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Sample records for dau farmaceitiski aktvo

  1. Development and in-house validation of allergen-specific ELISA tests for the quantification of Dau c 1.01, Dau c 1.02 and Dau c 4 in carrot extracts (Daucus carota).

    PubMed

    Foetisch, Kay; Dahl, Lotte; Jansen, Baerbel; Becker, Wolf-Meinhard; Lidholm, Jonas; van Ree, Ronald; Broll, Hermann; Kaul, Susanne; Vieths, Stefan; Holzhauser, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Even though carrot allergy is common in Europe, the amount of different allergens in carrots is still unknown due to a lack of methods for quantitative allergen measurements. The current study aimed at the development of quantitative ELISA tests for the known carrot allergens, namely Dau c 1.01, Dau c 1.02, and Dau c 4 in pure carrot extracts. Monoclonal antibodies targeting the major carrot allergen isoforms Dau c 1.01 and Dau c 1.02 were generated and combined in sandwich ELISA with rabbit antisera against Api g 1, the celery homologue of Dau c 1. A competitive ELISA for the carrot profilin Dau c 4 was based on a polyclonal rabbit antiserum. The three ELISA tests were allergen-specific and displayed detection limits between 0.4 and 6 ng allergen/ml of carrot extract. The mean coefficient of variation (CV) as a means of intraassay variability of the Dau c 1.01, Dau c 1.02 and Dau c 4 ELISA tests was 8.1%, 6.9%, and 11.9%, and the mean interassay CV 13.3%, 37.1% and 15.6%, respectively. Target recovery ranged between 93 and 113%. In conclusion, the specific, accurate and reproducible quantification of three important carrot allergens may help to identify less allergenic carrot varieties, as well as to standardize the amount of allergens in extracts used for carrot allergy diagnosis.

  2. 75 FR 8310 - Defense Acquisition University (DAU) Board of Visitors (BoV) Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-24

    ... of the Secretary Defense Acquisition University (DAU) Board of Visitors (BoV) Meeting AGENCY: Defense Acquisition University, DoD. ACTION: Meeting notice. SUMMARY: The next meeting of the Defense Acquisition University (DAU) Board of Visitors (BoV) will be held at DAU Headquarters at Fort Belvoir, Virginia. The...

  3. Nuclear Shadowing and Select d+Au Observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adeluyi, Adeola; Fai, George

    2007-04-01

    Much of the complexity of the description of d+Au collisions in the framework of perturbative Quantum Chromodynamics (pQCD) derives from effects of the nuclear environment. Here we investigate the effects of the most recent available nuclear shadowing parametrization, the Hirai-Kumano-Nagai (HKN) nuclear parton distribution functions (nPDFs) and the updated Albino-Kniehl-Kramer (AKK) fragmentation functions on three select d+Au collision observables. We compare our results to available experimental data from the STAR and BRAHMS collaborations.

  4. Buflomedil interference with the monoclonal EMIT d.a.u. amphetamine/methamphetamine immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Papa, P; Rocchi, L; Mainardi, C; Donzelli, G

    1997-05-01

    The interference of buflomedil with the monoclonal and polyclonal EMIT d.a.u. amphetamine immunoassays was investigated. Urine samples collected from 20 patients taking 600 mg of buflomedil daily gave false positive results with the monoclonal EMIT d.a.u. assay, as did urine specimens collected 2 hours after the first oral dose of buflomedil. Conversely, no false positive results occurred with the polyclonal EMIT d.a.u. amphetamine assay. Urine samples with buflomedil added at concentrations greater than 100 mg/l gave false positive results with the monoclonal immunoassay. Buflomedil concentrations found in the patient urines (56-400 mg/l) failed to correlate to EMIT assay responses: this result suggests that one or more buflomedil metabolites, besides the unchanged drug, probably interfere in the monoclonal EMIT d.a.u. assay.

  5. DAU Mission Assistance: A Less Familiar Tool In the Acquisition Tool Kit

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    for DAU Mid-Atlantic. oday’s acquisition environment is complex. Aside from the many technical challenges associated with developing new capabilities...to specialized mission as- sistance. What Types of Mission Assistance Does DAU Offer? Specific Mission Assistance varies and can take on many ...Acquisition Programs (MDAPs) and Major Au- tomated Information Systems (MAISs) face many challenges throughout their life cycle. Having an experienced

  6. The Value of Training: Analysis of DAU’s Requirements Management Training Results

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-01

    Requirements Management , including a 1-week advanced classroom course. While teaching this course, the DAU faculty routinely conducts pre-testing and...154–173 1-week Advanced Concepts and Skills for Requirements Management (RQM 310) classroom capstone course to the curriculum. Table 1 shows the...short deadline to train and certify requirements managers through a com- bination of online and classroom courses. The success of the initial DAU

  7. In vivo and in vitro bioconversion of epsilon-rhodomycinone glycoside to doxorubicin: functions of DauP, DauK, and DoxA.

    PubMed Central

    Dickens, M L; Priestley, N D; Strohl, W R

    1997-01-01

    We recently determined the function of the gene product of Streptomyces sp. strain C5 doxA, a cytochrome P-450-like protein, to be daunorubicin C-14 hydroxylase (M. L. Dickens and W. R. Strohl, J. Bacteriol. 178: 3389-3395, 1996). In the present study, we show that DoxA also catalyzes the hydroxylation of 13-deoxycarminomycin and 13-deoxydaunorubicin to 13-dihydrocarminomycin and 13-dihydrodaunorubicin, respectively, as well as oxidizing the 13-dihydro-anthracyclines to their respective 13-keto forms. The Streptomyces sp. strain C5 dauP gene product also was shown unequivocally to remove the carbomethoxy group of the epsilon-rhodomycinone-glycoside (rhodomycin D) to form 10-carboxy-13-deoxycarminomycin. Additionally, Streptomyces sp. strain C5 DauK was found to methylate the anthracyclines rhodomycin D, 10-carboxy-13-deoxycarminomycin, and 13-deoxy-carminomycin, at the 4-hydroxyl position, indicating a broader substrate specificity than was previously known. The products of Streptomyces sp. strain C5 doxA, dauK, and dauP were sufficient and necessary to confer on Streptomyces lividans TK24 the ability to convert rhodomycin D, the first glycoside in daunorubicin and doxorubicin biosynthesis, to doxorubicin. PMID:9098063

  8. Extraction of Emission Source Images in d+Au and

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Paul

    2004-10-01

    Relativistic heavy ion collisions at RHIC, produce a fireball of nuclear matter with extremely high energy density. The dynamical evolution of this fireball is driven by such fundamental properties as the nuclear Equation of State (EOS) and possibly by a phase transition, e.g., to a Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP). Two-particle correlation studies, for various particle species,provide an important probe of the space-time extent of this fireball. In recent measurements the PHENIX collaboration has used a model-independent imaging technique proposed by Brown and Danielewicz(D.Brown and P.Danieliwicz, Phys.Rev.C 64, 014902 (2001))to extract two-particle source functions directly from Au+Au and d+Au collisions at √sNN=200 GeV. Source images obtained from these two systems for various particle species for several centality and kt selections will be presented and compared/contrasted. The implications of these results for the decay dynamics of the fireball created at RHIC will also be dicussed.

  9. Acquisition Community Team Dynamics: The Tuckman Model vs. the DAU Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-30

    DAU Model ( FNP —Tuckman model sans Storming), was experienced by 229 of the 321 teams (77%). This discrete three-stage model, along with a redefined...DAU teams, an SAF<N<P algorithm was developed that calculates FNP scores in order to assess the degree to which a statistically valid F<N<P model...separate the two. Tuckman Model - FSNP Test Teams Individuals Raw Time-of-Occurrence 1% 3% Sequence Analysis 2% 6% Tuckman Variant - FNP Test

  10. 77 FR 20615 - DAU Industry Day: “Affordability, Efficiency, and the Industrial Base”

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-05

    ... of the Secretary DAU Industry Day: ``Affordability, Efficiency, and the Industrial Base'' AGENCY..., efficiency, and the industrial base. After a variety of presenters, the session will conclude with Mr. Frank... maintaining a healthy industrial base. Following the plenary session, each company will have the opportunity...

  11. DAU Consulting Might Be the Right Enabler To Improve Your Acquisition Outcomes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    on a source selection, or were facing several foreboding programmatic risks, or were challenged by recent Karon Curry n Rob Tremaine Tom...as well: Dr. James McMichael, acting President, De- fense Acquisition Uni- versity: “Our mission at DAU is to develop qualified acquisition

  12. Characterization of the T-cell response to Dau c 1, the Bet v 1-homolog in carrot.

    PubMed

    Zulehner, N; Nagl, B; Briza, P; Roulias, A; Ballmer-Weber, B; Zlabinger, G J; Ferreira, F; Bohle, B

    2017-02-01

    In contrast to other Bet v 1-related food allergens, the major carrot allergen, Dau c 1, has been suggested to induce food allergy independently from Bet v 1. As T cells are crucial in the sensitization process, we sought to characterize the T-cell response to Dau c 1 and its cross-reactivity with Bet v 1. Dau c 1-specific T-cell lines (TCL) and clones (TCC) established from PBMC of birch pollen-allergic patients with carrot allergy were analyzed for reactivity to Bet v 1, epitope specificity, allergen-induced cytokine secretion, and expression of integrins α4β7 and α4β1, critical for gut and lung homing, respectively. mRNA expression of GATA3 and Tbet was analyzed in sorted CD3(+) CD4(+) CFSE(low) cells proliferating upon stimulation of PBMC with Dau c 1 or Bet v 1. Dau c 1 was incubated with endolysosomal proteases, and the resulting fragments were identified by mass spectrometry. Among 14 distinct T-cell-activating regions, Dau c 1139-153 was recognized by 55% of the patients. Only 6 of 15 (40%) Dau c 1-specific TCL and 9 of 21 (43%) TCC reacted with Bet v 1. Bet v 1-nonreactive TCC were mainly Th1-like and showed a higher expression of the integrin β7 and a significantly lower expression of the integrin β1 than Bet v 1-positive TCC. A Th1-like response was also detected in Dau c 1-reactive CD3(+) CD4(+) CFSE(low) cells. Full-length Dau c 1 was still detectable after 48 h of endolysosomal degradation. Proteolytic fragments of Dau c 1 matched its T-cell-activating regions. Dau c 1 displays several characteristics of sensitizing allergens, namely a major T-cell-activating region, low susceptibility to endolysosomal degradation, and induction of a Bet v 1-independent T-cell response. These cellular insights confirm that the major carrot allergen has a special status among Bet v 1-related food allergens. © 2016 The Authors. Allergy Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Ranitidine interference with the monoclonal EMIT d.a.u. amphetamine/methamphetamine immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Poklis, A; Hall, K V; Still, J; Binder, S R

    1991-01-01

    The interference of ranitidine with the monoclonal EMIT d.a.u. amphetamine/methamphetamine immunoassay (ME) was investigated. Urine specimens collected from 23 patients receiving 150-300 mg of ranitidine daily were found to contain 7-271 mg/L of the drug when analyzed by Remedi automated high pressure liquid chromatography. Only patient specimens and urine samples with ranitidine added at concentrations greater than 91 mg/L gave false positive ME results. Of the 63 patient urine samples analyzed by ME, 12 gave false positive results. All false positive results occurred in the first or second void after ingestion. No false positive results occurred with the polyclonal EMIT d.a.u. amphetamine or TDx amphetamine/methamphetamine II assays.

  14. Direct photon production in d+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adare, A.; Adler, S. S.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Al-Jamel, A.; Alexander, J.; Angerami, A.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Aphecetche, L.; Aramaki, Y.; Armendariz, R.; Aronson, S. H.; Asai, J.; Atomssa, E. T.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Baldisseri, A.; Barish, K. N.; Barnes, P. D.; Bassalleck, B.; Basye, A. T.; Bathe, S.; Batsouli, S.; Baublis, V.; Bauer, F.; Baumann, C.; Bazilevsky, A.; Belikov, S.; Belmont, R.; Bennett, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Bhom, J. H.; Bickley, A. A.; Bjorndal, M. T.; Blau, D. S.; Boissevain, J. G.; Bok, J. S.; Borel, H.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Brown, D. S.; Bruner, N.; Bucher, D.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Burward-Hoy, J. M.; Butsyk, S.; Camacho, C. M.; Camard, X.; Campbell, S.; Caringi, A.; Chand, P.; Chang, B. S.; Chang, W. C.; Charvet, J.-L.; Chen, C.-H.; Chernichenko, S.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiba, J.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, P.; Churyn, A.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cobigo, Y.; Cole, B. A.; Comets, M. P.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M.; Constantin, P.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Cussonneau, J. P.; Dahms, T.; Dairaku, S.; Danchev, I.; Das, K.; Datta, A.; David, G.; Dayananda, M. K.; Deák, F.; Delagrange, H.; Denisov, A.; d'Enterria, D.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Devismes, A.; Dharmawardane, K. V.; Dietzsch, O.; Dion, A.; Donadelli, M.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Dubey, A. K.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Dutta, D.; Dzhordzhadze, V.; D'Orazio, L.; Edwards, S.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Ellinghaus, F.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Espagnon, B.; Esumi, S.; Eyser, K. O.; Fadem, B.; Fields, D. E.; Finck, C.; Finger, M.; Finger, M., Jr.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Fox, B. D.; Fraenkel, Z.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fujiwara, K.; Fukao, Y.; Fung, S.-Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Gadrat, S.; Garishvili, I.; Germain, M.; Glenn, A.; Gong, H.; Gonin, M.; Gosset, J.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grim, G.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gunji, T.; Gustafsson, H.-Å.; Hachiya, T.; Hadj Henni, A.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamblen, J.; Han, R.; Hanks, J.; Hansen, A. G.; Hartouni, E. P.; Haruna, K.; Harvey, M.; Haslum, E.; Hasuko, K.; Hayano, R.; He, X.; Heffner, M.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Heuser, J. M.; Hidas, P.; Hiejima, H.; Hill, J. C.; Hobbs, R.; Hohlmann, M.; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Hoover, A.; Horaguchi, T.; Hornback, D.; Huang, S.; Ichihara, T.; Ichimiya, R.; Iinuma, H.; Ikeda, Y.; Ikonnikov, V. V.; Imai, K.; Imrek, J.; Inaba, M.; Inuzuka, M.; Isenhower, D.; Isenhower, L.; Ishihara, M.; Isobe, T.; Issah, M.; Isupov, A.; Ivanischev, D.; Iwanaga, Y.; Jacak, B. V.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; Jin, J.; Jinnouchi, O.; Johnson, B. M.; Johnson, S. C.; Jones, T.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kajihara, F.; Kametani, S.; Kamihara, N.; Kamin, J.; Kaneta, M.; Kang, J. H.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kasai, M.; Katou, K.; Kawabata, T.; Kawall, D.; Kawashima, M.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kelly, S.; Kempel, T.; Khachaturov, B.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kijima, K. M.; Kikuchi, J.; Kim, A.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E.; Kim, E.-J.; Kim, E. J.; Kim, G.-B.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y.-J.; Kinney, E.; Kiriluk, K.; Kiss, Á.; Kistenev, E.; Kiyomichi, A.; Klay, J.; Klein-Boesing, C.; Kleinjan, D.; Kobayashi, H.; Kochenda, L.; Kochetkov, V.; Kohara, R.; Komkov, B.; Konno, M.; Koster, J.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kozlov, A.; Král, A.; Kravitz, A.; Kroon, P. J.; Kuberg, C. H.; Kunde, G. J.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Layton, D.; Lebedev, A.; Le Bornec, Y.; Leckey, S.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, J.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, T.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Lenzi, B.; Li, X.; Li, X. H.; Lichtenwalner, P.; Liebing, P.; Lim, H.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Liška, T.; Litvinenko, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, M. X.; Love, B.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Malakhov, A.; Malik, M. D.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Mao, Y.; Martinez, G.; Mašek, L.; Masui, H.; Matathias, F.; Matsumoto, T.; McCain, M. C.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; McGlinchey, D.; Means, N.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mibe, T.; Mignerey, A. C.; Mikeš, P.; Miki, K.; Miller, T. E.; Milov, A.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mishra, G. C.; Mishra, M.; Mitchell, J. T.; Mohanty, A. K.; Moon, H. J.; Morino, Y.; Morreale, A.; Morrison, D. P.; Moss, J. M.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Mukhopadhyay, D.; Muniruzzaman, M.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagle, J. L.; Naglis, M.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, K. R.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Nam, S.; Newby, J.; Nguyen, M.; Nihashi, M.; Niida, T.; Nouicer, R.; Nyanin, A. S.; Nystrand, J.; Oakley, C.; O'Brien, E.; Oda, S. X.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Ohnishi, H.; Ojha, I. D.; Oka, M.; Okada, K.; Onuki, Y.; Oskarsson, A.; Otterlund, I.; Ouchida, M.; Oyama, K.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pal, D.; Palounek, A. P. T.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, I. H.; Park, J.; Park, S. K.; Park, W. J.; Pate, S. F.; Pei, H.; Penev, V.; Peng, J.-C.; Pereira, H.; Peresedov, V.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Petti, R.; Pierson, A.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pisani, R. P.; Proissl, M.; Purschke, M. L.; Purwar, A. K.; Qu, H.; Qualls, J. M.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Rembeczki, S.; Reuter, M.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Roach, D.; Roche, G.; Rolnick, S. D.; Romana, A.; Rosati, M.; Rosen, C. A.; Rosendahl, S. S. E.; Rosnet, P.; Rukoyatkin, P.; Ružička, P.; Rykov, V. L.; Ryu, S. S.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sakai, S.; Sakashita, K.; Samsonov, V.; Sanfratello, L.; Sano, S.; Santo, R.; Sato, H. D.; Sato, S.; Sato, T.; Sawada, S.; Schutz, Y.; Sedgwick, K.; Seele, J.; Seidl, R.; Semenov, A. Yu.; Semenov, V.; Seto, R.; Sharma, D.; Shea, T. K.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Sim, K. S.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Slunečka, M.; Soldatov, A.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Staley, F.; Stankus, P. W.; Stenlund, E.; Stepanov, M.; Ster, A.; Stoll, S. P.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Sukhanov, A.; Sullivan, J. P.; Sziklai, J.; Takagi, S.; Takagui, E. M.; Taketani, A.; Tanabe, R.; Tanaka, K. H.; Tanaka, Y.; Taneja, S.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Tarján, P.; Themann, H.; Thomas, D.; Thomas, T. L.; Togawa, M.; Toia, A.; Tojo, J.; Tomášek, L.; Tomita, Y.; Torii, H.; Towell, R. S.; Tram, V.-N.; Tserruya, I.; Tsuchimoto, Y.; Tydesjö, H.; Tyurin, N.; Uam, T. J.; Vale, C.; Valle, H.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vazquez-Zambrano, E.; Veicht, A.; Velkovska, J.; Velkovsky, M.; Vértesi, R.; Veszprémi, V.; Vinogradov, A. A.; Virius, M.; Volkov, M. A.; Vrba, V.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Wei, F.; Wei, R.; Wessels, J.; White, S. N.; Willis, N.; Winter, D.; Wohn, F. K.; Woody, C. L.; Wright, R. M.; Wysocki, M.; Xie, W.; Yamaguchi, Y. L.; Yamaura, K.; Yang, R.; Yanovich, A.; Ying, J.; Yokkaichi, S.; You, Z.; Young, G. R.; Younus, I.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zaudtke, O.; Zhang, C.; Zhou, S.; Zimányi, J.; Zolin, L.; Zong, X.

    2013-05-01

    Direct photons have been measured in sNN=200 GeV d+Au collisions at midrapidity. A wide pT range is covered by measurements of nearly real virtual photons (1d+Au collisions over the scaled p+p cross section is consistent with unity. Theoretical calculations assuming standard cold-nuclear-matter effects describe the data well for the entire pT range. This indicates that the large enhancement of direct photons observed in Au+Au collisions for 1.0

  15. High-p(T) Tomography of d+Au and Au+Au at SPS, RHIC, and LHC.

    PubMed

    Vitev, Ivan; Gyulassy, Miklos

    2002-12-16

    The interplay of nuclear effects on the p(T)>2 GeV inclusive hadron spectra in d+Au and Au+Au reactions at sqrt[s(NN)]=17, 200, and 5500 GeV is compared to leading order perturbative QCD calculations for elementary p+p (p+p) collisions. The competition between nuclear shadowing, Cronin effect, and jet energy loss due to medium-induced gluon radiation is predicted to lead to a striking energy dependence of the nuclear suppression/enhancement pattern in A+A reactions. We show that future d+Au data can be used to disentangle the initial and final state effects.

  16. Defense AT&L Magazine A Publication of the Defense Acquisition University. Volume 33, Number 5, DAU 181

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-10-01

    Photographer’s Mate 2nd Class Richard J. Brunson Students at Fleet Training Center (FTC) work as a team to extinguish a Class Bravo fire while instructors...My point of contact is Dr. Russell A. Vacante at (703) 805-4864 or via e-mail at russ.vacante @dau.mil. Michael W. Wynne Acting Attachments As

  17. Open Charm Yields in d+Au Collisions at sqrt(sNN) = 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, J.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, B.D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Badyal, S.K.; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bezverkhny, B.I.; Bharadwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A.K.; Bhatia, V.S.; Bichsel, H.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, C.O.; Bonner, B.E.; Botje, M.; Boucham, A.; Brandin, A.; Bravar, A.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, R.V.; Cai, X.Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la Barca Sanchez, M.; Castillo, J.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford, H.J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; De Moura, M.M.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Dogra, S.M.; Dong, W.J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J.E.; Du, F.; Dubey, A.K.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Dutta Mazumda, M.R.; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, W.R.; Efimov, L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fomenko, K.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Gaillard, L.; Gans, J.; Ganti, M.S.; Gaudichet, L.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J.F.; Grachov, O.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S.M.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gutierrez, T.D.; Hallman, T.J.; Hamed, A.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, J.W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T.W.; Heppelmann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Huang, H.Z.; Huang, S.L.; Hughes, E.W.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Ivanshin, Yu.I.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Janik, M.; Jiang, H.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Khodyrev, V.Yu.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, E.M.; Klay, J.; Klein, S.R.; Koetke, D.D.; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, S.M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V.I.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A.I.; Kumar, A.; et al.

    2005-01-07

    Mid-rapidity open charm spectra from direct reconstruction of D{sup 0}({bar D}{sup 0}) {yields} K{sup {-+}} {pi}{sup {+-}} in d+Au collisions and indirect electron/positron measurements via charm semileptonic decays in p+p and d+Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV are reported. The D{sup 0}({bar D}{sup 0}) spectrum covers a transverse momentum (p{sub T}) range of 0.1 < p{sub T} < 3 GeV/c whereas the electron spectra cover a range of 1 < p{sub T} < 4 GeV/c. The electron spectra show approximate binary collision scaling between p+p and d+Au collisions. From these two independent analyses, the differential cross section per nucleon-nucleon binary interaction at mid-rapidity for open charm production from d+Au collisions at RHIC is d{sigma}{sub c{bar c}}{sup NN}/dy = 0.30 {+-} 0.04 (stat.) {+-} 0.09(syst.) mb. The results are compared to theoretical calculations. Implications for charmonium results in A+A collisions are discussed.

  18. Forward Di-Hadron Correlations in d+Au Collisions in PHENIX

    SciTech Connect

    Eyser, K. Oleg

    2011-07-15

    Suppression in nuclear modification factors have been observed in past measurements at RHIC at {radical}(s{sub NN}) = 200 GeV in deuteron-gold collisions. Gluon saturation has been proposed as one among many explanations for this effect. Due to the gluon densities at low Bjoerken-x in the Lorentz-contracted gold nuclei, saturation effects are expected to be enhanced in the forward direction of the deuteron. Two new electromagnetic calorimeters have been incorporated into the PHENIX experiment covering pseudo-rapidities of 3.1<{eta}<3.7(3.9). We have used these calorimeters to study forward di-hadron correlations, probing parton momentum fractions down to x{sub Bj}{approx_equal}10{sup -3} in the gold nuclei. This analysis is based on the 2008 d+Au data with an integrated luminosity of 80 nb{sup -1}.

  19. Effects of DAU 6215, a novel 5-hydroxytryptamine3 (5-HT3) antagonist on electrophysiological properties of the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed Central

    Passani, M. B.; Pugliese, A. M.; Azzurrini, M.; Corradetti, R.

    1994-01-01

    1. The aim of the present study was to test the effects of DAU 6215 (endo-N-(8-methyl-8-azabicyclo-[3.2.1]-octo-3-yl)-2,3-dihydro-2-ox o-1H- benzimidazole-1-carboxamide carboxamide hydrochloride), a newly synthesized, selective 5-hydroxytryptamine3 (5-HT3) antagonist, on the cell membrane properties and on characterized 5-HT-mediated responses of pyramidal neurones in the hippocampal CA1 region. 2. Administration of DAU 6215, even at concentrations several hundred fold its Ki, did not affect the cell membrane properties of pyramidal neurones, nor modify extracellularly recorded synaptic potentials, evoked by stimulating the Schaffer's collaterals. 3. Micromolar concentrations (15-30 microM) of 5-HT elicited several responses in pyramidal neurones that are mediated by distinct 5-HT receptor subtypes. DAU 6215 did not antagonize the 5-HT1A-induced membrane hyperpolarization and conductance increase, a response that was blocked by the selective 5-HT1A antagonist NAN-190 (1-(2-methoxyphenyl)-4-[4-(2-phtalamido)butyl- piperazine). Similarly, DAU 6215 did not affect the membrane depolarization and decrease in amplitude of the afterhyperpolarization, elicited by the activation of putative 5-HT4 receptors. 4. 5-HT increased the frequency of spontaneous postsynaptic potentials (s.p.s.ps) recorded in pyramidal neurones loaded with chloride. In agreement with previous observations, most of the s.p.s.ps were reversed GABAergic events, produced by the activation of 5-HT3 receptors on interneurones, because they persisted in the presence of the glutamate NMDA and non NMDA antagonists, D-aminophosphonovaleric acid (APV; 50 microM) and 6,7-dinitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (DNQX; 25 microM), and were elicited by the selective 5-HT3 agonist, 2-methyl-5-HT (2-Me-5-HT, 50 microM).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8075890

  20. Take a Deep Dive With DAU: The Kind We Offer Is Safe and Sure to Keep You Dry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-01-01

    performance or the depth at which nitrogen narcosis begins to set in. Spring, a graduate of West Point and former NASA astronaut, currently works at the...Defense Acquisition University West Region in San Diego, California, as a professor of Engineering, Test and Evaluation, as well as chief learning...officer and an executive coach. Haydu-Jackson is a former contractor supporting DAU West Region. She completed her coursework toward a master’s degree

  1. Heavy-flavour production in high-energy d-Au and p-Pb collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beraudo, Andrea; De Pace, Arturo; Monteno, Marco; Nardi, Marzia; Prino, Francesco

    2016-03-01

    Soft-hadron measurements in high-energy collisions of small systems like p-Pb and d-Au show peculiar qualitative features (long-range rapidity correlations, flattening of the p T -spectra with increasing hadron mass and centrality, non-vanishing Fourier harmonics in the azimuthal particle distributions) suggestive of the formation of a strongly-interacting medium displaying a collective behaviour, with a hydrodynamic flow as a response to the pressure gradients in the initial conditions. Hard observables (high- p T jet and hadron spectra) on the other hand, within the current large systematic uncertainties, appear only midly modified with the respect to the benchmark case of minimum-bias p-p collisions. What should one expect for heavy-flavour particles, initially produced in hard processes but tending, in the nucleus-nucleus case, to approach kinetic equilibrium with the rest of the medium? This is the issue we address in the present study, showing how the current experimental findings are compatible with a picture in which the formation of a hot medium even in proton-nucleus collisions modifies the propagation and hadronization of heavy-flavour particles.

  2. Forward Di-Hadron Correlations and RdA in d+Au Collisions at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Ihnjea

    2011-10-01

    Measurements using the PHENIX forward detectors in high energy deuteron-gold collisions make it possible to study cold nuclear matter effects in nucleon structure. The high parton densities in nuclei at low-x lead to gluon fusion causing saturation of the gluon distribution and thus suppression of hadron production cross section. This saturation has been described as the formation of the Color Glass Condensate (CGC). A conclusive measurement discriminating between different mechanisms has yet to be carried out. CGC calculations predict significant suppression of conditional yields for rapidity separated hadron pairs with one of the hadrons at forward rapidity. Two new forward electromagnetic calorimeters (Muon Piston Calorimeters, - 3 . 1 < η < - 3 . 7 , 3 . 1 < η < 3 . 9) allow the PHENIX experiment to further study forward di-hadron correlations and RdA which have been predicted to show dramatic effects due to gluon saturation. Azimuthal correlations of di- hadron pairs at different pseudorapidities and RdA of π0 and η will be shown. The forward pseudorapidity correlations are especially interesting because it is expected that they provide a test of gluon saturation down to x 10-3 in the Au nucleus. The analysis presented is based on the high integrated luminosity data sample of d+Au collisions at √{sNN} = 200 GeV taken at RHIC in 2008.

  3. IDENTIFIED PARTICLE TRANSVERSE MOMENTUM SPECTRA IN P+P AND D+AU COLLISIONS AT SNN=200 GEV.

    SciTech Connect

    NETRAKANTI, P.K.

    2005-10-24

    The transverse momentum (pT) spectra for identified charged pions, protons and anti-protons from p+p and d+Au collisions are measured around midrapidity (|y| < 0.5) over the range of 0.3 < p{sub T} < 10 GeV/c at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV. The charged pion and proton+anti-proton spectra at high p{sub T} in p+p collisions have been compared with the next-to-leading order perturbative quantum chromodynamic (NLO pQCD) calculations with a specific fragmentation scheme. The p/{pi}{sup +} and {bar p}/{pi}{sup -} has been studied at high p{sub T}. The nuclear modification factor (R{sub dAu}) shows that the identified particle Cronin effects around midrapidity are significantly non-zero for charged pions and to be even larger for protons at intermediate p{sub T} (2 < p{sub T} < 5 GeV/c).

  4. Investigation into some aspects of EMIT d.a.u., TLC, and GC-MS urinalysis of bromazepam.

    PubMed

    El-Haj, B M; Al-Amri, A M; Hassan, M H; Bin-Khadem, R K

    2001-01-01

    Among the different 1,4-benzodiazepine urinary metabolites, those of bromazepam possess distinctive chemical features that may be used in their selective isolation and detection. The detection of bromazepam metabolites in urine was carried out using EMIT d.a.u., thin-layer chromatography (TLC), and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The positive EMIT d.a.u. benzodiazepine assay for bromazepam was found to be due to the 3-hydroxybromazepam (3HOB) metabolite. The detection by TLC and GC-MS was carried out after enzyme or acid hydrolysis of the glucuronide conjugates. Both the 2-amino-3-hydroxy5-bromobenzoylpyridine (AHBBP) metabolite and the acid hydrolysis product of 3-HOB, 2-amino-5-bromobenzoylpyridine (ABBP), were selectively detected by TLC. The bromazepam metabolites in urine could be both isolated and detected selectively by GC-MS in the presence of the metabolites of other 1,4-benzodiazepines that were sometimes used in combination with bromazepam. Both 3-HOB and AHBBP were detected by GC-MS only after trimethylsilyl (TMS) derivatization and not as the free compounds or the acetyl derivatives. Only ABBP was detected in three forms: ABBP, the TMS derivative, and the acetyl derivative. Evidence has been obtained from the enzyme hydrolysis and the TLC studies for the formation of the glucuronide conjugate of AHBBP at the 3-OH group rather than at the 2-NH2 group. All the results have been validated using reference 3-HOB and AHBBP.

  5. Azimuthal angle correlations for rapidity separated Hadron pairs in d+Au collisions at square root of sNN=200 GeV.

    PubMed

    Adler, S S; Afanasiev, S; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Al-Jamel, A; Alexander, J; Aoki, K; Aphecetche, L; Armendariz, R; Aronson, S H; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Babintsev, V; Baldisseri, A; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Bassalleck, B; Bathe, S; Batsouli, S; Baublis, V; Bauer, F; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Bjorndal, M T; Boissevain, J G; Borel, H; Brooks, M L; Brown, D S; Bruner, N; Bucher, D; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Burward-Hoy, J M; Butsyk, S; Camard, X; Chand, P; Chang, W C; Chernichenko, S; Chi, C Y; Chiba, J; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choudhury, R K; Chujo, T; Cianciolo, V; Cobigo, Y; Cole, B A; Comets, M P; Constantin, P; Csanád, M; Csörgo, T; Cussonneau, J P; d'Enterria, D; Das, K; David, G; Deák, F; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Devismes, A; Dietzsch, O; Drachenberg, J L; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Dzhordzhadze, V; Efremenko, Y V; En'yo, H; Espagnon, B; Esumi, S; Fields, D E; Finck, C; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fox, B D; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fukao, Y; Fung, S-Y; Gadrat, S; Germain, M; Glenn, A; Gonin, M; Gosset, J; Goto, Y; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Perdekamp, M Grosse; Gustafsson, H-A; Hachiya, T; Haggerty, J S; Hamagaki, H; Hansen, A G; Hartouni, E P; Harvey, M; Hasuko, K; Hayano, R; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Heuser, J M; Hidas, P; Hiejima, H; Hill, J C; Hobbs, R; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Hoover, A; Horaguchi, T; Ichihara, T; Ikonnikov, V V; Imai, K; Inaba, M; Inuzuka, M; Isenhower, D; Isenhower, L; Ishihara, M; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Jacak, B V; Jia, J; Jinnouchi, O; Johnson, B M; Johnson, S C; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Kajihara, F; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kaneta, M; Kang, J H; Katou, K; Kawabata, T; Kazantsev, A V; Kelly, S; Khachaturov, B; Khanzadeev, A; Kikuchi, J; Kim, D J; Kim, E; Kim, G-B; Kim, H J; Kinney, E; Kiss, A; Kistenev, E; Kiyomichi, A; Klein-Boesing, C; Kobayashi, H; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Kohara, R; Komkov, B; Konno, M; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Kroon, P J; Kuberg, C H; Kunde, G J; Kurita, K; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lajoie, J G; Le Bornec, Y; Lebedev, A; Leckey, S; Lee, D M; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Li, X H; Lim, H; Litvinenko, A; Liu, M X; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malakhov, A; Manko, V I; Mao, Y; Martinez, G; Masui, H; Matathias, F; Matsumoto, T; McCain, M C; McGaughey, P L; Miake, Y; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mishra, G C; Mitchell, J T; Mohanty, A K; Morrison, D P; Moss, J M; Mukhopadhyay, D; Muniruzzaman, M; Nagamiya, S; Nagle, J L; Nakamura, T; Newby, J; Nyanin, A S; Nystrand, J; O'Brien, E; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Ojha, I D; Okada, H; Okada, K; Oskarsson, A; Otterlund, I; Oyama, K; Ozawa, K; Pal, D; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, J; Park, W J; Pate, S F; Pei, H; Penev, V; Peng, J-C; Pereira, H; Peresedov, V; Pierson, A; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Qualls, J M; Rak, J; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Reuter, M; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Roche, G; Romana, A; Rosati, M; Rosendahl, S S E; Rosnet, P; Rykov, V L; Ryu, S S; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakai, S; Samsonov, V; Sanfratello, L; Santo, R; Sato, H D; Sato, S; Sawada, S; Schutz, Y; Semenov, V; Seto, R; Shea, T K; Shein, I; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shimomura, M; Sickles, A; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Sim, K S; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Staley, F; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stepanov, M; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Sullivan, J P; Takagi, S; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tanaka, K H; Tanaka, Y; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Taranenko, A; Tarján, P; Thomas, T L; Togawa, M; Tojo, J; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tram, V-N; Tserruya, I; Tsuchimoto, Y; Tydesjö, H; Tyurin, N; Uam, T J; van Hecke, H W; Velkovska, J; Velkovsky, M; Veszprémi, V; Vinogradov, A A; Volkov, M A; Vznuzdaev, E; Wang, X R; Watanabe, Y; White, S N; Willis, N; Wohn, F K; Woody, C L; Xie, W; Yanovich, A; Yokkaichi, S; Young, G R; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zhang, C; Zhou, S; Zimányi, J; Zolin, L; Zong, X

    2006-06-09

    Deuteron-gold (d+Au) collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider provide ideal platforms for testing QCD theories in dense nuclear matter at high energy. In particular, models suggesting strong saturation effects for partons carrying small nucleon momentum fraction (x) predict modifications to jet production at forward rapidity (deuteron-going direction) in d+Au collisions. We report on two-particle azimuthal angle correlations between charged hadrons at forward/backward (deuteron/gold going direction) rapidity and charged hadrons at midrapidity in d+Au and p+p collisions at square root of sNN=200 GeV. Jet structures observed in the correlations are quantified in terms of the conditional yield and angular width of away-side partners. The kinematic region studied here samples partons in the gold nucleus with x~0.1 to ~0.01. Within this range, we find no x dependence of the jet structure in d+Au collisions.

  6. Absence of suppression in particle production at large transverse momentum in sqrt[s(NN)]=200 GeV d+Au collisions.

    PubMed

    Adler, S S; Afanasiev, S; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Al-Jamel, A; Alexander, J; Aoki, K; Aphecetche, L; Armendariz, R; Aronson, S H; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Babintsev, V; Baldisseri, A; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Bassalleck, B; Bathe, S; Batsouli, S; Baublis, V; Bauer, F; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Bjorndal, M T; Boissevain, J G; Borel, H; Brooks, M L; Brown, D S; Bruner, N; Bucher, D; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Burward-Hoy, J M; Butsyk, S; Camard, X; Chand, P; Chang, W C; Chernichenko, S; Chi, C Y; Chiba, J; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choudhury, R K; Chujo, T; Cianciolo, V; Cobigo, Y; Cole, B A; Comets, M P; Constantin, P; Csanád, M; Csörgo, T; Cussonneau, J P; d'Enterria, D; Das, K; David, G; Deák, F; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Devismes, A; Dietzsch, O; Drachenberg, J L; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Dzhordzhadze, V; Efremenko, Y V; En'yo, H; Espagnon, B; Esumi, S; Fields, D E; Finck, C; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fox, B D; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fukao, Y; Fung, S-Y; Gadrat, S; Germain, M; Glenn, A; Gonin, M; Gosset, J; Goto, Y; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Grosse Perdekamp, M; Gustafsson, H-A; Hachiya, T; Haggerty, J S; Hamagaki, H; Hansen, A G; Hartouni, E P; Harvey, M; Hasuko, K; Hayano, R; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Heuser, J M; Hidas, P; Hiejima, H; Hill, J C; Hobbs, R; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Hoover, A; Horaguchi, T; Ichihara, T; Ikonnikov, V V; Imai, K; Inuzuka, M; Isenhower, D; Isenhower, L; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Jacak, B V; Jia, J; Jinnouchi, O; Johnson, B M; Johnson, S C; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Kajihara, F; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kaneta, M; Kang, J H; Katou, K; Kawabata, T; Kazantsev, A; Kelly, S; Khachaturov, B; Khanzadeev, A; Kikuchi, J; Kim, D J; Kim, E; Kim, G-B; Kim, H J; Kinney, E; Kiss, A; Kistenev, E; Kiyomichi, A; Klein-Boesing, C; Kobayashi, H; Kochetkov, V; Kohara, R; Komkov, B; Konno, M; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Kroon, P J; Kuberg, C H; Kunde, G J; Kurita, K; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lajoie, J G; Le Bornec, Y; Lebedev, A; Leckey, S; Lee, D M; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Li, X; Li, X H; Lim, H; Litvinenko, A; Liu, M X; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malakhov, A; Manko, V I; Mao, Y; Martinez, G; Masui, H; Matathias, F; Matsumoto, T; McCain, M C; McGaughey, P L; Miake, Y; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mishra, G C; Mitchell, J T; Mohanty, A K; Morrison, D P; Moss, J M; Mukhopadhyay, D; Muniruzzaman, M; Nagamiya, S; Nagle, J L; Nakamura, T; Newby, J; Nyanin, A S; Nystrand, J; O'Brien, E; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Ojha, I D; Okada, H; Okada, K; Oskarsson, A; Otterlund, I; Oyama, K; Ozawa, K; Pal, D; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, J; Park, W J; Pate, S F; Pei, H; Penev, V; Peng, J-C; Pereira, H; Peresedov, V; Pierson, A; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Qualls, J; Rak, J; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Reuter, M; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Roche, G; Romana, A; Rosati, M; Rosendahl, S; Rosnet, P; Rykov, V L; Ryu, S S; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakai, S; Samsonov, V; Sanfratello, L; Santo, R; Sato, H D; Sato, S; Sawada, S; Schutz, Y; Semenov, V; Seto, R; Shea, T K; Shein, I; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shimomura, M; Sickles, A; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Sim, K S; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S; Sourikova, I V; Staley, F; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stepanov, M; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Sullivan, J P; Takagi, S; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tanaka, K H; Tanaka, Y; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Taranenko, A; Tarján, P; Thomas, T L; Togawa, M; Tojo, J; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tram, V-N; Tserruya, I; Tsuchimoto, Y; Tydesjö, H; Tyurin, N; Uam, T J; van Hecke, H W; Velkovska, J; Velkovsky, M; Veszprémi, V; Vinogradov, A A; Volkov, M A; Vznuzdaev, E; Wang, X R; Watanabe, Y; White, S N; Willis, N; Wohn, F K; Woody, C L; Xie, W; Yanovich, A; Yokkaichi, S; Young, G R; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zhang, C; Zhou, S; Zimányi, J; Zolin, L; Zong, X

    2003-08-15

    Transverse momentum spectra of charged hadrons with p(T)<8 GeV/c and neutral pions with p(T)<10 GeV/c have been measured at midrapidity by the PHENIX experiment at BNL RHIC in d+Au collisions at sqrt[s(NN)]=200 GeV. The measured yields are compared to those in p+p collisions at the same sqrt[s(NN)] scaled up by the number of underlying nucleon-nucleon collisions in d+Au. The yield ratio does not show the suppression observed in central Au+Au collisions at RHIC. Instead, there is a small enhancement in the yield of high momentum particles.

  7. Evidence from d+Au measurements for final-state suppression of high-p(T) hadrons in Au+Au collisions at RHIC.

    PubMed

    Adams, J; Adler, C; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Anderson, M; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Badyal, S K; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellwied, R; Berger, J; Bezverkhny, B I; Bhardwaj, S; Bhaskar, P; Bhati, A K; Bichsel, H; Billmeier, A; Bland, L C; Blyth, C O; Bonner, B E; Botje, M; Boucham, A; Brandin, A; Bravar, A; Cadman, R V; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Carroll, J; Castillo, J; Castro, M; Cebra, D; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, Y; Chernenko, S P; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, B; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Das, S; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Dong, X; Draper, J E; Du, F; Dubey, A K; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Dutta Majumdar, M R; Eckardt, V; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Fachini, P; Faine, V; Faivre, J; Fatemi, R; Filimonov, K; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flierl, D; Foley, K J; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Ganti, M S; Gagunashvili, N; Gans, J; Gaudichet, L; Germain, M; Geurts, F; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; Gonzalez, J E; Grachov, O; Grigoriev, V; Gronstal, S; Grosnick, D; Guedon, M; Guertin, S M; Gupta, A; Gushin, E; Gutierrez, T D; Hallman, T J; Hardtke, D; Harris, J W; Heinz, M; Henry, T W; Heppelmann, S; Herston, T; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Horsley, M; Huang, H Z; Huang, S L; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Ishihara, A; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Janik, M; Johnson, I; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kaneta, M; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Klay, J; Klein, S R; Klyachko, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Konstantinov, A S; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kovalenko, A D; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kumar, A; Kunde, G J; Kunz, C L; Kutuev, R Kh; Kuznetsov, A A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lansdell, C P; Lasiuk, B; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednický, R; Leontiev, V M; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, Q; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, L; Liu, Z; Liu, Q J; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Lopez-Noriega, M; Love, W A; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, J; Ma, Y G; Magestro, D; Mahajan, S; Mangotra, L K; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Marx, J; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McShane, T S; Meissner, F; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A; Messer, M; Miller, M L; Milosevich, Z; Minaev, N G; Mironov, C; Mishra, D; Mitchell, J; Mohanty, B; Molnar, L; Moore, C F; Mora-Corral, M J; Morozov, V; de Moura, M M; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nayak, S K; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nevski, P; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Norman, B; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Paic, G; Pandey, S U; Pal, S K; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Phatak, S C; Picha, R; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potekhin, M; Potrebenikova, E; Potukuchi, B V K S; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Putschke, J; Rai, G; Rakness, G; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D; Reid, J G; Renault, G; Retiere, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevski, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L J; Rykov, V; Sahoo, R; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Savin, I; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schroeder, L S; Schweda, K; Seger, J; Seliverstov, D; Seyboth, P; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Sharma, M; Shestermanov, K E; Shimanskii, S S; Singaraju, R N; Simon, F; Skoro, G; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sood, G; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, S; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Struck, C; Suaide, A A P; Sugarbaker, E; Suire, C; Sumbera, M; Surrow, B; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Szarwas, P; Tai, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Thein, D; Thomas, J H; Tikhomirov, V; Tokarev, M; Tonjes, M B; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Trivedi, M D; Trofimov, V; Tsai, O; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; VanderMolen, A M; Vasiliev, A N; Vasiliev, M; Vigdor, S E; Viyogi, Y P; Voloshin, S A; Waggoner, W; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Ward, H; Watson, J W; Wells, R; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Willson, R; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wood, J; Wu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Xu, Z Z; Yakutin, A E; Yamamoto, E; Yang, J; Yepes, P; Yurevich, V I; Zanevski, Y V; Zborovský, I; Zhang, H; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, W M; Zhang, Z P; Zołnierczuk, P A; Zoulkarneev, R; Zoulkarneeva, J; Zubarev, A N

    2003-08-15

    We report measurements of single-particle inclusive spectra and two-particle azimuthal distributions of charged hadrons at high transverse momentum (high p(T)) in minimum bias and central d+Au collisions at sqrt[s(NN)]=200 GeV. The inclusive yield is enhanced in d+Au collisions relative to binary-scaled p+p collisions, while the two-particle azimuthal distributions are very similar to those observed in p+p collisions. These results demonstrate that the strong suppression of the inclusive yield and back-to-back correlations at high p(T) previously observed in central Au+Au collisions are due to final-state interactions with the dense medium generated in such collisions.

  8. Nuclear Modification of ψ', χc, and J/ψ Production in d+Au Collisions at sNN=200GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adare, A.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Alexander, J.; Angerami, A.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Aramaki, Y.; Atomssa, E. T.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Barish, K. N.; Bassalleck, B.; Basye, A. T.; Bathe, S.; Baublis, V.; Baumann, C.; Bazilevsky, A.; Belikov, S.; Belmont, R.; Bennett, R.; Bhom, J. H.; Blau, D. S.; Bok, J. S.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Butsyk, S.; Campbell, S.; Caringi, A.; Chen, C.-H.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, P.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cole, B. A.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Dahms, T.; Dairaku, S.; Danchev, I.; Das, K.; Datta, A.; David, G.; Dayananda, M. K.; Denisov, A.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dharmawardane, K. V.; Dietzsch, O.; Dion, A.; Donadelli, M.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Dutta, D.; D'Orazio, L.; Edwards, S.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Ellinghaus, F.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Fadem, B.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M., Jr.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Fraenkel, Z.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fujiwara, K.; Fukao, Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Garishvili, I.; Glenn, A.; Gong, H.; Gonin, M.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grim, G.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gunji, T.; Gustafsson, H.-Å.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamblen, J.; Han, R.; Hanks, J.; Haslum, E.; Hayano, R.; He, X.; Heffner, M.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Hill, J. C.; Hohlmann, M.; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hornback, D.; Huang, S.; Ichihara, T.; Ichimiya, R.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Inaba, M.; Isenhower, D.; Ishihara, M.; Issah, M.; Ivanischev, D.; Iwanaga, Y.; Jacak, B. V.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; Jin, J.; Johnson, B. M.; Jones, T.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kajihara, F.; Kamin, J.; Kang, J. H.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kasai, M.; Kawall, D.; Kawashima, M.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kempel, T.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kijima, K. M.; Kikuchi, J.; Kim, A.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E.-J.; Kim, Y.-J.; Kinney, E.; Kiss, Á.; Kistenev, E.; Kleinjan, D.; Kochenda, L.; Komkov, B.; Konno, M.; Koster, J.; Král, A.; Kravitz, A.; Kunde, G. J.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, J.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Li, X.; Lichtenwalner, P.; Liebing, P.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Liška, T.; Liu, H.; Liu, M. X.; Love, B.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Malik, M. D.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Mao, Y.; Masui, H.; Matathias, F.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; McGlinchey, D.; Means, N.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mibe, T.; Mignerey, A. C.; Miki, K.; Milov, A.; Mitchell, J. T.; Mohanty, A. K.; Moon, H. J.; Morino, Y.; Morreale, A.; Morrison, D. P.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagle, J. L.; Naglis, M.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, K. R.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Nam, S.; Newby, J.; Nguyen, M.; Nihashi, M.; Nouicer, R.; Nyanin, A. S.; Oakley, C.; O'Brien, E.; Oda, S. X.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Oka, M.; Okada, K.; Onuki, Y.; Oskarsson, A.; Ouchida, M.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, I. H.; Park, S. K.; Park, W. J.; Pate, S. F.; Pei, H.; Peng, J.-C.; Pereira, H.; Perepelitsa, D.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Petti, R.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pisani, R. P.; Proissl, M.; Purschke, M. L.; Qu, H.; Rak, J.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Rembeczki, S.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Roach, D.; Roche, G.; Rolnick, S. D.; Rosati, M.; Rosen, C. A.; Rosendahl, S. S. E.; Ružička, P.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sakashita, K.; Samsonov, V.; Sano, S.; Sato, T.; Sawada, S.; Sedgwick, K.; Seele, J.; Seidl, R.; Seto, R.; Sharma, D.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Sim, K. S.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Slunečka, M.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Stankus, P. W.; Stenlund, E.; Stoll, S. P.; Sugitate, T.; Sukhanov, A.; Sziklai, J.; Takagui, E. M.; Taketani, A.; Tanabe, R.; Tanaka, Y.; Taneja, S.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Themann, H.; Thomas, D.; Thomas, T. L.; Togawa, M.; Toia, A.; Tomášek, L.; Torii, H.; Towell, R. S.; Tserruya, I.; Tsuchimoto, Y.; Vale, C.; Valle, H.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vazquez-Zambrano, E.; Veicht, A.; Velkovska, J.; Vértesi, R.; Virius, M.; Vrba, V.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Wei, F.; Wei, R.; Wessels, J.; White, S. N.; Winter, D.; Woody, C. L.; Wright, R. M.; Wysocki, M.; Yamaguchi, Y. L.; Yamaura, K.; Yang, R.; Yanovich, A.; Ying, J.; Yokkaichi, S.; You, Z.; Young, G. R.; Younus, I.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zhou, S.

    2013-11-01

    We present results for three charmonia states (ψ', χc, and J/ψ) in d+Au collisions at |y|<0.35 and sNN=200GeV. We find that the modification of the ψ' yield relative to that of the J/ψ scales approximately with charged particle multiplicity at midrapidity across p+A, d+Au, and A+A results from the Super Proton Synchrotron and the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. In large-impact-parameter collisions we observe a similar suppression for the ψ' and J/ψ, while in small-impact-parameter collisions the more weakly bound ψ' is more strongly suppressed. Owing to the short time spent traversing the Au nucleus, the larger ψ' suppression in central events is not explained by an increase of the nuclear absorption owing to meson formation time effects.

  9. Pseudorapidity Asymmetry and Centrality Dependence of Charged Hadron Spectra in d+Au collisions at sqrt(sNN) = 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, J.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, B.D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Badyal, S.K.; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bezverkhny, B.I.; Bharadwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A.K.; Bhatia, V.S.; Bichsel, H.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, C.O.; Bonner, B.E.; Botje, M.; Boucham, A.; Brandin, A.V.; Bravar, A.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, R.V.; Cai, X.Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la Barca Sanchez, M.; Castillo, J.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford, H.J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; de Moura, M.M.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Dogra, S.M.; Dong, W.J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J.E.; Du, F.; Dubey, A.K.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Dutta Mazumdar, M.R.; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, W.R.; Efimov, L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fomenko, K.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Gaillard, L.; Gans, J.; Ganti, M.S.; Gaudichet, L.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J.E.; Grachov, O.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S.M.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gutierrez, T.D.; Hallman, T.J.; Hamed, A.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, J.W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T.W.; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Huang, H.Z.; Huang, S.L.; Hughes, E.W.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Janik, M.; Jiang, H.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Khodyrev, V.Yu.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, E.M.; Klay, J.; Klein, S.R.; Koetke, D.D.; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V.I.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A.I.; Kumar, A.; Kutuev, R.Kh.; et al.

    2005-01-12

    The pseudorapidity asymmetry and centrality dependence of charged hadron spectra in d+Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV are presented. The charged particle density at mid-rapidity, its pseudorapidity asymmetry and centrality dependence are reasonably reproduced by a Multi-Phase Transport model, by HIJING, and by the latest calculations in a saturation model. Ratios of transverse momentum spectra between backward and forward pseudorapidity are above unity for p{sub T} below 5 GeV/c. The ratio of central to peripheral spectra in d+Au collisions shows enhancement at 2 < p{sub T} < 6 GeV/c, with a larger effect at backward rapidity than forward rapidity. Our measurements are in qualitative agreement with gluon saturation and in contrast to calculations based on incoherent multiple partonic scatterings.

  10. Effect of event selection on jetlike correlation measurement in d+Au Collisions at \\(\\sqrt{s_{\\mathrm{NN}}}=200\\) GeV

    DOE PAGES

    Adamczyk, L.

    2015-03-03

    In this study, dihadron correlations are analyzed in \\(\\sqrt{s_{\\mathrm{NN}}}=200\\) GeV d+Au collisions classified by forward charged particle multiplicity and zero-degree neutral energy in the Au-beam direction. It is found that the jetlike correlated yield increases with the event multiplicity. After taking into account this dependence, the non-jet contribution on the away side is minimal, leaving little room for a back-to-back ridge in these collisions.

  11. Molecular characterization of Dau c 1, the Bet v 1 homologous protein from carrot and its cross-reactivity with Bet v 1 and Api g 1.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann-Sommergruber, K; O'Riordain, G; Ahorn, H; Ebner, C; Laimer Da Camara Machado, M; Pühringer, H; Scheiner, O; Breiteneder, H

    1999-06-01

    Up to 70% of patients with birch pollen allergy exhibit the so-called oral allergy syndrome, an IgE-mediated food allergy. The most frequent and therefore best characterized pollen-fruit syndrome is apple allergy in patients suffering from tree pollen-induced pollinosis. The occurrence of adverse reactions to proteins present in vegetables such as celery and carrots in patients suffering from pollen allergy has also been reported. cDNAs for Bet v 1 homologous proteins have been cloned from celery, apple and cherry. Objective The aim of the study was to identify Bet v 1 homologues from carrot (Daucus carota), to isolate the respective cDNA, to compare the IgE-binding capacity of the natural protein to the recombinant allergen and determine the cross-reactivity to Api g 1 and Bet v 1. Molecular characterization of the carrot allergen was performed using IgE-immunoblotting, cross-inhibition assays, N-terminal sequencing, PCR-based cDNA cloning and expression of the recombinant protein in Escherichia coli. A 16-kDa protein from carrot was identified as a major IgE-binding component and designated Dau c 1. Sequencing corresponding cDNAs revealed three extremely similar sequences (Dau c 1.1, 1.2 and 1.3) with an open reading frame of 462 bp coding for 154 amino acid residues. Purified recombinant Dau c 1.2 was tested in immunoblots displaying IgE-binding capacity comparable to its natural counterpart. Cross-inhibition assays verified the existence of common B-cell epitopes present on Dau c 1, Api g 1 as well as on Bet v 1.

  12. Forward {Lambda} production and nuclear stopping power in d+Au collisions at {radical}{ovr s}{sub NN} =200 GeV.

    SciTech Connect

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Krueger, K.; Spinka, H. M.; Underwood, D. G.; STAR Collaboration; High Energy Physics; Univ. of Illinois; Panjab Univ.; Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre; Kent State Univ.; Particle Physic Lab.

    2007-01-01

    We report the measurement of {Lambda} and {bar {Lambda}} and yields and inverse slope parameters in d+Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV at forward and backward rapidities (y = {+-} 2.75), using data from the STAR forward time projection chambers. The contributions of different processes to baryon transport and particle production are probed exploiting the inherent asymmetry of the d+Au system. Comparisons to model calculations show that baryon transport on the deuteron side is consistent with multiple collisions of the deuteron nucleons with gold participants. On the gold side, HIJING-based models without a hadronic rescattering phase do not describe the measured particle yields, while models that include target remnants or hadronic rescattering do. The multichain model can provide a good description of the net baryon density in d+Au collisions at energies currently available at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, and the derived parameters of the model agree with those from nuclear collisions at lower energies.

  13. Hadronic resonance production in d+au collisions at {radical}{ovr s}{sub NN} =200 GeV measured at the BNL relativistic heavy ion collider.

    SciTech Connect

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Krueger, K.; Spinka, H. M.; Underwood, D. G.; STAR Collaboration; High Energy Physics; Univ. of Illinois; Panjab Univ.; Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre; Kent State Univ.; Particle Physic Lab.

    2008-01-01

    We present the first measurements of the {rho}(770){sup 0},K*(892), {Delta}(1232){sup ++}, {sigma}(1385), and {Lambda}(1520) resonances in d+Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV, reconstructed via their hadronic decay channels using the STAR detector (the solenoidal tracker at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider). The masses and widths of these resonances are studied as a function of transverse momentum p{sub T}. We observe that the resonance spectra follow a generalized scaling law with the transverse mass m{sub T}. The of resonances in minimum bias collisions are compared with the of {pi},K and {bar p}. The {rho}{sup 0}/{pi}{sup -}, K{sup +}/K{sup -}, {Delta}{sup ++}/p, {Sigma}(1385)/{Lambda}, and {Lambda}(1520)/{Lambda} ratios in d+Au collisions are compared with the measurements in minimum bias p+p interactions, where we observe that both measurements are comparable. The nuclear modification factors (R{sub dAu}) of the {rho}{sup 0},K{sup +}, and {Sigma}{sup +} scale with the number of binary collisions (N{sub bin}) for p{sub T} > 1.2 GeV/c.

  14. Φ meson production in d+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Adare, A.

    2015-10-19

    The PHENIX Collaboration has measured Φ meson production in d+Au collisions at √sNN=200 GeV using the dimuon and dielectron decay channels. The Φ meson is measured in the forward (backward) d-going (Au-going) direction, 1.2 < y < 2.2 (–2.2 < y < –1.2) in the transverse-momentum (pT) range from 1–7 GeV/c and at midrapidity |y|<0.35 in the pT range below 7 GeV/c. The Φ meson invariant yields and nuclear-modification factors as a function of pT, rapidity, and centrality are reported. An enhancement of Φ meson production is observed in the Au-going direction, while suppression is seen in the d-going direction, and no modification is observed at midrapidity relative to the yield in p+p collisions scaled by the number of binary collisions. As a result, similar behavior was previously observed for inclusive charged hadrons and open heavy flavor, indicating similar cold-nuclear-matter effects.

  15. Φ meson production in d+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV

    DOE PAGES

    Adare, A.

    2015-10-19

    The PHENIX Collaboration has measured Φ meson production in d+Au collisions at √sNN=200 GeV using the dimuon and dielectron decay channels. The Φ meson is measured in the forward (backward) d-going (Au-going) direction, 1.2 < y < 2.2 (–2.2 < y < –1.2) in the transverse-momentum (pT) range from 1–7 GeV/c and at midrapidity |y|<0.35 in the pT range below 7 GeV/c. The Φ meson invariant yields and nuclear-modification factors as a function of pT, rapidity, and centrality are reported. An enhancement of Φ meson production is observed in the Au-going direction, while suppression is seen in the d-going direction,more » and no modification is observed at midrapidity relative to the yield in p+p collisions scaled by the number of binary collisions. As a result, similar behavior was previously observed for inclusive charged hadrons and open heavy flavor, indicating similar cold-nuclear-matter effects.« less

  16. Measurement of long-range angular correlation and quadrupole anisotropy of pions and (anti)protons in central d+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV

    DOE PAGES

    Adare, A.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; ...

    2015-05-12

    In this study, we present azimuthal angular correlations between charged hadrons and energy deposited in calorimeter towers in central d+Au and aluminum bias p+p collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV. The charged hadron is measured at midrapidity lηl < 0.35, and the energy us measured at large rapidity (–3.7 < η < –3.1, Au-going direction). An enhanced near-side angular correlation across lΔηl > 2.75 is observed in d+Au collisions. Using the event plane method applied to the Au-going energy distribution, we extract the anisotropy strength v₂ for inclusive charged hadrons at midrapidity up to pT = 4.5 GeV/c. We alsomore » present the measurement of v₂ for identified π± and (anti)protons in central d+Au collisions, and observe a mass-ordering pattern similar to that seen in heavy ion collisions. These results are compared with viscous hydrodynamic calculations and measurements from p+Pb at √sNN = 5.02 TeV. The magnitude of the mass-ordering in d+Au is found to be smaller than that in p+Pb collisions, which may indicate smaller radial flow in lower energy d+Au collisions.« less

  17. Measurement of K0S and K*0 in p+p, d+Au, and Cu+Cu collisions at sqrt SNN = 200 GeV

    DOE PAGES

    Adare, A.; Aidala, C.

    2014-11-01

    The PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider has performed a systematic study of K0S and K*0 meson production at midrapidity in p+p, d+Au, and Cu+Cu collisions at sqrt SNN = 200 GeV. The K0S and K*0 mesons are reconstructed via their K0S and π0(→γγ)π0 (→γγ) and K*0 → K ± π± decay modes, respectively. The measured transverse-momentum spectra are used to determine the nuclear modification factor of K0S and K*0 mesons in d+Au and Cu+Cu collisions at different centralities. In the d+Au collisions, the nuclear modification factor of K0S and K*0 mesons is almost constant as a functionmore » of transverse momentum and is consistent with unity showing that cold-nuclear-matter effects do not play a significant role in the measured kinematic range. In Cu+Cu collisions, within the uncertainties no nuclear modification is registered in peripheral collisions. In central collisions, both mesons show suppression relative to the expectations from the p+p yield scaled by the number of binary nucleon-nucleon collisions in the Cu+Cu system. In the pT range 2–5 GeV/c, the strange mesons ( K0S, K*0) similarly to the Φ meson with hidden strangeness, show an intermediate suppression between the more suppressed light quark mesons (π0) and the nonsuppressed baryons (p, p-bar). At higher transverse momentum, pT > 5 GeV/c, production of all particles is similarly suppressed by a factor of ≈2. (auth)« less

  18. Isolation and Characterization of a Novel Cold-Adapted Esterase, MtEst45, from Microbulbifer thermotolerans DAU221

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yong-Suk

    2016-01-01

    A novel esterase, MtEst45, was isolated from a fosmid genomic library of Microbulbifer thermotolerans DAU221. The encoding gene is predicted to have a mass of 45,564 Da and encodes 495 amino acids, excluding a 21 amino acid signal peptide. MtEst45 showed a low amino acid identity (approximately 23–24%) compared with other lipolytic enzymes belonging to Family III, a closely related bacterial lipolytic enzyme family. MtEst45 also showed a conserved GXSXG motif, G131IS133YG135, which was reported as active site of known lipolytic enzymes, and the putative catalytic triad composed of D237 and H265. Because these mutants of MtEst45, which was S133A, D237N, and H265L, had no activity, these catalytic triad is deemed essential for the enzyme catalysis. MtEst45 was overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) and purified via His-tag affinity chromatography. The optimal pH and temperature of MtEst45 were estimated to be 8.17 and 46.27°C by response surface methodology, respectively. Additionally, MtEst45 was also active between 1 and 15°C. The optimal hydrolysis substrate for MtEst45 among p-nitrophenyl esters (C2–C18) was p-nitrophenyl butyrate, and the Km and Vmax values were 0.0998 mM and 550 μmol/min/mg of protein, respectively. MtEst45 was strongly inhibited by Hg2+, Zn2+, and Cu2+ ions; by phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride; and by β-mercaptoethanol. Ca2+ did not affect the enzyme's activity. These biochemical properties, sequence identity, and phylogenetic analysis suggest that MtEst45 represents a novel and valuable bacterial lipolytic enzyme family and is useful for biotechnological applications. PMID:26973604

  19. Detection of opiate use in a methadone maintenance treatment population with the CEDIA 6-acetylmorphine and CEDIA DAU opiate assays.

    PubMed

    Spanbauer, A C; Casseday, S; Davoudzadeh, D; Preston, K L; Huestis, M A

    2001-10-01

    Heroin, with a plasma half-life of approximately 5 min, is rapidly metabolized to 6-acetylmorphine (6-AM). 6-AM, a specific marker for heroin use, which also has a short half-life of only 0.6 h, is detected in urine for only a few hours after heroin exposure. Ingestion of poppy seeds and/or licit opiate analgesics can produce positive urine opiate tests. This has complicated the interpretation of positive opiate results and contributed to the decision to raise opiate cutoff concentrations and to require 6-AM confirmation in federally mandated workplace drug-testing programs. Microgenics Corp. has developed the CEDIA 6-AM assay, a homogeneous enzyme immunoassay for semiquantitative determination of 6-AM in human urine, in addition to its CEDIA DAU opiate assay. Urine specimens were collected 3 times per week from 27 participants enrolled in a clinical research trial evaluating a contingency management treatment program for heroin and cocaine abuse. Of the 1377 urine specimens screened, 261 (18.9%) were positive for opiates at > or = 300 ng/mL, 153 (11.1%) were positive for opiates at > or = 2000 ng/mL, and 55 (4.0%) were positive for 6-AM at > or = 10 ng/mL. For opiate-positive screens > or = 300 and > or = 2000 ng/mL, 91.3% and 80.8% confirmed positive for morphine or codeine at the respective gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) cutoffs. All specimens screening positive for 6-AM also confirmed positive by GC-MS at > or = 10 ng/mL. Increasing the opiate screening and confirmation cutoffs for the federal workplace drug-testing program resulted in 8% fewer opiate-positive tests; however, recent heroin use was not affected by this change.

  20. Isolation and Characterization of a Novel Cold-Adapted Esterase, MtEst45, from Microbulbifer thermotolerans DAU221.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong-Suk

    2016-01-01

    A novel esterase, MtEst45, was isolated from a fosmid genomic library of Microbulbifer thermotolerans DAU221. The encoding gene is predicted to have a mass of 45,564 Da and encodes 495 amino acids, excluding a 21 amino acid signal peptide. MtEst45 showed a low amino acid identity (approximately 23-24%) compared with other lipolytic enzymes belonging to Family III, a closely related bacterial lipolytic enzyme family. MtEst45 also showed a conserved GXSXG motif, G131IS133YG135, which was reported as active site of known lipolytic enzymes, and the putative catalytic triad composed of D237 and H265. Because these mutants of MtEst45, which was S133A, D237N, and H265L, had no activity, these catalytic triad is deemed essential for the enzyme catalysis. MtEst45 was overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) and purified via His-tag affinity chromatography. The optimal pH and temperature of MtEst45 were estimated to be 8.17 and 46.27°C by response surface methodology, respectively. Additionally, MtEst45 was also active between 1 and 15°C. The optimal hydrolysis substrate for MtEst45 among p-nitrophenyl esters (C2-C18) was p-nitrophenyl butyrate, and the K m and V max values were 0.0998 mM and 550 μmol/min/mg of protein, respectively. MtEst45 was strongly inhibited by Hg(2+), Zn(2+), and Cu(2+) ions; by phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride; and by β-mercaptoethanol. Ca(2+) did not affect the enzyme's activity. These biochemical properties, sequence identity, and phylogenetic analysis suggest that MtEst45 represents a novel and valuable bacterial lipolytic enzyme family and is useful for biotechnological applications.

  1. Analysis of whole blood for drugs of abuse using EMIT d.a.u. reagents and a Monarch 1000 Chemistry Analyzer.

    PubMed

    Diosi, D T; Harvey, D C

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes refinements in procedures coupling methanolic extraction-precipitation of whole blood with subsequent screening for commonly encountered drugs of abuse using EMIT d.a.u. reagents on a Monarch Chemistry Analyzer. The automation capabilities inherent in the Monarch make batch processing of samples convenient and cost effective. The small sample volume requirement of the Monarch allows greater sensitivities and use of lower cutoffs than previously reported. Subsequent analysis of EMIT positives by GC/MS confirmed the presence of the indicated drugs of abuse 86.7% of the time.

  2. Cold-nuclear-matter effects on heavy-quark production in d+Au collisions at sqrt[S(NN)]=200 GeV.

    PubMed

    Adare, A; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Al-Bataineh, H; Alexander, J; Angerami, A; Aoki, K; Apadula, N; Aramaki, Y; Atomssa, E T; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, B; Babintsev, V; Bai, M; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Barish, K N; Bassalleck, B; Basye, A T; Bathe, S; Baublis, V; Baumann, C; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Belmont, R; Bennett, R; Berdnikov, A; Berdnikov, Y; Bhom, J H; Blau, D S; Bok, J S; Boyle, K; Brooks, M L; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Butsyk, S; Campbell, S; Caringi, A; Chen, C-H; Chi, C Y; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choi, J B; Choudhury, R K; Christiansen, P; Chujo, T; Chung, P; Chvala, O; Cianciolo, V; Citron, Z; Cole, B A; Conesa Del Valle, Z; Connors, M; Csanád, M; Csörgő, T; Dahms, T; Dairaku, S; Danchev, I; Das, K; Datta, A; David, G; Dayananda, M K; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dharmawardane, K V; Dietzsch, O; Dion, A; Donadelli, M; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Drees, K A; Durham, J M; Durum, A; Dutta, D; D'Orazio, L; Edwards, S; Efremenko, Y V; Ellinghaus, F; Engelmore, T; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Fadem, B; Fields, D E; Finger, M; Finger, M; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fujiwara, K; Fukao, Y; Fusayasu, T; Garishvili, I; Glenn, A; Gong, H; Gonin, M; Goto, Y; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Grim, G; Grosse Perdekamp, M; Gunji, T; Gustafsson, H-Å; Haggerty, J S; Hahn, K I; Hamagaki, H; Hamblen, J; Han, R; Hanks, J; Haslum, E; Hayano, R; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Hester, T; Hill, J C; Hohlmann, M; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Horaguchi, T; Hornback, D; Huang, S; Ichihara, T; Ichimiya, R; Ikeda, Y; Imai, K; Inaba, M; Isenhower, D; Ishihara, M; Issah, M; Ivanischev, D; Iwanaga, Y; Jacak, B V; Jia, J; Jiang, X; Jin, J; Johnson, B M; Jones, T; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Jumper, D S; Kajihara, F; Kamin, J; Kang, J H; Kapustinsky, J; Karatsu, K; Kasai, M; Kawall, D; Kawashima, M; Kazantsev, A V; Kempel, T; Khanzadeev, A; Kijima, K M; Kikuchi, J; Kim, A; Kim, B I; Kim, D J; Kim, E-J; Kim, Y-J; Kinney, E; Kiss, A; Kistenev, E; Kleinjan, D; Kochenda, L; Komkov, B; Konno, M; Koster, J; Král, A; Kravitz, A; Kunde, G J; Kurita, K; Kurosawa, M; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lai, Y S; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Lee, D M; Lee, J; Lee, K B; Lee, K S; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Li, X; Lichtenwalner, P; Liebing, P; Linden Levy, L A; Liška, T; Liu, H; Liu, M X; Love, B; Lynch, D; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malik, M D; Manko, V I; Mannel, E; Mao, Y; Masui, H; Matathias, F; McCumber, M; McGaughey, P L; Means, N; Meredith, B; Miake, Y; Mibe, T; Mignerey, A C; Miki, K; Milov, A; Mitchell, J T; Mohanty, A K; Moon, H J; Morino, Y; Morreale, A; Morrison, D P; Moukhanova, T V; Murakami, T; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagle, J L; Naglis, M; Nagy, M I; Nakagawa, I; Nakamiya, Y; Nakamura, K R; Nakamura, T; Nakano, K; Nam, S; Newby, J; Nguyen, M; Nihashi, M; Nouicer, R; Nyanin, A S; Oakley, C; O'Brien, E; Oda, S X; Ogilvie, C A; Oka, M; Okada, K; Onuki, Y; Oskarsson, A; Ouchida, M; Ozawa, K; Pak, R; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, I H; Park, S K; Park, W J; Pate, S F; Pei, H; Peng, J-C; Pereira, H; Peressounko, D Yu; Petti, R; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Proissl, M; Purschke, M L; Qu, H; Rak, J; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Rembeczki, S; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Richardson, E; Roach, D; Roche, G; Rolnick, S D; Rosati, M; Rosen, C A; Rosendahl, S S E; Ružička, P; Sahlmueller, B; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakashita, K; Samsonov, V; Sano, S; Sato, T; Sawada, S; Sedgwick, K; Seele, J; Seidl, R; Seto, R; Sharma, D; Shein, I; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shimomura, M; Shoji, K; Shukla, P; Sickles, A; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Silvestre, C; Sim, K S; Singh, B K; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Slunečka, M; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Sukhanov, A; Sziklai, J; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tanabe, R; Tanaka, Y; Taneja, S; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Tarafdar, S; Taranenko, A; Themann, H; Thomas, D; Thomas, T L; Togawa, M; Toia, A; Tomášek, L; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tserruya, I; Tsuchimoto, Y; Vale, C; Valle, H; van Hecke, H W; Vazquez-Zambrano, E; Veicht, A; Velkovska, J; Vértesi, R; Virius, M; Vrba, V; Vznuzdaev, E; Wang, X R; Watanabe, D; Watanabe, K; Watanabe, Y; Wei, F; Wei, R; Wessels, J; White, S N; Winter, D; Woody, C L; Wright, R M; Wysocki, M; Yamaguchi, Y L; Yamaura, K; Yang, R; Yanovich, A; Ying, J; Yokkaichi, S; You, Z; Young, G R; Younus, I; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zhou, S

    2012-12-14

    The PHENIX experiment has measured electrons and positrons at midrapidity from the decays of hadrons containing charm and bottom quarks produced in d+Au and p+p collisions at sqrt[S(NN)]=200 GeV in the transverse-momentum range 0.85 ≤ p(T)(e) ≤ 8.5 GeV/c. In central d+Au collisions, the nuclear modification factor R(dA) at 1.5

  3. Centrality, rapidity, and transverse-momentum dependence of cold nuclear matter effects on J/psi production in dAu, CuCu, and AuAu collisions at sq root(s{sub NN})=200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreiro, E. G.; Fleuret, F.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.

    2010-06-15

    We have carried out a wide study of cold nuclear matter (CNM) effects on J/psi production in dAu, CuCu and AuAu collisions at sq root(s{sub NN})=200 GeV. We have studied the effects of three different gluon-shadowing parametrizations, using the usual simplified kinematics for which the momentum of the gluon recoiling against the J/psi is neglected as well as an exact kinematics for a 2->2 process; namely g+g->J/psi+g as expected from LO pQCD. We have shown that the rapidity distribution of the nuclear modification factor R{sub dAu}, and particularly its antishadowing peak, is systematically shifted toward larger rapidities in the 2->2 kinematics, irrespective of which shadowing parametrization is used. In turn, we have noted differences in the effective final-state nuclear absorption needed to fit the PHENIX dAu data. Taking advantage of our implementation of 2->2 kinematics, we have also computed the transverse momentum dependence of the nuclear modification factor, which cannot be predicted with the usual simplified kinematics. All the corresponding observables have been computed for CuCu and AuAu collisions and compared to the PHENIX and STAR data. Finally, we have extracted the effective nuclear absorption from the recent measurements of R{sub CP} in dAu collisions by the PHENIX collaboration.

  4. Rapidity and species dependence of particle production at largetransverse momentum for d+Au collisions at psNN = 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Abelev, B.I.; Adams, J.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett,J.; Anderson, B.D.; Anderson, M.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Bai,Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A.K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, S.-L.; Bonner, B.E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A.V.; Bravar, A.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, R.V.; Cai,X.Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la Barca Sanchez, M.; Castillo, J.; Catu,O.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen,H.F.; Chen, J.H.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Cosentino, M.R.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford,H.J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; Daugherity, M.; de Moura, M.M.; Dedovich, T.G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Djawotho,P.; Dogra, S.M.; Dong, W.J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J.E.; Du, F.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Dutta Mazumdar, M.R.; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, W.R.; Efimov,L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage,J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch,E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Gaillard, L.; Ganti,M.S.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J.S.; Gorbunov, Y.G.; Gos,H.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S.M.; Guimaraes, K.S.F.F.; Guo,Y.; Gupta, N.; Gutierrez, T.D.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T.J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J.W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T.W.; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte,B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A.M.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Horner, M.J.; Huang, H.Z.; Huang, S.L.; Hughes, E.W.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs,P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Jakl, P.; Jia, F.; Jiang, H.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khodyrev, V.Yu.; Kim, B.C.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, E.M.; Klein,S.R.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D.D.; et al.

    2006-12-19

    We determine rapidity asymmetry in the production of charged pions, protons and anti-protons for large transverse momentum (p{sub T}) for d+Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV. The rapidity asymmetry is defined as the ratio of particle yields at backward rapidity (Au beam direction or -ve rapidity) to those at forward rapidity (d beam direction or +ve rapidity). The identified hadrons are measured in the rapidity regions |y| < 0.5 and 0.5 < |y| < 1.0 for the p{sub T} range 2.5 < p{sub T} < 10 GeV/c. We observe significant rapidity asymmetry for charged pion and proton+anti-proton production in both rapidity regions. The asymmetry is larger for 0.5 < |y| < 1.0 than for |y| < 0.5 and is almost independent of particle type. The measurements are compared to various model predictions employing multiple scattering, energy loss, nuclear shadowing, saturation effects, and recombination, and also to a phenomenological parton model. We find that asymmetries are sensitive to model parameters and show model-preference. The rapidity dependence of {pi}{sup -}/{pi}{sup +} and {bar p}/p ratios in peripheral d+Au and forward neutron-tagged events are used to study the contributions of valence quarks and gluons to particle production at high p{sub T}. The results are compared to calculations based on NLO pQCD and other measurements of quark fragmentation functions.

  5. A cold-adapted carbohydrate esterase from the oil-degrading marine Bacterium Microbulbifer thermotolerans DAU221: gene cloning, purification, and characterization.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong-Suk; Heo, Jae Bok; Lee, Je-Hoon; Choi, Yong-Lark

    2014-07-01

    A cold-adapted carbohydrate esterase, CEST, belonging to the carbohydrate esterase family 6, was cloned from Microbulbifer thermotolerans DAU221. CEST was composed of 307 amino acids with the first 22 serving as a secretion signal peptide. The calculated molecular mass and isoelectric point of the mature enzyme were 31,244 Da and pH 5.89, respectively. The catalytic triad consisted of residues Ser37, Glu192, and His281 in the conserved regions: GQSNMXG, QGEX(D/N), and DXXH. The three-dimensional structure of CEST revealed that CEST belongs to the α/β-class of protein consisted of a central six-stranded β-sheet flanked by eight α-helices. The recombinant CEST was purified by His-tag affinity chromatography and the characterization showed its optimal temperature and pH were 15°C and 8.0, respectively. Specifically, CEST maintained up to 70% of its enzyme activity when preincubated at 50°C or 60°C for 6 h, and 89% of its enzyme activity when preincubated at 70°C for 1h . The results suggest CEST belongs to group 3 of the cold-adapted enzymes. The enzyme activity was increased by Na(+) and Mg(2+) ions but was strongly inhibited by Cu(+) and Hg(2+) ions, at all ion concentrations. Using p-nitrophenyl acetate as a substrate, the enzyme had a Km of 0.278 mM and a kcat of 1.9 s(-1). Site-directed mutagenesis indicated that the catalytic triad (Ser37, Glu192, and His281) and Asp278 were essential for the enzyme activity.

  6. Measurement of K0S and K*0 in p+p, d+Au, and Cu+Cu collisions at sqrt SNN = 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Adare, A.; Aidala, C.

    2014-11-01

    The PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider has performed a systematic study of K0S and K*0 meson production at midrapidity in p+p, d+Au, and Cu+Cu collisions at sqrt SNN = 200 GeV. The K0S and K*0 mesons are reconstructed via their K0S and π0(→γγ)π0 (→γγ) and K*0 → K ± π± decay modes, respectively. The measured transverse-momentum spectra are used to determine the nuclear modification factor of K0S and K*0 mesons in d+Au and Cu+Cu collisions at different centralities. In the d+Au collisions, the nuclear modification factor of K0S and K*0 mesons is almost constant as a function of transverse momentum and is consistent with unity showing that cold-nuclear-matter effects do not play a significant role in the measured kinematic range. In Cu+Cu collisions, within the uncertainties no nuclear modification is registered in peripheral collisions. In central collisions, both mesons show suppression relative to the expectations from the p+p yield scaled by the number of binary nucleon-nucleon collisions in the Cu+Cu system. In the pT range 2–5 GeV/c, the strange mesons ( K0S, K*0) similarly to the Φ meson with hidden strangeness, show an intermediate suppression between the more suppressed light quark mesons (π0) and the nonsuppressed baryons (p, p-bar). At higher transverse momentum, pT > 5 GeV/c, production of all particles is similarly suppressed by a factor of ≈2. (auth)

  7. Near-side azimuthal and pseudorapidity correlations using neutral strange baryons and mesons in d+Au , Cu + Cu, and Au + Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV

    DOE PAGES

    Abelev, B.; Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; ...

    2016-07-28

    Here we present measurements of the near side of triggered di-hadron correlations using neutral strange baryons (more » $$Λ,\\overline{Λ}$$) and mesons (K$$0\\atop{S}$$ ) at intermediate transverse momentum (3 < pT< 6 GeV/c) to look for possible flavor and baryon-meson dependence. This study is performed in d+Au, Cu+Cu, and Au+Au collisions at $$\\sqrt{s}$$$_{NN}$$ = 200 GeV measured by the STAR experiment at RHIC. The near-side di-hadron correlation contains two structures, a peak which is narrow in azimuth and pseudorapidity consistent with correlations from jet fragmentation, and a correlation in azimuth which is broad in pseudorapidity. The particle composition of the jet-like correlation is determined using identified associated particles. The dependence of the conditional yield of the jet-like correlation on the trigger particle momentum, associated particle momentum, and centrality for correlations with unidentified trigger particles are presented. The neutral strange particle composition in jet-like correlations with unidentified charged particle triggers is not well described by PYTHIA. However, the yield of unidentified particles in jet-like correlations with neutral strange particle triggers is described reasonably well by the same model.« less

  8. Charged-particle multiplicity and pseudorapidity distributions measured with the PHOBOS detector in Au+Au, Cu+Cu, d+Au, and p+p collisions at ultrarelativistic energies

    SciTech Connect

    Alver, B.; Ballintijn, M.; Busza, W.; Decowski, M. P.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Henderson, C.; Kane, J. L.; Katzy, J.; Kulinich, P.; Li, W.; Loizides, C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rosenberg, L.; Sarin, P.; Steadman, S. G.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Vale, C.

    2011-02-15

    Pseudorapidity distributions of charged particles emitted in Au+Au, Cu+Cu, d+Au, and p+p collisions over a wide energy range have been measured using the PHOBOS detector at the BNL Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC). The centrality dependence of both the charged particle distributions and the multiplicity at midrapidity were measured. Pseudorapidity distributions of charged particles emitted with |{eta}|<5.4, which account for between 95% and 99% of the total charged-particle emission associated with collision participants, are presented for different collision centralities. Both the midrapidity density dN{sub ch}/d{eta} and the total charged-particle multiplicity N{sub ch} are found to factorize into a product of independent functions of collision energy, {radical}(s{sub N{sub N}}), and centrality given in terms of the number of nucleons participating in the collision, N{sub part}. The total charged particle multiplicity, observed in these experiments and those at lower energies, assumes a linear dependence of (lns{sub N{sub N}}){sup 2} over the full range of collision energy of {radical}(s{sub N{sub N}})=2.7-200 GeV.

  9. Charged-particle multiplicity and pseudorapidity distributionsmeasured with the PHOBOS detector in Au+Au, Cu+Cu, d+Au, and p+p collisions at ultra-relativistic energies.

    SciTech Connect

    Alver, B.; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Ballintijn, M.; Barton, D. S.; Wuosmaa, A.

    2011-01-01

    Pseudorapidity distributions of charged particles emitted in Au+Au, Cu+Cu, d+Au, and p+p collisions over a wide energy range have been measured using the PHOBOS detector at the BNL Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC). The centrality dependence of both the charged particle distributions and the multiplicity at midrapidity were measured. Pseudorapidity distributions of charged particles emitted with |{eta}| < 5.4, which account for between 95% and 99% of the total charged-particle emission associated with collision participants, are presented for different collision centralities. Both the midrapidity density dN{sub ch}/d{eta} and the total charged-particle multiplicity N{sub ch} are found to factorize into a product of independent functions of collision energy, {radical}s{sub NN}, and centrality given in terms of the number of nucleons participating in the collision, N{sub part}. The total charged particle multiplicity, observed in these experiments and those at lower energies, assumes a linear dependence of (lns{sub NN}){sup 2} over the full range of collision energy of {radical}s{sub NN} = 2.7-200 GeV.

  10. Top Performing PMs: How DAU Develops Them

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    Acquisition, Part A Acquisition, Part B 25 hrs., online 4.5 days classroom PMT 251 PMT 257 Program Management Program Management Tools Course, Part I...Program Management Program Management O�ce Course, Part A O�ce Course Part B 22 hrs., online 18.5 days classroom BCF 103 SYS 202 Fundamentals of...University at Fort Belvoir, Virginia. His current interest is helping program managers become effective leaders. Gadeken received his doctorate in

  11. Defense Acquisition University (DAU) Program Managers Tool Kit

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    of Manufacturng n the Acquston Process .........................53 Common Producton Rsks That Greatly Impact Cost, Schedule and Performance...Key Lfe Cycle Revew Factors ......................96 Canddate Software Measures (Metrcs) ...............................................97 Qualty...J C T D LE G EN D: AC AT — Ac qu isi tio n C at eg or y C D D — C ap ab ilit y D ev el op m en t D oc um en t C PD — C ap ab ilit y Pr od uc tio

  12. Mecanismes de deformation de nanoparticules d'Au par irradiation ionique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harkati Kerbouah, Chahineze

    2011-12-01

    In the present thesis, we study the anisotropic deformation of gold nanoparticles embedded in amorphous silica or crystalline aluminum arsenide, under ion bombardment. We try to comprehend the mechanism responsible for this deformation and to remove any ambiguity related to the explanation of this phenomenon. A hybrid process combining sputtering and plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition was used to fabricate Au/SiO2 layers on fused silica substrates. Structures with single and multilayer were obtained. Heating during or after deposition activates the Au atom agglomeration and favours the growth of the nanoparticles. Also, a Au/AlAs nanocomposite was obtained by ion implantation of AlAs films, followed by rapid thermal annealing. The samples of the two nanocomposites, cooled with liquid nitrogen, were irradiated with 2 to 40 MeV Cu, Si, Au or In ion beams, at fluences ranging from 1x10 13 to 4x1015 ions/cm2, using a Tandem or Tandetron accelerator. The structural and morphological properties of the Au/SiO2 nanocomposite were extracted by optical means; the frequency and the width of surface plasmon resonance band depend on the nanoparticle shape and size, their concentration, the inter-particle distance and the dielectric properties of material in which the particles are embedded. The aluminum arsenide crystallinity was studied by two techniques: Raman spectroscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry in channelling configuration (RBS/ channelling). The Au concentration in the nanocomposite layers was deducted from RBS results. The size distribution and metallic nanoparticles shape transformation in both nanocomposites were observed by electronic transmission microscopy. The results obtained within the framework of this work are the subject of three journal papers. The first publication shows the possibility of manipulating the width and spectral position of the gold nanoparticle absorption band in Au/SiO2 nanocomposites by modifying their structure (form, size and inter-particle distance). The obtained Au nanoparticles are nearly spherical. The surface plasmon (PS) absorption band corresponding to the distant particles is located at 520 nm. After ion irradiation, the spherical nanoparticles transform into ellipsoids aligned along the ion beam. The absorption band splits into two bands: transversal and longitudinal. The band corresponding to the ellipsoids small axis (transversal) is blue-shifted and that corresponding to the long axis (longitudinal) is red-shifted indicating the elongation of particles in the beam direction. The second paper is consecrated to the crucial role of the plastic deformation of the matrix and to the importance of the metal atomic mobility in the anisotropic nanoparticles deformation in Au/SiO 2 nanocomposites. Our measurements show that a threshold value of 2 keV/nm (electronic stopping power) is necessary for the deformation of Au nanoparticles. This value is close to that required for silica deformation. Mobility of the Au atoms at the time of the ion passage is confirmed by temperature calculation within the ionic track. The third paper treats the attempt of formation and deformation of Au nanoparticles in crystalline aluminum arsenide matrix known by its high resistance to amorphisation and deformation under ionic bombardment. The principal result of the last article confirms the essential role of the matrix. It proves that the anisotropic deformation of surrounding material is indispensable for gold nanoparticles deformation. The experimental results mentioned above and temperature calculations within ionic tracks allowed us to propose the following anisotropic deformation scenario of Au nanoparticles embedded in Au/SiO2 nanocomposite: (1) Each ion crossing the silica melts (very briefly) a narrow cylinder around its trajectory forming thus a latent track. This is consistent with the observed threshold value in the electronic stopping power. (2) The cumulative effect of many separate ion impacts leads to the anisotropic growth of the silica matrix which contracts in the direction of the beam and elongates in the perpendicular direction. The overlap model of the ionic tracks was used to validate this phenomenon. (3) The deformation of silica generates strains which act on the nanoparticles in the plane perpendicular to the ion trajectory. In order to accommodate these strains, the Au nanoparticles deform in the beam direction. (4) The deformation of nanoparticles occurs each time an ion traverses the gold particle and melts a cylinder around its trajectory. The mobility of the gold atoms was confirmed by a calculation of the equivalent temperature from the deposited energy in the material by incident ions. The scenario above is compatible with our experimental data obtained in the case of the Au/SiO2 nanocomposite. It is further supported by the fact that the Au nanoparticules do not deform when they are integrated in AlAs which is resistant to the deformation. Keywords: ion irradiation, nanoparticles, Au, electronic stopping power, surface plasmon resonance, elongation, silica, aluminum arsenide.

  13. Recent results on identified particle spectra from d+Au collisions at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jena, Chitrasen

    2009-10-01

    The Cronin effect [1], the enhancement of hadron spectra at intermediate pT in p + A collisions as compared to those in p + p collisions, has received renewed interest at RHIC [2]. It is thought that this effect may reflect on the early parton scatterings in high-energy nuclear collisions. In order to further investigate the Cronin effect, and shed light on the initial conditions at RHIC, we have analyzed the rapidity dependence of φ meson production in d + Au collisions at RHIC. In this talk, we report on STAR preliminary results of φ meson transverse momentum distributions(using the hadronic decay mode φ -> K^+K^-) and charged hadrons spectra from 200 GeV d + Au collisions. The dataset used for this analysis is from STAR's year 8 d + Au collisions with significantly reduced material (˜1/10) and high statistics (˜3) compared with previous runs. The particle species and the mass dependence of the nuclear modification factor as a function of rapidity will be presented.

  14. Knowledge Sharing, Communities of Practice, and Learning Asset Integration - DAU’s Major Initiatives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    investing in KM, Organizational Learning (OL), and other development programs to help employees tap into knowledge resources. This article discusses the...impact of KM on personal learning, job performance, and organizational learning . What follows is an overview of Knowledge Sharing through the eyes of the

  15. Defense AT&L Magazine: A Publication of the Defense Acquisition University. Volume 33, Number 4, DAU 180

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-08-01

    Experience has shown there will be no quick fixes or miracle transformations. But even so, it isn’t like try- ing to turn lead into gold. This...104 per cen t gro wth 02- 03 Power of the PLM 51 Defense AT&L: July-August 2004 cantly contribute to AT&L Goal Number 7—a moti- vated, agile workforce...Hawaii Army National Guard, Fort Ruger, Hawaii, Environmental Quality—Individ- ual/Team Robins Air Force Base, Ga., Pollution Prevention—In- dustrial

  16. Defense AT&L Magazine A Publication of the Defense Acquisition University. Volume 34, Number 2, DAU 183

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    and recommended that adequate funding be provided for aircrew ground training, aircraft simulators, and up- grades to training devices . The V-22...Specifying how often each task must be trained. It is the V-22’s end user who defines success (i.e., ef- fectiveness of a training device ) for the...training con- tinuum. “In previous acquisition models, all of the groups—the training device managers, classroom in- structors and others—defined success

  17. Defense AT&L Magazine: A Publication of the Defense Acquisition University. Volume 34, Number 3, DAU 184

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    ject, if nothing else. They also provide the history , records, justification, and basis for decisions on the project and what you have done. They will...community are fond of saying “If it ain’t funded, it ain’t.” There is a kernel of truth here, a partial truth, but we recommend adding the word “yet...Heideggerian phi- losophy (reviews of which are given in Being-in-the-World by Hubert L. Dreyfus and The History of Political Philoso- phy edited by Leo

  18. Defense AT&L Magazine A Publication of the Defense Acquisition University. Volume 33, Number 6, DAU 181

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    time (time from receipt of requisition to delivery of goods to customer) for unique consumable spares purchase requests rose to 320 days, and efforts...turnaround time for Army Mustang scout vehicle consum - able spares, DLA needs to reengineer business processes and reassess vendor relationships. Three...average turnaround time for pur- chases of consumable spares had remained at 320 days, showing that his re- cent efforts to improve re- sponse time

  19. Defense AT&L Magazine A Publication of the Defense Acquisition University. Volume 34, Number 1, DAU 182

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-02-01

    program management environment has identified seven key leadership behaviors most frequently seen in successful PMs. A P U B L I C A T I O N O F T H...through withdrawal but will help you work more productively and effectively throughout the year. D E F E N S E A C Q U I S I T I O N U N I V E R S I T...effective leaders. Gadeken received his doctorate in engineering management from The George Washington University. P R O F E S S I O N A L D E V E L O

  20. Systematic Measurements of Identified Particle Spectra in pp, d+Au and Au+Au Collisions from STAR

    SciTech Connect

    STAR Coll

    2009-04-11

    Identified charged particle spectra of {pi}{sup {+-}}, K{sup {+-}}, p and {bar p} at mid-rapidity (|y| < 0.1) measured by the dE/dx method in the STAR-TPC are reported for pp and d + Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV and for Au + Au collisions at 62.4 GeV, 130 GeV, and 200 GeV. Average transverse momenta, total particle production, particle yield ratios, strangeness and baryon production rates are investigated as a function of the collision system and centrality. The transverse momentum spectra are found to be flatter for heavy particles than for light particles in all collision systems; the effect is more prominent for more central collisions. The extracted average transverse momentum of each particle species follows a trend determined by the total charged particle multiplicity density. The Bjorken energy density estimate is at least several GeV/fm{sub 3} for a formation time less than 1 fm/c. A significantly larger net-baryon density and a stronger increase of the net-baryon density with centrality are found in Au + Au collisions at 62.4 GeV than at the two higher energies. Antibaryon production relative to total particle multiplicity is found to be constant over centrality, but increases with the collision energy. Strangeness production relative to total particle multiplicity is similar at the three measured RHIC energies. Relative strangeness production increases quickly with centrality in peripheral Au + Au collisions, to a value about 50% above the pp value, and remains rather constant in more central collisions. Bulk freeze-out properties are extracted from thermal equilibrium model and hydrodynamics-motivated blast-wave model fits to the data. Resonance decays are found to have little effect on the extracted kinetic freeze-out parameters due to the transverse momentum range of our measurements. The extracted chemical freeze-out temperature is constant, independent of collision system or centrality; its value is close to the predicted phase-transition temperature, suggesting that chemical freeze-out happens in the vicinity of hadronization and the chemical freezeout temperature is universal despite the vastly different initial conditions in the collision systems. The extracted kinetic freeze-out temperature, while similar to the chemical freeze-out temperature in pp, d + Au, and peripheral Au + Au collisions, drops significantly with centrality in Au + Au collisions, whereas the extracted transverse radial flow velocity increases rapidly with centrality. There appears to be a prolonged period of particle elastic scatterings from chemical to kinetic freeze-out in central Au + Au collisions. The bulk properties extracted at chemical and kinetic freeze-out are observed to evolve smoothly over the measured energy range, collision systems, and collision centralities.

  1. Educating the Workforce for Early Integration of ESOH into JCIDS and Systems Engineering

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-01

    Beta testing  Launched on DAU Learning Management System 15 Mar 2011. Total graduates as of March 23, 2012: 67  DAU Course Catalogue listing...Launched original CLM on DAU Learning Management System April 2005. Total graduates as of March 23, 2012: 3,433  DAU Course Catalogue listing

  2. Search for dark photons from neutral meson decays in p+p and d+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV

    DOE PAGES

    Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; ...

    2015-03-10

    In this study, the standard model (SM) of particle physics is spectacularly successful, yet the measured value of the muon anomalous magnetic moment (g-2)μ deviates from SM calculations by 3.6σ. Several theoretical models attribute this to the existence of a “dark photon,” an additional U(1) gauge boson, which is weakly coupled to ordinary photons. The PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider has searched for a dark photon, U, in π⁰, η → γe⁺e⁻ decays and obtained upper limits of O(2×10⁻⁶) on U-γ mixing at 90% CL for the mass range 30 < mU < 90 MeV/c². Combined withmore » other experimental limits, the remaining region in the U-γ mixing parameter space that can explain the (g-2)μ deviation from its SM value is nearly completely excluded at the 90% confidence level, with only a small region of 29 < mU < 32 MeV/c² remaining.« less

  3. Search for dark photons from neutral meson decays in p+p and d+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akimoto, R.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Al-Ta'ani, H.; Alexander, J.; Alfred, M.; Andrews, K. R.; Angerami, A.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelt, E.; Aramaki, Y.; Armendariz, R.; Asai, J.; Asano, H.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Atomssa, E. T.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Baldisseri, A.; Bandara, N. S.; Bannier, B.; Barish, K. N.; Barnes, P. D.; Bassalleck, B.; Basye, A. T.; Bathe, S.; Batsouli, S.; Baublis, V.; Baumann, C.; Bazilevsky, A.; Beaumier, M.; Beckman, S.; Belikov, S.; Belmont, R.; Ben-Benjamin, J.; Bennett, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Bhom, J. H.; Bickley, A. A.; Black, D.; Blau, D. S.; Boissevain, J. G.; Bok, J. S.; Borel, H.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Broxmeyer, D.; Bryslawskyj, J.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Butsyk, S.; Camacho, C. M.; Campbell, S.; Caringi, A.; Castera, P.; Chang, B. S.; Chang, W. C.; Charvet, J. L.; Chen, C. H.; Chernichenko, S.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, P.; Churyn, A.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cole, B. A.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M.; Constantin, P.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Dahms, T.; Dairaku, S.; Danchev, I.; Das, K.; Datta, A.; Daugherity, M. S.; David, G.; Dayananda, M. K.; DeBlasio, K.; Dehmelt, K.; Denisov, A.; d'Enterria, D.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dharmawardane, K. V.; Dietzsch, O.; Ding, L.; Dion, A.; Do, J. H.; Donadelli, M.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Dubey, A. K.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Dutta, D.; Dzhordzhadze, V.; D'Orazio, L.; Edwards, S.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Ellinghaus, F.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Eyser, K. O.; Fadem, B.; Feege, N.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Fraenkel, Z.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fujiwara, K.; Fukao, Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Gal, C.; Gallus, P.; Garg, P.; Garishvili, I.; Ge, H.; Giordano, F.; Glenn, A.; Gong, H.; Gong, X.; Gonin, M.; Gosset, J.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grim, G.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gu, Y.; Gunji, T.; Guo, L.; Guragain, H.; Gustafsson, H. Å.; Hachiya, T.; Hadj Henni, A.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamblen, J.; Han, R.; Han, S. Y.; Hanks, J.; Harper, C.; Hartouni, E. P.; Haruna, K.; Hasegawa, S.; Hashimoto, K.; Haslum, E.; Hayano, R.; He, X.; Heffner, M.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Hill, J. C.; Hohlmann, M.; Hollis, R. S.; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hori, Y.; Hornback, D.; Hoshino, T.; Huang, J.; Huang, S.; Ichihara, T.; Ichimiya, R.; Iinuma, H.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Imazu, Y.; Imrek, J.; Inaba, M.; Iordanova, A.; Isenhower, D.; Ishihara, M.; Isobe, T.; Issah, M.; Isupov, A.; Ivanischev, D.; Ivanishchev, D.; Iwanaga, Y.; Jacak, B. V.; Jeon, S. J.; Jezghani, M.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; Jin, J.; John, D.; Johnson, B. M.; Jones, T.; Joo, E.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kajihara, F.; Kametani, S.; Kamihara, N.; Kamin, J.; Kaneti, S.; Kang, B. H.; Kang, J. H.; Kang, J. S.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kasai, M.; Kawall, D.; Kawashima, M.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kempel, T.; Key, J. A.; Khachatryan, V.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kihara, K.; Kijima, K. M.; Kikuchi, J.; Kim, A.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, C.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E.; Kim, E. J.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, M.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kinney, E.; Kiriluk, K.; Kiss, Á.; Kistenev, E.; Klatsky, J.; Klay, J.; Klein-Boesing, C.; Kleinjan, D.; Kline, P.; Koblesky, T.; Kochenda, L.; Kofarago, M.; Komkov, B.; Konno, M.; Koster, J.; Kotov, D.; Kozlov, A.; Král, A.; Kravitz, A.; Kunde, G. J.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Layton, D.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, J.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S. H.; Lee, S. R.; Lee, T.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Leitgab, M.; Lenzi, B.; Li, X.; Lichtenwalner, P.; Liebing, P.; Lim, S. H.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Liška, T.; Litvinenko, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, M. X.; Love, B.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Makek, M.; Malakhov, A.; Malik, M. D.; Manion, A.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Mao, Y.; Mašek, L.; Masui, H.; Matathias, F.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; McGlinchey, D.; McKinney, C.; Means, N.; Meles, A.; Mendoza, M.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mibe, T.; Mignerey, A. C.; Mikeš, P.; Miki, K.; Miller, A. J.; Milov, A.; Mishra, D. K.; Mishra, M.; Mitchell, J. T.; Miyachi, Y.; Miyasaka, S.; Mizuno, S.; Mohanty, A. K.; Montuenga, P.; Moon, H. J.; Moon, T.; Morino, Y.; Morreale, A.; Morrison, D. P.; Motschwiller, S.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Mukhopadhyay, D.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Mwai, A.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagle, J. L.; Naglis, M.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakagomi, H.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, K. R.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Nam, S.; Nattrass, C.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Newby, J.; Nguyen, M.; Nihashi, M.; Niida, T.; Nouicer, R.; Novitzky, N.; Nyanin, A. S.; Oakley, C.; O'Brien, E.; Oda, S. X.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Oka, M.; Okada, K.; Onuki, Y.; Orjuela Koop, J. D.; Oskarsson, A.; Ouchida, M.; Ozaki, H.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Palounek, A. P. T.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, B. H.; Park, I. H.; Park, J.; Park, S.; Park, S. K.; Park, W. J.; Pate, S. F.; Patel, L.; Patel, M.; Pei, H.; Peng, J. C.; Pereira, H.; Perepelitsa, D. V.; Perera, G. D. N.; Peresedov, V.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Perry, J.; Petti, R.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pinson, R.; Pisani, R. P.; Proissl, M.; Purschke, M. L.; Purwar, A. K.; Qu, H.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Rembeczki, S.; Reygers, K.; Reynolds, D.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Riveli, N.; Roach, D.; Roche, G.; Rolnick, S. D.; Rosati, M.; Rosen, C. A.; Rosendahl, S. S. E.; Rosnet, P.; Rowan, Z.; Rubin, J. G.; Rukoyatkin, P.; Ružička, P.; Rykov, V. L.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sakai, S.; Sakashita, K.; Sako, H.; Samsonov, V.; Sano, S.; Sarsour, M.; Sato, S.; Sato, T.; Savastio, M.; Sawada, S.; Schaefer, B.; Schmoll, B. K.; Sedgwick, K.; Seele, J.; Seidl, R.; Semenov, A. Yu.; Semenov, V.; Sen, A.; Seto, R.; Sett, P.; Sexton, A.; Sharma, D.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T. A.; Shigaki, K.; Shim, H. H.; Shimomura, M.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Sim, K. S.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Slunečka, M.; Sodre, T.; Soldatov, A.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Staley, F.; Stankus, P. W.; Stenlund, E.; Stepanov, M.; Ster, A.; Stoll, S. P.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Sukhanov, A.; Sumita, T.; Sun, J.; Sziklai, J.; Takagui, E. M.; Takahara, A.; Taketani, A.; Tanabe, R.; Tanaka, Y.; Taneja, S.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Tarján, P.; Tennant, E.; Themann, H.; Thomas, D.; Thomas, T. L.; Timilsina, A.; Todoroki, T.; Togawa, M.; Toia, A.; Tomášek, L.; Tomášek, M.; Tomita, Y.; Torii, H.; Towell, M.; Towell, R.; Towell, R. S.; Tram, V N.; Tserruya, I.; Tsuchimoto, Y.; Utsunomiya, K.; Vale, C.; Valle, H.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vargyas, M.; Vazquez-Zambrano, E.; Veicht, A.; Velkovska, J.; Vértesi, R.; Vinogradov, A. A.; Virius, M.; Vossen, A.; Vrba, V.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Watanabe, Y. S.; Wei, F.; Wei, R.; Wessels, J.; Whitaker, S.; White, S. N.; Winter, D.; Wolin, S.; Woody, C. L.; Wright, R. M.; Wysocki, M.; Xia, B.; Xie, W.; Xue, L.; Yalcin, S.; Yamaguchi, Y. L.; Yamaura, K.; Yang, R.; Yanovich, A.; Ying, J.; Yokkaichi, S.; Yoo, J. S.; Yoon, I.; You, Z.; Young, G. R.; Younus, I.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zaudtke, O.; Zelenski, A.; Zhang, C.; Zhou, S.; Zolin, L.

    2015-03-10

    In this study, the standard model (SM) of particle physics is spectacularly successful, yet the measured value of the muon anomalous magnetic moment (g-2)μ deviates from SM calculations by 3.6σ. Several theoretical models attribute this to the existence of a “dark photon,” an additional U(1) gauge boson, which is weakly coupled to ordinary photons. The PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider has searched for a dark photon, U, in π⁰, η → γe⁺e⁻ decays and obtained upper limits of O(2×10⁻⁶) on U-γ mixing at 90% CL for the mass range 30 < mU < 90 MeV/c². Combined with other experimental limits, the remaining region in the U-γ mixing parameter space that can explain the (g-2)μ deviation from its SM value is nearly completely excluded at the 90% confidence level, with only a small region of 29 < mU < 32 MeV/c² remaining.

  4. Centrality dependence of charged hadron transverse momentum spectra in d+Au collisions at {radical}{ovr{sup S}NN} = 200 GeV.

    SciTech Connect

    Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Ballintijn, M.; Barton, D. S.; Becker, B.; George, N.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; PHOBOS Collaboration; Physics; BNL; Massachusetts Inst. of Tech.

    2003-08-15

    We have measured transverse momentum distributions of charged hadrons produced in Au+Au collisions at {radical}{ovr S{sub NN}} = 62.4 GeV. The spectra are presented for transverse momenta 0.25 < p{sub T} < 4.5 GeV/c, in a pseudo-rapidity range of 0.2 < {eta} < 1.4. The nuclear modification factor R{sub AA} is calculated relative to p+p data at the same collision energy as a function of collision centrality. For 2 < p{sub T} < 4.5 GeV/c, R{sub AA} is found to be significantly larger than in Au+Au collisions at {radical}{ovr S{sub NN}} = 130 and 200 GeV. In contrast to the large change in R{sub AA}, we observe a very similar centrality evolution of the p{sub T} spectra at {radical}{ovr S{sub NN}} = 62.4 GeV and 200 GeV. The dynamical origin of this surprising factorization of energy and centrality dependence of particle production in heavy ion collisions remains to be understood.

  5. Getting the Best Value in a Source Selection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    taxpayer. The authors can be contacted at brian.schultz@dau.mil and david.dotson@dau.mil. implement a process to govern the risk management ef- forts...Value is what you get.” —Warren Buffett Schultz is a professor of Program Management , at the Defense Acquisition University (DAU) Capital Northeast...Region, Fort Belvoir, Virginia. Dotson is a professor of Contract Management at the DAU Mid-Atlantic Region in California, Maryland. Competition in

  6. United States Navy Contracting Officer Warranting Process

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    Certification Standards & Core Plus Development Guide Contracting Level 1 from DAU, http://icatalog.dau.mil/onlinecatalog/CareerLvl.aspx? lvl =1&cfld=3...CareerLvl.aspx? lvl =2&cfld=3 ..............70 Table 6. Certification Standards & Core Plus Development Guide Contracting Level 3 from DAU, http...icatalog.dau.mil/onlinecatalog/CareerLvl.aspx? lvl =3&cfld=3 ..............74 Table 7. COMFISCS Standard Warrant Levels Matrix from Source: Commander

  7. Managing O and S Costs: A Framework to Consider

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    James Francisco n Worth Mizell n Daniel Cikovic Jaynes is the assistant commander for Logistics and Industrial Operations at NAVAIR Systems Command... Assistance , DAU Mid-Atlantic; Francisco is the PMA-213 assistant program manager for Logistics, DAU Mid-Atlantic; Mizell is the former PMA-213 JPALS... assistant program manager for Logistics, DAU Mid-Atlantic; Cikovic is the former PMA-213 NAVAIR 4.2 cost lead, DAU Mid-Atlantic. For most weapon

  8. Training Dental Students to Use Chairside Assistants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Institutes of Health (DHEW), Bethesda, MD. Div. of Dental Health.

    More than 100 individuals attended a 2-day conference on developing dental auxiliary utilization (DAU) programs. Presentations included in this report are: (1) "How the Dean Implements the DAU Program," by James English, (2) "Some Objectives of a DAU Program" by Charles Barr, (3) "Role of the Supervisor in a Dental…

  9. Inclusive pi^0, eta, and direct photon production at high transverse momentum in p+p and d+Au collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    STAR Collaboration; Abelev, Betty

    2010-07-07

    We report a measurement of high-p{sub T} inclusive {pi}{sup 0}, {eta}, and direct photon production in p + p and d + Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV at midrapidity (0 < {eta} < 1). Photons from the decay {pi}{sup 0} {yields} {gamma}{gamma} were detected in the Barrel Electromagnetic Calorimeter of the STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. The {eta} {yields} {gamma}{gamma} decay was also observed and constituted the first {eta} measurement by STAR. The first direct photon cross section measurement by STAR is also presented, the signal was extracted statistically by subtracting the {pi}{sup 0}, {eta}, and {omega}(782) decay background from the inclusive photon distribution observed in the calorimeter. The analysis is described in detail, and the results are found to be in good agreement with earlier measurements and with next-to-leading order perturbative QCD calculations.

  10. Corrigendum to “Suppression of Υ production in d+Au and Au+Au collisions at √ SNN = 200 GeV" [Phys. Lett. B 735 (2014) 127-137

    SciTech Connect

    Adamczyk, L.

    2015-04-01

    We report measurements of Υ meson production in p + p, d + Au, and Au+Au collisions using the STAR detector at RHIC. We compare the Υ yield to the measured cross section in p + p collisions in order to quantify any modifications of the yield in cold nuclear matter using d + Au data and in hot nuclear matter using Au+Au data separated into three centrality classes. Our p + p measurement is based on three times the statistics of our previous result. We obtain a nuclear modification factor for Upsilon (1S + 2S + 3S) in the rapidity range |y| < 1 in d + Au collisions of RdAu = 0.79 ± 0.24(stat.) ± 0.03(syst.) ± 0.10(p + p syst.). A comparison with models including shadowing and initial state parton energy loss indicates the presence of additional cold-nuclear matter suppression. Similarly, in the top 10% most-central Au + Au collisions, we measure a nuclear modification factor of R AA = 0.49 ±0.1(stat.) ±0.02(syst.) ±0.06(p + p syst.), which is a larger suppression factor than that seen in cold nuclear matter. Our results are consistent with complete suppression of excited-state Upsilon mesons in Au + Au collisions. The additional suppression in Au + Au is consistent with the level expected in model calculations that include the presence of a hot, deconfined Quark–Gluon Plasma. However, understanding the suppression seen in d + Au is still needed before any definitive statements about the nature of the suppression in Au + Au can be made.

  11. Corrigendum to “Suppression of Υ production in d+Au and Au+Au collisions at √ SNN = 200 GeV" [Phys. Lett. B 735 (2014) 127-137

    DOE PAGES

    Adamczyk, L.

    2015-04-01

    We report measurements of Υ meson production in p + p, d + Au, and Au+Au collisions using the STAR detector at RHIC. We compare the Υ yield to the measured cross section in p + p collisions in order to quantify any modifications of the yield in cold nuclear matter using d + Au data and in hot nuclear matter using Au+Au data separated into three centrality classes. Our p + p measurement is based on three times the statistics of our previous result. We obtain a nuclear modification factor for Upsilon (1S + 2S + 3S) in themore » rapidity range |y| < 1 in d + Au collisions of RdAu = 0.79 ± 0.24(stat.) ± 0.03(syst.) ± 0.10(p + p syst.). A comparison with models including shadowing and initial state parton energy loss indicates the presence of additional cold-nuclear matter suppression. Similarly, in the top 10% most-central Au + Au collisions, we measure a nuclear modification factor of R AA = 0.49 ±0.1(stat.) ±0.02(syst.) ±0.06(p + p syst.), which is a larger suppression factor than that seen in cold nuclear matter. Our results are consistent with complete suppression of excited-state Upsilon mesons in Au + Au collisions. The additional suppression in Au + Au is consistent with the level expected in model calculations that include the presence of a hot, deconfined Quark–Gluon Plasma. However, understanding the suppression seen in d + Au is still needed before any definitive statements about the nature of the suppression in Au + Au can be made.« less

  12. An Upgrade on the Rabbit Model of Anthracycline-Induced Cardiomyopathy: Shorter Protocol, Reduced Mortality, and Higher Incidence of Overt Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Talavera, Jesús; Fernández-Del-Palacio, María Josefa; García-Nicolás, Obdulio; Seva, Juan; Brooks, Gavin; Moraleda, Jose M.

    2015-01-01

    Current protocols of anthracycline-induced cardiomyopathy in rabbits present with high premature mortality and nephrotoxicity, thus rendering them unsuitable for studies requiring long-term functional evaluation of myocardial function (e.g., stem cell therapy). We compared two previously described protocols to an in-house developed protocol in three groups: Group DOX2 received doxorubicin 2 mg/kg/week (8 weeks); Group DAU3 received daunorubicin 3 mg/kg/week (10 weeks); and Group DAU4 received daunorubicin 4 mg/kg/week (6 weeks). A cohort of rabbits received saline (control). Results of blood tests, cardiac troponin I, echocardiography, and histopathology were analysed. Whilst DOX2 and DAU3 rabbits showed high premature mortality (50% and 33%, resp.), DAU4 rabbits showed 7.6% premature mortality. None of DOX2 rabbits developed overt dilated cardiomyopathy; 66% of DAU3 rabbits developed overt dilated cardiomyopathy and quickly progressed to severe congestive heart failure. Interestingly, 92% of DAU4 rabbits showed overt dilated cardiomyopathy and 67% developed congestive heart failure exhibiting stable disease. DOX2 and DAU3 rabbits showed alterations of renal function, with DAU3 also exhibiting hepatic function compromise. Thus, a shortened protocol of anthracycline-induced cardiomyopathy as in DAU4 group results in high incidence of overt dilated cardiomyopathy, which insidiously progressed to congestive heart failure, associated to reduced systemic compromise and very low premature mortality. PMID:26788502

  13. An Upgrade on the Rabbit Model of Anthracycline-Induced Cardiomyopathy: Shorter Protocol, Reduced Mortality, and Higher Incidence of Overt Dilated Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Talavera, Jesús; Giraldo, Alejandro; Fernández-Del-Palacio, María Josefa; García-Nicolás, Obdulio; Seva, Juan; Brooks, Gavin; Moraleda, Jose M

    2015-01-01

    Current protocols of anthracycline-induced cardiomyopathy in rabbits present with high premature mortality and nephrotoxicity, thus rendering them unsuitable for studies requiring long-term functional evaluation of myocardial function (e.g., stem cell therapy). We compared two previously described protocols to an in-house developed protocol in three groups: Group DOX2 received doxorubicin 2 mg/kg/week (8 weeks); Group DAU3 received daunorubicin 3 mg/kg/week (10 weeks); and Group DAU4 received daunorubicin 4 mg/kg/week (6 weeks). A cohort of rabbits received saline (control). Results of blood tests, cardiac troponin I, echocardiography, and histopathology were analysed. Whilst DOX2 and DAU3 rabbits showed high premature mortality (50% and 33%, resp.), DAU4 rabbits showed 7.6% premature mortality. None of DOX2 rabbits developed overt dilated cardiomyopathy; 66% of DAU3 rabbits developed overt dilated cardiomyopathy and quickly progressed to severe congestive heart failure. Interestingly, 92% of DAU4 rabbits showed overt dilated cardiomyopathy and 67% developed congestive heart failure exhibiting stable disease. DOX2 and DAU3 rabbits showed alterations of renal function, with DAU3 also exhibiting hepatic function compromise. Thus, a shortened protocol of anthracycline-induced cardiomyopathy as in DAU4 group results in high incidence of overt dilated cardiomyopathy, which insidiously progressed to congestive heart failure, associated to reduced systemic compromise and very low premature mortality.

  14. Training the DoD Software Acquisition Professional

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-01

    by all five domains of DoD software systems (Weapons, C4ISR, Defense Business Systems , Modeling and Simulation , Infrastruc- ture Systems and Services...all career fields. This article will help the reader understand the cur- rent DAU training model and how DAU is working with the IT Functional Leader...understand the current DAU training model and how DAU is working with the IT Functional Leader to identify ways to train all of DoD as needed to ensure we

  15. Arabidopsis DAYU/ABERRANT PEROXISOME MORPHOLOGY9 Is a Key Regulator of Peroxisome Biogenesis and Plays Critical Roles during Pollen Maturation and Germination in Planta[W

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin-Ran; Li, Hong-Ju; Yuan, Li; Liu, Man; Shi, Dong-Qiao; Liu, Jie; Yang, Wei-Cai

    2014-01-01

    Pollen undergo a maturation process to sustain pollen viability and prepare them for germination. Molecular mechanisms controlling these processes remain largely unknown. Here, we report an Arabidopsis thaliana mutant, dayu (dau), which impairs pollen maturation and in vivo germination. Molecular analysis indicated that DAU encodes the peroxisomal membrane protein ABERRANT PEROXISOME MORPHOLOGY9 (APEM9). DAU is transiently expressed from bicellular pollen to mature pollen during male gametogenesis. DAU interacts with peroxisomal membrane proteins PEROXIN13 (PEX13) and PEX16 in planta. Consistently, both peroxisome biogenesis and peroxisome protein import are impaired in dau pollen. In addition, the jasmonic acid (JA) level is significantly decreased in dau pollen, and the dau mutant phenotype is partially rescued by exogenous application of JA, indicating that the male sterility is mainly due to JA deficiency. In addition, the phenotypic survey of peroxin mutants indicates that the PEXs most likely play different roles in pollen germination. Taken together, these data indicate that DAU/APEM9 plays critical roles in peroxisome biogenesis and function, which is essential for JA production and pollen maturation and germination. PMID:24510720

  16. The Tools are Out There: DAUs Knowledge Sharing Capabilities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    resources link back exhaustively to ACQuipedia ar- ticles, giving users one - stop information on key acquisition terms. DAU also introduced a new...dap.dau.mil>. Deployed in July 2009, the DAP is a one - stop source for acquisition information and tools, replacing the AT&L Knowledge Sharing System

  17. [Effect of dauricine on rat and human platelet aggregation and metabolism of arachidonic acid in washed rat platelets].

    PubMed

    Tong, L; Yue, T L

    1989-01-01

    Dauricine (Dau), an isoquinoline alkaloid extracted from the roots of Menispermum dauricum D. C. and used as an antiarrhythmic agent in China recently, was shown to inhibit rat platelet aggregation induced by arachidonic acid (AA) and ADP, as well as human platelet aggregation induced by AA, ADP and adrenaline (Adr) in vitro in a dose-dependent manner. The concentration of Dau required for 50% inhibition (IC50) of rat platelet aggregation induced by AA and ADP was 26 and 37 mumol/L, respectively. For human platelet aggregation induced by AA, ADP and Adr the IC50 of Dau was found to be 39, 55 and 43 mumol/L, respectively. Dau inhibited the cyclooxygenase pathway metabolites of AA (TXB2 and HHT) in washed intact rat platelets. The production of TXB2 and HHT was reduced by 26% and 19%, respectively, when the Dau concentration was 50 mumol/L and by 46 and 45%, respectively, when the concentration of Dau was 100 mumol/L. The formation of 12-HETE was also inhibited at 100 mumol/L of Dau. The inhibitory effect of Dau on AA metabolism may be one of the mechanisms related to its inhibition of platelet aggregation.

  18. Organizational Behavior in Acquisition Organizations: Creating Synergy for Informed Change

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-16

    Tuckman Model vs. the DAU Model Pamela J. Knight, PhD, DAU The Relationships Between Work Team Strategic Intent and Work Team Performance Thomas R...Davis Highway, Suite 1204, Arlington VA 22202-4302. Respondents should be aware that notwithstanding any other provision of law, no person shall be

  19. Dauricine inhibits insulin-like growth factor-I-induced hypoxia inducible factor 1α protein accumulation and vascular endothelial growth factor expression in human breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xu-dong; Zhou, Xin; Zhou, Ke-yuan

    2009-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effects of dauricine (Dau) on insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I)-induced hypoxia inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in human breast cancer cells (MCF-7). Methods: Serum-starved MCF-7 cells were pretreated for 1 h with different concentrations of Dau, followed by incubation with IGF-I for 6 h. HIF-1α and VEGF protein expression levels were analyzed by Western blotting and ELISA, respectively. HIF-1α and VEGF mRNA levels were determined by real-time PCR. In vitro angiogenesis was observed via the human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) tube formation assay. An in vitro invasion assay on HUVECs was performed. Results: Dau significantly inhibited IGF-I-induced HIF-1α protein expression but had no effect on HIF-1α mRNA expression. However, Dau remarkably suppressed VEGF expression at both protein and mRNA levels in response to IGF-I. Mechanistically, Dau suppressed IGF-I-induced HIF-1α and VEGF protein expression mainly by blocking the activation of PI-3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway. In addition, Dau reduced IGF-I-induced HIF-1α protein accumulation by inhibiting its synthesis as well as by promoting its degradation. Functionally, Dau inhibited angiogenesis in vitro. Moreover, Dau had a direct effect on IGF-I-induced invasion of HUVECs. Conclusion: Dau inhibits human breast cancer angiogenesis by suppressing HIF-1α protein accumulation and VEGF expression, which may provide a novel potential mechanism for the anticancer activities of Dau in human breast cancer. PMID:19349962

  20. Defense AR Journal. Issue 56, Volume 17, Number 4. Measuring Programs and Progress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-01

    driving outcome-based product support strategies that maxi - 4 5 8 | A Publication of the Defense Acquisition University http://www.dau.mil mize...business office, using policies and practices in line with the commander’s intent for that installation. While this maxi - mizes flexibility at the...Northrop Grumman had already earned contract extensions through 2017 . 4 7 0 | A Publication of the Defense Acquisition University http://www.dau.mil

  1. Defense AT and L, Volume 46, Number 1, January-February 2017

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-01-01

    Support Group Leo Filipowicz Director, DAU Visual Arts and Press Randy Weekes Defense AT&L Editorial Staff Managing Editor/Senior Editor, DAU Press...Benjamin Tyree Art Director Tia Gray Online Content Editor Collie J. Johnson Production Manager Frances Battle Online Support Nina Austin Copy Editor...Circulation Manager Debbie Gonzalez Editorial Support Noelia Gamboa Michael Shoemaker Article preparation/submission guidelines are located on the

  2. Should Cost: A Strategy for Managing Military Systems Money

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-01

    telecoms and network discussions of what has been done and what will come down as future system and policy changes. Iterative results included... telecom . Of the numerous SCIs available, the chief financial officer for the portfolio chose the QF-16 Engine Management (see photo). The program...be contacted at Jennifer.A.Miller212.civ@mail.mil. DAU Alumni Association Join The SucceSS neTwork The DAU Alumni Association opens the door to a

  3. Desacetyluvaricin induces S phase arrest in SW480 colorectal cancer cells through superoxide overproduction.

    PubMed

    Xue, Jun-Yi; Zhou, Guang-Xiong; Chen, Tianfeng; Gao, Si; Choi, Mei-Yuk; Wong, Yum-Shing

    2014-03-01

    Annonaceous acetogenins (ACGs) are a group of fatty acid-derivatives with potent anticancer effects. In the present study, we found desacetyluvaricin (Dau) exhibited notable in vitro antiproliferative effect on SW480 human colorectal carcinoma cells with IC50 value of 14 nM. The studies on the underlying mechanisms revealed that Dau inhibited the cancer cell growth through induction of S phase cell cycle arrest from 11.3% (control) to 33.2% (160 nM Dau), which was evidenced by the decreased protein expression of cyclin A Overproduction of superoxide, intracellular DNA damage, and inhibition of MEK/ERK signaling pathway, were also found involved in cells exposed to Dau. Moreover, pre-treatment of the cells with ascorbic acid significantly prevented the Dau-induced overproduction of superoxide, DNA damage and cell cycle arrest. Taken together, our results suggest that Dau induces S phase arrest in cancer cells by firstly superoxide overproduction and subsequently the involvement of various signaling pathways.

  4. Downregulation of myogenic microRNAs in sub-chronic but not in sub-acute model of daunorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Doka, Gabriel; Malikova, Eva; Galkova, Kristina; La Rocca, Giampiero; Kruzliak, Peter; Adamek, Mariusz; Rodrigo, Luis; Krenek, Peter; Klimas, Jan

    2017-03-16

    Cardiac muscle-related microRNAs play important roles in cardiac development and disease by translational silencing of mRNAs, the dominant mechanism of microRNA action. To test whether they could be involved in daunorubicin-associated cardiomyopathy (DACM), we determined expression patterns of myomiRs in two distinct models of DACM. We used 10-12 weeks old male Wistar rats. In the sub-acute model, rats were administered with six doses of daunorubicin (DAU-A, 3 mg/kg, i.p., every 48 h). Rats were sacrificed two days after the last dose. In the sub-chronic model, anaesthetized rats were administered a single dose of daunorubicin (15 mg/kg, i.v., DAU-C). Age-matched controls (CON) received vehicle. Rats were sacrificed eight weeks later. Left ventricular (LV) functions (LV pressure, rate of pressure development, +dP/dt and decline, -dP/dt) were measured using left ventricular catheterization. Expressions of myomiRs (miR-208a, miR-499, miR-1 and miR-133a), markers of cardiac failure (atrial and brain natriuretic peptides genes; Nppa and Nppb) and myosin heavy chain genes (Myh6, Myh7, Myh7b) in cardiac tissue were determined by RT-PCR. Protein expression of gp91phox NADPH oxidase subunit was detected by immunoblotting. Both DAU groups exhibited a similar depression of LV function, and LV weight reduction, accompanied by an upregulation of natriuretic peptides, and a decrease of Myh6 to total Myh ratio (-18% in DAU-A and - 25% in DAU-C, as compared to controls; both P < 0.05). DAU-C, but not DAU-A rats had a 35% mortality rate and exhibited a significantly increased gp91phox expression (DAU-C: 197 ± 33 versus CON-C: 100 ± 11; P < 0.05). Interestingly, myomiRs levels were only reduced in DAU-C compared to CON-C (miR-208: -45%, miR-499: -30%, miR-1: -29%, miR- and miR133a: -25%; all P < 0.05) but were unaltered in DAU-A. The lack of myomiRs expression, particularly in sub-chronic model, suggests the loss of control of myomiRs network on late

  5. Cardioprotective effects of inorganic nitrate/nitrite in chronic anthracycline cardiotoxicity: Comparison with dexrazoxane.

    PubMed

    Lenčová-Popelová, Olga; Jirkovský, Eduard; Jansová, Hana; Jirkovská-Vávrová, Anna; Vostatková-Tichotová, Lucie; Mazurová, Yvona; Adamcová, Michaela; Chládek, Jaroslav; Hroch, Miloš; Pokorná, Zuzana; Geršl, Vladimír; Šimůnek, Tomáš; Štěrba, Martin

    2016-02-01

    Dexrazoxane (DEX) is a clinically available cardioprotectant that reduces the toxicity induced by anthracycline (ANT) anticancer drugs; however, DEX is seldom used and its action is poorly understood. Inorganic nitrate/nitrite has shown promising results in myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury and recently in acute high-dose ANT cardiotoxicity. However, the utility of this approach for overcoming clinically more relevant chronic forms of cardiotoxicity remains elusive. Hence, in this study, the protective potential of inorganic nitrate and nitrite against chronic ANT cardiotoxicity was investigated, and the results were compared to those using DEX. Chronic cardiotoxicity was induced in rabbits with daunorubicin (DAU). Sodium nitrate (1g/L) was administered daily in drinking water, while sodium nitrite (0.15 or 5mg/kg) or DEX (60mg/kg) was administered parenterally before each DAU dose. Although oral nitrate induced a marked increase in plasma NOx, it showed no improvement in DAU-induced mortality, myocardial damage or heart failure. Instead, the higher nitrite dose reduced the incidence of end-stage cardiotoxicity, prevented related premature deaths and significantly ameliorated several molecular and cellular perturbations induced by DAU, particularly those concerning mitochondria. The latter result was also confirmed in vitro. Nevertheless, inorganic nitrite failed to prevent DAU-induced cardiac dysfunction and molecular remodeling in vivo and failed to overcome the cytotoxicity of DAU to cardiomyocytes in vitro. In contrast, DEX completely prevented all of the investigated molecular, cellular and functional perturbations that were induced by DAU. Our data suggest that the difference in cardioprotective efficacy between DEX and inorganic nitrite may be related to their different abilities to address a recently proposed upstream target for ANT in the heart - topoisomerase IIβ. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Neuroprotective effects of phytosterols and flavonoids from Cirsium setidens and Aster scaber in human brain neuroblastoma SK-N-SH cells.

    PubMed

    Chung, Mi Ja; Lee, Sanghyun; Park, Yong Il; Lee, Jisun; Kwon, Ki Han

    2016-03-01

    We investigated the neuroprotective effects and action mechanism of three major compounds [daucosterol (Dau), pectolinarin (Pec), and astragalin (Ast)] isolated from edible plants against H2O2-induced cell death of human brain neuroblastoma SK-N-SH cells. Cytotoxicity was determined by MTT and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assays. Apoptotic cell death was monitored by annexin V-FITC/PI double staining and by TUNEL assay. The formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), expression of antioxidant enzymes and phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) were determined by 2,7-dichlorofluorescein diacetate (DCF-DA) assay, RT-PCR, and western blotting, respectively. The ethyl acetate fractions from Cirsium setidens (CSEA) and Aster scaber (ASEA) showed neuroprotective effects in SK-N-SH cells. The phytochemicals were isolated from CSEA and ASEA and identified by spectral analyses, as β-sitosterol, Dau, Pec, Ast, or isoquercitrin. Pretreatment with Dau, Pec, or Ast showed protective effects against H2O2-induced cell death and inhibited ROS generation by oxidative stress. HO-1 mRNA and protein levels were increased by the presence of H2O2 and were further elevated by pretreatment with Dau and Ast. Dau pretreatment resulted in further increases of H2O2-induced enhancement in levels of CAT and SOD2. Pretreatment with Dau, Pec, and Ast inhibited phosphorylation of MAPK, such as extracellular protein regulated protein kinase, p38, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase by H2O2. Dau exerts its neuroprotective effects by down regulation of MAPK pathways and upregulation of the HO-1, CAT and SOD2 antioxidant genes and is associated with reduced oxidative stress in SK-N-SH cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Measurement of long-range angular correlation and quadrupole anisotropy of pions and (anti)protons in central d+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Adare, A.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akimoto, R.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Al-Ta’ani, H.; Alexander, J.; Andrews, K. R.; Angerami, A.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Appelt, E.; Aramaki, Y.; Armendariz, R.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Atomssa, E. T.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Bannier, B.; Barish, K. N.; Bassalleck, B.; Basye, A. T.; Bathe, S.; Baublis, V.; Baumann, C.; Bazilevsky, A.; Belikov, S.; Belmont, R.; Ben-Benjamin, J.; Bennett, R.; Bhom, J. H.; Blau, D. S.; Bok, J. S.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Broxmeyer, D.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Butsyk, S.; Campbell, S.; Caringi, A.; Castera, P.; Chen, C. -H.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, P.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cole, B. A.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Dahms, T.; Dairaku, S.; Danchev, I.; Das, K.; Datta, A.; David, G.; Dayananda, M. K.; Denisov, A.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dharmawardane, K. V.; Dietzsch, O.; Dion, A.; Donadelli, M.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Dutta, D.; D’Orazio, L.; Edwards, S.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Ellinghaus, F.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En’yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Fadem, B.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Fraenkel, Z.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fujiwara, K.; Fukao, Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Gal, C.; Garishvili, I.; Glenn, A.; Gong, H.; Gong, X.; Gonin, M.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grim, G.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gunji, T.; Guo, L.; Gustafsson, H. -Å.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamblen, J.; Han, R.; Hanks, J.; Harper, C.; Hashimoto, K.; Haslum, E.; Hayano, R.; He, X.; Heffner, M.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Hill, J. C.; Hohlmann, M.; Hollis, R. S.; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hori, Y.; Hornback, D.; Huang, S.; Ichihara, T.; Ichimiya, R.; Iinuma, H.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Inaba, M.; Iordanova, A.; Isenhower, D.; Ishihara, M.; Issah, M.; Ivanischev, D.; Iwanaga, Y.; Jacak, B. V.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; Jin, J.; John, D.; Johnson, B. M.; Jones, T.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kajihara, F.; Kamin, J.; Kaneti, S.; Kang, B. H.; Kang, J. H.; Kang, J. S.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kasai, M.; Kawall, D.; Kawashima, M.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kempel, T.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kijima, K. M.; Kikuchi, J.; Kim, A.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E. -J.; Kim, Y. -J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kinney, E.; Kiss, Á.; Kistenev, E.; Kleinjan, D.; Kline, P.; Kochenda, L.; Komkov, B.; Konno, M.; Koster, J.; Kotov, D.; Král, A.; Kravitz, A.; Kunde, G. J.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, J.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S. H.; Lee, S. R.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Li, X.; Lichtenwalner, P.; Liebing, P.; Lim, S. H.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Liška, T.; Liu, H.; Liu, M. X.; Love, B.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Malik, M. D.; Manion, A.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Mao, Y.; Masui, H.; Matathias, F.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; McGlinchey, D.; McKinney, C.; Means, N.; Mendoza, M.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mibe, T.; Mignerey, A. C.; Miki, K.; Milov, A.; Mitchell, J. T.; Miyachi, Y.; Mohanty, A. K.; Moon, H. J.; Morino, Y.; Morreale, A.; Morrison, D. P.; Motschwiller, S.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagle, J. L.; Naglis, M.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, K. R.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Nam, S.; Newby, J.; Nguyen, M.; Nihashi, M.; Nouicer, R.; Nyanin, A. S.; Oakley, C.; O’Brien, E.; Oda, S. X.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Oka, M.; Okada, K.; Onuki, Y.; Oskarsson, A.; Ouchida, M.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, B. H.; Park, I. H.; Park, S. K.; Park, W. J.; Pate, S. F.; Patel, L.; Pei, H.; Peng, J. -C.; Pereira, H.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Petti, R.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pisani, R. P.; Proissl, M.; Purschke, M. L.; Qu, H.; Rak, J.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Rembeczki, S.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Roach, D.; Roche, G.; Rolnick, S. D.; Rosati, M.; Rosen, C. A.; Rosendahl, S. S. E.; Ružička, P.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sakashita, K.; Samsonov, V.; Sano, S.; Sarsour, M.; Sato, T.; Savastio, M.; Sawada, S.; Sedgwick, K.; Seele, J.; Seidl, R.; Seto, R.; Sharma, D.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T. -A.; Shigaki, K.; Shim, H. H.; Shimomura, M.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Sim, K. S.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Slunečka, M.; Sodre, T.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Stankus, P. W.; Stenlund, E.; Stoll, S. P.; Sugitate, T.; Sukhanov, A.; Sun, J.; Sziklai, J.; Takagui, E. M.; Takahara, A.; Taketani, A.; Tanabe, R.; Tanaka, Y.; Taneja, S.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Tennant, E.; Themann, H.; Thomas, D.; Thomas, T. L.; Togawa, M.; Toia, A.; Tomášek, L.; Tomášek, M.; Torii, H.; Towell, R. S.; Tserruya, I.; Tsuchimoto, Y.; Utsunomiya, K.; Vale, C.; Valle, H.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vazquez-Zambrano, E.; Veicht, A.; Velkovska, J.; Vértesi, R.; Virius, M.; Vossen, A.; Vrba, V.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Watanabe, Y. S.; Wei, F.; Wei, R.; Wessels, J.; White, S. N.; Winter, D.; Woody, C. L.; Wright, R. M.; Wysocki, M.; Yamaguchi, Y. L.; Yamaura, K.; Yang, R.; Yanovich, A.; Ying, J.; Yokkaichi, S.; Yoo, J. S.; You, Z.; Young, G. R.; Younus, I.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zelenski, A.; Zhou, S.

    2015-05-12

    In this study, we present azimuthal angular correlations between charged hadrons and energy deposited in calorimeter towers in central d+Au and aluminum bias p+p collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV. The charged hadron is measured at midrapidity lηl < 0.35, and the energy us measured at large rapidity (–3.7 < η < –3.1, Au-going direction). An enhanced near-side angular correlation across lΔηl > 2.75 is observed in d+Au collisions. Using the event plane method applied to the Au-going energy distribution, we extract the anisotropy strength v₂ for inclusive charged hadrons at midrapidity up to pT = 4.5 GeV/c. We also present the measurement of v₂ for identified π± and (anti)protons in central d+Au collisions, and observe a mass-ordering pattern similar to that seen in heavy ion collisions. These results are compared with viscous hydrodynamic calculations and measurements from p+Pb at √sNN = 5.02 TeV. The magnitude of the mass-ordering in d+Au is found to be smaller than that in p+Pb collisions, which may indicate smaller radial flow in lower energy d+Au collisions.

  8. Control of the intermolecular photodimerization of anthracene derivatives by hydrogen bonding of urea groups in dilute solution.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Hisato; Nishimura, Yoshinobu; Arai, Tatsuo

    2016-08-04

    The photodimerization reaction of anthracene derivatives was performed by capitalizing on intermolecular hydrogen bonds. Anthracene derivatives that can control the dimerization reaction depending on the substitution site were designed by using two anthryl moieties and one urea group, referred to as N,N'-dianthracen-n-ylurea, nDAU (n = 1, 2 and 9), which are symmetrically substituted by 1-anthryl, 2-anthryl and 9-anthryl groups, respectively. We investigated the excimer emission and photodimerization reaction of these anthracene-urea derivatives using absorption, emission, and (1)H NMR spectroscopy along with fluorescence decay measurements. All derivatives showed a concentration dependence of their fluorescence spectra and multiple fluorescence lifetime components even at 10(-6) M. Significantly, 9DAU resulted in an intermolecular photodimerization reaction. These differences in photoreactivity of nDAU may depend on variations in the overlap of the intermolecularly associated anthracene rings of nDAU by hydrogen bonding between intermolecular urea moieties. Furthermore, the dimerization quantum yield of 9DAU was reduced by the addition of tetrabutylammonium acetate (TBAAc). Consequently, we revealed that the substitution site and the addition of TBAAc affected the dimerization reaction of anthracene-urea derivatives.

  9. Early and delayed cardioprotective intervention with dexrazoxane each show different potential for prevention of chronic anthracycline cardiotoxicity in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Jirkovský, Eduard; Lenčová-Popelová, Olga; Hroch, Miloš; Adamcová, Michaela; Mazurová, Yvona; Vávrová, Jaroslava; Mičuda, Stanislav; Šimůnek, Tomáš; Geršl, Vladimír; Štěrba, Martin

    2013-09-15

    Despite incomplete understanding to its mechanism of action, dexrazoxane (DEX) is still the only clearly effective cardioprotectant against chronic anthracycline (ANT) cardiotoxicity. However, its clinical use is currently restricted to patients exceeding significant ANT cumulative dose (300mg/m(2)), although each ANT cycle may induce certain potentially irreversible myocardial damage. Therefore, the aim of this study was to compare early and delayed DEX intervention against chronic ANT cardiotoxicity and study the molecular events involved. The cardiotoxicity was induced in rabbits with daunorubicin (DAU; 3mg/kg/week for 10 weeks); DEX (60mg/kg) was administered either before the 1st or 7th DAU dose (i.e. after ≈300mg/m(2) cumulative dose). While both DEX administration schedules prevented DAU-induced premature deaths and severe congestive heart failure, only the early intervention completely prevented the left ventricular dysfunction, myocardial morphological changes and mitochondrial damage. Further molecular analyses did not support the assumption that DEX cardioprotection is based and directly proportional to protection from DAU-induced oxidative damage and/or deletions in mtDNA. Nevertheless, DAU induced significant up-regulation of heme oxygenase 1 pathway while heme synthesis was inversely regulated and both changes were schedule-of-administration preventable by DEX. Early and delayed DEX interventions also differed in ability to prevent DAU-induced down-regulation of expression of mitochondrial proteins encoded by both nuclear and mitochondrial genome. Hence, the present functional, morphological as well as the molecular data highlights the enormous cardioprotective effects of DEX and provides novel insights into the molecular events involved. Furthermore, the data suggests that currently recommended delayed intervention may not be able to take advantage of the full cardioprotective potential of the drug.

  10. Indications of conical emission of charged hadrons at the BNL relativistic heavy ion collider.

    PubMed

    Abelev, B I; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Anderson, B D; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Bai, Y; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Baumgart, S; Beavis, D R; Bellwied, R; Benedosso, F; Betts, R R; Bhardwaj, S; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Biritz, B; Bland, L C; Bombara, M; Bonner, B E; Botje, M; Bouchet, J; Braidot, E; Brandin, A V; Bruna, E; Bueltmann, S; Burton, T P; Bystersky, M; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Callner, J; Catu, O; Cebra, D; Cendejas, R; Cervantes, M C; Chajecki, Z; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Chen, J Y; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, K E; Christie, W; Chung, S U; Clarke, R F; Codrington, M J M; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cosentino, M R; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Dash, S; Daugherity, M; De Silva, C; de Moura, M M; Dedovich, T G; Dephillips, M; Derevschikov, A A; de Souza, R Derradi; Didenko, L; Djawotho, P; Dogra, S M; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, F; Dunlop, J C; Dutta Mazumdar, M R; Edwards, W R; Efimov, L G; Elhalhuli, E; Elnimr, M; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Estienne, M; Eun, L; Fachini, P; Fatemi, R; Fedorisin, J; Feng, A; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fine, V; Fisyak, Y; Gagliardi, C A; Gaillard, L; Gangadharan, D R; Ganti, M S; Garcia-Solis, E; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; Gorbunov, Y N; Gordon, A; Grebenyuk, O; Grosnick, D; Grube, B; Guertin, S M; Guimaraes, K S F F; Gupta, A; Gupta, N; Guryn, W; Haag, B; Hallman, T J; Hamed, A; Harris, J W; He, W; Heinz, M; Heppelmann, S; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffman, A M; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Hollis, R S; Huang, H Z; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Iordanova, A; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Jakl, P; Jin, F; Jones, P G; Joseph, J; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kajimoto, K; Kang, K; Kapitan, J; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Kettler, D; Khodyrev, V Yu; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Klein, S R; Knospe, A G; Kocoloski, A; Koetke, D D; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kouchpil, V; Kravtsov, P; Kravtsov, V I; Krueger, K; Krus, M; Kuhn, C; Kumar, L; Kurnadi, P; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lapointe, S; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, C-H; Levine, M J; Li, C; Li, Y; Lin, G; Lin, X; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, H; Liu, J; Liu, L; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Longacre, R S; Love, W A; Lu, Y; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, G L; Ma, Y G; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Mall, O I; Mangotra, L K; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McShane, T S; Meschanin, A; Millane, J; Miller, M L; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mischke, A; Mitchell, J; Mohanty, B; Molnar, L; Morozov, D A; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nattrass, C; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nepali, C; Netrakanti, P K; Ng, M J; Nogach, L V; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okada, H; Okorokov, V; Olson, D; Pachr, M; Page, B S; Pal, S K; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlak, T; Peitzmann, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Phatak, S C; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Poskanzer, A M; Potukuchi, B V K S; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Pruthi, N K; Putschke, J; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Reed, R; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L; Russcher, M J; Rykov, V; Sahoo, R; Sakrejda, I; Sakuma, T; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sarsour, M; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Selyuzhenkov, I; Seyboth, P; Shabetai, A; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Sharma, M; Shi, S S; Shi, X-H; Sichtermann, E P; Simon, F; Singaraju, R N; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stadnik, A; Stanislaus, T D S; Staszak, D; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Suaide, A A P; Suarez, M C; Subba, N L; Sumbera, M; Sun, X M; Sun, Y; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tang, Z; Tarnowsky, T; Thein, D; Thomas, J H; Tian, J; Timmins, A R; Timoshenko, S; Tlusty, D; Tokarev, M; Trainor, T A; Tram, V N; Trattner, A L; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tsai, O D; Ulery, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; van Leeuwen, M; Vander Molen, A M; Vanfossen, J A; Varma, R; Vasconcelos, G M S; Vasilevski, I M; Vasiliev, A N; Videbaek, F; Vigdor, S E; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Voloshin, S A; Wada, M; Waggoner, W T; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, J S; Wang, Q; Wang, X; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, Y; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, Y; Xu, Z; Yepes, P; Yoo, I-K; Yue, Q; Zawisza, M; Zbroszczyk, H; Zhan, W; Zhang, H; Zhang, S; Zhang, W M; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, Y; Zhong, C; Zhou, J; Zoulkarneev, R; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zuo, J X

    2009-02-06

    Three-particle azimuthal correlation measurements with a high transverse momentum trigger particle are reported for pp, d+Au, and Au+Au collisions at sqrt[s_{NN}]=200 GeV by the STAR experiment. Dijet structures are observed in pp, d+Au and peripheral Au+Au collisions. An additional structure is observed in central Au+Au data, signaling conical emission of correlated charged hadrons. The conical emission angle is found to be theta=1.37+/-0.02(stat)-0.07+0.06(syst), independent of p_{ perpendicular}.

  11. NMR investigation of the effect of caffeine on the hetero-association of an anticancer drug with a vitamin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evstigneev, M. P.; Evstigneev, V. P.; Davies, D. B.

    2006-12-01

    The complexation between an anti-cancer drug Daunomycin (DAU) and a Vitamin B 2 derivative, flavin-mononucleotide (FMN), in the presence of a third type of aromatic molecule, caffeine (CAF), in aqueous solution has been studied by NMR spectroscopy. Ternary mixtures of the drug, vitamin and caffeine have been analysed quantitatively taking into account all possible complexation reactions between the aromatic molecules in solution. The results show that complexation between DAU and FMN decreases on addition of CAF which suggests that caffeine at physiological concentrations in vivo may affect the biological synergism of drug and vitamin.

  12. Charged particle multiplicity studies with PHOBOS.

    SciTech Connect

    Alver, B.; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Ballintijn, M.; Barton, D. S.; Physics; Massachusetts Inst. of Tech.; BNL

    2008-01-01

    Summary and conclusion: (1) Multiplicity - PHOBOS have performed complete charged particle multiplicity measurements for Au+Au, Cu+Cu, d+Au, and p+p collisions, System size dependence, and 'Complete' pseudorapidity distributions; 'Universality' compared to elementary e+e- collisions; and (2) Midrapidity multiplicity - Factorization of centrality and energy dependencies; (3) Limiting fragmentation - extended longitudinal scaling - Seen for Au+Au, Cu+Cu, and d+Au, Also observed in flow observables; (4) Total charged particle multiplicity - N{sub ch}/N{sub part} constant with centrality, (5) Future - Finish up many analysis and reviews.

  13. Indications of conical emission of charged hadrons at the BNL relativistic heavy ion collider.

    SciTech Connect

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Krueger, K.; Spinka, H. M.; Underwood, D. G.; High Energy Physics; Univ. of Illinois; Panjab Univ.; Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre; Kent State Univ.; Particle Physic Lab.; STAR Collaboration

    2009-01-01

    Three-particle azimuthal correlation measurements with a high transverse momentum trigger particle are reported for pp, d+Au, and Au+Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV by the STAR experiment. Dijet structures are observed in pp, d+Au and peripheral Au+Au collisions. An additional structure is observed in central Au+Au data, signaling conical emission of correlated charged hadrons. The conical emission angle is found to be {theta} = 1.37 {+-} 0.02(stat){sub -0.07}{sup +0.06} (syst), independent of p.

  14. Defense AT and L. Volume 39, Number 4. July August 2010

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    Editorial Staff Senior Editor, DAU Press • Managing Editor Carol Scheina Contributing Editors Christina Cavoli Judith M. Greig Collie J. Johnson Art...L (ISSN 1547-5476), formerly Program Manager , is published bimonthly by the DAU Press and is free to all U.S. and foreign national subscribers...Atlantic Region acquisition/program management department chair, oversaw the development of this interview. D E F E N S E A T & L I N T E R V I E W

  15. Defense Acquisition Workforce Improvement Act (DAWIA) Certification: A Comparative Analysis of Certification Versus Qualification

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    Manager DACUM Developing a Curriculum DAP Defense Acquisition Position DASWP Defense Acquisition Strategic Workforce Plan DAU Defense...a developing a curriculum ( DACUM ) methodology and practitioner focus groups. DACUM , according to the DACUM website, is a “storyboarding process... DACUM , 2001). The resultant information is consolidated in chart format and usually includes information on critical and frequently performed tasks and

  16. Best Practices in Defense Technology Development and Technology Maturity Assessments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-28

    Mr. Jeffrey Craver Defense Acquisition University Lt Col Dian Hall DTRA RD 2010-04-28 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for Public Release...Contact/Consultation Information Mr. Jeff Craver Defense Acquisition University South Region Huntsville, AL 35807 E-mail: Jeffrey.Craver@dau.mil Dian

  17. An Analysis of the Effect of Knowledge Management on the Execution of Simplified Acquisition Procedures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-27

    Connection website: https://acc.dau.mil/CommunityBrowser.aspx?id=340759&view=w Department of Defense Office of Inspector General. (2012). ISO 9001 ...gain a competitive advantage in procurements using SAPs by leveraging existing databases, expertise, available training , and other sources of...knowledge management to gain a competitive advantage in procurements using SAPs by leveraging existing databases, expertise, available training , and

  18. 75 FR 22562 - Board of Visitors Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-29

    ... Visitors (BoV) will be held at DAU Headquarters at Fort Belvoir, Virginia. The purpose of this meeting is to report back to the BoV on continuing items of interest. DATES: The meeting will be held on May...

  19. Doxylamine: a cause for false-positive gas chromatographic assay for phencyclidine.

    PubMed

    Schaldenbrand, J D; McClatchey, K D; Patel, J A; Muilenberg, M J

    1981-01-01

    A 25-year-old white woman ingested an unknown quantity of doxylamine succinate and flurazepam. Urine immunoassay screen (EMIT-dau) was positive for benzodiazopine and negative for phencyclidine. Subsequent gas chromatographic assay of the urine revealed a markedly positive assay for phencyclidine. Doxylamine was ultimately found to be the cause for the false-positive gas chromatographic assay for phencyclidine.

  20. DoD Acquisition Workforce Education: An SBA Education Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davenport, Richard W.

    2009-01-01

    A Department of Defense (DoD) M&S education task force is in the process of studying the Modeling and Simulation (M&S) education of the acquisition workforce. Historically, DoD acquisition workforce education is not referred to as education, but rather what the Defense Acquisition University (DAU) refers to as "practitioner training, career…

  1. Defense Acquisition Research Journal. Volume 20, Number 3, Issue 67, October 2013

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    DAU ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 2013−2014 HIRSCH RESEARCH PAPER COMPETITION It’s a New World Out There: The Next 10 Years! CALL FOR PAPERS Research topics...to understand the respondents’ satisfaction with the use of these practices. Although virtually all respondents indicated that they found some

  2. Using Open Systems Architecture to Revolutionize Capability Acquisition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-13

    in adaptability Integrate & Deliver • Manage Platform-unique elements • Reduce acquisition cost & risk • Spur innovation & enhance...Manage Platform-unique elements • Reduce acquisition cost & risk • Spur innovation & enhance warfighter capability The Naval Business Model...Architecture (OSA) Strategy 6 See acc.dau.mil/osastrategy • Technical Reference Frameworks (TRFs) • Defined & managed by Government/ Industry consortia

  3. Balancing Government Risks with Contractor Incentives in Performance-Based Logistics Contracts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    party), partially to ensure compliance with requirements for government depot workloads. In effect, these public / private partnerships create a...the government and commercial firms, regardless of whether or not the PBLs involve public / private partnerships . Given this criteria, the research...the PBL strategy involves capitalizing on integrated logistics chains and public / private partnerships (DAU, 2005). Research conducted by DeVries

  4. Department of Defense Enterprise Architecture Transition Strategy, Version 2.0

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-29

    organization, training, materials , leadership and education, personnel, and facilities (DOTMLPF) implications for making information available on a...processes such as the Systems Development Lifecycle (http://akss.dau.mil/dag/) and Information Resources Management (DoD IRM Plan) have also occurred...Enterprise Information Decision Support (EIDS) investment: risks to medical and dental readiness and medical surveillance  Defense Message

  5. 48 CFR 237.172 - Service Contracts Surveillance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Surveillance. 237.172 Section 237.172 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS...-General 237.172 Service Contracts Surveillance. Ensure that quality assurance surveillance plans are....) Retain quality assurance surveillance plans in the official contract file. See https://sam.dau.mil, Step...

  6. 48 CFR 237.172 - Service Contracts Surveillance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Surveillance. 237.172 Section 237.172 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS...-General 237.172 Service Contracts Surveillance. Ensure that quality assurance surveillance plans are....) Retain quality assurance surveillance plans in the official contract file. See https://sam.dau.mil, Step...

  7. 48 CFR 237.172 - Service Contracts Surveillance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Surveillance. 237.172 Section 237.172 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS...-General 237.172 Service Contracts Surveillance. Ensure that quality assurance surveillance plans are....) Retain quality assurance surveillance plans in the official contract file. See https://sam.dau.mil, Step...

  8. 48 CFR 237.172 - Service Contracts Surveillance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Surveillance. 237.172 Section 237.172 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS...-General 237.172 Service Contracts Surveillance. Ensure that quality assurance surveillance plans are....) Retain quality assurance surveillance plans in the official contract file. See https://sam.dau.mil, Step...

  9. 48 CFR 237.172 - Service Contracts Surveillance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Surveillance. 237.172 Section 237.172 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS...-General 237.172 Service Contracts Surveillance. Ensure that quality assurance surveillance plans are....) Retain quality assurance surveillance plans in the official contract file. See https://sam.dau.mil, Step...

  10. Centrality, Rapidity And Transverse-Momentum Dependence of Cold Nuclear Matter Effects on J/Psi Production in D Au, Cu Cu And Au Au Collisions at S(NN)**(1/2)

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreiro, E.G.; Fleuret, F.; Lansberg, J.P.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; /SPhN, DAPNIA, Saclay

    2011-11-11

    We have carried out a wide study of Cold Nuclear Matter (CNM) effects on J/{Psi} = production in dAu, CuCu and AuAu collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV. We have studied the effects of three different gluon-shadowing parameterizations, using the usual simplified kinematics for which the momentum of the gluon recoiling against the J/{Psi} is neglected as well as an exact kinematics for a 2 {yields} 2 process, namely g + g {yields} J/{psi} + g as expected from LO pQCD. We have shown that the rapidity distribution of the nuclear modification factor R{sub dAu}, and particularly its anti-shadowing peak, is systematically shifted toward larger rapidities in the 2 {yields} 2 kinematics, irrespective of which shadowing parameterization is used. In turn, we have noted differences in the effective final-state nuclear absorption needed to fit the PHENIX dAu data. Taking advantage of our implementation of a 2 {yields} 2 kinematics, we have also computed the transverse momentum dependence of the nuclear modification factor, which cannot be predicted with the usual simplified kinematics. All the corresponding observables have been computed for CuCu and AuAu collisions and compared to the PHENIX and STAR data. Finally, we have extracted the effective nuclear absorption from the recent measurements of RCP in dAu collisions by the PHENIX collaboration.

  11. 76 FR 14949 - Defense Acquisition University Industry Day: “Better Buying Power” Initiatives

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-18

    ... of the Secretary Defense Acquisition University Industry Day: ``Better Buying Power'' Initiatives AGENCY: Defense Acquisition University, DoD. ACTION: Event notice. SUMMARY: Mrs. Katrina McFarland, President, Defense Acquisition University (DAU), will host a forum to discuss implementation of Better...

  12. 76 FR 62394 - Meeting of the Defense Acquisition University Board of Visitors; Cancellation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-07

    ... of the Secretary Meeting of the Defense Acquisition University Board of Visitors; Cancellation AGENCY: Defense Acquisition University (DAU), Department of Defense (DoD). ACTION: Notice; cancellation. SUMMARY: On September 22, 2011 (76 FR 58786), the Defense Acquisition University Board of Visitors announced a...

  13. Defense Acquisition University Program Managers Tool Kit

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    International Standards Organization ( ISO ) registration of a supplier’s quality system since there have been instances where ISO 9001 -registered supplier...58 Quality Management Systems (Defense Acquisition Guidebook...facilities and equipment. DAU PROGRAM MANAGERS TOOL KIT 59 Quality Management Systems (see Defense Acquisition Guidebook) • The PM should allow

  14. The Development of an All-in-One Virtual Campus from Ground Zero.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, Shanan W.; Sobieszcyk, Frank; Farmer, Rachelle

    This paper describes the authors' experiences in developing an all-in-one virtual university. The Defense Acquisition University (DAU) is a consortium of Department of Defense education and training institutions and organizations that provides mandatory and assignment-specific courses for military and civilian personnel serving in 11 acquisition…

  15. Gold nanoparticle-based beacon to detect STAT5b mRNA expression in living cells: a case optimized by bioinformatics screen.

    PubMed

    Deng, Dawei; Li, Yang; Xue, Jianpeng; Wang, Jie; Ai, Guanhua; Li, Xin; Gu, Yueqing

    2015-01-01

    Messenger RNA (mRNA), a single-strand ribonucleic acid with functional gene information is usually abnormally expressed in cancer cells and has become a promising biomarker for the study of tumor progress. Hairpin DNA-coated gold nanoparticle (hDAuNP) beacon containing a bare gold nanoparticle (AuNP) as fluorescence quencher and thiol-terminated fluorescently labeled stem-loop-stem oligonucleotide sequences attached by Au-S bond is currently a new nanoscale biodiagnostic platform capable of mRNA detection, in which the design of the loop region sequence is crucial for hybridizing with the target mRNA. Hence, in this study, to improve the sensitivity and selectivity of hDAuNP beacon simultaneously, the loop region of hairpin DNA was screened by bioinformatics strategy. Here, signal transducer and activator of transcription 5b (STAT5b) mRNA was selected and used as a practical example. The results from the combined characterizations using optical techniques, flow cytometry assay, and cell microscopic imaging showed that after optimization, the as-prepared hDAuNP beacon had higher selectivity and sensitivity for the detection of STAT5b mRNA in living cells, as compared with our previous beacon. Thus, the bioinformatics method may be a promising new strategy for assisting in the designing of the hDAuNP beacon, extending its application in the detection of mRNA expression and the resultant mRNA-based biological processes and disease pathogenesis.

  16. Time Management Tips: For Those Who Dont Have the Time

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    chime. Whipping out your phone every time it emits a horrid hip-hop riff or Beethoven prelude hurts your productivity. Check mobile e-mail when you...productive day! The author may be contacted at roy.wood@dau.mil. Whipping out your phone every time it emits a horrid hip-hop riff or Beethoven prelude hurts your productivity.

  17. DoD Acquisition Workforce Education: An SBA Education Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davenport, Richard W.

    2009-01-01

    A Department of Defense (DoD) M&S education task force is in the process of studying the Modeling and Simulation (M&S) education of the acquisition workforce. Historically, DoD acquisition workforce education is not referred to as education, but rather what the Defense Acquisition University (DAU) refers to as "practitioner training, career…

  18. How Well Are PMs Doing? Industry View of Defense Program Manager Counterparts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    professional and holds a PhD in Organization and Management from Capella University, Minneapolis, Minnesota. (E-mail address: Roy.Wood@dau.mil) 2 1 8...aerospace industry. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Capella University, Minneapolis, MN. Besner, C., & Hobbs, B. (2006). The perceived value and...competencies in the workplace. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Capella University, Minneapolis, MN. Government Accountability Office. (2005

  19. The Defense Acquisition University: Training Professionals for the Acquisition Workforce, 1992-2003

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    109 Performance Learning Model ...102 Figure 13 DAU Learning Construct: Modernizing Acquisition Training— Performance Learning Model (PLM) (2001...of DAWIA intended that the new university be modeled as an “academic” institution. Representative Mavroules explained his philosophy for the new

  20. More Time Management Tips for Busy People

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    University (DAU) and also teaches for the Phoenix School of Advanced Studies . He is a retired naval officer and acquisition professional. No...be surprised how quickly you can shrink those monster - stacks into something more manageable and less intimidating. So, what now? Simply put a couple

  1. Funding Ammunition Ports

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    CRM D0020940.A2/Final, December 2009. Brauner, Marygail K., Ellen M. Pint, John R. Bondanella, Daniel A. Relles, and Paul Steinberg , Dollars and Sense...2011: http://www.dau.mil/pubscats/PubsCats/Hanks.pdf Hirshleifer, Jack , “On the Economics of Transfer Pricing,” The Journal of Business, Vol. 29, No. 3

  2. Performance of the Defense Acquisition System, 2013 Annual Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-28

    Attributed to W. Edwards Deming While the United States achieves its national security missions by equipping its military forces with the best weapons... quality , and availability. 2 See https://dag.dau.mil/Pages/acqframework.aspx for a...helps to understand how well the defense acquisition system performs, based on management principles and intermediary outputs and outcomes. As this

  3. Heavy Flavor Measurements at the RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Donadelli, Marisilvia

    2010-11-12

    The main focus of the heavy flavor program at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) facility is to investigate the properties of the Quark-Gluon Plasma poduced in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions, by studying its effect on open heavy flavor and quarkonia production. The measurements shown in this Letter were performed by PHENIX and STAR experiments in p+p, d+Au, Au+Au collisions at {radical}(S{sub NN}) = 200 GeV. Charm and beauty cross sections are measured and compared through single lepton, and lepton-hadron correlations in p+p collisions. R{sub AA} modification factor for single electrons in Au+Au collisions is presented. Quarkonia measurements include J/{Psi}, {Psi}' and {Upsilon} yields as well as rapidity dependence, and modification factors for J/{Psi} in d+Au collisions and for {Upsilon} in Au+Au collisions.

  4. Transient-Evoked Otoacoustic Emissions, Preliminary Results for Validity of TEOAEs Implemented on Mimosa Acoustics T2K Measurement System v3.1.3

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-23

    20 -10 0 10 20 30 40 Frequency (kHz) L s ( dB S P L r m s/ 23 .4 H z) Click Dau chirp Shera chirp Figure 1. Comparison of spectra for the click...found. PAGE 5 -10 -8 -6 -4 -2 0 2 -5 0 5 p s ( 20 m P a pe ak ) Click 53 dB SPL, 1-5 kHz -10 -8 -6 -4 -2 0 2 -5 0 5 p s ( 20 m P a pe ak...Dau chirp 53 dB SPL, 1-5 kHz -10 -8 -6 -4 -2 0 2 -5 0 5 Stimulus duration (ms) p s ( 20 m P a pe ak )

  5. Formation of complexes of antimicrobial agent norfloxacin with antitumor antibiotics of anthracycline series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evstigneev, M. P.; Rybakova, K. A.; Davies, D. B.

    2007-05-01

    The formation of complexes in solutions of the norfloxacin antimicrobial agent (NOR) with daunomycin (DAU) and nogalamycin (NOG), antitumor anthracycline antibiotics, was studied using 1H NMR spectroscopy. Based on the concentration and temperature dependences of the chemical shifts of the protons of interacting molecules, the equilibrium constants and thermodynamic parameters (enthalpy and entropy) of heteroassociation of the antibiotics were calculated. It was shown that NOR interacts with DAU (NOG) in aqueous solutions forming stacked heterocomplexes with parallel orientation of the molecular chromophores. The conclusion was drawn that such interactions should be taken into account when anthracyclines and quinolones are jointly administered during combined chemotherapy, since they can contribute to the medico-biological synergistic effect of these antibiotics.

  6. Phase Zero Contracting Operations (PZCO) -- Strategic and Integrative Planning for Contingency and Expeditionary Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-02

    assessments of the Annex W plan may utilize strength, weakness, opportunity, threat ( SWOT ) and capability gap analysis techniques. The SWOT method...contracting career field. He is the course manager for the DAU’s CON 234 Contingency Contracting Course and DAU-South’s regional representative for...strategic and analytical areas, such as OPLAN analysis , logistics assessments, contracting, and similar professional disciplines. Of note, most

  7. From Not-So-Great to Worse: The Myth of Best Practice Methodologies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-13

    market performance according to Collins’ measure, and that none do so when measured according to a metric based on modern portfolio theory. We...in the Army Command and General Staff College’s Department of Logistics and Resource Operations . 55 Defense AT&L: July-August 2009 In a late-1980s...JOIN THE SUCCESS NETWORK The DAU Alumni Association opens the door to a worldwide network of Defense Acquisition University graduates, faculty

  8. Defense Acquisition Research Journal: Strengthening Cost Consciousness, Professionalism, and Technical Excellence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-01

    Bechler, 1998). An ample supply of programs teaches us to be better communicators; few programs exist that teach us to be 126 Defense ARJ, April 2016, Vol...the best path focused on outcomes and reality … separates per- ceptions and agendas from needs and goals.” For SLMs at DAU more than 10 years, the...committed to teach - ing those who work for him. Humility is also an important characteristic. Patience and persistence. Bureaucratic organizations are

  9. Predicting speech intelligibility based on a correlation metric in the envelope power spectrum domain.

    PubMed

    Relaño-Iborra, Helia; May, Tobias; Zaar, Johannes; Scheidiger, Christoph; Dau, Torsten

    2016-10-01

    A speech intelligibility prediction model is proposed that combines the auditory processing front end of the multi-resolution speech-based envelope power spectrum model [mr-sEPSM; Jørgensen, Ewert, and Dau (2013). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 134(1), 436-446] with a correlation back end inspired by the short-time objective intelligibility measure [STOI; Taal, Hendriks, Heusdens, and Jensen (2011). IEEE Trans. Audio Speech Lang.

  10. A Rationale and Framework for Establishing a Systems Engineering Community Within the Department of the Army

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    workforce. Recruitment is not an event; it is a process. Moira Hanna (2010), explained recruitment as being comprised of several steps: “applicant...efforts ( Hanna , 2010, p. 1). 36 The challenges in recruiting are great when an agency is working against current undergraduate student thought processes...engineering. This is because the systems engineering taught in DAU would be focused on the way the engineer supports the PM. The hypothetical jack of

  11. Scandal and Tragedy Or Acquisition Lessons Relearned by the F-35 Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-01-01

    recommendations on joint aircraft acquisition strategies for the future to avoid the perception of scandal and tragedy. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.22594/dau...group of SMEs produced high-fidelity qualitative analysis of the experi- ences, beliefs, and perceptions of respondents from multiple perspectives...establishing quality assurance pro- grams over the contractor, which the JPO disagrees with because it does not have the resources or the responsibility to

  12. Defense Acquisition Research Journal. Volume 23, Number 4, Issue 79, October 2016

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-01

    Collie J. Johnson Associate Editor Michael Shoemaker Copy Editor/Circulation Manager Debbie Gonzalez Multimedia Assistant Noelia Gamboa Editing, Design...supported by the DAUAA—and earn Continuous Learning Points toward DoD continuing education requirements. Membership is open to all DAU graduates, faculty...and explain how to engage with the books and with one another. Most of all, we encourage you to bring what you have learned and recognized into your

  13. ϕ Meson Measurements at Forward/Backward Rapidity at RHIC with PHENIX Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiaochun; Phenix Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    Given the relatively small hadronic interaction cross section, ϕ meson production provide a unique and complimentary method for exploring the hot and dense medium properties created in the relativistic heavy ion collisions. In this talk, a summary of the ϕ measurements at forward and backward rapidities in p+p, d+Au, Cu+Au collisions in the PHENIX experiment at RHIC will be given. Office of Science, Department of Energy.

  14. Comparison of Variance-to-Mean Ratio Methods for Reparables Inventory Management

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-01

    Demystifying RBL” called RBL “the cornerstone of the supply system for setting recoverable parts levels in the supply system” ( Fulk , 1999). In its predecessor...only a very few people know what goes on inside. Because of this, users often feel that RBL is more of a shove system than a push system ( Fulk , 1999...website. n. pag. http://akss.dau.mil/software/6.jsp. 23 March 2006. Fulk , David A. Demystifying RBL. Air Force Logistics Management Agency

  15. Criteria for Limit Equilibrium Slope Stability Program Package.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-05-01

    such commercial products. .n . .... . . . . . . . . Unclassified SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE (Whe~n Date Entered __________________ REPORT...capabilities. The final package will be able to perform either (Continued) DD I 13 CITION OF I NOV 65 IS 08SOLETE Unclassified SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS...PAGE (Whent Date Entered) Unclassified SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PA69(ghs DAMISI Dau0 20. ABSTRACT (Continued). -4a Bishop, Spencer, Modified

  16. Survey of Small Business Barriers to Department of Defense Contracts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-01-01

    1 : 2–29 Survey of Small Business Barriers to DoD Contracts http://www.dau.mil Research Hypothesis Methodology Based on our literature review...gain further insight into our research hypothesis, we developed and administered a survey for small businesses. A large-scale survey was administered...innovation research (SBIR) participants and engineering support firms, “nontechnical” service-based businesses providing services DoD uses every day

  17. Early Birds in Korea: Exporting Defense AT and L Has Far Reaching Impact

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-01

    photos. 53 Defense AT&L: November–December 2015 2006, Yu, Park, Maj. Hansoo Park and Lt. Col. Hyeok Seo gathered at the conference room of the JUSMAG...the members of the EBS. The members evolve from acquisition professionals to acquisition leaders themselves. EBS President Col. Hyeok Seo of the ROK...Assistant Secretary of Defense for Acquisition, and James Woolsey, President of DAU. Seo currently is working on the HR development of the DAPA by

  18. Defense Standardization Program Journal, July/December 2007

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-01

    Measurements. SVstemins requiring stricter controls will be classified as limited-use svstenm.Thc standard seeks to limit the aninal effective dose to...Wide Access Control Enforcement Mechanism 11)epa rtitietits 93 Events 94 People 96 DAU Courses-FY08 [e...l" miq Gregory E. Saunders .-= for he DSP...standards for personal protective equipment, comnmunications, access control , radio-frequency identification, emergency management, biometrics, and urban

  19. Defense AT&L (Volume 36, Number 5, September-October 2007)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-01

    nical risks continue to surface throughout the ac- quisition process. I’m recommending to the DAU risk management knowledge project officer that the...tools designed to control costs, preserve schedule, and influence performance outcomes. Some of these management tools—including contractual mea- sures...as advertised? Have they outlived their usefulness? What went wrong? These and many other questions immediately surfaced in the ac- quisition

  20. Defense AT&L (Volume 36, Number 3, May-June 2007)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    Program Manager E-resource Guides PM e-resource guides are online systems that allow users to view resources ( books , articles, Web sites, courses, etc...public administration, or may be used as part of other educational programs with approval (DAU accreditation toward Level II is pending).* The two online ...spam generated by the address in the online magazine.) Article preparation/submission guidelines are located on the inside back cover of each issue or

  1. Are cardioprotective effects of NO-releasing drug molsidomine translatable to chronic anthracycline cardiotoxicity settings?

    PubMed

    Lenčová-Popelová, Olga; Jansová, Hana; Jirkovský, Eduard; Bureš, Jan; Jirkovská-Vávrová, Anna; Mazurová, Yvona; Reimerová, Petra; Vostatková, Lucie; Adamcová, Michaela; Hroch, Miloš; Pokorná, Zuzana; Kovaříková, Petra; Šimůnek, Tomáš; Štěrba, Martin

    2016-11-30

    Chronic anthracycline (ANT) cardiotoxicity is a serious complication of cancer chemotherapy. Molsidomine, a NO-releasing drug, has been found cardioprotective in different models of I/R injury and recently in acute high-dose ANT cardiotoxicity. Hence, we examined whether its cardioprotective effects are translatable to chronic ANT cardiotoxicity settings without induction of nitrosative stress and interference with antiproliferative action of ANTs. The effects of molsidomine (0.025 and 0.5mg/kg, i.v.) were studied on the well-established model of chronic ANT cardiotoxicity in rabbits (daunorubicin/DAU/3mg/kg/week for 10 weeks). Molsidomine was unable to significantly attenuate mortality, development of heart failure and morphological damage induced by DAU. Molsidomine did not alter DAU-induced myocardial lipoperoxidation, MnSOD down-regulation, up-regulation of HO-1, IL-6, and molecular markers of cardiac remodeling. Although molsidomine increased 3-nitrotyrosine in the myocardium, this event had no impact on cardiotoxicity development. Using H9c2 myoblasts and isolated cardiomyocytes, it was found that SIN-1 (an active metabolite of molsidomine) induces significant protection against ANT toxicity, but only at high concentrations. In leukemic HL-60 cells, SIN-1 initially augmented ANT cytotoxicity (in low and clinically achievable concentrations), but it protected these cells against ANT in the high concentrations. UHPLC-MS/MS investigation demonstrated that the loss of ANT cytotoxicity after co-incubation of the cells in vitro with high concentrations of SIN-1 is caused by unexpected chemical depletion of DAU molecule. The present study demonstrates that cardioprotective effects of molsidomine are not translatable to clinically relevant chronic form of ANT cardiotoxicity. The augmentation of antineoplastic effects of ANT in low (nM) concentrations may deserve further study. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Inserting Agility in System Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    Agile IT Acquisition, IT Box, Scrum Inserting Agility in System Development Matthew R. Kennedy and Lt Col Dan Ward, USAF With the fast-paced nature...1,700 individuals and 71 countries, found Scrum and eXtreme Programming to be the most widely followed method- ologies (VersionOne, 2007). Other...University http://www.dau.mil 259 Defense ARJ, July 2012, Vol. 19 No. 3 : 249–264 Scrum Scrum is a framework used for project management, which is

  3. Department of Defense Policies and Procedures for the Acquisition of Information Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    3. Program Manager’s Guide for Managing Software, October 10, 2001, Rev 2.0 https://acc.dau.mil/ CommunityBrowser.aspx?id=24374& lang =en-US I...Loose Couplers as an Information Design Strategy. www.ffrdc.org/work/ tech_papers/tech_papers_07/07_0802/07_0802.pdf 10 I C H A P T E R 2

  4. 78 FR 48658 - Defense Acquisition University Board of Visitors; Notice of Federal Advisory Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-09

    .... DAU Strategic Plan/FY14 Performance Plan 10:15 a.m. Knowledge Sharing Study 11:15 a.m. Team Training...: Pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 552b and 41 CFR 102-3.140 through 102-3.165, and the availability of space, this meeting is open to the public. However, because of space limitations, allocation of seating will be...

  5. Integration and Interoperability: An Analysis to Identify the Attributes for System of Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-01

    in an open field with bows and arrows, hot oil 32 slight shots, and cannonball projectiles. The asymmetrical warfare of rapid attack...processes, procedures, terms, and conditions for military or technical procedures or equipment between the member countries of the alliance. This...qualitatively new properties as a result of the grouping. In fact, the member systems may not be connected into a whole (https://akss.dau.mil/DAG/Guidebook

  6. Transaction Costs and Cost Breaches in Major Defense Acquisition Programs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-02-04

    the impact of communication technology in developing countries as a post-doctoral research fellow for the Institute for Communications Technology at...that emphasizes pinning down the technical scope of the work, communicating the basis on which the estimate is built, identifying the quality of the...bases, schools, missile storage facilities, maintenance facilities, medical/ dental clinics, libraries, and military family housing (DAU, 2011b

  7. Economic Value of Army Foreign Military Sales

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    Unit Cost PBL Performance Based Logistics PEO Program Executive Office POTUS President of the United States RFI Request for Information RFP...Business & Public Policy - 27 - Naval Postgraduate School 4. Performance Based Logistics Performance based logistics ( PBL ) represents cost savings to...the government through shared sustainment costs. According to DAU, PBL is “an outcome-based product support strategy for the development and

  8. Economic Value of Army Foreign Military Sales

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    Acquisition Unit Cost PBL Performance Based Logistics PEO Program Executive Office POTUS President of the United States RFI Request for Information...another project. 27 4. Performance Based Logistics Performance based logistics ( PBL ) represents cost savings to the government through shared...sustainment costs. According to DAU, PBL is “an outcome-based product support strategy for the development and implementation of an integrated, affordable

  9. Behind the Mosaic: Insurgent Centers of Gravity and Counterinsurgency

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-01

    For more information on the general uprising aspect of dau tranh, see Toczek, 51-52; Pike, 218-219; Sam C. Sarkesian, Unconventional Conflicts in a...more information on the emergent Iraqi insurgent groups, see Ahmed S. Hashim , Insurgency and Counter-Insurgency in Iraq (Ithaca: Cornell University...Jefferson, NC: McFarland and Company, Inc., 2010. Hart, B. H. Liddell. Strategy. 2nd ed. New York: Penguin Books, 1991. Hashim , Ahmed S. Insurgency

  10. Assessing Security Cooperation: Improving Methods to Maximize Effects

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    Glossary, https://dap.dau.mil/glossary/Pages/Default.aspx) 15 Norman K. Denzin and Yvonna S. Lincoln, eds., The Landscape of Qualitative Research...Thousand Oaks: Sage Publications, 1998), 11. 16 To access the list: http://www.state.gov/f/indicators/index.htm. 17 Denzin , 7. 18 Denzin , 29. 19...Norman K. Denzin and Yvonna S. Lincoln, eds., Handbook of Qualitative Research (Thousand Oaks: Sage Publications, 1994), 353-359. 20 Maurice Punch

  11. Fostering Systems Engineering Education Through Interdisciplinary Programs and Graduate Capstone Projects

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    and continuous learning opportunities for DoD personnel. Information can be found at http://www.dau.mil/default.aspx . 3. Bloom B. S ., Taxonomy of...for Learning, Teaching and Assessing: a Revision of Bloom’s Taxonomy of Educational Objectives. Longman, New York, 1956. 5. Information regarding...PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR( S ) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME( S ) AND ADDRESS(ES) Air

  12. Employing Risk Management to Control Military Construction Costs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-01

    S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Defense Acquisition University (DAU),Defense Acquisition Research Journal ,9820 Belvoir Road, Suite 3,Fort Belvoir,VA,22060-5565...Team ( ELT ), co-chaired by the PMO’s Deputy Program Director—Site and Baltimore District’s program manager for the NCE effort. ELT membership is...the ELT , membership consists of executives (both government and contractor) of each executing element (Figure 3). PLTs meet on a weekly basis (or

  13. Gold nanoparticle-based beacon to detect STAT5b mRNA expression in living cells: a case optimized by bioinformatics screen

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Dawei; Li, Yang; Xue, Jianpeng; Wang, Jie; Ai, Guanhua; Li, Xin; Gu, Yueqing

    2015-01-01

    Messenger RNA (mRNA), a single-strand ribonucleic acid with functional gene information is usually abnormally expressed in cancer cells and has become a promising biomarker for the study of tumor progress. Hairpin DNA-coated gold nanoparticle (hDAuNP) beacon containing a bare gold nanoparticle (AuNP) as fluorescence quencher and thiol-terminated fluorescently labeled stem–loop–stem oligonucleotide sequences attached by Au–S bond is currently a new nanoscale biodiagnostic platform capable of mRNA detection, in which the design of the loop region sequence is crucial for hybridizing with the target mRNA. Hence, in this study, to improve the sensitivity and selectivity of hDAuNP beacon simultaneously, the loop region of hairpin DNA was screened by bioinformatics strategy. Here, signal transducer and activator of transcription 5b (STAT5b) mRNA was selected and used as a practical example. The results from the combined characterizations using optical techniques, flow cytometry assay, and cell microscopic imaging showed that after optimization, the as-prepared hDAuNP beacon had higher selectivity and sensitivity for the detection of STAT5b mRNA in living cells, as compared with our previous beacon. Thus, the bioinformatics method may be a promising new strategy for assisting in the designing of the hDAuNP beacon, extending its application in the detection of mRNA expression and the resultant mRNA-based biological processes and disease pathogenesis. PMID:25987838

  14. Technical Leadership Development Program-Year 3

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-30

    briefing by Gordon Kranz, DUSD(A&T)/SSE Director, Technical Management Functional Leader, “Human Capital Strategy and Planning for SPRDE-SE & PSE , DT...Within the SPRDE career field, the DAU currently offers Level I, II, and III certifications in Program Systems Engineering ( PSE ), Science and...Technology Management (S&TM), and Systems Engineering (SE) career paths. For this effort, the focus is on the SPRDE- PSE and SPRDE-SE career fields

  15. Technical Leadership Development Program: A013 - Year 3

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-28

    Management Functional Leader, “Human Capital Strategy and Planning for SPRDE-SE & PSE , DT&E, and PQM,” https://acc.dau.mil/GetAttachment.aspx?id...USA:
Berrett‐Koehler
Publishers,
Inc.
 
 Kranz,
G.
2009.
“Human
Capital
Strategy
and
Planning
for
SPRDE‐SE
&
 PSE ,
DT&E,
and
PQM.”
 Presentation.
Ft

  16. Systems Engineering Technical Leadership Development Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-30

    Functional Leader, “Human Capital Strategy and Planning for SPRDE-SE & PSE , DT&E, and PQM,” https://acc.dau.mil/GetAttachment.aspx?id=280166, August 28...and III certifications in Program Systems Engineering ( PSE ), Science and Technology Management (S&TM), and Systems Engineering (SE) career paths...For this effort, the focus is on the SPRDE- PSE and SPRDE-SE career fields specifically. This research topic will support and extend the SPRDE- PSE

  17. Need Finds Opportunity: 21st Century COTS Solution Promises to Improve the Student Experience and Address a Strategic Need

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-01

    resources) into one accessible gateway. This single destination will serve as the central community resource that will enable the work- force, DAU...toward increasingly feature-rich and complex handsets —fea- ture-rich but less functional. Then came the iPhone. Function finally met form. It was...acquisition re- sources. Final Thoughts The intent is to field the Student Information System in 2012 in time for the 2013 registration cycle . Its success

  18. Operation of the Defense Acquisition, Technology, and Logistics Workforce Education, Training, and Career Development Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-21

    per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing...AT&L Workforce Education, Training, and Career Development Program. 5.3.9. Provide data for metrics and information to the management...single point of contact with Defense Acquistion University (DAU) and the other DoD Components on matters relating to the AT&L Workforce Education

  19. Experience Catalysts: How They Fill the Acquisition Experience Gap for the DoD

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    cata- strophic aerodynamic effects and cause complete f light control failure. Those beliefs changed when Chuck Yeager broke the sound barrier in the...did the Defense Acquisi- tion Workforce actually say about the effectiveness and value of these foundational experience catalysts early on while...program that tracks behavioral changes at A Publication of the Defense Acquisition University http://www.dau.mil 59 ARJ, January 2012, Vol. 19 No. 1

  20. Can Applying Organic and Industry Best Practices Improve Foreign Military Sales Supportability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    Publication of the Defense Acquisition University www.dau.mil and using Federal Express, United Parcel Service, or DHL International as a source for...the FMS customer , this could create a cyclical process where the FMS customer returns to request either an increase of systems or other available...by the international customer ; 2) take advantage of potential initiatives and existing best business practices; and 3) improve life cycle support

  1. Swamped by Regulations: Perils of an Ever-Increasing Burden

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-01

    Management at the Defense Acquisition University-South in Huntsville, Alabama. He spent the last 12 years as a DAU instructor and has more than 15 years...acquisition process, “Our system over time accumulated excessive levels of complex regulatory re- quirements that are imposed on our program managers and...place on our acquisition professionals.” Indeed what is needed is comprehensive acquisition reform that concentrates on lean and efficient manage

  2. A Simulation Model for Setting Terms for Performance Based Contract Terms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    called performance-based life cycle product support) and the fictional superhero Batman. Like Batman, PBL has received a poor reputation because of...problem with a service constraint. Working Paper. University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX. Fowler, A. (2009). Misunderstood superheroes ... Superheroes , Internet www.dau.mil/pubscats/PubsCats/atl/fow_jf09.pdf, Accessed on March 28, 2010. PBL is Not Contracting Out Logistics via Product Support

  3. How Can Civilian Retention in the Army Contracting Command Contracting Professional Community Be Affected?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-30

    Command Contracting Professional Community Be Affected ? Charles Farrior, DAU Published: 30 April 2011 NPS-AM-11-C8P17R02-061 Report Documentation...Professional Community Be Affected ? 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f...statistical analyses to test specific hypotheses. Methodologies include case studies, modeling, surveys, and experiments. On the whole, such findings make

  4. Defense AT&L. Volume 42, Number 3, May-June 2013

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    collaboration with program managers and teams in the workplace . 10 Bridging the Gap Brad Pantuck Dedicated technology transition programs work best by... skill set are needed to handle increased com- plexity and uncertainty. Vol XLII No. 3, DAU 232 Published by the DEFENSE ACQUISITION...achieve solid success in program execution . Lesson Learned No. 7: PMs’ goals need to be viewed from the implementer’s perspective (“a view from the

  5. Learning in the Shadows: A Retrospective View

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-30

    Ñçê=fåÑçêãÉÇ=`Ü~åÖÉ= - 443 - ELP Questionnaire The survey questions were designed to measure the perceived effectiveness of 14 ELP activities and...DAU staff members. This research is the first effort that measured organizational learning outcomes by evaluating /assessing the perceived...A copy is also sent to the ELP Coordinator after the end of the Capstone. Methodology The researcher used a survey consisting of 11 quantitative

  6. Antigenotoxic Effect of Chamomilla recutita (L.) Rauschert Essential Oil in Mouse Spermatogonial Cells, and Determination of Its Antioxidant Capacity in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Ceruelos, Alejandra; Madrigal-Santillán, Eduardo; Morales-González, José Antonio; Chamorro-Cevallos, Germán; Cassani-Galindo, Martha; Madrigal-Bujaidar, Eduardo

    2010-01-01

    Chamomilla recutita (L.) Rauschert (Asteraceae), popularly known as chamomile, is a plant used in traditional medicine for various therapeutic purposes. Chamomile essential oil (CEO) is particularly known to inhibit the genotoxic damage produced by mutagens in mice somatic cells. The aim of this research was to determine the inhibitory potential of CEO on the genotoxic damage produced by daunorubicin (DAU) in mice germ cells. We evaluated the effect of 5, 50, and 500 mg/kg of essential oil on the rate of sister chromatid exchange (SCE) induced in spermatogonia by 10 mg/kg of the mutagen. We found no genotoxicity of CEO, but detected an inhibition of SCE after the damage induced by DAU; from the lowest to the highest dose of CEO we found an inhibition of 47.5%, 61.9%, and 93.5%, respectively. As a possible mechanism of action, the antioxidant capacity of CEO was determined using the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical scavenging method and ferric thiocyanate assays. In the first test we observed a moderate scavenging potential of the oil; nevertheless, the second assay showed an antioxidant capacity similar to that observed with vitamin E. In conclusion, we found that CEO is an efficient chemoprotective agent against the damage induced by DAU in the precursor cells of the germinal line of mice, and that its antioxidant capacity may induce this effect. PMID:21152302

  7. Children and terrorism-related news: training parents in Coping and Media Literacy.

    PubMed

    Comer, Jonathan S; Furr, Jami M; Beidas, Rinad S; Weiner, Courtney L; Kendall, Philip C

    2008-08-01

    This study examined associations between televised news regarding risk for future terrorism and youth outcomes and investigated the effects of training mothers in an empirically based approach to addressing such news with children. This approach--Coping and Media Literacy (CML)--emphasized modeling, media literacy, and contingent reinforcement and was compared via randomized design to Discussion as Usual (DAU). Ninety community youth (aged 7-13 years) and their mothers viewed a televised news clip about the risk of future terrorism, and threat perceptions and state anxiety were assessed preclip, postclip, and postdiscussion. Children responded to the clip with elevated threat perceptions and anxiety. Children of CML-trained mothers exhibited lower threat perceptions than DAU youth at postclip and at postdiscussion. Additionally, CML-trained mothers exhibited lower threat perceptions and state anxiety at postclip and postdiscussion than did DAU mothers. Moreover, older youth responded to the clip with greater societal threat perception than did younger youth. Findings document associations between terrorism-related news, threat perceptions, and anxiety and support the utility of providing parents with strategies for addressing news with children. Implications and research suggestions are discussed.

  8. Immunoassay screening of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) and its confirmation by HPLC and fluorescence detection following LSD ImmunElute extraction.

    PubMed

    Grobosch, T; Lemm-Ahlers, U

    2002-04-01

    In all, 3872 urine specimens were screened for lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) using the CEDIA DAU LSD assay. Forty-eight samples, mainly from psychiatric patients or drug abusers, were found to be LSD positive, but only 13 (27%) of these could be confirmed by high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection (HPLC-FLD) following immunoaffinity extraction (IAE). Additional analysis for LSD using the DPC Coat-a-Count RIA was performed to compare the two immunoassay screening methods. Complete agreement between the DPC RIA assay and HPLC-FLD results was observed at concentrations below a cutoff concentration of 500 pg/mL. Samples that were LSD positive in the CEDIA DAU assay but not confirmed by HPLC-FLD were also investigated for interfering compounds using REMEDI HS drug-profiling system. REMEDI HS analysis identified 15 compounds (parent drugs and metabolites) that are believed to cross-react in the CEDIA DAU LSD assay: ambroxol, prilocaine, pipamperone, diphenhydramine, metoclopramide, amitriptyline, doxepine, atracurium, bupivacaine, doxylamine, lidocaine, mepivacaine, promethazine, ranitidine, and tramadole. The IAE/HPLC-FLD combination is rapid, easy to perform and reliable. It can reduce costs when standard, rather than more advanced, HPLC equipment is used, especially for labs that perform analyses for LSD infrequently. The chromatographic analysis of LSD, nor-LSD, and iso-LSD is not influenced by any of the tested cross-reacting compounds even at a concentration of 100 ng/mL.

  9. Visual detection of multidrug resistance gene in living cell using the molecular beacon imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qiumei; Ma, Yi; Gu, Yueqing

    2014-09-01

    A major problem in cancer treatment is the development of resistance to chemotherapeutic agents in tumor cells. Detection of effective prognostic biomarkers and targets are of crucial importance to the management of individualized therapies. However, quantitative analysis of the drug resistance gene had been difficult because of technical limitations. In this study, we designed and used a special hairpin deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), which served as a beacon for detecting human drug resistance indicater. Upon hybridizing with the target mRNA, the hairpin DNA modified gold nanoparticle beacons (hDAuNP beacons) release the fluorophores attached at 5'end of the oligonucleotide sequence. The fluorescence properties of the beacon before and after the hybridization with the complementary DNA were confirmed in vitro. The hDAuNP beacons could be taken up by living cells with low inherent cytotoxicity and higher stability. hDAuNP beacon imaged by confocal laser scanning microscopy to detect the resistance gene expression. The detected fluorescence in MCF7and MCF7/ADR cells correlates with the specific drug resistance gene expression, which is consistent with the result from Q-PCR. Thus, this approach overcame many of the challenges of previous techniques by creating highly sensitive and effective intracellular probes for monitoring gene expression.

  10. Children and Terrorism-Related News: Training Parents in Coping and Media Literacy

    PubMed Central

    Comer, Jonathan S.; Furr, Jami M.; Beidas, Rinad S.; Weiner, Courtney L.; Kendall, Philip C.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined associations between televised news regarding risk for future terrorism and youth outcomes and investigated the effects of training mothers in an empirically based approach to addressing such news with children. This approach—Coping and Media Literacy (CML)—emphasized modeling, media literacy, and contingent reinforcement and was compared via randomized design to Discussion as Usual (DAU). Ninety community youth (aged 7−13 years) and their mothers viewed a televised news clip about the risk of future terrorism, and threat perceptions and state anxiety were assessed preclip, postclip, and postdiscussion. Children responded to the clip with elevated threat perceptions and anxiety. Children of CML-trained mothers exhibited lower threat perceptions than DAU youth at postclip and at postdiscussion. Additionally, CML-trained mothers exhibited lower threat perceptions and state anxiety at postclip and postdiscussion than did DAU mothers. Moreover, older youth responded to the clip with greater societal threat perception than did younger youth. Findings document associations between terrorism-related news, threat perceptions, and anxiety and support the utility of providing parents with strategies for addressing news with children. Implications and research suggestions are discussed. PMID:18665686

  11. Purification and characterization of natural Bet v 1 from birch pollen and related allergens from carrot and celery.

    PubMed

    Bollen, Mirko A; Garcia, Aranzazu; Cordewener, Jan H G; Wichers, Harry J; Helsper, Johannes P F G; Savelkoul, Huub F J; van Boekel, Martinus A J S

    2007-12-01

    Birch pollen allergy is predominantly caused by the major allergen Bet v 1 and can lead to crossreactions with homologous proteins in food. Two major cross-reactive food allergens are Dau c 1 from carrot and Api g 1 from celery, which have never been purified from their natural source. Here, we describe a non-denaturing purification method for obtaining natural Bet v 1, Dau c 1 and Api g 1, comprising of ammonium sulfate precipitation, hydrophobic interaction chromatography and size exclusion chromatography. This method resulted in 98-99% pure isoform mixtures for each allergen. Characterization of these isoform mixtures with Q-TOF MS/MS clearly showed earlier reported isoforms of Bet v 1, Dau c 1 and Api g 1, but also new isoforms. The presence of secondary structure in the three purified allergens was demonstrated via circular dichroism and showed high similarity. The immune reactivity of the natural allergens was compared with recombinant proteins by Western blot and ELISA and showed similar reactivity.

  12. Long range rapidity correlations and jet production in high energy nuclear collisions

    SciTech Connect

    STAR Collaboration; Abelev, Betty

    2010-07-05

    The STAR Collaboration at RHIC presents a systematic study of high transverse momentum charged di-hadron correlations at small azimuthal pair separation {Delta}{phi}, in d+Au and central Au+Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV. Significant correlated yield for pairs with large longitudinal separation {Delta}{eta} is observed in central Au+Au, in contrast to d+Au collisions. The associated yield distribution in {Delta}{eta} x {delta}{phi} can be decomposed into a narrow jet-like peak at small angular separation which has a similar shape to that found in d+Au collisions, and a component which is narrow in {Delta}{phi} and depends only weakly on {Delta}{eta}, the 'ridge'. Using two systematically independent analyses, finite ridge yield is found to persist for trigger p{sub t} > 6 GeV/c, indicating that it is correlated with jet production. The transverse momentum spectrum of hadrons comprising the ridge is found to be similar to that of bulk particle production in the measured range (2 < p{sub t} < 4 GeV/c).

  13. Accumulation of polychlorinated biphenyls and brominated flame retardants in breast milk from women living in Vietnamese e-waste recycling sites.

    PubMed

    Tue, Nguyen Minh; Sudaryanto, Agus; Minh, Tu Binh; Isobe, Tomohiko; Takahashi, Shin; Viet, Pham Hung; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2010-04-01

    This study investigated the contamination status of PCBs, PBDEs and HBCDs in human and possible exposure pathways in three Vietnamese e-waste recycling sites: Trang Minh (suburb of Hai Phong city), Dong Mai and Bui Dau (Hung Yen province), and one reference site (capital city Hanoi) by analysing human breast milk samples and examining the relationships between contaminant levels and lifestyle factors. Levels of PBDEs, but not PCBs and HBCDs, were significantly higher in Trang Minh and Bui Dau than in the reference site. The recyclers from Bui Dau had the highest levels of PBDEs (20-250 ng g(-1) lipid wt.), higher than in the reference group by two orders of magnitude and more abundant than PCBs (28-59 ng g(-1) lipid wt.), and were also the only group with significant exposure to HBCDs (1.4-7.6 ng g(-1) lipid wt.). A specific accumulation, unrelated to diet, of low-chlorinated PCBs and high-brominated PBDEs was observed in e-waste recyclers, suggesting extensive exposure to these compounds during e-waste recycling activities, possibly through inhalation and ingestion of dust. The estimated infant intake dose of PBDEs from breast milk of some mothers occupationally involved in e-waste recycling were close to or higher than the reference doses issued by the U.S. EPA.

  14. An ultrasensitive sandwich-type electrochemical immunosensor based on the signal amplification system of double-deck gold film and thionine unite with platinum nanowire inlaid globular SBA-15 microsphere.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ping; Li, Mingdang; Pei, Fubin; Li, Yueyun; Liu, Qing; Dong, Yunhui; Chu, Qingyan; Zhu, Hongjun

    2017-05-15

    A novel thionine unites with platinum nanowire inlaid globular SBA-15 (Pt NWs@g-SBA-15/Thi) not only utilizes as an efficient electrical signal probe but also constitutes an amplifying system with double-deck gold film (D-Au film) have been applied to the fabrication of sandwich-type immunosensor for detecting hepatitis B surface antigen (HBs Ag). The D-Au film can accelerate the electron transfer on the electrode interface due to the tunneling effect between the two Au films and can improve the load capacity of primary antibodies (Ab1) because of the good biocompatibility. The Pt NWs@g-SBA-15/Thi with uniform globular morphology not only can effectively reduce the spatial limitation for loading the secondary antibodies (Ab2) but also can provide outstanding pore accessibility of guest species from outside and offer catalytically active sites in a large scale. Besides, the presence of Thi can well enhance the electrical conductivity of Pt NWs@g-SBA-15/Thi. With the good cooperation between D-Au film and Pt NWs@g-SBA-15/Thi, a linear relationship between current signals and the concentrations of HBs Ag was obtained in the wide range from 10 fg/mL to 100ng/mL and the detection limit of HBs Ag was 3.3 fg/mL (signal-to-noise ratio of 3). Furthermore, the designed immunosensor with excellent selectivity, reproducibility and stability shows excellent performance in detection of human serum samples and provides a promising capacity for detecting a wide range of other tumor markers in clinical application.

  15. A pilot study of the microbiological quality of culturally diverse, ready-to-eat foods from selected retail establishments in Melbourne, Australia.

    PubMed

    McLean, Sarah K; Dunn, Louise A; Palombo, Enzo A

    2010-05-01

    In recent years, there has been an increasing number of foodborne outbreaks linked to the consumption of culturally diverse foods. This appears to be because of the increasing quantity of culturally diverse foods available and a preference to store these foods, some of which are considered potentially hazardous, at ambient temperature. This practice may contravene temperature requirements defined by the Food Standards Code. A lack of understanding of the hazardous nature of some culturally prepared foods also poses difficulties in applying the Australian food safety legislation by regulators. This pilot study examined the normal microbiota of four culturally diverse foods: nem chua, che dau trang, kueh talam, and bánh tét nhân man, which are traditionally stored and consumed at ambient temperature. Challenge testing was conducted to investigate the ability of these foods to support the growth of foodborne bacterial pathogens. Two of the products (kueh talam and che dau) were found to be microbiologically unsatisfactory because of the high standard plate counts. Challenge testing indicated that kueh talam, che dau, and bánh tét nhân man were able to support the growth of Bacillus cereus, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Salmonella (1-2 log increases over 6 hours at 25 degrees C), suggesting that these foods may require temperature control during storage. However, nem chua was unable to support the growth of test bacteria, probably because of its acidic nature (pH 4.5), suggesting that ambient storage of this food may be safe. This study provided some preliminary evidence to support the need for further sampling and challenge testing of these products.

  16. In vivo and in vitro biotransformation of theobromine by phenobarbital- and 3-methylcholanthrene-inducible cytochrome P-450 monooxygenases in rat liver. Role of thiol compounds.

    PubMed

    Shively, C A; Vesell, E S

    1987-01-01

    A new in vitro method was developed and applied to establish the role of the hepatic cytochrome P-450 monooxygenases in theobromine biotransformation by control and phenobarbital (PB)- and 3-methylcholanthrene (3MC)-induced Sprague-Dawley rats. In vivo theobromine metabolite formation and pharmacokinetic parameters were also determined to serve as a comparison for in vitro studies. In vivo, the major urinary metabolite was 6-amino-5-[N-methylformylamino]-1-methyluracil (3,7DAU) with lesser amounts of 3,7-dimethyluric acid (3,7DMU), 3-methylxanthine, 7-methylxanthine, 7-methyluric acid, and traces of dimethylallantoin (DMA). Following induction with 3MC, but not PB, selective increases occurred in the urinary excretion of 3,7DAU, indicating that a 3MC-inducible cytochrome P-450 isozyme plays a significant role in this metabolic pathway. Both PB and 3MC induction increased slightly urinary elimination of DMA, a minor metabolite. Pharmacokinetic studies after a single oral dose of 5 mg/kg theobromine revealed a marked effect of 3MC treatment on theobromine elimination, as evidenced by a 59% decrease in theobromine t1/2, a 75% decrease in AUC, and a 284% increase in clearance. By contrast, PB had no effect. Fecal 14C elimination accounted for approximately 5% of the administered theobromine dose, and biliary excretion studies revealed the presence of 3,7DMU, DMA, 3,7DAU, and unchanged theobromine. Studies in vitro indicated that 3,7DMU was the major theobromine metabolite produced by liver microsomes. Conversion rates in PB- and 3MC-induced rats were 2- and 11-fold higher, respectively, than in controls.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Nucleon-gold collisions at 200A GeV using tagged d + Au interactions in the PHOBOS detector

    DOE PAGES

    Back, B. B.; Nouicer, R.; Baker, M. D.; ...

    2015-09-23

    Forward calorimetry in the PHOBOS detector has been used to study charged hadron production in d+Au, p+Au, and n+Au collisions at √sNN =200GeV. The forward proton calorimeter detectors are described and a procedure for determining collision centrality with these detectors is detailed. The deposition of energy by deuteron spectator nucleons in the forward calorimeters is used to identify p+Au and n+Au collisions in the data. A weighted combination of the yield of p+Au and n+Au is constructed to build a reference for Au+Au collisions that better matches the isospin composition of the gold nucleus. The pT and centrality dependence ofmore » the yield of this improved reference system is found to match that of d+Au. The shape of the charged-particle transverse momentum distribution is observed to extrapolate smoothly from p+p¯ to central d+Au as a function of the charged-particle pseudorapidity density. The asymmetry of positively and negatively charged hadron production in p+Au is compared to that of n+Au. No significant asymmetry is observed at midrapidity. In conclusion, these studies augment recent results from experiments at the CERN Large Hadron Collider and BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider facilities to give a more complete description of particle production in p+A and d+A collisions, essential for the understanding the medium produced in high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions.« less

  18. Nucleon-gold collisions at 200A GeV using tagged d + Au interactions in the PHOBOS detector

    SciTech Connect

    Back, B. B.; Nouicer, R.; Baker, M. D.; Ballintijn, M.; Barton, D. S.; Becker, B.; Betts, R. R.; Bickley, A. A; Stienberg, P.; Ioradnova, A.; Pak, R.; Sukhanov, A.

    2015-09-23

    Forward calorimetry in the PHOBOS detector has been used to study charged hadron production in d+Au, p+Au, and n+Au collisions at √sNN =200GeV. The forward proton calorimeter detectors are described and a procedure for determining collision centrality with these detectors is detailed. The deposition of energy by deuteron spectator nucleons in the forward calorimeters is used to identify p+Au and n+Au collisions in the data. A weighted combination of the yield of p+Au and n+Au is constructed to build a reference for Au+Au collisions that better matches the isospin composition of the gold nucleus. The pT and centrality dependence of the yield of this improved reference system is found to match that of d+Au. The shape of the charged-particle transverse momentum distribution is observed to extrapolate smoothly from p+p¯ to central d+Au as a function of the charged-particle pseudorapidity density. The asymmetry of positively and negatively charged hadron production in p+Au is compared to that of n+Au. No significant asymmetry is observed at midrapidity. In conclusion, these studies augment recent results from experiments at the CERN Large Hadron Collider and BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider facilities to give a more complete description of particle production in p+A and d+A collisions, essential for the understanding the medium produced in high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions.

  19. Visual detection of STAT5B gene expression in living cell using the hairpin DNA modified gold nanoparticle beacon.

    PubMed

    Xue, Jianpeng; Shan, Lingling; Chen, Haiyan; Li, Yang; Zhu, Hongyan; Deng, Dawei; Qian, Zhiyu; Achilefu, Samuel; Gu, Yueqing

    2013-03-15

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 5B (STAT5B) is an important protein in JAK-STAT signaling pathway that is responsible for the metastasis and proliferation of tumor cells. Determination of the STAT5B messenger Ribonucleic Acid (mRNA) relating to the STAT5B expression provides insight into the mechanism of tumor progression. In this study, we designed and used a special hairpin deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) for human STAT5B mRNA to functionalize gold nanoparticles, which served as a beacon for detecting human STAT5B expression. Up to 90% quenching efficiency was achieved. Upon hybridizing with the target mRNA, the hairpin DNA modified gold nanoparticle beacons (hDAuNP beacons) release the fluorophores attached at 5' end of the oligonucleotide sequence. The fluorescence properties of the beacon before and after the hybridization with the complementary DNA were confirmed in vitro. The stability of hDAuNP beacons against degradation by DNase I and GSH indicated that the prepared beacon is stable inside cells. The detected fluorescence in MCF-7 cancer cells correlates with the specific STAT5B mRNA expression, which is consistent with the result from PCR measurement. Fluorescence microscopy showed that the hDAuNP beacons internalized in cells without using transfection agents, with intracellular distribution in the cytoplasm rather than the nucleus. The results demonstrated that this beacon could directly provide quantitative measurement of the intracellular STAT5B mRNA in living cells. Compared to the previous approaches, this beacon has advantages of higher target to background ratio of detection and an increased resistance to nuclease degradation. The strategy reported in this study is a promising approach for the intracellular measurement of RNA or protein expression in living cells, and has great potential in the study of drug screening and discovery. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. The Climate/Team Effectiveness Survey: Another Tool for the Program Management Office Team

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    260’s Executive Leadership Team [ ELT ], I found the anonymity to provide my candid and unedited opinions and recommenda- tions liberating.” After the...the NAVAIRSYSCOM community. The results were out-briefed by the DAU Mid-Atlantic team to the entire PMA-260 ELT , allowing key managers to ask...clarify results and, as a group, discuss points that went across functional areas. The ELT out-brief soon was followed up with a full out-brief of the

  1. Hadron production in deuteron-gold collisions and nuclear parton distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Adeluyi, Adeola; Fai, George

    2007-11-15

    We calculate nuclear modification factors R{sub dAu}, central-to-peripheral ratios, R{sub CP}, and pseudorapidity asymmetries Y{sub Asym} in deuteron-gold collisions at {radical}(s)=200 GeV in the framework of leading-order (LO) perturbative quantum chromodynamics. We use the Eskola-Kolhinen-Salgado (EKS), the Frankfurt-Guzey-Strikman (FGS), and the Hirai-Kumano-Nagai (HKN) nuclear parton distribution functions and the Albino-Kramer-Kniehl (AKK) fragmentation functions in our calculations. Results are compared to experimental data from the BRAHMS and STAR collaborations.

  2. Twenty Minutes from Now

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-01

    change— will become the norm. The global marketplace and the bil- lions of consumers that make up the cyberspace called Web 2.0 will drive this change...Acquisition University www.dau.mil Image designed by Harambee Dennis » Keywords: Social Media, Web 2.0 , Policy and Technol- ogy, Knowledge Management...Substitute “social media” or “ Web 2.0 ” for KM and it’s the same argument. Specifically related to social media, Mark Drapeau of National Defense Univer

  3. DoD Life Cycle Management (LCM) and Product Support Manager (PSM) Rapid Deployment Training

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-01

    C FRP Decision ReviewLRIP/ IOT &E Post-CDR Assessment Technology Development (Program Initiation) Concept Decision Pre-Systems Acquisition Post...cost.” -- FY10 NDAA, Section 805 50 PL 111-84 Sec 805 PSM Responsibilities • A product support manager for a major weapon system shall- – develop and...acc.dau.mil/psm 51 PL 111-84 Sec 805 Report Language • “Product support” encompasses all critical functions related to weapon-system readiness, including

  4. Defense AT&L (Volume 34, Number 5, September-October 2005)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-01

    versa. 16 The Cultural Sources of Acquisition Risk: Part I Christopher S. Roman Metrics don’t tell the whole story. Program manage- ment is more an...convenient postage-free mailer inside this issue or download our online mailer at <http://www.dau.mil/pubs/damtoc.asp>. Defense AT&L is a vehicle for...you provide us your business address, you may become part of mailing lists we are required to provide to other agencies who request the lists as public

  5. Defense AT and L. Volume 44, Number 3

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    and Press Randy Weekes Defense AT&L Editorial Staff Managing Editor/Senior Editor, DAU Press Benjamin Tyree Online Content Editor Collie J. Johnson...but augmenting your budgets is worth that effort. Advertise . Someone you don’t know needs what you’re doing. If your product could be used across...You’ll be surprised how many people haven’t heard about your “available capabilities.” Advertising (writing articles for DoD or Service publications and

  6. DIFFRACTION DISSOCIATION - 50 YEARS LATER.

    SciTech Connect

    WHITE, S.N.

    2005-04-27

    The field of Diffraction Dissociation, which is the subject of this workshop, began 50 years ago with the analysis of deuteron stripping in low energy collisions with nuclei. We return to the subject in a modern context- deuteron dissociation in {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV d-Au collisions recorded during the 2003 RHIC run in the PHENIX experiment. At RHIC energy, d {yields} n+p proceeds predominantly (90%) through Electromagnetic Dissociation and the remaining fraction via the hadronic shadowing described by Glauber. Since the dissociation cross section has a small theoretical error we adopt this process to normalize other cross sections measured in RHIC.

  7. Transverse momentum and centrality dependence of high-ptnon-photonic electron suppression in Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$= 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Abelev, B.I.; Adams, J.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett,J.; Anderson, B.D.; Anderson, M.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Bai,Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A.K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, S.-L.; Bonner, B.E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A.V.; Bravar, A.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, R.V.; Cai,X.Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la Barca Sanchez, M.; Castillo, J.; Catu,O.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen,H.F.; Chen, J.H.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Cosentino, M.R.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford,H.J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; Daugherity, M.; de Moura, M.M.; Dedovich, T.G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Djawotho,P.; Dogra, S.M.; Dong, W.J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J.E.; Du, F.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Dutta Mazumdar, M.R.; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, W.R.; Efimov,L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch,E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Gaillard, L.; Ganti,M.S.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J.S.; Gorbunov, Y.G.; Gos,H.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S.M.; Guimaraes, K.S.F.F.; Guo,Y.; Gupta, N.; Gutierrez, T.D.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T.J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J.W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T.W.; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte,B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A.M.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Horner, M.J.; Huang, H.Z.; Huang, S.L.; Hughes, E.W.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs,P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Jakl, P.; Jia, F.; Jiang, H.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khodyrev, V.Yu.; Kim, B.C.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, E.M.; Klein,S.R.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D.D.; et al.

    2006-07-11

    The STAR collaboration at RHIC reports measurements of theinclusive yield of non-photonic electrons, which arise dominantly fromsemi-leptonic decays of heavy flavor mesons, over a broad range oftransverse momenta (1.2dAu, and AuAucollisions at sqrt sNN = 200 GeV. The non-photonic electron yieldexhibits unexpectedly large suppression in central AuAu collisions athigh pt, suggesting substantial heavy quark energy loss at RHIC. Thecentrality and \\pt dependences of the suppression provide constraints ontheoretical models of suppression.

  8. Cold Nuclear Matter effects on J/psi production at RHIC: comparing shadowing models

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreiro, E.G.; Fleuret, F.; Lansberg, J.P.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; /SPhN, DAPNIA, Saclay

    2009-06-19

    We present a wide study on the comparison of different shadowing models and their influence on J/{psi} production. We have taken into account the possibility of different partonic processes for the c{bar c}-pair production. We notice that the effect of shadowing corrections on J/{psi} production clearly depends on the partonic process considered. Our results are compared to the available data on dAu collisions at RHIC energies. We try different break up cross section for each of the studied shadowing models.

  9. Probing the Nucleus with Deuteron+Gold Collisions at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Citron, Zvi Hirsh

    2011-12-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) was built to produce and study Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP), the phase of matter thought to exist under conditions sufficiently hot and dense to create a medium in which the degrees of freedom are quarks and gluons rather than color neutral hadrons. Already in its early years of running, the data from RHIC provided tantalizing evidence of QGP signatures in Au+Au collisions at sNN = 200 GeV. A crucial part of understanding the putative QGP in Au+Au collisions is to have both a well understood reference as well as a robust control experiment. Proton-proton collisions at the same sNN serve as the baseline for heavy ion collisions at RHIC, and play an invaluable role in setting our frame of reference in interactions that do not create any nuclear medium. For the control experiment, RHIC's ability to collide asymmetric beams is utilized and d+Au collisions are used. Unlike p+p collisions, in the d+Au system there is a nuclear medium present---the heavy Au nucleus---and so we may study this system to distinguish initial state cold nuclear matter effects from final state effects that occur in the hot dense medium of Au+Au collisions. Beyond its use as a control experiment, the d+Au collision system presents the opportunity for important study of nuclear and nucleonic structure, it is after all necessary for our colored parton theory to operate in the nucleus as well as in a QGP. Deuteron - gold collisions at RHIC are a powerful tool for shedding light on cold nuclear matter effects. This thesis describes two analyses of d+Au collisions measured by the PHENIX experiment at RHIC. The first is a measurement of the midrapidity yield of unidentified charged hadrons in the 2003 RHIC run. This is used a key baseline for understanding particle production in Au+Au collisions as well as a detailed look at the Cronin effect. The second analysis measures rapidity separated two-particle production where one of the particles is at either forward

  10. National Needs for Critically Evaluated Physical and Chemical Data.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-01-01

    regulatory proposals are under consideration. The unsolved problem is how to allocate a portion of these widely dispersed savings to cover the costs of... nitride fuels to develop higher breeder gains. Water-cooled breeder: develop capability of breeding in pressurized water, study physics, thermal, and...of t oxi c acwtt , it riti fi cat ion and dau- tIrMi T1.1t in I t III t ’ (, I o h ti Ai i It Wteor, P𔃻-(], ind ,l; t l - i oi,)s 5,ia Xit ti~ vi !j

  11. Experimental overview on small colliding systems at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stankus, Paul

    2016-12-01

    Beginning with the observation of ridge/flow-like features in pair correlations measurements in p+Pb, d+Au and high-density p+p events at RHIC and LHC, the last few years have seen a great surge of interest in the question of whether anything like a hot, locally-equilibrated QCD medium is formed in the small systems at collider energies. Many intriguing and suggestive results have been presented, but conclusions about medium formation must be approached with care. This presentation will attempt to summarize the experimental results from small colliding systems measured at RHIC, as part of a careful and objective evaluation of this question.

  12. Identifying High-Risk Alcohol Users in First-Year College Students: Attitude, Intention, and Facebook.

    PubMed

    Pumper, Megan A; Moreno, Megan A

    2013-07-29

    It is challenging to identify older adolescents at risk for alcohol dependence. This study investigated first-year college students who scored as dependent alcohol users (DAU), and examined their alcohol use and Facebook displays. This longitudinal study recruited college students at two universities to complete a phone interview prior to college (Time 1) and one year later (Time 2). Interviews assessed lifetime and current alcohol use, and attitude (scale of 0=very negative to 6=very positive) and intention (scale of 0=not at all likely to 5=very likely) toward alcohol use. The alcohol use disorders identification test (AUDIT) was administered at Time 2. Facebook profiles were evaluated for the presence of references to alcohol use and intoxication/problematic drinking (I/PD) prior to and throughout the participants first year at the university. Analyses included Chi-squared tests and Wilcoxon sign rank tests. Of 315 participants in the study, a total of 21 (6.7%) of participants met criteria as a DAU at Time 2. DAUs were 54.5% female, 86.4% Caucasian, and 73.7% from University A. At Time 1 all DAUs reported lifetime alcohol use and 91.1% were current drinkers. At Time 2, 95.7% were current drinkers. At Time 1, DAU's mean attitude toward alcohol was 4.0 (SD=1.0) and mean intention was 4.0 (SD=1.4); by Time 2 attitude was 4.6 (SD=0.9), p=0.02, and intention was 4.9 (SD=0.3). At Time 1, 39.1% of DAUs displayed alcohol references on Facebook but only one referenced I/PD. By Time 2, 20 DAU profile owners (90.4%) displayed some reference to alcohol and 52.2% referenced I/PD. Findings suggest areas in which dependence could be identified early, specifically attitude towards alcohol and assessment of Facebook profiles for references to alcohol. These findings have the potential to guide future intervention efforts for this high-risk population.

  13. Defense AT&L (Volume 35, Number 1, January-February 2006)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-02-01

    DAU Press,9820 Belvoir Road,Fort Belvoir,VA,22060-5565 8 . PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS...unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8 -98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 2 Vice Adm. Keith W. Lippert, USN The director of the Defense Logistics Agency talks...1 8 8 Some photos appearing in this publication may be digitally enhanced. 14 It’s About Time Maj. Dan Ward, USAF, Maj. Chris Quaid, USAF Despite

  14. 5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)4 receptors in post mortem human brain tissue: distribution, pharmacology and effects of neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, G P; Mason, S L; Meldrum, A; De Keczer, S; Parnes, H; Eglen, R M; Wong, E H

    1995-01-01

    1. The distribution, pharmacology and effects of neurodegenerative diseases on 5-HT4 receptors in human brain have been characterized in vitro. 2. The 5-HT4 receptor in post mortem human brain tissue was specifically labelled with [3H]-GR 113808. In human putamen, this ligand labelled a homogeneous population of sites, with an apparent affinity (-log Kd) of 10.1 and a density (Bmax) of 5.73 fmol mg-1 tissue. The pharmacology of this site was characterized by use of a series of displacing ligands, and the following rank order of apparent affinities (with mean +/- s.d. -log Ki values in parentheses) was generated: GR113808 (10.05 +/- 0.04) > SDZ 205,557 (8.65 +/- 0.08) > DAU 6285 (7.95 +/- 0.04) > BIMU-1 (7.81 +/- 0.06) > DAU 6215 (7.42 +/- 0.23) > tropisetron (7.39 +/- 0.23) > 5-HT (7.32 +/- 1.00) > BIMU-8 (7.25 +/- 0.04) > (R)-zacopride (5.82 +/- 0.04). The Hill coefficients were not significantly different from unity, consistent with an interaction at a single site. A comparison of the affinities of these compounds with those obtained from guinea-pig striatum indicated no evidence of species differences. 3. The regional distribution of 5-HT4 receptors was assessed by determining the density of binding sites for [3H]-GR 113808.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7780656

  15. PHENIX results on collectivity tests in high-multiplicity p + p and p + Au collisions at √{sNN} = 200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, Itaru

    2016-12-01

    The observation of possible collective effects in high-multiplicity p+p and p+Pb collisions at the LHC and in d+Au and 3He+Au collisions at RHIC challenge our understanding of the ingredients necessary for quark-gluon plasma formation. For further investigation of these effects, the PHENIX collaboration has taken high statistics data in p+p and p+Au and p+Al collisions in 2015. For these data sets, high-multiplicity triggers were implemented using the forward silicon detector (FVTX) and the beam-beam counter (BBC) covering pseudo-rapidity 1.0 < | η | < 3.0 and 3.1 < | η | < 3.9, respectively. The multi-hundred million high-multiplicity event samples recorded enable highly differential analysis to look for collective effects. We report results on large pseudo-rapidity separation correlations to elucidate if the so-called ridge phenomena exists in certain p+p event classes at RHIC. The flow coefficients from azimuthal anisotropies in p+Au are extracted and compared with theoretical expectations in various models, including viscous hydrodynamics where the elliptic flow strength is expected to be substantially smaller than in d+Au and 3He+Au at the same energy due to the smaller initial spatial eccentricity.

  16. Collective effects in light-heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenke, Björn; Venugopalan, Raju

    2014-11-01

    We present results for the azimuthal anisotropy of charged hadron distributions in A+A, p+A, d+A, and 3He+A collisions within the IP-Glasma+MUSIC model. Obtained anisotropies are due to the fluid dynamic response of the system to the fluctuating initial geometry of the interaction region. While the elliptic and triangular anisotropies in peripheral Pb+Pb collisions at √{ s} = 2.76 TeV are well described by the model, the same quantities in √{ s} = 5.02 TeV p+Pb collisions underestimate the experimental data. This disagreement can be due to neglected initial state correlations or the lack of a detailed description of the fluctuating spatial structure of the proton, or both. We further present predictions for azimuthal anisotropies in p+Au, d+Au, and 3He+Au collisions at √{ s} = 200 GeV. For d+Au and 3He+Au collisions we expect the detailed substructure of the nucleon to become less important.

  17. Performance characteristics of selected immunoassays for preliminary test of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine, methamphetamine, and related drugs in urine specimens.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Jui; Liu, Chiareiy; Liu, C P; Tsay, Wen-Ing; Li, Jih-Heng; Lin, Dong-Liang; Liu, Ray H

    2003-10-01

    Eight commercially available immunoassays for amphetamines (DRI Amphetamines, CEDIA DAU Amphetamines-Semiquantitative, EMIT d.a.u. Monoclonal Amphetamine/Methamphetamine, Synchron CX Systems AMPH, TDx/TDxFLx Amphetamine/Methamphetamine II, CEDIA Amphetamines/Ecstasy, COBAS INTEGRA Amphetamines, and Abuscreen((R)) OnLine HS Amphetamine/MDMA) are evaluated for their effectiveness in serving as the preliminary test methodology for the analysis of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine/3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDMA/MDA) and methamphetamine/amphetamine (MA/AM). Standard solutions (in urine matrix) of MDMA, MDA, MA, and AM are used to determine these immunoassays' reactivities (or cross-reactivities) toward these compounds of interest. Case specimens containing MDMA/MDA and MA/AM are also used to study the correlations of the apparent immunoassay MDMA (or MA) concentrations and the gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric concentrations of these compounds. Data resulting from this study suggest that CEDIA Amphetamines/Ecstasy can best predict the concentrations of MDMA and MA in case specimens and can also detect the presence of MDMA at low levels, whereas Abuscreen OnLine HS Amphetamine/MDMA can detect both MDMA and MA at low concentrations.

  18. Experimental studies of di-jets in Au + Au collisions using angular correlations with respect to back-to-back leading hadrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk, L.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alakhverdyants, A. V.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anson, C. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Banerjee, A.; Barnovska, Z.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Betancourt, M. J.; Betts, R. R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Borowski, W.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Brovko, S. G.; Bruna, E.; Bültmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Butterworth, J.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Chen, L.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Chung, P.; Chwastowski, J.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Corliss, R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Cui, X.; Das, S.; Davila Leyva, A.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derradi de Souza, R.; Dhamija, S.; Didenko, L.; Ding, F.; Dion, A.; Djawotho, P.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Elnimr, M.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Fedorisin, J.; Fersch, R. G.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Gliske, S.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Grebenyuk, O. G.; Grosnick, D.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hajkova, O.; Hamed, A.; Han, L.-X.; Harris, J. W.; Hays-Wehle, J. P.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Huo, L.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jena, C.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kesich, A.; Kikola, D. P.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Kizka, V.; Klein, S. R.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Koralt, I.; Koroleva, L.; Korsch, W.; Kotchenda, L.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; LaPointe, S.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Leight, W.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, L.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. M.; Lima, L. M.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Lu, Y.; Luo, X.; Luszczak, A.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Madagodagettige Don, D. M. M. D.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mall, O. I.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mitrovski, M. K.; Mohammed, Y.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, B.; Munhoz, M. G.; Mustafa, M. K.; Naglis, M.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nogach, L. V.; Novak, J.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Ohlson, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldag, E. W.; Oliveira, R. A. N.; Olson, D.; Ostrowski, P.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Plyku, D.; Poljak, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Powell, C. B.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Przybycien, M.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Redwine, R.; Reed, R.; Riley, C. K.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Ross, J. F.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandacz, A.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, B.; Schmitz, N.; Schuster, T. R.; Seele, J.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, B.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, D.; Smirnov, N.; Solanki, D.; Sorensen, P.; deSouza, U. G.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Steadman, S. G.; Stevens, J. R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarini, L. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Turnau, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vanfossen, J. A., Jr.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Videbæk, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Vossen, A.; Wada, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, Q.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Whitten, C., Jr.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Witzke, W.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, H.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, W.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Xue, L.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Yepes, P.; Yi, Y.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Zawisza, M.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, F.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhu, X.; Zhu, Y. H.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.

    2013-04-01

    Jet-medium interactions are studied via a multihadron correlation technique (called “2+1”), where a pair of back-to-back hadron triggers with large transverse momentum is used as a proxy for a di-jet. This work extends the previous analysis for nearly symmetric trigger pairs with the highest momentum threshold of trigger hadron of 5 GeV/c with the new calorimeter-based triggers with energy thresholds of up to 10 GeV and above. The distributions of associated hadrons are studied in terms of correlation shapes and per-trigger yields on each trigger side. In contrast with di-hadron correlation results with single triggers, the associated hadron distributions for back-to-back triggers from central Au+Au data at sNN=200 GeV show no strong modifications compared to d+Au data at the same energy. An imbalance in the total transverse momentum between hadrons attributed to the near-side and away-side of jetlike peaks is observed. The relative imbalance in the Au+Au measurement with respect to d+Au reference is found to increase with the asymmetry of the trigger pair, consistent with the expectation from medium-induced energy-loss effects. In addition, this relative total transverse momentum imbalance is found to decrease for softer associated hadrons. Such evolution indicates that the energy missing at higher associated momenta is converted into softer hadrons.

  19. Exploiting intrinsic triangular geometry in relativistic (3)He+Au collisions to disentangle medium properties.

    PubMed

    Nagle, J L; Adare, A; Beckman, S; Koblesky, T; Koop, J Orjuela; McGlinchey, D; Romatschke, P; Carlson, J; Lynn, J E; McCumber, M

    2014-09-12

    Recent results in d+Au and p+Pb collisions at RHIC and the LHC provide evidence for collective expansion and flow of the created medium. We propose a control set of experiments to directly compare particle emission patterns from p+Pb, d+Au, and ^{3}He+Au or t+Au collisions at the same sqrt[s_{NN}] . Using a Monte Carlo Glauber simulation we find that a ^{3}He or triton projectile, with a realistic wave function description, induces a significant intrinsic triangular shape to the initial medium. If the system lives long enough, this survives into a significant third-order flow moment v_{3} even with viscous damping. By comparing systems with one, two, and three initial hot spots, one could disentangle the effects from the initial spatial distribution of the deposited energy and viscous damping. These are key tools for answering the question of how small a droplet of matter is necessary to form a quark-gluon plasma described by nearly inviscid hydrodynamics.

  20. Centrality-Dependent Modification of Jet-Production Rates in Deuteron-Gold Collisions at sNN=200 GeV

    DOE PAGES

    Adare, A.

    2016-03-24

    Wemore » measured jet production rates in p+p and d+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV recorded in 2008 with the PHENIX detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. Jets are reconstructed using the R=0.3 anti-kt algorithm from energy deposits in the electromagnetic calorimeter and charged tracks in multiwire proportional chambers, and the jet transverse momentum (pT) spectra are corrected for the detector response. Spectra are reported for jets with 12T<50 GeV/c, within a pseudorapidity acceptance of |η|<0.3. The nuclear-modification factor (RdAu) values for 0%–100% d+Au events are found to be consistent with unity, constraining the role of initial state effects on jet production. Nonetheless, the centrality-selected RdAu values and central-to-peripheral ratios (RCP) show large, pT-dependent deviations from unity, challenging the conventional models that relate hard-process rates and soft-particle production in collisions involving nuclei.« less

  1. Centrality-Dependent Modification of Jet-Production Rates in Deuteron-Gold Collisions at sNN=200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Adare, A.

    2016-03-24

    We measured jet production rates in p+p and d+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV recorded in 2008 with the PHENIX detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. Jets are reconstructed using the R=0.3 anti-kt algorithm from energy deposits in the electromagnetic calorimeter and charged tracks in multiwire proportional chambers, and the jet transverse momentum (pT) spectra are corrected for the detector response. Spectra are reported for jets with 12T<50 GeV/c, within a pseudorapidity acceptance of |η|<0.3. The nuclear-modification factor (RdAu) values for 0%–100% d+Au events are found to be consistent with unity, constraining the role of initial state effects on jet production. Nonetheless, the centrality-selected RdAu values and central-to-peripheral ratios (RCP) show large, pT-dependent deviations from unity, challenging the conventional models that relate hard-process rates and soft-particle production in collisions involving nuclei.

  2. phi meson measurements and flavor-dependent nuclear suppression at RHIC-PHENIX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kijima, Kotaro M.; PHENIX Collaboration

    2010-09-01

    Measurement of low mass vector mesons (ρ, ω, phi) provides important information to understand the properties of quark-gluon plasma (QGP) created in the central heavy-ion collision at RHIC. The mass and branching ratio of the phi meson decay into di-electron and di-kaon could be modified in the excited vacuum due to the effect of partial chiral symmetry restoration. In addition, phi meson contains hidden strangeness and hence its measurement can figure out the strangeness production. The suppression pattern of phi meson with high transverse momentum in heavy-ion collisions, compared to scaled p + p results, provides the information to understand the mechanism of production and energy loss of strange quark with the strongly coupled matter. The PHENIX experiment at RHIC has measured the phi meson production in p+p, d+Au and Au+Au collisions at \\sqrt{s_{NN}} up to 200 GeV at mid-rapidity. In this paper, we will present recent PHENIX results about the phi meson production. The mass peaks for phi have been observed in both di-electron and di-kaon invariant mass spectra. The extracted spectra, mass and width of phi in p+p, d+Au and Au+Au are reviewed. Moreover, we compare the nuclear modification factors of various hadrons and discuss flavor dependence of their suppression patterns.

  3. Minimal Streptomyces sp. strain C5 daunorubicin polyketide biosynthesis genes required for aklanonic acid biosynthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Rajgarhia, V B; Strohl, W R

    1997-01-01

    The structure of the Streptomyces sp. strain C5 daunorubicin type II polyketide synthase (PKS) gene region is different from that of other known type II PKS gene clusters. Directly downstream of the genes encoding ketoacylsynthase alpha and beta (KS alpha, KS beta) are two genes (dpsC, dpsD) encoding proteins of unproven function, both absent from other type II PKS gene clusters. Also in contrast to other type II PKS clusters, the gene encoding the acyl carrier protein (ACP), dpsG, is located about 6.8 kbp upstream of the genes encoding the daunorubicin KS alpha and KS beta. In this work, we demonstrate that the minimal genes required to produce aklanonic acid in heterologous hosts are dpsG (ACP), dauI (regulatory activator), dpsA (KS alpha), dpsB (KS beta), dpsF (aromatase), dpsE (polyketide reductase), and dauG (putative deoxyaklanonic acid oxygenase). The two unusual open reading frames, dpsC (KASIII homolog lacking a known active site) and dpsD (acyltransferase homolog), are not required to synthesize aklanonic acid. Additionally, replacement of dpsD or dpsCD in Streptomyces sp. strain C5 with a neomycin resistance gene (aphI) results in mutant strains that still produced anthracyclines. PMID:9098068

  4. Cold-nuclear-matter effects on heavy-quark production at forward and backward rapidity in d + Au collisions at √sNN = 200  GeV.

    PubMed

    Adare, A; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Akimoto, R; Al-Bataineh, H; Al-Ta'ani, H; Alexander, J; Andrews, K R; Angerami, A; Aoki, K; Apadula, N; Appelt, E; Aramaki, Y; Armendariz, R; Aschenauer, E C; Atomssa, E T; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, B; Babintsev, V; Bai, M; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Bannier, B; Barish, K N; Bassalleck, B; Basye, A T; Bathe, S; Baublis, V; Baumann, C; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Belmont, R; Ben-Benjamin, J; Bennett, R; Bhom, J H; Blau, D S; Bok, J S; Boyle, K; Brooks, M L; Broxmeyer, D; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Butsyk, S; Campbell, S; Caringi, A; Castera, P; Chen, C-H; Chi, C Y; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choi, J B; Choudhury, R K; Christiansen, P; Chujo, T; Chung, P; Chvala, O; Cianciolo, V; Citron, Z; Cole, B A; Conesa Del Valle, Z; Connors, M; Csanád, M; Csörgő, T; Dahms, T; Dairaku, S; Danchev, I; Das, K; Datta, A; David, G; Dayananda, M K; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dharmawardane, K V; Dietzsch, O; Dion, A; Donadelli, M; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Drees, K A; Durham, J M; Durum, A; Dutta, D; D'Orazio, L; Edwards, S; Efremenko, Y V; Ellinghaus, F; Engelmore, T; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Fadem, B; Fields, D E; Finger, M; Finger, M; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fujiwara, K; Fukao, Y; Fusayasu, T; Gal, C; Garishvili, I; Glenn, A; Gong, H; Gong, X; Gonin, M; Goto, Y; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Grim, G; Grosse Perdekamp, M; Gunji, T; Guo, L; Gustafsson, H-Å; Haggerty, J S; Hahn, K I; Hamagaki, H; Hamblen, J; Han, R; Hanks, J; Harper, C; Hashimoto, K; Haslum, E; Hayano, R; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Hester, T; Hill, J C; Hohlmann, M; Hollis, R S; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Horaguchi, T; Hori, Y; Hornback, D; Huang, S; Ichihara, T; Ichimiya, R; Iinuma, H; Ikeda, Y; Imai, K; Inaba, M; Iordanova, A; Isenhower, D; Ishihara, M; Issah, M; Ivanischev, D; Iwanaga, Y; Jacak, B V; Jia, J; Jiang, X; Jin, J; John, D; Johnson, B M; Jones, T; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Jumper, D S; Kajihara, F; Kamin, J; Kaneti, S; Kang, B H; Kang, J H; Kang, J S; Kapustinsky, J; Karatsu, K; Kasai, M; Kawall, D; Kawashima, M; Kazantsev, A V; Kempel, T; Khanzadeev, A; Kijima, K M; Kikuchi, J; Kim, A; Kim, B I; Kim, D J; Kim, E-J; Kim, Y-J; Kim, Y K; Kinney, E; Kiss, A; Kistenev, E; Kleinjan, D; Kline, P; Kochenda, L; Komkov, B; Konno, M; Koster, J; Kotov, D; Král, A; Kravitz, A; Kunde, G J; Kurita, K; Kurosawa, M; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lai, Y S; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Lee, D M; Lee, J; Lee, K B; Lee, K S; Lee, S H; Lee, S R; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Li, X; Lichtenwalner, P; Liebing, P; Lim, S H; Linden Levy, L A; Liška, T; Liu, H; Liu, M X; Love, B; Lynch, D; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malik, M D; Manion, A; Manko, V I; Mannel, E; Mao, Y; Masui, H; Matathias, F; McCumber, M; McGaughey, P L; McGlinchey, D; McKinney, C; Means, N; Mendoza, M; Meredith, B; Miake, Y; Mibe, T; Mignerey, A C; Miki, K; Milov, A; Mitchell, J T; Miyachi, Y; Mohanty, A K; Moon, H J; Morino, Y; Morreale, A; Morrison, D P; Motschwiller, S; Moukhanova, T V; Murakami, T; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagle, J L; Naglis, M; Nagy, M I; Nakagawa, I; Nakamiya, Y; Nakamura, K R; Nakamura, T; Nakano, K; Nam, S; Newby, J; Nguyen, M; Nihashi, M; Nouicer, R; Nyanin, A S; Oakley, C; O'Brien, E; Oda, S X; Ogilvie, C A; Oka, M; Okada, K; Onuki, Y; Oskarsson, A; Ouchida, M; Ozawa, K; Pak, R; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, B H; Park, I H; Park, S K; Park, W J; Pate, S F; Patel, L; Pei, H; Peng, J-C; Pereira, H; Peressounko, D Yu; Petti, R; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Proissl, M; Purschke, M L; Qu, H; Rak, J; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Rembeczki, S; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Richardson, E; Roach, D; Roche, G; Rolnick, S D; Rosati, M; Rosen, C A; Rosendahl, S S E; Ružička, P; Sahlmueller, B; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakashita, K; Samsonov, V; Sano, S; Sarsour, M; Sato, T; Savastio, M; Sawada, S; Sedgwick, K; Seele, J; Seidl, R; Seto, R; Sharma, D; Shein, I; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shim, H H; Shimomura, M; Shoji, K; Shukla, P; Sickles, A; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Silvestre, C; Sim, K S; Singh, B K; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Slunečka, M; Sodre, T; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Sukhanov, A; Sun, J; Sziklai, J; Takagui, E M; Takahara, A; Taketani, A; Tanabe, R; Tanaka, Y; Taneja, S; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Tarafdar, S; Taranenko, A; Tennant, E; Themann, H; Thomas, D; Thomas, T L; Togawa, M; Toia, A; Tomášek, L; Tomášek, M; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tserruya, I; Tsuchimoto, Y; Utsunomiya, K; Vale, C; Valle, H; van Hecke, H W; Vazquez-Zambrano, E; Veicht, A; Velkovska, J; Vértesi, R; Virius, M; Vossen, A; Vrba, V; Vznuzdaev, E; Wang, X R; Watanabe, D; Watanabe, K; Watanabe, Y; Watanabe, Y S; Wei, F; Wei, R; Wessels, J; White, S N; Winter, D; Woody, C L; Wright, R M; Wysocki, M; Yamaguchi, Y L; Yamaura, K; Yang, R; Yanovich, A; Ying, J; Yokkaichi, S; Yoo, J S; You, Z; Young, G R; Younus, I; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zelenski, A; Zhou, S

    2014-06-27

    The PHENIX experiment has measured open heavy-flavor production via semileptonic decay over the transverse momentum range 1 < p(T) < 6  GeV/c at forward and backward rapidity (1.4 < |y| < 2.0) in d+Au and p + p collisions at √sNN = 200  GeV. In central d+Au collisions, relative to the yield in p + p collisions scaled by the number of binary nucleon-nucleon collisions, a suppression is observed at forward rapidity (in the d-going direction) and an enhancement at backward rapidity (in the Au-going direction). Predictions using nuclear-modified-parton-distribution functions, even with additional nuclear-p(T) broadening, cannot simultaneously reproduce the data at both rapidity ranges, which implies that these models are incomplete and suggests the possible importance of final-state interactions in the asymmetric d + Au collision system. These results can be used to probe cold-nuclear-matter effects, which may significantly affect heavy-quark production, in addition to helping constrain the magnitude of charmonia-breakup effects in nuclear matter.

  5. Recent highlights from the PHENIX heavy ion program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, J. C.

    2015-05-01

    It is accepted that a QGP can be formed in relativistic collisions of heavy nuclei (A+A). Recently long-range correlations have been observed in p+A collisions at the LHC in high multiplicity events. PHENIX has carried out a series of studies of d+Au collisions at 200 GeV to see if such correlations persist at lower energies compared to those at the LHC. Results of a study of long-range correlations and flow are presented for d+Au collisions. Data from Au+Au collisions collected during the beam energy scan (BES) was used to determine both quark and nucleon number scaling. The HBT method was used to determine radii of the fireball at kinetic freezeout. Implications for the nuclear EOS are discussed. Also results of a search for "dark photons" are presented. Recent PHENIX highlights on heavy flavor, electromagnetic probes, spin and plans for PHENIX upgrades were presented in other talks at this conference.

  6. Hadronic resonance production in d + Au collisions at sqrt s NN = 200 GeV at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    STAR Coll

    2008-08-22

    We present the first measurements of the {rho}(770){sup 0}, K*(892), {Delta}(1232){sup ++}, {Sigma}(1385), and {Lambda}(1520) resonances in d+Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV, reconstructed via their hadronic decay channels using the STAR detector at RHIC. The masses and widths of these resonances are studied as a function of transverse momentum (p{sub T}). We observe that the resonance spectra follow a generalized scaling law with the transverse mass (m{sub T}). The of resonances in minimum bias collisions is compared to the of {pi}, K, and {bar p}. The {rho}{sup 0}/{pi}{sup -}, K*/K{sup -}, {Delta}{sup ++}/p, {Sigma}(1385)/{Lambda}, and {Lambda}(1520)/{Lambda} ratios in d + Au collisions are compared to the measurements in minimum bias p + p interactions, where we observe that both measurements are comparable. The nuclear modification factors (R{sub dAu}) of the {rho}{sup 0}, K*, and {Sigma}* scale with the number of binary collisions (N{sub bin}) for p{sub T} > 1.2 GeV/c.

  7. Sequential regeneration of charmonia in heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Xiaojian; Rapp, Ralf

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the production of ψ (2 S) in nuclear collisions at RHIC and LHC energies. We first address charmonium production in 200 GeV d-Au collisions at RHIC; the strong suppression of ψ‧ mesons observed in these reactions indicates mechanisms beyond initial cold nuclear matter effects. We find that a more complete treatment of hadronic dissociation reactions leads to appreciable ψ‧ suppression in the thermal medium of an expanding fireball background for d-Au collisions. When implementing updated hadronic reaction rates into a fireball for 2.76 TeV Pb-Pb collisions at LHC, the regeneration of ψ‧ mesons occurs significantly later than for J / ψ's. Despite a smaller total number of regenerated ψ‧, the stronger radial flow at their time of production induces a marked enhancement of their RAA relative to J / ψ's in a transverse-momentum range of pt ≃ 3- 6 GeV. We explore the consequences and uncertainties of this ;sequential regeneration; mechanism on the RAA double ratio and find that it can reproduce the trends observed in recent CMS data.

  8. Detection times of marijuana metabolites in urine by immunoassay and GC-MS.

    PubMed

    Huestis, M A; Mitchell, J M; Cone, E J

    1995-10-01

    Reports of prolonged drug excretion have provided the basis for the common assumption that cannabinoid metabolites may he detected in urine for a week or longer. The accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity of immunoassays for the detection of cannabinoids and metabolites are unique for a specific assay and may change overtime. it is important that individuals who select assays and those who interpret test results be aware of qualitative and quantitative changes that occur. In the present study, detection times of cannabinoids in urine were determined using cannabinoid immunoassays with 20-, 50-, and 100-ng/mL cutoffs and using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Six subjects each smoked a single marijuana cigarette (placebo, 1.75, or 3.55% delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol [THC]) each week while residing on the clinical ward of the Addiction Research Center. Each urine specimen was analyzed under blind conditions by immunoassay according to the manufacturer's instructions. The following cannabinoid reagents were evaluated: EMIT d.a.u. 100, EMIT d.a.u. 50, EMIT d.a.u. 20, EMIT II 100, EMIT II 50, Abuscreen OnLine, and Abuscreen RIA, DRI, and ADx. All urine specimens were also analyzed for 11-nor-9-carboxy-delta9-THC by GC-MS using a 15-ng/mL cutoff. Urinary cannabinoid detection times varied substantially across assays, subjects, doses, and cutoff concentrations. Detection times were shorter than previously assumed. Mean detection times increased from a maximum of 0.5 days after the low dose to 1.5 days after the high dose using the 100-ng/mL cutoff. Mean detection times were less than 1 day following the low dose and less than 2 days following high-dose exposure using the 50-ng/mL cutoff. Mean detection times ranged from 1 to 5 days after the low dose and from 3 to 6 days after the high dose using the 20-ng/mL cutoff immunoassay. GC-MS detection times were approximately twice as long as mean detection times using an immunoassay with a cutoff of 50 ng

  9. Unbalanced upregulation of ryanodine receptor 2 plays a particular role in early development of daunorubicin cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kucerova, Dana; Doka, Gabriel; Kruzliak, Peter; Turcekova, Katarina; Kmecova, Jana; Brnoliakova, Zuzana; Kyselovic, Jan; Kirchhefer, Uwe; Müller, Frank U; Krenek, Peter; Boknik, Peter; Klimas, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Calcium release channel on the sarcoplasmic reticulum of cardiomyocytes (ryanodine receptor type 2, RyR2) plays a critical role in the regulation of calcium and was identified as a crucial factor for development of chronic anthracycline cardiomyopathy. Its early stages are less well described although these determine the later development. Hence, we tested the effect of repeated, short-term anthracycline (daunorubicin) administration on cardiac performance, cardiomyocyte function and accompanied changes in calcium regulating proteins expression. Ten-twelve weeks old male Wistar rats were administered with 6 doses of daunorubicin (DAU, 3 mg/kg, i.p., every 48 h), controls (CON) received vehicle. Left ventricular function (left ventricular pressure, LVP; rate of pressure development, +dP/dt and decline, -dP/dt) was measured using left ventricular catheterization under tribromethanol anaesthesia (15 ml/kg b.w.). Cell shortening was measured in enzymatically isolated cardiomyocytes. The expressions of RyR2 and associated intracellular calcium regulating proteins, cytoskeletal proteins (alpha-actinin, alpha-tubul in) as well as oxidative stress regulating enzymes (gp91phox, MnSOD) were detected in ventricular tissue samples using immunoblotting. mRNA expressions of cardiac damage markers (Nppa and Nppb, atrial and brain natriuretic peptides; Myh6, Myh7 and Myh7b, myosin heavy chain alpha and beta) were detected using RT-PCR. Thiobarbituric acid reactive substances concentration was measured to estimate oxidative stress. DAU rats exhibited significantly depressed left ventricular features (LVP by 14%, +dP/dt by 36% and -dP/dt by 30%; for all P<0.05), in line with concomitant increase in Nppa and Nppb gene expressions (3.23- and 2.18-fold, for both P<0.05), and a 4.34-fold increase in Myh7 (P<0.05). Controversially, we observed increased cell shortening of isolated cardiac cells by 31% (p<0.05). DAU administration was associated with a twofold upregulation of RyR2 (P<0

  10. PHENIX results on centrality dependence of yields and correlations in d plus Au collisions at root s(NN)=200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Sakaguchi, T.

    2016-12-01

    PHENIX has measured the transverse momentum (pT) spectra and two particle angular correlations for high pT particles in d+Au collisions at psNN=200 GeV using the RHIC Year-2008 run data. The azimuthal angle correlations for two particles with a large rapidity gap exhibit a ridge-like structure. Using the pi-0s reconstructed in the EMCal, we have successfully extended the pT reach of the correlation up to 8 GeV/c. We find that the azimuthal anisotropy of hadrons found at low pT persists up to 6 GeV/c with a significant centrality and pT dependence, similar to what was observed in A+A collisions.

  11. User's manual for the Langley Research Center 14- by 22- foot subsonic tunnel static data acquisition system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orie, Nettie M.; Quinto, P. Frank

    1993-01-01

    The Static Data Acquisition System (SDAS) components primarily responsible for acquiring data at the 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel are the NEFF 620/600 Data Acquisition Unit (DAU) and the PSI 780B electronically scanned pressure (ESP) measurement system. A 9250 Modcomp computer is used to process the signal, to do all aerodynamic calculation, and to control the output of data. All of the tasks required to support a wind tunnel investigation are menu driven. The purpose of this report is to acquaint users of this system with the wide range of capabilities that exist with the available hardware and software and provide them with the proper procedures to follow when setting up or running individual tests.

  12. Black brant from Alaska staging and wintering in Japan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Derksen, Dirk V.; Bollinger, K.S.; Ward, David H.; Sedinger, J.S.; Miyabayashi, Y.

    1996-01-01

    Black brant (Branta bernicla nigricans) nest in colonies in arctic Canada, Alaska, and Russia (Derksen and Ward 1993, Sedinger et al. 1993). Virtually the entire population stages in fall at Izembek Lagoon near the tip of the Alaska Peninsula (Bellrose 1976) before southward migration (Dau 1992) to winter habitats in British Columbia, Washington, Oregon, California, and Baja California (Subcommittee on Black Brant 1992). A small number of black brant winter in Japan, Korea, and China (Owen 1980). In Japan 3,000–5,000 brant of unknown origin stop over in fall, and a declining population (<1,000) of birds winter here, primarily in the northern islands (Brazil 1991, Miyabayashi et al. 1994). Here, we report sightings of brant in Japan that were marked in Alaska and propose a migration route based on historical and recent observations and weather patterns.

  13. Elliptic Anisotropy ν2 May Be Dominated by Particle Escape instead of Hydrodynamic Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Zi-Wei; He, Liang; Edmonds, Terrence; Liu, Feng; Molnar, Denes; Wang, Fuqiang

    2016-12-01

    It is commonly believed that azimuthal anisotropies in relativistic heavy ion collisions are generated by hydrodynamic evolution of the strongly interacting quark-gluon plasma. Here we use transport models to study how azimuthal anisotropies depend on the number of collisions that each parton suffers. We find that the majority of ν2 comes from the anisotropic escape of partons, not from the parton collective flow, for semi-central Au+Au collisions at 200A GeV. As expected, the fraction of ν2 from the anisotropic particle escape is even higher for smaller systems such as d+Au. Our transport model results also confirm that azimuthal anisotropies would be dominated by hydrodynamic flow at unrealistically-high parton cross sections. Our finding thus naturally explains the similarity of azimuthal anisotropies in small and large systems; however, it presents a challenge to the paradigm of anisotropic flow.

  14. Is the QCD Plasma Observable at RHIC with Purely Hadronic Signals?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahana, David E.; Kahana, Sidney H.

    2009-03-01

    A consistent picture of the Au+Au and D+Au, √s = 200 A GeV measurements at RHIC obtained with the PHENIX, STAR, PHOBOS and BRAHMS detectors was previously developed with the simulation LUCIFER. The approach was modeled on the early production of a fluid of pre-hadrons after the completion of an initial phase of high energy interactions. A successful description of both measured "jet" suppression and elliptical flow is obtained with a key element being the early production of pre-mesons which are relatively strongly interacting. The synthesis of these two signals in a common description puts in doubt the likelihood of direct hadronic observation of the colored phase which, for appreciably hard partons, lasts only a short interval ˜tp, while the time for pre-mesons to hadronise tf is in general considerably longer.

  15. B Production In p-p and A-A Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kisslinger, Leonard S.; Singha, Bijit

    2017-09-01

    This is an extension of our recent work on D+(c\\bar {d}),Do(c\\bar {u}) production from p-p and d-Au collisions to B+(b\\bar {d}),Bo(b\\bar {u}) production from p-p and A-A collisions. The rapidity cross sections for B+(c\\bar {d}),Bo(b\\bar {u}) production from both p-p and A-A collisions are estimated. Our present work makes use of previous work on J/Ψ, Ψ'(2S), ϒ(n S) production in p-p and A-A collisions, with the main new aspect being the fragmentation probability, D_{b → b\\bar {q}}, which turns out to be similar to the fragmentation probability D_{c → c\\bar {q}} used in our recent work.

  16. Propoxyphene and norpropoxyphene quantitation in the same solid-phase extraction using Toxi-Lab Spec VC MP3 system.

    PubMed

    King, J W; King, L J

    1994-01-01

    We have found that in using the Toxi-Lab Spec VC MP3 column we were able to easily identify and quantitate both propoxyphene and the major metabolite, norpropoxyphene, in a single extraction using urine as a matrix. Samples were screened using the Syva EMIT d.a.u. 1.0 assay for propoxyphene on the Olympus 5131, and all presumptive positives were prepared for confirmation by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry on Hewlett-Packard instruments. Urine (1.0 mL) was extracted and treated with a strong base (pH 11.0) in order to rearrange, by base catalysis, norpropoxyphene to norpropoxyphene amide, which chromatographs well on these columns.

  17. Cross section for bb¯ production via dielectrons in d + Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Adare, A.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Alexander, J.; Angerami, A.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Aramaki, Y.; Atomssa, E. T.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Barish, K. N.; Bassalleck, B.; Basye, A. T.; Bathe, S.; Baublis, V.; Baumann, C.; Bazilevsky, A.; Belikov, S.; Belmont, R.; Bennett, R.; Bhom, J. H.; Blau, D. S.; Bok, J. S.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Butsyk, S.; Campbell, S.; Caringi, A.; Chen, C. -H.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, P.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cole, B. A.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Dahms, T.; Dairaku, S.; Danchev, I.; Das, K.; Datta, A.; David, G.; Dayananda, M. K.; Denisov, A.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dharmawardane, K. V.; Dietzsch, O.; Dion, A.; Donadelli, M.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Dutta, D.; D'Orazio, L.; Edwards, S.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Ellinghaus, F.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Fadem, B.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Fraenkel, Z.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fujiwara, K.; Fukao, Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Garishvili, I.; Glenn, A.; Gong, H.; Gonin, M.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grim, G.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gunji, T.; Gustafsson, H. -Å.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamblen, J.; Han, R.; Hanks, J.; Haslum, E.; Hayano, R.; He, X.; Heffner, M.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Hill, J. C.; Hohlmann, M.; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hornback, D.; Huang, S.; Ichihara, T.; Ichimiya, R.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Inaba, M.; Isenhower, D.; Ishihara, M.; Issah, M.; Ivanischev, D.; Iwanaga, Y.; Jacak, B. V.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; Jin, J.; Johnson, B. M.; Jones, T.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kajihara, F.; Kamin, J.; Kang, J. H.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kasai, M.; Kawall, D.; Kawashima, M.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kempel, T.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kijima, K. M.; Kikuchi, J.; Kim, A.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E. -J.; Kim, Y. -J.; Kinney, E.; Kiss, Á.; Kistenev, E.; Kleinjan, D.; Kochenda, L.; Komkov, B.; Konno, M.; Koster, J.; Král, A.; Kravitz, A.; Kunde, G. J.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, J.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Li, X.; Lichtenwalner, P.; Liebing, P.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Liška, T.; Liu, H.; Liu, M. X.; Love, B.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Malik, M. D.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Mao, Y.; Masui, H.; Matathias, F.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; McGlinchey, D.; Means, N.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mibe, T.; Mignerey, A. C.; Miki, K.; Milov, A.; Mitchell, J. T.; Mohanty, A. K.; Moon, H. J.; Morino, Y.; Morreale, A.; Morrison, D. P.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagle, J. L.; Naglis, M.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, K. R.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Nam, S.; Newby, J.; Nguyen, M.; Nihashi, M.; Nouicer, R.; Nyanin, A. S.; Oakley, C.; O'Brien, E.; Oda, S. X.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Oka, M.; Okada, K.; Onuki, Y.; Oskarsson, A.; Ouchida, M.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, I. H.; Park, S. K.; Park, W. J.; Pate, S. F.; Pei, H.; Peng, J. -C.; Pereira, H.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Petti, R.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pisani, R. P.; Proissl, M.; Purschke, M. L.; Qu, H.; Rak, J.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Rembeczki, S.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Roach, D.; Roche, G.; Rolnick, S. D.; Rosati, M.; Rosen, C. A.; Rosendahl, S. S. E.; Ružička, P.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sakashita, K.; Samsonov, V.; Sano, S.; Sato, T.; Sawada, S.; Sedgwick, K.; Seele, J.; Seidl, R.; Seto, R.; Sharma, D.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T. -A.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Sim, K. S.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Slunečka, M.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Stankus, P. W.; Stenlund, E.; Stoll, S. P.; Sugitate, T.; Sukhanov, A.; Sziklai, J.; Takagui, E. M.; Taketani, A.; Tanabe, R.; Tanaka, Y.; Taneja, S.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Themann, H.; Thomas, D.; Thomas, T. L.; Togawa, M.; Toia, A.; Tomášek, L.; Torii, H.; Towell, R. S.; Tserruya, I.; Tsuchimoto, Y.; Vale, C.; Valle, H.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vazquez-Zambrano, E.; Veicht, A.; Velkovska, J.; Vértesi, R.; Virius, M.; Vrba, V.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Wei, F.; Wei, R.; Wessels, J.; White, S. N.; Winter, D.; Woody, C. L.; Wright, R. M.; Wysocki, M.; Yamaguchi, Y. L.; Yamaura, K.; Yang, R.; Yanovich, A.; Ying, J.; Yokkaichi, S.; You, Z.; Young, G. R.; Younus, I.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zhou, S.

    2015-01-26

    We report a measurement of e⁺e⁻ pairs from semileptonic heavy-flavor decays in d+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV. Thus, exploring the mass and transverse-momentum dependence of the yield, the bottom decay contribution can be isolated from charm, and quantified by comparison to PYTHIA and MC@NLO simulations. The resulting bb-production cross section is σdAubb=1.37±0.28(stat)±0.46(syst) mb, which is equivalent to a nucleon-nucleon cross section of σNNbb =3.4 ± 0.8(stat)±1.1(syst) µb.

  18. Cross section for bb¯ production via dielectrons in d + Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV

    DOE PAGES

    Adare, A.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; ...

    2015-01-26

    We report a measurement of e⁺e⁻ pairs from semileptonic heavy-flavor decays in d+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV. Thus, exploring the mass and transverse-momentum dependence of the yield, the bottom decay contribution can be isolated from charm, and quantified by comparison to PYTHIA and MC@NLO simulations. The resulting bb-production cross section is σdAubb=1.37±0.28(stat)±0.46(syst) mb, which is equivalent to a nucleon-nucleon cross section of σNNbb =3.4 ± 0.8(stat)±1.1(syst) µb.

  19. J/psi production in sqrt s_NN=200 GeV Cu+Cu collisions.

    PubMed

    Adare, A; Afanasiev, S; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Al-Bataineh, H; Alexander, J; Aoki, K; Aphecetche, L; Armendariz, R; Aronson, S H; Asai, J; Atomssa, E T; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, B; Babintsev, V; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Baldisseri, A; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Bassalleck, B; Bathe, S; Batsouli, S; Baublis, V; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Bennett, R; Berdnikov, Y; Bickley, A A; Boissevain, J G; Borel, H; Boyle, K; Brooks, M L; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Butsyk, S; Campbell, S; Chang, B S; Charvet, J-L; Chernichenko, S; Chiba, J; Chi, C Y; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Chujo, T; Chung, P; Churyn, A; Cianciolo, V; Cleven, C R; Cole, B A; Comets, M P; Constantin, P; Csanád, M; Csörgo, T; Dahms, T; Das, K; David, G; Deaton, M B; Dehmelt, K; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; d'Enterria, D; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dietzsch, O; Dion, A; Donadelli, M; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Dubey, A K; Durum, A; Dzhordzhadze, V; Efremenko, Y V; Egdemir, J; Ellinghaus, F; Emam, W S; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Eyser, K O; Fields, D E; Finger, M; Finger, M; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fujiwara, K; Fukao, Y; Fusayasu, T; Gadrat, S; Garishvili, I; Glenn, A; Gong, H; Gonin, M; Gosset, J; Goto, Y; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Grosse Perdekamp, M; Gunji, T; Gustafsson, H-A; Hachiya, T; Hadj Henni, A; Haegemann, C; Haggerty, J S; Hamagaki, H; Han, R; Harada, H; Hartouni, E P; Haruna, K; Haslum, E; Hayano, R; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Hester, T; He, X; Hiejima, H; Hill, J C; Hobbs, R; Hohlmann, M; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Horaguchi, T; Hornback, D; Ichihara, T; Imai, K; Inaba, M; Inoue, Y; Isenhower, D; Isenhower, L; Ishihara, M; Isobe, T; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Jacak, B V; Jia, J; Jin, J; Jinnouchi, O; Johnson, B M; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Kajihara, F; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kamin, J; Kaneta, M; Kang, J H; Kanou, H; Kawall, D; Kazantsev, A V; Khanzadeev, A; Kikuchi, J; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, E; Kinney, E; Kiss, A; Kistenev, E; Kiyomichi, A; Klay, J; Klein-Boesing, C; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Komkov, B; Konno, M; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Král, A; Kravitz, A; Kubart, J; Kunde, G J; Kurihara, N; Kurita, K; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lai, Y-S; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Lee, D M; Lee, M K; Lee, T; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Lenzi, B; Liska, T; Litvinenko, A; Liu, M X; Li, X; Love, B; Lynch, D; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malakhov, A; Malik, M D; Manko, V I; Mao, Y; Masek, L; Masui, H; Matathias, F; McCumber, M; McGaughey, P L; Miake, Y; Mikes, P; Miki, K; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mishra, M; Mitchell, J T; Mitrovski, M; Morreale, A; Morrison, D P; Moukhanova, T V; Mukhopadhyay, D; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagata, Y; Nagle, J L; Naglis, M; Nakagawa, I; Nakamiya, Y; Nakamura, T; Nakano, K; Newby, J; Nguyen, M; Norman, B E; Nyanin, A S; O'Brien, E; Oda, S X; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Okada, H; Okada, K; Oka, M; Omiwade, O O; Oskarsson, A; Ouchida, M; Ozawa, K; Pak, R; Pal, D; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, J; Park, W J; Pate, S F; Pei, H; Peng, J-C; Pereira, H; Peresedov, V; Peressounko, D Yu; Pinkenburg, C; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Qu, H; Rak, J; Rakotozafindrabe, A; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Rembeczki, S; Reuter, M; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Roche, G; Romana, A; Rosati, M; Rosendahl, S S E; Rosnet, P; Rukoyatkin, P; Rykov, V L; Sahlmueller, B; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakai, S; Sakata, H; Samsonov, V; Sato, S; Sawada, S; Seele, J; Seidl, R; Semenov, V; Seto, R; Sharma, D; Shein, I; Shevel, A; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shimomura, M; Shoji, K; Sickles, A; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Silvestre, C; Sim, K S; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Skutnik, S; Slunecka, M; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Staley, F; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stepanov, M; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Suire, C; Sziklai, J; Tabaru, T; Takagi, S; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tanaka, Y; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Taranenko, A; Tarján, P; Thomas, T L; Togawa, M; Toia, A; Tojo, J; Tomásek, L; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tram, V-N; Tserruya, I; Tsuchimoto, Y; Vale, C; Valle, H; van Hecke, H W; Velkovska, J; Vertesi, R; Vinogradov, A A; Virius, M; Vrba, V; Vznuzdaev, E; Wagner, M; Walker, D; Wang, X R; Watanabe, Y; Wessels, J; White, S N; Winter, D; Woody, C L; Wysocki, M; Xie, W; Yamaguchi, Y L; Yanovich, A; Yasin, Z; Ying, J; Yokkaichi, S; Young, G R; Younus, I; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zaudtke, O; Zhang, C; Zhou, S; Zimányi, J; Zolin, L

    2008-09-19

    Yields for J/psi production in Cu+Cu collisions at sqrt s_NN=200 GeV have been measured over the rapidity range |y|<2.2 and compared with results in p+p and Au+Au collisions at the same energy. The Cu+Cu data offer greatly improved precision over existing Au+Au data for J/psi production in collisions with small to intermediate numbers of participants, in the range where the quark-gluon plasma transition threshold is predicted to lie. Cold nuclear matter estimates based on ad hoc fits to d+Au data describe the Cu+Cu data up to N_part approximately 50, corresponding to a Bjorken energy density of at least 1.5 GeV/fm(3).

  20. Pseudorapidity density of charged particles in p+Pb collisions at √(s(NN))=5.02 TeV.

    PubMed

    Abelev, B; Adam, J; Adamová, D; Adare, A M; Aggarwal, M M; Aglieri Rinella, G; Agnello, M; Agocs, A G; Agostinelli, A; Ahammed, Z; Ahmad, N; Ahmad Masoodi, A; Ahn, S U; Ahn, S A; Ajaz, M; Akindinov, A; Aleksandrov, D; Alessandro, B; Alfaro Molina, R; Alici, A; Alkin, A; Almaráz Aviña, E; Alme, J; Alt, T; Altini, V; Altinpinar, S; Altsybeev, I; Andrei, C; Andronic, A; Anguelov, V; Anielski, J; Anson, C; Antičić, T; Antinori, F; Antonioli, P; Aphecetche, L; Appelshäuser, H; Arbor, N; Arcelli, S; Arend, A; Armesto, N; Arnaldi, R; Aronsson, T; Arsene, I C; Arslandok, M; Asryan, A; Augustinus, A; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Aystö, J; Azmi, M D; Bach, M; Badalà, A; Baek, Y W; Bailhache, R; Bala, R; Baldini Ferroli, R; Baldisseri, A; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F; Bán, J; Baral, R C; Barbera, R; Barile, F; Barnaföldi, G G; Barnby, L S; Barret, V; Bartke, J; Basile, M; Bastid, N; Basu, S; Bathen, B; Batigne, G; Batyunya, B; Baumann, C; Bearden, I G; Beck, H; Behera, N K; Belikov, I; Bellini, F; 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Kushpil, V; Kushpil, S; Kvaerno, H; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Lakomov, I; Langoy, R; La Pointe, S L; Lara, C; Lardeux, A; La Rocca, P; Lea, R; Lechman, M; Lee, K S; Lee, S C; Lee, G R; Legrand, I; Lehnert, J; Lenhardt, M; Lenti, V; León, H; Leoncino, M; León Monzón, I; León Vargas, H; Lévai, P; Lien, J; Lietava, R; Lindal, S; Lindenstruth, V; Lippmann, C; Lisa, M A; Ljunggren, H M; Loenne, P I; Loggins, V R; Loginov, V; Lohner, D; Loizides, C; Loo, K K; Lopez, X; López Torres, E; Løvhøiden, G; Lu, X-G; Luettig, P; Lunardon, M; Luo, J; Luparello, G; Luzzi, C; Ma, K; Ma, R; Madagodahettige-Don, D M; Maevskaya, A; Mager, M; Mahapatra, D P; Maire, A; Malaev, M; Maldonado Cervantes, I; Malinina, L; Mal'kevich, D; Malzacher, P; Mamonov, A; Manceau, L; Mangotra, L; Manko, V; Manso, F; Manzari, V; Mao, Y; Marchisone, M; Mareš, J; Margagliotti, G V; Margotti, A; Marín, A; Markert, C; Marquard, M; Martashvili, I; Martin, N A; Martinengo, P; Martínez, M I; Martínez Davalos, A; Martínez García, G; 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    2013-01-18

    The charged-particle pseudorapidity density measured over four units of pseudorapidity in nonsingle-diffractive p+Pb collisions at a center-of-mass energy per nucleon pair √(s(NN))=5.02 TeV is presented. The average value at midrapidity is measured to be 16.81±0.71 (syst), which corresponds to 2.14±0.17 (syst) per participating nucleon, calculated with the Glauber model. This is 16% lower than in nonsingle-diffractive pp collisions interpolated to the same collision energy and 84% higher than in d+Au collisions at s√(s(NN))=0.2 TeV. The measured pseudorapidity density in p+Pb collisions is compared to model predictions and provides new constraints on the description of particle production in high-energy nuclear collisions.

  1. Pseudorapidity Density of Charged Particles in p+Pb Collisions at sNN=5.02TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abelev, B.; Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Adare, A. M.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Agnello, M.; Agocs, A. G.; Agostinelli, A.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, N.; Ahmad Masoodi, A.; Ahn, S. U.; Ahn, S. A.; Ajaz, M.; Akindinov, A.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alfaro Molina, R.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Almaráz Aviña, E.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altini, V.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anielski, J.; Anson, C.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arbor, N.; Arcelli, S.; Arend, A.; Armesto, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Aronsson, T.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Asryan, A.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Äystö, J.; Azmi, M. D.; Bach, M.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Baldini Ferroli, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Bán, J.; Baral, R. C.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. 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K.; Grajcarek, R.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, S.; Grigoryan, A.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Gros, P.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grossiord, J.-Y.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerra Gutierrez, C.; Guerzoni, B.; Guilbaud, M.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gulkanyan, H.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Haaland, Ø.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.; Han, B. H.; Hanratty, L. D.; Hansen, A.; Harmanová-Tóthová, Z.; Harris, J. W.; Hartig, M.; Harton, A.; Hasegan, D.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hayashi, S.; Hayrapetyan, A.; Heckel, S. T.; Heide, M.; Helstrup, H.; Herghelegiu, A.; Herrera Corral, G.; Herrmann, N.; Hess, B. A.; Hetland, K. F.; Hicks, B.; Hippolyte, B.; Hori, Y.; Hristov, P.; Hřivnáčová, I.; Huang, M.; Humanic, T. J.; Hwang, D. S.; Ichou, R.; Ilkaev, R.; Ilkiv, I.; Inaba, M.; Incani, E.; Innocenti, G. M.; Innocenti, P. G.; Ippolitov, M.; Irfan, M.; Ivan, C.; Ivanov, V.; Ivanov, A.; Ivanov, M.; Ivanytskyi, O.; Jachołkowski, A.; Jacobs, P. M.; Jang, H. J.; Janik, R.; Janik, M. A.; Jayarathna, P. H. S. Y.; Jena, S.; Jha, D. M.; Jimenez Bustamante, R. T.; Jones, P. G.; Jung, H.; Jusko, A.; Kaidalov, A. B.; Kalcher, S.; Kaliňák, P.; Kalliokoski, T.; Kalweit, A.; Kang, J. H.; Kaplin, V.; Karasu Uysal, A.; Karavichev, O.; Karavicheva, T.; Karpechev, E.; Kazantsev, A.; Kebschull, U.; Keidel, R.; Khan, K. H.; Khan, P.; Khan, M. M.; Khan, S. A.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kharlov, Y.; Kileng, B.; Kim, D. W.; Kim, T.; Kim, B.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, M.; Kim, M.; Kim, S.; Kim, D. J.; Kirsch, S.; Kisel, I.; Kiselev, S.; Kisiel, A.; Klay, J. L.; Klein, J.; Klein-Bösing, C.; Kliemant, M.; Kluge, A.; Knichel, M. L.; Knospe, A. G.; Köhler, M. K.; Kollegger, T.; Kolojvari, A.; Kondratiev, V.; Kondratyeva, N.; Konevskikh, A.; Kour, R.; Kovalenko, V.; Kowalski, M.; Kox, S.; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, G.; Kral, J.; Králik, I.; Kramer, F.; Kravčáková, A.; Krawutschke, T.; Krelina, M.; Kretz, M.; Krivda, M.; Krizek, F.; Krus, M.; Kryshen, E.; Krzewicki, M.; Kucheriaev, Y.; Kugathasan, T.; Kuhn, C.; Kuijer, P. G.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, J.; Kurashvili, P.; Kurepin, A.; Kurepin, A. B.; Kuryakin, A.; Kushpil, V.; Kushpil, S.; Kvaerno, H.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; Ladrón de Guevara, P.; Lakomov, I.; Langoy, R.; La Pointe, S. L.; Lara, C.; Lardeux, A.; La Rocca, P.; Lea, R.; Lechman, M.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S. C.; Lee, G. R.; Legrand, I.; Lehnert, J.; Lenhardt, M.; Lenti, V.; León, H.; Leoncino, M.; León Monzón, I.; León Vargas, H.; Lévai, P.; Lien, J.; Lietava, R.; Lindal, S.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lippmann, C.; Lisa, M. A.; Ljunggren, H. M.; Loenne, P. I.; Loggins, V. R.; Loginov, V.; Lohner, D.; Loizides, C.; Loo, K. K.; Lopez, X.; López Torres, E.; Løvhøiden, G.; Lu, X.-G.; Luettig, P.; Lunardon, M.; Luo, J.; Luparello, G.; Luzzi, C.; Ma, K.; Ma, R.; Madagodahettige-Don, D. M.; Maevskaya, A.; Mager, M.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Maire, A.; Malaev, M.; Maldonado Cervantes, I.; Malinina, L.; Mal'Kevich, D.; Malzacher, P.; Mamonov, A.; Manceau, L.; Mangotra, L.; Manko, V.; Manso, F.; Manzari, V.; Mao, Y.; Marchisone, M.; Mareš, J.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Margotti, A.; Marín, A.; Markert, C.; Marquard, M.; Martashvili, I.; Martin, N. A.; Martinengo, P.; Martínez, M. I.; Martínez Davalos, A.; Martínez García, G.; Martynov, Y.; Mas, A.; Masciocchi, S.; Masera, M.; Masoni, A.; Massacrier, L.; Mastroserio, A.; Matthews, Z. L.; Matyja, A.; Mayer, C.; Mazer, J.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Meddi, F.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Mercado Pérez, J.; Meres, M.; Miake, Y.; Milano, L.; Milosevic, J.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, A. N.; Miśkowiec, D.; Mitu, C.; Mizuno, S.; Mlynarz, J.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Montaño Zetina, L.; Monteno, M.; Montes, E.; Moon, T.; Morando, M.; Moreira De Godoy, D. A.; Moretto, S.; Morreale, A.; Morsch, A.; Muccifora, V.; Mudnic, E.; Muhuri, S.; Mukherjee, M.; Müller, H.; Munhoz, M. G.; Musa, L.; Musso, A.; Nandi, B. K.; Nania, R.; Nappi, E.; Nattrass, C.; Navin, S.; Nayak, T. K.; Nazarenko, S.; Nedosekin, A.; Nicassio, M.; Niculescu, M.; Nielsen, B. S.; Niida, T.; Nikolaev, S.; Nikolic, V.; Nikulin, V.; Nikulin, S.; Nilsen, B. S.; Nilsson, M. S.; Noferini, F.; Nomokonov, P.; Nooren, G.; Novitzky, N.; Nyanin, A.; Nyatha, A.; Nygaard, C.; Nystrand, J.; Ochirov, A.; Oeschler, H.; Oh, S. K.; Oh, S.; Oleniacz, J.; Oliveira Da Silva, A. C.; Oppedisano, C.; Ortiz Velasquez, A.; Oskarsson, A.; Ostrowski, P.; Otwinowski, J.; Oyama, K.; Ozawa, K.; Pachmayer, Y.; Pachr, M.; Padilla, F.; Pagano, P.; Paić, G.; Painke, F.; Pajares, C.; Pal, S. K.; Palaha, A.; Palmeri, A.; Papikyan, V.; Pappalardo, G. S.; Park, W. J.; Passfeld, A.; Pastirčák, B.; Patalakha, D. I.; Paticchio, V.; Paul, B.; Pavlinov, A.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Pereira Da Costa, H.; Pereira De Oliveira Filho, E.; Peresunko, D.; Pérez Lara, C. E.; Perini, D.; Perrino, D.; Peryt, W.; Pesci, A.; Peskov, V.; Pestov, Y.; Petráček, V.; Petran, M.; Petris, M.; Petrov, P.; Petrovici, M.; Petta, C.; Piano, S.; Piccotti, A.; Pikna, M.; Pillot, P.; Pinazza, O.; Pinsky, L.; Pitz, N.; Piyarathna, D. B.; Planinic, M.; Płoskoń, M.; Pluta, J.; Pocheptsov, T.; Pochybova, S.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Poghosyan, M. G.; Polák, K.; Polichtchouk, B.; Pop, A.; Porteboeuf-Houssais, S.; Pospíšil, V.; Potukuchi, B.; Prasad, S. K.; Preghenella, R.; Prino, F.; Pruneau, C. A.; Pshenichnov, I.; Puddu, G.; Punin, V.; Putiš, M.; Putschke, J.; Quercigh, E.; Qvigstad, H.; Rachevski, A.; Rademakers, A.; Räihä, T. S.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ramello, L.; Ramírez Reyes, A.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Räsänen, S. S.; Rascanu, B. T.; Rathee, D.; Read, K. F.; Real, J. S.; Redlich, K.; Reed, R. J.; Rehman, A.; Reichelt, P.; Reicher, M.; Renfordt, R.; Reolon, A. R.; Reshetin, A.; Rettig, F.; Revol, J.-P.; Reygers, K.; Riccati, L.; Ricci, R. A.; Richert, T.; Richter, M.; Riedler, P.; Riegler, W.; Riggi, F.; Rodríguez Cahuantzi, M.; Rodriguez Manso, A.; Røed, K.; Rohr, D.; Röhrich, D.; Romita, R.; Ronchetti, F.; Rosnet, P.; Rossegger, S.; Rossi, A.; Roy, C.; Roy, P.; Rubio Montero, A. J.; Rui, R.; Russo, R.; Ryabinkin, E.; Rybicki, A.; Sadovsky, S.; Šafařík, K.; Sahoo, R.; Sahu, P. K.; Saini, J.; Sakaguchi, H.; Sakai, S.; Sakata, D.; Salgado, C. A.; Salzwedel, J.; Sambyal, S.; Samsonov, V.; Sanchez Castro, X.; Šándor, L.; Sandoval, A.; Sano, M.; Sano, S.; Santagati, G.; Santoro, R.; Sarkamo, J.; Scapparone, E.; Scarlassara, F.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schiaua, C.; Schicker, R.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, H. R.; Schreiner, S.; Schuchmann, S.; Schukraft, J.; Schuster, T.; Schutz, Y.; Schwarz, K.; Schweda, K.; Scioli, G.; Scomparin, E.; Scott, P. A.; Scott, R.; Segato, G.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Senyukov, S.; Seo, J.; Serci, S.; Serradilla, E.; Sevcenco, A.; Shabetai, A.; Shabratova, G.; Shahoyan, R.; Sharma, S.; Sharma, N.; Rohni, S.; Shigaki, K.; Shtejer, K.; Sibiriak, Y.; Siciliano, M.; Sicking, E.; Siddhanta, S.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Simatovic, G.; Simonetti, G.; Singaraju, R.; Singh, R.; Singha, S.; Singhal, V.; Sinha, B. C.; Sinha, T.; Sitar, B.; Sitta, M.; Skaali, T. B.; Skjerdal, K.; Smakal, R.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R. J. M.; Søgaard, C.; Soltz, R.; Son, H.; Song, J.; Song, M.; Soos, C.; Soramel, F.; Sputowska, I.; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, M.; Srivastava, B. K.; Stachel, J.; Stan, I.; Stefanek, G.; Steinpreis, M.; Stenlund, E.; Steyn, G.; Stiller, J. H.; Stocco, D.; Stolpovskiy, M.; Strmen, P.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Subieta Vásquez, M. A.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Sultanov, R.; Šumbera, M.; Susa, T.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Szarka, I.; Szczepankiewicz, A.; Szostak, A.; Szymański, M.; Takahashi, J.; Tapia Takaki, J. D.; Tarantola Peloni, A.; Tarazona Martinez, A.; Tauro, A.; Tejeda Muñoz, G.; Telesca, A.; Terrevoli, C.; Thäder, J.; Thomas, D.; Tieulent, R.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Toia, A.; Torii, H.; Toscano, L.; Trubnikov, V.; Truesdale, D.; Trzaska, W. H.; Tsuji, T.; Tumkin, A.; Turrisi, R.; Tveter, T. S.; Ulery, J.; Ullaland, K.; Ulrich, J.; Uras, A.; Urbán, J.; Urciuoli, G. M.; Usai, G. L.; Vajzer, M.; Vala, M.; Valencia Palomo, L.; Vallero, S.; Vande Vyvre, P.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vannucci, L.; Vargas, A.; Varma, R.; Vasileiou, M.; Vasiliev, A.; Vechernin, V.; Veldhoen, M.; Venaruzzo, M.; Vercellin, E.; Vergara, S.; Vernet, R.; Verweij, M.; Vickovic, L.; Viesti, G.; Vilakazi, Z.; Villalobos Baillie, O.; Vinogradov, A.; Vinogradov, Y.; Vinogradov, L.; Virgili, T.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vodopyanov, A.; Voloshin, K.; Voloshin, S.; Volpe, G.; von Haller, B.; Vorobyev, I.; Vranic, D.; Vrláková, J.; Vulpescu, B.; Vyushin, A.; Wagner, V.; Wagner, B.; Wan, R.; Wang, Y.; Wang, M.; Wang, D.; Wang, Y.; Watanabe, K.; Weber, M.; Wessels, J. P.; Westerhoff, U.; Wiechula, J.; Wikne, J.; Wilde, M.; Wilk, G.; Wilk, A.; Williams, M. C. S.; Windelband, B.; Xaplanteris Karampatsos, L.; Yaldo, C. G.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yang, S.; Yang, H.; Yasnopolskiy, S.; Yi, J.; Yin, Z.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yoon, J.; Yu, W.; Yuan, X.; Yushmanov, I.; Zaccolo, V.; Zach, C.; Zampolli, C.; Zaporozhets, S.; Zarochentsev, A.; Závada, P.; Zaviyalov, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zelnicek, P.; Zgura, I. S.; Zhalov, M.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, X.; Zhou, F.; Zhou, D.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, X.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, A.; Zinovjev, G.; Zoccarato, Y.; Zynovyev, M.; Zyzak, M.

    2013-01-01

    The charged-particle pseudorapidity density measured over four units of pseudorapidity in nonsingle-diffractive p+Pb collisions at a center-of-mass energy per nucleon pair sNN=5.02TeV is presented. The average value at midrapidity is measured to be 16.81±0.71(syst), which corresponds to 2.14±0.17(syst) per participating nucleon, calculated with the Glauber model. This is 16% lower than in nonsingle-diffractive pp collisions interpolated to the same collision energy and 84% higher than in d+Au collisions at sNN=0.2TeV. The measured pseudorapidity density in p+Pb collisions is compared to model predictions and provides new constraints on the description of particle production in high-energy nuclear collisions.

  2. Transverse momentum and centrality dependence of high-pT nonphotonic electron suppression in Au+Au collisions at sqrt[s NN]=200 GeV.

    PubMed

    Abelev, B I; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Anderson, B D; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Bai, Y; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Baumgart, S; Belaga, V V; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A; Bellwied, R; Benedosso, F; Betts, R R; Bhardwaj, S; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Blyth, S-L; Bombara, M; Bonner, B E; Botje, M; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Bravar, A; Burton, T P; Bystersky, M; Cadman, R V; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Callner, J; Catu, O; Cebra, D; Chajecki, Z; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Chen, J Y; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Chung, S U; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cosentino, M R; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Dash, S; Daugherity, M; de Moura, M M; Dedovich, T G; Dephillips, M; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Djawotho, P; Dogra, S M; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, F; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Dutta Mazumdar, M R; Eckardt, V; Edwards, W R; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Estienne, M; Fachini, P; Fatemi, R; Fedorisin, J; Feng, A; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fine, V; Fisyak, Y; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Gaillard, L; Ganti, M S; Garcia-Solis, E; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; Gorbunov, Y G; Gos, H; Grebenyuk, O; Grosnick, D; Guertin, S M; Guimaraes, K S F F; Gupta, N; Haag, B; Hallman, T J; Hamed, A; Harris, J W; He, W; Heinz, M; Henry, T W; Heppelmann, S; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffman, A M; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D; Hollis, R; Horner, M J; Huang, H Z; Hughes, E W; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Iordanova, A; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Jakl, P; Jia, F; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kang, K; Kapitan, J; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Kettler, D; Khodyrev, V Yu; Kim, B C; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Kislov, E M; Klein, S R; Knospe, A G; Kocoloski, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kouchpil, V; Kowalik, K L; Kravtsov, P; Kravtsov, V I; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kumar, A; Kurnadi, P; Kuznetsov, A A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lapointe, S; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, C-H; Lehocka, S; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, Q; Li, Y; Lin, G; Lin, X; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, H; Liu, J; Liu, L; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Longacre, R S; Love, W A; Lu, Y; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, G L; Ma, J G; Ma, Y G; Magestro, D; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Mangotra, L K; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McClain, C J; McShane, T S; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A; Millane, J; Miller, M L; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mironov, C; Mischke, A; Mitchell, J; Mohanty, B; Morozov, D A; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nattrass, C; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nepali, N S; Netrakanti, P K; Nogach, L V; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Pachr, M; Pal, S K; Panebratsev, Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Peitzmann, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Phatak, S C; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Porile, N; Poskanzer, A M; Potekhin, M; Potrebenikova, E; Potukuchi, B V K S; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Putschke, J; Qattan, I A; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Relyea, D; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L; Russcher, M J; Sahoo, R; Sakrejda, I; Sakuma, T; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sarsour, M; Sazhin, P S; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Selyuzhenkov, I; Seyboth, P; Shabetai, A; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Sharma, M; Shen, W Q; Shimanskiy, S S; Sichtermann, E P; Simon, F; Singaraju, R N; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Speltz, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stadnik, A; Stanislaus, T D S; Staszak, D; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Suaide, A A P; Suarez, M C; Subba, N L; Sumbera, M; Sun, X M; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tarnowsky, T; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Timoshenko, S; Tokarev, M; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tsai, O D; Ulery, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; van der Kolk, N; van Leeuwen, M; Vander Molen, A M; Varma, R; Vasilevski, I M; Vasiliev, A N; Vernet, R; Vigdor, S E; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Voloshin, S A; Waggoner, W T; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, J S; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Watson, J W; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Wetzler, A; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, J; Wu, Y; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, Z; Yepes, P; Yoo, I-K; Yue, Q; Yurevich, V I; Zhan, W; Zhang, H; Zhang, W M; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, Y; Zhong, C; Zhou, J; Zoulkarneev, R; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zubarev, A N; Zuo, J X

    2007-05-11

    The STAR collaboration at the BNL Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) reports measurements of the inclusive yield of nonphotonic electrons, which arise dominantly from semileptonic decays of heavy flavor mesons, over a broad range of transverse momenta (1.2d+Au, and Au+Au collisions at sqrt[s_{NN}]=200 GeV. The nonphotonic electron yield exhibits an unexpectedly large suppression in central Au+Au collisions at high p(T), suggesting substantial heavy-quark energy loss at RHIC. The centrality and p(T) dependences of the suppression provide constraints on theoretical models of suppression.

  3. Experience with IBS-suppression lattice in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko,V.N.; Luo, Y.; Ptitsyn, V.; Satogata, T.; Tepikian, S.; Bai, M.; Bruno, D.; Cameron, P.; Connolly, R.; Della Penna, A.; Drees, A.; Fedotov, A.; Ganetis, G.; Hoff, L.; Louie, W.; Malitsky, N.; Marr, G.; Marusic, A.; Montag, C.; Pilat, F.; Roser, T.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.

    2008-06-23

    An intra-beam scattering (IBS) is the limiting factor of the luminosity lifetime for RHIC operating with heavy ions. In order to suppress the IBS we designed and implemented new lattice with higher betatron tunes. This lattice had been developed during last three years and had been used for gold ions in yellow ring of the RHIC during d-Au part of the RHIC Run-8. The use of this lattice allowed both significant increases in the luminosity lifetime and the luminosity levels via reduction of beta-stars in the IPS. In this paper we report on the development, the tests and the performance of IBS-suppression lattice in RHIC, including the resulting increases in the peak and the average luminosity. We also report on our plans for future steps with the IBS suppression.

  4. Is the QCD Plasma Observable at RHIC with Purely Hadronic Signals?

    SciTech Connect

    Kahana, David E.; Kahana, Sidney H.

    2009-03-23

    A consistent picture of the Au+Au and D+Au, {radical}(s) = 200 A GeV measurements at RHIC obtained with the PHENIX, STAR, PHOBOS and BRAHMS detectors was previously developed with the simulation LUCIFER. The approach was modeled on the early production of a fluid of pre-hadrons after the completion of an initial phase of high energy interactions. A successful description of both measured ''jet'' suppression and elliptical flow is obtained with a key element being the early production of pre-mesons which are relatively strongly interacting. The synthesis of these two signals in a common description puts in doubt the likelihood of direct hadronic observation of the colored phase which, for appreciably hard partons, lasts only a short interval {approx}t{sub p}, while the time for pre-mesons to hadronise t{sub f} is in general considerably longer.

  5. Recent Results from Phobos

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, Edmundo; Betts, R. R.; Garcia, E.; Halliwell, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Iordanova, A.; Sagerer, J.; Smith, C. E.; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Barton, D. S.; Carroll, A.; Chai, Z.; George, N.; Hauer, M.; Holzman, B.; Pak, R.; Seals, H.; Sedykh, I.

    2007-02-12

    The PHOBOS detector is one of four heavy ion experiments at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory. In this paper we will review some of the results of PHOBOS from the data collected in p+p, d+Au and Au+Au collisions at nucleon-nucleon center-of-mass energies up to 200 GeV. Evidence is found of the formation of a very high energy density and highly interactive system, which can not be described in terms of hadrons, and has a relatively low baryon density. There is evidence that the system formed is thermalized to a certain degree. Scaling with the number of participants and extended longitudinal scaling behavior are also observed in distributions of produced charged particles.

  6. Recent Results from RHIC: The Perfect Liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Westfall, Gary

    2006-07-19

    In the past two years we have witnessed a leap forward in the understanding high temperature, high density, and strongly interacting matter produced in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Combining measurements of Au+Au, d+Au, and p+p collisions at energies up to 200 GeV per nucleon pair in the center of mass frame, the four RHIC experimental groups, STAR, PHENIX, PHOBOS, and BRAHMS, have produced impressive experimental evidence for the existence of a new form of matter. In this Colloquium, I will present an overview of recent experimental results from RHIC including evidence for thermalization, hydrodynamic behavior of a perfect fluid, the partonic origin of flow, and jet suppression. These measurements point to the observation of a hot, dense, strongly interacting matter produced in central Au+Au collisions at the highest available energies.

  7. Electronic Stopping Power Calculations.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-06-04

    8. ~~~~~~~~~~~~ no f~DAu T NUMBER(e) — ‘ / 7 J G /Brennan~~~~1 ~~~~ fNpØ~L4_78_c~~5L~\\ 4 I. PERFORM I NG O R GA N I Z A T I OF f l I A M E AND...between 2=6 and Z=20 have been used on targets of carbon, aluminum, nickel, silver , and gold. Also, carbon , nitrogen, oxygen, and neon projectiles...have been studied on a variety of gaseous targets, pri— manly the noble gases. Bromine, chlorine, iodine, and uranium projectiles have also been studied

  8. PHENIX results on jets in d + Au

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanks, J. Ali

    2016-12-01

    We present recently published results [A. Adare, et al., arxiv:arXiv:1509.04657] on fully reconstructed R=0.3 anti-kt jets measured in p+p and d+Au collisions at 200 GeV center-of-mass energy. The jet yields for four centrality classes along with the p+p reference are presented, as well as both the minimum bias RdAu and centrality dependent RdAu and RCP. We find that while the minimum bias RdA is consistent with unity, providing a strong constraint on models including cold-nuclear-matter effects or energy loss in small systems, the centrality dependent RdAu show a striking variation which presents a challenge to models attempting to describe the interplay between soft and hard processes in these systems.

  9. Opportunities for Drell-Yan Physics at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Aschenauer, E.; Bland, L.; Crawford, H.; Goto, Y.; Eyser, O.; Kang, Z.; Vossen, A.

    2011-05-24

    Drell-Yan (DY) physics gives the unique opportunity to study the parton structure of nucleons in an experimentally and theoretically clean way. With the availability of polarized proton-proton collisions and asymmetric d+Au collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), we have the basic (and unique in the world) tools to address several fundamental questions in QCD, including the expected gluon saturation at low partonic momenta and the universality of transverse momentum dependent parton distribution functions. A Drell-Yan program at RHIC is tied closely to the core physics questions of a possible future electron-ion collider, eRHIC. The more than 80 participants of this workshop focused on recent progress in these areas by both theory and experiment, trying to address imminent questions for the near and mid-term future.

  10. Experimental observation of silver and gold penetration into dental ceramic by means of a radiotracer technique

    SciTech Connect

    Moya, F.; Payan, J.; Bernardini, J.; Moya, E.G.

    1987-12-01

    A radiotracer technique was used to study silver and gold diffusion into dental porcelain under experimental conditions close to the real conditions in prosthetic laboratories for porcelain bakes. It was clearly shown that these non-oxidizable elements were able to diffuse into the ceramic as well as oxidizable ones. The penetration depth varied widely according to the element. The ratio DAg/DAu was about 10(3) around 850 degrees C. In contrast to gold, the silver diffusion rate was high enough to allow silver, from the metallic alloy, to be present at the external ceramic surface after diffusion into the ceramic. Hence, the greening of dental porcelains baked on silver-rich alloys could be explained mainly by a solid-state diffusion mechanism.

  11. Knowledge, Experience, and Training in Incentive Contracting for the Department of Defense

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-30

    qÜáêíÉÉåíÜ=^ååì~ä= ^Åèìáëáíáçå=oÉëÉ~êÅÜ= póãéçëáìã= qÜìêëÇ~ó=pÉëëáçåë= sçäìãÉ=ff= = Knowledge, Experience, and Training in Incentive Contracting for the...Professor of Operations Management, Ivey Business School Knowledge, Experience, and Training in Incentive Contracting for the Department of Defense Kevin...Incentive Contracting for the Department of Defense Kevin R. Carman—Dean of the DAU West Region, has over 40 years of program and contract

  12. Comae Berenicids and related activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koseki, Masahiro

    2011-12-01

    The Comae Berenicids have been considered as a winter shower but lower meteor activities continue the whole year round in this region. It might be called the meteors of Coma Sororum Medusae (CSM) instead of Comae Berenicids (COM). The CSM radiant passes the zenith twice in lower latitudes of the northern hemisphere and CSM activities vary with the altitude of the radiant. December Leonis Minorids (DLM) and September varepsilon-Perseids (SPE) are distinct from the CSM background meteors, but July Pegasids (JPE), delta-Aurigids (DAU) and nu-Aurigids (NAU) are buried in this complex. The conglomeration of DLM, COM and JCO (January Comae Berenicids) has caused confusion in meteor observations as to whether they are three distinct sources or should be considered as one. A simple model of meteor stream structure shows the clear profile of their activities. Although their radiant drifts are overlapping, they might have different parent objects.

  13. Cold nuclear matter effects on J/ψ yields as a function of rapidity and nuclear geometry in d+A collisions at sqrt[s(NN)]=200  GeV.

    PubMed

    Adare, A; Afanasiev, S; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Al-Bataineh, H; Alexander, J; Angerami, A; Aoki, K; Apadula, N; Aphecetche, L; Aramaki, Y; Asai, J; Atomssa, E T; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, B; Babintsev, V; Bai, M; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Baldisseri, A; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Bassalleck, B; Basye, A T; Bathe, S; Batsouli, S; Baublis, V; Baumann, C; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Belmont, R; Bennett, R; Berdnikov, A; Berdnikov, Y; Bhom, J H; Bickley, A A; Blau, D S; Boissevain, J G; Bok, J S; Borel, H; Boyle, K; Brooks, M L; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Butsyk, S; Camacho, C M; Campbell, S; Caringi, A; Chang, B S; Chang, W C; Charvet, J-L; Chen, C-H; Chernichenko, S; Chi, C Y; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choi, J B; Choudhury, R K; Christiansen, P; Chujo, T; Chung, P; Churyn, A; Chvala, O; Cianciolo, V; Citron, Z; Cole, B A; Conesa del Valle, Z; Connors, M; Constantin, P; Csanád, M; Csörgo, T; Dahms, T; Dairaku, S; Danchev, I; Das, K; Datta, A; David, G; Dayananda, M K; Denisov, A; d'Enterria, D; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dharmawardane, K V; Dietzsch, O; Dion, A; Donadelli, M; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Drees, K A; Dubey, A K; Durham, J M; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Dzhordzhadze, V; D'Orazio, L; Edwards, S; Efremenko, Y V; Ellinghaus, F; Engelmore, T; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Eyser, K O; Fadem, B; Fields, D E; Finger, M; Finger, M; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fujiwara, K; Fukao, Y; Fusayasu, T; Garishvili, I; Glenn, A; Gong, H; Gonin, M; Gosset, J; Goto, Y; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Grim, G; Grosse Perdekamp, M; Gunji, T; Gustafsson, H-Å; Hadj Henni, A; Haggerty, J S; Hahn, K I; Hamagaki, H; Hamblen, J; Han, R; Hanks, J; Hartouni, E P; Haruna, K; Haslum, E; Hayano, R; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Hester, T; Hill, J C; Hohlmann, M; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Horaguchi, T; Hornback, D; Huang, S; Ichihara, T; Ichimiya, R; Iinuma, H; Ikeda, Y; Imai, K; Imrek, J; Inaba, M; Isenhower, D; Ishihara, M; Isobe, T; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Ivanischev, D; Iwanaga, Y; Jacak, B V; Jia, J; Jiang, X; Jin, J; Johnson, B M; Jones, T; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Jumper, D S; Kajihara, F; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kamin, J; Kang, J H; Kapustinsky, J; Karatsu, K; Kasai, M; Kawall, D; Kawashima, M; Kazantsev, A V; Kempel, T; Khanzadeev, A; Kijima, K M; Kikuchi, J; Kim, A; Kim, B I; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, E; Kim, E J; Kim, S H; Kim, Y-J; Kinney, E; Kiriluk, K; Kiss, Á; Kistenev, E; Klay, J; Klein-Boesing, C; Kochenda, L; Komkov, B; Konno, M; Koster, J; Kozlov, A; Král, A; Kravitz, A; Kunde, G J; Kurita, K; Kurosawa, M; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lai, Y S; Lajoie, J G; Layton, D; Lebedev, A; Lee, D M; Lee, J; Lee, K B; Lee, K S; Lee, T; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Lenzi, B; Li, X; Lichtenwalner, P; Liebing, P; Linden Levy, L A; Liška, T; Litvinenko, A; Liu, H; Liu, M X; Love, B; Lynch, D; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malakhov, A; Malik, M D; Manko, V I; Mannel, E; Mao, Y; Mašek, L; Masui, H; Matathias, F; McCumber, M; McGaughey, P L; McGlinchey, D; Means, N; Meredith, B; Miake, Y; Mibe, T; Mignerey, A C; Mikeš, P; Miki, K; Milov, A; Mishra, M; Mitchell, J T; Mohanty, A K; Moon, H J; Morino, Y; Morreale, A; Morrison, D P; Moukhanova, T V; Mukhopadhyay, D; Murakami, T; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagle, J L; Naglis, M; Nagy, M I; Nakagawa, I; Nakamiya, Y; Nakamura, K R; Nakamura, T; Nakano, K; Nam, S; Newby, J; Nguyen, M; Nihashi, M; Niita, T; Nouicer, R; Nyanin, A S; Oakley, C; O'Brien, E; Oda, S X; Ogilvie, C A; Oka, M; Okada, K; Onuki, Y; Oskarsson, A; Ouchida, M; Ozawa, K; Pak, R; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, I H; Park, J; Park, S K; Park, W J; Pate, S F; Pei, H; Peng, J-C; Pereira, H; Peresedov, V; Peressounko, D Yu; Petti, R; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Proissl, M; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Qu, H; Rak, J; Rakotozafindrabe, A; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Rembeczki, S; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Richardson, E; Roach, D; Roche, G; Rolnick, S D; Rosati, M; Rosen, C A; Rosendahl, S S E; Rosnet, P; Rukoyatkin, P; Ružička, P; Rykov, V L; Sahlmueller, B; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakai, S; Sakashita, K; Samsonov, V; Sano, S; Sato, T; Sawada, S; Sedgwick, K; Seele, J; Seidl, R; Semenov, A Yu; Semenov, V; Seto, R; Sharma, D; Shein, I; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shimomura, M; Shoji, K; Shukla, P; Sickles, A; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Silvestre, C; Sim, K S; Singh, B K; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Slunečka, M; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Staley, F; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stepanov, M; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Suire, C; Sukhanov, A; Sziklai, J; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tanabe, R; Tanaka, Y; Taneja, S; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Tarafdar, S; Taranenko, A; Tarján, P; Themann, H; Thomas, D; Thomas, T L; Togawa, M; Toia, A; Tomášek, L; Tomita, Y; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tram, V-N; Tserruya, I; Tsuchimoto, Y; Vale, C; Valle, H; van Hecke, H W; Vazquez-Zambrano, E; Veicht, A; Velkovska, J; Vértesi, R; Vinogradov, A A; Virius, M; Vossen, A; Vrba, V; Vznuzdaev, E; Wang, X R; Watanabe, D; Watanabe, K; Watanabe, Y; Wei, F; Wei, R; Wessels, J; White, S N; Winter, D; Woody, C L; Wright, R M; Wysocki, M; Xie, W; Yamaguchi, Y L; Yamaura, K; Yang, R; Yanovich, A; Ying, J; Yokkaichi, S; You, Z; Young, G R; Younus, I; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zaudtke, O; Zhang, C; Zhou, S; Zolin, L

    2011-09-30

    We present measurements of J/ψ yields in d+Au collisions at sqrt[s(NN)]=200  GeV recorded by the PHENIX experiment and compare them with yields in p+p collisions at the same energy per nucleon-nucleon collision. The measurements cover a large kinematic range in J/ψ rapidity (-2.2

  14. Determination of nimetazepam and 7-aminonimetazepam in human urine by using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kuang-Chuan; Cheng, Min-Chi; Hsieh, Chin-Lin; Hsu, Jung-Fa; Wu, Jen-Der; Lee, Ching-Kuo

    2013-01-10

    We report determination of metabolites of popular drugs of abuse, including nimetazepam and nitrazepam, in urine by using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. Nimetazepam and its metabolites, 7-aminonimetazepam and nitrazepam, were extracted by solid-phase extraction using a DAU cartridge. An ammonium acetate buffer solution (pH 4) and a Luna polar-RP column were selected as the mobile and stationary phase, respectively, for liquid chromatography. Mass spectrometry was used for analysis and was optimized for operation in the positive mode for all analytes. The urine specimens were screened for the presence of nimetazepam and its metabolites nitrazepam and 7-aminonimetazepam at a concentration of 0.1ng/mL. Presence of 7-aminonimetazepam in the urine was an indicator of the subject being a probable abuser of nimetazepam.

  15. Functional evidence for a 5-HT2B receptor mediating contraction of longitudinal muscle in human small intestine.

    PubMed Central

    Borman, R A; Burleigh, D E

    1995-01-01

    Application of 5-hydroxytryptamine induces contraction of longitudinal muscle strips from human terminal ileum. The response was resistant to antagonism by ketanserin, ondansetron or DAU6285, but was non-surmountably antagonized by methysergide. The selective 5-HT2B/2C receptor antagonist, SB 200646A evoked a concentration-dependent, parallel and dextral displacement of the concentration-response curve to 5-HT, yielding a pA2 estimate of 7.17. Application of yohimbine, a 5-HT1 and 5-HT2B receptor antagonist, also induced a rightward shift of the response curve to 5-HT, yielding a pA2 estimate of 8.10. In conclusion, it appears that a 5-HT2B receptor mediates the contractile response of the longitudinal muscle of human small intestine to 5-HT. PMID:7599919

  16. Revisiting Cuts for Improved Calibrations of the PHENIX Muon Piston Calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bownes, Emma; Phenix Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    The PHENIX Muon Piston Calorimeter (MPC) has been used extensively to study RHIC p+p and d+Au collisions, but has not been used as often in the analysis of Au+Au collisions. Forward/backward measurements of transverse energy 3 . 1 < | η | < 3 . 9 in the beam energy scan are of particular interest for studies of the strongly interacting quark-gluon plasma. Now that new methods are being employed to help calibrate the heavy ion collisions, focus can again be put on the optimal set of cuts for calibrating these runs. Studies leading to the determination of these cuts will be described. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 1507841.

  17. OPERATIONS AND PERFORMANCE OF RHIC AS A CU-CU COLLIDER.

    SciTech Connect

    PILAT, R.; AHRENS, L.; BAI, M.; BARTON, D.S.; ET AL.

    2005-05-16

    The 5th year of RHIC operations, started in November 2004 and expected to last till June 2005, consists of a physics run with Cu-Cu collisions at 100 GeV/u followed by one with polarized protons (pp) at 100 GeV [l]. We will address here the overall performance of the RHIC complex used for the first time as a Cu-Cu collider, and compare it with previous operational experience with Au, PP and asymmetric d-Au collisions. We will also discuss operational improvements, such as a {beta}* squeeze to 85cm in the high luminosity interaction regions from the design value of 1m, system improvements, machine performance and limitations, and address reliability and uptime issues.

  18. Collateral sensitivity to gemcitabine (2',2'-difluorodeoxycytidine) and cytosine arabinoside of daunorubicin- and VM-26-resistant variants of human small cell lung cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Bergman, A M; Munch-Petersen, B; Jensen, P B; Sehested, M; Veerman, G; Voorn, D A; Smid, K; Pinedo, H M; Peters, G J

    2001-06-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR), characterized by a cross-resistance to many natural toxin-related compounds, may be caused either by overexpression of a drug efflux pump such as P-glycoprotein, (P-gP), multidrug resistance proteins MRP1-3, or BCRP/MXR or, in the case of DNA topoisomerase II active drugs, by a decrease in the enzymatic activity of the target molecule termed altered topoisomerase MDR (at-MDR). However, human small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) cell lines showed a collateral sensitivity to 2',2'-difluorodeoxycytidine (gemcitabine, dFdC) and 1-beta-D-arabinofuranosylcytosine (ara-C). H69/DAU, a daunorubicin (DAU)-resistant variant of H69 with a P-gP overexpression, and NYH/VM, a VM-26 (teniposide)-resistant variant of NYH with an at-MDR, were both 2-fold more sensitive to gemcitabine and 7- and 2-fold more sensitive to ara-C, respectively. MDR variants had a 4.3- and 2.0-fold increased activity of deoxycytidine kinase (dCK), respectively. dCK catalyzes the first rate-limiting activation step of both gemcitabine and ara-C. In addition, deoxycytidine deaminase, responsible for inactivation of dFdC and ara-C, was 9.0-fold lower in H69/DAU cells. The level of thymidine kinase 2, a mitochondrial enzyme that can also phosphorylate deoxycytidine and gemcitabine, was not significantly different between the variants. These differences most likely caused an increased accumulation of the active metabolites (dFdCTP, 2.1- and 1.6-fold in NYH/VM and H69/DAU cells, respectively) and of ara-CTP (1.3-fold in NYH/VM cells). Ara-CTP accumulation was not detectable in either H69 variant. The pools of all ribonucleoside and deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates were at least 3- to 4-fold higher in the NYH variants compared to the H69 variants; for dCTP and dGTP this difference was even larger. The higher ribonucleotide pools might explain the >10-fold higher accumulation of dFdCTP in NYH compared to H69 variants. Since dCTP is low, H69 cells might not need a high ara-CTP accumulation

  19. PION INTERFEREMETRY FROM P+P TO AU+AU IN STAR.

    SciTech Connect

    CHAJECKI, Z.

    2005-08-15

    The geometric substructure of the particle-emitting source has been characterized via two-particle interferometry by the STAR collaboration for all energies and colliding systems at RHIC. We present systematic studies of charged pion interferometry. The collective nature of the source is revealed through the m{sub T} dependence of HBT radii for all particle types. Preliminary results suggest a scaling in the pion HBT radii with overall system size, as central Au+Au collisions are compared to peripheral collisions as well as with Cu+Cu and even with d+Au and p+p collisions, naively suggesting comparable flow strength in all systems. To probe this issue in greater detail, multidimensional correlation functions are studied using a spherical decomposition method. This allows clear identification of source anisotropy and, for the light systems, the presence of significant long-range non-femtoscopic correlations.

  20. J/{psi} suppression and the decrease of nuclear absorption with increasing energy

    SciTech Connect

    Capella, A.; Ferreiro, E. G.

    2007-12-15

    In the framework of the Glauber-Gribov field theory in the eikonal approximation, we show that in hadron-nucleus collisions in the high-energy limit and under specific conditions, the rescattering contributions to the J/{psi} production cross section vanish, leading to an A{sup 1} dependence on the atomic number A - except for nuclear effects in the nucleus structure function, the so-called shadowing. We show that the data from the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider on J/{psi} production in d-Au collisions can be described with nuclear shadowing alone ({sigma}{sub abs}=0). The corresponding results for Au-Au collisions are also presented and compared with available data.

  1. High pT hadron spectra at RHIC: an overview

    SciTech Connect

    Klay, J L

    2004-10-11

    Recent results on high transverse momentum (p{sub T}) hadron production in p+p, d+Au and Au+Au collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) are reviewed. Comparison of the nuclear modification factors, R{sub dAu}(p{sub T}) and R{sub AA}(p{sub T}), demonstrates that the large suppression in central Au+Au collisions is due to strong final-state effects. Theoretical models which incorporate jet quenching via gluon Bremsstrahlung in the dense partonic medium that is expected in central Au+Au collisions at ultra-relativistic energies are shown to reproduce the shape and magnitude of the observed suppression over the range of collision energies so far studied at RHIC.

  2. RH diversity in Mali: characterization of a new haplotype RHD*DIVa/RHCE*ceTI(D2).

    PubMed

    Ba, Alhassane; Beley, Sophie; Chiaroni, Jacques; Bailly, Pascal; Silvy, Monique

    2015-06-01

    Knowledge of RH variants in African populations is critical to improving transfusion safety in countries with populations of African ancestry and to providing valuable information and direction for future development of transfusion in Africa. The purpose of this report is to describe RH diversity in individuals from Mali. Blood samples collected from 147 individuals self-identified as Dogon and Fulani were analyzed for Rh antigens and alleles. The most common RHD allele variant was RHD*DAU0. Five predicted partial-D phenotypes were attributed to RHD*DAU3 or RHD*DIVa. Neither RHD*DAR nor RHD*DIIIa was found. Investigation of RHCE revealed three predicted partial-e antigens encoded by RHCE*ce(254G) in trans to RHCE*cE. Regarding C antigen, 28 Fulani typed as C+ and 16 of 28 harbored at least one RHCE*Ce-D(4)-ce, two being homozygous and predicted to show a rare RH:32,-46 phenotype. A new RHCE*ceTI with replacement of Exon 2 by RHD (RHCE*ceTI(D2)) was identified in Dogon and was identified by inheritance study to be in cis to RHD*DIVa. These samples typed C- with anti-C polyclonal antibody and monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) MS24, P3X2551368+MS24, and MS273, but positive with anti-RhCe MoAb-BS58. The same pattern was observed in sample with RHD*DIVa/RHCE*ceTI. Our survey indicated an uneven distribution of RH variant alleles between Dogon and Fulani, suggesting that study in well-documented cohorts is warranted. A high incidence of predicted partial-C phenotype encoded by RHCE*Ce-D(4)-ce was found in Fulani. Further study will also be needed to clarify the clinical significance of the new DIVa/ceTI(D2) haplotype encoding partial D and variant ce antigens. © 2015 AABB.

  3. Proton motive force-driven and ATP-dependent drug extrusion systems in multidrug-resistant Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed Central

    Bolhuis, H; Molenaar, D; Poelarends, G; van Veen, H W; Poolman, B; Driessen, A J; Konings, W N

    1994-01-01

    Three mutants of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis MG1363, termed EthR, DauR, and RhoR, were selected for resistance to high concentrations of ethidium bromide, daunomycin, and rhodamine 6G, respectively. These mutants were found to be cross resistant to a number of structurally and functionally unrelated drugs, among which were typical substrates of the mammalian multidrug transporter (P-glycoprotein) such as daunomycin, quinine, actinomycin D, gramicidin D, and rhodamine 6G. The three multidrug-resistant strains showed an increased rate of energy-dependent ethidium and daunomycin efflux compared with that of the wild-type strain. This suggests that resistance to these toxic compounds is at least partly due to active efflux. Efflux of ethidium from the EthR strain could occur against a 37-fold inwardly directed concentration gradient. In all strains, ethidium efflux was inhibited by reserpine, a well-known inhibitor of P-glycoprotein. Ionophores which selectively dissipate the membrane potential or the pH gradient across the membrane inhibited ethidium and daunomycin efflux in the wild-type strain, corresponding with a proton motive force-driven efflux system. The ethidium efflux system in the EthR strain, on the other hand, was inhibited by ortho-vanadate and not upon dissipation of the proton motive force, which suggests the involvement of ATP in the energization of transport. The partial inhibition of ethidium efflux by ortho-vanadate and nigericin in the DauR and RhoR strains suggest that a proton motive force-dependent and an ATP-dependent system are expressed simultaneously. This is the first report of an ATP-dependent transport system in prokaryotes which confers multidrug resistance to the organism. PMID:7961458

  4. Development and evaluation of an improved method for screening of amphetamines.

    PubMed

    Shindelman, J; Mahal, J; Hemphill, G; Pizzo, P; Coty, W A

    1999-10-01

    We developed a homogeneous immunoassay method to eliminate false-positive amphetamine results caused by cross-reactive substances, including over-the-counter allergy and cold medications. This method uses a neutralizing antibody that binds to amphetamines but does not bind to the labeled amphetamine conjugate used in the assay. The amount of neutralizing antibody is sufficient to reduce the assay signal resulting from authentic amphetamine and methamphetamine, but not the signal resulting from cross-reactants. This concept was implemented using the CEDIA DAU Amphetamines assay on Hitachi 747 and 717 clinical chemistry analyzers. Urine samples were tested using the standard, unmodified reagents in one channel and reagents containing the neutralizing antibody in a second channel. The difference in rate between the two tests was calculated by the analyzer; true-positive samples showed a significantly greater decrease in assay signal in response to neutralizing antibody as compared with false-positive samples. The neutralization method was evaluated in two studies using 448 samples that tested positive in the initial CEDIA DAU Amphetamines screening test. The samples were separated into categories of 154 true-positive samples and 294 false-positive samples based upon a secondary screen with the Abbott FPIA Amphetamines assay followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) testing using the HHS (SAMHSA) cutoff criteria. The CEDIA neutralization test successfully identified all 154 of the GC-MS confirmed positive samples. The test successfully identified as false positive 251 out of the 294 (85.4%) samples that failed to confirm by GC-MS.

  5. Antitumor effects of two bisdioxopiperazines against two experimental lung cancer models in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Da-Yong; Xu, Bin; Ding, Jian

    2004-01-01

    Background Probimane (Pro), an anti-cancer agent originating in China, was derived from razoxane (ICRF-159, Raz), a drug created in Britain, specifically targeting at cancer metastasis and as a cardioprotectant of anthrocyclines. Pro and Raz are bisdioxopiperazine compounds. In this work, we evaluated the anti-tumor and anti-metastatic effects of Pro and Raz in vivo against two lung tumor models, one of murine origin (Lewis lung carcinoma, LLC) and one of human origin (LAX-83). Results After determining the lethal dosage of Pro and Raz, we assessed and compared the inhibitory effects of Pro and Raz against primary tumor growth and metastatic occurrences of LLC at the dosage of LD5. Pro and Raz were active against primary tumor growth and significantly inhibited pulmonary metastasis of LLC at same dose-ranges (inhibitory rates > 90 %). Both Raz and Pro were effective in 1, 5, and 9 day administration schedules. Three different schedules of Raz and Pro were effective against the primary tumor growth of LLC (35–50 %). The synergistic anticancer effect of Raz with bleomycin (Ble) (from 41.3 % to 73.3 %) was more obvious than those with daunorubicin (Dau) (from 33.1 % to 56.3 %) in the LLC tumor model. Pro was also seen to have synergistic anti-cancer effects with Ble in the LLC model. Both Raz and Pro inhibited the growth of LAX 83 in a statistically significant manner. Conclusions These data suggest that both Raz and Pro may have anti-tumor potentiality and Raz and Pro have combinative effects with Ble or Dau. The potential targets of bisdioxopiperazines may include lung cancers, especially on tumor metastasis. The anti-cancer effects of Raz and Pro can be increased with the help of other anticancer drugs. PMID:15617579

  6. The 1968 andesitic lateral blast eruption at Arenal volcano, Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarado, Guillermo E.; Soto, Gerardo J.; Schmincke, Hans-Ulrich; Bolge, Louise L.; Sumita, Mari

    2006-09-01

    The magmatic andesitic eruption of Arenal volcano on July 29-31, 1968, after centuries of dormancy, produced three new fissural craters (A, B and C) on its western flank and a multilayered pyroclastic deposit emplaced by complex transport mechanisms. The explosions were initially triggered by a volatile oversaturated (4-7 wt.% H 2O) magma. Several lines of evidences suggest a small blast surge, where a wood-rich pyroclastic deposit was emplaced as a ground layer, followed by several units of coarse-grained (Md Φ between - 0.65 and - 5.40) tephra deposits (LU: lapilli units, DAU: double ash units). LU-1, -2, -3, DAU-1 and -2 consist of unconsolidated and well- to poorly sorted vesiculated bombs and lapilli of andesite, some blocks, ash and shredded wood. The individual units are possibly correlated with the major explosions of July 29. The thickness of the deposits decreases with the distance from the volcano from 5.6 m to a few centimeters. On average, 90% of the components are juvenile (10% dense andesite and 90% vesicular). These coarse-grained beds were deposited in rapid succession by a complex transport process, involving normal fallout, strong ballistic trajectories with a lateral hot (˜ 400 °C) blast surge (LU, equivalent to A 1). Ballistic and coarse tephra sprayed in a narrow (85°) area within about 5.5 km from the lowest crater, and a high (ca. 10 km) eruption column dispersed airfall fine lapilli-ash > 100 km from the volcano. Ash-cloud forming explosions, producing thin pyroclastic surge and muddy phreatomagmatic fallout deposits (FLAU, equivalent to A 2 and A 3), closed the blast surge sequence. The successive explosions on July 30-31 mainly produced block and ash flows, and widely dispersed ash fall. The total volume of pyroclastic material is calculated as 25.8 ± 5.5 × 10 6 m 3 (9.4 ± 2.0 × 10 6 m 3 DRE). A model is proposed to explain the peculiarities of the formation, transportation and emplacement of the blast deposits. The intrusion of

  7. Vibrational Spectroscopy of Transient Dipolar Radicals via Autodetachment of Dipole-Bound States of Cold Anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Dao-Ling; Liu, Hong-Tao; Dau, Phuong Diem; Wang, Lai-Sheng

    2014-06-01

    High-resolution vibrational spectroscopy of transient species is important for determining their molecular structures and understanding their chemical reactivity. However, the low abundance and high reactivity of molecular radicals pose major challenges to conventional absorption spectroscopic methods. The observation of dipole-bound states (DBS) in anions extend autodetachment spectroscopy to molecular anions whose corresponding neutral radicals possess a large enough dipole moment (>2.5 D).1,2 However, due to the difficulty of assigning the congested spectra at room temperature, there have been only a limited number of autodetachment spectra via DBS reported. Recently, we have built an improved version of a cold trap3 coupled with high-resolution photoelectron imaging.4 The first observation of mode-specific auotodetachment of DBS of cold phenoxide have shown that not only vibrational hot bands were completely suppressed, but also rotational profile was observed.5 The vibrational frequencies of the DBS were found to be the same as those of the neutral radical, suggesting that vibrational structures of dipolar radicals can be probed via DBS.5 More significantly, the DBS resonances allowed a number of vibrational modes with very weak Frank-Condon factors to be "lightened" up via vibrational autodetachment.5 Recently, our first high-resolution vibrational spectroscopy of the dehydrogenated uracil radical, with partial rotational resolution, via autodetachment from DBS of cold deprotonated uracil anions have been reported.6 Rich vibrational information is obtained for this important radical species. The resolved rotational profiles also allow us to characterize the rotational temperature of the trapped anions for the first time.6 1 K. R. Lykke, D. M. Neumark, T. Andersen, V. J. Trapa, and W. C. Lineberger, J. Chem. Phys. 87, 6842 (1987). 2 D. M. Wetzel, and J. I. Brauman, J. Chem. Phys. 90, 68 (1989). 3 P. D. Dau, H. T. Liu, D. L. Huang, and L. S. Wang, J. Chem. Phys

  8. Etude critique de la prise en charge de 159 personnes âgées en consultation de psychiatrie

    PubMed Central

    Ben Thabet, Jihène; Ammar, Yousra; Charfi, Nada; Zouari, Lobna; Zouari, Nasreddine; Gaha, Lotfi; Maalej, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Le phénomène de vieillissement des populations est associé à une augmentation de la prévalence de la morbidité liée à l’âge. La prescription des psychotropes chez le sujet âgé est de plus en plus fréquente dans les institutions, les doses sont de plus en plus élevées, avec un recours fréquent à une poly pharmacothérapie. Nous nous sommes proposé de décrire les conduites thérapeutiques chez le sujet âgé consultant en psychiatrie, en vue de les confronter aux dernières recommandations en la matière. Méthodes L’étude était de type rétrospectif et descriptif. Elle a concerné les sujets âgés d'au moins 60 ans ayant consulté pour la première fois en psychiatrie, au CHU Hédi Chaker à Sfax, en 2010 ou 2011. Résultats Nous avons colligé 159 dossiers. L’âge moyen était de 73 ans. La démence et les troubles de l'humeur étaient les diagnostics les plus fréquents. Sur le plan thérapeutique, une poly thérapie faite d'au moins deux psychotropes de familles différentes a été prescrite pour 55,9%. Chez 60.3% des sujets, le traitement a été prescrit d'emblée à dose complète. Aucun dossier ne faisait état d'une prise en charge psychothérapeutique. Conclusion La prise en charge des malades de notre étude n’était pas conforme aux recommandations, notamment en matière d'association médicamenteuse, de progression des doses et d'association de la psychothérapie à la pharmacothérapie. L'information des médecins et leur sensibilisation aux particularités du sujet âgé contribuerait à optimiser les soins qui leur sont prodigués, y compris en psychiatrie. PMID:25120873

  9. Measurement of Elliptic Llow in p+Au Collisions at √SNN = 200 GeV Using the PHENIX Detector at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koblesky, Theodore E.

    The Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP), a hot and dense state of matter in which quarks are not confined inside hadrons, is thought to be the same as the matter comprising the entire universe approximately one microsecond after the Big Bang. In Au+Au collisions at √SNN = 200 GeV at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and Pb+Pb collisions at √ SNN = 2.76 TeV at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), QGP has been discovered to have unique properties, such as its opacity to color charges and the fact that it behaves like a near-perfect fluid. Collective behavior in the form of a substantial elliptical azimuthal anisotropy ( v2) in the momentum distribution of final state particles has been observed, indicating a strongly-coupled, hydrodynamically flowing medium. Recently, features of collectivity have been detected in high-multiplicity, small collision systems thought to be too small to produce the QGP, such as 3He+Au and d+Au at √SNN = 200 GeV, p+Pb at √SNN = 5 TeV, and in p+p = 13 TeV events. In order to constrain models seeking to describe this phenomena, collision systems with distinct initial collision geometries were run at RHIC: 3He+Au for triangular geometry, d+Au for elliptical geometry, and p+Au for circular geometry. Together with coauthors, in a theory paper published in 2014, we proposed the suite of measurements at RHIC of the three collision systems. This thesis is the completion of that set of three measurements, by measuring v2 in the p+Au system. This thesis gives details on the analysis techniques used to make the measurement including the quality assurance of the data, the optimization of the midrapidity charged hadron cuts, and the event plane angle calibration. Special attention is given to correcting the systematic effects produced by the beam alignment unique to the p+Au dataset in order to make the v2 measurement with sufficient precision. Comparisons of v2 in the three collision systems and various theoretical models are made and it appears to

  10. ALTEA calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaconte, V.; Altea Team

    The ALTEA project is aimed at studying the possible functional damages to the Central Nervous System (CNS) due to particle radiation in space environment. The project is an international and multi-disciplinary collaboration. The ALTEA facility is an helmet-shaped device that will study concurrently the passage of cosmic radiation through the brain, the functional status of the visual system and the electrophysiological dynamics of the cortical activity. The basic instrumentation is composed by six active particle telescopes, one ElectroEncephaloGraph (EEG), a visual stimulator and a pushbutton. The telescopes are able to detect the passage of each particle measuring its energy, trajectory and released energy into the brain and identifying nuclear species. The EEG and the Visual Stimulator are able to measure the functional status of the visual system, the cortical electrophysiological activity, and to look for a correlation between incident particles, brain activity and Light Flash perceptions. These basic instruments can be used separately or in any combination, permitting several different experiments. ALTEA is scheduled to fly in the International Space Station (ISS) in November, 15th 2004. In this paper the calibration of the Flight Model of the silicon telescopes (Silicon Detector Units - SDUs) will be shown. These measures have been taken at the GSI heavy ion accelerator in Darmstadt. First calibration has been taken out in November 2003 on the SDU-FM1 using C nuclei at different energies: 100, 150, 400 and 600 Mev/n. We performed a complete beam scan of the SDU-FM1 to check functionality and homogeneity of all strips of silicon detector planes, for each beam energy we collected data to achieve good statistics and finally we put two different thickness of Aluminium and Plexiglas in front of the detector in order to study fragmentations. This test has been carried out with a Test Equipment to simulate the Digital Acquisition Unit (DAU). We are scheduled to

  11. Differential cytotoxicity of 19 anticancer agents in wild type and etoposide resistant small cell lung cancer cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, P. B.; Christensen, I. J.; Sehested, M.; Hansen, H. H.; Vindeløv, L.

    1993-01-01

    A panel of six 'wild type' and three VP-16 resistant small cell lung cancer (SCLC) cell lines is used to evaluate to what extent in vitro sensitivity testing using a clonogenic assay can contribute to combine cytotoxic drugs to regimens with improved efficacy against SCLC. The resistant lines include (a) H69/DAU4, which is classical multidrug resistant (MDR) with a P-glycoprotein efflux pump (b) NYH/VM, which exhibits an altered topoisomerase II (topo II) activity and (c) H69/VP, which is cross-resistant to vincristine, exhibits a reduced drug accumulation as H69/DAU4 but is without P-glycoprotein. 19 anticancer agents were compared in the panel. The MDR lines demonstrated, as expected, cross-resistance to all topo II drugs, but also different patterns of collateral sensitivity to BCNU, cisplatin, ara-C, hydroxyurea, and to the topo I inhibitor camptothecin. The complete panel of nine cell lines clearly demonstrated diverse sensitivity patterns to drugs with different modes of action. Correlation analysis showed high correlation coefficients (CC) among drug analogues (e.g. VP-16/VM-26 0.99, vincristine/vindesine 0.89), and between drugs with similar mechanisms of action (e.g. BCNU/Cisplatin 0.89, VP-16/Doxorubicin 0.92), whereas different drug classes demonstrated low or even negative CC (e.g. BCNU/VP-16 -0.21). When the CC of the 19 drug patterns to VP-16 were plotted against the CC to BCNU, clustering was observed between drugs acting on microtubules, on topo II, alkylating agents, and antimetabolites. In this plot, camptothecin and ara-C patterns were promising by virtue of their lack of cross-resistance to alkylating agents and topo II drugs. Thus, the differential cytotoxicity patterns on this panel of cells can (1) give information about drug mechanism of action, (2) enable the selection and combination of non-cross-resistant drugs, and (3) show where new drugs 'fit in' among established agents. PMID:8094293

  12. Differential cytotoxicity of 19 anticancer agents in wild type and etoposide resistant small cell lung cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Jensen, P B; Christensen, I J; Sehested, M; Hansen, H H; Vindeløv, L

    1993-02-01

    A panel of six 'wild type' and three VP-16 resistant small cell lung cancer (SCLC) cell lines is used to evaluate to what extent in vitro sensitivity testing using a clonogenic assay can contribute to combine cytotoxic drugs to regimens with improved efficacy against SCLC. The resistant lines include (a) H69/DAU4, which is classical multidrug resistant (MDR) with a P-glycoprotein efflux pump (b) NYH/VM, which exhibits an altered topoisomerase II (topo II) activity and (c) H69/VP, which is cross-resistant to vincristine, exhibits a reduced drug accumulation as H69/DAU4 but is without P-glycoprotein. 19 anticancer agents were compared in the panel. The MDR lines demonstrated, as expected, cross-resistance to all topo II drugs, but also different patterns of collateral sensitivity to BCNU, cisplatin, ara-C, hydroxyurea, and to the topo I inhibitor camptothecin. The complete panel of nine cell lines clearly demonstrated diverse sensitivity patterns to drugs with different modes of action. Correlation analysis showed high correlation coefficients (CC) among drug analogues (e.g. VP-16/VM-26 0.99, vincristine/vindesine 0.89), and between drugs with similar mechanisms of action (e.g. BCNU/Cisplatin 0.89, VP-16/Doxorubicin 0.92), whereas different drug classes demonstrated low or even negative CC (e.g. BCNU/VP-16 -0.21). When the CC of the 19 drug patterns to VP-16 were plotted against the CC to BCNU, clustering was observed between drugs acting on microtubules, on topo II, alkylating agents, and antimetabolites. In this plot, camptothecin and ara-C patterns were promising by virtue of their lack of cross-resistance to alkylating agents and topo II drugs. Thus, the differential cytotoxicity patterns on this panel of cells can (1) give information about drug mechanism of action, (2) enable the selection and combination of non-cross-resistant drugs, and (3) show where new drugs 'fit in' among established agents.

  13. Human urinary excretion profile after smoking and oral administration of ( sup 14 C)delta 1-tetrahydrocannabinol

    SciTech Connect

    Johansson, E.; Gillespie, H.K.; Halldin, M.M. )

    1990-05-01

    The urinary excretion profiles of delta 1-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta 1-THC) metabolites have been evaluated in two chronic and two naive marijuana users after smoking and oral administration of ({sup 14}C)delta 1-THC. Urine was collected for five days after each administration route and analyzed for total delta 1-THC metabolites by radioactivity determination, for delta 1-THC-7-oic acid by high-performance liquid chromatography, and for cross-reacting cannabinoids by the EMIT d.a.u. cannabinoid assay. The average urinary excretion half-life of {sup 14}C-labeled delta 1-THC metabolites was calculated to be 18.2 +/- 4.9 h (+/- SD). The excretion profiles of delta 1-THC-7-oic acid and EMIT readings were similar to the excretion profile of {sup 14}C-labeled metabolites in the naive users. However, in the chronic users the excretion profiles of delta 1-THC-7-oic acid and EMIT readings did not resemble the radioactive excretion due to the heavy influence from previous Cannabis use. Between 8-14% of the radioactive dose was recovered in the urine in both user groups after oral administration. Lower urinary recovery was obtained both in the chronic and naive users after smoking--5 and 2%, respectively.

  14. Physicochemical and detonation properties of powerful explosive nitrates and their exploding action upon various barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golubev, Vladimir; Klapötke, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    The results on physicochemical and detonation properties for six powerful explosive nitrates such as aminotetrazolium nitrate (AT-NO3) , diaminotetrazolium nitrate (DAT-NO3) , diaminouronium nitrate (DAU-NO3) , 1-amino-3-nitro-guanidinium nitrate (ANQ-NO3) , oxalylhydrazinium nitrate (OHN) and oxalylhydrazinium dinitrate (OHDN) are presented in the paper. Physicochemical properties of these nitrates were determined with the use of methods of X-ray diffraction, nuclear magnetic resonance, mass spectrometry, infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry. Sensitivities to impact, friction and electrostatic discharge were determined too. All possible quantum-chemical properties of molecules and mechanisms of their decomposition were calculated using the Gaussian 09 program. Detonation properties of explosive nitrates and equations of state of detonation products in the form of Jones-Wilkins-Lee were calculated using the EXPLO5 V.6.02 program. Calculations were fulfilled for explosive materials having the maximum crystalline density and for porous and having small additions of a polymeric binder ones. Comparative calculations on determination of exploding action of examined nitrates upon barriers, plates and shells of various materials were conducted using the ANSYS Autodyn 15.0 program in plain, cylindrical and spherical statements. For comparison all similar results were obtained also for such well-known explosives as RDX and HMX.

  15. Detection of MDR1 mRNA expression with optimized gold nanoparticle beacon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qiumei; Qian, Zhiyu; Gu, Yueqing

    2016-03-01

    MDR1 (multidrug resistance gene) mRNA expression is a promising biomarker for the prediction of doxorubicin resistance in clinic. However, the traditional technical process in clinic is complicated and cannot perform the real-time detection mRNA in living single cells. In this study, the expression of MDR1 mRNA was analyzed based on optimized gold nanoparticle beacon in tumor cells. Firstly, gold nanoparticle (AuNP) was modified by thiol-PEG, and the MDR1 beacon sequence was screened and optimized using a BLAST bioinformatics strategy. Then, optimized MDR1 molecular beacons were characterized by transmission electron microscope, UV-vis and fluorescence spectroscopies. The cytotoxicity of MDR1 molecular beacon on L-02, K562 and K562/Adr cells were investigated by MTT assay, suggesting that MDR1 molecular beacon was low inherent cytotoxicity. Dark field microscope was used to investigate the cellular uptake of hDAuNP beacon assisted with ultrasound. Finally, laser scanning confocal microscope images showed that there was a significant difference in MDR1 mRNA expression in K562 and K562/Adr cells, which was consistent with the results of q-PCR measurement. In summary, optimized MDR1 molecular beacon designed in this study is a reliable strategy for detection MDR1 mRNA expression in living tumor cells, and will be a promising strategy for in guiding patient treatment and management in individualized medication.

  16. Future Physics Capabilities of RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, B. M.

    2007-05-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory is a versatile facility for both heavy-ion and polarized-proton collision physics. The initial heavy-ion runs (Au+Au, Cu+Cu, and d+Au) have led to the unexpected discoveries at RHIC that (1) the new state of matter produced is a "nearly-perfect" fluid, (2) fast quarks (jets) lose large amounts of energy, when traversing the medium, (3) the quarks themselves are observed to flow, and (4) forward particle production is lower than expected. The polarized proton (p+p) program has discovered that gluons do not make a maximal contribution to the spin of the proton. Substantial upgrades to the accelerator and experimental detectors are ushering in an exciting transition from discovery to understanding. RHIC is poised to address these fundamental questions of broad significance: (a) What are the phases of QCD matter? (b) What is the wave function of the proton? (c) What is the wave function of a heavy nucleus? (d) What is the nature of non-equilibrium processes in a fundamental theory? After a brief introduction this talk and paper give an abbreviated overview of what has been learned so far, the plan for the mid-term (2006-2011), and the long-range plan (2012 and beyond).

  17. Calibrating the Muon Piston Calorimeter (MPC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skolnik, Marianne

    2012-10-01

    The Muon Piston Calorimeter (MPC) is a subsystem of the PHENIX detector. The MPC, an electromagnetic calorimeter, is effective at measuring the energy of photons and electrons produced from collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The MPC outputs a voltage signal that we then convert into an energy reading. One common way to calibrate electromagnetic calorimeters is to use photons from π^0 decays. Since many of the photons that enter the detector are the result of natural pion decay, we can pair up the photons and create π^0 candidates. We then plot their masses tower by tower and with the correct cuts a mass peak will appear close to the position predicted by the simulation PISA of the PHENIX detector. Then, we relate the mass peaks from the measured data to mass peaks from simulated data to adjust the gains. Once the MPC is calibrated we can use it to study Au+Au collisions. Previously, the detector has been used to study spin physics using data collected from p+p collisions, and cold nuclear matter effects using d+Au collisions. These new calibrations will allow us to measure new global variables such as transverse energy in both the forward and backward kinematic regions, 3.1< |η| < 3.9.

  18. Multiple scattering effects on heavy meson production in p+A collisions at backward rapidity

    DOE PAGES

    Kang, Zhong-Bo; Vitev, Ivan; Wang, Enke; ...

    2014-11-20

    We study the incoherent multiple scattering effects on heavy meson production in the backward rapidity region of p+A collisions within the generalized high-twist factorization formalism. We calculate explicitly the double scattering contributions to the heavy meson differential cross sections by taking into account both initial-state and final-state interactions, and find that these corrections are positive. We further evaluate the nuclear modification factor for muons that come form the semi-leptonic decays of heavy flavor mesons. Phenomenological applications in d+Au collisions at a center-of-mass energy View the MathML sources=200 GeV at RHIC and in p+Pb collisions at View the MathML sources=5.02 TeVmore » at the LHC are presented. We find that incoherent multiple scattering can describe rather well the observed nuclear enhancement in the intermediate pTpT region for such reactions.« less

  19. Measurements of Elliptic and Triangular Flow in High-Multiplicity 3He+Au Collisions at √(s(NN))=200 GeV.

    PubMed

    Adare, A; Afanasiev, S; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Akimoto, R; Al-Bataineh, H; Alexander, J; Alfred, M; Al-Ta'ani, H; Andrews, K R; Angerami, A; Aoki, K; Apadula, N; Aphecetche, L; Appelt, E; Aramaki, Y; Armendariz, R; Aronson, S H; Asai, J; Asano, H; Aschenauer, E C; Atomssa, E T; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, B; Babintsev, V; Bai, M; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Baldisseri, A; Bandara, N S; Bannier, B; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Bassalleck, B; Basye, A T; Bathe, S; Batsouli, S; Baublis, V; Baumann, C; Bazilevsky, A; Beaumier, M; Beckman, S; Belikov, S; Belmont, R; Ben-Benjamin, J; Bennett, R; Berdnikov, A; Berdnikov, Y; Bhom, J H; Bickley, A A; Blau, D S; Boissevain, J G; Bok, J S; Borel, H; Boyle, K; Brooks, M L; Broxmeyer, D; Bryslawskyj, J; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Butsyk, S; Camacho, C M; Campbell, S; Caringi, A; Castera, P; Chang, B S; Chang, W C; Charvet, J-L; Chen, C-H; Chernichenko, S; Chi, C Y; Chiba, J; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choi, J B; Choudhury, R K; Christiansen, P; Chujo, T; Chung, P; Churyn, A; Chvala, O; Cianciolo, V; Citron, Z; Cleven, C R; Cole, B A; Comets, M P; Conesa del Valle, Z; Connors, M; Constantin, P; Csanád, M; Csörgő, T; Dahms, T; Dairaku, S; Danchev, I; Danley, D; Das, K; Datta, A; Daugherity, M S; David, G; Dayananda, M K; Deaton, M B; DeBlasio, K; Dehmelt, K; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; d'Enterria, D; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dharmawardane, K V; Dietzsch, O; Dion, A; Diss, P B; Do, J H; Donadelli, M; D'Orazio, L; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Drees, K A; Dubey, A K; Durham, J M; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Dzhordzhadze, V; Edwards, S; Efremenko, Y V; Egdemir, J; Ellinghaus, F; Emam, W S; Engelmore, T; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Eyser, K O; Fadem, B; Feege, N; Fields, D E; Finger, M; Finger, M; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fujiwara, K; Fukao, Y; Fusayasu, T; Gadrat, S; Gal, C; Gallus, P; Garg, P; Garishvili, I; Ge, H; Giordano, F; Glenn, A; Gong, H; Gong, X; Gonin, M; Gosset, J; Goto, Y; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Grim, G; Grosse Perdekamp, M; Gu, Y; Gunji, T; Guo, L; Gustafsson, H-Å; Hachiya, T; Hadj Henni, A; Haegemann, C; Haggerty, J S; Hahn, K I; Hamagaki, H; Hamblen, J; Hamilton, H F; Han, R; Han, S Y; Hanks, J; Harada, H; Harper, C; Hartouni, E P; Haruna, K; Hasegawa, S; Haseler, T O S; Hashimoto, K; Haslum, E; Hayano, R; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Hester, T; Hiejima, H; Hill, J C; Hobbs, R; Hohlmann, M; Hollis, R S; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Horaguchi, T; Hori, Y; Hornback, D; Hoshino, T; Hotvedt, N; Huang, J; Huang, S; Ichihara, T; Ichimiya, R; Iinuma, H; Ikeda, Y; Imai, K; Imrek, J; Inaba, M; Inoue, Y; Iordanova, A; Isenhower, D; Isenhower, L; Ishihara, M; Isobe, T; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Ivanishchev, D; Iwanaga, Y; Jacak, B V; Jezghani, M; Jia, J; Jiang, X; Jin, J; Jinnouchi, O; John, D; Johnson, B M; Jones, T; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Jumper, D S; Kajihara, F; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kamin, J; Kanda, S; Kaneta, M; Kaneti, S; Kang, B H; Kang, J H; Kang, J S; Kanou, H; Kapustinsky, J; Karatsu, K; Kasai, M; Kawall, D; Kawashima, M; Kazantsev, A V; Kempel, T; Key, J A; Khachatryan, V; Khanzadeev, A; Kijima, K M; Kikuchi, J; Kim, A; Kim, B I; Kim, C; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, E; Kim, E-J; Kim, G W; Kim, M; Kim, S H; Kim, Y-J; Kim, Y K; Kimelman, B; Kinney, E; Kiriluk, K; Kiss, Á; Kistenev, E; Kitamura, R; Kiyomichi, A; Klatsky, J; Klay, J; Klein-Boesing, C; Kleinjan, D; Kline, P; Koblesky, T; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Komkov, B; Konno, M; Koster, J; Kotchetkov, D; Kotov, D; Kozlov, A; Král, A; Kravitz, A; Kubart, J; Kunde, G J; Kurihara, N; Kurita, K; Kurosawa, M; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lai, Y S; Lajoie, J G; Layton, D; Lebedev, A; Lee, D M; Lee, J; Lee, K B; Lee, K S; Lee, M K; Lee, S; Lee, S H; Lee, S R; Lee, T; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Lenzi, B; Li, X; Lichtenwalner, P; Liebing, P; Lim, S H; Linden Levy, L A; Liška, T; Litvinenko, A; Liu, H; Liu, M X; Love, B; Lynch, D; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Makek, M; Malakhov, A; Malik, M D; Manion, A; Manko, V I; Mannel, E; Mao, Y; Mašek, L; Masui, H; Matathias, F; McCumber, M; McGaughey, P L; McGlinchey, D; McKinney, C; Means, N; Meles, A; Mendoza, M; Meredith, B; Miake, Y; Mibe, T; Mignerey, A C; Mikeš, P; Miki, K; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mishra, D K; Mishra, M; Mitchell, J T; Mitrovski, M; Miyachi, Y; Miyasaka, S; Mizuno, S; Mohanty, A K; Montuenga, P; Moon, H J; Moon, T; Morino, Y; Morreale, A; Morrison, D P; Motschwiller, S; Moukhanova, T V; Mukhopadhyay, D; Murakami, T; Murata, J; Mwai, A; Nagamiya, S; Nagashima, K; Nagata, Y; Nagle, J L; Naglis, M; Nagy, M I; Nakagawa, I; Nakagomi, H; Nakamiya, Y; Nakamura, K R; Nakamura, T; Nakano, K; Nam, S; Nattrass, C; Netrakanti, P K; Newby, J; Nguyen, M; Nihashi, M; Niida, T; Nishimura, S; Norman, B E; Nouicer, R; Novak, T; Novitzky, N; Nyanin, A S; Oakley, C; O'Brien, E; Oda, S X; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Oka, M; Okada, K; Omiwade, O O; Onuki, Y; Orjuela Koop, J D; Osborn, J D; Oskarsson, A; Ouchida, M; Ozawa, K; Pak, R; Pal, D; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, B H; Park, I H; Park, J; Park, J S; Park, S; Park, S K; Park, W J; Pate, S F; Patel, L; Patel, M; Pei, H; Peng, J-C; Pereira, H; Perepelitsa, D V; Perera, G D N; Peresedov, V; Peressounko, D Yu; Perry, J; Petti, R; Pinkenburg, C; Pinson, R; Pisani, R P; Proissl, M; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Qu, H; Rak, J; Rakotozafindrabe, A; Ramson, B J; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Rembeczki, S; Reuter, M; Reygers, K; Reynolds, D; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Richardson, E; Rinn, T; Roach, D; Roche, G; Rolnick, S D; Romana, A; Rosati, M; Rosen, C A; Rosendahl, S S E; Rosnet, P; Rowan, Z; Rubin, J G; Rukoyatkin, P; Ružička, P; Rykov, V L; Sahlmueller, B; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakai, S; Sakashita, K; Sakata, H; Sako, H; Samsonov, V; Sano, S; Sarsour, M; Sato, S; Sato, T; Savastio, M; Sawada, S; Schaefer, B; Schmoll, B K; Sedgwick, K; Seele, J; Seidl, R; Semenov, A Yu; Semenov, V; Sen, A; Seto, R; Sett, P; Sexton, A; Sharma, D; Shein, I; Shevel, A; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shim, H H; Shimomura, M; Shoji, K; Shukla, P; Sickles, A; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Silvestre, C; Sim, K S; Singh, B K; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Skutnik, S; Slunečka, M; Snowball, M; Sodre, T; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Staley, F; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stepanov, M; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Suire, C; Sukhanov, A; Sumita, T; Sun, J; Sziklai, J; Tabaru, T; Takagi, S; Takagui, E M; Takahara, A; Taketani, A; Tanabe, R; Tanaka, Y; Taneja, S; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Tarafdar, S; Taranenko, A; Tarján, P; Tennant, E; Themann, H; Thomas, D; Thomas, T L; Tieulent, R; Timilsina, A; Todoroki, T; Togawa, M; Toia, A; Tojo, J; Tomášek, L; Tomášek, M; Tomita, Y; Torii, H; Towell, C L; Towell, R; Towell, R S; Tram, V-N; Tserruya, I; Tsuchimoto, Y; Utsunomiya, K; Vale, C; Valle, H; van Hecke, H W; Vazquez-Zambrano, E; Veicht, A; Velkovska, J; Vértesi, R; Vinogradov, A A; Virius, M; Vossen, A; Vrba, V; Vznuzdaev, E; Wagner, M; Walker, D; Wang, X R; Watanabe, D; Watanabe, K; Watanabe, Y; Watanabe, Y S; Wei, F; Wei, R; Wessels, J; White, A S; White, S N; Winter, D; Woody, C L; Wright, R M; Wysocki, M; Xia, B; Xie, W; Xue, L; Yalcin, S; Yamaguchi, Y L; Yamaura, K; Yang, R; Yanovich, A; Yasin, Z; Ying, J; Yokkaichi, S; Yoo, J H; Yoo, J S; Yoon, I; You, Z; Young, G R; Younus, I; Yu, H; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zaudtke, O; Zelenski, A; Zhang, C; Zhou, S; Zimamyi, J; Zolin, L; Zou, L

    2015-10-02

    We present the first measurement of elliptic (v(2)) and triangular (v(3)) flow in high-multiplicity (3)He+Au collisions at √(s(NN))=200  GeV. Two-particle correlations, where the particles have a large separation in pseudorapidity, are compared in (3)He+Au and in p+p collisions and indicate that collective effects dominate the second and third Fourier components for the correlations observed in the (3)He+Au system. The collective behavior is quantified in terms of elliptic v(2) and triangular v(3) anisotropy coefficients measured with respect to their corresponding event planes. The v(2) values are comparable to those previously measured in d+Au collisions at the same nucleon-nucleon center-of-mass energy. Comparisons with various theoretical predictions are made, including to models where the hot spots created by the impact of the three (3)He nucleons on the Au nucleus expand hydrodynamically to generate the triangular flow. The agreement of these models with data may indicate the formation of low-viscosity quark-gluon plasma even in these small collision systems.

  20. Application of pericardial fluid to the analysis of morphine (heroin) and cocaine in forensic toxicology.

    PubMed

    Contreras, María Teresa; Hernández, Antonio F; González, Marisa; González, Susana; Ventura, Rosa; Pla, Antonio; Valverde, Juan Luis; Segura, Jordi; de la Torre, Rafael

    2006-12-20

    In this study opiates (morphine and codeine) and cocaine and its related metabolites (benzoylecgonine and cocaethylene) were analyzed in pericardial fluid by GC/MS. This is the first study reporting levels of drugs of abuse in this body fluid. The analytical method used has been previously validated and then applied to 54 drug-related deaths in the Barcelona area (Spain). Median levels were as follows: morphine 589ng/ml, range 19-8857 (n=49); codeine 26ng/ml, range 15-343 (n=35); cocaine 78ng/ml, range 10-220 (n=14), benzoylecgonine 742ng/ml, range 20-3386 (n=15), and cocaethylene 36ng/ml, range 9-100 (n=13). In addition, a comparative study of the concentration of opiates and cocaine in pericardial fluid by both semi-quantitative EMIT d.a.u. and GC/MS (used as reference) was performed. Fairly good correlations for opiates (r=0.905) and cocaine (r=0.859) were found; however, the consistently low results of EMIT in the analysis of cocaine comparing to GC/MS could be caused by matrix effect. In spite of that, it raises the possibility of using the immunoassay as a preliminary technique in forensic toxicology.

  1. Detection of the synthetic drug 4-fluoroamphetamine (4-FA) in serum and urine.

    PubMed

    Röhrich, J; Becker, J; Kaufmann, T; Zörntlein, S; Urban, R

    2012-02-10

    4-Fluoroamphetamine (4-FA) was detected in the blood and urine of two individuals suspected for driving under the influence (DUI). The test for amphetamines in urine subjected to immunoassay screening using the CEDIA DAU assay proved positive. Further investigations revealed a 4-FA cross-reactivity of about 6% in the CEDIA amphetamine assay. 4-FA was qualitatively detected in a general unknown screening for drugs using GC/MS in full scan mode. No other drugs or fluorinated phenethylamines were detected. A validated GC/MS method was established in SIM mode for serum analysis of 4-FA with a limit of detection (LOD) of 1 ng/mL and a lower limit of quantification (LLOQ) of 5 ng/mL. Intra-assay precision was approx. 4% and inter-assay precision approx. 8%. Applying this method, the 4-FA serum concentrations of the two subjects were determined to be 350 ng/mL and 475 ng/mL, respectively. Given the pharmacological data of amphetamine, 4-FA psychoactive effects are to be expected at these serum levels. Both subjects exhibited sympathomimetic effects and psychostimulant-like impairment accordingly.

  2. Performance of immunoassays in screening for opiates, cannabinoids and amphetamines in post-mortem blood.

    PubMed

    Hino, Yukiko; Ojanperä, Ilkka; Rasanen, Ilpo; Vuori, Erkki

    2003-01-28

    Several immunoassay methods for screening of abused drugs in whole blood were evaluated in post-mortem forensic toxicology. Blood samples known to be positive or negative for opiates, cannabinoids or amphetamines by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) were analysed by EMIT II Plus and EMIT d.a.u., Syva RapidTest and Triage 8 after acetone precipitation. In these experiments, the EMIT immunoassay method was modified by using the Dade Behring VIVA analyser to detect substances more sensitively. Low concentrations of abused drugs were detected in blood samples. The sensitivities of the modified EMIT method for opiates, cannabinoids and amphetamines were 100, 86 and 98%, respectively, whereas the values were below 86% with the other methods. The specificities of all immunoassay methods for opiates and cannabinoids were 83% or above but 51-85% for amphetamines. Sample rejection occurred in a few cases with the EMIT amphetamine assays. The modified EMIT immunoassay system presented here seems to be useful for screening of drugs of abuse in post-mortem blood samples, especially when urine is not available.

  3. Determination of designer drug cross-reactivity on five commercial immunoassay screening kits.

    PubMed

    Regester, Laura E; Chmiel, Jeffrey D; Holler, Justin M; Vorce, Shawn P; Levine, Barry; Bosy, Thomas Z

    2015-03-01

    The detection of new designer drugs is often a difficult issue in forensic urine drug testing as immunoassays are the primary screening methodology for drugs of abuse in many of these laboratories. Cross-reactivity of compounds with immunoassay kits can either aid or complicate the detection of a variety of drug and drug metabolites. For instance, emerging designer drugs that share structural similarities to amphetamines and phencyclidine (PCP) have the potential to cross-react with assays designed to detect these compounds. This study evaluates the cross-reactivity of five commercially available immunoassay reagent kits for 94 designer drugs on a Roche/Hitachi Modular P automated screening instrument. The compounds used in this study are grouped by structural class as follows: 2,5-dimethoxyamphetamines, 2C (2,5-dimethoxyphenethylamines), β-keto amphetamines, substituted amphetamines, piperazines, α-pyrrolidinopropiophenones, tryptamines and PCP analogs. A drug concentration of 100 µg/mL was used to determine cross-reactivity for each assay and resulted in the following positive rates: Microgenics DRI(®) Ecstasy enzyme assay (19%), Microgenics DRI(®) Phencyclidine enzyme assay (20%), Lin-Zhi Methamphetamine enzyme immunoassay (39%), Siemens/Syva(®) EMIT(®)II Plus Amphetamines assay (43%) and CEDIA(®) DAU Amphetamine/Ecstasy assay (57%). Of the 94 designer drugs tested, 14% produced a negative response for all five kits. No designer drug used in this study generated a positive result for all five immunoassay kits.

  4. Oxidation of caffeine and related methylxanthines in ascorbate and polyphenol-driven Fenton-type oxidations.

    PubMed

    Stadler, R H; Richoz, J; Turesky, R J; Welti, D H; Fay, L B

    1996-03-01

    Caffeine and related methylxanthines were subjected to free radical mediated oxidation by incubation with Fe(3+)-EDTA/ascorbate and Fe(3+)-EDTA/polyphenolics. The reaction mixtures were analysed by reverse-phase HPLC, revealing the corresponding C-8 hydroxylated analogues as the major products of hydroxyl radical mediated attack. Further oxidation products of caffeine, analysed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS), were the N1-, N3- and N7-demethylated methylxanthine analogues theobromine, paraxanthine and theophylline, respectively. Isolable amounts of the imidazole ring operated 6-amino-5-(N-formylmethyl-amino)-1,3-dimethyl-uracil (1,3,7-DAU) derivative were also detected, which was characterised by 1H NMR and mass spectroscopy. The identified products indicate that the pertinent chemical reactions, i.e. C-8 hydroxylation, demethylations, and C8-N9 bond scission, are comparable to the primary metabolic pathways of caffeine in humans. The influence of pH, transition metals, hydrogen peroxide, free radical scavengers and metal chelators on caffeine oxidation was studied. This report illustrates that natural food-borne reactants can aid in identifying specific chemical markers of free radical induced damage. Furthermore, potentially anti-and pro-oxidative reactions can be elucidated which may be important in assessing the impact of nutrient additives and supplements on the shelf life and stability of foods and beverages.

  5. An Experimental Review on Heavy-Flavor v 2 in Heavy-Ion Collision

    DOE PAGES

    Nasim, Md.; Esha, Roli; Huang, Huan Zhong

    2016-01-01

    For overmore » a decade now, the primary purpose of relativistic heavy-ion collisions at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has been to study the properties of QCD matter under extreme conditions—high temperature and high density. The heavy-ion experiments at both RHIC and LHC have recorded a wealth of data in p+p, p+Pb, d+Au, Cu+Cu, Cu+Au, Au+Au, Pb+Pb, and U+U collisions at energies ranging from s N N = 7.7  GeV to 7 TeV. Heavy quarks are considered good probe to study the QCD matter created in relativistic collisions due to their very large mass and other unique properties. A precise measurement of various properties of heavy-flavor hadrons provides an insight into the fundamental properties of the hot and dense medium created in these nucleus-nucleus collisions, such as transport coefficient and thermalization and hadronization mechanisms. The main focus of this paper is to present a review on the measurements of azimuthal anisotropy of heavy-flavor hadrons and to outline the scientific opportunities in this sector due to future detector upgrade. We will mainly discuss the elliptic flow of open charmed meson ( D -meson), J / ψ , and leptons from heavy-flavor decay at RHIC and LHC energy.« less

  6. Click- and chirp-evoked human compound action potentials.

    PubMed

    Chertoff, Mark; Lichtenhan, Jeffery; Willis, Marie

    2010-05-01

    In the experiments reported here, the amplitude and the latency of human compound action potentials (CAPs) evoked from a chirp stimulus are compared to those evoked from a traditional click stimulus. The chirp stimulus was created with a frequency sweep to compensate for basilar membrane traveling wave delay using the O-Chirp equations from Fobel and Dau [(2004). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 116, 2213-2222] derived from otoacoustic emission data. Human cochlear traveling wave delay estimates were obtained from derived compound band action potentials provided by Eggermont [(1979). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 65, 463-470]. CAPs were recorded from an electrode placed on the tympanic membrane (TM), and the acoustic signals were monitored with a probe tube microphone attached to the TM electrode. Results showed that the amplitude and latency of chirp-evoked N1 of the CAP differed from click-evoked CAPs in several regards. For the chirp-evoked CAP, the N1 amplitude was significantly larger than the click-evoked N1s. The latency-intensity function was significantly shallower for chirp-evoked CAPs as compared to click-evoked CAPs. This suggests that auditory nerve fibers respond with more unison to a chirp stimulus than to a click stimulus.

  7. Momentum space saturation model for deep inelastic scattering and single inclusive hadron production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basso, E. A. F.; Gay Ducati, M. B.; de Oliveira, E. G.

    2011-08-01

    We show how the Santana Amaral-Gay Ducati-Betemps-Soyez (AGBS) model, originally developed for deep inelastic scattering applied to HERA data on the proton structure function, can also describe the RHIC data on single inclusive hadron yield for d+Au and p+p collisions through a new simultaneous fit. The single inclusive hadron production is modeled through the color glass condensate, which uses the quark (and gluon) condensate amplitudes in momentum space. The AGBS model is also a momentum space model based on the asymptotic solutions of the Balitsky-Kovchegov equation, although a different definition of the Fourier transform is used. This aspect is overcome, and a description entirely in transverse momentum of both processes arises for the first time. The small difference between the simultaneous fit and the one for HERA data alone suggests that the AGBS model describes very well both kinds of processes and thus emerges as a good tool to investigate the inclusive hadron production data. We use this model for predictions at LHC energies, which agrees very well with available experimental data.

  8. Predicting the Perceived Sound Quality of Frequency-Compressed Speech

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Rainer; Parsa, Vijay; Scollie, Susan

    2014-01-01

    The performance of objective speech and audio quality measures for the prediction of the perceived quality of frequency-compressed speech in hearing aids is investigated in this paper. A number of existing quality measures have been applied to speech signals processed by a hearing aid, which compresses speech spectra along frequency in order to make information contained in higher frequencies audible for listeners with severe high-frequency hearing loss. Quality measures were compared with subjective ratings obtained from normal hearing and hearing impaired children and adults in an earlier study. High correlations were achieved with quality measures computed by quality models that are based on the auditory model of Dau et al., namely, the measure PSM, computed by the quality model PEMO-Q; the measure qc, computed by the quality model proposed by Hansen and Kollmeier; and the linear subcomponent of the HASQI. For the prediction of quality ratings by hearing impaired listeners, extensions of some models incorporating hearing loss were implemented and shown to achieve improved prediction accuracy. Results indicate that these objective quality measures can potentially serve as tools for assisting in initial setting of frequency compression parameters. PMID:25402456

  9. Momentum space dipole amplitude for DIS and inclusive hadron production

    SciTech Connect

    Basso, E. A.; Gay Ducati, M. B.; De Oliveira, E. G.

    2013-03-25

    We show how the AGBS model, originally developed for deep inelastic scattering applied to HERA data on the proton structure function, can also describe the RHIC data on single inclusive hadron yield for d+Au and p+p collisions through a new simultaneous fit. The single inclusive hadron production is modeled through the color glass condensate, which uses the quark(and gluon) condensate amplitudes in momentum space. The AGBS model is also a momentum space model based on the asymptotic solutions of the BK equation, although a different definition of the Fourier transform is used. This description entirely in transverse momentum of both processes arises for the first time. The small difference between the simultaneous fit and the one for HERA data alone suggests that the AGBS model describes very well both kind of processes and thus emerges as a good tool to investigate the inclusive hadron production data. We use this model for predictions at LHC energies, which agree quite well with available experimental data.

  10. Production of mono- and bimetallic nanoparticles of noble metals by pyrolysis of organic extracts on silicon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serga, V.; Kulikova, L.; Cvetkov, A.; Krumina, A.; Kodols, M.; Chornaja, S.; Dubencovs, K.; Sproge, E.

    2013-12-01

    In the present work the influence of the tri-n-octylammonium (Oct3NH+) salt anion (PtCl62-, PdCl42-, AuCl4-) nature on the phase composition and mean size of crystallites of the extract pyrolysis products on the SiO2 nanopowder has been studied. The XRD phase analysis of the composites (metal loading 2.4 wt.%) made under the same conditions, at the pyrolysis of Pt- and Au-containing extracts has shown the formation of nanoparticles of Pt (dPt = 15 nm) and Au (dAu = 33 nm), respectively. The end-product of the pyrolysis of the Pd-containing extract has an admixture phase of PdO along with the main metal phase (dPd = 21 nm). At the preparation of bimetallic particles (Pt-Pd, Pt-Au, Pd-Au) on the SiO2 nanopowder it has been found that the nanoparticles of the PtPd alloy, Pt and Au or Pd and Au nanoparticles are the products of the thermal decomposition of two-component mixtures of extracts. The investigation of catalytic properties of the produced composites in the reaction of glycerol oxidation by molecular oxygen in alkaline aqueous solutions has shown that all bimetallic composites exhibit catalytic activity in contrast to monometallic ones.

  11. A multi-resolution envelope-power based model for speech intelligibility.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, Søren; Ewert, Stephan D; Dau, Torsten

    2013-07-01

    The speech-based envelope power spectrum model (sEPSM) presented by Jørgensen and Dau [(2011). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 130, 1475-1487] estimates the envelope power signal-to-noise ratio (SNRenv) after modulation-frequency selective processing. Changes in this metric were shown to account well for changes of speech intelligibility for normal-hearing listeners in conditions with additive stationary noise, reverberation, and nonlinear processing with spectral subtraction. In the latter condition, the standardized speech transmission index [(2003). IEC 60268-16] fails. However, the sEPSM is limited to conditions with stationary interferers, due to the long-term integration of the envelope power, and cannot account for increased intelligibility typically obtained with fluctuating maskers. Here, a multi-resolution version of the sEPSM is presented where the SNRenv is estimated in temporal segments with a modulation-filter dependent duration. The multi-resolution sEPSM is demonstrated to account for intelligibility obtained in conditions with stationary and fluctuating interferers, and noisy speech distorted by reverberation or spectral subtraction. The results support the hypothesis that the SNRenv is a powerful objective metric for speech intelligibility prediction.

  12. Predicting speech intelligibility based on the signal-to-noise envelope power ratio after modulation-frequency selective processing.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, Søren; Dau, Torsten

    2011-09-01

    A model for predicting the intelligibility of processed noisy speech is proposed. The speech-based envelope power spectrum model has a similar structure as the model of Ewert and Dau [(2000). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 108, 1181-1196], developed to account for modulation detection and masking data. The model estimates the speech-to-noise envelope power ratio, SNR(env), at the output of a modulation filterbank and relates this metric to speech intelligibility using the concept of an ideal observer. Predictions were compared to data on the intelligibility of speech presented in stationary speech-shaped noise. The model was further tested in conditions with noisy speech subjected to reverberation and spectral subtraction. Good agreement between predictions and data was found in all cases. For spectral subtraction, an analysis of the model's internal representation of the stimuli revealed that the predicted decrease of intelligibility was caused by the estimated noise envelope power exceeding that of the speech. The classical concept of the speech transmission index fails in this condition. The results strongly suggest that the signal-to-noise ratio at the output of a modulation frequency selective process provides a key measure of speech intelligibility.

  13. Marijuana-laced brownies: behavioral effects, physiologic effects, and urinalysis in humans following ingestion.

    PubMed

    Cone, E J; Johnson, R E; Paul, B D; Mell, L D; Mitchell, J

    1988-01-01

    Five drug-free male subjects ingested marijuana-laced brownies in a double-blind crossover study designed to test for behavioral effects, physiologic effects, and urinary cannabinoid metabolites produced as a result of consumption of marijuana plant material cooked in foodstuff. On three separate occasions, each subject consumed two brownies which contained 1.6 g of marijuana plant material. Placebo marijuana plant material (0% THC) was mixed with marijuana plant material (2.8% THC) so that each subject ingested equivalent marijuana plant material of 0, 1, and 2 marijuana cigarettes (2.8% THC). Subjects scored significantly higher on behavioral measures after consumption of brownies containing THC than with placebo; however, the effects were slow to appear and variable. Peak effects occurred 2.5 to 3.5 h after dosing. Modest changes in pulse and blood pressure also were noted. Urinalyses by EMIT d.a.u. assay and Abuscreen RIA for cannabinoids and GC/MS assay for THCCOOH indicated that substantial amounts of marijuana-related metabolites were excreted over a period of 3 to 14 days. No positives were produced as a result of ingestion of placebo brownies.

  14. Meteor activity from the Perseus-Auriga region in September and October

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rendtel, Jurgen; Molau, Sirko

    2010-10-01

    A systematic search was carried out for radiants of high-inclination meteor showers in September and October based on data collected over eleven years with cameras of the IMO Video Meteor Network. The Aurigids (206 AUR), with an outburst in 2007, and the September epsilon-Perseids (208 SPE), with an outburst in 2008, were the most prominent showers. Detailed SPE outburst data of 2008 are presented. Data of the October Lyncids (228 OLY) and the beta-Aurigids (210 BAU) stored in the database of the IAU Meteor Data Center have been confirmed. Radiant data of the September Lyncids (81 SLY) have been improved, and the activity period of the delta-Aurigids (224 DAU) has been better defined. Two new radiants have been detected: the September-October Lyncids (424 SOL) and the psi-Aurigids (425 PSA). All showers are at high-inclination orbits and may be part of a complex which could be similar to the Kreutz group of comets.

  15. Near-side azimuthal and pseudorapidity correlations using neutral strange baryons and mesons in d+Au , Cu + Cu, and Au + Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Abelev, B.; Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Ashraf, M. U.; Attri, A.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, X.; Bairathi, V.; Barnby, L. S.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bombara, M.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Bouchet, J.; Brandenburg, J. D.; Brandin, A. V.; Bunzarov, I.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Campbell, J. M.; Cebra, D.; Chakaberia, I.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chatterjee, A.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, X.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Christie, W.; Contin, G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, S.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Esha, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Federic, P.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, Z.; Filip, P.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Fulek, L.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gaillard, L.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Hamad, A. I.; Hamed, A.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; He, L.; Heppelmann, S.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Horvat, S.; Huang, T.; Huang, B.; Huang, X.; Huang, H. Z.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Jentsch, A.; Jia, J.; Jiang, K.; Jones, P. G.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikoła, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Kochenda, L.; Koetke, D. D.; Kosarzewski, L. K.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kumar, L.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Li, C.; Li, Y.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Lin, T.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, S.; Luo, X.; Ma, L.; Ma, R.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Magdy, N.; Majka, R.; Manion, A.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; McKinzie, S.; Meehan, K.; Mei, J. C.; Miller, Z. W.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mishra, D.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Niida, T.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Okorokov, V. A.; Olvitt, D.; Page, B. S.; Pak, R.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Pile, P.; Pluta, J.; Poniatowska, K.; Porter, J.; Posik, M.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Ray, R. L.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, B.; Sharma, A.; Sharma, M. K.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, Z.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Sikora, R.; Simko, M.; Singha, S.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Smirnov, D.; Solyst, W.; Song, L.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stepanov, M.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Summa, B.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Sun, X. M.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Tang, Z.; Tang, A. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Tawfik, A.; Thäder, J.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Todoroki, T.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Tripathy, S. K.; Tsai, O. D.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Upsal, I.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Varma, R.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Vossen, A.; Wang, H.; Wang, Y.; Wang, G.; Wang, Y.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, F.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Wen, L.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y.; Xiao, Z. G.; Xie, W.; Xie, G.; Xin, K.; Xu, Y. F.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, N.; Xu, J.; Xu, H.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Q.; Yang, S.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Yang, C.; Ye, Z.; Ye, Z.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I. -K.; Yu, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhu, X.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.

    2016-07-28

    Here we present measurements of the near side of triggered di-hadron correlations using neutral strange baryons ( $Λ,\\overline{Λ}$) and mesons (K$0\\atop{S}$ ) at intermediate transverse momentum (3 < pT< 6 GeV/c) to look for possible flavor and baryon-meson dependence. This study is performed in d+Au, Cu+Cu, and Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$$_{NN}$ = 200 GeV measured by the STAR experiment at RHIC. The near-side di-hadron correlation contains two structures, a peak which is narrow in azimuth and pseudorapidity consistent with correlations from jet fragmentation, and a correlation in azimuth which is broad in pseudorapidity. The particle composition of the jet-like correlation is determined using identified associated particles. The dependence of the conditional yield of the jet-like correlation on the trigger particle momentum, associated particle momentum, and centrality for correlations with unidentified trigger particles are presented. The neutral strange particle composition in jet-like correlations with unidentified charged particle triggers is not well described by PYTHIA. However, the yield of unidentified particles in jet-like correlations with neutral strange particle triggers is described reasonably well by the same model.

  16. Quantifying the sQGP - Heavy Ion Collisions at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Seto, Richard

    2014-12-01

    This is the closeout for DE-FG02-86ER40271 entitled Quantifying the sQGP - Heavy Ion Collisions at the RHIC. Two major things were accomplished. The first, is the physics planning, design, approval, construction, and commissioning of the MPC-EX. The MPC-EX is an electromagnetic calorimeter covering a rapidity of 3<|eta|<4, which was added to the PHENIX detector. Its primary aim is to measure low-x gluons, in order to understand the suppression seen in a variety of signatures, such as the J/Psi. A candidate to explain this phenomena is the Color Glass Condensate (CGC) A second task was to look at collisions of asymmetric species, in particularly Cu+Au. The signature was the suppression of J/Psi mesons at forward and backward rapidity, where a stronger suppression was seen in the copper going direction. While the blue of the suppression is due to hot nuclear matter effects (e.g. screening) the increase in suppression on the Au side was consistent with cold nuclear matter effects seen in d+Au collisions. A major candidate for the explanation of this phenomena is the aforementioned CGC. Finally the work on sPHENIX, particularly an extension to the forward region, called fsPHENIX is described.

  17. A study of nuclear effects using forward-rapidity hadron production and di-hadron angular correlations in square root of S(NN) = 200 GeV deuteron-gold and proton-proton collisions with the PHENIX detector at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meredith, Beau Anthony

    Measurements using the PHENIX forward detectors at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) in high-energy deuteron-gold (d+Au) collisions enable us to study cold nuclear matter effects in nucleon structure at small parton-momentum fraction, or Bjorken-x. The large gluon densities in Lorentz-contracted gold nuclei enable us to search for the yet-unobserved saturation of the gluon distribution at small x, which is caused by a balance between gluon fusion and splitting. Gluon saturation is described by the Color Glass Condensate (CGC) theory [1], which predicts a suppression of inclusive particle production in heavy-ion collisions, in particular at forward rapidity, because of a decreased gluon density. In addition, it has been suggested that forward rapidity di-hadron correlations may elucidate CGC effects with two signatures that are specific predictions from CGC: awayside-yield suppression and angular broadening [2]. This thesis describes the first experimental measurements of these forward di-hadron correlations in PHENIX. Previously, RHIC experiments have shown a suppression in the single-particle nuclear modification factors (RdA, R cp) for sNN = 200 GeV d+Au collisions in the forward (deuteron) direction [3, 4]. Multiple theories can explain the observed suppression (including CGC), but a conclusive measurement discriminating amongst the models has yet to be carried out. Two new forward-rapidity electromagnetic calorimeters (Muon Piston Calorimeters or MPCs, --3.7 < eta < --3.1, 3.1 < eta < 3.9) enable the PHENIX experiment to measure the single-particle nuclear modification factors in addition to further understanding forward particle production with the forward di-hadron correlation measurements. Azimuthal correlations of di-hadron pairs at different pseudorapidities allow us to scan the x-dependence of correlated di-hadron production, which can then be used to discriminate amongst the models that compete to explain the observed levels of forward particle

  18. Advanced Simultion of Digital Filters.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-09-01

    41*NO**41*0 04E tq N *44*1110, *W*1411 N Ni INaIl1 04 N- t-4 " 04 s%s. 04 N N ++ N + N4 C4 C N N4 N4 m ONNNNN No NNN0 4 110004aam illdx N N PA DA...U LU _j - x ui l I- z < U I i < W -- -z 1 2: z c )z c (,F- c, C Lu C) a = C -i r = w 1- U j I- u M: cr Do a_ C4 C CDC Z: C$ CD C) oj cCD - o- 0 o...0 4 N0=NuuC NQu lad N N 04 C4 ON NNNONNONNNON 04 d aw adil a c N Noo 04CDO* NQ N~oo* **** * NOO* *** * *ad N N*41n* 1 *04u4441*41414 1 t.4NuV’Q4** MO

  19. Near-side azimuthal and pseudorapidity correlations using neutral strange baryons and mesons in d+Au , Cu + Cu, and Au + Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Abelev, B.; Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Ashraf, M. U.; Attri, A.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, X.; Bairathi, V.; Barnby, L. S.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bombara, M.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Bouchet, J.; Brandenburg, J. D.; Brandin, A. V.; Bunzarov, I.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Campbell, J. M.; Cebra, D.; Chakaberia, I.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chatterjee, A.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, X.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Christie, W.; Contin, G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, S.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Esha, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Federic, P.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, Z.; Filip, P.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Fulek, L.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gaillard, L.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Hamad, A. I.; Hamed, A.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; He, L.; Heppelmann, S.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Horvat, S.; Huang, T.; Huang, B.; Huang, X.; Huang, H. Z.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Jentsch, A.; Jia, J.; Jiang, K.; Jones, P. G.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikoła, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Kochenda, L.; Koetke, D. D.; Kosarzewski, L. K.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kumar, L.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Li, C.; Li, Y.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Lin, T.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, S.; Luo, X.; Ma, L.; Ma, R.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Magdy, N.; Majka, R.; Manion, A.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; McKinzie, S.; Meehan, K.; Mei, J. C.; Miller, Z. W.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mishra, D.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Niida, T.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Okorokov, V. A.; Olvitt, D.; Page, B. S.; Pak, R.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Pile, P.; Pluta, J.; Poniatowska, K.; Porter, J.; Posik, M.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Ray, R. L.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, B.; Sharma, A.; Sharma, M. K.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, Z.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Sikora, R.; Simko, M.; Singha, S.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Smirnov, D.; Solyst, W.; Song, L.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stepanov, M.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Summa, B.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Sun, X. M.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Tang, Z.; Tang, A. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Tawfik, A.; Thäder, J.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Todoroki, T.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Tripathy, S. K.; Tsai, O. D.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Upsal, I.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Varma, R.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Vossen, A.; Wang, H.; Wang, Y.; Wang, G.; Wang, Y.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, F.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Wen, L.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y.; Xiao, Z. G.; Xie, W.; Xie, G.; Xin, K.; Xu, Y. F.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, N.; Xu, J.; Xu, H.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Q.; Yang, S.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Yang, C.; Ye, Z.; Ye, Z.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I. -K.; Yu, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhu, X.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.

    2016-07-28

    Here we present measurements of the near side of triggered di-hadron correlations using neutral strange baryons ( $Λ,\\overline{Λ}$) and mesons (K$0\\atop{S}$ ) at intermediate transverse momentum (3 < pT< 6 GeV/c) to look for possible flavor and baryon-meson dependence. This study is performed in d+Au, Cu+Cu, and Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$$_{NN}$ = 200 GeV measured by the STAR experiment at RHIC. The near-side di-hadron correlation contains two structures, a peak which is narrow in azimuth and pseudorapidity consistent with correlations from jet fragmentation, and a correlation in azimuth which is broad in pseudorapidity. The particle composition of the jet-like correlation is determined using identified associated particles. The dependence of the conditional yield of the jet-like correlation on the trigger particle momentum, associated particle momentum, and centrality for correlations with unidentified trigger particles are presented. The neutral strange particle composition in jet-like correlations with unidentified charged particle triggers is not well described by PYTHIA. However, the yield of unidentified particles in jet-like correlations with neutral strange particle triggers is described reasonably well by the same model.

  20. Quarkonia and heavy flavors latest PHENIX results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jouan, Denis; Phenix Collaboration

    2014-05-01

    Heavy quarkonia are direct probes of deconfinement in the quark gluon plasma formed in heavy ion collisions. Other effects also occur, such as modification of the parton distributions in cold nuclear matter, and a multidimensional description is necessary to disentangle the various contributions. Characterization of the production processes in p+p and p or d induced collisions with ions is critical in the extraction of the additional effects in ionion collisions. The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider has delivered a wide range of systems and energies, from p+p to Au+Au through d+Au and Cu+Au, from 7.6 to 200 GeV (N-N collision energy), allowing the PHENIX experiment to start exploring these experimentally available dimensions for open and hidden charm and beauty as a function of rapidity and transverse momentum. Recent PHENIX results on heavy flavor production measured through lepton pairs or singles, including J/Ψ, Ψ', Χc, Upsilon and open charm and beauty, are presented.

  1. High pressure effects on allergen food proteins.

    PubMed

    Somkuti, Judit; Smeller, László

    2013-12-15

    There are several proteins, which can cause allergic reaction if they are inhaled or ingested. Our everyday food can also contain such proteins. Food allergy is an IgE-mediated immune disorder, a growing health problem of great public concern. High pressure is known to affect the structure of proteins; typically few hundred MPa pressure can lead to denaturation. That is why several trials have been performed to alter the structure of the allergen proteins by high pressure, in order to reduce its allergenicity. Studies have been performed both on simple protein solutions and on complex food systems. Here we review those allergens which have been investigated under or after high pressure treatment by methods capable of detecting changes in the secondary and tertiary structure of the proteins. We focus on those allergenic proteins, whose structural changes were investigated by spectroscopic methods under pressure in correlation with the observed allergenicity (IgE binding) changes. According to this criterion we selected the following allergen proteins: Mal d 1 and Mal d 3 (apple), Bos d 5 (milk), Dau c 1 (carrot), Gal d 2 (egg), Ara h 2 and Ara h 6 (peanut), and Gad m 1 (cod). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. High-performance liquid chromatographic method for simultaneous determination of [1-methyl-14C]caffeine and its eight major metabolites in rat urine.

    PubMed

    Schrader, E; Klaunick, G; Jorritsma, U; Neurath, H; Hirsch-Ernst, K I; Kahl, G F; Foth, H

    1999-04-16

    A selective and sensitive reversed-phase liquid chromatographic method was developed for the simultaneous analysis of [1-Me-14C]caffeine and its eight major radiolabelled metabolites in rat urine. The separation of the complex mixture of caffeine metabolites was achieved by gradient elution with a dual solvent system using an endcapped C18 reversed-phase column, which in contrast to commonly used C18 reversed-phase columns also allows the separation of the two isomers of 6-amino-5-(N-formylmethylamino)-1,3-dimethyluracil (1,3,7-DAU), a caffeine metabolite of quantitative importance predominantly occurring in rat. As caffeine is metabolised primarily by members of the cytochrome P450 1A (CYP1A) subfamiliy, determination of the pattern of caffeine metabolites in rat urine enables analysis of activities of this important enzyme subfamily in vivo. Since CYP1A is suggested to be involved in the detoxification of bilirubin, the assay may be applied to search for untoxic inducers of CYP1A which might be of pharmacological interest in the treatment of hyperbilirubinaemia.

  3. Proprietes de Transport Electronique du Rutile Stoechiometrique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keroack, Danielle

    Le rutile est un oxyde metallique qui presente beaucoup de similitudes avec certains perovskites notamment le titanate de barium ou de strontium. Il est comme ces derniers, compose d'un agencement d'octaedres d'oxygene centres sur l'atome de titane. Ces octaedres sont responsables de la forte polarisabilite de ces cristaux et de leur grande constante dielectrique. Leurs proprietes optiques, seuil d'absorption et spectre de phonons, sont par exemple forts semblables. La presente etude vise a determiner la nature du transport electronique dans le rutile stoechiometrique pur et d'en comparer les resultats avec les proprietes de certains perovskites. Nous determinerons par differentes mesures optoelectroniques les parametres caracteristiques des pieges et leur influence sur le transport des electrons et des trous. Les resultats de conductivite et de capacitance de meme que les spectres de photoconductivite dans nos echantillons ont mis en evidence la presence d'au moins cinq niveaux energetiques dans la bande interdite du rutile agissant comme pieges pour les electrons ou pour les trous et qui jouent un role de premiere importance dans le comportement electrique du rutile. Par la technique de charge transitoire, nous determinerons pour la premiere fois dans le rutile stoechiometrique la grandeur de la mobilite de derive des trous a la temperature ambiante soit 3,4 cm^2/V cdots et nous etablierons une borne superieure a la mobilite des electrons soit 0,1 cm^2 /Vcdots.

  4. Medium effects on heavy-flavour observables in high-energy nuclear collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beraudo, Andrea

    2016-11-01

    The peculiar role of heavy-flavour observables in relativistic heavy-ion collisions is discussed. Produced in the early stage, c and b quarks cross the hot medium arising from the collision, interacting strongly with the latter, until they hadronize. Depending on the strength of the interaction heavy quarks may or not approach kinetic equilibrium with the plasma, tending in the first case to follow the collective flow of the expanding fireball. The presence of a hot deconfined medium may also affect heavyquark hadronization, being possible for them to recombine with the surrounding light thermal partons, so that the final heavy-flavour hadrons inherit part of the flow of the medium. Here we show how it is possible to develop a complete transport setup allowing one to describe heavy-flavour production in high-energy nuclear collisions, displaying some major results one can obtain. Finally, the possibility that the formation of a hot deconfined medium even in small systems (high-multiplicity p-Au and d-Au collisions, so far) may affect also heavy-flavour observables is investigated.

  5. Systemsize dependence of associated yields in hadron-triggered jets

    SciTech Connect

    STAR Collaboration; Abelev, Betty

    2010-07-05

    We present results on the system size dependence of high transverse momentum di-hadron correlations at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV as measured by STAR at RHIC. Measurements in d+Au, Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions reveal similar jet-like correlation yields at small angular separation ({Delta}{phi} {approx} 0, {Delta}{eta} {approx} 0) for all systems and centralities. Previous measurements have shown that the away-side yield is suppressed in heavy-ion collisions. We present measurements of the away-side suppression as a function of transverse momentum and centrality in Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions. The suppression is found to be similar in Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions at a similar number of participants. The results are compared to theoretical calculations based on the parton quenching model and the modified fragmentation model. The observed differences between data and theory indicate that the correlated yields presented here will provide important constraints on medium density profile and energy loss model parameters.

  6. Passive inhalation of marijuana smoke: urinalysis and room air levels of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol

    SciTech Connect

    Cone, E.J.; Johnson, R.E.; Darwin, W.D.; Yousefnejad, D.; Mell, L.D.; Paul, B.D.; Mitchell, J.

    1987-05-01

    In two separate studies, 5 drug-free male volunteers with a history of marijuana use were passively exposed to the sidestream smoke of 4 and 16 marijuana cigarettes (2.8% delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC)) for 1 h each day for 6 consecutive days. A third study was similarly performed with 2 marijuana-naive subjects passively exposed to the smoke of 16 marijuana cigarettes. Passive smoke exposure was conducted in a small, unventilated room. Room air levels of THC and CO were monitored frequently. All urine specimens were collected and analyzed by EMIT d.a.u. assay, Abuscreen radioimmunoassay and GC/MS. The studies show that significant amounts of THC were absorbed by all subjects at the higher level of passive smoke exposure (eg., smoke from 16 marijuana cigarettes), resulting in urinary excretion of significant amounts of cannabinoid metabolites. However, it seems improbable that subjects would unknowingly tolerate the noxious smoke conditions produced by this exposure. At the lower level of passive marijuana-smoke exposure, specimens tested positive only infrequently or were negative. Room air levels of THC during passive smoke exposure appeared to be the most critical factor in determining whether a subject produced cannabinoid-positive urine specimens.

  7. Measurements of elliptic and triangular flow in high-multiplicity 3He+Au collisions at √sNN=200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Adare, A.

    2015-09-28

    We present the first measurement of elliptic (v2) and triangular (v3) flow in high-multiplicity 3He+Aucollisions at √sNN=200 GeV. Two-particle correlations, where the particles have a large separation in pseudorapidity, are compared in 3He+Au and in p+p collisions and indicate that collective effects dominate the second and third Fourier components for the correlations observed in the 3He+Ausystem. The collective behavior is quantified in terms of elliptic v2 and triangular v3 anisotropy coefficients measured with respect to their corresponding event planes. The v2 values are comparable to those previously measured in d+Au collisions at the same nucleon-nucleon center-of-mass energy. Comparisons with various theoretical predictions are made, including to models where the hot spots created by the impact of the three 3He nucleons on the Au nucleus expand hydrodynamically to generate the triangular flow. The agreement of these models with data may indicate the formation of low-viscosity quark-gluon plasma even in these small collision systems.

  8. Measurements of elliptic and triangular flow in high-multiplicity 3He+Au collisions at √sNN=200 GeV

    DOE PAGES

    Adare, A.

    2015-09-28

    We present the first measurement of elliptic (v2) and triangular (v3) flow in high-multiplicity 3He+Aucollisions at √sNN=200 GeV. Two-particle correlations, where the particles have a large separation in pseudorapidity, are compared in 3He+Au and in p+p collisions and indicate that collective effects dominate the second and third Fourier components for the correlations observed in the 3He+Ausystem. The collective behavior is quantified in terms of elliptic v2 and triangular v3 anisotropy coefficients measured with respect to their corresponding event planes. The v2 values are comparable to those previously measured in d+Au collisions at the same nucleon-nucleon center-of-mass energy. Comparisons with variousmore » theoretical predictions are made, including to models where the hot spots created by the impact of the three 3He nucleons on the Au nucleus expand hydrodynamically to generate the triangular flow. The agreement of these models with data may indicate the formation of low-viscosity quark-gluon plasma even in these small collision systems.« less

  9. Multiplicity and pseudorapidity distributions of charged particles in asymmetric and deformed nuclear collisions in the wounded quark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaturvedi, O. S. K.; Srivastava, P. K.; Kumar, Ashwini; Singh, B. K.

    2016-12-01

    The charged particle multiplicity (n_{ch}) and pseudorapidity density (dn_{ch}/dη) are key observables to characterize the properties of matter created in heavy-ion collisions. The dependence of these observables on collision energy and the collision geometry are a key tool to understand the underlying particle production mechanism. Recently much interest has been focused on asymmetric and deformed nuclei collisions since these collisions can provide a deeper understanding about the nature of quantum chromodynamics (QCD). From the phenomenological perspective, a unified model which describes the experimental data coming from various kinds of collision experiments is much needed to provide physical insights on the production mechanism. In this paper, we have calculated the charged hadron multiplicities for nucleon-nucleus, such as proton-lead ( p-Pb) and asymmetric nuclei collisions like deutron-gold ( d-Au), and copper-gold (Cu-Au) within a new version of the wounded quark model (WQM) and we have shown their variation with respect to centrality. Further we have used a suitable density function within our WQM to calculate pseudorapidity density of charged hadrons at midrapidity in the collisions of deformed uranium nuclei. We found that our model with suitable density functions describes the experimental data for symmetric, asymmetric and deformed nuclei collisions simultaneously over a wide range of the collision energy.

  10. Use of implanted satellite transmitters to locate Spectacled Eiders at-sea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Petersen, Margaret R.; Douglas, David C.; Mulcahy, Daniel M.

    1995-01-01

    Population estimates of Spectacled Eiders (Somateria fischeri) on the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta (YKD), Alaska, suggest that by 1992 the number of birds on this major nesting area had declined to 1,721 pairs, 4% of that estimated in the 1970s (Stehn st al 1993). Consequently, Spectacled Eiders were listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. As nesting habitats for this species are believed to have changed little over the past 100 years, hypotheses concerning the cause of this decline include factors away from nesting areas. The non-nesting distribution of this eider is unknown, but birds are believed to molt and winter in the Bering and Chukchi seas (Dau and Kistchinski 1977). Systematic aerial surveys to locate areas where birds concentrate are expensive because of the vast area to be surveyed and dangerous because of restricted daylight and extreme weather conditions. Surveys from ships along the ice margin in the Bering Sea failed to locate concentrations of birds (Irving et al 1968, Everett et al 1989). We initiated a study to determine if at-sea areas used by Spectacled Eiders could be identified using satellite telemetry.

  11. Killing efficacy of a new silicon phthalocyanine in human melanoma cells treated with photodynamic therapy by early activation of mitochondrion-mediated apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Barge, Jérôme; Decréau, Richard; Julliard, Michel; Hubaud, Jean-Claude; Sabatier, Anne-Sophie; Grob, Jean-Jacques; Verrando, Patrick

    2004-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a promising therapeutic modality that utilizes a combination of a photosensitizer and visible light for the destruction of diseased tissues. Using human-pigmented melanoma cells, we examined the photokilling efficacy of new silicon-phthalocyanines (SiPc) that bore bulky axial substituents. The bis(cholesteryloxy) derivate (Chol-O-SiPc) displayed the best in vitro photokilling efficacy (LD(50) = 6-8 x 10(-9) M) and was seven to nine times more potent than chloro-aluminium Pc (ClAlPc), a known photosensitizer used as a reference. Although Chol-O-SiPc was half as potent as ClAlPc for promoting photo-oxidative membrane damage in a cell-free assay, early events of mitochondrion-mediated apoptosis upon PDT were triggered much faster, as demonstrated by kinetics studies examining cells with permeabilized mitochondrial membranes, cytochrome c release and caspase-9 activation. Inhibition of caspase-9 activity by a substrate analogue argued for its central role in the proapoptotic events leading to cell death by Chol-O-SiPc PDT. In addition, immunoblots showed that Bcl-2 antiapoptotic oncoprotein was not a primary target of Chol-O-SiPc in M3Dau cells treated with PDT. Conclusively, Chol-O-SiPc is a useful new photosensitizer with the property of triggering cell apoptosis mediated by mitochondria.

  12. A homosexual militant at the beginning of the century: Marc André Raffalovich.

    PubMed

    Cardon, P

    1993-01-01

    This work is based on my thesis from Aix en Provence on French Civilisation and Letters (1984). The head of the examinations was the writer Raymond Jean. My idea is to show how the decadent writer and poet Marc André Raffalovich fought against the personalities in science concerning homosexuality with a new point of view and with great difficulty, shedding new light on this subject in a review from 1886 to 1914 under the direction of Dr. Alexandre Lacassagne Les Archives d'Anthropologie Criminelle de Médecine Légale et de Psychologie Normale et Pathologique published in 1886, edited by the director A. Lacassagne, professor and chairman of legal medicine, Lyon, and author of the article "Pederastie," Dictionnaire Encyclopedique des Sciences Medicales, volume XXII published in 1886. In 1893, he wrote an introduction for l'Inversion Sexuelle of Dr. Julien Chevalier (Paris: Masson-Lyon Storck). This monthly review "d'au moins 80 pages" was called L'Ecole Lyonnaise, and so to say, l'Ecole Francaise d'Anthropologie Criminelle, which defends against l'Ecole Italienne of Lombroso, the culturalist theory of the birth of the criminal; according to this école du milieu social: "La Société a les criminels qu'elle merite" (The society has criminals it deserves). After the first world war, it was to be overridden by the Marxist analysis.

  13. Surpoids et obésité dans la population au-dessus de 20 ans en milieu urbain bamakois (Mali)

    PubMed Central

    Oumar Bâ, Hamidou; Menta, Ichaka; Camara, Youssouf; Sangaré, Ibrahima; Sidibé, Noumou; Doumbia, Seydou; Diarra, Mamadou Bocary

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Il est question dans notre travail d’étudier le SP et l'OB et les facteurs associés dans la population âgée de 20 ans ou plus. Méthodes Notre échantillon a été obtenu à partir d'une enquête sur les pathologies cardiovasculaires dans le District de Bamako et impliquant 2199 sujets de 5-104 ans, en sélectionnant tous les sujets âgés d'au moins 20 ans (1162). Pour chaque sujet, l'IMC, rapport taille / hanche et le tour de taille ont été déterminées. Les données ont été analysées avec SPSS 12. Résultats L’âge moyen était de 36,86 années, 61,4% étaient des femmes, 49,7% dans le secteur informel et 38,0% avaient réalisé l'enseignement primaire. Facteurs de risque cardiovasculaires étaient l'inactivité physique (72,4%), le tabagisme (12,2%) et hypertension (26,7%). La prévalence de l'obésité était de 8,8 et 14,7% respectivement sur la base de l'indice de masse et le tour de taille. Conclusion Le SP et l'OB sont à prendre en compte dans les mesures de politique sanitaire que dans la pratique quotidienne des professionnels de santé, il est peut-être plus utile d'utiliser plusieurs paramètres pour être à même de bien stratifier nos patients par rapport à leur risque. PMID:25932065

  14. A human development framework for CO2 reductions.

    PubMed

    Costa, Luís; Rybski, Diego; Kropp, Jürgen P

    2011-01-01

    Although developing countries are called to participate in CO(2) emission reduction efforts to avoid dangerous climate change, the implications of proposed reduction schemes in human development standards of developing countries remain a matter of debate. We show the existence of a positive and time-dependent correlation between the Human Development Index (HDI) and per capita CO(2) emissions from fossil fuel combustion. Employing this empirical relation, extrapolating the HDI, and using three population scenarios, the cumulative CO(2) emissions necessary for developing countries to achieve particular HDI thresholds are assessed following a Development As Usual approach (DAU). If current demographic and development trends are maintained, we estimate that by 2050 around 85% of the world's population will live in countries with high HDI (above 0.8). In particular, 300 Gt of cumulative CO(2) emissions between 2000 and 2050 are estimated to be necessary for the development of 104 developing countries in the year 2000. This value represents between 20 % to 30 % of previously calculated CO(2) budgets limiting global warming to 2 °C. These constraints and results are incorporated into a CO(2) reduction framework involving four domains of climate action for individual countries. The framework reserves a fair emission path for developing countries to proceed with their development by indexing country-dependent reduction rates proportional to the HDI in order to preserve the 2 °C target after a particular development threshold is reached. For example, in each time step of five years, countries with an HDI of 0.85 would need to reduce their per capita emissions by approx. 17% and countries with an HDI of 0.9 by 33 %. Under this approach, global cumulative emissions by 2050 are estimated to range from 850 up to 1100 Gt of CO(2). These values are within the uncertainty range of emissions to limit global temperatures to 2 °C.

  15. Forensic drug testing for opiates. VI. Urine testing for hydromorphone, hydrocodone, oxymorphone, and oxycodone with commercial opiate immunoassays and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Smith, M L; Hughes, R O; Levine, B; Dickerson, S; Darwin, W D; Cone, E J

    1995-01-01

    Opiate testing for morphine and codeine is performed routinely in forensic urine drug-testing laboratories in an effort to identify illicit opiate abusers. In addition to heroin, the 6-keto-opioids, including hydromorphone, hydrocodone, oxymorphone, and oxycodone, have high abuse liability and are self-administered by opiate abusers, but only limited information is available on detection of these compounds by current immunoassay and gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric (GC-MS) methods. In this study, single doses of hydromorphone, hydrocodone, oxymorphone, and oxycodone were administered to human subjects, and urine samples were collected before and periodically after dosing. Opiate levels were determined in a quantitative mode with four commercial immunoassays, TDx opiates (TDx), Abuscreen radioimmunoassay (ABUS), Coat-A-Count morphine in urine (CAC), and EMIT d.a.u. opiate assay (EMIT), and by GC-MS. GC-MS assay results indicated that hydromorphone, hydrocodone, oxymorphone, and oxycodone administration resulted in rapid excretion of parent drug and O-demethylated metabolites in urine. Peak concentrations occurred within 8 h after drug administration and declined below 300 ng/mL within 24-48 h. Immunoassay testing indicated that hydromorphone, hydrocodone, and oxycodone, but not oxymorphone, were detectable in urine by TDx and EMIT (300-ng/mL cutoff) for 6-24 h. ABUS detected only hydrocodone, and CAC failed to detect any of the four 6-keto-opioid analgesics. Generally, immunoassays for opiates in urine displayed substantially lower sensitivities for 6-keto-opioids compared with GC-MS. Consequently, urine samples containing low to moderate concentrations of hydromorphone, hydrocodone, oxymorphone, and oxycodone will likely go undetected when tested by conventional immunoassays.

  16. Occurrence of perchlorate and thiocyanate in human serum from e-waste recycling and reference sites in Vietnam: association with thyroid hormone and iodide levels.

    PubMed

    Eguchi, Akifumi; Kunisue, Tatsuya; Wu, Qian; Trang, Pham Thi Kim; Viet, Pham Hung; Kannan, Kurunthachalam; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2014-07-01

    Perchlorate (ClO4 (-)) and thiocyanate (SCN(-)) interfere with iodide (I(-)) uptake by the sodium/iodide symporter, and thereby these anions may affect the production of thyroid hormones (THs) in the thyroid gland. Although human exposure to perchlorate and thiocyanate has been studied in the United States and Europe, few investigations have been performed in Asian countries. In this study, we determined concentrations of perchlorate, thiocyanate, and iodide in 131 serum samples collected from 2 locations in Northern Vietnam, Bui Dau (BD; electrical and electronic waste [e-waste] recycling site) and Doung Quang (DQ; rural site) and examined the association between serum levels of these anions with levels of THs. The median concentrations of perchlorate, thiocyanate, and iodide detected in the serum of Vietnamese subjects were 0.104, 2020, and 3.11 ng mL(-1), respectively. Perchlorate levels were significantly greater in serum of the BD population (median 0.116 ng mL(-1)) than those in the DQ population (median 0.086 ng mL(-1)), which indicated greater exposure from e-waste recycling operations by the former. Serum concentrations of thiocyanate were not significantly different between the BD and DQ populations, but increased levels of this anion were observed among smokers. Iodide was a significant positive predictor of serum levels of FT3 and TT3 and a significant negative predictor of thyroid-stimulating hormone in males. When the association between serum levels of perchlorate or thiocyanate and THs was assessed using a stepwise multiple linear regression model, no significant correlations were found. In addition to greater concentrations of perchlorate detected in the e-waste recycling population, however, given that lower concentrations of iodide were observed in the serum of Vietnamese females, detailed risk assessments on TH homeostasis for females inhabiting e-waste recycling sites, especially for pregnant women and their neonates, are required.

  17. Dynamics of strange, charm and high momentum hadrons in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassing, W.; Gallmeister, K.; Bratkovskaya, E. L.; Greiner, C.; Stöcker, H.

    2004-07-01

    We investigate hadron production and attenuation of hadrons with strange and charm quarks (or antiquarks) as well as high transverse momentum hadrons in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions from 2 A GeV to 21.3 A TeV within two independent transport approaches (UrQMD and HSD). Both transport models are based on quark, diquark, string and hadronic degrees of freedom, but do not include any explicit phase transition to a quark-gluon plasma. From our dynamical calculations we find that both models do not describe the maximum in the K+/ π+ ratio at 20-30 A GeV in central Au+Au collisions found experimentally, though the excitation functions of strange mesons are reproduced well in HSD and UrQMD. Furthermore, the transport calculations show that the charmonium recreation by D+ D¯→J/Ψ+ meson reactions is comparable to the dissociation by ‘comoving’ mesons at RHIC energies contrary to SPS energies. This leads to the final result that the total J/ Ψ suppression as a function of centrality at RHIC should be less than the suppression seen at SPS energies where the ‘comover’ dissociation is substantial and the backward channels play no role. Furthermore, our transport calculations-in comparison to experimental data on transverse momentum spectra from pp, d+Au and Au+Au reactions-show that pre-hadronic effects are responsible for both the hardening of the hadron spectra for low transverse momenta (Cronin effect) as well as the suppression of high pT hadrons. The mutual interactions of formed hadrons are found to be negligible in central Au+Au collisions at s=200 GeV for p T≥6 GeV/c and the sizeable suppression seen experimentally is attributed to a large extent to the interactions of ‘leading’ pre-hadrons with the dense environment.

  18. Modelling speech intelligibility in adverse conditions.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, Søren; Dau, Torsten

    2013-01-01

    Jørgensen and Dau (J Acoust Soc Am 130:1475-1487, 2011) proposed the speech-based envelope power spectrum model (sEPSM) in an attempt to overcome the limitations of the classical speech transmission index (STI) and speech intelligibility index (SII) in conditions with nonlinearly processed speech. Instead of considering the reduction of the temporal modulation energy as the intelligibility metric, as assumed in the STI, the sEPSM applies the signal-to-noise ratio in the envelope domain (SNRenv). This metric was shown to be the key for predicting the intelligibility of reverberant speech as well as noisy speech processed by spectral subtraction. The key role of the SNRenv metric is further supported here by the ability of a short-term version of the sEPSM to predict speech masking release for different speech materials and modulated interferers. However, the sEPSM cannot account for speech subjected to phase jitter, a condition in which the spectral structure of the intelligibility of speech signal is strongly affected, while the broadband temporal envelope is kept largely intact. In contrast, the effects of this distortion can be predicted -successfully by the spectro-temporal modulation index (STMI) (Elhilali et al., Speech Commun 41:331-348, 2003), which assumes an explicit analysis of the spectral "ripple" structure of the speech signal. However, since the STMI applies the same decision metric as the STI, it fails to account for spectral subtraction. The results from this study suggest that the SNRenv might reflect a powerful decision metric, while some explicit across-frequency analysis seems crucial in some conditions. How such across-frequency analysis is "realized" in the auditory system remains unresolved.

  19. The importance of cochlear processing for the formation of auditory brainstem and frequency following responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dau, Torsten

    2003-02-01

    A model for the generation of auditory brainstem responses (ABR) and frequency following responses (FFRs) is presented. The model is based on the concept introduced by Goldstein and Kiang [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 30, 107-114 (1958)] that evoked potentials recorded at remote electrodes can theoretically be given by convolution of an elementary unit waveform (unitary response) with the instantaneous discharge rate function for the corresponding unit. In the present study, the nonlinear computational auditory-nerve model recently developed by Heinz et al. [ARLO 2(3), 91-96 (2001)] was used to calculate the instantaneous discharge rate ri(t) for fibers i in the frequency range from 0.1 and 10 kHz. The summed activity across frequency was convolved with a unitary response which is assumed to reflect contributions from different cell populations within the auditory brainstem, recorded at a given pair of electrodes on the scalp. Predicted potential patterns are compared with experimental data for a number of stimulus and level conditions. Clicks, chirps as defined in Dau et al. [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 107, 1530-1540 (2000)], long-duration stimuli comprising the chirp, as well as tones and slowly varying tonal sweeps were considered. The results demonstrate the importance of considering the effects of the basilar-membrane traveling wave and auditory-nerve processing for the formation of ABR and FFR. Specifically, the results support the hypothesis that the FFR to low-frequency tones represents synchronized activity mainly stemming from mid- and high-frequency units at more basal sites, and not from units tuned to frequencies around the signal frequency.

  20. An 18-electron system containing a superheavy element: theoretical studies of sg@au12.

    PubMed

    Cao, Guo-Jin; Schwarz, W H Eugen; Li, Jun

    2015-04-06

    M@Au12 cage molecules (M = transition element from group 6) are interesting clusters with high-symmetric structure and significant stability. As the heavier homologue of W is (106)Sg, it is interesting to pinpoint whether the Sg@Au12 cluster is also stable. Geometric and electronic structures and bonding of various Sg@Au12 isomers were investigated with density functional theory (PW91, PBE, B3LYP) and wave function theory (MP2, CCSD(T)) approaches. The lowest-energy isomer of Sg@Au12 has icosahedral symmetry with significant Sg(6d)-Au(6s) covalent-metallic interaction and is comparable to the lighter homologues (M = Mo, W), with similar binding energy, although Sg follows (as a rare case) the textbook rule "ns below (n - 1)d". The 12 6s valence electrons from Au12 and the six 7s6d ones from Sg can be viewed as an 18e system below and above the interacting Au 5d band, forming nine delocalized multicenter bond pairs with a high stability of ∼0.8 eV of bond energy per each of the 12 Sg-Au contacts. Different prescriptions (orbital, multipole-deformation, charge-partition, and X-ray-spectroscopy based ones) assign ambiguous atomic charges to the centric and peripheral atoms; atomic core-level energy shifts correspond to some negative charge shift to the gold periphery, more so for Cr@Au12 than for Sg@Au12 or Au@Au12.

  1. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP, VOLUME 57, HIGH PT PHYSICS AT RHIC, DECEMBER 2-6, 2003

    SciTech Connect

    Kretzer, Stefan; Venugopalan, Raju; Vogelsang, Werner

    2004-02-18

    The AuAu, dAu, and pp collision modes of the RHIC collider at BNL have led to the publication of exciting high p{perpendicular} particle production data. There have also been two physics runs with polarized protons, and preliminary results on the double-spin asymmetry for pion production had been presented very recently. The ontological questions behind these measurements are fascinating: Did RHIC collisions create a Quark-Gluon-Plasma phase and did they verify the Color Glass Condensate as the high energy limit of QCD? Will the Spin Crisis finally be resolved in terms of gluon polarization and what new surprises are we yet to meet for Transverse Spin? Phenomena related to sub-microscopic questions as important as these call for interpretations that are footed in solid theory. At large p{perpendicular}, perturbative concepts are legitimately expected to provide useful approaches. The corresponding hard parton dynamics are, in several ways, key to unraveling the initial or final state and collisional phase of hard scattering events in vacuum as well as in hot or cold nuclear matter. Before the advent of RHIC data, a RIKEN-BNL workshop had been held at BNL in March 1999 on ''Hard Parton Physics in High Energy Nuclear Collisions''. The 2003 workshop on ''High p{perpendicular} Physics at RHIC'' was a logical continuation of this previous workshop. It gave the opportunity to revisit the 1999 expectations in the light of what has been found in the meantime and, at the same time, to critically discuss the underlying theoretical concepts. We brought together theorists who have done seminal work on the foundations of parton phenomenology in field theory, with theorists and experimentalists who are presently working on RHIC phenomenology. The participants were both from a high-energy physics and nuclear physics background and it remains only to be said here that this chemistry worked perfectly and the workshop was a great success.

  2. Cosmetic Preservatives as Therapeutic Corneal and Scleral Tissue Cross-Linking Agents

    PubMed Central

    Babar, Natasha; Kim, MiJung; Cao, Kerry; Shimizu, Yukari; Kim, Su-Young; Takaoka, Anna; Trokel, Stephen L.; Paik, David C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Previously, aliphatic β-nitroalcohols (BNAs) have been studied as a means to chemically induce tissue cross-linking (TXL) of cornea and sclera. There are a number of related and possibly more potent agents, known as formaldehyde releasers (FARs), that are in commercial use as preservatives in cosmetics and other personal care products. The present study was undertaken in order to screen such compounds for potential clinical utility as therapeutic TXL agents. Methods. A chemical registry of 62 FARs was created from a literature review and included characteristics relevant to TXL such as molecular weight, carcinogenicity/mutagenicity, toxicity, hydrophobicity, and commercial availability. From this registry, five compounds [diazolidinyl urea (DAU), imidazolidinyl urea (IMU), sodium hydroxymethylglycinate (SMG), DMDM hydantoin (DMDM), 5-Ethyl-3,7-dioxa-1-azabicyclo [3.3.0] octane (OCT)] were selected for efficacy screening using two independent systems, an ex vivo rabbit corneal cross-linking simulation setup and incubation of cut scleral tissue pieces. Treatments were conducted at pH 7.4 or 8.5 for 30 minutes. Efficacy was evaluated using thermal denaturation temperature (Tm), and cell toxicity was studied using the trypan blue exclusion method. Results. Cross-linking effects in the five selected FARs were pH and concentration dependent. Overall, the Tm shifts were in agreement with both cornea and sclera. By comparison with BNAs previously reported upon, the FARs identified in this study were significantly more potent but with similar or better cytotoxicity. Conclusions. The FARs, a class of compounds well known to the cosmetic industry, may have utility as therapeutic TXL agents. The compounds studied thus far show promise and will be further tested. PMID:25634979

  3. Cosmetic preservatives as therapeutic corneal and scleral tissue cross-linking agents.

    PubMed

    Babar, Natasha; Kim, MiJung; Cao, Kerry; Shimizu, Yukari; Kim, Su-Young; Takaoka, Anna; Trokel, Stephen L; Paik, David C

    2015-01-29

    Previously, aliphatic β-nitroalcohols (BNAs) have been studied as a means to chemically induce tissue cross-linking (TXL) of cornea and sclera. There are a number of related and possibly more potent agents, known as formaldehyde releasers (FARs), that are in commercial use as preservatives in cosmetics and other personal care products. The present study was undertaken in order to screen such compounds for potential clinical utility as therapeutic TXL agents. A chemical registry of 62 FARs was created from a literature review and included characteristics relevant to TXL such as molecular weight, carcinogenicity/mutagenicity, toxicity, hydrophobicity, and commercial availability. From this registry, five compounds [diazolidinyl urea (DAU), imidazolidinyl urea (IMU), sodium hydroxymethylglycinate (SMG), DMDM hydantoin (DMDM), 5-Ethyl-3,7-dioxa-1-azabicyclo [3.3.0] octane (OCT)] were selected for efficacy screening using two independent systems, an ex vivo rabbit corneal cross-linking simulation setup and incubation of cut scleral tissue pieces. Treatments were conducted at pH 7.4 or 8.5 for 30 minutes. Efficacy was evaluated using thermal denaturation temperature (Tm), and cell toxicity was studied using the trypan blue exclusion method. Cross-linking effects in the five selected FARs were pH and concentration dependent. Overall, the Tm shifts were in agreement with both cornea and sclera. By comparison with BNAs previously reported upon, the FARs identified in this study were significantly more potent but with similar or better cytotoxicity. The FARs, a class of compounds well known to the cosmetic industry, may have utility as therapeutic TXL agents. The compounds studied thus far show promise and will be further tested. Copyright 2015 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  4. Tuberculose multifocale chez les immunocompétents

    PubMed Central

    Rezgui, Amel; Fredj, Fatma Ben; Mzabi, Anis; Karmani, Monia; Laouani, Chadia

    2016-01-01

    La tuberculose multifocale est définie par la l'atteinte d'au moins deux sites extra-pulmonaires associée ou non à une atteinte pulmonaire. On se propose d’étudier les différentes caractéristiques cliniques et évolutives de la tuberculose multifocale à travers une étude rétrospective de 10 cas. Parmi 41 cas de tuberculose colligés entre 1999 et 2013. Dix patients avaient une tuberculose multifocale, soit 24% des patients. Il s'agissait de 9 femmes et 1 homme d’âge moyen à 50 ans (30-68 ans). Nos patients étaient tous correctement vaccinés par le BCG. Un bilan à la recherche d'une éventuelle immunodépression fait pour tous les patients était négatif. Il s'agissait d'une tuberculose ganglionnaire dans 7 cas, digestive dans 3 cas, péricardique dans 2 cas, ostéo-articulaire dans 2 cas, cérébrale dans 1 cas, urinaire dans 2 cas, uro-génitale dans 4 cas, surrénalienne dans 1 cas, cutanée dans 1 cas et musculaire dans 1 cas. Tous nos patients ont bénéficié d'un traitement antituberculeux pour une durée moyenne de 10 mois avec bonne évolution. La tuberculose multifocale est une des maladies à diagnostic difficile. Elle peut toucher les immunocompétents mais son pronostic est souvent bon. Un traitement anti-tuberculeux doit être instauré le plus rapidement possible pour éviter les séquelles. PMID:27583077

  5. In-depth study of Marxist population theory, promote China's population science.

    PubMed

    Liu, J

    1983-01-01

    The 3rd National Population Science Seminar, held in Beijng from Feb. 21-27, 1981, brought together over 270 Chinese population researchers and professionals, as well as social science and family planning workers. Participants presented over 220 papers and reports, which showed a higher level of scholarship than previous seminar papers. Chen Dau, the head of the Planning Bureau of the Chinese Academy for Social Sciences, gave the opening address and explained the seminar's 2 tasks: 1) to exchange academic ideas and 2) to found the Population Association of China (PAC), and suggested 3 topics for theoretical discussion: 1) Marxist theory on the 2 kinds of production, 2) the differences between China's population control and old and NeoMalthusianism, and 3) the 1 child policy. Xu Dixin, the vice-president of the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, spoke on socialist population laws, planned population control, and potential problems with the 1 child family policy. 8 special groups at the seminar discussed 1) Marxist theory on the 2 types of production, 2) Marx and Malthus on population, 3) China's population control policy, 4) population studies, 5) China's population problems, 6) problems with population control in rural areas, 7) urban population issues, and 8) the population problems of minority nationalities. Participants founded the PAC on the last day of the seminar. Vice-premier Cheu Muhua also addressed the seminar on the tremendous success the family planning program has had in the last 2 years and the difficulty of the task of controlling China's population growth. Population research must explain China's population laws so that growth can be controlled.

  6. Cold Nuclear Matter Effects on Heavy Quark Production in Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durham, John Matthew

    2011-12-01

    The experimental collaborations at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) have established that dense nuclear matter with partonic degrees of freedom is formed in collisions of heavy nuclei at 200 GeV. Information from heavy quarks has given significant insight into the dynamics of this matter. Charm and bottom quarks are dominantly produced by gluon fusion in the early stages of the collision, and thus experience the complete evolution of the medium. The production baseline measured in p + p collisions can be described by fixed order plus next to leading log perturbative QCD calculations within uncertainties. In central Au+Au collisions, suppression has been measured relative to the yield in p + p scaled by the number of nucleon-nucleon collisions, indicating a significant energy loss by heavy quarks in the medium. The large elliptic flow amplitude v2 provides evidence that the heavy quarks flow along with the lighter partons. The suppression and elliptic flow of these quarks are in qualitative agreement with calculations based on Langevin transport models that imply a viscosity to entropy density ratio close to the conjectured quantum lower bound of 1/4pi. However, a full understanding of these phenomena requires measurements of cold nuclear matter (CNM) effects, which should be present in Au+Au collisions but are difficult to distinguish experimentally from effects due to interactions with the medium. This thesis presents measurements of electrons at midrapidity from the decays of heavy quarks produced in d+Au collisions at RHIC. A significant enhancement of these electrons is seen at a transverse momentum below 5 GeV/c, indicating strong CNM effects on charm quarks that are not present for lighter quarks. A simple model of CNM effects in Au+Au collisions suggests that the level of suppression in the hot nuclear medium is comparable for all quark flavors.

  7. Second-order temporal modulation transfer functions.

    PubMed

    Lorenzi, C; Soares, C; Vonner, T

    2001-08-01

    Detection thresholds were measured for a sinusoidal modulation applied to the modulation depth of a sinusoidally amplitude-modulated (SAM) white noise carrier as a function of the frequency of the modulation applied to the modulation depth (referred to as f'm). The SAM noise acted therefore as a "carrier" stimulus of frequency fm, and sinusoidal modulation of the SAM-noise modulation depth generated two additional components in the modulation spectrum: fm-f'm and fm+f'm. The tracking variable was the modulation depth of the sinusoidal variation applied to the "carrier" modulation depth. The resulting "second-order" temporal modulation transfer functions (TMTFs) measured on four listeners for "carrier" modulation frequencies fm of 16, 64, and 256 Hz display a low-pass segment followed by a plateau. This indicates that sensitivity to fluctuations in the strength of amplitude modulation is best for fluctuation rates f'm below about 2-4 Hz when using broadband noise carriers. Measurements of masked modulation detection thresholds for the lower and upper modulation sideband suggest that this capacity is possibly related to the detection of a beat in the sound's temporal envelope. The results appear qualitatively consistent with the predictions of an envelope detector model consisting of a low-pass filtering stage followed by a decision stage. Unlike listeners' performance, a modulation filterbank model using Q values > or = 2 should predict that second-order modulation detection thresholds should decrease at high values of f'm due to the spectral resolution of the modulation sidebands (in the modulation domain). This suggests that, if such modulation filters do exist, their selectivity is poor. In the latter case, the Q value of modulation filters would have to be less than 2. This estimate of modulation filter selectivity is consistent with the results of a previous study using a modulation-masking paradigm [S. D. Ewert and T. Dau, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 108, 1181

  8. Transverse energy production and charged-particle multiplicity at midrapidity in various systems from sNN=7.7 to 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akimoto, R.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Alexander, J.; Alfred, M.; Al-Jamel, A.; Al-Ta'ani, H.; Angerami, A.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Aphecetche, L.; Aramaki, Y.; Armendariz, R.; Aronson, S. H.; Asai, J.; Asano, H.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Atomssa, E. T.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Bai, X.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Baldisseri, A.; Bandara, N. S.; Bannier, B.; Barish, K. N.; Barnes, P. D.; Bassalleck, B.; Basye, A. T.; Bathe, S.; Batsouli, S.; Baublis, V.; Bauer, F.; Baumann, C.; Baumgart, S.; Bazilevsky, A.; Beaumier, M.; Beckman, S.; Belikov, S.; Belmont, R.; Bennett, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Bhom, J. H.; Bickley, A. A.; Bjorndal, M. T.; Black, D.; Blau, D. S.; Boissevain, J. G.; Bok, J. S.; Borel, H.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Brown, D. S.; Bryslawskyj, J.; Bucher, D.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Burward-Hoy, J. M.; Butsyk, S.; Campbell, S.; Caringi, A.; Castera, P.; Chai, J. -S.; Chang, B. S.; Charvet, J. -L.; Chen, C. -H.; Chernichenko, S.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiba, J.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Choi, S.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, P.; Churyn, A.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cleven, C. R.; Cobigo, Y.; Cole, B. A.; Comets, M. P.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M.; Constantin, P.; Cronin, N.; Crossette, N.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Dahms, T.; Dairaku, S.; Danchev, I.; Danley, T. W.; Das, K.; Datta, A.; Daugherity, M. S.; David, G.; Dayananda, M. K.; Deaton, M. B.; DeBlasio, K.; Dehmelt, K.; Delagrange, H.; Denisov, A.; d'Enterria, D.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dharmawardane, K. V.; Dietzsch, O.; Ding, L.; Dion, A.; Diss, P. B.; Do, J. H.; Donadelli, M.; D'Orazio, L.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Dubey, A. K.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Dutta, D.; Dzhordzhadze, V.; Edwards, S.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Egdemir, J.; Ellinghaus, F.; Emam, W. S.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Espagnon, B.; Esumi, S.; Eyser, K. O.; Fadem, B.; Feege, N.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Forestier, B.; Fraenkel, Z.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fujiwara, K.; Fukao, Y.; Fung, S. -Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Gadrat, S.; Gainey, K.; Gal, C.; Gallus, P.; Garg, P.; Garishvili, A.; Garishvili, I.; Gastineau, F.; Ge, H.; Germain, M.; Giordano, F.; Glenn, A.; Gong, H.; Gong, X.; Gonin, M.; Gosset, J.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grim, G.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gu, Y.; Gunji, T.; Guo, L.; Guragain, H.; Gustafsson, H. -Å.; Hachiya, T.; Hadj Henni, A.; Haegemann, C.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hagiwara, M. N.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamblen, J.; Hamilton, H. F.; Han, R.; Han, S. Y.; Hanks, J.; Harada, H.; Hartouni, E. P.; Haruna, K.; Harvey, M.; Hasegawa, S.; Haseler, T. O. S.; Hashimoto, K.; Haslum, E.; Hasuko, K.; Hayano, R.; Hayashi, S.; He, X.; Heffner, M.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Heuser, J. M.; Hiejima, H.; Hill, J. C.; Hobbs, R.; Hohlmann, M.; Hollis, R. S.; Holmes, M.; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hori, Y.; Hornback, D.; Hoshino, T.; Hotvedt, N.; Huang, J.; Huang, S.; Hur, M. G.; Ichihara, T.; Ichimiya, R.; Iinuma, H.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Imazu, Y.; Imrek, J.; Inaba, M.; Inoue, Y.; Iordanova, A.; Isenhower, D.; Isenhower, L.; Ishihara, M.; Isinhue, A.; Isobe, T.; Issah, M.; Isupov, A.; Ivanishchev, D.; Iwanaga, Y.; Jacak, B. V.; Javani, M.; Jeon, S. J.; Jezghani, M.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; Jin, J.; Jinnouchi, O.; Johnson, B. M.; Jones, T.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kajihara, F.; Kametani, S.; Kamihara, N.; Kamin, J.; Kanda, S.; Kaneta, M.; Kaneti, S.; Kang, B. H.; Kang, J. H.; Kang, J. S.; Kanou, H.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kasai, M.; Kawagishi, T.; Kawall, D.; Kawashima, M.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kelly, S.; Kempel, T.; Key, J. A.; Khachatryan, V.; Khandai, P. K.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kijima, K. M.; Kikuchi, J.; Kim, A.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, C.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E.; Kim, E. -J.; Kim, G. W.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, K. -B.; Kim, M.; Kim, Y. -J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kim, Y. -S.; Kimelman, B.; Kinney, E.; Kiss, Á.; Kistenev, E.; Kitamura, R.; Kiyomichi, A.; Klatsky, J.; Klay, J.; Klein-Boesing, C.; Kleinjan, D.; Kline, P.; Koblesky, T.; Kochenda, L.; Kochetkov, V.; Kofarago, M.; Komatsu, Y.; Komkov, B.; Konno, M.; Koster, J.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kotov, D.; Kozlov, A.; Král, A.; Kravitz, A.; Krizek, F.; Kroon, P. J.; Kubart, J.; Kunde, G. J.; Kurihara, N.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Le Bornec, Y.; Leckey, S.; Lee, B.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, G. H.; Lee, J.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, M. K.; Lee, S.; Lee, S. H.; Lee, S. R.; Lee, T.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Leitgab, M.; Lenzi, B.; Lewis, B.; Li, X.; Li, X. H.; Lichtenwalner, P.; Liebing, P.; Lim, H.; Lim, S. H.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Liška, T.; Litvinenko, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, M. X.; Love, B.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Makek, M.; Malakhov, A.; Malik, M. D.; Manion, A.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Mao, Y.; Maruyama, T.; Mašek, L.; Masui, H.; Masumoto, S.; Matathias, F.; McCain, M. C.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; McGlinchey, D.; McKinney, C.; Means, N.; Meles, A.; Mendoza, M.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mibe, T.; Midori, J.; Mignerey, A. C.; Mikeš, P.; Miki, K.; Miller, T. E.; Milov, A.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mishra, D. K.; Mishra, G. C.; Mishra, M.; Mitchell, J. T.; Mitrovski, M.; Miyachi, Y.; Miyasaka, S.; Mizuno, S.; Mohanty, A. K.; Mohapatra, S.; Montuenga, P.; Moon, H. J.; Moon, T.; Morino, Y.; Morreale, A.; Morrison, D. P.; Moskowitz, M.; Moss, J. M.; Motschwiller, S.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Mukhopadhyay, D.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Mwai, A.; Nagae, T.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagashima, K.; Nagata, Y.; Nagle, J. L.; Naglis, M.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakagomi, H.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, K. R.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Nam, S.; Nattrass, C.; Nederlof, A.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Newby, J.; Nguyen, M.; Nihashi, M.; Niida, T.; Nishimura, S.; Norman, B. E.; Nouicer, R.; Novák, T.; Novitzky, N.; Nukariya, A.; Nyanin, A. S.; Nystrand, J.; Oakley, C.; Obayashi, H.; O'Brien, E.; Oda, S. X.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Ohnishi, H.; Oide, H.; Ojha, I. D.; Oka, M.; Okada, K.; Omiwade, O. O.; Onuki, Y.; Orjuela Koop, J. D.; Osborn, J. D.; Oskarsson, A.; Otterlund, I.; Ouchida, M.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pal, D.; Palounek, A. P. T.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, B. H.; Park, I. H.; Park, J.; Park, J. S.; Park, S.; Park, S. K.; Park, W. J.; Pate, S. F.; Patel, L.; Patel, M.; Pei, H.; Peng, J. -C.; Pereira, H.; Perepelitsa, D. V.; Perera, G. D. N.; Peresedov, V.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Perry, J.; Petti, R.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pinson, R.; Pisani, R. P.; Proissl, M.; Purschke, M. L.; Purwar, A. K.; Qu, H.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ramson, B. J.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Rembeczki, S.; Reuter, M.; Reygers, K.; Reynolds, D.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Rinn, T.; Riveli, N.; Roach, D.; Roche, G.; Rolnick, S. D.; Romana, A.; Rosati, M.; Rosen, C. A.; Rosendahl, S. S. E.; Rosnet, P.; Rowan, Z.; Rubin, J. G.; Rukoyatkin, P.; Ružička, P.; Rykov, V. L.; Ryu, M. S.; Ryu, S. S.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sakai, S.; Sakashita, K.; Sakata, H.; Sako, H.; Samsonov, V.; Sano, M.; Sano, S.; Sarsour, M.; Sato, H. D.; Sato, S.; Sato, T.; Sawada, S.; Schaefer, B.; Schmoll, B. K.; Sedgwick, K.; Seele, J.; Seidl, R.; Sekiguchi, Y.; Semenov, V.; Sen, A.; Seto, R.; Sett, P.; Sexton, A.; Sharma, D.; Shaver, A.; Shea, T. K.; Shein, I.; Shevel, A.; Shibata, T. -A.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shohjoh, T.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Sim, K. S.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Skolnik, M.; Skutnik, S.; Slunečka, M.; Smith, W. C.; Snowball, M.; Solano, S.; Soldatov, A.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Staley, F.; Stankus, P. W.; Steinberg, P.; Stenlund, E.; Stepanov, M.; Ster, A.; Stoll, S. P.; Stone, M. R.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Sukhanov, A.; Sullivan, J. P.; Sumita, T.; Sun, J.; Sziklai, J.; Tabaru, T.; Takagi, S.; Takagui, E. M.; Takahara, A.; Taketani, A.; Tanabe, R.; Tanaka, K. H.; Tanaka, Y.; Taneja, S.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Tarján, P.; Tennant, E.; Themann, H.; Thomas, D.; Thomas, T. L.; Tieulent, R.; Timilsina, A.; Todoroki, T.; Togawa, M.; Toia, A.; Tojo, J.; Tomášek, L.; Tomášek, M.; Torii, H.; Towell, C. L.; Towell, R.; Towell, R. S.; Tram, V-N.; Tserruya, I.; Tsuchimoto, Y.; Tsuji, T.; Tuli, S. K.; Tydesjö, H.; Tyurin, N.; Vale, C.; Valle, H.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vargyas, M.; Vazquez-Zambrano, E.; Veicht, A.; Velkovska, J.; Vértesi, R.; Vinogradov, A. A.; Virius, M.; Voas, B.; Vossen, A.; Vrba, V.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wagner, M.; Walker, D.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Watanabe, Y. S.; Wei, F.; Wei, R.; Wessels, J.; Whitaker, S.; White, A. S.; White, S. N.; Willis, N.; Winter, D.; Wolin, S.; Woody, C. L.; Wright, R. M.; Wysocki, M.; Xia, B.; Xie, W.; Xue, L.; Yalcin, S.; Yamaguchi, Y. L.; Yamaura, K.; Yang, R.; Yanovich, A.; Yasin, Z.; Ying, J.; Yokkaichi, S.; Yoo, J. H.; Yoon, I.; You, Z.; Young, G. R.; Younus, I.; Yu, H.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zaudtke, O.; Zelenski, A.; Zhang, C.; Zhou, S.; Zimamyi, J.; Zolin, L.; Zou, L.

    2016-02-03

    Measurements of midrapidity charged-particle multiplicity distributions, dNch/dη, and midrapidity transverse-energy distributions, dET/dη, are presented for a variety of collision systems and energies. Included are distributions for Au+Au collisions at √sNN=200, 130, 62.4, 39, 27, 19.6, 14.5, and 7.7 GeV, Cu+Cu collisions at √sNN=200 and 62.4 GeV, Cu+Au collisions at √sNN=200 GeV, U+U collisions at√sNN=193 GeV, d+Au collisions at √sNN=200 GeV, He3+Au collisions at √sNN=200 GeV, and p+p collisions at √sNN=200 GeV. We present centrality-dependent distributions at midrapidity in terms of the number of nucleon participants, Npart, and the number of constituent quark participants, Nqp. For all A+A collisions down to √sNN=7.7 GeV, we observed that the midrapidity data are better described by scaling with Nqp than scaling with Npart. Finally, our estimates of the Bjorken energy density, εBJ, and the ratio of dET/dη to dNch/dη are presented, the latter of which is seen to be constant as a function of centrality for all systems.

  9. Transverse energy production and charged-particle multiplicity at midrapidity in various systems from sNN=7.7 to 200 GeV

    DOE PAGES

    Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; ...

    2016-02-03

    Measurements of midrapidity charged-particle multiplicity distributions, dNch/dη, and midrapidity transverse-energy distributions, dET/dη, are presented for a variety of collision systems and energies. Included are distributions for Au+Au collisions at √sNN=200, 130, 62.4, 39, 27, 19.6, 14.5, and 7.7 GeV, Cu+Cu collisions at √sNN=200 and 62.4 GeV, Cu+Au collisions at √sNN=200 GeV, U+U collisions at√sNN=193 GeV, d+Au collisions at √sNN=200 GeV, He3+Au collisions at √sNN=200 GeV, and p+p collisions at √sNN=200 GeV. We present centrality-dependent distributions at midrapidity in terms of the number of nucleon participants, Npart, and the number of constituent quark participants, Nqp. For all A+A collisions down tomore » √sNN=7.7 GeV, we observed that the midrapidity data are better described by scaling with Nqp than scaling with Npart. Finally, our estimates of the Bjorken energy density, εBJ, and the ratio of dET/dη to dNch/dη are presented, the latter of which is seen to be constant as a function of centrality for all systems.« less

  10. LHeC and eRHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko,V.

    2009-07-16

    This paper is focused on possible designs and predicted performances of two proposed high-energy, high-luminosity electron-hadron colliders: eRHIC at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL, Upton, NY, USA) and LHeC at Organisation Europeenne pour la Recherche Nucleaire (CERN, Geneve, Switzerland). The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC, BNL) and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC, CERN) are designed as versatile colliders. RHIC is colliding various species of hadrons staring from polarized protons to un-polarized heavy ions (such as fully stripped Au (gold) ions) in various combinations: polarized p-p, d-Au, Cu-Cu, Au-Au. Maximum energy in RHIC is 250 GeV (per beam) for polarized protons and 100 GeV/n for heavy ions. There is planed expansion of the variety of species to include polarized He{sup 3} and unpolarized fully stripped U (uranium). LHeC is designed to collide both un-polarized protons with energy up to 7 TeV per beam and fully stripped Pb (lead) ions with energy up to 3 TeV/n. Both eRHIC and LHeC plan to add polarized electrons (or/and positrons) to the list of colliding species in these versatile hadron colliders. In eRHIC 10-20 GeV electrons would collide with hadrons circulating in RHIC. In LHeC 50-150 GeV polarized leptons will collided with LHC's hadron beams. Both colliders plan to operate in electron-proton (in RHIC case protons are polarized as well) and electron-ion collider modes. eRHIC and LHeC colliders are complimentary both in the energy reach and in their physics goals. I will discuss in this paper possible choices of the accelerator technology for the electron part of the collider for both eRHIC and LHeC, and will present predicted performance for the colliders. In addition, possible staging scenarios for these colliders will be discussed.

  11. [Obtention of a heterohybridoma for production of type IgM monoclonal antibodies against the D antigen of the Rh system].

    PubMed

    León-González, Graciela; Cruz, Carlos

    2007-03-01

    The objective was to obtain a heterohybridoma capable of producing a monoclonal antibody with IgM type anti-D specificity (Rh system), that could be used as a reactive for hemoclasification. Mononuclear cells (MNC) were extracted from a blood sample of a highly sensitized woman, five days after giving birth to an Rh positive child. These were then transformed with the culture supernatant (CSN) of B05.8 cells, rich in Epstein Barr virus (EBV). Once transformed and in exponential growth, they were fused with K6H6/B5 line cells using PEG 4.000 as a fusing agent in a 1:1 proportion. After fusion, they were seeded in culture plates in order to evaluate the formation of hybrids and the secretion of specific antibodies in the CSN of each well. The efficiency of the fusion was 1.8 x 10(-6), making it possible to obtain an anti-D IgM producing clone, which we named BMS-9. This clone could be maintained in constant culture for three months, producing antibodies in a concentration of 4 microg/mL in de CSN. It was also possible to obtain antibodies with an Artificial Capilar System (ACS) reaching a concentration of 24 microg/mL. Potency was determined using Ror cells. In CSN at immediate centrifugation (IC): 1 x 32, score 52; 15' from incubation at room temperature (RT): 1 x 1,024 score 105. With that ACS product at IC: 1 x 32 score 54; 15' from incubation at RT: 1 x 8.192 score 136; and a 37 degrees C: 1 x 8,192 score 136. Reactivity was detected with red cells D(IIIa), D(IV), D(Va), D(VI) type IV, D(VII), DFR, DNU, STEM+, DAR and DAU. There was no reactivity with red cells D(IIIc), DI(Va), D(V) type II, D(VI) types I, II y III, Ro(HAR), DOL and weak D type II. During field study, no false negative or false positive reactions were detected. A stable heterohybridoma was obtained, producer of IgM type anti-D, with enough qualities to be used in blood typing. Given the excellent qualities of the antibody, we are evaluating dilution media and the addition of type IgG antibodies

  12. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop: Progress in High-pT Physics at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Bazilevsky, A.; Bland, L.; Vogelsang, W.

    2010-03-17

    This volume archives the presentations at the RIKEN BNL Research Center workshop 'Progress in High-PT Physics at RHIC', held at BNL in March 2010. Much has been learned from high-p{sub T} physics after 10 years of RHIC operations for heavy-ion collisions, polarized proton collisions and d+Au collisions. The workshop focused on recent progress in these areas by both theory and experiment. The first morning saw review talks on the theory of RHIC high-p{sub T} physics by G. Sterman and J. Soffer, and on the experimental results by M. Tannenbaum. One of the most exciting recent results from the RHIC spin program is the first observation of W bosons and their associated single-spin asymmetry. The new preliminary data were reported on the first day of our workshop, along with a theoretical perspective. There also were detailed discussions on the global analysis of polarized parton distributions, including the knowledge on gluon polarization and the impact of the W-data. The main topic of the second workshop day were single-transverse spin asymmetries and their analysis in terms of transverse-momentum dependent parton distributions. There is currently much interest in a future Drell-Yan program at RHIC, thanks to the exciting physics opportunities this would offer. This was addressed in some of the talks. There also were presentations on the latest results on transverse-spin physics from HERMES and BELLE. On the final day of the workshop, the focus shifted toward forward and small-x physics at RHIC, which has become a cornerstone of the whole RHIC program. Exciting new data were presented and discussed in terms of their possible implications for our understanding of strong color-field phenomena in QCD. In the afternoon, there were discussions of nuclear parton distributions and jet observables, among them fragmentation. The workshop was concluded with outlooks toward the near-term (LHC, JLab) and longer-term (EIC) future. The workshop has been a great success. We had

  13. SYSTEMATIC STUDIES OF HEAVY ION COLLISIONS TO SEARCH FOR QUARK-GLUON PLASMA

    SciTech Connect

    Fuqiang Wang

    2007-11-29

    This is the final technical report for DOE Outstanding Junior Investigator (OJI) Award, 'Systematic Studies of Heavy Ion Collisions to Search for Quark-Gluon Plasma', grant DE-FG02-02ER41219, Principal Investigator (PI) Fuqiang Wang. The research under the grant was divided into two phases. The first concentrated on systematic studies of soft hadron production at low transverse momentum (p{sub T}), in particular the production of (anti-)baryon and strangeness in heavy ion collisions at RHIC energies. The second concentrated on measurements of di-hadron and multi-hadron jet-correlations and investigations of medium response to jets. The research was conducted at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) at BNL with the Solenoidal Tracker At RHIC (STAR) experiment. The total grant is $214,000. The grant established a PC farm solely used for this research. The PC farm consists of 8 nodes with a total of 16 CPUs and 3 disk servers of total 2 TB shared storage. The current balance of the grant is $19,985. The positive balance is because an initial purchase of $22,600 for the PC farm came out of the PI's start-up fund due to the lateness of the award. The PC farm is an integral part of the Purdue Physics Department's computer cluster. The grant supported two Ph.D. graduate students. Levente Molnar was supported from July 2002 to December 2003, and worked on soft hadron production. His thesis title is Systematics of Identified Particle Production in pp, d-Au and Au-Au Collisions at RHIC Energies. He graduated in 2006 and now is a Postdoctoral fellow at INFN Sezione di Bari, Italy working on the ALICE experiment at the LHC. Jason Ulery was supported from January 2004 to July 2007. His thesis title is Two- and Three-Particle Jet-Like Correlations. He defended his thesis in October 2007 and is moving to Frankfurt University, Germany to work on the ALICE experiment at the LHC. The research by this grant resulted in 7 journal publications (2 PRL, 1 PLB, 1 PRC, 2 submitted and

  14. Les conjonctivites néonatales dans le canton de Glidji au Sud du Togo: une étude transversale à propos de 159 nouveau-nés

    PubMed Central

    Kokou, Vonor; Nidain, Maneh; Kassoula, Nononsaa Batomguela; Kwassi, Fiaty- Amenouvor; Meba, Banla; Patrice, Balo Komi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Le but de l’étude était décrire les aspects épidémiologiques des conjonctivites néonatales dans le canton de Glidji au Sud du Togo. Methodes Nous avons mené une étude transversale dans les 4 Unités Sanitaires Périphériques du canton de Glidji du 19 Mars au 13 Mai 2009 soit 8 semaines. Tous les nouveau-nés ont été inclus et la conjonctivite néonatale était définie par la présence chez un nouveau-né d'au moins deux des signes suivants: hyperhémie conjonctivale, œdème palpébral, chémosis, sécrétions purulentes, larmoiement. Les paramètres étudiés étaient l’âge, le sexe, les facteurs de risque, les antécédents, la présence ou non de conjonctivite, les germes en causes et l’évolution sous traitement. Resultats Sur la période, 159 nouveau-nés ont été examinés. L’âge moyen était de 10,9 jours avec des extrêmes de 0 à 28 jours. Il y avait 80 garçons pour 79 filles soit un sex-ratio de 1,01. Sur les 159 nouveau-nés, 7 cas de conjonctivite ont été diagnostiqués soit une prévalence de 4,4%. Les facteurs de risque identifiés étaient l'accouchement par voie basse et la présence d'IST chez la mère pendant la grossesse. Sur les 7 cas de conjonctivite, l'examen cytobactériologique a permis d'isoler le staphylococcus aureus dans 2 cas. L’évolution des cas de conjonctivite sous traitement était favorable avec régression des signes dès le 3è jour. Conclusion Les conjonctivites néonatales avaient une prévalence de 4,4% dans le canton de Glidji au sud du Togo et le staphylocoque doré était le germe en cause. Leur prévention passe par un bon suivi lors de la consultation prénatale et l'instillation de collyre antibiotique à la naissance PMID:27642383

  15. Etude des facteurs de risque du retard de croissance intra-utérin à Lubumbashi

    PubMed Central

    Moyambe, Jules Ngwe Thaba; Bernard, Pierre; Khang'Mate, Faustin; Nkoy, Albert Mwembo Tambwe A; Mukalenge, Faustin Chenge; Makanda, Daudet; Twite, Eugene; Ndudula, Arthur Munkana; Lubamba, Cham; Kadingi, Arnauld Kabulu; Kayomb, Mutach; Kayamba, Prosper Kalenga Muenze

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Dans notre milieu, il n'existe aucune politique de prévention du Retard de Croissance Intra-Utérin (RCIU) clairement défini. L'objectif de ce travail était d'identifier les facteurs de risque de RCIU afin de proposer une stratégie de lutte contre cette pathologie en agissant surtout sur des facteurs pouvant faire l'objet d'une action préventive. Méthodes Une étude cas-témoins a été menée dans 11 centres hospitaliers de Lubumbashi en République Démocratique du Congo, de Janvier 2010 à Juin 2011, dans le but d'identifier les facteurs de risque du retard de croissance intra-utérin (RCIU). Au total 420 gestantes (cas et témoins) avec grossesse monofoetale d'au moins 24 semaines d'aménorrhée ont été inclues dans l'étude. Les cas correspondaient aux gestantes dont le poids du fœtus était resté inférieur au 10 eme percentile des courbes de référence d'Alexander, après 2 échographies successives réalisées à intervalle de 4 semaines. Les témoins correspondaient aux gestantes dont le poids du fœtus était supérieur ou égal au 10 eme percentile de mêmes courbes. A chaque cas a été apparié un témoin de même parité porteur d'une grossesse de même âge. Résultats L'analyse univariée a identifié comme facteurs de risque: la taille maternelle. Conclusion L'amélioration du niveau socio-économique des populations, la lutte contre le paludisme et les consultations prénatales mieux organisées couplées à une meilleure éducation sanitaire et nutritionnelle peuvent contribuer sensiblement à la réduction de la fréquence du RCIU à Lubumbashi. PMID:23504392

  16. Le syndrome de cushing chez l'adolescent: à propos de 18 patients

    PubMed Central

    Haraj, Nassim Essabah; El Aziz, Siham; Chadli, Asma

    2015-01-01

    Le syndrome de Cushing est une pathologie rare mais grave chez l'enfant et l'adolescent. Elle diffère de la pathologie adulte par le mode de présentation et la prise en charge. Il s'agit d'une étude rétrospective des dossiers de patients suivis pour syndrome de Cushing au service d'endocrinologie de Casablanca entre 2002 - 2015, incluant les patients âgés au moment du diagnostic de moins de 22 ans, et ayant un suivi d'au moins 1 an. Au total 18 dossiers ont été inclus. L’âge moyen est de 19,55 ans, avec une prédominance féminine. La durée d’évolution moyenne est de 4,05 ans. Le tableau clinique est fait souvent d'une cassure de poids, une obésité ou une séborrhée et acné. La démarche diagnostique est comparable à celle de l'adulte. Sur le plan étiologique on retrouve une prédominance de la maladie de Cushing (15 patients). Sur le plan thérapeutique, 14 patients ont bénéficié d'une chirurgie hypophysaire, avec complément par radiothérapie chez 3 patients devant l’échec de la chirurgie, Une ablation d'une tumeur surrénalienne chez une patiente et une surrénalectomie bilatérale chez trois patients. L’évolution a été marquée par une guérison chez 9 patients et le décès chez 4 (suite à un syndrome de Nelson, infection sévère, choc hémorragique, corticosurrénalome). Les résultats de cette étude soulignent la gravité de cette maladie, ce qui nécessite d'organiser le suivi, en élaborant des programmes spécifiques de suivi médical et de prise en charge psychologique. PMID:26985265

  17. System, energy, and flavor dependence of jets through di-hadron correlations in heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nattrass, Christine

    QCD predicts a phase transition in nuclear matter at high energy densities. This matter, called a Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP), should have very different properties from normal nuclear matter due to its high temperature and density. The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) was built to study the QGP. Jets can act as a calibrated probe to examine the QGP, however, reconstruction of jets in a heavy ion environment is difficult. Therefore jets have been studied in heavy ion collisions by investigating the spatial correlations between two intermediate to high-pT hadrons in an event. Previous studies have shown that the near-side di-hadron correlation peak can be decomposed into two components, a jet-like correlation and the Ridge. The jet-like correlation is narrow in both azimuth and pseudorapidity, while the Ridge is narrow in azimuth but independent of pseudorapidity within STAR's acceptance. STAR's data from Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions at sNN = 62 GeV and sNN = 200 GeV allow comparative studies of these components in different systems and at different energies. Data on correlations with both identified trigger particles and identified associated particles are presented, including the first studies of identified particle correlations in Cu+Cu and the energy dependence of these correlations. The yields are studied as a function of collision centrality, transverse momentum of the trigger particle, transverse momentum of the associated particle, and trigger and associated particle type. The data in this thesis indicate that the jet-like correlation component in heavy ion collisions is dominantly produced by vacuum fragmentation of hard scattered partons. The Ridge component is not present in p+p or d+Au collisions. The Ridge yield is consistent between systems for the same Npart and has properties similar to the bulk. Theoretical mechanisms for the production of the Ridge include parton recombination, collisional energy loss in the medium (momentum kicks), and gluon

  18. Résultats fonctionnels de la chirurgie de la cataracte par phacoalternative avec implantation en chambre postérieure: à propos de 300 cas à Bobo Dioulasso (Burkina Faso)

    PubMed Central

    Diallo, Jean Wenceslas; Meda, Nonfounikoun; Ahnoux-Zabsonre, Ahgbatouhabéba; Yameogo, Claudette; Dolo, Mariam; Sanou, Jérôme; Daboue, Arsène

    2015-01-01

    La cataracte est la première cause de cécité curable dans le monde. Son traitement est chirurgical. Le but de notre travail a été d’évaluer les résultats de la phacoalternative ou la chirurgie de la cataracte à petite incision. Il s'est agi d'une étude transversale descriptive à collecte prospective allant du 1er janvier au 31 septembre 2014, chez des patients âgés d'au moins 40 ans. Les données socio-démographiques, l'acuité visuelle, l'astigmatisme et les complications ont été évalués. Nous avons inclus 300 yeux de 286 patients. L’âge moyen était de 66 ans (écart type 9,93) avec une prédominance masculine de 57,7%. Les co-morbidités étaient dominées par l'hypertension artérielle 30,33% des cas. L'acuité visuelle pré-opératoire était de moins de 1/20è dans 70, 7% des cas. En biométrie, la puissance moyenne était de 21,50 dioptries. L'implant posé a été adéquat dans 60%. Les principales complications per-opératoires étaient le chémosis post-anesthésie 4,67% et l'issue de vitrée moins de 2% des cas. Les complications post opératoires précoces ont été dominées par l’œdème de cornée 26,33%, et les complications tardives par la cataracte secondaire. L'astigmatisme induit était de 1, 12 dioptrie en moyenne (écart type 1,26). Sans correction, les résultats visuels étaient mauvais dans moins de 1%, limites dans 31%, et bons 68% suivants les normes de l'Organisation Mondiale de la Santé. La phacoalternative donne des résultats satisfaisants, avec peu de complications. L'amélioration du plateau technique et la disponibilité d'implants adéquats pourraient les améliorer. PMID:26140073

  19. Evaluation des indicateurs d’alerte précoce de la résistance du VIH aux ARV en Côte d’Ivoire en 2011

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Kouadio Jean; Damey, Néto Florence; Konan, Diby Jean Paul; Aka, Joseph; Aka-Konan, Sandrine; Ani, Alex; Bonle, Marguerite Te; Kouassi, Dinard

    2016-01-01

    Introduction En 2001, l'Organisation des Nations Unies recommandait de rendre disponible les médicaments antirétroviraux dans les pays à ressources limitées. Cependant, l'utilisation de ces médicaments à grande échelle s'accompagne du développement de résistance du virus. En Côte d'Ivoire, plusieurs sites prescrivent les antirétroviraux. Cette étude avait pour objectif d'évaluer les facteurs programmatiques associés à un risque élevé d'émergence de résistance du VIH aux antirétroviraux. Méthodes Il s'agit d'une cohorte rétrospective sur 20 sites de prise en charge des personnes vivant avec le VIH. La population d'étude était constituée des personnes ayant initié leur traitement antirétroviral sur les sites en 2008-2009. L'estimation de la taille de l'échantillon a été faite à partir de la stratégie d'échantillonnage de l'OMS. Résultats Sur 20 sites, 98% des prescriptions initiales étaient conformes aux directives nationales et 20% des sites avaient 100% de prescriptions conformes. Au total, 33% des patients étaient perdus de vue au cours des 12 premiers mois de traitement antirétroviral et 20% des sites avaient moins de 20% de perdus de vue. A 12 mois, 51% des patients demeuraient sous traitement de première intention approprié et 11% des sites ont atteint le seuil d'au moins 70% de patients sous traitement de première intention approprié. Un seul site n'a pas connu de rupture d'antirétroviraux sur les 12 mois. Conclusion Des insuffisances relevées dans la prise en charge des personnes vivant avec le VIH traduisent l'existence d'un risque important de résistance du virus aux antirétroviraux en 2008-2009. Pour minimiser ce risque les pratiques de prescription devraient être améliorées, un système de recherche des absents aux rendez-vous devrait être mis en place et la disponibilité constante des antirétroviraux devraient être assurée. PMID:28250876

  20. Facteurs associes aux décès des nouveau-nés suspects d'infections bactériennes au Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Pédiatrique Charles de Gaulle de Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso

    PubMed Central

    Ouédraogo, Solange Odile Yugbaré; Méda, Désiré; Dao, Lassina; Kouéta, Fla; Ludovic, Kam; Traoré, Ramata Ouédraogo; Yé, Diarra

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Il s'agit d’étudier les facteurs associés au décès des nouveau-nés suspects d'infections bactériennes au centre hospitalier universitaire pédiatrique Charles de gaulle de Ouagadougou. Méthodes Nous avons mené une étude de cohorte rétrospective du 1er janvier 2009 au 31 décembre 2012 au centre hospitalier universitaire pédiatrique Charles de gaulle de Ouagadougou. Résultats La fréquence hospitalière des nouveau-nés suspects d'infection bactérienne sur était de 62,8%. L’âge médian à l'admission était de trois jours et le sex ratio de 1,1. Parmi ces nouveau-nés, 351 (22,8%) ont bénéficié d'au moins un examen bactériologique, et 28 (8%) ont eu la confirmation de l'origine bactérienne de l'infection. Au cours de la période néonatale, 138(9%) nouveau-nés sont décédés avec un taux de létalité précoce et tardive respectivement de 9,6% et 8,3%. Le lieu de résidence, le mode d'admission, le nombre de consultations prénatales, le poids de naissance, la présence de signes de gravité et l'année d'admission étaient les facteurs de risque indépendants associés au décès. Conclusion Les facteurs associés au décès devraient être pris en compte dans les interventions de santé pour réduire la mortalité néonatale. PMID:27583071

  1. Dioxin-related compounds in breast milk of women from Vietnamese e-waste recycling sites: levels, toxic equivalents and relevance of non-dietary exposure.

    PubMed

    Tue, Nguyen Minh; Katsura, Kana; Suzuki, Go; Tuyen, Le Huu; Takasuga, Takumi; Takahashi, Shin; Viet, Pham Hung; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2014-08-01

    Although informal e-waste recycling sites (EWRSs) are hotspots of both polychlorinated and polybrominated dibenzo-p-dioxins/dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs and PBDD/Fs), human exposure to the latter has not been studied in details. This study investigated the accumulation levels and profiles of dioxin-related compounds (DRCs) in breast milk samples from women living in two Vietnamese EWRSs and estimated the intake contribution from e-waste-related exposure. Screening results using Dioxin-Responsive Chemically Activated LUciferase gene eXpression assay (DR-CALUX) showed higher dioxin-like (DL) activities in samples from the EWRS Bui Dau than in those from the EWRS Trang Minh and a reference site (2.3-10 vs 1.7-4.8 and 0.60-5.7 pg CALUX-TEQ/g lipid, n=10, 6 and 9, respectively). Chemical analysis results of selected samples show that the WHO-TEQ levels of PCDD/Fs, DL-PCBs and PBDD/Fs in EWRS samples were not significantly higher than in those from the reference site (0.22-7.4 vs 1.1-3.0 pg/g lipid) and within the Vietnamese background range, but women involved in recycling accumulated higher concentrations of PCDFs (13-15 vs 2.3-8.8 pg/g lipid) and PBDFs (1.1-1.5 vs <1.1 pg/g lipid). By comparing the DRC profile in milk of these women with the reported profile in house dust from the same site, dust ingestion was estimated to contribute most of the intake for tetraBDF, 37 per cent to 55 per cent for penta-octaCDFs, but less than twenty per cent for PCDDs and DL-PCBs, and 26 per cent for total WHO-TEQs. The DL activities in some EWRS milk samples were not fully explained by chemical data, suggesting contribution from unidentified compounds. The estimated WHO-TEQ intake doses for breastfed infants (1.3-33 pg/kg/d) mostly exceeded the tolerable value, especially for those living in the EWRSs; and unidentified DRCs might increase further the dioxin-related health risk.

  2. Electron spin resonance detection of oxygen radicals released by UVA-irradiated human fibroblasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souchard, J. P.; Pierlot, G.; Barbacanne, M. A.; Charveron, M.; Bonafé, J.-L.; Nepveu, F.

    1999-01-01

    This work reports the electron spin resonance (ESR) detection of oxygenated radicals (OR) released by cultured human fibroblasts after UVA (365 nm) exposure. 5,5-dimethyl-pyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO) was used as spin trap. After a UVA irradiation of one hour, followed by a latent period of at least 45 min., and an incubation time of 30 min. in a trapping medium containing DMPO, glucose, Na^+, K+ and Ca2+ an ESR signal was recorded. By contrast, an ESR signal was produced after only 15 min. incubation when calcium ionophore A23187 was used. Although the ESR signal was characteristic of the hydroxyl adduct DMPO-OH, the use of catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD) revealed that UVA stimulated fibroblasts released the superoxide anion O2- in the medium. SOD, vitamin C and (+)-catechin inhibited the release of superoxide generated by human fibroblasts stimulated with A23187 calcium ionophore at 5 units/ml, 10-5 M and 2× 10-4 M, respectively. Dans ce travail nous présentons la détection par résonance de spin électronique (RSE) de radicaux oxygénés (RO) libérés par des fibroblastes humains en culture après irradiation aux UVA (365 nm). Le 5,5-diméthyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxyde (DMPO) a été utilisé comme piégeur de spin. Après une irradiation aux UVA d'une heure, suivie d'une période de latence d'au moins 45 min. et d'une incubation de 30 min. dans un milieu de piégeage composé de DMPO, glucose, Na^+, K+ et Ca2+, un signal RPE est enregistré. L'ionophore calcique A23187 entraîne l'apparition d'un signal RPE après seulement 15 min. d'incubation. Bien que le signal RPE obtenu corresponde à l'adduit DMPO-OH du radical hydroxyle, l'utilisation de catalase et de superoxyde dismutase (SOD) a révélé que les fibroblastes libéraient l'anion superoxyde dans le milieu de culture. Sur ce modèle cellulaire la SOD, la vitamine C et la (+) catéchine inhibent la production du radical superoxyde aux concentrations respectivement de 5 unités/ml, 10-5 M et 2× 10-4M.

  3. The central arctic caribou herd

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cameron, Raymond D.; Smith, Walter T.; White, Robert G.; Griffith, Brad; Douglas, David C.; Reynolds, Patricia E.; Rhode, E.B.

    2002-01-01

    From the mid-1970s through the mid-1980s, use of calving and summer habitats by Central Arctic herd caribou (Rangifer tarandus granti) declined near petroleum development infrastructure on Alaska's arctic coastal plain (Cameron et al. 1979; Cameron and Whitten 1980, Smith and Cameron 1983. Whitten and Cameron 1983a, 1985: Dau and Cameron 1986).With surface development continuing to expand westward from the Prudhoe Bay petroleum development area (Fig. 4.1), concerns arose that the resultant cumulative losses of habitat would eventually reduce productivity of the caribou herd. Specifically, reduced access of adult females to preferred foraging areas might adversely affect growth and fattening (Elison et al. 1986. Clough et al. 1987), in turn depressing calf production (Dauphiné 1976, Thomas 1982, Reimers 1983, White 1983, Eloranta and Nieminen 1986. Lenvik et al. 1988, Thomas and Kiliaan 1991) and survival (Haukioja and Salovaara 1978, Rognmo et al. 1983, Skogland 1984, Eloranta and Nieminen 1986, Adamczewski et al. 1987).Those concerns, though justified in theory, lacked empirical support. With industrial development in arctic Alaska virtually unprecedented, there was little basis for predicting the extent and duration of habitat loss, much less the secondary short- and long-term effects on the well-being of a particular caribou herd.Furthermore, despite a general acceptance that body condition and fecundity of the females are functionally related for reindeer and caribou, it seemed unlikely that any single model would apply to all subspecies of Rangifer, and perhaps not even within a subspecies in different geographic regions. We therefore lacked a complete understanding of the behavioral responses of arctic caribou to industrial development, the manner in which access to habitats might be affected, and how changes in habitat use might translate into measurable effects on fecundity and herd growth rate.Our study addressed the following objectives: 1) estimate

  4. Understanding approaches to balance assessment in physical therapy practice for elderly inpatients of a rehabilitation hospital.

    PubMed

    Gervais, Tanner; Burling, Nicole; Krull, Justin; Lugg, Carrie; Lung, Maria; Straus, Sharon; Jaglal, Susan; Sibley, Kathryn M

    2014-01-01

    Objectif : L'équilibre constitue un facteur modifiable critique de risque de chutes chez les adultes âgés. Cette étude visait à déterminer les outils utilisés en physiothérapie pour évaluer l'équilibre en pratique clinique et les éléments constituants de l'équilibre évalués au moyen de mesures normalisées ou autres. Méthodes : On a procédé à un examen rétrospectif des dossiers de 250 patients âgés de 65 ans et plus qui ont suivi une réadaptation en service interne après avoir reçu un diagnostic clinique associé à une déficience de l'équilibre (accident vasculaire cérébral, problèmes de l'appareil locomoteur, amputation d'un membre inférieur, déconditionnement et chirurgie cardiaque) à un hôpital de réadaptation de l'Ontario. Résultats : Tous les patients ont fait l'objet d'au moins une évaluation comportant un volet équilibre. On a pris des mesures normalisées de l'équilibre chez 73 % des patients : le test chronométré lever-marcher (48 %) et le test d'équilibre de Berg (36 %) ont servi le plus souvent pour cette évaluation. Les stratégies de mouvement réactifs et le traitement cognitif ont été les éléments de l'équilibre évalués le moins souvent. L'équilibre a été évalué le moins souvent chez les personnes qui avaient subi une chirurgie cardiaque. Conclusions : Il existe une variation importante au niveau de l'évaluation de l'équilibre et les données indiquent qu'il n'est pas tenu compte également de tous les éléments pertinents. Les recherches à venir dans d'autres contextes cliniques devraient inclure les évaluations d'autres professionnels de la santé afin de permettre de comprendre plus complètement les procédures actuelles d'évaluation de l'équilibre.

  5. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor activation blocks long-term potentiation at cerebellar parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapses via cannabinoid signaling.

    PubMed

    Rinaldo, Lorenzo; Hansel, Christian

    2013-07-02

    Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) are known to modulate synaptic plasticity in various brain areas. A signaling pathway triggered by mAChR activation is the production and release of endocannabinoids that bind to type 1 cannabinoid receptors (CB1R) located on synaptic terminals. Using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from rat cerebellar slices, we have demonstrated that the muscarinic agonist oxotremorine-m (oxo-m) blocks the induction of presynaptic long-term potentiation (LTP) at parallel fiber (PF)-Purkinje cell synapses in a CB1R-dependent manner. Under control conditions, LTP was induced by delivering 120 PF stimuli at 8 Hz. In contrast, no LTP was observed when oxo-m was present during tetanization. PF-LTP was restored when the CB1R antagonist N-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-5-(4-iodophenyl)-4-methyl-N-1-piperidinyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide (AM251) was coapplied with oxo-m. Furthermore, the suppressive effect of oxo-m on PF-LTP was abrogated by the GDP analog GDP-β-S (applied intracellularly), the phospholipase C inhibitor U-73122, and the diacylglycerol lipase inhibitor tetrahydrolipstatin (THL), suggesting that cannabinoid synthesis results from the activation of Gq-coupled mAChRs present on Purkinje cells. The oxo-m-mediated suppression of LTP was also prevented in the presence of the M3 receptor antagonist DAU 5884, and was absent in M1/M3 receptor double-KO mice, identifying M3 receptors as primary oxo-m targets. Our findings allow for the possibility that cholinergic signaling in the cerebellum--which may result from long-term depression (LTD)-related disinhibition of cholinergic neurons in the vestibular nuclei--suppresses presynaptic LTP to prevent an up-regulation of transmitter release that opposes the reduction of postsynaptic responsiveness. This modulatory capacity of mAChR signaling could promote the functional penetrance of LTD.

  6. Flame retardant emission from e-waste recycling operation in northern Vietnam: environmental occurrence of emerging organophosphorus esters used as alternatives for PBDEs.

    PubMed

    Matsukami, Hidenori; Tue, Nguyen Minh; Suzuki, Go; Someya, Masayuki; Tuyen, Le Huu; Viet, Pham Hung; Takahashi, Shin; Tanabe, Shinsuke; Takigami, Hidetaka

    2015-05-01

    Three oligomeric organophosphorus flame retardants (o-PFRs), eight monomeric PFRs (m-PFRs), tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) were identified and quantified in surface soils and river sediments around the e-waste recycling area in Bui Dau, northern Vietnam. Around the e-waste recycling workshops, 1,3-phenylene bis(diphenyl phosphate) (PBDPP), bisphenol A bis(diphenyl phosphate) (BPA-BDPP), triphenyl phosphate (TPHP), TBBPA, and PBDEs were dominant among the investigated flame retardants (FRs). The respective concentrations of PBDPP, BPA-BDPP, TPHP, TBBPA and the total PBDEs were 6.6-14000 ng/g-dry, <2-1500 ng/g-dry, 11-3300 ng/g-dry, <5-2900 ng/g-dry, and 67-9200 ng/g-dry in surface soils, and 4.4-78 ng/g-dry, <2-20 ng/g-dry, 7.3-38 ng/g-dry, 6.0-44 ng/g-dry and 100-350 ng/g-dry in river sediments. Near the open burning site of e-waste, tris(methylphenyl) phosphate (TMPP), (2-ethylhexyl)diphenyl phosphate (EHDPP), TPHP, and the total PBDEs were abundantly with respective concentrations of <2-190 ng/g-dry, <2-69 ng/g-dry, <3-51 ng/g-dry and 1.7-67 ng/g-dry in surface soils. Open storage and burning of e-waste have been determined to be important factors contributing to the emissions of FRs. The environmental occurrence of emerging FRs, especially o-PFRs, indicates that the alternation of FRs addition in electronic products is shifting in response to domestic and international regulations of PBDEs. The emissions of alternatives from open storage and burning of e-waste might become greater than those of PBDEs in the following years. The presence and environmental effects of alternatives should be regarded as a risk factor along with e-waste recycling. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Di-Hadron Angular Correlation Dependence on Leading Hadron Identity in Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauder, Kolja

    A unique state of matter is created in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP). It displays the properties of a near-perfect liquid of quarks and gluons (partons) interacting collectively via the strong force. Properties of this medium can be explored using high-energy probes created in the form of back-to-back pairs (jets) in hard scatterings. A distinct feature of the QGP is jet quenching, which describes the large energy loss of such probes observed in measurements of hadron distributions in head-on heavy ion collisions. A more differential measurement of jet quenching is achieved using di-hadron correlations, where relative angular distributions are studied with respect to a leading (high energy) "trigger" hadron. Two striking features found in di-hadron correlations are the emergence of a long-range plateau on the near-side (at small relative azimuth), the so-called "ridge", and a broadening and deformation of the away-side, back to back with the trigger. Using 200 GeV central gold-gold and minimum bias deuteron-gold collision data collected by the STAR detector at RHIC, a systematic study of the dependence of di-hadron correlation structures on the identity of the trigger particle is carried out in this work by statistically separating pion from non-pion (i.e. proton and kaon) triggers, offering new insights into the hadronization mechanisms in the QGP. The jet-like yield at small relative angles is found enhanced for leading pions in Au+Au data with respect to the d+Au reference, while leading non-pions (protons and kaons) do not elicit such an enhancement. These findings are discussed within the context of quark recombination. At large angles, the correlated yield is significantly higher for leading non-pions than pions. Parameters extracted from two-dimensional model fits are used to test consistency with the constituent quark scaling assumptions

  8. Reconciliation of climate protection & development: the role of OECD & developing countries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kropp, J. P.; Costa, L.; Rybski, D.

    2012-04-01

    Although developing countries are called to participate in CO2 emission reduction efforts to avoid dangerous climate change, the implications of proposed reduction schemes in human development standards of developing countries remain a matter of debate. We show the existence of a positive and time-dependent correlation between the Human Development Index (HDI) and per capita CO2 emissions from fossil fuel use. We employ this empirical relation under consideration the parallel constraint of the 2°C target, extrapolations of the HDI, and using population scenarios to determine emission pathways for countries. We assume that developing countries will rely on fossil fuel use in the future, e.g. due to cost reasons (Development as Usual - DAU), but we also define as turning the 0.8 HDI threshold. Beyond this value a country is commonly considered as developed. We show if current demographic and development trends are maintained that around 85% of the world's population will live in countries with high HDI (above 0.8) by 2050. In such a case 300 Gt of cumulative CO2 emissions are estimated to be necessary for the development of 104 developing countries in the year 2000 between 2000 and 2050. This value represents between 20 % to 30 % of previously calculated CO2 budgets limiting global warming to 2°C. These constraints and results are incorporated into a CO2 reduction framework involving four domains of climate action for individual countries. The framework reserves a fair and equitable emission path for developing countries to proceed with their development by indexing country-dependent reduction rates proportional to the HDI in order to preserve the 2°C target after a particular development threshold is reached. It can be shown that in such a case the pressure to the OECD countries could be higher than assumed. For example, in each time step of five years, countries with an HDI of 0.85 would need to reduce their per capita emissions by approx. 17% and countries with

  9. Méningiome intracrânien multiple: expérience du service de neurochirurgie CHU Avicenne Rabat - Salé, à propos de 4 cas et revue de la literature

    PubMed Central

    Djoubairou, Ben Ousmanou; Karekezi, Claire; Moussé, Nabil; Doleagbenou, Agbéko Komlan; Gana, Rachid; El Abbadi, Najia; El Maaqili, Moulay Rachid

    2014-01-01

    Les méningiomes intracrâniennes multiples sont définies comme la présence d'au moins deux méningiomes sur des sites intracrâniens différents et ceci en absence de neurofibromatose. C'est une tumeur rare dont la prévalence varie entre 1-10%. Le but de notre travail était de décrire les caractéristiques cliniques, radiologiques, histologiques d'une série de 4 patients porteurs de méningiome multiple et en déduire les facteurs de risques de survenue de cette pathologie. Préciser la qualité d'exérèse chirurgicale de la lésion selon la classification de Simpson. Rapporter les suites postopératoires ainsi que le suivie à long termes des patients afin de préciser leur qualité de vie. Il s'agit d'une étude rétrospective portant sur 4 cas de Méningiomes intracrâniens multiples sur 174 patients opérés pour méningiome au CHU Avicenne entre Janvier 2000 à Décembre 2013. En s'aidant des données cliniques, imageries, chirurgicales, histologiques mentionnée dans le dossier médical de chaque patient. Notre série est constitué de 4 patients (3 femmes pour 1 homme), d'un âge allant de 42-50 ans (moyenne d’âge= 45,5 ans). Nous avons identifié 21 méningiomes (17 en sus tentoriel et 4 en sous tentoriel), aucun cas de décès ni d'infection postopératoire dans notre échantillon. Le pronostic reste bon malgré le nombre de lésion nécessitant parfois plusieurs interventions chirurgicales. PMID:25419331

  10. An Assessment of Seasonal Circulation Patterns in the Gulf of Tonkin, Vietnam, Utilizing a Numerical Model, HF Radar and In Situ Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogowski, P.; Zavala-garay, J.; Terrill, E. J.; Wilkin, J.; Shearman, R. K.; Lam, T. H.

    2016-12-01

    Analysis of the spatial and temporal ocean circulation patterns of the Gulf of Tonkin are the focus of an ongoing collaborative effort between the Vietnamese Center for Oceanography, Vietnam Administration for Seas and Islands, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, Oregon State University, and Rutgers University. Here we present a performance summary of HF radar observations from three long range ( 5 MHz) Vietnamese radar stations located at Hon Dau, Dong Hoi, and Nghi Xuan from May 2012 - present and their utilization for verification and calibration of a numerical model in the western portion of the Gulf of Tonkin. Data availability was strongly dependent on oceanographic conditions in the region which are governed by a monsoonal circulation pattern. During the summer monsoon (wet season), the atmospheric conditions are dominated by low-level southwesterlies which result in winds blowing offshore from Vietnam that often result in minimal radar observations due to low wave conditions. However, the higher frequency storm events result in total current vectors up to 200 km offshore. The transition into this wet season occurs fairly regularly and quite abruptly towards the end of May. In contrast, the transition into the dry season is much more gradual, beginning in September with the mean winds slowly changing direction to become northeasterlies over a period of about three months. The winter monsoon brings cooler air in from the northeast via the Pacific from December through April, which generally leads to increased radar coverage due to the onshore flow leading to more substantial wave conditions in the western portion of the Gulf of Tonkin. The combination of large riverine freshwater inflows and the seasonally-reversing monsoon winds drive strong seasonal and inter-annual variability within the region. In addition to HF radar observations, in situ measurements (glider, CTD) and historical data were essential for calibrating and verifying the accuracy of the

  11. Les accidents du travail dans le transport urbain en commun de la ville province de Kinshasa, République Démocratique du Congo: une étude transversale descriptive

    PubMed Central

    Wangata, Jemima; Elenge, Myriam; De Brouwer, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Le transport en commun urbain constitue un secteur où les travailleurs sont très exposés aux accidents du travail. Cette étude visait une description épidémiologique des accidents du travail dans le secteur informel du transport en commun à Kinshasa en vue d'apporter les pistes d'amélioration de la sécurité des travailleurs dans cette activité. Méthodes Un questionnaire sur les accidents du travail, administré en Décembre 2012 a permis d'explorer les tendances significatives entre les accidents et leurs circonstances, leurs facteurs associés, leurs conséquences au sein d'une population des travailleurs (n = 472) du transport en commun à Kinshasa. Résultats Durant les 12 derniers précédant l’étude 76.5% des travailleurs ont connu au moins un accident du travail, 54,8% ont connu un arrêt d'au moins 1jour. Les accidents liés à la circulation routière étaient plus important suivis des chutes. Les facteurs ayant montré des différences significatives étaient le travail sous l'influence de l'alcool et le port des équipements de protection individuelle. Les plaies (46,3%) et les contusions (39,4%) étaient les lésions les plus courantes. Les membres supérieurs (51,3%) et inférieurs (30,7%) étaient les plus atteints. 76,6% des travailleurs ont assumé seuls leur prise en charge médicale. Conclusion L'incidence des accidents du travail dans ce secteur est très élevée. La mise en place d'une politique de prévention et gestion de différents facteurs associés ainsi qu'un système de déclaration d'accidents est nécessaire dans ce secteur. Les patrons ainsi que les politiques devraient veiller à une prise en charge médicale correcte pour des travailleurs accidentés. PMID:25667703

  12. How do quarks and gluons lose energy in the QGP?

    DOE PAGES

    Tannenbaum, M. J.

    2015-03-10

    multiplicity or transverse energy production in p-p collisions–soft particles, with ρT < 2 GeV/c, predominate. Thus an apparent hard scattering component for A+A multiplicity distributions based on a popular formula, dNAAch/dη = [(1 - x) (Npart)dNppch/dη2 + x (NcolldNppch/dη], seems to be an unphysical way to understand the deviation from Npart scaling. Based on recent p-p and d+A measurements, a more physical way is presented along with several other stimulating results and ideas from recent d+Au (p+Pb) measurements.« less

  13. Fractionation of highly siderophile and chalcogen elements during magma transport in the mantle: Constraints from pyroxenites of the Balmuccia peridotite massif

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zaicong; Becker, Harry

    2015-06-01

    Sulfide segregation from sulfur saturated basic magmas affects the compositions of chalcophile elements such as the highly siderophile elements (HSE) and the chalcogens S, Se, Te to variable extent. Whether this process predominantly occurs in the lower crust or in the mantle and how segregation of liquid sulfide and accumulation affects concentrations and ratios of these elements at different mantle depths and in presumed primitive basic magmas remains uncertain. Abundances of the HSE, S, Se and Te and Os isotopes in websterites and spinel clinopyroxenites of the Balmuccia peridotite massif (Ivrea-Verbano Zone, Italian Alps) provide new insight on sulfide segregation and the compositional change of melt and peridotite during magma transport in the mantle. Balmuccia websterites and clinopyroxenites formed from late Paleozoic and Mesozoic melt influx into stretched continental lithospheric mantle of the Ivrea-Verbano Zone, respectively. The HSE and chalcogen element compositions of websterites and clinopyroxenites reflect the segregation and accumulation of sulfide melt from S saturated silicate melts with different abundances and ratios of chalcogens and the HSE. The pyroxenites display large variations in abundances of the platinum group elements (PGE) and Te whereas abundances of less chalcophile elements S, Se and Re are much less variable. The fractionation between the PGE and fractionation of Re/Os, S/Se and Se/Te in the mantle pyroxenites are consistent with sulfide melt-silicate melt partitioning with a sequence of apparent coefficients of DPGE > DAu ⩾ DTe > DSe ⩾ DS ≈ DRe. Concentrations in ocean ridge basalts and in gabbros of the lower oceanic crust are also consistent with such fractionation. Websterites which have formed during refertilization of depleted peridotites display ratios of the HSE and moderately suprachondritic initial 187Os/188Os similar to interstitial sulfides of refertilized peridotites. These compositions are different from

  14. Transverse-energy production and fluctuations over centrality and acceptance in relativistic heavy-ion and nucleon-nucleon collisions: Quark versus nucleon interactions and a search for the quark-gluon plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armendariz, Raul L.

    Measuring energy produced in relativistic heavy-ion collisions is a way to investigate if a model of quark participants, or nucleon participants better describes the internal dynamics of the collision. The energy produced is proportional to the energy density in the interaction region; changes in fluctuations of energy production could be a signature for a phase transition between ordinary hadronic matter to a liberated quark-gluon plasma phase, QGP, thought to have existed one millionth of a second after the Big Bang creation of the Universe and before protons and neutrons had formed. Three experimental nuclear physics data-analyses were conducted using the sum energy of all particles produced in the direction transverse to the beam, ET, when nuclei collide in a 2.4 mile long circular atom smasher. The nuclei are accelerated in opposite directions at 99.995% the speed of light, and center-of-mass energies available for new particle production of sNN = 62.4 GeV, and 200 GeV per colliding nucleon pair were studied. The ET was recorded by the lead-scintillator electromagnetic calorimeter detectors of the Pioneering High Energy Interactions Experiment (PHENIX), at the Relativistic heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The collision systems studied were 200 GeV protons with protons ( p + p), deuterons with Au ions (d+Au), and 62.4 GeV and 200 GeV gold ions with gold ions (Au+Au). The first analysis, mean ET in collision centrality, explores whether a model of nucleon participants, or quark participants, better describes energy production with collision impact. The second analysis, ET fluctuations in collision centrality, looks for non-random fluctuations in ET distributions when the density of colliding partons becomes high. The third analysis, ET fluctuations in geometric acceptance, examines fluctuations as a function of detector fiducial volume in a search for correlated energy distribution in space (correlations ), known to occur in

  15. How do quarks and gluons lose energy in the QGP?

    SciTech Connect

    Tannenbaum, M. J.

    2015-03-10

    kT-effect. Another issue well known from experiments at the CERN ISR, SpS and SpS collider is that parton-parton hard-collisions make negligible contribution to multiplicity or transverse energy production in p-p collisions–soft particles, with ρT < 2 GeV/c, predominate. Thus an apparent hard scattering component for A+A multiplicity distributions based on a popular formula, dNAAch/dη = [(1 - x) (Npart)dNppch/dη2 + x (NcolldNppch/dη], seems to be an unphysical way to understand the deviation from Npart scaling. Based on recent p-p and d+A measurements, a more physical way is presented along with several other stimulating results and ideas from recent d+Au (p+Pb) measurements.

  16. In vitro cross-resistance and collateral sensitivity in seven resistant small-cell lung cancer cell lines: preclinical identification of suitable drug partners to taxotere, taxol, topotecan and gemcitabin.

    PubMed

    Jensen, P B; Holm, B; Sorensen, M; Christensen, I J; Sehested, M

    1997-01-01

    The acquisition of drug-resistant tumour cells is the main problem in the medical treatment of a range of malignant diseases. In recent years, three new classes of anti-cancer agents, each with a novel mechanism of action, have been brought forward to clinical trials. These are the topoisomerase I (topo I) poisons topotecan and irinotecan, which are both camptothecin derivatives, the taxane tubulin stabilizers taxol and taxotere and, finally, the antimetabolite gemcitabin, which is active in solid tumours. The process of optimizing their use in a combination with established agents is very complex, with numerous possible drug and schedule regimens. We describe here how a broad panel of drug-resistant small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) cell lines can be used as a model of tumour heterogeneity to aid in the selection of non-cross-resistant regimens. We have selected low-fold (3-10x) drug-resistant sublines from a classic (NCI-H69) and a variant (OC-NYH) SCLC cell line. The resistant cell lines include two sublines with different phenotypes towards alkylating agents (H69/BCNU and NYH/CIS), two sublines with different phenotypes against topo I poisons (NYH/CAM and NYH/TPT) and three multidrug resistant (MDR) sublines (H69/DAU, NYH/VM, and H69/VP) with combinations of mdr1 and MRP overexpression as well as topoisomerase II (topo II) down-regulation or mutation. Sensitivity to 20 established and new agents was measured in a standardized clonogenic assay. Resistance was highly drug specific. Thus, none of the cell lines was resistant to all drugs. In fact, all resistant cell lines exhibited patterns of collateral sensitivity to various different classes of drugs. The most intriguing pattern was collateral sensitivity to gemcitabin in two cell lines and to ara-C in five drug-resistant cell lines, i.e. in all lines except the lines resistant to topo I poisons. Next, all sensitivity patterns in the nine cell lines were compared by correlation analysis. A high correlation

  17. In vitro cross-resistance and collateral sensitivity in seven resistant small-cell lung cancer cell lines: preclinical identification of suitable drug partners to taxotere, taxol, topotecan and gemcitabin.

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, P. B.; Holm, B.; Sorensen, M.; Christensen, I. J.; Sehested, M.

    1997-01-01

    The acquisition of drug-resistant tumour cells is the main problem in the medical treatment of a range of malignant diseases. In recent years, three new classes of anti-cancer agents, each with a novel mechanism of action, have been brought forward to clinical trials. These are the topoisomerase I (topo I) poisons topotecan and irinotecan, which are both camptothecin derivatives, the taxane tubulin stabilizers taxol and taxotere and, finally, the antimetabolite gemcitabin, which is active in solid tumours. The process of optimizing their use in a combination with established agents is very complex, with numerous possible drug and schedule regimens. We describe here how a broad panel of drug-resistant small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) cell lines can be used as a model of tumour heterogeneity to aid in the selection of non-cross-resistant regimens. We have selected low-fold (3-10x) drug-resistant sublines from a classic (NCI-H69) and a variant (OC-NYH) SCLC cell line. The resistant cell lines include two sublines with different phenotypes towards alkylating agents (H69/BCNU and NYH/CIS), two sublines with different phenotypes against topo I poisons (NYH/CAM and NYH/TPT) and three multidrug resistant (MDR) sublines (H69/DAU, NYH/VM, and H69/VP) with combinations of mdr1 and MRP overexpression as well as topoisomerase II (topo II) down-regulation or mutation. Sensitivity to 20 established and new agents was measured in a standardized clonogenic assay. Resistance was highly drug specific. Thus, none of the cell lines was resistant to all drugs. In fact, all resistant cell lines exhibited patterns of collateral sensitivity to various different classes of drugs. The most intriguing pattern was collateral sensitivity to gemcitabin in two cell lines and to ara-C in five drug-resistant cell lines, i.e. in all lines except the lines resistant to topo I poisons. Next, all sensitivity patterns in the nine cell lines were compared by correlation analysis. A high correlation

  18. Groundwater flow and solute transport at the Mourquong saline-water disposal basin, Murray Basin, southeastern Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmons, Craig; Narayan, Kumar; Woods, Juliette; Herczeg, Andrew

    2002-03-01

    échargent naturellement. Le bassin de stockage est isolé hydrodynamiquement par des argiles lacustres de faible perméabilité, mais il existe des zones vulnérables au sud-est, là où les argiles sont apparemment absentes. L'importance des fuites verticales et latérales des saumures du bassin et les processus contrôlant leur migration ont été étudiés au moyen (1) d'analyses de chlorures et des isotopes stables de l'eau (2H/1H et 18O/16O) pour définir le mélange entre les eaux souterraines régionales et l'eau du lac, et (2) du code SUTRA d'écoulement souterrain et de transport de soluté d'eaux de densités variables. Les résultats hydrochimiques indiquent que l'eau de stockage évaporée s'est introduite d'au moins 100 m vers l'est et qu'il existe un écoulement négligeable de saumures vers le sud, en direction de la rivière Murray. Le modèle permet de considérer différents scénarios de gestion. L'écoulement des eaux salées vers la rivière Murray était le scénario le pire du fait de l'irrigation qui est appliquée entre le bassin de stockage et la rivière Murray. Les conditions actuelles de fonctionnement produisent un écoulement direct faible, sinon nul, des saumures du bassin vers la rivière. Resumen. Las aguas subterráneas salinas y los retornos de riego se almacenan habitualmente en unas 200 balsas naturales y artificiales de deshechos, situadas a lo largo de la Cuenca de los ríos Murray-Darling (Australia). Su impacto en los acuíferos y en el propio río Murray, que actúa como una de las fuentes principales de abastecimiento de agua en Australia, es un asunto preocupante. En uno de estos lugares, las aguas subterráneas salinizadas son bombeadas al lago Mourquong, que es un complejo natural de descarga del acuífero. La balsa de eliminación está revestida con arcillas lacustres de baja permeabilidad, pero hay áreas vulnerables hacia el sudeste, donde parece no haber arcilla. Se examina el alcance de la precolación vertical y lateral de las

  19. Strong and Electroweak Matter 2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eskola, Kari J.; Kainulainen, Kimmo; Kajantie, Keijo; Rummukainen, Kari

    RHIC experimental summary: the message from pp, d+Au and Au+Au collisions / M. Calderón de la Barca Sánchez -- Hydrodynamic aspects of relativistic heavy ion collisions at RHIC / P. F. Kolb -- Photon emission in a hot QCD plasma / P. Aurenche -- In search of the saturation scale: intrinsic features of the CGC / H. Weigert -- From leading hadron suppression to jet quenching at RHIC and LHC / U. A. Wiedemann -- Lattice simulations with chemical potential / C. Schmidt -- Mesonic correlators in hot QCD / M. Laine -- Thermalization and plasma instabilities / P. Arnold -- Transport coefficients in hot QCD / G. D. Moore -- Classical fields and heavy ion collisions / T. Lappi -- Progress in nonequilibrium quantum field theory II / J. Berges and J. Serreau -- A general effective theory for dense quark matter / P. T. Reuter, Q. Wang and D. H. Rischke -- Thermal leptogenesis / M. Plümacher -- Cold electroweak Baryogenesis / J. Smit -- Proton-nucleus collisions in the color glass condensate framework / J.-P. Blaizot, F. Gelis and R. Venugopalan -- From classical to quantum saturation in the nuclear wavefunction / D. N. Triantafyllopoulos -- Charge correlations in heavy ion collisions / A. Rajantie -- Whitening of the quark-gluon plasma / S. Mrówczyński -- Progress in anisotropic plasma physics / P. Romatschke and M. Strickland -- Deconfinement and chiral symmetry: competing orders / K. Tuominen -- Relation between the chiral and deconfinement phase transitions / Y. Hatta -- Renormalized Polyakov loops, matrix models and the Gross-Witten point / A. Dumitru and J. T. Lenaghan -- The nature of the soft excitation at the critical end point of QCD / A. Jakovác ... [et al.] -- Thermodynamics of the 1+1-dimensional nonlinear sigma model through next-to-leading order in 1/N / H. J. Warringa -- Light quark meson correlations at high temperature / E. Laemann ... [et al.] -- Charmonia at finite momenta in a deconfined plasma / S. Datta ... [et al.] -- QCD thermodynamics: lattice

  20. Impacts of afforestation on groundwater resources and quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Alistair; Chapman, Deborah

    2001-07-01

    Plans to double the proportion of land under forest cover in Ireland by the year 2035 have been initiated. The plan, primarily financially driven, ignores potential environmental impacts of forestry, particularly impacts on groundwater resources and quality. Since groundwater supplies almost 25% of Ireland's total potable water, these impacts are important. Field investigations indicate that afforestation leads to a reduction in runoff by as much as 20%, mainly due to interception of rainfall by forest canopies. Clearfelling has the opposite impact. Implications are that uncoordinated forestry practices can potentially exacerbate flooding. Groundwater recharge is affected by forestry, largely due to greater uptake of soil water by trees and to increased water-holding capacity of forest soils, arising from higher organic contents. Recharge rates under forests can be reduced to one tenth that under grass or heathland. Groundwater quality may be affected by enhanced acidification and nitrification under forests, due partly to scavenging of atmospheric pollutants by forest canopies, and partly to greater deposition of highly acid leaf litter. The slower recharge rates of groundwater under forests lead to significant delays in manifestation of deterioration in groundwater quality. Résumé. Des plans sont à l'étude pour doubler la proportion du couvert forestier en Irlande d'ici à 2035. Le plan, primitivement déterminé sur une base financière, ignore les impacts environnementaux potentiels de la foresterie, et particulièrement les impacts sur les ressources en eau souterraine et leur qualité. Du fait que les eaux souterraines satisfont presque 25% du total de l'eau potable de l'Irlande, ces impacts sont importants. Les études de terrain montrent que le reboisement conduit à une réduction du ruissellement d'au moins 20%, principalement à cause d'une interception de la pluie par le couvert forestier. Les coupes ont un impact contraire. Les implications sont

  1. Présentation générale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volino, F.

    simulés, de façon quasi-parfaite, par le même modèle, en supposant que l'échantillon soit "en poudre", et avec des valeurs très faibles du paramètre d'ordre. Une phase isotrope de polymère nématique étant un polymère normal, on a alors testé le modèle avec un polymère conventionnel, et de la même façon, de très bonnes simulations ont été obtenues. L'incohérence logique associée à ces résultats vient du fait que la théorie des modes élastiques ne devrait plus être applicable. En effet, le point de départ de cette théorie est une fonctionnelle énergie libre du nématique distordu par les fluctuations thermiques, qui ne contient que le terme quadratique en gradient d'orientation des molécules par rapport au directeur moyen. La limitation à ce premier terme signifie que la description ne devrait être valable que pour des gradients faibles, donc des paramètres d'ordre élevés. On aboutit donc au paradoxe suivant : la théorie des modes élastiques des nématiques permet de décrire d'autant mieux les spectres RMN de polymères, nématiques ou non, que le paramètre d'ordre est faible, c'est-à-dire qu'elle sort de son domaine d'applicabilité présumé. La façon la plus simple d'expliquer cette situation paradoxale est de dire que si la théorie des modes élastiques marche très bien en toutes circonstances, c'est parce qu'elle est beaucoup plus générale que ne l'ont (implicitement) imaginé leurs auteurs. Mais pour que tout redevienne cohérent, il fallait changer la signification d'au moins un concept de base de la théorie. Il a été décidé de modifier la signification des constantes élastiques et des viscosités, telles qu'elles apparaissent au niveau des équations fondamentales de la théorie standard. En pratique, la modification qui a été faite a été de supposer que ces quantités ne sont pas les quantités macroscopiques, mais des quantités non mesurables, associées aux modes élastiques, dépendant du vecteur d