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Sample records for david smiles arthur

  1. Arthur Smith, Local Baptist Pastor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heaton, Moss, Ed.

    1985-01-01

    Written and published by the students at Gary High School this volume has three articles dealing with East Texas life. The first "Arthur Smith" (David Hancock and others) is an account of growing up in Marian County, Texas is described by the local Baptist minister. The pastor begins with the year of his birth and gives detailed…

  2. Smile: A review.

    PubMed

    Manjula, W S; Sukumar, M R; Kishorekumar, S; Gnanashanmugam, K; Mahalakshmi, K

    2015-04-01

    "Beauty is in the mind of the beholder, each mind perceives a different beauty" famously said by writer Margeret Wolfe Hungerford. A beautiful smile is a gateway to the world. The aim of this article was to identify the criteria for designing the perfect smile. It was determined, smile design is a multifactorial process and various steps are involved in designing a radiant smile.

  3. Third Annual David Derse Memorial Lecture and Award | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Anne Arthur, Guest Writer The Third Annual David Derse Memorial Lecture and Award presentation was held on Nov. 18 at NCI at Frederick to honor the outstanding research accomplishments of David Derse, Ph.D., and to stimulate the exchange of innovative ideas that Derse was well known for promoting throughout his scientific career.

  4. Hearing smiles and smile suppression in natural speech

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drahota, Amy K.; Reddy, Vasudevi

    2003-04-01

    That we can hear smiles in speech is an established finding. However smiles in natural speech can be of many different kinds, serving different social functions. Previous research has focused only on one category of smile using either smiles ``posed'' during speech or degraded samples of smiling speech (to disguise the content of utterances). The present study used naturally occurring speech in three foreign languages (Czech, Spanish, and Finnish) and in English, presented to naive native English speakers. Preliminary analyses extracted two kinds of smiles in speech-``open smiles'' and ``suppressed smiles'' in contrast to speech with ``no smiles.'' Eighty listeners were presented with 18 audio-clips (six of each type) in randomized order. ``No smiles'' and ``open smiles'' were successfully identified across all languages. ``Suppressed smiles'' were most often coded as ``no smiles.'' An exploration of the pitch contours showed that ``suppressed smiles'' had a higher average pitch similar to ``open smiles,'' but a significantly higher variance in pitch range than others. Natural speech produces smiles serving very different functions. The auditory expression and perceivability of emotion is likely to be influenced by subtle social functions only evident in natural interactions.

  5. NASA Sees Hurricane Arthur's Fireworks

    NASA Video Gallery

    On July 3, NASA's TRMM satellite passed over Arthur and saw intense bands of thunderstorms north of Arthur's well defined eye dropping rainfall at a rate of over 98.4 mm (3.9 inches) per hour. Thos...

  6. 10 commandments of smile esthetics

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Andre Wilson

    2014-01-01

    The search for esthetic treatment has persisted in the routine of dental professionals. Following this trend, dental patients have sought treatment with the primary aim of improving smile esthetics. The aim of this article is to present a protocol to assess patient's smile: The 10 Commandments of smile esthetics. PMID:25279532

  7. A photographic diary of travels with David Kupfer.

    PubMed

    Estabrook, Ronald W

    2006-01-01

    The present article focuses on David Kupfer as a colleague and fellow traveler who participated in numerous meetings on cytochrome P450 held at exotic venues. It was always a pleasure to renew a long-standing friendship with David by meeting him at these meetings. His inscrutable smile combined with residues of an accent derived from his earlier background in Poland and Israel characterized this warm and delightful man. A number of photos of David in various locales are presented with this article in an attempt to fully capture the outstanding qualities of this man.

  8. David Scott

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Dr. David R. Scott was appointed Director of NASA's Flight Research Center on April 18, 1975. From August 1973 he served as Deputy Director of FRC and was appointed acting director in January 1975. He is retired from the U.S. Air Force where he held the rank of Colonel. Dave left the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center on October 30, 1977 after the Center had been renamed in honor of Hugh L. Dryden. As a NASA astronaut, Scott flew on Gemini 8, Apollo 9 and was spacecraft commander of Apollo 15. When he left the astronaut corps in 1972, Scott was named Technical Assistant to the Apollo Program Manager at Johnson Space Center in Houston. Later he served as Special Assistant for Mission Operations and Government Funded Equipment. Dave earned a Bachelor of Science Degree from the United States Military Academy in 1954, standing fifth in a class of 633, and the degrees of Bachelor and Master of Science in Aeronautics and Astronautics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in 1962. He was awarded an Honorary Doctorate of Astronautical Science from the University of Michigan in 1971. Dave has graduated from the Air Force Experimental Test Pilot School and Aerospace Research Pilot School. He has over 5,600 hours flying time along with 20 hours of extra vehicular activity (EVA) time. Dr. Scott is a Fellow of the American Astronautical Society; Associate Fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics; a member of the Society of Experimental Test Pilots, Tau Beta Pi, Sigma Xi, and Sigma Gamma Tau. Among Dr. Scott's special honors are two NASA Distinguished Service Medals, the NASA Exceptional Service Medal, two Air Force Distinguished Service Medals, the Air Force Distinguished Flying Cross, the Air Force Association's David C. Schilling Trophy, and the Robert J. Collier Trophy for 1971.

  9. Second Annual David Derse Memorial Lecture and Award | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Anne Arthur, Guest Writer The Second Annual David Derse Memorial Lecture and Award presentation was held on November 12, 2013, at the NCI at Frederick Conference Center to honor David Derse’s outstanding research accomplishments and to stimulate the exchange of innovative ideas that Derse was well known for promoting throughout his scientific career. The Annual David Derse Memorial Lecture and Award is sponsored by the HIV Drug Resistance Program, with support from Hye Kyung Chung-Derse, Ph.D., the National Cancer Institute (NCI), the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and colleagues and friends of Derse who contributed to the memorial fund in his honor.

  10. Arthur: A Tale of Disempowerment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosow, La Vergne

    1989-01-01

    Recounts the case of Arthur, a neglected 9-year-old boy from an opulent home. Arthur's illiterate mother failed to provide him with books or a study area and refused to cooperate in a teacher-designed literacy program. Socioeconomic status can foster false assumptions about a child's home environment and its influence on literacy development.…

  11. Arthur: A Personalized Instructional System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, Juan E.; Han, C. Y.

    2002-01-01

    Examined whether there was a significant difference in learner outcomes from the use of Arthur (Gilbert & Han, 1999), a computer-based adaptive instructional system that provides personalized instruction to each learner. Found that Arthur does provide a significant difference in learner outcomes. (EV)

  12. Faces of Marshall: Arthur Brown

    NASA Video Gallery

    Several Marshall employees were interviewed as part of Marshall's 50th Anniversary activities. Metallurgist Arthur Brown shares how his high school drafting and welding success led him to a NASA ca...

  13. Lip asymmetry and smile aesthetics.

    PubMed

    Batwa, Waeil; McDonald, Fraser; Cash, Alex

    2013-11-01

    Objective : To determine if lip asymmetry can affect lip aesthetics. Setting and Participants : A group of dentists (n = 40) and cleft patients (n = 40) were recruited from the dental hospital and cleft service. Interventions : Still photographic digital images of lips and teeth were manipulated to produce a computerized gradient of smile appearance with different degrees of upper-lip vertical asymmetry. These five photographs (with 0 mm representing "symmetry," and 1, 2, 2.5, and 3 mm, asymmetries) were assessed by participants using a 5-point Likert scale. Statistics : Descriptive statistics in addition to chi-square test were used to analyze the data. In order to satisfy the requirement of the chi-square test, the five smile ratings were reduced to three. Results : Lip asymmetry did affect relative smile aesthetics, as determined by dentists and cleft patients. Both the dentists and cleft patients rated the 0-mm photograph more attractive than the 2.5-mm and 3-mm smiles (P < .05). The 0-, 1-, and 2-mm smiles were indistinguishable for both dentists and cleft patients. Conclusion : Lip asymmetry affects smile aesthetics. However, cleft patients and dentists were tolerant of minor asymmetries. This suggests that small degrees of lip asymmetry do not affect relative smile aesthetics as much as large degrees of lip asymmetry (2.5 mm or more).

  14. 33 CFR 117.702 - Arthur Kill.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Arthur Kill. 117.702 Section 117... OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.702 Arthur Kill. (a) The draw of the Arthur Kill (AK) Railroad Bridge shall be maintained in the full open position for navigation at all...

  15. 33 CFR 117.702 - Arthur Kill.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Arthur Kill. 117.702 Section 117... OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.702 Arthur Kill. (a) The draw of the Arthur Kill (AK) Railroad Bridge shall be maintained in the full open position for navigation at all...

  16. 33 CFR 117.702 - Arthur Kill.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Arthur Kill. 117.702 Section 117... OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.702 Arthur Kill. (a) The draw of the Arthur Kill (AK) Railroad Bridge shall be maintained in the full open position for navigation at all...

  17. 33 CFR 117.702 - Arthur Kill.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Arthur Kill. 117.702 Section 117... OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.702 Arthur Kill. (a) The draw of the Arthur Kill (AK) Railroad Bridge shall be maintained in the full open position for navigation at all...

  18. 33 CFR 117.702 - Arthur Kill.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Arthur Kill. 117.702 Section 117... OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.702 Arthur Kill. (a) The draw of the Arthur Kill (AK) Railroad Bridge shall be maintained in the full open position for navigation at all...

  19. Smiling virtual agent in social context.

    PubMed

    Ochs, Magalie; Niewiadomski, Radoslaw; Brunet, Paul; Pelachaud, Catherine

    2012-10-01

    A smile may communicate different communicative intentions depending on subtle characteristics of the facial expression. In this article, we propose an algorithm to determine the morphological and dynamic characteristics of virtual agent's smiles of amusement, politeness, and embarrassment. The algorithm has been defined based on a virtual agent's smiles corpus constructed by users and analyzed with a decision tree classification technique. An evaluation, in different contexts, of the resulting smiles has enabled us to validate the proposed algorithm.

  20. Operation Smile "Changing Lives, One Smile at a Time."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reclaiming Children and Youth, 2000

    2000-01-01

    Although many young people are concerned about acne and dieting, there are some children who retreat from social contact because of facial deformities that can be changed only through surgery. Operation Smile is an organization dedicated to giving young people suffering from physical disfigurement an opportunity to come out of hiding and become…

  1. [The smile line, a literature search].

    PubMed

    van der Geld, P A; van Waas, M A

    2003-09-01

    Beautiful teeth, visible when smiling, are in line with the present ideal of beauty. The display of teeth when smiling is determined by the smile line: the projection of the lower border of the upper lip on the maxillary teeth when smiling. On the basis of a literature search the determining methods of the smile line are discussed, demographic data of the position of the smile line are given, and factors of influence are examined. There is no unequivocal method for determining the position of the smile line. A rough distinction can be made between qualitative and (semi)-quantitative methods. The (semi)-quantitative methods have clear advantages for research purposes, but their reliability is unknown. It was demonstrated that among minimally 40% of subjects the maxillary gingiva was not visible when smiling. The mandibular gingiva was not visible when smiling among more than 90% of subjects. Furthermore, it appeared that among women the smile line was on average higher situated than among men and that it has not yet been proven that the smile line will be situated lower when growing older.

  2. Be Careful Where You Smile: Culture Shapes Judgments of Intelligence and Honesty of Smiling Individuals.

    PubMed

    Krys, Kuba; -Melanie Vauclair, C; Capaldi, Colin A; Lun, Vivian Miu-Chi; Bond, Michael Harris; Domínguez-Espinosa, Alejandra; Torres, Claudio; Lipp, Ottmar V; Manickam, L Sam S; Xing, Cai; Antalíková, Radka; Pavlopoulos, Vassilis; Teyssier, Julien; Hur, Taekyun; Hansen, Karolina; Szarota, Piotr; Ahmed, Ramadan A; Burtceva, Eleonora; Chkhaidze, Ana; Cenko, Enila; Denoux, Patrick; Fülöp, Márta; Hassan, Arif; Igbokwe, David O; Işık, İdil; Javangwe, Gwatirera; Malbran, María; Maricchiolo, Fridanna; Mikarsa, Hera; Miles, Lynden K; Nader, Martin; Park, Joonha; Rizwan, Muhammad; Salem, Radwa; Schwarz, Beate; Shah, Irfana; Sun, Chien-Ru; van Tilburg, Wijnand; Wagner, Wolfgang; Wise, Ryan; Yu, Angela Arriola

    Smiling individuals are usually perceived more favorably than non-smiling ones-they are judged as happier, more attractive, competent, and friendly. These seemingly clear and obvious consequences of smiling are assumed to be culturally universal, however most of the psychological research is carried out in WEIRD societies (Western, Educated, Industrialized, Rich, and Democratic) and the influence of culture on social perception of nonverbal behavior is still understudied. Here we show that a smiling individual may be judged as less intelligent than the same non-smiling individual in cultures low on the GLOBE's uncertainty avoidance dimension. Furthermore, we show that corruption at the societal level may undermine the prosocial perception of smiling-in societies with high corruption indicators, trust toward smiling individuals is reduced. This research fosters understanding of the cultural framework surrounding nonverbal communication processes and reveals that in some cultures smiling may lead to negative attributions.

  3. No smile like another: adult age differences in identifying emotions that accompany smiles

    PubMed Central

    Riediger, Michaela; Studtmann, Markus; Westphal, Andrea; Rauers, Antje; Weber, Hannelore

    2014-01-01

    People smile in various emotional contexts, for example, when they are amused or angry or simply being polite. We investigated whether younger and older adults differ in how well they are able to identify the emotional experiences accompanying smile expressions, and whether the age of the smiling person plays a role in this respect. With this aim, we produced 80 video episodes of three types of smile expressions: positive-affect smiles had been spontaneously displayed by target persons as they were watching amusing film clips and cartoons. Negative-affect smiles had been displayed spontaneously by target persons during an interaction in which they were being unfairly accused. Affectively neutral smiles were posed upon request. Differences in the accompanying emotional experiences were validated by target persons' self-reports. These smile videos served as experimental stimuli in two studies with younger and older adult participants. In Study 1, older participants were less likely to attribute positive emotions to smiles, and more likely to assume that a smile was posed. Furthermore, younger participants were more accurate than older adults at identifying emotional experiences accompanying smiles. In Study 2, both younger and older participants attributed positive emotions more frequently to smiles shown by older as compared to younger target persons, but older participants did so less frequently than younger participants. Again, younger participants were more accurate than older participants in identifying emotional experiences accompanying smiles, but this effect was attenuated for older target persons. Older participants could better identify the emotional state accompanying smiles shown by older than by younger target persons. Taken together, these findings indicate that there is an age-related decline in the ability to decipher the emotional meaning of smiles presented without context, which, however, is attenuated when the smiling person is also an older adult

  4. No smile like another: adult age differences in identifying emotions that accompany smiles.

    PubMed

    Riediger, Michaela; Studtmann, Markus; Westphal, Andrea; Rauers, Antje; Weber, Hannelore

    2014-01-01

    People smile in various emotional contexts, for example, when they are amused or angry or simply being polite. We investigated whether younger and older adults differ in how well they are able to identify the emotional experiences accompanying smile expressions, and whether the age of the smiling person plays a role in this respect. With this aim, we produced 80 video episodes of three types of smile expressions: positive-affect smiles had been spontaneously displayed by target persons as they were watching amusing film clips and cartoons. Negative-affect smiles had been displayed spontaneously by target persons during an interaction in which they were being unfairly accused. Affectively neutral smiles were posed upon request. Differences in the accompanying emotional experiences were validated by target persons' self-reports. These smile videos served as experimental stimuli in two studies with younger and older adult participants. In Study 1, older participants were less likely to attribute positive emotions to smiles, and more likely to assume that a smile was posed. Furthermore, younger participants were more accurate than older adults at identifying emotional experiences accompanying smiles. In Study 2, both younger and older participants attributed positive emotions more frequently to smiles shown by older as compared to younger target persons, but older participants did so less frequently than younger participants. Again, younger participants were more accurate than older participants in identifying emotional experiences accompanying smiles, but this effect was attenuated for older target persons. Older participants could better identify the emotional state accompanying smiles shown by older than by younger target persons. Taken together, these findings indicate that there is an age-related decline in the ability to decipher the emotional meaning of smiles presented without context, which, however, is attenuated when the smiling person is also an older adult.

  5. Smile rejuvenation: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Raghu, Ramya; Shetty, Ashish; Manjunath, Gautham P.; Roy, Chimaya Kumar Samanta; Puneetha, P. G.; Reddy, Satya Narayan

    2014-01-01

    Mesiodens is the commonly occurring supernumerary tooth seen between the maxillary central incisors which causes compromised aesthetics and malocclusion. Till date orthodontic therapy provides an excellent solution for the management of mesiodens. Recently, Restorative Space Management (RSM) has been used successfully to correct tooth shape, proportions and colour with minimal tooth preparations. This case report describes the successful management of an unaesthetic smile due to presence of a mesiodens in the midline primarily using aesthetic treatment only. PMID:25298657

  6. Obituary: David Stanley Evans, 1916-2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bash, Frank N.

    2005-12-01

    David Stanley Evans died on 14 November 2004 in Austin, Texas. He was a noted observational astronomer whose career was divided between South Africa and Texas. He also used the extensive historical collections at the University of Texas to write several books on the history of astronomy. He was born in Cardiff, Wales on 28 January 1916. David received his BA degree in mathematics in 1937 from Kings College, Cambridge. He became a PhD student at Cambridge Observatory in 1937, and was one of Sir Arthur Eddington's last surviving students. He received his PhD degree in 1941 with a dissertation entitled, "The Formation of the Balmer Series of Hydrogen in Stellar Atmospheres." He was a conscientious objector to war and, thus, spent the war years at Oxford working with physicist Kurt Mendelssohn on medical problems, involving cadavers, relating to the war. During these years, David was scientific editor of "Discovery", and he was editor of "The Observatory". David left England in 1946 in order to take up the position of Second Assistant at the Radcliffe Observatory, Pretoria, South Africa. He and H. Knox Shaw were the entire staff after R. O. Redman left, and they aluminized and installed the mirrors in the 74-inch telescope. His notable scientific contribution was to use lunar occultations to measure stellar angular diameters during the 1950s. He succeeded in determining the angular diameter of Antares and determined that Arcturus was not circular but had an elliptical shape. The elliptical shape was later shown to be an instrumental artifact, but the utility of using lunar occultations to measure stellar diameters and stellar multiplicity was conclusively demonstrated. T. Gold presented David's paper on lunar occultation angular diameters at the January 1953 meeting of the Royal Astronomical Society. For the rest of his life, David resented Gold's remarks, because he felt that he had been ridiculed. By 1953, David Evans was Chief Assistant at the Royal Observatory

  7. Rhythmical Alchemy: Village Drumming with Arthur Hull.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hillerson, Gary R.; Hull, Arthur

    As a step toward writing a master's thesis in psychology, the connection between rhythm circles and psychotherapeutic process was explored. Arthur Hull, who experienced and preached about the healing power of rhythm for many years, was interviewed. This article recorded the interview between Arthur and the researcher. The interviewer learned that…

  8. Arthur. What Works Clearinghouse Intervention Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2006

    2006-01-01

    "Arthur," a book-based educational television program designed for children ages 4-8, is popular among preschool and kindergarten students. The program is based on the storybooks, by Marc Brown, about Arthur, an 8-year-old aardvark. Each show is 30 minutes in length and includes two stories involving characters dealing with moral issues.…

  9. Interview with David Moore

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossman, Allan; Dietz, E. Jacquelin; Moor, David

    2013-01-01

    David Moore is Professor Emeritus of Statistics at Purdue University. He served as the first President of the International Association for Statistical Education (IASE) from 1993-1995 and as President of the American Statistical Association (ASA) in 1998. He is a Fellow of the ASA and of the IMS and was awarded the ASA's Founders Award in…

  10. David Gale: Restless Pioneer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Walter

    2006-01-01

    David Gale was one of the mathematicians responsible for the modern form of the theory of duality in linear programming and the associated proof of the minimax theorem in the theory of games. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and is Professor Emeritus of Mathematics and Operations Research at the University of California at…

  11. David Macaulay's Pyramid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frew, Andrew W.

    1997-01-01

    Integrating literature and mathematics can be meaningful using David Macaulay's "Pyramid." This article provides an annotated bibliography of picture books, fiction, folk tales, nonfiction, videotapes, audio books, and CD-ROMs for grades 1-12 to support a unit on Egypt. Describes related math activities; and highlights a catalog of…

  12. Recollections of David Marr.

    PubMed

    Nishihara, H K

    2012-01-01

    David Marr came to MIT's Artificial Intelligence (AI) Lab in the early 1970s and energized the study of vision at the intersection of computer science, psychology, and neuroscience. As one of his first graduate students, I had the privilege of getting to know him and working with him during that heady period of AI research.

  13. Band selection study for SMILES-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Makoto; Shiotani, Masato; Ochiai, Satoshi; Baron, Philippe; Manago, Naohiro; Nishibori, Toshiyuki; Mizuno, Akira; Ozeki, Hiroyuki; Uzawa, Yoshinori; Maezawa, Hiroyuki

    2016-07-01

    Submillimeter limb sounding is very useful technique to investigate Earth's middle atmosphere since it can measure both reactive minor species (ClO, BrO, HO¬2, etc) and stable species (O3, HCl, etc) at day/night conditions as already established by UARS/MLS, Odin/SMR, and Aura/MLS. Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-emission Sounder (SMILES) was the first instrument to use 4K cooled SIS (Superconductor-Insulator-Superconductor) detection system for the limb sounding of the atmosphere in the frequency regions 625 GHz (Bands A and B) and 650 GHz (Band C) [1]. It has demonstrated its very high sensitivity (System Temperature, Tsys ~250K) for measuring stratospheric and mesospheric species, O3, HCl, ClO, HO2, HOCl, BrO, and O3 isotopes from Oct. 12, 2009 to Apr. 21, 2010 [2-5]. Since SMILES operation has terminated after only 6 months operation due to failure of sub-mm local oscillator (and later 4K cooler system), there exist strong scientific demand to develop successor of SMILES, the SMILES-2, which has optimized and enhanced frequency coverage to observe: (a) BrO and HOCl without interferences of stronger emission lines, (b) N2O, H2O, NO2, and CH3Cl not covered by the SMILES frequency regions, and (c) O2 line to measure temperature. This paper discusses possible SMILES-2 band selection considering limited instrument resources (number of SIS mixers and sub-mm local oscillator) and scientific requirements. This paper describes current status of SMILES-2 band selection study; (1) known issues of SMILES observations, (2) SMILES-2 scientific requirements, (3) methods of band selection study, (4) temperature, horizontal wind speed, H2O sensitivity study, (5) BrO and HOCl line selection, and (6) current band selection and possible instrument design.

  14. SPECTRAL SMILE CORRECTION IN CRISM HYPERSPECTRAL IMAGES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceamanos, X.; Doute, S.

    2009-12-01

    The Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) is affected by a common artifact in "push-broom" sensors, the so-called "spectral smile". As a consequence, both central wavelength and spectral width of the spectral response vary along the across-track dimension, thus giving rise to a shifting and smoothing of spectra (see Fig. 1 (left)). In fact, both effects are greater for spectra on the edges, while they are minimum for data acquired by central detectors, the so-called "sweet spot". The prior artifacts become particularly critical for Martian observations which contain steep spectra such as CO2 ice-rich polar images. Fig. 1 (right) shows the horizontal brightness gradient which appears in every band corresponding to a steep portion of spectra. The correction of CRISM spectral smile is addressed using a two-step method which aims at modifying data sensibly in order to mimic the optimal CRISM response. First, all spectra, which are previously interpolated by cubic splines, are resampled to the "sweet spot" wavelengths in order to overcome the spectra shift. Secondly, the non-uniform spectral width is overcome by mimicking an increase of spectral resolution thanks to a spectral sharpening. In order to minimize noise, only bands particularly suffering from smile are selected. First, bands corresponding to the outliers of the Minimum Noise Transformation (MNF) eigenvector, which corresponds to the MNF band related to smile (MNF-smile), are selected. Then, a spectral neighborhood Θi, which takes into account the local spectral convexity or concavity, is defined for every selected band in order to maximize spectral shape preservation. The proposed sharpening technique takes into account both the instrument parameters and the observed spectra. First, every reflectance value belonging to a Θi is reevaluated by a sharpening which depends on a ratio of the spectral width of the current detector and the "sweet spot" one. Then, the optimal degree of

  15. David Keynes Hill.

    PubMed

    Huxley, Andrew

    2003-01-01

    David Hill followed his father, A.V. Hill FRS, into the study of muscular contraction. Using a wide range of experimental techniques, he made several important advances of which the most important was the discovery of the 'short-range elastic component', a phenomenon which implied that even in the resting state there was an interaction between the thick (myosin) and thin (actin) filaments. He also studied physical changes in nerve when stimulated.

  16. Robust smile detection using convolutional neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianco, Simone; Celona, Luigi; Schettini, Raimondo

    2016-11-01

    We present a fully automated approach for smile detection. Faces are detected using a multiview face detector and aligned and scaled using automatically detected eye locations. Then, we use a convolutional neural network (CNN) to determine whether it is a smiling face or not. To this end, we investigate different shallow CNN architectures that can be trained even when the amount of learning data is limited. We evaluate our complete processing pipeline on the largest publicly available image database for smile detection in an uncontrolled scenario. We investigate the robustness of the method to different kinds of geometric transformations (rotation, translation, and scaling) due to imprecise face localization, and to several kinds of distortions (compression, noise, and blur). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that this type of investigation has been performed for smile detection. Experimental results show that our proposal outperforms state-of-the-art methods on both high- and low-quality images.

  17. The value of genuine and polite smiles.

    PubMed

    Shore, Danielle M; Heerey, Erin A

    2011-02-01

    Humans show remarkable ability to adapt their social behavior to suit the changing requirements of their interactions. An interaction partner's social cues, particularly facial expressions, likely play an important role in motivating and reinforcing this behavioral adaptation. Over three studies, we test a key aspect of this idea. Specifically, we ask how the reinforcement value of facial expressions compares to that of nonsocial feedback and to what degree two frequently occurring expressions (genuine and polite smiles) differ in reinforcement value. Our findings show that social feedback is preferred over nonsocial feedback and that genuine smiles are preferred over polite smiles. Based on a logistic model of our data, we show that both monetary and social values of stimuli contribute significantly to participants' decisions. Indeed, participants were willing to sacrifice the chance of a monetary reward to receive a genuine smile and produced inflated estimates of the value of genuinely smiling faces. These findings suggest that genuine smiles, and potentially other social cues, may be useful social reinforcers and therefore important in the control of social behavior on a moment-to-moment basis during interaction.

  18. David Hartley's Newtonian neuropsychology.

    PubMed

    Smith, C U

    1987-04-01

    David Hartley's association psychology has been immensely influential. His vibrationist neurophysiology has, in contrast, been largely overlooked and forgotten. Hartley's vibration theory is examined. On the one hand it is shown how closely it is related to Sir Isaac Newton's mathematical physics and on the other how well it complements the association theory. The vibration theory, indeed, strongly influenced Hartley's associationist psychology and hence is of more than merely antiquarian interest. Although Hartley's understanding of the central nervous system has long been superseded, his general ideas prefigure some aspects of contemporary neurophysiology and philosophy of mind and thus provide a further reason for rescuing his vibrationism from oblivion.

  19. GOETHALS BRIDGE FROM NORTH SIDE OVER ARTHUR KILL. RAILROAD BRIDGE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    GOETHALS BRIDGE FROM NORTH SIDE OVER ARTHUR KILL. RAILROAD BRIDGE IN FOREGROUND - Goethals Bridge, Spanning Arthur Kill from New Jersey to Staten Island, Staten Island (subdivision), Richmond County, NY

  20. Obituary: Arthur Dodd Code (1923-2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marché, Jordan D., II

    2009-12-01

    Former AAS president Arthur Dodd Code, age 85, passed away at Meriter Hospital in Madison, Wisconsin on 11 March 2009, from complications involving a long-standing pulmonary condition. Code was born in Brooklyn, New York on 13 August 1923, as the only child of former Canadian businessman Lorne Arthur Code and Jesse (Dodd) Code. An experienced ham radio operator, he entered the University of Chicago in 1940, but then enlisted in the U.S. Navy (1943-45) and was later stationed as an instructor at the Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D.C. During the war, he gained extensive practical experience with the design and construction of technical equipment that served him well in years ahead. Concurrently, he took physics courses at George Washington University (some under the tutelage of George Gamow). In 1945, he was admitted to the graduate school of the University of Chicago, without having received his formal bachelor's degree. In 1950, he was awarded his Ph.D. for a theoretical study of radiative transfer in O- and B-type stars, directed by Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar. hired onto the faculty of the Department of Astronomy at the University of Wisconsin-Madison (1951-56). He then accepted a tenured appointment at the California Institute of Technology and the Mount Wilson and Palomar Observatories (1956-58). But following the launch of Sputnik, Code returned to Wisconsin in 1958 as full professor of astronomy, director of the Washburn Observatory, and department chairman so that he could more readily pursue his interest in space astronomy. That same year, he was chosen a member of the Space Science Board of the National Academy of Sciences (created during the International Geophysical Year) and shortly became one of five principal investigators of the original NASA Space Science Working Group. In a cogent 1960 essay, Code argued that astrophysical investigations, when conducted from beyond the Earth's atmosphere, "cannot fail to have a tremendous impact on the

  1. 78 FR 43063 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Arthur Kill, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-19

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Arthur Kill, NY AGENCY: Coast Guard... District, has issued a temporary deviation from the regulations governing the operation of the Arthur Kill AK Railroad Bridge across Arthur Kill, mile 11.6, between Staten Island, New York and Elizabeth,...

  2. The Unusual Evolution of Hurricane Arthur 2014

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Folmer, Michael; Line, William; Cangialosi, John; Halverson, Jeffery; Berndt, Emily; Sienkiewicz, Joseph; Goodman, Steve; Goldberg, Mitch

    2015-01-01

    Hurricane Arthur (2014) was an early season hurricane that had its roots in a convective complex in the Southern Plains of the U.S. As the complex moved into northern Texas, a Mesoscale Convective Vortex (MCV) formed and drifted towards the east of the southern U.S. for a few days before emerging over the southwest Atlantic near South Carolina. The MCV drifted south and slowly acquired tropical characteristics, eventually becoming a Category 2 hurricane that would affect much of eastern North Carolina prior to the 4th of July holiday weekend. Arthur continued up the coast, brushing portions of southeast New England and merged with an upper-level low, completing a full tropical to extratropical-transition in the process, producing damaging wind gusts in portions of the Canadian Maritimes. As part of the GOES-R and JPSS Satellite Proving Grounds, multiple proxy and operational products were available to analyze and forecast this complex evolution. The Storm Prediction Center had products available to monitor the initial severe thunderstorm aspect, while the National Hurricane Center and Ocean Prediction Center were able to monitor the tropical and extratropical transition of Arthur using various convective and red, green, blue (RGB) products that have been introduced in recent years. This paper will discuss Arthur's evolution through the eyes of the various Satellite Proving Ground demonstrations.

  3. Douglas MacArthur Upon Reflection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-04-01

    father’s funeral .14 Arthur II was a vigorous, bellicose, pugnacious, relentless and heroic military leader.15 According to General Enoch Crowder...the devil may care 1920s, Douglas didn’t understand the stock market, didn’t care for jazz and would not sample bathtub gin. The junior Mrs

  4. Arthur Ashe Jr. Sports Scholars Awards 2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elfman, Lois; Walker, Marlon A.

    2011-01-01

    "Diverse: Issues In Higher Education" established the Sports Scholars Awards to honor undergraduate students of color who have made achieving both academically and athletically a winning combination. Inspired by tennis legend Arthur Ashe Jr.'s commitment to education as well as his love for the game of tennis, "Diverse" invites every college and…

  5. Arthur Ashe Jr. Sports Scholars Awards 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elfman, Lois; Ford, William J.

    2010-01-01

    "Diverse: Issues In Higher Education" established the Sports Scholars Awards to honor undergraduate students of color who have made achieving both academically and athletically a winning combination. Inspired by tennis legend Arthur Ashe Jr.'s commitment to education as well as his love for the game of tennis, they invite every college and…

  6. 1997 Arthur Ashe Jr. Sport Scholars Awards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roach, Ronald

    1997-01-01

    Winners of the "Black Issues in Higher Education" Arthur Ashe Jr. 1997 athletes of the year, one male and one female, are profiled and Sport Scholars are listed for baseball, softball, basketball, fencing, archery, football, handball, soccer, field hockey, crew, swimming, gymnastics, tennis, squash, golf, volleyball, lacrosse, wrestling, water…

  7. Perceptual, Categorical, and Affective Processing of Ambiguous Smiling Facial Expressions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calvo, Manuel G.; Fernandez-Martin, Andres; Nummenmaa, Lauri

    2012-01-01

    Why is a face with a smile but non-happy eyes likely to be interpreted as happy? We used blended expressions in which a smiling mouth was incongruent with the eyes (e.g., angry eyes), as well as genuine expressions with congruent eyes and mouth (e.g., both happy or angry). Tasks involved detection of a smiling mouth (perceptual), categorization of…

  8. Smile makeover utilizing direct composite resin veneers.

    PubMed

    Koczarski, Michael

    2008-12-01

    Creating a beautiful smile is more than restoring a single tooth back to its proper form. One must take into account the entire aesthetic zone, along with the mechanics of restoring the teeth to proper form and function. To make this effort even more challenging, the clinician is in full control and completely accountable for making the direct composite resin restorations from which the smile is created. Patients usually won't critique the aesthetics of a posterior direct resin, but once we move into the visible smile (along with the fact that most cosmetic procedures are patient desire- and want-driven) we must be able to deliver what the patient expects. Preplanning the case and avoiding the "prep and pray" approach to the smile-design process is the cornerstone of success. Utilizing tools for the creation of the restorations, such as a preoperative wax-up and silicone putty matrix, help the clinician break the procedure down to individual restorations that when created in harmony with the pre-operative design or wax-up, will allow a final "smile design" to emerge with predictability without getting lost in the daunting task of creating the entire smile all at once. Proper use of ideal composite materials adds the final touch on creating realistic results that even the most discerning patients demand. Layering colors, utilizing differing opacities and translucencies within the restorative process, is a must. Having a "recipe" to follow simplifies the process and gives the clinician confidence that the final result will have that realistic look. All in all, the easiest way to handle a challenging case is to break it down into smaller and more manageable increments in order to ensure a predictable outcome.

  9. Towards a Universal SMILES representation - A standard method to generate canonical SMILES based on the InChI

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background There are two line notations of chemical structures that have established themselves in the field: the SMILES string and the InChI string. The InChI aims to provide a unique, or canonical, identifier for chemical structures, while SMILES strings are widely used for storage and interchange of chemical structures, but no standard exists to generate a canonical SMILES string. Results I describe how to use the InChI canonicalisation to derive a canonical SMILES string in a straightforward way, either incorporating the InChI normalisations (Inchified SMILES) or not (Universal SMILES). This is the first description of a method to generate canonical SMILES that takes stereochemistry into account. When tested on the 1.1 m compounds in the ChEMBL database, and a 1 m compound subset of the PubChem Substance database, no canonicalisation failures were found with Inchified SMILES. Using Universal SMILES, 99.79% of the ChEMBL database was canonicalised successfully and 99.77% of the PubChem subset. Conclusions The InChI canonicalisation algorithm can successfully be used as the basis for a common standard for canonical SMILES. While challenges remain – such as the development of a standard aromatic model for SMILES – the ability to create the same SMILES using different toolkits will mean that for the first time it will be possible to easily compare the chemical models used by different toolkits. PMID:22989151

  10. Laurance David Hall.

    PubMed

    Coxon, Bruce

    2011-01-01

    An account is given of the life, scientific contributions, and passing of Laurance David Hall (1938-2009), including his early history and education at the University of Bristol, UK, and the synthesis and NMR spectroscopy of carbohydrates and other natural products during ∼20 years of research and teaching at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada. Lists of graduate students, post-doctoral fellows, and sabbatical visitors are provided for this period. Following a generous endowment by Dr. Herchel Smith, Professor Hall built a new Department of Medicinal Chemistry at Cambridge University, UK, and greatly expanded his researches into the technology and applications of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and zero quantum NMR. MRI technology was applied both to medical problems such as the characterization of cartilage degeneration in knee joints, the measurement of ventricular function, lipid localization in animal models of atherosclerosis, paramagnetic metal complexes of polysaccharides as contrast agents, and studies of many other anatomical features, but also to several aspects of materials analysis, including food analyses, process control, and the elucidation of such physical phenomena as the flow of liquids through porous media, defects in concrete, and the visualization of fungal damage to wood. Professor Hall's many publications, patents, lectures, and honors and awards are described, and also his successful effort to keep the Asilomar facility in Pacific Grove, California as the alternating venue for the annual Experimental NMR Conference. Two memorial services for Professor Hall are remembered.

  11. Arthur L. Schmeltekopf Jr. (1932-2007)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Carleton J.

    2009-05-01

    Arthur Louis Schmeltekopf Jr. died of mesothelioma, a lung cancer associated with exposure to asbestos, at his home in Marshall, N. C., on 20 August 2007. He was born on 24 February 1932, in Kyle, Tex., to Arthur L. and Meta (Engelbrecht) Schmeltekopf and grew up nearby on the family farm. Art had an early interest in science. A dispute over the reactivity of alkali metals toward water led to an experiment at Kyle High School involving a chunk of sodium metal and a toilet in the boys' room. The resulting explosion shattered the toilet, creating a flood, multiple geysers and panic in the nearby girls' room, a displaced lid on the school’s septic tank, and an enduring school legend.

  12. Astronaut Gordon Cooper smiles for recovery crew

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    Astronaut L. Gordon Cooper Jr., has a smile for the recovery crew of the U.S.S. Kearsarge, after he is on board from a successful 22 orbit mission of the earth in his spacecraft 'Faith 7'. Cooper is still sitting in his capsule, with his helmet off.

  13. Arthur Cayley and the `Gruppen Pest'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinberger, P.

    2015-09-01

    The original contributions of Arthur Cayley to the Philosophical Magazine on group theory and his 'trees' are revisited and to some extend reinterpreted. Both topics were and are of enormous importance not only in physics (group theory, graph theory), but also in quite a few other disciplines as diverse as information technology or, for example, linguistics (trees, graph theory). In order to show that these two topics originally arose from interests in the theory of permutations also Cayley's 'Mousetrap' game is briefly mentioned.

  14. Memories of David Kirzhnits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolotovsky, B. M.

    2013-06-01

    In the mid-1950s, a new staff member appeared at the Theory Division of the Physical Institute of the Academy of Sciences (FIAN): David Abramovich Kirzhnits. A Moscow State University alumnus, after graduation he had been assigned to a large defense plant in the city of Gorky, where he had worked for several years as an engineer. He was "liberated" from there by Igor Evgenyevich Tamm, our department head, who managed to transfer him to FIAN. Igor Evgenyevich knew D. A. Kirzhnits - they had met in Moscow before Kirzhnits finished university. At that time Kirzhnits was performing thesis work with professor A. S. Kompaneyets as academic adviser. At his adviser's suggestion, D. Kirzhnits consulted with I. E. Tamm on questions pertaining to the thesis topic. I. E. Tamm took a great liking for the diploma student, and he even wanted to recruit D. A. Kirzhnits for the Theory Division immediately after graduation. But at that time (1949) this proved impossible for several reasons. First, D. Kirzhnits was, as they say, an "invalid of the fifth group" - a Jew - which during those years of violent struggle against cosmopolitanismb often proved an obstacle in looking for work. Second, during the years of mass repressions D. Kirzhnits' father had been arrested on treason charges (according to the charges, he had wanted to sell the Far East to Japan). After intensive investigation his father was released, but he lived only a little longer. Reports of this also could have impeded his acceptance. Third, Igor Evgenyevich didn't have enough weight in officials' eyes at that time and so was unable to overcome "first" and "second."...

  15. David Morrison on Lake Vostok

    NASA Video Gallery

    Dr. David Morrison discusses the implications of research possibilities at Lake Vostok, one of the largest subglacial lakes located over two miles beneath the ice in Antarctica. The lake has been c...

  16. The perception of smile attractiveness among Saudi population

    PubMed Central

    Mokhtar, Hadeel A; Abuljadayel, Layla W; Al-Ali, Reem M; Yousef, Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Parameters of dental beauty change across time for varying reasons. Thus, an understanding of the factors that help or harm the attractiveness of a smile is an important step in creating attractive smiles. This study aimed to identify factors that affect smile perception and attractiveness among the Saudi population. A cross-sectional study was conducted among the Saudi population. Questionnaires were distributed to 130 dentists and final-year dental students, and to 130 laypersons. The questionnaire contained six smile photographs created by Photoshop® software. There was a statistically significant difference in scale ratings, based on participant background, for the “gummy” smile picture (P-value =0.003), diastema picture (P-value =0.000) and the “Reverse” smile picture (P-value =0.004). As for sex, males significantly underscored the gummy picture (P-value =0.009). Older people accepted the gummy smile less than did younger people, but diastema was considered as one of the variations that spoiled the attractiveness of the smile. “Dental background” participants significantly identified the ideal smile better than the “nondental” group. The perception of diastema as a sign of beauty among Saudi population in the past has definitely changed, according to the results of our study, where diastema and reverse smile received the lowest score in this survey. PMID:25653558

  17. Perception of adults' smile esthetics among orthodontists, clinicians and laypeople

    PubMed Central

    Cotrim, Enio Ribeiro; Vasconcelos, Átila Valadares; Haddad, Ana Cristina Soares Santos; Reis, Sílvia Augusta Braga

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Smile esthetics has become a major concern among patients and orthodontists. Therefore, the aim of this study was: (1) To highlight differences in perception of smile esthetics by clinicians, orthodontists and laypeople; (2) To assess factors such as lip thickness, smile height, color gradation, tooth size and crowding, and which are associated with smile unpleasantness. METHODS: To this end, edited photographs emphasizing the lower third of the face of 41 subjects were assessed by three groups (orthodontists, laypeople and clinicians) who graded the smiles from 1 to 9, highlighting the markers that evince smile unpleasantness. Kruskall-Wallis test supplemented by Bonferroni test was used to assess differences among groups. Additionally, the prevailing factors in smile unpleasantness were also described. RESULTS: There was no significant difference (P = 0.67) among groups rates. However, the groups highlighted different characteristics associated with smile unpleasantness. Orthodontists emphasized little gingival display, whereas laypeople emphasized disproportionate teeth and clinicians emphasized yellow teeth. CONCLUSION: Orthodontists, laypeople and clinicians similarly assess smile esthetics; however, noticing different characteristics. Thus, the orthodontist must be careful not to impose his own perception of smile esthetics. PMID:25741823

  18. Smiling in Pain: Explorations of Its Social Motives

    PubMed Central

    Prkachin, Kenneth; Lautenbacher, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Studies of facial responses during experimental and clinical pain have revealed a surprising phenomenon, namely, that a considerable number of individuals respond with a smile. So far, it is not known why smiling occurs during pain. It is possible that the “smile of pain” is socially motivated (e.g., reinforcing social bonds while undergoing an unpleasant experience). The present studies were conducted in an attempt to address the role of social motives in smiling during pain. In two studies, we varied the quantitative (level of sociality) and qualitative (properties of the relationship between interactants) components of the situations in which participants received painful stimulation. Participants' faces were video-recorded and the occurrence of smiling was assessed. The occurrence of smiling differed depending on stimulus intensity and the properties of the relationship between interactants. Smiling occurred more often during the painful compared to nonpainful stimulation. Whereas the presence of a stranger (experimenter) reduced the smiling behavior, the presence of an intimate other increased it. Slight variations in the level of sociality, however, had no effect on the degree of smiling. Social motives possibly aimed at strengthening social bonds and thus ensuring social support appear to underlie smiling during pain. PMID:24236233

  19. STS-57 PLC G. David Low, in LES, listens to egress briefing at JSC's MAIL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    STS-57 Endeavour, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 105, Payload Commander (PLC) and Mission Specialist (MS) G. David Low, wearing launch and entry suit (LES), smiles for the photographer during an emergency egress briefing. Low, along with the other STS-57 crewmembers, will participate in an emergency egress simulation in JSC's Crew Compartment Trainer (CCT) to familiarize himself with the procedures necessary in the event of an emergency during launch or landing aboard the space shuttle. The CCT is located in JSC's Mockup and Integration Laboratory (MAIL) Bldg 9NE.

  20. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer October, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer October, 1934 (a) PROVINCE HOUSE STEPS FROM WEST - Wrought Iron Archway & Steps, Province & Bosworth Streets, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  1. 10. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. 1935 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. 1935 (j) Int- (so- called) Slaves' Pew, East Gallery. - Chestnut Hill Meetinghouse, Chestnut Street, Millville, Worcester County, MA

  2. 6. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. 1935. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. 1935. (f) Int-General view looking north toward pulpit. - Chestnut Hill Meetinghouse, Chestnut Street, Millville, Worcester County, MA

  3. 5. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. 1935. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. 1935. (e) Ext- Detail, main entrance, west front. - Chestnut Hill Meetinghouse, Chestnut Street, Millville, Worcester County, MA

  4. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer April, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer April, 1934 (b) LIGHTHOUSE AND KEEPER'S COTTAGE FROM SOUTHWEST - Lighthouse, Cedar Point Scituate Harbor, Scituate, Plymouth County, MA

  5. 11. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. 1935 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. 1935 (g) Ext- general view, gateway entrance and fence. - Timothy Jackson House, 527 Washington Street, Newton, Middlesex County, MA

  6. Smiling in a job interview: when less is more.

    PubMed

    Ruben, Mollie A; Hall, Judith A; Schmid Mast, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    Two studies examined the effect of applicants' smiling on hireability. In a pre-test study, participants were asked to rate the expected behavior for four types of applicants. Newspaper reporter applicants were expected to be more serious than applicants for other jobs. In Study 1, participants were randomly assigned to be an applicant or interviewer for a newspaper reporting job. Smiling was negatively related to hiring, and smiling mediated the relation between applicants' motivation to make a good impression and hiring. Hiring was maximized when applicants smiled less in the middle of the interview relative to the start and end. In Study 2, participants watched Study 1 clips and were randomly assigned to believe the applicants were applying to one of four jobs. Participants rated more suitability when applicants smiled less, especially for jobs associated with a serious demeanor. This research shows that job type is an important moderator of the impact of smiling on hiring.

  7. Rhinoplasty and the aesthetic of the smile.

    PubMed

    de Benito, J; Fernandez Sanza, I

    1995-01-01

    The resection of the columella and nasal depressor muscles is a simple operation to perform and one which allows an improvement in the facial physiognomy of many patients. This operation can be done alone or in conjunction with the classic rhinoplasty, thus achieving an improvement in the aesthetics of the smile. It has also been proved, contrary to common belief, that the action of these muscles has no connection with physiological breathing mechanisms.

  8. Estimating smile intensity: A better way

    PubMed Central

    Girard, Jeffrey M.; Cohn, Jeffrey F.; De la Torre, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Both the occurrence and intensity of facial expressions are critical to what the face reveals. While much progress has been made towards the automatic detection of facial expression occurrence, controversy exists about how to estimate expression intensity. The most straight-forward approach is to train multiclass or regression models using intensity ground truth. However, collecting intensity ground truth is even more time consuming and expensive than collecting binary ground truth. As a shortcut, some researchers have proposed using the decision values of binary-trained maximum margin classifiers as a proxy for expression intensity. We provide empirical evidence that this heuristic is flawed in practice as well as in theory. Unfortunately, there are no shortcuts when it comes to estimating smile intensity: researchers must take the time to collect and train on intensity ground truth. However, if they do so, high reliability with expert human coders can be achieved. Intensity-trained multiclass and regression models outperformed binary-trained classifier decision values on smile intensity estimation across multiple databases and methods for feature extraction and dimensionality reduction. Multiclass models even outperformed binary–trained classifiers on smile occurrence detection. PMID:26461205

  9. The Components of Smile Design: New York University Smile Evaluation Form Revisited, Update 2015.

    PubMed

    Calamia, John R; Wolff, Mark S

    2015-07-01

    This article updates a simple checklist of foundational knowledge in aesthetic dental concepts that allows clinicians to organize their thoughts, to record the concerns of the patient, and to map out those improvements that must be addressed. This adjunct is called a Smile Evaluation Form. Along with other adjuncts such as radiographs, study casts, and diagnostic wax-ups, the Smile Evaluation Form allows clinicians to form a conceptual visualization of the expected end point. It provides a checklist for discussions with other disciplines in the team, to provide a logical sequence of treatment with a mutually agreed-on end point.

  10. Additive SMILES-based optimal descriptors in QSAR modelling bee toxicity: Using rare SMILES attributes to define the applicability domain.

    PubMed

    Toropov, A A; Benfenati, E

    2008-05-01

    The additive SMILES-based optimal descriptors have been used for modelling the bee toxicity. The influence of relative prevalence of the SMILES attributes in a training and test sets to the models for bee toxicity has been analysed. Avoiding the use of rare attributes improves statistical characteristics of the model on the external test set. The possibility of using the probability of the presence of SMILES attributes in training and test sets for rational definition of the applicability domain is discussed.

  11. David Hume on Competent Judges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eaton, Marcia Muelder

    2004-01-01

    This essay is the eighth in an occasional series on past treatments of major issues in arts education policy from antiquity through the twentieth century. The essay on which it is based, David Hume's "Of the Standard of Taste," originally published in 1757, is too extensive to be reprinted here, but it is easily accessible in the public…

  12. A Reply from David Elkind.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elkind, David

    1989-01-01

    Replying to Robert H. Anderson's article in the same "Principal" issue, David Elkind defends his article against classroom rotation. Elkind strongly favors multiage grouping and team teaching, but views the real issue as departmentalization and rotation versus self-contained classrooms. Although multiage grouping and team teaching are…

  13. The SMile Card: a computerised data card for multiple sclerosis patients. SMile Card Scientific Board.

    PubMed

    Mancardi, G L; Uccelli, M M; Sonnati, M; Comi, G; Milanese, C; De Vincentiis, A; Battaglia, M A

    2000-04-01

    The SMile Card was developed as a means for computerising clinical information for the purpose of transferability, accessibility, standardisation and compilation of a national database of demographic and clinical information about multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. In many European countries, centres for MS are organised independently from one another making collaboration, consultation and patient referral complicated. Only the more highly advanced clinical centres, generally located in large urban areas, have had the possibility to utilise technical possibilities for improving the organisation of patient clinical and research information, although independently from other centres. The information system, developed utilising the Visual Basic language for Microsoft Windows 95, stores information via a 'smart card' in a database which is initiated and updated utilising a microprocessor, located at each neurological clinic. The SMile Card, currently being tested in Italy, permits patients to carry with them all relevant medical information without limitations. Neurologists are able to access and update, via the microprocessor, the patient's entire medical history and MS-related information, including the complete neurological examination and laboratory test results. The SMile Card provides MS patients and neurologists with a complete computerised archive of clinical information which is accessible throughout the country. In addition, data from the SMile Card system can be exported to other database programs.

  14. Infant Smiling during Social Interaction: Arousal Modulation or Activation Indicator?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ewy, Richard

    In a study of infant smiling, 20 mother-infant dyads were videotaped in normal face-to-face interaction when the infants were 9 and 14 weeks of age. Videotapes were used to determine which of two classes of smiling behavior models, either arousal modulation or activation indicator, was most supported by empirical data. Arousal modulation models…

  15. The Development of Laughing and Smiling in Nursery School Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bainum, Charlene K.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    A total of 86 children three, four, and five years of age were observed to evaluate the frequency of occurrence and conditions surrounding laughing and smiling. Results were interpreted as supporting interpersonal theories of laughing and smiling and as calling into question theories stressing intrapersonal factors. (Author/RH)

  16. SMILE--Science and Mathematics Investigative Learning Experiences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orzech, Miriam W.; Borden, Sue

    Oregon State University (OSU) designed and implemented the Science and Mathematics Investigative Learning Experiences Program (SMILE) to encourage minority students to pursue careers in science and engineering. SMILE offers an after-school enrichment program for middle-school Hispanic and Native American students in eight rural Oregon communities.…

  17. Children's and Adolescents' Perception of the Authenticity of Smiles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thibault, Pascal; Gosselin, Pierre; Brunel, Marie-Lise; Hess, Ursula

    2009-01-01

    Recently, Thibault and colleagues described the Duchenne marker as a cultural dialect for the perception of smile authenticity. The current study had the goal to follow up on this finding and to investigate the cues that French Canadian children use to evaluate the authenticity of smiles from members of three ethnic groups. The authenticity of six…

  18. Study on imaging spectrometer with smile and keystone eliminated

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaolong; Yu, Kun; Zhang, Jun

    2017-03-01

    The formulas of image height in two-dimensional field about Gaussian and tilted imaging system of grating-based imaging spectrometer instrument (GISI) are deduced firstly, and the determined expressions of smile and keystone of GISI are obtained. It is proposed to correct the smile with off-axis lens, and the elimination effect of the smile is studied by means of spatial ray tracing. By controlling the degree of off-axis and the distribution of focal power of the off-axis lens, the long-wave infrared imaging spectrometer with well-eliminated smile and keystone is designed. The maximum of smile and keystone at working wavelengths in all fields of view are less than 8.57 μm and 13.33 μm, respectively.

  19. Children's Ability to Distinguish between Enjoyment and Non-Enjoyment Smiles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gosselin, Pierre; Perron, Melanie; Maassarani, Reem

    2010-01-01

    Children's ability to distinguish between enjoyment and non-enjoyment smiles was investigated by presenting participants with short video excerpts of smiles. Enjoyment smiles differed from non-enjoyment smiles by greater symmetry and by appearance changes produced in the eye region by the Cheek Raiser action. The results indicate that 6- and…

  20. From the Infant's Smile to Mastery of Anxiety: The Developmental Role of Humor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Jacob

    The smiles and laughter of an infant form the beginning of the developmental process of interpersonal interaction and socialization. The earliest smiles are automatic expressions of internal states, but soon infants' smiles are communications of pleasure. The developmental changes in smiling and laughing in early infancy reflect the rapidity with…

  1. The Growing Brilliance of Brady's Smile: Doing Big Things for Little Ones in Need

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Amy Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    Smiles can do so much for an individual, regardless if a person is the giver or the receiver. When someone smiles at a person, they perceptibly see or feel something they like about that person, and that makes him or her feel special. The person smiling obviously has some joy they wish to share, and it is apparent in their smile. Little Brady…

  2. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. April ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. April 1934. (b) Ext- Detail doorway, east side of house. - Reverend Roger Newton House, Newton Place (moved from original location), Greenfield, Franklin County, MA

  3. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. April ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. April 1934. (A) Ext. General view from Southeast. - Reverend Roger Newton House, Newton Place (moved from original location), Greenfield, Franklin County, MA

  4. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. 1935. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. 1935. From snapshot made by a Survey employee. (a) Ext- General front view from southeast. - Lucy Gray House, Indian Hill Road, North Tisbury, Dukes County, MA

  5. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. 1937 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. 1937 (From snapshot made by Survey Employee.) (a) Ext- General view from Southeast. - Pollard Tavern, Great Road, Bedford, Middlesex County, MA

  6. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. 1935. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. 1935. From snapshot made by a Survey employee. (b) Ext- General view rear, looking from north. - Lucy Gray House, Indian Hill Road, North Tisbury, Dukes County, MA

  7. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. 1935. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. 1935. From snapshot made by a Survey employee. (c) Ext-Detail entrance on south. - Lucy Gray House, Indian Hill Road, North Tisbury, Dukes County, MA

  8. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. 1937 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. 1937 (From snapshot made by Survey employee.) (b) Ext- Main building, south end. - Pollard Tavern, Great Road, Bedford, Middlesex County, MA

  9. 12. Historic American Buildings Survey Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer Apr. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Historic American Buildings Survey Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer Apr. 1, 1939 (l) INT.- STAIRWAY, 4th FLOOR, LOOKING SOUTH - M.I.T., Rogers Building, 491 Boylston Street, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  10. 4. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur W. Stewart, Photographer November ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur W. Stewart, Photographer November 27, 1936 SOUTHWEST ELEVATION OF SECOND FLOOR FIREPLACE. - Judge Sebron G. Sneed House, Route I-35 & Bluff Springs Road, Austin, Travis County, TX

  11. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur W. Stewart, Photographer November ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur W. Stewart, Photographer November 27, 1936 SOUTH ELEVATION (FRONT). - Judge Sebron G. Sneed House, Route I-35 & Bluff Springs Road, Austin, Travis County, TX

  12. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur W. Stewart, Photographer November ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur W. Stewart, Photographer November 27, 1936 SOUTHWEST ELEVATION (SOUTH FRONT AND WEST SIDE). - Judge Sebron G. Sneed House, Route I-35 & Bluff Springs Road, Austin, Travis County, TX

  13. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer September, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer September, 1934 (a) GENERAL VIEW FROM SOUTHEAST - St. Augustine Chapel, St. Augustine Cemetery, Dorchester Street, South Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  14. 8. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. 1935. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. 1935. (h) Int-Detail Gallery Stairs, S.E. Corner. - Chestnut Hill Meetinghouse, Chestnut Street, Millville, Worcester County, MA

  15. 9. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. 1935. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. 1935. (i) Int-Looking down on pulpit and first floor from west gallery. - Chestnut Hill Meetinghouse, Chestnut Street, Millville, Worcester County, MA

  16. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer (c) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer (c) EXT.-MAPLE MEADOW BROOK AQUEDUCT, WILMINGTON, LOOKING NORTHEAST - Middlesex Canal, Maple Meadow Brook Aqueduct, Wilmington, Middlesex County, MA

  17. 16. Historic American Buildings Survey Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer May ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. Historic American Buildings Survey Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer May 29, 1939 (r) INT.- MANTEL & MIRROR, SOUTHEAST ROOM, 1st. FLOOR - Cook-Oliver House, 142 Federal Street, Salem, Essex County, MA

  18. 7. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. April, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. April, 1934. (d) Portion of old machinery now lying beside track. - Granite Railway, Pine Hill Quarry to Neponset River, Quincy, Norfolk County, MA

  19. 9. Historic American Buildings Survey Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer Oct. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Historic American Buildings Survey Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer Oct. 28, 1935 (i) INT.- WALL STENCILLING, REAR ROOM, 2nd. FLOOR - Peter Jayne House, 37 Mugford Street, Marblehead, Essex County, MA

  20. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur W. Stewart, Photographer April ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur W. Stewart, Photographer April 24, 1936 EAST ELEVATION (FRONT). - O'Henry House, Lone Star Brewery, 600 Lone Star Boulevard, San Antonio, Bexar County, TX

  1. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. 1935. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. 1935. (c) Int- Mantel detail (sitting) room SE corner, first floor - Fearing-Warr House, 14 Elm Street, Wareham, Plymouth County, MA

  2. 12. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur W. Stewart, Photographer, September ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur W. Stewart, Photographer, September 23, 1936 DETAIL OF TOWER (EAST ELEVATION). - Mission San Jose y San Miguel de Aguayo, Mission Road, San Antonio, Bexar County, TX

  3. Arthur Miller Wins a Peace Prize: Teaching, Literature, and Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kopald, Meredith

    1992-01-01

    Describes how a high school student was able to express powerful feelings and achieve some kind of reconciliation with his father through his therapeutic exploration of Arthur Miller's play "Death of a Salesman." (PRA)

  4. Neuro syphilis: Portrayals by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.

    PubMed

    Somasundaram, O

    2009-01-01

    The developments in neuro syphilis in the 19 th century are integral parts of the history of psychiatry. The delineation of various aspects of neuro syphilis by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle in three of his stories is discussed in brief.

  5. 9. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. 1935 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. 1935 (k) Int-Mantel detail, Dining (S.E. Corner) Room, First Floor. - Timothy Jackson House, 527 Washington Street, Newton, Middlesex County, MA

  6. 10. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. 1935. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. 1935. (l) Int-Mantel Detail, Bedroom (S.E. Corner) Second Floor. - Timothy Jackson House, 527 Washington Street, Newton, Middlesex County, MA

  7. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. 1935 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. 1935 (c) Ext- General view of House and Ell from Southeast. - Timothy Jackson House, 527 Washington Street, Newton, Middlesex County, MA

  8. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. 1935 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. 1935 (b) Ext- General view of main house from southeast. - Timothy Jackson House, 527 Washington Street, Newton, Middlesex County, MA

  9. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur W. Stewart, Photographer March ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur W. Stewart, Photographer March 24, 1936 SOUTHWEST ELEVATION (SOUTH SIDE AND WEST END). - St. Mark's Episcopal Church, 307 East Pecan Street, San Antonio, Bexar County, TX

  10. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur W. Stewart, Photographer March ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur W. Stewart, Photographer March 16, 1936 EAST ELEVATION (ALTAR END AND BELL TOWER). - St. Mark's Episcopal Church, 307 East Pecan Street, San Antonio, Bexar County, TX

  11. 4. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur W. Stewart, Photographer March ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur W. Stewart, Photographer March 24, 1936 DETAIL WEST END AND SOUTH SIDE (SOUTHWEST ELEVATION). - St. Mark's Episcopal Church, 307 East Pecan Street, San Antonio, Bexar County, TX

  12. 8. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. April, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. April, 1934. (e) Portion of old quarry wagon at head of incline. - Granite Railway, Pine Hill Quarry to Neponset River, Quincy, Norfolk County, MA

  13. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. April, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. April, 1934. (a) General view of incline to Quarry from Northwest. - Granite Railway, Pine Hill Quarry to Neponset River, Quincy, Norfolk County, MA

  14. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. April, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. April, 1934. (c) Detail of track and set pulleys on quarry incline. - Granite Railway, Pine Hill Quarry to Neponset River, Quincy, Norfolk County, MA

  15. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. April, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. April, 1934. (b) Detail of old railroad part way up incline to quarry. - Granite Railway, Pine Hill Quarry to Neponset River, Quincy, Norfolk County, MA

  16. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer Dec. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer Dec. 29, 1936 (i) EXT.- 32, 34 JACKSON STREET, looking NORTHWEST - Mill Houses, 32 & 34 Jackson Street, Middleboro, Plymouth County, MA

  17. 5. Historic American Buildings Survey Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer Nov. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Historic American Buildings Survey Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer Nov. 5, 1938 (e) INT.- EAST WALL & FIREPLACE, DINING ROOM - Reverend Pitt Clark House, Mansfield Avenue, Norton, Bristol County, MA

  18. 6. Historic American Buildings Survey Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer Nov. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Historic American Buildings Survey Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer Nov. 5, 1938 (f) INT.- EAST WALL & FIREPLACE, BACK KITCHEN - Reverend Pitt Clark House, Mansfield Avenue, Norton, Bristol County, MA

  19. 8. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur W. Stewart, Photographer June ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur W. Stewart, Photographer June 26, 1936 GENERAL VIEW AFTER 1919 STORM (SOUTHWEST ELEVATION). - Conrad Meuly House & Store, 210 Chaparral Street, Corpus Christi, Nueces County, TX

  20. 7. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur W. Stewart, Photographer June ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur W. Stewart, Photographer June 26, 1936 GENERAL VIEW PRIOR TO 1919 STORM (EAST ELEVATION). - Conrad Meuly House & Store, 210 Chaparral Street, Corpus Christi, Nueces County, TX

  1. 6. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer; COPY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer; COPY OF VIEW BELONGING RO MR. FAXON, OF QUINCY. (f) Ext- Photo of full size model of old car. - Granite Railway, Pine Hill Quarry to Neponset River, Quincy, Norfolk County, MA

  2. 6. Historic American Buildings Survey Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer August, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Historic American Buildings Survey Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer August, 1934 (f) Int- Mantel in southwest room first floor - Colonel Josiah Quincy House, 20 Muirhead Street, Quincy, Norfolk County, MA

  3. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer August, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer August, 1934 (c) Ext- Detail old seat on entrance porch - Colonel Josiah Quincy House, 20 Muirhead Street, Quincy, Norfolk County, MA

  4. 8. Historic American Buildings Survey Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer August, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Historic American Buildings Survey Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer August, 1934 (h) Int- Mantel in southwest room second floor - Colonel Josiah Quincy House, 20 Muirhead Street, Quincy, Norfolk County, MA

  5. 7. Historic American Buildings Survey Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer August, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Historic American Buildings Survey Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer August, 1934 (g) Int- Mantel in northeast room first floor - Colonel Josiah Quincy House, 20 Muirhead Street, Quincy, Norfolk County, MA

  6. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer August, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer August, 1934 (b) Ext- Detail entrance porch from southwest - Colonel Josiah Quincy House, 20 Muirhead Street, Quincy, Norfolk County, MA

  7. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. 1935 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. 1935 (a) Model of Old Windmill and Vats found in Atwood House, W. Chatham, Mass. - Enoch Harding Salt Works, Buck's Creek, West Chatham, Barnstable County, MA

  8. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. 1938 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. 1938 (c) Int- Shoe Shop looking toward East End - Henry Wilson Shoe Shop, West Central & Mill Streets, Natick, Middlesex County, MA

  9. Leaders’ Smiles Reflect Cultural Differences in Ideal Affect

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Jeanne L.; Ang, Jen Ying Zhen; Blevins, Elizabeth; Goernandt, Julia; Fung, Helene H.; Jiang, Da; Elliott, Julian; Kölzer, Anna; Uchida, Yukiko; Lee, Yi-Chen; Lin, Yicheng; Zhang, Xiulan; Govindama, Yolande; Haddouk, Lise

    2015-01-01

    Cultures differ in the emotions they teach their members to value (“ideal affect”). We conducted three studies to examine whether leaders’ smiles reflect these cultural differences in ideal affect. In Study 1, we compared the smiles of top ranked American and Chinese government leaders, chief-executive-officers (CEOs), and university presidents in their official photos. Consistent with findings that Americans value excitement and other high arousal positive states more than Chinese, American top ranked leaders (N = 98) showed more excited smiles than Chinese top ranked leaders (N = 91) across occupations. In Study 2, we compared the smiles of winning vs. losing political candidates and higher vs. lower ranking CEOs and university presidents in the US and Taiwan/China. American leaders (N = 223) showed more excited smiles than Taiwanese/Chinese leaders (N =266), regardless of election outcome or ranking. In Study 3, we administered self-report measures of ideal affect in college student samples from 10 different nations (N = 1,267) and then eight years later, coded the smiles that legislators from those nations showed in their official photos (N = 3,372). The more nations valued excitement and other high arousal positive states, the more their leaders showed excited smiles; similarly, the more nations valued calm and other low arousal positive states, the more their leaders showed calm smiles. These results held after controlling for national differences in GDP per capita, democratization, and human development. Together, these findings suggest that leaders’ smiles reflect the affective states valued by their cultures. PMID:26751631

  10. Leaders' smiles reflect cultural differences in ideal affect.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Jeanne L; Ang, Jen Ying Zhen; Blevins, Elizabeth; Goernandt, Julia; Fung, Helene H; Jiang, Da; Elliott, Julian; Kölzer, Anna; Uchida, Yukiko; Lee, Yi-Chen; Lin, Yicheng; Zhang, Xiulan; Govindama, Yolande; Haddouk, Lise

    2016-03-01

    Cultures differ in the emotions they teach their members to value ("ideal affect"). We conducted 3 studies to examine whether leaders' smiles reflect these cultural differences in ideal affect. In Study 1, we compared the smiles of top-ranked American and Chinese government leaders, chief executive officers, and university presidents in their official photos. Consistent with findings that Americans value excitement and other high-arousal positive states more than Chinese, American top-ranked leaders (N = 98) showed more excited smiles than Chinese top-ranked leaders (N = 91) across occupations. In Study 2, we compared the smiles of winning versus losing political candidates and higher versus lower ranking chief executive officers and university presidents in the United States and Taiwan/China. American leaders (N = 223) showed more excited smiles than Taiwanese/Chinese leaders (N = 266), regardless of election outcome or ranking. In Study 3, we administered self-report measures of ideal affect in college student samples from 10 different nations (N = 1,267) and then 8 years later, coded the smiles that legislators from those nations showed in their official photos (N = 3,372). The more nations valued excitement and other high arousal positive states, the more their leaders showed excited smiles; similarly, the more nations valued calm and other low-arousal positive states, the more their leaders showed calm smiles. These results held after controlling for national differences in democratization, human development, and gross domestic product per capita. Together, these findings suggest that leaders' smiles reflect the affective states valued by their cultures.

  11. Molecular characterization of SMILE as a novel corepressor of nuclear receptors

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yuan-Bin; Nedumaran, Balachandar; Choi, Hueng-Sik

    2009-01-01

    SMILE (small heterodimer partner interacting leucine zipper protein) has been identified as a coregulator in ER signaling. In this study, we have examined the effects of SMILE on other NRs (nuclear receptors). SMILE inhibits GR, CAR and HNF4α-mediated transactivation. Knockdown of SMILE gene expression increases the transactivation of the NRs. SMILE interacts with GR, CAR and HNF4α in vitro and in vivo. SMILE and these NRs colocalize in the nucleus. SMILE binds to the ligand-binding domain or AF2 domain of the NRs. Competitions between SMILE and the coactivators GRIP1 or PGC-1α have been demonstrated in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, an intrinsic repressive activity of SMILE is observed in Gal4-fusion system, and the intrinsic repressive domain is mapped to the C-terminus of SMILE, spanning residues 203–354. Moreover, SMILE interacts with specific HDACs (histone deacetylases) and SMILE-mediated repression is released by HDAC inhibitor trichostatin A, in a NR-specific manner. Finally, ChIP (chromatin immunoprecipitation) assays reveal that SMILE associates with the NRs on the target gene promoters. Adenoviral overexpression of SMILE represses GR-, CAR- and HNF4α-mediated target gene expression. Overall, these results suggest that SMILE functions as a novel corepressor of NRs via competition with coactivators and the recruitment of HDACs. PMID:19429690

  12. Honoring Jean-David Rochaix.

    PubMed

    Govindjee; Redding, Kevin

    2017-02-01

    We honor Jean-David Rochaix, an outstanding scholar of chloroplast biogenesis and photosynthesis, who received the prestigious Lifetime Achievement Award of the International Society of Photosynthesis Research at its 17th International Photosynthesis Congress held in Maastricht, The Netherlands (August 5-12, 2016). With this award he joins other major discoverers in the field of photosynthesis: Pierre Joliot (of France, 2013); Ulrich W. Heber* (of Germany, 2010) and Kenneth Sauer (of USA, 2010); Jan M. Anderson* (of Australia, 2007); and Horst T. Witt* (of Germany, 2004). See "Appendix 1" for the list of those who have received the ISPR Communication, Innovation, Calvin-Benson, and Hill awards.

  13. Blocking Mimicry Makes True and False Smiles Look the Same

    PubMed Central

    Rychlowska, Magdalena; Cañadas, Elena; Wood, Adrienne; Krumhuber, Eva G.; Fischer, Agneta; Niedenthal, Paula M.

    2014-01-01

    Recent research suggests that facial mimicry underlies accurate interpretation of subtle facial expressions. In three experiments, we manipulated mimicry and tested its role in judgments of the genuineness of true and false smiles. Experiment 1 used facial EMG to show that a new mouthguard technique for blocking mimicry modifies both the amount and the time course of facial reactions. In Experiments 2 and 3, participants rated true and false smiles either while wearing mouthguards or when allowed to freely mimic the smiles with or without additional distraction, namely holding a squeeze ball or wearing a finger-cuff heart rate monitor. Results showed that blocking mimicry compromised the decoding of true and false smiles such that they were judged as equally genuine. Together the experiments highlight the role of facial mimicry in judging subtle meanings of facial expressions. PMID:24670316

  14. Minimally invasive cosmetic dentistry: smile reconstruction using direct resin bonding.

    PubMed

    Prieto, Lucia Trazzi; Araujo, Cintia Tereza Pimenta; de Oliveira, Dayane Carvalho Ramos Salles; de Azevedo Vaz, Sergio Lins; D'Arce, Maria Beatriz Freitas; Paulillo, Luis Alexandre Maffei Sartini

    2014-01-01

    Discrepancies in tooth size and shape can interfere with smile harmony. Composite resin can be used to improve the esthetics of the smile at a low cost while offering good clinical performance. This article presents an approach for restoring and correcting functional, anatomic, and esthetic discrepancies with minimal intervention, using composites and a direct adhesive technique. This conservative restorative procedure provided the patient with maximum personal esthetic satisfaction.

  15. The Photoshop Smile Design technique (part 1): digital dental photography.

    PubMed

    McLaren, Edward A; Garber, David A; Figueira, Johan

    2013-01-01

    The proliferation of digital photography and imaging devices is enhancing clinicians' ability to visually document patients' intraoral conditions. By understanding the elements of esthetics and learning how to incorporate technology applications into clinical dentistry, clinicians can predictably plan smile design and communicate anticipated results to patients and ceramists alike. This article discusses camera, lens, and flash selection and setup, and how to execute specific types of images using the Adobe Photoshop Smile Design (PSD) technique.

  16. Attributions of guilt and punishment as functions of physical attractiveness and smiling.

    PubMed

    Abel, Millicent H; Watters, Heather

    2005-12-01

    The authors found an interaction between sex of participant and sex of defendant in the leniency bias toward a smiling defendant. Differences occurred for male participants when levying punishment for a smiling male defendant vs. a smiling female defendant and for a smiling male defendant vs. a nonsmiling male defendant, whereas differences did not occur for female participants. The authors found moderating effects of physical attractiveness and smiling between guilt and punishment. The only significant positive relationship between guilt and punishment occurred for the defendant whom participants rated low in physical attractiveness and who was not smiling. When guilty, the smiling and unattractive defendant received less punishment than did the smiling and attractive defendant. The authors discussed complex relationships between physical attractiveness, smiling, guilt, and punishment.

  17. Distributed Access View Integrated Database (DAVID) system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, Barry E.

    1991-01-01

    The Distributed Access View Integrated Database (DAVID) System, which was adopted by the Astrophysics Division for their Astrophysics Data System, is a solution to the system heterogeneity problem. The heterogeneous components of the Astrophysics problem is outlined. The Library and Library Consortium levels of the DAVID approach are described. The 'books' and 'kits' level is discussed. The Universal Object Typer Management System level is described. The relation of the DAVID project with the Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) program is explained.

  18. [Book review] Green engineering: environmentally conscious design, by David T. Allen and David R. Shonnard

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boustany, R.G.

    2002-01-01

    Review of: Green engineering: Environmentally conscious design / David T. Allen and David R. Shonnard / Prentice-Hall, Inc., One Lake Street, Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. 2002. 552 pages. ISBN 0-13-061908-6.

  19. From the Symbolic Analysis of Virtual Faces to a Smiles Machine.

    PubMed

    Ochs, Magalie; Diday, Edwin; Afonso, Filipe

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we present an application of symbolic data processing for the design of virtual character's smiling facial expressions. A collected database of virtual character's smiles directly created by users has been explored using symbolic data analysis methods. An unsupervised analysis has enabled us to identify the morphological and dynamic characteristics of different types of smiles as well as of combinations of smiles. Based on the symbolic data analysis, to generate different smiling faces, we have developed procedures to automatically reconstitute smiling virtual faces from a point in a multidimensional space corresponding to a principal component analysis plane.

  20. David Mechanic: Professional Zombie Hunter.

    PubMed

    Hafferty, Frederic W; Tilburt, Jon

    2016-08-01

    Within the fields of medicine and sociology, the descriptor "profession" (along with its brethren: profession, professionalization, and professionalism) has had a rich etymological history, with terms taking on different meanings at different times-sometimes trespassing into shibboleth and jargon. This etymological journey has co-evolved with the career of David Mechanic to whom this issue of the Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law is devoted. We exploit a provocative metaphor applied to Mechanic's work on the challenges facing medicine as a profession as a playful exegesis on what we call "profession" to excavate an ensconced and encrusted domain of health jargon operating at the tensive interface of society and modern medical work.

  1. A Star of David catenane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leigh, David A.; Pritchard, Robin G.; Stephens, Alexander J.

    2014-11-01

    We describe the synthesis of a [2]catenane that consists of two triply entwined 114-membered rings, a molecular link. The woven scaffold is a hexameric circular helicate generated by the assembly of six tris(bipyridine) ligands with six iron(II) cations, with the size of the helicate promoted by the use of sulfate counterions. The structure of the ligand extension directs subsequent covalent capture of the catenane by ring-closing olefin metathesis. Confirmation of the Star of David topology (two rings, six crossings) is provided by NMR spectroscopy, mass spectrometry and X-ray crystallography. Extraction of the iron(II) ions with tetrasodium ethylenediaminetetraacetate affords the wholly organic molecular link. The self-assembly of interwoven circular frameworks of controlled size, and their subsequent closure by multiple directed covalent bond-forming reactions, provides a powerful strategy for the synthesis of molecular topologies of ever-increasing complexity.

  2. David L. Harrison: A Work Of Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raymond, Allen

    2005-01-01

    This article describes poet and writer David L. Harrison. A former School Board Chairman from Springfield, MO, David was responsible for beginning an annual "Teacher Appreciation Banquet" and for launching the "Sky High for Reading" program. The "Sky High for Reading" program encourages children in Springfield to read enough books so that, if…

  3. Akinetic mutism and the story of David.

    PubMed

    Sinden, Rebecca; Wilson, Barbara A; Rose, Anita; Mistry, Nimisha

    2017-02-02

    Following a description about the characteristics of akinetic mutism (AM) and how it differs from locked-in syndrome (LIS) and a disorder of consciousness (DOC), we present the case of David, a 71-year-old man with AM. David sustained a stroke following a middle cerebral artery (MCA) thrombus. A CT scan at the time detected old ischaemic infarcts affecting the right frontal lobe, the left occipital lobe and the left parietal lobe so David had bilateral brain damage. Initially thought to have a DOC, further neuropsychological assessments administered when David had improved a little, resulted in the diagnosis of AM. Although David spoke little, when he did speak, his words and phrases were well articulated, grammatical and with appropriate intonation. He was alert and visually aware and he was not paralysed. We discuss whether the diagnosis was correct and address the difficulties in assessing such patients.

  4. 77 FR 1023 - Regulated Navigation Area; Arthur Kill, NY and NJ

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-09

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA11 Regulated Navigation Area; Arthur Kill, NY and NJ AGENCY... amending the Regulated Navigation Area (RNA) in the navigable waters of the Arthur Kill in New York and New... Arthur Kill. An earlier TIR added the basic RNA regulation for that waterway: 33 CFR 165.T01-0727 (76...

  5. 76 FR 45690 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Raritan River, Arthur Kill and Their Tributaries, Staten Island...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-01

    ... Kill and Their Tributaries, Staten Island, NY and Elizabeth, NJ AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Final... operation of the Arthur Kill (AK) Railroad Bridge at mile 11.6, across Arthur Kill between Staten Island... proposed rulemaking (NPRM) entitled Drawbridge Operation Regulations Raritan River, Arthur Kill and...

  6. 76 FR 16715 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Raritan River, Arthur Kill and Their Tributaries, Staten Island...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-25

    ... Kill and Their Tributaries, Staten Island, NY and Elizabeth, NJ AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION... regulations governing the operation of the Arthur Kill (AK) Railroad Bridge at mile 11.6, across Arthur Kill... Kill (AK) Railroad Bridge at mile 11.6, across Arthur Kill, has a vertical clearance of 31 feet at...

  7. American Historian Arthur Schlesinger's Challenge to Women Historians and Scholars.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Barbara Bennett

    In 1922, Arthur Schlesinger urged his fellow historians to write women into the history books. He recognized that the size and sweep of women's history offered scholars and students the opportunity of a new major field. His call failed to arouse skeptical minds through the 1940s and 1950s as feminism fell into disrepute. But with the resurgence of…

  8. Neuro syphilis: Portrayals by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

    PubMed Central

    Somasundaram, O.

    2009-01-01

    The developments in neuro syphilis in the 19th century are integral parts of the history of psychiatry. The delineation of various aspects of neuro syphilis by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle in three of his stories is discussed in brief. PMID:19881059

  9. Reconsidering Arthur Bestor and the Cold War in Social Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weltman, Burton

    2000-01-01

    Explores the development of Arthur Bestor's ideas and his differences with progressives during the 1950's. Contends their differences, exacerbated by the Cold War, were matters of emphasis not principles. Concludes that ongoing post-Cold War battles among liberal social educators should be resolved in favor of their common social and educational…

  10. Astronaut William McArthur prepares for a training exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Wearing training versions of the partial pressure launch and entry garment, Astronaut William S. McArthur prepares to rehearse emergency egress procedures for the STS-58 mission. He is standing outside of the side hatch to the full fuselage trainer.

  11. Narrative Development in Bilingual Kindergarteners: Can Arthur Help?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uchikoshi, Yuuko

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the effects of the children's TV program Arthur on the development of narrative skills over an academic year for Spanish-speaking English-language learners. In October, February, and June of their kindergarten year, children were asked to tell a story, in English, prompted by 3 pictures. Before the 2nd and 3rd assessments, half…

  12. Social Smiling and Its Components in High-Risk Infant Siblings without Later ASD Symptomatology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, Caitlin McMahon; Ibañez, Lisa V.; Foss-Feig, Jennifer H.; Stone, Wendy L.

    2014-01-01

    Impaired affective expression, including social smiling, is common in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and may represent an early marker for ASD in their infant siblings (Sibs-ASD). Social smiling and its component behaviors (eye contact and non-social smiling) were examined at 15 months in Sibs-ASD who demonstrated later ASD…

  13. Re: 'Treatment of gummy smile: Nasal septum dysplasia as etiologic factor and therapeutic target'.

    PubMed

    Polo, Mario

    2015-10-01

    An evaluation and commentary of a recently suggested technique for the correction of gummy smiles is presented. A comparison of long-term stability reported with other surgical techniques, is also performed. From the results reported, use of this technique could offer a treatment option for those affected with excessive gingival display on smiling (gummy smile).

  14. Heterogeneous distributed query processing: The DAVID system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, Barry E.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of the Distributed Access View Integrated Database (DAVID) project is the development of an easy to use computer system with which NASA scientists, engineers and administrators can uniformly access distributed heterogeneous databases. Basically, DAVID will be a database management system that sits alongside already existing database and file management systems. Its function is to enable users to access the data in other languages and file systems without having to learn the data manipulation languages. Given here is an outline of a talk on the DAVID project and several charts.

  15. Gummy Smile Correction with Diode Laser: Two Case Reports

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Mahesh; Laju, S; Erali, Susil M; Erali, Sunil M; Fathima, Al Zainab; Gopinath, P V

    2015-01-01

    Beautification of smiles is becoming an everyday requirement in dental practice. Apart from teeth, gingiva also plays an important role in smile esthetics. Excessive visualization of gingiva is a common complaint among patients seeking esthetic treatment. A wide variety of procedures are available for correction of excessive gum display based on the cause of the condition. Soft tissue diode laser contouring of gingiva is a common procedure that can be undertaken in a routine dental setting with excellent patient satisfaction and minimal post-operative sequale. Two cases of esthetic crown lengthening with diode laser 810 nm are presented here. PMID:26668491

  16. Human identification through the analysis of smile photographs.

    PubMed

    Silva, Rhonan Ferreira; Franco, Ademir; Souza, João Batista de; Picoli, Fernando Fortes; Mendes, Solon Diego Santos Carvalho; Nunes, Fernando Gomes

    2015-06-01

    The comparison between antemortem and portmortem data comprehends the basis of the dental identification process. High-tech devices allow for optimal manipulation of postmortem data. However, in especial situations, the victims do not have records of dental treatments, making necessary the search for antemortem data from personal belongings. Smile photographs are one of the most common sources of dental information detected from personal belongings. In this context, the present study reports a forensic case in which a charred body was positively identified through the application of 3 techniques for the analysis of smile photographs.

  17. Our Magnetic Planet (Arthur Holmes Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laj, Carlo

    2015-04-01

    It is a great honour to receive the Arthur Holmes Medal, certainly the highest scientific award of my life. My first thoughts and deep gratitude are with the people who have contributed to me being here today, from my PhD mentors, Pierre Berge and Pierre Pério, later Jacques Labeyrie, my colleagues and students and last, but not least, the members of the Committee on Education of EGU, with whom I have shared over 10 years of a wonderful educational activity. In this presentation, among the various scientific arguments in which I have been involved, I will recall only those mentioned in my letter of nomination to the Holmes Medal, trying to replace them in what was known at the time. After a PhD in Solid State Physics, working in a laboratory of the Commissariat à l'Énergie Atomique, I obtained a post doctoral research position for the the study of liquid binary critical fluids, and worked on this topics for 5 years. I then joined the Centre des Faibles Radioactivités, a CNRS-CEA Institute dedicated to the study of geological-environmental phenomena. My first task there has been to develop a paleomagnetic laboratory, dedicated to the study of Earth Sciences, through the study of the magnetic properties of sediments and igneous rocks. From there on, my entire scientific activity has been devoted to the study of our "Magnetic Planet". My first project in Geophysics dealt with the geodynamical evolution of the Aegean Arc. At the time, only a few paleomagnetic studies existed in the Mediterranean realm, and none in the Aegean region. Moreover all of them dealt with rather old geological formations, so that almost nothing was known about the recent post-cretaceous evolution. The originality of our study was to start from the most recent to the older formations, in order to precisely describe "retro-tectonically" the different phases of rotational deformation. This intensive study (over 700 sampling sites, over 10,000 samples spread over continental Greece, the Aegean

  18. The Mystery of the European Smile: A Comparison Based on Individual Photographs Provided by Internet Users

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze cross-cultural differences in preference for smiling among the users of one of the most popular instant messaging sites called Windows Live Messenger in terms of facial expression (smiling vs. non-smiling) on the photographs accompanying their profiles. 2,000 photos from 10 countries were rated by two independent judges. Despite the fact that 20 years have passed since the fall of the Berlin Wall, Internet users from a former Soviet bloc appear to smile less often than those from Western Europe. Also, replicating past research, women irrespective of their nationality smiled more than men. PMID:21057574

  19. Let the Avatar Brighten Your Smile: Effects of Enhancing Facial Expressions in Virtual Environments.

    PubMed

    Oh, Soo Youn; Bailenson, Jeremy; Krämer, Nicole; Li, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated the positive effects of smiling on interpersonal outcomes. The present research examined if enhancing one's smile in a virtual environment could lead to a more positive communication experience. In the current study, participants' facial expressions were tracked and mapped on a digital avatar during a real-time dyadic conversation. The avatar's smile was rendered such that it was either a slightly enhanced version or a veridical version of the participant's actual smile. Linguistic analyses using the Linguistic Inquiry Word Count (LIWC) revealed that participants who communicated with each other via avatars that exhibited enhanced smiles used more positive words to describe their interaction experience compared to those who communicated via avatars that displayed smiling behavior reflecting the participants' actual smiles. In addition, self-report measures showed that participants in the 'enhanced smile' condition felt more positive affect after the conversation and experienced stronger social presence compared to the 'normal smile' condition. These results are particularly striking when considering the fact that most participants (>90%) were unable to detect the smiling manipulation. This is the first study to demonstrate the positive effects of transforming unacquainted individuals' actual smiling behavior during a real-time avatar-networked conversation.

  20. Factors affecting smile esthetics in adults with different types of anterior overjet malocclusion

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Pei-Chin

    2017-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to quantitatively assess the relationship of smile esthetic variables with various types of malocclusion, and identify the cephalometric factors affecting smile measurements. Methods This retrospective study included 106 patients who were treated with retention at the orthodontic department of Taipei Medical University Hospital. Hard-tissue variables were measured using lateral cephalographic tracings, and nine smile esthetic variables were measured using facial photographs. The patients were divided into three groups according to their overjet (< 0, 0–4, and > 4 mm). An analysis of variance was conducted to compare the pretreatment cephalometric variables and smile esthetic variables among the three groups. Multiple linear regression analysis was performed to identify the cephalometric factors affecting the smile measurements in each group. Results Except the upper midline and buccal corridor ratio, all of the smile measurements differed significantly among the three groups before orthodontic treatment. Some of the smile characteristics were correlated with the cephalometric measurements in different types of malocclusion. The overjet was the major factor influencing the smile pattern in all three types of malocclusion. Conclusions Smile characteristics differ between different types of malocclusion; the smile may be influenced by skeletal pattern, dental procumbency, or facial type. These findings indicate that establishment of an optimal horizontal anterior teeth relationship is the key to improving the smile characteristics in different types of malocclusion. PMID:28127537

  1. Sex differences over age groups in self-posed smiling in photographs.

    PubMed

    Otta, E

    1998-12-01

    The present study was designed to investigate self-posed smiling behavior in photographs as a function of both sex and age. The photographs of 1,171 Brazilian middle-class people, taken in a wide variety of informal social settings were examined. Only 25.7% of the girls and 25.0% of the boys of 2- to 5-yrs-age group were seen smiling in the photographs. Older children, adolescents, and adults were much more expressive than young children. Furthermore, significantly more females were seen smiling than males. Females also smiled more expansively than males. Finally, smiling was less frequent among middle-aged and older groups, especially among males. The present study replicated the sex difference in self-posed smiling behavior consistently reported by American researchers examining college yearbook photographs. Further, the results are consistent with the hypothesis that, besides being associated with emotional experience, smiling has a strong social motivation.

  2. SMILE Maker: A Web-Based Tool for Problem Solving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoyanov, Svetoslav; Aroyo, Lora; Kommers, Piet; Kurtev, Ivan

    This paper focuses on the purposes, theoretical model, and functionality of the SMILE (Solution Mapping Intelligent Learning Environment) Maker--a World Wide Web-based problem-solving tool. From an instructional design point of view, an attempt to establish a balance between constructivism/instructivism, content-treatment…

  3. Forensic odontology identification using smile photograph analysis--case reports.

    PubMed

    Silva, R F; Pereira, S D; Prado, F B; Daruge, E; Daruge, E

    2008-06-01

    The identification of unknown human by smile photographs that show specific characteristics of each individual has found wide acceptance all over the world. Therefore this paper shows this situation reporting different cases which smile photograph analysis were crucial to determine the positive identification of unidentified human bodies. All the cases were subjected to personal identification by photographs of smile including one adult male found in an advanced stage of decomposition, one adult female disappeared during an ecotourism trip, and one carbonized body of a male individual found in a forest region. During the autopsy the photographs of the smile were used by comparison of the ante and postmortem images gave accurate and useful information not only about dental state but also the anatomical features surrounding the upper and lower anterior dental arches. This method is not time-consuming and also has the advantage of allowing extraoral dental examination. It is also recommended when there is a need to provide quantitative data for a forensic identification based on these structures.

  4. Influence of bimaxillary protrusion on the perception of smile esthetics

    PubMed Central

    Almutairi, Terki K.; Albarakati, Sahar F.; Aldrees, Abdullah M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the impact of bimaxillary protrusion on smile esthetics as perceived by dental professionals and laypersons. Methods: One hundred and fifty evaluators, equally distributed into their respective panels (orthodontists, general dentists, and laypersons), participated in this cross-sectional study conducted in April to December 2012 in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The patient sample consisted of 14 female patients divided equally into 2 groups: bimaxillary protrusion patients, and patients who have had 4-premolar extraction treatment. Two standardized photographs (frontal and three-quarter close-up smile views), and a lateral cephalogram were taken for each patient. The evaluators were asked to rate the attractiveness of each photo according to a 100-mm visual analog scale. These esthetic ratings were correlated with the patients’ cephalometric measurements. Results: The bimaxillary protrusion group was rated significantly as less attractive than the treatment group by each evaluator panel. Panel comparison showed that laypeople were less receptive of bimaxillary protrusion than dental professionals. Frontal and three-quarter views of the same smiles were not similarly rated for esthetic perceptions. Correlational analysis revealed that the dentoalveolar measurement with the highest significant negative correlation to the smile esthetics was the upper incisors to palatal plane (U1-PP) angle. Conclusion: Patients with bimaxillary protrusion were found to be less attractive than patients who were treated for the condition. This was especially evident among the laypersons. An increase in the upper incisor inclination, as well as a decrease in the interincisal angle compounds the bimaxillary effect. PMID:25630010

  5. Perception of Laypeople and Dental Professionals of Smile Esthetics

    PubMed Central

    Saffarpour, Aida; Ghavam, Maryam; Saffarpour, Anna; Dayani, Rozita; Fard, Mohammad Javad Kharazi

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to assess and compare the perception of laypersons and dental professionals of smile esthetics based on two factors namely gingival display and alignment of teeth. Materials and Methods: A total of 32 females were randomly selected among dental students in the International Campus of School of Dentistry, Tehran University of Medical Sciences (Tehran, Iran) with no previous history of esthetic dental work. Frontal photographs were obtained and cropped from the subnasal to menton areas of subjects to standardize the size of pictures. Three series of slides were prepared of the pictures using Microsoft PowerPoint software. The first series of slides were shown to familiarize the observers with the images. The second and third series were displayed for the observers and they were then asked to fill out a questionnaire. The group of observers included 10 dental specialists and 10 laypersons. Each observer was given a visual analog scale (VAS) chart for scoring (1–10). After completion of the questionnaires, data were transferred to a computer and the differences in judgments of professionals and laypeople were analyzed using the Mann Whitney test. Results: No significant difference was found in the judgments of professionals and laypeople on evaluating overall smile esthetics, gingival display and alignment of teeth except for the slide showing a reverse smile arc. Conclusions: Laypeople and professionals had similar perceptions of smile esthetics. Thus, it appears that clinicians can rely on the judgment of laypersons in esthetic dental treatments. PMID:27928236

  6. What Coy Smiles Say about Positive Shyness in Early Infancy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colonnesi, Cristina; Bogels, Susan M.; de Vente, Wieke; Majdandzic, Mirjana

    2013-01-01

    Positive shyness is a universal emotion with the specific social function of regulating our interactions by improving trust and liking, and showing politeness. The present study examined early infant production of coy smiles during social interactions as a measure of positive shy behavior. Eighty 4-month-olds were experimentally observed during…

  7. Perception of midline deviations in smile esthetics by laypersons

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Jamille Barros; da Silva, Licínio Esmeraldo; Caetano, Márcia Tereza de Oliveira; da Motta, Andrea Fonseca Jardim; Cury-Saramago, Adriana de Alcantara; Mucha, José Nelson

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the esthetic perception of upper dental midline deviation by laypersons and if adjacent structures influence their judgment. Methods: An album with 12 randomly distributed frontal view photographs of the smile of a woman with the midline digitally deviated was evaluated by 95 laypersons. The frontal view smiling photograph was modified to create from 1 mm to 5 mm deviations in the upper midline to the left side. The photographs were cropped in two different manners and divided into two groups of six photographs each: group LCN included the lips, chin, and two-thirds of the nose, and group L included the lips only. The laypersons performed the rate of each smile using a visual analog scale (VAS). Wilcoxon test, Student’s t-test and Mann-Whitney test were applied, adopting a 5% level of significance. Results: Laypersons were able to perceive midline deviations starting at 1 mm. Statistically significant results (p< 0.05) were found for all multiple comparisons of the values in photographs of group LCN and for almost all comparisons in photographs of group L. Comparisons between the photographs of groups LCN and L showed statistically significant values (p< 0.05) when the deviation was 1 mm. Conclusions: Laypersons were able to perceive the upper dental midline deviations of 1 mm, and above when the adjacent structures of the smiles were included. Deviations of 2 mm and above when the lips only were included. The visualization of structures adjacent to the smile demonstrated influence on the perception of midline deviation. PMID:28125140

  8. SMILE: A new way to explore solar-terrestrial relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branduardi-Raymont, Graziella; Wang, Chi; Sembay, Steven; Dai, Lei; Li, Lei; Donovan, Eric; Read, Andy; Spanswick, Emma; Sibeck, David; Escoubet, Philippe; Rebuffat, Denis; Raab, Walfried; Zheng, Jianhua

    2016-10-01

    SMILE (Solar wind Magnetosphere Ionosphere Link Explorer) will investigate the dynamic response of the Earth's magnetosphere to the impact of the solar wind in a unique and global manner, never attempted before. From a highly elliptical Earth orbit, SMILE will combine soft X-ray imaging of the Earth's magnetic boundaries and polar cusps with simultaneous UV imaging of the Northern aurora, while self-sufficiently measuring solar wind/magnetosheath plasma and magnetic field conditions in situ. X-ray imaging of the dayside magnetosheath and cusps is an innovative technique made possible by the relatively recent discovery of solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) X-ray emission, first observed at comets, and subsequently found to occur in the vicinity of the Earth's magnetosphere.For the first time we will be able to trace and link the processes of solar wind injection in the magnetosphere with those acting on the charged particles precipitating into the cusps and eventually the aurora. While the basic theory of magnetospheric circulation is well known and the microscale has been explored by many in situ measurements, the reality of how this complex interaction takes place on a global scale, and how it evolves, is still not understood. SMILE will answer questions such as: What are the fundamental modes of the dayside solar wind/magnetosphere interaction and the large-scale structure of the interaction region? What defines the substorm cycle? How do CME-driven storms arise and how do they relate to substorms?SMILE is a joint space mission between ESA and the Chinese Academy of Sciences. This presentation will cover the science that will be delivered by SMILE and its impact on our understanding of the way the solar wind interacts with the Earth's environment, and will give an overview of its payload and of the mission's development.

  9. 9. VIEW SHOWING PEARL WHITFORD (LEFT) AND ARTHUR RAINING BIRD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. VIEW SHOWING PEARL WHITFORD (LEFT) AND ARTHUR RAINING BIRD (RIGHT) HOLDING A FRAMED FLOUR SACK USED BY THE ROCKY BOY'S AGENCY FLOUR MILL. THE SACK SHOWS AN IMAGE OF ROCK BOY, LEADER OF THE CHIPPEWA AND CREE INDIANS IN MONTANA AT THE TIME ROCK BOY'S RESERVATION WAS CREATED BY CONGRESS (PHOTO WAS TAKEN BEHIND THE AGENCY'S SCHOOL). - Rocky Boy's Agency Flour Mill, Rocky Boy, Hill County, MT

  10. Smiles as signals of lower status in football players and fashion models: evidence that smiles are associated with lower dominance and lower prestige.

    PubMed

    Ketelaar, Timothy; Koenig, Bryan L; Gambacorta, Daniel; Dolgov, Igor; Hor, Daniel; Zarzosa, Jennifer; Luna-Nevarez, Cuauhtémoc; Klungle, Micki; Wells, Lee

    2012-07-10

    Across four studies, the current paper demonstrates that smiles are associated with lower social status. Moreover, the association between smiles and lower status appears in the psychology of observers and generalizes across two forms of status: prestige and dominance. In the first study, faces of fashion models representing less prestigious apparel brands were found to be more similar to a canonical smile display than the faces of models representing more prestigious apparel brands. In a second study, after being experimentally primed with either high or low prestige fashion narratives, participants in the low prestige condition were more likely to perceive smiles in a series of photographs depicting smiling and non-smiling faces. A third study of football player photographs revealed that the faces of less dominant (smaller) football players were more similar to the canonical smile display than the faces of their physically larger counterparts. Using the same football player photographs, a fourth study found that smiling was a more reliable indicator of perceived status-relevant personality traits than perceptions of the football players' physical sizes inferred from the photographs.

  11. What Lies Beneath? Minority Group Members' Suspicion of Whites' Egalitarian Motivation Predicts Responses to Whites' Smiles.

    PubMed

    Kunstman, Jonathan W; Tuscherer, Taylor; Trawalter, Sophie; Lloyd, E Paige

    2016-09-01

    Antiprejudice norms and attempts to conceal racial bias have made Whites' positive treatment of racial minorities attributionally ambiguous. Although some minorities believe Whites' positivity is genuine, others are suspicious of Whites' motives and believe their kindness is primarily motivated by desires to avoid appearing prejudiced. For those suspicious of Whites' motives, Whites' smiles may paradoxically function as threat cues. To the extent that Whites' smiles cue threat among suspicious minorities, we hypothesized that suspicious minorities would explicitly perceive Whites' smiles as threatening (Study 1), automatically orient to smiling White-as opposed to smiling Black-targets (Study 2), and accurately discriminate between Whites' real and fake smiles (Study 3). These results provide convergent evidence that cues typically associated with acceptance and affiliation ironically function as threat cues among suspicious racial minorities.

  12. Signal Characteristics of Spontaneous Facial Expressions: Automatic Movement in Solitary and Social Smiles

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Karen L.; Cohn, Jeffrey F.; Tian, Yingli

    2009-01-01

    The assumption that the smile is an evolved facial display suggests that there may be universal features of smiling in addition to the basic facial configuration. We show that smiles include not only a stable configuration of features, but also temporally consistent movement patterns. In spontaneous smiles from two social contexts, duration of lip corner movement during the onset phase was independent of social context and the presence of other facial movements, including dampening. These additional movements produced variation in both peak and offset duration. Both onsets and offsets had dynamic properties similar to automatically controlled movements, with a consistent relation between maximum velocity and amplitude of lip corner movement in smiles from two distinct contexts. Despite the effects of individual and social factors on facial expression timing overall, consistency in onset and offset phases suggests that portions of the smile display are relatively stereotyped and may be automatically produced. PMID:14638288

  13. French Crossings: III. The Smile of the Tiger

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Colin

    2016-01-01

    This article continues the theme of ‘French Crossings’ explored in other Presidential Addresses by focussing on the border zone between the human and the animal. The focus is on the allegedly tiger-like character attributed to Maimilien Robespierre, particularly after his fall from power and his execution in 1794. This theme is explored in terms of Thermidorian propaganda, French Revolutionary historiography and the ancient discipline of physiognomy, which was reactivated by Johann-Caspar Lavater in the late eighteenth century and still influential through much of the nineteenth. Robespierre’s animal rather than human status was also held to emerge in his inability to smile or laugh, a significant point also in that the meaning of the smile was changing in the same period. PMID:27630376

  14. Test results after refurbish of cryogenic system for smiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otsuka, Kiyomi; Tsunematsu, Shoji; Okabayashi, Akinobu; Narasaki, Katsuhiro; Satoh, Ryota

    2010-09-01

    Superconducting Sub-millimeter-wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) is to be operated aboard the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) of the International Space Station (ISS) in 2009. SMILES uses two superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) mixers for sub-millimeter-wave atmospheric observation and they are cooled to 4 K levels by a cryogenic system with a two-stage Stirling cooler, a Joule-Thomson (JT) cycle cooler and a cryostat composed of three stages. Two-stage Stirling cooler precools the JT circuit and also cools radiation shields in the cryostat. JT circuit has three tube-in-tube type heat exchangers and an orifice for JT expansion in the cryostat. The cryogenic system is built, tested and delivered.

  15. Family Matters: A Conversation with David Popenoe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iannone, Carol

    2009-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Professor David Popenoe, author of the controversial book "Disturbing the Nest: Family Change and Decline in Modern Societies" (1988). Popenoe heads the National Marriage Project at Rutgers University, where he taught sociology for forty-five years until his recent retirement. Here, Popenoe discusses his…

  16. A Conversation with...David Satcher.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Neil A.

    1996-01-01

    David Satcher began his career as a medical geneticist and was appointed director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in 1993. In this interview, Dr. Satcher talks about the responsibilities of the CDC and explains how a childhood experience inspired his interest in medicine and his continuing commitment to community service.…

  17. Exploring the Living Planet with David Attenborough.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgess, Jacquelin; Unwin, David

    1984-01-01

    In this interview David Attenborough, the celebrated natural history film maker and writer, talks about his highly successful television series, "The Living Planet." Devoted to the exposition of the world's ecosystems, the film represents a significant example of popular geographic education. (RM)

  18. Speaking Personally--With David Foster

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Journal of Distance Education, 2010

    2010-01-01

    David Foster is the founder of Kryterion, an Internet test administration company, and currently serves there as chief scientist and executive vice president. He is the author of numerous articles for industry trade journals and textbooks and sits on the Council for the International Test Commission. In this interview, Foster talks about his…

  19. Another Perspective: An Interview with David Smith

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Ruth A.; Johnson, Kelli

    2005-01-01

    To provide another perspective on evaluation within nonformal settings, "New Directions for Evaluation" recently interviewed David Smith, the coordinator of the Professional Learning to Close the Achievement Gap program for the Kansas City, Kansas, Public Schools, who has extensive background in education and educational research. He formerly held…

  20. David L. Gutmann (1925-2013).

    PubMed

    Rose, Jon; Huyck, Margaret; Grunes, Jerome

    2014-01-01

    David L. Gutmann, a pioneer in geropsychology and professor emeritus at Northwestern University, died on November 3, 2013, at the age of 88. A student of Bernice Neugarten, Bruno Bettelheim, and Erik Erikson, Gutmann discovered changes in adult psychological development related to parenting styles that held across diverse cultures.

  1. David Baines: Rural Doctor, Lecturer, Dancer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisecarver, Charmaine

    1993-01-01

    Discusses the career of David Baines, an American Indian doctor who successfully integrates traditional and modern medicine. Describes problems faced by American Indian doctors, the tremendous amount of work involved in medical training, and problems associated with working in rural areas and trying to straddle two opposing cultures when…

  2. David Ben-Gurion: A Creative Leader

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosemarin, Shoshana

    2014-01-01

    David Ben-Gurion (1886-1973), the first Prime Minister of Israel, is included in Pasternak's (2001) list of the nine most memorable leaders of the twentieth century. All of them are remembered for the reforms they initiated. Roosevelt (USA), Stalin (Russia), Castro (Cuba), and Thatcher (England) focused on social-economical changes, whereas Gandhi…

  3. A Case of You: Remembering David Fowler

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pimm, David

    2004-01-01

    The author has framed this brief appreciation of David Flower in terms of influence; specifically, his influence as a teacher, both in person and through his writing (most of all his attempted rewriting of much of the history of Greek mathematics). The author will also make some second-order remarks about the influence of teachers.

  4. Reading Pictures: An Interview with David Wiesner

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varga-Dobai, Kinga

    2008-01-01

    Two-time Caldecott Honor winner (Free Fall, Sector 7) and three-time Caldecott Medal winner (Tuesday, The Three Pigs, Flotsam), David Wiesner is regarded as one of the most remarkable creators of visual storytelling living today. Wiesner is well known for his innovative and unique subject matter and his sophisticated painting-like illustrations…

  5. Interview with Dr. David H. Kalsbeek

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sauter, David M.

    2005-01-01

    David H. Kalsbeek currently is vice president for enrollment management at DePaul University in Chicago, Illinois. In that capacity, he leads the marketing and enrollment development strategies for the nation's largest and fastest-growing Catholic university, enrolling 23,000 students in eight colleges and six campuses throughout the greater…

  6. Speaking Personally--With Mark David Milliron

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Journal of Distance Education, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Mark David Milliron, board chair of the Institute for the Study of Knowledge Management in Education, a trustee with Western Governors University, and a member of the advisory board for the University of Texas (UT) TeleCampus. He is also president and CEO of Catalyze Learning International, a private…

  7. Sensitivity study of SMILES-2 for chemical species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Makoto; Manago, Naohiro; Ozeki, Hiroyuki; Ochiai, Satoshi; Baron, Philippe

    2015-10-01

    Sensitivity studies of temperature and chemical species (Observed by ISS/JEM/SMILES: O3, HCl, ClO, HO2, BrO, HNO3, CH3CN, and Not observed by SMILES: Temperature, H2O, N2O, NO2, NO, CH3Cl, CO, H2CO, OH and O-atom) was carried out for the SMILES-2 proposal, a sub-mm and THz observation of limb emission from space over the spectral region from 400 GHz to 2.5 THz. Tentative but optimal candidate of frequency bands to cover these species was selected with 3 SIS (Superconductor-Insulator-Superconductor) mixers; SIS-1 (485-489 GHz + 523-527 GHz), SIS-2 (623-627 GHz + 648-652 GHz), SIS-3 (557 GHz + 576.3 GHz) and 2 HEB (Hot Electron Bolometer); HEB-1 (1.8 THz OH) and HEB-2 (2.06 THz O-atom). Temperature can be retrieved with 1 K precision and 1 km vertical resolution from 15 to 120 km. Other chemical species also showed very high single scan precision (random error) comparable to statistical standard error of previous satellite measurements.

  8. Let the Avatar Brighten Your Smile: Effects of Enhancing Facial Expressions in Virtual Environments

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Soo Youn; Bailenson, Jeremy; Krämer, Nicole; Li, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated the positive effects of smiling on interpersonal outcomes. The present research examined if enhancing one’s smile in a virtual environment could lead to a more positive communication experience. In the current study, participants’ facial expressions were tracked and mapped on a digital avatar during a real-time dyadic conversation. The avatar’s smile was rendered such that it was either a slightly enhanced version or a veridical version of the participant’s actual smile. Linguistic analyses using the Linguistic Inquiry Word Count (LIWC) revealed that participants who communicated with each other via avatars that exhibited enhanced smiles used more positive words to describe their interaction experience compared to those who communicated via avatars that displayed smiling behavior reflecting the participants’ actual smiles. In addition, self-report measures showed that participants in the ‘enhanced smile’ condition felt more positive affect after the conversation and experienced stronger social presence compared to the ‘normal smile’ condition. These results are particularly striking when considering the fact that most participants (>90%) were unable to detect the smiling manipulation. This is the first study to demonstrate the positive effects of transforming unacquainted individuals’ actual smiling behavior during a real-time avatar-networked conversation. PMID:27603784

  9. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle: the author was an ophthalmologist.

    PubMed

    Ravin, J G; Migdal, C

    1995-01-01

    Sir Arthur Conan Doyle created the famous detective Sherlock Holmes, and his faithful companion, Dr. Watson. A graduate of the University of Edinburgh Medical School, Doyle (1859-1930) spent nearly ten years practicing medicine. During his years in general practice, Doyle gave particular attention to the eye. Later, he studied ophthalmology in Vienna and spent time with the best known ophthalmologist in Paris. He returned to London and established an ophthalmological office near Harley Street. His literary career soon overtook the medical career, but he made many references to medicine, and to ophthalmology in particular in his writings.

  10. Arthur Benton and a bunch of Dutch flowers.

    PubMed

    Bouma, Anke; Bakker, Dirk J

    2009-02-01

    This paper shows how Arthur Benton's excellent research in the field of neuropsychological topics like hemispheric specialization, Gerstmann syndrome, aphasia, prosopagnosia and visuospatial deficits has influenced the development of the field of neuropsychology in The Netherlands. Also, his outstanding methodological knowledge and clinical experience have had an enormously significant impact on neuropsychological assessment in this country. Benton's knowledge about the different topics in neuropsychology was tremendous, while at the same time he was always critical and aware of findings he was not able to understand.

  11. Etienne-Arthur Louis Fallot and his tetralogy.

    PubMed

    Loukas, Marios; Cesmebasi, Alper; Le, Duong; Etienne, Denzil; Tubbs, R Shane; Anderson, Robert H

    2014-10-01

    Étienne-Arthur Louis Fallot (1850-1911) is one of the most significant medical figures of the 19th century with an eponymous congenital cardiac malformation. His initial account of the four anatomical features making up his tetralogy proved remarkably significant in the progression of clinical descriptions of the lesions producing cyanotic congenital cardiac disease. Although subsequently the cause of appreciable controversy, the accuracy of his initial descriptions underscore the current diagnostic and therapeutic approach to the malformation now known uniformly as tetralogy of Fallot.

  12. It's Elementary: Engaging Students through the Writings of Arthur Conan Doyle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrissey, Ted

    2002-01-01

    Notes that Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's writing allows for a variety of critical thinking activities, extensive use of computer technology, and the involvement of the entire faculty, staff and administration in the learning process. Presents a few activities that teachers can do with their students based on the work of Arthur Conan Doyle. (SG)

  13. 33 CFR 165.T01-0727 - Regulated Navigation Area; Arthur Kill, NY and NJ.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Kill, NY and NJ. 165.T01-0727 Section 165.T01-0727 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... § 165.T01-0727 Regulated Navigation Area; Arthur Kill, NY and NJ. (a) Regulated area. The following area..., and Gulfport Reach in the Arthur Kill; bounded in the northeast by a line drawn from position 40°...

  14. 33 CFR 165.T01-0727 - Regulated Navigation Area; Arthur Kill, NY and NJ.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Kill, NY and NJ. 165.T01-0727 Section 165.T01-0727 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... § 165.T01-0727 Regulated Navigation Area; Arthur Kill, NY and NJ. (a) Regulated area. The following area..., and Gulfport Reach in the Arthur Kill; bounded in the northeast by a line drawn from position 40°...

  15. Begin at the Beginning: Reflections on the Career of Arthur Cropley

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maslany, George

    2015-01-01

    Arthur Cropley's academic career began in the early 1960s and, more than 50 years later, shows few signs of abating. Over this lengthy period, he has made important contributions not only to creativity research, but to a range of related areas of psychology. Arthur Cropley has also been an influential figure in the careers of several generations…

  16. Interface between astrophysical datasets and distributed database management systems (DAVID)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iyengar, S. S.

    1988-01-01

    This is a status report on the progress of the DAVID (Distributed Access View Integrated Database Management System) project being carried out at Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana. The objective is to implement an interface between Astrophysical datasets and DAVID. Discussed are design details and implementation specifics between DAVID and astrophysical datasets.

  17. 77 FR 26765 - David H.M. Phelps: Debarment Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration David H.M. Phelps: Debarment Order AGENCY: Food and Drug... under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FD&C Act) debarring David H.M. Phelps for a period of 20... Manual Guide 1410.35), finds that Mr. David H.M. Phelps has been convicted of 10 felony counts...

  18. David Gill: clock maker to global astronomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haley, P. A.

    2014-04-01

    Reduction in the uncertainty of physical measurements underpinned many advances in solar and stellar parallax, the determination of longitude, geodesy, and the accurate mapping of the heavens using celestial photography in the late nineteenth century. A pioneer in these areas, who successfully made the transition from clock maker in Aberdeen to H.M. Astronomer at the Cape of Good Hope was David Gill (1843-1914); Sir David Gill, K.C.B. from 1900. This paper celebrates the first third of Gill's career in astronomy and geodesy up to the time he was made redundant from Dun Echt Observatory at the end of 1875. It highlights how his horological skills were applied to telescope design and also how his aspirations to become a global astronomer started. The paper is timed to coincide with Gill's centenary anniversary year - he died 24 January 1914.

  19. Transcriptional Corepressor SMILE Recruits SIRT1 to Inhibit Nuclear Receptor Estrogen Receptor-related Receptor γ Transactivation*

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yuan-Bin; Park, Jeong-Hoh; Kim, Don-Kyu; Hwang, Jung Hwan; Oh, Sangmi; Park, Seung Bum; Shong, Minho; Lee, In-Kyu; Choi, Hueng-Sik

    2009-01-01

    SMILE (small heterodimer partner interacting leucine zipper protein) has been identified as a corepressor of the glucocorticoid receptor, constitutive androstane receptor, and hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α. Here we show that SMILE also represses estrogen receptor-related receptor γ (ERRγ) transactivation. Knockdown of SMILE gene expression increases ERRγ activity. SMILE directly interacts with ERRγ in vitro and in vivo. Domain mapping analysis showed that SMILE binds to the AF2 domain of ERRγ. SMILE represses ERRγ transactivation partially through competition with coactivators PGC-1α, PGC-1β, and GRIP1. Interestingly, the repression of SMILE on ERRγ is released by SIRT1 inhibitors, a catalytically inactive SIRT1 mutant, and SIRT1 small interfering RNA but not by histone protein deacetylase inhibitor. In vivo glutathione S-transferase pulldown and coimmunoprecipitation assays validated that SMILE physically interacts with SIRT1. Furthermore, the ERRγ inverse agonist GSK5182 enhances the interaction of SMILE with ERRγ and SMILE-mediated repression. Knockdown of SMILE or SIRT1 blocks the repressive effect of GSK5182. Moreover, chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that GSK5182 augments the association of SMILE and SIRT1 on the promoter of the ERRγ target PDK4. GSK5182 and adenoviral overexpression of SMILE cooperate to repress ERRγ-induced PDK4 gene expression, and this repression is released by overexpression of a catalytically defective SIRT1 mutant. Finally, we demonstrated that ERRγ regulates SMILE gene expression, which in turn inhibits ERRγ. Overall, these findings implicate SMILE as a novel corepressor of ERRγ and recruitment of SIRT1 as a novel repressive mechanism for SMILE and ERRγ inverse agonist. PMID:19690166

  20. When Does the Brain Distinguish between Genuine and Ambiguous Smiles? An ERP Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calvo, Manuel G.; Marrero, Hipolito; Beltran, David

    2013-01-01

    Event-related brain potentials (ERPs) were recorded to assess the processing time course of ambiguous facial expressions with a smiling mouth but neutral, fearful, or angry eyes, in comparison with genuinely happy faces (a smile and happy eyes) and non-happy faces (neutral, fearful, or angry mouth and eyes). Participants judged whether the faces…

  1. Impact of Treatment Decentration on Higher-Order Aberrations after SMILE

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wenwen; Cheng, Xinliang; Cai, Jianru

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate decentration following femtosecond laser small incision lenticule extraction (SMILE) and sub-Bowman keratomileusis (SBK) and its impact on higher-order aberrations (HOAs). Methods. Prospective, nonrandom, and comparison study. There were 96 eyes of 52 patients who received SMILE and 96 eyes of 49 patients who received SBK in this study. Decentration was calculated 6 months after surgery with Pentacam. HOAs and visual acuity after the surgery were examined for patients in both groups before and 6 months after surgery. Results. The mean decentration displacement in SMILE group was significantly less than SBK group (P = 0.020). 89 eyes were decentered within 0.50 mm after SMILE and SBK. The association between vertical decentration and the induced spherical aberration was insignificant in SMILE group (P = 0.035). There was an association between decentration and safety index, efficacy index, vertical coma, spherical aberration, and HOAs in root mean square (RMS, μm) after SBK (all P < 0.05). No difference was found in uncorrected and corrected distance visual acuity, safety index, efficacy index, and wavefront aberrations between the two subgroups at any delimited value after SMILE (all P > 0.05). Decentration exceeding 0.37 mm affected vertical coma and RMSh of SBK eyes (P = 0.002, 0.005). Conclusion. SMILE surgery achieved more accurate centration than SBK surgery. Vertical decentration is associated with the induced spherical aberration in SMILE.

  2. Effects of Environmental Events on Smiling and Laughing Behavior in Angelman Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Chris; Demetriades, Louisa; Hall, Scott

    2002-01-01

    A study examined the variability of smiling and laughing behaviors of three children (ages 7-17) with Angelman syndrome. Results found laughing and smiling increased during social situations and occurred at low levels during non-social situations. The behaviors, therefore, did not occur totally inappropriately, as has been suggested. (Contains…

  3. Effects of Social Stimuli on Laughing and Smiling in Young Children with Angelman Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richman, David M.; Gernat, Eric; Teichman, Heather

    2006-01-01

    The effects of social stimuli present and absent on laughing and smiling in 2 young children with Angelman syndrome were assessed via a multielement design. Results indicated that laughing and smiling for either child was unaffected by the social stimuli assessed in the social interaction condition. Results are discussed in terms of the effects of…

  4. A novel three-dimensional smile analysis based on dynamic evaluation of facial curve contour.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi; Lin, Han; Lin, Qiuping; Zhang, Jinxin; Zhu, Ping; Lu, Yao; Zhao, Zhi; Lv, Jiahong; Lee, Mln Kyeong; Xu, Yue

    2016-02-25

    The influence of three-dimensional facial contour and dynamic evaluation decoding on factors of smile esthetics is essential for facial beauty improvement. However, the kinematic features of the facial smile contour and the contribution from the soft tissue and underlying skeleton are uncharted. Here, the cheekbone-maxilla contour and nasolabial fold were combined into a "smile contour" delineating the overall facial topography emerges prominently in smiling. We screened out the stable and unstable points on the smile contour using facial motion capture and curve fitting, before analyzing the correlation between soft tissue coordinates and hard tissue counterparts of the screened points. Our finding suggests that the mouth corner region was the most mobile area characterizing smile expression, while the other areas remained relatively stable. Therefore, the perioral area should be evaluated dynamically while the static assessment outcome of other parts of the smile contour contribute partially to their dynamic esthetics. Moreover, different from the end piece, morphologies of the zygomatic area and the superior part of the nasolabial crease were determined largely by the skeleton in rest, implying the latter can be altered by orthopedic or orthodontic correction and the former better improved by cosmetic procedures to improve the beauty of smile.

  5. Brief Report: A Longitudinal Study of Excessive Smiling and Laughing in Children with Angelman Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Dawn; Horsler, Kate; Mount, Rebecca; Oliver, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Elevated laughing and smiling is a key characteristic of the Angelman syndrome behavioral phenotype, with cross-sectional studies reporting changes with environment and age. This study compares levels of laughing and smiling in 12 participants across three experimental conditions [full social interaction (with eye contact), social interaction with…

  6. Differences between Children and Adults in the Recognition of Enjoyment Smiles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Del Giudice, Marco; Colle, Livia

    2007-01-01

    The authors investigated the differences between 8-year-olds (n = 80) and adults (n = 80) in recognition of felt versus faked enjoyment smiles by using a newly developed picture set that is based on the Facial Action Coding System. The authors tested the effect of different facial action units (AUs) on judgments of smile authenticity. Multiple…

  7. Laughing and Smiling to Manage Trouble in French-Language Classroom Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petitjean, Cécile; González-Martínez, Esther

    2015-01-01

    This article deals with communicative functions of laughter and smiling in the classroom studied using a conversation analytical approach. Analysing a corpus of video-recorded French first-language lessons, we show how students sequentially organise laughter and smiling, and use them to preempt, solve or assess a problematic action. We also focus…

  8. A novel three-dimensional smile analysis based on dynamic evaluation of facial curve contour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yi; Lin, Han; Lin, Qiuping; Zhang, Jinxin; Zhu, Ping; Lu, Yao; Zhao, Zhi; Lv, Jiahong; Lee, Mln Kyeong; Xu, Yue

    2016-02-01

    The influence of three-dimensional facial contour and dynamic evaluation decoding on factors of smile esthetics is essential for facial beauty improvement. However, the kinematic features of the facial smile contour and the contribution from the soft tissue and underlying skeleton are uncharted. Here, the cheekbone-maxilla contour and nasolabial fold were combined into a “smile contour” delineating the overall facial topography emerges prominently in smiling. We screened out the stable and unstable points on the smile contour using facial motion capture and curve fitting, before analyzing the correlation between soft tissue coordinates and hard tissue counterparts of the screened points. Our finding suggests that the mouth corner region was the most mobile area characterizing smile expression, while the other areas remained relatively stable. Therefore, the perioral area should be evaluated dynamically while the static assessment outcome of other parts of the smile contour contribute partially to their dynamic esthetics. Moreover, different from the end piece, morphologies of the zygomatic area and the superior part of the nasolabial crease were determined largely by the skeleton in rest, implying the latter can be altered by orthopedic or orthodontic correction and the former better improved by cosmetic procedures to improve the beauty of smile.

  9. Relationship between Hyperactivity of Depressor Septi Nasi Muscle and Changes of Alar Base and Flaring during Smile

    PubMed Central

    Beiraghi-Toosi, Arash; Rezaei, Ezatollah; Zanjani, Elham

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Hyperactivity of depressor septi nasi muscle leads to smiling deformity and nasal tip depression. Lateral fascicles of this muscle help in widening the nostrils. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between the nasal length changes and the alar base and the alar flaring changes during smile. METHODS Standard photographs are performed in the face and lateral views with forward gaze in the repose and maximum smile. Nasal length, alar base, and alar flaring were measured on the prints of the photographs. To decrease possible errors in the size of the printed photographs, middle face height from glabella to ANS was measured in the lateral view and the interpupil distance in the face view to standardize the measurements. RESULTS Fifty cases were enrolled in this study. In 39 cases (78%), the nasal length was increased during smile. Forty-six cases (92%) had an increase in alar base diameter during smile. Alar flaring during smile increased in 48 cases (96%). Nasal length and alar base changes during smiling were not significantly correlated. Nasal length and alar flaring changes during smiling were not significantly related too. On the other hand, alar base and alar flaring changes during smile showed correlation. Alar base and alar flaring changes during smile were not significantly different in hyperactive and non-hyperactive cases. CONCLUSION Nasal length change during smiling and hypertrophy of the medial fascicles of depressor septi nasi were not related to alar base or alar flaring change during smile. PMID:27308240

  10. Improving gingival smile by means of guided bone regeneration principles

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Carlos Eduardo de Almeida; Brandão, Roberto Carlos Bodart; Martinelli, Carolina Borges; Pignaton, Túlio Bonna

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: This study evaluated the effectiveness of guided bone regeneration (GBR) carried out with xenogenic bone substitute (Bio-OssTM) and collagen resorbable membrane (Bio-GideTM) to improve gingival smile (GS) in patients with excessive vertical maxillary growth (EVMG). Methods: Twelve healthy women aged between 20 and 49 years old (mean age of 26 years), with 5 mm or more of gingival exposure during fully posed smile (FPS) due to EVMG, were included. Baseline digital photographs were taken with standardized head position at rest and FPS. In eight out of 12 cases, crown lengthening procedure was indicated and the initial incision was made 2 to 4 mm from the gingival margin. In four cases, with no indication for crown lengthening procedure, a sulcular incision was performed. GBR was performed in all cases, using micro screws and/or titanium mesh associated with Bio-OssTM and Bio-GideTM. After 10 days, sutures were removed. Recall appointments were scheduled at 1, 6, and 12 months when standardized photographs were again taken. ImageToolTM software was used to measure the gingival exposure (GE) during FPS from the standardized close-up smile photographs at baseline and 12 months. Results: GE mean at baseline was 275.44 mm2. After 12 months, patients who undergone exclusively GBR procedure, presented GE reduction of 40.7%, ∆ = 112.01 mm2 (statistically significant, p = 0.12), and patients who had crown lengthening associated with the graft had a reduction of 60%, ∆ = 167.01 mm2. Conclusion: Our results using GBR to improve GS in cases of EVMG showed an exceptionally high patient acceptance and satisfaction. One-year follow-up confirmed stable results. PMID:27409660

  11. The specific molecular identification of life experiment ( SMILE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sims, M. R.; Cullen, D. C.; Bannister, N. P.; Grant, W. D.; Henry, O.; Jones, R.; McKnight, D.; Thompson, D. P.; Wilson, P. K.

    2005-07-01

    We describe a compact, highly integrated instrument concept for the detection and identification of a wide range of molecules associated with extinct/extant life or potential life processes. The Specific Molecular Identification of Life Experiment ( SMILE) will be sensitive to the presence of a range of target molecules using both electrical and optical transduction techniques, and incorporates molecular imprinted polymers in addition to traditional biological receptors such as antibodies. A number of versions of the concept are possible depending on available resources e.g. mass, volume, etc. The full concept utilises a novel imaging interferometer where a large number of molecular receptors are deposited on the measurement plane of an imaging interferometer and read out by an imaging detector, enabling multiple targets - biomarkers - within a sample to be measured simultaneously. The optics can also form the basis of an UV-NIR imaging Fourier spectrometer allowing basic mineralogy studies to be conducted using optical properties to assist in the determination of the geological context of the samples. By incorporating micro-fabricated transducer arrays, micro-fluidics and artificial molecular recognition systems, as well as recombinant antibody technology with appropriate integration methods, SMILE forms a compact and robust "Life Marker Chip" which has been proposed for future planetary missions including ESA's ExoMars mission, where the instrument offers the possibility of conducting a direct in situ search for signs of past or present biological activity on Mars. In addition to its role in planetary exploration, derivatives of SMILE have multiple terrestrial applications in fields such as forensic analysis and environmental monitoring.

  12. CurlySMILES: a chemical language to customize and annotate encodings of molecular and nanodevice structures

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    CurlySMILES is a chemical line notation which extends SMILES with annotations for storage, retrieval and modeling of interlinked, coordinated, assembled and adsorbed molecules in supramolecular structures and nanodevices. Annotations are enclosed in curly braces and anchored to an atomic node or at the end of the molecular graph depending on the annotation type. CurlySMILES includes predefined annotations for stereogenicity, electron delocalization charges, extra-molecular interactions and connectivity, surface attachment, solutions, and crystal structures and allows extensions for domain-specific annotations. CurlySMILES provides a shorthand format to encode molecules with repetitive substructural parts or motifs such as monomer units in macromolecules and amino acids in peptide chains. CurlySMILES further accommodates special formats for non-molecular materials that are commonly denoted by composition of atoms or substructures rather than complete atom connectivity. PMID:21214931

  13. The SMILE fluxgate sensor: performance and possibilities of improvement.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyayev, S.; Ivchenko, N.; Korepanov, V.; Marusenkov, A.

    2009-04-01

    The Small Magnetometer in Low-Mass Experiment (SMILE) is a miniaturized triaxial fluxgate magnetometer with volume compensation incorporating efficient signal processing algorithms within a field programmable gate array (FPGA). SMILE was designed in collaboration between the Lviv Centre of Institute for Space Research (LC ISR) in Ukraine where the sensor was developed and the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) in Stockholm, Sweden where the electronics used to operate the instrument were designed and programmed. The SMILE magnetometer compares well with modern digital FGMs in resolution (20 bit, corresponding to 0.1 nT per bit ) and sample rate (up to 250 sample per second), but has significantly lower consumption (about 260 mW), smaller size (the sensor - 20x20x20 cubic millimeters, the first prototype of the electronic board - 120x80 square millimeters) and lower weight (the sensor - 21 g and the board - 80 g). Using the cubic coils for volume compensation, optimizing the sensor design and using Macor for main sensor parts resulted in achieving uniquely stable geometric parameters for such a small sensor. A calibration of the SMILE instrument was carried out at the Nurmijarvi Geophysical Observatory, showing high linearity (deviation no more than 6 nT along total ±50 μT scale) and low orthogonality error (<22 arcmin). The temperature coefficients of the scale factors were below 11 ppm/C and the deviation of the magnetic axes was about 3 arcsec per C in the range of -30 to +45 centidegrees. The bar-core fluxgate sensors are based on the two strips of amorphous Co-Fe-Si-B alloy of the dimensions 16x1x0.02 cubic millimeters. The sensors noise level is less than 30 pT/sqrt(Hz)at 1 Hz that it is rather good for such modest magnetic core volume. In the recent publications [1-3] the peculiarities of the electronic unit design, the signal detection algorithm and the results of the numerical simulation of the sensor magnetic core behavior during its excitation were

  14. Amelogenesis Imperfecta, Facial Esthetics and Snap-On Smile.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Lee; Bradshaw, Jonathan P; Marks, Murray K

    2015-01-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta is a hereditary enamel protein disorder affecting deciduous and secondary crown formation. The prevalence ranges from 1:700 to 1:14,000 depending on the population. These teeth may be hypoplastic, hypomineralized, or hypermineralized and are often discolored, sensitive and caries vulnerable. Patients often present with psychosocial issues due to appearance. Primary teeth are often treated with stainless steel crowns while secondary teeth are treated with full coverage esthetic crowns. The presenting preteen male here was fitted with Snap-On Smile? (www.snaponsmile.com). This treatment option provided cosmetic enhancement of the patient's appearance besides stabilization without altering the primary and secondary dentition during adolescent development.

  15. Dr. Arthur Conan Doyle and the case of congenital syphilis.

    PubMed

    Silverstein, Arthur M; Ruggere, Christine

    2006-01-01

    In 1894, Dr. Arthur Conan Doyle wrote "The Third Generation," a short story involving the transmission of congenital syphilis from generation to generation. Analysts of his writings have interpreted the pathogenetic mechanism involved in modern terms: infection of mother by father and then transplacental infection of the fetus. However, a review of the contemporary literature and the history of the concepts of congenital and "hereditary" syphilis demonstrates that the late 19th-century understanding of the process involved a Lamarckian transmission of paternal infection, via the sperm at the moment of conception. It was undoubtedly this concept that Doyle learned in medical school in the late 1870s and that provided the background to his story.

  16. Ernest Arthur Kendall: his life in peace and war.

    PubMed

    Faragher, Trevor

    2011-01-01

    Ernest Arthur Kendall (1876-1938), whose father founded the first veterinary school in Australia, qualified as a veterinary surgeon, as did three of his brothers. He was commissioned in the Australian Army Veterinary Corps and fought with distinction in both the Boer War and World War I. He established an Australian Veterinary Hospital near Calais, France, in 1917. The Purple Cross Society of Victoria paid for the fit-out and necessary material for the running of the hospital, which treated 24,300 animals before it closed in 1919. In that year, Colonel Kendall resumed his career in the Department of Agriculture Victoria, where he was appointed Chief Veterinary Officer in 1926 and Chairman of the Milk Board in 1934. He worked toward a pure milk supply, enabled the establishment of a laboratory to test milk samples, and looked forward to a well-planned campaign for the eradication of bovine tuberculosis.

  17. One Visit Providing Desirable Smile by Laser Application

    PubMed Central

    Fekrazad, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Providing desirable smile is one of the main concerns in cosmetic dentistry. Hyperpigmentation is one of the esthetic concerns especially in gummy smile patients. Lasers with different wavelength are used for oral surgery including Carbon Dioxide Laser (CO2), Neodymium-Doped Yttrium Aluminium Garnet (Nd:YAG), Erbium family and diode laser. In this case, all esthetic procedures including gingival depigmentation, caries detection and removal were done by laser technology in one session. Case study: A 40- year-old male with a chief complaint of black gingiva in upper jaw was referred. The right side of maxillary was anesthetized and depigmentation was done by Erbium, Chromium doped Yttrium Scandium Gallium Garnet (Er-Cr: YSGG) laser. Due to scores obtained from Diagnodent which indicated caries in dentin, the cavities were prepared by Er-Cr:YSGG laser. The cavities were restored by composite resin. The patient was advised to keep oral hygiene instructions and use mouthwash. Results: The patient reported no pain after surgery and did not use any systemic antibiotic. After 4 weeks, complete healing was observed. Conclusion: Considering acceptable clinical outcome, Er-Cr: YSGG laser can be considered as an effective method for combination of soft and hard tissue treatment. PMID:25606339

  18. Status of SMILES research products and retrieval algorithm description.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baron, Philippe; Kasai, Yasuko; Ochiai, Satoshi; Sagawa, Hideo; Mendrok, Jana; Urban, Joachim; Murtagh, Donal P.; Moller, Joakim; Murayama, Yasuhiro

    The super-conducting SubMillimeter wave Limb Emission Sounder (SMILES) is a high sensi-tive radiometer to study atmospheric dynamics and chemistry with a strong emphasis on the stratosphere. It is the result of the collaboration between the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and the National Institute of Information and Communications and Technol-ogy (NICT, Japan). It is operating from the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) onboard the International Space Station. Observations started on October, 2009. The latitude coverage is typically from -38° to 65° . The main products are the distribution from the upper-troposphere to the mesosphere of O3 and its isotopes, H35 Cl, H37 Cl, ClO, BrO, HO2 , HOCl, H2 O2 , CH3 CN and H2 O. Thanks to its high signal to noise ratio, SMILES is very well suited for observing radicals with very low abundances such as BrO and HO2 . Furthermore due to the ISS orbit precession, it is possible to follow their diurnal variation at given latitudes. The operational processing of the observations is done in JAXA for levels 1b and 2 data, and in NICT for level 3 data. A system for research on retrieval algorithms has been developed by NICT. The results are named research products. In this presentation, we will present the status and the algorithms for the NICT research products as well as the ongoing research including plans for new products.

  19. America's foremost early astronomer. [David Rittenhouse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubincam, David Parry; Rubincam, Milton, II

    1995-01-01

    The life of 18th century astronomer, craftsman, and partriot David Rittenhouse is detailed. As a craftsman, he distinguished himself as one of the foremost builders of clocks. He also built magnetic compasses and surveying instruments. The finest examples of his craftsmanship are considered two orreries, mechanical solar systems. In terms of astronomical observations, his best-known contribution was his observation of the transit of Venus in 1769. Rittenhouse constructed the first diffraction grating. Working as Treasurer of Pennsylvania throughout the Revolution, he became the first director of the Mint in 1792. Astronomical observations in later life included charting the position of Uranus after its discovery.

  20. An evaluation of dynamic lip-tooth characteristics during speech and smile in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Ackerman, Marc B; Brensinger, Colleen; Landis, J Richard

    2004-02-01

    This retrospective study was conducted to measure lip-tooth characteristics of adolescents. Pretreatment video clips of 1242 consecutive patients were screened for Class-I skeletal and dental patterns. After all inclusion criteria were applied, the final sample consisted of 50 patients (27 boys, 23 girls) with a mean age of 12.5 years. The raw digital video stream of each patient was edited to select a single image frame representing the patient saying the syllable "chee" and a second single image representing the patient's posed social smile and saved as part of a 12-frame image sequence. Each animation image was analyzed using a SmileMesh computer application to measure the smile index (the ratio of the intercommissure width divided by the interlabial gap), intercommissure width (mm), interlabial gap (mm), percent incisor below the intercommissure line, and maximum incisor exposure (mm). The data were analyzed using SAS (version 8.1). All recorded differences in linear measures had to be > or = 2 mm. The results suggest that anterior tooth display at speech and smile should be recorded independently but evaluated as part of a dynamic range. Asking patients to say "cheese" and then smile is no longer a valid method to elicit the parameters of anterior tooth display. When planning the vertical positions of incisors during orthodontic treatment, the orthodontist should view the dynamics of anterior tooth display as a continuum delineated by the time points of rest, speech, posed social smile, and a Duchenne smile.

  1. Influence of Smile Arc and Buccal Corridors on Facial Attractiveness: A Cross-sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Gaikwad, Shashank; Vaz, Anna C; Singh, Baldeep; Taneja, Lavina; Vinod, KS; Verma, Prateek

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Two aspects of the smile: the Smile Arc (SA) and Buccal Corridors (BC) have been the interest of the orthodontist in recent years. Aim The present study was undertaken to evaluate the influence of the smile arc and buccal corridors on facial attractiveness as evaluated by orthodontists, general dentists and laymen. Materials and Methods Two subjects (one male & one female) were selected from the regional population fulfilling the criteria of an ideal smile arc and ideal buccal corridors. Frontal smile view photographs of these subjects were taken and modified by using adobe photoshop 7.0 to create combination of three smile arc variance and three buccal corridors variations respectively which were shown to 25 orthodontists, 25 general dentists & 25 laymen, to rate the facial attractiveness of each image on a rating scale. Results All the three groups (laypersons, dentists and orthodontists) showed significant difference in ratings, indicating that they had different perceptions on the facial attractiveness. Conclusion Orthodontists were more precise in discerning the smile arc and buccal corridors compared to dentists and laypersons. PMID:27790573

  2. The osteosarcoma of the great poet Arthur Rimbaud (1854-1891).

    PubMed

    Androutsos, G

    2005-01-01

    Thanks to Arthur Rimbaud's excellent medical auto-observation, which is included in his correspondance, we can diagnose, post-mortem, an osteosarcoma in the right knee, a disease which turned out to be fatal for him.

  3. Interview with a SureSmile doctor: Nicole M. Jane. Interview by Robert P. Scholz.

    PubMed

    Jane, Nicole M

    2009-04-01

    SureSmile (OraMetrix, Richardson, Tex) uses advanced technologies, including digital models, virtual simulations, and robotic wire bending to help clinicians provide customized, efficient treatment. Nicole M. Jane has been a solo orthodontic practitioner in South Lake Tahoe, California, since 2004. She has been using SureSmile technology in her practice since December 2005 and is an advisor for SureSmile in her capacity as a practicing orthodontist. Before becoming an orthodontist, Dr Jane was a general dentist in the US Navy, 1998-2001.

  4. Evidence From ElderSmile for Diabetes and Hypertension Screening in Oral Health Programs

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Stephen; Schrimshaw, Eric W.; Metcalf, Sara S.; Greenblatt, Ariel Port; De La Cruz, Leydis; Kunzel, Carol; Northridge, Mary E.

    2015-01-01

    The ElderSmile clinical program was initiated in northern Manhattan in 2006. ElderSmile is a comprehensive community-based program offering education, screening and treatment services for seniors in impoverished communities. Originally focused on oral health, ElderSmile was expanded in 2010 to include diabetes and hypertension education and screening. More than 1,000 elders have participated in the expanded program to date. Quantitative and qualitative findings support a role for dental professionals in screening for these primary care sensitive conditions. PMID:26451080

  5. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey, David Aronow, Photographer circa 1924, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey, David Aronow, Photographer circa 1924, FRONT ELEVATION SHOWING BELLTOWER AND PROJECTING VERANDA. - Laurelton Hall, Laurel Hollow & Ridge Roads, Oyster Bay, Nassau County, NY

  6. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey, David Aronow, Photographer circa 1924, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey, David Aronow, Photographer circa 1924, DETAIL OF FRONT ELEVATION SHOWING PROJECTING VERANDA. - Laurelton Hall, Laurel Hollow & Ridge Roads, Oyster Bay, Nassau County, NY

  7. The Operational Leadership of General Douglas MacArthur in OPERATION CHROMITE

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    NAVAL WAR COLLEGE Newport, R.I. The Operational Leadership of General Douglas MacArthur in OPERATION CHROMITE by Judie A. Heineman Commander, United...Operations. The contents of this paper reflect my own personal views and are not necessarily endorsed by the Naval War College or the Department of...MacArthur in Operation Chromite 9. Personal Author: Judie Ann Heineman, Commander, United States Navy 10.Type of Report: FINAL 11. Date of Report: 13

  8. David Lasser - An American Spaceflight Pioneer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciancone, Michael L.; Lasser, Amelia

    2002-01-01

    David Lasser was one of the founders of the American Interplanetary Society (later known as the American Rocket Society) and author of the first English-language book (in 1931) on the use of rockets for human spaceflight. His involvement in the fledgling spaceflight movement was short-lived as he moved on to pursue a distinguished, if turbulent, career in the labor movement. In lieu of an oral history, Mr. Lasser provided his recollections on the pioneering days of rocketry and his thoughts on mankind's destiny in space. This paper provides an overview of Mr. Lasser's life and accomplishments as an American spaceflight visionary, along with a compilation of the information that he graciously provided.

  9. David D. Derse, 1949-2009.

    PubMed

    Shuh, Maureen

    2009-12-01

    David D. Derse, Ph.D., Head of the Retrovirus Gene Expression Section in the HIV Drug Resistance Program at the National Cancer Institute-Frederick (NCI-Frederick), passed away on October 9, 2009, a scant six weeks after being diagnosed with liver cancer. It was with great sadness that family, friends, and colleagues gathered together for his memorial service on Saturday, October 17, 2009, at the Middletown United Methodist Church in Maryland. As a NCI scientist since 1986, Dave studied the molecular mechanisms of infection and replication of a number of different types of retroviruses. Dave became an internationally known expert on human T cell lymphotrophic viruses type 1 and 2 (HTLV-1 and HTLV-2) and served on the editorial boards of Virology and Retrovirology. His most recent studies focused on the mechanisms of HTLV-1 virion morphogenesis, transmission, and replication.

  10. David Lukens Reasoner (1941-1992)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chappell, Rick

    David Lukens Reasoner, former head of NASA's Ionospheric Physics branch, died on April 21, 1992. Reasoner was born July 1, 1941. He worked tirelessly to expand NASA's Space Physics Division, bringing his deep experience and personal expertise to bear on the challenges of growth.During the magical period of the late 1950s and early 1960s when America turned its eyes toward space and the Moon, David Lukens Reasoner journeyed north from the nearby Texas town of Dickinson to Rice University with an idea of getting involved in exploring the frontiers of space. He pursued a course of study in electrical engineering and received a bachelor's degree in 1963 and a master's degree in 1964. In the early 1960s, the Space Science Department at Rice was formed, and President John Kennedy visited to say that America chose to go to space not because it is easy but because it is hard and because it would require the very best talents of our nation to succeed. Dave Reasoner was one of those talented people. His excellence in electrical engineering and physics, combined with his natural abilities in the laboratory, suited him ideally for building the machines of space. As a student, he built sounding rocket payloads and multiple instruments for satellites and experiment packages that were placed on the Moon by the Apollo astronauts. He completed his doctoral degree in space science in 1968. It was in these early thrilling days of space exploration that I first met Dave, beginning a friendship and collegial relationship that was to last 27 years.

  11. Flood geomorphology of Arthurs Rock Gulch, Colorado: paleoflood history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waythomas, Christopher F.; Jarrett, Robert D.

    1994-11-01

    Episodic late Quaternary flooding is recorded by bouldery deposits and slackwater sediments along Arthurs Rock Gulch, an ephemeral stream west of Fort Collins, Colorado. Flood deposits consist of individual granodiorite and pegmatite boulders, boulder bars, and coarse overbank sediment that rest on erosional terrace segments along the channel. We identified evidence for at least five flood in the lower two thirds of the 1.84 km 2 drainage basin. Flood deposits are differentiated by their position above the active channel, weathering characteristics, degree of boulder burial by colluvium, amount of lichen cover, and position with respect to terrace and colluvial deposits. Age estimates for the flood deposits are based on radiocarbon dating, tree-ring analyses, and relative-age criteria from four sites in the basin. At least two floods occurred in the last 300 years; a third flood is at least 5000 years old, but likely younger than 10,000 yr BP; and the two oldest floods occurred at least 40,000 years BP.

  12. Flood geomorphology of Arthurs Rock Gulch, Colorado: paleoflood history

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waythomas, C.F.; Jarrett, R.D.

    1994-01-01

    Episodic late Quaternary flooding is recorded by bouldery deposits and slackwater sediments along Arthurs Rock Gulch, an ephemeral stream west of Fort Collins, Colorado. Flood deposits consist of individual granodiorite and pegmatite boulders, boulder bars, and coarse overbank sediment that rest on erosional terrace segments along the channel. We identified evidence for at least five flood in the lower two thirds of the 1.84 km2 drainage basin. Flood deposits are differentiated by their position above the active channel, weathering characteristics, degree of boulder burial by colluvium, amount of lichen cover, and position with respect to terrace and colluvial deposits. Age estimates for the flood deposits are based on radiocarbon dating, tree-ring analyses, and relative-age criteria from four sites in the basin. At least two floods occurred in the last 300 years; a third flood is at least 5000 years old, but likely younger than 10,000 yr BP; and the two oldest floods occurred at least 40,000 years BP. ?? 1994.

  13. [Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Sherlock Holmes and infectious diseases].

    PubMed

    Ledermann D, Walter

    2010-10-01

    Besides a pleasant author of best sellers, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle was a medical doctor, writing excellent short stories about the exercise of his profession in England. However, even he mentions The British Medical Journal and The Lancet in the Sherlock Holmes's stories, when in the plot introduces infectious diseases, Conan Doyle ignores important discoveries in the field of tetanus. Anyway, the appearing of infectious diseases in the adventures of the detective are rare: one mention of tetanus, another of leprosy and- the most analyzed in medical literature a case of murder by inoculation of bacteria, probably the agent of melioidosis. Also he makes his hero discovers the toxic actions of a medusa and a transplant of solid organ. Little for a physician and less for an author who also wrote science fiction: it seems that the history of the great medical discoveries at the end of nineteenth century and beginning of the twentieth has passed by his side.., and he just couldn't see it.

  14. Arthur Rainsford Mowlem (1902-1986), plastic surgeon.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Richard W

    2013-08-01

    Arthur Rainsford Mowlem, the junior of the 'big four' plastic surgeons, with Harold Delf Gillies, Thomas Pomfret Kilner and Archibald Hector McIndoe, came to prominence managing casualties of the Second World War. Rainsford Mowlem's ancestor was John Mowlem, the creator of the construction firm. Rainsford worked his passage to the United Kingdom from New Zealand in 1927 and did not return to New Zealand but retired at the age of 60 to enjoy 23 more years in Spain. He was the driving force between 1934 and 1939 at the Plastic Surgery Unit at St James's Hospital, Balham, and instigated the North London Plastic Surgery Unit at Hill End, St Albans, from 1939 to 1953 and subsequently developed the Unit after moving to Mount Vernon Hospital, Northwood, Middlesex. After successfully hosting the International Meeting of Plastic Surgeons in London in 1959, he received recognition and honours in America but soon afterwards he surprised colleagues by retiring in 1962. Despite his significant contributions, he did not receive national honours but his life outside surgery was active including Trusteeship of the Mowlem Estate at Swanage in Dorset for 40 years.

  15. Management of gummy smile with Botulinum Toxin Type-A: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Dinker, Sudeeptha; Anitha, A; Sorake, Abhinay; Kumar, Kishore

    2014-01-01

    A 23 year old female patient presented with the chief complaint of gummy smile after previously undergoing Orthodontic treatment. Patient had a straight profile with competent lips and during posed and unposed smile the patient exhibited excessive gingival display. Since the patient was unwilling to undergo Orthodontic treatment and apprehensive about surgical procedures, this problem was addressed by injecting Botulinum toxin type-A as an alternative treatment approach. Two weeks post treatment; on follow up examination, improved results were seen without any side effects. As a result, an attractive and confident smile was perceived by the patient. How to cite the article: Dinker S, Anitha A, Sorake A, Kumar K. Management of gummy smile with Botulinum Toxin Type-A: A case report. J Int Oral Health 2014;6(1):111-5. PMID:24653614

  16. Facial Likability and Smiling Enhance Cooperation, but Have No Direct Effect on Moralistic Punishment.

    PubMed

    Mieth, Laura; Bell, Raoul; Buchner, Axel

    2016-09-01

    The present study serves to test how positive and negative appearance-based expectations affect cooperation and punishment. Participants played a prisoner's dilemma game with partners who either cooperated or defected. Then they were given a costly punishment option: They could spend money to decrease the payoffs of their partners. Aggregated over trials, participants spent more money for punishing the defection of likable-looking and smiling partners compared to punishing the defection of unlikable-looking and nonsmiling partners, but only because participants were more likely to cooperate with likable-looking and smiling partners, which provided the participants with more opportunities for moralistic punishment. When expressed as a conditional probability, moralistic punishment did not differ as a function of the partners' facial likability. Smiling had no effect on the probability of moralistic punishment, but punishment was milder for smiling in comparison to nonsmiling partners.

  17. [Light reflection zone on the incisors' surface--a new parameter for smile esthetics evaluation].

    PubMed

    Brezniak, N; Wasserstein, A; Shmuli, T

    2012-07-01

    The light reflection zone (LRZ) is a bright white dot or area that appears on the surface of the maxillary central incisors and/or the gingiva of the front teeth, visible in intra-oral and smile extra-oral photographs. Previously, a positive correlation between the location of the LRZ as observed in intra-oral frontal photographs and the inclination of the upper central incisors as measured on lateral headfims was found. The purpose of this study was to find whether this LRZ location can serve as a new parameter influencing the level of smile esthetics. Twelve pairs of facial photographs, including 10 of ordinary smiling persons and 2 of smiling models, were presented to 138 participants. The only difference between each pair was the location of the LRZ that was moved, compared to the original photograph, gingivally or incisally respectively, using Photoshop (Adobe). Each participant was asked to mark whether he/she noticed a difference between the 2 pictures, and if so, to score the nicer smile. Data analysis was carried out using Chi square test and Fisher's exact test (SPSS v17). The results showed that most of the participants did not recognize the differences between the pairs however, when differences were recognized, most of the participants pointed on the smile where the LRZ was located gingivally as the nicer one. This result was with statistical significance for the 2 models (p < 0.05), In conclusion, the LRZ is a new, yet unrecognized, parameter that can serve as a tool for the diagnosis of esthetic smile. The general population defines a nicer smile when the LRZ is located in the gingival area of the upper central incisors' surface rather than the incisal third. The LRZ should probably be studied not only in Orthodontics but also in other branches of dentistry.

  18. CenteringPregnancySmiles: implementation of a small group prenatal care model with oral health.

    PubMed

    Skelton, Judith; Mullins, Raynor; Langston, LeAnn Todd; Womack, Sara; Ebersole, Jeffrey L; Rising, Sharon Schindler; Kovarik, Robert

    2009-05-01

    Preterm/low birth weights are the leading perinatal problem in the U.S., and an association between preterm/low birth weight outcomes and oral health has been identified. In response to this, a group prenatal care program--CenteringPregnancySmiles--was implemented in rural Kentucky in 2006. This report describes the model and preliminary outcomes of the CenteringPregnancySmiles program.

  19. Total intrusion and distalization of the maxillary arch to improve smile esthetics

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Eui Seon; Hwang, Soonshin; Kim, Kyung-Ho

    2017-01-01

    This case report illustrates the successful treatment of a patient with skeletal Class II malocclusion and an unesthetic smile involving excessive gingival display and large buccal corridors. By applying dual buccal interradicular miniscrews, total intrusion of the maxillary dentition along with distalization was induced to improve both the occlusion and smile esthetics. In addition to the conventional cephalometric superimposition, three-dimensional superimposition was performed and evaluated to validate the treatment outcome. PMID:28127540

  20. 77 FR 71189 - Falck, David P.; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-29

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Falck, David P.; Notice of Filing Take notice that on November 23, 2012, David P. Falck submitted for filing, an application for authority to hold interlocking positions...-8659. Comment Date: 5:00 p.m. Eastern Time on December 14, 2012. Dated: November 23, 2012. Kimberly...

  1. Music: Part of the Basics at David Douglas and Salem.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pheasant, Marilyn

    1985-01-01

    This bulletin highlights elements of the music programs in two Oregon school districts--David Douglas School District 40 and Salem School District 24J--that have kept these programs viable in spite of financial constraints. Ingredients for success of the overall music program at David Douglas are first described. Important elements include hiring…

  2. Teaching Students about the Environment with Henry David Thoreau

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curriculum Review, 2008

    2008-01-01

    "Walden: The Ballad of Thoreau" is a two-act four-character play about the final two days writer Henry David Thoreau spent in his cabin before leaving Walden Pond. Teachers can use this play to teach about preserving the earth to students. This article presents a brief synopsis of the play and a brief biography of Henry David Thoreau.

  3. 75 FR 10244 - Ellsworth, David C.; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-05

    ... [Federal Register Volume 75, Number 43 (Friday, March 5, 2010)] [Notices] [Page 10244] [FR Doc No: 2010-4611] DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket No. ID-3716-001] Ellsworth, David C.; Notice of Filing February 25, 2010. Take notice that on February 12, 2010, David C....

  4. Perceptions of Altered Smile Esthetics: A Comparative Evaluation in Orthodontists, Dentists, and Laypersons

    PubMed Central

    Shagmani, Muftah; Al Kaddah, Fatma

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The current investigation was proposed to determine the impression of trained dental professionals and laypeople towards the modified smile esthetics. Materials and Methods. Twenty-six images were randomized in a survey and graded according to attractiveness by the orthodontists, general dentists, and laypeople. Photographs of gingival display, midline diastema, central incisor crown length, and lateral incisor crown width were manipulated with five minor changes in each. For smile arc and buccal corridor, two major changes were incorporated besides the ideal photograph. One-way ANOVA and Post Hoc analysis of the responses were measured for each group. Results. Most evaluators opined that the ideal smile in each category was the most acceptable. Orthodontists were more perceptive and exacting in accepting variations in the smile arc and buccal corridors. Dental professionals and laypeople indicated that either complete absence or a 0.5 mm of alterations in a gingival display, midline diastema, and crown length makes a smile beautiful and pleasant. Changes in crown width were not perceivable by all the three groups. Conclusion. Eastern Arabic laymen are more conscious about alterations in gingival display, midline diastema, and crown length in their smile. Hence, the orthodontist should pay attention to these factors during any orthodontic treatment. PMID:27774105

  5. Observation capability of Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) from International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasai, Yasuko; Baron, Philippe; Mendrok, Jana; Tanaka, Takahiro; Urban, Joachim; Kita, Kazuyuki; Sato, Ryota; Murtah, Donal; Suzuki, Makoto; Shiotani, Masato

    2010-05-01

    A new generation of super-sensitive submillimeter-wave receivers, employing SIS (Superconductor-Insulator- Superconductor) technology, will provide new opportunities for precise remote sensing observation of minor constituents in the atmosphere. SMILES had been launched at 11/09/2009, and installed on the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) in the International Space Station (ISS). SMILES is a collaboration project between NICT and JAXA. Mission objectives of SMILES are: i) Space demonstration of super-sensitive SIS mixer and 4-K mechanical cooler technology ii) Super-sensitive global observation of atmospheric minor constituents JEM/SMILES observes the atmospheric species such as O3, H35Cl, H37Cl, ClO, HO2, BrO, HOCl, HOBr, HNO3, CH3CN, Ozone isotope species, H2O, and Ice Cloud with the precisions in a few to several tens percents. Theoretical observation capability was studied with error analysis. The altitude region of observation is from the upper troposphere to the mesopouse. SMILES early results will be shown with global distributions (L3 data). The early comparison/validation of ozone performed with several satellite data, such as MLS, ACE, OSIRIS and Odin.SMR. The statistical analysis showed the differences were less of 5 percent between SMILES and other satellites data validated. This value was consistent with theoretical capability. This super technology may allow us to open new issues in atmospheric science.

  6. The effects of camera lenses and dental specialties on the perception of smile esthetics

    PubMed Central

    Sajjadi, Seyed Hadi; Khosravanifard, Behnam; Esmaeilpour, Mozhgan; Rakhshan, Vahid; Moazzami, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aim: The purpose of this study was to investigate whether different camera lenses and dental specialties can affect the perception of smile esthetics. Methods: In the first phase of this study, 40 female smile photographs (taken from dental students) were evaluated by six orthodontists, three specialists in restorative dentistry, and three prosthodontists to select the most beautiful smiles. The 20 students with the best smile ranks were again photographed in standard conditions, but this time with two different lenses: Regular and then macro lenses. Each referee evaluated the beauty of the smiles on a visual analog scale. The referees were blinded of the type of lenses, and the images were all coded. The data were analyzed using two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), Kruskal–Wallis and Mann–Whitney U-tests (alpha = 0.05, alpha = 0.0167). Results: The lenses led to similar scores of beauty perception (Mann–Whitney P = 0.8). There was no difference between subjective beauty perception of specialties (Kruskal–Wallis P = 0.6). Two-way ANOVA indicated no significant role for lenses (P = 0.1750), specialties (P = 0.7677), or their interaction (P = 0.7852). Conclusion: The photographs taken by a regular lens and then digitally magnified can be as appealing as close-up photographs taken by a macro lens. Experts in different specialties (orthodontics, prosthodontics, and restorative dentistry) showed similar subjective judgments of smile beauty. PMID:26952147

  7. Susceptibility to emotional contagion for negative emotions improves detection of smile authenticity

    PubMed Central

    Manera, Valeria; Grandi, Elisa; Colle, Livia

    2013-01-01

    A smile is a context-dependent emotional expression. A smiling face can signal the experience of enjoyable emotions, but people can also smile to convince another person that enjoyment is occurring when it is not. For this reason, the ability to discriminate between felt and faked enjoyment expressions is a crucial social skill. Despite its importance, adults show remarkable individual variation in this ability. Revealing the factors responsible for these huge individual differences is a key challenge in this domain. Here we investigated, on a large sample of participants, whether individual differences in smile authenticity recognition are accounted for by differences in the predisposition to experience other people's emotions, i.e., by susceptibility to emotional contagion. Results showed that susceptibility to emotional contagion for negative emotions increased smile authenticity detection, while susceptibility to emotional contagion for positive emotions worsened detection performance, because it leaded to categorize most of the faked smiles as sincere. These findings suggest that susceptibility to emotional contagion plays a key role in complex emotion recognition, and point out the importance of analyzing the tendency to experience other people's positive and negative emotions as separate abilities. PMID:23508036

  8. Perceptions of Altered Smile Esthetics: A Comparative Evaluation in Orthodontists, Dentists, and Laypersons.

    PubMed

    Al Taki, Amjad; Khalesi, Mohammed; Shagmani, Muftah; Yahia, Islam; Al Kaddah, Fatma

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The current investigation was proposed to determine the impression of trained dental professionals and laypeople towards the modified smile esthetics. Materials and Methods. Twenty-six images were randomized in a survey and graded according to attractiveness by the orthodontists, general dentists, and laypeople. Photographs of gingival display, midline diastema, central incisor crown length, and lateral incisor crown width were manipulated with five minor changes in each. For smile arc and buccal corridor, two major changes were incorporated besides the ideal photograph. One-way ANOVA and Post Hoc analysis of the responses were measured for each group. Results. Most evaluators opined that the ideal smile in each category was the most acceptable. Orthodontists were more perceptive and exacting in accepting variations in the smile arc and buccal corridors. Dental professionals and laypeople indicated that either complete absence or a 0.5 mm of alterations in a gingival display, midline diastema, and crown length makes a smile beautiful and pleasant. Changes in crown width were not perceivable by all the three groups. Conclusion. Eastern Arabic laymen are more conscious about alterations in gingival display, midline diastema, and crown length in their smile. Hence, the orthodontist should pay attention to these factors during any orthodontic treatment.

  9. Children's Nonverbal Displays of Winning and Losing: Effects of Social and Cultural Contexts on Smiles.

    PubMed

    Mui, Phoebe H C; Goudbeek, Martijn B; Swerts, Marc G J; Hovasapian, Arpine

    2017-01-01

    We examined the effects of social and cultural contexts on smiles displayed by children during gameplay. Eight-year-old Dutch and Chinese children either played a game alone or teamed up to play in pairs. Activation and intensity of facial muscles corresponding to Action Unit (AU) 6 and AU 12 were coded according to Facial Action Coding System. Co-occurrence of activation of AU 6 and AU 12, suggesting the presence of a Duchenne smile, was more frequent among children who teamed up than among children who played alone. Analyses of the intensity of smiles revealed an interaction between social and cultural contexts. Whereas smiles, both Duchenne and non-Duchenne, displayed by Chinese children who teamed up were more intense than those displayed by Chinese children who played alone, the effect of sociality on smile intensity was not observed for Dutch children. These findings suggest that the production of smiles by children in a competitive context is susceptible to both social and cultural factors.

  10. Wound healing profiles of hyperopic-small incision lenticule extraction (SMILE)

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yu-Chi; Ang, Heng Pei; Teo, Ericia Pei Wen; Lwin, Nyein Chan; Yam, Gary Hin Fai; Mehta, Jodhbir S.

    2016-01-01

    Refractive surgical treatment of hyperopia still remains a challenge for refractive surgeons. A new nomogram of small incision lenticule extraction (SMILE) procedure has recently been developed for the treatment of hyperopia. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the wound healing and inflammatory responses of this new nomogram (hyperopic-SMILE), and compared them to those of hyperopic-laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK), using a rabbit model. A total of 26 rabbits were used, and slit lamp biomicroscopy, autorefractor/keratometer, intraocular pressure measurement, anterior segment optical coherence tomography, corneal topography, and in vivo confocal microscopy examinations were performed during the study period of 4 weeks. The corneas were then harvested and subject to immunofluorescence of markers for inflammation (CD11b), wound healing (fibronectin) and keratocyte response (HSP47). The lenticule ultrastructual changes were also analyzed by transmission electron microscopy. Out results showed that hyperopic-SMILE effectively steepened the cornea. Compared to hyperopic-LASIK, hyperopic-SMILE had less postoperative wound healing response and stromal interface reaction, especially in higher refractive correction. However, compared to myopic-SMILE, hyperopic-SMILE resulted in more central deranged collagen fibrils. These results provide more perspective into this new treatment option for hyperopia, and evidence for future laser nomogram modification. PMID:27418330

  11. Obituary: David L. Band (1957-2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cominsky, Lynn

    2011-12-01

    David L. Band, of Potomac Maryland, died on March 16, 2009 succumbing to a long battle with spinal cord cancer. His death at the age of 52 came as a shock to his many friends and colleagues in the physics and astronomy community. Band showed an early interest and exceptional aptitude for physics, leading to his acceptance at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology as an undergraduate student in 1975. After graduating from MIT with an undergraduate degree in Physics, Band continued as a graduate student in Physics at Harvard University. His emerging interest in Astrophysics led him to the Astronomy Department at the Harvard Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA), where he did his dissertation work with Jonathan Grindlay. His dissertation (1985) entitled "Non-thermal Radiation Mechanisms and Processes in SS433 and Active Galactic Nuclei" was "pioneering work on the physics of jets arising from black holes and models for their emission, including self-absorption, which previewed much to come, and even David's own later work on Gamma-ray Bursts," according to Grindlay who remained a personal friend and colleague of Band's. Following graduate school, Band held postdoctoral positions at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, the University of California at Berkeley and the Center for Astronomy and Space Sciences at the University of California San Diego where he worked on the BATSE experiment that was part of the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO), launched in 1991. BATSE had as its main objective the study of cosmic gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and made significant advances in this area of research. Band became a world-renowned figure in the emerging field of GRB studies. He is best known for his widely-used analytic form of gamma-ray burst spectra known as the "Band Function." After the CGRO mission ended, Band moved to the Los Alamos National Laboratory where he worked mainly on classified research but continued to work on GRB energetics and spectra. When NASA planned

  12. Groundwater Flow in the Arthur Marble Aquifer, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, M. K.

    2008-05-01

    Arthur Marble underlies the Takaka Valley and outcrops in Karst Uplands to east and west of the valley in the South Island of New Zealand. It is the principal groundwater aquifer in the region and host to the remarkable Waikoropupu Springs near the coast. With average flow of 13,300 L/s, the karstic springs have many interesting features including unusual size and clarity. This work uses rainfall and river level, natural tracer and chemical measurements to determine the recharge sources and nature of the flow system in the Arthur Marble Aquifer (AMA). Total recharge to the AMA of 19,750 L/s comes from three sources (Karst Uplands stream seepage, Takaka River seepage and Takaka Valley rainfall infiltration). Since 13,300 L/s is discharged at the springs, the remainder must escape via offshore springs (6,450 L/s). The oxygen-18 mass balance allows the contribution of each source to each spring to be determined; most of the flow to the Main Spring of the Waikoropupu Springs comes from the Karst Uplands. The offshore springs are mostly fed from the Takaka River. The chemical concentrations of the Main Spring show input of 0.5% of sea water on average, but varying with flow. This variation with flow shows that two water components (sea-water-bearing and non-sea-water-bearing) contribute to the spring's discharge. Tritium measurements spanning 40 years, and CFC-11 measurements, give a mean residence time of 8 years for the Main Spring water using the preferred two-component model. Our conceptual flow model, based on the flow, oxygen-18, chloride and tritium measurements, reveals that two different flow systems with different recharge sources are needed to explain the flow within the AMA. One system contains deeply penetrating old water with mean age 10.2 years and water volume 3 cubic kilometers, recharged from the Karst Uplands. The other, at shallow levels below the valley floor, has much younger water, with mean age 1.2 years and water volume 0.4 cubic kilometers

  13. The JIM interview. David Korn, MD.

    PubMed

    Korn, D

    1995-04-01

    When David Korn, MD, was named dean of the Stanford University School of Medicine on October 9, 1984, he assumed leadership of a world class research institution. Stanford was at the forefront of medicine in the areas of transplantation and oncology, and the steady influx of privately insured patients had generated a net operating surplus of $17 million in that year alone. However, in the same issue of the Stanford University Hospital newsletter which announced the selection of Korn as Dean, a small article appeared on a new prospective payment system based on diagnosis-related groups (DRGs). The article stated that the new system had begun smoothly, though some payments for cost outliers had been delayed. Other cost containment measures soon followed, most notably the implementation of managed care, and by 1990, Stanford was $14 million in the red. Buffeted by changes in medical reimbursement, competition with less costly hospitals, and a nasty squabble with Congress over indirect research costs, Stanford has been on the frontlines of a struggle now confronting many academic medical centers. After successfully consolidating the university's clinical services into a unified Stanford Health System, Korn announced that he would be stepping down as Dean on April 1. Interviewed in his office in Palo Alto, Korn reflected on the difficulties of dealing with managed care, the current financial state of the institution, and what Stanford's experience may predict for other academic medical centers.

  14. Observation capability of Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) from International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasai, Yasuko; Tanaka, Takahiro; Dupuy, Eric; Kita, Kazuyuki; Baron, Philippe; Ochiai, Satoshi; Nishibori, Toshiyuki; Kikuchi, Kenichi; Mendrok, Jana; Murtagh, Donal P.; Urban, Joachim; Smiles Mission Team

    A new generation of sub-millimeter-wave receivers employing sensitive SIS (Superconductor-Insulator-Superconductor) detector technology will provide new opportunities for precise pas-sive remote sensing observation of minor constituents in atmosphere. Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) had been launched in September 11, 2009 and installed to the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) on the International Space Station (ISS). SMILES is a collaboration project of National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) and Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA). Mission objectives of SMILES are: 1. Space demonstration of super-sensitive SIS mixer and 4-K mechanical cooler technology 2. Super-sensitive global observation of atmospheric minor constituents with sub-millimeter-wave limb emission sounder JEM/SMILES will allow to observe the atmospheric species such as O3, H35Cl, H37Cl, ClO, HO2, BrO, HOCl, HOBr, HNO3, CH3CN, Ozone isotope species, H2O, and Ice Cloud with the precisions in a few to several tens percents. The altitude region of observation is from the upper troposphere to the mesopouse. We performed the early comparison/validation of ozone with 4 satellites measurements, AURA/MLS, Odin/SMR, ACE, and Odin/OSIRIS, and ozonesonde. SMILES ozone was in good agreement with these data. For example, difference between SMILES and MLS was less than 2 percent be-tween 20-50km. These results are consistent with the observation capabilities of JEM/SMILES with error analysis. This super technology may allow us to open new issues in atmospheric science.

  15. The unique contribution of elements of smile aesthetics to psychosocial well-being.

    PubMed

    Lukez, A; Pavlic, A; Trinajstic Zrinski, M; Spalj, S

    2015-04-01

    Pleasant smile aesthetics is an important contributory factor to psychosocial well-being. The aim of this study was to determine the psychosocial influence of smile aesthetics. The study was cross-sectional on a convenient sample that included patients, pupils, students and faculty staff. A total of 155 subjects (36% male) aged 12-39 (mean age 21, interquartile range 19-23) were included. Occlusal characteristics were recorded by the Index of Complexity, Outcome and Need, and smiling frontal view photographs were obtained. Fourteen variables were measured using photogrammetric analysis: smile width, visibility of buccal corridors, maximum teeth exposure, total gingival display, lip thickness, degree of occlusal cant and deviation from golden proportion of the teeth in maxillary intercanine sector. Psychometric instruments included the Psychosocial Impact of Dental Aesthetics Questionnaire and the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale. Statistical analysis comprised multiple linear regressions. Malocclusion severity is the most important predictor of psychosocial influence of smile aesthetics and self-esteem, the unique contribution of which accounts for a total of 4-27% of variability. Female gender is associated with higher psychological influence of dental aesthetics while male gender and older age with self-esteem. Malocclusions have higher psychosocial impact than parameters of mini- and micro-aesthetics of smile related to visibility of buccal corridors, amount of teeth exposure, gingival display, lip thickness, presence of occlusal cant and deviation from golden proportion of the teeth. It appears that people are not as focused on details of their smile as they are on distinctive malposition of teeth.

  16. Boundaries and interfaces in materials: The David A. Smith symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Pond, R.C. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering); Clark, W.A.T. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering); King, A.H. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering); Williams, D.B. (Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA (United States

    1998-01-01

    Just over a year ago David Smith died. Then the loss of a distinguished scientist and dedicated teacher was mourned. Now it is time to celebrate his accomplishments both as a scientist and teacher and this book serves as a reminder of his many contributions to the field of boundaries and interfaces. Researchers from ten countries contributed their work to the symposium, many of whom were former students of David from his years in Oxford. This emphasizes David's tremendous effect on the career of many established scientists through his role as both a teacher and an advisor. Separate abstracts were prepared for 38 papers in this book.

  17. Measurement of middle and upper atmospheric horizontal winds with a submillimeter/THz limb sounder: results from JEM/SMILES and simulation study for SMILES-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baron, Philippe; Manago, Naohiro; Ozeki, Hiroyuki; Yoshihisa, Irimajiri; Donal, Murtagh; Yoshinori, Uzawa; Satoshi, Ochiai; Masato, Shiotani; Makoto, Suzuki

    2016-04-01

    In a near future, ESA will launch the Atmospheric Dynamics Mission (ADM) equipped with a lidar for measuring tropospheric and lower stratospheric winds. NASA will continue a long-term series of upper atmospheric wind measurements (altitudes >80 km) with the new Michelson Interferometer for Global High-resolution Thermospheric Imaging (MIGHTI) on the Ionospheric Connection Explorer (ICON) satellite. No mission is planned to observe winds in the middle atmosphere (30-80 km), though they are recognized as essential parameters for understanding atmospheric dynamics and the vertical coupling between atmospheric regions. They are also promising data for improving long-term weather forecast and climate modelling. It has been demonstrated with the Superconducting Submillimeter Wave Limb Emission Sounder (SMILES, Oct 2009 - Apr 2010) that a 4-K cooled microwave radiometer can provide data to fill the altitude gap in the wind measurements. Its possible successor named SMILES-2, is being designed in Japan for the study of the middle and upper atmospheric chemistry and dynamics (O3, H2O, T, atomic O, OH, HO2, ClO, BrO, ...). If realized, the instrument will measure sub-millimeter and THz molecular spectral lines (616-150 μm) with high sensitivity and frequency resolution. The SMILES-2 characteristics are very well suited for horizontal wind observations between 20 km to more than 160 km. The best performances are found between 35-90 km where the retrieval precision is better than 3 m/s for a vertical resolution of 2-3 km [1]. In this presentation, we summarize the results obtained from SMILES and assess the measurement performances of SMILES-2 to measure horizontal winds. [1] P. Baron, N. Manago, H. Ozeki, Y. Irimajiri, D. Murtagh, Y. Uzawa, S. Ochiai, M. Shiotani, M. Suzuki: "Measurement of stratospheric and mesospheric winds with a SubMillimeter wave limb sounder: Results from JEM/SMILES and simulation study for SMILES-2"; Proc. of SPIE Remote sensing, 96390N-96390N-20

  18. Evaluation of dredged material proposed for ocean disposal from Arthur Kill Project Area, New York

    SciTech Connect

    Gruendell, B.D.; Barrows, E.S.; Borde, A.B.

    1997-01-01

    The objective of the bioassay reevaluation of Arthur Kill Federal Project was to reperform toxicity testing on proposed dredged material following current ammonia reduction protocols. Arthur Kill was one of four waterways sampled and evaluated for dredging and disposal in April 1993. Sediment samples were recollected from the Arthur Kill Project areas in August 1995. Tests and analyses were conducted according to the manual developed by the USACE and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Evaluation of Dredged Material Proposed for Ocean Disposal (Testing Manual), commonly referred to as the {open_quotes}Green Book,{close_quotes} and the regional manual developed by the USACE-NYD and EPA Region II, Guidance for Performing Tests on Dredged Material to be Disposed of in Ocean Waters. The reevaluation of proposed dredged material from the Arthur Kill project areas consisted of benthic acute toxicity tests. Thirty-three individual sediment core samples were collected from the Arthur Kill project area. Three composite sediments, representing each reach of the area proposed for dredging, was used in benthic acute toxicity testing. Benthic acute toxicity tests were performed with the amphipod Ampelisca abdita and the mysid Mysidopsis bahia. The amphipod and mysid benthic toxicity test procedures followed EPA guidance for reduction of total ammonia concentrations in test systems prior to test initiation. Statistically significant acute toxicity was found in all Arthur Kill composites in the static renewal tests with A. abdita, but not in the static tests with M. bahia. Statistically significant acute toxicity and a greater than 20% increase in mortality over the reference sediment was found in the static renewal tests with A. abdita. M. bahia did not show statistically significant acute toxicity or a greater than 10% increase in mortality over reference sediment in static tests. 5 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Ursodeoxycholic Acid Inhibits Liver X Receptor α-mediated Hepatic Lipogenesis via Induction of the Nuclear Corepressor SMILE*

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji-Min; Gang, Gil-Tae; Kim, Don-Kyu; Kim, Yong Deuk; Koo, Seung-Hoi; Lee, Chul-Ho; Choi, Hueng-Sik

    2014-01-01

    Small heterodimer partner interacting leucine zipper protein (SMILE) has been identified as a nuclear corepressor of the nuclear receptor (NRs) family. Here, we examined the role of SMILE in the regulation of nuclear receptor liver X receptor (LXRα)-mediated sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) gene expression. We found that SMILE inhibited T0901317 (T7)-induced transcriptional activity of LXRα, which functions as a major regulator of lipid metabolism by inducing SREBP-1c, fatty acid synthase (FAS), and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) gene expression. Moreover, we demonstrated that SMILE physically interacts with LXRα and represses T7-induced LXRα transcriptional activity by competing with coactivator SRC-1. Adenoviral overexpression of SMILE (Ad-SMILE) attenuated fat accumulation and lipogenic gene induction in the liver of T7 administered or of high fat diet (HFD)-fed mice. Furthermore, we investigated the mechanism by which ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) inhibits LXRα-induced lipogenic gene expression. Interestingly, UDCA treatment significantly increased SMILE promoter activity and gene expression in an adenosine monophosphate-activated kinase-dependent manner. Furthermore, UDCA treatment repressed T7-induced SREBP-1c, FAS, and ACC protein levels, whereas knockdown of endogenous SMILE gene expression by adenovirus SMILE shRNA (Ad-shSMILE) significantly reversed UDCA-mediated repression of SREBP-1c, FAS, and ACC protein levels. Collectively, these results demonstrate that UDCA activates SMILE gene expression through adenosine monophosphate-activated kinase phosphorylation, which leads to repression of LXRα-mediated hepatic lipogenic enzyme gene expression. PMID:24265317

  20. An Interview with Author/Screen Writer David Klass.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, Sissi

    2002-01-01

    Presents an interview with Author/Screen Writer David Klass. Discusses his dual role as young adult author and Hollywood screenwriter. Illuminates important differences that Klass finds when working as writer of young adult books and as a screenwriter. (SG)

  1. 12. Historic American Buildings Survey, David Aronow, Photographer circa 1924, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Historic American Buildings Survey, David Aronow, Photographer circa 1924, VIEW OF THE CENTRAL COURT WITH THE FOUNTAIN AND TIFFANY VASES IN NICHES. - Laurelton Hall, Laurel Hollow & Ridge Roads, Oyster Bay, Nassau County, NY

  2. 9. Historic American Buildings Survey, David Aronow, Photographer circa 1924, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Historic American Buildings Survey, David Aronow, Photographer circa 1924, LIVING ROOM SHOWING LIGHTING FIXTURES OF TIFFANY'S DESIGN. - Laurelton Hall, Laurel Hollow & Ridge Roads, Oyster Bay, Nassau County, NY

  3. 20. Historic American Buildings Survey, David Aronow, Photographer circa 1924, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. Historic American Buildings Survey, David Aronow, Photographer circa 1924, 'THE SPRING' ONE OF SEVEN FOUNTAINS ON TIFFANY ESTATE. - Laurelton Hall, Laurel Hollow & Ridge Roads, Oyster Bay, Nassau County, NY

  4. 16. Historic American Buildings Survey, David Aronow, Photographer circa 1924, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. Historic American Buildings Survey, David Aronow, Photographer circa 1924, TERRACE OVERLOOKING COLD SPRING HARBOR WITH VIEW OF 'TIFFANY TOWER'. - Laurelton Hall, Laurel Hollow & Ridge Roads, Oyster Bay, Nassau County, NY

  5. 5. Historic American Buildings Survey, David Aronow, Photographer circa 1924, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Historic American Buildings Survey, David Aronow, Photographer circa 1924, DETAIL OF ENTRANCE AND BELLTOWER ON FRONT ELEVATION. - Laurelton Hall, Laurel Hollow & Ridge Roads, Oyster Bay, Nassau County, NY

  6. 7. Historic American Buildings Survey, David Aronow, Photographer circa 1924, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Historic American Buildings Survey, David Aronow, Photographer circa 1924, DETAIL OF MAIN ENTRANCE WITH COLD SPRING HARBOR IN BACKGROUND. - Laurelton Hall, Laurel Hollow & Ridge Roads, Oyster Bay, Nassau County, NY

  7. 8. Historic American Buildings Survey, David Aronow, Photographer circa 1924, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Historic American Buildings Survey, David Aronow, Photographer circa 1924, LIVING ROOM WITH TIFFANY STAINED GLASS WINDOWS INCLUDING 'FEEDING THE FLAMINGOES,' 'THE FOUR SEASONS,' AND 'THE BATHERS'. - Laurelton Hall, Laurel Hollow & Ridge Roads, Oyster Bay, Nassau County, NY

  8. 19. Historic American Buildings Survey, David Aronow, Photographer circa 1924, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. Historic American Buildings Survey, David Aronow, Photographer circa 1924, INTERIOR OF TIFFANY CHAPEL SHOWING STAINED GLASS WINDOW. - Laurelton Hall, Laurel Hollow & Ridge Roads, Oyster Bay, Nassau County, NY

  9. 11. Historic American Buildings Survey, David Aronow, Photographer circa 1924, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Historic American Buildings Survey, David Aronow, Photographer circa 1924, CENTRAL COURT WITH PORTRAIT OF TIFFANY BY SOROLLA. - Laurelton Hall, Laurel Hollow & Ridge Roads, Oyster Bay, Nassau County, NY

  10. David Simpson Receives 2012 Waldo E. Smith Medal: Citation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerner-Lam, Arthur

    2013-01-01

    David Simpson was awarded the 2012 Waldo E. Smith Medal at the AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony, held on 5 December 2012 in San Francisco, Calif. The medal is for "extraordinary service to geophysics".

  11. David Haussler, Ph.D., Lectures on Cancer Genomics - TCGA

    Cancer.gov

    In this lecture, Dr. David Haussler provides a historical overview of the field of genomics leading up to TCGA, including the Cancer Genomics Hub at the University of California, Santa Cruz, and the TCGA Pan-Cancer initiative.

  12. 2. David Ames, Photographer, October 1982 VIEW EAST SHOWING WEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. David Ames, Photographer, October 1982 VIEW EAST SHOWING WEST (FRONT) ELEVATION - Jacob Dingee House, 105 East Seventh Street (moved to 500 Block North Market Street), Wilmington, New Castle County, DE

  13. 11. Historic American Buildings Survey David J. Kaminsky, Photographer August ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Historic American Buildings Survey David J. Kaminsky, Photographer August 1978 EAST FACADE, PART OF NORTH FACADE, SOUTH DAIRY BARN IN BACKGROUND, WITH FIELD IN FOREGROUND - Longview Farm, North Dairy Barn, Longview Road, Lees Summit, Jackson County, MO

  14. 20. Historic American Buildings Survey David J. Kaminsky, Photographer August ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. Historic American Buildings Survey David J. Kaminsky, Photographer August 1978 INTERIOR SECOND FLOOR EAST WING LOOKING SOUTHWEST - Longview Farm, South Dairy Barn-Milkhouse, Longview Road, Lees Summit, Jackson County, MO

  15. 10. Historic American Buildings Survey David J. Kaminsky, Photographer August ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Historic American Buildings Survey David J. Kaminsky, Photographer August 1978 SOUTH FACADE OF EAST WING - Longview Farm, South Dairy Barn-Milkhouse, Longview Road, Lees Summit, Jackson County, MO

  16. 13. Historic American Buildings Survey David J. Kaminsky, Photographer August ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Historic American Buildings Survey David J. Kaminsky, Photographer August 1978 SOUTH CENTRAL ENTRANCE/BREEZEWAY - Longview Farm, South Dairy Barn-Milkhouse, Longview Road, Lees Summit, Jackson County, MO

  17. 11. Historic American Buildings Survey David J. Kaminsky, Photographer August ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Historic American Buildings Survey David J. Kaminsky, Photographer August 1978 SOUTH FACADE OF WEST WING - Longview Farm, South Dairy Barn-Milkhouse, Longview Road, Lees Summit, Jackson County, MO

  18. 18. Historic American Buildings Survey David J. Kaminsky, Photographer August ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. Historic American Buildings Survey David J. Kaminsky, Photographer August 1978 INTERIOR FIRST FLOOR EAST WING LOOKING NORTHEAST - Longview Farm, South Dairy Barn-Milkhouse, Longview Road, Lees Summit, Jackson County, MO

  19. 12. Historic American Buildings Survey David J. Kaminsky, Photographer August ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Historic American Buildings Survey David J. Kaminsky, Photographer August 1978 LOOKING NORTHEAST TO BREEZEWAY BETWEEN BARN AND MILKHOUSE - Longview Farm, South Dairy Barn-Milkhouse, Longview Road, Lees Summit, Jackson County, MO

  20. 7. Historic American Buildings Survey David J. Kaminsky, Photographer August ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Historic American Buildings Survey David J. Kaminsky, Photographer August 1978 NORTH FACADE CENTRAL DOORS - Longview Farm, South Dairy Barn-Milkhouse, Longview Road, Lees Summit, Jackson County, MO

  1. 14. Historic American Buildings Survey David J. Kaminsky, Photographer August ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Historic American Buildings Survey David J. Kaminsky, Photographer August 1978 INTERIOR FIRST FLOOR WEST WING LOOKING NORTHEAST - Longview Farm, North Dairy Barn, Longview Road, Lees Summit, Jackson County, MO

  2. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey David J. Kaminsky, Photographer August ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey David J. Kaminsky, Photographer August 1978 NORTH ELEVATION OF CENTRAL PORTION, CLOSER - Longview Farm, South Dairy Barn-Milkhouse, Longview Road, Lees Summit, Jackson County, MO

  3. 24. Historic American Buildings Survey David J. Kaminsky, Photographer August ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. Historic American Buildings Survey David J. Kaminsky, Photographer August 1978 INTERIOR SECOND FLOOR LOOKING EAST-SOUTHEAST - Longview Farm, South Dairy Barn-Milkhouse, Longview Road, Lees Summit, Jackson County, MO

  4. 5. Historic American Buildings Survey David J. Kaminsky, Photographer August ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Historic American Buildings Survey David J. Kaminsky, Photographer August 1978 NORTH FACADE OF WEST WING FROM EAST NORTHEAST - Longview Farm, South Dairy Barn-Milkhouse, Longview Road, Lees Summit, Jackson County, MO

  5. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey David J. Kaminsky, Photographer August ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey David J. Kaminsky, Photographer August 1978 SOUTH FACADE WITH MANURE PIT IN FOREGROUND - Longview Farm, North Dairy Barn, Longview Road, Lees Summit, Jackson County, MO

  6. 9. Historic American Buildings Survey David J. Kaminsky, Photographer August ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Historic American Buildings Survey David J. Kaminsky, Photographer August 1978 SOUTH AND EAST FACADES OF EAST WING - Longview Farm, South Dairy Barn-Milkhouse, Longview Road, Lees Summit, Jackson County, MO

  7. 21. Historic American Buildings Survey David J. Kaminsky, Photographer August ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. Historic American Buildings Survey David J. Kaminsky, Photographer August 1978 INTERIOR SECOND FLOOR EAST WING LOOKING SOUTH - Longview Farm, South Dairy Barn-Milkhouse, Longview Road, Lees Summit, Jackson County, MO

  8. 22. Historic American Buildings Survey David J. Kaminsky, Photographer August ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. Historic American Buildings Survey David J. Kaminsky, Photographer August 1978 INTERIOR SECOND FLOOR CENTRAL STAIR LANDING LOOKING NORTH - Longview Farm, South Dairy Barn-Milkhouse, Longview Road, Lees Summit, Jackson County, MO

  9. 5. Historic American Buildings Survey David J. Kaminsky, Photographer August ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Historic American Buildings Survey David J. Kaminsky, Photographer August 1978 SOUTH FACADE OF CENTRAL PORTION, OBLIQUE VIEW - Longview Farm, North Dairy Barn, Longview Road, Lees Summit, Jackson County, MO

  10. 6. Historic American Buildings Survey David J. Kaminsky, Photographer August ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Historic American Buildings Survey David J. Kaminsky, Photographer August 1978 NORTH FACADE OF WEST WING FROM NORTHEAST - Longview Farm, South Dairy Barn-Milkhouse, Longview Road, Lees Summit, Jackson County, MO

  11. 12. Historic American Buildings Survey David J. Kaminsky, Photographer August ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Historic American Buildings Survey David J. Kaminsky, Photographer August 1978 EAST FACADE, PART OF NORTH FACADE, SOUTH DAIRY BARN IN BACKGROUND - Longview Farm, North Dairy Barn, Longview Road, Lees Summit, Jackson County, MO

  12. 25. Historic American Buildings Survey David J. Kaminsky, Photographer August ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. Historic American Buildings Survey David J. Kaminsky, Photographer August 1978 INTERIOR FIRST FLOOR EAST ROOM LOOKING TO SOUTHWEST CORNER - Longview Farm, South Dairy Barn-Milkhouse, Longview Road, Lees Summit, Jackson County, MO

  13. 9. Historic American Buildings Survey David J. Kaminsky, Photographer August ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Historic American Buildings Survey David J. Kaminsky, Photographer August 1978 EAST FACADE, PART OF NORTH FACADE, TAKEN FROM NORTHWEST - Longview Farm, North Dairy Barn, Longview Road, Lees Summit, Jackson County, MO

  14. 19. Historic American Buildings Survey David J. Kaminsky, Photographer August ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. Historic American Buildings Survey David J. Kaminsky, Photographer August 1978 INTERIOR FIRST FLOOR EAST WING LOOKING NORTH - Longview Farm, South Dairy Barn-Milkhouse, Longview Road, Lees Summit, Jackson County, MO

  15. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey David J. Kaminsky, Photographer August ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey David J. Kaminsky, Photographer August 1978 NORTH ELEVATION OF CENTRAL PORTION - Longview Farm, South Dairy Barn-Milkhouse, Longview Road, Lees Summit, Jackson County, MO

  16. 23. Historic American Buildings Survey David J. Kaminsky, Photographer August ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. Historic American Buildings Survey David J. Kaminsky, Photographer August 1978 INTERIOR SECOND FLOOR CENTRAL ROOM LOOKING WEST - Longview Farm, South Dairy Barn-Milkhouse, Longview Road, Lees Summit, Jackson County, MO

  17. Interview With the 2002 Caldecott Medal Winner, David Wiesner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giorgis, Cyndi; Johnson, Nancy J.

    2003-01-01

    Discusses David Wiesner, the 2002 Caldecott Medal Winner, and includes excerpts of an interview with him. Notes that Wiesner's books appeal to the imagination and often use art elements such as scale. Details the winning book, "The Three Pigs." (PM)

  18. Effects of Normal and Perturbed Social Play on the Duration and Amplitude of Different Types of Infant Smiles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fogel, Alan; Hsu, Hui-Chin; Shapiro, Alyson F.; Nelson-Goens, G. Christina; Secrist, Cory

    2006-01-01

    Different types of smiling varying in amplitude of lip corner retraction were investigated during 2 mother-infant games--peekaboo and tickle--at 6 and 12 months and during normally occurring and perturbed games. Using Facial Action Coding System (FACS), infant smiles were coded as simple (lip corner retraction only), Duchenne (simple plus cheek…

  19. Perception of Acceptable Range of Smiles by Specialists, General Dentists and Lay Persons and Evaluation of Different Aesthetic Paradigms

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Mainak Kanti; Saha, Suparna Ganguly; Dubey, Sandeep; Saxena, Divya; Vijaywargiya, Neelam; Kala, Shubham

    2017-01-01

    Introduction One of the most important goals of restorative dentistry is to restore the patient’s aesthetic. Smile analysis is subjective and it differs from person to person. An aesthetic smile involves a harmonious relationship between various parameters including the hard and soft tissues. Aim The aim of the study was to identify the acceptable range of several smiles (alone and in conjunction with the face) by specialists, general dentists as well as lay persons; and to identify the values of different criteria i.e., the Golden Proportion (GP), the Recurrent Esthetic Dental proportion (RED), Width to Height ratio (W/H ratio), the Apparent Contact Dimension (ACD), and lateral incisor position in a smile. Materials and Methods Hundred photographs of 50 subjects were taken, 50 of the smile alone and 50 of the individual’s frontal view of face. The photographs of the smiles and the faces were assessed for the aesthetic acceptability by 30 evaluators including 10 specialists with advanced training, 10 general dentists and 10 lay persons. Irreversible hydrocolloid impressions were made of the dentitions of all the individuals using stock trays and were poured in dental stone. Measurements were made on the facial surface of the teeth on the models and were recorded in millimeters using a sharp tipped digital vernier calliper. Data was analyzed to evaluate the presence of different parameters assessed in the smiles. Mean and standard deviation values for the percentage of only the agreeable smiles were calculated in both individual smile analysis and in conjunction with the face. The non agreeable smiles were excluded from further statistical analysis. Pearson Correlation Coefficient was calculated to compare the values obtained in all the three groups. Results More number of smiles were considered agreeable by the general dentists when compared to the specialists and the number even increased in case of evaluation by lay persons. Greater number of smiles was found

  20. Double-powered free gracilis muscle transfer for smile reanimation: A longitudinal optoelectronic study.

    PubMed

    Sforza, Chiarella; Frigerio, Alice; Mapelli, Andrea; Tarabbia, Filippo; Annoni, Isabella; Colombo, Valeria; Latiff, Mahfuz; Pimenta Ferreira, Claudia L; Rabbiosi, Dimitri; Sidequersky, Fernanda V; Zago, Matteo; Biglioli, Federico

    2015-07-01

    The choice of the motor donor nerve is a crucial point in free flap transfer algorithms. In the case of unilateral facial paralysis, the contralateral healthy facial nerve can provide coordinated smile animation and spontaneous emotional expression, but with unpredictable axonal ingrowth into the recipient muscle. Otherwise, the masseteric nerve ipsilateral to the paralysis can provide a powerful neural input, without a spontaneous trigger of the smile. Harvesting a bulky muscular free flap may enhance the quantity of contraction but esthetic results are unpleasant. Therefore, the logical solution for obtaining high amplitude of smiling combined with spontaneity of movement is to couple the neural input: the contralateral facial nerve plus the ipsilateral masseteric nerve. Thirteen patients with unilateral dense facial paralysis underwent a one-stage facial reanimation with a gracilis flap powered by a double donor neural input, provided by both the ipsilateral masseteric nerve (coaptation by an end-to-end neurorrhaphy with the obturator nerve) and the contralateral facial nerve (coaptation through a cross-face nerve graft: end-to-end neurorrhaphy on the healthy side and end-to-side neurorrhaphy on the obturator nerve, distal to the masseteric/obturator neurorrhaphy). Their facial movements were evaluated with an optoelectronic motion analyzer. Before surgery, on average, the paretic side exhibited a smaller total three-dimensional mobility than the healthy side, with a 52% activation ratio and >30% of asymmetry. After surgery, the differences significantly decreased (analysis of variance (ANOVA), p < 0.05), with an activation ratio between 75% (maximum smile) and 91% (maximum smile with teeth clenching), and <20% of asymmetry. Similar modifications were seen for the performance of spontaneous smiles. The significant presurgical asymmetry of labial movements reduced after surgery. The use of a double donor neural input permitted both movements that were similar

  1. Research for the Classroom: Playing with Difficult Poetry--High School Seniors and Arthur Sze's "Quipu"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fogle, Andy

    2012-01-01

    The author had been assigned two sections of Contemporary Literature, a semester-long senior elective, and he wanted to do something new with poetry. He planned to teach Arthur Sze's "Quipu." Sze's poetry is nonlinear, adopting principles from science, anthropology, and history into a multilayered poetic texture--text unlike anything students…

  2. Berkeley Lab Scientist Named MacArthur ''Genius'' Fellow for Audio Preservation Research

    SciTech Connect

    Haber, Carl

    2013-09-24

    Audio Preservationist Carl Haber was named a MacArthur Fellow in 2013. The Fellowship is a $625,000, no-strings-attached grant for individuals who have shown exceptional creativity in their work and the promise to do more. Learn more at http://www.macfound.org/fellows.

  3. General MacArthur’s Strategic Success During the Early Months of the Korean War

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-17

    Almond , FECOM’s Chief of Staff, recommended to General MacArthur to send a US infantry task force to Korea with the purpose to delay the North...elements of combat power. 156 MG Almond did not organize the GHQ as a joint headquarters to exploit the opportunities such as the North Korean long

  4. Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the Practice of Psychology: Arthur L. Kovacs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2004

    2004-01-01

    The 2004 Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the Practice of Psychology is awarded to Arthur L. Kovacs. He is recognized for making outstanding contributions to achieving statutory recognition and securing insurance reimbursement, and as a pioneer in the professional school movement, having trained several generations of practitioners.

  5. 3 CFR - Expediting Review of Pipeline Projects From Cushing, Oklahoma, to Port Arthur, Texas, and Other...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 3 The President 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Expediting Review of Pipeline Projects From Cushing, Oklahoma, to Port Arthur, Texas, and Other Domestic Pipeline Infrastructure Projects Presidential Documents Other Presidential Documents Memorandum of March 22, 2012 Expediting Review of Pipeline Projects...

  6. Assessing Early Communicative Ability: A Cross-Reporter Cumulative Score for the MacArthur CDI

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Houwer, Annick; Bornstein, Marc H.; Leach, Diane B.

    2005-01-01

    Thirty middle- to upper middle-class monolingual Dutch speaking families consisting of at least a mother and a father completed the Infant Form "Words and Gestures" of the Dutch adaptation of the MacArthur Communicative Development Inventory for the same child at 1;1. Considerable inter- and intrafamily variation emerged in how two (or three)…

  7. Educating the U.S. Army: Arthur L. Wagner and Reform, 1875-1905.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brereton, T. R.

    Arthur Lockwood Wagner, who graduated from West Point in 1876, was one of the best known and most influential U.S. Army officers of his day. An intellectual and educator, Wagner was instrumental in some of the most critical reforms in U.S. Army history. He advocated enhanced military education, adopting modern combat techniques, holding…

  8. ASCANs Harris, Helms, and McArthur during survival training at Fairchild AFB

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    1990 Group 13 Astronaut Candidates (ASCANs) (left to right) Bernard J. Harris, Jr, Susan J. Helms, and William S. McArthur, Jr open dehydrated food packages during wilderness survival training at Fairchild Air Force Base (AFB) in Spokane, Washington. The training was conducted in the mountain forests of Washington from 08-26-90 through 08-30-90.

  9. 75 FR 69154 - Land Release for Long Island MacArthur Airport

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-10

    ... proposed release from aeronautical use of approximately 17.69 acres of airport property, to allow for non-aeronautical development. The parcel is located on the northeast corner of the Long Island MacArthur Airport... sponsor's Federal obligation to use certain airport land for aeronautical use. Issued in Garden City,...

  10. Arthur[R] Presents Hooray for Health! A Health Curriculum for Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schottman, Elly, Ed.

    This health curriculum for teachers, after-school providers, and school nurses uses the cartoon character Arthur to introduce four units that explore four distinct early childhood health themes. The themes are: "Eat Well. Stay Fit" (good nutrition and exercise); "Open Wide!" (dental health); "Dealing with Feelings"…

  11. The Reasons for Suicide: An Analysis of the Diary of Arthur Inman

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lester, David

    2010-01-01

    Previous analyses of the diary of Arthur Inman, who committed suicide in 1963, portrayed him as psychiatrically disturbed, warped, corrupt, and weak. In contrast, the present article argues that he was an eccentric individual whose diary writing enabled him to live a full life by giving his life a purpose and by enabling him to ventilate at…

  12. William Bagley versus Arthur Bestor: Why the Standard Story Is Not True

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Null, J. Wesley

    2008-01-01

    This essay challenges the conventional understanding of William Bagley and Arthur Bestor, which suggests that they held similar views in curriculum and teacher education. The author thinks this view is completely wrong and provides a radical new interpretation of Bagley and Bestor that uncovers a lost tradition within the field of education.…

  13. Berkeley Lab Scientist Named MacArthur ''Genius'' Fellow for Audio Preservation Research

    ScienceCinema

    Haber, Carl

    2016-07-12

    Audio Preservationist Carl Haber was named a MacArthur Fellow in 2013. The Fellowship is a $625,000, no-strings-attached grant for individuals who have shown exceptional creativity in their work and the promise to do more. Learn more at http://www.macfound.org/fellows.

  14. Setting the Standard for Teaching as a Profession: A Conversation with Arthur Wise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Beverly

    2006-01-01

    Dr. Arthur Wise has had a long and distinguished career working for teacher quality and professionalism, school finance reform, and advancement of educational research. As the president of the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education, he directed that organization's development of performance-based standards and assessments and has…

  15. Short-Form Versions of the Spanish MacArthur-Bates Communicative Development Inventories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson-Maldonodo, Donna; Marchman, Virginia A.; Fernald, Lia C. H.

    2013-01-01

    The Spanish-language MacArthur-Bates Communicative Development Inventories (S-CDIs) are well-established parent report tools for assessing the language development of Spanish-speaking children under 3 years. Here, we introduce the short-form versions of the S-CDIs (SFI and SFII), offered as alternatives to the long forms for screening purposes or…

  16. Environmental Assessment for Perimeter Security Lighting at Fort MacArthur, California

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-07-01

    community of San Pedro. Soils within this association typically consist of marine sandstone, shale and breccia . Topography The community of San Pedro...typically comprised of marine sandstone, shale and breccia . Fort MacArthur is situated on Montezuma Clay Adobe which consists of excessively drained

  17. Assessing Internalizing, Externalizing, and Attention Problems in Young Children: Validation of the MacArthur HBQ

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lemery-Chalfant, Kathryn; Schreiber, Jane E.; Schmidt, Nicole L.; Van Hulle, Carol A.; Essex, Marilyn J.; Goldsmith, H. H.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To test the validity of the MacArthur Health and Behavior Questionnaire (HBQ) using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis to determine optimal thresholds for the HBQ in predicting Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children Version-IV (DISC-IV)diagnoses. The roles of child sex, level of impairment, and physical health in…

  18. Management of an Adult with Class III Malocclusion, Gummy Smile, and Spaced Dentition.

    PubMed

    Babar, Sameera; Calamia, John R; Sorrel, Jerry M

    2015-07-01

    This case report presents an interdisciplinary approach to achieve functioning occlusion and an aesthetically pleasing smile. This patient's concerns were spacing between upper front teeth and a gummy smile. The case was evaluated, and treatment was planned using a multidisciplinary approach. The patient rejected the option of orthognathic surgery to correct a skeletal problem. Treatment included orthodontics, osteoplasty, gingivoplasty, and porcelain veneer restorations to achieve the desired aesthetic result. Comprehensive orthodontics resulted in a functionally stable occlusion. Space distribution between maxillary anterior teeth with adequate overjet and overbite relationships allowed for conservative preparation to receive porcelain veneer restorations.

  19. Obituary: David Q. Wark, 1918-2002

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillin, Larry Max

    2003-12-01

    David Q. Wark, a research meteorologist at the National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA/NESDIS) and its predecessor organizations for 55 years, died of cancer 30 July 2002. He will be long remembered for his seminal contributions to the weather satellite program. A pioneer in the use of satellite sensors to provide observations of the Earth's environment for application to weather forecasting and atmospheric science, Dr. Wark was noted for his brilliant insights, dedication, and exceptional scientific achievements. He developed many of the theoretical and experimental techniques on which NOAA's current multi- billion-dollar meteorological satellite program is based. In the 1960's and early 1970's, he and his NOAA colleague Donald Hilleary were the motivating force and principal investigators for the first satellite instruments dedicated to sounding the atmosphere for temperature and water-vapor. These instruments included the Satellite Infra-Red Spectrometer (SIRS)-A and -B and the Vertical Temperature Profile Radiometer (VTPR), which were flown on NASA's Nimbus satellites and NOAA's ITOS-D satellites, respectively. With colleague Henry Fleming, he formulated the radiative transfer equation that quantifies the spectral radiances of the Earth and its atmosphere (measured at satellite altitude) and inverted that equation mathematically to infer the atmospheric temperature profile from satellite-based measurements of those radiances. A difficulty they had to overcome was that the mathematical problem is ill-posed, i.e., it admits of an infinite number of solutions. They arrived at a unique solution via an innovative application of a-priori information on the atmospheric state. This work was described in the landmark 1965 Wark and Fleming paper in the American Meteorological Society's Monthly Weather Review. From that early period until just weeks before his death, Dr. Wark continued

  20. Obituary: David Fulmer Bender, 1913-2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Sylvia L.

    2004-12-01

    David Fulmer Bender died in San Diego, California, on 13 September 2004, at the age of 91. His heart stopped suddenly while he was dancing. His pioneering work in establishing comprehensive, computer-accessible ephemerides of asteroids and comets found many applications, including the first-ever visit to an asteroid, Gaspra, by an interplanetary spacecraft. Dave was born in Reno, Nevada, on 10 February 1913, to Homer Charles Bender and Susan Bowers Bender. The family moved to Spokane, Washington, while Dave was very young. His father was a civil engineer and a graduate of MIT, who helped design bridges and dams throughout the Northwest, including the Grand Coolie Dam. Dave had a brother, Phillip (now deceased), who was one year younger. Advancing rapidly in the Spokane school system, Dave finished high school when he was 15 years old. At 16 he moved to Pasadena, California, and began his studies at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). In addition to pursuing his course work, he was active in track and football, a tendency toward physical exercise that stayed with him for the rest of his life. It was probably during these years that Dave heard a lecture by Albert Einstein, as mentioned to colleagues many years later. Dave received a BS degree in physics in 1933, an MS in 1934, and a PhD in 1937, all from Caltech. His dissertation was entitled, "The Index of Refraction of Air in the Photographic Infrared." During his sophomore year he found his way to Pomona College in Claremont, California, where he met his future wife, Elizabeth Boyden at a social gathering. They were married in 1935. Dave's academic career spanned the years from 1937 to 1970, initially at Louisiana State University, Vanderbilt University, and then Fisk. As a life-long pacifist and conscientious objector, Dave served alternate duty during World War II. In 1946 he joined the faculty of the physics department at Whittier College in California, where he became the department chair and

  1. Treatment of gummy smile: Gingival recontouring with the containment of the elevator muscle of the upper lip and wing of nose. A surgery innovation technique

    PubMed Central

    Storrer, Carmen Lucia Mueller; Valverde, Fabiane Kristine Bochenek; Santos, Felipe Rychuv; Deliberador, Tatiana Miranda

    2014-01-01

    The containment of the elevator muscle of the upper lip and wing of nose was used for the treatment of patients with gummy smile. This technique had corrected esthetic alterations of smile, reducing the upper lip elevation, which results in a smaller gingival display. An upper lip lengthening as well as a reduction in the upper lip shortening when the patient smiled could be observed. The high smile line was corrected without compromising the labial harmony. This study presents an innovative and effective therapeutic option to obtain a natural and harmonious smile. The patient expressed a high degree of satisfaction. PMID:25425832

  2. INTRODUCTION: David Sherrington as a mentor of young scientists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldbart, Paul M.

    2008-08-01

    How deeply honoured I am to have the opportunity to express my thoughts at this delightful celebration of David's achievements, so far, in his remarkable career. I have been asked to center my remarks on David's contributions to the mentoring and professional development of scientists early in their careers. This is a topic that I am more than happy to reflect on, because it gives me the opportunity to recall the exciting period I spent as one of David's postgraduate students at Imperial College in the early 1980s. It also gives me the chance to publicly express my gratitude to David for the opportunities he created for me at that time, as well as for the interest and care he has shown in my career and well-being ever since, as we have met up and exchanged news and ideas around the world: in New Mexico and Colorado, in Cancun, Paris and Trieste, at numerous March Meetings of the American Physical Society and, of course in London, Oxford, and my home town, Champaign-Urbana, location of the University of Illinois. I have been a member of David's circle for 25 years now, and I would like to tell you a little about how this came to be. Not because of what this says about me, but, rather, because of what it tells you about David and the rich generosity of his spirit and effort when it comes to supporting the underdog. I was indeed one such underdog—and that's putting it charitably—when I first met David in September of 1982, not long before the academic year was to begin. I had heard about the exciting circle of physical and mathematical ideas swirling around the spin glass question during the previous year, which I had spent at the University of California's Los Angeles campus, through an opportunity kindly arranged, as it happens, by Sam Edwards. But I was eager to return to the UK for postgraduate studies and to work on spin glasses, so I simply showed up at David's Imperial College office, unannounced (if I remember correctly). And with his characteristic

  3. [Smile "forced" smile versus "spontaneous": comparison of 3 techniques of reconstructive surgery of the face. Myoplasty temporal muscle, hypoglossal facial anastomosis and gracilis muscle free flap].

    PubMed

    Lheureux-Portmann, A; Lapalus-Curtoud, Q; Robert, M; Tankéré, F; Disant, F; Pasche, P; Lamas, G; Gatignol, P

    2013-01-01

    The facial palsy cause serious consequences for patients. Studies have also shown that in these patients, the inability to produce an appropriate and spontaneous smile would be a key factor of depression. When facial palsy is considered complete and the nerve cannot be repaired, the patient can benefit from palliative surgery to regain a better quality of life in the aesthetic, functional, and psychological aspects. The hypoglossal-facial anastomosis (AHF), temporal myoplasty (MAT) and gracilis transposition (TG) are the major surgeries currently used for this purpose. The aim of our study is to assess quantitatively and qualitatively the effects of each of these surgeries on the lip mobility and production of smile. From this perspective, we proposed a protocol of an evaluation of facial motricity, of quality of life, and more particularly on the quality and the analysis of the smile. The results underline that there is no significant difference in the recovery of the facial motricity according to the surgery. Only the slower, deferred deadline of recovery at the patients AHF and TG who have to wait several months, it is for the same levels as that of the patients' MAT. A premature and intensive rehabilitation such as the patients of our protocol benefited from it what is nevertheless essential to a good recovery whatever is the surgery.

  4. Mental disorder that afflicted King David the Great.

    PubMed

    Ben-Noun, Liubov

    2004-12-01

    This research uses the tools of modern medical science to study ancient descriptions of the symptoms suffered by King David. Biblical texts were examined, with a close study of verses relating to the mental disorder that afflicted King David, the second and greatest King of Israel, who ruled more than 3525 years ago. We include no commentaries, but refer only to the words of the Bible exactly as written. Evaluation of the passages referring to King David indicated that he was afflicted by some mental disorder, and among the many possibilities major depression, dysthymia and minor depression are the most likely. Of these diagnoses, major depression seems the most acceptable. This report suggests that the roots of contemporary psychiatry can be traced back to Biblical times.

  5. Finding Your Smile Again: A Child Care Professional's Guide to Reducing Stress and Avoiding Burnout

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Jeff A.

    2007-01-01

    An estimated 30 to 40 percent of child care professionals leave the field, often due to burnout arising from some combination of long hours, isolation, low pay, and lack of respect. With humor and empathy, "Finding Your Smile Again" provides dozens of proven techniques for coping with stressful situations and diagnosing and preventing burnout. A…

  6. Laugh and Smile upon the Holy Quran: The Study of Analytical Objectivities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    al-Domi, Mohammad Mahmoud

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to examine the positive impact of The Holy Quran based on the laugh and smile. This kind of derivatives in which context of praise, expression the feeling of happiness and joyful in the positive senses. Everyone needs to relieve his heart so that happiness and joy on their faces can be seen. Laughter also are some of attribute…

  7. Gender Differences in Physiological Reactivity to Infant Cries and Smiles in Military Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brewster, Albert L.; Nelson, John P.; McCanne, Thomas R.; Lucas, D. R.; Milner, Joel S.

    1998-01-01

    Twenty male and 29 female active-duty Air Force personnel viewed and listened to videotapes of a crying infant and a smiling infant while heart rate, skin resistance, and respiration rate were monitored. Males showed a larger increase in skin conductance and heart rate than females during the crying infant stimulus. (Author/CR)

  8. Discriminative Infant Smiling to Orientations of Talking Faces of Mother and Stranger.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, John S.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Tests the hypothesis that, while the difference in rate of smiling to O degree v non-O degree orientations will diminish with increasing age with silent and/or unfamiliar faces, infants over 14 weeks of age should continue to discriminate between a talking familiar 0 degree face, and all other combinations of orientation, familiarity, and silent…

  9. Take the S.M.I.L.E. Challenge: Indoor Air Quality and Your High School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deira, Maria-Isabel; Bloomfield, Molly

    1998-01-01

    The S.M.I.L.E. (Science and Math Investigative Learning Experiences) Program is a partnership between Oregon State University and eight rural Oregon school districts to provide science and math opportunities for disadvantaged students. Students in this program work on a problem that involves them in a real-world environmental issue. Describes an…

  10. BelSmile: a biomedical semantic role labeling approach for extracting biological expression language from text

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Po-Ting; Lo, Yu-Yan; Huang, Ming-Siang; Hsiao, Yu-Cheng; Tsai, Richard Tzong-Han

    2016-01-01

    Biological expression language (BEL) is one of the most popular languages to represent the causal and correlative relationships among biological events. Automatically extracting and representing biomedical events using BEL can help biologists quickly survey and understand relevant literature. Recently, many researchers have shown interest in biomedical event extraction. However, the task is still a challenge for current systems because of the complexity of integrating different information extraction tasks such as named entity recognition (NER), named entity normalization (NEN) and relation extraction into a single system. In this study, we introduce our BelSmile system, which uses a semantic-role-labeling (SRL)-based approach to extract the NEs and events for BEL statements. BelSmile combines our previous NER, NEN and SRL systems. We evaluate BelSmile using the BioCreative V BEL task dataset. Our system achieved an F-score of 27.8%, ∼7% higher than the top BioCreative V system. The three main contributions of this study are (i) an effective pipeline approach to extract BEL statements, and (ii) a syntactic-based labeler to extract subject–verb–object tuples. We also implement a web-based version of BelSmile (iii) that is publicly available at iisrserv.csie.ncu.edu.tw/belsmile. PMID:27173520

  11. A New Perspective on Neonatal Smiling: Differences between the Judgments of Expert Coders and Naive Observers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dondi, Marco; Messinger, Daniel; Colle, Marta; Tabasso, Alessia; Simion, Francesca; Barba, Beatrice Dalla; Fogel, Alan

    2007-01-01

    To better understand the form and recognizability of neonatal smiling, 32 newborns (14 girls; M = 25.6 hr) were videorecorded in the behavioral states of alertness, drowsiness, active sleep, and quiet sleep. Baby Facial Action Coding System coding of both lip corner raising (simple or non-Duchenne) and lip corner raising with cheek raising…

  12. Refraction outcomes after suction loss during small-incision lenticule extraction (SMILE)

    PubMed Central

    Gab-Alla, Amr A

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate refractive outcomes of two management approaches after suction loss during the small-incision lenticule extraction (SMILE) technique. Patients and methods This retrospective and comparative study was conducted at the El-Gowhara Private Eye Center. It included 26 consecutive eyes of patients who experienced suction loss during the SMILE technique. Patients were divided into two groups by the technical difficulties in redocking: in group A (12 eyes) suction loss occurred after the posterior lenticular cut and the creation of side-cuts, then suction was reapplied, and the procedure was completed; in group B (14 eyes) suction loss occurred after the posterior lenticular cut and the creation of side-cuts, then the procedure was postponed for 24 hours and completed with the same parameters. Manifest refraction outcomes were measured and compared 6 months postoperatively. Results This study included 26 eyes with suction loss during the SMILE technique: five patients with suction loss in both eyes, nine patients with suction loss in the right eye and seven patients with suction loss in the left eye. The incidence of suction loss in this study was 2.7%. At the postoperative 6-month follow-up time, there were statistically significant differences in refraction outcomes between the two groups, with a hyperopic shift in group A compared with group B. Conclusion A good refraction outcome can be achieved with appropriate management of suction loss during the SMILE technique, and it is recommended to postpone the treatment if this happens. PMID:28331285

  13. School Picture Day and Self-Concept: A Smile Is Worth the Trouble

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfeiffer, Margaret A.; Pfeiffer, Karl T.

    2011-01-01

    School picture day--it's an almost universal experience of waiting in line with a new comb, perching nervously on a stool, smiling under the bright lights, and then moving quickly out into the hall. For the past 8 years the authors have been increasingly aware of a picture day bias in the pictures taken of their oldest son. It appears to them that…

  14. Joint Attention in Autism: Teaching Smiling Coordinated with Gaze to Respond to Joint Attention Bids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krstovska-Guerrero, Ivana; Jones, Emily A.

    2013-01-01

    Children with autism demonstrate early deficits in joint attention and expressions of affect. Interventions to teach joint attention have addressed gaze behavior, gestures, and vocalizations, but have not specifically taught an expression of positive affect such as smiling that tends to occur during joint attention interactions. Intervention was…

  15. Developing Communication Skills in Deaf Primary School Pupils: Introducing and Evaluating the SmiLE Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alton, Sherryn; Herman, Rosalind; Pring, Tim

    2011-01-01

    Many profoundly deaf signers have difficulty communicating with hearing people. This article describes a therapy called "Strategies and Measurable Interaction in Live English" (smiLE; Schamroth and Threadgill, 2007a), an approach used to teach deaf children skills to become successful communicators in real-life situations. This study…

  16. Sensitivity to Differences between Enjoyment and Non-Enjoyment Smiles in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blampied, Meredith; Johnston, Lucy; Miles, Lynden; Liberty, Kathleen

    2010-01-01

    The sensitivity of male children (5-15 years) with and without autism spectrum disorder (ASD) to the affective state of others was tested using an emotion recognition task. Only children without ASD could reliably differentiate between enjoyment and non-enjoyment smiles. Results are considered in terms of the social impairments of children with…

  17. Brief Report: Perception of Genuine and Posed Smiles by Individuals with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boraston, Zillah L.; Corden, Ben; Miles, Lynden K.; Skuse, David H.; Blakemore, Sarah-Jayne

    2008-01-01

    Individuals with autism are impaired in the recognition of fear, which may be due to their reduced tendency to look at the eyes. Here we investigated another potential perceptual and social consequence of reduced eye fixation. The eye region of the face is critical for identifying genuine, or sincere, smiles. We therefore investigated this ability…

  18. "Check Your Smile", Prototype of a Collaborative LSP Website for Technical Vocabulary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yassine-Diab, Nadia; Alazard-Guiu, Charlotte; Loiseau, Mathieu; Sorin, Laurent; Orliac, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    In a design-based research approach (Barab & Squire, 2004), we are currently developing the first prototype of a collaborative Language for Specific Purposes (LSP) website. It focuses on technical vocabulary to help students master any field of LSP better. "Check Your Smile" is a platform aggregating various types of gameplays for…

  19. Experimental Analysis of Preschool Playmate Preferences as a Function of Smiles and Sex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, David; Ambike, Archana; Buckingham-Howes, Stacy; Cheah, Charissa S. L.

    2008-01-01

    Differential emotions theory (DET) ("The face of emotion." Appleton-Century-Crofts: East Norwalk, CT, 1971) posits that the smile functions in part to communicate and/or reflect social affiliation and plays an important role in children's social development. While children's positive emotion expressions have received attention from peer relations…

  20. [Digital smile design and anterior monolithic restorations chair side fabrication with Cerec Cad/Cam system].

    PubMed

    Perez-Davidi, M

    2015-10-01

    Digital dentistry and digital smile design are both components of modern dentistry. The combination of the two enables the dentist to simulate the desired outcome, share the mock up with the patient and coordinate his or her expectations with the probable esthetic outcome. In this article a case is presented of anterior restorations performed to improve the smile and esthetics of the patient, combining the digital smile design (by Christian Coachman) and the Avatar Digital smile aide of the Cerec SW4 (sirona Germany) software for designing and the MCxI inlab milling unit for the fabrication. The patients picture was imported into the software and the model of the teeth was super imposed into the 3d picture of the face enabling positioning the incisal edge and midline in the desired place and sharing the virtual demo with the patient. All this procedure was performed after the patient had a mockup session in the mouth done according to the wax up procedure. The mockup can be scanned in the mouth and added as a protocol to the patient's digital models, to be used later in the biogeneric copy option. Using this option the software uses the outline of the mockup as guide lins for the final restoration computerized proposal. It is still an aide tool to be improved and simplified but definitely it is the present and future of chair side prosthodontics.

  1. Negative self-perception of smile associated with malocclusions among Brazilian adolescents.

    PubMed

    Moura, Cristiano; Cavalcanti, Alessandro Leite; Gusmão, Estela Santos; Soares, Renata de Souza Coelho; Moura, Fabiana Torres Cavalcante; Santillo, Patrícia Morgana Hordonho

    2013-08-01

    This study estimated the prevalence of negative self-perception of smile because of occlusion abnormalities and investigated their association according to standard clinical criteria. The sample consisted of 1290 randomly selected Brazilian adolescent boys and girls aged 12-16 years. The outcome of interest was dissatisfaction with smile, and data were collected using a standardized questionnaire. Occlusion characteristics were assessed using the dental aesthetic index (DAI). The other study variables were gender, age, and use of dental services. A chi-square test and Poisson multiple regression were used for statistical analysis. Of the 1290 students interviewed and examined, 539 (41.8 per cent) were dissatisfied with their smile; of these, 373 (69.2 per cent) assigned their dissatisfaction to the presence of an occlusal abnormality, and 166 (30.8 per cent) reported reasons other than occlusal abnormalities for their negative self-perception of their smile. In multivariate analysis, the following variables were associated with the outcome of interest: maxillary anterior irregularity [prevalence ratio (PR) = 1.40; 95 per cent confidence interval (CI) = 1.29-1.80], incisal spacing (PR = 1.37; 95 per cent CI = 1.19-1.57), vertical open bite (PR = 1.34; 95 per cent CI = 1.15-1.55), mandibular anterior irregularity (PR = 1.29; 95 per cent CI = 1.14-1.46), permanent anterior teeth missing (PR = 1.21; 95 per cent CI = 1.05-1.39), and incisal diastema (PR = 1.14; 95 per cent CI = 1.01-1.31). The negative self-perception of smile was statistically associated with severity of occlusal disorders according to the DAI scores, which suggests that self-perception should be used together with standard clinical criteria when decisions about orthodontic treatments are made in public health care systems.

  2. Quasi-SMILES and nano-QFPR: The predictive model for zeta potentials of metal oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toropov, Andrey A.; Achary, P. Ganga Raju; Toropova, Alla P.

    2016-09-01

    Building up of the predictive quantitative structure-property/activity relationships (QSPRs/QSARs) for nanomaterials usually are impossible owing to the complexity of the molecular architecture of the nanomaterials. Simplified molecular input-line entry system (SMILES) is a tool to represent the molecular architecture of "traditional" molecules for "traditional" QSPR/QSAR. The quasi-SMILES is a tool to represent features (conditions and circumstances), which accompany the behavior of nanomaterials. Having, the training set and validation set, so-called quantitative feature-property relationships (QFPRs), based on the quasi-SMILES, one can build up model for zeta potentials of metal oxide nanoparticles for situations characterized by different features.

  3. Individual Differences in the Recognition of Enjoyment Smiles: No Role for Perceptual–Attentional Factors and Autistic-Like Traits

    PubMed Central

    Manera, Valeria; Del Giudice, Marco; Grandi, Elisa; Colle, Livia

    2011-01-01

    Adults show remarkable individual variation in the ability to detect felt enjoyment in smiles based on the Duchenne marker (Action Unit 6). It has been hypothesized that perceptual and attentional factors (possibly correlated to autistic-like personality traits in the normative range) play a major role in determining individual differences in recognition performance. Here, this hypothesis was tested in a sample of 100 young adults. Eye-tracking methodology was employed to assess patterns of visual attention during a smile recognition task. Results indicate that neither perceptual–attentional factors nor autistic-like personality traits contribute appreciably to individual differences in smile recognition. PMID:21779265

  4. Dr. David Sawyer, Mickey Mouse and Dr. David Brown attend a ceremony at Ronald McNair Middle School

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. David Sawyer (left), Superintendent of the Brevard County School District, Mickey Mouse, and Dr. David Brown, a NASA astronaut, attend a tribute to NASA astronaut Ronald McNair held in the gymnasium of Ronald McNair Magnet School in Cocoa, Fla. During the tribute, Walt Disney World presented a portrait of McNair to the school, which had previously been renamed for the fallen astronaut. McNair was one of a crew of seven who lost their lives during an accident following launch of the Space Shuttle Challenger in January 1986.

  5. Battling Creaticide: An Interview with David C. Berliner

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ambrose, Don

    2012-01-01

    This article presents an interview with David C. Berliner, a Regents' Professor in the College of Education at Arizona State University. His books include "Educational Psychology," "The Manufactured Crisis," and "The Handbook of Educational Psychology." He has served as president of the American Educational Research Association and of the…

  6. David Almond's "Skellig": "A New Vista of Contemplation"?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Susan Louise

    2009-01-01

    The debates that have arisen regarding Darwin's theories of evolution and Christian views of creation and their place in education in the United States have frequently been extremely heated, resulting in trials, hearings, and laws. This article provides an overview of some of the disagreements and illustrates how David Almond's British novel,…

  7. My Journey Into the Physics of David Finkelstein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, Stephon

    2017-01-01

    David Finkelstein was a co-pioneer of the use of topology and solitons in theoretical physics. The author reflects on the great impact Finkelstein had on his research throughout his career. The author provides an application of one of Finkelsteins idea pertaining to the fusion of quantum theory with relativity by utilizing techniques from Loop Quantum Gravity.

  8. Reflections on the Freshman Year: An Interview with David Riesman.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, John N.; Barefoot, Betsy

    1991-01-01

    An interview with David Riesman, founder of Harvard University's (Massachusetts) freshman seminar program, covers the origins and structure of the seminars, Riesman's own college experience, the importance of the college experience, faculty research, and the role of faculty in student intellectual development. (MSE)

  9. From the Ocean's Flotsam, David Wiesner Imagines a Journey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Barbara A.

    2008-01-01

    David Wiesner's 2007 Caldecott Medal-winning "Flotsam" blends the events of everyday life with the surreal. As he often does in his picture books, Wiesner plays with size and scale, opening "Flotsam" with a full-page illustration of a sand crab and the enormous eye behind it before pulling back on the second page to reveal the creature's actual…

  10. The Sociological Foundations of David Elliott's "Music Matters" Philosophy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paul, Stephen J.

    2000-01-01

    Focuses on the ideas presented in the book, "Music Matters (David Elliott)." Discusses Elliott's stance on praxialism, stating that his book is based on social mediation of action as its behavioral theory. Addresses Elliott's concept of expertise and topics using an interactionist perspective as a means of interpretation. (CMK)

  11. Henry David Thoreau and Martin Luther King, Jr. Lesson Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Brent

    1995-01-01

    Presents a five-lesson, high school instructional unit on the ideas and activities of Henry David Thoreau and Martin Luther King, Jr. Includes student objectives, step-by-step instructional procedures, and discussion questions. Provides quotations by Thoreau and King. (CFR)

  12. Astronaut David Scott practicing for Gemini 8 EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Astronaut David R. Scott practicing for Gemini 8 extravehicular acitivity (EVA) in bldg 4 of the Manned Spacecraft Center on the air bearing floor. He is wearing the the Hand-Held Maneuvering Unit which he will use during the EVA.

  13. David E. Smith Receives 2012 Charles A. Whitten Medal: Citation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Roger J.

    2013-01-01

    David E. Smith was awarded the 2012 Charles A. Whitten Medal at the AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony, held on 5 December 2012 in San Francisco, Calif. The medal is for "outstanding achievement in research on the form and dynamics of the Earth and planets."

  14. David P. McAllester on Navajo Music.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Patricia Shehan

    1994-01-01

    Asserts that music teachers increasingly are interested in music that originates outside the Western European tradition. Presents an interview with David P. McAllester on world music, the musical culture of the Navajo people, and how it should be taught in music classrooms. (CFR)

  15. "The Word I Would Use Is 'Aesthetic'": Reading David Hawkins.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Featherstone, Helen; Featherstone, Joseph

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the life of David Hawkins, one of the most influential educators involved in school reform in the 1960s. Focuses on the aesthetic as the center of Hawkins' vision of schooling. Compares Hawkins' perspective to Dewey's in terms of the aesthetic. (KHR)

  16. Astronauts David Griggs and Jeff Hoffman in Egress training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Astronaut David Griggs, wearing an extravehicular mobility unit (EMU), practices emergency egress from the space shuttle during an underwater test in the Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) (26473); Griggs (left) and Astronaut Jeff Hoffman train for egress in the WETF (26474).

  17. David Reeder and the History of Urban Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsden, Bill; Grosvenor, Ian

    2007-01-01

    David Reeder was one of the most important conservers of the traditions of urban history scholarship established during the 1960s at the University of Leicester under the leadership of Professor H. J. Dyos. Among Reeder's major achievements were the application of the skills and objectives of such scholarship to the history of education, and in…

  18. Moral philosophers are moral experts! A reply to David Archard.

    PubMed

    Gordon, John-Stewart

    2014-05-01

    In his article 'Why Moral Philosophers Are Not and Should Not Be Moral Experts' David Archard attempts to show that his argument from common-sense morality is more convincing than other competing arguments in the debate. I examine his main line of argumentation and eventually refute his main argument in my reply.

  19. STS-69 Mission Commander David M. Walker in white room

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    STS-69 Mission Commander David M. Walker chats with white room closeout crew members Bob Saulnier (left), Regulo Villalobos and closeout crew leader Travis Thompson prior to entering the flight deck of the Space Shuttle Endeavour at Launch Pad 39A.

  20. Q & A with Ed Tech Leaders: Interview with David Dockterman

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaughnessy, Michael F.

    2014-01-01

    In this article, Michael F. Shaughnessy, Contributing Editor of this journal, interviews David Dockterman, Chief Architect, Learning Sciences, at Scholastic Education, where he provides guidance on turning research into practical programs. Dockterman was one of the founders of Tom Snyder Productions, a leading educational software developer and…

  1. Child Welfare Research and Training: A Response to David Stoesz

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Brenda D.; Vandiver, Vikki L.

    2016-01-01

    In this response to David Stoesz' critique, "The Child Welfare Cartel," the authors agree that child welfare research and training must be improved. The authors disagree, however, with Stoesz' critique of social work education, his assessment of the most-needed forms of child welfare research, and his depiction of the goals and…

  2. David Hoffman's Law School Lectures, 1822-1833.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaffer, Thomas L.

    1982-01-01

    The Baltimore lawyer David Hoffman (1784-1854), the father of American legal ethics, was also the first of the systematic American legal educators. The history and operation of his law school, the curriculum, and his effective use of the lecture method are described and discussed. (MSE)

  3. Challenging Texts: Teaching Deliberately--Reading Henry David Thoreau's "Walden"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    One of the more difficult 19th-century American texts for high school students to read is undoubtedly Henry David Thoreau's "Walden." His erudite allusions, often page-long sentences, and sophisticated sense of the ironic initially leave many students cold. Still, the author encourages them to read amid the din of a cultural cacophony that shouts…

  4. Empowering Adolescent Readers: Intertextuality in Three Novels by David Almond

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latham, Don

    2008-01-01

    In "Skellig," "Kit's Wilderness," and "Clay", David Almond employs various types of intertextuality to enrich his narratives. Through the use of allusion, adaptation, collage, and mise-en-abyme, he encourages his adolescent readers to seek out precursor texts and to consider the interrelationships between these texts and his own. By so doing, he…

  5. Video from Panel Discussion with Joseph Fraumeni and David Schottenfeld

    Cancer.gov

    Video footage from Panel Discussion with Joseph Fraumeni and David Schottenfeld on Cancer Epidemiology over the Last Half-Century and Thoughts on the Future. The discussion took place on May 11, 2012, when DCEG hosted Dr. Schottenfeld as a Visiting Scholar.

  6. Arthur C. Graesser: Award for Distinguished Contributions of Applications of Psychology to Education and Training.

    PubMed

    2011-11-01

    Presents Arthur C. Graesser as the 2011 winner of the American Psychological Association Award for Distinguished Contributions of Applications of Psychology to Education and Training. "As a multifaceted psychologist, cognitive engineer of useful education and training technologies, and mentor of new talent for the world of applied and translational cognitive science, Arthur C. Graesser is the perfect role model, showing how a strong scholar and intellect can shape both research and practice. His work is a mix of top-tier scholarship in psychology, education, intelligent systems, and computational linguistics. He combines cognitive science excellence with bold use of psychological knowledge and intelligent systems to design new generations of learning opportunities and to help lay the foundation for a translational science of learning." (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. Reginald Crundall Punnett: first Arthur Balfour Professor of Genetics, Cambridge, 1912.

    PubMed

    Edwards, A W F

    2012-09-01

    R. C. Punnett, the codiscoverer of linkage with W. Bateson in 1904, had the good fortune to be invited to be the first Arthur Balfour Professor of Genetics at Cambridge University, United Kingdom, in 1912 when Bateson, for whom it had been intended, declined to leave his new appointment as first Director of the John Innes Horticultural Institute. We here celebrate the centenary of the first professorship dedicated to genetics, outlining Punnett's career and his scientific contributions, with special reference to the discovery of "partial coupling" in the sweet pea (later "linkage") and to the diagram known as Punnett's square. His seeming reluctance as coauthor with Bateson to promote the reduplication hypothesis to explain the statistical evidence for linkage is stressed, as is his relationship with his successor as Arthur Balfour Professor, R. A. Fisher. The background to the establishment of the Professorship is also described.

  8. Reginald Crundall Punnett: First Arthur Balfour Professor of Genetics, Cambridge, 1912

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, A. W. F.

    2012-01-01

    R. C. Punnett, the codiscoverer of linkage with W. Bateson in 1904, had the good fortune to be invited to be the first Arthur Balfour Professor of Genetics at Cambridge University, United Kingdom, in 1912 when Bateson, for whom it had been intended, declined to leave his new appointment as first Director of the John Innes Horticultural Institute. We here celebrate the centenary of the first professorship dedicated to genetics, outlining Punnett’s career and his scientific contributions, with special reference to the discovery of “partial coupling” in the sweet pea (later “linkage”) and to the diagram known as Punnett’s square. His seeming reluctance as coauthor with Bateson to promote the reduplication hypothesis to explain the statistical evidence for linkage is stressed, as is his relationship with his successor as Arthur Balfour Professor, R. A. Fisher. The background to the establishment of the Professorship is also described. PMID:22964834

  9. General Douglas MacArthur Military Leadership Writing Competition, Command and General Staff College, 2012

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S...1 Managing Risk in Today’s Army This paper is the second place winner of the General Douglas MacArthur...principles to guide leaders at all levels. In support of this important objective, the manual offers a comprehensive framework for leadership that

  10. The Use of the Digital Smile Design Concept as an Auxiliary Tool in Aesthetic Rehabilitation: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Zanardi, Piero Rocha; Laia Rocha Zanardi, Raquel; Chaib Stegun, Roberto; Sesma, Newton; Costa, Bru-no; Cruz Laganá, Dalva

    2016-01-01

    The digital smile design is a practical diagnosis method that can assist the clinician to visualize and measure dentogingival discrepancies. This clinical report aims to present the associated steps, from the diagnosis of the alterations diagnosis through to the final aesthetic result. A 37-years-old female patient presented as her main complaint the tooth form and colour discrepancies. Applying the digital smile design principle, the necessary measures for a harmonic smile correction could be accurately determined. The initial diagnosis led to a wax up of the master cast that was duplicated in acrylic resin directly in the mouth. This temporary restoration guided the periodontal surgery and the final pressed ceramic crown restoration. We conclude that the digital smile design concept seems to be a useful tool to achieve a satisfactory aesthetic result. PMID:27006721

  11. Brief report: the smiles of a child with autism spectrum disorder during an animal-assisted activity may facilitate social positive behaviors--quantitative analysis with smile-detecting interface.

    PubMed

    Funahashi, Atsushi; Gruebler, Anna; Aoki, Takeshi; Kadone, Hideki; Suzuki, Kenji

    2014-03-01

    We quantitatively measured the smiles of a child with autism spectrum disorder (ASD-C) using a wearable interface device during animal-assisted activities (AAA) for 7 months, and compared the results with a control of the same age. The participant was a 10-year-old boy with ASD, and a normal healthy boy of the same age was the control. They voluntarily participated in this study. Neither child had difficulty putting on the wearable device. They kept putting on the device comfortably through the entire experiment (duration of a session was about 30-40 min). This study was approved by the Ethical Committee based on the rules established by the Institute for Developmental Research, Aichi Human Service Center. The behavior of the participants during AAA was video-recorded and coded by the medical examiner (ME). In both groups, the smiles recognized by the ME corresponded with the computer-detected smiles. In both groups, positive social behaviors increased when the smiles increased. Also, negative social behaviors decreased when the smiles increased in the (ASD-C). It is suggested that by leading the (ASD-C) into a social environment that may cause smiling, the child's social positive behaviors may be facilitated and his social negative behaviors may be decreased.

  12. A new gene mapping resource: Interspecies hybrids between Pere David`s deer (Elaphurus davidianus) and red deer (Cervus elaphus)

    SciTech Connect

    Tate, M.L.; Mathias, H.C.; Penty, J.M.; Hill, D.F.; Fennessy, P.F.; Dodds, K.G.

    1995-03-01

    Three male F{sub 1} hybrids between Pere David`s deer and red deer were mated to red deer to produce 143 backcross calves. The pedigrees are a rare example of a fertile hybrid between evolutionarily divergent species. We examined the use of these families for genetic mapping of evolutionarily conserved (Type I) loci by testing for genetic linkage between five species-specific protein variants and 12 conserved DNA probes. Two probes were homologous, and the remainder syntenic, to the protein coding loci in cattle or humans. Using six restriction enzymes, each DNA probe detected one or more restriction fragments specific to Pere David`s deer. Linkage analyses among the species-specific variants placed the loci into four linkage groups within which linkage between adjacent loci and gene order was supported by a LOD > 3. Southern and protein analysis of LDHA and ALB provided identical segregation data. These linkage groups were consistent with the cattle gene map and provide new information for comparing the gene maps of ruminants, humans and mice. The deer hybrids are an important new resource that can contribute to the comparative analysis of the mammalian genome. 68 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. An Analysis of the Extratropical Transition of Hurricane Arthur (2014) from a JPSS Proving Ground Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folmer, M. J.; Berndt, E.; Halverson, J. B.; Dunion, J. P.; Goldberg, M.

    2015-12-01

    As part of the GOES-R and JPSS Satellite Proving Grounds, multiple proxy and operational products were available to analyze and forecast the complex evolution of Hurricane Arthur (2014). The National Hurricane Center, Ocean Prediction Center, Weather Prediction Center, and NESDIS Satellite Analysis Branch were able to monitor the tropical and extratropical transition of Arthur using various convective and red, green, blue (RGB) products that have been introduced in recent years. During the extratropical transition, the Air Mass RGB (AM RGB) product and AIRS/CrIS ozone products were available as a compliment to water vapor imagery to identify the upper-level low with associated stratospheric drying that absorbed much of Arthur's energy. The AM RGB product provides forecasters with an enhanced view of various air masses that are combined into a single image and can help differentiate between possible stratospheric/tropospheric interactions, moist tropical air masses, and cool, continental/maritime air masses. Even though this product provides a wealth of qualitative information about the horizontal distribution of synoptic features, forecasters are also interested in more quantitative information such as the vertical distribution of temperature, moisture, and ozone which impact the coloring of the resulting AM RGB. Currently, NOAA Unique CrIS/ATMS Processing System (NUCAPS) temperature and moisture soundings are available in AWIPS-II as a point-based display. Traditionally, soundings are used to anticipate and forecast severe convection, however unique and valuable information can be gained from soundings for other forecasting applications, such as extratropical transition, especially in data sparse regions. Additional research has been conducted to look at how NUCAPS soundings might help forecasters identify the pre-extratropical transition environment, leading to earlier diagnosis and better public advisories. NUCAPS soundings, AIRS soundings, NOAA G-IV GPS

  14. Mona Lisa's smile: a hypothesis based on a new principle of art neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Chakravarty, Ambar

    2010-07-01

    The smile on Mona Lisa's face remains enigmatous and a topic of much discussion in art circle over the centuries. In this essay the author proposes a new principle of art neuroscience or the science of aesthetics namely 'dynamism' which artists often employ to impart an illusion of movement in their art works which are essentially static. This illusion is possibly generated through imaginative thinking which involves frontal cortical activation in the viewer's brain coupled with activation of the motion area (area V5/MT) of the viewer's visual cortex. It is suggested that this principle of dynamism is somewhat different from the previously described concept of kinetic art. The author hypothesizes that the great painter Leonardo da Vinci very intelligently painted the angles of the mouth of Mona Lisa's face to evoke this illusion of movement (smile) to increase the aesthetic value of this great work of art.

  15. The ElderSmile TimeMap: Benefits of Connecting Statistics With Time and Place.

    PubMed

    Kum, Susan S; Wang, Hua; Wang, Peng; Jin, Zhu; De La Cruz, Leydis; Northridge, Mary E; Kunzel, Carol; Marshall, Stephen E; Metcalf, Sara S

    2015-09-01

    Community-based programs are critical for locally targeted public health education and accessible service delivery. Deriving useful information from such programs is important for their own evaluation and improvement and may facilitate research collaboration with partners and experts. Here we present an interactive Web-based application designed for a community-based oral health outreach program called ElderSmile to demonstrate how data can be summarized, filtered, compared, and visualized by time and place to inform program planning, evaluation, and research. The ElderSmile TimeMap ( http://www.acsu.buffalo.edu/∼smetcalf/resources/timemap.html ) is an emergent product of a US National Institutes of Health-funded collaboration of knowledge sharing among multidisciplinary team members at the University at Buffalo, Columbia University, and New York University.

  16. Modified lip repositioning: A surgical approach to treat the gummy smile

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Aditya Gopinath; Koganti, Vijay Prasad; Prabhakar, Ashok Kodangala; Soni, Sweta

    2015-01-01

    Gummy smile has been an esthetic concern for many patients. This clinical report describes a successful surgical coverage obtained by modified lip repositioning, thus surgically treating the gummy smile. The technique was performed to limit the retraction of elevator muscles (e.g., zygomaticus minor, orbicularis oris, leviator anguli oris and levator labi oris.) The technique is fulfilled by removing two strips of mucosa from maxillary buccal vestibule on both the sides leaving the frenum untouched and creating a partial thickness flap between mucogingival junction and upper lip musculature, and suturing the lip mucosa with mucogingival junction, resulting in a narrow vestibule and restricted muscle pull, thereby reducing gingival display. This technique is different from the conventional surgical lip repositioning as labial frenum is left untouched over here as it helps in maintain Litton the midline for lip repositioning and reduces the morbidity associated with it. PMID:26229285

  17. Optimized Conditions for Passerini-Smiles Reactions and Applications to Benzoxazinone Syntheses.

    PubMed

    Martinand-Lurin, Elodie; Dos Santos, Aurélie; Robineau, Emmanuelle; Retailleau, Pascal; Dauban, Philippe; Grimaud, Laurence; El Kaïm, Laurent

    2016-09-21

    Initial conditions disclosed for the Passerini-Smiles reaction are associated with a lack of efficiency that has prevented chemists from using it since its discovery. We wish to report herein our thorough study in the development of new experimental conditions for this coupling between electron-poor phenols, isocyanides, and carbonyl derivatives. These new conditions have been applied to several synthetic strategies towards benzoxazinones.

  18. Electrophile-integrating Smiles rearrangement provides previously inaccessible C4'-O-alkyl heptamethine cyanine fluorophores.

    PubMed

    Nani, Roger R; Shaum, James B; Gorka, Alexander P; Schnermann, Martin J

    2015-01-16

    New synthetic methods to rapidly access useful fluorophores are needed to advance modern molecular imaging techniques. A new variant of the classical Smiles rearrangement is reported that enables the efficient synthesis of previously inaccessible C4'-O-alkyl heptamethine cyanines. The key reaction involves N- to O-transposition with selective electrophile incorporation on nitrogen. A representative fluorophore exhibits excellent resistance to thiol nucleophiles, undergoes productive bioconjugation, and can be used in near-IR fluorescence imaging applications.

  19. New SMILES retrievals of ozone in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuribayashi, Kouta; Kasai, Yasuko; Orsolini, Yvan; Limpasuvan, Varavut

    2016-07-01

    Ozone in mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT) region has been observed from space since three decades. We examine ozone in MLT region using observations from the Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) on the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) of the International Space Station (ISS) between 12 October 2009 and 21 April 2010. We develop a new retrieval to improve upon previous ozone products, especially in the ozone secondary layer. One of the improvements in our new SMILES NICT level 2 product version 3.1.0 is that the profiles of the background atmosphere (altitude, pressure, and temperature) were calculated based on the global model GAIA (Ground-to-topside model of Atmosphere and Ionosphere for Aeronomy) to ensure the internal consistency of these profiles. We assess the quality of the new SMILES NICT Level2 product version 3.1.0 in the MLT region, by comparing with various satellite observations (such as SABER, GOMOS) and model calculations performed using the same background atmosphere as calculated from GAIA at the each observation point. This is to avoid that differences of ozone amount in the same air mass being caused by the use of different atmospheric conditions for calculation of volume mixing ratio from ozone density. We examine the differences caused by the vertical resolution, as well as random errors and systematic errors. The new SMILES ozone product shows good agreement with observations from other satellites in the MLT region. It sheds some light on the seasonal evolution of ozone at low latitudes, as influenced by tides.

  20. Double Variational Binding—(SMILES) Conformational Analysis by Docking Mechanisms for Anti-HIV Pyrimidine Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Putz, Mihai V.; Dudaș, Nicoleta A.; Isvoran, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    Variational quantitative binding–conformational analysis for a series of anti-HIV pyrimidine-based ligands is advanced at the individual molecular level. This was achieved by employing ligand-receptor docking algorithms for each molecule in the 1,3-disubstituted uracil derivative series that was studied. Such computational algorithms were employed for analyzing both genuine molecular cases and their simplified molecular input line entry system (SMILES) transformations, which were created via the controlled breaking of chemical bonds, so as to generate the longest SMILES molecular chain (LoSMoC) and Branching SMILES (BraS) conformations. The study identified the most active anti-HIV molecules, and analyzed their special and relevant bonding fragments (chemical alerts), and the recorded energetic and geometric docking results (i.e., binding and affinity energies, and the surface area and volume of bonding, respectively). Clear computational evidence was also produced concerning the ligand-receptor pocket binding efficacies of the LoSMoc and BraS conformation types, thus confirming their earlier presence (as suggested by variational quantitative structure-activity relationship, variational-QSAR) as active intermediates for the molecule-to-cell transduction process. PMID:26295229

  1. Focal dystonia and the Sensory-Motor Integrative Loop for Enacting (SMILE)

    PubMed Central

    Perruchoud, David; Murray, Micah M.; Lefebvre, Jeremie; Ionta, Silvio

    2014-01-01

    Performing accurate movements requires preparation, execution, and monitoring mechanisms. The first two are coded by the motor system, the latter by the sensory system. To provide an adaptive neural basis to overt behaviors, motor and sensory information has to be properly integrated in a reciprocal feedback loop. Abnormalities in this sensory-motor loop are involved in movement disorders such as focal dystonia, a hyperkinetic alteration affecting only a specific body part and characterized by sensory and motor deficits in the absence of basic motor impairments. Despite the fundamental impact of sensory-motor integration mechanisms on daily life, the general principles of healthy and pathological anatomic–functional organization of sensory-motor integration remain to be clarified. Based on the available data from experimental psychology, neurophysiology, and neuroimaging, we propose a bio-computational model of sensory-motor integration: the Sensory-Motor Integrative Loop for Enacting (SMILE). Aiming at direct therapeutic implementations and with the final target of implementing novel intervention protocols for motor rehabilitation, our main goal is to provide the information necessary for further validating the SMILE model. By translating neuroscientific hypotheses into empirical investigations and clinically relevant questions, the prediction based on the SMILE model can be further extended to other pathological conditions characterized by impaired sensory-motor integration. PMID:24999327

  2. Construction of a Corneal Stromal Equivalent with SMILE-Derived Lenticules and Fibrin Glue

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Houfa; Qiu, Peijin; Wu, Fang; Zhang, Wei; Teng, Wenqi; Qin, Zhenwei; Li, Chao; Zhou, Jiaojie; Fang, Zhi; Tang, Qiaomei; Fu, Qiuli; Ma, Jian; Yang, Yabo

    2016-01-01

    The scarcity of corneal tissue to treat deep corneal defects and corneal perforations remains a challenge. Currently, small incision lenticule extraction (SMILE)-derived lenticules appear to be a promising alternative for the treatment of these conditions. However, the thickness and toughness of a single piece of lenticule are limited. To overcome these limitations, we constructed a corneal stromal equivalent with SMILE-derived lenticules and fibrin glue. In vitro cell culture revealed that the corneal stromal equivalent could provide a suitable scaffold for the survival and proliferation of corneal epithelial cells, which formed a continuous pluristratified epithelium with the expression of characteristic markers. Finally, anterior lamellar keratoplasty in rabbits demonstrated that the corneal stromal equivalent with decellularized lenticules and fibrin glue could repair the anterior region of the stroma, leading to re-epithelialization and recovery of both transparency and ultrastructural organization. Corneal neovascularization, graft degradation, and corneal rejection were not observed within 3 months. Taken together, the corneal stromal equivalent with SMILE-derived lenticules and fibrin glue appears to be a safe and effective alternative for the repair of damage to the anterior cornea, which may provide new avenues in the treatment of deep corneal defects or corneal perforations. PMID:27651001

  3. Large-scale classification of P-glycoprotein inhibitors using SMILES-based descriptors.

    PubMed

    Prachayasittikul, V; Worachartcheewan, A; Toropova, A P; Toropov, A A; Schaduangrat, N; Prachayasittikul, V; Nantasenamat, C

    2017-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (Pgp) inhibition has been considered as an effective strategy towards combating multidrug-resistant cancers. Owing to the substrate promiscuity of Pgp, the classification of its interacting ligands is not an easy task and is an ongoing issue of debate. Chemical structures can be represented by the simplified molecular input line entry system (SMILES) in the form of linear string of symbols. In this study, the SMILES notations of 2254 Pgp inhibitors including 1341 active, and 913 inactive compounds were used for the construction of a SMILE-based classification model using CORrelation And Logic (CORAL) software. The model provided an acceptable predictive performance as observed from statistical parameters consisting of accuracy, sensitivity and specificity that afforded values greater than 70% and MCC value greater than 0.6 for training, calibration and validation sets. In addition, the CORAL method highlighted chemical features that may contribute to increased and decreased Pgp inhibitory activities. This study highlights the potential of CORAL software for rapid screening of prospective compounds from a large chemical space and provides information that could aid in the design and development of potential Pgp inhibitors.

  4. Analysis of soft tissue display during enjoyment smiling: part 1--Caucasians.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiulian; Nahles, Susanne; Nelson, Carolyn A; Lin, Ye; Nelson, Katja

    2013-01-01

    Esthetic considerations have become increasingly important in dental therapy. Evaluation of the soft tissue display during enjoyment smiling can provide useful information for esthetic oral rehabilitation. To date, no study has quantified the amount and frequency of soft tissue display in the area of the papilla. Photographic examination of 66 fully dentate patients with a mean age of 28.5 years was performed during enjoyment smiling. Digital processing and measurement of the tooth, gingival, and papillary display revealed that over 90% of subjects displayed papillae in the anterior teeth and first premolars during enjoyment smiling regardless of sex. The frequency of display in descending order consisted of maxillary lateral incisors (96%), central incisors (94%), canines (94%), first premolars (91%), second premolars (85%), and first molars (39%). The mean papillary display was 3.4 mm (range, 0.0 to 10.0 mm). There was no significant difference in the amount of papillary display between the sexes for anterior teeth, premolars, or first molars (P = .97, P = .79, and P = .48, respectively).

  5. Arthur Beer and his relations to Einstein and to the Warburg library (German Title: Arthur Beer und seine Beziehungen zu Einstein und zur Warburg-Bibliothek)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duerbeck, Hilmar W.; Beer, Peter

    We give an account of the scientific life of Arthur Beer (1900-1980). Born in Reichenberg, Bohemia, he studied in Leipzig, Vienna and Berlin. After obtaining his Ph.D., he worked with the Seewarte (maritime observatory) and with the Warburg Library, both in Hamburg. Because of his relations with Finlay Freundlich, Einstein and Fritz Saxl, he succeeded in emigrating to England in 1934, where he obtained a temporary position at Cambridge Observatory, and carried out astrophysical research under F.J.M. Stratton. After shorter stays at the observatories of Mill Hill and Kew, both in the vicinity of London, he obtained, after World War II, the position of Senior Assistant Observer in Cambridge. Besides his studies in astrophysics and the history of astronomy, he is best known as the founding editor of the series "Vistas in Astronomy".

  6. STS-86 Mission Specialist David Wolf in white room

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    STS-86 Mission Specialist David A. Wolf, at center facing camera, prepares to enter the Space Shuttle Atlantis at Launch Pad 39A, with the assistance of Rick Welty, in foreground at center, United Space Alliance (USA) orbiter vehicle closeout chief; and closeout team members, in background from left, Jim Davis, NASA quality assurance specialist; and George Schramm, USA mechanical technician. STS-86 Mission Specialist Vladimir Georgievich Titov, in foreground at far left, is awaiting his turn.

  7. About David Ruelle, After His 80th Birthday

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallavotti, Giovanni

    2017-02-01

    This is, with minor modifications, a text read at the 114th Statistical Mechanics meeting, in honor of D. Ruelle and Y. Sinai, at Rutgers, Dec. 13-15, 2015. It does not attempt to analyze, or not even just quote, all works of David Ruelle; I discuss, as usual in such occasions, a few among his works with which I have most familiarity and which were a source of inspiration for me.

  8. Digital Anthropometric Video-Imaging Device (DAVID) Operational Manual

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-08-29

    wish to thank John Joseph ofIsoperformance, Inc., for developing the initial Visual Basic program for the DAVID and the staff of SPA WAR System Center...operator in demographic data field of Remote Program 3. DIMENSIONNAME: Name of dimension in Microsoft Visual Basic program 4. SHORTNAME: Abbreviation for...measurement (e.g., SH, HT, etc.) in Microsoft Visual Basic program 5. ISCALIB: Switch in Microsoft Visual Basic program to indicate if measurement is

  9. David Nelson, MD, MPH | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Dr. David E Nelson is the Director of the Cancer Prevention Fellowship Program (CPFP) Branch in the National Cancer Institute's Division of Cancer Prevention. The CPFP is an internationally renowned postdoctoral program designed to train early career scientific researchers and leaders in the field of cancer prevention. Dr. Nelson came to the CPFP in 2008 after working at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta for many years. |

  10. Establishment of a new relationship between posed smile width and lower facial height: A cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Aby; George, Jinu; Peter, Elbe; Philip, Koshi; Chankramath, Rajesh; Johns, Dexton Antony; Bhaskar, Anitha

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The present study is intended to add a new parameter that would be useful in orthodontic clinical evaluation, treatment planning, and determination of vertical dimension (at occlusion). Materials and Methods: Standardized videographic recording of 79 subjects during posed smile was captured. Each video was then cut into 30 photos using the free studio software. The widest commissure-to-commissure posed smile frame (posed smile width [SW]) was selected as one of 10 or more frames showing an identical smile. Lower third of the face is measured from subnasale to soft tissue menton using a digital vernier caliper. Two values were then compared. Ratio between lower facial height and posed SW was calculated. Results: The co-relation between smiling width and lower facial height was found to be statistically significant (P < 0.01). The ratio of lower facial height and smiling width was calculated as 1.0016 with a standard deviation (SD) = 0.04 in males and 1.0301 with an SD = 0.07 in females. The difference between the mean lower facial height in males and females was statistically significant with a t = 10.231 and P = 0.000. The difference between the mean smiling width in males and females was also statistically significant with a t = 5.653 and P = 0.000. Conclusion: In class I subjects with pleasing appearance, normal facial proportions, normal overjet and overbite, and average Frankfort mandibular angle, the lower facial height (subnasale to soft tissue menton) is equal to posed SW. PMID:26430369

  11. What became of Arthur Conan Doyle's father? The last years of Charles Altamont Doyle.

    PubMed

    Beveridge, A

    2006-10-01

    This paper examines the fate of Arthur Conan Doyle's father, Charles Altamont Doyle, a Victorian illustrator, who spent his last years as an asylum inmate. Based on new archival research, it looks at the reasons for his institutionalisation and what befell him during his stay. It will consider Doyle's claim that he was wrongfully confined and also the suggestion that his family were responsible for having him committed. Finally, the paper will examine the nature of Doyle's condition and the creative work he produced whilst an asylum inmate.

  12. Fishy Hearing: A Short Biography of Arthur N. Popper, PhD.

    PubMed

    Coffin, Allison B

    2016-01-01

    Biologist Dr. Arthur Popper's career spans decades, from his early work on comparative inner ear morphology in fishes to his recent interest in how underwater noise impacts aquatic vertebrates. Along the way Dr. Popper's research subjects span at least 19 vertebrate taxa, from lamprey to lungfish to humans, and he's had a profound influence in the field of fish bioacoustics. This brief biography describes some of Dr. Popper's many contributions to fish hearing research and highlights both some of his major discoveries and some of the biological mysteries he has yet to solve.

  13. Two-message quantum-Arthur-Merlin game with single-qubit measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morimae, Tomoyuki

    2016-06-01

    We show that the class quantum-Arthur-Merlin (QAM) does not change even if the verifier's ability is restricted to only single-qubit measurements. To show the result, we use the idea of measurement-based quantum computing: the verifier, who can do only single-qubit measurements, can test the graph state sent from the prover and use it for his measurement-based quantum computing. Inspired by this construction, we also introduce a problem which we call stabilizer state optimization, and show that it is QMA-complete.

  14. Arthur Compton's 1941 Analysis of Explosive Fission in U-235: The Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Cameron

    2008-04-01

    In November 1941 Arthur Compton prepared a report for Vannevar Bush regarding the possibility of explosive fission of U-235. This remarkable report, arguably the parent document of the Los Alamos Primer, presented detailed estimates for the critical mass, expected energy release, efficiency, destructive effects and probable cost of such a weapon. This paper will examine the physics behind Compton's estimates for the critical mass and efficiency of a fission weapon and compare his results to those derived from present-day cross-sections and secondary-neutron numbers. His approach to the efficiency calculation is found to be particularly interesting in that it utilizes some very basic undergraduate physics.

  15. From structuralism to neutral monism in Arthur S. Eddington's philosophy of physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gherab-Martin, Karim J.

    2013-11-01

    Arthur S. Eddington is remembered as one of the best astrophysicists and popularizers of physics in the twentieth century. Nevertheless, his stimulating speculations in philosophy produced serious disputes among philosophers of his time, his philosophy remaining linked to idealism and mysticism. This paper shows this label to be misleading and argues for the identification of Eddington's philosophy with a kind of neutral monism regained from Bertrand Russell and influenced by the Gestalt psychology. The concept of structure is fundamental to our argument for the existence of a veiled neutral monism in Eddington's ideas.

  16. The Paleoproterozoic McArthur River (HYC) Pb/Zn/Ag deposit of northern Australia: organic geochemistry and ore genesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Junhong; Walter, Malcolm R.; Logan, Graham A.; Hinman, Mark C.; Summons, Roger E.

    2003-05-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in ore and mudstone within the McArthur River ore deposit show compound distribution patterns similar to those of hydrothermally generated petroleum in the Guaymas Basin and significantly different from those found in conventional oil. PAH abundances and their isomer distributions result from a temperature gradient between the source of mineralizing fluids and the sediments fringing the ore system during ore formation. Along with other geochemical, geological, paleobiological and mineralogical lines of evidence, these data provide strong evidence that the ore formed within partially lithified sediments under marine conditions. Given that the McArthur River ore body is an exquisitely preserved example of a sediment-hosted base-metal deposit, these results may be widely applicable. The McArthur deposit is also a rich repository of paleobiological information, allowing studies of the microbiology of ore formation and the paleobiology of an ancient hydrothermal system, as is discussed elsewhere.

  17. Alcohol and Emotional Contagion: An Examination of the Spreading of Smiles in Male and Female Drinking Groups

    PubMed Central

    Fairbairn, Catharine E.; Sayette, Michael A.; Aalen, Odd O.; Frigessi, Arnoldo

    2014-01-01

    Researchers have hypothesized that men gain greater reward from alcohol than women. However, alcohol-administration studies testing participants drinking alone have offered weak support for this hypothesis. Research suggests that social processes may be implicated in gender differences in drinking patterns. We examined the impact of gender and alcohol on “emotional contagion”—a social mechanism central to bonding and cohesion. Social drinkers (360 male, 360 female) consumed alcohol, placebo, or control beverages in groups of three. Social interactions were video recorded, and both Duchenne and non-Duchenne smiling were continuously coded using the Facial Action Coding System. Results revealed that Duchenne smiling (but not non-Duchenne smiling) contagion correlated with self-reported reward and typical drinking patterns. Importantly, Duchenne smiles were significantly less “infectious” among sober male versus female groups, and alcohol eliminated these gender differences in smiling contagion. Findings identify new directions for research exploring social-reward processes in the etiology of alcohol problems. PMID:26504673

  18. Heterogeneity of long-history migration explains cultural differences in reports of emotional expressivity and the functions of smiles.

    PubMed

    Rychlowska, Magdalena; Miyamoto, Yuri; Matsumoto, David; Hess, Ursula; Gilboa-Schechtman, Eva; Kamble, Shanmukh; Muluk, Hamdi; Masuda, Takahiko; Niedenthal, Paula Marie

    2015-05-12

    A small number of facial expressions may be universal in that they are produced by the same basic affective states and recognized as such throughout the world. However, other aspects of emotionally expressive behavior vary widely across culture. Just why do they vary? We propose that some cultural differences in expressive behavior are determined by historical heterogeneity, or the extent to which a country's present-day population descended from migration from numerous vs. few source countries over a period of 500 y. Our reanalysis of data on cultural rules for displaying emotion from 32 countries [n = 5,340; Matsumoto D, Yoo S, Fontaine J (2008) J Cross Cult Psychol 39(1):55-74] reveals that historical heterogeneity explains substantial, unique variance in the degree to which individuals believe that emotions should be openly expressed. We also report an original study of the underlying states that people believe are signified by a smile. Cluster analysis applied to data from nine countries (n = 726), including Canada, France, Germany, India, Indonesia, Israel, Japan, New Zealand, and the United States, reveals that countries group into "cultures of smiling" determined by historical heterogeneity. Factor analysis shows that smiles sort into three social-functional subtypes: pleasure, affiliative, and dominance. The relative importance of these smile subtypes varies as a function of historical heterogeneity. These findings thus highlight the power of social-historical factors to explain cross-cultural variation in emotional expression and smile behavior.

  19. Distribution of smile line, gingival angle and tooth shape among the Saudi Arabian subpopulation and their association with gingival biotype

    PubMed Central

    AlQahtani, Nabeeh A.; Haralur, Satheesh B.; AlMaqbol, Mohammad; AlMufarrij, Ali Jubran; Al Dera, Ahmed Ali; Al-Qarni, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the occurrence of smile line and maxillary tooth shape in the Saudi Arabian subpopulation, and to estimate the association between these parameters with gingival biotype. Materials and Methods: On the fulfillment of selection criteria, total 315 patients belong to Saudi Arabian ethnic group were randomly selected. Two frontal photographs of the patients were acquired. The tooth morphology, gingival angle, and smile line classification were determined with ImageJ image analyzing software. The gingival biotype was assessed by probe transparency method. The obtained data were analyzed with SPSS 19 (IBM Corporation, New York, USA) software to determine the frequency and association between other parameters and gingival biotype. Results: Among the clinical parameters evaluated, the tapering tooth morphology (56.8%), thick gingival biotype (53%), and average smile line (57.5%) was more prevalent. The statistically significant association was found between thick gingival biotype and the square tooth, high smile line. The high gingival angle was associated with thin gingival biotype. Conclusions: The study results indicate the existence of an association between tooth shape, smile line, and gingival angle with gingival biotype. PMID:27195228

  20. Face Gender Influences the Looking Preference for Smiling Expressions in 3.5-Month-Old Human Infants.

    PubMed

    Bayet, Laurie; Quinn, Paul C; Tanaka, James W; Lee, Kang; Gentaz, Édouard; Pascalis, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Young infants are typically thought to prefer looking at smiling expressions. Although some accounts suggest that the preference is automatic and universal, we hypothesized that it is not rigid and may be influenced by other face dimensions, most notably the face's gender. Infants are sensitive to the gender of faces; for example, 3-month-olds raised by female caregivers typically prefer female over male faces. We presented neutral versus smiling pairs of faces from the same female or male individuals to 3.5-month-old infants (n = 25), controlling for low-level cues. Infants looked longer to the smiling face when faces were female but longer to the neutral face when faces were male, i.e., there was an effect of face gender on the looking preference for smiling. The results indicate that a preference for smiling in 3.5-month-olds is limited to female faces, possibly reflective of differential experience with male and female faces.

  1. SMILE (Solar wind Magnetosphere Ionosphere Link Explorer): X-ray imaging of the Sun-Earth connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branduardi-Raymont, G.; Wang, C.; Smile Team

    2016-06-01

    SMILE is a novel space mission, under development, dedicated to study the dynamic coupling of the solar wind with the Earth's magnetosphere in a global way never attempted before. From a highly elliptical Earth orbit SMILE will obtain X-ray images of the magnetosheath and polar cusps simultaneously with UV images of the Northern aurora, while making in situ solar wind/magnetosheath plasma and magnetic field measurements. X-ray imaging of the dayside magnetosheath and cusps is now possible thanks to the relatively recent discovery of solar wind charge exchange X-ray emission, first observed at comets, and subsequently found to occur in the vicinity of the Earth's magnetosphere. SMILE will turn this unwanted background for astronomical observations into a diagnostic tool for the study of solar-terrestrial interactions, enabling us to trace and link the processes of solar wind injection in the magnetosphere with particle precipitation into the cusps and the aurora. SMILE is the first fully collaborative space mission from inception to implementation and operations between ESA and the Chinese Academy of Sciences. This talk will present the science and impact that SMILE will deliver, together with an overview of its payload and of the mission's development.

  2. Islands as model systems in ecology and evolution: prospects fifty years after MacArthur-Wilson.

    PubMed

    Warren, Ben H; Simberloff, Daniel; Ricklefs, Robert E; Aguilée, Robin; Condamine, Fabien L; Gravel, Dominique; Morlon, Hélène; Mouquet, Nicolas; Rosindell, James; Casquet, Juliane; Conti, Elena; Cornuault, Josselin; Fernández-Palacios, José María; Hengl, Tomislav; Norder, Sietze J; Rijsdijk, Kenneth F; Sanmartín, Isabel; Strasberg, Dominique; Triantis, Kostas A; Valente, Luis M; Whittaker, Robert J; Gillespie, Rosemary G; Emerson, Brent C; Thébaud, Christophe

    2015-02-01

    The study of islands as model systems has played an important role in the development of evolutionary and ecological theory. The 50th anniversary of MacArthur and Wilson's (December 1963) article, 'An equilibrium theory of insular zoogeography', was a recent milestone for this theme. Since 1963, island systems have provided new insights into the formation of ecological communities. Here, building on such developments, we highlight prospects for research on islands to improve our understanding of the ecology and evolution of communities in general. Throughout, we emphasise how attributes of islands combine to provide unusual research opportunities, the implications of which stretch far beyond islands. Molecular tools and increasing data acquisition now permit re-assessment of some fundamental issues that interested MacArthur and Wilson. These include the formation of ecological networks, species abundance distributions, and the contribution of evolution to community assembly. We also extend our prospects to other fields of ecology and evolution - understanding ecosystem functioning, speciation and diversification - frequently employing assets of oceanic islands in inferring the geographic area within which evolution has occurred, and potential barriers to gene flow. Although island-based theory is continually being enriched, incorporating non-equilibrium dynamics is identified as a major challenge for the future.

  3. David Kasner, MD, and the Road to Pars Plana Vitrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Blodi, Christopher F.

    2016-01-01

    David Kasner, MD (1927–2001), used his extensive dissections of eye bank eyes and experiences in teaching cataract surgery to resident physicians to realize that excision of vitreous when present in the anterior chamber of eyes undergoing cataract surgery was preferable to prior intraoperative procedures. Noting that eyes tolerated his maneuvers, he then performed planned subtotal open-sky vitrectomies; first on a traumatized eye in 1961, then on two eyes of patients with amyloidosis (1966–1967). The success of these operations was noted by others, most particularly Robert Machemer, MD. Kasner’s work directly led to further surgical developments, including closed pars plana vitrectomy. PMID:27660504

  4. Smile esthetics: Evaluation of long-term changes in the transverse dimension

    PubMed Central

    Misner, Kenner; English, Jeryl D.; Alexander, Wick G.; Alexander, J. Moody; Gallerano, Ron

    2017-01-01

    Objective To analyze the long-term changes in maxillary arch widths and buccal corridor ratios in orthodontic patients treated with and without premolar extractions. Methods The study included 53 patients who were divided into the extraction (n = 28) and nonextraction (n = 25) groups. These patients had complete orthodontic records from the pretreatment (T1), posttreatment (T2), and postretention (T3) periods. Their mean retention and postretention times were 4 years 2 months and 17 years 8 months, respectively. Dental models and smiling photographs from all three periods were digitized to compare the changes in three dental arch width measurements and three buccal corridor ratios over time between the extraction and nonextraction groups. Data were analyzed using analysis of variance tests. Post-hoc multiple comparisons were made using Bonferroni correction. Results Soft-tissue extension during smiling increased with age in both groups. The maximum dental width to smile width ratio (MDW/SW) also showed a favorable increase with treatment in both groups (p < 0.05), and remained virtually stable at T3 (p > 0.05). According to the MDW/SW ratio, the mean difference in the buccal corridor space of the two groups was 2.4 ± 0.2% at T3. Additionally, no significant group × time interaction was found for any of the buccal corridor ratios studied. Conclusions Premolar extractions did not negatively affect transverse maxillary arch widths and buccal corridor ratios. The long-term outcome of orthodontic treatment was comparable between the study groups. PMID:28337419

  5. Attitudes of Mississippi college students toward David Duke before and after seeing the film Who is David Duke?

    PubMed

    Eisenman, R; Girdner, E J; Burroughs, R G; Routman, M

    1993-01-01

    The attitudes of 211 students at a university in Mississippi were investigated both before and after seeing the Public Broadcasting Film Who Is David Duke? The film provided evidence of Duke's current racism, anti-Semitism, and pro-Nazi leanings. In a previous study with university students in Louisiana, the majority did not change their attitudes after watching the film (Eisenman, 1993). However, in the present study, students' attitudes showed change in an anti-Duke direction. The findings are discussed and reasons given for the differences between the two samples, and for the popularity of Duke, a former leader of the Ku Klux Klan.

  6. Temporalis Muscle Tendon Unit Transfer for Smile Restoration After Facial Paralysis.

    PubMed

    Owusu Boahene, Kofi D

    2016-02-01

    Temporalis muscle tendon unit (MTU) transfer may be used as a single-stage procedure for dynamic reanimation of the paralyzed face. Principles and biomechanics of muscle function and tendon transposition are essential in optimizing outcome. Critical steps and pearls for success include minimizing scarring, maintaining glide plains, mobilizing adequate tendon length, insertion of MTU at ideal tension based on intraoperative dynamic tension-excursion relationship, and insertion of tendon as close to the lip margin as possible. Because muscles adapt to tension, load, and task changes by altering their sarcomere arrangement and muscle fiber composition, physiotherapy should be initiated to use the repurposed temporalis MTU for smile restoration.

  7. Interactive programs with preschool children bring smiles and conversation to older adults: time-sampling study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Keeping older adults healthy and active is an emerging challenge of an aging society. Despite the importance of personal relationships to their health and well-being, changes in family structure have resulted in a lower frequency of intergenerational interactions. Limited studies have been conducted to compare different interaction style of intergenerational interaction. The present study aimed to compare the changes in visual attention, facial expression, engagement/behaviour, and intergenerational conversation in older adults brought about by a performance-based intergenerational (IG) program and a social-oriented IG program to determine a desirable interaction style for older adults. Methods The subjects of this study were 25 older adults who participated in intergenerational programs with preschool children aged 5 to 6 years at an adult day care centre in Tokyo. We used time sampling to perform a structured observation study. The 25 older participants of intergenerational programs were divided into two groups based on their interaction style: performance-based IG program (children sing songs and dance) and social-oriented IG program (older adults and children play games together). Based on the 5-minute video observation, we compared changes in visual attention, facial expression, engagement/behaviour, and intergenerational conversation between the performance-based and social-oriented IG programs. Results Constructive behaviour and intergenerational conversation were significantly higher in the social-oriented IG programming group than the performance-based IG programming group (p<0.001). No significant differences were observed in frequency of smiles, however, when weighted smiling rate was used, smiles were significantly more frequently observed in the social-oriented IG programming group than the performance-based IG programming (p<0.05). The visual attention occurred between the generations was significantly higher in the performance-based IG

  8. First Scholarship at AGU Established by David E. Lumley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahar, Joanna G.

    2009-09-01

    Shortly after AGU launched its annual voluntary contribution campaign last year—the theme was “Building Tomorrow's Talent Today”—the Union's development office received an e-mail message from David E. Lumley about establishing a scholarship for a high-school student or undergraduate. Many scientific societies and associations have quite a few named scholarships, but for AGU this was a new concept. Lumley was sure of what he wanted to do and even more excited when he learned that his scholarship would be a first for AGU. “I want to help inspire today's young minds to work on problems of global importance in both the energy and environment sectors of industry and academia,” Lumley said. Recipients of the David E. Lumley Young Scientist Scholarship for Energy and Environmental Science will be expected to present a paper and to participate in various student activities at Fall Meeting. “Meeting some of the ‘giants’ of geoscience and getting their feedback on research is a big deal for these young students. We sometimes lose sight of this,” he said.

  9. Age-related changes of the dental aesthetic zone at rest and during spontaneous smiling and speech.

    PubMed

    Van der Geld, Pieter; Oosterveld, Paul; Kuijpers-Jagtman, Anne Marie

    2008-08-01

    The aims of this study were to analyse lip line heights and age effects in an adult male population during spontaneous smiling, speech, and tooth display in the natural rest position and to determine whether lip line height follows a consistent pattern during these different functions. The sample consisted of 122 randomly selected male participants from three age cohorts (20-25 years, 35-40 years, and 50-55 years). Lip line heights were measured with a digital videographic method for smile analysis, which had previously been tested and found reliable. Statistical analysis of the data was carried out using correlation analysis, analysis of variance, and Tukey's post hoc tests. Maxillary lip line heights during spontaneous smiling were generally higher in the premolar area than at the anterior teeth. The aesthetic zone in 75 per cent of the participants included all maxillary teeth up to the first molar. Coherence in lip line heights during spontaneous smiling, speech, and tooth display in the natural rest position was confirmed by significant correlations. In older subjects, maxillary lip line heights decreased significantly in all situations. Lip line heights during spontaneous smiling were reduced by approximately 2 mm. In older participants, the mandibular lip line heights also changed significantly and teeth were displayed less during spontaneous smiling. Mandibular tooth display in the rest position increased significantly. Upper lip length increased significantly by almost 4 mm in older subjects, whereas upper lip elevation did not change significantly. The significant increasing lip coverage of the maxillary teeth indicates that the effects of age should be included in orthodontic treatment planning.

  10. The role of personality traits in self-rated oral health and preferences for different types of flawed smiles.

    PubMed

    Montero, J; Gómez Polo, C; Rosel, E; Barrios, R; Albaladejo, A; López-Valverde, A

    2016-01-01

    Symmetric, aligned and luminous smiles are usually classified as 'beautiful' and aesthetic. However, smile perception is not strictly governed by standardised rules. Personal traits may influence the perception of non-ideal smiles. We aimed to determine the influence of personality traits in self-rated oral health and satisfaction and in the aesthetic preference for different strategically flawed smiles shown in photographs. Smiles with dark teeth, with uneven teeth, with lip asymmetry and dental asymmetry were ordered from 1 to 4 as a function of the degree of beauty by 548 participants, of which 50·7% were females with a mean age of 41·5 ± 17·6 years (range: 16-89 years). Self-assessment and oral satisfaction were recorded on a Likert scale. Personality was measured by means of the Big Five Inventory (extraversion, agreeableness, conscientiousness, neuroticism and openness), and the Life Orientation Test was used to measure optimism and pessimism. Of the four photographs with imperfect smiles, dental asymmetry was the most highly assessed in 63% of the sample, and the worst was lip asymmetry, in 43·7% of the sample. Some personality traits (above all conscientiousness and openness) were significantly correlated with the position assigned to the photographs with dental and lip asymmetry or with misaligned teeth. The extraversion, agreeableness and openness traits were correlated with the self-perceptions of oral health and aesthetics of the participants. Dental asymmetry seems to be better tolerated than lip asymmetry. Personality traits are weakly but significantly correlated with the aesthetic preference and oral health values, conscientiousness and openness being the most relevant domains in this sense.

  11. Refractive lenticule extraction (ReLEx) through a small incision (SMILE) for correction of myopia and myopic astigmatism: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Ağca, Alper; Demirok, Ahmet; Yıldırım, Yusuf; Demircan, Ali; Yaşa, Dilek; Yeşilkaya, Ceren; Perente, İrfan; Taşkapılı, Muhittin

    2016-01-01

    Small-incision lenticule extraction (SMILE) is an alternative to laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) and photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) for the correction of myopia and myopic astigmatism. SMILE can be performed for the treatment of myopia ≤−12 D and astigmatism ≤5 D. The technology is currently only available in the VisuMax femtosecond laser platform. It offers several advantages over LASIK and PRK; however, hyperopia treatment, topography-guided treatment, and cyclotorsion control are not available in the current platform. The working principles, potential advantages, and disadvantages are discussed in this review. PMID:27757010

  12. The MacArthur Maze Fire and Roadway Collapse: Consequences for SNF Transportation - 12476

    SciTech Connect

    Bajwa, Christopher S.; Easton, Earl P.; Adkins, Harold; Cuta, Judith; Klymyshyn, Nicholas; Suffield, Sarah

    2012-07-01

    In 2007, a severe transportation accident occurred near Oakland, California, on a section of Interstate 880 known as the 'MacArthur Maze', involving a tractor trailer carrying gasoline which impacted an overpass support column and burst into flames. The subsequent fire caused the collapse of portions of the Interstate 580 overpass onto the remains of the tractor-trailer in less than 20 minutes, due to a reduction of strength in the structural steel exposed to the fire. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission is in the process of examining the impacts of this accident on the performance of a spent nuclear fuel transportation package, using detailed analysis models, in order to determine the potential regulatory implications related to the safe transport of spent nuclear fuel in the United States. This paper will provide a summary of this effort and present results and conclusions. The detailed thermal models of the MacArthur Maze fire scenario with ANSYS and COBRASFS have produced preliminary results indicating that in a fire of this severity, the peak fuel cladding temperature would almost certainly exceed the short-term limit of 570 deg. C (1058 deg. F), and would likely exceed the Zircaloy burst temperature limit of 750 deg. C (1382 deg. F) assumed in previous transportation studies. Additional work is needed to refine and verify some of the details of these complex models, but the overall results are consistent with previous fire analyses with similar models, and with the results obtained for the HAC fire evaluations with these models. These results as well as future results produced by these models can therefore be considered as reliable estimates of the temperatures that would be experienced in fire conditions of the severity of the MacArthur Maze fire scenario. The structural analyses show that the GA-4 package is robust enough to withstand the impact of the overhead span without suffering major damage or deformation to the containment boundary. The greatest

  13. 76 FR 34692 - Astoria Generating Company, L.P., NRG Power Marketing LLC, Arthur Kill Power LLC, Astoria Gas...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Astoria Generating Company, L.P., NRG Power Marketing LLC, Arthur Kill Power LLC, Astoria Gas Turbine Power LLC, Dunkirk Power LLC, Huntley Power LLC, Oswego Harbor Power LLC, TC Ravenswood, LLC; v. New York...

  14. 76 FR 36910 - Astoria Generating Company, L.P., NRG Power Marketing LLC, Arthur Kill Power LLC, Astoria Gas...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Astoria Generating Company, L.P., NRG Power Marketing LLC, Arthur Kill Power LLC, Astoria Gas Turbine Power LLC, Dunkirk Power LLC, Huntley Power LLC, Oswego Harbor Power LLC, TC Ravenswood, LLC. v. New York...

  15. 76 FR 36914 - Astoria Generating Company, L.P., NRG Power Marketing LLC, Arthur Kill Power LLC, Astoria Gas...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Astoria Generating Company, L.P., NRG Power Marketing LLC, Arthur Kill Power LLC, Astoria Gas Turbine Power LLC, Dunkirk Power LLC, Huntley Power LLC, Oswego Harbor Power LLC, TC Ravenswood, LLC, v. New York...

  16. Reception of Arthur Sutherland Neill's Pedagogical Concept and His Summerhill School in Hungarian and German Pedagogical Literature and Press

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langer-Buchwald, Judit

    2010-01-01

    Arthur Sutherland Neill is one of the most debated personalities among the representatives of the classic reform pedagogy, due to his pedagogical concept and its practical realization, and his Summerhill School, equally. He is often mentioned during public debates, where mostly the "three S"--"sex, swearing and smoking", are…

  17. Infant Communicative Development Assessed with the European Portuguese MacArthur-Bates Communicative Development Inventories Short Forms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frota, Sónia; Butler, Joseph; Correia, Susana; Severino, Cátia; Vicente, Selene; Vigário, Marina

    2016-01-01

    This article describes the European Portuguese MacArthur-Bates Communicative Development Inventories short forms, the first published instruments for the assessment of language development in EP-learning infants and toddlers. Normative data from the EP population are presented, focusing on developmental trends for vocabulary learning, production…

  18. Race Differences in Tested Intelligence: Important Socially, Obscure Causally. A Review ... of "Bias in Mental Testing", by Arthur R. Jensen.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphreys, Lloyd G.

    1981-01-01

    This document is a book review of "Bias in Mental Testing" by Arthur R. Jensen. Jensen discusses intelligence as a phenotypic construct. The problem of ethnic differences in phenotypic intelligence is emotionally charged, which makes rational consideration of the issues difficult. The reviewer disagrees with the author's predisposition…

  19. 77 FR 18891 - Expediting Review of Pipeline Projects From Cushing, Oklahoma, to Port Arthur, Texas, and Other...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-28

    ..., consultations, and other processes as necessary to expedite decisions related to domestic pipeline..., to Port Arthur, Texas, and Other Domestic Pipeline Infrastructure Projects Memorandum for the Heads... and trucks, and a world-class refining sector that last year was a net exporter of petroleum...

  20. Creativity Is More than Silly, More than Art, More than Good: The Diverse Career of Arthur Cropley

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, James C.

    2015-01-01

    In this article, I highlight some of Arthur Cropley's work that has been the most influential to me as a scholar. Cropley's work has continually pushed the boundaries by exploring what creativity is and isn't, squashing myths, and not making assumptions. I specifically discuss Cropley's research and theory on the importance of convergent thinking,…

  1. CORAL: QSPR model of water solubility based on local and global SMILES attributes.

    PubMed

    Toropov, Andrey A; Toropova, Alla P; Benfenati, Emilio; Gini, Giuseppina; Leszczynska, Danuta; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2013-01-01

    Water solubility is an important characteristic of a chemical in many aspects. However experimental definition of the endpoint for all substances is impossible. In this study quantitative structure-property relationships (QSPRs) for negative logarithm of water solubility-logS (mol L(-1)) are built up for five random splits into the sub-training set (≈55%), the calibration set (≈25%), and the test set (≈20%). Simplified molecular input-line entry system (SMILES) is used as the representation of the molecular structure. Optimal SMILES-based descriptors are calculated by means of the Monte Carlo method using the CORAL software (http://www.insilico.eu/coral). These one-variable models for water solubility are characterized by the following average values of the statistical characteristics: n(sub_train)=725-763; n(calib)=312-343; n(test)=231-261; r(sub_train)(2)=0.9211±0.0028; r(calib)(2)=0.9555±0.0045; r(test)(2)=0.9365±0.0073; s(sub_train)=0.561±0.0086; s(calib)=0.453±0.0209; s(test)=0.520±0.0205. Thus, the reproducibility of statistical quality of suggested models for water solubility confirmed for five various splits.

  2. DOAP1 Promotes Flowering in the Orchid Dendrobium Chao Praya Smile.

    PubMed

    Sawettalake, Nunchanoke; Bunnag, Sumontip; Wang, Yanwen; Shen, Lisha; Yu, Hao

    2017-01-01

    APETALA1 (AP1) encodes a key MADS-box transcription factor that specifies the floral meristem identity on the flank of the inflorescence meristem, and determines the identity of perianth floral organs in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Orchids are members of the Orchidaceae, one of the largest families of angiosperms. Although the expression patterns of a few AP1-like genes in orchids have been reported, their actual functions in orchid reproductive development are so far largely unknown. In this study, we isolated and characterized an AP1 ortholog, DOAP1, from Dendrobium Chao Praya Smile. DOAP1 was highly expressed in reproductive tissues, including inflorescence apices and flowers at various developmental stages. Overexpression of DOAP1 resulted in early flowering in Arabidopsis, and was able to rescue the floral organ defects of Arabidopsis ap1 mutants. Moreover, we successfully created transgenic Dendrobium Chao Praya Smile orchids overexpressing DOAP1, which displayed earlier flowering and earlier termination of inflorescence meristems into floral meristems than wild-type orchids. Our results demonstrate that DOAP1 plays an evolutionarily conserved role in promoting flowering and floral meristem specification in the Orchidaceae family.

  3. DOAP1 Promotes Flowering in the Orchid Dendrobium Chao Praya Smile

    PubMed Central

    Sawettalake, Nunchanoke; Bunnag, Sumontip; Wang, Yanwen; Shen, Lisha; Yu, Hao

    2017-01-01

    APETALA1 (AP1) encodes a key MADS-box transcription factor that specifies the floral meristem identity on the flank of the inflorescence meristem, and determines the identity of perianth floral organs in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Orchids are members of the Orchidaceae, one of the largest families of angiosperms. Although the expression patterns of a few AP1-like genes in orchids have been reported, their actual functions in orchid reproductive development are so far largely unknown. In this study, we isolated and characterized an AP1 ortholog, DOAP1, from Dendrobium Chao Praya Smile. DOAP1 was highly expressed in reproductive tissues, including inflorescence apices and flowers at various developmental stages. Overexpression of DOAP1 resulted in early flowering in Arabidopsis, and was able to rescue the floral organ defects of Arabidopsis ap1 mutants. Moreover, we successfully created transgenic Dendrobium Chao Praya Smile orchids overexpressing DOAP1, which displayed earlier flowering and earlier termination of inflorescence meristems into floral meristems than wild-type orchids. Our results demonstrate that DOAP1 plays an evolutionarily conserved role in promoting flowering and floral meristem specification in the Orchidaceae family. PMID:28386268

  4. The uncatchable smile in Leonardo da Vinci's La Bella Principessa portrait.

    PubMed

    Soranzo, Alessandro; Newberry, Michelle

    2015-08-01

    A portrait of uncertain origin recently came to light which, after extensive research and examination, was shown to be that rarest of things: a newly discovered Leonardo da Vinci painting entitled La Bella Principessa. This research presents a new illusion which is similar to that identified in the Mona Lisa; La Bella Principessa's mouth appears to change slant depending on both the Viewing Distance and the Level of Blur applied to a digital version of the portrait. Through a series of psychophysics experiments, it was found that a perceived change in the slant of the La Bella Principessa's mouth influences her expression of contentment thus generating an illusion that we have coined the "uncatchable smile". The elusive quality of the Mona Lisa's smile has been previously reported (Science, 290 (2000) 1299) and so the existence of a similar illusion in a portrait painted prior to the Mona Lisa becomes more interesting. The question remains whether Leonardo da Vinci intended this illusion. In any case, it can be argued that the ambiguity created adds to the portrait's allure.

  5. Masseteric-facial nerve transposition for reanimation of the smile in incomplete facial paralysis.

    PubMed

    Hontanilla, Bernardo; Marre, Diego

    2015-12-01

    Incomplete facial paralysis occurs in about a third of patients with Bell's palsy. Although their faces are symmetrical at rest, when they smile they have varying degrees of disfigurement. Currently, cross-face nerve grafting is one of the most useful techniques for reanimation. Transfer of the masseteric nerve, although widely used for complete paralysis, has not to our knowledge been reported for incomplete palsy. Between December 2008 and November 2013, we reanimated the faces of 9 patients (2 men and 7 women) with incomplete unilateral facial paralysis with transposition of the masseteric nerve. Sex, age at operation, cause of paralysis, duration of denervation, recipient nerves used, and duration of follow-up were recorded. Commissural excursion, velocity, and patients' satisfaction were evaluated with the FACIAL CLIMA and a questionnaire, respectively. The mean (SD) age at operation was 39 (±6) years and the duration of denervation was 29 (±19) months. There were no complications that required further intervention. Duration of follow-up ranged from 6-26 months. FACIAL CLIMA showed improvement in both commissural excursion and velocity of more than two thirds in 6 patients, more than one half in 2 patients and less than one half in one. Qualitative evaluation showed a slight or pronounced improvement in 7/9 patients. The masseteric nerve is a reliable alternative for reanimation of the smile in patients with incomplete facial paralysis. Its main advantages include its consistent anatomy, a one-stage operation, and low morbidity at the donor site.

  6. Facile Smiles-type rearrangement in radical cations of N-acyl arylsulfonamides and analogs

    PubMed Central

    Irikura, Karl K.; Todua, Nino G.

    2016-01-01

    RATIONALE N-Alkylation of sulfonylbenzamides was reported recently to cause a dramatic and surprising change in electron ionization mass spectrometry (EIMS), leading to a closed-shell base peak. Only an incomplete, speculative mechanism was available at that time. The fragmentation mechanism is determined in the present work and set in the context of related compounds. METHODS Candidate reaction mechanisms were evaluated theoretically using modest density-functional calculations. The fragmentation mechanism with the lowest barriers was identified and one of its implications tested successfully by experimental 18O-isotopic substitution. RESULTS The amide oxygen atom attacks the arylsulfonyl group at the ipso position (Smiles-type rearrangement), displacing a molecule of SO2. The resulting carboximidate radical cation has a weak C–O bond that breaks easily. The incipient aryloxyl radical abstracts a proton from the amide nitrogen to form the dominant product ion, but if the molecule is N-alkylated this cannot occur. Instead, the neutral aryloxyl radical is lost and a closed-shell, N-alkyl nitrilium ion is the major product. CONCLUSIONS The Smiles-type ion fragmentation mechanism is facile for the title compounds, despite the necessity for carbonyl oxygen to serve as a nucleophile. This rearrangement probably occurs in many of the mass spectra reported for structurally similar compounds, in which the nucleophile may be a thione, arylthio, imine, methylene, or methine moiety. PMID:24573815

  7. Analysis of soft tissue display during enjoyment smile. Part II: elder Caucasians.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Katja; Hu, Xiulian; Nack, Claudia; Nahles, Günter; Mehrhof, Jürgen; Nahles, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    Esthetic parameters in elder patients are essential in esthetic oral rehabilitation. To date, no study has quantified the amount and frequency of soft tissue display in the papilla area in patients over 50 years of age. Photographic examination of 42 fully dentate patients with a mean age of 59 years was performed during enjoyment smile. Digital processing and measurement of the tooth, gingiva, and papilla display revealed that over 90% of subjects displayed soft tissue in the papilla area of the anterior teeth and first premolar during enjoyment smile regardless of their sex. The frequency of the display in descending order follows: maxillary lateral incisor (96%), central incisor (94%), canine (94%), first premolar (91%), second premolar (85%), and first molar (39%). The mean amount of papilla display was 3.4 mm (0 to 10 mm). There was no significant difference in the amount of papilla display between sexes for anterior teeth, premolars, or first molar (P = .97, P = .79, and P = .48, respectively). Elder caucasians showed significantly less gingiva in the area of the premolars and molars but not in the anterior region. The amount of papilla display is significantly less in elder caucasians in the anterior and premolar region. The mean amount of soft tissue display decreased with age but the frequency of papilla display was more than 90% in the anterior region and greater than 70% in the premolar region, suggesting that pink esthetics is an issue in patients over 50 years of age.

  8. Humanism and values in the medical short stories of Arthur Conan Doyle.

    PubMed

    Rodin, A E; Key, J D

    1992-05-01

    In 1894 Arthur Conan Doyle published 15 medical short stories under the title of Round the Red Lamp, a red lamp being the symbol for a physician's office in Victorian England. These 19th-century vignettes do not indulge in scientific descriptions of diseases, their processes, or their treatment. Instead, they are based upon the effects of illness on the lives, sentiments, and emotions of the afflicted, their families, and their physicians. The stories are suffused with romance and humor. Conan Doyle's medical fiction of almost 100 years ago constitutes a superbly written and engaging collection that ranges from the comic to the pathetic. They contain universal themes that are especially appropriate today when humanistic elements are being usurped by rampant technology in both medical education and medical practice. These tales can make a significant contribution in related seminars for both students and practitioners.

  9. Better to light a candle: Arthur Barsky and global plastic surgery.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Christopher D; Barsky, Emily; Hagander, Lars; Barsky, Arthur J; Meara, John G

    2013-08-01

    Plastic and reconstructive surgery has had a long history with international humanitarian efforts. As the field of global surgery continues to gain momentum in academic centers throughout the world, the role of the surgical subspecialist in the public health infrastructure of low-resource communities has also begun to gain a new sense of wonder and importance. Arthur Barsky, Jr was arguably one of the most influential forefathers of global plastic surgery. Throughout his notable career spanning most of the 20th century, Barsky remained dedicated to delivering plastic and reconstructive surgical care to the disadvantaged worldwide, as well as educating others to do the same. Although he was not the first surgeon with an interest in global health, Barsky's work was unique and influential in its originality, magnitude, and scope. An appreciation and understanding of Barsky's groundbreaking work will help inform the future development of sustainable surgical systems in resource-poor settings.

  10. Arthur Compton's 1941 Report on explosive fission of U-235: A look at the physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, B. Cameron

    2007-12-01

    In November 1941, the third of three reports on atomic fission commissioned by Vannevar Bush through the National Academy of Sciences examined the prospects for explosive fission in U-235. This report, prepared by Arthur Compton, developed a model for estimating the critical mass and efficiency of an atomic bomb. I examine Compton's physics, attempt to discern the provenance of the numbers he adopted for various parameters, and compare his results with those yielded by a full diffusion-theory approach with contemporary values for the fission parameters. I conclude that Compton's physics is sound. A combination of somewhat optimistic parameter values and a conservative model for critical mass lead him to a numerical value for the bare critical radius of U-235 that is in fairly good accord with that yielded by diffusion theory. His estimated efficiency proved to be quite accurate for the Little Boy bomb.

  11. Arthur Beer and his relations with Einstein and the Warburg Institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duerbeck, Hilmar W.; Beer, Peter

    2006-06-01

    We give an account of the scientific life of Arthur Beer (1900-1980). Born in Reichenberg, Bohemia, he studied in Leipzig, Vienna and Berlin. After obtaining his Ph.D., he worked with the Seewarte (maritime observatory) and with the Warburg Library, both in Hamburg. Because of his relations with Finlay Freundlich, Albert Einstein and Fritz Saxl, he succeeded in emigrating to England in 1934, where he obtained a temporary position at Cambridge Observatory, and carried out astrophysical research under F.J.M. Stratton. After shorter stays at the observatories of Mill Hill and Kew, both in the vicinity of London, he obtained, after World War II, the position of Senior Assistant Observer in Cambridge. Besides his studies in astrophysics and the history of astronomy, he is best known as the founding Editor of the series Vistas in Astronomy.

  12. Delusions, Anger, and Serious Violence: New Findings From the MacArthur Violence Risk Assessment Study

    PubMed Central

    Ullrich, Simone; Keers, Robert; Coid, Jeremy W.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Recent research on the association between delusions and violence has suggested complex and differing pathways. Furthermore, it has been emphasized that temporal proximity is fundamental when investigating these relationships. We reanalyzed data from the MacArthur Violence Risk Assessment Study utilizing a different methodological approach to investigate associations between specific delusions and violence. Methods: Longitudinal study of 1136 male and female civil psychiatric inpatients after discharge. Delusions, affect due to delusions, and violence were measured at baseline and in 5 follow-up assessments. Serious violence was established using the MacArthur Community Violence Interview. Logistic mixed-effect models for repeated measures were performed. Results: A “prospective” model confirmed previous findings that delusions do not predict later violence. However, reanalysis, considering temporal proximity, indicated a relationship between specific delusions and outcome including: being spied upon (adjusted OR [AOR] = 1.62, 95% CI = 1.06–2.47, P = .027), being followed (AOR = 1.90, 95% CI = 1.29–2.80, P = .001), being plotted against (AOR = 1.70, 95% CI = 1.14–2.52, P = .009), being under control of person/force (AOR = 1.92, 95% CI = 1.24–2.97, P = .003), thought insertion (AOR = 1.63, 95% CI = 1.00–2.66, P = .048), and having special gifts/powers (AOR = 1.95, 95% CI = 1.31–2.92, P = .001). All these delusions were associated with angry affect (P < .05). Inclusion of anger in the model significantly attenuated the main effects (except grandiose delusions), indicating an indirect pathway. Conclusions: Temporal proximity is crucial when investigating relationships between delusions and violence. Anger due to delusions is the key factor in this pathway. Our findings have important implications for identification of psychotic patients at risk for violent behavior and, most importantly, management of their risk. PMID:24048345

  13. Astronaut David Brown talks with team members from South Carolina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Astronaut David Brown looks over the robot named 'L'il Max' with members of the team The Bot Kickers! from Northwestern High School, Rock Hill, S.C. Students from all over the country are at the KSC Visitor Complex for the FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Southeast Regional competition being held March 9-11 in the Rocket Garden. Teams of high school students are testing the limits of their imagination using robots they have designed, with the support of business and engineering professionals and corporate sponsors, to compete in a technological battle against other schools' robots. Of the 30 high school teams competing, 16 are Florida teams co- sponsored by NASA and KSC contractors. Local high schools participating are Astronaut, Bayside, Cocoa Beach, Eau Gallie, Melbourne, Melbourne Central Catholic, Palm Bay, Rockledge, Satellite, and Titusville.

  14. David Bohm's Hidden Variables Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Ned; Feldman, Gary; Wulsin, Wells

    2001-04-01

    This talk presents the hidden variables interpretation of quantum mechanics as proposed by David Bohm in 1952. Using a pilot-wave, Bohm’s theory reproduces the standard predictions of quantum mechanics while at the same time postulating that particles at all times are localized at definite positions. By way of introduction, the foundational issue of the quantum mechanics measurement problem will be discussed. The talk will then focus on how Bohm’s formulation of a hidden variables theory stands up to philosophical examination. Traditional objections to the theory, such as the EPR paradox, will be addressed, as well as the deeper metaphysical implications it holds for our view of the universe.

  15. STS-107 Crew Interviews: David Brown MS1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    STS-107 Mission Specialist 1 David Brown is seen during this preflight interview where he gives a quick overview of the mission before answering questions about his inspiration to become an astronaut and his career. Brown outlines his role in the mission in general, and specifically during the conducting of on-board science experiments. Brown discusses the following instruments and experiments in detail: ARMS (Advanced Respiratory Monitoring System), MEIDEX (Mediterranean Israeli Dust Experiment), Combustion Module 2, and FREESTAR (Fast Reaction Enables Science Technology and Research). He also describes the new primary payload carrier, the SPACEHAB research double module which doubles the amount of space available for research. Brown shares his thoughts about the importance of international cooperation in mission planning and the need for scientific research in space.

  16. David Duke, running for governor, proposes tattooing people with HIV.

    PubMed

    1995-05-19

    Former Ku Klux Klan leader, David Duke, planning a second run for governor of Louisiana, said he would curb the AIDS epidemic by tattooing people who are infected with HIV. His suggestion is to put indelible, glow-in-the-dark tattoos on the genitals of people infected with HIV. According to Duke, it may sound very draconian but it would not demean people. He also believes that tattooing would be legal because courts have a history of supporting the quarantining and institutionalizing of people with infectious diseases, such as tuberculosis. Duke said Cuba has had some success in using quarantines to reduce HIV infection, but he does not think it would work in the United States because it would cost too much. According to Duke, many people who get HIV from irresponsible behavior do not tell their partners that they have AIDS--these people are mad at the world and engage in dangerous behaviors even more.

  17. Astronaut David Brown talks to FIRST team members

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Astronaut David Brown talks with FIRST team members, Baxter Bomb Squad, from Mountain Home High School, Mountain Home, Ariz., during the FIRST competition. Students from all over the country are at the KSC Visitor Complex for the FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Southeast Regional competition March 9-11 in the Rocket Garden. Teams of high school students are testing the limits of their imagination using robots they have designed, with the support of business and engineering professionals and corporate sponsors, to compete in a technological battle against other schools' robots. Of the 30 high school teams competing, 16 are Florida teams co-sponsored by NASA and KSC contractors. Local high schools participating are Astronaut, Bayside, Cocoa Beach, Eau Gallie, Melbourne, Melbourne Central Catholic, Palm Bay, Rockledge, Satellite, and Titusville.

  18. Astronaut David Brown poses with ComBBat team

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Astronaut David Brown poses with members of the team known as ComBBat, representing Central Florida's Astronaut and Titusville high schools. ComBBat was teamed with Boeing at KSC and Brevard Community College. Students from all over the country are at the KSC Visitor Complex for the FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Southeast Regional competition being held March 9-11 in the Rocket Garden. Teams of high school students are testing the limits of their imagination using robots they have designed, with the support of business and engineering professionals and corporate sponsors, to compete in a technological battle against other schools' robots. Of the 30 high school teams competing, 16 are Florida teams co-sponsored by NASA and KSC contractors. Local high schools participating are Astronaut, Bayside, Cocoa Beach, Eau Gallie, Melbourne, Melbourne Central Catholic, Palm Bay, Rockledge, Satellite, and Titusville.

  19. Measurement of stratospheric and mesospheric winds with a submillimeter wave limb sounder: results from JEM/SMILES and simulation study for SMILES-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baron, Philippe; Manago, Naohiro; Ozeki, Hiroyuki; Irimajiri, Yoshihisa; Murtagh, Donal; Uzawa, Yoshinori; Ochiai, Satoshi; Shiotani, Masato; Suzuki, Makoto

    2015-10-01

    Satellite missions for measuring winds in the troposphere and thermosphere will be launched in a near future. There is no plan to observe winds in the altitude range between 30-90 km, though middle atmospheric winds are recognized as an essential parameter in various atmospheric research areas. Sub-millimetre limb sounders have the capability to fill this altitude gap. In this paper, we summarize the wind retrievals obtained from the Japanese Superconducting Submillimeter Wave Limb Emission Sounder (SMILES) which operated from the International Space Station between September 2009 and April 2010. The results illustrate the potential of such instruments to measure winds. They also show the need of improving the wind representation in the models in the Tropics, and globally in the mesosphere. A wind measurement sensitivity study has been conducted for its successor, SMILES-2, which is being studied in Japan. If it is realized, sub-millimeter and terahertz molecular lines suitable to determine line-of-sight winds will be measured. It is shown that with the current instrument definition, line-of-sight winds can be observed from 20 km up to more than 160 km. Winds can be retrieved with a precision better than 5 ms-1 and a vertical resolution of 2-3 km between 35-90 km. Above 90 km, the precision is better than 10 ms-1 with a vertical resolution of 3-5 km. Measurements can be performed day and night with a similar sensitivity. Requirements on observation parameters such as the antenna size, the satellite altitude are discussed. An alternative setting for the spectral bands is examined. The new setting is compatible with the general scientific objectives of the mission and the instrument design. It allows to improve the wind measurement sensitivity between 35 to 90 km by a factor 2. It is also shown that retrievals can be performed with a vertical resolution of 1 km and a precision of 5-10 ms-1 between 50 and 90 km.

  20. SMILE: a joint ESA/CAS mission to investigate the interaction between the solar wind and Earth's magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raab, Walfried; Branduardi-Raymont, Graziella; Wang, Chi; Dai, Lei; Donovan, Eric; Enno, Greg; Escoubet, Philippe; Holland, Andrew; Jing, Li; Kataria, Dhiren; Li, Lei; Read, Andy; Rebuffat, Denis; Romstedt, Jens; Runciman, Chris; Sembay, Steve; Spanswick, Emma; Sykes, Jon; Thornhill, Julian; Wielders, Arno; Zhang, Aibing; Zheng, Jianhua

    2016-07-01

    The Solar wind Magnetosphere Ionosphere Link Explorer (SMILE) is a collaborative science mission between ESA and the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS). SMILE is a novel self-standing mission to observe the coupling of the solar wind and Earth's magnetosphere via X-Ray imaging of the solar wind - magnetosphere interaction zones, UV imaging of global auroral distributions and simultaneous in-situ solar wind, magnetosheath plasma and magnetic field measurements. The SMILE mission proposal was submitted by a consortium of European, Chinese and Canadian scientists following a joint call for mission by ESA and CAS. It was formally selected by ESA's Science Programme Committee (SPC) as an element of the ESA Science Program in November 2015, with the goal of a launch at the end of 2021. In order to achieve its scientific objectives, the SMILE payload will comprise four instruments: the Soft X-ray Imager (SXI), which will spectrally map the Earth's magnetopause, magnetosheath and magnetospheric cusps; the UltraViolet Imager (UVI), dedicated to imaging the auroral regions; the Light Ion Analyser (LIA) and the MAGnetometer (MAG), which will establish the solar wind properties simultaneously with the imaging instruments. We report on the status of the mission and payload developments and the findings of a design study carried out in parallel at the concurrent design facilities (CDF) of ESA and CAS in October/November 2015.

  1. New Evaluation Vector through the Stanford Mobile Inquiry-Based Learning Environment (SMILE) for Participatory Action Research

    PubMed Central

    An, Ji-Young

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This article reviews an evaluation vector model driven from a participatory action research leveraging a collective inquiry system named SMILE (Stanford Mobile Inquiry-based Learning Environment). Methods SMILE has been implemented in a diverse set of collective inquiry generation and analysis scenarios including community health care-specific professional development sessions and community-based participatory action research projects. In each scenario, participants are given opportunities to construct inquiries around physical and emotional health-related phenomena in their own community. Results Participants formulated inquiries as well as potential clinical treatments and hypothetical scenarios to address health concerns or clarify misunderstandings or misdiagnoses often found in their community practices. From medical universities to rural village health promotion organizations, all participatory inquiries and potential solutions can be collected and analyzed. The inquiry and solution sets represent an evaluation vector which helps educators better understand community health issues at a much deeper level. Conclusions SMILE helps collect problems that are most important and central to their community health concerns. The evaluation vector, consisting participatory and collective inquiries and potential solutions, helps the researchers assess the participants' level of understanding on issues around health concerns and practices while helping the community adequately formulate follow-up action plans. The method used in SMILE requires much further enhancement with machine learning and advanced data visualization. PMID:27525157

  2. Determining chemical reactivity driving biological activity from SMILES transformations: the bonding mechanism of anti-HIV pyrimidines.

    PubMed

    Putz, Mihai V; Dudaş, Nicoleta A

    2013-07-30

    Assessing the molecular mechanism of a chemical-biological interaction and bonding stands as the ultimate goal of any modern quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) study. To this end the present work employs the main chemical reactivity structural descriptors (electronegativity, chemical hardness, chemical power, electrophilicity) to unfold the variational QSAR though their min-max correspondence principles as applied to the Simplified Molecular Input Line Entry System (SMILES) transformation of selected uracil derivatives with anti-HIV potential with the aim of establishing the main stages whereby the given compounds may inhibit HIV infection. The bonding can be completely described by explicitly considering by means of basic indices and chemical reactivity principles two forms of SMILES structures of the pyrimidines, the Longest SMILES Molecular Chain (LoSMoC) and the Branching SMILES (BraS), respectively, as the effective forms involved in the anti-HIV activity mechanism and according to the present work, also necessary intermediates in molecular pathways targeting/docking biological sites of interest.

  3. "Something to Smile About": An Evaluation of a Capacity-Building Oral Health Intervention for Staff Working with Homeless People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coles, Emma; Watt, Celia; Freeman, Ruth

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To use a qualitative exploration to evaluate whether "Something to Smile About" (STSA), an oral health intervention, had increased the oral health capacity of staff working with homeless people. Setting: A National Health Service board area in Scotland. Method: A purposive sample of 14 staff members from STSA-participating…

  4. The Effect of Parenting Style on Social Smiling in Infants at High and Low Risk for ASD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harker, Colleen M.; Ibañez, Lisa V.; Nguyen, Thanh P.; Messinger, Daniel S.; Stone, Wendy L.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined how parenting style at 9 months predicts growth in infant social engagement (i.e., social smiling) between 9 and 18 months during a free-play interaction in infants at high (HR-infants) and low (LR-infants) familial risk for autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Results indicated that across all infants, higher levels of maternal…

  5. Smile and laughter induction and intraoperative predictors of response to deep brain stimulation for obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Haq, Ihtsham U; Foote, Kelly D; Goodman, Wayne G; Wu, Samuel S; Sudhyadhom, Atchar; Ricciuti, Nicola; Siddiqui, Mustafa S; Bowers, Dawn; Jacobson, Charles E; Ward, Herbert; Okun, Michael S

    2011-01-01

    We recently treated six patients for OCD utilizing deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the anterior limb of the internal capsule and the nucleus accumbens region (ALIC-NA). We individually tested leads via a scripted intraoperative protocol designed to determine DBS-induced side effects and mood changes. We previously published qualitative data regarding our observations of induced emotional behaviors in our first five subjects. We have now studied these same behaviors in the full cohort of six patients over 2 years of follow-up and have examined the relationship of these behaviors to intraoperative mood changes and postoperative clinical outcomes. Five patients experienced at least one smile response during testing. At higher voltages of stimulation, some of these smiles progressed to natural laughter. Smiles and laughter were associated with mood elevation. At stimulation locations at which smiles were observed, voltage and mood were significantly correlated (p=0.0004 for right brain and p<0.0001 for left brain). In contrast, at contacts where smiles were not observed, mood was negatively correlated with voltage (p=0.0591 for right brain and p=0.0086 for left). Smile and laughter-inducing sites were located relatively medial, posterior, and deep in the ALIC-NA. The presence of stimulation induced laughter predicted improvement in OCD symptoms at 2 years. The higher the percentage of laugh conditions experienced in an individual patient, the greater the reduction in YBOCS (24 months, p=0.034). Other correlations between clinical outcomes and percent of smile/laugh conditions were not significant. These stimulation-induced behaviors were less frequently observed with 1 and 2-month postoperative test stimulation and were not observed at subsequent test stimulation sessions. Intraoperative stimulation-induced laughter may predict long-term OCD response to DBS. Identifying other potential response predictors for OCD will become increasingly important as more patients are

  6. SMILE and Wavefront-Guided LASIK Out-Compete Other Refractive Surgeries in Ameliorating the Induction of High-Order Aberrations in Anterior Corneal Surface

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To compare the change of anterior corneal higher-order aberrations (HOAs) after laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK), wavefront-guided LASIK with iris registration (WF-LASIK), femtosecond laser-assisted laser in situ keratomileusis (FS-LASIK), and small incision lenticule extraction (SMILE). Methods. In a prospective study, 82 eyes underwent LASIK, 119 eyes underwent WF-LASIK, 88 eyes underwent FS-LASIK, and 170 eyes underwent SMILE surgery. HOAs were measured with Pentacam device preoperatively and 6 months after surgery. The aberrations were described as Zernike polynomials, and analysis focused on total HOAs, spherical aberration (SA), horizontal coma, and vertical coma over 6 mm diameter central corneal zone. Results. Six months postoperatively, all procedures result in increase of anterior corneal total HOAs and SA. There were no significant differences in the induced HOAs between LASIK and FS-LASIK, while SMILE induced fewer total HOAs and SA compared with LASIK and FS-LASIK. Similarly, WF-LASIK also induced less total HOAs than LASIK and FS-LASIK, but only fewer SA than FS-LASIK (P < 0.05). No significant difference could be detected in the induced total HOAs and SA between SMILE and WF-LASIK, whereas SMILE induced more horizontal coma and vertical coma compared with WF-LASIK (P < 0.05). Conclusion. FS-LASIK and LASIK induced comparable anterior corneal HOAs. Compared to LASIK and FS-LASIK, both SMILE and WF-LASIK showed advantages in inducing less total HOAs. In addition, SMILE also possesses better ability to reduce the induction of SA in comparison with LASIK and FS-LASIK. However, SMILE induced more horizontal coma and vertical coma compared with WF-LASIK, indicating that the centration of SMILE procedure is probably less precise than WF-LASIK. PMID:27818792

  7. A Cabinet of Mathematical Curiosities at Teachers College: David Eugene Smith's Collection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Diane R.

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation is a history of David Eugene Smith's collection of historical books, manuscripts, portraits, and instruments related to mathematics. The study analyzes surviving documents, images, objects, college announcements and catalogs, and secondary sources related to Smith's collection. David Eugene Smith (1860-1944) travelled…

  8. Building Consensus toward a Shared Purpose: A Profile of President David Gray

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dessoff, Alan

    2011-01-01

    The author presents a profile of APPA president David Gray. One might say that David Gray's path into higher education facilities management was anything but traditional. Today, Gray is the assistant vice president of facilities services at Middle Tennessee State University. His professional career, however, actually began in banking. In 1993 he…

  9. 77 FR 67725 - Culturally Significant Object Imported for Exhibition Determinations: “Michelangelo's David Apollo”

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-13

    ... Culturally Significant Object Imported for Exhibition Determinations: ``Michelangelo's David Apollo'' SUMMARY... object to be included in the exhibition ``Michelangelo's David Apollo,'' imported from abroad for... display of the exhibit object at the National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC, from on or about December...

  10. Mini-temporalis transposition: a less invasive procedure of smile restoration for long-standing incomplete facial paralysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gang; Yang, Xianxian; Wang, Wei; Li, Qingfeng

    2015-03-01

    Facial paralysis is a common craniofacial deformity that is responsible for significant psychological and functional impairment. Free muscle transfer in 2 stages and latissimus dorsi transfer in one stage may be the most effective surgical procedure for achieving a symmetrical spontaneous smile for a patient with complete facial paralysis. However, these 2 procedures are unsuitable for many incomplete patients. The authors introduce a less invasive procedure, termed mini-temporalis transposition that is able to achieve a symmetrical spontaneous smile in incomplete patients. Through a zigzag incision into the temporal region, the middle third of the temporalis is transferred and elongated with the palmaris longus tendon or combined with the deep temporal fascia. The strips are anchored to key points at the modiolus and the middle of the ipsilateral orbicularis oris muscle through a small intraoral incision and subcutaneous tunnel. The key points are marked during preoperative smile analysis. This procedure was applied to 15 patients with long-standing incomplete facial paralysis. All patients obtained improvements in smile symmetry after the operation, and patients' satisfaction was high. In addition, no damage to residual facial nerve functions or development of procedure-induced complications (such as a facial contour defect, lip eversion or puckering, or skin tethering) was observed in any of the patients. Nevertheless, slight temporal hollowing was observed in 4 patients, and mild bulkiness over the zygomatic arch was a common observation. In summary, the mini-temporalis transfer technique is a safe and effective method of smile restoration for long-standing incomplete facial paralysis.

  11. Fleeting Smile

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidson, Sally

    2006-01-01

    The author's students were an unhappy, skeptical group of middle school students. Many of them had emotional issues. Many had drug addiction and prostitution in their broken and poverty-ridden families. Her school, which is a small charter school in a remote Arizona town, was a place of last resort for these students, who probably would not…

  12. IG Statement: Arthur A. Elkins, Jr., on OIG report Early Warning Report: Main EPA Headquarters Warehouse in Landover, Maryland, Requires Immediate EPA Attention

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Statement of Inspector General Arthur A. Elkins, Jr., on the Office of Inspector General (OIG) report Early Warning Report: Main EPA Headquarters Warehouse in Landover, Maryland, Requires Immediate EPA Attention.

  13. Camouflage of Severe Skeletal Class II Gummy Smile Patient Treated Nonsurgically with Mini Implants.

    PubMed

    Qamruddin, Irfan; Shahid, Fazal; Alam, Mohammad Khursheed; Zehra Jamal, Wafa

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal class II has always been a challenge in orthodontics and often needs assistance of surgical orthodontics in nongrowing patients when it presents with severe discrepancy. Difficulty increases more when vertical dysplasia is also associated with sagittal discrepancy. The advent of mini implants in orthodontics has broadened the spectrum of camouflage treatment. This case report presents a 16-year-old nongrowing girl with severe class II because of retrognathic mandible, and anterior dentoalveolar protrusion sagittally and vertically resulted in severe overjet of 13 mm and excessive display of incisors and gums. Both maxillary central incisors were trimmed by general practitioner few years back to reduce visibility. Treatment involved use of micro implant for retraction and intrusion of anterior maxillary dentoalveolar segment while lower incisors were proclined to obtain normal overjet, and overbite and pleasing soft tissue profile. Smile esthetics was further improved with composite restoration of incisal edges of both central incisors.

  14. Conservative reconstruction of the smile by orthodontic, bleaching, and restorative procedures

    PubMed Central

    Sundfeld, Renato Herman; Machado, Lucas Silveira; de Oliveira, Fernanda Garcia; Santos, Eduardo Almada; Lugato, Isabel Cristina Prado Torres; Sundfeld Neto, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    The following is a clinical case report of a patient whose chief complaint was the presence of generalized spacing in the maxillary anterior segment following orthodontic treatment. After meticulous clinical analyses and discussions of the clinical procedures to be adopted, dental bleaching was performed in both arches with 10% hydrogen peroxide (Opalescence Trèswhite Supreme 10% Hydrogen Peroxide - Ultradent Products, Inc., South Jordan, USA) after the conclusion and stabilization of orthodontic treatment. Then, the orthodontic appliance was removed and the diastemas in the maxillary anterior teeth were closed with Amelogen Plus (Ultradent Products, Inc., South Jordan, USA) resin composite. It was observed that the association of orthodontic, bleaching, and restorative procedures was capable of restoring dental shape, function, and esthetics, allowing the patient to smile without hesitation. PMID:22229015

  15. Use of Feldspathic Porcelain Veneers to Improve Smile Harmony: A 3-Year Follow-up Report.

    PubMed

    Federizzi, Leonardo; Gomes, Érica Alves; Báratro, Samantha Schaffer Pugilato; Baratto-Filho, Flares; Bacchi, Ataís; Spazzin, Aloísio Oro

    2016-01-01

    This case report describes an esthetic treatment to improve the shape and alignment of the anterior teeth, reestablishing smile harmony, using feldspathic porcelain veneers. Results of clinical follow up after 36 months are also presented. The advantages, disadvantages and limitations of the technique are detailed with reference to the relevant literature. This suggests that the success of treatment depends on adequate conditions of bonding between the veneers and the tooth complex, which involves parameters such as the strength and durability of the bond interface. Therefore, the clinical success of feldspathic porcelain veneers depends on the accurate selection of cases and correct execution of clinical and laboratory procedures. The rehabilitation involved from first right premolar to the left with feldspathic porcelain veneers made on refractory dies. After the 3-year follow up, excellent clinical results and patient satisfaction were achieved.

  16. Smiling faces and other rewards: using the Behavioral Assessment and Research System (BARS) with unique populations.

    PubMed

    Rohlman, D S; Gimenes, L S; Ebbert, C; Anger, W K; Bailey, S R; McCauley, L

    2000-12-01

    Concern about the exposure of children and adolescents to occupational and environmental hazards has increased, and so has the need to develop testing methods that can adequately assess the effects of exposure in children. A computerized testing system, the Behavioral Assessment and Research System (BARS), was successfully modified to test both younger populations and populations which do not speak English, the original language of the battery. These adaptations were modifications of the existing features of the BARS system which was designed to assess the broadest possible audience: simple language instructions broken down into basic concepts (step-by-step training with competency testing at each instruction step); a token dispenser along with a "smiling face" stimulus that reinforced appropriate performance; and adjustable parameter settings (e.g., number of trials, difficulty). Data from four groups demonstrate the feasibility of using BARS with children as young as preschool age and for non-English speaking children.

  17. QSPR modeling of octanol/water partition coefficient for vitamins by optimal descriptors calculated with SMILES.

    PubMed

    Toropov, A A; Toropova, A P; Raska, I

    2008-04-01

    Simplified molecular input line entry system (SMILES) has been utilized in constructing quantitative structure-property relationships (QSPR) for octanol/water partition coefficient of vitamins and organic compounds of different classes by optimal descriptors. Statistical characteristics of the best model (vitamins) are the following: n=17, R(2)=0.9841, s=0.634, F=931 (training set); n=7, R(2)=0.9928, s=0.773, F=690 (test set). Using this approach for modeling octanol/water partition coefficient for a set of organic compounds gives a model that is statistically characterized by n=69, R(2)=0.9872, s=0.156, F=5184 (training set) and n=70, R(2)=0.9841, s=0.179, F=4195 (test set).

  18. Short Alleles, Bigger Smiles? The Effect of 5-HTTLPR on Positive Emotional Expressions

    PubMed Central

    Haase, Claudia M.; Beermann, Ursula; Saslow, Laura R.; Shiota, Michelle N.; Saturn, Sarina R.; Lwi, Sandy J.; Casey, James J.; Nguyen, Nguyen K.; Whalen, Patrick K.; Keltner, Dacher J.; Levenson, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    The present research examined the effect of the 5-HTTLPR polymorphism in the serotonin transporter gene on objectively coded positive emotional expressions (i.e., laughing and smiling behavior objectively coded using the Facial Action Coding System). Three studies with independent samples of participants were conducted. Study 1 examined young adults watching still cartoons. Study 2 examined young, middle-aged, and older adults watching a thematically ambiguous yet subtly amusing film clip. Study 3 examined middle-aged and older spouses discussing an area of marital conflict (which typically produces both positive and negative emotion). Aggregating data across studies, results showed that the short allele of 5-HTTLPR predicted heightened positive emotional expressions. Results remained stable when controlling for age, gender, ethnicity, and depressive symptoms. These findings are consistent with the notion that the short allele of 5-HTTLPR functions as an emotion amplifier, which may confer heightened susceptibility to environmental conditions. PMID:26029940

  19. Camouflage of Severe Skeletal Class II Gummy Smile Patient Treated Nonsurgically with Mini Implants

    PubMed Central

    Qamruddin, Irfan; Shahid, Fazal; Alam, Mohammad Khursheed; Zehra Jamal, Wafa

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal class II has always been a challenge in orthodontics and often needs assistance of surgical orthodontics in nongrowing patients when it presents with severe discrepancy. Difficulty increases more when vertical dysplasia is also associated with sagittal discrepancy. The advent of mini implants in orthodontics has broadened the spectrum of camouflage treatment. This case report presents a 16-year-old nongrowing girl with severe class II because of retrognathic mandible, and anterior dentoalveolar protrusion sagittally and vertically resulted in severe overjet of 13 mm and excessive display of incisors and gums. Both maxillary central incisors were trimmed by general practitioner few years back to reduce visibility. Treatment involved use of micro implant for retraction and intrusion of anterior maxillary dentoalveolar segment while lower incisors were proclined to obtain normal overjet, and overbite and pleasing soft tissue profile. Smile esthetics was further improved with composite restoration of incisal edges of both central incisors. PMID:25548686

  20. The perceptual saliency of fearful eyes and smiles: A signal detection study

    PubMed Central

    Saban, Muhammet Ikbal; Rotshtein, Pia

    2017-01-01

    Facial features differ in the amount of expressive information they convey. Specifically, eyes are argued to be essential for fear recognition, while smiles are crucial for recognising happy expressions. In three experiments, we tested whether expression modulates the perceptual saliency of diagnostic facial features and whether the feature’s saliency depends on the face configuration. Participants were presented with masked facial features or noise at perceptual conscious threshold. The task was to indicate whether eyes (experiments 1-3A) or a mouth (experiment 3B) was present. The expression of the face and its configuration (i.e. spatial arrangement of the features) were manipulated. Experiment 1 compared fearful with neutral expressions, experiments 2 and 3 compared fearful versus happy expressions. The detection accuracy data was analysed using Signal Detection Theory (SDT), to examine the effects of expression and configuration on perceptual precision (d’) and response bias (c), separately. Across all three experiments, fearful eyes were detected better (higher d’) than neutral and happy eyes. Eyes were more precisely detected than mouths, whereas smiles were detected better than fearful mouths. The configuration of the features had no consistent effects across the experiments on the ability to detect expressive features. But facial configuration affected consistently the response bias. Participants used a more liberal criterion for detecting the eyes in canonical configuration and fearful expression. Finally, the power in low spatial frequency of a feature predicted its discriminability index. The results suggest that expressive features are perceptually more salient with a higher d’ due to changes at the low-level visual properties, with emotions and configuration affecting perception through top-down processes, as reflected by the response bias. PMID:28267761

  1. The double Smiles rearrangement in neutral conditions leading to one of 10-(nitropyridinyl)dipyridothiazine isomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morak-Młodawska, Beata; Pluta, Krystian; Suwińska, Kinga; Jeleń, Małgorzata

    2017-04-01

    Phenothiazines are reported to exhibit very promising anticancer, antibacterial, antifungal, anti-inflammatory activities, reversal of multidrug resistance and many other actions. Synthesis of phenotiazines is mostly carried cyclization of o-aminodiphenyl sulfides proceeded through the Smiles rearrangement. The modifications of the phenothiazine structure via the substitution of the benzene ring with the pyridine ring gave various pyridobenzothiazines and dipyridothiazines. The reaction of 3-amino-3'-nitro-2,2'-dipyridinyl sulfide with 4-chloro-3-nitropyridine in sole DMF led to one of four possible isomeric nitropyridinyldipyridothiazines. Two-dimensional 1H and 13C NMR experiments (COSY, ROESY, HSQC and HMBC) were used to reveal the right product structure as 10-(3'-nitro-4'-pyridinyl)dipyrido[2,3-b; 2',3'-e] [1,4]thiazine (10-(3'-nitro-4'-pyridinyl)-1,6-diazaphenothiazine). The final structure confirmation came from a single crystal X-ray analysis. This structure is the result of very rare reaction mechanism involving the double Smiles rearrangement of the Ssbnd N type. The tricyclic dipyridothiazine system is unexpectedly almost planar, with the butterfly angle of 176.39(4)° between two pyridine rings and 174.17(6)° between the halves of the thiazine ring (the NCCS) planes. The pyridinyl substituent is rotated about N10sbnd C11 bond and oriented almost perpendicularly to the tricyclic ring system with the dihedral angle between the two planar systems of 94.93(3)°. The nitropyridinyl substituent is located quasi-equatorially with the S⋯N10‒C11 angle of 176.92(8)°. The nitro group is tilted from the pyridine ring by 128.44(8)°.

  2. David Hartley's psychobiological associationism and the legacy of Aristotle.

    PubMed

    Buckingham, H W; Finger, S

    1997-04-01

    The idea that there are certain "laws" of learning (similarity, contrast, contiguity) can be traced to Aristotle. He maintained that external stimuli cause small movements in the vessels to the dominant heart, the vestiges of which can be linked to one another. Aristotle's laws of learning were incorporated into the writings of Hobbes, Locke, and Berkeley, men who said nothing about the physiological correlates of mental associations. This left the door open for David Hartley to combine mental associationism with the Newtonian idea that sensations can cause minute particle vibrations in the nerves. Hartley's amalgam of psychology, philosophy, and neurology was first presented in 1746, as a "trial balloon" at the end a little-known monograph on a treatment for kidney stones. It was repeated three years later in his better-known Observations on Man. In many ways, modern psychobiological connectionism can be traced back to Hartley's Conjectures of 1746, in which Aristotle's original thoughts were modified with then current ideas about functions of the mind and the nervous system.

  3. Characterization Report for the David Witherspoon Screen Art Site

    SciTech Connect

    Phyllis C. Weaver

    2011-01-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Office (ORO) of Environmental Management (EM) requested the technical assistance of Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) to characterize a tract of land associated with the David Witherspoon, Incorporated (DWI) Volunteer Equipment and Supply Company (VESC). This tract of land (hereinafter referred to as Screen Arts) is located in the Vestal Community in the 2000-block of Maryville Pike in south Knoxville, Tennessee, as shown in Figure A-1. This tract of land has been used primarily to store salvaged equipment and materials for resale, recycle, or for disposal in the former landfill once operated by DWI. The DWI Site industrial landfill and metal recycling business had been permitted by the Tennessee Division of Radiological Health to accept low-level radiologically contaminated metals. DWI received materials and equipment associated with operations from DOE sites, including those in Oak Ridge, Tennessee; Paducah, Kentucky; and Portsmouth, Ohio. It is likely that items stored at Screen Arts may have contained some residual radiological materials.

  4. Sir David Brewster's changing ideas on the plurality of worlds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Asúa, Miguel

    2006-06-01

    In the course of his long life the Scottish physicist David Brewster wrote copiously about the plurality of worlds. More Worlds than One (1854), perhaps his strongest statement on the question, was written as an answer to William Whewell's On the Plurality of Worlds (1853), which argued that life was a privilege of the Earth. Brewster's ideas changed drastically along the years in many crucial issues such as the habitability of the Sun and the Moon, the possibility that extraterrestrials could be different from humans, and the occupation of the Earth by intelligent races in the distant past. This paper succinctly surveys Brewster's main lines of thought about the plurality of worlds underlining the significance of his first two articles devoted exclusively to this topic. They were published in 1838 in The Monthly Chronicle, and affirm the habitability of the planets while denying that of the Moon. As is the case with many Victorian scientists, belief in pluralism was for Brewster part and parcel of a complex of ideas and attitudes in which it is hard to distinguish science from religion. I shall argue that a fair number of the shifting opinions and inconsistencies detectable in Brewster's ideas on the plurality of worlds can be attributed to the fact that these were used as pliable apologetic instruments in his scientific writings, many of which are permeated by strong religious concerns.

  5. General Douglas MacArthur Military Leadership Writing Competition, Command and General Staff College 2012 Award Winning Essays

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME...1 Managing Risk in Today’s Army This paper is the second place winner of the General Douglas MacArthur...principles to guide leaders at all levels. In support of this important objective, the manual offers a comprehensive framework for leadership that

  6. Hysterical chorea: Report of an outbreak and movie documentation by Arthur Van Gehuchten (1861-1914).

    PubMed

    Giménez-Roldán, Santiago; Aubert, Geneviève

    2007-06-15

    Psychogenic movement disorders remain a frequent and important clinical problem. First described in the Middle Ages, the dancing mania is considered to be one form of mass hysteria characterized by outbreaks of collective movement disorders. Patients may exhibit a wide variety of movement and gait disturbances, including tremulousness, jerks, or convulsions, usually with a sudden onset. Arthur Van Gehuchten (1861-1914), a distinguished Belgian neuroanatomist and neurologist, reported an outbreak of sudden involuntary movements in 13 adolescent girls residing in an orphanage. The description is to be found in his book Les Maladies nerveuses, completed before 1914 and published posthumously in 1920. The chapter is illustrated with sequential photographs of a girl exhibiting a peculiar gait, which is descriptively referred to as "chorée salutatoire" (saluting chorea). The original film with these pictures has been retrieved and is presented here together with a very similar film excerpt also found in Van Gehuchten's film collection. Van Gehuchten's movie documentation of a psychogenic movement disorder--labeled chorea but which should probably be considered as dystonia according to contemporary classification--appears to be unique. This report illustrates the tremendous value of moving pictures in recording and analyzing movement disorders.

  7. Arthur Neve (1859-1919) and a Mission Hospital in Srinagar, Kashmir.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Rais

    2011-11-01

    Mark Harrison has said that hospitals occupy a central place within health-care systems, not only on account of their curative functions but also as centres of teaching and research. The indigenous system of medicine practised by Hakims in Kashmir is the Unani. The Mission Hospital in Srinagar, Kashmir became the most important hospital attracting patients, not only within Kashmir but also in the surrounding countries and not only because of the curative facilities provided at the hospital but also because of the humane approach of its physicians, outstanding among them being Arthur Neve. The patients represented every class of society. Patients come from villages scattered throughout Kashmir and the Plains of India, and a few from Tibet, Afghanistan, Yarkand and Khostan. According to Neve, in 1912 there were 23,642 new outpatients and 1979 inpatients. Physical, socio-cultural and political conditions hinder access to the Mission Hospital. Neve's younger brother Ernest F Neve (1861-1946) made significant contributions when an earthquake struck and during cholera outbreaks in Kashmir at the end of the 19th century.

  8. Change in productive activity in late adulthood: MacArthur studies of successful aging.

    PubMed

    Glass, T A; Seeman, T E; Herzog, A R; Kahn, R; Berkman, L F

    1995-03-01

    Both cross-sectional comparisons and patterns of change in productive activities among members of the MacArthur Successful Aging cohort were examined. The data came from a three-site longitudinal study of community-dwelling adults aged 70-79. The highest functioning cohort (n = 1,192) was found to be significantly more productive than a comparison group of medium- and low-functioning respondents at baseline in four of five domains examined. In longitudinal models, we tested several hypotheses regarding the determinants of change in levels of productive activity over a three-year period. Overall, 15.1 percent (n = 162) of the cohort became less productive, while another 12.7 percent (n = 136) became more productive. Risk factors for decline in productivity included hospital admission and stroke. Age, functional disability, marriage, and increased mastery were protective against declines. Conversely, Blacks, those who were more satisfied with life at baseline, and those reporting increased mastery were more likely to increase their productivity.

  9. William Osler and Arthur Conan Doyle versus the antivivisectionists: some lessons from history for today.

    PubMed

    Key, J D; Rodin, A E

    1984-03-01

    Reaction against vivisection for research reached its height in the last two decades of the 19th century and the first two of the 20th, and a resurgence began in the 1960s. Antivivisectionism was and is related, in part, to emphasis on humanitarian sentiments. Two humanitarian physicians defended vivisection as essential. Dr. Arthur Conan Doyle in 1886 justified the killing of rabbits to relieve human suffering from hydrophobia. In 1910, he objected to the antihuman campaign of the antivivisectionists. Dr. William Osler reacted similarly to the threat to vivisection. He gave emphatic evidence to investigative committees in the United States in 1900 and in Britain in 1907. Osler also performed vivisection. His experimentation included studies of pig typhoid and tapeworm cysts in pigs and of the fate of india ink injected into the lungs of kittens. Osler and Conan Doyle were but two of the many prominent physicians who helped stem the tide of antivivisection legislation near the turn of the century. A review of the elements that fostered antivivisectionism in the society of their time is relevant in understanding and reacting to similar sentiments in the present era.

  10. Arthur L. Benton, Ph.D.: pioneer, colleague, mentor, and friend.

    PubMed

    Sivan, Abigail B; Levin, Harvey S; Hannay, Julia

    2007-07-01

    Arthur Benton, 97, died in Glenview, IL on December 27, 2006. He was born October 16, 1909 in New York City. He received his B.A. and M.A. degrees from Oberlin College, where Raymond Stetson was his mentor, and his Ph.D. in Psychology from Columbia University in 1935 under the mentorship of Carney Landis of the New York State Psychiatric Institute. Benton completed his training as a psychologist at the Payne Whitney Psychiatric Clinic of New York Hospital. Early in 1941, he volunteered for service in the United States Navy and was commissioned as a lieutenant in the medical department. His active duty lasted until 1945, followed by many years of service in the United States Navy Reserve, retiring at the rank of Captain. During his assignment at the San Diego Naval Hospital, Benton worked closely with neurologist Morris Bender and examined servicemen who had sustained penetrating brain wounds during combat. The experience of assessing servicemen with brain injury and Bender's influence led Benton to develop the Visual Retention Test, which still bears his name and continues to be widely used in clinical neuropsychological assessment.

  11. Bathymetric Surveys of Lake Arthur and Raccoon Lake, Pennsylvania, June 2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hittle, Clinton D.; Ruby, A. Thomas

    2008-01-01

    In spring of 2007, bathymetric surveys of two Pennsylvania State Park lakes were performed to collect accurate data sets of lake-bed elevations and to develop methods and techniques to conduct similar surveys across the state. The lake-bed elevations and associated geographical position data can be merged with land-surface elevations acquired through Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) techniques. Lake Arthur in Butler County and Raccoon Lake in Beaver County were selected for this initial data-collection activity. In order to establish accurate water-surface elevations during the surveys, benchmarks referenced to NAVD 88 were established on land at each lake by use of differential global positioning system (DGPS) surveys. Bathymetric data were collected using a single beam, 210 kilohertz (kHz) echo sounder and were coupled with the DGPS position data utilizing a computer software package. Transects of depth data were acquired at predetermined intervals on each lake, and the shoreline was delineated using a laser range finder and compass module. Final X, Y, Z coordinates of the geographic positions and lake-bed elevations were referenced to NAD 83 and NAVD 88 and are available to create bathymetric maps of the lakes.

  12. Human contamination of the marine environment - Arthur Harbor and McMurdo sound, Antarctica

    SciTech Connect

    Kennicutt, M.C. II; McDonald, S.J.; Sericano, J.L.; Boothe, P.; Oliver, J.; Safe, S.; Presley, B.J.; Liu, H.; Wade, T.L.; Wolfe, D.; Crockett, A.; Bockus, D.

    1995-05-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), pesticides, and trace metal concentrations in McMurdo Sound and Arthur Harbor, Antarctica, sediments and marine biota are reported. Biomarkers of contaminant exposure, biliary metabolites and EROD assays, were also measured. Hydrocarbon and trace metal contamination are generally limited to within hundreds of meters of human settlements. Local releases of fossil fuels, disposal of waste materials, and aging of ship and station structures contribute to contamination. High concentrations of PCBs were detected in sediments (250-4200 ng g{sup -1}) and organisms (up to 420 ng g{sup -1}) from Winter Quarters Bay (WQB). Trace metal and PAH sediment concentrations rarely exceed levels known to cause toxic effects in marine organisms, whereas PCBs in WQB often do. Biological responses to exposure include the formation of PAH metabolites and the inducement of the P4501A detoxification system in fish. Induction of EROD activity in in vitro rat hepatoma H4IIE cell bioassays by tissue extracts correlated with known levels of PCB contamination in invertebrate tissues. Local sources of contaminants greatly exceed those attributable to long-distance atmospheric transport. 31 refs., 4 figs.

  13. A cross-cultural comparison of the development of the social smile: a longitudinal study of maternal and infant imitation in 6- and 12-week-old infants.

    PubMed

    Wörmann, Viktoriya; Holodynski, Manfred; Kärtner, Joscha; Keller, Heidi

    2012-06-01

    Social smiling is universally regarded as being an infant's first facial expression of pleasure. Underlying co-constructivist emotion theories are the assumptions that the emergence of social smiling is bound to experiences of face-to-face interactions with caregivers and the impact of two developmental mechanisms--maternal and infant imitation. We analyzed mother-infant interactions from two different socio-cultural contexts and hypothesized that cross-cultural differences in face-to-face interactions determine the occurrence of both of these mechanisms and of the frequency of social smiling by 12-week-old infants. Twenty mother-infant dyads from a socio-cultural community with many face-to-face interactions (German families, Münster) were compared with 24 mother-infant dyads from a socio-cultural community with few such interactions (rural Nso families, Cameroon) when the infants were aged 6 and 12 weeks. When infants were 6 weeks old, mothers and their infants from both cultural communities smiled at each other for similar (albeit very short) amounts of time and used imitated each other's smiling similarly rarely. In contrast, when infants were 12 weeks old, mothers and their infants from Münster smiled at and imitated each other more often than did Nso mothers and their infants.

  14. Diurnal variation climatology of short-lived at atmospheric compositions (ClO, BrO, HO2 and HOCl) derived from SMILES NICT data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreyling, Daniel; Sagawa, Hideo; Kasai, Yasuko

    2013-04-01

    We present a diurnal variation climatology for short-lived at atmospheric compositions, such as ClO, BrO, HO2 and HOCl, as well as for longer life time species, like O3 and HCl from observations of unprecedented sensitivity with the Superconducting SubMIllimeter wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES), which is installed on the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) at the International Space Station (ISS). With its non sun synchronous orbit, SMILES measurements comprise observations at all local times. The target altitude range is between lower stratosphere and mesopause. Differences in diurnal variation chemistry of strato-, and mesospheric BrO and ClO of the diurnal climatology are presented. The data employed is produced by the SMILES level 2 retrieval algorithm version 2.1.5 at the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT). The SMILES climatology data sets are available via the SMILES data distribution homepage in NICT at https://smiles-p6.nict.go.jp/products/research_latitude-longitude.jsf

  15. Brief Report: The Smiles of a Child with Autism Spectrum Disorder during an Animal-Assisted Activity May Facilitate Social Positive Behaviors--Quantitative Analysis with Smile-Detecting Interface

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Funahashi, Atsushi; Gruebler, Anna; Aoki, Takeshi; Kadone, Hideki; Suzuki, Kenji

    2014-01-01

    We quantitatively measured the smiles of a child with autism spectrum disorder (ASD-C) using a wearable interface device during animal-assisted activities (AAA) for 7 months, and compared the results with a control of the same age. The participant was a 10-year-old boy with ASD, and a normal healthy boy of the same age was the control. They…

  16. Superovulation in red deer (Cervus elaphus) and Père David's deer (Elaphurus davidianus), and fertilization rates following artificial insemination with Père David's deer semen.

    PubMed

    Argo, C M; Jabbour, H N; Goddard, P J; Webb, R; Loudon, A S

    1994-03-01

    Two comparative studies were undertaken using adult, female red and Père David's deer to examine the ovulatory response of these animals to a superovulation regimen and fertilization rates following inter- and intraspecific laparoscopic insemination. In Expt 1 six Père David's deer and 12 red deer hinds were treated during the breeding season with an intravaginal progesterone-impregnated controlled internal drug release device (CIDR) for 14 days, with 200 iu pregnant mares' serum gonadotrophin (PMSG) administered 72 h before the device was withdrawn and eight injections of ovine FSH given at 12 h intervals starting at the time of PMSG administration. Oestrous behaviour began one day after CIDR device withdrawal (Père David's deer: 24.00 +/- 2.32 h; red deer: 24.60 +/- 2.23 h). The duration of oestrus was greater in Père David's deer than in red deer (17.50 +/- 1.43 h and 8.25 +/- 3.25 h, respectively, P < 0.001). The peak LH surge of Père David's deer was 68.65 +/- 4.74 ng ml-1 occurring 29.00 +/- 2.41 h after removal of the CIDR devices. In comparison, the peak LH surge in red deer was 17.09 +/- 3.64 ng ml-1 (P < 0.001), occurring 24.00 +/- 0.00 h after CIDR device withdrawal. Pre-surge concentrations of LH were also greater (P < 0.001) in Père David's deer (1.37 +/- 0.11 ng ml-1) than in red deer hinds (0.41 +/- 0.02 ng ml-1).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Life Cycle of a Large Telescope: the David Dunlap Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarrell, Richard

    2009-01-01

    When it went into operation in 1935, the 74-inch reflector at the David Dunlap Observatory was the world's second largest and most sophisticated telescope. Designed specifically for stellar spectroscopy, almost all work performed with it until the early 1950s was limited to that specialty. Most University of Toronto staff were expected to contribute to the observatory's programme. However, as the staff expanded and newer research specialties were introduced, the telescope had to be refitted with new auxiliary equipment, or not be used at all. By the late 1960s, the observatory's night sky began to deteriorate due to light pollution from uncontrolled urban growth. While limited work could be performed into the 1990s, the telescope was no longer considered "large” far more powerful, versatile instruments at much superior sites were by then available. That Toronto astronomers had moved on can be demonstrated from their publication records. The end came in 2008 when the University of Toronto decided that the land's value could be used to support astronomical research in a broader sense. In response, the community, which had ignored the observatory for most of its history, and a few dissident astronomers, strongly defended its survival on a number of grounds. The narrative suggests a number of life-cycle stages: 1) maximum use of the instrument due to superior environmental and technical conditions, plus staff homogeneity; 2) application of new technologies to extend the instrument's capability in the face of diversifying research interests and decaying environmental factors; 3) fading value due to obsolescence and poor environmental factors; 4) death or metamorphosis (such as becoming an educational or historical institution). It appears that these phases apply to a number of historical cases. It is not clear, for the Dunlap Observatory, how the fourth phase will play out.

  18. Sharing MedlinePlus®/MEDLINE for Information Literacy Education (SMILE): A Dental Public Health Information Project

    PubMed Central

    Gaines, Julie K.; Levy, Linda S.; Cogdill, Keith W.

    2012-01-01

    The SMILE project represented a partnership among the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio Libraries, the Gateway Clinic in Laredo, and the San Antonio Metropolitan Health District. The project focused on improving dental practitioners' access to reliable information resources and integrating the best evidence into public health dental practice. Through its training program, SMILE cultivated a set of “power information users” among the dentists, dental hygienists, and community health workers (promotores) who provide public health preventive care and oral health education. The dental public health practitioners gained information literacy skills and increased their knowledge about reliable sites such as blogs, PubMed®, and MedlinePlus®. This project fostered opportunities for expanded partnerships with public health personnel. PMID:22040242

  19. Construction of a virtual combinatorial library using SMILES strings to discover potential structure-diverse PPAR modulators.

    PubMed

    Liao, Chenzhong; Liu, Bing; Shi, Leming; Zhou, Jiaju; Lu, Xian-Ping

    2005-07-01

    Based on the structural characters of PPAR modulators, a virtual combinatorial library containing 1226,625 compounds was constructed using SMILES strings. Selected ADME filters were employed to compel compounds having poor drug-like properties from this library. This library was converted to sdf and mol2 files by CONCORD 4.0, and was then docked to PPARgamma by DOCK 4.0 to identify new chemical entities that may be potential drug leads against type 2 diabetes and other metabolic diseases. The method to construct virtual combinatorial library using SMILES strings was further visualized by Visual Basic.net that can facilitate the needs of generating other type virtual combinatorial libraries.

  20. [Book review] Middle American Herpetology, by Jaime Villa, Larry David Wilson, and Jerry D. Johnson

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scott, N.J.

    1989-01-01

    Review of: Middle American Herpetology: a bibliographic checklist. By Jaime Villa, Larry David Wilson and Jerry D. Johnson. 1988. University of Missouri Press, Columbia, Missouri 65211. 132 p., 16 color plates, $35.00 (hardcover).

  1. 78 FR 10608 - David Grant United States Air Force Medical Center Specialty Care Travel Reimbursement...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-14

    ... of the Secretary David Grant United States Air Force Medical Center Specialty Care Travel... States Air Force Medical Center Specialty Care Travel Reimbursement Demonstration Project. This... MTF, and sustain readiness-related medical skills activities for the military providers....

  2. Sparse multidimensional iterative lineshape-enhanced (SMILE) reconstruction of both non-uniformly sampled and conventional NMR data.

    PubMed

    Ying, Jinfa; Delaglio, Frank; Torchia, Dennis A; Bax, Ad

    2016-11-19

    Implementation of a new algorithm, SMILE, is described for reconstruction of non-uniformly sampled two-, three- and four-dimensional NMR data, which takes advantage of the known phases of the NMR spectrum and the exponential decay of underlying time domain signals. The method is very robust with respect to the chosen sampling protocol and, in its default mode, also extends the truncated time domain signals by a modest amount of non-sampled zeros. SMILE can likewise be used to extend conventional uniformly sampled data, as an effective multidimensional alternative to linear prediction. The program is provided as a plug-in to the widely used NMRPipe software suite, and can be used with default parameters for mainstream application, or with user control over the iterative process to possibly further improve reconstruction quality and to lower the demand on computational resources. For large data sets, the method is robust and demonstrated for sparsities down to ca 1%, and final all-real spectral sizes as large as 300 Gb. Comparison between fully sampled, conventionally processed spectra and randomly selected NUS subsets of this data shows that the reconstruction quality approaches the theoretical limit in terms of peak position fidelity and intensity. SMILE essentially removes the noise-like appearance associated with the point-spread function of signals that are a default of five-fold above the noise level, but impacts the actual thermal noise in the NMR spectra only minimally. Therefore, the appearance and interpretation of SMILE-reconstructed spectra is very similar to that of fully sampled spectra generated by Fourier transformation.

  3. Vitrification of high level nuclear waste inside ambient temperature disposal containers using inductive heating: The SMILE system

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, J.; Reich, M.; Barletta, R.

    1996-03-01

    A new approach, termed SMILE (Small Module Inductively Loaded Energy), for the vitrification of high level nuclear wastes (HLW) is described. Present vitrification systems liquefy the HLW solids and associated frit material in large high temperature melters. The molten mix is then poured into small ({approximately}1 m{sup 3}) disposal canisters, where it solidifies and cools. SMILE eliminates the separate, large high temperature melter. Instead, the BLW solids and frit melt inside the final disposal containers, using inductive heating. The contents then solidify and cool in place. The SMILE modules and the inductive heating process are designed so that the outer stainless can of the module remains at near ambient temperature during the process cycle. Module dimensions are similar to those of present disposal containers. The can is thermally insulated from the high temperature inner container by a thin layer of refractory alumina firebricks. The inner container is a graphite crucible lined with a dense alumina refractory that holds the HLW and fiit materials. After the SMILE module is loaded with a slurry of HLW and frit solids, an external multi-turn coil is energized with 30-cycle AC current. The enclosing external coil is the primary of a power transformer, with the graphite crucible acting as a single turn ``secondary.`` The induced current in the ``secondary`` heats the graphite, which in turn heats the HLW and frit materials. The first stage of the heating process is carried out at an intermediate temperature to drive off remnant liquid water and water of hydration, which takes about 1 day. The small fill/vent tube to the module is then sealed off and the interior temperature raised to the vitrification range, i.e., {approximately}1200C. Liquefaction is complete after approximately 1 day. The inductive heating then ceases and the module slowly loses heat to the environment, allowing the molten material to solidify and cool down to ambient temperature.

  4. Electrophile-Integrating Smiles Rearrangement Provides Previously Inaccessible C4′-O-Alkyl Heptamethine Cyanine Fluorophores

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    New synthetic methods to rapidly access useful fluorophores are needed to advance modern molecular imaging techniques. A new variant of the classical Smiles rearrangement is reported that enables the efficient synthesis of previously inaccessible C4′-O-alkyl heptamethine cyanines. The key reaction involves N- to O- transposition with selective electrophile incorporation on nitrogen. A representative fluorophore exhibits excellent resistance to thiol nucleophiles, undergoes productive bioconjugation, and can be used in near-IR fluorescence imaging applications. PMID:25562683

  5. Gender differences in the neural network of facial mimicry of smiles--An rTMS study.

    PubMed

    Korb, Sebastian; Malsert, Jennifer; Rochas, Vincent; Rihs, Tonia A; Rieger, Sebastian W; Schwab, Samir; Niedenthal, Paula M; Grandjean, Didier

    2015-09-01

    Under theories of embodied emotion, exposure to a facial expression triggers facial mimicry. Facial feedback is then used to recognize and judge the perceived expression. However, the neural bases of facial mimicry and of the use of facial feedback remain poorly understood. Furthermore, gender differences in facial mimicry and emotion recognition suggest that different neural substrates might accompany the production of facial mimicry, and the processing of facial feedback, in men and women. Here, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) was applied to the right primary motor cortex (M1), the right primary somatosensory cortex (S1), or, in a control condition, the vertex (VTX). Facial mimicry of smiles and emotion judgments were recorded in response to video clips depicting changes from neutral or angry to happy facial expressions. While in females rTMS over M1 and S1 compared to VTX led to reduced mimicry and, in the case of M1, delayed detection of smiles, there was no effect of TMS condition for males. We conclude that in female participants M1 and S1 play a role in the mimicry and in the use of facial feedback for accurate processing of smiles.

  6. War neuroses and Arthur Hurst: a pioneering medical film about the treatment of psychiatric battle casualties.

    PubMed

    Jones, Edgar

    2012-07-01

    From 1917 to 1918, Major Arthur Hurst filmed shell-shocked patients home from the war in France. Funded by the Medical Research Committee, and using Pathé cameramen, he recorded soldiers who suffered from intractable movement disorders as they underwent treatment at the Royal Victoria Hospital in Netley and undertook programs of occupational therapy at Seale Hayne in Devon. As one of the earliest UK medical films, Hurst's efforts may have drawn inspiration from the official documentary of the Battle of the Somme and films made in 1916 by French Army neurologists. Although initially motivated to make use of a novel medium to illustrate lectures, Hurst was alert to the wider appeal of the motion picture and saw an opportunity to position himself in the postwar medical hierarchy. Some "before treatment" shots were reenacted for the camera. Hurst, like some other shell shock doctors, openly used deception as a therapeutic measure. On the basis that the ends justified the means, they defended this procedure as ethical. Clinicians also took advantage of changes in military regulations to address functional symptoms. Claims made of "cures" in the film and associated publications by Hurst were challenged by other doctors treating shell shock. The absence of follow-up data and evidence from war pension files suggested that Hurst may have overstated the effectiveness of his methods. Nevertheless, the message conveyed in the film that chronic cases could be treated in a single session had a powerful resonance for ambitious or charismatic doctors and was revived in World War II.

  7. War Neuroses and Arthur Hurst: A Pioneering Medical Film about the Treatment of Psychiatric Battle Casualties

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Edgar

    2016-01-01

    From 1917 to 1918, Major Arthur Hurst filmed shell-shocked patients home from the war in France. Funded by the Medical Research Committee, and using Pathé cameramen, he recorded soldiers who suffered from intractable movement disorders as they underwent treatment at the Royal Victoria Hospital in Netley and undertook programs of occupational therapy at Seale Hayne in Devon. As one of the earliest UK medical films, Hurst’s efforts may have drawn inspiration from the official documentary of the Battle of the Somme and films made in 1916 by French Army neurologists. Although initially motivated to make use of a novel medium to illustrate lectures, Hurst was alert to the wider appeal of the motion picture and saw an opportunity to position himself in the postwar medical hierarchy. Some “before treatment” shots were reenacted for the camera. Hurst, like some other shell shock doctors, openly used deception as a therapeutic measure. On the basis that the ends justified the means, they defended this procedure as ethical. Clinicians also took advantage of changes in military regulations to address functional symptoms. Claims made of “cures” in the film and associated publications by Hurst were challenged by other doctors treating shell shock. The absence of follow-up data and evidence from war pension files suggested that Hurst may have overstated the effectiveness of his methods. Nevertheless, the message conveyed in the film that chronic cases could be treated in a single session had a powerful resonance for ambitious or charismatic doctors and was revived in World War II. PMID:21596724

  8. Phantoms in artists: the lost limbs of Blaise Cendrars,Arthur Rimbaud, and Paul Wittgenstein.

    PubMed

    Tatu, Laurent; Bogousslavsky, Julien; Boller, François

    2014-01-01

    There have been an increasing number of reports of postamputation pain and problems linked to phantom limbs over recent years, particularly in relation to war-related amputations. These problems, which are often poorly understood and considered rather mysterious, are still relevant because they are difficult to treat medically. Functional neuroimaging techniques now enable us to better understand their pathophysiology and to consider new rehabilitation techniques. Phantom limbs have often been a source of inspiration to writers, particularly in the period following the First World War, which was responsible for thousands of amputees. Some artists have suffered from postamputation complications themselves and have expressed them through their artistic works. Blaise Cendrars (1887-1961), one of the greatest authors of the twentieth century, suffered from stump pain and phantom limb phenomena for almost half a century following the amputation of his right arm during the First World War. He suffered from these phenomena until the end of his life and his literary work and personal correspondence are peppered with references to them. Arthur Rimbaud (1854-1891), one of the most famous poets in world literature, developed severe stump pain after his right leg was amputated due to a tumor. He survived for only six months after the procedure but left behind an account of the pain he experienced in correspondence to his family. The famous pianist Paul Wittgenstein (1887-1961), whose right arm was amputated during the First World War, became a famous left-handed concert pianist. The phantom movements of his right hand helped him to develop the dexterity of his left hand. The impact on the artistic life of these three men provides an original illustration of the various postamputation complications, specifically phantom limbs, stump pain, and moving phantom.

  9. The Ochoa urofacial syndrome: recognize the peculiar smile and avoid severe urological and renal complications

    PubMed Central

    Rondon, Atila Victal; Leslie, Bruno; Netto, José Murillo Bastos; de Freitas, Ricardo Garcia; Ortiz, Valdemar; Macedo, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Ochoa syndrome is rare and its major clinical problems frequently unrecognized. We describe facial characteristics of six patients to help health professional recognize the inverted smile that these patients present and refer them to proper treatment. Patients’ medical records were reviewed and patients’ urological status clinically reassessed. At last evaluation patients’ mean age was 15.5 years, and age ranged from 12 to 32 years. Mean follow-up was 35 months (12 to 60). Initial symptoms were urinary tract infections in four patients (67%) associated with enuresis and incontinence in three of them (50%). One patient had only urinary tract infection and two lower urinary tract symptoms without infections. Initial treatment consisted of clean intermittent catheterization with anticholinergics for all patients. Four patients (67%) were submitted to bladder augmentation. Two patients had end-stage renal disease during follow-up, one received kidney transplantation and one patient remained on the waiting list for a renal transplantation. Familial consanguinity was present in only one case. This significant condition is rare, but it must be recognized by pediatricians, nephrologists and urologists in order to institute early aggressive urological treatment. PMID:25946049

  10. Disease Combinations Associated with Physical Activity Identified: The SMILE Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Dörenkamp, Sarah; Mesters, Ilse; Schepers, Jan; Vos, Rein; van den Akker, Marjan; Teijink, Joep; de Bie, Rob

    2016-01-01

    In the search of predictors of inadequate physical activity, an investigation was conducted into the association between multimorbidity and physical activity (PA). So far the sum of diseases used as a measure of multimorbidity reveals an inverse association. How specific combinations of chronic diseases are associated with PA remains unclear. The objective of this study is to identify clusters of multimorbidity that are associated with PA. Cross-sectional data of 3,386 patients from the 2003 wave of the Dutch cohort study SMILE were used. Ward's agglomerative hierarchical clustering was executed to establish multimorbidity clusters. Chi-square statistics were used to assess the association between clusters of chronic diseases and PA, measured in compliance with the Dutch PA guideline. The highest rate of PA guideline compliance was found in patients the majority of whom suffer from liver disease, back problems, rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, and inflammatory joint disease (62.4%). The lowest rate of PA guideline compliance was reported in patients with heart disease, respiratory disease, and diabetes mellitus (55.8%). Within the group of people with multimorbidity, those suffering from heart disease, respiratory disease, and/or diabetes mellitus may constitute a priority population as PA has proven to be effective in the prevention and cure of all three disorders. PMID:26881231

  11. Synergistic Effects of Six Chronic Disease Pairs on Decreased Physical Activity: The SMILE Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Dörenkamp, Sarah; Mesters, Ilse; Vos, Rein; Schepers, Jan; van den Akker, Marjan; Teijink, Joep; de Bie, Rob

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about whether and how two chronic diseases interact with each other in modifying the risk of physical inactivity. The aim of the present study is to identify chronic disease pairs that are associated with compliance or noncompliance with the Dutch PA guideline recommendation and to study whether specific chronic disease pairs indicate an extra effect on top of the effects of the diseases individually. Cross-sectional data from 3,386 participants of cohort study SMILE were used and logistic regression analysis was performed to study the joint effect of the two diseases of each chronic disease pair for compliance with the Dutch PA guideline. For six chronic disease pairs, patients suffering from both diseases belonging to these disease pairs in question show a higher probability of noncompliance to the Dutch PA guideline, compared to what one would expect based on the effects of each of the two diseases alone. These six chronic disease pairs were chronic respiratory disease and severe back problems; migraine and inflammatory joint disease; chronic respiratory disease and severe kidney disease; chronic respiratory disease and inflammatory joint disease; inflammatory joint disease and rheumatoid arthritis; and rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis of the knees, hips, and hands. PMID:27274994

  12. Sergey Sukhanov, a Russian Physician in Professor Arthur Van Gehuchten's Lab - Based on Original 19th Century Documents

    PubMed Central

    Vein, Alla A.; Aubert, Geneviève

    2016-01-01

    In 1898, Russian physician Sergey Alexeevich Sukhanov (1867-1915) spent a 3-month traineeship in Professor Arthur Van Gehuchten's anatomy laboratory in Louvain (Belgium). A folder containing 17 handwritten documents in Russian was recently discovered in the archives of the Museum of the History of Medicine, First Moscow State Medical University. The letters give a lively account of Sukhanov's everyday observations, experiences and opinions while he was in Van Gehuchten's lab. We took a selection of these notes and put them into medical and historical context. PMID:27226287

  13. Accounting for changes in social support among married older adults: insights from the MacArthur Studies of Successful Aging.

    PubMed

    Gurung, Regan A R; Taylor, Shelley E; Seeman, Teresa E

    2003-09-01

    Using longitudinal, community-based data from the MacArthur Studies of Successful Aging, the authors examined determinants of changes in social support receipt among 439 married older adults. In general, social support increased over time, especially for those with many preexisting social ties, but those experiencing more psychological distress and cognitive dysfunction reported more negative encounters with others. Gender affected social support receipt: Men received emotional support primarily from their spouses, whereas women drew more heavily on their friends and relatives and children for emotional support. Discussion centers on the importance of social support provision to those with the greatest needs.

  14. A New Total Digital Smile Planning Technique (3D-DSP) to Fabricate CAD-CAM Mockups for Esthetic Crowns and Veneers

    PubMed Central

    Mastrangelo, F.; Gherlone, E. F.; Gastaldi, G.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Recently, the request of patients is changed in terms of not only esthetic but also previsualization therapy planning. The aim of this study is to evaluate a new 3D-CAD-CAM digital planning technique that uses a total digital smile process. Materials and Methods. Study participants included 28 adult dental patients, aged 19 to 53 years, with no oral, periodontal, or systemic diseases. For each patient, 3 intra- and extraoral pictures and intraoral digital impressions were taken. The digital images improved from the 2D Digital Smile System software and the scanner stereolithographic (STL) file was matched into the 3D-Digital Smile System to obtain a virtual previsualization of teeth and smile design. Then, the mockups were milled using a CAM system. Minimally invasive preparation was carried out on the enamel surface with the mockups as position guides. Results. The patients found both the digital smile design previsualization (64.3%) and the milling mockup test (85.7%) very effective. Conclusions. The new total 3D digital planning technique is a predictably and minimally invasive technique, allows easy diagnosis, and improves the communication with the patient and helps to reduce the working time and the errors usually associated with the classical prosthodontic manual step. PMID:27478442

  15. A New Total Digital Smile Planning Technique (3D-DSP) to Fabricate CAD-CAM Mockups for Esthetic Crowns and Veneers.

    PubMed

    Cattoni, F; Mastrangelo, F; Gherlone, E F; Gastaldi, G

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Recently, the request of patients is changed in terms of not only esthetic but also previsualization therapy planning. The aim of this study is to evaluate a new 3D-CAD-CAM digital planning technique that uses a total digital smile process. Materials and Methods. Study participants included 28 adult dental patients, aged 19 to 53 years, with no oral, periodontal, or systemic diseases. For each patient, 3 intra- and extraoral pictures and intraoral digital impressions were taken. The digital images improved from the 2D Digital Smile System software and the scanner stereolithographic (STL) file was matched into the 3D-Digital Smile System to obtain a virtual previsualization of teeth and smile design. Then, the mockups were milled using a CAM system. Minimally invasive preparation was carried out on the enamel surface with the mockups as position guides. Results. The patients found both the digital smile design previsualization (64.3%) and the milling mockup test (85.7%) very effective. Conclusions. The new total 3D digital planning technique is a predictably and minimally invasive technique, allows easy diagnosis, and improves the communication with the patient and helps to reduce the working time and the errors usually associated with the classical prosthodontic manual step.

  16. Remedial investigation/feasibility study for the David Witherspoon, Inc., 901 Site, Knoxville, Tennessee: Volume 2, Appendixes

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-01

    This document contains the appendixes for the remedial investigation and feasibility study for the David Witherspoon, Inc., 901 site in Knoxville, Tennessee. The following topics are covered in the appendixes: (A) David Witherspoon, Inc., 901 Site Historical Data, (B) Fieldwork Plans for the David Witherspoon, Inc., 901 Site, (C) Risk Assessment, (D) Remediation Technology Discussion, (E) Engineering Support Documentation, (F) Applicable or Relevant and Appropriate Requirements, and (G) Cost Estimate Documentation.

  17. Grounding of the Bahia Paraiso at Arthur Harbor, Antarctica. 1. Distribution and fate of oil spill related hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Kennicutt, M.C. II; Sweet, S.T. ); Fraser, W.R.; Culver, M. ); Stockton, W.L. )

    1991-03-01

    In January to March 1989 water, organisms, and sediments within a 2-mile radius of Arthur Harbor were contaminated with an estimated 600,000 L of petroleum spilled by the Bahia Paraiso. All components of the ecosystem were contaminated to varying degrees during the spill, including birds, limpets, macroalgae, clams, bottom-feeding fish, and sediments. The high-energy environment, the relatively small volume of material released, and the volatility of the released product all contributed to limiting toxic effects in time and space. The most effective removal processes were evaporation, dilution, winds, and currents. Sedimentation, biological uptake, microbial oxidation, and photooxidation accounted for removal of only a minor portion of the spill. One year after the spill several areas still exhibited contamination. Subtidal sediments and the more distant intertidal locations were devoid of detectable PAH contaminants whereas sediments near the docking facility at Palmer Station continued to reflect localized nonspill-related activities in the area. Arthur Harbor and adjacent areas continue to be chronically exposed to low-level petroleum contamination emanating from the Bahia Paraiso.

  18. Standardised pre-competitive screening of athletes in some European and African countries: the SMILE study.

    PubMed

    Assanelli, Deodato; Deodato, Assanelli; Ermolao, Andrea; Andrea, Ermolao; Carre, François; François, Carré; Deligiannis, Asterios; Asterios, Deligiannis; Mellwig, Klaus; Mellwig, Klaus; Klaus, Mellwig; Tahmi, Mohamed; Mohamed, Tahmi; Cesana, Bruno Mario; Mario, Cesana Bruno; Levaggi, Rosella; Rosella, Levaggi; Aliverti, Paola; Paola, Aliverti; Sharma, Sanjay; Sanjay, Sharma

    2014-06-01

    Most of the available data on the cardiovascular screening of athletes come from Italy, with fewer records being available outside of Italy and for non-Caucasian populations. The goals of the SMILE project (Sport Medicine Intervention to save Lives through ECG) are to evaluate the usefulness of 12-lead ECGs for the detection of cardiac diseases in athletes from three European countries and one African country and to estimate how many second-level examinations are needed subsequent to the initial screening in order to classify athletes with abnormal characteristics. A digital network consisting of Sport Centres and second and third opinion centres was set up in Greece, Germany, France and Algeria. Standard digital data input was carried out through the application of 12-lead ECGs, Bethesda questionnaires and physical examinations. Two hundred ninety-three of the 6,634 consecutive athletes required further evaluation, mostly (88.4 %) as a consequence of abnormal ECGs. After careful evaluation, 237 were determined to be healthy or apparently healthy, while 56 athletes were found to have cardiac disorders and were thus disqualified from active participation in sports. There was a large difference in the prevalence of diseases detected in Europe as compared with Algeria (0.23 and 4.01 %, respectively). Our data confirmed the noteworthy value of 12-lead resting ECGs as compared with other first-level evaluations, especially in athletes with asymptomatic cardiac diseases. Its value seems to have been even higher in Algeria than in the European countries. The establishment of a digital network of Sport Centres for second/third opinions in conjunction with the use of standard digital data input seems to be a valuable means for increasing the effectiveness of screening.

  19. The use of SMILES data to study ozone loss in the Arctic winter 2009/2010 and comparison with Odin/SMR data using assimilation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagi, K.; Murtagh, D.; Urban, J.; Sagawa, H.; Kasai, Y.

    2014-12-01

    The Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) on board the International Space Station observed ozone in the stratosphere with high precision from October 2009 to April 2010. Although SMILES measurements only cover latitudes from 38° S to 65° N, the combination of data assimilation methods and an isentropic advection model allows us to quantify the ozone depletion in the 2009/2010 Arctic polar winter by making use of the instability of the polar vortex in the northern hemisphere. Ozone data from both SMILES and Odin/SMR (Sub-Millimetre Radiometer) for the winter were assimilated into the Dynamical Isentropic Assimilation Model for OdiN Data (DIAMOND). DIAMOND is an off-line wind-driven transport model on isentropic surfaces. Wind data from the operational analyses of the European Centre for Medium- Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) were used to drive the model. In this study, particular attention is paid to the cross isentropic transport of the tracer in order to accurately assess the ozone loss. The assimilated SMILES ozone fields agree well with the limitation of noise induced variability within the SMR fields despite the limited latitude coverage of the SMILES observations. Ozone depletion has been derived by comparing the ozone field acquired by sequential assimilation with a passively transported ozone field initialized on 1 December 2009. Significant ozone loss was found in different periods and altitudes from using both SMILES and SMR data: The initial depletion occurred at the end of January below 550 K with an accumulated loss of 0.6-1.0 ppmv (approximately 20%) by 1 April. The ensuing loss started from the end of February between 575 K and 650 K. Our estimation shows that 0.8-1.3 ppmv (20-25 %) of O3 has been removed at the 600 K isentropic level by 1 April in volume mixing ratio (VMR).

  20. [Results of residual ametropia correction using CIRCLE technology after femtosecond laser SMILE surgery].

    PubMed

    Kostin, O A; Rebrikov, S V; Ovchinnikov, A I; Stepanov, A A; Takhchidi, Kh P

    2017-01-01

    Цель — оценка функциональных результатов повторной операции с применением технологии CIRCLE с использованием фемтосекундного лазера VisuMax и эксимерного лазера MEL-80 при регрессе рефракционного эффекта после операции SMILE. Материал и методы. В исследовании принимали участие пациенты, которым была выполнена операция SMILE. Через 1 год после операции SMILE при регрессе рефракционного эффекта была проведена операция докоррекции с применением технологии CIRCLE с использованием фемтосекундного лазера VisuMax. Роговичный лоскут отслаивали от стромального ложа и отворачивали в сторону. Эксимерлазерную абляцию стромального ложа производили с использованием лазера MEL-80. Роговичный лоскут укладывали обратно на стромальное ложе. У всех пациентов измеряли остроту зрения без коррекции, сфероэквивалент и остроту зрения с коррекцией как до операции докоррекции, так и после нее — через 1 день и через 1 мес. Результаты. Значения остроты зрения без коррекции, с коррекцией после операций были статистически достоверно лучшими по сравнению с дооперационными данными. Рефракция после операции докоррекции