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Sample records for dbv stars progress

  1. Asteroseismology of the DBV star CBS 114

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yan-Hui

    2016-08-01

    Asteroseismology is a unique and powerful tool to investigate the internal structure of stars. CBS 114 is the sixth known pulsating DBV star. It was observed by Handler, Metcalfe, & Wood at the South African Astronomical Observatory over three weeks in 2001. Then, it was observed by Metcalfe et al. for seven nights (2004 Feb. 19-25) on the 1.8 m telescope at the Bohyunsan Optical Astronomy Observatory and seven nights (2004 Feb. 21-27) on the 2.1 m telescope at the McDonald Observatory. Totally two triplets, four doublets, and five singlets were identified. The frequency splitting values are very different, from 5.2 μHz to 11.9 μHz, which may reflect differential rotations. We evolve grids of white dwarf models by MESA. Cores, added with He/C envelopes, of those white dwarf models are inserted into WDEC to evolve grids of DBV star models. With those DBV star models, we calculate eigenperiods. Those calculated periods are used to fit observed periods. A best-fitting model is selected. The parameters are T eff = 25000 K, M * = 0.740 M ⊙ and log(M He/M *) = —4.5. With the relatively large stellar mass, the effective temperature is close to the previous spectroscopic result. In addition, kinetic energy distributions are calculated for the best-fitting model. We find that the observed modes with large frequency splitting values are fitted by the calculated modes with a large amount of kinetic energy distributed in the C/O core. After preliminary analysis, we suggest that the C/O core may rotate at least two times faster than the helium layer for CBS 114.

  2. Asteroseismology Of The Kepler DBV - It's a Hot One!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Agnes; Ostensen, R.

    2012-01-01

    We present an asteroseismic analysis of the DBV recently found in the field of view of the Kepler satellite. We analyze the 5-mode pulsation spectrum that was produced based on one month of high cadence Kepler data. The pulsational characteristics of the star and the asteroseismic analysis strongly suggest that the star is hotter (29200 K) than the 24900 K suggested by model fits to the low S/N survey spectrum of the object. This result has profound and exciting implications for tests of the Standard Model of particle physics. Hot DBVs are expected to lose over half of their energy through the emission of plasmon neutrinos. Continuous monitoring of the star with the Kepler satellite over the course of 3 to 5 years is not only very likely to yield more modes to help constrain the asteroseismic fits, but also allow us to obtain a rate of change of any stable mode and therefore measure the emission of plasmon neutrinos.

  3. The DBV White Dwarf EC20058-5234 the continuing story

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, Denis J.

    2010-11-01

    The helium atmosphere pulsator, EC 20058-5234 currently defines the hot edge of the DBV instability strip. Its effective temperature, estimated by both spectroscopic and asteroseismic techniques, is consistent with an extremely hot core for which models predict a neutrino cooling flux that exceeds the surface photon flux. The neutrinos are created primarily by the plasmon decay process. Although EC20058 is multiperiodic, it has been shown to be a very stable pulsator with two dominant modes. Contraction of the white dwarf has largely ceased in the DBV instability strip temperature regime, so the decreasing temperature due to cooling should lead to very small increases in the puslation periods provided no other effects such as resonant mode trapping occor. Beginning with a Whole Earth Telescope run in 1997, we have regularly obtained seasonal data on EC 20058 (largely at Mt John Observatory in NZ) in an effort to determine a Pdot for its pulsation modes and relate this to the theoretical neutrino cooling mechanism. This paper reports on progress.

  4. Asteroseismology of the Kepler Field DBV White Dwarf. It is a Hot One

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bischoff-Kim, Agnès; Østensen, Roy H.

    2011-11-01

    We present an asteroseismic analysis of the helium atmosphere white dwarf (a DBV) recently found in the field of view of the Kepler satellite. We analyze the five-mode pulsation spectrum that was produced based on one month of short-cadence Kepler data. The pulsational characteristics of the star and the asteroseismic analysis strongly suggest that the star is hotter (29,200 K) than the 24,900 K suggested by model fits to the low signal-to-noise survey spectrum of the object. This result has profound and exciting implications for tests of the standard model of particle physics. Hot DBVs are expected to lose over half of their energy through the emission of plasmon neutrinos. Continuous monitoring of the star with the Kepler satellite over the course of 3-5 years is not only very likely to yield more modes to help constrain the asteroseismic fits, but also to allow us to obtain a rate of change of any stable mode and therefore measure the emission of plasmon neutrinos.

  5. ASTEROSEISMOLOGY OF THE KEPLER FIELD DBV WHITE DWARF. IT IS A HOT ONE

    SciTech Connect

    Bischoff-Kim, Agnes; Ostensen, Roy H. E-mail: roy@ster.kuleuven.be

    2011-11-20

    We present an asteroseismic analysis of the helium atmosphere white dwarf (a DBV) recently found in the field of view of the Kepler satellite. We analyze the five-mode pulsation spectrum that was produced based on one month of short-cadence Kepler data. The pulsational characteristics of the star and the asteroseismic analysis strongly suggest that the star is hotter (29,200 K) than the 24,900 K suggested by model fits to the low signal-to-noise survey spectrum of the object. This result has profound and exciting implications for tests of the standard model of particle physics. Hot DBVs are expected to lose over half of their energy through the emission of plasmon neutrinos. Continuous monitoring of the star with the Kepler satellite over the course of 3-5 years is not only very likely to yield more modes to help constrain the asteroseismic fits, but also to allow us to obtain a rate of change of any stable mode and therefore measure the emission of plasmon neutrinos.

  6. The long term period stability of the hot DBV white dwarf EC20058-5234

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, Denis J.

    2009-06-01

    Since its discovery over a decade ago, the helium atmosphere pulsator EC 20058-5234 (QU Tel) has been studied both spectroscopically, and also extensively using the techniques of time-series photometry. Model atmosphere fits to quality spectra obtained with one of the Magellan telescopes have confirmed its status as the hottest know DBV, so it currently defines the blue edge of the DBV instability strip. Extensive time-series photometry (primarily from Mt John in NZ but also including a Whole Earth Telescope run) clearly demonstrates that this white dwarf is a very stable low amplitude pulsator. This is consistent with its position at or near the blue edge of the DBV instability strip. However, of perhaps greater significance is the possibility of employing this period stability to look for a period change that can be sourced to the predicted neutrino-dominated cooling of the hot white dwarfs. This paper provides an update on this work.

  7. Seven-period asteroseismic fit of the Kepler DBV

    SciTech Connect

    Bischoff-Kim, Agnès; Østensen, Roy H.; Hermes, J. J.; Provencal, Judith L. E-mail: roy@ster.kuleuven.be E-mail: jlp@udel.edu

    2014-10-10

    We present a new, better-constrained asteroseismic analysis of the helium-atmosphere (DB) white dwarf discovered in the field of view of the original Kepler mission. Observations obtained over the course of 2 yr yield at least seven independent modes, two more than were found in the discovery paper for the object. With several triplets and doublets, we are able to fix the ℓ and m identification of several modes before performing the fitting, greatly reducing the number of assumptions we must make about mode identification. We find a very thin helium layer for this relatively hot DB, which adds evidence to the hypothesis that helium diffuses outward during DB cooling. At least a few of the modes appear to be stable on evolutionary timescales and could allow us to obtain a measurement of the rate of cooling with monitoring of the star over the course of the next few years with ground-based follow-up.

  8. DriverDBv2: a database for human cancer driver gene research.

    PubMed

    Chung, I-Fang; Chen, Chen-Yang; Su, Shih-Chieh; Li, Chia-Yang; Wu, Kou-Juey; Wang, Hsei-Wei; Cheng, Wei-Chung

    2016-01-04

    We previously presented DriverDB, a database that incorporates ∼ 6000 cases of exome-seq data, in addition to annotation databases and published bioinformatics algorithms dedicated to driver gene/mutation identification. The database provides two points of view, 'Cancer' and 'Gene', to help researchers visualize the relationships between cancers and driver genes/mutations. In the updated DriverDBv2 database (http://ngs.ym.edu.tw/driverdb) presented herein, we incorporated >9500 cancer-related RNA-seq datasets and >7000 more exome-seq datasets from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), International Cancer Genome Consortium (ICGC), and published papers. Seven additional computational algorithms (meaning that the updated database contains 15 in total), which were developed for driver gene identification, are incorporated into our analysis pipeline, and the results are provided in the 'Cancer' section. Furthermore, there are two main new features, 'Expression' and 'Hotspot', in the 'Gene' section. 'Expression' displays two expression profiles of a gene in terms of sample types and mutation types, respectively. 'Hotspot' indicates the hotspot mutation regions of a gene according to the results provided by four bioinformatics tools. A new function, 'Gene Set', allows users to investigate the relationships among mutations, expression levels and clinical data for a set of genes, a specific dataset and clinical features.

  9. Whole earth telescope observations of the DBV white dwarf GD 358

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winget, D. E.; Nather, R. E.; Clemens, J. C.; Provencal, J. L.; Kleinman, S. J.; Bradley, P. A.; Claver, C. F.; Dixson, J. S.; Montgomery, M. H.; Hansen, C. J.

    1994-01-01

    We report on the analysis of 154 hours of early continuous high-speed photometry on the pulsating DB white dwarf (DBV) GD 358, obtained during the Whole Earth Telescope (WET) run of 1990 May. The power spectrum of the light curve is dominated by power in the range from 1000 to 2400 microHz with more than 180 significant peaks in the total spectrum. We identify all of the triplet frequencies as degree l = 1, and from the details of their spacings we derive the total stellar mass as 0.61 + or - 0.03 solar mass, the mass of the outer helium envelope as 2.0 + or - 1.0 x 10(exp -6) M(sub *), the absolute luminosity as 0.050 + or - 0.012 solar luminosity and the distance as 42 + or - 3 pc. We find strong evidence for differential rotation in the radial direction -- the outer envelope is rotating at least 1.8 times faster than the core -- and we detect the presence of a weak magnetic field with a strength of 1300 + or - 300 G. We also find a significant power at the sums and differences of the dominant frequencies, indicating nonlinear processes are significant, but they have a richness and complexity that rules out resonant mode coupling as a major cause.

  10. Progress in Na laser guide star adaptive optics and lessons learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Katharine J.

    2016-09-01

    Laser beams have long been applied across many disciplines, extending degrees of freedom for purely spatial control to polarization spatial control. Adaptive beam shaping in Na Laser Guide Star approaches will be assessed for progress and lessons learned. Laser Guide Stars based on Rayleigh Scattering at 530 nm is straightforward: simply frequency double a Nd:YAG. For Na Laser Guide Stars, there is no easy way to get 589 nm and is more cotp:plicated. Significate Laser Guide Star Systems include the Starfire Optical Range (SOR), The Lick Laser Gude Star (UC), Caltech/Mt. Palomar, the Keck Laser Guide Star, ESQ VLT, and Gemini South. These will be compared for progress and future developments.

  11. Learning from Pulsating Stars: Progress over the Last Century (Abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, H.

    2016-12-01

    (Abstract only) Scarcely more than a century has elapsed since it began to be widely accepted that pulsation plays an important role in the variability of stars. During that century pulsating stars have been used as tools to explore a variety of astrophysical questions, including the determination of distances to other galaxies, the testing of timescales of evolution through the HR diagram, and the identification of the ages and star formation histories of stellar populations. Among the significant early milestones along this investigative path are Henrietta Leavitt's discovery of a relation between the periods and luminosities of Cepheids, Harlow Shapley's proposal that all Cepheids are pulsating stars, and Arthur Stanley Eddington's use of the observed period change of d Cephei to constrain its power source. Today our explorations of pulsating stars are bolstered by long observational histories of brighter variables, surveys involving unprecedentedly large numbers of stars, and improved theoretical analyses. This talk will review aspects of the history and our current understanding of pulsating stars, paying particular attention to RR Lyrae, d Scuti, and Cepheid variables. Observations by AAVSO members have provided insight into several questions regarding the behavior of these stars.

  12. PROGRESSIVE STAR FORMATION IN THE YOUNG GALACTIC SUPER STAR CLUSTER NGC 3603

    SciTech Connect

    Beccari, Giacomo; Spezzi, Loredana; De Marchi, Guido; Andersen, Morten; Paresce, Francesco; Young, Erick; Panagia, Nino; Bond, Howard; Balick, Bruce; Calzetti, Daniela; Carollo, C. Marcella; Disney, Michael J.; Dopita, Michael A.; Frogel, Jay A.; Hall, Donald N. B.; Holtzman, Jon A.; Kimble, Randy A.; McCarthy, Patrick J.; O'Connell, Robert W.; Saha, Abhijit

    2010-09-10

    Early Release Science observations of the cluster NGC 3603 with the WFC3 on the refurbished Hubble Space Telescope allow us to study its recent star formation history. Our analysis focuses on stars with H{alpha} excess emission, a robust indicator of their pre-main sequence (PMS) accreting status. The comparison with theoretical PMS isochrones shows that 2/3 of the objects with H{alpha} excess emission have ages from 1 to 10 Myr, with a median value of 3 Myr, while a surprising 1/3 of them are older than 10 Myr. The study of the spatial distribution of these PMS stars allows us to confirm their cluster membership and to statistically separate them from field stars. This result establishes unambiguously for the first time that star formation in and around the cluster has been ongoing for at least 10-20 Myr, at an apparently increasing rate.

  13. The progress of TMT Laser Guide Star Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Min; Wei, Kai; Tang, Jinlong; Jiang, Changchun; Fan, Muwen; Chen, Feng; Rui, Daoman; Li, Xiqi; Boyer, Corinne; Wang, Lianqi; Ellerbroek, Brent; Xian, Hao; Rao, Changhui; Zhang, Yudong

    2016-07-01

    The Laser Guide Star Facility (LGSF) is responsible for generating the artificial laser guide stars required by the TMT Laser Guide Star (LGS) AO systems. The LGSF uses multiple sodium lasers to generate and project several LGS asterisms from a laser launch telescope located behind the TMT secondary mirror. The LGSF includes 3 main subsystems: (1) the laser system, (2) the beam transfer optics (BTO) system, (3) the associated laser safety system. At present, the LGSF is in the preliminary design phase. During this phase, the laser launch telescope trade study, Beam transfer optical path trade study are compared carefully, and some critical components prototypes have been carried out to verify the requirements, such as the polarization status control and test, the Fast Steer Mirror (FSM) prototype test.

  14. YoungStar: We're Turning Five! Five Year Analysis as of July 2015. YoungStar Progress Report 6

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin Council on Children and Families, 2015

    2015-01-01

    This report is the sixth in a series of Wisconsin Council on Children & Families (WCCF) reports tracking the progress of Wisconsin's YoungStar program, a quality rating and improvement system (QRIS) launched in 2010 to improve the quality of Wisconsin child care programs. YoungStar focuses on children of low-income working families receiving…

  15. YoungStar in Wisconsin: Analysis of Data as of July 2014. YoungStar Progress Report #5

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin Council on Children and Families, 2014

    2014-01-01

    YoungStar is a program of the Department of Children and Families (DCF) designed to improve the quality of child care for Wisconsin children. YoungStar is designed to: (1) evaluate and rate the quality of care given by child care providers; (2) help parents choose the best child care for their kids; (3) support providers with tools and training to…

  16. Progress in the Phase 0 Model Development of a STAR Concept for Dynamics and Control Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods-Vedeler, Jessica A.; Armand, Sasan C.

    2003-01-01

    The paper describes progress in the development of a lightweight, deployable passive Synthetic Thinned Aperture Radiometer (STAR). The spacecraft concept presented will enable the realization of 10 km resolution global soil moisture and ocean salinity measurements at 1.41 GHz. The focus of this work was on definition of an approximately 1/3-scaled, 5-meter Phase 0 test article for concept demonstration and dynamics and control testing. Design requirements, parameters and a multi-parameter, hybrid scaling approach for the dynamically scaled test model were established. The El Scaling Approach that was established allows designers freedom to define the cross section of scaled, lightweight structural components that is most convenient for manufacturing when the mass of the component is small compared to the overall system mass. Static and dynamic response analysis was conducted on analytical models to evaluate system level performance and to optimize panel geometry for optimal tension load distribution.

  17. YoungStar in Milwaukee County: An Initial Progress Report as of July 2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edie, Dave

    2011-01-01

    YoungStar is a program of the Department of Children and Families (DCF) created to improve the quality of child care for Wisconsin children. YoungStar is designed to: (1) Evaluate and rate the quality of care given by child care providers; (2) Help parents choose the best child care for their kids; (3) Support providers with tools and training to…

  18. YoungStar in Wisconsin: An Initial Progress Report as of July 2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edie, Dave

    2011-01-01

    YoungStar is a program of the Department of Children and Families (DCF) created to improve the quality of child care for Wisconsin children. YoungStar is designed to: (1) Evaluate and rate the quality of care given by child care providers; (2) Help parents choose the best child care for their kids; (3) Support providers with tools and training to…

  19. Progress on realistic modeling of black hole-neutron star binary mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duez, Matthew

    2011-04-01

    Black hole-neutron star (BHNS) binary mergers are important gravitational wave sources and (possibly) gamma ray burst progenitors. The current state of the art of BHNS simulations, while an impressive acheivement, is inadequate in a number of ways--most importantly in its treatment of neutron star matter and neutrino emission. We present a status report on the efforts of the Caltech-Cornell-CITA-WSU collaboration to accurately model BHNS binaries with realistic microphysics.

  20. Microwave Sounder for GEOS-R - A GeoSTAR Progress Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambrigtsen, Bjorn H.; Wilson, William; Tanner, Alan; Kangaslahti, Pekka P.

    2005-01-01

    The Geostationary Synthetic Thinned Aperture Radiometer (GeoSTAR) is a new concept for a microwave sounder, intended to be deployed on NOAA's next generation of geostationary weather satellites, GOES-R. A ground based prototype has been developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, under NASA Instrument Incubator Program sponsorship, and is now undergoing tests and performance characterization. The initial space version of GeoSTAR will have performance characteristics equal to those of the AMSU system currently operating on polar orbiting environmental satellites, but subsequent versions will significantly outperform AMSU. In addition to all-weather temperature and humidity soundings, GeoSTAR will also provide continuous rain mapping, tropospheric wind profiling and real time storm tracking.

  1. Pion-nucleus interactions and the STAR experiment at RHIC. Progress report, 1990--1993

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, C.F.

    1993-09-01

    This report summarizes the work carried out by personnel from the University of Texas at Austin at the Los Alamos Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) during the calendar years 1990--1993 and on the STAR experiment at RHIC under grant DE-FGO5-87ER40343 between the University of Texas at Austin and the United States Department of Energy. A brief overview of work supported by this grant is given in Section 2. An account of the study of the double giant resonances in pion double charge exchange forms Section 3. This report contains a list of published papers and preprints in Section 6, invited talks in Section 7, and abstracts in Section 8. These papers summarize experiments involving participants supported by this grant and indicate the work accomplished by these participants in this program of medium energy nuclear physics research. Section 9 contains a list of personnel who have participated in this research program.

  2. Progress and Challenges in SPH Simulations of Disk Galaxy Formation: The Combined Role of Resolution and the Star Formation Density Threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, L.

    2012-07-01

    We review progress in cosmological SPH simulations of disk galaxy formation. We discuss the role of numerical resolution and sub-grid recipes of star formation and feedback from supernovae, higlighting the important role of a high star formation density threshold comparable to that of star forming molecular gas phase. Two recent succesfull examples, in simulations of the formation of gas-rich bulgeless dwarf galaxies and in simulations of late-type spirals (the ERIS simulations), are presented and discussed. In the ERIS simulations, already in the progenitors at z = 3 the resolution is above the threshold indicated by previous idealized numerical experiments as necessary to minimize numerical angular momentum loss (Kaufmann et al. 2007). A high star formation density threshold maintains an inhomogeneous interstellar medium, where star formation is clustered, and thus the local effect of supernovae feedback is enhanced. As a result, outflows are naturally generated removing 2/3 of the baryons in galaxies with Vvir˜50 km/s and ˜ 30% of the baryons in galaxies with (Vvir ˜ 150 km/s). Low angular momentum baryons are preferentially removed since the strongest bursts of star formation occur predominantly near the center, especially after a merger event. This produces pure exponential disks or small bulges depending on galaxy mass, and, correspondingly, slowly rising or nearly flat rotation curves that match those of observed disk galaxies. In dwarfs the rapid mass removal by outflows generates a core-like distribution in the dark matter. Furthermore, contrary to the common picture, in the ERIS spiral galaxies a bar/pseudobulge forms rapidly, and not secularly, as a result of mergers and interactions at high-z.

  3. Strange stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alcock, Charles; Farhi, Edward; Olinto, Angela

    1986-01-01

    Strange matter, a form of quark matter that is postulated to be absolute stable, may be the true ground stage of the hadrons. If this hypothesis is correct, neutron stars may convert to 'strange stars'. The mass-radius relation for strange stars is very different from that of neutron stars; there is no minimum mass, and for mass of 1 solar mass or less, mass is proportional to the cube of the radius. For masses between 1 solar mass and 2 solar masses, the radii of strange stars are about 10 km, as for neutron stars. Strange stars may have an exposed quark surface, which is capable of radiating at rates greatly exceeding the Eddington limit, but has a low emissivity for X-ray photons. The stars may have a thin crust with the same composition as the preneutron drip outer layer of a conventional neutron star crust. Strange stars cool efficiently via neutrino emission.

  4. Stars and Star Myths.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eason, Oliver

    Myths and tales from around the world about constellations and facts about stars in the constellations are presented. Most of the stories are from Greek and Roman mythology; however, a few Chinese, Japanese, Polynesian, Arabian, Jewish, and American Indian tales are also included. Following an introduction, myths are presented for the following 32…

  5. From stars to nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meynet, G.

    2008-04-01

    We recall the basic physical principles governing the evolution of stars with some emphasis on the role played by the nuclear reactions. We argue that in general it is not possible from observations of stars to deduce constraints on the nuclear reaction rates. This is the reason why precise measurements of nuclear reaction rates are a necessity in order to make progresses in stellar physics, nucleosynthesis and chemical evolution of galaxies. There are however some stars which provides useful constraints on nuclear processes. The Wolf-Rayet stars of the WN type present at their surface CNO equilibrium patterns. There is also the particular case of the abundance of 22Ne at the surface of WC stars. The abundance of this element is a measure of the initial CNO content. Very interestingly, recent determinations of its abundance at the surface of WC stars tend to confirm that massive stars in the solar neighborhood have initial metallicities in agreement with the Asplund et al. [1] solar abundances.

  6. Pulsating Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catelan, M.; Smith, H. A.

    2015-03-01

    This book surveys our understanding of stars which change in brightness because they pulsate. Pulsating variable stars are keys to distance scales inside and beyond the Milky Way galaxy. They test our understanding not only of stellar pulsation theory but also of stellar structure and evolution theory. Moreover, pulsating stars are important probes of the formation and evolution of our own and neighboring galaxies. Our understanding of pulsating stars has greatly increased in recent years as large-scale surveys of pulsating stars in the Milky Way and other Local Group galaxies have provided a wealth of new observations and as space-based instruments have studied particular pulsating stars in unprecedented detail.

  7. Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livio, Mario; Villaver, Eva

    2009-11-01

    Participants; Preface Mario Livio and Eva Villaver; 1. High-mass star formation by gravitational collapse of massive cores M. R. Krumholz; 2. Observations of massive star formation N. A. Patel; 3. Massive star formation in the Galactic center D. F. Figer; 4. An X-ray tour of massive star-forming regions with Chandra L. K. Townsley; 5. Massive stars: feedback effects in the local universe M. S. Oey and C. J. Clarke; 6. The initial mass function in clusters B. G. Elmegreen; 7. Massive stars and star clusters in the Antennae galaxies B. C. Whitmore; 8. On the binarity of Eta Carinae T. R. Gull; 9. Parameters and winds of hot massive stars R. P. Kudritzki and M. A. Urbaneja; 10. Unraveling the Galaxy to find the first stars J. Tumlinson; 11. Optically observable zero-age main-sequence O stars N. R. Walborn; 12. Metallicity-dependent Wolf-Raynet winds P. A. Crowther; 13. Eruptive mass loss in very massive stars and Population III stars N. Smith; 14. From progenitor to afterlife R. A. Chevalier; 15. Pair-production supernovae: theory and observation E. Scannapieco; 16. Cosmic infrared background and Population III: an overview A. Kashlinsky.

  8. Hubble Tarantula Treasury Project. III. Photometric Catalog and Resulting Constraints on the Progression of Star Formation in the 30 Doradus Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabbi, E.; Lennon, D. J.; Anderson, J.; Cignoni, M.; van der Marel, R. P.; Zaritsky, D.; De Marchi, G.; Panagia, N.; Gouliermis, D. A.; Grebel, E. K.; Gallagher, J. S., III; Smith, L. J.; Sana, H.; Aloisi, A.; Tosi, M.; Evans, C. J.; Arab, H.; Boyer, M.; de Mink, S. E.; Gordon, K.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Larsen, S. S.; Ryon, J. E.; Zeidler, P.

    2016-01-01

    We present and describe the astro-photometric catalog of more than 800,000 sources found in the Hubble Tarantula Treasury Project (HTTP). HTTP is a Hubble Space Telescope Treasury program designed to image the entire 30 Doradus region down to the sub-solar (˜0.5 M⊙) mass regime using the Wide Field Camera 3 and the Advanced Camera for Surveys. We observed 30 Doradus in the near-ultraviolet (F275W, F336W), optical (F555W, F658N, F775W), and near-infrared (F110W, F160W) wavelengths. The stellar photometry was measured using point-spread function fitting across all bands simultaneously. The relative astrometric accuracy of the catalog is 0.4 mas. The astro-photometric catalog, results from artificial star experiments, and the mosaics for all the filters are available for download. Color-magnitude diagrams are presented showing the spatial distributions and ages of stars within 30 Dor as well as in the surrounding fields. HTTP provides the first rich and statistically significant sample of intermediate- and low-mass pre-main sequence candidates and allows us to trace how star formation has been developing through the region. The depth and high spatial resolution of our analysis highlight the dual role of stellar feedback in quenching and triggering star formation on the giant H ii region scale. Our results are consistent with stellar sub-clustering in a partially filled gaseous nebula that is offset toward our side of the Large Magellanic Cloud. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by AURA Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  9. HUBBLE TARANTULA TREASURY PROJECT. III. PHOTOMETRIC CATALOG AND RESULTING CONSTRAINTS ON THE PROGRESSION OF STAR FORMATION IN THE 30 DORADUS REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Sabbi, E.; Anderson, J.; Cignoni, M.; Marel, R. P. van der; Panagia, N.; Sana, H.; Aloisi, A.; Arab, H.; Gordon, K.; Lennon, D. J.; Zaritsky, D.; Marchi, G. De; Gouliermis, D. A.; Grebel, E. K.; III, J. S. Gallagher; Smith, L. J.; Evans, C. J.; Boyer, M.; Mink, S. E. de; and others

    2016-01-15

    We present and describe the astro-photometric catalog of more than 800,000 sources found in the Hubble Tarantula Treasury Project (HTTP). HTTP is a Hubble Space Telescope Treasury program designed to image the entire 30 Doradus region down to the sub-solar (∼0.5 M{sub ⊙}) mass regime using the Wide Field Camera 3 and the Advanced Camera for Surveys. We observed 30 Doradus in the near-ultraviolet (F275W, F336W), optical (F555W, F658N, F775W), and near-infrared (F110W, F160W) wavelengths. The stellar photometry was measured using point-spread function fitting across all bands simultaneously. The relative astrometric accuracy of the catalog is 0.4 mas. The astro-photometric catalog, results from artificial star experiments, and the mosaics for all the filters are available for download. Color–magnitude diagrams are presented showing the spatial distributions and ages of stars within 30 Dor as well as in the surrounding fields. HTTP provides the first rich and statistically significant sample of intermediate- and low-mass pre-main sequence candidates and allows us to trace how star formation has been developing through the region. The depth and high spatial resolution of our analysis highlight the dual role of stellar feedback in quenching and triggering star formation on the giant H ii region scale. Our results are consistent with stellar sub-clustering in a partially filled gaseous nebula that is offset toward our side of the Large Magellanic Cloud.

  10. CH Stars and Barium Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bond, H.; Sion, E.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The classical barium (or `Ba II') stars are RED GIANT STARS whose spectra show strong absorption lines of barium, strontium and certain other heavy elements, as well as strong features due to carbon molecules. Together with the related class of CH stars, the Ba II stars were crucial in establishing the existence of neutron-capture reactions in stellar interiors that are responsible for the synt...

  11. Stellar populations in star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Cheng-Yuan; de Grijs, Richard; Deng, Li-Cai

    2016-12-01

    Stellar populations contain the most important information about star cluster formation and evolution. Until several decades ago, star clusters were believed to be ideal laboratories for studies of simple stellar populations (SSPs). However, discoveries of multiple stellar populations in Galactic globular clusters have expanded our view on stellar populations in star clusters. They have simultaneously generated a number of controversies, particularly as to whether young star clusters may have the same origin as old globular clusters. In addition, extensive studies have revealed that the SSP scenario does not seem to hold for some intermediate-age and young star clusters either, thus making the origin of multiple stellar populations in star clusters even more complicated. Stellar population anomalies in numerous star clusters are well-documented, implying that the notion of star clusters as true SSPs faces serious challenges. In this review, we focus on stellar populations in massive clusters with different ages. We present the history and progress of research in this active field, as well as some of the most recent improvements, including observational results and scenarios that have been proposed to explain the observations. Although our current ability to determine the origin of multiple stellar populations in star clusters is unsatisfactory, we propose a number of promising projects that may contribute to a significantly improved understanding of this subject.

  12. Physics of primordial star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Naoki

    2012-09-01

    The study of primordial star formation has a history of nearly sixty years. It is generally thought that primordial stars are one of the key elements in a broad range of topics in astronomy and cosmology, from Galactic chemical evolution to the formation of super-massive blackholes. We review recent progress in the theory of primordial star formation. The standard theory of cosmic structure formation posits that the present-day rich structure of the Universe developed through gravitational amplification of tiny matter density fluctuations left over from the Big Bang. It has become possible to study primordial star formation rigorously within the framework of the standard cosmological model. We first lay out the key physical processes in a primordial gas. Then, we introduce recent developments in computer simulations. Finally, we discuss prospects for future observations of the first generation of stars.

  13. Wolf-Rayet Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamann, Wolf-Rainer; Sander, Andreas; Todt, Helge

    Nearly 150 years ago, the French astronomers Charles Wolf and Georges Rayet described stars with very conspicuous spectra that are dominated by bright and broad emission lines. Meanwhile termed Wolf-Rayet Stars after their discoverers, those objects turned out to represent important stages in the life of massive stars. As the first conference in a long time that was specifically dedicated to Wolf-Rayet stars, an international workshop was held in Potsdam, Germany, from 1.-5. June 2015. About 100 participants, comprising most of the leading experts in the field as well as as many young scientists, gathered for one week of extensive scientific exchange and discussions. Considerable progress has been reported throughout, e.g. on finding such stars, modeling and analyzing their spectra, understanding their evolutionary context, and studying their circumstellar nebulae. While some major questions regarding Wolf-Rayet stars still remain open 150 years after their discovery, it is clear today that these objects are not just interesting stars as such, but also keystones in the evolution of galaxies. These proceedings summarize the talks and posters presented at the Potsdam Wolf-Rayet workshop. Moreover, they also include the questions, comments, and discussions emerging after each talk, thereby giving a rare overview not only about the research, but also about the current debates and unknowns in the field. The Scientific Organizing Committee (SOC) included Alceste Bonanos (Athens), Paul Crowther (Sheffield), John Eldridge (Auckland), Wolf-Rainer Hamann (Potsdam, Chair), John Hillier (Pittsburgh), Claus Leitherer (Baltimore), Philip Massey (Flagstaff), George Meynet (Geneva), Tony Moffat (Montreal), Nicole St-Louis (Montreal), and Dany Vanbeveren (Brussels).

  14. VizieR Online Data Catalog: All-Sky Compiled Catalogue of 2.5 million stars (Kharchenko+ 2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharchenko, N. V.; Roeser, S.

    2009-09-01

    -V)T + d(B-V), i.e. using the recommendations from the Introduction to the Tycho catalogue and including additional corrections dV and d(B-V). These additional corrections were determined by comparison with ground-based data in the Johnson system. These corrections depend non-linearly on colour and reach 0.02 and 0.04 mag, respectively. Infrared stellar magnitudes J, H, Ks and their errors were copied from the 2MASS catalogue. Spectral classes in the MK or HD systems were taken from Hipparcos, CMC11, PPM, and Tycho-2 Spectral Type catalogues. Multiplicity and variability flags were taken from Tycho-1, Tycho-2, Hipparcos, CMC11, and PPM catalogues. The 1st version of the ASCC-2.5 contained some errors in the zones -1 to +1 degree which have been corrected (see details in the "History" section below). The 2nd version included a new file (ccadd.dat) containing the previously missing stars (including components of multiple systems). Note that the ASCC numbers did not change between the two versions, but additional numbers (2600001 to 2603318) were assigned. In the present 3rd version of the ASCC-2.5 the stars from file ccadd.dat are inserted in the basic files in accordance with their coordinates. Stars in the ASCC-2.5 are divided into 30 files ordered by declination (North and South polar caps and 28 bands of 5 degrees width), then sorted in order of right ascension within each file. (30 data files).

  15. Star Polymers.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jing M; McKenzie, Thomas G; Fu, Qiang; Wong, Edgar H H; Xu, Jiangtao; An, Zesheng; Shanmugam, Sivaprakash; Davis, Thomas P; Boyer, Cyrille; Qiao, Greg G

    2016-06-22

    Recent advances in controlled/living polymerization techniques and highly efficient coupling chemistries have enabled the facile synthesis of complex polymer architectures with controlled dimensions and functionality. As an example, star polymers consist of many linear polymers fused at a central point with a large number of chain end functionalities. Owing to this exclusive structure, star polymers exhibit some remarkable characteristics and properties unattainable by simple linear polymers. Hence, they constitute a unique class of technologically important nanomaterials that have been utilized or are currently under audition for many applications in life sciences and nanotechnologies. This article first provides a comprehensive summary of synthetic strategies towards star polymers, then reviews the latest developments in the synthesis and characterization methods of star macromolecules, and lastly outlines emerging applications and current commercial use of star-shaped polymers. The aim of this work is to promote star polymer research, generate new avenues of scientific investigation, and provide contemporary perspectives on chemical innovation that may expedite the commercialization of new star nanomaterials. We envision in the not-too-distant future star polymers will play an increasingly important role in materials science and nanotechnology in both academic and industrial settings.

  16. Radio stars.

    PubMed

    Hjellming, R M; Wade, C M

    1971-09-17

    Up to the present time six classes of radio stars have been established. The signals are almost always very faint and drastically variable. Hence their discovery has owed as much to serendipity as to the highly sophisticated equipment and techniques that have been used. When the variations are regular, as with the pulsars, this characteristic can be exploited very successfully in the search for new objects as well as in the detailed study of those that are already known. The detection of the most erratically variable radio stars, the flare stars and the x-ray stars, is primarily a matter of luck and patience. In the case of the novas, one at least knows where and oughly when to look for radio emission. A very sensitive interferometer is clearly the best instrument to use in the initial detection of a radio star. The fact that weak background sources are frequently present makes it essential to prove that the position of a radio source agrees with that of a star to within a few arc seconds. The potential of radio astronomy for the study of radio stars will not be realized until more powerful instruments than those that are available today can be utilized. So far, we have been able to see only the most luminous of the radio stars.

  17. Hot Stars in the Galactic Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adelman, Saul J.; Upgren, Arthur R.; Adelman, Carol J.

    2011-03-01

    Participants; Preface; Foreword; Acknowledgements; Part I. Introductory Papers: 1. What is the galaxy's halo population?; 2. Theoretical properties of horizontal-branch stars; 3. A review of A-type horizontal-branch stars; Part II. Surveys: 4. A progress report on the Edinburgh-Cape object survey; 5. A 300 square degree survey of young stars at high galactic latitudes; 6. The isolation of a new sample of B stars in the halo; 7. A northern catalog of FHB/A stars; 8. Recent progress on a continuing survey of galactic globular clusters for blue stragglers; 9. UV observations with FAUST and the galactic model; 10. Hot stars at the South Galactic Pole; Part III. Clusters: 11. Population II horizontal branches: a photometric study of globular clusters; 12. The period-shift effect in Oosterhoff type II globular clusters; 13. UV photometry of hot stars in omega centauri; 14. Spectroscopic and UBV observations of blue stars at the NGP; 15. Population I horizontal branches: probing the halo-to-disk transition; Part IV. Stars: 16. Very hot subdwarf O stars; 17. Quantitative spectroscopy of the very hot subluminous O-stars: K646, PG1159-035, and KPD0005+5106; 18. Analyzing the helium-rich hot sdO stars in the Palomar Green Survey; 19. Late type companions of hot sd O stars; 20. Hot stars in globular clusters; 21. Faint blue stars from the Hamburg Schmidt Survey; 22. Stellar winds and the evolution of sdB's to sdO's; 23. Halo stars in the Vilnius photometric system; 24. Horizontal branch stars in the geneva photometric system; 25. Zeeman observations of FHB stars and hot subdwarf stars; 26. What does a FHB star's spectrum look like?; 27. A technique for distinguishing FHB stars from A-type stars; 28. eEemental abundances of halo A and interloper stars; 29. The mass of blue horizontal branch stars in the globular cluster NGC6397; 30. IUE observations of blue HB stars in the globular clusters M3 and NGC6752; 31. Metallicities and kinematics of the local RR lyraes: lukewarm stars

  18. Hot Stars in the Galactic Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adelman, Saul J.; Upgren, Arthur R.; Adelman, Carol J.

    1994-08-01

    Participants; Preface; Foreword; Acknowledgements; Part I. Introductory Papers: 1. What is the galaxy's halo population?; 2. Theoretical properties of horizontal-branch stars; 3. A review of A-type horizontal-branch stars; Part II. Surveys: 4. A progress report on the Edinburgh-Cape object survey; 5. A 300 square degree survey of young stars at high galactic latitudes; 6. The isolation of a new sample of B stars in the halo; 7. A northern catalog of FHB/A stars; 8. Recent progress on a continuing survey of galactic globular clusters for blue stragglers; 9. UV observations with FAUST and the galactic model; 10. Hot stars at the South Galactic Pole; Part III. Clusters: 11. Population II horizontal branches: a photometric study of globular clusters; 12. The period-shift effect in Oosterhoff type II globular clusters; 13. UV photometry of hot stars in omega centauri; 14. Spectroscopic and UBV observations of blue stars at the NGP; 15. Population I horizontal branches: probing the halo-to-disk transition; Part IV. Stars: 16. Very hot subdwarf O stars; 17. Quantitative spectroscopy of the very hot subluminous O-stars: K646, PG1159-035, and KPD0005+5106; 18. Analyzing the helium-rich hot sdO stars in the Palomar Green Survey; 19. Late type companions of hot sd O stars; 20. Hot stars in globular clusters; 21. Faint blue stars from the Hamburg Schmidt Survey; 22. Stellar winds and the evolution of sdB's to sdO's; 23. Halo stars in the Vilnius photometric system; 24. Horizontal branch stars in the geneva photometric system; 25. Zeeman observations of FHB stars and hot subdwarf stars; 26. What does a FHB star's spectrum look like?; 27. A technique for distinguishing FHB stars from A-type stars; 28. eEemental abundances of halo A and interloper stars; 29. The mass of blue horizontal branch stars in the globular cluster NGC6397; 30. IUE observations of blue HB stars in the globular clusters M3 and NGC6752; 31. Metallicities and kinematics of the local RR lyraes: lukewarm stars

  19. Sounds of a Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-06-01

    colours show element displacements in opposite directions. Geologists monitor how seismic waves generated by earthquakes propagate through the Earth, and thus learn about the inner structure of our planet. The same technique works for stars. The Sun, our nearest star and a typical middle-age member of its class, has been investigated in this way since the 1960's. With "solar seismology" , astronomers have been able to learn much about the inner parts of the star, and not only the outer layers normally visible to the telescopes. In the Sun, heat is bubbling up from the central regions where enormous amount of energy is created by nuclear reactions . In the so-called convective zone , the gas is virtually boiling, and hot gas-bubbles are rising with a speed that is close to that of sound. Much like you can hear when water starts to boil, the turbulent convection in the Sun creates noise . These sound waves then propagate through the solar interior and are reflected on the surface, making it oscillate. This "ringing" is well observed in the Sun, where the amplitude and frequency of the oscillations provide astronomers with plenty of information about the physical conditions in the solar interior. From the Sun to the stars There is every reason to believe that our Sun is a quite normal star of its type. Other stars that are similar to the Sun are therefore likely to pulsate in much the same way as the Sun. The search for such oscillations in other solar-like stars has, however, been a long and difficult one. The problem is simply that the pulsations are tiny, so very great precision is needed in the measurements. However, the last few years have seen considerable progress in asteroseismology, and François Bouchy and Fabien Carrier from the Geneva Observatory have now been able to detect unambiguous acoustic oscillations in the Solar-twin star, Alpha Centauri A. The bright and nearby star Alpha Centauri Alpha Centauri (Alpha Cen) [1] is the brightest star in the constellation

  20. Symbiotic stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kafatos, M.; Michalitsianos, A. G.

    1984-01-01

    The physical characteristics of symbiotic star systems are discussed, based on a review of recent observational data. A model of a symbiotic star system is presented which illustrates how a cool red-giant star is embedded in a nebula whose atoms are ionized by the energetic radiation from its hot compact companion. UV outbursts from symbiotic systems are explained by two principal models: an accretion-disk-outburst model which describes how material expelled from the tenuous envelope of the red giant forms an inwardly-spiralling disk around the hot companion, and a thermonuclear-outburst model in which the companion is specifically a white dwarf which superheats the material expelled from the red giant to the point where thermonuclear reactions occur and radiation is emitted. It is suspected that the evolutionary course of binary systems is predetermined by the initial mass and angular momentum of the gas cloud within which binary stars are born. Since red giants and Mira variables are thought to be stars with a mass of one or two solar mass, it is believed that the original cloud from which a symbiotic system is formed can consist of no more than a few solar masses of gas.

  1. Rainbow's stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garattini, Remo; Mandanici, Gianluca

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, a growing interest in the equilibrium of compact astrophysical objects like white dwarf and neutron stars has been manifested. In particular, various modifications due to Planck-scale energy effects have been considered. In this paper we analyze the modification induced by gravity's rainbow on the equilibrium configurations described by the Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff (TOV) equation. Our purpose is to explore the possibility that the rainbow Planck-scale deformation of space-time could support the existence of different compact stars.

  2. Chameleon stars

    SciTech Connect

    Dzhunushaliev, Vladimir; Folomeev, Vladimir; Singleton, Douglas

    2011-10-15

    We consider a gravitating spherically symmetric configuration consisting of a scalar field nonminimally coupled to ordinary matter in the form of a perfect fluid. For this system we find static, regular, asymptotically flat solutions for both relativistic and nonrelativistic cases. It is shown that the presence of the nonminimal interaction leads to substantial changes both in the radial matter distribution of the star and in the star's total mass. A simple stability test indicates that, for the choice of parameters used in the paper, the solutions are unstable.

  3. Halo Star Lithium Depletion

    SciTech Connect

    Pinsonneault, M. H.; Walker, T. P.; Steigman, G.; Narayanan, Vijay K.

    1999-12-10

    The depletion of lithium during the pre-main-sequence and main-sequence phases of stellar evolution plays a crucial role in the comparison of the predictions of big bang nucleosynthesis with the abundances observed in halo stars. Previous work has indicated a wide range of possible depletion factors, ranging from minimal in standard (nonrotating) stellar models to as much as an order of magnitude in models that include rotational mixing. Recent progress in the study of the angular momentum evolution of low-mass stars permits the construction of theoretical models capable of reproducing the angular momentum evolution of low-mass open cluster stars. The distribution of initial angular momenta can be inferred from stellar rotation data in young open clusters. In this paper we report on the application of these models to the study of lithium depletion in main-sequence halo stars. A range of initial angular momenta produces a range of lithium depletion factors on the main sequence. Using the distribution of initial conditions inferred from young open clusters leads to a well-defined halo lithium plateau with modest scatter and a small population of outliers. The mass-dependent angular momentum loss law inferred from open cluster studies produces a nearly flat plateau, unlike previous models that exhibited a downward curvature for hotter temperatures in the 7Li-Teff plane. The overall depletion factor for the plateau stars is sensitive primarily to the solar initial angular momentum used in the calibration for the mixing diffusion coefficients. Uncertainties remain in the treatment of the internal angular momentum transport in the models, and the potential impact of these uncertainties on our results is discussed. The 6Li/7Li depletion ratio is also examined. We find that the dispersion in the plateau and the 6Li/7Li depletion ratio scale with the absolute 7Li depletion in the plateau, and we use observational data to set bounds on the 7Li depletion in main-sequence halo

  4. Star Power

    SciTech Connect

    2014-10-17

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory has released ''Star Power,'' a new informational video that uses dramatic and beautiful images and thought-provoking interviews to highlight the importance of the Laboratory's research into magnetic fusion.

  5. Star Power

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory has released ''Star Power,'' a new informational video that uses dramatic and beautiful images and thought-provoking interviews to highlight the importance of the Laboratory's research into magnetic fusion.

  6. The Music of the Stars : Spectroscopy of Pulsations in gamma Doradus Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunsden, Emily

    2013-05-01

    p>The mysteries of the interior structures of stars are being tackled with asteroseismology. The observable parameters of the surface pulsations of stars inform us of the interior characteristics of numerous classes of stars. The main-sequence gamma Doradus stars, just a little hotter than the Sun, offer the potential of determining stellar structure right down to the core. To determine the structural profile of a star, the observed frequencies and a full geometric description must be determined. This is only possible with long-term spectroscopic monitoring and careful analysis of the pulsation signature in spectral lines. This work seeks to identify the pulsational geometry of several gamma Doradus stars and to identify areas of improvement for current observation, analysis and modelling techniques. More than 4500 spectra were gathered on five stars for this purpose. For three stars a successful multi-frequency and mode identification solution was determined and significant progress has been made towards the understanding of a binary system involving a gamma Doradus star. A hybrid gamma Doradus/nbsp;delta Scuti pulsator was also intensely monitored and results from this work raise important questions about the classification of this type of star. Current analysis techniques were found to be fit-for-purpose for pure gamma Doradus stars, but stars with complexities such as hybrid pulsations and/or fast rotation require future development of the current models./p>

  7. Converting neutron stars into strange stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olinto, A. V.

    1991-01-01

    If strange matter is formed in the interior of a neutron star, it will convert the entire neutron star into a strange star. The proposed mechanisms are reviewed for strange matter seeding and the possible strange matter contamination of neutron star progenitors. The conversion process that follows seeding and the recent calculations of the conversion timescale are discussed.

  8. Star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labhardt, Lukas; Binggeli, Bruno

    Star clusters are at the heart of astronomy, being key objects for our understanding of stellar evolution and galactic structure. Observations with the Hubble Space Telescope and other modern equipment have revealed fascinating new facts about these galactic building blocks. This book provides two comprehensive and up-to-date, pedagogically designed reviews on star clusters by two well-known experts in the field. Bruce Carney presents our current knowledge of the relative and absolute ages of globular clusters and the chemical history of our Galaxy. Bill Harris addresses globular clusters in external galaxies and their use as tracers of galaxy formation and cosmic distance indicators. The book is written for graduate students as well as professionals in astronomy and astrophysics.

  9. Exceptional Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, S. R.; Hansen, B.; van Kerkwijk, M.; Phinney, E. S.

    2005-12-01

    As part of our Interdisciplinary Scientist effort (PI, Kulkarni) for the Space Interferometry Mission (SIM) we proposed an investigation with SIM of a number of exceptional stars. With SIM we plan to observe dozens of nearby white dwarfs and search for planets surviving the evolution away from the main sequence as well as (newly formed) planets formed in the circumbinary disks of post-AGB binaries or as a result of white dwarf mergers. We propose to measure the proper motion of a sample of X-ray binaries and Be star binaries with the view of understanding the originof high latitude objects and inferring natal kicks and pre-supernova orbits. We plan to observe several compact object binaries to determine the mass of the compact star. Of particular importance is the proposed observation of SS 433 (for which we propose to use the spectrometer on SIM to measure the proper motion of the emission line clumps embedded in the relativistic jets). Separately we are investigating the issue of frame tie between SIM and the ecliptic frame (by observing binary millisecond pulsars with SIM; the position of these objects is very well determined by pulsar timing) and the degree to which highly precise visibility amplitude measurements can be inverted to infer binary parameters.

  10. Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Heuvel, Ed

    Radio pulsars are unique laboratories for a wide range of physics and astrophysics. Understanding how they are created, how they evolve and where we find them in the Galaxy, with or without binary companions, is highly constraining of theories of stellar and binary evolution. Pulsars' relationship with a recently discovered variety of apparently different classes of neutron stars is an interesting modern astrophysical puzzle which we consider in Part I of this review. Radio pulsars are also famous for allowing us to probe the laws of nature at a fundamental level. They act as precise cosmic clocks and, when in a binary system with a companion star, provide indispensable venues for precision tests of gravity. The different applications of radio pulsars for fundamental physics will be discussed in Part II. We finish by making mention of the newly discovered class of astrophysical objects, the Fast Radio Bursts, which may or may not be related to radio pulsars or neutron stars, but which were discovered in observations of the latter.

  11. Heavy Elements and Cool Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wahlgren, Glenn M.; Carpenter, Kenneth G.; Norris, Ryan P.

    2008-01-01

    We report on progress in the analysis of high-resolution near-IR spectra of alpha Orionis (M2 Iab) and other cool, luminous stars. Using synthetic spectrum techniques, we search for atomic absorption lines in the stellar spectra and evaluate the available line parameter data for use in our abundance analyses. Our study concentrates on the post iron-group elements copper through zirconium as a means of investigating the slow neutron-capture process of nucleosynthesis in massive stars and the mechanisms that transport recently processed material up into the photospheric region. We discuss problems with the atomic data and model atmospheres that need to be addressed before theoretically derived elemental abundances from pre-supernova nucleosynthesis calculations can be tested by comparison with abundances determined from observations of cool, massive stars.

  12. Binary stars.

    PubMed

    Paczynacuteski, B

    1984-07-20

    Most stars in the solar neighborhood are either double or multiple systems. They provide a unique opportunity to measure stellar masses and radii and to study many interesting and important phenomena. The best candidates for black holes are compact massive components of two x-ray binaries: Cygnus X-1 and LMC X-3. The binary radio pulsar PSR 1913 + 16 provides the best available evidence for gravitational radiation. Accretion disks and jets observed in close binaries offer a very good testing ground for models of active galactic nuclei and quasars.

  13. ESO VLT laser guide star facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonaccini, Domenico; Hackenberg, Wolfgang K.; Cullum, Martin J.; Brunetto, Enzo; Ott, Thomas; Quattri, Marco; Allaert, Eric; Dimmler, Martin; Tarenghi, Massimo; Van Kersteren, A.; Di Chirico, C.; Buzzoni, Bernard; Gray, Peter; Tamai, R.; Tapia, M.

    2002-02-01

    We report in this paper on the design and progress of the ESO Laser Guide Star Facility. The project will create a user facility embedded in UT4, to produce in the Earth's Mesosphere Laser Guide Stars, which extend the sky coverage of Adaptive Optics systems on the VLT UT4 telescope. Embedded into the project are provisions for multiple LGS to cope with second generation MCAO instruments.

  14. Neutron matter, symmetry energy and neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandolfi, S.; Steiner, A. W.

    2016-01-01

    Recent progress in quantum Monte Carlo with modern nucleon-nucleon interactions have enabled the successful description of properties of light nuclei and neutron- rich matter. Of particular interest is the nuclear symmetry energy, the energy cost of creating an isospin asymmetry, and its connection to the structure of neutron stars. Combining these advances with recent observations of neutron star masses and radii gives insight into the equation of state of neutron-rich matter near and above the saturation density. In particular, neutron star radius measurements constrain the derivative of the symmetry energy.

  15. Neutron matter, symmetry energy and neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Stefano, Gandolfi; Steiner, Andrew W

    2016-01-01

    Recent progress in quantum Monte Carlo with modern nucleon-nucleon interactions have enabled the successful description of properties of light nuclei and neutron-rich matter. Of particular interest is the nuclear symmetry energy, the energy cost of creating an isospin asymmetry, and its connection to the structure of neutron stars. Combining these advances with recent observations of neutron star masses and radii gives insight into the equation of state of neutron-rich matter near and above the saturation density. In particular, neutron star radius measurements constrain the derivative of the symmetry energy.

  16. O stars and Wolf-Rayet stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conti, Peter S.; Underhill, Anne B.; Jordan, Stuart (Editor); Thomas, Richard (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    Basic information is given about O and Wolf-Rayet stars indicating how these stars are defined and what their chief observable properties are. Part 2 of the volume discussed four related themes pertaining to the hottest and most luminous stars. Presented are: an observational overview of the spectroscopic classification and extrinsic properties of O and Wolf-Rayet stars; the intrinsic parameters of luminosity, effective temperature, mass, and composition of the stars, and a discussion of their viability; stellar wind properties; and the related issues concerning the efforts of stellar radiation and wind on the immediate interstellar environment are presented.

  17. Lifestyles of the Stars.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Cocoa Beach, FL. John F. Kennedy Space Center.

    Some general information on stars is provided in this National Aeronautics and Space Administration pamphlet. Topic areas briefly discussed are: (1) the birth of a star; (2) main sequence stars; (3) red giants; (4) white dwarfs; (5) neutron stars; (6) supernovae; (7) pulsars; and (8) black holes. (JN)

  18. Egyptian "Star Clocks"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Symons, Sarah

    Diagonal, transit, and Ramesside star clocks are tables of astronomical information occasionally found in ancient Egyptian temples, tombs, and papyri. The tables represent the motions of selected stars (decans and hour stars) throughout the Egyptian civil year. Analysis of star clocks leads to greater understanding of ancient Egyptian constellations, ritual astronomical activities, observational practices, and pharaonic chronology.

  19. Fibre Optics In A Multi-Star Wideband Local Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, J. R.

    1983-08-01

    Early experience has been gained with the switched-star type of network in the Fibrevision cable TV trial at Milton Keynes, and British Telecom are progressing towards a full-scale multi-star wideband local network. This paper discusses both the present and future use of fibre optics in this type of network.

  20. Star Formation in Dwarf Irregular Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dohm-Palmer, Robbie Christopher

    can support several star forming episodes. There is an age progression among the star forming regions which suggests that the star formation is propagating through the galaxies.

  1. Neutron Stars and NuSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhalerao, Varun

    2012-05-01

    My thesis centers around the study of neutron stars, especially those in massive binary systems. To this end, it has two distinct components: the observational study of neutron stars in massive binaries with a goal of measuring neutron star masses and participation in NuSTAR, the first imaging hard X-ray mission, one that is extremely well suited to the study of massive binaries and compact objects in our Galaxy. The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) is a NASA Small Explorer mission that will carry the first focusing high energy X-ray telescope to orbit. NuSTAR has an order-of-magnitude better angular resolution and has two orders of magnitude higher sensitivity than any currently orbiting hard X-ray telescope. I worked to develop, calibrate, and test CdZnTe detectors for NuSTAR. I describe the CdZnTe detectors in comprehensive detail here - from readout procedures to data analysis. Detailed calibration of detectors is necessary for analyzing astrophysical source data obtained by the NuSTAR. I discuss the design and implementation of an automated setup for calibrating flight detectors, followed by calibration procedures and results. Neutron stars are an excellent probe of fundamental physics. The maximum mass of a neutron star can put stringent constraints on the equation of state of matter at extreme pressures and densities. From an astrophysical perspective, there are several open questions in our understanding of neutron stars. What are the birth masses of neutron stars? How do they change in binary evolution? Are there multiple mechanisms for the formation of neutron stars? Measuring masses of neutron stars helps answer these questions. Neutron stars in high-mass X-ray binaries have masses close to their birth mass, providing an opportunity to disentangle the role of "nature" and "nurture" in the observed mass distributions. In 2006, masses had been measured for only six such objects, but this small sample showed the greatest diversity in masses

  2. Moving inhomogeneous envelopes of stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oskinova, Lidia M.; Kubátová, Brankica; Hamann, Wolf-Rainer

    2016-11-01

    Massive stars are extremely luminous and drive strong winds, blowing a large part of their matter into the galactic environment before they finally explode as a supernova. Quantitative knowledge of massive star feedback is required to understand our Universe as we see it. Traditionally, massive stars have been studied under the assumption that their winds are homogeneous and stationary, largely relying on the Sobolev approximation. However, observations with the newest instruments, together with progress in model calculations, ultimately dictate a cardinal change of this paradigm: stellar winds are highly inhomogeneous. Hence, we are now advancing to a new stage in our understanding of stellar winds. Using the foundations laid by V.V. Sobolev and his school, we now update and further develop the stellar spectral analysis techniques. New sophisticated 3-D models of radiation transfer in inhomogeneous expanding media elucidate the physics of stellar winds and improve classical empiric mass-loss rate diagnostics. Applications of these new techniques to multiwavelength observations of massive stars yield consistent and robust stellar wind parameters.

  3. Enigma of Runaway Stars Solved

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1997-01-01

    Supernova Propels Companion Star through Interstellar Space The following success story is a classical illustration of scientific progress through concerted interplay of observation and theory. It concerns a 35-year old mystery which has now been solved by means of exciting observations of a strange double star. An added touch is the successive involvement of astronomers connected to the European Southern Observatory. For many years, astronomers have been puzzled by the fact that, among the thousands of very young, hot and heavy stars which have been observed in the Milky Way, there are some that move with exceptionally high velocities. In some cases, motions well above 100 km/sec, or ten times more than normal for such stars, have been measured. How is this possible? Which mechanism is responsible for the large amounts of energy needed to move such heavy bodies at such high speeds? Could it be that these stars are accelerated during the powerful explosion of a companion star as a supernova? Such a scenario was proposed in 1961 by Adriaan Blaauw [1], but until now, observational proof has been lacking. Now, however, strong supporting evidence for this mechanism has become available from observations obtained at the ESO La Silla observatory. The mysterious runaway stars OB-runaway stars [2] are heavy stars that travel through interstellar space with an anomalously high velocity. They have been known for several decades, but it has always been a problem to explain their high velocities. Although most OB-runaway stars are located at distances of several thousands of lightyears, their high velocity results in a measurable change in position on sky photos taken several years apart. The velocity component in the direction of the Earth can be measured very accurately from a spectrogram. From a combination of such observations, it is possible to measure the space velocity of OB-runaways. Bow shocks reveal runaway stars It has also been found that some OB-runaways display

  4. Magnetism and activity of planet hosting stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Jason T.; Miller, Brendan P.

    The magnetic activity levels of planet host stars may differ from that of stars not known to host planets in several ways. Hot Jupiters may induce activity in their hosts through magnetic interactions, or through tidal interactions by affecting their host's rotation or convection. Measurements of photospheric, chromospheric, or coronal activity might then be abnormally high or low compared to control stars that do not host hot Jupiters, or might be modulated at the planet's orbital period. Such detections are complicated by the small amplitude of the expected signal, by the fact that the signals may be transient, and by the difficulty of constructing control samples due to exoplanet detection biases and the uncertainty of field star ages. We review these issues, and discuss avenues for future progress in the field.

  5. Variable Star Research With International Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Querci, F. R.; Querci, M.

    1997-05-01

    Generally speaking, variable stars are monitored through observing campaigns which coordinate multi-site telescopes at various longitudes. A new practice is in progress: devoted networks involving robotic telescopes. We will review these two technologies and will emphasize the NORT (Network of Oriental Robotic Telescopes) project which we are promoting in North Africa, Middle-Eastern countries and Asia.

  6. CCD star trackers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goss, W. C.

    1975-01-01

    The application of CCDs to star trackers and star mappers is considered. Advantages and disadvantages of silicon CCD star trackers are compared with those of image dissector star trackers. It is concluded that the CCD has adequate sensitivity for most single star tracking tasks and is distinctly superior in multiple star tracking or mapping applications. The signal and noise figures of several current CCD configurations are discussed. The basic structure of the required signal processing is described, and it is shown that resolution in excess of the number of CCD elements may be had by interpolation.

  7. The Millennium Star Atlas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinnott, R. W.

    1997-08-01

    Derived from Hipparcos and Tycho observations, the Millennium Star Atlas is a set of 1548 charts covering the entire sky to about magnitude 11. It stands apart from all previous printed atlases in completeness to magnitude 10 and in uniformity around the sky. The generous chart scale has made possible a number of innovations never before seen in a star atlas: arrows on high-proper-motion stars, double-star ticks conveying separation and position angle for a specific modern epoch, distance labels for nearby stars, and variable stars coded by amplitude, period, and type. Among the nonstellar objects plotted, more than 8000 galaxies are shown with aspect ratio and orientation.

  8. Astrophysics: Stars fight back

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Philip F.

    2014-12-01

    Galaxies contain fewer stars than predicted. The discovery of a massive galactic outflow of molecular gas in a compact galaxy, which forms stars 100 times faster than the Milky Way, may help to explain why. See Letter p.68

  9. Star Formation in Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Topics addressed include: star formation; galactic infrared emission; molecular clouds; OB star luminosity; dust grains; IRAS observations; galactic disks; stellar formation in Magellanic clouds; irregular galaxies; spiral galaxies; starbursts; morphology of galactic centers; and far-infrared observations.

  10. Intrinsically variable stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohm-Vitense, Erika; Querci, Monique

    1987-01-01

    The characteristics of intrinsically variable stars are examined, reviewing the results of observations obtained with the IUE satellite since its launch in 1978. Selected data on both medium-spectral-class pulsating stars (Delta Cep stars, W Vir stars, and related groups) and late-type variables (M, S, and C giants and supergiants) are presented in spectra, graphs, and tables and described in detail. Topics addressed include the calibration of the the period-luminosity relation, Cepheid distance determination, checking stellar evolution theory by the giant companions of Cepheids, Cepheid masses, the importance of the hydrogen convection zone in Cepheids, temperature and abundance estimates for Population II pulsating stars, mass loss in Population II Cepheids, SWP and LWP images of cold giants and supergiants, temporal variations in the UV lines of cold stars, C-rich cold stars, and cold stars with highly ionized emission lines.

  11. Nearby Stars as Gravitational Wave Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, Ilídio; Silk, Joseph

    2015-07-01

    Sun-like stellar oscillations are excited by turbulent convection and have been discovered in some 500 main-sequence and sub-giant stars and in more than 12,000 red giant stars. When such stars are near gravitational wave sources, low-order quadrupole acoustic modes are also excited above the experimental threshold of detectability, and they can be observed, in principle, in the acoustic spectra of these stars. Such stars form a set of natural detectors to search for gravitational waves over a large spectral frequency range, from {10}-7 to {10}-2 Hz. In particular, these stars can probe the {10}-6-{10}-4 Hz spectral window which cannot be probed by current conventional gravitational wave detectors, such as the Square Kilometre Array and Evolved Laser Interferometer Space Antenna. The Planetary Transits and Oscillations of State (PLATO) stellar seismic mission will achieve photospheric velocity amplitude accuracy of {cm} {{{s}}}-1. For a gravitational wave search, we will need to achieve accuracies of the order of {10}-2 {cm} {{{s}}}-1, i.e., at least one generation beyond PLATO. However, we have found that multi-body stellar systems have the ideal setup for this type of gravitational wave search. This is the case for triple stellar systems formed by a compact binary and an oscillating star. Continuous monitoring of the oscillation spectra of these stars to a distance of up to a kpc could lead to the discovery of gravitational waves originating in our galaxy or even elsewhere in the universe. Moreover, unlike experimental detectors, this observational network of stars will allow us to study the progression of gravitational waves throughout space.

  12. Dibaryons in neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olinto, Angela V.; Haensel, Pawel; Frieman, Joshua A.

    1991-01-01

    The effects are studied of H-dibaryons on the structure of neutron stars. It was found that H particles could be present in neutron stars for a wide range of dibaryon masses. The appearance of dibaryons softens the equations of state, lowers the maximum neutron star mass, and affects the transport properties of dense matter. The parameter space is constrained for dibaryons by requiring that a 1.44 solar mass neutron star be gravitationally stable.

  13. Chromospheres of Coronal Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linsky, Jeffrey L.; Wood, Brian E.

    1996-01-01

    We summarize the main results obtained from the analysis of ultraviolet emission line profiles of coronal late-type stars observed with the Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph (GHRS) on the Hubble Space Telescope. The excellent GHRS spectra provide new information on magnetohydrodynamic phenomena in the chromospheres and transition regions of these stars. One exciting new result is the discovery of broad components in the transition region lines of active stars that we believe provide evidence for microflare heating in these stars.

  14. America's Star Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyons, Ray; Lance, Keith Curry

    2009-01-01

    "Library Journal"'s new national rating of public libraries, the "LJ" Index of Public Library Service, identifies 256 "star" libraries. It rates 7,115 public libraries. The top libraries in each group get five, four, or three Michelin guide-like stars. All included libraries, stars or not, can use their scores to learn from their peers and improve…

  15. Gravothermal Star Clusters - Theory and Computer Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spurzem, Rainer

    2010-11-01

    In the George Darwin lecture, delivered to the British Royal Astronomical Society in 1960 by Viktor A. Ambartsumian he wrote on the evolution of stellar systems that it can be described by the "dynamic evolution of a gravitating gas" complemented by "a statistical description of the changes in the physical states of stars". This talk will show how this physical concept has inspired theoretical modeling of star clusters in the following decades up to the present day. The application of principles of thermodynamics shows, as Ambartsumian argued in his 1960 lecture, that there is no stable state of equilibrium of a gravitating star cluster. The trend to local thermodynamic equilibrium is always disturbed by escaping stars (Ambartsumian), as well as by gravothermal and gravogyro instabilities, as it was detected later. Here the state-of-the-art of modeling the evolution of dense stellar systems based on principles of thermodynamics and statistical mechanics (Fokker-Planck approximation) will be reviewed. Recent progress including rotation and internal correlations (primordial binaries) is presented. The models have also very successfully been used to study dense star clusters around massive black holes in galactic nuclei and even (in a few cases) relativistic supermassive dense objects in centres of galaxies (here again briefly touching one of the many research fields of V.A. Ambartsumian). For the modern present time of high-speed supercomputing, where we are tackling direct N-body simulations of star clusters, we will show that such direct modeling supports and proves the concept of the statistical models based on the Fokker-Planck theory, and that both theoretical concepts and direct computer simulations are necessary to support each other and make scientific progress in the study of star cluster evolution.

  16. Applying Machine Learning to Star Cluster Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorenko, Kristina; Grasha, Kathryn; Calzetti, Daniela; Mahadevan, Sridhar

    2016-01-01

    Catalogs describing populations of star clusters are essential in investigating a range of important issues, from star formation to galaxy evolution. Star cluster catalogs are typically created in a two-step process: in the first step, a catalog of sources is automatically produced; in the second step, each of the extracted sources is visually inspected by 3-to-5 human classifiers and assigned a category. Classification by humans is labor-intensive and time consuming, thus it creates a bottleneck, and substantially slows down progress in star cluster research.We seek to automate the process of labeling star clusters (the second step) through applying supervised machine learning techniques. This will provide a fast, objective, and reproducible classification. Our data is HST (WFC3 and ACS) images of galaxies in the distance range of 3.5-12 Mpc, with a few thousand star clusters already classified by humans as a part of the LEGUS (Legacy ExtraGalactic UV Survey) project. The classification is based on 4 labels (Class 1 - symmetric, compact cluster; Class 2 - concentrated object with some degree of asymmetry; Class 3 - multiple peak system, diffuse; and Class 4 - spurious detection). We start by looking at basic machine learning methods such as decision trees. We then proceed to evaluate performance of more advanced techniques, focusing on convolutional neural networks and other Deep Learning methods. We analyze the results, and suggest several directions for further improvement.

  17. Probing the Birth of Super Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Kelsey

    2009-05-01

    Super star clusters are among the most extreme star formation environments known; they have incredible stellar densities, and each can harbor thousands of massive stars within radii of only a few parsecs. The most robust of these clusters may even be precursors to the ancient globular clusters ubiquitous around massive galaxies in the local universe today. Understanding the formation and feedback of super star clusters has the potential to provide us with insight into the evolution of starburst episodes throughout the universe. At present the relationship between the local physical conditions and the voracity of star formation is not well-constrained. Some progress has been made: over the last decade, a number of natal super star clusters have been discovered, providing us with a glimpse into their early evolution. However, the set of existing observations is anemic, and our current physical model for these natal clusters in simplistic. I will overview what we think we know about these objects based on existing observations and outline some of the most significant gaps in our current understanding.

  18. Star field simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    A Star Field Simulator has been developed to serve as a source of radiation for the ASTRO Star Tracker. The star tracker and simulator are components of a motion compensation test facility located at Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. Preflight tests and simulations using various levels of guide stars are performed in the test facility to establish performance of the motion compensation system before being used in a flight environment. The ASTRO Star Tracker operates over a wide dynamic range of irradiance corresponding to visual stellar magnitudes of -0.8 to 8. A minimum of three simulated guide stars with variable magnitudes are needed to fully test the Star Tracker performance under simulated mission conditions.

  19. Ponderable soliton stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, Hong-Yee

    1990-01-01

    The theory of Lee and Pang (1987), who obtained solutions for soliton stars composed of zero-temperature fermions and bosons, is applied here to quark soliton stars. Model soliton stars based on a simple physical model of the proton are computed, and the properties of the solitons are discussed, including the important problem of the existence of a limiting mass and thus the possible formation of black holes of primordial origin. It is shown that there is a definite mass limit for ponderable soliton stars, so that during cooling a soliton star might reach a stage beyond which no equilibrium configuration exists and the soliton star probably will collapse to become a black hole. The radiation of ponderable soliton stars may alter the short-wavelength character of the cosmic background radiation, and may be observed as highly redshifted objects at z of about 100,000.

  20. Massive Compact Stars as Quark Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Hilário; Barbosa Duarte, Sérgio; de Oliveira, José Carlos T.

    2011-03-01

    High-mass compact stars have been reported recently in the literature, providing strong constraints on the properties of the ultra dense matter beyond the saturation nuclear density. In view of these results, the calculations of quark star or hybrid star equilibrium structure must be compatible with the provided observational data. But since the equations of state used in describing quark matter are in general too soft in comparison with the equation of states used to describe the hadronic or nuclear matter, the calculated quark star models presented in the literature are in general not suitable to explain the stability of highly-compact massive objects. In this work, we present the calculations of a spherically symmetric quark star structure by using an equation of state that takes into account the superconducting color-flavor locked phase of the strange quark matter. In addition, some fundamental aspects of QCD (asymptotic freedom and confinement) are considered by means of a phenomenological description of the deconfined quark phase, the density-dependent quark mass model. The quark matter behavior introduced by this model stiffens the corresponding equation of state. We thus investigate the influence of this model on the mass-radius diagram of quark stars. We obtain massive quark stars due to the stiffness of the equation of state, when a reasonable parameterization of the color superconducting gap is used. Models of quark stars enveloped by a nucleonic crust composed of a nuclear lattice embedded in an electron gas, with nuclei close to neutron drip line, are also discussed.

  1. Star Clusters within FIRE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Adrianna; Moreno, Jorge; Naiman, Jill; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Hopkins, Philip F.

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we analyze the environments surrounding star clusters of simulated merging galaxies. Our framework employs Feedback In Realistic Environments (FIRE) model (Hopkins et al., 2014). The FIRE project is a high resolution cosmological simulation that resolves star forming regions and incorporates stellar feedback in a physically realistic way. The project focuses on analyzing the properties of the star clusters formed in merging galaxies. The locations of these star clusters are identified with astrodendro.py, a publicly available dendrogram algorithm. Once star cluster properties are extracted, they will be used to create a sub-grid (smaller than the resolution scale of FIRE) of gas confinement in these clusters. Then, we can examine how the star clusters interact with these available gas reservoirs (either by accreting this mass or blowing it out via feedback), which will determine many properties of the cluster (star formation history, compact object accretion, etc). These simulations will further our understanding of star formation within stellar clusters during galaxy evolution. In the future, we aim to enhance sub-grid prescriptions for feedback specific to processes within star clusters; such as, interaction with stellar winds and gas accretion onto black holes and neutron stars.

  2. Dark stars: a review.

    PubMed

    Freese, Katherine; Rindler-Daller, Tanja; Spolyar, Douglas; Valluri, Monica

    2016-06-01

    Dark stars are stellar objects made (almost entirely) of hydrogen and helium, but powered by the heat from dark matter annihilation, rather than by fusion. They are in hydrostatic and thermal equilibrium, but with an unusual power source. Weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), among the best candidates for dark matter, can be their own antimatter and can annihilate inside the star, thereby providing a heat source. Although dark matter constitutes only [Formula: see text]0.1% of the stellar mass, this amount is sufficient to power the star for millions to billions of years. Thus, the first phase of stellar evolution in the history of the Universe may have been dark stars. We review how dark stars come into existence, how they grow as long as dark matter fuel persists, and their stellar structure and evolution. The studies were done in two different ways, first assuming polytropic interiors and more recently using the MESA stellar evolution code; the basic results are the same. Dark stars are giant, puffy (∼10 AU) and cool (surface temperatures  ∼10 000 K) objects. We follow the evolution of dark stars from their inception at  ∼[Formula: see text] as they accrete mass from their surroundings to become supermassive stars, some even reaching masses  >[Formula: see text] and luminosities  >[Formula: see text], making them detectable with the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope. Once the dark matter runs out and the dark star dies, it may collapse to a black hole; thus dark stars may provide seeds for the supermassive black holes observed throughout the Universe and at early times. Other sites for dark star formation may exist in the Universe today in regions of high dark matter density such as the centers of galaxies. The current review briefly discusses dark stars existing today, but focuses on the early generation of dark stars.

  3. Dark stars: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freese, Katherine; Rindler-Daller, Tanja; Spolyar, Douglas; Valluri, Monica

    2016-06-01

    Dark stars are stellar objects made (almost entirely) of hydrogen and helium, but powered by the heat from dark matter annihilation, rather than by fusion. They are in hydrostatic and thermal equilibrium, but with an unusual power source. Weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), among the best candidates for dark matter, can be their own antimatter and can annihilate inside the star, thereby providing a heat source. Although dark matter constitutes only ≲ 0.1% of the stellar mass, this amount is sufficient to power the star for millions to billions of years. Thus, the first phase of stellar evolution in the history of the Universe may have been dark stars. We review how dark stars come into existence, how they grow as long as dark matter fuel persists, and their stellar structure and evolution. The studies were done in two different ways, first assuming polytropic interiors and more recently using the MESA stellar evolution code; the basic results are the same. Dark stars are giant, puffy (˜10 AU) and cool (surface temperatures  ˜10 000 K) objects. We follow the evolution of dark stars from their inception at  ˜1{{M}⊙} as they accrete mass from their surroundings to become supermassive stars, some even reaching masses  >{{10}6}{{M}⊙} and luminosities  >{{10}10}{{L}⊙} , making them detectable with the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope. Once the dark matter runs out and the dark star dies, it may collapse to a black hole; thus dark stars may provide seeds for the supermassive black holes observed throughout the Universe and at early times. Other sites for dark star formation may exist in the Universe today in regions of high dark matter density such as the centers of galaxies. The current review briefly discusses dark stars existing today, but focuses on the early generation of dark stars.

  4. STAR in CTO PCI: When is STAR not a star?

    PubMed

    Hira, Ravi S; Dean, Larry S

    2016-04-01

    Subintimal tracking and reentry (STAR) has been used as a bailout strategy and involves an uncontrolled dissection and recanalization into the distal lumen to reestablish vessel patency. In the current study, thrombolysis in myocardial infarction (TIMI) flow < 3 was the only variable which they found to be significantly associated with restenosis and reocclusion after stent placement. It may be reasonable to consider second generation drug eluting stent placement in patients receiving STAR that have TIMI 3 flow, however, this should only be done if there is no compromise of major side branches. If unsure, we recommend to perform balloon angioplasty without stenting.

  5. Stars and linear dunes on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edgett, Kenneth S.; Blumberg, Dan G.

    1994-01-01

    A field containing 11 star and incipient star dunes occurs on Mars at 8.8 deg S, 270.9 deg W. Examples of linear dunes are found in a crater at 59.4 deg S, 343 deg W. While rare, dune varieties that form in bi- and multidirectional wind regimes are not absent from the surface of Mars. The occurence of both of these dune fields offers new insight into the nature of martian wind conditions and sand supply. The linear dunes appears to have formed through modification of a formerly transverse aeolian deposit, suggesting a relatively recent change in local wind direction. The 11 dunes in the star dune locality show a progressive change from barchan to star form as each successive dune has traveled up into a valley, into a more complex wind regime. The star dunes corroborate the model of N. Lancaster (1989), for the formation of star dunes by projection of transverse dunes into a complex, topographically influenced wind regime. The star dunes have dark streaks emanating from them, providing evidence that the dunes were active at or near the time the relevant image was obtained by the Viking 1 orbiter in 1978. The star and linear dunes described here are located in different regions on the martian surface. Unlike most star and linear dunes on Earth, both martian examples are isolated occurrences; neither is part of a major sand sea. Previously published Mars general circulation model results suggest that the region in which the linear dune field occurs should be a bimodal wind regime, while the region in which the star dunes occur should be unimodal. The star dunes are probably the result of localized complication of the wind regime owing to topographic confinement of the dunes. Local topographic influence on wind regime is also evident in the linear dune field, as there are transverse dunes in close proximity to the linear dunes, and their occurrence is best explained by funneling of wind through a topographic gap in the upwind crater wall.

  6. The First Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Naoki

    2010-10-01

    The standard cosmological model predicts that the first cosmological objects are formed when the age of the universe is a few hundred million years. Recent theoretical studies and numerical simulations consistently suggest that the first objects are very massive primordial stars. We introduce the key physics and explain why the first stars are thought to be massive, rather than to be low-mass stars. The state-of-the-art simulations include all the relevant atomic and molecular physics to follow the thermal evolution of a prestellar gas cloud to very high ``stellar'' densities. Evolutionary calculations of the primordial stars suggest the formation of massive blackholes in the early universe. Finally, we show the results from high-resolution simulations of star formation in a low-metallicity gas. Vigorous fragmentation is triggered in a star-forming gas cloud at a metallicity of as low as Z = 10-5Zsolar.

  7. Strange nonchaotic stars.

    PubMed

    Lindner, John F; Kohar, Vivek; Kia, Behnam; Hippke, Michael; Learned, John G; Ditto, William L

    2015-02-06

    The unprecedented light curves of the Kepler space telescope document how the brightness of some stars pulsates at primary and secondary frequencies whose ratios are near the golden mean, the most irrational number. A nonlinear dynamical system driven by an irrational ratio of frequencies generically exhibits a strange but nonchaotic attractor. For Kepler's "golden" stars, we present evidence of the first observation of strange nonchaotic dynamics in nature outside the laboratory. This discovery could aid the classification and detailed modeling of variable stars.

  8. SIRTF and star formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shu, Frank H.

    1988-01-01

    Four problems in the field of star formation that can be attacked to advantage with SIRTF are discussed: (1) the patterns of star formation in spiral galaxies, (2) the physical mechanism for bimodal star formation, (3) the nature of bipolar outflows from young stellar objects, and (4) the birth of brown dwarfs. In each case, SIRTF can provide the crucial combination of high angular resolution with great sensitivity over a broad range of wavelengths that is needed to address the relevant issues.

  9. Nagyszombat and the stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zsoldos, E.

    Péter Pázmány, founder of the University of Nagyszombat, considered stars in terms inherited from medieval times. The theses, connected to the university graduation, soon left this definition, and imagined stars as made from sublunar elements. The 1753 decree of the Empress Maria Theresia ordered university professors to publish textbooks. These textbooks, together with the theses showed a definite improvement, defining stars according to contemporary knowledge.

  10. Strange Nonchaotic Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, John F.; Kohar, Vivek; Kia, Behnam; Hippke, Michael; Learned, John G.; Ditto, William L.

    2015-08-01

    Exploiting the unprecedented capabilities of the planet-hunting Kepler space telescope, which stared at 150 000 stars for four years, we discuss recent evidence that certain stars dim and brighten in complex patterns with fractal features. Such stars pulsate at primary and secondary frequencies whose ratios are near the famous golden mean, the most irrational number. A nonlinear system driven by an irrational ratio of frequencies is generically attracted toward a “strange” behavior that is geometrically fractal without displaying the “butterfly effect” of chaos. Strange nonchaotic attractors have been observed in laboratory experiments and have been hypothesized to describe the electrochemical activity of the brain, but a bluish white star 16 000 light years from Earth in the constellation Lyra may manifest, in the scale-free distribution of its minor frequency components, the first strange nonchaotic attractor observed in the wild. The recognition of stellar strange nonchaotic dynamics may improve the classification of these stars and refine the physical modeling of their interiors. We also discuss nonlinear analysis of other RR Lyrae stars in Kepler field of view and discuss some toy models for modeling these stars.References: 1) Hippke, Michael, et al. "Pulsation period variations in the RRc Lyrae star KIC 5520878." The Astrophysical Journal 798.1 (2015): 42.2) Lindner, John F., et al. "Strange nonchaotic stars." Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 054101 (2015)

  11. Charged Proca stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landea, Ignacio Salazar; García, Federico

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we study gauged solutions associated with a massive vector field representing a spin-1 condensate, namely, the Proca field. We focus on regular spherically symmetric solutions which we construct either using a self-interaction potential or general relativity in order to glue the solutions together. We start generating nongravitating solutions—so-called Proca Q -balls and charged Proca Q -balls. Then we turn on backreaction on the metric, allowing gravity to hold together the Proca condensate, to study the so-called Proca stars, charged Proca stars, Proca Q -stars, and charged Proca Q -stars.

  12. Massive soliton stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Hong-Yee

    1990-05-01

    The structure of nontopological solutions of Einstein field equations as proposed by Friedberg, Lee, and Pang (1987) is examined. This analysis incorporates finite temperature effects and pair creation. Quarks are assumed to be the only species that exist in interior of soliton stars. The possibility of primordial creation of soliton stars in the incomplete decay of the degenerate vacuum in early universe is explored. Because of dominance of pair creation inside soliton stars, the luminosity of soliton stars is not determined by its radiative transfer characteristics, and the surface temperature of soliton stars can be the same as its interior temperature. It is possible that soliton stars are intense X-ray radiators at large distances. Soliton stars are nearly 100 percent efficient energy converters, converting the rest energy of baryons entering the interior into radiation. It is possible that a sizable number of baryons may also be trapped inside soliton stars during early epochs of the universe. In addition, if soliton stars exist they could assume the role played by massive black holes in galactic centers.

  13. Massive soliton stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, Hong-Yee

    1990-01-01

    The structure of nontopological solutions of Einstein field equations as proposed by Friedberg, Lee, and Pang (1987) is examined. This analysis incorporates finite temperature effects and pair creation. Quarks are assumed to be the only species that exist in interior of soliton stars. The possibility of primordial creation of soliton stars in the incomplete decay of the degenerate vacuum in early universe is explored. Because of dominance of pair creation inside soliton stars, the luminosity of soliton stars is not determined by its radiative transfer characteristics, and the surface temperature of soliton stars can be the same as its interior temperature. It is possible that soliton stars are intense X-ray radiators at large distances. Soliton stars are nearly 100 percent efficient energy converters, converting the rest energy of baryons entering the interior into radiation. It is possible that a sizable number of baryons may also be trapped inside soliton stars during early epochs of the universe. In addition, if soliton stars exist they could assume the role played by massive black holes in galactic centers.

  14. Introduction to neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Lattimer, James M.

    2015-02-24

    Neutron stars contain the densest form of matter in the present universe. General relativity and causality set important constraints to their compactness. In addition, analytic GR solutions are useful in understanding the relationships that exist among the maximum mass, radii, moments of inertia, and tidal Love numbers of neutron stars, all of which are accessible to observation. Some of these relations are independent of the underlying dense matter equation of state, while others are very sensitive to the equation of state. Recent observations of neutron stars from pulsar timing, quiescent X-ray emission from binaries, and Type I X-ray bursts can set important constraints on the structure of neutron stars and the underlying equation of state. In addition, measurements of thermal radiation from neutron stars has uncovered the possible existence of neutron and proton superfluidity/superconductivity in the core of a neutron star, as well as offering powerful evidence that typical neutron stars have significant crusts. These observations impose constraints on the existence of strange quark matter stars, and limit the possibility that abundant deconfined quark matter or hyperons exist in the cores of neutron stars.

  15. Delta Scuti stars: Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guzik, J. A.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of asteroseismology is not only to derive the internal structure of individual stars from their observed oscillation frequencies, but also to test and extend one's understanding of the physics of matter under the extremes of temperature, density, and pressure found in stellar interiors. In this review, the author hopes to point out what one can learn about the Sun by studying (delta) Scuti stars, as well as what one can learn about stars more massive or evolved than the Sun. He discusses some of the difficulties in theoretical approaches to asteroseismology for (delta) Scuti stars, using FG Vir, (delta) Scuti, and CD-24(degree) 7599 as examples.

  16. Combinations of 148 navigation stars and the star tracker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, R.

    1980-01-01

    The angular separation of all star combinations for 148 nav star on the onboard software for space transportation system-3 flight and following missions is presented as well as the separation of each pair that satisfies the viewing constraints of using both star trackers simultaneously. Tables show (1) shuttle star catalog 1980 star position in M 1950 coordinates; (2) two star combination of 148 nav stars; and (3) summary of two star-combinations of the star tracker 5 deg filter. These 148 stars present 10,875 combinations. For the star tracker filters of plus or minus 5 deg, there are 875 combinations. Formalhaut (nav star 26) has the best number of combinations, which is 33.

  17. Laser guide star adaptive optics: Present and future

    SciTech Connect

    Olivier, S.S.; Max, C.E.

    1993-03-01

    Feasibility demonstrations using one to two meter telescopes have confirmed the utility of laser beacons as wavefront references for adaptive optics systems. Laser beacon architectures suitable for the new generation of eight and ten meter telescopes are presently under study. This paper reviews the concept of laser guide star adaptive optics and the progress that has been made by groups around the world implementing such systems. A description of the laser guide star program at LLNL and some experimental results is also presented.

  18. JetStar in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    This 18-second movie clip shows the NASA Dryden Lockheed C-140 JetStar in flight with its pylon-mounted air-turbine-drive system used to gather information on the acoustic characteristics of subscale advanced design propellers. Data was gathered through 28 flush-mounted microphones on the skin of the aircraft. From 1976 to 1987 the NASA Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio -- today known as the Glenn Research Center -- engaged in research and development of an advanced turboprop concept in partnership with Hamilton Standard, Windsor Locks, Connecticut, the largest manufacturer of propellers in the United States. The Advanced Turboprop Project took its impetus from the energy crisis of the early 1970's and sought to produce swept propeller blades that would increase efficiency and reduce noise. As the project progressed, Pratt & Whitney, Allison Gas Turbine Division of General Motors, General Electric, Gulfstream, Rohr Industries, Boeing, Lockheed, and McDonnell Douglas, among others, also took part. NASA Lewis did the much of the ground research and marshaled the resources of these and other members of the aeronautical community. The team came to include the NASA Ames Research Center, Langley Research Center, and the Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (before and after that time, the Dryden Flight Research Center). Together, they brought the propeller to the flight research stage, and the team that worked on the project won the coveted Collier Trophy for its efforts in 1987. To test the acoustics of the propeller the team developed, it mounted propeller models on a C-140 JetStar aircraft fuselage at NASA Dryden. The JetStar was modified with the installation of an air-turbine-drive system. The drive motor, with a test propeller, was mounted on a pylon atop the JetStar. The JetStar was equipped with an array of 28 microphones flush-mounted in the fuselage of the aircraft beneath the propeller. Microphones mounted on the wings and on an accompanying Learjet chase

  19. GLOBAL STAR FORMATION REVISITED

    SciTech Connect

    Silk, Joseph; Norman, Colin E-mail: norman@stsci.edu

    2009-07-20

    A general treatment of disk star formation is developed from a dissipative multiphase model, with the dominant dissipation due to cloud collisions. The Schmidt-Kennicutt (SK) law emerges naturally for star-forming disks and starbursts. We predict that there should be an inverse correlation between Tully-Fisher law and SK law residuals. The model is extended to include a multiphase treatment of supernova feedback that leads to a turbulent pressure-regulated generalization of the star formation law and is applicable to gas-rich starbursts. Enhanced pressure, as expected in merger-induced star formation, enhances star formation efficiency. An upper limit is derived for the disk star formation rate in starbursts that depends on the ratio of global ISM to cloud pressures. We extend these considerations to the case where the interstellar gas pressure in the inner galaxy is dominated by outflows from a central active galactic nucleus (AGN). During massive spheroid formation, AGN-driven winds trigger star formation, resulting in enhanced supernova feedback and outflows. The outflows are comparable to the AGN-boosted star formation rate and saturate in the super-Eddington limit. Downsizing of both SMBH and spheroids is a consequence of AGN-driven positive feedback. Bondi accretion feeds the central black hole with a specific accretion rate that is proportional to the black hole mass. AGN-enhanced star formation is mediated by turbulent pressure and relates spheroid star formation rate to black hole accretion rate. The relation between black hole mass and spheroid velocity dispersion has a coefficient (Salpeter time to gas consumption time ratio) that provides an arrow of time. Highly efficient, AGN-boosted star formation can occur at high redshift.

  20. Doppler Imaging of Stars with Surface Inhomogeneities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collier Cameron, A.

    I review recent progress in the field of stellar surface imaging, with particular reference to advanced methods for mapping surface-brightness distributions on magnetically active late-type stars. New signal enhancement techniques, utilising profile information from hundreds or thousands of photospheric lines simultaneously, allows images to be derived for stars several magnitudes fainter than was previously possible. For brighter stars, the same techniques make it possible to map features as small as two or three degrees in extent on the stellar surface. While this opens up whole new areas of research, such as the ability to use starspot tracking to study surface differential rotation patterns on single and binary stars, caution must be exercised in the treatment of ''nuisance parameters'' such as the stellar rotation rate, surface abundances and radial velocity. At the very high S:N levels we now use, the effects of systematic errors in these parameters are easier to identify, isolate and eliminate. This leads to the possibility of measuring precise radial velocity variations (at the few hundred m s-2 level or better) in late-type stars even with equatorial rotation speeds as high as 100 km s-1). This is particularly topical given the recent discovery that one of our prime imaging targets, the young southern K0 dwarf AB Doradus, has an astrometric companion in a highly eccentric orbit with an inferred mass close to the H-burning limit.

  1. MODEL ATMOSPHERES FOR X-RAY BURSTING NEUTRON STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Medin, Zachary James; Steinkirch, Marina von; Calder, Alan C.; Fontes, Christopher J.; Fryer, Chris L.; Hungerford, Aimee L.

    2016-11-21

    The hydrogen and helium accreted by X-ray bursting neutron stars is periodically consumed in runaway thermonuclear reactions that cause the entire surface to glow brightly in X-rays for a few seconds. With models of the emission, the mass and radius of the neutron star can be inferred from the observations. By simultaneously probing neutron star masses and radii, X-ray bursts (XRBs) are one of the strongest diagnostics of the nature of matter at extremely high densities. Accurate determinations of these parameters are difficult, however, due to the highly non-ideal nature of the atmospheres where XRBs occur. Also, observations from X-ray telescopes such as RXTE and NuStar can potentially place strong constraints on nuclear matter once uncertainties in atmosphere models have been reduced. Lastly, here we discuss current progress on modeling atmospheres of X-ray bursting neutron stars and some of the challenges still to be overcome.

  2. Model Atmospheres for X-Ray Bursting Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medin, Zach; von Steinkirch, Marina; Calder, Alan C.; Fontes, Christopher J.; Fryer, Chris L.; Hungerford, Aimee L.

    2016-12-01

    The hydrogen and helium accreted by X-ray bursting neutron stars is periodically consumed in runaway thermonuclear reactions that cause the entire surface to glow brightly in X-rays for a few seconds. With models of the emission, the mass and radius of the neutron star can be inferred from the observations. By simultaneously probing neutron star masses and radii, X-ray bursts (XRBs) are one of the strongest diagnostics of the nature of matter at extremely high densities. Accurate determinations of these parameters are difficult, however, due to the highly non-ideal nature of the atmospheres where XRBs occur. Observations from X-ray telescopes such as RXTE and NuStar can potentially place strong constraints on nuclear matter once uncertainties in atmosphere models have been reduced. Here we discuss current progress on modeling atmospheres of X-ray bursting neutron stars and some of the challenges still to be overcome.

  3. Star Trek in the Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Aerospace Education, 1977

    1977-01-01

    Describes specific educational programs for using the Star Trek TV program from kindergarten through college. For each grade level lesson plans, ideas for incorporating Star Trek into future classes, and reports of specific programs utilizing Star Trek are provided. (SL)

  4. Neutron Star Compared to Manhattan

    NASA Video Gallery

    A pulsar is a neutron star, the crushed core of a star that has exploded. Neutron stars crush half a million times more mass than Earth into a sphere no larger than Manhattan, as animated in this s...

  5. Observations of FK Comae stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bopp, B. W.

    1981-01-01

    Observations on the FK Comae stars are described. FK Com, UZ Lib and HD 199178 are compared and related as a group of stars. The crucial observational tests of the proposed evolutionary status of these stars are noted.

  6. Numerical study of the properties of compact stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negreiros, Rodrigo Picanco

    2009-10-01

    Compact stars are formed in catastrophic astrophysical events such as supernova explosions and binary stellar collisions. These objects permanently harbor compressed ultra-dense nuclear matter in their interiors. This key feature, together with the ongoing progress in observational astrophysics, make compact stars superb astrophysical laboratories for a wide range of intriguing physicals studies. Several such studies are performed in this thesis. The first activity concerns the widely unknown nuclear equation of state and the core composition of compact stars. Particular attention is paid to the possible presence of hyperons in the cores of neutron stars as well as to stars made of unconfined up, down and strange quarks (strange quark stars). The effects of ultra-strong electric fields on the surfaces of the latter is explored. The second activity aims at investigating the structure and stability of rapidly rotating compact stars. Special attention is paid to the maximal stable rotational frequencies of rotating compact stars. The third activity focuses on the thermal evolution of compact stars, driven by neutrino emission from their cores and by photon emission from the surfaces. It is show that the thermal behavior depends very strongly on the stellar core composition. Moreover, it is found that the thermal evolution of neutron stars is significantly different to that of strange quark stars. The studies performed in this thesis are key for our understanding of the thermal evolution of isolated rotating neutron stars, anomalous X-ray pulsars and soft gamma repeaters, and provide most valuable information about the phase diagram of isospin-asymmetric ultra-dense nuclear matter which can not be probed in high-energy collision experiments.

  7. KEY ISSUES REVIEW: Insights from simulations of star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Richard B.

    2007-03-01

    Although the basic physics of star formation is classical, numerical simulations have yielded essential insights into how stars form. They show that star formation is a highly nonuniform runaway process characterized by the emergence of nearly singular peaks in density, followed by the accretional growth of embryo stars that form at these density peaks. Circumstellar discs often form from the gas being accreted by the forming stars, and accretion from these discs may be episodic, driven by gravitational instabilities or by protostellar interactions. Star-forming clouds typically develop filamentary structures, which may, along with the thermal physics, play an important role in the origin of stellar masses because of the sensitivity of filament fragmentation to temperature variations. Simulations of the formation of star clusters show that the most massive stars form by continuing accretion in the dense cluster cores, and this again is a runaway process that couples star formation and cluster formation. Star-forming clouds also tend to develop hierarchical structures, and smaller groups of forming objects tend to merge into progressively larger ones, a generic feature of self-gravitating systems that is common to star formation and galaxy formation. Because of the large range of scales and the complex dynamics involved, analytic models cannot adequately describe many aspects of star formation, and detailed numerical simulations are needed to advance our understanding of the subject. 'The purpose of computing is insight, not numbers.' Richard W Hamming, in Numerical Methods for Scientists and Engineers (1962) 'There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio, than are dreamt of in your philosophy.' William Shakespeare, in Hamlet, Prince of Denmark (1604)

  8. Stars and Flowers, Flowers and Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minti, Hari

    2012-12-01

    The author, a graduated from the Bucharest University (1964), actually living and working in Israel, concerns his book to variable stars and flowers, two domains of his interest. The analogies includes double stars, eclipsing double stars, eclipses, Big Bang. The book contains 34 chapters, each of which concerns various relations between astronomy and other sciences and pseudosciences such as Psychology, Religion, Geology, Computers and Astrology (to which the author is not an adherent). A special part of the book is dedicated to archeoastronomy and ethnoastronomy, as well as to history of astronomy. Between the main points of interest of these parts: ancient sanctuaries in Sarmizegetusa (Dacia), Stone Henge(UK) and other. The last chapter of the book is dedicated to flowers. The book is richly illustrated. It is designed for a wide circle of readers.

  9. Hybrid stars that masquerade as neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Paris; Mark Alford; Matt Braby; Sanjay Reddy

    2004-11-01

    We show that a hybrid (nuclear + quark matter) star can have a mass-radius relationship very similar to that predicted for a star made of purely nucleonic matter. We show this for a generic parameterization of the quark matter equation of state, and also for an MIT bag model, each including a phenomenological correction based on gluonic corrections to the equation of state. We obtain hybrid stars as heavy as 2 M{sub solar} for reasonable values of the bag model parameters. For nuclear matter, we use the equation of state calculated by Akmal, Pandharipande, and Ravenhall using many-body techniques. Both mixed and homogeneous phases of nuclear and quark matter are considered.

  10. HUBBLE SNAPSHOT CAPTURES LIFE CYCLE OF STARS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    In this stunning picture of the giant galactic nebula NGC 3603, the crisp resolution of NASA's Hubble Space Telescope captures various stages of the life cycle of stars in one single view. To the upper right of center is the evolved blue supergiant called Sher 25. The star has a unique circumstellar ring of glowing gas that is a galactic twin to the famous ring around the supernova 1987A. The grayish-bluish color of the ring and the bipolar outflows (blobs to the upper right and lower left of the star) indicates the presence of processed (chemically enriched) material. Near the center of the view is a so-called starburst cluster dominated by young, hot Wolf-Rayet stars and early O-type stars. A torrent of ionizing radiation and fast stellar winds from these massive stars has blown a large cavity around the cluster. The most spectacular evidence for the interaction of ionizing radiation with cold molecular-hydrogen cloud material are the giant gaseous pillars to the right and lower left of the cluster. These pillars are sculptured by the same physical processes as the famous pillars Hubble photographed in the M16 Eagle Nebula. Dark clouds at the upper right are so-called Bok globules, which are probably in an earlier stage of star formation. To the lower left of the cluster are two compact, tadpole-shaped emission nebulae. Similar structures were found by Hubble in Orion, and have been interpreted as gas and dust evaporation from possibly protoplanetary disks (proplyds). The 'proplyds' in NGC 3603 are 5 to 10 times larger in size and correspondingly also more massive. This single view nicely illustrates the entire stellar life cycle of stars, starting with the Bok globules and giant gaseous pillars, followed by circumstellar disks, and progressing to evolved massive stars in the young starburst cluster. The blue supergiant with its ring and bipolar outflow marks the end of the life cycle. The color difference between the supergiant's bipolar outflow and the diffuse

  11. On the evolution and explosion of massive stars

    SciTech Connect

    Limongi, Marco; Chieffi, Alessandro

    2008-05-21

    We review our recent progresses on the presupernova evolution of massive stars in the range 11-120 M{sub {center_dot}} of solar metallicity. Special attention will be devoted to the effect of the mass loss rate during the Wolf-Rayet stages in determining the structure and the physical properties of the star prior the supernova explosion. We also discuss the explosive yields and the initial mass-remnant mass relation in the framework of the kinetic bomb induced explosion and hence the contribution of these stars to the global chemical enrichment of the interstellar medium.

  12. The Star Formation History of the Lupus Dark Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grocholski, A. J.; Hughes, J. D.

    1999-05-01

    In light of recent HIPPARCOS observations we have revised the distance to the Lupus dark cloud complex upwards. This, along with the adoption of newer pre-main sequence mass tracks and isochrones have led to a new mass function and age distribution. We use calculated masses and ages to discuss the progression of star formation through the Lupus clouds, with particular reference to Lupus 3, which is forming intermediate (3-5Mo) stars and a multitude of very low mass stars (<0.3 Mo).

  13. Observing Double Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genet, Russell M.; Fulton, B. J.; Bianco, Federica B.; Martinez, John; Baxter, John; Brewer, Mark; Carro, Joseph; Collins, Sarah; Estrada, Chris; Johnson, Jolyon; Salam, Akash; Wallen, Vera; Warren, Naomi; Smith, Thomas C.; Armstrong, James D.; McGaughey, Steve; Pye, John; Mohanan, Kakkala; Church, Rebecca

    2012-05-01

    Double stars have been systematically observed since William Herschel initiated his program in 1779. In 1803 he reported that, to his surprise, many of the systems he had been observing for a quarter century were gravitationally bound binary stars. In 1830 the first binary orbital solution was obtained, leading eventually to the determination of stellar masses. Double star observations have been a prolific field, with observations and discoveries - often made by students and amateurs - routinely published in a number of specialized journals such as the Journal of Double Star Observations. All published double star observations from Herschel's to the present have been incorporated in the Washington Double Star Catalog. In addition to reviewing the history of visual double stars, we discuss four observational technologies and illustrate these with our own observational results from both California and Hawaii on telescopes ranging from small SCTs to the 2-meter Faulkes Telescope North on Haleakala. Two of these technologies are visual observations aimed primarily at published "hands-on" student science education, and CCD observations of both bright and very faint doubles. The other two are recent technologies that have launched a double star renaissance. These are lucky imaging and speckle interferometry, both of which can use electron-multiplying CCD cameras to allow short (30 ms or less) exposures that are read out at high speed with very low noise. Analysis of thousands of high speed exposures allows normal seeing limitations to be overcome so very close doubles can be accurately measured.

  14. Nebraska STARS: Achieving Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roschewski, Pat; Isernhagen, Jody; Dappen, Leon

    2006-01-01

    In 2000, the state of Nebraska passed legislation requiring the assessment of student performance on content standards, but its requirements were very different from those of any other state. Nebraska created what has come to be known as STARS (School-based Teacher-led Assessment and Reporting System). Under STARS, each of Nebraska's nearly 500…

  15. Science through ARts (STAR)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Densmore, Marycay; Kolecki, Joseph C.; Miller, Allan; Petersen, Ruth; Terrell, Mike

    2005-01-01

    Science Through ARts (STAR) is a free, international, cross-curricular program thematically aligned with "The Vision for Space Exploration," a framework of goals and objectives published by NASA in February 2004. Through the STAR program, students in grades 5 through 12 are encouraged to apply their knowledge in creative ways as they approach a…

  16. Nuclear Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumayer, Nadine

    2017-03-01

    The centers of galaxies host two distinct, compact components: massive black holes and nuclear star clusters. Nuclear star clusters are the densest stellar systems in the universe, with masses of ~ 107M⊙ and sizes of ~ 5pc. They are almost ubiquitous at the centres of nearby galaxies with masses similar to, or lower than the Milky Way. Their occurrence both in spirals and dwarf elliptical galaxies appears to be a strong function of total galaxy light or mass. Nucleation fractions are up to 100% for total galaxy magnitudes of M B = -19mag or total galaxy luminosities of about L B = 1010 L ⊙ and falling nucleation fractions for both smaller and higher galaxy masses. Although nuclear star clusters are so common, their formation mechanisms are still under debate. The two main formation scenarios proposed are the infall and subsequent merging of star clusters and the in-situ formation of stars at the center of a galaxy. Here, I review the state-of-the-art of nuclear star cluster observations concerning their structure, stellar populations and kinematics. These observations are used to constrain the proposed formation scenarios for nuclear star clusters. Constraints from observations show, that likely both cluster infall and in-situ star formation are at work. The relative importance of these two mechanisms is still subject of investigation.

  17. Star spot location estimation using Kalman filter for star tracker.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hai-bo; Yang, Jian-kun; Wang, Jiong-qi; Tan, Ji-chun; Li, Xiu-jian

    2011-04-20

    Star pattern recognition and attitude determination accuracy is highly dependent on star spot location accuracy for the star tracker. A star spot location estimation approach with the Kalman filter for a star tracker has been proposed, which consists of three steps. In the proposed approach, the approximate locations of the star spots in successive frames are predicted first; then the measurement star spot locations are achieved by defining a series of small windows around each predictive star spot location. Finally, the star spot locations are updated by the designed Kalman filter. To confirm the proposed star spot location estimation approach, the simulations based on the orbit data of the CHAMP satellite and the real guide star catalog are performed. The simulation results indicate that the proposed approach can filter out noises from the measurements remarkably if the sampling frequency is sufficient.

  18. Activity Cycles in Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, David H.

    2009-01-01

    Starspots and stellar activity can be detected in other stars using high precision photometric and spectrometric measurements. These observations have provided some surprises (starspots at the poles - sunspots are rarely seen poleward of 40 degrees) but more importantly they reveal behaviors that constrain our models of solar-stellar magnetic dynamos. The observations reveal variations in cycle characteristics that depend upon the stellar structure, convection zone dynamics, and rotation rate. In general, the more rapidly rotating stars are more active. However, for stars like the Sun, some are found to be inactive while nearly identical stars are found to be very active indicating that periods like the Sun's Maunder Minimum (an inactive period from 1645 to 1715) are characteristic of Sun-like stars.

  19. Producing Runaway Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-07-01

    How are the hypervelocity stars weve observed in our galaxy produced? A recent study suggests that these escapees could be accelerated by a massive black hole in the center of the Large Magellanic Cloud.A Black Hole SlingshotSince their discovery in 2005, weve observed dozens of candidate hypervelocity stars stars whose velocity in the rest frame of our galaxy exceeds the local escape velocity of the Milky Way. These stars present a huge puzzle: how did they attain these enormous velocities?One potential explanation is known as the Hills mechanism. In this process, a stellar binary is disrupted by a close encounter with a massive black hole (like those thought to reside at the center of every galaxy). One member of the binary is flung out of the system as a result of the close encounter, potentially reaching very large velocities.A star-forming region known as LHA 120-N 11, located within the LMC. Some binary star systems within the LMC might experience close encounters with a possible massive black hole at the LMCs center. [ESA/NASA/Hubble]Blame the LMC?Usually, discussions of the Hills mechanism assume that Sagittarius A*, the supermassive black hole at the center of the Milky Way, is the object guilty of accelerating the hypervelocity stars weve observed. But what if the culprit isnt Sgr A*, but a massive black hole at the center of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), one of the Milky Ways satellite galaxies?Though we dont yet have evidence of a massive black hole at the center of the LMC, the dwarf galaxy is large enough to potentially host one as large as 100,000 solar masses. Assuming that it does, two scientists at the University of Cambridge, Douglas Boubert and Wyn Evans, have now modeled how this black hole might tear apart binary star systems and fling hypervelocity stars around the Milky Way.Models for AccelerationBoubert and Evans determined that the LMCs hypothetical black hole could easily eject stars at ~100 km/s, which is the escape velocity of the

  20. The Carbon Star Phenomenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wing, Robert F.

    2000-06-01

    The atmospheres of many stars have chemical compositions that are significantly different from that of the interstellar medium from which they are formed. This symposium considered all kinds of late-type stars showing altered compositions, the carbon stars being simply the best-known of these. All stages of stellar evolution from the main sequence to the ejection of a planetary nebula were considered, with emphasis on the changes that occur on the asymptotic giant branch. The spectroscopic properties of the photospheres and circumstellar envelopes of chemically-peculiar red giant stars, their origins via single-star evolution or mass transfer in binary systems, and the methods currently used to study them were all discussed in detail. This volume includes the full texts of papers given orally at the symposium and abstracts of the posters. Link: http://www.wkap.nl/book.htm/0-7923-6347-7

  1. How Stars Form

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKee, Christopher F.

    2017-01-01

    Stars are the atoms of the universe. The process by which stars form is at the nexus of astrophysics since they are believed to be responsible for the re-ionization of the universe, they created the heavy elements, they play a central role in the formation and evolution of galaxies, and their formation naturally leads to the formation of planets. Whereas early work on star formation was based on the assumption that it is a quiescent process, it is now believed that turbulence plays a dominant role. In this overview, I shall discuss the evolution of our understanding of how stars form and current ideas about the stellar initial mass function and the rate of star formation.

  2. Catch a Star!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-11-01

    ESO and the European Association for Astronomy Education are launching today the 2007 edition of 'Catch a Star!', their international astronomy competition for school students. Now in its fifth year, the competition offers students the chance to win a once-in-a-lifetime trip to ESO's flagship observatory in Chile, as well as many other prizes. Students are invited to 'become astronomers' and embark on a journey to explore the Universe. ESO PR Photo 42/06 The competition includes separate categories - 'Catch a Star Researchers' and 'Catch a Star Adventurers' - to ensure that every student, whatever their level, has the chance to enter and win exciting prizes. For the artistically minded, 'Catch a Star!' also includes an artwork competition, 'Catch a Star Artists'. "'Catch a Star!' offers a unique opportunity for students to learn more about astronomy and about the methods scientists use to discover new things about the Universe", said Douglas Pierce-Price, Education Officer at ESO. In teams, students choose an astronomical topic to study and produce an in-depth report. An important part of the project for 'Catch a Star Researchers' is to think about how ESO's telescopes or a telescope of the future can contribute to their investigations of the subject. As well as the top prize - a trip to one of ESO's observatory sites in Chile - visits to observatories in Germany, Austria and Spain, and many other prizes are also available to be won. 'Catch a Star Researchers' winners will be chosen by an international jury, and 'Catch a Star Adventurers' will be awarded further prizes by lottery. Entries for 'Catch a Star Artists' will be displayed on the web and winners chosen with the help of a public online vote. The first editions of 'Catch a Star!' have attracted several hundred entries from more than 25 countries worldwide. Previous winning entries have included "Star clusters and the structure of the Milky Way" (Budapest, Hungary), "Vega" (Acqui Terme, Italy) and "Venus

  3. Making star teams out of star players.

    PubMed

    Mankins, Michael; Bird, Alan; Root, James

    2013-01-01

    Top talent is an invaluable asset: In highly specialized or creative work, for instance, "A" players are likely to be six times as productive as "B" players. So when your company has a crucial strategic project, why not multiply all that firepower and have a team of your best performers tackle it? Yet many companies hesitate to do this, believing that all-star teams don't work: Big egos will get in the way. The stars won't be able to work with one another. They'll drive the team Leader crazy. Mankins, Bird, and Root of Bain & Company believe it's time to set aside that thinking. They have seen all-star teams do extraordinary work. But there is a right way and a wrong way to organize them. Before you can even begin to assemble such a team, you need to have the right talent management practices, so you hire and develop the best people and know what they're capable of. You have to give the team appropriate incentives and leaders and support staffers who are stars in their own right. And projects that are ill-defined or small scale are not for all-star teams. Use them only for critical missions, and make sure their objectives are clear. Even with the right setup, things can still go wrong. The wise executive will take steps to manage egos, prune non-team-players, and prevent average coworkers from feeling completely undervalued. She will also invest a lot of time in choosing the right team Leader and will ask members for lots of feedback to monitor how that leader is doing.

  4. Dense Axion Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braaten, Eric; Mohapatra, Abhishek; Zhang, Hong

    2016-09-01

    If the dark matter particles are axions, gravity can cause them to coalesce into axion stars, which are stable gravitationally bound systems of axions. In the previously known solutions for axion stars, gravity and the attractive force between pairs of axions are balanced by the kinetic pressure. The mass of these dilute axion stars cannot exceed a critical mass, which is about 10-14M⊙ if the axion mass is 10-4 eV . We study axion stars using a simple approximation to the effective potential of the nonrelativistic effective field theory for axions. We find a new branch of dense axion stars in which gravity is balanced by the mean-field pressure of the axion Bose-Einstein condensate. The mass on this branch ranges from about 10-20M⊙ to about M⊙ . If a dilute axion star with the critical mass accretes additional axions and collapses, it could produce a bosenova, leaving a dense axion star as the remnant.

  5. Dense Axion Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohapatra, Abhishek; Braaten, Eric; Zhang, Hong

    2016-03-01

    If the dark matter consists of axions, gravity can cause them to coalesce into axion stars, which are stable gravitationally bound Bose-Einstein condensates of axions. In the previously known axion stars, gravity and the attractive force between pairs of axions are balanced by the kinetic pressure. If the axion mass energy is mc2 =10-4 eV, these dilute axion stars have a maximum mass of about 10-14M⊙ . We point out that there are also dense axion stars in which gravity is balanced by the mean-field pressure of the axion condensate. We study axion stars using the leading term in a systematically improvable approximation to the effective potential of the nonrelativistic effective field theory for axions. Using the Thomas-Fermi approximation in which the kinetic pressure is neglected, we find a sequence of new branches of axion stars in which gravity is balanced by the mean-field interaction energy of the axion condensate. If mc2 =10-4 4 eV, the first branch of these dense axion stars has mass ranging from about 10-11M⊙ toabout M⊙.

  6. Dense Axion Stars.

    PubMed

    Braaten, Eric; Mohapatra, Abhishek; Zhang, Hong

    2016-09-16

    If the dark matter particles are axions, gravity can cause them to coalesce into axion stars, which are stable gravitationally bound systems of axions. In the previously known solutions for axion stars, gravity and the attractive force between pairs of axions are balanced by the kinetic pressure. The mass of these dilute axion stars cannot exceed a critical mass, which is about 10^{-14}M_{⊙} if the axion mass is 10^{-4}  eV. We study axion stars using a simple approximation to the effective potential of the nonrelativistic effective field theory for axions. We find a new branch of dense axion stars in which gravity is balanced by the mean-field pressure of the axion Bose-Einstein condensate. The mass on this branch ranges from about 10^{-20}M_{⊙} to about M_{⊙}. If a dilute axion star with the critical mass accretes additional axions and collapses, it could produce a bosenova, leaving a dense axion star as the remnant.

  7. Highly-evolved stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heap, S. R.

    1981-01-01

    The ways in which the IUE has proved useful in studying highly evolved stars are reviewed. The importance of high dispersion spectra for abundance analyses of the sd0 stars and for studies of the wind from the central star of NGC 6543 and the wind from the 0 type component of Vela X-1 is shown. Low dispersion spectra are used for absolute spectrophotometry of the dwarf nova, Ex Hya. Angular resolution is important for detecting and locating UV sources in globular clusters.

  8. Superradiance in stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardoso, Vitor; Brito, Richard; Rosa, João L.

    2015-06-01

    It has long been known that dissipation is a crucial ingredient in the superradiant amplification of wave packets off rotating objects. We show that, once appropriate dissipation mechanisms are included, stars are also prone to superradiance and superradiant instabilities. In particular, ultralight dark matter with small interaction cross section with the star material or self-annihilation can trigger a superradiant instability. On long time scales, the instability strips the star of most of its angular momentum. Whether or not new stationary configurations surrounded by scalar condensates exist remains to be seen.

  9. Multiplicity study of young pre-main sequence stars in the Lupus star-forming Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, Nikolaus; Mugrauer, Markus; Schmidt, Tobias O. B.; Neuhaeuser, Ralph; Ginski, Christian

    2013-07-01

    We have conducted a high contrast imaging search for (sub)stellar companions among 63 young pre-main sequence stars in the Lupus star forming region, using the adaptive optics imager NACO at UT4 of the ESO Paranal observatory. We detected faint co-moving companions around our targets at angular separations between about 0.1 up to several arc seconds (binaries and triple systems). Some of these companions are in the sub stellar mass regime, according to their apparent near infrared photometry at the distance of the Lupus star forming region (about 140pc). We give a progress report to our long-term project, still in execution with the follow-up spectroscopy of detected substellar companion-candidates, and present some first results.

  10. Revealing the pulsational properties of the V777 Herculis star KUV 05134+2605 by its long-term monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bognár, Zs.; Paparó, M.; Córsico, A. H.; Kepler, S. O.; Győrffy, Á.

    2014-10-01

    Context. KUV 05134+2605 is one of the 21 pulsating DB white dwarfs (V777 Her or DBV variables) known so far. The detailed investigation of the short-period and low-amplitude pulsations of these relatively faint targets requires considerable observational efforts from the ground, long-term single-site or multi-site observations. The observed amplitudes of excited modes undergo short-term variations in many cases, which makes determining pulsation modes difficult. Aims: We aim to determine the pulsation frequencies of KUV 05134+2605, find regularities between the frequency and period components, and perform an asteroseismic investigation for the first time. Methods: We re-analysed the published data and collected new measurements. We compared the frequency content of the different datasets from the different epochs and performed various tests to check the reliability of the frequency determinations. The mean period spacings were investigated with linear fits to the observed periods, Kolmogorov-Smirnov and inverse variance significance tests, and with a Fourier analysis of different period sets, including a Monte Carlo test that simulated the effect of alias ambiguities. We employed fully evolutionary DB white dwarf models for the asteroseismic investigations. Results: We identified 22 frequencies between 1280 and 2530 μHz. These form 12 groups, which suggests at least 12 possible frequencies for the asteroseismic investigations. Thanks to the extended observations, KUV 05134+2605 joined the group of rich white dwarf pulsators. We identified one triplet and at least one doublet with a ≈ 9 μHz frequency separation, from which we derived a stellar rotation period of 0.6 d. We determined the mean period spacings of ≈ 31 s and 18 s for the modes we propose as dipole and quadrupole. We found an excellent agreement between the stellar mass derived from the ℓ = 1 period spacing and the period-to-period fits, all providing M∗ = 0.84 - 0.85 M⊙ solutions. Our study

  11. Discovery of variable stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurochkin, N. Y.

    1973-01-01

    Instrumented methods of discovering variable stars are reviewed, specifically the blink comparator, color contrast method, positive-negative method, and television method. Among the empirical methods discussed, the Van Gent method is the most important.

  12. Guide star probabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soneira, R. M.; Bahcall, J. N.

    1981-01-01

    Probabilities are calculated for acquiring suitable guide stars (GS) with the fine guidance system (FGS) of the space telescope. A number of the considerations and techniques described are also relevant for other space astronomy missions. The constraints of the FGS are reviewed. The available data on bright star densities are summarized and a previous error in the literature is corrected. Separate analytic and Monte Carlo calculations of the probabilities are described. A simulation of space telescope pointing is carried out using the Weistrop north galactic pole catalog of bright stars. Sufficient information is presented so that the probabilities of acquisition can be estimated as a function of position in the sky. The probability of acquiring suitable guide stars is greatly increased if the FGS can allow an appreciable difference between the (bright) primary GS limiting magnitude and the (fainter) secondary GS limiting magnitude.

  13. Conformally symmetric relativistic star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahaman, Farook; Maharaj, Sunil D.; Sardar, Iftikar Hossain; Chakraborty, Koushik

    2017-03-01

    We investigate whether compact stars having Tolman-like interior geometry admit conformal symmetry. Taking anisotropic pressure along the two principal directions within the compact object, we obtain physically relevant quantities such as transverse and radial pressure, density and redshift function. We study the equation of state (EOS) for the matter distribution inside the star. From the relation between pressure and density function of the constituent matter, we explore the nature and properties of the interior matter. The redshift function and compactness parameter are found to be physically reasonable. The matter inside the star satisfies the null, weak and strong energy conditions. Finally, we compare the masses and radii predicted from the model with corresponding values in some observed stars.

  14. Cooling of neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pethick, C. J.

    1992-01-01

    It is at present impossible to predict the interior constitution of neutron stars based on theory and results from laboratory studies. It has been proposed that it is possible to obtain information on neutron star interiors by studying thermal radiation from their surfaces, because neutrino emission rates, and hence the temperature of the central part of a neutron star, depend on the properties of dense matter. The theory predicts that neutron stars cool relatively slowly if their cores are made up of nucleons, and cool faster if the matter is in an exotic state, such as a pion condensate, a kaon condensate, or quark matter. This view has recently been questioned by the discovery of a number of other processes that could lead to copious neutrino emission and rapid cooling.

  15. Cosmology with hypervelocity stars

    SciTech Connect

    Loeb, Abraham

    2011-04-01

    In the standard cosmological model, the merger remnant of the Milky Way and Andromeda (Milkomeda) will be the only galaxy remaining within our event horizon once the Universe has aged by another factor of ten, ∼ 10{sup 11} years after the Big Bang. After that time, the only extragalactic sources of light in the observable cosmic volume will be hypervelocity stars being ejected continuously from Milkomeda. Spectroscopic detection of the velocity-distance relation or the evolution in the Doppler shifts of these stars will allow a precise measurement of the vacuum mass density as well as the local matter distribution. Already in the near future, the next generation of large telescopes will allow photometric detection of individual stars out to the edge of the Local Group, and may target the ∼ 10{sup 5±1} hypervelocity stars that originated in it as cosmological tracers.

  16. Catch a Star 2008!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-10-01

    ESO and the European Association for Astronomy Education have just launched the 2008 edition of 'Catch a Star', their international astronomy competition for school students. Now in its sixth year, the competition offers students the chance to win a once-in-a-lifetime trip to ESO's flagship observatory in Chile, as well as many other prizes. CAS logo The competition includes separate categories - 'Catch a Star Researchers' and 'Catch a Star Adventurers' - to ensure that every student, whatever their level, has the chance to enter and win exciting prizes. In teams, students investigate an astronomical topic of their choice and write a report about it. An important part of the project for 'Catch a Star Researchers' is to think about how ESO's telescopes such as the Very Large Telescope (VLT) or future telescopes such as the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) and the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT) could contribute to investigations of the topic. Students may also include practical activities such as observations or experiments. For the artistically minded, 'Catch a Star' also offers an artwork competition, 'Catch a Star Artists'. Last year, hundreds of students from across Europe and beyond took part in 'Catch a Star', submitting astronomical projects and artwork. "'Catch a Star' gets students thinking about the wonders of the Universe and the science of astronomy, with a chance of winning great prizes. It's easy to take part, whether by writing about astronomy or creating astronomically inspired artwork," said Douglas Pierce-Price, Education Officer at ESO. As well as the top prize - a trip to ESO's Very Large Telescope in Chile - visits to observatories in Austria and Spain, and many other prizes, can also be won. 'Catch a Star Researchers' winners will be chosen by an international jury, and 'Catch a Star Adventurers' will be awarded further prizes by lottery. Entries for 'Catch a Star Artists' will be displayed on the web and winners

  17. Bubbly Little Star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    In this processed Spitzer Space Telescope image, baby star HH 46/47 can be seen blowing two massive 'bubbles.' The star is 1,140 light-years away from Earth.

    The infant star can be seen as a white spot toward the center of the Spitzer image. The two bubbles are shown as hollow elliptical shells of bluish-green material extending from the star. Wisps of green in the image reveal warm molecular hydrogen gas, while the bluish tints are formed by starlight scattered by surrounding dust.

    These bubbles formed when powerful jets of gas, traveling at 200 to 300 kilometers per second, or about 120 to 190 miles per second, smashed into the cosmic cloud of gas and dust that surrounds HH 46/47. The red specks at the end of each bubble show the presence of hot sulfur and iron gas where the star's narrow jets are currently crashing head-on into the cosmic cloud's gas and dust material.

    Whenever astronomers observe a star, or snap a stellar portrait, through the lens of any telescope, they know that what they are seeing is slightly blurred. To clear up the blurring in Spitzer images, astronomers at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory developed an image processing technique for Spitzer called Hi-Res deconvolution.

    This process reduces blurring and makes the image sharper and cleaner, enabling astronomers to see the emissions around forming stars in greater detail. When scientists applied this image processing technique to the Spitzer image of HH 46/47, they were able to see winds from the star and jets of gas that are carving the celestial bubbles.

    This infrared image is a three-color composite, with data at 3.6 microns represented in blue, 4.5 and 5.8 microns shown in green, and 24 microns represented as red.

  18. Chaotic Star Birth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for Poster VersionClick on the image for IRAS 4B Inset

    Located 1,000 light years from Earth in the constellation Perseus, a reflection nebula called NGC 1333 epitomizes the beautiful chaos of a dense group of stars being born. Most of the visible light from the young stars in this region is obscured by the dense, dusty cloud in which they formed. With NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope, scientists can detect the infrared light from these objects. This allows a look through the dust to gain a more detailed understanding of how stars like our sun begin their lives.

    The young stars in NGC 1333 do not form a single cluster, but are split between two sub-groups. One group is to the north near the nebula shown as red in the image. The other group is south, where the features shown in yellow and green abound in the densest part of the natal gas cloud. With the sharp infrared eyes of Spitzer, scientists can detect and characterize the warm and dusty disks of material that surround forming stars. By looking for differences in the disk properties between the two subgroups, they hope to find hints of the star and planet formation history of this region.

    The knotty yellow-green features located in the lower portion of the image are glowing shock fronts where jets of material, spewed from extremely young embryonic stars, are plowing into the cold, dense gas nearby. The sheer number of separate jets that appear in this region is unprecedented. This leads scientists to believe that by stirring up the cold gas, the jets may contribute to the eventual dispersal of the gas cloud, preventing more stars from forming in NGC 1333.

    In contrast, the upper portion of the image is dominated by the infrared light from warm dust, shown as red.

  19. Star of Bethlehem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, D.; Murdin, P.

    2001-07-01

    The biblical Star of Bethlehem, which heralded the birth of Jesus Christ, is only mentioned in the Gospel of St Matthew 2. The astrologically significant 7 bc triple conjunction of Jupiter and Saturn in the constellation of Pisces is the most likely candidate, although a comet/nova in 5 bc and a comet in 4 bc cannot be ruled out. There is also the possibility that the star was simply fictitious....

  20. Matter accreting neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meszaros, P.

    1981-01-01

    Some of the fundamental neutron star parameters, such as the mass and the magnetic field strength, were experimentally determined in accreting neutron star systems. Some of the relevant data and the models used to derive useful information from them, are reviewed concentrating mainly on X-ray pulsars. The latest advances in our understanding of the radiation mechanisms and the transfer in the strongly magnetized polar cap regions are discussed.

  1. Spectroscopic Binary Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batten, A.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Historically, spectroscopic binary stars were binary systems whose nature was discovered by the changing DOPPLER EFFECT or shift of the spectral lines of one or both of the component stars. The observed Doppler shift is a combination of that produced by the constant RADIAL VELOCITY (i.e. line-of-sight velocity) of the center of mass of the whole system, and the variable shift resulting from the o...

  2. Seeing Stars in Serpens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Infant stars are glowing gloriously in this infrared image of the Serpens star-forming region, captured by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope.

    The reddish-pink dots are baby stars deeply embedded in the cosmic cloud of gas and dust that collapsed to create it. A dusty disk of cosmic debris, or 'protoplanetary disk,' that may eventually form planets, surrounds the infant stars.

    Wisps of green throughout the image indicate the presence of carbon rich molecules called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. On Earth, these molecules can be found on charred barbecue grills and in automobile exhaust. Blue specks sprinkled throughout the image are background stars in our Milky Way galaxy.

    The Serpens star-forming region is located approximately 848 light-years away in the Serpens constellation.

    The image is a three-channel, false-color composite, where emission at 4.5 microns is blue, emission at 8.0 microns is green, and 24 micron emission is red.

  3. Collapsing Enormous Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-09-01

    One of the big puzzles in astrophysics is how supermassive black holes (SMBHs) managed to grow to the large sizes weve observed in the very early universe. In a recent study, a team of researchers examines the possibility that they were formed by the direct collapse of supermassive stars.Formation MysterySMBHs billions of times as massive as the Sun have been observed at a time when the universe was less than a billion years old. But thats not enough time for a stellar-mass black hole to grow to SMBH-size by accreting material so another theory is needed to explain the presence of these monsters so early in the universes history. A new study, led by Tatsuya Matsumoto (Kyoto University, Japan), poses the following question: what if supermassive stars in the early universe collapsed directly into black holes?Previous studies of star formation in the early universe have suggested that, in the hot environment of these primordial times, stars might have been able to build up mass much faster than they can today. This could result in early supermassive stars roughly 100,000 times more massive than the Sun. But if these early stars end their lives by collapsing to become massive black holes in the same way that we believe massive stars can collapse to form stellar-mass black holes today this should result in enormously violent explosions. Matusmoto and collaborators set out to model this process, to determine what we would expect to see when it happens!Energetic BurstsThe authors modeled the supermassive stars prior to collapse and then calculated whether a jet, created as the black hole grows at the center of the collapsing star, would be able to punch out of the stellar envelope. They demonstrated that the process would work much like the widely-accepted collapsar model of massive-star death, in which a jet successfully punches out of a collapsing star, violently releasing energy in the form of a long gamma-ray burst (GRB).Because the length of a long GRB is thought to

  4. Hot Subluminous Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heber, U.

    2016-08-01

    Hot subluminous stars of spectral type B and O are core helium-burning stars at the blue end of the horizontal branch or have evolved even beyond that stage. Most hot subdwarf stars are chemically highly peculiar and provide a laboratory to study diffusion processes that cause these anomalies. The most obvious anomaly lies with helium, which may be a trace element in the atmosphere of some stars (sdB, sdO) while it may be the dominant species in others (He-sdB, He-sdO). Strikingly, the distribution in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram of He-rich versus He-poor hot subdwarf stars of the globular clusters ω Cen and NGC 2808 differ from that of their field counterparts. The metal-abundance patterns of hot subdwarfs are typically characterized by strong deficiencies of some lighter elements as well as large enrichments of heavy elements. A large fraction of sdB stars are found in close binaries with white dwarf or very low-mass main sequence companions, which must have gone through a common-envelope (CE) phase of evolution. Because the binaries are detached they provide a clean-cut laboratory to study this important but yet poorly understood phase of stellar evolution. Hot subdwarf binaries with sufficiently massive white dwarf companions are viable candidate progenitors of type Ia supernovae both in the double degenerate as well as in the single degenerate scenario as helium donors for double detonation supernovae. The hyper-velocity He-sdO star US 708 may be the surviving donor of such a double detonation supernova. Substellar companions to sdB stars have also been found. For HW Vir systems the companion mass distribution extends from the stellar into the brown dwarf regime. A giant planet to the acoustic-mode pulsator V391 Peg was the first discovery of a planet that survived the red giant evolution of its host star. Evidence for Earth-size planets to two pulsating sdB stars have been reported and circumbinary giant planets or brown dwarfs have been found around HW

  5. Compact Star Time Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swank, J. H.

    1996-12-01

    A major goal of RXTE is to investigate the fastest timing signals from compact stars, especially neutron stars and black holes. Signals have now been found from many (at least nine) low mass X-ray binaries containing neutron stars in the frequency range (100-1200 Hz) expected for the rotation period of the neutron star after being spun up by accretion over a long period. The kilohertz frequency domain for these sources is simpler than the domain of oscillations below about 50 Hz in that a few isolated features can dominate over white noise. However there are three main features to consider (not all present at the same time) and at least two are quasiperiodic with varying widths and frequencies. Several models are pitting their predictions against the behavior of these features, but the bursters, especially, appear to be revealing the neutron stars's spin. It is consistent with our beliefs that no black hole candidate has shown the same complex of signals, although at least one QPO frequency of a few hundred Hz could be expected in black hole candidates by analogy to the 67 Hz observed from GRS 1915+105. The observations also provide critical tests of the interpretions of the lower frequency (5-50 Hz) QPO and the variable noise seen in both low magnetic field neutron stars and black hole candidates. The kilohertz features have not been seen from the accreting pulsars with relatively high magnetic fields, but high luminosity pulsars (such as last year's transient, GRO J1744-28) reveal signatures of the dynamic interaction between the accretion flow, the magnetic field, and perhaps the neutron star surface in addition to their coherent pulsations.

  6. Life Cycle of Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In this stunning picture of the giant galactic nebula NGC 3603, the crisp resolution of NASA's Hubble Space Telescope captures various stages of the life cycle of stars in one single view. To the upper left of center is the evolved blue supergiant called Sher 25. The star has a unique circumstellar ring of glowing gas that is a galactic twin to the famous ring around the supernova 1987A. The grayish-bluish color of the ring and the bipolar outflows (blobs to the upper right and lower left of the star) indicates the presence of processed (chemically enriched) material. Near the center of the view is a so-called starburst cluster dominated by young, hot Wolf-Rayet stars and early O-type stars. A torrent of ionizing radiation and fast stellar winds from these massive stars has blown a large cavity around the cluster. The most spectacular evidence for the interaction of ionizing radiation with cold molecular-hydrogen cloud material are the giant gaseous pillars to the right of the cluster. These pillars are sculptured by the same physical processes as the famous pillars Hubble photographed in the M16 Eagle Nebula. Dark clouds at the upper right are so-called Bok globules, which are probably in an earlier stage of star formation. To the lower left of the cluster are two compact, tadpole-shaped emission nebulae. Similar structures were found by Hubble in Orion, and have been interpreted as gas and dust evaporation from possibly protoplanetary disks (proplyds). This true-color picture was taken on March 5, 1999 with the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2.

  7. Connecting the density structure of molecular clouds with star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kainulainen, Jouni

    In the current paradigm of turbulence-regulated interstellar medium (ISM), star formation rates of entire galaxies are intricately linked to the density structure of the individual molecular clouds. This density structure is essentially encapsulated in the probability distribution function of volume densities (ρ-PDF), which directly affects the star formation rates predicted by analytic models. Contrasting its fundamental role, the ρ-PDF function has remained virtually unconstrained by observations. I describe in this contribution the recent progress in attaining observational constraints for the column density PDFs (N-PDFs) of molecular clouds that function as a proxy of the ρ-PDFs. Specifically, observational works point towards a universal correlation between the shape of the N-PDFs and star formation activity in molecular clouds. The correlation is in place from the scales of a parsec up to the scales of entire galaxies, making it a fundamental, global link between the ISM structure and star formation.

  8. Quantitative spectroscopy of OB stars: from dwarfs to supergiants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przybilla, N.; Nieva, M. F.; Firnstein, M.; Butler, K.

    2013-02-01

    We discuss recent progress made in the spectral modelling of OB stars from the main sequence to evolved phases as BA-type supergiants. Non-LTE line-formation computations can now reproduce observed spectra over the entire optical and near-IR wavelength range with high confidence, facilitating stellar atmospheric parameters and elemental abundances to be determined at high accuracy and precision. An overview is given how the fundamental stellar parameters of single stars determined in our new approach compare to high-precision data derived from detached eclipsing massive binary stars. Finally, the observational constraints for a sample of Galactic objects are put in context with state-of-the-art evolution models for rotating massive stars.

  9. Rotational and magnetic field instabilities in neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Kokkotas, Kostas D.

    2014-01-14

    In this short review we present recent results on the dynamics of neutron stars and their magnetic fields. We discuss the progress that has been made, during the last 5 years, in understanding the rotational instabilities with emphasis to the one due to the f-mode, the possibility of using gravitational wave detection in constraining the parameters of neutron stars and revealing the equation of state as well as the detectability of gravitational waves produced during the unstable phase of a neutron star’s life. In addition we discuss the dynamics of extremely strong magnetic fields observed in a class of neutron stars (magnetars). Magnetic fields of that strength are responsible for highly energetic phenomena (giant flares) and we demonstrate that the analysis of the emitted electromagnetic radiation can lead in constraining the parameters of neutron stars. Furthermore, we present our results from the study of such violent phenomena in association with the emission of gravitational radiation.

  10. Anatomy of a Spiral Arm: Gas, Dust and Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schinnerer, Eva; Meidt, Sharon; Pety, Jerome; Leroy, Adam; Hughes, Annie; Colombo, Dario

    2015-08-01

    Spiral arms can be easily depicted in disk galaxies from the numerous young stars associated with them. However, it is on a fundamental level not clear where, how and when star formation starts relative to the spiral arm. We address these questions by utilizing high 1-3'' resolution observation of the total and dense molecular gas in a spiral arm segment of the nearby grand-design spiral galaxy M51 from PAWS (PdBI Arcsecond Whirlpool Survey) in combination with observations of young stars, HII regions and dust emission. We build a complete picture of the onset, progression and impact of star formation for this segment and discuss this picture in light of theoretical expectations.

  11. Magnetism and Activity of Planet-Hosting Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Jason Thomas; Miller, Brendan

    2015-08-01

    The magnetic activity levels of planet host stars may differ from that of stars not known to host planets in several ways. Hot jupiters may induce activity in their hosts through magnetic interactions, or through tidal interactions by affecting their host's rotation or convection. Measurements of photospheric, chromospheric, or coronal activity might then be abnormally abnormally high or low compared to control stars that do not host hot Jupiters, or might be modulated at the planet's orbital period. Such detections are complicated by the small amplitude of the expected signal, by the fact that the signals may be transient, and by the difficulty of constructing control samples due to exoplanet deteciton biases and the uncertainty of field star ages. I will review these issues, and discuss avenues for future progress in the field.

  12. Apollo Project- star projector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    The specially designed star projector used in the Projection Planetarium. From A.W. Vogeley, 'Piloted Space-Flight Simulation at Langley Research Center,' Paper presented at the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, 1966 Winter Meeting, New York, NY, November 27 - December 1, 1966. 'Another approach to the scene-generation problem is the point-light-source projection technique. This technique has been used in the Langley Projection Planetarium,... to study Apollo launch-abort problems. This method was very effective in providing the required horizon-to-horizon view of Florida as seen from about 100,000 feet.' 'This projector operates on a concept developed by Spitz. It consists of a point-light source reflecting off a centrally located highly reflective sphere which directs the light outward through the many holes representing the stars. The size of the holes is varied to vary star magnitude. The star images are brought into focus on the inside of the planetarium by lenses glued to the surface of the projector and the diameter of the projection sphere govern the focal length required for these lenses. Although this type of projector does not have the precision required for the study of navigation problems it is very adequate for pilot control problems such as rendezvous where the star field is primarily used as an attitude reference.'

  13. Condensate dark matter stars

    SciTech Connect

    Li, X.Y.; Harko, T.; Cheng, K.S. E-mail: harko@hkucc.hku.hk

    2012-06-01

    We investigate the structure and stability properties of compact astrophysical objects that may be formed from the Bose-Einstein condensation of dark matter. Once the critical temperature of a boson gas is less than the critical temperature, a Bose-Einstein Condensation process can always take place during the cosmic history of the universe. Therefore we model the dark matter inside the star as a Bose-Einstein condensate. In the condensate dark matter star model, the dark matter equation of state can be described by a polytropic equation of state, with polytropic index equal to one. We derive the basic general relativistic equations describing the equilibrium structure of the condensate dark matter star with spherically symmetric static geometry. The structure equations of the condensate dark matter stars are studied numerically. The critical mass and radius of the dark matter star are given by M{sub crit} ≈ 2(l{sub a}/1fm){sup 1/2}(m{sub χ}/1 GeV){sup −3/2}M{sub s}un and R{sub crit} ≈ 1.1 × 10{sup 6}(l{sub a}/1 fm){sup 1/2}(m{sub χ}/1 GeV){sup −3/2} cm respectively, where l{sub a} and m{sub χ} are the scattering length and the mass of dark matter particle, respectively.

  14. Nursery of New Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This is a Hubble Space Telescope image (right) of a vast nebula called NGC 604, which lies in the neighboring spiral galaxy M33, located 2.7 million light-years away in the constellation Triangulum. This is a site where new stars are being born in a spiral arm of the galaxy. Though such nebulae are common in galaxies, this one is particularly large, nearly 1,500 light-years across. The nebula is so vast it is easily seen in ground-based telescopic images (left). At the heart of NGC 604 are over 200 hot stars, much more massive than our Sun (15 to 60 solar masses). They heat the gaseous walls of the nebula making the gas fluoresce. Their light also highlights the nebula's three-dimensional shape, like a lantern in a cavern. By studying the physical structure of a giant nebula, astronomers may determine how clusters of massive stars affect the evolution of the interstellar medium of the galaxy. The nebula also yields clues to its star formation history and will improve understanding of the starburst process when a galaxy undergoes a 'firestorm' of star formation. The image was taken on January 17, 1995 with Hubble's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2. Separate exposures were taken in different colors of light to study the physical properties of the hot gas (17,000 degrees Fahrenheit, 10,000 degrees Kelvin

  15. Circulation of Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boitani, P.

    2016-01-01

    Since the dawn of man, contemplation of the stars has been a primary impulse in human beings, who proliferated their knowledge of the stars all over the world. Aristotle sees this as the product of primeval and perennial “wonder” which gives rise to what we call science, philosophy, and poetry. Astronomy, astrology, and star art (painting, architecture, literature, and music) go hand in hand through millennia in all cultures of the planet (and all use catasterisms to explain certain phenomena). Some of these developments are independent of each other, i.e., they take place in one culture independently of others. Some, on the other hand, are the product of the “circulation of stars.” There are two ways of looking at this. One seeks out forms, the other concentrates on the passing of specific lore from one area to another through time. The former relies on archetypes (for instance, with catasterism), the latter constitutes a historical process. In this paper I present some of the surprising ways in which the circulation of stars has occurred—from East to West, from East to the Far East, and from West to East, at times simultaneously.

  16. Star Caught Smoking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-08-01

    VLTI Snapshots Dusty Puff Around Variable Star Using ESO's Very Large Telescope Interferometer, astronomers from France and Brazil have detected a huge cloud of dust around a star. This observation is further evidence for the theory that such stellar puffs are the cause of the repeated extreme dimming of the star. ESO PR Photo 34a/07 ESO PR Photo 34a/07 Dust Cloud in a R CrB Star (Artist's Impression) R Coronae Borealis stars are supergiants exhibiting erratic variability. Named after the first star that showed such behaviour [1], they are more than 50 times larger than our Sun. R Coronae Borealis stars can see their apparent brightness unpredictably decline to a thousandth of their nominal value within a few weeks, with the return to normal light levels being much slower. It has been accepted for decades that such fading could be due to obscuration of the stellar surface by newly formed dusty clouds. This 'Dust Puff Theory' suggests that mass is lost from the R Coronae Borealis (or R CrB for short) star and then moves away until the temperature is low enough for carbon dust to form. If the newly formed dust cloud is located along our line-of-sight, it eclipses the star. As the dust is blown away by the star's strong light, the 'curtain' vanishes and the star reappears. RY Sagittarii is the brightest member in the southern hemisphere of this family of weird stars. Located about 6,000 light-years away towards the constellation of Sagittarius (The Archer), its peculiar nature was discovered in 1895 by famous Dutch astronomer Jacobus Cornelius Kapteyn. In 2004, near-infrared adaptive optics observations made with NACO on ESO's Very Large Telescope allowed astronomers Patrick de Laverny and Djamel Mékarnia to clearly detect the presence of clouds around RY Sagittarii. This was the first direct confirmation of the standard scenario explaining the light variations of R CrB stars by the presence of heterogeneities in their envelope surrounding the star. ESO PR Photo 32e

  17. Origin of Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brecher, K.

    1999-12-01

    The origin of the concept of neutron stars can be traced to two brief, incredibly insightful publications. Work on the earlier paper by Lev Landau (Phys. Z. Sowjetunion, 1, 285, 1932) actually predated the discovery of neutrons. Nonetheless, Landau arrived at the notion of a collapsed star with the density of a nucleus (really a "nucleus star") and demonstrated (at about the same time as, and independent of, Chandrasekhar) that there is an upper mass limit for dense stellar objects of about 1.5 solar masses. Perhaps even more remarkable is the abstract of a talk presented at the December 1933 meeting of the American Physical Society published by Walter Baade and Fritz Zwicky in 1934 (Phys. Rev. 45, 138). It followed the discovery of the neutron by just over a year. Their report, which was about the same length as the present abstract: (1) invented the concept and word supernova; (2) suggested that cosmic rays are produced by supernovae; and (3) in the authors own words, proposed "with all reserve ... the view that supernovae represent the transitions from ordinary stars to neutron stars (italics), which in their final stages consist of extremely closely packed neutrons." The abstract by Baade and Zwicky probably contains the highest density of new, important (and correct) ideas in high energy astrophysics ever published in a single paper. In this talk, we will discuss some of the facts and myths surrounding these two publications.

  18. Characterizing Retired A Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghezzi, Luan; Johnson, John

    2015-08-01

    A complete understanding of the formation and evolution of planetary systems depends on the precise characterization of the planets and their host stars. The stellar mass is particularly important because it might influence the planet occurrence and it is used to constrain the planetary masses, thus providing information about the systems' architectures. Single FGK stars on the main sequence usually have precise masses estimated from evolutionary tracks, but the results of this method for subgiants and giants have recently been called into question. In this work, we describe the ongoing efforts to precisely constrain the masses of evolved stars using benchmark subgiants and giants from the literature as well as the sample of retired A stars observed by the California Planet Search survey. Different input atmospheric parameters (from excitation and ionization equilibria, spectral synthesis, interferometry and photometry) and methods (evolutionary tracks, asteroseismology and lithium abundances) are used to critically evaluate the stellar masses and its uncertainties. Preliminary results are discussed and suggest that current mass determinations for evolved stars do not present any significant systematic errors.

  19. Neutron stars interiors: Theory and reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, J. R.

    2016-03-01

    There are many fascinating processes in the universe which we observe in more detail thanks to increasingly sophisticated technology. One of the most interesting phenomena is the life cycle of stars, their birth, evolution and death. If the stars are massive enough, they end their lives in a core-collapse supernova explosion, one of the most violent events in the universe. As a result, the densest objects in the universe, neutron stars and/or black holes, are created. The physical basis of these events should be understood in line with observation. Unfortunately, available data do not provide adequate constraints for many theoretical models of dense matter. One of the most open areas of research is the composition of matter in the cores of neutron stars. Unambiguous fingerprints for the appearance and evolution of particular components, such as strange baryons and mesons, with increasing density, have not been identified. In particular, the hadron-quark phase transition remains a subject of intensive research. In this contribution we briefly survey the most promising observational and theoretical directions leading to progress in understanding high density matter in neutron stars. A possible way forward in modeling high-density matter is outlined, exemplified by the quark-meson-coupling model (QMC). This model makes connection between hadronic structure and the underlying quark make-up. It offers a natural explanation for the saturation of nuclear force and treats high-density matter, containing the full baryon octet, in terms of four uniquely defined parameters adjusted to properties of symmetric nuclear matter at saturation.

  20. Planetesimal Accretion in Binary Star Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzari, F.; Scholl, H.

    2000-11-01

    Planetesimal accretion in close binary systems is a complex process for the gravitational perturbations of the companion star on the planetesimal orbits. These perturbations excite high eccentricities that can halt the accumulation process of planetesimals into planets also in those regions around the star where stable planetary orbits would eventually be possible. However, the evolution of a planetesimal swarm is also affected by collisions and gas drag. In particular, gas drag combined with the secular perturbations of the secondary star forces a strong alignment of all the planetesimal periastra. Since periastra are also coupled to eccentricities via the secular perturbations of the companion, the orbits of the planetesimals, besides all being aligned, also have very close values of eccentricity. This orbital ``phasing'' strongly reduces the contribution of the eccentricity to the relative velocities between planetesimals, and the impact speeds are dominated by the Keplerian shear: accretion becomes possible. This behavior is not limited to small planetesimals but also affects bodies as large as 100 km in diameter. The effects of gas drag are in fact enhanced by the presence of the constant forced component in the orbital eccentricity of the planetesimals. We describe analytically the periastron alignment by using the secular equations developed by Heppenheimer, and we test the prediction of the theory with a numerical code that integrates the orbits of a swarm of planetesimals perturbed by gas drag and collisions. The gas density is assumed to decrease outward, and the collisions are modeled as inelastic. Our computations are focused on the α Centauri system, which is a good candidate for terrestrial planets as we will show. The impact velocities between planetesimals of different sizes are computed at progressively increasing distances from the primary star and are compared with estimates for the maximum velocity for accretion. According to our simulations in

  1. Heavy Metal Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-08-01

    La Silla Telescope Detects Lots of Lead in Three Distant Binaries Summary Very high abundances of the heavy element Lead have been discovered in three distant stars in the Milky Way Galaxy . This finding strongly supports the long-held view that roughly half of the stable elements heavier than Iron are produced in common stars during a phase towards the end of their life when they burn their Helium - the other half results from supernova explosions. All the Lead contained in each of the three stars weighs about as much as our Moon. The observations show that these "Lead stars" - all members of binary stellar systems - have been more enriched with Lead than with any other chemical element heavier than Iron. This new result is in excellent agreement with predictions by current stellar models about the build-up of heavy elements in stellar interiors. The new observations are reported by a team of Belgian and French astronomers [1] who used the Coude Echelle Spectrometer on the ESO 3.6-m telescope at the La Silla Observatory (Chile). PR Photo 26a/01 : A photo of HD 196944 , one of the "Lead stars". PR Photo 26b/01 : A CES spectrum of HD 196944 . The build-up of heavy elements Astronomers and physicists denote the build-up of heavier elements from lighter ones as " nucleosynthesis ". Only the very lightest elements (Hydrogen, Helium and Lithium [2]) were created at the time of the Big Bang and therefore present in the early universe. All the other heavier elements we now see around us were produced at a later time by nucleosynthesis inside stars. In those "element factories", nuclei of the lighter elements are smashed together whereby they become the nuclei of heavier ones - this process is known as nuclear fusion . In our Sun and similar stars, Hydrogen is being fused into Helium. At some stage, Helium is fused into Carbon, then Oxygen, etc. The fusion process requires positively charged nuclei to move very close to each other before they can unite. But with increasing

  2. GRACE star camera noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, Nate

    2016-08-01

    Extending results from previous work by Bandikova et al. (2012) and Inacio et al. (2015), this paper analyzes Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) star camera attitude measurement noise by processing inter-camera quaternions from 2003 to 2015. We describe a correction to star camera data, which will eliminate a several-arcsec twice-per-rev error with daily modulation, currently visible in the auto-covariance function of the inter-camera quaternion, from future GRACE Level-1B product releases. We also present evidence supporting the argument that thermal conditions/settings affect long-term inter-camera attitude biases by at least tens-of-arcsecs, and that several-to-tens-of-arcsecs per-rev star camera errors depend largely on field-of-view.

  3. General Relativity&Compact Stars

    SciTech Connect

    Glendenning, Norman K.

    2005-08-16

    Compact stars--broadly grouped as neutron stars and white dwarfs--are the ashes of luminous stars. One or the other is the fate that awaits the cores of most stars after a lifetime of tens to thousands of millions of years. Whichever of these objects is formed at the end of the life of a particular luminous star, the compact object will live in many respects unchanged from the state in which it was formed. Neutron stars themselves can take several forms--hyperon, hybrid, or strange quark star. Likewise white dwarfs take different forms though only in the dominant nuclear species. A black hole is probably the fate of the most massive stars, an inaccessible region of spacetime into which the entire star, ashes and all, falls at the end of the luminous phase. Neutron stars are the smallest, densest stars known. Like all stars, neutron stars rotate--some as many as a few hundred times a second. A star rotating at such a rate will experience an enormous centrifugal force that must be balanced by gravity or else it will be ripped apart. The balance of the two forces informs us of the lower limit on the stellar density. Neutron stars are 10{sup 14} times denser than Earth. Some neutron stars are in binary orbit with a companion. Application of orbital mechanics allows an assessment of masses in some cases. The mass of a neutron star is typically 1.5 solar masses. They can therefore infer their radii: about ten kilometers. Into such a small object, the entire mass of our sun and more, is compressed.

  4. Pulsating Star Mystery Solved

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-11-01

    By discovering the first double star where a pulsating Cepheid variable and another star pass in front of one another, an international team of astronomers has solved a decades-old mystery. The rare alignment of the orbits of the two stars in the double star system has allowed a measurement of the Cepheid mass with unprecedented accuracy. Up to now astronomers had two incompatible theoretical predictions of Cepheid masses. The new result shows that the prediction from stellar pulsation theory is spot on, while the prediction from stellar evolution theory is at odds with the new observations. The new results, from a team led by Grzegorz Pietrzyński (Universidad de Concepción, Chile, Obserwatorium Astronomiczne Uniwersytetu Warszawskiego, Poland), appear in the 25 November 2010 edition of the journal Nature. Grzegorz Pietrzyński introduces this remarkable result: "By using the HARPS instrument on the 3.6-metre telescope at ESO's La Silla Observatory in Chile, along with other telescopes, we have measured the mass of a Cepheid with an accuracy far greater than any earlier estimates. This new result allows us to immediately see which of the two competing theories predicting the masses of Cepheids is correct." Classical Cepheid Variables, usually called just Cepheids, are unstable stars that are larger and much brighter than the Sun [1]. They expand and contract in a regular way, taking anything from a few days to months to complete the cycle. The time taken to brighten and grow fainter again is longer for stars that are more luminous and shorter for the dimmer ones. This remarkably precise relationship makes the study of Cepheids one of the most effective ways to measure the distances to nearby galaxies and from there to map out the scale of the whole Universe [2]. Unfortunately, despite their importance, Cepheids are not fully understood. Predictions of their masses derived from the theory of pulsating stars are 20-30% less than predictions from the theory of the

  5. Really Hot Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-04-01

    Spectacular VLT Photos Unveil Mysterious Nebulae Summary Quite a few of the most beautiful objects in the Universe are still shrouded in mystery. Even though most of the nebulae of gas and dust in our vicinity are now rather well understood, there are some which continue to puzzle astronomers. This is the case of a small number of unusual nebulae that appear to be the subject of strong heating - in astronomical terminology, they present an amazingly "high degree of excitation". This is because they contain significant amounts of ions, i.e., atoms that have lost one or more of their electrons. Depending on the atoms involved and the number of electrons lost, this process bears witness to the strength of the radiation or to the impact of energetic particles. But what are the sources of that excitation? Could it be energetic stars or perhaps some kind of exotic objects inside these nebulae? How do these peculiar objects fit into the current picture of universal evolution? New observations of a number of such unusual nebulae have recently been obtained with the Very Large Telescope (VLT) at the ESO Paranal Observatory (Chile). In a dedicated search for the origin of their individual characteristics, a team of astronomers - mostly from the Institute of Astrophysics & Geophysics in Liège (Belgium) [1] - have secured the first detailed, highly revealing images of four highly ionized nebulae in the Magellanic Clouds, two small satellite galaxies of our home galaxy, the Milky Way, only a few hundred thousand light-years away. In three nebulae, they succeeded in identifying the sources of energetic radiation and to eludicate their exceptional properties: some of the hottest, most massive stars ever seen, some of which are double. With masses of more than 20 times that of the Sun and surface temperatures above 90 000 degrees, these stars are truly extreme. PR Photo 09a/03: Nebula around the hot star AB7 in the SMC. PR Photo 09b/03: Nebula near the hot Wolf-Rayet star BAT99

  6. Weighing the Smallest Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-01-01

    VLT Finds Young, Very Low Mass Objects Are Twice As Heavy As Predicted Summary Thanks to the powerful new high-contrast camera installed at the Very Large Telescope, photos have been obtained of a low-mass companion very close to a star. This has allowed astronomers to measure directly the mass of a young, very low mass object for the first time. The object, more than 100 times fainter than its host star, is still 93 times as massive as Jupiter. And it appears to be almost twice as heavy as theory predicts it to be. This discovery therefore suggests that, due to errors in the models, astronomers may have overestimated the number of young "brown dwarfs" and "free floating" extrasolar planets. PR Photo 03/05: Near-infrared image of AB Doradus A and its companion (NACO SDI/VLT) A winning combination A star can be characterised by many parameters. But one is of uttermost importance: its mass. It is the mass of a star that will decide its fate. It is thus no surprise that astronomers are keen to obtain a precise measure of this parameter. This is however not an easy task, especially for the least massive ones, those at the border between stars and brown dwarf objects. Brown dwarfs, or "failed stars", are objects which are up to 75 times more massive than Jupiter, too small for major nuclear fusion processes to have ignited in its interior. To determine the mass of a star, astronomers generally look at the motion of stars in a binary system. And then apply the same method that allows determining the mass of the Earth, knowing the distance of the Moon and the time it takes for its satellite to complete one full orbit (the so-called "Kepler's Third Law"). In the same way, they have also measured the mass of the Sun by knowing the Earth-Sun distance and the time - one year - it takes our planet to make a tour around the Sun. The problem with low-mass objects is that they are very faint and will often be hidden in the glare of the brighter star they orbit, also when viewed

  7. Computational astrophysics: Pulsating stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, C. G.

    The field of computational astrophysics in pulsating star studies has grown considerably since the advent of the computer. Initially calculations were done on the IBM 704 with 32K of memory and now we use the CRAY YMP computers with considerably more memory. Our early studies were for models of pulsating stars using a 1D Lagrangian hydrodynamic code (SPEC) with radiation diffusion. The radiative transfer was treated in the equilibrium diffusion approximation and the hydrodynamics was done utilizing the approximation of artificial viscosity. The early calculations took many hours of 704 CPU time. Early in 1965 we decided to improve on the usual treatment of the radiative transfer used in our codes by utilizing the method of moments, the so-called variable Eddington approximation. In this approximation the material energy field is uncoupled from the radiation energy field and the angular dependence is introduced through the Eddington factor. A multigroup frequency dependent method may also be applied. The Eddington factor is determined by snapshots of the stars structure utilizing a y-line approximation. The full radiative transfer approximation appears necessary in order to understand the light curves for W Virginia stars and may be important for the light curves of RR Lyrae stars. A detailed radiative transfer method does not appear to be necessary for the understanding of Cepheid light curves. A recent improvement to our models for pulsating stars is in the use of an adaptive mesh scheme to resolve the sharp features in the nonlinear hydrodynamic structure. From these improved structures, better analysis of the radius, velocity, and light curves could be obtained.

  8. American Urban Star Fest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pazmino, John

    2003-12-01

    Over the last couple of decades New York City implemented, and continues to carry out, several schemes of eradicating luminous graffiti. One result has been the gradual recovery of the natural night sky. By 1994 the normal clear sky transparency over Manhattan deepened to fourth magnitude and has been slowly creeping deeper, until in 2002 it is at magnitude 4 to 4.5. In the spring of 1995, during some lazing on a Manhattan rooftop under a sky full of stars, several New York astronomers hatched the idea of letting the whole people celebrate the renewed starry sky. In due course they, through the Amateur Astronomers Association, engaged the New York City Parks Department and the Urban Park Rangers in an evening of quiet picnicking to enjoy the stars in their natural sky. Thus the Urban Star Fest was born. The event thrilled about 3,000 visitors in Central Park's Sheep Meadow on Saturday 30 September 1995. This year's Fest, the eighth in the series demonstrated the City's upper skyline of stars on Saturday 5 October 2002 to about 2,200 enthused visitors. Although the Fest is always noted as cancelable for inclement weather, so far, it has convened every year, with attendance ranging from 4,000 down to a mere 1,000, this latter being under the smoke plume of the World Trade Center in 2001. Despite this swing in attendance, the American Urban Star Fest is America's largest regularly scheduled public astronomy event. Of course, special occasions, like comets or eclipses, can and do attract far larger interest both in the city and elsewhere. The presentation shows the setup and program of the American Urban Star Fest, to illustrate how the general public can actively become aware of the night sky and see for themselves the result of their very own efforts at removing light pollution--and note where improvement is yet to come.

  9. Morphodynamics of star dunes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, D.; Narteau, C.; Rozier, O.; Courrech du Pont, S.

    2012-04-01

    Star dunes are among the biggest and the most impressive dunes in Earth sand seas. Nonetheless, they remain poorly studied, probably because of their apparent complexity. They are massive pyramidal dunes with interlaced arms whose slip faces are oriented in various directions. Being large, they can integrate wind properties over a wide range of time scales. Thus, they are observed for wind regimes with multiple directions, and may result from the amalgamation of dunes or from the development of arms on a well-established dune pattern. In both cases, the roles of wind directional variability and secondary flow have been emphasized but not precisely quantified. Here, we report simulations where the star dune shape results from a a combination of longitudinal dunes, which form the star dune arms. These arms may radiate and so interact with the other dunes in the field. This mass exchange, controlled by the morphodynamics of star dunes arms, must play an important role in the large-scale arrangement of star dunes networks. We first demonstrate that star dune arms orientation maximizes the flux in the direction of crests. This is opposed to the usually admit dunes orientation, which maximizes the sediment transport perpendicular to the crest. Indeed, depending on sand availability, dunes development results from the growth of a wave on a sand bed or from a net transport of sediment, which grows and extends an isolated longitudinal dune over a non-erodible soil. These two different mechanisms lead to two different modes of crests orientation. Then, we show that the propagating arms reach a stationary state characterized by constant width, height and growth rate. These are controlled by the frequency at which the wind changes direction. Arm width and height increase, whereas the propagation speed decreases with a decreasing frequency. These morphodynamics properties are helpful to assess from pattern observation the variability of wind directionality over several time

  10. A Star on Earth

    SciTech Connect

    Prager, Stewart; Zwicker, Andrew; Hammet, Greg; Tresemer, Kelsey; Diallo, Ahmed

    2014-03-05

    At the Energy Department's Princeton Plasma Physics Lab, scientists are trying to accomplish what was once considered the realm of science fiction: create a star on Earth. The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) is a magnetic fusion device that is used to study the physics principles of spherically shaped plasmas -- hot ionized gases in which, under the right conditions, nuclear fusion will occur. Fusion is the energy source of the sun and all of the stars. Not just limited to theoretical work, the NSTX is enabling cutting-edge research to develop fusion as a future energy source.

  11. The Drifting Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-04-01

    By studying in great detail the 'ringing' of a planet-harbouring star, a team of astronomers using ESO's 3.6-m telescope have shown that it must have drifted away from the metal-rich Hyades cluster. This discovery has implications for theories of star and planet formation, and for the dynamics of our Milky Way. ESO PR Photo 09a/08 ESO PR Photo 09a/08 Iota Horologii The yellow-orange star Iota Horologii, located 56 light-years away towards the southern Horologium ("The Clock") constellation, belongs to the so-called "Hyades stream", a large number of stars that move in the same direction. Previously, astronomers using an ESO telescope had shown that the star harbours a planet, more than 2 times as large as Jupiter and orbiting in 320 days (ESO 12/99). But until now, all studies were unable to pinpoint the exact characteristics of the star, and hence to understand its origin. A team of astronomers, led by Sylvie Vauclair from the University of Toulouse, France, therefore decided to use the technique of 'asteroseismology' to unlock the star's secrets. "In the same way as geologists monitor how seismic waves generated by earthquakes propagate through the Earth and learn about the inner structure of our planet, it is possible to study sound waves running through a star, which forms a sort of large, spherical bell," says Vauclair. The 'ringing' from this giant musical instrument provides astronomers with plenty of information about the physical conditions in the star's interior. And to 'listen to the music', the astronomers used one of the best instruments available. The observations were conducted in November 2006 during 8 consecutive nights with the state-of-the-art HARPS spectrograph mounted on the ESO 3.6-m telescope at La Silla. Up to 25 'notes' could be identified in the unique dataset, most of them corresponding to waves having a period of about 6.5 minutes. These observations allowed the astronomers to obtain a very precise portrait of Iota Horologii: its

  12. The DQ Herculis stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Joseph

    1994-01-01

    We review the properties of the DQ Herculis stars: cataclysmic variables containing an accreting, magnetic, rapidly rotating white dwarf. These stars are characterized by strong X-ray emission, high-excitation spectra, and very stable optical and X-ray pulsations in their light curves. There is considerable resemblance to their more famous cousins, the AM Herculis stars, but the latter class is additionally characterized by spin-orbit synchronism and the presence of strong circular polarization. We list eighteen stars passing muster as certain or very likely DQ Her stars. The rotational periods range from 33 s to 2.0 hr. Additional periods can result when the rotating searchlight illuminates other structures in the binary. A single hypothesis explains most of the observed properties: magnetically channeled accretion within a truncated disk. Some accretion flow still seems to proceed directly to the magnetosphere, however. The white dwarfs' magnetic moments are in the range 10(sup 32) - 10(sup 34) G cc, slightly weaker than in AM Her stars but with some probable overlap. The more important reason why DQ Hers have broken synchronism is probably their greater accretion rate and orbital separation. The observed L(sub x)/L(sub V) values are surprisingly low for a radially accreting white dwarf, suggesting that most of the accretion energy is not radiated in a strong shock above the magnetic pole. The fluxes can be more satisfactorily explained if most of the radial infall energy manages to bypass the shock and deposit itse lf directly in the white dwarf photosphere, where it should emerge as extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation. This also provides an adequate source of ionizing photons to power the high-excitation optical and UV emission lines. This is probably the DQ Her analog to the famous 'soft X-ray excess' in AM Her stars. However, unlike the AM Her case, this radiation has not been directly observed, so the analogy must not (yet) be embraced too firmly. There is

  13. A Star on Earth

    ScienceCinema

    Prager, Stewart; Zwicker, Andrew; Hammet, Greg; Tresemer, Kelsey; Diallo, Ahmed

    2016-07-12

    At the Energy Department's Princeton Plasma Physics Lab, scientists are trying to accomplish what was once considered the realm of science fiction: create a star on Earth. The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) is a magnetic fusion device that is used to study the physics principles of spherically shaped plasmas -- hot ionized gases in which, under the right conditions, nuclear fusion will occur. Fusion is the energy source of the sun and all of the stars. Not just limited to theoretical work, the NSTX is enabling cutting-edge research to develop fusion as a future energy source.

  14. Synthetic guide star generation

    DOEpatents

    Payne, Stephen A [Castro Valley, CA; Page, Ralph H [Castro Valley, CA; Ebbers, Christopher A [Livermore, CA; Beach, Raymond J [Livermore, CA

    2008-06-10

    A system for assisting in observing a celestial object and providing synthetic guide star generation. A lasing system provides radiation at a frequency at or near 938 nm and radiation at a frequency at or near 1583 nm. The lasing system includes a fiber laser operating between 880 nm and 960 nm and a fiber laser operating between 1524 nm and 1650 nm. A frequency-conversion system mixes the radiation and generates light at a frequency at or near 589 nm. A system directs the light at a frequency at or near 589 nm toward the celestial object and provides synthetic guide star generation.

  15. Synthetic guide star generation

    DOEpatents

    Payne, Stephen A.; Page, Ralph H.; Ebbers, Christopher A.; Beach, Raymond J.

    2004-03-09

    A system for assisting in observing a celestial object and providing synthetic guide star generation. A lasing system provides radiation at a frequency at or near 938 nm and radiation at a frequency at or near 1583 nm. The lasing system includes a fiber laser operating between 880 nm and 960 nm and a fiber laser operating between 1524 nm and 1650 nm. A frequency-conversion system mixes the radiation and generates light at a frequency at or near 589 nm. A system directs the light at a frequency at or near 589 nm toward the celestial object and provides synthetic guide star generation.

  16. The neutron star zoo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harding, Alice K.

    2013-12-01

    Neutron stars are a very diverse population, both in their observational and their physical properties. They prefer to radiate most of their energy at X-ray and gamma-ray wavelengths. But whether their emission is powered by rotation, accretion, heat, magnetic fields or nuclear reactions, they are all different species of the same animal whose magnetic field evolution and interior composition remain a mystery. This article will broadly review the properties of inhabitants of the neutron star zoo, with emphasis on their high-energy emission.

  17. A Real Shooting Star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for movie of A Real Shooting Star

    This artist's animation illustrates a star flying through our galaxy at supersonic speeds, leaving a 13-light-year-long trail of glowing material in its wake. The star, named Mira (pronounced my-rah) after the latin word for 'wonderful,' sheds material that will be recycled into new stars, planets and possibly even life. NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer discovered the long trail of material behind Mira during its survey of the entire sky in ultraviolet light.

    The animation begins by showing a close-up of Mira -- a red-giant star near the end of its life. Red giants are red in color and extremely bloated; for example, if a red giant were to replace our sun, it would engulf everything out to the orbit of Mars. They constantly blow off gas and dust in the form of stellar winds, supplying the galaxy with molecules, such as oxygen and carbon, that will make their way into new solar systems. Our sun will mature into a red giant in about 5 billion years.

    As the animation pulls out, we can see the enormous trail of material deposited behind Mira as it hurls along between the stars. Like a boat traveling through water, a bow shock, or build up of gas, forms ahead of the star in the direction of its motion. Gas in the bow shock is heated and then mixes with the cool hydrogen gas in the wind that is blowing off Mira. This heated hydrogen gas then flows around behind the star, forming a turbulent wake.

    Why does the trailing hydrogen gas glow in ultraviolet light? When it is heated, it transitions into a higher-energy state, which then loses energy by emitting ultraviolet light - a process known as fluorescence.

    Finally, the artist's rendering gives way to the actual ultraviolet image taken by the Galaxy Evolution Explorer

    Mira is located 350 light-years from Earth in the constellation Cetus, otherwise known as the whale. Coincidentally, Mira

  18. Star cluster dynamics.

    PubMed

    Vesperini, Enrico

    2010-02-28

    Dynamical evolution plays a key role in shaping the current properties of star clusters and star cluster systems. A detailed understanding of the effects of evolutionary processes is essential to be able to disentangle the properties that result from dynamical evolution from those imprinted at the time of cluster formation. In this review, I focus my attention on globular clusters, and review the main physical ingredients driving their early and long-term evolution, describe the possible evolutionary routes and show how cluster structure and stellar content are affected by dynamical evolution.

  19. Stellar Dynamical Processes in Massive Star and Star Cluster Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Jonathan; Eyer, L.

    2009-01-01

    We study how high precision astrometric measurements by SIM and GAIA of stars involved in dynamical ejection events from star clusters can constrain theories of massive star and star cluster formation. We focus on the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC). First, we investigate the scientific potential associated with an accurate measurement of the distance and proper motion of Theta 1 Ori C, which is the most massive star in the cluster and was recently involved (about 4000 years ago) in the ejection of a B star: the Becklin-Neugebauer (BN) star. The motion of the BN star has taken it close to a massive protostar, known as source I, where it appears to have influenced the accretion and outflow activity, most likely by a tidal interaction with the accretion disk. An accurate proper motion measurement of Theta 1 Ori C will constrain BN's initial motion, allowing us to search for deflections caused by the gravitational potential of the massive protostar. Second, we search the Hipparcos catalog for candidate runaway stars, i.e. that have been dynamically ejected from the cluster over the course of the last several Myr. SIM and GAIA observations of these stars will be needed to confirm their origin from the ONC. The results of this study will constrain the star cluster formation timescale and the statistics of the population of ejected stars. JCT acknowledges support from from NSF CAREER grant AST-0645412 and a grant from NASA for SIM Science Studies.

  20. The Death of a Star

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorne, Kip S.

    1971-01-01

    Theories associated with the gravitational collapse of a star into black holes" are described. Suggests that the collapse and compression might go through the stages from white dwarf star to neutron core to black hole." (TS)

  1. Photographic photometry of variable stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kholopov, P. N.

    1973-01-01

    Photographic methods of determining stellar magnitude and measuring brightness of variable stars on negatives include the photoelectric method and the contascope. Calibration curves are usually plotted by the UBV method. Magnitudes of comparison stars can be determined from photographs.

  2. Finding Planets around other stars

    NASA Video Gallery

    Just as the Earth revolves around the sun, our closest star, other planets might orbit the stars you see in the night sky. Think of all the planets in the universe that may be just the right distan...

  3. The Wolf-Rayet stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahade, J.

    1981-12-01

    Aspects of the problems of the Wolf-Rayet stars related to their chemical composition, their evolutionary status, and their apparent dichotomy in two spectral sequences are discussed. Dogmas concerning WR stars are critically discussed, including the belief that WR stars lack hydrogen, that they are helium stars evolved from massive close binaries, and the existence of a second WR stage in which the star is a short-period single-lined binary. The relationship of WR stars with planetary nebulae is addressed, as is the membership of these stars in clusters and associations. The division of WR stars into WN and WC sequences is considered, questioning the reasonability of accounting for WR line formation in terms of abundance differences.

  4. Star Formation in Irregular Galaxies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Deidre; Wolff, Sidney

    1985-01-01

    Examines mechanisms of how stars are formed in irregular galaxies. Formation in giant irregular galaxies, formation in dwarf irregular galaxies, and comparisons with larger star-forming regions found in spiral galaxies are considered separately. (JN)

  5. Neutron stars: A cosmic hadron physics laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pines, David

    1989-01-01

    A progress report is given on neutron stars as a cosmic hadron physics laboratory. Particular attention is paid to the crustal neutron superfluid, and to the information concerning its properties which may be deduced from observations of pulsar glitches and postglitch behavior. Current observational evidence concerning the softness or stiffness of the high density neutron matter equation of state is reviewed briefly, and the (revolutionary) implications of a confirmation of the existence of a 0.5 ms pulsar at the core of (Supernova) SN1987A are discussed.

  6. Radio Emission from Binary Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hjellming, R.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Stellar radio emission is most common in double star systems where each star provides something essential in producing the large amounts of radio radiation needed for it to be detectable by RADIO TELESCOPES. They transfer mass, supply energy or, when one of the stars is a NEUTRON STAR or BLACK HOLE, have the strong gravitational fields needed for the energetic particles and magnetic fields needed...

  7. Binary stars - Formation by fragmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boss, Alan P.

    1988-01-01

    Theories of binary star formation by capture, separate nuclei, fission and fragmentation are compared, assessing the success of theoretical attempts to explain the observed properties of main-sequence binary stars. The theory of formation by fragmentation is examined, discussing the prospects for checking the theory against observations of binary premain-sequence stars. It is concluded that formation by fragmentation is successful at explaining many of the key properties of main-sequence binary stars.

  8. The evolution of massive stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The hypotheses underlying theoretical studies of the evolution of massive model stars with and without mass loss are summarized. The evolutionary tracks followed by the models across theoretical Hertzsprung-Russell (HR) diagrams are compared with the observed distribution of B stars in an HR diagram. The pulsational properties of models of massive star are also described.

  9. Trek to the Stars

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubinstein, Robert E.

    1977-01-01

    "Star Trek", which was aired on television for three years, brought the creatures and conflicts of the "outer reaches" of space into our living rooms. Here its new episodes and reruns are analyzed by elementary students as part of a social studies/elementary science curriculum. (Author/RK)

  10. NuStar

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    NuStar ; CASRN 85509 - 19 - 9 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effects

  11. Pygmy stars: first pair.

    PubMed

    Zwicky, F

    1966-07-01

    The binary LP 101-15/16 having the proper motion of 1.62 seconds of arc per year has been studied with the prime-focus spectrograph of the 200-inch (508 cm) telescope. Indications are that LP 101-15/16 is the first pair of pygmy stars ever discovered. One of its components, LP 101-16, is probably a blue pygmy star which is at least four magnitudes fainter than the ordinary white dwarfs. Also, two of the Balmer lines in absorption appear to be displaced toward the red by amounts which indicate the existence of an Einstein gravitational red shift corresponding to about 1000 km sec-1. On the other hand LP 101-15 is red and shows an entirely new type of spectrum, which suggests that it may be a first representative of a type of red pygmy star which is 2.5 magnitudes fainter than the M-type dwarf stars of the main sequence.

  12. Reaching for the Stars

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terry, Dorothy Givens

    2012-01-01

    Dr. Mae Jemison is the world's first woman astronaut of color who continues to reach for the stars. Jemison was recently successful in leading a team that has secured a $500,000 federal grant to make interstellar space travel a reality. The Dorothy Jemison Foundation for Excellence (named after Jemison's mother) was selected in June by the Defense…

  13. The Astounding Stars.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery, Angela; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Studying about stellar constellations provides children with an opportunity to learn about ancient myths and mathematics at the same time. An interdisciplinary teaching unit combines information about myths associated with the zodiac signs and instructions for plotting the coordinates of stars. (PP)

  14. Reaching for the Stars.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roper-Davis, Sharon

    1999-01-01

    Describes "Reaching for the Stars," a program which develops teaming and mentoring skills in senior physics students. Phase 1 requires student pairs to design a rocket; Phase 2 pairs seniors with gifted second graders who build the rocket from written instructions; and in Phase 3, pairs of seniors create a children's storybook explaining…

  15. Chemical Compositions of Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leckrone, D.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    In 1835, in a famously inaccurate forecast, the French philosopher Auguste Comte wrote of stars that, `We understand the possibility of determining their shapes, their distances, their sizes and their movements; whereas we would never know how to study by any means their chemical composition…'. At the close of the 20th century the accurate measurement of the abundances of the chemical elements in...

  16. Division Iv: Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbally, Christopher; D'Antona, Francesca; Spite, Monique; Asplund, Martin; Charbonnel, Corinne; Docobo, Jose Angel; Gray, Richard O.; Piskunov, Nikolai E.

    2012-04-01

    This Division IV was started on a trial basis at the General Assembly in The Hague 1994 and was formally accepted at the Kyoto General Assembly in 1997. Its broad coverage of ``Stars'' is reflected in its relatively large number of Commissions and so of members (1266 in late 2011). Its kindred Division V, ``Variable Stars'', has the same history of its beginning. The thinking at the time was to achieve some kind of balance between the number of members in each of the 12 Divisions. Amid the current discussion of reorganizing the number of Divisions into a more compact form it seems advisable to make this numerical balance less of an issue than the rationalization of the scientific coverage of each Division, so providing more effective interaction within a particular field of astronomy. After all, every star is variable to a certain degree and such variability is becoming an ever more powerful tool to understand the characteristics of every kind of normal and peculiar star. So we may expect, after hearing the reactions of members, that in the restructuring a single Division will result from the current Divisions IV and V.

  17. Sleeping under the stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zirkel, Jack

    Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson went on a camping trip. As they lay down for the night, Holmes said, “Watson, look up at the sky and tell me what you see.”Watson:“! see millions and millions of stars.”

  18. White Star technology.

    PubMed

    Olson, Randall J; Kumar, Rajiv

    2003-02-01

    White Star micropulse technology is a software modification that allows extremely short bursts of ultrasound energy. Studies have shown that this decreases wound heat build-up with the retained efficiency of continuous ultrasound. Decreased energy utilization with improved corneal function and improved nuclear fragment followability appear to be additional benefits.

  19. Multipath star switch controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, T. O.

    1980-01-01

    Device concept permits parallel computers to scan several commonnetwork-connected data stations at maximum rate. Sequencers leap-frog to bypass ports already being serviced by another computer. Two-path system for 16-port star switch controller is cost effective if added bandwidth or increased reliability is desired. Triple-path system would be cost effective for 32-port controller.

  20. Molecules between the Stars.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verschuur, Gerrit L.

    1987-01-01

    Provides a listing of molecules discovered to date in the vast interstellar clouds of dust and gas. Emphasizes the recent discoveries of organic molecules. Discusses molecular spectral lines, MASERs (microwave amplification by stimulated emission of radiation), molecular clouds, and star birth. (TW)

  1. Physics of the Stars

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haig, G. Y.

    1974-01-01

    Describes how astrophysics can be a do-it-yourself project within a school boy's budget and background, by giving detailed instruction on equipment construction. In addition, this article describes many experiments to undertake, with the equipment, such as determining color temperature, star spectra, chemical composition and others. (BR)

  2. Insight into star death

    SciTech Connect

    Talcott, R.

    1988-02-01

    Nineteen neutrinos, formed in the center of a supernova, became a theorist's dream. They came straight from the heart of supernova 1987A and landed in two big underground tanks of water. Suddenly a new chapter in observational astronomy opened as these two neutrino telescopes gave astronomers their first look ever into the core of a supernova explosion. But the theorists' dream almost turned into a nightmare. Observations of the presupernova star showed conclusively that the star was a blue supergiant, but theorists have long believed only red supergiant stars could explode as supernovae. Do astronomers understand supernovae better now than when supernova 1987A exploded in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) one year ago Yes. The observations of neutrinos spectacularly confirmed a vital aspect of supernova theory. But the observed differences between 1987A and other supernovae have illuminated and advanced our perception of how supernovae form. By working together, observers and theorists are continuing to hone their ideas about how massive stars die and how the subsequent supernovae behave.

  3. First Star I See.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caffrey, Jaye Andras

    This children's novel tells the story of a young girl with attention deficit disorder (ADD) without hyperactivity and her younger brother who has ADD with hyperactivity. Trying to win a school writing contest on the topic of space and stars helps bright, imaginative Paige Bradley realize that fixing her "focusing knob" will compensate for her ADD.…

  4. StarLogo TNG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klopfer, Eric; Scheintaub, Hal; Huang, Wendy; Wendel, Daniel

    Computational approaches to science are radically altering the nature of scientific investigatiogn. Yet these computer programs and simulations are sparsely used in science education, and when they are used, they are typically “canned” simulations which are black boxes to students. StarLogo The Next Generation (TNG) was developed to make programming of simulations more accessible for students and teachers. StarLogo TNG builds on the StarLogo tradition of agent-based modeling for students and teachers, with the added features of a graphical programming environment and a three-dimensional (3D) world. The graphical programming environment reduces the learning curve of programming, especially syntax. The 3D graphics make for a more immersive and engaging experience for students, including making it easy to design and program their own video games. Another change to StarLogo TNG is a fundamental restructuring of the virtual machine to make it more transparent. As a result of these changes, classroom use of TNG is expanding to new areas. This chapter is concluded with a description of field tests conducted in middle and high school science classes.

  5. Magnetic Dynamos and Stars

    SciTech Connect

    Eggleton, P P

    2007-02-15

    Djehuty is a code that has been developed over the last five years by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), from earlier code designed for programmatic efforts. Operating in a massively parallel environment, Djehuty is able to model entire stars in 3D. The object of this proposal was to continue the effort to introduce magneto-hydrodynamics (MHD) into Djehuty, and investigate new classes of inherently 3D problems involving the structure, evolution and interaction of stars and planets. However, towards the end of the second year we discovered an unexpected physical process of great importance in the evolution of stars. Consequently for the third year we changed direction and concentrated on this process rather than on magnetic fields. Our new process was discovered while testing the code on red-giant stars, at the 'helium flash'. We found that a thin layer was regularly formed which contained a molecular-weight inversion, and which led therefore to Rayleigh-Taylor instability. This in turn led to some deeper-than-expected mixing, which has the property that (a) much {sup 3}He is consumed, and (b) some {sup 13}C is produced. These two properties are closely in accord with what has been observed over the last thirty years in red giants, whereas what was observed was largely in contradiction to what earlier theoretical models predicted. Thus our new 3D models with Djehuty explain a previously-unexplained problem of some thirty years standing.

  6. Reading Stars. 2013 Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Literacy Trust, 2013

    2013-01-01

    The National Literacy Trust's Premier League Reading Stars has now been running for 10 years. During this time, hundreds of thousands of children and families have been inspired by the power of football to develop a love of reading. Although the programme has grown and evolved over this period, the premise remains the same: harnessing the…

  7. H-cluster stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, X. Y.; Gao, C. Y.; Xu, R. X.

    2013-06-01

    The study of dense matter at ultrahigh density has a very long history, which is meaningful for us to understand not only cosmic events in extreme circumstances but also fundamental laws of physics. It is well known that the state of cold matter at supranuclear density depends on the non-perturbative nature of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) and is essential for modelling pulsars. A so-called H-cluster matter is proposed in this paper as the nature of dense matter in reality. In compact stars at only a few nuclear densities but low temperature, quarks could be interacting strongly with each other there. That might render quarks grouped in clusters, although the hypothetical quark clusters in cold dense matter have not been confirmed due to the lack of both theoretical and experimental evidence. Motivated by recent lattice QCD simulations of the H-dibaryons (with structure uuddss), we therefore consider here a possible kind of quark clusters, H-clusters, that could emerge inside compact stars during their initial cooling as the dominant components inside (the degree of freedom could then be H-clusters there). Taking into account the in-medium stiffening effect, we find that at baryon densities of compact stars H-cluster matter could be more stable than nuclear matter. We also find that for the H-cluster matter with lattice structure, the equation of state could be so stiff that it would seem to be `superluminal' in the most dense region. However, the real sound speed for H-cluster matter is in fact difficult to calculate, so at this stage we do not put constraints on our model from the usual requirement of causality. We study the stars composed of H-clusters, i.e. H-cluster stars, and derive the dependence of their maximum mass on the in-medium stiffening effect, showing that the maximum mass could be well above 2 M⊙ as observed and that the resultant mass-radius relation fits the measurement of the rapid burster under reasonable parameters. Besides a general

  8. Morphodynamics of star dunes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courrech du Pont, S.; Zhang, D.; Narteau, C.; Rozier, O.

    2011-12-01

    Star dunes are the bigger and most impressive dunes in Earth sand seas. Nonetheless, they remain poorly studied, probably because of their apparent complexity. They are massive pyramidal dunes with interlaced arms whose slip faces are oriented in various directions. Being large, they can integrate wind properties over a wide range of time scales. Thus, they are observed for wind regimes with multiple directions, and may result from the amalgamation of dunes or from the development of arms on a well-established dune pattern. In both cases, the roles of wind directional variability and secondary flow have been emphasized but not precisely quantified. As a matter of fact, although star dunes are ubiquitous in major sand seas, little is known about their formation and their evolution, essentially because of their size. We report simulations where the star dune shape results from a combination of longitudinal dunes, which form the star dune arms. These arms may radiate and so interact with the other dunes in the field. This mass exchange, controlled by the morphodynamics of star dunes arms, must play an important role in the large-scale arrangement of star dunes networks. We first demonstrate that star dune arms orientation maximizes the flux in the direction of crests. This is opposed to the usually admit dunes orientation, which maximizes the sediment transport perpendicular to the crest. Indeed, depending on sand availability, dunes development results from the growth of a wave on a sand bed or from a net transport of sediment, which grows and extends an isolated longitudinal dune over a non-erodible soil. These two different mechanisms lead to two different modes of crests orientation. Then, we show that the propagating arms reach a stationary state characterized by constant width, height and growth rate. These are controlled by the frequency at which the wind changes direction. Arm width and height increase, whereas the propagation speed decreases with a decreasing

  9. A Numerical Study on the Streams of Star Debris after Tidal Disruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camacho Olachea, Priscila; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Law-Smith, Jamie

    2017-01-01

    Lurking at the centers of most galaxies are gigantic star and gas devouring monsters. These monsters are supermassive black holes (SMBHs), some of which are larger than our solar system and ten billion times as massive as our own Sun. The vast majority of stars in the universe live for tens of billions of years, eventually dying from old age as the nuclearreactions that power them become progressively less effective. But for every ten thousand stars that die peacefully, one star will be brutally torn apart by the extreme tidal forces present as it passes near a SMBH. My recent work has been to develop computational tools necessary to study the fates of stars disrupted by SMBHs. In this research project I presentthe results of my numerical study aimed at understanding the streams of star debris that result after disruption.

  10. White Dwarf Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kepler, S. O.

    2014-10-01

    White dwarfs are the evolutionary endpoint for nearly 95% of all stars born in our Galaxy, the final stages of evolution of all low- and intermediate mass stars, i.e., main sequence stars with masses below (8.5± 1.5) M_{odot}, depending on metallicity of the progenitor, mass loss and core overshoot. Massive white dwarfs are intrinsically rare objects, tand produce a gap in the determination of the initial vs. final mass relation at the high mass end (e.g. Weidemann 2000 A&A, 363, 647; Kalirai et al. 2008, ApJ, 676, 594; Williams, Bolte & Koester 2009, ApJ, 693, 355). Main sequences stars with higher masses will explode as SNII (Smartt S. 2009 ARA&A, 47, 63), but the limit does depend on the metallicity of the progenitor. Massive white dwarfs are probably SNIa progenitors through accretion or merger. They are rare, being the final product of massive stars (less common) and have smaller radius (less luminous). Kepler et al. 2007 (MNRAS, 375, 1315), Kleinman et al. 2013 (ApJS, 204, 5) estimate only 1-2% white dwarfs have masses above 1 M_{odot}. The final stages of evolution after helium burning are a race between core growth and loss of the H-rich envelope in a stellar wind. When the burning shell is exposed, the star rapidly cools and burning ceases, leaving a white dwarf. As they cool down, the magnetic field freezes in, ranging from a few kilogauss to a gigagauss. Peculiar type Ia SN 2006gz, SN 2007if, SN 2009dc, SN 2003fg suggest progenitors in the range 2.4-2.8 M_{odot}, and Das U. & Mukhopadhyay B. (2012, Phys. Rev. D, 86, 042001) estimate that the Chandrasekhar limit increases to 2.3-2.6 M_{odot} for extremely high magnetic field stars, but differential rotation induced by accretion could also increase it, according to Hachisu I. et al. 2012 (ApJ, 744, 69). García-Berro et al. 2012, ApJ, 749, 25, for example, proposes double degenerate mergers are the progenitors of high-field magnetic white dwarfs. We propose magnetic fields enhance the line broadening in

  11. Investigating the Impact of the Premier League Reading Stars Programme on Children's Attainment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pabion, Clémence

    2014-01-01

    The evaluation of the Premier League Reading Stars (PLRS) programme in 2013 has established that the intervention is having a positive impact on the attainment of participating children in reading and writing: Three out of four children made at least six months' progress in just ten weeks. One child in three made a year's progress or more. The…

  12. Decreased Temperature Facilitates Short-Term Sea Star Wasting Disease Survival in the Keystone Intertidal Sea Star Pisaster ochraceus

    PubMed Central

    Kohl, Warren T.; McClure, Timothy I.; Miner, Benjamin G.

    2016-01-01

    An extensive 2013 mass mortality event along the West Coast of North America due to Sea Star Wasting Disease (SSWD) has affected at least 20 species of sea stars. Among environmental factors potentially contributing to the timing of the current outbreak, increased coastal water temperatures are hypothesized to have contributed to previous and current outbreaks of SSWD. With a laboratory experiment, we tested whether cooler temperatures, similar to average winter temperatures, compared to average summer temperatures could slow the progression of morbidity or prevent SSWD mortality entirely in Pisaster ochraceus. Sea stars housed in cooler water progressed through SSWD states more slowly than sea stars housed at summer temperatures. However, the cooler temperature did not prevent SSWD mortality, and all stars died of the disease. Our data are consistent with experimental studies and field observations during previous and current outbreaks, and support the hypothesis that changes in coastal water temperatures have influenced one of the largest disease related mass mortality events in our oceans. PMID:27128673

  13. A Vanishing Star Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-07-01

    VLT Observations of an Unusual Stellar System Reinhold Häfner of the Munich University Observatory (Germany) is a happy astronomer. In 1988, when he was working at a telescope at the ESO La Silla observatory, he came across a strange star that suddenly vanished off the computer screen. He had to wait for more than a decade to get the full explanation of this unusual event. On June 10-11, 1999, he observed the same star with the first VLT 8.2-m Unit Telescope (ANTU) and the FORS1 astronomical instrument at Paranal [1]. With the vast power of this new research facility, he was now able to determine the physical properties of a very strange stellar system in which two planet-size stars orbit each other. One is an exceedingly hot white dwarf star , weighing half as much as the Sun, but only twice as big as the Earth. The other is a much cooler and less massive red dwarf star , one-and-a-half times the size of planet Jupiter. Once every three hours, the hot star disappears behind the other, as seen from the Earth. For a few minutes, the brightness of the system drops by a factor of more than 250 and it "vanishes" from view in telescopes smaller than the VLT. A variable star named NN Serpentis ESO PR Photo 30a/99 ESO PR Photo 30a/99 [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 468 pix - 152k] [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 936 pix - 576k] [High-Res - JPEG: 2304 x 2695 pix - 4.4M] Caption to ESO PR Photo 30a/99 : The sky field around the 17-mag variable stellar system NN Serpentis , as seen in a 5 sec exposure through a V(isual) filter with VLT ANTU and FORS1. It was obtained just before the observation of an eclipse of this unsual object and served to centre the telescope on the corresponding sky position. The field shown here measures 4.5 x 4.5 armin 2 (1365 x 1365 pix 2 ; 0.20 arcsec/pix). The field is somewhat larger than that shown in Photo 30b/99 and has the same orientation to allow comparison: North is about 20° anticlockwise from the top and East is 90° clockwise from that direction. The

  14. Progress with the lick adaptive optics system

    SciTech Connect

    Gavel, D T; Olivier, S S; Bauman, B; Max, C E; Macintosh, B

    2000-03-01

    Progress and results of observations with the Lick Observatory Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics System are presented. This system is optimized for diffraction-limited imaging in the near infrared, 1-2 micron wavelength bands. We describe our development efforts in a number of component areas including, a redesign of the optical bench layout, the commissioning of a new infrared science camera, and improvements to the software and user interface. There is also an ongoing effort to characterize the system performance with both natural and laser guide stars and to fold this data into a refined system model. Such a model can be used to help plan future observations, for example, predicting the point-spread function as a function of seeing and guide star magnitude.

  15. Progress with the Lick adaptive optics system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavel, Donald T.; Olivier, Scot S.; Bauman, Brian J.; Max, Claire E.; Macintosh, Bruce A.

    2000-07-01

    Progress and results of observations with the Lick Observatory Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics System are presented. This system is optimized for diffraction-limited imaging in the near infrared, 1 - 2 micron wavelength bands. We describe our development efforts in a number of component areas including, a redesign of the optical bench layout, the commissioning of a new infrared science camera, and improvements to the software and user interface. There is also an ongoing effort to characterize the system performance with both natural and laser guide stars and to fold this data into a refined system model. Such a model can be used to help plan future observations, for example, predicting the point-spread function as a function of seeing and guide star magnitude.

  16. Highly integrated electronics for the star TPC

    SciTech Connect

    Arthur, A.A.; Bieser, F.; Hearn, W.; Kleinfelder, S.; Merrick, T.; Millaud, J.; Noggle, T.; Rai, G.; Ritter, H.G.; Wieman, H.

    1991-12-31

    The concept for the STAR TPC front-end electronics is presented and the progress toward the development of a fully integrated solution is described. It is the goal of the R+D program to develop the complete electronics chain for the STAR central TPC detector at RHIC. It is obvious that solutions chosen e.g. for ALEPH are not adequate for the 150000 channels that need to be instrumented for readout. It will be necessary to perform all the signal processing, digitization and multiplexing directly on the detector in order to reduce per channel cost and the amount of cabling necessary to read out the information. We follow the approach chosen by the EOS TPC project, where the readout electronics on the detector consists of an integrated preamplifier, a hybrid shaping amplifier, an integrated switched capacitor array and a highly multiplexed ADC. The STAR electronics will be further integrated so that approximately 16 channels of the preamplifier, the shaper, the analog store and the ADC will be contained in two integrated circuits located directly on the pad plane.

  17. GOMOS: Gobal Ozone Monitoring by Occultation of Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leppelmeier, G. W.; Kyrola, E.; Pellinen, R.; Merat, P.; Korpela, S.; Bertaux, J. L.; Chassefiere, E.; Dalaudier, F.; Megie, G.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper we report on the progress and status of the Global Ozone Monitoring by Occultation of Stars (GOMOS) instrument, and imaging spectrometer under development for flight on the European Space Agency's Polar Orbiting Earth Mission (POEM-1) mission in 1998. Employing occultation of stars as a light probe of the Earth's atmosphere from a sun-sychronous polar orbit, the instrument will monitor ozone and other atmospheric trace gases over the entire globe. Atmospheric transmission resolution of approximately 1.7 km. When data are combined regionally, it will be possible to detect ozone concentration trends as small as 0.05 percent/year, depending on the degree of combination.

  18. New Frontiers in Stellar Astrophysics: Massive Stars as Cosmological Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levesque, Emily M.

    2015-01-01

    Massive stars are crucial building blocks in the study of star-forming galaxies, stellar evolution, and transient events, and their applications as fundamental astrophysical tools span a broad range of subfields. Unfortunately, many key traits of massive stars - from their physical properties and ionizing radiation to their evolution and core-collapse deaths - remain poorly understood. I will discuss several current research programs focused on developing a comprehensive picture of massive stars across the cosmos. These include observational surveys and population synthesis models of star-forming galaxies; progenitor and host environment studies of transient phenomena such as supernovae and gamma-ray bursts; and the remarkable reach of extragalactic stellar observations, which recently led to the discovery of the first Thorne-Zytkow object candidate. With cutting-edge theoretical models and the capabilities of current ground-based and orbital observatories, we are ideally poised to make substantial progress in our understanding of massive stars over the coming decade. This in turn will equip us with the tools we need to take full advantage of the frontiers opened up by new observational facilities such as JWST, the ELTs, and LSST, allowing us to immediately begin probing the new corners of the universe that they reveal.

  19. NGC 1097:Constraining mechanisms for star formation with the VLA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Sarah; Sheth, Kartik; Balser, Dana S.; Yarber, Aara'L.

    2015-01-01

    The project goal is to trace the precise location of star forming regions in the barred spiral NGC 1097. Specifically we want to better understand how the star formation progresses in the bar and at the bar ends. Our hydrodynamic gas flow model indicates gas flow should never cross dust lanes yet previous azimuthal cross-correlation analysis have indicated that the Hα emission is offset on the leading side of the bar dust lanes. It is critical to verify the precise locations of the stars forming regions. Is the star formation initiated in the dust lanes, or perhaps in dust spurs on the trailing side of the galaxy? We will measure synchrotron and thermal radiation contributions to quantify recent activity and compare to existing Hα, GALEX, archival VLA, and new ALMA Cycle 0 and Cycle 1 observations. This project will help catalog current and past star formation activity in the bar of NGC 1097 and thus help constrain the mechanisms for star formation.

  20. Are Field OB Stars Alone?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oey, Sally

    2005-07-01

    This SNAP program offers an inexpensive, simple program to search for low-mass companions of field OB stars. Do field OB stars exist in true isolation, as suggested by a recent Galactic study, or are they the tip of the iceberg on a small cluster of low-mass stars as predicted by the cluster mass function and stellar IMF? Short ACS/WFC V and I observations proposed here may easily resolve this issue for field OB stars in the Small Magellanic Cloud. Truly isolated OB stars represent a theoretical challenge and variation from clusters, in mode of star formation, and have important consequences for our understanding of the field stellar population in galaxies. Small clusters around the field OB stars, on the other hand, may confirm the universality of the stellar clustering law and IMF.

  1. Dead Star Rumbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Composite of Supernova Remnant Cassiopeia A This Spitzer Space Telescope composite shows the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A (white ball) and surrounding clouds of dust (gray, orange and blue). It consists of two processed images taken one year apart. Dust features that have not changed over time appear gray, while those that have changed are colored blue or orange. Blue represents an earlier time and orange, a later time.

    These observations illustrate that a blast of light from Cassiopeia A is waltzing outward through the dusty skies. This dance, called an 'infrared echo,' began when the remnant erupted about 50 years ago.

    Cassiopeia A is the remnant of a once massive star that died in a violent supernova explosion 325 years ago. It consists of a dead star, called a neutron star, and a surrounding shell of material that was blasted off as the star died. This remnant is located 10,000 light-years away in the northern constellation Cassiopeia.

    An infrared echo is created when a star explodes or erupts, flashing light into surrounding clumps of dust. As the light zips through the dust clumps, it heats them up, causing them to glow successively in infrared, like a chain of Christmas bulbs lighting up one by one. The result is an optical illusion, in which the dust appears to be flying outward at the speed of light. This apparent motion can be seen here by the shift in colored dust clumps.

    Echoes are distinct from supernova shockwaves, which are made up material that is swept up and hurled outward by exploding stars.

    This infrared echo is the largest ever seen, stretching more than 50 light-years away from Cassiopeia A. If viewed from Earth, the entire movie frame would take up the same amount of space as two full moons.

    Hints of an older infrared echo from Cassiopeia A's supernova explosion hundreds of years ago can also be seen.

    The earlier Spitzer image was taken on November 30

  2. Gaining Insight into Star Formation: Resolved Star Formation Laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebst, Kelley; Scowen, Paul A.

    2014-06-01

    Until recently astronomers have used star formation laws to measure the star formation rate and star formation efficiency of galaxies only on global scales because of the poor resolution of available data. What I am now capable of producing is a spatially resolved star formation law that can provide direct insight into the physical processes that govern star formation and assess the short-term nature of bursts of star formation and the longer-term nature of larger-scale events that can dictate the global distribution of stars and the ultimate fate of a galaxy as a whole. I am using exquisite narrowband optical data from a variety of sources, including the Hubble Space Telescope, and Kitt Peak National Observatory, etc., in conjunction with infrared data from the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxy Survey and the Spitzer Local Volume Legacy survey, neutral gas data from The HI Nearby Galaxy Survey, and molecular gas data from the Berkeley-Illinois-Maryland Association Survey of Nearby Galaxies, to provide star formation rates and star formation efficiencies on previously inaccessible small spatial scales across a suite of galaxies that represent a range of star formation environments and scales. My sample includes 18 spiral galaxies ranging from 2.1 to 15.1 Mpc in distance and offers a large range of morphological types (i.e. a large range of star formation environments). I am using these data to test different models of star formation modes under a variety of physical conditions and relate the variations I observe to the known local physical conditions and the associated star formation histories for each locale within each galaxy.This is the heart of the matter - that the nature and evolution of the local physical environment intimately influences how stars can form, how quickly and how massive those stars are allowed to form, and as a result how they shape the local conditions for subsequent star formation. It is this tracking of the stellar ecology that is vital for

  3. Neutron Star Science with the NuSTAR

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, J. K.

    2015-10-16

    The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR), launched in June 2012, helped scientists obtain for the first time a sensitive high-­energy X-­ray map of the sky with extraordinary resolution. This pioneering telescope has aided in the understanding of how stars explode and neutron stars are born. LLNL is a founding member of the NuSTAR project, with key personnel on its optics and science team. We used NuSTAR to observe and analyze the observations of different neutron star classes identified in the last decade that are still poorly understood. These studies not only help to comprehend newly discovered astrophysical phenomena and emission processes for members of the neutron star family, but also expand the utility of such observations for addressing broader questions in astrophysics and other physics disciplines. For example, neutron stars provide an excellent laboratory to study exotic and extreme phenomena, such as the equation of state of the densest matter known, the behavior of matter in extreme magnetic fields, and the effects of general relativity. At the same time, knowing their accurate populations has profound implications for understanding the life cycle of massive stars, star collapse, and overall galactic evolution.

  4. Flattest Star Ever Seen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-06-01

    VLT Interferometer Measurements of Achernar Challenge Stellar Theory Summary To a first approximation, planets and stars are round. Think of the Earth we live on. Think of the Sun, the nearest star, and how it looks in the sky. But if you think more about it, you realize that this is not completely true. Due to its daily rotation, the solid Earth is slightly flattened ("oblate") - its equatorial radius is some 21 km (0.3%) larger than the polar one. Stars are enormous gaseous spheres and some of them are known to rotate quite fast, much faster than the Earth. This would obviously cause such stars to become flattened. But how flat? Recent observations with the VLT Interferometer (VLTI) at the ESO Paranal Observatory have allowed a group of astronomers [1] to obtain by far the most detailed view of the general shape of a fast-spinning hot star, Achernar (Alpha Eridani) , the brightest in the southern constellation Eridanus (The River). They find that Achernar is much flatter than expected - its equatorial radius is more than 50% larger than the polar one! In other words, this star is shaped very much like the well-known spinning-top toy, so popular among young children. The high degree of flattening measured for Achernar - a first in observational astrophysics - now poses an unprecedented challenge for theoretical astrophysics . The effect cannot be reproduced by common models of stellar interiors unless certain phenomena are incorporated, e.g. meridional circulation on the surface ("north-south streams") and non-uniform rotation at different depths inside the star. As this example shows, interferometric techniques will ultimately provide very detailed information about the shapes, surface conditions and interior structure of stars . PR Photo 15a/03 : The VLT Interferometer configuration for the Achernar measurements PR Photo 15b/03 : Achernar's "profile" , as measured by the VLTI. PR Photo 15c/03 : Models of Achernar's spatial shape. VLTI observations of Achernar

  5. STAR FORMATION ACROSS THE W3 COMPLEX

    SciTech Connect

    Román-Zúñiga, Carlos G.; Ybarra, Jason E.; Tapia, Mauricio; Megías, Guillermo D.; Lada, Elizabeth A.; Alves, Joáo F.

    2015-09-15

    We present a multi-wavelength analysis of the history of star formation in the W3 complex. Using deep, near-infrared ground-based images combined with images obtained with Spitzer and Chandra observatories, we identified and classified young embedded sources. We identified the principal clusters in the complex and determined their structure and extension. We constructed extinction-limited samples for five principal clusters and constructed K-band luminosity functions that we compare with those of artificial clusters with varying ages. This analysis provided mean ages and possible age spreads for the clusters. We found that IC 1795, the centermost cluster of the complex, still hosts a large fraction of young sources with circumstellar disks. This indicates that star formation was active in IC 1795 as recently as 2 Myr ago, simultaneous to the star-forming activity in the flanking embedded clusters, W3-Main and W3(OH). A comparison with carbon monoxide emission maps indicates strong velocity gradients in the gas clumps hosting W3-Main and W3(OH) and shows small receding clumps of gas at IC 1795, suggestive of rapid gas removal (faster than the T Tauri timescale) in the cluster-forming regions. We discuss one possible scenario for the progression of cluster formation in the W3 complex. We propose that early processes of gas collapse in the main structure of the complex could have defined the progression of cluster formation across the complex with relatively small age differences from one group to another. However, triggering effects could act as catalysts for enhanced efficiency of formation at a local level, in agreement with previous studies.

  6. Star Formation Across the W3 Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Román-Zúñiga, Carlos G.; Ybarra, Jason E.; Megías, Guillermo D.; Tapia, Mauricio; Lada, Elizabeth A.; Alves, Joáo F.

    2015-09-01

    We present a multi-wavelength analysis of the history of star formation in the W3 complex. Using deep, near-infrared ground-based images combined with images obtained with Spitzer and Chandra observatories, we identified and classified young embedded sources. We identified the principal clusters in the complex and determined their structure and extension. We constructed extinction-limited samples for five principal clusters and constructed K-band luminosity functions that we compare with those of artificial clusters with varying ages. This analysis provided mean ages and possible age spreads for the clusters. We found that IC 1795, the centermost cluster of the complex, still hosts a large fraction of young sources with circumstellar disks. This indicates that star formation was active in IC 1795 as recently as 2 Myr ago, simultaneous to the star-forming activity in the flanking embedded clusters, W3-Main and W3(OH). A comparison with carbon monoxide emission maps indicates strong velocity gradients in the gas clumps hosting W3-Main and W3(OH) and shows small receding clumps of gas at IC 1795, suggestive of rapid gas removal (faster than the T Tauri timescale) in the cluster-forming regions. We discuss one possible scenario for the progression of cluster formation in the W3 complex. We propose that early processes of gas collapse in the main structure of the complex could have defined the progression of cluster formation across the complex with relatively small age differences from one group to another. However, triggering effects could act as catalysts for enhanced efficiency of formation at a local level, in agreement with previous studies.

  7. Hyperons and neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Vidaña, Isaac

    2015-02-24

    In this lecture I will briefly review some of the effects of hyperons on the properties of neutron and proto-neutron stars. In particular, I will revise the problem of the strong softening of the EoS, and the consequent reduction of the maximum mass, induced by the presence of hyperons, a puzzle which has become more intringuing and difficult to solve due the recent measurements of the unusually high masses of the millisecond pulsars PSR J1903+0327 (1.667±0.021M{sub ⊙}), PSR J1614–2230 (1.97±0.04M{sub ⊙}), and PSR J0348+0432 (2.01±0.04M{sub ⊙}). Finally, I will also examine the role of hyperons on the cooling properties of newly born neutron stars and on the so-called r-mode instability.

  8. Stars at Gammasphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernstein, L. A.; Schiller, A.; Cooper, J. R.; Becker, J. A.; Fallon, P.; Macchiavelli, M. A.; McMahan, M. A.; Guttormsen, M.; Rekstad, J. B.; Siem, S.; Sarantites, D. G.; Sobotka, L. G.; Mitchell, G. E.; Tavukcu, E.

    2002-10-01

    STARS (Silicon Telescope Array for Reaction Studies) is a highly segmented array of particle telescope designed to allow for particle-gamma coincidence measurements in both forward and inverse kinematics at either forward or backward angles using GAMAMSPHERE. Two different arrays of Silicon surface barrier detectors can be employed depending on the configuration of the experiment. The first STARS experiment at GAMMASPHERE took place in April 2002. The ^157Gd(^3He,α)^156Gd reaction at E_α = 45 MeV was used to a) measure level densities and gamma-ray strength functions below the neutron binding energy, and b) to simulate neutron-induced reactions on ^155Gd. Preliminary results from this experiment will be presented. This work was funded by the US Department of Energy under contracts number W-7405-ENG-48 (LLNL), AC03-76SF00098 (LBNL) and the Norwegian Research Council (Oslo).

  9. Shooting Star Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The Shooting Star Experiment (SSE) is designed to develop and demonstrate the technology required to focus the sun's energy and use the energy for inexpensive space Propulsion Research. Pictured is an engineering model (Pathfinder III) of the Shooting Star Experiment (SSE). This model was used to test and characterize the motion and deformation of the structure caused by thermal effects. In this photograph, alignment targets are being placed on the engineering model so that a theodolite (alignment telescope) could be used to accurately measure the deformation and deflections of the engineering model under extreme conditions, such as the coldness of deep space and the hotness of the sun as well as vacuum. This thermal vacuum test was performed at the X-Ray Calibration Facility because of the size of the test article and the capabilities of the facility to simulate in-orbit conditions

  10. O-star kinematics

    SciTech Connect

    Karimova, D.K.; Pavlovskaya, E.D.

    1984-01-01

    Proper motions determined by the authors are utilized to study the kinematics of 79 O-type stars at distance r< or =2.5 kpc. The sample is divided into two groups, having space-velocity dispersions tau/sub I/roughly-equal10 km/sec, sigma/sub II/roughly-equal35 km/sec. Solutions for the velocity-field parameters for group I yield a galactic angular rotation speed ..omega../sub 0/ = 24.9 km sec/sup -1/ kpc/sup -1/ at the sun (for R/sub 0/ = 10.0 kpc) and an Oort constant A = 12.2 km sec/sup -1/ kpc/sup -1/. Most of the O stars exhibit a small z-velocity directed away from the galactic plane. The velocity-ellipsoid parameters and box-orbit elements are calculated.

  11. White Dwarf Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Peering deep inside a cluster of several hundred thousand stars, NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has uncovered the oldest burned-out stars in our Milky Way Galaxy, giving astronomers a fresh reading on the age of the universe.

    Located in the globular cluster M4, these small, burned-out stars -- called white dwarfs -- are about 12 to 13 billion years old. By adding the one billion years it took the cluster to form after the Big Bang, astronomers found that the age of the white dwarfs agrees with previous estimates that the universe is 13 to 14 billion years old.

    The images, including some taken by Hubble's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2, are available online at

    http://oposite.stsci.edu/pubinfo/pr/2002/10/ or

    http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/images/wfpc .

    The camera was designed and built by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.

    In the top panel, a ground-based observatory snapped a panoramic view of the entire cluster, which contains several hundred thousand stars within a volume of 10 to 30 light-years across. The Kitt Peak National Observatory's .9-meter telescope took this picture in March 1995. The box at left indicates the region observed by the Hubble telescope.

    The Hubble telescope studied a small region of the cluster. A section of that region is seen in the picture at bottom left. A sampling of an even smaller region is shown at bottom right. This region is only about one light-year across. In this smaller region, Hubble pinpointed a number of faint white dwarfs. The blue circles indicate the dwarfs. It took nearly eight days of exposure time over a 67-day period to find these extremely faint stars.

    Globular clusters are among the oldest clusters of stars in the universe. The faintest and coolest white dwarfs within globular clusters can yield a globular cluster's age. Earlier Hubble observations showed that the first stars formed less than 1 billion years after the universe's birth in the big bang. So, finding the

  12. Dilepton Measurements at STAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geurts, Frank; STAR Collaboration

    2013-08-01

    In the study of hot and dense nuclear matter, created in relativistic heavy-ion collisions, dilepton measurements play an essential role. Leptons, when compared to hadrons, have only little interaction with the strongly interacting system. Thus, dileptons provide ideal penetrating probes that allow the study of such a system throughout its space-time evolution. In the low mass range (Mll < 1.1 GeV/c2), the dominant source of dileptons originates from the decay of vector mesons which may see effects from chiral symmetry restoration. In the intermediate mass range (1.1 < Mll < 3.0 GeV/c2), the main contributions to the mass spectrum are expected to originate from the thermal radiation of a quark-gluon plasma as well as the decays of charm mesons. In the high mass range (Mll > 3.0 GeV/c2), dilepton measurements are expected to see contributions from primordial processes involving heavy quarks, and Drell-Yan production. With the introduction of the Time-of-Flight detector, the STAR detector has been able to perform large acceptance, high purity electron identification. In this contribution, we will present STAR's recent dielectron measurements in the low and intermediate mass range for RHIC beam energies ranging between 19.6 and 200 GeV. Compared to electrons, muon measurements have the advantage of reduced bremsstrahlung radiation in the surrounding detector materials. With the upcoming detector upgrades, specifically the muon detector (MTD), STAR will be able to include such measurements in its (di-)lepton studies. We will discuss the future dilepton program at STAR and the physics cases for these upgrades.

  13. Detector limitations, STAR

    SciTech Connect

    Underwood, D. G.

    1998-07-13

    Every detector has limitations in terms of solid angle, particular technologies chosen, cracks due to mechanical structure, etc. If all of the presently planned parts of STAR [Solenoidal Tracker At RHIC] were in place, these factors would not seriously limit our ability to exploit the spin physics possible in RHIC. What is of greater concern at the moment is the construction schedule for components such as the Electromagnetic Calorimeters, and the limited funding for various levels of triggers.

  14. The STAR PXL detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contin, G.

    2016-12-01

    The PiXeL detector (PXL) of the STAR experiment at RHIC is the first application of the state-of-the-art thin Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) technology in a collider environment. Designed to extend the STAR measurement capabilities in the heavy flavor domain, it took data in Au+Au collisions, p+p and p+Au collisions at 0√sNN=20 GeV at RHIC, during the period 2014-2016. The PXL detector is based on 50 μm-thin MAPS sensors with a pitch of 20.7 μm. Each sensor includes an array of nearly 1 million pixels, read out in rolling shutter mode in 185.6 μs. The 170 mW/cm2 power dissipation allows for air cooling and contributes to reduce the global material budget to 0.4% radiation length on the innermost layer. Experience and lessons learned from construction and operations will be presented in this paper. Detector performance and results from 2014 Au+Au data analysis, demonstrating the STAR capabilities of charm reconstruction, will be shown.

  15. Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... clumsiness; progressive weakness; and visual, speech, and sometimes personality changes. The progression of deficits leads to life- ... clumsiness; progressive weakness; and visual, speech, and sometimes personality changes. The progression of deficits leads to life- ...

  16. A new family of magnetic stars: the Am stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blazère, A.; Neiner, C.; Petit, P.; Lignières, F.

    2016-12-01

    We presented the discovery of an ultra-weak field in three Am stars, β UMa, θ Leo, and Alhena, thanks to ultra-deep spectropolarimetric observations. Two of the three stars of this study shown peculiar magnetic signatures with prominent positive lobes like the one of Sirius A that are not expected in the standard theory of the Zeeman effect. Alhena, contrary to Sirius A, β UMa and θ Leo, show normal signatures. These detections of ultra-weak fields in Am stars suggest the existence of a new family of magnetic intermediate-mass stars: the Am stars. However the various shapes of the signatures required further observation to identify the physical processes at work in these stars. A preliminary explanation is based on microturbulence.

  17. Light curves and Fourier coefficients for a subsample of the MACHO Delta Scuti stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Templeton, M.; McNamara, B.

    1998-07-01

    We have compiled a sample of Delta Scuti candidates from the MACHO catalog of variable stars in the direction of the Galactic Bulge, and a detailed spectral analysis of this time series data is in progress. The MACHO project (see Alcock et al. 1997) has collected a massive amount of photometry on millions of stars in the directions of the Galactic Bulge and the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds. Many thousands of variable stars have been detected, among them Delta Scuti stars (towards the Galactic Bulge only; Delta Scuti stars in the LMC and SMC are below the detection limits of MACHO). See the discovery paper of Minniti et al. (1997) for more background and sample light curves. Of our initial sample of 136 stars showing variability on timescales less than 0.3d and with (V-R) colors similar to those of Delta Scuti stars, we find that sim 90 are likely Delta Scuti stars, with the remainder being either eclipsing binaries of W Ursa Majoris type ``A'' or which require more detailed observations for classification. The ultimate goal of our study is to determine as accurately as possible the pulsation spectra and pulsation mode types of the candidate Delta Scuti stars. In the present paper, we discuss the general light curve shapes of these objects by analyzing the Fourier harmonics of observed pulsation modes. This technique has been explored in some detail for Cepheids (Simon & Lee 1981) and for Delta Scuti stars (Antonello et al. 1987; Poretti et al. 1990). Recent non-linear modeling work by Bono et al. (1997) suggests that the light curve shape is a strong indicator of the radial overtone number for radially pulsating Delta Scuti stars. Therefore, Fourier analysis of pulsation frequencies and their Fourier harmonics may indicate which overtone a given star is pulsating in. Here, we present the initial results for a subsample of the MACHO Delta Scuti stars.

  18. Massive-Star Magnetospheres: Now in 3-D!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend, Richard

    Magnetic fields are unexpected in massive stars, due to the absence of a dynamo convection zone beneath their surface layers. Nevertheless, kilogauss-strength, ordered fields were detected in a small subset of these stars over three decades ago, and the intervening years have witnessed the steady expansion of this subset. A distinctive feature of magnetic massive stars is that they harbor magnetospheres --- circumstellar environments where the magnetic field interacts strongly with the star's radiation-driven wind, confining it and channelling it into energetic shocks. A wide range of observational signatures are associated with these magnetospheres, in diagnostics ranging from X-rays all the way through to radio emission. Moreover, these magnetospheres can play an important role in massive-star evolution, by amplifying angular momentum loss in the wind. Recent progress in understanding massive-star magnetospheres has largely been driven by magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) simulations. However, these have been restricted to two- dimensional axisymmetric configurations, with three-dimensional configurations possible only in certain special cases. These restrictions are limiting further progress; we therefore propose to develop completely general three-dimensional models for the magnetospheres of massive stars, on the one hand to understand their observational properties and exploit them as plasma-physics laboratories, and on the other to gain a comprehensive understanding of how they influence the evolution of their host star. For weak- and intermediate-field stars, the models will be based on 3-D MHD simulations using a modified version of the ZEUS-MP code. For strong-field stars, we will extend our existing Rigid Field Hydrodynamics (RFHD) code to handle completely arbitrary field topologies. To explore a putative 'photoionization-moderated mass loss' mechanism for massive-star magnetospheres, we will also further develop a photoionization code we have recently

  19. Star centroiding error compensation for intensified star sensors.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jie; Xiong, Kun; Yu, Wenbo; Yan, Jinyun; Zhang, Guangjun

    2016-12-26

    A star sensor provides high-precision attitude information by capturing a stellar image; however, the traditional star sensor has poor dynamic performance, which is attributed to its low sensitivity. Regarding the intensified star sensor, the image intensifier is utilized to improve the sensitivity, thereby further improving the dynamic performance of the star sensor. However, the introduction of image intensifier results in star centroiding accuracy decrease, further influencing the attitude measurement precision of the star sensor. A star centroiding error compensation method for intensified star sensors is proposed in this paper to reduce the influences. First, the imaging model of the intensified detector, which includes the deformation parameter of the optical fiber panel, is established based on the orthographic projection through the analysis of errors introduced by the image intensifier. Thereafter, the position errors at the target points based on the model are obtained by using the Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) optimization method. Last, the nearest trigonometric interpolation method is presented to compensate for the arbitrary centroiding error of the image plane. Laboratory calibration result and night sky experiment result show that the compensation method effectively eliminates the error introduced by the image intensifier, thus remarkably improving the precision of the intensified star sensors.

  20. Insights on the First Stars from CEMP-no Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choplin, Arthur; Meynet, Georges; Maeder, André; Hirschi, Raphael; Ekström, Sylvia; Chiappini, Cristina

    CEMP-no stars (Carbon-Enhanced metal-poor stars with no or few s- or r-elements) are long-lived low mass stars presenting a very low iron content and overabundances of carbon relatively to the sun. Their chemically peculiar abundance pattern could be inherited from a previous rotating massive star, also called the source star. Thanks to the rotational mixing at work in the source star, the chemical species transit from a hydrogen burning region to a helium burning region, leading to a varied and rich nucleosynthesis. Depending on the initial rotation of the source star, the internal mixing is more or less important, leading to a different nucleosynthesis. We suggest first that the observed 12C/13C ratio might constrain the mass cut of the source star. Then, we apply that constraint on a set of 20 M ȯ source stars models with various initial rotation rates. We show that the ejecta of these 20 M ȯ models match rather well the observed scatters of C/H, N/H, O/H, and Na/H of the CEMP-no sample. The impact of changing the reaction rate of 27Al(p, γ )28Si is also investigated.

  1. A Theoretical Analysis of Thermal Radiation from Neutron Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Applegate, James H.

    1993-01-01

    As soon as it was realized that the direct URCA process is allowed by many modern nuclear equation of state, an analysis of its effect on the cooling of neutron stars was undertaken. A primary study showed that the occurrence of the direct URCA process makes the surface temperature of a neutron star suddenly drop by almost an order of magnitude when the cold wave from the core reaches the surface when the star is a few years old. The results of this study are published in Page and Applegate. As a work in progress, we are presently extending the above work. Improved expressions for the effect of nucleon pairing on the neutrino emissivity and specific heat are now available, and we have incorporated them in a recalculation of rate of the direct URCA process.

  2. The physics and modes of star cluster formation: simulations.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Cathie

    2010-02-28

    We review progress in numerical simulations of star cluster formation. These simulations involve the bottom-up assembly of clusters through hierarchical mergers, which produces a fractal stellar distribution at young (approx. 0.5 Myr) ages. The resulting clusters are predicted to be mildly aspherical and highly mass-segregated, except in the immediate aftermath of mergers. The upper initial mass function within individual clusters is generally somewhat flatter than for the aggregate population. Recent work has begun to clarify the factors that control the mean stellar mass in a star-forming cloud and also the efficiency of star formation. The former is sensitive to the thermal properties of the gas while the latter depends both on the magnetic field and the initial degree of gravitational boundedness of the natal cloud. Unmagnetized clouds that are initially bound undergo rapid collapse, which is difficult to reverse by ionization feedback or stellar winds.

  3. Probing the radiative zones of stars: Present status and developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turck-Chièze, S.

    2013-12-01

    Seismology of Sun and stars associated to precise solar neutrino detections reveals microscopic and macroscopic behaviors of radiative zones that were not anticipated by stellar modeling predictions. These results allow us to check the hypotheses of the equations used in stellar evolution for long. In this review, I list some of the problems which emerge from these confrontations both on the description of the Sun or solar-like stars and on the envelopes of intermediate-type stars, then I summarize the cases at least partly solved in using 3D MHD simulations, new opacity calculations and laboratory experiments. This review shows also how we hope to progress on the others inside our OPAC consortium or in using the coming detection of neutrino fluxes.

  4. Predicting neutron star properties based on chiral effective field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laduke, Alison; Sammarruca, Francesca

    2016-09-01

    The energy per nucleon as a function of density, known as the nuclear equation of state, is the crucial input in the structure equations of neutron stars and thus establishes the connection between nuclear physics and compact astrophysical objects. More precisely, the pressure which supports the star against gravitational collapse is mostly determined by the nature of the equation of state of highly neutron-rich matter. In this contribution, we will report on our work in progress to calculate neutron star masses and radii. The equation of state is obtained microscopically from Brueckner-Hartree-Fock calculations based on state-of-the-art nuclear forces which have been developed within the framework of chiral effective field theory. The latter has become popular in recent years as a fundamental and systematic approach firmly connected to low-energy quantum chromodynamics. Supported by the Hill Undergraduate Fellowship and the U.S. Department of Energy.

  5. The best and brightest metal-poor stars

    SciTech Connect

    Schlaufman, Kevin C.; Casey, Andrew R. E-mail: arc@ast.cam.ac.uk

    2014-12-10

    The chemical abundances of large samples of extremely metal-poor (EMP) stars can be used to investigate metal-free stellar populations, supernovae, and nucleosynthesis as well as the formation and galactic chemical evolution of the Milky Way and its progenitor halos. However, current progress on the study of EMP stars is being limited by their faint apparent magnitudes. The acquisition of high signal-to-noise spectra for faint EMP stars requires a major telescope time commitment, making the construction of large samples of EMP star abundances prohibitively expensive. We have developed a new, efficient selection that uses only public, all-sky APASS optical, 2MASS near-infrared, and WISE mid-infrared photometry to identify bright metal-poor star candidates through their lack of molecular absorption near 4.6 microns. We have used our selection to identify 11,916 metal-poor star candidates with V < 14, increasing the number of publicly available candidates by more than a factor of five in this magnitude range. Their bright apparent magnitudes have greatly eased high-resolution follow-up observations that have identified seven previously unknown stars with [Fe/H] ≲ –3.0. Our follow-up campaign has revealed that 3.8{sub −1.1}{sup +1.3}% of our candidates have [Fe/H] ≲ –3.0 and 32.5{sub −2.9}{sup +3.0}% have –3.0 ≲ [Fe/H] ≲ –2.0. The bulge is the most likely location of any existing Galactic Population III stars, and an infrared-only variant of our selection is well suited to the identification of metal-poor stars in the bulge. Indeed, two of our confirmed metal-poor stars with [Fe/H] ≲ –2.7 are within about 2 kpc of the Galactic center. They are among the most metal-poor stars known in the bulge.

  6. Astrophysics of Collapsing Axion Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eby, Joshua; Leembruggen, Madelyn; Suranyi, Peter; Wijewardhana, L. C. R.

    2017-01-01

    Axion stars are condensed states of large numbers of axion particles, bound by self-gravitation and quantum self-interactions. The mass of weakly bound axion stars is limited by gravitational stability, with condensates exceeding the maximum mass subject to collapse. During the collapse process, the axion density increases and higher-order self-interactions become increasingly relevant. By taking these terms into account, we provide evidence that in spite of a leading attractive interaction, collapsing axion stars stabilize in a dense state which is larger than its Schwarzschild radius, and so do not form black holes. During the last moments of collapse, number changing processes take place in the axion star with a very large rate, leading to emission of many highly energetic axions which escape from galaxies and galaxy clusters. Finally, if axion stars are a significant fraction of cold dark matter, then frequent collisions with each other or with ordinary stars could catalyze this collapse process as well.

  7. The Birth of Stars and Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bally, John; Reipurth, Bo

    2006-08-01

    Part I. Stars and Clusters: 1. Our Cosmic Backyard; 2. Looking up at the night sky; 3. The dark clouds of the Milky Way; 4. Infant stars; 5. Companions in birth: binary stars; 6. Outflows from young stars; 7. Towards adulthood; 8. The social life of stars: stellar groups; 9. Chaos in the nest: The brief lives of massive stars. Part II. Planetary Systems: 10. Solar systems in the making; 11. Messengers from the past; 12. Hazards to planet formation; 13. Planets around other stars; Part III. The Cosmic Context: 14. Cosmic cycles; 15. Star formation in galaxies; 16. The first stars and galaxies; 17. Astrobiology, origins, and SETI.

  8. The Orion nebula star cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panek, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    Photography through filters which suppress nebular light reveal a clustering of faint red stars centered on the Trapezium, this evidences a distinct cluster within the larger OB1 association. Stars within about 20 ft of trapezium comprise the Orion Nebula star cluster are considered. Topics discussed re: (1) extinction by dust grains; (2) photometric peculiarities; (3) spectroscopic peculiarities; (4) young variables; (5) the distribution and motion of gas within the cluster.

  9. Massive star clusters in galaxies.

    PubMed

    Harris, William E

    2010-02-28

    The ensemble of all star clusters in a galaxy constitutes its star cluster system. In this review, the focus of the discussion is on the ability of star clusters, particularly the systems of old massive globular clusters (GCs), to mark the early evolutionary history of galaxies. I review current themes and key findings in GC research, and highlight some of the outstanding questions that are emerging from recent work.

  10. The Brightest Delta Scuti Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzasi, D.; Bruntt, H.; Preston, H.; Mandeville, J.; Bedding, T.; Retter, A.; Kjeldsen, H.

    2003-12-01

    We present an analysis of observations of the bright star Altair (α Aql) obtained using the star camera on the Wide Field Infrared Explorer (WIRE) satellite. Although Altair lies within the δ Scuti instability strip, previous observations have not revealed the presence of oscillations. However, the WIRE observations show Altair to be a low amplitude (Δ m < 500 μ mag) δ Scuti star with at least 5 modes present. We further show that the detected frequencies are compatible with models for Altair.

  11. Strange Stars, Neutron Stars and Pulsar Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benvenuto, O. G.; Horvath, J. E.

    1990-11-01

    RESUMEN. Se ha conjeturado que una partlecula de dieciocho quarks, sin Carga, sin espi'n y sin colar (quark-alfa) podri'a ser estable a ba5as tern peraturas y presiones aiTh COfl respecto a materia extrafla. Presentamos en este trabajo la estmctura de estrellas extraflas incluyendo los efectos y apariencia de parti'culas uark-alfa en las capas exteriores. La estruc tura interna ya no es hoinogenea del centro a la superficie, sino que muestra un centro de materia extrafla, capas s6lidas y una costra delgada de materia normal en la superficie. La superficie de materia nonnal permite la fornaci6n de una magnetosfera, la que se piensa sea el sitlo en donde ocurre la emisi6n del pulsar. La superficie de superflui'do ayuda a explicar el fen6rneno de `glitch', el cual ba sido observado en muchos pulsares. Se discute la ecuaci6n de estado para rnateria quark-alfa relevante en este regimen. ABSTIZACT:It has been conjectured that an quark, uncharged, spinless and colorless particle Cquark-alpha) could be stable at low pressures and temperatures even with respect to strange matter. We present in work tlie structure of stars including the effects of the appearance of quark-alpi' particles ii their outer layers. The internal structure is no longer from tlie center to the surface, but show a strange matter core, a solid and superfluid layers and a thin crust of normal matter at the surface. The normal matter surface allows tlie fon tion of a magnetosphere, whicl is to be tl place where pulsar emission occurs. A superfluid layer helps to explain tlie glitch , wlflch has been observed in . equation of state for quark-alpha matter relevant in regime is also discussed. Keq LA)OtL : ARY S - OF STATF - ?.ACT

  12. Space Science in Action: Stars [Videotape].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1999

    This videotape recording shows students the many ways scientists look at the stars and how they can use what they see to answer questions such as What are stars made of?, How far away are they?, and How old are the stars? Students learn about the life span of stars and the various stages they pass through from protostar to main sequence star to…

  13. Heavy Stars Thrive among Heavy Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-08-01

    , with a sprinkling of the light element lithium. At our epoch, the visible ("baryonic") matter in the Universe still mostly consists of hydrogen and helium. However, progressively heavier elements have been built up via fusion processes in the interior of stars ever since the Big Bang. Some of the heaviest elements are also produced when massive stars die in gigantic stellar explosions, observed as "supernovae". This gradual process, referred to as "chemical evolution" , occurs with different speeds in different regions of the Universe, being fastest in those regions where star formation is most intense. In the relatively "quiet" region of the Milky Way galaxy where our Solar System was born some 4,600 million years ago, it took nearly 10,000 million years to produce all the heavy elements now found in our neighbourhood . Contrarily, in the innermost regions ( the "nuclei" ) of normal galaxies and especially in so-called "active galaxies", the same or even higher heavy-element "enrichment" levels were reached in much shorter time, less than about 1,000 to 2,000 million years. This is the result of observations of particularly active galaxy nuclei ("quasars") in the distant (i.e., early) Universe. Star formation in highly enriched environments Little is presently known about such highly enriched environments. Since astronomers refer to elements heavier than hydrogen and helium as "metals" , they talk about "metal-rich" regions . This is readily observable from the presence of strong lines from heavier elements in the spectra of the interstellar gas in such regions. A central, still unresolved question is whether under such special conditions, stars can still form with the same diversity of masses, as this happens in other, less extreme areas of the Universe . Indeed, some current theories of star formation and certain indirect observations appear to indicate that very heavy stars - with masses more than 20 - 30 times that of our Sun - could not possibly form in metal

  14. Apple Valley Double Star Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewer, Mark

    2015-05-01

    The High Desert Astronomical Society hosts an annual double star workshop, where participants measure the position angles and separations of double stars. Following the New Generation Science Standards (NGSS), adopted by the California State Board of Education, participants are assigned to teams where they learn the process of telescope set-up and operation, the gathering of data, and the reduction of the data. Team results are compared to the latest epoch listed in the Washington Double Star Catalog (WDS) and papers are written for publication in the Journal of Double Star Observations (JDSO). Each team presents a PowerPoint presentation to their peers about actual hands-on astronomical research.

  15. Thermal instability in DAV stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labrador, J.; Falcon, N.

    2008-01-01

    The short period of the fluctuations of stars DAV, in the order of the hun dreds of seconds; the modes of luminosity oscillation's to constant radio, and the non existence of fusion processes in such stars invite elaboration of models in the formalism of Mixing Length Theory of Convection(MLT). In the present work a mechanism of luminosity variation in DAV stars based on thermodynamic processes of non balance with homogenous convection. The results of the model allow satisfactorily reproducing the light curves of DAV classic stars: G29- 38, GD 358, HL Tau- 76 and WD1647+1591.

  16. Optical filtering for star trackers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, R. E.

    1973-01-01

    The optimization of optical filtering was investigated for tracking faint stars, down to the fifth magnitude. The effective wavelength and bandwidth for tracking pre-selected guide stars are discussed along with the results of an all-electronic tracker with a star tracking photomultiplier, which was tested with a simulated second magnitude star. Tables which give the sum of zodiacal light and galactic background light over the entire sky for intervals of five degrees in declination, and twenty minutes in right ascension are included.

  17. Fragmentation in massive star formation.

    PubMed

    Beuther, Henrik; Schilke, Peter

    2004-02-20

    Studies of evolved massive stars indicate that they form in a clustered mode. During the earliest evolutionary stages, these regions are embedded within their natal cores. Here we present high-spatial-resolution interferometric dust continuum observations disentangling the cluster-like structure of a young massive star-forming region. The derived protocluster mass distribution is consistent with the stellar initial mass function. Thus, fragmentation of the initial massive cores may determine the initial mass function and the masses of the final stars. This implies that stars of all masses can form via accretion processes, and coalescence of intermediate-mass protostars appears not to be necessary.

  18. Accretion Onto Magnetic Degenerate Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, Juhan

    2000-01-01

    While the original objectives of this research program included the study of radiative processes in cataclysmic variables and the evolution of neutron star magnetic fields, the scope of the reported research expanded to other related topics as this project developed. This final report therefore describes the results of our research in the following areas: 1) Irradiation-driven mass transfer cycles in cataclysmic variables and low-mass X-ray binaries; 2) Propeller effect and magnetic field decay in isolated old neutron stars; 3) Decay of surface magnetic fields in accreting neutron stars and pulsars; 4) Finite-Difference Hydrodynamic simulations of mass transfer in binary stars.

  19. SIM PlanetQuest Key Project Precursor Observations to Detect Gas Giant Planets Around Young Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanner, Angelle; Beichman, Charles; Akeson, Rachel; Ghez, Andrea; Grankin, Konstantin N.; Herbst, William; Hillenbrand, Lynne; Huerta, Marcos; Konopacky, Quinn; Metchev, Stanimir; Mohanty, Subhanjoy; Prato, L.; Simon, Michal

    2008-01-01

    We present a review of precursor observing programs for the SIM PlanetQuest Key project devoted to detecting Jupiter mass planets around young stars. In order to ensure that the stars in the sample are free of various sources of astrometric noise that might impede the detection of planets, we have initiated programs to collect photometry, high contrast images, interferometric data and radial velocities for stars in both the Northern and Southern hemispheres. We have completed a high contrast imaging survey of target stars in Taurus and the Pleiades and found no definitive common proper motion companions within one arcsecond (140 AU) of the SIM targets. Our radial velocity surveys have shown that many of the target stars in Sco-Cen are fast rotators and a few stars in Taurus and the Pleiades may have sub-stellar companions. Interferometric data of a few stars in Taurus show no signs of stellar or sub-stellar companions with separations of <5 mas. The photometric survey suggests that approximately half of the stars initially selected for this program are variable to a degree (1(sigma) >0.1 mag) that would degrade the astrometric accuracy achievable for that star. While the precursor programs are still a work in progress, we provide a comprehensive list of all targets ranked according to their viability as a result of the observations taken to date. By far, the observable that removes the most targets from the SIM-YSO program is photometric variability.

  20. Stars with Extended Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterken, C.

    2002-12-01

    This Workshop consisted of a full-day meeting of the Working Group "Sterren met Uitgebreide Atmosferen" (SUA, Working Group Stars with Extended Atmospheres), a discussion group founded in 1979 by Kees de Jager, Karel van der Hucht and Pik Sin The. This loose association of astronomers and astronomy students working in the Dutch-speaking part of the Low Countries (The Netherlands and Flanders) organised at regular intervals one-day meetings at the Universities of Utrecht, Leiden, Amsterdam and Brussels. These meetings consisted of the presentation of scientific results by junior as well as senior members of the group, and by discussions between the participants. As such, the SUA meetings became a forum for the exchange of ideas, and for asking questions and advice in an informal atmosphere. Kees de Jager has been chairman of the WG SUA from the beginning in 1979 till today, as the leading source of inspiration. At the occasion of Prof. Kees de Jager's 80th birthday, we decided to collect the presented talks in written form as a Festschrift in honour of this well-respected and much beloved scientist, teacher and friend. The first three papers deal with the personality of Kees de Jager, more specifically with his role as a supervisor and mentor of young researchers and as a catalyst in the research work of his colleagues. And also about his remarkable role in the establishment of astronomy education and research at the University of Brussels. The next presentation is a very detailed review of solar research, a field in which Cees was prominently active for many years. Then follow several papers dealing with stars about which Kees is a true expert: massive stars and extended atmospheres.

  1. Stars and Star Clusters: A Look at Intermediate-Mass Star-Forming Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundquist, Michael J.; Kobulnicky, Henry A.; Lau, Ryan M.

    2017-01-01

    Star-forming regions hosting intermediate-mass stars straddle the boundary separating the the low- and high-mass regimes. These intermediate-mass star-forming regions can be used to probe this transition from low- to high-mass star formation. Our team has assembled an all-sky catalog of 616 candidate intermediate-mass star forming regions (IMSFRs) selected by IRAS colors and refined by visual inspection of WISE imagery. We present here two outer-Galaxy star-forming regions, IRAS22451+6154 and IRAS23448+6010, that despite having similar IRAS colors and mid-infrared morphologies, have vastly different stellar content. We combine Gemini and IRTF NIR spectroscopy with WIYN and SOFIA imaging for a thorough look at the stellar content of these two regions.

  2. Sketching Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Jeremy

    The next time you plan a quiet evening under a salted sky, with hopes of bathing your eyes in the ancient light of a majestic star cluster, be sure that your sketching kit comes with you! A casual glance at these celestial marvels will not give you a decent appreciation for an object whose history and character are as unique as the fingerprints you should be pressing into the side of your trusty pencil. I can think of no better way to connect with these stellar ballets, to understand their intricacies, and to recall your view later than to spend time sketching the soft glow or blazing pinpricks you see through the eyepiece.

  3. Adsorption of star polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halperin, A.; Joanny, J. F.

    1991-06-01

    The adsorption of star polymers on a flat solid surface is analyzed by means of scalling arguments based on the Daoud-Cotton blob model. For the adsorption of a single star, consisting of f arms comprising each N monomers, we distinguish three regimes determined by the adsorption energy of a monomer at the surface, δ kT. 1) Strong adsorption characterized by the full adsorption of all arms occurs for δ > (f/N)^{3/5}. 2) A “Sombrero” like structure comprising f_ads fully adsorbed arms and f{-}f_ads free arms is obtained for (f/N)^{3/5}> δ > f^{9/20}/N^{3/5}. 3) Weakly adsorbed stars retain, essentially, the structure of a free star. This regime occurs for δ < f^{9/20}/N^{3/5}. The weakly adsorbed structure may also exist as a metastable state if δ > f^{9/5}/N^{3/5}. Nous étudions l'adsorption de polymères en étoile sur une surface solide en utilisant une approche de lois d'échelles basée sur le modèle de blobs de Daoud et Cotton. Pour une étoile formée de f bras contenant chacun N monomères, nous distinguons trois régimes suivant la valeur de l'énergie d'adsorption d'un monomère sur la surface δ kT. 1) L'adsorption forte caractérisée par une adsorption complète de tous les bras se produit lorsque δ > (f/N)^{3/5}. 2) Une structure en “sombrero” avec f_ads bras adsorbés et f{-}f_ads bras libres est obtenue si f^{9/20}/N^{3/5}δ < (f/N)^{3/5}. 3) Les étoiles faiblement adsorbées gardent une structure très similaire à celle des étoiles libres en solution. Ce régime existe si δ < f^{9/20}/N^{3/5}. La structure correspondant aux étoiles faiblement adsorbées peut aussi exister comme un état métastable si δ > f^{9/5}/N^{3/5}.

  4. The guide star catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lasker, Barry M.; Jenkner, Helmut; Russell, Jane L.

    1987-01-01

    Part 1 of the catalog presents an astronomical overview of the Guide Star Catalog, together with its history, the properties of its current implementation, and the prospects for enhancement. Part 2 presents the algorithms used in photometric and astrometric calibration of the catalog, as well as the analyses of the related errors. Part 3 presents the current structure and content, as well as future enhancements in this area. An overview of the forthcoming publications is given, both with regard to scientific papers and electronic media.

  5. On magnetized neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Lopes, Luiz; Menezes, Debora E-mail: debora.p.m@ufsc.br

    2015-08-01

    In this work we review the formalism normally used in the literature about the effects of density-dependent magnetic fields on the properties of neutron and quark stars, expose some ambiguities that arise and propose a way to solve the related problem. Our approach explores more deeply the concept of pressure, yielding the so called chaotic magnetic field formalism for the stress tensor. We also use a different way of introducing a variable magnetic field, which depends on the energy density rather than on the baryonic density, which allows us to build a parameter free model.

  6. Triggered Star Formation Surrounding Wolf-Rayet Star HD 211853

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tie; Wu, Yuefang; Zhang, Huawei; Qin, Sheng-Li

    2012-05-01

    The environment surrounding Wolf-Rayet (W-R) star HD 211853 is studied in molecular, infrared, as well as radio, and H I emission. The molecular ring consists of well-separated cores, which have a volume density of 103 cm-3 and kinematic temperature ~20 K. Most of the cores are under gravitational collapse due to external pressure from the surrounding ionized gas. From the spectral energy distribution modeling toward the young stellar objects, the sequential star formation is revealed on a large scale in space spreading from the W-R star to the molecular ring. A small-scale sequential star formation is revealed toward core "A," which harbors a very young star cluster. Triggered star formations are thus suggested. The presence of the photodissociation region, the fragmentation of the molecular ring, the collapse of the cores, and the large-scale sequential star formation indicate that the "collect and collapse" process functions in this region. The star-forming activities in core "A" seem to be affected by the "radiation-driven implosion" process.

  7. Star-forming galaxy models: Blending star formation into TREESPH

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mihos, J. Christopher; Hernquist, Lars

    1994-01-01

    We have incorporated star-formation algorithms into a hybrid N-body/smoothed particle hydrodynamics code (TREESPH) in order to describe the star forming properties of disk galaxies over timescales of a few billion years. The models employ a Schmidt law of index n approximately 1.5 to calculate star-formation rates, and explicitly include the energy and metallicity feedback into the Interstellar Medium (ISM). Modeling the newly formed stellar population is achieved through the use of hybrid SPH/young star particles which gradually convert from gaseous to collisionless particles, avoiding the computational difficulties involved in creating new particles. The models are shown to reproduce well the star-forming properties of disk galaxies, such as the morphology, rate of star formation, and evolution of the global star-formation rate and disk gas content. As an example of the technique, we model an encounter between a disk galaxy and a small companion which gives rise to a ring galaxy reminiscent of the Cartwheel (AM 0035-35). The primary galaxy in this encounter experiences two phases of star forming activity: an initial period during the expansion of the ring, and a delayed phase as shocked material in the ring falls back into the central regions.

  8. The first stars: a classification of CEMP-no stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeder, André; Meynet, Georges

    2015-08-01

    Aims: We propose and apply a new classification for the CEMP-no stars, which are carbon-enhanced metal-poor stars with no overabundance of s-elements and with [Fe/H] generally ≤-2.5. Methods: This classification is based on the changes in abundances for the elements and isotopes involved in the CNO, Ne-Na, and Mg-Al nuclear cycles. These abundances change very much owing to successive back and forth mixing motions between the He- and H-burning regions in massive stars (the "source stars" responsible for the chemical enrichment of the CEMP-no stars). Results: The wide variety of the ratios [C/Fe], 12C/13C, [N/Fe], [O/Fe], [Na/Fe], [Mg/Fe], [Al/Fe], [Sr/Fe], and [Ba/Fe], which are the main characteristics making the CEMP-no and low-s stars so peculiar, is described well in terms of the proposed nucleosynthetic classification. We note that the [(C+N+O)/Fe] ratios significantly increase for lower values of [Fe/H]. Conclusions: The classification of CEMP-no stars and the behavior of [(C+N+O)/Fe] support the presence, in the first stellar generations of the Galaxy, of fast-rotating massive stars experiencing strong mixing and mass loss (spinstars). This result has an impact on the early chemical and spectral evolution of the Galaxy.

  9. The influence of feedback from massive stars on the formation and emergence of massive clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dale, James E.

    2017-03-01

    Massive star clusters are of fundamental importance both observationally, since they are visible at such great distances, and theoretically, because of their influence on the large-scale ISM. Understanding stellar feedback is a prerequisite for making sense of their formation and early evolution, since feedback influences cluster structure, star formation efficiency, and sets the timescales on which clusters emerge from their parent clouds to become optically visible. I review the progress made in understanding these issues from a numerical perspective.

  10. Double Planet Meets Triple Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-08-01

    and then studied in more detail from Australia and from the Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO) during another such event on July 9, 1988. However, Pluto's atmosphere is still not well understood. It appears to be mostly composed of a dominant gas of atomic weight 28, probably molecular nitrogen (N 2 ). Near-IR solar reflection spectra have since shown a small presence of methane (CH 4 ), probably at a level of about 1% relative to nitrogen. The 1988 occultation clearly revealed two different layers in Pluto's atmosphere, a rather smooth and isothermal outer part, and a more complex one near the planet's surface, with the possible presence of an inversion layer (in which the temperature increases with altitude) or possibly haze of photochemical origin. The present observations aimed at discriminating between the current theoretical models of Pluto's atmosphere by means of detailed measurements of the changing intensity and colour of the stellar light, as the star is seen through progressively lower layers of the planet's atmosphere. Another important issue is the question of whether Pluto's atmosphere has changed since 1988. In the intervening 14 years, the planet has moved away from the Sun in its elliptic orbit, whereby there has been a change in the insolation (solar flux) of about 6%. This effect might possibly have caused changes in the surface temperature and in the overall atmospheric structure of Pluto. However, any firm conclusions will have to await a complete and careful evaluation of all available observations. ESO PR Photos 21a-c/02 may be reproduced, if credit is given to the European Southern Observatory (ESO).

  11. Stars For Citizens With Urban Star Parks and Lighting Specialists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigore, Valentin

    2015-08-01

    General contextOne hundred years ago, almost nobody imagine a life without stars every night even in the urban areas. Now, to see a starry sky is a special event for urban citizens.It is possible to see the stars even inside cities? Yes, but for that we need star parks and lighting specialists as partners.Educational aspectThe citizens must be able to identify the planets, constellations and other celestial objects in their urban residence. This is part of a basic education. The number of the people living in the urban area who never see the main constellations or important stars increase every year. We must do something for our urban community.What is an urban star park?An urban public park where we can see the main constellations can be considered an urban star park. There can be organized a lot of activities as practical lessons of astronomy, star parties, etc.Classification of the urban star parksA proposal for classification of the urban star parks taking in consideration the quality of the sky and the number of the city inhabitants:Two categories:- city star parks for cities with < 100.000 inhabitants- metropolis star parks for cities with > 100.000 inhabitantsFive levels of quality:- 1* level = can see stars of at least 1 magnitude with the naked eyes- 2* level = at least 2 mag- 3* level = at least 3 mag- 4* level= at least 4 mag- 5* level = at least 5 magThe urban star urban park structure and lighting systemA possible structure of a urban star park and sky-friend lighting including non-electric illumination are descripted.The International Commission on IlluminationA description of this structure which has as members national commissions from all over the world.Dark-sky activists - lighting specialistsNational Commissions on Illumination organize courses of lighting specialist. Dark-sky activists can become lighting specialists. The author shows his experience in this aspect as a recent lighting specialist and his cooperation with the Romanian National

  12. Al-Sufi's Investigation of Stars, Star Clusters and Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafez, Ihsan; Stephenson, F. R.; Orchiston, W.

    2011-01-01

    The distinguished Arabic astronomer, Al-Sufi (AD 903-986) is justly famous for his Book of the Fixed Stars, an outstanding Medieval treatise on astronomy that was assembled in 964. Developed from Ptolemy's Algamest, but based upon al-Sufi's own stellar observations, the Book of the Fixed Stars has been copied down through the ages, and currently 35 copies are known to exist in various archival repositories around the world. Among other things, this major work contains 55 astronomical tables, plus star charts for 48 constellations. For the first time a long-overdue English translation of this important early work is in active preparation. In this paper we provide biographical material about Al-Sufi and the contents of his Book of the Fixed Stars, before examining his novel stellar magnitude system, and his listing of star clusters and nebulae (including the first-ever mention of the Great Nebula in Andromeda).

  13. Clues about the first stars from CEMP-no stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choplin, A.; Meynet, G.; Maeder, A.

    2015-12-01

    The material used to form the CEMP-no stars presents signatures of material processed by the CNO cycle and by He-burning from a previous stellar generation called the source stars. In order to reproduce the relative abundance ratios like for instance C/N or ^{12}C/^{13}C, some mixing between the two burning regions must have occured in the source stars and only the outer layers of the stars, with modest amount coming from the CO core, must have been expelled either through stellar winds or at the time of the (faint) supernova event. With new models at low metallicity including rotational mixing, we shall discuss how the variety of abundances observed for CEMP-no stars can be reproduced.

  14. Probing Neutron Star Evolution with Gamma Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijers, Ralph A. M. J.

    1996-02-01

    The research sponsored by this grant was conducted in two fields of high-energy astrophysics: gamma-ray bursts and evolution of neutron stars. It is unknown at this time whether they are related. The work performed in each area is discussed followed by a full list of publications supported by the grant. My research (with E. Fenimore, L. Lubin, B. Paczyiiski, and A. Ulmer) has focussed on devising tests that could distinguish between BATSE and galactic-halo distance scales using the available data. In the first instance, the issue was whether the early BATSE peak flux distribution could be used to extract more than just a slope of the log N(greater than P) distribution, and whether it joined smoothly to the steeper peak flux distribution of bright bursts. To this end, we analysed the peak flux distribution for the presence of a change in slope. This was done both by fitting models with a core radius to see whether a significant value for it could be found, and by developing a completely model-independent test to search for slope changes in arbitrary distributions that are nearly power laws. A slope change was marginally detected in the first-year BATSE data. Good progress has been made in understanding the evolution of neutron stars and their magnetic fields. Having shown in earlier work that magnetic fields in some neutron stars, particularly Her X-1, do not decay spontaneously on million-year time scales, we set out to check whether such spontaneous decay was needed in isolated radio pulsars, as claimed by many. We found that it is not; rather long decay times or no decay are preferred. Since there are neutron stars with low magnetic fields, one must conclude that there is something in their past that distinguishes them from most pulsars. These so-called recycled pulsars are in binaries much more often than normal pulsars. My research concentrates on the class of scenarios in which the recycled pulsars are initially the same as ordinary high-field radio pulsars

  15. The 11 Micron Emissions of Carbon Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goebel, J. H.; Cheeseman, P.; Gerbault, F.

    1995-01-01

    A new classification scheme of the IRAS LRS carbon stars is presented. It comprises the separation of 718 probable carbon stars into 12 distinct self-similar spectral groupings. Continuum temperatures are assigned and range from 470 to 5000 K. Three distinct dust species are identifiable: SiC, alpha:C-H, and MgS. In addition to the narrow 11 + micron emission feature that is commonly attributed to SiC, a broad 11 + micron emission feature, that is correlated with the 8.5 and 7.7 micron features, is found and attributed to alpha:C-H. SiC and alpha:C-H band strengths are found to correlate with the temperature progression among the Classes. We find a spectral sequence of Classes that reflects the carbon star evolutionary sequence of spectral types, or alternatively developmental sequences of grain condensation in carbon-rich circumstellar shells. If decreasing temperature corresponds to increasing evolution, then decreasing temperature corresponds to increasing C/O resulting in increasing amounts of carbon rich dust, namely alpha:C-H. If decreasing the temperature corresponds to a grain condensation sequence, then heterogeneous, or induced nucleation scenarios are supported. SiC grains precede alpha:C-H and form the nuclei for the condensation of the latter material. At still lower temperatures, MgS appears to be quite prevalent. No 11.3 micron PAH features are identified in any of the 718 carbon stars. However, one of the coldest objects, IRAS 15048-5702, and a few others, displays an 11.9 micron emission feature characteristic of laboratory samples of coronene. That feature corresponds to the C-H out of plane deformation mode of aromatic hydrocarbon. This band indicates the presence of unsaturated, sp(sup 3), hydrocarbon bonds that may subsequently evolve into saturated bonds, sp(sup 2), if, and when, the star enters the planetary nebulae phase of stellar evolution. The effusion of hydrogen from the hydrocarbon grain results in the evolution in wavelength of this

  16. The 11 Micron Emissions of Cabon Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goebel, J. H.; Cheeseman, P.; Gerbault, F.

    1995-01-01

    A new classification scheme of the IRAS LRS carbon stars is presented. It comprises the separation of 718 probable carbon stars into 12 distinct self-similar spectral groupings. Continuum temperatures are assigned and range from 470 to 5000 K. Three distinct dust species are identifiable: SiC, alpha:C-H, and MgS. In addition to the narrow 11 + micron emission feature that is commonly attributed to SiC, a broad 11 + micron emission feature, that is correlated with the 8.5 and 7.7 micron features, is found and attributed to alpha:C-H. SiC and alpha:C-H band strengths are found to correlate with the temperature progression among the Classes. We find a spectral sequence of Classes that reflects the carbon star evolutionary sequence of spectral types, or alternatively developmental sequences of grain condensation in carbon-rich circumstellar shells. If decreasing temperature corresponds to increasing evolution, then decreasing temperature corresponds to increasing CIO resulting in increasing amounts of carbon rich dust, namely alpha:C-H. If decreasing the temperature corresponds to a grain condensation sequence, then heterogeneous, or induced nucleation scenarios are supported. SiC grains precede alpha:C-H and form the nuclei for the condensation of the latter material. At still lower temperatures, MgS appears to be quite prevalent. No 11.3 micron PAH features are identified in any of the 718 carbon stars. However, one of the coldest objects, IRAS 15048-5702, and a few others, displays an 11.9 micron emission feature characteristic of laboratory samples of coronene. That feature corresponds to the C-H out of plane deformation mode of aromatic hydrocarbon. This band indicates the presence of unsaturated, sp(sup 3), hydrocarbon bonds that may subsequently evolve into saturated bonds, sp(sup 2), if, and when, the star enters the planetary nebulae phase of stellar evolution. The effusion of hydrogen from the hydrocarbon grain results in the evolution in wavelength of this

  17. MODEL ATMOSPHERES FOR X-RAY BURSTING NEUTRON STARS

    DOE PAGES

    Medin, Zachary James; Steinkirch, Marina von; Calder, Alan C.; ...

    2016-11-21

    The hydrogen and helium accreted by X-ray bursting neutron stars is periodically consumed in runaway thermonuclear reactions that cause the entire surface to glow brightly in X-rays for a few seconds. With models of the emission, the mass and radius of the neutron star can be inferred from the observations. By simultaneously probing neutron star masses and radii, X-ray bursts (XRBs) are one of the strongest diagnostics of the nature of matter at extremely high densities. Accurate determinations of these parameters are difficult, however, due to the highly non-ideal nature of the atmospheres where XRBs occur. Also, observations from X-raymore » telescopes such as RXTE and NuStar can potentially place strong constraints on nuclear matter once uncertainties in atmosphere models have been reduced. Lastly, here we discuss current progress on modeling atmospheres of X-ray bursting neutron stars and some of the challenges still to be overcome.« less

  18. Spin-down dynamics of magnetized solar-type stars

    SciTech Connect

    Oglethorpe, R. L. F.; Garaud, P.

    2013-12-01

    It has long been known that solar-type stars undergo significant spin-down, via magnetic braking, during their main-sequence lifetimes. However, magnetic braking only operates on the surface layers; it is not yet completely understood how angular momentum is transported within the star and how rapidly the spin-down information is communicated to the deep interior. In this work, we use insight from recent progress in understanding internal solar dynamics to model the interior of other solar-type stars. We assume, following Gough and McIntyre, that the bulk of the radiation zone of these stars is held in uniform rotation by the presence of an embedded large-scale primordial field, confined below a stably stratified, magnetic-free tachocline by large-scale meridional flows downwelling from the convection zone. We derive simple equations to describe the response of this model interior to spin-down of the surface layers, which are identical to the two-zone model of MacGregor and Brenner, with a coupling timescale proportional to the local Eddington-Sweet timescale across the tachocline. This timescale depends both on the rotation rate of the star and on the thickness of the tachocline, and it can vary from a few hundred thousand years to a few Gyr, depending on stellar properties. Qualitative predictions of the model appear to be consistent with observations, although they depend sensitively on the assumed functional dependence of the tachocline thickness on the stellar rotation rate.

  19. The magnetic fields of forming solar-like stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, S. G.; Jardine, M.; Gray, C. G.; Donati, J.-F.

    2010-12-01

    Magnetic fields play a crucial role at all stages of the formation of low-mass stars and planetary systems. In the final stages, in particular, they control the kinematics of in-falling gas from circumstellar discs, and the launching and collimation of spectacular outflows. The magnetic coupling with the disc is thought to influence the rotational evolution of the star, while magnetized stellar winds control the braking of more evolved stars and may influence the migration of planets. Magnetic reconnection events trigger energetic flares which irradiate circumstellar discs with high energy particles that influence the disc chemistry and set the initial conditions for planet formation. However, it is only in the past few years that the current generation of optical spectropolarimeters has allowed the magnetic fields of forming solar-like stars to be probed in unprecedented detail. In order to do justice to the recent extensive observational programs new theoretical models are being developed that incorporate magnetic fields with an observed degree of complexity. In this review we draw together disparate results from the classical electromagnetism, molecular physics/chemistry and the geophysics literature, and demonstrate how they can be adapted to construct models of the large scale magnetospheres of stars and planets. We conclude by examining how the incorporation of multipolar magnetic fields into new theoretical models will drive future progress in the field through the elucidation of several observational conundrums.

  20. Spin-down Dynamics of Magnetized Solar-type Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oglethorpe, R. L. F.; Garaud, P.

    2013-12-01

    It has long been known that solar-type stars undergo significant spin-down, via magnetic braking, during their main-sequence lifetimes. However, magnetic braking only operates on the surface layers; it is not yet completely understood how angular momentum is transported within the star and how rapidly the spin-down information is communicated to the deep interior. In this work, we use insight from recent progress in understanding internal solar dynamics to model the interior of other solar-type stars. We assume, following Gough & McIntyre, that the bulk of the radiation zone of these stars is held in uniform rotation by the presence of an embedded large-scale primordial field, confined below a stably stratified, magnetic-free tachocline by large-scale meridional flows downwelling from the convection zone. We derive simple equations to describe the response of this model interior to spin-down of the surface layers, which are identical to the two-zone model of MacGregor & Brenner, with a coupling timescale proportional to the local Eddington-Sweet timescale across the tachocline. This timescale depends both on the rotation rate of the star and on the thickness of the tachocline, and it can vary from a few hundred thousand years to a few Gyr, depending on stellar properties. Qualitative predictions of the model appear to be consistent with observations, although they depend sensitively on the assumed functional dependence of the tachocline thickness on the stellar rotation rate.

  1. Nonlinear rheology of entangled symmetric and asymmetric star polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tezel, Amy Kathleen

    Polymer architecture has a significant effect on the material properties of polymer melts and solutions. These topological differences are important because they either prohibit or allow different relaxation mechanisms when the system is perturbed from equilibrium. In the past three decades, significant progress has been made describing the response of entangled polymer liquids to small perturbations (the linear viscoelastic regime), however when flow is added, the situation becomes more complex. In flow, it has been suggested that a relaxation mechanism known as convective constraint release (CCR) will dominate the relaxation response of entangled polymers at shear rates in between the inverse of the longest relaxation time (taul) and the inverse of the Rouse time (tauR). Initial experiments using linear polymers could only provide a limited test of this mechanism because the window of relevant shear rates is small. Star polymers, however, provide an excellent system with which to test the accuracy of CCR because of the wide range of shear rates at which it is expected to dominate. We have proposed both a steady state and transient model that incorporates CCR in a straightforward way and favorably compared its predictions of stresses with those measured experimentally. Asymmetric stars are intriguing because they are very similar to both linear chains and symmetric stars. Currently work is being done in other groups to quantitatively describe asymmetric stars in the linear viscoelastic regime. We have synthesized our own batch of asymmetric stars and have conducted the first study of asymmetric stars in the nonlinear regime. These results are examined in the context of previous work done on linear and symmetric star polymers.

  2. Stars Just Got Bigger - A 300 Solar Mass Star Uncovered

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-07-01

    Using a combination of instruments on ESO's Very Large Telescope, astronomers have discovered the most massive stars to date, one weighing at birth more than 300 times the mass of the Sun, or twice as much as the currently accepted limit of 150 solar masses. The existence of these monsters - millions of times more luminous than the Sun, losing weight through very powerful winds - may provide an answer to the question "how massive can stars be?" A team of astronomers led by Paul Crowther, Professor of Astrophysics at the University of Sheffield, has used ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT), as well as archival data from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, to study two young clusters of stars, NGC 3603 and RMC 136a in detail. NGC 3603 is a cosmic factory where stars form frantically from the nebula's extended clouds of gas and dust, located 22 000 light-years away from the Sun (eso1005). RMC 136a (more often known as R136) is another cluster of young, massive and hot stars, which is located inside the Tarantula Nebula, in one of our neighbouring galaxies, the Large Magellanic Cloud, 165 000 light-years away (eso0613). The team found several stars with surface temperatures over 40 000 degrees, more than seven times hotter than our Sun, and a few tens of times larger and several million times brighter. Comparisons with models imply that several of these stars were born with masses in excess of 150 solar masses. The star R136a1, found in the R136 cluster, is the most massive star ever found, with a current mass of about 265 solar masses and with a birthweight of as much as 320 times that of the Sun. In NGC 3603, the astronomers could also directly measure the masses of two stars that belong to a double star system [1], as a validation of the models used. The stars A1, B and C in this cluster have estimated masses at birth above or close to 150 solar masses. Very massive stars produce very powerful outflows. "Unlike humans, these stars are born heavy and lose weight as

  3. Deep Stromvil Photometry for Star Formation in the Head of the Pelican Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyle, Richard P.; J., S.; Stott, J.; J., S.; Janusz, R.; J., S.; Straizys, V.

    2010-01-01

    The North America and Pelican Nebulae, and specifically the dark cloud L935 contain regions of active star formation (Herbig, G. H. 1958, ApJ, 128,259). Previously we reported on Vatican telescope observations by Stromvil intermediate-band filters in a 12-arcmin field in the "Gulf of Mexico" region of L935. There we classify A, F, and G-type stars. However, the many faint K and M-type dwarf stars remain somewhat ambiguous in calibration and classification. But attaining reasonable progress, we turn to another part of L935 located near the Pelican head. This area includes the "bright rim" which is formed by dust and gas condensed by the light pressure of an unseen O-type star hidden behind the dense dark cloud. Straizys and Laugalys (2008 Baltic Astronomy, 17, 143 ) have identified this star to be one of the 2MASS objects with Av=23 mag. A few concentrations of faint stars, V 13 to 14 mag. are immersed in this dark region. Among these stars are a few known emission-line objects (T-Tauri or post T-Tauri stars). A half degree nearby are some photometric Vilnius standards we use to calibrate our new field. We call on 2MASS data for correlative information. Also the Stromvil photometry offers candidate stars for spectral observations. The aim of this study in the Vilnius and Stromvil photometric systems is to classify stars down to V = 18 mag., to confirm the existence of the young star clusters, and to determine the distance of the cloud covering the suspected hidden ionizing star.

  4. Stars and Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neta, Miguel

    2014-05-01

    'Estrelas e Planetas' (Stars and Planets) project was developed during the academic year 2009/2010 and was tested on three 3rd grade classes of one school in Quarteira, Portugal. The aim was to encourage the learning of science and the natural and physical phenomena through the construction and manipulation of materials that promote these themes - in this case astronomy. Throughout the project the students built a small book containing three themes of astronomy: differences between stars and planets, the solar system and the phases of the Moon. To each topic was devoted two sessions of about an hour each: the first to teach the theoretical aspects of the theme and the second session to assembly two pages of the book. All materials used (for theoretical sessions and for the construction of the book) and videos of the finished book are available for free use in www.miguelneta.pt/estrelaseplanetas. So far there is only a Portuguese version but soon will be published in English as well. This project won the Excellency Prize 2011 of Casa das Ciências, a portuguese site for teachers supported by the Calouste Gulbenkian Fundation (www.casadasciencias.org).

  5. Morphogenesis of star dunes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, D.; Narteau, C.; Rozier, O.

    2010-12-01

    Dunes constantly adapt their shapes in response to the flow. Under multi-modal wind orientation, this permanent reorganization may result in the formation of star dunes, a highly complex structure with multiple arms, crests and slip faces oriented in different directions. Here, we show that this majestic dune feature can be described as a superposition of longitudinal dunes. In a 3D cellular automaton for sediment transport, star dunes form by amalgamation or by nucleation and growth of secondary longitudinal dunes. When the dune shape reaches a steady state, individual arms continue to propagate and detach from the main structure to feed other dunes in the neighborhood. From the sedimentary structures produced by the model we show that arm elongation is strongly dependent on the frequency at which the wind oscillates. This demonstrates that the elongation/propagation of dunes is a highly non-linear process that should account for crest reorientation over different time scales. We conclude that such a behavior needs to be taken into account when estimating climatic conditions from sedimentary structures on Earth or satellite images on other planetary bodies.

  6. Recovery Ship Freedom Star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Freedom Star, one of NASA's two solid rocket booster recovery ships, is towing a barge containing the third Space Shuttle Super Lightweight External Tank (SLWT) into Port Canaveral. This SLWT was slated for use to launch the orbiter Discovery on mission STS-95 in October 1998. This first time towing arrangement, part of a cost saving plan by NASA to prudently manage existing resources, began June 12 from the Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans where the Shuttle's external tanks were manufactured. The barge was transported up Banana River to the LC-39 turn basin using a conventional tug boat. Previously, NASA relied on an outside contractor to provide external tank towing services at a cost of about $120,000 per trip. The new plan allowed NASA's Space Flight Operations contractor, United Space Alliance (USA), to provide the same service to NASA using the recovery ships during their downtime between Shuttle launches. Studies showed a potential savings of about $50,000 per trip. The cost of the necessary ship modifications would be paid back by the fourteenth tank delivery. The other recovery ship, Liberty Star, also underwent deck strengthening enhancements and had the necessary towing wench installed.

  7. The Stars of Heaven

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickover, Clifford A.

    2004-05-01

    Do a little armchair space travel, rub elbows with alien life forms, and stretch your mind to the furthest corners of our uncharted universe. With this astonishing guidebook, you don't have to be an astronomer to explore the mysteries of stars and their profound meaning for human existence. Clifford A. Pickover tackles a range of topics from stellar evolution to the fundamental reasons why the universe permits life to flourish. He alternates sections that explain the mysteries of the cosmos with sections that dramatize mind-expanding concepts through a fictional dialog between futuristic humans and their alien peers (who embark on a journey beyond the reader's wildest imagination). This highly accessible and entertaining approach turns an intimidating subject into a scientific game open to all dreamers. Told in Pickover's inimitable blend of fascinating state-of-the-art science and whimsical science fiction, and packed with numerous diagrams and illustrations, The Stars of Heaven unfolds a world of paradox and mystery, one that will intrigue anyone who has ever pondered the night sky with wonder.

  8. A Star on the Run

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-10-01

    Usually stars that are born together tend to move together but sometimes stars can go rogue and run away from their original birthplace. A pair of astronomers have now discovered the first runaway red supergiant (RSG) ever identified in another galaxy. With a radial velocity discrepancy of 300 km/s, its also the fastest runaway massive star known. Discrepant Speeds: When massive stars form in giant molecular clouds, they create what are known as OB associations: groups of hot, massive, short-lived stars that have similar velocities because theyre moving through space together. But sometimes stars that appear to be part of an OB association dont have the same velocity as the rest of the group. These stars are called runaways.What causes an OB star to run away is still debated, but we know that a fairly significant fraction of OB stars are runaways. In spite of this, surprisingly few runaways have been found that are evolved massive stars i.e., the post-main-sequence state of OB stars. This is presumably because these evolved stars have had more time to move away from their birthplace, and its more difficult to identify a runaway without the context of its original group. An Evolved Runaway: Difference between observed velocity and expected velocity, plotted as a function of expected velocity. The black points are foreground stars. The red points are expected RSGs, clustered around a velocity difference of zero. The green pentagon is the runaway RSG J004330.06+405258.4. [Evans Massey 2015]Despite this challenge, a recent survey of RSGs in the galaxy M31 has led to the detection of a massive star on the run! Kate Evans (Lowell Observatory and California Institute of Technology) and Philip Massey (Lowell Observatory and Northern Arizona University) discovered that RSG J004330.06+405258.4 is moving through the Andromeda Galaxy with a radial velocity thats off by about 300 km/s from the radial velocity expected for its location.Evans and Massey discovered this rogue star

  9. Gaia FGK benchmark stars: Effective temperatures and surface gravities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heiter, U.; Jofré, P.; Gustafsson, B.; Korn, A. J.; Soubiran, C.; Thévenin, F.

    2015-10-01

    Context. In the era of large Galactic stellar surveys, carefully calibrating and validating the data sets has become an important and integral part of the data analysis. Moreover, new generations of stellar atmosphere models and spectral line formation computations need to be subjected to benchmark tests to assess any progress in predicting stellar properties. Aims: We focus on cool stars and aim at establishing a sample of 34 Gaia FGK benchmark stars with a range of different metallicities. The goal was to determine the effective temperature and the surface gravity independently of spectroscopy and atmospheric models as far as possible. Most of the selected stars have been subjected to frequent spectroscopic investigations in the past, and almost all of them have previously been used as reference, calibration, or test objects. Methods: Fundamental determinations of Teff and log g were obtained in a systematic way from a compilation of angular diameter measurements and bolometric fluxes and from a homogeneous mass determination based on stellar evolution models. The derived parameters were compared to recent spectroscopic and photometric determinations and to gravity estimates based on seismic data. Results: Most of the adopted diameter measurements have formal uncertainties around 1%, which translate into uncertainties in effective temperature of 0.5%. The measurements of bolometric flux seem to be accurate to 5% or better, which contributes about 1% or less to the uncertainties in effective temperature. The comparisons of parameter determinations with the literature in general show good agreements with a few exceptions, most notably for the coolest stars and for metal-poor stars. Conclusions: The sample consists of 29 FGK-type stars and 5 M giants. Among the FGK stars, 21 have reliable parameters suitable for testing, validation, or calibration purposes. For four stars, future adjustments of the fundamental Teff are required, and for five stars the log g

  10. Star formation in the multiverse

    SciTech Connect

    Bousso, Raphael; Leichenauer, Stefan

    2009-03-15

    We develop a simple semianalytic model of the star formation rate as a function of time. We estimate the star formation rate for a wide range of values of the cosmological constant, spatial curvature, and primordial density contrast. Our model can predict such parameters in the multiverse, if the underlying theory landscape and the cosmological measure are known.

  11. WhiteStar user's guide

    SciTech Connect

    Ezell, T.F.

    1990-08-01

    The WhiteStar project provides design engineers with needed part design data. WhiteStar encourages the use of preferred parts by providing a user-convenient parts database. This report shows selections the user makes in order to obtain information on a particular part. 15 figs.

  12. Stars Get Dizzy After Lunch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Michael; Penev, Kaloyan

    2014-06-01

    Exoplanet searches have discovered a large number of "hot Jupiters"—high-mass planets orbiting very close to their parent stars in nearly circular orbits. A number of these planets are sufficiently massive and close-in to be significantly affected by tidal dissipation in the parent star, to a degree parameterized by the tidal quality factor Q *. This process speeds up their star's rotation rate while reducing the planet's semimajor axis. In this paper, we investigate the tidal destruction of hot Jupiters. Because the orbital angular momenta of these planets are a significant fraction of their star's rotational angular momenta, they spin up their stars significantly while spiraling to their deaths. Using the Monte Carlo simulation, we predict that for Q * = 106, 3.9 × 10-6 of stars with the Kepler Target Catalog's mass distribution should have a rotation period shorter than 1/3 day (8 hr) due to accreting a planet. Exoplanet surveys such as SuperWASP, HATnet, HATsouth, and KELT have already produced light curves of millions of stars. These two facts suggest that it may be possible to search for tidally destroyed planets by looking for stars with extremely short rotational periods, then looking for remnant planet cores around those candidates, anomalies in the metal distribution, or other signatures of the recent accretion of the planet.

  13. Comparable Habitable Zones of Stars

    NASA Video Gallery

    The habitable zone is the distance from a star where one can have liquid water on the surface of a planet. If a planet is too close to its parent star, it will be too hot and water would have evapo...

  14. Stars get dizzy after lunch

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Michael; Penev, Kaloyan

    2014-06-01

    Exoplanet searches have discovered a large number of {sup h}ot Jupiters{sup —}high-mass planets orbiting very close to their parent stars in nearly circular orbits. A number of these planets are sufficiently massive and close-in to be significantly affected by tidal dissipation in the parent star, to a degree parameterized by the tidal quality factor Q {sub *}. This process speeds up their star's rotation rate while reducing the planet's semimajor axis. In this paper, we investigate the tidal destruction of hot Jupiters. Because the orbital angular momenta of these planets are a significant fraction of their star's rotational angular momenta, they spin up their stars significantly while spiraling to their deaths. Using the Monte Carlo simulation, we predict that for Q {sub *} = 10{sup 6}, 3.9 × 10{sup –6} of stars with the Kepler Target Catalog's mass distribution should have a rotation period shorter than 1/3 day (8 hr) due to accreting a planet. Exoplanet surveys such as SuperWASP, HATnet, HATsouth, and KELT have already produced light curves of millions of stars. These two facts suggest that it may be possible to search for tidally destroyed planets by looking for stars with extremely short rotational periods, then looking for remnant planet cores around those candidates, anomalies in the metal distribution, or other signatures of the recent accretion of the planet.

  15. STARS: A Year in Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The Sustainability Tracking, Assessment & Rating System[TM] (STARS) is a program of AASHE, the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education. AASHE is a member-driven organization with a mission to empower higher education to lead the sustainability transformation. STARS was developed by AASHE with input and insight from…

  16. Mathematics Teaching with the Stars

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKinney, Sueanne E.; Bol, Linda; Berube, Clair

    2010-01-01

    The mathematics instructional approaches of effective elementary teachers in urban high- poverty schools were investigated. Approximately 99 urban elementary teachers were administered the Star Teacher Selection Interview; a total of 31 were identified as star teachers. These teachers were then administered the Instructional Practices…

  17. Convective dynamos for rotating stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilman, P. A.

    1981-01-01

    Global dynamo theory is applied to the problem of why some stars have field reversing dynamos, and others do not. It is argued that convectively driven dynamos are the most likely source of magnetic fields in stars that have convection zones.

  18. Socket stars: UBVRJIK radial profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, Bradley E.

    1995-05-01

    Visual inspectin of stars embedded in H II nebulae has shown a significant fraction to be surrounded by nearly symmetric extended regions within which the nebular brightness is apparently significantly fainter than is typical for the surrounding area. These 'socket stars' might be caused by a bubble in the nebula blown out by a stellar wind or they might be caused by a circumstellar envelope of dust hiding the emission behind the star. As such, the sockets could be the first manifestation of a previously unknown component of pre-main-sequence stars. Unfortunately, no quantitative proof of the existence of sockets has been presented. To fill this need, I have imaged 10 socket stars and six background stars with CCD cameras and infrared array cameras. From these images, I have constructed radial plots which should reveal dips in brightness immediately outside the seeing disk. The radial plots do not show any evidence for the existence of sockets. A detailed examination of the photographs orginally used to identify the sockets show that the causes of these reports are (1) artifacts resulting from the photographic process of dodging and (2) random coincidence of stars with local minima in nebular brightness. Thus, I conclude that 'socket stars' do not exist.

  19. ENERGY STAR Certified Audio Video

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Certified models meet all ENERGY STAR requirements as listed in the Version 3.0 ENERGY STAR Program Requirements for Audio Video Equipment that are effective as of May 1, 2013. A detailed listing of key efficiency criteria are available at http://www.energystar.gov/index.cfm?c=audio_dvd.pr_crit_audio_dvd

  20. ENERGY STAR Certified Pool Pumps

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Certified models meet all ENERGY STAR requirements as listed in the Version 1.0 ENERGY STAR Program Requirements for Pool Pumps that are effective as of February 15, 2013. A detailed listing of key efficiency criteria are available at http://www.energystar.gov/index.cfm?c=poolpumps.pr_crit_poolpumps

  1. Dust near luminous ultraviolet stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, Richard C.

    1993-01-01

    This report describes research activities related to the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) sky survey. About 745 luminous stars were examined for the presence of interstellar dust heated by a nearby star. The 'cirrus' discovered by IRAS is thermal radiation from interstellar dust at moderate and high galactic latitudes. The IRAS locates the dust which must (at some level) scatter ultraviolet starlight, although it was expected that thermal emission would be found around virtually every star, most stars shown no detectable emission. And the emission found is not uniform. It is not that the star is embedded in 'an interstellar medium', but rather what is found are discrete clouds that are heated by starlight. An exception is the dearth of clouds near the very hottest stars, implying that the very hottest stars play an active role with respect to destroying or substantially modifying the dust clouds over time. The other possibility is simply that the hottest stars are located in regions lacking in dust, which is counter-intuitive. A bibliography of related journal articles is attached.

  2. Hα observations of Be stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, D. P. K.; Rawat, S. D.; Janardhan, P.

    2000-12-01

    We present here the Hα spectra of 44 Be stars taken at a resolution of 0.5 Å. From the spectra, different emission line parameters have been deduced. A study of the correlations between different pairs of these parameters has been made with a view to understanding the mechanisms of line formation and shaping in Be stars.

  3. Astronomy: A truly embryonic star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, David A.

    2012-12-01

    The discovery of what may be the best example yet of a forming star caught in the moments just before birth provides a missing link in our understanding of how giant gas clouds collapse to form fully fledged stars. See Letter p.83

  4. Stars in the Tarantula Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In the most active starburst region in the local universe lies a cluster of brilliant, massive stars, known to astronomers as Hodge 301. Hodge 301, seen in the lower right hand corner of this image, lives inside the Tarantula Nebula in our galactic neighbor, the Large Magellanic Cloud. This star cluster is not the brightest, or youngest, or most populous star cluster in the Tarantula Nebula, that honor goes to the spectacular R136. In fact, Hodge 301 is almost 10 times older than the young cluster R136. But age has its advantages; many of the stars in Hodge 301 are so old that they have exploded as supernovae. These exploded stars are blasting material out into the surrounding region at speeds of almost 200 miles per second. This high speed ejecta are plowing into the surrounding Tarantula Nebula, shocking and compressing the gas into a multitude of sheets and filaments, seen in the upper left portion of the picture. Hodge 301 contains three red supergiants - stars that are close to the end of their evolution and are about to go supernova, exploding and sending more shocks into the Tarantula. Also present near the center of the image are small, dense gas globules and dust columns where new stars are being formed today, as part of the overall ongoing star formation throughout the Tarantula region.

  5. Four Neglected Southern Mira Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cragg, T. A.

    2006-06-01

    This paper is a continuation of the study of several southern Mira stars presented at the 1996 Fall Meeting of the AAVSO in Cambridge, Massachusetts. The four stars herein included are 0828-44, CT Vel; 1553-23, BK Sco; 1557-23, TY Sco; and 2011-52, X Tel. X Tel is now on the regular observing list of the RASNZ.

  6. EDITORIAL: Catalysing progress Catalysing progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna

    2010-01-01

    Examples of the merits of blue-sky research in the history of science are legion. The invention of the laser, celebrating its 50th anniversary this year, is an excellent example. When it was invented it was considered to be 'a solution waiting for a problem', and yet the level to which it has now infiltrated our day-to-day technological landscape speaks volumes. At the same time it is also true to say that the direction of research is also at times rightly influenced by the needs and concerns of the general public. Over recent years, growing concerns about the environment have had a noticeable effect on research in nanotechnology, motivating work on a range of topics from green nanomaterial synthesis [1] to high-efficiency solar cells [2] and hydrogen storage [3]. The impact of the world's energy consumption on the welfare of the planet is now an enduring and well founded concern. In the face of an instinctive reluctance to curtail habits of comfort and convenience and the appendages of culture and consumerism, research into renewable and more efficient energy sources seem an encouraging approach to alleviating an impending energy crisis. Fuel cells present one alternative to traditional combustion cells that have huge benefits in terms of the efficiency of energy conversion and the limited harmful emissions. In last week's issue of Nanotechnology, Chuan-Jian Zhong and colleagues at the State University of New York at Binghamton in the USA presented an overview of research on nanostructured catalysts in fuel cells [4]. The topical review includes insights into the interactions between nanoparticles and between nanoparticles and their substrate as well as control over the composition and nanostructure of catalysts. The review also serves to highlight how the flourishing of nanotechnology research has heralded great progress in the exploitation of catalysts with nanostructures ingeniously controlled to maximize surface area and optimize energetics for synthesis

  7. Binary Stars in SBS Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erastova, L. K.

    2016-06-01

    Thirty spectroscopic binary stars were found in the Second Byurakan Survey (SBS). They show composite spectra - WD(DA)+dM or dC (for example Liebert et al. 1994). They may have red color, if the radiation of the red star dominates, and blue one, if the blue star is brighter and have peculiar spectrum in our survey plate. We obtained slit spectra for most of such objects. But we often see the spectrum of one component, because our slit spectra did not cover all optical range. We examine by eye the slit spectra of all SBS stellar objects (˜700) in SDSS DR7, DR8 or DR9 independent on our observations. We confirmed or discovered the duplicity of 30 stars. Usually they are spectroscopic binaries, where one component is WD (DA) and the second one is a red star with or without emission. There also are other components combinations. Sometimes there are emission lines, probably, indicating variable ones.

  8. NSCool: Neutron star cooling code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, Dany

    2016-09-01

    NSCool is a 1D (i.e., spherically symmetric) neutron star cooling code written in Fortran 77. The package also contains a series of EOSs (equation of state) to build stars, a series of pre-built stars, and a TOV (Tolman- Oppenheimer-Volkoff) integrator to build stars from an EOS. It can also handle “strange stars” that have a huge density discontinuity between the quark matter and the covering thin baryonic crust. NSCool solves the heat transport and energy balance equations in whole GR, resulting in a time sequence of temperature profiles (and, in particular, a Teff - age curve). Several heating processes are included, and more can easily be incorporated. In particular it can evolve a star undergoing accretion with the resulting deep crustal heating, under a steady or time-variable accretion rate. NSCool is robust, very fast, and highly modular, making it easy to add new subroutines for new processes.

  9. Grand unification of neutron stars.

    PubMed

    Kaspi, Victoria M

    2010-04-20

    The last decade has shown us that the observational properties of neutron stars are remarkably diverse. From magnetars to rotating radio transients, from radio pulsars to isolated neutron stars, from central compact objects to millisecond pulsars, observational manifestations of neutron stars are surprisingly varied, with most properties totally unpredicted. The challenge is to establish an overarching physical theory of neutron stars and their birth properties that can explain this great diversity. Here I survey the disparate neutron stars classes, describe their properties, and highlight results made possible by the Chandra X-Ray Observatory, in celebration of its 10th anniversary. Finally, I describe the current status of efforts at physical "grand unification" of this wealth of observational phenomena, and comment on possibilities for Chandra's next decade in this field.

  10. The Visual Double Star Catalogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Brian D.

    2015-08-01

    In visual double star work, production of the first comprehensive attempt to list all discovered pairs in his accessible sky was prepared by S.W. Burnham in 1906. A double star catalog for the southern hemisphere was prepared by R.T.A. Innes et al. in 1927 and the northern hemisphere catalog was updated by R.G. Aitken and E. Doolittle in 1932. Eventually, this led to Lick Observatory maintaining what became known as the Index Catalogue, an all-sky visual double star database.In 1964, under the aegis of Commission 26, the Lick double star database was transferred to the U.S. Naval Observatory where it was redesignated the Washington Double Star Catalog where it and it's ancillary catalogs, have been maintained for over half a century. The current statistics of the catalog and it's supplements are presented as are the enhancements currently under consideration.

  11. Grand unification of neutron stars

    PubMed Central

    Kaspi, Victoria M.

    2010-01-01

    The last decade has shown us that the observational properties of neutron stars are remarkably diverse. From magnetars to rotating radio transients, from radio pulsars to isolated neutron stars, from central compact objects to millisecond pulsars, observational manifestations of neutron stars are surprisingly varied, with most properties totally unpredicted. The challenge is to establish an overarching physical theory of neutron stars and their birth properties that can explain this great diversity. Here I survey the disparate neutron stars classes, describe their properties, and highlight results made possible by the Chandra X-Ray Observatory, in celebration of its 10th anniversary. Finally, I describe the current status of efforts at physical “grand unification” of this wealth of observational phenomena, and comment on possibilities for Chandra’s next decade in this field. PMID:20404205

  12. Improved autonomous star identification algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Li-Yan; Xu, Lu-Ping; Zhang, Hua; Sun, Jing-Rong

    2015-06-01

    The log-polar transform (LPT) is introduced into the star identification because of its rotation invariance. An improved autonomous star identification algorithm is proposed in this paper to avoid the circular shift of the feature vector and to reduce the time consumed in the star identification algorithm using LPT. In the proposed algorithm, the star pattern of the same navigation star remains unchanged when the stellar image is rotated, which makes it able to reduce the star identification time. The logarithmic values of the plane distances between the navigation and its neighbor stars are adopted to structure the feature vector of the navigation star, which enhances the robustness of star identification. In addition, some efforts are made to make it able to find the identification result with fewer comparisons, instead of searching the whole feature database. The simulation results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm can effectively accelerate the star identification. Moreover, the recognition rate and robustness by the proposed algorithm are better than those by the LPT algorithm and the modified grid algorithm. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61172138 and 61401340), the Open Research Fund of the Academy of Satellite Application, China (Grant No. 2014_CXJJ-DH_12), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China (Grant Nos. JB141303 and 201413B), the Natural Science Basic Research Plan in Shaanxi Province, China (Grant No. 2013JQ8040), the Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (Grant No. 20130203120004), and the Xi’an Science and Technology Plan, China (Grant. No CXY1350(4)).

  13. StarGuides Plus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heck, A.

    StarGuides Plus represents the most comprehensive and accurately validated collection of practical data on organizations involved in astronomy, related space sciences and other related fields. This invaluable reference source (and its companion volume, StarBriefs Plus) should be on the reference shelf of every library, organization or individual with any interest in these areas. The coverage includes relevant universities, scientific committees, institutions, associations, societies, agencies, companies, bibliographic services, data centers, museums, dealers, distributors, funding organizations, journals, manufacturers, meteorological services, national norms & standard institutes, parent associations & societies, publishers, software producers & distributors, and so on. Besides astronomy and associated space sciences, related fields such as aeronautics, aeronomy, astronautics, atmospheric sciences, chemistry, communications, computer sciences, data processing, education, electronics, engineering, energetics, environment, geodesy, geophysics, information handling, management, mathematics, meteorology, optics, physics, remote sensing, and so on, are also covered where appropriate. After some thirty years in continuous compilation, verification and updating, StarGuides Plus currently gathers together some 6,000 entries from 100 countries. The information is presented in a clear, uncluttered manner for direct and easy use. For each entry, all practical data are listed: city, postal and electronic-mail addresses, telephone and fax numbers, URLs for WWW access, foundation years, numbers of members and/or numbers of staff, main activities, publications titles (with frequencies, ISS-Numbers and circulations), names and geographical coordinates of observing sites, names of planetariums, awards (prizes and/or distinctions) granted, etc. The entries are listed alphabetically in each country. An exhaustive index gives a breakdown not only by different designations and

  14. Clues About the First Stars from CEMP-no Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meynet, Georges; Maeder, André; Choplin, Arthur; Hirschi, Raphael; Ekström, Sylvia; Chiappini, Cristina

    2015-08-01

    The material used to form the CEMP-no stars presents signatures of material processed by the CNO cycle and by He-burning from a previous stellar generation called the source stars. In order to reproduce the absolute amounts of CNO elements observed at the surface of CEMP-no stars ([X/H] values), as well as the relative abundance ratios, for instance C/N, O/N or 12C/13C, some mixing between the two burning regions must have occured in the source stars and only the outer layers of the source stars, with modest amount coming from the CO core, must have been expelled either through stellar winds or at the time of the (faint) supernova event. With new models at low metallicity including rotational mixing, we shall discuss how the variety of abundances observed at the surface of CEMP-no stars can be reproduced. Some new results about the s-process nucleosynthesis by massive metal-poor rotating stars will also be presented.

  15. Primary Progressive Aphasia

    MedlinePlus

    Primary progressive aphasia Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Primary progressive aphasia (uh-FAY-zhuh) is a rare nervous system (neurological) syndrome ... your ability to communicate. People with primary progressive aphasia can have trouble expressing their thoughts and understanding ...

  16. Be stars with white dwarf companions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orio, Marina; Luna, Gerardo; Zemko, Polina; Kotulla, Ralf; Gallagher, Jay; Harbeck, Daniel

    2016-07-01

    A handful of supersoft X-ray sources in the Magellanic Clouds that could not be identified with transient nova outbursts turned out to be mainly massive close binaries. Recently, we have clearly identified a Be binary in M31, and are currently collecting data for another candidate in that galaxy. Work is in progress to assess whether the compact object companion really is a hydrogen burning white dwarf (the alternative being a massive stellar-mass black hole). If we can prove that Be+white dwarf interacting close binaries are common, and that hydrogen is often ignited on the white dwarf in these systems, we have discovered a new promising channel towards the explosion of supernovae of type Ia in star forming regions, without invoking double degenerate systems

  17. Surface abundances of ON stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, F.; Simón-Díaz, S.; Palacios, A.; Howarth, I.; Georgy, C.; Walborn, N. R.; Bouret, J.-C.; Barbá, R.

    2015-06-01

    Context. Massive stars burn hydrogen through the CNO cycle during most of their evolution. When mixing is efficient or when mass transfer in binary systems occurs, chemically processed material is observed at the surface of O and B stars. Aims: ON stars show stronger lines of nitrogen than morphologically normal counterparts. Whether this corresponds to the presence of material processed through the CNO cycle is not known. Our goal is to answer this question. Methods: We performed a spectroscopic analysis of a sample of ON stars with atmosphere models. We determined the fundamental parameters as well as the He, C, N, and O surface abundances. We also measured the projected rotational velocities. We compared the properties of the ON stars to those of normal O stars. Results: We show that ON stars are usually rich in helium. Their CNO surface abundances are fully consistent with predictions of nucleosynthesis. ON stars are more chemically evolved and rotate - on average - faster than normal O stars. Evolutionary models including rotation cannot account for the extreme enrichment observed among ON main sequence stars. Some ON stars are members of binary systems, but others are single stars as indicated by stable radial velocities. Mass transfer is therefore not a simple explanation for the observed chemical properties. Conclusions: We conclude that ON stars show extreme chemical enrichment at their surface, consistent with nucleosynthesis through the CNO cycle. Its origin is not clear at present. Based on observations obtained 1) at the Anglo-Australian Telescope; 2) at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT), which is operated by the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada, the Institut National des Science de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) of France, and the University of Hawaii; 3) at the ESO/La Silla Observatory under programs 081.D-2008, 083.D-0589, 086.D-0997; 4) the Nordic Optical Telescope, operated on the island of La

  18. Stellar and Binary Evolution in Star Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McMillan, Stephen L. W.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents a final report on research activities covered on Stellar and Binary Evolution in Star Clusters. Substantial progress was made in the development and dissemination of the "Starlab" software environment. Significant improvements were made to "kira," an N-body simulation program tailored to the study of dense stellar systems such as star clusters and galactic nuclei. Key advances include (1) the inclusion of stellar and binary evolution in a self-consistent manner, (2) proper treatment of the anisotropic Galactic tidal field, (3) numerous technical enhancements in the treatment of binary dynamics and interactions, and (4) full support for the special-purpose GRAPE-4 hardware, boosting the program's performance by a factor of 10-100 over the accelerated version. The data-reduction and analysis tools in Starlab were also substantially expanded. A Starlab Web site (http://www.sns.ias.edu/-starlab) was created and developed. The site contains detailed information on the structure and function of the various tools that comprise the package, as well as download information, "how to" tips and examples of common operations, demonstration programs, animations, etc. All versions of the software are freely distributed to all interested users, along with detailed installation instructions.

  19. The Destructive Birth of Massive Stars and Massive Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, Anna; Krumholz, Mark; McKee, Christopher F.; Klein, Richard I.; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico

    2017-01-01

    Massive stars play an essential role in the Universe. They are rare, yet the energy and momentum they inject into the interstellar medium with their intense radiation fields dwarfs the contribution by their vastly more numerous low-mass cousins. Previous theoretical and observational studies have concluded that the feedback associated with massive stars' radiation fields is the dominant mechanism regulating massive star and massive star cluster (MSC) formation. Therefore detailed simulation of the formation of massive stars and MSCs, which host hundreds to thousands of massive stars, requires an accurate treatment of radiation. For this purpose, we have developed a new, highly accurate hybrid radiation algorithm that properly treats the absorption of the direct radiation field from stars and the re-emission and processing by interstellar dust. We use our new tool to perform a suite of three-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamic simulations of the formation of massive stars and MSCs. For individual massive stellar systems, we simulate the collapse of massive pre-stellar cores with laminar and turbulent initial conditions and properly resolve regions where we expect instabilities to grow. We find that mass is channeled to the massive stellar system via gravitational and Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instabilities. For laminar initial conditions, proper treatment of the direct radiation field produces later onset of RT instability, but does not suppress it entirely provided the edges of the radiation-dominated bubbles are adequately resolved. RT instabilities arise immediately for turbulent pre-stellar cores because the initial turbulence seeds the instabilities. To model MSC formation, we simulate the collapse of a dense, turbulent, magnetized Mcl = 106 M⊙ molecular cloud. We find that the influence of the magnetic pressure and radiative feedback slows down star formation. Furthermore, we find that star formation is suppressed along dense filaments where the magnetic field is

  20. StarFISH: For Inferring Star-formation Histories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Jason; Zaritsky, Dennis

    2012-04-01

    StarFISH is a suite of programs designed to determine the star formation history (SFH) of a stellar population, given multicolor stellar photometry and a library of theoretical isochrones. It constructs a library of synthetic color-magnitude diagrams from the isochrones, which includes the effects of extinction, photometric errors and completeness, and binarity. A minimization routine is then used to determine the linear combination of synthetic CMDs that best matches the observed photometry. The set of amplitudes modulating each synthetic CMD describes the star formation history of the observed stellar population.

  1. Improving night sky star image processing algorithm for star sensors.

    PubMed

    Arbabmir, Mohammad Vali; Mohammadi, Seyyed Mohammad; Salahshour, Sadegh; Somayehee, Farshad

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, the night sky star image processing algorithm, consisting of image preprocessing, star pattern recognition, and centroiding steps, is improved. It is shown that the proposed noise reduction approach can preserve more necessary information than other frequently used approaches. It is also shown that the proposed thresholding method unlike commonly used techniques can properly perform image binarization, especially in images with uneven illumination. Moreover, the higher performance rate and lower average centroiding estimation error of near 0.045 for 400 simulated images compared to other algorithms show the high capability of the proposed night sky star image processing algorithm.

  2. Abundances in Przybylski's star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowley, C. R.; Ryabchikova, T.; Kupka, F.; Bord, D. J.; Mathys, G.; Bidelman, W. P.

    2000-09-01

    We have derived abundances for 54 elements in the extreme roAp star HD101065. ESO spectra with a resolution of about 80000, and S/N of 200 or more were employed. The adopted model has Teff=6600K, and log(g)=4.2. Because of the increased line opacity and consequent low gas pressure, convection plays no significant role in the temperature structure. Lighter elemental abundances through the iron group scatter about standard abundance distribution (SAD) (solar) values. Iron and nickel are about one order of magnitude deficient while cobalt is enhanced by 1.5dex. Heavier elements, including the lanthanides, generally follow the solar pattern but enhanced by 3 to 4dex. Odd-Z elements are generally less abundant than their even-Z neighbours. With a few exceptions (e.g. Yb), the abundance pattern among the heavy elements is remarkably coherent, and resembles a displaced solar distribution.

  3. Gaia and variable stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyer, Laurent; Holl, Berry; Mowlavi, Nami

    2014-01-01

    The study of variable phenomena (periodic, irregular or transient) provides a unique way to acquire knowledge about objects in our Universe. Currently, we are going through a rapid expansion of time-domain astrophysics. One reason for this expansion is the technological developments materialised in small to medium size observational projects such as HAT, OGLE, Catalina, PTF and upcoming very large projects such as Gaia or LSST. In this article, we are focusing on the ESA cornerstone mission Gaia. This spacecraft will provide astrometric, photometric and spectroscopic measurements for one billion stars. Among the existing and planned multi-epoch projects Gaia is unique because it will provide exquisite astrometric measurements for all objects it observes. We provide a brief overview of the literature concerning this mission and its expected contribution to variability studies.

  4. StarCam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swift, Wesley

    1999-01-01

    This project can be defined by it's three phases. The goals of Phase A of this contract are to (1) Determine the required dynamic range of the combined sky and stellar image and to (2) Specify camera and optics. That was accomplished and reported in the Phase A report attached. The goals of Phase B of this contract are to 1) Produce and demonstrate algorithms for starfield background removal, 2) Produce and demonstrate star tracking and centroiding algorithms, 3) Prepare and demonstrate pointing and auto- focus algorithms, and 4) Consult with those who develop flight software on above algorithms. We are pleased to report that the above has been accomplished and delivered to NASA via our contracting contact for this project, Cheryl Alexander and are attached here. We are proud to present this final report with the expectations that all should work as planned and under budget as well: two cameras for the expected price of one.

  5. Host's stars and habitability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallet, F.; Charbonnel, C.; Amard, L.

    2015-12-01

    With about 2000 exoplanets discovered within a large range of different configurations of distance from the star, size, mass, and atmospheric conditions, the concept of habitability cannot rely only on the stellar effective temperature anymore. In addition to the natural evolution of habitability with the intrinsic stellar parameters, tidal, magnetic, and atmospheric interactions are believed to have strong impact on the relative position of the planets inside the so-called habitable zone. Moreover, the notion of habitability itself strongly depends on the definition we give to the term ``habitable''. The aim of this talk is to provide a global and up-to-date overview of the work done during the last few years about the description and the modelling of the habitability, and to present the physical processes currently includes in this description.

  6. Shooting Star Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The Shooting Star Experiment (SSE) is designed to develop and demonstrate the technology required to focus the Sun's energy and use the energy for inexpensive space propulsion research. Pictured is an engineering model (Pathfinder III) of SSE and its thermal vacuum test to simulate in-orbit conditions at the X-Ray Calibration Facility at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). This model was used to test and characterize the motion and deformation of the structure caused by thermal effects. In this photograph, alignment targets are being placed on the engineering model so that a theodolite (alignment telescope) could be used to accurately measure the deformation and deflection of the engineering model under extreme condition, such as the coldness of deep space and the hotness of the Sun, as well as vacuum.

  7. Neutron Star Mass Distribution in Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chang-Hwan; Kim, Young-Min

    2016-05-01

    Massive neutron stars with ∼ 2Mʘ have been observed in neutron star-white dwarf binaries. On the other hand, well-measured neutron star masses in double-neutron-star binaries are still consistent with the limit of 1.5Mʘ. These observations raised questions on the neutron star equations of state and the neutron star binary evolution processes. In this presentation, a hypothesis of super-Eddington accretion and its implications are discussed. We argue that a 2Mʘ neutron star is an outcome of the super-Eddington accretion during the evolution of neutron star-white dwarf binary progenitors. We also suggest the possibility of the existence of new type of neutron star binary which consists of a typical neutron star and a massive compact companion (high-mass neutron star or black hole) with M ≥ 2Mʘ.

  8. The Maximum Mass of Rotating Strange Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szkudlarek, M.; Gondek-Rosiń; ska, D.; Villain, L.; Ansorg, M.

    2012-12-01

    Strange quark stars are considered as a possible alternative to neutron stars as compact objects (e.g. Weber 2003). A hot compact star (a proto-neutron star or a strange star) born in a supernova explosion or a remnant of neutron stars binary merger are expected to rotate differentially and be important sources of gravitational waves. We present results of the first relativistic calculations of differentially rotating strange quark stars for broad ranges of degree of differential rotation and maximum densities. Using a highly accurate, relativistic code we show that rotation may cause a significant increase of maximum allowed mass of strange stars, much larger than in the case of neutron stars with the same degree of differential rotation. Depending on the maximum allowed mass a massive neutron star (strange star) can be temporarily stabilized by differential rotation or collapse to a black hole.

  9. "Catch a Star !"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-05-01

    ESO and EAAE Launch Web-based Educational Programme for Europe's Schools Catch a star!... and discover all its secrets! This is the full title of an innovative educational project, launched today by the European Southern Observatory (ESO) and the European Association for Astronomy Education (EAAE). It welcomes all students in Europe's schools to an exciting web-based programme with a competition. It takes place within the context of the EC-sponsored European Week of Science and Technology (EWST) - 2002 . This unique project revolves around a web-based competition and is centred on astronomy. It is specifically conceived to stimulate the interest of young people in various aspects of this well-known field of science, but will also be of interest to the broad public. What is "Catch a Star!" about? [Go to Catch a Star Website] The programme features useful components from the world of research, but it is specifically tailored to (high-)school students. Younger participants are also welcome. Groups of up to four persons (e.g., three students and one teacher) have to select an astronomical object - a bright star, a distant galaxy, a beautiful comet, a planet or a moon in the solar system, or some other celestial body. Like detectives, they must then endeavour to find as much information as possible about "their" object. This information may be about the position and visibility in the sky, the physical and chemical characteristics, particular historical aspects, related mythology and sky lore, etc. They can use any source available, the web, books, newspaper and magazine articles, CDs etc. for this work. The group members must prepare a (short) summarising report about this investigation and "their" object, with their own ideas and conclusions, and send it to ESO (email address: eduinfo@eso.org). A jury, consisting of specialists from ESO and the EAAE, will carefully evaluate these reports. All projects that are found to fulfill the stipulated requirements, including a

  10. Star-forming Filament Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, Philip C.

    2017-03-01

    New models of star-forming filamentary clouds are presented in order to quantify their properties and to predict their evolution. These 2D axisymmetric models describe filaments that have no core, one low-mass core, and one cluster-forming core. They are based on Plummer-like cylinders and spheroids that are bounded by a constant-density surface of finite extent. In contrast to 1D Plummer-like models, they have specific values of length and mass, they approximate observed column density maps, and their distributions of column density (N-pdfs) are pole-free. Each model can estimate the star-forming potential of a core-filament system by identifying the zone of gas dense enough to form low-mass stars and by counting the number of enclosed thermal Jeans masses. This analysis suggests that the Musca central filament may be near the start of its star-forming life, with enough dense gas to make its first ∼3 protostars, while the Coronet filament is near the midpoint of its star formation, with enough dense gas to add ∼8 protostars to its ∼20 known stars. In contrast, L43 appears to be near the end of its star-forming life, since it lacks enough dense gas to add any new protostars to the two young stellar objectsalready known.

  11. Strange-quark-matter stars

    SciTech Connect

    Glendenning, N.K.

    1989-11-01

    We investigate the implications of rapid rotation corresponding to the frequency of the new pulsar reported in the supernovae remnant SN1987A. It places very stringent conditions on the equation of state if the star is assumed to be bound by gravity alone. We find that the central energy density of the star must be greater than 13 times that of nuclear density to be stable against the most optimistic estimate of general relativistic instabilities. This is too high for the matter to consist of individual hadrons. We conclude that it is implausible that the newly discovered pulsar, if its half-millisecond signals are attributable to rotation, is a neutron star. We show that it can be a strange quark star, and that the entire family of strange stars can sustain high rotation if strange matter is stable at an energy density exceeding about 5.4 times that of nuclear matter. We discuss the conversion of a neutron star to strange star, the possible existence of a crust of heavy ions held in suspension by centrifugal and electric forces, the cooling and other features. 34 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Rapidly rotating neutron star progenitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Postnov, K. A.; Kuranov, A. G.; Kolesnikov, D. A.; Popov, S. B.; Porayko, N. K.

    2016-12-01

    Rotating proto-neutron stars can be important sources of gravitational waves to be searched for by present-day and future interferometric detectors. It was demonstrated by Imshennik that in extreme cases the rapid rotation of a collapsing stellar core may lead to fission and formation of a binary proto-neutron star which subsequently merges due to gravitational wave emission. In this paper, we show that such dynamically unstable collapsing stellar cores may be the product of a former merger process of two stellar cores in a common envelope. We applied population synthesis calculations to assess the expected fraction of such rapidly rotating stellar cores which may lead to fission and formation of a pair of proto-neutron stars. We have used the BSE (Binary Star Evolution) population synthesis code supplemented with a new treatment of stellar core rotation during the evolution via effective core-envelope coupling, characterized by the coupling time, τc. The validity of this approach is checked by direct MESA calculations of the evolution of a rotating 15 M⊙ star. From comparison of the calculated spin distribution of young neutron stars with the observed one, reported by Popov and Turolla, we infer the value τc ≃ 5 × 105 yr. We show that merging of stellar cores in common envelopes can lead to collapses with dynamically unstable proto-neutron stars, with their formation rate being ˜0.1-1 per cent of the total core collapses, depending on the common envelope efficiency.

  13. Gravitational Waves from Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokkotas, Konstantinos

    2016-03-01

    Neutron stars are the densest objects in the present Universe, attaining physical conditions of matter that cannot be replicated on Earth. These unique and irreproducible laboratories allow us to study physics in some of its most extreme regimes. More importantly, however, neutron stars allow us to formulate a number of fundamental questions that explore, in an intricate manner, the boundaries of our understanding of physics and of the Universe. The multifaceted nature of neutron stars involves a delicate interplay among astrophysics, gravitational physics, and nuclear physics. The research in the physics and astrophysics of neutron stars is expected to flourish and thrive in the next decade. The imminent direct detection of gravitational waves will turn gravitational physics into an observational science, and will provide us with a unique opportunity to make major breakthroughs in gravitational physics, in particle and high-energy astrophysics. These waves, which represent a basic prediction of Einstein's theory of general relativity but have yet to be detected directly, are produced in copious amounts, for instance, by tight binary neutron star and black hole systems, supernovae explosions, non-axisymmetric or unstable spinning neutron stars. The focus of the talk will be on the neutron star instabilities induced by rotation and the magnetic field. The conditions for the onset of these instabilities and their efficiency in gravitational waves will be presented. Finally, the dependence of the results and their impact on astrophysics and especially nuclear physics will be discussed.

  14. Hot stars in globular clusters.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moehler, S.

    Globular clusters are ideal laboratories to study the evolution of low-mass stars. In this review, I shall concentrate on two types of hot stars observed in globular clusters: horizontal branch stars and UV bright stars. The third type, the white dwarfs, are covered by Bono in this volume. While the morphology of the horizontal branch correlates strongly with metallicity, it has been known for a long time that one parameter is not sufficient to describe the diversity of observed horizontal branch morphologies. A veritable zoo of candidates for this elusive ``2{nd} parameter'' has been suggested over the past decades, and the most prominent ones will be briefly discussed here. Adding to the complications, diffusion is active in the atmospheres of hot horizontal branch stars, which makes their analysis much more diffcult. The latest twist along the horizontal branch was added by the recent discovery of an extension to hotter temperatures and fainter magnitudes, the so-called ``blue hook''. The evolutionary origin of these stars is still under debate. I shall also give a brief overview of our current knowledge about hot UV bright stars and use them to illustrate the adverse effects of selection bias.

  15. PULSATING B-TYPE STARS IN THE OPEN CLUSTER NGC 884: FREQUENCIES, MODE IDENTIFICATION, AND ASTEROSEISMOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Saesen, S.; Briquet, M.; Aerts, C.; Carrier, F.; Miglio, A.

    2013-10-01

    Recent progress in the seismic interpretation of field β Cep stars has resulted in improvements of the physical description in the stellar structure and evolution model computations of massive stars. Further asteroseismic constraints can be obtained from studying ensembles of stars in a young open cluster, which all have similar age, distance, and chemical composition. We present an observational asteroseismology study based on the discovery of numerous multi-periodic and mono-periodic B stars in the open cluster NGC 884. We describe a thorough investigation of the pulsational properties of all B-type stars in the cluster. Overall, our detailed frequency analysis resulted in 115 detected frequencies in 65 stars. We found 36 mono-periodic, 16 bi-periodic, 10 tri-periodic, and 2 quadru-periodic stars and one star with nine independent frequencies. We also derived the amplitudes and phases of all detected frequencies in the U, B, V, and I filter, if available. We achieved unambiguous identifications of the mode degree for 12 of the detected frequencies in nine of the pulsators. Imposing the identified degrees and measured frequencies of the radial, dipole, and quadrupole modes of five pulsators led to a seismic cluster age estimate of log (age/yr) = 7.12-7.28 from a comparison with stellar models. Our study is a proof-of-concept for and illustrates the current status of ensemble asteroseismology of a young open cluster.

  16. Asteroseismology of EC14026 Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charpinet, Stephane; Fontaine, G.; Brassard, P.; Billères, M.

    2001-05-01

    EC14026 stars form a class of pulsating stars which recent discovery originates back to 1997 (Kilkenny et al. 1997, MNRAS, 285,640). These are hot, relatively compact objets belonging to the class of subdwarf B (or sdB) stars and showing rapid multiperiodic (P 80-600 seconds), low amplitude (a few millimags) luminosity variations. These stars are identified to Extended Horizontal Branch (EHB) models, and thus are evolved, low mass (M 0.5 Modot) core helium burning objects (Dorman et al. 1993, ApJ, 415, 596). The theory of EC14026 stars, which origin is anterior to their "observational discovery" (their existence was predicted on these theoretical basis; Charpinet et al. 1996, ApJ, 471, L103), is nowadays in a relatively mature state. The mode driving mechanism identified is a kappa-mechanism caused by the formation, due to microscopic chemical diffusion processes, of a strongly overabundant reservoir of iron in the envelope of these stars. This theory has been remarkably consistent with the rapidly growing amounts of observational data so far, thus opening the way to a potentially very fruitful application of the tools of asteroseismology to probe the structure of these objects. In this context, I will present a method to constrain, with asteroseismology, the stellar parameters of EC14026 stars. This method is based on the construction of large grids of pulsating subdwarf B star models, each model being analysed with a linear nonadiabatic pulsation code, aimed at deriving the most appropriate set of model parameters that can best reproduce the observed periods of a given pulsating sdB star. With this method, fundamental quantities such as the effective temperature, the surface gravity, the total mass, and the mass of the H-rich envelope can be inferred.

  17. Precarious Stars — a Variety of Boson Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafizi, M.

    In this paper we study boson stars made up of real scalar λϕ4 self-interacting fields at finite temperature. For the reason of their equation of state, we call these configurations "precarious stars." The equation of state for these stars follows from the Gaussian approximation applied to real scalar λϕ4 self-interacting fields. We numerically calculate these configurations in the frame of general relativity. We obtain masses, radii, surface temperatures and other characteristics. After a numerical analysis of the thermal radiation emitted from their surface, we conclude that these stars radiate rapidly all their energy and mass. Nevertheless, we raise the question of the role these configurations may have played in formation of the large scale structures of the Universe.

  18. Neutron star structure from QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraga, Eduardo S.; Kurkela, Aleksi; Vuorinen, Aleksi

    2016-03-01

    In this review article, we argue that our current understanding of the thermodynamic properties of cold QCD matter, originating from first principles calculations at high and low densities, can be used to efficiently constrain the macroscopic properties of neutron stars. In particular, we demonstrate that combining state-of-the-art results from Chiral Effective Theory and perturbative QCD with the current bounds on neutron star masses, the Equation of State of neutron star matter can be obtained to an accuracy better than 30% at all densities.

  19. The Sun: Our Nearest Star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, M. L.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We have in our celestial backyard, a prime example of a variable star. The Sun, long thought to be "perfect" and unvarying, began to reveal its cycles in the early 1600s as Galileo Galilei and Christoph Scheiner used a telescope to study sunspots. For the past four hundred years, scientists have accumulated data, showing a magnetic cycle that repeats, on average, every eleven (or twenty-two) years. In addition, modern satellites have shown that the energy output at radio and x-ray wavelengths also varies with this cycle. This talk will showcase the Sun as a star and discuss how solar studies may be used to understand other stars.

  20. The formation of sunlike stars.

    PubMed

    Lada, C J; Shu, F H

    1990-05-04

    Understanding how stars like the sun formed constitutes one of the principal challenges confronting modern astrophysics. In recent years, advances in observational technology, particularly at infrared and millimeter wavelengths, have produced an avalanche of critical data and unexpected discoveries about the process of star formation, which is blocked from external view at optical and shorter wavelengths by an obscuring blanket of interstellar dust. Fueled by this new knowledge, a comprehensive empirical picture of stellar genesis is beginning to emerge, laying the foundations for a coherent theory of the birth of sunlike stars.

  1. The early evolution of stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strom, Stephen E.

    1995-01-01

    This review outlines the observational properties of young stellar objects as they evolve from their birth within dense rotating molecular cores to fully-formed pre-main sequence stars. Current work suggests that most of the mass which ultimately comprises a fully-formed star is transferred from a flattened infalling envelope (of size approximately several thousand AU) through a circumstellar accretion disk to the stellar surface. We summarize current estimates for the duration of the envelope infall and disk accretion phases and discuss the implication of these timescales for the formation of stars of different mass and of planetary systems.

  2. Spectroscopy of γ Doradus stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunsden, E.; Pollard, K. R.; Cottrell, P. L.; Wright, D. J.; De Cat, P.; Kilmartin, P. M.

    2014-02-01

    The musician programme at the University of Canterbury has been successfully identifying pulsation modes in many γ Doradus stars using hundreds of ground-based spectroscopic observations. This paper describes some of the successful mode identifications and emerging patterns of the programme. The hybrid γ Doradus/δ Scuti star HD 49434 remains an enigma, despite the analysis of more than 1700 multi-site high-resolution spectra. A new result for this star is apparently distinct line-profile variations for the γ Doradus and δ Scuti frequencies.

  3. Tidal resonances in binary star systems. II - Slowly rotating stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, M. E.

    1988-12-01

    The potential energy of tidal interactions in a binary system with rotating components is formulated as a perturbation Hamiltonian which self-consistently couples the dynamics of the rotating stars' oscillations and orbital motion. The action-angle formalism used to discuss tidal resonances in the nonrotating case (Alexander, 1987) is extended to rotating stars. The behavior of a two-mode system and the procedure for treating an arbitrary number of modes are discussed.

  4. The Stars behind the Curtain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-02-01

    ESO is releasing a magnificent VLT image of the giant stellar nursery surrounding NGC 3603, in which stars are continuously being born. Embedded in this scenic nebula is one of the most luminous and most compact clusters of young, massive stars in our Milky Way, which therefore serves as an excellent "local" analogue of very active star-forming regions in other galaxies. The cluster also hosts the most massive star to be "weighed" so far. NGC 3603 is a starburst region: a cosmic factory where stars form frantically from the nebula's extended clouds of gas and dust. Located 22 000 light-years away from the Sun, it is the closest region of this kind known in our galaxy, providing astronomers with a local test bed for studying intense star formation processes, very common in other galaxies, but hard to observe in detail because of their great distance from us. The nebula owes its shape to the intense light and winds coming from the young, massive stars which lift the curtains of gas and clouds revealing a multitude of glowing suns. The central cluster of stars inside NGC 3603 harbours thousands of stars of all sorts (eso9946): the majority have masses similar to or less than that of our Sun, but most spectacular are several of the very massive stars that are close to the end of their lives. Several blue supergiant stars crowd into a volume of less than a cubic light-year, along with three so-called Wolf-Rayet stars - extremely bright and massive stars that are ejecting vast amounts of material before finishing off in glorious explosions known as supernovae. Using another recent set of observations performed with the SINFONI instrument on ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT), astronomers have confirmed that one of these stars is about 120 times more massive than our Sun, standing out as the most massive star known so far in the Milky Way [1]. The clouds of NGC 3603 provide us with a family picture of stars in different stages of their life, with gaseous structures that are

  5. A Heavy Flavor Tracker for STAR

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Z.; Chen, Y.; Kleinfelder, S.; Koohi, A.; Li, S.; Huang, H.; Tai, A.; Kushpil, V.; Sumbera, M.; Colledani, C.; Dulinski, W.; Himmi,A.; Hu, C.; Shabetai, A.; Szelezniak, M.; Valin, I.; Winter, M.; Miller,M.; Surrow, B.; Van Nieuwenhuizen G.; Bieser, F.; Gareus, R.; Greiner,L.; Lesser, F.; Matis, H.S.; Oldenburg, M.; Ritter, H.G.; Pierpoint, L.; Retiere, F.; Rose, A.; Schweda, K.; Sichtermann, E.; Thomas, J.H.; Wieman, H.; Yamamoto, E.; Kotov, I.

    2005-03-14

    We propose to construct a Heavy Flavor Tracker (HFT) for theSTAR experiment at RHIC. The HFT will bring new physics capabilities toSTAR and it will significantly enhance the physics capabilities of theSTAR detector at central rapidities. The HFT will ensure that STAR willbe able to take heavy flavor data at all luminosities attainablethroughout the proposed RHIC II era.

  6. A Heavy Flavor Tracker for STAR

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Z.; Chen, Y.; Kleinfelder, S.; Koohi, A.; Li, S.; Huang, H.; Tai, A.; Kushpil, V.; Sumbera, M.; Colledani, C.; Dulinski, W.; Himmi,A.; Hu, C.; Shabetai, A.; Szelezniak, M.; Valin, I.; Winter, M.; Surrow,B.; Van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Bieser, F.; Gareus, R.; Greiner, L.; Lesser,F.; Matis, H.S.; Oldenburg, M.; Ritter, H.G.; Pierpoint, L.; Retiere, F.; Rose, A.; Schweda, K.; Sichtermann, E.; Thomas, J.H.; Wieman, H.; Yamamoto, E.; Kotov, I.

    2005-03-14

    We propose to construct a Heavy Flavor Tracker (HFT) for the STAR experiment at RHIC. The HFT will bring new physics capabilities to STAR and it will significantly enhance the physics capabilities of the STAR detector at central rapidities. The HFT will ensure that STAR will be able to take heavy flavor data at all luminosities attainable throughout the proposed RHIC II era.

  7. Theoretical Considerations of Massive Star Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yorke, Harold W.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the formation of massive stars. The formation of massive stars is different in many ways from the formation of other stars. The presentation shows the math, and the mechanisms that must be possible for a massive star to form.

  8. Recovery From Giant Eruptions in Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashi, A.; Davidson, K.; Humphreys, R. M.

    2015-12-01

    We perform radiation hydrodynamic simulations to study how very massive stars recover from giant eruptions. The post eruption star experience strong mass loss due to strong winds, driven by radial pulsations in the star*s interior, that operate by the κ-mechanism. The mass loss history obtained in our simulations resembles η Car*s history.

  9. Star formation in the starburst cluster in NGC 3603

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correnti, Matteo; Paresce, Francesco; Aversa, Rossella; Beccari, Giacomo; De Marchi, Guido; Di Criscienzo, Marcella; Pang, Xiaoying; Spezzi, Loredana; Valenti, Elena; Ventura, Paolo

    2012-08-01

    We have used new, deep, visible and near infrared observations of the compact starburst cluster in the giant HII region NGC 3603 and its surroundings with the WFC3 on HST and HAWK-I on the VLT to study in detail the physical properties of its intermediate mass (˜1-3 M⊙) stellar population. We show that after correction for differential extinction and actively accreting stars, and the study of field star contamination, strong evidence remains for a continuous spread in the ages of pre-main sequence stars in the range ˜2 to ˜30 Myr within the temporal resolution available. Existing differences among presently available theoretical models account for the largest possible variation in shape of the measured age histograms within these limits. We also find that this isochronal age spread in the near infrared and visible Colour-Magnitude Diagrams cannot be reproduced by any other presently known source of astrophysical or instrumental scatter that could mimic the luminosity spread seen in our observations except, possibly, episodic accretion. The measured age spread and the stellar spatial distribution in the cluster are consistent with the hypothesis that star formation started at least 20-30 Myrs ago progressing slowly but continuously up to at least a few million years ago. All the stars in the considered mass range are distributed in a flattened oblate spheroidal pattern with the major axis oriented in an approximate South-East-North-West direction, and with the length of the equatorial axis decreasing with increasing age. This asymmetry is most likely due to the fact that star formation occurred along a filament of gas and dust in the natal molecular cloud oriented locally in this direction.

  10. The Neutron Star Zoo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, Alice K.

    2014-01-01

    Neutron stars are a very diverse population, both in their observational and their physical properties. They prefer to radiate most of their energy at X-ray and gamma-ray wavelengths. But whether their emission is powered by rotation, accretion, heat, magnetic fields or nuclear reactions, they are all different species of the same animal whose magnetic field evolution and interior composition remain a mystery. This article will broadly review the properties of inhabitants of the neutron star zoo, with emphasis on their high-energy emission. XXX Neutron stars are found in a wide variety of sources, displaying an amazing array of behavior. They can be isolated or in binary systems, accreting, heating, cooling, spinning down, spinning up, pulsing, flaring and bursting. The one property that seems to determine their behavior most strongly is their magnetic field strength, structure and evolution. The hot polar caps, bursts and flares of magnetars are likely due to the rapid decay and twisting of their superstrong magnetic fields, whose very existence requires some kind of early dynamo activity. The intermediate-strength magnetic fields of RPPs determines their spin-down behavior and radiation properties. However, the overlap of the magnetar and RPP populations is not understood at present. Why don't high-field RPPs burst or flare? Why don't lower-field magnetars sometimes behave more like RPPs? INS may be old magnetars whose high fields have decayed, but they do not account for the existence of younger RPPs with magnetar-strength fields. Not only the strength of the magnetic field but also its configuration may be important in making a NS a magnetar or a RPP. Magnetic field decay is a critical link between other NS populations as well. "Decay" of the magnetic field is necessary for normal RPPs to evolve into MSPs through accretion and spin up in LMXBs. Some kind of accretion-driven field reduction is the most likely mechanism, but it is controversial since it is not

  11. STAR Measurements and Modeling for Quantifying Air Quality and Climatic Impacts of Residential Biomass or Coal Combustion for Cooking, Heating and Lighting Kick-off Meeting

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    STAR grantees and EPA scientists will discuss progress on their projects which aim to quantify the extent to which interventions for cleaner cooking, heating, or lighting can impact air quality and climate, which in turn affect human health and welfare

  12. Chandra Captures Neutron Star Action

    NASA Video Gallery

    This movie from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory shows a fast moving jet of particles produced by a rapidly rotating neutron star, and may provide new insight into the nature of some of the densest...

  13. Coronal Structures in Cool Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliversen, Ronald (Technical Monitor); Duprec, Andrea K.

    2003-01-01

    Many papers have been published that further elucidate the structure of coronas in cool stars as determined from EUVE, HST, FUSE, Chandra, and XMM-Newton observations. Highlights of these are summarized including publications during this reporting period and presentations.

  14. Sleuthing the Isolated Compact Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, J. J.

    2004-08-01

    In the early 1990's, isolated thermally-emitting neutron stars accreting from the interstellar medium were predicted to show up in their thousands in the ROSAT soft X-ray all-sky survey. The glut of sources would provide unprecedented opportunities for probing the equation of state of ultra-dense matter. Only seven objects have been firmly identified to date. The reasons for this discrepency are discussed and recent high resolution X-ray spectroscopic observations of these objects are described. Spectra of the brightest of the isolated neutron star candidates, RX J1856.5-3754, continue to present interpretational difficulties for current neutron star model atmospheres and alternative models are briefly discussed. RX J1856.5-3754 remains a valid quark star candidate.

  15. The star arboricity of graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Algor, Ilan

    1988-03-01

    The problem concerns the minimum time in which a number of messages can be transmitted through a communication network in which each node can transmit to many other nodes simultaneously but can receive only one message at a time. In the undirected version of the problem, the graphs, G, representing the messages are finite, undirected and simple; the messages transmitted in unit time form a subgraph which is a star. The star aboricity, st(G) of a graph G is the minimum number of star forests whose union covers all edges of G. A maximum value is derived for the star aboricity of any d-regular graph G, and is proved through probabilistic arguments.

  16. The STAR Vertex Position Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llope, W. J.; Zhou, J.; Nussbaum, T.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Asselta, K.; Brandenburg, J. D.; Butterworth, J.; Camarda, T.; Christie, W.; Crawford, H. J.; Dong, X.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Geurts, F.; Hammond, J.; Judd, E.; McDonald, D. L.; Perkins, C.; Ruan, L.; Scheblein, J.; Schambach, J. J.; Soja, R.; Xin, K.; Yang, C.

    2014-09-01

    The 2×3 channel pseudo Vertex Position Detector (pVPD) in the STAR experiment at RHIC has been upgraded to a 2×19 channel detector in the same acceptance, called the Vertex Position Detector (VPD). This detector is fully integrated into the STAR trigger system and provides the primary input to the minimum-bias trigger in Au+Au collisions. The information from the detector is used both in the STAR Level-0 trigger and offline to measure the location of the primary collision vertex along the beam pipe and the event "start time" needed by other fast-timing detectors in STAR. The offline timing resolution of single detector channels in full-energy Au+Au collisions is ~100 ps, resulting in a start time resolution of a few tens of picoseconds and a resolution on the primary vertex location of ~1 cm.

  17. Starspots on Young pms Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseev, I. Yu.

    2014-06-01

    Long-term, multiband photometric observations of 8 young PMS stars are used to construct models for their starspots. It is shown that the average density of starspots is up to 40 % of the total surface of a star (V824 Ara), while the difference in temperatures between a quiet photosphere and a spot ranges from 870 K (AB Dor) to 1700-1800 K (PZ Tel, V1321 Ori, V395 Cep). The spots lie at low (2-8°, V343 Nor) and medium (25-61°) latitudes, while the largest latitude of starspots is 16-80°. A cyclical activity that shows up as changes in the total area and average latitude of the starspots is observed in the stars PZ Tel, TY Col, V824 Ara, and AB Dor. A latitudinal drift of the starspots and differential rotation of the star are observed which are analogous to those of the sun.

  18. Neutron stars : Seen my way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundt, Wolfgang

    2001-09-01

    An unconventional survey is presented of the observable properties of neutron stars and of all astrophysical phenomena possibly related to them, such as their pulsing, clock irregularities, bursting, flickering, and occasional super-Eddington brightness, the generation of cosmic rays, of gamma-ray bursts, of jets, and of synchrotron nebulae, their birth, and their occasional transient appearance as 'supersoft' X-ray sources. The msec pulsars are argued to be born fast, the black-hole candidates to be neutron stars inside of massive disks, and the gamma-ray bursts to be sparks from dense 'blades' accreting spasmodically onto the surfaces of (generally old) neutron stars within " 0.3 Kpc from the Sun. Supernovae - the likely birth events of neutron stars - are thick-walled explosions, not to be described by Sedov-Taylor waves, which illuminate their gaseous environs via collisions of their 'splinters'.

  19. Star formation across galactic environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Jason

    I present here parallel investigations of star formation in typical and extreme galaxies. The typical galaxies are selected to be free of active galactic nuclei (AGN), while the extreme galaxies host quasars (the most luminous class of AGN). These two environments are each insightful in their own way; quasars are among the most violent objects in the universe, literally reshaping their host galaxies, while my sample of AGN-free star-forming galaxies ranges from systems larger than the Milky Way to small galaxies which are forming stars at unsustainably high rates. The current paradigm of galaxy formation and evolution suggests that extreme circumstances are key stepping stones in the assembly of galaxies like our Milky Way. To test this paradigm and fully explore its ramifications, this dual approach is needed. My sample of AGN-free galaxies is drawn from the KPNO International Spectroscopic Survey. This Halpha-selected, volume-limited survey was designed to detect star-forming galaxies without a bias toward continuum luminosity. This type of selection ensures that this sample is not biased toward galaxies that are large or nearby. My work studies the KISS galaxies in the mid- and far-infrared using photometry from the IRAC and MIPS instruments aboard the Spitzer Space Telescope. These infrared bands are particularly interesting for star formation studies because the ultraviolet light from young stars is reprocessed into thermal emission in the far-infrared (24mum MIPS) by dust and into vibrational transitions features in the mid-infrared (8.0mum IRAC) by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The work I present here examines the efficiencies of PAH and thermal dust emission as tracers of star-formation rates over a wide range of galactic stellar masses. I find that the efficiency of PAH as a star-formation tracer varies with galactic stellar mass, while thermal dust has a highly variable efficiency that does not systematically depend on galactic stellar mass

  20. GRBs from the First Stars

    SciTech Connect

    Iocco, Fabio; /Naples U. /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2007-04-16

    We present an estimate of the Gamma Ray Bursts which should be expected from metal-free, elusive first generation of stars known as PopulationIII (PopIII). We derive the GRB rate from these stars from the Stellar Formation Rate obtained in several Reionization scenarios available in the literature. In all of the analyzed models we find that GRBs from PopIII are subdominant with respect to the ''standard'' (PopII) ones up to z {approx} 10.

  1. STAR Vertex Detector Upgrade Development

    SciTech Connect

    Greiner, Leo C.; Matis, Howard S.; Stezelberger, Thorsten; Vu,Chinh Q.; Wieman, Howard; Szelezniak, Michal; Sun, Xiangming

    2008-01-28

    We report on the development and prototyping efforts undertaken with the goal of producing a micro-vertex detector for the STAR experiment at the RHIC accelerator at BNL. We present the basic detector requirements and show a sensor development path, conceptual mechanical design candidates and readout architecture. Prototyping and beam test results with current generation MimoSTAR-2 sensors and a readout system featuring FPGA based on-the-fly hit finding and data sparsification are also presented.

  2. Neutron star news and puzzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Madappa

    2014-08-01

    Gerry Brown has had the most influence on my career in Physics, and my life after graduate studies. This article gives a brief account of some of the many ways in which Gerry shaped my research. Focus is placed on the significant strides on neutron star research made by the group at Stony Brook, which Gerry built from scratch. Selected puzzles about neutron stars that remain to be solved are noted.

  3. Laser Guide Star Operational Issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Max, C. E.

    Introduction Operational Implications for the Laser System Rayleigh Scattering Focus Changes Variations in Sodium Column Density Requirement to Nod the Telescope for Infra-Red Observing Calibration of the Adaptive Optics System for Sodium Laser Guide - Star Operation Types of Internal Calibration Sources Static Calibration Auxiliary Wavefront Sensors Dynamic Calibration (Real-Time Point-Spread-Function Measurements) Safety Considerations Regarding Laser Guide Star Systems Laser Eye Safety Fire Safety Aircraft Avoidance Spacecraft Damage Avoidance Laser Coordination on Multi-Telescope Summits Conclusions

  4. Keepers of the double stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenn, Joseph S.

    2013-03-01

    Astronomers have long tracked double stars in efforts to find those that are gravitationally-bound binaries and then to determine their orbits. Early catalogues by the Herschels, Struves, and others began with their own discoveries. In 1906 court reporter and amateur astronomer Sherburne Wesley Burnham published a massive double star catalogue containing data from many observers on more than 13,000 systems. Lick Observatory astronomer Robert Grant Aitken produced a much larger catalogue in 1932 and coordinated with Robert Innes of Johannesburg, who catalogued the southern systems. Aitken maintained and expanded Burnham's records of observations on handwritten file cards, and eventually turned them over to the Lick Observatory, where astrometrist Hamilton Jeffers further expanded the collection and put all the observations on punched cards. With the aid of Frances M. "Rete" Greeby he made two catalogues: an Index Catalogue with basic data about each star, and a complete catalogue of observations, with one observation per punched card. He enlisted Willem van den Bos of Johannesburg to add southern stars, and together they published the Index Catalogue of Visual Double Stars, 1961.0. As Jeffers approached retirement he became greatly concerned about the disposition of the catalogues. He wanted to be replaced by another "double star man," but Lick Director Albert E. Whitford had the new 120-inch reflector, the world's second largest telescope, and he wanted to pursue modern astrophysics instead. Jeffers was vociferously opposed to turning over the card files to another institution, and especially against their coming under the control of Kaj Strand of the United States Naval Observatory. In the end the USNO got the files and has maintained the records ever since, first under Charles Worley, and, since 1997, under Brian Mason. Now called the Washington Double Star Catalog (WDS), it is completely online and currently contains more than 1,200,000 measures of more than 125

  5. How Far Are the Stars?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Edward; Bell, Randy L.

    2005-01-01

    On any night, the stars seen in the sky can be as close to Earth as a few light-years or as distant as a few thousand light-years. Distances this large are hard to comprehend. The stars are so far away that the fastest spacecraft would take tens of thousands of years to reach even the nearest one. Yet, astronomers have been able to accurately…

  6. THE QUARKYONIC STAR

    SciTech Connect

    Fukushima, Kenji; Kojo, Toru E-mail: torukojo@illinois.edu

    2016-02-01

    We discuss theoretical scenarios on crossover between nuclear matter (NM) and quark matter (QM). We classify various possibilities into three major scenarios according to the onset of diquark degrees of freedom that characterizes color-superconducting (CSC) states. In the conventional scenario NM occurs at the liquid–gas (or liquid–vacuum at zero temperature) phase transition and QM occurs next, after which CSC eventually appears. With the effect of strong correlation, the BEC–BCS (Bose Einstein Condensation–Bardeen Cooper Schrieffer) scenario implies that CSC occurs next to NM and QM comes last in the BCS regime. We adopt the quarkyonic scenario in which NM, QM, and CSC are theoretically indistinguishable and thus these names refer to not distinct states but relevant descriptions of the same physical system. Based on this idea, we propose a natural scheme to interpolate NM near normal nuclear density and CSC with vector coupling at high baryon density. We finally discuss the mass–radius relation of the neutron star and constraints on parameters in the proposed scheme.

  7. STAR heavy flavor tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Hao

    2014-11-01

    Hadrons containing heavy quarks are a clean probe of the early dynamic evolution of the dense and hot medium created in high-energy nuclear collisions. To explore heavy quark production at RHIC, the Heavy Flavor Tracker (HFT) for the STAR experiment was built and installed in time for RHIC Run 14. The HFT consists of four layers of silicon detectors. The two outermost layers are silicon strip detectors and the two innermost layers are made from state-of-the-art ultra-thin CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS). This is the first application of a CMOS MAPS detector in a collider experiment. The use of thin pixel sensors plus the use of carbon fiber supporting material limits the material budget to be only 0.4% radiation length per pixel detector layer, enabling the reconstruction of low pT heavy flavor hadrons. The status and performance of the HFT in the RHIC 200 GeV Au + Au run in 2014 are reported. Very good detector efficiency, hit residuals and track resolution (DCAs) were observed in the cosmic ray data and in the Au + Au data.

  8. Neutron Star - Magnetosphere Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponce, Marcelo; Anderson, Matthew; Lehner, Luis; Liebling, Steven L.; Palenzuela, Carlos

    2012-03-01

    In this work we report results of the interaction of a neutron star magnetosphere in both collapsing and moving scenarios interacting with an ambient magnetic field. In recent works [1,2], it has been shown the important role and realism associated with studies of electromagnetic environments in some particular regimes, such as: ideal-MHD, force-free, and electro-vacuum. Motivated by this and their astrophysical implications for BBH and hybrid BH-NS mergers [3,4], we study the following cases: collapse of a magnetized NS, head-on collision of a BH-NS, and orbiting merger of a BH-NS. Based in the results from our simulations, we draw some relevant conclusions to the production of jets as described within the force-free formalism. [4pt] [1] C.Palenzuela, L.Lehner and S.Liebling, Science 329, 927 (2010).[0pt] [2] C.Palenzuela, T.Garrett, et al., Phys.Rev.D 82, 044045 (2010).[0pt] [3] L.Lehner, C.Palenzuela, et al., 2011.[0pt] [4] S.Liebling, L.Lehner, et al., Phys.Rev.D 81, 124023 (2010).

  9. The sun, our star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noyes, R. W.

    Observational data, analytical models, and instrumentation used to study the sun and its evolution are detailed, and attention is given to techniques for converting solar energy to useful power on earth. The star ignited when the mutual gravitational attractions of dust and vapor in a primordial cloud in the Galaxy caused an in-rush of accelerating particles which eventually became dense enough to ignite. The heat grew until inward rushing matter was balanced by outward moving radiative forces. The planets formed from similar debris, and solar radiation is suggested to have triggered the chemical reactions giving rise to life on earth. Visual, spectroscopic, coronagraphic, and UV observations of the sun from the ground and from spacecraft, particularly Skylab, are described, together with features of the solar surface, magnetic field, sunspots, and coronal loops. Models for the processes that occur in the solar interior are explored, as are the causes of solar flares. Attention is given to solar cells, heliostat arrays, wind turbines, and water turbines as means to convert, either directly or indirectly, the earth-bound solar energy to electrical and thermal power. Finally, the life cycle of the sun, about 9 billion yr in duration, is summarized, noting the current status of midlife.

  10. Space Shuttle Star Tracker Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrera, Linda M.

    2010-01-01

    The space shuttle fleet of avionics was originally designed in the 1970's. Many of the subsystems have been upgraded and replaced, however some original hardware continues to fly. Not only fly, but has proven to be the best design available to perform its designated task. The shuttle star tracker system is currently flying as a mixture of old and new designs, each with a unique purpose to fill for the mission. Orbiter missions have tackled many varied missions in space over the years. As the orbiters began flying to the International Space Station (ISS), new challenges were discovered and overcome as new trusses and modules were added. For the star tracker subsystem, the growing ISS posed an unusual problem, bright light. With two star trackers on board, the 1970's vintage image dissector tube (IDT) star trackers track the ISS, while the new solid state design is used for dim star tracking. This presentation focuses on the challenges and solutions used to ensure star trackers can complete the shuttle missions successfully. Topics include KSC team and industry partner methods used to correct pressurized case failures and track system performance.

  11. Faint UBVRI Standard Star Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clem, James L.; Landolt, Arlo U.

    2013-10-01

    High-quality CCD-based UBVRI photometry is presented for ~45, 000 stars distributed among 60 different fields centered on the celestial equator and at δ ≈ -50°. This photometry has been calibrated to the standard Johnson UBV and Kron-Cousins RI systems via observations of the UBVRI standard stars presented in the works of Landolt. The majority of the stars in our photometric catalog fall in the magnitude range 12 <~ V <~ 22 and in the color range -0.3 <~ (B - V) <~ 1.8. Each star averages 67 measures in each UBVRI filter from data taken on 250 different photometric nights over a period of ~6.5 yr from two different telescopes. Our final photometric database effectively extends the UBVRI standard star network defined by Landolt to much fainter magnitudes and increases the number density of stars within pre-existing standard fields. Hence, these new, fainter standards serve as suitable calibrators for investigators who employ either small or large-aperture telescopes for their observational projects.

  12. FAINT UBVRI STANDARD STAR FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Clem, James L.; Landolt, Arlo U. E-mail: landolt@phys.lsu.edu

    2013-10-01

    High-quality CCD-based UBVRI photometry is presented for ∼45, 000 stars distributed among 60 different fields centered on the celestial equator and at δ ≈ –50°. This photometry has been calibrated to the standard Johnson UBV and Kron-Cousins RI systems via observations of the UBVRI standard stars presented in the works of Landolt. The majority of the stars in our photometric catalog fall in the magnitude range 12 ∼< V ∼< 22 and in the color range –0.3 ∼< (B – V) ∼< 1.8. Each star averages 67 measures in each UBVRI filter from data taken on 250 different photometric nights over a period of ∼6.5 yr from two different telescopes. Our final photometric database effectively extends the UBVRI standard star network defined by Landolt to much fainter magnitudes and increases the number density of stars within pre-existing standard fields. Hence, these new, fainter standards serve as suitable calibrators for investigators who employ either small or large-aperture telescopes for their observational projects.

  13. KEPLER RAPIDLY ROTATING GIANT STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Costa, A. D.; Martins, B. L. Canto; Bravo, J. P.; Paz-Chinchón, F.; Chagas, M. L. das; Leão, I. C.; Oliveira, G. Pereira de; Silva, R. Rodrigues da; Roque, S.; Oliveira, L. L. A. de; Silva, D. Freire da; De Medeiros, J. R.

    2015-07-10

    Rapidly rotating giant stars are relatively rare and may represent important stages of stellar evolution, resulting from stellar coalescence of close binary systems or accretion of substellar companions by their hosting stars. In the present Letter, we report 17 giant stars observed in the scope of the Kepler space mission exhibiting rapid rotation behavior. For the first time, the abnormal rotational behavior for this puzzling family of stars is revealed by direct measurements of rotation, namely from photometric rotation period, exhibiting a very short rotation period with values ranging from 13 to 55 days. This finding points to remarkable surface rotation rates, up to 18 times the rotation of the Sun. These giants are combined with six others recently listed in the literature for mid-infrared (IR) diagnostics based on Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer information, from which a trend for an IR excess is revealed for at least one-half of the stars, but at a level far lower than the dust excess emission shown by planet-bearing main-sequence stars.

  14. Flare stars at radio wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Kenneth R.

    1990-01-01

    The radio emission from dMe flare stars is discussed using Very Large Array and Arecibo observations as examples. Active flare stars emit weak, unpolarized, quiescent radio radiation that may be always present. Although thermal bremsstrahlung and/or thermal gyroresonance radiation account for the slowly-varying, quiescent radio radiation of solar active regions, these processes cannot account for the long-wavelength quiescent radiation observed from nearby dMe flare stars. It has been attributed to nonthermal gyrosynchrotron radiation, but some as yet unexplained mechanism must be continually producing the energetic electrons. Long duration, narrow-band radiation is also emitted from some nearby dMe stars at 20 cm wavelength. Such radiation may be attributed to coherent plasma radiation or to coherent electron-cyclotron masers. Impulsive stellar flares exhibit rapid variations that require radio sources that are smaller than the star in size, and high brightness temperatures greater than 10(exp 15) K that are also explained by coherent radiation processes. Quasi-periodic temporal fluctuations suggest pulsations during some radio flares. Evidence for frequency structure and positive or negative frequency drifts during radio flares from dMe stars is also presented.

  15. BINARIES AMONG DEBRIS DISK STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, David R.; Zuckerman, B.

    2012-02-01

    We have gathered a sample of 112 main-sequence stars with known debris disks. We collected published information and performed adaptive optics observations at Lick Observatory to determine if these debris disks are associated with binary or multiple stars. We discovered a previously unknown M-star companion to HD 1051 at a projected separation of 628 AU. We found that 25% {+-} 4% of our debris disk systems are binary or triple star systems, substantially less than the expected {approx}50%. The period distribution for these suggests a relative lack of systems with 1-100 AU separations. Only a few systems have blackbody disk radii comparable to the binary/triple separation. Together, these two characteristics suggest that binaries with intermediate separations of 1-100 AU readily clear out their disks. We find that the fractional disk luminosity, as a proxy for disk mass, is generally lower for multiple systems than for single stars at any given age. Hence, for a binary to possess a disk (or form planets) it must either be a very widely separated binary with disk particles orbiting a single star or it must be a small separation binary with a circumbinary disk.

  16. First stars and reionization: Spinstars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiappini, C.

    2013-06-01

    Soon after the Big Bang, the appearance of the first stellar generations (hereafter, first stars) drastically changed the course of the history of the Universe by enriching the primordial gas with elements heavier than helium (referred to as metals) through both stellar winds and supernova explosions. High-resolution hydrodynamical simulations of the formation of the first stars suggest these objects to have formed in dark matter mini-halos, and to have played a key role in the formation of the first galaxies. Today these stars are (most likely) long dead, and even though next generation facilities will push the observational frontier to extremely high redshifts, with the aim of discovering the first galaxies, the first stars will still lie beyond reach. Thus, the only way to constrain our theoretical understanding of the formation of the first stars is to search for their imprints left in the oldest, still surviving, stars in our own backyard: the Milky Way and its satellites. Which imprints are we looking for, and where can we find them? We address these questions in the present review.

  17. Flare stars at radio wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Kenneth R.

    1989-01-01

    The radio emission from dMe flare stars is discussed using Very Large Array and Arecibo observations as examples. Active flare stars emit weak, unpolarized, quiescent radio radiation that may be always present. Although thermal bremsstrahlung and/or thermal gyroresonance radiation account for the slowly-varying, quiescent radio radiation of solar active regions, these processes cannot account for the long-wavelength quiescent radiation observed from nearby dMe flare stars. It has been attributed to nonthermal gyrosynchrotron radiation, but some as yet unexplained mechanism must be continually producing the energetic electrons. Long duration, narrow-band radiation is also emitted from some nearby dMe stars at 20 cm wavelength. Such radiation may be attributed to coherent plasma radiation or to coherent electron-cyclotron masers. Impulsive stellar flares exhibit rapid variations that require radio sources that are smaller than the star in size, and high brightness temperatures greater than 10(exp 15) K that are also explained by coherent radiation processes. Quasi-periodic temporal fluctuations suggest pulsations during some radio flares. Evidence for frequency structure and positive or negative frequency drifts during radio flares from dMe stars is also presented.

  18. Masses, Radii, and the Equation of State of Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özel, Feryal; Freire, Paulo

    2016-09-01

    We summarize our current knowledge of neutron-star masses and radii. Recent instrumentation and computational advances have resulted in a rapid increase in the discovery rate and precise timing of radio pulsars in binaries in the past few years, leading to a large number of mass measurements. These discoveries show that the neutron-star mass distribution is much wider than previously thought, with three known pulsars now firmly in the 1.9-2.0-M⊙ mass range. For radii, large, high-quality data sets from X-ray satellites as well as significant progress in theoretical modeling led to considerable progress in the measurements, placing them in the 10-11.5-km range and shrinking their uncertainties, owing to a better understanding of the sources of systematic errors. The combination of the massive-neutron-star discoveries, the tighter radius measurements, and improved laboratory constraints of the properties of dense matter has already made a substantial impact on our understanding of the composition and bulk properties of cold nuclear matter at densities higher than that of the atomic nucleus, a major unsolved problem in modern physics.

  19. Supernova Explosions and the Birth of Neutron Stars

    SciTech Connect

    Janka, H.-Thomas; Marek, Andreas; Mueller, Bernhard; Scheck, Leonhard

    2008-02-27

    We report here on recent progress in understanding the birth conditions of neutron stars and the way how supernovae explode. More sophisticated numerical models have led to the discovery of new phenomena in the supernova core, for example a generic hydrodynamic instability of the stagnant supernova shock against low-mode nonradial deformation and the excitation of gravity-wave activity in the surface and core of the nascent neutron star. Both can have supportive or decisive influence on the inauguration of the explosion, the former by improving the conditions for energy deposition by neutrino heating in the postshock gas, the latter by supplying the developing blast with a flux of acoustic power that adds to the energy transfer by neutrinos. While recent two-dimensional models suggest that the neutrino-driven mechanism may be viable for stars from {approx}8M{sub {center_dot}} to at least 15M{sub {center_dot}}, acoustic energy input has been advocated as an alternative if neutrino heating fails. Magnetohydrodynamic effects constitute another way to trigger explosions in connection with the collapse of sufficiently rapidly rotating stellar cores, perhaps linked to the birth of magnetars. The global explosion asymmetries seen in the recent simulations offer an explanation of even the highest measured kick velocities of young neutron stars.

  20. Resolved Star Formation Law In Nearby Infrared-bright Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Nurur; Bolatto, A.; Wong, T.; Leroy, A.; Ott, J.; Calzetti, D.; Blitz, L.; Walter, F.; Rosolowsky, E.; West, A.; Vogel, S.; Bigiel, F.; Xue, R.

    2009-05-01

    An accurate knowledge of star formation law is crucial to make progress in understanding galaxy formation and evolution. We are studying this topic using CARMA STING (Survey Toward Infrared-bright Nearby Galaxies), an interferometric CO survey of a sample of 27 star-forming nearby galaxies with a wealth of multi-wavelength data designed to study star formation in environments throughout the blue sequence at sub-kpc scales. We present results for NGC 4254 (M99), one of our sample galaxies. We construct star formation rate surface density (SFRSD) and gas (atomic and molecular) surface density indicators using a combination of high resolution data from CARMA, KPNO, Spitzer, IRAM and VLA. We find a tight correlation between SFRSD and molecular gas surface density (MGSD), whereas the relation between atomic gas surface density and SFRSD shows very large scatter. Within the central 6 kpc (radius) where CARMA is the most sensitive the MGSD derived from CO(1-0) and CO(2-1) shows similar trend, however, in the extended disk the slope, derived from CO(2-1) data alone, gets steeper.

  1. Coronal Diagnostics of Intermediate Activity Star XI Boo A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, Jeremy

    2005-01-01

    The analysis of Xi Boo A proved difficult to adapt to our line-by-line approach because of the strong wings of the RGS instrumental profile, as has been detailed in earlier reports. While progress was also delayed because of problems in using SAS v4, we succeeded in the past year or so to bring the analysis to conclusion. Abundances have been derived using both EPIC and RGS data, confirming earlier EUVE findings of a mild solar-like FIP effect, though with some evidence of a turn-up in abundances of elements with higher FIP. Plasma densities appear normal for a moderately active stellar corona. Xi Boo A nicely bridges the gap between the very active stars and stars like the Sun, and it indeed does appear that these are the stars in which the solar-like FIP effects begins to change to the "inverse FIP" type of effect seen in the very active stars. Probing this divide was the main goal of the proposal. These results are in the process of being prepared for publication, though we have not decided the target journal as yet.

  2. On Explosions of Extended Stars as Type i Supernovae.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glen, William Thomas Graham

    1985-12-01

    Despite great theoretical progress the nature of the progenitors of Type I supernovae is still in doubt. In recent years much attention has been focussed on accreting white dwarf models. This thesis examines another class of possible progenitors: extended helium stars. The computer code BOMB was written to hydrodynamically evolve the models. A total of seventeen models are examined. Five of them resemble R Cor Bor stars which are hydrogen-deficient pulsational variables of roughly 1.5 - 2.0 M(,o) named after the archetype R Corona Borealis. Ten other models are variations on these, used to explore the param- eter space of possible models. The remaining two models are of the bare white dwarf type which constitute the current orthodoxy in the field. It is found that the R Cor Bor stars are not viable as Type I super- nova progenitors. The bare white dwarf models fit the available data better then do any of the envelope models, although stars with rela- tively small, low-mass envelopes could also provide reasonable fits.

  3. Unexplained Brightening of Unusual Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1997-01-01

    Recent observations with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) have documented an unexpected and rapid, seven-fold brightening of an unusual double star at the centre of the impressive 47 Tucanae globular cluster in the southern sky. This is the first HST observation of such a rare phenomenon. The astronomers [1] who are involved in this observational program find that this event cannot be explained by any of the common processes known to occur in such stars. The cores of globular clusters Globular clusters are like huge swarms of stars, containing about one million suns, which move around in their common gravitational field. Most galaxies contain globular clusters; around 150 are known within the confines of our Galaxy, the Milky Way. Globular clusters change with time. In particular, at some stage in the life of a globular cluster, its central region will contract whereby the stars there move closer to each other. This phenomenon is referred to as core collapse [2]. Observations with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) have revealed enormous central densities of the order of 30,000 stars per cubic light-year in clusters with fully collapsed cores; this is to be compared with the stellar density in the solar neighborhood of only 0.003 stars per cubic light-year [3]. Binary stars in globular clusters Binary (i.e., double) stars play an important role in the evolution of globular clusters: they can delay, halt, or even reverse the process of core collapse. In this dense stellar environment, close encounters between passing stars and binaries are relatively frequent. Such events may leave the binary stars more tightly bound, and at the same time speed up the motion of the stars involved, thereby counteracting the contraction of the core. The same close stellar encounters may also produce a diverse progeny of exotic objects. The centers of globular clusters contain blue stragglers (stars that ``look'' younger than they really are), millisecond pulsars (rapidly rotating, very

  4. STARS knockout attenuates hypoxia-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension by suppressing pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhaoling; Wu, Huajie; Luo, Jianfeng; Sun, Xin

    2017-03-01

    STARS (STriated muscle Activator of Rho Signaling) is a sarcomeric protein, which expressed early in cardiac development and involved in pathological remodeling. Abundant evidence indicated that STARS could regulate cell proliferation, but it's exact function remains unclear. In this study, we aimed to investigate the role of STARS in the proliferation of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMC) and the potential effect on the progression of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). In this study, we established a PAH mouse model through chronic hypoxia exposure as reflected by the increased RVSP and RVHI. Western blot and RT-qPCR detected the increased STARS protein and mRNA levels in PAH mice. Next, we cultured the primary PASMC from PAH mice. After STARS overexpression in PASMC, STARS, SRF and Egr-1 were up-regulated significantly. The MTT assay revealed an increase in cell proliferation. Flow cytometry showed a marked inhibition of cell apoptosis. However, STARS silence in PASMC exerted opposite effects with STARS overexpression. SRF siRNA transfection blocked the effects of STARS overexpression in PASMC. In order to further confirm the role of STARS in PAH mice in vivo, we exposed STARS knockout mice to hypoxia and found lower RVSP and RVHI in knockout mice as compared with controls. Our results not only suggest that STARS plays a crucial role in the development of PAH by increasing the proliferation of PASMC through activation of the SRF/Egr-1 pathway, but also provides a new mechanism for hypoxia-induced PAH. In addition, STARS may represent a potential treatment target.

  5. Spectral types for early-type stars observed by Skylab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roman, N. G.

    1978-01-01

    MK spectral types are presented for 246 early-type stars observed with the S-019 ultraviolet stellar astronomy experiment on Skylab. K-line types are also given where applicable, and various peculiar stars are identified. The peculiar stars include five silicon stars, a shell star, a helium-rich star, a silicon-strontium star, a chromium-europium star, and two marginal metallic-line stars.

  6. Destruction of a Magnetized Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-01-01

    What happens when a magnetized star is torn apart by the tidal forces of a supermassive black hole, in a violent process known as a tidal disruption event? Two scientists have broken new ground by simulating the disruption of stars with magnetic fields for the first time.The magnetic field configuration during a simulation of the partial disruption of a star. Top left: pre-disruption star. Bottom left: matter begins to re-accrete onto the surviving core after the partial disruption. Right: vortices form in the core as high-angular-momentum debris continues to accrete, winding up and amplifying the field. [Adapted from Guillochon McCourt 2017]What About Magnetic Fields?Magnetic fields are expected to exist in the majority of stars. Though these fields dont dominate the energy budget of a star the magnetic pressure is a million times weaker than the gas pressure in the Suns interior, for example they are the drivers of interesting activity, like the prominences and flares of our Sun.Given this, we can wonder what role stars magnetic fields might play when the stars are torn apart in tidal disruption events. Do the fields change what we observe? Are they dispersed during the disruption, or can they be amplified? Might they even be responsible for launching jets of matter from the black hole after the disruption?Star vs. Black HoleIn a recent study, James Guillochon (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics) and Michael McCourt (Hubble Fellow at UC Santa Barbara) have tackled these questions by performing the first simulations of tidal disruptions of stars that include magnetic fields.In their simulations, Guillochon and McCourt evolve a solar-mass star that passes close to a million-solar-mass black hole. Their simulations explore different magnetic field configurations for the star, and they consider both what happens when the star barely grazes the black hole and is only partially disrupted, as well as what happens when the black hole tears the star apart

  7. Gaussian Analytic Centroiding method of star image of star tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haiyong; Xu, Ershuai; Li, Zhifeng; Li, Jingjin; Qin, Tianmu

    2015-11-01

    The energy distribution of an actual star image coincides with the Gaussian law statistically in most cases, so the optimized processing algorithm about star image centroiding should be constructed also by following Gaussian law. For a star image spot covering a certain number of pixels, the marginal distribution of the gray accumulation on rows and columns are shown and analyzed, based on which the formulas of Gaussian Analytic Centroiding method (GAC) are deduced, and the robustness is also promoted due to the inherited filtering effect of gray accumulation. Ideal reference star images are simulated by the PSF (point spread function) with integral form. Precision and speed tests for the Gaussian Analytic formulas are conducted under three scenarios of Gaussian radius (0.5, 0.671, 0.8 pixel), The simulation results show that the precision of GAC method is better than that of the other given algorithms when the Gaussian radius is not bigger than 5 × 5 pixel window, a widely used parameter. Above all, the algorithm which consumes the least time is still the novel GAC method. GAC method helps to promote the comprehensive performance in the attitude determination of a star tracker.

  8. New distances to RAVE stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binney, J.; Burnett, B.; Kordopatis, G.; McMillan, P. J.; Sharma, S.; Zwitter, T.; Bienaymé, O.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Steinmetz, M.; Gilmore, G.; Williams, M. E. K.; Navarro, J.; Grebel, E. K.; Helmi, A.; Parker, Q.; Reid, W. A.; Seabroke, G.; Watson, F.; Wyse, R. F. G.

    2014-01-01

    Probability density functions (pdfs) are determined from new stellar parameters for the distance moduli of stars for which the RAdial Velocity Experiment (RAVE) has obtained spectra with S/N ≥ 10. Single-Gaussian fits to the pdf in distance modulus suffice for roughly half the stars, with most of the other half having satisfactory two-Gaussian representations. As expected, early-type stars rarely require more than one Gaussian. The expectation value of distance is larger than the distance implied by the expectation of distance modulus; the latter is itself larger than the distance implied by the expectation value of the parallax. Our parallaxes of Hipparcos stars agree well with the values measured by Hipparcos, so the expectation of parallax is the most reliable distance indicator. The latter are improved by taking extinction into account. The effective temperature-absolute magnitude diagram of our stars is significantly improved when these pdfs are used to make the diagram. We use the method of kinematic corrections devised by Schönrich, Binney and Asplund to check for systematic errors for general stars and confirm that the most reliable distance indicator is the expectation of parallax. For cool dwarfs and low-gravity giants, <ϖ> tends to be larger than the true distance by up to 30 per cent. The most satisfactory distances are for dwarfs hotter than 5500 K. We compare our distances to stars in 13 open clusters with cluster distances from the literature and find excellent agreement for the dwarfs and indications that we are overestimating distances to giants, especially in young clusters.

  9. The lifetime of axion stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eby, Joshua; Suranyi, Peter; Wijewardhana, L. C. R.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the decay of condensates of scalars in a field theory defined by V (𝒜) = m2f2[1 -cos(𝒜/f)], where m and f are the mass and decay constant of the scalar field. An example of such a theory is that of the axion, in which case the condensates are called axion stars. The axion field, 𝒜, is self-adjoint. As a result, the axion number is not an absolutely conserved quantity. Therefore, axion stars are not stable and have finite lifetimes. Bound axions, localized on the volume of the star, have a coordinate uncertainty δx ˜ R ˜ 1/(maΔ), where R is the radius of the star and Δ = 1 - E0 2/ma 2. Here ma and E0 are the mass, and the ground state energy of the bound axion. Then the momentum distribution of axions has a width of δp ˜ maΔ. At strong binding, Δ = 𝒪(1), bound axions can easily transfer a sufficient amount of momentum to create and emit a free axion, leading to fast decay of the star with a transition rate Γ ˜ ma. However, when Δ ≪ 1, the momentum distribution is more restricted, and as shown in this paper, the transition rate for creating a free axion decreases as exp(-pδx) ˜exp(-Δ-1). Then sufficiently large, weakly bound axion stars, produced after the Big Bang, survive until the present time. We plot the region of their stability, limited by decay through axion loss and by gravitational instability, as a function of the mass of the axion and the mass of the star.

  10. On star formation in stellar systems. I - Photoionization effects in protoglobular clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tenorio-Tagle, G.; Bodenheimer, P.; Lin, D. N. C.; Noriega-Crespo, A.

    1986-01-01

    The progressive ionization and subsequent dynamical evolution of nonhomogeneously distributed low-metal-abundance diffuse gas after star formation in globular clusters are investigated analytically, taking the gravitational acceleration due to the stars into account. The basic equations are derived; the underlying assumptions, input parameters, and solution methods are explained; and numerical results for three standard cases (ionization during star formation, ionization during expansion, and evolution resulting in a stable H II region at its equilibrium Stromgren radius) are presented in graphs and characterized in detail. The time scale of residual-gas loss in typical clusters is found to be about the same as the lifetime of a massive star on the main sequence.

  11. The hot γ Doradus and Maia stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balona, L. A.; Engelbrecht, C. A.; Joshi, Y. C.; Joshi, S.; Sharma, K.; Semenko, E.; Pandey, G.; Chakradhari, N. K.; Mkrtichian, David; Hema, B. P.; Nemec, J. M.

    2016-08-01

    The hot γ Doradus stars have multiple low frequencies characteristic of γ Dor or SPB variables, but are located between the red edge of the SPB and the blue edge of the γ Dor instability strips where all low-frequency modes are stable in current models of these stars. Though δ Sct stars also have low frequencies, there is no sign of high frequencies in hot γ Dor stars. We obtained spectra to refine the locations of some of these stars in the H-R diagram and conclude that these are, indeed, anomalous pulsating stars. The Maia variables have multiple high frequencies characteristic of β Cep and δ Sct stars, but lie between the red edge of the β Cep and the blue edge of the δ Sct instability strips. We compile a list of all Maia candidates and obtain spectra of two of these stars. Again, it seems likely that these are anomalous pulsating stars which are currently not understood.

  12. Early star-forming galaxies and the reionization of the Universe.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Brant E; Ellis, Richard S; Dunlop, James S; McLure, Ross J; Stark, Daniel P

    2010-11-04

    Star-forming galaxies trace cosmic history. Recent observational progress with the NASA Hubble Space Telescope has led to the discovery and study of the earliest known galaxies, which correspond to a period when the Universe was only ∼800 million years old. Intense ultraviolet radiation from these early galaxies probably induced a major event in cosmic history: the reionization of intergalactic hydrogen.

  13. Study on the faint star extraction technology with MEMS gyro aided APS star tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Fei; Zhao, Borui; Sun, Ting; Xu, Wei; You, Zheng

    2013-08-01

    Star tracker is the most accurate attitude sensor for satellite. Generally speaking, the higher the accuracy, the fainter the star can be sensed by the star tracker. How to extract the faint star from a star image is becoming a critical technology in dynamic condition for star tracker, especially using the APS (Active Pixels Sensor) detector. A novel APS star tracker with MEMS Gyroscope aided system was proposed in this paper that could extremely improve the detection effect and capability for the faint stars. During the exposure time of star tracker, the trajectory of star projection on the detector maybe occupy more than ten pixels due to the satellite rotation. In this situation, the signal-to-noise ratio will decline sharply, and the traditional star extraction method for faint star will take no effect. As a result, the accuracy of star tracker would decline sharply, even more, couldn't work. Using the MEMS Gyroscope, the track of star projection can be predicated and measured, on the basis of which the deconvolution algorithm could be taken to recover the faint star signal. The accuracy of the star projection centroid could be improved obviously, and the dynamic performance of the star tracker would be improved by a magnitude. Meanwhile, the MEMS gyroscope has not less volume, mass and power consumption, which make it more suitable for the application of APS star tracker.

  14. Singular Isothermal Disks and the Formation of Multiple Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galli, Daniele; Shu, Frank H.; Laughlin, Gregory; Lizano, Susana; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A crucial missing ingredient in previous theoretical studies of fragmentation is the inclusion of dynamically important levels of magnetic fields. As a minimal model for a candidate presursor to the formation of binary and multiple stars, we therefore consider the equilibrium configuration of isopedically magnetized, scale-free, singular isothermal disks, without the assumption of axial symmetry. We find that lopsided (M = 1) configurations exist at any dimensionless rotation rate, including zero. Multiple-lobed (M = 2, 3, 4, ...) configurations bifurcate from an underlying axisymmetric sequence at progressively higher dimensionless rates of rotation, but such nonaxisymmetric sequences always terminate in shockwaves before they have a chance to fission into separate bodies. We advance the hypothesis that binary and multiple star-formation from smooth (i.e., not highly turbulent) starting states that are supercritical but in unstable mechanical balance requires the rapid (i.e., dynamical) loss of magnetic flux at some stage of the ensuing gravitational collapse.

  15. Prototype sector production for the STAR inner TPC upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chi; STAR Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is upgrading the Inner TPC sectors (iTPC). By increasing the number of inner pad rows from 13 to 40 and renewing the inner sector wires, this major detector upgrade will improve the rapidity coverage from |η| < 1 to |η| < 1.5, provide better momentum resolution, and better energy loss (dE/dx) resolution. The iTPC upgrade is crucial to STAR Beam Energy Scan Phase II (BES- II) program, which will provide in-depth understanding on QCD phase diagram and in-medium modification. In this paper we report on progress on the iTPC sector construction. The iTPC module fabrication techniques and testing results from the first full size prototype are presented.

  16. Pairing gap in the inner crust of neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Esbensen, H.; Broglia, R.A.; Vigezzi, E.; Barranco, F.

    1995-08-01

    The pairing gap in the inner crust of a neutron star can be strongly affected by the presence of heavy nuclei. The effect is commonly estimated in a semiclassical description, using the local density approximation. It was found that the nuclear specific heat can become comparable to the electronic specific heat at certain densities and temperatures. The quantitative result depends critically upon the magnitude of the pairing gap. We therefore decided to assess the validity of the semiclassical approach. This is done by solving the quantal BCS pairing gap equation for neutrons that are confined to the Wigner-Seitz cell that surrounds a heavy nucleus. We performed calculations that are based on the Gogny pairing force. They are feasible for realistic densities of neutrons and heavy nuclei that are expected to be found in the inner crust of neutron stars. The results will be compared to the semiclassical predictions. This work is in progress.

  17. Recent developments on the STAR detector system at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Wieman, H.; Adams, D.L.; Added, N.

    1997-12-01

    The STAR detector system is designed to provide tracking, momentum analysis and particle identification for many of the mid-rapidity charged particles produced in collisions at the RHIC collider. A silicon vertex detector (SVT) provides three layers of tracking near the interaction point. This is followed by the main time projection chamber (TPC), which continues tracking out to 200 cm radial distance from the interaction region. The detector design also includes an electromagnetic calorimeter, various trigger detectors, and radial TPCs in the forward region. The entire system is enclosed in a 0.5 T solenoid magnet. A progress report is given for the various components of the STAR detector system. The authors report on the recent developments in the detector proto-typing and construction, with an emphasis on the main TPC, recent TPC cosmic ray testing and shipping to Brookhaven National Laboratory.

  18. The B[e] Phenomenon in Pre-Main-Sequence Herbig Ae/Be Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oudmaijer, R. D.

    2017-02-01

    In this review I describe the intermediate mass pre-main-sequence Herbig Ae/Be stars and their role in studies of star formation. They play a particularly important part in understanding the differences between the accretion of matter onto low and high mass stars. Once these differences are understood, further progress can be made in high mass star formation. Given that the B[e] phenomenon is a spectroscopic one, I will present recent developments in the spectroscopic studies of the Herbig Ae/Be stars, and then move to the [e] phenomenon in these object. Based on a large sample, it is found that forbidden lines are present for half of the Herbig Ae/Be stars, implying that the "[e]" phenomenon is widespread in Herbig Ae/Be stars. I will describe how the presence and properties of these lines can be used to our advantage in learning about their circumstellar environments, and their disks in particular. I conclude with a forward look.

  19. Triggered Star Formation on the Border of the Orion-Eridanus Superbubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hsu-Tai; Chen, W. P.

    2009-04-01

    A census of classical T Tauri stars and Herbig Ae/Be stars has been performed around the Orion-Eridanus Superbubble that is ionized and created by the Ori OB1 association. This sample is used to study the spatial distribution of newborn stars, hence the recent star formation sequence, in the region that includes two giant molecular clouds (Orions A and B) and additional smaller clouds (NGC 2149, GN 05.51.4, VdB 64, the Crossbones, the Northern Filament, LDN 1551, LDN 1558, and LDN 1563). Most of the molecular clouds are located on the border of the Superbubble, and associated with Hα filaments and star formation activity, except the Northern Filament which is probably located outside the Superbubble. This suggests that while star formation progresses from the oldest Ori OB1a subgroup to 1b, 1c, and 1d, the Superbubble compresses and initiates starbirth in clouds such as NGC 2149, GN 05.51.4, VdB 64, and the Crossbones, which are located more than 100 pc away from the center of the Superbubble, and even in clouds some 200 pc away, i.e., in LDN 1551, LDN 1558, and LDN 1563. A superbubble appears to have potentially a long-range influence in triggering next-generation star formation in an OB association.

  20. Theory of winds in late-type evolved and pre-main-sequence stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macgregor, K. B.

    1983-01-01

    Recent observational results confirm that many of the physical processes which are known to occur in the Sun also occur among late-type stars in general. One such process is the continuous loss of mass from a star in the form of a wind. There now exists an abundance of either direct or circumstantial evidence which suggests that most (if not all) stars in the cool portion of the HR diagram possess winds. An attempt is made to assess the current state of theoretical understanding of mass loss from two distinctly different classes of late-type stars: the post-main-sequence giant/supergiant stars and the pre-main-sequence T Tauri stars. Toward this end, the observationally inferred properties of the wind associated with each of the two stellar classes under consideration are summarized and compared against the predictions of existing theoretical models. Although considerable progress has been made in attempting to identify the mechanisms responsible for mass loss from cool stars, many fundamental problems remain to be solved.

  1. Neutron Star Structure From Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lattimer, James

    2006-10-01

    Neutron stars are laboratories for dense matter physics. Observations of neutron stars, in the form of radio pulsars, X-ray binaries, X-ray bursters, and thermally-emitting isolated stars, are rapidly accumulating. Especially interesting are the radio pulsars PSR J0751+1807, Terzan 5 I and Terzan 5 J (with suprisingly large measured masses of 2.1±0.2, 1.69±0.1 and 1.85±0.05 solar masses, respectively), the pulsar PSR J1748-2446ad with the most rapid spin rate of 716 Hz, and the radio pulsar binary PSR J0737-3039 for which a moment of inertia of one of the neutron stars might be measured within a few years. Extremely massive neutron stars are important because they set limits to the maximum mass and upper limits to the maximum density found in cold, static, objects, and might limit the appearance of exotic matter such as hyperons, Bose condensates or deconfined quarks in a star's interior. The spin rate sets an upper limit to the radius of a star of a given mass, and the moment of inertia, being roughly proportional to M R^2, is a sensitive measure of neutron star radius. While the maximum mass speaks to the relative stiffness of the high-density equation of state at several times nuclear matter density, the radius is a measure of the relative stiffness of the low-density equation of state in the vicinity of the nuclear saturation density. For the nearly pure neutron matter found in neutron stars, it is a direct measure of the density dependence of the nuclear symmetry energy. Other promising observational constraints might be obtained from neutron star seismology (which limits the relative crustal thickness) and Eddington limited fluxes observed from bursting sources, and from thermal emissions from cooling neutron stars. The latter have the potential of constraining R∞=R/√1-2GM/Rc^2 if the source's distance can be accurately assessed. The distances of two nearby isolated sources, RX J1856-3754 and Geminga, have been determined by parallax. However, there

  2. Searching for New Highly r-Process-Enhanced Stars in the Halo of the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beers, Timothy C.; Placco, Vinicius; Holmbeck, Erika M.; Hansen, Terese T.; Simon, Joshua D.; Thompson, Ian; Frebel, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Great progress has been made in recent years concerning understanding and constraining the nature of the astrophysical r-process, and on obtaining evidence for the likely astrophysical site(s) of its production. One of the keys to this progress was the identification, over 20 years ago, of a rare class of VMP stars ([Fe/H] < -2.0), which in spite of their very low metallicity, exhibit r-process-element enhancements relative to iron from 10 to over 100 times the Solar ratio (the r-II stars). These stars provide us with the best probes of the production of the r-process elements in the early Universe. Furthermore, knowledge of their metallicity distribution and frequency in the halo field provides potentially tight constraints on the origin of the r-process. However, due to their rarity (~3% of VMP stars), only a total of ~25 r-II stars have been found to date.We provide an update on our new survey effort to quadruple the numbers of recognized r-II stars over the next few years, based on "snapshot" high-resolution spectroscopy of a sample of some 2500 bright (V < 13.5) VMP stars, using the Echelle spectrograph on the du Pont 2.5m telescope. To date, some 1000 targets have been identified, based on medium-resolution follow-up of stars from the RAVE survey, the Best & Brightest survey, and a variety of other sources. Over 100 of these targets have been observed at high resolution in the first run with the du Pont telscope; we expect this number to grow rapidly, as observations continue.This work received partial support from PHY 14-30152; Physics Frontier Center/JINA Center for the Evolution of the Elements (JINA-CEE), awarded by the US National Science Foundation.

  3. Old and new neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Ruderman, M.

    1984-09-01

    The youngest known radiopulsar in the rapidly spinning magnetized neutron star which powers the Crab Nebula, the remnant of the historical supernova explosion of 1054 AD. Similar neutron stars are probably born at least every few hundred years, but are less frequent than Galactic supernova explosions. They are initially sources of extreme relativistic electron and/or positron winds (approx.10/sup 38/s/sup -1/ of 10/sup 12/ eV leptons) which greatly decrease as the neutron stars spin down to become mature pulsars. After several million years these neutron stars are no longer observed as radiopulsars, perhaps because of large magnetic field decay. However, a substantial fraction of the 10/sup 8/ old dead pulsars in the Galaxy are the most probable source for the isotropically distributed ..gamma..-ray burst detected several times per week at the earth. Some old neutron stars are spun-up by accretion from companions to be resurrected as rapidly spinning low magnetic field radiopulsars. 52 references, 6 figures, 3 tables.

  4. Observing Sun-like Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martens, Petrus C.; White, Russel J.

    2016-05-01

    The Sun represents only one realization of the many possibilities for stellar dynamos. In order to fully understand the physics of solar and stellar magnetism we need to study in full detail the magnetic cycles of stars that are very much like the Sun . To do this we need a telescope that can resolve the disks of nearby solar type stars. Georgia State's University Center for High Resolution Astronomy (CHARA) array is a diffraction limited interferometer with a baseline of over 300 m, located on Mount Wilson. It is the highest resolution telescope in the visible and infrared currently in operation. CHARA has resolved the disks of larger stars and observed starspots. We will describe an ongoing observing program for nearby Sun-like stars to determine with great accuracy the basic parameters of these stars and the presence of starspots on their surfaces. Combined with the decades long observations of Mount Wilson and Lowell Observatories of stellar cycles the data obtained will act as a powerful constraint on solar and stellar dynamo models and simulations.

  5. The Michigan Binary Star Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, Rudi P.

    2007-07-01

    At the end of the nineteenth century, William J. Hussey and Robert G. Aitken, both at Lick Observatory, began a systematic search for unrecorded binary stars with the aid of the 12" and 36" refracting telescopes at Lick Observatory. Aitken's work (and book on binary stars) are well known, Hussey's contributions less so. In 1905 Hussey, a Michigan engineering graduate, returned to direct the Ann Arbor astronomy program, and immediately he began to design new instrumentation for the study of binary stars and to train potential observers. For a time, he spent six months a year at the La Plata Observatory, where he discovered a number of new pairs and decided upon a major southern hemisphere campaign. He spent a decade obtaining the lenses for a large refractor, through the vicissitudes of war and depression. Finally, he obtained a site in South Africa, a 26" refractor, and a small corps of observers, but he died in London en route to fulfill his dream. His right hand man, Richard Rossiter, established the observatory and spent the next thirty years discovering and measuring binary stars: his personal total is a record for the field. This talk is an account of the methods, results, and utility of the extraordinary binary star factory in the veldt.

  6. Noncommutative via closed star product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupriyanov, V. G.; Vitale, P.

    2015-08-01

    We consider linear star products on of Lie algebra type. First we derive the closed formula for the polydifferential representation of the corresponding Lie algebra generators. Using this representation we define the Weyl star product on the dual of the Lie algebra. Then we construct a gauge operator relating the Weyl star product with the one which is closed with respect to some trace functional, Tr ( f ⋆ g) = Tr ( f · g). We introduce the derivative operator on the algebra of the closed star product and show that the corresponding Leibniz rule holds true up to a total derivative. As a particular example we study the space R {/θ 3} with type noncommutativity and show that in this case the closed star product is the one obtained from the Duflo quantization map. As a result a Laplacian can be defined such that its commutative limit reproduces the ordinary commutative one. The deformed Leibniz rule is applied to scalar field theory to derive conservation laws and the corresponding noncommutative currents.

  7. Abundances in Hot Evolved Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Klaus; Rauch, Thomas; Kruk, Jeffrey W.

    2009-05-01

    The hydrogen-deficiency in extremely hot post-AGB stars of spectral class PG1159 is probably caused by a (very) late helium-shell flash or a AGB final thermal pulse that consumes the hydrogen envelope, exposing the usually-hidden intershell region. Thus, the photospheric element abundances of these stars allow us to draw conclusions about details of nuclear burning and mixing processes in the precursor AGB stars. We compare predicted element abundances to those determined by quantitative spectral analyses performed with advanced non-LTE model atmospheres. A good qualitative and quantitative agreement is found for many species (He, C, N, O, Ne, F, Si, Ar) but discrepancies for others (P, S, Fe) point at shortcomings in stellar evolution models for AGB stars. Almost all of the chemical trace elements in these hot stars can only be identified in the UV spectral range. The Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer and the Hubble Space Telescope played a crucial role for this research.

  8. Chemical Soups Around Cool Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    This artist's conception shows a young, hypothetical planet around a cool star. A soupy mix of potentially life-forming chemicals can be seen pooling around the base of the jagged rocks. Observations from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope hint that planets around cool stars the so-called M-dwarfs and brown dwarfs that are widespread throughout our galaxy might possess a different mix of life-forming, or prebiotic, chemicals than our young Earth.

    Life on our planet is thought to have arisen out of a pond-scum-like mix of chemicals. Some of these chemicals are thought to have come from a planet-forming disk of gas and dust that swirled around our young sun. Meteorites carrying the chemicals might have crash-landed on Earth.

    Astronomers don't know if these same life-generating processes are taking place around stars that are cooler than our sun, but the Spitzer observations show their disk chemistry is different. Spitzer detected a prebiotic molecule, called hydrogen cyanide, in the disks around yellow stars like our sun, but found none around cooler, less massive, reddish stars. Hydrogen cyanide is a carbon-containing, or organic compound. Five hydrogen cyanide molecules can join up to make adenine a chemical element of the DNA molecule found in all living organisms on Earth.

  9. Clues on the first stars from CEMP-no stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choplin, Arthur; Meynet, Georges; Maeder, André; Hirschi, Raphael; Ekström, Sylvia; Chiappini, Cristina

    2016-08-01

    The material used to form the CEMP-no stars presents signatures of processing by the CNO cycle and by He-burning from a previous stellar generation called spinstars. We compare the composition of the ejecta (wind + supernova) of a spinstar model to observed abundances of CEMP-no stars. We show that observed abundances as well as the isotope ratio 12C/13C may be reproduced by the spinstar ejecta if we assume different mass cuts when adding the supernova material to the wind ejecta.

  10. Star Formation Regions in LDN 1667

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyulbudaghian, A. L.

    2015-09-01

    A group of three star formation regions in the dark cloud LDN 1667 is examined. All three of these regions contain Trapezium type systems. 12C(1-0) observations are made of the part of the molecular cloud LDN 1667 associated with one of the star formation regions. Three molecular clouds were detected, one of which (the main cloud) has a red and a blue outflow. Three stars from the star formation regions are found to have annular nebulae and one star has a conical nebula. The dark cloud LDN 1667 is associated with a radial system of dark globules which is formed by the star HD 57061.

  11. Orbital elements of S stars - Revisiting the evolutionary status of S stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorissen, A.; Mayor, M.

    1992-07-01

    The hypothesis of an evolutionary link between barium stars and the non-Mira S stars is discussed. The hypothesis of an evolutionary link between the barium stars and the non-Mira S stars is confirmed. The mass function distribution of S stars, indicating that the companions are likely white dwarfs, as is the case for barium stars, supports this hypothesis. However, systems with periods shorter than 600 d appear to be lacking among S stars, although they are present among barium stars. Moreover, S stars appear to be less massive on the average than barium stars. It is suggested that these differences between the two families can be naturally explained by assuming that non-Mira S stars (without Tc) populate the first giant branch instead of the asymptotic branch. A synoptic view of the evolutionary paths followed by low- and intermediate-mass binary systems is presented, with special emphasis on the relationships between the families of peculiar red giants.

  12. Progression of Liver Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... The Progression of Liver Disease The Progression of Liver Disease There are many different types of liver ... may put your life in danger. The Healthy Liver Your liver helps fight infections and cleans your ...

  13. Chang'E-3 Science Exploration Progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Yongliao; Ouyang, Ziyuan

    Chang’e-3 mission is the second phase of China Lunar Exploration Program which its main science objectives is to map the landing site and the rover path, determine its surface chemical composition and study the regional geological and geochemical characteristics, map the earth’s plasmasphere and study Earth’s plasmasphere responses to solar activity and plasma behaviors in the magnetosphere, monitor the variable stars, bright active galactic nuclei ( AGN ) and survey the sky. Eight scientific payloads onboard the CE-3 probe has obtained lots of data, and this paper will introduce their exploration progresses and some new scientific results. Key words: Chang’e-3 Mission, Science Exploration Progress, Scientific Payloads

  14. A brightness-referenced star identification algorithm for APS star trackers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Zhao, Qile; Liu, Jingnan; Liu, Ning

    2014-10-08

    Star trackers are currently the most accurate spacecraft attitude sensors. As a result, they are widely used in remote sensing satellites. Since traditional charge-coupled device (CCD)-based star trackers have a limited sensitivity range and dynamic range, the matching process for a star tracker is typically not very sensitive to star brightness. For active pixel sensor (APS) star trackers, the intensity of an imaged star is valuable information that can be used in star identification process. In this paper an improved brightness referenced star identification algorithm is presented. This algorithm utilizes the k-vector search theory and adds imaged stars' intensities to narrow the search scope and therefore increase the efficiency of the matching process. Based on different imaging conditions (slew, bright bodies, etc.) the developed matching algorithm operates in one of two identification modes: a three-star mode, and a four-star mode. If the reference bright stars (the stars brighter than three magnitude) show up, the algorithm runs the three-star mode and efficiency is further improved. The proposed method was compared with other two distinctive methods the pyramid and geometric voting methods. All three methods were tested with simulation data and actual in orbit data from the APS star tracker of ZY-3. Using a catalog composed of 1500 stars, the results show that without false stars the efficiency of this new method is 4~5 times that of the pyramid method and 35~37 times that of the geometric method.

  15. A Brightness-Referenced Star Identification Algorithm for APS Star Trackers

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peng; Zhao, Qile; Liu, Jingnan; Liu, Ning

    2014-01-01

    Star trackers are currently the most accurate spacecraft attitude sensors. As a result, they are widely used in remote sensing satellites. Since traditional charge-coupled device (CCD)-based star trackers have a limited sensitivity range and dynamic range, the matching process for a star tracker is typically not very sensitive to star brightness. For active pixel sensor (APS) star trackers, the intensity of an imaged star is valuable information that can be used in star identification process. In this paper an improved brightness referenced star identification algorithm is presented. This algorithm utilizes the k-vector search theory and adds imaged stars' intensities to narrow the search scope and therefore increase the efficiency of the matching process. Based on different imaging conditions (slew, bright bodies, etc.) the developed matching algorithm operates in one of two identification modes: a three-star mode, and a four-star mode. If the reference bright stars (the stars brighter than three magnitude) show up, the algorithm runs the three-star mode and efficiency is further improved. The proposed method was compared with other two distinctive methods the pyramid and geometric voting methods. All three methods were tested with simulation data and actual in orbit data from the APS star tracker of ZY-3. Using a catalog composed of 1500 stars, the results show that without false stars the efficiency of this new method is 4∼5 times that of the pyramid method and 35∼37 times that of the geometric method. PMID:25299950

  16. Extrasolar planets and star formation: science opportunities for future ELTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stapelfeldt, Karl R.

    Future extremely large telescopes will be the engines of major progress in the fields of star and planet formation, brown dwarfs, and extrasolar planets. Their throughput will enable spectroscopic studies of the structure of brown dwarf atmospheres; reveal the composition and kinematics of protoplanetary disks; extend radial velocity searches for extrasolar planets to fainter stars and lower masses; and characterize the surfaces of the most distant Kuiper Belt objects. Their resolution will allow us to resolve and track the orbits of close binary young stars and brown dwarfs, establishing their dynamical masses and calibrating their evolutionary tracks; probe the inner region of young stellar object disks, resolving the jet collimation region in accreting systems and disk inner holes in more evolved ones; and move the horizon for stellar companion searches inward to 40 mas, enabling the direct detection of hot young planets orbiting 10 AU from young T Tauri stars. The high contrast imaging capability of future ELTs is uncertain, and depends on future developments in extreme adaptive optics. Wavefront control considerations suggest a fundamental atmospheric contrast limit of 10^{-8} for companion searches to nearby solar-type stars, below which detections are unlikely to be possible. To reach this performance level, continuing investments will be needed in extreme adaptive optics work, in addition to careful attention to the specialized requirements of ultra-high contrast imaging in ELT design. Above the 10^{-8} contrast limit, a 30m telescope has the potential to directly image about a dozen of the currently known radial velocity planets.

  17. The First Generation of Stars in Lambda-CDM Cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Liang; Abel, T.; Frenk, C.S.; Jenkins, A.; Springel, V.; Yoshida, N.; /Nagoya U.

    2006-10-10

    We have performed a large set of high-resolution cosmological simulations using smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) to study the formation of the first luminous objects in the {Lambda}CDM cosmology. We follow the collapse of primordial gas clouds in eight early structures and document the scatter in the properties of the first star-forming clouds. Our first objects span formation redshifts from z {approx} 10 to z {approx} 50 and cover an order of magnitude in halo mass. We find that the physical properties of the central star-forming clouds are very similar in all of the simulated objects despite significant differences in formation redshift and environment. This suggests that the formation path of the first stars is largely independent of the collapse redshift; the physical properties of the clouds have little correlation with spin, mass, or assembly history of the host halo. The collapse of proto-stellar objects at higher redshifts progresses much more rapidly due to the higher densities, which accelerates the formation of molecular hydrogen, enhances initial cooling and shortens the dynamical timescales. The mass of the star-forming clouds cover a broad range, from a few hundred to a few thousand solar masses, and exhibit various morphologies: some have disk-like structures which are nearly rotational supported; others form flattened spheroids; still others form bars. All of them develop a single protostellar ''seed'' which does not fragment into multiple objects up to the moment that the central gas becomes optically thick to H{sub 2} cooling lines. At this time, the instantaneous mass accretion rate onto the centre varies significantly from object to object, with disk-like structures having the smallest mass accretion rates. The formation epoch and properties of the star-forming clouds are sensitive to the values of cosmological parameters.

  18. PRISM Polarimetry of Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerkstra, Brennan; Lomax, Jamie R.; Bjorkman, Karen S.; Bjorkman, Jon Eric; Skiff, Brian; Covey, Kevin R.; Wisniewski, John P.

    2016-01-01

    We present the early results from our long-term, multi-epoch filter polarization survey of massive stars in and around young Galactic clusters. These BVRI polarization data were obtained using the PRISM instrument mounted on the 1.8m Perkins Telescope at Lowell Observatory. We first detail the creation of our new semi-automated polarization data reduction pipeline that we developed to process these data. Next, we present our analysis of the instrumental polarization properties of the PRISM instrument, via observations of polarized and unpolarized standard stars. Finally, we present early results on the total and intrinsic polarization behavior of several isolated, previously suggested classical Be stars, and discuss these results in the context of the larger project.BK acknowledges support from a NSF/REU at the University of Oklahoma. This program was also supported by NSF-AST 11411563, 1412110, and 1412135.

  19. A Sparkling Spray of Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-12-01

    The festive season has arrived for astronomers at the European Southern Observatory (ESO) in the form of this dramatic new image. It shows the swirling gas around the region known as NGC 2264 -- an area of sky that includes the sparkling blue baubles of the Christmas Tree star cluster. Omega Centauri ESO PR Photo 48/08 NGC 2264 and the Christmas Tree cluster NGC 2264 lies about 2600 light-years from Earth in the obscure constellation of Monoceros, the Unicorn, not far from the more familiar figure of Orion, the Hunter. The image shows a region of space about 30 light-years across. William Herschel discovered this fascinating object during his great sky surveys in the late 18th century. He first noticed the bright cluster in January 1784 and the brightest part of the visually more elusive smudge of the glowing gas clouds at Christmas nearly two years later. The cluster is very bright and can easily be seen with binoculars. With a small telescope (whose lenses will turn the view upside down) the stars resemble the glittering lights on a Christmas tree. The dazzling star at the top is even bright enough to be seen with the unaided eye. It is a massive multiple star system that only emerged from the dust and gas a few million years ago. As well as the cluster there are many interesting and curious structures in the gas and dust. At the bottom of the frame, the dark triangular feature is the evocative Cone Nebula, a region of molecular gas flooded by the harsh light of the brightest cluster members. The region to the right of the brightest star has a curious, fur-like texture that has led to the name Fox Fur Nebula. Much of the image appears red because the huge gas clouds are glowing under the intense ultra-violet light coming from the energetic hot young stars. The stars themselves appear blue as they are hotter, younger and more massive than our own Sun. Some of this blue light is scattered by dust, as can be seen occurring in the upper part of the image. This

  20. Neutron stars are gold mines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lattimer, James M.

    Neutron stars are not only mines for clues to dense matter physics but may also be the auspicious sources of half of all nuclei heavier than A = 60 in the universe, including the auric isotopes. Although the cold dense matter above the nuclear saturation density cannot be directly explored in the laboratory, gilded constraints on the properties of matter from 1 to 10 times higher density can now be panned from neutron star observations. We show how upcoming observations, such as gravitational wave from mergers, precision timing of pulsars, neutrinos from neutron star birth and X-rays from bursts and thermal emissions, will provide the bullion from which further advances can be smelted.

  1. Planetary systems in star clusters .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouwenhoven, M. B. N.; Shu, Qi; Cai, Maxwell Xu; Spurzem, Rainer

    Thousands of confirmed and candidate exoplanets have been identified in recent years. Consequently, theoretical research on the formation and dynamical evolution of planetary systems has seen a boost, and the processes of planet-planet scattering, secular evolution, and interaction between planets and gas/debris disks have been well-studied. Almost all of this work has focused on the formation and evolution of isolated planetary systems, and neglect the effect of external influences, such as the gravitational interaction with neighbouring stars. Most stars, however, form in clustered environments that either quickly disperse, or evolve into open clusters. Under these conditions, young planetary systems experience frequent close encounters with other stars, at least during the first 106-107 years, which affects planets orbiting at any period range, as well as their debris structures.

  2. Exploding Stars and Stripes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-03-01

    The discovery of a pattern of X-ray "stripes" in the remains of an exploded star may provide the first direct evidence that a cosmic event can accelerate particles to energies a hundred times higher than achieved by the most powerful particle accelerator on Earth. This result comes from a very long observation of the Tycho supernova remnant with NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. It could explain how some of the extremely energetic particles bombarding the Earth, called cosmic rays, are produced. "We've seen lots of intriguing structures in supernova remnants, but we've never seen stripes before," said Kristoffer Eriksen, a postdoctoral researcher at Rutgers University who led the study. "This made us think very hard about what's happening in the blast wave of this powerful explosion." This latest study from Chandra provides support for a theory about how magnetic fields can be dramatically amplified in such blast waves. In this theory, the magnetic fields become highly tangled and the motions of the particles very turbulent near the expanding supernova shock wave at the front edge of the supernova remnant. High-energy charged particles can bounce back and forth across the shock wave repeatedly, gaining energy with each crossing. Theoretical models of the motion of the most energetic particles -- which are mostly protons -- are predicted to leave a messy network of holes and dense walls corresponding to weak and strong regions of magnetic fields, respectively. The X-ray stripes discovered by the Chandra researchers are thought to be regions where the turbulence is greater and the magnetic fields more tangled than surrounding areas, and may be the walls predicted by the theory. Electrons become trapped in these regions and emit X-rays as they spiral around the magnetic field lines. However, the regular and almost periodic pattern of the X-ray stripes was not predicted by the theory. "It was a big surprise to find such a neatly arranged set of stripes," said co

  3. Accretion, Outflows, and Winds of Magnetized Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanova, Marina M.; Owocki, Stanley P.

    2015-10-01

    Many types of stars have strong magnetic fields that can dynamically influence the flow of circumstellar matter. In stars with accretion disks, the stellar magnetic field can truncate the inner disk and determine the paths that matter can take to flow onto the star. These paths are different in stars with different magnetospheres and periods of rotation. External field lines of the magnetosphere may inflate and produce favorable conditions for outflows from the disk-magnetosphere boundary. Outflows can be particularly strong in the propeller regime, wherein a star rotates more rapidly than the inner disk. Outflows may also form at the disk-magnetosphere boundary of slowly rotating stars, if the magnetosphere is compressed by the accreting matter. In isolated, strongly magnetized stars, the magnetic field can influence formation and/or propagation of stellar wind outflows. Winds from low-mass, solar-type stars may be either thermally or magnetically driven, while winds from massive, luminous O and B type stars are radiatively driven. In all of these cases, the magnetic field influences matter flow from the stars and determines many observational properties. In this chapter we review recent studies of accretion, outflows, and winds of magnetized stars with a focus on three main topics: (1) accretion onto magnetized stars; (2) outflows from the disk-magnetosphere boundary; and (3) winds from isolated massive magnetized stars. We show results obtained from global magnetohydrodynamic simulations and, in a number of cases compare global simulations with observations.

  4. Star formation inside a galactic outflow.

    PubMed

    Maiolino, R; Russell, H R; Fabian, A C; Carniani, S; Gallagher, R; Cazzoli, S; Arribas, S; Belfiore, F; Bellocchi, E; Colina, L; Cresci, G; Ishibashi, W; Marconi, A; Mannucci, F; Oliva, E; Sturm, E

    2017-04-13

    Recent observations have revealed massive galactic molecular outflows that may have the physical conditions (high gas densities) required to form stars. Indeed, several recent models predict that such massive outflows may ignite star formation within the outflow itself. This star-formation mode, in which stars form with high radial velocities, could contribute to the morphological evolution of galaxies, to the evolution in size and velocity dispersion of the spheroidal component of galaxies, and would contribute to the population of high-velocity stars, which could even escape the galaxy. Such star formation could provide in situ chemical enrichment of the circumgalactic and intergalactic medium (through supernova explosions of young stars on large orbits), and some models also predict it to contribute substantially to the star-formation rate observed in distant galaxies. Although there exists observational evidence for star formation triggered by outflows or jets into their host galaxy, as a consequence of gas compression, evidence for star formation occurring within galactic outflows is still missing. Here we report spectroscopic observations that unambiguously reveal star formation occurring in a galactic outflow at a redshift of 0.0448. The inferred star-formation rate in the outflow is larger than 15 solar masses per year. Star formation may also be occurring in other galactic outflows, but may have been missed by previous observations owing to the lack of adequate diagnostics.

  5. Reconstructing Progressive Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Andy

    2013-01-01

    The work of Colonel Francis W. Parker, the man whom Dewey called "the father of progressive education," provides a starting point for reconstructing the loose ambiguities of progressive education into a coherent social and educational philosophy. Although progressives have claimed their approach is more humane and sensitive to children, we need…

  6. Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) overexpression attenuates HFD-induced hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yanyan; Sui, Xianxian; Zhan, Yongkun; Xu, Chen; Li, Xiaobo; Ning, Yanxia; Zhi, Xiuling; Yin, Lianhua

    2017-04-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) covers a wide spectrum of liver pathology. Intracellular lipid accumulation is the first step in the development and progression of NAFLD. Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) plays an important role in the synthesis of bile acid and intracellular lipid homeostasis and cholesterol metabolism. We hypothesize that StAR is involved in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) pathogenesis. The hypothesis was identified using free fatty acid (FFA)-overloaded NAFLD in vitro model and high-fat diet (HFD)-induced NAFLD mouse model transfected by recombinant adenovirus encoding StAR (StAR). StAR expression was also examined in pathology samples of patients with fatty liver by immunohistochemical staining. We found that the expression level of StAR was reduced in the livers obtained from fatty liver patients and NAFLD mice. Additionally, StAR overexpression decreased the levels of hepatic lipids and maintained the hepatic glucose homeostasis due to the activation of farnesoid x receptor (FXR). StAR overexpression attenuated the impairment of insulin signaling in fatty liver. This protective role of StAR was owing to a reduction of intracellular diacylglycerol levels and the phosphorylation of PKCε. Furthermore, FXR inactivation reversed the observed beneficial effects of StAR. The present study revealed that StAR overexpression can reduce hepatic lipid accumulation, regulate glucose metabolism and attenuate insulin resistance through a mechanism involving the activation of FXR. Our study suggests that StAR may be a potential therapeutic target for NAFLD.

  7. Star Cluster Buzzing With Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-01-01

    A dense globular star cluster near the center of our Milky Way Galaxy holds a buzzing beehive of rapidly-spinning millisecond pulsars, according to astronomers who discovered 21 new pulsars in the cluster using the National Science Foundation's 100-meter Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) in West Virginia. The cluster, called Terzan 5, now holds the record for pulsars, with 24, including three known before the GBT observations. Pulsar Diagram Pulsar Diagram: Click on image for more detail. "We hit the jackpot when we looked at this cluster," said Scott Ransom, an astronomer at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory in Charlottesville, VA. "Not only does this cluster have a lot of pulsars -- and we still expect to find more in it -- but the pulsars in it are very interesting. They include at least 13 in binary systems, two of which are eclipsing, and the four fastest-rotating pulsars known in any globular cluster, with the fastest two rotating nearly 600 times per second, roughly as fast as a household blender," Ransom added. Ransom and his colleagues reported their findings to the American Astronomical Society's meeting in San Diego, CA, and in the online journal Science Express. The star cluster's numerous pulsars are expected to yield a bonanza of new information about not only the pulsars themselves, but also about the dense stellar environment in which they reside and probably even about nuclear physics, according to the scientists. For example, preliminary measurements indicate that two of the pulsars are more massive than some theoretical models would allow. "All these exotic pulsars will keep us busy for years to come," said Jason Hessels, a Ph.D student at McGill University in Montreal. Globular clusters are dense agglomerations of up to millions of stars, all of which formed at about the same time. Pulsars are spinning, superdense neutron stars that whirl "lighthouse beams" of radio waves or light around as they spin. A neutron star is what is

  8. AN ULTRACOOL STAR'S CANDIDATE PLANET

    SciTech Connect

    Pravdo, Steven H.; Shaklan, Stuart B. E-mail: stuart.shaklan@jpl.nasa.gov

    2009-07-20

    We report here the discovery of the first planet around an ultracool dwarf star. It is also the first extrasolar giant planet astrometrically discovered around a main-sequence star. The statistical significance of the detection is shown in two ways. First, there is a 2 x 10{sup -8} probability that the astrometric motion fits a parallax-and-proper-motion-only model. Second, periodogram analysis shows a false alarm probability of 3 x 10{sup -5} that the discovered period is randomly generated. The planetary mass is M {sub 2} = 6.4 (+2.6,-3.1) Jupiter-masses (M {sub J}), and the orbital period is P = 0.744 (+0.013,-0.008) yr in the most likely model. In less likely models, companion masses that are higher than the 13 M {sub J} planetary mass limit are ruled out by past radial velocity (RV) measurements unless the system RV is more than twice the current upper limits and the near-periastron orbital phase was never observed. This new planetary system is remarkable, in part, because its star, VB 10, is near the lower mass limit for a star. Our astrometric observations provide a dynamical mass measurement and will in time allow us to confront the theoretical models of formation and evolution of such systems and their members. We thus add to the diversity of planetary systems and to the small number of known M-dwarf planets. Planets such as VB 10b could be the most numerous type of planets because M stars comprise >70% of all stars. To date they have remained hidden since the dominant RV planet-discovery technique is relatively insensitive to these dim, red systems.

  9. Formation of the first stars.

    PubMed

    Bromm, Volker

    2013-11-01

    Understanding the formation of the first stars is one of the frontier topics in modern astrophysics and cosmology. Their emergence signalled the end of the cosmic dark ages, a few hundred million years after the Big Bang, leading to a fundamental transformation of the early Universe through the production of ionizing photons and the initial enrichment with heavy chemical elements. We here review the state of our knowledge, separating the well understood elements of our emerging picture from those where more work is required. Primordial star formation is unique in that its initial conditions can be directly inferred from the Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) model of cosmological structure formation. Combined with gas cooling that is mediated via molecular hydrogen, one can robustly identify the regions of primordial star formation, the so-called minihalos, having total masses of ~10(6) M⊙ and collapsing at redshifts z ≈ 20-30. Within this framework, a number of studies have defined a preliminary standard model, with the main result that the first stars were predominantly massive. This model has recently been modified to include a ubiquitous mode of fragmentation in the protostellar disks, such that the typical outcome of primordial star formation may be the formation of a binary or small multiple stellar system. We will also discuss extensions to this standard picture due to the presence of dynamically significant magnetic fields, of heating from self-annihalating WIMP dark matter, or cosmic rays. We conclude by discussing possible strategies to empirically test our theoretical models. Foremost among them are predictions for the upcoming James Webb space telescope (JWST), to be launched ~2018, and for 'stellar archaeology', which probes the abundance pattern in the oldest, most-metal poor stars in our cosmic neighborhood, thereby constraining the nucleosynthesis inside the first supernovae.

  10. Gaia FGK benchmark stars: Metallicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jofré, P.; Heiter, U.; Soubiran, C.; Blanco-Cuaresma, S.; Worley, C. C.; Pancino, E.; Cantat-Gaudin, T.; Magrini, L.; Bergemann, M.; González Hernández, J. I.; Hill, V.; Lardo, C.; de Laverny, P.; Lind, K.; Masseron, T.; Montes, D.; Mucciarelli, A.; Nordlander, T.; Recio Blanco, A.; Sobeck, J.; Sordo, R.; Sousa, S. G.; Tabernero, H.; Vallenari, A.; Van Eck, S.

    2014-04-01

    Context. To calibrate automatic pipelines that determine atmospheric parameters of stars, one needs a sample of stars, or "benchmark stars", with well-defined parameters to be used as a reference. Aims: We provide detailed documentation of the iron abundance determination of the 34 FGK-type benchmark stars that are selected to be the pillars for calibration of the one billion Gaia stars. They cover a wide range of temperatures, surface gravities, and metallicities. Methods: Up to seven different methods were used to analyze an observed spectral library of high resolutions and high signal-to-noise ratios. The metallicity was determined by assuming a value of effective temperature and surface gravity obtained from fundamental relations; that is, these parameters were known a priori and independently from the spectra. Results: We present a set of metallicity values obtained in a homogeneous way for our sample of benchmark stars. In addition to this value, we provide detailed documentation of the associated uncertainties. Finally, we report a value of the metallicity of the cool giant ψ Phe for the first time. Based on NARVAL and HARPS data obtained within the Gaia DPAC (Data Processing and Analysis Consortium) and coordinated by the GBOG (Ground-Based Observations for Gaia) working group and on data retrieved from the ESO-ADP database.Tables 6-76 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/564/A133

  11. Preventing Breast Cancer: Making Progress

    MedlinePlus

    ... medical literature, the Study of Tamoxifen and Raloxifene (STAR) trial was started in 1998. That study enrolled ... in the BCPT. Studies, such as BCPT and STAR, involve women who have not had breast cancer, ...

  12. Let s make progress together!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adriana, Mazare; Liliana, Gheorghian

    2015-04-01

    " University in Iasi, Romania were important attractions for our students in the last three years due to the interesting experiences and its minerals museum. In order to be aware of the importance of animal and vegetable resources the students also visited the Botanical Gardens and the Natural Science Museum in Iasi. Our city and capital county, Suceava, hosted the International Astronomy Olympiad, and students wanted to know more about the stars. Equally popular among our students were the trips organized within the national event "Night of the researchers" at the astronomical observatory and planetarium in Suceava where they were fascinated by the stars, equipment and the new discoveries in the study of the cosmos. We keep in mind Henry Ford's words: "Coming together is the beginning. Keeping together is progress. Working together is success.

  13. Star City, Russia Medical Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandler, Michael R.; Senter, Cedric H.; Roden, Sean K.; Gilmore, Stevan; Powers, William E.; Alexander, David J.

    2004-01-01

    Since the beginning of the NASA/Mir missions, NASA has had astronauts in training at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center (GCTC), also known as Star City, with crewmembers currently there to train for the International Space Station missions. Agreements have been reached with all International Partners that allow the crewmember's parent agency to provide a flight surgeon to oversee crewmember health and safety during training away from home. NASA Medical Operations through the Bioastronautics Contract employs flight surgeons to provide medical support for U.S. crewmembers and their support staff. This poster presentation reviews the aspects of NASA medical operations at Star City.

  14. Physical parameters for TGAS stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masana, E.; Solano, E.

    2017-03-01

    The Tycho-Gaia Astrometric Solution (TGAS) catalogue contains positions, parallaxes, proper motions and G magnitudes for more than 2 million stars. It was released in September 2016 as part of the Gaia Data Release 1 (DR1). In this work we investigated some methods to get additional information, in particular the effective temperature, the surface gravity and metallicity, but also reddening, absolute magnitudes or bolometric corrections, for TGAS stars. We have also searched for radial velocities in the Gaia-ESO Survey (GES).

  15. Massive Star Burps, Then Explodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-04-01

    Berkeley -- In a galaxy far, far away, a massive star suffered a nasty double whammy. On Oct. 20, 2004, Japanese amateur astronomer Koichi Itagaki saw the star let loose an outburst so bright that it was initially mistaken for a supernova. The star survived, but for only two years. On Oct. 11, 2006, professional and amateur astronomers witnessed the star actually blowing itself to smithereens as Supernova 2006jc. Swift UVOT Image Swift UVOT Image (Credit: NASA / Swift / S.Immler) "We have never observed a stellar outburst and then later seen the star explode," says University of California, Berkeley, astronomer Ryan Foley. His group studied the event with ground-based telescopes, including the 10-meter (32.8-foot) W. M. Keck telescopes in Hawaii. Narrow helium spectral lines showed that the supernova's blast wave ran into a slow-moving shell of material, presumably the progenitor's outer layers ejected just two years earlier. If the spectral lines had been caused by the supernova's fast-moving blast wave, the lines would have been much broader. artistic rendering This artistic rendering depicts two years in the life of a massive blue supergiant star, which burped and spewed a shell of gas, then, two years later, exploded. When the supernova slammed into the shell of gas, X-rays were produced. (Credit: NASA/Sonoma State Univ./A.Simonnet) Another group, led by Stefan Immler of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md., monitored SN 2006jc with NASA's Swift satellite and Chandra X-ray Observatory. By observing how the supernova brightened in X-rays, a result of the blast wave slamming into the outburst ejecta, they could measure the amount of gas blown off in the 2004 outburst: about 0.01 solar mass, the equivalent of about 10 Jupiters. "The beautiful aspect of our SN 2006jc observations is that although they were obtained in different parts of the electromagnetic spectrum, in the optical and in X-rays, they lead to the same conclusions," says Immler. "This

  16. STAR cluster-finder ASIC

    SciTech Connect

    Botlo, M.; LeVine, M.J.; Scheetz, R.A.

    1997-12-31

    The STAR experiment reads out a TPC and an SVT (silicon vertex tracker), both of which require in-line pedestal subtraction, compression of ADC values from 10-bit to 8-bit, and location of time sequences representing responses to charged-particle tracks. The STAR cluster finder ASIC responds to all of these needs. Pedestal subtraction and compression are performed using lookup tables in attached RAM. We describe its design and implementation, as well as testing methodology and results of tests performed on foundry prototypes.

  17. Neutrino Processes in Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolomeitsev, E. E.; Voskresensky, D. N.

    2010-10-01

    The aim of these lectures is to introduce basic processes responsible for cooling of neutron stars and to show how to calculate the neutrino production rate in dense strongly interacting nuclear medium. The formalism is presented that treats on equal footing one-nucleon and multiple-nucleon processes and reactions with virtual bosonic modes and condensates. We demonstrate that neutrino emission from dense hadronic component in neutron stars is subject of strong modifications due to collective effects in the nuclear matter. With the most important in-medium processes incorporated in the cooling code an overall agreement with available soft X ray data can be easily achieved. With these findings the so-called “standard” and “non-standard” cooling scenarios are replaced by one general “nuclear medium cooling scenario” which relates slow and rapid neutron star coolings to the star masses (interior densities). The lectures are split in four parts. Part I: After short introduction to the neutron star cooling problem we show how to calculate neutrino reaction rates of the most efficient one-nucleon and two-nucleon processes. No medium effects are taken into account in this instance. The effects of a possible nucleon pairing are discussed. We demonstrate that the data on neutron star cooling cannot be described without inclusion of medium effects. It motivates an assumption that masses of the neutron stars are different and that neutrino reaction rates should be strongly density dependent. Part II: We introduce the Green’s function diagram technique for systems in and out of equilibrium and the optical theorem formalism. The latter allows to perform calculations of production rates with full Green’s functions including all off-mass-shell effects. We demonstrate how this formalism works within the quasiparticle approximation. Part III: The basic concepts of the nuclear Fermi liquid approach are introduced. We show how strong interaction effects can be

  18. RS CVn stars - Chromospheric phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bopp, B. W.

    1983-01-01

    The observational information regarding chromospheric emission features in surface-active RS CVn stars is reviewed. Three optical features are considered in detail: Ca II H and K, Balmer H-alpha and He I 10830 A. While the qualitative behavior of these lines is in accord with solar-analogy/rotation-activity ideas, the quantitative variation and scaling are very poorly understood. In many cases, the spectroscopic observations with sufficient SNR and resolution to decide these questions have simply not yet been made. The FK Com stars, in particular, present extreme examples of rotation that may well tax present understanding of surface activity to its limits.

  19. Strange stars at finite temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Subharthi; Bagchi, Manjari; Dey, Jishnu; Dey, Mira

    2006-03-01

    We calculate strange star properties, using large Nc approximation with built-in chiral symmetry restoration (CSM). We used a relativistic Hartree Fock meanfield approximation method, using a modi.ed Richardson potential with two scale parameters Λ and Λ', to find a new set of equation of state (EOS) for strange quark matter. We take the effect of temperature (T) on gluon mass, in addition to the usual density dependence, and find that the transition T from hadronic matter to strange matter is 80 MeV. Therefore formation of strange stars may be the only signal for formation of QGP with asymptotic freedom (AF) and CSM.

  20. Reconnaissance of the Nearby Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, Todd

    1999-01-01

    Accomplishments by the PI during this grant period include: 1. Creating, enhancing, and testing the NStars Database website. During the spring and summer of 1999, the PI performed roughly a dozen extensive "stress tests" of the website. Each test included checking data for individual stars and conducting searches that produced lists of stars from the Database to verify that each entry was correct. In the process, errors were discovered and rectified before the website was made public in July 1999. 2. "Advertising" NStars as a Project to astronomers worldwide. 3. Providing data that has been incorporated into the NStars Database. 4. Observations in Support of the NStars Project.

  1. First Stars III Conference Summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Shea, B. W.; McKee, C. F.; Heger, A.; Abel, T.

    2008-03-01

    The understanding of the formation, life, and death of Population III stars, as well as the impact that these objects had on later generations of structure formation, is one of the foremost issues in modern cosmological research and has been an active area of research during the past several years. We summarize the results presented at "First Stars III," a conference sponsored by Los Alamos National Laboratory, the Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, and the Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics. This conference, the third in a series, took place in July 2007 at the La Fonda Hotel in Santa Fe, New Mexico, U.S.A.

  2. Blue metal-poor stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preston, George W.; Sneden, Christopher

    2004-12-01

    We review the discovery of blue metal-poor (BMP) stars and the resolution of this population into blue stragglers and intermediate-age Main-Sequence stars by use of binary fractions. We show that the specific frequencies of blue stragglers in the halo field and in globular clusters differ by an order of magnitude. We attribute this difference to the different modes of production of these two populations. We report carbon and s-process enrichment among very metal-poor field blue stragglers and discuss how this result can be used to further resolve field blue stragglers into groups formed during RGB and AGB evolution of their erstwhile primary companions.

  3. Star formation - A theoretician's view

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shu, Frank H.

    1991-01-01

    The present evaluation of the hypothesis that the birth of a sunlike star occurs in four stages, with a critical bipolar outflow phase, notes that observed molecular outflows cannot be initiated from circumstellar disks and must instead represent swept-up shells of gas that are driven by strong protostellar winds. The star can resolve its growing angular-momentum problem only by rejecting a fraction of the material that is fed through the disk in a powerful, magnetocentrifugally-driven wind. Empirical properties measured for well-collimated outflow sources can be accounted for by the interaction of this anisotropic wind with the ambient molecular cloud core.

  4. Star formation and gas supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catinella, B.

    2016-06-01

    A detailed knowledge of how gas cycles in and around galaxies, and how it depends on galaxy properties such as stellar mass and star formation rate, is crucial to understand galaxy formation and evolution. We take advantage of the most sensitive surveys of cold gas in massive galaxies, GASS and COLD GASS, as well as of the state-of-the-art HI blind survey ALFALFA to investigate how molecular and atomic hydrogen reservoirs vary along and across the main sequence of star-forming galaxies.

  5. Influence of X-ray radiation on the hot star wind ionization state and on the radiative force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krtička, Jiří; Kubát, Jiří

    2016-09-01

    Hot stars emit large amounts of X-rays, which are assumed to originate in the supersonic stellar wind. Part of the emitted X-rays is subsequently absorbed in the wind and influences its ionization state. Because hot star winds are driven radiatively, the modified ionization equilibrium affects the radiative force. We review the recent progress in modeling the influence of X-rays on the radiative equilibrium and on the radiative force. We focus particularly on single stars with X-rays produced in wind shocks and on binaries with massive components, which belong to the most luminous objects in X-rays.

  6. College Students' Preinstructional Ideas about Stars and Star Formation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Janelle M.; Prather, Edward E.; Johnson, Bruce; Slater, Timothy F.

    2009-01-01

    This study (Note 1) investigated the beliefs about stars that students hold when they enter an undergraduate introductory astronomy course for nonscience majors. Students' preinstructional ideas were investigated through the use of several student-supplied-response (SSR) surveys, which asked students to describe their ideas about topics such as…

  7. Probing the faintest stars in a globular star cluster.

    PubMed

    Richer, Harvey B; Anderson, Jay; Brewer, James; Davis, Saul; Fahlman, Gregory G; Hansen, Brad M S; Hurley, Jarrod; Kalirai, Jasonjot S; King, Ivan R; Reitzel, David; Rich, R Michael; Shara, Michael M; Stetson, Peter B

    2006-08-18

    NGC 6397 is the second closest globular star cluster to the Sun. Using 5 days of time on the Hubble Space Telescope, we have constructed an ultradeep color-magnitude diagram for this cluster. We see a clear truncation in each of its two major stellar sequences. Faint red main-sequence stars run out well above our observational limit and near to the theoretical prediction for the lowest mass stars capable of stable hydrogen burning in their cores. We also see a truncation in the number counts of faint blue stars, namely white dwarfs. This reflects the limit to which the bulk of the white dwarfs can cool over the lifetime of the cluster. There is also a turn toward bluer colors in the least luminous of these objects. This was predicted for the very coolest white dwarfs with hydrogen-rich atmospheres as the formation of H(2) and the resultant collision-induced absorption cause their atmospheres to become largely opaque to infrared radiation.

  8. From neutron stars to quark stars in mimetic gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astashenok, Artyom V.; Odintsov, Sergei D.

    2016-09-01

    Realistic models of neutron and quark stars in the framework of mimetic gravity with a Lagrange multiplier constraint are presented. We discuss the effect of a mimetic scalar aiming to describe dark matter on the mass-radius relation and the moment of inertia for slowly rotating relativistic stars. The mass-radius relation and moment of inertia depend on the value of the mimetic scalar in the center of the star. This fact leads to the ambiguity in the mass-radius relation for a given equation of state. Such ambiguity allows us to explain some observational facts better than in standard general relativity. The case of mimetic potential V (ϕ )˜A eC ϕ2 is considered in detail. The relative deviation of the maximal moment of inertia is approximately twice as large as the relative deviation of the maximal stellar mass. We also briefly discuss the mimetic f (R ) gravity. In the case of f (R )=R +a R2 mimetic gravity, it is expected that the increase of maximal mass and maximal moment of inertia due to the mimetic scalar becomes much stronger with bigger parameter a . The influence of the scalar field in mimetic gravity can lead to the possible existence of extreme neutron stars with large masses.

  9. Evolved star water maser cloud size determined by star size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, A. M. S.; Etoka, S.; Gray, M. D.; Lekht, E. E.; Mendoza-Torres, J. E.; Murakawa, K.; Rudnitskij, G.; Yates, J. A.

    2012-10-01

    Context. Cool, evolved stars undergo copious mass loss but the detailed mechanisms and the form in which the matter is returned to the ISM are still under debate. Aims: We investigated the structure and evolution of the wind at 5 to 50 stellar radii from asymptotic giant branch and red supergiant stars. Methods: 22-GHz water masers around seven evolved stars were imaged using MERLIN, at sub-AU resolution. Each source was observed at between 2 and 7 epochs, covering several stellar periods. We compared our results with long-term single dish monitoring provided by the Pushchino radio telescope. Results: The 22-GHz emission is located in approximately spherical, thick, unevenly filled shells. The outflow velocity increases twofold or more between the inner and outer shell limits. Water maser clumps could be matched at successive epochs separated by less than two years for AGB stars, or at least 5 years for RSG. This is much shorter than the decades taken for the wind to cross the maser shell, and comparison with spectral monitoring shows that some features fade and reappear. In five sources, most of the matched maser features brighten or dim in concert from one epoch to the next. A number of individual maser features show idiosyncratic behaviour, including one cloud in W Hya caught in the act of passing in front of a background cloud leading to 50-fold, transient amplification. The masing clouds are one or two orders of magnitude denser than the wind average and contain a substantial fraction of the mass loss in this region, with a filling factor <1%. The RSG clouds are about ten times bigger than those round the AGB stars. Conclusions: Proper motions are dominated by expansion, with no systematic rotation. The maser clouds presumably survive for decades (the shell crossing time) but the masers are not always beamed in our direction. Only radiative effects can explain changes in flux density throughout the maser shells on short timescales. The size of the clouds is

  10. White Dwarfs, Neutron Stars and Black Holes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szekeres, P.

    1977-01-01

    The three possible fates of burned-out stars: white dwarfs, neutron stars and black holes, are described in elementary terms. Characteristics of these celestial bodies, as provided by Einstein's work, are described. (CP)

  11. Astrophysics: Violent emissions of newborn stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Röllig, Markus

    2016-09-01

    Interactions between young stars and their parent molecular clouds are poorly understood. High-resolution observations of the Orion nebula now reveal these interactions, which have implications for star formation. See Letter p.207

  12. Optical Multicolor Photometry of Spectrophotometric Standard Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landolt, Arlo U.; Uomoto, Alan K.

    2007-03-01

    Photoelectric data on the Johnson-Kron-Cousins UBVRI broadband photometric system are provided for a set of stars that have been used as spectrophotometric standard stars for the Hubble Space Telescope.

  13. Extremely metal-poor stars from the SDSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, H.-G.; Bonifacio, P.; Caffau, E.; Behara, N. T.; González Hernández, J. I.; Sbordone, L.

    2008-12-01

    We give a progress report on the activities within the CIFIST Team related to the search for extremely metal-poor (EMP) stars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey's (SDSS) spectroscopic catalogue. So far, the search has provided 25 candidates with metallicities around or smaller than -3. For 15 candidates, high-resolution spectroscopy with UVES at the VLT has confirmed their EMP status. Work is under way to extend the search to the SDSS's photometric catalogue by augmenting the SDSS photometry and by gauging the capabilities of X-shooter when going to significantly fainter targets.

  14. Massive binary stars as a probe of massive star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiminki, Daniel C.

    2010-10-01

    Massive stars are among the largest and most influential objects we know of on a sub-galactic scale. Binary systems, composed of at least one of these stars, may be responsible for several types of phenomena, including type Ib/c supernovae, short and long gamma ray bursts, high-velocity runaway O and B-type stars, and the density of the parent star clusters. Our understanding of these stars has met with limited success, especially in the area of their formation. Current formation theories rely on the accumulated statistics of massive binary systems that are limited because of their sample size or the inhomogeneous environments from which the statistics are collected. The purpose of this work is to provide a higher-level analysis of close massive binary characteristics using the radial velocity information of 113 massive stars (B3 and earlier) and binary orbital properties for the 19 known close massive binaries in the Cygnus OB2 Association. This work provides an analysis using the largest amount of massive star and binary information ever compiled for an O-star rich cluster like Cygnus OB2, and compliments other O-star binary studies such as NGC 6231, NGC 2244, and NGC 6611. I first report the discovery of 73 new O or B-type stars and 13 new massive binaries by this survey. This work involved the use of 75 successful nights of spectroscopic observation at the Wyoming Infrared Observatory in addition to observations obtained using the Hydra multi-object spectrograph at WIYN, the HIRES echelle spectrograph at KECK, and the Hamilton spectrograph at LICK. I use these data to estimate the spectrophotometric distance to the cluster and to measure the mean systemic velocity and the one-sided velocity dispersion of the cluster. Finally, I compare these data to a series of Monte Carlo models, the results of which indicate that the binary fraction of the cluster is 57 +/- 5% and that the indices for the power law distributions, describing the log of the periods, mass

  15. Spitzer Digs Up Hidden Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] 3-Panel Version Figure 1 [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Visible Light Figure 2 Infrared (IRAC) Figure 3 Combined Figure 4

    Two rambunctious young stars are destroying their natal dust cloud with powerful jets of radiation, in an infrared image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope.

    The stars are located approximately 600 light-years away in a cosmic cloud called BHR 71. In visible light (left panel), BHR 71 is just a large black structure. The burst of yellow light toward the bottom of the cloud is the only indication that stars might be forming inside. In infrared light (center panel), the baby stars are shown as the bright yellow smudges toward the center. Both of these yellow spots have wisps of green shooting out of them. The green wisps reveal the beginning of a jet. Like a rainbow, the jet begins as green, then transitions to orange, and red toward the end. The combined visible-light and infrared composite (right panel) shows that a young star's powerful jet is responsible for the rupture at the bottom of the dense cloud in the visible-light image. Astronomers know this because burst of light in the visible-light image overlaps exactly with a jet spouting-out of the left star, in the infrared image.

    The jets' changing colors reveal a cooling effect, and may suggest that the young stars are spouting out radiation in regular bursts. The green tints at the beginning of the jet reveal really hot hydrogen gas, the orange shows warm gas, and the reddish wisps at the end represent the coolest gas. The fact that gas toward the beginning of the jet is hotter than gas near the middle suggests that the stars must give off regular bursts of energy -- and the material closest to the star is being heated by shockwaves from a recent stellar outburst. Meanwhile, the tints of orange reveal gas that is

  16. Disrupted Stars in Unusual Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-03-01

    Tidal disruption events (TDEs) occur when a star passes a little too close to a supermassive black hole at the center of a galaxy. Tidal forces from the black hole cause the passing star to be torn apart, resulting in a brief flare of radiation as the stars material accretes onto the black hole. A recent study asks the following question: do TDEs occur most frequently in an unusual type of galaxy?A Trend in DisruptionsSo far, we have data from eight candidate TDEs that peaked in optical and ultraviolet wavelengths. The spectra from these observations have shown an intriguing trend: many of these TDEs host galaxies exhibit weak line emission (indicating little or no current star-formation activity), and yet they show strong Balmer absorption lines (indicating star formation activity occurred within the last Gyr). These quiescent, Balmer-strong galaxies likely underwent a period of intense star formation that recently ended.To determine if TDEs are overrepresented in such galaxies, a team of scientists led by Decker French (Steward Observatory, University of Arizona) has quantified the fraction of galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) that exhibit similar properties to those of TDE hosts.Quantifying OverrepresentationSpectral characteristics of SDSS galaxies (gray) and TDE candidate host galaxies (colored points): line emission vs. Balmer absorption. The lower right-hand box identifies thequiescent, Balmer-strong galaxies which contain most TDE events, yet are uncommon among the galaxy sample as a whole. Click for a better look! [French et al. 2016]French and collaborators compare the optical spectra of the TDE host galaxies to those of nearly 600,000 SDSS galaxies, using two different cutoffs for the Balmer absorption the indicator of past star formation. Their strictest cut, filtering for very high Balmer absorption, selected only 0.2% of the SDSS galaxies, yet 38% of the TDEs are hosted in such galaxies. Using a more relaxed cutoff selects 2.3% of

  17. Weighing Ultra-Cool Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-05-01

    Large Ground-Based Telescopes and Hubble Team-Up to Perform First Direct Brown Dwarf Mass Measurement [1] Summary Using ESO's Very Large Telescope at Paranal and a suite of ground- and space-based telescopes in a four-year long study, an international team of astronomers has measured for the first time the mass of an ultra-cool star and its companion brown dwarf. The two stars form a binary system and orbit each other in about 10 years. The team obtained high-resolution near-infrared images; on the ground, they defeated the blurring effect of the terrestrial atmosphere by means of adaptive optics techniques. By precisely determining the orbit projected on the sky, the astronomers were able to measure the total mass of the stars. Additional data and comparison with stellar models then yield the mass of each of the components. The heavier of the two stars has a mass around 8.5% of the mass of the Sun and its brown dwarf companion is even lighter, only 6% of the solar mass. Both objects are relatively young with an age of about 500-1,000 million years. These observations represent a decisive step towards the still missing calibration of stellar evolution models for very-low mass stars. PR Photo 19a/04: Orbit of the ultra-cool stars in 2MASSW J0746425+2000321. PR Photo 19b/04: Animated Gif of the orbital motion. Telephone number star Even though astronomers have found several hundreds of very low mass stars and brown dwarfs, the fundamental properties of these extreme objects, such as masses and surface temperatures, are still not well known. Within the cosmic zoo, these ultra-cool stars represent a class of "intermediate" objects between giant planets - like Jupiter - and "normal" stars less massive than our Sun, and to understand them well is therefore crucial to the field of stellar astrophysics. The problem with these ultra-cool stars is that contrary to normal stars that burn hydrogen in their central core, no unique relation exists between the luminosity of the

  18. The problem of the barium stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohm-Vitense, E.; Nemec, J.; Proffitt, C.

    1984-01-01

    Ultraviolet observations of barium stars and other cool stars with peculiar element abundances are reported. Those observations attempted to find hot white dwarf companions. Among six real barium stars studied, only Zeta Cap was found to have a white dwarf companion. Among seven mild, or marginal, barium stars studied, at least three were found to have hot subluminous companions. It is likely that all of them have white dwarf companions.

  19. The nuclear physics of neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piekarewicz, J.

    2014-05-01

    We explore the unique and fascinating structure of neutron stars. Although neutron stars are of interest in many areas of Physics, our aim is to provide an intellectual bridge between Nuclear Physics and Astrophysics. We argue against the naive perception of a neutron star as a uniform assembly of neutrons packed to enormous densities. Rather, by focusing on the many exotic phases that are speculated to exist in a neutron star, we show how the reality is different and far more interesting.

  20. Development of a Guide Star Search System.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, T.; Omata, K.; Takata, T.; Kosugi, G.; Ozawa, T.; Ichikawa, S.; Sasaki, T.

    1997-03-01

    A Guide Star Search System is developed with the aid of a script language for building GUI, Tcl/Tk. Using a Data Base Management System, the authors have realized quick search for guide stars in an observational field from the Guide Star Catalog and the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory Star Catalog. This system has been implemented in OOPS (Okoyama Optical Polarimetry and Spectroscopy System) at Okayama Astrophysical Observatory.

  1. [WN] central stars of planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todt, H.; Peña, M.; Hamann, W.-R.; Gräfener, G.

    2010-11-01

    Hydrogen-deficient central stars are commonly considered as the progenitors of H-deficient white dwarfs. Spectroscopically, many H-deficient central stars resemble massive Wolf-Rayet stars of the carbon sequence and are therefore classified as [WC] stars. The massive WR stars of the nitrogen sequence (WN), however, have no spectroscopic counterpart among the central stars. With PB 8 we found for the first time a central star with a WR-type emission line spectrum that resembles the nitrogen sequence with only a slight enhancement of carbon lines, and therefore we classified this star as [WN/C]. Our analysis reveals that its atmosphere consists mainly of helium, with some hydrogen and only traces of carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen. This is very different from any other Wolf-Rayet type central stars. The results of our analyses, especially the chemical composition, strongly constrains possible scenarios for the formation of PB 8. For the time being, we don't know any path of single-star evolution that could explain this enigmatic central star. In this context, we will also discuss the status of the central star of PMR 5, which is another candidate for a [WN] spectral type.

  2. Observations of southern emission-line stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henize, K. G.

    1976-01-01

    A catalog of 1929 stars showing H-alpha emission on photographic plates is presented which covers the entire southern sky south of declination -25 deg to a red limiting magnitude of about 11.0. The catalog provides previous designations of known emission-line stars equatorial (1900) and galactic coordinates, visual and photographic magnitudes, H-alpha emission parameters, spectral types, and notes on unusual spectral features. The objects listed include 16 M stars, 25 S stars, 37 carbon stars, 20 symbiotic stars, 40 confirmed or suspected T Tauri stars, 16 novae, 14 planetary nebulae, 11 P Cygni stars, 9 Bep stars, 87 confirmed or suspected Wolf-Rayet stars, and 26 'peculiar' stars. Two new T associations are discovered, one in Lupus and one in Chamaeleon. Objects with variations in continuum or H-alpha intensity are noted, and the distribution by spectral type is analyzed. It is found that the sky distribution of these emission-line stars shows significant concentrations in the region of the small Sagittarius cloud and in the Carina region.

  3. Formative Assessment Probes: Where Are the Stars?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeley, Page

    2011-01-01

    Gazing at the night sky is a familiar experience for many elementary students. Depending on where children live, they can often look out a window and see the Moon and stars. Children may have seen the Moon and stars in television shows, movies, posters, or children's picture books. Regardless of whether they see the Moon and stars firsthand or…

  4. Theory of cooling neutron stars versus observations

    SciTech Connect

    Yakovlev, D. G.; Gnedin, O. Y.; Kaminker, A. D.; Potekhin, A. Y.

    2008-02-27

    We review current state of neutron star cooling theory and discuss the prospects to constrain the equation of state, neutrino emission and superfluid properties of neutron star cores by comparing the cooling theory with observations of thermal radiation from isolated neutron stars.

  5. The International Teen STAR Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klaus, Hanna

    The program "Teen STAR (Sexuality Teaching in the context of Adult Responsibility)" begins by helping young people understand the woman's cyclic and the man's constant fertility in order to encourage pre-marital abstinence in adolescents. Students then discover the values of fertility and begin to derive the norms that govern possessing it.…

  6. Asteroseismology of White Dwarf Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Carl J.

    1997-01-01

    The primary purpose of this investigation has been to study various aspects of multimode pulsations in variable white dwarfs. In particular, nonlinear interactions among pulsation modes in white dwarfs (and, to some extent, in other variable stars), analysis of recent observations where such interactions are important, and preliminary work on the effects of crystallization in cool white dwarfs are reported.

  7. The Politics of Star Wars.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkins, Lee

    George Lucas's Star Wars trilogy is used as the basis for the creation of a political subtext arising from one of America's most enduring literary myths--the American Adam. That subtext, when translated into a modern political context, pinpoints two central issues to face this democracy in the coming years, as well as a national ambivalence about…

  8. The Regressive Effect of STAR.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Widerquist, Karl

    New York State's School Tax Relief Aid (STAR) heavily favors wealthier districts, partially reversing equalizing effects that state aid is designed to have. Normally state school aid helps bring less wealthy school districts closer to the standard of wealthier districts. It increases and makes up the lost revenue from taxpayers in the state as a…

  9. NuSTAR in Space

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's newest X-ray telescope will have a lengthy structure thatunfolds in space, allowing it to see high-energy objects like feedingblack holes.› Download high-res video› NuSTAR's mission ...

  10. Hot Jupiters and cool stars

    SciTech Connect

    Villaver, Eva; Mustill, Alexander J.; Livio, Mario; Siess, Lionel

    2014-10-10

    Close-in planets are in jeopardy, as their host stars evolve off the main sequence (MS) to the subgiant and red giant phases. In this paper, we explore the influences of the stellar mass (in the range 1.5-2 M {sub ☉}), mass-loss prescription, planet mass (from Neptune up to 10 Jupiter masses), and eccentricity on the orbital evolution of planets as their parent stars evolve to become subgiants and red giants. We find that planet engulfment along the red giant branch is not very sensitive to the stellar mass or mass-loss rates adopted in the calculations, but quite sensitive to the planetary mass. The range of initial separations for planet engulfment increases with decreasing mass-loss rates or stellar masses and increasing planetary masses. Regarding the planet's orbital eccentricity, we find that as the star evolves into the red giant phase, stellar tides start to dominate over planetary tides. As a consequence, a transient population of moderately eccentric close-in Jovian planets is created that otherwise would have been expected to be absent from MS stars. We find that very eccentric and distant planets do not experience much eccentricity decay, and that planet engulfment is primarily determined by the pericenter distance and the maximum stellar radius.

  11. Jets from Merging Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    With the recent discovery of gravitational waves from the merger of two black holes, its especially important to understand the electromagnetic signals resulting from mergers of compact objects. New simulations successfully follow a merger of two neutron stars that produces a short burst of energy via a jet consistent with short gamma-ray burst (sGRB) detections.Still from the authors simulation showing the two neutron stars, and their magnetic fields, before merger. [Adapted from Ruiz et al. 2016]Challenging SystemWe have long suspected that sGRBs are produced by the mergers of compact objects, but this model has been difficult to prove. One major hitch is that modeling the process of merger and sGRB launch is very difficult, due to the fact that these extreme systems involve magnetic fields, fluids and full general relativity.Traditionally, simulations are only able to track such mergers over short periods of time. But in a recent study, Milton Ruiz (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Industrial University of Santander, Colombia) and coauthors Ryan Lang, Vasileios Paschalidis and Stuart Shapiro have modeled a binary neutron star system all the way through the process of inspiral, merger, and the launch of a jet.A Merger TimelineHow does this happen? Lets walk through one of the teams simulations, in which dipole magnetic field lines thread through the interior of each neutron star and extend beyond its surface(like magnetic fields found in pulsars). In this example, the two neutron stars each have a mass of 1.625 solar masses.Simulation start (0 ms)Loss of energy via gravitational waves cause the neutron stars to inspiral.Merger (3.5 ms)The neutron stars are stretched by tidal effects and make contact. Their merger produces a hypermassive neutron star that is supported against collapse by its differential (nonuniform) rotation.Delayed collapse into a black hole (21.5 ms)Once the differential rotation is redistributed by magnetic fields and partially

  12. Phantom stars and topology change

    SciTech Connect

    DeBenedictis, Andrew; Garattini, Remo; Lobo, Francisco S. N.

    2008-11-15

    In this work, we consider time-dependent dark-energy star models, with an evolving parameter {omega} crossing the phantom divide {omega}=-1. Once in the phantom regime, the null energy condition is violated, which physically implies that the negative radial pressure exceeds the energy density. Therefore, an enormous negative pressure in the center may, in principle, imply a topology change, consequently opening up a tunnel and converting the dark-energy star into a wormhole. The criteria for this topology change are discussed and, in particular, we consider a Casimir energy approach involving quasilocal energy difference calculations that may reflect or measure the occurrence of a topology change. We denote these exotic geometries consisting of dark-energy stars (in the phantom regime) and phantom wormholes as phantom stars. The final product of this topological change, namely, phantom wormholes, have far-reaching physical and cosmological implications, as in addition to being used for interstellar shortcuts, an absurdly advanced civilization may manipulate these geometries to induce closed timelike curves, consequently violating causality.

  13. Cool dust and baby stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eales, Steve

    2013-01-01

    The helium that is cooling its camera is about to run out, but the data from the Herschel Space Observatory, which is designed to study how stars and galaxies form, are likely to keep sub-millimetre-wavelength astronomers busy for years to come. Steve Eales explains.

  14. Colors of RR Lyrae Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Cecil G.

    1999-02-01

    The methods of Davis & Cox are applied to a series of models described by Bono & Stellingwerf to determine the colors of RR Lyrae stars. Convection is ignored, and the radiation flow is treated by a complete variable Eddington, multifrequency-dependent radiative transfer approximation.

  15. Dust near luminous ultraviolet stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, Richard C.

    1992-01-01

    More than 700 luminous stars in the infrared astronomical satellite (IRAS) Skyflux plates were examined for the presence of dust heated by a nearby star. This dust may be distinguished from the ubiquitous cool cirrus by its higher temperature and thus enhanced 60 micron emission. More than 120 dust clouds were found around only 106 of the stars with a volume filling factor of 0.006 and an intercloud separation of 46 pc. A region of dust smoothly distributed through the volume of space heated by the star could not be found and hence an upper limit of 0.05 cm(exp -3) is placed on the equivalent gas density in the intercloud regions. The clouds have an average density of 0.22 cm(exp -3) and a radius of 1.9 pc, albeit with wide variations in their properties. Two different scale heights of 140 and 540 pc were found. This was interpreted as evidence for different distributions of dust in and out of the galactic disk.

  16. Bright Star Astrometry with URAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zacharias, N.

    2015-10-01

    The U.S. Naval Observatory Robotic Astrometric Telescope (URAT) is observing the northern sky since April 2012 for an astrometric survey. Multiple overlaps per year are performed in a single bandpass (680-750 nm) using the "redlens" 20 cm aperture astrograph and a mosaic of large CCDs. Besides the regular, deep survey to magnitude 18.5, short exposures with an objective grating are taken to access stars as bright as 3rd magnitude. A brief overview of the program, observing and reductions is given. Positions on the 8 to 20 mas level are obtained of 66,202 Hipparcos stars at current epochs. These are compared to the Hipparcos Catalog to investigate its accuracy. About 20% of the observed Hipparcos stars are found to have inconsistent positions with the Hipparcos Catalog prediction on the 3 sigma level or over (about 75 mas or more discrepant position offsets). Some stars are now seen at an arcsec (or 25 sigma) off their Hipparcos Catalog predicted position.

  17. The magnetic activity sunlike stars.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, A H

    1984-08-24

    Sunspots, flares, and the myriad time-varying "events" observable in the Sun-the only star whose surface we can examine in detail-are testimony that the Sun is a magnetically variable or active star. Its magnetic field, carried into interplanetary space by the solar wind, produces observable changes in Earth's magnetosphere and variations in the flux of galactic cosmic-ray particles incident upon Earth's upper atmosphere. Centuries of observation have enabled solar scientists to recognize that the Sun's magnetism exists and varies in a globally organized pattern that is somehow coupled to the Sun's rotation. Within the past decade O. C. Wilson demonstrated that analogs of solar activity exist and can be studied in many other dwarf stars. From the continuing study, knowledge of the precise rates of rotation of the stars under investigation is being gained for the first time. The results are expected to increase our understanding of the origin of solar activity and stellar activity in general.

  18. Hot Post-AGB Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parthasarathy, M.; Gauba, G.; Fujii, T.; Nakada, Y.

    2001-08-01

    From the study of IRAS sources with far-IR colors similar to planetary nebulae (PNe), several proto-planetary nebulae with hot (OB) post-AGB central stars have been detected. These stars form an evolutionary link between the cooler G,F,A supergiant stars that have evolved off the Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) and the hot (OB) central stars of PNe. The optical spectra of these objects show strong Balmer emission lines and in some cases low excitation nebular emission lines such as [NII] and [SII] superposed on the OB stellar continuum. The absence of of [OIII] 5007Å line and the presence of low excitation nebular emission lines indicate that photoionisation has just started. The UV(IUE) spectra of some of these objects revealed violet shifted stellar wind P-Cygni profiles of CIV, SiIV and NV, indicating hot and fast stellar wind and post-AGB mass loss. These objects appear to be rapildy evolving into the early stages of PNe similar to that observed in the case of Hen1357 IRAS 17119-5926 (Stingray Nebula) and IRAS 18062+2410 SAO85766.

  19. Coronal Structures In Cool Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dupree, Andrea K.; Oliversen, Ronald (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Many papers have been published that further elucidate the structure of coronas in cool stars as determined from EUVE, HST, FUSE, Chandra, and XMM-Newton observations. Highlights of these are summarized in several pages folk wing that were presented at, the AAS Meeting in Albuquerque in June 2002 during the Topical Session.

  20. End of the Line for a Star like Ours

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riddle, Bob

    2010-01-01

    Stars of different masses have varying life spans, with the more massive stars "burning out" more quickly than stars of lower masses. How or what they do when they burn out also varies, depending on the mass of the star. All stars are called "main sequence stars" as they continue fusing hydrogen and staying in a state of equilibrium--a balance…

  1. Catching a Falling Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-07-01

    , etc. This image was obtained by MASCOT on August 25, 2002 and shows a meteor caught in the act. (Note that this is not the meteor whose spectrum was recorded). The Milky Way is also clearly visible in the centre. A popular saying states that when you see a meteor, you may make a wish. While astronomers cannot promise that it will be realised, a team of astronomers [1] have indeed seen a dream come true! On May 12, 2002, they were lucky to record the spectrum of a bright meteor when it happened - by sheer chance and against all reasonable odds - to cross the narrow slit of the FORS1 instrument on the ESO Very Large Telescope. At the time of this unlikely event, the telescope was performing a series of 20-minute spectroscopic exposures of a supernova in a distant galaxy in order to establish constraints on the dark energy content of the Universe (see e.g. ESO PR 21/98). Thanks to its enormous light-collecting and magnifying power, the VLT recorded the spectrum of the meteor trail perpendicular to its path on one of these exposures. "We really hit the jackpot", says ESO astronomer Emmanuel Jehin: "Chances of capturing a meteor in the narrow slit of the FORS1 spectrograph are about as big as for me winning the national lottery." Meteor spectra have on occasion been obtained serendipitously during photographic star spectra surveys. But this is now maybe the only meteor spectrum recorded with a large telescope and a modern spectrograph. The spectrum covers the wavelength range from 637 to 1050 nm, which is dominated by emissions from air atoms and molecules in the meteor path and teach us about the collision processes in the wake of a meteoroid. The rapid motion of the meteor across the sky resulted in a very brief exposure while crossing the narrow spectrograph slit - only 1/50 of a millisecond! - and despite the relative brightness of the meteor it was only thanks to the VLT's great light-gathering power that any record was procured. The meteor was estimated at magnitude

  2. Coronal Structures in Cool Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliversen, Ronald (Technical Monitor); Dupree, Andrea K.

    2005-01-01

    We have extended our study of the structure of coronas in cool stars to very young stars still accreting from their surrounding disks. In addition we are pursing the connection between coronal X-rays and a powerful diagnostic line in the infrared, the He I 10830Angstrom transition of helium. Highlights of these are summarized below including publications during this reporting period and presentations. Spectroscopy of the infrared He I (lambda10830) line with KECK/NIRSPEC and IRTF/CSHELL and of the ultraviolet C III (lambda977) and O VI (lambda1032) emission with FUSE reveals that the classical T Tauri star TW Hydrae exhibits P Cygni profiles, line asymmetries, and absorption indicative of a continuous, fast (approximately 400 kilometers per second), hot (approximately 300,000 K) accelerating outflow with a mass loss rate approximately 10(exp -11)-10(exp -12) solar mass yr(sup -1) or larger. Spectra of T Tauri N appear consistent with such a wind. The source of the emission and outflow seems restricted to the stars themselves. Although the mass accretion rate is an order of magnitude less for TW Hya than for T Tau, the outflow reaches higher velocities at chromospheric temperatures in TW Hya. Winds from young stellar objects may be substantially hotter and faster than previously thought. The ultraviolet emission lines, when corrected for absorption are broad. Emission associated with the accretion flow and shock is likely to show turbulent broadening. We note that the UV line widths are significantly larger than the X-ray line widths. If the X-rays from TW Hya are generated at the accretion shock, the UV lines may not be directly associated with the shock. On the other hand, studies of X-ray emission in young star clusters, suggest that the strength of the X-ray emission is correlated with stellar rotation, thus casting doubt on an accretion origin for the X-rays. We are beginning to access the infrared spectral region where the He I 108308Angstroms transition

  3. Anatomy of a Shooting Star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Annotated Version

    A close-up view of a star racing through space faster than a speeding bullet can be seen in this image from NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer. The star, called Mira (pronounced My-rah), is traveling at 130 kilometers per second, or 291,000 miles per hour. As it hurls along, it sheds material that will be recycled into new stars, planets and possibly even life.

    In this image, Mira is moving from left to right. It is visible as the pinkish dot in the bulb shape at right. The yellow dot below is a foreground star. Mira is traveling so fast that it's creating a bow shock, or build-up of gas, in front of it, as can be seen here at right.

    Like a boat traveling through water, a bow shock forms ahead of the star in the direction of its motion. Gas in the bow shock is heated and then mixes with the cool hydrogen gas in the wind that is blowing off Mira. This heated hydrogen gas then flows around behind the star, forming a wake.

    Why is the wake of material glowing? When the hydrogen gas is heated, it transitions into a higher-energy state, which then loses energy by emitting ultraviolet light - a process called fluorescence. The Galaxy Evolution Explorer has special instruments that can detect this ultraviolet light.

    A similar fluorescence process is responsible for the Northern Lights -- a glowing, green aurora that can be seen from northern latitudes. However, in that case nitrogen and oxygen gas are fluorescing with visible light.

    Streams and a loop of material can also be seen coming off Mira. Astronomers are still investigating what these streams are, but they suspect that they are denser parts of Mira's wind perhaps flowing out of the star's poles.

    This image consists of data captured by both the far- and near-ultraviolet detectors on the Galaxy Evolution Explorer between November 18 and December 15, 2006. It has a total exposure time of about 3 hours.

  4. "europe Towards the Stars"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1995-06-01

    spectrograph, fitted with the associated detector). In the instrument documentation, you describe the instrument, its design, construction and the test results." A Future Space Mission - Designing an on-board Instrument. "You design an instrument for a future space mission to the outer Solar System. The purpose is to carry out observations of Pluto and Transneptunian Objects. Describe the design, the physical/chemical principles of the instrument and the observations to be made with it. Give examples of some possible results." Theory - Looking into the Future. "You describe a stable planetary system around another star. Your report contains a description of the conditions (inner structure, composition, surface features, atmosphere) of the planets. What are the technical requirements for observing this system from the Earth? Which kind of observations of these objects can be done with available instruments?" None of these subjects are easy to treat, but experience has shown that thanks to very dedicated teachers, the teaching of astronomy takes place at a surprisingly high level at many of Europe's schools. The establishment of the European Association for Astronomy Education (EAAE) last year has also resulted in a Europe-wide, increasing interest in these matters and many EAAE members actively promote the present contest and participate in the organisation. Many good entries are therefore expected. The participation is open to pupils in their last or second-to-last year before baccalaureate. In each country, a National Committee has been established that will organise the contest and evaluate the responses. In most cases, the closing date is early October 1995, and the national award ceremonies will take place in early November. Detailed information about this programme may be obtained from the National Committees at the addresses below. A VISIT TO ESO The members of the winning teams from each country will be invited to spend an exciting and informative week at the ESO

  5. A Four-Star Lightweight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-10-01

    An important part of exoplanet studies is the attempt to understand how planets and solar systems form. New measurements of the lowest-mass quadruple star system ever discovered are now confirming an intriguing theory: in addition to other channels, large gas planets may form in the same way that stars do.Formation ChannelsExoplanets have been found in an enormous variety of configurations, from hot Jupiters only 0.01 AU away from their host star, to planetary-mass companions that orbit at a whopping distance of 1,000 AU.Formation of these gas giants could occur via a number of different theorized pathways, such as growth from rocky cores close to host star, or fragmentation from instabilities far out in the protoplanetary disk. But given that the line between giant planets and brown dwarfs is somewhat fuzzy, another theory has come under consideration as well: could gas giants form out of the collapse and fragmentation of a molecular cloud, in the same way that stars form?In a recent study, Brendan Bowler and Lynne Hillenbrand (California Institute of Technology) argue that one star system, 2M0441+2301 AabBab, might actually be evidence that this channel works. 2M0441+2301 AabBab is a young (less than 3 million years old) quadruple system in the Taurus star-forming region, previously identified through imaging. Since photometry alone isnt enough to be sure of the masses of the components, Bowler and Hillenbrand used the OSIRIS instrument on the Keck I telescope to obtain the first resolved spectra of each component of this system, verifying the systems intriguing properties.Pair of PairsNear-IR spectra of 2M0441+2301 Aa, Ab, Ba, and Bb. The insets shows the unresolved 2MASS image of the system and the Keck/NIRC2 images of each binary subsystem. Click for a better look! [BowlerHillenbrand 2015]2M0441+2301 AabBab is whats known as a hierarchical quadruple system: it consists of a pair of close-binary star systems that orbit each other at an enormous distance of at

  6. Star Formation in Henize 206

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] IRA-MIPS Composite

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Visible

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] IRAC

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] MIPS

    The LMC is a small satellite galaxy gravitationally bound to our own Milky Way. Yet the gravitational effects are tearing the companion to shreds in a long-playing drama of 'intergalactic cannibalism.' These disruptions lead to a recurring cycle of star birth and star death.

    Astronomers are particularly interested in the LMC because its fractional content of heavy metals is two to five times lower than is seen in our solar neighborhood. [In this context, 'heavy elements' refer to those elements not present in the primordial universe. Such elements as carbon, oxygen and others are produced by nucleosynthesis and are ejected into the interstellar medium via mass loss by stars, including supernova explosions.] As such, the LMC provides a nearby cosmic laboratory that may resemble the distant universe in its chemical composition.

    The primary Spitzer image, showing the wispy filamentary structure of Henize 206, is a four-color composite mosaic created by combining data from an infrared array camera (IRAC) at near-infrared wavelengths and the mid-infrared data from a multiband imaging photometer (MIPS). Blue represents invisible infrared light at wavelengths of 3.6 and 4.5 microns. Note that most of the stars in the field of view radiate primarily at these short infrared wavelengths. Cyan denotes emission at 5.8 microns, green depicts the 8.0 micron light, and red is used to trace the thermal emission from dust at 24 microns. The separate instrument images are included as insets to the main composite.

    An inclined ring of emission dominates the central and upper regions of the image. This delineates a bubble of hot, x-ray emitting gas that was blown into space when a massive star died in a supernova

  7. Young and Waltzing Binary Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-10-01

    ADONIS Observes Low-mass Eclipsing System in Orion Summary A series of very detailed images of a binary system of two young stars have been combined into a movie . In merely 3 days, the stars swing around each other. As seen from the earth, they pass in front of each other twice during a full revolution, producing eclipses during which their combined brightness diminishes . A careful analysis of the orbital motions has now made it possible to deduce the masses of the two dancing stars . Both turn out to be about as heavy as our Sun. But while the Sun is about 4500 million years old, these two stars are still in their infancy. They are located some 1500 light-years away in the Orion star-forming region and they probably formed just 10 million years ago . This is the first time such an accurate determination of the stellar masses could be achieved for a young binary system of low-mass stars . The new result provides an important piece of information for our current understanding of how young stars evolve. The observations were obtained by a team of astronomers from Italy and ESO [1] using the ADaptive Optics Near Infrared System (ADONIS) on the 3.6-m telescope at the ESO La Silla Observatory. PR Photo 29a/01 : The RXJ 0529.4+0041 system before primary eclipse PR Photo 29b/01 : The RXJ 0529.4+0041 system at mid-primary eclipse PR Photo 29c/01 : The RXJ 0529.4+0041 system after primary eclipse PR Photo 29d/01 : The RXJ 0529.4+0041 system before secondary eclipse PR Photo 29e/01 : The RXJ 0529.4+0041 system at mid-secondary eclipse PR Photo 29f/01 : The RXJ 0529.4+0041 system after secondary eclipse PR Video Clip 06/01 : Video of the RXJ 0529.4+0041 system Binary stars and stellar masses Since some time, astronomers have noted that most stars seem to form in binary or multiple systems. This is quite fortunate, as the study of binary stars is the only way in which it is possible to measure directly one of the most fundamental quantities of a star, its mass. The mass of a

  8. Episodic Accretion in Young Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audard, M.; Ábrahám, P.; Dunham, M. M.; Green, J. D.; Grosso, N.; Hamaguchi, K.; Kastner, J. H.; Kóspál, Á.; Lodato, G.; Romanova, M. M.; Skinner, S. L.; Vorobyov, E. I.; Zhu, Z.

    In the last 20 years, the topic of episodic accretion has gained significant interest in the star-formation community. It is now viewed as a common, although still poorly understood, phenomenon in low-mass star formation. The FU Orionis objects (FUors) are long-studied examples of this phenomenon. FU Orionis objects are believed to undergo accretion outbursts during which the accretion rate rapidly increases from typically 10-7 to a few 10-4 M⊙ yr-1, and remains elevated over several decades or more. EXors, a loosely defined class of pre-main-sequence stars, exhibit shorter and repetitive outbursts, associated with lower accretion rates. The relationship between the two classes, and their connection to the standard pre-main-sequence evolutionary sequence, is an open question: Do they represent two distinct classes, are they triggered by the same physical mechanism, and do they occur in the same evolutionary phases? Over the past couple of decades, many theoretical and numerical models have been developed to explain the origin of FUor and EXor outbursts. In parallel, such accretion bursts have been detected at an increasing rate, and as observing techniques improve, each individual outburst is studied in increasing detail. We summarize key observations of pre-main-sequence star outbursts, and review the latest thinking on outburst triggering mechanisms, the propagation of outbursts from star/disk to disk/jet systems, the relation between classical EXors and FUors, and newly discovered outbursting sources — all of which shed new light on episodic accretion. We finally highlight some of the most promising directions for this field in the near- and long-term.

  9. Hierarchical Star Formation Across Galactic Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouliermis, Dimitrios

    2016-09-01

    Most stars form in clusters. This fact has emerged from the finding that "embedded clusters account for the 70 - 90% fraction of all stars formed in Giant Molecular Clouds (GMCs)." While this is the case at scales of few 10 parsecs, typical for GMCs, a look at star-forming galaxies in the Local Group (LG) shows significant populations of enormous loose complexes of early-type stars extending at scales from few 100 to few 1000 parsecs. The fact that these stellar complexes host extremely large numbers of loosely distributed massive blue stars implies either that stars form also in an unbound fashion or they are immediately dislocated from their original compact birthplaces or both. The Legacy Extra-Galactic UV Survey (LEGUS) has produced remarkable collections of resolved early-type stars in 50 star-forming LG galaxies, suited for testing ideas about recent star formation. I will present results from our ongoing project on star formation across LEGUS disk galaxies. We characterize the global clustering behavior of the massive young stars in order to understand the morphology of star formation over galactic scales. This morphology appears to be self-similar with fractal dimensions comparable to those of the molecular interstellar medium, apparently driven by large-scale turbulence. Our clustering analysis reveals compact stellar systems nested in larger looser concentrations, which themselves are the dense parts of unbound complexes and super-structures, giving evidence of hierarchical star formation up to galactic scales. We investigate the structural and star formation parameters demographics of the star-forming complexes revealed at various levels of compactness. I will discuss the outcome of our correlation and regression analyses on these parameters in an attempt to understand the link between galactic disk dynamics and morphological structure in spiral and ring galaxies of the local universe.

  10. Terrestrial Planet Finder Interferometer: 2007-2008 Progress and Plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, P. R.; Lay, O. P.; Martin, S. R.; Peters, R. D.; Gappinger, R. O.; Ksendzov, A.; Scharf, D. P.; Booth, A. J.; Beichman, C. A.; Serabyn, E.; Johnston, K. J.; Danchi, W. C.

    2008-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of technology development for the Terrestrial Planet Finder Interferometer (TPF-I). TPF-I is a mid-infrared space interferometer being designed with the capability of detecting Earth-like planets in the habitable zones around nearby stars. The overall technology roadmap is presented and progress with each of the testbeds is summarized. The current interferometer architecture, design trades, and the viability of possible reduced-scope mission concepts are also presented.

  11. Recent progress on dense nuclear matter in skyrmion approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, YongLiang; Rho, Mannque

    2017-03-01

    The Skyrme model provides a novel unified approach to nuclear physics. In this approach, single baryon, baryonic matter and medium-modified hadron properties are treated on the same footing. Intrinsic density dependence (IDD) reflecting the change of vacuum by compressed baryonic matter figures naturally in the approach. In this article, we review the recent progress on accessing dense nuclear matter by putting baryons treated as solitons, namely, skyrmions, on crystal lattice with accents on the implications in compact stars.

  12. Star Clusters in the Magellanic Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, J. S., III

    2014-09-01

    The Magellanic Clouds (MC) are prime locations for studies of star clusters covering a full range in age and mass. This contribution briefly reviews selected properties of Magellanic star clusters, by focusing first on young systems that show evidence for hierarchical star formation. The structures and chemical abundance patterns of older intermediate age star clusters in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) are a second topic. These suggest a complex history has affected the chemical enrichment in the SMC and that low tidal stresses in the SMC foster star cluster survival.

  13. Physics of Mass Loss in Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puls, Joachim; Sundqvist, Jon O.; Markova, Nevena

    2015-01-01

    We review potential mass-loss mechanisms in the various evolutionary stages of massive stars, from the well-known line-driven winds of O-stars and BA-supergiants to the less-understood winds of Red Supergiants. We discuss optically thick winds from Wolf-Rayet stars and Very Massive Stars, and the hypothesis of porosity-moderated, continuum-driven mass loss from stars formally exceeding the Eddington limit, which might explain the giant outbursts from Luminous Blue Variables. We finish this review with a glance on the impact of rapid rotation, magnetic fields and small-scale inhomogeneities in line-driven winds.

  14. X-rays from the youngest stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feigelson, Eric D.

    1994-01-01

    The X-ray properties of classical and weak-lined T Tauri stars are briefly reviewed, emphasizing recent results from the ROSAT satellite and prospects for ASCA. The interpretation of the high level of T Tauri X-rays as enhanced solar-type magnetic activity is discussed and criticized. The census of X-ray emitters is significantly increasing estimates of galactic star formation efficiency, and X-ray emission may be important for self-regulation of star formation. ASCA images will detect star formation regions out to several kiloparsecs and will study the magnetically heated plasma around T Tauri stars. However, images will often suffer from crowding effects.

  15. Stellar yields of rotating first stars

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Koh; Umeda, Hideyuki; Yoshida, Takashi

    2014-05-02

    First stars, also called population III stars, are born in the earliest universe without any heavy elements. These stars are the first nuclear reactor in the universe and affect their circumstances emitting synthesized materials. Not only the stellar evolution, but also their chemical yields have many distinctive characteristics. We have modeled evolution of population III stars including effect of stellar rotation. Internal mixing induced by rotation naturally results in primary nitrogen production. Evolution of rotating massive stars is followed until the core collapse phase. The new Pop III yield model will consistently explain the observed abundances of metal-poor systems.

  16. Measuring star formation rates in blue galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, John S., III; Hunter, Deidre A.

    1987-01-01

    The problems associated with measurements of star formation rates in galaxies are briefly reviewed, and specific models are presented for determinations of current star formation rates from H alpha and Far Infrared (FIR) luminosities. The models are applied to a sample of optically blue irregular galaxies, and the results are discussed in terms of star forming histories. It appears likely that typical irregular galaxies are forming stars at nearly constant rates, although a few examples of systems with enhanced star forming activity are found among HII regions and luminous irregular galaxies.

  17. THE SUN AS A VARIABLE STAR III.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    observations has taught us more about the variations of solar type stars than about the sun itself. The observations of 15 stars of spectral types F and...stars 40 Leo, beta CVn and eta Boo this deviation is less than 0.004 mag. No evidence of variability in the stars which are similar to the sun has been...detected during this program. If we assume the sun acts in similar fashion to each of these stars, its variability over a fifteen-year period probably

  18. Supervised ensemble classification of Kepler variable stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bass, G.; Borne, K.

    2016-07-01

    Variable star analysis and classification is an important task in the understanding of stellar features and processes. While historically classifications have been done manually by highly skilled experts, the recent and rapid expansion in the quantity and quality of data has demanded new techniques, most notably automatic classification through supervised machine learning. We present an expansion of existing work on the field by analysing variable stars in the Kepler field using an ensemble approach, combining multiple characterization and classification techniques to produce improved classification rates. Classifications for each of the roughly 150 000 stars observed by Kepler are produced separating the stars into one of 14 variable star classes.

  19. A microprocessor-controlled CCD star tracker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salomon, P. M.; Goss, W. C.

    1976-01-01

    The STELLAR (Star Tracker for Economical Long Life Attitude Reference) utilizes an image sensing Charge-Coupled Device (CCD) operating under microprocessor control. This approach results in a new type of high-accuracy star tracker which can be adapted to a wide variety of different space flight applications through software changes only. The STELLAR determines two-axis star positions by computing the element and the interelement interpolated centroid positions of the star images. As many as 10 stars may be tracked simultaneously, providing significantly increased stability and accuracy. A detailed description of the STELLAR is presented along with measurements of system performance obtained from an operating breadboard model.

  20. Lunar occultation observation of μ Sgr: A progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Jatmiko, A. T. P.; Puannandra, G. P.; Hapsari, R. D.; Putri, R. A.; Arifin, Z. M.; Haans, G. K.; Hadiputrawan, I. P. W.

    2014-03-24

    Lunar Occultation (LO) is an event where limb of the Moon passing over a particular heavenly bodies such as stars, asteroids, or planets. In other words, during the event, stars, asteroids and planets are occulted by the Moon. When occulted objects contact the lunar limb, there will be a diffraction fringe(s) which can be measured photometrically, until the signal vanishes into noise. This event will give us a valuable information about binarities (of stars) and/or angular diameters estimation (of stars, planets, asteroids) in milliarcsecond resolution, by fitting with theoretical LO pattern. CCDs are common for LO observation because of its fast read out, and recently are developed for sub-meter class telescope. In this paper, our LO observation attempt of μ Sgr and its progress report are presented. The observation was conducted on July 30{sup th}, 2012 at Bosscha Observatory, Indonesia, using 45cm f/12 GOTO telescope combined with ST-9 XE CCD camera and Bessel B filter. We used drift-scan method to obtain light curve of the star as it was disappearing behind Moon's dark limb. Our goal is to detect binarity (or multiplicity) of this particular object.