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Sample records for dau farmaceitiski aktvo

  1. Development and in-house validation of allergen-specific ELISA tests for the quantification of Dau c 1.01, Dau c 1.02 and Dau c 4 in carrot extracts (Daucus carota).

    PubMed

    Foetisch, Kay; Dahl, Lotte; Jansen, Baerbel; Becker, Wolf-Meinhard; Lidholm, Jonas; van Ree, Ronald; Broll, Hermann; Kaul, Susanne; Vieths, Stefan; Holzhauser, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Even though carrot allergy is common in Europe, the amount of different allergens in carrots is still unknown due to a lack of methods for quantitative allergen measurements. The current study aimed at the development of quantitative ELISA tests for the known carrot allergens, namely Dau c 1.01, Dau c 1.02, and Dau c 4 in pure carrot extracts. Monoclonal antibodies targeting the major carrot allergen isoforms Dau c 1.01 and Dau c 1.02 were generated and combined in sandwich ELISA with rabbit antisera against Api g 1, the celery homologue of Dau c 1. A competitive ELISA for the carrot profilin Dau c 4 was based on a polyclonal rabbit antiserum. The three ELISA tests were allergen-specific and displayed detection limits between 0.4 and 6 ng allergen/ml of carrot extract. The mean coefficient of variation (CV) as a means of intraassay variability of the Dau c 1.01, Dau c 1.02 and Dau c 4 ELISA tests was 8.1%, 6.9%, and 11.9%, and the mean interassay CV 13.3%, 37.1% and 15.6%, respectively. Target recovery ranged between 93 and 113%. In conclusion, the specific, accurate and reproducible quantification of three important carrot allergens may help to identify less allergenic carrot varieties, as well as to standardize the amount of allergens in extracts used for carrot allergy diagnosis.

  2. 75 FR 8310 - Defense Acquisition University (DAU) Board of Visitors (BoV) Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-24

    ... of the Secretary Defense Acquisition University (DAU) Board of Visitors (BoV) Meeting AGENCY: Defense Acquisition University, DoD. ACTION: Meeting notice. SUMMARY: The next meeting of the Defense Acquisition University (DAU) Board of Visitors (BoV) will be held at DAU Headquarters at Fort Belvoir, Virginia....

  3. Nuclear Shadowing and Select d+Au Observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adeluyi, Adeola; Fai, George

    2007-04-01

    Much of the complexity of the description of d+Au collisions in the framework of perturbative Quantum Chromodynamics (pQCD) derives from effects of the nuclear environment. Here we investigate the effects of the most recent available nuclear shadowing parametrization, the Hirai-Kumano-Nagai (HKN) nuclear parton distribution functions (nPDFs) and the updated Albino-Kniehl-Kramer (AKK) fragmentation functions on three select d+Au collision observables. We compare our results to available experimental data from the STAR and BRAHMS collaborations.

  4. Improvement of antibiotic productivity by knock-out of dauW in Streptomyces coeruleobidus.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Tianjie; Yin, Chenghui; Zhu, Chunbao; Zhu, Baoquan; Hu, Youjia

    2011-10-20

    Daunorubicin (DNR) is an important anthracycline antibiotic. Its biosynthesis pathway has been well understood, however, the regulation of DNR biosynthesis needs further investigations. An ORF cloned between drrB and dnrX from the genome of a DNR producer, Streptomyces coeruleobidus DM, was named dauW and designated as an orthologous gene with dnrW and drrD. Several plasmids were constructed for over-expression and/or disruption of dauW in DM. Complete disruption of dauW can significantly increase the yield of DNR. We also found that the transcription level of dnrI, a major regulatory protein in the biosynthesis of DNR, and the self-resistance level were improved in dauW knock-out mutant. These results suggested that dauW may be a down-regulatory gene for DNR biosynthesis. Antibiotics productivity in S. coeruleobidus could be improved via regulation of the transcription of dnrI, a SARP regulator. The production of DNR in a high-producer and the yield of epi-DNR in an engineering strain were also increased by disruption of dauW.

  5. Dau c 1.01 and Dau c 1.02-silenced transgenic carrot plants show reduced allergenicity to patients with carrot allergy.

    PubMed

    Peters, Susanna; Imani, Jafargholi; Mahler, Vera; Foetisch, Kay; Kaul, Susanne; Paulus, Kathrin E; Scheurer, Stephan; Vieths, Stefan; Kogel, Karl-Heinz

    2011-06-01

    Pathogenesis-related protein-10 (PR10) is a ubiquitous small plant protein induced by microbial pathogens and abiotic stress that adversely contributes to the allergenic potency of many fruits and vegetables, including carrot. In this plant, two highly similar genes encoding PR10 isoforms have been isolated and designated as allergen Dau c 1.01 and Dau c 1.02. The aim of the study was to generate PR10-reduced hypoallergenic carrots by silencing either one of these genes in transgenic carrots by means of RNA interference (RNAi). The efficiency of gene silencing by stably expressed hairpin RNA (hnRNA) was documented by means of quantitative RT-PCR (qPCR) and immunoblotting. Quantification of the residual protein revealed that PR10 accumulation was strongly decreased compared with untransformed controls. Treatment of carrot plants with the PR protein-inducing chemical salicylic acid resulted in an increase of PR10 isoforms only in wild-type but not in Dau c 1-silenced mutants. The decrease of the allergenic potential in Dau c 1-silenced plants was sufficient to cause a reduced allergenic reactivity in patients with carrot allergy, as determined with skin prick tests (SPT). However, simultaneous silencing of multiple allergens will be required to design hypoallergenic carrots for the market. Our findings demonstrate the feasibility of creating low-allergenic food by using RNAi. This constitutes a reasonable approach to allergen avoidance.

  6. 77 FR 20615 - DAU Industry Day: “Affordability, Efficiency, and the Industrial Base”

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-05

    ... of the Secretary DAU Industry Day: ``Affordability, Efficiency, and the Industrial Base'' AGENCY..., efficiency, and the industrial base. After a variety of presenters, the session will conclude with Mr. Frank... maintaining a healthy industrial base. Following the plenary session, each company will have the...

  7. Direct photon production in d+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adare, A.; Adler, S. S.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Al-Jamel, A.; Alexander, J.; Angerami, A.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Aphecetche, L.; Aramaki, Y.; Armendariz, R.; Aronson, S. H.; Asai, J.; Atomssa, E. T.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Baldisseri, A.; Barish, K. N.; Barnes, P. D.; Bassalleck, B.; Basye, A. T.; Bathe, S.; Batsouli, S.; Baublis, V.; Bauer, F.; Baumann, C.; Bazilevsky, A.; Belikov, S.; Belmont, R.; Bennett, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Bhom, J. H.; Bickley, A. A.; Bjorndal, M. T.; Blau, D. S.; Boissevain, J. G.; Bok, J. S.; Borel, H.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Brown, D. S.; Bruner, N.; Bucher, D.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Burward-Hoy, J. M.; Butsyk, S.; Camacho, C. M.; Camard, X.; Campbell, S.; Caringi, A.; Chand, P.; Chang, B. S.; Chang, W. C.; Charvet, J.-L.; Chen, C.-H.; Chernichenko, S.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiba, J.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, P.; Churyn, A.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cobigo, Y.; Cole, B. A.; Comets, M. P.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M.; Constantin, P.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Cussonneau, J. P.; Dahms, T.; Dairaku, S.; Danchev, I.; Das, K.; Datta, A.; David, G.; Dayananda, M. K.; Deák, F.; Delagrange, H.; Denisov, A.; d'Enterria, D.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Devismes, A.; Dharmawardane, K. V.; Dietzsch, O.; Dion, A.; Donadelli, M.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Dubey, A. K.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Dutta, D.; Dzhordzhadze, V.; D'Orazio, L.; Edwards, S.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Ellinghaus, F.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Espagnon, B.; Esumi, S.; Eyser, K. O.; Fadem, B.; Fields, D. E.; Finck, C.; Finger, M.; Finger, M., Jr.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Fox, B. D.; Fraenkel, Z.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fujiwara, K.; Fukao, Y.; Fung, S.-Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Gadrat, S.; Garishvili, I.; Germain, M.; Glenn, A.; Gong, H.; Gonin, M.; Gosset, J.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grim, G.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gunji, T.; Gustafsson, H.-Å.; Hachiya, T.; Hadj Henni, A.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamblen, J.; Han, R.; Hanks, J.; Hansen, A. G.; Hartouni, E. P.; Haruna, K.; Harvey, M.; Haslum, E.; Hasuko, K.; Hayano, R.; He, X.; Heffner, M.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Heuser, J. M.; Hidas, P.; Hiejima, H.; Hill, J. C.; Hobbs, R.; Hohlmann, M.; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Hoover, A.; Horaguchi, T.; Hornback, D.; Huang, S.; Ichihara, T.; Ichimiya, R.; Iinuma, H.; Ikeda, Y.; Ikonnikov, V. V.; Imai, K.; Imrek, J.; Inaba, M.; Inuzuka, M.; Isenhower, D.; Isenhower, L.; Ishihara, M.; Isobe, T.; Issah, M.; Isupov, A.; Ivanischev, D.; Iwanaga, Y.; Jacak, B. V.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; Jin, J.; Jinnouchi, O.; Johnson, B. M.; Johnson, S. C.; Jones, T.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kajihara, F.; Kametani, S.; Kamihara, N.; Kamin, J.; Kaneta, M.; Kang, J. H.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kasai, M.; Katou, K.; Kawabata, T.; Kawall, D.; Kawashima, M.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kelly, S.; Kempel, T.; Khachaturov, B.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kijima, K. M.; Kikuchi, J.; Kim, A.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E.; Kim, E.-J.; Kim, E. J.; Kim, G.-B.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y.-J.; Kinney, E.; Kiriluk, K.; Kiss, Á.; Kistenev, E.; Kiyomichi, A.; Klay, J.; Klein-Boesing, C.; Kleinjan, D.; Kobayashi, H.; Kochenda, L.; Kochetkov, V.; Kohara, R.; Komkov, B.; Konno, M.; Koster, J.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kozlov, A.; Král, A.; Kravitz, A.; Kroon, P. J.; Kuberg, C. H.; Kunde, G. J.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Layton, D.; Lebedev, A.; Le Bornec, Y.; Leckey, S.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, J.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, T.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Lenzi, B.; Li, X.; Li, X. H.; Lichtenwalner, P.; Liebing, P.; Lim, H.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Liška, T.; Litvinenko, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, M. X.; Love, B.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Malakhov, A.; Malik, M. D.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Mao, Y.; Martinez, G.; Mašek, L.; Masui, H.; Matathias, F.; Matsumoto, T.; McCain, M. C.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; McGlinchey, D.; Means, N.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mibe, T.; Mignerey, A. C.; Mikeš, P.; Miki, K.; Miller, T. E.; Milov, A.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mishra, G. C.; Mishra, M.; Mitchell, J. T.; Mohanty, A. K.; Moon, H. J.; Morino, Y.; Morreale, A.; Morrison, D. P.; Moss, J. M.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Mukhopadhyay, D.; Muniruzzaman, M.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagle, J. L.; Naglis, M.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, K. R.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Nam, S.; Newby, J.; Nguyen, M.; Nihashi, M.; Niida, T.; Nouicer, R.; Nyanin, A. S.; Nystrand, J.; Oakley, C.; O'Brien, E.; Oda, S. X.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Ohnishi, H.; Ojha, I. D.; Oka, M.; Okada, K.; Onuki, Y.; Oskarsson, A.; Otterlund, I.; Ouchida, M.; Oyama, K.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pal, D.; Palounek, A. P. T.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, I. H.; Park, J.; Park, S. K.; Park, W. J.; Pate, S. F.; Pei, H.; Penev, V.; Peng, J.-C.; Pereira, H.; Peresedov, V.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Petti, R.; Pierson, A.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pisani, R. P.; Proissl, M.; Purschke, M. L.; Purwar, A. K.; Qu, H.; Qualls, J. M.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Rembeczki, S.; Reuter, M.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Roach, D.; Roche, G.; Rolnick, S. D.; Romana, A.; Rosati, M.; Rosen, C. A.; Rosendahl, S. S. E.; Rosnet, P.; Rukoyatkin, P.; Ružička, P.; Rykov, V. L.; Ryu, S. S.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sakai, S.; Sakashita, K.; Samsonov, V.; Sanfratello, L.; Sano, S.; Santo, R.; Sato, H. D.; Sato, S.; Sato, T.; Sawada, S.; Schutz, Y.; Sedgwick, K.; Seele, J.; Seidl, R.; Semenov, A. Yu.; Semenov, V.; Seto, R.; Sharma, D.; Shea, T. K.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Sim, K. S.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Slunečka, M.; Soldatov, A.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Staley, F.; Stankus, P. W.; Stenlund, E.; Stepanov, M.; Ster, A.; Stoll, S. P.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Sukhanov, A.; Sullivan, J. P.; Sziklai, J.; Takagi, S.; Takagui, E. M.; Taketani, A.; Tanabe, R.; Tanaka, K. H.; Tanaka, Y.; Taneja, S.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Tarján, P.; Themann, H.; Thomas, D.; Thomas, T. L.; Togawa, M.; Toia, A.; Tojo, J.; Tomášek, L.; Tomita, Y.; Torii, H.; Towell, R. S.; Tram, V.-N.; Tserruya, I.; Tsuchimoto, Y.; Tydesjö, H.; Tyurin, N.; Uam, T. J.; Vale, C.; Valle, H.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vazquez-Zambrano, E.; Veicht, A.; Velkovska, J.; Velkovsky, M.; Vértesi, R.; Veszprémi, V.; Vinogradov, A. A.; Virius, M.; Volkov, M. A.; Vrba, V.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Wei, F.; Wei, R.; Wessels, J.; White, S. N.; Willis, N.; Winter, D.; Wohn, F. K.; Woody, C. L.; Wright, R. M.; Wysocki, M.; Xie, W.; Yamaguchi, Y. L.; Yamaura, K.; Yang, R.; Yanovich, A.; Ying, J.; Yokkaichi, S.; You, Z.; Young, G. R.; Younus, I.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zaudtke, O.; Zhang, C.; Zhou, S.; Zimányi, J.; Zolin, L.; Zong, X.

    2013-05-01

    Direct photons have been measured in sNN=200 GeV d+Au collisions at midrapidity. A wide pT range is covered by measurements of nearly real virtual photons (1d+Au collisions over the scaled p+p cross section is consistent with unity. Theoretical calculations assuming standard cold-nuclear-matter effects describe the data well for the entire pT range. This indicates that the large enhancement of direct photons observed in Au+Au collisions for 1.0

  8. [A road to science: the trajectory of the botanist Leda Dau].

    PubMed

    Dau, Leda

    2008-06-01

    This interview with Leda Dau explores her career at the Museu Nacional from 1953 to 1994 and her dedication to research and teaching in the field of botany. She was a member of one of the first generations of women who felt the effects of the social transformations that began in the 1920s. This process brought changes to the gender system in Brazil and improved women's opportunities for schooling and professionalization, thereby allowing them access to the era's restricted world of science.

  9. Cold nuclear matter effects on J/ ψ yields in d+Au collisions at PHENIX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wysocki, Matthew G.; Phenix Collaboration

    2011-04-01

    The latest PHENIX measurements of J/ψ yields in d+Au collisions at √{sN}=200 GeV are presented as well as the nuclear modification factor RAu and RP. The results span a wide rapidity range ( -2.2

  10. Identified particle production in p+p and d+Au collisions at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hongyan; BRAHMS Collaboration

    2007-08-01

    The BRAHMS experiment at RHIC has measured the transverse momentum spectra of charged pions, kaons and (anti-)protons over a wide range of rapidity in d+Au and p+p collisions at \\sqrt{s_NN}=200 GeV. The nuclear modification factor RdAu at forward rapidity shows a clear suppression for π+. The measured net-proton yields in p+p collisions are compared to PYTHIA and HIJING/B and seem to be better described by the latter.

  11. Open charm yields in d+Au collisions at squareroot[sNN]=200 GeV.

    PubMed

    Adams, J; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Badyal, S K; Bai, Y; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellwied, R; Berger, J; Bezverkhny, B I; Bharadwaj, S; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhatia, V S; Bichsel, H; Billmeier, A; Bland, L C; Blyth, C O; Bonner, B E; Botje, M; Boucham, A; Brandin, A V; Bravar, A; Bystersky, M; Cadman, R V; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Castillo, J; Cebra, D; Chajecki, Z; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, Y; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Das, S; de Moura, M M; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Dogra, S M; Dong, W J; Dong, X; Draper, J E; Du, F; Dubey, A K; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Dutta Mazumdar, M R; Eckardt, V; Edwards, W R; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Estienne, M; Fachini, P; Faivre, J; Fatemi, R; Fedorisin, J; Filimonov, K; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fine, V; Fisyak, Y; Fomenko, K; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Gaillard, L; Gans, J; Ganti, M S; Gaudichet, L; Geurts, F; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; Gonzalez, J E; Grachov, O; Grebenyuk, O; Grosnick, D; Guertin, S M; Guo, Y; Gupta, A; Gutierrez, T D; Hallman, T J; Hamed, A; Hardtke, D; Harris, J W; Heinz, M; Henry, T W; Hepplemann, S; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Huang, H Z; Huang, S L; Hughes, E W; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Ishihara, A; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Janik, M; Jiang, H; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kang, K; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Khodyrev, V Yu; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Kislov, E M; Klay, J; Klein, S R; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Kravtsov, V I; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kumar, A; Kutuev, R Kh; Kuznetsov, A A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lehocka, S; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, Q; Li, Y; Lin, G; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, L; Liu, Q J; Liu, Z; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Lopez-Noriega, M; Love, W A; Lu, Y; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, G L; Ma, J G; Ma, Y G; Magestro, D; Mahajan, S; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Mangotra, L K; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Marx, J N; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McClain, C J; McShane, T S; Meissner, F; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A; Miller, M L; Minaev, N G; Mironov, C; Mischke, A; Mishra, D K; Mitchell, J; Mohanty, B; Molnar, L; Moore, C F; Morozov, D A; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nayak, S K; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Netrakanti, P K; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Pal, S K; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Peitzmann, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Phatak, S C; Picha, R; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potekhin, M; Potrebenikova, E; Potukuchi, B V K S; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Putschke, J; Rakness, G; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D; Reid, J G; Renault, G; Retiere, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L; Sahoo, R; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sarsour, M; Savin, I; Sazhin, P S; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schweda, K; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Shao, W; Sharma, M; Shen, W Q; Shestermanov, K E; Shimanskiy, S S; Sichtermann, E; Simon, F; Singaraju, R N; Skoro, G; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sood, G; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Speltz, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stadnik, A; Stanislaus, T D S; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Suaide, A A P; Sugarbaker, E; Suire, C; Sumbera, M; Surrow, B; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Szarwas, P; Tai, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tarnowsky, T; Thein, D; Thomas, J H; Timoshenko, S; Tokarev, M; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tsai, O D; Ulery, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Urkinbaev, A; Van Buren, G; van Leeuwen, M; Vander Molen, A M; Varma, R; Vasilevski, I M; Vasiliev, A N; Vernet, R; Vigdor, S E; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Voloshin, S A; Vznuzdaev, M; Waggoner, W T; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, G; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Wang, Y; Wang, Z M; Ward, H; Watson, J W; Webb, J C; Wells, R; Westfall, G D; Wetzler, A; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wood, J; Wu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Xu, Z Z; Yamamoto, E; Yepes, P; Yurevich, V I; Zanevsky, Y V; Zhang, H; Zhang, W M; Zhang, Z P; Zoulkarneev, R; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zubarev, A N

    2005-02-18

    Midrapidity open charm spectra from direct reconstruction of D0(D0)-->K-/+pi+/- in d+Au collisions and indirect electron-positron measurements via charm semileptonic decays in p+p and d+Au collisions at squareroot[sNN]=200 GeV are reported. The D0(D0) spectrum covers a transverse momentum (pT) range of 0.1d+Au collisions. From these two independent analyses, the differential cross section per nucleon-nucleon binary interaction at midrapidity for open charm production from d+Au collisions at BNL RHIC is dsigma(NN)cc/dy=0.30+/-0.04(stat)+/-0.09(syst) mb. The results are compared to theoretical calculations. Implications for charmonium results in A+A collisions are discussed. PMID:15783724

  12. Open Charm Yields in d+Au Collisions at sqrt(sNN) = 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, J.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, B.D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Badyal, S.K.; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bezverkhny, B.I.; Bharadwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A.K.; Bhatia, V.S.; Bichsel, H.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, C.O.; Bonner, B.E.; Botje, M.; Boucham, A.; Brandin, A.; Bravar, A.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, R.V.; Cai, X.Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la Barca Sanchez, M.; Castillo, J.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford, H.J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; De Moura, M.M.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Dogra, S.M.; Dong, W.J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J.E.; Du, F.; Dubey, A.K.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Dutta Mazumda, M.R.; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, W.R.; Efimov, L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fomenko, K.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Gaillard, L.; Gans, J.; Ganti, M.S.; Gaudichet, L.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J.F.; Grachov, O.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S.M.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gutierrez, T.D.; Hallman, T.J.; Hamed, A.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, J.W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T.W.; Heppelmann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Huang, H.Z.; Huang, S.L.; Hughes, E.W.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Ivanshin, Yu.I.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Janik, M.; Jiang, H.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Khodyrev, V.Yu.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, E.M.; Klay, J.; Klein, S.R.; Koetke, D.D.; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, S.M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V.I.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A.I.; Kumar, A.; et al.

    2005-01-07

    Mid-rapidity open charm spectra from direct reconstruction of D{sup 0}({bar D}{sup 0}) {yields} K{sup {-+}} {pi}{sup {+-}} in d+Au collisions and indirect electron/positron measurements via charm semileptonic decays in p+p and d+Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV are reported. The D{sup 0}({bar D}{sup 0}) spectrum covers a transverse momentum (p{sub T}) range of 0.1 < p{sub T} < 3 GeV/c whereas the electron spectra cover a range of 1 < p{sub T} < 4 GeV/c. The electron spectra show approximate binary collision scaling between p+p and d+Au collisions. From these two independent analyses, the differential cross section per nucleon-nucleon binary interaction at mid-rapidity for open charm production from d+Au collisions at RHIC is d{sigma}{sub c{bar c}}{sup NN}/dy = 0.30 {+-} 0.04 (stat.) {+-} 0.09(syst.) mb. The results are compared to theoretical calculations. Implications for charmonium results in A+A collisions are discussed.

  13. Rapidity densities of π±, K± and p (\\barp) in p+p and d+Au collisions at \\sqrt{s_NN} = 200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hongyan; BRAHMS Collaboration

    2008-10-01

    The study of p+p and d+Au collisions can help establish the size-dependent effects seen in Au+Au measurements. Rapidity densities of π±, K± and p (\\barp) are presented for p+p and d+Au collisions, with the centrality dependence of these densities explored for the d+Au collisions. The scaling of the rapidity density by the number of participants langNpartrang or number of proton participants involved in the collisions may reveal different physics at mid-rapidity and forward rapidities. The comparison of the rapidity densities of charged hadrons and net-protons in the central Au+Au collisions with smaller control systems such as p+p and d+Au will help us to understand the baryon transport in these systems. Rapidity densities of identified charged hadrons (π±, K± and p (\\barp) ) measured by the BRAHMS experiment in different systems are compared.

  14. Heavy-flavour production in high-energy d-Au and p-Pb collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beraudo, Andrea; De Pace, Arturo; Monteno, Marco; Nardi, Marzia; Prino, Francesco

    2016-03-01

    Soft-hadron measurements in high-energy collisions of small systems like p-Pb and d-Au show peculiar qualitative features (long-range rapidity correlations, flattening of the p T -spectra with increasing hadron mass and centrality, non-vanishing Fourier harmonics in the azimuthal particle distributions) suggestive of the formation of a strongly-interacting medium displaying a collective behaviour, with a hydrodynamic flow as a response to the pressure gradients in the initial conditions. Hard observables (high- p T jet and hadron spectra) on the other hand, within the current large systematic uncertainties, appear only midly modified with the respect to the benchmark case of minimum-bias p-p collisions. What should one expect for heavy-flavour particles, initially produced in hard processes but tending, in the nucleus-nucleus case, to approach kinetic equilibrium with the rest of the medium? This is the issue we address in the present study, showing how the current experimental findings are compatible with a picture in which the formation of a hot medium even in proton-nucleus collisions modifies the propagation and hadronization of heavy-flavour particles.

  15. Φ meson production in d+Au collisions at sNN=200GeV

    DOE PAGES

    Adare, A.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Alexander, J.; Alfred, M.; Angerami, A.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; et al

    2015-10-01

    The PHENIX Collaboration has measured Φ meson production in d+Au collisions at √sNN=200 GeV using the dimuon and dielectron decay channels. We measured the Φ meson in the forward (backward) d-going (Au-going) direction, 1.2T) range from 1–7 GeV/c and at midrapidity |y|<0.35 in the pT range below 7 GeV/c. The Φ meson invariant yields and nuclear-modification factors as a function of pT, rapidity, and centrality are reported. An enhancement of Φ meson production is observed in the Au-going direction, while suppression is seen in the d-going direction, and no modification is observed at midrapidity relative to the yield in p+pmore » collisions scaled by the number of binary collisions. We found similar behavior was previously observed for inclusive charged hadrons and open heavy flavor, indicating similar cold-nuclear-matter effects.« less

  16. IDENTIFIED PARTICLE TRANSVERSE MOMENTUM SPECTRA IN P+P AND D+AU COLLISIONS AT SNN=200 GEV.

    SciTech Connect

    NETRAKANTI, P.K.

    2005-10-24

    The transverse momentum (pT) spectra for identified charged pions, protons and anti-protons from p+p and d+Au collisions are measured around midrapidity (|y| < 0.5) over the range of 0.3 < p{sub T} < 10 GeV/c at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV. The charged pion and proton+anti-proton spectra at high p{sub T} in p+p collisions have been compared with the next-to-leading order perturbative quantum chromodynamic (NLO pQCD) calculations with a specific fragmentation scheme. The p/{pi}{sup +} and {bar p}/{pi}{sup -} has been studied at high p{sub T}. The nuclear modification factor (R{sub dAu}) shows that the identified particle Cronin effects around midrapidity are significantly non-zero for charged pions and to be even larger for protons at intermediate p{sub T} (2 < p{sub T} < 5 GeV/c).

  17. Spectra and ratios of identified particles in Au+Au and d+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Alexander, J.; Angerami, A.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Aramaki, Y.; Atomssa, E. T.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Barish, K. N.; Bassalleck, B.; Basye, A. T.; Bathe, S.; Baublis, V.; Baumann, C.; Bazilevsky, A.; Belikov, S.; Belmont, R.; Bennett, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Bhom, J. H.; Bickley, A. A.; Blau, D. S.; Bok, J. S.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Butsyk, S.; Camacho, C. M.; Campbell, S.; Caringi, A.; Chen, C.-H.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, P.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cole, B. A.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M.; Constantin, P.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Dahms, T.; Dairaku, S.; Danchev, I.; Das, K.; Datta, A.; David, G.; Dayananda, M. K.; Denisov, A.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dharmawardane, K. V.; Dietzsch, O.; Dion, A.; Donadelli, M.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Dutta, D.; D'Orazio, L.; Edwards, S.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Ellinghaus, F.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Fadem, B.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M., Jr.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Fraenkel, Z.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fujiwara, K.; Fukao, Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Garishvili, I.; Glenn, A.; Gong, H.; Gonin, M.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grim, G.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gunji, T.; Gustafsson, H.-Å.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamblen, J.; Han, R.; Hanks, J.; Hartouni, E. P.; Haslum, E.; Hayano, R.; He, X.; Heffner, M.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Hill, J. C.; Hohlmann, M.; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hornback, D.; Huang, S.; Ichihara, T.; Ichimiya, R.; Ide, J.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Inaba, M.; Isenhower, D.; Ishihara, M.; Isobe, T.; Issah, M.; Isupov, A.; Ivanischev, D.; Iwanaga, Y.; Jacak, B. V.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; Jin, J.; Johnson, B. M.; Jones, T.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kajihara, F.; Kametani, S.; Kamihara, N.; Kamin, J.; Kang, J. H.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kasai, M.; Kawall, D.; Kawashima, M.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kempel, T.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kijima, K. M.; Kikuchi, J.; Kim, A.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E.; Kim, E.-J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y.-J.; Kinney, E.; Kiriluk, K.; Kiss, Á.; Kistenev, E.; Kleinjan, D.; Kochenda, L.; Komkov, B.; Konno, M.; Koster, J.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kozlov, A.; Král, A.; Kravitz, A.; Kunde, G. J.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, J.; Lee, K.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Leitner, E.; Lenzi, B.; Li, X.; Lichtenwalner, P.; Liebing, P.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Liška, T.; Litvinenko, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, M. X.; Love, B.; Luechtenborg, R.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Malakhov, A.; Malik, M. D.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Mao, Y.; Masui, H.; Matathias, F.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; McGlinchey, D.; Means, N.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mibe, T.; Mignerey, A. C.; Mikeš, P.; Miki, K.; Milov, A.; Mishra, M.; Mitchell, J. T.; Mohanty, A. K.; Moon, H. J.; Morino, Y.; Morreale, A.; Morrison, D. P.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagle, J. L.; Naglis, M.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, K. R.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Nam, S.; Newby, J.; Nguyen, M.; Nihashi, M.; Nouicer, R.; Nyanin, A. S.; Oakley, C.; O'Brien, E.; Oda, S. X.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Oka, M.; Okada, K.; Onuki, Y.; Oskarsson, A.; Ouchida, M.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, I. H.; Park, J.; Park, S. K.; Park, W. J.; Pate, S. F.; Pei, H.; Peng, J.-C.; Pereira, H.; Peresedov, V.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Petti, R.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pisani, R. P.; Proissl, M.; Purschke, M. L.; Purwar, A. K.; Qu, H.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Rembeczki, S.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Roach, D.; Roche, G.; Rolnick, S. D.; Rosati, M.; Rosen, C. A.; Rosendahl, S. S. E.; Rosnet, P.; Rukoyatkin, P.; Ružička, P.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sakashita, K.; Samsonov, V.; Sano, S.; Sato, T.; Sawada, S.; Sedgwick, K.; Seele, J.; Seidl, R.; Semenov, A. Yu.; Seto, R.; Sharma, D.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Sim, K. S.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Slunečka, M.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Sparks, N. A.; Stankus, P. W.; Stenlund, E.; Stoll, S. P.; Sugitate, T.; Sukhanov, A.; Sziklai, J.; Takagui, E. M.; Taketani, A.; Tanabe, R.; Tanaka, Y.; Taneja, S.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Tarján, P.; Themann, H.; Thomas, D.; Thomas, T. L.; Togawa, M.; Toia, A.; Tomášek, L.; Torii, H.; Towell, R. S.; Tserruya, I.; Tsuchimoto, Y.; Vale, C.; Valle, H.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vazquez-Zambrano, E.; Veicht, A.; Velkovska, J.; Vértesi, R.; Vinogradov, A. A.; Virius, M.; Vrba, V.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Wei, F.; Wei, R.; Wessels, J.; White, S. N.; Winter, D.; Wood, J. P.; Woody, C. L.; Wright, R. M.; Wysocki, M.; Xie, W.; Yamaguchi, Y. L.; Yamaura, K.; Yang, R.; Yanovich, A.; Ying, J.; Yokkaichi, S.; You, Z.; Young, G. R.; Younus, I.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zhang, C.; Zhou, S.; Zolin, L.

    2013-08-01

    The transverse momentum (pT) spectra and ratios of identified charged hadrons (π±, K±, p, p¯) produced in sNN=200 GeV Au+Au and d+Au collisions are reported in five different centrality classes for each collision species. The measurements of pions and protons are reported up to pT=6 GeV/c (5 GeV/c), and the measurements of kaons are reported up to pT=4 GeV/c (3.5 GeV/c) in Au+Au (d+Au) collisions. In the intermediate pT region, between 2 and 5 GeV/c, a significant enhancement of baryon-to-meson ratios compared to those measured in p+p collisions is observed. This enhancement is present in both Au+Au and d+Au collisions and increases as the collisions become more central. We compare a class of peripheral Au+Au collisions with a class of central d+Au collisions which have a comparable number of participating nucleons and binary nucleon-nucleon collisions. The pT-dependent particle ratios for these classes display a remarkable similarity, which is then discussed.

  18. Antiparticle to particle production ratios in hadron-hadron and d-Au collisions in the DPMJET-III Monte Carlo model

    SciTech Connect

    Bopp, F. W.; Ranft, J.; Engel, R.; Roesler, S.

    2008-01-15

    To understand baryon stopping we analyze new Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and Fermilab data within the framework of the multichain Monte Carlo DPMJET-III. The present consideration is restricted to hadron-hadron and d-Au collisions, where the present version of the model can be trusted.

  19. Comparison of RapiTest with Emit d.a.u. and GC-MS for the analysis of drugs in urine.

    PubMed

    Korte, T; Pykäläinen, J; Lillsunde, P; Seppälä, T

    1997-01-01

    Results obtained with RapiTest THC (One Step delta 9-Tetrahydrocannabinol Test), RapiTest MOP (One Step Morphine Test), RapiTest MET (One Step Methamphetamine Test), and RapiTest COC (One Step Cocaine Test) were compared with the results obtained with Emit d.a.u. and with gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric (GC-MS) methods. In all, 81 urine samples taken from specimens submitted for routine analysis in the Laboratory of Pharmacology and Toxicology were analyzed. Samples were screened with Emit, reanalyzed by RapiTests, and quantitated using GC-MS methods. Both positive and negative urine samples were tested. The results obtained with RapiTests correlated well with the Emit d.a.u. and GC-MS data when operating above the cutoff concentrations specified for these methods. RapiTest MOP was found to have crossreactivity with codeine and ethylmorphine, and RapiTest MET crossreacted with amphetamine.

  20. Absence of suppression in particle production at large transverse momentum in sqrt[s(NN)]=200 GeV d+Au collisions.

    PubMed

    Adler, S S; Afanasiev, S; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Al-Jamel, A; Alexander, J; Aoki, K; Aphecetche, L; Armendariz, R; Aronson, S H; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Babintsev, V; Baldisseri, A; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Bassalleck, B; Bathe, S; Batsouli, S; Baublis, V; Bauer, F; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Bjorndal, M T; Boissevain, J G; Borel, H; Brooks, M L; Brown, D S; Bruner, N; Bucher, D; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Burward-Hoy, J M; Butsyk, S; Camard, X; Chand, P; Chang, W C; Chernichenko, S; Chi, C Y; Chiba, J; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choudhury, R K; Chujo, T; Cianciolo, V; Cobigo, Y; Cole, B A; Comets, M P; Constantin, P; Csanád, M; Csörgo, T; Cussonneau, J P; d'Enterria, D; Das, K; David, G; Deák, F; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Devismes, A; Dietzsch, O; Drachenberg, J L; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Dzhordzhadze, V; Efremenko, Y V; En'yo, H; Espagnon, B; Esumi, S; Fields, D E; Finck, C; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fox, B D; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fukao, Y; Fung, S-Y; Gadrat, S; Germain, M; Glenn, A; Gonin, M; Gosset, J; Goto, Y; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Grosse Perdekamp, M; Gustafsson, H-A; Hachiya, T; Haggerty, J S; Hamagaki, H; Hansen, A G; Hartouni, E P; Harvey, M; Hasuko, K; Hayano, R; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Heuser, J M; Hidas, P; Hiejima, H; Hill, J C; Hobbs, R; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Hoover, A; Horaguchi, T; Ichihara, T; Ikonnikov, V V; Imai, K; Inuzuka, M; Isenhower, D; Isenhower, L; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Jacak, B V; Jia, J; Jinnouchi, O; Johnson, B M; Johnson, S C; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Kajihara, F; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kaneta, M; Kang, J H; Katou, K; Kawabata, T; Kazantsev, A; Kelly, S; Khachaturov, B; Khanzadeev, A; Kikuchi, J; Kim, D J; Kim, E; Kim, G-B; Kim, H J; Kinney, E; Kiss, A; Kistenev, E; Kiyomichi, A; Klein-Boesing, C; Kobayashi, H; Kochetkov, V; Kohara, R; Komkov, B; Konno, M; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Kroon, P J; Kuberg, C H; Kunde, G J; Kurita, K; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lajoie, J G; Le Bornec, Y; Lebedev, A; Leckey, S; Lee, D M; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Li, X; Li, X H; Lim, H; Litvinenko, A; Liu, M X; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malakhov, A; Manko, V I; Mao, Y; Martinez, G; Masui, H; Matathias, F; Matsumoto, T; McCain, M C; McGaughey, P L; Miake, Y; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mishra, G C; Mitchell, J T; Mohanty, A K; Morrison, D P; Moss, J M; Mukhopadhyay, D; Muniruzzaman, M; Nagamiya, S; Nagle, J L; Nakamura, T; Newby, J; Nyanin, A S; Nystrand, J; O'Brien, E; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Ojha, I D; Okada, H; Okada, K; Oskarsson, A; Otterlund, I; Oyama, K; Ozawa, K; Pal, D; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, J; Park, W J; Pate, S F; Pei, H; Penev, V; Peng, J-C; Pereira, H; Peresedov, V; Pierson, A; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Qualls, J; Rak, J; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Reuter, M; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Roche, G; Romana, A; Rosati, M; Rosendahl, S; Rosnet, P; Rykov, V L; Ryu, S S; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakai, S; Samsonov, V; Sanfratello, L; Santo, R; Sato, H D; Sato, S; Sawada, S; Schutz, Y; Semenov, V; Seto, R; Shea, T K; Shein, I; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shimomura, M; Sickles, A; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Sim, K S; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S; Sourikova, I V; Staley, F; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stepanov, M; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Sullivan, J P; Takagi, S; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tanaka, K H; Tanaka, Y; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Taranenko, A; Tarján, P; Thomas, T L; Togawa, M; Tojo, J; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tram, V-N; Tserruya, I; Tsuchimoto, Y; Tydesjö, H; Tyurin, N; Uam, T J; van Hecke, H W; Velkovska, J; Velkovsky, M; Veszprémi, V; Vinogradov, A A; Volkov, M A; Vznuzdaev, E; Wang, X R; Watanabe, Y; White, S N; Willis, N; Wohn, F K; Woody, C L; Xie, W; Yanovich, A; Yokkaichi, S; Young, G R; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zhang, C; Zhou, S; Zimányi, J; Zolin, L; Zong, X

    2003-08-15

    Transverse momentum spectra of charged hadrons with p(T)<8 GeV/c and neutral pions with p(T)<10 GeV/c have been measured at midrapidity by the PHENIX experiment at BNL RHIC in d+Au collisions at sqrt[s(NN)]=200 GeV. The measured yields are compared to those in p+p collisions at the same sqrt[s(NN)] scaled up by the number of underlying nucleon-nucleon collisions in d+Au. The yield ratio does not show the suppression observed in central Au+Au collisions at RHIC. Instead, there is a small enhancement in the yield of high momentum particles.

  1. Nuclear modification of ψ', χc, and J/ψ production in d+Au collisions at sqrt[s(NN)]=200  GeV.

    PubMed

    Adare, A; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Al-Bataineh, H; Alexander, J; Angerami, A; Aoki, K; Apadula, N; Aramaki, Y; Atomssa, E T; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, B; Babintsev, V; Bai, M; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Barish, K N; Bassalleck, B; Basye, A T; Bathe, S; Baublis, V; Baumann, C; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Belmont, R; Bennett, R; Bhom, J H; Blau, D S; Bok, J S; Boyle, K; Brooks, M L; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Butsyk, S; Campbell, S; Caringi, A; Chen, C-H; Chi, C Y; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choi, J B; Choudhury, R K; Christiansen, P; Chujo, T; Chung, P; Chvala, O; Cianciolo, V; Citron, Z; Cole, B A; Conesa del Valle, Z; Connors, M; Csanád, M; Csörgő, T; Dahms, T; Dairaku, S; Danchev, I; Das, K; Datta, A; David, G; Dayananda, M K; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dharmawardane, K V; Dietzsch, O; Dion, A; Donadelli, M; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Drees, K A; Durham, J M; Durum, A; Dutta, D; D'Orazio, L; Edwards, S; Efremenko, Y V; Ellinghaus, F; Engelmore, T; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Fadem, B; Fields, D E; Finger, M; Finger, M; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fujiwara, K; Fukao, Y; Fusayasu, T; Garishvili, I; Glenn, A; Gong, H; Gonin, M; Goto, Y; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Grim, G; Grosse Perdekamp, M; Gunji, T; Gustafsson, H-Å; Haggerty, J S; Hahn, K I; Hamagaki, H; Hamblen, J; Han, R; Hanks, J; Haslum, E; Hayano, R; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Hester, T; Hill, J C; Hohlmann, M; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Horaguchi, T; Hornback, D; Huang, S; Ichihara, T; Ichimiya, R; Ikeda, Y; Imai, K; Inaba, M; Isenhower, D; Ishihara, M; Issah, M; Ivanischev, D; Iwanaga, Y; Jacak, B V; Jia, J; Jiang, X; Jin, J; Johnson, B M; Jones, T; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Jumper, D S; Kajihara, F; Kamin, J; Kang, J H; Kapustinsky, J; Karatsu, K; Kasai, M; Kawall, D; Kawashima, M; Kazantsev, A V; Kempel, T; Khanzadeev, A; Kijima, K M; Kikuchi, J; Kim, A; Kim, B I; Kim, D J; Kim, E-J; Kim, Y-J; Kinney, E; Kiss, Á; Kistenev, E; Kleinjan, D; Kochenda, L; Komkov, B; Konno, M; Koster, J; Král, A; Kravitz, A; Kunde, G J; Kurita, K; Kurosawa, M; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lai, Y S; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Lee, D M; Lee, J; Lee, K B; Lee, K S; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Li, X; Lichtenwalner, P; Liebing, P; Linden Levy, L A; Liška, T; Liu, H; Liu, M X; Love, B; Lynch, D; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malik, M D; Manko, V I; Mannel, E; Mao, Y; Masui, H; Matathias, F; McCumber, M; McGaughey, P L; McGlinchey, D; Means, N; Meredith, B; Miake, Y; Mibe, T; Mignerey, A C; Miki, K; Milov, A; Mitchell, J T; Mohanty, A K; Moon, H J; Morino, Y; Morreale, A; Morrison, D P; Moukhanova, T V; Murakami, T; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagle, J L; Naglis, M; Nagy, M I; Nakagawa, I; Nakamiya, Y; Nakamura, K R; Nakamura, T; Nakano, K; Nam, S; Newby, J; Nguyen, M; Nihashi, M; Nouicer, R; Nyanin, A S; Oakley, C; O'Brien, E; Oda, S X; Ogilvie, C A; Oka, M; Okada, K; Onuki, Y; Oskarsson, A; Ouchida, M; Ozawa, K; Pak, R; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, I H; Park, S K; Park, W J; Pate, S F; Pei, H; Peng, J-C; Pereira, H; Perepelitsa, D; Peressounko, D Yu; Petti, R; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Proissl, M; Purschke, M L; Qu, H; Rak, J; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Rembeczki, S; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Richardson, E; Roach, D; Roche, G; Rolnick, S D; Rosati, M; Rosen, C A; Rosendahl, S S E; Ružička, P; Sahlmueller, B; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakashita, K; Samsonov, V; Sano, S; Sato, T; Sawada, S; Sedgwick, K; Seele, J; Seidl, R; Seto, R; Sharma, D; Shein, I; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shimomura, M; Shoji, K; Shukla, P; Sickles, A; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Silvestre, C; Sim, K S; Singh, B K; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Slunečka, M; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Sukhanov, A; Sziklai, J; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tanabe, R; Tanaka, Y; Taneja, S; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Tarafdar, S; Taranenko, A; Themann, H; Thomas, D; Thomas, T L; Togawa, M; Toia, A; Tomášek, L; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tserruya, I; Tsuchimoto, Y; Vale, C; Valle, H; van Hecke, H W; Vazquez-Zambrano, E; Veicht, A; Velkovska, J; Vértesi, R; Virius, M; Vrba, V; Vznuzdaev, E; Wang, X R; Watanabe, D; Watanabe, K; Watanabe, Y; Wei, F; Wei, R; Wessels, J; White, S N; Winter, D; Woody, C L; Wright, R M; Wysocki, M; Yamaguchi, Y L; Yamaura, K; Yang, R; Yanovich, A; Ying, J; Yokkaichi, S; You, Z; Young, G R; Younus, I; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zhou, S

    2013-11-15

    We present results for three charmonia states (ψ', χc, and J/ψ) in d+Au collisions at |y|<0.35 and sqrt[s(NN)]=200  GeV. We find that the modification of the ψ' yield relative to that of the J/ψ scales approximately with charged particle multiplicity at midrapidity across p+A, d+Au, and A+A results from the Super Proton Synchrotron and the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. In large-impact-parameter collisions we observe a similar suppression for the ψ' and J/ψ, while in small-impact-parameter collisions the more weakly bound ψ' is more strongly suppressed. Owing to the short time spent traversing the Au nucleus, the larger ψ' suppression in central events is not explained by an increase of the nuclear absorption owing to meson formation time effects.

  2. Nuclear Modification of ψ', χc, and J/ψ Production in d+Au Collisions at sNN=200GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adare, A.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Alexander, J.; Angerami, A.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Aramaki, Y.; Atomssa, E. T.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Barish, K. N.; Bassalleck, B.; Basye, A. T.; Bathe, S.; Baublis, V.; Baumann, C.; Bazilevsky, A.; Belikov, S.; Belmont, R.; Bennett, R.; Bhom, J. H.; Blau, D. S.; Bok, J. S.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Butsyk, S.; Campbell, S.; Caringi, A.; Chen, C.-H.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, P.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cole, B. A.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Dahms, T.; Dairaku, S.; Danchev, I.; Das, K.; Datta, A.; David, G.; Dayananda, M. K.; Denisov, A.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dharmawardane, K. V.; Dietzsch, O.; Dion, A.; Donadelli, M.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Dutta, D.; D'Orazio, L.; Edwards, S.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Ellinghaus, F.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Fadem, B.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M., Jr.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Fraenkel, Z.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fujiwara, K.; Fukao, Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Garishvili, I.; Glenn, A.; Gong, H.; Gonin, M.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grim, G.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gunji, T.; Gustafsson, H.-Å.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamblen, J.; Han, R.; Hanks, J.; Haslum, E.; Hayano, R.; He, X.; Heffner, M.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Hill, J. C.; Hohlmann, M.; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hornback, D.; Huang, S.; Ichihara, T.; Ichimiya, R.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Inaba, M.; Isenhower, D.; Ishihara, M.; Issah, M.; Ivanischev, D.; Iwanaga, Y.; Jacak, B. V.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; Jin, J.; Johnson, B. M.; Jones, T.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kajihara, F.; Kamin, J.; Kang, J. H.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kasai, M.; Kawall, D.; Kawashima, M.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kempel, T.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kijima, K. M.; Kikuchi, J.; Kim, A.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E.-J.; Kim, Y.-J.; Kinney, E.; Kiss, Á.; Kistenev, E.; Kleinjan, D.; Kochenda, L.; Komkov, B.; Konno, M.; Koster, J.; Král, A.; Kravitz, A.; Kunde, G. J.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, J.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Li, X.; Lichtenwalner, P.; Liebing, P.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Liška, T.; Liu, H.; Liu, M. X.; Love, B.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Malik, M. D.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Mao, Y.; Masui, H.; Matathias, F.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; McGlinchey, D.; Means, N.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mibe, T.; Mignerey, A. C.; Miki, K.; Milov, A.; Mitchell, J. T.; Mohanty, A. K.; Moon, H. J.; Morino, Y.; Morreale, A.; Morrison, D. P.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagle, J. L.; Naglis, M.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, K. R.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Nam, S.; Newby, J.; Nguyen, M.; Nihashi, M.; Nouicer, R.; Nyanin, A. S.; Oakley, C.; O'Brien, E.; Oda, S. X.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Oka, M.; Okada, K.; Onuki, Y.; Oskarsson, A.; Ouchida, M.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, I. H.; Park, S. K.; Park, W. J.; Pate, S. F.; Pei, H.; Peng, J.-C.; Pereira, H.; Perepelitsa, D.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Petti, R.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pisani, R. P.; Proissl, M.; Purschke, M. L.; Qu, H.; Rak, J.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Rembeczki, S.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Roach, D.; Roche, G.; Rolnick, S. D.; Rosati, M.; Rosen, C. A.; Rosendahl, S. S. E.; Ružička, P.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sakashita, K.; Samsonov, V.; Sano, S.; Sato, T.; Sawada, S.; Sedgwick, K.; Seele, J.; Seidl, R.; Seto, R.; Sharma, D.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Sim, K. S.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Slunečka, M.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Stankus, P. W.; Stenlund, E.; Stoll, S. P.; Sugitate, T.; Sukhanov, A.; Sziklai, J.; Takagui, E. M.; Taketani, A.; Tanabe, R.; Tanaka, Y.; Taneja, S.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Themann, H.; Thomas, D.; Thomas, T. L.; Togawa, M.; Toia, A.; Tomášek, L.; Torii, H.; Towell, R. S.; Tserruya, I.; Tsuchimoto, Y.; Vale, C.; Valle, H.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vazquez-Zambrano, E.; Veicht, A.; Velkovska, J.; Vértesi, R.; Virius, M.; Vrba, V.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Wei, F.; Wei, R.; Wessels, J.; White, S. N.; Winter, D.; Woody, C. L.; Wright, R. M.; Wysocki, M.; Yamaguchi, Y. L.; Yamaura, K.; Yang, R.; Yanovich, A.; Ying, J.; Yokkaichi, S.; You, Z.; Young, G. R.; Younus, I.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zhou, S.

    2013-11-01

    We present results for three charmonia states (ψ', χc, and J/ψ) in d+Au collisions at |y|<0.35 and sNN=200GeV. We find that the modification of the ψ' yield relative to that of the J/ψ scales approximately with charged particle multiplicity at midrapidity across p+A, d+Au, and A+A results from the Super Proton Synchrotron and the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. In large-impact-parameter collisions we observe a similar suppression for the ψ' and J/ψ, while in small-impact-parameter collisions the more weakly bound ψ' is more strongly suppressed. Owing to the short time spent traversing the Au nucleus, the larger ψ' suppression in central events is not explained by an increase of the nuclear absorption owing to meson formation time effects.

  3. Evidence from d+Au measurements for final-state suppression of high-p(T) hadrons in Au+Au collisions at RHIC.

    PubMed

    Adams, J; Adler, C; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Anderson, M; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Badyal, S K; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellwied, R; Berger, J; Bezverkhny, B I; Bhardwaj, S; Bhaskar, P; Bhati, A K; Bichsel, H; Billmeier, A; Bland, L C; Blyth, C O; Bonner, B E; Botje, M; Boucham, A; Brandin, A; Bravar, A; Cadman, R V; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Carroll, J; Castillo, J; Castro, M; Cebra, D; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, Y; Chernenko, S P; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, B; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Das, S; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Dong, X; Draper, J E; Du, F; Dubey, A K; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Dutta Majumdar, M R; Eckardt, V; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Fachini, P; Faine, V; Faivre, J; Fatemi, R; Filimonov, K; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flierl, D; Foley, K J; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Ganti, M S; Gagunashvili, N; Gans, J; Gaudichet, L; Germain, M; Geurts, F; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; Gonzalez, J E; Grachov, O; Grigoriev, V; Gronstal, S; Grosnick, D; Guedon, M; Guertin, S M; Gupta, A; Gushin, E; Gutierrez, T D; Hallman, T J; Hardtke, D; Harris, J W; Heinz, M; Henry, T W; Heppelmann, S; Herston, T; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Horsley, M; Huang, H Z; Huang, S L; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Ishihara, A; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Janik, M; Johnson, I; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kaneta, M; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Klay, J; Klein, S R; Klyachko, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Konstantinov, A S; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kovalenko, A D; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kumar, A; Kunde, G J; Kunz, C L; Kutuev, R Kh; Kuznetsov, A A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lansdell, C P; Lasiuk, B; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednický, R; Leontiev, V M; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, Q; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, L; Liu, Z; Liu, Q J; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Lopez-Noriega, M; Love, W A; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, J; Ma, Y G; Magestro, D; Mahajan, S; Mangotra, L K; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Marx, J; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McShane, T S; Meissner, F; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A; Messer, M; Miller, M L; Milosevich, Z; Minaev, N G; Mironov, C; Mishra, D; Mitchell, J; Mohanty, B; Molnar, L; Moore, C F; Mora-Corral, M J; Morozov, V; de Moura, M M; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nayak, S K; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nevski, P; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Norman, B; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Paic, G; Pandey, S U; Pal, S K; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Phatak, S C; Picha, R; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potekhin, M; Potrebenikova, E; Potukuchi, B V K S; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Putschke, J; Rai, G; Rakness, G; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D; Reid, J G; Renault, G; Retiere, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevski, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L J; Rykov, V; Sahoo, R; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Savin, I; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schroeder, L S; Schweda, K; Seger, J; Seliverstov, D; Seyboth, P; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Sharma, M; Shestermanov, K E; Shimanskii, S S; Singaraju, R N; Simon, F; Skoro, G; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sood, G; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, S; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Struck, C; Suaide, A A P; Sugarbaker, E; Suire, C; Sumbera, M; Surrow, B; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Szarwas, P; Tai, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Thein, D; Thomas, J H; Tikhomirov, V; Tokarev, M; Tonjes, M B; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Trivedi, M D; Trofimov, V; Tsai, O; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; VanderMolen, A M; Vasiliev, A N; Vasiliev, M; Vigdor, S E; Viyogi, Y P; Voloshin, S A; Waggoner, W; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Ward, H; Watson, J W; Wells, R; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Willson, R; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wood, J; Wu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Xu, Z Z; Yakutin, A E; Yamamoto, E; Yang, J; Yepes, P; Yurevich, V I; Zanevski, Y V; Zborovský, I; Zhang, H; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, W M; Zhang, Z P; Zołnierczuk, P A; Zoulkarneev, R; Zoulkarneeva, J; Zubarev, A N

    2003-08-15

    We report measurements of single-particle inclusive spectra and two-particle azimuthal distributions of charged hadrons at high transverse momentum (high p(T)) in minimum bias and central d+Au collisions at sqrt[s(NN)]=200 GeV. The inclusive yield is enhanced in d+Au collisions relative to binary-scaled p+p collisions, while the two-particle azimuthal distributions are very similar to those observed in p+p collisions. These results demonstrate that the strong suppression of the inclusive yield and back-to-back correlations at high p(T) previously observed in central Au+Au collisions are due to final-state interactions with the dense medium generated in such collisions. PMID:12935009

  4. Pseudorapidity Asymmetry and Centrality Dependence of Charged Hadron Spectra in d+Au collisions at sqrt(sNN) = 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, J.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, B.D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Badyal, S.K.; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bezverkhny, B.I.; Bharadwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A.K.; Bhatia, V.S.; Bichsel, H.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, C.O.; Bonner, B.E.; Botje, M.; Boucham, A.; Brandin, A.V.; Bravar, A.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, R.V.; Cai, X.Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la Barca Sanchez, M.; Castillo, J.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford, H.J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; de Moura, M.M.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Dogra, S.M.; Dong, W.J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J.E.; Du, F.; Dubey, A.K.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Dutta Mazumdar, M.R.; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, W.R.; Efimov, L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fomenko, K.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Gaillard, L.; Gans, J.; Ganti, M.S.; Gaudichet, L.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J.E.; Grachov, O.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S.M.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gutierrez, T.D.; Hallman, T.J.; Hamed, A.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, J.W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T.W.; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Huang, H.Z.; Huang, S.L.; Hughes, E.W.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Janik, M.; Jiang, H.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Khodyrev, V.Yu.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, E.M.; Klay, J.; Klein, S.R.; Koetke, D.D.; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V.I.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A.I.; Kumar, A.; Kutuev, R.Kh.; et al.

    2005-01-12

    The pseudorapidity asymmetry and centrality dependence of charged hadron spectra in d+Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV are presented. The charged particle density at mid-rapidity, its pseudorapidity asymmetry and centrality dependence are reasonably reproduced by a Multi-Phase Transport model, by HIJING, and by the latest calculations in a saturation model. Ratios of transverse momentum spectra between backward and forward pseudorapidity are above unity for p{sub T} below 5 GeV/c. The ratio of central to peripheral spectra in d+Au collisions shows enhancement at 2 < p{sub T} < 6 GeV/c, with a larger effect at backward rapidity than forward rapidity. Our measurements are in qualitative agreement with gluon saturation and in contrast to calculations based on incoherent multiple partonic scatterings.

  5. Forward {Lambda} production and nuclear stopping power in d+Au collisions at {radical}{ovr s}{sub NN} =200 GeV.

    SciTech Connect

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Krueger, K.; Spinka, H. M.; Underwood, D. G.; STAR Collaboration; High Energy Physics; Univ. of Illinois; Panjab Univ.; Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre; Kent State Univ.; Particle Physic Lab.

    2007-01-01

    We report the measurement of {Lambda} and {bar {Lambda}} and yields and inverse slope parameters in d+Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV at forward and backward rapidities (y = {+-} 2.75), using data from the STAR forward time projection chambers. The contributions of different processes to baryon transport and particle production are probed exploiting the inherent asymmetry of the d+Au system. Comparisons to model calculations show that baryon transport on the deuteron side is consistent with multiple collisions of the deuteron nucleons with gold participants. On the gold side, HIJING-based models without a hadronic rescattering phase do not describe the measured particle yields, while models that include target remnants or hadronic rescattering do. The multichain model can provide a good description of the net baryon density in d+Au collisions at energies currently available at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, and the derived parameters of the model agree with those from nuclear collisions at lower energies.

  6. Hadronic resonance production in d+au collisions at {radical}{ovr s}{sub NN} =200 GeV measured at the BNL relativistic heavy ion collider.

    SciTech Connect

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Krueger, K.; Spinka, H. M.; Underwood, D. G.; STAR Collaboration; High Energy Physics; Univ. of Illinois; Panjab Univ.; Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre; Kent State Univ.; Particle Physic Lab.

    2008-01-01

    We present the first measurements of the {rho}(770){sup 0},K*(892), {Delta}(1232){sup ++}, {sigma}(1385), and {Lambda}(1520) resonances in d+Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV, reconstructed via their hadronic decay channels using the STAR detector (the solenoidal tracker at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider). The masses and widths of these resonances are studied as a function of transverse momentum p{sub T}. We observe that the resonance spectra follow a generalized scaling law with the transverse mass m{sub T}. The of resonances in minimum bias collisions are compared with the of {pi},K and {bar p}. The {rho}{sup 0}/{pi}{sup -}, K{sup +}/K{sup -}, {Delta}{sup ++}/p, {Sigma}(1385)/{Lambda}, and {Lambda}(1520)/{Lambda} ratios in d+Au collisions are compared with the measurements in minimum bias p+p interactions, where we observe that both measurements are comparable. The nuclear modification factors (R{sub dAu}) of the {rho}{sup 0},K{sup +}, and {Sigma}{sup +} scale with the number of binary collisions (N{sub bin}) for p{sub T} > 1.2 GeV/c.

  7. Pion, kaon, proton and anti-proton transverse momentum distributions from p+p and d+Au collisions at sqrt(sNN) = 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, J.; Adler, C.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, B.D.; Anderson, M; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Badyal, S.K.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bezverkhny, B.I.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhaskar, P.; Bhati, A.K.; Bichsel, H.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, C.O.; Bonner, B.E.; Botje, M.; Boucham, A.; Brandin, A.; Bravar, A.; Cadman, R.V.; Cai, X.Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la Barca Sanchez, M.; Carroll, J.; Castillo, J.; Castro, M.; Cebra, D.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, Y.; Chernenko, S.P.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, B.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford, H.J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Dong, X.; Draper, J.E.; Du, F.; Dubey, A.K.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Dutta Majumdar, M.R.; Eckardt, V.; Efimov, L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Faine, V.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flierl, D.; Foley, K.J.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Ganti, M.S.; Gutierrez, T.D.; Gagunashvili, N.; Gans, J.; Gaudichet, L.; Germain, M.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J.E.; Grachov, O.; Grigoriev, V.; Cronstal, S.; Grosnick, D.; Guedon, M.; Guertin, S.M.; Gupta, A.; Gushin, E.; Hallman, T.J.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, J.W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T.W.; Heppelmann, S.; Herston, T.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Horsley, M.; Huang, H.Z.; Huang, S.L.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Janik, M.; Johnson, I.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kaneta, M.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klay, J.; Klein, S.R.; Klyachko, A.; Koetke, D.D.; Kollegger, T.; Konstantinov, A.S.; Kopytine, S.M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kovalenko, A.D.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A.I.; Kumar, A.; et al.

    2003-09-16

    Identified mid-rapidity particle spectra of {pi}{sup {+-}}, K{sup {+-}}, and p({bar p}) from 200 GeV p+p and d+Au collisions are reported. A time-of-flight detector based on multi-gap resistive plate chamber technology is used for particle identification. The particle-species dependence of the Cronin effect is observed to be significantly smaller than that at lower energies. The ratio of the nuclear modification factor (R{sub dAu}) between (p+ {bar p}) and charged hadrons (h) in the transverse momentum range 1.2 < p{sub T} < 3.0 GeV/c is measured to be 1.19 {+-} 0.05(stat) {+-} 0.03(syst) in minimum-bias collisions and shows little centrality dependence. The yield ratio of (p + {bar p})/h in minimum-bias d+Au collisions is found to be a factor of 2 lower than that in Au+Au collisions, indicating that the Cronin effect alone is not enough to account for the relative baryon enhancement observed in heavy ion collisions at RHIC.

  8. Quadrupole anisotropy in dihadron azimuthal correlations in central d+Au collisions at √(s(NN))=200 GeV.

    PubMed

    Adare, A; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Al-Bataineh, H; Alexander, J; Angerami, A; Aoki, K; Apadula, N; Aramaki, Y; Atomssa, E T; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, B; Babintsev, V; Bai, M; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Barish, K N; Bassalleck, B; Basye, A T; Bathe, S; Baublis, V; Baumann, C; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Belmont, R; Bennett, R; Bhom, J H; Blau, D S; Bok, J S; Boyle, K; Brooks, M L; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Butsyk, S; Campbell, S; Caringi, A; Chen, C-H; Chi, C Y; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choi, J B; Choudhury, R K; Christiansen, P; Chujo, T; Chung, P; Chvala, O; Cianciolo, V; Citron, Z; Cole, B A; Conesa Del Valle, Z; Connors, M; Csanád, M; Csörgő, T; Dahms, T; Dairaku, S; Danchev, I; Das, K; Datta, A; David, G; Dayananda, M K; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dharmawardane, K V; Dietzsch, O; Dion, A; Donadelli, M; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Drees, K A; Durham, J M; Durum, A; Dutta, D; D'Orazio, L; Edwards, S; Efremenko, Y V; Ellinghaus, F; Engelmore, T; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Fadem, B; Fields, D E; Finger, M; Finger, M; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fujiwara, K; Fukao, Y; Fusayasu, T; Garishvili, I; Glenn, A; Gong, H; Gonin, M; Goto, Y; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Grim, G; Grosse Perdekamp, M; Gunji, T; Gustafsson, H-Å; Haggerty, J S; Hahn, K I; Hamagaki, H; Hamblen, J; Han, R; Hanks, J; Haslum, E; Hayano, R; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Hester, T; Hill, J C; Hohlmann, M; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Horaguchi, T; Hornback, D; Huang, S; Ichihara, T; Ichimiya, R; Ikeda, Y; Imai, K; Inaba, M; Isenhower, D; Ishihara, M; Issah, M; Ivanischev, D; Iwanaga, Y; Jacak, B V; Jia, J; Jiang, X; Jin, J; Johnson, B M; Jones, T; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Jumper, D S; Kajihara, F; Kamin, J; Kang, J H; Kapustinsky, J; Karatsu, K; Kasai, M; Kawall, D; Kawashima, M; Kazantsev, A V; Kempel, T; Khanzadeev, A; Kijima, K M; Kikuchi, J; Kim, A; Kim, B I; Kim, D J; Kim, E-J; Kim, Y-J; Kinney, E; Kiss, Á; Kistenev, E; Kleinjan, D; Kochenda, L; Komkov, B; Konno, M; Koster, J; Král, A; Kravitz, A; Kunde, G J; Kurita, K; Kurosawa, M; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lai, Y S; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Lee, D M; Lee, J; Lee, K B; Lee, K S; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Li, X; Lichtenwalner, P; Liebing, P; Linden Levy, L A; Liška, T; Liu, H; Liu, M X; Love, B; Lynch, D; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malik, M D; Manko, V I; Mannel, E; Mao, Y; Masui, H; Matathias, F; McCumber, M; McGaughey, P L; McGlinchey, D; Means, N; Meredith, B; Miake, Y; Mibe, T; Mignerey, A C; Miki, K; Milov, A; Mitchell, J T; Mohanty, A K; Moon, H J; Morino, Y; Morreale, A; Morrison, D P; Moukhanova, T V; Murakami, T; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagle, J L; Naglis, M; Nagy, M I; Nakagawa, I; Nakamiya, Y; Nakamura, K R; Nakamura, T; Nakano, K; Nam, S; Newby, J; Nguyen, M; Nihashi, M; Nouicer, R; Nyanin, A S; Oakley, C; O'Brien, E; Oda, S X; Ogilvie, C A; Oka, M; Okada, K; Onuki, Y; Oskarsson, A; Ouchida, M; Ozawa, K; Pak, R; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, I H; Park, S K; Park, W J; Pate, S F; Pei, H; Peng, J-C; Pereira, H; Perepelitsa, D; Peressounko, D Yu; Petti, R; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Proissl, M; Purschke, M L; Qu, H; Rak, J; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Rembeczki, S; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Richardson, E; Roach, D; Roche, G; Rolnick, S D; Rosati, M; Rosen, C A; Rosendahl, S S E; Ružička, P; Sahlmueller, B; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakashita, K; Samsonov, V; Sano, S; Sato, T; Sawada, S; Sedgwick, K; Seele, J; Seidl, R; Seto, R; Sharma, D; Shein, I; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shimomura, M; Shoji, K; Shukla, P; Sickles, A; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Silvestre, C; Sim, K S; Singh, B K; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Slunečka, M; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Sukhanov, A; Sziklai, J; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tanabe, R; Tanaka, Y; Taneja, S; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Tarafdar, S; Taranenko, A; Themann, H; Thomas, D; Thomas, T L; Togawa, M; Toia, A; Tomášek, L; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tserruya, I; Tsuchimoto, Y; Vale, C; Valle, H; van Hecke, H W; Vazquez-Zambrano, E; Veicht, A; Velkovska, J; Vértesi, R; Virius, M; Vrba, V; Vznuzdaev, E; Wang, X R; Watanabe, D; Watanabe, K; Watanabe, Y; Wei, F; Wei, R; Wessels, J; White, S N; Winter, D; Woody, C L; Wright, R M; Wysocki, M; Yamaguchi, Y L; Yamaura, K; Yang, R; Yanovich, A; Ying, J; Yokkaichi, S; You, Z; Young, G R; Younus, I; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zhou, S

    2013-11-22

    The PHENIX collaboration at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) reports measurements of azimuthal dihadron correlations near midrapidity in d+Au collisions at √(s(NN))=200 GeV. These measurements complement recent analyses by experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) involving central p+Pb collisions at √(s(NN))=5.02 TeV, which have indicated strong anisotropic long-range correlations in angular distributions of hadron pairs. The origin of these anisotropies is currently unknown. Various competing explanations include parton saturation and hydrodynamic flow. We observe qualitatively similar, but larger, anisotropies in d+Au collisions at RHIC compared to those seen in p+Pb collisions at the LHC. The larger extracted v2 values in d+Au are consistent with expectations from hydrodynamic calculations owing to the larger expected initial-state eccentricity compared with that from p+Pb collisions. When both are divided by an estimate of the initial-state eccentricity the scaled anisotropies follow a common trend with multiplicity that may extend to heavy ion data at RHIC and the LHC, where the anisotropies are widely thought to arise from hydrodynamic flow.

  9. Measurement of long-range angular correlation and quadrupole anisotropy of pions and (anti)protons in central d+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV

    DOE PAGES

    Adare, A.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akimoto, R.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Al-Ta’ani, H.; Alexander, J.; Andrews, K. R.; Angerami, A.; et al

    2015-05-12

    In this study, we present azimuthal angular correlations between charged hadrons and energy deposited in calorimeter towers in central d+Au and aluminum bias p+p collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV. The charged hadron is measured at midrapidity lηl < 0.35, and the energy us measured at large rapidity (–3.7 < η < –3.1, Au-going direction). An enhanced near-side angular correlation across lΔηl > 2.75 is observed in d+Au collisions. Using the event plane method applied to the Au-going energy distribution, we extract the anisotropy strength v₂ for inclusive charged hadrons at midrapidity up to pT = 4.5 GeV/c. We alsomore » present the measurement of v₂ for identified π± and (anti)protons in central d+Au collisions, and observe a mass-ordering pattern similar to that seen in heavy ion collisions. These results are compared with viscous hydrodynamic calculations and measurements from p+Pb at √sNN = 5.02 TeV. The magnitude of the mass-ordering in d+Au is found to be smaller than that in p+Pb collisions, which may indicate smaller radial flow in lower energy d+Au collisions.« less

  10. Measurement of Long-Range Angular Correlation and Quadrupole Anisotropy of Pions and (Anti)Protons in Central d+Au Collisions at sqrt[s_{NN}]=200 GeV.

    PubMed

    Adare, A; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Akimoto, R; Al-Bataineh, H; Al-Ta'ani, H; Alexander, J; Andrews, K R; Angerami, A; Aoki, K; Apadula, N; Appelt, E; Aramaki, Y; Armendariz, R; Aschenauer, E C; Atomssa, E T; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, B; Babintsev, V; Bai, M; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Bannier, B; Barish, K N; Bassalleck, B; Basye, A T; Bathe, S; Baublis, V; Baumann, C; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Belmont, R; Ben-Benjamin, J; Bennett, R; Bhom, J H; Blau, D S; Bok, J S; Boyle, K; Brooks, M L; Broxmeyer, D; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Butsyk, S; Campbell, S; Caringi, A; Castera, P; Chen, C-H; Chi, C Y; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choi, J B; Choudhury, R K; Christiansen, P; Chujo, T; Chung, P; Chvala, O; Cianciolo, V; Citron, Z; Cole, B A; Conesa Del Valle, Z; Connors, M; Csanád, M; Csörgő, T; Dahms, T; Dairaku, S; Danchev, I; Das, K; Datta, A; David, G; Dayananda, M K; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dharmawardane, K V; Dietzsch, O; Dion, A; Donadelli, M; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Drees, K A; Durham, J M; Durum, A; Dutta, D; D'Orazio, L; Edwards, S; Efremenko, Y V; Ellinghaus, F; Engelmore, T; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Fadem, B; Fields, D E; Finger, M; Finger, M; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fujiwara, K; Fukao, Y; Fusayasu, T; Gal, C; Garishvili, I; Glenn, A; Gong, H; Gong, X; Gonin, M; Goto, Y; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Grim, G; Grosse Perdekamp, M; Gunji, T; Guo, L; Gustafsson, H-Å; Haggerty, J S; Hahn, K I; Hamagaki, H; Hamblen, J; Han, R; Hanks, J; Harper, C; Hashimoto, K; Haslum, E; Hayano, R; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Hester, T; Hill, J C; Hohlmann, M; Hollis, R S; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Horaguchi, T; Hori, Y; Hornback, D; Huang, S; Ichihara, T; Ichimiya, R; Iinuma, H; Ikeda, Y; Imai, K; Inaba, M; Iordanova, A; Isenhower, D; Ishihara, M; Issah, M; Ivanischev, D; Iwanaga, Y; Jacak, B V; Jia, J; Jiang, X; Jin, J; John, D; Johnson, B M; Jones, T; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Jumper, D S; Kajihara, F; Kamin, J; Kaneti, S; Kang, B H; Kang, J H; Kang, J S; Kapustinsky, J; Karatsu, K; Kasai, M; Kawall, D; Kawashima, M; Kazantsev, A V; Kempel, T; Khanzadeev, A; Kijima, K M; Kikuchi, J; Kim, A; Kim, B I; Kim, D J; Kim, E-J; Kim, Y-J; Kim, Y K; Kinney, E; Kiss, Á; Kistenev, E; Kleinjan, D; Kline, P; Kochenda, L; Komkov, B; Konno, M; Koster, J; Kotov, D; Král, A; Kravitz, A; Kunde, G J; Kurita, K; Kurosawa, M; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lai, Y S; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Lee, D M; Lee, J; Lee, K B; Lee, K S; Lee, S H; Lee, S R; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Li, X; Lichtenwalner, P; Liebing, P; Lim, S H; Linden Levy, L A; Liška, T; Liu, H; Liu, M X; Love, B; Lynch, D; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malik, M D; Manion, A; Manko, V I; Mannel, E; Mao, Y; Masui, H; Matathias, F; McCumber, M; McGaughey, P L; McGlinchey, D; McKinney, C; Means, N; Mendoza, M; Meredith, B; Miake, Y; Mibe, T; Mignerey, A C; Miki, K; Milov, A; Mitchell, J T; Miyachi, Y; Mohanty, A K; Moon, H J; Morino, Y; Morreale, A; Morrison, D P; Motschwiller, S; Moukhanova, T V; Murakami, T; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagle, J L; Naglis, M; Nagy, M I; Nakagawa, I; Nakamiya, Y; Nakamura, K R; Nakamura, T; Nakano, K; Nam, S; Newby, J; Nguyen, M; Nihashi, M; Nouicer, R; Nyanin, A S; Oakley, C; O'Brien, E; Oda, S X; Ogilvie, C A; Oka, M; Okada, K; Onuki, Y; Oskarsson, A; Ouchida, M; Ozawa, K; Pak, R; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, B H; Park, I H; Park, S K; Park, W J; Pate, S F; Patel, L; Pei, H; Peng, J-C; Pereira, H; Peressounko, D Yu; Petti, R; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Proissl, M; Purschke, M L; Qu, H; Rak, J; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Rembeczki, S; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Richardson, E; Roach, D; Roche, G; Rolnick, S D; Rosati, M; Rosen, C A; Rosendahl, S S E; Ružička, P; Sahlmueller, B; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakashita, K; Samsonov, V; Sano, S; Sarsour, M; Sato, T; Savastio, M; Sawada, S; Sedgwick, K; Seele, J; Seidl, R; Seto, R; Sharma, D; Shein, I; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shim, H H; Shimomura, M; Shoji, K; Shukla, P; Sickles, A; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Silvestre, C; Sim, K S; Singh, B K; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Slunečka, M; Sodre, T; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Sukhanov, A; Sun, J; Sziklai, J; Takagui, E M; Takahara, A; Taketani, A; Tanabe, R; Tanaka, Y; Taneja, S; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Tarafdar, S; Taranenko, A; Tennant, E; Themann, H; Thomas, D; Thomas, T L; Togawa, M; Toia, A; Tomášek, L; Tomášek, M; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tserruya, I; Tsuchimoto, Y; Utsunomiya, K; Vale, C; Valle, H; van Hecke, H W; Vazquez-Zambrano, E; Veicht, A; Velkovska, J; Vértesi, R; Virius, M; Vossen, A; Vrba, V; Vznuzdaev, E; Wang, X R; Watanabe, D; Watanabe, K; Watanabe, Y; Watanabe, Y S; Wei, F; Wei, R; Wessels, J; White, S N; Winter, D; Woody, C L; Wright, R M; Wysocki, M; Yamaguchi, Y L; Yamaura, K; Yang, R; Yanovich, A; Ying, J; Yokkaichi, S; Yoo, J S; You, Z; Young, G R; Younus, I; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zelenski, A; Zhou, S

    2015-05-15

    We present azimuthal angular correlations between charged hadrons and energy deposited in calorimeter towers in central d+Au and minimum bias p+p collisions at sqrt[s_{NN}]=200 GeV. The charged hadron is measured at midrapidity |η|<0.35, and the energy is measured at large rapidity (-3.7<η<-3.1, Au-going direction). An enhanced near-side angular correlation across |Δη|>2.75 is observed in d+Au collisions. Using the event plane method applied to the Au-going energy distribution, we extract the anisotropy strength v_{2} for inclusive charged hadrons at midrapidity up to p_{T}=4.5 GeV/c. We also present the measurement of v_{2} for identified π^{±} and (anti)protons in central d+Au collisions, and observe a mass-ordering pattern similar to that seen in heavy-ion collisions. These results are compared with viscous hydrodynamic calculations and measurements from p+Pb at sqrt[s_{NN}]=5.02 TeV. The magnitude of the mass ordering in d+Au is found to be smaller than that in p+Pb collisions, which may indicate smaller radial flow in lower energy d+Au collisions.

  11. Measurement of Long-Range Angular Correlation and Quadrupole Anisotropy of Pions and (Anti)Protons in Central d+Au Collisions at sqrt[s_{NN}]=200 GeV.

    PubMed

    Adare, A; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Akimoto, R; Al-Bataineh, H; Al-Ta'ani, H; Alexander, J; Andrews, K R; Angerami, A; Aoki, K; Apadula, N; Appelt, E; Aramaki, Y; Armendariz, R; Aschenauer, E C; Atomssa, E T; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, B; Babintsev, V; Bai, M; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Bannier, B; Barish, K N; Bassalleck, B; Basye, A T; Bathe, S; Baublis, V; Baumann, C; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Belmont, R; Ben-Benjamin, J; Bennett, R; Bhom, J H; Blau, D S; Bok, J S; Boyle, K; Brooks, M L; Broxmeyer, D; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Butsyk, S; Campbell, S; Caringi, A; Castera, P; Chen, C-H; Chi, C Y; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choi, J B; Choudhury, R K; Christiansen, P; Chujo, T; Chung, P; Chvala, O; Cianciolo, V; Citron, Z; Cole, B A; Conesa Del Valle, Z; Connors, M; Csanád, M; Csörgő, T; Dahms, T; Dairaku, S; Danchev, I; Das, K; Datta, A; David, G; Dayananda, M K; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dharmawardane, K V; Dietzsch, O; Dion, A; Donadelli, M; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Drees, K A; Durham, J M; Durum, A; Dutta, D; D'Orazio, L; Edwards, S; Efremenko, Y V; Ellinghaus, F; Engelmore, T; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Fadem, B; Fields, D E; Finger, M; Finger, M; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fujiwara, K; Fukao, Y; Fusayasu, T; Gal, C; Garishvili, I; Glenn, A; Gong, H; Gong, X; Gonin, M; Goto, Y; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Grim, G; Grosse Perdekamp, M; Gunji, T; Guo, L; Gustafsson, H-Å; Haggerty, J S; Hahn, K I; Hamagaki, H; Hamblen, J; Han, R; Hanks, J; Harper, C; Hashimoto, K; Haslum, E; Hayano, R; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Hester, T; Hill, J C; Hohlmann, M; Hollis, R S; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Horaguchi, T; Hori, Y; Hornback, D; Huang, S; Ichihara, T; Ichimiya, R; Iinuma, H; Ikeda, Y; Imai, K; Inaba, M; Iordanova, A; Isenhower, D; Ishihara, M; Issah, M; Ivanischev, D; Iwanaga, Y; Jacak, B V; Jia, J; Jiang, X; Jin, J; John, D; Johnson, B M; Jones, T; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Jumper, D S; Kajihara, F; Kamin, J; Kaneti, S; Kang, B H; Kang, J H; Kang, J S; Kapustinsky, J; Karatsu, K; Kasai, M; Kawall, D; Kawashima, M; Kazantsev, A V; Kempel, T; Khanzadeev, A; Kijima, K M; Kikuchi, J; Kim, A; Kim, B I; Kim, D J; Kim, E-J; Kim, Y-J; Kim, Y K; Kinney, E; Kiss, Á; Kistenev, E; Kleinjan, D; Kline, P; Kochenda, L; Komkov, B; Konno, M; Koster, J; Kotov, D; Král, A; Kravitz, A; Kunde, G J; Kurita, K; Kurosawa, M; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lai, Y S; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Lee, D M; Lee, J; Lee, K B; Lee, K S; Lee, S H; Lee, S R; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Li, X; Lichtenwalner, P; Liebing, P; Lim, S H; Linden Levy, L A; Liška, T; Liu, H; Liu, M X; Love, B; Lynch, D; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malik, M D; Manion, A; Manko, V I; Mannel, E; Mao, Y; Masui, H; Matathias, F; McCumber, M; McGaughey, P L; McGlinchey, D; McKinney, C; Means, N; Mendoza, M; Meredith, B; Miake, Y; Mibe, T; Mignerey, A C; Miki, K; Milov, A; Mitchell, J T; Miyachi, Y; Mohanty, A K; Moon, H J; Morino, Y; Morreale, A; Morrison, D P; Motschwiller, S; Moukhanova, T V; Murakami, T; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagle, J L; Naglis, M; Nagy, M I; Nakagawa, I; Nakamiya, Y; Nakamura, K R; Nakamura, T; Nakano, K; Nam, S; Newby, J; Nguyen, M; Nihashi, M; Nouicer, R; Nyanin, A S; Oakley, C; O'Brien, E; Oda, S X; Ogilvie, C A; Oka, M; Okada, K; Onuki, Y; Oskarsson, A; Ouchida, M; Ozawa, K; Pak, R; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, B H; Park, I H; Park, S K; Park, W J; Pate, S F; Patel, L; Pei, H; Peng, J-C; Pereira, H; Peressounko, D Yu; Petti, R; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Proissl, M; Purschke, M L; Qu, H; Rak, J; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Rembeczki, S; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Richardson, E; Roach, D; Roche, G; Rolnick, S D; Rosati, M; Rosen, C A; Rosendahl, S S E; Ružička, P; Sahlmueller, B; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakashita, K; Samsonov, V; Sano, S; Sarsour, M; Sato, T; Savastio, M; Sawada, S; Sedgwick, K; Seele, J; Seidl, R; Seto, R; Sharma, D; Shein, I; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shim, H H; Shimomura, M; Shoji, K; Shukla, P; Sickles, A; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Silvestre, C; Sim, K S; Singh, B K; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Slunečka, M; Sodre, T; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Sukhanov, A; Sun, J; Sziklai, J; Takagui, E M; Takahara, A; Taketani, A; Tanabe, R; Tanaka, Y; Taneja, S; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Tarafdar, S; Taranenko, A; Tennant, E; Themann, H; Thomas, D; Thomas, T L; Togawa, M; Toia, A; Tomášek, L; Tomášek, M; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tserruya, I; Tsuchimoto, Y; Utsunomiya, K; Vale, C; Valle, H; van Hecke, H W; Vazquez-Zambrano, E; Veicht, A; Velkovska, J; Vértesi, R; Virius, M; Vossen, A; Vrba, V; Vznuzdaev, E; Wang, X R; Watanabe, D; Watanabe, K; Watanabe, Y; Watanabe, Y S; Wei, F; Wei, R; Wessels, J; White, S N; Winter, D; Woody, C L; Wright, R M; Wysocki, M; Yamaguchi, Y L; Yamaura, K; Yang, R; Yanovich, A; Ying, J; Yokkaichi, S; Yoo, J S; You, Z; Young, G R; Younus, I; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zelenski, A; Zhou, S

    2015-05-15

    We present azimuthal angular correlations between charged hadrons and energy deposited in calorimeter towers in central d+Au and minimum bias p+p collisions at sqrt[s_{NN}]=200 GeV. The charged hadron is measured at midrapidity |η|<0.35, and the energy is measured at large rapidity (-3.7<η<-3.1, Au-going direction). An enhanced near-side angular correlation across |Δη|>2.75 is observed in d+Au collisions. Using the event plane method applied to the Au-going energy distribution, we extract the anisotropy strength v_{2} for inclusive charged hadrons at midrapidity up to p_{T}=4.5 GeV/c. We also present the measurement of v_{2} for identified π^{±} and (anti)protons in central d+Au collisions, and observe a mass-ordering pattern similar to that seen in heavy-ion collisions. These results are compared with viscous hydrodynamic calculations and measurements from p+Pb at sqrt[s_{NN}]=5.02 TeV. The magnitude of the mass ordering in d+Au is found to be smaller than that in p+Pb collisions, which may indicate smaller radial flow in lower energy d+Au collisions. PMID:26024164

  12. Characterization of maltotriose production by hydrolyzing of soluble starch with α-amylase from Microbulbifer thermotolerans DAU221.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong-Suk; Park, Dong-Ju; Choi, Yong-Lark

    2015-05-01

    A maltotriose-producing α-amylase, AmyA, from a newly isolated bacterial strain Microbulbifer thermotolerans DAU221 was purified and characterized in the heterologous host, Escherichia coli, using the pCold I vector. The amyA gene encoded a 761-residue protein composed of a 33 amino acid secretion signal peptide. The purified α-amylase with a molecular mass of 80 kDa, approximately, shared a sequence motif characteristic of the glycoside hydrolase family 13. The enzyme was optimally active, at 50 °C in sodium phosphate buffer (pH 6.0), by the traditional one factor-at-a-time method. But the optimal conditions of time, temperature, and pH for production of maltotriose from soluble starch were 1.76 h, 44.95 °C, and pH 6.35 by response surface methodology, respectively. Maltotriose, as the major enzyme reaction product, was analyzed by thin-layer chromatography (TLC) and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The enzyme was found to be inhibited by the addition of 10 mM Cu(2+), Fe(3+), Hg(2+), Zn(2+), and EDTA, but exhibited extreme stability toward hexane. The K m and V max values for the hydrolysis of soluble starch were 1.08 mg/mL and 1.736 mmol maltotriose/mg protein/min, respectively.

  13. Φ meson production in d+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV

    DOE PAGES

    Adare, A.

    2015-10-19

    The PHENIX Collaboration has measured Φ meson production in d+Au collisions at √sNN=200 GeV using the dimuon and dielectron decay channels. The Φ meson is measured in the forward (backward) d-going (Au-going) direction, 1.2 < y < 2.2 (–2.2 < y < –1.2) in the transverse-momentum (pT) range from 1–7 GeV/c and at midrapidity |y|<0.35 in the pT range below 7 GeV/c. The Φ meson invariant yields and nuclear-modification factors as a function of pT, rapidity, and centrality are reported. An enhancement of Φ meson production is observed in the Au-going direction, while suppression is seen in the d-going direction,more » and no modification is observed at midrapidity relative to the yield in p+p collisions scaled by the number of binary collisions. As a result, similar behavior was previously observed for inclusive charged hadrons and open heavy flavor, indicating similar cold-nuclear-matter effects.« less

  14. Φ meson production in d+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Adare, A.

    2015-10-19

    The PHENIX Collaboration has measured Φ meson production in d+Au collisions at √sNN=200 GeV using the dimuon and dielectron decay channels. The Φ meson is measured in the forward (backward) d-going (Au-going) direction, 1.2 < y < 2.2 (–2.2 < y < –1.2) in the transverse-momentum (pT) range from 1–7 GeV/c and at midrapidity |y|<0.35 in the pT range below 7 GeV/c. The Φ meson invariant yields and nuclear-modification factors as a function of pT, rapidity, and centrality are reported. An enhancement of Φ meson production is observed in the Au-going direction, while suppression is seen in the d-going direction, and no modification is observed at midrapidity relative to the yield in p+p collisions scaled by the number of binary collisions. As a result, similar behavior was previously observed for inclusive charged hadrons and open heavy flavor, indicating similar cold-nuclear-matter effects.

  15. Measurement of K0S and K*0 in p+p, d+Au, and Cu+Cu collisions at sqrt SNN = 200 GeV

    DOE PAGES

    Adare, A.; Aidala, C.

    2014-11-01

    The PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider has performed a systematic study of K0S and K*0 meson production at midrapidity in p+p, d+Au, and Cu+Cu collisions at sqrt SNN = 200 GeV. The K0S and K*0 mesons are reconstructed via their K0S and π0(→γγ)π0 (→γγ) and K*0 → K ± π± decay modes, respectively. The measured transverse-momentum spectra are used to determine the nuclear modification factor of K0S and K*0 mesons in d+Au and Cu+Cu collisions at different centralities. In the d+Au collisions, the nuclear modification factor of K0S and K*0 mesons is almost constant as a functionmore » of transverse momentum and is consistent with unity showing that cold-nuclear-matter effects do not play a significant role in the measured kinematic range. In Cu+Cu collisions, within the uncertainties no nuclear modification is registered in peripheral collisions. In central collisions, both mesons show suppression relative to the expectations from the p+p yield scaled by the number of binary nucleon-nucleon collisions in the Cu+Cu system. In the pT range 2–5 GeV/c, the strange mesons ( K0S, K*0) similarly to the Φ meson with hidden strangeness, show an intermediate suppression between the more suppressed light quark mesons (π0) and the nonsuppressed baryons (p, p-bar). At higher transverse momentum, pT > 5 GeV/c, production of all particles is similarly suppressed by a factor of ≈2. (auth)« less

  16. Analysis of whole blood for drugs of abuse using EMIT d.a.u. reagents and a Monarch 1000 Chemistry Analyzer.

    PubMed

    Diosi, D T; Harvey, D C

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes refinements in procedures coupling methanolic extraction-precipitation of whole blood with subsequent screening for commonly encountered drugs of abuse using EMIT d.a.u. reagents on a Monarch Chemistry Analyzer. The automation capabilities inherent in the Monarch make batch processing of samples convenient and cost effective. The small sample volume requirement of the Monarch allows greater sensitivities and use of lower cutoffs than previously reported. Subsequent analysis of EMIT positives by GC/MS confirmed the presence of the indicated drugs of abuse 86.7% of the time.

  17. Isolation and Characterization of a Novel Cold-Adapted Esterase, MtEst45, from Microbulbifer thermotolerans DAU221

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yong-Suk

    2016-01-01

    A novel esterase, MtEst45, was isolated from a fosmid genomic library of Microbulbifer thermotolerans DAU221. The encoding gene is predicted to have a mass of 45,564 Da and encodes 495 amino acids, excluding a 21 amino acid signal peptide. MtEst45 showed a low amino acid identity (approximately 23–24%) compared with other lipolytic enzymes belonging to Family III, a closely related bacterial lipolytic enzyme family. MtEst45 also showed a conserved GXSXG motif, G131IS133YG135, which was reported as active site of known lipolytic enzymes, and the putative catalytic triad composed of D237 and H265. Because these mutants of MtEst45, which was S133A, D237N, and H265L, had no activity, these catalytic triad is deemed essential for the enzyme catalysis. MtEst45 was overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) and purified via His-tag affinity chromatography. The optimal pH and temperature of MtEst45 were estimated to be 8.17 and 46.27°C by response surface methodology, respectively. Additionally, MtEst45 was also active between 1 and 15°C. The optimal hydrolysis substrate for MtEst45 among p-nitrophenyl esters (C2–C18) was p-nitrophenyl butyrate, and the Km and Vmax values were 0.0998 mM and 550 μmol/min/mg of protein, respectively. MtEst45 was strongly inhibited by Hg2+, Zn2+, and Cu2+ ions; by phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride; and by β-mercaptoethanol. Ca2+ did not affect the enzyme's activity. These biochemical properties, sequence identity, and phylogenetic analysis suggest that MtEst45 represents a novel and valuable bacterial lipolytic enzyme family and is useful for biotechnological applications. PMID:26973604

  18. Suppression of back-to-back hadron pairs at forward rapidity in d+Au collisions at √s(NN)=200 GeV.

    PubMed

    Adare, A; Afanasiev, S; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Al-Bataineh, H; Alexander, J; Angerami, A; Aoki, K; Apadula, N; Aramaki, Y; Atomssa, E T; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, B; Babintsev, V; Bai, M; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Barish, K N; Bassalleck, B; Basye, A T; Bathe, S; Baublis, V; Baumann, C; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Belmont, R; Bennett, R; Berdnikov, A; Berdnikov, Y; Bhom, J H; Blau, D S; Bok, J S; Boyle, K; Brooks, M L; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Butsyk, S; Campbell, S; Caringi, A; Chen, C-H; Chi, C Y; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choi, J B; Choudhury, R K; Christiansen, P; Chujo, T; Chung, P; Chvala, O; Cianciolo, V; Citron, Z; Cole, B A; Conesa del Valle, Z; Connors, M; Csanád, M; Csörgo, T; Dahms, T; Dairaku, S; Danchev, I; Das, K; Datta, A; David, G; Dayananda, M K; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dharmawardane, K V; Dietzsch, O; Dion, A; Donadelli, M; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Drees, K A; Durham, J M; Durum, A; Dutta, D; D'Orazio, L; Edwards, S; Efremenko, Y V; Ellinghaus, F; Engelmore, T; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Fadem, B; Fields, D E; Finger, M; Finger, M; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fujiwara, K; Fukao, Y; Fusayasu, T; Garishvili, I; Glenn, A; Gong, H; Gonin, M; Goto, Y; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Grim, G; Grosse Perdekamp, M; Gunji, T; Gustafsson, H-Å; Haggerty, J S; Hahn, K I; Hamagaki, H; Hamblen, J; Han, R; Hanks, J; Haslum, E; Hayano, R; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Hester, T; Hill, J C; Hohlmann, M; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Horaguchi, T; Hornback, D; Huang, S; Ichihara, T; Ichimiya, R; Ikeda, Y; Imai, K; Inaba, M; Isenhower, D; Ishihara, M; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Ivanischev, D; Iwanaga, Y; Jacak, B V; Jia, J; Jiang, X; Jin, J; Johnson, B M; Jones, T; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Jumper, D S; Kajihara, F; Kamin, J; Kang, J H; Kapustinsky, J; Karatsu, K; Kasai, M; Kawall, D; Kawashima, M; Kazantsev, A V; Kempel, T; Khanzadeev, A; Kijima, K M; Kikuchi, J; Kim, A; Kim, B I; Kim, D J; Kim, E J; Kim, Y-J; Kinney, E; Kiss, Á; Kistenev, E; Kochenda, L; Komkov, B; Konno, M; Koster, J; Král, A; Kravitz, A; Kunde, G J; Kurita, K; Kurosawa, M; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lai, Y S; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Lee, D M; Lee, J; Lee, K B; Lee, K S; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Li, X; Lichtenwalner, P; Liebing, P; Linden Levy, L A; Liška, T; Litvinenko, A; Liu, H; Liu, M X; Love, B; Lynch, D; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malakhov, A; Malik, M D; Manko, V I; Mannel, E; Mao, Y; Masui, H; Matathias, F; McCumber, M; McGaughey, P L; Means, N; Meredith, B; Miake, Y; Mibe, T; Mignerey, A C; Miki, K; Milov, A; Mitchell, J T; Mohanty, A K; Moon, H J; Morino, Y; Morreale, A; Morrison, D P; Moukhanova, T V; Murakami, T; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagle, J L; Naglis, M; Nagy, M I; Nakagawa, I; Nakamiya, Y; Nakamura, K R; Nakamura, T; Nakano, K; Nam, S; Newby, J; Nguyen, M; Nihashi, M; Nouicer, R; Nyanin, A S; Oakley, C; O'Brien, E; Oda, S X; Ogilvie, C A; Oka, M; Okada, K; Onuki, Y; Oskarsson, A; Ouchida, M; Ozawa, K; Pak, R; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, I H; Park, S K; Park, W J; Pate, S F; Pei, H; Peng, J-C; Pereira, H; Peresedov, V; Peressounko, D Yu; Petti, R; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Proissl, M; Purschke, M L; Qu, H; Rak, J; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Richardson, E; Roach, D; Roche, G; Rolnick, S D; Rosati, M; Rosen, C A; Rosendahl, S S E; Rukoyatkin, P; Ružička, P; Sahlmueller, B; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakashita, K; Samsonov, V; Sano, S; Sato, T; Sawada, S; Sedgwick, K; Seele, J; Seidl, R; Seto, R; Sharma, D; Shein, I; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shimomura, M; Shoji, K; Shukla, P; Sickles, A; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Silvestre, C; Sim, K S; Singh, B K; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Slunečka, M; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Sukhanov, A; Sziklai, J; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tanabe, R; Tanaka, Y; Taneja, S; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Tarafdar, S; Taranenko, A; Themann, H; Thomas, D; Thomas, T L; Togawa, M; Toia, A; Tomášek, L; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tserruya, I; Tsuchimoto, Y; Vale, C; Valle, H; van Hecke, H W; Vazquez-Zambrano, E; Veicht, A; Velkovska, J; Vértesi, R; Virius, M; Vrba, V; Vznuzdaev, E; Wang, X R; Watanabe, D; Watanabe, K; Watanabe, Y; Wei, F; Wei, R; Wessels, J; White, S N; Winter, D; Woody, C L; Wright, R M; Wysocki, M; Yamaguchi, Y L; Yamaura, K; Yang, R; Yanovich, A; Ying, J; Yokkaichi, S; You, Z; Young, G R; Younus, I; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zhou, S; Zolin, L

    2011-10-21

    Back-to-back hadron pair yields in d+Au and p+p collisions at √s(NN)=200 GeV were measured with the PHENIX detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. Rapidity separated hadron pairs were detected with the trigger hadron at pseudorapidity |η|<0.35 and the associated hadron at forward rapidity (deuteron direction, 3.0<η<3.8). Pairs were also detected with both hadrons measured at forward rapidity; in this case, the yield of back-to-back hadron pairs in d+Au collisions with small impact parameters is observed to be suppressed by a factor of 10 relative to p+p collisions. The kinematics of these pairs is expected to probe partons in the Au nucleus with a low fraction x of the nucleon momenta, where the gluon densities rise sharply. The observed suppression as a function of nuclear thickness, p(T), and η points to cold nuclear matter effects arising at high parton densities.

  19. Cold-nuclear-matter effects on heavy-quark production in d+Au collisions at sqrt[S(NN)]=200 GeV.

    PubMed

    Adare, A; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Al-Bataineh, H; Alexander, J; Angerami, A; Aoki, K; Apadula, N; Aramaki, Y; Atomssa, E T; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, B; Babintsev, V; Bai, M; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Barish, K N; Bassalleck, B; Basye, A T; Bathe, S; Baublis, V; Baumann, C; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Belmont, R; Bennett, R; Berdnikov, A; Berdnikov, Y; Bhom, J H; Blau, D S; Bok, J S; Boyle, K; Brooks, M L; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Butsyk, S; Campbell, S; Caringi, A; Chen, C-H; Chi, C Y; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choi, J B; Choudhury, R K; Christiansen, P; Chujo, T; Chung, P; Chvala, O; Cianciolo, V; Citron, Z; Cole, B A; Conesa Del Valle, Z; Connors, M; Csanád, M; Csörgő, T; Dahms, T; Dairaku, S; Danchev, I; Das, K; Datta, A; David, G; Dayananda, M K; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dharmawardane, K V; Dietzsch, O; Dion, A; Donadelli, M; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Drees, K A; Durham, J M; Durum, A; Dutta, D; D'Orazio, L; Edwards, S; Efremenko, Y V; Ellinghaus, F; Engelmore, T; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Fadem, B; Fields, D E; Finger, M; Finger, M; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fujiwara, K; Fukao, Y; Fusayasu, T; Garishvili, I; Glenn, A; Gong, H; Gonin, M; Goto, Y; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Grim, G; Grosse Perdekamp, M; Gunji, T; Gustafsson, H-Å; Haggerty, J S; Hahn, K I; Hamagaki, H; Hamblen, J; Han, R; Hanks, J; Haslum, E; Hayano, R; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Hester, T; Hill, J C; Hohlmann, M; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Horaguchi, T; Hornback, D; Huang, S; Ichihara, T; Ichimiya, R; Ikeda, Y; Imai, K; Inaba, M; Isenhower, D; Ishihara, M; Issah, M; Ivanischev, D; Iwanaga, Y; Jacak, B V; Jia, J; Jiang, X; Jin, J; Johnson, B M; Jones, T; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Jumper, D S; Kajihara, F; Kamin, J; Kang, J H; Kapustinsky, J; Karatsu, K; Kasai, M; Kawall, D; Kawashima, M; Kazantsev, A V; Kempel, T; Khanzadeev, A; Kijima, K M; Kikuchi, J; Kim, A; Kim, B I; Kim, D J; Kim, E-J; Kim, Y-J; Kinney, E; Kiss, A; Kistenev, E; Kleinjan, D; Kochenda, L; Komkov, B; Konno, M; Koster, J; Král, A; Kravitz, A; Kunde, G J; Kurita, K; Kurosawa, M; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lai, Y S; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Lee, D M; Lee, J; Lee, K B; Lee, K S; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Li, X; Lichtenwalner, P; Liebing, P; Linden Levy, L A; Liška, T; Liu, H; Liu, M X; Love, B; Lynch, D; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malik, M D; Manko, V I; Mannel, E; Mao, Y; Masui, H; Matathias, F; McCumber, M; McGaughey, P L; Means, N; Meredith, B; Miake, Y; Mibe, T; Mignerey, A C; Miki, K; Milov, A; Mitchell, J T; Mohanty, A K; Moon, H J; Morino, Y; Morreale, A; Morrison, D P; Moukhanova, T V; Murakami, T; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagle, J L; Naglis, M; Nagy, M I; Nakagawa, I; Nakamiya, Y; Nakamura, K R; Nakamura, T; Nakano, K; Nam, S; Newby, J; Nguyen, M; Nihashi, M; Nouicer, R; Nyanin, A S; Oakley, C; O'Brien, E; Oda, S X; Ogilvie, C A; Oka, M; Okada, K; Onuki, Y; Oskarsson, A; Ouchida, M; Ozawa, K; Pak, R; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, I H; Park, S K; Park, W J; Pate, S F; Pei, H; Peng, J-C; Pereira, H; Peressounko, D Yu; Petti, R; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Proissl, M; Purschke, M L; Qu, H; Rak, J; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Rembeczki, S; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Richardson, E; Roach, D; Roche, G; Rolnick, S D; Rosati, M; Rosen, C A; Rosendahl, S S E; Ružička, P; Sahlmueller, B; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakashita, K; Samsonov, V; Sano, S; Sato, T; Sawada, S; Sedgwick, K; Seele, J; Seidl, R; Seto, R; Sharma, D; Shein, I; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shimomura, M; Shoji, K; Shukla, P; Sickles, A; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Silvestre, C; Sim, K S; Singh, B K; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Slunečka, M; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Sukhanov, A; Sziklai, J; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tanabe, R; Tanaka, Y; Taneja, S; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Tarafdar, S; Taranenko, A; Themann, H; Thomas, D; Thomas, T L; Togawa, M; Toia, A; Tomášek, L; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tserruya, I; Tsuchimoto, Y; Vale, C; Valle, H; van Hecke, H W; Vazquez-Zambrano, E; Veicht, A; Velkovska, J; Vértesi, R; Virius, M; Vrba, V; Vznuzdaev, E; Wang, X R; Watanabe, D; Watanabe, K; Watanabe, Y; Wei, F; Wei, R; Wessels, J; White, S N; Winter, D; Woody, C L; Wright, R M; Wysocki, M; Yamaguchi, Y L; Yamaura, K; Yang, R; Yanovich, A; Ying, J; Yokkaichi, S; You, Z; Young, G R; Younus, I; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zhou, S

    2012-12-14

    The PHENIX experiment has measured electrons and positrons at midrapidity from the decays of hadrons containing charm and bottom quarks produced in d+Au and p+p collisions at sqrt[S(NN)]=200 GeV in the transverse-momentum range 0.85 ≤ p(T)(e) ≤ 8.5 GeV/c. In central d+Au collisions, the nuclear modification factor R(dA) at 1.5

  20. Centrality dependence of charged antiparticle to particle ratios near midrapidity in d+Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN})=200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Back, B.B.; Baker, M.D.; Barton, D.S.; Becker, B.; Carroll, A.; George, N.; Gushue, S.; Holzman, B.; Pak, R.; Sedykh, I.; Steinberg, P.; Sukhanov, A.; Ballintijn, M.; Busza, W.; Decowski, M.P.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Henderson, C.; Kane, J.L.; Kulinich, P.; Lee, J.W.

    2004-07-01

    The ratios of the yields of charged antiparticles to particles have been obtained for pions, kaons, and protons near midrapidity for d+Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN})=200 GeV as a function of centrality. The reported values represent the ratio of the yields averaged over the rapidity range of 0.1

  1. Rapidity and species dependence of particle production at largetransverse momentum for d+Au collisions at psNN = 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Abelev, B.I.; Adams, J.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett,J.; Anderson, B.D.; Anderson, M.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Bai,Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A.K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, S.-L.; Bonner, B.E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A.V.; Bravar, A.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, R.V.; Cai,X.Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la Barca Sanchez, M.; Castillo, J.; Catu,O.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen,H.F.; Chen, J.H.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Cosentino, M.R.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford,H.J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; Daugherity, M.; de Moura, M.M.; Dedovich, T.G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Djawotho,P.; Dogra, S.M.; Dong, W.J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J.E.; Du, F.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Dutta Mazumdar, M.R.; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, W.R.; Efimov,L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage,J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch,E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Gaillard, L.; Ganti,M.S.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J.S.; Gorbunov, Y.G.; Gos,H.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S.M.; Guimaraes, K.S.F.F.; Guo,Y.; Gupta, N.; Gutierrez, T.D.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T.J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J.W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T.W.; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte,B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A.M.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Horner, M.J.; Huang, H.Z.; Huang, S.L.; Hughes, E.W.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs,P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Jakl, P.; Jia, F.; Jiang, H.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khodyrev, V.Yu.; Kim, B.C.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, E.M.; Klein,S.R.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D.D.; et al.

    2006-12-19

    We determine rapidity asymmetry in the production of charged pions, protons and anti-protons for large transverse momentum (p{sub T}) for d+Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV. The rapidity asymmetry is defined as the ratio of particle yields at backward rapidity (Au beam direction or -ve rapidity) to those at forward rapidity (d beam direction or +ve rapidity). The identified hadrons are measured in the rapidity regions |y| < 0.5 and 0.5 < |y| < 1.0 for the p{sub T} range 2.5 < p{sub T} < 10 GeV/c. We observe significant rapidity asymmetry for charged pion and proton+anti-proton production in both rapidity regions. The asymmetry is larger for 0.5 < |y| < 1.0 than for |y| < 0.5 and is almost independent of particle type. The measurements are compared to various model predictions employing multiple scattering, energy loss, nuclear shadowing, saturation effects, and recombination, and also to a phenomenological parton model. We find that asymmetries are sensitive to model parameters and show model-preference. The rapidity dependence of {pi}{sup -}/{pi}{sup +} and {bar p}/p ratios in peripheral d+Au and forward neutron-tagged events are used to study the contributions of valence quarks and gluons to particle production at high p{sub T}. The results are compared to calculations based on NLO pQCD and other measurements of quark fragmentation functions.

  2. Measurement of K0S and K*0 in p+p, d+Au, and Cu+Cu collisions at sqrt SNN = 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Adare, A.; Aidala, C.

    2014-11-01

    The PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider has performed a systematic study of K0S and K*0 meson production at midrapidity in p+p, d+Au, and Cu+Cu collisions at sqrt SNN = 200 GeV. The K0S and K*0 mesons are reconstructed via their K0S and π0(→γγ)π0 (→γγ) and K*0 → K ± π± decay modes, respectively. The measured transverse-momentum spectra are used to determine the nuclear modification factor of K0S and K*0 mesons in d+Au and Cu+Cu collisions at different centralities. In the d+Au collisions, the nuclear modification factor of K0S and K*0 mesons is almost constant as a function of transverse momentum and is consistent with unity showing that cold-nuclear-matter effects do not play a significant role in the measured kinematic range. In Cu+Cu collisions, within the uncertainties no nuclear modification is registered in peripheral collisions. In central collisions, both mesons show suppression relative to the expectations from the p+p yield scaled by the number of binary nucleon-nucleon collisions in the Cu+Cu system. In the pT range 2–5 GeV/c, the strange mesons ( K0S, K*0) similarly to the Φ meson with hidden strangeness, show an intermediate suppression between the more suppressed light quark mesons (π0) and the nonsuppressed baryons (p, p-bar). At higher transverse momentum, pT > 5 GeV/c, production of all particles is similarly suppressed by a factor of ≈2. (auth)

  3. Charged-particle multiplicity and pseudorapidity distributionsmeasured with the PHOBOS detector in Au+Au, Cu+Cu, d+Au, and p+p collisions at ultra-relativistic energies.

    SciTech Connect

    Alver, B.; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Ballintijn, M.; Barton, D. S.; Wuosmaa, A.

    2011-01-01

    Pseudorapidity distributions of charged particles emitted in Au+Au, Cu+Cu, d+Au, and p+p collisions over a wide energy range have been measured using the PHOBOS detector at the BNL Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC). The centrality dependence of both the charged particle distributions and the multiplicity at midrapidity were measured. Pseudorapidity distributions of charged particles emitted with |{eta}| < 5.4, which account for between 95% and 99% of the total charged-particle emission associated with collision participants, are presented for different collision centralities. Both the midrapidity density dN{sub ch}/d{eta} and the total charged-particle multiplicity N{sub ch} are found to factorize into a product of independent functions of collision energy, {radical}s{sub NN}, and centrality given in terms of the number of nucleons participating in the collision, N{sub part}. The total charged particle multiplicity, observed in these experiments and those at lower energies, assumes a linear dependence of (lns{sub NN}){sup 2} over the full range of collision energy of {radical}s{sub NN} = 2.7-200 GeV.

  4. Charged-particle multiplicity and pseudorapidity distributions measured with the PHOBOS detector in Au+Au, Cu+Cu, d+Au, and p+p collisions at ultrarelativistic energies

    SciTech Connect

    Alver, B.; Ballintijn, M.; Busza, W.; Decowski, M. P.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Henderson, C.; Kane, J. L.; Katzy, J.; Kulinich, P.; Li, W.; Loizides, C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rosenberg, L.; Sarin, P.; Steadman, S. G.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Vale, C.

    2011-02-15

    Pseudorapidity distributions of charged particles emitted in Au+Au, Cu+Cu, d+Au, and p+p collisions over a wide energy range have been measured using the PHOBOS detector at the BNL Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC). The centrality dependence of both the charged particle distributions and the multiplicity at midrapidity were measured. Pseudorapidity distributions of charged particles emitted with |{eta}|<5.4, which account for between 95% and 99% of the total charged-particle emission associated with collision participants, are presented for different collision centralities. Both the midrapidity density dN{sub ch}/d{eta} and the total charged-particle multiplicity N{sub ch} are found to factorize into a product of independent functions of collision energy, {radical}(s{sub N{sub N}}), and centrality given in terms of the number of nucleons participating in the collision, N{sub part}. The total charged particle multiplicity, observed in these experiments and those at lower energies, assumes a linear dependence of (lns{sub N{sub N}}){sup 2} over the full range of collision energy of {radical}(s{sub N{sub N}})=2.7-200 GeV.

  5. Nuclear suppression at large forward rapidities in d-Au collisions at relativistic and ultrarelativistic energies

    SciTech Connect

    Nemchik, J.; Petracek, V.; Potashnikova, I. K.; Sumbera, M.

    2008-08-15

    We study a strong suppression of the relative production rate (d-Au)/(p-p) for inclusive high-p{sub T} hadrons of different species at large forward rapidities (large Feynman x{sub F}). The model predictions calculated in the light-cone dipole approach are in a good agreement with the recent measurements by the BRAHMS and STAR Collaborations at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. We predict a similar suppression at large p{sub T} and large x{sub F} also at lower energies, where no effect of coherence is possible. This allows us to exclude the saturation models or the models based on Color Glass Condensate from interpretation of nuclear effects.

  6. Mecanismes de deformation de nanoparticules d'Au par irradiation ionique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harkati Kerbouah, Chahineze

    2011-12-01

    In the present thesis, we study the anisotropic deformation of gold nanoparticles embedded in amorphous silica or crystalline aluminum arsenide, under ion bombardment. We try to comprehend the mechanism responsible for this deformation and to remove any ambiguity related to the explanation of this phenomenon. A hybrid process combining sputtering and plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition was used to fabricate Au/SiO2 layers on fused silica substrates. Structures with single and multilayer were obtained. Heating during or after deposition activates the Au atom agglomeration and favours the growth of the nanoparticles. Also, a Au/AlAs nanocomposite was obtained by ion implantation of AlAs films, followed by rapid thermal annealing. The samples of the two nanocomposites, cooled with liquid nitrogen, were irradiated with 2 to 40 MeV Cu, Si, Au or In ion beams, at fluences ranging from 1x10 13 to 4x1015 ions/cm2, using a Tandem or Tandetron accelerator. The structural and morphological properties of the Au/SiO2 nanocomposite were extracted by optical means; the frequency and the width of surface plasmon resonance band depend on the nanoparticle shape and size, their concentration, the inter-particle distance and the dielectric properties of material in which the particles are embedded. The aluminum arsenide crystallinity was studied by two techniques: Raman spectroscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry in channelling configuration (RBS/ channelling). The Au concentration in the nanocomposite layers was deducted from RBS results. The size distribution and metallic nanoparticles shape transformation in both nanocomposites were observed by electronic transmission microscopy. The results obtained within the framework of this work are the subject of three journal papers. The first publication shows the possibility of manipulating the width and spectral position of the gold nanoparticle absorption band in Au/SiO2 nanocomposites by modifying their structure (form, size and inter-particle distance). The obtained Au nanoparticles are nearly spherical. The surface plasmon (PS) absorption band corresponding to the distant particles is located at 520 nm. After ion irradiation, the spherical nanoparticles transform into ellipsoids aligned along the ion beam. The absorption band splits into two bands: transversal and longitudinal. The band corresponding to the ellipsoids small axis (transversal) is blue-shifted and that corresponding to the long axis (longitudinal) is red-shifted indicating the elongation of particles in the beam direction. The second paper is consecrated to the crucial role of the plastic deformation of the matrix and to the importance of the metal atomic mobility in the anisotropic nanoparticles deformation in Au/SiO 2 nanocomposites. Our measurements show that a threshold value of 2 keV/nm (electronic stopping power) is necessary for the deformation of Au nanoparticles. This value is close to that required for silica deformation. Mobility of the Au atoms at the time of the ion passage is confirmed by temperature calculation within the ionic track. The third paper treats the attempt of formation and deformation of Au nanoparticles in crystalline aluminum arsenide matrix known by its high resistance to amorphisation and deformation under ionic bombardment. The principal result of the last article confirms the essential role of the matrix. It proves that the anisotropic deformation of surrounding material is indispensable for gold nanoparticles deformation. The experimental results mentioned above and temperature calculations within ionic tracks allowed us to propose the following anisotropic deformation scenario of Au nanoparticles embedded in Au/SiO2 nanocomposite: (1) Each ion crossing the silica melts (very briefly) a narrow cylinder around its trajectory forming thus a latent track. This is consistent with the observed threshold value in the electronic stopping power. (2) The cumulative effect of many separate ion impacts leads to the anisotropic growth of the silica matrix which contracts in the direction of the beam and elongates in the perpendicular direction. The overlap model of the ionic tracks was used to validate this phenomenon. (3) The deformation of silica generates strains which act on the nanoparticles in the plane perpendicular to the ion trajectory. In order to accommodate these strains, the Au nanoparticles deform in the beam direction. (4) The deformation of nanoparticles occurs each time an ion traverses the gold particle and melts a cylinder around its trajectory. The mobility of the gold atoms was confirmed by a calculation of the equivalent temperature from the deposited energy in the material by incident ions. The scenario above is compatible with our experimental data obtained in the case of the Au/SiO2 nanocomposite. It is further supported by the fact that the Au nanoparticules do not deform when they are integrated in AlAs which is resistant to the deformation. Keywords: ion irradiation, nanoparticles, Au, electronic stopping power, surface plasmon resonance, elongation, silica, aluminum arsenide.

  7. J/psi production and absorption in p + A and d+Au collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Vogt, R; Lourenco, C; Woehri, H

    2010-11-30

    The level of 'anomalous' charmonium suppression in high-energy heavy-ion collisions and its interpretation as a signal of quark-gluon plasma formation requires a robust understanding of charmonium production and absorption in proton-nucleus collisions. In a previous study we have shown that, contrary to common belief, the so-called J/{psi} 'absorption cross section', {sigma}{sub abs}{sup J/{psi}}, is not a 'universal constant' but, rather, an effective parameter that depends very significantly on the charmonium rapidity and on the collision energy. Here we present ugraded Glauber calculations with the EPS09 parameterization of nuclear modifications of the parton densities. We confirm that the effective 'absorption cross section' depends on the J/{psi} kinematics and the collision energy. We also make further steps towards understanding the physics of the mechanisms behind the observed 'cold nuclear matter' effects.

  8. Nuclear suppression at large forward rapidities in d-Au collisions at relativistic and ultrarelativistic energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemchik, J.; Petráček, V.; Potashnikova, I. K.; Šumbera, M.

    2008-08-01

    We study a strong suppression of the relative production rate (d-Au)/(p-p) for inclusive high-pT hadrons of different species at large forward rapidities (large Feynman xF). The model predictions calculated in the light-cone dipole approach are in a good agreement with the recent measurements by the BRAHMS and STAR Collaborations at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. We predict a similar suppression at large pT and large xF also at lower energies, where no effect of coherence is possible. This allows us to exclude the saturation models or the models based on Color Glass Condensate from interpretation of nuclear effects.

  9. Systematic Measurements of Identified Particle Spectra in pp, d+Au and Au+Au Collisions from STAR

    SciTech Connect

    STAR Coll

    2009-04-11

    Identified charged particle spectra of {pi}{sup {+-}}, K{sup {+-}}, p and {bar p} at mid-rapidity (|y| < 0.1) measured by the dE/dx method in the STAR-TPC are reported for pp and d + Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV and for Au + Au collisions at 62.4 GeV, 130 GeV, and 200 GeV. Average transverse momenta, total particle production, particle yield ratios, strangeness and baryon production rates are investigated as a function of the collision system and centrality. The transverse momentum spectra are found to be flatter for heavy particles than for light particles in all collision systems; the effect is more prominent for more central collisions. The extracted average transverse momentum of each particle species follows a trend determined by the total charged particle multiplicity density. The Bjorken energy density estimate is at least several GeV/fm{sub 3} for a formation time less than 1 fm/c. A significantly larger net-baryon density and a stronger increase of the net-baryon density with centrality are found in Au + Au collisions at 62.4 GeV than at the two higher energies. Antibaryon production relative to total particle multiplicity is found to be constant over centrality, but increases with the collision energy. Strangeness production relative to total particle multiplicity is similar at the three measured RHIC energies. Relative strangeness production increases quickly with centrality in peripheral Au + Au collisions, to a value about 50% above the pp value, and remains rather constant in more central collisions. Bulk freeze-out properties are extracted from thermal equilibrium model and hydrodynamics-motivated blast-wave model fits to the data. Resonance decays are found to have little effect on the extracted kinetic freeze-out parameters due to the transverse momentum range of our measurements. The extracted chemical freeze-out temperature is constant, independent of collision system or centrality; its value is close to the predicted phase-transition temperature, suggesting that chemical freeze-out happens in the vicinity of hadronization and the chemical freezeout temperature is universal despite the vastly different initial conditions in the collision systems. The extracted kinetic freeze-out temperature, while similar to the chemical freeze-out temperature in pp, d + Au, and peripheral Au + Au collisions, drops significantly with centrality in Au + Au collisions, whereas the extracted transverse radial flow velocity increases rapidly with centrality. There appears to be a prolonged period of particle elastic scatterings from chemical to kinetic freeze-out in central Au + Au collisions. The bulk properties extracted at chemical and kinetic freeze-out are observed to evolve smoothly over the measured energy range, collision systems, and collision centralities.

  10. Search for dark photons from neutral meson decays in p+p and d+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV

    DOE PAGES

    Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akimoto, R.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Al-Ta'ani, H.; Alexander, J.; Alfred, M.; et al

    2015-03-10

    In this study, the standard model (SM) of particle physics is spectacularly successful, yet the measured value of the muon anomalous magnetic moment (g-2)μ deviates from SM calculations by 3.6σ. Several theoretical models attribute this to the existence of a “dark photon,” an additional U(1) gauge boson, which is weakly coupled to ordinary photons. The PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider has searched for a dark photon, U, in π⁰, η → γe⁺e⁻ decays and obtained upper limits of O(2×10⁻⁶) on U-γ mixing at 90% CL for the mass range 30 < mU < 90 MeV/c². Combined withmore » other experimental limits, the remaining region in the U-γ mixing parameter space that can explain the (g-2)μ deviation from its SM value is nearly completely excluded at the 90% confidence level, with only a small region of 29 < mU < 32 MeV/c² remaining.« less

  11. Search for dark photons from neutral meson decays in p+p and d+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akimoto, R.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Al-Ta'ani, H.; Alexander, J.; Alfred, M.; Andrews, K. R.; Angerami, A.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelt, E.; Aramaki, Y.; Armendariz, R.; Asai, J.; Asano, H.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Atomssa, E. T.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Baldisseri, A.; Bandara, N. S.; Bannier, B.; Barish, K. N.; Barnes, P. D.; Bassalleck, B.; Basye, A. T.; Bathe, S.; Batsouli, S.; Baublis, V.; Baumann, C.; Bazilevsky, A.; Beaumier, M.; Beckman, S.; Belikov, S.; Belmont, R.; Ben-Benjamin, J.; Bennett, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Bhom, J. H.; Bickley, A. A.; Black, D.; Blau, D. S.; Boissevain, J. G.; Bok, J. S.; Borel, H.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Broxmeyer, D.; Bryslawskyj, J.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Butsyk, S.; Camacho, C. M.; Campbell, S.; Caringi, A.; Castera, P.; Chang, B. S.; Chang, W. C.; Charvet, J. L.; Chen, C. H.; Chernichenko, S.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, P.; Churyn, A.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cole, B. A.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M.; Constantin, P.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Dahms, T.; Dairaku, S.; Danchev, I.; Das, K.; Datta, A.; Daugherity, M. S.; David, G.; Dayananda, M. K.; DeBlasio, K.; Dehmelt, K.; Denisov, A.; d'Enterria, D.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dharmawardane, K. V.; Dietzsch, O.; Ding, L.; Dion, A.; Do, J. H.; Donadelli, M.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Dubey, A. K.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Dutta, D.; Dzhordzhadze, V.; D'Orazio, L.; Edwards, S.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Ellinghaus, F.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Eyser, K. O.; Fadem, B.; Feege, N.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Fraenkel, Z.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fujiwara, K.; Fukao, Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Gal, C.; Gallus, P.; Garg, P.; Garishvili, I.; Ge, H.; Giordano, F.; Glenn, A.; Gong, H.; Gong, X.; Gonin, M.; Gosset, J.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grim, G.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gu, Y.; Gunji, T.; Guo, L.; Guragain, H.; Gustafsson, H. Å.; Hachiya, T.; Hadj Henni, A.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamblen, J.; Han, R.; Han, S. Y.; Hanks, J.; Harper, C.; Hartouni, E. P.; Haruna, K.; Hasegawa, S.; Hashimoto, K.; Haslum, E.; Hayano, R.; He, X.; Heffner, M.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Hill, J. C.; Hohlmann, M.; Hollis, R. S.; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hori, Y.; Hornback, D.; Hoshino, T.; Huang, J.; Huang, S.; Ichihara, T.; Ichimiya, R.; Iinuma, H.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Imazu, Y.; Imrek, J.; Inaba, M.; Iordanova, A.; Isenhower, D.; Ishihara, M.; Isobe, T.; Issah, M.; Isupov, A.; Ivanischev, D.; Ivanishchev, D.; Iwanaga, Y.; Jacak, B. V.; Jeon, S. J.; Jezghani, M.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; Jin, J.; John, D.; Johnson, B. M.; Jones, T.; Joo, E.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kajihara, F.; Kametani, S.; Kamihara, N.; Kamin, J.; Kaneti, S.; Kang, B. H.; Kang, J. H.; Kang, J. S.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kasai, M.; Kawall, D.; Kawashima, M.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kempel, T.; Key, J. A.; Khachatryan, V.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kihara, K.; Kijima, K. M.; Kikuchi, J.; Kim, A.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, C.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E.; Kim, E. J.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, M.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kinney, E.; Kiriluk, K.; Kiss, Á.; Kistenev, E.; Klatsky, J.; Klay, J.; Klein-Boesing, C.; Kleinjan, D.; Kline, P.; Koblesky, T.; Kochenda, L.; Kofarago, M.; Komkov, B.; Konno, M.; Koster, J.; Kotov, D.; Kozlov, A.; Král, A.; Kravitz, A.; Kunde, G. J.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Layton, D.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, J.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S. H.; Lee, S. R.; Lee, T.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Leitgab, M.; Lenzi, B.; Li, X.; Lichtenwalner, P.; Liebing, P.; Lim, S. H.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Liška, T.; Litvinenko, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, M. X.; Love, B.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Makek, M.; Malakhov, A.; Malik, M. D.; Manion, A.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Mao, Y.; Mašek, L.; Masui, H.; Matathias, F.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; McGlinchey, D.; McKinney, C.; Means, N.; Meles, A.; Mendoza, M.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mibe, T.; Mignerey, A. C.; Mikeš, P.; Miki, K.; Miller, A. J.; Milov, A.; Mishra, D. K.; Mishra, M.; Mitchell, J. T.; Miyachi, Y.; Miyasaka, S.; Mizuno, S.; Mohanty, A. K.; Montuenga, P.; Moon, H. J.; Moon, T.; Morino, Y.; Morreale, A.; Morrison, D. P.; Motschwiller, S.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Mukhopadhyay, D.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Mwai, A.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagle, J. L.; Naglis, M.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakagomi, H.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, K. R.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Nam, S.; Nattrass, C.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Newby, J.; Nguyen, M.; Nihashi, M.; Niida, T.; Nouicer, R.; Novitzky, N.; Nyanin, A. S.; Oakley, C.; O'Brien, E.; Oda, S. X.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Oka, M.; Okada, K.; Onuki, Y.; Orjuela Koop, J. D.; Oskarsson, A.; Ouchida, M.; Ozaki, H.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Palounek, A. P. T.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, B. H.; Park, I. H.; Park, J.; Park, S.; Park, S. K.; Park, W. J.; Pate, S. F.; Patel, L.; Patel, M.; Pei, H.; Peng, J. C.; Pereira, H.; Perepelitsa, D. V.; Perera, G. D. N.; Peresedov, V.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Perry, J.; Petti, R.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pinson, R.; Pisani, R. P.; Proissl, M.; Purschke, M. L.; Purwar, A. K.; Qu, H.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Rembeczki, S.; Reygers, K.; Reynolds, D.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Riveli, N.; Roach, D.; Roche, G.; Rolnick, S. D.; Rosati, M.; Rosen, C. A.; Rosendahl, S. S. E.; Rosnet, P.; Rowan, Z.; Rubin, J. G.; Rukoyatkin, P.; Ružička, P.; Rykov, V. L.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sakai, S.; Sakashita, K.; Sako, H.; Samsonov, V.; Sano, S.; Sarsour, M.; Sato, S.; Sato, T.; Savastio, M.; Sawada, S.; Schaefer, B.; Schmoll, B. K.; Sedgwick, K.; Seele, J.; Seidl, R.; Semenov, A. Yu.; Semenov, V.; Sen, A.; Seto, R.; Sett, P.; Sexton, A.; Sharma, D.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T. A.; Shigaki, K.; Shim, H. H.; Shimomura, M.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Sim, K. S.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Slunečka, M.; Sodre, T.; Soldatov, A.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Staley, F.; Stankus, P. W.; Stenlund, E.; Stepanov, M.; Ster, A.; Stoll, S. P.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Sukhanov, A.; Sumita, T.; Sun, J.; Sziklai, J.; Takagui, E. M.; Takahara, A.; Taketani, A.; Tanabe, R.; Tanaka, Y.; Taneja, S.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Tarján, P.; Tennant, E.; Themann, H.; Thomas, D.; Thomas, T. L.; Timilsina, A.; Todoroki, T.; Togawa, M.; Toia, A.; Tomášek, L.; Tomášek, M.; Tomita, Y.; Torii, H.; Towell, M.; Towell, R.; Towell, R. S.; Tram, V N.; Tserruya, I.; Tsuchimoto, Y.; Utsunomiya, K.; Vale, C.; Valle, H.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vargyas, M.; Vazquez-Zambrano, E.; Veicht, A.; Velkovska, J.; Vértesi, R.; Vinogradov, A. A.; Virius, M.; Vossen, A.; Vrba, V.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Watanabe, Y. S.; Wei, F.; Wei, R.; Wessels, J.; Whitaker, S.; White, S. N.; Winter, D.; Wolin, S.; Woody, C. L.; Wright, R. M.; Wysocki, M.; Xia, B.; Xie, W.; Xue, L.; Yalcin, S.; Yamaguchi, Y. L.; Yamaura, K.; Yang, R.; Yanovich, A.; Ying, J.; Yokkaichi, S.; Yoo, J. S.; Yoon, I.; You, Z.; Young, G. R.; Younus, I.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zaudtke, O.; Zelenski, A.; Zhang, C.; Zhou, S.; Zolin, L.

    2015-03-10

    In this study, the standard model (SM) of particle physics is spectacularly successful, yet the measured value of the muon anomalous magnetic moment (g-2)μ deviates from SM calculations by 3.6σ. Several theoretical models attribute this to the existence of a “dark photon,” an additional U(1) gauge boson, which is weakly coupled to ordinary photons. The PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider has searched for a dark photon, U, in π⁰, η → γe⁺e⁻ decays and obtained upper limits of O(2×10⁻⁶) on U-γ mixing at 90% CL for the mass range 30 < mU < 90 MeV/c². Combined with other experimental limits, the remaining region in the U-γ mixing parameter space that can explain the (g-2)μ deviation from its SM value is nearly completely excluded at the 90% confidence level, with only a small region of 29 < mU < 32 MeV/c² remaining.

  12. Centrality dependence of charged hadron transverse momentum spectra in d+Au collisions at {radical}{ovr{sup S}NN} = 200 GeV.

    SciTech Connect

    Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Ballintijn, M.; Barton, D. S.; Becker, B.; George, N.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; PHOBOS Collaboration; Physics; BNL; Massachusetts Inst. of Tech.

    2003-08-15

    We have measured transverse momentum distributions of charged hadrons produced in Au+Au collisions at {radical}{ovr S{sub NN}} = 62.4 GeV. The spectra are presented for transverse momenta 0.25 < p{sub T} < 4.5 GeV/c, in a pseudo-rapidity range of 0.2 < {eta} < 1.4. The nuclear modification factor R{sub AA} is calculated relative to p+p data at the same collision energy as a function of collision centrality. For 2 < p{sub T} < 4.5 GeV/c, R{sub AA} is found to be significantly larger than in Au+Au collisions at {radical}{ovr S{sub NN}} = 130 and 200 GeV. In contrast to the large change in R{sub AA}, we observe a very similar centrality evolution of the p{sub T} spectra at {radical}{ovr S{sub NN}} = 62.4 GeV and 200 GeV. The dynamical origin of this surprising factorization of energy and centrality dependence of particle production in heavy ion collisions remains to be understood.

  13. Corrigendum to “Suppression of Υ production in d+Au and Au+Au collisions at √ SNN = 200 GeV" [Phys. Lett. B 735 (2014) 127-137

    DOE PAGES

    Adamczyk, L.

    2015-04-01

    We report measurements of Υ meson production in p + p, d + Au, and Au+Au collisions using the STAR detector at RHIC. We compare the Υ yield to the measured cross section in p + p collisions in order to quantify any modifications of the yield in cold nuclear matter using d + Au data and in hot nuclear matter using Au+Au data separated into three centrality classes. Our p + p measurement is based on three times the statistics of our previous result. We obtain a nuclear modification factor for Upsilon (1S + 2S + 3S) in themore » rapidity range |y| < 1 in d + Au collisions of RdAu = 0.79 ± 0.24(stat.) ± 0.03(syst.) ± 0.10(p + p syst.). A comparison with models including shadowing and initial state parton energy loss indicates the presence of additional cold-nuclear matter suppression. Similarly, in the top 10% most-central Au + Au collisions, we measure a nuclear modification factor of R AA = 0.49 ±0.1(stat.) ±0.02(syst.) ±0.06(p + p syst.), which is a larger suppression factor than that seen in cold nuclear matter. Our results are consistent with complete suppression of excited-state Upsilon mesons in Au + Au collisions. The additional suppression in Au + Au is consistent with the level expected in model calculations that include the presence of a hot, deconfined Quark–Gluon Plasma. However, understanding the suppression seen in d + Au is still needed before any definitive statements about the nature of the suppression in Au + Au can be made.« less

  14. Inclusive pi^0, eta, and direct photon production at high transverse momentum in p+p and d+Au collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    STAR Collaboration; Abelev, Betty

    2010-07-07

    We report a measurement of high-p{sub T} inclusive {pi}{sup 0}, {eta}, and direct photon production in p + p and d + Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV at midrapidity (0 < {eta} < 1). Photons from the decay {pi}{sup 0} {yields} {gamma}{gamma} were detected in the Barrel Electromagnetic Calorimeter of the STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. The {eta} {yields} {gamma}{gamma} decay was also observed and constituted the first {eta} measurement by STAR. The first direct photon cross section measurement by STAR is also presented, the signal was extracted statistically by subtracting the {pi}{sup 0}, {eta}, and {omega}(782) decay background from the inclusive photon distribution observed in the calorimeter. The analysis is described in detail, and the results are found to be in good agreement with earlier measurements and with next-to-leading order perturbative QCD calculations.

  15. Corrigendum to “Suppression of Υ production in d+Au and Au+Au collisions at √ SNN = 200 GeV" [Phys. Lett. B 735 (2014) 127-137

    SciTech Connect

    Adamczyk, L.

    2015-04-01

    We report measurements of Υ meson production in p + p, d + Au, and Au+Au collisions using the STAR detector at RHIC. We compare the Υ yield to the measured cross section in p + p collisions in order to quantify any modifications of the yield in cold nuclear matter using d + Au data and in hot nuclear matter using Au+Au data separated into three centrality classes. Our p + p measurement is based on three times the statistics of our previous result. We obtain a nuclear modification factor for Upsilon (1S + 2S + 3S) in the rapidity range |y| < 1 in d + Au collisions of RdAu = 0.79 ± 0.24(stat.) ± 0.03(syst.) ± 0.10(p + p syst.). A comparison with models including shadowing and initial state parton energy loss indicates the presence of additional cold-nuclear matter suppression. Similarly, in the top 10% most-central Au + Au collisions, we measure a nuclear modification factor of R AA = 0.49 ±0.1(stat.) ±0.02(syst.) ±0.06(p + p syst.), which is a larger suppression factor than that seen in cold nuclear matter. Our results are consistent with complete suppression of excited-state Upsilon mesons in Au + Au collisions. The additional suppression in Au + Au is consistent with the level expected in model calculations that include the presence of a hot, deconfined Quark–Gluon Plasma. However, understanding the suppression seen in d + Au is still needed before any definitive statements about the nature of the suppression in Au + Au can be made.

  16. Gene transcription analysis of carrot allergens by relative quantification with single and duplex reverse transcription real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Zagon, Jutta; Jansen, Bärbel; Knoppik, Meike; Ehlers, Anke; Kroh, Lothar W; Holzhauser, Thomas; Vieths, Stefan; Broll, Hermann

    2010-01-01

    Single and duplex real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) systems have been developed to quantify specific mRNA transcription of genes coding for the major Daucus carota allergen isoforms Dau c 1.01 and Dau c 1.02. Methods were tested with samples from the local market. Whereas the gene transcription levels for Dau c 1.01 were consistently high in all investigated samples, significant differences for the Dau c 1.02 transcription could be demonstrated in randomly collected market samples. The gene transcription level for the minor Dau c 1.02 variant is about one log below Dau c 1.01. Both formats, single or duplex real-time methods, exhibit ideal cycle threshold (CT) ranges and good reproducibility. In particular, the easily performed duplex real-time PCR system is potentially suited for the selection of hypoallergenic varieties and studying the impact of post-harvesting or environmental conditions.

  17. An Upgrade on the Rabbit Model of Anthracycline-Induced Cardiomyopathy: Shorter Protocol, Reduced Mortality, and Higher Incidence of Overt Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Talavera, Jesús; Fernández-Del-Palacio, María Josefa; García-Nicolás, Obdulio; Seva, Juan; Brooks, Gavin; Moraleda, Jose M.

    2015-01-01

    Current protocols of anthracycline-induced cardiomyopathy in rabbits present with high premature mortality and nephrotoxicity, thus rendering them unsuitable for studies requiring long-term functional evaluation of myocardial function (e.g., stem cell therapy). We compared two previously described protocols to an in-house developed protocol in three groups: Group DOX2 received doxorubicin 2 mg/kg/week (8 weeks); Group DAU3 received daunorubicin 3 mg/kg/week (10 weeks); and Group DAU4 received daunorubicin 4 mg/kg/week (6 weeks). A cohort of rabbits received saline (control). Results of blood tests, cardiac troponin I, echocardiography, and histopathology were analysed. Whilst DOX2 and DAU3 rabbits showed high premature mortality (50% and 33%, resp.), DAU4 rabbits showed 7.6% premature mortality. None of DOX2 rabbits developed overt dilated cardiomyopathy; 66% of DAU3 rabbits developed overt dilated cardiomyopathy and quickly progressed to severe congestive heart failure. Interestingly, 92% of DAU4 rabbits showed overt dilated cardiomyopathy and 67% developed congestive heart failure exhibiting stable disease. DOX2 and DAU3 rabbits showed alterations of renal function, with DAU3 also exhibiting hepatic function compromise. Thus, a shortened protocol of anthracycline-induced cardiomyopathy as in DAU4 group results in high incidence of overt dilated cardiomyopathy, which insidiously progressed to congestive heart failure, associated to reduced systemic compromise and very low premature mortality. PMID:26788502

  18. An Upgrade on the Rabbit Model of Anthracycline-Induced Cardiomyopathy: Shorter Protocol, Reduced Mortality, and Higher Incidence of Overt Dilated Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Talavera, Jesús; Giraldo, Alejandro; Fernández-Del-Palacio, María Josefa; García-Nicolás, Obdulio; Seva, Juan; Brooks, Gavin; Moraleda, Jose M

    2015-01-01

    Current protocols of anthracycline-induced cardiomyopathy in rabbits present with high premature mortality and nephrotoxicity, thus rendering them unsuitable for studies requiring long-term functional evaluation of myocardial function (e.g., stem cell therapy). We compared two previously described protocols to an in-house developed protocol in three groups: Group DOX2 received doxorubicin 2 mg/kg/week (8 weeks); Group DAU3 received daunorubicin 3 mg/kg/week (10 weeks); and Group DAU4 received daunorubicin 4 mg/kg/week (6 weeks). A cohort of rabbits received saline (control). Results of blood tests, cardiac troponin I, echocardiography, and histopathology were analysed. Whilst DOX2 and DAU3 rabbits showed high premature mortality (50% and 33%, resp.), DAU4 rabbits showed 7.6% premature mortality. None of DOX2 rabbits developed overt dilated cardiomyopathy; 66% of DAU3 rabbits developed overt dilated cardiomyopathy and quickly progressed to severe congestive heart failure. Interestingly, 92% of DAU4 rabbits showed overt dilated cardiomyopathy and 67% developed congestive heart failure exhibiting stable disease. DOX2 and DAU3 rabbits showed alterations of renal function, with DAU3 also exhibiting hepatic function compromise. Thus, a shortened protocol of anthracycline-induced cardiomyopathy as in DAU4 group results in high incidence of overt dilated cardiomyopathy, which insidiously progressed to congestive heart failure, associated to reduced systemic compromise and very low premature mortality.

  19. Arabidopsis DAYU/ABERRANT PEROXISOME MORPHOLOGY9 is a key regulator of peroxisome biogenesis and plays critical roles during pollen maturation and germination in planta.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin-Ran; Li, Hong-Ju; Yuan, Li; Liu, Man; Shi, Dong-Qiao; Liu, Jie; Yang, Wei-Cai

    2014-02-01

    Pollen undergo a maturation process to sustain pollen viability and prepare them for germination. Molecular mechanisms controlling these processes remain largely unknown. Here, we report an Arabidopsis thaliana mutant, dayu (dau), which impairs pollen maturation and in vivo germination. Molecular analysis indicated that DAU encodes the peroxisomal membrane protein ABERRANT PEROXISOME MORPHOLOGY9 (APEM9). DAU is transiently expressed from bicellular pollen to mature pollen during male gametogenesis. DAU interacts with peroxisomal membrane proteins PEROXIN13 (PEX13) and PEX16 in planta. Consistently, both peroxisome biogenesis and peroxisome protein import are impaired in dau pollen. In addition, the jasmonic acid (JA) level is significantly decreased in dau pollen, and the dau mutant phenotype is partially rescued by exogenous application of JA, indicating that the male sterility is mainly due to JA deficiency. In addition, the phenotypic survey of peroxin mutants indicates that the PEXs most likely play different roles in pollen germination. Taken together, these data indicate that DAU/APEM9 plays critical roles in peroxisome biogenesis and function, which is essential for JA production and pollen maturation and germination.

  20. Direct Photons at Low pT Measured in PHENIX

    SciTech Connect

    Peressounko, D.; Awes, Terry C; Batsouli, Sotiria; Cianciolo, Vince; Efremenko, Yuri; Read Jr, Kenneth F; Silvermyr, David O; Sorensen, Soren P; Stankus, Paul W; Young, Glenn R; Zhang, Chun; PHENIX, Collaboration

    2007-01-01

    Direct photon spectra measured at small p{sub T} in p+p, d+Au and Au+Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN}=200 GeV are presented. Several measurement techniques including statistical subtraction, tagging, and internal and external conversion were applied and found to produce consistent results. The p+p and d+Au results are found to be in very good agreement with pQCD predictions over the entire p{sub T} range. The direct photon yield in Au+Au collisions is compared to binary scaled d+Au data but the large systematic errors in d+Au results do not allow us to draw conclusions on the presence of a direct photon excess due to matter-related emission in Au+Au collisions.

  1. Among substituted 9,10-dihydro-9,10-[1,2]benzenoanthracene-1,4,5,8-tetraones, the lead antitumor triptycene bisquinone TT24 blocks nucleoside transport, induces apoptotic DNA fragmentation and decreases the viability of L1210 leukemic cells in the nanomolar range of daunorubicin in vitro.

    PubMed

    Perchellet, Elisabeth M; Sperfslage, Bonnie J; Wang, Yang; Huang, Xiaodong; Tamura, Masafumi; Hua, Duy H; Perchellet, Jean-Pierre

    2002-07-01

    In contrast to their inactive parent compound triptycene (code name TT0), several new synthetic analogs (TT code number) have antileukemic activities and remain effective in daunorubicin (DAU)-resistant tumor sublines in vitro. Among variously substituted 9,10-dihydro-9,10-[1,2]benzenoanthracene-1,4,5,8-tetraones, a total of six lead antitumor compounds have been identified, and their code names are TT2, TT13, TT16, TT19, TT21 and TT24. These active antitumor triptych structures have bisquinone functionality, and various bromo, methoxy, methylamino and/or dimethylamino substitutions with or without longer alkyl chains on the amino function. Like the anthracycline quinone antibiotic DAU, these triptycene (TT) bisquinones also inhibit DNA synthesis and induce DNA cleavage in relation with their cytotoxic activities, but have the additional advantage of blocking the cellular transport of purine and pyrimidine nucleosides, an effect which DAU cannot do. As demonstrated by intact chromatin precipitation and agarose gel electrophoresis, the ability of TT bisquinones and DAU to induce DNA fragmentation is biphasic with a peak that shifts to lower concentrations with increasing times of drug exposure. The most effective lead antitumor compound, TT24, induces DNA cleavage in the same concentration-dependent manner as DAU at 24 h (similar peak in response to 1.6 microM) and is nearly equipotent to DAU against L1210 tumor cell viability at day 4 (IC50 values of TT24 and DAU: 48 and 25 nM, respectively). The mechanism by which TT24 induces DNA fragmentation is inhibited by actinomycin D, cycloheximide, benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp-fluoromethyl ketone, benzyloxycarbonyl-Ile-Glu-Thr-Asp-fluoromethyl ketone, N-tosyl-L-phenylalanine chloromethyl ketone and ZnSO4, suggesting that TT bisquinones trigger apoptosis by caspase and endonuclease activation. Since TT24 is cytotoxic in the nanomolar range of DAU, but might have a more versatile mechanism of action than DAU in wild

  2. Measurement of long-range angular correlation and quadrupole anisotropy of pions and (anti)protons in central d+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Adare, A.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akimoto, R.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Al-Ta’ani, H.; Alexander, J.; Andrews, K. R.; Angerami, A.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Appelt, E.; Aramaki, Y.; Armendariz, R.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Atomssa, E. T.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Bannier, B.; Barish, K. N.; Bassalleck, B.; Basye, A. T.; Bathe, S.; Baublis, V.; Baumann, C.; Bazilevsky, A.; Belikov, S.; Belmont, R.; Ben-Benjamin, J.; Bennett, R.; Bhom, J. H.; Blau, D. S.; Bok, J. S.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Broxmeyer, D.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Butsyk, S.; Campbell, S.; Caringi, A.; Castera, P.; Chen, C. -H.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, P.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cole, B. A.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Dahms, T.; Dairaku, S.; Danchev, I.; Das, K.; Datta, A.; David, G.; Dayananda, M. K.; Denisov, A.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dharmawardane, K. V.; Dietzsch, O.; Dion, A.; Donadelli, M.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Dutta, D.; D’Orazio, L.; Edwards, S.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Ellinghaus, F.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En’yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Fadem, B.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Fraenkel, Z.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fujiwara, K.; Fukao, Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Gal, C.; Garishvili, I.; Glenn, A.; Gong, H.; Gong, X.; Gonin, M.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grim, G.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gunji, T.; Guo, L.; Gustafsson, H. -Å.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamblen, J.; Han, R.; Hanks, J.; Harper, C.; Hashimoto, K.; Haslum, E.; Hayano, R.; He, X.; Heffner, M.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Hill, J. C.; Hohlmann, M.; Hollis, R. S.; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hori, Y.; Hornback, D.; Huang, S.; Ichihara, T.; Ichimiya, R.; Iinuma, H.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Inaba, M.; Iordanova, A.; Isenhower, D.; Ishihara, M.; Issah, M.; Ivanischev, D.; Iwanaga, Y.; Jacak, B. V.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; Jin, J.; John, D.; Johnson, B. M.; Jones, T.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kajihara, F.; Kamin, J.; Kaneti, S.; Kang, B. H.; Kang, J. H.; Kang, J. S.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kasai, M.; Kawall, D.; Kawashima, M.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kempel, T.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kijima, K. M.; Kikuchi, J.; Kim, A.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E. -J.; Kim, Y. -J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kinney, E.; Kiss, Á.; Kistenev, E.; Kleinjan, D.; Kline, P.; Kochenda, L.; Komkov, B.; Konno, M.; Koster, J.; Kotov, D.; Král, A.; Kravitz, A.; Kunde, G. J.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, J.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S. H.; Lee, S. R.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Li, X.; Lichtenwalner, P.; Liebing, P.; Lim, S. H.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Liška, T.; Liu, H.; Liu, M. X.; Love, B.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Malik, M. D.; Manion, A.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Mao, Y.; Masui, H.; Matathias, F.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; McGlinchey, D.; McKinney, C.; Means, N.; Mendoza, M.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mibe, T.; Mignerey, A. C.; Miki, K.; Milov, A.; Mitchell, J. T.; Miyachi, Y.; Mohanty, A. K.; Moon, H. J.; Morino, Y.; Morreale, A.; Morrison, D. P.; Motschwiller, S.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagle, J. L.; Naglis, M.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, K. R.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Nam, S.; Newby, J.; Nguyen, M.; Nihashi, M.; Nouicer, R.; Nyanin, A. S.; Oakley, C.; O’Brien, E.; Oda, S. X.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Oka, M.; Okada, K.; Onuki, Y.; Oskarsson, A.; Ouchida, M.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, B. H.; Park, I. H.; Park, S. K.; Park, W. J.; Pate, S. F.; Patel, L.; Pei, H.; Peng, J. -C.; Pereira, H.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Petti, R.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pisani, R. P.; Proissl, M.; Purschke, M. L.; Qu, H.; Rak, J.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Rembeczki, S.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Roach, D.; Roche, G.; Rolnick, S. D.; Rosati, M.; Rosen, C. A.; Rosendahl, S. S. E.; Ružička, P.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sakashita, K.; Samsonov, V.; Sano, S.; Sarsour, M.; Sato, T.; Savastio, M.; Sawada, S.; Sedgwick, K.; Seele, J.; Seidl, R.; Seto, R.; Sharma, D.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T. -A.; Shigaki, K.; Shim, H. H.; Shimomura, M.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Sim, K. S.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Slunečka, M.; Sodre, T.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Stankus, P. W.; Stenlund, E.; Stoll, S. P.; Sugitate, T.; Sukhanov, A.; Sun, J.; Sziklai, J.; Takagui, E. M.; Takahara, A.; Taketani, A.; Tanabe, R.; Tanaka, Y.; Taneja, S.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Tennant, E.; Themann, H.; Thomas, D.; Thomas, T. L.; Togawa, M.; Toia, A.; Tomášek, L.; Tomášek, M.; Torii, H.; Towell, R. S.; Tserruya, I.; Tsuchimoto, Y.; Utsunomiya, K.; Vale, C.; Valle, H.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vazquez-Zambrano, E.; Veicht, A.; Velkovska, J.; Vértesi, R.; Virius, M.; Vossen, A.; Vrba, V.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Watanabe, Y. S.; Wei, F.; Wei, R.; Wessels, J.; White, S. N.; Winter, D.; Woody, C. L.; Wright, R. M.; Wysocki, M.; Yamaguchi, Y. L.; Yamaura, K.; Yang, R.; Yanovich, A.; Ying, J.; Yokkaichi, S.; Yoo, J. S.; You, Z.; Young, G. R.; Younus, I.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zelenski, A.; Zhou, S.

    2015-05-12

    In this study, we present azimuthal angular correlations between charged hadrons and energy deposited in calorimeter towers in central d+Au and aluminum bias p+p collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV. The charged hadron is measured at midrapidity lηl < 0.35, and the energy us measured at large rapidity (–3.7 < η < –3.1, Au-going direction). An enhanced near-side angular correlation across lΔηl > 2.75 is observed in d+Au collisions. Using the event plane method applied to the Au-going energy distribution, we extract the anisotropy strength v₂ for inclusive charged hadrons at midrapidity up to pT = 4.5 GeV/c. We also present the measurement of v₂ for identified π± and (anti)protons in central d+Au collisions, and observe a mass-ordering pattern similar to that seen in heavy ion collisions. These results are compared with viscous hydrodynamic calculations and measurements from p+Pb at √sNN = 5.02 TeV. The magnitude of the mass-ordering in d+Au is found to be smaller than that in p+Pb collisions, which may indicate smaller radial flow in lower energy d+Au collisions.

  3. Control of the intermolecular photodimerization of anthracene derivatives by hydrogen bonding of urea groups in dilute solution.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Hisato; Nishimura, Yoshinobu; Arai, Tatsuo

    2016-08-01

    The photodimerization reaction of anthracene derivatives was performed by capitalizing on intermolecular hydrogen bonds. Anthracene derivatives that can control the dimerization reaction depending on the substitution site were designed by using two anthryl moieties and one urea group, referred to as N,N'-dianthracen-n-ylurea, nDAU (n = 1, 2 and 9), which are symmetrically substituted by 1-anthryl, 2-anthryl and 9-anthryl groups, respectively. We investigated the excimer emission and photodimerization reaction of these anthracene-urea derivatives using absorption, emission, and (1)H NMR spectroscopy along with fluorescence decay measurements. All derivatives showed a concentration dependence of their fluorescence spectra and multiple fluorescence lifetime components even at 10(-6) M. Significantly, 9DAU resulted in an intermolecular photodimerization reaction. These differences in photoreactivity of nDAU may depend on variations in the overlap of the intermolecularly associated anthracene rings of nDAU by hydrogen bonding between intermolecular urea moieties. Furthermore, the dimerization quantum yield of 9DAU was reduced by the addition of tetrabutylammonium acetate (TBAAc). Consequently, we revealed that the substitution site and the addition of TBAAc affected the dimerization reaction of anthracene-urea derivatives. PMID:27444124

  4. Indications of conical emission of charged hadrons at the BNL relativistic heavy ion collider.

    SciTech Connect

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Krueger, K.; Spinka, H. M.; Underwood, D. G.; High Energy Physics; Univ. of Illinois; Panjab Univ.; Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre; Kent State Univ.; Particle Physic Lab.; STAR Collaboration

    2009-01-01

    Three-particle azimuthal correlation measurements with a high transverse momentum trigger particle are reported for pp, d+Au, and Au+Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV by the STAR experiment. Dijet structures are observed in pp, d+Au and peripheral Au+Au collisions. An additional structure is observed in central Au+Au data, signaling conical emission of correlated charged hadrons. The conical emission angle is found to be {theta} = 1.37 {+-} 0.02(stat){sub -0.07}{sup +0.06} (syst), independent of p.

  5. Indications of conical emission of charged hadrons at the BNL relativistic heavy ion collider.

    PubMed

    Abelev, B I; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Anderson, B D; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Bai, Y; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Baumgart, S; Beavis, D R; Bellwied, R; Benedosso, F; Betts, R R; Bhardwaj, S; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Biritz, B; Bland, L C; Bombara, M; Bonner, B E; Botje, M; Bouchet, J; Braidot, E; Brandin, A V; Bruna, E; Bueltmann, S; Burton, T P; Bystersky, M; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Callner, J; Catu, O; Cebra, D; Cendejas, R; Cervantes, M C; Chajecki, Z; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Chen, J Y; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, K E; Christie, W; Chung, S U; Clarke, R F; Codrington, M J M; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cosentino, M R; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Dash, S; Daugherity, M; De Silva, C; de Moura, M M; Dedovich, T G; Dephillips, M; Derevschikov, A A; de Souza, R Derradi; Didenko, L; Djawotho, P; Dogra, S M; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, F; Dunlop, J C; Dutta Mazumdar, M R; Edwards, W R; Efimov, L G; Elhalhuli, E; Elnimr, M; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Estienne, M; Eun, L; Fachini, P; Fatemi, R; Fedorisin, J; Feng, A; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fine, V; Fisyak, Y; Gagliardi, C A; Gaillard, L; Gangadharan, D R; Ganti, M S; Garcia-Solis, E; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; Gorbunov, Y N; Gordon, A; Grebenyuk, O; Grosnick, D; Grube, B; Guertin, S M; Guimaraes, K S F F; Gupta, A; Gupta, N; Guryn, W; Haag, B; Hallman, T J; Hamed, A; Harris, J W; He, W; Heinz, M; Heppelmann, S; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffman, A M; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Hollis, R S; Huang, H Z; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Iordanova, A; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Jakl, P; Jin, F; Jones, P G; Joseph, J; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kajimoto, K; Kang, K; Kapitan, J; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Kettler, D; Khodyrev, V Yu; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Klein, S R; Knospe, A G; Kocoloski, A; Koetke, D D; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kouchpil, V; Kravtsov, P; Kravtsov, V I; Krueger, K; Krus, M; Kuhn, C; Kumar, L; Kurnadi, P; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lapointe, S; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, C-H; Levine, M J; Li, C; Li, Y; Lin, G; Lin, X; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, H; Liu, J; Liu, L; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Longacre, R S; Love, W A; Lu, Y; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, G L; Ma, Y G; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Mall, O I; Mangotra, L K; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McShane, T S; Meschanin, A; Millane, J; Miller, M L; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mischke, A; Mitchell, J; Mohanty, B; Molnar, L; Morozov, D A; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nattrass, C; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nepali, C; Netrakanti, P K; Ng, M J; Nogach, L V; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okada, H; Okorokov, V; Olson, D; Pachr, M; Page, B S; Pal, S K; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlak, T; Peitzmann, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Phatak, S C; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Poskanzer, A M; Potukuchi, B V K S; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Pruthi, N K; Putschke, J; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Reed, R; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L; Russcher, M J; Rykov, V; Sahoo, R; Sakrejda, I; Sakuma, T; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sarsour, M; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Selyuzhenkov, I; Seyboth, P; Shabetai, A; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Sharma, M; Shi, S S; Shi, X-H; Sichtermann, E P; Simon, F; Singaraju, R N; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stadnik, A; Stanislaus, T D S; Staszak, D; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Suaide, A A P; Suarez, M C; Subba, N L; Sumbera, M; Sun, X M; Sun, Y; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tang, Z; Tarnowsky, T; Thein, D; Thomas, J H; Tian, J; Timmins, A R; Timoshenko, S; Tlusty, D; Tokarev, M; Trainor, T A; Tram, V N; Trattner, A L; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tsai, O D; Ulery, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; van Leeuwen, M; Vander Molen, A M; Vanfossen, J A; Varma, R; Vasconcelos, G M S; Vasilevski, I M; Vasiliev, A N; Videbaek, F; Vigdor, S E; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Voloshin, S A; Wada, M; Waggoner, W T; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, J S; Wang, Q; Wang, X; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, Y; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, Y; Xu, Z; Yepes, P; Yoo, I-K; Yue, Q; Zawisza, M; Zbroszczyk, H; Zhan, W; Zhang, H; Zhang, S; Zhang, W M; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, Y; Zhong, C; Zhou, J; Zoulkarneev, R; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zuo, J X

    2009-02-01

    Three-particle azimuthal correlation measurements with a high transverse momentum trigger particle are reported for pp, d+Au, and Au+Au collisions at sqrt[s_{NN}]=200 GeV by the STAR experiment. Dijet structures are observed in pp, d+Au and peripheral Au+Au collisions. An additional structure is observed in central Au+Au data, signaling conical emission of correlated charged hadrons. The conical emission angle is found to be theta=1.37+/-0.02(stat)-0.07+0.06(syst), independent of p_{ perpendicular}. PMID:19257508

  6. Charged particle multiplicity studies with PHOBOS.

    SciTech Connect

    Alver, B.; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Ballintijn, M.; Barton, D. S.; Physics; Massachusetts Inst. of Tech.; BNL

    2008-01-01

    Summary and conclusion: (1) Multiplicity - PHOBOS have performed complete charged particle multiplicity measurements for Au+Au, Cu+Cu, d+Au, and p+p collisions, System size dependence, and 'Complete' pseudorapidity distributions; 'Universality' compared to elementary e+e- collisions; and (2) Midrapidity multiplicity - Factorization of centrality and energy dependencies; (3) Limiting fragmentation - extended longitudinal scaling - Seen for Au+Au, Cu+Cu, and d+Au, Also observed in flow observables; (4) Total charged particle multiplicity - N{sub ch}/N{sub part} constant with centrality, (5) Future - Finish up many analysis and reviews.

  7. Universal scaling of pT distribution of particles in relativistic nuclear collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, L. L.; Yang, C. B.

    2007-04-01

    With the experimental data from the STAR, PHENIX, and BRAHMS programs on the centrality and rapidity dependence of the pT spectrum in Au+Au and d+Au collisions, we show that a scaling distribution exists that is independent of the colliding system, centrality, and rapidity. The parameter for the average transverse momentum increases from peripheral to central d+Au collisions. This increase accounts for the enhancement of particle production in those collisions. A nonextensive entropy is used to derive the scaling function.

  8. NMR investigation of the effect of caffeine on the hetero-association of an anticancer drug with a vitamin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evstigneev, M. P.; Evstigneev, V. P.; Davies, D. B.

    2006-12-01

    The complexation between an anti-cancer drug Daunomycin (DAU) and a Vitamin B 2 derivative, flavin-mononucleotide (FMN), in the presence of a third type of aromatic molecule, caffeine (CAF), in aqueous solution has been studied by NMR spectroscopy. Ternary mixtures of the drug, vitamin and caffeine have been analysed quantitatively taking into account all possible complexation reactions between the aromatic molecules in solution. The results show that complexation between DAU and FMN decreases on addition of CAF which suggests that caffeine at physiological concentrations in vivo may affect the biological synergism of drug and vitamin.

  9. The Development of an All-in-One Virtual Campus from Ground Zero.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, Shanan W.; Sobieszcyk, Frank; Farmer, Rachelle

    This paper describes the authors' experiences in developing an all-in-one virtual university. The Defense Acquisition University (DAU) is a consortium of Department of Defense education and training institutions and organizations that provides mandatory and assignment-specific courses for military and civilian personnel serving in 11 acquisition…

  10. Hybridized doxorubicin-Au nanospheres exhibit enhanced near-infrared surface plasmon absorption for photothermal therapy applications.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jialin; Wang, Zuhua; Li, Qingpo; Liu, Fei; Du, Yongzhong; Yuan, Hong; Hu, Fuqiang; Wei, Yinghui; You, Jian

    2015-03-19

    Photothermal therapy (PTT) employs photosensitizing agents, which are taken up by cells and generate heat when irradiated with near-infrared (NIR) light, to enable the photoablation of cancer cells. High absorption in the NIR region is crucial for a photosensitizing agent to achieve efficient PTT. Different combinations between gold nanoparticles and fluorescent agents always influence their spectrum properties. Herein, we fabricated a novel combination of a fluorescent agent (doxorubicin, DOX, also a popular chemotherapeutic agent) with gold nanospheres by synthesizing hybridized DOX-Au nanospheres (DAuNS), where a part of the DOX molecules and Au co-formed a hybridized matrix as the shell and the remaining DOX molecules precipitated as the core. The unique structure of DAuNS induced interesting changes in the characteristics including spectrum properties, morphology, drug loading and antitumor activity. We observed that DAuNS exhibited a significantly enhanced surface plasmon absorption in the NIR region, inducing a more efficient photothermal conversion and stronger tumor-cell killing ability under NIR laser irradiation. In addition, our study presents a new and simple platform to load a drug into nanoparticles. DAuNS could be a promising nanoparticle with the "two punch" efficacy of PTT and chemotherapy and could be used in clinical applications due to its controllable synthesis, small size, and narrow size distribution.

  11. 78 FR 48658 - Defense Acquisition University Board of Visitors; Notice of Federal Advisory Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-09

    .... DAU Strategic Plan/FY14 Performance Plan 10:15 a.m. Knowledge Sharing Study 11:15 a.m. Team Training...(a)(3) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act of 1972, the public or interested organizations...

  12. 75 FR 22562 - Board of Visitors Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-29

    ... Visitors (BoV) will be held at DAU Headquarters at Fort Belvoir, Virginia. The purpose of this meeting is to report back to the BoV on continuing items of interest. DATES: The meeting will be held on May...

  13. Gold nanoparticle-based beacon to detect STAT5b mRNA expression in living cells: a case optimized by bioinformatics screen.

    PubMed

    Deng, Dawei; Li, Yang; Xue, Jianpeng; Wang, Jie; Ai, Guanhua; Li, Xin; Gu, Yueqing

    2015-01-01

    Messenger RNA (mRNA), a single-strand ribonucleic acid with functional gene information is usually abnormally expressed in cancer cells and has become a promising biomarker for the study of tumor progress. Hairpin DNA-coated gold nanoparticle (hDAuNP) beacon containing a bare gold nanoparticle (AuNP) as fluorescence quencher and thiol-terminated fluorescently labeled stem-loop-stem oligonucleotide sequences attached by Au-S bond is currently a new nanoscale biodiagnostic platform capable of mRNA detection, in which the design of the loop region sequence is crucial for hybridizing with the target mRNA. Hence, in this study, to improve the sensitivity and selectivity of hDAuNP beacon simultaneously, the loop region of hairpin DNA was screened by bioinformatics strategy. Here, signal transducer and activator of transcription 5b (STAT5b) mRNA was selected and used as a practical example. The results from the combined characterizations using optical techniques, flow cytometry assay, and cell microscopic imaging showed that after optimization, the as-prepared hDAuNP beacon had higher selectivity and sensitivity for the detection of STAT5b mRNA in living cells, as compared with our previous beacon. Thus, the bioinformatics method may be a promising new strategy for assisting in the designing of the hDAuNP beacon, extending its application in the detection of mRNA expression and the resultant mRNA-based biological processes and disease pathogenesis.

  14. 76 FR 14949 - Defense Acquisition University Industry Day: “Better Buying Power” Initiatives

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-18

    ... of the Secretary Defense Acquisition University Industry Day: ``Better Buying Power'' Initiatives AGENCY: Defense Acquisition University, DoD. ACTION: Event notice. SUMMARY: Mrs. Katrina McFarland, President, Defense Acquisition University (DAU), will host a forum to discuss implementation of...

  15. 76 FR 62394 - Meeting of the Defense Acquisition University Board of Visitors; Cancellation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-07

    ... of the Secretary Meeting of the Defense Acquisition University Board of Visitors; Cancellation AGENCY: Defense Acquisition University (DAU), Department of Defense (DoD). ACTION: Notice; cancellation. SUMMARY: On September 22, 2011 (76 FR 58786), the Defense Acquisition University Board of Visitors announced...

  16. Optimized Ultrasound Conditions for Enhanced Sensitivity of Molecular Beacons in the Detection of MDR1 mRNA in Living Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qiumei; Ma, Yi; Wang, Zhaohui; Wang, Ke; Liu, Ruonan; Han, Zhihao; Zhang, Min; Li, Siwen; Gu, Yueqing

    2016-03-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp), aprognostic indicator for chemotherapy failure, is encoded by multidrug resistance gene (MDR1). MDR1 mRNA expression could serve as a guidance for personalized medicine. However, the traditional PCR process for mRNA measurement is complicated and cannot realize the real-time detection of mRNA in living single cells. In this work, optimized gold nanoparticle-based molecular beacons were employed to determine MDR1 mRNA levels in living cancer cells. To improve detection sensitivity, ultrasound (US) irradiation was applied to facilitate and enhance cellular uptake of hairpin DNA-coated gold nanoparticle (hDAuNP). The US conditions including irradiation power, exposure time, duty cycle, and incubation time were optimized. The slight difference in MDR1 expression manipulated by siRNA silence could be recognized by US assisted hDAuNP beacons; a 10-fold increase of detection sensitivity was achieved compared with the nonultrasound assistance. Meanwhile, the detection cycle could be shortened from 12 to 2 h. Furthermore, this hDAuNP beacon can serve as an antisense agent to down-regulate P-gp expression and to reverse drug resistance of MCF-7/Adr cells to doxorubicin. Our results demonstrated that the MDR1 hDAuNP beacon assisted by US irradiation had great potential to predict chemotherapy sensitivity and to overcome multidrug resistance in cancer cells and was thus a promising tool for individualized medicine.

  17. DoD Acquisition Workforce Education: An SBA Education Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davenport, Richard W.

    2009-01-01

    A Department of Defense (DoD) M&S education task force is in the process of studying the Modeling and Simulation (M&S) education of the acquisition workforce. Historically, DoD acquisition workforce education is not referred to as education, but rather what the Defense Acquisition University (DAU) refers to as "practitioner training, career…

  18. Centrality, Rapidity And Transverse-Momentum Dependence of Cold Nuclear Matter Effects on J/Psi Production in D Au, Cu Cu And Au Au Collisions at S(NN)**(1/2)

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreiro, E.G.; Fleuret, F.; Lansberg, J.P.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; /SPhN, DAPNIA, Saclay

    2011-11-11

    We have carried out a wide study of Cold Nuclear Matter (CNM) effects on J/{Psi} = production in dAu, CuCu and AuAu collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV. We have studied the effects of three different gluon-shadowing parameterizations, using the usual simplified kinematics for which the momentum of the gluon recoiling against the J/{Psi} is neglected as well as an exact kinematics for a 2 {yields} 2 process, namely g + g {yields} J/{psi} + g as expected from LO pQCD. We have shown that the rapidity distribution of the nuclear modification factor R{sub dAu}, and particularly its anti-shadowing peak, is systematically shifted toward larger rapidities in the 2 {yields} 2 kinematics, irrespective of which shadowing parameterization is used. In turn, we have noted differences in the effective final-state nuclear absorption needed to fit the PHENIX dAu data. Taking advantage of our implementation of a 2 {yields} 2 kinematics, we have also computed the transverse momentum dependence of the nuclear modification factor, which cannot be predicted with the usual simplified kinematics. All the corresponding observables have been computed for CuCu and AuAu collisions and compared to the PHENIX and STAR data. Finally, we have extracted the effective nuclear absorption from the recent measurements of RCP in dAu collisions by the PHENIX collaboration.

  19. Optimized Ultrasound Conditions for Enhanced Sensitivity of Molecular Beacons in the Detection of MDR1 mRNA in Living Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qiumei; Ma, Yi; Wang, Zhaohui; Wang, Ke; Liu, Ruonan; Han, Zhihao; Zhang, Min; Li, Siwen; Gu, Yueqing

    2016-03-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp), aprognostic indicator for chemotherapy failure, is encoded by multidrug resistance gene (MDR1). MDR1 mRNA expression could serve as a guidance for personalized medicine. However, the traditional PCR process for mRNA measurement is complicated and cannot realize the real-time detection of mRNA in living single cells. In this work, optimized gold nanoparticle-based molecular beacons were employed to determine MDR1 mRNA levels in living cancer cells. To improve detection sensitivity, ultrasound (US) irradiation was applied to facilitate and enhance cellular uptake of hairpin DNA-coated gold nanoparticle (hDAuNP). The US conditions including irradiation power, exposure time, duty cycle, and incubation time were optimized. The slight difference in MDR1 expression manipulated by siRNA silence could be recognized by US assisted hDAuNP beacons; a 10-fold increase of detection sensitivity was achieved compared with the nonultrasound assistance. Meanwhile, the detection cycle could be shortened from 12 to 2 h. Furthermore, this hDAuNP beacon can serve as an antisense agent to down-regulate P-gp expression and to reverse drug resistance of MCF-7/Adr cells to doxorubicin. Our results demonstrated that the MDR1 hDAuNP beacon assisted by US irradiation had great potential to predict chemotherapy sensitivity and to overcome multidrug resistance in cancer cells and was thus a promising tool for individualized medicine. PMID:26821347

  20. RHD allele distribution in Africans of Mali

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Franz F; Moulds, Joann M; Tounkara, Anatole; Kouriba, Bourema; Flegel, Willy A

    2003-01-01

    Background Aberrant and non-functional RHD alleles are much more frequent in Africans than in Europeans. The DAU cluster of RHD alleles exemplifies that the alleles frequent in Africans have evaded recognition until recently. A comprehensive survey of RHD alleles in any African population was lacking. Results We surveyed the molecular structure and frequency of RHD alleles in Mali (West Africa) by evaluating 116 haplotypes. Only 69% could be attributed to standard RHD (55%) or the RHD deletion (14%). The aberrant RHD allele DAU-0 was predicted for 19%, RHDΨ for 7% and Ccdes for 4% of all haplotypes. DAU-3 and the new RHD allele RHD(L207F), dubbed DMA, were found in one haplotype each. A PCR-RFLP for the detection of the hybrid Rhesus box diagnostic for the RHD deletion in Europeans was false positive in 9 individuals, including all carriers of RHDΨ . Including two silent mutations and the RHD deletion, a total of 9 alleles could be differentiated. Conclusion Besides standard RHD and the RHD deletion, DAU-0, RHDΨ and Ccdes are major alleles in Mali. Our survey proved that the most frequent alleles of West Africans have been recognized allowing to devise reliable genotyping and phenotyping strategies. PMID:14505497

  1. A new daunomycin-peptide conjugate: synthesis, characterization and the effect on the protein expression profile of HL-60 cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Orbán, Erika; Manea, Marilena; Marquadt, Andreas; Bánóczi, Zoltán; Csík, Gabriella; Fellinger, Erzsébet; Bosze, Szilvia; Hudecz, Ferenc

    2011-10-19

    Daunomycin (Dau) is a DNA-binding antineoplastic agent in the treatment of various types of cancer, such as osteosarcomas and acute myeloid leukemia. One approach to improve its selectivity and to decrease the side effects is the conjugation of Dau with oligopeptide carriers, which might alter the drug uptake and intracellular fate. Here, we report on the synthesis, characterization, and in vitro biological properties of a novel conjugate in which Dau is attached, via an oxime bond, to one of the cancer specific small peptides (LTVSPWY) selected from a random phage peptide library. The in vitro cytostatic effect and cellular uptake of Dau═Aoa-LTVSPWY-NH(2) conjugate were studied on various human cancer cell lines expressing different levels of ErbB2 receptor which could be targeted by the peptide. We found that the new daunomycin-peptide conjugate is highly cytostatic and could be taken up efficiently by the human cancer cells studied. However, the conjugate was less effective than the free drug itself. RP-HPLC data indicate that the conjugate is stable at least for 24 h in the pH 2.5-7.0 range of buffers, as well as in cell culture medium. The conjugate in the presence of rat liver lysosomal homogenate, as indicated by LC-MS analysis, could be degraded. The smallest, Dau-containing metabolite (Dau═Aoa-Leu-OH) identified and prepared expresses DNA-binding ability. In order to get insight on the potential mechanism of action, we compared the protein expression profile of HL-60 human leukemia cells after treatment with the free and peptide conjugated daunomycin. Proteomic analysis suggests that the expression of several proteins has been altered. This includes three proteins, whose expression was lower (tubulin β chain) or markedly higher (proliferating cell nuclear antigen and protein kinase C inhibitor protein 1) after administration of cells with Dau-conjugate vs free drug.

  2. Extremely temperature-insensitive continuous-wave broadband quantum cascade lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Kazuue; Yamanishi, Masamichi; Furuta, Shinichi; Dougakiuchi, Tatsuo; Sugiyama, Atsushi; Edamura, Tadataka

    2013-03-01

    Quantum cascade (QC) lasers are promising light sources for many chemical sensing applications in the mid-infrared spectral range. For industrial applications, broadband wavelength tuning of external-cavity QC lasers with very broad gain-width has been demonstrated. QC lasers based on anti-crossed dual-upper-state (DAU) designs are one of the promising candidates because of its broad bandwidth as well as high device performances. In fact, wide wavelength tuning of external cavity QC lasers with the anti-crossed DAU designs has been exhibited in several wavelengths: the tuning range of ~25% in pulsed mode and <17% in cw mode at room temperature. Here we report conspicuous temperature performances of continuous wave quantum cascade lasers with broad gain bandwidths. The lasers with the anti-crossed DAU designs, characterized by strong super-linear current-light output curves, exhibit the extremely high characteristic temperature for threshold current density, T0~750 K above room temperature. In addition, its slope efficiency is growing with increasing temperature (negative T1-value). For the pulsed operation of a short 1 mm length laser, the temperature coefficient reaches the surprisingly high value of 1085 K over 340-380 K temperature range. The distinctive characteristics of the DAU lasers are attributable to the optical absorption quenching which has been clarified to take place in indirect pumped QC lasers. Such high characteristic temperatures of the DAU-QC lasers provide great advantages for practical applications, in addition to its potential of broadband tuning.

  3. Induction of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 cleavage by antitumor triptycene bisquinones in wild-type and daunorubicin-resistant HL-60 cell lines.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Perchellet, Elisabeth M; Tamura, Masafumi; Hua, Duy H; Perchellet, Jean Pierre

    2002-12-15

    In contrast to their inactive parent compound triptycene (code name TT0), new synthetic analogs (TT code number) mimic the antitumor effects of the anthracycline quinone antibiotic daunorubicin (DAU) in the nM range in vitro but have the additional advantage of also blocking nucleoside transport and retaining their efficacy in multidrug-resistant (MDR) tumor cells. Since TT bisquinones may induce DNA fragmentation at 24 h by an active mechanism that requires RNA and protein syntheses and protease activities, the most cytotoxic of them, TT24, was tested for its ability to induce poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) cleavage, an early marker of apoptosis. PARP-1 cleavage starts at 2-3 h and is maximally induced at 6 h by 1.6 microM concentrations of TT24 and DAU in wild-type drug-sensitive HL-60-S cells. However, in MDR HL-60-RV cells, PARP-1 cleavage is still induced by 4 microM TT24 but not by 4-10 microM DAU. The magnitude of PARP-1 cleavage may increase with the number of quinoid rings in the triptych structure and, in contrast to TT0, all lead antitumor TT bisquinones share the ability to fully induce PARP-1 cleavage in HL-60-S cells. A 1 h pulse treatment is sufficient for TT24 and DAU to induce PARP-1 cleavage at 6 h. Since the abilities of TT24 and DAU to induce PARP-1 cleavage are inhibited by benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp-fluoromethyl ketone but not by N-tosyl-L-phenylalanine chloromethyl ketone, caspase-mediated apoptosis may be involved in the mechanism by which these quinone antitumor drugs induce the proteolytic cleavage of PARP-1 at 6 h and the internucleosomal fragmentation of DNA at 24 h in the HL-60 tumor cell system. PMID:12406551

  4. Centrality Dependence of {pi}0 and {eta} Production at Large Transverse Momentum in sqrt(s_NN) = 200 GeV d + Au Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Awes, Terry C; Batsouli, Sotiria; Cianciolo, Vince; Efremenko, Yuri; Plasil, F; Read Jr, Kenneth F; Silvermyr, David O; Sorensen, Soren P; Stankus, Paul W; Young, Glenn R; Zhang, Chun; PHENIX, Collaboration

    2007-04-01

    The dependence of transverse momentum spectra of neutral pions and {eta} mesons with p{sub T}<16 GeV/c and p{sub T}<12 GeV/c, respectively, on the centrality of the collision has been measured at midrapidity by the PHENIX experiment at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) in d+Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN}=200 GeV. The measured yields are compared to those in p+p collisions at the same {radical}s{sub NN} scaled by the number of underlying nucleon-nucleon collisions in d+Au. At all centralities, the yield ratios show no suppression, in contrast to the strong suppression seen for central Au+Au collisions at RHIC. Only a weak pT and centrality dependence can be observed.

  5. FLUCTUATION AND LOW TRANSVERSE MOMENTUM CORRELATION RESULTS FROM PHENIX.

    SciTech Connect

    MITCHELL,J.T.

    2006-07-03

    The PHENIX Experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider has conducted a survey of fluctuations in charged hadron multiplicity in Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 22, 62, and 200 GeV. A universal power law scaling for multiplicity fluctuations expressed as {sigma}{sup 2}/{mu}{sup 2} is observed as a function of N{sub part} for all species studied that is independent of the transverse momentum range of the measurement. PHENIX has also measured transverse momentum correlation amplitudes in p+p, d+Au, and Au+Au collisions. At low transverse momentum, significant differences in the correlations between the baseline p+p and d+Au data and the Au+Au data are presented.

  6. Broadband tuning of continuous wave quantum cascade lasers in long wavelength (> 10 μm) range.

    PubMed

    Dougakiuchi, Tatsuo; Fujita, Kazuue; Sugiyama, Atsushi; Ito, Akio; Akikusa, Naota; Edamura, Tadataka

    2014-08-25

    Broadband spectral tuning in the long wavelength range (greater than 10 μm) was demonstrated with an external-cavity quantum cascade laser. The tunable wavelength of the laser ranged from 9.5 to 11.4 μm (176 cm(-1); corresponding to 18% of the center wavelength) in continuous wave (cw) operation at room temperature, without any anti-reflection coating. The gain chip based on the anti-crossed dual-upper-state (DAU) design provided a cw lasing up to 300 K, with a low threshold current density of 2.1 kA/cm2. The highly stable broadband spectral tuning and high laser performance were enabled by the spectrally homogeneous gain profile of the anti-crossed DAU active region.

  7. Terahertz generation in mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers with a dual-upper-state active region

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, Kazuue Hitaka, Masahiro; Ito, Akio; Edamura, Tadataka; Yamanishi, Masamichi; Jung, Seungyong; Belkin, Mikhail A.

    2015-06-22

    We report the performance of room temperature terahertz sources based on intracavity difference-frequency generation in mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers with a dual-upper-state (DAU) active region. DAU active region design is theoretically expected to produce larger optical nonlinearity for terahertz difference-frequency generation, compared to the active region designs of the bound-to-continuum type used previously. Fabricated buried heterostructure devices with a two-section buried distributed feedback grating and the waveguide designed for Cherenkov difference-frequency phase-matching scheme operate in two single-mode mid-infrared wavelengths at 10.7 μm and 9.7 μm and produce terahertz output at 2.9 THz with mid-infrared to terahertz conversion efficiency of 0.8 mW/W{sup 2} at room temperature.

  8. Heavy Flavor Measurements at the RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Donadelli, Marisilvia

    2010-11-12

    The main focus of the heavy flavor program at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) facility is to investigate the properties of the Quark-Gluon Plasma poduced in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions, by studying its effect on open heavy flavor and quarkonia production. The measurements shown in this Letter were performed by PHENIX and STAR experiments in p+p, d+Au, Au+Au collisions at {radical}(S{sub NN}) = 200 GeV. Charm and beauty cross sections are measured and compared through single lepton, and lepton-hadron correlations in p+p collisions. R{sub AA} modification factor for single electrons in Au+Au collisions is presented. Quarkonia measurements include J/{Psi}, {Psi}' and {Upsilon} yields as well as rapidity dependence, and modification factors for J/{Psi} in d+Au collisions and for {Upsilon} in Au+Au collisions.

  9. Why Deuterium+Au was the critical control experiment at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyulassy, Miklos

    2003-10-01

    One of the striking discoveries at RHIC was the strong (factor of 4-5) suppression of high pT pions above 4 GeV/c in central Au+Au at 200 AGeV. In addition the data reveal an evolution from di-jet correlations in peripheral collisions to mono-jet production in central collisions. Two paradigms existed prior to the new D+Au data proporting to explain the same jet quenching pattern. One is based on the formation of an opaque Quark-Gluon Plasma [1]. The other is based on initial state gluon shadowing in the Color Glass Condensate model for the nuclear wavefunction [2]. I review both paradigms and how the D+Au reaction provides the critical control experiment to decide which is closer to reality under RHIC conditions. I conclude that if the preliminary d+Au data are confirmed, then a QGP was in fact formed in central Au+Au at RHIC. References: [1] M. Gyulassy, Ivan Vitev, Xin-Nian Wang, Ben-Wei Zhang nucl-th/0302077 and refs. therein. [2] Edmond Iancu, Raju Venugopalan hep-ph/0303204 and refs. therein.

  10. Visual detection of multidrug resistance gene in living cell using the molecular beacon imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qiumei; Ma, Yi; Gu, Yueqing

    2014-09-01

    A major problem in cancer treatment is the development of resistance to chemotherapeutic agents in tumor cells. Detection of effective prognostic biomarkers and targets are of crucial importance to the management of individualized therapies. However, quantitative analysis of the drug resistance gene had been difficult because of technical limitations. In this study, we designed and used a special hairpin deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), which served as a beacon for detecting human drug resistance indicater. Upon hybridizing with the target mRNA, the hairpin DNA modified gold nanoparticle beacons (hDAuNP beacons) release the fluorophores attached at 5'end of the oligonucleotide sequence. The fluorescence properties of the beacon before and after the hybridization with the complementary DNA were confirmed in vitro. The hDAuNP beacons could be taken up by living cells with low inherent cytotoxicity and higher stability. hDAuNP beacon imaged by confocal laser scanning microscopy to detect the resistance gene expression. The detected fluorescence in MCF7and MCF7/ADR cells correlates with the specific drug resistance gene expression, which is consistent with the result from Q-PCR. Thus, this approach overcame many of the challenges of previous techniques by creating highly sensitive and effective intracellular probes for monitoring gene expression.

  11. Comparison of student productivity in four-handed clinic and regular unassisted clinic.

    PubMed

    Holmes, David C; Squire, Larry J; Arneson, Scott K; Doering, John V

    2009-09-01

    Although four-handed dentistry is routine in most dental practices in the United States, solo unassisted clinical practice is the norm for students at many North American dental schools. The objective of this study was to compare the clinical productivity of fourth-year dental students practicing in a four-handed model to the clinical productivity of those same fourth-year dental students practicing in a solo, unassisted mode at the University of Iowa College of Dentistry for the three academic years 2005-08. Students averaged 2.62 patient visits per day in the four-handed Dental Auxiliary Utilization (DAU) Clinic and 1.74 visits per day in the regular Family Dentistry Clinic. Charging fees that are approximately 50 percent of prevailing local private practice fees, the mean daily charges for services provided by individual students averaged $329 in the DAU Clinic and $190 in the Family Dentistry Clinic. The mean daily productivity differentials were 0.88 patient visits and $139. While students averaged 51 percent more patient visits and 75 percent higher charges daily in the DAU Clinic as compared to the regular Family Dentistry Clinic, the increased revenues might not be sufficient to offset increased expenses incurred in the four-handed clinical operation.

  12. Production of {omega} Mesons at Large Transverse Momenta in p + p and d + Au Collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Awes, Terry C; Batsouli, Sotiria; Cianciolo, Vince; Efremenko, Yuri; Plasil, F; Read Jr, Kenneth F; Silvermyr, David O; Sorensen, Soren P; Stankus, Paul W; Young, Glenn R; Zhang, Chun; PHENIX, Collaboration

    2007-05-01

    The PHENIX experiment at RHIC has measured the invariant cross section for omega-meson production at midrapidity in the transverse momentum range 2.5d+Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN})=200 GeV. Measurements in two decay channels ({omega}{yields}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and {omega}{yields}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma}) yield consistent results, and the reconstructed {omega} mass agrees with the accepted value within the pT range of the measurements. The {omega}/{pi}{sup 0} ratio is found to be 0.85{+-}0.05stat{+-}0.09sys in p+p and 0.94{+-}0.08stat{+-}0.12sys in d+Au collisions, independent of pT. The nuclear modification factor R{sub dA}{sup {omega}} is 1.03{+-}0.12stat{+-}0.21sys and 0.83{+-}0.21stat{+-}0.17sys in minimum bias and central (0-20%) d+Au collisions, respectively.

  13. Antigenotoxic effect of Chamomilla recutita (L.) Rauschert essential oil in mouse spermatogonial cells, and determination of its antioxidant capacity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Ceruelos, Alejandra; Madrigal-Santillán, Eduardo; Morales-González, José Antonio; Chamorro-Cevallos, Germán; Cassani-Galindo, Martha; Madrigal-Bujaidar, Eduardo

    2010-01-01

    Chamomilla recutita (L.) Rauschert (Asteraceae), popularly known as chamomile, is a plant used in traditional medicine for various therapeutic purposes. Chamomile essential oil (CEO) is particularly known to inhibit the genotoxic damage produced by mutagens in mice somatic cells. The aim of this research was to determine the inhibitory potential of CEO on the genotoxic damage produced by daunorubicin (DAU) in mice germ cells. We evaluated the effect of 5, 50, and 500 mg/kg of essential oil on the rate of sister chromatid exchange (SCE) induced in spermatogonia by 10 mg/kg of the mutagen. We found no genotoxicity of CEO, but detected an inhibition of SCE after the damage induced by DAU; from the lowest to the highest dose of CEO we found an inhibition of 47.5%, 61.9%, and 93.5%, respectively. As a possible mechanism of action, the antioxidant capacity of CEO was determined using the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical scavenging method and ferric thiocyanate assays. In the first test we observed a moderate scavenging potential of the oil; nevertheless, the second assay showed an antioxidant capacity similar to that observed with vitamin E. In conclusion, we found that CEO is an efficient chemoprotective agent against the damage induced by DAU in the precursor cells of the germinal line of mice, and that its antioxidant capacity may induce this effect. PMID:21152302

  14. Antigenotoxic Effect of Chamomilla recutita (L.) Rauschert Essential Oil in Mouse Spermatogonial Cells, and Determination of Its Antioxidant Capacity in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Ceruelos, Alejandra; Madrigal-Santillán, Eduardo; Morales-González, José Antonio; Chamorro-Cevallos, Germán; Cassani-Galindo, Martha; Madrigal-Bujaidar, Eduardo

    2010-01-01

    Chamomilla recutita (L.) Rauschert (Asteraceae), popularly known as chamomile, is a plant used in traditional medicine for various therapeutic purposes. Chamomile essential oil (CEO) is particularly known to inhibit the genotoxic damage produced by mutagens in mice somatic cells. The aim of this research was to determine the inhibitory potential of CEO on the genotoxic damage produced by daunorubicin (DAU) in mice germ cells. We evaluated the effect of 5, 50, and 500 mg/kg of essential oil on the rate of sister chromatid exchange (SCE) induced in spermatogonia by 10 mg/kg of the mutagen. We found no genotoxicity of CEO, but detected an inhibition of SCE after the damage induced by DAU; from the lowest to the highest dose of CEO we found an inhibition of 47.5%, 61.9%, and 93.5%, respectively. As a possible mechanism of action, the antioxidant capacity of CEO was determined using the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical scavenging method and ferric thiocyanate assays. In the first test we observed a moderate scavenging potential of the oil; nevertheless, the second assay showed an antioxidant capacity similar to that observed with vitamin E. In conclusion, we found that CEO is an efficient chemoprotective agent against the damage induced by DAU in the precursor cells of the germinal line of mice, and that its antioxidant capacity may induce this effect. PMID:21152302

  15. Functional characterization of solute carrier (SLC) 26/sulfate permease (SulP) proteins in membrane mimetic systems.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Lakshmi; Baars, Tonie Luise; Fendler, Klaus; Michel, Hartmut

    2016-04-01

    Solute carrier (SLC) 26 or sulfate permease (SulP) anion transporters, belong to a phylogenetically ancient family of secondary active transporters. Members of the family are involved in several human genetic diseases and cell physiological processes. Despite their importance, the substrates for transport by this family of proteins have been poorly characterized. In this study, recombinant StmYchM/DauA, a SulP from Salmonella typhimurium was purified to homogeneity and functionally characterized. StmYchM/DauA was found to be a dimer in solution as determined by size exclusion chromatography coupled to multiple angle light scattering. We report a functional characterization of the SulP proteins in two membrane mimetic systems and reveal a dual nature of anionic substrates for SulP. StmYchM/DauA functionally incorporated into nanodiscs could bind fumarate with millimolar affinities (KD = 4.6 ± 0.29 mM) as detected by intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence quench studies. In contrast, electrophysiological experiments performed in reconstituted liposomes indicate a strong bicarbonate transport in the presence of chloride but no detectable electrogenic fumarate transport. We hence suggest that while SulP acts as an electrogenic bicarbonate transporter, fumarate may serve as substrate under different conditions indicating multiple functions of SulP.

  16. Immunoassay screening of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) and its confirmation by HPLC and fluorescence detection following LSD ImmunElute extraction.

    PubMed

    Grobosch, T; Lemm-Ahlers, U

    2002-04-01

    In all, 3872 urine specimens were screened for lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) using the CEDIA DAU LSD assay. Forty-eight samples, mainly from psychiatric patients or drug abusers, were found to be LSD positive, but only 13 (27%) of these could be confirmed by high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection (HPLC-FLD) following immunoaffinity extraction (IAE). Additional analysis for LSD using the DPC Coat-a-Count RIA was performed to compare the two immunoassay screening methods. Complete agreement between the DPC RIA assay and HPLC-FLD results was observed at concentrations below a cutoff concentration of 500 pg/mL. Samples that were LSD positive in the CEDIA DAU assay but not confirmed by HPLC-FLD were also investigated for interfering compounds using REMEDI HS drug-profiling system. REMEDI HS analysis identified 15 compounds (parent drugs and metabolites) that are believed to cross-react in the CEDIA DAU LSD assay: ambroxol, prilocaine, pipamperone, diphenhydramine, metoclopramide, amitriptyline, doxepine, atracurium, bupivacaine, doxylamine, lidocaine, mepivacaine, promethazine, ranitidine, and tramadole. The IAE/HPLC-FLD combination is rapid, easy to perform and reliable. It can reduce costs when standard, rather than more advanced, HPLC equipment is used, especially for labs that perform analyses for LSD infrequently. The chromatographic analysis of LSD, nor-LSD, and iso-LSD is not influenced by any of the tested cross-reacting compounds even at a concentration of 100 ng/mL.

  17. Children and Terrorism-Related News: Training Parents in Coping and Media Literacy

    PubMed Central

    Comer, Jonathan S.; Furr, Jami M.; Beidas, Rinad S.; Weiner, Courtney L.; Kendall, Philip C.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined associations between televised news regarding risk for future terrorism and youth outcomes and investigated the effects of training mothers in an empirically based approach to addressing such news with children. This approach—Coping and Media Literacy (CML)—emphasized modeling, media literacy, and contingent reinforcement and was compared via randomized design to Discussion as Usual (DAU). Ninety community youth (aged 7−13 years) and their mothers viewed a televised news clip about the risk of future terrorism, and threat perceptions and state anxiety were assessed preclip, postclip, and postdiscussion. Children responded to the clip with elevated threat perceptions and anxiety. Children of CML-trained mothers exhibited lower threat perceptions than DAU youth at postclip and at postdiscussion. Additionally, CML-trained mothers exhibited lower threat perceptions and state anxiety at postclip and postdiscussion than did DAU mothers. Moreover, older youth responded to the clip with greater societal threat perception than did younger youth. Findings document associations between terrorism-related news, threat perceptions, and anxiety and support the utility of providing parents with strategies for addressing news with children. Implications and research suggestions are discussed. PMID:18665686

  18. NMR study of the supramolecular structure of dual drug-loaded poly(butylcyanoacrylate) nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Simeonova, Margarita; Rangel, Maria; Ivanova, Galya

    2013-10-21

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been used for structural characterization of 5-fluorouracil (5FU) & daunorubicin (DAU) co-loaded poly(butylcyanoacrylate) nanoparticles (PBCN), prepared by an anionic polymerization of n-butylcyanoacrylate, probing two different drug loading approaches. Diffusion ordered spectroscopy, obtained through pulsed field gradient NMR experiments, has been performed to determine the overall structure of the 5FU & DAU co-loaded PBCN and to clarify the mechanisms of drug immobilization and location in the polymer matrix of PBCN. Physicochemical properties such as composition, size, surface chemistry and shape have been defined. All data obtained have been referred to the dual drug-loading procedures employed. The results show that 5FU & DAU co-loaded PBCN can be designed to exhibit different properties, composition and overall structure, depending on the method of preparation. The structural attributes relate to the drug efficacy and reactivity characteristics such as capacity for sustained drug release, targeted drug delivery, drug penetration, retention in and transport through bio-membranes. The design of nanoparticle platforms to deliver multiple drugs for combination therapy offers the opportunity for novel strategies in an effort to increase the efficacy of cancer therapy.

  19. Long range rapidity correlations and jet production in high energy nuclear collisions

    SciTech Connect

    STAR Collaboration; Abelev, Betty

    2010-07-05

    The STAR Collaboration at RHIC presents a systematic study of high transverse momentum charged di-hadron correlations at small azimuthal pair separation {Delta}{phi}, in d+Au and central Au+Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV. Significant correlated yield for pairs with large longitudinal separation {Delta}{eta} is observed in central Au+Au, in contrast to d+Au collisions. The associated yield distribution in {Delta}{eta} x {delta}{phi} can be decomposed into a narrow jet-like peak at small angular separation which has a similar shape to that found in d+Au collisions, and a component which is narrow in {Delta}{phi} and depends only weakly on {Delta}{eta}, the 'ridge'. Using two systematically independent analyses, finite ridge yield is found to persist for trigger p{sub t} > 6 GeV/c, indicating that it is correlated with jet production. The transverse momentum spectrum of hadrons comprising the ridge is found to be similar to that of bulk particle production in the measured range (2 < p{sub t} < 4 GeV/c).

  20. Antitumor triptycene bisquinones induce a caspase-independent release of mitochondrial cytochrome c and a caspase-2-mediated activation of initiator caspase-8 and -9 in HL-60 cells by a mechanism which does not involve Fas signaling.

    PubMed

    Perchellet, Elisabeth M; Wang, Yang; Weber, Rebeka L; Lou, Kaiyan; Hua, Duy H; Perchellet, Jean-Pierre H

    2004-11-01

    Synthetic triptycene analogs (TT code number) mimic the antitumor effects of daunorubicin (DAU) in vitro, but have the advantage of blocking nucleoside transport, inhibiting both DNA topoisomerase I and II activities, and retaining their efficacy in multidrug-resistant (MDR) tumor cells. Since TT bisquinones induce poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) cleavage at 6 h and internucleosomal DNA fragmentation at 24 h, which are, respectively, early and late markers of apoptosis, these antitumor drugs were tested for their ability to trigger the release of mitochondrial cytochrome c (Cyt c) and the caspase activation cascade in the HL-60 cell system. Based on their ability to reduce the viability of wild-type, drug-sensitive HL-60-S cells in the nanomolar range, six lead antitumor TT bisquinones have been identified so far: TT2, TT13, TT16, TT19, TT24 and TT26. In accord with the fact that effector caspase-3 is responsible for PARP-1 cleavage, 4 microM concentrations of DAU and these TT bisquinones all maximally induce caspase-3 activity at 6 h in HL-60-S cells, an effect which persists when the drugs are removed after a 1-h pulse treatment. Since caspase-3 may be activated by initiator caspase-9 and -8, it is significant to show that such caspase activation cascade is induced by 4 microM DAU and TT bisquinones at 6 h in HL-60-S cells. Although the relationship is not perfect, the ability of TT analogs to induce caspase-3, -8 and -9 activities may be linked to their quinone functionality and cytotoxicity. Interestingly, 4 microM concentrations of TT bisquinones retain their ability to induce caspase-3, -8 and -9 activities at 6 h in the MDR HL-60-RV cell line where 4 microM DAU becomes totally ineffective. The release of mitochondrial Cyt c is also detected within 6 h in HL-60-S cells treated with 4 microM DAU or TT bisquinones, a finding consistent with the fact that Cyt c is the apoptotic trigger that activates caspase-9. Caspase-2 and -8 may both act upstream of

  1. Screening of cocaine and its metabolites in human urine samples by direct analysis in real-time source coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry after online preconcentration utilizing microextraction by packed sorbent.

    PubMed

    Jagerdeo, Eshwar; Abdel-Rehim, Mohamed

    2009-05-01

    Microextraction by packed sorbent (MEPS) has been evaluated for fast screening of drugs of abuse with mass spectrometric detection. In this study, C8 (octyl-silica, useful for nonpolar to moderately polar compounds), ENV(+) (hydroxylated polystyrene-divinylbenzene copolymer, for extraction of aliphatic and aromatic polar compounds), Oasis MCX (sulfonic-poly(divinylbenzene-co-N-polyvinyl-pyrrolidone) copolymer), and Clean Screen DAU (mixed mode, ion exchanger for acidic and basic compounds) were used as sorbents for the MEPS. The focus was on fast extraction and preconcentration of the drugs with rapid analysis using a time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer as the detector with direct analysis in a real-time (DART) source. The combination of an analysis time of less than 1 min and accurate mass of the first monoisotopic peak of the analyte and the relative abundances of the peaks in the isotopic clusters provided reliable information for identification. Furthermore, the study sought to demonstrate that it is possible to quantify the analyte of interest using a DART source when an internal standard is used. Of all the sorbents used in the study, Clean Screen DAU performed best for extraction of the analytes from urine. Using Clean Screen DAU to extract spiked samples containing the drugs, linearity was demonstrated for ecgonine methyl ester, benzoylecgonine, cocaine, and cocaethylene with average ranges of: 65-910, 75-1100, 95-1200, and 75-1100 ng/mL (n = 5), respectively. The limits of detection (LOD) for ecgonine methyl ester, benzoylecgonine, cocaine, and cocaethylene were 22.9 ng/mL, 23.7 ng/mL, 4.0 ng/mL, and 9.8 ng/mL respectively, using a signal-to-noise ratio of 3:1. PMID:19264505

  2. Hyperthermia enhances tumor uptake and antitumor efficacy of thermostable liposomal daunorubicin in a rat solid tumor.

    PubMed

    van Bree, C; Krooshoop, J J; Rietbroek, R C; Kipp, J B; Bakker, P J

    1996-02-01

    The combination of local hyperthermia (HT) with thermostable liposomal daunorubicin (DaunoXome, DX) was investigated to assess targeted drug delivery to experimental tumors. Female Wag/Rij rats bearing solid R-1 rhabdomyosarcomas received i.v. injections of 10 or 15 mg/kg of DX or free-Daunorubicin (f-Dau). After a 1-h interval, HT (60 min at 43 degrees C) was applied. Pharmacokinetics were studied in relation to tumor growth time (TGT), i.e., the time for tumors to reach their original volumes. Pharmacokinetic studies revealed that DX accumulation in tumor tissue was similar to f-Dau. A 5.4-fold increase (P = 0.0084) in tumor drug delivery was observed when DX was combined with HT, whereas liposomes remained stable. For f-Dau, HT had an additional effect on TGT at both drug doses tested (9.6 and 6.2 days, respectively, for 10 mg/kg, P = 0.0092; 17.7 and 13.7, respectively, for 15 mg/kg, P = 0.0431). For DX, HT significantly enhanced TGT of DX in the lower dose (17.1 and 6.4 days, respectively, P = 0.0005), whereas tumors did not regrow at day 25 after DX + HT in the higher dose. Unfortunately, after this time interval, the animals died of late toxicity, probably not related to HT. These results indicate that HT promotes extravasation of DX into tumor tissue and enhances its effectiveness. The finding that HT-induced drug release from the liposomes was not responsible for enhanced antitumor activity provides a rationale for further investigation of thermostable liposomes in conjunction with HT. PMID:8564972

  3. Visual detection of STAT5B gene expression in living cell using the hairpin DNA modified gold nanoparticle beacon.

    PubMed

    Xue, Jianpeng; Shan, Lingling; Chen, Haiyan; Li, Yang; Zhu, Hongyan; Deng, Dawei; Qian, Zhiyu; Achilefu, Samuel; Gu, Yueqing

    2013-03-15

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 5B (STAT5B) is an important protein in JAK-STAT signaling pathway that is responsible for the metastasis and proliferation of tumor cells. Determination of the STAT5B messenger Ribonucleic Acid (mRNA) relating to the STAT5B expression provides insight into the mechanism of tumor progression. In this study, we designed and used a special hairpin deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) for human STAT5B mRNA to functionalize gold nanoparticles, which served as a beacon for detecting human STAT5B expression. Up to 90% quenching efficiency was achieved. Upon hybridizing with the target mRNA, the hairpin DNA modified gold nanoparticle beacons (hDAuNP beacons) release the fluorophores attached at 5' end of the oligonucleotide sequence. The fluorescence properties of the beacon before and after the hybridization with the complementary DNA were confirmed in vitro. The stability of hDAuNP beacons against degradation by DNase I and GSH indicated that the prepared beacon is stable inside cells. The detected fluorescence in MCF-7 cancer cells correlates with the specific STAT5B mRNA expression, which is consistent with the result from PCR measurement. Fluorescence microscopy showed that the hDAuNP beacons internalized in cells without using transfection agents, with intracellular distribution in the cytoplasm rather than the nucleus. The results demonstrated that this beacon could directly provide quantitative measurement of the intracellular STAT5B mRNA in living cells. Compared to the previous approaches, this beacon has advantages of higher target to background ratio of detection and an increased resistance to nuclease degradation. The strategy reported in this study is a promising approach for the intracellular measurement of RNA or protein expression in living cells, and has great potential in the study of drug screening and discovery.

  4. Nucleon-gold collisions at 200A GeV using tagged d + Au interactions in the PHOBOS detector

    DOE PAGES

    Back, B. B.; Nouicer, R.; Baker, M. D.; Ballintijn, M.; Barton, D. S.; Becker, B.; Betts, R. R.; Bickley, A. A; Stienberg, P.; Ioradnova, A.; et al

    2015-09-23

    Forward calorimetry in the PHOBOS detector has been used to study charged hadron production in d+Au, p+Au, and n+Au collisions at √sNN =200GeV. The forward proton calorimeter detectors are described and a procedure for determining collision centrality with these detectors is detailed. The deposition of energy by deuteron spectator nucleons in the forward calorimeters is used to identify p+Au and n+Au collisions in the data. A weighted combination of the yield of p+Au and n+Au is constructed to build a reference for Au+Au collisions that better matches the isospin composition of the gold nucleus. The pT and centrality dependence ofmore » the yield of this improved reference system is found to match that of d+Au. The shape of the charged-particle transverse momentum distribution is observed to extrapolate smoothly from p+p¯ to central d+Au as a function of the charged-particle pseudorapidity density. The asymmetry of positively and negatively charged hadron production in p+Au is compared to that of n+Au. No significant asymmetry is observed at midrapidity. In conclusion, these studies augment recent results from experiments at the CERN Large Hadron Collider and BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider facilities to give a more complete description of particle production in p+A and d+A collisions, essential for the understanding the medium produced in high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions.« less

  5. Nematode orphan genes are adopted by conserved regulatory networks and find a home in ecology.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Melanie G; Sommer, Ralf J

    2015-01-01

    Nematode dauer formation represents an essential survival and dispersal strategy and is one of a few ecologically relevant traits that can be studied in laboratory approaches. Under harsh environmental conditions, the nematode model organisms Caenorhabditis elegans and Pristionchus pacificus arrest their development and induce the formation of stress-resistant dauer larvae in response to dauer pheromones, representing a key example of phenotypic plasticity. Previous studies have indicated that in P. pacificus, many wild isolates show cross-preference of dauer pheromones and compete for access to a limited food source. When investigating the genetic mechanisms underlying this intraspecific competition, we recently discovered that the orphan gene dauerless (dau-1) controls dauer formation by copy number variation. Our results show that dau-1 acts in parallel to or downstream of steroid hormone signaling but upstream of the nuclear hormone receptor daf-12, suggesting that DAU-1 represents a novel inhibitor of DAF-12. Phylogenetic analysis reveals that the observed copy number variation is part of a complex series of gene duplication events that occurred over short evolutionary time scales. Here, we comment on the incorporation of novel or fast-evolving genes into conserved genetic networks as a common principle for the evolution of phenotypic plasticity and intraspecific competition. We discuss the possibility that orphan genes might often function in the regulation and execution of ecologically relevant traits. Given that only few ecological processes can be studied in model organisms, the function of such genes might often go unnoticed, explaining the large number of uncharacterized genes in model system genomes. PMID:27123366

  6. Nucleon-gold collisions at 200A GeV using tagged d + Au interactions in the PHOBOS detector

    SciTech Connect

    Back, B. B.; Nouicer, R.; Baker, M. D.; Ballintijn, M.; Barton, D. S.; Becker, B.; Betts, R. R.; Bickley, A. A; Stienberg, P.; Ioradnova, A.; Pak, R.; Sukhanov, A.

    2015-09-23

    Forward calorimetry in the PHOBOS detector has been used to study charged hadron production in d+Au, p+Au, and n+Au collisions at √sNN =200GeV. The forward proton calorimeter detectors are described and a procedure for determining collision centrality with these detectors is detailed. The deposition of energy by deuteron spectator nucleons in the forward calorimeters is used to identify p+Au and n+Au collisions in the data. A weighted combination of the yield of p+Au and n+Au is constructed to build a reference for Au+Au collisions that better matches the isospin composition of the gold nucleus. The pT and centrality dependence of the yield of this improved reference system is found to match that of d+Au. The shape of the charged-particle transverse momentum distribution is observed to extrapolate smoothly from p+p¯ to central d+Au as a function of the charged-particle pseudorapidity density. The asymmetry of positively and negatively charged hadron production in p+Au is compared to that of n+Au. No significant asymmetry is observed at midrapidity. In conclusion, these studies augment recent results from experiments at the CERN Large Hadron Collider and BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider facilities to give a more complete description of particle production in p+A and d+A collisions, essential for the understanding the medium produced in high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions.

  7. BRAHMS OVERVIEW

    SciTech Connect

    DEBBE, R.; FOR THE BRAHMS COLLABORATION

    2005-02-05

    A brief review of BRAHMS measurements of bulk particle production in RHIC Au+Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} 200GeV is presented, together with some discussion of baryon number transport. Intermediate p{sub T} measurements in different collision systems (Au+Au, d+ Au and p+p) are also discussed in the context of jet quenching and saturation of the gluon density in Au ions at RHIC energies. This report also includes preliminary results for identified particles at forward rapidities in d+Au and Au+Au collisions.

  8. COLLIMATION EXPERIENCE AT RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    DREES,K.A.FLILLER,R.TRBOJEVIC,D.KAIN,V.

    2003-05-19

    In the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) the abort kicker magnets are the limiting aperture. Continuous losses at this location could deteriorate the kicker performance. In addition, losses especially in the triplet area cause backgrounds in the experimental detectors. The RHIC one-stage collimation system was used to reduce these backgrounds as well as losses at the abort kickers. Collimation performance and results from various runs with even and uneven species (Au-Au, pp and d-Au) are presented and compared. Upgrades of the system for the upcoming high luminosity runs are outlined.

  9. DIFFRACTION DISSOCIATION - 50 YEARS LATER.

    SciTech Connect

    WHITE, S.N.

    2005-04-27

    The field of Diffraction Dissociation, which is the subject of this workshop, began 50 years ago with the analysis of deuteron stripping in low energy collisions with nuclei. We return to the subject in a modern context- deuteron dissociation in {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV d-Au collisions recorded during the 2003 RHIC run in the PHENIX experiment. At RHIC energy, d {yields} n+p proceeds predominantly (90%) through Electromagnetic Dissociation and the remaining fraction via the hadronic shadowing described by Glauber. Since the dissociation cross section has a small theoretical error we adopt this process to normalize other cross sections measured in RHIC.

  10. Transverse momentum and centrality dependence of high-ptnon-photonic electron suppression in Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$= 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Abelev, B.I.; Adams, J.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett,J.; Anderson, B.D.; Anderson, M.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Bai,Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A.K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, S.-L.; Bonner, B.E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A.V.; Bravar, A.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, R.V.; Cai,X.Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la Barca Sanchez, M.; Castillo, J.; Catu,O.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen,H.F.; Chen, J.H.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Cosentino, M.R.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford,H.J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; Daugherity, M.; de Moura, M.M.; Dedovich, T.G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Djawotho,P.; Dogra, S.M.; Dong, W.J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J.E.; Du, F.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Dutta Mazumdar, M.R.; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, W.R.; Efimov,L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch,E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Gaillard, L.; Ganti,M.S.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J.S.; Gorbunov, Y.G.; Gos,H.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S.M.; Guimaraes, K.S.F.F.; Guo,Y.; Gupta, N.; Gutierrez, T.D.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T.J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J.W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T.W.; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte,B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A.M.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Horner, M.J.; Huang, H.Z.; Huang, S.L.; Hughes, E.W.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs,P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Jakl, P.; Jia, F.; Jiang, H.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khodyrev, V.Yu.; Kim, B.C.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, E.M.; Klein,S.R.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D.D.; et al.

    2006-07-11

    The STAR collaboration at RHIC reports measurements of theinclusive yield of non-photonic electrons, which arise dominantly fromsemi-leptonic decays of heavy flavor mesons, over a broad range oftransverse momenta (1.2dAu, and AuAucollisions at sqrt sNN = 200 GeV. The non-photonic electron yieldexhibits unexpectedly large suppression in central AuAu collisions athigh pt, suggesting substantial heavy quark energy loss at RHIC. Thecentrality and \\pt dependences of the suppression provide constraints ontheoretical models of suppression.

  11. Probing the Nucleus with Deuteron+Gold Collisions at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Citron, Zvi Hirsh

    2011-12-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) was built to produce and study Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP), the phase of matter thought to exist under conditions sufficiently hot and dense to create a medium in which the degrees of freedom are quarks and gluons rather than color neutral hadrons. Already in its early years of running, the data from RHIC provided tantalizing evidence of QGP signatures in Au+Au collisions at sNN = 200 GeV. A crucial part of understanding the putative QGP in Au+Au collisions is to have both a well understood reference as well as a robust control experiment. Proton-proton collisions at the same sNN serve as the baseline for heavy ion collisions at RHIC, and play an invaluable role in setting our frame of reference in interactions that do not create any nuclear medium. For the control experiment, RHIC's ability to collide asymmetric beams is utilized and d+Au collisions are used. Unlike p+p collisions, in the d+Au system there is a nuclear medium present---the heavy Au nucleus---and so we may study this system to distinguish initial state cold nuclear matter effects from final state effects that occur in the hot dense medium of Au+Au collisions. Beyond its use as a control experiment, the d+Au collision system presents the opportunity for important study of nuclear and nucleonic structure, it is after all necessary for our colored parton theory to operate in the nucleus as well as in a QGP. Deuteron - gold collisions at RHIC are a powerful tool for shedding light on cold nuclear matter effects. This thesis describes two analyses of d+Au collisions measured by the PHENIX experiment at RHIC. The first is a measurement of the midrapidity yield of unidentified charged hadrons in the 2003 RHIC run. This is used a key baseline for understanding particle production in Au+Au collisions as well as a detailed look at the Cronin effect. The second analysis measures rapidity separated two-particle production where one of the particles is at either forward

  12. Cold Nuclear Matter effects on J/psi production at RHIC: comparing shadowing models

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreiro, E.G.; Fleuret, F.; Lansberg, J.P.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; /SPhN, DAPNIA, Saclay

    2009-06-19

    We present a wide study on the comparison of different shadowing models and their influence on J/{psi} production. We have taken into account the possibility of different partonic processes for the c{bar c}-pair production. We notice that the effect of shadowing corrections on J/{psi} production clearly depends on the partonic process considered. Our results are compared to the available data on dAu collisions at RHIC energies. We try different break up cross section for each of the studied shadowing models.

  13. High-pT azimuthal correlations of neutral strange baryons and mesons in STAR at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Bielcikova, Jana

    2006-07-11

    We present results on two-particle azimuthal correlations of high-pT neutral strange baryons ({lambda},{lambda}-bar) and mesons (K{sub S}{sup 0}) associated with non-identified charged particles in d+Au and Au+Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN}) = 200 GeV. In particular, we discuss properties of the near-side yield of associated charged particles as a function of centrality, transverse momentum and zT, as well as possible baryon/meson and particle/antiparticle differences. The results are compared to the proton and pion triggered correlations and to fragmentation and recombination models.

  14. Hadron production in deuteron-gold collisions and nuclear parton distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Adeluyi, Adeola; Fai, George

    2007-11-15

    We calculate nuclear modification factors R{sub dAu}, central-to-peripheral ratios, R{sub CP}, and pseudorapidity asymmetries Y{sub Asym} in deuteron-gold collisions at {radical}(s)=200 GeV in the framework of leading-order (LO) perturbative quantum chromodynamics. We use the Eskola-Kolhinen-Salgado (EKS), the Frankfurt-Guzey-Strikman (FGS), and the Hirai-Kumano-Nagai (HKN) nuclear parton distribution functions and the Albino-Kramer-Kniehl (AKK) fragmentation functions in our calculations. Results are compared to experimental data from the BRAHMS and STAR collaborations.

  15. Prevention of Birch Pollen-Related Food Allergy by Mucosal Treatment with Multi-Allergen-Chimers in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hoflehner, Elisabeth; Hufnagl, Karin; Schabussova, Irma; Jasinska, Joanna; Hoffmann-Sommergruber, Karin; Bohle, Barbara; Maizels, Rick M.; Wiedermann, Ursula

    2012-01-01

    Background Among birch pollen allergic patients up to 70% develop allergic reactions to Bet v 1-homologue food allergens such as Api g 1 (celery) or Dau c 1 (carrot), termed as birch pollen-related food allergy. In most cases, specific immunotherapy with birch pollen extracts does not reduce allergic symptoms to the homologue food allergens. We therefore genetically engineered a multi-allergen chimer and tested if mucosal treatment with this construct could represent a novel approach for prevention of birch pollen-related food allergy. Methodology BALB/c mice were poly-sensitized with a mixture of Bet v 1, Api g 1 and Dau c 1 followed by a sublingual challenge with carrot, celery and birch pollen extracts. For prevention of allergy sensitization an allergen chimer composed of immunodominant T cell epitopes of Api g 1 and Dau c 1 linked to the whole Bet v 1 allergen, was intranasally applied prior to sensitization. Results Intranasal pretreatment with the allergen chimer led to significantly decreased antigen-specific IgE-dependent β-hexosaminidase release, but enhanced allergen-specific IgG2a and IgA antibodies. Accordingly, IL-4 levels in spleen cell cultures and IL-5 levels in restimulated spleen and cervical lymph node cell cultures were markedly reduced, while IFN-γ levels were increased. Immunomodulation was associated with increased IL-10, TGF-β and Foxp3 mRNA levels in NALT and Foxp3 in oral mucosal tissues. Treatment with anti-TGF-β, anti-IL10R or anti-CD25 antibodies abrogated the suppression of allergic responses induced by the chimer. Conclusion Our results indicate that mucosal application of the allergen chimer led to decreased Th2 immune responses against Bet v 1 and its homologue food allergens Api g 1 and Dau c 1 by regulatory and Th1-biased immune responses. These data suggest that mucosal treatment with a multi-allergen vaccine could be a promising treatment strategy to prevent birch pollen-related food allergy. PMID:22768077

  16. Centrality-Dependent Modification of Jet-Production Rates in Deuteron-Gold Collisions at √[s(NN)]=200 GeV.

    PubMed

    Adare, A; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Al-Bataineh, H; Alexander, J; Alfred, M; Angerami, A; Aoki, K; Apadula, N; Aramaki, Y; Asano, H; Atomssa, E T; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, B; Babintsev, V; Bai, M; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Bandara, N S; Bannier, B; Barish, K N; Bassalleck, B; Basye, A T; Bathe, S; Baublis, V; Baumann, C; Bazilevsky, A; Beaumier, M; Beckman, S; Belikov, S; Belmont, R; Bennett, R; Berdnikov, A; Berdnikov, Y; Bhom, J H; Blau, D S; Bok, J S; Boyle, K; Brooks, M L; Bryslawskyj, J; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Butsyk, S; Campbell, S; Caringi, A; Chen, C-H; Chi, C Y; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choi, J B; Choudhury, R K; Christiansen, P; Chujo, T; Chung, P; Chvala, O; Cianciolo, V; Citron, Z; Cole, B A; Conesa Del Valle, Z; Connors, M; Csanád, M; Csörgő, T; Dahms, T; Dairaku, S; Danchev, I; Danley, T W; Das, K; Datta, A; Daugherity, M S; David, G; Dayananda, M K; DeBlasio, K; Dehmelt, K; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dharmawardane, K V; Dietzsch, O; Dion, A; Diss, P B; Do, J H; Donadelli, M; D'Orazio, L; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Drees, K A; Durham, J M; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Edwards, S; Efremenko, Y V; Ellinghaus, F; Engelmore, T; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Fadem, B; Feege, N; Fields, D E; Finger, M; Finger, M; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fujiwara, K; Fukao, Y; Fusayasu, T; Gal, C; Gallus, P; Garg, P; Garishvili, I; Ge, H; Giordano, F; Glenn, A; Gong, H; Gonin, M; Goto, Y; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Grim, G; Grosse Perdekamp, M; Gunji, T; Gustafsson, H-Å; Hachiya, T; Haggerty, J S; Hahn, K I; Hamagaki, H; Hamblen, J; Hamilton, H F; Han, R; Han, S Y; Hanks, J; Hasegawa, S; Haseler, T O S; Hashimoto, K; Haslum, E; Hayano, R; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Hester, T; Hill, J C; Hohlmann, M; Hollis, R S; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Horaguchi, T; Hornback, D; Hoshino, T; Hotvedt, N; Huang, J; Huang, S; Ichihara, T; Ichimiya, R; Ikeda, Y; Imai, K; Inaba, M; Iordanova, A; Isenhower, D; Ishihara, M; Issah, M; Ivanishchev, D; Iwanaga, Y; Jacak, B V; Jezghani, M; Jia, J; Jiang, X; Jin, J; Johnson, B M; Jones, T; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Jumper, D S; Kajihara, F; Kamin, J; Kanda, S; Kang, J H; Kapustinsky, J; Karatsu, K; Kasai, M; Kawall, D; Kawashima, M; Kazantsev, A V; Kempel, T; Key, J A; Khachatryan, V; Khanzadeev, A; Kijima, K M; Kikuchi, J; Kim, A; Kim, B I; Kim, C; Kim, D J; Kim, E-J; Kim, G W; Kim, M; Kim, Y-J; Kimelman, B; Kinney, E; Kiss, Á; Kistenev, E; Kitamura, R; Klatsky, J; Kleinjan, D; Kline, P; Koblesky, T; Kochenda, L; Komkov, B; Konno, M; Koster, J; Kotov, D; Král, A; Kravitz, A; Kunde, G J; Kurita, K; Kurosawa, M; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lai, Y S; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Lee, D M; Lee, J; Lee, K B; Lee, K S; Lee, S; Lee, S H; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Li, X; Lichtenwalner, P; Liebing, P; Lim, S H; Linden Levy, L A; Liška, T; Liu, H; Liu, M X; Love, B; Lynch, D; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Makek, M; Malik, M D; Manion, A; Manko, V I; Mannel, E; Mao, Y; Masui, H; Matathias, F; McCumber, M; McGaughey, P L; McGlinchey, D; McKinney, C; Means, N; Meles, A; Mendoza, M; Meredith, B; Miake, Y; Mibe, T; Mignerey, A C; Miki, K; Milov, A; Mishra, D K; Mitchell, J T; Miyasaka, S; Mizuno, S; Mohanty, A K; Montuenga, P; Moon, H J; Moon, T; Morino, Y; Morreale, A; Morrison, D P; Moukhanova, T V; Murakami, T; Murata, J; Mwai, A; Nagamiya, S; Nagashima, K; Nagle, J L; Naglis, M; Nagy, M I; Nakagawa, I; Nakagomi, H; Nakamiya, Y; Nakamura, K R; Nakamura, T; Nakano, K; Nam, S; Nattrass, C; Netrakanti, P K; Newby, J; Nguyen, M; Nihashi, M; Niida, T; Nishimura, S; Nouicer, R; Novák, T; Novitzky, N; Nyanin, A S; Oakley, C; O'Brien, E; Oda, S X; Ogilvie, C A; Oka, M; Okada, K; Onuki, Y; Orjuela Koop, J D; Osborn, J D; Oskarsson, A; Ouchida, M; Ozawa, K; Pak, R; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, I H; Park, J S; Park, S; Park, S K; Park, W J; Pate, S F; Patel, M; Pei, H; Peng, J-C; Pereira, H; Perepelitsa, D V; Perera, G D N; Peressounko, D Yu; Perry, J; Petti, R; Pinkenburg, C; Pinson, R; Pisani, R P; Proissl, M; Purschke, M L; Qu, H; Rak, J; Ramson, B J; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Rembeczki, S; Reygers, K; Reynolds, D; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Richardson, E; Rinn, T; Roach, D; Roche, G; Rolnick, S D; Rosati, M; Rosen, C A; Rosendahl, S S E; Rowan, Z; Rubin, J G; Ružička, P; Sahlmueller, B; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakashita, K; Sako, H; Samsonov, V; Sano, S; Sarsour, M; Sato, S; Sato, T; Sawada, S; Schaefer, B; Schmoll, B K; Sedgwick, K; Seele, J; Seidl, R; Sen, A; Seto, R; Sett, P; Sexton, A; Sharma, D; Shein, I; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shimomura, M; Shoji, K; Shukla, P; Sickles, A; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Silvestre, C; Sim, K S; Singh, B K; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Slunečka, M; Snowball, M; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stepanov, M; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Sukhanov, A; Sumita, T; Sun, J; Sziklai, J; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tanabe, R; Tanaka, Y; Taneja, S; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Tarafdar, S; Taranenko, A; Themann, H; Thomas, D; Thomas, T L; Tieulent, R; Timilsina, A; Todoroki, T; Togawa, M; Toia, A; Tomášek, L; Tomášek, M; Torii, H; Towell, C L; Towell, R; Towell, R S; Tserruya, I; Tsuchimoto, Y; Vale, C; Valle, H; van Hecke, H W; Vazquez-Zambrano, E; Veicht, A; Velkovska, J; Vértesi, R; Virius, M; Vrba, V; Vznuzdaev, E; Wang, X R; Watanabe, D; Watanabe, K; Watanabe, Y; Watanabe, Y S; Wei, F; Wei, R; Wessels, J; White, A S; White, S N; Winter, D; Woody, C L; Wright, R M; Wysocki, M; Xia, B; Xue, L; Yalcin, S; Yamaguchi, Y L; Yamaura, K; Yang, R; Yanovich, A; Ying, J; Yokkaichi, S; Yoo, J H; Yoon, I; You, Z; Young, G R; Younus, I; Yu, H; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zelenski, A; Zhou, S; Zou, L

    2016-03-25

    Jet production rates are measured in p+p and d+Au collisions at sqrt[s_{NN}]=200  GeV recorded in 2008 with the PHENIX detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. Jets are reconstructed using the R=0.3 anti-k_{t} algorithm from energy deposits in the electromagnetic calorimeter and charged tracks in multiwire proportional chambers, and the jet transverse momentum (p_{T}) spectra are corrected for the detector response. Spectra are reported for jets with 12d+Au events are found to be consistent with unity, constraining the role of initial state effects on jet production. However, the centrality-selected R_{dAu} values and central-to-peripheral ratios (R_{CP}) show large, p_{T}-dependent deviations from unity, challenging the conventional models that relate hard-process rates and soft-particle production in collisions involving nuclei. PMID:27058071

  17. Envelope and intensity based prediction of psychoacoustic masking and speech intelligibility.

    PubMed

    Biberger, Thomas; Ewert, Stephan D

    2016-08-01

    Human auditory perception and speech intelligibility have been successfully described based on the two concepts of spectral masking and amplitude modulation (AM) masking. The power-spectrum model (PSM) [Patterson and Moore (1986). Frequency Selectivity in Hearing, pp. 123-177] accounts for effects of spectral masking and critical bandwidth, while the envelope power-spectrum model (EPSM) [Ewert and Dau (2000). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 108, 1181-1196] has been successfully applied to AM masking and discrimination. Both models extract the long-term (envelope) power to calculate signal-to-noise ratios (SNR). Recently, the EPSM has been applied to speech intelligibility (SI) considering the short-term envelope SNR on various time scales (multi-resolution speech-based envelope power-spectrum model; mr-sEPSM) to account for SI in fluctuating noise [Jørgensen, Ewert, and Dau (2013). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 134, 436-446]. Here, a generalized auditory model is suggested combining the classical PSM and the mr-sEPSM to jointly account for psychoacoustics and speech intelligibility. The model was extended to consider the local AM depth in conditions with slowly varying signal levels, and the relative role of long-term and short-term SNR was assessed. The suggested generalized power-spectrum model is shown to account for a large variety of psychoacoustic data and to predict speech intelligibility in various types of background noise. PMID:27586734

  18. Cold-nuclear-matter effects on heavy-quark production at forward and backward rapidity in d + Au collisions at √sNN = 200  GeV.

    PubMed

    Adare, A; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Akimoto, R; Al-Bataineh, H; Al-Ta'ani, H; Alexander, J; Andrews, K R; Angerami, A; Aoki, K; Apadula, N; Appelt, E; Aramaki, Y; Armendariz, R; Aschenauer, E C; Atomssa, E T; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, B; Babintsev, V; Bai, M; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Bannier, B; Barish, K N; Bassalleck, B; Basye, A T; Bathe, S; Baublis, V; Baumann, C; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Belmont, R; Ben-Benjamin, J; Bennett, R; Bhom, J H; Blau, D S; Bok, J S; Boyle, K; Brooks, M L; Broxmeyer, D; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Butsyk, S; Campbell, S; Caringi, A; Castera, P; Chen, C-H; Chi, C Y; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choi, J B; Choudhury, R K; Christiansen, P; Chujo, T; Chung, P; Chvala, O; Cianciolo, V; Citron, Z; Cole, B A; Conesa Del Valle, Z; Connors, M; Csanád, M; Csörgő, T; Dahms, T; Dairaku, S; Danchev, I; Das, K; Datta, A; David, G; Dayananda, M K; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dharmawardane, K V; Dietzsch, O; Dion, A; Donadelli, M; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Drees, K A; Durham, J M; Durum, A; Dutta, D; D'Orazio, L; Edwards, S; Efremenko, Y V; Ellinghaus, F; Engelmore, T; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Fadem, B; Fields, D E; Finger, M; Finger, M; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fujiwara, K; Fukao, Y; Fusayasu, T; Gal, C; Garishvili, I; Glenn, A; Gong, H; Gong, X; Gonin, M; Goto, Y; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Grim, G; Grosse Perdekamp, M; Gunji, T; Guo, L; Gustafsson, H-Å; Haggerty, J S; Hahn, K I; Hamagaki, H; Hamblen, J; Han, R; Hanks, J; Harper, C; Hashimoto, K; Haslum, E; Hayano, R; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Hester, T; Hill, J C; Hohlmann, M; Hollis, R S; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Horaguchi, T; Hori, Y; Hornback, D; Huang, S; Ichihara, T; Ichimiya, R; Iinuma, H; Ikeda, Y; Imai, K; Inaba, M; Iordanova, A; Isenhower, D; Ishihara, M; Issah, M; Ivanischev, D; Iwanaga, Y; Jacak, B V; Jia, J; Jiang, X; Jin, J; John, D; Johnson, B M; Jones, T; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Jumper, D S; Kajihara, F; Kamin, J; Kaneti, S; Kang, B H; Kang, J H; Kang, J S; Kapustinsky, J; Karatsu, K; Kasai, M; Kawall, D; Kawashima, M; Kazantsev, A V; Kempel, T; Khanzadeev, A; Kijima, K M; Kikuchi, J; Kim, A; Kim, B I; Kim, D J; Kim, E-J; Kim, Y-J; Kim, Y K; Kinney, E; Kiss, A; Kistenev, E; Kleinjan, D; Kline, P; Kochenda, L; Komkov, B; Konno, M; Koster, J; Kotov, D; Král, A; Kravitz, A; Kunde, G J; Kurita, K; Kurosawa, M; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lai, Y S; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Lee, D M; Lee, J; Lee, K B; Lee, K S; Lee, S H; Lee, S R; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Li, X; Lichtenwalner, P; Liebing, P; Lim, S H; Linden Levy, L A; Liška, T; Liu, H; Liu, M X; Love, B; Lynch, D; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malik, M D; Manion, A; Manko, V I; Mannel, E; Mao, Y; Masui, H; Matathias, F; McCumber, M; McGaughey, P L; McGlinchey, D; McKinney, C; Means, N; Mendoza, M; Meredith, B; Miake, Y; Mibe, T; Mignerey, A C; Miki, K; Milov, A; Mitchell, J T; Miyachi, Y; Mohanty, A K; Moon, H J; Morino, Y; Morreale, A; Morrison, D P; Motschwiller, S; Moukhanova, T V; Murakami, T; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagle, J L; Naglis, M; Nagy, M I; Nakagawa, I; Nakamiya, Y; Nakamura, K R; Nakamura, T; Nakano, K; Nam, S; Newby, J; Nguyen, M; Nihashi, M; Nouicer, R; Nyanin, A S; Oakley, C; O'Brien, E; Oda, S X; Ogilvie, C A; Oka, M; Okada, K; Onuki, Y; Oskarsson, A; Ouchida, M; Ozawa, K; Pak, R; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, B H; Park, I H; Park, S K; Park, W J; Pate, S F; Patel, L; Pei, H; Peng, J-C; Pereira, H; Peressounko, D Yu; Petti, R; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Proissl, M; Purschke, M L; Qu, H; Rak, J; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Rembeczki, S; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Richardson, E; Roach, D; Roche, G; Rolnick, S D; Rosati, M; Rosen, C A; Rosendahl, S S E; Ružička, P; Sahlmueller, B; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakashita, K; Samsonov, V; Sano, S; Sarsour, M; Sato, T; Savastio, M; Sawada, S; Sedgwick, K; Seele, J; Seidl, R; Seto, R; Sharma, D; Shein, I; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shim, H H; Shimomura, M; Shoji, K; Shukla, P; Sickles, A; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Silvestre, C; Sim, K S; Singh, B K; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Slunečka, M; Sodre, T; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Sukhanov, A; Sun, J; Sziklai, J; Takagui, E M; Takahara, A; Taketani, A; Tanabe, R; Tanaka, Y; Taneja, S; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Tarafdar, S; Taranenko, A; Tennant, E; Themann, H; Thomas, D; Thomas, T L; Togawa, M; Toia, A; Tomášek, L; Tomášek, M; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tserruya, I; Tsuchimoto, Y; Utsunomiya, K; Vale, C; Valle, H; van Hecke, H W; Vazquez-Zambrano, E; Veicht, A; Velkovska, J; Vértesi, R; Virius, M; Vossen, A; Vrba, V; Vznuzdaev, E; Wang, X R; Watanabe, D; Watanabe, K; Watanabe, Y; Watanabe, Y S; Wei, F; Wei, R; Wessels, J; White, S N; Winter, D; Woody, C L; Wright, R M; Wysocki, M; Yamaguchi, Y L; Yamaura, K; Yang, R; Yanovich, A; Ying, J; Yokkaichi, S; Yoo, J S; You, Z; Young, G R; Younus, I; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zelenski, A; Zhou, S

    2014-06-27

    The PHENIX experiment has measured open heavy-flavor production via semileptonic decay over the transverse momentum range 1 < p(T) < 6  GeV/c at forward and backward rapidity (1.4 < |y| < 2.0) in d+Au and p + p collisions at √sNN = 200  GeV. In central d+Au collisions, relative to the yield in p + p collisions scaled by the number of binary nucleon-nucleon collisions, a suppression is observed at forward rapidity (in the d-going direction) and an enhancement at backward rapidity (in the Au-going direction). Predictions using nuclear-modified-parton-distribution functions, even with additional nuclear-p(T) broadening, cannot simultaneously reproduce the data at both rapidity ranges, which implies that these models are incomplete and suggests the possible importance of final-state interactions in the asymmetric d + Au collision system. These results can be used to probe cold-nuclear-matter effects, which may significantly affect heavy-quark production, in addition to helping constrain the magnitude of charmonia-breakup effects in nuclear matter.

  19. Synthesis and properties of ApU analogues containing 2'-halo-2'-deoxyadenosines. Effects of 2' substituents on oligonucleotide conformation.

    PubMed

    Uesugi, S; Kaneyasu, T; Ikehara, M

    1982-11-01

    Five A-U analogues containing deoxyadenosine or 2'-halo-2'-deoxyadenosines, which are known to have widely different C3'-endo conformer populations according to their electronegativities of the halogen substituents, dAfl-U, dAcl-U, dAbr-U, dAio-U, and dA-U, were synthesized chemically. Characterization of these dimers has been performed by UV absorption, circular dichroism, and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The results show that the dimers containing 2'-halo-2'-deoxyadenosines have stacked conformations with a geometry similar to that of A-U and the degree of stacking decreases in the order dAfl-U greater than dAcl-U greater than dAbr-U greater than dAio-U. dAcl-U is assumed to have the same degree of stacking as A-U. dA-U takes a more stacked conformation than does dAio-U, but the mode of stacking is different from those of the other dimers. The effects of the 2' substituents on dimer conformation are discussed in terms of electronegativity, molecular size, and hydrophobicity.

  20. Centrality-Dependent Modification of Jet-Production Rates in Deuteron-Gold Collisions at sNN=200 GeV

    DOE PAGES

    Adare, A.

    2016-03-24

    Wemore » measured jet production rates in p+p and d+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV recorded in 2008 with the PHENIX detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. Jets are reconstructed using the R=0.3 anti-kt algorithm from energy deposits in the electromagnetic calorimeter and charged tracks in multiwire proportional chambers, and the jet transverse momentum (pT) spectra are corrected for the detector response. Spectra are reported for jets with 12T<50 GeV/c, within a pseudorapidity acceptance of |η|<0.3. The nuclear-modification factor (RdAu) values for 0%–100% d+Au events are found to be consistent with unity, constraining the role of initial state effects on jet production. Nonetheless, the centrality-selected RdAu values and central-to-peripheral ratios (RCP) show large, pT-dependent deviations from unity, challenging the conventional models that relate hard-process rates and soft-particle production in collisions involving nuclei.« less

  1. Collective effects in light-heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenke, Björn; Venugopalan, Raju

    2014-11-01

    We present results for the azimuthal anisotropy of charged hadron distributions in A+A, p+A, d+A, and 3He+A collisions within the IP-Glasma+MUSIC model. Obtained anisotropies are due to the fluid dynamic response of the system to the fluctuating initial geometry of the interaction region. While the elliptic and triangular anisotropies in peripheral Pb+Pb collisions at √{ s} = 2.76 TeV are well described by the model, the same quantities in √{ s} = 5.02 TeV p+Pb collisions underestimate the experimental data. This disagreement can be due to neglected initial state correlations or the lack of a detailed description of the fluctuating spatial structure of the proton, or both. We further present predictions for azimuthal anisotropies in p+Au, d+Au, and 3He+Au collisions at √{ s} = 200 GeV. For d+Au and 3He+Au collisions we expect the detailed substructure of the nucleon to become less important.

  2. Quarkonium shadowing in pPb and Pb+Pb collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Vogt, R

    2007-05-21

    The d+Au data from RHIC, including the pA results from the fixed-target CERN SPS pA data, suggest increased importance of initial-state shadowing and decreasing nuclear absorption with increasing energy. This is not surprising since smaller x is probed at higher energy while absorption due to multiple scattering is predicted to decrease with energy. The CERN SPS data suggest a J/{psi} absorption cross section of about 4 mb without shadowing, and a larger absorption cross section if it is included since the SPS x range is in the antishadowing region. The d+Au RHIC data support smaller absorption, {sigma}{sup J/{psi}}{sub abs} {approx} 0-2 mb. Thus our predictions for J/{psi} and {Upsilon} production in pPb and Pb+Pb interactions at the LHC are shown for initial-state shadowing alone with no absorption or dense matter effects. We note that including absorption would only move the calculated ratios down in proportion to the absorption survival probability since, at LHC energies, any rapidity dependence of absorption is at very large |y|, outside the detector acceptance.

  3. Centrality-Dependent Modification of Jet-Production Rates in Deuteron-Gold Collisions at √[s(NN)]=200 GeV.

    PubMed

    Adare, A; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Al-Bataineh, H; Alexander, J; Alfred, M; Angerami, A; Aoki, K; Apadula, N; Aramaki, Y; Asano, H; Atomssa, E T; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, B; Babintsev, V; Bai, M; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Bandara, N S; Bannier, B; Barish, K N; Bassalleck, B; Basye, A T; Bathe, S; Baublis, V; Baumann, C; Bazilevsky, A; Beaumier, M; Beckman, S; Belikov, S; Belmont, R; Bennett, R; Berdnikov, A; Berdnikov, Y; Bhom, J H; Blau, D S; Bok, J S; Boyle, K; Brooks, M L; Bryslawskyj, J; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Butsyk, S; Campbell, S; Caringi, A; Chen, C-H; Chi, C Y; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choi, J B; Choudhury, R K; Christiansen, P; Chujo, T; Chung, P; Chvala, O; Cianciolo, V; Citron, Z; Cole, B A; Conesa Del Valle, Z; Connors, M; Csanád, M; Csörgő, T; Dahms, T; Dairaku, S; Danchev, I; Danley, T W; Das, K; Datta, A; Daugherity, M S; David, G; Dayananda, M K; DeBlasio, K; Dehmelt, K; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dharmawardane, K V; Dietzsch, O; Dion, A; Diss, P B; Do, J H; Donadelli, M; D'Orazio, L; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Drees, K A; Durham, J M; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Edwards, S; Efremenko, Y V; Ellinghaus, F; Engelmore, T; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Fadem, B; Feege, N; Fields, D E; Finger, M; Finger, M; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fujiwara, K; Fukao, Y; Fusayasu, T; Gal, C; Gallus, P; Garg, P; Garishvili, I; Ge, H; Giordano, F; Glenn, A; Gong, H; Gonin, M; Goto, Y; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Grim, G; Grosse Perdekamp, M; Gunji, T; Gustafsson, H-Å; Hachiya, T; Haggerty, J S; Hahn, K I; Hamagaki, H; Hamblen, J; Hamilton, H F; Han, R; Han, S Y; Hanks, J; Hasegawa, S; Haseler, T O S; Hashimoto, K; Haslum, E; Hayano, R; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Hester, T; Hill, J C; Hohlmann, M; Hollis, R S; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Horaguchi, T; Hornback, D; Hoshino, T; Hotvedt, N; Huang, J; Huang, S; Ichihara, T; Ichimiya, R; Ikeda, Y; Imai, K; Inaba, M; Iordanova, A; Isenhower, D; Ishihara, M; Issah, M; Ivanishchev, D; Iwanaga, Y; Jacak, B V; Jezghani, M; Jia, J; Jiang, X; Jin, J; Johnson, B M; Jones, T; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Jumper, D S; Kajihara, F; Kamin, J; Kanda, S; Kang, J H; Kapustinsky, J; Karatsu, K; Kasai, M; Kawall, D; Kawashima, M; Kazantsev, A V; Kempel, T; Key, J A; Khachatryan, V; Khanzadeev, A; Kijima, K M; Kikuchi, J; Kim, A; Kim, B I; Kim, C; Kim, D J; Kim, E-J; Kim, G W; Kim, M; Kim, Y-J; Kimelman, B; Kinney, E; Kiss, Á; Kistenev, E; Kitamura, R; Klatsky, J; Kleinjan, D; Kline, P; Koblesky, T; Kochenda, L; Komkov, B; Konno, M; Koster, J; Kotov, D; Král, A; Kravitz, A; Kunde, G J; Kurita, K; Kurosawa, M; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lai, Y S; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Lee, D M; Lee, J; Lee, K B; Lee, K S; Lee, S; Lee, S H; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Li, X; Lichtenwalner, P; Liebing, P; Lim, S H; Linden Levy, L A; Liška, T; Liu, H; Liu, M X; Love, B; Lynch, D; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Makek, M; Malik, M D; Manion, A; Manko, V I; Mannel, E; Mao, Y; Masui, H; Matathias, F; McCumber, M; McGaughey, P L; McGlinchey, D; McKinney, C; Means, N; Meles, A; Mendoza, M; Meredith, B; Miake, Y; Mibe, T; Mignerey, A C; Miki, K; Milov, A; Mishra, D K; Mitchell, J T; Miyasaka, S; Mizuno, S; Mohanty, A K; Montuenga, P; Moon, H J; Moon, T; Morino, Y; Morreale, A; Morrison, D P; Moukhanova, T V; Murakami, T; Murata, J; Mwai, A; Nagamiya, S; Nagashima, K; Nagle, J L; Naglis, M; Nagy, M I; Nakagawa, I; Nakagomi, H; Nakamiya, Y; Nakamura, K R; Nakamura, T; Nakano, K; Nam, S; Nattrass, C; Netrakanti, P K; Newby, J; Nguyen, M; Nihashi, M; Niida, T; Nishimura, S; Nouicer, R; Novák, T; Novitzky, N; Nyanin, A S; Oakley, C; O'Brien, E; Oda, S X; Ogilvie, C A; Oka, M; Okada, K; Onuki, Y; Orjuela Koop, J D; Osborn, J D; Oskarsson, A; Ouchida, M; Ozawa, K; Pak, R; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, I H; Park, J S; Park, S; Park, S K; Park, W J; Pate, S F; Patel, M; Pei, H; Peng, J-C; Pereira, H; Perepelitsa, D V; Perera, G D N; Peressounko, D Yu; Perry, J; Petti, R; Pinkenburg, C; Pinson, R; Pisani, R P; Proissl, M; Purschke, M L; Qu, H; Rak, J; Ramson, B J; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Rembeczki, S; Reygers, K; Reynolds, D; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Richardson, E; Rinn, T; Roach, D; Roche, G; Rolnick, S D; Rosati, M; Rosen, C A; Rosendahl, S S E; Rowan, Z; Rubin, J G; Ružička, P; Sahlmueller, B; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakashita, K; Sako, H; Samsonov, V; Sano, S; Sarsour, M; Sato, S; Sato, T; Sawada, S; Schaefer, B; Schmoll, B K; Sedgwick, K; Seele, J; Seidl, R; Sen, A; Seto, R; Sett, P; Sexton, A; Sharma, D; Shein, I; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shimomura, M; Shoji, K; Shukla, P; Sickles, A; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Silvestre, C; Sim, K S; Singh, B K; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Slunečka, M; Snowball, M; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stepanov, M; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Sukhanov, A; Sumita, T; Sun, J; Sziklai, J; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tanabe, R; Tanaka, Y; Taneja, S; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Tarafdar, S; Taranenko, A; Themann, H; Thomas, D; Thomas, T L; Tieulent, R; Timilsina, A; Todoroki, T; Togawa, M; Toia, A; Tomášek, L; Tomášek, M; Torii, H; Towell, C L; Towell, R; Towell, R S; Tserruya, I; Tsuchimoto, Y; Vale, C; Valle, H; van Hecke, H W; Vazquez-Zambrano, E; Veicht, A; Velkovska, J; Vértesi, R; Virius, M; Vrba, V; Vznuzdaev, E; Wang, X R; Watanabe, D; Watanabe, K; Watanabe, Y; Watanabe, Y S; Wei, F; Wei, R; Wessels, J; White, A S; White, S N; Winter, D; Woody, C L; Wright, R M; Wysocki, M; Xia, B; Xue, L; Yalcin, S; Yamaguchi, Y L; Yamaura, K; Yang, R; Yanovich, A; Ying, J; Yokkaichi, S; Yoo, J H; Yoon, I; You, Z; Young, G R; Younus, I; Yu, H; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zelenski, A; Zhou, S; Zou, L

    2016-03-25

    Jet production rates are measured in p+p and d+Au collisions at sqrt[s_{NN}]=200  GeV recorded in 2008 with the PHENIX detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. Jets are reconstructed using the R=0.3 anti-k_{t} algorithm from energy deposits in the electromagnetic calorimeter and charged tracks in multiwire proportional chambers, and the jet transverse momentum (p_{T}) spectra are corrected for the detector response. Spectra are reported for jets with 12d+Au events are found to be consistent with unity, constraining the role of initial state effects on jet production. However, the centrality-selected R_{dAu} values and central-to-peripheral ratios (R_{CP}) show large, p_{T}-dependent deviations from unity, challenging the conventional models that relate hard-process rates and soft-particle production in collisions involving nuclei.

  4. Centrality Dependence of Productions for Single Hadrons and Inclusive Jets in High-Energy p + A Collisions with NLO QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shi-Yong; Shen, Ke-Ming; Dai, Wei; Zhang, Ben-Wei; Zhang, Han-Zhong; Wang, En-Ke

    2015-07-01

    By using the recent spatially dependent nuclear PDF set EPS09s, we investigated the centrality-dependent Cold Nuclear Matter (CNM) effects for neutral π, η mesons and inclusive jets at RHIC in d+Au collisions and at LHC in p+Pb collisions. The nuclear modification factors as functions of transverse momentum are plotted at different centralities bins respectively. At all fixed centralities, the nuclear modification factors show no significant suppressions, contrast to the strong suppressions observed for central Au+Au collisions. Our results are consistent with the PHENIX preliminary Data in minimum bias and central d+Au collisions. The LHC experimental Data also support our predictions for both single inclusive hadron and inclusive jets productions in central p+Pb collisions. And the centrality dependence of the nuclear suppressions for all the observations in our calculations are lower than the RHIC and LHC Data. Supported by Ministry of Science and Technology in China under Grant Nos. 2014CB845404, 2014DFG02050, and by Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 11322546, 11435004, 11221504

  5. Cold-nuclear-matter effects on heavy-quark production at forward and backward rapidity in d + Au collisions at √sNN = 200  GeV.

    PubMed

    Adare, A; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Akimoto, R; Al-Bataineh, H; Al-Ta'ani, H; Alexander, J; Andrews, K R; Angerami, A; Aoki, K; Apadula, N; Appelt, E; Aramaki, Y; Armendariz, R; Aschenauer, E C; Atomssa, E T; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, B; Babintsev, V; Bai, M; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Bannier, B; Barish, K N; Bassalleck, B; Basye, A T; Bathe, S; Baublis, V; Baumann, C; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Belmont, R; Ben-Benjamin, J; Bennett, R; Bhom, J H; Blau, D S; Bok, J S; Boyle, K; Brooks, M L; Broxmeyer, D; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Butsyk, S; Campbell, S; Caringi, A; Castera, P; Chen, C-H; Chi, C Y; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choi, J B; Choudhury, R K; Christiansen, P; Chujo, T; Chung, P; Chvala, O; Cianciolo, V; Citron, Z; Cole, B A; Conesa Del Valle, Z; Connors, M; Csanád, M; Csörgő, T; Dahms, T; Dairaku, S; Danchev, I; Das, K; Datta, A; David, G; Dayananda, M K; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dharmawardane, K V; Dietzsch, O; Dion, A; Donadelli, M; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Drees, K A; Durham, J M; Durum, A; Dutta, D; D'Orazio, L; Edwards, S; Efremenko, Y V; Ellinghaus, F; Engelmore, T; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Fadem, B; Fields, D E; Finger, M; Finger, M; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fujiwara, K; Fukao, Y; Fusayasu, T; Gal, C; Garishvili, I; Glenn, A; Gong, H; Gong, X; Gonin, M; Goto, Y; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Grim, G; Grosse Perdekamp, M; Gunji, T; Guo, L; Gustafsson, H-Å; Haggerty, J S; Hahn, K I; Hamagaki, H; Hamblen, J; Han, R; Hanks, J; Harper, C; Hashimoto, K; Haslum, E; Hayano, R; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Hester, T; Hill, J C; Hohlmann, M; Hollis, R S; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Horaguchi, T; Hori, Y; Hornback, D; Huang, S; Ichihara, T; Ichimiya, R; Iinuma, H; Ikeda, Y; Imai, K; Inaba, M; Iordanova, A; Isenhower, D; Ishihara, M; Issah, M; Ivanischev, D; Iwanaga, Y; Jacak, B V; Jia, J; Jiang, X; Jin, J; John, D; Johnson, B M; Jones, T; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Jumper, D S; Kajihara, F; Kamin, J; Kaneti, S; Kang, B H; Kang, J H; Kang, J S; Kapustinsky, J; Karatsu, K; Kasai, M; Kawall, D; Kawashima, M; Kazantsev, A V; Kempel, T; Khanzadeev, A; Kijima, K M; Kikuchi, J; Kim, A; Kim, B I; Kim, D J; Kim, E-J; Kim, Y-J; Kim, Y K; Kinney, E; Kiss, A; Kistenev, E; Kleinjan, D; Kline, P; Kochenda, L; Komkov, B; Konno, M; Koster, J; Kotov, D; Král, A; Kravitz, A; Kunde, G J; Kurita, K; Kurosawa, M; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lai, Y S; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Lee, D M; Lee, J; Lee, K B; Lee, K S; Lee, S H; Lee, S R; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Li, X; Lichtenwalner, P; Liebing, P; Lim, S H; Linden Levy, L A; Liška, T; Liu, H; Liu, M X; Love, B; Lynch, D; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malik, M D; Manion, A; Manko, V I; Mannel, E; Mao, Y; Masui, H; Matathias, F; McCumber, M; McGaughey, P L; McGlinchey, D; McKinney, C; Means, N; Mendoza, M; Meredith, B; Miake, Y; Mibe, T; Mignerey, A C; Miki, K; Milov, A; Mitchell, J T; Miyachi, Y; Mohanty, A K; Moon, H J; Morino, Y; Morreale, A; Morrison, D P; Motschwiller, S; Moukhanova, T V; Murakami, T; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagle, J L; Naglis, M; Nagy, M I; Nakagawa, I; Nakamiya, Y; Nakamura, K R; Nakamura, T; Nakano, K; Nam, S; Newby, J; Nguyen, M; Nihashi, M; Nouicer, R; Nyanin, A S; Oakley, C; O'Brien, E; Oda, S X; Ogilvie, C A; Oka, M; Okada, K; Onuki, Y; Oskarsson, A; Ouchida, M; Ozawa, K; Pak, R; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, B H; Park, I H; Park, S K; Park, W J; Pate, S F; Patel, L; Pei, H; Peng, J-C; Pereira, H; Peressounko, D Yu; Petti, R; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Proissl, M; Purschke, M L; Qu, H; Rak, J; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Rembeczki, S; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Richardson, E; Roach, D; Roche, G; Rolnick, S D; Rosati, M; Rosen, C A; Rosendahl, S S E; Ružička, P; Sahlmueller, B; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakashita, K; Samsonov, V; Sano, S; Sarsour, M; Sato, T; Savastio, M; Sawada, S; Sedgwick, K; Seele, J; Seidl, R; Seto, R; Sharma, D; Shein, I; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shim, H H; Shimomura, M; Shoji, K; Shukla, P; Sickles, A; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Silvestre, C; Sim, K S; Singh, B K; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Slunečka, M; Sodre, T; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Sukhanov, A; Sun, J; Sziklai, J; Takagui, E M; Takahara, A; Taketani, A; Tanabe, R; Tanaka, Y; Taneja, S; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Tarafdar, S; Taranenko, A; Tennant, E; Themann, H; Thomas, D; Thomas, T L; Togawa, M; Toia, A; Tomášek, L; Tomášek, M; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tserruya, I; Tsuchimoto, Y; Utsunomiya, K; Vale, C; Valle, H; van Hecke, H W; Vazquez-Zambrano, E; Veicht, A; Velkovska, J; Vértesi, R; Virius, M; Vossen, A; Vrba, V; Vznuzdaev, E; Wang, X R; Watanabe, D; Watanabe, K; Watanabe, Y; Watanabe, Y S; Wei, F; Wei, R; Wessels, J; White, S N; Winter, D; Woody, C L; Wright, R M; Wysocki, M; Yamaguchi, Y L; Yamaura, K; Yang, R; Yanovich, A; Ying, J; Yokkaichi, S; Yoo, J S; You, Z; Young, G R; Younus, I; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zelenski, A; Zhou, S

    2014-06-27

    The PHENIX experiment has measured open heavy-flavor production via semileptonic decay over the transverse momentum range 1 < p(T) < 6  GeV/c at forward and backward rapidity (1.4 < |y| < 2.0) in d+Au and p + p collisions at √sNN = 200  GeV. In central d+Au collisions, relative to the yield in p + p collisions scaled by the number of binary nucleon-nucleon collisions, a suppression is observed at forward rapidity (in the d-going direction) and an enhancement at backward rapidity (in the Au-going direction). Predictions using nuclear-modified-parton-distribution functions, even with additional nuclear-p(T) broadening, cannot simultaneously reproduce the data at both rapidity ranges, which implies that these models are incomplete and suggests the possible importance of final-state interactions in the asymmetric d + Au collision system. These results can be used to probe cold-nuclear-matter effects, which may significantly affect heavy-quark production, in addition to helping constrain the magnitude of charmonia-breakup effects in nuclear matter. PMID:25014805

  6. Triptycenes: a novel synthetic class of bifunctional anticancer drugs that inhibit nucleoside transport, induce DNA cleavage and decrease the viability of leukemic cells in the nanomolar range in vitro.

    PubMed

    Perchellet, E M; Magill, M J; Huang, X; Brantis, C E; Hua, D H; Perchellet, J P

    1999-09-01

    In contrast to their inactive parent compound triptycene (code name TT0), several triptycene (TT) analogs (code names TT1 to TT13), most of them new compounds, were synthesized and shown to prevent L1210 leukemic cells from synthesizing macromolecules and growing in vitro. The most potent rigid tetracyclic quinones synthesized so far are TT2 and its C2-brominated derivative, TT13. The antitumor activity of TT2 has been compared to that of daunomycin (DAU), a clinically valuable anthracycline antibiotic which is structurally different from TT2 but also contains a quinone moiety. TT2 inhibits the proliferation (IC50: 300 nM at day 2 and 150 nM at day 4) and viability (IC50: 250 nM at day 2 and 100 nM at day 4) of L1210 cells to the same maximal degree as DAU, suggesting that the cytostatic and cytotoxic activities of TT2 are a combination of drug concentration and duration of drug exposure. Since TT2 does not increase the mitotic index of L1210 cells at 24 h like vincristine, it is unlikely to be an antimitotic drug that disrupts microtubule dynamics. Like DAU, a 1.5-3 h pretreatment with TT2 is sufficient to inhibit the rates of DNA, RNA and protein syntheses determined over 30-60 min periods of pulse-labeling in L1210 cells in vitro (IC50: 6 microM). In contrast to DAU, which is inactive, a 15 min pretreatment with TT2 has the advantage of also inhibiting the cellular transport of nucleosides occuring over a 30 s period in vitro (IC50: 6 microM), suggesting that TT2 prevents the incorporation of [3H]thymidine into DNA because it rapidly blocks the uptake of [3H]thymidine by the tumor cells. After 24 h, TT2 induces as much DNA cleavage as camptothecin and DAU, two anti-cancer drugs producing DNA strand breaks and known to respectively inhibit DNA topoisomerase I and II activities. Interestingly, the abilities of TT2 to block nucleoside transport, inhibit DNA synthesis and induce DNA fragmentation are irreversible upon drug removal, suggesting that this compound may

  7. The use of laser technology for the welding of the automotive tree mechanical clutch subject to the action of residual intrinsic magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daurelio, G.; Campanile, E.; D'Alonzo, M.; Memola Capece Minutolo, F.; Spera, M.; Lugarà, M.; Ferrandino, V.

    2007-05-01

    The material in issue is a case-hardening steel, type 20MnCr5 (UNI 8550), that has been previously undergone to a softening annealing process conferring therefore to the material one equal Hardness Brinnel 200 to 220 HB. This steel is very difficult to weld as by laser technology as by other welding technologies by fusion. It has been experienced a power at first laser of 1500 W (for requirements begins them of understanding of the process and the relative to you parameters to set up then) and of 3000 W, like previewed. They have been used a covering gas and a laser beam focusing mirror. All the welded tests have been at first subordinates to taken care of a visual examination to eye and then to an Image Acquisition System, computerized and connected to both metallographic and stereo microscope. Then cut to you with metallographic apparatus, workings to the abrasive papers and metallographic cloths, in order to end with a chemical etching of type NITAL. The best ones turn out to you have been then always visualize in shape of macro and micro-graphs, acquired with the same Image Acquisition System of type NIKON - LUCIA 4.82 vers. by LIM, to storage and automatically measure the cross-section area (melted zone) and then to calculate the efficiency level, on each joint and bead on plate, expressed in Dau unit, to verify the laser welding efficiency, correlated to the laser working parameters. To a better characterization of the produced joints many micro-hardness tests and relate family hardness trends and profiles have been carried out. At the end from the comparison of the values of ETE % and MR % (Model of Swift- Hook & Gick) and of the values of WE in Dau (Model DA.LU.), lead on some beads of the 20MnCr5, has turned out an ulterior and substantial validity and goodness (as well as easiness of employment and calculation of WE) of this last Model and Unit of Measure. In fact the values of ETE % and WE (in Dau) are appeared substantially similar, respecting both all

  8. Severe hemolytic transfusion reaction due to anti-D in a D+ patient with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Ipe, Tina S; Wilkes, Jennifer J; Hartung, Helge D; Westhoff, Connie M; Chou, Stella T; Friedman, David F

    2015-03-01

    A 5-year-old male with sickle cell disease presented with pain, dark urine, and fatigue 10 days after a red blood cell (RBC) transfusion. Laboratory evaluation demonstrated severe anemia, blood type O+, and anti-D in the serum. Anti-D in a D+ patient led to RH genotyping, which revealed homozygosity for RHD*DAU4 that encodes partial D antigen. Anti-D in this patient whose RBCs exclusively express partial D caused a delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction after exposure to D+ RBCs. The finding of anti-D in a D+patient should be investigated by molecular methods to help distinguish an alloantibody from an autoantibody. PMID:25171447

  9. Severe hemolytic transfusion reaction due to anti-D in a D+ patient with sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Ipe, Tina S.; Wilkes, Jennifer J.; Hartung, Helge D.; Westhoff, Connie M.; Chou, Stella T.; Friedman, David F.

    2014-01-01

    A 5-year-old male with sickle cell disease presented with pain, dark urine, and fatigue 10 days after a red blood cell (RBC) transfusion. Laboratory evaluation demonstrated severe anemia, blood type O+, and anti-D in the serum. Anti-D in a D+ patient led to RH genotyping which revealed homozygosity for RHD*DAU4 that encodes partial D antigen. Anti-D in this patient whose RBCs exclusively express partial D caused a delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction after exposure to D+ RBCs. The finding of anti-D in a D+ patient should be investigated by molecular methods to help distinguish an alloantibody from an autoantibody. PMID:25171447

  10. Opportunities for Drell-Yan Physics at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Aschenauer, E.; Bland, L.; Crawford, H.; Goto, Y.; Eyser, O.; Kang, Z.; Vossen, A.

    2011-05-24

    Drell-Yan (DY) physics gives the unique opportunity to study the parton structure of nucleons in an experimentally and theoretically clean way. With the availability of polarized proton-proton collisions and asymmetric d+Au collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), we have the basic (and unique in the world) tools to address several fundamental questions in QCD, including the expected gluon saturation at low partonic momenta and the universality of transverse momentum dependent parton distribution functions. A Drell-Yan program at RHIC is tied closely to the core physics questions of a possible future electron-ion collider, eRHIC. The more than 80 participants of this workshop focused on recent progress in these areas by both theory and experiment, trying to address imminent questions for the near and mid-term future.

  11. Experimental observation of silver and gold penetration into dental ceramic by means of a radiotracer technique

    SciTech Connect

    Moya, F.; Payan, J.; Bernardini, J.; Moya, E.G.

    1987-12-01

    A radiotracer technique was used to study silver and gold diffusion into dental porcelain under experimental conditions close to the real conditions in prosthetic laboratories for porcelain bakes. It was clearly shown that these non-oxidizable elements were able to diffuse into the ceramic as well as oxidizable ones. The penetration depth varied widely according to the element. The ratio DAg/DAu was about 10(3) around 850 degrees C. In contrast to gold, the silver diffusion rate was high enough to allow silver, from the metallic alloy, to be present at the external ceramic surface after diffusion into the ceramic. Hence, the greening of dental porcelains baked on silver-rich alloys could be explained mainly by a solid-state diffusion mechanism.

  12. Multiplicity dependence of pion, kaon, proton and lambda production in p-Pb collisions at √{sNN}=5.02 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abelev, B.; Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Adare, A. M.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Agnello, M.; Agocs, A. G.; Agostinelli, A.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, N.; Ahmad Masoodi, A.; Ahmed, I.; Ahn, S. U.; Ahn, S. A.; Aimo, I.; Aiola, S.; Ajaz, M.; Akindinov, A.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altini, V.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Alves Garcia Prado, C.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anielski, J.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arbor, N.; Arcelli, S.; Armesto, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Aronsson, T.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmi, M. D.; Bach, M.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bailhache, R.; Bairathi, V.; Bala, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Bán, J.; Baral, R. C.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartke, J.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Baumann, C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Bergognon, A. A. E.; Bertens, R. A.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, F.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Bock, F.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Bogolyubsky, M.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Bornschein, J.; Botje, M.; Botta, E.; Böttger, S.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Brun, R.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Caliva, A.; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Canoa Roman, V.; Cara Romeo, G.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Carminati, F.; Casanova Díaz, A.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Casula, E. A. R.; Catanescu, V.; Cavicchioli, C.; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Chochula, P.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Collu, A.; Colocci, M.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M. E.; Contin, G.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortese, P.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Albino, R.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dainese, A.; Dang, R.; Danu, A.; Das, K.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; De, S.; Delagrange, H.; Deloff, A.; Dénes, E.; Deppman, A.; de Barros, G. O. V.; De Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Cuveland, J.; De Falco, A.; De Gruttola, D.; De Marco, N.; De Pasquale, S.; de Rooij, R.; Diaz Corchero, M. A.; Dietel, T.; Divià, R.; Di Bari, D.; Di Giglio, C.; Di Liberto, S.; Di Mauro, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.; Dobrowolski, T.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Dutta Majumdar, A. K.; D Erasmo, G.; Elia, D.; Emschermann, D.; Engel, H.; Erazmus, B.; Erdal, H. A.; Eschweiler, D.; Espagnon, B.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Eyyubova, G.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Falchieri, D.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Fehlker, D.; Feldkamp, L.; Felea, D.; Feliciello, A.; Feofilov, G.; Ferencei, J.; Fernández Téllez, A.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Floratos, E.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Gargiulo, C.; Garishvili, I.; Gerhard, J.; Germain, M.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghidini, B.; Ghosh, P.; Gianotti, P.; Giubellino, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Goerlich, L.; Gomez, R.; González-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Gotovac, S.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Grajcarek, R.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grossiord, J.-Y.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, B.; Guilbaud, M.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gulkanyan, H.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Khan, K. H.; Haake, R.; Haaland, Ø.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.; Hanratty, L. D.; Hansen, A.; Harris, J. W.; Hartmann, H.; Harton, A.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hayashi, S.; Hayrapetyan, A.; Heckel, S. T.; Heide, M.; Helstrup, H.; Herghelegiu, A.; Herrera Corral, G.; Herrmann, N.; Hess, B. A.; Hetland, K. F.; Hicks, B.; Hippolyte, B.; Hori, Y.; Hristov, P.; Hřivnáčová, I.; Huang, M.; Humanic, T. J.; Hutter, D.; Hwang, D. S.; Ilkaev, R.; Ilkiv, I.; Inaba, M.; Incani, E.; Innocenti, G. M.; Ionita, C.; Ippolitov, M.; Irfan, M.; Ivanov, M.; Ivanov, V.; Ivanytskyi, O.; Jachołkowski, A.; Jacobs, P. M.; Jahnke, C.; Jang, H. J.; Janik, M. A.; Jayarathna, P. H. S. Y.; Jena, S.; Jimenez Bustamante, R. T.; Jones, P. G.; Jung, H.; Jusko, A.; Kalcher, S.; Kaliňák, P.; Kalweit, A.; Kang, J. H.; Kaplin, V.; Kar, S.; Karasu Uysal, A.; Karavichev, O.; Karavicheva, T.; Karpechev, E.; Kazantsev, A.; Kebschull, U.; Keidel, R.; Ketzer, B.; Khan, M. M.; Khan, P.; Khan, S. A.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kharlov, Y.; Kileng, B.; Kim, T.; Kim, B.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, D. W.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, M.; Kim, M.; Kim, S.; Kirsch, S.; Kisel, I.; Kiselev, S.; Kisiel, A.; Kiss, G.; Klay, J. L.; Klein, J.; Klein-Bösing, C.; Kluge, A.; Knichel, M. L.; Knospe, A. G.; Kobdaj, C.; Köhler, M. K.; Kollegger, T.; Kolojvari, A.; Kondratiev, V.; Kondratyeva, N.; Konevskikh, A.; Kovalenko, V.; Kowalski, M.; Kox, S.; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, G.; Kral, J.; Králik, I.; Kramer, F.; Kravčáková, A.; Krelina, M.; Kretz, M.; Krivda, M.; Krizek, F.; Krus, M.; Kryshen, E.; Krzewicki, M.; Kucera, V.; Kucheriaev, Y.; Kugathasan, T.; Kuhn, C.; Kuijer, P. G.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, J.; Kurashvili, P.; Kurepin, A. B.; Kurepin, A.; Kuryakin, A.; Kushpil, V.; Kushpil, S.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; Ladrón de Guevara, P.; Lagana Fernandes, C.; Lakomov, I.; Langoy, R.; Lara, C.; Lardeux, A.; Lattuca, A.; La Pointe, S. L.; La Rocca, P.; Lea, R.; Lechman, M.; Lee, S. C.; Lee, G. R.; Legrand, I.; Lehnert, J.; Lemmon, R. C.; Lenhardt, M.; Lenti, V.; Leoncino, M.; León Monzón, I.; Lévai, P.; Li, S.; Lien, J.; Lietava, R.; Lindal, S.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lippmann, C.; Lisa, M. A.; Ljunggren, H. M.; Lodato, D. F.; Loenne, P. I.; Loggins, V. R.; Loginov, V.; Lohner, D.; Loizides, C.; Lopez, X.; López Torres, E.; Løvhøiden, G.; Lu, X.-G.; Luettig, P.; Lunardon, M.; Luo, J.; Luparello, G.; Luzzi, C.; Ma, R.; Maevskaya, A.; Mager, M.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Maire, A.; Malaev, M.; Maldonado Cervantes, I.; Malinina, L.; Mal'Kevich, D.; Malzacher, P.; Mamonov, A.; Manceau, L.; Manko, V.; Manso, F.; Manzari, V.; Marchisone, M.; Mareš, J.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Margotti, A.; Marín, A.; Markert, C.; Marquard, M.; Martashvili, I.; Martin, N. A.; Martinengo, P.; Martínez, M. I.; Martínez García, G.; Martin Blanco, J.; Martynov, Y.; Mas, A.; Masciocchi, S.; Masera, M.; Masoni, A.; Massacrier, L.; Mastroserio, A.; Matyja, A.; Mazer, J.; Mazumder, R.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Meddi, F.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Mercado Pérez, J.; Meres, M.; Miake, Y.; Mikhaylov, K.; Milano, L.; Milosevic, J.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, A. N.; Miśkowiec, D.; Mitu, C.; Mlynarz, J.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Montaño Zetina, L.; Monteno, M.; Montes, E.; Morando, M.; Moreira De Godoy, D. A.; Moretto, S.; Morreale, A.; Morsch, A.; Muccifora, V.; Mudnic, E.; Muhuri, S.; Mukherjee, M.; Müller, H.; Munhoz, M. G.; Murray, S.; Musa, L.; Nandi, B. K.; Nania, R.; Nappi, E.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nazarenko, S.; Nedosekin, A.; Nicassio, M.; Niculescu, M.; Nielsen, B. S.; Nikolaev, S.; Nikulin, S.; Nikulin, V.; Nilsen, B. S.; Nilsson, M. S.; Noferini, F.; Nomokonov, P.; Nooren, G.; Nyanin, A.; Nyatha, A.; Nystrand, J.; Oeschler, H.; Oh, S. K.; Oh, S.; Olah, L.; Oleniacz, J.; Oliveira Da Silva, A. C.; Onderwaater, J.; Oppedisano, C.; Ortiz Velasquez, A.; Oskarsson, A.; Otwinowski, J.; Oyama, K.; Pachmayer, Y.; Pachr, M.; Pagano, P.; Paić, G.; Painke, F.; Pajares, C.; Pal, S. K.; Palaha, A.; Palmeri, A.; Papikyan, V.; Pappalardo, G. S.; Park, W. J.; Passfeld, A.; Patalakha, D. I.; Paticchio, V.; Paul, B.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Pereira Da Costa, H.; Pereira De Oliveira Filho, E.; Peresunko, D.; Pérez Lara, C. E.; Perrino, D.; Peryt, W.; Pesci, A.; Pestov, Y.; Petráček, V.; Petran, M.; Petris, M.; Petrov, P.; Petrovici, M.; Petta, C.; Piano, S.; Pikna, M.; Pillot, P.; Pinazza, O.; Pinsky, L.; Pitz, N.; Piyarathna, D. B.; Planinic, M.; Płoskoń, M.; Pluta, J.; Pochybova, S.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Poghosyan, M. G.; Polichtchouk, B.; Pop, A.; Porteboeuf-Houssais, S.; Pospíšil, V.; Potukuchi, B.; Prasad, S. K.; Preghenella, R.; Prino, F.; Pruneau, C. A.; Pshenichnov, I.; Puddu, G.; Punin, V.; Putschke, J.; Qvigstad, H.; Rachevski, A.; Rademakers, A.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ramello, L.; Raniwala, S.; Raniwala, R.; Räsänen, S. S.; Rascanu, B. T.; Rathee, D.; Rauch, W.; Rauf, A. W.; Razazi, V.; Read, K. F.; Real, J. S.; Redlich, K.; Reed, R. J.; Rehman, A.; Reichelt, P.; Reicher, M.; Reidt, F.; Renfordt, R.; Reolon, A. R.; Reshetin, A.; Rettig, F.; Revol, J.-P.; Reygers, K.; Riccati, L.; Ricci, R. A.; Richert, T.; Richter, M.; Riedler, P.; Riegler, W.; Riggi, F.; Rivetti, A.; Rodríguez Cahuantzi, M.; Rodriguez Manso, A.; Røed, K.; Rogochaya, E.; Rohni, S.; Rohr, D.; Röhrich, D.; Romita, R.; Ronchetti, F.; Rosnet, P.; Rossegger, S.; Rossi, A.; Roy, P.; Roy, C.; Rubio Montero, A. J.; Rui, R.; Russo, R.; Ryabinkin, E.; Rybicki, A.; Sadovsky, S.; Šafařík, K.; Sahoo, R.; Sahu, P. K.; Saini, J.; Sakaguchi, H.; Sakai, S.; Sakata, D.; Salgado, C. A.; Salzwedel, J.; Sambyal, S.; Samsonov, V.; Sanchez Castro, X.; Šándor, L.; Sandoval, A.; Sano, M.; Santagati, G.; Santoro, R.; Sarkar, D.; Scapparone, E.; Scarlassara, F.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schiaua, C.; Schicker, R.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, H. R.; Schuchmann, S.; Schukraft, J.; Schulc, M.; Schuster, T.; Schutz, Y.; Schwarz, K.; Schweda, K.; Scioli, G.; Scomparin, E.; Scott, R.; Scott, P. A.; Segato, G.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seo, J.; Serci, S.; Serradilla, E.; Sevcenco, A.; Shabetai, A.; Shabratova, G.; Shahoyan, R.; Sharma, S.; Sharma, N.; Shigaki, K.; Shtejer, K.; Sibiriak, Y.; Siddhanta, S.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Simatovic, G.; Singaraju, R.; Singh, R.; Singha, S.; Singhal, V.; Sinha, B. C.; Sinha, T.; Sitar, B.; Sitta, M.; Skaali, T. B.; Skjerdal, K.; Smakal, R.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R. J. M.; Soltz, R.; Song, M.; Song, J.; Soos, C.; Soramel, F.; Spacek, M.; Sputowska, I.; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, M.; Srivastava, B. K.; Stachel, J.; Stan, I.; Stefanek, G.; Steinpreis, M.; Stenlund, E.; Steyn, G.; Stiller, J. H.; Stocco, D.; Stolpovskiy, M.; Strmen, P.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Subieta Vásquez, M. A.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Suleymanov, M.; Sultanov, R.; Šumbera, M.; Susa, T.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Szarka, I.; Szczepankiewicz, A.; Szymański, M.; Takahashi, J.; Tangaro, M. A.; Tapia Takaki, J. D.; Tarantola Peloni, A.; Tarazona Martinez, A.; Tauro, A.; Tejeda Muñoz, G.; Telesca, A.; Terrevoli, C.; Ter Minasyan, A.; Thäder, J.; Thomas, D.; Tieulent, R.; Timmins, A. R.; Toia, A.; Torii, H.; Trubnikov, V.; Trzaska, W. H.; Tsuji, T.; Tumkin, A.; Turrisi, R.; Tveter, T. S.; Ulery, J.; Ullaland, K.; Ulrich, J.; Uras, A.; Urciuoli, G. M.; Usai, G. L.; Vajzer, M.; Vala, M.; Valencia Palomo, L.; Vande Vyvre, P.; Vannucci, L.; Van Hoorne, J. W.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vargas, A.; Varma, R.; Vasileiou, M.; Vasiliev, A.; Vechernin, V.; Veldhoen, M.; Venaruzzo, M.; Vercellin, E.; Vergara, S.; Vernet, R.; Verweij, M.; Vickovic, L.; Viesti, G.; Viinikainen, J.; Vilakazi, Z.; Villalobos Baillie, O.; Vinogradov, A.; Vinogradov, L.; Vinogradov, Y.; Virgili, T.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vodopyanov, A.; Völkl, M. A.; Voloshin, S.; Voloshin, K.; Volpe, G.; von Haller, B.; Vorobyev, I.; Vranic, D.; Vrláková, J.; Vulpescu, B.; Vyushin, A.; Wagner, B.; Wagner, V.; Wagner, J.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Wang, M.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, K.; Weber, M.; Wessels, J. P.; Westerhoff, U.; Wiechula, J.; Wikne, J.; Wilde, M.; Wilk, G.; Wilkinson, J.; Williams, M. C. S.; Windelband, B.; Winn, M.; Xiang, C.; Yaldo, C. G.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yang, H.; Yang, P.; Yang, S.; Yano, S.; Yasnopolskiy, S.; Yi, J.; Yin, Z.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yushmanov, I.; Zaccolo, V.; Zach, C.; Zampolli, C.; Zaporozhets, S.; Zarochentsev, A.; Závada, P.; Zaviyalov, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zelnicek, P.; Zgura, I. S.; Zhalov, M.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, X.; Zhou, D.; Zhou, Y.; Zhou, F.; Zhu, X.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, H.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, M. B.; Zimmermann, A.; Zinovjev, G.; Zoccarato, Y.; Zynovyev, M.; Zyzak, M.

    2014-01-01

    In this Letter, comprehensive results on π±, K±, KS0, p(pbar) and Λ(Λbar) production at mid-rapidity (0d-Au, Au-Au and Pb-Pb results at lower energy and with predictions based on QCD-inspired and hydrodynamic models.

  13. Heavy Flavour production at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Kabana, Sonia

    2010-12-22

    We present a review of Heavy Flavour production in p+p, d+Au and A+A collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). We focus on two important topics, jet quenching and quarkonia. Anomalous energy loss (jet quenching) of quarks passing through the dense and hot matter build in heavy ion collisions is one of the outstanding discoveries made at RHIC, allowing for an estimate of the initial density. Furthermore, color screening of hidden charm and beauty states is a key signature of the QCD phase transition, allowing an estimate of the initial temperature. We present results on the flavour dependence of jet quenching. Heavy flavour production in A+A as compared to p+p collisions will be discussed for open and hidden charm.

  14. Production of ω mesons in p + p, d + Au, Cu + Cu, and Au + Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Al-Jamel, A.; Alexander, J.; Angerami, A.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Aphecetche, L.; Aramaki, Y.; Armendariz, R.; Aronson, S. H.; Asai, J.; Atomssa, E. T.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Baldisseri, A.; Barish, K. N.; Barnes, P. D.; Bassalleck, B.; Basye, A. T.; Bathe, S.; Batsouli, S.; Baublis, V.; Bauer, F.; Baumann, C.; Bazilevsky, A.; Belikov, S.; Belmont, R.; Bennett, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Bhom, J. H.; Bickley, A. A.; Bjorndal, M. T.; Blau, D. S.; Boissevain, J. G.; Bok, J. S.; Borel, H.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Brown, D. S.; Bucher, D.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Burward-Hoy, J. M.; Butsyk, S.; Camacho, C. M.; Campbell, S.; Caringi, A.; Chai, J.-S.; Chang, B. S.; Charvet, J.-L.; Chen, C.-H.; Chernichenko, S.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiba, J.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, P.; Churyn, A.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cleven, C. R.; Cobigo, Y.; Cole, B. A.; Comets, M. P.; Conesa Del Valle, Z.; Connors, M.; Constantin, P.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Dahms, T.; Dairaku, S.; Danchev, I.; Das, K.; Datta, A.; David, G.; Dayananda, M. K.; Deaton, M. B.; Dehmelt, K.; Delagrange, H.; Denisov, A.; D'Enterria, D.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dharmawardane, K. V.; Dietzsch, O.; Dion, A.; Donadelli, M.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Dubey, A. K.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Dutta, D.; Dzhordzhadze, V.; D'Orazio, L.; Edwards, S.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Egdemir, J.; Ellinghaus, F.; Emam, W. S.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Espagnon, B.; Esumi, S.; Eyser, K. O.; Fadem, B.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M., Jr.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Forestier, B.; Fraenkel, Z.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fujiwara, K.; Fukao, Y.; Fung, S.-Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Gadrat, S.; Garishvili, I.; Gastineau, F.; Germain, M.; Glenn, A.; Gong, H.; Gonin, M.; Gosset, J.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grim, G.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gunji, T.; Gustafsson, H.-Å.; Hachiya, T.; Hadj Henni, A.; Haegemann, C.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hagiwara, M. N.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamblen, J.; Han, R.; Hanks, J.; Harada, H.; Hartouni, E. P.; Haruna, K.; Harvey, M.; Haslum, E.; Hasuko, K.; Hayano, R.; He, X.; Heffner, M.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Heuser, J. M.; Hiejima, H.; Hill, J. C.; Hobbs, R.; Hohlmann, M.; Holmes, M.; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hornback, D.; Huang, S.; Hur, M. G.; Ichihara, T.; Ichimiya, R.; Ide, J.; Iinuma, H.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Inaba, M.; Inoue, Y.; Isenhower, D.; Isenhower, L.; Ishihara, M.; Isobe, T.; Issah, M.; Isupov, A.; Ivanischev, D.; Iwanaga, Y.; Jacak, B. V.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; Jin, J.; Jinnouchi, O.; Johnson, B. M.; Jones, T.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kajihara, F.; Kametani, S.; Kamihara, N.; Kamin, J.; Kaneta, M.; Kang, J. H.; Kanou, H.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kasai, M.; Kawagishi, T.; Kawall, D.; Kawashima, M.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kelly, S.; Kempel, T.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kijima, K. M.; Kikuchi, J.; Kim, A.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E.; Kim, E. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y.-J.; Kim, Y.-S.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinney, E.; Kiriluk, K.; Kiss, Á.; Kistenev, E.; Kiyomichi, A.; Klay, J.; Klein-Boesing, C.; Kochenda, L.; Kochetkov, V.; Komkov, B.; Konno, M.; Koster, J.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kozlov, A.; Král, A.; Kravitz, A.; Kroon, P. J.; Kubart, J.; Kunde, G. J.; Kurihara, N.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Le Bornec, Y.; Leckey, S.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, J.; Lee, K.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, M. K.; Lee, T.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Leitner, E.; Lenzi, B.; Li, X.; Li, X. H.; Lichtenwalner, P.; Liebing, P.; Lim, H.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Liška, T.; Litvinenko, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, M. X.; Love, B.; Luechtenborg, R.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Malakhov, A.; Malik, M. D.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Mao, Y.; Mašek, L.; Masui, H.; Matathias, F.; McCain, M. C.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; Means, N.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mibe, T.; Mignerey, A. C.; Mikeš, P.; Miki, K.; Miller, T. E.; Milov, A.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mishra, G. C.; Mishra, M.; Mitchell, J. T.; Mitrovski, M.; Mohanty, A. K.; Moon, H. J.; Morino, Y.; Morreale, A.; Morrison, D. P.; Moss, J. M.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Mukhopadhyay, D.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagata, Y.; Nagle, J. L.; Naglis, M.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, K. R.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Nam, S.; Newby, J.; Nguyen, M.; Nihashi, M.; Norman, B. E.; Nouicer, R.; Nyanin, A. S.; Nystrand, J.; Oakley, C.; O'Brien, E.; Oda, S. X.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Ohnishi, H.; Ojha, I. D.; Oka, M.; Okada, K.; Omiwade, O. O.; Onuki, Y.; Oskarsson, A.; Otterlund, I.; Ouchida, M.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pal, D.; Palounek, A. P. T.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, I. H.; Park, J.; Park, S. K.; Park, W. J.; Pate, S. F.; Pei, H.; Peng, J.-C.; Pereira, H.; Peresedov, V.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Petti, R.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pisani, R. P.; Proissl, M.; Purschke, M. L.; Purwar, A. K.; Qu, H.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Rembeczki, S.; Reuter, M.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Roach, D.; Roche, G.; Rolnick, S. D.; Romana, A.; Rosati, M.; Rosen, C. A.; Rosendahl, S. S. E.; Rosnet, P.; Rukoyatkin, P.; Ružička, P.; Rykov, V. L.; Ryu, S. S.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sakai, S.; Sakashita, K.; Sakata, H.; Samsonov, V.; Sano, S.; Sato, H. D.; Sato, S.; Sato, T.; Sawada, S.; Sedgwick, K.; Seele, J.; Seidl, R.; Semenov, A. Yu.; Semenov, V.; Seto, R.; Sharma, D.; Shea, T. K.; Shein, I.; Shevel, A.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shohjoh, T.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Sim, K. S.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Skutnik, S.; Slunečka, M.; Smith, W. C.; Soldatov, A.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Sparks, N. A.; Staley, F.; Stankus, P. W.; Stenlund, E.; Stepanov, M.; Ster, A.; Stoll, S. P.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Sukhanov, A.; Sullivan, J. P.; Sziklai, J.; Tabaru, T.; Takagi, S.; Takagui, E. M.; Taketani, A.; Tanabe, R.; Tanaka, K. H.; Tanaka, Y.; Taneja, S.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Tarján, P.; Themann, H.; Thomas, D.; Thomas, T. L.; Togawa, M.; Toia, A.; Tojo, J.; Tomášek, L.; Torii, H.; Towell, R. S.; Tram, V.-N.; Tserruya, I.; Tsuchimoto, Y.; Tuli, S. K.; Tydesjö, H.; Tyurin, N.; Vale, C.; Valle, H.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vazquez-Zambrano, E.; Veicht, A.; Velkovska, J.; Vértesi, R.; Vinogradov, A. A.; Virius, M.; Vrba, V.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wagner, M.; Walker, D.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Wei, F.; Wei, R.; Wessels, J.; White, S. N.; Willis, N.; Winter, D.; Wood, J. P.; Woody, C. L.; Wright, R. M.; Wysocki, M.; Xie, W.; Yamaguchi, Y. L.; Yamaura, K.; Yang, R.; Yanovich, A.; Yasin, Z.; Ying, J.; Yokkaichi, S.; You, Z.; Young, G. R.; Younus, I.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zaudtke, O.; Zhang, C.; Zhou, S.; Zimányi, J.; Zolin, L.

    2011-10-01

    The PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider has measured ω meson production via leptonic and hadronic decay channels in p+p, d+Au, Cu+Cu, and Au+Au collisions at sNN = 200 GeV. The invariant transverse momentum spectra measured in different decay modes give consistent results. Measurements in the hadronic decay channel in Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions show that ω production has a suppression pattern at high transverse momentum, similar to that of π0 and η in central collisions, but no suppression is observed in peripheral collisions. The nuclear modification factors, RAA, are consistent in Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions at similar numbers of participant nucleons.

  15. J/psi production in sqrt s_NN=200 GeV Cu+Cu collisions.

    PubMed

    Adare, A; Afanasiev, S; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Al-Bataineh, H; Alexander, J; Aoki, K; Aphecetche, L; Armendariz, R; Aronson, S H; Asai, J; Atomssa, E T; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, B; Babintsev, V; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Baldisseri, A; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Bassalleck, B; Bathe, S; Batsouli, S; Baublis, V; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Bennett, R; Berdnikov, Y; Bickley, A A; Boissevain, J G; Borel, H; Boyle, K; Brooks, M L; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Butsyk, S; Campbell, S; Chang, B S; Charvet, J-L; Chernichenko, S; Chiba, J; Chi, C Y; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Chujo, T; Chung, P; Churyn, A; Cianciolo, V; Cleven, C R; Cole, B A; Comets, M P; Constantin, P; Csanád, M; Csörgo, T; Dahms, T; Das, K; David, G; Deaton, M B; Dehmelt, K; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; d'Enterria, D; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dietzsch, O; Dion, A; Donadelli, M; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Dubey, A K; Durum, A; Dzhordzhadze, V; Efremenko, Y V; Egdemir, J; Ellinghaus, F; Emam, W S; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Eyser, K O; Fields, D E; Finger, M; Finger, M; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fujiwara, K; Fukao, Y; Fusayasu, T; Gadrat, S; Garishvili, I; Glenn, A; Gong, H; Gonin, M; Gosset, J; Goto, Y; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Grosse Perdekamp, M; Gunji, T; Gustafsson, H-A; Hachiya, T; Hadj Henni, A; Haegemann, C; Haggerty, J S; Hamagaki, H; Han, R; Harada, H; Hartouni, E P; Haruna, K; Haslum, E; Hayano, R; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Hester, T; He, X; Hiejima, H; Hill, J C; Hobbs, R; Hohlmann, M; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Horaguchi, T; Hornback, D; Ichihara, T; Imai, K; Inaba, M; Inoue, Y; Isenhower, D; Isenhower, L; Ishihara, M; Isobe, T; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Jacak, B V; Jia, J; Jin, J; Jinnouchi, O; Johnson, B M; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Kajihara, F; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kamin, J; Kaneta, M; Kang, J H; Kanou, H; Kawall, D; Kazantsev, A V; Khanzadeev, A; Kikuchi, J; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, E; Kinney, E; Kiss, A; Kistenev, E; Kiyomichi, A; Klay, J; Klein-Boesing, C; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Komkov, B; Konno, M; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Král, A; Kravitz, A; Kubart, J; Kunde, G J; Kurihara, N; Kurita, K; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lai, Y-S; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Lee, D M; Lee, M K; Lee, T; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Lenzi, B; Liska, T; Litvinenko, A; Liu, M X; Li, X; Love, B; Lynch, D; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malakhov, A; Malik, M D; Manko, V I; Mao, Y; Masek, L; Masui, H; Matathias, F; McCumber, M; McGaughey, P L; Miake, Y; Mikes, P; Miki, K; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mishra, M; Mitchell, J T; Mitrovski, M; Morreale, A; Morrison, D P; Moukhanova, T V; Mukhopadhyay, D; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagata, Y; Nagle, J L; Naglis, M; Nakagawa, I; Nakamiya, Y; Nakamura, T; Nakano, K; Newby, J; Nguyen, M; Norman, B E; Nyanin, A S; O'Brien, E; Oda, S X; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Okada, H; Okada, K; Oka, M; Omiwade, O O; Oskarsson, A; Ouchida, M; Ozawa, K; Pak, R; Pal, D; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, J; Park, W J; Pate, S F; Pei, H; Peng, J-C; Pereira, H; Peresedov, V; Peressounko, D Yu; Pinkenburg, C; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Qu, H; Rak, J; Rakotozafindrabe, A; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Rembeczki, S; Reuter, M; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Roche, G; Romana, A; Rosati, M; Rosendahl, S S E; Rosnet, P; Rukoyatkin, P; Rykov, V L; Sahlmueller, B; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakai, S; Sakata, H; Samsonov, V; Sato, S; Sawada, S; Seele, J; Seidl, R; Semenov, V; Seto, R; Sharma, D; Shein, I; Shevel, A; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shimomura, M; Shoji, K; Sickles, A; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Silvestre, C; Sim, K S; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Skutnik, S; Slunecka, M; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Staley, F; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stepanov, M; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Suire, C; Sziklai, J; Tabaru, T; Takagi, S; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tanaka, Y; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Taranenko, A; Tarján, P; Thomas, T L; Togawa, M; Toia, A; Tojo, J; Tomásek, L; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tram, V-N; Tserruya, I; Tsuchimoto, Y; Vale, C; Valle, H; van Hecke, H W; Velkovska, J; Vertesi, R; Vinogradov, A A; Virius, M; Vrba, V; Vznuzdaev, E; Wagner, M; Walker, D; Wang, X R; Watanabe, Y; Wessels, J; White, S N; Winter, D; Woody, C L; Wysocki, M; Xie, W; Yamaguchi, Y L; Yanovich, A; Yasin, Z; Ying, J; Yokkaichi, S; Young, G R; Younus, I; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zaudtke, O; Zhang, C; Zhou, S; Zimányi, J; Zolin, L

    2008-09-19

    Yields for J/psi production in Cu+Cu collisions at sqrt s_NN=200 GeV have been measured over the rapidity range |y|<2.2 and compared with results in p+p and Au+Au collisions at the same energy. The Cu+Cu data offer greatly improved precision over existing Au+Au data for J/psi production in collisions with small to intermediate numbers of participants, in the range where the quark-gluon plasma transition threshold is predicted to lie. Cold nuclear matter estimates based on ad hoc fits to d+Au data describe the Cu+Cu data up to N_part approximately 50, corresponding to a Bjorken energy density of at least 1.5 GeV/fm(3).

  16. J/{psi} Production in s_NN = 200 GeV Cu+Cu Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Adare, A.; Awes, Terry C; Cianciolo, Vince; Efremenko, Yuri; Read Jr, Kenneth F; Silvermyr, David O; Sorensen, Soren P; Stankus, Paul W; Young, Glenn R; PHENIX, Collaboration

    2008-01-01

    Yields for J/{Psi} production in Cu+Cu collisions at {radical}S{sub NN}=200 GeV have been measured over the rapidity range |y|<2.2 and compared with results in p+p and Au+Au collisions at the same energy. The Cu+Cu data offer greatly improved precision over existing Au+Au data for J/{Psi} production in collisions with small to intermediate numbers of participants, in the range where the quark-gluon plasma transition threshold is predicted to lie. Cold nuclear matter estimates based on ad hoc fits to d+Au data describe the Cu+Cu data up to N{sub part} {approx} 50, corresponding to a Bjorken energy density of at least 1.5 GeV/fm{sup 3}.

  17. Cross section for bb¯ production via dielectrons in d + Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Adare, A.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Alexander, J.; Angerami, A.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Aramaki, Y.; Atomssa, E. T.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Barish, K. N.; Bassalleck, B.; Basye, A. T.; Bathe, S.; Baublis, V.; Baumann, C.; Bazilevsky, A.; Belikov, S.; Belmont, R.; Bennett, R.; Bhom, J. H.; Blau, D. S.; Bok, J. S.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Butsyk, S.; Campbell, S.; Caringi, A.; Chen, C. -H.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, P.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cole, B. A.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Dahms, T.; Dairaku, S.; Danchev, I.; Das, K.; Datta, A.; David, G.; Dayananda, M. K.; Denisov, A.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dharmawardane, K. V.; Dietzsch, O.; Dion, A.; Donadelli, M.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Dutta, D.; D'Orazio, L.; Edwards, S.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Ellinghaus, F.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Fadem, B.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Fraenkel, Z.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fujiwara, K.; Fukao, Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Garishvili, I.; Glenn, A.; Gong, H.; Gonin, M.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grim, G.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gunji, T.; Gustafsson, H. -Å.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamblen, J.; Han, R.; Hanks, J.; Haslum, E.; Hayano, R.; He, X.; Heffner, M.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Hill, J. C.; Hohlmann, M.; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hornback, D.; Huang, S.; Ichihara, T.; Ichimiya, R.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Inaba, M.; Isenhower, D.; Ishihara, M.; Issah, M.; Ivanischev, D.; Iwanaga, Y.; Jacak, B. V.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; Jin, J.; Johnson, B. M.; Jones, T.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kajihara, F.; Kamin, J.; Kang, J. H.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kasai, M.; Kawall, D.; Kawashima, M.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kempel, T.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kijima, K. M.; Kikuchi, J.; Kim, A.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E. -J.; Kim, Y. -J.; Kinney, E.; Kiss, Á.; Kistenev, E.; Kleinjan, D.; Kochenda, L.; Komkov, B.; Konno, M.; Koster, J.; Král, A.; Kravitz, A.; Kunde, G. J.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, J.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Li, X.; Lichtenwalner, P.; Liebing, P.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Liška, T.; Liu, H.; Liu, M. X.; Love, B.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Malik, M. D.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Mao, Y.; Masui, H.; Matathias, F.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; McGlinchey, D.; Means, N.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mibe, T.; Mignerey, A. C.; Miki, K.; Milov, A.; Mitchell, J. T.; Mohanty, A. K.; Moon, H. J.; Morino, Y.; Morreale, A.; Morrison, D. P.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagle, J. L.; Naglis, M.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, K. R.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Nam, S.; Newby, J.; Nguyen, M.; Nihashi, M.; Nouicer, R.; Nyanin, A. S.; Oakley, C.; O'Brien, E.; Oda, S. X.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Oka, M.; Okada, K.; Onuki, Y.; Oskarsson, A.; Ouchida, M.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, I. H.; Park, S. K.; Park, W. J.; Pate, S. F.; Pei, H.; Peng, J. -C.; Pereira, H.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Petti, R.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pisani, R. P.; Proissl, M.; Purschke, M. L.; Qu, H.; Rak, J.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Rembeczki, S.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Roach, D.; Roche, G.; Rolnick, S. D.; Rosati, M.; Rosen, C. A.; Rosendahl, S. S. E.; Ružička, P.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sakashita, K.; Samsonov, V.; Sano, S.; Sato, T.; Sawada, S.; Sedgwick, K.; Seele, J.; Seidl, R.; Seto, R.; Sharma, D.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T. -A.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Sim, K. S.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Slunečka, M.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Stankus, P. W.; Stenlund, E.; Stoll, S. P.; Sugitate, T.; Sukhanov, A.; Sziklai, J.; Takagui, E. M.; Taketani, A.; Tanabe, R.; Tanaka, Y.; Taneja, S.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Themann, H.; Thomas, D.; Thomas, T. L.; Togawa, M.; Toia, A.; Tomášek, L.; Torii, H.; Towell, R. S.; Tserruya, I.; Tsuchimoto, Y.; Vale, C.; Valle, H.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vazquez-Zambrano, E.; Veicht, A.; Velkovska, J.; Vértesi, R.; Virius, M.; Vrba, V.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Wei, F.; Wei, R.; Wessels, J.; White, S. N.; Winter, D.; Woody, C. L.; Wright, R. M.; Wysocki, M.; Yamaguchi, Y. L.; Yamaura, K.; Yang, R.; Yanovich, A.; Ying, J.; Yokkaichi, S.; You, Z.; Young, G. R.; Younus, I.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zhou, S.

    2015-01-26

    We report a measurement of e⁺e⁻ pairs from semileptonic heavy-flavor decays in d+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV. Thus, exploring the mass and transverse-momentum dependence of the yield, the bottom decay contribution can be isolated from charm, and quantified by comparison to PYTHIA and MC@NLO simulations. The resulting bb-production cross section is σdAubb=1.37±0.28(stat)±0.46(syst) mb, which is equivalent to a nucleon-nucleon cross section of σNNbb =3.4 ± 0.8(stat)±1.1(syst) µb.

  18. Gold solubility and partitioning between sulfide liquid, monosulfide solid solution and hydrous mantle melts: Implications for the formation of Au-rich magmas and crust-mantle differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuan; Audétat, Andreas

    2013-10-01

    The solubility of Au in sulfur-free vs. sulfide-saturated melts and its partitioning behavior between sulfide liquid (SL), monosulfide solid solution (MSS) and hydrous basanite melt at variable Au activities was investigated in a fO2 range of FMQ-2 to FMQ+1.6 at 1200 °C/1.5 GPa using piston cylinder apparatus. Gold solubility in sulfur-free (<100 μg/g S) melt is low (0.6-1.6 μg/g) and increases with fO2 in a manner consistent with Au dissolution as AuO1/2, whereas in sulfide-saturated melts it is high (13.6 ± 1.7 μg/g) and independent of fO2. Variations in the chlorine content of sulfide-saturated melts (0.2-1.2 wt% Cl) had no measurable effect on Au solubility. Gold partition coefficients between sulfide liquid and silicate melt (DAuSL/SM) are very high, ∼10,000 ± 3000, which is at the upper end of values reported in previous studies. Gold partition coefficients between MSS and silicate melt (DAuMSS/SM) are much lower, 60 ± 10, which is at the lower end of previous values. Both DAuSL/SM and DAuMSS/SM are independent of fO2. The new Au partition coefficients were used in conjunction with previously published Cu and Ag partition coefficients to investigate the role of MSS versus SL during partial melting in the source region of primitive potassic magmas and during crust-mantle differentiation. The high Au content of ore deposits associated with potassic magmas has commonly been explained by the dissolution of Au-rich sulfide liquid, either during partial melting in the mantle source or during partial re-melting of sulfide-bearing cumulates at the crust-mantle boundary. We argue that MSS is the dominant sulfide phase in the mantle source region of these magmas, and thus that their high Au content is a consequence of low MSS-silicate melt partition coefficients rather than of sulfide exhaustion or partial re-melting of sulfide-bearing cumulates. Continental crust is depleted in Au, Ag and Cu relative to mantle melts, which was thought to be due to removal of

  19. Black brant from Alaska staging and wintering in Japan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Derksen, Dirk V.; Bollinger, K.S.; Ward, David H.; Sedinger, J.S.; Miyabayashi, Y.

    1996-01-01

    Black brant (Branta bernicla nigricans) nest in colonies in arctic Canada, Alaska, and Russia (Derksen and Ward 1993, Sedinger et al. 1993). Virtually the entire population stages in fall at Izembek Lagoon near the tip of the Alaska Peninsula (Bellrose 1976) before southward migration (Dau 1992) to winter habitats in British Columbia, Washington, Oregon, California, and Baja California (Subcommittee on Black Brant 1992). A small number of black brant winter in Japan, Korea, and China (Owen 1980). In Japan 3,000–5,000 brant of unknown origin stop over in fall, and a declining population (<1,000) of birds winter here, primarily in the northern islands (Brazil 1991, Miyabayashi et al. 1994). Here, we report sightings of brant in Japan that were marked in Alaska and propose a migration route based on historical and recent observations and weather patterns.

  20. User's manual for the Langley Research Center 14- by 22- foot subsonic tunnel static data acquisition system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orie, Nettie M.; Quinto, P. Frank

    1993-01-01

    The Static Data Acquisition System (SDAS) components primarily responsible for acquiring data at the 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel are the NEFF 620/600 Data Acquisition Unit (DAU) and the PSI 780B electronically scanned pressure (ESP) measurement system. A 9250 Modcomp computer is used to process the signal, to do all aerodynamic calculation, and to control the output of data. All of the tasks required to support a wind tunnel investigation are menu driven. The purpose of this report is to acquaint users of this system with the wide range of capabilities that exist with the available hardware and software and provide them with the proper procedures to follow when setting up or running individual tests.

  1. Cold nuclear matter effects on J/ψ yields as a function of rapidity and nuclear geometry in d+A collisions at sqrt[s(NN)]=200  GeV.

    PubMed

    Adare, A; Afanasiev, S; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Al-Bataineh, H; Alexander, J; Angerami, A; Aoki, K; Apadula, N; Aphecetche, L; Aramaki, Y; Asai, J; Atomssa, E T; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, B; Babintsev, V; Bai, M; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Baldisseri, A; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Bassalleck, B; Basye, A T; Bathe, S; Batsouli, S; Baublis, V; Baumann, C; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Belmont, R; Bennett, R; Berdnikov, A; Berdnikov, Y; Bhom, J H; Bickley, A A; Blau, D S; Boissevain, J G; Bok, J S; Borel, H; Boyle, K; Brooks, M L; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Butsyk, S; Camacho, C M; Campbell, S; Caringi, A; Chang, B S; Chang, W C; Charvet, J-L; Chen, C-H; Chernichenko, S; Chi, C Y; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choi, J B; Choudhury, R K; Christiansen, P; Chujo, T; Chung, P; Churyn, A; Chvala, O; Cianciolo, V; Citron, Z; Cole, B A; Conesa del Valle, Z; Connors, M; Constantin, P; Csanád, M; Csörgo, T; Dahms, T; Dairaku, S; Danchev, I; Das, K; Datta, A; David, G; Dayananda, M K; Denisov, A; d'Enterria, D; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dharmawardane, K V; Dietzsch, O; Dion, A; Donadelli, M; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Drees, K A; Dubey, A K; Durham, J M; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Dzhordzhadze, V; D'Orazio, L; Edwards, S; Efremenko, Y V; Ellinghaus, F; Engelmore, T; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Eyser, K O; Fadem, B; Fields, D E; Finger, M; Finger, M; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fujiwara, K; Fukao, Y; Fusayasu, T; Garishvili, I; Glenn, A; Gong, H; Gonin, M; Gosset, J; Goto, Y; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Grim, G; Grosse Perdekamp, M; Gunji, T; Gustafsson, H-Å; Hadj Henni, A; Haggerty, J S; Hahn, K I; Hamagaki, H; Hamblen, J; Han, R; Hanks, J; Hartouni, E P; Haruna, K; Haslum, E; Hayano, R; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Hester, T; Hill, J C; Hohlmann, M; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Horaguchi, T; Hornback, D; Huang, S; Ichihara, T; Ichimiya, R; Iinuma, H; Ikeda, Y; Imai, K; Imrek, J; Inaba, M; Isenhower, D; Ishihara, M; Isobe, T; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Ivanischev, D; Iwanaga, Y; Jacak, B V; Jia, J; Jiang, X; Jin, J; Johnson, B M; Jones, T; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Jumper, D S; Kajihara, F; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kamin, J; Kang, J H; Kapustinsky, J; Karatsu, K; Kasai, M; Kawall, D; Kawashima, M; Kazantsev, A V; Kempel, T; Khanzadeev, A; Kijima, K M; Kikuchi, J; Kim, A; Kim, B I; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, E; Kim, E J; Kim, S H; Kim, Y-J; Kinney, E; Kiriluk, K; Kiss, Á; Kistenev, E; Klay, J; Klein-Boesing, C; Kochenda, L; Komkov, B; Konno, M; Koster, J; Kozlov, A; Král, A; Kravitz, A; Kunde, G J; Kurita, K; Kurosawa, M; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lai, Y S; Lajoie, J G; Layton, D; Lebedev, A; Lee, D M; Lee, J; Lee, K B; Lee, K S; Lee, T; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Lenzi, B; Li, X; Lichtenwalner, P; Liebing, P; Linden Levy, L A; Liška, T; Litvinenko, A; Liu, H; Liu, M X; Love, B; Lynch, D; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malakhov, A; Malik, M D; Manko, V I; Mannel, E; Mao, Y; Mašek, L; Masui, H; Matathias, F; McCumber, M; McGaughey, P L; McGlinchey, D; Means, N; Meredith, B; Miake, Y; Mibe, T; Mignerey, A C; Mikeš, P; Miki, K; Milov, A; Mishra, M; Mitchell, J T; Mohanty, A K; Moon, H J; Morino, Y; Morreale, A; Morrison, D P; Moukhanova, T V; Mukhopadhyay, D; Murakami, T; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagle, J L; Naglis, M; Nagy, M I; Nakagawa, I; Nakamiya, Y; Nakamura, K R; Nakamura, T; Nakano, K; Nam, S; Newby, J; Nguyen, M; Nihashi, M; Niita, T; Nouicer, R; Nyanin, A S; Oakley, C; O'Brien, E; Oda, S X; Ogilvie, C A; Oka, M; Okada, K; Onuki, Y; Oskarsson, A; Ouchida, M; Ozawa, K; Pak, R; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, I H; Park, J; Park, S K; Park, W J; Pate, S F; Pei, H; Peng, J-C; Pereira, H; Peresedov, V; Peressounko, D Yu; Petti, R; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Proissl, M; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Qu, H; Rak, J; Rakotozafindrabe, A; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Rembeczki, S; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Richardson, E; Roach, D; Roche, G; Rolnick, S D; Rosati, M; Rosen, C A; Rosendahl, S S E; Rosnet, P; Rukoyatkin, P; Ružička, P; Rykov, V L; Sahlmueller, B; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakai, S; Sakashita, K; Samsonov, V; Sano, S; Sato, T; Sawada, S; Sedgwick, K; Seele, J; Seidl, R; Semenov, A Yu; Semenov, V; Seto, R; Sharma, D; Shein, I; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shimomura, M; Shoji, K; Shukla, P; Sickles, A; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Silvestre, C; Sim, K S; Singh, B K; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Slunečka, M; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Staley, F; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stepanov, M; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Suire, C; Sukhanov, A; Sziklai, J; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tanabe, R; Tanaka, Y; Taneja, S; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Tarafdar, S; Taranenko, A; Tarján, P; Themann, H; Thomas, D; Thomas, T L; Togawa, M; Toia, A; Tomášek, L; Tomita, Y; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tram, V-N; Tserruya, I; Tsuchimoto, Y; Vale, C; Valle, H; van Hecke, H W; Vazquez-Zambrano, E; Veicht, A; Velkovska, J; Vértesi, R; Vinogradov, A A; Virius, M; Vossen, A; Vrba, V; Vznuzdaev, E; Wang, X R; Watanabe, D; Watanabe, K; Watanabe, Y; Wei, F; Wei, R; Wessels, J; White, S N; Winter, D; Woody, C L; Wright, R M; Wysocki, M; Xie, W; Yamaguchi, Y L; Yamaura, K; Yang, R; Yanovich, A; Ying, J; Yokkaichi, S; You, Z; Young, G R; Younus, I; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zaudtke, O; Zhang, C; Zhou, S; Zolin, L

    2011-09-30

    We present measurements of J/ψ yields in d+Au collisions at sqrt[s(NN)]=200  GeV recorded by the PHENIX experiment and compare them with yields in p+p collisions at the same energy per nucleon-nucleon collision. The measurements cover a large kinematic range in J/ψ rapidity (-2.2

  2. Geometrical scaling of direct-photon production in hadron collisions from RHIC to the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Klein-Boesing, Christian; McLerran, L.

    2014-05-27

    Geometric scaling is a property of hadronic interactions predicted by theories of gluon saturation and expressing rates in terms of dimensionless ratios of transverse momentum to the saturation momentum. In this paper we consider production of photons in pp, dAu and AuAu collisions at √sNN= 200 GeV (RHIC) and in PbPb collisions at √sNN= 2760 GeV (LHC) and show that the yield of direct photons in the transverse momentum range 1 GeV

  3. Quarkonia measurements and physics opportunities in p+A collisions at the PHENIX experiment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kwangbok

    2013-04-01

    The PHENIX collaboration has measured quarkonia resonances of J/ψ, ^amp;', χc and υ in d+Au collisions. The measurements give us important knowledge to understand the cold nuclear matter effects of nuclear parton modification, gluon saturation, initial state parton energy loss and final state nuclear absorption models. In addition to the quarkonia, measurements of the Drell-Yan process are also good channels to understand the initial-state effects since the leptons from Drell-Yan will not interact with the nuclear medium. Recently installed Silicon Vertex Detectors, FVTX & VTX, will measure open heavy flavors and Drell-Yan precisely. At RHIC, there are discussions to deliver multi-species p+A collisions to get new and interesting physics measurements in near future. In this talk, I review the PHENIX measurements and discuss the physics opportunities with p+A collisions by the FVTX & VTX detectors and with possible detector upgrades for the future.

  4. The color glass condensate and the average transverse momentum in proton-nucleus collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durães, F. O.; Giannini, A. V.; Gonçalves, V. P.; Navarra, F. S.

    2016-08-01

    We compute the energy and rapidity dependence of the average transverse momentum ⟨pT ⟩ in pp and pA collisions at RHIC and LHC energies in the framework of the Color Glass Condensate (CGC) formalism. We update previous predictions for the pT - spectra using the hybrid formalism of the CGC approach and two phenomenological models for the dipole – target scattering amplitude. We demonstrate that these models are able to describe the RHIC and LHC data for the hadron production in pp, dAu and pPb collisions at pT ≤⃒ 20 GeV. Moreover, we present our predictions for ⟨pT ⟩ and demonstrate that the ratio ⟨pT (y)⟩=⟨pT (y = 0)⟩ decreases with the rapidity and has a behavior similar to that predicted by hydrodynamical calculations.

  5. Three-particle coincidence of the long range pseudorapidity correlation in high energy nucleus-nucleus collisions.

    PubMed

    Abelev, B I; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Alakhverdyants, A V; Anderson, B D; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baumgart, S; Beavis, D R; Bellwied, R; Betancourt, M J; Betts, R R; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Biritz, B; Bland, L C; Bnzarov, I; Bonner, B E; Bouchet, J; Braidot, E; Brandin, A V; Bridgeman, A; Bruna, E; Bueltmann, S; Burton, T P; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Catu, O; Cebra, D; Cendejas, R; Cervantes, M C; Chajecki, Z; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Chen, J Y; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, K E; Christie, W; Chung, P; Clarke, R F; Codrington, M J M; Corliss, R; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Dash, S; Davila Leyva, A; De Silva, L C; Debbe, R R; Dedovich, T G; DePhillips, M; Derevschikov, A A; Derradi de Souza, R; Didenko, L; Djawotho, P; Dogra, S M; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Dunlop, J C; Dutta Mazumdar, M R; Efimov, L G; Elhalhuli, E; Elnimr, M; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Estienne, M; Eun, L; Fachini, P; Fatemi, R; Fedorisin, J; Fersch, R G; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fine, V; Fisyak, Y; Gagliardi, C A; Gangadharan, D R; Ganti, M S; Garcia-Solis, E J; Geromitsos, A; Geurts, F; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; Gorbunov, Y N; Gordon, A; Grebenyuk, O; Grosnick, D; Grube, B; Guertin, S M; Gupta, A; Gupta, N; Guryn, W; Haag, B; Hallman, T J; Hamed, A; Han, L-X; Harris, J W; Hays-Wehle, J P; Heinz, M; Heppelmann, S; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffman, A M; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Hollis, R S; Huang, H Z; Humanic, T J; Huo, L; Igo, G; Iordanova, A; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Jakl, P; Jena, C; Jin, F; Jones, C L; Jones, P G; Joseph, J; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kajimoto, K; Kang, K; Kapitan, J; Kauder, K; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Kettler, D; Khodyrev, V Yu; Kikola, D P; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Knospe, A G; Kocoloski, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Konzer, J; Kopytine, M; Koralt, I; Korsch, W; Kotchenda, L; Kouchpil, V; Kravtsov, P; Kravtsov, V I; Krueger, K; Krus, M; Kumar, L; Kurnadi, P; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; LaPointe, S; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, C-H; Lee, J H; Leight, W; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, L; Li, N; Li, W; Li, X; Li, X; Li, Y; Li, Z; Lin, G; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, H; Liu, J; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Longacre, R S; Love, W A; Lu, Y; Ludlam, T; Ma, G L; Ma, Y G; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Mall, O I; Mangotra, L K; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Masui, H; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McDonald, D; McShane, T S; Meschanin, A; Milner, R; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mischke, A; Mitrovski, M K; Mohanty, B; Morozov, D A; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nattrass, C; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Netrakanti, P K; Ng, M J; Nogach, L V; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okada, H; Okorokov, V; Olson, D; Pachr, M; Page, B S; Pal, S K; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlak, T; Peitzmann, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Phatak, S C; Pile, P; Planinic, M; Ploskon, M A; Pluta, J; Plyku, D; Poljak, N; Poskanzer, A M; Potukuchi, B V K S; Powell, C B; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Pruthi, N K; Pujahari, P R; Putschke, J; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Redwine, R; Reed, R; Rehberg, J M; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L; Sahoo, R; Sakai, S; Sakrejda, I; Sakuma, T; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sangaline, E; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schuster, T R; Seele, J; Seger, J; Selyuzhenkov, I; Seyboth, P; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Sharma, M; Shi, S S; Sichtermann, E P; Simon, F; Singaraju, R N; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, N; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Staszak, D; Stevens, J R; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Suaide, A A P; Suarez, M C; Subba, N L; Sumbera, M; Sun, X M; Sun, Y; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tang, Z; Tarini, L H; Tarnowsky, T; Thein, D; Thomas, J H; Tian, J; Timmins, A R; Timoshenko, S; Tlusty, D; Tokarev, M; Tram, V N; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tsai, O D; Ulery, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; van Nieuwenhuizen, G; van Leeuwen, M; Vanfossen, J A; Varma, R; Vasconcelos, G M S; Vasiliev, A N; Videbæk, F; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Wada, M; Walker, M; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, J S; Wang, Q; Wang, X; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Webb, G; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Wingfield, E; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, Y; Xie, W; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, W; Xu, Y; Xu, Z; Xue, L; Yang, Y; Yepes, P; Yip, K; Yoo, I-K; Yue, Q; Zawisza, M; Zbroszczyk, H; Zhan, W; Zhang, S; Zhang, W M; Zhang, X P; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, J; Zhong, C; Zhou, J; Zhou, W; Zhu, X; Zhu, Y-H; Zoulkarneev, R; Zoulkarneeva, Y

    2010-07-01

    We report the first three-particle coincidence measurement in pseudorapidity (Δη) between a high transverse momentum (p⊥) trigger particle and two lower p⊥ associated particles within azimuth |Δϕ|<0.7 in square root of s(NN)=200 GeV d+Au and Au+Au collisions. Charge ordering properties are exploited to separate the jetlike component and the ridge (long range Δη correlation). The results indicate that the correlation of ridge particles are uniform not only with respect to the trigger particle but also between themselves event by event in our measured Δη. In addition, the production of the ridge appears to be uncorrelated to the presence of the narrow jetlike component. PMID:20867701

  6. Transverse momentum and centrality dependence of high-pT nonphotonic electron suppression in Au+Au collisions at sqrt[s NN]=200 GeV.

    PubMed

    Abelev, B I; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Anderson, B D; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Bai, Y; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Baumgart, S; Belaga, V V; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A; Bellwied, R; Benedosso, F; Betts, R R; Bhardwaj, S; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Blyth, S-L; Bombara, M; Bonner, B E; Botje, M; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Bravar, A; Burton, T P; Bystersky, M; Cadman, R V; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Callner, J; Catu, O; Cebra, D; Chajecki, Z; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Chen, J Y; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Chung, S U; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cosentino, M R; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Dash, S; Daugherity, M; de Moura, M M; Dedovich, T G; Dephillips, M; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Djawotho, P; Dogra, S M; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, F; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Dutta Mazumdar, M R; Eckardt, V; Edwards, W R; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Estienne, M; Fachini, P; Fatemi, R; Fedorisin, J; Feng, A; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fine, V; Fisyak, Y; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Gaillard, L; Ganti, M S; Garcia-Solis, E; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; Gorbunov, Y G; Gos, H; Grebenyuk, O; Grosnick, D; Guertin, S M; Guimaraes, K S F F; Gupta, N; Haag, B; Hallman, T J; Hamed, A; Harris, J W; He, W; Heinz, M; Henry, T W; Heppelmann, S; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffman, A M; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D; Hollis, R; Horner, M J; Huang, H Z; Hughes, E W; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Iordanova, A; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Jakl, P; Jia, F; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kang, K; Kapitan, J; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Kettler, D; Khodyrev, V Yu; Kim, B C; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Kislov, E M; Klein, S R; Knospe, A G; Kocoloski, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kouchpil, V; Kowalik, K L; Kravtsov, P; Kravtsov, V I; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kumar, A; Kurnadi, P; Kuznetsov, A A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lapointe, S; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, C-H; Lehocka, S; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, Q; Li, Y; Lin, G; Lin, X; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, H; Liu, J; Liu, L; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Longacre, R S; Love, W A; Lu, Y; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, G L; Ma, J G; Ma, Y G; Magestro, D; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Mangotra, L K; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McClain, C J; McShane, T S; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A; Millane, J; Miller, M L; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mironov, C; Mischke, A; Mitchell, J; Mohanty, B; Morozov, D A; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nattrass, C; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nepali, N S; Netrakanti, P K; Nogach, L V; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Pachr, M; Pal, S K; Panebratsev, Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Peitzmann, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Phatak, S C; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Porile, N; Poskanzer, A M; Potekhin, M; Potrebenikova, E; Potukuchi, B V K S; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Putschke, J; Qattan, I A; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Relyea, D; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L; Russcher, M J; Sahoo, R; Sakrejda, I; Sakuma, T; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sarsour, M; Sazhin, P S; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Selyuzhenkov, I; Seyboth, P; Shabetai, A; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Sharma, M; Shen, W Q; Shimanskiy, S S; Sichtermann, E P; Simon, F; Singaraju, R N; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Speltz, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stadnik, A; Stanislaus, T D S; Staszak, D; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Suaide, A A P; Suarez, M C; Subba, N L; Sumbera, M; Sun, X M; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tarnowsky, T; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Timoshenko, S; Tokarev, M; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tsai, O D; Ulery, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; van der Kolk, N; van Leeuwen, M; Vander Molen, A M; Varma, R; Vasilevski, I M; Vasiliev, A N; Vernet, R; Vigdor, S E; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Voloshin, S A; Waggoner, W T; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, J S; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Watson, J W; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Wetzler, A; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, J; Wu, Y; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, Z; Yepes, P; Yoo, I-K; Yue, Q; Yurevich, V I; Zhan, W; Zhang, H; Zhang, W M; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, Y; Zhong, C; Zhou, J; Zoulkarneev, R; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zubarev, A N; Zuo, J X

    2007-05-11

    The STAR collaboration at the BNL Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) reports measurements of the inclusive yield of nonphotonic electrons, which arise dominantly from semileptonic decays of heavy flavor mesons, over a broad range of transverse momenta (1.2d+Au, and Au+Au collisions at sqrt[s_{NN}]=200 GeV. The nonphotonic electron yield exhibits an unexpectedly large suppression in central Au+Au collisions at high p(T), suggesting substantial heavy-quark energy loss at RHIC. The centrality and p(T) dependences of the suppression provide constraints on theoretical models of suppression. PMID:17677616

  7. Cold Nuclear Matter Effects on J/{psi} Yields as a Function of Rapidity and Nuclear Geometry in d+A Collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN})=200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Adare, A.; Bickley, A. A.; Ellinghaus, F.; Kinney, E.; Kiriluk, K.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Nagle, J. L.; Rosen, C. A.; Seele, J.; Wysocki, M.; Afanasiev, S.; Isupov, A.; Litvinenko, A.; Malakhov, A.; Peresedov, V.; Rukoyatkin, P.; Zolin, L.; Aidala, C.; Datta, A.; Ajitanand, N. N.

    2011-09-30

    We present measurements of J/{psi} yields in d+Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN})=200 GeV recorded by the PHENIX experiment and compare them with yields in p+p collisions at the same energy per nucleon-nucleon collision. The measurements cover a large kinematic range in J/{psi} rapidity (-2.2

  8. Cross section for bb¯ production via dielectrons in d + Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV

    DOE PAGES

    Adare, A.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Alexander, J.; Angerami, A.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Aramaki, Y.; et al

    2015-01-26

    We report a measurement of e⁺e⁻ pairs from semileptonic heavy-flavor decays in d+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV. Thus, exploring the mass and transverse-momentum dependence of the yield, the bottom decay contribution can be isolated from charm, and quantified by comparison to PYTHIA and MC@NLO simulations. The resulting bb-production cross section is σdAubb=1.37±0.28(stat)±0.46(syst) mb, which is equivalent to a nucleon-nucleon cross section of σNNbb =3.4 ± 0.8(stat)±1.1(syst) µb.

  9. Experience with IBS-suppression lattice in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko,V.N.; Luo, Y.; Ptitsyn, V.; Satogata, T.; Tepikian, S.; Bai, M.; Bruno, D.; Cameron, P.; Connolly, R.; Della Penna, A.; Drees, A.; Fedotov, A.; Ganetis, G.; Hoff, L.; Louie, W.; Malitsky, N.; Marr, G.; Marusic, A.; Montag, C.; Pilat, F.; Roser, T.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.

    2008-06-23

    An intra-beam scattering (IBS) is the limiting factor of the luminosity lifetime for RHIC operating with heavy ions. In order to suppress the IBS we designed and implemented new lattice with higher betatron tunes. This lattice had been developed during last three years and had been used for gold ions in yellow ring of the RHIC during d-Au part of the RHIC Run-8. The use of this lattice allowed both significant increases in the luminosity lifetime and the luminosity levels via reduction of beta-stars in the IPS. In this paper we report on the development, the tests and the performance of IBS-suppression lattice in RHIC, including the resulting increases in the peak and the average luminosity. We also report on our plans for future steps with the IBS suppression.

  10. OPERATIONS AND PERFORMANCE OF RHIC AS A CU-CU COLLIDER.

    SciTech Connect

    PILAT, R.; AHRENS, L.; BAI, M.; BARTON, D.S.; ET AL.

    2005-05-16

    The 5th year of RHIC operations, started in November 2004 and expected to last till June 2005, consists of a physics run with Cu-Cu collisions at 100 GeV/u followed by one with polarized protons (pp) at 100 GeV [l]. We will address here the overall performance of the RHIC complex used for the first time as a Cu-Cu collider, and compare it with previous operational experience with Au, PP and asymmetric d-Au collisions. We will also discuss operational improvements, such as a {beta}* squeeze to 85cm in the high luminosity interaction regions from the design value of 1m, system improvements, machine performance and limitations, and address reliability and uptime issues.

  11. Recent Results from RHIC: The Perfect Liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Westfall, Gary

    2006-07-19

    In the past two years we have witnessed a leap forward in the understanding high temperature, high density, and strongly interacting matter produced in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Combining measurements of Au+Au, d+Au, and p+p collisions at energies up to 200 GeV per nucleon pair in the center of mass frame, the four RHIC experimental groups, STAR, PHENIX, PHOBOS, and BRAHMS, have produced impressive experimental evidence for the existence of a new form of matter. In this Colloquium, I will present an overview of recent experimental results from RHIC including evidence for thermalization, hydrodynamic behavior of a perfect fluid, the partonic origin of flow, and jet suppression. These measurements point to the observation of a hot, dense, strongly interacting matter produced in central Au+Au collisions at the highest available energies.

  12. Is the QCD Plasma Observable at RHIC with Purely Hadronic Signals?

    SciTech Connect

    Kahana, David E.; Kahana, Sidney H.

    2009-03-23

    A consistent picture of the Au+Au and D+Au, {radical}(s) = 200 A GeV measurements at RHIC obtained with the PHENIX, STAR, PHOBOS and BRAHMS detectors was previously developed with the simulation LUCIFER. The approach was modeled on the early production of a fluid of pre-hadrons after the completion of an initial phase of high energy interactions. A successful description of both measured ''jet'' suppression and elliptical flow is obtained with a key element being the early production of pre-mesons which are relatively strongly interacting. The synthesis of these two signals in a common description puts in doubt the likelihood of direct hadronic observation of the colored phase which, for appreciably hard partons, lasts only a short interval {approx}t{sub p}, while the time for pre-mesons to hadronise t{sub f} is in general considerably longer.

  13. Recent Results from Phobos

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, Edmundo; Betts, R. R.; Garcia, E.; Halliwell, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Iordanova, A.; Sagerer, J.; Smith, C. E.; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Barton, D. S.; Carroll, A.; Chai, Z.; George, N.; Hauer, M.; Holzman, B.; Pak, R.; Seals, H.; Sedykh, I.

    2007-02-12

    The PHOBOS detector is one of four heavy ion experiments at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory. In this paper we will review some of the results of PHOBOS from the data collected in p+p, d+Au and Au+Au collisions at nucleon-nucleon center-of-mass energies up to 200 GeV. Evidence is found of the formation of a very high energy density and highly interactive system, which can not be described in terms of hadrons, and has a relatively low baryon density. There is evidence that the system formed is thermalized to a certain degree. Scaling with the number of participants and extended longitudinal scaling behavior are also observed in distributions of produced charged particles.

  14. Pseudorapidity density of charged particles in p+Pb collisions at √(s(NN))=5.02 TeV.

    PubMed

    Abelev, B; Adam, J; Adamová, D; Adare, A M; Aggarwal, M M; Aglieri Rinella, G; Agnello, M; Agocs, A G; Agostinelli, A; Ahammed, Z; Ahmad, N; Ahmad Masoodi, A; Ahn, S U; Ahn, S A; Ajaz, M; Akindinov, A; Aleksandrov, D; Alessandro, B; Alfaro Molina, R; Alici, A; Alkin, A; Almaráz Aviña, E; Alme, J; Alt, T; Altini, V; Altinpinar, S; Altsybeev, I; Andrei, C; Andronic, A; Anguelov, V; Anielski, J; Anson, C; Antičić, T; Antinori, F; Antonioli, P; Aphecetche, L; Appelshäuser, H; Arbor, N; Arcelli, S; Arend, A; Armesto, N; Arnaldi, R; Aronsson, T; Arsene, I C; Arslandok, M; Asryan, A; Augustinus, A; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Aystö, J; Azmi, M D; Bach, M; Badalà, A; Baek, Y W; Bailhache, R; Bala, R; Baldini Ferroli, R; Baldisseri, A; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F; Bán, J; Baral, R C; Barbera, R; Barile, F; Barnaföldi, G G; Barnby, L S; Barret, V; Bartke, J; Basile, M; Bastid, N; Basu, S; Bathen, B; Batigne, G; Batyunya, B; Baumann, C; Bearden, I G; Beck, H; Behera, N K; Belikov, I; Bellini, F; Bellwied, R; Belmont-Moreno, E; Bencedi, G; Beole, S; Berceanu, I; Bercuci, A; Berdnikov, Y; Berenyi, D; Bergognon, A A E; Berzano, D; Betev, L; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhom, J; Bianchi, L; Bianchi, N; Bielčík, J; Bielčíková, J; Bilandzic, A; Bjelogrlic, S; Blanco, F; Blanco, F; Blau, D; Blume, C; Boccioli, M; Böttger, S; Bogdanov, A; Bøggild, H; Bogolyubsky, M; Boldizsár, L; Bombara, M; Book, J; Borel, H; Borissov, A; Bossú, F; Botje, M; Botta, E; Braidot, E; Braun-Munzinger, P; Bregant, M; Breitner, T; Browning, T A; Broz, M; Brun, R; Bruna, E; Bruno, G E; Budnikov, D; Buesching, H; Bufalino, S; Busch, O; Buthelezi, Z; Caballero Orduna, D; Caffarri, D; Cai, X; Caines, H; Calvo Villar, E; Camerini, P; Canoa Roman, V; Cara Romeo, G; Carena, W; Carena, F; Carlin Filho, N; Carminati, F; Casanova Díaz, A; Castillo Castellanos, J; Castillo Hernandez, J F; Casula, E A R; Catanescu, V; Cavicchioli, C; Ceballos Sanchez, C; Cepila, J; Cerello, P; Chang, B; Chapeland, S; Charvet, J L; Chattopadhyay, S; Chattopadhyay, S; Chawla, I; Cherney, M; Cheshkov, C; Cheynis, B; Chibante Barroso, V; Chinellato, D D; Chochula, P; Chojnacki, M; Choudhury, S; Christakoglou, P; Christensen, C H; Christiansen, P; Chujo, T; Chung, S U; Cicalo, C; Cifarelli, L; Cindolo, F; Cleymans, J; Coccetti, F; Colamaria, F; Colella, D; Collu, A; Conesa Balbastre, G; Conesa del Valle, Z; Connors, M E; Contin, G; Contreras, J G; Cormier, T M; Corrales Morales, Y; Cortese, P; Cortés Maldonado, I; Cosentino, M R; Costa, F; Cotallo, M E; Crescio, E; Crochet, P; Cruz Alaniz, E; Cuautle, E; Cunqueiro, L; Dainese, A; Dalsgaard, H H; Danu, A; Das, K; Das, I; Das, S; Das, D; Dash, S; Dash, A; De, S; de Barros, G O V; De Caro, A; de Cataldo, G; de Cuveland, J; De Falco, A; De Gruttola, D; Delagrange, H; Deloff, A; De Marco, N; Dénes, E; De Pasquale, S; Deppman, A; Erasmo, G D; de Rooij, R; Diaz Corchero, M A; Di Bari, D; Dietel, T; Di Giglio, C; Di Liberto, S; Di Mauro, A; Di Nezza, P; Divià, R; Djuvsland, Ø; Dobrin, A; Dobrowolski, T; Dönigus, B; Dordic, O; Driga, O; Dubey, A K; Dubla, A; Ducroux, L; Dupieux, P; Dutta Majumdar, M R; Dutta Majumdar, A K; Elia, D; Emschermann, D; Engel, H; Erazmus, B; Erdal, H A; Espagnon, B; Estienne, M; Esumi, S; Evans, D; Eyyubova, G; Fabris, D; Faivre, J; Falchieri, D; Fantoni, A; Fasel, M; Fearick, R; Fehlker, D; Feldkamp, L; Felea, D; Feliciello, A; Fenton-Olsen, B; Feofilov, G; Fernández Téllez, A; Ferretti, A; Festanti, A; Figiel, J; Figueredo, M A S; Filchagin, S; Finogeev, D; Fionda, F M; Fiore, E M; Floris, M; Foertsch, S; Foka, P; Fokin, S; Fragiacomo, E; Francescon, A; Frankenfeld, U; Fuchs, U; Furget, C; Fusco Girard, M; Gaardhøje, J J; Gagliardi, M; Gago, A; Gallio, M; Gangadharan, D R; Ganoti, P; Garabatos, C; Garcia-Solis, E; Garishvili, I; Gerhard, J; Germain, M; Geuna, C; Gheata, A; Gheata, M; Ghidini, B; Ghosh, P; Gianotti, P; Girard, M R; Giubellino, P; Gladysz-Dziadus, E; Glässel, P; Gomez, R; Ferreiro, E G; González-Trueba, L H; González-Zamora, P; Gorbunov, S; Goswami, A; Gotovac, S; Grabski, V; Graczykowski, L K; Grajcarek, R; Grelli, A; Grigoras, A; Grigoras, C; Grigoriev, V; Grigoryan, S; Grigoryan, A; Grinyov, B; Grion, N; Gros, P; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J F; Grossiord, J-Y; Grosso, R; Guber, F; Guernane, R; Guerra Gutierrez, C; Guerzoni, B; Guilbaud, M; Gulbrandsen, K; Gulkanyan, H; Gunji, T; Gupta, A; Gupta, R; Haaland, Ø; Hadjidakis, C; Haiduc, M; Hamagaki, H; Hamar, G; Han, B H; Hanratty, L D; Hansen, A; Harmanová-Tóthová, Z; Harris, J W; Hartig, M; Harton, A; Hasegan, D; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hayashi, S; Hayrapetyan, A; Heckel, S T; Heide, M; Helstrup, H; Herghelegiu, A; Herrera Corral, G; Herrmann, N; Hess, B A; Hetland, K F; Hicks, B; Hippolyte, B; Hori, Y; Hristov, P; Hřivnáčová, I; Huang, M; Humanic, T J; Hwang, D S; Ichou, R; Ilkaev, R; Ilkiv, I; Inaba, M; Incani, E; Innocenti, G M; Innocenti, P G; Ippolitov, M; Irfan, M; Ivan, C; Ivanov, V; Ivanov, A; Ivanov, M; Ivanytskyi, O; Jachołkowski, A; Jacobs, P M; Jang, H J; Janik, R; Janik, M A; Jayarathna, P H S Y; Jena, S; Jha, D M; Jimenez Bustamante, R T; Jones, P G; Jung, H; Jusko, A; Kaidalov, A B; Kalcher, S; Kaliňák, P; Kalliokoski, T; Kalweit, A; Kang, J H; Kaplin, V; Karasu Uysal, A; Karavichev, O; Karavicheva, T; Karpechev, E; Kazantsev, A; Kebschull, U; Keidel, R; Khan, K H; Khan, P; Khan, M M; Khan, S A; Khanzadeev, A; Kharlov, Y; Kileng, B; Kim, D W; Kim, T; Kim, B; Kim, J H; Kim, J S; Kim, M; Kim, M; Kim, S; Kim, D J; Kirsch, S; Kisel, I; Kiselev, S; Kisiel, A; Klay, J L; Klein, J; Klein-Bösing, C; Kliemant, M; Kluge, A; Knichel, M L; Knospe, A G; Köhler, M K; Kollegger, T; Kolojvari, A; Kondratiev, V; Kondratyeva, N; Konevskikh, A; Kour, R; Kovalenko, V; Kowalski, M; Kox, S; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, G; Kral, J; Králik, I; Kramer, F; Kravčáková, A; Krawutschke, T; Krelina, M; Kretz, M; Krivda, M; Krizek, F; Krus, M; Kryshen, E; Krzewicki, M; Kucheriaev, Y; Kugathasan, T; Kuhn, C; Kuijer, P G; Kulakov, I; Kumar, J; Kurashvili, P; Kurepin, A; Kurepin, A B; Kuryakin, A; Kushpil, V; Kushpil, S; Kvaerno, H; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Lakomov, I; Langoy, R; La Pointe, S L; Lara, C; Lardeux, A; La Rocca, P; Lea, R; Lechman, M; Lee, K S; Lee, S C; Lee, G R; Legrand, I; Lehnert, J; Lenhardt, M; Lenti, V; León, H; Leoncino, M; León Monzón, I; León Vargas, H; Lévai, P; Lien, J; Lietava, R; Lindal, S; Lindenstruth, V; Lippmann, C; Lisa, M A; Ljunggren, H M; Loenne, P I; Loggins, V R; Loginov, V; Lohner, D; Loizides, C; Loo, K K; Lopez, X; López Torres, E; Løvhøiden, G; Lu, X-G; Luettig, P; Lunardon, M; Luo, J; Luparello, G; Luzzi, C; Ma, K; Ma, R; Madagodahettige-Don, D M; Maevskaya, A; Mager, M; Mahapatra, D P; Maire, A; Malaev, M; Maldonado Cervantes, I; Malinina, L; Mal'kevich, D; Malzacher, P; Mamonov, A; Manceau, L; Mangotra, L; Manko, V; Manso, F; Manzari, V; Mao, Y; Marchisone, M; Mareš, J; Margagliotti, G V; Margotti, A; Marín, A; Markert, C; Marquard, M; Martashvili, I; Martin, N A; Martinengo, P; Martínez, M I; Martínez Davalos, A; Martínez García, G; Martynov, Y; Mas, A; Masciocchi, S; Masera, M; Masoni, A; Massacrier, L; Mastroserio, A; Matthews, Z L; Matyja, A; Mayer, C; Mazer, J; Mazzoni, M A; Meddi, F; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Mercado Pérez, J; Meres, M; Miake, Y; Milano, L; Milosevic, J; Mischke, A; Mishra, A N; Miśkowiec, D; Mitu, C; Mizuno, S; Mlynarz, J; Mohanty, B; Molnar, L; Montaño Zetina, L; Monteno, M; Montes, E; Moon, T; Morando, M; Moreira De Godoy, D A; Moretto, S; Morreale, A; Morsch, A; Muccifora, V; Mudnic, E; Muhuri, S; Mukherjee, M; Müller, H; Munhoz, M G; Musa, L; Musso, A; Nandi, B K; Nania, R; Nappi, E; Nattrass, C; Navin, S; Nayak, T K; Nazarenko, S; Nedosekin, A; Nicassio, M; Niculescu, M; Nielsen, B S; Niida, T; Nikolaev, S; Nikolic, V; Nikulin, V; Nikulin, S; Nilsen, B S; Nilsson, M S; Noferini, F; Nomokonov, P; Nooren, G; Novitzky, N; Nyanin, A; Nyatha, A; Nygaard, C; Nystrand, J; Ochirov, A; Oeschler, H; Oh, S K; Oh, S; Oleniacz, J; Oliveira Da Silva, A C; Oppedisano, C; Ortiz Velasquez, A; Oskarsson, A; Ostrowski, P; Otwinowski, J; Oyama, K; Ozawa, K; Pachmayer, Y; Pachr, M; Padilla, F; Pagano, P; Paić, G; Painke, F; Pajares, C; Pal, S K; Palaha, A; Palmeri, A; Papikyan, V; Pappalardo, G S; Park, W J; Passfeld, A; Pastirčák, B; Patalakha, D I; Paticchio, V; Paul, B; Pavlinov, A; Pawlak, T; Peitzmann, T; Pereira Da Costa, H; Pereira De Oliveira Filho, E; Peresunko, D; Pérez Lara, C E; Perini, D; Perrino, D; Peryt, W; Pesci, A; Peskov, V; Pestov, Y; Petráček, V; Petran, M; Petris, M; Petrov, P; Petrovici, M; Petta, C; Piano, S; Piccotti, A; Pikna, M; Pillot, P; Pinazza, O; Pinsky, L; Pitz, N; Piyarathna, D B; Planinic, M; Płoskoń, M; Pluta, J; Pocheptsov, T; Pochybova, S; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Poghosyan, M G; Polák, K; Polichtchouk, B; Pop, A; Porteboeuf-Houssais, S; Pospíšil, V; Potukuchi, B; Prasad, S K; Preghenella, R; Prino, F; Pruneau, C A; Pshenichnov, I; Puddu, G; Punin, V; Putiš, M; Putschke, J; Quercigh, E; Qvigstad, H; Rachevski, A; Rademakers, A; Räihä, T S; Rak, J; Rakotozafindrabe, A; Ramello, L; Ramírez Reyes, A; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Räsänen, S S; Rascanu, B T; Rathee, D; Read, K F; Real, J S; Redlich, K; Reed, R J; Rehman, A; Reichelt, P; Reicher, M; Renfordt, R; Reolon, A R; Reshetin, A; Rettig, F; Revol, J-P; Reygers, K; Riccati, L; Ricci, R A; Richert, T; Richter, M; Riedler, P; Riegler, W; Riggi, F; Rodríguez Cahuantzi, M; Rodriguez Manso, A; Røed, K; Rohr, D; Röhrich, D; Romita, R; Ronchetti, F; Rosnet, P; Rossegger, S; Rossi, A; Roy, C; Roy, P; Rubio Montero, A J; Rui, R; Russo, R; Ryabinkin, E; Rybicki, A; Sadovsky, S; Safařík, K; Sahoo, R; Sahu, P K; Saini, J; Sakaguchi, H; Sakai, S; Sakata, D; Salgado, C A; Salzwedel, J; Sambyal, S; Samsonov, V; Sanchez Castro, X; Sándor, L; Sandoval, A; Sano, M; Sano, S; Santagati, G; Santoro, R; Sarkamo, J; Scapparone, E; Scarlassara, F; Scharenberg, R P; Schiaua, C; Schicker, R; Schmidt, C; Schmidt, H R; Schreiner, S; Schuchmann, S; Schukraft, J; Schuster, T; Schutz, Y; Schwarz, K; Schweda, K; Scioli, G; Scomparin, E; Scott, P A; Scott, R; Segato, G; Selyuzhenkov, I; Senyukov, S; Seo, J; Serci, S; Serradilla, E; Sevcenco, A; Shabetai, A; Shabratova, G; Shahoyan, R; Sharma, S; Sharma, N; Rohni, S; Shigaki, K; Shtejer, K; Sibiriak, Y; Siciliano, M; Sicking, E; Siddhanta, S; Siemiarczuk, T; Silvermyr, D; Silvestre, C; Simatovic, G; Simonetti, G; Singaraju, R; Singh, R; Singha, S; Singhal, V; Sinha, B C; Sinha, T; Sitar, B; Sitta, M; Skaali, T B; Skjerdal, K; Smakal, R; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R J M; Søgaard, C; Soltz, R; Son, H; Song, J; Song, M; Soos, C; Soramel, F; Sputowska, I; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, M; Srivastava, B K; Stachel, J; Stan, I; Stefanek, G; Steinpreis, M; Stenlund, E; Steyn, G; Stiller, J H; Stocco, D; Stolpovskiy, M; Strmen, P; Suaide, A A P; Subieta Vásquez, M A; Sugitate, T; Suire, C; Sultanov, R; Sumbera, M; Susa, T; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Szarka, I; Szczepankiewicz, A; Szostak, A; Szymański, M; Takahashi, J; Tapia Takaki, J D; Tarantola Peloni, A; Tarazona Martinez, A; Tauro, A; Tejeda Muñoz, G; Telesca, A; Terrevoli, C; Thäder, J; Thomas, D; Tieulent, R; Timmins, A R; Tlusty, D; Toia, A; Torii, H; Toscano, L; Trubnikov, V; Truesdale, D; Trzaska, W H; Tsuji, T; Tumkin, A; Turrisi, R; Tveter, T S; Ulery, J; Ullaland, K; Ulrich, J; Uras, A; Urbán, J; Urciuoli, G M; Usai, G L; Vajzer, M; Vala, M; Valencia Palomo, L; Vallero, S; Vande Vyvre, P; van Leeuwen, M; Vannucci, L; Vargas, A; Varma, R; Vasileiou, M; Vasiliev, A; Vechernin, V; Veldhoen, M; Venaruzzo, M; Vercellin, E; Vergara, S; Vernet, R; Verweij, M; Vickovic, L; Viesti, G; Vilakazi, Z; Villalobos Baillie, O; Vinogradov, A; Vinogradov, Y; Vinogradov, L; Virgili, T; Viyogi, Y P; Vodopyanov, A; Voloshin, K; Voloshin, S; Volpe, G; von Haller, B; Vorobyev, I; Vranic, D; Vrláková, J; Vulpescu, B; Vyushin, A; Wagner, V; Wagner, B; Wan, R; Wang, Y; Wang, M; Wang, D; Wang, Y; Watanabe, K; Weber, M; Wessels, J P; Westerhoff, U; Wiechula, J; Wikne, J; Wilde, M; Wilk, G; Wilk, A; Williams, M C S; Windelband, B; Xaplanteris Karampatsos, L; Yaldo, C G; Yamaguchi, Y; Yang, S; Yang, H; Yasnopolskiy, S; Yi, J; Yin, Z; Yoo, I-K; Yoon, J; Yu, W; Yuan, X; Yushmanov, I; Zaccolo, V; Zach, C; Zampolli, C; Zaporozhets, S; Zarochentsev, A; Závada, P; Zaviyalov, N; Zbroszczyk, H; Zelnicek, P; Zgura, I S; Zhalov, M; Zhang, H; Zhang, X; Zhou, F; Zhou, D; Zhou, Y; Zhu, J; Zhu, H; Zhu, J; Zhu, X; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, A; Zinovjev, G; Zoccarato, Y; Zynovyev, M; Zyzak, M

    2013-01-18

    The charged-particle pseudorapidity density measured over four units of pseudorapidity in nonsingle-diffractive p+Pb collisions at a center-of-mass energy per nucleon pair √(s(NN))=5.02 TeV is presented. The average value at midrapidity is measured to be 16.81±0.71 (syst), which corresponds to 2.14±0.17 (syst) per participating nucleon, calculated with the Glauber model. This is 16% lower than in nonsingle-diffractive pp collisions interpolated to the same collision energy and 84% higher than in d+Au collisions at s√(s(NN))=0.2 TeV. The measured pseudorapidity density in p+Pb collisions is compared to model predictions and provides new constraints on the description of particle production in high-energy nuclear collisions. PMID:23373913

  15. The color glass condensate and the average transverse momentum in proton-nucleus collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durães, F. O.; Giannini, A. V.; Gonçalves, V. P.; Navarra, F. S.

    2016-08-01

    We compute the energy and rapidity dependence of the average transverse momentum ⟨pT ⟩ in pp and pA collisions at RHIC and LHC energies in the framework of the Color Glass Condensate (CGC) formalism. We update previous predictions for the pT - spectra using the hybrid formalism of the CGC approach and two phenomenological models for the dipole - target scattering amplitude. We demonstrate that these models are able to describe the RHIC and LHC data for the hadron production in pp, dAu and pPb collisions at pT ≤⃒ 20 GeV. Moreover, we present our predictions for ⟨pT ⟩ and demonstrate that the ratio ⟨pT (y)⟩=⟨pT (y = 0)⟩ decreases with the rapidity and has a behavior similar to that predicted by hydrodynamical calculations.

  16. Is the QCD Plasma Observable at RHIC with Purely Hadronic Signals?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahana, David E.; Kahana, Sidney H.

    2009-03-01

    A consistent picture of the Au+Au and D+Au, √s = 200 A GeV measurements at RHIC obtained with the PHENIX, STAR, PHOBOS and BRAHMS detectors was previously developed with the simulation LUCIFER. The approach was modeled on the early production of a fluid of pre-hadrons after the completion of an initial phase of high energy interactions. A successful description of both measured "jet" suppression and elliptical flow is obtained with a key element being the early production of pre-mesons which are relatively strongly interacting. The synthesis of these two signals in a common description puts in doubt the likelihood of direct hadronic observation of the colored phase which, for appreciably hard partons, lasts only a short interval ˜tp, while the time for pre-mesons to hadronise tf is in general considerably longer.

  17. The 1968 andesitic lateral blast eruption at Arenal volcano, Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarado, Guillermo E.; Soto, Gerardo J.; Schmincke, Hans-Ulrich; Bolge, Louise L.; Sumita, Mari

    2006-09-01

    The magmatic andesitic eruption of Arenal volcano on July 29-31, 1968, after centuries of dormancy, produced three new fissural craters (A, B and C) on its western flank and a multilayered pyroclastic deposit emplaced by complex transport mechanisms. The explosions were initially triggered by a volatile oversaturated (4-7 wt.% H 2O) magma. Several lines of evidences suggest a small blast surge, where a wood-rich pyroclastic deposit was emplaced as a ground layer, followed by several units of coarse-grained (Md Φ between - 0.65 and - 5.40) tephra deposits (LU: lapilli units, DAU: double ash units). LU-1, -2, -3, DAU-1 and -2 consist of unconsolidated and well- to poorly sorted vesiculated bombs and lapilli of andesite, some blocks, ash and shredded wood. The individual units are possibly correlated with the major explosions of July 29. The thickness of the deposits decreases with the distance from the volcano from 5.6 m to a few centimeters. On average, 90% of the components are juvenile (10% dense andesite and 90% vesicular). These coarse-grained beds were deposited in rapid succession by a complex transport process, involving normal fallout, strong ballistic trajectories with a lateral hot (˜ 400 °C) blast surge (LU, equivalent to A 1). Ballistic and coarse tephra sprayed in a narrow (85°) area within about 5.5 km from the lowest crater, and a high (ca. 10 km) eruption column dispersed airfall fine lapilli-ash > 100 km from the volcano. Ash-cloud forming explosions, producing thin pyroclastic surge and muddy phreatomagmatic fallout deposits (FLAU, equivalent to A 2 and A 3), closed the blast surge sequence. The successive explosions on July 30-31 mainly produced block and ash flows, and widely dispersed ash fall. The total volume of pyroclastic material is calculated as 25.8 ± 5.5 × 10 6 m 3 (9.4 ± 2.0 × 10 6 m 3 DRE). A model is proposed to explain the peculiarities of the formation, transportation and emplacement of the blast deposits. The intrusion of

  18. High Transverse Momentum {eta} Meson Production in p+p,d+Au and Au+Au Collisions at sqrt(sNN) = 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Adler, S. S.; Awes, Terry C; Batsouli, Sotiria; Cianciolo, Vince; Efremenko, Yuri; Plasil, F; Read Jr, Kenneth F; Silvermyr, David O; Sorensen, Soren P; Stankus, Paul W; Young, Glenn R; Zhang, Chun; PHENIX, Collaboration

    2007-01-01

    Inclusive transverse momentum spectra of {eta} mesons in the range p{sub T}{approx}2-12 GeV/c have been measured at midrapidity (|{eta}|<0.35) by the PHENIX experiment at RHIC in p+p,d+Au, and Au+Au collisions at {radical}R{sub NN}=200 GeV. The eta mesons are reconstructed through their {eta}{yields}{gamma} {gamma} channel for the three colliding systems as well as through the {eta}{yields}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decay mode in p+p and d+Au collisions. The nuclear modification factor in d+Au collisions, RdAu(p{sub T}){approx}1.0-1.1, suggests at most only modest pT broadening ('Cronin enhancement'). In central Au+Au reactions, the eta yields are significantly suppressed, with RAuAu(p{sub T}){approx}0.2. The ratio of {eta} to {pi}{sup 0} yields is approximately constant as a function of pT for the three colliding systems in agreement with the high-pT world average of R{sub {eta}}/{pi}{sup 0}{approx}0.5 in hadron-hadron, hadron-nucleus, and nucleus-nucleus collisions for a wide range of center-of-mass energies {radical}R{sub NN}{approx}3-1800 GeV as well as, for high scaled momentum xp, in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilations at {radical}R=91.2 GeV. These results are consistent with a scenario where high-pT eta production in nuclear collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider is largely unaffected by initial-state effects but where light-quark mesons ({pi}{sup 0},{eta}) are equally suppressed due to final-state interactions of the parent partons in the dense medium produced in Au+Au reactions.

  19. Vibrational Spectroscopy of Transient Dipolar Radicals via Autodetachment of Dipole-Bound States of Cold Anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Dao-Ling; Liu, Hong-Tao; Dau, Phuong Diem; Wang, Lai-Sheng

    2014-06-01

    High-resolution vibrational spectroscopy of transient species is important for determining their molecular structures and understanding their chemical reactivity. However, the low abundance and high reactivity of molecular radicals pose major challenges to conventional absorption spectroscopic methods. The observation of dipole-bound states (DBS) in anions extend autodetachment spectroscopy to molecular anions whose corresponding neutral radicals possess a large enough dipole moment (>2.5 D).1,2 However, due to the difficulty of assigning the congested spectra at room temperature, there have been only a limited number of autodetachment spectra via DBS reported. Recently, we have built an improved version of a cold trap3 coupled with high-resolution photoelectron imaging.4 The first observation of mode-specific auotodetachment of DBS of cold phenoxide have shown that not only vibrational hot bands were completely suppressed, but also rotational profile was observed.5 The vibrational frequencies of the DBS were found to be the same as those of the neutral radical, suggesting that vibrational structures of dipolar radicals can be probed via DBS.5 More significantly, the DBS resonances allowed a number of vibrational modes with very weak Frank-Condon factors to be "lightened" up via vibrational autodetachment.5 Recently, our first high-resolution vibrational spectroscopy of the dehydrogenated uracil radical, with partial rotational resolution, via autodetachment from DBS of cold deprotonated uracil anions have been reported.6 Rich vibrational information is obtained for this important radical species. The resolved rotational profiles also allow us to characterize the rotational temperature of the trapped anions for the first time.6 1 K. R. Lykke, D. M. Neumark, T. Andersen, V. J. Trapa, and W. C. Lineberger, J. Chem. Phys. 87, 6842 (1987). 2 D. M. Wetzel, and J. I. Brauman, J. Chem. Phys. 90, 68 (1989). 3 P. D. Dau, H. T. Liu, D. L. Huang, and L. S. Wang, J. Chem. Phys

  20. Antitumor triptycene analogs induce a rapid collapse of mitochondrial transmembrane potential in HL-60 cells and isolated mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Perchellet, Elisabeth M; Ward, Mary M; Lou, Kaiyan; Zhao, Huiping; Battina, Srinivas K; Wiredu, Bernard; Hua, Duy H; Perchellet, Jean-Pierre H

    2006-01-01

    (DAU) is unable to mimic the rapid downward arrowDeltapsim caused by antitumor TT bisquinones within 5-40 min of treatment in HL-60 cells or isolated mitochondria. Moreover, the downward arrowDeltapsim caused by 25 microM TT2 or 100 microM Ca(2+) in isolated mitochondria are similarly blocked by cyclosporin A (CsA), bongkrekic acid and decylubiquinone, which prevent PTP opening, suggesting that, in contrast to DAU, antitumor TT analogs that directly target mitochondria to trigger the Ca(2+)-dependent and CsA-sensitive downward arrowDeltapsim, might induce PTP opening and the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis even in the absence of nuclear signals. PMID:16327993

  1. Beam Energy and System-size Dependence of the Space-time Extent of the Pion Emission Source Produced in Heavy-Ion Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mwai, Alex

    The primary goal of high-energy nuclear physics is to develop a thorough understanding of the QCD phase diagram: Its different phases, their boundaries, and the physics they define. Heavy-ion collisions reproduce at a microscale the conditions necessary to initiate the phase transitions of nuclear matter that are only possible at extreme temperatures (T) and baryon chemical potential (mu_{B}). An important probe utilized in studies of the hot and dense matter created in heavy-ion collisions is the method of Hanbury-Brown and Twiss interferometry. The technique is useful in providing measurements in space and time of the pion emission sources at freeze-out. One enduring question of interest in studies of the QCD phase diagram is the position in T and mu_{B} coordinates of the QCD Critical End Point (CEP) as well as the onset of deconfinement, as predicted by model calculations. According to these models, the Equation of State (EoS) should soften in the vicinity of the CEP and/or a first order phase transition. The expanding hot and dense system is sensitive to changes in the EoS. A softening of the EoS will therefore be reflected in measurements of the final size in space-time of the pion emission source. Another question is how small can a system be before we see a turn-off of hydrodynamically driven final-state effects. In this thesis, detailed HBT measurements obtained using the PHENIX detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) are presented for three beam collision energies (sqrt{s_{NN}}. = 39, 62, and 200 GeV) and three collision species (d+Au, Cu+Cu, and Au+Au). The measurements are studied for their dependence on collision geometry and transverse mass (m_{T}), and observations are made on how the small asymmetric system, d+Au, compares to the A+A systems for these dependencies. In addition, newly observed universal scaling patterns with the initial transverse size, bar{R}, and 1/sqrt{m_{T}} for both RHIC HBT measurements and the Pb+Pb collision

  2. DNA damage induced by a new 2-chloroethyl nitrosourea on malignant melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Godeneche, D; Rapp, M; Thierry, A; Laval, F; Madelmont, J C; Chollet, P; Veyre, A

    1990-09-15

    Different biological aspects of a novel 2-chloroethyl nitrosourea derived from cysteamine, N'-(2-chloroethyl)-N-[2-(methylsulfinyl)ethyl]-N'- nitrosourea (CMSOEN2), were studied. Drug-induced cytotoxic effects, uptake kinetics, DNA damage, and O6-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase activity were determined in 3 melanoma cell lines: the murine B16 and 2 human metastatic-derived cell lines (M4 Beu and M3 Dau). We found that radioactivity uptake and incorporation in acido-precipitable material was inversely proportional to cell drug viability. The highly CMSOEN2-sensitive B16 line showed the lowest total radioactivity uptake. In fact, among the melanoma cell parameters studied, 3 of them were well correlated: (a) cytotoxicity as reflected by the colony-forming assay; (b) DNA cross-link frequency estimated by the alkaline elution technique; and (c) O6-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase activity (Mer phenotype), defined as the ability of cell extracts to remove O6-methylguanine from N-methyl-N-nitrosourea-alkylated DNA. The 2 human cell lines (M4 Beu and M3 Dau), the most resistant to the cytostatic drug effects, showed little or no ability to form DNA lethal cross-links. These results correspond to the higher O6-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase activity found in human-derived cell lines compared with that present in murine B16 cell lines. This study confirms that the cell content in this repair DNA protein is certainly one of the important factors implicated in the variability of response to 2-chloroethyl nitrosourea treatment observed in a number of established malignant cell lines. It has been shown that pretreatment of derived cell lines with methylating agents (N-methyl-N-nitrosourea, N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine) or O6-methylguanine used as a free base, increased cytotoxic effects of this class of anticancer agents, likely by saturating receptor sites (sulfhydryl groups) of this specific DNA repair enzyme. Nevertheless, in preliminary Phase I and II clinical

  3. ALTEA calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaconte, V.; Altea Team

    The ALTEA project is aimed at studying the possible functional damages to the Central Nervous System (CNS) due to particle radiation in space environment. The project is an international and multi-disciplinary collaboration. The ALTEA facility is an helmet-shaped device that will study concurrently the passage of cosmic radiation through the brain, the functional status of the visual system and the electrophysiological dynamics of the cortical activity. The basic instrumentation is composed by six active particle telescopes, one ElectroEncephaloGraph (EEG), a visual stimulator and a pushbutton. The telescopes are able to detect the passage of each particle measuring its energy, trajectory and released energy into the brain and identifying nuclear species. The EEG and the Visual Stimulator are able to measure the functional status of the visual system, the cortical electrophysiological activity, and to look for a correlation between incident particles, brain activity and Light Flash perceptions. These basic instruments can be used separately or in any combination, permitting several different experiments. ALTEA is scheduled to fly in the International Space Station (ISS) in November, 15th 2004. In this paper the calibration of the Flight Model of the silicon telescopes (Silicon Detector Units - SDUs) will be shown. These measures have been taken at the GSI heavy ion accelerator in Darmstadt. First calibration has been taken out in November 2003 on the SDU-FM1 using C nuclei at different energies: 100, 150, 400 and 600 Mev/n. We performed a complete beam scan of the SDU-FM1 to check functionality and homogeneity of all strips of silicon detector planes, for each beam energy we collected data to achieve good statistics and finally we put two different thickness of Aluminium and Plexiglas in front of the detector in order to study fragmentations. This test has been carried out with a Test Equipment to simulate the Digital Acquisition Unit (DAU). We are scheduled to

  4. Etude critique de la prise en charge de 159 personnes âgées en consultation de psychiatrie

    PubMed Central

    Ben Thabet, Jihène; Ammar, Yousra; Charfi, Nada; Zouari, Lobna; Zouari, Nasreddine; Gaha, Lotfi; Maalej, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Le phénomène de vieillissement des populations est associé à une augmentation de la prévalence de la morbidité liée à l’âge. La prescription des psychotropes chez le sujet âgé est de plus en plus fréquente dans les institutions, les doses sont de plus en plus élevées, avec un recours fréquent à une poly pharmacothérapie. Nous nous sommes proposé de décrire les conduites thérapeutiques chez le sujet âgé consultant en psychiatrie, en vue de les confronter aux dernières recommandations en la matière. Méthodes L’étude était de type rétrospectif et descriptif. Elle a concerné les sujets âgés d'au moins 60 ans ayant consulté pour la première fois en psychiatrie, au CHU Hédi Chaker à Sfax, en 2010 ou 2011. Résultats Nous avons colligé 159 dossiers. L’âge moyen était de 73 ans. La démence et les troubles de l'humeur étaient les diagnostics les plus fréquents. Sur le plan thérapeutique, une poly thérapie faite d'au moins deux psychotropes de familles différentes a été prescrite pour 55,9%. Chez 60.3% des sujets, le traitement a été prescrit d'emblée à dose complète. Aucun dossier ne faisait état d'une prise en charge psychothérapeutique. Conclusion La prise en charge des malades de notre étude n’était pas conforme aux recommandations, notamment en matière d'association médicamenteuse, de progression des doses et d'association de la psychothérapie à la pharmacothérapie. L'information des médecins et leur sensibilisation aux particularités du sujet âgé contribuerait à optimiser les soins qui leur sont prodigués, y compris en psychiatrie. PMID:25120873

  5. Synthesis, enzymatic stability and in vitro cytostatic effect of Daunorubicin-GnRH-III derivative dimers.

    PubMed

    Schreier, Verena Natalie; Mező, Gábor; Orbán, Erika; Dürr, Claudia; Marquardt, Andreas; Manea, Marilena

    2013-04-01

    Bioconjugates containing chemotherapeutic agents attached to peptide hormones, such as gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), are developed as drug delivery systems for targeted cancer chemotherapy. We report here the synthesis and biochemical characterization of disulfide bond-linked dimeric bioconjugates in which daunorubicin was coupled via an oxime linkage to aminooxyacetylated GnRH-III ([Glp-His-Trp-Ser-His-Asp-Trp-Lys(DauAoa-Cys)-Pro-Gly-NH2]2; where Glp is pyroglutamic acid and Aoa is aminooxyacetyl) and its derivatives modified in position four by N-Me-Ser and Lys(Ac). The in vitro stability/degradation of the bioconjugates was determined in human serum, as well as in the presence of rat liver lysosomal homogenate and digestive enzymes. All compounds were stable at least for 24h in human serum and in the presence of pepsin and trypsin, while they were degraded by lysosomal enzymes. The daunorubicin-GnRH-III derivative dimers were partly digested by α-chymotrypsin; however, they had increased stability compared to the corresponding monomers, making them potential candidates for oral administration. The in vitro cytostatic effect of the compounds was determined on MCF-7 human breast cancer cells by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. All daunorubicin-GnRH-III derivative dimers exerted slightly increased in vitro cytostatic effect (IC50 values in low μM range) than the corresponding monomeric bioconjugates.

  6. A simulation framework for auditory discrimination experiments: Revealing the importance of across-frequency processing in speech perception.

    PubMed

    Schädler, Marc René; Warzybok, Anna; Ewert, Stephan D; Kollmeier, Birger

    2016-05-01

    A framework for simulating auditory discrimination experiments, based on an approach from Schädler, Warzybok, Hochmuth, and Kollmeier [(2015). Int. J. Audiol. 54, 100-107] which was originally designed to predict speech recognition thresholds, is extended to also predict psychoacoustic thresholds. The proposed framework is used to assess the suitability of different auditory-inspired feature sets for a range of auditory discrimination experiments that included psychoacoustic as well as speech recognition experiments in noise. The considered experiments were 2 kHz tone-in-broadband-noise simultaneous masking depending on the tone length, spectral masking with simultaneously presented tone signals and narrow-band noise maskers, and German Matrix sentence test reception threshold in stationary and modulated noise. The employed feature sets included spectro-temporal Gabor filter bank features, Mel-frequency cepstral coefficients, logarithmically scaled Mel-spectrograms, and the internal representation of the Perception Model from Dau, Kollmeier, and Kohlrausch [(1997). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 102(5), 2892-2905]. The proposed framework was successfully employed to simulate all experiments with a common parameter set and obtain objective thresholds with less assumptions compared to traditional modeling approaches. Depending on the feature set, the simulated reference-free thresholds were found to agree with-and hence to predict-empirical data from the literature. Across-frequency processing was found to be crucial to accurately model the lower speech reception threshold in modulated noise conditions than in stationary noise conditions.

  7. Binaural processing model based on contralateral inhibition. I. Model structure.

    PubMed

    Breebaart, J; van de Par, S; Kohlrausch, A

    2001-08-01

    This article presents a quantitative binaural signal detection model which extends the monaural model described by Dau et al. [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 99, 3615-3622 (1996)]. The model is divided into three stages. The first stage comprises peripheral preprocessing in the right and left monaural channels. The second stage is a binaural processor which produces a time-dependent internal representation of the binaurally presented stimuli. This stage is based on the Jeffress delay line extended with tapped attenuator lines. Through this extension, the internal representation codes both interaural time and intensity differences. In contrast to most present-day models, which are based on excitatory-excitatory interaction, the binaural interaction in the present model is based on contralateral inhibition of ipsilateral signals. The last stage, a central processor, extracts a decision variable that can be used to detect the presence of a signal in a detection task, but could also derive information about the position and the compactness of a sound source. In two accompanying articles, the model predictions are compared with data obtained with human observers in a great variety of experimental conditions. PMID:11519576

  8. Human urinary excretion profile after smoking and oral administration of ( sup 14 C)delta 1-tetrahydrocannabinol

    SciTech Connect

    Johansson, E.; Gillespie, H.K.; Halldin, M.M. )

    1990-05-01

    The urinary excretion profiles of delta 1-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta 1-THC) metabolites have been evaluated in two chronic and two naive marijuana users after smoking and oral administration of ({sup 14}C)delta 1-THC. Urine was collected for five days after each administration route and analyzed for total delta 1-THC metabolites by radioactivity determination, for delta 1-THC-7-oic acid by high-performance liquid chromatography, and for cross-reacting cannabinoids by the EMIT d.a.u. cannabinoid assay. The average urinary excretion half-life of {sup 14}C-labeled delta 1-THC metabolites was calculated to be 18.2 +/- 4.9 h (+/- SD). The excretion profiles of delta 1-THC-7-oic acid and EMIT readings were similar to the excretion profile of {sup 14}C-labeled metabolites in the naive users. However, in the chronic users the excretion profiles of delta 1-THC-7-oic acid and EMIT readings did not resemble the radioactive excretion due to the heavy influence from previous Cannabis use. Between 8-14% of the radioactive dose was recovered in the urine in both user groups after oral administration. Lower urinary recovery was obtained both in the chronic and naive users after smoking--5 and 2%, respectively.

  9. Passive inhalation of marijuana smoke: urinalysis and room air levels of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol

    SciTech Connect

    Cone, E.J.; Johnson, R.E.; Darwin, W.D.; Yousefnejad, D.; Mell, L.D.; Paul, B.D.; Mitchell, J.

    1987-05-01

    In two separate studies, 5 drug-free male volunteers with a history of marijuana use were passively exposed to the sidestream smoke of 4 and 16 marijuana cigarettes (2.8% delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC)) for 1 h each day for 6 consecutive days. A third study was similarly performed with 2 marijuana-naive subjects passively exposed to the smoke of 16 marijuana cigarettes. Passive smoke exposure was conducted in a small, unventilated room. Room air levels of THC and CO were monitored frequently. All urine specimens were collected and analyzed by EMIT d.a.u. assay, Abuscreen radioimmunoassay and GC/MS. The studies show that significant amounts of THC were absorbed by all subjects at the higher level of passive smoke exposure (eg., smoke from 16 marijuana cigarettes), resulting in urinary excretion of significant amounts of cannabinoid metabolites. However, it seems improbable that subjects would unknowingly tolerate the noxious smoke conditions produced by this exposure. At the lower level of passive marijuana-smoke exposure, specimens tested positive only infrequently or were negative. Room air levels of THC during passive smoke exposure appeared to be the most critical factor in determining whether a subject produced cannabinoid-positive urine specimens.

  10. Quantifying the sQGP - Heavy Ion Collisions at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Seto, Richard

    2014-12-01

    This is the closeout for DE-FG02-86ER40271 entitled Quantifying the sQGP - Heavy Ion Collisions at the RHIC. Two major things were accomplished. The first, is the physics planning, design, approval, construction, and commissioning of the MPC-EX. The MPC-EX is an electromagnetic calorimeter covering a rapidity of 3<|eta|<4, which was added to the PHENIX detector. Its primary aim is to measure low-x gluons, in order to understand the suppression seen in a variety of signatures, such as the J/Psi. A candidate to explain this phenomena is the Color Glass Condensate (CGC) A second task was to look at collisions of asymmetric species, in particularly Cu+Au. The signature was the suppression of J/Psi mesons at forward and backward rapidity, where a stronger suppression was seen in the copper going direction. While the blue of the suppression is due to hot nuclear matter effects (e.g. screening) the increase in suppression on the Au side was consistent with cold nuclear matter effects seen in d+Au collisions. A major candidate for the explanation of this phenomena is the aforementioned CGC. Finally the work on sPHENIX, particularly an extension to the forward region, called fsPHENIX is described.

  11. An Experimental Review on Heavy-Flavor v 2 in Heavy-Ion Collision

    DOE PAGES

    Nasim, Md.; Esha, Roli; Huang, Huan Zhong

    2016-01-01

    For overmore » a decade now, the primary purpose of relativistic heavy-ion collisions at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has been to study the properties of QCD matter under extreme conditions—high temperature and high density. The heavy-ion experiments at both RHIC and LHC have recorded a wealth of data in p+p, p+Pb, d+Au, Cu+Cu, Cu+Au, Au+Au, Pb+Pb, and U+U collisions at energies ranging from s N N = 7.7  GeV to 7 TeV. Heavy quarks are considered good probe to study the QCD matter created in relativistic collisions due to their very large mass and other unique properties. A precise measurement of various properties of heavy-flavor hadrons provides an insight into the fundamental properties of the hot and dense medium created in these nucleus-nucleus collisions, such as transport coefficient and thermalization and hadronization mechanisms. The main focus of this paper is to present a review on the measurements of azimuthal anisotropy of heavy-flavor hadrons and to outline the scientific opportunities in this sector due to future detector upgrade. We will mainly discuss the elliptic flow of open charmed meson ( D -meson), J / ψ , and leptons from heavy-flavor decay at RHIC and LHC energy.« less

  12. Marijuana-laced brownies: behavioral effects, physiologic effects, and urinalysis in humans following ingestion.

    PubMed

    Cone, E J; Johnson, R E; Paul, B D; Mell, L D; Mitchell, J

    1988-01-01

    Five drug-free male subjects ingested marijuana-laced brownies in a double-blind crossover study designed to test for behavioral effects, physiologic effects, and urinary cannabinoid metabolites produced as a result of consumption of marijuana plant material cooked in foodstuff. On three separate occasions, each subject consumed two brownies which contained 1.6 g of marijuana plant material. Placebo marijuana plant material (0% THC) was mixed with marijuana plant material (2.8% THC) so that each subject ingested equivalent marijuana plant material of 0, 1, and 2 marijuana cigarettes (2.8% THC). Subjects scored significantly higher on behavioral measures after consumption of brownies containing THC than with placebo; however, the effects were slow to appear and variable. Peak effects occurred 2.5 to 3.5 h after dosing. Modest changes in pulse and blood pressure also were noted. Urinalyses by EMIT d.a.u. assay and Abuscreen RIA for cannabinoids and GC/MS assay for THCCOOH indicated that substantial amounts of marijuana-related metabolites were excreted over a period of 3 to 14 days. No positives were produced as a result of ingestion of placebo brownies.

  13. Momentum space saturation model for deep inelastic scattering and single inclusive hadron production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basso, E. A. F.; Gay Ducati, M. B.; de Oliveira, E. G.

    2011-08-01

    We show how the Santana Amaral-Gay Ducati-Betemps-Soyez (AGBS) model, originally developed for deep inelastic scattering applied to HERA data on the proton structure function, can also describe the RHIC data on single inclusive hadron yield for d+Au and p+p collisions through a new simultaneous fit. The single inclusive hadron production is modeled through the color glass condensate, which uses the quark (and gluon) condensate amplitudes in momentum space. The AGBS model is also a momentum space model based on the asymptotic solutions of the Balitsky-Kovchegov equation, although a different definition of the Fourier transform is used. This aspect is overcome, and a description entirely in transverse momentum of both processes arises for the first time. The small difference between the simultaneous fit and the one for HERA data alone suggests that the AGBS model describes very well both kinds of processes and thus emerges as a good tool to investigate the inclusive hadron production data. We use this model for predictions at LHC energies, which agrees very well with available experimental data.

  14. Momentum space dipole amplitude for DIS and inclusive hadron production

    SciTech Connect

    Basso, E. A.; Gay Ducati, M. B.; De Oliveira, E. G.

    2013-03-25

    We show how the AGBS model, originally developed for deep inelastic scattering applied to HERA data on the proton structure function, can also describe the RHIC data on single inclusive hadron yield for d+Au and p+p collisions through a new simultaneous fit. The single inclusive hadron production is modeled through the color glass condensate, which uses the quark(and gluon) condensate amplitudes in momentum space. The AGBS model is also a momentum space model based on the asymptotic solutions of the BK equation, although a different definition of the Fourier transform is used. This description entirely in transverse momentum of both processes arises for the first time. The small difference between the simultaneous fit and the one for HERA data alone suggests that the AGBS model describes very well both kind of processes and thus emerges as a good tool to investigate the inclusive hadron production data. We use this model for predictions at LHC energies, which agree quite well with available experimental data.

  15. Measurements of Elliptic and Triangular Flow in High-Multiplicity He3+Au Collisions at sNN=200GeV

    DOE PAGES

    Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akimoto, R.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Alexander, J.; Alfred, M.; Al-Ta’ani, H.; et al

    2015-09-28

    In this paper, we present the first measurement of elliptic (v2) and triangular (v3) flow in high-multiplicity 3He+Aucollisions at √sNN=200 GeV. Two-particle correlations, where the particles have a large separation in pseudorapidity, are compared in 3He+Au and in p+p collisions and indicate that collective effects dominate the second and third Fourier components for the correlations observed in the 3He+Ausystem. The collective behavior is quantified in terms of elliptic v2 and triangular v3 anisotropy coefficients measured with respect to their corresponding event planes. The v2 values are comparable to those previously measured in d+Au collisions at the same nucleon-nucleon center-of-mass energy.more » Comparisons with various theoretical predictions are made, including to models where the hot spots created by the impact of the three 3He nucleons on the Au nucleus expand hydrodynamically to generate the triangular flow. Finally, the agreement of these models with data may indicate the formation of low-viscosity quark-gluon plasma even in these small collision systems.« less

  16. Measurements of Elliptic and Triangular Flow in High-Multiplicity 3He+Au Collisions at √(s(NN))=200 GeV.

    PubMed

    Adare, A; Afanasiev, S; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Akimoto, R; Al-Bataineh, H; Alexander, J; Alfred, M; Al-Ta'ani, H; Andrews, K R; Angerami, A; Aoki, K; Apadula, N; Aphecetche, L; Appelt, E; Aramaki, Y; Armendariz, R; Aronson, S H; Asai, J; Asano, H; Aschenauer, E C; Atomssa, E T; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, B; Babintsev, V; Bai, M; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Baldisseri, A; Bandara, N S; Bannier, B; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Bassalleck, B; Basye, A T; Bathe, S; Batsouli, S; Baublis, V; Baumann, C; Bazilevsky, A; Beaumier, M; Beckman, S; Belikov, S; Belmont, R; Ben-Benjamin, J; Bennett, R; Berdnikov, A; Berdnikov, Y; Bhom, J H; Bickley, A A; Blau, D S; Boissevain, J G; Bok, J S; Borel, H; Boyle, K; Brooks, M L; Broxmeyer, D; Bryslawskyj, J; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Butsyk, S; Camacho, C M; Campbell, S; Caringi, A; Castera, P; Chang, B S; Chang, W C; Charvet, J-L; Chen, C-H; Chernichenko, S; Chi, C Y; Chiba, J; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choi, J B; Choudhury, R K; Christiansen, P; Chujo, T; Chung, P; Churyn, A; Chvala, O; Cianciolo, V; Citron, Z; Cleven, C R; Cole, B A; Comets, M P; Conesa del Valle, Z; Connors, M; Constantin, P; Csanád, M; Csörgő, T; Dahms, T; Dairaku, S; Danchev, I; Danley, D; Das, K; Datta, A; Daugherity, M S; David, G; Dayananda, M K; Deaton, M B; DeBlasio, K; Dehmelt, K; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; d'Enterria, D; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dharmawardane, K V; Dietzsch, O; Dion, A; Diss, P B; Do, J H; Donadelli, M; D'Orazio, L; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Drees, K A; Dubey, A K; Durham, J M; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Dzhordzhadze, V; Edwards, S; Efremenko, Y V; Egdemir, J; Ellinghaus, F; Emam, W S; Engelmore, T; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Eyser, K O; Fadem, B; Feege, N; Fields, D E; Finger, M; Finger, M; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fujiwara, K; Fukao, Y; Fusayasu, T; Gadrat, S; Gal, C; Gallus, P; Garg, P; Garishvili, I; Ge, H; Giordano, F; Glenn, A; Gong, H; Gong, X; Gonin, M; Gosset, J; Goto, Y; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Grim, G; Grosse Perdekamp, M; Gu, Y; Gunji, T; Guo, L; Gustafsson, H-Å; Hachiya, T; Hadj Henni, A; Haegemann, C; Haggerty, J S; Hahn, K I; Hamagaki, H; Hamblen, J; Hamilton, H F; Han, R; Han, S Y; Hanks, J; Harada, H; Harper, C; Hartouni, E P; Haruna, K; Hasegawa, S; Haseler, T O S; Hashimoto, K; Haslum, E; Hayano, R; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Hester, T; Hiejima, H; Hill, J C; Hobbs, R; Hohlmann, M; Hollis, R S; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Horaguchi, T; Hori, Y; Hornback, D; Hoshino, T; Hotvedt, N; Huang, J; Huang, S; Ichihara, T; Ichimiya, R; Iinuma, H; Ikeda, Y; Imai, K; Imrek, J; Inaba, M; Inoue, Y; Iordanova, A; Isenhower, D; Isenhower, L; Ishihara, M; Isobe, T; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Ivanishchev, D; Iwanaga, Y; Jacak, B V; Jezghani, M; Jia, J; Jiang, X; Jin, J; Jinnouchi, O; John, D; Johnson, B M; Jones, T; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Jumper, D S; Kajihara, F; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kamin, J; Kanda, S; Kaneta, M; Kaneti, S; Kang, B H; Kang, J H; Kang, J S; Kanou, H; Kapustinsky, J; Karatsu, K; Kasai, M; Kawall, D; Kawashima, M; Kazantsev, A V; Kempel, T; Key, J A; Khachatryan, V; Khanzadeev, A; Kijima, K M; Kikuchi, J; Kim, A; Kim, B I; Kim, C; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, E; Kim, E-J; Kim, G W; Kim, M; Kim, S H; Kim, Y-J; Kim, Y K; Kimelman, B; Kinney, E; Kiriluk, K; Kiss, Á; Kistenev, E; Kitamura, R; Kiyomichi, A; Klatsky, J; Klay, J; Klein-Boesing, C; Kleinjan, D; Kline, P; Koblesky, T; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Komkov, B; Konno, M; Koster, J; Kotchetkov, D; Kotov, D; Kozlov, A; Král, A; Kravitz, A; Kubart, J; Kunde, G J; Kurihara, N; Kurita, K; Kurosawa, M; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lai, Y S; Lajoie, J G; Layton, D; Lebedev, A; Lee, D M; Lee, J; Lee, K B; Lee, K S; Lee, M K; Lee, S; Lee, S H; Lee, S R; Lee, T; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Lenzi, B; Li, X; Lichtenwalner, P; Liebing, P; Lim, S H; Linden Levy, L A; Liška, T; Litvinenko, A; Liu, H; Liu, M X; Love, B; Lynch, D; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Makek, M; Malakhov, A; Malik, M D; Manion, A; Manko, V I; Mannel, E; Mao, Y; Mašek, L; Masui, H; Matathias, F; McCumber, M; McGaughey, P L; McGlinchey, D; McKinney, C; Means, N; Meles, A; Mendoza, M; Meredith, B; Miake, Y; Mibe, T; Mignerey, A C; Mikeš, P; Miki, K; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mishra, D K; Mishra, M; Mitchell, J T; Mitrovski, M; Miyachi, Y; Miyasaka, S; Mizuno, S; Mohanty, A K; Montuenga, P; Moon, H J; Moon, T; Morino, Y; Morreale, A; Morrison, D P; Motschwiller, S; Moukhanova, T V; Mukhopadhyay, D; Murakami, T; Murata, J; Mwai, A; Nagamiya, S; Nagashima, K; Nagata, Y; Nagle, J L; Naglis, M; Nagy, M I; Nakagawa, I; Nakagomi, H; Nakamiya, Y; Nakamura, K R; Nakamura, T; Nakano, K; Nam, S; Nattrass, C; Netrakanti, P K; Newby, J; Nguyen, M; Nihashi, M; Niida, T; Nishimura, S; Norman, B E; Nouicer, R; Novak, T; Novitzky, N; Nyanin, A S; Oakley, C; O'Brien, E; Oda, S X; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Oka, M; Okada, K; Omiwade, O O; Onuki, Y; Orjuela Koop, J D; Osborn, J D; Oskarsson, A; Ouchida, M; Ozawa, K; Pak, R; Pal, D; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, B H; Park, I H; Park, J; Park, J S; Park, S; Park, S K; Park, W J; Pate, S F; Patel, L; Patel, M; Pei, H; Peng, J-C; Pereira, H; Perepelitsa, D V; Perera, G D N; Peresedov, V; Peressounko, D Yu; Perry, J; Petti, R; Pinkenburg, C; Pinson, R; Pisani, R P; Proissl, M; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Qu, H; Rak, J; Rakotozafindrabe, A; Ramson, B J; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Rembeczki, S; Reuter, M; Reygers, K; Reynolds, D; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Richardson, E; Rinn, T; Roach, D; Roche, G; Rolnick, S D; Romana, A; Rosati, M; Rosen, C A; Rosendahl, S S E; Rosnet, P; Rowan, Z; Rubin, J G; Rukoyatkin, P; Ružička, P; Rykov, V L; Sahlmueller, B; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakai, S; Sakashita, K; Sakata, H; Sako, H; Samsonov, V; Sano, S; Sarsour, M; Sato, S; Sato, T; Savastio, M; Sawada, S; Schaefer, B; Schmoll, B K; Sedgwick, K; Seele, J; Seidl, R; Semenov, A Yu; Semenov, V; Sen, A; Seto, R; Sett, P; Sexton, A; Sharma, D; Shein, I; Shevel, A; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shim, H H; Shimomura, M; Shoji, K; Shukla, P; Sickles, A; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Silvestre, C; Sim, K S; Singh, B K; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Skutnik, S; Slunečka, M; Snowball, M; Sodre, T; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Staley, F; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stepanov, M; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Suire, C; Sukhanov, A; Sumita, T; Sun, J; Sziklai, J; Tabaru, T; Takagi, S; Takagui, E M; Takahara, A; Taketani, A; Tanabe, R; Tanaka, Y; Taneja, S; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Tarafdar, S; Taranenko, A; Tarján, P; Tennant, E; Themann, H; Thomas, D; Thomas, T L; Tieulent, R; Timilsina, A; Todoroki, T; Togawa, M; Toia, A; Tojo, J; Tomášek, L; Tomášek, M; Tomita, Y; Torii, H; Towell, C L; Towell, R; Towell, R S; Tram, V-N; Tserruya, I; Tsuchimoto, Y; Utsunomiya, K; Vale, C; Valle, H; van Hecke, H W; Vazquez-Zambrano, E; Veicht, A; Velkovska, J; Vértesi, R; Vinogradov, A A; Virius, M; Vossen, A; Vrba, V; Vznuzdaev, E; Wagner, M; Walker, D; Wang, X R; Watanabe, D; Watanabe, K; Watanabe, Y; Watanabe, Y S; Wei, F; Wei, R; Wessels, J; White, A S; White, S N; Winter, D; Woody, C L; Wright, R M; Wysocki, M; Xia, B; Xie, W; Xue, L; Yalcin, S; Yamaguchi, Y L; Yamaura, K; Yang, R; Yanovich, A; Yasin, Z; Ying, J; Yokkaichi, S; Yoo, J H; Yoo, J S; Yoon, I; You, Z; Young, G R; Younus, I; Yu, H; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zaudtke, O; Zelenski, A; Zhang, C; Zhou, S; Zimamyi, J; Zolin, L; Zou, L

    2015-10-01

    We present the first measurement of elliptic (v(2)) and triangular (v(3)) flow in high-multiplicity (3)He+Au collisions at √(s(NN))=200  GeV. Two-particle correlations, where the particles have a large separation in pseudorapidity, are compared in (3)He+Au and in p+p collisions and indicate that collective effects dominate the second and third Fourier components for the correlations observed in the (3)He+Au system. The collective behavior is quantified in terms of elliptic v(2) and triangular v(3) anisotropy coefficients measured with respect to their corresponding event planes. The v(2) values are comparable to those previously measured in d+Au collisions at the same nucleon-nucleon center-of-mass energy. Comparisons with various theoretical predictions are made, including to models where the hot spots created by the impact of the three (3)He nucleons on the Au nucleus expand hydrodynamically to generate the triangular flow. The agreement of these models with data may indicate the formation of low-viscosity quark-gluon plasma even in these small collision systems. PMID:26551807

  17. J/ψ suppression at forward rapidity in Au + Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Alexander, J.; Aoki, K.; Aramaki, Y.; Atomssa, E. T.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Barish, K. N.; Bassalleck, B.; Basye, A. T.; Bathe, S.; Baublis, V.; Baumann, C.; Bazilevsky, A.; Belikov, S.; Belmont, R.; Bennett, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Bickley, A. A.; Bok, J. S.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Butsyk, S.; Camacho, C. M.; Campbell, S.; Chen, C.-H.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, P.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cole, B. A.; Connors, M.; Constantin, P.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Dahms, T.; Dairaku, S.; Danchev, I.; Das, K.; Datta, A.; David, G.; Denisov, A.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dietzsch, O.; Dion, A.; Donadelli, M.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Dutta, D.; Edwards, S.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Ellinghaus, F.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Fadem, B.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M., Jr.; Finger, M.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Fraenkel, Z.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fujiwara, K.; Fukao, Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Garishvili, I.; Glenn, A.; Gong, H.; Gonin, M.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gunji, T.; Gustafsson, H.-Å.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamblen, J.; Hanks, J.; Han, R.; Hartouni, E. P.; Haslum, E.; Hayano, R.; Heffner, M.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; He, X.; Hill, J. C.; Hohlmann, M.; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hornback, D.; Huang, S.; Ichihara, T.; Ichimiya, R.; Ide, J.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Inaba, M.; Isenhower, D.; Ishihara, M.; Isobe, T.; Issah, M.; Isupov, A.; Ivanischev, D.; Jacak, B. V.; Jia, J.; Jin, J.; Johnson, B. M.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kajihara, F.; Kametani, S.; Kamihara, N.; Kamin, J.; Kang, J. H.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kawall, D.; Kawashima, M.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kempel, T.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kijima, K. M.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E. J.; Kim, E.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinney, E.; Kiriluk, K.; Kiss, Á.; Kistenev, E.; Kochenda, L.; Komkov, B.; Konno, M.; Koster, J.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kozlov, A.; Král, A.; Kravitz, A.; Kunde, G. J.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, J.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K.; Lee, K. S.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Leitner, E.; Lenzi, B.; Liebing, P.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Liška, T.; Litvinenko, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, M. X.; Li, X.; Love, B.; Luechtenborg, R.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Malakhov, A.; Malik, M. D.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Mao, Y.; Masui, H.; Matathias, F.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; Means, N.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mignerey, A. C.; Mikeš, P.; Miki, K.; Milov, A.; Mishra, M.; Mitchell, J. T.; Mohanty, A. K.; Morino, Y.; Morreale, A.; Morrison, D. P.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Murata, J.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagle, J. L.; Naglis, M.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Newby, J.; Nguyen, M.; Nouicer, R.; Nyanin, A. S.; O'Brien, E.; Oda, S. X.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Okada, K.; Oka, M.; Onuki, Y.; Oskarsson, A.; Ouchida, M.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, I. H.; Park, J.; Park, S. K.; Park, W. J.; Pate, S. F.; Pei, H.; Peng, J.-C.; Pereira, H.; Peresedov, V.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pisani, R. P.; Proissl, M.; Purschke, M. L.; Purwar, A. K.; Qu, H.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Roach, D.; Roche, G.; Rolnick, S. D.; Rosati, M.; Rosen, C. A.; Rosendahl, S. S. E.; Rosnet, P.; Rukoyatkin, P.; Ružička, P.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sakashita, K.; Samsonov, V.; Sano, S.; Sato, T.; Sawada, S.; Sedgwick, K.; Seele, J.; Seidl, R.; Semenov, A. Yu.; Seto, R.; Sharma, D.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Sim, K. S.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Slunečka, M.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Sparks, N. A.; Stankus, P. W.; Stenlund, E.; Stoll, S. P.; Sugitate, T.; Sukhanov, A.; Sziklai, J.; Takagui, E. M.; Taketani, A.; Tanabe, R.; Tanaka, Y.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Tarján, P.; Themann, H.; Thomas, T. L.; Togawa, M.; Toia, A.; Tomášek, L.; Torii, H.; Towell, R. S.; Tserruya, I.; Tsuchimoto, Y.; Vale, C.; Valle, H.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vazquez-Zambrano, E.; Veicht, A.; Velkovska, J.; Vértesi, R.; Vinogradov, A. A.; Virius, M.; Vrba, V.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Wei, F.; Wei, R.; Wessels, J.; White, S. N.; Winter, D.; Wood, J. P.; Woody, C. L.; Wright, R. M.; Wysocki, M.; Xie, W.; Yamaguchi, Y. L.; Yamaura, K.; Yang, R.; Yanovich, A.; Ying, J.; Yokkaichi, S.; Young, G. R.; Younus, I.; You, Z.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zhang, C.; Zhou, S.; Zolin, L.

    2011-11-01

    Heavy quarkonia are observed to be suppressed in relativistic heavy-ion collisions relative to their production in p+p collisions scaled by the number of binary collisions. In order to determine if this suppression is related to color screening of these states in the produced medium, one needs to account for other nuclear modifications including those in cold nuclear matter. In this paper, we present new measurements from the PHENIX 2007 data set of J/ψ yields at forward rapidity (1.2<|y|<2.2) in Au+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV. The data confirm the earlier finding that the suppression of J/ψ at forward rapidity is stronger than at midrapidity, while also extending the measurement to finer bins in collision centrality and higher transverse momentum (pT). We compare the experimental data to the most recent theoretical calculations that incorporate a variety of physics mechanisms including gluon saturation, gluon shadowing, initial-state parton energy loss, cold nuclear matter breakup, color screening, and charm recombination. We find J/ψ suppression beyond cold-nuclear-matter effects. However, the current level of disagreement between models and d+Au data precludes using these models to quantify the hot-nuclear-matter suppression.

  18. Φ meson production in d+Au collisions at sNN=200GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Adare, A.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Alexander, J.; Alfred, M.; Angerami, A.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Aramaki, Y.; Asano, H.; Atomssa, E. T.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Bandara, N. S.; Bannier, B.; Barish, K. N.; Bassalleck, B.; Basye, A. T.; Bathe, S.; Baublis, V.; Baumann, C.; Bazilevsky, A.; Beaumier, M.; Beckman, S.; Belikov, S.; Belmont, R.; Bennett, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Bhom, J. H.; Blau, D. S.; Bok, J. S.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Bryslawskyj, J.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Butsyk, S.; Campbell, S.; Caringi, A.; Chen, C. -H.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, P.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cole, B. A.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Dahms, T.; Dairaku, S.; Danchev, I.; Danley, D.; Das, K.; Datta, A.; Daugherity, M. S.; David, G.; Dayananda, M. K.; DeBlasio, K.; Dehmelt, K.; Denisov, A.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dharmawardane, K. V.; Dietzsch, O.; Dion, A.; Diss, P. B.; Do, J. H.; Donadelli, M.; D'Orazio, L.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Dutta, D.; Edwards, S.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Ellinghaus, F.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Fadem, B.; Feege, N.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Fraenkel, Z.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fujiwara, K.; Fukao, Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Gal, C.; Gallus, P.; Garg, P.; Garishvili, I.; Ge, H.; Giordano, F.; Glenn, A.; Gong, H.; Gonin, M.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grim, G.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gunji, T.; Gustafsson, H. -Å.; Hachiya, T.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamblen, J.; Hamilton, H. F.; Han, R.; Han, S. Y.; Hanks, J.; Hasegawa, S.; Haseler, T. O. S.; Hashimoto, K.; Haslum, E.; Hayano, R.; He, X.; Heffner, M.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Hill, J. C.; Hohlmann, M.; Hollis, R. S.; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hornback, D.; Hoshino, T.; Hotvedt, N.; Huang, J.; Huang, S.; Ichihara, T.; Ichimiya, R.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Inaba, M.; Iordanova, A.; Isenhower, D.; Ishihara, M.; Issah, M.; Ivanishchev, D.; Iwanaga, Y.; Jacak, B. V.; Jezghani, M.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; Jin, J.; Johnson, B. M.; Jones, T.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kajihara, F.; Kamin, J.; Kanda, S.; Kang, J. H.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kasai, M.; Kawall, D.; Kawashima, M.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kempel, T.; Key, J. A.; Khachatryan, V.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kijima, K. M.; Kikuchi, J.; Kim, A.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, C.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E. -J.; Kim, G. W.; Kim, M.; Kim, Y. -J.; Kimelman, B.; Kinney, E.; Kiss, Á.; Kistenev, E.; Kitamura, R.; Klatsky, J.; Kleinjan, D.; Kline, P.; Koblesky, T.; Kochenda, L.; Komkov, B.; Konno, M.; Koster, J.; Kotov, D.; Král, A.; Kravitz, A.; Kunde, G. J.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, J.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S.; Lee, S. H.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Li, X.; Lichtenwalner, P.; Liebing, P.; Lim, S. H.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Liška, T.; Liu, H.; Liu, M. X.; Love, B.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Makek, M.; Malik, M. D.; Manion, A.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Mao, Y.; Masui, H.; Matathias, F.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; McGlinchey, D.; McKinney, C.; Means, N.; Meles, A.; Mendoza, M.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mibe, T.; Mignerey, A. C.; Miki, K.; Milov, A.; Mishra, D. K.; Mitchell, J. T.; Miyasaka, S.; Mizuno, S.; Mohanty, A. K.; Montuenga, P.; Moon, H. J.; Moon, T.; Morino, Y.; Morreale, A.; Morrison, D. P.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Mwai, A.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagashima, K.; Nagle, J. L.; Naglis, M.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakagomi, H.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, K. R.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Nam, S.; Nattrass, C.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Newby, J.; Nguyen, M.; Nihashi, M.; Niida, T.; Nishimura, S.; Nouicer, R.; Novak, T.; Novitzky, N.; Nyanin, A. S.; Oakley, C.; O'Brien, E.; Oda, S. X.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Oka, M.; Okada, K.; Onuki, Y.; Orjuela Koop, J. D.; Osborn, J. D.; Oskarsson, A.; Ouchida, M.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, I. H.; Park, J. S.; Park, S.; Park, S. K.; Park, W. J.; Pate, S. F.; Patel, M.; Pei, H.; Peng, J. -C.; Pereira, H.; Perepelitsa, D. V.; Perera, G. D. N.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Perry, J.; Petti, R.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pinson, R.; Pisani, R. P.; Proissl, M.; Purschke, M. L.; Qu, H.; Rak, J.; Ramson, B. J.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Rembeczki, S.; Reygers, K.; Reynolds, D.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Rinn, T.; Roach, D.; Roche, G.; Rolnick, S. D.; Rosati, M.; Rosen, C. A.; Rosendahl, S. S. E.; Rowan, Z.; Rubin, J. G.; Ružička, P.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sakashita, K.; Sako, H.; Samsonov, V.; Sano, S.; Sarsour, M.; Sato, S.; Sato, T.; Sawada, S.; Schaefer, B.; Schmoll, B. K.; Sedgwick, K.; Seele, J.; Seidl, R.; Sen, A.; Seto, R.; Sett, P.; Sexton, A.; Sharma, D.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T. -A.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Sim, K. S.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Slunečka, M.; Snowball, M.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Stankus, P. W.; Stenlund, E.; Stepanov, M.; Stoll, S. P.; Sugitate, T.; Sukhanov, A.; Sumita, T.; Sun, J.; Sziklai, J.; Takagui, E. M.; Taketani, A.; Tanabe, R.; Tanaka, Y.; Taneja, S.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Themann, H.; Thomas, D.; Thomas, T. L.; Tieulent, R.; Timilsina, A.; Todoroki, T.; Togawa, M.; Toia, A.; Tomášek, L.; Tomášek, M.; Torii, H.; Towell, C. L.; Towell, R.; Towell, R. S.; Tserruya, I.; Tsuchimoto, Y.; Vale, C.; Valle, H.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vazquez-Zambrano, E.; Veicht, A.; Velkovska, J.; Vértesi, R.; Virius, M.; Vrba, V.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Watanabe, Y. S.; Wei, F.; Wei, R.; Wessels, J.; White, A. S.; White, S. N.; Winter, D.; Woody, C. L.; Wright, R. M.; Wysocki, M.; Xia, B.; Xue, L.; Yalcin, S.; Yamaguchi, Y. L.; Yamaura, K.; Yang, R.; Yanovich, A.; Ying, J.; Yokkaichi, S.; Yoo, J. H.; Yoon, I.; You, Z.; Young, G. R.; Younus, I.; Yu, H.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zelenski, A.; Zhou, S.; Zou, L.

    2015-10-01

    The PHENIX Collaboration has measured Φ meson production in d+Au collisions at √sNN=200 GeV using the dimuon and dielectron decay channels. We measured the Φ meson in the forward (backward) d-going (Au-going) direction, 1.2T) range from 1–7 GeV/c and at midrapidity |y|<0.35 in the pT range below 7 GeV/c. The Φ meson invariant yields and nuclear-modification factors as a function of pT, rapidity, and centrality are reported. An enhancement of Φ meson production is observed in the Au-going direction, while suppression is seen in the d-going direction, and no modification is observed at midrapidity relative to the yield in p+p collisions scaled by the number of binary collisions. We found similar behavior was previously observed for inclusive charged hadrons and open heavy flavor, indicating similar cold-nuclear-matter effects.

  19. Cold Nuclear Matter Effects on J/{psi} Production as Constrained by Deuteron-Gold Measurements at s_NN = 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Adare, A.; Awes, Terry C; Cianciolo, Vince; Read Jr, Kenneth F; Silvermyr, David O; Sorensen, Soren P; Stankus, Paul W; Young, Glenn R; PHENIX, Collaboration

    2008-01-01

    We present a new analysis of J/{psi} production yields in deuteron-gold collisions at {radical}s{sub NN}=200 GeV using data taken from the PHENIX experiment in 2003 and previously published in S. S. Adler et al. The high statistics proton-proton J/psi data taken in 2005 are used to improve the baseline measurement and thus construct updated cold nuclear matter modification factors (R{sub dAu}). A suppression of J/psi in cold nuclear matter is observed as one goes forward in rapidity (in the deuteron-going direction), corresponding to a region more sensitive to initial-state low-x gluons in the gold nucleus. The measured nuclear modification factors are compared to theoretical calculations of nuclear shadowing to which a J/psi (or precursor) breakup cross section is added. Breakup cross sections of {sigma}breakup=2.8{sub -1.4}{sup +1.7} (2.2{sub -1.5}{sup +1.6}) mb are obtained by fitting these calculations to the data using two different models of nuclear shadowing. These breakup cross-section values are consistent within large uncertainties with the 4.2{+-}0.5 mb determined at lower collision energies. Projecting this range of cold nuclear matter effects to copper-copper and gold-gold collisions reveals that the current constraints are not sufficient to firmly quantify the additional hot nuclear matter effect.

  20. A simulation framework for auditory discrimination experiments: Revealing the importance of across-frequency processing in speech perception.

    PubMed

    Schädler, Marc René; Warzybok, Anna; Ewert, Stephan D; Kollmeier, Birger

    2016-05-01

    A framework for simulating auditory discrimination experiments, based on an approach from Schädler, Warzybok, Hochmuth, and Kollmeier [(2015). Int. J. Audiol. 54, 100-107] which was originally designed to predict speech recognition thresholds, is extended to also predict psychoacoustic thresholds. The proposed framework is used to assess the suitability of different auditory-inspired feature sets for a range of auditory discrimination experiments that included psychoacoustic as well as speech recognition experiments in noise. The considered experiments were 2 kHz tone-in-broadband-noise simultaneous masking depending on the tone length, spectral masking with simultaneously presented tone signals and narrow-band noise maskers, and German Matrix sentence test reception threshold in stationary and modulated noise. The employed feature sets included spectro-temporal Gabor filter bank features, Mel-frequency cepstral coefficients, logarithmically scaled Mel-spectrograms, and the internal representation of the Perception Model from Dau, Kollmeier, and Kohlrausch [(1997). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 102(5), 2892-2905]. The proposed framework was successfully employed to simulate all experiments with a common parameter set and obtain objective thresholds with less assumptions compared to traditional modeling approaches. Depending on the feature set, the simulated reference-free thresholds were found to agree with-and hence to predict-empirical data from the literature. Across-frequency processing was found to be crucial to accurately model the lower speech reception threshold in modulated noise conditions than in stationary noise conditions. PMID:27250164

  1. Detection of MDR1 mRNA expression with optimized gold nanoparticle beacon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qiumei; Qian, Zhiyu; Gu, Yueqing

    2016-03-01

    MDR1 (multidrug resistance gene) mRNA expression is a promising biomarker for the prediction of doxorubicin resistance in clinic. However, the traditional technical process in clinic is complicated and cannot perform the real-time detection mRNA in living single cells. In this study, the expression of MDR1 mRNA was analyzed based on optimized gold nanoparticle beacon in tumor cells. Firstly, gold nanoparticle (AuNP) was modified by thiol-PEG, and the MDR1 beacon sequence was screened and optimized using a BLAST bioinformatics strategy. Then, optimized MDR1 molecular beacons were characterized by transmission electron microscope, UV-vis and fluorescence spectroscopies. The cytotoxicity of MDR1 molecular beacon on L-02, K562 and K562/Adr cells were investigated by MTT assay, suggesting that MDR1 molecular beacon was low inherent cytotoxicity. Dark field microscope was used to investigate the cellular uptake of hDAuNP beacon assisted with ultrasound. Finally, laser scanning confocal microscope images showed that there was a significant difference in MDR1 mRNA expression in K562 and K562/Adr cells, which was consistent with the results of q-PCR measurement. In summary, optimized MDR1 molecular beacon designed in this study is a reliable strategy for detection MDR1 mRNA expression in living tumor cells, and will be a promising strategy for in guiding patient treatment and management in individualized medication.

  2. Meteor activity from the Perseus-Auriga region in September and October

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rendtel, Jurgen; Molau, Sirko

    2010-10-01

    A systematic search was carried out for radiants of high-inclination meteor showers in September and October based on data collected over eleven years with cameras of the IMO Video Meteor Network. The Aurigids (206 AUR), with an outburst in 2007, and the September epsilon-Perseids (208 SPE), with an outburst in 2008, were the most prominent showers. Detailed SPE outburst data of 2008 are presented. Data of the October Lyncids (228 OLY) and the beta-Aurigids (210 BAU) stored in the database of the IAU Meteor Data Center have been confirmed. Radiant data of the September Lyncids (81 SLY) have been improved, and the activity period of the delta-Aurigids (224 DAU) has been better defined. Two new radiants have been detected: the September-October Lyncids (424 SOL) and the psi-Aurigids (425 PSA). All showers are at high-inclination orbits and may be part of a complex which could be similar to the Kreutz group of comets.

  3. An evaluation of objective measures for intelligibility prediction of time-frequency weighted noisy speech.

    PubMed

    Taal, Cees H; Hendriks, Richard C; Heusdens, Richard; Jensen, Jesper

    2011-11-01

    Existing objective speech-intelligibility measures are suitable for several types of degradation, however, it turns out that they are less appropriate in cases where noisy speech is processed by a time-frequency weighting. To this end, an extensive evaluation is presented of objective measure for intelligibility prediction of noisy speech processed with a technique called ideal time frequency (TF) segregation. In total 17 measures are evaluated, including four advanced speech-intelligibility measures (CSII, CSTI, NSEC, DAU), the advanced speech-quality measure (PESQ), and several frame-based measures (e.g., SSNR). Furthermore, several additional measures are proposed. The study comprised a total number of 168 different TF-weightings, including unprocessed noisy speech. Out of all measures, the proposed frame-based measure MCC gave the best results (ρ = 0.93). An additional experiment shows that the good performing measures in this study also show high correlation with the intelligibility of single-channel noise reduced speech. PMID:22087929

  4. Predicting the Perceived Sound Quality of Frequency-Compressed Speech

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Rainer; Parsa, Vijay; Scollie, Susan

    2014-01-01

    The performance of objective speech and audio quality measures for the prediction of the perceived quality of frequency-compressed speech in hearing aids is investigated in this paper. A number of existing quality measures have been applied to speech signals processed by a hearing aid, which compresses speech spectra along frequency in order to make information contained in higher frequencies audible for listeners with severe high-frequency hearing loss. Quality measures were compared with subjective ratings obtained from normal hearing and hearing impaired children and adults in an earlier study. High correlations were achieved with quality measures computed by quality models that are based on the auditory model of Dau et al., namely, the measure PSM, computed by the quality model PEMO-Q; the measure qc, computed by the quality model proposed by Hansen and Kollmeier; and the linear subcomponent of the HASQI. For the prediction of quality ratings by hearing impaired listeners, extensions of some models incorporating hearing loss were implemented and shown to achieve improved prediction accuracy. Results indicate that these objective quality measures can potentially serve as tools for assisting in initial setting of frequency compression parameters. PMID:25402456

  5. Forensic drug testing for opiates. IV. Analytical sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of commercial urine opiate immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Cone, E J; Dickerson, S; Paul, B D; Mitchell, J M

    1992-01-01

    Four commercial immunoassays, TDx Opiates (TDx), Coat-A-Count Morphine in Urine (CAC), Abuscreen Radioimmunoassay for Morphine (ABUS) and Emit d.a.u. Opiate Assay (EMIT), were tested for sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy with urine specimens containing known amounts of opiates and opiate metabolites. The immunoassays were evaluated in a semiquantitative mode by comparison of morphine equivalents to GC/MS assay of free and total morphine and codeine or to target concentrations. In all cases, the apparent sensitivities of the assays were higher than those required for detection of morphine at cutoffs mandated by the Health and Human Services guidelines for testing of Federal workers. The apparent specificities of the immunoassays varied considerably. The CAC assay was found to be highly selective for free morphine, whereas TDx, ABUS, and EMIT demonstrated broad cross-reactivity with other opiates. Comparison of semiquantitative results from the immunoassays with GC/MS data indicated a high degree of accuracy for determination of morphine levels. Generally, the patterns of sensitivity and cross-reactivity were unique for each assay, indicating that a detailed knowledge of assay performance characteristics is necessary for accurate interpretation of forensic urine testing data.

  6. Measurements of Elliptic and Triangular Flow in High-Multiplicity 3He+Au Collisions at √(s(NN))=200 GeV.

    PubMed

    Adare, A; Afanasiev, S; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Akimoto, R; Al-Bataineh, H; Alexander, J; Alfred, M; Al-Ta'ani, H; Andrews, K R; Angerami, A; Aoki, K; Apadula, N; Aphecetche, L; Appelt, E; Aramaki, Y; Armendariz, R; Aronson, S H; Asai, J; Asano, H; Aschenauer, E C; Atomssa, E T; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, B; Babintsev, V; Bai, M; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Baldisseri, A; Bandara, N S; Bannier, B; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Bassalleck, B; Basye, A T; Bathe, S; Batsouli, S; Baublis, V; Baumann, C; Bazilevsky, A; Beaumier, M; Beckman, S; Belikov, S; Belmont, R; Ben-Benjamin, J; Bennett, R; Berdnikov, A; Berdnikov, Y; Bhom, J H; Bickley, A A; Blau, D S; Boissevain, J G; Bok, J S; Borel, H; Boyle, K; Brooks, M L; Broxmeyer, D; Bryslawskyj, J; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Butsyk, S; Camacho, C M; Campbell, S; Caringi, A; Castera, P; Chang, B S; Chang, W C; Charvet, J-L; Chen, C-H; Chernichenko, S; Chi, C Y; Chiba, J; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choi, J B; Choudhury, R K; Christiansen, P; Chujo, T; Chung, P; Churyn, A; Chvala, O; Cianciolo, V; Citron, Z; Cleven, C R; Cole, B A; Comets, M P; Conesa del Valle, Z; Connors, M; Constantin, P; Csanád, M; Csörgő, T; Dahms, T; Dairaku, S; Danchev, I; Danley, D; Das, K; Datta, A; Daugherity, M S; David, G; Dayananda, M K; Deaton, M B; DeBlasio, K; Dehmelt, K; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; d'Enterria, D; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dharmawardane, K V; Dietzsch, O; Dion, A; Diss, P B; Do, J H; Donadelli, M; D'Orazio, L; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Drees, K A; Dubey, A K; Durham, J M; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Dzhordzhadze, V; Edwards, S; Efremenko, Y V; Egdemir, J; Ellinghaus, F; Emam, W S; Engelmore, T; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Eyser, K O; Fadem, B; Feege, N; Fields, D E; Finger, M; Finger, M; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fujiwara, K; Fukao, Y; Fusayasu, T; Gadrat, S; Gal, C; Gallus, P; Garg, P; Garishvili, I; Ge, H; Giordano, F; Glenn, A; Gong, H; Gong, X; Gonin, M; Gosset, J; Goto, Y; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Grim, G; Grosse Perdekamp, M; Gu, Y; Gunji, T; Guo, L; Gustafsson, H-Å; Hachiya, T; Hadj Henni, A; Haegemann, C; Haggerty, J S; Hahn, K I; Hamagaki, H; Hamblen, J; Hamilton, H F; Han, R; Han, S Y; Hanks, J; Harada, H; Harper, C; Hartouni, E P; Haruna, K; Hasegawa, S; Haseler, T O S; Hashimoto, K; Haslum, E; Hayano, R; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Hester, T; Hiejima, H; Hill, J C; Hobbs, R; Hohlmann, M; Hollis, R S; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Horaguchi, T; Hori, Y; Hornback, D; Hoshino, T; Hotvedt, N; Huang, J; Huang, S; Ichihara, T; Ichimiya, R; Iinuma, H; Ikeda, Y; Imai, K; Imrek, J; Inaba, M; Inoue, Y; Iordanova, A; Isenhower, D; Isenhower, L; Ishihara, M; Isobe, T; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Ivanishchev, D; Iwanaga, Y; Jacak, B V; Jezghani, M; Jia, J; Jiang, X; Jin, J; Jinnouchi, O; John, D; Johnson, B M; Jones, T; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Jumper, D S; Kajihara, F; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kamin, J; Kanda, S; Kaneta, M; Kaneti, S; Kang, B H; Kang, J H; Kang, J S; Kanou, H; Kapustinsky, J; Karatsu, K; Kasai, M; Kawall, D; Kawashima, M; Kazantsev, A V; Kempel, T; Key, J A; Khachatryan, V; Khanzadeev, A; Kijima, K M; Kikuchi, J; Kim, A; Kim, B I; Kim, C; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, E; Kim, E-J; Kim, G W; Kim, M; Kim, S H; Kim, Y-J; Kim, Y K; Kimelman, B; Kinney, E; Kiriluk, K; Kiss, Á; Kistenev, E; Kitamura, R; Kiyomichi, A; Klatsky, J; Klay, J; Klein-Boesing, C; Kleinjan, D; Kline, P; Koblesky, T; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Komkov, B; Konno, M; Koster, J; Kotchetkov, D; Kotov, D; Kozlov, A; Král, A; Kravitz, A; Kubart, J; Kunde, G J; Kurihara, N; Kurita, K; Kurosawa, M; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lai, Y S; Lajoie, J G; Layton, D; Lebedev, A; Lee, D M; Lee, J; Lee, K B; Lee, K S; Lee, M K; Lee, S; Lee, S H; Lee, S R; Lee, T; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Lenzi, B; Li, X; Lichtenwalner, P; Liebing, P; Lim, S H; Linden Levy, L A; Liška, T; Litvinenko, A; Liu, H; Liu, M X; Love, B; Lynch, D; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Makek, M; Malakhov, A; Malik, M D; Manion, A; Manko, V I; Mannel, E; Mao, Y; Mašek, L; Masui, H; Matathias, F; McCumber, M; McGaughey, P L; McGlinchey, D; McKinney, C; Means, N; Meles, A; Mendoza, M; Meredith, B; Miake, Y; Mibe, T; Mignerey, A C; Mikeš, P; Miki, K; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mishra, D K; Mishra, M; Mitchell, J T; Mitrovski, M; Miyachi, Y; Miyasaka, S; Mizuno, S; Mohanty, A K; Montuenga, P; Moon, H J; Moon, T; Morino, Y; Morreale, A; Morrison, D P; Motschwiller, S; Moukhanova, T V; Mukhopadhyay, D; Murakami, T; Murata, J; Mwai, A; Nagamiya, S; Nagashima, K; Nagata, Y; Nagle, J L; Naglis, M; Nagy, M I; Nakagawa, I; Nakagomi, H; Nakamiya, Y; Nakamura, K R; Nakamura, T; Nakano, K; Nam, S; Nattrass, C; Netrakanti, P K; Newby, J; Nguyen, M; Nihashi, M; Niida, T; Nishimura, S; Norman, B E; Nouicer, R; Novak, T; Novitzky, N; Nyanin, A S; Oakley, C; O'Brien, E; Oda, S X; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Oka, M; Okada, K; Omiwade, O O; Onuki, Y; Orjuela Koop, J D; Osborn, J D; Oskarsson, A; Ouchida, M; Ozawa, K; Pak, R; Pal, D; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, B H; Park, I H; Park, J; Park, J S; Park, S; Park, S K; Park, W J; Pate, S F; Patel, L; Patel, M; Pei, H; Peng, J-C; Pereira, H; Perepelitsa, D V; Perera, G D N; Peresedov, V; Peressounko, D Yu; Perry, J; Petti, R; Pinkenburg, C; Pinson, R; Pisani, R P; Proissl, M; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Qu, H; Rak, J; Rakotozafindrabe, A; Ramson, B J; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Rembeczki, S; Reuter, M; Reygers, K; Reynolds, D; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Richardson, E; Rinn, T; Roach, D; Roche, G; Rolnick, S D; Romana, A; Rosati, M; Rosen, C A; Rosendahl, S S E; Rosnet, P; Rowan, Z; Rubin, J G; Rukoyatkin, P; Ružička, P; Rykov, V L; Sahlmueller, B; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakai, S; Sakashita, K; Sakata, H; Sako, H; Samsonov, V; Sano, S; Sarsour, M; Sato, S; Sato, T; Savastio, M; Sawada, S; Schaefer, B; Schmoll, B K; Sedgwick, K; Seele, J; Seidl, R; Semenov, A Yu; Semenov, V; Sen, A; Seto, R; Sett, P; Sexton, A; Sharma, D; Shein, I; Shevel, A; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shim, H H; Shimomura, M; Shoji, K; Shukla, P; Sickles, A; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Silvestre, C; Sim, K S; Singh, B K; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Skutnik, S; Slunečka, M; Snowball, M; Sodre, T; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Staley, F; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stepanov, M; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Suire, C; Sukhanov, A; Sumita, T; Sun, J; Sziklai, J; Tabaru, T; Takagi, S; Takagui, E M; Takahara, A; Taketani, A; Tanabe, R; Tanaka, Y; Taneja, S; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Tarafdar, S; Taranenko, A; Tarján, P; Tennant, E; Themann, H; Thomas, D; Thomas, T L; Tieulent, R; Timilsina, A; Todoroki, T; Togawa, M; Toia, A; Tojo, J; Tomášek, L; Tomášek, M; Tomita, Y; Torii, H; Towell, C L; Towell, R; Towell, R S; Tram, V-N; Tserruya, I; Tsuchimoto, Y; Utsunomiya, K; Vale, C; Valle, H; van Hecke, H W; Vazquez-Zambrano, E; Veicht, A; Velkovska, J; Vértesi, R; Vinogradov, A A; Virius, M; Vossen, A; Vrba, V; Vznuzdaev, E; Wagner, M; Walker, D; Wang, X R; Watanabe, D; Watanabe, K; Watanabe, Y; Watanabe, Y S; Wei, F; Wei, R; Wessels, J; White, A S; White, S N; Winter, D; Woody, C L; Wright, R M; Wysocki, M; Xia, B; Xie, W; Xue, L; Yalcin, S; Yamaguchi, Y L; Yamaura, K; Yang, R; Yanovich, A; Yasin, Z; Ying, J; Yokkaichi, S; Yoo, J H; Yoo, J S; Yoon, I; You, Z; Young, G R; Younus, I; Yu, H; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zaudtke, O; Zelenski, A; Zhang, C; Zhou, S; Zimamyi, J; Zolin, L; Zou, L

    2015-10-01

    We present the first measurement of elliptic (v(2)) and triangular (v(3)) flow in high-multiplicity (3)He+Au collisions at √(s(NN))=200  GeV. Two-particle correlations, where the particles have a large separation in pseudorapidity, are compared in (3)He+Au and in p+p collisions and indicate that collective effects dominate the second and third Fourier components for the correlations observed in the (3)He+Au system. The collective behavior is quantified in terms of elliptic v(2) and triangular v(3) anisotropy coefficients measured with respect to their corresponding event planes. The v(2) values are comparable to those previously measured in d+Au collisions at the same nucleon-nucleon center-of-mass energy. Comparisons with various theoretical predictions are made, including to models where the hot spots created by the impact of the three (3)He nucleons on the Au nucleus expand hydrodynamically to generate the triangular flow. The agreement of these models with data may indicate the formation of low-viscosity quark-gluon plasma even in these small collision systems.

  7. Quarkonia and heavy flavors latest PHENIX results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jouan, Denis; Phenix Collaboration

    2014-05-01

    Heavy quarkonia are direct probes of deconfinement in the quark gluon plasma formed in heavy ion collisions. Other effects also occur, such as modification of the parton distributions in cold nuclear matter, and a multidimensional description is necessary to disentangle the various contributions. Characterization of the production processes in p+p and p or d induced collisions with ions is critical in the extraction of the additional effects in ionion collisions. The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider has delivered a wide range of systems and energies, from p+p to Au+Au through d+Au and Cu+Au, from 7.6 to 200 GeV (N-N collision energy), allowing the PHENIX experiment to start exploring these experimentally available dimensions for open and hidden charm and beauty as a function of rapidity and transverse momentum. Recent PHENIX results on heavy flavor production measured through lepton pairs or singles, including J/Ψ, Ψ', Χc, Upsilon and open charm and beauty, are presented.

  8. Predicting the perceived sound quality of frequency-compressed speech.

    PubMed

    Huber, Rainer; Parsa, Vijay; Scollie, Susan

    2014-01-01

    The performance of objective speech and audio quality measures for the prediction of the perceived quality of frequency-compressed speech in hearing aids is investigated in this paper. A number of existing quality measures have been applied to speech signals processed by a hearing aid, which compresses speech spectra along frequency in order to make information contained in higher frequencies audible for listeners with severe high-frequency hearing loss. Quality measures were compared with subjective ratings obtained from normal hearing and hearing impaired children and adults in an earlier study. High correlations were achieved with quality measures computed by quality models that are based on the auditory model of Dau et al., namely, the measure PSM, computed by the quality model PEMO-Q; the measure qc, computed by the quality model proposed by Hansen and Kollmeier; and the linear subcomponent of the HASQI. For the prediction of quality ratings by hearing impaired listeners, extensions of some models incorporating hearing loss were implemented and shown to achieve improved prediction accuracy. Results indicate that these objective quality measures can potentially serve as tools for assisting in initial setting of frequency compression parameters. PMID:25402456

  9. High pressure effects on allergen food proteins.

    PubMed

    Somkuti, Judit; Smeller, László

    2013-12-15

    There are several proteins, which can cause allergic reaction if they are inhaled or ingested. Our everyday food can also contain such proteins. Food allergy is an IgE-mediated immune disorder, a growing health problem of great public concern. High pressure is known to affect the structure of proteins; typically few hundred MPa pressure can lead to denaturation. That is why several trials have been performed to alter the structure of the allergen proteins by high pressure, in order to reduce its allergenicity. Studies have been performed both on simple protein solutions and on complex food systems. Here we review those allergens which have been investigated under or after high pressure treatment by methods capable of detecting changes in the secondary and tertiary structure of the proteins. We focus on those allergenic proteins, whose structural changes were investigated by spectroscopic methods under pressure in correlation with the observed allergenicity (IgE binding) changes. According to this criterion we selected the following allergen proteins: Mal d 1 and Mal d 3 (apple), Bos d 5 (milk), Dau c 1 (carrot), Gal d 2 (egg), Ara h 2 and Ara h 6 (peanut), and Gad m 1 (cod).

  10. Charged antiparticle to particle ratios near midrapidity in p+p collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN})=200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Back, B.B.; Baker, M.D.; Barton, D.S.; Becker, B.; Carroll, A.; George, N.; Gushue, S.; Holzman, B.; Pak, R.; Sedykh, I.; Steinberg, P.; Sukhanov, A.; Ballintijn, M.; Busza, W.; Decowski, M.P.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Henderson, C.; Kane, J.L.; Kulinich, P.; Lee, J.W.

    2005-02-01

    The ratios of the yields of primary charged antiparticles to particles have been obtained for pions, kaons, and protons near midrapidity for p+p collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN})=200 GeV. Ratios of <{pi}{sup -}/{pi}{sup +}>=1.000{+-}0.012 (stat.) {+-} 0.019 (syst.), =0.93{+-}0.05 (stat.) {+-} 0.03 (syst.), and

    =0.85{+-}0.04 (stat.) {+-} 0.03 (syst.) have been measured. The reported values represent the ratio of the yields averaged over the rapidity range of 0.1d+Au collisions at the same energy. The data are compared to results from other collision systems and energies.

  11. A homosexual militant at the beginning of the century: Marc André Raffalovich.

    PubMed

    Cardon, P

    1993-01-01

    This work is based on my thesis from Aix en Provence on French Civilisation and Letters (1984). The head of the examinations was the writer Raymond Jean. My idea is to show how the decadent writer and poet Marc André Raffalovich fought against the personalities in science concerning homosexuality with a new point of view and with great difficulty, shedding new light on this subject in a review from 1886 to 1914 under the direction of Dr. Alexandre Lacassagne Les Archives d'Anthropologie Criminelle de Médecine Légale et de Psychologie Normale et Pathologique published in 1886, edited by the director A. Lacassagne, professor and chairman of legal medicine, Lyon, and author of the article "Pederastie," Dictionnaire Encyclopedique des Sciences Medicales, volume XXII published in 1886. In 1893, he wrote an introduction for l'Inversion Sexuelle of Dr. Julien Chevalier (Paris: Masson-Lyon Storck). This monthly review "d'au moins 80 pages" was called L'Ecole Lyonnaise, and so to say, l'Ecole Francaise d'Anthropologie Criminelle, which defends against l'Ecole Italienne of Lombroso, the culturalist theory of the birth of the criminal; according to this école du milieu social: "La Société a les criminels qu'elle merite" (The society has criminals it deserves). After the first world war, it was to be overridden by the Marxist analysis. PMID:8301079

  12. Measurements of elliptic and triangular flow in high-multiplicity 3He+Au collisions at √sNN=200 GeV

    DOE PAGES

    Adare, A.

    2015-09-28

    We present the first measurement of elliptic (v2) and triangular (v3) flow in high-multiplicity 3He+Aucollisions at √sNN=200 GeV. Two-particle correlations, where the particles have a large separation in pseudorapidity, are compared in 3He+Au and in p+p collisions and indicate that collective effects dominate the second and third Fourier components for the correlations observed in the 3He+Ausystem. The collective behavior is quantified in terms of elliptic v2 and triangular v3 anisotropy coefficients measured with respect to their corresponding event planes. The v2 values are comparable to those previously measured in d+Au collisions at the same nucleon-nucleon center-of-mass energy. Comparisons with variousmore » theoretical predictions are made, including to models where the hot spots created by the impact of the three 3He nucleons on the Au nucleus expand hydrodynamically to generate the triangular flow. The agreement of these models with data may indicate the formation of low-viscosity quark-gluon plasma even in these small collision systems.« less

  13. Measurements of elliptic and triangular flow in high-multiplicity 3He+Au collisions at √sNN=200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Adare, A.

    2015-09-28

    We present the first measurement of elliptic (v2) and triangular (v3) flow in high-multiplicity 3He+Aucollisions at √sNN=200 GeV. Two-particle correlations, where the particles have a large separation in pseudorapidity, are compared in 3He+Au and in p+p collisions and indicate that collective effects dominate the second and third Fourier components for the correlations observed in the 3He+Ausystem. The collective behavior is quantified in terms of elliptic v2 and triangular v3 anisotropy coefficients measured with respect to their corresponding event planes. The v2 values are comparable to those previously measured in d+Au collisions at the same nucleon-nucleon center-of-mass energy. Comparisons with various theoretical predictions are made, including to models where the hot spots created by the impact of the three 3He nucleons on the Au nucleus expand hydrodynamically to generate the triangular flow. The agreement of these models with data may indicate the formation of low-viscosity quark-gluon plasma even in these small collision systems.

  14. Physicochemical and detonation properties of powerful explosive nitrates and their exploding action upon various barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golubev, Vladimir; Klapötke, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    The results on physicochemical and detonation properties for six powerful explosive nitrates such as aminotetrazolium nitrate (AT-NO3) , diaminotetrazolium nitrate (DAT-NO3) , diaminouronium nitrate (DAU-NO3) , 1-amino-3-nitro-guanidinium nitrate (ANQ-NO3) , oxalylhydrazinium nitrate (OHN) and oxalylhydrazinium dinitrate (OHDN) are presented in the paper. Physicochemical properties of these nitrates were determined with the use of methods of X-ray diffraction, nuclear magnetic resonance, mass spectrometry, infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry. Sensitivities to impact, friction and electrostatic discharge were determined too. All possible quantum-chemical properties of molecules and mechanisms of their decomposition were calculated using the Gaussian 09 program. Detonation properties of explosive nitrates and equations of state of detonation products in the form of Jones-Wilkins-Lee were calculated using the EXPLO5 V.6.02 program. Calculations were fulfilled for explosive materials having the maximum crystalline density and for porous and having small additions of a polymeric binder ones. Comparative calculations on determination of exploding action of examined nitrates upon barriers, plates and shells of various materials were conducted using the ANSYS Autodyn 15.0 program in plain, cylindrical and spherical statements. For comparison all similar results were obtained also for such well-known explosives as RDX and HMX.

  15. A global reanalysis of nuclear parton distribution functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eskola, Kari J.; Kolhinen, Vesa J.; Paukkunen, Hannu; Salgado, Carlos A.

    2007-05-01

    We determine the nuclear modifications of parton distribution functions of bound protons at scales Q2 >= 1.69 GeV2 and momentum fractions 10-5 <= x <= 1 in a global analysis which utilizes nuclear hard process data, sum rules and leading-order DGLAP scale evolution. The main improvements over our earlier work EKS98 are the automated χ2 minimization, simplified and better controllable fit functions, and most importantly, the possibility for error estimates. The resulting 16-parameter fit to the N = 514 datapoints is good, χ2/d.o.f = 0.82. Within the error estimates obtained, the old EKS98 parametrization is found to be fully consistent with the present analysis, with no essential difference in terms of χ2 either. We also determine separate uncertainty bands for the nuclear gluon and sea quark modifications in the large-x region where they are not stringently constrained by the available data. Comparison with other global analyses is shown and uncertainties demonstrated. Finally, we show that RHIC-BRAHMS data for inclusive hadron production in d+Au collisions lend support for a stronger gluon shadowing at x < 0.01 and also that fairly large changes in the gluon modifications do not rapidly deteriorate the goodness of the overall fits, as long as the initial gluon modifications in the region x ~ 0.02-0.04 remain small.

  16. Centrality Dependent Studies of Identified Particle Spectra at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekele, Selemon

    2008-10-01

    We present preliminary results from the BRAHMS experiment on identified particle spectra and ratios at y ˜0 and y ˜3 as a function of centrality for 200 GeV/NN Cu+Cu collisions. By comparing the Cu+Cu data with earlier results for the Au+Au and d+Au systems, it is possible to study how the heavy-ion reaction dynamics for a given number of participants depends on the overall system size. Particle yields, , and particle ratios are studied as a function of the number of participants. Transverse momentum distributions provide information on the final stages of the collision evolution at kinetic freeze-out. The kinetic freeze-out parameters of the Cu+Cu system are studied as a function of centrality by a simultaneous blast-wave model fit to the pion, kaon and (anti)proton spectra. The Cu+Cu results will be compared to other collision systems at RHIC to unravel the dependence on system size.

  17. A study of nuclear effects using forward-rapidity hadron production and di-hadron angular correlations in square root of S(NN) = 200 GeV deuteron-gold and proton-proton collisions with the PHENIX detector at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meredith, Beau Anthony

    Measurements using the PHENIX forward detectors at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) in high-energy deuteron-gold (d+Au) collisions enable us to study cold nuclear matter effects in nucleon structure at small parton-momentum fraction, or Bjorken-x. The large gluon densities in Lorentz-contracted gold nuclei enable us to search for the yet-unobserved saturation of the gluon distribution at small x, which is caused by a balance between gluon fusion and splitting. Gluon saturation is described by the Color Glass Condensate (CGC) theory [1], which predicts a suppression of inclusive particle production in heavy-ion collisions, in particular at forward rapidity, because of a decreased gluon density. In addition, it has been suggested that forward rapidity di-hadron correlations may elucidate CGC effects with two signatures that are specific predictions from CGC: awayside-yield suppression and angular broadening [2]. This thesis describes the first experimental measurements of these forward di-hadron correlations in PHENIX. Previously, RHIC experiments have shown a suppression in the single-particle nuclear modification factors (RdA, R cp) for sNN = 200 GeV d+Au collisions in the forward (deuteron) direction [3, 4]. Multiple theories can explain the observed suppression (including CGC), but a conclusive measurement discriminating amongst the models has yet to be carried out. Two new forward-rapidity electromagnetic calorimeters (Muon Piston Calorimeters or MPCs, --3.7 < eta < --3.1, 3.1 < eta < 3.9) enable the PHENIX experiment to measure the single-particle nuclear modification factors in addition to further understanding forward particle production with the forward di-hadron correlation measurements. Azimuthal correlations of di-hadron pairs at different pseudorapidities allow us to scan the x-dependence of correlated di-hadron production, which can then be used to discriminate amongst the models that compete to explain the observed levels of forward particle

  18. Transverse momentum distributions of final-state particles produced in AA, p(d)A, and pp collisions at high energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fu-Hu

    2008-08-01

    In the framework of the cylinder model, the transverse momentum distributions of final-state particles produced in nucleus-nucleus ( AA), proton(deuteron)-nucleus [ p(d)A], and proton-proton ( pp) collisions at high energies are investigated by a semi-empirical two-component distribution. In the region closing the side-surface of the cylinder, the local source stays in a low excitation state; and in the region closing the central axis of the cylinder, the local source stays in a high excitation state. The calculated results are in agreement with the experimental data of Cu sbnd Cu collisions at √{s}=22.5 GeV measured by the PHENIX Collaboration, p-Pb collisions at 400 GeV measured by the NA50 Collaboration, d-Au collisions at √{s}=200 GeV measured by the PHENIX Collaboration, and pp collisions at √{s}=200 GeV measured by the PHENIX and BRAHMS Collaborations.

  19. An improved global analysis of nuclear parton distribution functions including RHIC data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eskola, Kari J.; Paukkunen, Hannu; Salgado, Carlos A.

    2008-07-01

    We present an improved leading-order global DGLAP analysis of nuclear parton distribution functions (nPDFs), supplementing the traditionally used data from deep inelastic lepton-nucleus scattering and Drell-Yan dilepton production in proton-nucleus collisions, with inclusive high-pT hadron production data measured at RHIC in d+Au collisions. With the help of an extended definition of the χ2 function, we now can more efficiently exploit the constraints the different data sets offer, for gluon shadowing in particular, and account for the overall data normalization uncertainties during the automated χ2 minimization. The very good simultaneous fit to the nuclear hard process data used demonstrates the feasibility of a universal set of nPDFs, but also limitations become visible. The high-pT forward-rapidity hadron data of BRAHMS add a new crucial constraint into the analysis by offering a direct probe for the nuclear gluon distributions—a sector in the nPDFs which has traditionally been very badly constrained. We obtain a strikingly stronger gluon shadowing than what has been estimated in previous global analyses. The obtained nPDFs are released as a parametrization called EPS08.

  20. Transverse Spin at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaorong

    2016-03-01

    In recent years, there has been exciting development in both experimental and theoretical studies of transverse spin asymmetries in polarized p+p and and DIS collisions. As a unique polarized proton-proton collider, Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) provides a unique opportunity to investigate the novel physics mechanisms that cause the large single spin asymmetry at the forward rapidity. Both PHENIX and STAR experiments have been studying the transverse spin asymmetries with a variety of final state particles in different kinematic regimes since 2006. Especially, recent theoretical development on scattering a polarized probe on the saturated nuclear may provide a unique way to probe the gluon and quark TMDs. RHIC successfully ran polarized p+Au collisions in 2015. We will expect to have new results from polarized d+Au to compare with existing results from p+p collision to extend our understanding of QCD. Further more, In 2015, PHENIX installed MPC-ex calorimeter at very forward region to measure direct photon AN and STAR installed Roman Pots to study the diffractive events in polarized p+p and p+Au collisions. The recent results on transverse polarized p+p and p+Au collisions from both PHENIX and STAR experiments will be presented in this talk. I will also briefly discuss the possibility for the transverse Spin program at future experiments sPHENIX and forward sPHENIX at RHIC. Supported by US Department of Energy and RIKEN Brookhaven Research Center.

  1. Studying Proton-Proton Collisions Using Pythia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolotov, Adi

    2004-10-01

    At Brookhaven National Lab, the RHIC experiments are currently investigating, on a subatomic level, what happens when heavy ions collide at high speeds. This is done in order to create such high temperatures and densities that quarks are no longer bound to one another. This state of matter is called the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP). Evidence for the existence of the QGP may be the quenching of hadron jets, which occurs when the fast quarks or gluons lose so much energy in the hot, dense medium that they cannot survive. Then the jets of particles that these particles usually result in cannot be made. By studying the particle yield at high transverse momentum (Pt), one can probe what is happening to the jets created during collisions. Using Pythia, a standard model event generator based on the Lund String Model, we study jets of particles created when elementary protons collide. Then we know what should happen to jets at high transverse momentum transfer, when no QGP is present. Comparing the pt spectrum of jet partners generated by Pythia to RHIC results for proton-proton collisions shows that the two do in fact agree. This not only insures that the analysis of RHIC data is correct, but it also establishes a basis for comparison for Au-Au collisions. Comparing d+Au collision data to the Pythia Pt spectrum of jets with leading baryon and meson triggers, we found good agreement. Thus the jet production does not change drastically in nature in the presence of a cold nuclear medium.

  2. A human development framework for CO2 reductions.

    PubMed

    Costa, Luís; Rybski, Diego; Kropp, Jürgen P

    2011-01-01

    Although developing countries are called to participate in CO(2) emission reduction efforts to avoid dangerous climate change, the implications of proposed reduction schemes in human development standards of developing countries remain a matter of debate. We show the existence of a positive and time-dependent correlation between the Human Development Index (HDI) and per capita CO(2) emissions from fossil fuel combustion. Employing this empirical relation, extrapolating the HDI, and using three population scenarios, the cumulative CO(2) emissions necessary for developing countries to achieve particular HDI thresholds are assessed following a Development As Usual approach (DAU). If current demographic and development trends are maintained, we estimate that by 2050 around 85% of the world's population will live in countries with high HDI (above 0.8). In particular, 300 Gt of cumulative CO(2) emissions between 2000 and 2050 are estimated to be necessary for the development of 104 developing countries in the year 2000. This value represents between 20 % to 30 % of previously calculated CO(2) budgets limiting global warming to 2 °C. These constraints and results are incorporated into a CO(2) reduction framework involving four domains of climate action for individual countries. The framework reserves a fair emission path for developing countries to proceed with their development by indexing country-dependent reduction rates proportional to the HDI in order to preserve the 2 °C target after a particular development threshold is reached. For example, in each time step of five years, countries with an HDI of 0.85 would need to reduce their per capita emissions by approx. 17% and countries with an HDI of 0.9 by 33 %. Under this approach, global cumulative emissions by 2050 are estimated to range from 850 up to 1100 Gt of CO(2). These values are within the uncertainty range of emissions to limit global temperatures to 2 °C. PMID:22216227

  3. Neutral pion production with respect to centrality and reaction plane in Au+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Alexander, J.; Aoki, K.; Aramaki, Y.; Atomssa, E. T.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Barish, K. N.; Bassalleck, B.; Basye, A. T.; Bathe, S.; Baublis, V.; Baumann, C.; Bazilevsky, A.; Belikov, S.; Belmont, R.; Bennett, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Bickley, A. A.; Bok, J. S.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Butsyk, S.; Camacho, C. M.; Campbell, S.; Chen, C.-H.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, P.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cole, B. A.; Connors, M.; Constantin, P.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Dahms, T.; Dairaku, S.; Danchev, I.; Das, K.; Datta, A.; David, G.; Denisov, A.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dietzsch, O.; Dion, A.; Donadelli, M.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Dutta, D.; Edwards, S.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Ellinghaus, F.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Fadem, B.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M., Jr.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Fraenkel, Z.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fujiwara, K.; Fukao, Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Garishvili, I.; Glenn, A.; Gong, H.; Gonin, M.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gunji, T.; Gustafsson, H.-Å.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamblen, J.; Han, R.; Hanks, J.; Hartouni, E. P.; Haslum, E.; Hayano, R.; He, X.; Heffner, M.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Hill, J. C.; Hohlmann, M.; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hornback, D.; Huang, S.; Ichihara, T.; Ichimiya, R.; Ide, J.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Inaba, M.; Isenhower, D.; Ishihara, M.; Isobe, T.; Issah, M.; Isupov, A.; Ivanischev, D.; Jacak, B. V.; Jia, J.; Jin, J.; Johnson, B. M.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kajihara, F.; Kametani, S.; Kamihara, N.; Kamin, J.; Kang, J. H.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kawall, D.; Kawashima, M.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kempel, T.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kijima, K. M.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E.; Kim, E.-J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinney, E.; Kiriluk, K.; Kiss, Á.; Kistenev, E.; Kochenda, L.; Komkov, B.; Konno, M.; Koster, J.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kozlov, A.; Král, A.; Kravitz, A.; Kunde, G. J.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, J.; Lee, K.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Leitner, E.; Lenzi, B.; Li, X.; Liebing, P.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Liška, T.; Litvinenko, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, M. X.; Love, B.; Luechtenborg, R.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Malakhov, A.; Malik, M. D.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Mao, Y.; Masui, H.; Matathias, F.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; Means, N.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mignerey, A. C.; Mikeš, P.; Miki, K.; Milov, A.; Mishra, M.; Mitchell, J. T.; Mohanty, A. K.; Morino, Y.; Morreale, A.; Morrison, D. P.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Murata, J.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagle, J. L.; Naglis, M.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Newby, J.; Nguyen, M.; Niida, T.; Nouicer, R.; Nyanin, A. S.; O'Brien, E.; Oda, S. X.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Oka, M.; Okada, K.; Onuki, Y.; Oskarsson, A.; Ouchida, M.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, I. H.; Park, J.; Park, S. K.; Park, W. J.; Pate, S. F.; Pei, H.; Peng, J.-C.; Pereira, H.; Peresedov, V.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pisani, R. P.; Proissl, M.; Purschke, M. L.; Purwar, A. K.; Qu, H.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Roach, D.; Roche, G.; Rolnick, S. D.; Rosati, M.; Rosen, C. A.; Rosendahl, S. S. E.; Rosnet, P.; Rukoyatkin, P.; Ružička, P.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sakashita, K.; Samsonov, V.; Sano, S.; Sato, T.; Sawada, S.; Sedgwick, K.; Seele, J.; Seidl, R.; Semenov, A. Yu.; Seto, R.; Sharma, D.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Sim, K. S.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Slunečka, M.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Sparks, N. A.; Stankus, P. W.; Stenlund, E.; Stoll, S. P.; Sugitate, T.; Sukhanov, A.; Sziklai, J.; Takagui, E. M.; Taketani, A.; Tanabe, R.; Tanaka, Y.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Tarján, P.; Themann, H.; Thomas, T. L.; Togawa, M.; Toia, A.; Tomášek, L.; Torii, H.; Towell, R. S.; Tserruya, I.; Tsuchimoto, Y.; Vale, C.; Valle, H.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vazquez-Zambrano, E.; Veicht, A.; Velkovska, J.; Vértesi, R.; Vinogradov, A. A.; Virius, M.; Vrba, V.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Wei, F.; Wei, R.; Wessels, J.; White, S. N.; Winter, D.; Wood, J. P.; Woody, C. L.; Wright, R. M.; Wysocki, M.; Xie, W.; Yamaguchi, Y. L.; Yamaura, K.; Yang, R.; Yanovich, A.; Ying, J.; Yokkaichi, S.; You, Z.; Young, G. R.; Younus, I.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zhang, C.; Zhou, S.; Zolin, L.

    2013-03-01

    The PHENIX experiment has measured the production of π0s in Au+Au collisions at sNN = 200 GeV. The new data offer a fourfold increase in recorded luminosity, providing higher precision and a larger reach in transverse momentum, pT, to 20 GeV/c. The production ratio of η/π0 is 0.46±0.01(stat)±0.05(syst), constant with pT and collision centrality. The observed ratio is consistent with earlier measurements, as well as with the p+p and d+Au values. π0 are suppressed by a factor of 5, as in earlier findings. However, with the improved statistical precision a small but significant rise of the nuclear modification factor RAA vs pT, with a slope of 0.0106±0.00290.0034 (Gev/c)-1, is discernible in central collisions. A phenomenological extraction of the average fractional parton energy loss shows a decrease with increasing pT. To study the path-length dependence of suppression, the π0 yield is measured at different angles with respect to the event plane; a strong azimuthal dependence of the π0 RAA is observed. The data are compared to theoretical models of parton energy loss as a function of the path length L in the medium. Models based on perturbative quantum chromodynamics are insufficient to describe the data, while a hybrid model utilizing pQCD for the hard interactions and anti-de-Sitter space/conformal field theory (AdS/CFT) for the soft interactions is consistent with the data.

  4. Frequency specificity of chirp-evoked auditory brainstem responses.

    PubMed

    Wegner, Oliver; Dau, Torsten

    2002-03-01

    This study examines the usefulness of the upward chirp stimulus developed by Dau et al. [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 107, 1530-1540 (2000)] for retrieving frequency-specific information. The chirp was designed to produce simultaneous displacement maxima along the cochlear partition by compensating for frequency-dependent traveling-time differences. In the first experiment, auditory brainstem responses (ABR) elicited by the click and the broadband chirp were obtained in the presence of high-pass masking noise, with cutoff frequencies of 0.5, 1, 2, 4, and 8 kHz. Results revealed a larger wave-V amplitude for chirp than for click stimulation in all masking conditions. Wave-V amplitude for the chirp increased continuously with increasing high-pass cutoff frequency while it remains nearly constant for the click for cutoff frequencies greater than 1 kHz. The same two stimuli were tested in the presence of a notched-noise masker with one-octave wide spectral notches corresponding to the cutoff frequencies used in the first experiment. The recordings were compared with derived responses, calculated offline, from the high-pass masking conditions. No significant difference in response amplitude between click and chirp stimulation was found for the notched-noise responses as well as for the derived responses. In the second experiment, responses were obtained using narrow-band stimuli. A low-frequency chirp and a 250-Hz tone pulse with comparable duration and magnitude spectrum were used as stimuli. The narrow-band chirp elicited a larger response amplitude than the tone pulse at low and medium stimulation levels. Overall, the results of the present study further demonstrate the importance of considering peripheral processing for the formation of ABR. The chirp might be of particular interest for assessing low-frequency information.

  5. Diamond of Possibly Metallurgical and Seismic Origin in an Alloy from the Debris After an Earthquake in Central Taiwan: Part One

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giamn, M.

    2004-05-01

    Central Taiwan was struck by an earthquake on September 21, 1999, that measured 7.3 on the Richter scale (stated by Taiwanese Seismic Research Center under its Central Meteorological Bureau; 7.6 by the United States Geological Survey). It has led to vast regional destruction and casualties of over 2,000. From the debris(1) in Lam-dau(2), a specimen of a section of a strand of an alloy wire was examined. Diamond was identified as fine grained multicrystalline batch therein not dissimillar to carbonado in appearance and properties. Its presence due to contamination is unlikely. Diamond is not present in the steelmaking process, nor in the local geology (distant to the eclogites and diamond has not been known to be present therein). Culturally the most favored jewelry and ornamental materials through the ages are gold and jade, instead of diamond. There is no known source of diamond in the vicinity sufficiently abundant to constitute a source of contamination. Oxidation-deoxidation reactions in the iron-carbon-alloys system are the likely source of carbon. Under favorable conditions and thermal history, and probably in limited scale (microstructural), seismicity is theoretically viable as a mode of force for the generation of diamond. The force may have been magnified when applied upon small dimensions. Generally perceived as a destructive force, seismicity can be beneficial as a less immediately obvious category of natural resources in facilitating phase transformation. It may be closer to be so in active regions. For instance, more than 22,000 earthquakes have been recorded in Taiwan during year 2003, averaging one earthquake every less than 24 minutes, although most were below 5 in magnetude. (1) A temporary terminology being utilized here loosely refering to a group of materials on site above ground. (2) Also spelled as Nantou when based upon Beijingnese pronounciation.

  6. Asn47 and Phe114 modulate the inner sphere reorganization energies of type zero copper proteins.

    PubMed

    Sadhu, Biswajit; Sundararajan, Mahesh

    2016-06-22

    The geometric structures and electron transfer properties of type 1 Cu proteins are reasonably understood at the molecular level (E. I. Solomon and R. G. Hadt, Coord. Chem. Rev., 2011, 255, 774-789, J. J. Warren, K. M. Lancaster, J. H. Richards and H. B. Gray, J. Inorg. Biochem., 2012, 115, 119-126). Much understanding of type 1 copper electron transfer reactivity has come from site directed mutagenesis studies. For example, artificial "type zero" Cu-centres constructed in cupredoxin-azurin have showcased the capacity of outer-sphere hydrogen bonding networks to enhance Cu II/I electron transfer reactivity. In this paper, we have elaborated on earlier kinetics and electronic structural studies of type zero Cu by calculating the inner sphere reorganization energies of type 1, type 2, and type zero Cu proteins using density functional theory (DFT). Although the choice of density functionals for copper systems is not straightforward, we have benchmarked the density functionals against the recently reported ESI-PES data for two synthetic copper models (S. Niu, D.-L. Huang, P. D. Dau, H.-T. Liu, L.-S. Wang and T. J. Ichiye, Chem. Theory Comput., 2014, 10, 1283). For the Cu proteins, our calculations predict that changes in the coordination number upon metal reduction lead to large inner sphere reorganization energies for type 2 Cu sites, whereas retention in the coordination number is observed for type zero Cu sites. These variations in the coordination number are modulated by the outer-sphere coordinating residues Asn47 and Phe114, which are involved in hydrogen bonding with the Asp112 side chain.

  7. Tuberculose multifocale chez les immunocompétents

    PubMed Central

    Rezgui, Amel; Fredj, Fatma Ben; Mzabi, Anis; Karmani, Monia; Laouani, Chadia

    2016-01-01

    La tuberculose multifocale est définie par la l'atteinte d'au moins deux sites extra-pulmonaires associée ou non à une atteinte pulmonaire. On se propose d’étudier les différentes caractéristiques cliniques et évolutives de la tuberculose multifocale à travers une étude rétrospective de 10 cas. Parmi 41 cas de tuberculose colligés entre 1999 et 2013. Dix patients avaient une tuberculose multifocale, soit 24% des patients. Il s'agissait de 9 femmes et 1 homme d’âge moyen à 50 ans (30-68 ans). Nos patients étaient tous correctement vaccinés par le BCG. Un bilan à la recherche d'une éventuelle immunodépression fait pour tous les patients était négatif. Il s'agissait d'une tuberculose ganglionnaire dans 7 cas, digestive dans 3 cas, péricardique dans 2 cas, ostéo-articulaire dans 2 cas, cérébrale dans 1 cas, urinaire dans 2 cas, uro-génitale dans 4 cas, surrénalienne dans 1 cas, cutanée dans 1 cas et musculaire dans 1 cas. Tous nos patients ont bénéficié d'un traitement antituberculeux pour une durée moyenne de 10 mois avec bonne évolution. La tuberculose multifocale est une des maladies à diagnostic difficile. Elle peut toucher les immunocompétents mais son pronostic est souvent bon. Un traitement anti-tuberculeux doit être instauré le plus rapidement possible pour éviter les séquelles. PMID:27583077

  8. Highly siderophile element (HSE) abundances in the mantle of Mars are due to core formation at high pressure and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Righter, K.; Danielson, L. R.; Pando, K. M.; Williams, J.; Humayun, M.; Hervig, R. L.; Sharp, T. G.

    2015-04-01

    Highly siderophile elements (HSEs) can be used to understand accretion and core formation in differentiated bodies, due to their strong affinity for FeNi metal and sulfides. Coupling experimental studies of metal-silicate partitioning with analyses of HSE contents of Martian meteorites can thus offer important constraints on the early history of Mars. Here, we report new metal-silicate partitioning data for the PGEs and Au and Re across a wide range of pressure and temperature space, with three series designed to complement existing experimental data sets for HSE. The first series examines temperature effects for D(HSE) in two metallic liquid compositions—C-bearing and C-free. The second series examines temperature effects for D(Re) in FeO-bearing silicate melts and FeNi-rich alloys. The third series presents the first systematic study of high pressure and temperature effects for D(Au). We then combine our data with previously published partitioning data to derive predictive expressions for metal-silicate partitioning of the HSE, which are subsequently used to calculate HSE concentrations of the Martian mantle during continuous accretion of Mars. Our results show that at midmantle depths in an early magma ocean (equivalent to approximately 14 GPa, 2100 °C), the HSE contents of the silicate fraction are similar to those observed in the Martian meteorite suite. This is in concert with previous studies on moderately siderophile elements. We then consider model calculations that examine the role of melting, fractional crystallization, and sulfide saturation/undersaturation in establishing the range of HSE contents in Martian meteorites derived from melting of the postcore formation mantle. The core formation modeling indicates that the HSE contents can be established by metal-silicate equilibrium early in the history of Mars, thus obviating the need for a late veneer for HSE, and by extension volatile siderophile elements, or volatiles in general.

  9. Surpoids et obésité dans la population au-dessus de 20 ans en milieu urbain bamakois (Mali)

    PubMed Central

    Oumar Bâ, Hamidou; Menta, Ichaka; Camara, Youssouf; Sangaré, Ibrahima; Sidibé, Noumou; Doumbia, Seydou; Diarra, Mamadou Bocary

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Il est question dans notre travail d’étudier le SP et l'OB et les facteurs associés dans la population âgée de 20 ans ou plus. Méthodes Notre échantillon a été obtenu à partir d'une enquête sur les pathologies cardiovasculaires dans le District de Bamako et impliquant 2199 sujets de 5-104 ans, en sélectionnant tous les sujets âgés d'au moins 20 ans (1162). Pour chaque sujet, l'IMC, rapport taille / hanche et le tour de taille ont été déterminées. Les données ont été analysées avec SPSS 12. Résultats L’âge moyen était de 36,86 années, 61,4% étaient des femmes, 49,7% dans le secteur informel et 38,0% avaient réalisé l'enseignement primaire. Facteurs de risque cardiovasculaires étaient l'inactivité physique (72,4%), le tabagisme (12,2%) et hypertension (26,7%). La prévalence de l'obésité était de 8,8 et 14,7% respectivement sur la base de l'indice de masse et le tour de taille. Conclusion Le SP et l'OB sont à prendre en compte dans les mesures de politique sanitaire que dans la pratique quotidienne des professionnels de santé, il est peut-être plus utile d'utiliser plusieurs paramètres pour être à même de bien stratifier nos patients par rapport à leur risque. PMID:25932065

  10. Forensic drug testing for opiates. VI. Urine testing for hydromorphone, hydrocodone, oxymorphone, and oxycodone with commercial opiate immunoassays and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Smith, M L; Hughes, R O; Levine, B; Dickerson, S; Darwin, W D; Cone, E J

    1995-01-01

    Opiate testing for morphine and codeine is performed routinely in forensic urine drug-testing laboratories in an effort to identify illicit opiate abusers. In addition to heroin, the 6-keto-opioids, including hydromorphone, hydrocodone, oxymorphone, and oxycodone, have high abuse liability and are self-administered by opiate abusers, but only limited information is available on detection of these compounds by current immunoassay and gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric (GC-MS) methods. In this study, single doses of hydromorphone, hydrocodone, oxymorphone, and oxycodone were administered to human subjects, and urine samples were collected before and periodically after dosing. Opiate levels were determined in a quantitative mode with four commercial immunoassays, TDx opiates (TDx), Abuscreen radioimmunoassay (ABUS), Coat-A-Count morphine in urine (CAC), and EMIT d.a.u. opiate assay (EMIT), and by GC-MS. GC-MS assay results indicated that hydromorphone, hydrocodone, oxymorphone, and oxycodone administration resulted in rapid excretion of parent drug and O-demethylated metabolites in urine. Peak concentrations occurred within 8 h after drug administration and declined below 300 ng/mL within 24-48 h. Immunoassay testing indicated that hydromorphone, hydrocodone, and oxycodone, but not oxymorphone, were detectable in urine by TDx and EMIT (300-ng/mL cutoff) for 6-24 h. ABUS detected only hydrocodone, and CAC failed to detect any of the four 6-keto-opioid analgesics. Generally, immunoassays for opiates in urine displayed substantially lower sensitivities for 6-keto-opioids compared with GC-MS. Consequently, urine samples containing low to moderate concentrations of hydromorphone, hydrocodone, oxymorphone, and oxycodone will likely go undetected when tested by conventional immunoassays.

  11. Cosmetic Preservatives as Therapeutic Corneal and Scleral Tissue Cross-Linking Agents

    PubMed Central

    Babar, Natasha; Kim, MiJung; Cao, Kerry; Shimizu, Yukari; Kim, Su-Young; Takaoka, Anna; Trokel, Stephen L.; Paik, David C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Previously, aliphatic β-nitroalcohols (BNAs) have been studied as a means to chemically induce tissue cross-linking (TXL) of cornea and sclera. There are a number of related and possibly more potent agents, known as formaldehyde releasers (FARs), that are in commercial use as preservatives in cosmetics and other personal care products. The present study was undertaken in order to screen such compounds for potential clinical utility as therapeutic TXL agents. Methods. A chemical registry of 62 FARs was created from a literature review and included characteristics relevant to TXL such as molecular weight, carcinogenicity/mutagenicity, toxicity, hydrophobicity, and commercial availability. From this registry, five compounds [diazolidinyl urea (DAU), imidazolidinyl urea (IMU), sodium hydroxymethylglycinate (SMG), DMDM hydantoin (DMDM), 5-Ethyl-3,7-dioxa-1-azabicyclo [3.3.0] octane (OCT)] were selected for efficacy screening using two independent systems, an ex vivo rabbit corneal cross-linking simulation setup and incubation of cut scleral tissue pieces. Treatments were conducted at pH 7.4 or 8.5 for 30 minutes. Efficacy was evaluated using thermal denaturation temperature (Tm), and cell toxicity was studied using the trypan blue exclusion method. Results. Cross-linking effects in the five selected FARs were pH and concentration dependent. Overall, the Tm shifts were in agreement with both cornea and sclera. By comparison with BNAs previously reported upon, the FARs identified in this study were significantly more potent but with similar or better cytotoxicity. Conclusions. The FARs, a class of compounds well known to the cosmetic industry, may have utility as therapeutic TXL agents. The compounds studied thus far show promise and will be further tested. PMID:25634979

  12. Cold Nuclear Matter Effects on Heavy Quark Production in Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durham, John Matthew

    2011-12-01

    The experimental collaborations at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) have established that dense nuclear matter with partonic degrees of freedom is formed in collisions of heavy nuclei at 200 GeV. Information from heavy quarks has given significant insight into the dynamics of this matter. Charm and bottom quarks are dominantly produced by gluon fusion in the early stages of the collision, and thus experience the complete evolution of the medium. The production baseline measured in p + p collisions can be described by fixed order plus next to leading log perturbative QCD calculations within uncertainties. In central Au+Au collisions, suppression has been measured relative to the yield in p + p scaled by the number of nucleon-nucleon collisions, indicating a significant energy loss by heavy quarks in the medium. The large elliptic flow amplitude v2 provides evidence that the heavy quarks flow along with the lighter partons. The suppression and elliptic flow of these quarks are in qualitative agreement with calculations based on Langevin transport models that imply a viscosity to entropy density ratio close to the conjectured quantum lower bound of 1/4pi. However, a full understanding of these phenomena requires measurements of cold nuclear matter (CNM) effects, which should be present in Au+Au collisions but are difficult to distinguish experimentally from effects due to interactions with the medium. This thesis presents measurements of electrons at midrapidity from the decays of heavy quarks produced in d+Au collisions at RHIC. A significant enhancement of these electrons is seen at a transverse momentum below 5 GeV/c, indicating strong CNM effects on charm quarks that are not present for lighter quarks. A simple model of CNM effects in Au+Au collisions suggests that the level of suppression in the hot nuclear medium is comparable for all quark flavors.

  13. Increased proapoptotic activity of electron beam irradiated doxorubicin and epirubicin in multidrug-resistant human leukemic cells.

    PubMed

    Paszel-Jaworska, A; Totoń, E; Dettlaff, K; Kaczmarek, A; Bednarski, W; Oszczapowicz, I; Jelińska, A; Rybczyńska, M

    2016-10-25

    This study evaluated the effect of electron beam irradiation on the cytotoxic activity of anthracycline antibiotics such as doxorubicin (DOX), epirubicin (EPI), and dunorubicin (DAU) in human acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell line CCRF-CEM and its multidrug-resistant variant CCRF-VCR1000 cell line characterized by the overexpression of ABCB1 gene. Drugs were irradiated at doses of 10 and 25 kGy. Data from EPR studies proved that the highest concentration of free radicals was found in DOX and that the number of stable free radicals is always greater after irradiation. In in vitro studies, a higher cytotoxic activity of irradiated DOX and EPI in multidrug-resistant CCRF-VCR1000 cells was observed. This tendency was maintained during the storage at 4 °C for 90 days. Changes in CCRF-CEM cells' viability were not dependent on the irradiation status and its dose and were only drug-concentration dependent in all measurement time points. It was proved that increased potency of 25 kGy e-beam irradiated drugs results from their enhanced proapoptotic activity. Apoptotic cell death observed in CCRF-VCR1000 cells treated with irradiated drugs was caspase-8, -9, and -3 dependent and related to the increased Bax/Bcl-2 ratio. No significant differences in the effects of irradiated and non-irradiated drugs on p53 and NFκB transcription factor level and their translocation to the nucleus were noted. Increased activity of the irradiated drugs was not dependent on ABCB1 level.

  14. In-depth study of Marxist population theory, promote China's population science.

    PubMed

    Liu, J

    1983-01-01

    The 3rd National Population Science Seminar, held in Beijng from Feb. 21-27, 1981, brought together over 270 Chinese population researchers and professionals, as well as social science and family planning workers. Participants presented over 220 papers and reports, which showed a higher level of scholarship than previous seminar papers. Chen Dau, the head of the Planning Bureau of the Chinese Academy for Social Sciences, gave the opening address and explained the seminar's 2 tasks: 1) to exchange academic ideas and 2) to found the Population Association of China (PAC), and suggested 3 topics for theoretical discussion: 1) Marxist theory on the 2 kinds of production, 2) the differences between China's population control and old and NeoMalthusianism, and 3) the 1 child policy. Xu Dixin, the vice-president of the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, spoke on socialist population laws, planned population control, and potential problems with the 1 child family policy. 8 special groups at the seminar discussed 1) Marxist theory on the 2 types of production, 2) Marx and Malthus on population, 3) China's population control policy, 4) population studies, 5) China's population problems, 6) problems with population control in rural areas, 7) urban population issues, and 8) the population problems of minority nationalities. Participants founded the PAC on the last day of the seminar. Vice-premier Cheu Muhua also addressed the seminar on the tremendous success the family planning program has had in the last 2 years and the difficulty of the task of controlling China's population growth. Population research must explain China's population laws so that growth can be controlled. PMID:12313987

  15. Recent developments and perspective in spintronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fert, A.

    2008-03-01

    Recent developments and perspective in spintronics: A. Fert, UMR CNRS/Thales, 91767 Palaiseau and Université Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay, France After an introduction on the fundamentals of spin transport and the discovery of GMR, I will focus on the most recent developments in spintronics. I will first describe the field of the spin transfer phenomena by reviewing experimental results on magnetic switching and generation of microwave oscillations by spin transfer. The synchronization and phase locking of a collection of STO’s (Spin Transfer Oscillators) is an example of new important problem raised by the experiments of spin transfer. I will present data on the synchronization of electrically connected STO. I will then continue the review with results on spintronics with semiconductors, molecular spintronics and spin Hall effect.Acknowledgements: I thanks all the coworkers of my recent works on spintronics, A. Anane[1], J. Barnas [2], A. Barthélémy [1], A. Bernand-Mantel [1], M. Bibes [1], O. Boulle [1], V.Cros [1], C.Deranlot [1], M.Elsen [1], G. Faini [3], B. Georges [1], JM.George [1], R. Giraud [3], M. Gmitra [2], J.Grollier [1], A.Hamzic [5], L. Hueso [6], H.Jaffrès [1], S. Laribi [1], A. Lemaitre [3], P. M. Levy [7], N. Mathur [6], R. Mattana [1],, F. Petroff [1], P. Seneor [1], F.Van Dau [1], A. Vaurès [1]. [1] Unité Mixte de Physique CNRS/Thales, Palaiseau and Université Paris Sud,Orsay, France[2] Department of Physics, Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznan, Poland[3] CNRS- LPN, Marcoussis, France[4] IEF, Université Paris-Sud, Orsay, France[5] University of Zagreb, Croatia[6] Cambridge University, UK [7] New York University

  16. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP, VOLUME 57, HIGH PT PHYSICS AT RHIC, DECEMBER 2-6, 2003

    SciTech Connect

    Kretzer, Stefan; Venugopalan, Raju; Vogelsang, Werner

    2004-02-18

    The AuAu, dAu, and pp collision modes of the RHIC collider at BNL have led to the publication of exciting high p{perpendicular} particle production data. There have also been two physics runs with polarized protons, and preliminary results on the double-spin asymmetry for pion production had been presented very recently. The ontological questions behind these measurements are fascinating: Did RHIC collisions create a Quark-Gluon-Plasma phase and did they verify the Color Glass Condensate as the high energy limit of QCD? Will the Spin Crisis finally be resolved in terms of gluon polarization and what new surprises are we yet to meet for Transverse Spin? Phenomena related to sub-microscopic questions as important as these call for interpretations that are footed in solid theory. At large p{perpendicular}, perturbative concepts are legitimately expected to provide useful approaches. The corresponding hard parton dynamics are, in several ways, key to unraveling the initial or final state and collisional phase of hard scattering events in vacuum as well as in hot or cold nuclear matter. Before the advent of RHIC data, a RIKEN-BNL workshop had been held at BNL in March 1999 on ''Hard Parton Physics in High Energy Nuclear Collisions''. The 2003 workshop on ''High p{perpendicular} Physics at RHIC'' was a logical continuation of this previous workshop. It gave the opportunity to revisit the 1999 expectations in the light of what has been found in the meantime and, at the same time, to critically discuss the underlying theoretical concepts. We brought together theorists who have done seminal work on the foundations of parton phenomenology in field theory, with theorists and experimentalists who are presently working on RHIC phenomenology. The participants were both from a high-energy physics and nuclear physics background and it remains only to be said here that this chemistry worked perfectly and the workshop was a great success.

  17. In-depth study of Marxist population theory, promote China's population science.

    PubMed

    Liu, J

    1983-01-01

    The 3rd National Population Science Seminar, held in Beijng from Feb. 21-27, 1981, brought together over 270 Chinese population researchers and professionals, as well as social science and family planning workers. Participants presented over 220 papers and reports, which showed a higher level of scholarship than previous seminar papers. Chen Dau, the head of the Planning Bureau of the Chinese Academy for Social Sciences, gave the opening address and explained the seminar's 2 tasks: 1) to exchange academic ideas and 2) to found the Population Association of China (PAC), and suggested 3 topics for theoretical discussion: 1) Marxist theory on the 2 kinds of production, 2) the differences between China's population control and old and NeoMalthusianism, and 3) the 1 child policy. Xu Dixin, the vice-president of the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, spoke on socialist population laws, planned population control, and potential problems with the 1 child family policy. 8 special groups at the seminar discussed 1) Marxist theory on the 2 types of production, 2) Marx and Malthus on population, 3) China's population control policy, 4) population studies, 5) China's population problems, 6) problems with population control in rural areas, 7) urban population issues, and 8) the population problems of minority nationalities. Participants founded the PAC on the last day of the seminar. Vice-premier Cheu Muhua also addressed the seminar on the tremendous success the family planning program has had in the last 2 years and the difficulty of the task of controlling China's population growth. Population research must explain China's population laws so that growth can be controlled.

  18. Transverse energy production and charged-particle multiplicity at midrapidity in various systems from sNN=7.7 to 200 GeV

    DOE PAGES

    Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akimoto, R.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Alexander, J.; Alfred, M.; Al-Jamel, A.; et al

    2016-02-03

    Measurements of midrapidity charged-particle multiplicity distributions, dNch/dη, and midrapidity transverse-energy distributions, dET/dη, are presented for a variety of collision systems and energies. Included are distributions for Au+Au collisions at √sNN=200, 130, 62.4, 39, 27, 19.6, 14.5, and 7.7 GeV, Cu+Cu collisions at √sNN=200 and 62.4 GeV, Cu+Au collisions at √sNN=200 GeV, U+U collisions at√sNN=193 GeV, d+Au collisions at √sNN=200 GeV, He3+Au collisions at √sNN=200 GeV, and p+p collisions at √sNN=200 GeV. We present centrality-dependent distributions at midrapidity in terms of the number of nucleon participants, Npart, and the number of constituent quark participants, Nqp. For all A+A collisions down tomore » √sNN=7.7 GeV, we observed that the midrapidity data are better described by scaling with Nqp than scaling with Npart. Finally, our estimates of the Bjorken energy density, εBJ, and the ratio of dET/dη to dNch/dη are presented, the latter of which is seen to be constant as a function of centrality for all systems.« less

  19. Evaluation of immunochemical drug screenings of whole blood samples. A retrospective optimization of cutoff levels after confirmation-analysis on GC-MS and HPLC-DAD.

    PubMed

    Kroener, Lars; Musshoff, Frank; Madea, Burkhard

    2003-01-01

    Four commonly used immunoassay kits were evaluated for their efficiency in screening for drugs of abuse in whole blood. Six groups of illicit drugs (opiates, cannabinoids, amphetamines, cocain and benzoylecgonine, benzodiazepines, and methadone) were determined by using the homogenous assays ADx and CEDIA DAU and compared with the results produced by means of the inhomogenous assays MTP and Pyxis 24. The measured 86 blood samples were taken from authentic routine analyses between February and September, 2000. Chromatographic confirmation analyses were carried out in all cases (positive and negative immunochemical pretesting). The cutoff levels were retrospectively optimized to reduce false-negative results with priority. Furthermore, false-positive pretests were minimized in order to decrease laboratory work under economical aspects. Specificity and sensitivity were determined for each parameter and assay. For the ADx assay, specificities of 54% (cannabinoids) to 97% (cocaine and metabolite) and sensitivities of about 67% (amphetamine class) to 94% (opiates) were found. The CEDIA assay revealed specificities of 77% (methadone) up to 100% (benzodiazepines) and 75-96% sensitivities for amphetamines and opiates. The MTP immunoassay resulted in specificities of 52% (methadone) to 95% (opiates, cocain, and metabolite) and sensitivities of 92% (amphetamines) up to 100% (methadone). The evaluation of the Pyxis 24 resulted in specificities of 70-96% (benzodiazepines and amphetamines) and sensitivities of 75% (amphetamines) up to 100% (cannabinoids and methadone), respectively. In conclusion, the microtiterplate immunoassays revealed higher sensitivities and have proved to be at an advantage detecting the lowest concentrations of drugs. However, especially for clinical applications in emergency cases with acute intoxications, when screening results are urgently required, homogenic assays such as ADx or Cedia provide preferable alternatives with faster and easier handling.

  20. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP (VOLUME 64)

    SciTech Connect

    KHARZEEV,D.; KRETZER,S.; TEANEY,D.; VENUGOPALAN,R.; VOGELSANG,W.

    2004-09-28

    We are presently in a very exciting and important phase of the RHIC era. A huge body of data. has been gathered in heavy-ion collisions that provides very convincing evidence for the formation of a quark. gluon plasma in central collisions. Recently, studies of nuclear modification factors in forward dAu collisions have shown tantalizing signatures that may be understood most naturally in terms of a, universal form of matter controlling the high energy limit of strong interactions, the Color Glass Condensate. Finally, important advances have also been made in spin physics, where first measurements of single-transverse and double-longitudinal spin asymmetries have been presented, marking a qualitatively new era in this field. The wealth of the new experimental data called for a workshop in which theorists took stock and reviewed in depth what has been achieved, in order to give guidance as to what avenues should be taken from here. This was the idea behind the workshop ''Theory Summer Program on RHIC Physics''. We decided to invite a fairly small number of participants--some world leaders in their field, others only at the beginning of their careers, but all actively involved in RHIC physics. Each one of them stayed over an extended period of time from two to six weeks. Such long-terms stays led to particularly fruitful interactions and collaborations with many members of the BNL theory groups, as well as with experimentalists at BNL. They also were most beneficial for achieving the main goal of this workshop, namely to perform detailed studies.

  1. Relative vulnerability of chronic wasting disease infected mule deer to vehicle collisions.

    PubMed

    Krumm, Caroline E; Conner, Mary M; Miller, Michael W

    2005-07-01

    We estimated chronic wasting disease (CWD) prevalence among vehicle-killed mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) in select data analysis units (DAUs) in northern Colorado, USA, and compared these with estimated CWD prevalence among mule deer of the same sex sampled in the vicinity of collision sites to assess relative vulnerability of CWD-infected individuals to vehicle collisions. Twenty-five of 171 vehicle-killed mule deer tested positive for CWD (overall prevalence=0.146, 95% confidence interval [CI]=0.097-0.208); 173 of 2,317 deer sampled in the vicinity of these vehicle-killed deer tested positive (overall prevalence=0.075, 95% CI=0.064-0.085). In nine of ten DAU x sex comparisons, relative risk of CWD infection tended to be higher among vehicle-killed deer (range of estimated relative risks=1.6-15.9). Spongiform encephalopathy was detected in 12 of 20 (60%; 95% CI=39-81%) CWD-positive deer killed by vehicles and in 79 of 180 (44%; 95% CI=37-52%) CWD-positive deer detected via random sampling (relative risk=1.37; 95% CI=0.92-2.03), suggesting that infected deer killed by vehicles tended to be in later stages of disease than those killed by hunters. Our data offer evidence that CWD-infected mule deer may be relatively vulnerable to vehicle collisions. It follows that sampling of vehicle-killed mule deer may be exploited to increase efficiency of surveillance programs designed to detect new foci of CWD infection; moreover, evidence of increased susceptibility to vehicle collisions may aid in understanding vulnerability of CWD-infected individuals to other forms of death, particularly predation.

  2. Investigating the structural evolution of thiolate protected gold clusters from first-principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Yong; Zeng, Xiao Cheng

    2012-06-01

    Unlike bulk materials, the physicochemical properties of nano-sized metal clusters can be strongly dependent on their atomic structure and size. Over the past two decades, major progress has been made in both the synthesis and characterization of a special class of ligated metal nanoclusters, namely, the thiolate-protected gold clusters with size less than 2 nm. Nevertheless, the determination of the precise atomic structure of thiolate-protected gold clusters is still a grand challenge to both experimentalists and theorists. The lack of atomic structures for many thiolate-protected gold clusters has hampered our in-depth understanding of their physicochemical properties and size-dependent structural evolution. Recent breakthroughs in the determination of the atomic structure of two clusters, [Au25(SCH2CH2Ph)18]q (q = -1, 0) and Au102(p-MBA)44, from X-ray crystallography have uncovered many new characteristics regarding the gold-sulfur bonding as well as the atomic packing structure in gold thiolate nanoclusters. Knowledge obtained from the atomic structures of both thiolate-protected gold clusters allows researchers to examine a more general ``inherent structure rule'' underlying this special class of ligated gold nanoclusters. That is, a highly stable thiolate-protected gold cluster can be viewed as a combination of a highly symmetric Au core and several protecting gold-thiolate ``staple motifs'', as illustrated by a general structural formula [Au]a+a'[Au(SR)2]b[Au2(SR)3]c[Au3(SR)4]d[Au4(SR)5]e where a, a', b, c, d and e are integers that satisfy certain constraints. In this review article, we highlight recent progress in the theoretical exploration and prediction of the atomic structures of various thiolate-protected gold clusters based on the ``divide-and-protect'' concept in general and the ``inherent structure rule'' in particular. As two demonstration examples, we show that the theoretically predicted lowest-energy structures of Au25(SR)8- and Au38(SR)24 (-R

  3. Le syndrome de cushing chez l'adolescent: à propos de 18 patients

    PubMed Central

    Haraj, Nassim Essabah; El Aziz, Siham; Chadli, Asma

    2015-01-01

    Le syndrome de Cushing est une pathologie rare mais grave chez l'enfant et l'adolescent. Elle diffère de la pathologie adulte par le mode de présentation et la prise en charge. Il s'agit d'une étude rétrospective des dossiers de patients suivis pour syndrome de Cushing au service d'endocrinologie de Casablanca entre 2002 - 2015, incluant les patients âgés au moment du diagnostic de moins de 22 ans, et ayant un suivi d'au moins 1 an. Au total 18 dossiers ont été inclus. L’âge moyen est de 19,55 ans, avec une prédominance féminine. La durée d’évolution moyenne est de 4,05 ans. Le tableau clinique est fait souvent d'une cassure de poids, une obésité ou une séborrhée et acné. La démarche diagnostique est comparable à celle de l'adulte. Sur le plan étiologique on retrouve une prédominance de la maladie de Cushing (15 patients). Sur le plan thérapeutique, 14 patients ont bénéficié d'une chirurgie hypophysaire, avec complément par radiothérapie chez 3 patients devant l’échec de la chirurgie, Une ablation d'une tumeur surrénalienne chez une patiente et une surrénalectomie bilatérale chez trois patients. L’évolution a été marquée par une guérison chez 9 patients et le décès chez 4 (suite à un syndrome de Nelson, infection sévère, choc hémorragique, corticosurrénalome). Les résultats de cette étude soulignent la gravité de cette maladie, ce qui nécessite d'organiser le suivi, en élaborant des programmes spécifiques de suivi médical et de prise en charge psychologique. PMID:26985265

  4. Etude des facteurs de risque du retard de croissance intra-utérin à Lubumbashi

    PubMed Central

    Moyambe, Jules Ngwe Thaba; Bernard, Pierre; Khang'Mate, Faustin; Nkoy, Albert Mwembo Tambwe A; Mukalenge, Faustin Chenge; Makanda, Daudet; Twite, Eugene; Ndudula, Arthur Munkana; Lubamba, Cham; Kadingi, Arnauld Kabulu; Kayomb, Mutach; Kayamba, Prosper Kalenga Muenze

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Dans notre milieu, il n'existe aucune politique de prévention du Retard de Croissance Intra-Utérin (RCIU) clairement défini. L'objectif de ce travail était d'identifier les facteurs de risque de RCIU afin de proposer une stratégie de lutte contre cette pathologie en agissant surtout sur des facteurs pouvant faire l'objet d'une action préventive. Méthodes Une étude cas-témoins a été menée dans 11 centres hospitaliers de Lubumbashi en République Démocratique du Congo, de Janvier 2010 à Juin 2011, dans le but d'identifier les facteurs de risque du retard de croissance intra-utérin (RCIU). Au total 420 gestantes (cas et témoins) avec grossesse monofoetale d'au moins 24 semaines d'aménorrhée ont été inclues dans l'étude. Les cas correspondaient aux gestantes dont le poids du fœtus était resté inférieur au 10 eme percentile des courbes de référence d'Alexander, après 2 échographies successives réalisées à intervalle de 4 semaines. Les témoins correspondaient aux gestantes dont le poids du fœtus était supérieur ou égal au 10 eme percentile de mêmes courbes. A chaque cas a été apparié un témoin de même parité porteur d'une grossesse de même âge. Résultats L'analyse univariée a identifié comme facteurs de risque: la taille maternelle. Conclusion L'amélioration du niveau socio-économique des populations, la lutte contre le paludisme et les consultations prénatales mieux organisées couplées à une meilleure éducation sanitaire et nutritionnelle peuvent contribuer sensiblement à la réduction de la fréquence du RCIU à Lubumbashi. PMID:23504392

  5. Facteurs associes aux décès des nouveau-nés suspects d'infections bactériennes au Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Pédiatrique Charles de Gaulle de Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso

    PubMed Central

    Ouédraogo, Solange Odile Yugbaré; Méda, Désiré; Dao, Lassina; Kouéta, Fla; Ludovic, Kam; Traoré, Ramata Ouédraogo; Yé, Diarra

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Il s'agit d’étudier les facteurs associés au décès des nouveau-nés suspects d'infections bactériennes au centre hospitalier universitaire pédiatrique Charles de gaulle de Ouagadougou. Méthodes Nous avons mené une étude de cohorte rétrospective du 1er janvier 2009 au 31 décembre 2012 au centre hospitalier universitaire pédiatrique Charles de gaulle de Ouagadougou. Résultats La fréquence hospitalière des nouveau-nés suspects d'infection bactérienne sur était de 62,8%. L’âge médian à l'admission était de trois jours et le sex ratio de 1,1. Parmi ces nouveau-nés, 351 (22,8%) ont bénéficié d'au moins un examen bactériologique, et 28 (8%) ont eu la confirmation de l'origine bactérienne de l'infection. Au cours de la période néonatale, 138(9%) nouveau-nés sont décédés avec un taux de létalité précoce et tardive respectivement de 9,6% et 8,3%. Le lieu de résidence, le mode d'admission, le nombre de consultations prénatales, le poids de naissance, la présence de signes de gravité et l'année d'admission étaient les facteurs de risque indépendants associés au décès. Conclusion Les facteurs associés au décès devraient être pris en compte dans les interventions de santé pour réduire la mortalité néonatale. PMID:27583071

  6. Electron spin resonance detection of oxygen radicals released by UVA-irradiated human fibroblasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souchard, J. P.; Pierlot, G.; Barbacanne, M. A.; Charveron, M.; Bonafé, J.-L.; Nepveu, F.

    1999-01-01

    This work reports the electron spin resonance (ESR) detection of oxygenated radicals (OR) released by cultured human fibroblasts after UVA (365 nm) exposure. 5,5-dimethyl-pyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO) was used as spin trap. After a UVA irradiation of one hour, followed by a latent period of at least 45 min., and an incubation time of 30 min. in a trapping medium containing DMPO, glucose, Na^+, K+ and Ca2+ an ESR signal was recorded. By contrast, an ESR signal was produced after only 15 min. incubation when calcium ionophore A23187 was used. Although the ESR signal was characteristic of the hydroxyl adduct DMPO-OH, the use of catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD) revealed that UVA stimulated fibroblasts released the superoxide anion O2- in the medium. SOD, vitamin C and (+)-catechin inhibited the release of superoxide generated by human fibroblasts stimulated with A23187 calcium ionophore at 5 units/ml, 10-5 M and 2× 10-4 M, respectively. Dans ce travail nous présentons la détection par résonance de spin électronique (RSE) de radicaux oxygénés (RO) libérés par des fibroblastes humains en culture après irradiation aux UVA (365 nm). Le 5,5-diméthyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxyde (DMPO) a été utilisé comme piégeur de spin. Après une irradiation aux UVA d'une heure, suivie d'une période de latence d'au moins 45 min. et d'une incubation de 30 min. dans un milieu de piégeage composé de DMPO, glucose, Na^+, K+ et Ca2+, un signal RPE est enregistré. L'ionophore calcique A23187 entraîne l'apparition d'un signal RPE après seulement 15 min. d'incubation. Bien que le signal RPE obtenu corresponde à l'adduit DMPO-OH du radical hydroxyle, l'utilisation de catalase et de superoxyde dismutase (SOD) a révélé que les fibroblastes libéraient l'anion superoxyde dans le milieu de culture. Sur ce modèle cellulaire la SOD, la vitamine C et la (+) catéchine inhibent la production du radical superoxyde aux concentrations respectivement de 5 unités/ml, 10-5 M et 2× 10-4M.

  7. Flame retardant emission from e-waste recycling operation in northern Vietnam: environmental occurrence of emerging organophosphorus esters used as alternatives for PBDEs.

    PubMed

    Matsukami, Hidenori; Tue, Nguyen Minh; Suzuki, Go; Someya, Masayuki; Tuyen, Le Huu; Viet, Pham Hung; Takahashi, Shin; Tanabe, Shinsuke; Takigami, Hidetaka

    2015-05-01

    Three oligomeric organophosphorus flame retardants (o-PFRs), eight monomeric PFRs (m-PFRs), tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) were identified and quantified in surface soils and river sediments around the e-waste recycling area in Bui Dau, northern Vietnam. Around the e-waste recycling workshops, 1,3-phenylene bis(diphenyl phosphate) (PBDPP), bisphenol A bis(diphenyl phosphate) (BPA-BDPP), triphenyl phosphate (TPHP), TBBPA, and PBDEs were dominant among the investigated flame retardants (FRs). The respective concentrations of PBDPP, BPA-BDPP, TPHP, TBBPA and the total PBDEs were 6.6-14000 ng/g-dry, <2-1500 ng/g-dry, 11-3300 ng/g-dry, <5-2900 ng/g-dry, and 67-9200 ng/g-dry in surface soils, and 4.4-78 ng/g-dry, <2-20 ng/g-dry, 7.3-38 ng/g-dry, 6.0-44 ng/g-dry and 100-350 ng/g-dry in river sediments. Near the open burning site of e-waste, tris(methylphenyl) phosphate (TMPP), (2-ethylhexyl)diphenyl phosphate (EHDPP), TPHP, and the total PBDEs were abundantly with respective concentrations of <2-190 ng/g-dry, <2-69 ng/g-dry, <3-51 ng/g-dry and 1.7-67 ng/g-dry in surface soils. Open storage and burning of e-waste have been determined to be important factors contributing to the emissions of FRs. The environmental occurrence of emerging FRs, especially o-PFRs, indicates that the alternation of FRs addition in electronic products is shifting in response to domestic and international regulations of PBDEs. The emissions of alternatives from open storage and burning of e-waste might become greater than those of PBDEs in the following years. The presence and environmental effects of alternatives should be regarded as a risk factor along with e-waste recycling.

  8. SYSTEMATIC STUDIES OF HEAVY ION COLLISIONS TO SEARCH FOR QUARK-GLUON PLASMA

    SciTech Connect

    Fuqiang Wang

    2007-11-29

    This is the final technical report for DOE Outstanding Junior Investigator (OJI) Award, 'Systematic Studies of Heavy Ion Collisions to Search for Quark-Gluon Plasma', grant DE-FG02-02ER41219, Principal Investigator (PI) Fuqiang Wang. The research under the grant was divided into two phases. The first concentrated on systematic studies of soft hadron production at low transverse momentum (p{sub T}), in particular the production of (anti-)baryon and strangeness in heavy ion collisions at RHIC energies. The second concentrated on measurements of di-hadron and multi-hadron jet-correlations and investigations of medium response to jets. The research was conducted at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) at BNL with the Solenoidal Tracker At RHIC (STAR) experiment. The total grant is $214,000. The grant established a PC farm solely used for this research. The PC farm consists of 8 nodes with a total of 16 CPUs and 3 disk servers of total 2 TB shared storage. The current balance of the grant is $19,985. The positive balance is because an initial purchase of $22,600 for the PC farm came out of the PI's start-up fund due to the lateness of the award. The PC farm is an integral part of the Purdue Physics Department's computer cluster. The grant supported two Ph.D. graduate students. Levente Molnar was supported from July 2002 to December 2003, and worked on soft hadron production. His thesis title is Systematics of Identified Particle Production in pp, d-Au and Au-Au Collisions at RHIC Energies. He graduated in 2006 and now is a Postdoctoral fellow at INFN Sezione di Bari, Italy working on the ALICE experiment at the LHC. Jason Ulery was supported from January 2004 to July 2007. His thesis title is Two- and Three-Particle Jet-Like Correlations. He defended his thesis in October 2007 and is moving to Frankfurt University, Germany to work on the ALICE experiment at the LHC. The research by this grant resulted in 7 journal publications (2 PRL, 1 PLB, 1 PRC, 2 submitted and

  9. Dioxin-related compounds in breast milk of women from Vietnamese e-waste recycling sites: levels, toxic equivalents and relevance of non-dietary exposure.

    PubMed

    Tue, Nguyen Minh; Katsura, Kana; Suzuki, Go; Tuyen, Le Huu; Takasuga, Takumi; Takahashi, Shin; Viet, Pham Hung; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2014-08-01

    Although informal e-waste recycling sites (EWRSs) are hotspots of both polychlorinated and polybrominated dibenzo-p-dioxins/dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs and PBDD/Fs), human exposure to the latter has not been studied in details. This study investigated the accumulation levels and profiles of dioxin-related compounds (DRCs) in breast milk samples from women living in two Vietnamese EWRSs and estimated the intake contribution from e-waste-related exposure. Screening results using Dioxin-Responsive Chemically Activated LUciferase gene eXpression assay (DR-CALUX) showed higher dioxin-like (DL) activities in samples from the EWRS Bui Dau than in those from the EWRS Trang Minh and a reference site (2.3-10 vs 1.7-4.8 and 0.60-5.7 pg CALUX-TEQ/g lipid, n=10, 6 and 9, respectively). Chemical analysis results of selected samples show that the WHO-TEQ levels of PCDD/Fs, DL-PCBs and PBDD/Fs in EWRS samples were not significantly higher than in those from the reference site (0.22-7.4 vs 1.1-3.0 pg/g lipid) and within the Vietnamese background range, but women involved in recycling accumulated higher concentrations of PCDFs (13-15 vs 2.3-8.8 pg/g lipid) and PBDFs (1.1-1.5 vs <1.1 pg/g lipid). By comparing the DRC profile in milk of these women with the reported profile in house dust from the same site, dust ingestion was estimated to contribute most of the intake for tetraBDF, 37 per cent to 55 per cent for penta-octaCDFs, but less than twenty per cent for PCDDs and DL-PCBs, and 26 per cent for total WHO-TEQs. The DL activities in some EWRS milk samples were not fully explained by chemical data, suggesting contribution from unidentified compounds. The estimated WHO-TEQ intake doses for breastfed infants (1.3-33 pg/kg/d) mostly exceeded the tolerable value, especially for those living in the EWRSs; and unidentified DRCs might increase further the dioxin-related health risk.

  10. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop: Progress in High-pT Physics at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Bazilevsky, A.; Bland, L.; Vogelsang, W.

    2010-03-17

    This volume archives the presentations at the RIKEN BNL Research Center workshop 'Progress in High-PT Physics at RHIC', held at BNL in March 2010. Much has been learned from high-p{sub T} physics after 10 years of RHIC operations for heavy-ion collisions, polarized proton collisions and d+Au collisions. The workshop focused on recent progress in these areas by both theory and experiment. The first morning saw review talks on the theory of RHIC high-p{sub T} physics by G. Sterman and J. Soffer, and on the experimental results by M. Tannenbaum. One of the most exciting recent results from the RHIC spin program is the first observation of W bosons and their associated single-spin asymmetry. The new preliminary data were reported on the first day of our workshop, along with a theoretical perspective. There also were detailed discussions on the global analysis of polarized parton distributions, including the knowledge on gluon polarization and the impact of the W-data. The main topic of the second workshop day were single-transverse spin asymmetries and their analysis in terms of transverse-momentum dependent parton distributions. There is currently much interest in a future Drell-Yan program at RHIC, thanks to the exciting physics opportunities this would offer. This was addressed in some of the talks. There also were presentations on the latest results on transverse-spin physics from HERMES and BELLE. On the final day of the workshop, the focus shifted toward forward and small-x physics at RHIC, which has become a cornerstone of the whole RHIC program. Exciting new data were presented and discussed in terms of their possible implications for our understanding of strong color-field phenomena in QCD. In the afternoon, there were discussions of nuclear parton distributions and jet observables, among them fragmentation. The workshop was concluded with outlooks toward the near-term (LHC, JLab) and longer-term (EIC) future. The workshop has been a great success. We had

  11. Les conjonctivites néonatales dans le canton de Glidji au Sud du Togo: une étude transversale à propos de 159 nouveau-nés

    PubMed Central

    Kokou, Vonor; Nidain, Maneh; Kassoula, Nononsaa Batomguela; Kwassi, Fiaty- Amenouvor; Meba, Banla; Patrice, Balo Komi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Le but de l’étude était décrire les aspects épidémiologiques des conjonctivites néonatales dans le canton de Glidji au Sud du Togo. Methodes Nous avons mené une étude transversale dans les 4 Unités Sanitaires Périphériques du canton de Glidji du 19 Mars au 13 Mai 2009 soit 8 semaines. Tous les nouveau-nés ont été inclus et la conjonctivite néonatale était définie par la présence chez un nouveau-né d'au moins deux des signes suivants: hyperhémie conjonctivale, œdème palpébral, chémosis, sécrétions purulentes, larmoiement. Les paramètres étudiés étaient l’âge, le sexe, les facteurs de risque, les antécédents, la présence ou non de conjonctivite, les germes en causes et l’évolution sous traitement. Resultats Sur la période, 159 nouveau-nés ont été examinés. L’âge moyen était de 10,9 jours avec des extrêmes de 0 à 28 jours. Il y avait 80 garçons pour 79 filles soit un sex-ratio de 1,01. Sur les 159 nouveau-nés, 7 cas de conjonctivite ont été diagnostiqués soit une prévalence de 4,4%. Les facteurs de risque identifiés étaient l'accouchement par voie basse et la présence d'IST chez la mère pendant la grossesse. Sur les 7 cas de conjonctivite, l'examen cytobactériologique a permis d'isoler le staphylococcus aureus dans 2 cas. L’évolution des cas de conjonctivite sous traitement était favorable avec régression des signes dès le 3è jour. Conclusion Les conjonctivites néonatales avaient une prévalence de 4,4% dans le canton de Glidji au sud du Togo et le staphylocoque doré était le germe en cause. Leur prévention passe par un bon suivi lors de la consultation prénatale et l'instillation de collyre antibiotique à la naissance PMID:27642383

  12. Méningiome intracrânien multiple: expérience du service de neurochirurgie CHU Avicenne Rabat - Salé, à propos de 4 cas et revue de la literature

    PubMed Central

    Djoubairou, Ben Ousmanou; Karekezi, Claire; Moussé, Nabil; Doleagbenou, Agbéko Komlan; Gana, Rachid; El Abbadi, Najia; El Maaqili, Moulay Rachid

    2014-01-01

    Les méningiomes intracrâniennes multiples sont définies comme la présence d'au moins deux méningiomes sur des sites intracrâniens différents et ceci en absence de neurofibromatose. C'est une tumeur rare dont la prévalence varie entre 1-10%. Le but de notre travail était de décrire les caractéristiques cliniques, radiologiques, histologiques d'une série de 4 patients porteurs de méningiome multiple et en déduire les facteurs de risques de survenue de cette pathologie. Préciser la qualité d'exérèse chirurgicale de la lésion selon la classification de Simpson. Rapporter les suites postopératoires ainsi que le suivie à long termes des patients afin de préciser leur qualité de vie. Il s'agit d'une étude rétrospective portant sur 4 cas de Méningiomes intracrâniens multiples sur 174 patients opérés pour méningiome au CHU Avicenne entre Janvier 2000 à Décembre 2013. En s'aidant des données cliniques, imageries, chirurgicales, histologiques mentionnée dans le dossier médical de chaque patient. Notre série est constitué de 4 patients (3 femmes pour 1 homme), d'un âge allant de 42-50 ans (moyenne d’âge= 45,5 ans). Nous avons identifié 21 méningiomes (17 en sus tentoriel et 4 en sous tentoriel), aucun cas de décès ni d'infection postopératoire dans notre échantillon. Le pronostic reste bon malgré le nombre de lésion nécessitant parfois plusieurs interventions chirurgicales. PMID:25419331

  13. LHeC and eRHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko,V.

    2009-07-16

    This paper is focused on possible designs and predicted performances of two proposed high-energy, high-luminosity electron-hadron colliders: eRHIC at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL, Upton, NY, USA) and LHeC at Organisation Europeenne pour la Recherche Nucleaire (CERN, Geneve, Switzerland). The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC, BNL) and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC, CERN) are designed as versatile colliders. RHIC is colliding various species of hadrons staring from polarized protons to un-polarized heavy ions (such as fully stripped Au (gold) ions) in various combinations: polarized p-p, d-Au, Cu-Cu, Au-Au. Maximum energy in RHIC is 250 GeV (per beam) for polarized protons and 100 GeV/n for heavy ions. There is planed expansion of the variety of species to include polarized He{sup 3} and unpolarized fully stripped U (uranium). LHeC is designed to collide both un-polarized protons with energy up to 7 TeV per beam and fully stripped Pb (lead) ions with energy up to 3 TeV/n. Both eRHIC and LHeC plan to add polarized electrons (or/and positrons) to the list of colliding species in these versatile hadron colliders. In eRHIC 10-20 GeV electrons would collide with hadrons circulating in RHIC. In LHeC 50-150 GeV polarized leptons will collided with LHC's hadron beams. Both colliders plan to operate in electron-proton (in RHIC case protons are polarized as well) and electron-ion collider modes. eRHIC and LHeC colliders are complimentary both in the energy reach and in their physics goals. I will discuss in this paper possible choices of the accelerator technology for the electron part of the collider for both eRHIC and LHeC, and will present predicted performance for the colliders. In addition, possible staging scenarios for these colliders will be discussed.

  14. Les accidents du travail dans le transport urbain en commun de la ville province de Kinshasa, République Démocratique du Congo: une étude transversale descriptive

    PubMed Central

    Wangata, Jemima; Elenge, Myriam; De Brouwer, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Le transport en commun urbain constitue un secteur où les travailleurs sont très exposés aux accidents du travail. Cette étude visait une description épidémiologique des accidents du travail dans le secteur informel du transport en commun à Kinshasa en vue d'apporter les pistes d'amélioration de la sécurité des travailleurs dans cette activité. Méthodes Un questionnaire sur les accidents du travail, administré en Décembre 2012 a permis d'explorer les tendances significatives entre les accidents et leurs circonstances, leurs facteurs associés, leurs conséquences au sein d'une population des travailleurs (n = 472) du transport en commun à Kinshasa. Résultats Durant les 12 derniers précédant l’étude 76.5% des travailleurs ont connu au moins un accident du travail, 54,8% ont connu un arrêt d'au moins 1jour. Les accidents liés à la circulation routière étaient plus important suivis des chutes. Les facteurs ayant montré des différences significatives étaient le travail sous l'influence de l'alcool et le port des équipements de protection individuelle. Les plaies (46,3%) et les contusions (39,4%) étaient les lésions les plus courantes. Les membres supérieurs (51,3%) et inférieurs (30,7%) étaient les plus atteints. 76,6% des travailleurs ont assumé seuls leur prise en charge médicale. Conclusion L'incidence des accidents du travail dans ce secteur est très élevée. La mise en place d'une politique de prévention et gestion de différents facteurs associés ainsi qu'un système de déclaration d'accidents est nécessaire dans ce secteur. Les patrons ainsi que les politiques devraient veiller à une prise en charge médicale correcte pour des travailleurs accidentés. PMID:25667703

  15. [Obtention of a heterohybridoma for production of type IgM monoclonal antibodies against the D antigen of the Rh system].

    PubMed

    León-González, Graciela; Cruz, Carlos

    2007-03-01

    The objective was to obtain a heterohybridoma capable of producing a monoclonal antibody with IgM type anti-D specificity (Rh system), that could be used as a reactive for hemoclasification. Mononuclear cells (MNC) were extracted from a blood sample of a highly sensitized woman, five days after giving birth to an Rh positive child. These were then transformed with the culture supernatant (CSN) of B05.8 cells, rich in Epstein Barr virus (EBV). Once transformed and in exponential growth, they were fused with K6H6/B5 line cells using PEG 4.000 as a fusing agent in a 1:1 proportion. After fusion, they were seeded in culture plates in order to evaluate the formation of hybrids and the secretion of specific antibodies in the CSN of each well. The efficiency of the fusion was 1.8 x 10(-6), making it possible to obtain an anti-D IgM producing clone, which we named BMS-9. This clone could be maintained in constant culture for three months, producing antibodies in a concentration of 4 microg/mL in de CSN. It was also possible to obtain antibodies with an Artificial Capilar System (ACS) reaching a concentration of 24 microg/mL. Potency was determined using Ror cells. In CSN at immediate centrifugation (IC): 1 x 32, score 52; 15' from incubation at room temperature (RT): 1 x 1,024 score 105. With that ACS product at IC: 1 x 32 score 54; 15' from incubation at RT: 1 x 8.192 score 136; and a 37 degrees C: 1 x 8,192 score 136. Reactivity was detected with red cells D(IIIa), D(IV), D(Va), D(VI) type IV, D(VII), DFR, DNU, STEM+, DAR and DAU. There was no reactivity with red cells D(IIIc), DI(Va), D(V) type II, D(VI) types I, II y III, Ro(HAR), DOL and weak D type II. During field study, no false negative or false positive reactions were detected. A stable heterohybridoma was obtained, producer of IgM type anti-D, with enough qualities to be used in blood typing. Given the excellent qualities of the antibody, we are evaluating dilution media and the addition of type IgG antibodies

  16. How do quarks and gluons lose energy in the QGP?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tannenbaum, M. J.

    2015-03-01

    . Thus an apparent hard scattering component for A+A multiplicity distributions based on a popular formula, dNAAch/dη = [(1 - x) langleNpartrangle dNppch/dη/2 + x langleNcollrangledNppch/dη], seems to be an unphysical way to understand the deviation from Npart scaling. Based on recent p-p and d+A measurements, a more physical way is presented along with several other stimulating results and ideas from recent d+Au (p+Pb) measurements.

  17. Monzonitoids as indicator of intrachamber fractionation exemplified by Nui Chua complex (Nothern Vietnam)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelepaev, R. A.; Polyakov, G. V.; Hung, T. Q.; Hoa, T. T.; Phuong, N. T.; Izokh, A. E.; Nien, B. A.

    2012-04-01

    A characteristic feature of various geodynamic settings is the presence genetically related basic, intermediate and acid intrusive rocks. Our investigations have focused on the study of intermediate and basic rocks with increased alkali content. These rocks are known as monzogabbro, monzonite, monzodiorite, mangerite or syenodiorite among the Precambrian anorthositic complexes, of the Caledonian fold structures (Siberia, Norway), among the intrusions associated with subduction zones, as well as in the intrusions associated with Permian and Triassic large igneous provinces (LIP), (Siberian and Emeyshan LIP). We focused on the study of complex Nui Chua (NC), which have the same age with the mafic magmatism associated with Emeyshan LIP. The structure of the N intrusion was traditionally determinate as lherzolite-wehrlite-troctolitic layered rocks, anorthosite-leicogabbronorit pegmatoid, mezogabbronorite, rocks of the marginal series. The small (up to 10 sq. km) intrusions consist of biotite gabbros, monzogabbro, monzogabbronorite and monzodiorite. These rocks are composed of the western part of the NC intrusion. The material composition of these intrusions has not been adequately studied. NC layered series is accompanied by sulphide PGE-Cu-Ni mineralization in rocks. Marginal rocks are accompanied by ilmenite mineralization (Kay Cham deposit in NE contact of the NC intrusion). Disseminated ilmenite is also observed in the rocks of the western part of the NC intrusion and Co Lam and Son Dau intrusions. To date, one of the questions about of the complex is the relationship between NC layered series rocks with monzodiorite of small intrusions. What is kind of this relationship: petrogenetic or they are two independent magmatic events? Thus, the petrographic data show the differences between the layered series of the NC intrusion and monzonitoids of satellite intrusions. However, mineralogical, petrochemical and geochemical data show that monzonitoids may be genetically

  18. Fractionation of highly siderophile and chalcogen elements during magma transport in the mantle: Constraints from pyroxenites of the Balmuccia peridotite massif

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zaicong; Becker, Harry

    2015-06-01

    Sulfide segregation from sulfur saturated basic magmas affects the compositions of chalcophile elements such as the highly siderophile elements (HSE) and the chalcogens S, Se, Te to variable extent. Whether this process predominantly occurs in the lower crust or in the mantle and how segregation of liquid sulfide and accumulation affects concentrations and ratios of these elements at different mantle depths and in presumed primitive basic magmas remains uncertain. Abundances of the HSE, S, Se and Te and Os isotopes in websterites and spinel clinopyroxenites of the Balmuccia peridotite massif (Ivrea-Verbano Zone, Italian Alps) provide new insight on sulfide segregation and the compositional change of melt and peridotite during magma transport in the mantle. Balmuccia websterites and clinopyroxenites formed from late Paleozoic and Mesozoic melt influx into stretched continental lithospheric mantle of the Ivrea-Verbano Zone, respectively. The HSE and chalcogen element compositions of websterites and clinopyroxenites reflect the segregation and accumulation of sulfide melt from S saturated silicate melts with different abundances and ratios of chalcogens and the HSE. The pyroxenites display large variations in abundances of the platinum group elements (PGE) and Te whereas abundances of less chalcophile elements S, Se and Re are much less variable. The fractionation between the PGE and fractionation of Re/Os, S/Se and Se/Te in the mantle pyroxenites are consistent with sulfide melt-silicate melt partitioning with a sequence of apparent coefficients of DPGE > DAu ⩾ DTe > DSe ⩾ DS ≈ DRe. Concentrations in ocean ridge basalts and in gabbros of the lower oceanic crust are also consistent with such fractionation. Websterites which have formed during refertilization of depleted peridotites display ratios of the HSE and moderately suprachondritic initial 187Os/188Os similar to interstitial sulfides of refertilized peridotites. These compositions are different from

  19. How do quarks and gluons lose energy in the QGP?

    DOE PAGES

    Tannenbaum, M. J.

    2015-03-10

    multiplicity or transverse energy production in p-p collisions–soft particles, with ρT < 2 GeV/c, predominate. Thus an apparent hard scattering component for A+A multiplicity distributions based on a popular formula, dNAAch/dη = [(1 - x) (Npart)dNppch/dη2 + x (NcolldNppch/dη], seems to be an unphysical way to understand the deviation from Npart scaling. Based on recent p-p and d+A measurements, a more physical way is presented along with several other stimulating results and ideas from recent d+Au (p+Pb) measurements.« less

  20. How do quarks and gluons lose energy in the QGP?

    SciTech Connect

    Tannenbaum, M. J.

    2015-03-10

    kT-effect. Another issue well known from experiments at the CERN ISR, SpS and SpS collider is that parton-parton hard-collisions make negligible contribution to multiplicity or transverse energy production in p-p collisions–soft particles, with ρT < 2 GeV/c, predominate. Thus an apparent hard scattering component for A+A multiplicity distributions based on a popular formula, dNAAch/dη = [(1 - x) (Npart)dNppch/dη2 + x (NcolldNppch/dη], seems to be an unphysical way to understand the deviation from Npart scaling. Based on recent p-p and d+A measurements, a more physical way is presented along with several other stimulating results and ideas from recent d+Au (p+Pb) measurements.

  1. Impacts of afforestation on groundwater resources and quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Alistair; Chapman, Deborah

    2001-07-01

    Plans to double the proportion of land under forest cover in Ireland by the year 2035 have been initiated. The plan, primarily financially driven, ignores potential environmental impacts of forestry, particularly impacts on groundwater resources and quality. Since groundwater supplies almost 25% of Ireland's total potable water, these impacts are important. Field investigations indicate that afforestation leads to a reduction in runoff by as much as 20%, mainly due to interception of rainfall by forest canopies. Clearfelling has the opposite impact. Implications are that uncoordinated forestry practices can potentially exacerbate flooding. Groundwater recharge is affected by forestry, largely due to greater uptake of soil water by trees and to increased water-holding capacity of forest soils, arising from higher organic contents. Recharge rates under forests can be reduced to one tenth that under grass or heathland. Groundwater quality may be affected by enhanced acidification and nitrification under forests, due partly to scavenging of atmospheric pollutants by forest canopies, and partly to greater deposition of highly acid leaf litter. The slower recharge rates of groundwater under forests lead to significant delays in manifestation of deterioration in groundwater quality. Résumé. Des plans sont à l'étude pour doubler la proportion du couvert forestier en Irlande d'ici à 2035. Le plan, primitivement déterminé sur une base financière, ignore les impacts environnementaux potentiels de la foresterie, et particulièrement les impacts sur les ressources en eau souterraine et leur qualité. Du fait que les eaux souterraines satisfont presque 25% du total de l'eau potable de l'Irlande, ces impacts sont importants. Les études de terrain montrent que le reboisement conduit à une réduction du ruissellement d'au moins 20%, principalement à cause d'une interception de la pluie par le couvert forestier. Les coupes ont un impact contraire. Les implications sont

  2. Groundwater flow and solute transport at the Mourquong saline-water disposal basin, Murray Basin, southeastern Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmons, Craig; Narayan, Kumar; Woods, Juliette; Herczeg, Andrew

    2002-03-01

    échargent naturellement. Le bassin de stockage est isolé hydrodynamiquement par des argiles lacustres de faible perméabilité, mais il existe des zones vulnérables au sud-est, là où les argiles sont apparemment absentes. L'importance des fuites verticales et latérales des saumures du bassin et les processus contrôlant leur migration ont été étudiés au moyen (1) d'analyses de chlorures et des isotopes stables de l'eau (2H/1H et 18O/16O) pour définir le mélange entre les eaux souterraines régionales et l'eau du lac, et (2) du code SUTRA d'écoulement souterrain et de transport de soluté d'eaux de densités variables. Les résultats hydrochimiques indiquent que l'eau de stockage évaporée s'est introduite d'au moins 100 m vers l'est et qu'il existe un écoulement négligeable de saumures vers le sud, en direction de la rivière Murray. Le modèle permet de considérer différents scénarios de gestion. L'écoulement des eaux salées vers la rivière Murray était le scénario le pire du fait de l'irrigation qui est appliquée entre le bassin de stockage et la rivière Murray. Les conditions actuelles de fonctionnement produisent un écoulement direct faible, sinon nul, des saumures du bassin vers la rivière. Resumen. Las aguas subterráneas salinas y los retornos de riego se almacenan habitualmente en unas 200 balsas naturales y artificiales de deshechos, situadas a lo largo de la Cuenca de los ríos Murray-Darling (Australia). Su impacto en los acuíferos y en el propio río Murray, que actúa como una de las fuentes principales de abastecimiento de agua en Australia, es un asunto preocupante. En uno de estos lugares, las aguas subterráneas salinizadas son bombeadas al lago Mourquong, que es un complejo natural de descarga del acuífero. La balsa de eliminación está revestida con arcillas lacustres de baja permeabilidad, pero hay áreas vulnerables hacia el sudeste, donde parece no haber arcilla. Se examina el alcance de la precolación vertical y lateral de las

  3. Présentation générale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volino, F.

    simulés, de façon quasi-parfaite, par le même modèle, en supposant que l'échantillon soit "en poudre", et avec des valeurs très faibles du paramètre d'ordre. Une phase isotrope de polymère nématique étant un polymère normal, on a alors testé le modèle avec un polymère conventionnel, et de la même façon, de très bonnes simulations ont été obtenues. L'incohérence logique associée à ces résultats vient du fait que la théorie des modes élastiques ne devrait plus être applicable. En effet, le point de départ de cette théorie est une fonctionnelle énergie libre du nématique distordu par les fluctuations thermiques, qui ne contient que le terme quadratique en gradient d'orientation des molécules par rapport au directeur moyen. La limitation à ce premier terme signifie que la description ne devrait être valable que pour des gradients faibles, donc des paramètres d'ordre élevés. On aboutit donc au paradoxe suivant : la théorie des modes élastiques des nématiques permet de décrire d'autant mieux les spectres RMN de polymères, nématiques ou non, que le paramètre d'ordre est faible, c'est-à-dire qu'elle sort de son domaine d'applicabilité présumé. La façon la plus simple d'expliquer cette situation paradoxale est de dire que si la théorie des modes élastiques marche très bien en toutes circonstances, c'est parce qu'elle est beaucoup plus générale que ne l'ont (implicitement) imaginé leurs auteurs. Mais pour que tout redevienne cohérent, il fallait changer la signification d'au moins un concept de base de la théorie. Il a été décidé de modifier la signification des constantes élastiques et des viscosités, telles qu'elles apparaissent au niveau des équations fondamentales de la théorie standard. En pratique, la modification qui a été faite a été de supposer que ces quantités ne sont pas les quantités macroscopiques, mais des quantités non mesurables, associées aux modes élastiques, dépendant du vecteur d