strength is compatible with combined WMAP, HST, SN, LSS and H(z) data. Neutrino mass and/or cosmic curvature are allowed to be larger than in non-interacting models. Our analysis sheds light as well on unstable scenarios previously proposed.

  16. Dark GPC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bañas, Andrew R.; Villangca, Mark J.; Palima, Darwin; Glückstad, Jesper

    2016-03-01

    Generalized Phase Contrast (GPC) is an efficient method for efficiently shaping light into speckle-free contiguous optical distributions useful in diverse applications such as static beam shaping, optical manipulation and recently, for excitation in two-photon optogenetics. GPC typically results in a 3x intensified user defined input mask shape against a dark background. In this work, we emphasize GPC's capability of optimal destructive interference, normally used to create the dark background surrounding the shaped light. We also study input parameters wherein the locations of light and darkness are interchanged with respect to typical GPC output, thus resulting to a well-defined structured darkness. The conditions that give destructive interference for the output are then applied to near-arbitrary shapes. Preliminary experimental results are presented using dynamic spatial light modulator to form scaled arbitrary darkness shapes. Supporting demonstrations that reverse the light and dark regions of amplitude-modulated input are also presented as a related case of structuring destructive interference. Our analysis and experimental demonstrations show a simplified approach in the generation of extended regions of destructive interference within coherent beams.

  17. Keeping the Stars in Our Eyes: Global Astronomy Month's Dark Skies Awareness Programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Constance E.; Global Astronomy Month's Dark Skies Awareness Working Group

    2012-01-01

    The International Year of Astronomy provided opportunities to experience the beauty of the night sky. Every April since IYA2009, Global Astronomy Month (GAM) carried on the activities with new ones. Its goal is to bring astronomy enthusiasts together to celebrate astronomy and the beauty of observing the sky. Dark Skies Awareness (DSA) is a major program of GAM. Its main "take away" message focuses on reasons and methods for preserving the night sky. With half of the world's population living in cities, many people never experience the wonderment of a pristinely dark sky. "Light pollution” is obscuring people's long-standing natural heritage to view stars. Poorly-aimed and unshielded outdoor lights are the cause of most of the light pollution. They waste more than $2 billion (17 billion kilowatt-hours) of energy in the United States each year. Under unpolluted skies we ought to see more than a couple thousand stars, yet we see less than a hundred from many cities. A number of dark skies events and activities to promote public awareness on how to save energy and save our night sky were held worldwide during GAM2011 and will be held during GAM2012: · International Earth & Sky Photo Contest, April 1-22 · GLOBE at Night, which measures local levels of light pollution over a 10 day period, April 11-20 · International Dark Sky Week, April 14-20 · World Night in Defense of Starlight, April 20 · Dark Sky Rangers, designed to involve young people in preventing light pollution · One Star at a Time, creating accessible public spaces for viewing a dark night sky · Dark Skies Awareness 10 minute audio podcasts and poetry GAM 2012 DSA programs will be presented in terms of lessons learned and plans ahead to redress a disappearing natural heritage-our dark night sky.

  18. Adsorption sites on icosahedral quasicrystal surfaces: Dark stars and white flowers

    SciTech Connect

    Unal, B.; Jenks, C.J.; Thiel, P.A.

    2009-01-12

    From other work, two preferred sites have been suggested for metals and semimetals adsorbed on the fivefold surfaces of icosahedral, Al-based quasicrystals. Because of their appearance in scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) images, these sites are known as dark stars and white flowers. In this paper, we analyze four bulk structural models in physical space to determine the types, chemical decorations, and densities of the dark star - and, to a lesser extent, the white flower - adsorption sites for the fivefold planes of icosahedral Al-Pd-Mn. We find that the chemical decorations of these sites are heterogeneous, even within a single model. Both features are also structurally heterogeneous, according to STM measurements, and the structural variation is consistent with the bulk structure models. Finally, from the models, the density of dark stars in the planes correlates with the step height. This may explain previous experimental observations of different properties for different terraces.

  19. Dark matter line emission constraints from NuSTAR observations of the bullet cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Riemer-Sørensen, S.; Wik, D.; Madejski, G.; Molendi, S.; Gastaldello, F.; Harrison, F. A.; Craig, W. W.; Hailey, C. J.; Boggs, S. E.; Christensen, F. E.; Stern, D.; Zhang, W. W.; Hornstrup, A.

    2015-08-27

    Some dark matter candidates, e.g., sterile neutrinos, provide observable signatures in the form of mono-energetic line emission. Here, we present the first search for dark matter line emission in the $3-80\\;\\mathrm{keV}$ range in a pointed observation of the Bullet Cluster with NuSTAR. We do not detect any significant line emission and instead we derive upper limits (95% CL) on the flux, and interpret these constraints in the context of sterile neutrinos and more generic dark matter candidates. NuSTAR does not have the sensitivity to constrain the recently claimed line detection at $3.5\\;\\mathrm{keV}$, but improves on the constraints for energies of $10-25\\;\\mathrm{keV}$.

  20. Dark matter line emission constraints from NuSTAR observations of the bullet cluster

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Riemer-Sørensen, S.; Wik, D.; Madejski, G.; Molendi, S.; Gastaldello, F.; Harrison, F. A.; Craig, W. W.; Hailey, C. J.; Boggs, S. E.; Christensen, F. E.; et al

    2015-08-27

    Some dark matter candidates, e.g., sterile neutrinos, provide observable signatures in the form of mono-energetic line emission. Here, we present the first search for dark matter line emission in themore » $$3-80\\;\\mathrm{keV}$$ range in a pointed observation of the Bullet Cluster with NuSTAR. We do not detect any significant line emission and instead we derive upper limits (95% CL) on the flux, and interpret these constraints in the context of sterile neutrinos and more generic dark matter candidates. NuSTAR does not have the sensitivity to constrain the recently claimed line detection at $$3.5\\;\\mathrm{keV}$$, but improves on the constraints for energies of $$10-25\\;\\mathrm{keV}$$.« less

  1. Dark Stars: A New Look at the First Stars in the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spolyar, Douglas; Bodenheimer, Peter; Freese, Katherine; Gondolo, Paolo

    2009-11-01

    We have proposed that the first phase of stellar evolution in the history of the universe may be dark (matter powered) stars (DSs), luminous objects powered by dark matter (DM) heating rather than by nuclear fusion, and in this paper we examine the history of these DSs. The power source is annihilation of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) which are their own antiparticles. These WIMPs are the best motivated DM candidates and may be discovered by ongoing direct or indirect detection searches (e.g., Fermi/GLAST) or at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. A new stellar phase results, powered by DM annihilation as long as there is a DM fuel, from millions to billions of years. We build up the DSs from the time DM heating becomes the dominant power source, accreting more and more matter onto them. We have included many new effects in the current study, including a variety of particle masses and accretion rates, nuclear burning, feedback mechanisms, and possible repopulation of DM density due to capture. Remarkably, we find that in all these cases, we obtain the same result: the first stars are very large, 500-1000 times as massive as the Sun; as well as puffy (radii 1-10 AU), bright (106-107 L sun), and cool (T surf < 10, 000 K) during the accretion. These results differ markedly from the standard picture in the absence of DM heating, in which the maximum mass is about 140 M sun and the temperatures are much hotter (T surf > 50,000 K). Hence DSs should be observationally distinct from standard Pop III stars. In addition, DSs avoid the (unobserved) element enrichment produced by the standard first stars. Once the DM fuel is exhausted, the DS becomes a heavy main-sequence star; these stars eventually collapse to form massive black holes that may provide seeds for the supermassive black holes observed at early times as well as explanations for recent ARCADE data and for intermediate-mass black holes.

  2. Inflation, Dark Matter, Dark Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolb, Edward W.

    2005-06-01

    Remarkable 20th-century cosmological discoveries and theoretical ideas led to the development of the present cosmological "standard model." In this lecture I will focus on one of the more recent ideas that may now be regarded as part of the framework of the standard big-bang model; namely, that structure in the universe results from the growth of small seed density fluctuations produced during the inflationary universe. In order to complete this picture, I will also discuss the idea that the present mass density is dominated by dark matter and that there is now a preponderance of dark energy.

  3. Psychopathology in a Galaxy Far, Far Away: the Use of Star Wars' Dark Side in Teaching.

    PubMed

    Hall, Ryan C W; Friedman, Susan Hatters

    2015-12-01

    Star Wars is well known, timeless, universal, and incorporated into shared culture. Trainees have grown up with the movies, and based on their enduring popularity, attending psychiatrists are likely to have seen them too. This article highlights psychopathology from the Dark Side of Star Wars films which can be used in teaching. These include as follows: borderline and narcissistic personality traits, psychopathy, PTSD, partner violence risk, developmental stages, and of course Oedipal conflicts.

  4. Dark scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahonen, Pasi; Alahuhta, Petteri; Daskala, Barbara; Delaitre, Sabine; Hert, Paul De; Lindner, Ralf; Maghiros, Ioannis; Moscibroda, Anna; Schreurs, Wim; Verlinden, Michiel

    In this chapter, we present four "dark scenarios" that highlight the key socio-economic, legal, technological and ethical risks to privacy, identity, trust, security and inclusiveness posed by new AmI technologies. We call them dark scenarios, because they show things that could go wrong in an AmI world, because they present visions of the future that we do not want to become reality. The scenarios expose threats and vulnerabilities as a way to inform policy-makers and planners about issues they need to take into account in developing new policies or updating existing legislation. Before presenting the four scenarios and our analysis of each, we describe the process of how we created the scenarios as well as the elements in our methodology for analysing the scenarios.

  5. Dark matter

    PubMed Central

    Peebles, P. James E.

    2015-01-01

    The evidence for the dark matter (DM) of the hot big bang cosmology is about as good as it gets in natural science. The exploration of its nature is now led by direct and indirect detection experiments, to be complemented by advances in the full range of cosmological tests, including judicious consideration of the rich phenomenology of galaxies. The results may confirm ideas about DM already under discussion. If we are lucky, we also will be surprised once again. PMID:24794526

  6. Dark matter.

    PubMed

    Peebles, P James E

    2015-10-01

    The evidence for the dark matter (DM) of the hot big bang cosmology is about as good as it gets in natural science. The exploration of its nature is now led by direct and indirect detection experiments, to be complemented by advances in the full range of cosmological tests, including judicious consideration of the rich phenomenology of galaxies. The results may confirm ideas about DM already under discussion. If we are lucky, we also will be surprised once again.

  7. Dark matter.

    PubMed

    Peebles, P James E

    2015-10-01

    The evidence for the dark matter (DM) of the hot big bang cosmology is about as good as it gets in natural science. The exploration of its nature is now led by direct and indirect detection experiments, to be complemented by advances in the full range of cosmological tests, including judicious consideration of the rich phenomenology of galaxies. The results may confirm ideas about DM already under discussion. If we are lucky, we also will be surprised once again. PMID:24794526

  8. Analysis of dark matter and dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yongquan, Han

    2016-05-01

    As the law of unity of opposites of the Philosophy tells us, the bright material exists, the dark matter also exists. Dark matter and dark energy should allow the law of unity of opposites. The Common attributes of the matter is radiation, then common attributes of dark matter must be absorb radiation. Only the rotation speed is lower than the speed of light radiation, can the matter radiate, since the speed of the matter is lower than the speed of light, so the matter is radiate; The rotate speed of the dark matter is faster than the light , so the dark matter doesn't radiate, it absorbs radiation. The energy that the dark matter absorb radiation produced (affect the measurement of time and space distribution of variations) is dark energy, so the dark matter produce dark energy only when it absorbs radiation. Dark matter does not radiate, two dark matters does not exist inevitably forces, and also no dark energy. Called the space-time ripples, the gravitational wave is bent radiation, radiation particles should be graviton, graviton is mainly refers to the radiation particles whose wavelength is small. Dark matter, dark energy also confirms the existence of the law of symmetry.

  9. Microlensing of Kepler stars as a method of detecting primordial black hole dark matter.

    PubMed

    Griest, Kim; Lehner, Matthew J; Cieplak, Agnieszka M; Jain, Bhuvnesh

    2011-12-01

    If the dark matter consists of primordial black holes (PBHs), we show that gravitational lensing of stars being monitored by NASA's Kepler search for extrasolar planets can cause significant numbers of detectable microlensing events. A search through the roughly 150,000 light curves would result in large numbers of detectable events for PBHs in the mass range 5×10(-10) M(⊙) to 10(-4) M(⊙). Nondetection of these events would close almost 2 orders of magnitude of the mass window for PBH dark matter. The microlensing rate is higher than previously noticed due to a combination of the exceptional photometric precision of the Kepler mission and the increase in cross section due to the large angular sizes of the relatively nearby Kepler field stars. We also present a new formalism for calculating optical depth and microlensing rates in the presence of large finite-source effects. PMID:22182077

  10. Star Formation Histories of Dwarf Galaxies: Keys to Galaxy Formation and Dark Matter Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boylan-Kolchin, Michael

    2014-10-01

    We propose to perform a suite of hydrodynamical simulations in order to understand the connection between dwarf galaxy star formation histories, stellar content, and central dark matter densities. This will leverage one of HST's unique and enduring scientific contributions, deep and uniform photometry of nearby dwarf galaxies that enables reconstructions of their ancient {z 6-10} star formation histories, to shed light on some of the main problems in galaxy formation and cosmology.Analysis of HST observations has definitively shown that dwarfs exhibit a surprising variety of star formation histories: some dwarfs host nearly purely ancient populations, while others have formed 90% of their stars after redshift 1. This diversity is unexpected in current theoretical models, which predict primarily old stellar populations in low-mass objects. The topic of star formation histories of dwarfs has also received significant attention recently in the context of possible small-scale problems of the LCDM model: if episodic bursts of star formation inject energy into dwarfs' dark matter halos, it may provide a natural explanation of the observed low densities of dwarf galaxies within LCDM.Our simulations will adopt physically-motivated, explicit feedback prescriptions that are fixed by our knowledge of stellar evolution. We will choose halos having diverse mass assembly histories within a narrow range of mass and compare their star formation histories to HST observations of nearby isolated dwarf galaxies, thereby testing fundamental aspects of galaxy formation modeling and dark matter astrophysics. Data from our simulations will be publicly released via a dedicated website.

  11. Dark matter universe.

    PubMed

    Bahcall, Neta A

    2015-10-01

    Most of the mass in the universe is in the form of dark matter--a new type of nonbaryonic particle not yet detected in the laboratory or in other detection experiments. The evidence for the existence of dark matter through its gravitational impact is clear in astronomical observations--from the early observations of the large motions of galaxies in clusters and the motions of stars and gas in galaxies, to observations of the large-scale structure in the universe, gravitational lensing, and the cosmic microwave background. The extensive data consistently show the dominance of dark matter and quantify its amount and distribution, assuming general relativity is valid. The data inform us that the dark matter is nonbaryonic, is "cold" (i.e., moves nonrelativistically in the early universe), and interacts only weakly with matter other than by gravity. The current Lambda cold dark matter cosmology--a simple (but strange) flat cold dark matter model dominated by a cosmological constant Lambda, with only six basic parameters (including the density of matter and of baryons, the initial mass fluctuations amplitude and its scale dependence, and the age of the universe and of the first stars)--fits remarkably well all the accumulated data. However, what is the dark matter? This is one of the most fundamental open questions in cosmology and particle physics. Its existence requires an extension of our current understanding of particle physics or otherwise point to a modification of gravity on cosmological scales. The exploration and ultimate detection of dark matter are led by experiments for direct and indirect detection of this yet mysterious particle.

  12. Dark matter universe

    PubMed Central

    Bahcall, Neta A.

    2015-01-01

    Most of the mass in the universe is in the form of dark matter—a new type of nonbaryonic particle not yet detected in the laboratory or in other detection experiments. The evidence for the existence of dark matter through its gravitational impact is clear in astronomical observations—from the early observations of the large motions of galaxies in clusters and the motions of stars and gas in galaxies, to observations of the large-scale structure in the universe, gravitational lensing, and the cosmic microwave background. The extensive data consistently show the dominance of dark matter and quantify its amount and distribution, assuming general relativity is valid. The data inform us that the dark matter is nonbaryonic, is “cold” (i.e., moves nonrelativistically in the early universe), and interacts only weakly with matter other than by gravity. The current Lambda cold dark matter cosmology—a simple (but strange) flat cold dark matter model dominated by a cosmological constant Lambda, with only six basic parameters (including the density of matter and of baryons, the initial mass fluctuations amplitude and its scale dependence, and the age of the universe and of the first stars)—fits remarkably well all the accumulated data. However, what is the dark matter? This is one of the most fundamental open questions in cosmology and particle physics. Its existence requires an extension of our current understanding of particle physics or otherwise point to a modification of gravity on cosmological scales. The exploration and ultimate detection of dark matter are led by experiments for direct and indirect detection of this yet mysterious particle. PMID:26417091

  13. Dark matter universe.

    PubMed

    Bahcall, Neta A

    2015-10-01

    Most of the mass in the universe is in the form of dark matter--a new type of nonbaryonic particle not yet detected in the laboratory or in other detection experiments. The evidence for the existence of dark matter through its gravitational impact is clear in astronomical observations--from the early observations of the large motions of galaxies in clusters and the motions of stars and gas in galaxies, to observations of the large-scale structure in the universe, gravitational lensing, and the cosmic microwave background. The extensive data consistently show the dominance of dark matter and quantify its amount and distribution, assuming general relativity is valid. The data inform us that the dark matter is nonbaryonic, is "cold" (i.e., moves nonrelativistically in the early universe), and interacts only weakly with matter other than by gravity. The current Lambda cold dark matter cosmology--a simple (but strange) flat cold dark matter model dominated by a cosmological constant Lambda, with only six basic parameters (including the density of matter and of baryons, the initial mass fluctuations amplitude and its scale dependence, and the age of the universe and of the first stars)--fits remarkably well all the accumulated data. However, what is the dark matter? This is one of the most fundamental open questions in cosmology and particle physics. Its existence requires an extension of our current understanding of particle physics or otherwise point to a modification of gravity on cosmological scales. The exploration and ultimate detection of dark matter are led by experiments for direct and indirect detection of this yet mysterious particle. PMID:26417091

  14. The extravagant universe : exploding stars, dark energy and the accelerating cosmos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirshner, Robert P.

    One of the world's leading astronomers tells the story of unlocking an astonishing cosmic secret. Supernova expert Robert Kirshner brings readers inside a lively research team on the quest that led them to an extraordinary cosmological discovery: the expansion of the universe is accelerating under the influence of a dark energy that makes space itself expand. Measurements of light from exploding stars--some of them halfway across the universe--let these astronomers trace the history of cosmic expansion. The results have been amazing. Instead of a universe slowing down due to gravity as theory predicted, observations reveal a universe whose expansion is speeding up. This measurement of dark energy--a quality of space itself that causes cosmic acceleration--points to a gaping hole in our understanding of fundamental physics. In 1917, Einstein proposed the "cosmological constant" to explain a static universe. When observations proved that the universe was expanding, he cast this early form of dark energy aside. But recent observations described first-hand in this book show that the cosmological constant--or something just like it--dominates the universe's mass and energy budget and determines its fate and shape. Warned by Einstein's blunder, and contradicted by the initial results of a competing research team, Kirshner and his colleagues were reluctant to accept their own result. But, convinced by evidence built on their hard-earned understanding of exploding stars, they announced their conclusion that the universe is accelerating in February 1998. Other lines of inquiry and parallel supernova research now support a new synthesis of a cosmos dominated by dark energy but also containing several forms of dark matter. We live in an extravagant universe with a surprising number of essential ingredients: the real universe we measure is not the simplest one we could imagine. This book invites any reader to share in the excitement of a remarkable adventure of discovery.

  15. Long GRBs as a tool to investigate star formation in dark matter halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Jun-Jie; Hao, Jing-Meng; Wu, Xue-Feng; Yuan, Ye-Fei

    2016-03-01

    First stars can only form in structures that are suitably dense, which can be parametrized by the minimum dark matter halo mass Mmin. Mmin must play an important role in star formation. The connection of long gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs) with the collapse of massive stars has provided a good opportunity for probing star formation in dark matter halos. We place some constraints on Mmin using the latest Swift LGRB data. We conservatively consider that LGRB rate is proportional to the cosmic star formation rate (CSFR) and an additional evolution parametrized as (1 + z) α, where the CSFR model is a function of Mmin. Using the χ2 statistic, the contour constraints on the Mmin-α plane show that at the 1σ confidence level, we have Mmin <1010.5M⊙ from 118 LGRBs with redshift z < 4 and luminosity Liso > 1.8 ×1051 ergs-1. We also find that adding 12 high-z (4 < z < 5) LGRBs (consisting of 104 LGRBs with z < 5 and Liso > 3.1 ×1051 ergs-1) could result in much tighter constraints on Mmin, for which, 107.7M⊙ star formation in dark matter halos.

  16. Dark-Skies Awareness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Constance E.

    2009-05-01

    The arc of the Milky Way seen from a truly dark location is part of our planet's natural heritage. More than one fifth of the world population, two thirds of the United States population and one half of the European Union population have already lost naked eye visibility of the Milky Way. This loss, caused by light pollution, is a serious and growing issue that impacts astronomical research, the economy, ecology, energy conservation, human health, public safety and our shared ability to see the night sky. For this reason, "Dark Skies” is a cornerstone project of the International Year of Astronomy. Its goal is to raise public awareness of the impact of artificial lighting on local environments by getting people worldwide involved in a variety of programs that: 1. Teach about dark skies using new technology (e.g., an activity-based planetarium show on DVD, podcasting, social networking on Facebook and MySpace, a Second Life presence) 2. Provide thematic events on light pollution at star parties and observatory open houses (Dark Skies Discovery Sites, Nights in the (National) Parks, Sidewalk Astronomy) 3. Organize events in the arts (e.g., a photography contest) 4. Involve citizen-scientists in naked-eye and digital-meter star hunting programs (e.g., GLOBE at Night, "How Many Stars?", the Great World Wide Star Count and the radio frequency interference equivalent: "Quiet Skies") and 5. Raise awareness about the link between light pollution and public health, economic issues, ecological consequences, energy conservation, safety and security, and astronomy (e.g., The Starlight Initiative, World Night in Defense of Starlight, International Dark Sky Week, International Dark-Sky Communities, Earth Hour, The Great Switch Out, a traveling exhibit, downloadable posters and brochures). The presentation will provide an update, describe how people can become involved and take a look ahead at the program's sustainability. For more information, visit www.darkskiesawareness.org.

  17. Conquest of darkness by management of the stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiseman, Robert S.

    This text was presented as the Thomas B. Dowd Memorial Lecture for 1991 national Infrared Information Symposium (IRIS). The history of Army Night Vision from World War II to 1972 proves how the right organization with talented people and proper support can succeed. This presentation not only illustrates the growth of image intensifier technology and families of equipment, but the key events and stars that made it all happen. Described are the management techniques used and how to organize for effective research, development, engineering, and production programs; the evolution of the Far Infrared Common Module program is described; and how the Night Vision Laboratory was unique.

  18. Light's Darkness

    ScienceCinema

    Padgett, Miles [University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland

    2016-07-12

    Optical vortices and orbital angular momentum are currently topical subjects in the optics literature. Although seemingly esoteric, they are, in fact, the generic state of light and arise whenever three or more plane waves interfere. To be observed by eye the light must be monochromatic. Laser speckle is one such example, where the optical energy circulates around each black spot, giving a local orbital angular momentum. This talk with report three on-going studies. First, when considering a volume of interfering waves, the laser specs map out threads of complete darkness embedded in the light. Do these threads form loops? Links? Or even knots? Second, when looking through a rapidly spinning window, the image of the world on the other side is rotated: true or false? Finally, the entanglement of orbital angular momentum states means measuring how the angular position of one photons sets the angular momentum of another: is this an angular version of the EPR (Einstein, Podolsky, and Rosen) paradox?

  19. PMS and ZAMS stars associated with the dark cloud LDN 1655

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavarría-K, C.; Moreno-Corral, M. A.; de Lara, E.; de la Fuente, E.

    2013-01-01

    We give results of a low-resolution optical spectroscopic study of the bright nebulous stars conforming the tight stellar trapezium embedded in IRAS06548-0815, of the exciting star of IRAS06547-0810, and of the stars associated with reflection nebulae (R-or N-stars) NJ065703.0-081421, NJ065714.1-081016, IRAS06548-0815 D and IRAS06548-0815 G, all objects scarcely observed and apparently pertaining to the dark cloud LDN 1655. Our results given here combined with the corresponding 2MASS near infrared photometry enables us to estimate a photometric distance to LDN1655 of 1.9 ± kpc and to locate the trapezium stars on the (logL∗/L⊙,logTeff) or HR diagram in an attempt to disclose about their true nature. The spectroscopy of IRAS06548-0815 revealed two classic T Tauri, two Herbig Ae/Be stars, four weak-line T Tauri stars, and two probable lithium-rich stars. Additionally, we found that the R-star IRAS06547-0810 is excited by a single B1(V) star, that IRAS06548-0815 D is excited by a SpT. B2/B3(V) star, NJ065703.0-081421 and NJ065714.1-081016 are excited by a B3/B4(V) emission star and an A6(V) star, respectively. The brightest near infrared source of the trapezium, IRS1, has an infrared luminosity comparable to a highly reddened O8(V) star (AV≈29m). The second brightest near infrared source of the trapezium, IRAS06548-0815 C is, optically, a single classical T Tauri star of spectral type K4/K5, but is a resolved binary in the 2MASSKs band, both components being of about the same brightness.

  20. Observational probes of the connection between Star Formation Efficiency and Dark Matter halo mass of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalinova, Veselina; Colombo, Dario; Rosolowsky, Erik

    2015-08-01

    Modern simulations predict that the stellar mass and the star formation efficiency of a galaxy are tightly linked to the dark matter (DM) halo mass of that galaxy. This prediction relies on a specific model of galaxy evolution and so testing this prediction directly tests our best models of galaxy formation and evolution. Recent DM numerical studies propose relationships between star formation efficiency and the DM halo mass with two domains based on SF feedback (low-mass) vs. AGN feedback (high-mass), see Moster et al. (2013). The observational probe of such parameters in the relationship imply globally important physics that are fundamental as, e.g., the star formation law (e.g., Kennicutt et al., 1998), the universal depletion time (Leroy et al. 2008), and the origin of the cold gas phase with respect to the stellar disc (Davis et al.2011). Thus, we can directly measure whether this parameterization is correct by estimating the stellar mass, star formation efficiency and dynamical (DM) mass for a set of galaxies at strategically selected points to test if they fall on the predicted relationship.We use CO data from the Extragalactic Database for Galaxy Evolution survey (EDGE) in conjunction with archival 21-cm data and spectroscopic data from Calar Alto Legacy Integral Field spectroscopy Area survey (CALIFA) to measure the stellar vs. halo mass and star-formation-efficiency vs. halo mass relations of the galaxies. We also analyze archival 21-cm spectra to estimate rotation speeds, atomic gas masses and halo masses for a set of EDGE galaxies. Data from CALIFA are used for high quality star formation efficiency and stellar mass measurements. By linking these three parameters - stellar mass, star formation efficiency (SFE) and DM halo mass - we can test the simulation models of how the gas is cooling in the potential wells of the dark matter halos and then forms stars.

  1. Chandra's Darkest Bright Star: not so Dark after All?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayres, Thomas R.

    2008-11-01

    The Chandra High Resolution camera (HRC) has obtained numerous short exposures of the ultraviolet (UV)-bright star Vega (α Lyrae; HD 172167: A0 V), to calibrate the response of the detector to out-of-band (non-X-ray) radiation. A new analysis uncovered a stronger "blue leak" in the imaging section (HRC-I) than reported in an earlier study of Vega based on a subset of the pointings. The higher count rate—a factor of nearly 2 above prelaunch estimates—raised the possibility that genuine coronal X-rays might lurk among the out-of-band events. Exploiting the broader point-spread function of the UV leak compared with soft X-rays identified an excess of counts centered on the target, technically at 3σ significance. A number of uncertainties, however, prevent a clear declaration of a Vegan corona. A more secure result would be within reach of a deep uninterrupted HRC-I pointing.

  2. Constraining the dark fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Kunz, Martin; Liddle, Andrew R.; Parkinson, David; Gao Changjun

    2009-10-15

    Cosmological observations are normally fit under the assumption that the dark sector can be decomposed into dark matter and dark energy components. However, as long as the probes remain purely gravitational, there is no unique decomposition and observations can only constrain a single dark fluid; this is known as the dark degeneracy. We use observations to directly constrain this dark fluid in a model-independent way, demonstrating, in particular, that the data cannot be fit by a dark fluid with a single constant equation of state. Parametrizing the dark fluid equation of state by a variety of polynomials in the scale factor a, we use current kinematical data to constrain the parameters. While the simplest interpretation of the dark fluid remains that it is comprised of separate dark matter and cosmological constant contributions, our results cover other model types including unified dark energy/matter scenarios.

  3. Dark matter candidates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Michael S.

    1989-01-01

    The types of particles which may provide the nonluminous mass required by big-bang cosmological models are listed and briefly characterized. The observational evidence for the existence of dark matter (outweighing the luminous component by at least a factor of 10) is reviewed; the theoretical arguments favoring mainly nonbaryonic dark matter are summarized; and particular attention is given to weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) remaining as relics from the early universe. The WIMPs are classified as thermal relics (heavy stable neutrinos and lighter neutralinos), asymmetric relics (including baryons), nonthermal relics (superheavy magnetic monopoles, axions, and soliton stars), and truly exotic relics (relativistic debris or vacuum energy). Explanations for the current apparent baryon/exotica ratio of about 0.1 in different theoretical scenarios are considered, and the problems of experimental and/or observational dark-matter detection are examined.

  4. Big Questions: Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, Don

    2013-12-05

    Carl Sagan's oft-quoted statement that there are "billions and billions" of stars in the cosmos gives an idea of just how much "stuff" is in the universe. However scientists now think that in addition to the type of matter with which we are familiar, there is another kind of matter out there. This new kind of matter is called "dark matter" and there seems to be five times as much as ordinary matter. Dark matter interacts only with gravity, thus light simply zips right by it. Scientists are searching through their data, trying to prove that the dark matter idea is real. Fermilab's Dr. Don Lincoln tells us why we think this seemingly-crazy idea might not be so crazy after all.

  5. Big Questions: Dark Matter

    ScienceCinema

    Lincoln, Don

    2016-07-12

    Carl Sagan's oft-quoted statement that there are "billions and billions" of stars in the cosmos gives an idea of just how much "stuff" is in the universe. However scientists now think that in addition to the type of matter with which we are familiar, there is another kind of matter out there. This new kind of matter is called "dark matter" and there seems to be five times as much as ordinary matter. Dark matter interacts only with gravity, thus light simply zips right by it. Scientists are searching through their data, trying to prove that the dark matter idea is real. Fermilab's Dr. Don Lincoln tells us why we think this seemingly-crazy idea might not be so crazy after all.

  6. Signatures of dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltz, Edward Anthony

    It is well known that most of the mass in the universe remains unobserved save for its gravitational effect on luminous matter. The nature of this ``dark matter'' remains a mystery. From measurements of the primordial deuterium abundance, the theory of big bang nucleosynthesis predicts that there are not enough baryons to account for the amount of dark matter observed, thus the missing mass must take an exotic form. Several promising candidates have been proposed. In this work I will describe my research along two main lines of inquiry into the dark matter puzzle. The first possibility is that the dark matter is exotic massive particles, such as those predicted by supersymmetric extensions to the standard model of particle physics. Such particles are generically called WIMPs, for weakly interacting massive particles. Focusing on the so-called neutralino in supersymmetric models, I discuss the possible signatures of such particles, including their direct detection via nuclear recoil experiments and their indirect detection via annihilations in the halos of galaxies, producing high energy antiprotons, positrons and gamma rays. I also discuss signatures of the possible slow decays of such particles. The second possibility is that there is a population of black holes formed in the early universe. Any dark objects in galactic halos, black holes included, are called MACHOs, for massive compact halo objects. Such objects can be detected by their gravitational microlensing effects. Several possibilities for sources of baryonic dark matter are also interesting for gravitational microlensing. These include brown dwarf stars and old, cool white dwarf stars. I discuss the theory of gravitational microlensing, focusing on the technique of pixel microlensing. I make predictions for several planned microlensing experiments with ground based and space based telescopes. Furthermore, I discuss binary lenses in the context of pixel microlensing. Finally, I develop a new technique for

  7. Radio constraints on heavily obscured star formation within dark gamma-ray burst host galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Perley, D. A.; Perley, R. A.

    2013-12-01

    Highly dust-obscured starbursting galaxies (submillimeter galaxies and their ilk) represent the most extreme sites of star formation in the distant universe and contribute significantly to overall cosmic star formation beyond z > 1.5. Some stars formed in these environments may also explode as gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and contribute to the population of 'dark' bursts. Here we present Very Large Array wideband radio-continuum observations of 15 heavily dust-obscured Swift GRBs to search for radio synchrotron emission associated with intense star formation in their host galaxies. Most of these targets (11) are not detected. Of the remaining four objects, one detection is marginal, and for two others we cannot yet rule out the contribution of a long-lived radio afterglow. The final detection is secure, but indicates a star formation rate (SFR) roughly consistent with the dust-corrected UV-inferred value. Most galaxies hosting obscured GRBs are therefore not forming stars at extreme rates, and the amount of optical extinction seen along a GRB afterglow sightline does not clearly correlate with the likelihood that the host has a sufficiently high SFR to be radio-detectable. While some submillimeter galaxies do readily produce GRBs, these GRBs are often not heavily obscured—suggesting that the outer (modestly obscured) parts of these galaxies overproduce GRBs and the inner (heavily obscured) parts underproduce GRBs relative to their respective contributions to star formation, hinting at strong chemical or initial mass function gradients within these systems.

  8. A new type of compact stellar population: “dark star clusters”

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Sambaran; Kroupa, Pavel

    2015-08-01

    The possibility of the presence of large populations of stellar mass black holes (BHs) in star clusters has currently come into focus as an increasing number of BHs are being detected in globular clusters from X-ray and radio observations. By virtue of their ~10 times higher mass than the average stellar mass, these BHs strongly segregate towards the center of their parent star cluster. In that way they become dynamically highly active and potentially invoke a wide variety of physical phenomena; the most important ones being emission of gravitational waves (GWs), formation of X-ray binaries, and expansion of the cluster. However, closer to the Galactic center, a different manifestation of the BH population within a star cluster can take place. We propose, for the first time, that rapid removal of stars from the outer parts of a cluster by the strong tidal field in the inner region of our Galaxy can unveil its BH sub-cluster. The remaining system would apparently be a super-virial star cluster that is gravitationally held compact by an invisible mass. We study the formation and properties of such systems through direct N-body computations and estimate that they can be present in significant numbers (~100) in the inner region of the Milky Way. We call such objects “dark star clusters” (DSCs) as they appear dimmer than normal star clusters of similar total mass and they comprise a predicted, new class of entities. Dark Star Clusters are a natural outcome of star clusters’ evolution in a strong tidal field provided a substantial number of BHs (and neutron stars) are formed with low natal kicks and are retained in them. Hence, the discovery of DSCs will not only constrain the uncertain natal kicks of BHs, thereby scenarios of BH formation, but will also reassure star clusters as potential sites for GW emission for forthcoming ground-based detectors such as the Advanced LIGO. Finally, we discuss whether the Galactic-central IRS 13E can possibly be a DSC.

  9. Dark Matter Burners

    SciTech Connect

    Moskalenko, Igor V.; Wai, Lawrence L.; /SLAC

    2007-02-28

    We show that a star orbiting close enough to an adiabatically grown supermassive black hole (SMBH) can capture weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) at an extremely high rate. The stellar luminosity due to annihilation of captured WIMPs in the stellar core may be comparable to or even exceed the luminosity of the star due to thermonuclear burning. The model thus predicts the existence of unusual stars, essentially WIMP burners, in the vicinity of a SMBH. We find that the most efficient WIMP burners are stars with degenerate electron cores, e.g. white dwarfs (WDs); such WDs may have a very high surface temperature. If found, such stars would provide evidence for the existence of particle dark matter and can possibly be used to establish its density profile. On the other hand, the lack of such unusual stars may provide constraints on the WIMP density near the SMBH, as well as the WIMP-nucleus scattering and pair annihilation cross-sections.

  10. Photometric Calibrations of Standard Star Fields for the Dark Energy Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyatt, Samuel; Tucker, D. L.; Smith, A.

    2014-01-01

    The Dark Energy Survey (DES) is a 5000 square deg grizY imaging survey to be conducted using the new 3 square deg (2. 2-diameter) wide-field mosaic camera (DECam) on the CTIO Blanco 4-m telescope. The primary scientific goal of the DES is to constrain dark energy cosmological parameters via four complementary methods: galaxy cluster counting, weak lensing, galaxy angular correlations, and Type Ia supernovae, supported by precision photometric redshifts. Here, we describe code developed to calibrate additional standard star fields in the DES natural grizY system, and we describe our initial results using the data obtained during the DES Science Verification Phase. Some of these standard stars will be used to supplement those currently being used for nightly calibrations. Others are to be used as local tertiary standards scattered throughout the DES footprint in order to anchor the DES global relative calibrations against large-scale spatial gradients, as well as to tie the whole DES data set to an initial absolute flux scale.

  11. From Darkness to Light: Observing the First Stars and Galaxies with the Redshifted 21-cm Line using the Dark Ages Radio Explorer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, Jack O.; Lazio, Joseph; Bowman, Judd D.; Bradley, Richard F.; Datta, Abhirup; Furlanetto, Steven; Jones, Dayton L.; Kasper, Justin; Loeb, Abraham; Harker, Geraint

    2015-01-01

    The Dark Ages Radio Explorer (DARE) will reveal when the first stars, black holes, and galaxies formed in the early Universe and will define their characteristics, from the Dark Ages (z=35) to the Cosmic Dawn (z=11). This epoch of the Universe has never been directly observed. The DARE science instrument is composed of electrically-short bi-conical dipole antennas, a correlation receiver, and a digital spectrometer that measures the sky-averaged, low frequency (40-120 MHz) spectral features from the highly redshifted 21-cm HI line that surrounds the first objects. These observations are possible because DARE will orbit the Moon at an altitude of 125 km and takes data when it is above the radio-quiet, ionosphere-free, solar-shielded lunar farside. DARE executes the small-scale mission described in the NASA Astrophysics Roadmap (p. 83): 'mapping the Universe's hydrogen clouds using 21-cm radio wavelengths via lunar orbiter from the farside of the Moon'. This mission will address four key science questions: (1) When did the first stars form and what were their characteristics? (2) When did the first accreting black holes form and what was their characteristic mass? (3) When did reionization begin? (4) What surprises emerged from the Dark Ages (e.g., Dark Matter decay). DARE uniquely complements other major telescopes including Planck, JWST, and ALMA by bridging the gap between the smooth Universe seen via the CMB and rich web of galaxy structures seen with optical/IR/mm telescopes. Support for the development of this mission concept was provided by the Office of the Director, NASA Ames Research Center and by JPL/Caltech.

  12. Carbon-enhanced metal-poor stars: relics from the dark ages

    SciTech Connect

    Cooke, Ryan J.; Madau, Piero

    2014-08-20

    We use detailed nucleosynthesis calculations and a realistic prescription for the environment of the first stars to explore the first episodes of chemical enrichment that occurred during the dark ages. Based on these calculations, we propose a novel explanation for the increased prevalence of carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) stars with decreasing Fe abundance: the observed chemistry for the most metal-poor Galactic halo stars is the result of an intimate link between the explosions of the first stars and their host minihalo's ability to retain its gas. Specifically, high-energy supernovae produce a near solar ratio of C/Fe, but are effective in evacuating the gas from their host minihalo, thereby suppressing the formation of a second generation of stars. On the other hand, minihalos that host low-energy supernovae are able to retain their gas and form a second stellar generation, but, as a result, the second stars are born with a supersolar ratio of C/Fe. Our models are able to accurately reproduce the observed distributions of [C/Fe] and [Fe/H], as well as the fraction of CEMP stars relative to non-CEMP stars as a function of [Fe/H] without any free parameters. We propose that the present lack of chemical evidence for very massive stars (≳ 140 M {sub ☉}) that ended their lives as a highly energetic pair-instability supernova does not imply that such stars were rare or did not exist; the chemical products of these very massive first stars may have been evacuated from their host minihalos and were never incorporated into subsequent generations of stars. Finally, our models suggest that the most Fe-poor stars currently known may have seen the enrichment from a small multiple of metal-free stars, and need not have been exclusively enriched by a solitary first star. These calculations also add further support to the possibility that some of the surviving dwarf satellite galaxies of the Milky Way are the relics of the first galaxies.

  13. Star/galaxy separation at faint magnitudes: Application to a simulated Dark Energy Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Soumagnac, M.T.; et al.

    2013-06-21

    We address the problem of separating stars from galaxies in future large photometric surveys. We focus our analysis on simulations of the Dark Energy Survey (DES). In the first part of the paper, we derive the science requirements on star/galaxy separation, for measurement of the cosmological parameters with the Gravitational Weak Lensing and Large Scale Structure probes. These requirements are dictated by the need to control both the statistical and systematic errors on the cosmological parameters, and by Point Spread Function calibration. We formulate the requirements in terms of the completeness and purity provided by a given star/galaxy classifier. In order to achieve these requirements at faint magnitudes, we propose a new method for star/galaxy separation in the second part of the paper. We first use Principal Component Analysis to outline the correlations between the objects parameters and extract from it the most relevant information. We then use the reduced set of parameters as input to an Artificial Neural Network. This multi-parameter approach improves upon purely morphometric classifiers (such as the classifier implemented in SExtractor), especially at faint magnitudes: it increases the purity by up to 20% for stars and by up to 12% for galaxies, at i-magnitude fainter than 23.

  14. Dark matter candidates

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, M.S.

    1989-01-01

    One of the simplest, yet most profound, questions we can ask about the Universe is, how much stuff is in it, and further what is that stuff composed of. Needless to say, the answer to this question has very important implications for the evolution of the Universe, determining both the ultimate fate and the course of structure formation. Remarkably, at this late date in the history of the Universe we still do not have a definitive answer to this simplest of questions---although we have some very intriguing clues. It is known with certainty that most of the material in the Universe is dark, and we have the strong suspicion that the dominant component of material in the Cosmos is not baryons, but rather is exotic relic elementary particles left over from the earliest, very hot epoch of the Universe. If true, the Dark Matter question is a most fundamental one facing both particle physics and cosmology. The leading particle dark matter candidates are: the axion, the neutralino, and a light neutrino species. All three candidates are accessible to experimental tests, and experiments are now in progress. In addition, there are several dark horse, long shot, candidates, including the superheavy magnetic monopole and soliton stars. 13 refs.

  15. Far-infrared observations of a star-forming region in the Corona Australis dark cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruz-Gonzalez, I.; Mcbreen, B.; Fazio, G. G.

    1984-01-01

    A high-resolution far-IR (40-250-micron) survey of a 0.9-sq-deg section of the core region of the Corona Australis dark cloud (containing very young stellar objects such as T Tauri stars, Herbig Ae and Be stars, Herbig-Haro objects, and compact H II regions) is presented. Two extended far-IR sources were found, one associated with the Herbig emission-line star R CrA and the other with the irregular emission-line variable star TY CrA. The two sources have substantially more far-IR radiation than could be expected from a blackbody extrapolation of their near-IR fluxes. The total luminosities of these sources are 145 and 58 solar luminosity, respectively, implying that the embedded objects are of intermediate or low mass. The infrared observations of the sources associated with R CrA and TY CrA are consistent with models of the evolution of protostellar envelopes of intermediate mass. However, the TY CrA source appears to have passed the evolutionary stage of expelling most of the hot dust near the central source, yielding an age of about 1 Myr.

  16. Light chiral dark sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harigaya, Keisuke; Nomura, Yasunori

    2016-08-01

    An interesting possibility for dark matter is a scalar particle of mass of order 10 MeV-1 GeV, interacting with a U (1 ) gauge boson (dark photon) which mixes with the photon. We present a simple and natural model realizing this possibility. The dark matter arises as a composite pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone boson (dark pion) in a non-Abelian gauge sector, which also gives a mass to the dark photon. For a fixed non-Abelian gauge group, S U (N ) , and a U (1 ) charge of the constituent dark quarks, the model has only three free parameters: the dynamical scale of the non-Abelian gauge theory, the gauge coupling of the dark photon, and the mixing parameter between the dark and standard model photons. In particular, the gauge symmetry of the model does not allow any mass term for the dark quarks, and the stability of the dark pion is understood as a result of an accidental global symmetry. The model has a significant parameter space in which thermal relic dark pions comprise all of the dark matter, consistently with all experimental and cosmological constraints. In a corner of the parameter space, the discrepancy of the muon g -2 between experiments and the standard model prediction can also be ameliorated due to a loop contribution of the dark photon. Smoking-gun signatures of the model include a monophoton signal from the e+e- collision into a photon and a "dark rho meson." Observation of two processes in e+e- collision—the mode into the dark photon and that into the dark rho meson—would provide strong evidence for the model.

  17. Distance to Dark Bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Using the unique orbit of NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope and a depth-perceiving trick called parallax, astronomers have determined the distance to an invisible Milky Way object called OGLE-2005-SMC-001. This artist's concept illustrates how this trick works: different views from both Spitzer and telescopes on Earth are combined to give depth perception.

    Our Milky Way galaxy is heavier than it looks, and scientists use the term 'dark matter' to describe all the 'heavy stuff' in the universe that seems to be present but invisible to our telescopes. While much of this dark matter is likely made up of exotic materials, different from the ordinary particles that make up the world around us, some may consist of dark celestial bodies -- like planets, black holes, or failed stars -- that do not produce light or are too faint to detect from Earth. OGLE-2005-SMC-001 is one of these dark celestial bodies.

    Although astronomers cannot see a dark body, they can sense its presence from the way light acts around it. When a dark body like OGLE-2005-SMC-001 passes in front of a bright star, its gravity causes the background starlight to bend and brighten, a process called gravitational microlensing. When the observing telescope, dark body, and star system are closely aligned, the microlensing event reaches maximum, or peak, brightness.

    A team of astronomers first sensed OGLE-2005-SMC-001's presence when it passed in front of a star in a neighboring satellite galaxy called the Small Magellanic Cloud. In this artist's rendering, the satellite galaxy is depicted as the fuzzy structure sitting to the left of Earth. Once they detected this microlensing event, the scientists used Spitzer and the principle of parallax to figure out its distance. Humans naturally use parallax to determine distance. Each eye sees the distance of an object differently. The brain takes each eye's perspective and instantaneously calculates how far away the object is.

    To determine OGLE

  18. Nonthermal Supermassive Dark Matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, Daniel J. H.; Kolb, Edward W.; Riotto, Antonio

    1999-01-01

    We discuss several cosmological production mechanisms for nonthermal supermassive dark matter and argue that dark matter may he elementary particles of mass much greater than the weak scale. Searches for dark matter should ma be limited to weakly interacting particles with mass of the order of the weak scale, but should extend into the supermassive range as well.

  19. NUV Detector Dark Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Wei

    2010-09-01

    Perform routine monitoring of MAMA detector dark current. The main purpose isto look for evidence of a change in the dark rates, both to track on-orbit timedependence and to check for a detector problem developing. The spatial distribution of dark rates on the detector and the effect of SAA will also be studied.

  20. NUV Detector Dark Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ely, Justin

    2013-10-01

    Perform routine monitoring of MAMA detector dark current. The main purpose isto look for evidence of a change in the dark rates, both to track on-orbit timedependence and to check for a detector problem developing. The spatial distribution of dark rates on the detector and the effect of SAA will also be studied.

  1. NUV Detector Dark Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ely, Justin

    2012-10-01

    Perform routine monitoring of MAMA detector dark current. The main purpose isto look for evidence of a change in the dark rates, both to track on-orbit timedependence and to check for a detector problem developing. The spatial distribution of dark rates on the detector and the effect of SAA will also be studied.

  2. NUV Detector Dark Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Colin

    2011-10-01

    Perform routine monitoring of MAMA detector dark current. The main purpose isto look for evidence of a change in the dark rates, both to track on-orbit timedependence and to check for a detector problem developing. The spatial distribution of dark rates on the detector and the effect of SAA will also be studied.

  3. Coupling dark energy to dark matter inhomogeneities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marra, Valerio

    2016-09-01

    We propose that dark energy in the form of a scalar field could effectively couple to dark matter inhomogeneities. Through this coupling energy could be transferred to/from the scalar field, which could possibly enter an accelerated regime. Though phenomenological, this scenario is interesting as it provides a natural trigger for the onset of the acceleration of the universe, since dark energy starts driving the expansion of the universe when matter inhomogeneities become sufficiently strong. Here we study a possible realization of this idea by coupling dark energy to dark matter via the linear growth function of matter perturbations. The numerical results show that it is indeed possible to obtain a viable cosmology with the expected series of radiation, matter and dark-energy dominated eras. In particular, the current density of dark energy is given by the value of the coupling parameters rather than by very special initial conditions for the scalar field. In other words, this model-unlike standard models of cosmic late acceleration-does not suffer from the so-called "coincidence problem" and its related fine tuning of initial conditions.

  4. Physical properties of star clusters in the outer LMC as observed by the Dark Energy Survey

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Pieres, A.; et al.

    2016-05-26

    The Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) harbors a rich and diverse system of star clusters, whose ages, chemical abundances, and positions provide information about the LMC history of star formation. We use Science Verification imaging data from the Dark Energy Survey to increase the census of known star clusters in the outer LMC and to derive physical parameters for a large sample of such objects using a spatially and photometrically homogeneous data set. Our sample contains 255 visually identified cluster candidates, of which 109 were not listed in any previous catalog. We quantify the crowding effect for the stellar sample producedmore » by the DES Data Management pipeline and conclude that the stellar completeness is < 10% inside typical LMC cluster cores. We therefore develop a pipeline to sample and measure stellar magnitudes and positions around the cluster candidates using DAOPHOT. We also implement a maximum-likelihood method to fit individual density profiles and colour-magnitude diagrams. For 117 (from a total of 255) of the cluster candidates (28 uncatalogued clusters), we obtain reliable ages, metallicities, distance moduli and structural parameters, confirming their nature as physical systems. The distribution of cluster metallicities shows a radial dependence, with no clusters more metal-rich than [Fe/H] ~ -0.7 beyond 8 kpc from the LMC center. The age distribution has two peaks at ~ 1.2 Gyr and ~ 2.7 Gyr.« less

  5. The Dark Matter Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Robert H.

    2014-02-01

    1. Introduction; 2. Early history of the dark matter hypothesis; 3. The stability of disk galaxies: the dark halo solutions; 4. Direct evidence: extended rotation curves of spiral galaxies; 5. The maximum disk: light traces mass; 6. Cosmology and the birth of astroparticle physics; 7. Clusters revisited: missing mass found; 8. CDM confronts galaxy rotation curves; 9. The new cosmology: dark matter is not enough; 10. An alternative to dark matter: Modified Newtonian Dynamics; 11. Seeing dark matter: the theory and practice of detection; 12. Reflections: a personal point of view; Appendix; References; Index.

  6. The Average Star Formation Histories of Galaxies in Dark Matter Halos from z = 0-8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behroozi, Peter S.; Wechsler, Risa H.; Conroy, Charlie

    2013-06-01

    We present a robust method to constrain average galaxy star formation rates (SFRs), star formation histories (SFHs), and the intracluster light (ICL) as a function of halo mass. Our results are consistent with observed galaxy stellar mass functions, specific star formation rates (SSFRs), and cosmic star formation rates (CSFRs) from z = 0 to z = 8. We consider the effects of a wide range of uncertainties on our results, including those affecting stellar masses, SFRs, and the halo mass function at the heart of our analysis. As they are relevant to our method, we also present new calibrations of the dark matter halo mass function, halo mass accretion histories, and halo-subhalo merger rates out to z = 8. We also provide new compilations of CSFRs and SSFRs; more recent measurements are now consistent with the buildup of the cosmic stellar mass density at all redshifts. Implications of our work include: halos near 1012 M ⊙ are the most efficient at forming stars at all redshifts, the baryon conversion efficiency of massive halos drops markedly after z ~ 2.5 (consistent with theories of cold-mode accretion), the ICL for massive galaxies is expected to be significant out to at least z ~ 1-1.5, and dwarf galaxies at low redshifts have higher stellar mass to halo mass ratios than previous expectations and form later than in most theoretical models. Finally, we provide new fitting formulae for SFHs that are more accurate than the standard declining tau model. Our approach places a wide variety of observations relating to the SFH of galaxies into a self-consistent framework based on the modern understanding of structure formation in ΛCDM. Constraints on the stellar mass-halo mass relationship and SFRs are available for download online.

  7. The First dark microhalos

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, HongSheng; Taylor, James E.; Silk, Joseph; Hooper, Dan; /Oxford U. /Fermilab

    2005-08-01

    Earth-mass dark matter halos are likely to have been the first bound structures to form in the Universe. Whether such objects have survived to the present day in galaxies depends on, among other factors, the rate of encounters with normal stars. In this letter, we estimate the amount of tidal heating and mass loss in microhalos as a result of stellar encounters. We find that while microhalos are only mildly heated in dwarf galaxies of low stellar density, and they should have been completely destroyed in bulge or M32-like regions of high stellar density. In disk galaxies, such as the Milky Way, the disruption rate depends strongly on the orbital parameters of the microhalo; while stochastic radial orbits in triaxial Galactic potential are destroyed first, systems on non-planar retrograde orbits with large pericenters survive the longest. Since many microhalos lose a significant fraction of their material to unbound tidal streams, the final dark matter distribution in the solar neighborhood is better described as a superposition of microstreams rather than as a set of discrete spherical clumps in an otherwise homogeneous medium. Different morphologies of microhalos have implications for direct and indirect dark matter detection experiments.

  8. Dark matter superfluid and DBI dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Rong-Gen; Wang, Shao-Jiang

    2016-01-01

    It was shown recently that, without jeopardizing the success of the Λ cold dark matter model on cosmic scales, the modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND) can be derived as an emergent phenomenon when axionlike dark matter particles condense into superfluid on the galactic scales. We propose in this paper a Dirac-Born-Infeld (DBI) scalar field conformally coupled to the matter components. To maintain the success of MOND phenomenon of dark matter superfluid on the galactic scales, the fifth force introduced by the DBI scalar should be screened on the galactic scales. It turns out that the screening effect naturally leads to a simple explanation for a longstanding puzzle that the MOND critical acceleration coincides with present Hubble scale. This galactic coincidence problem is solved, provided that the screened DBI scalar also plays the role of dark energy on the cosmic scales.

  9. The darkness of spin-0 dark radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, M.C. David

    2015-01-01

    We show that the scattering of a general spin-0 sector of dark radiation off the pre-recombination thermal plasma results in undetectably small spectral distortions of the Cosmic Microwave Background.

  10. Dark Forces and Light Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Hooper, Dan; Weiner, Neal; Xue, Wei

    2012-09-01

    We consider a simple class of models in which the dark matter, X, is coupled to a new gauge boson, phi, with a relatively low mass (m_phi \\sim 100 MeV-3 GeV). Neither the dark matter nor the new gauge boson have tree-level couplings to the Standard Model. The dark matter in this model annihilates to phi pairs, and for a coupling of g_X \\sim 0.06 (m_X/10 GeV)^1/2 yields a thermal relic abundance consistent with the cosmological density of dark matter. The phi's produced in such annihilations decay through a small degree of kinetic mixing with the photon to combinations of Standard Model leptons and mesons. For dark matter with a mass of \\sim10 GeV, the shape of the resulting gamma-ray spectrum provides a good fit to that observed from the Galactic Center, and can also provide the very hard electron spectrum required to account for the observed synchrotron emission from the Milky Way's radio filaments. For kinetic mixing near the level naively expected from loop-suppressed operators (epsilon \\sim 10^{-4}), the dark matter is predicted to scatter elastically with protons with a cross section consistent with that required to accommodate the signals reported by DAMA/LIBRA, CoGeNT and CRESST-II.

  11. The mutual interaction between Population III stars and self-annihilating dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stacy, Athena; Pawlik, Andreas H.; Bromm, Volker; Loeb, Abraham

    2014-06-01

    We use cosmological simulations of high-redshift minihaloes to investigate the effect of dark matter annihilation (DMA) on the collapse of primordial gas. We numerically investigate the evolution of the gas as it assembles in a Population III stellar disc. We find that when DMA effects are neglected, the disc undergoes multiple fragmentation events beginning at ˜500 yr after the appearance of the first protostar. On the other hand, DMA heating and ionization of the gas speeds the initial collapse of gas to protostellar densities and also affects the stability of the developing disc against fragmentation, depending on the DM distribution. We compare the evolution when we model the DM density with an analytical DM profile which remains centrally peaked, and when we simulate the DM profile using N-body particles (the `live' DM halo). When utilizing the analytical DM profile, DMA suppresses disc fragmentation for ˜3500 yr after the first protostar forms, in agreement with earlier work. However, when using a `live' DM halo, the central DM density peak is gradually flattened due to the mutual interaction between the DM and the rotating gaseous disc, reducing the effects of DMA on the gas, and enabling secondary protostars of mass ˜1 M⊙ to be formed within ˜900 yr. These simulations demonstrate that DMA is ineffective in suppressing gas collapse and subsequent fragmentation, rendering the formation of long-lived dark stars unlikely. However, DMA effects may still be significant in the early collapse and disc formation phase of primordial gas evolution.

  12. Radial systems of dark globules

    SciTech Connect

    Gyul'budagyn, A.L.

    1986-03-01

    The author gives examples of radial systems consisting of dark globules and ''elephant trunks''. Besides already known systems, which contain hot stars at their center, data are given on three radial systems of a new kind, at the center of which there are stars of spectral types later than B. Data are given on 32 globules of radial systems of the association Cep OB2. On the basis of the observational data, it is concluded that at least some of the isolated Bok globules derive from elephant trunks and dark globules forming radial systems around hot stars. It is also suggested that the two molecular clouds situated near the Rosette nebula and possessing velocities differing by ca 20 km/sec from the velocity of the nebula could have been ejected in opposite directions from the center of the nebula. One of these clouds consists of dark globules forming the radial system of the Rosette nebula.

  13. Reionization and dark matter decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldengott, Isabel M.; Boriero, Daniel; Schwarz, Dominik J.

    2016-08-01

    Cosmic reionization and dark matter decay can impact observations of the cosmic microwave sky in a similar way. A simultaneous study of both effects is required to constrain unstable dark matter from cosmic microwave background observations. We compare two reionization models with and without dark matter decay. We find that a reionization model that fits also data from quasars and star forming galaxies results in tighter constraints on the reionization optical depth τreio, but weaker constraints on the spectral index ns than the conventional parametrization. We use the Planck 2015 data to constrain the effective decay rate of dark matter to Γeff < 2.9 × 10-25/s at 95% C.L. This limit is robust and model independent. It holds for any type of decaying dark matter and it depends only weakly on the chosen parametrization of astrophysical reionization. For light dark matter particles that decay exclusively into electromagnetic components this implies a limit of Γ < 5.3 × 10-26/s at 95% C.L. Specifying the decay channels, we apply our result to the case of keV-mass sterile neutrinos as dark matter candidates and obtain constraints on their mixing angle and mass, which are comparable to the ones from the diffuse X-ray background.

  14. Reionization and dark matter decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldengott, Isabel M.; Boriero, Daniel; Schwarz, Dominik J.

    2016-08-01

    Cosmic reionization and dark matter decay can impact observations of the cosmic microwave sky in a similar way. A simultaneous study of both effects is required to constrain unstable dark matter from cosmic microwave background observations. We compare two reionization models with and without dark matter decay. We find that a reionization model that fits also data from quasars and star forming galaxies results in tighter constraints on the reionization optical depth τreio, but weaker constraints on the spectral index ns than the conventional parametrization. We use the Planck 2015 data to constrain the effective decay rate of dark matter to Γeff < 2.9 × 10‑25/s at 95% C.L. This limit is robust and model independent. It holds for any type of decaying dark matter and it depends only weakly on the chosen parametrization of astrophysical reionization. For light dark matter particles that decay exclusively into electromagnetic components this implies a limit of Γ < 5.3 × 10‑26/s at 95% C.L. Specifying the decay channels, we apply our result to the case of keV-mass sterile neutrinos as dark matter candidates and obtain constraints on their mixing angle and mass, which are comparable to the ones from the diffuse X-ray background.

  15. Neutrinos and dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Ibarra, Alejandro

    2015-07-15

    Neutrinos could be key particles to unravel the nature of the dark matter of the Universe. On the one hand, sterile neutrinos in minimal extensions of the Standard Model are excellent dark matter candidates, producing potentially observable signals in the form of a line in the X-ray sky. On the other hand, the annihilation or the decay of dark matter particles produces, in many plausible dark matter scenarios, a neutrino flux that could be detected at neutrino telescopes, thus providing non-gravitational evidence for dark matter. More conservatively, the non-observation of a significant excess in the neutrino fluxes with respect to the expected astrophysical backgrounds can be used to constrain dark matter properties, such as the self-annihilation cross section, the scattering cross section with nucleons and the lifetime.

  16. Cold dark matter heats up.

    PubMed

    Pontzen, Andrew; Governato, Fabio

    2014-02-13

    A principal discovery in modern cosmology is that standard model particles comprise only 5 per cent of the mass-energy budget of the Universe. In the ΛCDM paradigm, the remaining 95 per cent consists of dark energy (Λ) and cold dark matter. ΛCDM is being challenged by its apparent inability to explain the low-density 'cores' of dark matter measured at the centre of galaxies, where centrally concentrated high-density 'cusps' were predicted. But before drawing conclusions, it is necessary to include the effect of gas and stars, historically seen as passive components of galaxies. We now understand that these can inject heat energy into the cold dark matter through a coupling based on rapid gravitational potential fluctuations, explaining the observed low central densities.

  17. Tidal capture of a primordial black hole by a neutron star: implications for constraints on dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Pani, Paolo; Loeb, Abraham E-mail: aloeb@cfa.harvard.edu

    2014-06-01

    In a close encounter with a neutron star, a primordial black hole can get gravitationally captured by depositing a considerable amount of energy into nonradial stellar modes of very high angular number l. If the neutron-star equation of state is sufficiently stiff, we show that the total energy loss in the point-particle approximation is formally divergent. Various mechanisms — including viscosity, finite-size effects and the elasticity of the crust — can damp high-l modes and regularize the total energy loss. Within a short time, the black hole is trapped inside the star and disrupts it by rapid accretion. Estimating these effects, we predict that the existence of old neutron stars in regions where the dark-matter density ρ{sub DM}∼>10{sup 2}(σ/km s{sup −1}) GeV cm{sup −3} (where σ is the dark-matter velocity dispersion) limits the abundance of primordial black holes in the mass range 10{sup 17} g∼dark matter constituent.

  18. Clumpy cold dark matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silk, Joseph; Stebbins, Albert

    1993-01-01

    A study is conducted of cold dark matter (CDM) models in which clumpiness will inhere, using cosmic strings and textures suited to galaxy formation. CDM clumps of 10 million solar mass/cu pc density are generated at about z(eq) redshift, with a sizable fraction surviving. Observable implications encompass dark matter cores in globular clusters and in galactic nuclei. Results from terrestrial dark matter detection experiments may be affected by clumpiness in the Galactic halo.

  19. Interacting warm dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Cruz, Norman; Palma, Guillermo; Zambrano, David; Avelino, Arturo E-mail: guillermo.palma@usach.cl E-mail: avelino@fisica.ugto.mx

    2013-05-01

    We explore a cosmological model composed by a dark matter fluid interacting with a dark energy fluid. The interaction term has the non-linear λρ{sub m}{sup α}ρ{sub e}{sup β} form, where ρ{sub m} and ρ{sub e} are the energy densities of the dark matter and dark energy, respectively. The parameters α and β are in principle not constrained to take any particular values, and were estimated from observations. We perform an analytical study of the evolution equations, finding the fixed points and their stability properties in order to characterize suitable physical regions in the phase space of the dark matter and dark energy densities. The constants (λ,α,β) as well as w{sub m} and w{sub e} of the EoS of dark matter and dark energy respectively, were estimated using the cosmological observations of the type Ia supernovae and the Hubble expansion rate H(z) data sets. We find that the best estimated values for the free parameters of the model correspond to a warm dark matter interacting with a phantom dark energy component, with a well goodness-of-fit to data. However, using the Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC) we find that this model is overcame by a warm dark matter – phantom dark energy model without interaction, as well as by the ΛCDM model. We find also a large dispersion on the best estimated values of the (λ,α,β) parameters, so even if we are not able to set strong constraints on their values, given the goodness-of-fit to data of the model, we find that a large variety of theirs values are well compatible with the observational data used.

  20. Dark matter and cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Schramm, D.N.

    1992-03-01

    The cosmological dark matter problem is reviewed. The Big Bang Nucleosynthesis constraints on the baryon density are compared with the densities implied by visible matter, dark halos, dynamics of clusters, gravitational lenses, large-scale velocity flows, and the {Omega} = 1 flatness/inflation argument. It is shown that (1) the majority of baryons are dark; and (2) non-baryonic dark matter is probably required on large scales. It is also noted that halo dark matter could be either baryonic or non-baryonic. Descrimination between cold'' and hot'' non-baryonic candidates is shown to depend on the assumed seeds'' that stimulate structure formation. Gaussian density fluctuations, such as those induced by quantum fluctuations, favor cold dark matter, whereas topological defects such as strings, textures or domain walls may work equally or better with hot dark matter. A possible connection between cold dark matter, globular cluster ages and the Hubble constant is mentioned. Recent large-scale structure measurements, coupled with microwave anisotropy limits, are shown to raise some questions for the previously favored density fluctuation picture. Accelerator and underground limits on dark matter candidates are also reviewed.

  1. Searching for dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateo, Mario

    1994-01-01

    Three teams of astronomers believe they have independently found evidence for dark matter in our galaxy. A brief history of the search for dark matter is presented. The use of microlensing-event observation for spotting dark matter is described. The equipment required to observe microlensing events and three groups working on dark matter detection are discussed. The three groups are the Massive Compact Halo Objects (MACHO) Project team, the Experience de Recherche d'Objets Sombres (EROS) team, and the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment (OGLE) team. The first apparent detections of microlensing events by the three teams are briefly reported.

  2. Dark U (1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chia-Feng; Ma, Ernest; Yuan, Tzu-Chiang

    2015-06-01

    In this talk we will explore the possibility of adding a local U(1) dark sector to the standard model with the Higgs boson as a portal connecting the visible standard model sector and the dark one. We will discuss existing experimental constraint on the model parameters from the invisible width of Higgs decay. Implications of such a dark U(1) sector on phenomenology at the Large Hardon Collider will be addressed. In particular, detailed results for the non-standard signals of multi-lepton-jets that arise from this simple dark sector will be presented.

  3. Dark matter in cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luković, Vladimir; Cabella, Paolo; Vittorio, Nicola

    2014-07-01

    In this paper we review the main theoretical and experimental achievements in the field of dark matter from the cosmological and astrophysical point of view. We revisit it from the very first surveys of local astrophysical matter, up to the stringent constraints on matter properties, coming from the last release of data on cosmological scales. To bring closer and justify the idea of dark matter, we will go across methods and tools for measuring dark matter characteristics, and in some cases a combination of methods that provide one of the greatest direct proofs for dark matter, such as Bullet cluster.

  4. Dark matter and cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Schramm, D.N.

    1992-03-01

    The cosmological dark matter problem is reviewed. The Big Bang Nucleosynthesis constraints on the baryon density are compared with the densities implied by visible matter, dark halos, dynamics of clusters, gravitational lenses, large-scale velocity flows, and the {Omega} = 1 flatness/inflation argument. It is shown that (1) the majority of baryons are dark; and (2) non-baryonic dark matter is probably required on large scales. It is also noted that halo dark matter could be either baryonic or non-baryonic. Descrimination between ``cold`` and ``hot`` non-baryonic candidates is shown to depend on the assumed ``seeds`` that stimulate structure formation. Gaussian density fluctuations, such as those induced by quantum fluctuations, favor cold dark matter, whereas topological defects such as strings, textures or domain walls may work equally or better with hot dark matter. A possible connection between cold dark matter, globular cluster ages and the Hubble constant is mentioned. Recent large-scale structure measurements, coupled with microwave anisotropy limits, are shown to raise some questions for the previously favored density fluctuation picture. Accelerator and underground limits on dark matter candidates are also reviewed.

  5. Dark energy and extended dark matter halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernin, A. D.; Teerikorpi, P.; Valtonen, M. J.; Dolgachev, V. P.; Domozhilova, L. M.; Byrd, G. G.

    2012-03-01

    The cosmological mean matter (dark and baryonic) density measured in the units of the critical density is Ωm = 0.27. Independently, the local mean density is estimated to be Ωloc = 0.08-0.23 from recent data on galaxy groups at redshifts up to z = 0.01-0.03 (as published by Crook et al. 2007, ApJ, 655, 790 and Makarov & Karachentsev 2011, MNRAS, 412, 2498). If the lower values of Ωloc are reliable, as Makarov & Karachentsev and some other observers prefer, does this mean that the Local Universe of 100-300 Mpc across is an underdensity in the cosmic matter distribution? Or could it nevertheless be representative of the mean cosmic density or even be an overdensity due to the Local Supercluster therein. We focus on dark matter halos of groups of galaxies and check how much dark mass the invisible outer layers of the halos are able to host. The outer layers are usually devoid of bright galaxies and cannot be seen at large distances. The key factor which bounds the size of an isolated halo is the local antigravity produced by the omnipresent background of dark energy. A gravitationally bound halo does not extend beyond the zero-gravity surface where the gravity of matter and the antigravity of dark energy balance, thus defining a natural upper size of a system. We use our theory of local dynamical effects of dark energy to estimate the maximal sizes and masses of the extended dark halos. Using data from three recent catalogs of galaxy groups, we show that the calculated mass bounds conform with the assumption that a significant amount of dark matter is located in the invisible outer parts of the extended halos, sufficient to fill the gap between the observed and expected local matter density. Nearby groups of galaxies and the Virgo cluster have dark halos which seem to extend up to their zero-gravity surfaces. If the extended halo is a common feature of gravitationally bound systems on scales of galaxy groups and clusters, the Local Universe could be typical or even

  6. Asymmetric Dark Matter and Dark Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Blennow, Mattias; Martinez, Enrique Fernandez; Mena, Olga; Redondo, Javier; Serra, Paolo E-mail: enfmarti@cern.ch E-mail: redondo@mppmu.mpg.de

    2012-07-01

    Asymmetric Dark Matter (ADM) models invoke a particle-antiparticle asymmetry, similar to the one observed in the Baryon sector, to account for the Dark Matter (DM) abundance. Both asymmetries are usually generated by the same mechanism and generally related, thus predicting DM masses around 5 GeV in order to obtain the correct density. The main challenge for successful models is to ensure efficient annihilation of the thermally produced symmetric component of such a light DM candidate without violating constraints from collider or direct searches. A common way to overcome this involves a light mediator, into which DM can efficiently annihilate and which subsequently decays into Standard Model particles. Here we explore the scenario where the light mediator decays instead into lighter degrees of freedom in the dark sector that act as radiation in the early Universe. While this assumption makes indirect DM searches challenging, it leads to signals of extra radiation at BBN and CMB. Under certain conditions, precise measurements of the number of relativistic species, such as those expected from the Planck satellite, can provide information on the structure of the dark sector. We also discuss the constraints of the interactions between DM and Dark Radiation from their imprint in the matter power spectrum.

  7. 4. DARK CANYON SIPHON VIEW ACROSS DARK CANYON AT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. DARK CANYON SIPHON - VIEW ACROSS DARK CANYON AT LOCATION OF SIPHON. VIEW TO NORTHWEST - Carlsbad Irrigation District, Dark Canyon Siphon, On Main Canal, 1 mile South of Carlsbad, Carlsbad, Eddy County, NM

  8. Dark Energy, Black Holes and Exploding Stars: NASA's Chandra Observatory Marks Five Years of Scientific Achievement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-08-01

    On Aug. 12, 1999, NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory opened its sunshade doors for the first time, allowing celestial X-ray light to reach the observatory's mirrors. This one small step for the observatory proved to be a giant leap for science as Chandra began its mission to shed new light on a violent, mysterious universe invisible to the human eye. The Marshall Center manages the Chandra program. On August 12, 1999, NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory opened its sunshade doors for the first time, allowing celestial X-ray light to reach the observatory's mirrors. This one small step for the observatory proved to be a giant leap for science as Chandra began its mission to shed new light on a violent, mysterious universe invisible to the human eye. "Humans cannot see X-rays, but Chandra can," said Chandra project scientist Dr. Martin C. Weisskopf of NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala. "And what the observatory has revealed in five short years has been nothing short of amazing. Thanks to Chandra, we've gleaned new information on dark energy, black holes, exploding stars and all other categories of astronomical objects." "Chandra's resolving power is equivalent to the ability to read a newspaper headline a half-mile away," said Chandra Program Manager Keith Hefner of the Marshall Center. "It's an engineering marvel that has performed nearly flawlessly and provided major science discoveries over the past five years." A Chandra timeline reveals some of its most noteworthy discoveries: * Chandra finds a ring around the Crab Nebula. After only two months in space, the observatory reveals a brilliant ring around the heart of the Crab Pulsar in the Crab Nebula - the remains of a stellar explosion - providing clues about how the nebula is energized by a pulsing neutron, or collapsed, star. (Sept. 28, 1999) * Chandra reveals a possible black hole in the Milky Way. Culminating 25 years of searching by astronomers, researchers say that a faint X-ray source, newly

  9. Understanding the Star Formation Process in the Filamentary Dark Cloud GF 9: Near-Infrared Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciardi, David R.; Woodward, Charles E.; Clemens, Dan P.; Harker, David E.; Rudy, Richard J.

    1998-01-01

    We have performed a near-infrared JHK survey of a dense core and a diffuse filament region within the filamentary dark cloud GF 9 (LDN 1082). The core region is associated with the IRAS point source PSC 20503+6006 and is suspected of being a site of star formation. The diffuse filament region has no associated IRAS point sources and is likely quiescent. We find that neither the core nor the filament region appears to contain a Class I or Class II young stellar object. As traced by the dust extinction, the core and filament regions contain 26 and 22 solar mass, respectively, with an average H2 volume density for both regions of approximately 2500/cu cm. The core region contains a centrally condensed extinction maximum with a peak extinction of A(sub v) greater than or approximately equal to 10 mag that appears to be associated with the IRAS point source. The average H2 volume density of the extinction core is approximately 8000/cu cm. The dust within the filament, however, shows no sign of a central condensation and is consistent with a uniform-density cylindrical distribution.

  10. Dark Energy Camera for Blanco

    SciTech Connect

    Binder, Gary A.; /Caltech /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    In order to make accurate measurements of dark energy, a system is needed to monitor the focus and alignment of the Dark Energy Camera (DECam) to be located on the Blanco 4m Telescope for the upcoming Dark Energy Survey. One new approach under development is to fit out-of-focus star images to a point spread function from which information about the focus and tilt of the camera can be obtained. As a first test of a new algorithm using this idea, simulated star images produced from a model of DECam in the optics software Zemax were fitted. Then, real images from the Mosaic II imager currently installed on the Blanco telescope were used to investigate the algorithm's capabilities. A number of problems with the algorithm were found, and more work is needed to understand its limitations and improve its capabilities so it can reliably predict camera alignment and focus.

  11. The Light and Dark Face of a Star-Forming Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-03-01

    Today, ESO is unveiling an image of the little known Gum 19, a faint nebula that, in the infrared, appears dark on one half and bright on the other. On one side hot hydrogen gas is illuminated by a supergiant blue star called V391 Velorum. New star formation is taking place within the ribbon of luminous and dark material that brackets V391 Velorum's left in this perspective. After many millennia, these fledgling stars, coupled with the explosive demise of V391 Velorum as a supernova, will likely alter Gum 19's present Janus-like appearance. Gum 19 is located in the direction of the constellation Vela (the Sail) at a distance of approximately 22 000 light years. The Gum 19 moniker derives from a 1955 publication by the Australian astrophysicist Colin S. Gum that served as the first significant survey of so-called HII (read "H-two") regions in the southern sky. HII refers to hydrogen gas that is ionised, or energised to the extent that the hydrogen atoms lose their electrons. Such regions emit light at well-defined wavelengths (or colours), thereby giving these cosmic clouds their characteristic glow. And indeed, much like terrestrial clouds, the shapes and textures of these HII regions change as time passes, though over the course of eons rather than before our eyes. For now, Gum 19 has somewhat of a science fiction-esque, "rip in spacetime" look to it in this image, with a narrow, near-vertical bright region slashing across the nebula. Looking at it, you could possibly see a resemblance to a two-toned angelfish or an arrow with a darkened point. This new image of the evocative Gum 19 object was captured by an infrared instrument called SOFI, mounted on ESO's New Technology Telescope (NTT) that operates at the La Silla Observatory in Chile. SOFI stands for Son of ISAAC, after the "father" instrument, ISAAC, that is located at ESO's Very Large Telescope observatory at Paranal to the north of La Silla. Observing this nebula in the infrared allows astronomers to see

  12. Working the Dark Edges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weston, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    Environmentalism's wider and wilder possibilities today appear as regions of seeming darkness that bracket or frame acceptable environmental thinking. One of these barely-mentionable darknesses is outer space--the cosmos. Another is the inner and chthonic powers of the land and natural beings generally. This essay aims to bring these two kinds of…

  13. Dark Energy, or Worse

    ScienceCinema

    Professor Sean Carroll

    2016-07-12

    General relativity is inconsistent with cosmological observations unless we invoke components of dark matter and dark energy that dominate the universe. While it seems likely that these exotic substances really do exist, the alternative is worth considering: that Einstein's general relativity breaks down on cosmological scales. I will discuss models of modified gravity, tests in the solar system and elsewhere, and consequences for cosmology.

  14. The dark halo of the milky Way

    PubMed

    Alcock

    2000-01-01

    Most of the matter in the Milky Way is invisible to astronomers. Precise numbers are elusive, but it appears that the dark component is 20 times as massive as the visible disk of stars and gas. This dark matter is distributed in space differently than the stars, forming a vast, diffuse halo, more spherical than disklike, which occupies more than 1000 times the volume of the disk of stars. The composition of this dark halo is unknown, but it may comprise a mixture of ancient, degenerate dwarf stars and exotic, hypothetical elementary particles.

  15. Cold dark matter halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubinski, John Joseph

    The dark halos arising in the Cold Dark Matter (CDM) cosmology are simulated to investigate the relationship between the structure and kinematics of dark halos and galaxies. Realistic cosmological initial conditions and tidal field boundary conditions are used in N-body simulations of the collapse of density peaks to form dark halos. The core radii of dark halos are no greater than the softening radius, rs = 1.4 kpc. The density profiles can be fit with an analytical Hernquist (1990) profile with an effective power law which varies between -1 in the center to -4 at large radii. The rotation curves of dark halos resemble the flat rotation curves of spiral galaxies in the observed range, 1.5 approximately less than r approximately less than 30 kpc. The halos are strongly triaxial and very flat with (c/a) = 0.50 and (b/a) = 0.71. The distribution of ellipticities for dark halos reaches a maximum at epsilon = 0.5 in contrast to the distribution for elliptical galaxies which peaks at epsilon = 0.2 suggesting that ellipticals are much rounder than dark halos. Dark halos are generally flatter than their progenitor density peaks. The final shape and orientation of a dark halo are largely determined by tidal torquing and are sensitive to changes in the strength and orientation of a tidal field. Dark halos are pressure supported objects with negligible rotational support as indicated by the mean dimensionless spin, lamda = 0.042 +/- 0.024. The angular momentum vector tends to align with the true minor axis of dark halos. Elliptical galaxies have a similar behavior implied by the observation of the tendency for alignment of the rotation vector and the apparent minor axis. The origin of this behavior may be traced to the tendency for tidal torques to misalign with the major axis of a density peak. Tidal torques are found to isotropize the velocity ellipsoids of dark halos at large radii, contrary to the expectation of radially anisotropic velocity ellipsoids in cold collapse

  16. Resonant SIMP dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Soo-Min; Lee, Hyun Min

    2016-07-01

    We consider a resonant SIMP dark matter in models with two singlet complex scalar fields charged under a local dark U(1)D. After the U(1)D is broken down to a Z5 discrete subgroup, the lighter scalar field becomes a SIMP dark matter which has the enhanced 3 → 2 annihilation cross section near the resonance of the heavier scalar field. Bounds on the SIMP self-scattering cross section and the relic density can be fulfilled at the same time for perturbative couplings of SIMP. A small gauge kinetic mixing between the SM hypercharge and dark gauge bosons can be used to make SIMP dark matter in kinetic equilibrium with the SM during freeze-out.

  17. Fingerprinting dark energy

    SciTech Connect

    Sapone, Domenico; Kunz, Martin

    2009-10-15

    Dark energy perturbations are normally either neglected or else included in a purely numerical way, obscuring their dependence on underlying parameters like the equation of state or the sound speed. However, while many different explanations for the dark energy can have the same equation of state, they usually differ in their perturbations so that these provide a fingerprint for distinguishing between different models with the same equation of state. In this paper we derive simple yet accurate approximations that are able to characterize a specific class of models (encompassing most scalar-field models) which is often generically called 'dark energy'. We then use the approximate solutions to look at the impact of the dark energy perturbations on the dark matter power spectrum and on the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect in the cosmic microwave background radiation.

  18. Dark matter in NGC 4472

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewenstein, Michael

    1992-01-01

    An attempt is made to constrain the total mass distribution of the giant elliptical galaxy NGC 4472 by constructing simultaneous equilibrium models for the gas and stars. Emphasis is given to reconciling the value of the emission-weighted average value of kT derived from the Ginga spectrum with the amount of dark matter needed to account for velocity dispersion observations.

  19. A LUMINOUS BLUE VARIABLE STAR INTERACTING WITH A NEARBY INFRARED DARK CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Palau, Aina; Girart, Josep M.; Rizzo, J. Ricardo; Henkel, Christian

    2014-04-01

    G79.29+0.46 is a nebula created by a luminous blue variable (LBV) star candidate characterized by two almost circular concentric shells. In order to investigate whether the shells are interacting with the infrared dark cloud (IRDC) G79.3+0.3 located at the southwestern border of the inner shell, we conducted Jansky Very Large Array observations of NH{sub 3}(1, 1), (2, 2) and c-C{sub 3}H{sub 2}, and combined them with previous Effelsberg data. The overall NH{sub 3} emission consists of one main clump, named G79A, elongated following the shape of the IRDC, plus two fainter and smaller cores to the north, which spatially match the inner infrared shell. We analyzed the NH{sub 3} spectra at each position with detected emission and inferred linewidth, rotational temperature, column density, and abundance maps, and find that: (1) the linewidth of NH{sub 3}(1, 1) in the northern cores is 0.5 km s{sup –1}, slightly larger than in their surroundings; (2) the NH{sub 3} abundance is enhanced by almost one order of magnitude toward the northwestern side of G79A; (3) there is one ''hot slab'' at the interface between the inner infrared shell and the NH{sub 3} peak of G79A; and (4) the western and southern edges of G79A present chemical differentiation, with c-C{sub 3}H{sub 2} tracing more external layers than NH{sub 3}, similar to what is found in photon-dominated regions. Overall, the kinematics and physical conditions of G79A are consistent with both shock-induced and UV radiation-induced chemistry driven by the LBV star. Therefore, the IRDC is not likely associated with the star-forming region DR15, but located farther away, near G79.29+0.46 at 1.4 kpc.

  20. Through a glass, darkly.

    PubMed

    Rittenberry, Ronnie

    2005-10-01

    The technology available in today's auto-darkening welding helmets was the stuff of science fiction to welders 30 years ago. A single lens capable of darkening automatically to a variable, preset shade level the instant an arc is struck would have sounded about as realistic as a "Star Trek"-style "transporter" or a cell phone that can take pictures. "It would have been complete and total science fiction," said Kevin Coughlin, president of Hoodlum Welding Gear, Minneapolis. "The technology really didn't exist, so it would be like me telling you your car will be flying in 20 years--you'd look at me and laugh. Even 25 years ago, if someone had told me [the lens] would go from clear to dark when you spark, I'd have said, 'Yeah, right, sure it does.' "

  1. A Submillimetre Study of Massive Star Formation Within the W51 Complex and Infrared Dark Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, Harriet Alice Louise

    Despite its importance the fundamental question of how massive stars form remains unanswered, with improvements to both models and observations having crucial roles to play. To quote Bate et al. (2003) computational models of star formation are limited because "conditions in molecular clouds are not sufficiently well understood to be able to select a representative sample of cloud cores for the initial conditions". It is this notion that motivates the study of the environments within Giant Molecular Clouds (GMCs) and Infrared Dark Clouds (IRDCs), known sites of massive star formation, at the clump and core level. By studying large populations of these objects, it is possible to make conclusions based on global properties. With this in mind I study the dense molecular clumps within one of the most massive GMCs in the Galaxy: the W51 GMC. New observations of the W51 GMC in the 12CO, 13CO and C18O (3-2) transitions using the HARP instrument on the JCMT are presented. With the help of the clump finding algorithm CLUMPFIND a total of 1575 dense clumps are identified of which 1130 are associated with the W51 GMC, yielding a dense mass reservoir of 1.5 × 10^5 M contained within these clumps. Of these clumps only 1% by number are found to be super-critical, yielding a super-critical clump formation efficiency of 0.5%, below current SFE estimates of the region. This indicates star formation within the W51 GMC will diminish over time although evidence from the first search for molecular outflows presents the W51 GMC in an active light with a lower limit of 14 outflows. The distribution of the outflows within the region searched found them concentrated towards the W51A region. Having much smaller sizes and masses, obtaining global properties of clumps and cores within IRDCs required studying a large sample of these objects. To do this pre-existing data from the SCUBA Legacy Catalogue was utilised to study IRDCs within a catalogues based on 8 μm data. This data identified

  2. Exothermic dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, Peter W.; Saraswat, Prashant; Harnik, Roni; Rajendran, Surjeet

    2010-09-15

    We propose a novel mechanism for dark matter to explain the observed annual modulation signal at DAMA/LIBRA which avoids existing constraints from every other dark matter direct detection experiment including CRESST, CDMS, and XENON10. The dark matter consists of at least two light states with mass {approx}few GeV and splittings {approx}5 keV. It is natural for the heavier states to be cosmologically long-lived and to make up an O(1) fraction of the dark matter. Direct detection rates are dominated by the exothermic reactions in which an excited dark matter state downscatters off of a nucleus, becoming a lower energy state. In contrast to (endothermic) inelastic dark matter, the most sensitive experiments for exothermic dark matter are those with light nuclei and low threshold energies. Interestingly, this model can also naturally account for the observed low-energy events at CoGeNT. The only significant constraint on the model arises from the DAMA/LIBRA unmodulated spectrum but it can be tested in the near future by a low-threshold analysis of CDMS-Si and possibly other experiments including CRESST, COUPP, and XENON100.

  3. Supernovae and Dark Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domínguez, I.; Bravo, E.; Piersanti, L.; Straniero, O.; Tornambé, A.

    2009-08-01

    A decade ago the observations of thermonuclear supernovae at high-redhifts showed that the expansion rate of the Universe is accelerating and since then, the evidence for cosmic acceleration has gotten stronger. This acceleration requires that the Universe is dominated by dark energy, an exotic component characterized by its negative pressure. Nowadays all the available astronomical data (i.e. thermonuclear supernovae, cosmic microwave background, barionic acoustic oscillations, large scale structure, etc.) agree that our Universe is made of about 70% of dark energy, 25% of cold dark matter and only 5% of known, familiar matter. This Universe is geometrically flat, older than previously thought, its destiny is no longer linked to its geometry but to dark energy, and we ignore about 95% of its components. To understand the nature of dark energy is probably the most fundamental problem in physics today. Current astronomical observations are compatible with dark energy being the vacuum energy. Supernovae have played a fundamental role in modern Cosmology and it is expected that they will contribute to unveil the dark energy. In order to do that it is mandatory to understand the limits of supernovae as cosmological distance indicators, improving their precision by a factor 10.

  4. [Dark matter and dark energy of the universe].

    PubMed

    Aguilar Peris, José

    2005-01-01

    At the turn of the 20th Century, the Universe was thought to consist of our solar system, the Sun, planets, satellites and comets, floating under the Milky Way. The astronomers were ignorant of the existence of galaxies, clusters, quasars and black holes. Over the last ten years the Cosmology has made remarkable progress in our understanding of the composition of the Universe: 23 per cent is in an unknown form called dark matter; 73 per cent in another form called dark energy; 3 per cent is made of free hydrogen and helium atoms; 0.5 per cent makes up all the light we see in the night including the stars, clusters and superclusters; 0.3 per cent is in free neutrino particles; and finally, 0.03 per cent is in the heavier nuclei of which the Sun, the Earth and ourselves are made. In this work we study specially the dark matter and the dark energy. The first one appears to be attached to galaxies, and astronomers agree that it is cold, meaning that the particles that make up that matter are not moving fast. Very recently astronomers discovered that a tremendous amount of the so-cahled dark energy exists and that it is pushing and accelerating the expansion of the Universe. Should this expansion continue for another 14,000 million years, the sky will darken with only a handful of galaxies remaining visible.

  5. Inflation, dark matter, and dark energy in the string landscape.

    PubMed

    Liddle, Andrew R; Ureña-López, L Arturo

    2006-10-20

    We consider the conditions needed to unify the description of dark matter, dark energy, and inflation in the context of the string landscape. We find that incomplete decay of the inflaton field gives the possibility that a single field is responsible for all three phenomena. By contrast, unifying dark matter and dark energy into a single field, separate from the inflaton, appears rather difficult.

  6. Inflatable Dark Matter.

    PubMed

    Davoudiasl, Hooman; Hooper, Dan; McDermott, Samuel D

    2016-01-22

    We describe a general scenario, dubbed "inflatable dark matter," in which the density of dark matter particles can be reduced through a short period of late-time inflation in the early Universe. The overproduction of dark matter that is predicted within many, otherwise, well-motivated models of new physics can be elegantly remedied within this context. Thermal relics that would, otherwise, be disfavored can easily be accommodated within this class of scenarios, including dark matter candidates that are very heavy or very light. Furthermore, the nonthermal abundance of grand unified theory or Planck scale axions can be brought to acceptable levels without invoking anthropic tuning of initial conditions. A period of late-time inflation could have occurred over a wide range of scales from ∼MeV to the weak scale or above, and could have been triggered by physics within a hidden sector, with small but not necessarily negligible couplings to the standard model.

  7. Ghost dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Furukawa, Tomonori; Yokoyama, Shuichiro; Ichiki, Kiyotomo; Sugiyama, Naoshi; Mukohyama, Shinji E-mail: shu@a.phys.nagoya-u.ac.jp E-mail: naoshi@a.phys.nagoya-u.ac.jp

    2010-05-01

    We revisit ghost dark matter, the possibility that ghost condensation may serve as an alternative to dark matter. In particular, we investigate the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) background evolution and the large-scale structure (LSS) in the ΛGDM universe, i.e. a late-time universe dominated by a cosmological constant and ghost dark matter. The FRW background of the ΛGDM universe is indistinguishable from that of the standard ΛCDM universe if M∼>1eV, where M is the scale of spontaneous Lorentz breaking. From the LSS we find a stronger bound: M∼>10eV. For smaller M, ghost dark matter would have non-negligible sound speed after the matter-radiation equality, and thus the matter power spectrum would significantly differ from observation. These bounds are compatible with the phenomenological upper bound M∼<100GeV known in the literature.

  8. Elastically Decoupling Dark Matter.

    PubMed

    Kuflik, Eric; Perelstein, Maxim; Lorier, Nicolas Rey-Le; Tsai, Yu-Dai

    2016-06-01

    We present a novel dark matter candidate, an elastically decoupling relic, which is a cold thermal relic whose present abundance is determined by the cross section of its elastic scattering on standard model particles. The dark matter candidate is predicted to have a mass ranging from a few to a few hundred MeV, and an elastic scattering cross section with electrons, photons and/or neutrinos in the 10^{-3}-1  fb range. PMID:27314712

  9. Elastically Decoupling Dark Matter.

    PubMed

    Kuflik, Eric; Perelstein, Maxim; Lorier, Nicolas Rey-Le; Tsai, Yu-Dai

    2016-06-01

    We present a novel dark matter candidate, an elastically decoupling relic, which is a cold thermal relic whose present abundance is determined by the cross section of its elastic scattering on standard model particles. The dark matter candidate is predicted to have a mass ranging from a few to a few hundred MeV, and an elastic scattering cross section with electrons, photons and/or neutrinos in the 10^{-3}-1  fb range.

  10. Dark Matter Effective Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Nobile, Eugenio; Sannino, Francesco

    2012-05-01

    We organize the effective (self-)interaction terms for complex scalar dark matter candidates which are either an isosinglet, isodoublet or an isotriplet with respect to the weak interactions. The classification has been performed ordering the operators in inverse powers of the dark matter (DM) cutoff scale. We assume Lorentz invariance, color and charge neutrality. We also introduce potentially interesting DM induced flavor-changing operators. Our general framework allows for model independent investigations of DM properties.

  11. GUTzilla dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harigaya, Keisuke; Lin, Tongyan; Lou, Hou Keong

    2016-09-01

    Motivated by gauge coupling unification and dark matter, we present an extension to the Standard Model where both are achieved by adding an extra new matter multiplet. Such considerations lead to a Grand Unified Theory with very heavy WIMPzilla dark matter, which has mass greater than ˜ 107 GeV and must be produced before reheating ends. Naturally, we refer to this scenario as GUTzilla dark matter. Here we present a minimal GUTzilla model, adding a vector-like quark multiplet to the Standard Model. Proton decay constraints require the new multiplet to be both color and electroweak charged, which prompts us to include a new confining SU(3) gauge group that binds the multiplet into a neutral composite dark matter candidate. Current direct detection constraints are evaded due to the large dark matter mass; meanwhile, next-generation direct detection and proton decay experiments will probe much of the parameter space. The relic abundance is strongly dependent on the dynamics of the hidden confining sector, and we show that dark matter production during the epoch of reheating can give the right abundance.

  12. Dark matter: Theoretical perspectives

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, M.S. . Enrico Fermi Inst. Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL )

    1993-01-01

    I both review and make the case for the current theoretical prejudice: a flat Universe whose dominant constituent is nonbaryonic dark matter, emphasizing that this is still a prejudice and not yet fact. The theoretical motivation for nonbaryonic dark matter is discussed in the context of current elementary-particle theory, stressing that: (1) there are no dark matter candidates within the standard model of particle physics; (2) there are several compelling candidates within attractive extensions of the standard model of particle physics; and (3) the motivation for these compelling candidates comes first and foremost from particle physics. The dark-matter problem is now a pressing issue in both cosmology and particle physics, and the detection of particle dark matter would provide evidence for new physics.'' The compelling candidates are: a very light axion ( 10[sup [minus]6] eV--10[sup [minus]4] eV); a light neutrino (20 eV--90 eV); and a heavy neutralino (10 GeV--2 TeV). The production of these particles in the early Universe and the prospects for their detection are also discussed. I briefly mention more exotic possibilities for the dark matter, including a nonzero cosmological constant, superheavy magnetic monopoles, and decaying neutrinos.

  13. Dark matter: Theoretical perspectives

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, M.S. |

    1993-01-01

    I both review and make the case for the current theoretical prejudice: a flat Universe whose dominant constituent is nonbaryonic dark matter, emphasizing that this is still a prejudice and not yet fact. The theoretical motivation for nonbaryonic dark matter is discussed in the context of current elementary-particle theory, stressing that: (1) there are no dark matter candidates within the standard model of particle physics; (2) there are several compelling candidates within attractive extensions of the standard model of particle physics; and (3) the motivation for these compelling candidates comes first and foremost from particle physics. The dark-matter problem is now a pressing issue in both cosmology and particle physics, and the detection of particle dark matter would provide evidence for ``new physics.`` The compelling candidates are: a very light axion ( 10{sup {minus}6} eV--10{sup {minus}4} eV); a light neutrino (20 eV--90 eV); and a heavy neutralino (10 GeV--2 TeV). The production of these particles in the early Universe and the prospects for their detection are also discussed. I briefly mention more exotic possibilities for the dark matter, including a nonzero cosmological constant, superheavy magnetic monopoles, and decaying neutrinos.

  14. Dark matter: theoretical perspectives.

    PubMed Central

    Turner, M S

    1993-01-01

    I both review and make the case for the current theoretical prejudice: a flat Universe whose dominant constituent is nonbaryonic dark matter, emphasizing that this is still a prejudice and not yet fact. The theoretical motivation for nonbaryonic dark matter is discussed in the context of current elementary-particle theory, stressing that (i) there are no dark-matter candidates within the "standard model" of particle physics, (ii) there are several compelling candidates within attractive extensions of the standard model of particle physics, and (iii) the motivation for these compelling candidates comes first and foremost from particle physics. The dark-matter problem is now a pressing issue in both cosmology and particle physics, and the detection of particle dark matter would provide evidence for "new physics." The compelling candidates are a very light axion (10(-6)-10(-4) eV), a light neutrino (20-90 eV), and a heavy neutralino (10 GeV-2 TeV). The production of these particles in the early Universe and the prospects for their detection are also discussed. I briefly mention more exotic possibilities for the dark matter, including a nonzero cosmological constant, superheavy magnetic monopoles, and decaying neutrinos. PMID:11607395

  15. Symmetryless dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajiyama, Yuji; Kannike, Kristjan; Raidal, Martti

    2012-02-01

    It is appealing to stabilize dark matter by the same discrete non-Abelian symmetry that is used to explain the structure of quark and lepton mass matrices. However, to generate exact tribimaximal neutrino mixing at tree level, the non-Abelian flavor symmetry must necessarily be broken by vacuum expectation values of flavon scalars, rendering dark matter unstable. We study singlet, doublet, and triplet SU(2) multiplets of both scalar and fermion dark matter candidates and enumerate the conditions under which no d<6 dark matter decay operators are generated even in the case if the flavor symmetry is broken to nothing. We show that under the assumptions that the flavor group is fully broken and that the dark matter decay operators are suppressed only by a high scale, the vacuum expectation values of flavon scalars transforming as higher multiplets (e.g., triplets) of the flavor group must be at the electroweak scale. The most economical way for that is to use standard model Higgs boson(s) as flavons. Such models can be tested by the LHC experiments. This scenario requires the existence of additional Froggatt-Nielsen scalars that generate hierarchies in Yukawa couplings. We study the conditions under which large and small flavor breaking parameters can coexist without destabilizing the dark matter.

  16. HST images of ubiquitous dark giants as dark matter in the galactic discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celis, L. S.

    2003-07-01

    A revision of the Bubble Nebula Region (NGC 7635) and the Trifid Nebula Region (NGC 6514) whose images were taken by the Hubble Space Telescope HST gives clues of the ubiquitous character of the dark giants, which were found for the first time in the Carina Nebula Region (NGC 3324) [1]. The formation of dark giants, due to the extreme ageing of red giant cocoon stars, can explain the enormous quantity of dark giants pointing out their presence of dark matter as a residual material from successive generations of stars. The dark giants might be as many as 98.9% of dark matter needed to represent the gravitational support of the optical stars in the galactic discs.

  17. Does Antimatter Appear Dark?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, Walton

    2014-03-01

    According to Standard Model the photon is an elementary particle and a gauge boson. However, there is another model of the photon with very interesting properties. In 1932 de Broglie suggested that the photon is a composite particle formed of a neutrino-antineutrino pair. This theory, now known as the ``neutrino theory of light,'' has evolved over the years. It still has problems in that it requires massless 2-component neutrinos, while there are indications that neutrinos have mass. In the composite photon theory the photon is γ =νLν̲R (electron neutrinos), while the antiphoton is γ ̲ =νRν̲L , two particles that have never been observed. Since the neutrino-electron interaction is V-A, the antiphoton neutrinos have the wrong helicity to interact with electrons, rendering the antiphotons undetectable. Conversely, in an antimatter world, for which the neutrino-positron interaction is V+A, photons do not interact with positrons. Thus, antimatter stars and galaxies would appear dark to us, and they would not even reflect light from matter stars.

  18. Dark matter dynamics and indirect detection

    SciTech Connect

    Bertone, Gianfranco; Merritt, David; /Rochester Inst. Tech.

    2005-04-01

    Non-baryonic, or ''dark'', matter is believed to be a major component of the total mass budget of the universe. We review the candidates for particle dark matter and discuss the prospects for direct detection (via interaction of dark matter particles with laboratory detectors) and indirect detection (via observations of the products of dark matter self-annihilations), focusing in particular on the Galactic center, which is among the most promising targets for indirect detection studies. The gravitational potential at the Galactic center is dominated by stars and by the supermassive black hole, and the dark matter distribution is expected to evolve on sub-parsec scales due to interaction with these components. We discuss the dominant interaction mechanisms and show how they can be used to rule out certain extreme models for the dark matter distribution, thus increasing the information that can be gleaned from indirect detection searches.

  19. Levitating dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Kaloper, Nemanja; Padilla, Antonio E-mail: antonio.padilla@nottingham.ac.uk

    2009-10-01

    A sizable fraction of the total energy density of the universe may be in heavy particles with a net dark U(1)' charge comparable to its mass. When the charges have the same sign the cancellation between their gravitational and gauge forces may lead to a mismatch between different measures of masses in the universe. Measuring galactic masses by orbits of normal matter, such as galaxy rotation curves or lensing, will give the total mass, while the flows of dark matter agglomerates may yield smaller values if the gauge repulsion is not accounted for. If distant galaxies which house light beacons like SNe Ia contain such dark particles, the observations of their cosmic recession may mistake the weaker forces for an extra 'antigravity', and infer an effective dark energy equation of state smaller than the real one. In some cases, including that of a cosmological constant, these effects can mimic w < −1. They can also lead to a local variation of galaxy-galaxy forces, yielding a larger 'Hubble Flow' in those regions of space that could be taken for a dynamical dark energy, or superhorizon effects.

  20. Levitating dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaloper, Nemanja; Padilla, Antonio

    2009-10-01

    A sizable fraction of the total energy density of the universe may be in heavy particles with a net dark U(1)' charge comparable to its mass. When the charges have the same sign the cancellation between their gravitational and gauge forces may lead to a mismatch between different measures of masses in the universe. Measuring galactic masses by orbits of normal matter, such as galaxy rotation curves or lensing, will give the total mass, while the flows of dark matter agglomerates may yield smaller values if the gauge repulsion is not accounted for. If distant galaxies which house light beacons like SNe Ia contain such dark particles, the observations of their cosmic recession may mistake the weaker forces for an extra `antigravity', and infer an effective dark energy equation of state smaller than the real one. In some cases, including that of a cosmological constant, these effects can mimic w < -1. They can also lead to a local variation of galaxy-galaxy forces, yielding a larger `Hubble Flow' in those regions of space that could be taken for a dynamical dark energy, or superhorizon effects.

  1. MAMA Dark Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Wei

    2010-09-01

    This proposal monitors the behavior of the dark current in each of the MAMA detectors, to look for evidence of change in the dark rate, indicative of detector problems developing.The basic monitor takes two 1300s TIME-TAG darks bi-weekly with each detector. The pairs of exposures for each detector are linked so that they are taken at opposite ends of the same SAA free interval. This pairing of exposures will make it easier to separate long and short term temporal variability from temperature dependent changes.For both detectors, additional blocks of exposures are taken once a year. These are groups of three 1314 s TIME-TAG darks for each of the MAMA detectors, distributed over a single SAA free interval. This will give more information on the brightness of the FUV MAMA dark current as a function of the amount of time that the HV has been on, and for the NUV MAMA will give a better measure of the short term temperature dependence.

  2. MAMA Dark Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Colin

    2011-10-01

    This proposal monitors the behavior of the dark current in each of the MAMA detectors, to look for evidence of change in the dark rate, indicative of detector problems developing.The basic monitor takes two 1300s TIME-TAG darks bi-weekly with each detector. The pairs of exposures for each detector are linked so that they are taken at opposite ends of the same SAA free interval. This pairing of exposures will make it easier to separate long and short term temporal variability from temperature dependent changes.For both detectors, additional blocks of exposures are taken once a year. These are groups of three 1314 s TIME-TAG darks for each of the MAMA detectors, distributed over a single SAA free interval. This will give more information on the brightness of the FUV MAMA dark current as a function of the amount of time that the HV has been on, and for the NUV MAMA will give a better measure of the short term temperature dependence.

  3. WISPy cold dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arias, Paola; Cadamuro, Davide; Goodsell, Mark; Jaeckel, Joerg; Redondo, Javier; Ringwald, Andreas

    2012-06-01

    Very weakly interacting slim particles (WISPs), such as axion-like particles (ALPs) or hidden photons (HPs), may be non-thermally produced via the misalignment mechanism in the early universe and survive as a cold dark matter population until today. We find that, both for ALPs and HPs whose dominant interactions with the standard model arise from couplings to photons, a huge region in the parameter spaces spanned by photon coupling and ALP or HP mass can give rise to the observed cold dark matter. Remarkably, a large region of this parameter space coincides with that predicted in well motivated models of fundamental physics. A wide range of experimental searches — exploiting haloscopes (direct dark matter searches exploiting microwave cavities), helioscopes (searches for solar ALPs or HPs), or light-shining-through-a-wall techniques — can probe large parts of this parameter space in the foreseeable future.

  4. Axion dark matter searches

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Stern, Ian P.

    2014-01-01

    We report nearly all astrophysical and cosmological data point convincingly to a large component of cold dark matter in the Universe. The axion particle, first theorized as a solution to the strong charge-parity problem of quantum chromodynamics, has been established as a prominent CDM candidate. Cosmic observation and particle physics experiments have bracketed the unknown mass of the axion between approximately a μeV and a meV. The Axion Dark Matter eXperiement (ADMX) has successfully completed searches between 1.9 and 3.7 μeV down to the KSVZ photon-coupling limit. ADMX and the Axion Dark Matter eXperiement High-Frequency (ADMX-HF) will search for axionsmore » at weaker coupling and/or higher frequencies within the next few years. Status of the experiments, current research and development, and projected mass-coupling exclusion limits are presented.« less

  5. Nearly Supersymmetric Dark Atoms

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Behbahani, Siavosh R.; Jankowiak, Martin; Rube, Tomas; Wacker, Jay G.

    2011-01-01

    Theories of dark matter that support bound states are an intriguing possibility for the identity of the missing mass of the Universe. This article proposes a class of models of supersymmetric composite dark matter where the interactions with the Standard Model communicate supersymmetry breaking to the dark sector. In these models, supersymmetry breaking can be treated as a perturbation on the spectrum of bound states. Using a general formalism, the spectrum with leading supersymmetry effects is computed without specifying the details of the binding dynamics. The interactions of the composite states with the Standard Model are computed, and several benchmarkmore » models are described. General features of nonrelativistic supersymmetric bound states are emphasized.« less

  6. Asymmetric twin Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Farina, Marco

    2015-11-09

    We study a natural implementation of Asymmetric Dark Matter in Twin Higgs models. The mirroring of the Standard Model strong sector suggests that a twin baryon with mass around 5 GeV is a natural Dark Matter candidate once a twin baryon number asymmetry comparable to the SM asymmetry is generated. We explore twin baryon Dark Matter in two different scenarios, one with minimal content in the twin sector and one with a complete copy of the SM, including a light twin photon. The essential requirements for successful thermal history are presented, and in doing so we address some of the cosmological issues common to many Twin Higgs models. The required interactions we introduce predict signatures at direct detection experiments and at the LHC.

  7. Asymmetric twin Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Farina, Marco

    2015-11-01

    We study a natural implementation of Asymmetric Dark Matter in Twin Higgs models. The mirroring of the Standard Model strong sector suggests that a twin baryon with mass around 5 GeV is a natural Dark Matter candidate once a twin baryon number asymmetry comparable to the SM asymmetry is generated. We explore twin baryon Dark Matter in two different scenarios, one with minimal content in the twin sector and one with a complete copy of the SM, including a light twin photon. The essential requirements for successful thermal history are presented, and in doing so we address some of the cosmological issues common to many Twin Higgs models. The required interactions we introduce predict signatures at direct detection experiments and at the LHC.

  8. Axion dark matter searches

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, Ian P.; Collaboration: ADMX Collaboration; ADMX-HF Collaboration

    2014-06-24

    Nearly all astrophysical and cosmological data point convincingly to a large component of cold dark matter in the Universe. The axion particle, first theorized as a solution to the strong charge-parity problem of quantum chromodynamics, has been established as a prominent CDM candidate. Cosmic observation and particle physics experiments have bracketed the unknown mass of the axion between approximately a μeV and a meV. The Axion Dark Matter eXperiement (ADMX) has successfully completed searches between 1.9 and 3.7 μeV down to the KSVZ photon-coupling limit. ADMX and the Axion Dark Matter eXperiement High-Frequency (ADMX-HF) will search for axions at weaker coupling and/or higher frequencies within the next few years. Status of the experiments, current research and development, and projected mass-coupling exclusion limits are presented.

  9. Dark matter possibilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Orvin

    2015-04-01

    In my research I observe signals that penetrate dense matter and I hypothesize that they are due to waves in dark matter. Since they readily penetrate thick matter I hypothesize that they are due to small dark matter particles instead of the usual hypothesized Wimps. For example I observed signals that penetrate my local hill at near 77 m/s. In addition the solar cycle appears to be due to to dark matter oscillating in the sun producing standing waves that have to due with planet placement and stability of the solar system. Dozens of experiments, over the past 20 years, confirm the penetrating waves. Examples of the experiments are presented on my website darkmatterwaves.com and US patent number 8,669,917 B1.

  10. Dark Energy. What the ...?

    SciTech Connect

    Wechsler, Risa

    2007-10-30

    What is the Universe made of? This question has been asked as long as humans have been questioning, and astronomers and physicists are finally converging on an answer. The picture which has emerged from numerous complementary observations over the past decade is a surprising one: most of the matter in the Universe isn't visible, and most of the Universe isn't even made of matter. In this talk, I will explain what the rest of this stuff, known as 'Dark Energy' is, how it is related to the so-called 'Dark Matter', how it impacts the evolution of the Universe, and how we can study the dark universe using observations of light from current and future telescopes.

  11. Nearly Supersymmetric Dark Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Behbahani, Siavosh R.; Jankowiak, Martin; Rube, Tomas; Wacker, Jay G.; /SLAC /Stanford U., ITP

    2011-08-12

    Theories of dark matter that support bound states are an intriguing possibility for the identity of the missing mass of the Universe. This article proposes a class of models of supersymmetric composite dark matter where the interactions with the Standard Model communicate supersymmetry breaking to the dark sector. In these models supersymmetry breaking can be treated as a perturbation on the spectrum of bound states. Using a general formalism, the spectrum with leading supersymmetry effects is computed without specifying the details of the binding dynamics. The interactions of the composite states with the Standard Model are computed and several benchmark models are described. General features of non-relativistic supersymmetric bound states are emphasized.

  12. Axion dark matter searches

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, Ian P.

    2014-01-01

    We report nearly all astrophysical and cosmological data point convincingly to a large component of cold dark matter in the Universe. The axion particle, first theorized as a solution to the strong charge-parity problem of quantum chromodynamics, has been established as a prominent CDM candidate. Cosmic observation and particle physics experiments have bracketed the unknown mass of the axion between approximately a μeV and a meV. The Axion Dark Matter eXperiement (ADMX) has successfully completed searches between 1.9 and 3.7 μeV down to the KSVZ photon-coupling limit. ADMX and the Axion Dark Matter eXperiement High-Frequency (ADMX-HF) will search for axions at weaker coupling and/or higher frequencies within the next few years. Status of the experiments, current research and development, and projected mass-coupling exclusion limits are presented.

  13. Star Formation in the Southern Dark Cloud DC 296.2-3.6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persi, P.; Gómez, M.; Tapia, M.; Roth, M.; de Buizer, J. M.; Marenzi, A. R.

    2008-06-01

    We report near- and mid-infrared (IR) images of the southern hemisphere dark cloud DC 296.2-3.6 associated with IRAS 11431 - 6516. The Ks and L' images show the presence of an IR nebulosity at the center of the dark cloud (DC). From the analysis of the near-IR color-color diagrams we have identified a young stellar population in the region. Five of these young stellar objects, here named A, B, C, D, and E, were also detected in the mid-IR. Sources B, D, and E are Class I-II T Tauri as suggested by the analysis of their spectral energy distributions. In addition, source E shows a long-term near-IR variability. The near-IR color-color diagrams indicate the presence of circumstellar dust envelope in sources A, B, D, and E, while the fit of SEDs of the intermediate- and low-mass objects A and B with a radiation transfer model including infalling envelope+disk+central source suggests circumstellar disks around these two objects. These results indicate that DC 296.2-3.6, located in the far Carina arm, is associated with an embedded cluster of low-mass young stellar objects.

  14. Big Mysteries: Dark Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, Don

    2014-04-15

    Scientists were shocked in 1998 when the expansion of the universe wasn't slowing down as expected by our best understanding of gravity at the time; the expansion was speeding up! That observation is just mind blowing, and yet it is true. In order to explain the data, physicists had to resurrect an abandoned idea of Einstein's now called dark energy. In this video, Fermilab's Dr. Don Lincoln tells us a little about the observations that led to the hypothesis of dark energy and what is the status of current research on the subject.

  15. Voids of dark energy

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, Sourish; Maor, Irit

    2007-03-15

    We investigate the clustering properties of a dynamical dark energy component. In a cosmic mix of a pressureless fluid and a light scalar field, we follow the linear evolution of spherical matter perturbations. We find that the scalar field tends to form underdensities in response to the gravitationally collapsing matter. We thoroughly investigate these voids for a variety of initial conditions, explain the physics behind their formation, and consider possible observational implications. Detection of dark energy voids will clearly rule out the cosmological constant as the main source of the present acceleration.

  16. Big Mysteries: Dark Energy

    ScienceCinema

    Lincoln, Don

    2016-07-12

    Scientists were shocked in 1998 when the expansion of the universe wasn't slowing down as expected by our best understanding of gravity at the time; the expansion was speeding up! That observation is just mind blowing, and yet it is true. In order to explain the data, physicists had to resurrect an abandoned idea of Einstein's now called dark energy. In this video, Fermilab's Dr. Don Lincoln tells us a little about the observations that led to the hypothesis of dark energy and what is the status of current research on the subject.

  17. Dark Energy and The Dark Matter Relic Abundance

    SciTech Connect

    Rosati, Francesca

    2004-11-17

    Two mechanisms by which the quintessence scalar could enhance the relic abundance of dark matter particles are discussed. These effects can have an impact on supersymmetric candidates for dark matter.

  18. Dark Energy, Dark Matter and Science with Constellation-X

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardiff, Ann Hornschemeier

    2005-01-01

    Constellation-X, with more than 100 times the collecting area of any previous spectroscopic mission operating in the 0.25-40 keV bandpass, will enable highthroughput, high spectral resolution studies of sources ranging from the most luminous accreting supermassive black holes in the Universe to the disks around young stars where planets form. This talk will review the updated Constellation-X science case, released in booklet form during summer 2005. The science areas where Constellation-X will have major impact include the exploration of the space-time geometry of black holes spanning nine orders of magnitude in mass and the nature of the dark energy and dark matter which govern the expansion and ultimate fate of the Universe. Constellation-X will also explore processes referred to as "cosmic feedback" whereby mechanical energy, radiation, and chemical elements from star formation and black holes are returned to interstellar and intergalactic medium, profoundly affecting the development of structure in the Universe, and will also probe all the important life cycles of matter, from stellar and planetary birth to stellar death via supernova to stellar endpoints in the form of accreting binaries and supernova remnants. This talk will touch upon all these areas, with particular emphasis on Constellation-X's role in the study of Dark Energy.

  19. Impact of the relative motion between the dark matter and baryons on the first stars: semi-analytical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fialkov, Anastasia; Barkana, Rennan; Tseliakhovich, Dmitriy; Hirata, Christopher M.

    2012-08-01

    Recently the initial supersonic relative velocity between the dark matter and baryons was shown to have an important effect on galaxy formation at high redshift. We study the impact of this relative motion on the distribution of the star-forming haloes and on the formation redshift of the very first star. We include a new aspect of the relative velocity effect found in recent simulations by fitting their results to obtain the spatially varying minimum halo mass needed for molecular cooling. Thus, the relative velocities have three separate effects: suppression of the halo abundance, suppression of the gas content within each halo and boosting of the minimum cooling mass. We show that the two suppressions (of gas content and of halo abundance) are the primary effects on the small minihaloes that cannot form stars, while the cooling mass boost combines with the abundance suppression to produce order unity fluctuations in stellar density. We quantify the large-scale inhomogeneity of galaxies, finding that 68 per cent of the star formation (averaged on a 3 Mpc scale) is confined to 35 per cent of the volume at z= 20 (and just 18 per cent at z= 40). In addition, we estimate the first observable star to be formed at redshift z= 65 (t˜ 33 Myr) which includes a delay of Δz˜ 5 (Δt˜ 3.6 Myr) due to the relative velocity.

  20. Models for SIMP dark matter and dark photon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyun Min; Seo, Min-Seok

    2016-06-01

    We give a review on the SIMP paradigm and discuss a consistent model for SIMP dark mesons in the context of a dark QCD with flavor symmetry. The Z'-portal interaction is introduced being compatible with stable dark mesons and is responsible for making the SIMP dark mesons remain in kinetic equilibrium with the SM during the freeze-out process. The SIMP parameter space of the Z' gauge boson can be probed by future collider and direct detection experiments.

  1. Dark energy and dark matter from primordial QGP

    SciTech Connect

    Vaidya, Vaishali Upadhyaya, G. K.

    2015-07-31

    Coloured relics servived after hadronization might have given birth to dark matter and dark energy. Theoretical ideas to solve mystery of cosmic acceleration, its origin and its status with reference to recent past are of much interest and are being proposed by many workers. In the present paper, we present a critical review of work done to understand the earliest appearance of dark matter and dark energy in the scenario of primordial quark gluon plasma (QGP) phase after Big Bang.

  2. Rapid Circumstellar Disk Evolution and an Accelerating Star Formation Rate in the Infrared Dark Cloud M17 SWex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Povich, Matthew S.; Townsley, Leisa K.; Robitaille, Thomas P.; Broos, Patrick S.; Orbin, Wesley T.; King, Robert R.; Naylor, Tim; Whitney, Barbara A.

    2016-07-01

    We present a catalog of 840 X-ray sources and first results from a 100 ks Chandra X-ray Observatory imaging study of the filamentary infrared (IR) dark cloud G014.225-00.506, which forms the central regions of a larger cloud complex known as the M17 southwest extension (M17 SWex). In addition to the rich population of protostars and young stellar objects with dusty circumstellar disks revealed by archival data from the Spitzer Space Telescope, we discover a population of X-ray-emitting, intermediate-mass pre-main-sequence stars that lack IR excess emission from circumstellar disks. We model the IR spectral energy distributions of this source population to measure its mass function and place new constraints on the destruction timescales for the inner dust disk for 2-8 M ⊙ stars. We also place a lower limit on the star formation rate (SFR) and find that it is quite high (\\dot{M}≥slant 0.007 M ⊙ yr-1), equivalent to several Orion Nebula Clusters in G14.225-0.506 alone, and likely accelerating. The cloud complex has not produced a population of massive, O-type stars commensurate with its SFR. This absence of very massive (≳20 M ⊙) stars suggests that either (1) M17 SWex is an example of a distributed mode of star formation that will produce a large OB association dominated by intermediate-mass stars but relatively few massive clusters, or (2) the massive cores are still in the process of accreting sufficient mass to form massive clusters hosting O stars.

  3. The onset of massive star formation: The evolution of temperature and density structure in an infrared dark cloud

    SciTech Connect

    Battersby, Cara; Ginsburg, Adam; Bally, John; Darling, Jeremy; Longmore, Steve; Dunham, Miranda

    2014-06-01

    We present new NH{sub 3} (1, 1), (2, 2), and (4, 4) observations from the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array compiled with work in the literature to explore the range of conditions observed in young, massive star-forming regions. To sample the effects of evolution independent from those of distance/resolution, abundance, and large-scale environment, we compare clumps in different evolutionary stages within a single infrared dark cloud (IRDC), G32.02+0.06. We find that the early stages of clustered star formation are characterized by dense, parsec-scale filamentary structures interspersed with complexes of dense cores (<0.1 pc cores clustered in complexes separated by ∼1 pc) with masses from about 10 to 100 M {sub ☉}. The most quiescent core is the most extended while the star forming cores are denser and more compact, showing very similar column density structure before and shortly after the onset of massive star formation, with peak surface densities Σ ≳ 1 g cm{sup –2}. Quiescent cores and filaments show smoothly varying temperatures from 10 to 20 K, rising to over 40 K in star-forming cores. We calculate virial parameters for 16 cores and find that the level of support provided by turbulence is generally insufficient to support them against gravitational collapse ((α{sub vir}) ∼ 0.6). The star-forming filaments show smooth velocity fields, punctuated by discontinuities at the sites of active star formation. We discuss the massive molecular filament (M ∼ 10{sup 5} M {sub ☉}, length >60 pc) hosting the IRDC, hypothesizing that it may have been shaped by previous generations of massive stars.

  4. Nonthermal production of dark radiation and dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reece, Matthew; Roxlo, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    Dark matter may be coupled to dark radiation: light degrees of freedom that mediate forces between dark sector particles. Cosmological constraints favor dark radiation that is colder than Standard Model radiation. In models with fixed couplings between dark matter and the Standard Model, these constraints can be difficult to satisfy if thermal equilibrium is assumed in the early universe. We construct a model of asymmetric reheating of the visible and dark sectors from late decays of a long-lived particle (for instance, a modulus). We show, as a proof of principle, that such a model can populate a sufficiently cold dark sector while also generating baryon and dark matter asymmetries through the out-of-equilibrium decay. We frame much of our discussion in terms of the scenario of dissipative dark matter, as in the Double-Disk Dark Matter scenario. However, our results may also be of interest for other scenarios like the Twin Higgs model that are in danger of overproducing dark radiation due to nonnegligible dark-visible couplings.

  5. Shedding light on baryonic dark matter.

    PubMed

    Silk, J

    1991-02-01

    Halo dark matter, if it is baryonic, may plausibly consist of compact stellar remnants. Jeans mass clouds containing 10(6) to 10(8) solar masses could have efficiently formed stars in the early universe and could plausibly have generated, for a suitably top-heavy stellar initial mass function, a high abundance of neutron stars as well as a small admixture of long-lived low mass stars. Within the resulting clusters of dark remnants, which eventually are tidally disrupted when halos eventually form, captures of neutron stars by non-degenerate stars resulted in formation of close binaries. These evolve to produce, by the present epoch, an observable x-ray signal associated with dark matter aggregations in galaxy halos and galaxy cluster cores.

  6. Shedding light on baryonic dark matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silk, Joseph

    1991-01-01

    Halo dark matter, if it is baryonic, may plausibly consist of compact stellar remnants. Jeans mass clouds containing 10 to the 6th to 10 to the 8th solar masses could have efficiently formed stars in the early universe and could plausibly have generated, for a suitably top-heavy stellar initial mass function, a high abundance of neutron stars as well as a small admixture of long-lived low mass stars. Within the resulting clusters of dark remnants, which eventually are tidally disrupted when halos eventually form, captures of neutron stars by nondegenerate stars resulted in formation of close binaries. These evolve to produce, by the present epoch, an observable X-ray signal associated with dark matter aggregations in galaxy cluster cores.

  7. The Search for Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Orrell, John

    2013-11-20

    More than 25 years ago, PNNL scientists began the first underground measurements searching for dark matter using specialized radiation detector technology. Dark matter is yet to be discovered says Physicist John L. Orrell.

  8. The Search for Dark Matter

    ScienceCinema

    Orrell, John

    2016-07-12

    More than 25 years ago, PNNL scientists began the first underground measurements searching for dark matter using specialized radiation detector technology. Dark matter is yet to be discovered says Physicist John L. Orrell.

  9. Dark matter on top

    SciTech Connect

    Gómez, M.A.; Jackson, C.B.; Shaughnessy, G. E-mail: chris@uta.edu

    2014-12-01

    We consider a simplified model of fermionic dark matter which couples exclusively to the right-handed top quark via a renormalizable interaction with a color-charged scalar. We first compute the relic abundance of this type of dark matter and investigate constraints placed on the model parameter space by the latest direct detection data. We also perform a detailed analysis for the production of dark matter at the LHC for this model. We find several kinematic variables that allow for a clean signal extraction and we show that the parameter space of this model will be well probed during LHC Run-II. Finally, we investigate the possibility of detecting this type of dark matter via its annihilations into gamma rays. We compute the continuum and the line emission (which includes a possible ''Higgs in Space!'' line) and its possible discovery by future gamma-ray telescopes. We find that the annihilation spectrum has distinctive features which may distinguish it from other models.

  10. Asymmetric condensed dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguirre, Anthony; Diez-Tejedor, Alberto

    2016-04-01

    We explore the viability of a boson dark matter candidate with an asymmetry between the number densities of particles and antiparticles. A simple thermal field theory analysis confirms that, under certain general conditions, this component would develop a Bose-Einstein condensate in the early universe that, for appropriate model parameters, could survive the ensuing cosmological evolution until now. The condensation of a dark matter component in equilibrium with the thermal plasma is a relativistic process, hence the amount of matter dictated by the charge asymmetry is complemented by a hot relic density frozen out at the time of decoupling. Contrary to the case of ordinary WIMPs, dark matter particles in a condensate must be lighter than a few tens of eV so that the density from thermal relics is not too large. Big-Bang nucleosynthesis constrains the temperature of decoupling to the scale of the QCD phase transition or above. This requires large dark matter-to-photon ratios and very weak interactions with standard model particles.

  11. Dark Sky Scotland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillier, D.

    2008-06-01

    Dark Sky Scotland (DSS) 2006-2008 is a nationwide programme of public and educational astronomy events. It demonstrates successful national partnerships with non-astronomy organisations and effective ways of delivering events in remote rural communities. DSS is looking for international partners for IYA2009.

  12. Inflatable Dark Matter

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Davoudiasl, Hooman; Hooper, Dan; McDermott, Samuel D.

    2016-01-22

    We describe a general scenario, dubbed “Inflatable Dark Matter”, in which the density of dark matter particles can be reduced through a short period of late-time inflation in the early universe. The overproduction of dark matter that is predicted within many otherwise well-motivated models of new physics can be elegantly remedied within this context, without the need to tune underlying parameters or to appeal to anthropic considerations. Thermal relics that would otherwise be disfavored can easily be accommodated within this class of scenarios, including dark matter candidates that are very heavy or very light. Furthermore, the non-thermal abundance of GUTmore » or Planck scale axions can be brought to acceptable levels, without invoking anthropic tuning of initial conditions. Additionally, a period of late-time inflation could have occurred over a wide range of scales from ~ MeV to the weak scale or above, and could have been triggered by physics within a hidden sector, with small but not necessarily negligible couplings to the Standard Model.« less

  13. FUV MAMA Dark Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Colin

    2012-10-01

    The monitor takes six 1300s TIME-TAG darks every six weeks. The exposures are distributed over about six hours from initial turn-on to characterize the rate increase as a function of turn-on time and temperature. The frequency has been reduced from bi-weekly to once every six weeks to stay within a reasonable orbit count.

  14. NUV MAMA Dark Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Colin

    2013-10-01

    The basic monitor takes two 1300s TIME-TAG darks bi-weekly.. The pairs of exposures are linked so that they are taken about 6 hours apart in the same SAA free interval. This pairing of exposures will make it easier to separate long and short term temporal variability from temperature dependent changes.

  15. FUV MAMA Dark Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Colin

    2013-10-01

    The monitor takes six 1300s TIME-TAG darks every six weeks. The exposures are distributed over about six hours from initial turn-on to characterize the rate increase as a function of turn-on time and temperature.

  16. NUV MAMA Dark Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Colin

    2012-10-01

    The basic monitor takes two 1300s TIME-TAG darks bi-weekly.. The pairs of exposures are linked so that they are taken about 6 hours apart in the same SAA free interval. This pairing of exposures will make it easier to separate long and short term temporal variability from temperature dependent changes.

  17. Hidden SU (N ) glueball dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soni, Amarjit; Zhang, Yue

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the possibility that the dark matter candidate is from a pure non-Abelian gauge theory of the hidden sector, motivated in large part by its elegance and simplicity. The dark matter is the lightest bound state made of the confined gauge fields, the hidden glueball. We point out that this simple setup is capable of providing rich and novel phenomena in the dark sector, especially in the parameter space of large N . They include self-interacting and warm dark matter scenarios, Bose-Einstein condensation leading to massive dark stars possibly millions of times heavier than our sun giving rise to gravitational lensing effects, and indirect detections through higher dimensional operators as well as interesting collider signatures.

  18. Dark matter detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baudis, Laura

    2016-08-01

    More than 80 years after its first postulation in modern form, the existence and distribution of dark matter in our Universe is well established. Dark matter is the gravitational glue that holds together galaxies, galaxy clusters and structures on the largest cosmological scales, and an essential component to explain the observed fluctuations in the cosmic microwave background. Yet its existence is inferred indirectly, through its gravitational influence on luminous matter, and its nature is not known. A viable hypothesis is that dark matter is made of new, elementary particles, with allowed masses and interaction strengths spanning a wide range. Two well-motivated classes of candidates are axions and weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), and experimental efforts have now reached sensitivities that allow them to test this hypothesis. Axions, produced non-thermally in the early Universe, can be detected by exploiting their predicted couplings to photons and electrons. WIMPs can be detected directly by looking for their collisions with atomic nuclei ultra-low background detectors, or indirectly, through the observation of their annihilation products such as neutrinos, gamma rays, positrons and antiprotons over the astrophysical background. A complementary method is the production of dark matter particles at colliders such as the Large Hadron Collider, where they could be observed indirectly via missing transverse energy, or via associated particle production. I will review the main experimental efforts to search for dark matter particles, and the existing constraints on the interaction cross sections. I will also discuss future experiments, their complementarity and their ability to measure the properties of these particles.

  19. Constraining Dark Matter and Dark Energy Models using Astrophysical Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieplak, Agnieszka M.

    This thesis addresses astrophysical probes to constrain dark matter (DM) and dark energy models. Primordial black holes (PBHs) remain one of the few DM candidates within the Standard Model of Particle Physics. This thesis presents a new probe of this PBH DM, using the microlensing of the source stars monitored by the already existing Kepler satellite. With its photometric precision and the large projected cross section of the nearby stars, it is found that previous constraints on PBH DM could theoretically be extended by two orders of magnitude. Correcting a well-known microlensing formula, a limb-darkening analysis is included, and a new approximation is calculated for future star selection. A preliminary prediction is calculated for the planned Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope. A preliminary study of the first two years of publicly available Kepler data is presented. The investigation yields many new sources of background error not predicted in the theoretical calculations, such as stellar flares and comets in the field of view. Since no PBH candidates are detected, an efficiency of detection is therefore calculated by running a Monte Carlo with fake limb-darkened finite-source microlensing events. It is found that with just the first 8 quarters of data, a full order of magnitude of the PBH mass range can be already constrained. Finally, one of the astrophysical probes of dark energy is also addressed - specifically, the baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) measurement in the gas distribution, as detected in quasar absorption lines. This unique measurement of dark energy at intermediate redshifts is being measured by current telescope surveys. The last part of this thesis therefore focuses on understanding the systematic effects in such a detection. Since the bias between the underlying dark matter distribution and the measured gas flux distribution is based on gas physics, hydrodynamic simulations are used to understand the evolution of neutral hydrogen over

  20. Foreword: Dark energy and CMB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodelson, Scott; Huterer, Dragan

    2015-03-01

    Maps of the Universe when it was 400,000 years old from observations of the cosmic microwave background and over the last ten billion years from galaxy surveys point to a compelling cosmological model. This model requires a very early epoch of accelerated expansion, inflation, during which the seeds of structure were planted via quantum mechanical fluctuations. These seeds began to grow via gravitational instability during the epoch in which dark matter dominated the energy density of the universe, transforming small perturbations laid down during inflation into nonlinear structures such as million light-year sized clusters, galaxies, stars, planets, and people. Over the past few billion years, we have entered a new phase, during which the expansion of the Universe is accelerating presumably driven by yet another substance, dark energy.

  1. X-ray Observations of the Variable Star V1735 Cygni and the IC 5146 Dark Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skinner, Steve L.; Briggs, K. R.; Guedel, M.; Sokal, K. R.

    2008-09-01

    The variable star V1735 Cyg (= Elias 1-12) is located in the IC 5146 dark cloud, a region of active low-mass star formation that has been extensively studied in the optical and infrared. We present results of an X-ray observation of IC 5146 with XMM-Newton, centered on V1735 Cyg. This star is a member of the class of FU Orionis variables that undergo strong optical outbursts thought to be linked to episodic accretion. Hard X-ray emission was detected from V1735 Cyg at a characteristic temperature kT > 5 keV, in some respects similar to that recently detected in the prototype FU Ori (Skinner et al. 2006, ApJ, 643, 995). We compare the X-ray properties of V1735 Cyg and FU Ori and discuss possible emission mechanisms in the framework of a complex physical environment that likely involves accretion, strong winds, magnetic fields, and possible binarity. We also report the discovery of a second X-ray source located 24 arc-secs northeast of V1735 Cyg that may be associated with a deeply embedded young star previously detected in sub-mm observations. This research is supported by NASA/GSFC grant NNX06AE93G.

  2. How dark chocolate is processed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This month’s column will continue the theme of “How Is It Processed?” The column will focus on dark chocolate. The botanical name for the cacao tree is Theobroma cacao, which literally means “food of the Gods.” Dark chocolate is both delicious and nutritious. Production of dark chocolate will be des...

  3. Dynamics of dark energy with a coupling to dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Boehmer, Christian G.; Caldera-Cabral, Gabriela; Maartens, Roy; Lazkoz, Ruth

    2008-07-15

    Dark energy and dark matter are the dominant sources in the evolution of the late universe. They are currently only indirectly detected via their gravitational effects, and there could be a coupling between them without violating observational constraints. We investigate the background dynamics when dark energy is modeled as exponential quintessence and is coupled to dark matter via simple models of energy exchange. We introduce a new form of dark sector coupling, which leads to a more complicated dynamical phase space and has a better physical motivation than previous mathematically similar couplings.

  4. The local dark matter density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Read, J. I.

    2014-06-01

    I review current efforts to measure the mean density of dark matter near the Sun. This encodes valuable dynamical information about our Galaxy and is also of great importance for ‘direct detection’ dark matter experiments. I discuss theoretical expectations in our current cosmology; the theory behind mass modelling of the Galaxy; and I show how combining local and global measures probes the shape of the Milky Way dark matter halo and the possible presence of a ‘dark disc’. I stress the strengths and weaknesses of different methodologies and highlight the continuing need for detailed tests on mock data—particularly in the light of recently discovered evidence for disequilibria in the Milky Way disc. I collate the latest measurements of ρdm and show that, once the baryonic surface density contribution Σb is normalized across different groups, there is remarkably good agreement. Compiling data from the literature, I estimate Σb = 54.2 ± 4.9 M⊙pc-2, where the dominant source of uncertainty is in the H i gas contribution. Assuming this contribution from the baryons, I highlight several recent measurements of ρdm in order of increasing data complexity and prior, and, correspondingly, decreasing formal error bars. Comparing these measurements with spherical extrapolations from the Milky Way’s rotation curve, I show that the Milky Way is consistent with having a spherical dark matter halo at R0 ˜ 8 kpc. The very latest measures of ρdm based on ˜10 000 stars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey appear to favour little halo flattening at R0, suggesting that the Galaxy has a rather weak dark matter disc, with a correspondingly quiescent merger history. I caution, however, that this result hinges on there being no large systematics that remain to be uncovered in the SDSS data, and on the local baryonic surface density being Σb ˜ 55 M⊙pc-2. I conclude by discussing how the new Gaia satellite will be transformative. We will obtain much tighter

  5. DARK MATTER CORES IN THE FORNAX AND SCULPTOR DWARF GALAXIES: JOINING HALO ASSEMBLY AND DETAILED STAR FORMATION HISTORIES

    SciTech Connect

    Amorisco, N. C.; Zavala, J.; De Boer, T. J. L.

    2014-02-20

    We combine the detailed star formation histories of the Fornax and Sculptor dwarf spheroidals with the mass assembly history of their dark matter (DM) halo progenitors to estimate if the energy deposited by Type II supernovae (SNe II) is sufficient to create a substantial DM core. Assuming the efficiency of energy injection of the SNe II into DM particles is ε{sub gc} = 0.05, we find that a single early episode, z ≳ z {sub infall}, that combines the energy of all SNe II due to explode over 0.5 Gyr is sufficient to create a core of several hundred parsecs in both Sculptor and Fornax. Therefore, our results suggest that it is energetically plausible to form cores in cold dark matter (CDM) halos via early episodic gas outflows triggered by SNe II. Furthermore, based on CDM merger rates and phase-space density considerations, we argue that the probability of a subsequent complete regeneration of the cusp is small for a substantial fraction of dwarf-size halos.

  6. Dark matter and dark energy: summary and future directions.

    PubMed

    Ellis, John

    2003-11-15

    This paper reviews the progress reported at the Discussion Meeting and advertises some possible future directions in our drive to understand dark matter and dark energy. Additionally, a first attempt is made to place in context the exciting new results from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe satellite, which were published shortly after this meeting. In the first part of this paper, pieces of observational evidence shown here that bear on the amounts of dark matter and dark energy are reviewed. Subsequently, particle candidates for dark matter are mentioned, and detection strategies are discussed. Finally, ideas are presented for calculating the amounts of dark matter and dark energy, and possibly relating them to laboratory data.

  7. Evolution of the dark matter distribution at the galactic center.

    PubMed

    Merritt, David

    2004-05-21

    Annihilation radiation from neutralino dark matter at the Galactic center (GC) would be greatly enhanced if the dark matter were strongly clustered around the supermassive black hole (SBH). The existence of a dark matter "spike" is made plausible by the observed, steeply rising stellar density near the GC SBH. Here the time-dependent equations describing gravitational interaction of the dark matter with the stars are solved. Scattering of dark matter particles by stars would substantially lower the dark matter density near the GC SBH over 10 Gyr, due both to kinetic heating and to capture of dark matter particles by the SBH. This evolution implies a decrease by several orders of magnitude in the observable flux of annihilation products compared with models that associate a steep, dark matter spike with the SBH.

  8. Dilaton-assisted dark matter.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yang; Carena, Marcela; Lykken, Joseph

    2009-12-31

    A dilaton could be the dominant messenger between standard model fields and dark matter. The measured dark matter relic abundance relates the dark matter mass and spin to the conformal breaking scale. The dark matter-nucleon spin-independent cross section is predicted in terms of the dilaton mass. We compute the current constraints on the dilaton from LEP and Tevatron experiments, and the gamma-ray signal from dark matter annihilation to dilatons that could be observed by Fermi Large Area Telescope.

  9. Dilaton-Assisted Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Bai Yang; Lykken, Joseph; Carena, Marcela

    2009-12-31

    A dilaton could be the dominant messenger between standard model fields and dark matter. The measured dark matter relic abundance relates the dark matter mass and spin to the conformal breaking scale. The dark matter-nucleon spin-independent cross section is predicted in terms of the dilaton mass. We compute the current constraints on the dilaton from LEP and Tevatron experiments, and the gamma-ray signal from dark matter annihilation to dilatons that could be observed by Fermi Large Area Telescope.

  10. Effect of Streaming Motion of Baryons Relative to Dark Matter on the Formation of the First Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stacy, Athena; Bromm, Volker; Loeb, Abraham

    2011-03-01

    We evaluate the effect of a supersonic relative velocity between the baryons and dark matter on the thermal and density evolution of the first gas clouds at z <~ 50. Through a series of cosmological simulations, initialized at z i = 100 with a range of relative streaming velocities and minihalo formation redshifts, we find that the typical streaming velocities will have little effect on the gas evolution. Once the collapse begins, the subsequent evolution of the gas will be nearly indistinguishable from the case of no streaming, and star formation will still proceed in the same way, with no change in the characteristic Pop III stellar masses. Reionization is expected to be dominated by halo masses of gsim108 M sun, for which the effect of streaming should be negligible.

  11. Gravitational effects of condensate dark matter on compact stellar objects

    SciTech Connect

    Li, X.Y.; Wang, F.Y.; Cheng, K.S. E-mail: fayinwang@gmail.com

    2012-10-01

    We study the gravitational effect of non-self-annihilating dark matter on compact stellar objects. The self-interaction of condensate dark matter can give high accretion rate of dark matter onto stars. Phase transition to condensation state takes place when the dark matter density exceeds the critical value. A compact degenerate dark matter core is developed and alter the structure and stability of the stellar objects. Condensate dark matter admixed neutron stars is studied through the two-fluid TOV equation. The existence of condensate dark matter deforms the mass-radius relation of neutron stars and lower their maximum baryonic masses and radii. The possible effects on the Gamma-ray Burst rate in high redshift are discussed.

  12. The Dark Energy Survey: more than dark energy - an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dark Energy Survey Collaboration; Abbott, T.; Abdalla, F. B.; Aleksić, J.; Allam, S.; Amara, A.; Bacon, D.; Balbinot, E.; Banerji, M.; Bechtol, K.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bertin, E.; Blazek, J.; Bonnett, C.; Bridle, S.; Brooks, D.; Brunner, R. J.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Caminha, G. B.; Capozzi, D.; Carlsen, J.; Carnero-Rosell, A.; Carollo, M.; Carrasco-Kind, M.; Carretero, J.; Castander, F. J.; Clerkin, L.; Collett, T.; Conselice, C.; Crocce, M.; Cunha, C. E.; D'Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; Davis, T. M.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Dodelson, S.; Doel, P.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Estrada, J.; Etherington, J.; Evrard, A. E.; Fabbri, J.; Finley, D. A.; Flaugher, B.; Foley, R. J.; Fosalba, P.; Frieman, J.; García-Bellido, J.; Gaztanaga, E.; Gerdes, D. W.; Giannantonio, T.; Goldstein, D. A.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Guarnieri, P.; Gutierrez, G.; Hartley, W.; Honscheid, K.; Jain, B.; James, D. J.; Jeltema, T.; Jouvel, S.; Kessler, R.; King, A.; Kirk, D.; Kron, R.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Li, T. S.; Lima, M.; Lin, H.; Maia, M. A. G.; Makler, M.; Manera, M.; Maraston, C.; Marshall, J. L.; Martini, P.; McMahon, R. G.; Melchior, P.; Merson, A.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Mohr, J. J.; Morice-Atkinson, X.; Naidoo, K.; Neilsen, E.; Nichol, R. C.; Nord, B.; Ogando, R.; Ostrovski, F.; Palmese, A.; Papadopoulos, A.; Peiris, H. V.; Peoples, J.; Percival, W. J.; Plazas, A. A.; Reed, S. L.; Refregier, A.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Ross, A.; Rozo, E.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sadeh, I.; Sako, M.; Sánchez, C.; Sanchez, E.; Santiago, B.; Scarpine, V.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Sheldon, E.; Smith, M.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Soumagnac, M.; Suchyta, E.; Sullivan, M.; Swanson, M.; Tarle, G.; Thaler, J.; Thomas, D.; Thomas, R. C.; Tucker, D.; Vieira, J. D.; Vikram, V.; Walker, A. R.; Wechsler, R. H.; Weller, J.; Wester, W.; Whiteway, L.; Wilcox, H.; Yanny, B.; Zhang, Y.; Zuntz, J.

    2016-08-01

    This overview paper describes the legacy prospect and discovery potential of the Dark Energy Survey (DES) beyond cosmological studies, illustrating it with examples from the DES early data. DES is using a wide-field camera (DECam) on the 4 m Blanco Telescope in Chile to image 5000 sq deg of the sky in five filters (grizY). By its completion, the survey is expected to have generated a catalogue of 300 million galaxies with photometric redshifts and 100 million stars. In addition, a time-domain survey search over 27 sq deg is expected to yield a sample of thousands of Type Ia supernovae and other transients. The main goals of DES are to characterize dark energy and dark matter, and to test alternative models of gravity; these goals will be pursued by studying large-scale structure, cluster counts, weak gravitational lensing and Type Ia supernovae. However, DES also provides a rich data set which allows us to study many other aspects of astrophysics. In this paper, we focus on additional science with DES, emphasizing areas where the survey makes a difference with respect to other current surveys. The paper illustrates, using early data (from `Science Verification', and from the first, second and third seasons of observations), what DES can tell us about the Solar system, the Milky Way, galaxy evolution, quasars and other topics. In addition, we show that if the cosmological model is assumed to be Λ+cold dark matter, then important astrophysics can be deduced from the primary DES probes. Highlights from DES early data include the discovery of 34 trans-Neptunian objects, 17 dwarf satellites of the Milky Way, one published z > 6 quasar (and more confirmed) and two published superluminous supernovae (and more confirmed).

  13. The Dark Energy Survey: More than dark energy - An overview

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Abbott, T.

    2016-03-21

    This overview article describes the legacy prospect and discovery potential of the Dark Energy Survey (DES) beyond cosmological studies, illustrating it with examples from the DES early data. DES is using a wide-field camera (DECam) on the 4m Blanco Telescope in Chile to image 5000 sq deg of the sky in five filters (grizY). By its completion the survey is expected to have generated a catalogue of 300 million galaxies with photometric redshifts and 100 million stars. In addition, a time-domain survey search over 27 sq deg is expected to yield a sample of thousands of Type Ia supernovae andmore » other transients. The main goals of DES are to characterise dark energy and dark matter, and to test alternative models of gravity; these goals will be pursued by studying large scale structure, cluster counts, weak gravitational lensing and Type Ia supernovae. However, DES also provides a rich data set which allows us to study many other aspects of astrophysics. In this paper we focus on additional science with DES, emphasizing areas where the survey makes a difference with respect to other current surveys. The paper illustrates, using early data (from `Science Verification', and from the first, second and third seasons of observations), what DES can tell us about the solar system, the Milky Way, galaxy evolution, quasars, and other topics. In addition, we show that if the cosmological model is assumed to be Lambda+ Cold Dark Matter (LCDM) then important astrophysics can be deduced from the primary DES probes. Lastly, highlights from DES early data include the discovery of 34 Trans Neptunian Objects, 17 dwarf satellites of the Milky Way, one published z > 6 quasar (and more confirmed) and two published superluminous supernovae (and more confirmed).« less

  14. On dark energy isocurvature perturbation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jie; Zhang, Xinmin; Li, Mingzhe E-mail: limz@nju.edu.cn

    2011-06-01

    Determining the equation of state of dark energy with astronomical observations is crucially important to understand the nature of dark energy. In performing a likelihood analysis of the data, especially of the cosmic microwave background and large scale structure data the dark energy perturbations have to be taken into account both for theoretical consistency and for numerical accuracy. Usually, one assumes in the global fitting analysis that the dark energy perturbations are adiabatic. In this paper, we study the dark energy isocurvature perturbation analytically and discuss its implications for the cosmic microwave background radiation and large scale structure. Furthermore, with the current astronomical observational data and by employing Markov Chain Monte Carlo method, we perform a global analysis of cosmological parameters assuming general initial conditions for the dark energy perturbations. The results show that the dark energy isocurvature perturbations are very weakly constrained and that purely adiabatic initial conditions are consistent with the data.

  15. Multi-Component Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Zurek, Kathryn M.

    2008-11-01

    We explore multi-component dark matter models where the dark sector consists of multiple stable states with different mass scales, and dark forces coupling these states further enrich the dynamics. The multi-component nature of the dark matter naturally arises in supersymmetric models, where both R parity and an additional symmetry, such as a Z{sub 2}, is preserved. We focus on a particular model where the heavier component of dark matter carries lepton number and annihilates mostly to leptons. The heavier component, which is essentially a sterile neutrino, naturally explains the PAMELA, ATIC and synchrotron signals, without an excess in antiprotons which typically mars other models of weak scale dark matter. The lighter component, which may have a mass from a GeV to a TeV, may explain the DAMA signal, and may be visible in low threshold runs of CDMS and XENON, which search for light dark matter.

  16. Complex Dark Matter

    ScienceCinema

    Lincoln, Don

    2016-07-12

    After a century of study, scientists have come to the realization that the ordinary matter made of atoms is a minority in the universe. In order to explain observations, it appears that there exists a new and undiscovered kind of matter, called dark matter, that is five times more prevalent than ordinary matter. The evidence for this new matter’s existence is very strong, but scientists know only a little about its nature. In today’s video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln talks about an exciting and unconventional idea, specifically that dark matter might have a very complex set of structures and interactions. While this idea is entirely speculative, it is an interesting hypothesis and one that scientists are investigating.

  17. Methanol in dark clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friberg, P.; Hjalmarson, A.; Madden, S. C.; Irvine, W. M.

    1988-01-01

    The first observation of methanol in cold dark clouds TMC 1, L 134 N, and B 335 is reported. In all three clouds, the relative abundance of methanol was found to be in the range of 10 to the -9th (i.e., almost an order of magnitude more abundant than acetaldehyde), with no observable variation between the clouds. Methanol emission showed a complex velocity structure; in TMC 1, clear indications of non-LTE were observed. Dimethyl ether was searched for in L 134 N; the upper limit of the column density of dimethyl ether in L 134 N was estimated to be 4 x 10 to the 12th/sq cm, assuming 5 K rotation temperature and LTE. This limit makes the abundance ratio (CH3)2O/CH3OH not higher than 1/5, indicating that dimethyl ether is not overabundant in this dark cloud.

  18. Temporal dark polariton solitons.

    PubMed

    Kartashov, Yaroslav V; Skryabin, Dmitry V

    2016-04-15

    We predict that strong coupling between waveguide photons and excitons of quantum well embedded into waveguide results in the formation of hybrid-dark and antidark light-matter solitons. Such temporal solitons exist due to interplay between repulsive excitonic nonlinearity and giant group-velocity dispersion arising in the vicinity of excitonic resonance. Such fully conservative states do not require external pumping to counteract losses and form continuous families parameterized by the power-dependent phase shift and velocity of their motion. Dark solitons are stable in the considerable part of their existence domain, while antidark solitons are always unstable. Both families exist outside the forbidden frequency gap of the linear system. PMID:27082338

  19. Dark Skies Rangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doran, Rosa

    2015-08-01

    Creating awareness about the importance of the protection of our dark skies is the main goal of the Dark Skies Rangers project, a joint effort from the NOAO and the Galileo Teacher Training Program. Hundreds of schools and thousands of students have been reached by this program. We will focus in particular on the experience being developed in Portugal where several municipalities have now received street light auditing produced by students with suggestions on how to enhance the energy efficiency of illumination of specific urban areas. In the International Year of Light we are investing our efforts in exporting the successful Portuguese experience to other countries. The recipe is simple: train teachers, engage students, foster the participation of local community and involve local authorities in the process. In this symposium we hope to draft the cookbook for the near future.

  20. Complex Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, Don

    2015-04-16

    After a century of study, scientists have come to the realization that the ordinary matter made of atoms is a minority in the universe. In order to explain observations, it appears that there exists a new and undiscovered kind of matter, called dark matter, that is five times more prevalent than ordinary matter. The evidence for this new matter’s existence is very strong, but scientists know only a little about its nature. In today’s video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln talks about an exciting and unconventional idea, specifically that dark matter might have a very complex set of structures and interactions. While this idea is entirely speculative, it is an interesting hypothesis and one that scientists are investigating.

  1. Dark-matter halo mergers as a fertile environment for low-mass Population III star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bovino, S.; Latif, M. A.; Grassi, T.; Schleicher, D. R. G.

    2014-07-01

    While Population III (Pop III) stars are typically thought to be massive, pathways towards lower mass Pop III stars may exist when the cooling of the gas is particularly enhanced. A possible route is enhanced HD cooling during the merging of dark-matter haloes. The mergers can lead to a high ionization degree catalysing the formation of HD molecules and may cool the gas down to the cosmic microwave background temperature. In this paper, we investigate the merging of mini-haloes with masses of a few 105 M⊙ and explore the feasibility of this scenario. We have performed three-dimensional cosmological hydrodynamics calculations with the ENZO code, solving the thermal and chemical evolution of the gas by employing the astrochemistry package KROME. Our results show that the HD abundance is increased by two orders of magnitude compared to the no-merging case and the halo cools down to ˜60 K triggering fragmentation. Based on Jeans estimates, the expected stellar masses are about 10 M⊙. Our findings show that the merging scenario is a potential pathway for the formation of low-mass stars.

  2. Falsification of dark energy by fluid mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Carl H.

    2011-11-01

    The 2011 Nobel Prize in Physics has been awarded for the discovery from observations of increased supernovae dimness interpreted as distance, so that the Universe expansion rate has changed from a rate decreasing since the big bang to one that is now increasing, driven by anti-gravity forces of a mysterious dark energy material comprising 70% of the Universe mass-energy. Fluid mechanical considerations falsify both the accelerating expansion and dark energy concepts. Kinematic viscosity is neglected in current stan- dard models of self-gravitational structure formation, which rely on cold dark matter CDM condensations and clusterings that are also falsified by fluid mechanics. Weakly collisional CDM particles do not condense but diffuse away. Photon viscosity predicts su- perclustervoid fragmentation early in the plasma epoch and protogalaxies at the end. At the plasma-gas transition, the plasma fragments into Earth-mass gas planets in trillion planet clumps (proto-globular-star-cluster PGCs). The hydrogen planets freeze to form the dark matter of galaxies and merge to form their stars. Dark energy is a systematic dimming error for Supernovae Ia caused by dark matter planets near hot white dwarf stars at the Chandrasekhar carbon limit. Evaporated planet atmospheres may or may not scatter light from the events depending on the line of sight.

  3. Seven-color Photometry and Classification of Stars in the Vicinity of the Dark Cloud Tgu H994 (ldn 1399, 1400 and 1402)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čepas, V.; Zdanavičius, J.; Zdanavičius, K.; Straižys, V.; Laugalys, V.

    The results of CCD photometry in the seven-color Vilnius system are given for 727 stars down to V = 17 mag in a 1.5 square degree field in the region of dark cloud TGU H994 P1 (or LDN 1399, LDN 1400 and LDN 1402) in Camelopardalis. Using the intrinsic color indices and photometric reddening-free Q-parameters, two-dimensional spectral types for 73% of stars are determined.

  4. Natural Neutrino Dark Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Gurwich, Ilya

    2010-06-23

    1 construct a general description for neutrino dark energy models, that do not require exotic particles or strange couplings. With the help of the above, this class of models is reduced to a single function with several constraints. It is shown that these models lead to some concrete predictions that can be verified (or disproved) within the next decade, using results from PLANK, EUCLID and JDEM.

  5. Dark energy from QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, Federico R.; Zhitnitsky, Ariel R.

    2010-08-30

    We review two mechanisms rooted in the infrared sector of QCD which, by exploiting the properties of the QCD ghost, as introduced by Veneziano, provide new insight on the cosmological dark energy problem, first, in the form of a Casimir-like energy from quantising QCD in a box, and second, in the form of additional, time-dependent, vacuum energy density in an expanding universe. Based on [1, 2].

  6. THE DARK MOLECULAR GAS

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfire, Mark G.; Hollenbach, David; McKee, Christopher F. E-mail: dhollenbach@seti.or

    2010-06-20

    The mass of molecular gas in an interstellar cloud is often measured using line emission from low rotational levels of CO, which are sensitive to the CO mass, and then scaling to the assumed molecular hydrogen H{sub 2} mass. However, a significant H{sub 2} mass may lie outside the CO region, in the outer regions of the molecular cloud where the gas-phase carbon resides in C or C{sup +}. Here, H{sub 2} self-shields or is shielded by dust from UV photodissociation, whereas CO is photodissociated. This H{sub 2} gas is 'dark' in molecular transitions because of the absence of CO and other trace molecules, and because H{sub 2} emits so weakly at temperatures 10 K dark mass and find that the fraction of the molecular mass in this dark component is remarkably constant ({approx}0.3 for average visual extinction through the cloud A-bar{sub V{approx_equal}}8) and insensitive to the incident ultraviolet radiation field strength, the internal density distribution, and the mass of the molecular cloud as long as A-bar{sub V}, or equivalently, the product of the average hydrogen nucleus column and the metallicity through the cloud, is constant. We also find that the dark mass fraction increases with decreasing A-bar{sub V}, since relatively more molecular H{sub 2} material lies outside the CO region in this case.

  7. Dynamics of Dark Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Copeland, Edmund J.

    2007-11-20

    I briefly review attempts that have been made to model dark energy. These include models of a cosmological constant, dynamical models where a scalar field may be responsible for the observed late time acceleration through to the possibility that we are not fully in control of the gravity sector and the acceleration may be some manifestation of modified gravity. In all cases we will see some degree of fine tuning is required with the current models.

  8. Stealth dark matter: Dark scalar baryons through the Higgs portal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appelquist, T.; Brower, R. C.; Buchoff, M. I.; Fleming, G. T.; Jin, X.-Y.; Kiskis, J.; Kribs, G. D.; Neil, E. T.; Osborn, J. C.; Rebbi, C.; Rinaldi, E.; Schaich, D.; Schroeder, C.; Syritsyn, S.; Vranas, P.; Weinberg, E.; Witzel, O.; Lattice Strong Dynamics LSD Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    We present a new model of stealth dark matter: a composite baryonic scalar of an S U (ND) strongly coupled theory with even ND≥4 . All mass scales are technically natural, and dark matter stability is automatic without imposing an additional discrete or global symmetry. Constituent fermions transform in vectorlike representations of the electroweak group that permit both electroweak-breaking and electroweak-preserving mass terms. This gives a tunable coupling of stealth dark matter to the Higgs boson independent of the dark matter mass itself. We specialize to S U (4 ), and investigate the constraints on the model from dark meson decay, electroweak precision measurements, basic collider limits, and spin-independent direct detection scattering through Higgs exchange. We exploit our earlier lattice simulations that determined the composite spectrum as well as the effective Higgs coupling of stealth dark matter in order to place bounds from direct detection, excluding constituent fermions with dominantly electroweak-breaking masses. A lower bound on the dark baryon mass mB≳300 GeV is obtained from the indirect requirement that the lightest dark meson not be observable at LEP II. We briefly survey some intriguing properties of stealth dark matter that are worthy of future study, including collider studies of dark meson production and decay; indirect detection signals from annihilation; relic abundance estimates for both symmetric and asymmetric mechanisms; and direct detection through electromagnetic polarizability, a detailed study of which will appear in a companion paper.

  9. Dark matter axions revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visinelli, Luca; Gondolo, Paolo

    2009-08-01

    We study for what specific values of the theoretical parameters the axion can form the totality of cold dark matter. We examine the allowed axion parameter region in the light of recent data collected by the WMAP5 mission plus baryon acoustic oscillations and supernovae, and assume an inflationary scenario and standard cosmology. We also upgrade the treatment of anharmonicities in the axion potential, which we find important in certain cases. If the Peccei-Quinn symmetry is restored after inflation, we recover the usual relation between axion mass and density, so that an axion mass ma=(85±3)μeV makes the axion 100% of the cold dark matter. If the Peccei-Quinn symmetry is broken during inflation, the axion can instead be 100% of the cold dark matter for ma<15meV provided a specific value of the initial misalignment angle θi is chosen in correspondence to a given value of its mass ma. Large values of the Peccei-Quinn symmetry breaking scale correspond to small, perhaps uncomfortably small, values of the initial misalignment angle θi.

  10. Unparticle dark energy

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, D.-C.; Stojkovic, Dejan; Dutta, Sourish

    2009-09-15

    We examine a dark energy model where a scalar unparticle degree of freedom plays the role of quintessence. In particular, we study a model where the unparticle degree of freedom has a standard kinetic term and a simple mass potential, the evolution is slowly rolling and the field value is of the order of the unparticle energy scale ({lambda}{sub u}). We study how the evolution of w depends on the parameters B (a function of unparticle scaling dimension d{sub u}), the initial value of the field {phi}{sub i} (or equivalently, {lambda}{sub u}) and the present matter density {omega}{sub m0}. We use observational data from type Ia supernovae, baryon acoustic oscillations and the cosmic microwave background to constrain the model parameters and find that these models are not ruled out by the observational data. From a theoretical point of view, unparticle dark energy model is very attractive, since unparticles (being bound states of fundamental fermions) are protected from radiative corrections. Further, coupling of unparticles to the standard model fields can be arbitrarily suppressed by raising the fundamental energy scale M{sub F}, making the unparticle dark energy model free of most of the problems that plague conventional scalar field quintessence models.

  11. Dark Skies are a Universal Resource: IYA Programs on Dark Skies Awareness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Constance E.; Bueter, C.; Pompea, S. M.; Berglund, K.; Mann, T.; Gay, P.; Crelin, B.; Collins, D.; Sparks, R.

    2008-05-01

    The loss of a dark night sky as a natural resource is a growing concern. It impacts not only astronomical research, but also health, ecology, safety, economics and energy conservation. Because of its relevance, "Dark Skies” is a theme of the US Node for the International Year of Astronomy (IYA). Its goal is to raise public awareness of the impact of artificial lighting on local environments by getting people involved in a variety of dark skies-related programs. To reach this goal, the ASP session will immerse participants in hands-on, minds-on activities, events and resources on dark skies awareness. These include a planetarium show on DVD, podcasting, social networking, a digital photography contest, The Great Switch Out, Earth Hour, National Dark Skies Week, a traveling exhibit, a 6-minute video tutorial, Dark Skies Teaching Sites, Astronomy Nights in the (National) Parks, Sidewalk Astronomy Nights, and unaided-eye and digital-meter star counting programs like GLOBE at Night. The ASP "Dark Skies” session is offered to provide IYA dark skies-related programs to a variety of attendees. Participants include professional or amateur astronomers, education and public outreach professionals, science center/museum/planetarium staff and educators who want to lead activities involving dark skies awareness in conjunction with IYA. During the session, each participant will be given a package of educational materials on the various dark skies programs. We will provide the "know-how” and the means for session attendees to become community leaders in promoting these dark skies programs as public events at their home institutions during IYA. Participants will be able to jump-start their education programs through the use of well-developed instructional materials and kits sent later if they commit to leading IYA dark skies activities. For more information about the IYA Dark Skies theme, visit http://astronomy2009.us/darkskies/.

  12. Dark Matter Burners: Preliminary Estimate

    SciTech Connect

    Moskalenko, Igor V.; Wai, L.; /SLAC

    2006-09-11

    We show that a star orbiting close enough to an adiabatically grown supermassive black hole can capture a large number of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) during its lifetime. WIMP annihilation energy release in low- to medium-mass stars is comparable with or even exceeds the luminosity of such stars due to thermonuclear burning. The excessive energy release in the stellar core may result in an evolution scenario different from what is expected for a regular star. The model thus predicts the existence of unusual stars within the central parsec of galactic nuclei. If found, such stars would provide evidence for the existence of particle dark matter. The excess luminosity of such stars attributed to WIMP ''burning'' can be used to infer the local WIMP matter density. A white dwarf with a highly eccentric orbit around the central black hole may exhibit variations in brightness correlated with the orbital phase. On the other hand, white dwarfs shown to lack such orbital brightness variations can be used to provide constraints on WIMP matter density, WIMP-nucleus scattering and pair annihilation cross sections.

  13. EDITORIAL: Focus on Dark Matter and Particle Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aprile, Elena; Profumo, Stefano

    2009-10-01

    Doetinchem, H Gast, T Kirn and S Schael Axion searches with helioscopes and astrophysical signatures for axion(-like) particles K Zioutas, M Tsagri, Y Semertzidis, T Papaevangelou, T Dafni and V Anastassopoulos The indirect search for dark matter with IceCube Francis Halzen and Dan Hooper DIRECT DARK MATTER SEARCHES:EXPERIMENTS Gaseous dark matter detectors G Sciolla and C J Martoff Search for dark matter with CRESST Rafael F Lang and Wolfgang Seidel DIRECT AND INDIRECT PARTICLE DARK MATTER SEARCHES:THEORY Dark matter annihilation around intermediate mass black holes: an update Gianfranco Bertone, Mattia Fornasa, Marco Taoso and Andrew R Zentner Update on the direct detection of dark matter in MSSM models with non-universal Higgs masses John Ellis, Keith A Olive and Pearl Sandick Dark stars: a new study of the first stars in the Universe Katherine Freese, Peter Bodenheimer, Paolo Gondolo and Douglas Spolyar Determining the mass of dark matter particles with direct detection experiments Chung-Lin Shan The detection of subsolar mass dark matter halos Savvas M Koushiappas Neutrino coherent scattering rates at direct dark matter detectors Louis E Strigari Gamma rays from dark matter annihilation in the central region of the Galaxy Pasquale Dario Serpico and Dan Hooper DARK MATTER MODELS The dark matter interpretation of the 511 keV line Céline Boehm Axions as dark matter particles Leanne D Duffy and Karl van Bibber Sterile neutrinos Alexander Kusenko Dark matter candidates Lars Bergström Minimal dark matter: model and results Marco Cirelli and Alessandro Strumia Shedding light on the dark sector with direct WIMP production Partha Konar, Kyoungchul Kong, Konstantin T Matchev and Maxim Perelstein Axinos as dark matter particles Laura Covi and Jihn E Kim

  14. Unified dark energy-dark matter model with inverse quintessence

    SciTech Connect

    Ansoldi, Stefano; Guendelman, Eduardo I. E-mail: guendel@bgu.ac.il

    2013-05-01

    We consider a model where both dark energy and dark matter originate from the coupling of a scalar field with a non-canonical kinetic term to, both, a metric measure and a non-metric measure. An interacting dark energy/dark matter scenario can be obtained by introducing an additional scalar that can produce non constant vacuum energy and associated variations in dark matter. The phenomenology is most interesting when the kinetic term of the additional scalar field is ghost-type, since in this case the dark energy vanishes in the early universe and then grows with time. This constitutes an ''inverse quintessence scenario'', where the universe starts from a zero vacuum energy density state, instead of approaching it in the future.

  15. Understanding Dark Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greyber, Howard

    2009-11-01

    By careful analysis of the data from the WMAP satellite, scientists were surprised to determine that about 70% of the matter in our universe is in some unknown form, and labeled it Dark Energy. Earlier, in 1998, two separate international groups of astronomers studying Ia supernovae were even more surprised to be forced to conclude that an amazing smooth transition occurred, from the expected slowing down of the expansion of our universe (due to normal positive gravitation) to an accelerating expansion of the universe that began at at a big bang age of the universe of about nine billion years. In 1918 Albert Einstein stated that his Lambda term in his theory of general relativity was ees,``the energy of empty space,'' and represented a negative pressure and thus a negative gravity force. However my 2004 ``Strong'' Magnetic Field model (SMF) for the origin of magnetic fields at Combination Time (Astro-ph0509223 and 0509222) in our big bang universe produces a unique topology for Superclusters, having almost all the mass, visible and invisible, i.e. from clusters of galaxies down to particles with mass, on the surface of an ellipsoid surrounding a growing very high vacuum. If I hypothesize, with Einstein, that there exists a constant ees force per unit volume, then, gradually, as the universe expands from Combination Time, two effects occur (a) the volume of the central high vacuum region increases, and (b) the density of positive gravity particles in the central region of each Supercluster in our universe decreases dramatically. Thus eventually Einstein's general relativity theory's repulsive gravity of the central very high vacuum region becomes larger than the positive gravitational attraction of all the clusters of galaxies, galaxies, quasars, stars and plasma on the Supercluster shell, and the observed accelerating expansion of our universe occurs. This assumes that our universe is made up mostly of such Superclusters. It is conceivable that the high vacuum

  16. TRACING THE PECULIAR DARK MATTER STRUCTURE IN THE GALAXY CLUSTER Cl 0024+17 WITH INTRACLUSTER STARS AND GAS

    SciTech Connect

    Jee, M. J.

    2010-07-01

    Intracluster light (ICL) is believed to originate from the stars stripped from cluster galaxies. They are no longer gravitationally bound to individual galaxies, but to the cluster, and their smooth distribution potentially makes them serve as much denser tracers of the cluster dark matter than the sparsely distributed cluster galaxies. We present our study of the ICL in the galaxy cluster Cl 0024+17 using both Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) and Subaru data, where we previously reported the discovery of a ring-like dark matter structure with gravitational lensing. The ACS images provide much lower sky levels than ground-based data, and enable us to measure relative variation of surface brightness reliably. This analysis is repeated with the Subaru images to examine if consistent features are recovered despite a different reduction scheme and different instrumental characteristics. We find that the ICL profile clearly resembles the peculiar mass profile, which stops decreasing at r {approx} 50'' ({approx}265 kpc) and slowly increases until it turns over at r {approx} 75'' ({approx}397 kpc). This feature is seen in both ACS and Subaru images for nearly all available passband images while the features are in general stronger in red filters. The consistency across different filters and instruments strongly rules out the possibility that the feature might come from any residual, uncorrected calibration errors. In addition, our re-analysis of the cluster X-ray data shows that the peculiar mass structure is also indicated by a non-negligible (3.7{sigma} in Chandra and 2.4{sigma} in XMM-Newton) bump in the intracluster gas profile when the geometric center of the dark matter ring, not the peak of the X-ray emission, is chosen as the center of the radial bin. The location of the gas ring is closer to the center by {approx}15'' ({approx}80 kpc), raising an interesting possibility that the ring-like structure is expanding and the gas ring is lagging behind perhaps because

  17. Milli-interacting dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallemacq, Quentin

    2013-09-01

    We present a dark matter model reproducing well the results from DAMA/LIBRA and CoGeNT and having no contradiction with the negative results from XENON100 and CDMS-II/Ge. Two new species of fermions F and G form hydrogenlike atoms with standard atomic size through a dark U(1) gauge interaction carried out by a dark massless photon. A Yukawa coupling between the nuclei F and neutral scalar particles S induces an attractive shorter-range interaction. This dark sector interacts with our standard particles because of the presence of two mixings, a kinetic photon-dark photon mixing, and a mass σ-S mixing. The dark atoms from the halo diffuse elastically in terrestrial matter until they thermalize and then reach underground detectors with thermal energies, where they form bound states with nuclei by radiative capture. This causes the emission of photons that produce the signals observed by direct-search experiments.

  18. The DarkSide awakens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davini, S.; Agnes, P.; Agostino, L.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Alexander, T.; Alton, A. K.; Arisaka, K.; Back, H. O.; Baldin, B.; Biery, K.; Bonfini, G.; Bossa, M.; Bottino, B.; Brigatti, A.; Brodsky, J.; Budano, F.; Bussino, S.; Cadeddu, M.; Cadonati, L.; Cadoni, M.; Calaprice, F.; Canci, N.; Candela, A.; Cao, H.; Cariello, M.; Carlini, M.; Catalanotti, S.; Cavalcante, P.; Chepurnov, A.; Cocco, A. G.; Covone, G.; D'Angelo, D.; D'Incecco, M.; De Cecco, S.; De Deo, M.; De Vincenzi, M.; Derbin, A.; Devoto, A.; Di Eusanio, F.; Di Pietro, G.; Edkins, E.; Empl, A.; Fan, A.; Fiorillo, G.; Fomenko, K.; Foster, G.; Franco, D.; Gabriele, F.; Galbiati, C.; Giganti, C.; Goretti, A. M.; Granato, F.; Grandi, L.; Gromov, M.; Guan, M.; Guardincerri, Y.; Hackett, B. R.; Herner, K. R.; Hungerford, E. V.; Ianni, Aldo; Ianni, Andrea; James, I.; Jollet, C.; Keeter, K.; Kendziora, C. L.; Kobychev, V.; Koh, G.; Korablev, D.; Korga, G.; Kubankin, A.; Li, X.; Lissia, M.; Lombardi, P.; Luitz, S.; Ma, Y.; Machulin, I. N.; Mandarano, A.; Mari, S. M.; Maricic, J.; Marini, L.; Martoff, C. J.; Meregaglia, A.; Meyers, P. D.; Miletic, T.; Milincic, R.; Montanari, D.; Monte, A.; Montuschi, M.; Monzani, M. E.; Mosteiro, P.; Mount, B. J.; Muratova, V. N.; Musico, P.; Napolitano, J.; Orsini, M.; Ortica, F.; Pagani, L.; Pallavicini, M.; Pantic, E.; Parmeggiano, S.; Pelczar, K.; Pelliccia, N.; Perasso, S.; Pocar, A.; Pordes, S.; Pugachev, D. A.; Qian, H.; Randle, K.; Ranucci, G.; Razeto, A.; Reinhold, B.; Renshaw, A. L.; Romani, A.; Rossi, B.; Rossi, N.; Rountree, S. D.; Sablone, D.; Saggese, P.; Saldanha, R.; Sands, W.; Sangiorgio, S.; Savarese, C.; Segreto, E.; Semenov, D. A.; Shields, E.; Singh, P. N.; Skorokhvatov, M. D.; Smirnov, O.; Sotnikov, A.; Stanford, C.; Suvorov, Y.; Tartaglia, R.; Tatarowicz, J.; Testera, G.; Tonazzo, A.; Trinchese, P.; Unzhakov, E. V.; Vishneva, A.; Vogelaar, B.; Wada, M.; Walker, S.; Wang, H.; Wang, Y.; Watson, A. W.; Westerdale, S.; Wilhelmi, J.; Wojcik, M. M.; Xiang, X.; Xu, J.; Yang, C.; Yoo, J.; Zavatarelli, S.; Zec, A.; Zhong, W.; Zhu, C.; Zuzel, G.

    2016-05-01

    The DarkSide program at LNGS aims to perform background-free WIMP searches using two phase liquid argon time projection chambers, with the ultimate goal of covering all parameters down to the so-called neutrino floor. One of the distinct features of the program is the use of underground argon with has a reduced content of the radioactive 39Ar compared to atmospheric argon. The DarkSide Collaboration is currently operating the DarkSide-50 experiment, the first such WIMP detector using underground argon. Operations with underground argon indicate a suppression of 39Ar by a factor (1.4 ± 0.2) × 103 relative to atmospheric argon. The new results obtained with DarkSide-50 and the plans for the next steps of the DarkSide program, the 20t fiducial mass DarkSide-20k detector and the 200 t fiducial Argo, are reviewed in this proceedings.

  19. MEST-The dark hole, dark comet and dark matter are the space-time center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Dayong

    2012-03-01

    The model of dark matter such as dark hole (black hole), dark comet and dark light have the space-time center. The wave is the space-time. Because the dark matter is space-time center, so it has the ``negative'' mass.(http://meetings.aps.org/link/BAPS.2011.MAR.K1.68) (1) Gm1m2r^2=-Gc^4E1E2r^2. (2) 14πɛ0q1q2r^2=-μ0c^24πq1q2r^2. Among it, m: the mass, r: the displacement, E: the energy, q: the quantity of electricity. Like charges repel each other, unlike charges attract; Like magnetic attract, unlike magnetic repel each other. Unlike mass repel each other, like mass attract; like energy repel each other, unlike energy attract. So the dark matter has a repulsive force to the stellar matter. So it can cause the discrepancy between the rotation curves. The nuclear of atom has antielectron. The proton (energy particle) get its charge; the neutron (mass particle) get its mass. It is a new atomic model. Like isospin repel each other, unlike isospin attract, Like spin attract, unlike spin repel each other. The dark nucleus is made up of the isospin and spin particle-space-time particle such as dark photon and dark neutrino. The space-time center of dark light of dark matter has valence mass-valence neutron and valence energy-valence proton. The dark light can take a reaction with neutrino. So we can use neutrino to find it. (3) D^-n+νe->p+e. (4) D^-p-νe->n-e. Among it, D: the center of dark light, -n: the negative valence neutron, νe: electron neutrino, p: proton, e: electron.

  20. Direct search for dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Jonghee; /Fermilab

    2009-12-01

    Dark matter is hypothetical matter which does not interact with electromagnetic radiation. The existence of dark matter is only inferred from gravitational effects of astrophysical observations to explain the missing mass component of the Universe. Weakly Interacting Massive Particles are currently the most popular candidate to explain the missing mass component. I review the current status of experimental searches of dark matter through direct detection using terrestrial detectors.

  1. Dark Matter Velocity Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Speckhard, Eric G; Ng, Kenny C Y; Beacom, John F; Laha, Ranjan

    2016-01-22

    Dark matter decays or annihilations that produce linelike spectra may be smoking-gun signals. However, even such distinctive signatures can be mimicked by astrophysical or instrumental causes. We show that velocity spectroscopy-the measurement of energy shifts induced by relative motion of source and observer-can separate these three causes with minimal theoretical uncertainties. The principal obstacle has been energy resolution, but upcoming experiments will have the precision needed. As an example, we show that the imminent Astro-H mission can use Milky Way observations to separate possible causes of the 3.5-keV line. We discuss other applications. PMID:26849582

  2. Dark Matter Velocity Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Speckhard, Eric G; Ng, Kenny C Y; Beacom, John F; Laha, Ranjan

    2016-01-22

    Dark matter decays or annihilations that produce linelike spectra may be smoking-gun signals. However, even such distinctive signatures can be mimicked by astrophysical or instrumental causes. We show that velocity spectroscopy-the measurement of energy shifts induced by relative motion of source and observer-can separate these three causes with minimal theoretical uncertainties. The principal obstacle has been energy resolution, but upcoming experiments will have the precision needed. As an example, we show that the imminent Astro-H mission can use Milky Way observations to separate possible causes of the 3.5-keV line. We discuss other applications.

  3. Dark matter axions

    SciTech Connect

    Sikivie, P. |

    1992-09-01

    The physics of axions is briefly reviewed theoretically, and various constraints on the axion mass are recounted. Then the two main contributions to the present cosmological axion energy density, that due to the realignment of the vacuum during the QCD phase transition and that from axions radiated by cosmic axion strings, are discussed. Next, two detection schemes for axions that are sensitive to different mass ranges, an electromagnetic cavity permeated by a strong magnetic field and a system of superconducting wires embedded in a material transparent to microwave radiation, are described. Finally, the phase space structure of cold dark matter galactic halos is considered. (RWR)

  4. Dark matter axions

    SciTech Connect

    Sikivie, P. . Inst. for Theoretical Physics Florida Univ., Gainesville, FL . Dept. of Physics)

    1992-01-01

    The physics of axions is briefly reviewed theoretically, and various constraints on the axion mass are recounted. Then the two main contributions to the present cosmological axion energy density, that due to the realignment of the vacuum during the QCD phase transition and that from axions radiated by cosmic axion strings, are discussed. Next, two detection schemes for axions that are sensitive to different mass ranges, an electromagnetic cavity permeated by a strong magnetic field and a system of superconducting wires embedded in a material transparent to microwave radiation, are described. Finally, the phase space structure of cold dark matter galactic halos is considered. (RWR)

  5. Astrophysical constraints on dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Chiu Man; Hsu, Stephen D. H.

    2016-02-01

    Dark energy (i.e., a cosmological constant) leads, in the Newtonian approximation, to a repulsive force which grows linearly with distance and which can have astrophysical consequences. For example, the dark energy force overcomes the gravitational attraction from an isolated object (e.g., dwarf galaxy) of mass 107M⊙ at a distance of 23 kpc. Observable velocities of bound satellites (rotation curves) could be significantly affected, and therefore used to measure or constrain the dark energy density. Here, isolated means that the gravitational effect of large nearby galaxies (specifically, of their dark matter halos) is negligible; examples of isolated dwarf galaxies include Antlia or DDO 190.

  6. THE DARK ENERGY CAMERA

    SciTech Connect

    Flaugher, B.; Diehl, H. T.; Alvarez, O.; Angstadt, R.; Annis, J. T.; Buckley-Geer, E. J.; Honscheid, K.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Bonati, M.; Antonik, M.; Brooks, D.; Ballester, O.; Cardiel-Sas, L.; Beaufore, L.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bernstein, R. A.; Bigelow, B.; Boprie, D.; Campa, J.; Castander, F. J.; Collaboration: DES Collaboration; and others

    2015-11-15

    The Dark Energy Camera is a new imager with a 2.°2 diameter field of view mounted at the prime focus of the Victor M. Blanco 4 m telescope on Cerro Tololo near La Serena, Chile. The camera was designed and constructed by the Dark Energy Survey Collaboration and meets or exceeds the stringent requirements designed for the wide-field and supernova surveys for which the collaboration uses it. The camera consists of a five-element optical corrector, seven filters, a shutter with a 60 cm aperture, and a charge-coupled device (CCD) focal plane of 250 μm thick fully depleted CCDs cooled inside a vacuum Dewar. The 570 megapixel focal plane comprises 62 2k × 4k CCDs for imaging and 12 2k × 2k CCDs for guiding and focus. The CCDs have 15 μm × 15 μm pixels with a plate scale of 0.″263 pixel{sup −1}. A hexapod system provides state-of-the-art focus and alignment capability. The camera is read out in 20 s with 6–9 electron readout noise. This paper provides a technical description of the camera's engineering, construction, installation, and current status.

  7. Optical Dark Rogue Wave.

    PubMed

    Frisquet, Benoit; Kibler, Bertrand; Morin, Philippe; Baronio, Fabio; Conforti, Matteo; Millot, Guy; Wabnitz, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Photonics enables to develop simple lab experiments that mimic water rogue wave generation phenomena, as well as relativistic gravitational effects such as event horizons, gravitational lensing and Hawking radiation. The basis for analog gravity experiments is light propagation through an effective moving medium obtained via the nonlinear response of the material. So far, analogue gravity kinematics was reproduced in scalar optical wave propagation test models. Multimode and spatiotemporal nonlinear interactions exhibit a rich spectrum of excitations, which may substantially expand the range of rogue wave phenomena, and lead to novel space-time analogies, for example with multi-particle interactions. By injecting two colliding and modulated pumps with orthogonal states of polarization in a randomly birefringent telecommunication optical fiber, we provide the first experimental demonstration of an optical dark rogue wave. We also introduce the concept of multi-component analog gravity, whereby localized spatiotemporal horizons are associated with the dark rogue wave solution of the two-component nonlinear Schrödinger system. PMID:26864099

  8. Optical Dark Rogue Wave

    PubMed Central

    Frisquet, Benoit; Kibler, Bertrand; Morin, Philippe; Baronio, Fabio; Conforti, Matteo; Millot, Guy; Wabnitz, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Photonics enables to develop simple lab experiments that mimic water rogue wave generation phenomena, as well as relativistic gravitational effects such as event horizons, gravitational lensing and Hawking radiation. The basis for analog gravity experiments is light propagation through an effective moving medium obtained via the nonlinear response of the material. So far, analogue gravity kinematics was reproduced in scalar optical wave propagation test models. Multimode and spatiotemporal nonlinear interactions exhibit a rich spectrum of excitations, which may substantially expand the range of rogue wave phenomena, and lead to novel space-time analogies, for example with multi-particle interactions. By injecting two colliding and modulated pumps with orthogonal states of polarization in a randomly birefringent telecommunication optical fiber, we provide the first experimental demonstration of an optical dark rogue wave. We also introduce the concept of multi-component analog gravity, whereby localized spatiotemporal horizons are associated with the dark rogue wave solution of the two-component nonlinear Schrödinger system. PMID:26864099

  9. The Dark Energy Camera

    SciTech Connect

    Flaugher, B.

    2015-04-11

    The Dark Energy Camera is a new imager with a 2.2-degree diameter field of view mounted at the prime focus of the Victor M. Blanco 4-meter telescope on Cerro Tololo near La Serena, Chile. The camera was designed and constructed by the Dark Energy Survey Collaboration, and meets or exceeds the stringent requirements designed for the wide-field and supernova surveys for which the collaboration uses it. The camera consists of a five element optical corrector, seven filters, a shutter with a 60 cm aperture, and a CCD focal plane of 250-μm thick fully depleted CCDs cooled inside a vacuum Dewar. The 570 Mpixel focal plane comprises 62 2k x 4k CCDs for imaging and 12 2k x 2k CCDs for guiding and focus. The CCDs have 15μm x 15μm pixels with a plate scale of 0.263" per pixel. A hexapod system provides state-of-the-art focus and alignment capability. The camera is read out in 20 seconds with 6-9 electrons readout noise. This paper provides a technical description of the camera's engineering, construction, installation, and current status.

  10. Methanol in dark clouds.

    PubMed

    Friberg, P; Madden, S C; Hjalmarson, A; Irvine, W M

    1988-01-01

    We report observations, for the first time, of the 2(0) - 1(0)A+ and E, 2(-1) - 1(-1) E, and 1(0) - 0(0)A+ lines of methanol (CH3OH) in three dark cold clouds, TMC1, L134N, and B335. The CH3OH emission is extended in these clouds and shows a complex velocity structure. Clear indications of non LTE excitation are observed in TMC 1. Estimated column densities are a few 10(13) cm-2. Although less abundant than formaldehyde (H2CO), methanol is almost an order of magnitude more abundant than acetaldehyde (CH3CHO), in these clouds. Dimethyl ether was searched for in L134N, to an upper limit of 4 10(12) cm-2 (3 sigma). Implications for dark cloud excitation and chemistry are discussed. A new, more accurate, rest frequency 96741.39(0.01) MHz is determined for the 2(0) - 1(0) A+ E line of methanol.

  11. (Mainly) axion dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baer, Howard

    2016-06-01

    The strong CP problem of QCD is at heart a problem of naturalness: why is the FF ˜ term highly suppressed in the QCD Lagrangian when it seems necessary to explain why there are three and not four light pions? The most elegant solution posits a spontaneously broken Peccei-Quinn (PQ) symmetry which requires the existence of the axion field a. The axion field settles to the minimum of its potential thus removing the offensive term but giving rise to the physical axion whose coherent oscillations can make up the cold dark matter. Only now are experiments such as ADMX beginning to explore QCD axion parameter space. Since a bonafide scalar particle- the Higgs boson- has been discovered, one might expect its mass to reside at the axion scale fa ˜ 1011 GeV. The Higgs mass is elegantly stabilized by supersymmetry: in this case the axion is accompanied by its axino and saxion superpartners. Requiring naturalness also in the electroweak sector implies higgsino-like WIMPs so then we expect mixed axion-WIMP dark matter. Ultimately we would expect detection of both an axion and a WIMP while signals for light higgsinos may show up at LHC and must show up at ILC.

  12. Optical Dark Rogue Wave.

    PubMed

    Frisquet, Benoit; Kibler, Bertrand; Morin, Philippe; Baronio, Fabio; Conforti, Matteo; Millot, Guy; Wabnitz, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Photonics enables to develop simple lab experiments that mimic water rogue wave generation phenomena, as well as relativistic gravitational effects such as event horizons, gravitational lensing and Hawking radiation. The basis for analog gravity experiments is light propagation through an effective moving medium obtained via the nonlinear response of the material. So far, analogue gravity kinematics was reproduced in scalar optical wave propagation test models. Multimode and spatiotemporal nonlinear interactions exhibit a rich spectrum of excitations, which may substantially expand the range of rogue wave phenomena, and lead to novel space-time analogies, for example with multi-particle interactions. By injecting two colliding and modulated pumps with orthogonal states of polarization in a randomly birefringent telecommunication optical fiber, we provide the first experimental demonstration of an optical dark rogue wave. We also introduce the concept of multi-component analog gravity, whereby localized spatiotemporal horizons are associated with the dark rogue wave solution of the two-component nonlinear Schrödinger system.

  13. The Dark Energy Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flaugher, B.; Diehl, H. T.; Honscheid, K.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Alvarez, O.; Angstadt, R.; Annis, J. T.; Antonik, M.; Ballester, O.; Beaufore, L.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bernstein, R. A.; Bigelow, B.; Bonati, M.; Boprie, D.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E. J.; Campa, J.; Cardiel-Sas, L.; Castander, F. J.; Castilla, J.; Cease, H.; Cela-Ruiz, J. M.; Chappa, S.; Chi, E.; Cooper, C.; da Costa, L. N.; Dede, E.; Derylo, G.; DePoy, D. L.; de Vicente, J.; Doel, P.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Eiting, J.; Elliott, A. E.; Emes, J.; Estrada, J.; Fausti Neto, A.; Finley, D. A.; Flores, R.; Frieman, J.; Gerdes, D.; Gladders, M. D.; Gregory, B.; Gutierrez, G. R.; Hao, J.; Holland, S. E.; Holm, S.; Huffman, D.; Jackson, C.; James, D. J.; Jonas, M.; Karcher, A.; Karliner, I.; Kent, S.; Kessler, R.; Kozlovsky, M.; Kron, R. G.; Kubik, D.; Kuehn, K.; Kuhlmann, S.; Kuk, K.; Lahav, O.; Lathrop, A.; Lee, J.; Levi, M. E.; Lewis, P.; Li, T. S.; Mandrichenko, I.; Marshall, J. L.; Martinez, G.; Merritt, K. W.; Miquel, R.; Muñoz, F.; Neilsen, E. H.; Nichol, R. C.; Nord, B.; Ogando, R.; Olsen, J.; Palaio, N.; Patton, K.; Peoples, J.; Plazas, A. A.; Rauch, J.; Reil, K.; Rheault, J.-P.; Roe, N. A.; Rogers, H.; Roodman, A.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Schindler, R. H.; Schmidt, R.; Schmitt, R.; Schubnell, M.; Schultz, K.; Schurter, P.; Scott, L.; Serrano, S.; Shaw, T. M.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Stefanik, A.; Stuermer, W.; Suchyta, E.; Sypniewski, A.; Tarle, G.; Thaler, J.; Tighe, R.; Tran, C.; Tucker, D.; Walker, A. R.; Wang, G.; Watson, M.; Weaverdyck, C.; Wester, W.; Woods, R.; Yanny, B.; DES Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    The Dark Energy Camera is a new imager with a 2.°2 diameter field of view mounted at the prime focus of the Victor M. Blanco 4 m telescope on Cerro Tololo near La Serena, Chile. The camera was designed and constructed by the Dark Energy Survey Collaboration and meets or exceeds the stringent requirements designed for the wide-field and supernova surveys for which the collaboration uses it. The camera consists of a five-element optical corrector, seven filters, a shutter with a 60 cm aperture, and a charge-coupled device (CCD) focal plane of 250 μm thick fully depleted CCDs cooled inside a vacuum Dewar. The 570 megapixel focal plane comprises 62 2k × 4k CCDs for imaging and 12 2k × 2k CCDs for guiding and focus. The CCDs have 15 μm × 15 μm pixels with a plate scale of 0.″263 pixel-1. A hexapod system provides state-of-the-art focus and alignment capability. The camera is read out in 20 s with 6-9 electron readout noise. This paper provides a technical description of the camera's engineering, construction, installation, and current status.

  14. Correlation between dark matter and dark radiation in string compactifications

    SciTech Connect

    Allahverdi, Rouzbeh; Cicoli, Michele; Dutta, Bhaskar; Sinha, Kuver E-mail: mcicoli@ictp.it E-mail: kusinha@syr.edu

    2014-10-01

    Reheating in string compactifications is generically driven by the decay of the lightest modulus which produces Standard Model particles, dark matter and light hidden sector degrees of freedom that behave as dark radiation. This common origin allows us to find an interesting correlation between dark matter and dark radiation. By combining present upper bounds on the effective number of neutrino species N{sub eff} with lower bounds on the reheating temperature as a function of the dark matter mass m{sub DM} from Fermi data, we obtain strong constraints on the (N{sub eff}, m{sub DM})-plane. Most of the allowed region in this plane corresponds to non-thermal scenarios with Higgsino-like dark matter. Thermal dark matter can be allowed only if N{sub eff} tends to its Standard Model value. We show that the above situation is realised in models with perturbative moduli stabilisation where the production of dark radiation is unavoidable since bulk closed string axions remain light and do not get eaten up by anomalous U(1)s.

  15. The Photosynthetic Dark Reactions Do Not Operate in the Dark.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lonergan, Thomas A.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the common misconception persistent in high school and college level introductory biology texts that "dark reactions" of the Calvin cycle actually occur in the dark. Explains that they are indirectly dependent on the presence of light for their activity. (ASK)

  16. Soft X-ray observations of pre-main sequence stars in the chamaeleon dark cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feigelson, Eric D.; Kriss, Gerard A.

    1987-01-01

    Einstein IPC observations of the nearby Chamaeleon I star forming cloud show 22 well-resolved soft X-ray sources in a 1x2 deg region. Twelve are associated with H-alpha emission line pre-main sequence (PMS) stars, and four with optically selected PMS stars. Several X-ray sources have two or more PMS stars in their error circles. Optical spectra were obtained at CTIO of possible stellar counterparts of the remaining X-ray sources. They reveal 5 probable new cloud members, K7-MO stars with weak or absent emission lines. These naked X-ray selected PMS stars are similar to those found in the Taurus-Auriga cloud. The spatial distributions and H-R diagrams of the X-ray and optically selected PMS stars in the cloud are very similar. Luminosity functions indicate the Chamaeleon stars are on average approximately 5 times more X-ray luminous than Pleiad dwarfs. A significant correlation between L sub x and optical magnitude suggests this trend may continue within the PMS phase of stellar evolution. The relation of increasing X-ray luminosity with decreasing stellar ages is thus extended to stellar ages as young as 1 million years.

  17. Halo cold dark matter and microlensing

    SciTech Connect

    Gates, Evalyn; Turner, Michael S.

    1993-12-01

    There is good evidence that most of the baryons in the Universe are dark and some evidence that most of the matter in the Universe is nonbaryonic with cold dark matter (cdm) being a promising possibility. We discuss expectations for the abundance of baryons and cdm in the halo of our galaxy and locally. We show that in plausible cdm models the local density of cdm is at least $10^{-25}\\gcmm3$. We also discuss what one can learn about the the local cdm density from microlensing of stars in the LMC by dark stars in the halo and, based upon a suite of reasonable two-component halo models, conclude that microlensing is not a sensitive probe of the local cdm density.

  18. Stealth Dark Matter: Dark scalar baryons through the Higgs portal

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Appelquist, T.; Brower, R. C.; Buchoff, M. I.; Fleming, G. T.; Jin, X. -Y.; Kiskis, J.; Kribs, G. D.; Neil, E. T.; Osborn, J. C.; Rebbi, C.; et al

    2015-10-23

    We present a new model of "Stealth Dark Matter": a composite baryonic scalar of an SU(ND) strongly coupled theory with even ND ≥ 4. All mass scales are technically natural, and dark matter stability is automatic without imposing an additional discrete or global symmetry. Constituent fermions transform in vectorlike representations of the electroweak group that permit both electroweak-breaking and electroweak-preserving mass terms. This gives a tunable coupling of stealth dark matter to the Higgs boson independent of the dark matter mass itself. We specialize to SU(4), and investigate the constraints on the model from dark meson decay, electroweak precision measurements,more » basic collider limits, and spin-independent direct detection scattering through Higgs exchange. We exploit our earlier lattice simulations that determined the composite spectrum as well as the effective Higgs coupling of stealth dark matter in order to place bounds from direct detection, excluding constituent fermions with dominantly electroweak-breaking masses. A lower bound on the dark baryon mass mB ≳ 300 GeV is obtained from the indirect requirement that the lightest dark meson not be observable at LEP II. Furthermore, we briefly survey some intriguing properties of stealth dark matter that are worthy of future study, including collider studies of dark meson production and decay; indirect detection signals from annihilation; relic abundance estimates for both symmetric and asymmetric mechanisms; and direct detection through electromagnetic polarizability, a detailed study of which will appear in a companion paper.« less

  19. Stealth Dark Matter: Dark scalar baryons through the Higgs portal

    SciTech Connect

    Appelquist, T.; Brower, R. C.; Buchoff, M. I.; Fleming, G. T.; Jin, X. -Y.; Kiskis, J.; Kribs, G. D.; Neil, E. T.; Osborn, J. C.; Rebbi, C.; Rinaldi, E.; Schaich, D.; Schroeder, C.; Syritsyn, S.; Vranas, P.; Weinberg, E.; Witzel, O.

    2015-10-23

    We present a new model of "Stealth Dark Matter": a composite baryonic scalar of an SU(ND) strongly coupled theory with even ND ≥ 4. All mass scales are technically natural, and dark matter stability is automatic without imposing an additional discrete or global symmetry. Constituent fermions transform in vectorlike representations of the electroweak group that permit both electroweak-breaking and electroweak-preserving mass terms. This gives a tunable coupling of stealth dark matter to the Higgs boson independent of the dark matter mass itself. We specialize to SU(4), and investigate the constraints on the model from dark meson decay, electroweak precision measurements, basic collider limits, and spin-independent direct detection scattering through Higgs exchange. We exploit our earlier lattice simulations that determined the composite spectrum as well as the effective Higgs coupling of stealth dark matter in order to place bounds from direct detection, excluding constituent fermions with dominantly electroweak-breaking masses. A lower bound on the dark baryon mass mB ≳ 300 GeV is obtained from the indirect requirement that the lightest dark meson not be observable at LEP II. Furthermore, we briefly survey some intriguing properties of stealth dark matter that are worthy of future study, including collider studies of dark meson production and decay; indirect detection signals from annihilation; relic abundance estimates for both symmetric and asymmetric mechanisms; and direct detection through electromagnetic polarizability, a detailed study of which will appear in a companion paper.

  20. Optimizing New Dark Energy Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Tyson, J. Anthony

    2013-08-26

    Next generation “Stage IV” dark energy experiments under design during this grant, and now under construction, will enable the determination of the properties of dark energy and dark matter to unprecedented precision using multiple complementary probes. The most pressing challenge in these experiments is the characterization and understanding of the systematic errors present within any given experimental configuration and the resulting impact on the accuracy of our constraints on dark energy physics. The DETF and the P5 panel in their reports recommended “Expanded support for ancillary measurements required for the long-term program and for projects that will improve our understanding and reduction of the dominant systematic measurement errors.” Looking forward to the next generation Stage IV experiments we have developed a program to address the most important potential systematic errors within these experiments. Using data from current facilities it has been feasible and timely to undertake a detailed investigation of the systematic errors. In this DOE grant we studied of the source and impact of the dominant systematic effects in dark energy measurements, and developed new analysis tools and techniques to minimize their impact. Progress under this grant is briefly reviewed in this technical report. This work was a necessary precursor to the coming generations of wide-deep probes of the nature of dark energy and dark matter. The research has already had an impact on improving the efficiencies of all Stage III and IV dark energy experiments.

  1. Plasma dark matter direct detection

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, J.D.; Foot, R. E-mail: rfoot@unimelb.edu.au

    2016-01-01

    Dark matter in spiral galaxies like the Milky Way may take the form of a dark plasma. Hidden sector dark matter charged under an unbroken U(1)' gauge interaction provides a simple and well defined particle physics model realising this possibility. The assumed U(1)' neutrality of the Universe then implies (at least) two oppositely charged dark matter components with self-interactions mediated via a massless 'dark photon' (the U(1)' gauge boson). In addition to nuclear recoils such dark matter can give rise to keV electron recoils in direct detection experiments. In this context, the detailed physical properties of the dark matter plasma interacting with the Earth is required. This is a complex system, which is here modelled as a fluid governed by the magnetohydrodynamic equations. These equations are numerically solved for some illustrative examples, and implications for direct detection experiments discussed. In particular, the analysis presented here leaves open the intriguing possibility that the DAMA annual modulation signal is due primarily to electron recoils (or even a combination of electron recoils and nuclear recoils). The importance of diurnal modulation (in addition to annual modulation) as a means of probing this kind of dark matter is also emphasised.

  2. The structure and early evolution of massive star forming regions. Substructure in the infrared dark cloud SDC13

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, C.; Fuller, G. A.; Peretto, N.; Zhang, Q.; Traficante, A.; Avison, A.; Jimenez-Serra, I.

    2016-10-01

    Context. Investigations into the substructure of massive star forming regions are essential for understanding the observed relationships between core mass distributions and mass distributions in stellar clusters, differentiating between proposed mechanisms of massive star formation. Aims: We study the substructure in the two largest fragments (i.e. cores) MM1 and MM2, in the infrared dark cloud complex SDC13. As MM1 appears to be in a later stage of evolution than MM2, comparing their substructure provides an insight in to the early evolution of massive clumps. Methods: We report the results of high resolution SMA dust continuum observations towards MM1 and MM2. Combining these data with Herschel observations, we carry out RADMC-3D radiative transfer modelling to characterise the observed substructure. Results: SMA continuum data indicates 4 sub-fragments in the SDC13 region. The nature of the second brightest sub-fragment (B) is uncertain as it does not appear as prominent at the lower MAMBO resolution or at radio wavelengths. Statistical analysis indicates that it is unlikely to be a background source, an AGB star, or the free-free emission of a HII region. It is plausible that B is a runaway object ejected from MM1. MM1, which is actively forming stars, consists of two sub-fragments A and C. This is confirmed by 70 μmHerschel data. While MM1 and MM2 appear quite similar in previous low resolution observations, at high resolution, the sub-fragment at the centre of MM2 (D) is much fainter than sub-fragment at the centre of MM1 (A). RADMC-3D models of MM1 and MM2 are able to reproduce these results, modelling MM2 with a steeper density profile and higher mass than is required for MM1. The relatively steep density profile of MM2 depends on a significant temperature decrease in its centre, justified by the lack of star formation in MM2. A final stellar population for MM1 was extrapolated, indicating a star formation efficiency typical of regions of core and cluster

  3. Soft X-ray observations of pre-main-sequence stars in the Chamaeleon dark cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feigelson, Eric D.; Kriss, Gerard A.

    1989-01-01

    X-ray observations of the Chamaeleon I cloud, a star-forming region, are reported. A total of 22 distinct X-ray sources, most associated with previously identified premain sequence stars, are found. The spatial distributions and HR diagrams of the stars are very similar, suggesting that they are coeval. Luminosity functions suggest that the stars have an average X-ray luminosity (Lx) several times that of the Pleiades dwarfs. The value of Lx is significantly correlated with optical magnitude, though no relation between X-ray emission and any photometric or emission line characteristic is present. It is suggested that a Skumanich-type power-law relation may be present over the entire range of stellar ages between 10 to the 6th and 10 to the 10th yr.

  4. ASCA Observations of the T Tauri Star SU Aurigae and the Surrounding L1517 Dark Cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skinner, Stephen L.; Walter, Frederick M.

    1998-01-01

    We present the results of a approximately equals 40 ks pointed Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA) observation of the L1517 star-forming region, centered on the X-ray-bright T Tauri star SU Aurigae. This star has the highest X-ray luminosity of any classical T Tauri star in the Taurus-Auriga region, and its optical spectra show evidence for both mass inflow and outflow. Strong X-ray emission was detected from SU Aur (L(sub x) = 10(exp 30.9) ergs s(exp -1)) as well as weaker emission from five other pre-main-sequence stars. Although no large-amplitude flares were detected, the X-ray emission of SU Aur showed clear variability in the form of a slow decline in count rate during the 1.3 day observation. We provide the first direct comparison of the coronal differential emission measure (DEM) distribution of a classical T Tauri star with that of a young main-sequence star of similar spectral type. The DEM distributions of SU Aur (G2; age 3 Myr) and the young solar-like star EK Draconis (GO V; age 70 Myr) are qualitatively similar, with both showing a bimodal temperature distribution characterized by a cool plasma component peaking at approximately 8-9 MK and a hot component peaking at approximately 20-21 MK. However, there is a striking difference in the relative proportion of plasma at high temperatures in the two stars, with hot plasma (>20 MK) accounting for approximately equals 80% of the volume emission measure of SU Aur, compared to only approximately equals 40% in EK Dra. These results provide new insight into the changes that will occur in the corona of a T Tauri star as it descends onto the main sequence. A sharp decline in the fraction of coronal plasma at flarelike temperatures will occur during the late-T Tauri and post-T Tauri phases, and other recent X-ray studies have shown that this decline will continue after the young solar-like star reaches the main sequence.

  5. Wanted! Nuclear Data for Dark Matter Astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Gondolo, P.

    2014-06-15

    Astronomical observations from small galaxies to the largest scales in the universe can be consistently explained by the simple idea of dark matter. The nature of dark matter is however still unknown. Empirically it cannot be any of the known particles, and many theories postulate it as a new elementary particle. Searches for dark matter particles are under way: production at high-energy accelerators, direct detection through dark matter-nucleus scattering, indirect detection through cosmic rays, gamma rays, or effects on stars. Particle dark matter searches rely on observing an excess of events above background, and a lot of controversies have arisen over the origin of observed excesses. With the new high-quality cosmic ray measurements from the AMS-02 experiment, the major uncertainty in modeling cosmic ray fluxes is in the nuclear physics cross sections for spallation and fragmentation of cosmic rays off interstellar hydrogen and helium. The understanding of direct detection backgrounds is limited by poor knowledge of cosmic ray activation in detector materials, with order of magnitude differences between simulation codes. A scarcity of data on nucleon spin densities blurs the connection between dark matter theory and experiments. What is needed, ideally, are more and better measurements of spallation cross sections relevant to cosmic rays and cosmogenic activation, and data on the nucleon spin densities in nuclei.

  6. The dark side of plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Gómez, D E; Teo, Z Q; Altissimo, M; Davis, T J; Earl, S; Roberts, A

    2013-08-14

    Plasmonic dark modes are pure near-field modes that can arise from the plasmon hybridization in a set of interacting nanoparticles. When compared to bright modes, dark modes have longer lifetimes due to their lack of a net dipole moment, making them attractive for a number of applications. We demonstrate the excitation and optical detection of a collective dark plasmonic mode from individual plasmonic trimers. The trimers consist of triangular arrangements of gold nanorods, and due to this symmetry, the lowest-energy dark plasmonic mode can interact with radially polarized light. The experimental data presented confirm the excitation of this mode, and its assignment is supported with an electrostatic approximation wherein these dark modes are described in terms of plasmon hybridization. The strong confinement of energy in these modes and their associated near fields hold great promise for achieving strong coupling to single photon emitters.

  7. Dark matter and cosmological nucleosynthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schramm, D. N.

    1986-01-01

    Existing dark matter problems, i.e., dynamics, galaxy formation and inflation, are considered, along with a model which proposes dark baryons as the bulk of missing matter in a fractal universe. It is shown that no combination of dark, nonbaryonic matter can either provide a cosmological density parameter value near unity or, as in the case of high energy neutrinos, allow formation of condensed matter at epochs when quasars already existed. The possibility that correlations among galactic clusters are scale-free is discussed. Such a distribution of matter would yield a fractal of 1.2, close to a one-dimensional universe. Biasing, cosmic superstrings, and percolated explosions and hot dark matter are theoretical approaches that would satisfy the D = 1.2 fractal model of the large-scale structure of the universe and which would also allow sufficient dark matter in halos to close the universe.

  8. Acausality from a dark sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carone, Christopher D.

    2014-03-01

    Solutions to the hierarchy problem that require partners for each standard model particle often require that these states live at or above the electroweak scale, to satisfy phenomenological bounds. Partners to possible dark sector particles may be significantly lighter, due to the assumed weakness of the couplings between the dark and visible sectors. Here we consider the possibility that a dark sector might include light Lee-Wick particles. We present the formulation of a theory in which a dark photon and its Lee-Wick partner have kinetic mixing with hypercharge. We point out that the Lee-Wick partner of the dark photon will lead to an apparent violation of causality at small distance scales that might be discerned in low-energy experiments.

  9. Light thoughts on dark energy

    SciTech Connect

    Linder, Eric V.

    2004-04-01

    The physical process leading to the acceleration of the expansion of the universe is unknown. It may involve new high energy physics or extensions to gravitation. Calling this generically dark energy, we examine the consistencies and relations between these two approaches, showing that an effective equation of state function w(z) is broadly useful in describing the properties of the dark energy. A variety of cosmological observations can provide important information on the dynamics of dark energy and the future looks bright for constraining dark energy, though both the measurements and the interpretation will be challenging. We also discuss a more direct relation between the spacetime geometry and acceleration, via ''geometric dark energy'' from the Ricci scalar, and superacceleration or phantom energy where the fate of the universe may be more gentle than the Big Rip.

  10. The search for dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cline, David B.

    2016-03-01

    We discuss the search for dark matter. We first review the data from LUX that excludes the low-mass WIMP region and slightly lowers the XENON100 limits. We provide a brief review of the problems with the claimed low-mass signals. We discuss the current expectations for SUSY-WIMP dark matter and show why very massive detectors like Darwin may be required. We discuss some theoretical predictions from the meeting. There was compelling evidence from events observed in the Galactic Center by Fermi-LAT of WIMP dark matter at the UCLA meeting. We recount the Richard Arnowitt Lectures at UCLA dark matter symposiums and his role in the development of the strategy to detect SUGRA dark matter. In Honor of Richard Arnowitt.

  11. Familon model of dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdyuzha, V.; Lalakulich, O.; Ponomarev, Yu.; Vereshkov, G.

    2004-05-01

    If the next fundamental level of matter occurs (preons), then dark matter must consist of familons containing a 'hot' component from massless particles and a 'cold' component from massive particles. During the evolution of the Universe this dark matter occurred up to late-time relativistic phase transitions the temperatures of which were different. Fluctuations created by these phase transitions had a fractal character. As a result the structuration of dark matter (and therefore the baryon subsystem) occurred, and in the Universe some characteristic scales which have caused this phenomenon arise naturally. Familons are collective excitations of non-perturbative preon condensates that could be produced during an earlier relativistic phase transition. For structuration of dark matter (and the baryon component), three generations of particles are necessary. The first generation of particles produced the observed baryon world. The second and third generations produced dark matter from particles that appeared when symmetry between the generations was spontaneously broken.

  12. Why Is the Sky Dark at Night?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stinner, Arthur

    2014-01-01

    The puzzle as to just why the sky is dark at night, given that there are so many stars, has been around at least since Newton. This article summarizes six cosmological models that have been used to attempt to give an account of this puzzle including the Copernican universe, the Newton-Halley universe, the nineteenth century "one galaxy"…

  13. Jovian Dark Spot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    A recently discovered black spot in Jupiter's clouds is darker than any feature ever before observed on the giant planet. The spot may be the result of a downward spiraling wind that blows away high clouds and reveals deeper, very dark cloud layers. These three panels depict the same area of Jupiter's atmosphere. A map of Jovian temperatures near 250 millibar pressure (top) panel is derived from the photopolarimeter-radiometer instrument on NASA's Galileo Jupiter orbiter. This map is compared with maps derived from images of the same area in visible light (middle panel)and thermal radiation sensitive to cloud-top temperatures (bottom panel).

    The single downward-pointing arrow in the top panel indicates the location of a warm area that corresponds to the position of a so-called 'black spot'(shown in the middle panel), a feature that is about a year old. Features this dark are rare on Jupiter. The bottom panel, sensitive to temperatures at Jupiter's cloud tops, shows this feature as a bright object, meaning that upper-level cold clouds are missing - allowing us to see deeper into Jupiter's warmer interior. The dark visible appearance of the feature than most likely represents the color of very deep clouds. The warm temperatures and cloud-free conditions imply that this feature is a region where dry upper-atmospheric gas is being forced to converge, is warmed up and then forced to descend, clearing out clouds. It is the opposite of wet, upwelling gas in areas such as Jupiter's Great Red Spot or white ovals. On the other hand, it is unlike the dry and relatively cloudless feature into which the Galileo probe descended in 1995, because that region had the same temperatures as its surroundings and did not appear nearly as dark as this new spot.

    The temperatures sampled by the photopolarimeter radiometer are near the top of Jupiter's troposphere, where wind motions control the atmosphere. The top row of arrows shows the location of temperature waves in a warm region

  14. Indirect Dark Matter Signals

    SciTech Connect

    Boer, Wim de

    2008-11-23

    Dark Matter annihilation (DMA) may yield an excess of gamma rays and antimatter particles, like antiprotons and positrons, above the background from cosmic ray interactions. Several signatures, ranging from the positron excess, as observed by HEAT, AMS-01 and PAMELA, the gamma ray excess, as observed by the EGRET spectrometer, the WMAP-haze, and constraints from antiprotons, as observed by CAPRICE, BESS and PAMELA, have been discussed in the literature. Unfortunately, the different signatures all lead to different WIMP masses, indicating that at least some of these interpretations are likely to be incorrect. Here we review them and discuss their relative merits and uncertainties. New x-ray data from ROSAT suggests non-negligible convection in our Galaxy, which leads to an order of magnitude uncertainty in the yield of charged particles from DMA, since even a rather small convection will let drift the charged particles in the halo to outer space.

  15. Fractality of light's darkness.

    PubMed

    O'Holleran, Kevin; Dennis, Mark R; Flossmann, Florian; Padgett, Miles J

    2008-02-01

    Natural light fields are threaded by lines of darkness. For monochromatic light, the phenomenon is familiar in laser speckle, i.e., the black points that appear in the scattered light. These black points are optical vortices that extend as lines throughout the volume of the field. We establish by numerical simulations, supported by experiments, that these vortex lines have the fractal properties of a Brownian random walk. Approximately 73% of the lines percolate through the optical beam, the remainder forming closed loops. Our statistical results are similar to those of vortices in random discrete lattice models of cosmic strings, implying that the statistics of singularities in random optical fields exhibit universal behavior. PMID:18352372

  16. Dark light Higgs bosons.

    SciTech Connect

    Draper, P.; Liu, T.; Wagner, C. E. M.; Wang, L.-T.; Zhang, H.

    2011-03-24

    We study a limit of the nearly Peccei-Quinn-symmetric next-to-minimal supersymmetric standard model possessing novel Higgs and dark matter (DM) properties. In this scenario, there naturally coexist three light singletlike particles: a scalar, a pseudoscalar, and a singlinolike DM candidate, all with masses of order 0.1-10 GeV. The decay of a standard model-like Higgs boson to pairs of the light scalars or pseudoscalars is generically suppressed, avoiding constraints from collider searches for these channels. For a certain parameter window annihilation into the light pseudoscalar and exchange of the light scalar with nucleons allow the singlino to achieve the correct relic density and a large direct-detection cross section consistent with the DM direct-detection experiments, CoGeNT and DAMA/LIBRA, preferred region simultaneously. This parameter space is consistent with experimental constraints from LEP, the Tevatron, ?, and flavor physics.

  17. Dark matter constraints from stellar evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayala, A.; Domínguez, I.; Straniero, O.

    2016-01-01

    The study of dark matter constraints from its effect on star evolution has been discussed in recent years. We propose a star evolution simulation approach to determine those costraints from properties related to star evolutionary stages and propose globular cluster observables in order to check those constraints. My work in progress (my PhD project research) employs FRANEC code to simulate complete star evolution from pre-main sequence to AGB phase, and regards several DM candidates like axions or WIMPs, motivated by different unsolved physical problems. Detailed energy production or energy loss due to DM particles are included, taking into account the expected interaction between dark matter particles and stellar plasma within different models.

  18. Avian dark cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hara, J.; Plymale, D. R.; Shepard, D. L.; Hara, H.; Garry, Robert F.; Yoshihara, T.; Zenner, Hans-Peter; Bolton, M.; Kalkeri, R.; Fermin, Cesar D.

    2002-01-01

    Dark cells (DCs) of mammalian and non-mammalian species help to maintain the homeostasis of the inner ear fluids in vivo. Although the avian cochlea is straight and the mammalian cochlea is coiled, no significant difference in the morphology and/or function of mammalian and avian DCs has been reported. The mammalian equivalent of avian DCs are marginal cells and are located in the stria vascularis along a bony sheet. Avian DCs hang free from the tegmentum vasculosum (TV) of the avian lagena between the perilymph and endolymph. Frame averaging was used to image the fluorescence emitted by several fluorochromes applied to freshly isolated dark cells (iDCs) from chickens (Gallus domesticus) inner ears. The viability of iDCs was monitored via trypan blue exclusion at each isolation step. Sodium Green, BCECF-AM, Rhodamine 123 and 9-anthroyl ouabain molecules were used to test iDC function. These fluorochromes label iDCs ionic transmembrane trafficking function, membrane electrogenic potentials and Na+/K+ ATPase pump's activity. Na+/K+ ATPase pump sites, were also evaluated by the p-nitrophenyl phosphatase reaction. These results suggest that iDCs remain viable for several hours after isolation without special culturing requirements and that the number and functional activity of Na+/K+ ATPase pumps in the iDCs were indistinguishable from in vivo DCs. Primary cultures of freshly iDCs were successfully maintained for 28 days in plastic dishes with RPMI 1640 culture medium. The preparation of iDCs overcomes the difficulty of DCs accessability in vivo and the unavoidable contamination that rupturing the inner ear microenvironments induces.

  19. Mapping Dark Matter Halos with Stellar Kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Jeremy; Gebhardt, K.; Greene, J. E.; Graves, G.

    2013-07-01

    Galaxies of all sizes form and evolve in the centers of dark matter halos. As these halos constitute the large majority of the total mass of a galaxy, dark matter certainly plays a central role in the galaxy's formation and evolution. Yet despite our understanding of the importance of dark matter, observations of the extent and shape of dark matter halos have been slow in coming. The paucity of data is particularly acute in elliptical galaxies. Happily, concerted effort over the past several years by a number of groups has been shedding light on the dark matter halos around galaxies over a wide range in mass. The development of new instrumentation and large surveys, coupled with the tantalizing evidence for a direct detection of dark matter from the AMS experiment, has brought on a golden age in the study of galactic scale dark matter halos. I report on results using extended stellar kinematics from integrated light to dynamically model massive elliptical galaxies in the local universe. I use the integral field power of the Mitchell Spectrograph to explore the kinematics of stars to large radii (R > 2.5 r_e). Once the line-of-sight stellar kinematics are measured, I employ orbit-based, axisymmetric dynamical modeling to explore a range of dark matter halo parameterizations. Globular cluster kinematics at even larger radii are used to further constrain the dynamical models. The dynamical models also return information on the anisotropy of the stars which help to further illuminate the primary formation mechanisms of the galaxy. Specifically, I will show dynamical modeling results for the first and second rank galaxies in the Virgo Cluster, M49 and M87. Although similar in total luminosity and ellipticity, these two galaxies show evidence for different dark matter halo shapes, baryon to dark matter fractions, and stellar anisotropy profiles. Moreover, the stellar velocity dispersion at large radii in M87 is significantly higher than the globular clusters at the same

  20. A Near-Infrared Imaging Survey of the Lupus 3 Dark Cloud: A Modest Cluster of Low-Mass, Pre-Main-Sequence Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Yasushi; Tamura, Motohide; Oasa, Yumiko; Nakajima, Tadashi

    2000-02-01

    We present the first report on results of a near-infrared imaging survey of the Lupus 3 dark cloud. This cloud is known to be associated with a modest cluster of T Tauri stars from a previous optical Hα emission-line star survey. The survey covers 7'x11', which corresponds to a projected area of ~0.35x0.55 pc at a distance of 150 pc. Mapping was carried out at J, H, and Ks, to 10 σ limiting magnitudes of J=17.0, H=16.5, and Ks=15.5. A total of 229 sources brighter than Ks<15.8 were detected at all bands with a 90% completeness limit. Source classification is performed based on the near-infrared colors. Ten sources are candidates of Lada's Class II pre-main-sequence (PMS) stars, as they have a color excess that cannot be explained by reddening resulting from interstellar dust. We also identified 11 Class I-like candidates that were not detected at J and have a large color excess (H-Ks>=2), which is unlikely to arise from extinction in the Lupus dark cloud. There are four subclusters in this survey area of which three are embedded and mainly consist of the Class I-like candidates. The average density of PMS stars is around 500 pc-3, suggesting the presence of a modest cluster of embedded PMS stars. We estimate masses of the Class II candidates with aid of an evolutionary model of PMS stars. Ten of them have masses less than 0.08 Msolar if we assume their age to be 106 yr. Hence, we consider them to be young brown dwarf (YBD) candidates. The relative population of YBDs in the Lupus 3 dark cloud is larger than in the Taurus.

  1. Dark Matter near the Sun: Simulated Star Counts and the Oort Limit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilden, D.; Bahcall, J. N.

    1984-01-01

    An ensemble of orbits passing through the solar position was generated for a specific mass model of the galaxy. These orbits are randomly sampled to form simulated density distributions of tracer stars perpendicular to the galactic disk. The simulated distributions are analyzed to determine the sampling errors in a self consistent derivation of the total amount of matter near the Sun (the Oort limit).

  2. Dark matter cores all the way down

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Read, J. I.; Agertz, O.; Collins, M. L. M.

    2016-07-01

    We use high-resolution simulations of isolated dwarf galaxies to study the physics of dark matter cusp-core transformations at the edge of galaxy formation: M200 = 107-109 M⊙. We work at a resolution (˜4 pc minimum cell size; ˜250 M⊙ per particle) at which the impact from individual supernovae explosions can be resolved, becoming insensitive to even large changes in our numerical `sub-grid' parameters. We find that our dwarf galaxies give a remarkable match to the stellar light profile; star formation history; metallicity distribution function; and star/gas kinematics of isolated dwarf irregular galaxies. Our key result is that dark matter cores of size comparable to the stellar half-mass radius r1/2 always form if star formation proceeds for long enough. Cores fully form in less than 4 Gyr for the M200 = 108 M⊙ and ˜14 Gyr for the 109 M⊙ dwarf. We provide a convenient two parameter `CORENFW' fitting function that captures this dark matter core growth as a function of star formation time and the projected stellar half-mass radius. Our results have several implications: (i) we make a strong prediction that if Λcold dark matter is correct, then `pristine' dark matter cusps will be found either in systems that have truncated star formation and/or at radii r > r1/2; (ii) complete core formation lowers the projected velocity dispersion at r1/2 by a factor of ˜2, which is sufficient to fully explain the `too-big-to-fail problem'; and (iii) cored dwarfs will be much more susceptible to tides, leading to a dramatic scouring of the sub-halo mass function inside galaxies and groups.

  3. Dark antiatoms can explain DAMA

    SciTech Connect

    Wallemacq, Quentin; Cudell, Jean-René E-mail: jr.cudell@ulg.ac.be

    2015-02-01

    We show that the existence of a sub-dominant form of dark matter, made of dark ''antiatoms'' of mass m∼ 1 TeV and size a-dot {sub 0}∼ 3 fm, can explain the results of direct detection experiments, with a positive signal in DAMA/NaI and DAMA/LIBRA and no signal in other experiments. The signal comes from the binding of the dark antiatoms to thallium, a dopant in DAMA, and is not present for the constituent atoms of other experiments. The dark antiatoms are made of two particles oppositely charged under a dark U(1) symmetry and can bind to terrestrial atoms because of a kinetic mixing between the photon and the massless dark photon, such that the dark particles acquire an electric millicharge ∼ ± 5.10{sup −4}e. This millicharge enables them to bind to high-Z atoms via radiative capture, after they thermalize in terrestrial matter through elastic collisions.

  4. Dark Matter Searches With GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Wai, Lawrence; Nuss, E.

    2007-02-05

    Indirect detection of particle dark matter relies upon pair annihilation of Weakly Interaction Massive Particles (WIMPs), which is complementary to the well known techniques of direct detection (WIMP-nucleus scattering) and collider production (WIMP pair production). Pair annihilation of WIMPs results in the production of gamma-rays, neutrinos, and anti-matter. Of the various experiments sensitive to indirect detection of dark matter, the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) may play the most crucial role in the next few years. After launch in late 2007, The GLAST Large Area Telescope (LAT) will survey the gamma-ray sky in the energy range of 20MeV-300GeV. By eliminating charged particle background above 100 MeV, GLAST may be sensitive to as yet to be observed Milky Way dark matter subhalos, as well as WIMP pair annihilation spectral lines from the Milky Way halo. Discovery of gamma-ray signals from dark matter in the Milky Way would not only demonstrate the particle nature of dark matter; it would also open a new observational window on galactic dark matter substructure. Location of new dark matter sources by GLAST would dramatically alter the experimental landscape; ground based gamma ray telescopes could follow up on the new GLAST sources with precision measurements of the WIMP pair annihilation spectrum.

  5. Iapetus Bright and Dark Terrains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Saturn's outermost large moon, Iapetus, has a bright, heavily cratered icy terrain and a dark terrain, as shown in this Voyager 2 image taken on August 22, 1981. Amazingly, the dark material covers precisely the side of Iapetus that leads in the direction of orbital motion around Saturn (except for the poles), whereas the bright material occurs on the trailing hemisphere and at the poles. The bright terrain is made of dirty ice, and the dark terrain is surfaced by carbonaceous molecules, according to measurements made with Earth-based telescopes. Iapetus' dark hemisphere has been likened to tar or asphalt and is so dark that no details within this terrain were visible to Voyager 2. The bright icy hemisphere, likened to dirty snow, shows many large impact craters. The closest approach by Voyager 2 to Iapetus was a relatively distant 600,000 miles, so that our best images, such as this, have a resolution of about 12 miles. The dark material is made of organic substances, probably including poisonous cyano compounds such as frozen hydrogen cyanide polymers. Though we know a little about the dark terrain's chemical nature, we do not understand its origin. Two theories have been developed, but neither is fully satisfactory--(1) the dark material may be organic dust knocked off the small neighboring satellite Phoebe and 'painted' onto the leading side of Iapetus as the dust spirals toward Saturn and Iapetus hurtles through the tenuous dust cloud, or (2) the dark material may be made of icy-cold carbonaceous 'cryovolcanic' lavas that were erupted from Iapetus' interior and then blackened by solar radiation, charged particles, and cosmic rays. A determination of the actual cause, as well as discovery of any other geologic features smaller than 12 miles across, awaits the Cassini Saturn orbiter to arrive in 2004.

  6. Detecting dark matter with imploding pulsars in the galactic center.

    PubMed

    Bramante, Joseph; Linden, Tim

    2014-11-01

    The paucity of old millisecond pulsars observed at the galactic center of the Milky Way could be the result of dark matter accumulating in and destroying neutron stars. In regions of high dark matter density, dark matter clumped in a pulsar can exceed the Schwarzschild limit and collapse into a natal black hole which destroys the pulsar. We examine what dark matter models are consistent with this hypothesis and find regions of parameter space where dark matter accumulation can significantly degrade the neutron star population within the galactic center while remaining consistent with observations of old millisecond pulsars in globular clusters and near the solar position. We identify what dark matter couplings and masses might cause a young pulsar at the galactic center to unexpectedly extinguish. Finally, we find that pulsar collapse age scales inversely with the dark matter density and linearly with the dark matter velocity dispersion. This implies that maximum pulsar age is spatially dependent on position within the dark matter halo of the Milky Way. In turn, this pulsar age spatial dependence will be dark matter model dependent.

  7. Detecting dark matter with imploding pulsars in the galactic center.

    PubMed

    Bramante, Joseph; Linden, Tim

    2014-11-01

    The paucity of old millisecond pulsars observed at the galactic center of the Milky Way could be the result of dark matter accumulating in and destroying neutron stars. In regions of high dark matter density, dark matter clumped in a pulsar can exceed the Schwarzschild limit and collapse into a natal black hole which destroys the pulsar. We examine what dark matter models are consistent with this hypothesis and find regions of parameter space where dark matter accumulation can significantly degrade the neutron star population within the galactic center while remaining consistent with observations of old millisecond pulsars in globular clusters and near the solar position. We identify what dark matter couplings and masses might cause a young pulsar at the galactic center to unexpectedly extinguish. Finally, we find that pulsar collapse age scales inversely with the dark matter density and linearly with the dark matter velocity dispersion. This implies that maximum pulsar age is spatially dependent on position within the dark matter halo of the Milky Way. In turn, this pulsar age spatial dependence will be dark matter model dependent. PMID:25415895

  8. Falsification of Dark Energy by Fluid Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Carl H.

    2012-03-01

    The 2011 Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded for the discovery of accelerating super- novae dimness, suggesting a remarkable reversal in the expansion rate of the Universe from a decrease to an increase, driven by anti-gravity forces of a mysterious dark energy material comprising 70% of the Universe mass-energy. Fluid mechanics and Herschel- Planck-Spitzer-Hubble etc. space telescope observations falsify both the accelerating ex- pansion rate and dark energy concepts. Kinematic viscosity is neglected in models of self-gravitational structure formation. Large plasma photon viscosity predicts protosu- perclustervoid fragmentation early in the plasma epoch and protogalaxies at the end. At the plasma-gas transition, the gas protogalaxies fragment into Earth-mass rogue plan- ets in highly persistent, trillion-planet clumps (proto-globular-star-cluster PGCs). PGC planets freeze to form the dark matter of galaxies and merge to form their stars, giving the hydrogen triple-point (14 K) infrared emissions observed. Dark energy is a system- atic dimming error for Supernovae Ia caused by partially evaporated planets feeding hot white dwarf stars at the Chandrasekhar carbon limit. Planet atmospheres may or may not dim light from SNe-Ia events depending on the line of sight.

  9. A two measure model of dark energy and dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Guendelman, Eduardo; Singleton, Douglas; Yongram, N. E-mail: dougs@csufresno.edu

    2012-11-01

    In this work we construct a unified model of dark energy and dark matter. This is done with the following three elements: a gravitating scalar field, φ with a non-conventional kinetic term, as in the string theory tachyon; an arbitrary potential, V(φ); two measures — a metric measure ((−g){sup 1/2}) and a non-metric measure (Φ). The model has two interesting features: (i) For potentials which are unstable and would give rise to tachyonic scalar field, this model can stabilize the scalar field. (ii) The form of the dark energy and dark matter that results from this model is fairly insensitive to the exact form of the scalar field potential.

  10. Dark matter with a late decaying dark partner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairbairn, Malcolm; Zupan, Jure

    2009-07-01

    We explain the PAMELA positron excess and the PPB-BETS/ATIC e++e- data using a simple two component dark sector model (2CDS). The two particle species in the dark matter sector are assumed to be in thermal equilibrium in the early universe. While one particle is stable and is the present day dark matter, the second one is metastable and decays after the universe is 10-8 s old. In this model it is simple to accommodate the large boost factors required to explain the PAMELA positron excess without the need for large spikes in the local dark matter density. We provide the constraints on the parameters of the model and comment on possible signals at future colliders.

  11. Dark matter with a late decaying dark partner

    SciTech Connect

    Fairbairn, Malcolm; Zupan, Jure E-mail: Jure.Zupan@cern.ch

    2009-07-01

    We explain the PAMELA positron excess and the PPB-BETS/ATIC e{sup +}+e{sup −} data using a simple two component dark sector model (2CDS). The two particle species in the dark matter sector are assumed to be in thermal equilibrium in the early universe. While one particle is stable and is the present day dark matter, the second one is metastable and decays after the universe is 10{sup −8} s old. In this model it is simple to accommodate the large boost factors required to explain the PAMELA positron excess without the need for large spikes in the local dark matter density. We provide the constraints on the parameters of the model and comment on possible signals at future colliders.

  12. The dark cube: dark and light character profiles

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background. Research addressing distinctions and similarities between people’s malevolent character traits (i.e., the Dark Triad: Machiavellianism, narcissism, and psychopathy) has detected inconsistent linear associations to temperament traits. Additionally, these dark traits seem to have a common core expressed as uncooperativeness. Hence, some researchers suggest that the dark traits are best represented as one global construct (i.e., the unification argument) rather than as ternary construct (i.e., the uniqueness argument). We put forward the dark cube (cf. Cloninger’s character cube) comprising eight dark profiles that can be used to compare individuals who differ in one dark character trait while holding the other two constant. Our aim was to investigate in which circumstances individuals who are high in each one of the dark character traits differ in Cloninger’s “light” character traits: self-directedness, cooperativeness, and self-transcendence. We also investigated if people’s dark character profiles were associated to their light character profiles. Method. A total of 997 participants recruited from Amazon’s Mechanical Turk (MTurk) responded to the Short Dark Triad and the Short Character Inventory. Participants were allocated to eight different dark profiles and eight light profiles based on their scores in each of the traits and any possible combination of high and low scores. We used three-way interaction regression analyses and t-tests to investigate differences in light character traits between individuals with different dark profiles. As a second step, we compared the individuals’ dark profile with her/his character profile using an exact cell-wise analysis conducted in the ROPstat software (http://www.ropstat.com). Results. Individuals who expressed high levels of Machiavellianism and those who expressed high levels of psychopathy also expressed low self-directedness and low cooperativeness. Individuals with high levels of

  13. Capturing prokaryotic dark matter genomes.

    PubMed

    Gasc, Cyrielle; Ribière, Céline; Parisot, Nicolas; Beugnot, Réjane; Defois, Clémence; Petit-Biderre, Corinne; Boucher, Delphine; Peyretaillade, Eric; Peyret, Pierre

    2015-12-01

    Prokaryotes are the most diverse and abundant cellular life forms on Earth. Most of them, identified by indirect molecular approaches, belong to microbial dark matter. The advent of metagenomic and single-cell genomic approaches has highlighted the metabolic capabilities of numerous members of this dark matter through genome reconstruction. Thus, linking functions back to the species has revolutionized our understanding of how ecosystem function is sustained by the microbial world. This review will present discoveries acquired through the illumination of prokaryotic dark matter genomes by these innovative approaches.

  14. Dark coupling and gauge invariance

    SciTech Connect

    Gavela, M.B.; Honorez, L. Lopez; Rigolin, S. E-mail: llopezho@ulb.ac.be E-mail: stefano.rigolin@pd.infn.it

    2010-11-01

    We study a coupled dark energy-dark matter model in which the energy-momentum exchange is proportional to the Hubble expansion rate. The inclusion of its perturbation is required by gauge invariance. We derive the linear perturbation equations for the gauge invariant energy density contrast and velocity of the coupled fluids, and we determine the initial conditions. The latter turn out to be adiabatic for dark energy, when assuming adiabatic initial conditions for all the standard fluids. We perform a full Monte Carlo Markov Chain likelihood analysis of the model, using WMAP 7-year data.

  15. Solving the Dark Matter Problem

    ScienceCinema

    Baltz, Ted

    2016-07-12

    Cosmological observations have firmly established that the majority of matter in the universe is of an unknown type, called 'dark matter'. A compelling hypothesis is that the dark matter consists of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) in the mass range around 100 GeV. If the WIMP hypothesis is correct, such particles could be created and studied at accelerators. Furthermore they could be directly detected as the primary component of our galaxy. Solving the dark matter problem requires that the connection be made between the two. We describe some theoretical and experimental avenues that might lead to this connection.

  16. Capturing prokaryotic dark matter genomes.

    PubMed

    Gasc, Cyrielle; Ribière, Céline; Parisot, Nicolas; Beugnot, Réjane; Defois, Clémence; Petit-Biderre, Corinne; Boucher, Delphine; Peyretaillade, Eric; Peyret, Pierre

    2015-12-01

    Prokaryotes are the most diverse and abundant cellular life forms on Earth. Most of them, identified by indirect molecular approaches, belong to microbial dark matter. The advent of metagenomic and single-cell genomic approaches has highlighted the metabolic capabilities of numerous members of this dark matter through genome reconstruction. Thus, linking functions back to the species has revolutionized our understanding of how ecosystem function is sustained by the microbial world. This review will present discoveries acquired through the illumination of prokaryotic dark matter genomes by these innovative approaches. PMID:26100932

  17. Ten Minutes in the Dark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beichler, James

    2007-10-01

    Both Dark Matter (DM) and Dark Energy (DE) can be explained using a single extended model of the space-time continuum. The Cold Dark Matter halo around spiral galaxies emerges as a natural consequence of the geometry after adding a macroscopic fourth dimension of space to normal four-dimensional space-time. Once DM is explained, the DE that is increasing the rate of expansion of the universe follows. No changes to General Relativity are required beyond the realization that curvature is an extrinsic property of the four-dimensional space-time continuum. Kaluza's five-dimensional unification of General Relativity and electromagnetic theory is completely explained by this model.

  18. Mixed dark matter from technicolor

    SciTech Connect

    Belyaev, Alexander; Frandsen, Mads T.; Sarkar, Subir; Sannino, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    We study natural composite cold dark matter candidates which are pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone bosons (pNGB) in models of dynamical electroweak symmetry breaking. Some of these can have a significant thermal relic abundance, while others must be mainly asymmetric dark matter. By considering the thermal abundance alone we find a lower bound of m{sub W} on the pNGB mass when the (composite) Higgs is heavier than 115 GeV. Being pNGBs, the dark matter candidates are in general light enough to be produced at the LHC.

  19. Entropy bounds and dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Stephen D. H.

    2004-07-01

    Entropy bounds render quantum corrections to the cosmological constant Λ finite. Under certain assumptions, the natural value of Λ is of order the observed dark energy density ~10-10 eV4, thereby resolving the cosmological constant problem. We note that the dark energy equation of state in these scenarios is w≡p/ρ=0 over cosmological distances, and is strongly disfavored by observational data. Alternatively, Λ in these scenarios might account for the diffuse dark matter component of the cosmological energy density. Permanent address: Institute of Theoretical Science and Department of Physics, University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97403.

  20. Dark Sky Protection and Education - Izera Dark Sky Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berlicki, Arkadiusz; Kolomanski, Sylwester; Mrozek, Tomasz; Zakowicz, Grzegorz

    2015-08-01

    Darkness of the night sky is a natural component of our environment and should be protected against negative effects of human activities. The night darkness is necessary for balanced life of plants, animals and people. Unfortunately, development of human civilization and technology has led to the substantial increase of the night-sky brightness and to situation where nights are no more dark in many areas of the World. This phenomenon is called "light pollution" and it can be rank among such problems as chemical pollution of air, water and soil. Besides the environment, the light pollution can also affect e.g. the scientific activities of astronomers - many observatories built in the past began to be located within the glow of city lights making the night observations difficult, or even impossible.In order to protect the natural darkness of nights many so-called "dark sky parks" were established, where the darkness is preserved, similar to typical nature reserves. The role of these parks is not only conservation but also education, supporting to make society aware of how serious the problem of the light pollution is.History of the dark sky areas in Europe began on November 4, 2009 in Jizerka - a small village situated in the Izera Mountains, when Izera Dark Sky Park (IDSP) was established - it was the first transboundary dark sky park in the World. The idea of establishing that dark sky park in the Izera Mountains originated from a need to give to the society in Poland and Czech Republic the knowledge about the light pollution. Izera Dark Sky Park is a part of the astro-tourism project "Astro Izery" that combines tourist attraction of Izera Valley and astronomical education under the wonderful starry Izera sky. Besides the IDSP, the project Astro Izery consists of the set of simple astronomical instruments (gnomon, sundial), natural educational trail "Solar System Model", and astronomical events for the public. In addition, twice a year we organize a 3-4 days

  1. Dark matter and dark energy from quark bag model

    SciTech Connect

    Brilenkov, Maxim; Eingorn, Maxim; Jenkovszky, Laszlo; Zhuk, Alexander E-mail: maxim.eingorn@gmail.com E-mail: ai.zhuk2@gmail.com

    2013-08-01

    We calculate the present expansion of our Universe endowed with relict colored objects — quarks and gluons — that survived hadronization either as isolated islands of quark-gluon ''nuggets'' or spread uniformly in the Universe. In the first scenario, the QNs can play the role of dark matter. In the second scenario, we demonstrate that uniform colored objects can play the role of dark energy providing the late-time accelerating expansion of the Universe.

  2. Gravitational lenses and dark matter - Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gott, J. Richard, III

    1987-01-01

    Theoretical models are presented for guiding the application of gravitational lenses to probe the characteristics of dark matter in the universe. Analytical techniques are defined for quantifying the mass associated with lensing galaxies (in terms of the image separation), determining the quantity of dark mass of the lensing bodies, and estimating the mass density of the lenses. The possibility that heavy halos are made of low mass stars is considered, along with the swallowing of central images of black holes or cusps in galactic nuclei and the effects produced on a lensed quasar image by nonbaryonic halos. The observable effects of dense groups and clusters and the characteristics of dark matter strings are discussed, and various types of images which are possible due to lensing phenomena and position are described.

  3. Probing gravitational dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Jing; He, Hong-Jian

    2015-03-01

    So far all evidences of dark matter (DM) come from astrophysical and cosmological observations, due to the gravitational interactions of DM. It is possible that the true DM particle in the universe joins gravitational interactions only, but nothing else. Such a Gravitational DM (GDM) may act as a weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP), which is conceptually simple and attractive. In this work, we explore this direction by constructing the simplest scalar GDM particle χs. It is a Bbb Z2 odd singlet under the standard model (SM) gauge group, and naturally joins the unique dimension-4 interaction with Ricci curvature, ξsχs2Script R, where ξs is the dimensionless nonminimal coupling. We demonstrate that this gravitational interaction ξsχs2Script R, together with Higgs-curvature nonminimal coupling term ξhH†HScript R, induces effective couplings between χs2 and SM fields, and can account for the observed DM thermal relic abundance. We analyze the annihilation cross sections of GDM particles and derive the viable parameter space for realizing the DM thermal relic density. We further study the direct/indirect detections and the collider signatures of such a scalar GDM. These turn out to be highly predictive and testable.

  4. Viscous dark fluid universe

    SciTech Connect

    Hipolito-Ricaldi, W. S.; Velten, H. E. S.; Zimdahl, W.

    2010-09-15

    We investigate the cosmological perturbation dynamics for a universe consisting of pressureless baryonic matter and a viscous fluid, the latter representing a unified model of the dark sector. In the homogeneous and isotropic background the total energy density of this mixture behaves as a generalized Chaplygin gas. The perturbations of this energy density are intrinsically nonadiabatic and source relative entropy perturbations. The resulting baryonic matter power spectrum is shown to be compatible with the 2dFGRS and SDSS (DR7) data. A joint statistical analysis, using also Hubble-function and supernovae Ia data, shows that, different from other studies, there exists a maximum in the probability distribution for a negative present value q{sub 0{approx_equal}}-0.53 of the deceleration parameter. Moreover, while previous descriptions on the basis of generalized Chaplygin-gas models were incompatible with the matter power-spectrum data since they required a much too large amount of pressureless matter, the unified model presented here favors a matter content that is of the order of the baryonic matter abundance suggested by big-bang nucleosynthesis.

  5. Bright Galaxies, Dark Matters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, Vera

    In 1965, Vera Rubin was the first woman permitted to observe at Palomar Observatory. In the intervening years, she has become one of the world's finest and most respected astronomers. This particular collection of essays is compiled from work written over the past 15 years and deals with a variety of subjects in astronomy and astrophysics, specifically galaxies and dark matter. The book also contains biographical sketches of astronomers who have been colleagues and friends, providing a stimulating view of a woman in science. About the Author Since 1965 Vera Rubin has been a staff member at the Department of Terrestrial Magnetism of the Carnegie Institution of Washington. Dr. Rubin has authored nearly 200 papers on the structure of our galaxy, motions within other galaxies, and large scale motions in the universe. She has been a distinguished visiting astronomer at the Cerro Tololo Inter American Observatory in Chile; a Chancellor's Distinguished Professor at the University of California, Berkeley; a President's Distinguished Visitor at Vassar College; and a Beatrice Tinsley visiting professor at the University of Texas, Austin.

  6. The Other Dark Sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pazmino, John

    In previous demonstrations of New York's elimination of luminous graffiti from its skies, I focused attention on large-scale projects in the showcase districts of Manhattan. Although these works earned passionate respect in the dark sky movement, they by the same token were disheartening. New York was in some quarters of the movement regarded more as an unachievable Shangri-La than as a role model to emulate. This presentation focuses on scenes of light abatement efforts in parts of New York which resemble other towns in scale and density. I photographed these scenes along a certain bus route in Brooklyn on my way home from work during October 2001. This route circulates through various "bedroom communities," each similar to a mid-size to large town elsewhere in the United States. The sujbects included individual structures - stores, banks, schools - and streetscapes mimicking downtowns. The latter protrayed a mix of atrocious and excellent lighting practice, being that these streets are in transition by the routine process of replacement and renovation. The fixtures used - box lamps, fluted or Fresnel globes, subdued headsigns, indirect lighting - are casually obtainable by property managers at local outlets for lighting apparatus. They are routinely offered to the property managers by storefront designers, security services, contractors, and the community improvement or betterment councils.

  7. Probing gravitational dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Jing; He, Hong-Jian

    2015-03-27

    So far all evidences of dark matter (DM) come from astrophysical and cosmological observations, due to the gravitational interactions of DM. It is possible that the true DM particle in the universe joins gravitational interactions only, but nothing else. Such a Gravitational DM (GDM) may act as a weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP), which is conceptually simple and attractive. In this work, we explore this direction by constructing the simplest scalar GDM particle χ{sub s}. It is a ℤ{sub 2} odd singlet under the standard model (SM) gauge group, and naturally joins the unique dimension-4 interaction with Ricci curvature, ξ{sub s}χ{sub s}{sup 2}R, where ξ{sub s} is the dimensionless nonminimal coupling. We demonstrate that this gravitational interaction ξ{sub s}χ{sub s}{sup 2}R, together with Higgs-curvature nonminimal coupling term ξ{sub h}H{sup †}HR, induces effective couplings between χ{sub s}{sup 2} and SM fields, and can account for the observed DM thermal relic abundance. We analyze the annihilation cross sections of GDM particles and derive the viable parameter space for realizing the DM thermal relic density. We further study the direct/indirect detections and the collider signatures of such a scalar GDM. These turn out to be highly predictive and testable.

  8. Oscillating asymmetric dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Tulin, Sean; Yu, Hai-Bo; Zurek, Kathryn M. E-mail: haiboyu@umich.edu

    2012-05-01

    We study the dynamics of dark matter (DM) particle-antiparticle oscillations within the context of asymmetric DM. Oscillations arise due to small DM number-violating Majorana-type mass terms, and can lead to recoupling of annihilation after freeze-out and washout of the DM density. Asymmetric DM oscillations 'interpolate' between symmetric and asymmetric DM freeze-out scenarios, and allow for a larger DM model-building parameter space. We derive the density matrix equations for DM oscillations and freeze-out from first principles using nonequilibrium field theory, and our results are qualitatively different than in previous studies. DM dynamics exhibits particle-vs-antiparticle 'flavor' effects, depending on the interaction type, analogous to neutrino oscillations in a medium. 'Flavor-sensitive' DM interactions include scattering or annihilation through a new vector boson, while 'flavor-blind' interactions include scattering or s-channel annihilation through a new scalar boson. In particular, we find that flavor-sensitive annihilation does not recouple when coherent oscillations begin, and that flavor-blind scattering does not lead to decoherence.

  9. Imperfect Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Mirzagholi, Leila; Vikman, Alexander E-mail: alexander.vikman@lmu.de

    2015-06-01

    We consider cosmology of the recently introduced mimetic matter with higher derivatives (HD). Without HD this system describes irrotational dust—Dark Matter (DM) as we see it on cosmologically large scales. DM particles correspond to the shift-charges—Noether charges of the shifts in the field space. Higher derivative corrections usually describe a deviation from the thermodynamical equilibrium in the relativistic hydrodynamics. Thus we show that mimetic matter with HD corresponds to an imperfect DM which: i) renormalises the Newton's constant in the Friedmann equations, ii) has zero pressure when there is no extra matter in the universe, iii) survives the inflationary expansion which puts the system on a dynamical attractor with a vanishing shift-charge, iv) perfectly tracks any external matter on this attractor, v) can become the main (and possibly the only) source of DM, provided the shift-symmetry in the HD terms is broken during some small time interval in the radiation domination époque. In the second part of the paper we present a hydrodynamical description of general anisotropic and inhomogeneous configurations of the system. This imperfect mimetic fluid has an energy flow in the field's rest frame. We find that in the Eckart and in the Landau-Lifshitz frames the mimetic fluid possesses nonvanishing vorticity appearing already at the first order in the HD. Thus, the structure formation and gravitational collapse should proceed in a rather different fashion from the simple irrotational DM models.

  10. The Dark Matter of Biology.

    PubMed

    Ross, Jennifer L

    2016-09-01

    The inside of the cell is full of important, yet invisible species of molecules and proteins that interact weakly but couple together to have huge and important effects in many biological processes. Such "dark matter" inside cells remains mostly hidden, because our tools were developed to investigate strongly interacting species and folded proteins. Example dark-matter species include intrinsically disordered proteins, posttranslational states, ion species, and rare, transient, and weak interactions undetectable by biochemical assays. The dark matter of biology is likely to have multiple, vital roles to regulate signaling, rates of reactions, water structure and viscosity, crowding, and other cellular activities. We need to create new tools to image, detect, and understand these dark-matter species if we are to truly understand fundamental physical principles of biology.

  11. Direct reconstruction of dark energy.

    PubMed

    Clarkson, Chris; Zunckel, Caroline

    2010-05-28

    An important issue in cosmology is reconstructing the effective dark energy equation of state directly from observations. With so few physically motivated models, future dark energy studies cannot only be based on constraining a dark energy parameter space. We present a new nonparametric method which can accurately reconstruct a wide variety of dark energy behavior with no prior assumptions about it. It is simple, quick and relatively accurate, and involves no expensive explorations of parameter space. The technique uses principal component analysis and a combination of information criteria to identify real features in the data, and tailors the fitting functions to pick up trends and smooth over noise. We find that we can constrain a large variety of w(z) models to within 10%-20% at redshifts z≲1 using just SNAP-quality data. PMID:20867085

  12. The LZ dark matter experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinsey, D. N.; LZ Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    The LUX and ZEPLIN collaborations have merged to construct a 7 tonne two-phase Xe dark matter detector, known as LUX-ZEPLIN or LZ. Chosen as one of the Generation 2 suite of dark matter direct detection experiments, LZ will probe spin-independent WIMP-nucleon cross sections down to 2 × 10-48 cm2 at 50 GeV/c2 within 3 years of operation, covering a substantial range of theoretically-motivated dark matter candidates. Along with dark matter interactions with Xe nuclei, LZ will also be sensitive to solar neutrinos emitted by the pp fusion process in the sun, neutrinos emitted by a nearby supernova and detected by coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering, certain classes of axions and axion-like particles, and neutrinoless double-beta decay of 136Xe. The design of LZ is presented, along with its expected backgrounds and projected sensitivity.

  13. Dark Energy Rules the Universe

    SciTech Connect

    Linder, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Berkeley Lab theoretical physicist Eric Linder previews his Nov. 24, 2008 talk on the mystery of dark energy. Catch his full lecture here: http://www.osti.gov/sciencecinema/servlets/purl/1007511?format=mp4

  14. Direct reconstruction of dark energy.

    PubMed

    Clarkson, Chris; Zunckel, Caroline

    2010-05-28

    An important issue in cosmology is reconstructing the effective dark energy equation of state directly from observations. With so few physically motivated models, future dark energy studies cannot only be based on constraining a dark energy parameter space. We present a new nonparametric method which can accurately reconstruct a wide variety of dark energy behavior with no prior assumptions about it. It is simple, quick and relatively accurate, and involves no expensive explorations of parameter space. The technique uses principal component analysis and a combination of information criteria to identify real features in the data, and tailors the fitting functions to pick up trends and smooth over noise. We find that we can constrain a large variety of w(z) models to within 10%-20% at redshifts z≲1 using just SNAP-quality data.

  15. The Dark Matter of Biology.

    PubMed

    Ross, Jennifer L

    2016-09-01

    The inside of the cell is full of important, yet invisible species of molecules and proteins that interact weakly but couple together to have huge and important effects in many biological processes. Such "dark matter" inside cells remains mostly hidden, because our tools were developed to investigate strongly interacting species and folded proteins. Example dark-matter species include intrinsically disordered proteins, posttranslational states, ion species, and rare, transient, and weak interactions undetectable by biochemical assays. The dark matter of biology is likely to have multiple, vital roles to regulate signaling, rates of reactions, water structure and viscosity, crowding, and other cellular activities. We need to create new tools to image, detect, and understand these dark-matter species if we are to truly understand fundamental physical principles of biology. PMID:27602719

  16. Scalar graviton as dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Pirogov, Yu. F.

    2015-06-15

    The basics of the theory of unimodular bimode gravity built on the principles of unimodular gauge invariance/relativity and general covariance are exposed. Besides the massless tensor graviton of General Relativity, the theory includes an (almost) massless scalar graviton treated as the gravitational dark matter. A spherically symmetric vacuum solution describing the coherent scalar-graviton field for the soft-core dark halos, with the asymptotically flat rotation curves, is demonstrated as an example.

  17. Observed trend in the star formation history and the dark matter fraction of galaxies at redshift z ≈ 0.8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shetty, Shravan; Cappellari, Michele

    2015-12-01

    We study the star formation history for a sample of 154 galaxies with stellar mass 10^{10}≲ M_{*} ≲ 10^{12} { M_{⊙}} in the redshift range 0.7 < z < 0.9. We do this using stellar population models combined with full-spectrum fitting of good quality spectra and high-resolution photometry. For a subset of 68 galaxies (M_{*}≳ 10^{11}{ M_{⊙}}) we additionally construct dynamical models. These use an axisymmetric solution to the Jeans equations, which allows for velocity anisotropy, and adopts results from abundance matching techniques to account for the dark matter content. We find that (i) the trends in star formation history observed in the local Universe are already in place by z ˜ 1: the most massive galaxies are already passive, while lower mass ones have a more extended star formation histories, and the lowest mass galaxies are actively forming stars; (ii) we place an upper limit of a factor 1.5 to the size growth of the massive galaxy population; (iii) we present strong evidence for low dark matter fractions within 1Re (median of 9 per cent and 90th percentile of 21 per cent) for galaxies with M_{*} ≳ 10^{11} { M_{⊙}} at these redshifts; and (iv) we confirm that these galaxies have, on average, a Salpeter normalization of the stellar initial mass function.

  18. Decoupling dark energy from matter

    SciTech Connect

    Brax, Philippe; Davis, Anne-Christine; Martin, Jérôme E-mail: c.vandebruck@sheffield.ac.uk E-mail: jmartin@iap.fr

    2009-09-01

    We examine the embedding of dark energy in high energy models based upon supergravity and extend the usual phenomenological setting comprising an observable sector and a hidden supersymmetry breaking sector by including a third sector leading to the acceleration of the expansion of the universe. We find that gravitational constraints on the non-existence of a fifth force naturally imply that the dark energy sector must possess an approximate shift symmetry. When exact, the shift symmetry provides an example of a dark energy sector with a runaway potential and a nearly massless dark energy field whose coupling to matter is very weak, contrary to the usual lore that dark energy fields must couple strongly to matter and lead to gravitational inconsistencies. Moreover, the shape of the potential is stable under one-loop radiative corrections. When the shift symmetry is slightly broken by higher order terms in the Kähler potential, the coupling to matter remains small. However, the cosmological dynamics are largely affected by the shift symmetry breaking operators leading to the appearance of a minimum of the scalar potential such that dark energy behaves like an effective cosmological constant from very early on in the history of the universe.

  19. Dark matter and global symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mambrini, Yann; Profumo, Stefano; Queiroz, Farinaldo S.

    2016-09-01

    General considerations in general relativity and quantum mechanics are known to potentially rule out continuous global symmetries in the context of any consistent theory of quantum gravity. Assuming the validity of such considerations, we derive stringent bounds from gamma-ray, X-ray, cosmic-ray, neutrino, and CMB data on models that invoke global symmetries to stabilize the dark matter particle. We compute up-to-date, robust model-independent limits on the dark matter lifetime for a variety of Planck-scale suppressed dimension-five effective operators. We then specialize our analysis and apply our bounds to specific models including the Two-Higgs-Doublet, Left-Right, Singlet Fermionic, Zee-Babu, 3-3-1 and Radiative See-Saw models. Assuming that (i) global symmetries are broken at the Planck scale, that (ii) the non-renormalizable operators mediating dark matter decay have O (1) couplings, that (iii) the dark matter is a singlet field, and that (iv) the dark matter density distribution is well described by a NFW profile, we are able to rule out fermionic, vector, and scalar dark matter candidates across a broad mass range (keV-TeV), including the WIMP regime.

  20. Dark matter beams at LBNF

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Coloma, Pilar; Dobrescu, Bogdan A.; Frugiuele, Claudia; Harnik, Roni

    2016-04-08

    High-intensity neutrino beam facilities may produce a beam of light dark matter when protons strike the target. Searches for such a dark matter beam using its scattering in a nearby detector must overcome the large neutrino background. We characterize the spatial and energy distributions of the dark matter and neutrino beams, focusing on their differences to enhance the sensitivity to dark matter. We find that a dark matter beam produced by a Zmore » $$^{'}$$ boson in the GeV mass range is both broader and more energetic than the neutrino beam. The reach for dark matter is maximized for a detector sensitive to hard neutral-current scatterings, placed at a sizable angle off the neutrino beam axis. In the case of the Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF), a detector placed at roughly 6 degrees off axis and at a distance of about 200 m from the target would be sensitive to Z$$^{'}$$ couplings as low as 0.05. This search can proceed symbiotically with neutrino measurements. We also show that the MiniBooNE and MicroBooNE detectors, which are on Fermilab’s Booster beamline, happen to be at an optimal angle from the NuMI beam and could perform searches with existing data. As a result, this illustrates potential synergies between LBNF and the short-baseline neutrino program if the detectors are positioned appropriately.« less

  1. Dark Energy and Termonuclear Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domíngez, I.; Bravo, E.; Piersanti, L.; Tornambé, A.; Straniero, O.; Höflich, P.

    2008-12-01

    Nowadays it is widely accepted that the current Universe is dominated by dark energy and exotic matter, the so called StandardModel of Cosmoloy or CDM model. All the available data (Thermonuclear Supernovae, Cosmic Microwave Background, Baryon Acoustic Oscillations, Large Scale Structure, etc.) are compatible with a flat Universe made by ~70% of dark energy. Up to now observations agree that dark energy may be the vacuum energy (or cosmological constant) although improvements are needed to constrain further its equation of state. In this context, the cosmic destiny of the Universe is no longer linked to its geometry but to the nature of dark energy; it may be flat and expand forever or collapse. To understand the nature of dark energy is probably the most fundamental problem in physics today; it may open new roads of knowledge and led to unify gravity with the other fundamental interactions in nature. It is expected that astronomical data will continue to provide directions to theorists and experimental physicists. Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) have played a fundamental role, showing the acceleration of the expansion rate of the Universe a decade ago, and up to now they are the only astronomical observations that provide a direct evidence of the acceleration. However, in order to determine the source of the dark energy term it is mandatory to improve the precision of supernovae as distance indicators on cosmological scale.

  2. Skew-flavored dark matter

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Agrawal, Prateek; Chacko, Zackaria; Fortes, Elaine C. F. S.; Kilic, Can

    2016-05-10

    We explore a novel flavor structure in the interactions of dark matter with the Standard Model. We consider theories in which both the dark matter candidate, and the particles that mediate its interactions with the Standard Model fields, carry flavor quantum numbers. The interactions are skewed in flavor space, so that a dark matter particle does not directly couple to the Standard Model matter fields of the same flavor, but only to the other two flavors. This framework respects minimal flavor violation and is, therefore, naturally consistent with flavor constraints. We study the phenomenology of a benchmark model in whichmore » dark matter couples to right-handed charged leptons. In large regions of parameter space, the dark matter can emerge as a thermal relic, while remaining consistent with the constraints from direct and indirect detection. The collider signatures of this scenario include events with multiple leptons and missing energy. In conclusion, these events exhibit a characteristic flavor pattern that may allow this class of models to be distinguished from other theories of dark matter.« less

  3. Dark D-brane cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Koivisto, Tomi; Wills, Danielle; Zavala, Ivonne E-mail: d.e.wills@durham.ac.uk

    2014-06-01

    Disformally coupled cosmologies arise from Dirac-Born-Infeld actions in Type II string theories, when matter resides on a moving hidden sector D-brane. Since such matter interacts only very weakly with the standard model particles, this scenario can provide a natural origin for the dark sector of the universe with a clear geometrical interpretation: dark energy is identified with the scalar field associated to the D-brane's position as it moves in the internal space, acting as quintessence, while dark matter is identified with the matter living on the D-brane, which can be modelled by a perfect fluid. The coupling functions are determined by the (warped) extra-dimensional geometry, and are thus constrained by the theory. The resulting cosmologies are studied using both dynamical system analysis and numerics. From the dynamical system point of view, one free parameter controls the cosmological dynamics, given by the ratio of the warp factor and the potential energy scales. The disformal coupling allows for new scaling solutions that can describe accelerating cosmologies alleviating the coincidence problem of dark energy. In addition, this scenario may ameliorate the fine-tuning problem of dark energy, whose small value may be attained dynamically, without requiring the mass of the dark energy field to be unnaturally low.

  4. Measure the local dark matter density with LAMOST spectroscopic survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chao; Xia, Qiran; Mao, Shude

    2016-08-01

    The local dark matter density plays the key role in the distribution of the dark matter halo near the Galactic disk. It will also answer whether a dark matter disk exists in the Milky Way. We measure the local dark matter density with LAMOST observed stars located at around the north Galactic pole. The selection effects of the observations are well considered and corrected. We find that the derived DM density, which is around 0.0159+0.0047 -0.0057 M ⊙ pc-3 providing a flat local rotation curve.

  5. No evidence of dark matter in the solar neighborhood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moni Bidin, C.; Carraro, G.; Méndez, R. A.; Smith, R.

    We measured the surface mass density of the Galactic disk at the solar posi- tion, up to 4 kpc from the plane, by means of the kinematics of 400 thick disk stars. The results match the expectations for the visible mass only, and no dark matter is detected in the volume under analysis. The current models of dark matter halo are excluded with a significance higher than 5, unless a highly prolate halo is assumed, very atypical in cold dark matter simula- tions. The resulting lack of dark matter at the solar position challenges the current models. FULL TEXT IN SPANISH

  6. Deuteration in infrared dark clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lackington, Matias; Fuller, Gary A.; Pineda, Jaime E.; Garay, Guido; Peretto, Nicolas; Traficante, Alessio

    2016-01-01

    Much of the dense gas in molecular clouds has a filamentary structure but the detailed structure and evolution of this gas is poorly known. We have observed 54 cores in infrared dark clouds (IRDCs) using N2H+ (1-0) and (3-2) to determine the kinematics of the densest material, where stars will form. We also observed N2D+ (3-2) towards 29 of the brightest peaks to analyse the level of deuteration which is an excellent probe of the quiescent of the early stages of star formation. There were 13 detections of N2D+ (3-2). This is one of the largest samples of IRDCs yet observed in these species. The deuteration ratio in these sources ranges between 0.003 and 0.14. For most of the sources the material traced by N2D+ and N2H+ (3-2) still has significant turbulent motions, however three objects show subthermal N2D+ velocity dispersion. Surprisingly the presence or absence of an embedded 70μm source shows no correlation with the detection of N2D+ (3-2), nor does it correlate with any change in velocity dispersion or excitation temperature. Comparison with recent models of deuteration suggest evolutionary time-scales of these regions of several free-fall times or less.

  7. On dark degeneracy and interacting models

    SciTech Connect

    Carneiro, S.; Borges, H.A. E-mail: humberto@ufba.br

    2014-06-01

    Cosmological background observations cannot fix the dark energy equation of state, which is related to a degeneracy in the definition of the dark sector components. Here we show that this degeneracy can be broken at perturbation level by imposing two observational properties on dark matter. First, dark matter is defined as the clustering component we observe in large scale structures. This definition is meaningful only if dark energy is unperturbed, which is achieved if we additionally assume, as a second condition, that dark matter is cold, i.e. non-relativistic. As a consequence, dark energy models with equation-of-state parameter −1 ≤ ω < 0 are reduced to two observationally distinguishable classes with ω = −1, equally competitive when tested against observations. The first comprises the ΛCDM model with constant dark energy density. The second consists of interacting models with an energy flux from dark energy to dark matter.

  8. A parallel world in the dark

    SciTech Connect

    Higaki, Tetsutaro; Jeong, Kwang Sik; Takahashi, Fuminobu E-mail: ksjeong@tuhep.phys.tohoku.ac.jp

    2013-08-01

    The baryon-dark matter coincidence is a long-standing issue. Interestingly, the recent observations suggest the presence of dark radiation, which, if confirmed, would pose another coincidence problem of why the density of dark radiation is comparable to that of photons. These striking coincidences may be traced back to the dark sector with particle contents and interactions that are quite similar, if not identical, to the standard model: a dark parallel world. It naturally solves the coincidence problems of dark matter and dark radiation, and predicts a sterile neutrino(s) with mass of O(0.1−1) eV, as well as self-interacting dark matter made of the counterpart of ordinary baryons. We find a robust prediction for the relation between the abundance of dark radiation and the sterile neutrino, which can serve as the smoking-gun evidence of the dark parallel world.

  9. Superheavy dark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel Chung

    2000-05-25

    If there exists fields of mass of the order of 10{sup 13} GeV and large field inflation occurs, their interaction with classical gravitation will generate enough particles to give the universe critical density today regardless of their nongravitational coupling. In the standard dark matter scenarios, WIMPs are usually considered to have once been in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE), and their present abundance is determined by their self-annihilation cross section. In that case, unitarity and the lower bound on the age of the universe constrains the mass of the relic to be less than 500 TeV. On the other hand, if the DM particles never attained LTE in the past, self-annihilation cross section does not determine their abundance. For example, axions, which may never have been in LTE, can have their abundance determined by the dynamics of the phase transition associated with the breaking of U(1){sub PQ}. These nonthermal relics (ones that never obtained LTE) are typically light. However, there are mechanisms that can produce superheavy (many orders of magnitude greater than the weak scale) nonthermal relics. Some of this is reviewed in reference 2. Although not known at the time when this talk was given, it is now known that if the DM fields are coupled to the inflaton field, then the mass of the DM particles that can be naturally produced in significant abundance after inflation can be as large as 10{sup {minus}3} M{sub Pl} (paper in preparation). The author discusses the gravitational production mechanism which is a generic consequence of any large field inflationary phase ending.

  10. Wave Dark Matter and Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parry, Alan R.

    We explore a model of dark matter called wave dark matter (also known as scalar field dark matter and boson stars) which has recently been motivated by a new geometric perspective by Bray. Wave dark matter describes dark matter as a scalar field which satisfies the Einstein-Klein-Gordon equations. These equations rely on a fundamental constant Upsilon (also known as the "mass term'' of the Klein-Gordon equation). Specifically, in this dissertation, we study spherically symmetric wave dark matter and compare these results with observations of dwarf spheroidal galaxies as a first attempt to compare the implications of the theory of wave dark matter with actual observations of dark matter. This includes finding a first estimate of the fundamental constant Upsilon. In the introductory Chapter 1, we present some preliminary background material to define and motivate the study of wave dark matter and describe some of the properties of dwarf spheroidal galaxies. In Chapter 2, we present several different ways of describing a spherically symmetric spacetime and the resulting metrics. We then focus our discussion on an especially useful form of the metric of a spherically symmetric spacetime in polar-areal coordinates and its properties. In particular, we show how the metric component functions chosen are extremely compatible with notions in Newtonian mechanics. We also show the monotonicity of the Hawking mass in these coordinates. Finally, we discuss how these coordinates and the metric can be used to solve the spherically symmetric Einstein-Klein-Gordon equations. In Chapter 3, we explore spherically symmetric solutions to the Einstein-Klein-Gordon equations, the defining equations of wave dark matter, where the scalar field is of the form f(t, r) = eiotF(r) for some constant o ∈ R and complex-valued function F(r). We show that the corresponding metric is static if and only if F( r) = h(r)eia for some constant alpha ∈ R and real-valued function h(r). We describe the

  11. Exmoor - Europe's first International Dark Sky Reserve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, S.

    2011-12-01

    On 2011 October 9 Exmoor National Park in the southwest of England was designated as Europe's first International Dark Sky Reserve by the International Dark Skies Association. This is a huge achievement, and follows three years of work by park authorities, local astronomers, lighting engineers and the resident community. Exmoor Dark Sky Reserve follows in the footsteps of Galloway Forest Dark Sky Park, set up in 2009, and Sark Dark Sky Island, established in January 2011.

  12. Can the Existence of Dark Energy be Directly Detected?

    SciTech Connect

    Perl, Martin L.; /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2011-11-23

    The majority of astronomers and physicists accept the reality of dark energy and also believe that it can only be studied indirectly through observation of the motions of stars and galaxies. In this paper I open the experimental question of whether it is possible to directly detect dark energy through the presence of dark energy density. Two thirds of this paper outlines the major aspects of dark energy density as now comprehended by the astronomical and physics community. The final third summarizes various proposals for direct detection of dark energy density or its possible effects. At this time I do not have a fruitful answer to the question: Can the Existence of Dark Energy Be Directly Detected?

  13. Description of dark energy and dark matter by vector fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meierovich, Boris E.

    A simple Lagrangian (with squared covariant divergence of a vector field as a kinetic term) turned out an adequate tool for oscopic description of dark sector. The zero-mass field acts as the dark energy. Its energy-momentum tensor is a simple additive to the cosmological constant. Space-like and time-like massive vector fields describe two different forms of dark matter. The space-like field is attractive. It is responsible for the observed plateau in galaxy rotation curves. The time-like massive field displays repulsive elasticity. In balance with dark energy and ordinary matter it provides a four-parametric diversity of regular solutions of the Einstein equations describing different possible cosmological and oscillating non-singular scenarios of evolution of the Universe. In particular, the singular "big bang" turns into a regular inflation-like transition from contraction to expansion with accelerated expansion at late times. The fine-tuned Friedman-Robertson-Walker singular solution is a particular limiting case at the boundary of existence of regular oscillating solutions (in the absence of vector fields). The simplicity of the general covariant expression for the energy-momentum tensor allows analyzing the main properties of the dark sector analytically, avoiding unnecessary model assumptions.

  14. Probing the Dark Sector with Dark Matter Bound States.

    PubMed

    An, Haipeng; Echenard, Bertrand; Pospelov, Maxim; Zhang, Yue

    2016-04-15

    A model of the dark sector where O(few  GeV) mass dark matter particles χ couple to a lighter dark force mediator V, m_{V}≪m_{χ}, is motivated by the recently discovered mismatch between simulated and observed shapes of galactic halos. Such models, in general, provide a challenge for direct detection efforts and collider searches. We show that for a large range of coupling constants and masses, the production and decay of the bound states of χ, such as 0^{-+} and 1^{--} states, η_{D} and ϒ_{D}, is an important search channel. We show that e^{+}e^{-}→η_{D}+V or ϒ_{D}+γ production at B factories for α_{D}>0.1 is sufficiently strong to result in multiple pairs of charged leptons and pions via η_{D}→2V→2(l^{+}l^{-}) and ϒ_{D}→3V→3(l^{+}l^{-}) (l=e,μ,π). The absence of such final states in the existing searches performed at BABAR and Belle sets new constraints on the parameter space of the model. We also show that a search for multiple bremsstrahlung of dark force mediators, e^{+}e^{-}→χχ[over ¯]+nV, resulting in missing energy and multiple leptons, will further improve the sensitivity to self-interacting dark matter.

  15. Probing the Dark Sector with Dark Matter Bound States.

    PubMed

    An, Haipeng; Echenard, Bertrand; Pospelov, Maxim; Zhang, Yue

    2016-04-15

    A model of the dark sector where O(few  GeV) mass dark matter particles χ couple to a lighter dark force mediator V, m_{V}≪m_{χ}, is motivated by the recently discovered mismatch between simulated and observed shapes of galactic halos. Such models, in general, provide a challenge for direct detection efforts and collider searches. We show that for a large range of coupling constants and masses, the production and decay of the bound states of χ, such as 0^{-+} and 1^{--} states, η_{D} and ϒ_{D}, is an important search channel. We show that e^{+}e^{-}→η_{D}+V or ϒ_{D}+γ production at B factories for α_{D}>0.1 is sufficiently strong to result in multiple pairs of charged leptons and pions via η_{D}→2V→2(l^{+}l^{-}) and ϒ_{D}→3V→3(l^{+}l^{-}) (l=e,μ,π). The absence of such final states in the existing searches performed at BABAR and Belle sets new constraints on the parameter space of the model. We also show that a search for multiple bremsstrahlung of dark force mediators, e^{+}e^{-}→χχ[over ¯]+nV, resulting in missing energy and multiple leptons, will further improve the sensitivity to self-interacting dark matter. PMID:27127956

  16. Search for young stars among ROSAT All-Sky Survey X-ray sources in and around the R CrA dark cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuhäuser, R.; Walter, F. M.; Covino, E.; Alcalá, J. M.; Wolk, S. J.; Frink, S.; Guillout, P.; Sterzik, M. F.; Comerón, F.

    2000-10-01

    We present the ROSAT All-Sky Survey data in a 126 deg2 area in and around the CrA star forming region. With low-resolution spectroscopy of unidentified ROSAT sources we could find 19 new pre-main sequence stars, two of which are classical T Tauri stars, the others being weak-lined. The spectral types of these new T Tauri stars range from F7 to M6. The two new classical T Tauri stars are located towards two small cloud-lets outside of the main CrA cloud. They appear to be ~ 10 Myrs old, by comparing their location in the H-R diagram with isochrones for an assumed distance of 130 pc, the distance of the main CrA dark cloud. The new off-cloud weak-line T Tauri stars may have formed in similar cloudlets, which have dispersed recently. High-resolution spectra of our new T Tauri stars show that they have significantly more lithium absorption than zero-age main-sequence stars of the same spectral type, so that they are indeed young. From those spectra we also obtained rotational and radial velocities. For some stars we found the proper motion in published catalogs. The direction and velocity of the 3D space motion - south relative to the galatic plane - of the CrA T Tauri stars is consistent with the dark cloud being formed originally by a high-velocity cloud impact onto the galactic plane, which triggered the star formation in CrA. We also present VRIJHK photometry for most of the new T Tauri stars to derive their luminosities, ages, and masses. Partly based on observations collected at the 1.52 m and 3.5 m telescopes of the European Southern Observatory, Chile, in programs 55.E-0549, 57.E-0646, and 63.L-0023, and on observations collected at the 0.9 m, 1.5 m, and 4.0 m CTIO telescope.

  17. Evolution of the stellar-to-dark matter relation: Separating star-forming and passive galaxies from z = 1 to 0

    SciTech Connect

    Tinker, Jeremy L.; Leauthaud, Alexie; Bundy, Kevin; George, Matthew R.; Behroozi, Peter; Wechsler, Risa H.; Massey, Richard; Rhodes, Jason

    2013-12-01

    We use measurements of the stellar mass function, galaxy clustering, and galaxy-galaxy lensing within the COSMOS survey to constrain the stellar-to-halo mass relation (SHMR) of star forming and quiescent galaxies over the redshift range z = [0.2, 1.0]. For massive galaxies, M {sub *} ≳ 10{sup 10.6} M {sub ☉}, our results indicate that star-forming galaxies grow proportionately as fast as their dark matter halos while quiescent galaxies are outpaced by dark matter growth. At lower masses, there is minimal difference in the SHMRs, implying that the majority low-mass quiescent galaxies have only recently been quenched of their star formation. Our analysis also affords a breakdown of all COSMOS galaxies into the relative numbers of central and satellite galaxies for both populations. At z = 1, satellite galaxies dominate the red sequence below the knee in the stellar mass function. But the number of quiescent satellites exhibits minimal redshift evolution; all evolution in the red sequence is due to low-mass central galaxies being quenched of their star formation. At M {sub *} ∼ 10{sup 10} M {sub ☉}, the fraction of central galaxies on the red sequence increases by a factor of 10 over our redshift baseline, while the fraction of quenched satellite galaxies at that mass is constant with redshift. We define a 'migration rate' to the red sequence as the time derivative of the passive galaxy abundances. We find that the migration rate of central galaxies to the red sequence increases by nearly an order of magnitude from z = 1 to z = 0. These results imply that the efficiency of quenching star formation for centrals is increasing with cosmic time, while the mechanisms that quench the star formation of satellite galaxies in groups and clusters is losing efficiency.

  18. In Darkness Born

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Martin

    2009-06-01

    Preface; 1. What does astronomy tell us?; 2. what is a star?; 3. Our galaxy; 4. Where are starts born?; 5. How to recognise the youngest stars; 6. Nature's womb; 7. How and why clouds collapse; 8. Towards a more sedate life; 9. High-mass stars and triggering mechanisms; 10. Planets; 11. Epilogue; Index.

  19. The Dark Age of the universe.

    PubMed

    Miralda-Escudé, Jordi

    2003-06-20

    The Dark Age is the period between the time when the cosmic microwave background was emitted and the time when the evolution of structure in the universe led to the gravitational collapse of objects, in which the first stars were formed. The period of reionization started with the ionizing light from the first stars, and it ended when all the atoms in the intergalactic medium had been reionized. The most distant sources of light known at present are galaxies and quasars at redshift z congruent with 6, and their spectra indicate that the end of reionization was occurring just at that time. The Cold Dark Matter theory for structure formation predicts that the first sources formed much earlier.

  20. The Dark Age of the universe.

    PubMed

    Miralda-Escudé, Jordi

    2003-06-20

    The Dark Age is the period between the time when the cosmic microwave background was emitted and the time when the evolution of structure in the universe led to the gravitational collapse of objects, in which the first stars were formed. The period of reionization started with the ionizing light from the first stars, and it ended when all the atoms in the intergalactic medium had been reionized. The most distant sources of light known at present are galaxies and quasars at redshift z congruent with 6, and their spectra indicate that the end of reionization was occurring just at that time. The Cold Dark Matter theory for structure formation predicts that the first sources formed much earlier. PMID:12817139

  1. Direct search for dark matter with DarkSide

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Agnes, P.

    2015-11-16

    Here, the DarkSide experiment is designed for the direct detection of Dark Matter with a double phase liquid Argon TPC operating underground at Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso. The TPC is placed inside a 30 tons liquid organic scintillator sphere, acting as a neutron veto, which is in turn installed inside a 1 kt water Cherenkov detector. The current detector is running since November 2013 with a 50 kg atmospheric Argon fill and we report here the first null results of a Dark Matter search for a (1422 ± 67) kg.d exposure. This result correspond to a 90% CL uppermore » limit on the WIMP-nucleon cross section of 6.1 × 10-44 cm2 (for a WIMP mass of 100 GeV/c2) and it's currently the most sensitive limit obtained with an Argon target.« less

  2. Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS): The Hunt for Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Sadoulet, Bernard

    2006-03-06

    Deciphering the nature of dark matter has great scientific importance. A leading hypothesis is that dark matter is made of Weakly Interactive Massive Particles (WIMPs), which may result from supersymmetry or additional spatial dimensions. The underground search for elastic scattering of WIMPs on suitable targets (the so-called 'direct detection') is currently led by the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search II (CDMS II) experiment. Its sensitivity is ten times better than any other experiment and we hope to obtain another factor ten in the coming two years. After a brief recall of our recent results, I will describe the complementarity between direct detection experiments, the LHC and the ILC and I will outline the role that SLAC could play in this SuperCDMS program.

  3. Direct search for dark matter with DarkSide

    SciTech Connect

    Agnes, P.

    2015-11-16

    Here, the DarkSide experiment is designed for the direct detection of Dark Matter with a double phase liquid Argon TPC operating underground at Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso. The TPC is placed inside a 30 tons liquid organic scintillator sphere, acting as a neutron veto, which is in turn installed inside a 1 kt water Cherenkov detector. The current detector is running since November 2013 with a 50 kg atmospheric Argon fill and we report here the first null results of a Dark Matter search for a (1422 ± 67) kg.d exposure. This result correspond to a 90% CL upper limit on the WIMP-nucleon cross section of 6.1 × 10-44 cm2 (for a WIMP mass of 100 GeV/c2) and it's currently the most sensitive limit obtained with an Argon target.

  4. MEST- there is a dark hole around solar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Dayong

    2015-04-01

    According to Einstein's equation and a TaiJi model-a balance between the spacetime and massenergy, the paper supposes there is a dark hole around the solar system, and they build up a balance system. The dark hole is made up of dark matter-dark massenergy that is spacetime center, so it is difficult observed. The supposing of dark hole will try to explain below questions: 1. What is dark matter? 2. Why and how do dark matter around galaxies and star? 3. Are there have relationship between dark matter and ``Oort Cloud''? 4. Why are there Jovian planets and terrestrial planets? 5. Why do the Jovian planets of big mass is far away from sun? 6. Why do planets have elliptic orbits and the same direction of their revolution? 7. How did periodicity Mass Extinctions caused by seasonal impaction of dark hole or dark matter? 8. Why did the dark asteroid look like dark comet? Why is asteroid-1950 DA such low density and rock hull of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko? 9. Did the dark matter made coal, oil and natural gas during the Mass Extinctions on our earth? 10. Could consciousness of life help lives to renew and evolve from the Mass Extinctions? http://meeting.aps.org/link/BAPS.2015.APR.T1.26 http://meeting.aps.org/link/BAPS.2015.MAR.Z23.14 http://meetings.aps.org/link/BAPS.2013.MAR.H1.267 http://meetings.aps.org/link/BAPS.2009.APR.E1.33 http://meetings.aps.org/link/BAPS.2010.APR.C1.37 http://meetings.aps.org/link/BAPS.2014.APR.L1.3 http://meetings.aps.org/link/BAPS.2014.APR.L1.2

  5. CO observations of dark clouds in Lupus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, D. C.; Cohen, R.; May, J.

    1986-01-01

    C-12O observations covering 170 square degrees toward the southern T Association Lupus have revealed the presence of an extended physically related complex of dark clouds which have recently formed low mass stars. The estimated mass of the clouds (about 30,000 solar masses) is comparable to that of the nearby Ophiuchus dust clouds. The Lupus clouds are projected onto a gap between two subgroups of the Scorpio-Centaurus OB association suggesting that this long accepted subgrouping may require reinterpretation.

  6. Z-portal dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Arcadi, Giorgio; Mambrini, Yann; Richard, Francois

    2015-03-11

    We propose to generalize the extensions of the Standard Model where the Z boson serves as a mediator between the Standard Model sector and the dark sector χ. We show that, like in the Higgs portal case, the combined constraints from the recent direct searches restrict severely the nature of the coupling of the dark matter to the Z boson and set a limit m{sub χ}≳200 GeV (except in a very narrow region around the Z-pole region). Using complementarity between spin dependent, spin independent and FERMI limits, we predict the nature of this coupling, more specifically the axial/vectorial ratio that respects a thermal dark matter coupled through a Z-portal while not being excluded by the current observations. We also show that the next generation of experiments of the type LZ or XENON1T will test Z-portal scenario for dark matter mass up to 2 TeV. The condition of a thermal dark matter naturally predicts the spin-dependent scattering cross section on the neutron to be σ{sub χn}{sup SD}≃10{sup −40} cm{sup 2}, which then becomes a clear prediction of the model and a signature testable in the near future experiments.

  7. Inflationary imprints on dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Nurmi, Sami; Tenkanen, Tommi; Tuominen, Kimmo E-mail: tommi.tenkanen@helsinki.fi

    2015-11-01

    We show that dark matter abundance and the inflationary scale H could be intimately related. Standard Model extensions with Higgs mediated couplings to new physics typically contain extra scalars displaced from vacuum during inflation. If their coupling to Standard Model is weak, they will not thermalize and may easily constitute too much dark matter reminiscent to the moduli problem. As an example we consider Standard Model extended by a Z{sub 2} symmetric singlet s coupled to the Standard Model Higgs Φ via λ Φ{sup †}Φ s{sup 2}. Dark matter relic density is generated non-thermally for λ ∼< 10{sup −7}. We show that the dark matter yield crucially depends on the inflationary scale. For H∼ 10{sup 10} GeV we find that the singlet self-coupling and mass should lie in the regime λ{sub s}∼> 10{sup −9} and m{sub s}∼< 50 GeV to avoid dark matter overproduction.

  8. Euclid and the Dark Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellier, Yannick

    2016-07-01

    The ESA Euclid mission aims to understand why the expansion of the Universe is accelerating and pin down the source responsible for the acceleration. It will uncover the very nature of dark energy and gravitation by measuring with exquisite accuracy the expansion rate of the Universe and the growth rate of structure formation in the Universe. To achieve its objectives Euclid will observe the distribution of dark matter in the Universe by measuring shapes of weakly distorted distant galaxies lensed by foreground cosmic structures with the VIS imaging instrument. In parallel, Euclid will analyse the clustering of galaxies and the distribution of clusters of galaxies by using spectroscopy and measuring redshifts of galaxies with the NISP photometer and spectrometer instrument. The Euclid mission will observe one third of the sky (15,000 deg2) to collect data on several billion galaxies spread over the last ten billion years. In this presentation I will report on the considerable technical and scientific progresses made since COSPAR 2014, on behalf of the Euclid Collaboration. The recent mission PDR that has been passed successfully shows that Euclid should meet its requirements and achieve its primary scientific objectives to map the dark universe. The most recent forecasts and constraints on dark energy, gravity, dark matter and inflation will be presented.

  9. Dark Skies Rangers - Fighting light pollution and simulating dark skies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doran, Rosa; Correia, Nelson; Guerra, Rita; Costa, Ana

    2015-03-01

    Dark Skies Rangers is an awareness program aimed at students of all ages to stimulate them to make an audit of light pollution in their school/district. The young light pollution fighters evaluate the level of light pollution, how much energy is being wasted, and produce a report to be delivered to the local authorities. They are also advised to promote a light pollution awareness campaign to the local community targeting not only the dark skies but also other implications such as effects in our health, to the flora and fauna, etc.

  10. Dark radiation from modulated reheating

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Takeshi; Takahashi, Fuminobu; Takahashi, Tomo; Yamaguchi, Masahide E-mail: fumi@tuhep.phys.tohoku.ac.jp E-mail: gucci@phys.titech.ac.jp

    2012-03-01

    We show that the modulated reheating mechanism can naturally account for dark radiation, whose existence is hinted by recent observations of the cosmic microwave background radiation and the primordial Helium abundance. In this mechanism, the inflaton decay rate depends on a light modulus which acquires almost scale-invariant quantum fluctuations during inflation. We find that the light modulus is generically produced by the inflaton decay and therefore a prime candidate for the dark radiation. Interestingly, an almost scale-invariant power spectrum predicted in the modulated reheating mechanism gives a better fit to the observation in the presence of the extra radiation. We discuss the production mechanism of the light modulus in detail taking account of its associated isocurvature fluctuations. We also consider a case where the modulus becomes the dominant component of dark matter.

  11. The DAMIC Dark Matter Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    de Mello Neto, J. R.T.

    2015-10-07

    The DAMIC (DArk Matter In CCDs) experiment uses high-resistivity, scientific-grade CCDs to search for dark matter. The CCD’s low electronic noise allows an unprecedently low energy threshold of a few tens of eV; this characteristic makes it possible to detect silicon recoils resulting from interactions of low-mass WIMPs. In addition, the CCD’s high spatial resolution and the excellent energy response results in very effective background identification techniques. The experiment has a unique sensitivity to dark matter particles with masses below 10 GeV/c2. Previous results have motivated the construction of DAMIC100, a 100 grams silicon target detector currently being installed at SNOLAB. The mode of operation and unique imaging capabilities of the CCDs, and how they may be exploited to characterize and suppress backgrounds are discussed, as well as physics results after one year of data taking.

  12. Dark matter in 3D

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Alves, Daniele S. M.; El Hedri, Sonia; Wacker, Jay G.

    2016-03-21

    We discuss the relevance of directional detection experiments in the post-discovery era and propose a method to extract the local dark matter phase space distribution from directional data. The first feature of this method is a parameterization of the dark matter distribution function in terms of integrals of motion, which can be analytically extended to infer properties of the global distribution if certain equilibrium conditions hold. The second feature of our method is a decomposition of the distribution function in moments of a model independent basis, with minimal reliance on the ansatz for its functional form. We illustrate our methodmore » using the Via Lactea II N-body simulation as well as an analytical model for the dark matter halo. Furthermore, we conclude that O(1000) events are necessary to measure deviations from the Standard Halo Model and constrain or measure the presence of anisotropies.« less

  13. The dark side of curvature

    SciTech Connect

    Barenboim, Gabriela; Martínez, Enrique Fernández; Mena, Olga; Verde, Licia E-mail: enfmarti@mppmu.mpg.de E-mail: liciaverde@icc.ub.edu

    2010-03-01

    Geometrical tests such as the combination of the Hubble parameter H(z) and the angular diameter distance d{sub A}(z) can, in principle, break the degeneracy between the dark energy equation of state parameter w(z), and the spatial curvature Ω{sub k} in a direct, model-independent way. In practice, constraints on these quantities achievable from realistic experiments, such as those to be provided by Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) galaxy surveys in combination with CMB data, can resolve the cosmic confusion between the dark energy equation of state parameter and curvature only statistically and within a parameterized model for w(z). Combining measurements of both H(z) and d{sub A}(z) up to sufficiently high redshifts z ∼ 2 and employing a parameterization of the redshift evolution of the dark energy equation of state are the keys to resolve the w(z)−Ω{sub k} degeneracy.

  14. Dark Forces At The Tevatron

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Buckley, Matt; Fileviez Perez, Pavel; Hooper, Dan; Neil, Ethan

    2011-08-19

    A simple explanation of the W + dijet excess recently reported by the CDF collaboration involves the introduction of a new gauge boson with sizable couplings to quarks, but with no or highly suppressed couplings to leptons. Anomaly-free theories which include such a leptophobic gauge boson must also include additional particle content, which may include a stable and otherwise viable candidate for dark matter. Based on the couplings and mass of the Z` required to generate the CDF excess, we predict such a dark matter candidate to possess an elastic scattering cross section with nucleons on the order of σmore » ~ 10-40 cm2, providing a natural explanation for the signals reported by the CoGeNT and DAMA/LIBRA collaborations. In this light, CDF may be observing the gauge boson responsible for the force which mediates the interactions between the dark and visible matter of our universe.« less

  15. Laying bare Venus' dark secrets

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, D.A.

    1987-10-01

    Ground-based IR observations of the dark side of Venus obtained in 1983 and 1985 with the Anglo-Australian Telescope are studied. An IR spectrum of Venus' dark side is analyzed. It is observed that the Venus atmosphere is composed of CO and radiation escapes only at 1.74 microns and 2.2 to 2.4 microns. The possible origin of the radiation, either due to absorbed sunlight or escaping thermal radiation, was investigated. These two hypotheses were eliminated, and it is proposed that the clouds of Venus are transparent and the radiation originates from the same stratum as the brighter portions but is weakened by the passage through the upper layer. The significance of the observed dark side markings is discussed.

  16. How many dark energy parameters?

    SciTech Connect

    Linder, Eric V.; Huterer, Dragan

    2005-05-16

    For exploring the physics behind the accelerating universe a crucial question is how much we can learn about the dynamics through next generation cosmological experiments. For example, in defining the dark energy behavior through an effective equation of state, how many parameters can we realistically expect to tightly constrain? Through both general and specific examples (including new parametrizations and principal component analysis) we argue that the answer is 42 - no, wait, two. Cosmological parameter analyses involving a measure of the equation of state value at some epoch (e.g., w_0) and a measure of the change in equation of state (e.g., w') are therefore realistic in projecting dark energy parameter constraints. More elaborate parametrizations could have some uses (e.g., testing for bias or comparison with model features), but do not lead to accurately measured dark energy parameters.

  17. Dark Matter in 3D

    SciTech Connect

    Alves, Daniele S.M.; Hedri, Sonia El; Wacker, Jay G.

    2012-04-01

    We discuss the relevance of directional detection experiments in the post-discovery era and propose a method to extract the local dark matter phase space distribution from directional data. The first feature of this method is a parameterization of the dark matter distribution function in terms of integrals of motion, which can be analytically extended to infer properties of the global distribution if certain equilibrium conditions hold. The second feature of our method is a decomposition of the distribution function in moments of a model independent basis, with minimal reliance on the ansatz for its functional form. We illustrate our method using the Via Lactea II N-body simulation as well as an analytical model for the dark matter halo. We conclude that O(1000) events are necessary to measure deviations from the Standard Halo Model and constrain or measure the presence of anisotropies.

  18. Dark Forces At The Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Buckley, Matt; Fileviez Perez, Pavel; Hooper, Dan; Neil, Ethan

    2011-08-19

    A simple explanation of the W + dijet excess recently reported by the CDF collaboration involves the introduction of a new gauge boson with sizable couplings to quarks, but with no or highly suppressed couplings to leptons. Anomaly-free theories which include such a leptophobic gauge boson must also include additional particle content, which may include a stable and otherwise viable candidate for dark matter. Based on the couplings and mass of the Z` required to generate the CDF excess, we predict such a dark matter candidate to possess an elastic scattering cross section with nucleons on the order of σ ~ 10-40 cm2, providing a natural explanation for the signals reported by the CoGeNT and DAMA/LIBRA collaborations. In this light, CDF may be observing the gauge boson responsible for the force which mediates the interactions between the dark and visible matter of our universe.

  19. Interacting dark sector with transversal interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Chimento, Luis P.; Richarte, Martín G.

    2015-03-26

    We investigate the interacting dark sector composed of dark matter, dark energy, and dark radiation for a spatially flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) background by introducing a three-dimensional internal space spanned by the interaction vector Q and solve the source equation for a linear transversal interaction. Then, we explore a realistic model with dark matter coupled to a scalar field plus a decoupled radiation term, analyze the amount of dark energy in the radiation era and find that our model is consistent with the recent measurements of cosmic microwave background anisotropy coming from Planck along with the future constraints achievable by CMBPol experiment.

  20. [Dark respiration of terrestrial vegetations: a review].

    PubMed

    Sun, Jin-Wei; Yuan, Feng-Hui; Guan, De-Xin; Wu, Jia-Bing

    2013-06-01

    The source and sink effect of terrestrial plants is one of the hotspots in terrestrial ecosystem research under the background of global change. Dark respiration of terrestrial plants accounts for a large fraction of total net carbon balance, playing an important role in the research of carbon cycle under global climate change. However, there is little study on plant dark respiration. This paper summarized the physiological processes of plant dark respiration, measurement methods of the dark respiration, and the effects of plant biology and environmental factors on the dark respiration. The uncertainty of the dark respiration estimation was analyzed, and the future hotspots of related researches were pointed out.

  1. Educating for the Preservation of Dark Skies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preston, Sandra Lee; Cianciolo, Frank; Wetzel, Marc; Finkelstein, Keely; Wren, William; Nance, Craig

    2015-08-01

    The stars at night really are big and bright deep in the heart of Texas at the McDonald Observatory near Fort Davis, Texas. Each year 80,000 visitors from all over the world make the pilgrimage to the Observatory to attend one of the three-times-a-week star parties. Many experience, for the first time, the humbling, splendor of a truly dark night sky. Over the last several years, the Observatory has experienced dramatic increases in visitation demonstrating the public’s appetite for science education, in general, and interest in the night sky, in particular. This increasing interest in astronomy is, ironically, occurring at a time when most of humanity’s skies are becoming increasingly light-polluted frustrating this natural interest. Dark skies and knowledgeable education and outreach staff are an important resource in maintaining the public’s interest in astronomy, support for astronomical research, and local tourism.This year Observatory educators were inspired by the observance of the International Year of Light to promote healthy outdoor lighting through its popular Astronomy Day distance learning program. This program reaches tens of thousands of K-12 students in Texas and other states with a message of how they can take action to preserve dark skies. As well, more than a thousand Boy Scouts visiting during the summer months receive a special program, which includes activities focusing on good lighting practices, thereby earning them credits toward an astronomy badge.The Observatory also offers a half-a-dozen K-12 teacher professional development workshops onsite each year, which provide about 90 teachers with dark skies information, best-practice lighting demonstrations, and red flashlights. Multi-year workshops for National Park and State of Texas Parks personnel are offered on dark sky preservation and sky interpretation at McDonald and a Dark Skies fund for retrofitting lights in the surrounding area has been established. The Observatory also uses

  2. A Dark Spot on Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This view taken by NASA's Galileo spacecraft of Jupiter's icy moon Europa focuses on a dark, smooth region whose center is the lowest area in this image. To the west (left), it is bounded by a cliff and terraces, which might have been formed by normal faulting. The slopes toward the east (right) leading into the dark spot are gentle.

    Near the center of the dark area, it appears the dark materials have covered some of the bright terrain and ridges. This suggests that when the dark material was deposited, it may have been a fluid or an icy slush.

    Only a few impact craters are visible, with some of them covered or flooded by dark material. Some appear in groups, which may indicate that they are secondary craters formed by debris excavated during a larger impact event. A potential source for these is the nearby crater Mannann`an.

    North is to the top of the picture which is centered at 1 degree south latitude and 225 degrees west longitude. The images in this mosaic have been re-projected to 50 meters (55 yards) per picture element. They were obtained by the Solid State Imaging (SSI) system on March 29, 1998, during Galileo's fourteenth orbit of Jupiter, at ranges as close as 1940 kilometers (1,200 miles) from Europa.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo

  3. The Logotropic Dark Fluid as a unification of dark matter and dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavanis, Pierre-Henri

    2016-07-01

    We propose a heuristic unification of dark matter and dark energy in terms of a single "dark fluid" with a logotropic equation of state P = Aln ⁡ (ρ /ρP), where ρ is the rest-mass density, ρP = 5.16 ×1099gm-3 is the Planck density, and A is the logotropic temperature. The energy density ɛ is the sum of a rest-mass energy term ρc2 ∝a-3 mimicking dark matter and an internal energy term u (ρ) = - P (ρ) - A = 3 Aln ⁡ a + C mimicking dark energy (a is the scale factor). The logotropic temperature is approximately given by A ≃ρΛc2 / ln ⁡ (ρP /ρΛ) ≃ρΛc2 / [ 123 ln ⁡ (10) ], where ρΛ = 6.72 ×10-24gm-3 is the cosmological density and 123 is the famous number appearing in the ratio ρP /ρΛ ∼10123 between the Planck density and the cosmological density. More precisely, we obtain A = 2.13 ×10-9gm-1s-2 that we interpret as a fundamental constant. At the cosmological scale, our model fulfills the same observational constraints as the ΛCDM model (they will differ in about 25 Gyrs when the logotropic universe becomes phantom). However, the logotropic dark fluid has a nonzero speed of sound and a nonzero Jeans length which, at the beginning of the matter era, is about λJ = 40.4pc, in agreement with the minimum size of the dark matter halos observed in the universe. The existence of a nonzero Jeans length may solve the missing satellite problem. At the galactic scale, the logotropic pressure balances the gravitational attraction, providing halo cores instead of cusps. This may solve the cusp problem. The logotropic equation of state generates a universal rotation curve that agrees with the empirical Burkert profile of dark matter halos up to the halo radius. In addition, it implies that all the dark matter halos have the same surface density Σ0 =ρ0rh = 141M⊙ /pc2 and that the mass of dwarf galaxies enclosed within a sphere of fixed radius ru = 300pc has the same value M300 = 1.93 ×107M⊙, in remarkable agreement with the observations

  4. Dark Matter Ignition of Type Ia Supernovae.

    PubMed

    Bramante, Joseph

    2015-10-01

    Recent studies of low redshift type Ia supernovae (SN Ia) indicate that half explode from less than Chandrasekhar mass white dwarfs, implying ignition must proceed from something besides the canonical criticality of Chandrasekhar mass SN Ia progenitors. We show that 1-100 PeV mass asymmetric dark matter, with imminently detectable nucleon scattering interactions, can accumulate to the point of self-gravitation in a white dwarf and collapse, shedding gravitational potential energy by scattering off nuclei, thereby heating the white dwarf and igniting the flame front that precedes SN Ia. We combine data on SN Ia masses with data on the ages of SN Ia-adjacent stars. This combination reveals a 2.8σ inverse correlation between SN Ia masses and ignition ages, which could result from increased capture of dark matter in 1.4 vs 1.1 solar mass white dwarfs. Future studies of SN Ia in galactic centers will provide additional tests of dark-matter-induced type Ia ignition. Remarkably, both bosonic and fermionic SN Ia-igniting dark matter also resolve the missing pulsar problem by forming black holes in ≳10  Myr old pulsars at the center of the Milky Way. PMID:26551803

  5. Dark Matter Ignition of Type Ia Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bramante, Joseph

    2015-10-01

    Recent studies of low redshift type Ia supernovae (SN Ia) indicate that half explode from less than Chandrasekhar mass white dwarfs, implying ignition must proceed from something besides the canonical criticality of Chandrasekhar mass SN Ia progenitors. We show that 1-100 PeV mass asymmetric dark matter, with imminently detectable nucleon scattering interactions, can accumulate to the point of self-gravitation in a white dwarf and collapse, shedding gravitational potential energy by scattering off nuclei, thereby heating the white dwarf and igniting the flame front that precedes SN Ia. We combine data on SN Ia masses with data on the ages of SN Ia-adjacent stars. This combination reveals a 2.8 σ inverse correlation between SN Ia masses and ignition ages, which could result from increased capture of dark matter in 1.4 vs 1.1 solar mass white dwarfs. Future studies of SN Ia in galactic centers will provide additional tests of dark-matter-induced type Ia ignition. Remarkably, both bosonic and fermionic SN Ia-igniting dark matter also resolve the missing pulsar problem by forming black holes in ≳10 Myr old pulsars at the center of the Milky Way.

  6. Supernovae from the Dark Energy Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Ravi

    2016-03-01

    The nature of dark energy is one of the greatest unsolved problems in physics today. Its existence was inferred from observations of exploding stars known as Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). These SNe Ia are standardizable candles that are excellent cosmological tools for probing dark energy through the distance-redshift relation. The Dark Energy Survey (DES) Supernova Program is repeatedly observing 30 square degrees within the full 5000-square-degree DES footprint and has discovered thousands of SNe Ia, in addition to many other types of SNe. DES has recently completed Year 3 of observations, with at least two more years still to go. In this talk, I will highlight the papers that have been published by the DES SN Program as well the ongoing analyses and projects within the group. I will introduce frameworks being developed for cosmological inference using Bayesian hierarchical regression models and discuss the steps needed for this. These include the transient detection pipeline, photometric calibration, host galaxy identification, follow-up spectroscopy of SNe and host galaxies, and SN photometric classification. I will also discuss DES discoveries of several superluminous SNe. On behalf of the Dark Energy Survey collaboration.

  7. Dark Matter Ignition of Type Ia Supernovae.

    PubMed

    Bramante, Joseph

    2015-10-01

    Recent studies of low redshift type Ia supernovae (SN Ia) indicate that half explode from less than Chandrasekhar mass white dwarfs, implying ignition must proceed from something besides the canonical criticality of Chandrasekhar mass SN Ia progenitors. We show that 1-100 PeV mass asymmetric dark matter, with imminently detectable nucleon scattering interactions, can accumulate to the point of self-gravitation in a white dwarf and collapse, shedding gravitational potential energy by scattering off nuclei, thereby heating the white dwarf and igniting the flame front that precedes SN Ia. We combine data on SN Ia masses with data on the ages of SN Ia-adjacent stars. This combination reveals a 2.8σ inverse correlation between SN Ia masses and ignition ages, which could result from increased capture of dark matter in 1.4 vs 1.1 solar mass white dwarfs. Future studies of SN Ia in galactic centers will provide additional tests of dark-matter-induced type Ia ignition. Remarkably, both bosonic and fermionic SN Ia-igniting dark matter also resolve the missing pulsar problem by forming black holes in ≳10  Myr old pulsars at the center of the Milky Way.

  8. Dark matter balls help supernovae to explode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froggatt, C. D.; Nielsen, H. B.

    2015-10-01

    As a solution to the well-known problem that the shock wave potentially responsible for the explosion of a supernova actually tends to stall, we propose a new energy source arising from our model for dark matter. Our earlier model proposed that dark matter should consist of cm-large white dwarf-like objects kept together by a skin separating two different sorts of vacua. These dark matter balls or pearls will collect in the middle of any star throughout its lifetime. At some stage during the development of a supernova, the balls will begin to take in neutrons and then other surrounding material. By passing into a ball nucleons fall through a potential of order 10 MeV, causing a severe production of heat — of order 10 foe for a solar mass of material eaten by the balls. The temperature in the iron core will thereby be raised, splitting up the iron into smaller nuclei. This provides a mechanism for reviving the shock wave when it arrives and making the supernova explosion really occur. The onset of the heating due to the dark matter balls would at first stop the collapse of the supernova progenitor. This opens up the possibility of there being two collapses giving two neutrino outbursts, as apparently seen in the supernova SN1987A — one in Mont Blanc and one 4 h 43 min later in both IMB and Kamiokande.

  9. Dark sky enters the lexicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2012-01-01

    “Basketbrawl,” “cloud music,” “humblebrag,” and “occupy Wall Street.” These are some of the catchwords and phrases that lexicographer Grant Barrett included in a year-end newspaper column, “Which words will live on?,” in the New York Times on 31 December 2011. Among the couple dozen examples of new language was “dark sky.” Barrett wrote that it “designates a place free of nighttime light pollution. For example, the island of Sark in the English Channel is a dark-sky island.”

  10. Measuring Dark Energy with CHIME

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newburgh, Laura; Chime Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment (CHIME) is a new radio transit interferometer currently being built at the Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory (DRAO) in Penticton, BC, Canada. We will use the 21 cm emission line of neutral hydrogen to map baryon acoustic oscillations between 400-800 MHz across 3/4 of the sky. These measurements will yield sensitive constraints on the dark energy equation of state between redshifts 0.8 - 2.5, a fascinating but poorly probed era corresponding to when dark energy began to impact the expansion history of the Universe. I will describe theCHIME instrument, the analysis challenges, the calibration requirements, and current status.

  11. Dark matter in elliptical galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carollo, C. M.; Zeeuw, P. T. DE; Marel, R. P. Van Der; Danziger, I. J.; Qian, E. E.

    1995-01-01

    We present measurements of the shape of the stellar line-of-sight velocity distribution out to two effective radii along the major axes of the four elliptical galaxies NGC 2434, 2663, 3706, and 5018. The velocity dispersion profiles are flat or decline gently with radius. We compare the data to the predictions of f = f(E, L(sub z)) axisymmetric models with and without dark matter. Strong tangential anisotropy is ruled out at large radii. We conclude from our measurements that massive dark halos must be present in three of the four galaxies, while for the fourth galaxy (NGC 2663) the case is inconclusive.

  12. Observing dark energy with SNAP

    SciTech Connect

    Linder, Eric V.; SNAP Collaboration

    2004-06-07

    The nature of dark energy is of such fundamental importance -- yet such a mystery -- that a dedicated dark energy experiment should be as comprehensive and powerfully incisive as possible. The Supernova/Acceleration Probe robustly controls for a wide variety of systematic uncertainties, employing the Type Ia supernova distance method, with high signal to noise light curves and spectra over the full redshift range from z=0.1-1.7, and the weak gravitational lensing method with an accurate and stable point spread function.

  13. Distribution of Galactic Dark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langton, Jonathan; Foss, Asa

    2001-04-01

    In this paper we examine the rotational curves of two dwarf spiral galaxies, NGC 2403 and NGC 3198. The observed rotation cannot be accounted for by luminous matter alone, therefore there must be a substantial dark component. We found the dark matter in both galaxies to be distributed according to the equation rho(r) = b*r/(r^2 + x^2). Combining this with a distribution of luminous matter rho(r)= rho(o)* e^-(a*r), we produced a rotation curve that matched the observed orbital velocities to within 4%.

  14. Field Flows of Dark Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Cahn, Robert N.; de Putter, Roland; Linder, Eric V.

    2008-07-08

    Scalar field dark energy evolving from a long radiation- or matter-dominated epoch has characteristic dynamics. While slow-roll approximations are invalid, a well defined field expansion captures the key aspects of the dark energy evolution during much of the matter-dominated epoch. Since this behavior is determined, it is not faithfully represented if priors for dynamical quantities are chosen at random. We demonstrate these features for both thawing and freezing fields, and for some modified gravity models, and unify several special cases in the literature.

  15. Dark-matter 'paparazzi' exposed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Margaret

    2008-10-01

    After waiting almost two years for data that may shed light on the mysterious substance that makes up almost a quarter of the universe, some physicists thought a new result on dark matter was just too exciting to keep quiet. So when a member of the Payload for Antimatter Matter Exploration and Light-nuclei Astrophysics (PAMELA) team recently gave a conference talk, a few audience members could not resist taking photos of the slides. By incorporating their snapshots into papers posted on the arXiv preprint server, these "paparazzi" physicists sparked a debate on both dark matter and datasharing etiquette in a digital world.

  16. Dark Times for the Fluffiest Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Beasley, Michael A.; Burkert, Andreas; Abraham, Roberto G.; Brodie, Jean P.; Deich, Aaron; Martin-navarro, Ignacio; Martinez-Delgado, David; Pota, Vincenzo; Rider, Nicole; Sandoval, Michael; Santhanakrishnan, Vakini; Stone, Maria; Van Dokkum, Pieter G.

    2016-06-01

    Ultra-diffuse galaxies (UDGs) were recently recognized as an abundant class of low-surface brightness galaxies with unusually large sizes -- found both in galaxy clusters and in the field. The nature and origins of these galaxies are unclear, with one intriguing possibility that some of them are "failed Milky Ways" with massive halos but a paucity of stars. I will present observations of stars and globular clusters in UDGs that constrain their stellar populations and masses -- including evidence for being ultra-rich in dark matter. I will also show results from simulations of UDG formation through ram-pressure stripping of gas-rich disk galaxies.

  17. Embrace the Dark Side: Advancing the Dark Energy Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suchyta, Eric

    The Dark Energy Survey (DES) is an ongoing cosmological survey intended to study the properties of the accelerated expansion of the Universe. In this dissertation, I present work of mine that has advanced the progress of DES. First is an introduction, which explores the physics of the cosmos, as well as how DES intends to probe it. Attention is given to developing the theoretical framework cosmologists use to describe the Universe, and to explaining observational evidence which has furnished our current conception of the cosmos. Emphasis is placed on the dark sector - dark matter and dark energy - the content of the Universe not explained by the Standard Model of particle physics. As its name suggests, the Dark Energy Survey has been specially designed to measure the properties of dark energy. DES will use a combination of galaxy cluster, weak gravitational lensing, angular clustering, and supernovae measurements to derive its state of the art constraints, each of which is discussed in the text. The work described in this dissertation includes science measurements directly related to the first three of these probes. The dissertation presents my contributions to the readout and control system of the Dark Energy Camera (DECam); the name of this software is SISPI. SISPI uses client-server and publish-subscribe communication patterns to coordinate and command actions among the many hardware components of DECam - the survey instrument for DES, a 570 megapixel CCD camera, mounted at prime focus of the Blanco 4-m Telescope. The SISPI work I discuss includes coding applications for DECam's filter changer mechanism and hexapod, as well as developing the Scripts Editor, a GUI application for DECam users to edit and export observing sequence SISPI can load and execute. Next, the dissertation describes the processing of early DES data, which I contributed. This furnished the data products used in the first-completed DES science analysis, and contributed to improving the

  18. Propagation of Light through Composite Dark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kvam, Audrey; Latimer, David

    2013-10-01

    A concordance of observations indicates that around 80% of the matter in the universe is some unknown dark matter. This dark matter could be comprised of a single structureless particle, but much richer theories exist. Signals from the DAMA, CoGeNT, and CDMS-II dark matter detectors along with the non-observation of dark matter by other detectors motivate theories of composite dark matter along with a ``dark'' electromagnetic sector. The composite models propose baryon-like or atom-like dark matter. If photons kinetically mix with the ``dark'' photons, then light traveling through dark matter will experience dispersion. We expect the dispersion to be approximated by the Drude-Lorentz model where the model parameters are particular to a given dark matter candidate. As light travels through the dispersive medium, it can accrue to a frequency-dependent time lag. Measurement of such a time lag can yield clues as to the nature of the dark matter. As a first application, we model hydrogenic dark atoms and use astrophysical data to constrain the mass, binding energy, and the fractional electric charge of the dark atoms.

  19. Dark-matter admixed white dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, S.-C.; Chu, M.-C.; Lin, L.-M.; Wong, K.-W.

    2013-06-01

    We study the equilibrium structures of white dwarfs with dark matter cores formed by non-self-annihilating dark matter (DM) particles with masses ranging from 1 GeV to 100 GeV, which are assumed to form an ideal degenerate Fermi gas inside the stars. For DM particles of mass 10 GeV and 100 GeV, we find that stable stellar models exist only if the mass of the DM core inside the star is less than O(10-3)M⊙ and O(10-6)M⊙, respectively. The global properties of these stars, and in particular the corresponding Chandrasekhar mass limits, are essentially the same as those of traditional white dwarf models without DM. Nevertheless, in the 10 GeV case, the gravitational attraction of the DM core is strong enough to squeeze the normal matter in the core region to densities above neutron drip, far above those in traditional white dwarfs. For DM with a particle mass of 1 GeV, the DM core inside the star can be as massive as ˜0.1M⊙ and affects the global structure of the star significantly. In this case, the radius of a stellar model with DM can be about two times smaller than that of a traditional white dwarf. Furthermore, the Chandrasekhar mass limit can also be decreased by as much as 40%. Our results may have implications on the extent to which type Ia supernovae can be regarded as standard candles—a key assumption in the discovery of dark energy.

  20. Dark matter assimilation into the baryon asymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    D'Eramo, Francesco; Fei, Lin; Thaler, Jesse E-mail: lfei@mit.edu

    2012-03-01

    Pure singlets are typically disfavored as dark matter candidates, since they generically have a thermal relic abundance larger than the observed value. In this paper, we propose a new dark matter mechanism called {sup a}ssimilation{sup ,} which takes advantage of the baryon asymmetry of the universe to generate the correct relic abundance of singlet dark matter. Through assimilation, dark matter itself is efficiently destroyed, but dark matter number is stored in new quasi-stable heavy states which carry the baryon asymmetry. The subsequent annihilation and late-time decay of these heavy states yields (symmetric) dark matter as well as (asymmetric) standard model baryons. We study in detail the case of pure bino dark matter by augmenting the minimal supersymmetric standard model with vector-like chiral multiplets. In the parameter range where this mechanism is effective, the LHC can discover long-lived charged particles which were responsible for assimilating dark matter.

  1. Dark matter axions and caustic rings

    SciTech Connect

    Sikivie, P.

    1997-11-01

    This report contains discussions on the following topics: the strong CP problem; dark matter axions; the cavity detector of galactic halo axions; and caustic rings in the density distribution of cold dark matter halos.

  2. The LZ Dark Matter Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehman, Victor M.

    2012-10-01

    One of the most important open questions in physics is the fundamental nature of the dark matter. The direct detection of a dark matter particle in a terrestrial experiment would dramatically impact cosmology and particle physics, and would open a window on a new type of observational astrophysics. The LZ collaboration has proposed to construct a 7-ton liquid xenon dark matter detector at the 4850 level of the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, South Dakota. The LZ detector will be based upon the well-established liquid xenon TPC technology, and will capitalize upon the existing infrastructure of the LUX experiment to allow for a rapid turn-around after the conclusion of LUX data taking. With a ducial mass of more than 5 tons, the experiment will probe WIMP-nucleon cross sections down to 2x10-48 cm^2 in 3 years of operation. This represents an improvement of approximately 5000 times over current results, covering a substantial range of theoretically-motivated particle dark matter candidates.

  3. A dark day for dinosaurs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Pete

    2015-11-01

    On average, 91 people are killed by asteroids each year. In her book Dark Matter and the Dinosaurs, theoretical physicist Lisa Randall focuses on a novel question: how did a dinosaur-killing asteroid end up on its collision course with Earth in the first place?

  4. Did LIGO Detect Dark Matter?

    PubMed

    Bird, Simeon; Cholis, Ilias; Muñoz, Julian B; Ali-Haïmoud, Yacine; Kamionkowski, Marc; Kovetz, Ely D; Raccanelli, Alvise; Riess, Adam G

    2016-05-20

    We consider the possibility that the black-hole (BH) binary detected by LIGO may be a signature of dark matter. Interestingly enough, there remains a window for masses 20M_{⊙}≲M_{bh}≲100M_{⊙} where primordial black holes (PBHs) may constitute the dark matter. If two BHs in a galactic halo pass sufficiently close, they radiate enough energy in gravitational waves to become gravitationally bound. The bound BHs will rapidly spiral inward due to the emission of gravitational radiation and ultimately will merge. Uncertainties in the rate for such events arise from our imprecise knowledge of the phase-space structure of galactic halos on the smallest scales. Still, reasonable estimates span a range that overlaps the 2-53  Gpc^{-3} yr^{-1} rate estimated from GW150914, thus raising the possibility that LIGO has detected PBH dark matter. PBH mergers are likely to be distributed spatially more like dark matter than luminous matter and have neither optical nor neutrino counterparts. They may be distinguished from mergers of BHs from more traditional astrophysical sources through the observed mass spectrum, their high ellipticities, or their stochastic gravitational wave background. Next-generation experiments will be invaluable in performing these tests.

  5. Did LIGO Detect Dark Matter?

    PubMed

    Bird, Simeon; Cholis, Ilias; Muñoz, Julian B; Ali-Haïmoud, Yacine; Kamionkowski, Marc; Kovetz, Ely D; Raccanelli, Alvise; Riess, Adam G

    2016-05-20

    We consider the possibility that the black-hole (BH) binary detected by LIGO may be a signature of dark matter. Interestingly enough, there remains a window for masses 20M_{⊙}≲M_{bh}≲100M_{⊙} where primordial black holes (PBHs) may constitute the dark matter. If two BHs in a galactic halo pass sufficiently close, they radiate enough energy in gravitational waves to become gravitationally bound. The bound BHs will rapidly spiral inward due to the emission of gravitational radiation and ultimately will merge. Uncertainties in the rate for such events arise from our imprecise knowledge of the phase-space structure of galactic halos on the smallest scales. Still, reasonable estimates span a range that overlaps the 2-53  Gpc^{-3} yr^{-1} rate estimated from GW150914, thus raising the possibility that LIGO has detected PBH dark matter. PBH mergers are likely to be distributed spatially more like dark matter than luminous matter and have neither optical nor neutrino counterparts. They may be distinguished from mergers of BHs from more traditional astrophysical sources through the observed mass spectrum, their high ellipticities, or their stochastic gravitational wave background. Next-generation experiments will be invaluable in performing these tests. PMID:27258861

  6. Wino dark matter under siege

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Timothy; Lisanti, Mariangela; Pierce, Aaron; Slatyer, Tracy R.

    2013-10-01

    A fermion triplet of SU(2)L — a wino — is a well-motivated dark matter candidate. This work shows that present-day wino annihilations are constrained by indirect detection experiments, with the strongest limits coming from H.E.S.S. and Fermi. The bounds on wino dark matter are presented as a function of mass for two scenarios: thermal (winos constitute a subdominant component of the dark matter for masses less than 3.1 TeV) and non-thermal (winos comprise all the dark matter). Assuming the NFW halo model, the H.E.S.S. search for gamma-ray lines excludes the 3.1 TeV thermal wino; the combined H.E.S.S. and Fermi results completely exclude the non-thermal scenario. Uncertainties in the exclusions are explored. Indirect detection may provide the only probe for models of anomaly plus gravity mediation where the wino is the lightest superpartner and scalars reside at the 100 TeV scale.

  7. Wino dark matter under siege

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Timothy; Lisanti, Mariangela; Pierce, Aaron; Slatyer, Tracy R. E-mail: mlisanti@princeton.edu E-mail: tslatyer@mit.edu

    2013-10-01

    A fermion triplet of SU(2){sub L} — a wino — is a well-motivated dark matter candidate. This work shows that present-day wino annihilations are constrained by indirect detection experiments, with the strongest limits coming from H.E.S.S. and Fermi. The bounds on wino dark matter are presented as a function of mass for two scenarios: thermal (winos constitute a subdominant component of the dark matter for masses less than 3.1 TeV) and non-thermal (winos comprise all the dark matter). Assuming the NFW halo model, the H.E.S.S. search for gamma-ray lines excludes the 3.1 TeV thermal wino; the combined H.E.S.S. and Fermi results completely exclude the non-thermal scenario. Uncertainties in the exclusions are explored. Indirect detection may provide the only probe for models of anomaly plus gravity mediation where the wino is the lightest superpartner and scalars reside at the 100 TeV scale.

  8. MSSM Dark Matter Without Prejudice

    SciTech Connect

    Gainer, James S.; /SLAC

    2009-12-11

    Recently we examined a large number of points in a 19-dimensional parameter subspace of the CP-conserving MSSM with Minimal Flavor Violation. We determined whether each of these points satisfied existing theoretical, experimental, and observational constraints. Here we discuss the properties of the parameter space points allowed by existing data that are relevant for dark matter searches.

  9. Did LIGO Detect Dark Matter?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bird, Simeon; Cholis, Ilias; Muñoz, Julian B.; Ali-Haïmoud, Yacine; Kamionkowski, Marc; Kovetz, Ely D.; Raccanelli, Alvise; Riess, Adam G.

    2016-05-01

    We consider the possibility that the black-hole (BH) binary detected by LIGO may be a signature of dark matter. Interestingly enough, there remains a window for masses 20 M⊙≲Mbh≲100 M⊙ where primordial black holes (PBHs) may constitute the dark matter. If two BHs in a galactic halo pass sufficiently close, they radiate enough energy in gravitational waves to become gravitationally bound. The bound BHs will rapidly spiral inward due to the emission of gravitational radiation and ultimately will merge. Uncertainties in the rate for such events arise from our imprecise knowledge of the phase-space structure of galactic halos on the smallest scales. Still, reasonable estimates span a range that overlaps the 2 - 53 Gpc-3 yr-1 rate estimated from GW150914, thus raising the possibility that LIGO has detected PBH dark matter. PBH mergers are likely to be distributed spatially more like dark matter than luminous matter and have neither optical nor neutrino counterparts. They may be distinguished from mergers of BHs from more traditional astrophysical sources through the observed mass spectrum, their high ellipticities, or their stochastic gravitational wave background. Next-generation experiments will be invaluable in performing these tests.

  10. Status of superheavy dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aloisio, R.; Berezinsky, V.; Kachelrieß, M.

    2006-07-01

    Superheavy particles are a natural candidate for the dark matter in the universe and our galaxy, because they are produced generically during inflation in cosmologically interesting amounts. The most attractive model for the origin of superheavy dark matter (SHDM) is gravitational production at the end of inflation. The observed cosmological density of dark matter determines the mass of the SHDM particle as mX=(afew)×1013GeV, promoting it to a natural candidate for the source of the observed ultrahigh energy cosmic rays (UHECR). After a review of the theoretical aspects of SHDM, we update its predictions for UHECR observations: no GZK cutoff, flat energy spectrum with dN/dE≈1/E1.9, photon dominance and galactic anisotropy. We analyze the existing data and conclude that SDHM as explanation for the observed UHECRs is at present disfavored but not yet excluded. We calculate the anisotropy relevant for future Auger observations that should be the conclusive test for this model. Finally, we emphasize that negative results of searches for SHDM in UHECR do not disfavor SHDM as a dark matter candidate. Therefore, UHECRs produced by SHDM decays and with the signatures as described should be searched for in the future as subdominant effect.

  11. Bright Ideas for Dark Days

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Easley, Dauna

    2005-01-01

    In this brief column, the author of "Teachers Touch Eternity," provides 20 tips that teachers can use to motivate themselves and others through the dark days of winter: (1) Fake it till you make it; (2) Allow for spontaneity; (3) Build an encouragement folder; (4) Lighten up! (5) Read motivational books or inspirational thoughts late at night or…

  12. Diphoton resonance confronts dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Soo-Min; Kang, Yoo-Jin; Lee, Hyun Min

    2016-07-01

    As an interpretation of the 750 GeV diphoton excesses recently reported by both ATLAS and CMS collaborations, we consider a simple extension of the Standard Model with a Dirac fermion dark matter where a singlet complex scalar field mediates between dark matter and SM particles via effective couplings to SM gauge bosons and/or Higgs-portal. In this model, we can accommodate the diphoton events through the direct and/or cascade decays of pseudo-scalar and real scalar partners of the complex scalar field. We show that mono-jet searches and gamma-ray observations are complementary in constraining the region where the width of the diphoton resonance can be enhanced due to the couplings of the resonance to dark matter and the correct relic density is obtained. In the case of cascade decay of the resonance, the effective couplings of singlet scalars can be smaller, but the model is still testable by the future discrimination between single photon and photon-jet at the LHC as well as the gamma-ray searches for the cascade annihilation of dark matter.

  13. Dark Energy/matter Unification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, Aharon; Lederer, Yoav; Karasik, David

    2003-03-01

    Let our Universe resemble a 4-dim bubble, floating in a flat (or AdS) 5-dim background, but insist on its evolution being governed by the standard Einstein-Hilbert action. The conserved bulk energy then parameterizes an intriguing deviation from general relativity with an essential built-in Einstein limit. Even an apparently `empty' bubble Universe is effectively infested by a dark (= beyond Einstein) component. In particular, the geodetic evolution of a Λ-dominated toy Universe, absolutely free of genuine matter, gets translated into a specific FRW cosmology which is barely distinguishable from ΛCDM. A more realistic model presents a dark dominated era which bridges past (radiation/baryon dominated) and future (Λ-dominated) Einstein regimes. To prove the clumpiness property of our unified dark component, we have derived the geodesic brane analog of Schwarzschild solution. It is characterized by (i) Dark cosmological background, (ii) Newtonian limit, and quite serendipitously allows for (iii) Non-singular dusty core.

  14. Gibberellins repress photomorphogenesis in darkness.

    PubMed

    Alabadí, David; Gil, Joan; Blázquez, Miguel A; García-Martínez, José L

    2004-03-01

    Plants undergo two different developmental programs depending on whether they are growing in darkness (skotomorphogenesis) or in the presence of light (photomorphogenesis). It has been proposed that the latter is the default pathway followed by many plants after germination and before the seedling emerges from soil. The transition between the two pathways is tightly regulated. The conserved COP1-based complex is central in the light-dependent repression of photomorphogenesis in darkness. Besides this control, hormones such as brassinosteroids (BRs), cytokinins, auxins, or ethylene also have been shown to regulate, to different extents, this developmental switch. In the present work, we show that the hormone gibberellin (GA) widely participates in this regulation. Studies from Arabidopsis show that both chemical and genetic reductions of endogenous GA levels partially derepress photomorphogenesis in darkness. This is based both on morphological phenotypes, such as hypocotyl elongation and hook and cotyledon opening, and on molecular phenotypes, such as misregulation of the light-controlled genes CAB2 and RbcS. Genetic studies indicate that the GA signaling elements GAI and RGA participate in these responses. Our results also suggest that GA regulation of this response partially depends on BRs. This regulation seems to be conserved across species because lowering endogenous GA levels in pea (Pisum sativum) induces full de-etiolation in darkness, which is not reverted by BR application. Our results, therefore, attribute an important role for GAs in the establishment of etiolated growth and in repression of photomorphogenesis. PMID:14963246

  15. MSSM Dark Matter Without Prejudice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gainer, James S.

    2010-02-01

    Recently we examined a large number of points in a 19-dimensional parameter subspace of the CP-conserving MSSM with Minimal Flavor Violation. We determined whether each of these points satisfied existing theoretical, experimental, and observational constraints. Here we discuss the properties of the parameter space points allowed by existing data that are relevant for dark matter searches.

  16. The Dark Side of Creativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cropley, David H., Ed.; Cropley, Arthur J., Ed.; Kaufman, James C., Ed.; Runco, Mark A., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    With few exceptions, scholarship on creativity has focused on its positive aspects while largely ignoring its dark side. This includes not only creativity deliberately aimed at hurting others, such as crime or terrorism, or at gaining unfair advantages, but also the accidental negative side effects of well-intentioned acts. This book brings…

  17. "CosmoMicroPhysics" Approach to Study the Dark Matter and Dark Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vavilova, Iryna; Shulga, Valery M.

    In 2007-2009 the Complex Research Program of the NAS of Ukraine titled "Study of the Structure of the Universe, Dark Matter and Dark Energy" (CosmoMicroPhysics) was con-ducted with the aim to join efforts of the Ukrainian scientists for resolving this actual task (http://www.nas.gov.ua/ResearchActivities/ComplexProgram/Pages/17.aspx). Our research team is presented by the scientists and post-graduated students from 15 institutes and univer-sities of Ukraine ()about 70 persons) working in the different fields (astrophysics, mathematics, theoretical physics, and nuclear physics). The main scientific goals, which were put forwards on the observational and theoretical revelations of dark matter/dark energy, were the follow-ing: -Observational base of the astronomical revelations of dark matter and dark energy as well as candidates to the different baryonic components of the hidden mass of the Universe; -Observational base of the earlier evolution of the Universe and properties of the large-scale structure; -Theoretical support for such observational data and creation of the cosmological models; -Experimental search of the WIMPs and study of the neutrino properties as one of the main components of a dark matter; -Theoretical research of the classical and quantum fields in astrophysics and cosmology. We will discuss the main results obtained by our team as the essential contribution to resolve this problem: * Observations, data analysis, and estimation as regarding the various LMS components of the Universe, at the first turn as the candidates to the dark matter (AGNs, black holes in double stars, halo of galaxies and galaxy groups/clusters, mass-to-luminosity estimation for isolated galaxies and galaxies in clusters/groups, brawn dwarfs etc.); * Gravitational lenses as the sources of the mass distribution data in the Universe; *Theoretical models of the Universe with cosmological fields, Dark energy models, and research of the dark energy impact on the evolution of the

  18. Cold dark matter: Controversies on small scales

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, David H.; Bullock, James S.; Governato, Fabio; Kuzio de Naray, Rachel; Peter, Annika H. G.

    2015-01-01

    The cold dark matter (CDM) cosmological model has been remarkably successful in explaining cosmic structure over an enormous span of redshift, but it has faced persistent challenges from observations that probe the innermost regions of dark matter halos and the properties of the Milky Way’s dwarf galaxy satellites. We review the current observational and theoretical status of these “small-scale controversies.” Cosmological simulations that incorporate only gravity and collisionless CDM predict halos with abundant substructure and central densities that are too high to match constraints from galaxy dynamics. The solution could lie in baryonic physics: Recent numerical simulations and analytical models suggest that gravitational potential fluctuations tied to efficient supernova feedback can flatten the central cusps of halos in massive galaxies, and a combination of feedback and low star formation efficiency could explain why most of the dark matter subhalos orbiting the Milky Way do not host visible galaxies. However, it is not clear that this solution can work in the lowest mass galaxies, where discrepancies are observed. Alternatively, the small-scale conflicts could be evidence of more complex physics in the dark sector itself. For example, elastic scattering from strong dark matter self-interactions can alter predicted halo mass profiles, leading to good agreement with observations across a wide range of galaxy mass. Gravitational lensing and dynamical perturbations of tidal streams in the stellar halo provide evidence for an abundant population of low-mass subhalos in accord with CDM predictions. These observational approaches will get more powerful over the next few years. PMID:25646464

  19. Cold dark matter: Controversies on small scales.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, David H; Bullock, James S; Governato, Fabio; Kuzio de Naray, Rachel; Peter, Annika H G

    2015-10-01

    The cold dark matter (CDM) cosmological model has been remarkably successful in explaining cosmic structure over an enormous span of redshift, but it has faced persistent challenges from observations that probe the innermost regions of dark matter halos and the properties of the Milky Way's dwarf galaxy satellites. We review the current observational and theoretical status of these "small-scale controversies." Cosmological simulations that incorporate only gravity and collisionless CDM predict halos with abundant substructure and central densities that are too high to match constraints from galaxy dynamics. The solution could lie in baryonic physics: Recent numerical simulations and analytical models suggest that gravitational potential fluctuations tied to efficient supernova feedback can flatten the central cusps of halos in massive galaxies, and a combination of feedback and low star formation efficiency could explain why most of the dark matter subhalos orbiting the Milky Way do not host visible galaxies. However, it is not clear that this solution can work in the lowest mass galaxies, where discrepancies are observed. Alternatively, the small-scale conflicts could be evidence of more complex physics in the dark sector itself. For example, elastic scattering from strong dark matter self-interactions can alter predicted halo mass profiles, leading to good agreement with observations across a wide range of galaxy mass. Gravitational lensing and dynamical perturbations of tidal streams in the stellar halo provide evidence for an abundant population of low-mass subhalos in accord with CDM predictions. These observational approaches will get more powerful over the next few years.

  20. Cold dark matter: Controversies on small scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinberg, David H.; Bullock, James S.; Governato, Fabio; Kuzio de Naray, Rachel; Peter, Annika H. G.

    2015-10-01

    The cold dark matter (CDM) cosmological model has been remarkably successful in explaining cosmic structure over an enormous span of redshift, but it has faced persistent challenges from observations that probe the innermost regions of dark matter halos and the properties of the Milky Way's dwarf galaxy satellites. We review the current observational and theoretical status of these "small-scale controversies." Cosmological simulations that incorporate only gravity and collisionless CDM predict halos with abundant substructure and central densities that are too high to match constraints from galaxy dynamics. The solution could lie in baryonic physics: Recent numerical simulations and analytical models suggest that gravitational potential fluctuations tied to efficient supernova feedback can flatten the central cusps of halos in massive galaxies, and a combination of feedback and low star formation efficiency could explain why most of the dark matter subhalos orbiting the Milky Way do not host visible galaxies. However, it is not clear that this solution can work in the lowest mass galaxies, where discrepancies are observed. Alternatively, the small-scale conflicts could be evidence of more complex physics in the dark sector itself. For example, elastic scattering from strong dark matter self-interactions can alter predicted halo mass profiles, leading to good agreement with observations across a wide range of galaxy mass. Gravitational lensing and dynamical perturbations of tidal streams in the stellar halo provide evidence for an abundant population of low-mass subhalos in accord with CDM predictions. These observational approaches will get more powerful over the next few years.

  1. Dark Matter Halos with VIRUS-P

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Jeremy; Gebhardt, K.

    2010-05-01

    We present new, two-dimensional stellar kinematic data on several of the most massive galaxies in the local universe. These data were taken with the integral field spectrograph, VIRUS-P, and extend to unprecedented radial distances. Once robust stellar kinematics are in hand, we run orbit-based axisymmetric dynamical models in order to constrain the stellar mass-to-light ratio and dark matter halo parameters. We have run a large set of dynamical models on the second rank galaxy in the Virgo cluster, M87, and find clear evidence for a massive dark matter halo. The two-dimensional stellar kinematics for several of our other targets, all first and second rank galaxies, are also presented. Dark matter halos are known to dominate the mass profile of elliptical galaxies somewhere between one to two effective radii, yet due to the low surface brightness at these radial distances, determining stellar dynamics is technologically challenging. To overcome this, constraints on the dark matter halo are often made with planetary nebulae or globular clusters at large radii. However, as results from different groups have returned contradictory results, it remains unclear whether different dynamical tracers always follow the stellar kinematics. Due to VIRUS-P's large field of view and on-sky fiber diameter, we are able to determine stellar kinematics at radial distances that overlap with other dynamical tracers. Understanding what the dynamics of stars, planetary nebula and globular clusters tell us about both the extent of the dark matter halo profile and the formation histories of the largest elliptical galaxies is a primary science driver for this work.

  2. Cold dark matter: Controversies on small scales.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, David H; Bullock, James S; Governato, Fabio; Kuzio de Naray, Rachel; Peter, Annika H G

    2015-10-01

    The cold dark matter (CDM) cosmological model has been remarkably successful in explaining cosmic structure over an enormous span of redshift, but it has faced persistent challenges from observations that probe the innermost regions of dark matter halos and the properties of the Milky Way's dwarf galaxy satellites. We review the current observational and theoretical status of these "small-scale controversies." Cosmological simulations that incorporate only gravity and collisionless CDM predict halos with abundant substructure and central densities that are too high to match constraints from galaxy dynamics. The solution could lie in baryonic physics: Recent numerical simulations and analytical models suggest that gravitational potential fluctuations tied to efficient supernova feedback can flatten the central cusps of halos in massive galaxies, and a combination of feedback and low star formation efficiency could explain why most of the dark matter subhalos orbiting the Milky Way do not host visible galaxies. However, it is not clear that this solution can work in the lowest mass galaxies, where discrepancies are observed. Alternatively, the small-scale conflicts could be evidence of more complex physics in the dark sector itself. For example, elastic scattering from strong dark matter self-interactions can alter predicted halo mass profiles, leading to good agreement with observations across a wide range of galaxy mass. Gravitational lensing and dynamical perturbations of tidal streams in the stellar halo provide evidence for an abundant population of low-mass subhalos in accord with CDM predictions. These observational approaches will get more powerful over the next few years. PMID:25646464

  3. Unseen Universe: Welcome to the dark side

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogan, Jenny

    2007-07-01

    Physicists say that 96% of the Universe is unseen, and appeal to the ideas of 'dark matter' and 'dark energy' to make up the difference. In the first of two articles, Jenny Hogan reports that attempts to identify the mysterious dark matter are on the verge of success. In the second, Geoff Brumfiel asks why dark energy, hailed as a breakthrough when discovered a decade ago, is proving more frustrating than ever to the scientists who study it.

  4. Dark matter in a bouncing universe

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, Yeuk-Kwan E.; Kang, Jin U; Li, Changhong E-mail: jin.u.kang2@gmail.com

    2014-11-01

    We investigate a new scenario of dark matter production in a bouncing universe, in which dark matter was produced completely out of equilibrium in the contracting as well as expanding phase. We explore possibilities of using dark matter as a probe of the bouncing universe, focusing on the relationship between a critical temperature of the bouncing universe and the present relic abundance of dark matter.

  5. New spectral features from bound dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catena, Riccardo; Kouvaris, Chris

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate that dark matter particles gravitationally bound to the Earth can induce a characteristic nuclear recoil signal at low energies in direct detection experiments. The new spectral feature that we predict can provide a complementary verification of dark matter discovery at experiments with positive signal but unclear background. The effect is generically expected, in that the ratio of bound over halo dark matter event rates at detectors is independent of the dark matter-nucleon cross section.

  6. A Search for Dark Higgs Bosons

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, J.P.

    2012-06-08

    Recent astrophysical and terrestrial experiments have motivated the proposal of a dark sector with GeV-scale gauge boson force carriers and new Higgs bosons. We present a search for a dark Higgs boson using 516 fb{sup -1} of data collected with the BABAR detector. We do not observe a significant signal and we set 90% confidence level upper limits on the product of the Standard Model-dark sector mixing angle and the dark sector coupling constant.

  7. Scaling of light and dark time intervals.

    PubMed

    Marinova, J

    1978-01-01

    Scaling of light and dark time intervals of 0.1 to 1.1 s is performed by the mehtod of magnitude estimation with respect to a given standard. The standards differ in duration and type (light and dark). The light intervals are subjectively estimated as longer than the dark ones. The relation between the mean interval estimations and their magnitude is linear for both light and dark intervals.

  8. Limits in late time conversion of cold dark matter into dark radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boriero, D.; de Holanda, P. C.; Motta, M.

    2013-06-01

    Structure formation creates high temperature and density regions in the Universe that allow the conversion of matter into more stable states, with a corresponding emission of relativistic matter and radiation. An example of such a mechanism is the supernova event, that releases relativistic neutrinos corresponding to 99% of the binding energy of remnant neutron star. We take this phenomena as a starting point for an assumption that similar processes could occur in the dark sector, where structure formation would generate a late time conversion of cold dark matter into a relativistic form of dark matter. We performed a phenomenological study about the limits of this conversion, where we assumed a transition profile that is a generalized version of the neutrino production in supernovae events. With this assumption, we obtained an interesting modification for the constraint over the cold dark matter density. We show that when comparing with the standard ΛCDM cosmology, there is no preference for conversion, although the best fit is within 1σ from the standard model best fit. The methodology and the results obtained qualify this conversion hypothesis, from the large scale structure point of view, as a viable and interesting model to be tested in the future with small scale data, and mitigate discrepancies between observations at this scale and the pure cold dark matter model.

  9. The nongravitational interactions of dark matter in colliding galaxy clusters.

    PubMed

    Harvey, David; Massey, Richard; Kitching, Thomas; Taylor, Andy; Tittley, Eric

    2015-03-27

    Collisions between galaxy clusters provide a test of the nongravitational forces acting on dark matter. Dark matter's lack of deceleration in the "bullet cluster" collision constrained its self-interaction cross section σ(DM)/m < 1.25 square centimeters per gram (cm(2)/g) [68% confidence limit (CL)] (σ(DM), self-interaction cross section; m, unit mass of dark matter) for long-ranged forces. Using the Chandra and Hubble Space Telescopes, we have now observed 72 collisions, including both major and minor mergers. Combining these measurements statistically, we detect the existence of dark mass at 7.6σ significance. The position of the dark mass has remained closely aligned within 5.8 ± 8.2 kiloparsecs of associated stars, implying a self-interaction cross section σ(DM)/m < 0.47 cm(2)/g (95% CL) and disfavoring some proposed extensions to the standard model.

  10. The nongravitational interactions of dark matter in colliding galaxy clusters.

    PubMed

    Harvey, David; Massey, Richard; Kitching, Thomas; Taylor, Andy; Tittley, Eric

    2015-03-27

    Collisions between galaxy clusters provide a test of the nongravitational forces acting on dark matter. Dark matter's lack of deceleration in the "bullet cluster" collision constrained its self-interaction cross section σ(DM)/m < 1.25 square centimeters per gram (cm(2)/g) [68% confidence limit (CL)] (σ(DM), self-interaction cross section; m, unit mass of dark matter) for long-ranged forces. Using the Chandra and Hubble Space Telescopes, we have now observed 72 collisions, including both major and minor mergers. Combining these measurements statistically, we detect the existence of dark mass at 7.6σ significance. The position of the dark mass has remained closely aligned within 5.8 ± 8.2 kiloparsecs of associated stars, implying a self-interaction cross section σ(DM)/m < 0.47 cm(2)/g (95% CL) and disfavoring some proposed extensions to the standard model. PMID:25814581

  11. Nonthermal dark matter in mirage mediation

    SciTech Connect

    Nagai, Minoru; Nakayama, Kazunori

    2007-12-15

    In mirage-mediation models there exists a modulus field whose mass is O(1000) TeV and its late decay may significantly change the standard thermal relic scenario of the dark matter. We study nonthermal production of the dark matter directly from the modulus decay, and find that for some parameter regions nonthermally produced neutralinos can become the dark matter.

  12. Big Bang synthesis of nuclear dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, Edward; Lasenby, Robert; March-Russell, John; West, Stephen M.

    2015-06-01

    We investigate the physics of dark matter models featuring composite bound states carrying a large conserved dark "nucleon" number. The properties of sufficiently large dark nuclei may obey simple scaling laws, and we find that this scaling can determine the number distribution of nuclei resulting from Big Bang Dark Nucleosynthesis. For plausible models of asymmetric dark matter, dark nuclei of large nucleon number, e.g. ≳ 108, may be synthesised, with the number distribution taking one of two characteristic forms. If small-nucleon-number fusions are sufficiently fast, the distribution of dark nuclei takes on a logarithmically-peaked, universal form, independent of many details of the initial conditions and small-number interactions. In the case of a substantial bottleneck to nucleosynthesis for small dark nuclei, we find the surprising result that even larger nuclei, with size ≫ 108, are often finally synthesised, again with a simple number distribution. We briefly discuss the constraints arising from the novel dark sector energetics, and the extended set of (often parametrically light) dark sector states that can occur in complete models of nuclear dark matter. The physics of the coherent enhancement of direct detection signals, the nature of the accompanying dark-sector form factors, and the possible modifications to astrophysical processes are discussed in detail in a companion paper.

  13. Dark radiation alleviates problems with dark matter halos.

    PubMed

    Chu, Xiaoyong; Dasgupta, Basudeb

    2014-10-17

    We show that a scalar and a fermion charged under a global U(1) symmetry can not only explain the existence and abundance of dark matter (DM) and dark radiation (DR), but can also imbue DM with improved scattering properties at galactic scales, while remaining consistent with all other observations. Delayed DM-DR kinetic decoupling eases the missing satellites problem, while scalar-mediated self-interactions of DM ease the cusp versus core and too big to fail problems. In this scenario, DM is expected to be pseudo-Dirac and have a mass 100 keV ≲ m(χ) ≲ 10 GeV. The predicted DR may be measurable using the primordial elemental abundances from big bang nucleosynthesis, and using the cosmic microwave background.

  14. Dark radiation alleviates problems with dark matter halos.

    PubMed

    Chu, Xiaoyong; Dasgupta, Basudeb

    2014-10-17

    We show that a scalar and a fermion charged under a global U(1) symmetry can not only explain the existence and abundance of dark matter (DM) and dark radiation (DR), but can also imbue DM with improved scattering properties at galactic scales, while remaining consistent with all other observations. Delayed DM-DR kinetic decoupling eases the missing satellites problem, while scalar-mediated self-interactions of DM ease the cusp versus core and too big to fail problems. In this scenario, DM is expected to be pseudo-Dirac and have a mass 100 keV ≲ m(χ) ≲ 10 GeV. The predicted DR may be measurable using the primordial elemental abundances from big bang nucleosynthesis, and using the cosmic microwave background. PMID:25361246

  15. Gravity resonance spectroscopy constrains dark energy and dark matter scenarios.

    PubMed

    Jenke, T; Cronenberg, G; Burgdörfer, J; Chizhova, L A; Geltenbort, P; Ivanov, A N; Lauer, T; Lins, T; Rotter, S; Saul, H; Schmidt, U; Abele, H

    2014-04-18

    We report on precision resonance spectroscopy measurements of quantum states of ultracold neutrons confined above the surface of a horizontal mirror by the gravity potential of Earth. Resonant transitions between several of the lowest quantum states are observed for the first time. These measurements demonstrate that Newton's inverse square law of gravity is understood at micron distances on an energy scale of 10-14  eV. At this level of precision, we are able to provide constraints on any possible gravitylike interaction. In particular, a dark energy chameleon field is excluded for values of the coupling constant β>5.8×108 at 95% confidence level (C.L.), and an attractive (repulsive) dark matter axionlike spin-mass coupling is excluded for the coupling strength gsgp>3.7×10-16 (5.3×10-16) at a Yukawa length of λ=20  μm (95% C.L.).

  16. Sub-horizon evolution of cold dark matter perturbations through dark matter-dark energy equivalence epoch

    SciTech Connect

    Piattella, O.F.; Martins, D.L.A.; Casarini, L. E-mail: denilsonluizm@gmail.com

    2014-10-01

    We consider a cosmological model of the late universe constituted by standard cold dark matter plus a dark energy component with constant equation of state w and constant effective speed of sound. By neglecting fluctuations in the dark energy component, we obtain an equation describing the evolution of sub-horizon cold dark matter perturbations through the epoch of dark matter-dark energy equality. We explore its analytic solutions and calculate an exact w-dependent correction for the dark matter growth function, logarithmic growth function and growth index parameter through the epoch considered. We test our analytic approximation with the numerical solution and find that the discrepancy is less than 1% for 0k = during the cosmic evolution up to a = 100.

  17. Dark Matter Annihilation at the Galactic Center

    SciTech Connect

    Linden, Timothy Ryan

    2013-06-01

    Observations by the WMAP and PLANCK satellites have provided extraordinarily accurate observations on the densities of baryonic matter, dark matter, and dark energy in the universe. These observations indicate that our universe is composed of approximately ve times as much dark matter as baryonic matter. However, e orts to detect a particle responsible for the energy density of dark matter have been unsuccessful. Theoretical models have indicated that a leading candidate for the dark matter is the lightest supersymmetric particle, which may be stable due to a conserved R-parity. This dark matter particle would still be capable of interacting with baryons via weak-force interactions in the early universe, a process which was found to naturally explain the observed relic abundance of dark matter today. These residual annihilations can persist, albeit at a much lower rate, in the present universe, providing a detectable signal from dark matter annihilation events which occur throughout the universe. Simulations calculating the distribution of dark matter in our galaxy almost universally predict the galactic center of the Milky Way Galaxy (GC) to provide the brightest signal from dark matter annihilation due to its relative proximity and large simulated dark matter density. Recent advances in telescope technology have allowed for the rst multiwavelength analysis of the GC, with suitable e ective exposure, angular resolution, and energy resolution in order to detect dark matter particles with properties similar to those predicted by the WIMP miracle. In this work, I describe ongoing e orts which have successfully detected an excess in -ray emission from the region immediately surrounding the GC, which is di cult to describe in terms of standard di use emission predicted in the GC region. While the jury is still out on any dark matter interpretation of this excess, I describe several related observations which may indicate a dark matter origin. Finally, I discuss the

  18. Dark radiation constraints on mixed Axion/Neutralino dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, Kyu Jung; Baer, Howard; Lessa, Andre E-mail: baer@nhn.ou.edu

    2013-04-01

    Recent analyses of CMB data combined with the measurement of BAO and H{sub 0} show that dark radiation — parametrized by the apparent number of additional neutrinos ΔN{sub eff} contributing to the cosmic expansion — is bounded from above by about ΔN{sub eff}∼<1.6 at 95% CL. We consider the mixed axion/neutralino cold dark matter scenario which arises in R-parity conserving supersymmetric (SUSY) models wherein the strong CP problem is solved by hadronic axions with a concommitant axion(a)/saxion(s)/axino(ã) supermultiplet. Our new results include improved calculations of thermal axion and saxion production and include effects of saxion decay to axinos and axions. We show that the above bound on ΔN{sub eff} is easily satisfied if saxions are mainly thermally produced and m{sub LSP} < m{sub ã}∼dark matter are highly constrained by combined CMB, BBN and Xe-100 constraints. In particular, supersymmetric models with a standard overabundance of neutralino dark matter are excluded for all values of the Peccei-Quinn breaking scale. Next generation WIMP direct detection experiments may be able to discover or exclude mixed axion-neutralino CDM scenarios where s → aa is the dominant saxion decay mode.

  19. Tying dark matter to baryons with self-interactions.

    PubMed

    Kaplinghat, Manoj; Keeley, Ryan E; Linden, Tim; Yu, Hai-Bo

    2014-07-11

    Self-interacting dark matter (SIDM) models have been proposed to solve the small-scale issues with the collisionless cold dark matter paradigm. We derive equilibrium solutions in these SIDM models for the dark matter halo density profile including the gravitational potential of both baryons and dark matter. Self-interactions drive dark matter to be isothermal and this ties the core sizes and shapes of dark matter halos to the spatial distribution of the stars, a radical departure from previous expectations and from cold dark matter predictions. Compared to predictions of SIDM-only simulations, the core sizes are smaller and the core densities are higher, with the largest effects in baryon-dominated galaxies. As an example, we find a core size around 0.3 kpc for dark matter in the Milky Way, more than an order of magnitude smaller than the core size from SIDM-only simulations, which has important implications for indirect searches of SIDM candidates.

  20. Tying dark matter to baryons with self-interactions.

    PubMed

    Kaplinghat, Manoj; Keeley, Ryan E; Linden, Tim; Yu, Hai-Bo

    2014-07-11

    Self-interacting dark matter (SIDM) models have been proposed to solve the small-scale issues with the collisionless cold dark matter paradigm. We derive equilibrium solutions in these SIDM models for the dark matter halo density profile including the gravitational potential of both baryons and dark matter. Self-interactions drive dark matter to be isothermal and this ties the core sizes and shapes of dark matter halos to the spatial distribution of the stars, a radical departure from previous expectations and from cold dark matter predictions. Compared to predictions of SIDM-only simulations, the core sizes are smaller and the core densities are higher, with the largest effects in baryon-dominated galaxies. As an example, we find a core size around 0.3 kpc for dark matter in the Milky Way, more than an order of magnitude smaller than the core size from SIDM-only simulations, which has important implications for indirect searches of SIDM candidates. PMID:25062162

  1. Superconducting Detectors for Superlight Dark Matter.

    PubMed

    Hochberg, Yonit; Zhao, Yue; Zurek, Kathryn M

    2016-01-01

    We propose and study a new class of superconducting detectors that are sensitive to O(meV) electron recoils from dark matter-electron scattering. Such devices could detect dark matter as light as the warm dark-matter limit, m(X)≳1  keV. We compute the rate of dark-matter scattering off of free electrons in a (superconducting) metal, including the relevant Pauli blocking factors. We demonstrate that classes of dark matter consistent with terrestrial and cosmological or astrophysical constraints could be detected by such detectors with a moderate size exposure.

  2. The Dark Matter Problem: A Historical Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Robert H.

    2010-04-01

    1. Introduction; 2. Early history of the dark matter hypothesis; 3. The stability of disk galaxies: the dark halo solutions; 4. Direct evidence: extended rotation curves of spiral galaxies; 5. The maximum disk: light traces mass; 6. Cosmology and the birth of astroparticle physics; 7. Clusters revisited: missing mass found; 8. CDM confronts galaxy rotation curves; 9. The new cosmology: dark matter is not enough; 10. An alternative to dark matter: Modified Newtonian Dynamics; 11. Seeing dark matter: the theory and practice of detection; 12. Reflections: a personal point of view; Appendix; References; Index.

  3. Non-baryonic dark matter in cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Popolo, A.

    2013-07-01

    This paper is based on lectures given at the IX Mexican School on Gravitation and Mathematical Physics. The lectures (as the paper) were a broad-band review of the current status of non-baryonic dark matter research. I start with a historical overview of the evidences of dark matter existence, then I discuss how dark matter is distributed from small scale to large scale, and I then verge the attention to dark matter nature: dark matter candidates and their detection. I finally discuss some of the limits of the ΛCDM model, with particular emphasis on the small scale problems of the paradigm.

  4. Do neutrinos contribute to total dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manihar Singh, Koijam; Mahanta, K. L.

    2016-02-01

    From a critical study of our present universe it is found that dark energy, and of course, dark matter are there in the universe from the beginning of its evolution manifesting in one form or the other. The different forms contained in our model are found to be generalized Chaplygin gas, quintessence and phantom energy; of course, the generalized Chaplygin gas can explain the origin of dark energy as well as dark matter in our universe simultaneously. However the more beauty in our study is that there is high possibility of the energy produced from the neutrinos might contribute to the dark energy prevalent in this universe.

  5. Phase-space structure of cold dark matter halos

    SciTech Connect

    Sikivie, P.; Ipser, J.R.

    1991-12-31

    A galactic halo of cold dark matter particles has a sheet-like structure in phase-space. The energy and momentum spectra of such particles on earth has a set of peaks whose central values and intensities form a record of the formation of the Galaxy. Scattering of the dark matter particles by stars and globular clusters broadens the peaks but does not erase them entirely. The giant shells around some elliptical galaxies may be a manifestation of this structure.

  6. Flavored dark matter beyond Minimal Flavor Violation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Agrawal, Prateek; Blanke, Monika; Gemmler, Katrin

    2014-10-13

    We study the interplay of flavor and dark matter phenomenology for models of flavored dark matter interacting with quarks. We allow an arbitrary flavor structure in the coupling of dark matter with quarks. This coupling is assumed to be the only new source of violation of the Standard Model flavor symmetry extended by a U(3) χ associated with the dark matter. We call this ansatz Dark Minimal Flavor Violation (DMFV) and highlight its various implications, including an unbroken discrete symmetry that can stabilize the dark matter. As an illustration we study a Dirac fermionic dark matter χ which transforms asmore » triplet under U(3) χ , and is a singlet under the Standard Model. The dark matter couples to right-handed down-type quarks via a colored scalar mediator Φ with a coupling λ. We identify a number of “flavor-safe” scenarios for the structure of λ which are beyond Minimal Flavor Violation. Also, for dark matter and collider phenomenology we focus on the well-motivated case of b-flavored dark matter. Furthermore, the combined flavor and dark matter constraints on the parameter space of λ turn out to be interesting intersections of the individual ones. LHC constraints on simplified models of squarks and sbottoms can be adapted to our case, and monojet searches can be relevant if the spectrum is compressed.« less

  7. Flavored dark matter beyond Minimal Flavor Violation

    SciTech Connect

    Agrawal, Prateek; Blanke, Monika; Gemmler, Katrin

    2014-10-13

    We study the interplay of flavor and dark matter phenomenology for models of flavored dark matter interacting with quarks. We allow an arbitrary flavor structure in the coupling of dark matter with quarks. This coupling is assumed to be the only new source of violation of the Standard Model flavor symmetry extended by a U(3) χ associated with the dark matter. We call this ansatz Dark Minimal Flavor Violation (DMFV) and highlight its various implications, including an unbroken discrete symmetry that can stabilize the dark matter. As an illustration we study a Dirac fermionic dark matter χ which transforms as triplet under U(3) χ , and is a singlet under the Standard Model. The dark matter couples to right-handed down-type quarks via a colored scalar mediator Φ with a coupling λ. We identify a number of “flavor-safe” scenarios for the structure of λ which are beyond Minimal Flavor Violation. Also, for dark matter and collider phenomenology we focus on the well-motivated case of b-flavored dark matter. Furthermore, the combined flavor and dark matter constraints on the parameter space of λ turn out to be interesting intersections of the individual ones. LHC constraints on simplified models of squarks and sbottoms can be adapted to our case, and monojet searches can be relevant if the spectrum is compressed.

  8. The Cosmology of Composite Inelastic Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Spier Moreira Alves, Daniele; Behbahani, Siavosh R.; Schuster, Philip; Wacker, Jay G.; /SLAC

    2011-08-19

    Composite dark matter is a natural setting for implementing inelastic dark matter - the O(100 keV) mass splitting arises from spin-spin interactions of constituent fermions. In models where the constituents are charged under an axial U(1) gauge symmetry that also couples to the Standard Model quarks, dark matter scatters inelastically off Standard Model nuclei and can explain the DAMA/LIBRA annual modulation signal. This article describes the early Universe cosmology of a minimal implementation of a composite inelastic dark matter model where the dark matter is a meson composed of a light and a heavy quark. The synthesis of the constituent quarks into dark hadrons results in several qualitatively different configurations of the resulting dark matter composition depending on the relative mass scales in the system.

  9. Baryon destruction by asymmetric dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Davoudiasl, Hooman; Morrissey, David E.; Tulin, Sean; Sigurdson, Kris

    2011-11-01

    We investigate new and unusual signals that arise in theories where dark matter is asymmetric and carries a net antibaryon number, as may occur when the dark matter abundance is linked to the baryon abundance. Antibaryonic dark matter can cause induced nucleon decay by annihilating visible baryons through inelastic scattering. These processes lead to an effective nucleon lifetime of 10{sup 29}-10{sup 32} yrs in terrestrial nucleon decay experiments, if baryon number transfer between visible and dark sectors arises through new physics at the weak scale. The possibility of induced nucleon decay motivates a novel approach for direct detection of cosmic dark matter in nucleon decay experiments. Monojet searches (and related signatures) at hadron colliders also provide a complementary probe of weak-scale dark-matter-induced baryon number violation. Finally, we discuss the effects of baryon-destroying dark matter on stellar systems and show that it can be consistent with existing observations.

  10. Baryon destruction by asymmetric dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Davoudiasl H.; Morrissey, D.; Sigurdson, K.; Tulin, S.

    2011-11-10

    We investigate new and unusual signals that arise in theories where dark matter is asymmetric and carries a net antibaryon number, as may occur when the dark matter abundance is linked to the baryon abundance. Antibaryonic dark matter can cause induced nucleon decay by annihilating visible baryons through inelastic scattering. These processes lead to an effective nucleon lifetime of 10{sup 29}-10{sup 32} yrs in terrestrial nucleon decay experiments, if baryon number transfer between visible and dark sectors arises through new physics at the weak scale. The possibility of induced nucleon decay motivates a novel approach for direct detection of cosmic dark matter in nucleon decay experiments. Monojet searches (and related signatures) at hadron colliders also provide a complementary probe of weak-scale dark-matter-induced baryon number violation. Finally, we discuss the effects of baryon-destroying dark matter on stellar systems and show that it can be consistent with existing observations.

  11. Common origin of visible and dark universe

    SciTech Connect

    Gu Peihong; Sarkar, Utpal

    2010-02-01

    Dark matter, baryonic matter, and dark energy have different properties but contribute comparable energy density to the present Universe. We point out that they may have a common origin. As the dark energy has a scale far lower than all known scales in particle physics but very close to neutrino masses, while the excess matter over antimatter in the baryonic sector is probably related to the neutrino-mass generation, we unify the origin of the dark and visible universe in a variant of the seesaw model. In our model (i) the dark matter relic density is a dark matter asymmetry emerged simultaneously with the baryon asymmetry from leptogenesis; (ii) the dark energy is due to a pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone-Boson associated with the neutrino-mass generation.

  12. Cosmology with interaction in the dark sector

    SciTech Connect

    Costa, F. E. M.; Barboza, E. M. Jr.; Alcaniz, J. S.

    2009-06-15

    Unless some unknown symmetry in nature prevents or suppresses a nonminimal coupling in the dark sector, the dark energy field may interact with the pressureless component of dark matter. In this paper, we investigate some cosmological consequences of a general model of interacting dark matter-dark energy characterized by a dimensionless parameter {epsilon}. We derive a coupled scalar field version for this general class of scenarios and carry out a joint statistical analysis involving type Ia supernovae data (Legacy and Constitution sets), measurements of baryon acoustic oscillation peaks at z=0.20 (2dFGRS) and z=0.35 (SDSS), and measurements of the Hubble evolution H(z). For the specific case of vacuum decay (w=-1), we find that, although physically forbidden, a transfer of energy from dark matter to dark energy is favored by the data.

  13. Unexpected features of the dark proteome.

    PubMed

    Perdigão, Nelson; Heinrich, Julian; Stolte, Christian; Sabir, Kenneth S; Buckley, Michael J; Tabor, Bruce; Signal, Beth; Gloss, Brian S; Hammang, Christopher J; Rost, Burkhard; Schafferhans, Andrea; O'Donoghue, Seán I

    2015-12-29

    We surveyed the "dark" proteome-that is, regions of proteins never observed by experimental structure determination and inaccessible to homology modeling. For 546,000 Swiss-Prot proteins, we found that 44-54% of the proteome in eukaryotes and viruses was dark, compared with only ∼14% in archaea and bacteria. Surprisingly, most of the dark proteome could not be accounted for by conventional explanations, such as intrinsic disorder or transmembrane regions. Nearly half of the dark proteome comprised dark proteins, in which the entire sequence lacked similarity to any known structure. Dark proteins fulfill a wide variety of functions, but a subset showed distinct and largely unexpected features, such as association with secretion, specific tissues, the endoplasmic reticulum, disulfide bonding, and proteolytic cleavage. Dark proteins also had short sequence length, low evolutionary reuse, and few known interactions with other proteins. These results suggest new research directions in structural and computational biology. PMID:26578815

  14. Unexpected features of the dark proteome.

    PubMed

    Perdigão, Nelson; Heinrich, Julian; Stolte, Christian; Sabir, Kenneth S; Buckley, Michael J; Tabor, Bruce; Signal, Beth; Gloss, Brian S; Hammang, Christopher J; Rost, Burkhard; Schafferhans, Andrea; O'Donoghue, Seán I

    2015-12-29

    We surveyed the "dark" proteome-that is, regions of proteins never observed by experimental structure determination and inaccessible to homology modeling. For 546,000 Swiss-Prot proteins, we found that 44-54% of the proteome in eukaryotes and viruses was dark, compared with only ∼14% in archaea and bacteria. Surprisingly, most of the dark proteome could not be accounted for by conventional explanations, such as intrinsic disorder or transmembrane regions. Nearly half of the dark proteome comprised dark proteins, in which the entire sequence lacked similarity to any known structure. Dark proteins fulfill a wide variety of functions, but a subset showed distinct and largely unexpected features, such as association with secretion, specific tissues, the endoplasmic reticulum, disulfide bonding, and proteolytic cleavage. Dark proteins also had short sequence length, low evolutionary reuse, and few known interactions with other proteins. These results suggest new research directions in structural and computational biology.

  15. Dark Skies, Bright Kids Year 7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bittle, Lauren E.; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Borish, H. Jacob; Burkhardt, Andrew; Firebaugh, Ariel; Hancock, Danielle; Rochford Hayes, Christian; Linden, Sean; Liss, Sandra; Matthews, Allison; Prager, Brian; Pryal, Matthew; Sokal, Kimberly R.; Troup, Nicholas William; Wenger, Trey

    2016-01-01

    We present updates from our seventh year of operation including new club content, continued assessments, and our fifth annual Star Party. Dark Skies, Bright Kids (DSBK) is an entirely volunteer-run outreach organization based out of the Department of Astronomy at the University of Virginia. Our core mission is to enhance elementary science education and literacy in Central Virginia through fun, hands-on activities that introduce basic Astronomy concepts. Our primary focus is hosting an 8-10 week after-school astronomy club at underserved elementary and middle schools. Each week, DSBK volunteers take the role of coaches to introduce astronomy-related concepts ranging from the Solar System to galaxies to astrobiology, and to lead students in interactive learning activities. Another hallmark of DSBK is hosting our Annual Central Virginia Star Party, a free event open to the community featuring star-gazing and planetarium shows.

  16. Dark Energy from Discrete Spacetime

    PubMed Central

    Trout, Aaron D.

    2013-01-01

    Dark energy accounts for most of the matter-energy content of our universe, yet current theories of its origin rely on radical physical assumptions such as the holographic principle or controversial anthropic arguments. We give a better motivated explanation for dark energy, claiming that it arises from a small negative scalar-curvature present even in empty spacetime. The vacuum has this curvature because spacetime is fundamentally discrete and there are more ways for a discrete geometry to have negative curvature than positive. We explicitly compute this effect using a variant of the well known dynamical-triangulations (DT) model for quantum gravity. Our model predicts a time-varying non-zero cosmological constant with a current value, in natural units, in agreement with observation. This calculation is made possible by a novel characterization of the possible DT action values combined with numerical evidence concerning their degeneracies. PMID:24312502

  17. Dark energy from discrete spacetime.

    PubMed

    Trout, Aaron D

    2013-01-01

    Dark energy accounts for most of the matter-energy content of our universe, yet current theories of its origin rely on radical physical assumptions such as the holographic principle or controversial anthropic arguments. We give a better motivated explanation for dark energy, claiming that it arises from a small negative scalar-curvature present even in empty spacetime. The vacuum has this curvature because spacetime is fundamentally discrete and there are more ways for a discrete geometry to have negative curvature than positive. We explicitly compute this effect using a variant of the well known dynamical-triangulations (DT) model for quantum gravity. Our model predicts a time-varying non-zero cosmological constant with a current value, [Formula: see text] in natural units, in agreement with observation. This calculation is made possible by a novel characterization of the possible DT action values combined with numerical evidence concerning their degeneracies.

  18. Number-theory dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Kazunori; Takahashi, Fuminobu; Yanagida, Tsutomu T.

    2011-05-01

    We propose that the stability of dark matter is ensured by a discrete subgroup of the U(1)B-L gauge symmetry, Z(B-L). We introduce a set of chiral fermions charged under the U(1)B-L in addition to the right-handed neutrinos, and require the anomaly-cancellation conditions associated with the U(1)B-L gauge symmetry. We find that the possible number of fermions and their charges are tightly constrained, and that non-trivial solutions appear when at least five additional chiral fermions are introduced. The Fermat theorem in the number theory plays an important role in this argument. Focusing on one of the solutions, we show that there is indeed a good candidate for dark matter, whose stability is guaranteed by Z(B-L).

  19. Dark Valley in Newton Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-418, 11 July 2003

    This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) high resolution image shows part of a dark-floored valley system in northern Newton Crater. The valley might have been originally formed by liquid water; the dark material is probably sand that has blown into the valley in more recent times. The picture was acquired earlier this week on July 6, 2003, and is located near 39.2oS, 157.9oW. The picture covers an area 2.3 km (1.4 mi) across; sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper left.

  20. Dark matter from split seesaw

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusenko, Alexander; Takahashi, Fuminobu; Yanagida, Tsutomu T.

    2010-09-01

    The seesaw mechanism in models with extra dimensions is shown to be generically consistent with a broad range of Majorana masses. The resulting democracy of scales implies that the seesaw mechanism can naturally explain the smallness of neutrino masses for an arbitrarily small right-handed neutrino mass. If the scales of the seesaw parameters are split, with two right-handed neutrinos at a high scale and one at a keV scale, one can explain the matter-antimatter asymmetry of the universe, as well as dark matter. The dark matter candidate, a sterile right-handed neutrino with mass of several keV, can account for the observed pulsar velocities and for the recent data from Chandra X-ray Observatory, which suggest the existence of a 5 keV sterile right-handed neutrino.

  1. Naturality, unification, and dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Kainulainen, Kimmo; Virkajaervi, Jussi; Tuominen, Kimmo

    2010-08-15

    We consider a model where electroweak symmetry breaking is driven by technicolor dynamics with minimal particle content required for walking coupling and saturation of global anomalies. Furthermore, the model features three additional Weyl fermions singlet under technicolor interactions, two of which provide for a one-loop unification of the standard model gauge couplings. Among these extra matter fields exists a possible candidate for weakly interacting dark matter. We evaluate the relic densities and find that they are sufficient to explain the cosmological observations and avoid the experimental limits from earth-based searches. Hence, we establish a nonsupersymmetric framework where hierarchy and naturality problems are solved, coupling constant unification is achieved, and a plausible dark matter candidate exists.

  2. Alternative to particle dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoury, Justin

    2015-01-01

    We propose an alternative to particle dark matter that borrows ingredients of modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND) while adding new key components. The first new feature is a dark matter fluid, in the form of a scalar field with small equation of state and sound speed. This component is critical in reproducing the success of cold dark matter for the expansion history and the growth of linear perturbations, but does not cluster significantly on nonlinear scales. Instead, the missing mass problem on nonlinear scales is addressed by a modification of the gravitational force law. The force law approximates MOND at large and intermediate accelerations, and therefore reproduces the empirical success of MOND at fitting galactic rotation curves. At ultralow accelerations, the force law reverts to an inverse-square law, albeit with a larger Newton's constant. This latter regime is important in galaxy clusters and is consistent with their observed isothermal profiles, provided the characteristic acceleration scale of MOND is mildly varying with scale or mass, such that it is 12 times higher in clusters than in galaxies. We present an explicit relativistic theory in terms of two scalar fields. The first scalar field is governed by a Dirac-Born-Infeld action and behaves as a dark matter fluid on large scales. The second scalar field also has single-derivative interactions and mediates a fifth force that modifies gravity on nonlinear scales. Both scalars are coupled to matter via an effective metric that depends locally on the fields. The form of this effective metric implies the equality of the two scalar gravitational potentials, which ensures that lensing and dynamical mass estimates agree. Further work is needed in order to make both the acceleration scale of MOND and the fraction at which gravity reverts to an inverse-square law explicitly dynamical quantities, varying with scale or mass.

  3. Dissipative dark matter explains rotation curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foot, R.

    2015-06-01

    Dissipative dark matter, where dark matter particles interact with a massless (or very light) boson, is studied. Such dark matter can arise in simple hidden sector gauge models, including those featuring an unbroken U (1 )' gauge symmetry, leading to a dark photon. Previous work has shown that such models can not only explain the large scale structure and cosmic microwave background, but potentially also dark matter phenomena on small scales, such as the inferred cored structure of dark matter halos. In this picture, dark matter halos of disk galaxies not only cool via dissipative interactions but are also heated via ordinary supernovae (facilitated by an assumed photon-dark photon kinetic mixing interaction). This interaction between the dark matter halo and ordinary baryons, a very special feature of these types of models, plays a critical role in governing the physical properties of the dark matter halo. Here, we further study the implications of this type of dissipative dark matter for disk galaxies. Building on earlier work, we develop a simple formalism which aims to describe the effects of dissipative dark matter in a fairly model independent way. This formalism is then applied to generic disk galaxies. We also consider specific examples, including NGC 1560 and a sample of dwarf galaxies from the LITTLE THINGS survey. We find that dissipative dark matter, as developed here, does a fairly good job accounting for the rotation curves of the galaxies considered. Not only does dissipative dark matter explain the linear rise of the rotational velocity of dwarf galaxies at small radii, but it can also explain the observed wiggles in rotation curves which are known to be correlated with corresponding features in the disk gas distribution.

  4. NASA Finds Direct Proof of Dark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-08-01

    Dark matter and normal matter have been wrenched apart by the tremendous collision of two large clusters of galaxies. The discovery, using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory and other telescopes, gives direct evidence for the existence of dark matter. "This is the most energetic cosmic event, besides the Big Bang, which we know about," said team member Maxim Markevitch of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, Mass. Lensing Illustration Gravitational Lensing Explanation These observations provide the strongest evidence yet that most of the matter in the universe is dark. Despite considerable evidence for dark matter, some scientists have proposed alternative theories for gravity where it is stronger on intergalactic scales than predicted by Newton and Einstein, removing the need for dark matter. However, such theories cannot explain the observed effects of this collision. "A universe that's dominated by dark stuff seems preposterous, so we wanted to test whether there were any basic flaws in our thinking," said Doug Clowe of the University of Arizona at Tucson, and leader of the study. "These results are direct proof that dark matter exists." Animation of Cluster Collision Animation of Cluster Collision In galaxy clusters, the normal matter, like the atoms that make up the stars, planets, and everything on Earth, is primarily in the form of hot gas and stars. The mass of the hot gas between the galaxies is far greater than the mass of the stars in all of the galaxies. This normal matter is bound in the cluster by the gravity of an even greater mass of dark matter. Without dark matter, which is invisible and can only be detected through its gravity, the fast-moving galaxies and the hot gas would quickly fly apart. The team was granted more than 100 hours on the Chandra telescope to observe the galaxy cluster 1E0657-56. The cluster is also known as the bullet cluster, because it contains a spectacular bullet-shaped cloud of hundred

  5. Photometric distances to nine dark globules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maheswar, G.; Bhatt, H. C.

    2006-07-01

    Distances to nine dark globules are determined by a method using optical (VRI) and near-infrared (near-IR) (JHK) photometry of stars projected towards the field containing the globules. In this method, we compute intrinsic colour indices of stars projected towards the direction of the globule by dereddening the observed colour indices using various trial values of extinction AV and a standard extinction law. These computed intrinsic colour indices for each star are then compared with the intrinsic colour indices of normal main-sequence stars and a spectral type is assigned to the star for which the computed colour indices best match with the standard intrinsic colour indices. Distances (d) to the stars are determined using the AV and absolute magnitude (MV) corresponding to the spectral types thus obtained. A distance versus extinction plot is made and the distance at which AV undergoes a sharp rise is taken to be the distance to the globule. All the clouds studied in this work are in the distance range 160-400pc. The estimated distances to dark globules LDN 544, LDN 549, LDN 567, LDN 543, LDN 1113, LDN 1031, LDN 1225, LDN 1252 and LDN 1257 are 180 +/- 35, 200 +/- 40, 180 +/- 35, 160 +/- 30, 350 +/- 70, 200 +/- 40, 400 +/- 80, 250 +/- 50 and 250 +/- 50pc, respectively. Using the distances determined, we have estimated the masses of the globules and the far-IR luminosity of the IRAS sources associated with them. The mass of the clouds studied are in the range 10-200Msolar.

  6. Twin Higgs Asymmetric Dark Matter.

    PubMed

    García García, Isabel; Lasenby, Robert; March-Russell, John

    2015-09-18

    We study asymmetric dark matter (ADM) in the context of the minimal (fraternal) twin Higgs solution to the little hierarchy problem, with a twin sector with gauged SU(3)^{'}×SU(2)^{'}, a twin Higgs doublet, and only third-generation twin fermions. Naturalness requires the QCD^{'} scale Λ_{QCD}^{'}≃0.5-20  GeV, and that t^{'} is heavy. We focus on the light b^{'} quark regime, m_{b^{'}}≲Λ_{QCD}^{'}, where QCD^{'} is characterized by a single scale Λ_{QCD}^{'} with no light pions. A twin baryon number asymmetry leads to a successful dark matter (DM) candidate: the spin-3/2 twin baryon, Δ^{'}∼b^{'}b^{'}b^{'}, with a dynamically determined mass (∼5Λ_{QCD}^{'}) in the preferred range for the DM-to-baryon ratio Ω_{DM}/Ω_{baryon}≃5. Gauging the U(1)^{'} group leads to twin atoms (Δ^{'}-τ^{'}[over ¯] bound states) that are successful ADM candidates in significant regions of parameter space, sometimes with observable changes to DM halo properties. Direct detection signatures satisfy current bounds, at times modified by dark form factors. PMID:26430985

  7. Twin Higgs Asymmetric Dark Matter.

    PubMed

    García García, Isabel; Lasenby, Robert; March-Russell, John

    2015-09-18

    We study asymmetric dark matter (ADM) in the context of the minimal (fraternal) twin Higgs solution to the little hierarchy problem, with a twin sector with gauged SU(3)^{'}×SU(2)^{'}, a twin Higgs doublet, and only third-generation twin fermions. Naturalness requires the QCD^{'} scale Λ_{QCD}^{'}≃0.5-20  GeV, and that t^{'} is heavy. We focus on the light b^{'} quark regime, m_{b^{'}}≲Λ_{QCD}^{'}, where QCD^{'} is characterized by a single scale Λ_{QCD}^{'} with no light pions. A twin baryon number asymmetry leads to a successful dark matter (DM) candidate: the spin-3/2 twin baryon, Δ^{'}∼b^{'}b^{'}b^{'}, with a dynamically determined mass (∼5Λ_{QCD}^{'}) in the preferred range for the DM-to-baryon ratio Ω_{DM}/Ω_{baryon}≃5. Gauging the U(1)^{'} group leads to twin atoms (Δ^{'}-τ^{'}[over ¯] bound states) that are successful ADM candidates in significant regions of parameter space, sometimes with observable changes to DM halo properties. Direct detection signatures satisfy current bounds, at times modified by dark form factors.

  8. Axion cold dark matter revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visinelli, L.; Gondolo, P.

    2010-01-01

    We study for what specific values of the theoretical parameters the axion can form the totality of cold dark matter. We examine the allowed axion parameter region in the light of recent data collected by the WMAP5 mission plus baryon acoustic oscillations and supernovae [1], and assume an inflationary scenario and standard cosmology. We also upgrade the treatment of anharmonicities in the axion potential, which we find important in certain cases. If the Peccei-Quinn symmetry is restored after inflation, we recover the usual relation between axion mass and density, so that an axion mass ma = (85 ± 3) μeV makes the axion 100% of the cold dark matter. If the Peccei-Quinn symmetry is broken during inflation, the axion can instead be 100% of the cold dark matter for ma < 15 meV provided a specific value of the initial misalignment angle θi is chosen in correspondence to a given value of its mass ma. Large values of the Peccei-Quinn symmetry breaking scale correspond to small, perhaps uncomfortably small, values of the initial misalignment angle θi.

  9. Astronomy Education Under Dark Skies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecylia Molenda-Zakowicz, Joanna

    2015-08-01

    We have been providing professional support for the high school students and the astronomy teachers since 2007. Our efforts include organizing astronomy events that take from several hours, like, e.g., watching the transit of Venus, to several days, like the workshops organized in the framework of the projects 'School Workshops on Astronomy' (SWA) and 'Wygasz'.The SWA and Wygasz workshops include presentations by experts in astronomy and space science research, presentations prepared by students being supervised by those experts, hands-on interactive experience in the amateur astrophotography, various pencil-and-paper exercises, and other practical activities. We pay particular attention to familiarize the teachers and students with the idea and the necessity of protecting the dark sky. The format of these events allows also for some time for teachers to share ideas and best practices in teaching astronomy.All those activities are organized either in the Izera Dark-Sky Park in Poland or in other carefuly selected locations in which the beauty of the dark night sky can be appreciated.

  10. Heavy spin-2 Dark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babichev, Eugeny; Marzola, Luca; Raidal, Martti; Schmidt-May, Angnis; Urban, Federico; Veermäe, Hardi; von Strauss, Mikael

    2016-09-01

    We provide further details on a recent proposal addressing the nature of the dark sectors in cosmology and demonstrate that all current observations related to Dark Matter can be explained by the presence of a heavy spin-2 particle. Massive spin-2 fields and their gravitational interactions are uniquely described by ghost-free bimetric theory, which is a minimal and natural extension of General Relativity. In this setup, the largeness of the physical Planck mass is naturally related to extremely weak couplings of the heavy spin-2 field to baryonic matter and therefore explains the absence of signals in experiments dedicated to Dark Matter searches. It also ensures the phenomenological viability of our model as we confirm by comparing it with cosmological and local tests of gravity. At the same time, the spin-2 field possesses standard gravitational interactions and it decays universally into all Standard Model fields but not into massless gravitons. Matching the measured DM abundance together with the requirement of stability constrains the spin-2 mass to be in the 1 to 100 TeV range.

  11. Galactic dark matter in the phantom field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ming-Hsun; Yang, Kwei-Chou

    2012-12-01

    We investigate the possibility that the galactic dark matter exists in a scenario where the phantom field is responsible for the dark energy. We obtain the statically and spherically approximate solution for this kind of galaxy system with a supermassive black hole at its center. The solution of the metric functions is satisfied with gtt=-grr-1. Constrained by the observation of the rotational stars moving in circular orbits with nearly constant tangential speed in a spiral galaxy, the background of the phantom field which is spatially inhomogeneous has an exponential potential. To avoid the well-known quantum instability of the vacuum at high frequencies, the phantom field defined in an effective theory is valid only at low energies. Under this assumption, we further investigate the following properties. The absorption cross section of the low-energy S-wave excitations of the phantom field into the central black hole is shown to be the horizontal area of the central black hole. Because the infalling phantom particles have a total negative energy, the accretion of the phantom energy is related to the decrease of the black hole mass, which is estimated to be much less than a solar mass in the lifetime of the Universe. Using a simple model with the cold dark matter very weakly coupled to the “low-frequency” phantom particles that are generated from the background, we show that these two densities can be quasistable in the galaxy.

  12. Dark matter searches using superheated liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manuel, Bou-Cabo; Miguel, Ardid; Ivan, Felis

    2016-07-01

    Direct detection of dark matter is one of the most important topics in modern physics. It is estimated that 22% of universe matter is composed by dark matter in front of 0.4% of ordinary matter like stars, galaxies planets and all kind of known astrophysical objects. Several kinds of experiments are nowadays involved in detection of one of the more accepted particle candidates to be dark matter: WIMPs (Weakly Interacting Massive Particles). These detectors, using several kinds of techniques: Cryogenic semiconductors, scintillation materials like I Na or noble gas chambers among others, are reporting very interesting but inconclusive results. In this paper a review of detectors that are using the superheated liquid technique in bubble chambers in order to detect WIMPs is reported. Basically, we will report about Coupp (Chicagoland observatory for underground particle physics), PICO that is composed by Coupp and Picasso researchers having the aim to build a ton experiment and also about a new detector named MOSCAB (Materia oscura a bolle) that recently published a first results of a test chamber that uses also superheated liquid technique but as a Geyser chamber.

  13. Galilean Equivalence for Galactic Dark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesden, Michael; Kamionkowski, Marc

    2006-09-01

    Satellite galaxies are tidally disrupted as they orbit the Milky Way. If dark matter (DM) experiences a stronger self-attraction than baryons, stars will preferentially gain rather than lose energy during tidal disruption, leading to an enhancement in the trailing compared to the leading tidal stream. The Sgr dwarf galaxy is seen to have roughly equal streams, challenging models in which DM and baryons accelerate differently by more than 10%. Future observations and a better understanding of DM distribution should allow detection of equivalence violation at the percent level.

  14. Updated Kinematic Constraints on a Dark Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, Eric David; Randall, Lisa

    2016-06-01

    We update the method of the Holmberg & Flynn study, including an updated model of the Milky Way’s interstellar gas, radial velocities, an updated reddening map, and a careful statistical analysis, to bound the allowed surface density and scale height of a dark disk. We pay careful attention to the self-consistency of the model, including the gravitational influence of the dark disk on other disk components, and to the net velocity of the tracer stars. We find that the data set exhibits a non-zero bulk velocity in the vertical direction as well as a displacement from the expected location at the Galactic midplane. If not properly accounted for, these features would bias the bound toward low dark disk mass. We therefore perform our analysis two ways. In the first, using the traditional method, we subtract the mean velocity and displacement from the tracers’ phase space distributions. In the second method, we perform a non-equilibrium version of the HF method to derive a bound on the dark disk parameters for an oscillating tracer distribution. Despite updates in the mass model and reddening map, the traditional method results remain consistent with those of HF2000. The second, non-equilibrium technique, however, allows a surface density as large as 14 {M}⊙ {{{pc}}}-2 (and as small as 0 {M}⊙ {{{pc}}}-2), demonstrating much weaker constraints. For both techniques, the bound on surface density is weaker for larger scale height. In future analyses of Gaia data it will be important to verify whether the tracer populations are in equilibrium.

  15. Physical Conditions of the Earliest Phases of Massive Star Formation: Single-dish and Interferometric Observations of Ammonia and CCS in Infrared Dark Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dirienzo, William J.; Brogan, Crystal; Indebetouw, Rémy; Chandler, Claire J.; Friesen, Rachel K.; Devine, Kathryn E.

    2015-11-01

    Infrared Dark Clouds (IRDCs) harbor the earliest phases of massive star formation, and many of the compact cores in IRDCs, traced by millimeter continuum or by molecular emission in high critical density lines, host massive young stellar objects (YSOs). We used the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope and the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) to map {NH}{}3 and CCS in nine IRDCs to reveal the temperature, density, and velocity structures and explore chemical evolution in the dense (\\gt {10}22 {cm}{}-2) gas. Ammonia is an excellent molecular tracer for these cold, dense environments. The internal structure and kinematics of the IRDCs include velocity gradients, filaments, and possibly colliding clumps that elucidate the formation process of these structures and their YSOs. We find a wide variety of substructure including filaments and globules at distinct velocities, sometimes overlapping at sites of ongoing star formation. It appears that these IRDCs are still being assembled from molecular gas clumps even as star formation has already begun, and at least three of them appear consistent with the morphology of “hub-filament structures” discussed in the literature. Furthermore, we find that these clumps are typically near equipartition between gravitational and kinetic energies, so these structures may survive for multiple free-fall times.

  16. DARK FLUID: A UNIFIED FRAMEWORK FOR MODIFIED NEWTONIAN DYNAMICS, DARK MATTER, AND DARK ENERGY

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Hongsheng; Li Baojiu E-mail: b.li@damtp.cam.ac.u

    2010-03-20

    Empirical theories of dark matter (DM) like modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND) gravity and of dark energy (DE) like f(R) gravity were motivated by astronomical data. But could these theories be branches rooted from a more general and hence generic framework? Here we propose a very generic Lagrangian of such a framework based on simple dimensional analysis and covariant symmetry requirements, and explore various outcomes in a top-down fashion. The desired effects of quintessence plus cold DM particle fields or MOND-like scalar field(s) are shown to be largely achievable by one vector field only. Our framework preserves the covariant formulation of general relativity, but allows the expanding physical metric to be bent by a single new species of dark fluid flowing in spacetime. Its non-uniform stress tensor and current vector are simple functions of a vector field with variable norm, not coupled with the baryonic fluid and the four-vector potential of the photon fluid. The dark fluid framework generically branches into a continuous spectrum of theories with DE and DM effects, including the f(R) gravity, tensor-vector-scalar-like theories, Einstein-Aether, and nuLAMBDA theories as limiting cases. When the vector field degenerates into a pure scalar field, we obtain the physics for quintessence. Choices of parameters can be made to pass Big Bang nucleosynthesis, parameterized post-Newtonian, and causality constraints. In this broad setting we emphasize the non-constant dynamical field behind the cosmological constant effect, and highlight plausible corrections beyond the classical MOND predictions.

  17. Dark Galaxies and Lost Baryons (IAU S244)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Jonathan I.; Disney, Michael J.

    2008-05-01

    Preface; Conference prelims; The HI that barked in the night M. J. Disney; The detection of dark galaxies in blind HI surveys J. I. Davies; Red haloes of galaxies - reservoirs of baryonic dark matter? E. Zackrisson, N. Bergvall, C. Flynn, G. Ostlin, G. Micheva and B. Baldwell; Constraints on dark and visible mass in galaxies from strong gravitational lensing S. Dye and S. Warren; Lost baryons at low redshift S. Mathur, F. Nicastro and R. Williams; Observed properties of dark matter on small spatial scales R. Wyse and G. Gilmore; The mass distribution in spiral galaxies P. Salucci; Connecting lost baryons and dark galaxies via QSO absorption lines T. Tripp; ALFALFA: HI cosmology in the local universe R. Giovanelli; The ALFALFA search for (almost) dark galaxies across the HI mass function M. Haynes; HI clouds detected towards Virgo with the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA Survey B. Kent; Cosmic variance in the HI mass function S. Schneider; The Arecibo Galaxy Environments Survey - potential for finding dark galaxies and results so far R. Minchin et al.; Free-floating HI clouds in the M81 group E. Brinks, F. Walter and E. Skillman; Where are the stars in dark galaxies J. Rosenberg, J. Salzer and J. Cannon; The halo by halo missing baryon problem S. McGaugh; The local void is really empty R. Tully; Voids in the local volume: a limit on appearance of a galaxy in a dark matter halo A. Tikhonov and A. Klypin; Dim baryons in the cosmic web C. Impey; A census of baryons in galaxy clusters and groups A. Gonzalez, D. Zaritsky and A. Zabludo; Statistical properties of the intercluster light from SDSS image stacking S. Zibetti; QSO strong gravitational lensing and the detection of dark halos A. Maccio; Strong gravitational lensing: bright galaxies and lost dark-matter L. Koopmans; Mapping the distribution of luminous and dark matter in strong lensing galaxies I. Ferreras, P. Saha, L. Williams and S. Burles; Tidal debris posing as dark galaxies P. Duc, F. Bournaud and E. Brinks

  18. New astrophysical probes of dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mei-Yu

    In my thesis, I present four studies to explore astrophysical methods for understanding dark matter properties. To understand the nature of dark matter, I explore a few unstable dark matter models that are invoked as ways to address apparent discrepancies between the predictions of standard cold dark matter and observations of small-scale galactic structure. My studies are aimed at developing independent large-scale constraints on these models. One of the model is a decaying dark matter model such that one dark matter particle decays into two relativistic non-interacting particles. In the second model, a dark matter particle decays into a less massive, stable dark matter particle with a recoil kick velocity Vk and a relativistic non-interacting particle. I consider two types of experiments: one is weak lensing cosmic shear with future or forthcoming surveys like Dark Energy Survey (DES) and Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST); the other one is Lyman-alpha forest spectrum, which has contemporary data from Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and other observations. I found that large-scale structure growth is sensitive to the change of dark matter properties due to these decay processes, and they can provide competitive constraints comparing to other existing limits. On small scale, the gravitational interplay of baryon and dark matter can affect the clustering of dark matter. I examine adiabatic contraction (AC) models what are traditionally used to parametrize the dark matter response to the cooling of baryons by investigating a suite of numerical simulations. We found that the errors in AC reconstructions are correlated with baryonic physics and certain halo properties. Our results indicate that existing AC models need significant calibration in order to predicting realistic matter distribution.

  19. Is Cold Dark Matter a Vacuum Effect?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houlden, Michael A.

    Current theories about the Universe based on an FLRW model conclude that it is composed of ~4% normal matter, ~28 % dark matter and ~68% Dark Energy which is responsible for the well-established accelerated expansion: this model works extremely well. As the Universe expands the density of normal and dark matter decreases while the proportion of Dark Energy increases. This model assumes that the amount of dark matter, whose nature at present is totally unknown, has remained constant. This is a natural assumption if dark matter is a particle of some kind - WIMP, sterile neutrino, lightest supersysmmetric particle or axion, etc. - that must have emerged from the early high temperature phase of the Big Bang. This paper proposes that dark matter is not a particle such as these but a vacuum effect, and that the proportion of dark matter in the Universe is actually increasing with time. The idea that led to this suggestion was that a quantum process (possibly the Higgs mechanism) might operate in the nilpotent vacuum that Rowlands postulates is a dual space to the real space where Standard Model fundamental fermions (and we) reside. This could produce a vacuum quantum state that has mass, which interacts gravitationally, and such states would be `dark matter'. It is proposed that the rate of production of dark matter by this process might depend on local circumstances, such as the density of dark matter and/or normal matter. This proposal makes the testable prediction that the ratio of baryonic to dark matter varies with redshift and offers an explanation, within the framework of Rowlands' ideas, of the coincidence problem - why has cosmic acceleration started in the recent epoch at redshift z ~0.55 when the Dark Energy density first became equal to the matter density?. This process also offers a potential solution to the `missing baryon' problem.

  20. The Dark Disk of the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purcell, Chris W.; Bullock, James S.; Kaplinghat, Manoj

    2009-10-01

    Massive satellite accretions onto early galactic disks can lead to the deposition of dark matter in disk-like configurations that co-rotate with the galaxy. This phenomenon has potentially dramatic consequences for dark matter detection experiments. We utilize focused, high-resolution simulations of accretion events onto disks designed to be Galaxy analogues, and compare the resultant disks to the morphological and kinematic properties of the Milky Way's thick disk in order to bracket the range of co-rotating accreted dark matter. In agreement with previous results, we find that the Milky Way's merger history must have been unusually quiescent compared to median Λ cold dark matter expectations and, therefore, its dark disk must be relatively small: the fraction of accreted dark disk material near the Sun is about 20% of the host halo density or smaller and the co-rotating dark matter fraction near the Sun, defined as particles moving with a rotational velocity lag less than 50 km s-1, is enhanced by about 30% or less compared to a standard halo model. Such a dark disk could contribute dominantly to the low energy (of order keV for a dark matter particle with mass 100 GeV) nuclear recoil event rate of direct detection experiments, but it will not change the likelihood of detection significantly. These dark disks provide testable predictions of weakly interacting massive particle dark matter models and should be considered in detailed comparisons to experimental data. Our findings suggest that the dark disk of the Milky Way may provide a detectable signal for indirect detection experiments, contributing up to about 25% of the dark matter self-annihilation signal in the direction of the center of the Galaxy, lending the signal a noticeably oblate morphology.

  1. Hidden dark matter sector, dark radiation, and the CMB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chacko, Zackaria; Cui, Yanou; Hong, Sungwoo; Okui, Takemichi

    2015-09-01

    We consider theories where dark matter is composed of a thermal relic of weak scale mass, whose couplings to the standard model (SM) are however too small to give rise to the observed abundance. Instead, the abundance is set by annihilation to light hidden sector states that carry no charges under the SM gauge interactions. In such a scenario the constraints from direct and indirect detection, and from collider searches for dark matter, can easily be satisfied. The masses of such light hidden states can be protected by symmetry if they are Nambu-Goldstone bosons, fermions, or gauge bosons. These states can then contribute to the cosmic energy density as dark radiation, leading to observable signals in the cosmic microwave background (CMB). Furthermore, depending on whether or not the light hidden sector states self-interact, the fraction of the total energy density that free-streams is either decreased or increased, leading to characteristic effects on both the scalar and tensor components of the CMB anisotropy that allows these two cases to be distinguished. The magnitude of these signals depends on the number of light degrees of freedom in the hidden sector, and on the temperature at which it kinetically decouples from the SM. We consider a simple model that realizes this scenario, based on a framework in which the SM and hidden sector are initially in thermal equilibrium through the Higgs portal, and show that the resulting signals are compatible with recent Planck results, while large enough to be detected in upcoming experiments such as CMBPol and CMB Stage-IV. Invisible decays of the Higgs into hidden sector states at colliders can offer a complementary probe of this model.

  2. Polytropic dark matter flows illuminate dark energy and accelerated expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleidis, K.; Spyrou, N. K.

    2015-04-01

    Currently, a large amount of data implies that the matter constituents of the cosmological dark sector might be collisional. An attractive feature of such a possibility is that, it can reconcile dark matter (DM) and dark energy (DE) in terms of a single component, accommodated in the context of a polytropic-DM fluid. In fact, polytropic processes in a DM fluid have been most successfully used in modeling dark galactic haloes, thus significantly improving the velocity dispersion profiles of galaxies. Motivated by such results, we explore the time evolution and the dynamical characteristics of a spatially-flat cosmological model, in which, in principle, there is no DE at all. Instead, in this model, the DM itself possesses some sort of fluidlike properties, i.e., the fundamental units of the Universe matter-energy content are the volume elements of a DM fluid, performing polytropic flows. In this case, together with all the other physical characteristics, we also take the energy of this fluid's internal motions into account as a source of the universal gravitational field. This form of energy can compensate for the extra energy, needed to compromise spatial flatness, namely, to justify that, today, the total energy density parameter is exactly unity. The polytropic cosmological model, depends on only one free parameter, the corresponding (polytropic) exponent, Γ. We find this model particularly interesting, because for Γ ≤ 0.541, without the need for either any exotic DE or the cosmological constant, the conventional pressure becomes negative enough so that the Universe accelerates its expansion at cosmological redshifts below a transition value. In fact, several physical reasons, e.g., the cosmological requirement for cold DM (CDM) and a positive velocity-of-sound square, impose further constraints on the value of Γ, which is eventually settled down to the range -0.089 < Γ ≤ 0. This cosmological model does not suffer either from the age problem or from the

  3. Prospects for detecting supersymmetric dark matter in the Galactic halo.

    PubMed

    Springel, V; White, S D M; Frenk, C S; Navarro, J F; Jenkins, A; Vogelsberger, M; Wang, J; Ludlow, A; Helmi, A

    2008-11-01

    Dark matter is the dominant form of matter in the Universe, but its nature is unknown. It is plausibly an elementary particle, perhaps the lightest supersymmetric partner of known particle species. In this case, annihilation of dark matter in the halo of the Milky Way should produce gamma-rays at a level that may soon be observable. Previous work has argued that the annihilation signal will be dominated by emission from very small clumps (perhaps smaller even than the Earth), which would be most easily detected where they cluster together in the dark matter haloes of dwarf satellite galaxies. Here we report that such small-scale structure will, in fact, have a negligible impact on dark matter detectability. Rather, the dominant and probably most easily detectable signal will be produced by diffuse dark matter in the main halo of the Milky Way. If the main halo is strongly detected, then small dark matter clumps should also be visible, but may well contain no stars, thereby confirming a key prediction of the cold dark matter model.

  4. Prospects for detecting supersymmetric dark matter in the Galactic halo.

    PubMed

    Springel, V; White, S D M; Frenk, C S; Navarro, J F; Jenkins, A; Vogelsberger, M; Wang, J; Ludlow, A; Helmi, A

    2008-11-01

    Dark matter is the dominant form of matter in the Universe, but its nature is unknown. It is plausibly an elementary particle, perhaps the lightest supersymmetric partner of known particle species. In this case, annihilation of dark matter in the halo of the Milky Way should produce gamma-rays at a level that may soon be observable. Previous work has argued that the annihilation signal will be dominated by emission from very small clumps (perhaps smaller even than the Earth), which would be most easily detected where they cluster together in the dark matter haloes of dwarf satellite galaxies. Here we report that such small-scale structure will, in fact, have a negligible impact on dark matter detectability. Rather, the dominant and probably most easily detectable signal will be produced by diffuse dark matter in the main halo of the Milky Way. If the main halo is strongly detected, then small dark matter clumps should also be visible, but may well contain no stars, thereby confirming a key prediction of the cold dark matter model. PMID:18987737

  5. Identifying Dark Matter Burners in the Galactic Center

    SciTech Connect

    Moskalenko, Igor V.; Wai, Lawrence L.

    2007-04-16

    If the supermassive black hole (SMBH) at the center of our Galaxy grew adiabatically, then a dense ''spike'' of dark matter is expected to have formed around it. Assuming that dark matter is composed primarily of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), a star orbiting close enough to the SMBH can capture WIMPs at an extremely high rate. The stellar luminosity due to annihilation of captured WIMPs in the stellar core may be comparable to or even exceed the luminosity of the star due to thermonuclear burning. The model thus predicts the existence of unusual stars, i.e. ''WIMP burners'', in the vicinity of an adiabatically grown SMBH. We find that the most efficient WIMP burners are stars with degenerate electron cores, e.g. white dwarfs (WD) or degenerate cores with envelopes. If found, such stars would provide evidence for the existence of particle dark matter and could possibly be used to establish its density profile. In our previous paper we computed the luminosity from WIMP burning for a range of dark matter spike density profiles, degenerate core masses, and distances from the SMBH. Here we compare our results with the observed stars closest to the Galactic center and find that they could be consistent with WIMP burners in the form of degenerate cores with envelopes. We also cross-check the WIMP burner hypothesis with the EGRET observed flux of gamma-rays from the Galactic center, which imposes a constraint on the dark matter spike density profile and annihilation cross-section. We find that the EGRET data is consistent with the WIMP burner hypothesis. New high precision measurements by GLAST will confirm or set stringent limits on a dark matter spike at the Galactic center, which will in turn support or set stringent limits on the existence of WIMP burners at the Galactic center.

  6. Self Interacting Dark Matter and Baryons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fry, Alexander B.; Governato, Fabio; Pontzen, Andrew; Quinn, Thomas R.

    2015-01-01

    Self Interacting Dark Matter (SIDM) is a cosmologically consistent alternative theory to Cold Dark Matter (CDM). SIDM is motivated as a solution to solve problems of the CDM model on small scales including the core/cusp problem, the missing satellites, and halo triaxiality. Each of these problems has secular astrophysical solutions, however taken together and along with suggestions from dark matter (DM) particle physics it is interesting to place constraints on how strong a self interaction would have to be for us to observe it and conversely the null hypothesis of whether we can rule out SIDM. We use high resolution cosmological simulations to compare evolution of stellar populations and (DM) components of dwarf galaxies. Our advanced smooth particle hydrodynamics N-body simulations combine SIDM with baryon physics including star formation, feedback recipes, metal line cooling, UV background, and thermal diffusion that eliminates artificial surface gas tension. We find for a constant SIDM cross section of 2 cm2 g-1 that DM interactions alone are not significant enough to create cores in dwarf galaxies and for low mass (Vpeak= 25 km s-1) galaxies the introduction of SIDM fails to decrease the DM central density. Our simulations with star formation feedback are in good agreement with observational estimates of Local Group dwarfs. The lower mass (below 108 M⊙) halos have inefficient SF, late formation time, and less DM interactions thus small field halos in CDM and SIDM remain cuspy. We conclude that constant cross section SIDM of 2 cm2 g-1 would be close to unobservable in dwarf galaxies and yet at the same time this cross section is already larger than some observational constraints found in larger (higher velocity) systems. We conclude that to differentiate between SIDM and CDM in an observationally detectable and astrophysically consistent manner a velocity dependent cross section that peaks for halos with small peak velocities will be necessary.

  7. Gravitational Waves from a Dark Phase Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwaller, Pedro

    2015-10-01

    In this work, we show that a large class of models with a composite dark sector undergo a strong first order phase transition in the early Universe, which could lead to a detectable gravitational wave signal. We summarize the basic conditions for a strong first order phase transition for SU (N ) dark sectors with nf flavors, calculate the gravitational wave spectrum and show that, depending on the dark confinement scale, it can be detected at eLISA or in pulsar timing array experiments. The gravitational wave signal provides a unique test of the gravitational interactions of a dark sector, and we discuss the complementarity with conventional searches for new dark sectors. The discussion includes the twin Higgs and strongly interacting massive particle models as well as symmetric and asymmetric composite dark matter scenarios.

  8. Gravitational Waves from a Dark Phase Transition.

    PubMed

    Schwaller, Pedro

    2015-10-30

    In this work, we show that a large class of models with a composite dark sector undergo a strong first order phase transition in the early Universe, which could lead to a detectable gravitational wave signal. We summarize the basic conditions for a strong first order phase transition for SU(N) dark sectors with n_{f} flavors, calculate the gravitational wave spectrum and show that, depending on the dark confinement scale, it can be detected at eLISA or in pulsar timing array experiments. The gravitational wave signal provides a unique test of the gravitational interactions of a dark sector, and we discuss the complementarity with conventional searches for new dark sectors. The discussion includes the twin Higgs and strongly interacting massive particle models as well as symmetric and asymmetric composite dark matter scenarios. PMID:26565451

  9. Unexpected features of the dark proteome

    PubMed Central

    Perdigão, Nelson; Heinrich, Julian; Stolte, Christian; Sabir, Kenneth S.; Buckley, Michael J.; Tabor, Bruce; Signal, Beth; Gloss, Brian S.; Hammang, Christopher J.; Rost, Burkhard; Schafferhans, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    We surveyed the “dark” proteome–that is, regions of proteins never observed by experimental structure determination and inaccessible to homology modeling. For 546,000 Swiss-Prot proteins, we found that 44–54% of the proteome in eukaryotes and viruses was dark, compared with only ∼14% in archaea and bacteria. Surprisingly, most of the dark proteome could not be accounted for by conventional explanations, such as intrinsic disorder or transmembrane regions. Nearly half of the dark proteome comprised dark proteins, in which the entire sequence lacked similarity to any known structure. Dark proteins fulfill a wide variety of functions, but a subset showed distinct and largely unexpected features, such as association with secretion, specific tissues, the endoplasmic reticulum, disulfide bonding, and proteolytic cleavage. Dark proteins also had short sequence length, low evolutionary reuse, and few known interactions with other proteins. These results suggest new research directions in structural and computational biology. PMID:26578815

  10. Dark photons as fractional cosmic neutrino masquerader

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, Kin-Wang; Tu, Huitzu; Yuan, Tzu-Chiang E-mail: huitzu@phys.sinica.edu.tw

    2014-09-01

    Recently, Weinberg proposed a Higgs portal model with a spontaneously broken global U(1) symmetry in which Goldstone bosons may be masquerading as fractional cosmic neutrinos. We extend the model by gauging the U(1) symmetry. This gives rise to the so-called dark photon and dark Higgs. The dark photons can constitute about 0.912 (0.167) to the effective number of light neutrino species if they decouple from the thermal bath before the pions become non-relativistic and after (before) the QCD transition. Restriction on the parameter space of the portal coupling and the dark Higgs mass is obtained from the freeze-out condition of the dark photons. Combining with the collider data constraints on the invisible width of the standard model Higgs requires the dark Higgs mass to be less than a few GeV.

  11. STIS-20 NUV MAMA Dark Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proffitt, Charles

    2009-07-01

    The STIS NUV-MAMA dark current is dominated by a phosphorescent glow from the detector window. Meta-stable states in this window are populated by cosmic ray impacts, which, days later, can be thermally excited to an unstable state from which they decay, emitting a UV photon. The equilibrium population of these meta-stable states is larger at lower temperatures; so warming up the detector from its cold safing will lead to a large, but temporary, increase in the dark current. To monitor the decay of this glow, and to determine the equilibrium dark current for Cycle 17, four 1380s NUV-MAMA ACCUM mode darks should be taken each week during the SMOV period. Once the observed dark current has reached an approximate equilibrium with the mean detector temperature, the frequency of this monitor can be reduced to one pair of darks per week.

  12. The Dark Ages Radio Explorer (DARE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, Jack O.; Lazio, J.; Bowman, J.; Bradley, R.; Carilli, C.; Furlanetto, S.; Harker, G.; Loeb, A.; Pritchard, J.

    2011-01-01

    "What were the first objects to light up the universe, and when did they do it"? (NRC, 2011). These are among the most fundamental questions in modern astrophysics and cosmology as articulated in the recent NRC report, New Worlds, New Horizons in Astronomy and Astrophysics. The Astro2010 Decadal Survey singles out this epoch as one of the top three science objectives for the coming decade. The birth of the first stars and black holes - the end of the Dark Ages or the "Cosmic Dawn” - is one of the truly transformative events in the history of the Universe. It provides the key connection between observations of the extraordinarily smooth Universe 400,000 years after the Big Bang seen via the Cosmic Microwave Background, and telescopic images that reveal the wealth of structures and galaxies seen today. Unfortunately, this epoch has remained tantalizingly out of reach for decades and its exploration requires fundamentally new techniques. With the Dark Ages Radio Explorer (DARE), we will investigate this early epoch of the Universe ( 80-350 million years after the Big Bang) for the first time using the sky-averaged, redshifted 21-cm Background (z=13-35) arising from the time when the first stars and black holes appeared in the Universe. DARE consists of a pair of tapered dipole antennas in lunar orbit operating in the shielded zone above the farside at 40-120 MHz. In this talk, we will discuss the science objectives and the instrument package for DARE.

  13. "Let There Be Night" Advocates Dark Skies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bueter, Chuck

    2008-05-01

    Let There Be Night is an interactive planetarium program that supports a community-wide experiment to quantify local sky glow. In the planetarium, visitors will experience three aspects of light pollution--glare, sky glow, and light trespass--and decide whether and how to confront dark sky issues. Planetarians can select optional recorded stories and lessons to complement live demonstrations or star talks. As a companion experiment, students in grades 3-8 from one school district will then submit their backyard observations of Orion's limiting magnitude to the 2009 Globe at Night star hunt while small student teams concurrently quantify sky glow from each schoolyard with hand-held meters. After mapping their results and having classroom discussions, students will present their findings to the School Board. Material compiled and created for the program will be available for other dark sky advocates at www.LetThereBeNight.com, while large digital files will be distributed on disk through two planetarium associations. A 2008 Toyota TAPESTRY grant has enticed significant professional support, additional funding, and in-kind contributions.

  14. DNA barcoding and taxonomy: dark taxa and dark texts.

    PubMed

    Page, Roderic D M

    2016-09-01

    Both classical taxonomy and DNA barcoding are engaged in the task of digitizing the living world. Much of the taxonomic literature remains undigitized. The rise of open access publishing this century and the freeing of older literature from the shackles of copyright have greatly increased the online availability of taxonomic descriptions, but much of the literature of the mid- to late-twentieth century remains offline ('dark texts'). DNA barcoding is generating a wealth of computable data that in many ways are much easier to work with than classical taxonomic descriptions, but many of the sequences are not identified to species level. These 'dark taxa' hamper the classical method of integrating biodiversity data, using shared taxonomic names. Voucher specimens are a potential common currency of both the taxonomic literature and sequence databases, and could be used to help link names, literature and sequences. An obstacle to this approach is the lack of stable, resolvable specimen identifiers. The paper concludes with an appeal for a global 'digital dashboard' to assess the extent to which biodiversity data are available online.This article is part of the themed issue 'From DNA barcodes to biomes'.

  15. Dark goo: bulk viscosity as an alternative to dark energy

    SciTech Connect

    Gagnon, Jean-Sebastien; Lesgourgues, Julien E-mail: julien.lesgourgues@cern.ch

    2011-09-01

    We present a simple (microscopic) model in which bulk viscosity plays a role in explaining the present acceleration of the universe. The effect of bulk viscosity on the Friedmann equations is to turn the pressure into an 'effective' pressure containing the bulk viscosity. For a sufficiently large bulk viscosity, the effective pressure becomes negative and could mimic a dark energy equation of state. Our microscopic model includes self-interacting spin-zero particles (for which the bulk viscosity is known) that are added to the usual energy content of the universe. We study both background equations and linear perturbations in this model. We show that a dark energy behavior is obtained for reasonable values of the two parameters of the model (i.e. the mass and coupling of the spin-zero particles) and that linear perturbations are well-behaved. There is no apparent fine tuning involved. We also discuss the conditions under which hydrodynamics holds, in particular that the spin-zero particles must be in local equilibrium today for viscous effects to be important.

  16. DNA barcoding and taxonomy: dark taxa and dark texts

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Both classical taxonomy and DNA barcoding are engaged in the task of digitizing the living world. Much of the taxonomic literature remains undigitized. The rise of open access publishing this century and the freeing of older literature from the shackles of copyright have greatly increased the online availability of taxonomic descriptions, but much of the literature of the mid- to late-twentieth century remains offline (‘dark texts’). DNA barcoding is generating a wealth of computable data that in many ways are much easier to work with than classical taxonomic descriptions, but many of the sequences are not identified to species level. These ‘dark taxa’ hamper the classical method of integrating biodiversity data, using shared taxonomic names. Voucher specimens are a potential common currency of both the taxonomic literature and sequence databases, and could be used to help link names, literature and sequences. An obstacle to this approach is the lack of stable, resolvable specimen identifiers. The paper concludes with an appeal for a global ‘digital dashboard’ to assess the extent to which biodiversity data are available online. This article is part of the themed issue ‘From DNA barcodes to biomes’. PMID:27481786

  17. DNA barcoding and taxonomy: dark taxa and dark texts.

    PubMed

    Page, Roderic D M

    2016-09-01

    Both classical taxonomy and DNA barcoding are engaged in the task of digitizing the living world. Much of the taxonomic literature remains undigitized. The rise of open access publishing this century and the freeing of older literature from the shackles of copyright have greatly increased the online availability of taxonomic descriptions, but much of the literature of the mid- to late-twentieth century remains offline ('dark texts'). DNA barcoding is generating a wealth of computable data that in many ways are much easier to work with than classical taxonomic descriptions, but many of the sequences are not identified to species level. These 'dark taxa' hamper the classical method of integrating biodiversity data, using shared taxonomic names. Voucher specimens are a potential common currency of both the taxonomic literature and sequence databases, and could be used to help link names, literature and sequences. An obstacle to this approach is the lack of stable, resolvable specimen identifiers. The paper concludes with an appeal for a global 'digital dashboard' to assess the extent to which biodiversity data are available online.This article is part of the themed issue 'From DNA barcodes to biomes'. PMID:27481786

  18. Dark matter in the universe

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, M.S. Chicago Univ., IL . Enrico Fermi Inst.)

    1990-11-01

    What is the quantity and composition of material in the Universe This is one of the most fundamental questions we can ask about the Universe, and its answer bears on a number of important issues including the formation of structure in the Universe, and the ultimate fate and the earliest history of the Universe. Moreover, answering this question could lead to the discovery of new particles, as well as shedding light on the nature of the fundamental interactions. At present, only a partial answer is at hand: Most of the material in the Universe does not give off detectable radiation, i.e., is dark;'' the dark matter associated with bright galaxies contributes somewhere between 10% and 30% of the critical density (by comparison luminous matter contributes less than 1%); baryonic matter contributes between 1.1% and 12% of critical. The case for the spatially-flat, Einstein-de Sitter model is supported by three compelling theoretical arguments--structure formation, the temporal Copernican principle, and inflation--and by some observational data. If {Omega} is indeed unity--or even just significantly greater than 0.1--then there is a strong case for a Universe comprised of nonbaryonic matter. There are three well motivated particle dark-matter candidates: an axion of mass 10{sup {minus}6} eV to 10{sup {minus}4} eV; a neutralino of mass 10 GeV to about 3 TeV; or a neutrino of mass 20 eV to 90 eV. All three possibilities can be tested by experiments that are either being planned or are underway. 63 refs.

  19. Dark matter in the universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Michael S.

    1991-01-01

    What is the quantity and composition of material in the Universe? This is one of the most fundamental questions we can ask about the Universe, and its answer bears on a number of important issues including the formation of structure in the Universe, and the ultimate fate and the earliest history of the Universe. Moreover, answering this question could lead to the discovery of new particles, as well as shedding light on the nature of the fundamental interactions. At present, only a partial answer is at hand. Most of the radiation in the Universe does not give off detectable radiation; it is dark. The dark matter associated with bright galaxies contributes somewhere between 10 and 30 percent of the critical density; baryonic matter contributes between 1.1 and 12 percent of the critical. The case for the spatially flat, Einstein-de Sitter model is supported by three compelling theoretical arguments - structure formation, the temporal Copernican principle, and inflation - and by some observational data. If Omega is indeed unity, or even just significantly greater than 0.1, then there is a strong case for a Universe comprised of nonbaryonic matter. There are three well motivated particle dark matter candidates: an axion of mass 10 (exp -6) eV to 10 (exp -4) eV; a neutrino of mass 10 GeV to about 3 TeV; or a neutrino of mass 20 eV to 90 eV. All three possibilities can be tested by experiments that are either planned or are underway.

  20. Dark matter in the Universe

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, M.S. Chicago Univ., IL . Enrico Fermi Inst.)

    1991-03-01

    What is the quantity and composition of material in the universe This is one of the most fundamental questions we can ask about the universe, and its answer bears on a number of important issues including the formation of structure in the universe, and the ultimate fate and the earliest history of the universe. Moreover, answering this question could lead to the discovery of new particles, as well as shedding light on the nature of the fundamental interactions. At present, only a partial answer is at hand: most of the material in the universe does not give off detectable radiation, i.e., is dark;'' the dark matter associated with bright galaxies contributes somewhere between 10% and 30% of the critical density (by comparison luminous matter contributes less than 1%); baryonic matter contributes between 1.1% and 12% of critical. The case for the spatially-flat, Einstein-de Sitter model is supported by three compelling theoretical arguments -- structure formation, the temporal Copernican principle, and inflation -- and by some observational data. If {Omega} is indeed unity--or even just significantly greater than 0.1--then there is a strong case for a universe comprised of nonbaryonic matter. There are three well motivated particle dark-matter candidates: an axion of mass 10{sup {minus}6} eV to 10{sup {minus}4} eV; a neutralino of mass 10 GeV to about 3 TeV; or a neutrino of mass 20 eV to 90 eV. All three possibilities can be tested by experiments that are either being planned or are underway. 71 refs., 6 figs.

  1. Axion dark matter detection using atomic transitions.

    PubMed

    Sikivie, P

    2014-11-14

    Dark matter axions may cause transitions between atomic states that differ in energy by an amount equal to the axion mass. Such energy differences are conveniently tuned using the Zeeman effect. It is proposed to search for dark matter axions by cooling a kilogram-sized sample to millikelvin temperatures and count axion induced transitions using laser techniques. This appears to be an appropriate approach to axion dark matter detection in the 10^{-4}  eV mass range.

  2. Dark matter and the equivalence principle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frieman, Joshua A.; Gradwohl, Ben-Ami

    1993-01-01

    A survey is presented of the current understanding of dark matter invoked by astrophysical theory and cosmology. Einstein's equivalence principle asserts that local measurements cannot distinguish a system at rest in a gravitational field from one that is in uniform acceleration in empty space. Recent test-methods for the equivalence principle are presently discussed as bases for testing of dark matter scenarios involving the long-range forces between either baryonic or nonbaryonic dark matter and ordinary matter.

  3. Dark matter more mysterious than expected

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jałocha, Joanna

    2015-12-01

    Based on the lecture Dark Matter --- more mysterious than expected}, given by me at the Cosmology School in Kielce on 18 July 2015, I will briefly discuss in this essay the history of dark matter and why this notion is so essential for the contemporary physics. Next, I will present the point of view of the research team I work with, on the presence of nonbaryonic dark matter in the Universe and in spiral galaxies.

  4. Holographic dark energy from minimal supergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landim, Ricardo C. G.

    2016-02-01

    We embed models of holographic dark energy (HDE) coupled to dark matter (DM) in minimal supergravity plus matter, with one chiral superfield. We analyze two cases. The first one has the Hubble radius as the infrared (IR) cutoff and the interaction between the two fluids is proportional to the energy density of the DE. The second case has the future event horizon as IR cutoff while the interaction is proportional to the energy density of both components of the dark sector.

  5. Current and future searches for dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, Daniel A.; /Fermilab

    2005-07-01

    Recent experimental data confirms that approximately one quarter of the universe consists of cold dark matter. Particle theories provide natural candidates for this dark matter in the form of either Axions or Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). A growing body of experiments is aimed at direct or indirect detection of particle dark matter. I summarize the current status of these experiments and offer projections of their future sensitivity.

  6. TASI 2008 Lectures on Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Hooper, Dan; /Fermilab /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr.

    2009-01-01

    Based on lectures given at the 2008 Theoretical Advanced Study Institute (TASI), I review here some aspects of the phenomenology of particle dark matter, including the process of thermal freeze-out in the early universe, and the direct and indirect detection of WIMPs. I also describe some of the most popular particle candidates for dark matter and summarize the current status of the quest to discover dark matter's particle identity.

  7. Dark Matter Jets at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, Yang; Rajaraman, Arvind; /UC, Irvine

    2012-03-28

    We argue that dark matter particles which have strong interactions with the Standard Model particles are not excluded by current astrophysical constraints. These dark matter particles have unique signatures at colliders; instead of missing energy, the dark matter particles produce jets. We propose a new search strategy for such strongly interacting particles by looking for a signal of two trackless jets. We show that suitable cuts can plausibly allow us to find these signals at the LHC even in early data.

  8. Dark matter as a cancer hazard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chashchina, Olga; Silagadze, Zurab

    2016-07-01

    We comment on the paper "Dark matter collisions with the human body" by K. Freese and C. Savage (2012) [1] and describe a dark matter model for which the results of the previous paper do not quite apply. Within this mirror dark matter model, potentially hazardous objects, mirror micrometeorites, can exist and may lead to diseases triggered by multiple mutations, such as cancer, though with very low probability.

  9. Axion Dark Matter Detection Using Atomic Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikivie, P.

    2014-11-01

    Dark matter axions may cause transitions between atomic states that differ in energy by an amount equal to the axion mass. Such energy differences are conveniently tuned using the Zeeman effect. It is proposed to search for dark matter axions by cooling a kilogram-sized sample to millikelvin temperatures and count axion induced transitions using laser techniques. This appears to be an appropriate approach to axion dark matter detection in the 1 0-4 eV mass range.

  10. Dark radiation and inflationary freedom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gariazzo, Stefano

    2016-05-01

    A relaxed primordial power spectrum (PPS) of scalar perturbations arising from inflation can impact the dark radiation constraints obtained from Cosmic Microwave Background and other cosmological measurements. If inflation produces a non-standard PPS for the initial fluctuations, a fully thermalized light sterile neutrino can be favoured by CMB observations, instead of being strongly disfavoured. In the case of a thermal axion, the constraints on the axion mass are relaxed when the PPS is different from the standard power law. Based on Refs. [1, 2].

  11. Dark Matter in the MSSM

    SciTech Connect

    Cotta, R.C.; Gainer, J.S.; Hewett, J.L.; Rizzo, T.G.; /SLAC

    2009-04-07

    We have recently examined a large number of points in the parameter space of the phenomenological MSSM, the 19-dimensional parameter space of the CP-conserving MSSM with Minimal Flavor Violation. We determined whether each of these points satisfied existing experimental and theoretical constraints. This analysis provides insight into general features of the MSSM without reference to a particular SUSY breaking scenario or any other assumptions at the GUT scale. This study opens up new possibilities for SUSY phenomenology both in colliders and in astrophysical experiments. Here we shall discuss the implications of this analysis relevant to the study of dark matter.

  12. BBN with light dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Berezhiani, Zurab; Dolgov, Aleksander; Tkachev, Igor E-mail: dolgov@fe.infn.it

    2013-02-01

    Effects of light millicharged dark matter particles on primordial nucleosynthesis are considered. It is shown that if the mass of such particles is much smaller than the electron mass, they lead to strong overproduction of Helium-4. An agreement with observations can be achieved by non-vanishing lepton asymmetry. Baryon-to-photon ratio at BBN and neutrino-to-photon ratio both at BBN and at recombination are noticeably different as compared to the standard cosmological model. The latter ratio and possible lepton asymmetry could be checked by Planck. For higher mass of new particles the effect is much less pronounced and may even have opposite sign.

  13. 750 GeV dark pion: Cousin of a dark G -parity odd WIMP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Yang; Berger, Joshua; Lu, Ran

    2016-04-01

    We point out a potential common origin of the recently observed 750 GeV diphoton resonance and a weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) candidate. In a dark QCD sector with an unbroken dark G parity, the diphoton resonance could be a dark G -even pion, while the WIMP could be the lightest dark G -odd pion. Both particles are Standard Model gauge singlets and have the same decay constant. For the dark pion decay constant of around 500 GeV, both the diphoton excess at the LHC and the dark matter thermal abundance can be accommodated in our model. Our model predicts additional dark G -even and dark G -odd color-octet pions within reach of the 13 TeV LHC runs. For the 5 +5 ¯ model, compatible with the grand unified theories, the WIMP mass is predicted to be within (613,750) GeV.

  14. Dark matter from decaying topological defects

    SciTech Connect

    Hindmarsh, Mark; Kirk, Russell; West, Stephen M. E-mail: russell.kirk.2008@live.rhul.ac.uk

    2014-03-01

    We study dark matter production by decaying topological defects, in particular cosmic strings. In topological defect or ''top-down'' (TD) scenarios, the dark matter injection rate varies as a power law with time with exponent p−4. We find a formula in closed form for the yield for all p < 3/2, which accurately reproduces the solution of the Boltzmann equation. We investigate two scenarios (p = 1, p = 7/6) motivated by cosmic strings which decay into TeV-scale states with a high branching fraction into dark matter particles. For dark matter models annihilating either by s-wave or p-wave, we find the regions of parameter space where the TD model can account for the dark matter relic density as measured by Planck. We find that topological defects can be the principal source of dark matter, even when the standard freeze-out calculation under-predicts the relic density and hence can lead to potentially large ''boost factor'' enhancements in the dark matter annihilation rate. We examine dark matter model-independent limits on this scenario arising from unitarity and discuss example model-dependent limits coming from indirect dark matter search experiments. In the four cases studied, the upper bound on Gμ for strings with an appreciable channel into TeV-scale states is significantly more stringent than the current Cosmic Microwave Background limits.

  15. Regenerating a symmetry in asymmetric dark matter.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Matthew R; Profumo, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    Asymmetric dark matter theories generically allow for mass terms that lead to particle-antiparticle mixing. Over the age of the Universe, dark matter can thus oscillate from a purely asymmetric configuration into a symmetric mix of particles and antiparticles, allowing for pair-annihilation processes. Additionally, requiring efficient depletion of the primordial thermal (symmetric) component generically entails large annihilation rates. We show that unless some symmetry completely forbids dark matter particle-antiparticle mixing, asymmetric dark matter is effectively ruled out for a large range of masses, for almost any oscillation time scale shorter than the age of the Universe. PMID:22304253

  16. Dipolar dark matter with massive bigravity

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchet, Luc; Heisenberg, Lavinia

    2015-12-14

    Massive gravity theories have been developed as viable IR modifications of gravity motivated by dark energy and the problem of the cosmological constant. On the other hand, modified gravity and modified dark matter theories were developed with the aim of solving the problems of standard cold dark matter at galactic scales. Here we propose to adapt the framework of ghost-free massive bigravity theories to reformulate the problem of dark matter at galactic scales. We investigate a promising alternative to dark matter called dipolar dark matter (DDM) in which two different species of dark matter are separately coupled to the two metrics of bigravity and are linked together by an internal vector field. We show that this model successfully reproduces the phenomenology of dark matter at galactic scales (i.e. MOND) as a result of a mechanism of gravitational polarisation. The model is safe in the gravitational sector, but because of the particular couplings of the matter fields and vector field to the metrics, a ghost in the decoupling limit is present in the dark matter sector. However, it might be possible to push the mass of the ghost beyond the strong coupling scale by an appropriate choice of the parameters of the model. Crucial questions to address in future work are the exact mass of the ghost, and the cosmological implications of the model.

  17. How clustering dark energy affects matter perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrabi, A.; Basilakos, S.; Pace, F.

    2015-09-01

    The rate of structure formation in the Universe is different in homogeneous and clustered dark energy models. The degree of dark energy clustering depends on the magnitude of its effective sound speed c2_eff and for c2_eff=0 dark energy clusters in a similar fashion to dark matter while for c2_eff=1 it stays (approximately) homogeneous. In this paper we consider two distinct equations of state for the dark energy component, wd = const and w_d=w_0+w_1(z/1+z) with c2_eff as a free parameter and we try to constrain the dark energy effective sound speed using current available data including Type Ia supernovae, baryon acoustic oscillation, cosmic microwave background shift parameter (Planck and WMAP), Hubble parameter, big bang nucleosynthesis and the growth rate of structures fσ8(z). At first we derive the most general form of the equations governing dark matter and dark energy clustering under the assumption that c2_eff=const. Finally, performing an overall likelihood analysis we find that the likelihood function peaks at c2_eff=0; however, the dark energy sound speed is degenerate with respect to the cosmological parameters, namely Ωm and wd.

  18. Regenerating a symmetry in asymmetric dark matter.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Matthew R; Profumo, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    Asymmetric dark matter theories generically allow for mass terms that lead to particle-antiparticle mixing. Over the age of the Universe, dark matter can thus oscillate from a purely asymmetric configuration into a symmetric mix of particles and antiparticles, allowing for pair-annihilation processes. Additionally, requiring efficient depletion of the primordial thermal (symmetric) component generically entails large annihilation rates. We show that unless some symmetry completely forbids dark matter particle-antiparticle mixing, asymmetric dark matter is effectively ruled out for a large range of masses, for almost any oscillation time scale shorter than the age of the Universe.

  19. Halos of unified dark matter scalar field

    SciTech Connect

    Bertacca, Daniele; Bartolo, Nicola; Matarrese, Sabino E-mail: nicola.bartolo@pd.infn.it

    2008-05-15

    We investigate the static and spherically symmetric solutions of Einstein's equations for a scalar field with a non-canonical kinetic term, assumed to provide both the dark matter and dark energy components of the Universe. In particular, we give a prescription to obtain solutions (dark halos) whose rotation curve v{sub c}(r) is in good agreement with observational data. We show that there exist suitable scalar field Lagrangians that allow us to describe the cosmological background evolution and the static solutions with a single dark fluid.

  20. Cosmological constraints on superconducting dark energy models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keresztes, Zoltán; Gergely, László Á.; Harko, Tiberiu; Liang, Shi-Dong

    2015-12-01

    We consider cosmological tests of a scalar-vector-tensor gravitational model, in which the dark energy is included in the total action through a gauge-invariant, electromagnetic type contribution. The ground state of dark energy, corresponding to a constant potential V , is a Bose-Einstein type condensate with spontaneously broken U(1) symmetry. In other words, dark energy appears as a massive vector field emerging from a superposition of a massless vector and a scalar field, the latter corresponding to the Goldstone boson. Two particular cosmological models, corresponding to pure electric and pure magnetic type potentials, respectively, are confronted with type IA supernovae and Hubble parameter data. In the electric case, a good fit is obtained along a narrow inclined stripe in the Ωm-ΩV parameter plane, which includes the Λ cold dark matter limit as the best fit. The other points on this admissible region represent superconducting dark energy as a sum of a cosmological constant and a time-evolving contribution. In the magnetic case the cosmological test selects either (i) parameter ranges of the superconducting dark energy allowing for the standard baryonic sector plus dark matter or (ii) a unified superconducting dark matter and dark energy model, additionally including only the baryonic sector.