Science.gov

Sample records for david smiles arthur

  1. Arthur Smith, Local Baptist Pastor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heaton, Moss, Ed.

    1985-01-01

    Written and published by the students at Gary High School this volume has three articles dealing with East Texas life. The first "Arthur Smith" (David Hancock and others) is an account of growing up in Marian County, Texas is described by the local Baptist minister. The pastor begins with the year of his birth and gives detailed information about…

  2. Smile design.

    PubMed

    Davis, Nicholas C

    2007-04-01

    Many scientific and artistic principles considered collectively are useful in creating a beautiful smile. The evaluation and analysis of the face, lips, gingival tissues and teeth are all considered in this process. Recognizing the ideal as a goal provides a direction for diagnosis and treatment planning for smile rejuvenation. This article focuses on the dental and dental-facial composition involved in smile design. Basic facial esthetics are reviewed as a guideline for facial analysis.

  3. Smile: A review.

    PubMed

    Manjula, W S; Sukumar, M R; Kishorekumar, S; Gnanashanmugam, K; Mahalakshmi, K

    2015-04-01

    "Beauty is in the mind of the beholder, each mind perceives a different beauty" famously said by writer Margeret Wolfe Hungerford. A beautiful smile is a gateway to the world. The aim of this article was to identify the criteria for designing the perfect smile. It was determined, smile design is a multifactorial process and various steps are involved in designing a radiant smile.

  4. Smile architecture: beyond smile design.

    PubMed

    Messing, M G

    1995-05-01

    Successful cosmetic dental treatment is both functional and aesthetic. It requires evaluation of a patient's expectations, diagnosis of pre-existing problems and careful planning of treatment to eliminate or control the causes of existing conditions. The use of mounted diagnostic casts and a diagnostic wax-up allows visualization of the expected result. Provisional restorations offer a "dress rehearsal" to preview functional and aesthetic results before completion of the final restorations. The term "smile architecture" is used to describe the process that guides a patient and dentist from initial complaint through to final case acceptance.

  5. Third Annual David Derse Memorial Lecture and Award | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Anne Arthur, Guest Writer The Third Annual David Derse Memorial Lecture and Award presentation was held on Nov. 18 at NCI at Frederick to honor the outstanding research accomplishments of David Derse, Ph.D., and to stimulate the exchange of innovative ideas that Derse was well known for promoting throughout his scientific career.

  6. Smile: A review

    PubMed Central

    Manjula, W. S.; Sukumar, M. R.; Kishorekumar, S.; Gnanashanmugam, K.; Mahalakshmi, K.

    2015-01-01

    “Beauty is in the mind of the beholder, each mind perceives a different beauty” famously said by writer Margeret Wolfe Hungerford. A beautiful smile is a gateway to the world. The aim of this article was to identify the criteria for designing the perfect smile. It was determined, smile design is a multifactorial process and various steps are involved in designing a radiant smile. PMID:26015730

  7. What's in a Smile?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Messinger, Daniel S.; Fogel, Alan; Dickson, K. Laurie

    1999-01-01

    Compared Duchenne and non-Duchenne smiles of 1- to 6-month olds during weekly videotapes of mother/infant interaction for clues regarding emotional significance. Correlated levels of Duchenne and non-Duchenne smiling within sessions; found that they had similar developmental trajectories. Duchenne smiles were typically preceded by non-Duchenne…

  8. NASA Sees Hurricane Arthur's Fireworks

    NASA Video Gallery

    On July 3, NASA's TRMM satellite passed over Arthur and saw intense bands of thunderstorms north of Arthur's well defined eye dropping rainfall at a rate of over 98.4 mm (3.9 inches) per hour. Thos...

  9. Principles of smile design

    PubMed Central

    Bhuvaneswaran, Mohan

    2010-01-01

    An organized and systematic approach is required to evaluate, diagnose and resolve esthetic problems predictably. It is of prime importance that the final result is not dependent only on the looks alone. Our ultimate goal as clinicians is to achieve pleasing composition in the smile by creating an arrangement of various esthetic elements. This article reviews the various principles that govern the art of smile designing. The literature search was done using PubMed search and Medline. This article will provide a basic knowledge to the reader to bring out a functional stable smile. PMID:21217950

  10. Principles of smile design.

    PubMed

    Bhuvaneswaran, Mohan

    2010-10-01

    An organized and systematic approach is required to evaluate, diagnose and resolve esthetic problems predictably. It is of prime importance that the final result is not dependent only on the looks alone. Our ultimate goal as clinicians is to achieve pleasing composition in the smile by creating an arrangement of various esthetic elements. This article reviews the various principles that govern the art of smile designing. The literature search was done using PubMed search and Medline. This article will provide a basic knowledge to the reader to bring out a functional stable smile.

  11. Smile esthetics: calculated beauty?

    PubMed

    Lecocq, Guillaume; Truong Tan Trung, Lisa

    2014-06-01

    Esthetic demand from patients continues to increase. Consequently, the treatments we offer are moving towards more discreet or invisible techniques using lingual brackets in order to achieve harmonious, balanced results in line with our treatment goals. As orthodontists, we act upon relationships between teeth and bone. And the equilibrium they create impacts the entire face via the smile. A balanced smile is essential to an esthetic outcome and is governed by rules, which guide both the practitioner and patient. A smile can be described in terms of mathematical ratios and proportions but beauty cannot be calculated. For the smile to sit harmoniously within the face, we need to take into account facial proportions and the possibility of their being modified by our orthopedic appliances or by surgery.

  12. Arthur: A Personalized Instructional System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, Juan E.; Han, C. Y.

    2002-01-01

    Examined whether there was a significant difference in learner outcomes from the use of Arthur (Gilbert & Han, 1999), a computer-based adaptive instructional system that provides personalized instruction to each learner. Found that Arthur does provide a significant difference in learner outcomes. (EV)

  13. Second Annual David Derse Memorial Lecture and Award | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Anne Arthur, Guest Writer The Second Annual David Derse Memorial Lecture and Award presentation was held on November 12, 2013, at the NCI at Frederick Conference Center to honor David Derse’s outstanding research accomplishments and to stimulate the exchange of innovative ideas that Derse was well known for promoting throughout his scientific career. The Annual David Derse Memorial Lecture and Award is sponsored by the HIV Drug Resistance Program, with support from Hye Kyung Chung-Derse, Ph.D., the National Cancer Institute (NCI), the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and colleagues and friends of Derse who contributed to the memorial fund in his honor.

  14. 10 commandments of smile esthetics.

    PubMed

    Machado, Andre Wilson

    2014-01-01

    The search for esthetic treatment has persisted in the routine of dental professionals. Following this trend, dental patients have sought treatment with the primary aim of improving smile esthetics. The aim of this article is to present a protocol to assess patient's smile: The 10 Commandments of smile esthetics.

  15. 10 commandments of smile esthetics

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Andre Wilson

    2014-01-01

    The search for esthetic treatment has persisted in the routine of dental professionals. Following this trend, dental patients have sought treatment with the primary aim of improving smile esthetics. The aim of this article is to present a protocol to assess patient's smile: The 10 Commandments of smile esthetics. PMID:25279532

  16. Faces of Marshall: Arthur Brown

    NASA Video Gallery

    Several Marshall employees were interviewed as part of Marshall's 50th Anniversary activities. Metallurgist Arthur Brown shares how his high school drafting and welding success led him to a NASA ca...

  17. "Celebration of the smile".

    PubMed

    Crawford, P R

    1989-03-01

    April is Dental Health Month--a month especially set aside to alert Canadians that Dental Health is indeed a major ingredient of the total quality of life. This year, the campaign's primary focus will not be mastication, function, freedom from disease or pain, but "Celebration of the Smile." A Smile is infectious, it's contagious, and one of the world's greatest bargains. The returns are immeasurable. When truly genuine and freely given, the Smile elicits almost instant trust and friendship. No frown can ever do that! And it takes so very little effort and energy. We are not sure what anatomist conducted the research but it is reported that three times more muscles are required to frown than to Smile! Dentists everywhere can take much pride in their contribution to enhancing one of Nature's most precious commodities--the Smile. What a long road it has been from the primitive attempts of just a hundred years ago when alleviating pain was the priority and any crude attempt to enhance appearance was secondary. Only 25 years ago silicate cement was often the only material available for anterior teeth. Far, far too many beautiful Smiles were marred with dark halos around poor fillings and recurrent decay. Missing teeth were commonplace; there were gaps, spaces and "flipper dentures." It's hard to believe how rapidly we have advanced in so short a time. Taken for granted today are caries-free mouths, composite filling materials that defy detection, bonded porcelain veneers and fixed prostheses that can even improve where Nature has "faltered."(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Beyond smile dynamics: mimicry and beliefs in judgments of smiles.

    PubMed

    Maringer, Marcus; Krumhuber, Eva G; Fischer, Agneta H; Niedenthal, Paula M

    2011-02-01

    The judgment that a smile is based on "true," usually positive, feelings affects social interaction. However, the processes underlying the interpretation of a smile as being more or less genuine are not well understood. The aim of the present research was to test predictions of the Simulation of Smiles Model (SIMS) proposed by Niedenthal, Mermillod, Maringer, and Hess (2010). In addition to the perceptual features that can guide the judgment of a smile as genuine, the model identifies the conditions that the judgments rely on: (a) the embodiment of the facial expression and its corresponding state, and (b) beliefs about the situations in which genuine smiles are most often expressed. Results of two studies are consistent with the model in that they confirm the hypotheses that facial mimicry provides feedback that is used to judge the meaning of a smile, and that beliefs about the situations in which a smile occurs guides such judgments when mimicry is inhibited. PMID:21401238

  19. Smiling makes you look older.

    PubMed

    Ganel, Tzvi

    2015-12-01

    People smile in social interactions to convey different types of nonverbal communication. However, smiling can potentially change the way a person is perceived along different facial dimensions, including perceived age. It is commonly assumed that smiling faces are perceived as younger than faces carrying a neutral expression. In the series of experiments reported here, I describe an unintuitive and robust effect in the opposite direction. Across different experimental conditions and stimulus sets, smiling faces were consistently perceived as older compared to neutral face photos of the same persons. I suggest that this effect is due to observer failure to ignore smile-associated wrinkles, mainly along the region of the eyes. These findings point to a misconception regarding the relationship between facial smile and perceived age and shed new light on the processes underlying human age perception.

  20. Infants Time Their Smiles to Make Their Moms Smile.

    PubMed

    Ruvolo, Paul; Messinger, Daniel; Movellan, Javier

    2015-01-01

    One of the earliest forms of interaction between mothers and infants is smiling games. While the temporal dynamics of these games have been extensively studied, they are still not well understood. Why do mothers and infants time their smiles the way they do? To answer this question we applied methods from control theory, an approach frequently used in robotics, to analyze and synthesize goal-oriented behavior. The results of our analysis show that by the time infants reach 4 months of age both mothers and infants time their smiles in a purposeful, goal-oriented manner. In our study, mothers consistently attempted to maximize the time spent in mutual smiling, while infants tried to maximize mother-only smile time. To validate this finding, we ported the smile timing strategy used by infants to a sophisticated child-like robot that automatically perceived and produced smiles while interacting with adults. As predicted, this strategy proved successful at maximizing adult-only smile time. The results indicate that by 4 months of age infants interact with their mothers in a goal-oriented manner, utilizing a sophisticated understanding of timing in social interactions. Our work suggests that control theory is a promising technique for both analyzing complex interactive behavior and providing new insights into the development of social communication.

  1. Infants Time Their Smiles to Make Their Moms Smile

    PubMed Central

    Ruvolo, Paul; Messinger, Daniel; Movellan, Javier

    2015-01-01

    One of the earliest forms of interaction between mothers and infants is smiling games. While the temporal dynamics of these games have been extensively studied, they are still not well understood. Why do mothers and infants time their smiles the way they do? To answer this question we applied methods from control theory, an approach frequently used in robotics, to analyze and synthesize goal-oriented behavior. The results of our analysis show that by the time infants reach 4 months of age both mothers and infants time their smiles in a purposeful, goal-oriented manner. In our study, mothers consistently attempted to maximize the time spent in mutual smiling, while infants tried to maximize mother-only smile time. To validate this finding, we ported the smile timing strategy used by infants to a sophisticated child-like robot that automatically perceived and produced smiles while interacting with adults. As predicted, this strategy proved successful at maximizing adult-only smile time. The results indicate that by 4 months of age infants interact with their mothers in a goal-oriented manner, utilizing a sophisticated understanding of timing in social interactions. Our work suggests that control theory is a promising technique for both analyzing complex interactive behavior and providing new insights into the development of social communication. PMID:26398187

  2. Smile design--specific considerations.

    PubMed

    Morley, J

    1997-09-01

    Smile design is a new discipline that has come to the forefront with the recent popularity of cosmetic dentistry techniques. This article explores some of the principles used in smile design that can enhance the esthetics of any anterior restorative procedure.

  3. Software Design for Smile Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sodagar, A.; Rafatjoo, R.; Gholami Borujeni, D.; Noroozi, H.; Sarkhosh, A.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Esthetics and attractiveness of the smile is one of the major demands in contemporary orthodontic treatment. In order to improve a smile design, it is necessary to record “posed smile” as an intentional, non-pressure, static, natural and reproducible smile. The record then should be analyzed to determine its characteristics. In this study, we intended to design and introduce a software to analyze the smile rapidly and precisely in order to produce an attractive smile for the patients. Materials and Methods: For this purpose, a practical study was performed to design multimedia software “Smile Analysis” which can receive patients’ photographs and videographs. After giving records to the software, the operator should mark the points and lines which are displayed on the system’s guide and also define the correct scale for each image. Thirty-three variables are measured by the software and displayed on the report page. Reliability of measurements in both image and video was significantly high (α=0.7–1). Results: In order to evaluate intra- operator and inter-operator reliability, five cases were selected randomly. Statistical analysis showed that calculations performed in smile analysis software were both valid and highly reliable (for both video and photo). Conclusion: The results obtained from smile analysis could be used in diagnosis, treatment planning and evaluation of the treatment progress. PMID:21998792

  4. Lip asymmetry and smile aesthetics.

    PubMed

    Batwa, Waeil; McDonald, Fraser; Cash, Alex

    2013-11-01

    Objective : To determine if lip asymmetry can affect lip aesthetics. Setting and Participants : A group of dentists (n = 40) and cleft patients (n = 40) were recruited from the dental hospital and cleft service. Interventions : Still photographic digital images of lips and teeth were manipulated to produce a computerized gradient of smile appearance with different degrees of upper-lip vertical asymmetry. These five photographs (with 0 mm representing "symmetry," and 1, 2, 2.5, and 3 mm, asymmetries) were assessed by participants using a 5-point Likert scale. Statistics : Descriptive statistics in addition to chi-square test were used to analyze the data. In order to satisfy the requirement of the chi-square test, the five smile ratings were reduced to three. Results : Lip asymmetry did affect relative smile aesthetics, as determined by dentists and cleft patients. Both the dentists and cleft patients rated the 0-mm photograph more attractive than the 2.5-mm and 3-mm smiles (P < .05). The 0-, 1-, and 2-mm smiles were indistinguishable for both dentists and cleft patients. Conclusion : Lip asymmetry affects smile aesthetics. However, cleft patients and dentists were tolerant of minor asymmetries. This suggests that small degrees of lip asymmetry do not affect relative smile aesthetics as much as large degrees of lip asymmetry (2.5 mm or more).

  5. SMILES ice cloud products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MilláN, L.; Read, W.; Kasai, Y.; Lambert, A.; Livesey, N.; Mendrok, J.; Sagawa, H.; Sano, T.; Shiotani, M.; Wu, D. L.

    2013-06-01

    Upper tropospheric water vapor and clouds play an important role in Earth's climate, but knowledge of them, in particular diurnal variation in deep convective clouds, is limited. An essential variable to understand them is cloud ice water content. The Japanese Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) on board the International Space Station (ISS) samples the atmosphere at different local times allowing the study of diurnal variability of atmospheric parameters. We describe a new ice cloud data set consisting of partial Ice Water Path and Ice Water Content. Preliminary comparisons with EOS-MLS, CloudSat-CPR and CALIOP-CALIPSO are presented. Then, the diurnal variation over land and over open ocean for partial ice water path is reported. Over land, a pronounced diurnal variation peaking strongly in the afternoon/early evening was found. Over the open ocean, little temporal dependence was encountered. This data set is publicly available for download in HDF5 format.

  6. Rhythmical Alchemy: Village Drumming with Arthur Hull.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hillerson, Gary R.; Hull, Arthur

    As a step toward writing a master's thesis in psychology, the connection between rhythm circles and psychotherapeutic process was explored. Arthur Hull, who experienced and preached about the healing power of rhythm for many years, was interviewed. This article recorded the interview between Arthur and the researcher. The interviewer learned that…

  7. Arthur. What Works Clearinghouse Intervention Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2006

    2006-01-01

    "Arthur," a book-based educational television program designed for children ages 4-8, is popular among preschool and kindergarten students. The program is based on the storybooks, by Marc Brown, about Arthur, an 8-year-old aardvark. Each show is 30 minutes in length and includes two stories involving characters dealing with moral issues. The show…

  8. Create Your Own Amazing Arthur Event.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharma, Amina

    Since 1996, the "Arthur" program on the Public Broadcasting System (PBS) has featured stories about the challenges of childhood for children ages 3 through 8, illustrating problem-solving and communication skills as well as the importance of self-respect and respect for others. This booklet provides creative ideas for ways to incorporate "Arthur"…

  9. Arthur Kelman: tribute and remembrance.

    PubMed

    Sequeira, Luis

    2012-01-01

    With the death of Professor Arthur Kelman at age 90, the plant sciences, and particularly the field of plant pathology, lost one of its most influential and effective leaders. His long career involved important positions in the Departments of Plant Pathology at North Carolina State University (1949-1965) and the University of Wisconsin (1965-1989). Recognized not only for his achievements in research and his charismatic influence on his numerous students, Arthur was, most of all, an extraordinary teacher. He and his students made significant contributions in the fields of virulence, ecology, and control of bacterial plant pathogens. In addition, he was extremely active in service to professional societies, including the American Phytopathological Society, and a major force in the development of the International Society for Plant Pathology. In addition, he was an influential member of the Council of the National Academy of Sciences, and, after retirement from the University of Wisconsin, he served for two years as Chief Scientist of the Competitive Grants Program of the US Department of Agriculture. He received numerous awards as a teacher and researcher, and felt an intense sense of duty to his profession. He was one of the most influential plant pathologists of the twentieth century and will be remembered for his great intellect and his humanity. PMID:22656646

  10. Obituary: David Stanley Evans, 1916-2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bash, Frank N.

    2005-12-01

    David Stanley Evans died on 14 November 2004 in Austin, Texas. He was a noted observational astronomer whose career was divided between South Africa and Texas. He also used the extensive historical collections at the University of Texas to write several books on the history of astronomy. He was born in Cardiff, Wales on 28 January 1916. David received his BA degree in mathematics in 1937 from Kings College, Cambridge. He became a PhD student at Cambridge Observatory in 1937, and was one of Sir Arthur Eddington's last surviving students. He received his PhD degree in 1941 with a dissertation entitled, "The Formation of the Balmer Series of Hydrogen in Stellar Atmospheres." He was a conscientious objector to war and, thus, spent the war years at Oxford working with physicist Kurt Mendelssohn on medical problems, involving cadavers, relating to the war. During these years, David was scientific editor of "Discovery", and he was editor of "The Observatory". David left England in 1946 in order to take up the position of Second Assistant at the Radcliffe Observatory, Pretoria, South Africa. He and H. Knox Shaw were the entire staff after R. O. Redman left, and they aluminized and installed the mirrors in the 74-inch telescope. His notable scientific contribution was to use lunar occultations to measure stellar angular diameters during the 1950s. He succeeded in determining the angular diameter of Antares and determined that Arcturus was not circular but had an elliptical shape. The elliptical shape was later shown to be an instrumental artifact, but the utility of using lunar occultations to measure stellar diameters and stellar multiplicity was conclusively demonstrated. T. Gold presented David's paper on lunar occultation angular diameters at the January 1953 meeting of the Royal Astronomical Society. For the rest of his life, David resented Gold's remarks, because he felt that he had been ridiculed. By 1953, David Evans was Chief Assistant at the Royal Observatory

  11. Operation Smile "Changing Lives, One Smile at a Time."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reclaiming Children and Youth, 2000

    2000-01-01

    Although many young people are concerned about acne and dieting, there are some children who retreat from social contact because of facial deformities that can be changed only through surgery. Operation Smile is an organization dedicated to giving young people suffering from physical disfigurement an opportunity to come out of hiding and become…

  12. Reading a smiling face: messages conveyed by various forms of smiling.

    PubMed

    Otta, E; Folladore Abrosio, F; Hoshino, R L

    1996-06-01

    This study investigated the effect of various forms of smiling (closed smile, upper smile, or broad smile) on person perception. Brazilian undergraduates (N = 330) judged a photograph of a male or female stimulus person in three age ranges (young, middle-aged, and old) and smiling or not. 7-point scales were used to measure respondents' perception of the stimulus persons on various attributes (attractiveness, happiness, extroversion, sympathy, kindness, submission, ambition, and intelligence). We found that a smile enhanced attractiveness and kindness ratings independently of its form, whereas the influence of the various forms on ratings of happiness was additive. As the neutral face changed to a closed smile and the closed smile became a broad smile, target stimuli were attributed greater rated happiness. We also found a contribution of perceivers' gender to the judgements of extroversion and sympathy, indicating a slightly greater discrimination of facial expressions among women than among men. PMID:8823879

  13. JEM/SMILES observation capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasai, Yasuko J.; Baron, Philippe; Ochiai, Satoshi; Mendrok, Jana; Urban, Joachim; Murtagh, Donal; Moller, Joakim; Manabe, Takeshi; Kikuchi, Kenichi; Nishibori, Toshiyuki

    2009-09-01

    A new generation of sub-millimeter-wave receivers employing sensitive SIS (Superconductor-Insulator- Superconductor) detector technology will provide new opportunities for precise passive remote sensing observation of minor constituents in atmosphere. Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) was designed to be onbord the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) on the International Space Station (ISS) as a collaboration project of National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) and Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA). SMILES scheduled to be launch in September 11, 2009 by the H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV). Mission Objectives are: i) Space demonstration of superconductive mixer and 4-K mechanical cooler for the submillimeter limb emission sounding, and ii) global observations of atmospheric minor constituents. JEM/SMILES will allow to observe the atmospheric species such as O3, H35Cl, H37 Cl, ClO, BrO, HOCl, HO2, and HNO3, CH3CN, and Ozone isotope species with the precisions in a few to several tens percents from upper troposphere to the mesosphere. We have estimated the observation capabilities of JEM/SMILES. This new technology may allow us to open new issues in atmospheric science.

  14. No smile like another: adult age differences in identifying emotions that accompany smiles

    PubMed Central

    Riediger, Michaela; Studtmann, Markus; Westphal, Andrea; Rauers, Antje; Weber, Hannelore

    2014-01-01

    People smile in various emotional contexts, for example, when they are amused or angry or simply being polite. We investigated whether younger and older adults differ in how well they are able to identify the emotional experiences accompanying smile expressions, and whether the age of the smiling person plays a role in this respect. With this aim, we produced 80 video episodes of three types of smile expressions: positive-affect smiles had been spontaneously displayed by target persons as they were watching amusing film clips and cartoons. Negative-affect smiles had been displayed spontaneously by target persons during an interaction in which they were being unfairly accused. Affectively neutral smiles were posed upon request. Differences in the accompanying emotional experiences were validated by target persons' self-reports. These smile videos served as experimental stimuli in two studies with younger and older adult participants. In Study 1, older participants were less likely to attribute positive emotions to smiles, and more likely to assume that a smile was posed. Furthermore, younger participants were more accurate than older adults at identifying emotional experiences accompanying smiles. In Study 2, both younger and older participants attributed positive emotions more frequently to smiles shown by older as compared to younger target persons, but older participants did so less frequently than younger participants. Again, younger participants were more accurate than older participants in identifying emotional experiences accompanying smiles, but this effect was attenuated for older target persons. Older participants could better identify the emotional state accompanying smiles shown by older than by younger target persons. Taken together, these findings indicate that there is an age-related decline in the ability to decipher the emotional meaning of smiles presented without context, which, however, is attenuated when the smiling person is also an older adult

  15. No smile like another: adult age differences in identifying emotions that accompany smiles.

    PubMed

    Riediger, Michaela; Studtmann, Markus; Westphal, Andrea; Rauers, Antje; Weber, Hannelore

    2014-01-01

    People smile in various emotional contexts, for example, when they are amused or angry or simply being polite. We investigated whether younger and older adults differ in how well they are able to identify the emotional experiences accompanying smile expressions, and whether the age of the smiling person plays a role in this respect. With this aim, we produced 80 video episodes of three types of smile expressions: positive-affect smiles had been spontaneously displayed by target persons as they were watching amusing film clips and cartoons. Negative-affect smiles had been displayed spontaneously by target persons during an interaction in which they were being unfairly accused. Affectively neutral smiles were posed upon request. Differences in the accompanying emotional experiences were validated by target persons' self-reports. These smile videos served as experimental stimuli in two studies with younger and older adult participants. In Study 1, older participants were less likely to attribute positive emotions to smiles, and more likely to assume that a smile was posed. Furthermore, younger participants were more accurate than older adults at identifying emotional experiences accompanying smiles. In Study 2, both younger and older participants attributed positive emotions more frequently to smiles shown by older as compared to younger target persons, but older participants did so less frequently than younger participants. Again, younger participants were more accurate than older participants in identifying emotional experiences accompanying smiles, but this effect was attenuated for older target persons. Older participants could better identify the emotional state accompanying smiles shown by older than by younger target persons. Taken together, these findings indicate that there is an age-related decline in the ability to decipher the emotional meaning of smiles presented without context, which, however, is attenuated when the smiling person is also an older adult.

  16. Remembering David N. Schramm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Michael S.

    2001-03-01

    Eight months ago David Schramm died doing one of things he loved most - flying his airplane, known as Big-bang Aviation. He was to have been at this meeting doing something that he loved even more - going to scientific meetings to talk about the latest results and to renew friendships...

  17. Interview with David Moore

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossman, Allan; Dietz, E. Jacquelin; Moor, David

    2013-01-01

    David Moore is Professor Emeritus of Statistics at Purdue University. He served as the first President of the International Association for Statistical Education (IASE) from 1993-1995 and as President of the American Statistical Association (ASA) in 1998. He is a Fellow of the ASA and of the IMS and was awarded the ASA's Founders Award in…

  18. David Gale: Restless Pioneer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Walter

    2006-01-01

    David Gale was one of the mathematicians responsible for the modern form of the theory of duality in linear programming and the associated proof of the minimax theorem in the theory of games. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and is Professor Emeritus of Mathematics and Operations Research at the University of California at…

  19. Smile rejuvenation: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Raghu, Ramya; Shetty, Ashish; Manjunath, Gautham P.; Roy, Chimaya Kumar Samanta; Puneetha, P. G.; Reddy, Satya Narayan

    2014-01-01

    Mesiodens is the commonly occurring supernumerary tooth seen between the maxillary central incisors which causes compromised aesthetics and malocclusion. Till date orthodontic therapy provides an excellent solution for the management of mesiodens. Recently, Restorative Space Management (RSM) has been used successfully to correct tooth shape, proportions and colour with minimal tooth preparations. This case report describes the successful management of an unaesthetic smile due to presence of a mesiodens in the midline primarily using aesthetic treatment only. PMID:25298657

  20. Insulin-Inducible SMILE Inhibits Hepatic Gluconeogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji-Min; Seo, Woo-Young; Han, Hye-Sook; Oh, Kyoung-Jin; Lee, Yong-Soo; Kim, Don-Kyu; Choi, Seri; Choi, Byeong Hun; Harris, Robert A; Lee, Chul-Ho; Koo, Seung-Hoi; Choi, Hueng-Sik

    2016-01-01

    The role of a glucagon/cAMP-dependent protein kinase-inducible coactivator PGC-1α signaling pathway is well characterized in hepatic gluconeogenesis. However, an opposing protein kinase B (PKB)/Akt-inducible corepressor signaling pathway is unknown. A previous report has demonstrated that small heterodimer partner-interacting leucine zipper protein (SMILE) regulates the nuclear receptors and transcriptional factors that control hepatic gluconeogenesis. Here, we show that hepatic SMILE expression was induced by feeding in normal mice but not in db/db and high-fat diet (HFD)-fed mice. Interestingly, SMILE expression was induced by insulin in mouse primary hepatocyte and liver. Hepatic SMILE expression was not altered by refeeding in liver-specific insulin receptor knockout (LIRKO) or PKB β-deficient (PKBβ(-/-)) mice. At the molecular level, SMILE inhibited hepatocyte nuclear factor 4-mediated transcriptional activity via direct competition with PGC-1α. Moreover, ablation of SMILE augmented gluconeogenesis and increased blood glucose levels in mice. Conversely, overexpression of SMILE reduced hepatic gluconeogenic gene expression and ameliorated hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance in db/db and HFD-fed mice. Therefore, SMILE is an insulin-inducible corepressor that suppresses hepatic gluconeogenesis. Small molecules that enhance SMILE expression would have potential for treating hyperglycemia in diabetes. PMID:26340929

  1. Incisors’ proportions in smile esthetics

    PubMed Central

    Alsulaimani, Fahad F; Batwa, Waeil

    2013-01-01

    Aims: To determine whether alteration of the maxillary central and lateral incisors’ length and width, respectively, would affect perceived smile esthetics and to validate the most esthetic length and width, respectively, for the central and lateral incisors. Materials and Methods: Photographic manipulation was undertaken to produce two sets of photographs, each set of four photographs showing the altered width of the lateral incisor and length of the central length. The eight produced photographs were assessed by laypeople, dentists and orthodontists. Results: Alteration in the incisors’ proportion affected the relative smile attractiveness for laypeople (n=124), dentists (n=115) and orthodontists (n=68); dentists and orthodontists did not accept lateral width reduction of more than 0.5 mm (P<0.01), which suggests that the lateral to central incisor width ratio ranges from 54% to 62%. However, laypeople did not accept lateral width reduction of more than 1 mm (P<0.01), widening the range to be from 48% to 62%. All groups had zero tolerance for changes in central crown length (P<0.01). Conclusion: All participants recognized that the central incisors’ length changes. For lateral incisors, laypeople were more tolerant than dentists and orthodontists. This suggests that changing incisors’ proportions affects the relative smile attractiveness. PMID:24987650

  2. GOETHALS BRIDGE FROM NORTH SIDE OVER ARTHUR KILL. RAILROAD BRIDGE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    GOETHALS BRIDGE FROM NORTH SIDE OVER ARTHUR KILL. RAILROAD BRIDGE IN FOREGROUND - Goethals Bridge, Spanning Arthur Kill from New Jersey to Staten Island, Staten Island (subdivision), Richmond County, NY

  3. Obituary: Arthur Dodd Code (1923-2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marché, Jordan D., II

    2009-12-01

    Former AAS president Arthur Dodd Code, age 85, passed away at Meriter Hospital in Madison, Wisconsin on 11 March 2009, from complications involving a long-standing pulmonary condition. Code was born in Brooklyn, New York on 13 August 1923, as the only child of former Canadian businessman Lorne Arthur Code and Jesse (Dodd) Code. An experienced ham radio operator, he entered the University of Chicago in 1940, but then enlisted in the U.S. Navy (1943-45) and was later stationed as an instructor at the Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D.C. During the war, he gained extensive practical experience with the design and construction of technical equipment that served him well in years ahead. Concurrently, he took physics courses at George Washington University (some under the tutelage of George Gamow). In 1945, he was admitted to the graduate school of the University of Chicago, without having received his formal bachelor's degree. In 1950, he was awarded his Ph.D. for a theoretical study of radiative transfer in O- and B-type stars, directed by Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar. hired onto the faculty of the Department of Astronomy at the University of Wisconsin-Madison (1951-56). He then accepted a tenured appointment at the California Institute of Technology and the Mount Wilson and Palomar Observatories (1956-58). But following the launch of Sputnik, Code returned to Wisconsin in 1958 as full professor of astronomy, director of the Washburn Observatory, and department chairman so that he could more readily pursue his interest in space astronomy. That same year, he was chosen a member of the Space Science Board of the National Academy of Sciences (created during the International Geophysical Year) and shortly became one of five principal investigators of the original NASA Space Science Working Group. In a cogent 1960 essay, Code argued that astrophysical investigations, when conducted from beyond the Earth's atmosphere, "cannot fail to have a tremendous impact on the

  4. David Keynes Hill.

    PubMed

    Huxley, Andrew

    2003-01-01

    David Hill followed his father, A.V. Hill FRS, into the study of muscular contraction. Using a wide range of experimental techniques, he made several important advances of which the most important was the discovery of the 'short-range elastic component', a phenomenon which implied that even in the resting state there was an interaction between the thick (myosin) and thin (actin) filaments. He also studied physical changes in nerve when stimulated.

  5. 78 FR 43063 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Arthur Kill, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-19

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Arthur Kill, NY AGENCY: Coast Guard... District, has issued a temporary deviation from the regulations governing the operation of the Arthur Kill AK Railroad Bridge across Arthur Kill, mile 11.6, between Staten Island, New York and Elizabeth,...

  6. Structured Methods in Language Education: SMILE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf-Schein, Enid G.

    This paper describes a method of language intervention, Structured Methods in Language Education (SMILE), used with students having severe language disabilities due to such factors as autistic disorder, central auditory dysfunction, impaired hearing, or mental handicap. SMILE develops a hierarchy of skills leading from phonology to morphology to…

  7. Smile designing for the malcontent patient.

    PubMed

    LuBovich, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    Patients and dentists may have conflicting opinions regarding the definition of an esthetically pleasing smile. Every dentist is likely to encounter malcontent patients who may have difficulty communicating their esthetic desires for smiles and may even refuse to pay for successful treatment outcomes that they misperceive as failures. Learning how to work with such patients is essential. Part of achieving patient satisfaction is encouraging their participation in designing their smile. With the use of a crown-bridge-veneer pattern, tried-on prepared teeth, or implants, an exacting acrylic wax smile is designed. This pattern is used to analytically and objectively design porcelain contours for the finished smile design. This technique works well for veneers, full crowns, or bridges.

  8. 1997 Arthur Ashe Jr. Sport Scholars Awards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roach, Ronald

    1997-01-01

    Winners of the "Black Issues in Higher Education" Arthur Ashe Jr. 1997 athletes of the year, one male and one female, are profiled and Sport Scholars are listed for baseball, softball, basketball, fencing, archery, football, handball, soccer, field hockey, crew, swimming, gymnastics, tennis, squash, golf, volleyball, lacrosse, wrestling, water…

  9. Convergent Creativity: From Arthur Cropley (1935-) Onwards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Ai-Girl

    2015-01-01

    Arthur Cropley's view on convergent thinking is reviewed, with reflections on the relations of divergent and convergent processes and the roles of knowledge and convergent creativity. While divergence is about considering and generating multiplicity, possibility, difference, originality, and so on; convergence is about relating, associating,…

  10. Arthur Wright Combs: A Humanistic Pioneer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magnuson, Sandy

    2012-01-01

    Arthur Wright Combs (1912-1999) championed humanistic counseling and education. He proposed a theory that incorporated humanistic values and cognitive factors. This article features a review of his contributions, an overview of his theory, a synthesis of stories about Combs that were acquired during research interviews, and my commentary on his…

  11. The Unusual Evolution of Hurricane Arthur 2014

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Folmer, Michael; Line, William; Cangialosi, John; Halverson, Jeffery; Berndt, Emily; Sienkiewicz, Joseph; Goodman, Steve; Goldberg, Mitch

    2015-01-01

    Hurricane Arthur (2014) was an early season hurricane that had its roots in a convective complex in the Southern Plains of the U.S. As the complex moved into northern Texas, a Mesoscale Convective Vortex (MCV) formed and drifted towards the east of the southern U.S. for a few days before emerging over the southwest Atlantic near South Carolina. The MCV drifted south and slowly acquired tropical characteristics, eventually becoming a Category 2 hurricane that would affect much of eastern North Carolina prior to the 4th of July holiday weekend. Arthur continued up the coast, brushing portions of southeast New England and merged with an upper-level low, completing a full tropical to extratropical-transition in the process, producing damaging wind gusts in portions of the Canadian Maritimes. As part of the GOES-R and JPSS Satellite Proving Grounds, multiple proxy and operational products were available to analyze and forecast this complex evolution. The Storm Prediction Center had products available to monitor the initial severe thunderstorm aspect, while the National Hurricane Center and Ocean Prediction Center were able to monitor the tropical and extratropical transition of Arthur using various convective and red, green, blue (RGB) products that have been introduced in recent years. This paper will discuss Arthur's evolution through the eyes of the various Satellite Proving Ground demonstrations.

  12. Chariots of Fire: King Arthur Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kramer, Fred

    1987-01-01

    Discusses one of the perennial challenges of teaching English literature--finding ways to relate it to modern problems and issues and thus make the study accessible to students. Includes an example that relates the themes of "Morte D'Arthur" and "Chariots of Fire" and focuses on the sea imagery in both pieces. (JD)

  13. Arthur Dunn: Civic Visionary from the Heartland.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nieboer, Ruth A.

    This paper considers the life and accomplishments of Arthur Dunn, a pioneer in the field of social studies education. The paper discusses the cooperative community of Dunn's youth, his education and teaching experiences, and his publications on civics and their influence on teaching methods. (BT)

  14. Arthur Ashe Jr. Sports Scholars Awards 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elfman, Lois; Ford, William J.

    2010-01-01

    "Diverse: Issues In Higher Education" established the Sports Scholars Awards to honor undergraduate students of color who have made achieving both academically and athletically a winning combination. Inspired by tennis legend Arthur Ashe Jr.'s commitment to education as well as his love for the game of tennis, they invite every college and…

  15. Arthur Ashe Jr. Sports Scholars Awards 2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elfman, Lois; Walker, Marlon A.

    2011-01-01

    "Diverse: Issues In Higher Education" established the Sports Scholars Awards to honor undergraduate students of color who have made achieving both academically and athletically a winning combination. Inspired by tennis legend Arthur Ashe Jr.'s commitment to education as well as his love for the game of tennis, "Diverse" invites every college and…

  16. David Hartley's Newtonian neuropsychology.

    PubMed

    Smith, C U

    1987-04-01

    David Hartley's association psychology has been immensely influential. His vibrationist neurophysiology has, in contrast, been largely overlooked and forgotten. Hartley's vibration theory is examined. On the one hand it is shown how closely it is related to Sir Isaac Newton's mathematical physics and on the other how well it complements the association theory. The vibration theory, indeed, strongly influenced Hartley's associationist psychology and hence is of more than merely antiquarian interest. Although Hartley's understanding of the central nervous system has long been superseded, his general ideas prefigure some aspects of contemporary neurophysiology and philosophy of mind and thus provide a further reason for rescuing his vibrationism from oblivion.

  17. Virtual smile design systems: a current review.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Moritz; Mehl, Albert

    2015-01-01

    In the age of digital dentistry, virtual treatment planning is becoming an increasingly important element of dental practice. Thanks to new technological advances in the computer- assisted design and computer-assisted manufacturing (CAD/CAM) of dental restorations, predictable interdisciplinary treatment using the backward planning approach appears useful and feasible. Today, a virtual smile design can be used as the basis for creating an esthetic virtual setup of the desired final result. The virtual setup, in turn, is used to plan further treatment steps in an interdisciplinary team approach, and communicate the results to the patient. The smile design concept and the esthetic analyses required for it are described in this article. We include not only a step-by-step description of the virtual smile design workflow, but also describe and compare the several available smile design options and systems. Subsequently, a brief discussion of the advantages and limitations of virtual smile design is followed by a section on different ways to integrate a two-dimensional (2D) smile design into the digital three-dimensional (3D) workflow. New technological developments are also described, such as the integration of smile designs in digital face scans, and 3D diagnostic follow-up using intraoral scanners.

  18. Smile (System/Machine-Independent Local Environment)

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, J.G.

    1988-04-01

    This document defines the characteristics of Smile, a System/machine-independent local environment. This environment consists primarily of a number of primitives (types, macros, procedure calls, and variables) that a program may use; these primitives provide facilities, such as memory allocation, timing, tasking and synchronization beyond those typically provided by a programming language. The intent is that a program will be portable from system to system and from machine to machine if it relies only on the portable aspects of its programming language and on the Smile primitives. For this to be so, Smile itself must be implemented on each system and machine, most likely using non-portable constructions; that is, while the environment provided by Smile is intended to be portable, the implementation of Smile is not necessarily so. In order to make the implementation of Smile as easy as possible and thereby expedite the porting of programs to a new system or a new machine, Smile has been defined to provide a minimal portable environment; that is, simple primitives are defined, out of which more complex facilities may be constructed using portable procedures. The implementation of Smile can be as any of the following: the underlying software environment for the operating system of an otherwise {open_quotes}bare{close_quotes} machine, a {open_quotes}guest{close_quotes} system environment built upon a preexisting operating system, an environment within a {open_quotes}user{close_quotes} process run by an operating system, or a single environment for an entire machine, encompassing both system and {open_quotes}user{close_quotes} processes. In the first three of these cases the tasks provided by Smile are {open_quotes}lightweight processes{close_quotes} multiplexed within preexisting processes or the system, while in the last case they also include the system processes themselves.

  19. Band selection study for SMILES-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Makoto; Shiotani, Masato; Ochiai, Satoshi; Baron, Philippe; Manago, Naohiro; Nishibori, Toshiyuki; Mizuno, Akira; Ozeki, Hiroyuki; Uzawa, Yoshinori; Maezawa, Hiroyuki

    2016-07-01

    Submillimeter limb sounding is very useful technique to investigate Earth's middle atmosphere since it can measure both reactive minor species (ClO, BrO, HO¬2, etc) and stable species (O3, HCl, etc) at day/night conditions as already established by UARS/MLS, Odin/SMR, and Aura/MLS. Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-emission Sounder (SMILES) was the first instrument to use 4K cooled SIS (Superconductor-Insulator-Superconductor) detection system for the limb sounding of the atmosphere in the frequency regions 625 GHz (Bands A and B) and 650 GHz (Band C) [1]. It has demonstrated its very high sensitivity (System Temperature, Tsys ~250K) for measuring stratospheric and mesospheric species, O3, HCl, ClO, HO2, HOCl, BrO, and O3 isotopes from Oct. 12, 2009 to Apr. 21, 2010 [2-5]. Since SMILES operation has terminated after only 6 months operation due to failure of sub-mm local oscillator (and later 4K cooler system), there exist strong scientific demand to develop successor of SMILES, the SMILES-2, which has optimized and enhanced frequency coverage to observe: (a) BrO and HOCl without interferences of stronger emission lines, (b) N2O, H2O, NO2, and CH3Cl not covered by the SMILES frequency regions, and (c) O2 line to measure temperature. This paper discusses possible SMILES-2 band selection considering limited instrument resources (number of SIS mixers and sub-mm local oscillator) and scientific requirements. This paper describes current status of SMILES-2 band selection study; (1) known issues of SMILES observations, (2) SMILES-2 scientific requirements, (3) methods of band selection study, (4) temperature, horizontal wind speed, H2O sensitivity study, (5) BrO and HOCl line selection, and (6) current band selection and possible instrument design.

  20. SPECTRAL SMILE CORRECTION IN CRISM HYPERSPECTRAL IMAGES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceamanos, X.; Doute, S.

    2009-12-01

    The Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) is affected by a common artifact in "push-broom" sensors, the so-called "spectral smile". As a consequence, both central wavelength and spectral width of the spectral response vary along the across-track dimension, thus giving rise to a shifting and smoothing of spectra (see Fig. 1 (left)). In fact, both effects are greater for spectra on the edges, while they are minimum for data acquired by central detectors, the so-called "sweet spot". The prior artifacts become particularly critical for Martian observations which contain steep spectra such as CO2 ice-rich polar images. Fig. 1 (right) shows the horizontal brightness gradient which appears in every band corresponding to a steep portion of spectra. The correction of CRISM spectral smile is addressed using a two-step method which aims at modifying data sensibly in order to mimic the optimal CRISM response. First, all spectra, which are previously interpolated by cubic splines, are resampled to the "sweet spot" wavelengths in order to overcome the spectra shift. Secondly, the non-uniform spectral width is overcome by mimicking an increase of spectral resolution thanks to a spectral sharpening. In order to minimize noise, only bands particularly suffering from smile are selected. First, bands corresponding to the outliers of the Minimum Noise Transformation (MNF) eigenvector, which corresponds to the MNF band related to smile (MNF-smile), are selected. Then, a spectral neighborhood Θi, which takes into account the local spectral convexity or concavity, is defined for every selected band in order to maximize spectral shape preservation. The proposed sharpening technique takes into account both the instrument parameters and the observed spectra. First, every reflectance value belonging to a Θi is reevaluated by a sharpening which depends on a ratio of the spectral width of the current detector and the "sweet spot" one. Then, the optimal degree of

  1. Treatment of the Patient with Gummy Smile in Conjunction with Digital Smile Approach.

    PubMed

    Arias, David Montalvo; Trushkowsky, Richard D; Brea, Luis M; David, Steven B

    2015-07-01

    Gummy smile cases are always esthetically demanding cases. This article presents a case treated with an interdisciplinary treatment approach and Digital Smile Approach (DSA) using Keynote (DSA), to predictably achieve an esthetic outcome for a patient with gummy smile. The importance of using questionnaires and checklists to facilitate the gathering of diagnostic data cannot be overemphasized. The acquired data must then be transferred to the design of the final restorations. The use of digital smile design has emerged as a powerful tool in cosmetic dentistry to help both practitioner and patient visualize the final outcome.

  2. Arthur R. Jensen (1923-2012).

    PubMed

    Lubinski, David

    2013-01-01

    Presents an obituary for Arthur R. Jensen. Arthur R. Jensen epitomized the "London School" of psychological thought, studying human individuality as a branch of biology by teaming evolutionary, genetic, and experimental/multivariate/quantitative methods to examine psychological diversity. His intellectual ancestry traces back through his mentor Hans Eysenck to Cyril Burt, Charles Spearman, and, ultimately, Sir Francis Galton. Haggbloom et al. (2002, Review of General Psychology) ranked him among the top 50 eminent psychologists of the 20th century primarily for his work on the construct of general intelligence (g) and its antecedents. But he was also known for his studies in human learning, memory, the cumulative deficit hypothesis, Spearman's hypothesis, the speed of information hypothesis, and test bias. Yet, because of the controversial nature of his work, his career was conspicuously marked by tensions: The extent to which his work was either admired or reviled by many distinguished scientists is unparalleled. PMID:23895609

  3. Arthur R. Jensen (1923-2012).

    PubMed

    Lubinski, David

    2013-01-01

    Presents an obituary for Arthur R. Jensen. Arthur R. Jensen epitomized the "London School" of psychological thought, studying human individuality as a branch of biology by teaming evolutionary, genetic, and experimental/multivariate/quantitative methods to examine psychological diversity. His intellectual ancestry traces back through his mentor Hans Eysenck to Cyril Burt, Charles Spearman, and, ultimately, Sir Francis Galton. Haggbloom et al. (2002, Review of General Psychology) ranked him among the top 50 eminent psychologists of the 20th century primarily for his work on the construct of general intelligence (g) and its antecedents. But he was also known for his studies in human learning, memory, the cumulative deficit hypothesis, Spearman's hypothesis, the speed of information hypothesis, and test bias. Yet, because of the controversial nature of his work, his career was conspicuously marked by tensions: The extent to which his work was either admired or reviled by many distinguished scientists is unparalleled.

  4. Arthur Cayley and the `Gruppen Pest'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinberger, P.

    2015-09-01

    The original contributions of Arthur Cayley to the Philosophical Magazine on group theory and his 'trees' are revisited and to some extend reinterpreted. Both topics were and are of enormous importance not only in physics (group theory, graph theory), but also in quite a few other disciplines as diverse as information technology or, for example, linguistics (trees, graph theory). In order to show that these two topics originally arose from interests in the theory of permutations also Cayley's 'Mousetrap' game is briefly mentioned.

  5. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer April, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer April, 1934 (b) LIGHTHOUSE AND KEEPER'S COTTAGE FROM SOUTHWEST - Lighthouse, Cedar Point Scituate Harbor, Scituate, Plymouth County, MA

  6. 11. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. 1935 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. 1935 (g) Ext- general view, gateway entrance and fence. - Timothy Jackson House, 527 Washington Street, Newton, Middlesex County, MA

  7. 10. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. 1935 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. 1935 (j) Int- (so- called) Slaves' Pew, East Gallery. - Chestnut Hill Meetinghouse, Chestnut Street, Millville, Worcester County, MA

  8. 5. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. 1935. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. 1935. (e) Ext- Detail, main entrance, west front. - Chestnut Hill Meetinghouse, Chestnut Street, Millville, Worcester County, MA

  9. 6. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. 1935. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. 1935. (f) Int-General view looking north toward pulpit. - Chestnut Hill Meetinghouse, Chestnut Street, Millville, Worcester County, MA

  10. Maxillary anterior papilla display during smiling: a clinical study of the interdental smile line.

    PubMed

    Hochman, Mark N; Chu, Stephen J; Tarnow, Dennis P

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this research was to quantify the visual display (presence) or lack of display (absence) of interdental papillae during maximum smiling in a patient population aged 10 to 89 years. Four hundred twenty digital single-lens reflex photographs of patients were taken and examined for the visual display of interdental papillae between the maxillary anterior teeth during maximum smiling. Three digital photographs were taken per patient from the frontal, right frontal-lateral, and left frontal-lateral views. The data set of photographs was examined by two examiners for the presence or absence of the visual display of papillae. The visual display of interdental papillae during maximum smiling occurred in 380 of the 420 patients examined in this study, equivalent to a 91% occurrence rate. Eighty-seven percent of all patients categorized as having a low gingival smile line (n = 303) were found to display the interdental papillae upon smiling. Differences were noted for individual age groups according to the decade of life as well as a trend toward decreasing papillary display with increasing age. The importance of interdental papillae display during dynamic smiling should not be left undiagnosed since it is visible in over 91% of older patients and in 87% of patients with a low gingival smile line, representing a common and important esthetic element that needs to be assessed during smile analysis of the patient.

  11. Gender, smiling, and witness credibility in actual trials.

    PubMed

    Nagle, Jacklyn E; Brodsky, Stanley L; Weeter, Kaycee

    2014-01-01

    It has been acknowledged that females exhibit more smiling behaviors than males, but there has been little attention to this gender difference in the courtroom. Although both male and female witnesses exhibit smiling behaviors, there has been no research examining the subsequent effect of gender and smiling on witness credibility. This study used naturalistic observation to examine smiling behaviors and credibility in actual witnesses testifying in court. Raters assessed the smiling behaviors and credibility (as measured by the Witness Credibility Scale) of 32 male and female witnesses testifying in trials in a mid-sized Southern city. "Credibility raters" rated the perceived likeability, trustworthiness, confidence, knowledge, and overall credibility of the witnesses using the Witness Credibility Scale. "Smile raters" noted smiling frequency and types, including speaking/expressive and listening/receptive smiles. Gender was found to affect perceived trustworthiness ratings, in which male witnesses were seen as more trustworthy than female witnesses. No significant differences were found in the smiling frequency for male and female witnesses. However, the presence of smiling was found to contribute to perceived likeability of a witness. Smiling female witnesses were found to be more likeable than smiling male and non-smiling female witnesses.

  12. Gender, smiling, and witness credibility in actual trials.

    PubMed

    Nagle, Jacklyn E; Brodsky, Stanley L; Weeter, Kaycee

    2014-01-01

    It has been acknowledged that females exhibit more smiling behaviors than males, but there has been little attention to this gender difference in the courtroom. Although both male and female witnesses exhibit smiling behaviors, there has been no research examining the subsequent effect of gender and smiling on witness credibility. This study used naturalistic observation to examine smiling behaviors and credibility in actual witnesses testifying in court. Raters assessed the smiling behaviors and credibility (as measured by the Witness Credibility Scale) of 32 male and female witnesses testifying in trials in a mid-sized Southern city. "Credibility raters" rated the perceived likeability, trustworthiness, confidence, knowledge, and overall credibility of the witnesses using the Witness Credibility Scale. "Smile raters" noted smiling frequency and types, including speaking/expressive and listening/receptive smiles. Gender was found to affect perceived trustworthiness ratings, in which male witnesses were seen as more trustworthy than female witnesses. No significant differences were found in the smiling frequency for male and female witnesses. However, the presence of smiling was found to contribute to perceived likeability of a witness. Smiling female witnesses were found to be more likeable than smiling male and non-smiling female witnesses. PMID:24634058

  13. Effect of posterior gingival smile on the perception of smile esthetics

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Martínez, Alicia; Vicente-Hernández, Ascensión

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate and compare the influence of posterior gummy smile on the perception of smile esthetics by orthodontists, general-dentists and laypersons. Study Design: A frontal photograph of a smile with normal gum exposure was chosen and manipulated digitally using Adobe Photoshop C3 to generate three further images with posterior gum exposure of 4, 6 and 8mm. These four images were assessed by the three evaluator groups: orthodontists (n=40), general-dentists (n=40) and laypersons (n=40). Both orthodontists and dentists had at least ten years professional experience and laypersons were aged between 40-50 years. The proportion of men to women was 20:20 in each group. Evaluators awarded a score to the smile esthetics of each image: 1=acceptable, 2=moderately acceptable, 3=unacceptable. Afterwards, each evaluator placed the four images in order of esthetic preference. Results: No significant differences (p>0.05) were detected between the three evaluator groups for the photo without posterior gummy smile. The perception of smile esthetics for a the 4mm posterior gummy smile (median for orthodontists=2, general-dentists= 1, laypersons=1), the 6mm (median for orthodontists=2, general-dentists=1, laypersons=1) and the 8mm (median for orthodontists=3, general-dentists=2, laypersons=2) was significantly different between orthodontists and the other two evaluator groups (p<0.0017). The three evaluator groups coincided in placing the image with the 6mm gum exposure in first place in order of esthetic preference. Conclusions: Posterior gummy smile influences the perception of smile esthetics more negatively among orthodontists than the rest of the groups. Key words:Aesthetics, gummy smile back, orthodontists, dentists, laypersons. PMID:23986015

  14. David Crighton 1942 2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ffowcs Williams, John E.

    2001-06-01

    David Crighton was struck down by cancer in his fifty-eighth year. He was then at the height of his career and was one of the most admired personalities in fluid mechanics. He had specialized in wave theory, helping to understand and solve problems of practical importance using the full power of mathematical method. Efforts to control the sound and vibration caused by unsteady flow were never far from his thinking, and Crighton's contribution to those efforts has changed significantly the way the subject is viewed. Having first attracted him into the field and never losing my interest in the way he was influencing it, it is natural that I should comment on the technical developments while looking back on Crighton's professional life. The subject has changed a great deal and there are now many more researchers involved in its study, many of whom rely on techniques that Crighton pioneered really powerful mathematical methods. But the basic problems remain: powerful flows are noisy.

  15. David Morrison on Lake Vostok

    NASA Video Gallery

    Dr. David Morrison discusses the implications of research possibilities at Lake Vostok, one of the largest subglacial lakes located over two miles beneath the ice in Antarctica. The lake has been c...

  16. You may look unhappy unless you smile: the distinctiveness of a smiling face against faces without an explicit smile.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyung-Bum; Han, Ji-Eun; Hyun, Joo-Seok

    2015-05-01

    An expressionless face is often perceived as rude whereas a smiling face is considered as hospitable. Repetitive exposure to such perceptions may have developed stereotype of categorizing an expressionless face as expressing negative emotion. To test this idea, we displayed a search array where the target was an expressionless face and the distractors were either smiling or frowning faces. We manipulated set size. Search reaction times were delayed with frowning distractors. Delays became more evident as the set size increased. We also devised a short-term comparison task where participants compared two sequential sets of expressionless, smiling, and frowning faces. Detection of an expression change across the sets was highly inaccurate when the change was made between frowning and expressionless face. These results indicate that subjects were confused with expressed emotions on frowning and expressionless faces, suggesting that it is difficult to distinguish expressionless face from frowning faces.

  17. Memories of David Kirzhnits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolotovsky, B. M.

    2013-06-01

    In the mid-1950s, a new staff member appeared at the Theory Division of the Physical Institute of the Academy of Sciences (FIAN): David Abramovich Kirzhnits. A Moscow State University alumnus, after graduation he had been assigned to a large defense plant in the city of Gorky, where he had worked for several years as an engineer. He was "liberated" from there by Igor Evgenyevich Tamm, our department head, who managed to transfer him to FIAN. Igor Evgenyevich knew D. A. Kirzhnits - they had met in Moscow before Kirzhnits finished university. At that time Kirzhnits was performing thesis work with professor A. S. Kompaneyets as academic adviser. At his adviser's suggestion, D. Kirzhnits consulted with I. E. Tamm on questions pertaining to the thesis topic. I. E. Tamm took a great liking for the diploma student, and he even wanted to recruit D. A. Kirzhnits for the Theory Division immediately after graduation. But at that time (1949) this proved impossible for several reasons. First, D. Kirzhnits was, as they say, an "invalid of the fifth group" - a Jew - which during those years of violent struggle against cosmopolitanismb often proved an obstacle in looking for work. Second, during the years of mass repressions D. Kirzhnits' father had been arrested on treason charges (according to the charges, he had wanted to sell the Far East to Japan). After intensive investigation his father was released, but he lived only a little longer. Reports of this also could have impeded his acceptance. Third, Igor Evgenyevich didn't have enough weight in officials' eyes at that time and so was unable to overcome "first" and "second."...

  18. Smile line and occlusion: An epidemiological study

    PubMed Central

    Harati, Mahsa; Mostofi, Shahbaz Naser; Jalalian, Ezzatollah; Rezvani, Gholamreza

    2013-01-01

    Background: The purpose of the present study was to discuss some new concepts of the desirable characteristics of smile tooth display. Due to the increasing application of cosmetic dental treatments, there is an increasing need for better understanding of the esthetic principles. Materials and Methods: In the present descriptive study, with 212 participants, included were patients with no history of orthodontic treatment, loss or prosthetic replacement of anterior teeth, extracted teeth, lips with asymmetry or a history of trauma. Chi-square test was used to determine possible significances in the relation of smile line to Angle occlusion class, overbite and overjet and arch form. A P level of <0.05 was set as to be significant. Results: Chi-square test indicated that there was a significant difference between the smile design and overbite, overjet and gender but no statistically significant association was found between the smile design and crossbite, molar Angle classification and arch form. Conclusion: Within the limitations of such studies, it might be concluded that there is a significant and important relation between some occlusal parameters and smile design, which must be considered. PMID:24379858

  19. LEGENDS OF KING ARTHUR. LITERATURE CURRICULUM III, STUDENT VERSION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    KITZHABER, ALBERT R.

    A STUDENT VERSION OF A CURRICULUM GUIDE ON THE "LEGENDS OF KING ARTHUR" WAS DEVELOPED. SELECTED LEGENDS ARE REPRODUCED ALONG WITH AN INTRODUCTION, STUDY QUESTIONS, AND A PASSAGE FROM MALORY'S "LE MORTE D'ARTHUR" IN THE ORIGINAL LANGUAGE OF THE FIRST EDITION (1485). THE TEACHER VERSION IS ED 010 814. RELATED REPORTS ARE ED 010 129 THROUGH ED 010…

  20. Perceptual, Categorical, and Affective Processing of Ambiguous Smiling Facial Expressions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calvo, Manuel G.; Fernandez-Martin, Andres; Nummenmaa, Lauri

    2012-01-01

    Why is a face with a smile but non-happy eyes likely to be interpreted as happy? We used blended expressions in which a smiling mouth was incongruent with the eyes (e.g., angry eyes), as well as genuine expressions with congruent eyes and mouth (e.g., both happy or angry). Tasks involved detection of a smiling mouth (perceptual), categorization of…

  1. STS-57 PLC G. David Low, in LES, listens to egress briefing at JSC's MAIL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    STS-57 Endeavour, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 105, Payload Commander (PLC) and Mission Specialist (MS) G. David Low, wearing launch and entry suit (LES), smiles for the photographer during an emergency egress briefing. Low, along with the other STS-57 crewmembers, will participate in an emergency egress simulation in JSC's Crew Compartment Trainer (CCT) to familiarize himself with the procedures necessary in the event of an emergency during launch or landing aboard the space shuttle. The CCT is located in JSC's Mockup and Integration Laboratory (MAIL) Bldg 9NE.

  2. Smile makeover utilizing direct composite resin veneers.

    PubMed

    Koczarski, Michael

    2008-12-01

    Creating a beautiful smile is more than restoring a single tooth back to its proper form. One must take into account the entire aesthetic zone, along with the mechanics of restoring the teeth to proper form and function. To make this effort even more challenging, the clinician is in full control and completely accountable for making the direct composite resin restorations from which the smile is created. Patients usually won't critique the aesthetics of a posterior direct resin, but once we move into the visible smile (along with the fact that most cosmetic procedures are patient desire- and want-driven) we must be able to deliver what the patient expects. Preplanning the case and avoiding the "prep and pray" approach to the smile-design process is the cornerstone of success. Utilizing tools for the creation of the restorations, such as a preoperative wax-up and silicone putty matrix, help the clinician break the procedure down to individual restorations that when created in harmony with the pre-operative design or wax-up, will allow a final "smile design" to emerge with predictability without getting lost in the daunting task of creating the entire smile all at once. Proper use of ideal composite materials adds the final touch on creating realistic results that even the most discerning patients demand. Layering colors, utilizing differing opacities and translucencies within the restorative process, is a must. Having a "recipe" to follow simplifies the process and gives the clinician confidence that the final result will have that realistic look. All in all, the easiest way to handle a challenging case is to break it down into smaller and more manageable increments in order to ensure a predictable outcome.

  3. Astronaut Gordon Cooper smiles for recovery crew

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    Astronaut L. Gordon Cooper Jr., has a smile for the recovery crew of the U.S.S. Kearsarge, after he is on board from a successful 22 orbit mission of the earth in his spacecraft 'Faith 7'. Cooper is still sitting in his capsule, with his helmet off.

  4. It is better to smile to women: gender modifies perception of honesty of smiling individuals across cultures.

    PubMed

    Krys, Kuba; Hansen, Karolina; Xing, Cai; Espinosa, Alejandra Domínguez; Szarota, Piotr; Morales, María Fernanda

    2015-03-01

    Social perception studies have revealed that smiling individuals are perceived more favourably on many communion dimensions in comparison to nonsmiling individuals. Research on gender differences in smiling habits showed that women smile more than men. In our study, we investigated this phenomena further and hypothesised that women perceive smiling individuals as more honest than men. An experiment conducted in seven countries (China, Germany, Mexico, Norway, Poland, Republic of South Africa and USA) revealed that gender may influence the perception of honesty in smiling individuals. We compared ratings of honesty made by male and female participants who viewed photos of smiling and nonsmiling people. While men and women did not differ on ratings of honesty in nonsmiling individuals, women assessed smiling individuals as more honest than men did. We discuss these results from a social norms perspective.

  5. It is better to smile to women: gender modifies perception of honesty of smiling individuals across cultures.

    PubMed

    Krys, Kuba; Hansen, Karolina; Xing, Cai; Espinosa, Alejandra Domínguez; Szarota, Piotr; Morales, María Fernanda

    2015-03-01

    Social perception studies have revealed that smiling individuals are perceived more favourably on many communion dimensions in comparison to nonsmiling individuals. Research on gender differences in smiling habits showed that women smile more than men. In our study, we investigated this phenomena further and hypothesised that women perceive smiling individuals as more honest than men. An experiment conducted in seven countries (China, Germany, Mexico, Norway, Poland, Republic of South Africa and USA) revealed that gender may influence the perception of honesty in smiling individuals. We compared ratings of honesty made by male and female participants who viewed photos of smiling and nonsmiling people. While men and women did not differ on ratings of honesty in nonsmiling individuals, women assessed smiling individuals as more honest than men did. We discuss these results from a social norms perspective. PMID:25066890

  6. Perception of adults' smile esthetics among orthodontists, clinicians and laypeople

    PubMed Central

    Cotrim, Enio Ribeiro; Vasconcelos, Átila Valadares; Haddad, Ana Cristina Soares Santos; Reis, Sílvia Augusta Braga

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Smile esthetics has become a major concern among patients and orthodontists. Therefore, the aim of this study was: (1) To highlight differences in perception of smile esthetics by clinicians, orthodontists and laypeople; (2) To assess factors such as lip thickness, smile height, color gradation, tooth size and crowding, and which are associated with smile unpleasantness. METHODS: To this end, edited photographs emphasizing the lower third of the face of 41 subjects were assessed by three groups (orthodontists, laypeople and clinicians) who graded the smiles from 1 to 9, highlighting the markers that evince smile unpleasantness. Kruskall-Wallis test supplemented by Bonferroni test was used to assess differences among groups. Additionally, the prevailing factors in smile unpleasantness were also described. RESULTS: There was no significant difference (P = 0.67) among groups rates. However, the groups highlighted different characteristics associated with smile unpleasantness. Orthodontists emphasized little gingival display, whereas laypeople emphasized disproportionate teeth and clinicians emphasized yellow teeth. CONCLUSION: Orthodontists, laypeople and clinicians similarly assess smile esthetics; however, noticing different characteristics. Thus, the orthodontist must be careful not to impose his own perception of smile esthetics. PMID:25741823

  7. The perception of smile attractiveness among Saudi population

    PubMed Central

    Mokhtar, Hadeel A; Abuljadayel, Layla W; Al-Ali, Reem M; Yousef, Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Parameters of dental beauty change across time for varying reasons. Thus, an understanding of the factors that help or harm the attractiveness of a smile is an important step in creating attractive smiles. This study aimed to identify factors that affect smile perception and attractiveness among the Saudi population. A cross-sectional study was conducted among the Saudi population. Questionnaires were distributed to 130 dentists and final-year dental students, and to 130 laypersons. The questionnaire contained six smile photographs created by Photoshop® software. There was a statistically significant difference in scale ratings, based on participant background, for the “gummy” smile picture (P-value =0.003), diastema picture (P-value =0.000) and the “Reverse” smile picture (P-value =0.004). As for sex, males significantly underscored the gummy picture (P-value =0.009). Older people accepted the gummy smile less than did younger people, but diastema was considered as one of the variations that spoiled the attractiveness of the smile. “Dental background” participants significantly identified the ideal smile better than the “nondental” group. The perception of diastema as a sign of beauty among Saudi population in the past has definitely changed, according to the results of our study, where diastema and reverse smile received the lowest score in this survey. PMID:25653558

  8. Smiling in Pain: Explorations of Its Social Motives

    PubMed Central

    Prkachin, Kenneth; Lautenbacher, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Studies of facial responses during experimental and clinical pain have revealed a surprising phenomenon, namely, that a considerable number of individuals respond with a smile. So far, it is not known why smiling occurs during pain. It is possible that the “smile of pain” is socially motivated (e.g., reinforcing social bonds while undergoing an unpleasant experience). The present studies were conducted in an attempt to address the role of social motives in smiling during pain. In two studies, we varied the quantitative (level of sociality) and qualitative (properties of the relationship between interactants) components of the situations in which participants received painful stimulation. Participants' faces were video-recorded and the occurrence of smiling was assessed. The occurrence of smiling differed depending on stimulus intensity and the properties of the relationship between interactants. Smiling occurred more often during the painful compared to nonpainful stimulation. Whereas the presence of a stranger (experimenter) reduced the smiling behavior, the presence of an intimate other increased it. Slight variations in the level of sociality, however, had no effect on the degree of smiling. Social motives possibly aimed at strengthening social bonds and thus ensuring social support appear to underlie smiling during pain. PMID:24236233

  9. 10. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. Aug. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. Aug. 1937. (j) Int- Mantel and Breast, N. E. First Floor Room, looking toward front. - Joshua Ward House, 148 Washington Street, Salem, Essex County, MA

  10. 12. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. August, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. August, 1937. (l) Int- Mantel and Breast S. E. First Floor Room. - Joshua Ward House, 148 Washington Street, Salem, Essex County, MA

  11. 4. Historic American Buildings Survey Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer May ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Historic American Buildings Survey Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer May 31, 1936 (ttt) BOSTON STONE, PUBLIC ALLEY No. 102, NEAR MARSHALL ST., BOSTON - Boundary Stones QQQ, RRR, SSS, & TTT, Various Boston locations, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  12. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. 1935 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. 1935 (a) Model of Old Windmill and Vats found in Atwood House, W. Chatham, Mass. - Enoch Harding Salt Works, Buck's Creek, West Chatham, Barnstable County, MA

  13. 12. Historic American Buildings Survey Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer Aug. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Historic American Buildings Survey Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer Aug. 3, 1938 (k) INT.- MANTLE, NORTHEAST ROOM, 2nd. FLOOR - Captain William Wildes House, 872 Commercial Street, Weymouth, Norfolk County, MA

  14. 9. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. 1935. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. 1935. (k) Int-Detail of Corner Fireplace in Parlor (Living) (SE) Room, First Floor. - Daniel Shute House, Main & South Pleasant Streets, Hingham, Plymouth County, MA

  15. 11. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. 1936 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. 1936 (k) Int- Paneled fireplace end, southeast room, first floor. - Squire William Sever House, 2 Linden Street, Kingston, Plymouth County, MA

  16. 9. Historic American Buildings Survey Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer Oct. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Historic American Buildings Survey Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer Oct. 28, 1935 (i) INT.- WALL STENCILLING, REAR ROOM, 2nd. FLOOR - Peter Jayne House, 37 Mugford Street, Marblehead, Essex County, MA

  17. 16. Historic American Buildings Survey Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer May ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. Historic American Buildings Survey Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer May 29, 1939 (r) INT.- MANTEL & MIRROR, SOUTHEAST ROOM, 1st. FLOOR - Cook-Oliver House, 142 Federal Street, Salem, Essex County, MA

  18. 10. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. 1935. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. 1935. (l) Int-Mantel Detail, Bedroom (S.E. Corner) Second Floor. - Timothy Jackson House, 527 Washington Street, Newton, Middlesex County, MA

  19. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. 1935 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. 1935 (b) Ext- General view of main house from southeast. - Timothy Jackson House, 527 Washington Street, Newton, Middlesex County, MA

  20. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. 1935 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. 1935 (c) Ext- General view of House and Ell from Southeast. - Timothy Jackson House, 527 Washington Street, Newton, Middlesex County, MA

  1. 9. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. 1935 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. 1935 (k) Int-Mantel detail, Dining (S.E. Corner) Room, First Floor. - Timothy Jackson House, 527 Washington Street, Newton, Middlesex County, MA

  2. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. April ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. April 1934. (A) Ext. General view from Southeast. - Reverend Roger Newton House, Newton Place (moved from original location), Greenfield, Franklin County, MA

  3. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. April ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. April 1934. (b) Ext- Detail doorway, east side of house. - Reverend Roger Newton House, Newton Place (moved from original location), Greenfield, Franklin County, MA

  4. 16. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur W. Stewart, Photographer, September ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur W. Stewart, Photographer, September 22, 1936 DETAIL OF ROSE WINDOW (SOUTH ELEVATION OF SMALL CHAPEL). - Mission San Jose y San Miguel de Aguayo, Mission Road, San Antonio, Bexar County, TX

  5. 17. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur W. Stewart, Photographer, September ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur W. Stewart, Photographer, September 22, 1936 CLOSE-UP DETAIL OF ROSE WINDOW (SOUTH ELEVATION OF SMALL CHAPEL). - Mission San Jose y San Miguel de Aguayo, Mission Road, San Antonio, Bexar County, TX

  6. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. 1935. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. 1935. From snapshot made by a Survey employee. (b) Ext- General view rear, looking from north. - Lucy Gray House, Indian Hill Road, North Tisbury, Dukes County, MA

  7. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. 1937 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. 1937 (From snapshot made by Survey employee.) (b) Ext- Main building, south end. - Pollard Tavern, Great Road, Bedford, Middlesex County, MA

  8. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. 1937 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. 1937 (From snapshot made by Survey Employee.) (a) Ext- General view from Southeast. - Pollard Tavern, Great Road, Bedford, Middlesex County, MA

  9. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. 1935. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. 1935. From snapshot made by a Survey employee. (a) Ext- General front view from southeast. - Lucy Gray House, Indian Hill Road, North Tisbury, Dukes County, MA

  10. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. 1935. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. 1935. From snapshot made by a Survey employee. (c) Ext-Detail entrance on south. - Lucy Gray House, Indian Hill Road, North Tisbury, Dukes County, MA

  11. 7. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur W. Stewart, Photographer July ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur W. Stewart, Photographer July 15, 1936 DETAIL OF COOKING FIREPLACE IN BASEMENT (LOOKING WEST). - Judge Thomas J. Devine House, San Antonio, Bexar County, TX

  12. 9. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. 1935. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. 1935. (i) Int-Looking down on pulpit and first floor from west gallery. - Chestnut Hill Meetinghouse, Chestnut Street, Millville, Worcester County, MA

  13. 8. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. 1935. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. 1935. (h) Int-Detail Gallery Stairs, S.E. Corner. - Chestnut Hill Meetinghouse, Chestnut Street, Millville, Worcester County, MA

  14. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur W. Stewart, Photographer April ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur W. Stewart, Photographer April 24, 1936 EAST ELEVATION (FRONT). - O'Henry House, Lone Star Brewery, 600 Lone Star Boulevard, San Antonio, Bexar County, TX

  15. 5. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur W. Stewart, Photographer June ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur W. Stewart, Photographer June 26, 1936 DETAIL OF PORCH (NORTH ELEVATION). - Conrad Meuly House & Store, 210 Chaparral Street, Corpus Christi, Nueces County, TX

  16. 6. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur W. Stewart, Photographer October ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur W. Stewart, Photographer October 10, 1936 DETAIL OF CAST IRON GRILLE ON FRONT PORCH. - Conrad Meuly House & Store, 210 Chaparral Street, Corpus Christi, Nueces County, TX

  17. 4. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur W. Stewart, Photographer June ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur W. Stewart, Photographer June 26, 1936 GENERAL VIEW (NORTH AND EAST ELEVATION). - Conrad Meuly House & Store, 210 Chaparral Street, Corpus Christi, Nueces County, TX

  18. 5. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur W. Stewart, Photographer June ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur W. Stewart, Photographer June 24, 1936 EAST ELEVATION MAIN RANCH HOUSE (REAR). - San Bartolo Ranch Buildings, Falcon Reservoir Site, Zapata, Zapata County, TX

  19. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur W. Stewart, Photographer June ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur W. Stewart, Photographer June 24, 1936 EAST ELEVATION SHOWING BUILDINGS 3, 2 AND 1. - San Bartolo Ranch Buildings, Falcon Reservoir Site, Zapata, Zapata County, TX

  20. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur W. Stewart, Photographer June ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur W. Stewart, Photographer June 24, 1936 WEST ELEVATION SHOWING BUILDINGS 1,2 AND 3. - San Bartolo Ranch Buildings, Falcon Reservoir Site, Zapata, Zapata County, TX

  1. 4. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur W. Stewart, Photographer June ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur W. Stewart, Photographer June 24, 1936 WEST ELEVATION OF MAIN RANCH HOUSE (FRONT). - San Bartolo Ranch Buildings, Falcon Reservoir Site, Zapata, Zapata County, TX

  2. 7. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. Oct. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. Oct. 1937. (h) Int- Old Bar in Basement Tap Room - Old Tavern Inn, Wareham Street (State Route 28), Middleboro, Plymouth County, MA

  3. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. April, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. April, 1934. (b) Detail of old railroad part way up incline to quarry. - Granite Railway, Pine Hill Quarry to Neponset River, Quincy, Norfolk County, MA

  4. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. April, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. April, 1934. (c) Detail of track and set pulleys on quarry incline. - Granite Railway, Pine Hill Quarry to Neponset River, Quincy, Norfolk County, MA

  5. 8. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. April, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. April, 1934. (e) Portion of old quarry wagon at head of incline. - Granite Railway, Pine Hill Quarry to Neponset River, Quincy, Norfolk County, MA

  6. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. April, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. April, 1934. (a) General view of incline to Quarry from Northwest. - Granite Railway, Pine Hill Quarry to Neponset River, Quincy, Norfolk County, MA

  7. 4. Historic American Buildings Survey Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer April, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Historic American Buildings Survey Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer April, 1934 (d) SIDE DOORWAY IN TOWER FROM NORTHWEST - Bulfinch Church, North Street & Maplewood Avenue (moved from Park Row), Pittsfield, Berkshire County, MA

  8. 4. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. Oct. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. Oct. 1937. (d) Ext- Detail of Entrance (East) Front. - Colonel Alexander Field House, 280 Longmeadow Street, Longmeadow, Hampden County, MA

  9. 4. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. 1935. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. 1935. (d) Ext- Detail west entrance doorway. - Captain John Stearns House, Old Post Road, Oldtown, North Attleboro, Bristol County, MA

  10. 4. Historic American Buildings Survey Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer Oct. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Historic American Buildings Survey Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer Oct. 3, 1936 (d) INT.-MAIN STAIRWAY - Jennie Sampson House, Main Street (moved to Cotchpinicutt Road, North Chatham, MA), Lakeville, Plymouth County, MA

  11. 4. Historic American Buildings Survey Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer Nov. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Historic American Buildings Survey Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer Nov. 12, 1936 (d) INT.- EAST WALL, NORTHWEST ROOM, FIRST FLOOR - Francis Wyman House, Francis Wyman Road, Burlington, Middlesex County, MA

  12. 4. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. 1935. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. 1935. (d) Int-Paneled (East) side of parlor, N.W. corner, first floor. - Daniel Caldwell House, 126 Main Street, Watertown, Middlesex County, MA

  13. 8. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur W. Stewart, Photographer June ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur W. Stewart, Photographer June 26, 1936 GENERAL VIEW AFTER 1919 STORM (SOUTHWEST ELEVATION). - Conrad Meuly House & Store, 210 Chaparral Street, Corpus Christi, Nueces County, TX

  14. 7. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur W. Stewart, Photographer June ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur W. Stewart, Photographer June 26, 1936 GENERAL VIEW PRIOR TO 1919 STORM (EAST ELEVATION). - Conrad Meuly House & Store, 210 Chaparral Street, Corpus Christi, Nueces County, TX

  15. Arthur Miller Wins a Peace Prize: Teaching, Literature, and Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kopald, Meredith

    1992-01-01

    Describes how a high school student was able to express powerful feelings and achieve some kind of reconciliation with his father through his therapeutic exploration of Arthur Miller's play "Death of a Salesman." (PRA)

  16. Neuro syphilis: Portrayals by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.

    PubMed

    Somasundaram, O

    2009-01-01

    The developments in neuro syphilis in the 19 th century are integral parts of the history of psychiatry. The delineation of various aspects of neuro syphilis by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle in three of his stories is discussed in brief.

  17. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. 1935. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. 1935. (c) Int- Mantel detail (sitting) room SE corner, first floor - Fearing-Warr House, 14 Elm Street, Wareham, Plymouth County, MA

  18. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer (c) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer (c) EXT.-MAPLE MEADOW BROOK AQUEDUCT, WILMINGTON, LOOKING NORTHEAST - Middlesex Canal, Maple Meadow Brook Aqueduct, Wilmington, Middlesex County, MA

  19. David Hume on Competent Judges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eaton, Marcia Muelder

    2004-01-01

    This essay is the eighth in an occasional series on past treatments of major issues in arts education policy from antiquity through the twentieth century. The essay on which it is based, David Hume's "Of the Standard of Taste," originally published in 1757, is too extensive to be reprinted here, but it is easily accessible in the public domain.…

  20. Smiling in a job interview: when less is more.

    PubMed

    Ruben, Mollie A; Hall, Judith A; Schmid Mast, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    Two studies examined the effect of applicants' smiling on hireability. In a pre-test study, participants were asked to rate the expected behavior for four types of applicants. Newspaper reporter applicants were expected to be more serious than applicants for other jobs. In Study 1, participants were randomly assigned to be an applicant or interviewer for a newspaper reporting job. Smiling was negatively related to hiring, and smiling mediated the relation between applicants' motivation to make a good impression and hiring. Hiring was maximized when applicants smiled less in the middle of the interview relative to the start and end. In Study 2, participants watched Study 1 clips and were randomly assigned to believe the applicants were applying to one of four jobs. Participants rated more suitability when applicants smiled less, especially for jobs associated with a serious demeanor. This research shows that job type is an important moderator of the impact of smiling on hiring.

  1. Recognizing face identity from natural and morphed smiles.

    PubMed

    Lander, Karen; Chuang, Lewis; Wickham, Lee

    2006-05-01

    It is easier to identify a degraded familiar face when it is shown moving (smiling, talking; nonrigid motion), than when it is displayed as a static image (Knight & Johnston, 1997; Lander, Christie, & Bruce, 1999). Here we explore the theoretical underpinnings of the moving face recognition advantage. In Experiment 1 we show that the identification of personally familiar faces when shown naturally smiling is significantly better than when the person is shown artificially smiling (morphed motion), as a single static neutral image or as a single static smiling image. In Experiment 2 we demonstrate that speeding up the motion significantly impairs the recognition of identity from natural smiles, but has little effect on morphed smiles. We conclude that the recognition advantage for face motion does not reflect a general benefit for motion, but suggests that, for familiar faces, information about their characteristic motion is stored in memory.

  2. Children's and adolescents' perception of the authenticity of smiles.

    PubMed

    Thibault, Pascal; Gosselin, Pierre; Brunel, Marie-Lise; Hess, Ursula

    2009-03-01

    Recently, Thibault and colleagues described the Duchenne marker as a cultural dialect for the perception of smile authenticity. The current study had the goal to follow up on this finding and to investigate the cues that French Canadian children use to evaluate the authenticity of smiles from members of three ethnic groups. The authenticity of six smiles differing in intensity and presence of orbicularis oculi (Duchenne marker) was rated by 1206 children from 4 to 17 years of age. No differences were found as a function of encoder group. All children perceived medium Duchenne smiles as more authentic than equally intense medium non-Duchenne smiles. Furthermore, results suggest a decrease in the reliance on intensity across the age span. Younger children use the intensity marker along the whole continuum to infer authenticity. In contrast, older children (14- to 17-year-olds) rated all smiles that did not contain the Duchenne marker as roughly equally low in authenticity.

  3. SMILE - New mission to image the magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escoubet, C.-Philippe; Wang, Chi; Branduardi-Raymont, Graziella; Sembay, Steve; Dai, Lei; Li, Lei; Donovan, Eric; Spanswick, Emma; Sibeck, David; Read, Andy; Rebuffat, Denis; Wielders, Arno; Zheng, Jianhua; Romstedt, Jens; Raab, Walfried; Lumb, David

    2016-04-01

    Solar wind Magnetosphere Ionosphere Link Explorer (SMILE) is a novel self-standing mission to be jointly developed between ESA and the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS). It will observe the solar wind-magnetosphere coupling via simultaneous in situ solar wind/magnetosheath plasma and magnetic field measurements, X-Ray images of the magnetosheath and polar cusps, and UV images of global auroral distributions. Remote sensing of the cusps with X-ray imaging is now possible thanks to the relatively recent discovery of solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) X-ray emission, first observed at comets, and subsequently found to occur in the vicinity of the Earth's magnetosphere. The SMILE science as well as the results of the on-going study undertaken jointly by ESA and CAS will be presented.

  4. Smile lifts - a functional and aesthetic perspective.

    PubMed

    Bloom, D R; Padayachy, J N

    2006-02-25

    Cosmetic dentistry has evolved with the advent of more robust porcelain materials and ever-stronger bonding agents. This series of three articles aims to provide a practical overview of what is now possible both functionally and cosmetically from the preparation of a small number of teeth, through a whole smile, to full mouth rehabilitation. A complete diagnosis is the starting point to planning any cosmetic or functional changes. Guidance is given on the techniques used but adequate training must be considered essential before embarking upon modification in occlusal schemes or even minor adjustments in smile design. Porcelain laminate veneers have a role in the restoration and rehabilitation of a wearing and functionally compromised dentition.

  5. EXAMINING THE EFFECT OF SMILE INTENSITY ON AGE PERCEPTIONS.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ze; He, Xin; Liu, Fan

    2015-08-01

    Research has demonstrated the positive effects of smiles on interpersonal perceptions of attractiveness, likability, and friendliness. A possible mechanism underlying the effects of smiles is babyfacedness. Four studies were conducted with 1,235 participants. In Study 1, 646 participants were assigned to one of the six levels of smile intensity and responded to the measures of age perception and perceived babyfacedness. Compared to the neutral expression, the maximal smile reduced age estimations and this effect was mediated by perceived babyfacedness. In Study 2, 59 respondents' responses indicated that a maximal smile reduced the perception of age. In Study 3, 318 respondents estimated the age of models in different sex and levels of smile intensity. Maximal smiles reduced age estimations. In Study 4, 125 students and 87 non-students were randomly assigned to one of the three levels of smile intensity and provided age estimations. Replicating previous findings, maximal smiles reduced age estimations. Consistent results emerged from the various contexts, models, and samples, as well as in a pooled analysis.

  6. [Movement disorders in David Copperfield].

    PubMed

    Garćia Ruiz, P J; Gulliksen, L L

    1999-01-01

    Charles Dickens' novels are a source of vivid neurological descriptions. Besides Pickwickian syndrome, many other neurological descriptions can be found in Dickens' novels. David Copperfield contains several characters with movement disorders including generalized dystonia (Mr. Uriah Heep), restless legs syndrome (the waiter), cervical dystonia (Mr. Sharp) and spasmodic dysphonia (Mr. Creakle). These neurological descriptions an probably based on the observation of actual patients. PMID:10570623

  7. The Components of Smile Design: New York University Smile Evaluation Form Revisited, Update 2015.

    PubMed

    Calamia, John R; Wolff, Mark S

    2015-07-01

    This article updates a simple checklist of foundational knowledge in aesthetic dental concepts that allows clinicians to organize their thoughts, to record the concerns of the patient, and to map out those improvements that must be addressed. This adjunct is called a Smile Evaluation Form. Along with other adjuncts such as radiographs, study casts, and diagnostic wax-ups, the Smile Evaluation Form allows clinicians to form a conceptual visualization of the expected end point. It provides a checklist for discussions with other disciplines in the team, to provide a logical sequence of treatment with a mutually agreed-on end point.

  8. Obituary: Arthur Dodd Code (1923-2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marché, Jordan D., II

    2009-12-01

    Former AAS president Arthur Dodd Code, age 85, passed away at Meriter Hospital in Madison, Wisconsin on 11 March 2009, from complications involving a long-standing pulmonary condition. Code was born in Brooklyn, New York on 13 August 1923, as the only child of former Canadian businessman Lorne Arthur Code and Jesse (Dodd) Code. An experienced ham radio operator, he entered the University of Chicago in 1940, but then enlisted in the U.S. Navy (1943-45) and was later stationed as an instructor at the Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D.C. During the war, he gained extensive practical experience with the design and construction of technical equipment that served him well in years ahead. Concurrently, he took physics courses at George Washington University (some under the tutelage of George Gamow). In 1945, he was admitted to the graduate school of the University of Chicago, without having received his formal bachelor's degree. In 1950, he was awarded his Ph.D. for a theoretical study of radiative transfer in O- and B-type stars, directed by Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar. hired onto the faculty of the Department of Astronomy at the University of Wisconsin-Madison (1951-56). He then accepted a tenured appointment at the California Institute of Technology and the Mount Wilson and Palomar Observatories (1956-58). But following the launch of Sputnik, Code returned to Wisconsin in 1958 as full professor of astronomy, director of the Washburn Observatory, and department chairman so that he could more readily pursue his interest in space astronomy. That same year, he was chosen a member of the Space Science Board of the National Academy of Sciences (created during the International Geophysical Year) and shortly became one of five principal investigators of the original NASA Space Science Working Group. In a cogent 1960 essay, Code argued that astrophysical investigations, when conducted from beyond the Earth's atmosphere, "cannot fail to have a tremendous impact on the

  9. Infant Smiling during Social Interaction: Arousal Modulation or Activation Indicator?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ewy, Richard

    In a study of infant smiling, 20 mother-infant dyads were videotaped in normal face-to-face interaction when the infants were 9 and 14 weeks of age. Videotapes were used to determine which of two classes of smiling behavior models, either arousal modulation or activation indicator, was most supported by empirical data. Arousal modulation models…

  10. The Development of Laughing and Smiling in Nursery School Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bainum, Charlene K.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    A total of 86 children three, four, and five years of age were observed to evaluate the frequency of occurrence and conditions surrounding laughing and smiling. Results were interpreted as supporting interpersonal theories of laughing and smiling and as calling into question theories stressing intrapersonal factors. (Author/RH)

  11. Beam-smiling in bent-Laue monochromators

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, B.; Dilmanian, F. A.; Wu, X. Y.; Huang, X.; Chapman, L. D.; Ivanov, I.; Zhong, Z.; Thomlinson, W. C.

    1997-07-01

    When a wide fan-shaped x-ray beam is diffracted by a bent crystal in the Laue geometry, the profile of the diffracted beam generally does not appear as a straight line, but as a line with its ends curved up or curved down. This effect, referred to as 'beam-smiling', has been a major obstacle in developing bent-Laue crystal monochromators for medical applications of synchrotron x-ray. We modeled a cylindrically bent crystal using the Finite Element Analysis (FEA) method, and we carried out experiments at the National Synchrotron Light Source and Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source. Our studies show that, while beam-smiling exists in most of the crystal's area because of anticlastic bending effects, there is a region parallel to the bending axis of the crystal where the diffracted beam is 'smile-free'. By applying asymmetrical bending, this smile-free region can be shifted vertically away from the geometric center of the crystal, as desired. This leads to a novel method of compensating for beam-smiling. We will discuss the method of 'differential bending' for smile removal, beam-smiling in the Cauchios and the polychromatic geometry, and the implications of the method on developing single- and double-bent Laue monochromators. The experimental results will be discussed, concentrating on specific beam-smiling observation and removal as applied to the new monochromator of the Multiple Energy Computed Tomography [MECT] project of the Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory.

  12. Children's and Adolescents' Perception of the Authenticity of Smiles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thibault, Pascal; Gosselin, Pierre; Brunel, Marie-Lise; Hess, Ursula

    2009-01-01

    Recently, Thibault and colleagues described the Duchenne marker as a cultural dialect for the perception of smile authenticity. The current study had the goal to follow up on this finding and to investigate the cues that French Canadian children use to evaluate the authenticity of smiles from members of three ethnic groups. The authenticity of six…

  13. The challenge of cost restrictions in smile design.

    PubMed

    Feigenbaum, N

    1991-09-01

    This article demonstrates a method for smile enhancement involving the familiar "gummy" smile as well as irregular incisor gingival emergence levels. In this case study, financial considerations limited a comprehensive restorative treatment plan, restricting changes to several anterior teeth. Despite the restrictions, a solution was found.

  14. SMILE--Science and Mathematics Investigative Learning Experiences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orzech, Miriam W.; Borden, Sue

    Oregon State University (OSU) designed and implemented the Science and Mathematics Investigative Learning Experiences Program (SMILE) to encourage minority students to pursue careers in science and engineering. SMILE offers an after-school enrichment program for middle-school Hispanic and Native American students in eight rural Oregon communities.…

  15. The SMile Card: a computerised data card for multiple sclerosis patients. SMile Card Scientific Board.

    PubMed

    Mancardi, G L; Uccelli, M M; Sonnati, M; Comi, G; Milanese, C; De Vincentiis, A; Battaglia, M A

    2000-04-01

    The SMile Card was developed as a means for computerising clinical information for the purpose of transferability, accessibility, standardisation and compilation of a national database of demographic and clinical information about multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. In many European countries, centres for MS are organised independently from one another making collaboration, consultation and patient referral complicated. Only the more highly advanced clinical centres, generally located in large urban areas, have had the possibility to utilise technical possibilities for improving the organisation of patient clinical and research information, although independently from other centres. The information system, developed utilising the Visual Basic language for Microsoft Windows 95, stores information via a 'smart card' in a database which is initiated and updated utilising a microprocessor, located at each neurological clinic. The SMile Card, currently being tested in Italy, permits patients to carry with them all relevant medical information without limitations. Neurologists are able to access and update, via the microprocessor, the patient's entire medical history and MS-related information, including the complete neurological examination and laboratory test results. The SMile Card provides MS patients and neurologists with a complete computerised archive of clinical information which is accessible throughout the country. In addition, data from the SMile Card system can be exported to other database programs.

  16. Visibility of gingiva - An important determinant for an esthetic smile

    PubMed Central

    Sepolia, Shipra; Sepolia, Gaurav; Kaur, Rupinder; Gautam, Devendar Kumar; Jindal, Vikas; Gupta, Subhash Chander

    2014-01-01

    Background: Need for having better esthetics is the new emerging trend seen in patients’ demands and expectations. Various periodontal procedures including the mucogingival procedures have been designed to enhance the esthetics. The amount of gingival display of the patient is also an important parameter while considering the esthetics of the patient. Till date, very few studies have been done in which the amount of gingival visibility have been determined. So, the aim of this study was to evaluate the amount of visibility of gingiva during natural smile and forced smile in the patients visiting Himachal Dental College and Hospital. Materials and Methods: A total of 400 patients (242 females and 158 males), aged between 18 to 49 years, attending the outpatient department of Himachal Dental College, were included in this study. Patients were divided into two groups according to age and gender. Clinical photographs of the patients were taken and analyzed according to the following classification: (1) Very high smile line that is more than 2 mm of marginal gingiva visible or more than 2 mm apical to the cementoenamel junction visible for the reduced but healthy periodontium, (2) high smile line that is between 0 and 2 mm of marginal gingiva visible or between 0 and 2 mm apical to the cementoenamel junction visible for the reduced but healthy periodontium, (3) average smile line in which only gingival embrasures are visible, (4) low smile line in which gingival embrasures and cementoenamel junction not visible. Examination of the gingiva was done for both natural smile and forced smile. Results: During smile analysis, the following results were revealed for Natural smile and forced smile. Natural smile analysis revealed following: C1: 1%, C2: 6%, C3: 43.50% and C4 was 49.50%. Forced smile analysis revealed the following: C1: 1%, C2: 15.50%, C3: 59% and C4: 24.50%. Conclusions: Excessive gingival display is an esthetic concern both to the patient and clinician

  17. Distributed Access View Integrated Database (DAVID) system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, Barry E.

    1991-01-01

    The Distributed Access View Integrated Database (DAVID) System, which was adopted by the Astrophysics Division for their Astrophysics Data System, is a solution to the system heterogeneity problem. The heterogeneous components of the Astrophysics problem is outlined. The Library and Library Consortium levels of the DAVID approach are described. The 'books' and 'kits' level is discussed. The Universal Object Typer Management System level is described. The relation of the DAVID project with the Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) program is explained.

  18. The Growing Brilliance of Brady's Smile: Doing Big Things for Little Ones in Need

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Amy Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    Smiles can do so much for an individual, regardless if a person is the giver or the receiver. When someone smiles at a person, they perceptibly see or feel something they like about that person, and that makes him or her feel special. The person smiling obviously has some joy they wish to share, and it is apparent in their smile. Little Brady…

  19. Children's Ability to Distinguish between Enjoyment and Non-Enjoyment Smiles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gosselin, Pierre; Perron, Melanie; Maassarani, Reem

    2010-01-01

    Children's ability to distinguish between enjoyment and non-enjoyment smiles was investigated by presenting participants with short video excerpts of smiles. Enjoyment smiles differed from non-enjoyment smiles by greater symmetry and by appearance changes produced in the eye region by the Cheek Raiser action. The results indicate that 6- and…

  20. From the Infant's Smile to Mastery of Anxiety: The Developmental Role of Humor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Jacob

    The smiles and laughter of an infant form the beginning of the developmental process of interpersonal interaction and socialization. The earliest smiles are automatic expressions of internal states, but soon infants' smiles are communications of pleasure. The developmental changes in smiling and laughing in early infancy reflect the rapidity with…

  1. 75 FR 69154 - Land Release for Long Island MacArthur Airport

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-10

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Land Release for Long Island MacArthur Airport AGENCY: Federal Aviation... requesting public comment on the Long Island MacArthur Airport (ISP), Ronkonkoma, New York, notice of...-aeronautical development. The parcel is located on the northeast corner of the Long Island MacArthur...

  2. Port Arthur Alive: Exploring Past and Present, 4. Eyewitness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tasmanian Education Dept., Hobart (Australia).

    This document presents part 4 of a five part project in which students of the Tasmanian region of Australia are invited to explore the history of Port Arthur, a 19th century penal colony located in Tasmania. The project is based on three ideas: (1) studying history can be educational and enjoyable; (2) imagination is an essential part of studying…

  3. Narrative Development in Bilingual Kindergarteners: Can Arthur Help?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uchikoshi, Yuuko

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the effects of the children's TV program Arthur on the development of narrative skills over an academic year for Spanish-speaking English-language learners. In October, February, and June of their kindergarten year, children were asked to tell a story, in English, prompted by 3 pictures. Before the 2nd and 3rd assessments, half…

  4. Arthur Ashe Jr. Sports Scholars 2009--Male Finalists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diverse: Issues in Higher Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This article features the male and female finalists of the Arthur Ashe Jr. Sports Scholars 2009. The male finalists are: (1) Sam Bradford (University of Oklahoma); (2) Jamaal Parker (University of Georgia); (3) Masumi Turnbull (University of Kentucky); and (4) Brian Robiskie (The Ohio State University). The female finalists are: (1) Shardea Croes…

  5. Reconsidering Arthur Bestor and the Cold War in Social Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weltman, Burton

    2000-01-01

    Explores the development of Arthur Bestor's ideas and his differences with progressives during the 1950's. Contends their differences, exacerbated by the Cold War, were matters of emphasis not principles. Concludes that ongoing post-Cold War battles among liberal social educators should be resolved in favor of their common social and educational…

  6. Neuro syphilis: Portrayals by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

    PubMed Central

    Somasundaram, O.

    2009-01-01

    The developments in neuro syphilis in the 19th century are integral parts of the history of psychiatry. The delineation of various aspects of neuro syphilis by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle in three of his stories is discussed in brief. PMID:19881059

  7. Port Arthur Alive: Exploring Past and Present, 3. Background.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tasmanian Education Dept., Hobart (Australia).

    Part 3 of this five part project asks students of the Tasmanian region of Australia to explore the history of Port Arthur, a 19th century penal colony located in Tasmania. The project is based on three ideas: (1) studying history can be educational and enjoyable; (2) imagination is an essential part of studying history; and (3) history is most of…

  8. Leaders' smiles reflect cultural differences in ideal affect.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Jeanne L; Ang, Jen Ying Zhen; Blevins, Elizabeth; Goernandt, Julia; Fung, Helene H; Jiang, Da; Elliott, Julian; Kölzer, Anna; Uchida, Yukiko; Lee, Yi-Chen; Lin, Yicheng; Zhang, Xiulan; Govindama, Yolande; Haddouk, Lise

    2016-03-01

    Cultures differ in the emotions they teach their members to value ("ideal affect"). We conducted 3 studies to examine whether leaders' smiles reflect these cultural differences in ideal affect. In Study 1, we compared the smiles of top-ranked American and Chinese government leaders, chief executive officers, and university presidents in their official photos. Consistent with findings that Americans value excitement and other high-arousal positive states more than Chinese, American top-ranked leaders (N = 98) showed more excited smiles than Chinese top-ranked leaders (N = 91) across occupations. In Study 2, we compared the smiles of winning versus losing political candidates and higher versus lower ranking chief executive officers and university presidents in the United States and Taiwan/China. American leaders (N = 223) showed more excited smiles than Taiwanese/Chinese leaders (N = 266), regardless of election outcome or ranking. In Study 3, we administered self-report measures of ideal affect in college student samples from 10 different nations (N = 1,267) and then 8 years later, coded the smiles that legislators from those nations showed in their official photos (N = 3,372). The more nations valued excitement and other high arousal positive states, the more their leaders showed excited smiles; similarly, the more nations valued calm and other low-arousal positive states, the more their leaders showed calm smiles. These results held after controlling for national differences in democratization, human development, and gross domestic product per capita. Together, these findings suggest that leaders' smiles reflect the affective states valued by their cultures.

  9. Age-related changes in the Brazilian woman's smile.

    PubMed

    Correia, Luiza Nayara Almeida Lyra; Reis, Silvia Augusta Braga; Conti, Ana Claudia de Castro Ferreira; Capelozza Filho, Leopoldino; Almeida-Pedrin, Renata Rodrigues

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this research was to evaluate age-related changes in the smile of Brazilian women. The sample consisted of 249 Brazilian women who had not undergone previous orthodontic treatment or facial surgery. They were divided into four groups, according to age: G1 (20-29), G2 (30-39), G3 (40-49) and G4 (50 or older). Standardized front view photographs were taken while smiling and at rest. Measurements were evaluated by ANOVA and post-hoc Tukey. The Chi-square test was applied for qualitative variables. Upper lip thickness at rest and exposure of upper incisors on smiling decreased with age. Most individuals (60.9%) exhibited a medium smile. High smiles were more often seen in G1 (45%) and less frequently in G4 (18.8%), whereas the opposite occurred with the low smile, i.e., G4 (21.9%) and G1 (6.7%). Variations among the groups were observed in the transverse exposure of the teeth on smiling. In G1 and G3, there was a balance between tooth exposures, so that the teeth were exposed as far as the premolars and/or molars. Most of the women (56.3%) in G2 exposed their teeth as far as the first molars on smiling, whereas most of those (40.6%) in G4 exposed their teeth only as far as the first premolars on smiling. As age increased, there was decreased exposure of the upper incisors, decreased upper lip thickness and lower exposure of teeth vertically and transversely.

  10. Leaders’ Smiles Reflect Cultural Differences in Ideal Affect

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Jeanne L.; Ang, Jen Ying Zhen; Blevins, Elizabeth; Goernandt, Julia; Fung, Helene H.; Jiang, Da; Elliott, Julian; Kölzer, Anna; Uchida, Yukiko; Lee, Yi-Chen; Lin, Yicheng; Zhang, Xiulan; Govindama, Yolande; Haddouk, Lise

    2015-01-01

    Cultures differ in the emotions they teach their members to value (“ideal affect”). We conducted three studies to examine whether leaders’ smiles reflect these cultural differences in ideal affect. In Study 1, we compared the smiles of top ranked American and Chinese government leaders, chief-executive-officers (CEOs), and university presidents in their official photos. Consistent with findings that Americans value excitement and other high arousal positive states more than Chinese, American top ranked leaders (N = 98) showed more excited smiles than Chinese top ranked leaders (N = 91) across occupations. In Study 2, we compared the smiles of winning vs. losing political candidates and higher vs. lower ranking CEOs and university presidents in the US and Taiwan/China. American leaders (N = 223) showed more excited smiles than Taiwanese/Chinese leaders (N =266), regardless of election outcome or ranking. In Study 3, we administered self-report measures of ideal affect in college student samples from 10 different nations (N = 1,267) and then eight years later, coded the smiles that legislators from those nations showed in their official photos (N = 3,372). The more nations valued excitement and other high arousal positive states, the more their leaders showed excited smiles; similarly, the more nations valued calm and other low arousal positive states, the more their leaders showed calm smiles. These results held after controlling for national differences in GDP per capita, democratization, and human development. Together, these findings suggest that leaders’ smiles reflect the affective states valued by their cultures. PMID:26751631

  11. Leaders' smiles reflect cultural differences in ideal affect.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Jeanne L; Ang, Jen Ying Zhen; Blevins, Elizabeth; Goernandt, Julia; Fung, Helene H; Jiang, Da; Elliott, Julian; Kölzer, Anna; Uchida, Yukiko; Lee, Yi-Chen; Lin, Yicheng; Zhang, Xiulan; Govindama, Yolande; Haddouk, Lise

    2016-03-01

    Cultures differ in the emotions they teach their members to value ("ideal affect"). We conducted 3 studies to examine whether leaders' smiles reflect these cultural differences in ideal affect. In Study 1, we compared the smiles of top-ranked American and Chinese government leaders, chief executive officers, and university presidents in their official photos. Consistent with findings that Americans value excitement and other high-arousal positive states more than Chinese, American top-ranked leaders (N = 98) showed more excited smiles than Chinese top-ranked leaders (N = 91) across occupations. In Study 2, we compared the smiles of winning versus losing political candidates and higher versus lower ranking chief executive officers and university presidents in the United States and Taiwan/China. American leaders (N = 223) showed more excited smiles than Taiwanese/Chinese leaders (N = 266), regardless of election outcome or ranking. In Study 3, we administered self-report measures of ideal affect in college student samples from 10 different nations (N = 1,267) and then 8 years later, coded the smiles that legislators from those nations showed in their official photos (N = 3,372). The more nations valued excitement and other high arousal positive states, the more their leaders showed excited smiles; similarly, the more nations valued calm and other low-arousal positive states, the more their leaders showed calm smiles. These results held after controlling for national differences in democratization, human development, and gross domestic product per capita. Together, these findings suggest that leaders' smiles reflect the affective states valued by their cultures. PMID:26751631

  12. A Star of David catenane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leigh, David A.; Pritchard, Robin G.; Stephens, Alexander J.

    2014-11-01

    We describe the synthesis of a [2]catenane that consists of two triply entwined 114-membered rings, a molecular link. The woven scaffold is a hexameric circular helicate generated by the assembly of six tris(bipyridine) ligands with six iron(II) cations, with the size of the helicate promoted by the use of sulfate counterions. The structure of the ligand extension directs subsequent covalent capture of the catenane by ring-closing olefin metathesis. Confirmation of the Star of David topology (two rings, six crossings) is provided by NMR spectroscopy, mass spectrometry and X-ray crystallography. Extraction of the iron(II) ions with tetrasodium ethylenediaminetetraacetate affords the wholly organic molecular link. The self-assembly of interwoven circular frameworks of controlled size, and their subsequent closure by multiple directed covalent bond-forming reactions, provides a powerful strategy for the synthesis of molecular topologies of ever-increasing complexity.

  13. David Mechanic: Professional Zombie Hunter.

    PubMed

    Hafferty, Frederic W; Tilburt, Jon

    2016-08-01

    Within the fields of medicine and sociology, the descriptor "profession" (along with its brethren: profession, professionalization, and professionalism) has had a rich etymological history, with terms taking on different meanings at different times-sometimes trespassing into shibboleth and jargon. This etymological journey has co-evolved with the career of David Mechanic to whom this issue of the Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law is devoted. We exploit a provocative metaphor applied to Mechanic's work on the challenges facing medicine as a profession as a playful exegesis on what we call "profession" to excavate an ensconced and encrusted domain of health jargon operating at the tensive interface of society and modern medical work.

  14. David Mechanic: Professional Zombie Hunter.

    PubMed

    Hafferty, Frederic W; Tilburt, Jon

    2016-08-01

    Within the fields of medicine and sociology, the descriptor "profession" (along with its brethren: profession, professionalization, and professionalism) has had a rich etymological history, with terms taking on different meanings at different times-sometimes trespassing into shibboleth and jargon. This etymological journey has co-evolved with the career of David Mechanic to whom this issue of the Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law is devoted. We exploit a provocative metaphor applied to Mechanic's work on the challenges facing medicine as a profession as a playful exegesis on what we call "profession" to excavate an ensconced and encrusted domain of health jargon operating at the tensive interface of society and modern medical work. PMID:27127250

  15. David Hubel and Torsten Wiesel.

    PubMed

    Hubel, David; Wiesel, Torsten

    2012-07-26

    While attending medical school at McGill, David Hubel developed an interest in the nervous system during the summers he spent at the Montreal Neurological Institute. After heading to the United States in 1954 for a Neurology year at Johns Hopkins, he was drafted by the army and was assigned to the Neuropsychiatry Division at the Walter Reed Hospital, where he began his career in research and did his first recordings from the visual cortex of sleeping and awake cats. In 1958, he moved to the lab of Stephen Kuffler at Johns Hopkins, where he began a long and fruitful collaboration with Torsten Wiesel. Born in Sweden, Torsten Wiesel began his scientific career at the Karolinska Institute, where he received his medical degree in 1954. After spending a year in Carl Gustaf Bernhard's laboratory doing basic neurophysiological research, he moved to the United States to be a postdoctoral fellow with Stephen Kuffler. It was at Johns Hopkins where he met David Hubel in 1958, and they began working together on exploring the receptive field properties of neurons in the visual cortex. Their collaboration continued until the late seventies. Hubel and Wiesel's work provided fundamental insight into information processing in the visual system and laid the foundation for the field of visual neuroscience. They have had many achievements, including--but not limited to--the discovery of orientation selectivity in visual cortex neurons and the characterization of the columnar organization of visual cortex through their discovery of orientation columns and ocular-dominance columns. Their work earned them the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine in 1981, which they shared with Roger Sperry. PMID:22841302

  16. David Hubel and Torsten Wiesel.

    PubMed

    Hubel, David; Wiesel, Torsten

    2012-07-26

    While attending medical school at McGill, David Hubel developed an interest in the nervous system during the summers he spent at the Montreal Neurological Institute. After heading to the United States in 1954 for a Neurology year at Johns Hopkins, he was drafted by the army and was assigned to the Neuropsychiatry Division at the Walter Reed Hospital, where he began his career in research and did his first recordings from the visual cortex of sleeping and awake cats. In 1958, he moved to the lab of Stephen Kuffler at Johns Hopkins, where he began a long and fruitful collaboration with Torsten Wiesel. Born in Sweden, Torsten Wiesel began his scientific career at the Karolinska Institute, where he received his medical degree in 1954. After spending a year in Carl Gustaf Bernhard's laboratory doing basic neurophysiological research, he moved to the United States to be a postdoctoral fellow with Stephen Kuffler. It was at Johns Hopkins where he met David Hubel in 1958, and they began working together on exploring the receptive field properties of neurons in the visual cortex. Their collaboration continued until the late seventies. Hubel and Wiesel's work provided fundamental insight into information processing in the visual system and laid the foundation for the field of visual neuroscience. They have had many achievements, including--but not limited to--the discovery of orientation selectivity in visual cortex neurons and the characterization of the columnar organization of visual cortex through their discovery of orientation columns and ocular-dominance columns. Their work earned them the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine in 1981, which they shared with Roger Sperry.

  17. Influence of storage causing packaging stress changes on smile effect for diode laser arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hui-wu; Zhang, Yong; Fang, Yu-suo; Liu, Xiao-wen; Niu, Jiang-li; Yuan, Chun-sheng; Li, Cheng-yan; Wang, Yuan-yuan; Wang, Xiao-yan; Shen, Mu; An, Zhen-feng

    2013-09-01

    The smile effect is caused by the thermal stress in the packaging process. If packaging technology of a diode laser array is poor, smile effect will be very bad and the smile effect will vary with storage time. To accurately measure smile effect and to objectively compare the different measuring methods for smile effect, a set of optical system is designed for measuring the smile effect. By using an image amplification method, the smile effect of a diode laser array is accurately measured, and the measurement error is about +/-0.1μm. By researching, the heat sink surface flatness has little influence on smile effect. However the solder quality is a critical factor for smile effect. That is to say, there is more voids, the corresponding smile effect is more serious in this area. Reflow soldering curve has a major impact on smile effect in the packaging process of a diode laser array .During reflow soldering process, accelerated cooling before solidification and slow cooling after solidification not only can commendably reduce voids and smile effect ,but also can effectively solve the smile effect with storage time variation problem .By optimizing the reflow soldering curve of a diode laser array , the smile effect has been controlled within +/-0.5μm..As the smile effect values of a semiconductor laser array is diminished and the beam quality of a laser diode array is improved significantly. The recommended method provides favorable conditions for the beam collimation and shaping of a semiconductor laser array.

  18. David L. Harrison: A Work Of Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raymond, Allen

    2005-01-01

    This article describes poet and writer David L. Harrison. A former School Board Chairman from Springfield, MO, David was responsible for beginning an annual "Teacher Appreciation Banquet" and for launching the "Sky High for Reading" program. The "Sky High for Reading" program encourages children in Springfield to read enough books so that, if…

  19. Proportional smile design using the recurring esthetic dental (red) proportion.

    PubMed

    Ward, D H

    2001-01-01

    Dentists have needed an objective way in which to evaluate a smile. A method for determining the ideal size and position of the anterior teeth has been presented here. Use of the FIVE to evaluate the RED proportion and the width-to-height ratio, tempered with sound clinical judgment, gives pleasing and consistent results. With the diversity that exists in nature, rarely does the final result follow all the mathematical rules of proportional smile design. This approach may serve as a foundation on which to base initial smile design, however. When one begins to understand the relationship between beauty, mathematics, and the surrounding world, one begins to appreciate their interdependence.

  20. Our Magnetic Planet (Arthur Holmes Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laj, Carlo

    2015-04-01

    It is a great honour to receive the Arthur Holmes Medal, certainly the highest scientific award of my life. My first thoughts and deep gratitude are with the people who have contributed to me being here today, from my PhD mentors, Pierre Berge and Pierre Pério, later Jacques Labeyrie, my colleagues and students and last, but not least, the members of the Committee on Education of EGU, with whom I have shared over 10 years of a wonderful educational activity. In this presentation, among the various scientific arguments in which I have been involved, I will recall only those mentioned in my letter of nomination to the Holmes Medal, trying to replace them in what was known at the time. After a PhD in Solid State Physics, working in a laboratory of the Commissariat à l'Énergie Atomique, I obtained a post doctoral research position for the the study of liquid binary critical fluids, and worked on this topics for 5 years. I then joined the Centre des Faibles Radioactivités, a CNRS-CEA Institute dedicated to the study of geological-environmental phenomena. My first task there has been to develop a paleomagnetic laboratory, dedicated to the study of Earth Sciences, through the study of the magnetic properties of sediments and igneous rocks. From there on, my entire scientific activity has been devoted to the study of our "Magnetic Planet". My first project in Geophysics dealt with the geodynamical evolution of the Aegean Arc. At the time, only a few paleomagnetic studies existed in the Mediterranean realm, and none in the Aegean region. Moreover all of them dealt with rather old geological formations, so that almost nothing was known about the recent post-cretaceous evolution. The originality of our study was to start from the most recent to the older formations, in order to precisely describe "retro-tectonically" the different phases of rotational deformation. This intensive study (over 700 sampling sites, over 10,000 samples spread over continental Greece, the Aegean

  1. Our Magnetic Planet (Arthur Holmes Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laj, Carlo

    2015-04-01

    It is a great honour to receive the Arthur Holmes Medal, certainly the highest scientific award of my life. My first thoughts and deep gratitude are with the people who have contributed to me being here today, from my PhD mentors, Pierre Berge and Pierre Pério, later Jacques Labeyrie, my colleagues and students and last, but not least, the members of the Committee on Education of EGU, with whom I have shared over 10 years of a wonderful educational activity. In this presentation, among the various scientific arguments in which I have been involved, I will recall only those mentioned in my letter of nomination to the Holmes Medal, trying to replace them in what was known at the time. After a PhD in Solid State Physics, working in a laboratory of the Commissariat à l'Énergie Atomique, I obtained a post doctoral research position for the the study of liquid binary critical fluids, and worked on this topics for 5 years. I then joined the Centre des Faibles Radioactivités, a CNRS-CEA Institute dedicated to the study of geological-environmental phenomena. My first task there has been to develop a paleomagnetic laboratory, dedicated to the study of Earth Sciences, through the study of the magnetic properties of sediments and igneous rocks. From there on, my entire scientific activity has been devoted to the study of our "Magnetic Planet". My first project in Geophysics dealt with the geodynamical evolution of the Aegean Arc. At the time, only a few paleomagnetic studies existed in the Mediterranean realm, and none in the Aegean region. Moreover all of them dealt with rather old geological formations, so that almost nothing was known about the recent post-cretaceous evolution. The originality of our study was to start from the most recent to the older formations, in order to precisely describe "retro-tectonically" the different phases of rotational deformation. This intensive study (over 700 sampling sites, over 10,000 samples spread over continental Greece, the Aegean

  2. SMILE transmission line adder for RADLAC II

    SciTech Connect

    Mazarakis, M.G.; Poukey, J.W.; Shope, S.L.; Frost, C.A.; Turman, B.N.; Ramirez, J.J.; Prestwich, K.R.; Pankuch, P.J.

    1991-12-31

    SMILE is a coaxial Self Magnetically Insulated Transmission Line voltage adder. It replaces the original beam line of the RADLAC II accelerator by a 12.5 m long cathode electrode. The anode electrode remains practically the same, consisting of the original eight insulating stacks or feeds which are connected with equal diameter stainless steel cylinders. The beam is produced at the end of the accelerator and is free of all the possible instabilities associated with accelerating gaps and magnetic vacuum transport. Annular beams with {beta}{perpendicular} {le} 0.1 and radius r{sub b} {le} 1 cm were routinely obtained and extracted from a small magnetically-immersed foilless electron diode. Results of the experimental evaluation are presented and compared with design parameters and numerical simulation predictions. 4 refs.

  3. SMILE transmission line adder for RADLAC II

    SciTech Connect

    Mazarakis, M.G.; Poukey, J.W.; Shope, S.L.; Frost, C.A.; Turman, B.N.; Ramirez, J.J.; Prestwich, K.R. ); Pankuch, P.J. . Special Projects)

    1991-01-01

    SMILE is a coaxial Self Magnetically Insulated Transmission Line voltage adder. It replaces the original beam line of the RADLAC II accelerator by a 12.5 m long cathode electrode. The anode electrode remains practically the same, consisting of the original eight insulating stacks or feeds which are connected with equal diameter stainless steel cylinders. The beam is produced at the end of the accelerator and is free of all the possible instabilities associated with accelerating gaps and magnetic vacuum transport. Annular beams with {beta}{perpendicular} {le} 0.1 and radius r{sub b} {le} 1 cm were routinely obtained and extracted from a small magnetically-immersed foilless electron diode. Results of the experimental evaluation are presented and compared with design parameters and numerical simulation predictions. 4 refs.

  4. Blocking Mimicry Makes True and False Smiles Look the Same

    PubMed Central

    Rychlowska, Magdalena; Cañadas, Elena; Wood, Adrienne; Krumhuber, Eva G.; Fischer, Agneta; Niedenthal, Paula M.

    2014-01-01

    Recent research suggests that facial mimicry underlies accurate interpretation of subtle facial expressions. In three experiments, we manipulated mimicry and tested its role in judgments of the genuineness of true and false smiles. Experiment 1 used facial EMG to show that a new mouthguard technique for blocking mimicry modifies both the amount and the time course of facial reactions. In Experiments 2 and 3, participants rated true and false smiles either while wearing mouthguards or when allowed to freely mimic the smiles with or without additional distraction, namely holding a squeeze ball or wearing a finger-cuff heart rate monitor. Results showed that blocking mimicry compromised the decoding of true and false smiles such that they were judged as equally genuine. Together the experiments highlight the role of facial mimicry in judging subtle meanings of facial expressions. PMID:24670316

  5. Rapid porcelain veneers: smile design, preparation, and cementation.

    PubMed

    Javaheri, D S

    2001-11-01

    A technique for replacing existing porcelain veneers has been presented. Technique for smile design, tooth preparation, and cementation were described. The objective was to meet the patient's aesthetic expectations while also meeting functional requirements.

  6. Blocking mimicry makes true and false smiles look the same.

    PubMed

    Rychlowska, Magdalena; Cañadas, Elena; Wood, Adrienne; Krumhuber, Eva G; Fischer, Agneta; Niedenthal, Paula M

    2014-01-01

    Recent research suggests that facial mimicry underlies accurate interpretation of subtle facial expressions. In three experiments, we manipulated mimicry and tested its role in judgments of the genuineness of true and false smiles. Experiment 1 used facial EMG to show that a new mouthguard technique for blocking mimicry modifies both the amount and the time course of facial reactions. In Experiments 2 and 3, participants rated true and false smiles either while wearing mouthguards or when allowed to freely mimic the smiles with or without additional distraction, namely holding a squeeze ball or wearing a finger-cuff heart rate monitor. Results showed that blocking mimicry compromised the decoding of true and false smiles such that they were judged as equally genuine. Together the experiments highlight the role of facial mimicry in judging subtle meanings of facial expressions.

  7. Attributions of guilt and punishment as functions of physical attractiveness and smiling.

    PubMed

    Abel, Millicent H; Watters, Heather

    2005-12-01

    The authors found an interaction between sex of participant and sex of defendant in the leniency bias toward a smiling defendant. Differences occurred for male participants when levying punishment for a smiling male defendant vs. a smiling female defendant and for a smiling male defendant vs. a nonsmiling male defendant, whereas differences did not occur for female participants. The authors found moderating effects of physical attractiveness and smiling between guilt and punishment. The only significant positive relationship between guilt and punishment occurred for the defendant whom participants rated low in physical attractiveness and who was not smiling. When guilty, the smiling and unattractive defendant received less punishment than did the smiling and attractive defendant. The authors discussed complex relationships between physical attractiveness, smiling, guilt, and punishment. PMID:16334514

  8. Beam-smiling in bent-Laue monochromators

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, B.; Dilmanian, F.A.; Wu, X.Y.; Huang, X.; Ivanov, I.; Thomlinson, W.C.

    1997-07-01

    When a wide fan-shaped x-ray beam is diffracted by a bent crystal in the Laue geometry, the profile of the diffracted beam generally does not appear as a straight line, but as a line with its ends curved up or curved down. This effect, referred to as {open_quotes}beam-smiling{close_quotes}, has been a major obstacle in developing bent-Laue crystal monochromators for medical applications of synchrotron x-ray. We modeled a cylindrically bent crystal using the Finite Element Analysis (FEA) method, and we carried out experiments at the National Synchrotron Light Source and Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source. Our studies show that, while beam-smiling exists in most of the crystal{close_quote}s area because of anticlastic bending effects, there is a region parallel to the bending axis of the crystal where the diffracted beam is {open_quotes}smile-free{close_quotes}. By applying asymmetrical bending, this smile-free region can be shifted vertically away from the geometric center of the crystal, as desired. This leads to a novel method of compensating for beam-smiling. We will discuss the method of {open_quotes}differential bending{close_quotes} for smile removal, beam-smiling in the Cauchios and the polychromatic geometry, and the implications of the method on developing single- and double-bent Laue monochromators. The experimental results will be discussed, concentrating on specific beam-smiling observation and removal as applied to the new monochromator of the Multiple Energy Computed Tomography [MECT] project of the Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  9. Minimally invasive cosmetic dentistry: smile reconstruction using direct resin bonding.

    PubMed

    Prieto, Lucia Trazzi; Araujo, Cintia Tereza Pimenta; de Oliveira, Dayane Carvalho Ramos Salles; de Azevedo Vaz, Sergio Lins; D'Arce, Maria Beatriz Freitas; Paulillo, Luis Alexandre Maffei Sartini

    2014-01-01

    Discrepancies in tooth size and shape can interfere with smile harmony. Composite resin can be used to improve the esthetics of the smile at a low cost while offering good clinical performance. This article presents an approach for restoring and correcting functional, anatomic, and esthetic discrepancies with minimal intervention, using composites and a direct adhesive technique. This conservative restorative procedure provided the patient with maximum personal esthetic satisfaction.

  10. The Photoshop Smile Design technique (part 1): digital dental photography.

    PubMed

    McLaren, Edward A; Garber, David A; Figueira, Johan

    2013-01-01

    The proliferation of digital photography and imaging devices is enhancing clinicians' ability to visually document patients' intraoral conditions. By understanding the elements of esthetics and learning how to incorporate technology applications into clinical dentistry, clinicians can predictably plan smile design and communicate anticipated results to patients and ceramists alike. This article discusses camera, lens, and flash selection and setup, and how to execute specific types of images using the Adobe Photoshop Smile Design (PSD) technique.

  11. STS-74 MS Bill McArthur in white room

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    At Launch Pad 39A, STS-74 William S. 'Bill' McArthur Jr. bids farewell to white room closeout crew members before he enters the Space Shuttle Atlantis. Closeout crew members are (from left) Mike Mangione, KSC Lockheed closeout crew lead; Eartha Shoemaker, KSC NASA quality assurance technician; and Chris Meinert, KSC Lockheed mechanical technician. Atlantis is scheduled for liftoff at about 7:30 a.m. EST, Nov. 12.

  12. A Rosenzweig-MacArthur (1963) Criterion for the Chemostat

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yuanji

    2016-01-01

    The Rosenzweig-MacArthur (1963) criterion is a graphical criterion that has been widely used for elucidating the local stability properties of the Gause (1934) type predator-prey systems. It has not been stated whether a similar criterion holds for models with explicit resource dynamics (Kooi et al. (1998)), like the chemostat model. In this paper we use the implicit function theorem and implicit derivatives for proving that a similar graphical criterion holds under chemostat conditions, too. PMID:27517080

  13. A Rosenzweig-MacArthur (1963) Criterion for the Chemostat.

    PubMed

    Lindström, Torsten; Cheng, Yuanji

    2016-01-01

    The Rosenzweig-MacArthur (1963) criterion is a graphical criterion that has been widely used for elucidating the local stability properties of the Gause (1934) type predator-prey systems. It has not been stated whether a similar criterion holds for models with explicit resource dynamics (Kooi et al. (1998)), like the chemostat model. In this paper we use the implicit function theorem and implicit derivatives for proving that a similar graphical criterion holds under chemostat conditions, too.

  14. 9. VIEW SHOWING PEARL WHITFORD (LEFT) AND ARTHUR RAINING BIRD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. VIEW SHOWING PEARL WHITFORD (LEFT) AND ARTHUR RAINING BIRD (RIGHT) HOLDING A FRAMED FLOUR SACK USED BY THE ROCKY BOY'S AGENCY FLOUR MILL. THE SACK SHOWS AN IMAGE OF ROCK BOY, LEADER OF THE CHIPPEWA AND CREE INDIANS IN MONTANA AT THE TIME ROCK BOY'S RESERVATION WAS CREATED BY CONGRESS (PHOTO WAS TAKEN BEHIND THE AGENCY'S SCHOOL). - Rocky Boy's Agency Flour Mill, Rocky Boy, Hill County, MT

  15. Cataract surgery without anaesthesia: two descriptions by Arthur Jacob.

    PubMed

    Haridas, R P

    2009-07-01

    Dr Arthur Jacob (1790-1874), of Dublin, Ireland, was one of the leading ophthalmologists of his time. He was the first to describe the membrane that contains the rods and cones in the eye (membrana Jacobi) and basal cell carcinoma (Jacob's ulcer). He made a curved needle for cataract surgery from a sewing needle (Jacob's needle). Two descriptions of cataract surgery without anaesthesia are presented. PMID:19705632

  16. Scientific requirements and frequency selection for SMILES-2 proposal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manago, Naohiro; Suzuki, Makoto; Ozeki, Hiroyuki

    Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-emission Sounder (SMILES) was the first instrument to use 4K cooled SIS (Superconductor-Insulator-Superconductor) detection system for the observation of the atmosphere in the frequency regions 625 GHz (Bands A and B) and 650 GHz (Band C). It has demonstrated its high sensitivity (System Temperature, Tsys, 250 K) for measuring stratospheric and mesospheric species, O _{3}, HCl, ClO, HO _{2}, HOCl, BrO, and O _{3} isotopes from Oct. 12, 2009 to Apr. 21, 2010. Since SMILES operation has terminated after only 6 months operation due to failure of sub-mm local oscillator (and later 4K cooler system), there exist strong scientific demand to develop successor of SMILES, the SMILES-2, which has optimized and enhanced frequency coverage to observe: (a) BrO and HOCl without interferences of stronger emission lines, (b) N _{2}O, H _{2}O, NO _{2}, and CH _{3}Cl not covered by the SMILES frequency regions, and (c) O _{2} line to measure temperature. This paper discusses possible SMILES-2 band selection considering limited instrument resources (number of SIS mixers and sub-mm local oscillator) and scientific requirements. Temperature can be observed by using O _{2} emission lines. We selected 487.249 GHz, which is highest frequency below SMILES 600 GHz observation, O _{2} line to obtain highest vertical IFOV. There is H _{2}O line at 488.1 GHz. Two spectrometers (FFT spectrometer), one with 4 GHz bandwidth and 1 MHz resolution for retrieval of temperature and other species, and the other with high frequency resolution (<100 kHz) and 1 GHz bandwidth (487-488 GHz) for the retrieval of temperature at higher altitude (>60 km) and line of sight wind velocity (2 m/s precision). In the case of 4K cooling, temperature can be retrieved within 2% up to 100 km. In summary, current SMILES-2 scientific requirements can be achieved by having sub-mm frequency bands listed in Table 1, (1) 487±2 GHz (O _{2}, H _{2}O), (2) 527±2 GHz (BrO, NO _{2}, H _{2

  17. Sex differences in smiling and other photographed traits: a theoretical assessment.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Lee; Das, Shyamal

    2011-05-01

    Many studies have shown that females smile more than males do in social situations. The present study extends this research by examining a large sample of high school yearbook photographs. In addition to assessing the degree of smiling, ratings were obtained of the following traits for each photograph: hair length, hair colour, masculine-feminine appearance and physical attractiveness. Results reconfirmed earlier research showing that females smile more than males do while they are being photographed. Other findings were that smiling was positively correlated with hair length, femininity and physical attractiveness for females but not for males. When a multivariate analysis was performed, none of these traits predicted smiling in males, and only femininity was significant in predicting smiling in females. Although social learning theories of smiling can account for some of these findings, a recently proposed neurohormonal theory seems to best explain why femininity is related to smiling in females but not in males.

  18. 4. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur W. LeBoeuf, Photographer, 1937 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur W. LeBoeuf, Photographer, 1937 DETAIL OF WINDOW BREAKING INTO PEDIMENT. - First Congregational Church, 301 Benefit Street, Providence, Providence County, RI

  19. Gummy smile: clinical parameters useful for diagnosis and therapeutical approach.

    PubMed

    Monaco, Annalisa; Streni, Oriana; Marci, Maria Chiara; Marzo, Giuseppe; Gatto, Roberto; Giannoni, Mario

    2004-01-01

    In the analysis of the characteristics of a pleasant smile, a gummy smile has negative components, which most affect the esthetics of non-verbal communication. For this purpose a proposed classification based upon etiopathogenetic criteria as useful indications for a therapeutical approach is given. The nature of a high smile line can be: dento-gingival, connected to an abnormal dental eruption, which is revealed by a short clinic crown; muscular, caused by an hyperactivity of the elevator muscle of the upper lip; dento-alveolar (skeletal), due to an excessive protuberance or vertical growth of the jawbone (maxillary); lastly, a mixed nature, in the presence of more than one of the above described factors The diagnosis of gummy smile must be precocious and based, with reference to specific parameters, upon a careful analysis of the etiopathogenetic factors and the degree of seriousness of the alteration. A correct treatment plan must contemplate the possibility of an orthognatodontic, orthopedic and/or surgical therapeutic resolution considering the seriousness and complexity of the gums exposures (high smile line) in connection with the age of the subject.

  20. Esthetic Composition of Smile in Individuals with Cleft Lip, Alveolus, and Palate: Visibility of the Periodontium and the Esthetics of Smile

    PubMed Central

    Esper, Luis Augusto; Sbrana, Michyele Cristhiane; Cunha, Mércia Jussara da Silva; Moreira, Guilherme Santos; de Almeida, Ana Lúcia Pompéia Fraga

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate characteristics of smile related to visibility in individuals with cleft lip, alveolus, and palate. Design. Cross-sectional. Setting. HRAC/USP, Brazil. Patients. Individuals with repaired complete unilateral cleft lip and palate (n = 45), aged 15–30 years. Interventions. Frontal facial photographs were obtained in natural and forced smiles (n = 135). Six specialists in periodontics evaluated the photographs as to the smile line, thickness, and curve of the upper lip. Main Outcome Measures. The cleft area was compared with the contralateral region. Results were expressed as percentages and means. The findings were compared between groups of periodontists. Results. Statistically significant relationship was observed in the smile line between examiners and between natural and forced smiles, regardless of the association with the cleft side. The lip was thicker at rest and thinner in the forced smile, as also evaluated by the group not experienced with cleft care. The curve of the upper lip in natural and forced smiles was considered as close to straight by both groups, regardless of the cleft. Conclusion. The smile in individuals with clefts was regarded as average for both cleft and noncleft sides. The thickness was characterized as average to thin, being thinner in forced smile and when analyzed by the group not experienced with cleft care. In the average, the curve of the upper lip was considered as straight. The present study elucidates some characteristics related to the smile in individuals with repaired unilateral cleft lip, alveolus, and palate. PMID:23227326

  1. Re: 'Treatment of gummy smile: Nasal septum dysplasia as etiologic factor and therapeutic target'.

    PubMed

    Polo, Mario

    2015-10-01

    An evaluation and commentary of a recently suggested technique for the correction of gummy smiles is presented. A comparison of long-term stability reported with other surgical techniques, is also performed. From the results reported, use of this technique could offer a treatment option for those affected with excessive gingival display on smiling (gummy smile).

  2. Smile Production in Older Infants: The Importance of a Social Recipient for the Facial Signal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Susan Scanlon; Raag, Tarja

    1989-01-01

    Examined effects of social objects on smile production in 44 infants aged 1 1/2 years. Infants directed most of the smiles produced during nonsocial activity to an attentive social object. Although smiling frequency was lower when the only potential recipient was inattentive, the effect did not appear to be mediated by negative emotion. (RJC)

  3. Social Smiling and Its Components in High-Risk Infant Siblings without Later ASD Symptomatology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, Caitlin McMahon; Ibañez, Lisa V.; Foss-Feig, Jennifer H.; Stone, Wendy L.

    2014-01-01

    Impaired affective expression, including social smiling, is common in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and may represent an early marker for ASD in their infant siblings (Sibs-ASD). Social smiling and its component behaviors (eye contact and non-social smiling) were examined at 15 months in Sibs-ASD who demonstrated later ASD…

  4. Low complexity smile detection technique for mobile devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomaselli, Valeria; Guarnera, Mirko; Marchisio, Claudio Domenico; Moro, Simone

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, we propose a low complexity smile detection technique, able to detect smiles in a variety of light conditions, face positions, image resolutions. The proposed approach firstly detects the faces in the image, then applies almost cost-free mouth detection, extracts features from this region and finally classifies between smiling and nonsmiling stages. In this paper different feature extraction methods and classification techniques are analyzed from both the performance and computational complexity standpoints. The best compromise between performances and complexity is represented by a combined approach which exploits both a shape feature and a texture feature and uses the Mahalanobis distance based classifier. This solution achieves good performances with very low complexity, being suitable for an implementation on mobile devices.

  5. Riding pontic: a tool to keep patients smiling.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Narendra Shriram

    2013-05-01

    All patients expect a beautiful smile at the completion of orthodontic treatment, but some patients show concern regarding their appearance while undergoing treatment. The appearance of a gap from a missing tooth can be a concern, especially if it is in the display zone of a patient's smile. If the treatment plan includes prosthetic replacement of the missing tooth rather then space closure, then space maintenance is also an issue. In an appearance conscious patient use of riding pontic as space maintainers is a good option during treatment. How to cite this article: Sharma NS. Riding Pontic: A Tool to Keep Patients Smiling. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2013;6(2): 127-131.

  6. Riding Pontic: A Tool to Keep Patients Smiling

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Narendra Shriram

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT All patients expect a beautiful smile at the completion of orthodontic treatment, but some patients show concern regarding their appearance while undergoing treatment. The appearance of a gap from a missing tooth can be a concern, especially if it is in the display zone of a patient's smile. If the treatment plan includes prosthetic replacement of the missing tooth rather then space closure, then space maintenance is also an issue. In an appearance conscious patient use of riding pontic as space maintainers is a good option during treatment. How to cite this article: Sharma NS. Riding Pontic: A Tool to Keep Patients Smiling. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2013;6(2): 127-131. PMID:25206207

  7. Symposium 1: The Arthur case--a proposal for legislation.

    PubMed

    Brahams, D; Brahams, M

    1983-03-01

    Following the acquittal of Dr Leonard Arthur in the case of the Down's syndrome infant the co-authors of the first paper in this symposium prepared a draft bill on the treatment of chronically disabled infants which has since been informally commended by the Director of Public Prosecutions. A second contributor, a law student, also argues for legislation as being the most effective way for society to have its standards clarified and observed. In a final paper Dr Havard, Secretary of the British Medical Association, opposes legislation believing it would raise far more problems than it would resolve. The first article was originally published in the Law Society's Gazette. PMID:6220153

  8. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle: the author was an ophthalmologist.

    PubMed

    Ravin, J G; Migdal, C

    1995-01-01

    Sir Arthur Conan Doyle created the famous detective Sherlock Holmes, and his faithful companion, Dr. Watson. A graduate of the University of Edinburgh Medical School, Doyle (1859-1930) spent nearly ten years practicing medicine. During his years in general practice, Doyle gave particular attention to the eye. Later, he studied ophthalmology in Vienna and spent time with the best known ophthalmologist in Paris. He returned to London and established an ophthalmological office near Harley Street. His literary career soon overtook the medical career, but he made many references to medicine, and to ophthalmology in particular in his writings.

  9. Analysis of dynamic smile and upper lip curvature in young Chinese

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Ling-Zhi; Hu, Wen-Jie; Zhang, Yan-Ling; Chung, Kwok-Hung

    2013-01-01

    During smile evaluation and anterior esthetic construction, the anatomic and racial variations should be considered in order to achieve better matching results. The aims of this study were to validate an objective method for recording spontaneous smile process and to categorize the smile and upper lip curvature of Chinese Han-nationality youth. One hundred and eighty-eight Chinese Han-nationality youths (88 males and 100 females) ranged from 20 to 35 years of age were selected. Spontaneous smiles were elicited by watching comical movies and the dynamics of the spontaneous smile were captured continuously with a digital video camera. All subjects' smiles were categorized into three types: commissure, cuspid and gummy smile based on video editing software and final images. Subjects' upper lip curvatures were also measured and divided into three groups: upward, straight and downward. Reliability analysis was conducted to obtain intra-rater reliabilities on twice measurements. The Pearson Chi-square test was used to compare differences for each parameters (α=0.05). In smile classification, 60.6% commissure smile, 33.5% cuspid smile and 5.9% gummy smile were obtained. In upper lip measurement, 26.1% upward, 39.9% straight and 34.0% downward upper lip curvature were determined. The commissure smile group showed statistically significant higher percentage of straight (46.5%) and upward (40.4%) in upper lip curvatures (P<0.05), while cuspid smile group (65.1%) and gummy smile group (72.7%) showed statistically significant higher frequency in downward upper lip curvature (P<0.05). It is evident that differences in upper lip curvature and smile classification exist based on race, when comparing Chinese subjects with those of Caucasian descent, and gender. PMID:23558343

  10. Analysis of dynamic smile and upper lip curvature in young Chinese.

    PubMed

    Liang, Ling-Zhi; Hu, Wen-Jie; Zhang, Yan-Ling; Chung, Kwok-Hung

    2013-03-01

    During smile evaluation and anterior esthetic construction, the anatomic and racial variations should be considered in order to achieve better matching results. The aims of this study were to validate an objective method for recording spontaneous smile process and to categorize the smile and upper lip curvature of Chinese Han-nationality youth. One hundred and eighty-eight Chinese Han-nationality youths (88 males and 100 females) ranged from 20 to 35 years of age were selected. Spontaneous smiles were elicited by watching comical movies and the dynamics of the spontaneous smile were captured continuously with a digital video camera. All subjects' smiles were categorized into three types: commissure, cuspid and gummy smile based on video editing software and final images. Subjects' upper lip curvatures were also measured and divided into three groups: upward, straight and downward. Reliability analysis was conducted to obtain intra-rater reliabilities on twice measurements. The Pearson Chi-square test was used to compare differences for each parameters (α=0.05). In smile classification, 60.6% commissure smile, 33.5% cuspid smile and 5.9% gummy smile were obtained. In upper lip measurement, 26.1% upward, 39.9% straight and 34.0% downward upper lip curvature were determined. The commissure smile group showed statistically significant higher percentage of straight (46.5%) and upward (40.4%) in upper lip curvatures (P<0.05), while cuspid smile group (65.1%) and gummy smile group (72.7%) showed statistically significant higher frequency in downward upper lip curvature (P<0.05). It is evident that differences in upper lip curvature and smile classification exist based on race, when comparing Chinese subjects with those of Caucasian descent, and gender.

  11. Gummy Smile Correction with Diode Laser: Two Case Reports

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Mahesh; Laju, S; Erali, Susil M; Erali, Sunil M; Fathima, Al Zainab; Gopinath, P V

    2015-01-01

    Beautification of smiles is becoming an everyday requirement in dental practice. Apart from teeth, gingiva also plays an important role in smile esthetics. Excessive visualization of gingiva is a common complaint among patients seeking esthetic treatment. A wide variety of procedures are available for correction of excessive gum display based on the cause of the condition. Soft tissue diode laser contouring of gingiva is a common procedure that can be undertaken in a routine dental setting with excellent patient satisfaction and minimal post-operative sequale. Two cases of esthetic crown lengthening with diode laser 810 nm are presented here. PMID:26668491

  12. Human identification through the analysis of smile photographs.

    PubMed

    Silva, Rhonan Ferreira; Franco, Ademir; Souza, João Batista de; Picoli, Fernando Fortes; Mendes, Solon Diego Santos Carvalho; Nunes, Fernando Gomes

    2015-06-01

    The comparison between antemortem and portmortem data comprehends the basis of the dental identification process. High-tech devices allow for optimal manipulation of postmortem data. However, in especial situations, the victims do not have records of dental treatments, making necessary the search for antemortem data from personal belongings. Smile photographs are one of the most common sources of dental information detected from personal belongings. In this context, the present study reports a forensic case in which a charred body was positively identified through the application of 3 techniques for the analysis of smile photographs.

  13. Cooperative treatment planning in creating IPS Empress SMILES.

    PubMed

    Dickerson, W G

    1996-01-01

    With the continued increase in patient expectations for appearance-related restorations, the final result may be deficient in aesthetic qualities, such as color, contour, and shape. This is generally due to a breakdown in communication among the patient, dentist, and laboratory technician with regard to basic smile design principles prior to fabrication of the restoration. With the introduction of advanced porcelain systems (IPS Empress System, Ivoclar Williams, Amherst, NY), the clinician and technician can produce restorations that mimic the optical characteristics and color vitality of natural teeth. This article presents methods to improve communication, effectively evaluate smile design principles, and fabricate aesthetic all-ceramic restorations.

  14. Smile transformations with the use of direct composite restorations.

    PubMed

    Sameni, Abdi

    2013-01-01

    Mutual concerns shared by dentists and patients regarding removal of natural tooth structure affirm the need for non-invasive restorative treatments. Direct composite restorations are among today's conservative treatment modalities. Direct bonding procedures provide patients with an alternative to high biologic risk and expensive indirect porcelain restorations. This article discusses the principles involved in smile design cases, ways to successfully combine different treatment modalities, and materials to achieve outstanding esthetic and functional results. The article also demonstrates the versatility of today's composite materials for direct smile design restorations.

  15. Overview of SMILES Mission and Recent Outcomes from its Observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiotani, Masato; Sano, Takuki; Suzuki, Makoto

    2012-07-01

    The Superconducting Sub-millimeter Limb-emission Sounder (SMILES) was developed in order to operate onboard Japan Experiment Module (JEM) of the International Space Station (ISS). The key concept of SMILES is to obtain high-sensitivity measurements of minor species in the middle atmosphere using a receiver that employs superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) mixers, which are cooled to 4.5 K by a mechanical cryo-cooler. SMILES has observed atmospheric minor constituents related with ozone chemistry, such as O _{3}, HCl, ClO, HO _{2}, HOCl, BrO, with high sensitivity. Especially, O _{3}, HCl and ClO can be detected with altitude up to the mesosphere (around 80km). SMILES was successfully launched by the H-IIB rocket with the H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV) on September 11, 2009, and started atmospheric observations on October 12. Unfortunately, SMILES observations was terminated on April 21, 2010 due to the failure of the sub-millimeter local oscillator. Although a lot of studies for data processing are still continuing. One of the important scientific targets of SMILES mission is to contribute to the knowledge of detailed halogen chemistry which related to ozone destruction by providing useful constraints regarding these issues. One recent topic related to uncertainty in stratospheric chemistry is regarding BrO measurements, which suggest that very short-lived source gases likely also contribute to stratospheric total inorganic bromine (Br _{y}) by about 5 pptv, in addition to long-lived species. A main advantage of the SMILES observation is that it can measure the atmosphere at different local times because of the non-sun-synchronous orbit of the ISS. This is unique in the sense that most satellite observations for the upper atmosphere are usually done using a sun-synchronous orbit. Measurements of diurnal variation of the minor species are expected to provide further insights into middle atmosphere chemistry. In this presentation, we will introduce the

  16. 76 FR 16715 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Raritan River, Arthur Kill and Their Tributaries, Staten Island...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-25

    ... FR 3316). Public Meeting We do not now plan to hold a public meeting. But you may submit a request... Kill and Their Tributaries, Staten Island, NY and Elizabeth, NJ AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION... regulations governing the operation of the Arthur Kill (AK) Railroad Bridge at mile 11.6, across Arthur...

  17. 76 FR 45690 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Raritan River, Arthur Kill and Their Tributaries, Staten Island...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-01

    ... tributaries, in the Federal Register (76 FR 16715). We received one comment in response to the proposed rule... Kill and Their Tributaries, Staten Island, NY and Elizabeth, NJ AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Final... operation of the Arthur Kill (AK) Railroad Bridge at mile 11.6, across Arthur Kill between Staten...

  18. 77 FR 47284 - Safety Zone; Dredge Arthur J, Lake Huron, Lakeport, MI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-08

    .... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Table of Acronyms DHS Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Dredge Arthur J, Lake Huron, Lakeport, MI... from a portion of Lake Huron during the preparation for and salvage operations of the Arthur J....

  19. 77 FR 1023 - Regulated Navigation Area; Arthur Kill, NY and NJ

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-09

    ... Arthur Kill. An earlier TIR added the basic RNA regulation for that waterway: 33 CFR 165.T01-0727 (76 FR... Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Public Meeting We do not now plan to hold a public meeting within the... amending the Regulated Navigation Area (RNA) in the navigable waters of the Arthur Kill in New York and...

  20. It's Elementary: Engaging Students through the Writings of Arthur Conan Doyle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrissey, Ted

    2002-01-01

    Notes that Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's writing allows for a variety of critical thinking activities, extensive use of computer technology, and the involvement of the entire faculty, staff and administration in the learning process. Presents a few activities that teachers can do with their students based on the work of Arthur Conan Doyle. (SG)

  1. Begin at the Beginning: Reflections on the Career of Arthur Cropley

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maslany, George

    2015-01-01

    Arthur Cropley's academic career began in the early 1960s and, more than 50 years later, shows few signs of abating. Over this lengthy period, he has made important contributions not only to creativity research, but to a range of related areas of psychology. Arthur Cropley has also been an influential figure in the careers of several generations…

  2. The Mystery of the European Smile: A Comparison Based on Individual Photographs Provided by Internet Users

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze cross-cultural differences in preference for smiling among the users of one of the most popular instant messaging sites called Windows Live Messenger in terms of facial expression (smiling vs. non-smiling) on the photographs accompanying their profiles. 2,000 photos from 10 countries were rated by two independent judges. Despite the fact that 20 years have passed since the fall of the Berlin Wall, Internet users from a former Soviet bloc appear to smile less often than those from Western Europe. Also, replicating past research, women irrespective of their nationality smiled more than men. PMID:21057574

  3. Let the Avatar Brighten Your Smile: Effects of Enhancing Facial Expressions in Virtual Environments.

    PubMed

    Oh, Soo Youn; Bailenson, Jeremy; Krämer, Nicole; Li, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated the positive effects of smiling on interpersonal outcomes. The present research examined if enhancing one's smile in a virtual environment could lead to a more positive communication experience. In the current study, participants' facial expressions were tracked and mapped on a digital avatar during a real-time dyadic conversation. The avatar's smile was rendered such that it was either a slightly enhanced version or a veridical version of the participant's actual smile. Linguistic analyses using the Linguistic Inquiry Word Count (LIWC) revealed that participants who communicated with each other via avatars that exhibited enhanced smiles used more positive words to describe their interaction experience compared to those who communicated via avatars that displayed smiling behavior reflecting the participants' actual smiles. In addition, self-report measures showed that participants in the 'enhanced smile' condition felt more positive affect after the conversation and experienced stronger social presence compared to the 'normal smile' condition. These results are particularly striking when considering the fact that most participants (>90%) were unable to detect the smiling manipulation. This is the first study to demonstrate the positive effects of transforming unacquainted individuals' actual smiling behavior during a real-time avatar-networked conversation.

  4. Let the Avatar Brighten Your Smile: Effects of Enhancing Facial Expressions in Virtual Environments.

    PubMed

    Oh, Soo Youn; Bailenson, Jeremy; Krämer, Nicole; Li, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated the positive effects of smiling on interpersonal outcomes. The present research examined if enhancing one's smile in a virtual environment could lead to a more positive communication experience. In the current study, participants' facial expressions were tracked and mapped on a digital avatar during a real-time dyadic conversation. The avatar's smile was rendered such that it was either a slightly enhanced version or a veridical version of the participant's actual smile. Linguistic analyses using the Linguistic Inquiry Word Count (LIWC) revealed that participants who communicated with each other via avatars that exhibited enhanced smiles used more positive words to describe their interaction experience compared to those who communicated via avatars that displayed smiling behavior reflecting the participants' actual smiles. In addition, self-report measures showed that participants in the 'enhanced smile' condition felt more positive affect after the conversation and experienced stronger social presence compared to the 'normal smile' condition. These results are particularly striking when considering the fact that most participants (>90%) were unable to detect the smiling manipulation. This is the first study to demonstrate the positive effects of transforming unacquainted individuals' actual smiling behavior during a real-time avatar-networked conversation. PMID:27603784

  5. Social smiling and its components in high-risk infant siblings without later ASD symptomatology.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Caitlin McMahon; Ibañez, Lisa V; Foss-Feig, Jennifer H; Stone, Wendy L

    2014-04-01

    Impaired affective expression, including social smiling, is common in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and may represent an early marker for ASD in their infant siblings (Sibs-ASD). Social smiling and its component behaviors (eye contact and non-social smiling) were examined at 15 months in Sibs-ASD who demonstrated later ASD symptomatology (Sibs-ASD/AS), those who did not (Sibs-ASD/NS), and low-risk controls (Sibs-TD). Both Sibs-ASD subgroups demonstrated lower levels of social smiling than Sibs-TD, suggesting that early social smiling may reflect elevated genetic vulnerability rather than a specific marker for ASD. Only the Sibs-ASD/AS demonstrated less eye contact and non-social smiling than Sibs-TD, suggesting that different processes, threshold effects, or protective factors may underlie social smiling development in the two Sibs-ASD subgroups.

  6. Exploring the Living Planet with David Attenborough.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgess, Jacquelin; Unwin, David

    1984-01-01

    In this interview David Attenborough, the celebrated natural history film maker and writer, talks about his highly successful television series, "The Living Planet." Devoted to the exposition of the world's ecosystems, the film represents a significant example of popular geographic education. (RM)

  7. Reading Pictures: An Interview with David Wiesner

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varga-Dobai, Kinga

    2008-01-01

    Two-time Caldecott Honor winner (Free Fall, Sector 7) and three-time Caldecott Medal winner (Tuesday, The Three Pigs, Flotsam), David Wiesner is regarded as one of the most remarkable creators of visual storytelling living today. Wiesner is well known for his innovative and unique subject matter and his sophisticated painting-like illustrations…

  8. Interview with Dr. David H. Kalsbeek

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sauter, David M.

    2005-01-01

    David H. Kalsbeek currently is vice president for enrollment management at DePaul University in Chicago, Illinois. In that capacity, he leads the marketing and enrollment development strategies for the nation's largest and fastest-growing Catholic university, enrolling 23,000 students in eight colleges and six campuses throughout the greater…

  9. Another Perspective: An Interview with David Smith

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Ruth A.; Johnson, Kelli

    2005-01-01

    To provide another perspective on evaluation within nonformal settings, "New Directions for Evaluation" recently interviewed David Smith, the coordinator of the Professional Learning to Close the Achievement Gap program for the Kansas City, Kansas, Public Schools, who has extensive background in education and educational research. He formerly held…

  10. A Conversation with...David Satcher.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Neil A.

    1996-01-01

    David Satcher began his career as a medical geneticist and was appointed director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in 1993. In this interview, Dr. Satcher talks about the responsibilities of the CDC and explains how a childhood experience inspired his interest in medicine and his continuing commitment to community service.…

  11. David Baines: Rural Doctor, Lecturer, Dancer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisecarver, Charmaine

    1993-01-01

    Discusses the career of David Baines, an American Indian doctor who successfully integrates traditional and modern medicine. Describes problems faced by American Indian doctors, the tremendous amount of work involved in medical training, and problems associated with working in rural areas and trying to straddle two opposing cultures when…

  12. David L. Gutmann (1925-2013).

    PubMed

    Rose, Jon; Huyck, Margaret; Grunes, Jerome

    2014-01-01

    David L. Gutmann, a pioneer in geropsychology and professor emeritus at Northwestern University, died on November 3, 2013, at the age of 88. A student of Bernice Neugarten, Bruno Bettelheim, and Erik Erikson, Gutmann discovered changes in adult psychological development related to parenting styles that held across diverse cultures.

  13. David L. Gutmann (1925-2013).

    PubMed

    Rose, Jon; Huyck, Margaret; Grunes, Jerome

    2014-01-01

    David L. Gutmann, a pioneer in geropsychology and professor emeritus at Northwestern University, died on November 3, 2013, at the age of 88. A student of Bernice Neugarten, Bruno Bettelheim, and Erik Erikson, Gutmann discovered changes in adult psychological development related to parenting styles that held across diverse cultures. PMID:25046720

  14. Family Matters: A Conversation with David Popenoe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iannone, Carol

    2009-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Professor David Popenoe, author of the controversial book "Disturbing the Nest: Family Change and Decline in Modern Societies" (1988). Popenoe heads the National Marriage Project at Rutgers University, where he taught sociology for forty-five years until his recent retirement. Here, Popenoe discusses his…

  15. Speaking Personally--With David Foster

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Journal of Distance Education, 2010

    2010-01-01

    David Foster is the founder of Kryterion, an Internet test administration company, and currently serves there as chief scientist and executive vice president. He is the author of numerous articles for industry trade journals and textbooks and sits on the Council for the International Test Commission. In this interview, Foster talks about his…

  16. David Ben-Gurion: A Creative Leader

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosemarin, Shoshana

    2014-01-01

    David Ben-Gurion (1886-1973), the first Prime Minister of Israel, is included in Pasternak's (2001) list of the nine most memorable leaders of the twentieth century. All of them are remembered for the reforms they initiated. Roosevelt (USA), Stalin (Russia), Castro (Cuba), and Thatcher (England) focused on social-economical changes, whereas…

  17. Astronaut Walter Schirra smiles during post-flight physcial

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    Astronaut Walter M. Schirra Jr. smiles at medical personnel (out of frame) during a post-flight physcial aboard the U.S.S. Kearsage, prime recovery vessel for Mercury-Atlas 8 (MA-8) upon which Schirra served as pilot earlier today.

  18. An overview of SMILE (Solar wind Magnetosphere Ionosphere Link Explorer)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branduardi-Raymont, Graziella; Wang, Chi

    2016-07-01

    SMILE is a novel space mission, currently under development, dedicated to study the dynamic coupling of the solar wind with the Earth's magnetosphere in a global way never attempted so far. From a highly elliptical Earth orbit, SMILE will obtain X-ray images of the magnetosheath and polar cusps simultaneously with UV images of the Northern aurora, while also carrying out in situ solar wind/magnetosheath plasma and magnetic field measurements. For the first time we will be able to trace and link the processes of solar wind injection in the magnetosphere with those acting on the charged particles precipitating into the cusps and eventually the aurora. X-ray imaging of the dayside magnetosheath and cusps has been made possible thanks to the relatively recent discovery of solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) X-ray emission, first observed at comets, and subsequently found to occur in the vicinity of the Earth's magnetosphere. SMILE is the first fully collaborative space mission from inception to implementation and operations between ESA and the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS). This talk will present the science that SMILE will deliver and its impact, and will provide an overview of its payload and of the mission's development.

  19. What Coy Smiles Say about Positive Shyness in Early Infancy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colonnesi, Cristina; Bogels, Susan M.; de Vente, Wieke; Majdandzic, Mirjana

    2013-01-01

    Positive shyness is a universal emotion with the specific social function of regulating our interactions by improving trust and liking, and showing politeness. The present study examined early infant production of coy smiles during social interactions as a measure of positive shy behavior. Eighty 4-month-olds were experimentally observed during…

  20. Gender and Situational Differences in Children's Smiles, Touch, and Proxemics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berman, Phyllis W.; Smith, Vicki L.

    1984-01-01

    Results of study of 256 adolescents and preadolescents randomly assigned to same-sex grade-level pairs in two social situations--a neutral situation and a "male-appropriate" athletic situation-- showed no differences between sexes in overall amount of touching or proxemics, though girls smiled significantly more often than males. (CMG)

  1. Influence of bimaxillary protrusion on the perception of smile esthetics

    PubMed Central

    Almutairi, Terki K.; Albarakati, Sahar F.; Aldrees, Abdullah M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the impact of bimaxillary protrusion on smile esthetics as perceived by dental professionals and laypersons. Methods: One hundred and fifty evaluators, equally distributed into their respective panels (orthodontists, general dentists, and laypersons), participated in this cross-sectional study conducted in April to December 2012 in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The patient sample consisted of 14 female patients divided equally into 2 groups: bimaxillary protrusion patients, and patients who have had 4-premolar extraction treatment. Two standardized photographs (frontal and three-quarter close-up smile views), and a lateral cephalogram were taken for each patient. The evaluators were asked to rate the attractiveness of each photo according to a 100-mm visual analog scale. These esthetic ratings were correlated with the patients’ cephalometric measurements. Results: The bimaxillary protrusion group was rated significantly as less attractive than the treatment group by each evaluator panel. Panel comparison showed that laypeople were less receptive of bimaxillary protrusion than dental professionals. Frontal and three-quarter views of the same smiles were not similarly rated for esthetic perceptions. Correlational analysis revealed that the dentoalveolar measurement with the highest significant negative correlation to the smile esthetics was the upper incisors to palatal plane (U1-PP) angle. Conclusion: Patients with bimaxillary protrusion were found to be less attractive than patients who were treated for the condition. This was especially evident among the laypersons. An increase in the upper incisor inclination, as well as a decrease in the interincisal angle compounds the bimaxillary effect. PMID:25630010

  2. [Smile in self-representation and self-esteem].

    PubMed

    Guth, Élise; Bacon, William

    2010-12-01

    Does the smile play a part in the patient's self-esteem and social well-being? The assessment of the smile is part of the clinical examination and it contributes to the diagnosis. Other criteria besides quantitative or metric ones are considered in this work and make it original. Philosophical, psychological and sociological aspects have been considered to understand the role of the smile in human relationships and self-representation. The quest for beauty is universal but its assessment remains subjective even if attempts at objectivity have been made. Self-esteem is fundamental for the individual's mental and social well-being. A human being has to submit to the rules and customs of his fellow-men if he wants to be part of the society in which he lives. Even if some aesthetic standards cannot be skirted and seem to be universal, the reality of beauty is perverted by social diktats, so is the representation of the smile. It is therefore essential to listen to one's patient before considering his teeth. PMID:21144473

  3. SMILE: A new way to explore solar-terrestrial relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branduardi-Raymont, Graziella; Wang, Chi; Sembay, Steven; Dai, Lei; Li, Lei; Donovan, Eric; Read, Andy; Spanswick, Emma; Sibeck, David; Escoubet, Philippe; Rebuffat, Denis; Raab, Walfried; Zheng, Jianhua

    2016-10-01

    SMILE (Solar wind Magnetosphere Ionosphere Link Explorer) will investigate the dynamic response of the Earth's magnetosphere to the impact of the solar wind in a unique and global manner, never attempted before. From a highly elliptical Earth orbit, SMILE will combine soft X-ray imaging of the Earth's magnetic boundaries and polar cusps with simultaneous UV imaging of the Northern aurora, while self-sufficiently measuring solar wind/magnetosheath plasma and magnetic field conditions in situ. X-ray imaging of the dayside magnetosheath and cusps is an innovative technique made possible by the relatively recent discovery of solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) X-ray emission, first observed at comets, and subsequently found to occur in the vicinity of the Earth's magnetosphere.For the first time we will be able to trace and link the processes of solar wind injection in the magnetosphere with those acting on the charged particles precipitating into the cusps and eventually the aurora. While the basic theory of magnetospheric circulation is well known and the microscale has been explored by many in situ measurements, the reality of how this complex interaction takes place on a global scale, and how it evolves, is still not understood. SMILE will answer questions such as: What are the fundamental modes of the dayside solar wind/magnetosphere interaction and the large-scale structure of the interaction region? What defines the substorm cycle? How do CME-driven storms arise and how do they relate to substorms?SMILE is a joint space mission between ESA and the Chinese Academy of Sciences. This presentation will cover the science that will be delivered by SMILE and its impact on our understanding of the way the solar wind interacts with the Earth's environment, and will give an overview of its payload and of the mission's development.

  4. Dr. Arthur Conan Doyle and the case of congenital syphilis.

    PubMed

    Silverstein, Arthur M; Ruggere, Christine

    2006-01-01

    In 1894, Dr. Arthur Conan Doyle wrote "The Third Generation," a short story involving the transmission of congenital syphilis from generation to generation. Analysts of his writings have interpreted the pathogenetic mechanism involved in modern terms: infection of mother by father and then transplacental infection of the fetus. However, a review of the contemporary literature and the history of the concepts of congenital and "hereditary" syphilis demonstrates that the late 19th-century understanding of the process involved a Lamarckian transmission of paternal infection, via the sperm at the moment of conception. It was undoubtedly this concept that Doyle learned in medical school in the late 1870s and that provided the background to his story.

  5. 76 FR 12971 - David E. Berman: Debarment Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-09

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration David E. Berman: Debarment Order AGENCY: Food and Drug... the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the FD&C Act) debarring David E. Berman, MD, for 3 years... 1410.35), finds that David E. Berman has been convicted of a misdemeanor under Federal law for...

  6. Interface between astrophysical datasets and distributed database management systems (DAVID)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iyengar, S. S.

    1988-01-01

    This is a status report on the progress of the DAVID (Distributed Access View Integrated Database Management System) project being carried out at Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana. The objective is to implement an interface between Astrophysical datasets and DAVID. Discussed are design details and implementation specifics between DAVID and astrophysical datasets.

  7. 77 FR 26765 - David H.M. Phelps: Debarment Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration David H.M. Phelps: Debarment Order AGENCY: Food and Drug... under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FD&C Act) debarring David H.M. Phelps for a period of 20... Manual Guide 1410.35), finds that Mr. David H.M. Phelps has been convicted of 10 felony counts...

  8. Smiles as signals of lower status in football players and fashion models: evidence that smiles are associated with lower dominance and lower prestige.

    PubMed

    Ketelaar, Timothy; Koenig, Bryan L; Gambacorta, Daniel; Dolgov, Igor; Hor, Daniel; Zarzosa, Jennifer; Luna-Nevarez, Cuauhtémoc; Klungle, Micki; Wells, Lee

    2012-01-01

    Across four studies, the current paper demonstrates that smiles are associated with lower social status. Moreover, the association between smiles and lower status appears in the psychology of observers and generalizes across two forms of status: prestige and dominance. In the first study, faces of fashion models representing less prestigious apparel brands were found to be more similar to a canonical smile display than the faces of models representing more prestigious apparel brands. In a second study, after being experimentally primed with either high or low prestige fashion narratives, participants in the low prestige condition were more likely to perceive smiles in a series of photographs depicting smiling and non-smiling faces. A third study of football player photographs revealed that the faces of less dominant (smaller) football players were more similar to the canonical smile display than the faces of their physically larger counterparts. Using the same football player photographs, a fourth study found that smiling was a more reliable indicator of perceived status-relevant personality traits than perceptions of the football players' physical sizes inferred from the photographs. PMID:22947668

  9. David Alan Walker (1928-2012).

    PubMed

    Edwards, Gerald E; Heber, Ulrich

    2012-06-01

    David Alan Walker, Emeritus Professor of Biology, University of Sheffield, UK and Fellow of the Royal Society, died on February 13, 2012. David had a marvelous 60 year career as a scientist, during which he was a researcher, mentor, valued colleague, and a prolific writer in the field of photosynthesis. His career was marked by creative breakthroughs in isolation and analysis of chloroplast metabolism in vitro and simple but valuable technical advances for measurement of photosynthesis in vivo that remain relevant on a global scale to production of crops and biofuels, as well as plant responses to climate change. We include here personal remembrances by the authors (GEE and UH), and by (in alphabetical order): Zoran Cerovic (France), Bob Furbank (Australia), Geoffrey Hind (USA), John Humby (UK), Agu Laisk (Estonia), Peter Lea (UK), Ross Lilley (Australia), Barry Osmond (Australia), Simon Robinson (Australia) and Charles Stirling (UK). PMID:22638915

  10. What Lies Beneath? Minority Group Members' Suspicion of Whites' Egalitarian Motivation Predicts Responses to Whites' Smiles.

    PubMed

    Kunstman, Jonathan W; Tuscherer, Taylor; Trawalter, Sophie; Lloyd, E Paige

    2016-09-01

    Antiprejudice norms and attempts to conceal racial bias have made Whites' positive treatment of racial minorities attributionally ambiguous. Although some minorities believe Whites' positivity is genuine, others are suspicious of Whites' motives and believe their kindness is primarily motivated by desires to avoid appearing prejudiced. For those suspicious of Whites' motives, Whites' smiles may paradoxically function as threat cues. To the extent that Whites' smiles cue threat among suspicious minorities, we hypothesized that suspicious minorities would explicitly perceive Whites' smiles as threatening (Study 1), automatically orient to smiling White-as opposed to smiling Black-targets (Study 2), and accurately discriminate between Whites' real and fake smiles (Study 3). These results provide convergent evidence that cues typically associated with acceptance and affiliation ironically function as threat cues among suspicious racial minorities. PMID:27340154

  11. Recognition of Posed and Spontaneous Dynamic Smiles in Younger and Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Nora A.; Lehrfeld, Jonathan M.; Isaacowitz, Derek M.

    2010-01-01

    In two studies, we investigated age effects in the ability to recognize dynamic posed and spontaneous smiles. Study 1 found that both younger and older adult participants were above-chance in their ability to distinguish between posed and spontaneous younger adult smiles. Study 2 found that younger adult participant performance declined when judging a combination of both younger and older adult target smiles, while older adult participants outperformed younger adult participants in distinguishing between posed and spontaneous smiles. A synthesis of results across the two studies showed a small-to-medium age effect (d = −0.40) suggesting an older adult advantage when discriminating between smile types. Mixed stimuli (i.e., a mixture of younger and older adult faces) may impact accurate smile discrimination. Future research should investigate both the sources (cues, etc.) and behavioral effects of age-related differences in the discrimination of positive expressions. PMID:20718538

  12. Structural Seismic Risk at David City, Panama

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camacho, E.; Battlo, J.; Novelo-Casanova, D. A.; Tapia, A.; Lindhom, C.

    2007-12-01

    At the southwest margin of the Isthmus of Panama, the Cocos, Nazca and Panama Microplate join in a triple junction. In this tectonic setting, the Panama Fracture Zone (PFZ) which bounds the Nazca and Cocos plate, subducts in an oblique and shallow manner. This zone is one of the most active seismic areas of Central America. On July 18, 1934, the largest earthquake in Panama in historical times (Ms= 7.7) occurred in its northern region. This event caused extensive damage to towns located in the border of Panama and Costa Rica and during the two subsequent days, six aftershocks with magnitude greater than 6.0 were recorded. David City, with 130,000 inhabitants is the most important urban center in southwestern Panama and lies at the northern end of the PFZ. This city was impacted by the strong destructive earthquakes (Ms>7.0) that took place in 1879 and 1934, both with epicenters located on the northern terminus of the PFZ. In this work, we collected and digitized historical seismograms to measure the centroid moment tensor (CMT) from the main 1934 earthquake. Additionally, we gathered new macroseismic information to create improved and more complete isoseismals maps of the 1879 and 1934 events. We determined the probabilistic seismic hazard for David City using records of historical and recent seismicity and the characteristics of local faults. The hazard computation results are presented as peak iso-acceleration curves for rock/hard soil for a recurrence time of 500 years. An elastic response spectrum was obtained with a uniform exceedance probability of 10% in 50 years with one degree of freedom and 5% of damping. Our results indicate maximum peak ground acceleration (PGA) in downtown David of 3.8 and 4.5 m/s2 with a probability annual exceedance of 0.002 and 0.001, respectively. Structural vulnerability was determined analyzing the quality and construction design of housing, buildings, and critical facilities as well as the type of soil where these structures

  13. SMILE user's guide: a macro preprocessor for extending FORTRAN

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, L.H.

    1984-06-01

    SMILE is a precompiler that translates programs from a macro language into FORTRAN. It is available on the VAX-11 VMS (Virtual Memory System), the Cray-1 CTSS (Cray Time-Sharing System), and the CDC 7600 LTSS (Livermore Time-Sharing System). SMILE has supported and will continue to support the major FORTRAN compilers in use at Los Alamos. A macro library file may contain command predefinitions for a family of programs or a program being worked on by a number of coders. A selective compilation feature allows the selection of the appropriate code for each supported compiler. Rather efficient code for all systems results from an optional cleanup feature. Additional language features include multiple statements, symbolic labels, and byte support.

  14. SMILE: Orbital analysis and Schwarzschild modeling of triaxial stellar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasiliev, Eugene

    2013-08-01

    SMILE is interactive software for studying a variety of 2D and 3D models, including arbitrary potentials represented by a basis-set expansion, a spherical-harmonic expansion with coefficients being smooth functions of radius (splines), or a set of fixed point masses. Its main features include: orbit integration in various 2d and 3d potentials (including N-body and basis-set representations of an arbitrary potential);methods for analysis of orbital class, fundamental frequencies, regular or chaotic nature of an orbit, computation of Lyapunov exponents;Poincaré sections (in 2d) and frequency maps (in 3d) for analyzing orbital structure of potential;construction of self-consistent Schwarzschild models; andconvenient visualization and integrated GUI environment, and a console scriptable version.SMILE is portable to different platforms including MS Windows, Linux and Mac.

  15. French Crossings: III. The Smile of the Tiger

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Colin

    2016-01-01

    This article continues the theme of ‘French Crossings’ explored in other Presidential Addresses by focussing on the border zone between the human and the animal. The focus is on the allegedly tiger-like character attributed to Maimilien Robespierre, particularly after his fall from power and his execution in 1794. This theme is explored in terms of Thermidorian propaganda, French Revolutionary historiography and the ancient discipline of physiognomy, which was reactivated by Johann-Caspar Lavater in the late eighteenth century and still influential through much of the nineteenth. Robespierre’s animal rather than human status was also held to emerge in his inability to smile or laugh, a significant point also in that the meaning of the smile was changing in the same period. PMID:27630376

  16. French Crossings: III. The Smile of the Tiger

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Colin

    2016-01-01

    This article continues the theme of ‘French Crossings’ explored in other Presidential Addresses by focussing on the border zone between the human and the animal. The focus is on the allegedly tiger-like character attributed to Maimilien Robespierre, particularly after his fall from power and his execution in 1794. This theme is explored in terms of Thermidorian propaganda, French Revolutionary historiography and the ancient discipline of physiognomy, which was reactivated by Johann-Caspar Lavater in the late eighteenth century and still influential through much of the nineteenth. Robespierre’s animal rather than human status was also held to emerge in his inability to smile or laugh, a significant point also in that the meaning of the smile was changing in the same period.

  17. The observation capabilities of JEM/SMILES experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasai, Y. J.; Ochiai, S.; Baron, P.; Takahashi, C.; Mendrok, J.; Urban, J.; Mission Tean, J.

    2006-12-01

    A new generation of sub-millimeter-wave receivers employing sensitive SIS (Superconductor-Insulator- Superconductor) detector technology will provide new opportunities for precise remote sensing measurements of the stratospheric minor constituents. We have estimated the observation capabilities of the SIS instruments, namely JEM/SMILES (Japanese Experiment Module / Sub-Millimeter Limb Emission Sounder), currently planned for launch to International Space Station in 2008. JEM/SMILES will allow to observe the atmospheric species such as O3, H^{35}Cl, H37Cl, ClO, BrO, HOCl, HO2, and HNO3, CH_3CN, and Ozone isotope species with the precisions in a few to several tens percents. The target altitude region is form the upper troposphere to the mesosphere. This new technology may allow us to shade new light the open issue in atmospheric science.

  18. The SMILES observations of mesospheric ozone during the solar eclipse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imai, Koji; Shiotani, Masato; Suzuki, Makoto; Akiyoshi, Hideharu; Ebisawa, Ken; Takahashi, Kenshi; Yamashita, Yousuke; Imamura, Takashi

    Solar eclipse temporally reduces the amount of solar radiation, providing an opportunity to verify the mesospheric ozone photochemistry under a changing solar radiation. During the annular solar eclipse occurred on 15 January 2010, Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) successfully observed the temporal changes in ozone concentration between at 52 and 76 km. Analysis of the data with an atmospheric chemistry box model showed that, (i) the lower the altitude is, the closer to the normal nighttime average the concentration near the maximum eclipse obscuration becomes, and (ii) even if there were the SMILES observation points under similar degrees of obscuration, the concentrations measured at an altitude differed between the sunlight increasing and decreasing phases.

  19. SMILES observations of mesospheric ozone during the solar eclipse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imai, Koji; Imamura, Takashi; Takahashi, Kenshi; Akiyoshi, Hideharu; Yamashita, Yousuke; Suzuki, Makoto; Ebisawa, Ken; Shiotani, Masato

    2015-05-01

    The Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) successfully observed vertical distributions of ozone (O3) concentration in the middle atmosphere during the annular solar eclipse that occurred on 15 January 2010. In the mesosphere, where the photochemical lifetime of O3 is relatively short (approximately 100 s), altitude-dependent changes in O3 concentration under reduced solar radiation and their temporal variations were clearly observed as a function of the eclipse obscuration. This study reports the vertical distributions of mesospheric O3 during a solar eclipse event and analyzes theoretically the eclipse-induced changes. We show that simple analytical expressions for O3 concentration, which assume that O3 and O are in a photochemically steady state, can be used to describe the O3 concentration under reduced solar radiation. The SMILES data obtained during the eclipse provide a unique opportunity to test our current understanding of mesospheric O3 photochemistry.

  20. 16. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur W. LeBoeuf, Photographer, 1937 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur W. LeBoeuf, Photographer, 1937 FIREPLACE SET WITH BIBLICAL TILES, NORTHEAST ROOM. - Nichols-Wanton-Hunter House, 54 Washington Street, Newport, Newport County, RI

  1. Let the Avatar Brighten Your Smile: Effects of Enhancing Facial Expressions in Virtual Environments

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Soo Youn; Bailenson, Jeremy; Krämer, Nicole; Li, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated the positive effects of smiling on interpersonal outcomes. The present research examined if enhancing one’s smile in a virtual environment could lead to a more positive communication experience. In the current study, participants’ facial expressions were tracked and mapped on a digital avatar during a real-time dyadic conversation. The avatar’s smile was rendered such that it was either a slightly enhanced version or a veridical version of the participant’s actual smile. Linguistic analyses using the Linguistic Inquiry Word Count (LIWC) revealed that participants who communicated with each other via avatars that exhibited enhanced smiles used more positive words to describe their interaction experience compared to those who communicated via avatars that displayed smiling behavior reflecting the participants’ actual smiles. In addition, self-report measures showed that participants in the ‘enhanced smile’ condition felt more positive affect after the conversation and experienced stronger social presence compared to the ‘normal smile’ condition. These results are particularly striking when considering the fact that most participants (>90%) were unable to detect the smiling manipulation. This is the first study to demonstrate the positive effects of transforming unacquainted individuals’ actual smiling behavior during a real-time avatar-networked conversation. PMID:27603784

  2. Upper canine inclination influences the aesthetics of a smile.

    PubMed

    Bothung, C; Fischer, K; Schiffer, H; Springer, I; Wolfart, S

    2015-02-01

    This current study investigated which angle of canine inclination (angle between canine tooth axis (CA-line) and the line between the lateral canthus and the ipsilateral labial angle (EM-line)) is perceived to be most attractive in a smile. The second objective was to determine whether laymen and dental experts share the same opinion. A Q-sort assessment was performed with 48 posed smile photographs to obtain two models of neutral facial attractiveness. Two sets of images (1 male model set, 1 female model set), each containing seven images with incrementally altered canine and posterior teeth inclinations, were generated. The images were ranked for attractiveness by three groups (61 laymen, 59 orthodontists, 60 dentists). The images with 0° inclination, that is CA-line (maxillary canine axis) parallel to EM-line (the line formed by the lateral canthus and the ipsilateral corner of the mouth) (male model set: 54·4%; female model set: 38·9%), or -5° (inward) inclination (male model set: 20%; female model set: 29·4%) were perceived to be most attractive within each set. Images showing inward canine inclinations were regarded to be more attractive than those with outward inclinations. Dental experts and laymen were in accordance with the aesthetics. Smiles were perceived to be most attractive when the upper canine tooth axis was parallel to the EM-line. In reconstructive or orthodontic therapy, it is thus important to incline canines more inwardly than outwardly.

  3. VSLS Bry estimation from SMILES BrO observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Makoto; Shiotani, Masato; Mitsuda, Chihiro; Manago, Naohiro; Kinnison, Douglas; Imai, Koji; Ozeki, Hiroyuki

    Very Short Lived Source (VSLS) gases of Bry have been investigated, since it affects the chemistry of the stratosphere such as the long term recovery of the Ozone layer. VSLS Bry can be estimated from the difference of observed and model BrO value and the Bry/BrO calculated by the model. But previous VSLS Bry estimation spread over 4-8 ppt, due to the large uncertainty of the BrO observation. In this paper, we will report the SMILES (Superconducting Submillimeter-wave Limb Emission Sounder) BrO observation, and VSLS Bry estimation using SMILES L2 and Specified Dynamics WACCM Model (nudged to GEOS-5 data) calculation. SMILES operated on the ISS from Oct. 12, 2009 to Apr. 21, 2010. Since the detector (Superconductor-Insulator-Superconductor: SIS mixer) was cooled down to 4K, SMILES showed system noise figure, Tsys 250K, or spectral noise floor 0.4K, which gave one order better signal to noise ratio compared to previous sub-mm observations from space (Aura/MLS and Odin/SMR). SMILES VSLS Bry estimate (mean of 34 and 37 km) are about 4 pptv for Band A  (625 GHz), and about 5 pptv for Band C (650 GHz) for 10° latitude bins. Estimates become slightly lower in 30S-20S and 20S-10S, but are agreed within 4.63 5.27 pptv at 10S-50N at 34 km. VSLS Bry using v2.3 Band C BrO at 34 km as following, 30S-20S (3.26±0.66 pptv), 20S-10S (3.77±0.88), 10S-EQ (4.63±0.83), EQ-10N (4.67±0.58 ppt), 10N-20N (4.99±0.54), 20N-30N (5.27±0.59), 30N-40N (4.87±0.67). and 40N-50N (4.91±0.70).

  4. Flood geomorphology of Arthurs Rock Gulch, Colorado: paleoflood history

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waythomas, C.F.; Jarrett, R.D.

    1994-01-01

    Episodic late Quaternary flooding is recorded by bouldery deposits and slackwater sediments along Arthurs Rock Gulch, an ephemeral stream west of Fort Collins, Colorado. Flood deposits consist of individual granodiorite and pegmatite boulders, boulder bars, and coarse overbank sediment that rest on erosional terrace segments along the channel. We identified evidence for at least five flood in the lower two thirds of the 1.84 km2 drainage basin. Flood deposits are differentiated by their position above the active channel, weathering characteristics, degree of boulder burial by colluvium, amount of lichen cover, and position with respect to terrace and colluvial deposits. Age estimates for the flood deposits are based on radiocarbon dating, tree-ring analyses, and relative-age criteria from four sites in the basin. At least two floods occurred in the last 300 years; a third flood is at least 5000 years old, but likely younger than 10,000 yr BP; and the two oldest floods occurred at least 40,000 years BP. ?? 1994.

  5. Arthur Rainsford Mowlem (1902-1986), plastic surgeon.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Richard W

    2013-08-01

    Arthur Rainsford Mowlem, the junior of the 'big four' plastic surgeons, with Harold Delf Gillies, Thomas Pomfret Kilner and Archibald Hector McIndoe, came to prominence managing casualties of the Second World War. Rainsford Mowlem's ancestor was John Mowlem, the creator of the construction firm. Rainsford worked his passage to the United Kingdom from New Zealand in 1927 and did not return to New Zealand but retired at the age of 60 to enjoy 23 more years in Spain. He was the driving force between 1934 and 1939 at the Plastic Surgery Unit at St James's Hospital, Balham, and instigated the North London Plastic Surgery Unit at Hill End, St Albans, from 1939 to 1953 and subsequently developed the Unit after moving to Mount Vernon Hospital, Northwood, Middlesex. After successfully hosting the International Meeting of Plastic Surgeons in London in 1959, he received recognition and honours in America but soon afterwards he surprised colleagues by retiring in 1962. Despite his significant contributions, he did not receive national honours but his life outside surgery was active including Trusteeship of the Mowlem Estate at Swanage in Dorset for 40 years.

  6. [Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Sherlock Holmes and infectious diseases].

    PubMed

    Ledermann D, Walter

    2010-10-01

    Besides a pleasant author of best sellers, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle was a medical doctor, writing excellent short stories about the exercise of his profession in England. However, even he mentions The British Medical Journal and The Lancet in the Sherlock Holmes's stories, when in the plot introduces infectious diseases, Conan Doyle ignores important discoveries in the field of tetanus. Anyway, the appearing of infectious diseases in the adventures of the detective are rare: one mention of tetanus, another of leprosy and- the most analyzed in medical literature a case of murder by inoculation of bacteria, probably the agent of melioidosis. Also he makes his hero discovers the toxic actions of a medusa and a transplant of solid organ. Little for a physician and less for an author who also wrote science fiction: it seems that the history of the great medical discoveries at the end of nineteenth century and beginning of the twentieth has passed by his side.., and he just couldn't see it.

  7. America's foremost early astronomer. [David Rittenhouse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubincam, David Parry; Rubincam, Milton, II

    1995-01-01

    The life of 18th century astronomer, craftsman, and partriot David Rittenhouse is detailed. As a craftsman, he distinguished himself as one of the foremost builders of clocks. He also built magnetic compasses and surveying instruments. The finest examples of his craftsmanship are considered two orreries, mechanical solar systems. In terms of astronomical observations, his best-known contribution was his observation of the transit of Venus in 1769. Rittenhouse constructed the first diffraction grating. Working as Treasurer of Pennsylvania throughout the Revolution, he became the first director of the Mint in 1792. Astronomical observations in later life included charting the position of Uranus after its discovery.

  8. Positive Feeling, Negative Meaning: Visualizing the Mental Representations of In-Group and Out-Group Smiles

    PubMed Central

    Dotsch, Ron; Wentura, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Even though smiles are seen as universal facial expressions, research shows that there exist various kinds of smiles (i.e., affiliative smiles, dominant smiles). Accordingly, we suggest that there also exist various mental representations of smiles. Which representation is employed in cognition may depend on social factors, such as the smiling person’s group membership: Since in-group members are typically seen as more benevolent than out-group members, in-group smiles should be associated with more benevolent social meaning than those conveyed by out-group members. We visualized in-group and out-group smiles with reverse correlation image classification. These visualizations indicated that mental representations of in-group smiles indeed express more benevolent social meaning than those of out-group smiles. The affective meaning of these visualized smiles was not influenced by group membership. Importantly, the effect occurred even though participants were not instructed to attend to the nature of the smile, pointing to an automatic association between group membership and intention. PMID:26963621

  9. Relationship between Hyperactivity of Depressor Septi Nasi Muscle and Changes of Alar Base and Flaring during Smile

    PubMed Central

    Beiraghi-Toosi, Arash; Rezaei, Ezatollah; Zanjani, Elham

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Hyperactivity of depressor septi nasi muscle leads to smiling deformity and nasal tip depression. Lateral fascicles of this muscle help in widening the nostrils. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between the nasal length changes and the alar base and the alar flaring changes during smile. METHODS Standard photographs are performed in the face and lateral views with forward gaze in the repose and maximum smile. Nasal length, alar base, and alar flaring were measured on the prints of the photographs. To decrease possible errors in the size of the printed photographs, middle face height from glabella to ANS was measured in the lateral view and the interpupil distance in the face view to standardize the measurements. RESULTS Fifty cases were enrolled in this study. In 39 cases (78%), the nasal length was increased during smile. Forty-six cases (92%) had an increase in alar base diameter during smile. Alar flaring during smile increased in 48 cases (96%). Nasal length and alar base changes during smiling were not significantly correlated. Nasal length and alar flaring changes during smiling were not significantly related too. On the other hand, alar base and alar flaring changes during smile showed correlation. Alar base and alar flaring changes during smile were not significantly different in hyperactive and non-hyperactive cases. CONCLUSION Nasal length change during smiling and hypertrophy of the medial fascicles of depressor septi nasi were not related to alar base or alar flaring change during smile. PMID:27308240

  10. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey, David Aronow, Photographer circa 1924, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey, David Aronow, Photographer circa 1924, DETAIL OF FRONT ELEVATION SHOWING PROJECTING VERANDA. - Laurelton Hall, Laurel Hollow & Ridge Roads, Oyster Bay, Nassau County, NY

  11. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey, David Aronow, Photographer circa 1924, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey, David Aronow, Photographer circa 1924, FRONT ELEVATION SHOWING BELLTOWER AND PROJECTING VERANDA. - Laurelton Hall, Laurel Hollow & Ridge Roads, Oyster Bay, Nassau County, NY

  12. Laughing and Smiling to Manage Trouble in French-Language Classroom Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petitjean, Cécile; González-Martínez, Esther

    2015-01-01

    This article deals with communicative functions of laughter and smiling in the classroom studied using a conversation analytical approach. Analysing a corpus of video-recorded French first-language lessons, we show how students sequentially organise laughter and smiling, and use them to preempt, solve or assess a problematic action. We also focus…

  13. Effects of Environmental Events on Smiling and Laughing Behavior in Angelman Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Chris; Demetriades, Louisa; Hall, Scott

    2002-01-01

    A study examined the variability of smiling and laughing behaviors of three children (ages 7-17) with Angelman syndrome. Results found laughing and smiling increased during social situations and occurred at low levels during non-social situations. The behaviors, therefore, did not occur totally inappropriately, as has been suggested. (Contains…

  14. Effects of Social Stimuli on Laughing and Smiling in Young Children with Angelman Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richman, David M.; Gernat, Eric; Teichman, Heather

    2006-01-01

    The effects of social stimuli present and absent on laughing and smiling in 2 young children with Angelman syndrome were assessed via a multielement design. Results indicated that laughing and smiling for either child was unaffected by the social stimuli assessed in the social interaction condition. Results are discussed in terms of the effects of…

  15. Student Mini-Learning Exercise (SMiLE) Cards: Theory into Practice--Now!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tauber, Robert

    Based on the premise that educational psychology is often taught as theory with few opportunities for practical application, the Student Mini-Learning Exercise (SMiLE) Cards are presented to help students apply educational psychology concepts to field experiences. Components of these SMiLE Cards focus on: identification information; the concept…

  16. A novel three-dimensional smile analysis based on dynamic evaluation of facial curve contour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yi; Lin, Han; Lin, Qiuping; Zhang, Jinxin; Zhu, Ping; Lu, Yao; Zhao, Zhi; Lv, Jiahong; Lee, Mln Kyeong; Xu, Yue

    2016-02-01

    The influence of three-dimensional facial contour and dynamic evaluation decoding on factors of smile esthetics is essential for facial beauty improvement. However, the kinematic features of the facial smile contour and the contribution from the soft tissue and underlying skeleton are uncharted. Here, the cheekbone-maxilla contour and nasolabial fold were combined into a “smile contour” delineating the overall facial topography emerges prominently in smiling. We screened out the stable and unstable points on the smile contour using facial motion capture and curve fitting, before analyzing the correlation between soft tissue coordinates and hard tissue counterparts of the screened points. Our finding suggests that the mouth corner region was the most mobile area characterizing smile expression, while the other areas remained relatively stable. Therefore, the perioral area should be evaluated dynamically while the static assessment outcome of other parts of the smile contour contribute partially to their dynamic esthetics. Moreover, different from the end piece, morphologies of the zygomatic area and the superior part of the nasolabial crease were determined largely by the skeleton in rest, implying the latter can be altered by orthopedic or orthodontic correction and the former better improved by cosmetic procedures to improve the beauty of smile.

  17. A novel three-dimensional smile analysis based on dynamic evaluation of facial curve contour.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi; Lin, Han; Lin, Qiuping; Zhang, Jinxin; Zhu, Ping; Lu, Yao; Zhao, Zhi; Lv, Jiahong; Lee, Mln Kyeong; Xu, Yue

    2016-02-25

    The influence of three-dimensional facial contour and dynamic evaluation decoding on factors of smile esthetics is essential for facial beauty improvement. However, the kinematic features of the facial smile contour and the contribution from the soft tissue and underlying skeleton are uncharted. Here, the cheekbone-maxilla contour and nasolabial fold were combined into a "smile contour" delineating the overall facial topography emerges prominently in smiling. We screened out the stable and unstable points on the smile contour using facial motion capture and curve fitting, before analyzing the correlation between soft tissue coordinates and hard tissue counterparts of the screened points. Our finding suggests that the mouth corner region was the most mobile area characterizing smile expression, while the other areas remained relatively stable. Therefore, the perioral area should be evaluated dynamically while the static assessment outcome of other parts of the smile contour contribute partially to their dynamic esthetics. Moreover, different from the end piece, morphologies of the zygomatic area and the superior part of the nasolabial crease were determined largely by the skeleton in rest, implying the latter can be altered by orthopedic or orthodontic correction and the former better improved by cosmetic procedures to improve the beauty of smile.

  18. A novel three-dimensional smile analysis based on dynamic evaluation of facial curve contour

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yi; Lin, Han; Lin, Qiuping; Zhang, Jinxin; Zhu, Ping; Lu, Yao; Zhao, Zhi; Lv, Jiahong; Lee, Mln Kyeong; Xu, Yue

    2016-01-01

    The influence of three-dimensional facial contour and dynamic evaluation decoding on factors of smile esthetics is essential for facial beauty improvement. However, the kinematic features of the facial smile contour and the contribution from the soft tissue and underlying skeleton are uncharted. Here, the cheekbone-maxilla contour and nasolabial fold were combined into a “smile contour” delineating the overall facial topography emerges prominently in smiling. We screened out the stable and unstable points on the smile contour using facial motion capture and curve fitting, before analyzing the correlation between soft tissue coordinates and hard tissue counterparts of the screened points. Our finding suggests that the mouth corner region was the most mobile area characterizing smile expression, while the other areas remained relatively stable. Therefore, the perioral area should be evaluated dynamically while the static assessment outcome of other parts of the smile contour contribute partially to their dynamic esthetics. Moreover, different from the end piece, morphologies of the zygomatic area and the superior part of the nasolabial crease were determined largely by the skeleton in rest, implying the latter can be altered by orthopedic or orthodontic correction and the former better improved by cosmetic procedures to improve the beauty of smile. PMID:26911450

  19. When Does the Brain Distinguish between Genuine and Ambiguous Smiles? An ERP Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calvo, Manuel G.; Marrero, Hipolito; Beltran, David

    2013-01-01

    Event-related brain potentials (ERPs) were recorded to assess the processing time course of ambiguous facial expressions with a smiling mouth but neutral, fearful, or angry eyes, in comparison with genuinely happy faces (a smile and happy eyes) and non-happy faces (neutral, fearful, or angry mouth and eyes). Participants judged whether the faces…

  20. Brief Report: A Longitudinal Study of Excessive Smiling and Laughing in Children with Angelman Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Dawn; Horsler, Kate; Mount, Rebecca; Oliver, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Elevated laughing and smiling is a key characteristic of the Angelman syndrome behavioral phenotype, with cross-sectional studies reporting changes with environment and age. This study compares levels of laughing and smiling in 12 participants across three experimental conditions [full social interaction (with eye contact), social interaction with…

  1. Differences between Children and Adults in the Recognition of Enjoyment Smiles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Del Giudice, Marco; Colle, Livia

    2007-01-01

    The authors investigated the differences between 8-year-olds (n = 80) and adults (n = 80) in recognition of felt versus faked enjoyment smiles by using a newly developed picture set that is based on the Facial Action Coding System. The authors tested the effect of different facial action units (AUs) on judgments of smile authenticity. Multiple…

  2. Groundwater Flow in the Arthur Marble Aquifer, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, M. K.

    2008-05-01

    Arthur Marble underlies the Takaka Valley and outcrops in Karst Uplands to east and west of the valley in the South Island of New Zealand. It is the principal groundwater aquifer in the region and host to the remarkable Waikoropupu Springs near the coast. With average flow of 13,300 L/s, the karstic springs have many interesting features including unusual size and clarity. This work uses rainfall and river level, natural tracer and chemical measurements to determine the recharge sources and nature of the flow system in the Arthur Marble Aquifer (AMA). Total recharge to the AMA of 19,750 L/s comes from three sources (Karst Uplands stream seepage, Takaka River seepage and Takaka Valley rainfall infiltration). Since 13,300 L/s is discharged at the springs, the remainder must escape via offshore springs (6,450 L/s). The oxygen-18 mass balance allows the contribution of each source to each spring to be determined; most of the flow to the Main Spring of the Waikoropupu Springs comes from the Karst Uplands. The offshore springs are mostly fed from the Takaka River. The chemical concentrations of the Main Spring show input of 0.5% of sea water on average, but varying with flow. This variation with flow shows that two water components (sea-water-bearing and non-sea-water-bearing) contribute to the spring's discharge. Tritium measurements spanning 40 years, and CFC-11 measurements, give a mean residence time of 8 years for the Main Spring water using the preferred two-component model. Our conceptual flow model, based on the flow, oxygen-18, chloride and tritium measurements, reveals that two different flow systems with different recharge sources are needed to explain the flow within the AMA. One system contains deeply penetrating old water with mean age 10.2 years and water volume 3 cubic kilometers, recharged from the Karst Uplands. The other, at shallow levels below the valley floor, has much younger water, with mean age 1.2 years and water volume 0.4 cubic kilometers

  3. Analysis of the imaging method for assessment of the smile of laser diode bars.

    PubMed

    Martí-López, Luis; Ramos-de-Campos, José A; Furlan, Walter D

    2009-09-10

    We study imaging systems designed to assess the smile of laser diode bars (LDBs). The magnification matrix is derived from the required sampling period and the geometries of the LDBs and the charge-coupled device (CCD) array. These image-forming systems present in-plane pure translation invariance, but in the case of anamorphic ones, lack in-plane rotation invariance. It is shown that the smile parameters of the image of the LDB are linked with the smile parameters of the LDB by simple mathematical expressions. The spatial resolution of such optical systems is estimated at approximately 1 microm for a mean wavelength of lambda approximately 800 nm. Our results suggest that, with the current state-of-the-art, the formation of imaging methods for LDB smile assessment can be used to assess smile heights > or = 1 microm.

  4. Smile to see the forest: Facially expressed positive emotions broaden cognition

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Kareem J.; Waugh, Christian E.; Fredrickson, Barbara L.

    2011-01-01

    The broaden hypothesis, part of Fredrickson’s (1998, 2001) broaden-and-build theory, proposes that positive emotions lead to broadened cognitive states. Here, we present evidence that cognitive broadening can be produced by frequent facial expressions of positive emotion. Additionally, we present a novel method of using facial electromyography (EMG) to discriminate between Duchenne (genuine) and non-Duchenne (non-genuine) smiles. Across experiments, Duchenne smiles occurred more frequently during positive emotion inductions than neutral or negative inductions. Across experiments, Duchenne smiles correlated with self-reports of specific positive emotions. In Experiment 1, high frequencies of Duchenne smiles predicted increased attentional breadth on a global–local visual processing task. In Experiment 2, high frequencies of Duchenne smiles predicted increased attentional flexibility on a covert attentional orienting task. These data underscore the value of using multiple methods to measure emotional experience in studies of emotion and cognition. PMID:23275681

  5. The periodontal factor in esthetic smile design--altering gingival display.

    PubMed

    Bitter, Robert N

    2007-11-01

    The periodontal soft and hard tissues are an important determinant of restorative smile esthetics. Management of the periodontal tissues that "frame" each tooth is crucial to esthetic smile design. This article describes a four-step technique that makes it possible to sculpt the position of the labial gingival margin to provide additional crown height or length, a process the author describes as smile sculpting. This periodontal smile sculpting can aid in determining the pre-restorative treatment profile for teeth and create a blueprint for the restorative dentist to enhance a patient's final esthetic treatment results. Crucial to understanding this process is an appreciation of the periodontal principles that govern smile design, especially the periodontal biologic width and the influence of the underlying hard tissue bony architecture in defining the periodontal envelope from which the teeth emerge.

  6. The specific molecular identification of life experiment ( SMILE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sims, M. R.; Cullen, D. C.; Bannister, N. P.; Grant, W. D.; Henry, O.; Jones, R.; McKnight, D.; Thompson, D. P.; Wilson, P. K.

    2005-07-01

    We describe a compact, highly integrated instrument concept for the detection and identification of a wide range of molecules associated with extinct/extant life or potential life processes. The Specific Molecular Identification of Life Experiment ( SMILE) will be sensitive to the presence of a range of target molecules using both electrical and optical transduction techniques, and incorporates molecular imprinted polymers in addition to traditional biological receptors such as antibodies. A number of versions of the concept are possible depending on available resources e.g. mass, volume, etc. The full concept utilises a novel imaging interferometer where a large number of molecular receptors are deposited on the measurement plane of an imaging interferometer and read out by an imaging detector, enabling multiple targets - biomarkers - within a sample to be measured simultaneously. The optics can also form the basis of an UV-NIR imaging Fourier spectrometer allowing basic mineralogy studies to be conducted using optical properties to assist in the determination of the geological context of the samples. By incorporating micro-fabricated transducer arrays, micro-fluidics and artificial molecular recognition systems, as well as recombinant antibody technology with appropriate integration methods, SMILE forms a compact and robust "Life Marker Chip" which has been proposed for future planetary missions including ESA's ExoMars mission, where the instrument offers the possibility of conducting a direct in situ search for signs of past or present biological activity on Mars. In addition to its role in planetary exploration, derivatives of SMILE have multiple terrestrial applications in fields such as forensic analysis and environmental monitoring.

  7. Improving gingival smile by means of guided bone regeneration principles

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Carlos Eduardo de Almeida; Brandão, Roberto Carlos Bodart; Martinelli, Carolina Borges; Pignaton, Túlio Bonna

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: This study evaluated the effectiveness of guided bone regeneration (GBR) carried out with xenogenic bone substitute (Bio-OssTM) and collagen resorbable membrane (Bio-GideTM) to improve gingival smile (GS) in patients with excessive vertical maxillary growth (EVMG). Methods: Twelve healthy women aged between 20 and 49 years old (mean age of 26 years), with 5 mm or more of gingival exposure during fully posed smile (FPS) due to EVMG, were included. Baseline digital photographs were taken with standardized head position at rest and FPS. In eight out of 12 cases, crown lengthening procedure was indicated and the initial incision was made 2 to 4 mm from the gingival margin. In four cases, with no indication for crown lengthening procedure, a sulcular incision was performed. GBR was performed in all cases, using micro screws and/or titanium mesh associated with Bio-OssTM and Bio-GideTM. After 10 days, sutures were removed. Recall appointments were scheduled at 1, 6, and 12 months when standardized photographs were again taken. ImageToolTM software was used to measure the gingival exposure (GE) during FPS from the standardized close-up smile photographs at baseline and 12 months. Results: GE mean at baseline was 275.44 mm2. After 12 months, patients who undergone exclusively GBR procedure, presented GE reduction of 40.7%, ∆ = 112.01 mm2 (statistically significant, p = 0.12), and patients who had crown lengthening associated with the graft had a reduction of 60%, ∆ = 167.01 mm2. Conclusion: Our results using GBR to improve GS in cases of EVMG showed an exceptionally high patient acceptance and satisfaction. One-year follow-up confirmed stable results. PMID:27409660

  8. Amelogenesis Imperfecta, Facial Esthetics and Snap-On Smile.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Lee; Bradshaw, Jonathan P; Marks, Murray K

    2015-01-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta is a hereditary enamel protein disorder affecting deciduous and secondary crown formation. The prevalence ranges from 1:700 to 1:14,000 depending on the population. These teeth may be hypoplastic, hypomineralized, or hypermineralized and are often discolored, sensitive and caries vulnerable. Patients often present with psychosocial issues due to appearance. Primary teeth are often treated with stainless steel crowns while secondary teeth are treated with full coverage esthetic crowns. The presenting preteen male here was fitted with Snap-On Smile? (www.snaponsmile.com). This treatment option provided cosmetic enhancement of the patient's appearance besides stabilization without altering the primary and secondary dentition during adolescent development.

  9. A systematic approach to recreate a patient's former smile.

    PubMed

    Afshar, Ali

    2012-09-01

    In this case involving a 29-year-old woman with a history of stomach-acid-related reflux and extensive loss of tooth structure, the patient desired to regain the smile she "used to have." The treatment goals throughout the process were to manage risk, use minimally invasive procedures, and improve the prognosis in each of the four dental categories-periodontal, biomechanical, functional, and dentofacial. The treatment plan utilized a systematic approach to sequentially restore and protect the young woman's dentition. It included esthetic crown lengthening, establishing the ideal esthetic position of maxillary anterior and posterior teeth, addressing the mandibular plane of occlusion, and achieving optimal function.

  10. The SMILE fluxgate sensor: performance and possibilities of improvement.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyayev, S.; Ivchenko, N.; Korepanov, V.; Marusenkov, A.

    2009-04-01

    The Small Magnetometer in Low-Mass Experiment (SMILE) is a miniaturized triaxial fluxgate magnetometer with volume compensation incorporating efficient signal processing algorithms within a field programmable gate array (FPGA). SMILE was designed in collaboration between the Lviv Centre of Institute for Space Research (LC ISR) in Ukraine where the sensor was developed and the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) in Stockholm, Sweden where the electronics used to operate the instrument were designed and programmed. The SMILE magnetometer compares well with modern digital FGMs in resolution (20 bit, corresponding to 0.1 nT per bit ) and sample rate (up to 250 sample per second), but has significantly lower consumption (about 260 mW), smaller size (the sensor - 20x20x20 cubic millimeters, the first prototype of the electronic board - 120x80 square millimeters) and lower weight (the sensor - 21 g and the board - 80 g). Using the cubic coils for volume compensation, optimizing the sensor design and using Macor for main sensor parts resulted in achieving uniquely stable geometric parameters for such a small sensor. A calibration of the SMILE instrument was carried out at the Nurmijarvi Geophysical Observatory, showing high linearity (deviation no more than 6 nT along total ±50 μT scale) and low orthogonality error (<22 arcmin). The temperature coefficients of the scale factors were below 11 ppm/C and the deviation of the magnetic axes was about 3 arcsec per C in the range of -30 to +45 centidegrees. The bar-core fluxgate sensors are based on the two strips of amorphous Co-Fe-Si-B alloy of the dimensions 16x1x0.02 cubic millimeters. The sensors noise level is less than 30 pT/sqrt(Hz)at 1 Hz that it is rather good for such modest magnetic core volume. In the recent publications [1-3] the peculiarities of the electronic unit design, the signal detection algorithm and the results of the numerical simulation of the sensor magnetic core behavior during its excitation were

  11. David Lasser: An American Spaceflight Pioneer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciancone, Michael L.; Lasser, Amelia

    2002-01-01

    David Lasser was one of the founders of the American Interplanetary Society (later known as the American Rocket Society) and author of the first English-language book (in 1931) on the prospects of human spaceflight. Yet his involvement in the fledgling spaceflight movement was short-lived as he soon moved on to pursue a distinguished career in the cause of workers rights. In lieu of an oral history, the author corresponded with Mr. Lasser on a regular basis in the years before his death in 1996 to gather Mr. Lasser's views on human spaceflight activities as viewed from his unique perspective. This paper will document that correspondence with one of America's original spaceflight pioneers.

  12. David D. Derse, 1949-2009

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    David D. Derse, Ph.D., Head of the Retrovirus Gene Expression Section in the HIV Drug Resistance Program at the National Cancer Institute-Frederick (NCI-Frederick), passed away on October 9, 2009, a scant six weeks after being diagnosed with liver cancer. It was with great sadness that family, friends, and colleagues gathered together for his memorial service on Saturday, October 17, 2009, at the Middletown United Methodist Church in Maryland. As a NCI scientist since 1986, Dave studied the molecular mechanisms of infection and replication of a number of different types of retroviruses. Dave became an internationally known expert on human T cell lymphotrophic viruses type 1 and 2 (HTLV-1 and HTLV-2) and served on the editorial boards of Virology and Retrovirology. His most recent studies focused on the mechanisms of HTLV-1 virion morphogenesis, transmission, and replication. PMID:19951436

  13. David Lasser - An American Spaceflight Pioneer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciancone, Michael L.; Lasser, Amelia

    2002-01-01

    David Lasser was one of the founders of the American Interplanetary Society (later known as the American Rocket Society) and author of the first English-language book (in 1931) on the use of rockets for human spaceflight. His involvement in the fledgling spaceflight movement was short-lived as he moved on to pursue a distinguished, if turbulent, career in the labor movement. In lieu of an oral history, Mr. Lasser provided his recollections on the pioneering days of rocketry and his thoughts on mankind's destiny in space. This paper provides an overview of Mr. Lasser's life and accomplishments as an American spaceflight visionary, along with a compilation of the information that he graciously provided.

  14. Rainforest pioneer. Millennium trailblazers 3: David Cassell.

    PubMed

    Gilmour, D

    1999-01-01

    The Iwokrama International Centre for Rain Forest Conservation in Guyana is headed by Australian forester David Cassells who is also chairman of the Advisory Group for the World Conservation Union Forest Conservation Program. He states that this program is different from other projects to conserve tropical forests since it focuses on financial sustainability and self-sufficiency. He also plans that the revenue for the center will come from a mixture of eco-forestry with certified logging, ecotourism, sustainable production of non-timber products such as vines and latexes, bioprospecting, and the sale of forest management expertise. He further added that the program's success could change the way people value and use tropical forests.

  15. David Lukens Reasoner (1941-1992)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chappell, Rick

    David Lukens Reasoner, former head of NASA's Ionospheric Physics branch, died on April 21, 1992. Reasoner was born July 1, 1941. He worked tirelessly to expand NASA's Space Physics Division, bringing his deep experience and personal expertise to bear on the challenges of growth.During the magical period of the late 1950s and early 1960s when America turned its eyes toward space and the Moon, David Lukens Reasoner journeyed north from the nearby Texas town of Dickinson to Rice University with an idea of getting involved in exploring the frontiers of space. He pursued a course of study in electrical engineering and received a bachelor's degree in 1963 and a master's degree in 1964. In the early 1960s, the Space Science Department at Rice was formed, and President John Kennedy visited to say that America chose to go to space not because it is easy but because it is hard and because it would require the very best talents of our nation to succeed. Dave Reasoner was one of those talented people. His excellence in electrical engineering and physics, combined with his natural abilities in the laboratory, suited him ideally for building the machines of space. As a student, he built sounding rocket payloads and multiple instruments for satellites and experiment packages that were placed on the Moon by the Apollo astronauts. He completed his doctoral degree in space science in 1968. It was in these early thrilling days of space exploration that I first met Dave, beginning a friendship and collegial relationship that was to last 27 years.

  16. 76 FR 7837 - Magill, David W.; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Magill, David W.; Notice of Filing Take notice that on February 4, 2011, David W. Magill submitted for filing, an application for authority to hold interlocking...

  17. Music: Part of the Basics at David Douglas and Salem.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pheasant, Marilyn

    1985-01-01

    This bulletin highlights elements of the music programs in two Oregon school districts--David Douglas School District 40 and Salem School District 24J--that have kept these programs viable in spite of financial constraints. Ingredients for success of the overall music program at David Douglas are first described. Important elements include hiring…

  18. 77 FR 71189 - Falck, David P.; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-29

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Falck, David P.; Notice of Filing Take notice that on November 23, 2012, David P. Falck submitted for filing, an application for authority to hold interlocking positions...-8659. Comment Date: 5:00 p.m. Eastern Time on December 14, 2012. Dated: November 23, 2012. Kimberly...

  19. Teaching Students about the Environment with Henry David Thoreau

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curriculum Review, 2008

    2008-01-01

    "Walden: The Ballad of Thoreau" is a two-act four-character play about the final two days writer Henry David Thoreau spent in his cabin before leaving Walden Pond. Teachers can use this play to teach about preserving the earth to students. This article presents a brief synopsis of the play and a brief biography of Henry David Thoreau.

  20. 75 FR 10244 - Ellsworth, David C.; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Ellsworth, David C.; Notice of Filing February 25, 2010. Take notice that on February 12, 2010, David C. Ellsworth filed an informational report for authority to hold...

  1. Digital Smile Design concept delineates the final potential result of crown lengthening and porcelain veneers to correct a gummy smile.

    PubMed

    Trushkowsky, Richard; Arias, David Montalvo; David, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Prior to initiating any treatment, it is necessary to visualize the desired outcomes. It then becomes possible to formulate the steps required to achieve this result. Digital Smile Design (DSD) utilizes patient input and information gathered through diagnostic procedures to create an esthetic treatment scheme. In the case presented here, the NYUCD Esthetic Evaluation Form, intraoral and extraoral photographs, mounted diagnostic casts, physical examination, and radiographs were the diagnostic modalities. The gathered information served as a starting point for a wax-up and intraoral mock-up. This case report demonstrates how the DSD served as a template for crown lengthening procedures and design of the final porcelain veneer restorations. PMID:27433549

  2. Digital Smile Design concept delineates the final potential result of crown lengthening and porcelain veneers to correct a gummy smile.

    PubMed

    Trushkowsky, Richard; Arias, David Montalvo; David, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Prior to initiating any treatment, it is necessary to visualize the desired outcomes. It then becomes possible to formulate the steps required to achieve this result. Digital Smile Design (DSD) utilizes patient input and information gathered through diagnostic procedures to create an esthetic treatment scheme. In the case presented here, the NYUCD Esthetic Evaluation Form, intraoral and extraoral photographs, mounted diagnostic casts, physical examination, and radiographs were the diagnostic modalities. The gathered information served as a starting point for a wax-up and intraoral mock-up. This case report demonstrates how the DSD served as a template for crown lengthening procedures and design of the final porcelain veneer restorations.

  3. One Visit Providing Desirable Smile by Laser Application

    PubMed Central

    Fekrazad, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Providing desirable smile is one of the main concerns in cosmetic dentistry. Hyperpigmentation is one of the esthetic concerns especially in gummy smile patients. Lasers with different wavelength are used for oral surgery including Carbon Dioxide Laser (CO2), Neodymium-Doped Yttrium Aluminium Garnet (Nd:YAG), Erbium family and diode laser. In this case, all esthetic procedures including gingival depigmentation, caries detection and removal were done by laser technology in one session. Case study: A 40- year-old male with a chief complaint of black gingiva in upper jaw was referred. The right side of maxillary was anesthetized and depigmentation was done by Erbium, Chromium doped Yttrium Scandium Gallium Garnet (Er-Cr: YSGG) laser. Due to scores obtained from Diagnodent which indicated caries in dentin, the cavities were prepared by Er-Cr:YSGG laser. The cavities were restored by composite resin. The patient was advised to keep oral hygiene instructions and use mouthwash. Results: The patient reported no pain after surgery and did not use any systemic antibiotic. After 4 weeks, complete healing was observed. Conclusion: Considering acceptable clinical outcome, Er-Cr: YSGG laser can be considered as an effective method for combination of soft and hard tissue treatment. PMID:25606339

  4. Embodied memory: unconscious smiling modulates emotional evaluation of episodic memories

    PubMed Central

    Arminjon, Mathieu; Preissmann, Delphine; Chmetz, Florian; Duraku, Andrea; Ansermet, François; Magistretti, Pierre J.

    2015-01-01

    Since Damasio introduced the somatic markers hypothesis in Damasio (1994), it has spread through the psychological community, where it is now commonly acknowledged that somatic states are a factor in producing the qualitative dimension of our experiences. Present actions are emotionally guided by those somatic states that were previously activated in similar experiences. In this model, somatic markers serve as a kind of embodied memory. Here, we test whether the manipulation of somatic markers can modulate the emotional evaluation of negative memories. Because facial feedback has been shown to be a powerful means of modifying emotional judgements, we used it to manipulate somatic markers. Participants first read a sad story in order to induce a negative emotional memory and then were asked to rate their emotions and memory about the text. Twenty-four hours later, the same participants were asked to assume a predetermined facial feedback (smiling) while reactivating their memory of the sad story. The participants were once again asked to fill in emotional and memory questionnaires about the text. Our results showed that participants who had smiled during memory reactivation later rated the text less negatively than control participants. However, the contraction of the zygomaticus muscles during memory reactivation did not have any impact on episodic memory scores. This suggests that manipulating somatic states modified emotional memory without affecting episodic memory. Thus, modulating memories through bodily states might pave the way to studying memory as an embodied function and help shape new kinds of psychotherapeutic interventions. PMID:26074833

  5. Evaluation of dredged material proposed for ocean disposal from Arthur Kill Project Area, New York

    SciTech Connect

    Gruendell, B.D.; Barrows, E.S.; Borde, A.B.

    1997-01-01

    The objective of the bioassay reevaluation of Arthur Kill Federal Project was to reperform toxicity testing on proposed dredged material following current ammonia reduction protocols. Arthur Kill was one of four waterways sampled and evaluated for dredging and disposal in April 1993. Sediment samples were recollected from the Arthur Kill Project areas in August 1995. Tests and analyses were conducted according to the manual developed by the USACE and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Evaluation of Dredged Material Proposed for Ocean Disposal (Testing Manual), commonly referred to as the {open_quotes}Green Book,{close_quotes} and the regional manual developed by the USACE-NYD and EPA Region II, Guidance for Performing Tests on Dredged Material to be Disposed of in Ocean Waters. The reevaluation of proposed dredged material from the Arthur Kill project areas consisted of benthic acute toxicity tests. Thirty-three individual sediment core samples were collected from the Arthur Kill project area. Three composite sediments, representing each reach of the area proposed for dredging, was used in benthic acute toxicity testing. Benthic acute toxicity tests were performed with the amphipod Ampelisca abdita and the mysid Mysidopsis bahia. The amphipod and mysid benthic toxicity test procedures followed EPA guidance for reduction of total ammonia concentrations in test systems prior to test initiation. Statistically significant acute toxicity was found in all Arthur Kill composites in the static renewal tests with A. abdita, but not in the static tests with M. bahia. Statistically significant acute toxicity and a greater than 20% increase in mortality over the reference sediment was found in the static renewal tests with A. abdita. M. bahia did not show statistically significant acute toxicity or a greater than 10% increase in mortality over reference sediment in static tests. 5 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. 76 FR 36914 - Astoria Generating Company, L.P., NRG Power Marketing LLC, Arthur Kill Power LLC, Astoria Gas...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-23

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Astoria Generating Company, L.P., NRG Power Marketing LLC, Arthur Kill Power LLC, Astoria Gas Turbine Power LLC, Dunkirk Power LLC, Huntley Power LLC, Oswego Harbor Power LLC, TC..., 2011, Astoria Generating Company, NRG Power Marketing LLC, Arthur Kill Power LLC, Astoria Gas...

  7. Associations between psychosocial functioning and smiling intensity in patients with head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Juhun; Teo, Irene; Guindani, Michele; Reece, Gregory P; Markey, Mia K; Fingeret, Michelle Cororve

    2015-01-01

    Increasing attention is being given to developing quantitative measures of facial expression. This study used quantitative facial expression analysis to examine associations between smiling intensity and psychosocial functioning in patients with head and neck cancer (HNC). Smiling intensity of 95 HNC patients was measured using 48 quantitative measures calculated from facial photographs with and without a smile. We computed a composite smiling intensity score for each patient representing the degree of similarity to healthy controls. A lower composite score indicates that the person is less expressive, on average, than healthy controls. Patients also completed self-report measures assessing domains of body image and quality of life (QOL). Spearman rank correlations were computed to examine relationships between composite scores and psychosocial functioning. Composite scores were significantly correlated with multiple measures of body image and QOL. Specifically, decreased smiling intensity was associated with feelings of dissatisfaction with one's body, perceived negative social impact of body image, increased use of avoidance as a body image-coping strategy, reduced functional well-being, and greater head and neck cancer-specific issues. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate associations between an objectively quantified facial expression (i.e. smiling) and psychosocial functioning. Most previous studies have measured facial expression qualitatively. These findings indicate that smiling intensity may serve as an important clinical indicator of psychosocial well-being and warrants further clinical investigation.

  8. Social anxiety and perception of (un)trustworthiness in smiling faces.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-García, Aida; Calvo, Manuel G

    2016-10-30

    In social environments the smile can be driven by different motives and convey different emotions. This makes a smiling face ambiguous and amenable to alternative interpretations. We investigated how social anxiety is related to trustworthiness evaluation of morphed dynamic smiling faces depending on changes in the eye expression. Socially anxious and non-anxious participants judged the un/trustworthiness of people with different smiles. Social anxiety was related to reduced trustworthiness of (a) faces with a neutral mouth unfolding to a smile when the eyes were neutral at the beginning or end of the dynamic sequence, and (b) faces with a smiling mouth when happy eyes slightly changed towards neutrality, surprise, fear, sadness, disgust, or anger. In contrast, social anxiety was not related to trustworthiness judgments for non-ambiguous expressions unfolding from neutral (eyes and mouth) to happy (eyes and mouth) or from happy to neutral. Socially anxious individuals are characterized by an interpretation bias towards mistrusting any ambiguous smile due to the presence of non-happy eyes.

  9. Influence of Smile Arc and Buccal Corridors on Facial Attractiveness: A Cross-sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Gaikwad, Shashank; Vaz, Anna C; Singh, Baldeep; Taneja, Lavina; Vinod, KS; Verma, Prateek

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Two aspects of the smile: the Smile Arc (SA) and Buccal Corridors (BC) have been the interest of the orthodontist in recent years. Aim The present study was undertaken to evaluate the influence of the smile arc and buccal corridors on facial attractiveness as evaluated by orthodontists, general dentists and laymen. Materials and Methods Two subjects (one male & one female) were selected from the regional population fulfilling the criteria of an ideal smile arc and ideal buccal corridors. Frontal smile view photographs of these subjects were taken and modified by using adobe photoshop 7.0 to create combination of three smile arc variance and three buccal corridors variations respectively which were shown to 25 orthodontists, 25 general dentists & 25 laymen, to rate the facial attractiveness of each image on a rating scale. Results All the three groups (laypersons, dentists and orthodontists) showed significant difference in ratings, indicating that they had different perceptions on the facial attractiveness. Conclusion Orthodontists were more precise in discerning the smile arc and buccal corridors compared to dentists and laypersons. PMID:27790573

  10. Intraoperative smile in a multiple sclerosis patient with medication-refractory tremor.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Amanda J; Peng-Chen, Zhongxing; Pastrana, Marlon; Foote, Kelly D; Haq, Ihtsham; Okun, Michael S

    2014-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation has been utilized to improve disease symptoms in patients with Parkinson's disease, dystonia, essential tremor, and other neuropsychiatric syndromes such as depression and obsessive compulsive disorder. Deep brain stimulation has also been observed to improve tremor for select patients with multiple sclerosis. During intraoperative stimulation in these multiple sclerosis patients, researchers have observed a wide spectrum of motor and sensory phenomena, but no stimulation-induced emotional responses have been reported. We detailed intraoperative smiling associated with stimulation of the ventralis oralis anterior/ventralis oralis posterior border region of the left thalamus.  A single patient with medication-resistant multiple sclerosis tremor experienced smiling, laughing, and subjective euphoria during intraoperative stimulation of the left thalamus. Specifically, during intraoperative stimulation of the left thalamic ventralis oralis anterior border, the patient developed a contralateral smile which progressed to a bilateral smile and was accompanied by a feeling of subjective happiness. The smile habituated in approximately 60 seconds and it was reproducible on a repeat stimulation. The patient could subjectively feel the facial movement, and, at higher voltages, the movement was described as a pulling sensation. Stimulation of the anterior ventralis oralis anterior border of the left thalamus in an multiple sclerosis patient produced a unilateral smile that rapidly developed into a bilateral smile accompanied by euphoria. There were presumed capsular side effects at higher voltages. The exact mechanism by which stimulation of the thalamus produced a smile and mood elevation is unknown, but we speculate that the smile could be induced by stimulation of corticobulbar fibers arising from the caudal cingulate motor area connecting the contralateral facial nerve nucleus.

  11. Obituary: David L. Band (1957-2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cominsky, Lynn

    2011-12-01

    David L. Band, of Potomac Maryland, died on March 16, 2009 succumbing to a long battle with spinal cord cancer. His death at the age of 52 came as a shock to his many friends and colleagues in the physics and astronomy community. Band showed an early interest and exceptional aptitude for physics, leading to his acceptance at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology as an undergraduate student in 1975. After graduating from MIT with an undergraduate degree in Physics, Band continued as a graduate student in Physics at Harvard University. His emerging interest in Astrophysics led him to the Astronomy Department at the Harvard Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA), where he did his dissertation work with Jonathan Grindlay. His dissertation (1985) entitled "Non-thermal Radiation Mechanisms and Processes in SS433 and Active Galactic Nuclei" was "pioneering work on the physics of jets arising from black holes and models for their emission, including self-absorption, which previewed much to come, and even David's own later work on Gamma-ray Bursts," according to Grindlay who remained a personal friend and colleague of Band's. Following graduate school, Band held postdoctoral positions at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, the University of California at Berkeley and the Center for Astronomy and Space Sciences at the University of California San Diego where he worked on the BATSE experiment that was part of the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO), launched in 1991. BATSE had as its main objective the study of cosmic gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and made significant advances in this area of research. Band became a world-renowned figure in the emerging field of GRB studies. He is best known for his widely-used analytic form of gamma-ray burst spectra known as the "Band Function." After the CGRO mission ended, Band moved to the Los Alamos National Laboratory where he worked mainly on classified research but continued to work on GRB energetics and spectra. When NASA planned

  12. Evidence From ElderSmile for Diabetes and Hypertension Screening in Oral Health Programs

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Stephen; Schrimshaw, Eric W.; Metcalf, Sara S.; Greenblatt, Ariel Port; De La Cruz, Leydis; Kunzel, Carol; Northridge, Mary E.

    2015-01-01

    The ElderSmile clinical program was initiated in northern Manhattan in 2006. ElderSmile is a comprehensive community-based program offering education, screening and treatment services for seniors in impoverished communities. Originally focused on oral health, ElderSmile was expanded in 2010 to include diabetes and hypertension education and screening. More than 1,000 elders have participated in the expanded program to date. Quantitative and qualitative findings support a role for dental professionals in screening for these primary care sensitive conditions. PMID:26451080

  13. Smile analysis and face-bow transfer: enhancing aesthetic restorative treatment.

    PubMed

    Paul, S J

    2001-04-01

    The objective of current aesthetic dental treatments are to enhance the patient's smile by improving the overall dental appearance. A detailed analysis of the patient's face as it relates to the three-dimensional position, shape, and color of the teeth is required to improve this appearance. A full frontal and lateral evaluation of the patient's facial form is required to successfully complete on aesthetic smile evaluation. Additional considerations include cephalometry and a thorough dental analysis. This article demonstrates a comprehensive smile analysis technique and its communication to the dental technician.

  14. Digital Smile Design Meets the Dento-Facial Analyzer: Optimizing Esthetics While Preserving Tooth Structure.

    PubMed

    Tak On, Tse; Kois, John C

    2016-01-01

    This case of an adult male patient with missing maxillary lateral incisors who was unhappy with his smile focuses on implementation of the digital smile design (DSD) concept. Combined with the use of a dento-facial analyzer, DSD, which employs a series of extraoral photographs, allowed the clinician to preoperatively plan different approaches to the treatment and visualize the outcome of each one, as well as to effectively communicate critical tooth position references to the laboratory technician and the patient. The additive approach used in this case minimized tooth preparation while creating an esthetic smile.

  15. Can a new smile make you look more intelligent and successful?

    PubMed

    Beall, Anne E

    2007-04-01

    A smile has a tremendous impact on perceptions of one's attractiveness and one's personality. Previous psychological research has shown that attractive people are perceived as more successful, intelligent, and friendly. Research extends these findings by demonstrating that teeth alone can have an impact on overall attractiveness and perceptions of personality attributes. The results of the study discussed in this article extend the attractiveness research and demonstrate that one's smile is an important part of the physical attractiveness stereotype. One's smile clearly plays a significant role in the perception that others have of our appearance and our personality.

  16. South Lake Arthur field and occurrence of buried structures along Oligocene trend of southwestern Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Prescott, M.P.

    1988-09-01

    Significant gas reserves have recently been discovered in the Miogypsinoides sands along the Oligocene trend at the South Lake Arthur field. Detailed subsurface maps and seismic data are presented to exhibit the extent and nature of this local structure and to demonstrate future opportunities along the Oligocene trend.

  17. Assessing Internalizing, Externalizing, and Attention Problems in Young Children: Validation of the MacArthur HBQ

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lemery-Chalfant, Kathryn; Schreiber, Jane E.; Schmidt, Nicole L.; Van Hulle, Carol A.; Essex, Marilyn J.; Goldsmith, H. H.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To test the validity of the MacArthur Health and Behavior Questionnaire (HBQ) using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis to determine optimal thresholds for the HBQ in predicting Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children Version-IV (DISC-IV)diagnoses. The roles of child sex, level of impairment, and physical health in…

  18. Research for the Classroom: Playing with Difficult Poetry--High School Seniors and Arthur Sze's "Quipu"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fogle, Andy

    2012-01-01

    The author had been assigned two sections of Contemporary Literature, a semester-long senior elective, and he wanted to do something new with poetry. He planned to teach Arthur Sze's "Quipu." Sze's poetry is nonlinear, adopting principles from science, anthropology, and history into a multilayered poetic texture--text unlike anything students…

  19. Berkeley Lab Scientist Named MacArthur ''Genius'' Fellow for Audio Preservation Research

    ScienceCinema

    Haber, Carl

    2016-07-12

    Audio Preservationist Carl Haber was named a MacArthur Fellow in 2013. The Fellowship is a $625,000, no-strings-attached grant for individuals who have shown exceptional creativity in their work and the promise to do more. Learn more at http://www.macfound.org/fellows.

  20. Short-Form Versions of the Spanish MacArthur-Bates Communicative Development Inventories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson-Maldonodo, Donna; Marchman, Virginia A.; Fernald, Lia C. H.

    2013-01-01

    The Spanish-language MacArthur-Bates Communicative Development Inventories (S-CDIs) are well-established parent report tools for assessing the language development of Spanish-speaking children under 3 years. Here, we introduce the short-form versions of the S-CDIs (SFI and SFII), offered as alternatives to the long forms for screening purposes or…

  1. Factor Structure and Validity of the MacArthur Competence Assessment Tool--Criminal Adjudication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zapf, Patricia A.; Skeem, Jennifer L.; Golding, Stephen L.

    2005-01-01

    Examination of the available literature regarding the development of the MacArthur Competence Assessment Tool-Criminal Adjudication (MacCAT-CA) reveals 2 theoretical factor structures on which the MacCAT-CA was based: one in which 3 lower-order constructs are proposed (understanding, reasoning, appreciation) and one in which 2 higher-order…

  2. Reconsidering Arthur Bestor: A Postmortem for the Cold War in Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weltman, Burton

    This essay traces the liberal to conservative changes in U.S. political attitudes and the effect these changes had on progressive and essentialist theories of education from the 1940s to the present. Focus is on the role Arthur Bestor played in these developments. Bestor was a leader of the anti-progressive movement during the 1950s and the most…

  3. 76 FR 52569 - Regulated Navigation Area; Arthur Kill, NY and NJ

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-23

    ... regarding our public dockets in the January 17, 2008, issue of the Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Public... establishing a Regulated Navigation Area (RNA) on the navigable waters of the Arthur Kill in New York and New... the RNA is in place. ADDRESSES: You may submit comments identified by docket number USCG-...

  4. Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the Practice of Psychology: Arthur L. Kovacs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2004

    2004-01-01

    The 2004 Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the Practice of Psychology is awarded to Arthur L. Kovacs. He is recognized for making outstanding contributions to achieving statutory recognition and securing insurance reimbursement, and as a pioneer in the professional school movement, having trained several generations of practitioners.

  5. Arthur[R] Presents Hooray for Health! A Health Curriculum for Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schottman, Elly, Ed.

    This health curriculum for teachers, after-school providers, and school nurses uses the cartoon character Arthur to introduce four units that explore four distinct early childhood health themes. The themes are: "Eat Well. Stay Fit" (good nutrition and exercise); "Open Wide!" (dental health); "Dealing with Feelings" (emotions); and "Head Lice…

  6. Connecting Communities, Schools, and Families: An Interview with Arthur (Andy) Horne, Phd

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ziomek-Daigle, Jolie

    2007-01-01

    Dr. Arthur (Andy) Horne completed his PhD at Southern Illinois University in 1971. He taught at Indiana State University from 1971 until 1989, during which time he served as a member of the faculty and the director of training of the APA-accredited Counseling Psychology Program. He also was a member of the AAMFT-accredited Marriage and Family…

  7. Educating the U.S. Army: Arthur L. Wagner and Reform, 1875-1905.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brereton, T. R.

    Arthur Lockwood Wagner, who graduated from West Point in 1876, was one of the best known and most influential U.S. Army officers of his day. An intellectual and educator, Wagner was instrumental in some of the most critical reforms in U.S. Army history. He advocated enhanced military education, adopting modern combat techniques, holding…

  8. Berkeley Lab Scientist Named MacArthur ''Genius'' Fellow for Audio Preservation Research

    SciTech Connect

    Haber, Carl

    2013-09-24

    Audio Preservationist Carl Haber was named a MacArthur Fellow in 2013. The Fellowship is a $625,000, no-strings-attached grant for individuals who have shown exceptional creativity in their work and the promise to do more. Learn more at http://www.macfound.org/fellows.

  9. Amelogenesis Imperfecta, Facial Esthetics and Snap-On Smile.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Lee; Bradshaw, Jonathan P; Marks, Murray K

    2015-01-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta is a hereditary enamel protein disorder affecting deciduous and secondary crown formation. The prevalence ranges from 1:700 to 1:14,000 depending on the population. These teeth may be hypoplastic, hypomineralized, or hypermineralized and are often discolored, sensitive and caries vulnerable. Patients often present with psychosocial issues due to appearance. Primary teeth are often treated with stainless steel crowns while secondary teeth are treated with full coverage esthetic crowns. The presenting preteen male here was fitted with Snap-On Smile? (www.snaponsmile.com). This treatment option provided cosmetic enhancement of the patient's appearance besides stabilization without altering the primary and secondary dentition during adolescent development. PMID:26433999

  10. Smile without euphoria induced by deep brain stimulation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Morishita, Takashi; Foote, Kelly D; Archer, Derek B; Coombes, Stephen A; Vaillancourt, David E; Hassan, Anhar; Haq, Ihtsham U; Wolf, Janine; Okun, Michael S

    2015-01-01

    Poststroke central pain (PSCP) can be a debilitating medication-refractory disorder. We report a single case where right unilateral ventral capsule/ventral striatum (VC/VS) deep brain stimulation was used to treat PSCP and inadvertently induced a smile without euphoria. The patient was a 69 year-old woman who had a stroke with resultant dysesthesia and allodynia in her left hemibody and also a painful left hemibody dystonia. In her case, VC/VS stimulation induced a smile phenomenon, but without a euphoric sensation. This phenomenon was different from the typical smile responses we have observed in obsessive-compulsive disorder cases. This difference was considered to be possibly attributable to impairment in the emotional smile pathway.

  11. A technique for transferring a patient's smile line to a cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) image.

    PubMed

    Bidra, Avinash S

    2014-08-01

    Fixed implant-supported prosthodontic treatment for patients requiring a gingival prosthesis often demands that bone and implant levels be apical to the patient's maximum smile line. This is to avoid the display of the prosthesis-tissue junction (the junction between the gingival prosthesis and natural soft tissues) and prevent esthetic failures. Recording a patient's lip position during maximum smile is invaluable for the treatment planning process. This article presents a simple technique for clinically recording and transferring the patient's maximum smile line to cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images for analysis. The technique can help clinicians accurately determine the need for and amount of bone reduction required with respect to the maximum smile line and place implants in optimal positions.

  12. Brief Report: A Longitudinal Study of Excessive Smiling and Laughing in Children with Angelman Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Adams, Dawn; Horsler, Kate; Mount, Rebecca; Oliver, Chris

    2015-08-01

    Elevated laughing and smiling is a key characteristic of the Angelman syndrome behavioral phenotype, with cross-sectional studies reporting changes with environment and age. This study compares levels of laughing and smiling in 12 participants across three experimental conditions [full social interaction (with eye contact), social interaction with no eye contact, proximity only] at two data points. No differences were noted in frequency of laughing and smiling over time in any condition. However, with age as a covariate, the frequency of laughing and smiling decreased over time in the full social interaction (with eye contact) condition only. As this is the first longitudinal study to explore these behaviors in Angelman syndrome, the results suggest a gene-environment-time interaction within the behavioral phenotype.

  13. Brief Report: A Longitudinal Study of Excessive Smiling and Laughing in Children with Angelman Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Adams, Dawn; Horsler, Kate; Mount, Rebecca; Oliver, Chris

    2015-08-01

    Elevated laughing and smiling is a key characteristic of the Angelman syndrome behavioral phenotype, with cross-sectional studies reporting changes with environment and age. This study compares levels of laughing and smiling in 12 participants across three experimental conditions [full social interaction (with eye contact), social interaction with no eye contact, proximity only] at two data points. No differences were noted in frequency of laughing and smiling over time in any condition. However, with age as a covariate, the frequency of laughing and smiling decreased over time in the full social interaction (with eye contact) condition only. As this is the first longitudinal study to explore these behaviors in Angelman syndrome, the results suggest a gene-environment-time interaction within the behavioral phenotype. PMID:25749713

  14. 8. Historic American Buildings Survey, David Aronow, Photographer circa 1924, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Historic American Buildings Survey, David Aronow, Photographer circa 1924, LIVING ROOM WITH TIFFANY STAINED GLASS WINDOWS INCLUDING 'FEEDING THE FLAMINGOES,' 'THE FOUR SEASONS,' AND 'THE BATHERS'. - Laurelton Hall, Laurel Hollow & Ridge Roads, Oyster Bay, Nassau County, NY

  15. 11. Historic American Buildings Survey David J. Kaminsky, Photographer August ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Historic American Buildings Survey David J. Kaminsky, Photographer August 1978 EAST FACADE, PART OF NORTH FACADE, SOUTH DAIRY BARN IN BACKGROUND, WITH FIELD IN FOREGROUND - Longview Farm, North Dairy Barn, Longview Road, Lees Summit, Jackson County, MO

  16. 12. Historic American Buildings Survey David J. Kaminsky, Photographer August ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Historic American Buildings Survey David J. Kaminsky, Photographer August 1978 EAST FACADE, PART OF NORTH FACADE, SOUTH DAIRY BARN IN BACKGROUND - Longview Farm, North Dairy Barn, Longview Road, Lees Summit, Jackson County, MO

  17. Interview With the 2002 Caldecott Medal Winner, David Wiesner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giorgis, Cyndi; Johnson, Nancy J.

    2003-01-01

    Discusses David Wiesner, the 2002 Caldecott Medal Winner, and includes excerpts of an interview with him. Notes that Wiesner's books appeal to the imagination and often use art elements such as scale. Details the winning book, "The Three Pigs." (PM)

  18. 5. Historic American Buildings Survey, David Aronow, Photographer circa 1924, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Historic American Buildings Survey, David Aronow, Photographer circa 1924, DETAIL OF ENTRANCE AND BELLTOWER ON FRONT ELEVATION. - Laurelton Hall, Laurel Hollow & Ridge Roads, Oyster Bay, Nassau County, NY

  19. 19. Historic American Buildings Survey, David Aronow, Photographer circa 1924, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. Historic American Buildings Survey, David Aronow, Photographer circa 1924, INTERIOR OF TIFFANY CHAPEL SHOWING STAINED GLASS WINDOW. - Laurelton Hall, Laurel Hollow & Ridge Roads, Oyster Bay, Nassau County, NY

  20. 12. Historic American Buildings Survey, David Aronow, Photographer circa 1924, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Historic American Buildings Survey, David Aronow, Photographer circa 1924, VIEW OF THE CENTRAL COURT WITH THE FOUNTAIN AND TIFFANY VASES IN NICHES. - Laurelton Hall, Laurel Hollow & Ridge Roads, Oyster Bay, Nassau County, NY

  1. 16. Historic American Buildings Survey, David Aronow, Photographer circa 1924, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. Historic American Buildings Survey, David Aronow, Photographer circa 1924, TERRACE OVERLOOKING COLD SPRING HARBOR WITH VIEW OF 'TIFFANY TOWER'. - Laurelton Hall, Laurel Hollow & Ridge Roads, Oyster Bay, Nassau County, NY

  2. 7. Historic American Buildings Survey, David Aronow, Photographer circa 1924, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Historic American Buildings Survey, David Aronow, Photographer circa 1924, DETAIL OF MAIN ENTRANCE WITH COLD SPRING HARBOR IN BACKGROUND. - Laurelton Hall, Laurel Hollow & Ridge Roads, Oyster Bay, Nassau County, NY

  3. 11. Historic American Buildings Survey, David Aronow, Photographer circa 1924, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Historic American Buildings Survey, David Aronow, Photographer circa 1924, CENTRAL COURT WITH PORTRAIT OF TIFFANY BY SOROLLA. - Laurelton Hall, Laurel Hollow & Ridge Roads, Oyster Bay, Nassau County, NY

  4. 20. Historic American Buildings Survey, David Aronow, Photographer circa 1924, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. Historic American Buildings Survey, David Aronow, Photographer circa 1924, 'THE SPRING' ONE OF SEVEN FOUNTAINS ON TIFFANY ESTATE. - Laurelton Hall, Laurel Hollow & Ridge Roads, Oyster Bay, Nassau County, NY

  5. 9. Historic American Buildings Survey, David Aronow, Photographer circa 1924, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Historic American Buildings Survey, David Aronow, Photographer circa 1924, LIVING ROOM SHOWING LIGHTING FIXTURES OF TIFFANY'S DESIGN. - Laurelton Hall, Laurel Hollow & Ridge Roads, Oyster Bay, Nassau County, NY

  6. 8. Historic American Buildings Survey David J. Kaminsky, Photographer August ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Historic American Buildings Survey David J. Kaminsky, Photographer August 1978 INTERIOR LOOKING SOUTH AT HEARTH - Longview Farm, Paint-Carpentry-Blacksmith Shop, Longview Road, Lees Summit, Jackson County, MO

  7. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey David von Riesen, Photographer July ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey David von Riesen, Photographer July 1965 BARRACKS (West), Left - BARRACKS (East), Right (Combined into New Barn) - Fort Larned, Barracks (West), Larned, Pawnee County, KS

  8. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey David von Riesen, Photographer July ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey David von Riesen, Photographer July 1965 BARRACKS (West), Left - BARRACKS (East), Right (Combined into New Barn) - Fort Larned, Barracks (East), Larned, Pawnee County, KS

  9. Elimination of a "Gummy Smile" With Crown Lengthening and Lip Repositioning.

    PubMed

    Mahn, Douglas H

    2016-01-01

    Excessive gingival display is considered unattractive by many patients. A combination of surgical approaches may be required to correct this problem. Clinical crown lengthening involves recontouring crestal bone levels and moving the gingival margin in an apical direction. Lip repositioning reduces gingival display by limiting upper lip movement when smiling. This article describes a case in which a combination of clinical crown lengthening and lip repositioning was used to correct excessive gingival display when smiling.

  10. Susceptibility to emotional contagion for negative emotions improves detection of smile authenticity

    PubMed Central

    Manera, Valeria; Grandi, Elisa; Colle, Livia

    2013-01-01

    A smile is a context-dependent emotional expression. A smiling face can signal the experience of enjoyable emotions, but people can also smile to convince another person that enjoyment is occurring when it is not. For this reason, the ability to discriminate between felt and faked enjoyment expressions is a crucial social skill. Despite its importance, adults show remarkable individual variation in this ability. Revealing the factors responsible for these huge individual differences is a key challenge in this domain. Here we investigated, on a large sample of participants, whether individual differences in smile authenticity recognition are accounted for by differences in the predisposition to experience other people's emotions, i.e., by susceptibility to emotional contagion. Results showed that susceptibility to emotional contagion for negative emotions increased smile authenticity detection, while susceptibility to emotional contagion for positive emotions worsened detection performance, because it leaded to categorize most of the faked smiles as sincere. These findings suggest that susceptibility to emotional contagion plays a key role in complex emotion recognition, and point out the importance of analyzing the tendency to experience other people's positive and negative emotions as separate abilities. PMID:23508036

  11. The Perception and Mimicry of Facial Movements Predict Judgments of Smile Authenticity

    PubMed Central

    Korb, Sebastian; With, Stéphane; Niedenthal, Paula; Kaiser, Susanne; Grandjean, Didier

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms through which people perceive different types of smiles and judge their authenticity remain unclear. Here, 19 different types of smiles were created based on the Facial Action Coding System (FACS), using highly controlled, dynamic avatar faces. Participants observed short videos of smiles while their facial mimicry was measured with electromyography (EMG) over four facial muscles. Smile authenticity was judged after each trial. Avatar attractiveness was judged once in response to each avatar’s neutral face. Results suggest that, in contrast to most earlier work using static pictures as stimuli, participants relied less on the Duchenne marker (the presence of crow’s feet wrinkles around the eyes) in their judgments of authenticity. Furthermore, mimicry of smiles occurred in the Zygomaticus Major, Orbicularis Oculi, and Corrugator muscles. Consistent with theories of embodied cognition, activity in these muscles predicted authenticity judgments, suggesting that facial mimicry influences the perception of smiles. However, no significant mediation effect of facial mimicry was found. Avatar attractiveness did not predict authenticity judgments or mimicry patterns. PMID:24918939

  12. Smile effect detection for dispersive hypersepctral imager based on the doped reflectance panel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jiankang; Liu, Xiaoli; Ji, Yiqun; Chen, Yuheng; Shen, Weimin

    2012-11-01

    Hyperspectral imager is now widely used in many regions, such as resource development, environmental monitoring and so on. The reliability of spectral data is based on the instrument calibration. The smile, wavelengths at the center pixels of imaging spectrometer detector array are different from the marginal pixels, is a main factor in the spectral calibration because it can deteriorate the spectral data accuracy. When the spectral resolution is high, little smile can result in obvious signal deviation near weak atmospheric absorption peak. The traditional method of detecting smile is monochromator wavelength scanning which is time consuming and complex and can not be used in the field or at the flying platform. We present a new smile detection method based on the holmium oxide panel which has the rich of absorbed spectral features. The higher spectral resolution spectrometer and the under-test imaging spectrometer acquired the optical signal from the Spectralon panel and the holmium oxide panel respectively. The wavelength absorption peak positions of column pixels are determined by curve fitting method which includes spectral response function sequence model and spectral resampling. The iteration strategy and Pearson coefficient together are used to confirm the correlation between the measured and modeled spectral curve. The present smile detection method is posed on our designed imaging spectrometer and the result shows that it can satisfy precise smile detection requirement of high spectral resolution imaging spectrometer.

  13. Perceptions of Altered Smile Esthetics: A Comparative Evaluation in Orthodontists, Dentists, and Laypersons

    PubMed Central

    Shagmani, Muftah; Al Kaddah, Fatma

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The current investigation was proposed to determine the impression of trained dental professionals and laypeople towards the modified smile esthetics. Materials and Methods. Twenty-six images were randomized in a survey and graded according to attractiveness by the orthodontists, general dentists, and laypeople. Photographs of gingival display, midline diastema, central incisor crown length, and lateral incisor crown width were manipulated with five minor changes in each. For smile arc and buccal corridor, two major changes were incorporated besides the ideal photograph. One-way ANOVA and Post Hoc analysis of the responses were measured for each group. Results. Most evaluators opined that the ideal smile in each category was the most acceptable. Orthodontists were more perceptive and exacting in accepting variations in the smile arc and buccal corridors. Dental professionals and laypeople indicated that either complete absence or a 0.5 mm of alterations in a gingival display, midline diastema, and crown length makes a smile beautiful and pleasant. Changes in crown width were not perceivable by all the three groups. Conclusion. Eastern Arabic laymen are more conscious about alterations in gingival display, midline diastema, and crown length in their smile. Hence, the orthodontist should pay attention to these factors during any orthodontic treatment. PMID:27774105

  14. Susceptibility to emotional contagion for negative emotions improves detection of smile authenticity.

    PubMed

    Manera, Valeria; Grandi, Elisa; Colle, Livia

    2013-01-01

    A smile is a context-dependent emotional expression. A smiling face can signal the experience of enjoyable emotions, but people can also smile to convince another person that enjoyment is occurring when it is not. For this reason, the ability to discriminate between felt and faked enjoyment expressions is a crucial social skill. Despite its importance, adults show remarkable individual variation in this ability. Revealing the factors responsible for these huge individual differences is a key challenge in this domain. Here we investigated, on a large sample of participants, whether individual differences in smile authenticity recognition are accounted for by differences in the predisposition to experience other people's emotions, i.e., by susceptibility to emotional contagion. Results showed that susceptibility to emotional contagion for negative emotions increased smile authenticity detection, while susceptibility to emotional contagion for positive emotions worsened detection performance, because it leaded to categorize most of the faked smiles as sincere. These findings suggest that susceptibility to emotional contagion plays a key role in complex emotion recognition, and point out the importance of analyzing the tendency to experience other people's positive and negative emotions as separate abilities.

  15. The effects of camera lenses and dental specialties on the perception of smile esthetics

    PubMed Central

    Sajjadi, Seyed Hadi; Khosravanifard, Behnam; Esmaeilpour, Mozhgan; Rakhshan, Vahid; Moazzami, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aim: The purpose of this study was to investigate whether different camera lenses and dental specialties can affect the perception of smile esthetics. Methods: In the first phase of this study, 40 female smile photographs (taken from dental students) were evaluated by six orthodontists, three specialists in restorative dentistry, and three prosthodontists to select the most beautiful smiles. The 20 students with the best smile ranks were again photographed in standard conditions, but this time with two different lenses: Regular and then macro lenses. Each referee evaluated the beauty of the smiles on a visual analog scale. The referees were blinded of the type of lenses, and the images were all coded. The data were analyzed using two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), Kruskal–Wallis and Mann–Whitney U-tests (alpha = 0.05, alpha = 0.0167). Results: The lenses led to similar scores of beauty perception (Mann–Whitney P = 0.8). There was no difference between subjective beauty perception of specialties (Kruskal–Wallis P = 0.6). Two-way ANOVA indicated no significant role for lenses (P = 0.1750), specialties (P = 0.7677), or their interaction (P = 0.7852). Conclusion: The photographs taken by a regular lens and then digitally magnified can be as appealing as close-up photographs taken by a macro lens. Experts in different specialties (orthodontics, prosthodontics, and restorative dentistry) showed similar subjective judgments of smile beauty. PMID:26952147

  16. Observation capability of Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) from International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasai, Yasuko; Baron, Philippe; Mendrok, Jana; Tanaka, Takahiro; Urban, Joachim; Kita, Kazuyuki; Sato, Ryota; Murtah, Donal; Suzuki, Makoto; Shiotani, Masato

    2010-05-01

    A new generation of super-sensitive submillimeter-wave receivers, employing SIS (Superconductor-Insulator- Superconductor) technology, will provide new opportunities for precise remote sensing observation of minor constituents in the atmosphere. SMILES had been launched at 11/09/2009, and installed on the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) in the International Space Station (ISS). SMILES is a collaboration project between NICT and JAXA. Mission objectives of SMILES are: i) Space demonstration of super-sensitive SIS mixer and 4-K mechanical cooler technology ii) Super-sensitive global observation of atmospheric minor constituents JEM/SMILES observes the atmospheric species such as O3, H35Cl, H37Cl, ClO, HO2, BrO, HOCl, HOBr, HNO3, CH3CN, Ozone isotope species, H2O, and Ice Cloud with the precisions in a few to several tens percents. Theoretical observation capability was studied with error analysis. The altitude region of observation is from the upper troposphere to the mesopouse. SMILES early results will be shown with global distributions (L3 data). The early comparison/validation of ozone performed with several satellite data, such as MLS, ACE, OSIRIS and Odin.SMR. The statistical analysis showed the differences were less of 5 percent between SMILES and other satellites data validated. This value was consistent with theoretical capability. This super technology may allow us to open new issues in atmospheric science.

  17. Wound healing profiles of hyperopic-small incision lenticule extraction (SMILE)

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yu-Chi; Ang, Heng Pei; Teo, Ericia Pei Wen; Lwin, Nyein Chan; Yam, Gary Hin Fai; Mehta, Jodhbir S.

    2016-01-01

    Refractive surgical treatment of hyperopia still remains a challenge for refractive surgeons. A new nomogram of small incision lenticule extraction (SMILE) procedure has recently been developed for the treatment of hyperopia. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the wound healing and inflammatory responses of this new nomogram (hyperopic-SMILE), and compared them to those of hyperopic-laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK), using a rabbit model. A total of 26 rabbits were used, and slit lamp biomicroscopy, autorefractor/keratometer, intraocular pressure measurement, anterior segment optical coherence tomography, corneal topography, and in vivo confocal microscopy examinations were performed during the study period of 4 weeks. The corneas were then harvested and subject to immunofluorescence of markers for inflammation (CD11b), wound healing (fibronectin) and keratocyte response (HSP47). The lenticule ultrastructual changes were also analyzed by transmission electron microscopy. Out results showed that hyperopic-SMILE effectively steepened the cornea. Compared to hyperopic-LASIK, hyperopic-SMILE had less postoperative wound healing response and stromal interface reaction, especially in higher refractive correction. However, compared to myopic-SMILE, hyperopic-SMILE resulted in more central deranged collagen fibrils. These results provide more perspective into this new treatment option for hyperopia, and evidence for future laser nomogram modification. PMID:27418330

  18. The perception and mimicry of facial movements predict judgments of smile authenticity.

    PubMed

    Korb, Sebastian; With, Stéphane; Niedenthal, Paula; Kaiser, Susanne; Grandjean, Didier

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms through which people perceive different types of smiles and judge their authenticity remain unclear. Here, 19 different types of smiles were created based on the Facial Action Coding System (FACS), using highly controlled, dynamic avatar faces. Participants observed short videos of smiles while their facial mimicry was measured with electromyography (EMG) over four facial muscles. Smile authenticity was judged after each trial. Avatar attractiveness was judged once in response to each avatar's neutral face. Results suggest that, in contrast to most earlier work using static pictures as stimuli, participants relied less on the Duchenne marker (the presence of crow's feet wrinkles around the eyes) in their judgments of authenticity. Furthermore, mimicry of smiles occurred in the Zygomaticus Major, Orbicularis Oculi, and Corrugator muscles. Consistent with theories of embodied cognition, activity in these muscles predicted authenticity judgments, suggesting that facial mimicry influences the perception of smiles. However, no significant mediation effect of facial mimicry was found. Avatar attractiveness did not predict authenticity judgments or mimicry patterns.

  19. Treatment of gummy smile: Nasal septum dysplasia as etiologic factor and therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jiao; Herrler, Tanja; Xu, Hua; Li, Qingfeng; Dai, Chuanchang

    2015-10-01

    Various techniques to improve gummy smile exist. Depending on the individual etiology, previous approaches have focused on osseous, dental, and soft-tissue aspects. On the basis of the identification of nasal septum dysplasia as etiologic factor of gummy smile, we propose a novel strategy for the improvement in the treatment of excessive gingival exposure. In this prospective controlled study, 121 Asian patients with gummy smile and 150 volunteers were examined and compared with regard to the developmental status of the nasal septal cartilage reflected by the columella upward maximum movability (CUMM) as objective measurement parameter. A total of 46 patients with significantly increased CUMM underwent surgical treatment for excessive gingival exposure by septum cartilage reinforcement and, where required, additional extension using an autologous cartilage graft or an expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) implant. Gingival exposure at the fullest smile was photographed, measured, and analyzed before and 1, 3, and 6 months after surgery, and all possible complications were recorded. The results were evaluated in a patient satisfaction survey. CUMM showed a significant statistical difference between the patients desiring treatment for gummy smile (5.6 ± 0.92 mm) and volunteers (3.1 ± 0.76 mm), (p < 0.05). In the 46 patients who underwent surgical correction of gummy smile, the measured maximum gingival exposure at the fullest smile was 4.52 ± 1.7 mm preoperatively and significantly decreased to 1.79 ± 0.26 mm at 6 months postoperatively (p < 0.05). The overall complication rate was low, including transient stiffness of smile, implant deformation, and acute infection. The postoperative results were highly satisfactory in terms of aesthetic smile. This study proposes a novel strategy of reinforcement and extension of the nasal septum cartilage for the improvement of gummy smile confirming septal cartilage dysplasia as the etiologic factor.

  20. The relationship between smile attractiveness and esthetic parameters of patients with lateral agenesis treated with tooth recontouring or implants

    PubMed Central

    De-Marchi, Luciana Manzotti; Pini, Núbia Inocencya Pavesi; Pascotto, Renata Corrêa

    2012-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to associate smile esthetic judgment with dentofacial attributes of patients with unilateral and bilateral agenesis of maxillary lateral incisors treated with recontouring of canines or implants and patients with no agenesis (control). Material and methods Forty-six participants were divided into two groups: those treated with recontouring (N = 26) and those treated with implants (N = 20). The participants in the control group (N = 22) were selected among dentistry students at the State University of Maringá, Brazil. Photographs of posed smiles (17 cm × 10 cm) were evaluated with a 100-mm Visual Analog Scale. Smile attractiveness was judged by two groups: laypersons and dentists (N = 20 in each group). Judgment was classified into Unpleasant and Pleasant. Measurements of 11 smile attributes were done with ImageTool Version 3.0. These measurements were correlated with the type of judgment using the Pearson correlation coefficient. Results The two groups of evaluators showed no rating difference (analysis of variance, P = 0.64), thus they were placed into a single group. No significant correlation was found between esthetic judgment and six smile attributes (incisor exposure, interlabial gap, width 3 to 3, smile index, right buccal corridor, and buccal corridor ratio). The control group showed more correlations with the unpleasant judgment type than the other groups. Conclusion Some correlations between smile attributes and esthetic judgment were found, but other features of smiles not evaluated in this study may interfere in smile attractiveness. PMID:23674925

  1. The unique contribution of elements of smile aesthetics to psychosocial well-being.

    PubMed

    Lukez, A; Pavlic, A; Trinajstic Zrinski, M; Spalj, S

    2015-04-01

    Pleasant smile aesthetics is an important contributory factor to psychosocial well-being. The aim of this study was to determine the psychosocial influence of smile aesthetics. The study was cross-sectional on a convenient sample that included patients, pupils, students and faculty staff. A total of 155 subjects (36% male) aged 12-39 (mean age 21, interquartile range 19-23) were included. Occlusal characteristics were recorded by the Index of Complexity, Outcome and Need, and smiling frontal view photographs were obtained. Fourteen variables were measured using photogrammetric analysis: smile width, visibility of buccal corridors, maximum teeth exposure, total gingival display, lip thickness, degree of occlusal cant and deviation from golden proportion of the teeth in maxillary intercanine sector. Psychometric instruments included the Psychosocial Impact of Dental Aesthetics Questionnaire and the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale. Statistical analysis comprised multiple linear regressions. Malocclusion severity is the most important predictor of psychosocial influence of smile aesthetics and self-esteem, the unique contribution of which accounts for a total of 4-27% of variability. Female gender is associated with higher psychological influence of dental aesthetics while male gender and older age with self-esteem. Malocclusions have higher psychosocial impact than parameters of mini- and micro-aesthetics of smile related to visibility of buccal corridors, amount of teeth exposure, gingival display, lip thickness, presence of occlusal cant and deviation from golden proportion of the teeth. It appears that people are not as focused on details of their smile as they are on distinctive malposition of teeth.

  2. Observation capability of Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) from International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasai, Yasuko; Tanaka, Takahiro; Dupuy, Eric; Kita, Kazuyuki; Baron, Philippe; Ochiai, Satoshi; Nishibori, Toshiyuki; Kikuchi, Kenichi; Mendrok, Jana; Murtagh, Donal P.; Urban, Joachim; Smiles Mission Team

    A new generation of sub-millimeter-wave receivers employing sensitive SIS (Superconductor-Insulator-Superconductor) detector technology will provide new opportunities for precise pas-sive remote sensing observation of minor constituents in atmosphere. Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) had been launched in September 11, 2009 and installed to the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) on the International Space Station (ISS). SMILES is a collaboration project of National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) and Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA). Mission objectives of SMILES are: 1. Space demonstration of super-sensitive SIS mixer and 4-K mechanical cooler technology 2. Super-sensitive global observation of atmospheric minor constituents with sub-millimeter-wave limb emission sounder JEM/SMILES will allow to observe the atmospheric species such as O3, H35Cl, H37Cl, ClO, HO2, BrO, HOCl, HOBr, HNO3, CH3CN, Ozone isotope species, H2O, and Ice Cloud with the precisions in a few to several tens percents. The altitude region of observation is from the upper troposphere to the mesopouse. We performed the early comparison/validation of ozone with 4 satellites measurements, AURA/MLS, Odin/SMR, ACE, and Odin/OSIRIS, and ozonesonde. SMILES ozone was in good agreement with these data. For example, difference between SMILES and MLS was less than 2 percent be-tween 20-50km. These results are consistent with the observation capabilities of JEM/SMILES with error analysis. This super technology may allow us to open new issues in atmospheric science.

  3. The Involvement of SMILE/TMTC3 in Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Response

    PubMed Central

    Racapé, Maud; Duong Van Huyen, Jean-Paul; Danger, Richard; Giral, Magali; Bleicher, Françoise; Foucher, Yohann; Pallier, Annaïck; Pilet, Paul; Tafelmeyer, Petra; Ashton-Chess, Joanna; Dugast, Emilie; Pettré, Ségolène; Charreau, Béatrice; Soulillou, Jean-Paul; Brouard, Sophie

    2011-01-01

    Background Thestate of operational tolerance has been detected sporadically in some renal transplanted patients that stopped immunosuppressive drugs, demonstrating that allograft tolerance might exist in humans. Several years ago, a study by Brouard et al. identified a molecular signature of several genes that were significantly differentially expressed in the blood of such patients compared with patients with other clinical situations. The aim of the present study is to analyze the role of one of these molecules over-expressed in the blood of operationally tolerant patients, SMILE or TMTC3, a protein whose function is still unknown. Methodology/Principal Findings We first confirmed that SMILE mRNA is differentially expressed in the blood of operationally tolerant patients with drug-free long term graft function compared to stable and rejecting patients. Using a yeast two-hybrid approach and a colocalization study by confocal microscopy we furthermore report an interaction of SMILE with PDIA3, a molecule resident in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). In accordance with this observation, SMILE silencing in HeLa cells correlated with the modulation of several transcripts involved in proteolysis and a decrease in proteasome activity. Finally, SMILE silencing increased HeLa cell sensitivity to the proteasome inhibitor Bortezomib, a drug that induces ER stress via protein overload, and increased transcript expression of a stress response protein, XBP-1, in HeLa cells and keratinocytes. Conclusion/Significance In this study we showed that SMILE is involved in the endoplasmic reticulum stress response, by modulating proteasome activity and XBP-1 transcript expression. This function of SMILE may influence immune cell behavior in the context of transplantation, and the analysis of endoplasmic reticulum stress in transplantation may reveal new pathways of regulation in long-term graft acceptance thereby increasing our understanding of tolerance. PMID:21603654

  4. Obituary: David Q. Wark, 1918-2002

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillin, Larry Max

    2003-12-01

    David Q. Wark, a research meteorologist at the National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA/NESDIS) and its predecessor organizations for 55 years, died of cancer 30 July 2002. He will be long remembered for his seminal contributions to the weather satellite program. A pioneer in the use of satellite sensors to provide observations of the Earth's environment for application to weather forecasting and atmospheric science, Dr. Wark was noted for his brilliant insights, dedication, and exceptional scientific achievements. He developed many of the theoretical and experimental techniques on which NOAA's current multi- billion-dollar meteorological satellite program is based. In the 1960's and early 1970's, he and his NOAA colleague Donald Hilleary were the motivating force and principal investigators for the first satellite instruments dedicated to sounding the atmosphere for temperature and water-vapor. These instruments included the Satellite Infra-Red Spectrometer (SIRS)-A and -B and the Vertical Temperature Profile Radiometer (VTPR), which were flown on NASA's Nimbus satellites and NOAA's ITOS-D satellites, respectively. With colleague Henry Fleming, he formulated the radiative transfer equation that quantifies the spectral radiances of the Earth and its atmosphere (measured at satellite altitude) and inverted that equation mathematically to infer the atmospheric temperature profile from satellite-based measurements of those radiances. A difficulty they had to overcome was that the mathematical problem is ill-posed, i.e., it admits of an infinite number of solutions. They arrived at a unique solution via an innovative application of a-priori information on the atmospheric state. This work was described in the landmark 1965 Wark and Fleming paper in the American Meteorological Society's Monthly Weather Review. From that early period until just weeks before his death, Dr. Wark continued

  5. Reginald Crundall Punnett: First Arthur Balfour Professor of Genetics, Cambridge, 1912

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, A. W. F.

    2012-01-01

    R. C. Punnett, the codiscoverer of linkage with W. Bateson in 1904, had the good fortune to be invited to be the first Arthur Balfour Professor of Genetics at Cambridge University, United Kingdom, in 1912 when Bateson, for whom it had been intended, declined to leave his new appointment as first Director of the John Innes Horticultural Institute. We here celebrate the centenary of the first professorship dedicated to genetics, outlining Punnett’s career and his scientific contributions, with special reference to the discovery of “partial coupling” in the sweet pea (later “linkage”) and to the diagram known as Punnett’s square. His seeming reluctance as coauthor with Bateson to promote the reduplication hypothesis to explain the statistical evidence for linkage is stressed, as is his relationship with his successor as Arthur Balfour Professor, R. A. Fisher. The background to the establishment of the Professorship is also described. PMID:22964834

  6. Reginald Crundall Punnett: first Arthur Balfour Professor of Genetics, Cambridge, 1912.

    PubMed

    Edwards, A W F

    2012-09-01

    R. C. Punnett, the codiscoverer of linkage with W. Bateson in 1904, had the good fortune to be invited to be the first Arthur Balfour Professor of Genetics at Cambridge University, United Kingdom, in 1912 when Bateson, for whom it had been intended, declined to leave his new appointment as first Director of the John Innes Horticultural Institute. We here celebrate the centenary of the first professorship dedicated to genetics, outlining Punnett's career and his scientific contributions, with special reference to the discovery of "partial coupling" in the sweet pea (later "linkage") and to the diagram known as Punnett's square. His seeming reluctance as coauthor with Bateson to promote the reduplication hypothesis to explain the statistical evidence for linkage is stressed, as is his relationship with his successor as Arthur Balfour Professor, R. A. Fisher. The background to the establishment of the Professorship is also described.

  7. Arthur C. Graesser: Award for Distinguished Contributions of Applications of Psychology to Education and Training.

    PubMed

    2011-11-01

    Presents Arthur C. Graesser as the 2011 winner of the American Psychological Association Award for Distinguished Contributions of Applications of Psychology to Education and Training. "As a multifaceted psychologist, cognitive engineer of useful education and training technologies, and mentor of new talent for the world of applied and translational cognitive science, Arthur C. Graesser is the perfect role model, showing how a strong scholar and intellect can shape both research and practice. His work is a mix of top-tier scholarship in psychology, education, intelligent systems, and computational linguistics. He combines cognitive science excellence with bold use of psychological knowledge and intelligent systems to design new generations of learning opportunities and to help lay the foundation for a translational science of learning." (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. STS-92 MS McArthur gets suit checked in the White Room before launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    STS-92 Mission Specialist William S. McArthur Jr. undergoes final suit check in the White Room before entering Discovery. The White Room is an environmentally controlled area at the end of the Orbiter Access Arm that provides entry to the orbiter as well as emergency egress if needed. The arm remains in the extended position until 7 minutes 24 seconds before launch. McArthur and the rest of the crew are making the fifth flight to the International Space Station for construction. Discovery carries a payload that includes the Integrated Truss Structure Z-1, first of 10 trusses that will form the backbone of the Space Station, and the third Pressurized Mating Adapter that will provide a Shuttle docking port for solar array installation on the sixth Station flight and Lab installation on the seventh Station flight. The mission includes four spacewalks for the construction activities. Discovery's landing is expected Oct. 22 at 2:10 p.m. EDT.

  9. Measurement of middle and upper atmospheric horizontal winds with a submillimeter/THz limb sounder: results from JEM/SMILES and simulation study for SMILES-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baron, Philippe; Manago, Naohiro; Ozeki, Hiroyuki; Yoshihisa, Irimajiri; Donal, Murtagh; Yoshinori, Uzawa; Satoshi, Ochiai; Masato, Shiotani; Makoto, Suzuki

    2016-04-01

    In a near future, ESA will launch the Atmospheric Dynamics Mission (ADM) equipped with a lidar for measuring tropospheric and lower stratospheric winds. NASA will continue a long-term series of upper atmospheric wind measurements (altitudes >80 km) with the new Michelson Interferometer for Global High-resolution Thermospheric Imaging (MIGHTI) on the Ionospheric Connection Explorer (ICON) satellite. No mission is planned to observe winds in the middle atmosphere (30-80 km), though they are recognized as essential parameters for understanding atmospheric dynamics and the vertical coupling between atmospheric regions. They are also promising data for improving long-term weather forecast and climate modelling. It has been demonstrated with the Superconducting Submillimeter Wave Limb Emission Sounder (SMILES, Oct 2009 - Apr 2010) that a 4-K cooled microwave radiometer can provide data to fill the altitude gap in the wind measurements. Its possible successor named SMILES-2, is being designed in Japan for the study of the middle and upper atmospheric chemistry and dynamics (O3, H2O, T, atomic O, OH, HO2, ClO, BrO, ...). If realized, the instrument will measure sub-millimeter and THz molecular spectral lines (616-150 μm) with high sensitivity and frequency resolution. The SMILES-2 characteristics are very well suited for horizontal wind observations between 20 km to more than 160 km. The best performances are found between 35-90 km where the retrieval precision is better than 3 m/s for a vertical resolution of 2-3 km [1]. In this presentation, we summarize the results obtained from SMILES and assess the measurement performances of SMILES-2 to measure horizontal winds. [1] P. Baron, N. Manago, H. Ozeki, Y. Irimajiri, D. Murtagh, Y. Uzawa, S. Ochiai, M. Shiotani, M. Suzuki: "Measurement of stratospheric and mesospheric winds with a SubMillimeter wave limb sounder: Results from JEM/SMILES and simulation study for SMILES-2"; Proc. of SPIE Remote sensing, 96390N-96390N-20

  10. Obituary: David Q. Wark, 1918-2002

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillin, Larry Max

    2003-12-01

    David Q. Wark, a research meteorologist at the National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA/NESDIS) and its predecessor organizations for 55 years, died of cancer 30 July 2002. He will be long remembered for his seminal contributions to the weather satellite program. A pioneer in the use of satellite sensors to provide observations of the Earth's environment for application to weather forecasting and atmospheric science, Dr. Wark was noted for his brilliant insights, dedication, and exceptional scientific achievements. He developed many of the theoretical and experimental techniques on which NOAA's current multi- billion-dollar meteorological satellite program is based. In the 1960's and early 1970's, he and his NOAA colleague Donald Hilleary were the motivating force and principal investigators for the first satellite instruments dedicated to sounding the atmosphere for temperature and water-vapor. These instruments included the Satellite Infra-Red Spectrometer (SIRS)-A and -B and the Vertical Temperature Profile Radiometer (VTPR), which were flown on NASA's Nimbus satellites and NOAA's ITOS-D satellites, respectively. With colleague Henry Fleming, he formulated the radiative transfer equation that quantifies the spectral radiances of the Earth and its atmosphere (measured at satellite altitude) and inverted that equation mathematically to infer the atmospheric temperature profile from satellite-based measurements of those radiances. A difficulty they had to overcome was that the mathematical problem is ill-posed, i.e., it admits of an infinite number of solutions. They arrived at a unique solution via an innovative application of a-priori information on the atmospheric state. This work was described in the landmark 1965 Wark and Fleming paper in the American Meteorological Society's Monthly Weather Review. From that early period until just weeks before his death, Dr. Wark continued

  11. Obituary: David Fulmer Bender, 1913-2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Sylvia L.

    2004-12-01

    David Fulmer Bender died in San Diego, California, on 13 September 2004, at the age of 91. His heart stopped suddenly while he was dancing. His pioneering work in establishing comprehensive, computer-accessible ephemerides of asteroids and comets found many applications, including the first-ever visit to an asteroid, Gaspra, by an interplanetary spacecraft. Dave was born in Reno, Nevada, on 10 February 1913, to Homer Charles Bender and Susan Bowers Bender. The family moved to Spokane, Washington, while Dave was very young. His father was a civil engineer and a graduate of MIT, who helped design bridges and dams throughout the Northwest, including the Grand Coolie Dam. Dave had a brother, Phillip (now deceased), who was one year younger. Advancing rapidly in the Spokane school system, Dave finished high school when he was 15 years old. At 16 he moved to Pasadena, California, and began his studies at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). In addition to pursuing his course work, he was active in track and football, a tendency toward physical exercise that stayed with him for the rest of his life. It was probably during these years that Dave heard a lecture by Albert Einstein, as mentioned to colleagues many years later. Dave received a BS degree in physics in 1933, an MS in 1934, and a PhD in 1937, all from Caltech. His dissertation was entitled, "The Index of Refraction of Air in the Photographic Infrared." During his sophomore year he found his way to Pomona College in Claremont, California, where he met his future wife, Elizabeth Boyden at a social gathering. They were married in 1935. Dave's academic career spanned the years from 1937 to 1970, initially at Louisiana State University, Vanderbilt University, and then Fisk. As a life-long pacifist and conscientious objector, Dave served alternate duty during World War II. In 1946 he joined the faculty of the physics department at Whittier College in California, where he became the department chair and

  12. STS-74 Mission Specialist Bill McArthur Jr suits up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    William S. 'Bill' McArthur Jr., Mission Specialist 3 on Shuttle Mission STS-74, shares a light moment with a suit technician during suitup activities in the Operations and Checkout Building. He and four fellow astronauts will depart shortly for Pad 39A, where the Space Shuttle Atlantis awaits a second liftoff attempt during a seven-minute window scheduled to open at approximately 7:30 a.m. EST, Nov. 12.

  13. INTRODUCTION: David Sherrington as a mentor of young scientists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldbart, Paul M.

    2008-08-01

    How deeply honoured I am to have the opportunity to express my thoughts at this delightful celebration of David's achievements, so far, in his remarkable career. I have been asked to center my remarks on David's contributions to the mentoring and professional development of scientists early in their careers. This is a topic that I am more than happy to reflect on, because it gives me the opportunity to recall the exciting period I spent as one of David's postgraduate students at Imperial College in the early 1980s. It also gives me the chance to publicly express my gratitude to David for the opportunities he created for me at that time, as well as for the interest and care he has shown in my career and well-being ever since, as we have met up and exchanged news and ideas around the world: in New Mexico and Colorado, in Cancun, Paris and Trieste, at numerous March Meetings of the American Physical Society and, of course in London, Oxford, and my home town, Champaign-Urbana, location of the University of Illinois. I have been a member of David's circle for 25 years now, and I would like to tell you a little about how this came to be. Not because of what this says about me, but, rather, because of what it tells you about David and the rich generosity of his spirit and effort when it comes to supporting the underdog. I was indeed one such underdog—and that's putting it charitably—when I first met David in September of 1982, not long before the academic year was to begin. I had heard about the exciting circle of physical and mathematical ideas swirling around the spin glass question during the previous year, which I had spent at the University of California's Los Angeles campus, through an opportunity kindly arranged, as it happens, by Sam Edwards. But I was eager to return to the UK for postgraduate studies and to work on spin glasses, so I simply showed up at David's Imperial College office, unannounced (if I remember correctly). And with his characteristic

  14. ClO Observations from Space by JEM/SMILES: First results of SMILES L2 research product and comparison with MLS and Odin/SMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Tomohiro; Kasai, Yasuko; Baron, Philippe; Ochiai, Satoshi; Kanamori, Hideto; Murayama, Yasuhiro; Manabe, Takeshi; Urban, Joachim; Murtagh, Donal; Smiles Mission Team

    Submillimetre-wave receiving Systems based on sensitive SIS (Superconductor-Insulator-Superconductor) detector Technology provide new opportunities for Accurate Observation of ClO in the at-mosphere. The Superconducting Submillimetre-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) was launched and installed onboard the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) of the International Space Station (ISS) in September 2009. The SMILES project is a collaboration of the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA). The aims of THE SMILES project are: i) Space demonstration of super-conductive SIS mixer for submillimetre-wave limb emission sounding cooled down to 4K using a mechanical cooler. ii) Global measurements of atmospheric molecules and radicals. SMILES observes atmospheric species and isotopologues such as Osub3/sub, Hsup35/supCl, Hsup37/supCl, ClO, Upper tro-pospheric humidity, BrO, HOBr, HOCl, HOsub2/sub, Hsub2/subOsub2/sub, HNOsub3/sub, CHsub3/subCN, SOsub2/sub, and ozone isotope species in the altitude region from the upper troposphere to the mesosphere with a precision of a few percent. SMILES observes day and night profiles of ClO in the altitude range 20-65km between 65N and 38S. We have been analyzing the ClO observations. We will present the recent status of the analysis with respect to the NICT research level-2 data product, give an error estimation, and provide early comparison/validation results from comparisons with global measurements from Odin/SMR and MLS.

  15. STS-99 Mission Specialist Mohri smiles for camera.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- STS-99 Mission Specialist Mamoru Mohri of Japan has only smiles after Space Shuttle Endeavour's landing on KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility completing the 11-day, 5-hour, 38-minute-long STS-99 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 6:22:23 p.m. EST Feb. 22 , landing on orbit 181 of the mission. Nose gear touchdown was at 6:22:35 p.m.. EST, and wheel stop at 6:23:25 p.m. EST. At the controls were Commander Kevin Kregel and Pilot Dominic Gorie. Also onboard the orbiter were Mission Specialists Janet Kavandi, Janice Voss, and Gerhard Thiele of Germany. Mohri is with the National Space Development Agency (NASDA) and Thiele is with the European Space Agency. The crew returned from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission after mapping more than 47 million square miles of the Earth's surface. This was the 97th flight in the Space Shuttle program and the 14th for Endeavour, also marking the 50th landing at KSC, the 21st consecutive landing at KSC, and the 28th in the last 29 Shuttle flights.

  16. When 'slime' becomes 'smile': developmental letter position dyslexia in English.

    PubMed

    Kohnen, Saskia; Nickels, Lyndsey; Castles, Anne; Friedmann, Naama; McArthur, Genevieve

    2012-12-01

    We report the first three cases of selective developmental letter position dyslexia in English. Although the parents and teachers of the children were concerned about these children's reading, standard tests did not reveal their deficit. It was only when the appropriate target words were presented, in this case, migratable words, that their letter position dyslexia was detected. Whereas previous research has described cases with acquired and developmental forms of letter position dyslexia in Hebrew and Arabic readers, this is the first report of this type of reading disorder in English. The cardinal symptom of letter position dyslexia is the migration of letters within the word (reading slime as 'smile'; pirates as 'parties'). These migration errors occur in reading aloud as well as in tasks of silent reading. This study provides further evidence that migration errors emerge at the level of early visual-orthographic analysis, in the letter position encoding function. Alternative explanations for the occurrence of migration errors such as poor phonological processing or a deficit in the orthographic input lexicon are ruled out.

  17. Cross-Cultural Adaptations of the MacArthur Competence Assessment Tool for Treatment in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Saber, Ali; Tabatabaei, Seyed Mahmoud; Akasheh, Goodarz; Sehat, Mojtaba; Zanjani, Zahra; Larijani, Bagher

    2016-01-01

    Background According to general ethical and legal principles, valid consent must be obtained before starting any procedure. Objectives Due to the lack of a standard tool for assessing patients’ capacity to consent to medical treatment in Iran, the present study was carried out aiming to devise a Persian version of a cross-cultural adaptation of the MacArthur competence assessment tool. Patients and Methods By reviewing different methods of cultural translation and adaptation for assessment tools, and due to the lack of consensus on its processes, we selected Wild’s model as one of the most comprehensive methods in this regard. Wild’s (2005) 10-stage model includes preparation, forward translation, reconciliation of the forward translation, back translation of reconciliation, back translation review, cognitive debriefing and cognitive review, and finalization, proofreading and final reporting. Using this model, we translated the MacArthur assessment tool and made it adaptable to Iranian patients. Results The MacArthur assessment tool is not dependent on any specific culture and language. As a result, if translation and its scientific adaptation are done based on an integrated and detailed model, the tool can be used for every culture and language. In other words, this tool is not culture-specific; so, it is applicable in cases where a translation is needed, and it can be culturally adapted to suit different societies. Conclusions In the present study, we are able to focus on and prove the efficacy and benefits of this measurement tool. PMID:27148503

  18. The Power of an Infant's Smile: Maternal Physiological Responses to Infant Emotional Expressions.

    PubMed

    Mizugaki, Sanae; Maehara, Yukio; Okanoya, Kazuo; Myowa-Yamakoshi, Masako

    2015-01-01

    Infant emotional expressions, such as distress cries, evoke maternal physiological reactions. Most of which involve accelerated sympathetic nervous activity. Comparatively little is known about effects of positive infant expressions, such as happy smiles, on maternal physiological responses. This study investigated how physiological and psychological maternal states change in response to infants' emotional expressions. Thirty first-time mothers viewed films of their own 6- to 7-month-old infants' affective behavior. Each observed a video of a distress cry followed by a video showing one of two expressions (randomly assigned): a happy smiling face (smile condition) or a calm neutral face (neutral condition). Both before and after the session, participants completed a self-report inventory assessing their emotional states. The results of the self-report inventory revealed no effects of exposure to the infant videos. However, the mothers in the smile condition, but not in the neutral condition, showed deceleration of skin conductance. These findings demonstrate that the mothers who observed their infants smiling showed decreased sympathetic activity. We propose that an infant's positive emotional expression may affect the branch of the maternal stress-response system that modulates the homeostatic balance of the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems.

  19. Training approach-avoidance of smiling faces affects emotional vulnerability in socially anxious individuals

    PubMed Central

    Rinck, Mike; Telli, Sibel; Kampmann, Isabel L.; Woud, Marcella L.; Kerstholt, Merel; te Velthuis, Sarai; Wittkowski, Matthias; Becker, Eni S.

    2013-01-01

    Previous research revealed an automatic behavioral bias in high socially anxious individuals (HSAs): although their explicit evaluations of smiling faces are positive, they show automatic avoidance of these faces. This is reflected by faster pushing than pulling of smiling faces in an Approach-Avoidance Task (AAT; Heuer et al., 2007). The current study addressed the causal role of this avoidance bias for social anxiety. To this end, we used the AAT to train HSAs, either to approach smiling faces or to avoid them. We examined whether such an AAT training could change HSAs' automatic avoidance tendencies, and if yes, whether AAT effects would generalize to a new approach task with new facial stimuli, and to mood and anxiety in a social threat situation (a video-recorded self-presentation). We found that HSAs trained to approach smiling faces did indeed approach female faces faster after the training than HSAs trained to avoid smiling faces. Moreover, approach-faces training reduced emotional vulnerability: it led to more positive mood and lower anxiety after the self-presentation than avoid-faces training. These results suggest that automatic approach-avoidance tendencies have a causal role in social anxiety, and that they can be modified by a simple computerized training. This may open new avenues in the therapy of social phobia. PMID:23970862

  20. Validation of ozone data from the Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imai, Koji; Manago, Naohiro; Mitsuda, Chihiro; Naito, Yoko; Nishimoto, Eriko; Sakazaki, Takatoshi; Fujiwara, Masatomo; Froidevaux, Lucien; Clarmann, Thomas; Stiller, Gabriele P.; Murtagh, Donal P.; Rong, Ping-Ping; Mlynczak, Martin G.; Walker, Kaley A.; Kinnison, Douglas E.; Akiyoshi, Hideharu; Nakamura, Tetsu; Miyasaka, Takayuki; Nishibori, Toshiyuki; Mizobuchi, Satoko; Kikuchi, Ken-Ichi; Ozeki, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Chikako; Hayashi, Hiroo; Sano, Takuki; Suzuki, Makoto; Takayanagi, Masahiro; Shiotani, Masato

    2013-06-01

    The Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) onboard the International Space Station provided global measurements of ozone profiles in the middle atmosphere from 12 October 2009 to 21 April 2010. We present validation studies of the SMILES version 2.1 ozone product based on coincidence statistics with satellite observations and outputs of chemistry and transport models (CTMs). Comparisons of the stratospheric ozone with correlative data show agreements that are generally within 10%. In the mesosphere, the agreement is also good and better than 30% even at a high altitude of 73 km, and the SMILES measurements with their local time coverage also capture the diurnal variability very well. The recommended altitude range for scientific use is from 16 to 73 km. We note that the SMILES ozone values for altitude above 26 km are smaller than some of the correlative satellite datasets; conversely the SMILES values in the lower stratosphere tend to be larger than correlative data, particularly in the tropics, with less than 8% difference below ~24 km. The larger values in the lower stratosphere are probably due to departure of retrieval results between two detection bands at altitudes below 28 km; it is ~3% at 24 km and is increasing rapidly down below.

  1. Intercomparison of BrO and O3 vertical distributions retrieved from SMILES and SCIAMACHY measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozanov, Alexei; Hendrick, Francois; Kasai, Yasuko; Mieruch, Sebastian; Sinnhuber, Bjoern-Martin; Baron, Philippe; Bovensmann, Heinrich; Burrows, John P.; van Roozendael, Michel; von Savigny, Christian; Shiotani, Masato; Suzuki, Makoto

    Whereas the Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric CHartographY (SCIA-MACHY) launched on board ENVISAT in March 2002 provides now almost eight years of global measurements of various atmospheric species, the Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) is a new instrument put to operation on board the International Space Station (ISS) in October 2009. In this study we present first results obtained from the SMILES instrument and perform a comparison to SCIAMACHY and some other instru-ments. We consider vertical distributions of two atmospheric species which can be retrieved from measurements from both instruments, namely, bromine monoxide (BrO) and ozone. As there are a lot of space-borne instruments providing vertical distributions of ozone this species is used to control the overall retrieval quality of SMILES and to analyze the consistency be-tween ozone datasets from different space-borne instruments. Despite its major role in ozone depletion, measurements of stratospheric BrO are still relatively sparse and a need in addi-tional observations to improve our knowledge of the stratospheric bromine balance still exists. A new important source of information on the stratospheric BrO is potentially provided by the SMILES instrument. In this study we perform a quality assessment of BrO vertical pro-files obtained from SMILES comparing these to results from SCIAMACHY and ground-based UV-visible observations.

  2. An Analysis of the Extratropical Transition of Hurricane Arthur (2014) from a JPSS Proving Ground Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folmer, M. J.; Berndt, E.; Halverson, J. B.; Dunion, J. P.; Goldberg, M.

    2015-12-01

    As part of the GOES-R and JPSS Satellite Proving Grounds, multiple proxy and operational products were available to analyze and forecast the complex evolution of Hurricane Arthur (2014). The National Hurricane Center, Ocean Prediction Center, Weather Prediction Center, and NESDIS Satellite Analysis Branch were able to monitor the tropical and extratropical transition of Arthur using various convective and red, green, blue (RGB) products that have been introduced in recent years. During the extratropical transition, the Air Mass RGB (AM RGB) product and AIRS/CrIS ozone products were available as a compliment to water vapor imagery to identify the upper-level low with associated stratospheric drying that absorbed much of Arthur's energy. The AM RGB product provides forecasters with an enhanced view of various air masses that are combined into a single image and can help differentiate between possible stratospheric/tropospheric interactions, moist tropical air masses, and cool, continental/maritime air masses. Even though this product provides a wealth of qualitative information about the horizontal distribution of synoptic features, forecasters are also interested in more quantitative information such as the vertical distribution of temperature, moisture, and ozone which impact the coloring of the resulting AM RGB. Currently, NOAA Unique CrIS/ATMS Processing System (NUCAPS) temperature and moisture soundings are available in AWIPS-II as a point-based display. Traditionally, soundings are used to anticipate and forecast severe convection, however unique and valuable information can be gained from soundings for other forecasting applications, such as extratropical transition, especially in data sparse regions. Additional research has been conducted to look at how NUCAPS soundings might help forecasters identify the pre-extratropical transition environment, leading to earlier diagnosis and better public advisories. NUCAPS soundings, AIRS soundings, NOAA G-IV GPS

  3. Obituary: David Fulmer Bender, 1913-2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Sylvia L.

    2004-12-01

    David Fulmer Bender died in San Diego, California, on 13 September 2004, at the age of 91. His heart stopped suddenly while he was dancing. His pioneering work in establishing comprehensive, computer-accessible ephemerides of asteroids and comets found many applications, including the first-ever visit to an asteroid, Gaspra, by an interplanetary spacecraft. Dave was born in Reno, Nevada, on 10 February 1913, to Homer Charles Bender and Susan Bowers Bender. The family moved to Spokane, Washington, while Dave was very young. His father was a civil engineer and a graduate of MIT, who helped design bridges and dams throughout the Northwest, including the Grand Coolie Dam. Dave had a brother, Phillip (now deceased), who was one year younger. Advancing rapidly in the Spokane school system, Dave finished high school when he was 15 years old. At 16 he moved to Pasadena, California, and began his studies at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). In addition to pursuing his course work, he was active in track and football, a tendency toward physical exercise that stayed with him for the rest of his life. It was probably during these years that Dave heard a lecture by Albert Einstein, as mentioned to colleagues many years later. Dave received a BS degree in physics in 1933, an MS in 1934, and a PhD in 1937, all from Caltech. His dissertation was entitled, "The Index of Refraction of Air in the Photographic Infrared." During his sophomore year he found his way to Pomona College in Claremont, California, where he met his future wife, Elizabeth Boyden at a social gathering. They were married in 1935. Dave's academic career spanned the years from 1937 to 1970, initially at Louisiana State University, Vanderbilt University, and then Fisk. As a life-long pacifist and conscientious objector, Dave served alternate duty during World War II. In 1946 he joined the faculty of the physics department at Whittier College in California, where he became the department chair and

  4. Smile attractiveness in patients with Class II division 1 subdivision malocclusions treated with different tooth extraction protocols.

    PubMed

    Janson, Guilherme; Branco, Nuria C; Morais, Juliana F; Freitas, Marcos R

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to compare smile attractiveness between one, three, and four premolar extraction protocols in patients with Class II division 1 subdivision malocclusions and to analyse the aesthetic influence of buccal and posterior corridor widths on smile attractiveness. The sample consisted of posed smile photographs obtained from 66 subjects, divided into three groups according to the treatment-extraction protocol. Group 1 was treated with one maxillary premolar extraction included 23 subjects, group 2 was treated with four premolar extractions included 23 subjects, and 20 patients in group 3 were treated with three premolar extractions. Buccal and posterior corridor widths of each photograph were measured in proportion to the smile width. To rate the posed smile photographs, panels of 70 orthodontists and 46 laypeople used a 10-point scale. There were no significant differences in smile attractiveness scores between the three groups and between orthodontists and laypeople. Also buccal and posterior corridor widths did not differ between the groups and they did not influence the aesthetic scores. It was concluded that smile attractiveness is similar in treatment protocols of one, three, and four premolar extractions and that widths of buccal and posterior corridors do not influence smile attractiveness in these groups.

  5. Effects of Normal and Perturbed Social Play on the Duration and Amplitude of Different Types of Infant Smiles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fogel, Alan; Hsu, Hui-Chin; Shapiro, Alyson F.; Nelson-Goens, G. Christina; Secrist, Cory

    2006-01-01

    Different types of smiling varying in amplitude of lip corner retraction were investigated during 2 mother-infant games--peekaboo and tickle--at 6 and 12 months and during normally occurring and perturbed games. Using Facial Action Coding System (FACS), infant smiles were coded as simple (lip corner retraction only), Duchenne (simple plus cheek…

  6. Overview and early results of the Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Ken-Ichi; Nishibori, Toshiyuki; Ochiai, Satoshi; Ozeki, Hiroyuki; Irimajiri, Yoshihisa; Kasai, Yasuko; Koike, Makoto; Manabe, Takeshi; Mizukoshi, Kazuo; Murayama, Yasuhiro; Nagahama, Tomoo; Sano, Takuki; Sato, Ryota; Seta, Masumichi; Takahashi, Chikako; Takayanagi, Masahiro; Masuko, Harunobu; Inatani, Junji; Suzuki, Makoto; Shiotani, Masato

    2010-12-01

    The Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) was successfully launched and attached to the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) on the International Space Station (ISS) on 25 September 2009. It has been making atmospheric observations since 12 October 2009 with the aid of a 4 K mechanical cooler and superconducting mixers for submillimeter limb-emission sounding in the frequency bands of 624.32-626.32 GHz and 649.12-650.32 GHz . On the basis of the observed spectra, the data processing has been retrieving vertical profiles for the atmospheric minor constituents in the middle atmosphere, such as O3 with isotopes, HCl, ClO, HO2, BrO, and HNO3. Results from SMILES have demonstrated its high potential to observe atmospheric minor constituents in the middle atmosphere. Unfortunately, SMILES observations have been suspended since 21 April 2010 owing to the failure of a critical component.

  7. INTRODUCTION: David Sherrington as a mentor of young scientists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldbart, Paul M.

    2008-08-01

    How deeply honoured I am to have the opportunity to express my thoughts at this delightful celebration of David's achievements, so far, in his remarkable career. I have been asked to center my remarks on David's contributions to the mentoring and professional development of scientists early in their careers. This is a topic that I am more than happy to reflect on, because it gives me the opportunity to recall the exciting period I spent as one of David's postgraduate students at Imperial College in the early 1980s. It also gives me the chance to publicly express my gratitude to David for the opportunities he created for me at that time, as well as for the interest and care he has shown in my career and well-being ever since, as we have met up and exchanged news and ideas around the world: in New Mexico and Colorado, in Cancun, Paris and Trieste, at numerous March Meetings of the American Physical Society and, of course in London, Oxford, and my home town, Champaign-Urbana, location of the University of Illinois. I have been a member of David's circle for 25 years now, and I would like to tell you a little about how this came to be. Not because of what this says about me, but, rather, because of what it tells you about David and the rich generosity of his spirit and effort when it comes to supporting the underdog. I was indeed one such underdog—and that's putting it charitably—when I first met David in September of 1982, not long before the academic year was to begin. I had heard about the exciting circle of physical and mathematical ideas swirling around the spin glass question during the previous year, which I had spent at the University of California's Los Angeles campus, through an opportunity kindly arranged, as it happens, by Sam Edwards. But I was eager to return to the UK for postgraduate studies and to work on spin glasses, so I simply showed up at David's Imperial College office, unannounced (if I remember correctly). And with his characteristic

  8. Dr. David Sawyer, Mickey Mouse and Dr. David Brown attend a ceremony at Ronald McNair Middle School

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. David Sawyer (left), Superintendent of the Brevard County School District, Mickey Mouse, and Dr. David Brown, a NASA astronaut, attend a tribute to NASA astronaut Ronald McNair held in the gymnasium of Ronald McNair Magnet School in Cocoa, Fla. During the tribute, Walt Disney World presented a portrait of McNair to the school, which had previously been renamed for the fallen astronaut. McNair was one of a crew of seven who lost their lives during an accident following launch of the Space Shuttle Challenger in January 1986.

  9. Double-powered free gracilis muscle transfer for smile reanimation: A longitudinal optoelectronic study.

    PubMed

    Sforza, Chiarella; Frigerio, Alice; Mapelli, Andrea; Tarabbia, Filippo; Annoni, Isabella; Colombo, Valeria; Latiff, Mahfuz; Pimenta Ferreira, Claudia L; Rabbiosi, Dimitri; Sidequersky, Fernanda V; Zago, Matteo; Biglioli, Federico

    2015-07-01

    The choice of the motor donor nerve is a crucial point in free flap transfer algorithms. In the case of unilateral facial paralysis, the contralateral healthy facial nerve can provide coordinated smile animation and spontaneous emotional expression, but with unpredictable axonal ingrowth into the recipient muscle. Otherwise, the masseteric nerve ipsilateral to the paralysis can provide a powerful neural input, without a spontaneous trigger of the smile. Harvesting a bulky muscular free flap may enhance the quantity of contraction but esthetic results are unpleasant. Therefore, the logical solution for obtaining high amplitude of smiling combined with spontaneity of movement is to couple the neural input: the contralateral facial nerve plus the ipsilateral masseteric nerve. Thirteen patients with unilateral dense facial paralysis underwent a one-stage facial reanimation with a gracilis flap powered by a double donor neural input, provided by both the ipsilateral masseteric nerve (coaptation by an end-to-end neurorrhaphy with the obturator nerve) and the contralateral facial nerve (coaptation through a cross-face nerve graft: end-to-end neurorrhaphy on the healthy side and end-to-side neurorrhaphy on the obturator nerve, distal to the masseteric/obturator neurorrhaphy). Their facial movements were evaluated with an optoelectronic motion analyzer. Before surgery, on average, the paretic side exhibited a smaller total three-dimensional mobility than the healthy side, with a 52% activation ratio and >30% of asymmetry. After surgery, the differences significantly decreased (analysis of variance (ANOVA), p < 0.05), with an activation ratio between 75% (maximum smile) and 91% (maximum smile with teeth clenching), and <20% of asymmetry. Similar modifications were seen for the performance of spontaneous smiles. The significant presurgical asymmetry of labial movements reduced after surgery. The use of a double donor neural input permitted both movements that were similar

  10. Integrating child dental care at Community Smiles: the director's goals fulfilled....

    PubMed

    Flaer, Paul J; Benjamin, Paul L; Lopez, Manuel G; Patterson, Chip

    2010-01-01

    Community Smiles/Dade County Dental Research Clinic provides dental care to the indigent population of Miami-Dade County. A local board of directors governs the organization, with dental procedures performed by volunteer professionals from the community. The research clinic partners with community organizations to obtain sustained funding from diverse sources. The clinic has a long-term commitment to the growth and development of children in the community. Certainly, changing the structure and focus of the clinic toward children's dental care and seeking community funding and resources to institute this program was an experiment. In his four years as clinic director and chief executive officer (CEO) at Community Smiles, the late Dr. Robert M. Wolf brought increased clinic productivity and organizational change that expanded community involvement. Dr. Wolf's tenure at Community Smiles brought general increases in patients care in terms of patients visits, new patients and number of procedures performed. However, the key to his administration as clinic director and CEO was the production and integration of a children's dentistry program into the mainstream activities of the clinic. Furthermore, he oversaw the successful corporate reorganization of Community Smiles as the clinic emerged under a non-profit corporate structure employing multi-faceted community resources. Emphasizing new dental programs for children in the community is culturally and socially competent--positively impacting the public health. Community Smiles became a venue where disparities were largely eliminated and access to dental treatment increased. Health care was promoted as Community Smiles became a place that helped build a healthier community.

  11. Double-powered free gracilis muscle transfer for smile reanimation: A longitudinal optoelectronic study.

    PubMed

    Sforza, Chiarella; Frigerio, Alice; Mapelli, Andrea; Tarabbia, Filippo; Annoni, Isabella; Colombo, Valeria; Latiff, Mahfuz; Pimenta Ferreira, Claudia L; Rabbiosi, Dimitri; Sidequersky, Fernanda V; Zago, Matteo; Biglioli, Federico

    2015-07-01

    The choice of the motor donor nerve is a crucial point in free flap transfer algorithms. In the case of unilateral facial paralysis, the contralateral healthy facial nerve can provide coordinated smile animation and spontaneous emotional expression, but with unpredictable axonal ingrowth into the recipient muscle. Otherwise, the masseteric nerve ipsilateral to the paralysis can provide a powerful neural input, without a spontaneous trigger of the smile. Harvesting a bulky muscular free flap may enhance the quantity of contraction but esthetic results are unpleasant. Therefore, the logical solution for obtaining high amplitude of smiling combined with spontaneity of movement is to couple the neural input: the contralateral facial nerve plus the ipsilateral masseteric nerve. Thirteen patients with unilateral dense facial paralysis underwent a one-stage facial reanimation with a gracilis flap powered by a double donor neural input, provided by both the ipsilateral masseteric nerve (coaptation by an end-to-end neurorrhaphy with the obturator nerve) and the contralateral facial nerve (coaptation through a cross-face nerve graft: end-to-end neurorrhaphy on the healthy side and end-to-side neurorrhaphy on the obturator nerve, distal to the masseteric/obturator neurorrhaphy). Their facial movements were evaluated with an optoelectronic motion analyzer. Before surgery, on average, the paretic side exhibited a smaller total three-dimensional mobility than the healthy side, with a 52% activation ratio and >30% of asymmetry. After surgery, the differences significantly decreased (analysis of variance (ANOVA), p < 0.05), with an activation ratio between 75% (maximum smile) and 91% (maximum smile with teeth clenching), and <20% of asymmetry. Similar modifications were seen for the performance of spontaneous smiles. The significant presurgical asymmetry of labial movements reduced after surgery. The use of a double donor neural input permitted both movements that were similar

  12. Capability for ozone high-precision retrieval on JEM/SMILES observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Chikako; Suzuki, Makoto; Mitsuda, Chihiro; Ochiai, Satoshi; Manago, Naohiro; Hayashi, Hiroo; Iwata, Yoshitaka; Imai, Koji; Sano, Takuki; Takayanagi, Masahiro; Shiotani, Masato

    2011-09-01

    We estimate the capability of ozone (O 3) retrieval with the Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) instrument attached to the Exposed Facility of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) on the International Space Station (ISS). SMILES carries a 4-K mechanical refrigerator to cool superconducting devices in space. Since SMILES has high sensitivity thanks to the superconducting receiver, it is expected that SMILES has ability to retrieve O 3 profiles more precisely than the previous millimeter-submillimeter limb measurements from satellites. We examine the random error and the systematic error of O 3 vertical profiles based on the launch-ready retrieval algorithm developed for SMILES. The best random error with single-scan spectra is 0.4% at an altitude of 30 km with 3 km vertical resolution in the mid-latitudes. The random error is better than 5% in the altitude region from 15 to 70 km in the nighttime and from 15 to 55 km in the daytime with 3 km vertical resolution in the mid-latitudes. By averaging ten profiles, the random error is improved to 1% at 70 km altitude in the nighttime and to 5% in the daytime. Using SMILES, we expect to determine the diurnal variation of O 3 vertical profiles with high precision in the upper stratosphere. Finally, the retrieval capability of O 3 in the lower stratosphere is estimated. When retrieving spectral data using two receiver bands (624.32-626.32 GHz and 649.12-650.32 GHz) the random error above 13 km in the mid-latitudes and above 15 km in the tropics is expected to be better than 5% under clear sky conditions.

  13. Beauty in a smile: the role of medial orbitofrontal cortex in facial attractiveness.

    PubMed

    O'Doherty, J; Winston, J; Critchley, H; Perrett, D; Burt, D M; Dolan, R J

    2003-01-01

    The attractiveness of a face is a highly salient social signal, influencing mate choice and other social judgements. In this study, we used event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate brain regions that respond to attractive faces which manifested either a neutral or mildly happy face expression. Attractive faces produced activation of medial orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), a region involved in representing stimulus-reward value. Responses in this region were further enhanced by a smiling facial expression, suggesting that the reward value of an attractive face as indexed by medial OFC activity is modulated by a perceiver directed smile.

  14. Management of an Adult with Class III Malocclusion, Gummy Smile, and Spaced Dentition.

    PubMed

    Babar, Sameera; Calamia, John R; Sorrel, Jerry M

    2015-07-01

    This case report presents an interdisciplinary approach to achieve functioning occlusion and an aesthetically pleasing smile. This patient's concerns were spacing between upper front teeth and a gummy smile. The case was evaluated, and treatment was planned using a multidisciplinary approach. The patient rejected the option of orthognathic surgery to correct a skeletal problem. Treatment included orthodontics, osteoplasty, gingivoplasty, and porcelain veneer restorations to achieve the desired aesthetic result. Comprehensive orthodontics resulted in a functionally stable occlusion. Space distribution between maxillary anterior teeth with adequate overjet and overbite relationships allowed for conservative preparation to receive porcelain veneer restorations. PMID:26140973

  15. Instructional Implications of David C. Geary's Evolutionary Educational Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweller, John

    2008-01-01

    David C. Geary's thesis has the potential to alter our understanding of those aspects of human cognition relevant to instruction. His distinction between biologically primary knowledge that we have evolved to acquire and biologically secondary knowledge that is culturally important, taught in educational institutions and which we have not evolved…

  16. Astronaut David Wolf in medical experiment in SLS-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Astronaut David A. Wolf, mission specialist, participates in an experiment that investigates in-space distribution and movement of blood and gas in the pulmonary system. The data gathered during the two-week flight will be compared with results of tests performed on Earth to determine the changes that occur in pulmonary functions.

  17. Q & A with Ed Tech Leaders: Interview with David Dockterman

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaughnessy, Michael F.

    2014-01-01

    In this article, Michael F. Shaughnessy, Contributing Editor of this journal, interviews David Dockterman, Chief Architect, Learning Sciences, at Scholastic Education, where he provides guidance on turning research into practical programs. Dockterman was one of the founders of Tom Snyder Productions, a leading educational software developer and…

  18. Battling Creaticide: An Interview with David C. Berliner

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ambrose, Don

    2012-01-01

    This article presents an interview with David C. Berliner, a Regents' Professor in the College of Education at Arizona State University. His books include "Educational Psychology," "The Manufactured Crisis," and "The Handbook of Educational Psychology." He has served as president of the American Educational Research Association and of the…

  19. Can Education Save the World? A Response to David Gruenewald

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stables, Andrew

    2004-01-01

    Any commitment to education for sustainability assumes that teaching and learning can reduce or prevent damage to the biosphere. However, such an assumption remains deeply problematic. David Gruenewald's is only one of several possible epistemological positions. This article discusses the variety of such positions, arguing for that which might…

  20. Challenging Texts: Teaching Deliberately--Reading Henry David Thoreau's "Walden"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    One of the more difficult 19th-century American texts for high school students to read is undoubtedly Henry David Thoreau's "Walden." His erudite allusions, often page-long sentences, and sophisticated sense of the ironic initially leave many students cold. Still, the author encourages them to read amid the din of a cultural cacophony that shouts…

  1. Inside the Classroom of Harvard Law School Professor David Wilkins.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawrence-Lightfoot, Sara

    1999-01-01

    Examines the teaching methods of David Wilkins, an African American Harvard Law School professor considered an exciting teacher by his students and colleagues. Describes his skill in getting students to attend class, engage in legal thinking, feel comfortable in the classroom, and learn the formal rituals and procedures for the court. (SM)

  2. Empowering Adolescent Readers: Intertextuality in Three Novels by David Almond

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latham, Don

    2008-01-01

    In "Skellig," "Kit's Wilderness," and "Clay", David Almond employs various types of intertextuality to enrich his narratives. Through the use of allusion, adaptation, collage, and mise-en-abyme, he encourages his adolescent readers to seek out precursor texts and to consider the interrelationships between these texts and his own. By so doing, he…

  3. From the Ocean's Flotsam, David Wiesner Imagines a Journey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Barbara A.

    2008-01-01

    David Wiesner's 2007 Caldecott Medal-winning "Flotsam" blends the events of everyday life with the surreal. As he often does in his picture books, Wiesner plays with size and scale, opening "Flotsam" with a full-page illustration of a sand crab and the enormous eye behind it before pulling back on the second page to reveal the creature's actual…

  4. David Almond's "Skellig": "A New Vista of Contemplation"?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Susan Louise

    2009-01-01

    The debates that have arisen regarding Darwin's theories of evolution and Christian views of creation and their place in education in the United States have frequently been extremely heated, resulting in trials, hearings, and laws. This article provides an overview of some of the disagreements and illustrates how David Almond's British novel,…

  5. David Haynes: Chronicler of the African American Middle Class.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barron, Ronald

    1997-01-01

    Profiles writer David Haynes, and discusses his four novels (an award-winning young adult book and three novels for the adult market). Concludes that Haynes' success as a novelist is due to his characters, a healthy dose of humor, and his realistic depiction of a wide range of African American characters without resorting to sensationalism or…

  6. Grade 1 Students Meet David Wiesner's "Three Pigs."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pantaleo, Sylvia

    2002-01-01

    Describes the oral, written, and visual arts responses of a group of Grade 1 children. Discusses first grade children's understandings of and responses to several Radical Change characteristics and metafictive techniques found in David Wiesner's "The Three Pigs" (2001), the 2002 Randolph Caldecott Medal winner. Explores the nature of the literary…

  7. Video from Panel Discussion with Joseph Fraumeni and David Schottenfeld

    Cancer.gov

    Video footage from Panel Discussion with Joseph Fraumeni and David Schottenfeld on Cancer Epidemiology over the Last Half-Century and Thoughts on the Future. The discussion took place on May 11, 2012, when DCEG hosted Dr. Schottenfeld as a Visiting Scholar.

  8. Moral philosophers are moral experts! A reply to David Archard.

    PubMed

    Gordon, John-Stewart

    2014-05-01

    In his article 'Why Moral Philosophers Are Not and Should Not Be Moral Experts' David Archard attempts to show that his argument from common-sense morality is more convincing than other competing arguments in the debate. I examine his main line of argumentation and eventually refute his main argument in my reply.

  9. Life after Death in Poverty: David Treuer's "Little"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stirrup, David

    2005-01-01

    David Treuer's debut novel, "Little" (1995), is set on a Minnesota reservation, centering around a dilapidated housing tract that its small community of residents call "Poverty." Aptly named both for the condition and background of the housing, this name is the first pointer to the type of multifaceted reading that the novel merits. This essay…

  10. David Hoffman's Law School Lectures, 1822-1833.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaffer, Thomas L.

    1982-01-01

    The Baltimore lawyer David Hoffman (1784-1854), the father of American legal ethics, was also the first of the systematic American legal educators. The history and operation of his law school, the curriculum, and his effective use of the lecture method are described and discussed. (MSE)

  11. Reflections on the Scholarly Contributions of Professor David H. Jonassen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reeves, Thomas C.; Lee, Chwee Beng; Hung, Woei

    2013-01-01

    The six papers in this special issue of "Computers and Education" honoring Professor David H. Jonassen are diverse in nature. They also reflect differing interpretations of the implications of Jonassen's work for research and development focused on instructional models and the factors influencing instruction as well as the directions for future…

  12. STS-69 Mission Commander David M. Walker in white room

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    STS-69 Mission Commander David M. Walker chats with white room closeout crew members Bob Saulnier (left), Regulo Villalobos and closeout crew leader Travis Thompson prior to entering the flight deck of the Space Shuttle Endeavour at Launch Pad 39A.

  13. David Samwell (1751-98): surgeon on the Discovery.

    PubMed

    Morris, J S

    2002-07-01

    David Samwell, born in North Wales, was surgeon on the Discovery during the third and last voyage of Captain James Cook. Samwell wrote a biography of Cook and was a distinguished poet. He also served on several more voyages, retiring from the sea aged 45. PMID:12151677

  14. Henry David Thoreau and Martin Luther King, Jr. Lesson Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Brent

    1995-01-01

    Presents a five-lesson, high school instructional unit on the ideas and activities of Henry David Thoreau and Martin Luther King, Jr. Includes student objectives, step-by-step instructional procedures, and discussion questions. Provides quotations by Thoreau and King. (CFR)

  15. Child Welfare Research and Training: A Response to David Stoesz

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Brenda D.; Vandiver, Vikki L.

    2016-01-01

    In this response to David Stoesz' critique, "The Child Welfare Cartel," the authors agree that child welfare research and training must be improved. The authors disagree, however, with Stoesz' critique of social work education, his assessment of the most-needed forms of child welfare research, and his depiction of the goals and…

  16. Arthur Beer and his relations to Einstein and to the Warburg library (German Title: Arthur Beer und seine Beziehungen zu Einstein und zur Warburg-Bibliothek)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duerbeck, Hilmar W.; Beer, Peter

    We give an account of the scientific life of Arthur Beer (1900-1980). Born in Reichenberg, Bohemia, he studied in Leipzig, Vienna and Berlin. After obtaining his Ph.D., he worked with the Seewarte (maritime observatory) and with the Warburg Library, both in Hamburg. Because of his relations with Finlay Freundlich, Einstein and Fritz Saxl, he succeeded in emigrating to England in 1934, where he obtained a temporary position at Cambridge Observatory, and carried out astrophysical research under F.J.M. Stratton. After shorter stays at the observatories of Mill Hill and Kew, both in the vicinity of London, he obtained, after World War II, the position of Senior Assistant Observer in Cambridge. Besides his studies in astrophysics and the history of astronomy, he is best known as the founding editor of the series "Vistas in Astronomy".

  17. Treatment of gummy smile: Gingival recontouring with the containment of the elevator muscle of the upper lip and wing of nose. A surgery innovation technique

    PubMed Central

    Storrer, Carmen Lucia Mueller; Valverde, Fabiane Kristine Bochenek; Santos, Felipe Rychuv; Deliberador, Tatiana Miranda

    2014-01-01

    The containment of the elevator muscle of the upper lip and wing of nose was used for the treatment of patients with gummy smile. This technique had corrected esthetic alterations of smile, reducing the upper lip elevation, which results in a smaller gingival display. An upper lip lengthening as well as a reduction in the upper lip shortening when the patient smiled could be observed. The high smile line was corrected without compromising the labial harmony. This study presents an innovative and effective therapeutic option to obtain a natural and harmonious smile. The patient expressed a high degree of satisfaction. PMID:25425832

  18. A new gene mapping resource: Interspecies hybrids between Pere David`s deer (Elaphurus davidianus) and red deer (Cervus elaphus)

    SciTech Connect

    Tate, M.L.; Mathias, H.C.; Penty, J.M.; Hill, D.F.; Fennessy, P.F.; Dodds, K.G.

    1995-03-01

    Three male F{sub 1} hybrids between Pere David`s deer and red deer were mated to red deer to produce 143 backcross calves. The pedigrees are a rare example of a fertile hybrid between evolutionarily divergent species. We examined the use of these families for genetic mapping of evolutionarily conserved (Type I) loci by testing for genetic linkage between five species-specific protein variants and 12 conserved DNA probes. Two probes were homologous, and the remainder syntenic, to the protein coding loci in cattle or humans. Using six restriction enzymes, each DNA probe detected one or more restriction fragments specific to Pere David`s deer. Linkage analyses among the species-specific variants placed the loci into four linkage groups within which linkage between adjacent loci and gene order was supported by a LOD > 3. Southern and protein analysis of LDHA and ALB provided identical segregation data. These linkage groups were consistent with the cattle gene map and provide new information for comparing the gene maps of ruminants, humans and mice. The deer hybrids are an important new resource that can contribute to the comparative analysis of the mammalian genome. 68 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Couplage neutronique-thermohydraulique arthur-donjon avec les conditions aux collecteurs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landry, Alexandre

    First, the ARTHUR code of thermal-hydraulic encloses four initial elements, which are also initial conditions: channel outlet pressure, inlet mass flux, inlet coolant temperature and reactor geometry. The calculations using conservation laws and the modeling correlation for the CANDU-6 thermal-hydraulic phenomenon are based on the drift-flux model. It's a middle point between a simple and fast model and a complex and slow calculation. The couple ARTHUR-DONJON is a good tool since 2008. But, there is a place for improvements. For thermal-hydraulics, inlet pressure has to be added as initial condition. This will influence mass flux and coolant temperature. A jacobian method for mass flux correction will be developed and implemented to satisfy inlet and outlet pressures initial conditions. We have to use jacobians to find a relation between initials conditions and systems inputs. The jacobians is used to transform the system between state 1 and state 2. In reactor physics, IQS unit in DONJON code will be substituted by KINSOL unit for kinetics. For cross sections calculations in AFM unit, it will be corrected for a better power evolution. Thermal-hydraulics changes will involve some reactor physics changes and then, it will give a better simulation system. The results are excellent with the new ARTHUR-DONJON. We are going from 4 to 6 % of error to 0,1 % with power plant essay measurements. We are going from 0,5 second in one week calculations to 1,0 second in two or three days of calculations. Our results are not divergent with power plant essay measurements and they're now near those observed for a real nuclear reactor.

  20. [Smile "forced" smile versus "spontaneous": comparison of 3 techniques of reconstructive surgery of the face. Myoplasty temporal muscle, hypoglossal facial anastomosis and gracilis muscle free flap].

    PubMed

    Lheureux-Portmann, A; Lapalus-Curtoud, Q; Robert, M; Tankéré, F; Disant, F; Pasche, P; Lamas, G; Gatignol, P

    2013-01-01

    The facial palsy cause serious consequences for patients. Studies have also shown that in these patients, the inability to produce an appropriate and spontaneous smile would be a key factor of depression. When facial palsy is considered complete and the nerve cannot be repaired, the patient can benefit from palliative surgery to regain a better quality of life in the aesthetic, functional, and psychological aspects. The hypoglossal-facial anastomosis (AHF), temporal myoplasty (MAT) and gracilis transposition (TG) are the major surgeries currently used for this purpose. The aim of our study is to assess quantitatively and qualitatively the effects of each of these surgeries on the lip mobility and production of smile. From this perspective, we proposed a protocol of an evaluation of facial motricity, of quality of life, and more particularly on the quality and the analysis of the smile. The results underline that there is no significant difference in the recovery of the facial motricity according to the surgery. Only the slower, deferred deadline of recovery at the patients AHF and TG who have to wait several months, it is for the same levels as that of the patients' MAT. A premature and intensive rehabilitation such as the patients of our protocol benefited from it what is nevertheless essential to a good recovery whatever is the surgery.

  1. Fishy Hearing: A Short Biography of Arthur N. Popper, PhD.

    PubMed

    Coffin, Allison B

    2016-01-01

    Biologist Dr. Arthur Popper's career spans decades, from his early work on comparative inner ear morphology in fishes to his recent interest in how underwater noise impacts aquatic vertebrates. Along the way Dr. Popper's research subjects span at least 19 vertebrate taxa, from lamprey to lungfish to humans, and he's had a profound influence in the field of fish bioacoustics. This brief biography describes some of Dr. Popper's many contributions to fish hearing research and highlights both some of his major discoveries and some of the biological mysteries he has yet to solve.

  2. Two-message quantum-Arthur-Merlin game with single-qubit measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morimae, Tomoyuki

    2016-06-01

    We show that the class quantum-Arthur-Merlin (QAM) does not change even if the verifier's ability is restricted to only single-qubit measurements. To show the result, we use the idea of measurement-based quantum computing: the verifier, who can do only single-qubit measurements, can test the graph state sent from the prover and use it for his measurement-based quantum computing. Inspired by this construction, we also introduce a problem which we call stabilizer state optimization, and show that it is QMA-complete.

  3. What became of Arthur Conan Doyle's father? The last years of Charles Altamont Doyle.

    PubMed

    Beveridge, A

    2006-10-01

    This paper examines the fate of Arthur Conan Doyle's father, Charles Altamont Doyle, a Victorian illustrator, who spent his last years as an asylum inmate. Based on new archival research, it looks at the reasons for his institutionalisation and what befell him during his stay. It will consider Doyle's claim that he was wrongfully confined and also the suggestion that his family were responsible for having him committed. Finally, the paper will examine the nature of Doyle's condition and the creative work he produced whilst an asylum inmate.

  4. [Arthur Kronfeld (1886-1941)--a psychiatrist in the service of psychotherapy].

    PubMed

    Schröder, C

    1986-07-01

    The psychotherapeutic life-work of psychiatrist Arthur Kronfeld has almost fallen into oblivion. Against the background of the 100th anniversary of his birth the author traces Kronfeld's psychotherapeutic career, pointing out his activity at the Berliner "Institute of Sexual Research" under Magnus Hirschfeld, and his psychotherapeutic concept--the psychagogic guidance of the patient--and its connection with the individual psychology of Alfred Adler. Kronfeld translated his theoretical positions into activities directed towards socialization and the teachability of psychotherapy which are still worthy of note by those engaged in the field.

  5. Laugh and Smile upon the Holy Quran: The Study of Analytical Objectivities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    al-Domi, Mohammad Mahmoud

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to examine the positive impact of The Holy Quran based on the laugh and smile. This kind of derivatives in which context of praise, expression the feeling of happiness and joyful in the positive senses. Everyone needs to relieve his heart so that happiness and joy on their faces can be seen. Laughter also are some of attribute…

  6. Gender Differences in Physiological Reactivity to Infant Cries and Smiles in Military Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brewster, Albert L.; Nelson, John P.; McCanne, Thomas R.; Lucas, D. R.; Milner, Joel S.

    1998-01-01

    Twenty male and 29 female active-duty Air Force personnel viewed and listened to videotapes of a crying infant and a smiling infant while heart rate, skin resistance, and respiration rate were monitored. Males showed a larger increase in skin conductance and heart rate than females during the crying infant stimulus. (Author/CR)

  7. Experimental Analysis of Preschool Playmate Preferences as a Function of Smiles and Sex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, David; Ambike, Archana; Buckingham-Howes, Stacy; Cheah, Charissa S. L.

    2008-01-01

    Differential emotions theory (DET) ("The face of emotion." Appleton-Century-Crofts: East Norwalk, CT, 1971) posits that the smile functions in part to communicate and/or reflect social affiliation and plays an important role in children's social development. While children's positive emotion expressions have received attention from peer relations…

  8. A smile insensitive method for spectral linewidth narrowing on high power laser diode arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zining; Wang, Hongyan; Li, Yuandong; Lu, Qisheng; Hua, Weihong; Xu, Xiaojun; Chen, Jinbao

    2011-10-01

    To eliminate the smile effect in spectral linewidth narrowing on high power laser diode arrays, we have introduced a plane reflective mirror into a common Littrow configuration external cavity to enhance the correlation among emitters. By this way, we obtained uniform spectral distribution among emitters of a 64-elements laser diode array with 35 GHz linewidth and 41 W output laser power.

  9. School Picture Day and Self-Concept: A Smile Is Worth the Trouble

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfeiffer, Margaret A.; Pfeiffer, Karl T.

    2011-01-01

    School picture day--it's an almost universal experience of waiting in line with a new comb, perching nervously on a stool, smiling under the bright lights, and then moving quickly out into the hall. For the past 8 years the authors have been increasingly aware of a picture day bias in the pictures taken of their oldest son. It appears to them that…

  10. BelSmile: a biomedical semantic role labeling approach for extracting biological expression language from text.

    PubMed

    Lai, Po-Ting; Lo, Yu-Yan; Huang, Ming-Siang; Hsiao, Yu-Cheng; Tsai, Richard Tzong-Han

    2016-01-01

    Biological expression language (BEL) is one of the most popular languages to represent the causal and correlative relationships among biological events. Automatically extracting and representing biomedical events using BEL can help biologists quickly survey and understand relevant literature. Recently, many researchers have shown interest in biomedical event extraction. However, the task is still a challenge for current systems because of the complexity of integrating different information extraction tasks such as named entity recognition (NER), named entity normalization (NEN) and relation extraction into a single system. In this study, we introduce our BelSmile system, which uses a semantic-role-labeling (SRL)-based approach to extract the NEs and events for BEL statements. BelSmile combines our previous NER, NEN and SRL systems. We evaluate BelSmile using the BioCreative V BEL task dataset. Our system achieved an F-score of 27.8%, ∼7% higher than the top BioCreative V system. The three main contributions of this study are (i) an effective pipeline approach to extract BEL statements, and (ii) a syntactic-based labeler to extract subject-verb-object tuples. We also implement a web-based version of BelSmile (iii) that is publicly available at iisrserv.csie.ncu.edu.tw/belsmile. PMID:27173520

  11. Joint Attention in Autism: Teaching Smiling Coordinated with Gaze to Respond to Joint Attention Bids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krstovska-Guerrero, Ivana; Jones, Emily A.

    2013-01-01

    Children with autism demonstrate early deficits in joint attention and expressions of affect. Interventions to teach joint attention have addressed gaze behavior, gestures, and vocalizations, but have not specifically taught an expression of positive affect such as smiling that tends to occur during joint attention interactions. Intervention was…

  12. Current status of Superconductive Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiotani, Masato

    Superconductive Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) was designed to be aboard the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) on the International Space Station (ISS) as a collaboration project of Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT). Mission Objectives are: i) Space demonstration of superconductive mixer and 4-K mechanical cooler for the submillimeter limbemission sounding, and ii) global observations of atmospheric minor constituents in the stratosphere (O3, HCI, CIO, HO2, HOCI, BrO, O3 isotopes, HNO3, CH3CN, etc), contributing to the atmospheric sciences. The SMILES observation is characterized as aiming at variation and its impact of radical species in the stratosphere. Based on its high sensitivity in detecting atmospheric limb emission of the submillimeter wave range, JEM/SMILES will make measurements on several radical species crucial to the ozone chemistry (normal O3, isotope O3, ClO, HCl, HOCl, BrO, HO2, and H2O2). The SMILES will also try to observe isotopic composition of ozone. Fabrication of the proto-flight model (PFM) and functional test have been done, and it is aiming at the launch scheduled in 2009 by the H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV).

  13. An Harmonic Smile Resulted from the Use of Ceramic Prosthesis with Zirconia Structure: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Tavarez, Rudys Rodolfo de Jesus; Goncalves, Leticia Machado; Dias, Ana Paula; Dias, Anna Claudia Pereira; Malheiros, Adriana Santos; Silva, Alice Carvalho; Bandeca, Matheus Coelho

    2014-01-01

    The rehabilitation of patients requiring an esthetic smile demands a multidisciplinary approach. This clinical report describes a treatment plan for recovery aesthetics’ smile of anterior teeth using ceramic prosthesis with zirconia structure. Initially, a review of aesthetic parameters, diagnostic waxing, mock-up and provisional restorations was performed. A contextual assessment of aesthetic, proportion and shape of teeth was done to recreate a natural looking for teeth in consonance with the smile line. Subsequently, based on these parameters, fixed prostheses of the upper anterior teeth using ceramic restorations with zirconia infrastructures were performed. The use of ceramic restorations with zirconia structures associated with a careful treatment plan allows the professional to integrate esthetic and function for satisfactory clinical results. How to cite the article: Tavarez RR, Gonçalves LM, Dias AP, Dias AC, Malheiros AS, Silva AC, Bandeca MC. An harmonic smile resulted from the use of ceramic prosthesis with zirconia structure: A case report. J Int Oral Health 2014;6(3):90-2. PMID:25083040

  14. Brief Report: Perception of Genuine and Posed Smiles by Individuals with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boraston, Zillah L.; Corden, Ben; Miles, Lynden K.; Skuse, David H.; Blakemore, Sarah-Jayne

    2008-01-01

    Individuals with autism are impaired in the recognition of fear, which may be due to their reduced tendency to look at the eyes. Here we investigated another potential perceptual and social consequence of reduced eye fixation. The eye region of the face is critical for identifying genuine, or sincere, smiles. We therefore investigated this ability…

  15. A New Perspective on Neonatal Smiling: Differences between the Judgments of Expert Coders and Naive Observers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dondi, Marco; Messinger, Daniel; Colle, Marta; Tabasso, Alessia; Simion, Francesca; Barba, Beatrice Dalla; Fogel, Alan

    2007-01-01

    To better understand the form and recognizability of neonatal smiling, 32 newborns (14 girls; M = 25.6 hr) were videorecorded in the behavioral states of alertness, drowsiness, active sleep, and quiet sleep. Baby Facial Action Coding System coding of both lip corner raising (simple or non-Duchenne) and lip corner raising with cheek raising…

  16. Sensitivity to Differences between Enjoyment and Non-Enjoyment Smiles in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blampied, Meredith; Johnston, Lucy; Miles, Lynden; Liberty, Kathleen

    2010-01-01

    The sensitivity of male children (5-15 years) with and without autism spectrum disorder (ASD) to the affective state of others was tested using an emotion recognition task. Only children without ASD could reliably differentiate between enjoyment and non-enjoyment smiles. Results are considered in terms of the social impairments of children with…

  17. Developing Communication Skills in Deaf Primary School Pupils: Introducing and Evaluating the SmiLE Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alton, Sherryn; Herman, Rosalind; Pring, Tim

    2011-01-01

    Many profoundly deaf signers have difficulty communicating with hearing people. This article describes a therapy called "Strategies and Measurable Interaction in Live English" (smiLE; Schamroth and Threadgill, 2007a), an approach used to teach deaf children skills to become successful communicators in real-life situations. This study evaluates the…

  18. Finding Your Smile Again: A Child Care Professional's Guide to Reducing Stress and Avoiding Burnout

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Jeff A.

    2007-01-01

    An estimated 30 to 40 percent of child care professionals leave the field, often due to burnout arising from some combination of long hours, isolation, low pay, and lack of respect. With humor and empathy, "Finding Your Smile Again" provides dozens of proven techniques for coping with stressful situations and diagnosing and preventing burnout. A…

  19. [Digital smile design and anterior monolithic restorations chair side fabrication with Cerec Cad/Cam system].

    PubMed

    Perez-Davidi, M

    2015-10-01

    Digital dentistry and digital smile design are both components of modern dentistry. The combination of the two enables the dentist to simulate the desired outcome, share the mock up with the patient and coordinate his or her expectations with the probable esthetic outcome. In this article a case is presented of anterior restorations performed to improve the smile and esthetics of the patient, combining the digital smile design (by Christian Coachman) and the Avatar Digital smile aide of the Cerec SW4 (sirona Germany) software for designing and the MCxI inlab milling unit for the fabrication. The patients picture was imported into the software and the model of the teeth was super imposed into the 3d picture of the face enabling positioning the incisal edge and midline in the desired place and sharing the virtual demo with the patient. All this procedure was performed after the patient had a mockup session in the mouth done according to the wax up procedure. The mockup can be scanned in the mouth and added as a protocol to the patient's digital models, to be used later in the biogeneric copy option. Using this option the software uses the outline of the mockup as guide lins for the final restoration computerized proposal. It is still an aide tool to be improved and simplified but definitely it is the present and future of chair side prosthodontics.

  20. Overview and Early Results of the Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiotani, Masato

    2010-05-01

    The Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) was developed to be aboard the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) on the International Space Station (ISS) under the cooperation of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and the National Institute of Information and Communication Technology (NICT). SMILES was successfully launched by the H-IIB rocket with the H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV) on September 11, 2009 and was attached to JEM on September 25. Mission objectives are: i) Space demonstration of 4-K mechanical cooler and super-conductive mixer for the submillimeter limb-emission sounding in the frequency bands of 624.32- 627.32 GHz and 649.12- 650.32 GHz, and ii) global observations of atmospheric minor constituents in the middle atmosphere (O3, HCl, ClO, HO2, HOCl, BrO, O3 isotopes, HNO3, CH3CN, etc), contributing to the atmospheric sciences. SMILES started atmospheric observations on October 12, 2009, and has been making very precise measurements on several radical species crucial to the ozone chemistry with its high-sensitivity. In this presentation, the overview of SMILES and the early results will be shown to demonstrate its high potential to observe the atmospheric minor constituents in the middle atmosphere.

  1. Overview and early results of the Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiotani, Masato; Takayanagi, Masahiro; Murayama, Yasuhiro

    The Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) was developed to be aboard the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) on the International Space Station (ISS) under the cooperation of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and the National Institute of Information and Communication Technology (NICT). SMILES was successfully launched by the H-IIB rocket with the H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV) on September 11, 2009 and was attached to JEM on September 25. Mission objectives are: i) Space demonstration of 4-K mechanical cooler and super-conductive mixer for the submillimeter limb-emission sounding in the frequency bands of 624.32-627.32 GHz and 649.12-650.32 GHz, and ii) global observations of atmospheric minor constituents in the middle atmosphere (O3, HCl, ClO, HO2, HOCl, BrO, O3 isotopes, HNO3, CH3CN, etc), contributing to the atmospheric sciences. SMILES started atmospheric observations on October 12, 2009, and has been making very precise measurements on several radical species crucial to the ozone chemistry with its high-sensitivity. In this pre-sentation, the overview of SMILES and the preliminary results will be shown to demonstrate its high potential to observe the atmospheric minor constituents in the middle atmosphere.

  2. Comparison of two scales for evaluation of smile and dental attractiveness

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Pedro Lima Emmerich; da Motta, Andrea Fonseca Jardim; Guerra, Clarice Julia; Mucha, José Nelson

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the visual analogue scale (VAS) and the simplified Q-sort method used to investigate the highest level of agreement among dentists, orthodontists and laypeople when assessing smile and dental attractiveness. MATERIAL AND METHODS: An album containing 258 photos of 86 individuals with their lips at rest, a slight and broad smile, was assessed by 25 dentists (general clinicians and various specialties), 23 orthodontists and 27 laypeople with regard to smile and dental attractiveness. To this end, both VAS and simplified Q-sort method were used. Agreements were calculated by intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). RESULTS: For the single measurement between the VAS method and the simplified Q-sort method, all simplified Q-sort rates were higher in all groups. The simplified Q-sort method results ranged between 0.42 and 0.49 while those of the VAS method varied between 0.37 and 0.42. The simplified Q-sort method also presented higher mean measurement values (0.95 and 0.96) in comparison to VAS (0.94 and 0.95). CONCLUSIONS: Both scales may be considered reliable for evaluating smile and dental attractiveness; however, the simplified Q-Sort method presented slightly higher values than the VAS method. PMID:25992986

  3. Current Status of Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiotani, M.; Takayanagi, M.

    2009-12-01

    Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) was designed to be aboard the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) on the International Space Station (ISS) as a collaboration project of Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT). Mission Objectives are: i) Space demonstration of superconductive mixer and 4-K mechanical cooler for the submillimeter limb-emission sounding, and ii) global observations of atmospheric minor constituents in the stratosphere (O3, HCI, CIO, HO2, HOCI, BrO, O3 isotopes, HNO3, CH3CN, etc), contributing to the atmospheric sciences. The SMILES observation is characterized as aiming at variation and its impact of radical species in the stratosphere. Based on its high sensitivity in detecting atmospheric limb emission of the submillimeter wave range, JEM/SMILES will make measurements on several radical species crucial to the ozone chemistry. It will be launched with H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV) by the latest version of H-II rocket (H-IIB) on September 10th from Tanegashima Space Center in Japan. In this presentaiton, the up-to-date information of SMILES operation as well as the preliminary result of observation data processing.

  4. Capability study for ozone high-precision retrieval with JEM/SMILES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Chikako; Suzuki, Makoto; Ochiai, Satoshi; Takayanagi, Masahiro

    One of the most unique characteristics of JEM/SMILES observation is its high sensitivity (500K system noise by employing 4K cooled SIS mixer) in detecting atmospheric limb emission in the submillimeter wave range, which are band A (624.3-625.5 GHz), band B (625.1-626.3 GHz), and band C (649.1-650.3 GHz). It observes limb emission from atmospheric minor constituents in the stratosphere, such as O3 , ClO, HCl, HNO3 , HOCl, CH3 CN, HO2 , BrO, O3 isotopes etc. The JEM/SMILES mission is mainly devoted to studying precise halogen chemistry related to ozone destruction. Spatial coverage is near global, that is the nominal latitude coverage is 38S - 65N owing to tilting the antenna beam to 45 degree left from the direction of orbital motion. It is highly expected that SMILES observation path encounters the atmosphere in the elongated polar voltex toward lower latitude in the northern hemisphere. The sensitivity of SMILES can be utilized for its unique observations, one is the detection of trace species which has never been observed in acceptable precision, and the other is high precision observation of major species such as O3 and HCl. This paper discusses how the ozone high-precision retrieval with the JEM/SMILES can be achieved based on the operational retrieval algorithm. The JEM/SMILES observes ozone absorption line at 625.37GHz in lower observation bands, band A and band B. As the JEM/SMILES is a high sensitive sensor, the high-precision retrieval is expected, the minimum precision of retrieved ozone height profile is 0.5% at about 30km under ideal condition, which is better than existing similar sensors, such as Aura/MLS and Odin/SMR. It is also discussed height resolutions (3.5-4.1 km nominally determined by the instrument) as trade off with precision. Thus these two factors should be decided by a kind of trade-off considering scientific requirements. The information content is used to optimize these factors and we clarify the precision, the height resolution, and

  5. Navigation study on improvements to existing federal navigation channels Arthur Kill Channel, Howland Hook Marine Terminal, Staten Island, New York

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-06-01

    Improvements to the Arthur Kill Channel from the confluence of the Kill Van Kull Channel, the Arthur Kill Channel, and Newark Bay, along the Arthur Kill to the vicinity of Howland Hook Marine Terminal on Staten Island, New York are proposed. In addition, the study area was extended south from Howland Hook Terminal for approximately one mile in order to serve two oil terminals. The recommended improvements would include deepening to various depths down to 45 feet mean low water (MLW), widening the channel for unrestricted two-way traffic, and the creation of a turning basin. Specifically, a 41-foot MLW deep channel would be dredged in the previously authorized 35-foot MLW project in the Arthur Kill Channel from its confluence with the Newark Bay and Kill Van Kull channels to the Howland Hook Marine Terminal for a distance of approximately 2.1 miles. Also recommended are selected widenings and realignments of the channel at a depth of 41 feet in the interest of navigational safety. Additionally, a 40-foot MLW channel is proposed in the previously authorized 35-foot MLW project in the Arthur Kill Channel from the Howland Hook Marine Terminal to the Exxon Bayway and Gulfport facilities for a distance of approximately one mile. The channel would be selectively realigned to a 40-foot depth for navigational safety. No final determination has been made regarding the disposal of dredged material due to the uncertainty of available upland sites at this time. The turning basin would lie in the Kill Van Kull Channel at Bergen Point, where vessels turn from Kill Van Kull into Arthur Kill and Newark Bay. Total cost of the recommended plan is $49.4 million; the benefit-cost ratio is 4.35. The plan would take 4 years for completion and would have a projected life of 50 years.

  6. Quasi-SMILES and nano-QFPR: The predictive model for zeta potentials of metal oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toropov, Andrey A.; Achary, P. Ganga Raju; Toropova, Alla P.

    2016-09-01

    Building up of the predictive quantitative structure-property/activity relationships (QSPRs/QSARs) for nanomaterials usually are impossible owing to the complexity of the molecular architecture of the nanomaterials. Simplified molecular input-line entry system (SMILES) is a tool to represent the molecular architecture of "traditional" molecules for "traditional" QSPR/QSAR. The quasi-SMILES is a tool to represent features (conditions and circumstances), which accompany the behavior of nanomaterials. Having, the training set and validation set, so-called quantitative feature-property relationships (QFPRs), based on the quasi-SMILES, one can build up model for zeta potentials of metal oxide nanoparticles for situations characterized by different features.

  7. [Studies of the system analysis of social motivation, IV: The varieties of smiling and the problem of motivational adjustment].

    PubMed

    Bischof, N

    1996-01-01

    A formal theory is proposed that accounts for the motivational architecture underlying the spontaneous smiling response in its most salient varieties (i.e., smiling due to security, relief, embarrassment, fear, amazement, submission, and triumph). The theory is based on a single assumption according to which the smiling response, in all instances named, is due to a reduction of "autonomy claim" as defined within the framework of the Zurich Model of Social Motivation. The theory's consistency is evinced by way of computer simulation, its phenomenological plausibility can be demonstrated by animation based on Ekman's Facial Action Coding System.

  8. Magen David Adom--the EMS in Israel.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Daniel Y; Sorene, Eliot

    2008-01-01

    Israel is a small country with a population of around 7 million. The sole EMS provider for Israel is Magen David Adom (MDA) (translated as 'Red Shield of David'). MDA also carries out the functions of a National Society (similar to the Red Cross) and provides all the blood and blood product services for the country. Nationwide, the organisation responds to over 1000 emergency calls a day and uses doctors, paramedics, emergency medical technicians and volunteers. Local geopolitics has meant that MDA has to be prepared for anything from everyday emergency calls to suicide bombings and regional wars. MDA also prides itself in being able to rapidly assemble and dispatch mobile aid teams to scenes of international disasters. Such a broad range of activities is unusual for a single EMS organisation. PMID:17767990

  9. Magen David Adom--the EMS in Israel.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Daniel Y; Sorene, Eliot

    2008-01-01

    Israel is a small country with a population of around 7 million. The sole EMS provider for Israel is Magen David Adom (MDA) (translated as 'Red Shield of David'). MDA also carries out the functions of a National Society (similar to the Red Cross) and provides all the blood and blood product services for the country. Nationwide, the organisation responds to over 1000 emergency calls a day and uses doctors, paramedics, emergency medical technicians and volunteers. Local geopolitics has meant that MDA has to be prepared for anything from everyday emergency calls to suicide bombings and regional wars. MDA also prides itself in being able to rapidly assemble and dispatch mobile aid teams to scenes of international disasters. Such a broad range of activities is unusual for a single EMS organisation.

  10. STS-86 Mission Specialist David Wolf in white room

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    STS-86 Mission Specialist David A. Wolf, at center facing camera, prepares to enter the Space Shuttle Atlantis at Launch Pad 39A, with the assistance of Rick Welty, in foreground at center, United Space Alliance (USA) orbiter vehicle closeout chief; and closeout team members, in background from left, Jim Davis, NASA quality assurance specialist; and George Schramm, USA mechanical technician. STS-86 Mission Specialist Vladimir Georgievich Titov, in foreground at far left, is awaiting his turn.

  11. About David Ruelle, After His 80th Birthday

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallavotti, Giovanni

    2016-05-01

    This is, with minor modifications, a text read at the 114th Statistical Mechanics meeting, in honor of D. Ruelle and Y. Sinai, at Rutgers, Dec. 13-15, 2015. It does not attempt to analyze, or not even just quote, all works of David Ruelle; I discuss, as usual in such occasions, a few among his works with which I have most familiarity and which were a source of inspiration for me.

  12. David Nelson, MD, MPH | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Dr. David E Nelson is the Director of the Cancer Prevention Fellowship Program (CPFP) Branch in the National Cancer Institute's Division of Cancer Prevention. The CPFP is an internationally renowned postdoctoral program designed to train early career scientific researchers and leaders in the field of cancer prevention. Dr. Nelson came to the CPFP in 2008 after working at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta for many years. |

  13. Islands as model systems in ecology and evolution: prospects fifty years after MacArthur-Wilson.

    PubMed

    Warren, Ben H; Simberloff, Daniel; Ricklefs, Robert E; Aguilée, Robin; Condamine, Fabien L; Gravel, Dominique; Morlon, Hélène; Mouquet, Nicolas; Rosindell, James; Casquet, Juliane; Conti, Elena; Cornuault, Josselin; Fernández-Palacios, José María; Hengl, Tomislav; Norder, Sietze J; Rijsdijk, Kenneth F; Sanmartín, Isabel; Strasberg, Dominique; Triantis, Kostas A; Valente, Luis M; Whittaker, Robert J; Gillespie, Rosemary G; Emerson, Brent C; Thébaud, Christophe

    2015-02-01

    The study of islands as model systems has played an important role in the development of evolutionary and ecological theory. The 50th anniversary of MacArthur and Wilson's (December 1963) article, 'An equilibrium theory of insular zoogeography', was a recent milestone for this theme. Since 1963, island systems have provided new insights into the formation of ecological communities. Here, building on such developments, we highlight prospects for research on islands to improve our understanding of the ecology and evolution of communities in general. Throughout, we emphasise how attributes of islands combine to provide unusual research opportunities, the implications of which stretch far beyond islands. Molecular tools and increasing data acquisition now permit re-assessment of some fundamental issues that interested MacArthur and Wilson. These include the formation of ecological networks, species abundance distributions, and the contribution of evolution to community assembly. We also extend our prospects to other fields of ecology and evolution - understanding ecosystem functioning, speciation and diversification - frequently employing assets of oceanic islands in inferring the geographic area within which evolution has occurred, and potential barriers to gene flow. Although island-based theory is continually being enriched, incorporating non-equilibrium dynamics is identified as a major challenge for the future.

  14. [Arthur Simons on tonic neck reflexes in persons with hemiplegia. From the years 1916 to 1919].

    PubMed

    Holdorff, B

    2012-04-01

    Tonic neck reflexes described in 1921 by Magnus and deKlejn in animals and men were studied in hemiplegic patients who were mainly victims of WWI by Arthur Simons, a neurologist in Berlin and coworker of Hermann Oppenheim. The effect of the asymmetric neck reflexes after head rotation was restricted to the paralyzed side: tonus (spasms) of extension and adduction during mid-position of the head or head version to the paralyzed side; flexion tonus and abduction during head version to the non-paralyzed side; and flexion tonus (spasms) of the paralyzed limbs during flexion of the head and extension spasms by head extension. More than this, hemiplegic "Mitbewegungen" or associated reactions (Walshe) were observed. They are elicited by conscious innervations of the unaffected side, e.g. by fist closure, and are increased or varied by head rotation, the tonic neck reflexes. They occurred in 25%. A film with Arthur Simons as examiner from the years 1916-1919 shows these nearly forgotten phenomena. Their everyday significance was already stressed in 1920, long before the rules of antispastic positions were defined by Bobath. PMID:21845452

  15. The Use of the Digital Smile Design Concept as an Auxiliary Tool in Aesthetic Rehabilitation: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Zanardi, Piero Rocha; Laia Rocha Zanardi, Raquel; Chaib Stegun, Roberto; Sesma, Newton; Costa, Bru-No; Cruz Laganá, Dalva

    2016-01-01

    The digital smile design is a practical diagnosis method that can assist the clinician to visualize and measure dentogingival discrepancies. This clinical report aims to present the associated steps, from the diagnosis of the alterations diagnosis through to the final aesthetic result. A 37-years-old female patient presented as her main complaint the tooth form and colour discrepancies. Applying the digital smile design principle, the necessary measures for a harmonic smile correction could be accurately determined. The initial diagnosis led to a wax up of the master cast that was duplicated in acrylic resin directly in the mouth. This temporary restoration guided the periodontal surgery and the final pressed ceramic crown restoration. We conclude that the digital smile design concept seems to be a useful tool to achieve a satisfactory aesthetic result. PMID:27006721

  16. The Effect of Parenting Style on Social Smiling in Infants at High and Low Risk for ASD.

    PubMed

    Harker, Colleen M; Ibañez, Lisa V; Nguyen, Thanh P; Messinger, Daniel S; Stone, Wendy L

    2016-07-01

    This study examined how parenting style at 9 months predicts growth in infant social engagement (i.e., social smiling) between 9 and 18 months during a free-play interaction in infants at high (HR-infants) and low (LR-infants) familial risk for autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Results indicated that across all infants, higher levels of maternal responsiveness were concurrently associated with higher levels of social smiling, while higher levels of maternal directiveness predicted slower growth in social smiling. When accounting for maternal directiveness, which was higher in mothers of HR-infants, HR-infants exhibited greater growth in social smiling than LR-infants. Overall, each parenting style appears to make a unique contribution to the development of social engagement in infants at high- and low-risk for ASD.

  17. The Use of the Digital Smile Design Concept as an Auxiliary Tool in Aesthetic Rehabilitation: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Zanardi, Piero Rocha; Laia Rocha Zanardi, Raquel; Chaib Stegun, Roberto; Sesma, Newton; Costa, Bru-No; Cruz Laganá, Dalva

    2016-01-01

    The digital smile design is a practical diagnosis method that can assist the clinician to visualize and measure dentogingival discrepancies. This clinical report aims to present the associated steps, from the diagnosis of the alterations diagnosis through to the final aesthetic result. A 37-years-old female patient presented as her main complaint the tooth form and colour discrepancies. Applying the digital smile design principle, the necessary measures for a harmonic smile correction could be accurately determined. The initial diagnosis led to a wax up of the master cast that was duplicated in acrylic resin directly in the mouth. This temporary restoration guided the periodontal surgery and the final pressed ceramic crown restoration. We conclude that the digital smile design concept seems to be a useful tool to achieve a satisfactory aesthetic result.

  18. The Use of the Digital Smile Design Concept as an Auxiliary Tool in Aesthetic Rehabilitation: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Zanardi, Piero Rocha; Laia Rocha Zanardi, Raquel; Chaib Stegun, Roberto; Sesma, Newton; Costa, Bru-no; Cruz Laganá, Dalva

    2016-01-01

    The digital smile design is a practical diagnosis method that can assist the clinician to visualize and measure dentogingival discrepancies. This clinical report aims to present the associated steps, from the diagnosis of the alterations diagnosis through to the final aesthetic result. A 37-years-old female patient presented as her main complaint the tooth form and colour discrepancies. Applying the digital smile design principle, the necessary measures for a harmonic smile correction could be accurately determined. The initial diagnosis led to a wax up of the master cast that was duplicated in acrylic resin directly in the mouth. This temporary restoration guided the periodontal surgery and the final pressed ceramic crown restoration. We conclude that the digital smile design concept seems to be a useful tool to achieve a satisfactory aesthetic result. PMID:27006721

  19. Brief report: the smiles of a child with autism spectrum disorder during an animal-assisted activity may facilitate social positive behaviors--quantitative analysis with smile-detecting interface.

    PubMed

    Funahashi, Atsushi; Gruebler, Anna; Aoki, Takeshi; Kadone, Hideki; Suzuki, Kenji

    2014-03-01

    We quantitatively measured the smiles of a child with autism spectrum disorder (ASD-C) using a wearable interface device during animal-assisted activities (AAA) for 7 months, and compared the results with a control of the same age. The participant was a 10-year-old boy with ASD, and a normal healthy boy of the same age was the control. They voluntarily participated in this study. Neither child had difficulty putting on the wearable device. They kept putting on the device comfortably through the entire experiment (duration of a session was about 30-40 min). This study was approved by the Ethical Committee based on the rules established by the Institute for Developmental Research, Aichi Human Service Center. The behavior of the participants during AAA was video-recorded and coded by the medical examiner (ME). In both groups, the smiles recognized by the ME corresponded with the computer-detected smiles. In both groups, positive social behaviors increased when the smiles increased. Also, negative social behaviors decreased when the smiles increased in the (ASD-C). It is suggested that by leading the (ASD-C) into a social environment that may cause smiling, the child's social positive behaviors may be facilitated and his social negative behaviors may be decreased.

  20. Validation of stratospheric and mesospheric ozone observed by SMILES from International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasai, Y.; Sagawa, H.; Kreyling, D.; Dupuy, E.; Baron, P.; Mendrok, J.; Suzuki, K.; Sato, T. O.; Nishibori, T.; Mizobuchi, S.; Kikuchi, K.; Manabe, T.; Ozeki, H.; Sugita, T.; Fujiwara, M.; Irimajiri, Y.; Walker, K. A.; Bernath, P. F.; Boone, C.; Stiller, G.; von Clarmann, T.; Orphal, J.; Urban, J.; Murtagh, D.; Llewellyn, E. J.; Degenstein, D.; Bourassa, A. E.; Lloyd, N. D.; Froidevaux, L.; Birk, M.; Wagner, G.; Schreier, F.; Xu, J.; Vogt, P.; Trautmann, T.; Yasui, M.

    2013-09-01

    We observed ozone (O3) in the vertical region between 250 and 0.0005 hPa (~ 12-96 km) using the Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) on the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) of the International Space Station (ISS) between 12 October 2009 and 21 April 2010. The new 4 K superconducting heterodyne receiver technology of SMILES allowed us to obtain a one order of magnitude better signal-to-noise ratio for the O3 line observation compared to past spaceborne microwave instruments. The non-sun-synchronous orbit of the ISS allowed us to observe O3 at various local times. We assessed the quality of the vertical profiles of O3 in the 100-0.001 hPa (~ 16-90 km) region for the SMILES NICT Level 2 product version 2.1.5. The evaluation is based on four components: error analysis; internal comparisons of observations targeting three different instrumental setups for the same O3 625.371 GHz transition; internal comparisons of two different retrieval algorithms; and external comparisons for various local times with ozonesonde, satellite and balloon observations (ENVISAT/MIPAS, SCISAT/ACE-FTS, Odin/OSIRIS, Odin/SMR, Aura/MLS, TELIS). SMILES O3 data have an estimated absolute accuracy of better than 0.3 ppmv (3%) with a vertical resolution of 3-4 km over the 60 to 8 hPa range. The random error for a single measurement is better than the estimated systematic error, being less than 1, 2, and 7%, in the 40-1, 80-0.1, and 100-0.004 hPa pressure regions, respectively. SMILES O3 abundance was 10-20% lower than all other satellite measurements at 8-0.1 hPa due to an error arising from uncertainties of the tangent point information and the gain calibration for the intensity of the spectrum. SMILES O3 from observation frequency Band-B had better accuracy than that from Band-A. A two month period is required to accumulate measurements covering 24 h in local time of O3 profile. However such a dataset can also contain variation due to dynamical, seasonal, and

  1. Feasibility and verification of CH3CN observation by using ISS/JEM/SMILES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imai, Koji; Suzuki, Makoto; Manago, Naohiro; Sano, Takuki; Shiotani, Masato; Hayashi, Hiroo; Mitsuda, Chihiro; Takahashi, Chikako

    The Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) was designed to be aboard the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) on the International Space Station (ISS). The SMILES instrument was launched to the International Space Station (ISS) on 11st September, 2009 (Japan Standard Time, JST) using the HII Transfer Vehicle (HTV). The SMILES has been transferred to normal operation phase on 6th November, 2009 and observing of atmospheric minor constituents in the global stratosphere. Currently, level 2 data products of the SMILES measurements has been evaluated. CH3CN is a ubiquitous trace gas in the atmosphere. A primary source of CH3CN is biomass burning [Arijs and Brasseur, 1986; Hamm and Warneck, 1990; de Gouw et al., 2003]. Recent research has identified that biomass burning has instantaneous and longer term effects on the production of atmospheric gases. The extent of biomass burning has increased on a global scale over the last 100 years because of human activities, and such burning is much more frequent and widespread than was previously believed. However the behavior of CH3CN in the stratosphere is not completely understood. Moreover, in a small region of forest fire off the east coast of Florida, significant enhanced CH3CN as high as 1500 pptv have been observed by UARS MLS at an altitude between 100 and 68 hPa (corresponding to 16-19 km), which is fiftyfold CH3CN compared to a typical stratospheric background level of 30 pptv [Livesey et al., 2004]. However the SMILES L2 processing system does not have a real-time information about where enhanced CH3CN regions are. Therefore, it needs another approach for the observational data of a significant enhanced CH3CN to retrieve with more precision. Here we compare the latest data products from SMILES with coincident observations from the other balloon and satellite-borne instrument. We then assessed the case of observing CH3CN enhancement (1500 pptv) from the simulation study.

  2. Scores on the MacArthur Communicative Development Inventory of Children from Low- and Middle-Income Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arriaga, Rose I.; Fenson, Larry; Cronan, Terry; Pethick, Stephen J.

    1998-01-01

    This study compared language skills in a group of very low-income toddlers with those of a middle-income sample matched on age and sex. The assessment instrument used was the MacArthur Communicative Development Inventory for toddlers, a parent report form. Scores for low-income group were strikingly lower on three key indices evaluated: size of…

  3. Creativity Is More than Silly, More than Art, More than Good: The Diverse Career of Arthur Cropley

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, James C.

    2015-01-01

    In this article, I highlight some of Arthur Cropley's work that has been the most influential to me as a scholar. Cropley's work has continually pushed the boundaries by exploring what creativity is and isn't, squashing myths, and not making assumptions. I specifically discuss Cropley's research and theory on the importance of convergent thinking,…

  4. 75 FR 39662 - Foreign-Trade Subzone 116A-Port Arthur, TX; Expansion of Manufacturing Authority; Motiva...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-12

    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Subzone 116A--Port Arthur, TX; Expansion of Manufacturing..., requesting an expansion of the scope of manufacturing authority approved within Subzone 116A, on behalf of... petrochemical feedstocks (Board Order 668, 59 FR 61, 12-3-1994, as amended by Board Order 740, 60 FR...

  5. 75 FR 16456 - Adequacy Status of the Beaumont-Port Arthur, TX Maintenance Plan; 8-Hour Ozone Motor Vehicle...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-01

    ...; Transportation Conformity Rule Amendments: Response to Court Decision and Additional Rule Changes'' (69 FR 40004... been made, pursuant to 40 CFR 93.104(e). See, 73 FR 4419 (January 24, 2008). Authority: 42 U.S.C. 7401... motor vehicle emissions budgets (MVEB) in the Beaumont-Port Arthur, Texas (BPA) Redesignation...

  6. 76 FR 36910 - Astoria Generating Company, L.P., NRG Power Marketing LLC, Arthur Kill Power LLC, Astoria Gas...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Astoria Generating Company, L.P., NRG Power Marketing LLC, Arthur Kill Power LLC, Astoria Gas Turbine Power LLC, Dunkirk Power LLC, Huntley Power LLC, Oswego Harbor Power LLC, TC Ravenswood, LLC. v. New York...

  7. 76 FR 34692 - Astoria Generating Company, L.P., NRG Power Marketing LLC, Arthur Kill Power LLC, Astoria Gas...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Astoria Generating Company, L.P., NRG Power Marketing LLC, Arthur Kill Power LLC, Astoria Gas Turbine Power LLC, Dunkirk Power LLC, Huntley Power LLC, Oswego Harbor Power LLC, TC Ravenswood, LLC; v. New York...

  8. Infant Communicative Development Assessed with the European Portuguese MacArthur-Bates Communicative Development Inventories Short Forms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frota, Sónia; Butler, Joseph; Correia, Susana; Severino, Cátia; Vicente, Selene; Vigário, Marina

    2016-01-01

    This article describes the European Portuguese MacArthur-Bates Communicative Development Inventories short forms, the first published instruments for the assessment of language development in EP-learning infants and toddlers. Normative data from the EP population are presented, focusing on developmental trends for vocabulary learning, production…

  9. Reception of Arthur Sutherland Neill's Pedagogical Concept and His Summerhill School in Hungarian and German Pedagogical Literature and Press

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langer-Buchwald, Judit

    2010-01-01

    Arthur Sutherland Neill is one of the most debated personalities among the representatives of the classic reform pedagogy, due to his pedagogical concept and its practical realization, and his Summerhill School, equally. He is often mentioned during public debates, where mostly the "three S"--"sex, swearing and smoking", are existing as subject of…

  10. The Complexity of Intellectual Currents: Duncan McArthur and Ontario's Progressivist Curriculum Reforms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christou, Theodore Michael

    2013-01-01

    This paper concentrates on a seminal figure in the history of Canadian education who has never previously been the subject of historical examination: Duncan McArthur. As Deputy Minister, then Minister of Education, in Ontario between 1934 and 1942, he guided the province's public schools during a period of dramatic reorganisation within a…

  11. The MacArthur Maze Fire and Roadway Collapse: Consequences for SNF Transportation - 12476

    SciTech Connect

    Bajwa, Christopher S.; Easton, Earl P.; Adkins, Harold; Cuta, Judith; Klymyshyn, Nicholas; Suffield, Sarah

    2012-07-01

    In 2007, a severe transportation accident occurred near Oakland, California, on a section of Interstate 880 known as the 'MacArthur Maze', involving a tractor trailer carrying gasoline which impacted an overpass support column and burst into flames. The subsequent fire caused the collapse of portions of the Interstate 580 overpass onto the remains of the tractor-trailer in less than 20 minutes, due to a reduction of strength in the structural steel exposed to the fire. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission is in the process of examining the impacts of this accident on the performance of a spent nuclear fuel transportation package, using detailed analysis models, in order to determine the potential regulatory implications related to the safe transport of spent nuclear fuel in the United States. This paper will provide a summary of this effort and present results and conclusions. The detailed thermal models of the MacArthur Maze fire scenario with ANSYS and COBRASFS have produced preliminary results indicating that in a fire of this severity, the peak fuel cladding temperature would almost certainly exceed the short-term limit of 570 deg. C (1058 deg. F), and would likely exceed the Zircaloy burst temperature limit of 750 deg. C (1382 deg. F) assumed in previous transportation studies. Additional work is needed to refine and verify some of the details of these complex models, but the overall results are consistent with previous fire analyses with similar models, and with the results obtained for the HAC fire evaluations with these models. These results as well as future results produced by these models can therefore be considered as reliable estimates of the temperatures that would be experienced in fire conditions of the severity of the MacArthur Maze fire scenario. The structural analyses show that the GA-4 package is robust enough to withstand the impact of the overhead span without suffering major damage or deformation to the containment boundary. The greatest

  12. The Solar Wind - Magnetosphere Energy Coupling Function and Open Magnetic Flux Estimation: Two Science Aspects of the SMILE Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C.; Dai, L.; Sun, T.; Han, J.

    2015-12-01

    The Solar wind Magnetosphere Ionosphere Link Explorer (SMILE) is a novel self-standing mission to observe solar wind - magnetosphere coupling via simultaneous in situ solar wind /magnetosheath plasma and magnetic field measurements, X-ray images of the magnetosphere, and UV images of global auroral distribution defining system - level consequences. The SMILE mission is jointly supported by ESA and CSA, and the launch date is expected to be in 2021. SMILE will address several key outstanding questions concerning how the solar wind interacts with the magnetospheres on a global level. Quantitatively estimating the energy input from the solar wind into the magnetosphere on a global scale is still an observational challenge. Using global MHD simulations, we derive a new solar wind - magnetosphere energy coupling function. The X-ray images of the magnetosphere from the SMILE mission will help estimate the energy transfer from the solar wind into the magnetosphere. A second aspect SMILE can address is the open magnetic flux, which is closely related to magnetic reconnections in the dayside magnetopause and magnetotail. In a similar way, we find that the open magnetic flux can be estimated through a combined parameter f, which is a function of the solar wind velocity, number density, the southern interplanetary magnetic field strength, and the ionospheric Pederson conductance. The UV auroral images from SMILE will be used to determine the open magnetic flux, which may serve as a key space weather forecast element in the future.

  13. STS-92 M.S. Bill McArthur suits up for launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    STS-92 Mission Specialist William S. McArthur Jr. is fully suited up before the second launch attempt. He and the rest of the crew will be leaving soon for the ride to Launch Pad 39A on the Astrovan. During the 11-day mission to the International Space Station, four extravehicular activities (EVAs), or spacewalks, are planned for construction. The payload includes the Integrated Truss Structure Z-1 and the third Pressurized Mating Adapter. The Z-1 truss is the first of 10 that will become the backbone of the Space Station, eventually stretching the length of a football field. PMA-3 will provide a Shuttle docking port for solar array installation on the sixth Station flight and Lab installation on the seventh Station flight. Launch is scheduled for 7:17 p.m. EDT. Landing is expected Oct. 22 at 2:10 p.m. EDT.

  14. Better to light a candle: Arthur Barsky and global plastic surgery.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Christopher D; Barsky, Emily; Hagander, Lars; Barsky, Arthur J; Meara, John G

    2013-08-01

    Plastic and reconstructive surgery has had a long history with international humanitarian efforts. As the field of global surgery continues to gain momentum in academic centers throughout the world, the role of the surgical subspecialist in the public health infrastructure of low-resource communities has also begun to gain a new sense of wonder and importance. Arthur Barsky, Jr was arguably one of the most influential forefathers of global plastic surgery. Throughout his notable career spanning most of the 20th century, Barsky remained dedicated to delivering plastic and reconstructive surgical care to the disadvantaged worldwide, as well as educating others to do the same. Although he was not the first surgeon with an interest in global health, Barsky's work was unique and influential in its originality, magnitude, and scope. An appreciation and understanding of Barsky's groundbreaking work will help inform the future development of sustainable surgical systems in resource-poor settings. PMID:22868314

  15. Arthur Compton's 1941 Report on explosive fission of U-235: A look at the physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, B. Cameron

    2007-12-01

    In November 1941, the third of three reports on atomic fission commissioned by Vannevar Bush through the National Academy of Sciences examined the prospects for explosive fission in U-235. This report, prepared by Arthur Compton, developed a model for estimating the critical mass and efficiency of an atomic bomb. I examine Compton's physics, attempt to discern the provenance of the numbers he adopted for various parameters, and compare his results with those yielded by a full diffusion-theory approach with contemporary values for the fission parameters. I conclude that Compton's physics is sound. A combination of somewhat optimistic parameter values and a conservative model for critical mass lead him to a numerical value for the bare critical radius of U-235 that is in fairly good accord with that yielded by diffusion theory. His estimated efficiency proved to be quite accurate for the Little Boy bomb.

  16. Arthur Beer and his relations with Einstein and the Warburg Institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duerbeck, Hilmar W.; Beer, Peter

    2006-06-01

    We give an account of the scientific life of Arthur Beer (1900-1980). Born in Reichenberg, Bohemia, he studied in Leipzig, Vienna and Berlin. After obtaining his Ph.D., he worked with the Seewarte (maritime observatory) and with the Warburg Library, both in Hamburg. Because of his relations with Finlay Freundlich, Albert Einstein and Fritz Saxl, he succeeded in emigrating to England in 1934, where he obtained a temporary position at Cambridge Observatory, and carried out astrophysical research under F.J.M. Stratton. After shorter stays at the observatories of Mill Hill and Kew, both in the vicinity of London, he obtained, after World War II, the position of Senior Assistant Observer in Cambridge. Besides his studies in astrophysics and the history of astronomy, he is best known as the founding Editor of the series Vistas in Astronomy.

  17. Humanism and values in the medical short stories of Arthur Conan Doyle.

    PubMed

    Rodin, A E; Key, J D

    1992-05-01

    In 1894 Arthur Conan Doyle published 15 medical short stories under the title of Round the Red Lamp, a red lamp being the symbol for a physician's office in Victorian England. These 19th-century vignettes do not indulge in scientific descriptions of diseases, their processes, or their treatment. Instead, they are based upon the effects of illness on the lives, sentiments, and emotions of the afflicted, their families, and their physicians. The stories are suffused with romance and humor. Conan Doyle's medical fiction of almost 100 years ago constitutes a superbly written and engaging collection that ranges from the comic to the pathetic. They contain universal themes that are especially appropriate today when humanistic elements are being usurped by rampant technology in both medical education and medical practice. These tales can make a significant contribution in related seminars for both students and practitioners.

  18. The ElderSmile TimeMap: Benefits of Connecting Statistics With Time and Place.

    PubMed

    Kum, Susan S; Wang, Hua; Wang, Peng; Jin, Zhu; De La Cruz, Leydis; Northridge, Mary E; Kunzel, Carol; Marshall, Stephen E; Metcalf, Sara S

    2015-09-01

    Community-based programs are critical for locally targeted public health education and accessible service delivery. Deriving useful information from such programs is important for their own evaluation and improvement and may facilitate research collaboration with partners and experts. Here we present an interactive Web-based application designed for a community-based oral health outreach program called ElderSmile to demonstrate how data can be summarized, filtered, compared, and visualized by time and place to inform program planning, evaluation, and research. The ElderSmile TimeMap ( http://www.acsu.buffalo.edu/∼smetcalf/resources/timemap.html ) is an emergent product of a US National Institutes of Health-funded collaboration of knowledge sharing among multidisciplinary team members at the University at Buffalo, Columbia University, and New York University. PMID:26180989

  19. Modified lip repositioning: A surgical approach to treat the gummy smile

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Aditya Gopinath; Koganti, Vijay Prasad; Prabhakar, Ashok Kodangala; Soni, Sweta

    2015-01-01

    Gummy smile has been an esthetic concern for many patients. This clinical report describes a successful surgical coverage obtained by modified lip repositioning, thus surgically treating the gummy smile. The technique was performed to limit the retraction of elevator muscles (e.g., zygomaticus minor, orbicularis oris, leviator anguli oris and levator labi oris.) The technique is fulfilled by removing two strips of mucosa from maxillary buccal vestibule on both the sides leaving the frenum untouched and creating a partial thickness flap between mucogingival junction and upper lip musculature, and suturing the lip mucosa with mucogingival junction, resulting in a narrow vestibule and restricted muscle pull, thereby reducing gingival display. This technique is different from the conventional surgical lip repositioning as labial frenum is left untouched over here as it helps in maintain Litton the midline for lip repositioning and reduces the morbidity associated with it. PMID:26229285

  20. Smiles: a fortran-77 program for sequential machine interpreted lineament extraction using digital images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghavan, Venkatesh; Wadatsumu, Kiyoshi; Masumoto, Shinji

    1994-03-01

    A FORTRAN-77 program Sequential Machine Interpreted Lineament Extraction System (SMILES) is presented, which is useful for automatic and manual extraction of lineament information from digital images. The SMILES is a stand-alone package composed of several modules which perform the function of image display, lineament information extraction, data management, output generation, and preliminary analysis. The program architecture and application results are described. The program has been tested using LANDSAT MSS data of southwestern Japan. The Directional Segment Detection Algorithm (DSDA) also has been applied to shaded relief maps generated from digital elevation data of the same area. Interpretation of aerial photograph stereo pairs reveals that the machine interpreted features show photogeological expressions that are characteristic of geologic lineaments.

  1. Mona Lisa's smile: a hypothesis based on a new principle of art neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Chakravarty, Ambar

    2010-07-01

    The smile on Mona Lisa's face remains enigmatous and a topic of much discussion in art circle over the centuries. In this essay the author proposes a new principle of art neuroscience or the science of aesthetics namely 'dynamism' which artists often employ to impart an illusion of movement in their art works which are essentially static. This illusion is possibly generated through imaginative thinking which involves frontal cortical activation in the viewer's brain coupled with activation of the motion area (area V5/MT) of the viewer's visual cortex. It is suggested that this principle of dynamism is somewhat different from the previously described concept of kinetic art. The author hypothesizes that the great painter Leonardo da Vinci very intelligently painted the angles of the mouth of Mona Lisa's face to evoke this illusion of movement (smile) to increase the aesthetic value of this great work of art.

  2. The ElderSmile TimeMap: Benefits of Connecting Statistics With Time and Place

    PubMed Central

    Kum, Susan S.; Wang, Hua; Wang, Peng; Jin, Zhu; De La Cruz, Leydis; Kunzel, Carol; Marshall, Stephen E.; Metcalf, Sara S.

    2015-01-01

    Community-based programs are critical for locally targeted public health education and accessible service delivery. Deriving useful information from such programs is important for their own evaluation and improvement and may facilitate research collaboration with partners and experts. Here we present an interactive Web-based application designed for a community-based oral health outreach program called ElderSmile to demonstrate how data can be summarized, filtered, compared, and visualized by time and place to inform program planning, evaluation, and research. The ElderSmile TimeMap (http://www.acsu.buffalo.edu/∼smetcalf/resources/timemap.html) is an emergent product of a US National Institutes of Health–funded collaboration of knowledge sharing among multidisciplinary team members at the University at Buffalo, Columbia University, and New York University. PMID:26180989

  3. Karl Pribram, the James Arthur Lectures, and What Makes Us Human

    PubMed Central

    Tattersall, Ian

    2006-01-01

    Background The annual James Arthur lecture series on the Evolution of the Human Brain was inaugurated at the American Museum of Natural History in 1932, through a bequest from a successful manufacturer with a particular interest in mechanisms. Karl Pribram's thirty-ninth lecture of the series, delivered in 1970, was a seminal event that heralded much of the research agenda, since pursued by representatives of diverse disciplines, that touches on the evolution of human uniqueness. Discussion In his James Arthur lecture Pribram raised questions about the coding of information in the brain and about the complex association between language, symbol, and the unique human cognitive system. These questions are as pertinent today as in 1970. The emergence of modern human symbolic cognition is often viewed as a gradual, incremental process, governed by inexorable natural selection and propelled by the apparent advantages of increasing intelligence. However, there are numerous theoretical considerations that render such a scenario implausible, and an examination of the pattern of acquisition of behavioral and anatomical novelties in human evolution indicates that, throughout, major change was both sporadic and rare. What is more, modern bony anatomy and brain size were apparently both achieved well before we have any evidence for symbolic behavior patterns. This suggests that the biological substrate underlying the symbolic thought that is so distinctive of Homo sapiens today was exaptively achieved, long before its potential was actually put to use. In which case we need to look for the agent, perforce a cultural one, that stimulated the adoption of symbolic thought patterns. That stimulus may well have been the spontaneous invention of articulate language. PMID:17134484

  4. David Kasner, MD, and the Road to Pars Plana Vitrectomy.

    PubMed

    Blodi, Christopher F

    2016-01-01

    David Kasner, MD (1927-2001), used his extensive dissections of eye bank eyes and experiences in teaching cataract surgery to resident physicians to realize that excision of vitreous when present in the anterior chamber of eyes undergoing cataract surgery was preferable to prior intraoperative procedures. Noting that eyes tolerated his maneuvers, he then performed planned subtotal open-sky vitrectomies; first on a traumatized eye in 1961, then on two eyes of patients with amyloidosis (1966-1967). The success of these operations was noted by others, most particularly Robert Machemer, MD. Kasner's work directly led to further surgical developments, including closed pars plana vitrectomy. PMID:27660504

  5. David Kasner, MD, and the Road to Pars Plana Vitrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Blodi, Christopher F.

    2016-01-01

    David Kasner, MD (1927–2001), used his extensive dissections of eye bank eyes and experiences in teaching cataract surgery to resident physicians to realize that excision of vitreous when present in the anterior chamber of eyes undergoing cataract surgery was preferable to prior intraoperative procedures. Noting that eyes tolerated his maneuvers, he then performed planned subtotal open-sky vitrectomies; first on a traumatized eye in 1961, then on two eyes of patients with amyloidosis (1966–1967). The success of these operations was noted by others, most particularly Robert Machemer, MD. Kasner’s work directly led to further surgical developments, including closed pars plana vitrectomy. PMID:27660504

  6. David Kasner, MD, and the Road to Pars Plana Vitrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Blodi, Christopher F.

    2016-01-01

    David Kasner, MD (1927–2001), used his extensive dissections of eye bank eyes and experiences in teaching cataract surgery to resident physicians to realize that excision of vitreous when present in the anterior chamber of eyes undergoing cataract surgery was preferable to prior intraoperative procedures. Noting that eyes tolerated his maneuvers, he then performed planned subtotal open-sky vitrectomies; first on a traumatized eye in 1961, then on two eyes of patients with amyloidosis (1966–1967). The success of these operations was noted by others, most particularly Robert Machemer, MD. Kasner’s work directly led to further surgical developments, including closed pars plana vitrectomy.

  7. Metal Free Bi(hetero)aryl Synthesis: A Benzyne Truce–Smiles Rearrangement

    PubMed Central

    Holden, Catherine M.; Sohel, Shariar M. A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A new benzyne transformation is described that affords versatile biaryl structures without recourse to transition‐metal catalysis or stoichiometric amounts of organometallic building blocks. Aryl sulfonamides add to benzyne upon fluoride activation, and then undergo an aryl Truce–Smiles rearrangement to afford biaryls with sulfur dioxide extrusion. The reaction proceeds under simple reaction conditions and has excellent scope for the synthesis of sterically hindered atropisomeric biaryl amines. PMID:26762551

  8. Metal Free Bi(hetero)aryl Synthesis: A Benzyne Truce-Smiles Rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Holden, Catherine M; Sohel, Shariar M A; Greaney, Michael F

    2016-02-12

    A new benzyne transformation is described that affords versatile biaryl structures without recourse to transition-metal catalysis or stoichiometric amounts of organometallic building blocks. Aryl sulfonamides add to benzyne upon fluoride activation, and then undergo an aryl Truce-Smiles rearrangement to afford biaryls with sulfur dioxide extrusion. The reaction proceeds under simple reaction conditions and has excellent scope for the synthesis of sterically hindered atropisomeric biaryl amines.

  9. New SMILES retrievals of ozone in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuribayashi, Kouta; Kasai, Yasuko; Orsolini, Yvan; Limpasuvan, Varavut

    2016-07-01

    Ozone in mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT) region has been observed from space since three decades. We examine ozone in MLT region using observations from the Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) on the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) of the International Space Station (ISS) between 12 October 2009 and 21 April 2010. We develop a new retrieval to improve upon previous ozone products, especially in the ozone secondary layer. One of the improvements in our new SMILES NICT level 2 product version 3.1.0 is that the profiles of the background atmosphere (altitude, pressure, and temperature) were calculated based on the global model GAIA (Ground-to-topside model of Atmosphere and Ionosphere for Aeronomy) to ensure the internal consistency of these profiles. We assess the quality of the new SMILES NICT Level2 product version 3.1.0 in the MLT region, by comparing with various satellite observations (such as SABER, GOMOS) and model calculations performed using the same background atmosphere as calculated from GAIA at the each observation point. This is to avoid that differences of ozone amount in the same air mass being caused by the use of different atmospheric conditions for calculation of volume mixing ratio from ozone density. We examine the differences caused by the vertical resolution, as well as random errors and systematic errors. The new SMILES ozone product shows good agreement with observations from other satellites in the MLT region. It sheds some light on the seasonal evolution of ozone at low latitudes, as influenced by tides.

  10. Seasonal variations of tertiary and secondary ozone maxima observed by JEM/SMILES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahani, Mona; Sagawa, Hideo; Murata, Isao; Kasaba, Yasumasa; Kasai, Yasuko

    2013-04-01

    We represent seasonal variations of the tertiary and secondary peaks of ozone according to the SMILES (Superconducting sub-Millimeter Limb Emission Sounder) observation. The tertiary ozone maximum is typically known to form around high-latitude winter mesosphere at an altitude of 70 km. The reason would be the decrease of odd-oxygen losses due to the lower concentrations of odd-hydrogen. The secondary ozone peak exists in upper mesosphere lower thermosphere (MLT) (90-105 km) near the location of atomic oxygen maximum density. Although there are still database limitations for night time ozone measurements in the mesosphere - day and night time ozone measurements should be separated because of the strong diurnal variation of ozone in mesospheric region - , SMILES sub-millimeter passive sensor was able to observe the atmosphere during day and night time. SMILES is a highly sensitive radiometer to observe atmospheric compositions located at the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) on board the International Space Station (ISS) with the latitudinal coverage of 38S to 65N. It successfully measured vertical distributions and diurnal variations of ozone from upper troposphere to MLT region during its operational period October 2009 to April 2010. The precision of SMILES mesospheric ozone is less than 10-30%. We depict monthly latitudinal distributions of the ozone mixing ratio profiles, as well as the seasonal variations of profiles at several latitudes. At northern polar region, the altitudes of the mesospheric ozone maxima are determined at 70 and 90 km for tertiary and secondary peaks respectively. The ozone concentrations of tertiary and secondary ozone layers were shown to vary seasonally around 50%. The ozone minimum is shown below 80 km with the daily means lower than 0.25 ppm. As a near future perspective to expand our understanding of mesospheric ozone, we aim to compare the mesospheric profiles with GOMOS (Global Ozone Monitoring by Occultation of Stars) ozone

  11. Smile and laughter elicited by electrical stimulation of the frontal operculum.

    PubMed

    Caruana, F; Gozzo, F; Pelliccia, V; Cossu, M; Avanzini, P

    2016-08-01

    Laughter and smile are typical expressions of mirth and fundamental means of social communication. Despite their general interest, the current knowledge about the brain regions involved in the production of these expressions is still very limited, and the principal insights come from electrical stimulation (ES) studies in patients, in which, nevertheless, laughter or smile have been elicited very rarely. Previous studies showed that laughter is evoked by the stimulation of nodes of an emotional network encompassing the anterior cingulate, the superior frontal and basal temporal cortex. A common feature of these stimulation studies is that the facial expression was always accompanied by motor awareness and often by mirth, in line with the affective functions attributed to these regions. Little is known, in contrast, on the neural basis of the voluntary motor control of this expression. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of ES of the frontal operculum (FO), which is considered a crucial node for the linkage of the voluntary motor system for emotional expression and limbic emotional network. We report the case of ES applied to the frontal operculum (FO) in four patients with drug-resistant focal epilepsy undergoing stereo-electroencephalographic (SEEG) implantation of intracerebral electrodes. In all patients, ES applied to the FO produced laughter or smile. Interestingly, in one patient, the production of a smiling expression was also clearly accompanied by the lack of motor awareness. Since the lack of motor awareness has been previously observed only after the stimulation of the voluntary motor network, we speculate that FO is involved in the voluntary control of facial expressions, and is placed at the interface with the emotional network, gating limbic information to the motor system. PMID:27401930

  12. Proportional Smile Design: Using the Recurring Esthetic Dental Proportion to Correlate the Widths and Lengths of the Maxillary Anterior Teeth with the Size of the Face.

    PubMed

    Ward, Daniel H

    2015-07-01

    Proportional smile design is a useful tool for evaluating and designing smiles that are in harmony with the face. Although not always observed in nature, the recurring esthetic dental proportion is preferred by dentists surveyed to the width proportions observed in nature with normal-length teeth. The width/length ratio of the central incisor is a key determinant in providing a smile that is pleasing to dentists. Using the desired tooth length while maintaining the preferred 78% width/length ratio of the central incisor in conjunction with the recommended recurring esthetic dental proportion is a good method for designing a smile balanced with the face. PMID:26140969

  13. Proportional Smile Design: Using the Recurring Esthetic Dental Proportion to Correlate the Widths and Lengths of the Maxillary Anterior Teeth with the Size of the Face.

    PubMed

    Ward, Daniel H

    2015-07-01

    Proportional smile design is a useful tool for evaluating and designing smiles that are in harmony with the face. Although not always observed in nature, the recurring esthetic dental proportion is preferred by dentists surveyed to the width proportions observed in nature with normal-length teeth. The width/length ratio of the central incisor is a key determinant in providing a smile that is pleasing to dentists. Using the desired tooth length while maintaining the preferred 78% width/length ratio of the central incisor in conjunction with the recommended recurring esthetic dental proportion is a good method for designing a smile balanced with the face.

  14. Comparison of the Early Clinical Outcomes between Combined Small-Incision Lenticule Extraction and Collagen Cross-Linking versus SMILE for Myopia

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Alex L. K.; Chan, Tommy C. Y.; Cheng, George P. M.; Jhanji, Vishal; Ye, Cong; Woo, Victor C. P.; Lai, Jimmy S. M.

    2016-01-01

    Background. To compare the early outcome of combined SMILE and collagen crosslinking (SMILE Xtra) with SMILE. Method. Prospective, comparative interventional study of 21 eyes receiving SMILE Xtra using a low energy protocol and 32 control eyes receiving SMILE only. The outcomes were compared at 1, 3, and 6 months postoperatively. Results. Both groups had myopia with spherical equivalent refraction (SEQ) > 4.00 D. The SMILE Xtra group had thinner preoperative central corneal thickness and residual stromal bed thickness (p < 0.021). At 6 months, no eyes lost more than 1 line in corrected distance visual acuity. The safety index was 0.96 ± 0.06 and 1.00 ± 0.00 in SMILE Xtra and control, respectively (p < 0.001). 89% and 94% of eyes were within ±0.50 D of target refraction, respectively, with the mean error in SEQ correction being −0.17 ± 0.26 D for SMILE Xtra and +0.03 ± 0.25 D for control (p = 0.021). The efficacy index was 0.88 ± 0.13 and 0.97 ± 0.06, respectively (p = 0.005). Conclusion. SMILE Xtra had good overall safety profile and predictability at 6 months. However, when compared with control, the safety index and efficacy index were statistically significantly lower in the early postoperative period. PMID:27239334

  15. Construction of a Corneal Stromal Equivalent with SMILE-Derived Lenticules and Fibrin Glue.

    PubMed

    Yin, Houfa; Qiu, Peijin; Wu, Fang; Zhang, Wei; Teng, Wenqi; Qin, Zhenwei; Li, Chao; Zhou, Jiaojie; Fang, Zhi; Tang, Qiaomei; Fu, Qiuli; Ma, Jian; Yang, Yabo

    2016-01-01

    The scarcity of corneal tissue to treat deep corneal defects and corneal perforations remains a challenge. Currently, small incision lenticule extraction (SMILE)-derived lenticules appear to be a promising alternative for the treatment of these conditions. However, the thickness and toughness of a single piece of lenticule are limited. To overcome these limitations, we constructed a corneal stromal equivalent with SMILE-derived lenticules and fibrin glue. In vitro cell culture revealed that the corneal stromal equivalent could provide a suitable scaffold for the survival and proliferation of corneal epithelial cells, which formed a continuous pluristratified epithelium with the expression of characteristic markers. Finally, anterior lamellar keratoplasty in rabbits demonstrated that the corneal stromal equivalent with decellularized lenticules and fibrin glue could repair the anterior region of the stroma, leading to re-epithelialization and recovery of both transparency and ultrastructural organization. Corneal neovascularization, graft degradation, and corneal rejection were not observed within 3 months. Taken together, the corneal stromal equivalent with SMILE-derived lenticules and fibrin glue appears to be a safe and effective alternative for the repair of damage to the anterior cornea, which may provide new avenues in the treatment of deep corneal defects or corneal perforations. PMID:27651001

  16. Brain signatures of perceiving a smile: Time course and source localization.

    PubMed

    Beltrán, David; Calvo, Manuel G

    2015-11-01

    Facial happiness is consistently recognized faster than other expressions of emotion. In this study, to determine when and where in the brain such a recognition advantage develops, EEG activity during an expression categorization task was subjected to temporospatial PCA analysis and LAURA source localizations. Happy, angry, and neutral faces were presented either in whole or bottom-half format (with the mouth region visible). The comparison of part- versus whole-face conditions served to examine the role of the smile. Two neural signatures underlying the happy face advantage emerged. One peaked around 140 ms (left N140) and was source-located at the left IT cortex (MTG), with greater activity for happy versus non-happy faces in both whole and bottom-half face format. This suggests an enhanced perceptual encoding mechanism for salient smiles. The other peaked around 370 ms (P3b and N3) and was located at the right IT (FG) and dorsal cingulate (CC) cortices, with greater activity specifically for bottom-half happy versus non-happy faces. This suggests an enhanced recruitment of face-specific information to categorize (or reconstruct) facial happiness from diagnostic smiling mouths. Additional differential brain responses revealed a specific "anger effect," with greater activity for angry versus non-angry expressions (right N170 and P230; right pSTS and IPL); and a coarse "emotion effect," with greater activity for happy and angry versus neutral expressions (anterior P2 and posterior N170; vmPFC and right IFG).

  17. Double Variational Binding—(SMILES) Conformational Analysis by Docking Mechanisms for Anti-HIV Pyrimidine Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Putz, Mihai V.; Dudaș, Nicoleta A.; Isvoran, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    Variational quantitative binding–conformational analysis for a series of anti-HIV pyrimidine-based ligands is advanced at the individual molecular level. This was achieved by employing ligand-receptor docking algorithms for each molecule in the 1,3-disubstituted uracil derivative series that was studied. Such computational algorithms were employed for analyzing both genuine molecular cases and their simplified molecular input line entry system (SMILES) transformations, which were created via the controlled breaking of chemical bonds, so as to generate the longest SMILES molecular chain (LoSMoC) and Branching SMILES (BraS) conformations. The study identified the most active anti-HIV molecules, and analyzed their special and relevant bonding fragments (chemical alerts), and the recorded energetic and geometric docking results (i.e., binding and affinity energies, and the surface area and volume of bonding, respectively). Clear computational evidence was also produced concerning the ligand-receptor pocket binding efficacies of the LoSMoc and BraS conformation types, thus confirming their earlier presence (as suggested by variational quantitative structure-activity relationship, variational-QSAR) as active intermediates for the molecule-to-cell transduction process. PMID:26295229

  18. Construction of a Corneal Stromal Equivalent with SMILE-Derived Lenticules and Fibrin Glue

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Houfa; Qiu, Peijin; Wu, Fang; Zhang, Wei; Teng, Wenqi; Qin, Zhenwei; Li, Chao; Zhou, Jiaojie; Fang, Zhi; Tang, Qiaomei; Fu, Qiuli; Ma, Jian; Yang, Yabo

    2016-01-01

    The scarcity of corneal tissue to treat deep corneal defects and corneal perforations remains a challenge. Currently, small incision lenticule extraction (SMILE)-derived lenticules appear to be a promising alternative for the treatment of these conditions. However, the thickness and toughness of a single piece of lenticule are limited. To overcome these limitations, we constructed a corneal stromal equivalent with SMILE-derived lenticules and fibrin glue. In vitro cell culture revealed that the corneal stromal equivalent could provide a suitable scaffold for the survival and proliferation of corneal epithelial cells, which formed a continuous pluristratified epithelium with the expression of characteristic markers. Finally, anterior lamellar keratoplasty in rabbits demonstrated that the corneal stromal equivalent with decellularized lenticules and fibrin glue could repair the anterior region of the stroma, leading to re-epithelialization and recovery of both transparency and ultrastructural organization. Corneal neovascularization, graft degradation, and corneal rejection were not observed within 3 months. Taken together, the corneal stromal equivalent with SMILE-derived lenticules and fibrin glue appears to be a safe and effective alternative for the repair of damage to the anterior cornea, which may provide new avenues in the treatment of deep corneal defects or corneal perforations. PMID:27651001

  19. Focal dystonia and the Sensory-Motor Integrative Loop for Enacting (SMILE)

    PubMed Central

    Perruchoud, David; Murray, Micah M.; Lefebvre, Jeremie; Ionta, Silvio

    2014-01-01

    Performing accurate movements requires preparation, execution, and monitoring mechanisms. The first two are coded by the motor system, the latter by the sensory system. To provide an adaptive neural basis to overt behaviors, motor and sensory information has to be properly integrated in a reciprocal feedback loop. Abnormalities in this sensory-motor loop are involved in movement disorders such as focal dystonia, a hyperkinetic alteration affecting only a specific body part and characterized by sensory and motor deficits in the absence of basic motor impairments. Despite the fundamental impact of sensory-motor integration mechanisms on daily life, the general principles of healthy and pathological anatomic–functional organization of sensory-motor integration remain to be clarified. Based on the available data from experimental psychology, neurophysiology, and neuroimaging, we propose a bio-computational model of sensory-motor integration: the Sensory-Motor Integrative Loop for Enacting (SMILE). Aiming at direct therapeutic implementations and with the final target of implementing novel intervention protocols for motor rehabilitation, our main goal is to provide the information necessary for further validating the SMILE model. By translating neuroscientific hypotheses into empirical investigations and clinically relevant questions, the prediction based on the SMILE model can be further extended to other pathological conditions characterized by impaired sensory-motor integration. PMID:24999327

  20. Submillimeter limb-emission sounder JEM/SMILES aboard the Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inatani, Junji; Ozeki, Hiroyuki; Satoh, Ryouta; Nishibori, Toshiyuki; Ikeda, Naomi; Fujii, Yasunori; Nakajima, Takashi; Iida, Yukiei; Iida, Teruhito; Kikuchi, Ken'ichi; Miura, Takeshi; Masuko, Harunobu; Manabe, Takeshi; Ochiai, Satoshi; Seta, Masumichi; Irimajiri, Yoshihisa; Kasai, Yasuko; Suzuki, Makoto; Shirai, Tomoko; Tsujimaru, Sho; Shibasaki, Kazuo; Shiotani, Masato

    2000-12-01

    A submillimeter limb-emission sounder, that is to be aboard the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM, dubbed as KIBO) at the International Space Station, has been designed. This payload, Superconducting Submillimeter-wave Limb-emission Sounder (SMILES), is aimed at global mappings of stratospheric trace gases by means of the most sensitive submillimeter receiver ever operated in space. Such sensitivity is ascribed to a Superconductor-Insulator- Superconductor (SIS) mixer, which is operated at 4.5 K in a dedicated cryostat combined with a mechanical cooler. SMILES will observe ozone-depletion-related molecules such as ClO, Hcl, HO2, HNO3, BrO and O3 in the frequency bands at 624.32-626.32 GHz and 649.12-650.32 GHz. A scanning antenna will cover tangent altitudes from 10 to 60 km in every 53 seconds, while tracing the latitudes form 38 S to 65 N along its orbit. This global coverage makes SMILES a useful tool of observing the low- and mid- latitudinal areas as well as the Arctic peripheral region. The molecular emissions will be detected by two units of acousto-optic spectrometers (AOS), each of which has coverage of 1.2 GHz with a resolution of 1.8 MHz. This high-resolution spectroscopy will allow us to detect weak emission lines attributing to less-abundant species.