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Sample records for dc plasma nitriding

  1. Improvement in nano-hardness and corrosion resistance of low carbon steel by plasma nitriding with negative DC bias voltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alim, Mohamed Mounes; Saoula, Nadia; Tadjine, Rabah; Hadj-Larbi, Fayçal; Keffous, Aissa; Kechouane, Mohamed

    2016-10-01

    In this work, we study the effect of plasma nitriding on nano-hardness and corrosion resistance of low carbon steel samples. The plasma was generated through a radio-frequency inductively coupled plasma source. The substrate temperature increased (by the self-induced heating mechanism) with the treatment time for increasing negative bias voltages. X-rays diffraction analysis revealed the formation of nitride phases (ɛ-Fe2-3N and γ'-Fe4N) in the compound layer of the treated samples. A phase transition occurred from 3.5 kV to 4.0 kV and was accompanied by an increase in the volume fraction of the γ'-Fe4N phase and a decrease in that of the ɛ-Fe2-3N phase. Auger electron spectroscopy revealed a deep diffusion of the implanted nitrogen beyond 320 nm. The nano-hardness increased by ~400% for the nitrogen-implanted samples compared to the untreated state, the nitride phases are believed to participate to the hardening. Potentiodynamic polarization measurements revealed that the plasma nitriding has improved the corrosion resistance behavior of the material. When compared to the untreated state, the sample processed at 4.0 kV exhibits a shift of +500 mV and a reduction to 3% in its corrosion current. These results were obtained for relatively low bias voltages and short treatment time (2 h).

  2. Validity of "sputtering and re-condensation" model in active screen cage plasma nitriding process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeed, A.; Khan, A. W.; Jan, F.; Abrar, M.; Khalid, M.; Zakaullah, M.

    2013-05-01

    The validity of "sputtering and re-condensation" model in active screen plasma nitriding for nitrogen mass transfer mechanism is investigated. The dominant species including NH, Fe-I, N2+, N-I and N2 along with Hα and Hβ lines are observed in the optical emission spectroscopy (OES) analysis. Active screen cage and dc plasma nitriding of AISI 316 stainless steel as function of treatment time is also investigated. The structure and phases composition of the nitrided layer is studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Surface morphology is studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and hardness profile is obtained by Vicker's microhardness tester. Increasing trend in microhardness is observed in both cases but the increase in active screen plasma nitriding is about 3 times greater than that achieved by dc plasma nitriding. On the basis of metallurgical and OES observations the use of "sputtering and re-condensation" model in active screen plasma nitriding is tested.

  3. Analysis of plasma-nitrided steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salik, J.; Ferrante, J.; Honecy, F.; Hoffman, R., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The analysis of plasma nitrided steels can be divided to two main categories - structural and chemical. Structural analysis can provide information not only on the hardening mechanisms but also on the fundamental processes involved. Chemical analysis can be used to study the kinetics for the nitriding process and its mechanisms. In this paper preliminary results obtained by several techniques of both categories are presented and the applicability of those techniques to the analysis of plasma-nitrided steels is discussed.

  4. Nitriding of titanium and its alloys by N2, NH3 or mixtures of N2 + H2 in a dc arc plasma at low pressures ( or = to torr)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avni, R.

    1984-01-01

    The dc glow discharges in different gas mixtures of Ar + N2, Ar + NH3 or Ar + N2 + H2 result in the surface nitriding of Ti metal and its alloy (Ti6Al4V). Various gas mixtures were used in order to establish the main active species governing the nitriding process, i.e., N, N2, NH, or NH2 as excited or ionized particles. The dc discharge was sampled and analyzed by quadruple mass spectrometry (QPMS) and optical emission spectroscopy (OES), and the nitrided samples were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with an EDAX attachment, microhardness, and Fourier transform infrared reflectance spectrometry (FTIR). It was found that the excited and ionized nitrogen and hydrogen atoms are the main species responsible for the nitriding process in a dc glow discharge.

  5. Initial nitride formation during plasma-nitridation of cobalt surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattson, E. C.; Michalak, D. J.; Cabrera, W.; Veyan, J. F.; Chabal, Y. J.

    2016-08-01

    Nitridation of metal surfaces is of central importance in microelectronics and spintronics due to the excellent mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties of refractory nitrides. Here, we examine the chemical and structural modification of cobalt surfaces upon nitrogen plasma treatment, using in situ spectroscopic methods, as a method for synthesis of cobalt nitride thin films. We find that nitrogen is incorporated below the surface and forms an ultrathin film of CoN at temperatures as low as 50 °C. In addition, we observe the incorporation of oxygen and NO+ within the surface region. The nitrided cobalt surfaces are fully passivated by N, O, and NO+. These results provide a route for incorporation of cobalt nitride into a wide range applications.

  6. A Plasma-Based DC-DC Electrical Transformer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nebel, Richard; Finn, John

    2013-10-01

    Previous work has indicated that it may be possible to make DC-DC electrical transformers using plasmas. The mechanism is an MHD electromagnetic relaxation process induced by helical electrodes. This process is now being tested on the Bismark device at Tibbar Technologies.

  7. Reactive plasma atomization of aluminum nitride powder

    SciTech Connect

    Prichard, P.; Besser, M.; Sordelet, D.; Anderson, I.

    1997-02-01

    Experiments were performed to synthesize AlN powders by reacting Al with N using a conventional dc arc plasma as heat source. Feeding Al powder into Ar/N plasma open to atmosphere produced mainly Al oxide. Experiments using a chamber backfilled with nitrogen suppressed the Al oxide, but little AlN was formed. A furnace and crucible assembly was designed to feed molten Al directly into a DeLaval nozzle attached to the face of the dc arc plasma gun. Resulting submicron powders show a significant increase in AlN formation. This was dependent on chamber pressure, plasma velocity, and molten liquid feed rate. Experimental parameters, equipment design, effects of atomization/vaporization/condensation are discussed.

  8. Early stages during plasma nitriding of pure iron

    SciTech Connect

    Palacios, M.D.; Martinez, O.; Oseguera, J.

    1995-12-31

    The sequence of nitride formation during the early stages of plasma nitriding of pure iron was studied by optical microscopy, SEM, TEM and x-ray diffraction. Plasma nitriding at {approximately}490 C in a 25 vol.%H{sub 2} + 75 vol.%N{sub 2} mixture starts with the formation of {gamma}{prime}-Fe{sub 4}N after 40s. Once {gamma}{prime} nucleates, it mainly spreads laterally due to diffusion shortcuts in the discontinuous surface nitride layer. Before {gamma}{prime} is continuous on the surface, {epsilon} nucleates on top of it shortly after 40S. Epsilon is then observed to grow, both inwardly and laterally along with {gamma}{prime}. A compact {gamma}{prime}/{epsilon} bilayer forms on the surface at around 100s. The kinetics of nucleation, growth and compactation of the nitrides observed in the present work was significantly more rapid than in any of the nitriding process reported in the literature, including plasma nitriding. The acceleration of the nitriding kinetics in the early stages of plasma nitriding may be attributed to enhanced diffusion resulting from a high nitrogen flux from the plasma atmosphere. The results presented are consistent with the findings of a companion work on modeling the kinetics of nitride layer growth.

  9. Atmospheric-pressure-plasma nitriding of titanium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimitsu, Yuki; Ichiki, Ryuta; Kasamura, Kotaro; Yoshida, Masashi; Akamine, Shuichi; Kanazawa, Seiji

    2015-03-01

    Atmospheric-pressure-plasma nitriding of titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V has been achieved by using a pulsed-arc plasma jet with a N2/H2 gas mixture, where the plasma jet plume is sprayed onto the titanium surface under atmospheric pressure. We successfully formed a titanium nitride layer on the sample surface. Moreover, the diffusion layer was also formed, the hardness of which was increased from that of as-received titanium. The nitride layer growth was found to be diffusion-controlled, as in other conventional nitriding methods.

  10. Study on the Fast Nitriding Process of Active Screen Plasma Nitriding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, L.; Dai, J. T.; Huang, X. R.; Zhao, C.

    A new nitriding technology using active screen plasma nitriding (ASPN) was carried out in order to increase the nitriding speed of AISI 5140 steel. The fast nitriding process is based upon the different solubility and diffuse rate of nitrogen atoms in austenite and in ferrite of steel respectively. First, the nitriding samples were heated above the eutectoid temperature for a few minutes to dissolve a large amount of nitrogen and form a nitrogen-rich layer on the surface of the nitrided samples. Then, the nitriding temperature was decreased below the eutectoid temperature and kept the temperature for a long time to make the dissolved nitrogen in the nitrogen-rich layer diffuse into ferrite. The two different nitriding processes were carried on alternately. Experimental results indicate that the fast nitriding process not only enhances the nitriding speed remarkably, but also keeps the high hardness of the nitrided layer. The new fast nitriding technology with nitrogen-rich layer can be explained with "absorption- diffusion" model.

  11. The effect of Mo on the characteristics of a plasma nitrided layer of sintered iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendo, T.; Maliska, A. M.; Acuña, J. J. S.; Binder, C.; Hammes, G.; Consoni, D. R.; Klein, A. N.

    2016-02-01

    Samples of PM (powder metallurgy) plain iron were superficially enriched with Mo during a sintering process using a DC discharge. The Mo atoms from the cathode produced an enriched layer of approximately 15-20 μm thick, and it was enriched with up to 2.0 at.% Mo. Subsequently, the samples were plasma nitrided in a gas mixture (N2/H2) at different temperatures and nitrogen concentrations. The effect of the molybdenum on the plasma nitrided layer of sintered iron was investigated. Abnormal nitride morphologies that developed in the surface layer were observed. The presence of Mo that was substitutionally dissolved in ferrite influences the nucleation and growth of the iron-nitride compound layer. The microstructure and (local) composition changes of the layers were investigated using scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) and glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy (GDOES) analyses. To evaluate the mechanical properties, Vickers microhardness tests were conducted along the sample cross-sections. According to the nitriding conditions, submicroscopic fcc Mo2N-type nitrides that are coherent with the α-Fe matrix develop, as confirmed by the TEM analysis and by the broadening of the diffraction lines in the X-ray diffractogram. Molybdenum nitrides, γ-Mo2N, with an fcc structure and sphere-like shapes were observed on the sample surface where the Mo concentrations were higher.

  12. Plasma nitriding monitoring reactor: A model reactor for studying plasma nitriding processes using an active screen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamann, S.; Börner, K.; Burlacov, I.; Spies, H.-J.; Strämke, M.; Strämke, S.; Röpcke, J.

    2015-12-01

    A laboratory scale plasma nitriding monitoring reactor (PLANIMOR) has been designed to study the basics of active screen plasma nitriding (ASPN) processes. PLANIMOR consists of a tube reactor vessel, made of borosilicate glass, enabling optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and infrared absorption spectroscopy. The linear setup of the electrode system of the reactor has the advantages to apply the diagnostic approaches on each part of the plasma process, separately. Furthermore, possible changes of the electrical field and of the heat generation, as they could appear in down-scaled cylindrical ASPN reactors, are avoided. PLANIMOR has been used for the nitriding of steel samples, achieving similar results as in an industrial scale ASPN reactor. A compact spectrometer using an external cavity quantum cascade laser combined with an optical multi-pass cell has been applied for the detection of molecular reaction products. This allowed the determination of the concentrations of four stable molecular species (CH4, C2H2, HCN, and NH3). With the help of OES, the rotational temperature of the screen plasma could be determined.

  13. Plasma nitriding monitoring reactor: A model reactor for studying plasma nitriding processes using an active screen

    SciTech Connect

    Hamann, S. Röpcke, J.; Börner, K.; Burlacov, I.; Spies, H.-J.; Strämke, M.; Strämke, S.

    2015-12-15

    A laboratory scale plasma nitriding monitoring reactor (PLANIMOR) has been designed to study the basics of active screen plasma nitriding (ASPN) processes. PLANIMOR consists of a tube reactor vessel, made of borosilicate glass, enabling optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and infrared absorption spectroscopy. The linear setup of the electrode system of the reactor has the advantages to apply the diagnostic approaches on each part of the plasma process, separately. Furthermore, possible changes of the electrical field and of the heat generation, as they could appear in down-scaled cylindrical ASPN reactors, are avoided. PLANIMOR has been used for the nitriding of steel samples, achieving similar results as in an industrial scale ASPN reactor. A compact spectrometer using an external cavity quantum cascade laser combined with an optical multi-pass cell has been applied for the detection of molecular reaction products. This allowed the determination of the concentrations of four stable molecular species (CH{sub 4}, C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, HCN, and NH{sub 3}). With the help of OES, the rotational temperature of the screen plasma could be determined.

  14. Plasma nitriding monitoring reactor: A model reactor for studying plasma nitriding processes using an active screen.

    PubMed

    Hamann, S; Börner, K; Burlacov, I; Spies, H-J; Strämke, M; Strämke, S; Röpcke, J

    2015-12-01

    A laboratory scale plasma nitriding monitoring reactor (PLANIMOR) has been designed to study the basics of active screen plasma nitriding (ASPN) processes. PLANIMOR consists of a tube reactor vessel, made of borosilicate glass, enabling optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and infrared absorption spectroscopy. The linear setup of the electrode system of the reactor has the advantages to apply the diagnostic approaches on each part of the plasma process, separately. Furthermore, possible changes of the electrical field and of the heat generation, as they could appear in down-scaled cylindrical ASPN reactors, are avoided. PLANIMOR has been used for the nitriding of steel samples, achieving similar results as in an industrial scale ASPN reactor. A compact spectrometer using an external cavity quantum cascade laser combined with an optical multi-pass cell has been applied for the detection of molecular reaction products. This allowed the determination of the concentrations of four stable molecular species (CH4, C2H2, HCN, and NH3). With the help of OES, the rotational temperature of the screen plasma could be determined. PMID:26724023

  15. [Temperature measurement of DC argon plasma jet].

    PubMed

    Yan, Jian-Hua; Pan, Xin-Chao; Ma, Zeng-Yi; Tu, Xin; Cen, Ke-Fa

    2008-01-01

    The electron temperature of DC arc plasma jet is an important parameter, which determines the characteristics of plasma jet. The measurement of emission spectrum was performed to obtain the spectral intensities of some Ar lines and the method of diagrammatic view of Boltzmann was adopted to calculate the electron temperature. The results indicated that the electron temperature dropped at different speed along with the axes of the plasma jet and rose rapidly when the current was increased, and it also rose when the flowrate of argon was increased.

  16. Research of functional properties of nitride ion-plasma coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaulina, O. Yu; Ovechkin, B. B.; Papchenko, A. V.; Shvagrukova, E. V.

    2016-02-01

    This paper considers the influence of ion-plasma coatings with the use of nitrogen (N), zirconium nitride (ZrN), titanium-aluminum nitride (Ti,Al)N and titanium nitride and zirconium nitride by-layer (TiN+ZrN - eight layers) on the properties of steel 65X13. The main functional properties of the coatings are determined: microhardness, nanohardness, Young's modulus and corrosion resistance. It is shown that all the types of coatings allow increasing the physical and mechanical characteristics of instrument steel 65X13. Hardness and wear-resistance, depending on the type of the deposited coating, increase from 1, 5 to 4 times, corrosion resistance increases by tens times.

  17. Plasma deposited silicon nitride for indium phosphide encapsulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valco, G. J.; Kapoor, V. J.; Biedenbender, M. D.; Williams, W. D.

    1989-01-01

    The composition and the annealing characteristics of plasma-deposited silicon-nitride encapsulating films on the ion-implanted InP substrates were investigated, using two different substrate-cleaning procedures (organic solvents and HF or HIO3 solutions) prior to encapsulation. The effect of plasma deposition of silicon nitride on the InP substrates was assessed through the current-voltage characteristics of Schottky diodes. Results of XPS analyses showed that the cleaning procedure that employed HF solution left less oxygen on the InP surface than the procedure involving HIO3. No chemical interaction between the film and the substrate was observed before or after annealing.

  18. Properties of dc helicity injected tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Darrow, D.S.; Ono, M.; Forest, C.B.; Greene, G.J.; Hwang, Y.S.; Park, H.K. ); Taylor, R.J.; Pribyl, P.A.; Evans, J.D.; Lai, K.F.; Liberati, J.R. )

    1990-06-01

    Several dc helicity injection experiments using an electron beam technique have been conducted on the Current Drive Experiment (CDX) (Phys. Rev. Lett. {bold 59}, 2165 (1987)) and the Continuous Current Tokamak (CCT) (Phys. Rev. Lett. {bold 63}, 2365 (1989)). The data strongly suggest that tokamak plasmas are being formed and maintained by this method. The largest currents driven to date are 1 kA in CDX ({ital q}{sub {ital a}} =5) and 6 kA in CCT ({ital q}{sub {ital a}} =3.5). An initial comparison of discharge properties with helicity theory indicates rough agreement. Current drive energy efficiencies are 9% and 23% of Ohmic efficiency in two cases analyzed. Strong radial electric fields are observed in these plasmas that cause poloidal rotation and, possibly, improved confinement.

  19. Simulation of the dc Plasma in Carbon Nanotube Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hash, David; Bose, Deepak; Govindan, T. R.; Meyyappan, M.; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    A model for the dc plasma used in carbon nanotube growth is presented, and one-dimensional simulations of an acetylene/ammonia/argon system are performed. The effect of dc bias is illustrated by examining electron temperature, electron and ion densities, and neutral densities. Introducing a tungsten filament in the dc plasma, as in hot filament chemical vapor deposition with plasma assistance, shows negligible influence on the system characteristics.

  20. Bone tissue response to plasma-nitrided titanium implant surfaces

    PubMed Central

    FERRAZ, Emanuela Prado; SVERZUT, Alexander Tadeu; FREITAS, Gileade Pereira; SÁ, Juliana Carvalho; ALVES, Clodomiro; BELOTI, Marcio Mateus; ROSA, Adalberto Luiz

    2015-01-01

    A current goal of dental implant research is the development of titanium (Ti) surfaces to improve osseointegration. Plasma nitriding treatments generate surfaces that favor osteoblast differentiation, a key event to the process of osteogenesis. Based on this, it is possible to hypothesize that plasma-nitrided Ti implants may positively impact osseointegration. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vivo bone response to Ti surfaces modified by plasma-nitriding treatments. Material and Methods Surface treatments consisted of 20% N2 and 80% H2, 450°C and 1.5 mbar during 1 h for planar and 3 h for hollow cathode. Untreated surface was used as control. Ten implants of each surface were placed into rabbit tibiae and 6 weeks post-implantation they were harvested for histological and histomorphometric analyses. Results Bone formation was observed in contact with all implants without statistically significant differences among the evaluated surfaces in terms of bone-to-implant contact, bone area between threads, and bone area within the mirror area. Conclusion Our results indicate that plasma nitriding treatments generate Ti implants that induce similar bone response to the untreated ones. Thus, as these treatments improve the physico-chemical properties of Ti without affecting its biocompatibility, they could be combined with modifications that favor bone formation in order to develop new implant surfaces. PMID:25760262

  1. Study of a nitriding plasma using coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pealat, M.; Lefebvre, M.

    1987-01-01

    The rotational and vibrational distribution of the first levels of excitation of N2 molecular system were measured using Raman diffusion in the discharge of a nitriding plasma. The nitrided specimens were analyzed using metallography and X-ray diffraction.

  2. Moessbauer spectroscopy study on the corrosion resistance of plasma nitrided ASTM F138 stainless steel in chloride solution

    SciTech Connect

    Souza, S.D. de; Olzon-Dionysio, M.; Basso, R.L.O.; Souza, S. de

    2010-10-15

    Plasma nitriding of ASTM F138 stainless steel samples has been carried out using dc glow discharge under 80% H{sub 2}-20% N{sub 2} gas mixture, at 673 K, and 2, 4, and 7 h time intervals, in order to investigate the influence of treatment time on the microstructure and the corrosion resistance properties. The samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, glancing angle X-ray diffraction and conversion electron Moessbauer spectroscopy, besides electrochemical tests in NaCl aerated solution. A modified layer of about 6 {mu}m was observed for all the nitrided samples, independent of nitriding time. The X-ray diffraction analysis shows broad {gamma}{sub N} phase peaks, signifying a great degree of nitrogen supersaturation. Besides {gamma}{sub N,} the Moessbauer spectroscopy results indicated the occurrence of {gamma}' and {epsilon} phases, as well as some other less important phases. Corrosion measurements demonstrate that the plasma nitriding time affects the corrosion resistance and the best performance is reached at 4 h treatment. It seems that the {epsilon}/{gamma}' fraction ratio plays an important role on the resistance corrosion. Additionally, the Moessbauer spectroscopy was decisive in this study, since it was able to identify and quantify the iron phases that influence the corrosion resistance of plasma nitrided ASTM F138 samples.

  3. Study of Niobium Nitride Films Produced by DC Reactive Magnetron Sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotovy, I.; Buc, D.; Brcka, J.; Srnanek, R.

    1997-05-01

    Niobium nitride films were prepared onto unheated GaAs and SiO2 substrates by dc reactive magnetron sputtering from a niobium metal target in an Ar + N2 mixed atmosphere. During deposition, the nitrogen content in the gas mixture was varied from 0 to 20%. The effects of the different nitrogen content and high-temperature annealing (with annealing temperatures ranging from 850 to 950 °C) on the composition, structural and electrical properties of the films were studied using Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and resistivity measurement. The correlations between technological parameters and film properties, structure and composition were established.

  4. Pulsed DC magnetron sputtered piezoelectric thin film aluminum nitride – Technology and piezoelectric properties

    SciTech Connect

    Stoeckel, C. Kaufmann, C.; Hahn, R.; Schulze, R.; Billep, D.; Gessner, T.

    2014-07-21

    Pulsed DC magnetron sputtered aluminum nitride (AlN) thin films are prepared on several seed layers and at different sputtering conditions. The piezoelectric c-axis (002) orientation of the AlN is analyzed with X-ray diffraction method. The transverse piezoelectric coefficient d{sub 31} is determined with a Laser-Doppler-Vibrometer at cantilevers and membranes by analytical calculations and finite element method. Additionally, thin film AlN on bulk silicon is used to characterize the longitudinal piezoelectric charge coefficient d{sub 33}.

  5. Pulsed DC magnetron sputtered piezoelectric thin film aluminum nitride - Technology and piezoelectric properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoeckel, C.; Kaufmann, C.; Hahn, R.; Schulze, R.; Billep, D.; Gessner, T.

    2014-07-01

    Pulsed DC magnetron sputtered aluminum nitride (AlN) thin films are prepared on several seed layers and at different sputtering conditions. The piezoelectric c-axis (002) orientation of the AlN is analyzed with X-ray diffraction method. The transverse piezoelectric coefficient d31 is determined with a Laser-Doppler-Vibrometer at cantilevers and membranes by analytical calculations and finite element method. Additionally, thin film AlN on bulk silicon is used to characterize the longitudinal piezoelectric charge coefficient d33.

  6. Caracterisation of Titanium Nitride Layers Deposited by Reactive Plasma Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roşu, Radu Alexandru; Şerban, Viorel-Aurel; Bucur, Alexandra Ioana; Popescu, Mihaela; Uţu, Dragoş

    2011-01-01

    Forming and cutting tools are subjected to the intense wear solicitations. Usually, they are either subject to superficial heat treatments or are covered with various materials with high mechanical properties. In recent years, thermal spraying is used increasingly in engineering area because of the large range of materials that can be used for the coatings. Titanium nitride is a ceramic material with high hardness which is used to cover the cutting tools increasing their lifetime. The paper presents the results obtained after deposition of titanium nitride layers by reactive plasma spraying (RPS). As deposition material was used titanium powder and as substratum was used titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V). Macroscopic and microscopic (scanning electron microscopy) images of the deposited layers and the X ray diffraction of the coatings are presented. Demonstration program with layers deposited with thickness between 68,5 and 81,4 μm has been achieved and presented.

  7. Nitriding molybdenum: Effects of duration and fill gas pressure when using 100-Hz pulse DC discharge technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikhlaq, U.; R., Ahmad; Shafiq, M.; Saleem, S.; S. Shah, M.; Hussain, T.; A. Khan, I.; K., Abbas; S. Abbas, M.

    2014-10-01

    Molybdenum is nitrided by a 100-Hz pulsed DC glow discharge technique for various time durations and fill gas pressures to study the effects on the surface properties of molybdenum. X-ray diffractometry (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM) are used for the structural and morphological analysis of the nitrided layers. Vickers' microhardness tester is utilized to investigate surface microhardness. Phase analysis shows the formation of more molybdenum nitride molecules for longer nitriding durations at fill gas pressures of 2 mbar and 3 mbar (1 bar = 105 Pa). A considerable increase in surface microhardness (approximately by a factor of 2) is observed for longer duration (10 h) and 2-mbar pressure. Longer duration (10 h) and 2-mbar fill gas pressure favors the formation of homogeneous, smooth, hard layers by the incorporation of more nitrogen.

  8. Reactive DC magnetron sputtered zirconium nitride (ZrN) thin film and its characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, B.; Ashok, K.; Sanjeeviraja, C.; Kuppusami, P.; Jayachandran, M.

    2008-05-01

    Zirconium nitride (ZrN) thin films were prepared by using reactive direct current (DC) magnetron sputtering onto different substrates. A good polycrystalline nature with face centered cubic structure was observed from X-ray Diffraction for ZrN thin films. The observed 'd' values from the X-ray Diffraction pattern were found to be in good agreement with the standard 'd' values (JCPDS-89-5269). An emission peak is observed at 587nm from Photoluminescence studies for the excitation at 430nm. The resistivity value (ρ) of 2.1798 (μΩ cm) was observed. ZrN has high wear resistance and low coefficient of friction. A less negative value of Ecorr and lower value of Icorr observed for ZrN / Mild Steel (MS) clearly confirm the better corrosion resistance than the bare substrate. Also the higher Rct value and lower Cdl value was observed for ZrN / MS from Nyquist - plot.

  9. Band gap effects of hexagonal boron nitride using oxygen plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Sevak Singh, Ram; Leong Chow, Wai; Yingjie Tay, Roland; Hon Tsang, Siu; Mallick, Govind; Tong Teo, Edwin Hang

    2014-04-21

    Tuning of band gap of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) has been a challenging problem due to its inherent chemical stability and inertness. In this work, we report the changes in band gaps in a few layers of chemical vapor deposition processed as-grown h-BN using a simple oxygen plasma treatment. Optical absorption spectra show a trend of band gap narrowing monotonically from 6 eV of pristine h-BN to 4.31 eV when exposed to oxygen plasma for 12 s. The narrowing of band gap causes the reduction in electrical resistance by ∼100 fold. The x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results of plasma treated hexagonal boron nitride surface show the predominant doping of oxygen for the nitrogen vacancy. Energy sub-band formations inside the band gap of h-BN, due to the incorporation of oxygen dopants, cause a red shift in absorption edge corresponding to the band gap narrowing.

  10. Ion nitriding; Proceedings of the International Conference, Cleveland, OH, Sept. 15-17, 1986

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalvins, T. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    The present conference discusses plasma-assisted surface coating/modification processes, the applications to date of ion nitriding, the effects of nitrogen on metal surfaces, ion nitriding mechanisms in Cr, Al and Cr + Al-containing 1040 steel, ion nitriding of Al and its alloys, life enhancement for forging dies, novel anode plasma nitriding developments, and a comparative study of the pulsed and dc ion-nitriding behavior in specimens with blind holes. Also discussed are the influence of heating method on ion nitriding, surface hardening of marage steels by ion nitriding without core hardness reduction, plasma nitriding of nodular cast iron sput gears, NbN composites for superconductors, the carburization of tungsten in a glow discharge methane plasma, economic considerations concerning plasma nitriding, and the corrosion properties obtained by ion nitriding.

  11. Plasma etching of the Group-III nitrides

    SciTech Connect

    Shul, R.; Pearton, S.J.; Abernathy, C.R.

    1996-01-01

    In reactive ion etching (RIE) of GaN, the ion bombardment can damage the material, so it is necessary to develop plasma etch processes. This paper reports etching of GaN in an ECR (electron cyclotron resonance) etch system using both the ECR/RIE mode and the RIE-only mode. Group III (Ga, In, Al) nitride ECR etching is reviewed as a function of plasma chemistry, power, temperature, and pressure; as the ECR microwave power increased, the ion density and etch rates increased, with the etch rate increasing the most for InN. GaN etch rates > 6500 {angstrom}/min have been observed in the ECR/RIE mode. 2 figs, 6 refs.

  12. Characteristics of DC electric fields in transient plasma sheet events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laakso, H. E.; Escoubet, C. P.; Masson, A.

    2015-12-01

    We take an advantage of five different DC electric field measurements in the plasma sheet available from the EFW double probe experiment, EDI electron drift instrument, CODIF and HIA ion spectrometers, and PEACE electron spectrometer on the four Cluster spacecraft. The calibrated observations of the three spectrometers are used to determine the proton and electron velocity moments. The velocity moments can be used to estimate the proton and electron drift velocity and furthermore the DC electric field, assuming that the electron and proton velocity perpendicular to the magnetic field is dominated by the ExB drift motion. Naturally when ions and electrons do not perform a proper drift motion, which can happen in the plasma sheet, the estimated DC electric field from ion and electron motion is not correct. However, surprisingly often the DC electric fields estimated from electron and ion motions are identical suggesting that this field is a real DC electric field around the measurement point. As the measurement techniques are so different, it is quite plausible that when two different measurements yield the same DC electric field, it is the correct field. All five measurements of the DC electric field are usually not simultaneously available, especially on Cluster 2 where CODIF and HIA are not operational, or on Cluster 4 where EDI is off. In this presentation we investigate DC electric field in various transient plasma sheet events such as dipolarization events and BBF's and how the five measurements agree or disagree. There are plenty of important issues that are considered, e.g., (1) what kind of DC electric fields exist in such events and what are their spatial scales, (2) do electrons and ions perform ExB drift motions in these events, and (3) how well the instruments have been calibrated.

  13. Improving electrochemical properties of AISI 1045 steels by duplex surface treatment of plasma nitriding and aluminizing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haftlang, Farahnaz; Habibolahzadeh, Ali; Sohi, Mahmoud Heydarzadeh

    2015-02-01

    Improvement in electrochemical behavior of AISI 1045 steel after applying aluminum nitride coating was investigated in 3.5% NaCl solution, using potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) analyses. Aluminum nitride coating was applied on the steel surface by duplex treatment of pack aluminizing and plasma nitriding. Some specimens were plasma nitrided followed by aluminizing (PN-Al), while the others were pack aluminized followed by plasma nitriding (Al-PN). Topological and structural studies of the modified surfaces were conducted using scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscope (EDS), and X-ray diffractometer (XRD). The electrochemical measurements showed that the highest corrosion and polarization (Rp) resistances were obtained in PN-Al specimens, having single phase superficial layer of AlN. Pitting mechanism was dominant reason of lower corrosion resistance in the Al-PN specimens.

  14. Synthesis of silicon nanotubes by DC arc plasma method

    SciTech Connect

    Tank, C. M.; Bhoraskar, S. V.; Mathe, V. L.

    2012-06-05

    Plasma synthesis is a novel technique of synthesis of nanomaterials as they provide high rate of production and promote metastable reactions. Very thin walled silicon nanotubes were synthesized in a DC direct arc thermal plasma reactor. The effect of parameters of synthesis i.e. arc current and presence of hydrogen on the morphology of Si nanoparticles is reported. Silicon nanotubes were characterized by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Local Energy Dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX), and Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM).

  15. Plasma-assisted interface engineering of boron nitride nanostructure films.

    PubMed

    Pakdel, Amir; Bando, Yoshio; Golberg, Dmitri

    2014-10-28

    Today many aspects of science and technology are progressing into the nanoscale realm where surfaces and interfaces are intrinsically important in determining properties and performances of materials and devices. One familiar phenomenon in which interfacial interactions play a major role is the wetting of solids. In this work we use a facile one-step plasma method to control the wettability of boron nitride (BN) nanostructure films via covalent chemical functionalization, while their surface morphology remains intact. By tailoring the concentration of grafted hydroxyl groups, superhydrophilic, hydrophilic, and hydrophobic patterns are created on the initially superhydrophobic BN nanosheet and nanotube films. Moreover, by introducing a gradient of the functional groups, directional liquid spreading toward increasing [OH] content is achieved on the films. The resulting insights are meant to illustrate great potentials of this method to tailor wettability of ceramic films, control liquid flow patterns for engineering applications such as microfluidics and biosensing, and improve the interfacial contact and adhesion in nanocomposite materials.

  16. Analysis and experiments on thermal plasma processing for ultrafine powder synthesis of aluminium nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, H.; Hur, M.; Hong, S.H.

    1996-12-31

    Plasma synthesis experiments for producing ultrafine powders of aluminum nitride (AlN) are carried out using a non-transferred dc plasma torch of which jet flame can vaporize the aluminum powders injected into it to make the chemical reaction with nitrogen gas. For predicting the optimum processing parameters (the size, injected location and velocity of Al powders, and the ratio of nitrogen to argon arc gases), the trajectory and the evaporation state of an Al particle arc found by solving momentum and heat transfer equations. In addition, equilibrium chemical compositions are analyzed by the Gibbs free-energy minimization method to know the temperatures at which AlN synthesis occurs dominantly. A synthesis system consisting of a plasma torch, a reactor and a quenching chamber has been built for synthesis and quenching process of ultrafine powders of AlN. A fully-saturated fractional factorial test is employed to determine optimum process conditions for input power to the torch and flow rates of arc, carrier and reaction gases.

  17. Effect of plasma nitriding treatment on structural, tribological and electrochemical properties of commercially pure titanium.

    PubMed

    Çelik, İlhan; Karakan, Mehmet

    2016-02-01

    In this study, plasma nitriding treatment was applied to commercially pure titanium (Grade 2). Structural properties, electrochemical and tribological behaviours of the nitrided pure titanium specimens were comparatively investigated. Microstructure and morphology of the plasma nitrided specimens were analysed by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Furthermore, corrosion tests were conducted in Ringer's solution, which represents a human body environment, to determine electrochemical properties. Then, tribological and frictional properties were investigated using pin-on-disc tribometer, and a micro-hardness tester was used to measure the hardness of the coatings. The results showed that plasma nitrided specimens exhibited higher surface hardness than the untreated specimens did. In addition, the plasma nitrided specimens at 700 °C presented significantly better performance than the other plasma nitrided specimens (at 500 °C and 600 °C) under dry wear conditions. Moreover, corrosion test results showed that corrosion behaviours of untreated and nitrided samples had similar characteristic. PMID:26666885

  18. Effect of plasma nitriding treatment on structural, tribological and electrochemical properties of commercially pure titanium.

    PubMed

    Çelik, İlhan; Karakan, Mehmet

    2016-02-01

    In this study, plasma nitriding treatment was applied to commercially pure titanium (Grade 2). Structural properties, electrochemical and tribological behaviours of the nitrided pure titanium specimens were comparatively investigated. Microstructure and morphology of the plasma nitrided specimens were analysed by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Furthermore, corrosion tests were conducted in Ringer's solution, which represents a human body environment, to determine electrochemical properties. Then, tribological and frictional properties were investigated using pin-on-disc tribometer, and a micro-hardness tester was used to measure the hardness of the coatings. The results showed that plasma nitrided specimens exhibited higher surface hardness than the untreated specimens did. In addition, the plasma nitrided specimens at 700 °C presented significantly better performance than the other plasma nitrided specimens (at 500 °C and 600 °C) under dry wear conditions. Moreover, corrosion test results showed that corrosion behaviours of untreated and nitrided samples had similar characteristic.

  19. Dust structurization observed in a dc glow discharge dusty plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrich, Jonathon R.; Kim, Su-Hyun; Merlino, Robert L.

    2010-11-01

    Dusty plasmas, which are inherently open systems which require an ionization source to replenish the plasma absorbed on the grains, tend to exhibit self-organization. Various structures have been observed in dusty plasmas such as dust crystals, voids, and vortices. Due to the presence of drifting ions in dc discharge plasmas, spontaneously excited dust acoustic waves are also a common occurrence. By adjusting the discharge parameters we have observed a new phenomenon in dusty plasmas -- the spontaneous formation of three-dimensional stationary dust density structures. These structures appear as an ordered pattern consisting of alternating regions of high and low dust density arranged in a nested bowl-type configuration The stationary structure evolves from dust density waves that slow down as their wavelength decreases and eventually stop moving when the wavelength reaches some minimum size.

  20. Structure and properties of nitrided surface layer produced on NiTi shape memory alloy by low temperature plasma nitriding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czarnowska, Elżbieta; Borowski, Tomasz; Sowińska, Agnieszka; Lelątko, Józef; Oleksiak, Justyna; Kamiński, Janusz; Tarnowski, Michał; Wierzchoń, Tadeusz

    2015-04-01

    NiTi shape memory alloys are used for bone and cardiological implants. However, on account of the metallosis effect, i.e. the release of the alloy elements into surrounding tissues, they are subjected to various surface treatment processes in order to improve their corrosion resistance and biocompatibility without influencing the required shape memory properties. In this paper, the microstructure, topography and morphology of TiN surface layer on NiTi alloy, and corrosion resistance, both before and after nitriding in low-temperature plasma at 290 °C, are presented. Examinations with the use of the potentiodynamic and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy methods were carried out and show an increase of corrosion resistance in Ringer's solution after glow-discharge nitriding. This surface titanium nitride layer also improved the adhesion of platelets and the proliferation of osteoblasts, which was investigated in in vitro experiments with human cells. Experimental data revealed that nitriding NiTi shape memory alloy under low-temperature plasma improves its properties for bone implant applications.

  1. dc-plasma-sprayed electronic-tube device

    DOEpatents

    Meek, T.T.

    1982-01-29

    An electronic tube and associated circuitry which is produced by dc plasma arc spraying techniques is described. The process is carried out in a single step automated process whereby both active and passive devices are produced at very low cost. The circuitry is extremely reliable and is capable of functioning in both high radiation and high temperature environments. The size of the electronic tubes produced are more than an order of magnitude smaller than conventional electronic tubes.

  2. Spectroscopic diagnostics of active screen plasma nitriding processes: on the interplay of active screen and model probe plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamann, S.; Börner, K.; Burlacov, I.; Spies, H.-J.; Röpcke, J.

    2015-09-01

    In a reactor used for active screen plasma nitriding (ASPN) the interplay of two plasma types, (i) the plasma of the cylindrical active screen driven in a pulsed dc mode (f = 1 kHz, 60% duty cycle) and (ii) the plasma at an internal model probe driven in a cw dc mode, ignited in a low pressure H2-N2 gas mixture (p = 3 mbar) containing small amounts of CH4 and CO2 have been studied by tunable diode laser infrared absorption (TDLAS) and optical emission spectroscopy (OES) techniques. Applying in situ TDLAS the evolution of the carbon containing precursors, CH4 and CO2, and of the reaction products, NH3, HCN, CO and H2O, has been monitored. The degree of dissociation of the carbon containing precursor molecules varied between 70% and 92%. The concentrations of the reaction products were found to be in the range 1012…1015 molecules cm-3. By analyzing the development of the molecular concentrations at changes of gas mixtures and plasma power values, it was found that (i) HCN and NH3 are the main products of plasma conversion in the case of methane admixture and (ii) CO, HCN and NH3 in the carbon dioxide case. The fragmentation efficiencies of methane and carbon dioxide (RF(CH4)  ≈  1…2   ×   1015 molecules J-1, RF(CO2)  ≈  0.5…1.0   ×   1016 molecules J-1) and the respective conversion efficiencies to the product molecules (R C(product) ≈ 1013-1015 molecules J-1) have been determined for different gas mixtures and plasma power values, while the influence of probe and screen plasmas, i.e. the phenomena caused by the interplay of both plasma sources, was analyzed. The additional usage of the plasma at the model probe has a sensitive influence on the generation of the reaction products, in particular that of NH3 and HCN. With the help of OES the rotational temperature of the screen plasma could be determined, which increases with power from 770 K to 950 K. Also with power the ionic component of nitrogen molecules, i

  3. Corrosion resistance of zirconium oxynitride coatings deposited via DC unbalanced magnetron sputtering and spray pyrolysis-nitriding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cubillos, G. I.; Bethencourt, M.; Olaya, J. J.

    2015-02-01

    ZrOxNy/ZrO2 thin films were deposited on stainless steel using two different methods: ultrasonic spray pyrolysis-nitriding (SPY-N) and the DC unbalanced magnetron sputtering technique (UBMS). Using the first method, ZrO2 was initially deposited and subsequently nitrided in an anhydrous ammonia atmosphere at 1023 K at atmospheric pressure. For UBMS, the film was deposited in an atmosphere of air/argon with a Φair/ΦAr flow ratio of 3.0. Structural analysis was carried out through X-ray diffraction (XRD), and morphological analysis was done through scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Chemical analysis was carried out using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). ZrOxNy rhombohedral polycrystalline film was produced with spray pyrolysis-nitriding, whereas using the UBMS technique, the oxynitride films grew with cubic Zr2ON2 crystalline structures preferentially oriented along the (2 2 2) plane. Upon chemical analysis of the surface, the coatings exhibited spectral lines of Zr3d, O1s, and N1s, characteristic of zirconium oxynitride/zirconia. SEM analysis showed the homogeneity of the films, and AFM showed morphological differences according to the deposition technique of the coatings. Zirconium oxynitride films enhanced the stainless steel's resistance to corrosion using both techniques. The protective efficacy was evaluated using electrochemical techniques based on linear polarization (LP). The results indicated that the layers provide good resistance to corrosion when exposed to chloride-containing media.

  4. The effect of plasma-nitrided titanium surfaces on osteoblastic cell adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ferraz, Emanuela P; Sa, Juliana C; de Oliveira, Paulo T; Alves, Clodomiro; Beloti, Marcio M; Rosa, Adalberto L

    2014-04-01

    In this study, we evaluated the effect of new plasma-nitrided Ti surfaces on the progression of osteoblast cultures, including cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation. Ti surfaces were treated using two plasma-nitriding protocols, hollow cathode for 3 h (HC 3 h) and 1 h (HC 1 h) and planar for 1 h. Untreated Ti surfaces were used as control. Cells derived from human alveolar and rat calvarial bones were cultured on Ti surfaces for periods of up to 14 days and the following parameters were evaluated: cell morphology, adhesion, spreading and proliferation, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, extracellular matrix mineralization, and gene expression of key osteoblast markers. Plasma-nitriding treatments resulted in Ti surfaces with distinct physicochemical characteristics. The cell adhesion and ALP activity were higher on plasma-nitrided Ti surfaces compared with untreated one, whereas cell proliferation and extracellular matrix mineralization were not affected by the treatments. In addition, the plasma-nitrided Ti surfaces increased the ALP, reduced the osteocalcin and did not affect the Runx2 gene expression. We have shown that HC 3 h and planar Ti surfaces slightly favored the osteoblast differentiation process, and then these surfaces should be considered for further investigation using preclinical models.

  5. Dissipative dark solitons in a dc complex plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, S.; Heidemann, R.; Thoma, M. H.; Sütterlin, R.; Thomas, H. M.; Höfner, H.; Tarantik, K.; Morfill, G. E.; Usachev, A. D.; Petrov, O. F.; Fortov, V. E.

    2010-01-01

    The observation of dark solitons in a three-dimensional dc complex plasma is presented. The experiments are performed using neon gas at a pressure of 18 Pa and melamine-formaldehyde particles with a diameter of 3.43 μm. The waves are excited by a short pulse produced by the circular electrical-manipulative electrode built in inside the discharge glass tube. The wave speed is measured to be of the order of 15 mm/s. The propagation time of the observed dark soliton is approximately 10-15 times longer than the damping time.

  6. Structural properties of complex plasmas in a homogeneous dc discharge.

    PubMed

    Mitic, S; Klumov, B A; Konopka, U; Thoma, M H; Morfill, G E

    2008-09-19

    We report on the first three-dimensional (3D) complex plasma structure analysis for an experiment that was performed in an elongated discharge tube in the absence of striations. The low frequency discharge was established with 1 kHz alternating dc current through a cylindrical glass tube filled with neon at 30 Pa. The injected particle cloud consisted of monodisperse microparticles. A scanning laser sheet and a camera were used to determine the particle position in 3D. The observed cylindrical-shaped particle cloud showed an ordered structure with a distinct outer particle shell. The observations are in agreement with performed molecular dynamics simulations.

  7. Plasma nitriding using high H2 content gas mixtures for a cavitation erosion resistant steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allenstein, A. N.; Lepienski, C. M.; Buschinelli, A. J. A.; Brunatto, S. F.

    2013-07-01

    Plasma nitriding using high H2 content gas mixtures in CA-6NM martensitic stainless steel was studied in the present work. Nitriding was performed in H2 + N2 gas mixtures for 5, 10 and 20% N2, in volume, at 773 K (500 °C), during 2 h. Changes in the surface morphology and nitrided layer constitution were characterized by SEM, XRD, roughness analysis, and nanoindentation technique. Cavitation erosion behavior of the nitrided samples was also investigated by means of a 20 kHz ultrasonic vibrator. The study was emphasized for the three first cavitation stages (incubation, acceleration, and maximum erosion rate stage) of the cumulative erosion-time curve. Results indicate that the gas mixture nitrogen content strongly influences the phases' formation and its distribution on the nitrided layer. Better cavitation erosion resistance which was attributed to the finer and more homogeneous distribution of the nitrided layer phases was verified for samples treated at 5% N2. Otherwise, worse cavitation erosion behavior for samples nitrided at 20% N2 is supposed to be due to the formation of multiphase compound layer constituted by Fe4N + Fe2-3N + CrN, which can infer residual stress in treated surface.

  8. Sulfide Stress Cracking and Electrochemical Corrosion of Precipitation Hardening Steel After Plasma Oxy-Nitriding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granda-Gutiérrez, E. E.; Díaz-Guillén, J. C.; Díaz-Guillén, J. A.; González, M. A.; García-Vázquez, F.; Muñóz, R.

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, we present the results of a duplex plasma nitriding followed by an oxidizing stage process (which is also referred as oxy-nitriding) on the corrosion behavior of a 17-4PH precipitation hardening stainless steel. The formation of both, expanded martensite (b.c.t. α'N-phase) and chromium oxide (type Cr2O3) in the subsurface of oxy-nitrided samples at specific controlled conditions, leads in a noticeable increasing in the time-to-rupture during the sulfide stress cracking test, in comparison with an untreated reference sample. Oxy-nitriding improves the corrosion performance of the alloy when it is immersed in solutions saturated by sour gas, which extends the application potential of this type of steel in the oil and gas extraction and processing industry. The presence of the oxy-nitrided layer inhibits the corrosion process that occurs in the near-surface region, where hydrogen is liberated after the formation of iron sulfides, which finally produces a fragile fracture by micro-crack propagation; the obtained results suggest that oxy-nitriding slows this process, thus delaying the rupture of the specimen. Moreover, oxy-nitriding produces a hard, sour gas-resistant surface, but do not significantly affect the original chloride ion solution resistance of the material.

  9. Sulfide Stress Cracking and Electrochemical Corrosion of Precipitation Hardening Steel After Plasma Oxy-Nitriding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granda-Gutiérrez, E. E.; Díaz-Guillén, J. C.; Díaz-Guillén, J. A.; González, M. A.; García-Vázquez, F.; Muñóz, R.

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we present the results of a duplex plasma nitriding followed by an oxidizing stage process (which is also referred as oxy-nitriding) on the corrosion behavior of a 17-4PH precipitation hardening stainless steel. The formation of both, expanded martensite (b.c.t. α'N-phase) and chromium oxide (type Cr2O3) in the subsurface of oxy-nitrided samples at specific controlled conditions, leads in a noticeable increasing in the time-to-rupture during the sulfide stress cracking test, in comparison with an untreated reference sample. Oxy-nitriding improves the corrosion performance of the alloy when it is immersed in solutions saturated by sour gas, which extends the application potential of this type of steel in the oil and gas extraction and processing industry. The presence of the oxy-nitrided layer inhibits the corrosion process that occurs in the near-surface region, where hydrogen is liberated after the formation of iron sulfides, which finally produces a fragile fracture by micro-crack propagation; the obtained results suggest that oxy-nitriding slows this process, thus delaying the rupture of the specimen. Moreover, oxy-nitriding produces a hard, sour gas-resistant surface, but do not significantly affect the original chloride ion solution resistance of the material.

  10. Behavior of incorporated nitrogen in plasma-nitrided silicon oxide formed by chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinoda, Nao; Itokawa, Hiroshi; Fujitsuka, Ryota; Sekine, Katsuyuki; Onoue, Seiji; Tonotani, Junichi

    2016-04-01

    The behavior of nitrogen (N) atoms in plasma-nitrided silicon oxide (SiO2) formed by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) was characterized by physical analysis and from electrical properties. The changes in the chemical bonding and distribution of N in plasma-nitrided SiO2 were investigated for different subsequent processes. N-Si3, N-Si2O, and N2 are formed in a SiO2 film by plasma nitridation. N2 molecules diffuse out during annealing at temperatures higher than 900 °C. NH species are generated from N2 molecules and H in the SiO2 film with subsequent oxide deposition using O3 as an oxidant. The capacitance-voltage (C-V) curves of metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) capacitors are obtained. The negative shift of the C-V curve is caused by the increase in the density of positive fix charge traps in CVD-SiO2 induced by plasma nitridation. The C-V curve of plasma-nitrided SiO2 subjected to annealing shifts to the positive direction and that subjected to the subsequent oxide deposition shifts markedly to the negative direction. It is clarified that the density of positive charge fixed traps in plasma-nitrided SiO2 films decrease because the amount of N2 molecules is decreased by annealing, and that the density of traps increases because NH species are generated and move to the interface between SiO2 and the Si substrate with the subsequent oxide deposition.

  11. Effect of Plasma Nitriding Temperatures on Characteristics of Aisi 201 Austenitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yuxin; Zheng, Shaomei

    2016-10-01

    Samples of AISI 201 austenitic stainless steel were produced by plasma nitriding at 350∘C, 390∘C, 420∘C, 450∘C and 480∘C for 5h. Systematic characterization of the nitrided layer was carried out in terms of micrograph observations, phase identification, chemical composition depth profiling, surface microhardness measurements and electrochemical corrosion tests. The results show that the surface hardness and the layer thickness increased with increasing temperature. XRD indicated that a single S-phase layer was formed during low temperature (≤420∘C), while Cr2N or CrN phase was formed besides S-phase when nitrided at 450∘C and 480∘C. The specimen treated at 390∘C presents a much enhanced corrosion resistance compared to the untreated substrate. The corrosion resistance deteriorated for samples treated above 450∘C due to the formation of chromium nitrides.

  12. Cold atmospheric plasma jet in an axial DC electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Li; Keidar, Michael

    2016-08-01

    Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) jet is currently intensively investigated as a tool for new and potentially transformative cancer treatment modality. However, there are still many unknowns about the jet behavior that requires attention. In this paper, a helium CAP jet is tested in an electrostatic field generated by a copper ring. Using Rayleigh microwave scattering method, some delays of the electron density peaks for different ring potentials are observed. Meanwhile, a similar phenomenon associated with the bullet velocity is found. Chemical species distribution along the jet is analyzed based on the jet optical emission spectra. The spectra indicate that a lower ring potential, i.e., lower DC background electric field, can increase the amount of excited N2, N2+, He, and O in the region before the ring, but can decrease the amount of excited NO and HO almost along the entire jet. Combining all the results above, we discovered that an extra DC potential mainly affects the temporal plasma jet properties. Also, it is possible to manipulate the chemical compositions of the jet using a ring with certain electric potentials.

  13. Plasma Spraying of Copper by Hybrid Water-Gas DC Arc Plasma Torch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavka, T.; Matějíček, J.; Ctibor, P.; Mašláni, A.; Hrabovský, M.

    2011-06-01

    Water-stabilized DC arc plasma torches offer a good alternative to common plasma sources used for plasma spraying applications. Unique properties of the generated plasma are determined by a specific plasma torch construction. This article is focused on a study of the plasma spraying process performed by a hybrid torch WSP500®-H, which combines two principles of arc stabilization—water vortex and gas flow. Spraying tests with copper powder have been carried out in a wide range of plasma torch parameters. First, analyses of particle in-flight behavior for various spraying conditions were done. After, particles were collected in liquid nitrogen, which enabled analyses of the particle in-flight oxidation. A series of spraying tests were carried out and coatings were analyzed for their microstructure, porosity, oxide content, mechanical, and thermal properties.

  14. Characterization of Ultra Thin Oxynitride Formed by Radical Nitridation with Slot Plane Antenna Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugawara, Takuya; Matsuyama, Seiji; Sasaki, Masaru; Nakanishi, Toshio; Murakawa, Shigemi; Katsuki, Jiro; Ozaki, Shigenori; Tada, Yoshihide; Ohta, Tomohiro; Yamamoto, Nobuhiko

    2005-03-01

    We investigated the plasma nitridation mechanisms for an ultra-thin gate oxynitride (SiON) formation to extend the downscaling limit of equivalent oxide thickness (EOT). Using the slot plane antenna (SPA) plasma nitridation system, excellent gate SiON properties were obtained with low gate leakage and good carrier mobility down to less than 12 Å. From electrical and physical analysis results, the nitridation mechanism was discussed, which suggested that a control of oxygen partial pressure is important to achieve EOT reduction. A low electron temperature (Te) process under high-pressure condition leads to improved Gm and NBTI performance, which indicates that the reduction of a plasma damage under nitridation processes improve the performance and reliability of ultra thin SiON film. With optimized nitridation processes, the mobility degradation of nMOSFET is only 8% at \\textit{EOT}=11 Å. The NBTI reliability of pMOSFET is improved by more than 1 order compared with a low-pressure, high Te condition.

  15. Structure and corrosive wear resistance of plasma-nitrided alloy steels in 3% sodium chloride solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.K.; Shih, H.C. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1994-11-01

    Type 304 stainless steel (SS), type 410 SS, and type 4140 low-alloy steel were plasma nitrided in a commercial furnace at 560 C for 50 h. Microstructure and the composition of the nitrided layer were analyzed. The resistance to corrosive wear was evaluated by a tribotest in which the specimen was held under potentiostatic control at anodic and cathodic potentials in 3% sodium chloride solution (pH 6.8). Electrochemical polarization measurements were made, and the surface morphology and composition after corrosive wear were examined. Wear rates at cathodic potentials were very low, but significant weight losses were observed as the applied potentials were increased anodically. The coefficient of friction varied in a fashion similar to the wear rate. For the untreated alloys, the magnitude of the wear rate and coefficient of friction decreased as follows: type 4140 alloy > type 41 SS > type 304 SS. For the plasma-nitrided alloys, the ranking was: type 304 SS > type 410 SS. type 4140 alloy. Plasma nitriding was shown to be beneficial to the corrosive wear resistance of type 4140 alloy, but an adverse effect was obtained for types 304 and 410 SS. These findings could be interpreted in terms of the electrochemical polarization characteristics of a static specimen and were strongly related to the subtleties of the nitrided microstructures. The stable chromium nitride (CrN) segregated in the [gamma]-iron (type 304 SS) and [alpha]-Fe (type 41 SS) matrices and resulted in a pitting and spalling type of corrosive wear mechanism. The phases [epsilon]-(Fe, Cr)[sub 2-3]N and [gamma]-(Fe, Cr)[sub 4]N enriched in the surface layer of nitrided type 4140 alloy provided excellent corrosive wear resistance.

  16. Contrasting Behaviours of AC and DC Excited Plasmas in Contact with Liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jingjing; Hu, Xiao

    2013-08-01

    A comparative study of the needle-to-liquid plasma in the continuous mode with DC and AC excitations is detailed in this paper. All plasmas studied here are shown to be glow discharges. This study is based on measurements of several key parameters, including electrical energy, optical emission intensities of active species, rotational and vibrational temperatures, and temperatures of the needle and liquid electrodes. AC plasmas can produce 1.2~5 times higher excited state active species than DC plasmas under the same dissipated power. AC excited liquid plasmas have the highest energy utilization efficiency among the three systems (AC excited plasmas, DC excited plasmas with water anode and DC excited plasmas with water cathode); most of the energy is used to produce useful species rather than to heat the electrodes and plasmas.

  17. Plasma spheroidization of iron powders in a non-transferred DC thermal plasma jet

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, S. Selvarajan, V

    2008-06-15

    In this paper, the results of plasma spheroidization of iron powders using a DC non-transferred plasma spray torch are presented. The morphology of the processed powders was characterized through scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical microscopy (OM). The percentages of spheroidized powders were calculated by the shape factors such as the Irregularity Parameter (IP) and Roundness (RN). A maximum of 83% of spheroidization can be achieved. The spheroidization results are compared with the theoretical estimation and they are found to be in good agreement. The phase composition of the spheroidized powder was analyzed by XRD. The effect of plasma jet temperature and plasma gas flow rate on spheroidization is discussed. At low plasma gas flow rates and at high plasma jet temperatures, the percentage of spheroidization is high.

  18. Reduction in plasma potential by applying negative DC cathode bias in RF magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isomura, Masao; Yamada, Toshinori; Osuga, Kosuke; Shindo, Haruo

    2016-11-01

    We applied a negative DC bias voltage to the cathode of an RF magnetron sputtering system and successfully reduced the plasma potential in both argon plasma and hydrogen-diluted argon plasma. The crystallinity of the deposited Ge films is improved by increasing the negative DC bias voltage. It is indicated that the reduction in plasma potential is effective for reducing the plasma damage on deposited materials, caused by the electric potential between the plasma and substrates. In addition, the deposition rate is increased by the increased electric potential between the plasma and the cathode owing to the negative DC bias voltage. The present method successfully gives us higher speed and lower damage sputtering deposition. The increased electric potential between the plasma and the cathode suppresses the evacuation of electrons from the plasma and also enhances the generation of secondary electrons on the cathode. These probably suppress the electron loss from the plasma and result in the reduction in plasma potential.

  19. Reactive Plasma Nitriding of AL2O3 Powder in Thermal Spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahien, Mohammed; Yamada, Motohiro; Yasui, Toshiaki; Fukumoto, Masahiro

    Among advanced ceramics, aluminum nitride (AlN) had attracted much attention in the field of electrical and structural applications due to its outstanding properties. However, it is difficult to fabricate AlN coating by conventional thermal spray processes directly. Due to the thermal decomposition of feedstock AlN powder during spraying without a stable melting phase (which is required for deposition in thermal spray). Reactive plasma spraying (RPS) has been considered as a promising technology for in-situ formation of AlN thermally sprayed coatings. In this study the possibility of fabrication of AlN coating by reactive plasma nitriding of alumina (Al2O3) powder using N2/H2 plasma was investigated. It was possible to fabricate a cubic-AlN (c-AlN) based coating and the fabricated coating consists of c-AlN, α-Al2O3, Al5O6N and γ-Al2O3. It was difficult to understand the nitriding process from the fabricated coatings. Therefore, the Al2O3 powders were sprayed and collected in water. The microstructure observation of the collected powder and its cross section indicate that the reaction started from the surface. Thus, the sprayed particles were melted and reacted in high temperature reactive plasma and formed aluminum oxynitride which has cubic structure and easily nitride to c-AlN. During the coatings process the particles collide, flatten, and rapidly solidified on a substrate surface. The rapid solidification on the substrate surface due to the high quenching rate of the plasma flame prevents AlN crystal growth to form the hexagonal phase. Therefore, it was possible to fabricate c-AlN/Al2O3 based coatings through reactive plasma nitriding reaction of Al2O3 powder in thermal spray.

  20. Effect of Plasma Nitriding and Nitrocarburizing on HVOF-Sprayed Stainless Steel Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Gayoung; Bae, Gyuyeol; Moon, Kyungil; Lee, Changhee

    2013-12-01

    In this work, the effects of plasma nitriding (PN) and nitrocarburizing on HVOF-sprayed stainless steel nitride layers were investigated. 316 (austenitic), 17-4PH (precipitation hardening), and 410 (martensitic) stainless steels were plasma-nitrided and nitrocarburized using a N2 + H2 gas mixture and the gas mixture containing C2H2, respectively, at 550 °C. The results showed that the PN and nitrocarburizing produced a relatively thick nitrided layer consisting of a compound layer and an adjacent nitrogen diffusion layer depending on the crystal structures of the HVOF-sprayed stainless steel coatings. Also, the diffusion depth of nitrogen increased when a small amount of C2H2 (plasma nitrocarburizing process) was added. The PN and nitrocarburizing resulted in not only an increase of the surface hardness, but also improvement of the load bearing capacity of the HVOF-sprayed stainless steel coatings because of the formation of CrN, Fe3N, and Fe4N phases. Also, the plasma-nitrocarburized HVOF-sprayed 410 stainless steel had a superior surface microhardness and load bearing capacity due to the formation of Cr23C6 on the surface.

  1. Effect of Aluminum Content on Plasma-Nitrided Al x CoCrCuFeNi High-Entropy Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Wei-Yeh; Yeh, Jien-Wei

    2009-06-01

    High-entropy alloys (HEAs) Al x CoCrCuFeNi with different aluminum contents ( x = 0 to 1.8) were plasma nitrided at 525 °C for 45 hours with an aim to develop wear-resistant structural parts. The nitrided layer comprises a well-nitrided dendrite phase and an un-nitrided Cu-rich interdendrite phase. Surface hardening is a result of the formation of various nitrides in the nitrided dendrite: CrN, Fe4N, and AlN. With increasing aluminum content, the hardness of the nitrided layer increases due to the increased amount of hard AlN phase and the increased volume fraction of bcc phase being harder than the fcc one. The nitrided layer thickness shows an apparent decrease with the increasing aluminum content of the alloy. The present alloy system provides a wide range of substrate hardness from Hv 170 to 560 before nitriding, which even becomes harder by around Hv 30 after nitriding. For Al0.5CoCrCuFeNi alloy having the highest surface hardness of Hv 1300, a layer thickness of 23 μm, and a substrate hardness of Hv 300, an adhesive wear test confirms its superior wear resistance as being 17 times that of the un-nitrided samples.

  2. Experimental and numerical study on plasma nitriding of AISI P20 mold steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayebpashaee, N.; Vafaeenezhad, H.; Kheirandish, Sh.; Soltanieh, M.

    2016-09-01

    In this study, plasma nitriding was used to fabricate a hard protective layer on AISI P20 steel, at three process temperatures (450°C, 500°C, and 550°C) and over a range of time periods (2.5, 5, 7.5, and 10 h), and at a fixed gas N2:H2 ratio of 75vol%:25vol%. The morphology of samples was studied using optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, and the formed phase of each sample was determined by X-ray diffraction. The elemental depth profile was measured by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, wavelength dispersive spectroscopy, and glow dispersive spectroscopy. The hardness profile of the samples was identified, and the microhardness profile from the surface to the sample center was recorded. The results show that ɛ-nitride is the dominant species after carrying out plasma nitriding in all strategies and that the plasma nitriding process improves the hardness up to more than three times. It is found that as the time and temperature of the process increase, the hardness and hardness depth of the diffusion zone considerably increase. Furthermore, artificial neural networks were used to predict the effects of operational parameters on the mechanical properties of plastic mold steel. The plasma temperature, running time of imposition, and target distance to the sample surface were all used as network inputs; Vickers hardness measurements were given as the output of the model. The model accurately reproduced the experimental outcomes under different operational conditions; therefore, it can be used in the effective simulation of the plasma nitriding process in AISI P20 steel.

  3. Challenges Upon Reactive Plasma Spray Nitriding: Al Powders and Fabrication of AlN Coatings as a Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahien, Mohammed; Yamada, Motohiro; Fukumoto, Masahiro

    2016-06-01

    Reactive plasma spraying (RPS) is a promising technology for the in situ formation of several ceramic coatings. The focus of this paper is to summarize the state of our current knowledge about the RPS process and using the nitriding of Al particles and the fabrication of aluminum nitride coatings, as a case study. The aspects and challenges in this process such as the influence of the plasma power, in-flight time, particle size, nitriding mechanism, splat morphology, in-flight particle diagnostics, N2 plasma gas, and the feeding rate on the RPS process are analyzed and discussed.

  4. Mesenchymal stem cell adhesion and spreading on microwave plasma-nitrided titanium alloy

    PubMed Central

    Clem, William C.; Konovalov, Valery V.; Chowdhury, S.; Vohra, Yogesh K.; Catledge, Shane A.; Bellis, Susan L.

    2008-01-01

    Improved methods to increase surface hardness of metallic biomedical implants are being developed in an effort to minimize the formation of wear debris particles that cause local pain and inflammation. However, for many implant surface treatments, there is a risk of film delamination due to the mismatch of mechanical properties between the hard surface and the softer underlying metal. In this article, we describe the surface modification of titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V), using microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition to induce titanium nitride formation by nitrogen diffusion. The result is a gradual transition from a titanium nitride surface to the bulk titanium alloy, without a sharp interface that could otherwise lead to delamination. We demonstrate that vitronectin adsorption, as well as the adhesion and spreading of human mesenchymal stem cells to plasma-nitrided titanium is equivalent to that of Ti-6Al-4V, while hardness is improved 3- to 4-fold. These in vitro results suggest that the plasma nitriding technique has the potential to reduce wear, and the resulting debris particle release, of biomedical implants without compromising osseointegration; thus, minimizing the possibility of implant loosening over time. PMID:16265649

  5. Effects of DC bias voltages on the RF-excited plasma-tissue interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Aijun; Liu, Dingxin; Wang, Xiaohua; Li, Jiafeng; Chen, Chen; Rong, Mingzhe; Kong, Michael G.

    2016-10-01

    We present in this study how DC bias voltage impacts on the fluxes of reactive species on the skin tissue by means of a plasma-tissue interaction model. The DC bias voltage inputs less than 2% of the total discharge power, and hence it has little influence on the whole plasma characteritics including the volume-averaged densities of reactive species and the heating effect. However, it pushes the plasma bulk towards the skin surface, which significantly changes the local plasma characteristics in the vicinity of the skin surface, and in consequence remarkably enhances the flux densities of reactive species on the skin tissue. With the consideration of plasma dosage and heat damage on the skin tissue, DC bias voltage is a better approach compared with the common approach of increasing the plasma power. Since the DC voltage is easy to apply on the human body, it is a promising approach for use in clincial applications.

  6. Some Temperature Effects on AISI-304 Nitriding in an Inductively Coupled RF Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Valencia-Alvarado, R.; Barocio, S. R.; Mercado-Cabrera, A.; Pena-Eguiluz, R.; Munoz-Castro, A. E.; Piedad-Beneitez, A. de la; Rosa-Vazquez, J. de la; Lopez-Callejas, R.; Godoy-Cabrera, O. G.

    2006-12-04

    Some recent results obtained from nitriding AISI 304 stainless steel samples, 1.2 cm in diameter and 0.5 cm thick are reported here in the case of an 85% hydrogen and 15% nitrogen mixture work gas. The process was carried out from 300 to 400 W for (13.56 MHz) inductively coupled plasma within a 60 cm long pyrex glass tube 3.5 cm in diameter where the samples were biased up to -300 V with respect to earth. The resulting hardness appears to be a function of the substrate temperature which varied from 200 deg. C at a 0 V bias to 550 deg. C at -300 V. The plasma density at 400 W reached 3x1010 cm-3 with a 4 eV electron temperature. Prior to nitriding, all the samples were polished with 0.05 {mu}m diamond paste, leading to a 30 nm average roughness (Ra). After nitriding at -300 V, the Ra rose until {approx}400 nm while hardness values of 1500 HV under 300 g loads were measured. X ray diffraction indicates that the extended phase amplitude ({gamma}N), Fe and Cr nitride depends on the substrate temperature.

  7. TEM studies of plasma nitrided austenitic stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Stróz, D; Psoda, M

    2010-03-01

    Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy and X-ray phase analysis were used to study the structure of a layer formed during nitriding the AISI 316L stainless steel at temperature 440 degrees C. It was found that the applied treatment led to the formation of 6-microm-thick layer of the S-phase. There is no evidence of CrN precipitation. The X-ray diffraction experiments proved that the occurred austenite lattice expansion - due to nitrogen atoms - depended on the crystallographic direction. The cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy studies showed that the layer consisted of a single cubic phase that contained a lot of defects such as dislocations, stacking faults, slip bands and twins. The high-resolution electron microscopy observations were applied to study the defect formation due to the nitriding process. It was shown that the presence of great number of stacking faults leads to formation of nanotwins. Weak, forbidden {100} reflections were still another characteristic feature of the S-phase. These were not detected in the X-ray spectra of the phase. Basing on the high-resolution electron microscopy studies it can be suggested that the short-range ordering of the nitrogen atoms in the octahedral sites inside the f.c.c. matrix lattice takes place and gives rise to appearance of these spots. It is suggested that the cubic lattice undergoes not only expansion but also slight rombohedral distortion that explains differences in the lattice expansion for different crystallographic directions.

  8. High-Density Plasma Etching of Group-III Nitride Films for Device Application

    SciTech Connect

    Baca, A.G.; Crawford, M.H.; Han, J.; Lester, L.F.; Pearton, S.J.; Ren, F.; Shul, R.J.; Willison, C.G.; Zhang, L.; Zolper, J.C.

    1999-02-17

    As III-V nitride device structures become more complicated and design rules shrink, well-controlled etch processes are necessary. Due to limited wet chemical etch results for the group-III nitrides, a significant amount of effort has been devoted to the development of dry etch processing. Dry etch development was initially focused on mesa structures where high etch rates, anisotropic profiles, smooth sidewalls, and equi-rate etching of dissimilar materials were required. For example, commercially available LEDs and laser facets for GaN-based laser diodes have been patterned using reactive ion etching (RIE). With the recent interest in high power, high temperature electronic devices, etch characteristics may also require smooth surface morphology, low plasma-induced damage, and selective etching of one layer over another. The principal criteria for any plasma etch process is its utility in the fabrication of a device. In this study, we will report plasma etch results for the group-III nitrides and their application to device structures.

  9. Low-temperature synthesis of carbon nitride by microwave plasma CVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Ippei; Sakamoto, Yukihiro

    2016-01-01

    Investigation of the low temperature synthesis of carbon nitride was carried out by microwave plasma CVD. Carbon nitride was synthesized using an improved microwave plasma CVD apparatus. Si was used as the substrate. A mixture of CH4 and N2 gas was used as a reaction gas. Synthesis pressure was varied from 1.1 to 4.0 kPa, microwave power was varied from 400 to 800 W. Faceted particles were obtained at a microwave power of 800 W and a substrate temperature of 880 K. Faceted particles were obtained at various synthesis pressures and a substrate temperature of as low as 740 K. Also, β-Si3N4 and α-C3N4 peaks were observed in the X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern. As a result of studies of the low-temperature synthesis of carbon nitride by microwave plasma CVD, the morphology of deposits was found to depend on substrate temperature, and faceted particles were obtained at a substrate temperature as low as 740 K.

  10. Structure and properties of commercially pure titanium nitrided in the plasma of a low-pressure gas discharge produced by a PINK plasma generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Yu F.; Akhmadeev, Yu H.; Lopatin, I. V.; Petrikova, E. A.; Krysina, V.; Koval, N. N.

    2015-11-01

    The paper analyzes the surface structure and properties of commercially pure VT1-0 titanium nitrided in the plasma of a low-pressure gas discharge produced by a PINK plasma generator. The analysis demonstrates that the friction coefficient of the nitrided material decreases more than four times and its wear resistance and microhardness increases more than eight and three times, respectively. The physical mechanisms responsible for the enhancement of strength and tribological properties of the material are discussed.

  11. Reactive spark plasma sintering (SPS) of nitride reinforced titanium alloy composites

    SciTech Connect

    Borkar, Tushar; Nag, Soumya; Ren, Yang; Tiley, Jaimie; Banerjee, Rajarshi

    2014-12-25

    Coupled in situ alloying and nitridation of titanium–vanadium alloys, has been achieved by introducing reactive nitrogen gas during the spark plasma sintering (SPS) of blended titanium and vanadium elemental powders, leading to a new class of nitride reinforced titanium alloy composites. The resulting microstructure includes precipitates of the d-TiN phase with the NaCl structure, equiaxed (or globular) precipitates of a nitrogen enriched hcp a(Ti,N) phase with a c/a ratio more than what is expected for pure hcp Ti, and fine scale plate-shaped precipitates of hcp a-Ti, distributed within a bcc b matrix. During SPS processing, the d-TiN phase appears to form at a temperature of 1400 C, while only hcp a(Ti,N) and a-Ti phases form at lower processing temperatures. Consequently, the highest microhardness is exhibited by the composite processed at 1400 C while those processed at 1300 C or below exhibit lower values. Processing at temperatures below 1300 C, resulted in an incomplete alloying of the blend of titanium and vanadium powders. These d-TiN precipitates act as heterogeneous nucleation sites for the a(Ti,N) precipitates that appear to engulf and exhibit an orientation relationship with the nitride phase at the center. Furthermore, fine scale a-Ti plates are precipitated within the nitride precipitates, presumably resulting from the retrograde solubility of nitrogen in titanium.

  12. Rf-plasma synthesis of nanosize silicon carbide and nitride. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Buss, R.J.

    1997-02-01

    A pulsed rf plasma technique is capable of generating ceramic particles of 10 manometer dimension. Experiments using silane/ammonia and trimethylchlorosilane/hydrogen gas mixtures show that both silicon nitride and silicon carbide powders can be synthesized with control of the average particle diameter from 7 to 200 nm. Large size dispersion and much agglomeration appear characteristic of the method, in contrast to results reported by another research group. The as produced powders have a high hydrogen content and are air and moisture sensitive. Post-plasma treatment in a controlled atmosphere at elevated temperature (800{degrees}C) eliminates the hydrogen and stabilizes the powder with respect to oxidation or hydrolysis.

  13. Melting and spheroidization of hexagonal boron nitride in a microwave-powered, atmospheric pressure nitrogen plasma `

    SciTech Connect

    Gleiman, S. S.; Phillips, J.

    2001-01-01

    We have developed a method for producing spherically-shaped, hexagonal phase boron nitride (hBN) particles of controlled diameter in the 10-100 micron size range. Specifically, platelet-shaped hBN particles are passed as an aerosol through a microwave-generated, atmospheric pressure, nitrogen plasma. In the plasma, agglomerates formed by collisions between input hBN particles, melt and forms spheres. We postulate that this unprecedented process takes place in the unique environment of a plasma containing a high N-atom concentration, because in such an environment the decomposition temperature can be raised above the melting temperature. Indeed, given the following relationship [1]: BN{sub (condensed)} {leftrightarrow} B{sub (gas)} + N{sub (gas)}. Standard equilibrium thermodynamics indicate that the decomposition temperature of hBN is increased in the presence of high concentrations of N atoms. We postulate that in our plasma system the N atom concentration is high enough to raise the decomposition temperature above the (undetermined) melting temperature. Keywords Microwave plasma, boron nitride, melting, spherical, thermodynamics, integrated circuit package.

  14. Pulsed dc- and sine-wave-excited cold atmospheric plasma plumes: A comparative analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Q.; Lu, X. P.; Ostrikov, K.; Xian, Y.; Zou, C.; Xiong, Z.; Pan, Y.

    2010-04-01

    Cold atmospheric-pressure plasma plumes are generated in the ambient air by a single-electrode plasma jet device powered by pulsed dc and ac sine-wave excitation sources. Comprehensive comparisons of the plasma characteristics, including electrical properties, optical emission spectra, gas temperatures, plasma dynamics, and bacterial inactivation ability of the two plasmas are carried out. It is shown that the dc pulse excited plasma features a much larger discharge current and stronger optical emission than the sine-wave excited plasma. The gas temperature in the former discharge remains very close to the room temperature across the entire plume length; the sine-wave driven discharge also shows a uniform temperature profile, which is 20-30 degrees higher than the room temperature. The dc pulse excited plasma also shows a better performance in the inactivation of gram-positive staphylococcus aureus bacteria. These results suggest that the pulsed dc electric field is more effective for the generation of nonequilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma plumes for advanced plasma health care applications.

  15. Manual modification and plasma exposure of boron nitride ceramic to study Hall effect thruster plasma channel material erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satonik, Alexander J.

    Worn Hall effect thrusters (HET) show a variety of unique microstructures and elemental compositions in the boron nitride thruster channel walls. Worn thruster channels are typically created by running test thrusters in vacuum chambers for hundreds of hours. Studies were undertaken to manually modify samples of boron nitride without the use of a hall effect thruster. Samples were manually abraded with an abrasive blaster and sandpaper, in addition to a vacuum heater. Some of these samples were further exposed to a xenon plasma in a magnetron sputter device. Sandpaper and abrasive blaster tests were used to modify surface roughness values of the samples from 10,000 A to 150,000 A, matching worn thruster values. Vacuum heat treatments were performed on samples. These treatments showed the ability to modify chemical compositions of boron nitride samples, but not in a manner matching changes seen in worn thruster channels. Plasma erosion rate was shown to depend on the grade of the BN ceramic and the preparation of the surface prior to plasma exposure. Abraded samples were shown to erode 43% more than their pristine counterparts. Unique surface features and elemental compositions on the worn thruster channel samples were overwritten by new surface features on the ceramic grains. The microscope images of the ceramic surface show that the magnetron plasma source rounded the edges of the ceramic grains to closely match the worn HET surface. This effect was not as pronounced in studies of ion beam bombardment of the surface and appears to be a result of the quasi-neutral plasma environment.

  16. Plasma-Enhanced Atomic Layer Deposition of Silicon Nitride Using a Novel Silylamine Precursor.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae-Min; Jang, Se Jin; Yusup, Luchana L; Lee, Won-Jun; Lee, Sang-Ick

    2016-08-17

    We report the plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) of silicon nitride thin film using a silylamine compound as the silicon precursor. A series of silylamine compounds were designed by replacing SiH3 groups in trisilylamine by dimethylaminomethylsilyl or trimethylsilyl groups to obtain sufficient thermal stability. The silylamine compounds were synthesized through redistribution, amino-substitution, lithiation, and silylation reactions. Among them, bis(dimethylaminomethylsilyl)trimethylsilyl amine (C9H29N3Si3, DTDN2-H2) was selected as the silicon precursor because of the lowest bond dissociation energy and sufficient vapor pressures. The energies for adsorption and reaction of DTDN2-H2 with the silicon nitride surface were also calculated by density functional theory. PEALD silicon nitride thin films were prepared using DTDN2-H2 and N2 plasma. The PEALD process window was between 250 and 400 °C with a growth rate of 0.36 Å/cycle. The best film quality was obtained at 400 °C with a RF power of 100 W. The PEALD film prepared showed good bottom and sidewall coverages of ∼80% and ∼73%, respectively, on a trench-patterned wafer with an aspect ratio of 5.5. PMID:27447839

  17. Plasma-Enhanced Atomic Layer Deposition of Silicon Nitride Using a Novel Silylamine Precursor.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae-Min; Jang, Se Jin; Yusup, Luchana L; Lee, Won-Jun; Lee, Sang-Ick

    2016-08-17

    We report the plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) of silicon nitride thin film using a silylamine compound as the silicon precursor. A series of silylamine compounds were designed by replacing SiH3 groups in trisilylamine by dimethylaminomethylsilyl or trimethylsilyl groups to obtain sufficient thermal stability. The silylamine compounds were synthesized through redistribution, amino-substitution, lithiation, and silylation reactions. Among them, bis(dimethylaminomethylsilyl)trimethylsilyl amine (C9H29N3Si3, DTDN2-H2) was selected as the silicon precursor because of the lowest bond dissociation energy and sufficient vapor pressures. The energies for adsorption and reaction of DTDN2-H2 with the silicon nitride surface were also calculated by density functional theory. PEALD silicon nitride thin films were prepared using DTDN2-H2 and N2 plasma. The PEALD process window was between 250 and 400 °C with a growth rate of 0.36 Å/cycle. The best film quality was obtained at 400 °C with a RF power of 100 W. The PEALD film prepared showed good bottom and sidewall coverages of ∼80% and ∼73%, respectively, on a trench-patterned wafer with an aspect ratio of 5.5.

  18. Fabrication of boron nitride nanotube-gold nanoparticle hybrids using pulsed plasma in liquid.

    PubMed

    Ponraj, Sri balaji; Chen, Zhiqiang; Li, Lu Hua; Shankaranarayanan, Jayanth Suryanarayanan; Rajmohan, Gayathri Devi; du Plessis, Johan; Sinclair, Andrew J; Chen, Ying; Wang, Xungai; Kanwar, Jagat R; Dai, Xiujuan J

    2014-09-01

    Plasma, generated in liquid at atmospheric pressure by a nanosecond pulsed voltage, was used to fabricate hybrid structures from boron nitride nanotubes and gold nanoparticles in deionized water. The pH was greatly reduced, conductivity was significantly increased, and concentrations of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in the water were increased by the plasma treatment. The treatment reduced the length of the nanotubes, giving more individual cuplike structures, and introduced functional groups onto the surface. Gold nanoparticles were successively assembled onto the functionalized surfaces. The reactive species from the liquid plasma along with the nanosecond pulsed electric field seem to play a role in the shortening and functionalization of the nanotubes and the assembly of gold nanoparticles. The potential for targeted drug delivery was tested in a preliminary investigation using doxorubicin-loaded plasma-treated nanotubes which were effective at killing ∼99% of prostate cancer cells. PMID:25127006

  19. Dynamics of runaway tails with time-dependent sub-Dreicer dc fields in magnetized plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moghaddam-Taaheri, E.; Vlahos, L.

    1987-01-01

    The evolution of runaway tails driven by sub-Dreicer time-dependent dc fields in a magnetized plasma are studied numerically using a quasi-linear code based on the Ritz-Galerkin method and finite elements. It is found that the runaway tail maintained a negative slope during the dc field increase. Depending on the values of the dc electric field at t = 0 and the electron gyrofrequency to the plasma frequency ratio the runaway tail became unstable to the anomalous Doppler resonance or remained stable before the saturation of the dc field at some maximum value. The systems that remained stable during this stage became unstable to the anomalous Doppler or the Cerenkov resonances when the dc field was kept at the saturation level or decreased. Once the instability is triggered, the runaway tail is isotropized.

  20. Plasma-Enhanced Pulsed Laser Deposition of Wide Bandgap Nitrides for Space Power Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Triplett, G. E., Jr.; Durbin, S. M.

    2004-01-01

    The need for a reliable, inexpensive technology for small-scale space power applications where photovoltaic or chemical battery approaches are not feasible has prompted renewed interest in radioisotope-based energy conversion devices. Although a number of devices have been developed using a variety of semiconductors, the single most limiting factor remains the overall lifetime of the radioisotope battery. Recent advances in growth techniques for ultra-wide bandgap III-nitride semiconductors provide the means to explore a new group of materials with the promise of significant radiation resistance. Additional benefits resulting from the use of ultra-wide bandgap materials include a reduction in leakage current and higher operating voltage without a loss of energy transfer efficiency. This paper describes the development of a novel plasma-enhanced pulsed laser deposition system for the growth of cubic boron nitride semiconducting thin films, which will be used to construct pn junction devices for alphavoltaic applications.

  1. DC Plasma Synthesis of Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanofibers for Biointerfacing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, Ryan Christopher

    Vertically aligned carbon nanofibers (VACNFs) are a class of materials whose nanoscale dimensions and physical properties makes them uniquely suitable as functional elements in many applications for biodetection and biointerfacing on a cellular level. Control of VACNF synthesis by catalytic plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) presents many challenges in integration into devices and structures designed for biointerfacing, such as transparent or flexible substrates. This dissertation addresses ways to overcome many of these issues in addition to deepening the fundamental understanding of nano-synthesis in catalytic PECVD. First, a survey of the field of VACNF synthesis and biointerfacing is presented, identifying the present challenges and greatest experimental applications. It is followed by experimental observations that elucidate the underlying mechanism to fiber alignment during synthesis, a critical step for deterministic control of fiber growth. Using a grid of electrodes patterned by photolithography on an insulating substrate, it was found that the alignment of the fibers is controlled by the anisotropic etching provided by ions during dc-PECVD synthesis. The VACNFs that have been utilized for many cellular interfacing experiments have unique mechanical and fluorescent properties due to a SiNx coating. The mechanism for SiNx deposition to VACNF sidewalls during synthesis is explored in addition to a detailed study of the optical properties of the coating. To explain the optical properties of this coating it is proposed that the source of photoluminescence for the SiNx coated VACNFs is quantum confinement effects due to the presence of silicon nanoclusters embedded in a Si3N4 matrix. These luminescent fibers have proven useful as registry markers in cell impalefection studies. To realize VACNF arrays used as an inflatable angioplasty balloon with embedded fibers to deliver drugs across the blood-brain barrier, a method for transferring fibers to

  2. Modeling of Interactions between Surface properties, DC Self Bias and Plasma Stability in PECVD Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galli, Federico; Keil, Douglas; Augustyniak, Edward

    2011-10-01

    PECVD tools employing capacitively coupled plasma (CCP) sources are widely used in the semiconductor industry to deposit low-k dielectric materials. Power coupling in a CCP reactor is dominated by the plasma-sheath-surface dynamics. The properties of the electrode and other plasma-bounding surfaces, as well as the amount and type of material deposited thereon, affect such dynamics by modifying locally the plasma density, the electron temperature, and the DC self bias. Because PECVD tools are depositing tools, changes to the plasma properties due to surface modification are intrinsic of the process and unavoidable. The purpose of this work is to study these interactions between surface properties, secondary electron emission, DC self bias, plasma density and electron temperature by means of a fluid-type plasma model. Furthermore, the correlation between modeling results and some experimental results as a function of process parameters and chamber conditioning are reported and discussed.

  3. Modification of Low-Alloy Steel Surface by Plasma Electrolytic Nitriding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusmanov, S. A.; Smirnov, A. A.; Silkin, S. A.; Belkin, P. N.

    2016-07-01

    The structure of the low-alloy steel after plasma electrolytic nitriding (PEN) in electrolyte containing ammonium nitrate was investigated. The cross-sectional microstructure, composition, and phase constituents of modified layer under different processing conditions were characterized. It is shown that anode PEN provides the saturation of steel with nitrogen and formation of α-Fe2O3, FeO, and Fe3O4 oxides, Fe2-3N nitride, and martensite. The aqueous solution that contained 15 wt.% NH4Cl and 5 wt.% NH4NO3 allows one to obtain the hardened layer with a thickness of 80 μm and a microhardness up to 740 HV during 5 min at 850 °C. Surface roughness decreases from 1.5 to 0.8 μm after 5-min PEN at 650 °C. The proposed electrolyte and processing mode (750 °C, 10 min) enable to obtain the decrease in the weight loss after lubricate wear testing by a factor of 2.7. The base-nitrate electrolyte conditioned a decrease in the corrosion current density by a factor of 9 due to passivating effect of the oxide and nitride of iron.

  4. [Study of ignition characteristic of DC voltage plasma ignitor].

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng; He, Li-Ming; Lan, Yu-Dan; Du, Hong-Liang

    2011-09-01

    The changing law between interelectrode current, discharge characteristic and jet characteristic of plasma ignitor under different inlet Ar pressure and working current was researched by adopting self-made plasma ignitor. Still, four channels CCD spectrometer was adopted to measure the spectrum characteristic at the exit of ignitor and electron temperature of plasma was calculated according to the spectrum characteristic. The results show that the interelectrode current gradually reduced with rising inlet Ar pressure; The jet length of plasma ignitor firstly increased then reduced with rising inlet Ar flowrate, and also increased with rising working current; The working current of plasma ignitor reduced with rising inlet Ar flowrate, and increased with rising source output current; the electron temperature of plasma ignitor jet increased with rising working current and reduced with rising Ar flowrate. The research results are of certain guidance meanings and reference values for the practical application of plasma ignition system in aeroengine.

  5. Investigation on Plasma Jet Flow Phenomena During DC Air Arc Motion in Bridge-Type Contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Guofu; Bo, Kai; Chen, Mo; Zhou, Xue; Qiao, Xinlei

    2016-05-01

    Arc plasma jet flow in the air was investigated under a bridge-type contacts in a DC 270 V resistive circuit. We characterized the arc plasma jet flow appearance at different currents by using high-speed photography, and two polished contacts were used to search for the relationship between roughness and plasma jet flow. Then, to make the nature of arc plasma jet flow phenomena clear, a simplified model based on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory was established and calculated. The simulated DC arc plasma was presented with the temperature distribution and the current density distribution. Furthermore, the calculated arc flow velocity field showed that the circular vortex was an embodiment of the arc plasma jet flow progress. The combined action of volume force and contact surface was the main reason of the arc jet flow. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 51307030, 51277038)

  6. Dense plasma focus-assisted nitriding of AISI-304

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafiq, M.; Asghar, M.; Ahmad, S.; Sadiq, M.; Qayyum, A.; Zakaullah, M.

    Nitrogen ion implantation into AISI-304 stainless steel is carried out using a dense plasma focus device, operated at a charging voltage of 18 kV (discharge energyD1.45 kJ) with nitrogen filling at optimum pressure of 0.75 mbar. AISI-304 stainless steel samples placed axially above the anode tip are exposed to the ions for 10, 20 and 30 focus shots. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Vickers's micro hardness tester, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy are used to explore the ion induced changes in the crystallographic structures, surface morphology, elemental composition and surface hardness of the ion irradiated samples. The XRD pattern confirms the formation of an expanded austenite phase, owing to nitrogen incorporated into the existing iron lattice. The results of micro hardness tester show that the hardness is increased about three times at an axial distance of 5 cm for 20 shots.

  7. Application of DC plasma torch for synthesis of carbon nanostructured materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shavelkina, M. B.; Amirov, R. H.; Katarzhis, V. A.; Kiselev, V. I.

    2016-09-01

    The results of the synthesis of carbon nanostructures at high temperatures using a DC plasma torch are presented. Plasma was generated by introduction of argon, nitrogen and helium into the plasma torch with an anode in the form of an expanding channel. Sustainable modes of the plasma torch operation have been achieved by simultaneous tangential input of a plasma gas with a carbon source. Obtained solid products were studied using electron microscopy, thermogravimetry, Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction to characterize their properties and morphological structures.

  8. Influence of NH4Cl Powder Addition for Fabrication of Aluminum Nitride Coating in Reactive Atmospheric Plasma Spray Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahien, Mohammed; Yamada, Motohiro; Yasui, Toshiaki; Fukumoto, Masahiro

    2011-01-01

    Reactive plasma spray is the key to fabricating aluminum nitride (AlN) thermally sprayed coatings. It was possible to fabricate AlN/Al composite coatings using atmospheric plasma spray process through plasma nitriding of Al powders (Al 30 μm). The nitriding reaction and the AlN content could be improved by controlling the spray distance and the feedstock powder particle size. Increasing the spray distance and/or using smaller particle size of Al powders improved the in-flight nitriding reaction. However, it was difficult to fabricate thick and dense AlN coatings with an increase in the spray distance and/or when using fine particles. Thus, the coatings thickness was suppressed because of the complete nitriding of some particles (formation of AlN particles) during flight, which prevents the particle deposition. Furthermore, the excessive vaporization of Al fine particles (due to increased particle temperature) decreased the deposition efficiency. To fabricate thick AlN coatings in the reactive plasma spray process, improving the nitriding reaction of the large Al particles at short spray distance is required to decrease the vaporization of Al particles during flight. This study investigated the influence of adding ammonium chloride (NH4Cl) powders on the nitriding process of large Al powders and on the microstructure of the fabricated coatings. It was possible to fabricate thick AlN coatings at 100 mm spray distance with small addition of NH4Cl powders to the Al feedstock powders (30 μm). Addition of NH4Cl to the starting Al powders promoted the formation of AlN through changing the reaction path to vapor-phase nitridation chlorination-nitridation sequences as confirmed by the thermodynamic analysis of possible intermediate reactions. This changes the nitriding reaction to a mild way, so it is more controlled with no explosive mode and with relatively low heating rates. Thus, NH4Cl acts as a catalyst, nitrogen source, and diluent agent. Furthermore, the evolved

  9. Friction and wear of plasma-deposited amorphous hydrogenated films on silicon nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1991-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to examine the friction and wear behavior of amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H) films in sliding contact with silicon nitride pins in both dry nitrogen and humid air environments. Amorphous hydrogenated carbon films approximately 0.06 micron thick were deposited on silicon nitride flat substrates by using the 30 kHz ac glow discharge of a planar plasma reactor. The results indicate that an increase in plasma deposition power gives an increase in film density and hardness. The high-density a-C:H films deposited behaved tribologically much like bulk diamond. In the dry nitrogen environment, a tribochemical reaction produced a substance, probably a hydrocarbon-rich layer, that decreased the coefficient of friction. In the humid air environment, tribochemical interactions drastically reduced the wear life of a-C:H films and water vapor greatly increased the friction. Even in humid air, effective lubrication is possible with vacuum-annealed a-C:H films. The vacuum-annealed high-density a-C:H film formed an outermost superficial graphitic layer, which behaved like graphite, on the bulk a-C:H film. Like graphite, the annealed a-C:H film with the superficial graphitic layer showed low friction when adsorbed water vapor was present.

  10. Thermal and Kerr nonlinear properties of plasma-deposited silicon nitride/ silicon dioxide waveguides.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Kazuhiro; Saperstein, Robert E; Alic, Nikola; Fainman, Yeshaiahu

    2008-08-18

    We introduce and present experimental evaluations of loss and nonlinear optical response in a waveguide and an optical resonator, both implemented with a silicon nitride/ silicon dioxide material platform prepared by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition with dual frequency reactors that significantly reduce the stress and the consequent loss of the devices. We measure a relatively small loss of approximately 4dB/cm in the waveguides. The fabricated ring resonators in add-drop and all-pass arrangements demonstrate quality factors of Q=12,900 and 35,600. The resonators are used to measure both the thermal and ultrafast Kerr nonlinearities. The measured thermal nonlinearity is larger than expected, which is attributed to slower heat dissipation in the plasma-deposited silicon dioxide film. The n2 for silicon nitride that is unknown in the literature is measured, for the first time, as 2.4 x 10(-15)cm(2)/W, which is 10 times larger than that for silicon dioxide.

  11. A mathematical model and simulation results of plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of silicon nitride films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konakov, S. A.; Krzhizhanovskaya, V. V.

    2015-01-01

    We developed a mathematical model of Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD) of silicon nitride thin films from SiH4-NH3-N2-Ar mixture, an important application in modern materials science. Our multiphysics model describes gas dynamics, chemical physics, plasma physics and electrodynamics. The PECVD technology is inherently multiscale, from macroscale processes in the chemical reactor to atomic-scale surface chemistry. Our macroscale model is based on Navier-Stokes equations for a transient laminar flow of a compressible chemically reacting gas mixture, together with the mass transfer and energy balance equations, Poisson equation for electric potential, electrons and ions balance equations. The chemical kinetics model includes 24 species and 58 reactions: 37 in the gas phase and 21 on the surface. A deposition model consists of three stages: adsorption to the surface, diffusion along the surface and embedding of products into the substrate. A new model has been validated on experimental results obtained with the "Plasmalab System 100" reactor. We present the mathematical model and simulation results investigating the influence of flow rate and source gas proportion on silicon nitride film growth rate and chemical composition.

  12. Effect of sputtering pressure on crystalline quality and residual stress of AlN films deposited at 823 K on nitrided sapphire substrates by pulsed DC reactive sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtsuka, Makoto; Takeuchi, Hiroto; Fukuyama, Hiroyuki

    2016-05-01

    Aluminum nitride (AlN) is a promising material for use in applications such as deep-ultraviolet light-emitting diodes (UV-LEDs) and surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices. In the present study, the effect of sputtering pressure on the surface morphology, crystalline quality, and residual stress of AlN films deposited at 823 K on nitrided a-plane sapphire substrates, which have high-crystalline-quality c-plane AlN thin layers, by pulsed DC reactive sputtering was investigated. The c-axis-oriented AlN films were homoepitaxially grown on nitrided sapphire substrates at sputtering pressures of 0.4–1.5 Pa. Surface damage of the AlN sputtered films increased with increasing sputtering pressure because of arcing (abnormal electrical discharge) during sputtering. The sputtering pressure affected the crystalline quality and residual stress of AlN sputtered films because of a change in the number and energy of Ar+ ions and Al sputtered atoms. The crystalline quality of AlN films was improved by deposition with lower sputtering pressure.

  13. Nitriding characteristics of 4H-SiC irradiated with remote nitrogen plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimabayashi, Masaharu; Kurihara, Kazuaki; Horikawa, Yoshimine; Sasaki, Koichi

    2016-03-01

    We examined the atomic concentrations and the weight densities of SiC surfaces irradiated with remote nitrogen plasmas. The unique approach of this work is that we compared the SiC surface irradiated with atomic nitrogen with that irradiated with a mixture of atomic nitrogen and molecular nitrogen in the metastable \\text{A}3Σ \\text{u} + state. As a result, it was found that molecular nitrogen in the \\text{A}3Σ \\text{u} + state has a higher efficiency than atomic nitrogen in the nitriding of SiC surfaces. The weight density measurements have revealed the removal of Si and C from the SiC surface by the irradiation of remote nitrogen plasma. These results suggest that the formation of volatile molecules is less significant when the SiC surface is irradiated with molecular nitrogen in the metastable \\text{A}3Σ \\text{u} + state.

  14. An exploration of laser-sustained plasma interactions with titanium substrates during nitriding without direct irradiation by the laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, Amber Nalani

    Laser-sustained plasma (LSP) is plasma which can be sustained indefinitely by a laser beam away from any potentially interacting surfaces. LSPs can be sustained at steady state by balancing power input through inverse bremsstrahlung absorption with loss through radiation (continuous and line), convection, and conduction. For many years, plasma has been considered a negative influence in laser materials processing, disrupting the beam path and distorting radiation prior to the beam reaching the surface. New research indicates that LSP can be an opportunity for metallurgical surface treatments and the deposition of coatings with an improvement in properties over conventional coating methods. For the first time, the LSP was used to nitride surfaces independently of the associated laser beam and the resulting specimens were examined to gain new insights into the effects of laser plasmas on surface modification processes. A titanium plate was placed parallel to and at a radial distance from an LSP, rather than perpendicular to it, as is the typical geometry for laser processing. During the exposure of the substrate to the LSP, the process was observed via a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. The processed substrates were then examined visually, by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, focused ion beam, transmission electron microscopy, and x-ray diffraction to elucidate the morphological and microstructural features that are characteristic of this processing method. Results indicated that an LSP is a powerful tool for heating surfaces and simultaneously introducing activated gas species into the melt. The nitrided surfaces exhibited complex and uncommon morphologies, including faceted titanium nitride crystals, which had not been produced by conventional laser nitriding. The underlying microstructure demonstrated that LSP can generate layers similar to those produced by conventional laser nitriding, but to a much greater depth. This

  15. Atomic Layer Deposition of Silicon Nitride from Bis(tert-butylamino)silane and N2 Plasma.

    PubMed

    Knoops, Harm C M; Braeken, Eline M J; de Peuter, Koen; Potts, Stephen E; Haukka, Suvi; Pore, Viljami; Kessels, Wilhelmus M M

    2015-09-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) of silicon nitride (SiNx) is deemed essential for a variety of applications in nanoelectronics, such as gate spacer layers in transistors. In this work an ALD process using bis(tert-butylamino)silane (BTBAS) and N2 plasma was developed and studied. The process exhibited a wide temperature window starting from room temperature up to 500 °C. The material properties and wet-etch rates were investigated as a function of plasma exposure time, plasma pressure, and substrate table temperature. Table temperatures of 300-500 °C yielded a high material quality and a composition close to Si3N4 was obtained at 500 °C (N/Si=1.4±0.1, mass density=2.9±0.1 g/cm3, refractive index=1.96±0.03). Low wet-etch rates of ∼1 nm/min were obtained for films deposited at table temperatures of 400 °C and higher, similar to that achieved in the literature using low-pressure chemical vapor deposition of SiNx at >700 °C. For novel applications requiring significantly lower temperatures, the temperature window from room temperature to 200 °C can be a solution, where relatively high material quality was obtained when operating at low plasma pressures or long plasma exposure times.

  16. Atomic Layer Deposition of Silicon Nitride from Bis(tert-butylamino)silane and N2 Plasma.

    PubMed

    Knoops, Harm C M; Braeken, Eline M J; de Peuter, Koen; Potts, Stephen E; Haukka, Suvi; Pore, Viljami; Kessels, Wilhelmus M M

    2015-09-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) of silicon nitride (SiNx) is deemed essential for a variety of applications in nanoelectronics, such as gate spacer layers in transistors. In this work an ALD process using bis(tert-butylamino)silane (BTBAS) and N2 plasma was developed and studied. The process exhibited a wide temperature window starting from room temperature up to 500 °C. The material properties and wet-etch rates were investigated as a function of plasma exposure time, plasma pressure, and substrate table temperature. Table temperatures of 300-500 °C yielded a high material quality and a composition close to Si3N4 was obtained at 500 °C (N/Si=1.4±0.1, mass density=2.9±0.1 g/cm3, refractive index=1.96±0.03). Low wet-etch rates of ∼1 nm/min were obtained for films deposited at table temperatures of 400 °C and higher, similar to that achieved in the literature using low-pressure chemical vapor deposition of SiNx at >700 °C. For novel applications requiring significantly lower temperatures, the temperature window from room temperature to 200 °C can be a solution, where relatively high material quality was obtained when operating at low plasma pressures or long plasma exposure times. PMID:26305370

  17. Long range temporal correlation in the chaotic oscillations of a dc glow discharge plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Lahiri, S.; Roychowdhury, D.

    2012-08-15

    Long range temporal correlations in the fluctuations of the plasma floating potentials (measured using a Langmuir probe) are investigated in a dc glow discharge plasma. Keeping the neutral pressure constant, the discharge voltage was varied and at the formation of the plasma, quasi periodic oscillations were excited and on further increase of the discharge voltage they became chaotic (irregular) beyond a threshold voltage. We compared the Lyapunov exponent with the Hurst exponent obtained from R/S statistics which showed an opposite behaviour at the transition point. These results are perhaps new since we have not come across such comparative analysis for chaotic oscillations in a glow discharge plasma before.

  18. Adhesion, friction, and wear of plasma-deposited thin silicon nitride films at temperatures to 700 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Pouch, J. J.; Alterovitz, S. A.; Pantic, D. M.; Johnson, G. A.

    1988-01-01

    The adhesion, friction, and wear behavior of silicon nitride films deposited by low- and high-frequency plasmas (30 kHz and 13.56 MHz) at various temperatures to 700 C in vacuum were examined. The results of the investigation indicated that the Si/N ratios were much greater for the films deposited at 13.56 MHz than for those deposited at 30 kHz. Amorphous silicon was present in both low- and high-frequency plasma-deposited silicon nitride films. However, more amorphous silicon occurred in the films deposited at 13.56 MHz than in those deposited at 30 kHz. Temperature significantly influenced adhesion, friction, and wear of the silicon nitride films. Wear occurred in the contact area at high temperature. The wear correlated with the increase in adhesion and friction for the low- and high-frequency plasma-deposited films above 600 and 500 C, respectively. The low- and high-frequency plasma-deposited thin silicon nitride films exhibited a capability for lubrication (low adhesion and friction) in vacuum at temperatures to 500 and 400 C, respectively.

  19. Adhesion, friction, and wear of plasma-deposited thin silicon nitride films at temperatures to 700 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Pouch, J. J.; Alterovitz, S. A.; Pantic, D. M.; Johnson, G. A.

    1989-01-01

    The adhesion, friction, and wear behavior of silicon nitride films deposited by low- and high-frequency plasmas (30 kHz and 13.56 MHz) at various temperatures to 700 C in vacuum were examined. The results of the investigation indicated that the Si/N ratios were much greater for the films deposited at 13.56 MHz than for those deposited at 30 kHz. Amorphous silicon was present in both low- and high-frequency plasma-deposited silicon nitride films. However, more amorphous silicon occurred in the films deposited at 13.56 MHz than in those deposited at 30 kHz. Temperature significantly influenced adhesion, friction, and wear of the silicon nitride films. Wear occurred in the contact area at high temperature. The wear correlated with the increase in adhesion and friction for the low- and high-frequency plasma-deposited films above 600 and 500 C, respectively. The low- and high-frequency plasma-deposited thin silicon nitride films exhibited a capability for lubrication (low adhesion and friction) in vacuum at temperatures to 500 and 400 C, respectively.

  20. Formation of Expanded Austenite on a Cold-Sprayed AISI 316L Coating by Low-Temperature Plasma Nitriding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, Shinichiro; Ueda, Nobuhiro

    2015-12-01

    Low-temperature plasma nitriding at temperatures below 450 °C is commonly applied to austenitic stainless steels to enhance wear resistance, while maintaining corrosion resistance, by forming expanded austenite (known as the S-phase). In this work, low-temperature plasma nitriding of cold-sprayed AISI 316L coatings was examined. A cold-spray technique was developed to produce metal coatings with less oxidation. However, the cold-sprayed AISI 316L coating obtained by use of nitrogen gas as propellant contained many interconnected pores and cracks, and was, consequently, unsuitable as an anticorrosive coating. Therefore, laser post-treatment was used to modify the coating and increase its density to similar to that of bulk steel. The anticorrosive performance of this coating on a carbon steel substrate in NaCl solution was substantially improved. Subsequent low-temperature plasma nitriding enhanced the wear resistance by two orders of magnitude. It is concluded that cold-sprayed AISI 316L coatings treated by laser post-treatment and subsequent low-temperature plasma nitriding could be used as protective coatings under severe wear and corrosion conditions.

  1. Tribocorrosion studies of metallic biomaterials: The effect of plasma nitriding and DLC surface modifications.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Guo-Hua; Aune, Ragnhild E; Espallargas, Nuria

    2016-10-01

    The medical grade pure titanium, stainless steel and CoCrMo alloy have been utilized as biomaterials for load-bearing orthopedic prosthesis. The conventional surgery metals suffer from a combined effect of wear and corrosion once they are implanted, which may significantly accelerate the material degradation process. In this work, the tribocorrosion performance of the metallic biomaterials with different surface modifications was studied in the simulated body fluid for the purpose of investigating the effect of the surface treatments on the tribocorrosion performance and eventually finding the most suitable implantation materials. The metals were subjected to surface modifications by plasma nitriding in different treatment temperatures or physical vapor deposition (PVD) to produce diamond-like carbon (DLC) coating, respectively. The dry wear and tribocorrosion properties of the samples were evaluated by using a reciprocating ball-on-disc tribometer equipped with an electrochemical cell. Prior to the tribocorrosion tests, their electrochemical behavior was measured by the potentiodynamic polarization in phosphate buffer saline (PBS) solution at room temperature. Both stainless steel and CoCrMo after low temperature nitriding kept their passive nature by forming an expanded austenite phase. The DLC coated samples presented the low anodic corrosion current due to the chemical inertness of the carbon layer. During the tribocorrosion tests at open circuit potential, the untreated and low temperature nitrided samples exhibited significant potential drop towards the cathodic direction, which was a result of the worn out of the passive film. Galvanic coupling was established between the depassivated (worn) area and the still passive (unworn) area, making the materials suffered from wear-accelerated corrosion. The DLC coating performed as a solid lubricant in both dry wear and tribocorrosion tests, and the resulting wear after the tests was almost negligible. PMID:27348147

  2. Numerical simulation of plasma-induced electrolysis utilizing dc glow discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tochikubo, Fumiyoshi; Shirai, Naoki; Uchida, Satoshi; Shirafuji, Tatsuru

    2014-10-01

    In this work, we carried out one-dimensional numerical simulation of plasma-induced electrolysis, which consists of atmospheric pressure dc glow discharge and electrolyte solution connected in series. Grounded metal electrode is placed at the bottom of NaCl solution with 1 mm depth while powered electrode is placed at 1 mm above the solution surface. The gap is filled with helium. Continuity equations of charged species both in gas and in liquid were simultaneously calculated with Poisson's equation. Current continuity is considered at plasma-liquid interface. That is, hydrated electrons equivalent to electron flux from plasma, or H2O+ ions equivalent to positive ion flux from plasma are supplied in the liquid at plasma-liquid interface. The calculated gas-phase discharge structure is essentially the same as that between two metal electrodes. In front of the metal electrode in liquid, the electric double layer (EDL) with thickness of approximately 10 nm was formed to maintain the electrode reaction. However, the EDL was not formed at the liquid surface in contact with dc glow discharge, because charges are forcibly supplied from plasma to liquid. In other words, plasma-induced electrolysis is controlled at plasma-liquid interface by plasma. This work was partly supported by KAKENHI (Nos. 21110003 and 21110007).

  3. High energy electron fluxes in dc-augmented capacitively coupled plasmas I. Fundamental characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mingmei; Kushner, Mark J.

    2010-01-01

    Power deposition from electrons in capacitively coupled plasmas (CCPs) has components from stochastic heating, Joule heating, and from the acceleration of secondary electrons through sheaths produced by ion, electron, or photon bombardment of electrodes. The sheath accelerated electrons can produce high energy beams which, in addition to producing excitation and ionization in the gas can penetrate through the plasma and be incident on the opposite electrode. In the use of CCPs for microelectronics fabrication, there may be an advantage to having these high energy electrons interact with the wafer. To control the energy and increase the flux of the high energy electrons, a dc bias can be externally imposed on the electrode opposite the wafer, thereby producing a dc-augmented CCP (dc-CCP). In this paper, the characteristics of dc-CCPs will be discussed using results from a computational study. We found that for a given rf bias power, beams of high energy electrons having a narrow angular spread (<1°) can be produced incident on the wafer. The maximum energy in the high energy electron flux scales as ɛmax=-Vdc+Vrf+Vrf0, for a voltage on the dc electrode of Vdc, rf voltage of Vrf, and dc bias on the rf electrode of Vrf0. The dc current from the biased electrode must return to ground through surfaces other than the rf electrode and so seeks out a ground plane, typically the side walls. If the side wall is coated with a poorly conducting polymer, the surface will charge to drive the dc current through.

  4. Spatially-resolved spectral image of a microwave-induced plasma with Okamoto-cavity for nitridation of steel substrate.

    PubMed

    Sato, Shigeo; Arai, Yuuki; Wagatsuma, Kazuaki

    2014-01-01

    When a nitrogen microwave-induced plasma produced with an Okamoto-cavity was employed as a source for the nitridation of steel samples, the characteristics of the plasma were investigated by analyzing a spatially-resolved emission image of nitrogen excited species obtained with a two-dimensionally imaging spectrograph. Our previous study had reported on an excellent performance of the Okamoto-cavity microwave-induced plasma (MIP), enabling a nitrided layer having a several-micrometer-thickness to form on an iron substrate, even if the treatment is completed within 1 min, which is superior to a conventional plasma nitriding using low-pressure glow discharges requiring a prolonged treatment time. In this paper, the reason for this is discussed based on a spectrometric investigation. The emission images of band heads of nitrogen molecule and nitrogen molecule ion extended toward the axial/radial directions of the plasma at larger microwave powers supplied to the MIP, thus elevating the number density of the excited species of nitrogen, which would activate any chemical reaction on the iron substrate. However, a drastic increase in the growth rate of the nitrided layer when increasing the microwave power from 600 to 700 W, which had been observed in our previous study, could not be explained only from such a variation in the excited species of nitrogen. This result is probably because the growth process is dominantly controlled by thermal diffusion of nitrogen atom after it enters into the iron substrate, where the substrate temperature is the most important parameter concerning the mobility in the iron lattice. Therefore, the Okamoto-cavity MIP could contribute to a thermal source through radiative heating as well as a source of nitrogen excited species, especially in the growth process of the nitrided layer.

  5. Group-III Nitride Etch Selectivity in BCl(3)/Cl(2) ICP Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Abernathy, C.R.; Han, J.; Hong, J.; Lester, L.F.; Pearton, S.J.; Shul, R.J.; Willison, C.G.; Zhang, L.

    1998-12-09

    Patterning the group-IH nitrides has been challenging due to their strong bond energies and relatively inert chemical nature as compared to other compound semiconductors. Plasma etch processes have been used almost exclusively to pattern these films. The use of high-density plasma etch systems, including inductively coupled plasmas (ICP), has resulted in relatively high etch rates (often greater than 1.0 pmhnin) with anisotropic profiles and smooth etch morphologies. However, the etch mechanism is often dominated by high ion bombardment energies which can minimize etch selectivity. The use of an ICP-generated BCl~/C12 pkyma has yielded a highly versatile GaN etch process with rates ranging from 100 to 8000 A/rnin making this plasma chemistry a prime candidate for optimization of etch selectivity. In this study, we will report ICP etch rates and selectivities for GaN, AIN, and InN as a function of BCl~/Clz flow ratios, cathode rf-power, and ICP-source power. GaN:InN and GaN:AIN etch selectivities were typically less than 7:1 and showed the strongest dependence on flow ratio. This trend maybe attributed to faster GaN etch rates observed at higher concentrations of atomic Cl which was monitored using optical emission spectroscopy (OES). ~E~~~~f:~ INTRODUCTION DEC j 4898 Etch selectivi

  6. Previous heat treatment inducing different plasma nitriding behaviors in martensitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Figueroa, C. A.; Alvarez, F.; Mitchell, D. R. G.; Collins, G. A.; Short, K. T.

    2006-09-15

    In this work we report a study of the induced changes in structure and corrosion behavior of martensitic stainless steels nitrided by plasma immersion ion implantation (PI{sup 3}) at different previous heat treatments. The samples were characterized by x-ray diffraction and glancing angle x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and potentiodynamic measurements. Depending on the proportion of retained austenite in the unimplanted material, different phase transformations are obtained at lower and intermediate temperatures of nitrogen implantation. At higher temperatures, the great mobility of the chromium yields CrN segregations like spots in random distribution, and the {alpha}{sup '}-martensite is degraded to{alpha}-Fe (ferrite). The nitrided layer thickness follows a fairly linear relationship with the temperature and a parabolic law with the process time. The corrosion resistance depends strongly on chromium segregation from the martensitic matrix, as a result of the formation of CrN during the nitrogen implantation process and the formation of Cr{sub x}C during the heat treatment process. Briefly speaking, the best results are obtained using low tempering temperature and low implantation temperature (below 375 deg. ) due to the increment of the corrosion resistance and nitrogen dissolution in the structure with not too high diffusion depths (about 5-10 {mu}m)

  7. Radio Frequency Plasma Synthesis of Boron Nitride Nanotubes (BNNTs) for Structural Applications: Part I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hales, Stephen J.; Alexa, Joel A.; Jensen, Brian J.; Thomsen, Donald L.

    2016-01-01

    It is evident that nanotubes, such as carbon, boron nitride and even silicon, offer great potential for many aerospace applications. The opportunity exists to harness the extremely high strength and stiffness exhibited by high-purity, low-defect nanotubes in structural materials. Even though the technology associated with carbon nanotube (CNT) development is mature, the mechanical property benefits have yet to be fully realized. Boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) offer similar structural benefits, but exhibit superior chemical and thermal stability. A broader range of potential structural applications results, particularly as reinforcing agents for metal- and ceramic- based composites. However, synthesis of BNNTs is more challenging than CNTs mainly because of the higher processing temperatures required, and mass production techniques have yet to emerge. A promising technique is radio frequency plasma spray (RFPS), which is an inductively coupled, very high temperature process. The lack of electrodes and the self- contained, inert gas environment lend themselves to an ultraclean product. It is the aim of this White Paper to survey the state of the art with regard to nano-material production by analyzing the pros and cons of existing methods. The intention is to combine the best concepts and apply the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) RFPS facility to reliably synthesize large quantities of consistent, high-purity BNNTs.

  8. Control of plasma-liquid interaction of atmospheric DC glow discharge using liquid electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirai, Naoki; Aoki, Ryuta; Nito, Aihito; Aoki, Takuya; Uchida, Satoshi; Tochikubo, Fumiyoshi

    2014-10-01

    Atmospheric plasma in contact with liquid have a variety of interesting phenomena and applications. Previously, we investigated the fundamental characteristics of an atmospheric dc glow discharge using a liquid electrode with a miniature helium flow. We tried to control the plasma-liquid interaction by changing the plasma parameter such as gas species, liquid, and applied voltage. Sheath flow system enables another gas (N2, O2, Ar) flow to around the helium core flow. It can control the gas species around the discharge. When liquid (NaCl aq.) cathode DC discharge is generated, Na emission (588 nm) can be observed from liquid surface with increasing discharge current. Na emission strongly depends on the discharge current and liquid temperature. However, when Ar sheath flow is used, the intensity of Na becomes weak. When liquid anode DC discharge is generated, self-organized luminous pattern formation can be observed at the liquid surface. The pattern depends on existence of oxygen gas in gap. By changing the oxygen gas ratio in the gap, variety of pattern formation can be observed. The discharge in contact with liquid also can be used for synthesis of metal nanoparticles at plasma-liquid interface. Size and shape of nanoparticles depend on discharge gases. This work was supported financially in part by a Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research on Innovative Areas (No 21110007) from MEXT, Japan.

  9. Superconducting structure with layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride

    DOEpatents

    Murduck, James M.; Lepetre, Yves J.; Schuller, Ivan K.; Ketterson, John B.

    1989-01-01

    A superconducting structure is formed by depositing alternate layers of aluminum nitride and niobium nitride on a substrate. Deposition methods include dc magnetron reactive sputtering, rf magnetron reactive sputtering, thin-film diffusion, chemical vapor deposition, and ion-beam deposition. Structures have been built with layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride having thicknesses in a range of 20 to 350 Angstroms. Best results have been achieved with films of niobium nitride deposited to a thickness of approximately 70 Angstroms and aluminum nitride deposited to a thickness of approximately 20 Angstroms. Such films of niobium nitride separated by a single layer of aluminum nitride are useful in forming Josephson junctions. Structures of 30 or more alternating layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride are useful when deposited on fixed substrates or flexible strips to form bulk superconductors for carrying electric current. They are also adaptable as voltage-controlled microwave energy sources.

  10. Superconducting structure with layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride

    DOEpatents

    Murduck, J.M.; Lepetre, Y.J.; Schuller, I.K.; Ketterson, J.B.

    1989-07-04

    A superconducting structure is formed by depositing alternate layers of aluminum nitride and niobium nitride on a substrate. Deposition methods include dc magnetron reactive sputtering, rf magnetron reactive sputtering, thin-film diffusion, chemical vapor deposition, and ion-beam deposition. Structures have been built with layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride having thicknesses in a range of 20 to 350 Angstroms. Best results have been achieved with films of niobium nitride deposited to a thickness of approximately 70 Angstroms and aluminum nitride deposited to a thickness of approximately 20 Angstroms. Such films of niobium nitride separated by a single layer of aluminum nitride are useful in forming Josephson junctions. Structures of 30 or more alternating layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride are useful when deposited on fixed substrates or flexible strips to form bulk superconductors for carrying electric current. They are also adaptable as voltage-controlled microwave energy sources. 8 figs.

  11. DC Electric Fields and Associated Plasma Drifts Observed with the C/NOFS Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfaff, R.; Freudenreich, H.; Bromund, K.; Rowland, D.

    2009-01-01

    Initial DC electric field observations and associated plasma drifts are presented from the Vector Electric Field Investigation (VEFI) on the Air Force Communication/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) satellite. We present statistical averages of the vector fields for the first year of operations that include both the zonal and radial components of the resulting E x B plasma flows at low latitudes. Magnetic field data from the VEFI science magnetometer are used to compute the plasma flows. The DC electric field detector reveals zonal and radial electric fields that undergo strong diurnal variations, typically displaying eastward and outward-directed fields during the day and westward and downward-directed fields at night. There is considerable variation in the large scale DC electric field data, in both the daytime and nighttime cases, with enhanced structures typically observed at night. In general, the measured zonal DC electric field amplitudes include excursions that extend within the 0.4 - 2 m V/m range, corresponding to E x B drifts of the order of 30-150 m/s. The average vertical or radial electric fields may exceed the zonal fields in amplitude by a factor of 1.5 to 2. Although the data compare well, in a general sense, with previous satellite observations and statistical patterns of vertical ion drifts, the E x B drifts we report from C/NOFS rarely show a pronounced pre-reversal enhancement after sunset. We attribute this to a combination of extreme solar minimum conditions and the fact that the C/NOFS orbit of 401 by 867 km carries the probes essentially above the lower altitude regions where the wind-driven dynamo might be expected to create enhanced upwards drifts in the early evening. Evidence for wavenumber 4 tidal effects and other longitudinal signatures have been detected and will be presented. We also discuss off-equatorial electric fields and their relation to the ambient plasma density.

  12. Volt-ampere characteristics of a nitrogen DC plasma arc with anode melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Peng; Ni, Guo-Hua; Meng, Yue-Dong; Nagatsu, Masaaki

    2013-06-01

    The characteristics of a nitrogen arc using a graphite cathode and a melting anode in a pilot-scale plasma furnace are investigated. The voltage is examined as a function of current and apparent plasma length. The voltage increases non-linearly with the increase of apparent plasma length, with the current fixed. The experimental data so obtained are compared with the predictions of the Bowman model for the electric arc, and with numerical simulations as well. The level of agreement between the experimental data at the melting anode and the numerical predictions confirms the suitability of the proposed the Bowman model. These characteristics are relevant to the engineering design and evaluation of a DC plasma furnace and reactor for the treatment of hazardous fly ash waste.

  13. Treatment of refractory powders by a novel, high enthalpy dc plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pershin, L.; Mitrasinovic, A.; Mostaghimi, J.

    2013-06-01

    Thermophysical properties of CO2-CH4 mixtures at high temperatures are very attractive for materials processing. In comparison with argon, at the same temperature, such a mixture possesses much higher enthalpy and higher thermal conductivity. At high temperatures, CO2-CH4 mixture has a complex composition with strong presence of CO which, in the case of powder treatment, could reduce oxidation. In this work, a dc plasma torch with graphite cathode was used to study the effect of plasma gas composition on spheroidization of tungsten carbide and alumina powders. Two different gas compositions were used to generate the plasma while the torch current was kept at 300 A. Various techniques were employed to assess the average concentration of carbides and oxides and the final shape of the treated powders. Process parameters such as input power and plasma gas composition allow controlling the degree of powder oxidation and spheroidization of high melting point ceramic powders.

  14. Desizing of Starch Containing Cotton Fabrics Using Near Atmospheric Pressure, Cold DC Plasma Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasath, A.; Sivaram, S. S.; Vijay Anand, V. D.; Dhandapani, Saravanan

    2013-03-01

    An attempt has been made to desize the starch containing grey cotton fabrics using the DC plasma with oxygen as the gaseous medium. Process conditions of the plasma reactor were optimized in terms of distance between the plates (3.2 cm), applied voltage (600 V) and applied pressure (0.01 bar) to obtain maximum desizing efficiency. No discolouration was observed in the hot water extracts of the desized sample in presence of iodine though relatively higher solvent extractable impurities (4.53 %) were observed in the plasma desized samples compared to acid desized samples (3.38 %). Also, significant weight loss, improvements in plasma desized samples were observed than that of grey fabrics in terms of drop absorbency.

  15. Effects of Nozzle Configuration on Flow Characteristics inside DC Plasma Torch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, X. Q.; Li, H.; Zhao, T. Z.; Guo, W. K.; Xu, P.

    2004-10-01

    The effects of nozzle configuration on the characteristics of flow inside DC arc plasma torches are investigated by numerical simulation. The plasma torches with three typical types of nozzle configuration are used in this paper, and these torches are the SG-100 series commercial products of PRAXAIR Thermal Spray Products Inc. The assumption of steady-state, axis-symmetric, local thermodynamic equilibrium, and optically thin plasma is adopted in a two-dimensional modeling of plasma flow inside a plasma torch. The PHOENICS software is used for solving the governing equations, i.e., the conservation equations of mass, momentum, and energy. The calculated arc voltages are consistent with the experimental results when arc current, gas inflow rate, and working gas are the same. Temperature, axial velocity contours inside the plasma torches, and profiles along the torch axis and at the outlet section are presented to show the plasma flow characteristics. Comparisons are made among these torches in detail and the results show that torches with different anode nozzle configurations produce different characteristic plasma flows.

  16. Reactive Plasma-Sprayed Aluminum Nitride-Based Coating Thermal Conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahien, Mohammed; Yamada, Motohiro; Fukumoto, Masahiro; Egota, Kazumi; Okamoto, Kenji

    2015-12-01

    Recently, thick aluminum nitride/alumina (AlN/Al2O3) composite coatings were successfully fabricated through the reactive plasma spraying of fine Al2O3/AlN mixture in the N2/H2 atmospheric plasma. The coatings consist of AlN, Al5O6N, γ-Al2O3, and α-Al2O3 phases. This study will evaluate the thermal conductivity of these complicated plasma-sprayed coatings and optimize the controlling aspects. Furthermore, the influence of the process parameters on the coatings thermal conductivity will be investigated. The fabricated coatings showed very low thermal conductivity (2.43 W/m K) compared to the AlN sintered compacts. It is attributed to the phase composition of the fabricated coatings, oxide content, and porosity. The presence of Al2O3, Al5O6N and the high coating porosity decreased its thermal conductivity. The presence of oxygen in the AlN lattice creates Al vacancies which lead to phonon scattering and therefore suppressed the thermal conductivity. The formation of γ-Al2O3 phase in the coating leads to further decrease in its conductivity, due to its lower density compared to the α-phase. Moreover, the high porosity of the coating strongly suppressed the conductivity. This is due to the complicated microstructure of plasma spray coatings (splats, porosity, and interfaces, particularly in case of reactive spray process), which obviously lowered the conductivity. Furthermore, the measured coating density was lower than the AlN value and suppressed the coating conductivity. In addition, the spraying parameter showed a varied effect on the coating phase composition, porosity, density, and therefore on its conductivity. Although the N2 gas flow improved the nitride content, it suppressed the thermal conductivity gradually. It is attributed to the further increase in the porosity and further decrease in the density of the coatings with the N2 gas. Furthermore, increasing the arc did not show a significant change on the coating thermal conductivity. On the other hand

  17. An investigation of plasma chemistry for dc plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition of carbon nanotubes and nanofibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hash, David B.; Bell, Martin S.; Teo, Kenneth B. K.; Cruden, Brett A.; Milne, William I.; Meyyappan, M.

    2005-06-01

    The role of plasma in plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition of carbon nanotubes and nanofibres is investigated with both experimental and computational diagnostic techniques. A residual gas analysis (RGA) of a 12 mbar dc discharge with a C2H2/NH3 gas mixture is conducted near the Ni catalyst surface employed for carbon nanofibre growth. The results are corroborated with a 1D dc discharge model that solves for species densities, ion momentum, and ion, electron and neutral gas thermal energies. The effect of varying the plasma power from 0 to 200 W on the gas composition is studied. The dissociation efficiency of the plasma is demonstrated where over 50% of the feedstock is converted to a mixture of hydrogen, nitrogen and hydrogen cyanide at 200 W. Finally, the important role that endothermic ion-molecule reactions play in this conversion is, for the first time, established. Of these reactions, dissociative proton abstraction and collision-induced dissociation are of the greatest significance.

  18. In-Vitro Biocompatibility Studies of Plasma-Nitrided Titanium Alloy β-21S Using Fibroblast Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, L.; Raja, M. D.; Uma, T. S.; Rajendran, N.; Anandan, C.

    2016-04-01

    In the present work, titanium alloy β-21S was nitrided in a low-pressure RF plasma with 100% nitrogen and 20% hydrogen-diluted nitrogen at 800 °C for 4 h and the samples were evaluated for in-vitro biocompatibility by using NIH 3T3 fibroblast cell line. Cellular behavior was evaluated in terms of cell morphology and its viability. FESEM was exploited to observe the morphology of the cells fixed over the surface of the implant. Fibroblasts were seemed to be well distributed over the surface with its characteristic spindle-like shape. Over all, the results indicate that nitriding provided a compatible surface for cell attachment and cell growth. Cell viability and proliferation was assessed by using standard MTT assay. Compared with substrate, the nitrided samples exhibited high-percentage cell viability demonstrating their increased biocompatibility. In addition, the nitrided samples facilitate bone-like apatite formation and exhibited a gradual increase of apatite formation after immersion in Hanks' solution.

  19. Direct probing of anode arc root dynamics and voltage instability in a dc non-transferred arc plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghorui, S.; Tiwari, N.; Meher, K. C.; Jan, A.; Bhat, A.; Sahasrabudhe, S. N.

    2015-12-01

    The transient dynamics of the anode arc root in a dc non-transferred arc plasma torch is captured through fast photography and directly correlated with the associated voltage instability for the first time. The coexistence of multiple arc roots, the transition to a single arc root, root formation and extinction are investigated for the steady, takeover and re-strike modes of the arc. Contrary to the usual concept, the emerging plasma jet of a dc non-transferred arc plasma torch is found to carry current. An unusually long self-propelled arc plasma jet, a consequence of the phenomenon, is demonstrated.

  20. A bulk plasma model for dc and HiPIMS magnetrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenning, N.; Axnäs, I.; Raadu, M. A.; Lundin, D.; Helmerson, U.

    2008-11-01

    A plasma discharge model has been developed for the bulk plasma (also called the extended presheath) in sputtering magnetrons. It can be used both for high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) and conventional dc sputtering magnetrons. Demonstration calculations are made for the parameters of the HiPIMS sputtering magnetron at Linköping University, and also benchmarked against results in the literature on dc magnetrons. New insight is obtained regarding the structure and time development of the currents, the electric fields and the potential profiles. The transverse resistivity ηbottom has been identified as having fundamental importance both for the potential profiles and for the motion of ionized target material through the bulk plasma. New findings are that in the HiPIMS mode, as a consequence of a high value of ηbottom, (1) there can be an electric field reversal that in our case extends 0.01-0.04 m from the target, (2) the electric field in the bulk plasma is typically an order of magnitude weaker than in dc magnetrons, (3) in the region of electric field reversal the azimuthal current is diamagnetic in nature, i.e. mainly driven by the electron pressure gradient, and actually somewhat reduced by the electron Hall current which here has a reversed direction and (4) the azimuthal current above the racetrack can, through resistive friction, significantly influence the motion of the ionized fraction of the sputtered material and deflect it sideways, away from the target and towards the walls of the magnetron.

  1. Silicon nitride formation from a silane-nitrogen ECR (electron cyclotron resonance) plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Barbour, J.C.; Stein, H.J. ); Popov, O.A.; Yoder, M. ); Outten, C.A. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering)

    1990-01-01

    Good quality, low temperature silicon nitride and oxynitride films were deposited downstream from an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma source using SiH{sub 4} and N{sub 2} gas mixtures. The Si/N ratio and H content in the deposited films were determined using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS)and elastic recoil detection (ERD). The H concentration was minimum for films with compositions closest to that of stoichiometric Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}. The optimum conditions for producing a stoichiometric Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}were: a SiH{sub 4}/N{sub 2} flow ratio between 0.1 and 0.2, and an electrically isolated sample far from the ECR source. Infrared absorption spectra showed that as the film composition changed from N rich to Si rich the dominant bonds associated with H changed from N-H to Si-H. The addition of O{sub 2} to the background gas formed an oxynitride with a low H content similar to the stoichiometric Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} 10 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Stress control of silicon nitride films deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dong-ling; Feng, Xiao-fei; Wen, Zhi-yu; Shang, Zheng-guo; She, Yin

    2016-07-01

    Stress controllable silicon nitride (SiNx) films deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) are reported. Low stress SiNx films were deposited in both high frequency (HF) mode and dual frequency (HF/LF) mode. By optimizing process parameters, stress free (-0.27 MPa) SiNx films were obtained with the deposition rate of 45.5 nm/min and the refractive index of 2.06. Furthermore, at HF/LF mode, the stress is significantly influenced by LF ratio and LF power, and can be controlled to be 10 MPa with the LF ratio of 17% and LF power of 150 W. However, LF power has a little effect on the deposition rate due to the interaction between HF power and LF power. The deposited SiNx films have good mechanical and optical properties, low deposition temperature and controllable stress, and can be widely used in integrated circuit (IC), micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) and bio-MEMS.

  3. Effect of Low-Energy Ions on Plasma-Enhanced Deposition of Cubic Boron Nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torigoe, M.; Fukui, S.; Teii, K.; Matsumoto, S.

    2015-09-01

    The effect of low-energy ions on deposition of cubic boron nitride (cBN) films in an inductively coupled plasma with the chemistry of fluorine is studied in terms of ion energy, ion flux, and ion to boron flux ratio onto the substrate. The ion energy and the ion to boron flux ratio are determined from the sheath potential and the ratio of incident ion flux to net deposited boron flux, respectively. For negative substrate biases where sp2-bonded BN phase only or no deposit is formed, both the ion energy and the ion to boron flux ratio are high. For positive substrate biases where cBN phase is formed, the ion energy and the ion to boron flux ratio are estimated in the range of a few eV to 35 eV and 100 to 130, respectively. The impact of negative ions is presumed to be negligible due to their low kinetic energy relative to the sheath potential over the substrate surface. The impact of positive ions with high ion to boron flux ratios is primarily responsible for reduction of the ion energy for cBN film deposition. Work supported in part by a Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (B), a Funding Program for Next Generation World-Leading Researchers, and an Industrial Technology Research Grant Program 2008.

  4. Modelling chemical reactions in dc plasma inside oxygen bubbles in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, N.; Ishii, Y.; Yasuoka, K.

    2012-02-01

    Plasmas generated inside oxygen bubbles in water have been developed for water purification. Zero-dimensional numerical simulations were used to investigate the chemical reactions in plasmas driven by dc voltage. The numerical and experimental results of the concentrations of hydrogen peroxide and ozone in the solution were compared with a discharge current between 1 and 7 mA. Upon increasing the water vapour concentration inside bubbles, we saw from the numerical results that the concentration of hydrogen peroxide increased with discharge current, whereas the concentration of ozone decreased. This finding agreed with the experimental results. With an increase in the discharge current, the heat flux from the plasma to the solution increased, and a large amount of water was probably vaporized into the bubbles.

  5. Autowaves in a dc complex plasma confined behind a de Laval nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fink, M. A.; Zhdanov, S. K.; Schwabe, M.; Thoma, M. H.; Höfner, H.; Thomas, H. M.; Morfill, G. E.

    2013-05-01

    Experiments to explore stability conditions and topology of a dense microparticle cloud supported against gravity by a gas flow were carried out. By using a nozzle-shaped glass insert within the glass tube of a dc discharge plasma chamber a weakly ionized gas flow through a de Laval nozzle was produced. The experiments were performed using neon gas at a pressure of 100 Pa and melamine-formaldehyde particles with a diameter of 3.43 μm. The capturing and stable global confining of the particles behind the nozzle in the plasma were demonstrated. The particles inside the cloud behaved as a single convection cell inhomogeneously structured along the nozzle axis in a tube-like manner. The pulsed acceleration localized in the very head of the cloud mediated by collective plasma-particle interactions and the resulting wave pattern were studied in detail.

  6. Effect of hydrogen addition on the deposition of titanium nitride thin films in nitrogen added argon magnetron plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saikia, P.; Bhuyan, H.; Diaz-Droguett, D. E.; Guzman, F.; Mändl, S.; Saikia, B. K.; Favre, M.; Maze, J. R.; Wyndham, E.

    2016-06-01

    The properties and performance of thin films deposited by plasma assisted processes are closely related to their manufacturing techniques and processes. The objective of the current study is to investigate the modification of plasma parameters occurring during hydrogen addition in N2  +  Ar magnetron plasma used for titanium nitride thin film deposition, and to correlate the measured properties of the deposited thin film with the bulk plasma parameters of the magnetron discharge. From the Langmuir probe measurements, it was observed that the addition of hydrogen led to a decrease of electron density from 8.6 to 6.2  ×  (1014 m-3) and a corresponding increase of electron temperature from 6.30 to 6.74 eV. The optical emission spectroscopy study reveals that with addition of hydrogen, the density of argon ions decreases. The various positive ion species involving hydrogen are found to increase with increase of hydrogen partial pressure in the chamber. The thin films deposited were characterized using standard surface diagnostic tools such as x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), x-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy (RS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Although it was possible to deposit thin films of titanium nitride with hydrogen addition in nitrogen added argon magnetron plasma, the quality of the thin films deteriorates with higher hydrogen partial pressures.

  7. Microstructures and Mechanical Performance of Plasma-Nitrided Al0.3CrFe1.5MnNi0.5 High-Entropy Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Wei-Yeh; Chuang, Ming-Hao; Lin, Su-Jien; Yeh, Jien-Wei

    2012-07-01

    This study investigates the effect of plasma nitriding at 798 K (525 °C) on microstructures and the mechanical performance of Al0.3CrFe1.5MnNi0.5 high-entropy alloys (HEAs) obtained using different cast and wrought processing. All the alloys can be well nitride, with a thickness of around 80 μm, and attain a peak hardness level around Hv 1300 near the surface. The main nitride phases are CrN, AlN, and (Mn, Fe)4N. Those of the substrates are bcc, fcc, Al-, and Ni-rich B2 precipitates, and ρ phase. Their relative amounts depend on the prior processing and also change under the heat treatment during nitriding. The formation of ρ phase during nitriding could in-situ harden the substrate to attain the suitable level required for wear applications. This gives the advantage in simplifying the processing for making a wear-resistance component or a mold since austenitizing, quench hardening, and tempering required for steels such as SACM and SKD steels are no longer required and final finishing can be accomplished before nitriding. Nitrided Al0.3CrFe1.5MnNi0.5 samples have much better wear resistance than un-nitrided ones by 49 to 80 times and also exhibit superior adhesive wear resistance to conventional nitrided alloys: nitriding steel SACM-645 (AISI 7140), 316 stainless steel, and hot-mold steel SKD-61 (AISI H13) by 22 to 55 times depending on prior processing. The superiority is due to the fact that the present nitrided alloys possess a much thicker highly hardened layer than the conventional alloys.

  8. Plasma etch characteristics of aluminum nitride mask layers grown by low-temperature plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition in SF{sub 6} based plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Perros, Alexander; Bosund, Markus; Sajavaara, Timo; Laitinen, Mikko; Sainiemi, Lauri; Huhtio, Teppo; Lipsanen, Harri

    2012-01-15

    The plasma etch characteristics of aluminum nitride (AlN) deposited by low-temperature, 200 deg. C, plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) was investigated for reactive ion etch (RIE) and inductively coupled plasma-reactive ion etch (ICP-RIE) systems using various mixtures of SF{sub 6} and O{sub 2} under different etch conditions. During RIE, the film exhibits good mask properties with etch rates below 10r nm/min. For ICP-RIE processes, the film exhibits exceptionally low etch rates in the subnanometer region with lower platen power. The AlN film's removal occurred through physical mechanisms; consequently, rf power and chamber pressure were the most significant parameters in PEALD AlN film removal because the film was inert to the SF{sub x}{sup +} and O{sup +} chemistries. The etch experiments showed the film to be a resilient masking material. This makes it an attractive candidate for use as an etch mask in demanding SF{sub 6} based plasma etch applications, such as through-wafer etching, or when oxide films are not suitable.

  9. Modeling of Micro- and Nanoparticle Characteristics in DC Suspension Plasma Spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Xue-ming; Zhang, Kai; Xiong, Hong-bing

    2015-02-01

    Suspension plasma spray is a promising technology for surface coatings. In this work, a comprehensive numerical model was developed to investigate the multiphase flow of suspension droplets and nanoparticles in direct-current (DC) plasma spraying. A three-dimensional computational model was developed to describe the plasma jet flow fields coupled with the axial injection of suspension droplets in which the zirconia micro- and nanoparticles were dispersed. The suspension droplets were tracked using Lagrangian coordinates, considering particle heating, melting, and evaporation. After evaporation of the solvent surrounding the particle, the nanoparticles were discharged into the plasma flow. In addition to the viscous force exerted by the flow on the micrometer-sized particles, the Brownian force and the Saffman lift force were taken into account. The effects of the noncontinuum on particle momentum transfer and evaporation on heat transfer were also considered. The numerical predictions of gas flow temperature were compared with experimental data and numerical data obtained with a different computational fluid dynamics code. The agreement was reasonable. The trajectories, velocity, and temperature of nanoparticles were calculated, and compared with those of microparticles. The results showed that the Brownian force plays a major role in acceleration and heating of nanoparticles. Compared with the conventional plasma spray process with micrometer-sized feedstock, the nanoparticles in suspension plasma spraying were found to have a wider spatial distribution and higher temperature. The effects of operating parameters, such as the power input to the plasma gas and plasma gas composition, on the gas velocity and temperature were investigated. The parameters that have a significant effect on the heat and momentum transfer to the particles injected in the plasma jet were identified.

  10. Effects of post-deposition argon implantation on the memory properties of plasma-deposited silicon nitride films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shams, Q. A.; Brown, W. D.

    1989-10-01

    Post-deposition ion implantation has been used to introduce argon into plasma-enhanced chemically vapor deposited silicon nitride films in an attempt to influence the transfer, trapping, and emission of charge during write/erase exercising of the metal-silicon nitride-silicon oxide-silicon structure. Argon was implanted into the SiH4 -NH3 -N2 deposited films at energies ranging from 25 to 75 keV, current densities ranging from 0.1 to 75 μA/cm2 and fluences ranging from 1×1012 to 1×1016 ions/cm2. Physical properties of the films were studied by ellipsometry and infrared spectroscopy, while high frequency capacitance-voltage (C-V) curves were used to obtain programming, retention, and endurance characteristics.

  11. Effects of Gas Flow Rate on the Discharge Characteristics of a DC Excited Plasma Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xuechen; Jia, Pengying; Di, Cong; Bao, Wenting; Zhang, Chunyan

    2015-09-01

    A direct current (DC) source excited plasma jet consisting of a hollow needle anode and a plate cathode has been developed to form a diffuse discharge plume in ambient air with flowing argon as the working gas. Using optical and electrical methods, the discharge characteristics are investigated for the diffuse plasma plume. Results indicate that the discharge has a pulse characteristic, under the excitation of a DC voltage. The discharge pulse corresponds to the propagation process of a plasma bullet travelling from the anode to the cathode. It is found that, with an increment of the gas flow rate, both the discharge plume length and the current peak value of the pulsed discharge decrease in the laminar flow mode, reach their minima at about 1.5 L/min, and then slightly increase in the turbulent mode. However, the frequency of the pulsed discharge increases in the laminar mode with increasing the argon flow rate until the argon flow rate equals to about 1.5 L/min, and then slightly decreases in the turbulent mode. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 10805013, 11375051), Funds for Distinguished Young Scientists of Hebei Province, China (No. A2012201045), Department of Education for Outstanding Youth Project of China (No. Y2011120), and Youth Project of Hebei University of China (No. 2011Q14)

  12. Aerosynthesis: Growths of Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanofibers with Air DC Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kodumagulla, A; Varanasi, V; Pearce, Ryan; Wu, W-C; Hensley, Dale K; Tracy, Joseph B; McKnight, Timothy E; Melechko, Anatoli

    2014-01-01

    Vertically aligned carbon nanofibers (VACNF) have been synthesized in a mixture of acetone and air using catalytic DC plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Typically, ammonia or hydrogen is used as etchant gas in the mixture to remove carbon that otherwise passivates the catalyst surface and impedes growth. Our demonstration of using air as the etchant gas opens up a possibility that ion etching could be sufficient to maintain the catalytic activity state during synthesis. It also demonstrates the path toward growing VACNFs in open atmosphere.

  13. Microcathode Sustained Discharges for the generation of DC, non-thermal plasmas at high gas pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitchford, Leanne

    2007-10-01

    It is now well known that non-thermal DC plasmas can be generated and maintained in high pressure gases in small - hundreds of micron-sized - geometries. One such configuration, a MicroHollow Cathode Discharge (MHCD), orginally investigated by Schoenbach and colleagues (KH Schoenbach, et al, Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 6, 468 (1997)), consists of a metal/dielectric/metal sandwich through through which a central hole is pierced. The diameter of the hole and the thickness of the sandwich are each some 100's of microns. Larger volume plasmas can be generated by placing a third, positively biased electrode some distance (1 cm) away, in which case the MHCD can act as a plasma cathode. This configuration is called a MicroCathode Sustained Discharge or MCSD (RH Stark and KH Schoenbach J. Appl. Phys. 85 2075 (1999)). This talk will focus on the properties of the MCSD - its initiation and its electrical properties - and on the properties of the plasma generated in the MCSD volume. Experimental and numerical results for discharges in rare gases and in rare gas/oxygen mixtures at pressures up to atmospheric will be used to illustrate that the plasma generated in the MCSD is similar to a positive column plasma, with a low electric field and low to moderate gas temperature. The plasma conditions in the MCSD are suitable for the generation of large densities of radical species, such as oxygen molecules in the singlet delta metastable state (G. Bauville, et al, Appl. Phys. Lett. 90, 031501 (2007)).

  14. Study on effect of plasma surface treatments for diamond deposition by DC arc plasmatron.

    PubMed

    Kang, In-Je; Joa, Sang-Beom; Lee, Heon-Ju

    2013-11-01

    To improve the thermal conductivity and wear resistance of ceramic materials in the field of renewable energy technologies, diamond coating by plasma processing has been carried out in recent years. This study's goal is to improve diamond deposition on Al2O3 ceramic substrates by plasma surface treatments. Before diamond deposition was carried out in a vacuum, plasma surface treatments using Ar gas were conducted to improve conditions for deposition. We also conducted plasma processing for diamond deposition on Al2O3 ceramic substrates using a DC arc Plasmatron. The Al2O3 ceramic substrates with diamond film (5 x 15 mm2), were investigated by SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy), AFM (Atomic Force Microscopy) and XRD (X-ray Diffractometer). Then, the C-H stretching of synthetic diamond films by FTIR (Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy) was studied. We identified nanocrystalline diamond films on the Al2O3 ceramic substrates. The results showed us that the deposition rate of diamond films was 2.3 microm/h after plasma surface treatments. Comparing the above result with untreated ceramic substrates, the deposition rate improved with the surface roughness of the deposited diamond films.

  15. Influence of injected silver content on synthesis of silver coated nickel particles by DC thermal plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Si Taek; Kim, Tae-Hee; Park, Dong-Wha

    2016-06-01

    Silver nanoparticle-coated spherical nickel particles were prepared from a mixture of micro-sized silver and nickel as raw materials by DC thermal plasma treatment. The mixture of micro-sized silver and nickel powders was injected into the high-temperature region of an argon thermal plasma jet. Although the silver, with its very high thermal conductivity and relatively low boiling point, was thoroughly evaporated by this process, nickel was not evaporated perfectly because of its comparatively low thermal conductivity and high boiling point. The rough nickel powder was spheroidized as it melted. Finally, silver evaporated by the thermal plasma quickly condensed into nanoparticles on the surfaces of the micro-sized spherical nickel particles, aided by the sharp temperature gradient of the thermal plasma jet. With varying the ratios of silver to nickel feedstock from 1:10 to 5:1, the products synthesized in each condition were examined by XRD, XPS, FE-SEM, and FE-TEM. More silver nanoparticles were attached on the nickel by increasing the injected feedstock to 9.8 at% silver. Meanwhile, a decrease of silver in the products was observed when larger amounts of silver were introduced to the thermal plasma jet. The exposed silver components decreased with greater proportions of silver feedstock because of the metal's dendritic structure and the formation of silver-coated silver particles.

  16. Study on effect of plasma surface treatments for diamond deposition by DC arc plasmatron.

    PubMed

    Kang, In-Je; Joa, Sang-Beom; Lee, Heon-Ju

    2013-11-01

    To improve the thermal conductivity and wear resistance of ceramic materials in the field of renewable energy technologies, diamond coating by plasma processing has been carried out in recent years. This study's goal is to improve diamond deposition on Al2O3 ceramic substrates by plasma surface treatments. Before diamond deposition was carried out in a vacuum, plasma surface treatments using Ar gas were conducted to improve conditions for deposition. We also conducted plasma processing for diamond deposition on Al2O3 ceramic substrates using a DC arc Plasmatron. The Al2O3 ceramic substrates with diamond film (5 x 15 mm2), were investigated by SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy), AFM (Atomic Force Microscopy) and XRD (X-ray Diffractometer). Then, the C-H stretching of synthetic diamond films by FTIR (Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy) was studied. We identified nanocrystalline diamond films on the Al2O3 ceramic substrates. The results showed us that the deposition rate of diamond films was 2.3 microm/h after plasma surface treatments. Comparing the above result with untreated ceramic substrates, the deposition rate improved with the surface roughness of the deposited diamond films. PMID:24245257

  17. Structural and Dynamical Properties of Microrod Dusty Plasma in a Uniform DC Discharge under Microgravity

    SciTech Connect

    Usachev, Alexander; Zobnin, Andrey; Petrov, Oleg; Fortov, Vladimir

    2008-09-07

    In present experiment an ordering and dynamics of monodisperse nylon rods (D = 10 {mu}m, L = 300 {mu}m) in a uniform DC gas discharge plasma under microgravity have been investigated. Ordered rod structures were registered in DC discharge with a rod concentration of 400-8000 cm{sup -3} and a neon pressure range of 20-50 Pa. The structures revealed orientationally ordered hexagonal structures. DC discharge became unstable at rod number density more then 8000 cm{sup -3}. Rod drift velocities in a permanent electric field were measured for the neon pressure range. Dust acoustic instability ({nu}{approx}0.4{+-}0.1 Hz, {lambda}{approx}1.1{+-}0.4 cm, C{sub DAW}{approx}0.5 cm/s) in rod cloud was observed at a neon pressure of 25 Pa and a rod number density of 1500 cm{sup -3}. Using the 'low' frequency approximation of the linearized DAW dispersion relation and the measured rod drift velocity a rod electric charge had been estimated as Z{sub R}{approx}150000e.

  18. Pearl-necklace-like structures of microparticle strings observed in a dc complex plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fink, M. A.; Zhdanov, S. K.; Thoma, M. H.; Höfner, H.; Morfill, G. E.

    2012-12-01

    The observation of a well-developed treelike string structure supported by a gas flow in a three-dimensional dc complex plasma is presented. The dynamically stable strings, comprising 10-20 particles, were up to 5 mm long. The experiments were performed using neon gas at a pressure of 100 Pa and melamine-formaldehyde particles with a diameter of 3.43 μm. Inside the discharge glass tube a nozzle had been built in to supply the controllable gas (plasma) flux intensity distribution along the tube. The walls of the nozzle were transparent for the laser light illuminating the particles. That gave the opportunity to closely study the particle dynamics deep inside the nozzle.

  19. Desorption behavior of zinc atoms from zinc-sulfate solution irradiated with pulsed DC plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takaba, Takafumi; Suzuki, Haruka; Toyoda, Hirotaka

    2016-07-01

    A DC pulsed plasma ignited between a metal needle and zinc sulfate (ZnSO4) solution electrode was used to investigate Zn metal desorption from an electrolyte solution. Using an ICCD camera and optical band-pass filter, 2D atomic absorption spectroscopy was carried out during irradiation of pulsed plasma to the surface of the solution. The time-resolved measurement of Zn atoms released to the gas phase revealed that the Zn desorption rate monotonically increased with increasing number of discharge repetitions. The surface temperature of the electrolyte solution was observed with a thermographic camera, and correlations between the H2O and Zn desorption rate were inspected. The correlation between the H2O and Zn desorption rate suggested that Zn desorption is assisted not only by the electric field of the discharge but also by H2O evaporating from the solution.

  20. Growth of aligned carbon nanotubes on carbon microfibers by dc plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, L H.; AuBuchon, J F.; Chen, I C.; Daraio, C; Ye, X R.; Gapin, A; Jin, Sungho; Wang, Chong M.

    2006-01-16

    It is shown that unidirectionally aligned carbon nanotubes can be grown on electrically conductive network of carbon microfibers via control of buffer layer material and applied electric field during dc plasma chemical vapor deposition growth. Ni catalyst deposition on carbon microfiber produces relatively poorly aligned nanotubes with significantly varying diameters and lengths obtained. The insertion of Ti 5 nm thick underlayer between Ni catalyst layer and C microfiber substrate significantly alters the morphology of nanotubes, resulting in much better aligned, finer diameter, and longer array of nanotubes. This beneficial effect is attributed to the reduced reaction between Ni and carbon paper, as well as prevention of plasma etching of carbon paper by inserting a Ti buffer layer. Such a unidirectionally aligned nanotube structure on an open-pore conductive substrate structure may conveniently be utilized as a high-surface-area base electrodes for fuel cells, batteries, and other electrochemical and catalytic reactions.

  1. Inertization of heavy metals present in galvanic sludge by DC thermal plasma.

    PubMed

    Leal Vieira Cubas, Anelise; de Medeiros Machado, Marília; de Medeiros Machado, Marina; Gross, Frederico; Magnago, Rachel Faverzani; Moecke, Elisa Helena Siegel; Gonçalvez de Souza, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Galvanic sludge results from the treatment of effluents generated by the industrial metal surface treatment of industrial material, which consists in the deposition of a metal on a surface or a metal surface attack, for example, electrodeposition of conductors (metals) and non conductive, phosphate, anodizing, oxidation and/or printed circuit. The treatment proposed here is exposure of the galvanic sludge to the high temperatures provided by thermal plasma, a process which aims to vitrify the galvanic sludge and render metals (iron, zinc, and chromium) inert. Two different plasma reactors were assembled: with a DC transferred arc plasma torch and with a DC nontransferred arc plasma torch. In this way it was possible to verify which reactor was more efficient in the inertization of the metals and also to investigate whether the addition of quartzite sand to the sludge influences the vitrification of the material. Quantification of water content and density of the galvanic raw sludge were performed, as well as analyzes of total organic carbon (TOC) and identify the elements that make up the raw sludge through spectroscopy X-ray fluorescence (XRF). The chemical composition and the form of the pyrolyzed and vitrified sludge were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer (SEM-EDS) analysis, which it is a analysis that shows the chemical of the sample surface. The inertization of the sludge was verified in leaching tests, where the leachate was analyzed by flame atomic absorption spectroscopy (FAAS). The results of water content and density were 64.35% and 2.994 g.cm(-3), respectively. The TOC analysis determined 1.73% of C in the sample of galvanic raw sludge, and XRF analysis determined the most stable elements in the sample, and showed the highest peaks (higher stability) were Fe, Zn, and Cr. The efficiency of the sludge inertization was 100% for chromium, 99% for zinc, and 100% for iron. The results also showed that the most

  2. DC Electric Fields, Associated Plasma Drifts, and Irregularities Observed on the C/NOFS Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfaff, R.; Freudenreich, H.; Klenzing, J.

    2011-01-01

    Results are presented from the Vector Electric Field Investigation (VEFI) on the Air Force Communication/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) satellite, a mission designed to understand, model, and forecast the presence of equatorial ionospheric irregularities. The VEFI instrument includes a vector DC electric field detector, a fixed-bias Langmuir probe operating in the ion saturation regime, a flux gate magnetometer, an optical lightning detector, and associated electronics including a burst memory. Compared to data obtained during more active solar conditions, the ambient DC electric fields and their associated E x B drifts are variable and somewhat weak, typically < 1 mV/m. Although average drift directions show similarities to those previously reported, eastward/outward during day and westward/downward at night, this pattern varies significantly with longitude and is not always present. Daytime vertical drifts near the magnetic equator are largest after sunrise, with smaller average velocities after noon. Little or no pre-reversal enhancement in the vertical drift near sunset is observed, attributable to the solar minimum conditions creating a much reduced neutral dynamo at the satellite altitude. The nighttime ionosphere is characterized by larger amplitude, structured electric fields, even where the plasma density appears nearly quiescent. Data from successive orbits reveal that the vertical drifts and plasma density are both clearly organized with longitude. The spread-F density depletions and corresponding electric fields that have been detected thus far have displayed a preponderance to appear between midnight and dawn. Associated with the narrow plasma depletions that are detected are broad spectra of electric field and plasma density irregularities for which a full vector set of measurements is available for detailed study. The VEFI data represents a new set of measurements that are germane to numerous fundamental aspects of the electrodynamics

  3. Structured DC Electric Fields With and Without Associated Plasma Density Gradients Observed with the C/NOFS Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfaff, R.; Rowland, D.; Klenzing, J.; Freudenreich, H.; Bromund, K.; Liebrecht, C.; Roddy, P.; Hunton, D.

    2009-01-01

    DC electric field observations and associated plasma drifts gathered with the Vector Electric Field Investigation on the Air Force Communication/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) satellite typically reveal considerable variation at large scales (approximately 100's of km), in both daytime and nighttime cases, with enhanced structures usually confined to the nightside. Although such electric field structures are typically associated with plasma density depletions and structures, as observed by the Planar Langmuir Probe on C/NOFS, what is surprising is the number of cases in which large amplitude, structured DC electric fields are observed without a significant plasma density counterpart structure, including their appearance at times when the ambient plasma density appears relatively quiescent. We investigate the relationship of such structured DC electric fields and the ambient plasma density in the C/NOFS satellite measurements observed thus far, taking into account both plasma density depletions and enhancements. We investigate the mapping of the electric fields along magnetic field lines from distant altitudes and latitudes to locations where the density structures, which presumably formed the original seat of the electric fields, are no longer discernible in the observations. In some cases, the electric field structures and spectral characteristics appear to mimic those associated with equatorial spread-F processes, providing important clues to their origins. We examine altitude, seasonal, and longitudinal effects in an effort to establish the origin of such structured DC electric fields observed both with, and without, associated plasma density gradients

  4. Arc-Cathode Coupling in the Modeling of a Conventional DC Plasma Spray Torch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaya, M.; Chazelas, C.; Mariaux, G.; Vardelle, A.

    2015-01-01

    The plasma torch is the basis of the plasma spray process and understanding of the electric arc dynamics within the plasma torch is necessary for better control of torch and process instabilities. Numerical simulation is a useful tool for investigating the effect of the torch geometry and operating parameters on the electric arc characteristics provided that the model of arc dynamics is reliable and the boundary conditions of the computational domain are well founded. However, such a model should also address the intricate transient and 3D interactions between the electrically conducting fluid and electromagnetic, thermal, and acoustics phenomena. Especially, the description of the electrode regions where the electric arc connects with solid material is an important part of a realistic model of the plasma torch operation as the properties of electric arcs at atmospheric pressure depend not only on the arc plasma medium, but also on the electrodes. This paper describes the 3D and time-dependent numerical simulation of a plasma arc and is focused on the cathode boundary conditions. This model was used to investigate the differences in arc characteristics when the cathode is included into the numerical domain and coupled with the arc. The magnetic and thermal coupling between the cathode and arc made it possible to get rid of the current density boundary condition at the cathode tip that is delicate to predetermine. It also allowed a better prediction of the cathode flow jet generated by the pumping action induced by the interaction of the self-magnetic field with the electric current and so it allowed a better description of the dynamics of arc. It should be a necessary step in the development of a fully predictive model of DC plasma torch operation.

  5. Effect of deposition parameters on structural and mechanical properties of niobium nitride synthesized by plasma focus device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddiqui, Jamil; Hussain, Tousif; Ahmad, Riaz; Khalid, Nida

    2015-06-01

    Effects of deposition angle and axial distance on the structural and mechanical properties of niobium nitride synthesized by a dense plasma focus (DPF) system are studied. The x-ray diffraction (XRD) confirms that the deposition parameters affect the growth of multi-phase niobium nitride. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) shows the granular surface morphology with strong thermally assisted coagulation effects observed at the 5-cm axial distance. The non-porous granular morphology observed at the 9-cm distance along the anode axis is different from those observed at deposition angles of 10° and 20°. Energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) spectroscopy reveals the maximum nitrogen content at the shortest (5 cm) axial position. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) exhibits that the roughness of coated films varies for coatings synthesized at different axial and angular positions, and the Vickers micro-hardness test shows that a maximum hardness value is (08.44 ± 0.01) GPa for niobium nitride synthesized at 5-cm axial distance, which is about 500% more than that of a virgin sample. Project supported by the HEC, Pakistan.

  6. Deposition of magnesium nitride thin films on stainless steel-304 substrates by using a plasma focus device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramezani, Amir Hoshang; Habibi, Maryam; Ghoranneviss, Mahmood

    2014-08-01

    In this research, for the first time, we synthesize magnesium nitride thin films on 304-type stainless steel substrates using a Mather-type (2 kJ) plasma focus (PF) device. The films of magnesium nitride are coated with different number of focus shots (like 15, 25 and 35) at a distance of 8 cm from the anode tip and at 0° angular position with respect to the anode axis. For investigation of the structural properties and surface morphology of magnesium nitride films, we utilized the X-ray diffractometer (XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis, respectively. Also, the elemental composition is characterized by energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis. Furthermore, Vicker's microhardness is used to study the mechanical properties of the deposited films. The results show that the degree of crystallinity of deposited thin films (from XRD), the average size of particles and surface roughness (from AFM), crystalline growth of structures (from SEM) and the hardness values of the films depend on the number of focus shots. The EDX analysis demonstrates the existence of the elemental composition of magnesium in the deposited samples.

  7. Production of geopolymers using glass produced from DC plasma treatment of air pollution control (APC) residues.

    PubMed

    Kourti, Ioanna; Rani, D Amutha; Deegan, D; Boccaccini, A R; Cheeseman, C R

    2010-04-15

    Air pollution control (APC) residues are the hazardous waste produced from cleaning gaseous emissions at energy-from-waste (EfW) facilities processing municipal solid waste (MSW). APC residues have been blended with glass-forming additives and treated using DC plasma technology to produce a high calcium alumino-silicate glass. This research has investigated the optimisation and properties of geopolymers prepared from this glass. Work has shown that high strength geopolymers can be formed and that the NaOH concentration of the activating solution significantly affects the properties. The broad particle size distribution of the APC residue glass used in these experiments results in a microstructure that contains unreacted glass particles included within a geopolymer binder phase. The high calcium content of APC residues may cause the formation of some amorphous calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) gel. A mix prepared with S/L=3.4, Si/Al=2.6 and [NaOH]=6M in the activating solution, produced high strength geopolymers with compressive strengths of approximately 130 MPa. This material had high density (2070 kg/m(3)) and low porosity. The research demonstrates for the first time that glass derived from DC plasma treatment of APC residues can be used to form high strength geopolymer-glass composites that have potential for use in a range of applications.

  8. Role of GaAs surface clearing in plasma deposition of silicon nitride films for encapsulated annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Valco, G.J.; Kapoor, V.J.

    1985-06-01

    The role of GaAs surface cleaning and plasma reactor cleaning prior to deposition of silicon nitride films for encapsulated annealing has been investigated. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was employed to determine the surface characteristics of GaAs treated with HCl, HF, and NH4OH solutions preceded by a degreasing procedure. The HCl clean left the least amount of oxygen on the surface. Fluorine contamination resulting from the CF4 plasma used to clean the reactor was found to be located at the film-substrate interface by Auger electron spectroscopy with argon-ion sputtering. A modified deposition procedure was developed to eliminate the fluorine contamination. Plasma deposition of silicon nitride encapsulating films was found to modify the I-V characteristics of Schottky diodes subsequently formed on GaAs surface. The reverse current of the diodes was slightly reduced. Substrates implanted with Si at 100 keV and a dose of 5 x 10 to the 12th/sq cm showed a peak electron concentration of 1.7 x 10 to the 17th/cu cm at a depth of 0.1-micron with 60 percent activation after encapsulation and annealing at 800 C for 7 min. 9 references.

  9. Plasma parameters of pulsed-dc discharges in methane used to deposit diamondlike carbon films

    SciTech Connect

    Corbella, C.; Rubio-Roy, M.; Bertran, E.; Andujar, J. L.

    2009-08-01

    Here we approximate the plasma kinetics responsible for diamondlike carbon (DLC) depositions that result from pulsed-dc discharges. The DLC films were deposited at room temperature by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) in a methane (CH{sub 4}) atmosphere at 10 Pa. We compared the plasma characteristics of asymmetric bipolar pulsed-dc discharges at 100 kHz to those produced by a radio frequency (rf) source. The electrical discharges were monitored by a computer-controlled Langmuir probe operating in time-resolved mode. The acquisition system provided the intensity-voltage (I-V) characteristics with a time resolution of 1 mus. This facilitated the discussion of the variation in plasma parameters within a pulse cycle as a function of the pulse waveform and the peak voltage. The electron distribution was clearly divided into high- and low-energy Maxwellian populations of electrons (a bi-Maxwellian population) at the beginning of the negative voltage region of the pulse. We ascribe this to intense stochastic heating due to the rapid advancing of the sheath edge. The hot population had an electron temperature T{sub e}{sup hot} of over 10 eV and an initial low density n{sub e}{sup hot} which decreased to zero. Cold electrons of temperature T{sub e}{sup cold}approx1 eV represented the majority of each discharge. The density of cold electrons n{sub e}{sup cold} showed a monotonic increase over time within the negative pulse, peaking at almost 7x10{sup 10} cm{sup -3}, corresponding to the cooling of the hot electrons. The plasma potential V{sub p} of approx30 V underwent a smooth increase during the pulse and fell at the end of the negative region. Different rates of CH{sub 4} conversion were calculated from the DLC deposition rate. These were explained in terms of the specific activation energy E{sub a} and the conversion factor x{sub dep} associated with the plasma processes. The work deepens our understanding of the advantages of using pulsed power supplies

  10. Hydrogenation of defects in edge-defined film-fed grown aluminum-enhanced plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposited silicon nitride multicrystalline silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Ji-Weon; Rosenblum, Mark D.; Kalejs, Juris P.; Rohatgi, Ajeet

    2000-05-01

    Gettering of impurities and hydrogen passivation of defects in edge-defined film-fed grown (EFG) multicrystalline silicon were studied by low-cost manufacturable technologies such as emitter diffusion by a spin-on phosphorus dopant source, back surface field formation by screen-printed aluminum, and a post-deposition anneal of plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposited (PECVD) silicon nitride antireflection coating. These processes were carried out in a high-throughput lamp-heated conveyor belt furnace. PECVD silicon nitride-induced hydrogenation of defects in EFG silicon was studied in conjunction with screen-printed aluminum back surface field formation to investigate the synergistic effect of aluminum gettering and silicon nitride hydrogenation of bulk defects. It was found that post-deposition anneal of PECVD silicon nitride at temperatures ranging from 450 to 850 °C, without the coformation of aluminum back surface field on the back, does not provide appreciable passivation or hydrogenation of bulk defects in EFG material. However, simultaneous anneal of PECVD silicon nitride and formation of aluminum back surface field at 850 °C significantly enhanced the hydrogenation ability of the PECVD silicon nitride film. PECVD silicon nitride deposition and a subsequent anneal, after the aluminum back surface field formation, was found to be less effective in passivating bulk defects. It is proposed that aluminum-enhanced hydrogenation from a PECVD silicon nitride film is the result of vacancy generation at the aluminum-silicon interface due to the alloying process. The affinity of hydrogen to react with vacancies provides a chemical potential gradient that increases the flux of atomic hydrogen from the silicon nitride film into the bulk silicon. In addition, vacancies can dissociate hydrogen molecules, increasing the atomic hydrogen content of the bulk silicon. This enhances defect passivation and improves the minority carrier lifetime.

  11. I. Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition of Main Group Nitride Thin Films, and II. Synthesis of Niobium Amido Complexes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangarajan, Sri Prakash

    I. Main group nitride films were deposited at low substrate temperatures (<400 ^circC) by using plasma activated ammonia and the amido complexes, M(NMe_2)_4 (M = Si, Ge and Sn) and rm M_2(NMe _2)_6(M = Al, Ga) as precursors. In addition, tin, aluminum and gallium nitride films were thermally deposited from the amides and ammonia for comparison with the plasma deposited materials. The films were nearly stoichiometric with low carbon and oxygen contamination as determined by backscattering spectrometry. The growth rates of the group 14 nitrides increased going down the column, consistent with an associative mechanism involving the plasma-activated NH_3 and the amido complex. Elastic recoil detection measurements indicated that the films had hydrogen contents comparable to those reported for films deposited by other deposition techniques. Transmittance measurements indicated that all the films are highly transparent in the visible and near infrared regions. The silicon, germanium and aluminum nitride films displayed promising barrier properties in Au/MN_{x}/Si metallization schemes. II. The syntheses and characterization of several niobium(IV) amido complexes and their derivatives are reported. Reactions of rm NbX_4(thf)_2(X = Cl, Br) with LiN(SiMe_3)_2 gave Nb(N(SiMe_3)_2)_2Cl _2 and Nb(N(SiMe_3) _2)_2Br_2 in moderate yields. Nb(NPh _2)_4 was synthesized in 63% yield by the reaction of NbCl_4(thf) _2 with four equiv of LiNPh_2. . The reaction of one equivalent of ZnPh _2 with Nb(N(SiMe_3) _2)_2Cl_2 gave Nb(N(SiMe _3)_2)_2PhCl and in one case a mixture of Nb(N(SiMe_3)_2)_2 PhCl and Nb(N(SiMe_3)_2) _2Ph_2. Cp_2NbN(SiMe_3)SiMe _2CH_2, a metallacycle with a four membered planar ring, was prepared by reacting Nb(N(SiMe _3)_2)_2Cl_2 with two equiv of ZnCp_2.. X-ray crystallographic studies were carried out for Nb(NPh_2)_4, Nb(N(SiMe _3)_2)_2Br_2, Nb(N(SiMe _3)_2)_2PhCl and Nb(N(SiMe _3)_2)_2Ph_2. All have highly distorted tetrahedral geometries. The distortions usually are

  12. Geopolymers prepared from DC plasma treated air pollution control (APC) residues glass: properties and characterisation of the binder phase.

    PubMed

    Kourti, Ioanna; Devaraj, Amutha Rani; Bustos, Ana Guerrero; Deegan, David; Boccaccini, Aldo R; Cheeseman, Christopher R

    2011-11-30

    Air pollution control (APC) residues have been blended with glass-forming additives and treated using DC plasma technology to produce a high calcium aluminosilicate glass (APC glass). This has been used to form geopolymer-glass composites that exhibit high strength and density, low porosity, low water absorption, low leaching and high acid resistance. The composites have a microstructure consisting of un-reacted residual APC glass particles imbedded in a complex geopolymer and C-S-H gel binder phase, and behave as particle reinforced composites. The work demonstrates that materials prepared from DC plasma treated APC residues have potential to be used to form high quality pre-cast products.

  13. Influence of a transverse magnetic field on arc root movements in a dc plasma torch: Diamagnetic effect of arc column

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Keun Su

    2009-03-23

    The effect of a transverse magnetic field on the anodic arc root movement inside a dc plasma torch has been investigated. The arc voltage fluctuation, which represents the degree of the arc instability, was reduced to 28.6% of the original value and the high frequency components in the voltage signal also decreased in their magnitudes. The inherent arc instability in a dc thermal plasma torch seems to be suppressed by a diamagnetic effect of the arc column. Furthermore, the measured voltage wave forms indicated that the arc root attachment mode would be controllable by a transverse magnetic field.

  14. Synthesis of aluminum nitride powders from a plasma-assisted ball milled precursor through carbothermal reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Zhi-jie; Dai, Le-yang; Yang, De-zheng; Wang, Sen; Zhang, Bao-jian; Wang, Wen-chun; Cheng, Tie-han

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • A novel and high efficiency synthesizing AlN powders method combining mechanical ball milling and DBDP has been developed. • The particle size, the crystallite size, the lattice distortion, the morphology of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} powders, and the AlN conversion rate are investigated and compared under the ball milled Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} powders with DBDP and without DBDP. • The ball milled Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} powders with DBDP have small spherical structure morphology with very fine particles size and high specific surface area, which result in a higher chemical efficiency and a higher AlN conversion rate at lower thermal temperature. - Abstract: In this paper, aluminum nitride (AlN) powers have been produced with a novel and high efficiency method by thermal annealing at 1100–1600 °C of alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) powders which were previously ball milled for various time up to 40 h with and without the assistant of dielectric barrier discharge plasma (DBDP). The ball milled Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} powders with DBDP and without DBDP and the corresponding synthesized AlN powers are characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope, and transmission electron microscopy. From the characteristics of the ball milled Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} powders with DBDP and without DBDP, it can be seen that the ball milled Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} powders with DBDP have small spherical structure morphology with very fine particles size and high specific surface area, which result in a higher chemical efficiency and a higher AlN conversion rate at lower thermal temperature. Meanwhile, the synthesized AlN powders can be known as hexagonal AlN with fine crystal morphology and irregular lump-like structure, and have uniform distribution with the average particle size of about between 500 nm and 1000 nm. This provides an important method for fabricating ultra fine powders and synthesizing nitrogen compounds.

  15. Excitation wavelength dependence of water-window line emissions from boron-nitride laser-produced plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Crank, M.; Harilal, S. S.; Hassan, S. M.; Hassanein, A.

    2012-02-01

    We investigated the effects of laser excitation wavelength on water-window emission lines of laser-produced boron-nitride plasmas. Plasmas are produced by focusing 1064 nm and harmonically generated 532 and 266 nm radiation from a Nd:YAG laser on BN target in vacuum. Soft x-ray emission lines in the water-window region are recorded using a grazing-incidence spectrograph. Filtered photodiodes are used to obtain complementary data for water-window emission intensity and angular dependence. Spectral emission intensity changes in nitrogen Ly-{alpha} and He-{alpha} are used to show how laser wavelength affects emission. Our results show that the relative intensity of spectral lines is laser wavelength dependent, with the ratio of Ly-{alpha} to He-{alpha} emission intensity decreasing as laser wavelength is shortened. Filtered photodiode measurements of angular dependence showed that 266 and 532 nm laser wavelengths produce uniform emission.

  16. Characterization of Damage of Al2O3/Ge Gate Stack Structure Induced with Light Radiation during Plasma Nitridation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusumandari; Takeuchi, Wakana; Kato, Kimihiko; Shibayama, Shigehisa; Sakashita, Mitsuo; Nakatsuka, Osamu; Zaima, Shigeaki

    2012-01-01

    We have investigated the effects of light radiation during plasma nitridation on the electrical properties of an Al2O3/Ge gate stack structure using the pallet for plasma evaluation (PAPE) technique. From the capacitance-voltage characteristics, the flatband voltage shift due to fixed oxide charges significantly increases after light exposure with an energy higher than 7.5 eV. In addition, the density of trapped charges near the interface and the interface state density (Dit) also significantly increase after light exposure with an energy over 11.3 eV. The net density of positive fixed oxide charges, the density of trapped charges near the interface, and Dit can be reduced by post-metallization annealing (PMA) in N2 ambient at 300 °C.

  17. Effect of plasma parameters on characteristics of silicon nitride film deposited by single and dual frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, B. B.; Yin, Yongyi; Han, Jeon G.

    2016-03-01

    This work investigates the deposition of hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride films using various low-temperature plasmas. Utilizing radio-frequency (RF, 13.56 MHz) and ultra-high frequency (UHF, 320 MHz) powers, different plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition processes are conducted in the mixture of reactive N2/NH3/SiH4 gases. The processes are extensively characterized using different plasma diagnostic tools to study their plasma and radical generation capabilities. A typical transition of the electron energy distribution function from single- to bi-Maxwellian type is achieved by combining RF and ultra-high powers. Data analysis revealed that the RF/UHF dual frequency power enhances the plasma surface heating and produces hot electron population with relatively low electron temperature and high plasma density. Using various film analysis methods, we have investigated the role of plasma parameters on the compositional, structural, and optical properties of the deposited films to optimize the process conditions. The presented results show that the dual frequency power is effective for enhancing dissociation and ionization of neutrals, which in turn helps in enabling high deposition rate and improving film properties.

  18. Stress-controlled silicon nitride film with high optical transmittance prepared by an ultrahigh-vacuum electron cyclotron resonance plasma chemical-vapor deposition system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Jinho; Suzuki, Katsumi

    1994-06-01

    An ultrahigh-vaccuum electron cyclotron resonance plasma chemical-vapor deposition system with a substrate heating component has been applied to deposit silicon nitride film. Low background pressure (˜5×10-9 Torr) and efficient plasma excitation at a low deposition pressure (<10-3 Torr) result in a low oxygen impurity content in the silicon nitride film. Process flexibility of this system, i.e., control of the SiH4 to NH3 flow ratio, deposition pressure, and substrate temperature, allows the deposition of near-stoichiometry silicon nitride film with a high optical transmittance as well as a suppressed amount of hydrogen impurity and a low film stress.

  19. Synthesis of nanowires and nanoparticles of cubic aluminium nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramanian, C.; Godbole, V. P.; Rohatgi, V. K.; Das, A. K.; Bhoraskar, S. V.

    2004-03-01

    Nanostructures of cubic aluminium nitride were synthesized by DC arc-plasma-induced melting of aluminium in a nitrogen-argon ambient. The material flux ejected from the molten aluminium surface was found to react with nitrogen under highly non-equilibrium conditions and subsequently condense on a water-cooled surface to yield a mixture of nanowires and nanoparticles of crystalline cubic aluminium nitride. Both x-ray diffraction and electron diffraction measurements revealed that the as-synthesized nitrides adopted the cubic phase. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was used to understand the bonding configuration. Microstructural features of the synthesized material were best studied by transmission electron microscopy. From these analyses cubic aluminium nitride was found to be the dominating phase for both nanowires and nanoparticles synthesized at low currents. The typical particle size distribution was found to range over 15-80 nm, whereas the wires varied from 30 to 100 nm in diameter and 500 to 700 nm in length, depending upon the process parameters such as arc current and the nitrogen pressure. The reaction products inside the plasma zone were also obtained theoretically by minimization of free energy and the favourable zone temperature necessary for the formation of aluminium nitride was found to be {\\sim } 6000 K. Results are discussed in view of the highly non-equilibrium conditions that prevail during the arc-plasma synthesis.

  20. Evolution of an electron energy distribution function in a weak dc magnetic field in solenoidal inductive plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Min-Hyong; Choi, Seong Wook

    2008-12-01

    We investigated the evolution of the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) in a solenoidal inductively coupled plasma surrounded by an axial dc magnetic field. The increase in the dc magnetic field caused the EEDF to evolve from a bi-Maxwellian to a Maxwellian distribution. At the discharge center, the number of low energy electrons was significantly reduced while the high energy electron population showed little change when a weak dc magnetic field was present. However, at the discharge radial boundary, the high energy electron population decreased significantly with the magnetic field while the change in low energy population was not prominent compared to the discharge boundary. These changes in EEDFs at the boundary and center of the discharge are due to the radial confinement and the restriction of radial transport of electrons by dc magnetic field.

  1. Characteristics of an Electron Cyclotron Resonance Plasma Source for the Production of Active Nitrogen Species in III-V Nitride Epitaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyyappan, Meyya; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    A simple analysis is provided to determine the characteristics of an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma source for the generation of active nitrogen species in the molecular beam epitaxy of III-V nitrides. The effects of reactor geometry, pressure, power, and flow rate on the dissociation efficiency and ion flux are presented. Pulsing the input power is proposed to reduce the ion flux.

  2. Temporally and spatially resolved plasma spectroscopy in pulsed laser deposition of ultra-thin boron nitride films

    SciTech Connect

    Glavin, Nicholas R. E-mail: andrey.voevodin@us.af.mil; Muratore, Christopher; Jespersen, Michael L.; Hu, Jianjun; Fisher, Timothy S.; Voevodin, Andrey A. E-mail: andrey.voevodin@us.af.mil

    2015-04-28

    Physical vapor deposition (PVD) has recently been investigated as a viable, alternative growth technique for two-dimensional materials with multiple benefits over other vapor deposition synthesis methods. The high kinetic energies and chemical reactivities of the condensing species formed from PVD processes can facilitate growth over large areas and at reduced substrate temperatures. In this study, chemistry, kinetic energies, time of flight data, and spatial distributions within a PVD plasma plume ablated from a boron nitride (BN) target by a KrF laser at different pressures of nitrogen gas were investigated. Time resolved spectroscopy and wavelength specific imaging were used to identify and track atomic neutral and ionized species including B{sup +}, B*, N{sup +}, N*, and molecular species including N{sub 2}*, N{sub 2}{sup +}, and BN. Formation and decay of these species formed both from ablation of the target and from interactions with the background gas were investigated and provided insights into fundamental growth mechanisms of continuous, amorphous boron nitride thin films. The correlation of the plasma diagnostic results with film chemical composition and thickness uniformity studies helped to identify that a predominant mechanism for BN film formation is condensation surface recombination of boron ions and neutral atomic nitrogen species. These species arrive nearly simultaneously to the substrate location, and BN formation occurs microseconds before arrival of majority of N{sup +} ions generated by plume collisions with background molecular nitrogen. The energetic nature and extended dwelling time of incident N{sup +} ions at the substrate location was found to negatively impact resulting BN film stoichiometry and thickness. Growth of stoichiometric films was optimized at enriched concentrations of ionized boron and neutral atomic nitrogen in plasma near the condensation surface, providing few nanometer thick films with 1:1 BN stoichiometry and good

  3. Growth of ultrananocrystalline diamond film by DC Arcjet plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, G. C.; Li, B.; Yan, Z. Q.; Liu, J.; Lu, F. X.; Ye, H.

    2012-06-01

    Self-standing diamond films were grown by DC Arcjet plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The feed gasses were Ar/H2/CH4, in which the flow ratio of CH4 to H2 (F/F) was varied from 5% to 20%. Two distinct morphologies were observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM), i.e. the "pineapple-like" morphology and the "cauliflower-like" morphology. It was found that the morphologies of the as-grown films are strongly dependent on the flow ratio of CH4 to H2 in the feed gasses. High resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM) survey results revealed that there were nanocrystalline grains within the "pineapple-like" films whilst there were ultrananocrystalline grains within "cauliflower-like" films. X-ray diffraction (XRD) results suggested that (110) crystalline plane was the dominant surface in the "cauliflower-like" films whilst (100) crystalline plane was the dominant surface in the "pineapple-like" films. Raman spectroscopy revealed that nanostructured carbon features could be observed in both types of films. Plasma diagnosis was carried out in order to understand the morphology dependent growth mechanism. It could be concluded that the film morphology was strongly influenced by the density of gas phases. The gradient of C2 radical was found to be different along the growth direction under the different growth conditions.

  4. 3D MHD modelling of low current-high voltage dc plasma torch under restrike mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebouvier, A.; Delalondre, C.; Fresnet, F.; Cauneau, F.; Fulcheri, L.

    2012-01-01

    We present in this paper a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modelling of the gliding arc behaviour of a dc plasma torch operating with air under low current and high voltage conditions. The low current leads to instabilities and difficulties with simulating the process because the magnetic field is not sufficient to constrict the arc. The model is 3D, time dependent and the MHD equations are solved using CFD software Code_Saturne®. Although the arc is definitively non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE), the LTE assumption is considered as a first approach. The injection of air is tangential. A hot gas channel reattachment model has been used to simulate the restriking process of the arc root. After the description of the model, the most appropriate electrical voltage breakdown parameter has been selected in comparing with experimental results. A typical operating point is then studied in detail and shows the helical shape of the arc discharge in the nozzle. Finally, the mass flow rate and the current have been varied in the range 0.16-0.5 g s-1 and 100-300 mA, respectively, corresponding to typical glidarc operating points of our experimental plasma torch. The model shows good consistency with experimental data in terms of global behaviour, arc length, mean voltage and glidarc frequency.

  5. Recombination and thin film properties of silicon nitride and amorphous silicon passivated c-Si following ammonia plasma exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Yimao; Thomson, Andrew F.; Cuevas, Andres; McIntosh, Keith R.

    2015-01-26

    Recombination at silicon nitride (SiN{sub x}) and amorphous silicon (a-Si) passivated crystalline silicon (c-Si) surfaces is shown to increase significantly following an ammonia (NH{sub 3}) plasma exposure at room temperature. The effect of plasma exposure on chemical structure, refractive index, permittivity, and electronic properties of the thin films is also investigated. It is found that the NH{sub 3} plasma exposure causes (i) an increase in the density of Si≡N{sub 3} groups in both SiN{sub x} and a-Si films, (ii) a reduction in refractive index and permittivity, (iii) an increase in the density of defects at the SiN{sub x}/c-Si interface, and (iv) a reduction in the density of positive charge in SiN{sub x}. The changes in recombination and thin film properties are likely due to an insertion of N–H radicals into the bulk of SiN{sub x} or a-Si. It is therefore important for device performance to minimize NH{sub 3} plasma exposure of SiN{sub x} or a-Si passivating films during subsequent fabrication steps.

  6. Effect of active screen plasma nitriding pretreatment on wear behavior of TiN coating deposited by PACVD technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raoufi, M.; Mirdamadi, Sh.; Mahboubi, F.; Ahangarani, Sh.; Mahdipoor, M. S.; Elmkhah, H.

    2012-08-01

    Titanium based alloys are used extensively for improving wear properties of different parts due to their high hardness contents. Titanium nitride (TiN) is among these coatings which can be deposited on surface using various techniques such as CVD, PVD and PACVD. Their weak interface with substrate is one major drawback which can increase the total wear in spite of favorite wear behavior of TiN. Disc shaped samples from AISI H13 (DIN 1.2344) steel were prepared in this study. Single TiN coating was deposited on some of them while others have experienced a TiN deposition by active screen plasma nitriding (ASPN). Hardness at the surface and depth of samples was measured through Vickers micro hardness test which revealed 1810 Hv hardness as the maximum values for a dual-layered ASPN-TiN. Pin-on-disc wear test was done in order to study the wear mechanism. In this regard, the wear behavior of samples was investigated against pins from 100Cr6 (Din 1.3505) bearing steel and tungsten carbide-cobalt (WC-Co) steel. It was evidenced that the dual-layer ASPN-TiN coating has shown the least weight loss with the best wearing behavior because of its high hardness values, stable interface and acceptable resistance against peeling during wearing period.

  7. Plasma-deposited germanium nitride gate insulators for indium phosphide metal-insulator-semiconductor field-effect transistors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Gregory A.; Kapoor, Vik J.

    1991-01-01

    Plasma-deposited germanium nitride was investigated for the first time as a possible gate insulator for InP compound semiconductor metal-insulator-semiconductor FET (MISFET) technology. The germanium nitride films were successfully deposited in a capacitively coupled parallel plate reactor at 13.56 MHz operation using GeH4/N2/NH3 and GeH4/N2 mixtures as reactant gases. The former process produced better quality films with enhanced uniformity, increased deposition rates, and increased resistivity. The breakdown field strength of the films was greater than 10 to the 6th V/cm. Auger electron spectroscopy did not indicate significant chemical composition differences between the two processes. For MISFETs with 2-micron channel lengths fabricated on InP, the device transconductance and threshold voltage for the GeH4/N2/NH3 process were 17 mS/mm and -3.6 V, respectively. The drain-source breakdown voltages were greater than 10 V.

  8. Characterization of hydrogen-plasma interactions with photoresist, silicon, and silicon nitride surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Thedjoisworo, Bayu A.; Cheung, David; Zamani, Davoud

    2012-05-15

    For the 45 nm technology node and beyond, a major challenge is to achieve reasonably high photoresist ash rates while minimizing the loss of the silicon (Si) substrate and its nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}). Accordingly, an objective of this work is to characterize the photoresist strip rate under varying conditions of H{sub 2} plasma and the effects of these conditions on Si and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} etch rates. In addition, we discuss in detail the fundamental mechanisms of the reactions between H atoms and the above substrates and successfully reconcile the process trends obtained with the reaction mechanisms. In this work, photoresist, Si, and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} films were exposed to downstream pure-H{sub 2} discharges and their removal rates were characterized by ellipsometry as a function of the following parameters: substrate temperature, reactor pressure, H{sub 2} flow rate, and source power. The authors found that the H{sub 2}-based dry ash and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} etch are both thermally activated reactions, evidenced by the steady increase in etch rate as a function of temperature, with activation energies of {approx}5.0 and {approx}2.7 kcal/mol, respectively. The Si substrate exhibits a rather unique behavior where the etch rate increases initially to a maximum, which occurs at {approx}40 deg. C, and then decreases upon a further increase in temperature. The decrease in the Si etch rate at higher temperatures is attributed to the activation of competing side reactions that consume the chemisorbed H atoms on the Si surface, which then suppresses the Si-etch step. The photoresist and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} removal rates increase initially with increasing pressure, reaching maxima at {approx}800 and 2000 mTorr, respectively, beyond which the removal rates drop with increasing pressure. The initial increase in removal rate at the low-pressure regime is attributed to the increased atomic-hydrogen density, whereas the decrease in ash rate at the high-pressure regime could be

  9. Kinetic studies of NO formation in pulsed air-like low-pressure dc plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hübner, M.; Gortschakow, S.; Guaitella, O.; Marinov, D.; Rousseau, A.; Röpcke, J.; Loffhagen, D.

    2016-06-01

    The kinetics of the formation of NO in pulsed air-like dc plasmas at a pressure of 1.33 mbar and mean currents between 50 and 150 mA of discharge pulses with 5 ms duration has been investigated both experimentally and by self-consistent numerical modelling. Using time-resolved quantum cascade laser absorption spectroscopy, the densities of NO, NO2 and N2O have been measured in synthetic air as well as in air with 0.8% of NO2 and N2O, respectively. The temporal evolution of the NO density shows four distinct phases during the plasma pulse and the early afterglow in the three gas mixtures that were used. In particular, a steep density increase during the ignition phase and after termination of the discharge current pulse has been detected. The NO concentration has been found to reach a constant value of 0.57× {{10}14}~\\text{molecules}~\\text{c}{{\\text{m}}-3} , 1.05× {{10}14}~\\text{molecules}~\\text{c}{{\\text{m}}-3} , and 1.3× {{10}14}~\\text{molecules}~\\text{c}{{\\text{m}}-3} for mean plasma currents of 50 mA, 100 mA and 150 mA, respectively, in the afterglow. The measured densities of NO2 and N2O in the respective mixture decrease exponentially during the plasma pulse and remain almost constant in the afterglow, especially where the admixture of NO2 has a remarkable impact on the NO production during the ignition. The numerical results of the coupled solution of a set of rate equations for the various heavy particles and the time-dependent Boltzmann equation of the electrons agree quite well with the experimental findings for the different air-like plasmas. The main reaction processes have been analysed on the basis of the model calculations and the remaining differences between the experiment and modelling especially during the afterglow are discussed.

  10. Inactivation of Microcystis aeruginosa by DC glow discharge plasma: Impacts on cell integrity, pigment contents and microcystins degradation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong; Yang, Linfang; Yu, Zengliang; Huang, Qing

    2014-03-15

    We proposed a method to inactivate M. aeruginosa by using discharge plasma taking at the gas-solution interface supplied by DC power. Multiple analysis techniques including fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) and flow cytometry (FCM) were used to reveal the inactivation mechanism of M. aeruginosa. The photosynthetic pigment contents including phycocyanin, chlorophyll and metabolites were examined quantitatively. The DC glow discharge plasma caused an increased level of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and the damage of M. aeruginosa cells are mainly attributed to the oxidative stress including OH attack and H2O2 oxidation. Our findings demonstrate that plasma oxidation is a promising technology for inactivation of M. aeruginosa cells with simultaneous removal of microcystins and so it may lead us to a new route to efficient treatment of cyanobacterial blooms. PMID:24468526

  11. Terahertz radiation generation by beating of two super Gaussian lasers in plasma having static dc electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Saba; Singh, Ram Kishor; Sharma, R. P.

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents a scheme for the generation of high power terahertz radiation by the beating of two femtosecond super Gaussian lasers in plasma having dc electric field in the transverse direction. In this mechanism, a strong nonlinear ponderomotive force acts on the plasma electrons at the frequency difference of the two lasers ( ω 1 - ω 2 ) that imparts a nonlinear oscillatory velocity to plasma electrons which further result in the generation of a nonlinear current at this difference frequency (lying in THz domain). The dynamical equations governing the generation of THz waves have been solved semi-analytically; the result shows that the amplitude of the generated waves is considerably enhanced in the presence of dc electric field, and the index of super Gaussian beams also plays a keen role in governing the yield of THz waves.

  12. Nitrogen Plasma Instabilities and the Growth of Silicon Nitride by Electron Cyclotron Resonance Microwave Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pool, F. S.

    1996-01-01

    Nitrogen plasma instabilities have been identified through fluctuations in the ion current density and substrate floating potential. The plasma characteristics for both nitrogen and silane-nitrogen plasmas are consistent with a transition from an underdense to overdense plasma at 0.9 and 1.0 mTorr respectively.

  13. Direct growth of graphene on in situ epitaxial hexagonal boron nitride flakes by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Zhongguang; Zheng, Renjing; Khanaki, Alireza; Zuo, Zheng; Liu, Jianlin

    2015-11-23

    Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) single-crystal domains were grown on cobalt (Co) substrates at a substrate temperature of 850–900 °C using plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Three-point star shape h-BN domains were observed by scanning electron microscopy, and confirmed by Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The h-BN on Co template was used for in situ growth of multilayer graphene, leading to an h-BN/graphene heterostructure. Carbon atoms preferentially nucleate on Co substrate and edges of h-BN and then grow laterally to form continuous graphene. Further introduction of carbon atoms results in layer-by-layer growth of graphene on graphene and lateral growth of graphene on h-BN until it may cover entire h-BN flakes.

  14. Low temperature plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition of thin vanadium nitride layers for copper diffusion barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Rampelberg, Geert; Devloo-Casier, Kilian; Deduytsche, Davy; Detavernier, Christophe; Blasco, Nicolas

    2013-03-18

    Thin vanadium nitride (VN) layers were grown by atomic layer deposition using tetrakis(ethylmethylamino)vanadium and NH{sub 3} plasma at deposition temperatures between 70 Degree-Sign C and 150 Degree-Sign C on silicon substrates and polymer foil. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed a composition close to stoichiometric VN, while x-ray diffraction showed the {delta}-VN crystal structure. The resistivity was as low as 200 {mu}{Omega} cm for the as deposited films and further reduced to 143 {mu}{Omega} cm and 93 {mu}{Omega} cm by annealing in N{sub 2} and H{sub 2}/He/N{sub 2}, respectively. A 5 nm VN layer proved to be effective as a diffusion barrier for copper up to a temperature of 720 Degree-Sign C.

  15. A study of structural and mechanical properties of nano-crystalline tungsten nitride film synthesis by plasma focus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussnain, Ali; Singh Rawat, Rajdeep; Ahmad, Riaz; Hussain, Tousif; Umar, Z. A.; Ikhlaq, Uzma; Chen, Zhong; Shen, Lu

    2015-02-01

    Nano-crystalline tungsten nitride thin films are synthesized on AISI-304 steel at room temperature using Mather-type plasma focus system. The surface properties of the exposed substrate against different deposition shots are examined for crystal structure, surface morphology and mechanical properties using X-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscope, field emission scanning electron microscope and nano-indenter. The XRD results show the growth of WN and WN2 phases and the development of strain/stress in the deposited films by varying the number of deposition shots. Morphology of deposited films shows the significant change in the surface structure with different ion energy doses (number of deposition shots). Due to the effect of different ion energy doses, the strain/stress developed in the deposited film leads to an improvement of hardness of deposited films.

  16. Redeposition in plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition: Silicon nitride film quality ruled by the gas residence time

    SciTech Connect

    Knoops, Harm C. M. E-mail: w.m.m.kessels@tue.nl; Peuter, K. de; Kessels, W. M. M. E-mail: w.m.m.kessels@tue.nl

    2015-07-06

    The requirements on the material properties and growth control of silicon nitride (SiN{sub x}) spacer films in transistors are becoming ever more stringent as scaling of transistor structures continues. One method to deposit high-quality films with excellent control is atomic layer deposition (ALD). However, depositing SiN{sub x} by ALD has turned out to be very challenging. In this work, it is shown that the plasma gas residence time τ is a key parameter for the deposition of SiN{sub x} by plasma-assisted ALD and that this parameter can be linked to a so-called “redeposition effect”. This previously ignored effect, which takes place during the plasma step, is the dissociation of reaction products in the plasma and the subsequent redeposition of reaction-product fragments on the surface. For SiN{sub x} ALD using SiH{sub 2}(NH{sup t}Bu){sub 2} as precursor and N{sub 2} plasma as reactant, the gas residence time τ was found to determine both SiN{sub x} film quality and the resulting growth per cycle. It is shown that redeposition can be minimized by using a short residence time resulting in high-quality films with a high wet-etch resistance (i.e., a wet-etch rate of 0.5 nm/min in buffered HF solution). Due to the fundamental nature of the redeposition effect, it is expected to play a role in many more plasma-assisted ALD processes.

  17. Effects of Ti-C:H coating and plasma nitriding treatment on tribological, electrochemical, and biocompatibility properties of AISI 316L.

    PubMed

    Kao, W H; Su, Y L; Horng, J H; Zhang, K X

    2016-08-01

    Ti-C:H coatings were deposited on original, nitrided, and polished-nitrided AISI 316L stainless steel substrates using a closed field unbalanced magnetron sputtering system. Sliding friction wear tests were performed in 0.89 wt.% NaCl solution under a load of 30 N against AISI 316L stainless steel, Si3N4, and Ti6Al4V balls, respectively. The electrochemical properties of the various specimens were investigated by means of corrosion tests performed in 0.89 wt.% NaCl solution at room temperature. Finally, the biocompatibility properties of the specimens were investigated by performing cell culturing experiments using purified mouse leukemic monocyte macrophage cells (Raw264.7). In general, the results showed that plasma nitriding followed by Ti-C:H coating deposition provides an effective means of improving the wear resistance, anti-corrosion properties, and biocompatibility performance of AISI 316L stainless steel.

  18. Structural, morphological and mechanical properties of niobium nitride thin films grown by ion and electron beams emanated from plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddiqui, Jamil; Hussain, Tousif; Ahmad, Riaz; Umar, Zeeshan A.; Abdus Samad, Ubair

    2016-05-01

    The influence of variation in plasma deposition parameters on the structural, morphological and mechanical characteristics of the niobium nitride films grown by plasma-emanated ion and electron beams are investigated. Crystallographic investigation made by X-ray diffractometer shows that the film synthesized at 10 cm axial distance with 15 plasma focus shots (PFS) exhibits better crystallinity when compared to the other deposition conditions. Morphological analysis made by scanning electron microscope reveals a definite granular pattern composed of homogeneously distributed nano-spheroids grown as clustered particles for the film synthesized at 10 cm axial distance for 15 PFS. Roughness analysis demonstrates higher rms roughness for the films synthesized at shorter axial distance and by greater number of PFS. Maximum niobium atomic percentage (35.8) and maximum average hardness (19.4 ± 0.4 GPa) characterized by energy-dispersive spectroscopy and nano-hardness analyzer respectively are observed for film synthesized at 10 cm axial distance with 15 PFS.

  19. Correlation of film density and wet etch rate in hydrofluoric acid of plasma enhanced atomic layer deposited silicon nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provine, J.; Schindler, Peter; Kim, Yongmin; Walch, Steve P.; Kim, Hyo Jin; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Prinz, Fritz B.

    2016-06-01

    The continued scaling in transistors and memory elements has necessitated the development of atomic layer deposition (ALD) of silicon nitride (SiNx), particularly for use a low k dielectric spacer. One of the key material properties needed for SiNx films is a low wet etch rate (WER) in hydrofluoric (HF) acid. In this work, we report on the evaluation of multiple precursors for plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) of SiNx and evaluate the film's WER in 100:1 dilutions of HF in H2O. The remote plasma capability available in PEALD, enabled controlling the density of the SiNx film. Namely, prolonged plasma exposure made films denser which corresponded to lower WER in a systematic fashion. We determined that there is a strong correlation between WER and the density of the film that extends across multiple precursors, PEALD reactors, and a variety of process conditions. Limiting all steps in the deposition to a maximum temperature of 350 °C, it was shown to be possible to achieve a WER in PEALD SiNx of 6.1 Å/min, which is similar to WER of SiNx from LPCVD reactions at 850 °C.

  20. On the scaling of rf and dc self-bias voltages with pressure in electronegative capacitively coupled plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, Ankur; Dorf, Leonid; Rauf, Shahid; Collins, Ken

    2012-03-15

    Higher gas densities and lower diffusion losses at higher operating pressures typically lead to increased charged species densities (and hence flux) for a constant power deposition in capacitively coupled plasmas (CCP). As a result, one would expect that the bias radio-frequency (rf) voltage required to deposit a given power in a CCP reactor decreases with increasing operating pressure. These observations may not hold true in multiple frequency CCPs, commonly used for dielectric etching in microelectronics fabrication, due to nonlinear interactions between the rf sources. Wafer-based measurements of the rf and self-generated direct current (dc) bias voltages in a dual-frequency capacitively coupled electronegative plasma were made, which indicate that the rf and dc voltages vary nonmonotonically with pressure. These experimental results are presented in this paper and a computational plasma model is used to explain the experimental observations for varying 60 MHz and 13 MHz powers in the Ar/CF{sub 4}/CHF{sub 3} plasma over a pressure range of 25 to 400 mTorr. The authors found that while the ion density increases with pressure, the increase is most dominant near the electrode with the high frequency source (60 MHz). The rf and dc bias voltages are ultimately influenced by both charged species density magnitudes and spatial profiles.

  1. Use of dc Ar microdischarge with nonlocal plasma for identification of metal samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryavtsev, A. A.; Stefanova, M. S.; Pramatarov, P. M.

    2015-04-01

    The possibility of using the collisional electron spectroscopy (CES) method for the detection of atoms from metal samples is experimentally verified. The detection and identification of metal atoms from a Pt sample in the nonlocal plasma of short (without positive column) dc Ar microdischarge at intermediate pressures (5-30 Torr) is realized in this work. Cathode sputtering is used for atomization of the metal under analysis. The identification of the analyzed metal is made from the energy spectra of groups of fast nonlocal electrons—characteristic electrons released in the Penning ionization of the Pt atoms by Ar metastable atoms and molecules. The acquisition of the electron energy spectra is performed using an additional electrode—a sensor located at the boundary of the discharge volume. The Pt characteristic Penning electrons form the maxima in the electron energy spectra at the energies of their appearance, which are 2.6 eV and 1.4 eV. From the measured energy of the maxima, identification of the metal atoms is accomplished. The characteristic Ar maxima due to pair collisions between Ar metastable atoms and molecules and super-elastic collisions are also recorded. This study demonstrates the possibility of creating a novel microplasma analyzer for atoms from metal samples.

  2. Self-sustained criterion with photoionization for positive dc corona plasmas between coaxial cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Yuesheng; Zhang, Bo He, Jinliang

    2015-06-15

    The positive dc corona plasmas between coaxial cylinders in air under the application of a self-sustained criterion with photoionization are investigated in this paper. A photon absorption function suitable for cylindrical electrode, which can characterize the total photons within the ionization region, is proposed on the basis of the classic corona onset criteria. Based on the general fluid model with the self-sustained criterion, the role of photoionization in the ionization region is clarified. It is found that the surface electric field keeps constant under a relatively low corona current, while it is slightly weakened with the increase of the corona current. Similar tendencies can be found under different conductor radii and relative air densities. The small change of the surface electric field will become more significant for the electron density distribution as well as the ionization activity under a high corona current, compared with the results under the assumption of a constant surface field. The assumption that the surface electric field remains constant should be corrected with the increase of the corona current when the energetic electrons with a distance from the conductor surface are concerned.

  3. Use of dc Ar microdischarge with nonlocal plasma for identification of metal samples

    SciTech Connect

    Kudryavtsev, A. A.; Stefanova, M. S.; Pramatarov, P. M.

    2015-04-07

    The possibility of using the collisional electron spectroscopy (CES) method for the detection of atoms from metal samples is experimentally verified. The detection and identification of metal atoms from a Pt sample in the nonlocal plasma of short (without positive column) dc Ar microdischarge at intermediate pressures (5–30 Torr) is realized in this work. Cathode sputtering is used for atomization of the metal under analysis. The identification of the analyzed metal is made from the energy spectra of groups of fast nonlocal electrons—characteristic electrons released in the Penning ionization of the Pt atoms by Ar metastable atoms and molecules. The acquisition of the electron energy spectra is performed using an additional electrode—a sensor located at the boundary of the discharge volume. The Pt characteristic Penning electrons form the maxima in the electron energy spectra at the energies of their appearance, which are 2.6 eV and 1.4 eV. From the measured energy of the maxima, identification of the metal atoms is accomplished. The characteristic Ar maxima due to pair collisions between Ar metastable atoms and molecules and super-elastic collisions are also recorded. This study demonstrates the possibility of creating a novel microplasma analyzer for atoms from metal samples.

  4. DC non-thermal atmospheric-pressure plasma jet generated using a syringe needle electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matra, Khanit

    2016-07-01

    Non-thermal plasma jet was generated by applying a dc source voltage between the syringe needle anode with flowing Argon gas and a planar or a hollow copper cathode in an atmospheric-pressure environment. The two operating discharge modes, which were self-pulsing and a continuous discharge mode, these were mainly controlled by the limitations of the current flowing in the discharge circuit. A ballast resistor was an important factor in affecting the limitations of the operating discharge mode. The gas breakdown was initially generated in the self-pulsing discharge mode at the source voltage of 1.2 kV. This was slightly higher than the breakdown voltage at the experimental condition of 1 lpm of Argon and a 1 mm electrode gap distance. The peak self-pulsing discharge currents were up to 15–20 A with a self-pulsing frequency in the range of 10–20 kHz. The continuous discharge mode could be observed at the higher source voltage with the continuous discharge current within the range of a few milliamperes.

  5. Characteristics of sheath-driven tangential flow produced by a low-current DC surface glow discharge plasma actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Jichul; Shajid Rahman, Mohammad

    2014-08-01

    An experimental investigation of low-speed flow actuation at near-atmospheric pressure is presented. The flow actuation is achieved via low-current ( \\lesssim 1.0 mA) continuous or pulsed DC surface glow discharge plasma. The plasma actuator, consisting of two sharp-edged nickel electrodes, produces a tangential flow in a direction from anode to cathode, and is visualized using high-speed schlieren photography. The induced flow velocity estimated via the schlieren images reaches up to 5 m/s in test cases. The actuation capability increases with pressure and electrode gap distances, and the induced flow velocity increases logarithmically with the discharge power. Pulsed DC exhibits slightly improved actuation capability with better directionality. An analytic estimation of induced flow velocity obtained based on ion momentum in the cathode sheath and gas dynamics in one-dimensional flow yields values similar to those measured.

  6. Integrated approach for low-temperature synthesis of high-quality silicon nitride films in PECVD using RF-UHF hybrid plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, B. B.; Shin, Kyung S.; Han, Jeon G.

    2016-02-01

    This study investigates low-temperature plasma nitriding of hydrogenated silicon (SiN x :H) film in radio frequency (RF) and RF-ultra-high frequency (UHF) hybrid plasmas. To study the optimized conditions for the deposition of SiN x :H film, this work adopts a systematic plasma diagnostic approach in the nitrogen-silane and nitrogen-silane-ammonia plasmas. This work also evaluates the capability of plasma and radical formation by utilizing different plasma sources in the PECVD process. For the plasma diagnostics, we have purposefully used the combination of optical emission spectroscopy (OES), intensified CCD (ICCD) camera, vacuum ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy (VUVAS), and RF compensated Langmuir probe (LP). Data reveal that there is significant enhancement in the atomic nitrogen radicals, plasma densities, and film properties using the hybrid plasmas. Measurements show that addition of a small amount of NH3 can significantly reduce the electron temperature, plasma, and radical density. Also, optical and chemical properties of the deposited films are investigated on the basis of plasma diagnostics. Good quality SiN x :H films, with atomic nitrogen to hydrogen ratio of 4:1, are fabricated. The plasma chemistry of the hybrid plasmas is also discussed for its utility for plasma applications.

  7. Advances and directions of ion nitriding/carburizing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalvins, Talivaldis

    1989-01-01

    Ion nitriding and carburizing are plasma activated thermodynamic processes for the production of case hardened surface layers not only for ferrous materials, but also for an increasing number of nonferrous metals. When the treatment variables are properly controlled, the use of nitrogenous or carbonaceous glow discharge medium offers great flexibility in tailoring surface/near-surface properties independently of the bulk properties. The ion nitriding process has reached a high level of maturity and has gained wide industrial acceptance, while the more recently introduced ion carburizing process is rapidly gaining industrial acceptance. The current status of plasma mass transfer mechanisms into the surface regarding the formation of compound and diffusion layers in ion nitriding and carbon build-up ion carburizing is reviewed. In addition, the recent developments in design and construction of advanced equipment for obtaining optimized and controlled case/core properties is summarized. Also, new developments and trends such as duplex plasma treatments and alternatives to dc diode nitriding are highlighted.

  8. Development of a DC Glow Discharge Exhibit for the Demonstration of Plasma Behavior in a Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruder, Daniel

    2010-11-01

    The DC Glow Discharge Exhibit is intended to demonstrate the effects a magnetic field produces on a plasma in a vacuum chamber. The display, which will be featured as a part of The Liberty Science Center's ``Energy Quest Exhibition,'' consists of a DC glow discharge tube and information panels to educate the general public on plasma and its relation to fusion energy. Wall posters and an information booklet will offer brief descriptions of fusion-based science and technology, and will portray plasma's role in the development of fusion as a viable source of energy. The display features a horse-shoe magnet on a movable track, allowing viewers to witness the effects of a magnetic field upon a plasma. The plasma is created from air within a vacuum averaging between 100-200 mTorr. Signage within the casing describes the hardware components. The display is pending delivery to The Liberty Science Center, and will replace a similar, older exhibit presently at the museum.

  9. Low-temperature growth of gallium nitride films by inductively coupled-plasma-enhanced reactive magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Ni, Chih-Jui; Chau-Nan Hong, Franklin

    2014-05-15

    Gallium nitride (GaN) films were grown on sapphire substrate by reactive magnetron sputtering. Inductively coupled-plasma (ICP) source was installed between the substrate holder and the sputtering target to increase the plasma density and the degree of ionization of nitrogen gas. Liquid Ga and Ar/N{sub 2} were used as the sputtering target and sputtering gases, respectively. X-ray diffraction measurements confirmed that the authors could grow high quality GaN crystallites at 500 °C. However, the crystalline GaN (0002) peak remained even by lowering the growth temperature down to 300 °C. The N:Ga ratio of the film grown at 500 °C was almost 1:1, and the nitrogen composition became higher toward the 1:1 N:Ga ratio with increasing the growth temperature. The high degree of ionization induced by ICP source was essential to the growth of high crystalline quality GaN films.

  10. An experimental study on discharge characteristics in a pulsed-dc atmospheric pressure CH3OH/Ar plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Muyang; Liu, Sanqiu; Yang, Congying; Pei, Xuekai; Lu, Xinpei; Zhang, Jialiang; Wang, Dezhen

    2016-10-01

    Recently, C/H/Ar plasma discharges found enormous potential and possibility in carbonaceous compounds conversion and production. In this work, a pulsed-dc CH3OH/Ar plasma jet generated at atmospheric pressure is investigated by means of optical and electrical diagnosis concerning the variation of its basic parameters, absolute concentration of OH radicals, and plasma temperature with different CH3OH/Ar volume ratios, in the core region of discharge with needle-to-ring electrode configuration. The voltage-current characteristics are also measured at different CH3OH/Ar ratios. Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) results here show that only small amounts of added methanol vapor to argon plasma (about 0.05% CH3OH/Ar volume ratio) is favorable for the production of OH radicals. The optical emission lines of CH, CN, and C2 radicals have been detected in the CH3OH/Ar plasma. And, the plasma temperatures increase with successive amount of added methanol vapor to the growth plasma. Moreover, qualitative discussions are presented regarding the mechanisms for methanol dissociation and effect of the CH3OH component on the Ar plasma discharge at atmospheric pressure.

  11. Deposition and characterization of molybdenum thin films using dc-plasma magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Majid; Islam, Mohammad

    2013-12-15

    Molebdenum (Mo) thin films were deposited on well-cleaned soda-lime glass substrates using DC-plasma magnetron sputtering. In the design of experiment deposition was optimized for maximum beneficial characteristics by monitoring effect of process variables such as deposition power (100–200 W). Their electrical, structural and morphological properties were analyzed to study the effect of these variables. The electrical resistivity of Mo thin films could be reduced by increasing deposition power. Within the range of analyzed deposition power, Mo thin films showed a mono crystalline nature and the crystallites were found to have an orientation along [110] direction. The surface morphology of thin films showed that a highly dense micro structure has been obtained. The surface roughness of films increased with deposition power. The adhesion of Mo thin films could be improved by increasing the deposition power. Atomic force microscopy was used for the topographical study of the films and to determine the roughness of the films. X-ray diffractrometer and scanning electron microscopy analysis were used to investigate the crystallinity and surface morphology of the films. Hall effect measurement system was used to find resistivity, carrier mobility and carrier density of deposited films. The adhesion test was performed using scotch hatch tape adhesion test. Mo thin films prepared at deposition power of 200 W, substrate temperature of 23°C and Ar pressure of 0.0123 mbar exhibited a mono crystalline structure with an orientation along (110) direction, thickness of ∼550 nm and electrical resistivity value of 0.57 × 10{sup −4} Ω cm.

  12. Production of water mist from electrolyte surface in contact with atmospheric-pressure dc helium glow plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, K.; Ishigame, H.; Nishiyama, S.

    2015-09-01

    Plasma-liquid interaction is a new subject which has been opened by developments of atmospheric-pressure plasma sources. In this work, we adopted laser Mie scattering to examine an atmospheric-pressure dc helium glow plasma in contact with NaCl solution. The plasma was produced by applying a dc voltage between a stainless-steel gas nozzle and the electrolyte via a register of 100 k Ω. The gap distance between the electrolyte surface and the electrode was 4 mm. Helium as a working gas was fed from the nozzle toward the electrolyte surface. The discharge space was illuminated using a cw laser beam at a wavelength of 457 nm, and the scattered laser light was captured using a high-speed camera with an image intensifier via an interference filter at the laser wavelength. The scattered laser light told us the existence of particulates or water mists in the discharge space. The water mists were produced from the electrolyte surface explosively as well as randomly. The trajectories of the mists were basically parabolic. We sometimes observed the expansion of the mist size in the gas phase. The expansion was followed by the disappearance of the mist. This may be due to the evaporation of the mist, and is considered to be the production mechanism of Na in the gas phase.

  13. Plasma nitridation of silicon by N2 and NH3 in PECVD reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakardjieva, V. S.; Alexieva, Z. I.; Beshkov, G. D.; Mateev, E. S.

    2010-04-01

    The effect was investigated of nitrogen and ammonia plasma treatment of monocrystalline Si wafers. The experiments were carried out in a plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition reactor. The wafers were subjected to N2 and NH3 plasma treatment for varying times at temperature of 380 °C. The plasma treated surfaces were studied by transmission electron microscopy with C-Pt replicas, reflection high-energy electron diffraction and Auger electron spectroscopy. The results point to the growth of an amorphous layer on the surface. The Auger electron spectroscopy depth profiles obtained by sputtering show the presence of an oxynitride layer with varying composition depending on the time of plasma treatment. The Auger electron spectroscopy analysis shows that after 60 s of treatment in N2 plasma, the nitrogen content is 8 at.%, while after 300 s it is 22 at.%, the thickness of the oxynitride nanolayer being 2.5-7.2 nm. In the case of NH3 plasma the thickness calculated from the sputtering time (from 50 s to 15 min) varies between 2 and 12 nm, and the nitrogen content, between 5 and 35 at.%.

  14. The effects of axial magnetic fields on the operating characteristics and downstream plasma parameters of DC plasma torches

    SciTech Connect

    Takakura, Y.; Ono, S.; Teii, S.

    1995-12-31

    Plasma torch is used in many industrial processes for high temperature sources. In the past, an application of magnetic field is experientially known to stabilize plasma torch operations. However, there is a little discussion regarding to magnetic field effects on plasma torch operating characteristics and plasma parameters. In this work, the influences of magnetic field and plasma gas flow rate on plasma torch current-voltage characteristics and downstream plasma parameters have been experimentally studied, and results are qualitatively analyzed based on the charged particle transport equation.

  15. Modeling of a supersonic DC plasma torch system for carbon nanotube production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Liping

    The carbon nanotube (CNT) structure forms a very promising source material. It has unique properties such as high thermal and electrical conductivities, and a very high mechanical strength. In recent years, researchers were able to improve both the quantity and quality of the CNT production. Among the efforts made to scale up the production, Harbec and Meunier designed a new plasma torch process for the industrial production of CNT in bulk powder form. Their process is based on the DC plasma-jet pyrolysis of a carbon-containing gas. Experiments were conducted using either 100 slpm of argon or 225 slpm of helium. Tetrachloroethylene (C2Cl4, or TCE) was selected as the carbon raw material. The present work focuses on the modeling of this CNT synthesis process and aims at an understanding of the physical and chemical phenomena observed in this system. First, a description is made of the temperature and flow fields, as well as the species concentration distribution in the torch nozzle using both possibilities of He or Ar as the plasma gas. This is followed in the second part of the thesis by a model aimed to study the nucleation and evolution of the metal particles acting as catalyst for CNT growth in the nozzle. In the third part, the modeling of the TCE pyrolysis process in the flow was carried out. The fluid dynamics equations are used in this system showing supersonic characteristics. A realizable k-ε model is used to address the turbulent effects in the flow fields. The moment method is employed to calculate the formation of the fine catalyst particles from the metal vapor injected. Within the supersonic domain of the flow field, the influence of existing shock waves on the particle nucleation is discussed, as well as the chemical reactions involved. Results show that the supersonic phenomena make it possible for metal particles to nucleate and be maintained in small sizes. This however also causes a backflow in the nozzle, which partially contributes to the

  16. Continuous wavelet transform analysis for self-similarity properties of turbulence in magnetized DC glow discharge plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarma, Bornali; Chauhan, Sourabh S.; Wharton, A. M.; Iyengar, A. N. Sekar; Iyengar

    2013-10-01

    Characterization of self-similarity properties of turbulence in magnetized plasma is being carried out in DC glow discharge plasma. The time series floating potential fluctuation experimental data are acquired from the plasma by Langmuir probe. Continuous wavelet transform (CWT) analysis considering db4 mother wavelet has been applied to the experimental data and self-similarity properties are detected by evaluating the Hurst exponent from the wavelet variance plotting. From the CWT spectrum, effort is made to extract a highly correlated frequency by locating the brightest spot. Accordingly, those signals are treated for finding out correlation dimension and the Liapunov exponent so that the exact frequency responsible for the chaotic behavior could be found out.

  17. Design and Development of High Voltage Direct Current (DC) Sources for the Solar Array Module Plasma Interaction Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bibyk, Irene K.; Wald, Lawrence W.

    1995-01-01

    Two programmable, high voltage DC power supplies were developed as part of the flight electronics for the Solar Array Module Plasma Interaction Experiment (SAMPIE). SAMPIE's primary objectives were to study and characterize the high voltage arcing and parasitic current losses of various solar cells and metal samples within the space plasma of low earth orbit (LEO). High voltage arcing can cause large discontinuous changes in spacecraft potential which lead to damage of the power system materials and significant Electromagnetic Interference (EMI). Parasitic currents cause a change in floating potential which lead to reduced power efficiency. These primary SAMPIE objectives were accomplished by applying artificial biases across test samples over a voltage range from -600 VDC to +300 VDC. This paper chronicles the design, final development, and test of the two programmable high voltage sources for SAMPIE. The technical challenges to the design for these power supplies included vacuum, space plasma effects, thermal protection, Shuttle vibrations and accelerations.

  18. Boron nitride phosphide thin films grown on quartz substrate by hot-filament and plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X. W.; Xu, S. Y.; Han, G. R.

    2004-10-01

    Boron nitride phosphide films are, for the first time, grown on transparent quartz substrate by hot filament and radio-frequency plasma co-assisted chemical vapor deposition technique. XPS, XRD, SEM, and UV measurements are performed to study the chemical composition, crystallization, microstructure, and optical absorption, respectively. A centipede-like microstructure and undulating ground morphology on the film surface are observed, and their growth mechanism is speculated upon. The chemical composition is determined as BN1-xPx, whose characteristic XRD peak is preliminarily identified. The optical band gap can be modulated between 5.52 eV and 3.74 eV, simply by adjusting the phosphorus content in BN1-xPx through modifying the PH3 flux during the film-deposition process. The merits of the BN1-xPx film, such as high ultraviolet photoelectric sensitivity with negligible sensitivity in the visible region, modifiable wide optical band gap, and good adhesion on transparent substrate, suggest potential applications for ultraviolet photo-electronics.

  19. Approaching Defect-free Amorphous Silicon Nitride by Plasma-assisted Atomic Beam Deposition for High Performance Gate Dielectric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Shu-Ju; Wang, Chiang-Lun; Lee, Hung-Chun; Lin, Chun-Yeh; Chen, Jhih-Wei; Shiu, Hong-Wei; Chang, Lo-Yueh; Hsueh, Han-Ting; Chen, Hung-Ying; Tsai, Jyun-Yu; Lu, Ying-Hsin; Chang, Ting-Chang; Tu, Li-Wei; Teng, Hsisheng; Chen, Yi-Chun; Chen, Chia-Hao; Wu, Chung-Lin

    2016-06-01

    In the past few decades, gate insulators with a high dielectric constant (high-k dielectric) enabling a physically thick but dielectrically thin insulating layer, have been used to replace traditional SiOx insulator and to ensure continuous downscaling of Si-based transistor technology. However, due to the non-silicon derivative natures of the high-k metal oxides, transport properties in these dielectrics are still limited by various structural defects on the hetero-interfaces and inside the dielectrics. Here, we show that another insulating silicon compound, amorphous silicon nitride (a-Si3N4), is a promising candidate of effective electrical insulator for use as a high-k dielectric. We have examined a-Si3N4 deposited using the plasma-assisted atomic beam deposition (PA-ABD) technique in an ultra-high vacuum (UHV) environment and demonstrated the absence of defect-related luminescence; it was also found that the electronic structure across the a-Si3N4/Si heterojunction approaches the intrinsic limit, which exhibits large band gap energy and valence band offset. We demonstrate that charge transport properties in the metal/a-Si3N4/Si (MNS) structures approach defect-free limits with a large breakdown field and a low leakage current. Using PA-ABD, our results suggest a general strategy to markedly improve the performance of gate dielectric using a nearly defect-free insulator.

  20. Approaching Defect-free Amorphous Silicon Nitride by Plasma-assisted Atomic Beam Deposition for High Performance Gate Dielectric

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Shu-Ju; Wang, Chiang-Lun; Lee, Hung-Chun; Lin, Chun-Yeh; Chen, Jhih-Wei; Shiu, Hong-Wei; Chang, Lo-Yueh; Hsueh, Han-Ting; Chen, Hung-Ying; Tsai, Jyun-Yu; Lu, Ying-Hsin; Chang, Ting-Chang; Tu, Li-Wei; Teng, Hsisheng; Chen, Yi-Chun; Chen, Chia-Hao; Wu, Chung-Lin

    2016-01-01

    In the past few decades, gate insulators with a high dielectric constant (high-k dielectric) enabling a physically thick but dielectrically thin insulating layer, have been used to replace traditional SiOx insulator and to ensure continuous downscaling of Si-based transistor technology. However, due to the non-silicon derivative natures of the high-k metal oxides, transport properties in these dielectrics are still limited by various structural defects on the hetero-interfaces and inside the dielectrics. Here, we show that another insulating silicon compound, amorphous silicon nitride (a-Si3N4), is a promising candidate of effective electrical insulator for use as a high-k dielectric. We have examined a-Si3N4 deposited using the plasma-assisted atomic beam deposition (PA-ABD) technique in an ultra-high vacuum (UHV) environment and demonstrated the absence of defect-related luminescence; it was also found that the electronic structure across the a-Si3N4/Si heterojunction approaches the intrinsic limit, which exhibits large band gap energy and valence band offset. We demonstrate that charge transport properties in the metal/a-Si3N4/Si (MNS) structures approach defect-free limits with a large breakdown field and a low leakage current. Using PA-ABD, our results suggest a general strategy to markedly improve the performance of gate dielectric using a nearly defect-free insulator. PMID:27325155

  1. Approaching Defect-free Amorphous Silicon Nitride by Plasma-assisted Atomic Beam Deposition for High Performance Gate Dielectric.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Shu-Ju; Wang, Chiang-Lun; Lee, Hung-Chun; Lin, Chun-Yeh; Chen, Jhih-Wei; Shiu, Hong-Wei; Chang, Lo-Yueh; Hsueh, Han-Ting; Chen, Hung-Ying; Tsai, Jyun-Yu; Lu, Ying-Hsin; Chang, Ting-Chang; Tu, Li-Wei; Teng, Hsisheng; Chen, Yi-Chun; Chen, Chia-Hao; Wu, Chung-Lin

    2016-01-01

    In the past few decades, gate insulators with a high dielectric constant (high-k dielectric) enabling a physically thick but dielectrically thin insulating layer, have been used to replace traditional SiOx insulator and to ensure continuous downscaling of Si-based transistor technology. However, due to the non-silicon derivative natures of the high-k metal oxides, transport properties in these dielectrics are still limited by various structural defects on the hetero-interfaces and inside the dielectrics. Here, we show that another insulating silicon compound, amorphous silicon nitride (a-Si3N4), is a promising candidate of effective electrical insulator for use as a high-k dielectric. We have examined a-Si3N4 deposited using the plasma-assisted atomic beam deposition (PA-ABD) technique in an ultra-high vacuum (UHV) environment and demonstrated the absence of defect-related luminescence; it was also found that the electronic structure across the a-Si3N4/Si heterojunction approaches the intrinsic limit, which exhibits large band gap energy and valence band offset. We demonstrate that charge transport properties in the metal/a-Si3N4/Si (MNS) structures approach defect-free limits with a large breakdown field and a low leakage current. Using PA-ABD, our results suggest a general strategy to markedly improve the performance of gate dielectric using a nearly defect-free insulator. PMID:27325155

  2. Direct growth of hexagonal boron nitride/graphene heterostructures on cobalt foil substrates by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhongguang; Khanaki, Alireza; Tian, Hao; Zheng, Renjing; Suja, Mohammad; Zheng, Jian-Guo; Liu, Jianlin

    2016-07-01

    Graphene/hexagonal boron nitride (G/h-BN) heterostructures have attracted a great deal of attention because of their exceptional properties and wide variety of potential applications in nanoelectronics. However, direct growth of large-area, high-quality, and stacked structures in a controllable and scalable way remains challenging. In this work, we demonstrate the synthesis of h-BN/graphene (h-BN/G) heterostructures on cobalt (Co) foil by sequential deposition of graphene and h-BN layers using plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. It is found that the coverage of h-BN layers can be readily controlled on the epitaxial graphene by growth time. Large-area, uniform-quality, and multi-layer h-BN films on thin graphite layers were achieved. Based on an h-BN (5-6 nm)/G (26-27 nm) heterostructure, capacitor devices with Co(foil)/G/h-BN/Co(contact) configuration were fabricated to evaluate the dielectric properties of h-BN. The measured breakdown electric field showed a high value of ˜2.5-3.2 MV/cm. Both I-V and C-V characteristics indicate that the epitaxial h-BN film has good insulating characteristics.

  3. The effect of hydrogen-based, high density plasma etching on the electronic properties of gallium nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Eddy, C.R. Jr.; Molnar, B.

    1996-11-01

    Development of devices based on the wide gap semiconductor gallium nitride (GaN) requires the realization of reliable, high fidelity, low damage pattern transfer processes. In this work, GaN thin films grown by OMVPE have been subjected to both chlorine- and methane/hydrogen-based etch chemistries in an electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasma reactive ion etching system. Both n-type and semi-insulating thin films have been utilized to examine the effect of these etch processes on the electronic properties of the materials. The methane/hydrogen-based etch system (CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2}/Ar) induced considerable changes in the electrical properties of both n-type and semi-insulating films, causing the former to become more insulating and the latter to become conducting. In both cases, the original electrical properties were recoverable after a short, high temperature anneal. In the chlorine-based etching system (Cl{sub 2}), no changes in the electrical properties were observed and etch rates five times greater than in the methane/hydrogen-based system were achieved. Proposed mechanism responsible for the observed behavior will be discussed. These results show that pattern transfer processes based in chlorine etch chemistries are more suitable for the generation of high performance GaN devices.

  4. Low-temperature ({<=}200 Degree-Sign C) plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition of dense titanium nitride thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Samal, Nigamananda; Du Hui; Luberoff, Russell; Chetry, Krishna; Bubber, Randhir; Hayes, Alan; Devasahayam, Adrian

    2013-01-15

    Titanium nitride (TiN) has been widely used in the semiconductor industry for its diffusion barrier and seed layer properties. However, it has seen limited adoption in other industries in which low temperature (<200 Degree-Sign C) deposition is a requirement. Examples of applications which require low temperature deposition are seed layers for magnetic materials in the data storage (DS) industry and seed and diffusion barrier layers for through-silicon-vias (TSV) in the MEMS industry. This paper describes a low temperature TiN process with appropriate electrical, chemical, and structural properties based on plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition method that is suitable for the DS and MEMS industries. It uses tetrakis-(dimethylamino)-titanium as an organometallic precursor and hydrogen (H{sub 2}) as co-reactant. This process was developed in a Veeco NEXUS Trade-Mark-Sign chemical vapor deposition tool. The tool uses a substrate rf-biased configuration with a grounded gas shower head. In this paper, the complimentary and self-limiting character of this process is demonstrated. The effects of key processing parameters including temperature, pulse time, and plasma power are investigated in terms of growth rate, stress, crystal morphology, chemical, electrical, and optical properties. Stoichiometric thin films with growth rates of 0.4-0.5 A/cycle were achieved. Low electrical resistivity (<300 {mu}{Omega} cm), high mass density (>4 g/cm{sup 3}), low stress (<250 MPa), and >85% step coverage for aspect ratio of 10:1 were realized. Wet chemical etch data show robust chemical stability of the film. The properties of the film have been optimized to satisfy industrial viability as a Ruthenium (Ru) preseed liner in potential data storage and TSV applications.

  5. Exploring High Refractive Index Silicon-Rich Nitride Films by Low-Temperature Inductively Coupled Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition and Applications for Integrated Waveguides.

    PubMed

    Ng, Doris K T; Wang, Qian; Wang, Ting; Ng, Siu-Kit; Toh, Yeow-Teck; Lim, Kim-Peng; Yang, Yi; Tan, Dawn T H

    2015-10-01

    Silicon-rich nitride films are developed and explored using an inductively coupled plasma chemical vapor deposition system at low temperature of 250 °C with an ammonia-free gas chemistry. The refractive index of the developed silicon-rich nitride films can increase from 2.2 to 3.08 at 1550 nm wavelength while retaining a near-zero extinction coefficient when the amount of silane increases. Energy dispersive spectrum analysis gives the silicon to nitrogen ratio in the films. Atomic force microscopy shows a very smooth surface, with a surface roughness root-mean-square of 0.27 nm over a 3 μm × 3 μm area of the 300 nm thick film with a refractive index of 3.08. As an application example, the 300 nm thick silicon-rich nitride film is then patterned by electron beam lithography and etched using inductively coupled plasma system to form thin-film micro/nano waveguides, and the waveguide loss is characterized.

  6. Microstructural Characteristics of Plasma Nitrided Layer on Hot-Rolled 304 Stainless Steel with a Small Amount of α-Ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaolei; Yu, Zhiwei; Cui, Liying; Niu, Xinjun; Cai, Tao

    2016-02-01

    The hot-rolled 304 stainless steel with γ-austenite and approximately 5 pct α-ferrite elongated along the rolling direction was plasma-nitrided at a low temperature of 693 K (420 °C). X-ray diffraction results revealed that the nitrided layer was mainly composed of the supersaturated solid solution of nitrogen in austenite ( γ N). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations showed that the microstructure of the γ N phase exhibited "fracture factor contrast" reflective of the occurrence of fine pre-precipitations in γ N by the continuous precipitation. The occurrence of a diffuse scattering effect on the electron diffraction spots of γ N indicated that the pre-precipitation took place in γ N in the form of strongly bonded Cr-N clusters or pairs due to a strong attractive interaction of nitrogen with chromium. Scanning electron microscopy and TEM observations indicated that the discontinuous precipitation initiated from the γ/ α interfaces and grew from the austenite boundaries into austenite grains to form a lamellar structure consisting of CrN and ferrite. The orientation relationship between CrN and ferrite corresponded to a Baker-Nutting relationship: (100)CrN//(100) α ; [011]CrN//[001] α . A zigzag boundary line following the banded structure of alternating γ-austenite and elongated α-ferrite was presented between the nitrided layer and the substrate to form a continuous varying layer thickness, which resulted from the difference in diffusivities of nitrogen in α-ferrite and γ-austenite, along the γ/ α interfaces and through the lattice. Microstructural features similar to the γ N were also revealed in the ferrite of the nitrided layer by TEM. It was not excluded that a supersaturated solid solution of nitrogen in ferrite ( α N) formed in the nitrided layer.

  7. Analysis of processes in DC arc plasma torches for spraying that use air as plasma forming gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frolov, V.; Ivanov, D.; Toropchin, A.

    2014-11-01

    Developed in Saint Petersburg State Polytechnical University technological processes of air-plasma spraying of wear-resistant, regenerating, hardening and decorative coatings used in number of industrial areas are described. The article contains examples of applications of air plasma spraying of coatings as well as results of mathematical modelling of processes in air plasma torches for spraying.

  8. Enhancement of the crystalline Ge film growth by inductively coupled plasma-assisted pulsed DC sputtering.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eunkyeom; Han, Seung-Hee

    2014-11-01

    The effect of pulsed DC sputtering on the crystalline growth of Ge thin film was investigated. Ge thin films were deposited on the glass substrates using ICP-assisted pulsed DC sputtering. The Ge target was sputtered using asymmetric bipolar pulsed DC sputtering system with and without assistance of ICP source. The pulse frequency of 200 Hz and the pulse on time of 500 μsec (duty cycle = 10%) were kept during sputtering process. Crystal structures were studied from X-ray diffraction. The X-ray diffraction patterns clearly showed crystalline film structures. The Ge thin films with randomly oriented crystalline were obtained using pulsed DC sputtering without ICP, whereas they had well aligned (220) orientation crystalline using ICP source. Moreover, the combination of ICP assistance and pulsed DC sputtering enhanced the growth of crystalline Ge thin films without hydrogen and metal by in situ deposition. The structure and lattice of the films were studied from TEM images. The cross-sectional TEM images revealed the deposited Ge films with columnar structure. PMID:25958564

  9. Enhancement of the crystalline Ge film growth by inductively coupled plasma-assisted pulsed DC sputtering.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eunkyeom; Han, Seung-Hee

    2014-11-01

    The effect of pulsed DC sputtering on the crystalline growth of Ge thin film was investigated. Ge thin films were deposited on the glass substrates using ICP-assisted pulsed DC sputtering. The Ge target was sputtered using asymmetric bipolar pulsed DC sputtering system with and without assistance of ICP source. The pulse frequency of 200 Hz and the pulse on time of 500 μsec (duty cycle = 10%) were kept during sputtering process. Crystal structures were studied from X-ray diffraction. The X-ray diffraction patterns clearly showed crystalline film structures. The Ge thin films with randomly oriented crystalline were obtained using pulsed DC sputtering without ICP, whereas they had well aligned (220) orientation crystalline using ICP source. Moreover, the combination of ICP assistance and pulsed DC sputtering enhanced the growth of crystalline Ge thin films without hydrogen and metal by in situ deposition. The structure and lattice of the films were studied from TEM images. The cross-sectional TEM images revealed the deposited Ge films with columnar structure.

  10. Hollow-anode plasma source for molecular beam epitaxy of gallium nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, A.; Newman, N.; Rubin, M.; Dickinson, M.; Thomson, A.; Jones, E.; Phatak, P.; Gassmann, A.

    1995-09-01

    GaN films have been grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) using a hollow-anode nitrogen plasma source. The source was developed to minimize defect formation as a result of contamination and ion damage. The hollow-anode discharge is a special form of glow discharge with very small anode area. A positive anode voltage drop of 30--40 V and an increased anode sheath thickness leads to ignition of a relatively dense plasma in front of the anode hole. Driven by the pressure gradient, the ``anode`` plasma forms a bright plasma jet streaming with supersonic velocity towards the substrate. Films of GaN have been grown on (0001) SiC and (0001) Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} at a temperature from 600--800 C. The films were investigated by photoluminescence, cathodoluminescence, X-ray diffraction, and X-ray fluorescence. The film with the highest structural quality had a rocking curve with 5 arcmin, the lowest reported value for MBE growth to date.

  11. An energy-efficient process for decomposing perfluorooctanoic and perfluorooctane sulfonic acids using dc plasmas generated within gas bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuoka, K.; Sasaki, K.; Hayashi, R.

    2011-06-01

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS) are environmentally harmful and persistent substances. Their decomposition was investigated using dc plasmas generated within small gas bubbles in a solution. The plasma characteristics including discharge voltage, voltage drop in the liquid, plasma shape and the emission spectrum were examined with different gases. The decomposition rate and energy efficiency were evaluated by measuring the concentration of fluoride and sulfate ions released from PFOA/PFOS molecules. The concentration of fluoride ions and energy efficiency in the treatment of a PFOS solution were 17.7 mg l-1 (54.8% of the initial amount of fluorine atoms) and 26 mg kWh-1, respectively, after 240 min of operation. The addition of scavengers of hydroxyl radicals and hydrated electrons showed little effect on the decomposition. The decomposition processes were analyzed with an assumption that positive species reacted with PFOA/PFOS molecules at the boundary of the plasma-solution surface. This type of plasma showed a much higher decomposition energy efficiency compared with energy efficiencies reported in other studies.

  12. Effect of N2O to C4F8/O2 on Global Warming during Silicon Nitride Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD) Chamber Cleaning Using a Remote Inductively Coupled Plasma Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ji Hwang; Oh, Chang Hyun; Lee, Nae Eung; Yeom, Geun Young

    2002-12-01

    For the silicon nitride plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) chamber cleaning, a remote inductively coupled plasma (ICP) source was used with C4F8/O2/N2O and the effects of N2O on the silicon nitride cleaning rates and global warming were investigated. By adding 5% of N2O to C4F8/O2, the cleaning rate comparable to that of optimized Ar/NF3 could be obtained. At the exhaust line, CF4, C4F8, NF3, etc. were detected and the significant decrease of million metric tons of carbon equivalent (MMTCE) observed by the addition of N2O to C4F8/O2 was due to the decrease of emitted CF4. The MMTCE for the optimized C4F8/O2/N2O was also similar to that for Ar/NF3 at the highest cleaning condition.

  13. Plasma-assisted MBE growth of nitride-based intersubband detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Monroy, Eva; Guillot, Fabien; Leconte, Sylvain; Bellet-Amalric, Edith

    2007-04-10

    In this work, we present the plasma-assisted molecular-beam epitaxy of quantum well infrared photodetector structures, including the Si-doped GaN/AlN short-period superlattice of the active region, AlGaN claddings and integration of the final device. Photovoltage measurements of complete devices reveal a narrow ({approx}90 meV) detection peak at 1.39 {mu}m at room temperature.

  14. Effect of process parameters on properties of argon–nitrogen plasma for titanium nitride film deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Saikia, Partha; Kakati, Bharat

    2013-11-15

    In this study, the effect of working pressure and input power on the physical properties and sputtering efficiencies of argon–nitrogen (Ar/N{sub 2}) plasma in direct current magnetron discharge is investigated. The discharge in Ar/N{sub 2} is used to deposit TiN films on high speed steel substrate. The physical plasma parameters are determined by using Langmuir probe and optical emission spectroscopy. On the basis of the different reactions in the gas phase, the variation of plasma parameters and sputtering rate are explained. A prominent change of electron temperature, electron density, ion density, and degree of ionization of Ar is found as a function of working pressure and input power. The results also show that increasing working pressure exerts a negative effect on film deposition rate while increasing input power has a positive impact on the same. To confirm the observed physical properties and evaluate the texture growth as a function of deposition parameters, x-ray diffraction study of deposited TiN films is also done.

  15. Hysteresis in amplitudes of self-excited oscillations for co-axial electrode-geometry DC glow discharge plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, R.; Narayanan, R.; Prasad, Awadhesh

    2014-12-15

    Hysteresis in amplitudes of the self-excited oscillations of the floating potential and discharge current is observed in an unmagnetized co-axial electrode-geometry DC glow discharge plasma system. The nonlinearities of these oscillations are studied using standard dynamical analysis tools. The characterization revealed the transition of low-amplitude high-frequency period-n oscillations to a large amplitude low frequency period-1 oscillations through a chaotic intermediate route. The transition of the low amplitude, high frequency period-n oscillations to chaotic type is observed to be linked to the dynamical change in the plasma system, i.e., after a negative differential resistance (NDR) region, whereas the transition from chaotic to period-1 is observed to be linked to a discharge current threshold.

  16. Determination of dissolved boron in fresh, estuarine, and geothermal waters by d.c. argon-plasma emission spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ball, J.W.; Thompson, J.M.; Jenne, E.A.

    1978-01-01

    A d.c. argon-plasma emission spectrometer is used to determine dissolved boron in natural (fresh and estuarine) water samples. Concentrations ranged from 0.02 to 250 mg l-1. The emission-concentration function is linear from 0.02 to 1000 mg l-1. Achievement of a relative standard deviation of ??? 3% requires frequent restandardization to offset sensitivity changes. Dilution may be necessary to overcome high and variable electron density caused by differences in alkali-metal content and to avoid quenching of the plasma by high solute concentrations of sodium and other easily ionized elements. The proposed method was tested against a reference method and found to be more sensitive, equally or more precise and accurate, less subject to interferences, with a wider linear analytical range than the carmine method. Analyses of standard reference samples yielded results in all cases within one standard deviation of the means. ?? 1978.

  17. Structural evolution of Ti destroyable interlayer in large-size diamond film deposition by DC arc plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jianchao; Li, Chengming; Liu, Jinlong; Wei, Junjun; Chen, Liangxian; Hua, Chenyi; Yan, Xiongbo

    2016-05-01

    The addition of titanium (Ti) interlayer was verified to reduce the residual stress of diamond films by self-fracturing and facilitate the harvest of a crack-free free-standing diamond film prepared by direct current (DC) arc plasma jet. In this study, the evolution of the Ti interlayer between large-area diamond film and substrate was studied and modeled in detail. The evolution of the interlayer was found to be relevant to the distribution of the DC arc plasma, which can be divided into three areas (arc center, arc main, and arc edge). The formation rate of titanium carbide (TiC) in the arc main was faster than in the other two areas and resulted in the preferred generation of crack in the diamond film in the arc main during cooling. Sandwich structures were formed along with the growth of TiC until the complete transformation of the Ti interlayer. The interlayer released stress via self-fracture. Avoiding uneven fragile regions that formed locally in the interlayer and achieving cooperatively released stress are crucial for the preparation of large crack-free diamond films.

  18. Dc to ac field conversion due to leaky-wave excitation in a plasma slab behind an ionization front

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostin, V. A.; Vvedenskii, N. V.

    2015-03-01

    We present a way for generating coherent tunable electromagnetic radiation through dc to ac field conversion by an ionization front. The conversion is caused by the excitation of leaky waves behind the transversely limited ionization front propagating in a uniform electrostatic field. This differs significantly from the well-known dc-to-ac-radiation-converter models which consider Doppler-like frequency conversion by a transversely unlimited ionization front propagating in a spatially periodic electric field. We explore the dispersion properties and excitation of these leaky waves radiated through the transverse plasma boundary at the Cherenkov angle to the direction of propagation of a superluminal ionization front as dependent on the parameters of the plasma produced and on the speed of the ionization front. It is shown that not only the center frequency but also the duration and waveform of the generated pulse may significantly depend on the speed of the ionization front. The results indicate the possibility of using such converters based on planar photoconductive antennas to create sources of microwave and terahertz radiation with controllable waveforms that are transformed from video to radio pulse when the angle of incident ionizing radiation is tuned.

  19. Catastrophic instabilities of modified DA-DC hybrid surface waves in a semi-bounded plasma system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Myoung-Jae; Jung, Young-Dae

    2016-06-01

    We find the catastrophic instabilities and derive the growth rates for the dust-cyclotron resonance (DCR) and dust-rotation resonance (DRR) modes of the modified dust-acoustic and dust-cyclotron (DA-DC) hybrid surface waves propagating at the plasma-vacuum interface where the plasma is semi-bounded and composed of electrons and rotating dust grains. The effects of magnetic field and dust rotation frequency on the DCR- and DDR-modes are also investigated. We find that the dust rotation frequency enhances the growth rate of DCR-mode and the effect of dust rotation on this resonance mode decreases with an increase of the wave number. We also find that an increase of magnetic field strength enhances the DCR growth rate, especially, for the short wavelength regime. In the case of DRR-mode, the growth rate is found to be decreased less sensitively with an increase of the wave number compared with the case of DCR, but much significantly enhanced by an increase of dust rotation frequency. The DRR growth rate also decreases with an increase of the magnetic field strength, especially in the long wavelength regime. Interestingly, we find that catastrophic instabilities occur for both DCR- and DRR-modes of the modified DA-DC hybrid surface waves when the rotational frequency is close to the dust-cyclotron frequency. Both modes can also be excited catastrophically due to the cooperative interaction between the DCR-mode and the DRR-mode.

  20. Synthesis of Cubic Boron Nitride Nanoparticles from Boron Oxide, Melamine and NH3 by Non-Transferred Ar-N2 Thermal Plasma.

    PubMed

    Ko, Eun Ha; Kim, Tae-Hee; Choi, Sooseok; Park, Dong-Wha

    2015-11-01

    Cubic boron nitride (c-BN) which is has extremely high hardness and thermal conductivity comparable to the diamond was synthesized in nanoparticle form by using non-transferred thermal plasma. The input power of arc plasma was fixed at 13.5 kW and the operating pressure was also fixed at atmospheric pressure. Boron oxide (B2O3) and melamine (C3H6N6) were used as raw materials for the sources of boron and nitrogen. Ammonia gas (NH3) was additionally injected to plasma jet as reactive gas providing additional nitrogen. Decomposed B2O3 and C3H6N6 enhance reactivity for synthesizing c-BN with exothermic reactions between carbon, hydrogen and oxygen. Products were collected from the inner wall of reactor. In X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscope measurements, the collected powder was confirmed as c-BN nanoparticles which have crystalline size smaller than 150 nm.

  1. Residual compressive stress induced infrared-absorption frequency shift of hexagonal boron nitride in cubic boron nitride films prepared by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yong; Jin, Panpan; Chen, Aili; Yang, Hangsheng; Xu, Yabo

    2012-09-01

    The effects of compressive stress on the TO phonon frequencies of hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) in cubic BN (cBN) films were investigated using infrared absorption spectroscopy, showing that the B-N stretching vibration of hBN at 1380 cm-1 shifted to high wavenumbers under biaxial compressive stress with the rate 2.65 cm-1 per GPa, while the B-N-B bending vibration near 780 cm-1 shifted to low wavenumbers with the rate -3.45 cm-1/GPa. The density functional perturbation theoretical calculation was carried out to check the above phonon frequencies under stress for two typical orientations of hBN crystallite. The results are shown to be in fair agreement with the experimental data. Our results suggest that the residual compressive stress accumulated in cBN films can be evaluated from the IR peak position near 780 cm-1.

  2. Low-Temperature Plasma-Assisted Atomic Layer Deposition of Silicon Nitride Moisture Permeation Barrier Layers.

    PubMed

    Andringa, Anne-Marije; Perrotta, Alberto; de Peuter, Koen; Knoops, Harm C M; Kessels, Wilhelmus M M; Creatore, Mariadriana

    2015-10-14

    Encapsulation of organic (opto-)electronic devices, such as organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs), photovoltaic cells, and field-effect transistors, is required to minimize device degradation induced by moisture and oxygen ingress. SiNx moisture permeation barriers have been fabricated using a very recently developed low-temperature plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition (ALD) approach, consisting of half-reactions of the substrate with the precursor SiH2(NH(t)Bu)2 and with N2-fed plasma. The deposited films have been characterized in terms of their refractive index and chemical composition by spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The SiNx thin-film refractive index ranges from 1.80 to 1.90 for films deposited at 80 °C up to 200 °C, respectively, and the C, O, and H impurity levels decrease when the deposition temperature increases. The relative open porosity content of the layers has been studied by means of multisolvent ellipsometric porosimetry (EP), adopting three solvents with different kinetic diameters: water (∼0.3 nm), ethanol (∼0.4 nm), and toluene (∼0.6 nm). Irrespective of the deposition temperature, and hence the impurity content in the SiNx films, no uptake of any adsorptive has been observed, pointing to the absence of open pores larger than 0.3 nm in diameter. Instead, multilayer development has been observed, leading to type II isotherms that, according to the IUPAC classification, are characteristic of nonporous layers. The calcium test has been performed in a climate chamber at 20 °C and 50% relative humidity to determine the intrinsic water vapor transmission rate (WVTR) of SiNx barriers deposited at 120 °C. Intrinsic WVTR values in the range of 10(-6) g/m2/day indicate excellent barrier properties for ALD SiNx layers as thin as 10 nm, competing with that of state-of-the-art plasma-enhanced chemical vapor-deposited SiNx layers of a few hundred

  3. Low-Temperature Plasma-Assisted Atomic Layer Deposition of Silicon Nitride Moisture Permeation Barrier Layers.

    PubMed

    Andringa, Anne-Marije; Perrotta, Alberto; de Peuter, Koen; Knoops, Harm C M; Kessels, Wilhelmus M M; Creatore, Mariadriana

    2015-10-14

    Encapsulation of organic (opto-)electronic devices, such as organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs), photovoltaic cells, and field-effect transistors, is required to minimize device degradation induced by moisture and oxygen ingress. SiNx moisture permeation barriers have been fabricated using a very recently developed low-temperature plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition (ALD) approach, consisting of half-reactions of the substrate with the precursor SiH2(NH(t)Bu)2 and with N2-fed plasma. The deposited films have been characterized in terms of their refractive index and chemical composition by spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The SiNx thin-film refractive index ranges from 1.80 to 1.90 for films deposited at 80 °C up to 200 °C, respectively, and the C, O, and H impurity levels decrease when the deposition temperature increases. The relative open porosity content of the layers has been studied by means of multisolvent ellipsometric porosimetry (EP), adopting three solvents with different kinetic diameters: water (∼0.3 nm), ethanol (∼0.4 nm), and toluene (∼0.6 nm). Irrespective of the deposition temperature, and hence the impurity content in the SiNx films, no uptake of any adsorptive has been observed, pointing to the absence of open pores larger than 0.3 nm in diameter. Instead, multilayer development has been observed, leading to type II isotherms that, according to the IUPAC classification, are characteristic of nonporous layers. The calcium test has been performed in a climate chamber at 20 °C and 50% relative humidity to determine the intrinsic water vapor transmission rate (WVTR) of SiNx barriers deposited at 120 °C. Intrinsic WVTR values in the range of 10(-6) g/m2/day indicate excellent barrier properties for ALD SiNx layers as thin as 10 nm, competing with that of state-of-the-art plasma-enhanced chemical vapor-deposited SiNx layers of a few hundred

  4. III-Nitride Dry Etching - Comparison of Inductively Coupled Plasma Chemistries

    SciTech Connect

    Abernathy, C.R.; Cho, H.; Donovan, S.M.; Hahn, Y-B.; Han, J.; Hays, D.C.; MacKenzie, J.D.; Pearton, S.J.; Shul, R.J.

    1998-11-10

    A systematic study of the etch characteristics of GaN, AlN and InN has been performed with boron halides- (BI{sub 3} and BBr{sub 3}) and interhalogen- (ICl and IBr) based Inductively Coupled Plasmas. Maximum etch selectivities of -100:1 were achieved for InN over both GaN and AlN in the BI{sub 3} mixtures due to the relatively high volatility of the InN etch products and the lower bond strength of InN. Maximum selectivies of- 14 for InN over GaN and >25 for InN over AlN were obtained with ICl and IBr chemistries. The etched surface morphologies of GaN in these four mixtures are similar or better than those of the control sample.

  5. VUV-induced nitriding of polymer surfaces: Comparison with plasma treatments in nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truica-Marasescu, F.; Guimond, S.; Wertheimer, M. R.

    2003-08-01

    Film samples of two very pure polyolefins (low density polyethylene and biaxially oriented polypropylene) have been surface-modified by two different methods, vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photochemistry in low pressure ammonia, and atmospheric pressure glow discharge plasma treatment in N 2 gas. The results of these two treatments are compared, namely surface compositions (determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and infrared spectroscopy, ATR-FTIR) and surface energies (determined by contact angle goniometry with several probe liquids). We show that higher concentrations, [N], can be achieved by VUV photochemistry (up to 25%), that N is predominantly bonded as amine or amide groups, and that there exist certain particularities specific to each of the treatment methods investigated.

  6. Frictional and structural characterization of ion-nitrided low and high chromium steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalvins, T.

    1985-01-01

    Low Cr steels AISI 41410, AISI 4340, and high Cr austenitic stainless steels AISI 304, AISI 316 were ion nitrided in a dc glow discharge plasma consisting of a 75 percent H2 - 25 percent N2 mixture. Surface compound layer phases were identified, and compound layer microhardness and diffusion zone microhardness profiles were established. Distinct differences in surface compound layer hardness and diffusion zone profiles were determined between the low and high Cr alloy steels. The high Cr stainless steels after ion nitriding displayed a hard compound layer and an abrupt diffusion zone. The compound layers of the high Cr stainless steels had a columnar structure which accounts for brittleness when layers are exposed to contact stresses. The ion nitrided surfaces of high and low Cr steels displayed a low coefficient of friction with respect to the untreated surfaces when examined in a pin and disk tribotester.

  7. Numerical and experimental study on a pulsed-dc plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X. Y.; Pei, X. K.; Lu, X. P.; Liu, D. W.

    2014-06-01

    A numerical and experimental study of plasma jet propagation in a low-temperature, atmospheric-pressure, helium jet in ambient air is presented. A self-consistent, multi-species, two-dimensional axially symmetric plasma model with detailed finite-rate chemistry of helium-air mixture composition is used to provide insights into the propagation of the plasma jet. The obtained simulation results suggest that the sheath forms near the dielectric tube inner surface and shields the plasma channel from the tube surface. The strong electric field at the edge of the dielectric field enhances the ionization in the air mixing layer; therefore, the streamer head becomes ring-shaped when the streamer runs out of the tube. The avalanche-to-streamer transition is the main mechanism of streamer advancement. Penning ionization dominates the ionization reactions and increases the electrical conductivity of the plasma channel. The simulation results are supported by experimental observations under similar discharge conditions.

  8. Development of metal nanocluster ion source based on dc magnetron plasma sputtering at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Majumdar, Abhijit; Koepp, Daniel; Ganeva, Marina; Hippler, Rainer; Datta, Debasish; Bhattacharyya, Satyaranjan

    2009-09-15

    A simple and cost effective nanocluster ion source for the deposition of size selected metal nanocluster has been developed based on the dc magnetron discharge (including pulsed dc discharge). The most important and interesting feature of this cluster source is that it is working at room temperature, cooled by chilled water during the experiment. There is no extraction unit in this device and the cluster streams flow only due to the pressure gradient from source chamber to substrate via quadrupole mass filter. It has provision of multiple substrate holders in the deposition chamber, which can be controlled manually. The facility consists of quadrupole mass filter (QMF 200), which can select masses in the range of 2-125 000 atoms depending on the target materials, with a constant mass resolution (M/{Delta}M{approx}25). The dc magnetron discharge at a power of about 130 W with Ar as feed/buffer gas was used to produce the Cu nanocluster in an aggregation tube and deposited on Si (100) wafer temperature.

  9. A Particle-Tracking-Velocimetry (PTV) Investigation of Liquid Injection in a DC Plasma Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damiani, David; Tarlet, Dominique; Meillot, Erick

    2014-02-01

    The present article describes experimental results of liquid injection in a thermal plasma jet by particle-tracking velocimetry (PTV). This technique delivers an in-situ real-time analysis of the liquid breakup and measures the velocities and the trajectories of the particles. The observations were done within the 10 mm surrounding the injection location where the plasma brightness is considerable. First, a validation of the proposed investigation method was carried out in a slower plasma jet. Subsequently, PTV measurements within faster plasma jets, resulting in a set of trajectories, were compared with trajectories achieved through optical diagnostics based on a simple shadow-graph technique proposed by Damiani et al. [Injection d'un liquide au sein d'un jet plasma thermique: optimisation de la trajectoire des particules, Proceedings of Congrès Francophone de Techniques Laser, CFTL 2010, Vandoeuvre lès nancy, France, 2010 (in French)]. These trajectories indicated that a higher plasma flow rate was required to spray all droplet sizes in the axis of the flow, thereby enabling an optimal spraying (then coating) application for producing nanostructured thin layers. This study showed that the liquid injection parameters are of main importance to obtain optimal injection and plasma parameters to achieve the required coating properties.

  10. Plasma nitriding induced growth of Pt-nanowire arrays as high performance electrocatalysts for fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Shangfeng; Lin, Kaijie; Malladi, Sairam K.; Lu, Yaxiang; Sun, Shuhui; Xu, Qiang; Steinberger-Wilckens, Robert; Dong, Hanshan

    2014-09-01

    In this work, we demonstrate an innovative approach, combing a novel active screen plasma (ASP) technique with green chemical synthesis, for a direct fabrication of uniform Pt nanowire arrays on large-area supports. The ASP treatment enables in-situ N-doping and surface modification to the support surface, significantly promoting the uniform growth of tiny Pt nuclei which directs the growth of ultrathin single-crystal Pt nanowire (2.5-3 nm in diameter) arrays, forming a three-dimensional (3D) nano-architecture. Pt nanowire arrays in-situ grown on the large-area gas diffusion layer (GDL) (5 cm2) can be directly used as the catalyst electrode in fuel cells. The unique design brings in an extremely thin electrocatalyst layer, facilitating the charge transfer and mass transfer properties, leading to over two times higher power density than the conventional Pt nanoparticle catalyst electrode in real fuel cell environment. Due to the similar challenges faced with other nanostructures and the high availability of ASP for other material surfaces, this work will provide valuable insights and guidance towards the development of other new nano-architectures for various practical applications.

  11. Silicon nitride and oxynitride film formation using electron cyclotron resonance plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Barbour, J.C.

    1994-07-01

    Growth of dielectrics from electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasmas can provide for low-temperature surface passivation and gate-quality insulation. Properties of SiN{sub x} and SiN{sub x}O{sub y} were measured on three model substrates: Si, GaAs, and InSb. The hydrogen incorporated into as-grown SiN{sub x} was primarily bonded to nitrogen and the total H content decreased with increasing deposition temperature (100--600 C). A model for the thermal release of H from Si-H bonds and two types of N-H bonds described the energetics of the H stability. A thermally-grown SiO{sub 2} layer improved the interface between ECR-deposited SiN{sub x} and Si, yielding an interface-state density of 1.5 {times} 10{sup 11} cm{sup {minus}2} eV{sup {minus}1} (midgap). The thermal release of H from SiN{sub x} on GaAs passivated non-radiative recombination centers. The difference in adhesion of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} on InSb and the adhesion of Si{sub 3}ON{sub 2} on InSb was described in terms of the strength of the bonding at the dielectric-InSb interface, and the room-temperature growth of a high-quality dielectric on InSb was demonstrated.

  12. Deposition of titanium nitride on AISI-304 in a plasma focus environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeb, S.; Qayyum, A.; Shafiq, M.; Zakaullah, M.

    2008-05-01

    Polycrystalline, smooth, and hard thin films of TiN are successfully deposited on AISI-304 substrates using a 1.5kJ Mather-type dense plasma focus device charged at 18kV. The purpose of this study is to investigate the structural and mechanical properties of the TiN thin films in terms of ion dose and substrate position to establish the optimum deposition conditions. The films are analyzed using XRD, SEM, electron microprobe and micro-hardness testing. XRD confirms the deposition of a polycrystalline TiN thin film together with the emergence of an iron chromium nickel phase. The surface hardness-in comparison to the unexposed substrate-is found to increase up to 250% when a film is deposited using 30 focus shots at an axial distance of 6cm. SEM micrographs show that the quality of the film is improved with an increasing number of focus shots. The constituent elements of the film are also confirmed by electron microprobe.

  13. Streptococci biofilm decontamination on teeth by low-temperature air plasma of dc corona discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalóvá, Z.; Zahoran, M.; Zahoranová, A.; Machala, Z.

    2014-06-01

    Non-thermal plasmas of atmospheric pressure air direct current corona discharges were investigated for potential applications in dental medicine. The objective of this ex vivo study was to apply cold plasmas for the decontamination of Streptococci biofilm grown on extracted human teeth, and to estimate their antimicrobial efficiency and the plasma's impact on the enamel and dentine of the treated tooth surfaces. The results show that both positive streamer and negative Trichel pulse coronas can reduce bacterial population in the biofilm by up to 3 logs in a 10 min exposure time. This bactericidal effect can be reached faster (within 5 min) by electrostatic spraying of water through the discharge onto the treated tooth surface. Examination of the tooth surface after plasma exposure by infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy did not show any significant alteration in the tooth material composition or the tooth surface structures.

  14. DC Pulsed Atmospheric Micro Plasma using a Voltage Doubled Capacitive Ballast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Chang-Seung; Lee, Je-Hyun; Son, Eui-Jeong; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Lee, Hae June; Lee, Ho-Jun; PPRC Team

    2013-09-01

    An atmospheric plasma driven by the capacitive ballast circuit with voltage doubler has been developed. At first, the capacitors are charged and then the stored energy is injected into the electrode. At that time, the voltage is doubled by means of series connection switching. The switching device isolate the power from the plasma, therefore the discharge energy is effectively controlled by the stored energy in the capacitor. The role of voltage doubler is maintaining the charging voltage less than the firing voltage of the electrodes and providing sufficiently high voltage during the plasma generation. It eliminates parasitic discharge due to capacitive coupling between isolation switch and plasma electrodes. Proposed method allows stable operation of the μ-plasma under dielectric-free electrode as well as independent control of discharge voltage and energy. When the applied capacitance is varied as 1.2 nF, 10 nF and 22 nF at the voltage of 600V, the corresponding discharge energy per pulse is 168 μJ, 971 μJ, and 1.126 mJ respectively. For the fixed capacitance value, discharge duration decreases and peak current increases with the discharge voltage. The characteristics of the micro plasma are analyzed in terms of time-resolved images, spatio-temporally resolved OES and fluid simulations. This research was supported by Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology (2010-0011136).

  15. Distribution of Fe atom density in a dc magnetron sputtering plasma source measured by laser-induced fluorescence imaging spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibagaki, K.; Nafarizal, N.; Sasaki, K.; Toyoda, H.; Iwata, S.; Kato, T.; Tsunashima, S.; Sugai, H.

    2003-10-01

    Magnetron sputtering discharge is widely used as an efficient method for thin film fabrication. In order to achieve the optimized fabrication, understanding of the kinetics in plasmas is essential. In the present work, we measured the density distribution of sputtered Fe atoms using laser-induced fluorescence imaging spectroscopy. A dc magnetron plasma source with a Fe target was used. An area of 20 × 2 mm in front of the target was irradiated by a tunable laser beam having a planar shape. The picture of laser-induced fluorescence on the laser beam was taken using an ICCD camera. In this way, we obtained the two-dimensional image of the Fe atom density. As a result, it has been found that the Fe atom density observed at a distance of several centimeters from the target is higher than that adjacent to the target, when the Ar gas pressure was relatively high. It is suggested from this result that some gas-phase production processes of Fe atoms are available in the plasma. This work has been performed under the 21st Century COE Program by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology in Japan.

  16. Plasticity and ab initio characterizations on Fe 4N produced on the surface of nanocrystallized 18Ni-maraging steel plasma nitrided at lower temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, M. F.; Wu, Y. Q.; Liu, R. L.

    2009-08-01

    18Ni-maraging steel has been entirely nanocrystallized by a series of processes including solution treatment, hot-rolling deformation, cold-drawn deformation and direct electric heating. The plasma nitriding of nanocrystallized 18Ni-maraging steel was carried out at 410 °C for 3 h and 6 h in a mixture gas of 20% N 2 + 80% H 2 with a pressure of 400 Pa. The surface phase constructions and nitrogen concentration profile in surface layer were analyzed using an X-ray diffractometer (XRD) and the glow discharge spectrometry (GDS), respectively. The results show that an about 2 μm thick compound layer (mono-phase γ'-Fe 4N) can be produced on the top of the surface layer of nanocrystallized 18Ni-maraging steel plasma nitrided at 410 °C for 6 h. The measured hardness value of the nitrided surface is 11.6 GPa. More importantly, the γ'-Fe 4N phase has better plasticity, i.e., its plastic deformation energy calculated from the load-displacement curve obtained by nano-indentation tester is close to that of nanocrystallized 18Ni-maraging steel. Additionally, the mechanical properties of γ'-Fe 4N phase were also characterized by first-principles calculations. The calculated results indicate that the hardness value and the ratio of bulk to shear modulus ( B/ G) of the γ'-Fe 4N phase are 10.15 GPa and 3.12 (>1.75), respectively. This demonstrates that the γ'-Fe 4N phase has higher hardness and better ductility.

  17. Low sheet resistance titanium nitride films by low-temperature plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition using design of experiments methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, Micheal Blake, Alan; Povey, Ian M.; Schmidt, Michael; Petkov, Nikolay; Carolan, Patrick; Quinn, Aidan J.

    2014-05-15

    A design of experiments methodology was used to optimize the sheet resistance of titanium nitride (TiN) films produced by plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PE-ALD) using a tetrakis(dimethylamino)titanium precursor in a N{sub 2}/H{sub 2} plasma at low temperature (250 °C). At fixed chamber pressure (300 mTorr) and plasma power (300 W), the plasma duration and N{sub 2} flow rate were the most significant factors. The lowest sheet resistance values (163 Ω/sq. for a 20 nm TiN film) were obtained using plasma durations ∼40 s, N{sub 2} flow rates >60 standard cubic centimeters per minute, and purge times ∼60 s. Time of flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy data revealed reduced levels of carbon contaminants in the TiN films with lowest sheet resistance (163 Ω/sq.), compared to films with higher sheet resistance (400–600 Ω/sq.) while transmission electron microscopy data showed a higher density of nanocrystallites in the low-resistance films. Further significant reductions in sheet resistance, from 163 Ω/sq. to 70 Ω/sq. for a 20 nm TiN film (corresponding resistivity ∼145 μΩ·cm), were achieved by addition of a postcycle Ar/N{sub 2} plasma step in the PE-ALD process.

  18. The role of plasma chemistry on functional silicon nitride film properties deposited at low-temperature by mixing two frequency powers using PECVD.

    PubMed

    Sahu, B B; Yin, Y Y; Tsutsumi, T; Hori, M; Han, Jeon G

    2016-05-14

    Control of the plasma densities and energies of the principal plasma species is crucial to induce modification of the plasma reactivity, chemistry, and film properties. This work presents a systematic and integrated approach to the low-temperature deposition of hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride films looking into optimization and control of the plasma processes. Radiofrequency (RF) and ultrahigh frequency (UHF) power are combined to enhance significantly the nitrogen plasma and atomic-radical density to enforce their effect on film properties. This study presents an extensive investigation of the influence of combining radiofrequency (RF) and ultrahigh frequency (UHF) power as a power ratio (PR = RF : UHF), ranging from 4 : 0 to 0 : 4, on the compositional, structural, and optical properties of the synthesized films. The data reveal that DF power with a characteristic bi-Maxwellian electron energy distribution function (EEDF) is effectively useful for enhancing the ionization and dissociation of neutrals, which in turn helps in enabling high rate deposition with better film properties than that of SF operations. Utilizing DF PECVD, a wide-bandgap of ∼3.5 eV with strong photoluminescence features can be achieved only by using a high-density plasma and high nitrogen atom density at room temperature. The present work also proposes the suitability of the DF PECVD approach for industrial applications. PMID:27109293

  19. Grassroots Advancement Plasma Physics: The Creation of a Dc Glow Discharge Tube for a high school classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onumah, Henrietta; Sheth, Niraj; Gershman, Sophia; Post Zwicker, Andrew

    2002-11-01

    The objective of the project is to create a safe, affordable, portable, computer interactive, and multifunctional DC glow discharge tube for use in a typical high school physics classroom. Our goal is to use this device not only to capture and cerate interest in plasma physics but as a tool to engage students in an active exploration of a variety of physics topics. We present the design, operation and labs created with our discharge tube. We are creating a selection of labs ranging from current/voltage relationships to spectroscopy that can be done on our setup. We have evaluated the vacuum chamber material- glass vs. plastic, our electrode spacing- a fixed vs. variable, external electronics with an emphasis on the power supply, safety and ease of use. Our design is an accessible 6 inch long tube with an inner diameter of 2 inches, which attains low pressure of about 20- 40 mTorr and is computer interactive.

  20. Stress relief patterns of hydrogenated amorphous carbon films grown by dc-pulse plasma chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qi; Wang, Chengbing; Wang, Zhou; Zhang, Junyan; He, Deyan

    2008-12-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous carbon films were prepared on Si (1 0 0) substrates by dc-pulse plasma chemical vapor deposition. The nature of the deposited films was characterized by Raman spectra and the stress relief patterns were observed by scanning electron microscope. Besides the well-known sinusoidal type and flower type patterns, etc., two different stress relief patterns, ring type and peg-top shape with exiguous tine on the top, were observed. The ring type in this paper was a clear ridge-cracked buckle and unusual. Two competing buckle delamination morphologies ring and sinusoidal buckling coexist. The ridge-cracked buckle in ring type was narrower than the sinusoidal buckling. Meanwhile peg-top shape with exiguous tine on the top in this paper was unusual. These different patterns supported the approach in which the stress relief forms have been analyzed using the theory of plate buckling.

  1. Effect of additive gases and injection methods on chemical dry etching of silicon nitride, silicon oxynitride, and silicon oxide layers in F{sub 2} remote plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, Y. B.; Park, S. M.; Kim, D. J.; Lee, N.-E.; Kim, K. S.; Bae, G. H.

    2007-07-15

    The authors investigated the effects of various additive gases and different injection methods on the chemical dry etching of silicon nitride, silicon oxynitride, and silicon oxide layers in F{sub 2} remote plasmas. N{sub 2} and N{sub 2}+O{sub 2} gases in the F{sub 2}/Ar/N{sub 2} and F{sub 2}/Ar/N{sub 2}/O{sub 2} remote plasmas effectively increased the etch rate of the layers. The addition of direct-injected NO gas increased the etch rates most significantly. NO radicals generated by the addition of N{sub 2} and N{sub 2}+O{sub 2} or direct-injected NO molecules contributed to the effective removal of nitrogen and oxygen in the silicon nitride and oxide layers, by forming N{sub 2}O and NO{sub 2} by-products, respectively, and thereby enhancing SiF{sub 4} formation. As a result of the effective removal of the oxygen, nitrogen, and silicon atoms in the layers, the chemical dry etch rates were enhanced significantly. The process regime for the etch rate enhancement of the layers was extended at elevated temperature.

  2. Pressure and arc voltage coupling in dc plasma torches: Identification and extraction of oscillation modes

    SciTech Connect

    Rat, V.; Coudert, J. F.

    2010-08-15

    This work is devoted to the instabilities occurring in a plasma torch, such as those found in plasma spraying. These instabilities are responsible for a lack of reproducibility of coatings properties, especially in the case of suspension plasma spraying that is an innovative way to obtain thin coatings of submicron-sized particles. Strong Helmholtz oscillations are highlighted in the plasma flow and it is demonstrated that they overlap with different acoustic modes in addition with the more commonly admitted ''restrike'' mode, the later being due to rearcing events in the arc region. The instabilities occur in the arc voltage but it is experimentally shown in this paper that the pressure within the torch body presents the same kind of instabilities. Besides, a numerical filtering technique has been adapted to isolate the different instability components. The operating parameters of the plasma torch were varied in order to highlight their influence on the amplitude of the different modes, both for the arc voltage and the pressure.

  3. The use of ion chromatography-dc plasma atomic emission spectrometry for the speciation of trace metals

    SciTech Connect

    Urasa, I.T.

    1991-09-20

    The original objects of this research program were: to interface d.c. plasma atomic emission spectrometer with an ion chromatograph; to characterize and optimize the combined systems for application in the speciation of metals in aqueous solutions; to use this system in the study of the solution chemistry of various metals; and to find ways in which the measurement sensitivity of the method can be enhanced, thereby allowing the detection of metal species at low ppb concentration levels. This approach has been used to study the chemistry of and speciate several elements in solution including: arsenic, chromium, iron, manganese, nickel phosphorus, platinum, selenium, and vanadium. During the course of this research, we have found that the solution chemistry of the elements studied and the speciation data obtained can vary considerably depending on the solution, and the chromatographic conditions employed. The speciation of chromium, iron, and vanadium was found to be highly influenced by the acidity of the sample. The element selective nature of the d.c. plasma detector allows these changes to be monitored, thereby providing quantitative information on the new moieties formed. New approaches are being developed including the use of chelating ligands as preconcentration agents for purposes of reducing further the detection limits of the elements of interest and to improve the overall element speciation scheme. New thrusts are being directed towards the employment of post-column derivatization method coupled with colorimetric measurements to detect and quantify metal species eluting from the chromatographic column. The influence of sample acidity on these investigations will be carefully evaluated. These new thrusts are described in the accompanying Project Renewal Proposal.

  4. Characterization of plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposited nitride films used in very large scale integrated applications

    SciTech Connect

    Stamper, A.K.; Pennington, S.L. )

    1993-06-01

    Several PECVD SiN[sub x]H[sub y] processes used in VLSI applications are discussed. Films have been deposited in a 200-mm wafer single-chamber PecVD reactor. The processes are characterized in terms of deposition rates, uniformity across 200-mm silicon waters, conformality over metal lines, density, etch rates, polish rates, stress, index of refraction, and stoichiometry. PECVD nitride processes with high deposition rates and good conformality are presented along with processes with etch rates comparable to LPCVD nitride films.

  5. Hydrogen diffusion in silicon from plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposited silicon nitride film at high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheoran, Manav; Kim, Dong Seop; Rohatgi, Ajeet; Dekkers, H. F. W.; Beaucarne, G.; Young, Matthew; Asher, Sally

    2008-04-01

    The stable hydrogen isotope deuterium (D), which is released during the annealing of deuterated silicon nitride films, diffuses through the crystalline silicon and is captured by a thin, amorphous layer of silicon sputtered on the rear surface. We report on the measurement of the concentration of "penetrated" D by secondary ion mass spectrometry to monitor the flux of D diffusing through single-crystalline silicon wafers. The penetrated D content in the trapping layer increases with the annealing time. However, the flux of D injected into the silicon from the silicon nitride layer decreases as annealing time increases.

  6. Effects of Macroscopic Pattern Density and O2 Addition on Chamber Stability during Silicon Nitride Layer Etching in UNITY II-IEM Plasma Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Back, Woon Suck; Kim, Kil Ho; Kim, Jong Il; Lee, Joon Hyun; Won, Yong Sik; Choi, Seon Ho; Hwang, Chung Ho; Lee, Dai Hoon

    2002-04-01

    Effects of the wafer level pattern density on chamber particle generation during silicon nitride (Si3N4) layer etching have been studied in the medium density plasma source, UNITY II-IEM. It was found that the macroscopic pattern density of the etched layer strongly affects the etching environment and subsequently affects the chamber stability. The abrupt change in the macroscopic pattern density of the etched layer, especially when the pattern density is lowered, can sometimes results in the hazardous chamber particle generation. Experiments were performed in order to cope with the chamber particle generation induced by the macroscopic pattern density variation. Controlling the F/C ratio within the plasma by varying the amount of feeding O2 gas was proven to be an efficient way to prevent the occurrence of the chamber particles. Based on our experimental results, the mechanism for the chamber particle generation and that for the reduction will be discussed.

  7. RP and RQA Analysis for Floating Potential Fluctuations in a DC Magnetron Sputtering Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabavath, Gopikishan; Banerjee, I.; Mahapatra, S. K.

    2016-04-01

    The nonlinear dynamics of a direct current magnetron sputtering plasma is visualized using recurrence plot (RP) technique. RP comprises the recurrence quantification analysis (RQA) which is an efficient method to observe critical regime transitions in dynamics. Further, RQA provides insight information about the system’s behavior. We observed the floating potential fluctuations of the plasma as a function of discharge voltage by using Langmuir probe. The system exhibits quasi-periodic-chaotic-quasi-periodic-chaotic transitions. These transitions are quantified from determinism, Lmax, and entropy of RQA. Statistical investigations like kurtosis and skewness also studied for these transitions which are in well agreement with RQA results.

  8. Initial Results of DC Electric Fields, Associated Plasma Drifts, Magnetic Fields, and Plasma Waves Observed on the C/NOFS Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfaff, R.; Freudenreich, H.; Bromund, K.; Klenzing, J.; Rowland, D.; Maynard, N.

    2010-01-01

    Initial results are presented from the Vector Electric Field Investigation (VEFI) on the Air Force Communication/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) satellite, a mission designed to understand, model, and forecast the presence of equatorial ionospheric irregularities. The VEFI instrument includes a vector DC electric field detector, a fixed-bias Langmuir probe operating in the ion saturation regime, a flux gate magnetometer, an optical lightning detector, and associated electronics including a burst memory. Compared to data obtained during more active solar conditions, the ambient DC electric fields and their associated E x B drifts are variable and somewhat weak, typically < 1 mV/m. Although average drift directions show similarities to those previously reported, eastward/outward during day and westward/downward at night, this pattern varies significantly with longitude and is not always present. Daytime vertical drifts near the magnetic equator are largest after sunrise, with smaller average velocities after noon. Little or no pre-reversal enhancement in the vertical drift near sunset is observed, attributable to the solar minimum conditions creating a much reduced neutral dynamo at the satellite altitude. The nighttime ionosphere is characterized by larger amplitude, structured electric fields, even where the plasma density appears nearly quiescent. Data from successive orbits reveal that the vertical drifts and plasma density are both clearly organized with longitude. The spread-F density depletions and corresponding electric fields that have been detected thus far have displayed a preponderance to appear between midnight and dawn. Associated with the narrow plasma depletions that are detected are broad spectra of electric field and plasma density irregularities for which a full vector set of measurements is available for detailed study. Finally, the data set includes a wide range of ELF/VLF/HF oscillations corresponding to a variety of plasma waves

  9. Propagation characteristics of dust-acoustic waves in presence of a floating cylindrical object in the DC discharge plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhary, Mangilal; Mukherjee, S.; Bandyopadhyay, P.

    2016-08-01

    The experimental observation of the self-excited dust acoustic waves (DAWs) and its propagation characteristics in the absence and presence of a floating cylindrical object is investigated. The experiments are carried out in a direct current (DC) glow discharge dusty plasma in a background of argon gas. Dust particles are found levitated at the interface of plasma and cathode sheath region. The DAWs are spontaneously excited in the dust medium and found to propagate in the direction of ion drift (along the gravity) above a threshold discharge current at low pressure. Excitation of such a low frequency wave is a result of the ion-dust streaming instability in the dust cloud. Characteristics of the propagating dust acoustic wave get modified in the presence of a floating cylindrical object of radius larger than that of the dust Debye length. Instead of propagation in the vertical direction, the DAWs are found to propagate obliquely in the presence of the floating object (kept either vertically or horizontally). In addition, a horizontally aligned floating object forms a wave structure in the cone shaped dust cloud in the sheath region. Such changes in the propagation characteristics of DAWs are explained on the basis of modified potential (or electric field) distribution, which is a consequence of coupling of sheaths formed around the cylindrical object and the cathode.

  10. Low Pressure DC Glow Discharge Air Plasma Surface Treatment of Polyethylene (PE) Film for Improvement of Adhesive Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnasamy Navaneetha, Pandiyaraj; Vengatasamy, Selvarajan; Rajendrasing, R. Deshmukh; Paramasivam, Yoganand; Suresh, Balasubramanian; Sundaram, Maruthamuthu

    2013-01-01

    The present work deals with the change in surface properties of polyethylene (PE) film using DC low pressure glow discharge air plasma and makes it useful for technical applications. The change in hydrophilicity of the modified PE film surface was investigated by measuring contact angle and surface energy as a function of exposure time. Changes in the morphological and chemical composition of PE films were analyzed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The improvement in adhesion was studied by measuring T-peel and lap-shear strength. The results show that the wettability and surface energy of the PE film has been improved due to the introduction of oxygen-containing polar groups and an increase in surface roughness. The XPS result clearly shows the increase in concentration of oxygen content and the formation of polar groups on the polymer surface. The AFM observation on PE film shows that the roughness of the surface increased due to plasma treatment. The above morphological and chemical changes enhanced the adhesive properties of the PE film surfaces, which was confirmed by T-peel and lap-shear tests.

  11. Morphology of zirconia particles exposed to D.C. arc plasma jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaplatynsky, Isidor

    1987-01-01

    Zirconia particles were sprayed into water with an arc plasma gun in order to determine the effect of various gun operating parameters on their morphology. The collected particles were examined by XRD and SEM techniques. A correlation was established between the content of spherical (molten) particles and the operating parameters by visual inspection and regression analysis. It was determined that the composition of the arc gas and the power input were the predominant parameters that affected the melting of zirconia particles.

  12. Numerical investigation of the ion temperature effects on magnetized DC plasma sheath

    SciTech Connect

    Khoramabadi, Mansour; Ghomi, Hamid; Shukla, Padma Kant

    2011-04-01

    The properties of a magnetized plasma sheath with finite ion temperature is considered. The effects of the external magnetic field and the ion temperature on the sheath parameters are examined. It is found that by increasing the ion temperature and the magnetic field strength there is an increase in the positive space charge and the ion energy and a decrease in the sheath thickness. Furthermore, the ion temperature has a direct effect on the ion flux toward the wall.

  13. Argon–oxygen dc magnetron discharge plasma probed with ion acoustic waves

    SciTech Connect

    Saikia, Partha Saikia, Bipul Kumar; Goswami, Kalyan Sindhu; Phukan, Arindam

    2014-05-15

    The precise determination of the relative concentration of negative ions is very important for the optimization of magnetron sputtering processes, especially for those undertaken in a multicomponent background produced by adding electronegative gases, such as oxygen, to the discharge. The temporal behavior of an ion acoustic wave excited from a stainless steel grid inside the plasma chamber is used to determine the relative negative ion concentration in the magnetron discharge plasma. The phase velocity of the ion acoustic wave in the presence of negative ions is found to be faster than in a pure argon plasma, and the phase velocity increases with the oxygen partial pressure. Optical emission spectroscopy further confirms the increase in the oxygen negative ion density, along with a decrease in the argon positive ion density under the same discharge conditions. The relative negative ion concentration values measured by ion acoustic waves are compared with those measured by a single Langmuir probe, and a similarity in the results obtained by both techniques is observed.

  14. Analytical interpretation of arc instabilities in a DC plasma spray torch: the role of pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rat, V.; Coudert, J. F.

    2016-06-01

    Arc instabilities in a plasma spray torch are investigated experimentally and theoretically thanks to a linear simplified analytical model. The different parameters that determine the useful properties of the plasma jet at the torch exit, such as specific enthalpy and speed, but also pressure inside the torch and time variations of the flow rate are studied. The work is particularly focused on the link between the recorded arc voltage and the pressure in the cathode cavity. A frequency analysis of the recorded voltage and pressure allows the separation of different contributions following their spectral characteristics and highlights a resonance effect due to Helmholtz oscillations; these oscillations are responsible for the large amplitude fluctuations of all the parameters investigated. The influence of heat transfer, friction forces and residence time of the plasma in the nozzle are taken into account, thanks to different characteristics’ times. The volume of the cathode cavity in which the cold gas is stored before entering the arc region appears to be of prime importance for the dynamics of instabilities, particularly for the non-intuitive effect that induces flow-rate fluctuations in spite of the fact that the torch is fed at a constant flow rate.

  15. Destruction of inorganic municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash in a DC arc plasma furnace.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Peng; Ni, Guohua; Jiang, Yiman; Chen, Longwei; Chen, Mingzhou; Meng, Yuedong

    2010-09-15

    Due to the toxicity of dioxins, furans and heavy metals, there is a growing environmental concern on municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) fly ash in China. The purpose of this study is directed towards the volume-reduction of fly ash without any additive by thermal plasma and recycling of vitrified slag. This process uses extremely high-temperature in an oxygen-starved environment to completely decompose complex waste into very simple molecules. For developing the proper plasma processes to treat MSWI fly ash, a new crucible-type plasma furnace was built. The melting process metamorphosed fly ash to granulated slag that was less than 1/3 of the volume of the fly ash, and about 64% of the weight of the fly ash. The safety of the vitrified slag was tested. The properties of the slag were affected by the differences in the cooling methods. Water-cooled and composite-cooled slag showed more excellent resistance against the leaching of heavy metals and can be utilized as building material without toxicity problems.

  16. Properties and etching rates of negative ions in inductively coupled plasmas and dc discharges produced in Ar/SF{sub 6}

    SciTech Connect

    Draghici, M.; Stamate, E.

    2010-06-15

    Negative ion production is investigated in a chamber with transversal magnetic filter operated in dc or inductively coupled plasma (ICP) modes in Ar/SF{sub 6} gas mixtures. Plasma parameters are evaluated by mass spectrometry and Langmuir probe for different discharge conditions. The density ratio of negative ion to electron exceeded 300 in dc mode while it was below 100 in the ICP mode. The possibility to apply a large positive bias to an electrode without affecting the plasma potential and the transition from a negative sheath to anodic glow are also investigated. The etching rates by positive and negative ions are evaluated on silicon substrate for different Ar/SF{sub 6} gas ratios. The etching rate by negative ions was with less than 5% smaller than that by positive ions.

  17. C4F8O/O2/N-based Additive Gases for Silicon Nitride Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition Chamber Cleaning with Low Global Warming Potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ji Hwang; Bae, Jeong Woon; Oh, Chang Hyun; Kim, Ki Joon; Lee, Nae Eung; Yeom, Geun Young

    2002-11-01

    In this study, N2O and NO were added as additive gases to C4F8O/O2 for plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) silicon nitride chamber cleaning and their effects on the emission properties of perfluorocarbon compounds (PFCs) were investigated. The cleaning rate, destruction and removal efficiencies (DREs), and million metric tons of carbon equivalent (MMTCE) were studied as a function of flow rates of PFCs and additive gases. The use of C4F8O/O2 alone showed the highest cleaning rate and the lowest emission properties at the cleaning condition of 20%C4F8O/80%O2, working pressure of 500 mTorr, and 13.56 MHz rf power of 350 W. By the addition of about 20% NO or 20% N2O to the optimized C4F8O/O2, the additional reduction of MMTCE higher than 50% could be obtained. The addition of NO resulted in lower MMTCE compared to that in the case of the addition of N2O mostly due to the higher silicon nitride cleaning rate in the latter case.

  18. Plasma nitriding process by direct current glow discharge at low temperature increasing the thermal diffusivity of AISI 304 stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Prandel, L. V.; Somer, A.; Assmann, A.; Camelotti, F.; Costa, G.; Bonardi, C.; Jurelo, A. R.; Rodrigues, J. B.; Cruz, G. K.

    2013-02-14

    This work reports for the first time on the use of the open photoacoustic cell technique operating at very low frequencies and at room temperature to experimentally determine the thermal diffusivity parameter of commercial AISI304 stainless steel and AISI304 stainless steel nitrided samples. Complementary measurements of X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy were also performed. The results show that in standard AISI 304 stainless steel samples the thermal diffusivity is (4.0 {+-} 0.3) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} m{sup 2}/s. After the nitriding process, the thermal diffusivity increases to the value (7.1 {+-} 0.5) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} m{sup 2}/s. The results are being associated to the diffusion process of nitrogen into the surface of the sample. Carrying out subsequent thermal treatment at 500 Degree-Sign C, the thermal diffusivity increases up to (12.0 {+-} 2) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} m{sup 2}/s. Now the observed growing in the thermal diffusivity must be related to the change in the phases contained in the nitrided layer.

  19. Electron Backscatter Diffraction and Transmission Kikuchi Diffraction Analysis of an Austenitic Stainless Steel Subjected to Surface Mechanical Attrition Treatment and Plasma Nitriding.

    PubMed

    Proust, Gwénaëlle; Retraint, Delphine; Chemkhi, Mahdi; Roos, Arjen; Demangel, Clemence

    2015-08-01

    Austenitic 316L stainless steel can be used for orthopedic implants due to its biocompatibility and high corrosion resistance. Its range of applications in this field could be broadened by improving its wear and friction properties. Surface properties can be modified through surface hardening treatments. The effects of such treatments on the microstructure of the alloy were investigated here. Surface Mechanical Attrition Treatment (SMAT) is a surface treatment that enhances mechanical properties of the material surface by creating a thin nanocrystalline layer. After SMAT, some specimens underwent a plasma nitriding process to further enhance their surface properties. Using electron backscatter diffraction, transmission Kikuchi diffraction, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy, the microstructural evolution of the stainless steel after these different surface treatments was characterized. Microstructural features investigated include thickness of the nanocrystalline layer, size of the grains within the nanocrystalline layer, and depth of diffusion of nitrogen atoms within the material. PMID:26139391

  20. Electron Backscatter Diffraction and Transmission Kikuchi Diffraction Analysis of an Austenitic Stainless Steel Subjected to Surface Mechanical Attrition Treatment and Plasma Nitriding.

    PubMed

    Proust, Gwénaëlle; Retraint, Delphine; Chemkhi, Mahdi; Roos, Arjen; Demangel, Clemence

    2015-08-01

    Austenitic 316L stainless steel can be used for orthopedic implants due to its biocompatibility and high corrosion resistance. Its range of applications in this field could be broadened by improving its wear and friction properties. Surface properties can be modified through surface hardening treatments. The effects of such treatments on the microstructure of the alloy were investigated here. Surface Mechanical Attrition Treatment (SMAT) is a surface treatment that enhances mechanical properties of the material surface by creating a thin nanocrystalline layer. After SMAT, some specimens underwent a plasma nitriding process to further enhance their surface properties. Using electron backscatter diffraction, transmission Kikuchi diffraction, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy, the microstructural evolution of the stainless steel after these different surface treatments was characterized. Microstructural features investigated include thickness of the nanocrystalline layer, size of the grains within the nanocrystalline layer, and depth of diffusion of nitrogen atoms within the material.

  1. Impact of interstitial oxygen trapped in silicon during plasma growth of silicon oxy-nitride films for silicon solar cell passivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saseendran, Sandeep S.; Saravanan, S.; Raval, Mehul C.; Kottantharayil, Anil

    2016-03-01

    Low temperature oxidation of silicon in plasma ambient is a potential candidate for replacing thermally grown SiO2 films for surface passivation of crystalline silicon solar cells. In this work, we report the growth of silicon oxy-nitride (SiOxNy) film in N2O plasma ambient at 380 °C. However, this process results in trapping of interstitial oxygen within silicon. The impact of this trapped interstitial oxygen on the surface passivation quality is investigated. The interstitial oxygen trapped in silicon was seen to decrease for larger SiOxNy film thickness. Effective minority carrier lifetime (τeff) measurements on n-type float zone silicon wafers passivated by SiOxNy/silicon nitride (SiNv:H) stack showed a decrease in τeff from 347 μs to 68 μs, for larger SiOxNy film thickness due to degradation in interface properties. From high frequency capacitance-voltage measurements, it was concluded that the surface passivation quality was governed by the interface parameters (fixed charge density and interface state density). High temperature firing of the SiOxNy/SiNv:H stack resulted in a severe degradation in τeff due to migration of oxygen across the interface into silicon. However, on using the SiOxNy/SiNv:H stack for emitter surface passivation in screen printed p-type Si solar cells, an improvement in short wavelength response was observed in comparison to the passivation by SiNv:H alone, indicating an improvement in emitter surface passivation quality.

  2. Low temperature plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition of conducting zirconium nitride films using tetrakis (dimethylamido) zirconium and forming gas (5% H{sub 2} + 95% N{sub 2}) plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Muneshwar, Triratna Cadien, Ken

    2015-05-15

    Zirconium nitride (ZrN) has the lowest bulk electrical resistivity and high thermal stability among group IV and V transition metal nitrides, which makes it a promising material for ULSI applications such as a diffusion barrier for Cu interconnects, contact metal in III-V semiconductor devices, and in high density memory structures. Plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) of conducting ZrN thin films using Zr[N(CH{sub 3}){sub 2}]{sub 4} and forming gas (5% H{sub 2} + 95% N{sub 2}) plasma is reported in this article. The growth per cycle (GPC) for every deposition was determined from analysis of dynamic in-situ spectroscopic ellipsometry (d-iSE) measurements. An experimental design is proposed for faster determination of ALD growth saturation curves. At substrate temperature of 150 °C, a GPC of 0.10 nm/cycle was observed for self-limiting ZrN PEALD growth. The electrical resistivity of ZrN films deposited on SiO{sub 2} substrate was found to be 559.5 ± 18.5 μΩ cm with negligible change in resistivity even after ∼1000 h exposure to air. The metallic behavior of our ZrN films was evident from the free electron dispersion component in dielectric response, the broad band of photoelectron emission across Fermi level and the positive temperature coefficient for resistivity of 0.0088/ °C.

  3. DC and Structured Electric Fields Observed on the C/NOFS Satellite and Their Association with Longitude, Plasma Density, and Solar Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfaff, Robert; Freudenreich, H.; Rowland, D.; Klenzing, J.

    2012-01-01

    Observations of DC electric fields and associated E x B plasma drifts gathered by the Vector Electric Field Investigation (VEFI) on the Air Force Communication/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) satellite are presented. We show statistical averages of the vector fields and resulting E x B plasma flows for the first three years of operations as a function of season, longitude, local time, and Fl 0.7 conditions. Magnetic field data from the VEFI science magnetometer are used to compute the plasma flows. Although typically displaying eastward and outward-directed fields during the day and westward and downward-directed fields at night, the data from DC electric field detector often reveal variations from this pattern that depend on longitude, solar activity, and plasma density. Clear "wave-4" tidal effects in both electric field components have been detected and will be presented. Zonal plasma drifts show a marked variation with solar activity and may be used as a proxy for neutral winds at night. Evidence for pre-reversal enhancements in the meridional drifts that depend on solar activity is present for some longitudes, and are corroborated by clear evidence in the plasma density data that the spacecraft journeyed below the F-peak during evenings when the rise in the ionosphere is most pronounced. In addition to DC electric fields, the data reveal considerable electric field structures at large scales (approx 100's of km) that are usually confined to the nightside. Although such electric field structures are typically associated with plasma density depletions and structures, what is surprising is the number of cases in which large amplitude, structured DC electric fields are observed without a significant plasma density counterpart structure, including their appearance at times when the ambient plasma density appears relatively quiescent. We investigate the mapping of structured electric fields along magnetic field lines from distant locations and consider

  4. Density distributions of OH, Na, water vapor, and water mist in atmospheric-pressure dc helium glow plasmas in contact with NaCl solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Koichi; Ishigame, Hiroaki; Nishiyama, Shusuke

    2015-07-01

    This paper reports the density distributions of OH, Na, water vapor and water mist in atmospheric-pressure dc helium glow plasmas in contact with NaCl solution. The densities of OH, Na and H2O had different spatial distributions, while the Na density had a similar distribution to mist, suggesting that mist is the source of Na in the gas phase. When the flow rate of helium toward the electrolyte surface was increased, the distributions of all the species densities concentrated in the neighboring region to the electrolyte surface more significantly. The densities of all the species were sensitive to the electric polarity of the power supply. In particular, we never detected Na and mist when the electrolyte worked as the anode of the dc discharge. Contribution to the topical issue "The 14th International Symposium on High Pressure Low Temperature Plasma Chemistry (HAKONE XIV)", edited by Nicolas Gherardi, Ronny Brandenburg and Lars Stollenwark

  5. Functionalized boron nitride nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Sainsbury, Toby; Ikuno, Takashi; Zettl, Alexander K

    2014-04-22

    A plasma treatment has been used to modify the surface of BNNTs. In one example, the surface of the BNNT has been modified using ammonia plasma to include amine functional groups. Amine functionalization allows BNNTs to be soluble in chloroform, which had not been possible previously. Further functionalization of amine-functionalized BNNTs with thiol-terminated organic molecules has also been demonstrated. Gold nanoparticles have been self-assembled at the surface of both amine- and thiol-functionalized boron nitride Nanotubes (BNNTs) in solution. This approach constitutes a basis for the preparation of highly functionalized BNNTs and for their utilization as nanoscale templates for assembly and integration with other nanoscale materials.

  6. Microstructural characterization of Ti-6Al-4V alloy subjected to the duplex SMAT/plasma nitriding.

    PubMed

    Pi, Y; Faure, J; Agoda-Tandjawa, G; Andreazza, C; Potiron, S; Levesque, A; Demangel, C; Retraint, D; Benhayoune, H

    2013-09-01

    In this study, microstructural characterization of Ti-6Al-4V alloy, subjected to the duplex surface mechanical attrition treatment (SMAT)/nitriding treatment, leading to improve its mechanical properties, was carried out through novel and original samples preparation methods. Instead of acid etching which is limited for morphological characterization by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), an original ion polishing method was developed. Moreover, for structural characterization by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), an ion milling method based with the use of two ions guns was also carried out for cross-section preparation. To demonstrate the efficiency of the two developed methods, morphological investigations were done by traditional SEM and field emission gun SEM. This was followed by structural investigations through selected area electron diffraction (SAED) coupled with TEM and X-ray diffraction techniques. The results demonstrated that ionic polishing allowed to reveal a variation of the microstructure according to the surface treatment that could not be observed by acid etching preparation. TEM associated to SAED and X-ray diffraction provided information regarding the nanostructure compositional changes induced by the duplex SMAT/nitriding process.

  7. DC and Wave Electric Fields and Other Plasma Parameters Observed on Two Sounding Rockets in the Dark Cusp during IMF Bz North and South Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfaff, R. F.; Acuna, M.; Bounds, S.; Farrell, W.; Freudenreich, W.; Lepping, R.; Vondrak, R.; Maynard, N. C.; Moen, J.; Egeland, A.

    1999-01-01

    Two Black Brant IX sounding rockets were launched into the dark, dayside cusp near magnetic noon on December 2 and 3, 1997, from Ny Alesund, Spitzbergen at 79 deg N reaching altitudes of about 450 km. Real-time ground-based and Wind IMF data were used to determine the launch conditions. The first launch, with Bz north conditions, crossed into and back out of an open field region with merging poleward of the projected trajectory. The second flight, into Bz south conditions, was timed to coincide with an enhancement in the merging rate from a increase in the negative Bz, while the DMSP Fl 3 satellite was situated slightly to the north of the rocket trajectory. Each payload returned DC electric and magnetic fields, plasma waves, energetic particles, photometer data, and thermal plasma data. Data from both flights will be shown, with an emphasis on the DC electric field results. In particular, the data gathered on December 2, 1997 will be used to discuss ionospheric signatures of merging and the open/closed character of the the cusp/low latitude boundary layer. In contrast, the data gathered on December 3, 1997 shows evidence of pulsed electric field structures which will be examined in the context of cusp plasma entry processes. Both data sets returned a rich variety of plasma waves, as well as optical emissions and thermal plasma data.

  8. DC and Wave Electric Fields and Other Plasma Parameters Observed on Two Sounding Rockets in the Dark Cusp During IMF Bz North and South Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfaff, R. F.; Acuna, M.; Bounds, S.; Farrell, W.; Freudenreich, H.; Lepping, R.; Vondrak, R.; Maynard, N. C.; Moen, J.; Egeland, A.

    1997-01-01

    Two Black Brant IX sounding rockets were launched into the dark, dayside cusp near magnetic noon on December 2 and 3, 1997, from Ny Alesund, Spitzbergen at 79 N reaching altitudes of approximately 450 km. Real-time ground-based and Wind IMF data were used to determine the launch conditions. The first launch, with Bz north conditions, crossed into and back out of an open field region with merging poleward of the projected trajectory. The second flight, into Bz south conditions, was timed to coincide with an enhancement in the merging rate from a increase in the negative Bz, while the DMSP F13 satellite was situated slightly to the north of the rocket trajectory. Each payload returned DC electric and magnetic fields, plasma waves, energetic particles, photometer data, and thermal plasma data. Data from both flights will be shown, with an emphasis on the DC electric field results. In particular, the data gathered on December 2, 1997 will be used to discuss ionospheric signatures of merging and the open/closed character of the the cusp/low latitude boundary layer. In contrast, the data gathered on December 3, 1997 shows evidence of pulsed electric field structures which will be examined in the context of cusp plasma entry processes. Both data sets returned a rich variety of plasma waves, as well as optical emissions and thermal plasma data.

  9. DC and Wave Electric Fields and Other Plasma Parameters Observed on Two Sounding Rockets in the Dark Cusp during IMF BZ North and South Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfaff, R. F.; Bounds, S.; Acuna, M.; Maynard, N. C.; Moen, J.; Egeland, A.; Holtet, J.; Maseide, K.; Sandholt, P. E.; Soraas, F.

    1999-01-01

    Two Black Brant IX sounding rockets were launched into the dark, dayside cusp near magnetic noon on December 2 and 3, 1997, from Ny Alesund, Spitzbergen at 79degN reaching altitudes of approximately 450 km. Real-time ground-based and Wind (interplanetary magnetic field) IMF data were used to determine the launch conditions. The first launch, with Bz north conditions, crossed into and back out of an open field region with merging poleward of the projected trajectory. The second flight, into Bz south conditions, was timed to coincide with an enhancement in the merging rate from a increase in the negative Bz, while the (Defense Meteorological Satellite Program) DMSP F13 satellite was situated slightly to the north of the rocket trajectory. Each payload returned DC electric and magnetic fields, plasma waves, energetic particles, photometer data, and thermal plasma data. Data from both flights will be shown, with an emphasis on the DC electric field results. In particular, the data gathered on December 2, 1997 will be used to discuss ionospheric signatures of merging and the open/closed character of the the cusp/low latitude boundary layer. In contrast, the data gathered on December 3, 1997 shows evidence of pulsed electric field structures which will be examined in the context of cusp plasma entry processes. Both data sets returned a rich variety of plasma waves, as well as optical emissions and thermal plasma data.

  10. Synthesis of AlN/Al Polycrystals along with Al Nanoparticles Using Thermal Plasma Route

    SciTech Connect

    Kanhe, Nilesh S.; Nawale, A. B.; Kulkarni, N. V.; Bhoraskar, S. V.; Mathe, V. L.; Das, A. K.

    2011-07-15

    This paper for the first time reports the (200) oriented growth of hexagonal Aluminum nitride crystals during synthesis of aluminum nanoparticles in dc transferred arc thermal plasma reactor by gas phase condensation in nitrogen plasma. The structural and morphological study of as synthesized AlN crystal and aluminium nanoparticles was done by using the x-ray diffraction method, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy.

  11. Effect of collisions on dc magnetic-field generation in a plasma by resonance absorption of light

    SciTech Connect

    Adam, J.C.; Gourdin-Serveniere, A.; Mora, P.; Pellat, R.

    1982-05-01

    The importance of collisional ponderomotive effects on dc magnetic field generation is stressed. Computer simulations show that a weak rate of collision is sufficient to completely modify dc magnetic field generation in the resonant absorption of light, as compared with previous collisionless simulations. The agreement with theoretical predictions is shown.

  12. Analysis of plasma protein adsorption onto DC-Chol-DOPE cationic liposomes by HPLC-CHIP coupled to a Q-TOF mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Capriotti, Anna Laura; Caracciolo, Giulio; Caruso, Giuseppe; Cavaliere, Chiara; Pozzi, Daniela; Samperi, Roberto; Laganà, Aldo

    2010-12-01

    Plasma protein adsorption is regarded as a key factor in the in vivo organ distribution of intravenously administered drug carriers, and strongly depends on vector surface characteristics. The present study aimed to characterize the "protein corona" absorbed onto DC-Chol-DOPE cationic liposomes. This system was chosen because it is one of the most efficient and widely used non-viral formulations in vitro and a potential candidate for in vivo transfection of genetic material. After incubation of human plasma with cationic liposomes, nanoparticle-protein complex was separated from plasma by centrifugation. An integrated approach based on protein separation by one-dimensional 12% polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis followed by the automated HPLC-Chip technology coupled to a high-resolution mass spectrometer was employed for protein corona characterization. Thirty gel lanes, approximately 2 mm, were cut, digested and analyzed by HPLC-MS/MS. Fifty-eight human plasma proteins adsorbed onto DC-Chol-DOPE cationic liposomes were identified. The knowledge of the interactions of proteins with liposomes can be exploited for future controlled design of colloidal drug carriers and possibly in the controlled creation of biocompatible surfaces of other devices that come into contact with proteins in body fluids.

  13. Determination of ionization fraction and plasma potential in a dc magnetron sputtering system using a quartz crystal microbalance and a gridded energy analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Green, K.M.

    1997-01-01

    A diagnostic which combines a quartz crystal microbalance and a gridded energy analyzer has been developed to measure the ion-to- neutral ratio and the plasma potential in a commercial dc magnetron sputtering device. Additional features of this sensor include an externally controlled shutter which protects the diagnostic when it is in the chamber, but it is not in use. The diagnostic is mounted on a linear motion feedthrough and embedded in a slot in the wafer chuck to allow for measuring uniformity in deposition and ionization throughout the plane of the wafer. RF power is introduced to ionize the Al particles. Using the quartz crystal microbalance and the gridded energy analyzer, the ion-to-neutral ratio and other parameters are determined. Comparing the total deposition rate with and without a bias that screens out the ions, but leaves the plasma undisturbed, allows for the determination of the ion-to-neutral ratio. By varying the voltage applied to the grids, the plasma potential is measured. For example, a magnetron configuration having a pressure of 35 mtorr, a dc power of 2 kW, and a net rf power of 310{+-}5 W yielded 78{+-}5% ionization and a plasma potential of 35{+-}1 V.

  14. Helicon Discharge with Selectable Nitrogen Reactive Species Production as a Plasma Source for III-group Nitrides Growth by MBE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biloiu, Costel; Doss, Forest; Scime, Earl

    2004-11-01

    Plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PAMBE) of III-N materials is a potential alternative to MOCVD for fabrication of high quality wide band gap semiconductor devices. In the helicon plasma source, it may be possible to control the population of specific reactive nitrogen species by modification of the electron energy distribution function through the resonant wave-particle interaction arising from electrons traveling at same velocity as the helicon wave phase velocity. We report preliminary results on control of reactive nitrogen species performed in a steady state, high density, helicon plasma source CHEWIE (Compact HElicon Waves and Instabilities Experiment). The helicon vacuum chamber is a 12 cm long, Pyrex tube, 6 cm in diameter, connected to a stainless steel diffusion chamber. RF power of up to 1.0 kW over a frequency range of 3-28 MHz is used to create the steady state plasma. A 7 cm long, half wave, m = +1, helical antenna couples the rf energy into the plasma. A single solenoidal magnetic field coil surrounds the source and is capable of generating axial magnetic fields up to 600 G. Optical emission spectroscopy investigations show that under certain conditions, the decay from the long lived A^3Σ_u^+ state dominates the emission spectrum of the plasma.

  15. Persistent Longitudinal Variations of Plasma Density and DC Electric Fields in the Low Latitude Ionosphere Observed with Probes on the C/NOFS Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfaff, R.; Freudenreich, H.; Klenzing, J.; Rowland, D.; Liebrecht, C.; Bromund, K.; Roddy, P.

    2010-01-01

    Continuous measurements using in situ probes on consecutive orbits of the C/N0FS satellite reveal that the plasma density is persistently organized by longitude, in both day and night conditions and at all locations within the satellite orbit, defined by its perigee and apogee of 401 km and 867 km, respectively, and its inclination of 13 degrees. Typical variations are a factor of 2 or 3 compared to mean values. Furthermore, simultaneous observations of DC electric fields and their associated E x B drifts in the low latitude ionosphere also reveal that their amplitudes are also strongly organized by longitude in a similar fashion. The drift variations with longitude are particularly pronounced in the meridional component perpendicular to the magnetic field although they are also present in the zonal component as well. The longitudes of the peak meridional drift and density values are significantly out of phase with respect to each other. Time constants for the plasma accumulation at higher altitudes with respect to the vertical drift velocity must be taken into account in order to properly interpret the detailed comparisons of the phase relationship of the plasma density and plasma velocity variations. Although for a given period corresponding to that of several days, typically one longitude region dominates the structuring of the plasma density and plasma drift data, there is also evidence for variations organized about multiple longitudes at the same time. Statistical averages will be shown that suggest a tidal "wave 4" structuring is present in both the plasma drift and plasma density data. We interpret the apparent association of the modulation of the E x B drifts with longitude as well as that of the ambient plasma density as a manifestation of tidal forces at work in the low latitude upper atmosphere. The observations demonstrate how the high duty cycle of the C/NOFS observations and its unique orbit expose fundamental processes at work in the low latitude

  16. The influence of DC biasing on the uniformity of a-C:H films for three-dimensional substrates by using a plasma-based ion implantation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Toshiya; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Tsuda, Osamu; Tanaka, Akihiro; Koga, Yoshinori; Takai, Osamu

    2003-05-01

    Amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H) films were synthesized by the use of a PBII technique using an electron cyclotron resonance plasma source with a mirror field, and the influence of the biasing conditions on the properties and the uniformity of the three-dimensional surfaces of a-C:H films was investigated. For convex faces, the film thickness was almost constant, independent of the deposition conditions, because a uniform plasma surrounded the substrates. For concave faces, the thickness of the films that formed without biasing and with only the application of a pulse bias decreased when the microwave-incident angle was decreased. On the other hand, when a DC bias was applied to the substrate in addition to a pulse bias, the uniformity of the thickness was much improved with a distribution within ±10%. The improvement in the uniformity was assumed to be the result of the continuous supply of ions in the plasma to the surfaces by the DC biasing.

  17. Preparation of silicon carbide SiC-based nanopowders by the aerosol-assisted synthesis and the DC thermal plasma synthesis methods

    SciTech Connect

    Czosnek, Cezary; Bućko, Mirosław M.; Janik, Jerzy F.; Olejniczak, Zbigniew; Bystrzejewski, Michał; Łabędź, Olga; Huczko, Andrzej

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • Make-up of the SiC-based nanopowders is a function of the C:Si:O ratio in precursor. • Two-stage aerosol-assisted synthesis offers conditions close to equilibrium. • DC thermal plasma synthesis yields kinetically controlled SiC products. - Abstract: Nanosized SiC-based powders were prepared from selected liquid-phase organosilicon precursors by the aerosol-assisted synthesis, the DC thermal plasma synthesis, and a combination of the two methods. The two-stage aerosol-assisted synthesis method provides at the end conditions close to thermodynamic equilibrium. The single-stage thermal plasma method is characterized by short particle residence times in the reaction zone, which can lead to kinetically controlled products. The by-products and final nanopowders were characterized by powder XRD, infrared spectroscopy FT-IR, scanning electron microscopy SEM, and {sup 29}Si MAS NMR spectroscopy. BET specific surface areas of the products were determined by standard physical adsorption of nitrogen at 77 K. The major component in all synthesis routes was found to be cubic silicon carbide β-SiC with average crystallite sizes ranging from a few to tens of nanometers. In some cases, it was accompanied by free carbon, elemental silicon or silica nanoparticles. The final mesoporous β-SiC-based nanopowders have a potential as affordable catalyst supports.

  18. Investigation of a High Quality and Ultraviolet-Light Transparent Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition Silicon Nitride Film for Non-Volatile Memory Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chin-Kun; Ying, Tser-Liang; Wei, Chih-Shih; Liu, Lu-Min; Cheng, Huang-Chung; Lin, Mou-Shiung

    1995-09-01

    A high quality and ultraviolet-light transparent (UV-transparent) plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) silicon nitride ( SiN x) film is developed to form passivation layer for non-volatile memory devices. Comparing to the conventional PECVD SiN x film known to have tensile stress and opacity to ultraviolet-light (UV-light), the proposed SiN x film with very low compressive stress ( <1×109 dyn/cm2) and excellent UV-transmittance (>70% for 1.6 µ m-thick film) can be achieved. The film stress is strongly related to RF input power during deposition process. The UV-transmittance is influenced by pressure and SiH4/NH3 flow ratio. It is also shown that the UV-transmittance is closely correlated to refractive index (RI), film density as well as N/Si ratio inside the film. This SiN x film has been successfully applied to erasable programming read-only memory (EPROM's) devices, and very good UV-erasability and reliability performances are demonstrated.

  19. Surface recombination velocity of phosphorus-diffused silicon solar cell emitters passivated with plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposited silicon nitride and thermal silicon oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerr, M. J.; Schmidt, J.; Cuevas, A.; Bultman, J. H.

    2001-04-01

    The emitter saturation current density (JOe) and surface recombination velocity (Sp) of various high quality passivation schemes on phosphorus-diffused solar cell emitters have been determined and compared. The passivation schemes investigated were (i) stoichiometric plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposited (PECVD) silicon nitride (SiN), (ii) forming gas annealed thermally grown silicon oxide, and (iii) aluminum annealed (alnealed) thermal silicon oxide. Emitters with sheet resistances ranging from 30 to 430 and 50 to 380 Ω/□ were investigated for planar and random-pyramid textured silicon surfaces, which covers both industrial and laboratory emitters. The electronic surface passivation quality provided by PECVD SiN films was found to be good, with Sp values ranging from 1400 to 25 000 cm/s for planar emitters. Thin thermal silicon oxides were found to provide superior passivation to PECVD SiN, with the best passivation provided by an alnealed thin oxide (Sp values between 250 and 21 000 cm/s). The optimized PECVD SiN films are, nevertheless, sufficiently good for most silicon solar cell applications.

  20. Cancer cells (MCF-7, Colo-357, and LNCaP) viability on amorphous hydrogenated carbon nitride film deposited by dielectric barrier discharge plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumdar, Abhijit; Ummanni, Ramesh; Schröder, Karsten; Walther, Reinhard; Hippler, Rainer

    2009-08-01

    Atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge plasma in CH4/N2 (1:1) gas mixture has been employed to deposit amorphous hydrogenated carbon nitride (aH-CNx) film. In vitro studies with three different cancer cell lines were carried out on the coated surfaces. Preliminary biocompatibility and effect of CH4/N2 films have been investigated by measuring cell proliferation. Three different cancer cell (MCF-7, Colo-357, and LNCaP) suspensions have been exposed on the surface of aH-CNx film to investigate the effect of deposited films on viability of cells. Results from the MTS (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H- tetrazolium, inner salt) proliferation assays indicated that the deposited aH-CNx film is cytotoxic to cancer cell lines. Time course cell viability assay indicated maximum cell death at 24 h after seeding the cells. This effect is dependant on physicochemical and mechanical properties of the deposited films. The deposited film has been characterized by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The results confirm the presence of C-N, C≡N, C-Hx, C-O, N-O, overlapping NH, and OH bonds in the film.

  1. Effect of Low-Pressure Nitrogen DC Plasma Treatment on the Surface Properties of Biaxially Oriented Polypropylene, Poly (Methyl Methacrylate) and Polyvinyl Chloride Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    S. Hamideh, Mortazavi; Mahmood, Ghoranneviss; Soheil, Pilehvar; Sina, Esmaeili; Shamim, Zargham; S. Ebrahim, Hashemi; Hamzeh, Jodat

    2013-04-01

    In this study, commercial biaxially oriented polypropylene (BOPP), polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) films were treated with nitrogen plasma over different exposure times in a Pyrex tube surrounded by a DC variable magnetic field. The chemical changes that appeared on the surface of the samples were investigated using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy after treatment for 2 min, 4 min and 6 min in a nitrogen plasma chamber. Effects of the plasma treatment on the surface topographies and contact angles of the untreated and plasma treated films were also analyzed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and a contact angle measuring system. The results show that the plasma treated films become more hydrophilic with an enhanced wettability due to the formation of some new polar groups on the surface of the treated films. Moreover, at higher exposure times, the total surface energy in all treated films increased while a reduction in contact angle occurred. The behavior of surface roughness in each sample was completely different at higher exposure times.

  2. Analytical study of whistler mode waves in presence of parallel DC electric field for relativistic plasma in the magnetosphere of Uranus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, R. S.; Kaur, Rajbir

    2016-10-01

    In present paper, field aligned whistler mode waves are analyzed, in the presence of DC field in background plasma having relativistic distribution function in the magnetosphere of Uranus. The work has been examined for relativistic Maxwellian and loss-cone distribution function. In both the cases, we have studied the effect of various plasma parameters on the growth rate of waves by using the method of characteristics and discussed using data provided by Voyager 2. Growth rate has increased by increasing the magnitude of electric field, temperature anisotropy, energy density and number density of particles for Maxwellian and loss-cone background. However, when relativistic factor (λ =√{ 1 -v2 /c2 }) increases, growth rate decreases. The significant increase in real frequency of whistler waves can be observed. The results can be used for comparative study of planetary magnetospheres. The derivation can also be adapted to study various other instabilities in magnetosphere of Uranus.

  3. Characteristics of silicon nitride deposited by VHF (162 MHz)-plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition using a multi-tile push-pull plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ki Seok; Sirse, Nishant; Kim, Ki Hyun; Rogers Ellingboe, Albert; Kim, Kyong Nam; Yeom, Geun Young

    2016-10-01

    To prevent moisture and oxygen permeation into flexible organic electronic devices formed on substrates, the deposition of an inorganic diffusion barrier material such as SiN x is important for thin film encapsulation. In this study, by a very high frequency (162 MHz) plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (VHF-PECVD) using a multi-tile push-pull plasma source, SiN x layers were deposited with a gas mixture of NH3/SiH4 with/without N2 and the characteristics of the plasma and the deposited SiN x film as the thin film barrier were investigated. Compared to a lower frequency (60 MHz) plasma, the VHF (162 MHz) multi-tile push-pull plasma showed a lower electron temperature, a higher vibrational temperature, and higher N2 dissociation for an N2 plasma. When a SiN x layer was deposited with a mixture of NH3/SiH4 with N2 at a low temperature of 100 °C, a stoichiometric amorphous Si3N4 layer with very low Si-H bonding could be deposited. The 300 nm thick SiN x film exhibited a low water vapor transmission rate of 1.18  ×  10-4 g (m2 · d)-1, in addition to an optical transmittance of higher than 90%.

  4. PECVD silicon-rich nitride and low stress nitride films mechanical characterization using membrane point load deflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagolini, Alvise; Picciotto, Antonino; Crivellari, Michele; Conci, Paolo; Bellutti, Pierluigi

    2016-02-01

    An analysis of the mechanical properties of plasma enhanced chemical vapor (PECVD) silicon nitrides is presented, using micro fabricated silicon nitride membranes under point load deflection. The membranes are made of PECVD silicon-rich nitride and low stress nitride films. The mechanical performance of the bended membranes is examined both with analytical models and finite element simulation in order to extract the elastic modulus and residual stress values. The elastic modulus of low stress silicon nitride is calculated using stress free analytical models, while for silicon-rich silicon nitride and annealed low stress silicon nitride it is estimated with a pre-stressed model of point-load deflection. The effect of annealing both in nitrogen and hydrogen atmosphere is evaluated in terms of residual stress, refractive index and thickness variation. It is demonstrated that a hydrogen rich annealing atmosphere induces very little change in low stress silicon nitride. Nitrogen annealing effects are measured and shown to be much higher in silicon-rich nitride than in low stress silicon nitride. An estimate of PECVD silicon-rich nitride elastic modulus is obtained in the range between 240-320 GPa for deposited samples and 390 GPa for samples annealed in nitrogen atmosphere. PECVD low stress silicon nitride elastic modulus is estimated to be 88 GPa as deposited and 320 GPa after nitrogen annealing.

  5. Plasma assisted surface coating/modification processes: An emerging technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalvins, T.

    1986-01-01

    A broad understanding of the numerous ion or plasma assisted surface coating/modification processes is sought. An awareness of the principles of these processes is needed before discussing in detail the ion nitriding technology. On the basis of surface modifications arising from ion or plasma energizing and interactions, it can be broadly classified as deposition of distinct overlay coatings (sputtering-dc, radio frequency, magnetron, reactive; ion plating-diode, triode) and surface property modification without forming a discrete coating (ion implantation, ion beam mixing, laser beam irradiation, ion nitriding, ion carburizing, plasma oxidation). These techniques offer a great flexibility and are capable in tailoring desirable chemical and structural surface properties independent of the bulk properties.

  6. Photodetectors using III-V nitrides

    DOEpatents

    Moustakas, T.D.; Misra, M.

    1997-10-14

    A photodetector using a III-V nitride and having predetermined electrical properties is disclosed. The photodetector includes a substrate with interdigitated electrodes formed on its surface. The substrate has a sapphire base layer, a buffer layer formed from a III-V nitride and a single crystal III-V nitride film. The three layers are formed by electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (ECR-assisted MBE). Use of the ECR-assisted MBE process allows control and predetermination of the electrical properties of the photodetector. 24 figs.

  7. Photodetectors using III-V nitrides

    DOEpatents

    Moustakas, Theodore D.; Misra, Mira

    1997-01-01

    A photodetector using a III-V nitride and having predetermined electrical properties is disclosed. The photodetector includes a substrate with interdigitated electrodes formed on its surface. The substrate has a sapphire base layer, a buffer layer formed from a III-V nitride and a single crystal III-V nitride film. The three layers are formed by electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (ECR-assisted MBE). Use of the ECR-assisted MBE process allows control and predetermination of the electrical properties of the photodetector.

  8. Analytical and experimental studies for thermal plasma processing of materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Work continued on thermal plasma processing of materials. This quarter, ceramic powders of carbides, aluminum nitride, oxides, solids solutions, magnetic and non magnetic spinels, superconductors, and composites have been successfully synthesized in a Triple DC Torch Plasma Jet Reactor (TTPR) and in a single DC Plasma Jet Reactor. All the ceramic powders with the exception of AIN were synthesized using a novel injection method developed to overcome the problems associated with solid injection, in particular for the single DC plasma jet reactor, and to realize the benefits of gas phase reactions. Also, initial experiments have been performed for the deposition of diamond coatings on Si wafers using the TTPR with methane as the carbon source. Well faceted diamond crystallites were deposited on the surface of the wafers, forming a continuous one particle thick coating. For measuring temperature and velocity fields in plasma systems, enthalpy probes have been developed and tested. The validity has been checked by performing energy and mass flux balances in an argon plasma jet operated in argon atmosphere. Total Gibbs free energy minimization calculations using a quasi-equilibrium modification have been applied to simulate several chemical reactions. Plasma reactor modelling has been performed for the counter-flow liquid injection plasma synthesis experiment. Plasma diagnostics has been initiated to determine the pressure gradient in the coalesced part of the plasma jet. The pressure gradient drives the diffusion of chemical species which ultimately controls the chemical reactions.

  9. Plasma-Enhanced Atomic Layer Deposition of Ruthenium-Titanium Nitride Mixed-Phase Layers for Direct-Plate Liner and Copper Diffusion Barrier Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gildea, Adam James

    Current interconnect networks in semiconductor processing utilize a sputtered TaN diffusion barrier, Ta liner, and Cu seed to improve the adhesion, microstructure, and electromigration resistance of electrochemically deposited copper that fills interconnect wires and vias. However, as wire/via widths shrink due to device scaling, it becomes increasingly difficult to have the volume of a wire/via be occupied with ECD Cu which increases line resistance and increases the delay in signal propagation in IC chips. A single layer that could serve the purpose of a Cu diffusion barrier and ECD Cu adhesion promoter could allow ECD Cu to occupy a larger volume of a wire/via, leading to a decrease in line resistance and decrease in signal delay. Previous work has shown RuTaN, RuWCN, and RuCo films can act as Cu diffusion barriers and be directly platable to thickness of 2-3nm. However, other material selections may prove as effective or possibly better. Mixed-phase films of ruthenium titanium nitride grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD) were investigated for their performance as a Cu diffusion barrier and as a surface for the direct plating of ECD Cu. All Ru was deposited by plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) while TiN was deposited by either thermal ALD or PEALD. RuTiN, films with thermal ALD TiN and a Ru:Ti of 20:1 showed barrier performance comparable to PVD TaN at 3-4 nm thickness and 15 nm planar films were directly platable. Follow up work is certainly needed for this material set, yet initial results indicate RuTiN could serve as an effective direct plate liner for Cu interconnects.

  10. Comparative band alignment of plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposited high-k dielectrics on gallium nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Jialing; Eller, Brianna S.; Zhu Chiyu; England, Chris; Nemanich, Robert J.

    2012-09-01

    Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films, HfO{sub 2} films, and HfO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} stacked structures were deposited on n-type, Ga-face, GaN wafers using plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD). The wafers were first treated with a wet-chemical clean to remove organics and an in-situ combined H{sub 2}/N{sub 2} plasma at 650 Degree-Sign C to remove residual carbon contamination, resulting in a clean, oxygen-terminated surface. This cleaning process produced slightly upward band bending of 0.1 eV. Additional 650 Degree-Sign C annealing after plasma cleaning increased the upward band bending by 0.2 eV. After the initial clean, high-k oxide films were deposited using oxygen PEALD at 140 Degree-Sign C. The valence band and conduction band offsets (VBOs and CBOs) of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/GaN and HfO{sub 2}/GaN structures were deduced from in-situ x-ray and ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy (XPS and UPS). The valence band offsets were determined to be 1.8 and 1.4 eV, while the deduced conduction band offsets were 1.3 and 1.0 eV, respectively. These values are compared with the theoretical calculations based on the electron affinity model and charge neutrality level model. Moreover, subsequent annealing had little effect on these offsets; however, the GaN band bending did change depending on the annealing and processing. An Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer was investigated as an interfacial passivation layer (IPL), which, as results suggest, may lead to improved stability, performance, and reliability of HfO{sub 2}/IPL/GaN structures. The VBOs were {approx}0.1 and 1.3 eV, while the deduced CBOs were 0.6 and 1.1 eV for HfO{sub 2} with respect to Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and GaN, respectively.

  11. Prediction of plasma-induced damage distribution during silicon nitride etching using advanced three-dimensional voxel model

    SciTech Connect

    Kuboi, Nobuyuki Tatsumi, Tetsuya; Kinoshita, Takashi; Shigetoshi, Takushi; Fukasawa, Masanaga; Komachi, Jun; Ansai, Hisahiro

    2015-11-15

    The authors modeled SiN film etching with hydrofluorocarbon (CH{sub x}F{sub y}/Ar/O{sub 2}) plasma considering physical (ion bombardment) and chemical reactions in detail, including the reactivity of radicals (C, F, O, N, and H), the area ratio of Si dangling bonds, the outflux of N and H, the dependence of the H/N ratio on the polymer layer, and generation of by-products (HCN, C{sub 2}N{sub 2}, NH, HF, OH, and CH, in addition to CO, CF{sub 2}, SiF{sub 2}, and SiF{sub 4}) as ion assistance process parameters for the first time. The model was consistent with the measured C-F polymer layer thickness, etch rate, and selectivity dependence on process variation for SiN, SiO{sub 2}, and Si film etching. To analyze the three-dimensional (3D) damage distribution affected by the etched profile, the authors developed an advanced 3D voxel model that can predict the time-evolution of the etched profile and damage distribution. The model includes some new concepts for gas transportation in the pattern using a fluid model and the property of voxels called “smart voxels,” which contain details of the history of the etching situation. Using this 3D model, the authors demonstrated metal–oxide–semiconductor field-effect transistor SiN side-wall etching that consisted of the main-etch step with CF{sub 4}/Ar/O{sub 2} plasma and an over-etch step with CH{sub 3}F/Ar/O{sub 2} plasma under the assumption of a realistic process and pattern size. A large amount of Si damage induced by irradiated hydrogen occurred in the source/drain region, a Si recess depth of 5 nm was generated, and the dislocated Si was distributed in a 10 nm deeper region than the Si recess, which was consistent with experimental data for a capacitively coupled plasma. An especially large amount of Si damage was also found at the bottom edge region of the metal–oxide–semiconductor field-effect transistors. Furthermore, our simulation results for bulk fin-type field-effect transistor side-wall etching

  12. Inductively Coupled Plasma Etching of III-Nitrides in Cl(2)/Xe,Cl(2)/Ar and Cl(2)/He

    SciTech Connect

    Abernathy, C.R.; Cho, H.; Donovan, S.M.; Hahn, Y.B.; Hays, D.C.; Jung, K.B.; Pearton, S.J.; Shul, R.J.

    1999-01-05

    The role of additive noble gases He, Ar and Xe to C&based Inductively Coupled Plasmas for etching of GaN, AIN and InN were examined. The etch rates were a strong function of chlorine concentration, rf chuck power and ICP source power. The highest etch rates for InN were obtained with C12/Xe, while the highest rates for AIN and GaN were obtained with C12/He. Efficient breaking of the 111-nitrogen bond is crucial for attaining high etch rates. The InN etching was dominated by physical sputtering, in contrast to GaN and AIN. In the latter cases, the etch rates were limited by initial breaking of the III-nitrogen bond. Maximum selectivities of -80 for InN to GaN and InN to AIN were obtained.

  13. Low-temperature-deposited insulating films of silicon nitride by reactive sputtering and plasma-enhanced CVD: Comparison of characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Masaru; Takeyama, Mayumi B.; Nakata, Yoshihiro; Kobayashi, Yasushi; Nakamura, Tomoji; Noya, Atsushi

    2016-04-01

    The characteristics of SiN x films deposited by reactive sputtering and plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) are examined to obtain high-density films at low deposition temperatures. PECVD SiN x films deposited at 200 °C show low densities of 2.14-2.20 g/cm3 regardless of their composition, while their refractive index varies depending on their composition. PECVD requires the substrate temperature to obtain high-density films, because a possible cause of low-density films is the amount of Si-H bond, rather than that of N-H bond, in the films originating from hydrogen incorporated by the insufficient decomposition of SiH4 molecules at low temperatures. The sputtered SiN x films with high density are obtained at a temperature lower than 200 °C and considered a promising candidate for insulating films at low process temperatures.

  14. The deposition of titanium dioxide nanoparticles by means of a hollow cathode plasma jet in dc regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perekrestov, R.; Kudrna, P.; Tichý, M.

    2015-06-01

    TiO2 nanoparticles are being investigated in this work. Nanoparticles were obtained in Ar plasma on monocrystaline Si(111) substrate by means of a gas-phase deposition using a low pressure hollow cathode plasma jet. The material of the cathode is pure titanium. Oxygen was introduced separately from argon through an inlet in the chamber. The nanoparticle growth mechanism is qualitatively discussed. The morphology of the surfaces of thin films was investigated by an atomic force microscope. The chemical composition of the thin films was investigated by means of an energy-dispersive x-ray analysis and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. A cylindrical Langmuir probe and a fiber optic thermometer was used for measurements of plasma parameters and neutral gas temperature respectively. The relationship between plasma parameters and the films’ morphology is particularly explained.

  15. Comment on: "Characterization of Microroughness Parameters in Titanium Nitride Thin Films Grown by DC Magnetron Sputtering" [J Fusion Energ DOI 10.1007/s10894-012-9510-z

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solaymani, Shahram; Ghaderi, Atefeh; Nezafat, Negin Beryani

    2012-12-01

    In recent article [Ali Gelali. Azin Ahmadpourian. Reza Bavadi. M. R. Hantehzadeh. Arman Ahmadpourian. J Fusion Energ DOI 10.1007/s10894-012-9510-z], Ali Geleli et al. studied the PSD and RMS Roughness parameters in Titanium Nitride thin films by AFM data and used the computed fractal dimension value of micrographs to describe the surface morphology of thin films. Here, the correct form of equations and relationship between PSD and RMS will be discussed.

  16. Preparation of Carbon-Doped TiO2 Nanopowder Synthesized by Droplet Injection of Solution Precursor in a DC-RF Hybrid Plasma Flow System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Juyong; Takana, Hidemasa; Ando, Yasutaka; Solonenko, Oleg P.; Nishiyama, Hideya

    2013-08-01

    Carbon-doped titanium dioxide nanopowder has received much attention because of its higher photocatalytic performance, which is practically activated not only by UV, but also by visible light irradiation. In the present study, C-TiO2 nanopowder was synthesized by droplet injection of solution precursor in a DC-RF hybrid plasma flow system, resulting in higher photocatalytic performance even under visible light irradiation. In-flight C-TiO2 nanoparticles reacted with the high concentration of carbon in plasma flow and were then deposited on the surfaces of two quartz tubes in the upstream and downstream regions of this system. The collected C-TiO2 nanopowder contained anatase-rutile mixed-phase TiO2 and TiC, the contents of which depended on the location of the powder collection, the temperature, and the duration of plasma treatment. Highly functional C-TiO2 nanopowder collected in the downstream region exhibited a higher degradation rate of methylene blue than that of single-phase anatase TiO2, even under visible light irradiation, in spite of being TiC.

  17. Improved oxygen diffusion barrier properties of ruthenium-titanium nitride thin films prepared by plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Seong-Jun; Kim, Doo-In; Kim, Sang Ouk; Han, Tae Hee; Kwon, Jung-Dae; Park, Jin-Seong; Kwon, Se-Hun

    2011-01-01

    Ru-TiN thin films were prepared from bis(ethylcyclopentadienyl)ruthenium and tetrakis(dimethylamino)titanium using plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD). The Ru and TiN were deposited sequentially to intermix TiN with Ru. The composition of Ru-TiN films was controlled precisely by changing the number of deposition cycles allocated to Ru, while fixing the number of deposition cycles allocated to TiN. Although both Ru and TiN thin films have a polycrystalline structure, the microstructure of the Ru-TiN films changed from a TiN-like polycrystalline structure to a nanocrystalline on increasing the Ru intermixing ratio. Moreover, the electrical resistivity of the Ru0.67-TiN0.33 thin films is sufficiently low at 190 microomega x cm and was maintained even after O2 annealing at 750 degrees C. Therefore, Ru-TiN thin films can be utilized as a oxygen diffusion barrier material for future dynamic (DRAM) and ferroelectric (FeRAM) random access memory capacitors.

  18. Internal quantum efficiency of III-nitride quantum dot superlattices grown by plasma-assisted molecular-beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Gacevic, Z.; Kehagias, Th.; Koukoula, T.; Komninou, Ph.

    2011-05-15

    We present a study of the optical properties of GaN/AlN and InGaN/GaN quantum dot (QD) superlattices grown via plasma-assisted molecular-beam epitaxy, as compared to their quantum well (QW) counterparts. The three-dimensional/two-dimensional nature of the structures has been verified using atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The QD superlattices present higher internal quantum efficiency as compared to the respective QWs as a result of the three-dimensional carrier localization in the islands. In the QW samples, photoluminescence (PL) measurements point out a certain degree of carrier localization due to structural defects or thickness fluctuations, which is more pronounced in InGaN/GaN QWs due to alloy inhomogeneity. In the case of the QD stacks, carrier localization on potential fluctuations with a spatial extension smaller than the QD size is observed only for the InGaN QD-sample with the highest In content (peak emission around 2.76 eV). These results confirm the efficiency of the QD three-dimensional confinement in circumventing the potential fluctuations related to structural defects or alloy inhomogeneity. PL excitation measurements demonstrate efficient carrier transfer from the wetting layer to the QDs in the GaN/AlN system, even for low QD densities ({approx}10{sup 10} cm{sup -3}). In the case of InGaN/GaN QDs, transport losses in the GaN barriers cannot be discarded, but an upper limit to these losses of 15% is deduced from PL measurements as a function of the excitation wavelength.

  19. The use of ion chromatography-dc plasma atomic emission spectrometry for the speciation of trace metals. Annual performance report, February 1, 1989--January 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Urasa, I.T.

    1991-09-20

    The original objects of this research program were: to interface d.c. plasma atomic emission spectrometer with an ion chromatograph; to characterize and optimize the combined systems for application in the speciation of metals in aqueous solutions; to use this system in the study of the solution chemistry of various metals; and to find ways in which the measurement sensitivity of the method can be enhanced, thereby allowing the detection of metal species at low ppb concentration levels. This approach has been used to study the chemistry of and speciate several elements in solution including: arsenic, chromium, iron, manganese, nickel phosphorus, platinum, selenium, and vanadium. During the course of this research, we have found that the solution chemistry of the elements studied and the speciation data obtained can vary considerably depending on the solution, and the chromatographic conditions employed. The speciation of chromium, iron, and vanadium was found to be highly influenced by the acidity of the sample. The element selective nature of the d.c. plasma detector allows these changes to be monitored, thereby providing quantitative information on the new moieties formed. New approaches are being developed including the use of chelating ligands as preconcentration agents for purposes of reducing further the detection limits of the elements of interest and to improve the overall element speciation scheme. New thrusts are being directed towards the employment of post-column derivatization method coupled with colorimetric measurements to detect and quantify metal species eluting from the chromatographic column. The influence of sample acidity on these investigations will be carefully evaluated. These new thrusts are described in the accompanying Project Renewal Proposal.

  20. Hydrodynamic and direct-current insulator-based dielectrophoresis (H-DC-iDEP) microfluidic blood plasma separation.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Mahdi; Madadi, Hojjat; Casals-Terré, Jasmina; Sellarès, Jordi

    2015-06-01

    Evaluation and diagnosis of blood alterations is a common request for clinical laboratories, requiring a complex technological approach and dedication of health resources. In this paper, we present a microfluidic device that owing to a novel combination of hydrodynamic and dielectrophoretic techniques can separate plasma from fresh blood in a microfluidic channel and for the first time allows optical real-time monitoring of the components of plasma without pre- or post-processing. The microchannel is based on a set of dead-end branches at each side and is initially filled using capillary forces with a 2-μL droplet of fresh blood. During this process, stagnation zones are generated at the dead-end branches and some red blood cells (RBCs) are trapped there. An electric field is then applied and dielectrophoretic trapping of RBCs is used to prevent more RBCs entering into the channel, which works like a sieve. Besides, an electroosmotic flow is generated to sweep the rest of the RBCs from the central part of the channel. Consequently, an RBC-free zone of plasma is formed in the middle of the channel, allowing real-time monitoring of the platelet behavior. To study the generation of stagnation zones and to ensure RBC trapping in the initial constrictions, two numerical models were solved. The proposed experimental design separates up to 0.1 μL blood plasma from a 2-μL fresh human blood droplet. In this study, a plasma purity of 99 % was achieved after 7 min, according to the measurements taken by image analysis. Graphical Abstract Schematics of a real-time plasma monitoring system based on a Hydrodynamic and direct-current insulator-based dielectrophoresis microfluidic channel.

  1. Effect of N{sub 2} and Ar gas on DC arc plasma generation and film composition from Ti-Al compound cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhirkov, Igor Rosen, Johanna; Oks, Efim

    2015-06-07

    DC arc plasma from Ti, Al, and Ti{sub 1−x}Al{sub x} (x = 0.16, 0.25, 0.50, and 0.70) compound cathodes has been characterized with respect to plasma chemistry (charged particles) and charge-state-resolved ion energy for Ar and N{sub 2} pressures in the range 10{sup −6} to 3 × 10{sup −2} Torr. Scanning electron microscopy was used for exploring the correlation between the cathode and film composition, which in turn was correlated with the plasma properties. In an Ar atmosphere, the plasma ion composition showed a reduction of Al of approximately 5 at. % compared to the cathode composition, while deposited films were in accordance with the cathode stoichiometry. Introducing N{sub 2} above ∼5 × 10{sup −3} Torr, lead to a reduced Al content in the plasma as well as in the film, and hence a 1:1 correlation between the cathode and film composition cannot be expected in a reactive environment. This may be explained by an influence of the reactive gas on the arc mode and type of erosion of Ti and Al rich contaminations, as well as on the plasma transport. Throughout the investigated pressure range, a higher deposition rate was obtained from cathodes with higher Al content. The origin of generated gas ions was investigated through the velocity rule, stating that the most likely ion velocities of all cathode elements from a compound cathode are equal. The results suggest that the major part of the gas ions in Ar is generated from electron impact ionization, while gas ions in a N{sub 2} atmosphere primarily originate from a nitrogen contaminated layer on the cathode surface. The presented results provide a contribution to the understanding processes of plasma generation from compound cathodes. It also allows for a more reasonable approach to the selection of composite cathode and experimental conditions for thin film depositions.

  2. Investigation into nitrided spur gears

    SciTech Connect

    Yilbas, B.S.; Coban, A.; Nickel, J.; Sunar, M.; Sami, M.; Abdul Aleem, B.J.

    1996-12-01

    The cold forging method has been widely used in industry to produce machine parts. In general, gears are produced by shaping or hobbing. One of the shaping techniques is precision forging, which has several advantages over hobbing. In the present study, cold forging of spur gears from Ti-6Al-4V material is introduced. To improve the surface properties of the resulting gears, plasma nitriding was carried out. Nuclear reaction analysis was carried out to obtain the nitrogen concentration, while the micro-PIXE technique was used to determine the elemental distribution in the matrix after forging and nitriding processes. Scanning electron microscopy and x-ray powder diffraction were used to investigate the metallurgical changes and formation of nitride components in the surface region. Microhardness and friction tests were carried out to measure the hardness depth profile and friction coefficient at the surface. Finally, scoring failure tests were conducted to determine the rotational speed at which the gears failed. Three distinct regions were obtained in the nitride region, and at the initial stages of the scoring tests, failure in surface roughness was observed in the vicinity of the tip of the gear tooth. This occurred at a particular rotational speed and work input.

  3. Selection of operating conditions and analytical procedure in multi-metal analysis of animal tissues by d.c. plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Adrian; Petersson, Lars R.

    In order to expand the analytical capacity and achieve better utilization of tissue materials (liver, kidney, etc.) so as to assess the degrees of environmental pollution, a method for simultaneous determination of 14 metals (Al, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, Ni, Pb, V, W, and Zn) has been developed by applying d.c. plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy. The analytical emission lines were chosen after considering the absence of more important interfering emission lines from elements present in the matrix, and taking into account their intensity, background, range of linearity and working range. At increasing ionic buffer concentration most metals seem to have a region of relatively little change in intensity. A 0.25 M LiNO 3 solution was chosen as ionic buffer. Optimization of plasma position to obtain maximum light intensity at each of the analytical wavelengths was studied with both single- and multi-element cassettes. The intention was to find a plasma position with satisfactory light intensity for all metals to be determined simultaneously. Spectral interferences, stray light effects included, from elements present in the matrix were investigated and linear relationships were usually found between the "false" signal contribution and the concentration of the interfering element. These signals were expressed as spectral interference correction coefficients (SICC values) on a concentration equivalent basis, viz. μ ml -1 per μ ml -1. The effect of Ca on the analytical emission lines of Al, Pb, and W was not linear in contrast to the usual relationship. Organ tissues are prepared by automated wet digestion. Transfer of sample solution from the sample tray into the plasma is performed automatically. A microcomputer is used for evaluation of metal contents in the solutions, background correction by use of SICC values, and final calculation of metal concentrations in the tissues.

  4. Magnetoresistance measurements of superconducting molybdenum nitride thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskaran, R.; Arasu, A. V. Thanikai; Amaladass, E. P.

    2016-05-01

    Molybdenum nitride thin films have been deposited on aluminum nitride buffered glass substrates by reactive DC sputtering. GIXRD measurements indicate formation of nano-crystalline molybdenum nitride thin films. The transition temperature of MoN thin film is 7.52 K. The transition width is less than 0.1 K. The upper critical field Bc2(0), calculated using GLAG theory is 12.52 T. The transition width for 400 µA current increased initially upto 3 T and then decreased, while that for 100 µA current transition width did not decrease.

  5. M3D-C1 simulations of plasma response in ELM-mitigated ASDEX Upgrade and DIII-D discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyons, B. C.; Ferraro, N. M.; Haskey, S. R.; Logan, N. C.

    2015-11-01

    The extended magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) code M3D-C1 is used to study the time-independent, linear response of tokamak equilibria to applied, 3D magnetic perturbations. In doing so, we seek to develop a more complete understanding of what MHD phenomena are responsible for the mitigation and suppression of edge-localized modes (ELMs) and to explain why the success of ELM suppression experiments differs both within a single tokamak and across different tokamaks. We consider such experiments on ASDEX Upgrade and DIII-D. We examine how resonant and non-resonant plasma responses are affected by varying the relative magnitude and phase of sets of magnetic coils. The importance of two-fluid effects, rotation profiles, plasma β, collisionality, bootstrap current profiles, and various numerical parameters are explored. The results are verified against other MHD codes (e.g., IPEC, MARS), correlated to observations of ELM mitigation or suppression, and validated against observed magnetic responses. Work supported in part by US DOE under DE-FC02-04ER54698, DE-AC02-09CH11466, and the FES Postdoctoral Research Program.

  6. Effect of anomalous electron cross-field transport on electron energy distribution function in a DC-RF magnetized plasma discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raitses, Yevgeny; Donnelly, Vincent; Kaganovich, Igor; Godyak, Valery

    2013-09-01

    The application of the magnetic field in a low pressure plasma can cause a spatial separation of cold and hot electron groups. This so-called magnetic filter effect is not well understood and is the subject of our studies. In this work, we investigate electron energy distribution function in a DC-RF plasma discharge with crossed electric and magnetic field operating at sub-mtorr pressure range of xenon gas. Experimental studies showed that the increase of the magnetic field leads to a more uniform profile of the electron temperature across the magnetic field. This surprising result indicates the importance of anomalous electron transport that causes mixing of hot and cold electrons. High-speed imaging and probe measurements revealed a coherent structure rotating in E cross B direction with frequency of a few kHz. Similar to spoke oscillations reported for Hall thrusters, this rotating structure conducts the largest fraction of the cross-field current. This work was supported by the US DOE under Contract DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  7. Effect of anomalous electron cross-field transport on electron energy distribution function in a DC-RF magnetized plasma discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raitses, Yevgeny; Donnelly, Vincent M.; Kaganovich, Igor D.; Godyak, Valery

    2013-10-01

    The application of the magnetic field in a low pressure plasma can cause a spatial separation of cold and hot electron groups. This so-called magnetic filter effect is not well understood and is the subject of our studies. In this work, we investigate electron energy distribution function in a DC-RF plasma discharge with crossed electric and magnetic field operating at sub-mtorr pressure range of xenon gas. Experimental studies showed that the increase of the magnetic field leads to a more uniform profile of the electron temperature across the magnetic field. This surprising result indicates the importance of anomalous electron transport that causes mixing of hot and cold electrons. High-speed imaging and probe measurements revealed a coherent structure rotating in E cross B direction with frequency of a few kHz. Similar to spoke oscillations reported for Hall thrusters, this rotating structure conducts the largest fraction of the cross-field current. This work was supported by DOE contract DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  8. Preparation of uranium nitride

    DOEpatents

    Potter, Ralph A.; Tennery, Victor J.

    1976-01-01

    A process for preparing actinide-nitrides from massive actinide metal which is suitable for sintering into low density fuel shapes by partially hydriding the massive metal and simultaneously dehydriding and nitriding the dehydrided portion. The process is repeated until all of the massive metal is converted to a nitride.

  9. Milliwatt dc/dc Inverter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclyman, C. W.

    1983-01-01

    Compact dc/dc inverter uses single integrated-circuit package containing six inverter gates that generate and amplify 100-kHz square-wave switching signal. Square-wave switching inverts 10-volt local power to isolated voltage at another desired level. Relatively high operating frequency reduces size of filter capacitors required, resulting in small package unit.

  10. Effects of temperature and near-substrate plasma density on the structural and electrical properties of dc sputtered germanium thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Pollock, Kristin M.; Kaufman-Osborn, Tobin; Hiltrop, Jonas; Doyle, James R.

    2011-09-15

    Germanium thin films were deposited by dc reactive magnetron sputtering as a function of substrate temperature and ion flux using an unbalanced magnetron with an external magnetic field. The ion flux and energy distribution were measured using a retarding field energy analyzer (RFEA), a flat probe with a guard ring, and cylindrical Langmuir probes. The RFEA ion flux, the flat probe saturation currents, and the ion densities inferred from the cylindrical probe data are in very good agreement over a wide range of plasma densities, which were varied both by the external coil current and discharge power. The RFEA ion energy distributions are in good agreement with the plasma potentials inferred from the cylindrical probes, and suggest that the nonuniformity of the plasma in the vicinity of the substrate holder should be considered in the interpretation of probe results in these systems. The deposited films were characterized by x-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, optical transmission, resistivity, and Hall effect measurements. Under low ion bombardment conditions, an abrupt onset of the crystalline phase with respect to temperature is observed in the Raman and x-ray diffraction measurements, and the crystal quality increases with increasing temperature above the transition temperature. The transition is also accompanied by a sharp decrease in film resistivity. The microcrystalline films have a strong preferential orientation in the (220) direction, and are p type with carrier densities in the range 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3} and mobilities in the range 15-30 cm{sup 2}/V-s. The structural and electronic properties of the films are sensitive to the ion flux. Near the transition temperature the effects of increasing ion flux can be attributed to the small temperature rise that accompanies the higher plasma density. At higher temperatures the increased ion flux results in a more random crystallographic orientation, with significantly lower carrier concentrations and only

  11. Oxidation Protection of Uranium Nitride Fuel using Liquid Phase Sintering

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Paul A. Lessing

    2012-03-01

    Two methods are proposed to increase the oxidation resistance of uranium nitride (UN) nuclear fuel. These paths are: (1) Addition of USi{sub x} (e.g. U3Si2) to UN nitride powder, followed by liquid phase sintering, and (2) 'alloying' UN nitride with various compounds (followed by densification via Spark Plasma Sintering or Liquid Phase Sintering) that will greatly increase oxidation resistance. The advantages (high thermal conductivity, very high melting point, and high density) of nitride fuel have long been recognized. The sodium cooled BR-10 reactor in Russia operated for 18 years on uranium nitride fuel (UN was used as the driver fuel for two core loads). However, the potential advantages (large power up-grade, increased cycle lengths, possible high burn-ups) as a Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuel are offset by uranium nitride's extremely low oxidation resistance (UN powders oxidize in air and UN pellets decompose in hot water). Innovative research is proposed to solve this problem and thereby provide an accident tolerant LWR fuel that would resist water leaks and high temperature steam oxidation/spalling during an accident. It is proposed that we investigate two methods to increase the oxidation resistance of UN: (1) Addition of USi{sub x} (e.g. U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}) to UN nitride powder, followed by liquid phase sintering, and (2) 'alloying' UN nitride with compounds (followed by densification via Spark Plasma Sintering) that will greatly increase oxidation resistance.

  12. Spherical boron nitride particles and method for preparing them

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Jonathan; Gleiman, Seth S.; Chen, Chun-Ku

    2003-11-25

    Spherical and polyhedral particles of boron nitride and method of preparing them. Spherical and polyhedral particles of boron nitride are produced from precursor particles of hexagonal phase boron nitride suspended in an aerosol gas. The aerosol is directed to a microwave plasma torch. The torch generates plasma at atmospheric pressure that includes nitrogen atoms. The presence of nitrogen atoms is critical in allowing boron nitride to melt at atmospheric pressure while avoiding or at least minimizing decomposition. The plasma includes a plasma hot zone, which is a portion of the plasma that has a temperature sufficiently high to melt hexagonal phase boron nitride. In the hot zone, the precursor particles melt to form molten particles that acquire spherical and polyhedral shapes. These molten particles exit the hot zone, cool, and solidify to form solid particles of boron nitride with spherical and polyhedral shapes. The molten particles can also collide and join to form larger molten particles that lead to larger spherical and polyhedral particles.

  13. Methods of forming boron nitride

    DOEpatents

    Trowbridge, Tammy L; Wertsching, Alan K; Pinhero, Patrick J; Crandall, David L

    2015-03-03

    A method of forming a boron nitride. The method comprises contacting a metal article with a monomeric boron-nitrogen compound and converting the monomeric boron-nitrogen compound to a boron nitride. The boron nitride is formed on the same or a different metal article. The monomeric boron-nitrogen compound is borazine, cycloborazane, trimethylcycloborazane, polyborazylene, B-vinylborazine, poly(B-vinylborazine), or combinations thereof. The monomeric boron-nitrogen compound is polymerized to form the boron nitride by exposure to a temperature greater than approximately 100.degree. C. The boron nitride is amorphous boron nitride, hexagonal boron nitride, rhombohedral boron nitride, turbostratic boron nitride, wurzite boron nitride, combinations thereof, or boron nitride and carbon. A method of conditioning a ballistic weapon and a metal article coated with the monomeric boron-nitrogen compound are also disclosed.

  14. Role of hydrogen on the deposition and properties of fluorinated silicon-nitride films prepared by inductively coupled plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition using SiF{sub 4}/N{sub 2}/H{sub 2} mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Fandino, J.; Santana, G.; Rodriguez-Fernandez, L.; Cheang-Wong, J.C.; Ortiz, A.; Alonso, J.C.

    2005-03-01

    Fluorinated silicon-nitride films have been prepared at low temperature (250 deg. C) by remote plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition using mixtures of SiF{sub 4}, N{sub 2}, Ar, and various H{sub 2} flow rates. The deposited films were characterized by means of single wavelength ellipsometry, infrared transmission, resonant nuclear reactions, Rutherford backscattering analysis, and current-voltage measurements. It was found that films deposited without hydrogen grow with the highest deposition rate, however, they result with the highest fluorine content ({approx}27 at. %) and excess of silicon (Si/N ratio{approx_equal}1.75). These films also have the lowest refractive index and the highest etch rate, and exhibit very poor dielectric properties. As a consequence of the high fluorine content, these films hydrolize rapidly upon exposure to the ambient moisture, forming Si-H and N-H bonds, however, they do not oxidize completely. The addition of hydrogen to the deposition process reduces the deposition rate but improves systematically the stability and insulating properties of the films by reducing the amount of both silicon and fluorine incorporated during growth. All the fluorinated silicon-nitride films deposited at hydrogen flow rates higher than 3.5 sccm resulted free of Si-H bonds. In spite of the fact that films obtained at the highest hydrogen flow rate used in this work are still silicon rich (Si/N ratio{approx_equal}1.0) and contain a considerable amount of fluorine ({approx}16 at. %), they are chemically stable and show acceptable dielectric properties.

  15. Method for preparing actinide nitrides

    DOEpatents

    Bryan, G.H.; Cleveland, J.M.; Heiple, C.R.

    1975-12-01

    Actinide nitrides, and particularly plutonium and uranium nitrides, are prepared by reacting an ammonia solution of an actinide compound with an ammonia solution of a reactant or reductant metal, to form finely divided actinide nitride precipitate which may then be appropriately separated from the solution. The actinide nitride precipitate is particularly suitable for forming nuclear fuels.

  16. Ion-nitriding of Maraging steel (250 Grade) for Aeronautical application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shetty, K.; Kumar, S.; Rao, P. R.

    2008-03-01

    Ion nitriding is one of the surface modification processes to obtain better wear resistance of the component. Maraging steel (250 Grade) is used to manufacture a critical component in the control surface of a combat aircraft. This part requires high strength and good wear resistance. Maraging steels belong to a new class of high strength steels with the combination of strength and toughness that are among the highest attainable in general engineering alloys. Good wear resistance is achieved by ion-nitriding (also called as plasma nitriding or glow discharge nitriding) process of case nitriding. Ion-nitriding is a method of surface hardening using glow discharge technology to introduce nascent (elemental) nitrogen to the surface of a metal part for subsequent diffusion into the material. In the present investigation, ion-nitriding of Maraging steel (250 grade) is carried out at 450°C and its effect on microstructure and various properties is discussed.

  17. Effect of PostNitride Annealing on Wear and Corrosion Behavior of Titanium Alloy Ti-6Al-4V

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anandan, C.; Mohan, L.

    2016-10-01

    Titanium alloy, Ti-6Al-4V, was plasma nitrided using RF plasma with 100% N at 800 °C and annealed at 850 °C in vacuum. XRD and XPS studies show the formation of titanium nitrides after nitriding and redistribution of nitrogen after annealing. Potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy studies in Hank's solution show that nitriding decreases the corrosion resistance of the substrate and postnitride annealing improves the corrosion resistance of the nitrided samples. After nitriding, wear rate has decreased by an order of magnitude in reciprocating wear experiments and decreased further in annealed samples in comparison with that of substrate. Thus, postnitride annealing improves both corrosion and wear resistance of the nitrided sample. These improvements are attributed to redistribution of nitrogen and formation of a thin oxide layer on the sample due to annealing.

  18. Effect of PostNitride Annealing on Wear and Corrosion Behavior of Titanium Alloy Ti-6Al-4V

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anandan, C.; Mohan, L.

    2016-08-01

    Titanium alloy, Ti-6Al-4V, was plasma nitrided using RF plasma with 100% N at 800 °C and annealed at 850 °C in vacuum. XRD and XPS studies show the formation of titanium nitrides after nitriding and redistribution of nitrogen after annealing. Potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy studies in Hank's solution show that nitriding decreases the corrosion resistance of the substrate and postnitride annealing improves the corrosion resistance of the nitrided samples. After nitriding, wear rate has decreased by an order of magnitude in reciprocating wear experiments and decreased further in annealed samples in comparison with that of substrate. Thus, postnitride annealing improves both corrosion and wear resistance of the nitrided sample. These improvements are attributed to redistribution of nitrogen and formation of a thin oxide layer on the sample due to annealing.

  19. Reactive sputter deposition of boron nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Jankowski, A.F.; Hayes, J.P.; McKernan, M.A.; Makowiecki, D.M.

    1995-10-01

    The preparation of fully dense, boron targets for use in planar magnetron sources has lead to the synthesis of Boron Nitride (BN) films by reactive rf sputtering. The deposition parameters of gas pressure, flow and composition are varied along with substrate temperature and applied bias. The films are characterized for composition using Auger electron spectroscopy, for chemical bonding using Raman spectroscopy and for crystalline structure using transmission electron microscopy. The deposition conditions are established which lead to the growth of crystalline BN phases. In particular, the growth of an adherent cubic BN coating requires 400--500 C substrate heating and an applied {minus}300 V dc bias.

  20. Gallium nitride optoelectronic devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, T. L.; Chu, S. S.

    1972-01-01

    The growth of bulk gallium nitride crystals was achieved by the ammonolysis of gallium monochloride. Gallium nitride single crystals up to 2.5 x 0.5 cm in size were produced. The crystals are suitable as substrates for the epitaxial growth of gallium nitride. The epitaxial growth of gallium nitride on sapphire substrates with main faces of (0001) and (1T02) orientations was achieved by the ammonolysis of gallium monochloride in a gas flow system. The grown layers had electron concentrations in the range of 1 to 3 x 10 to the 19th power/cu cm and Hall mobilities in the range of 50 to 100 sq cm/v/sec at room temperature.

  1. Boron Nitride Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Michael W. (Inventor); Jordan, Kevin (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Boron nitride nanotubes are prepared by a process which includes: (a) creating a source of boron vapor; (b) mixing the boron vapor with nitrogen gas so that a mixture of boron vapor and nitrogen gas is present at a nucleation site, which is a surface, the nitrogen gas being provided at a pressure elevated above atmospheric, e.g., from greater than about 2 atmospheres up to about 250 atmospheres; and (c) harvesting boron nitride nanotubes, which are formed at the nucleation site.

  2. Boron nitride nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Michael W.; Jordan, Kevin; Park, Cheol

    2012-06-06

    Boron nitride nanotubes are prepared by a process which includes: (a) creating a source of boron vapor; (b) mixing the boron vapor with nitrogen gas so that a mixture of boron vapor and nitrogen gas is present at a nucleation site, which is a surface, the nitrogen gas being provided at a pressure elevated above atmospheric, e.g., from greater than about 2 atmospheres up to about 250 atmospheres; and (c) harvesting boron nitride nanotubes, which are formed at the nucleation site.

  3. Boron nitride composites

    DOEpatents

    Kuntz, Joshua D.; Ellsworth, German F.; Swenson, Fritz J.; Allen, Patrick G.

    2016-02-16

    According to one embodiment, a composite product includes hexagonal boron nitride (hBN), and a plurality of cubic boron nitride (cBN) particles, wherein the plurality of cBN particles are dispersed in a matrix of the hBN. According to another embodiment, a composite product includes a plurality of cBN particles, and one or more borate-containing binders.

  4. Adaptable DC offset correction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golusky, John M. (Inventor); Muldoon, Kelly P. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Methods and systems for adaptable DC offset correction are provided. An exemplary adaptable DC offset correction system evaluates an incoming baseband signal to determine an appropriate DC offset removal scheme; removes a DC offset from the incoming baseband signal based on the appropriate DC offset scheme in response to the evaluated incoming baseband signal; and outputs a reduced DC baseband signal in response to the DC offset removed from the incoming baseband signal.

  5. Gold film with gold nitride - A conductor but harder than gold

    SciTech Connect

    Siller, L.; Peltekis, N.; Krishnamurthy, S.; Chao, Y.; Bull, S.J.; Hunt, M.R.C.

    2005-05-30

    The formation of surface nitrides on gold films is a particularly attractive proposition, addressing the need to produce harder, but still conductive, gold coatings which reduce wear but avoid the pollution associated with conventional additives. Here we report production of large area gold nitride films on silicon substrates, using reactive ion sputtering and plasma etching, without the need for ultrahigh vacuum. Nanoindentation data show that gold nitride films have a hardness {approx}50% greater than that of pure gold. These results are important for large-scale applications of gold nitride in coatings and electronics.

  6. Experimental studies of radiation resistance of boron nitride, C2C ceramics Al2O3 and carbon-fiber composites using a PF-1000 plasma-focus device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gribkov, V. A.; Tuniz, C.; Demina, E. V.; Dubrovsky, A. V.; Pimenov, V. N.; Maslyaev, S. V.; Gaffka, R.; Gryaznevich, M.; Skladnik-Sadowska, E.; Sadowski, M. J.; Miklaszewski, R.; Paduch, M.; Scholz, M.

    2011-04-01

    This paper reports on experiments undertaken to compare the radiation resistance of two types of ceramics, boron nitride (BN) and pure alumina (Al2O3), which are used in a TAEA antenna coil installed in the MAST spherical tokamak. Samples of the investigated materials (bulk BN and a 20 μm film of Al2O3 on Al substrate) were exposed on the axis of the plasma-focus PF-1000 device, which can emit intense streams of hot plasma (v≈107 cm s-1 and Npl≈1018 cm-3) and fast deuteron beams (Ei≈100 keV). The most powerful plasma-ion pulse lasted 0.2-1.0 μs and its intensity decayed in about 100 μs. The irradiation process was diagnosed using fast optical cameras, laser interferometry and optical spectrometry. Experiments were performed at power flux densities equal to 109-1010 W cm-2 or 108-109 W cm-2 during the most powerful stage of the interaction process. The irradiated specimens were investigated by means of optical microscopy and x-ray structure analysis (XRSA). It was shown that at 1010 W cm-2 pulses the Al2O3 coating was completely evaporated, whereas a surface of the BN sample became smoother than in the virgin one. A direct comparison of both samples after the action of 108 W cm-2 pulses demonstrated a wave-like structure (more distinct on Al2O3). Weighing of these samples showed, however, that the evaporation of BN was about two times stronger than that of Al2O3 in spite of the lower irradiation flux; the XRSA showed no evidence of cracking of Al2O3 after these pulses. The insulation properties of Al2O3 did not decline, and the Al2O3 coating may be potentially more beneficial, provided that it is kept below its melting point. Characteristic features of damages of a material based on the carbon-fiber composite with additions of silicium carbide (SiC; 8-40% volumetric) were also investigated. It was found that at q=109 W cm-2, the surface erosion is associated with sputtering and evaporation. The degree of this erosion depends on the fibers' orientation in

  7. Remote quantitative temperature and thickness measurements of plasma-deposited titanium nitride thin coatings on steel using a laser interferometric thermoreflectance optical thermometer

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Yue; Mandelis, Andreas; Choy, Mervyn; Wang, Chinhua; Segal, Lee

    2005-08-15

    An optical thermometer based on the principle of laser thermoreflectance has been introduced to monitor the surface temperature of thin coatings on steel parts undergoing an industrial titanium nitride (TiN) alloy deposition process. To study the feasibility of the optical thermometer, various thermo-optical parameters of TiN affected by the deposition process have been investigated; namely, the reflectance-temperature relation, the thermoreflectance coefficient, and the coating thickness dependence of thermoreflectance and of total reflectance. A theory of interferometric thermoreflectance has been introduced to model the total reflectance variations during the coating process. An inverse reflectance-temperature relation for the TiN-D2 steel substrate system has been found and a first-order Taylor series expansion used to model thermoreflectance has been shown to yield a thermoreflectance coefficient which is independent of temperature. Both results are in quantitative agreement with the Drude-Zener theory of conductors and semi-conductors. An empirical formula has been derived to effectively model the experimental thermoreflectance coefficient dependence of the TiN-D2 steel system on TiN coating thickness, in qualitative agreement with scattering mechanisms of the Boltzmann transport theory in conductors and semiconductors. The good agreement of theoretical interferometric thermoreflectance simulations with in situ measurements during a specific industrial TiN sputter-coating growth process and the independence of the thermoreflectance and thin-coating-thickness reflectance coefficients from temperature show the potential of using this nonintrusive noncontacting technique as an optical thermometer to determine surface temperatures of physically inaccessible samples undergoing industrial coating deposition processes.

  8. Nitriding of high speed steel by bipolar PBII for improvement in adhesion strength of DLC films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Junho; Soejima, Koji; Kato, Takahisa; Kawaguchi, Masahiro; Lee, Wonsik

    2012-02-01

    In the present study, bipolar plasma based ion implantation and deposition (bipolar PBII) was used for plasma nitriding of high speed steel (SKH2), and the effects of the treatment parameters (positive pulse voltage, negative pulse voltage, treatment pressure, treatment time, and precursor gases) on the nitriding process were investigated. The hardness, roughness, and depth of nitride layer were also measured. The adhesion strength of diamond-like carbon (DLC) films coated on the nitride substrate was evaluated by carrying out Rockwell indentation and microscratch tests. Nitriding by bipolar PBII was achieved in the combining of two effects: nitrogen ion implantation by applying a high negative pulse voltage and thermal diffusion of nitrogen atoms under the application of a high positive pulse voltage. However, a very high voltage negative pulse caused surface roughening of the nitride layer. Application of a high positive pulse voltage during nitriding was found to be effective in promoting the thermal diffusion of the implanted nitrogen atoms. Effective nitriding could be achieved under the following conditions: high positive pulse voltage, low negative pulse voltage, high nitrogen gas pressure, and addition of hydrogen to the precursor gas. The adhesion strength of the DLC films on the SKH2 substrate was well improved after nitriding.

  9. High-Efficiency dc/dc Converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturman, J.

    1982-01-01

    High-efficiency dc/dc converter has been developed that provides commonly used voltages of plus or minus 12 Volts from an unregulated dc source of from 14 to 40 Volts. Unique features of converter are its high efficiency at low power level and ability to provide output either larger or smaller than input voltage.

  10. Cubic nitride templates

    DOEpatents

    Burrell, Anthony K; McCleskey, Thomas Mark; Jia, Quanxi; Mueller, Alexander H; Luo, Hongmei

    2013-04-30

    A polymer-assisted deposition process for deposition of epitaxial cubic metal nitride films and the like is presented. The process includes solutions of one or more metal precursor and soluble polymers having binding properties for the one or more metal precursor. After a coating operation, the resultant coating is heated at high temperatures under a suitable atmosphere to yield metal nitride films and the like. Such films can be used as templates for the development of high quality cubic GaN based electronic devices.

  11. Theory of gain in group-III nitride lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, W.W.; Wright, A.F.; Girndt, A.

    1997-06-01

    A microscopic theory of gain in a group-III nitride quantum well laser is presented. The approach, which treats carrier correlations at the level of quantum kinetic theory, gives a consistent account of plasma and excitonic effects in an inhomogeneously broadened system.

  12. Method for applying corrosion resistant metallic coating of zirconium nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, W.J.; Corsetti, L.V.

    1993-07-13

    A process is described for enhancing the wear and corrosion resistance of a cladding tube for a nuclear fuel rod, comprising reactively depositing zirconium nitride on the surface of said cladding tube by a cathodic arc plasma deposition process to form a thin wear resistant coating.

  13. The Structure and Properties of Pulsed dc Sputtered Nanocrystalline NbN Coatings for Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell.

    PubMed

    Chun, Sung-Yong

    2016-02-01

    Niobium nitride coatings for the surface modified proton exchange membrane fuel cells with various pulse parameters have been prepared using dc (direct current) and asymmetric-bipolar pulsed dc magnetron sputtering. The pulse frequency and the duty cycle were varied from 5 to 50 kHz and 50 to 95%, respectively. The deposition rate, grain size and resistivity of pulsed dc sputtered films were decreased when the pulse frequency increased, while the nano hardness of niobium nitride films increased. We present in detail coatings (e.g., deposition rate, grain size, prefer-orientation, resistivity and hardness). Our studies show that niobium nitride coatings with superior properties can be prepared using asymmetric-bipolar pulsed dc sputtering.

  14. The Structure and Properties of Pulsed dc Sputtered Nanocrystalline NbN Coatings for Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell.

    PubMed

    Chun, Sung-Yong

    2016-02-01

    Niobium nitride coatings for the surface modified proton exchange membrane fuel cells with various pulse parameters have been prepared using dc (direct current) and asymmetric-bipolar pulsed dc magnetron sputtering. The pulse frequency and the duty cycle were varied from 5 to 50 kHz and 50 to 95%, respectively. The deposition rate, grain size and resistivity of pulsed dc sputtered films were decreased when the pulse frequency increased, while the nano hardness of niobium nitride films increased. We present in detail coatings (e.g., deposition rate, grain size, prefer-orientation, resistivity and hardness). Our studies show that niobium nitride coatings with superior properties can be prepared using asymmetric-bipolar pulsed dc sputtering. PMID:27433732

  15. DC/DC Converter Stability Testing Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Bright L.

    2008-01-01

    This report presents study results on hybrid DC/DC converter stability testing methods. An input impedance measurement method and a gain/phase margin measurement method were evaluated to be effective to determine front-end oscillation and feedback loop oscillation. In particular, certain channel power levels of converter input noises have been found to have high degree correlation with the gain/phase margins. It becomes a potential new method to evaluate stability levels of all type of DC/DC converters by utilizing the spectral analysis on converter input noises.

  16. Surface band bending and band alignment of plasma enhanced atomic layer deposited dielectrics on Ga- and N-face gallium nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jialing; Eller, Brianna S.; Nemanich, Robert J.

    2014-09-01

    The effects of surface pretreatment, dielectric growth, and post deposition annealing on interface electronic structure and polarization charge compensation of Ga- and N-face bulk GaN were investigated. The cleaning process consisted of an ex-situ wet chemical NH4OH treatment and an in-situ elevated temperature NH3 plasma process to remove carbon contamination, reduce oxygen coverage, and potentially passivate N-vacancy related defects. After the cleaning process, carbon contamination decreased below the x-ray photoemission spectroscopy detection limit, and the oxygen coverage stabilized at ˜1 monolayer on both Ga- and N-face GaN. In addition, Ga- and N-face GaN had an upward band bending of 0.8 ± 0.1 eV and 0.6 ± 0.1 eV, respectively, which suggested the net charge of the surface states and polarization bound charge was similar on Ga- and N-face GaN. Furthermore, three dielectrics (HfO2, Al2O3, and SiO2) were prepared by plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition on Ga- or N-face GaN and annealed in N2 ambient to investigate the effect of the polarization charge on the interface electronic structure and band offsets. The respective valence band offsets of HfO2, Al2O3, and SiO2 with respect to Ga- and N-face GaN were 1.4 ± 0.1, 2.0 ± 0.1, and 3.2 ± 0.1 eV, regardless of dielectric thickness. The corresponding conduction band offsets were 1.0 ± 0.1, 1.3 ± 0.1, and 2.3 ± 0.1 eV, respectively. Experimental band offset results were consistent with theoretical calculations based on the charge neutrality level model. The trend of band offsets for dielectric/GaN interfaces was related to the band gap and/or the electronic part of the dielectric constant. The effect of polarization charge on band offset was apparently screened by the dielectric-GaN interface states.

  17. Deposition of hard and adherent diamond-like carbon films inside steel tubes using a pulsed-DC discharge.

    PubMed

    Trava-Airoldi, Vladimir Jesus; Capote, Gil; Bonetti, Luís Francisco; Fernandes, Jesum; Blando, Eduardo; Hübler, Roberto; Radi, Polyana Alves; Santos, Lúcia Vieira; Corat, Evaldo José

    2009-06-01

    A new, low cost, pulsed-DC plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition system that uses a bipolar, pulsed power supply was designed and tested to evaluate its capacity to produce quality diamond-like carbon films on the inner surface of steel tubes. The main focus of the study was to attain films with low friction coefficients, low total stress, a high degree of hardness, and very good adherence to the inner surface of long metallic tubes at a reasonable growth rate. In order to enhance the diamond-like carbon coating adhesion to metallic surfaces, four steps were used: (1) argon ion sputtering; (2) plasma nitriding; (3) a thin amorphous silicon interlayer deposition, using silane as the precursor gas; and (4) diamond-like carbon film deposition using methane atmosphere. This paper presents various test results as functions of the methane gas pressure and of the coaxial metal anode diameter, where the pulsed-DC voltage constant is kept constant. The influence of the coaxial metal anode diameter and of the methane gas pressure is also demonstrated. The results obtained showed the possibilities of using these DLC coatings for reduced friction and to harden inner surface of the steel tubes. PMID:19504937

  18. Deposition of hard and adherent diamond-like carbon films inside steel tubes using a pulsed-DC discharge.

    PubMed

    Trava-Airoldi, Vladimir Jesus; Capote, Gil; Bonetti, Luís Francisco; Fernandes, Jesum; Blando, Eduardo; Hübler, Roberto; Radi, Polyana Alves; Santos, Lúcia Vieira; Corat, Evaldo José

    2009-06-01

    A new, low cost, pulsed-DC plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition system that uses a bipolar, pulsed power supply was designed and tested to evaluate its capacity to produce quality diamond-like carbon films on the inner surface of steel tubes. The main focus of the study was to attain films with low friction coefficients, low total stress, a high degree of hardness, and very good adherence to the inner surface of long metallic tubes at a reasonable growth rate. In order to enhance the diamond-like carbon coating adhesion to metallic surfaces, four steps were used: (1) argon ion sputtering; (2) plasma nitriding; (3) a thin amorphous silicon interlayer deposition, using silane as the precursor gas; and (4) diamond-like carbon film deposition using methane atmosphere. This paper presents various test results as functions of the methane gas pressure and of the coaxial metal anode diameter, where the pulsed-DC voltage constant is kept constant. The influence of the coaxial metal anode diameter and of the methane gas pressure is also demonstrated. The results obtained showed the possibilities of using these DLC coatings for reduced friction and to harden inner surface of the steel tubes.

  19. Synthesis of zirconium oxynitride in air under DC electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morisaki, Nobuhiro; Yoshida, Hidehiro; Matsui, Koji; Tokunaga, Tomoharu; Sasaki, Katsuhiro; Yamamoto, Takahisa

    2016-08-01

    We synthesized zirconium oxynitride from yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) in air by applying DC electric fields that produced a controlled electric current in the specimen. When YSZ was heated under an applied DC electric field, the electric current of the specimen steeply increased at a critical temperature, called a flash event, during flash sintering. By keeping the electric current of the specimen constant during the flash event and then holding the specimen at the critical temperature, YSZ was transformed into zirconium oxynitride under the optimal conditions of 50 V/cm, 500 mA, and 1000 °C. We confirmed that zirconium oxynitride formed using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, electron energy-loss spectroscopy, and energy-dispersive spectrometry. To convert oxides to nitrides, reducing conditions are necessary to form excess oxygen vacancies. Our technique produced the strong reducing conditions necessary to form nitrides from the oxides by delivering a controlled electric current to the specimen.

  20. Irradiation performance of nitride fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, R.B.

    1993-01-01

    The properties and advantages of nitride fuels are well documented in the literature. Basically the high thermal conductivity and uranium density of nitride fuels permit high power density, good breeding ratios, low reactivity swings, and large diameter pins compared to oxides. Nitrides are compatible with cladding alloys and liquid metal coolants, thereby reducing fuel/cladding chemical interactions and permitting the use of sodium-bonded pins and the operation of breached pins. Recent analyses done under similar operating conditions show that - compared to metal - fuels mixed nitrides operate at lower temperatures, produce less cladding strain, have greater margins to failure, result in lower transient temperatures, and have lower sodium void reactivity. Uranium nitride fuel pellet fabrication processes were demonstrated during the SP-100 program, and irradiated nitride fuels can be reprocessed by the PUREX process. Irradiation performance data suggest that nitrides have low fission gas release and swelling rates thereby permitting favorable pin designs and long lifetime. The objective of this report is to summarize the available nitride irradiation performance data base and to recommend optimum nitride characteristics for use in advanced liquid metal reactors.

  1. Superplastic forging nitride ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Panda, Prakash C.; Seydel, Edgar R.; Raj, Rishi

    1988-03-22

    The invention relates to producing relatively flaw free silicon nitride ceramic shapes requiring little or no machining by superplastic forging This invention herein was made in part under Department of Energy Grant DE-AC01-84ER80167, creating certain rights in the United States Government. The invention was also made in part under New York State Science and Technology Grant SB1R 1985-10.

  2. Tribological and microstructural characteristics of ion-nitrided steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalvins, T.

    1983-01-01

    Three steels AISI 4140, AISI 4340 and AISI 304 stainless steel were ion nitrided in a plasma consisting of a 75:25 mixture of H2:N2, sometimes with a trace of CH4. Their surface topography was characterized by SEM and two distinct compound phases were identified: the gamma and the epsilon. The core-case hardness profiles were also established. The low Cr alloy steels have an extended diffusion zone in contrast to the 304 stainless steels which have a sharp interface. The depth of ion-nitriding is increased as the Cr content is decreased. Friction tests reveal that the gamma surface phase has a lower coefficient of friction than the epsilon phase. The lowest coefficient of friction is achieved when both the rider and the specimen surface are ion nitrided.

  3. Active Control of Nitride Plasmonic Dispersion in the Far Infrared.

    SciTech Connect

    Shaner, Eric A.; Dyer, Gregory Conrad; Seng, William Francis; Bethke, Donald Thomas; Grine, Albert Dario,; Baca, Albert G.; Allerman, Andrew A.

    2014-11-01

    We investigate plasmonic structures in nitride-based materials for far-infrared (IR) applications. The two dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in the GaN/AlGaN material system, much like metal- dielectric structures, is a patternable plasmonic medium. However, it also permits for direct tunability via an applied voltage. While there have been proof-of-principle demonstrations of plasma excitations in nitride 2DEGs, exploration of the potential of this material system has thus far been limited. We recently demonstrated coherent phenomena such as the formation of plasmonic crystals, strong coupling of tunable crystal defects to a plasmonic crystal, and electromagnetically induced transparency in GaAs/AlGaAs 2DEGs at sub-THz frequencies. In this project, we explore whether these effects can be realized in nitride 2DEG materials above 1 THz and at temperatures exceeding 77 K.

  4. Gallium nitride electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajan, Siddharth; Jena, Debdeep

    2013-07-01

    In the past two decades, there has been increasing research and industrial activity in the area of gallium nitride (GaN) electronics, stimulated first by the successful demonstration of GaN LEDs. While the promise of wide band gap semiconductors for power electronics was recognized many years before this by one of the contributors to this issue (J Baliga), the success in the area of LEDs acted as a catalyst. It set the field of GaN electronics in motion, and today the technology is improving the performance of several applications including RF cell phone base stations and military radar. GaN could also play a very important role in reducing worldwide energy consumption by enabling high efficiency compact power converters operating at high voltages and lower frequencies. While GaN electronics is a rapidly evolving area with active research worldwide, this special issue provides an opportunity to capture some of the great advances that have been made in the last 15 years. The issue begins with a section on epitaxy and processing, followed by an overview of high-frequency HEMTs, which have been the most commercially successful application of III-nitride electronics to date. This is followed by review and research articles on power-switching transistors, which are currently of great interest to the III-nitride community. A section of this issue is devoted to the reliability of III-nitride devices, an area that is of increasing significance as the research focus has moved from not just high performance but also production-worthiness and long-term usage of these devices. Finally, a group of papers on new and relatively less studied ideas for III-nitride electronics, such as interband tunneling, heterojunction bipolar transistors, and high-temperature electronics is included. These areas point to new areas of research and technological innovation going beyond the state of the art into the future. We hope that the breadth and quality of articles in this issue will make it

  5. Group-III Nitride Field Emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bensaoula, Abdelhak; Berishev, Igor

    2008-01-01

    Field-emission devices (cold cathodes) having low electron affinities can be fabricated through lattice-mismatched epitaxial growth of nitrides of elements from group III of the periodic table. Field emission of electrons from solid surfaces is typically utilized in vacuum microelectronic devices, including some display devices. The present field-emission devices and the method of fabricating them were developed to satisfy needs to reduce the cost of fabricating field emitters, make them compatible with established techniques for deposition of and on silicon, and enable monolithic integration of field emitters with silicon-based driving circuitry. In fabricating a device of this type, one deposits a nitride of one or more group-III elements on a substrate of (111) silicon or other suitable material. One example of a suitable deposition process is chemical vapor deposition in a reactor that contains plasma generated by use of electron cyclotron resonance. Under properly chosen growth conditions, the large mismatch between the crystal lattices of the substrate and the nitride causes strains to accumulate in the growing nitride film, such that the associated stresses cause the film to crack. The cracks lie in planes parallel to the direction of growth, so that the growing nitride film becomes divided into microscopic growing single-crystal columns. The outer ends of the fully-grown columns can serve as field-emission tips. By virtue of their chemical compositions and crystalline structures, the columns have low work functions and high electrical conductivities, both of which are desirable for field emission of electrons. From examination of transmission electron micrographs of a prototype device, the average column width was determined to be about 100 nm and the sharpness of the tips was determined to be characterized by a dimension somewhat less than 100 nm. The areal density of the columns was found to about 5 x 10(exp 9)/sq cm . about 4 to 5 orders of magnitude

  6. Electrochemical nitridation of metal surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Heli; Turner, John A.

    2015-06-30

    Electrochemical nitridation of metals and the produced metals are disclosed. An exemplary method of electrochemical nitridation of metals comprises providing an electrochemical solution at low temperature. The method also comprises providing a three-electrode potentiostat system. The method also comprises stabilizing the three-electrode potentiostat system at open circuit potential. The method also comprises applying a cathodic potential to a metal.

  7. DC source assemblies

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, Jeremy B; Newson, Steve

    2013-02-26

    Embodiments of DC source assemblies of power inverter systems of the type suitable for deployment in a vehicle having an electrically grounded chassis are provided. An embodiment of a DC source assembly comprises a housing, a DC source disposed within the housing, a first terminal, and a second terminal. The DC source also comprises a first capacitor having a first electrode electrically coupled to the housing, and a second electrode electrically coupled to the first terminal. The DC source assembly further comprises a second capacitor having a first electrode electrically coupled to the housing, and a second electrode electrically coupled to the second terminal.

  8. Structure, Mechanics and Synthesis of Nanoscale Carbon and Boron Nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinaldo, Steven G.

    This thesis is divided into two parts. In Part I, we examine the properties of thin sheets of carbon and boron nitride. We begin with an introduction to the theory of elastic sheets, where the stretching and bending modes are considered in detail. The coupling between stretching and bending modes is thought to play a crucial role in the thermodynamic stability of atomically-thin 2D sheets such as graphene. In Chapter 2, we begin by looking at the fabrication of suspended, atomically thin sheets of graphene. We then study their mechanical resonances which are read via an optical transduction technique. The frequency of the resonators was found to depend on their temperature, as was their quality factor. We conclude by offering some interpretations of the data in terms of the stretching and bending modes of graphene. In Chapter 3, we look briefly at the fabrication of thin sheets of carbon and boron nitride nanotubes. We examine the structure of the sheets using transmission and scanning electron microscopy (TEM and SEM, respectively). We then show a technique by which one can make sheets suspended over a trench with adjustable supports. Finally, DC measurements of the resistivity of the sheets in the temperature range 600 -- 1400 C are presented. In Chapter 4, we study the folding of few-layer graphene oxide, graphene and boron nitride into 3D aerogel monoliths. The properties of graphene oxide are first considered, after which the structure of graphene and boron nitride aerogels is examined using TEM and SEM. Some models for their structure are proposed. In Part II, we look at synthesis techniques for boron nitride (BN). In Chapter 5, we study the conversion of carbon structures of boron nitride via the application of carbothermal reduction of boron oxide followed by nitridation. We apply the conversion to a wide variety of morphologies, including aerogels, carbon fibers and nanotubes, and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite. In the latter chapters, we look at the

  9. Determination of the number densities of CH(X2Π) and CH(A2Δ) radicals in a DC cascaded arc discharge plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xingwei; Li, Cong; Wang, Yong; Wang, Zhiwei; Feng, Chunlei; Ding, Hongbin

    2015-09-01

    A combination of optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) has enabled to determinate the number densities of CH(A2Δ) and CH(X2Π) radicals simultaneously in a cascaded arc plasma reactor operating with a CH4/Ar mixture. It is found that the number density of CH(A2Δ) radical increases with discharge current at first and then decreases. However, the number density of CH(X2Π) radical decreases with discharge current when the rate of CH4 flow to total flow is lower than 1 %, while it increases slightly with discharge current when the rate is 1.5 %. The results reveal that CH radicals are deviation from excitation equilibrium. Although OES is the simplest and most straightforward means to investigate the CH radical behavior, it is not enough to provide the information of the CH(X2Π) number density, and additional methods, such as CRDS, are needed in the cascaded arc plasma jet.

  10. DC Self Bias Trends in Dual Frequency PECVD Deposition Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keil, D. L.; Augustyniak, E.; Leeser, C.; Galli, F.

    2011-10-01

    Capacitively coupled plasma (CCP) etch systems commonly report the DC auto or self bias developed as a consequence of capacitively coupling RF to the plasma. Frequently, these systems employ wafer pedestals comprised of electrostatic chucks which must monitor the self bias as part of their normal operation. DC self bias is often found to correlate with various etch process behaviors or system states. It is less common, however, to find CCP deposition systems that report DC self bias. This work reports results of a study of DC self bias trends due to chamber pressure, chamber conditioning and aging, and changes in wafer pedestal hardware. In particular, chamber film accumulation is found to correlate to certain DC bias trends. The applicability of these results for process tracking and system monitoring is discussed. Additionally, the DC self bias response to deliberate perturbations to the RF system are examined. These perturbations include those not normally encountered during commercial deposition such as `bleeding' current to ground.

  11. Hafnium nitride buffer layers for growth of GaN on silicon

    DOEpatents

    Armitage, Robert D.; Weber, Eicke R.

    2005-08-16

    Gallium nitride is grown by plasma-assisted molecular-beam epitaxy on (111) and (001) silicon substrates using hafnium nitride buffer layers. Wurtzite GaN epitaxial layers are obtained on both the (111) and (001) HfN/Si surfaces, with crack-free thickness up to 1.2 {character pullout}m. However, growth on the (001) surface results in nearly stress-free films, suggesting that much thicker crack-free layers could be obtained.

  12. Viscoelastic Behavior of PDMS Filled with Boron Nitrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, J. F.; Weinkauf, D. H.; Jeon, H. S.

    2004-03-01

    The addition of high thermal conductive filler particles such as boron nitride, aluminum nitride, or carbon fiber is an effective way to increase the thermal conductivity of polymeric materials for the industrial applications such as electronic packaging materials, encapsulants, and thermal fluids among others. The effects of particle dispersions, concentrations, and the interactions between BN and polymer matrix on the viscoelastic properties of the boron nitride (BN)/polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) composites prepared by mechanical mixing are investigated using oscillatory shear rheology. Both untreated and plasma treated boron nitride (BNP) particles with hexafluoropropylene oxide monomers have been used in this study. The addition of the plasma treated BN particles to the PDMS matrix decrease significantly the complex viscosity as well as storage and loss modulus of the composites due to the reduced interfacial energy between the surface of BNP and PDMS chains. For the PDMS/BN and PDMS/BNP composites, the maximum volume packing fraction ( ˜0.4) of the particles has been determined from the complex viscosity as a function of the frequency. Additionally, the shear-induced alignment of the BN particles dispersed in the PDMS matrix decreases the viscoelastic properties of the composites with the irregular oscillations which is related to the network formation of dispersed BN particles at the higher volume fractions (> ˜0.2).

  13. Synthesis and characterization of actinide nitrides

    SciTech Connect

    Jaques, Brian; Butt, Darryl P.; Marx, Brian M.; Hamdy, A.S.; Osterberg, Daniel; Balfour, Gordon

    2007-07-01

    A carbothermic reduction of the metal oxides in a hydrogen/nitrogen mixed gas stream prior to nitriding in a nitrogen gas stream was used to synthesize uranium nitride at 1500 deg. C, cerium nitride at 1400 deg. C, and dysprosium nitride at 1500 deg. C. Cerium nitride and dysprosium nitride were also synthesized via hydriding and nitriding the metal shavings at 900 deg. C and 1500 deg. C, respectively. Also, a novel ball-milling synthesis route was used to produce cerium nitride and dysprosium nitride from the metal shavings at room temperature. Dysprosium nitride was also produced by reacting the metal shavings in a high purity nitrogen gas stream at 1300 deg. C. All materials were characterized by phase analysis via X-ray diffraction. Only the high purity materials were further analyzed via chemical analysis to characterize the trace oxygen concentration. (authors)

  14. Gallium nitride nanotube lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Changyi; Liu, Sheng; Hurtado, Antonio; Wright, Jeremy Benjamin; Xu, Huiwen; Luk, Ting Shan; Figiel, Jeffrey J.; Brener, Igal; Brueck, Steven R. J.; Wang, George T.

    2015-01-01

    Lasing is demonstrated from gallium nitride nanotubes fabricated using a two-step top-down technique. By optically pumping, we observed characteristics of lasing: a clear threshold, a narrow spectral, and guided emission from the nanotubes. In addition, annular lasing emission from the GaN nanotube is also observed, indicating that cross-sectional shape control can be employed to manipulate the properties of nanolasers. The nanotube lasers could be of interest for optical nanofluidic applications or application benefitting from a hollow beam shape.

  15. Aluminum nitride grating couplers.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Siddhartha; Doerr, Christopher R; Piazza, Gianluca

    2012-06-10

    Grating couplers in sputtered aluminum nitride, a piezoelectric material with low loss in the C band, are demonstrated. Gratings and a waveguide micromachined on a silicon wafer with 600 nm minimum feature size were defined in a single lithography step without partial etching. Silicon dioxide (SiO(2)) was used for cladding layers. Peak coupling efficiency of -6.6 dB and a 1 dB bandwidth of 60 nm have been measured. This demonstration of wire waveguides and wideband grating couplers in a material that also has piezoelectric and elasto-optic properties will enable new functions for integrated photonics and optomechanics.

  16. Silicon Nitride for Direct Water-Splitting and Corrosion Mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    Head, J.; Turner, J.A.

    2006-01-01

    Todays fossil fuels are becoming harder to obtain, creating pollution problems, and posing hazards to people’s health. One alternative to fossil fuels is hydrogen, capable of serving as a clean and efficient energy carrier. Certain semiconductors are able to harness the energy of photons and direct it into water electrolysis in a process known as photoelectrochemical water splitting. Triple junction devices integrate three semiconductors of different band gaps resulting in a monolithic material that absorbs over a broader spectrum. Amorphous silicon (a-Si) is one such material that, when stacked in tandem, possesses water-splitting capabilities. Even though a-Si is capable of splitting water, it is an unstable material in solution and therefore requires a coating to protect the surface from corrosion. A stable, transparent material that has the potential for corrosion protection is silicon nitride. In this study, silicon nitride thin films were grown using DC magnetron sputtering with varying amounts of argon and nitrogen added to the system. X-ray diffraction indicated amorphous silicon nitride films. Current as a function of potential was determined from cyclic voltammetry measurements. Mott-Schottky analysis showed n-type behavior with absorption and transmission measurements indicated variation in flatband potentials. Variation in band gap values ranging from 1.90 to 4.0 eV. Corrosion measurements reveal that the silicon nitride samples exhibit both p-type and n-type behavior. Photocurrent over a range of potentials was greater in samples that were submerged in acidic electrolyte. Silicon nitride shows good stability in acidic, neutral, and basic solutions, indicative of a good material for corrosion mitigation.

  17. Cordierite silicon nitride filters

    SciTech Connect

    Sawyer, J.; Buchan, B. ); Duiven, R.; Berger, M. ); Cleveland, J.; Ferri, J. )

    1992-02-01

    The objective of this project was to develop a silicon nitride based crossflow filter. This report summarizes the findings and results of the project. The project was phased with Phase I consisting of filter material development and crossflow filter design. Phase II involved filter manufacturing, filter testing under simulated conditions and reporting the results. In Phase I, Cordierite Silicon Nitride (CSN) was developed and tested for permeability and strength. Target values for each of these parameters were established early in the program. The values were met by the material development effort in Phase I. The crossflow filter design effort proceeded by developing a macroscopic design based on required surface area and estimated stresses. Then the thermal and pressure stresses were estimated using finite element analysis. In Phase II of this program, the filter manufacturing technique was developed, and the manufactured filters were tested. The technique developed involved press-bonding extruded tiles to form a filter, producing a monolithic filter after sintering. Filters manufactured using this technique were tested at Acurex and at the Westinghouse Science and Technology Center. The filters did not delaminate during testing and operated and high collection efficiency and good cleanability. Further development in areas of sintering and filter design is recommended.

  18. Electrospun Gallium Nitride Nanofibers

    SciTech Connect

    Melendez, Anamaris; Morales, Kristle; Ramos, Idalia; Campo, Eva; Santiago, Jorge J.

    2009-04-19

    The high thermal conductivity and wide bandgap of gallium nitride (GaN) are desirable characteristics in optoelectronics and sensing applications. In comparison to thin films and powders, in the nanofiber morphology the sensitivity of GaN is expected to increase as the exposed area (proportional to the length) increases. In this work we present electrospinning as a novel technique in the fabrication of GaN nanofibers. Electrospinning, invented in the 1930s, is a simple, inexpensive, and rapid technique to produce microscopically long ultrafine fibers. GaN nanofibers are produced using gallium nitrate and dimethyl-acetamide as precursors. After electrospinning, thermal decomposition under an inert atmosphere is used to pyrolyze the polymer. To complete the preparation, the nanofibers are sintered in a tube furnace under a NH{sub 3} flow. Both scanning electron microscopy and profilometry show that the process produces continuous and uniform fibers with diameters ranging from 20 to a few hundred nanometers, and lengths of up to a few centimeters. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis shows the development of GaN nanofibers with hexagonal wurtzite structure. Future work includes additional characterization using transmission electron microscopy and XRD to understand the role of precursors and nitridation in nanofiber synthesis, and the use of single nanofibers for the construction of optical and gas sensing devices.

  19. Radiation effects on DC-DC Converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Dexin; Attia, John O.; Kankam, Mark D. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    DC-DC switching converters are circuits that can be used to convert a DC voltage of one value to another by switching action. They are increasing being used in space systems. Most of the popular DC-DC switching converters utilize power MOSFETs. However power MOSFETs, when subjected to radiation, are susceptible to degradation of device characteristics or catastrophic failure. This work focuses on the effects of total ionizing dose on converter performance. Four fundamental switching converters (buck converter, buck-boost converter, cuk converter, and flyback converter) were built using Harris IRF250 power MOSFETs. These converters were designed for converting an input of 60 volts to an output of about 12 volts with a switching frequency of 100 kHz. The four converters were irradiated with a Co-60 gamma source at dose rate of 217 rad/min. The performances of the four converters were examined during the exposure to the radiation. The experimental results show that the output voltage of the converters increases as total dose increases. However, the increases of the output voltage were different for the four different converters, with the buck converter and cuk converter the highest and the flyback converter the lowest. We observed significant increases in output voltage for cuk converter at a total dose of 24 krad (si).

  20. Silicon nitride coated silicon thin film on three dimensions current collector for lithium ion battery anode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Cheng-Yu; Chang, Chun-Chi; Duh, Jenq-Gong

    2016-09-01

    Silicon nitride coated silicon (N-Si) has been synthesized by two-step DC sputtering on Cu Micro-cone arrays (CMAs) at ambient temperature. The electrochemical properties of N-Si anodes with various thickness of nitride layer are investigated. From the potential window of 1.2 V-0.05 V, high rate charge-discharge and long cycle test have been executed to investigate the electrochemical performances of various N-Si coated Si-based lithium ion batteries anode materials. Higher specific capacity can be obtained after 200 cycles. The cycling stability is enhanced via thinner nitride layer coating as silicon nitride films are converted to Li3N with covered Si thin films. These N-Si anodes can be cycled under high rates up to 10 C due to low charge transfer resistance resulted from silicon nitride films. This indicates that the combination of silicon nitride and silicon can effectively endure high current and thus enhance the cycling stability. It is expected that N-Si is a potential candidate for batteries that can work effectively under high power.

  1. Investigations of silicon nitride films for silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Elmiger, J.R.; Kunst, M.

    1996-12-31

    Silicon nitride films on crystalline silicon were deposited in a low-temperature (<400 C) Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition process. The deposition process is monitored with in situ Time Resolved Microwave Conductivity measurements leading to an on-line quality control of the deposited films. It is shown that at the start of the deposition there is a strong decrease of the lifetime of the measured transient signal due to plasma induced damage at the silicon surface. Afterwards an increase of the lifetime is observed due to passivation of the interface. For thin films (<30 nm), the lifetime and the film composition depend on the film thickness. Furthermore, the film composition has a strong impact on the passivation of thick (100 nm) silicon nitride films. The best passivation is obtained for almost stoichiometric films characterized by a refractive index of 1.95.

  2. DC-to-DC switching converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuk, Slobodan M. (Inventor); Middlebrook, Robert D. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A dc-to-dc converter having nonpulsating input and output current uses two inductances, one in series with the input source, the other in series with the output load. An electrical energy transferring device with storage, namely storage capacitance, is used with suitable switching means between the inductances to DC level conversion. For isolation between the source and load, the capacitance may be divided into two capacitors coupled by a transformer, and for reducing ripple, the inductances may be coupled. With proper design of the coupling between the inductances, the current ripple can be reduced to zero at either the input or the output, or the reduction achievable in that way may be divided between the input and output.

  3. Hard carbon nitride and method for preparing same

    DOEpatents

    Haller, Eugene E.; Cohen, Marvin L.; Hansen, William L.

    1992-01-01

    Novel crystalline .alpha. (silicon nitride-like)-carbon nitride and .beta. (silicon nitride-like)-carbon nitride are formed by sputtering carbon in the presence of a nitrogen atmosphere onto a single crystal germanium or silicon, respectively, substrate.

  4. Radiation Effects on DC-DC Converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, De-Xin; AbdulMazid, M. D.; Attia, John O.; Kankam, Mark D. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In this work, several DC-DC converters were designed and built. The converters are Buck Buck-Boost, Cuk, Flyback, and full-bridge zero-voltage switched. The total ionizing dose radiation and single event effects on the converters were investigated. The experimental results for the TID effects tests show that the voltages of the Buck Buck-Boost, Cuk, and Flyback converters increase as total dose increased when using power MOSFET IRF250 as a switching transistor. The change in output voltage with total dose is highest for the Buck converter and the lowest for Flyback converter. The trend of increase in output voltages with total dose in the present work agrees with those of the literature. The trends of the experimental results also agree with those obtained from PSPICE simulation. For the full-bridge zero-voltage switch converter, it was observed that the dc-dc converter with IRF250 power MOSFET did not show a significant change of output voltage with total dose. In addition, for the dc-dc converter with FSF254R4 radiation-hardened power MOSFET, the output voltage did not change significantly with total dose. The experimental results were confirmed by PSPICE simulation that showed that FB-ZVS converter with IRF250 power MOSFET's was not affected with the increase in total ionizing dose. Single Event Effects (SEE) radiation tests were performed on FB-ZVS converters. It was observed that the FB-ZVS converter with the IRF250 power MOSFET, when the device was irradiated with Krypton ion with ion-energy of 150 MeV and LET of 41.3 MeV-square cm/mg, the output voltage increased with the increase in fluence. However, for Krypton with ion-energy of 600 MeV and LET of 33.65 MeV-square cm/mg, and two out of four transistors of the converter were permanently damaged. The dc-dc converter with FSF254R4 radiation hardened power MOSFET's did not show significant change at the output voltage with fluence while being irradiated by Krypton with ion energy of 1.20 GeV and LET of 25

  5. Modification of Ion Nitriding of Ti-6Al-4V for Simultaneous Improvement of Wear and Fatigue Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farokhzadeh, Khorameh

    Extensive application of titanium alloys in the aerospace sector is restricted due to their poor tribological properties especially when contact of surfaces is inevitable. Over the past few decades, many coating deposition and thermochemical treatments have been developed to improve the wear resistance of titanium alloys such as plasma (ion-) nitriding. A typical ion nitrided microstructure in titanium alloys consists of a thin surface layer composed of TiN and Ti 2N titanium nitrides (compound layer), a region of nitrogen-stabilized alpha-titanium (alpha-case), and a nitrogen diffusion zone. However, similar to other nitriding processes, the ion nitriding treatment involves high temperatures (750-1100°C) and results in brittle surface features and substrate microstructural changes that lead to deterioration of fatigue strength. In this research, a modified plasma nitriding treatment was developed to achieve simultaneous improvements of wear resistance and fatigue strength by optimization of the microstructure. The findings revealed that utilizing a low temperature of 600°C during the nitriding treatment inhibited the formation of brittle surface features (alpha-case) and bulk microstructural changes and increased the resistance of ion nitrided surfaces to surface crack initiation and propagation. The nitrided alloys exhibited a higher fatigue strength compared with those reported in the literature. Furthermore, at least 48% reduction in the coefficient of friction compared to the untreated alloy and considerable improvements in wear resistance were obtained by the formation of a thin (< 2 microm) compound layer on the surface supported by a 40 microm deep nitrogen diffusion zone. It was found that further improvements in wear resistance can be achieved by alteration of the surface microstructure prior to the plasma nitriding treatment. As such, a novel pretreatment step was developed to increase the nitriding kinetics at low temperatures via introducing a severe

  6. Preparation and study of Titanium Nitride films by reactive sputtering and an investigation of target poisoning during the process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aziz, Tareque; Rumaiz, Abdul

    Titanium Nitride (TiNx) thin films were prepared by reactive dc sputtering in presence of Ar-N2 plasma. The thin films were grown on Quartz and pure Si surfaces. The Ar-N2 content ratio was gradually varied while the substrate and the Titanium target were kept at room temperature. Structural properties, optical and electrical properties of the thin films were studied by using X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and XRD and 4 probe resistivity measurement. Target poisoning of the Ti target was also studied by varying reactive gas concentration and measuring the target current. A study of target current vs growth rate of the films was performed to investigate the onset of ``poison'' mode.Although there was an insignificant drop in plasma current, we noticed a drop in the deposition rate. This result was tested against Monte Carlo simulations using SRIM simulations. Effects of annealing on the crystallinity and the sheet resistance will also be discussed. The work has been supported by BSA,DOE.

  7. Boron nitride converted carbon fiber

    DOEpatents

    Rousseas, Michael; Mickelson, William; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2016-04-05

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to boron nitride converted carbon fiber. In one aspect, a method may include the operations of providing boron oxide and carbon fiber, heating the boron oxide to melt the boron oxide and heating the carbon fiber, mixing a nitrogen-containing gas with boron oxide vapor from molten boron oxide, and converting at least a portion of the carbon fiber to boron nitride.

  8. Superplastic forging nitride ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Panda, P.C.; Seydel, E.R.; Raj, R.

    1988-03-22

    A process is disclosed for preparing silicon nitride ceramic parts which are relatively flaw free and which need little or no machining, said process comprising the steps of: (a) preparing a starting powder by wet or dry mixing ingredients comprising by weight from about 70% to about 99% silicon nitride, from about 1% to about 30% of liquid phase forming additive and from 1% to about 7% free silicon; (b) cold pressing to obtain a preform of green density ranging from about 30% to about 75% of theoretical density; (c) sintering at atmospheric pressure in a nitrogen atmosphere at a temperature ranging from about 1,400 C to about 2,200 C to obtain a density which ranges from about 50% to about 100% of theoretical density and which is higher than said preform green density, and (d) press forging workpiece resulting from step (c) by isothermally uniaxially pressing said workpiece in an open die without initial contact between said workpiece and die wall perpendicular to the direction of pressing and so that pressed workpiece does not contact die wall perpendicular to the direction of pressing, to substantially final shape in a nitrogen atmosphere utilizing a temperature within the range of from about 1,400 C to essentially 1,750 C and strain rate within the range of about 10[sup [minus]7] to about 10[sup [minus]1] seconds[sup [minus]1], the temperature and strain rate being such that surface cracks do not occur, said pressing being carried out to obtain a shear deformation greater than 30% whereby superplastic forging is effected.

  9. Multilevel DC link inverter

    DOEpatents

    Su, Gui-Jia

    2003-06-10

    A multilevel DC link inverter and method for improving torque response and current regulation in permanent magnet motors and switched reluctance motors having a low inductance includes a plurality of voltage controlled cells connected in series for applying a resulting dc voltage comprised of one or more incremental dc voltages. The cells are provided with switches for increasing the resulting applied dc voltage as speed and back EMF increase, while limiting the voltage that is applied to the commutation switches to perform PWM or dc voltage stepping functions, so as to limit current ripple in the stator windings below an acceptable level, typically 5%. Several embodiments are disclosed including inverters using IGBT's, inverters using thyristors. All of the inverters are operable in both motoring and regenerating modes.

  10. Optimization of the ASPN Process to Bright Nitriding of Woodworking Tools Using the Taguchi Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walkowicz, J.; Staśkiewicz, J.; Szafirowicz, K.; Jakrzewski, D.; Grzesiak, G.; Stępniak, M.

    2013-02-01

    The subject of the research is optimization of the parameters of the Active Screen Plasma Nitriding (ASPN) process of high speed steel planing knives used in woodworking. The Taguchi approach was applied for development of the plan of experiments and elaboration of obtained experimental results. The optimized ASPN parameters were: process duration, composition and pressure of the gaseous atmosphere, the substrate BIAS voltage and the substrate temperature. The results of the optimization procedure were verified by the tools' behavior in the sharpening operation performed in normal industrial conditions. The ASPN technology proved to be extremely suitable for nitriding the woodworking planing tools, which because of their specific geometry, in particular extremely sharp wedge angles, could not be successfully nitrided using conventional direct current plasma nitriding method. The carried out research proved that the values of fracture toughness coefficient K Ic are in correlation with maximum spalling depths of the cutting edge measured after sharpening, and therefore may be used as a measure of the nitrided planing knives quality. Based on this criterion the optimum parameters of the ASPN process for nitriding high speed planing knives were determined.

  11. Band Offset Characterization of the Atomic Layer Deposited Aluminum Oxide on m-Plane Indium Nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Ye; Wallace, Joshua S.; Qin, Yueling; Gardella, Joseph A.; Dabiran, Amir M.; Singisetti, Uttam

    2016-04-01

    In this letter, we report the band offset characterization of the atomic layer deposited aluminum oxide on non-polar m-plane indium nitride grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy by using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The valence band offset between aluminum oxide and m-plane indium nitride was determined to be 2.83 eV. The Fermi level of indium nitride was 0.63 eV above valence band maximum, indicated a reduced band bending in comparison to polar indium nitride. The band gap of aluminum oxide was found to be to 6.7 eV, which gave a conduction band offset of 3.17 eV.

  12. A low-power nitriding technique utilizing a microwave-excited radical flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itagaki, Hirotomo; Hirose, Shingo; Kim, Jaeho; Ogura, Mutsuo; Wang, Xuelun; Nonaka, Atsushi; Ogiso, Hisato; Sakakita, Hajime

    2016-06-01

    We report a novel low-power nitriding technique by utilizing a 2.45 GHz microwave-excited nitrogen radical flow system. Nitrogen plasma was produced at the nozzle with dimensions of 50 × 0.5 mm2 and blown onto the surface of a target substrate. A titanium substrate has been used as a target plate since it is easy to visualize a nitriding effect. The titanium substrate was treated under the conditions of 60 W microwave power, 20 Torr of nitrogen gas pressure, and a plate temperature of ∼800 °C. As a result, we have succeeded in nitriding of the titanium substrate in a quasi-atmospheric region of 20 Torr and of a very low power of 60 W with the hardness kept high, which is almost the same as the hardness processed by conventional nitriding methods.

  13. Experimental observation of further frequency upshift from dc to ac radiation converter with perpendicular dc magnetic field

    PubMed

    Higashiguchi; Yugami; Gao; Niiyama; Sasaki; Takahashi; Ito; Nishida

    2000-11-20

    A frequency upshift of a short microwave pulse is generated by the interaction between a relativistic underdense ionization front and a periodic electrostatic field with a perpendicular dc magnetic field. When the dc magnetic field is applied, further frequency upshift of 3 GHz is observed with respect to an unmagnetized case which has typically a GHz range. The radiation frequency depends on both the plasma density and the strength of the dc magnetic field, i.e., the plasma frequency and the cyclotron frequency. The frequency of the emitted radiation is in reasonable agreement with the theoretical values. PMID:11082591

  14. Growth and Characterization of Gallium Nitride (GaN) Thin Films by Pecvd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmood, Hasan; Moore, S.; Zhang, D.; McIlroy, David N.

    2004-05-01

    Gallium nitride is a good candidate of nano-optical materials. Gallium nitride thin film was grown on Si (100) substrate by using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) technique in a UHV chamber with a base pressure of 9x10-10 torr. The temperature of precursor, Ga, was maintained at 800oC. The working pressure of nitrogen plasma was around 5x10-5 torr. The substrate temperature was in the range of 750-900oC. The chemical, morphological and crystal structural properties studied with XRD, XPS, SEM and ellipsometer will be presented.

  15. Indium nitride and gallium nitride grown from the melt at subatmospheric pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyck, Jeffrey Scott

    The wide-band-gap, group III nitride semiconductors (Al,Ga,In)N are a promising system for visible/near-UV optoelectronic devices. Despite significant technological advances, improvement in material quality is required. Moreover, pure InN has received little attention due to unavailability of high quality crystals, and uncertainty on the fundamental properties of InN exist in the literature. In this work, bulk, polycrystalline gallium nitride and indium nitride were synthesized without a substrate by saturating gallium or indium metal with atomic nitrogen from both ECR and ball plasma microwave sources. The results show that atomic nitrogen is an attractive alternative to high pressure N2 for the synthesis of the bulk nitrides. The GaN and InN crystals were confirmed to be wurtzitic by x-ray and electron diffraction. Weak yellow-band photoluminescence intensity and near-band-edge linewidths of 4 meV for some GaN crystals indicated high optical quality. The high crystalline quality of the InN crystals allowed for the most precise measurement of the lattice parameters currently possible: a = 3.5366 A, c = 5.7009 A. Raman spectra of InN were taken from both randomly oriented polycrystals and groups of oriented, faceted platelets. Phonon modes were assigned as ETO1=445cm -1,ATO1 =472cm-1, E22=448 cm-1, and ALO1=558 cm-1 , and previous disagreement in the literature is explained. The E22 and ALO1 linewidths of were 2.5 and 19 cm-1 are the narrowest ever reported. The measured TO phonon frequencies and lattice parameters were compared to those calculated from first principles and excellent agreement was found. Preliminary experiments on the growth of GaN from Ga/In alloys were performed. Addition of inert, soluble third elements to the Ga/N melt depresses the liquidus temperature, which is equivalent to increasing the solubility of GaN at constant temperature. Upon introduction of an (0001) sapphire substrate into the melt, oriented thin films of the solid nitride formed

  16. Thermal plasma processing

    SciTech Connect

    Boulos, M.I. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1991-12-01

    This paper is a review of the fundamental aspects involved in material processing using thermal plasma technology. The description of plasma-generating devices covers dc plasma torches, dc transferred arcs, radio-frequency (RF) inductively coupled plasma torches, and hybrid combinations of them. Emphasis is given to the identification of the basic energy-coupling mechanism in each case and the principal characteristics of the flow and temperature fields in the plasma. Materials-processing techniques using thermal plasmas are grouped in two broad categories, depending on the role played by the plasma in the process. Only typical examples are given in this review of each type of processes. The simplest and most widely used processes such as spheroidization, melting, deposition, and spray-coating make use of the plasma only as a high-temperature energy source. Thermal plasma technology is also used in applications involving chemical synthesis in which the plasma acts as a source of chemically active species.

  17. Nitride precipitation in salt-bath nitrided interstitial-free steel

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Tae-Ho; Oh, Chang-Seok; Lee, Min-Ku; Han, Sang-Won

    2010-10-15

    Nitride precipitation and its effect on microstrain in salt-bath nitrided interstitial-free steel were investigated using transmission electron microscopy and neutron diffraction. As the cooling rate after nitriding decreased, two nitrides, {gamma}'-Fe{sub 4}N and {alpha}{sup -}Fe{sub 16}N{sub 2}, were identified in diffusion zone. Combined analyses using Rietveld whole-profile fitting and size-strain analysis revealed that the microstrain in the nitrided specimen increased due to nitrogen supersaturation and then decreased after nitride precipitation, whereas the effective particle size continuously decreased. It was found that microstrain is the dominant factor in peak broadening of the nitrided specimen.

  18. Cathodoluminescence spectra of gallium nitride nanorods

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Gallium nitride [GaN] nanorods grown on a Si(111) substrate at 720°C via plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy were studied by field-emission electron microscopy and cathodoluminescence [CL]. The surface topography and optical properties of the GaN nanorod cluster and single GaN nanorod were measured and discussed. The defect-related CL spectra of GaN nanorods and their dependence on temperature were investigated. The CL spectra along the length of the individual GaN nanorod were also studied. The results reveal that the 3.2-eV peak comes from the structural defect at the interface between the GaN nanorod and Si substrate. The surface state emission of the single GaN nanorod is stronger as the diameter of the GaN nanorod becomes smaller due to an increased surface-to-volume ratio. PMID:22168896

  19. Radiation-Tolerant DC-DC Converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skutt, Glenn; Sable, Dan; Leslie, Leonard; Graham, Shawn

    2012-01-01

    A document discusses power converters suitable for space use that meet the DSCC MIL-PRF-38534 Appendix G radiation hardness level P classification. A method for qualifying commercially produced electronic parts for DC-DC converters per the Defense Supply Center Columbus (DSCC) radiation hardened assurance requirements was developed. Development and compliance testing of standard hybrid converters suitable for space use were completed for missions with total dose radiation requirements of up to 30 kRad. This innovation provides the same overall performance as standard hybrid converters, but includes assurance of radiation- tolerant design through components and design compliance testing. This availability of design-certified radiation-tolerant converters can significantly reduce total cost and delivery time for power converters for space applications that fit the appropriate DSCC classification (30 kRad).

  20. Ion-beam nitriding of steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salik, J.

    1984-01-01

    The application of the ion beam technique to the nitriding of steels is described. It is indicated that the technique can be successfully applied to nitriding. Some of the structural changes obtained by this technique are similar to those obtained by ion nitriding. The main difference is the absence of the iron nitride diffraction lines. It is found that the dependence of the resultant microhardness on beam voltage for super nitralloy is different from that of 304 stainless steel.

  1. Forback DC-to-DC converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukemire, Alan T.

    1993-03-01

    A pulse-width modulated DC-to-DC power converter including a first inductor, i.e. a transformer or an equivalent fixed inductor equal to the inductance of the secondary winding of the transformer, coupled across a source of DC input voltage via a transistor switch which is rendered alternately conductive (ON) and nonconductive (OFF) in accordance with a signal from a feedback control circuit is described. A first capacitor capacitively couples one side of the first inductor to a second inductor which is connected to a second capacitor which is coupled to the other side of the first inductor. A circuit load shunts the second capacitor. A semiconductor diode is additionally coupled from a common circuit connection between the first capacitor and the second inductor to the other side of the first inductor. A current sense transformer generating a current feedback signal for the switch control circuit is directly coupled in series with the other side of the first inductor so that the first capacitor, the second inductor and the current sense transformer are connected in series through the first inductor. The inductance values of the first and second inductors, moreover, are made identical. Such a converter topology results in a simultaneous voltsecond balance in the first inductance and ampere-second balance in the current sense transformer.

  2. Forback DC-to-DC converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukemire, Alan T.

    1995-05-01

    A pulse-width modulated DC-to-DC power converter including a first inductor, i.e. a transformer or an equivalent fixed inductor equal to the inductance of the secondary winding of the transformer, coupled across a source of DC input voltage via a transistor switch which is rendered alternately conductive (ON) and nonconductive (OFF) in accordance with a signal from a feedback control circuit is described. A first capacitor capacitively couples one side of the first inductor to a second inductor which is connected to a second capacitor which is coupled to the other side of the first inductor. A circuit load shunts the second capacitor. A semiconductor diode is additionally coupled from a common circuit connection between the first capacitor and the second inductor to the other side of the first inductor. A current sense transformer generating a current feedback signal for the switch control circuit is directly coupled in series with the other side of the first inductor so that the first capacitor, the second inductor and the current sense transformer are connected in series through the first inductor. The inductance values of the first and second inductors, moreover, are made identical. Such a converter topology results in a simultaneous voltsecond balance in the first inductance and ampere-second balance in the current sense transformer.

  3. Forback DC-to-DC converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lukemire, Alan T. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A pulse-width modulated DC-to-DC power converter including a first inductor, i.e. a transformer or an equivalent fixed inductor equal to the inductance of the secondary winding of the transformer, coupled across a source of DC input voltage via a transistor switch which is rendered alternately conductive (ON) and nonconductive (OFF) in accordance with a signal from a feedback control circuit is described. A first capacitor capacitively couples one side of the first inductor to a second inductor which is connected to a second capacitor which is coupled to the other side of the first inductor. A circuit load shunts the second capacitor. A semiconductor diode is additionally coupled from a common circuit connection between the first capacitor and the second inductor to the other side of the first inductor. A current sense transformer generating a current feedback signal for the switch control circuit is directly coupled in series with the other side of the first inductor so that the first capacitor, the second inductor and the current sense transformer are connected in series through the first inductor. The inductance values of the first and second inductors, moreover, are made identical. Such a converter topology results in a simultaneous voltsecond balance in the first inductance and ampere-second balance in the current sense transformer.

  4. Tunability of aluminum nitride acoustic resonators: a phenomenological approach.

    PubMed

    Defay, Emmanuel; Ben Hassine, Nizar; Emery, Patrick; Parat, Guy; Abergel, Julie; Devos, Arnaud

    2011-12-01

    A phenomenological approach is developed to identify the physical parameters causing the dc-voltage-induced tunability of aluminum nitride (AlN) acoustic resonators, widely used for RF filters. The typical resonance frequency of these resonators varies from 2.038 GHz at -200 V to 2.062 GHz at +200 V. This indicates, based on these RF measurements versus dc bias and the model used, that the AlN stiffness variation versus dc bias is the prominent effect because both resonance and antiresonance experience a similar variation, respectively, 24 MHz and 19 MHz at 400 V. Picosecond ultrasonics were also used to prove independently that the acoustic velocity (and therefore AlN stiffness) is sensitive to dc bias and that the variation induced is comparable to that extracted from the resonance measurements. It turned out that the stiffness relative variation for an electric field of 1 V/μm extracted from picosecond ultrasonics is 54 ppm-μm/V. This is in good agreement with the value extracted from the RF measurements, namely 57.2 ppm-μm/V. The overall tunability of these AlN resonators reaches 1.1%, which is an interesting figure, although probably not high enough for genuine applications.

  5. Silicon nitride/silicon carbide composite powders

    DOEpatents

    Dunmead, Stephen D.; Weimer, Alan W.; Carroll, Daniel F.; Eisman, Glenn A.; Cochran, Gene A.; Susnitzky, David W.; Beaman, Donald R.; Nilsen, Kevin J.

    1996-06-11

    Prepare silicon nitride-silicon carbide composite powders by carbothermal reduction of crystalline silica powder, carbon powder and, optionally, crystalline silicon nitride powder. The crystalline silicon carbide portion of the composite powders has a mean number diameter less than about 700 nanometers and contains nitrogen. The composite powders may be used to prepare sintered ceramic bodies and self-reinforced silicon nitride ceramic bodies.

  6. Process for making transition metal nitride whiskers

    DOEpatents

    Bamberger, C.E.

    1988-04-12

    A process for making metal nitrides, particularly titanium nitride whiskers, using a cyanide salt as a reducing agent for a metal compound in the presence of an alkali metal oxide. Sodium cyanide, various titanates and titanium oxide mixed with sodium oxide react to provide titanium nitride whiskers that can be used as reinforcement to ceramic composites. 1 fig., 1 tab.

  7. Process for making transition metal nitride whiskers

    DOEpatents

    Bamberger, Carlos E.

    1989-01-01

    A process for making metal nitrides, particularly titanium nitride whiskers, using a cyanide salt as a reducing agent for a metal compound in the presence of an alkali metal oxide. Sodium cyanide, various titanates and titanium oxide mixed with sodium oxide react to provide titanium nitride whiskers that can be used as reinforcement to ceramic composites.

  8. Method and device to synthesize boron nitride nanotubes and related nanoparticles

    DOEpatents

    Zettl, Alexander K.

    2016-07-19

    Methods and apparatus for producing chemical nanostructures having multiple elements, such as boron and nitride, e.g. boron nitride nanotubes, are disclosed. The method comprises creating a plasma jet, or plume, such as by an arc discharge. The plasma plume is elongated and has a temperature gradient along its length. It extends along its length into a port connector area having ports for introduction of feed materials. The feed materials include the multiple elements, which are introduced separately as fluids or powders at multiple ports along the length of the plasma plume, said ports entering the plasma plume at different temperatures. The method further comprises modifying a temperature at a distal portion of or immediately downstream of said plasma plume; and collecting said chemical nanostructures after said modifying.

  9. A pulsed DC gas flow hollow cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paduraru, Cristian

    A new gas flow hollow cathode discharge source (GFHC) has been developed, characterized, and applied to thin film deposition by sputtering and low-temperature PECVD. Non-reactive and reactive sputtering processes were investigated using copper and aluminum targets, respectively. For the first time, pulsed DC power was applied to a GFHC in order to avoid arcing caused by electrode surface contamination, and to stabilize the discharge in general. The electrical characteristics of the source, the parameters of the remote plasma and its optical emission, were studied and compared to those of a DC powered GFHC. We determined the electrical characteristics of the plasma, including the temporal behavior of the current and voltage under various conditions of pressure and inert gas flow through the cathode. The transition from a glow discharge mode to the hollow cathode mode was studied in an effort to determine the operating range of the GFHC. A capacitive current was discovered at the beginning of the on-time. The properties of the remote plasma were investigated using averaged and time-resolved Langmuir probe and optical emission measurements. The distribution of the remote plasma density resembles the gas flow velocity distribution through the cathode. Plasma processes during off time (decaying plasma) and on-time (plasma reestablishment) were studied and compared to those in pulsed DC magnetron and high power inductively coupled glow discharges. The dependence of the deposition rate, resistivity and thickness distribution of copper films dependence on pulse parameters, power, inert gas flow through the cathode and pressure have been studied. The thin film thickness distribution is governed by the distribution of the gas flow velocity, which can be calculated using laminar flow gas dynamics. In a pulsed DC GFHC system, the inert gas flow through the cathode prevents the penetration of the reactive gas from the chamber into the cathode. A special reactive gas delivery

  10. Intelligent dc-dc Converter Technology Developed and Tested

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Button, Robert M.

    2001-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center and the Cleveland State University have developed a digitally controlled dc-dc converter to research the benefits of flexible, digital control on power electronics and systems. Initial research and testing has shown that conventional dc-dc converters can benefit from improved performance by using digital-signal processors and nonlinear control algorithms.

  11. III-Nitride nanowire optoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Songrui; Nguyen, Hieu P. T.; Kibria, Md. G.; Mi, Zetian

    2015-11-01

    Group-III nitride nanowire structures, including GaN, InN, AlN and their alloys, have been intensively studied in the past decade. Unique to this material system is that its energy bandgap can be tuned from the deep ultraviolet (~6.2 eV for AlN) to the near infrared (~0.65 eV for InN). In this article, we provide an overview on the recent progress made in III-nitride nanowire optoelectronic devices, including light emitting diodes, lasers, photodetectors, single photon sources, intraband devices, solar cells, and artificial photosynthesis. The present challenges and future prospects of III-nitride nanowire optoelectronic devices are also discussed.

  12. Laser nitriding of iron: Nitrogen profiles and phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Illgner, C.; Schaaf, P.; Lieb, K. P.; Schubert, E.; Queitsch, R.; Bergmann, H.-W.

    1995-07-01

    Armco iron samples were surface nitrided by irradiating them with pulses of an excimer laser in a nitrogen atmosphere. The resulting nitrogen depth profiles measured by Resonant Nuclear Reaction Analysis (RNRA) and the phase formation determined by Conversion Electron Mössbauer Spectroscopy (CEMS) were investigated as functions of energy density and the number of pulses. The nitrogen content of the samples was found to be independent of the number of pulses in a layer of 50 nm from the surface and to increase in depths exceeding 150 nm. The phase composition did not change with the number of pulses. The nitrogen content can be related to an enhanced nitrogen solubility based on high temperatures and high pressures due to the laser-induced plasma above the sample. With increasing pulse energy density, the phase composition changes towards phases with higher nitrogen contents. Nitrogen diffusion seems to be the limiting factor for the nitriding process.

  13. Nitride tuning of lanthanide chromites.

    PubMed

    Black, Ashley P; Johnston, Hannah E; Oró-Solé, Judith; Bozzo, Bernat; Ritter, Clemens; Frontera, Carlos; Attfield, J Paul; Fuertes, Amparo

    2016-03-21

    LnCrO(3-x)N(x) perovskites with Ln = La, Pr and Nd and nitrogen contents up to x = 0.59 have been synthesised through ammonolysis of LnCrO4 precursors. These new materials represent one of the few examples of chromium oxynitrides. Hole-doping through O(2-)/N(3-) anion substitution suppresses the magnetic transition far less drastically than Ln(3+)/M(2+) (M = Ca, Sr) cation substitutions because of the greater covalency of metal-nitride bonds. Hence, nitride-doping is a more benign method for doping metal oxides without suppressing electronic transitions. PMID:26916315

  14. Reactive Atmospheric Plasma Spraying of AlN Coatings: Influence of Aluminum Feedstock Particle Size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahien, Mohammed; Yamada, Motohiro; Yasui, Toshiaki; Fukumoto, Masahiro

    2011-03-01

    Feedstock powder characteristics (size distribution, morphology, shape, specific mass, and injection rate) are considered to be one of the key factors in controlling plasma-sprayed coatings microstructure and properties. The influence of feedstock powder characteristics to control the reaction and coatings microstructure in reactive plasma spraying process (RPS) is still unclear. This study, investigated the influence of feedstock particle size in RPS of aluminum nitride (AlN) coatings, through plasma nitriding of aluminum (Al) feedstock powders. It was possible to fabricate AlN-based coatings through plasma nitriding of all kinds of Al powders in atmospheric plasma spray (APS) process. The nitriding ratio was improved with decreasing the particle size of feedstock powder, due to improving the nitriding reaction during flight. However, decreasing the particle size of feedstock powder suppressed the coatings thickness. Due to the loss of the powder during the injection, the excessive vaporization of fine Al particles and the completing nitriding reaction of some fine Al particles during flight. The feedstock particle size directly affects on the nitriding, melting, flowability, and the vaporization behaviors of Al powders during spraying. It concluded that using smaller particle size powders is useful for improving the nitriding ratio and not suitable for fabrication thick AlN coatings in reactive plasma spray process. To fabricate thick AlN coatings through RPS, enhancing the nitriding reaction of Al powders with large particle size during spraying is required.

  15. Reduction in interface state density of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/InGaAs metal-oxide-semiconductor interfaces by InGaAs surface nitridation

    SciTech Connect

    Hoshii, Takuya; Lee, Sunghoon; Suzuki, Rena; Taoka, Noriyuki; Yokoyama, Masafumi; Takenaka, Mitsuru; Takagi, Shinichi; Yamada, Hishashi; Hata, Masahiko; Yasuda, Tetsuji

    2012-10-01

    We report the decrease in interface trap density (D{sub it}) in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/InGaAs metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) capacitors by using electron cyclotron resonance plasma nitridation of the InGaAs surfaces. The impact of the nitridation process on the MOS interface properties is quantitatively examined. The plasma nitridation process is observed to form a nitrided layer at the InGaAs surface. The nitridation using microwave power (P{sub microwave}) of 250 W and nitridation time (t{sub nitridation}) of 420 s can form Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/InGaAs MOS interfaces with a minimum D{sub it} value of 2.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} cm{sup -2} eV{sup -1}. On the other hand, the nitridation process parameters such as P{sub microwave} and t{sub nitridation} are found to strongly alter D{sub it} (both decrease and increase are observed) and capacitance equivalent thickness (CET). It is found that the nitridation with higher P{sub microwave} and shorter t{sub nitridation} can reduce D{sub it} with less CET increase. Also, it is observed that as t{sub nitridation} increases, D{sub it} decreases first and increases later. It is revealed from XPS analyses that minimum D{sub it} can be determined by the balance between the saturation of nitridation and the progress of oxidation. As a result, it is found that the superior MOS interface formed by the nitridation is attributable to the existence of oxide-less InGaN/InGaAs interfaces.

  16. Precipitation of metal nitrides from chloride melts

    SciTech Connect

    Slater, S.A.; Miller, W.E.; Willit, J.L.

    1996-12-31

    Precipitation of actinides, lanthanides, and fission products as nitrides from molten chloride melts is being investigated for use as a final cleanup step in treating radioactive salt wastes generated by electrometallurgical processing of spent nuclear fuel. The radioactive components (eg, fission products) need to be removed to reduce the volume of high-level waste that requires disposal. To extract the fission products from the salt, a nitride precipitation process is being developed. The salt waste is first contacted with a molten metal; after equilibrium is reached, a nitride is added to the metal phase. The insoluble nitrides can be recovered and converted to a borosilicate glass after air oxidation. For a bench-scale experimental setup, a crucible was designed to contact the salt and metal phases. Solubility tests were performed with candidate nitrides and metal nitrides for which there are no solubility data. Experiments were performed to assess feasibility of precipitation of metal nitrides from chloride melts.

  17. Alloying Element Nitride Development in Ferritic Fe-Based Materials Upon Nitriding: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner, T.; Mittemeijer, E. J.

    2016-06-01

    With the aim of achieving a better understanding of the nitriding process of iron-based components (steels), as applied in engineering practice, the theoretical background and experimental observations currently available on the crystallographic, morphological, and compositional properties of the nitride precipitates in nitrided model binary and ternary, ferritic Fe-based alloys are summarily presented. Thermodynamic and kinetic considerations are employed in order to highlight their importance for the nitriding reaction and the resulting properties of the nitrided zone, thereby providing a more fundamental understanding of the nitriding process.

  18. Method of chemical vapor deposition of boron nitride using polymeric cyanoborane

    DOEpatents

    Maya, Leon

    1994-01-01

    Polymeric cyanoborane is volatilized, decomposed by thermal or microwave plasma energy, and deposited on a substrate as an amorphous film containing boron, nitrogen and carbon. Residual carbon present in the film is removed by ammonia treatment at an increased temperature, producing an adherent, essentially stoichiometric boron nitride film.

  19. Reactive low-voltage ion plating of hard silicon nitride optical thin films and their characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramm, Juergen; Hora, Ralf; Bovard, Bertrand G.

    1990-08-01

    Silicon nitride films were synthesized in a Balzers BAP 800 coating plant by an plasma enhanced evaporation process. Transparent, stoichiometric films free of hydrogen, oxygen, argon, and heavy metals were obtained. The optical properties, the chemical composition, the microhardness, the structure, and the morphology of the films were investigated.

  20. Method of chemical vapor deposition of boron nitride using polymeric cyanoborane

    DOEpatents

    Maya, L.

    1994-06-14

    Polymeric cyanoborane is volatilized, decomposed by thermal or microwave plasma energy, and deposited on a substrate as an amorphous film containing boron, nitrogen and carbon. Residual carbon present in the film is removed by ammonia treatment at an increased temperature, producing an adherent, essentially stoichiometric boron nitride film. 11 figs.

  1. RISK D/C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dias, W. C.

    1994-01-01

    RISK D/C is a prototype program which attempts to do program risk modeling for the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) architectures proposed in the Synthesis Group Report. Risk assessment is made with respect to risk events, their probabilities, and the severities of potential results. The program allows risk mitigation strategies to be proposed for an exploration program architecture and to be ranked with respect to their effectiveness. RISK D/C allows for the fact that risk assessment in early planning phases is subjective. Although specific to the SEI in its present form, RISK D/C can be used as a framework for developing a risk assessment program for other specific uses. RISK D/C is organized into files, or stacks, of information, including the architecture, the hazard, and the risk event stacks. Although predefined, all stacks can be upgraded by a user. The architecture stack contains information concerning the general program alternatives, which are subsequently broken down into waypoints, missions, and mission phases. The hazard stack includes any background condition which could result in a risk event. A risk event is anything unfavorable that could happen during the course of a specific point within an architecture, and the risk event stack provides the probabilities, consequences, severities, and any mitigation strategies which could be used to reduce the risk of the event, and how much the risk is reduced. RISK D/C was developed for Macintosh series computers. It requires HyperCard 2.0 or later, as well as 2Mb of RAM and System 6.0.8 or later. A Macintosh II series computer is recommended due to speed concerns. The standard distribution medium for this package is one 3.5 inch 800K Macintosh format diskette. RISK D/C was developed in 1991 and is a copyrighted work with all copyright vested in NASA. Macintosh and HyperCard are trademarks of Apple Computer, Inc.

  2. Structure of boron nitride nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Buranova, Yu. S. Kulnitskiy, B. A.; Perezhogin, I. A.; Blank, V. D.

    2015-01-15

    The crystallographic structure of boron nitride nanotubes has been investigated. Various defects that may arise during nanotube synthesis are revealed by electron microscopy. Nanotubes with different numbers of walls and different diameters are modeled by molecular dynamics methods. Structural features of single-wall nanotubes are demonstrated. The causes of certain defects in multiwall nanotubes are indicated.

  3. The Hardest Superconducting Metal Nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shanmin; Antonio, Daniel; Yu, Xiaohui; Zhang, Jianzhong; Cornelius, Andrew L.; He, Duanwei; Zhao, Yusheng

    2015-09-01

    Transition-metal (TM) nitrides are a class of compounds with a wide range of properties and applications. Hard superconducting nitrides are of particular interest for electronic applications under working conditions such as coating and high stress (e.g., electromechanical systems). However, most of the known TM nitrides crystallize in the rock-salt structure, a structure that is unfavorable to resist shear strain, and they exhibit relatively low indentation hardness, typically in the range of 10-20 GPa. Here, we report high-pressure synthesis of hexagonal δ-MoN and cubic γ-MoN through an ion-exchange reaction at 3.5 GPa. The final products are in the bulk form with crystallite sizes of 50 - 80 μm. Based on indentation testing on single crystals, hexagonal δ-MoN exhibits excellent hardness of ~30 GPa, which is 30% higher than cubic γ-MoN (~23 GPa) and is so far the hardest among the known metal nitrides. The hardness enhancement in hexagonal phase is attributed to extended covalently bonded Mo-N network than that in cubic phase. The measured superconducting transition temperatures for δ-MoN and cubic γ-MoN are 13.8 and 5.5 K, respectively, in good agreement with previous measurements.

  4. The Hardest Superconducting Metal Nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shanmin; Antonio, Daniel; Yu, Xiaohui; Zhang, Jianzhong; Cornelius, Andrew L.; He, Duanwei; Zhao, Yusheng

    2015-09-03

    Transition–metal (TM) nitrides are a class of compounds with a wide range of properties and applications. Hard superconducting nitrides are of particular interest for electronic applications under working conditions such as coating and high stress (e.g., electromechanical systems). However, most of the known TM nitrides crystallize in the rock–salt structure, a structure that is unfavorable to resist shear strain, and they exhibit relatively low indentation hardness, typically in the range of 10–20 GPa. Here, we report high–pressure synthesis of hexagonal δ–MoN and cubic γ–MoN through an ion–exchange reaction at 3.5 GPa. The final products are in the bulk form with crystallite sizes of 50 – 80 μm. Based on indentation testing on single crystals, hexagonal δ–MoN exhibits excellent hardness of ~30 GPa, which is 30% higher than cubic γ–MoN (~23 GPa) and is so far the hardest among the known metal nitrides. The hardness enhancement in hexagonal phase is attributed to extended covalently bonded Mo–N network than that in cubic phase. The measured superconducting transition temperatures for δ–MoN and cubic γ–MoN are 13.8 and 5.5 K, respectively, in good agreement with previous measurements.

  5. The Hardest Superconducting Metal Nitride

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shanmin; Antonio, Daniel; Yu, Xiaohui; Zhang, Jianzhong; Cornelius, Andrew L.; He, Duanwei; Zhao, Yusheng

    2015-01-01

    Transition–metal (TM) nitrides are a class of compounds with a wide range of properties and applications. Hard superconducting nitrides are of particular interest for electronic applications under working conditions such as coating and high stress (e.g., electromechanical systems). However, most of the known TM nitrides crystallize in the rock–salt structure, a structure that is unfavorable to resist shear strain, and they exhibit relatively low indentation hardness, typically in the range of 10–20 GPa. Here, we report high–pressure synthesis of hexagonal δ–MoN and cubic γ–MoN through an ion–exchange reaction at 3.5 GPa. The final products are in the bulk form with crystallite sizes of 50 – 80 μm. Based on indentation testing on single crystals, hexagonal δ–MoN exhibits excellent hardness of ~30 GPa, which is 30% higher than cubic γ–MoN (~23 GPa) and is so far the hardest among the known metal nitrides. The hardness enhancement in hexagonal phase is attributed to extended covalently bonded Mo–N network than that in cubic phase. The measured superconducting transition temperatures for δ–MoN and cubic γ–MoN are 13.8 and 5.5 K, respectively, in good agreement with previous measurements. PMID:26333418

  6. The Hardest Superconducting Metal Nitride

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Shanmin; Antonio, Daniel; Yu, Xiaohui; Zhang, Jianzhong; Cornelius, Andrew L.; He, Duanwei; Zhao, Yusheng

    2015-09-03

    Transition–metal (TM) nitrides are a class of compounds with a wide range of properties and applications. Hard superconducting nitrides are of particular interest for electronic applications under working conditions such as coating and high stress (e.g., electromechanical systems). However, most of the known TM nitrides crystallize in the rock–salt structure, a structure that is unfavorable to resist shear strain, and they exhibit relatively low indentation hardness, typically in the range of 10–20 GPa. Here, we report high–pressure synthesis of hexagonal δ–MoN and cubic γ–MoN through an ion–exchange reaction at 3.5 GPa. The final products are in the bulk form withmore » crystallite sizes of 50 – 80 μm. Based on indentation testing on single crystals, hexagonal δ–MoN exhibits excellent hardness of ~30 GPa, which is 30% higher than cubic γ–MoN (~23 GPa) and is so far the hardest among the known metal nitrides. The hardness enhancement in hexagonal phase is attributed to extended covalently bonded Mo–N network than that in cubic phase. The measured superconducting transition temperatures for δ–MoN and cubic γ–MoN are 13.8 and 5.5 K, respectively, in good agreement with previous measurements.« less

  7. P-type gallium nitride

    DOEpatents

    Rubin, M.; Newman, N.; Fu, T.; Ross, J.; Chan, J.

    1997-08-12

    Several methods have been found to make p-type gallium nitride. P-type gallium nitride has long been sought for electronic devices. N-type gallium nitride is readily available. Discovery of p-type gallium nitride and the methods for making it will enable its use in ultraviolet and blue light-emitting diodes and lasers. pGaN will further enable blue photocathode elements to be made. Molecular beam epitaxy on substrates held at the proper temperatures, assisted by a nitrogen beam of the proper energy produced several types of p-type GaN with hole concentrations of about 5{times}10{sup 11} /cm{sup 3} and hole mobilities of about 500 cm{sup 2} /V-sec, measured at 250 K. P-type GaN can be formed of unintentionally-doped material or can be doped with magnesium by diffusion, ion implantation, or co-evaporation. When applicable, the nitrogen can be substituted with other group III elements such as Al. 9 figs.

  8. P-type gallium nitride

    DOEpatents

    Rubin, Michael; Newman, Nathan; Fu, Tracy; Ross, Jennifer; Chan, James

    1997-01-01

    Several methods have been found to make p-type gallium nitride. P-type gallium nitride has long been sought for electronic devices. N-type gallium nitride is readily available. Discovery of p-type gallium nitride and the methods for making it will enable its use in ultraviolet and blue light-emitting diodes and lasers. pGaN will further enable blue photocathode elements to be made. Molecular beam epitaxy on substrates held at the proper temperatures, assisted by a nitrogen beam of the proper energy produced several types of p-type GaN with hole concentrations of about 5.times.10.sup.11 /cm.sup.3 and hole mobilities of about 500 cm.sup.2 /V-sec, measured at 250.degree. K. P-type GaN can be formed of unintentionally-doped material or can be doped with magnesium by diffusion, ion implantation, or co-evaporation. When applicable, the nitrogen can be substituted with other group III elements such as Al.

  9. DC Breakdown Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Calatroni, S.; Descoeudres, A.; Levinsen, Y.; Taborelli, M.; Wuensch, W.

    2009-01-22

    In the context of the CLIC (Compact Linear Collider) project investigations of DC breakdown in ultra high vacuum are carried out in parallel with high power RF tests. From the point of view of saturation breakdown field the best material tested so far is stainless steel, followed by titanium. Copper shows a four times weaker breakdown field than stainless steel. The results indicate clearly that the breakdown events are initiated by field emission current and that the breakdown field is limited by the cathode. In analogy to RF, the breakdown probability has been measured in DC and the data show similar behaviour as a function of electric field.

  10. DC attenuation meter

    DOEpatents

    Hargrove, Douglas L.

    2004-09-14

    A portable, hand-held meter used to measure direct current (DC) attenuation in low impedance electrical signal cables and signal attenuators. A DC voltage is applied to the signal input of the cable and feedback to the control circuit through the signal cable and attenuators. The control circuit adjusts the applied voltage to the cable until the feedback voltage equals the reference voltage. The "units" of applied voltage required at the cable input is the system attenuation value of the cable and attenuators, which makes this meter unique. The meter may be used to calibrate data signal cables, attenuators, and cable-attenuator assemblies.

  11. Fully CMOS-compatible titanium nitride nanoantennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, Justin A.; Naik, Gururaj V.; Petach, Trevor A.; Baum, Brian K.; Goldhaber-Gordon, David; Dionne, Jennifer A.

    2016-02-01

    CMOS-compatible fabrication of plasmonic materials and devices will accelerate the development of integrated nanophotonics for information processing applications. Using low-temperature plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD), we develop a recipe for fully CMOS-compatible titanium nitride (TiN) that is plasmonic in the visible and near infrared. Films are grown on silicon, silicon dioxide, and epitaxially on magnesium oxide substrates. By optimizing the plasma exposure per growth cycle during PEALD, carbon and oxygen contamination are reduced, lowering undesirable loss. We use electron beam lithography to pattern TiN nanopillars with varying diameters on silicon in large-area arrays. In the first reported single-particle measurements on plasmonic TiN, we demonstrate size-tunable darkfield scattering spectroscopy in the visible and near infrared regimes. The optical properties of this CMOS-compatible material, combined with its high melting temperature and mechanical durability, comprise a step towards fully CMOS-integrated nanophotonic information processing.

  12. DYLOS DC110

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Dylos DC1100 air quality monitor measures particulate matter (PM) to provide a continuous assessment of indoor air quality. The unit counts particles in two size ranges: large and small. According to the manufacturer, large particles have diameters between 2.5 and 10 micromet...

  13. DC arc weld starter

    DOEpatents

    Campiotti, Richard H.; Hopwood, James E.

    1990-01-01

    A system for starting an arc for welding uses three DC power supplies, a high voltage supply for initiating the arc, an intermediate voltage supply for sustaining the arc, and a low voltage welding supply directly connected across the gap after the high voltage supply is disconnected.

  14. DC-DC powering for the CMS pixel upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feld, Lutz; Fleck, Martin; Friedrichs, Marcel; Hensch, Richard; Karpinski, Waclaw; Klein, Katja; Rittich, David; Sammet, Jan; Wlochal, Michael

    2013-12-01

    The CMS experiment plans to replace its silicon pixel detector with a new one with improved rate capability and an additional detection layer at the end of 2016. In order to cope with the increased number of detector modules the new pixel detector will be powered via DC-DC converters close to the sensitive detector volume. This paper reviews the DC-DC powering scheme and reports on the ongoing R&D program to develop converters for the pixel upgrade. Design choices are discussed and results from the electrical and thermal characterisation of converter prototypes are shown. An emphasis is put on system tests with up to 24 converters. The performance of pixel modules powered by DC-DC converters is compared to conventional powering. The integration of the DC-DC powering scheme into the pixel detector is described and system design issues are reviewed.

  15. Aqueous stability of Ga- and N-polar gallium nitride.

    PubMed

    Foster, Corey M; Collazo, Ramon; Sitar, Zlatko; Ivanisevic, Albena

    2013-01-01

    The stability of III-nitride semiconductors in various solutions becomes important as researchers begin to integrate them into sensing platforms. This study quantitatively compares the stability of GaN surfaces with different polarities. This type of quantification is important because it represents the first step toward designing semiconductor material interfaces compatible with solution conditions. A stability study of Ga- and N-polar GaN was conducted by immersion of the surfaces in deionized H(2)O, pH 5, pH 9, and H(2)O(2) solutions for 7 days. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry of the solutions was conducted to determine the amount of gallium leached from the surface. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy were used to compare the treated surfaces to untreated surfaces. The results show that both gallium nitride surface types exhibit the greatest stability in acidic and neutral solutions. Gallium polar surfaces were found to exhibit superior stability to nitrogen polar surfaces in the solutions studied. Our findings highlight the need for further research on surface passivation and functionalization techniques for polar III-nitride semiconductors.

  16. Tribological properties of boron nitride synthesized by ion beam deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.; Spalvins, T.

    1985-01-01

    The adhesion and friction behavior of boron nitride films on 440 C bearing stainless steel substrates was examined. The thin films containing the boron nitride were synthesized using an ion beam extracted from a borazine plasma. Sliding friction experiments were conducted with BN in sliding contact with itself and various transition metals. It is indicated that the surfaces of atomically cleaned BN coating film contain a small amount of oxides and carbides, in addition to boron nitride. The coefficients of friction for the BN in contact with metals are related to the relative chemical activity of the metals. The more active the metal, the higher is the coefficient of friction. The adsorption of oxygen on clean metal and BN increases the shear strength of the metal - BN contact and increases the friction. The friction for BN-BN contact is a function of the shear strength of the elastic contacts. Clean BN surfaces exhibit relatively strong interfacial adhesion and high friction. The presence of adsorbates such as adventitious carbon contaminants on the BN surfaces reduces the shear strength of the contact area. In contrast, chemically adsorbed oxygen enhances the shear strength of the BN-BN contact and increases the friction.

  17. Early Oscillation Detection for DC/DC Converter Fault Diagnosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Bright L.

    2011-01-01

    The electrical power system of a spacecraft plays a very critical role for space mission success. Such a modern power system may contain numerous hybrid DC/DC converters both inside the power system electronics (PSE) units and onboard most of the flight electronics modules. One of the faulty conditions for DC/DC converter that poses serious threats to mission safety is the random occurrence of oscillation related to inherent instability characteristics of the DC/DC converters and design deficiency of the power systems. To ensure the highest reliability of the power system, oscillations in any form shall be promptly detected during part level testing, system integration tests, flight health monitoring, and on-board fault diagnosis. The popular gain/phase margin analysis method is capable of predicting stability levels of DC/DC converters, but it is limited only to verification of designs and to part-level testing on some of the models. This method has to inject noise signals into the control loop circuitry as required, thus, interrupts the DC/DC converter's normal operation and increases risks of degrading and damaging the flight unit. A novel technique to detect oscillations at early stage for flight hybrid DC/DC converters was developed.

  18. Aluminum Nitride Nanofibers fabricated using Electrospinning and Nitridation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbosa, Xenia; Campo, Eva; Santiago, Jorge; Ramos, Idalia

    2012-02-01

    Aluminum Nitride (AlN) and other nitride semiconductors are important materials in the fields of optoelectronics and electronics. AlN nanofibers were synthesized using electrospinning and subsequent heating under N2 and NH3 atmospheres. The precursor solution for electrospining contains aluminium nitrate and cellulose acetate. The electrospun nanofibers were heated in N2 to eliminate the polymer and produce Al2O3, and then nitridized at a temperature of 1200 C under NH3 flow. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) observations demonstrate the production of fibers with diameters ranging from a few nanometers to several micrometers. X-Ray Diffraction and UV-VIs analyses show the production of AlN nanofibers with hexagonal wurzite structure and a band gap of approximately approximately 6 eV. Current-Voltage measurements on a single AlN fiber with gold electrodes suggest the formation of a Schottky contact The fabrication method and results from the fibers characterization will be presented.

  19. Preparation of superhydrophobic nanodiamond and cubic boron nitride films

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Y. B.; Liu, W. M.; Wang, P. F.; Yang, Y.; Ye, Q.; He, B.; Pan, X. J.; Zhang, W. J.; Bello, I.; Lee, S. T.; Zou, Y. S.

    2010-09-27

    Superhydrophobic surfaces were achieved on the hardest and the second hardest materials, diamond and cubic boron nitride (cBN) films. Various surface nanostructures of nanocrystalline diamond (ND) and cBN films were constructed by carrying out bias-assisted reactive ion etching in hydrogen/argon plasmas; and it is shown that surface nanostructuring may enhance dramatically the hydrophobicity of ND and cBN films. Together with surface fluorination, superhydrophobic ND and cBN surfaces with a contact angle greater than 150 deg. and a sliding angle smaller than 10 deg. were demonstrated. The origin of hydrophobicity enhancement is discussed based on the Cassie model.

  20. Glow-discharge synthesis of silicon nitride precursor powders

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, P.; Buss, R.J.; Loehman, R.E. )

    1989-07-01

    A radio-frequency glow discharge is used for the synthesis of submicron, amorphous, silicon nitride precursor powders from silane and ammonia. Powders are produced with a range of Si/N ratios, including stoichiometric, Si-rich, and N-rich, and contain substantial amounts of hydrogen. The powders appear to be similar to silicon diimide and are easily converted to oxide by water vapor. The powders lose weight and crystallize to a mixture of {alpha} and {beta}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} after prolonged heating at 1600{degree}C. Studies of spectrally and spatially resolved optical emission from the plasma are reported.

  1. Synthesis, Properties, and Applications Of Boron Nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pouch, John J.; Alterovitz, Samuel A.

    1993-01-01

    Report describes synthesis, properties, and applications of boron nitride. Especially in thin-film form. Boron nitride films useful as masks in x-ray lithography; as layers for passivation of high-speed microelectronic circuits; insulating films; hard, wear-resistant, protective films for optical components; lubricants; and radiation detectors. Present status of single-crystal growth of boron nitride indicates promising candidate for use in high-temperature semiconductor electronics.

  2. Plasma chemistry for inorganic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsumoto, O.

    1980-01-01

    Practical application of plasma chemistry to the development of inorganic materials using both low temperature and warm plasmas are summarized. Topics cover: the surface nitrification and oxidation of metals; chemical vapor deposition; formation of minute oxide particles; the composition of oxides from chloride vapor; the composition of carbides and nitrides; freezing high temperature phases by plasma arc welding and plasma jet; use of plasma in the development of a substitute for petroleum; the production of silicon for use in solar cell batteries; and insulating the inner surface of nuclear fusion reactor walls.

  3. DC Electric Fields at the Magnetopause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laakso, H. E.; Escoubet, C. P.; Masson, A.

    2014-12-01

    In order to understand the transfer of energy, momentum and mass through the magnetopause one needs to know several plasma and field parameters including the DC electric field which is known to be challenging to measure in tenuous plasma regions, e.g. in the inner side of the magnetopause where the density drops below 1/cc. However, each of the Cluster spacecraft carries five different experiments that can provide information about DC electric fields, i.e. double probe antenna (EFW) and electron drift meter (EDI) as well as electron and ion spectrometers (PEACE, CIS-HIA, CIS-CODIF). Each technique is very different and has its own strengths and limitations. Therefore it is important to compare all available measurements before making a judgement on DC electric field variation at the magnetopause; note that only very rarely all five measurements are available at the same time. Although the full-resolution observations in the Cluster archive are calibrated, they can still contain various errors. However, when two experiments show the same field, it is quite likely that this is the right field because the different measurements are based on so complimentary techniques and the field varies so much when the spacecraft moves from the magnetosheath through the magnetopause into the magnetosphere, or vice versa. In this presentation we present several cases of the magnetopause crossings and how the different measurements agree and disagree around the magnetopause region.

  4. Comparison of Cavitation-Erosion Resistance of Carburized and Carburized-Plus-Nitrided 316LN Stainless Steel in Mercury

    SciTech Connect

    Pawel, Steven J

    2007-05-01

    Annealed type 316LN stainless steel in the (1) carburized and the (2) carburized plus nitrided conditions was evaluated for cavitation-erosion resistance in ambient temperature mercury using a vibratory horn method. The results indicated that, relative to the specimens receiving only the carburizing treatment, the specimens that received both surface treatments exhibited substantially greater weight loss, general thinning, and profile development as a function of sonication time - with all observed degradation limited to the nitrided layer. Further, the nitride layer was observed to be susceptible to extensive cracking (occasionally leading to spallation), but the cracking was never observed to penetrate into the carburized layer. These screening test results suggest there is no improvement in cavitation-erosion resistance associated with augmentation of the carburizing treatment with plasma nitriding.

  5. Manufacture of sintered silicon nitrides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwai, T.

    1985-01-01

    Sintered silicon nitrides are manufactured by sintering Si3N powder containing 2 to 15% in wt of a powder mixture composed of nitride powder of lanthanide or Y 100 parts and AIN powder less than 100 parts at 1500 to 1900 deg. temperature under a pressure of less than 200 Kg/sq. cm. The sintered Si3N has high mechanical strength in high temperature. Thus, Si3N4 93.0, Y 5.0 and AlN 2.0% in weight were wet mixed in acetone in N atom, molded and sintered at 1750 deg. and 1000 Kg/sq. cm. to give a sintered body having high hardness.

  6. Tunable surface plasmon resonances in sputtered titanium nitride thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shankernath, V.; Naidu, K. Lakshun; Krishna, M. Ghanashyam; Padmanabhan, K. A.

    2016-05-01

    Thin films of titanium nitride were deposited on alpha-brass and gold electroplated brass (GCB) substrates by DC reactive magnetron sputtering at different N2 partial pressures (10%, 50% and 100 %). The measured specular reflectance spectra of the films indicate the existence of surface plasmon resonance peaks whose positions are dependent on the substrate and nitrogen pressure during deposition. In the case of films on brass, the SPR (surface plasmon resonance) is centered around 600, 550 and 510 nm at 10,50 and 100% Nitrogen. In contrast, the SPR occurs at 510 nm for the films deposited at 10% and 50% nitrogen which red shifts to 570 nm for the film deposited in 100% nitrogen. The observed behavior is correlated with morphology, microstructure and structure of the films.

  7. High upper critical field in disordered niobium nitride superconductor

    SciTech Connect

    Baskaran, R. Thanikai Arasu, A. V.; Amaladass, E. P.; Janawadkar, M. P.

    2014-10-28

    Superconducting Niobium Nitride thin films have been deposited on glass, aluminum nitride buffered glass, and oxidized silicon substrates by reactive DC magnetron sputtering at ambient substrate temperatures. The crystal structure of these thin films has been determined to be cubic fcc B1 structure by Glancing Incidence X-Ray Diffraction analysis. The superconducting transition temperatures of the thin films were measured to be greater than 11.6 K with a maximum of 13.4 K. The negative temperature coefficient of resistance observed in these thin films indicates the presence of disorder. Magneto-resistance measurements have been carried out on these thin films patterned into standard four probe geometry upto a maximum magnetic field of 12 T for two films and upto 15 T for the other two films. The dependence of transition temperature on the applied field is analyzed to estimate the upper critical field. The upper critical field for most of the films was estimated to exceed 35 T, while one of the most disordered films had an estimated upper critical field greater than 70 T.

  8. Silicon Nitride Equation of State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swaminathan, Pazhayannur; Brown, Robert

    2015-06-01

    This report presents the development a global, multi-phase equation of state (EOS) for the ceramic silicon nitride (Si3N4) . Structural forms include amorphous silicon nitride normally used as a thin film and three crystalline polymorphs. Crystalline phases include hexagonal α-Si3N4, hexagonalβ-Si3N4, and the cubic spinel c-Si3N4. Decomposition at about 1900 °C results in a liquid silicon phase and gas phase products such as molecular nitrogen, atomic nitrogen, and atomic silicon. The silicon nitride EOS was developed using EOSPro which is a new and extended version of the PANDA II code. Both codes are valuable tools and have been used successfully for a variety of material classes. Both PANDA II and EOSPro can generate a tabular EOS that can be used in conjunction with hydrocodes. The paper describes the development efforts for the component solid phases and presents results obtained using the EOSPro phase transition model to investigate the solid-solid phase transitions in relation to the available shock data. Furthermore, the EOSPro mixture model is used to develop a model for the decomposition products and then combined with the single component solid models to study the global phase diagram. Sponsored by the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Living With a Star program office.

  9. Synthesis of cubic silicon nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zerr, Andreas; Miehe, Gerhard; Serghiou, George; Schwarz, Marcus; Kroke, Edwin; Riedel, Ralf; Fueß, Hartmut; Kroll, Peter; Boehler, Reinhard

    1999-07-01

    Silicon nitride (Si3N4) is used in a variety of important technological applications. The high fracture toughness, hardness and wear resistance of Si3N4-based ceramics are exploited in cutting tools and anti-friction bearings; in electronic applications, Si3N4 is used as an insulating, masking and passivating material. Two polymorphs of silicon nitride are known, both of hexagonal structure: α- and β-Si3N4. Here we report the synthesis of a third polymorph of silicon nitride, which has a cubic spinel structure. This new phase, c-Si3N4, is formed at pressures above 15GPa and temperatures exceeding 2,000K, yet persists metastably in air at ambient pressure to at least 700K. First-principles calculations of the properties of this phase suggest that the hardness of c-Si3N4 should be comparable to that of the hardest known oxide (stishovite, a high-pressure phase of SiO2), and significantly greater than the hardness of the two hexagonal polymorphs.

  10. High pressure phase transformations of cubic boron nitride from amorphous boron nitride using magnesium boron nitride as the catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, B. P.; Nover, G.; Will, G.

    1995-07-01

    Results are described of high pressure phase transformations of amorphous boron nitride (aBN) to cubic boron nitride (cBN) using magnesium boron nitride (Mg 3B 2N 4) as a catalyst-solvent. It was observed that amorphous boron nitride undergoes various structural modifications under high pressures and high temperatures leading to the formation of hexagonal, cubic and wurtzitic phases of boron nitride. The minimum pressure at which aBN starts transforming into cBN was found to be 25 kbar at 1800°C. This is the lowest pressure for cBN formation employing the catalyst-solvent process and is reported here for the first time.

  11. Fabrication and characterization of silicon nitride directional coupler interferometer for sensing aptamer hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okubo, K.; Uchiyamada, K.; Yokokawa, M.; Asakawa, K.; Suzuki, H.

    2016-03-01

    We used silicon nitride (Si3N4) directional coupler (DC) interferometers to fabricate evanescent field biosensors for detection of aptamer hybridization. The DC detects temporal changes in refractive index (RI) as changes in the relative intensities of near-fields. Numerical simulation provided information for sensitivity of the DC as well as preferable dimensions of single mode waveguides. The result suggests that lengthening the DC improves its sensitivity. Another approach to realize high sensitivity was to make the coupling region of the DC longer for a given complete coupling length Lc. A folded DC is also presented based on calculations using Si waveguides. Here a meander-line with an array of segmented DCs and asymmetric 180°-curved waveguides was accommodated in a (100 μm)2 square area. Phases of propagating lights within two curved waveguides could be coincided. This cascade-connection of the segments of the DCs facilitated highly sensitive detection of biomolecules and a flexible sensor design. Signal dependences on device length and bulk RI change were evaluated by end-fire coupling measurements. The optical intensities agreed well with the corresponding fitting curve and the curve calculated based on the coupled mode theory.

  12. Ion-beam nitriding of steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salik, Joshua (Inventor); Hubbell, Theodore E. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A surface of a steel substrate is nitrided without external heating by exposing it to a beam of nitrogen ions under low pressure, a pressure much lower than that employed for ion-nitriding. An ion source is used instead of a glow discharge. Both of these features reduce the introduction of impurities into the substrate surface.

  13. Method of preparation of uranium nitride

    DOEpatents

    Kiplinger, Jaqueline Loetsch; Thomson, Robert Kenneth James

    2013-07-09

    Method for producing terminal uranium nitride complexes comprising providing a suitable starting material comprising uranium; oxidizing the starting material with a suitable oxidant to produce one or more uranium(IV)-azide complexes; and, sufficiently irradiating the uranium(IV)-azide complexes to produce the terminal uranium nitride complexes.

  14. The Use of DC Glow Discharges as Undergraduate Educational Tools

    SciTech Connect

    Stephanie A. Wissel and Andrew Zwicker, Jerry Ross, and Sophia Gershman

    2012-10-09

    Plasmas have a beguiling way of getting students excited and interested in physics. We argue that plasmas can and should be incorporated into the undergraduate curriculum as both demonstrations and advanced investigations of electromagnetism and quantum effects. Our device, based on a direct current (DC) glow discharge tube, allows for a number of experiments into topics such as electrical breakdown, spectroscopy, magnetism, and electron temperature.

  15. The use of dc glow discharges as undergraduate educational tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wissel, Stephanie A.; Zwicker, Andrew; Ross, Jerry; Gershman, Sophia

    2013-09-01

    Plasmas have a beguiling way of getting students interested in physics. We argue that plasmas can and should be incorporated into the undergraduate curriculum as both demonstrations and advanced investigations of electromagnetism and quantum effects. We describe a device, based on a direct-current (dc) glow discharge tube, which allows for a number of experiments into topics such as electrical breakdown, spectroscopy, magnetism, and electron temperature.

  16. Alloy Effects on the Gas Nitriding Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, M.; Sisson, R. D.

    2014-12-01

    Alloy elements, such as Al, Cr, V, and Mo, have been used to improve the nitriding performance of steels. In the present work, plain carbon steel AISI 1045 and alloy steel AISI 4140 were selected to compare the nitriding effects of the alloying elements in AISI 4140. Fundamental analysis is carried out by using the "Lehrer-like" diagrams (alloy specific Lehrer diagram and nitriding potential versus nitrogen concentration diagram) and the compound layer growth model to simulate the gas nitriding process. With this method, the fundamental understanding for the alloy effect based on the thermodynamics and kinetics becomes possible. This new method paves the way for the development of new alloy for nitriding.

  17. Cl{sub 2}-based dry etching of the AlGaInN system in inductively coupled plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Hyun; Vartuli, C.B.; Abernathy, C.R.; Donovan, S.M.; Pearton, S.J.; Shul, R.J.; Han, J.

    1997-12-01

    Cl{sub 2}-based Inductively Coupled Plasmas with low additional dc self- biases(-100V) produce convenient etch rates(500-1500 A /min) for GaN, AlN, InN, InAlN and InGaN. A systematic study of the effects of additive gas(Ar, N{sub 2}, H{sub 2}), discharge composition and ICP source power and chuck power on etch rate and surface morphology has been performed. The general trends are to go through a maximum in etch rate with percent Cl{sub 2} in the discharge for all three mixtures, and to have an increase(decrease) in etch rate with source power(pressure). Since the etching is strongly ion-assisted, anisotropic pattern transfer is readily achieved. Maximum etch selectivities of approximately 6 for InN over the other nitrides were obtained.

  18. Advanced optical modelling of dynamically deposited silicon nitride layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borojevic, N.; Hameiri, Z.; Winderbaum, S.

    2016-07-01

    Dynamic deposition of silicon nitrides using in-line plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition systems results in non-uniform structure of the dielectric layer. Appropriate analysis of such layers requires the optical characterization to be performed as a function of the layer's depth. This work presents a method to characterize dynamically deposited silicon nitride layers. The method is based on the fitting of experimental spectroscopic ellipsometry data via grading of Tauc-Lorentz optical parameters through the depth of the layer. When compared with the standard Tauc-Lorentz fitting procedure, used in previous studies, the improved method is demonstrating better quality fits to the experimental data and revealing more accurate optical properties of the dielectric layers. The most significant advantage of the method is the ability to extract the depth profile of the optical properties along the direction of the layer normal. This is enabling a better understanding of layers deposited using dynamic plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition systems frequently used in the photovoltaic industry.

  19. Highly Transparent Conducting Polymer Top Contacts for Future III-Nitride Based Single Photon Emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riess, Sally; Mikulics, Martin; Winden, Andreas; Adam, Roman; Marso, Michel; Grützmacher, Detlev; Hardtdegen, Hilde

    2013-08-01

    In this paper we report on a simple conductive polymer based contacting technology for III-nitride based nanostructures with respect to the electrical operation within the telecommunication wavelength range. Singularly addressable InN/GaN pyramidal nanostructures were selectively grown by metalorganic vapour phase epitaxy (MOVPE) and subsequently integrated into a high-frequency device layout for future ultrafast electro-optical operation. The employment of the p-conducting polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-poly(styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) is found to increase the light transmittance up to 89% at a wavelength of 1550 nm compared to 72% in the case of a conventional Ni/Au thin layer top contact. DC measurements using a quasi operation mode for 1000 h reveal no degradation and only a moderate increase of the dark currents. Thus, conducting polymer technology shows tremendous potential for future highly efficient and reliable room temperature operation of nitride based single photon emitters (SPEs).

  20. Hard carbon nitride and method for preparing same

    DOEpatents

    Haller, E.E.; Cohen, M.L.; Hansen, W.L.

    1992-05-05

    Novel crystalline [alpha](silicon nitride-like)-carbon nitride and [beta](silicon nitride-like)-carbon nitride are formed by sputtering carbon in the presence of a nitrogen atmosphere onto a single crystal germanium or silicon, respectively, substrate. 1 figure.

  1. Molten-Salt-Based Growth of Group III Nitrides

    DOEpatents

    Waldrip, Karen E.; Tsao, Jeffrey Y.; Kerley, Thomas M.

    2008-10-14

    A method for growing Group III nitride materials using a molten halide salt as a solvent to solubilize the Group-III ions and nitride ions that react to form the Group III nitride material. The concentration of at least one of the nitride ion or Group III cation is determined by electrochemical generation of the ions.

  2. Patterning of GaN in high-density Cl{sub 2}- and BCl{sub 3}-based plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Shul, R.J.; Briggs, R.D.; Han, J.; Pearton, S.J.; Lee, J.W.; Vartuli, C.B.; Killeen, K.P.; Ludowise, M.J.

    1997-05-01

    Fabrication of group-III nitride electronic and photonic devices relies heavily on the ability to pattern features with anisotropic profiles, smooth surface morphologies, etch rates often exceeding 1 {micro}m/min, and a low degree of plasma-induced damage. Patterning these materials has been especially difficult due to their high bond energies and their relatively inert chemical nature as compared to other compound semiconductors. However, high-density plasma etching has been an effective patterning technique due to ion fluxes which are 2 to 4 orders of magnitude higher than conventional RIE systems. GaN etch rates as high as {approximately}1.3 {micro}m/min have been reported in ECR generated ICl plasmas at {minus}150 V dc-bias. In this study, the authors report high-density GaN etch results for ECR- and ICP-generated plasmas as a function of Cl{sub 2}- and BCl{sub 3}-based plasma chemistries.

  3. Development of Electromagnetically Pulled-Out Gas Plasma (EPOP) Gun for Medium Vacuum and its Fundamental Discharge Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagita, Taichiro; Tanoue, Hideto; Kamiya, Masao; Suda, Yoshiyuki; Takikawa, Hirofumi; Taki, Makoto; Hasegawa, Yushi; Ishikawa, Takeshi

    Electromagnetically pulled-out gas plasma (EPOP) gun was developed, which will be applied to the filtered arc deposition system in order to enhance the nitriding of preparing thin film under medium vacuum. A hot cathode of tungsten (W) filament was employed and DC discharge was generated between the cathode and anode (SUS304). The distance of electrodes was 100 mm. Electromagnetic coils were placed around the cathode, anode and plasma pulled-out duct, separately. Experimental pressure was 0.1 Pa. The following results were obtained. Ignition voltage became lower when the same direction magnetic field was axially applied to the cathode and anode. Minimum voltage for sustaining the discharge became lower when the magnetic filed was applied to the anode. With increasing discharge voltage, the discharge current increased dramatically for the discharge voltage less than 50 V and increased gradually for the voltage more than that. The plasma between the cathode and anode was able to be pulled out to the process chamber by applying magnetic field perpendicular to the discharge axis. The amount of pulled-out plasma increased with increasing the filament current and magnetic flux density for plasma pulling-out.

  4. Auxiliary resonant DC tank converter

    DOEpatents

    Peng, Fang Z.

    2000-01-01

    An auxiliary resonant dc tank (ARDCT) converter is provided for achieving soft-switching in a power converter. An ARDCT circuit is coupled directly across a dc bus to the inverter to generate a resonant dc bus voltage, including upper and lower resonant capacitors connected in series as a resonant leg, first and second dc tank capacitors connected in series as a tank leg, and an auxiliary resonant circuit comprising a series combination of a resonant inductor and a pair of auxiliary switching devices. The ARDCT circuit further includes first clamping means for holding the resonant dc bus voltage to the dc tank voltage of the tank leg, and second clamping means for clamping the resonant dc bus voltage to zero during a resonant period. The ARDCT circuit resonantly brings the dc bus voltage to zero in order to provide a zero-voltage switching opportunity for the inverter, then quickly rebounds the dc bus voltage back to the dc tank voltage after the inverter changes state. The auxiliary switching devices are turned on and off under zero-current conditions. The ARDCT circuit only absorbs ripples of the inverter dc bus current, thus having less current stress. In addition, since the ARDCT circuit is coupled in parallel with the dc power supply and the inverter for merely assisting soft-switching of the inverter without participating in real dc power transmission and power conversion, malfunction and failure of the tank circuit will not affect the functional operation of the inverter; thus a highly reliable converter system is expected.

  5. Self-Powered Broadband Photodetector using Plasmonic Titanium Nitride.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Amreen A; Sharma, Bikash; Barman, Tapan; Pal, Arup R

    2016-02-17

    We report the demonstration of plasmonic titanium nitride (TiN) for fabrication of an efficient hybrid photodetector. A novel synthesis method based on plasma nanotechnology is utilized for producing air stable plasma polymerized aniline-TiN (PPA-TiN) nanocomposite and its integration in photodetector geometry. The device performs as a self-powered detector that responds to ultraviolet and visible light at zero bias. The photodetector has the advantage of broadband absorption and outcomes an enhanced photoresponse including high responsivity and detectivity under low light conditions. This work opens up a new direction for plasmonic TiN-based hybrid nanocomposite and its exploitation in optoelectronic applications including imaging, light-wave communication and wire-free route for artificial vision. PMID:26807708

  6. Self-Powered Broadband Photodetector using Plasmonic Titanium Nitride.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Amreen A; Sharma, Bikash; Barman, Tapan; Pal, Arup R

    2016-02-17

    We report the demonstration of plasmonic titanium nitride (TiN) for fabrication of an efficient hybrid photodetector. A novel synthesis method based on plasma nanotechnology is utilized for producing air stable plasma polymerized aniline-TiN (PPA-TiN) nanocomposite and its integration in photodetector geometry. The device performs as a self-powered detector that responds to ultraviolet and visible light at zero bias. The photodetector has the advantage of broadband absorption and outcomes an enhanced photoresponse including high responsivity and detectivity under low light conditions. This work opens up a new direction for plasmonic TiN-based hybrid nanocomposite and its exploitation in optoelectronic applications including imaging, light-wave communication and wire-free route for artificial vision.

  7. High performance dc-dc conversion with voltage multipliers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrigill, W. T.; Myers, I. T.

    1974-01-01

    The voltage multipliers using capacitors and diodes first developed by Cockcroft and Walton in 1932 were reexamined in terms of state of the art fast switching transistors and diodes, and high energy density capacitors. Because of component improvements, the voltage multiplier, used without a transformer, now appears superior in weight to systems now in use for dc-dc conversion. An experimental 100-watt 1000-volt dc-dc converter operating at 100 kHz was built, with a component weight of about 1 kg/kW. Calculated and measured values of output voltage and efficiency agreed within experimental error.

  8. The Powder-Pack Nitriding Process: Growth Kinetics of Nitride Layers on Pure Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos-Silva, I.; Ortiz-Dominguez, M.; Elias-Espinosa, M.; Vega-Morón, R. C.; Bravo-Bárcenas, D.; Figueroa-López, U.

    2015-09-01

    In this study, the growth kinetics of nitride layers that develop during the powder-pack nitriding process on the surface of ARMCO pure iron was estimated. The powder-pack nitriding of pure iron was performed according to the Pulnieren© (H.E.F. Durferrit) method using a "Pulnier" powder and an activator, at 798-848 K with different exposure times (2-12 h) for each temperature. In addition, for the entire set of nitriding conditions, three different activator/"Pulnier" powder ratios (0.20, 0.25, and 0.35) were used to evaluate the activation level during the growth of nitride layers. The kinetics of the nitride layers over the surface of ARMCO pure iron were estimated by two mathematical approaches, that consider the mass balance equations at the growth interphases. The resulting expressions for the effective diffusion coefficients in the nitride layers were evaluated as a function of nitriding temperatures and activator/"Pulnier" powder ratio. Finally, based on the experimental parameters ascribed to the powder-pack nitriding process, two expressions were proposed to estimate the nitride layer thicknesses at 798 and 823 K after 9 h of exposure for each temperature, to validate the diffusion models used in this work.

  9. Formation and Structural Characteristic of Perpendicularly Aligned Boron Nitride Nanosheet Bridges in Polymer/Boron Nitride Composite Film and Its Thermal Conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Hong-Baek; Nakayama, Tadachika; Suzuki, Tsuneo; Tanaka, Satoshi; Jiang, Weihua; Suematsu, Hisayuki; Niihara, Koichi

    2011-01-01

    The anisotropic alignment of boron nitride (BN) nanosheets was performed in polysiloxane/BN nanosheet composite film under a DC electric field with a change in polarity. The hexagonal BN nanosheets were dispersed by sonication in a prepolymer mixture of polysiloxane followed by high-speed mixing. The homogeneous suspension was cast onto a spacer of microscale thickness and applied to a high DC electric field while changing polarity before the mixture became cross-linked. Analysis revealed that linearly aligned BN nanosheet (LABN) bridges were fabricated in the composite film while connecting the film planes as bridges. This is for first report on the fabrication of linearly aligned nanosheet bridges inside organic-inorganic hybrid films. The fabricated LABN bridges were attributed to the enhancement in the thermal conductivity of the composite film, and the mechanisms underlying the formation of LABN bridges and heat conduction were discussed.

  10. Aluminum nitride, Scandium nitride, and Aluminum-Scandium-Nitride ternary alloys : Structural, optical, and electrical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Ruopeng

    Al and Sc are iso-electric, both of which have three valence electrons. Their nitrides AlN and ScN both have high melting points, high hardness, and good chemical inertness. And their distinct properties find applications in different areas: AlN in piezoelectric acoustic-wave devices, and ScN as candidate for high-temperature thermoelectricity. While there are unsettled problems to solve for AlN and ScN alone, which are to obtain tilted c-axis texture in AlN for shear mode acoustic-wave devices to maximize performance, and to determine electronic band structure of ScN that has been long debated due to free carrier effect, the alloying between AlN and ScN is also intriguing in that the ternary alloy Al-Sc-N connects their similarity and opens even wider possibility and greater potential. The significantly enhanced piezoelectric coefficient in the alloy compared to pure AlN is one of the best examples that is little understood, and alternate bandgap engineering in LED fabrication would probably be another contribution from the alloy. Structural, optical, and electrical properties of AlN, ScN, and Al-Sc-N ternary alloys are thus studied in order to answer these questions, and to explore more fundamental physics characteristics within these nitride materials. For the purpose of achieving tilted c-axis texture in AlN, off-axis deposition is conducted with a variable deposition angle α = 0-84° in 5 mTorr pure N2 at room temperature. XRD pole figure analysis show that layers deposited from a normal angle (α = 0°) exhibit fiber texture, with the c-axis tilted by 42+/-2° off the substrate normal. However, as α is increased to 45°, two preferred in-plane grain orientations emerge, with populations I and II having the c-axis tilted towards and away from the deposition flux, by 53+/-2° and 47+/-1° off the substrate normal, respectively. Increasing alpha further to 65 and 84°, results in the development of a single population II with a 43+/-1° tilt. The observed tilt

  11. Improved DC Gun Insulator

    SciTech Connect

    M.L. Neubauer, K.B. Beard, R. Sah, C. Hernandez-Garcia, G. Neil

    2009-05-01

    Many user facilities such as synchrotron light sources and free electron lasers require accelerating structures that support electric fields of 10-100 MV/m, especially at the start of the accelerator chain where ceramic insulators are used for very high gradient DC guns. These insulators are difficult to manufacture, require long commissioning times, and have poor reliability, in part because energetic electrons bury themselves in the ceramic, creating a buildup of charge and causing eventual puncture. A novel ceramic manufacturing process is proposed. It will incorporate bulk resistivity in the region where it is needed to bleed off accumulated charge caused by highly energetic electrons. This process will be optimized to provide an appropriate gradient in bulk resistivity from the vacuum side to the air side of the HV standoff ceramic cylinder. A computer model will be used to determine the optimum cylinder dimensions and required resistivity gradient for an example RF gun application. A ceramic material example with resistivity gradient appropriate for use as a DC gun insulator will be fabricated by glazing using doping compounds and tested.

  12. Morphological observation of Y and T junctions in nanostructured boron nitride thin films.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sushil; Parashar, A; Rauthan, C M S; Singhal, S K; Dixit, P N; Singh, B P; Bhattacharyya, R

    2008-07-01

    Formations of Y and T nano junctions have been observed in boron nitride films deposited on silicon substrates by plasma chemical reaction of diborane (B2H6 diluted in hydrogen) and ammonia (NH3) gases using dual frequency (microwave/radio) plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique without any intentional heating of the substrates. It has been observed that these nano junctions form at a critical feed gas ratio of ammonia and diborane. We have investigated the effect of gas feed ratio R (=NH3/B2H6) in the plasma reaction chamber, keeping all other deposition parameters constant, on the morphology of boron nitride films. The deposited films are characterized by SEM, AFM, TEM and Laser Raman. For gas feed ratio, R < 100, octahedron and cubic morphologies have been observed in BN films and on increasing R to >100, size of the crystallites reduces to nanometer level. In some of our BN samples deposited at a critical value of gas ratio (R = 400), uniform Y and T junctions having bamboo like morphologies, in nanometer level, have been observed, which we wish to emphasis here as an interesting and newer observation in boron nitride films deposited by the dual frequency PECVD technique. This change in morphology exhibited by varying gas feed ratio is mainly due to excess nitrogen ions in the plasma. PMID:19051906

  13. Mechanical and electrochemical characterization of vanadium nitride (VN) thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caicedo, J. C.; Zambrano, G.; Aperador, W.; Escobar-Alarcon, L.; Camps, E.

    2011-10-01

    Vanadium nitride (V-N) thin films were grown using a reactive d.c. magnetron sputtering process, from a vanadium target (99.999%) in an Ar/N 2 gas mixture at different deposition bias voltage. Films were deposited onto silicon (1 0 0) and RUS-3 steel substrates at 400 °C. Structural, compositional, mechanical and electrochemical characterizations were performed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), elastic forward analysis (EFA), nanoindentation, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and Tafel polarization curves, respectively. X-ray diffraction patterns show the presence of (1 1 1) and (2 0 0) crystallographic orientations associated to the V-N cubic phase. Nanoindentation measurements revealed that when the bias voltage increases from 0 V to -150 V the hardness and elastic modulus are increased from 11 GPa to 20 GPa and from 187 GPa to 221 GPa, respectively. EIS and Tafel curves showed that the corrosion rate of steel, coated with V-N single layer films deposited without bias voltage, diminishes 90% compared to the steel without this coating. On the other hand, when the V-N coating was deposited at the highest d.c. bias voltage (-150 V), the corrosion rate was greater than in the steel coated with zero-voltage (0 V) V-N films. This last result could be attributed to the formation of porosities produced by the ion bombardment during the deposition process.

  14. Process for the production of metal nitride sintered bodies and resultant silicon nitride and aluminum nitride sintered bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yajima, S.; Omori, M.; Hayashi, J.; Kayano, H.; Hamano, M.

    1983-01-01

    A process for the manufacture of metal nitride sintered bodies, in particular, a process in which a mixture of metal nitrite powders is shaped and heated together with a binding agent is described. Of the metal nitrides Si3N4 and AIN were used especially frequently because of their excellent properties at high temperatures. The goal is to produce a process for metal nitride sintered bodies with high strength, high corrosion resistance, thermal shock resistance, thermal shock resistance, and avoidance of previously known faults.

  15. FOREWORD: The physics of III-V nitrides The physics of III-V nitrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridley, B. K.

    2009-04-01

    thought to be associated with the coupling of plasma and phonon modes, and this is discussed by Dyson. The intrinsic cause of phonon decay is the anharmonic interaction involving three phonons, and this process is described for zinc blende BN and hexagonal AlN, GaN and InN by Srivastava. The principal electron scattering mechanism at room temperature is associated with the interaction with polar optical modes. At high fields, transfer to the upper conduction-band valleys can take place and this involves the deformation-potential interaction. Deformation potentials have been derived by Yamakawa et al for GaN, and they have been incorporated into a cellular Monte Carlo simulation to describe high-field transport. In high-power devices, thermal as well as electronic transport is important. The thermal conductivity of the substrate of devices is a vital factor, and the possible use of AlN ceramics is discussed by AlShaikhi and Srivastarva. A striking device based on a zinc blende superlattice is the quantum cascade laser. Exploiting intersubband transitions in the AlN/GaN superlattice for the high-speed detection of infrared light is described by Hofstetter et al, clearly a first step towards a nitride based quantum cascade laser. In bulk material the displacement of As by N that transforms GaAs to GaN produces a huge change in properties. Adding a small amount of N to GaAs might be expected to produce a gradual more-or-less linear shift towards the properties of GaN, but this turns out to be far from the case. The strange properties of dilute nitrides have intrigued many workers in recent years. Its curious bandstructure suggested that hot-electron transport could exhibit a negative differential resistance, and a report on this topic can be found in the article by Patane et al A comprehensive study of transport of electrons and holes in dilute nitride/GaAs quantum wells is reported by Sun et al. An unusual new device—a spin filter—is presaged by the work of Zhao et al on

  16. Ultralow wear of gallium nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Guosong; Tan, Chee-Keong; Tansu, Nelson; Krick, Brandon A.

    2016-08-01

    Here, we reveal a remarkable (and surprising) physical property of GaN: it is extremely wear resistant. In fact, we measured the wear rate of GaN is approaching wear rates reported for diamond. Not only does GaN have an ultralow wear rate but also there are quite a few experimental factors that control the magnitude of its wear rate, further contributing to the rich and complex physics of wear of GaN. Here, we discovered several primary controlling factors that will affect the wear rate of III-Nitride materials: crystallographic orientation, sliding environment, and coating composition (GaN, InN and InGaN). Sliding in the ⟨ 1 2 ¯ 10 ⟩ is significantly lower wear than ⟨ 1 1 ¯ 00 ⟩ . Wear increases by 2 orders of magnitude with increasing humidity (from ˜0% to 50% RH). III-Nitride coatings are promising as multifunctional material systems for device design and sliding wear applications.

  17. Boron Nitride Nanoribbons Becomes Metallic

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Jingsong; Terrones Maldonado, Humberto; Sumpter, Bobby G; Lopez-Benzanilla, Alejandro

    2011-01-01

    Standard spin-polarized density functional theory calculations have been conducted to study the electronic structures and magnetic properties of O and S functionalized zigzag boron nitride nanoribbons (zBNNRs). Unlike the semiconducting and nonmagnetic H edge-terminated zBNNRs, the O edge-terminated zBNNRs have two energetically degenerate magnetic ground states with a ferrimagnetic character on the B edge, both of which are metallic. In contrast, the S edge-terminated zBNNRs are nonmagnetic albeit still metallic. An intriguing coexistence of two different Peierls-like distortions is observed for S edge-termination that manifests as a strong S dimerization at the B zigzag edge and a weak S trimerization at the N zigzag edge, dictated by the band fillings at the vicinity of the Fermi level. Nevertheless, metallicity is retained along the S wire on theNedge due to the partial filling of the band derived from the pz orbital of S. A second type of functionalization with O or S atoms embedded in the center of zBNNRs yields semiconducting features. Detailed examination of both types of functionalized zBNNRs reveals that the p orbitals on O or S play a crucial role in mediating the electronic structures of the ribbons.We suggest that O and S functionalization of zBNNRs may open new routes toward practical electronic devices based on boron nitride materials.

  18. Dc-To-Dc Converter Uses Reverse Conduction Of MOSFET's

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruber, Robert P.; Gott, Robert W.

    1991-01-01

    In modified high-power, phase-controlled, full-bridge, pulse-width-modulated dc-to-dc converters, switching devices power metal oxide/semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFET's). Decreases dissipation of power during switching by eliminating approximately 0.7-V forward voltage drop in anti-parallel diodes. Energy-conversion efficiency increased.

  19. Efficient Design in a DC to DC Converter Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruemmer, Joel E.; Williams, Fitch R.; Schmitz, Gregory V.

    2002-01-01

    Space Flight hardware requires high power conversion efficiencies due to limited power availability and weight penalties of cooling systems. The International Space Station (ISS) Electric Power System (EPS) DC-DC Converter Unit (DDCU) power converter is no exception. This paper explores the design methods and tradeoffs that were utilized to accomplish high efficiency in the DDCU. An isolating DC to DC converter was selected for the ISS power system because of requirements for separate primary and secondary grounds and for a well-regulated secondary output voltage derived from a widely varying input voltage. A flyback-current-fed push-pull topology or improved Weinberg circuit was chosen for this converter because of its potential for high efficiency and reliability. To enhance efficiency, a non-dissipative snubber circuit for the very-low-Rds-on Field Effect Transistors (FETs) was utilized, redistributing the energy that could be wasted during the switching cycle of the power FETs. A unique, low-impedance connection system was utilized to improve contact resistance over a bolted connection. For improved consistency in performance and to lower internal wiring inductance and losses a planar bus system is employed. All of these choices contributed to the design of a 6.25 KW regulated dc to dc converter that is 95 percent efficient. The methodology used in the design of this DC to DC Converter Unit may be directly applicable to other systems that require a conservative approach to efficient power conversion and distribution.

  20. A DC Transformer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngquist, Robert C.; Ihlefeld, Curtis M.; Starr, Stanley O.

    2013-01-01

    A component level dc transformer is described in which no alternating currents or voltages are present. It operates by combining features of a homopolar motor and a homopolar generator, both de devices, such that the output voltage of a de power supply can be stepped up (or down) with a corresponding step down (or up) in current. The basic theory for this device is developed, performance predictions are made, and the results from a small prototype are presented. Based on demonstrated technology in the literature, this de transformer should be scalable to low megawatt levels, but it is more suited to high current than high voltage applications. Significant development would be required before it could achieve the kilovolt levels needed for de power transmission.

  1. Early Oscillation Detection Technique for Hybrid DC/DC Converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Bright L.

    2011-01-01

    Oscillation or instability is a situation that must be avoided for reliable hybrid DC/DC converters. A real-time electronics measurement technique was developed to detect catastrophic oscillations at early stages for hybrid DC/DC converters. It is capable of identifying low-level oscillation and determining the degree of the oscillation at a unique frequency for every individual model of the converters without disturbing their normal operations. This technique is specially developed for space-used hybrid DC/DC converters, but it is also suitable for most of commercial and military switching-mode power supplies. This is a weak-electronic-signal detection technique to detect hybrid DC/DC converter oscillation presented as a specific noise signal at power input pins. It is based on principles of feedback control loop oscillation and RF signal modulations, and is realized by using signal power spectral analysis. On the power spectrum, a channel power amplitude at characteristic frequency (CPcf) and a channel power amplitude at switching frequency (CPsw) are chosen as oscillation level indicators. If the converter is stable, the CPcf is a very small pulse and the CPsw is a larger, clear, single pulse. At early stage of oscillation, the CPcf increases to a certain level and the CPsw shows a small pair of sideband pulses around it. If the converter oscillates, the CPcf reaches to a higher level and the CPsw shows more high-level sideband pulses. A comprehensive stability index (CSI) is adopted as a quantitative measure to accurately assign a degree of stability to a specific DC/DC converter. The CSI is a ratio of normal and abnormal power spectral density, and can be calculated using specified and measured CPcf and CPsw data. The novel and unique feature of this technique is the use of power channel amplitudes at characteristic frequency and switching frequency to evaluate stability and identify oscillations at an early stage without interfering with a DC/DC converter s

  2. Low Temperature Nitriding of 304 Austenitic Stainless Steel Using RF-ICP Method: the Role of Ion Beam Flux Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qing; Ba, Dechun; Ming, Yue; Xu, Lin; Guo, Deyu

    2014-10-01

    The significant role of ion beam flux during nitriding 304 austenitic stainless steel has been investigated by using a radio frequency inductively-coupled plasma reactor into which a sample with negative bias voltage was inserted. A milliammeter is used to detect the current of ions which collide with the sample and optical emission spectroscopy is used to discern the reactive species included in the nitrogen plasma. The nitriding efficiency is indicated by X-ray diffraction and the microhardness test. The reported data reveal that the ion beam flux density as well as the deposition pressure, bias voltage and time can strongly affect the nitriding of stainless steel via the expanded multiphase microstructure inside the nitrided layer. The increase in the density of ion flux results in an ascent in the intensity of the expanded peak and a simultaneous decline in the intensity of the γ austenite peak. The evolution trend of ion beam flux density is described as a function of the operating pressure and the bias voltage. The maximum ion flux density has been achieved at 10 Pa pressure and -500 V bias voltage. A reasonable nitriding region has been, consequently, suggested after comparing this work with previously reported results.

  3. Features of AlN film grown by ion-plasma sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubyanskiy, Ya V.; Bondarev, A. D.; Soshnikov, I. P.; Kotlyar, K. P.; Kirilenko, D. A.; Bert, N. A.; Ayusheva, K. R.; Tarasov, I. S.

    2016-08-01

    The work under consideration presents research of structure, composition and optical properties of aluminium nitride thin films grown by reactive ion plasma sputtering. Aluminium nitride films are shown to contain amorphous and polycrystalline phases. Amorphous phase presence influences on refraction and absorption indexes. Conditions of polycrystalline films with primary (dedicated) orientation synthesis are revealed.

  4. Silicon Nitride Membranes for Filtration and Separation

    SciTech Connect

    Galambos, Paul; Zavadil, Kevin; Shul, Randy; Willison, Christi Gober; Miller, Sam

    1999-07-19

    Semi-Permeable silicon nitride membranes have been developed using a Bosch etch process followed by a reactive ion etch (NE) process. These membranes were observed to allow air but not water to pass through them into surface micromachined, silicon nitride microfluidic channels. Membranes with this property have potential use in microfluidic systems as gas bubble traps and vents, filters to remove particles and gas partitioning membranes. Membrane permeation was measured as 1.6 x 10{sup {minus}8} mol/m{sup 2}Pa s of helium for inline membranes at the entrance and exit of the silicon nitride microfluidic channels.

  5. Uranium nitride behavior at thermionic temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, W. M.

    1973-01-01

    The feasibility of using uranium nitride for in-core thermionic applications was evaluated in electrically heated thermal gradient tests and in flat plate thermionic converters. These tests indicated that grain boundary penetration of uranium nitride into both tungsten and rhenium will occur under thermal gradient conditions. In the case of the tungsten thermionic converter, this led to grain boundary rupture of the emitter and almost total loss of electrical output from the converter. It appears that uranium nitride is unsuitable for thermionic applications at the 2000 K temperatures used in these tests.

  6. Fabrication and characterization of aluminum nitride/boron nitride nanocomposites by carbothermal reduction and nitridation of aluminum borate powders.

    PubMed

    Kusunose, Takafumi; Sakayanagi, Nobuaki; Sekino, Tohru; Ando, Yoichi

    2008-11-01

    In order to fabricate aluminum nitride/boron nitride (AIN/BN) nanocomposites by pressureless sintering, the present study investigated the synthesis of AIN-BN nanocomposite powders by carbothermal reduction and nitridation of aluminum borate powders. Homogeneous mixtures of alumina (Al2O3), boric acid (H3BO3), and carbon powder were used to synthesize AIN/BN nanocomposite powders containing 10 and 20 vol% BN. Aluminum borate was produced by reacting Al2O3 and B2O3 above 800 degrees C, and AIN and turbostratic BN (t-BN) were produced by reacting aluminum borate with carbon powder and nitrogen gas at 1500 degrees C. Carbothermal reduction followed by nitridation yielded an AIN/BN nanocomposite powder composed of nanosized AIN and t-BN. By pressureless sintering nanocomposite AIN/BN powders containing 5 wt% Y22O3, AIN/BN nanocomposites were obtained without compromising the high thermal conductivity and high hardness.

  7. Constricted glow discharge plasma source

    DOEpatents

    Anders, Andre; Anders, Simone; Dickinson, Michael; Rubin, Michael; Newman, Nathan

    2000-01-01

    A constricted glow discharge chamber and method are disclosed. The polarity and geometry of the constricted glow discharge plasma source is set so that the contamination and energy of the ions discharged from the source are minimized. The several sources can be mounted in parallel and in series to provide a sustained ultra low source of ions in a plasma with contamination below practical detection limits. The source is suitable for applying films of nitrides such as gallium nitride and oxides such as tungsten oxide and for enriching other substances in material surfaces such as oxygen and water vapor, which are difficult process as plasma in any known devices and methods. The source can also be used to assist the deposition of films such as metal films by providing low-energy ions such as argon ions.

  8. Highly selective etching of silicon nitride to physical-vapor-deposited a-C mask in dual-frequency capacitively coupled CH{sub 2}F{sub 2}/H{sub 2} plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J. S.; Kwon, B. S.; Heo, W.; Jung, C. R.; Park, J. S.; Shon, J. W.; Lee, N.-E.

    2010-01-15

    A multilevel resist (MLR) structure can be fabricated based on a very thin amorphous carbon (a-C) layer ( congruent with 80 nm) and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} hard-mask layer ( congruent with 300 nm). The authors investigated the selective etching of the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} layer using a physical-vapor-deposited (PVD) a-C mask in a dual-frequency superimposed capacitively coupled plasma etcher by varying the process parameters in the CH{sub 2}F{sub 2}/H{sub 2}/Ar plasmas, viz., the etch gas flow ratio, high-frequency source power (P{sub HF}), and low-frequency source power (P{sub LF}). They found that under certain etch conditions they obtain infinitely high etch selectivities of the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} layers to the PVD a-C on both the blanket and patterned wafers. The etch gas flow ratio played a critical role in determining the process window for infinitely high Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}/PVD a-C etch selectivity because of the change in the degree of polymerization. The etch results of a patterned ArF photoresisit/bottom antireflective coating/SiO{sub x}/PVD a-C/Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} MLR structure supported the idea of using a very thin PVD a-C layer as an etch-mask layer for the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} hard-mask pattern with a pattern width of congruent with 80 nm and high aspect ratio of congruent with 5.

  9. Nitriding of Aluminum Extrusion Die: Effect of Die Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhtar, S. S.; Arif, A. F. M.; Yilbas, B. S.

    2010-04-01

    Nitriding of complex-shaped extrusion dies may result in non-uniform nitride layers and hence a required hardness may not be achieved in some regions of the bearing area. The present study is carried out to assess the effect of extrusion die profile on the characteristics and growth behavior of nitride layers so that the critical die design feature can be identified to enhance the uniformity of the nitride layer. For this purpose, AISI H13 steel samples have been manufactured with profiles similar to those of hot extrusion dies. The samples were then gas nitrided under controlled nitriding potential. The uniformity and depth of nitride layers have been investigated in terms of compound layer and total nitride case depth for selected die features. The results of this study indicated the need to include the effect of profile on the nitride layer for the optimal die design with improved service life.

  10. III-Nitride Nanowire Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Jeremy Benjamin

    2014-07-01

    In recent years there has been a tremendous interest in nanoscale optoelectronic devices. Among these devices are semiconductor nanowires whose diameters range from 10-100 nm. To date, nanowires have been grown using many semiconducting material systems and have been utilized as light emitting diodes, photodetectors, and solar cells. Nanowires possess a relatively large index contrast relative to their dielectric environment and can be used as lasers. A key gure of merit that allows for nanowire lasing is the relatively high optical con nement factor. In this work, I discuss the optical characterization of 3 types of III-nitride nanowire laser devices. Two devices were designed to reduce the number of lasing modes to achieve singlemode operation. The third device implements low-group velocity mode lasing with a photonic crystal constructed of an array of nanowires. Single-mode operation is necessary in any application where high beam quality and single frequency operation is required. III-Nitride nanowire lasers typically operate in a combined multi-longitudinal and multi-transverse mode state. Two schemes are introduced here for controlling the optical modes and achieving single-mode op eration. The rst method involves reducing the diameter of individual nanowires to the cut-o condition, where only one optical mode propagates in the wire. The second method employs distributed feedback (DFB) to achieve single-mode lasing by placing individual GaN nanowires onto substrates with etched gratings. The nanowire-grating substrate acted as a distributed feedback mirror producing single mode operation at 370 nm with a mode suppression ratio (MSR) of 17 dB. The usage of lasers for solid state lighting has the potential to further reduce U.S. lighting energy usage through an increase in emitter e ciency. Advances in nanowire fabrication, speci cally a two-step top-down approach, have allowed for the demonstration of a multi-color array of lasers on a single chip that emit

  11. III-nitride nanowire lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Jeremy Benjamin

    In recent years there has been a tremendous interest in nanoscale optoelectronic devices. Among these devices are semiconductor nanowires whose diameters range from 10-100 nm. To date, nanowires have been grown using many semiconducting material systems and have been utilized as light emitting diodes, photodetectors, and solar cells. Nanowires possess a relatively large index contrast relative to their dielectric environment and can be used as lasers. A key figure of merit that allows for nanowire lasing is the relatively high optical confinement factor. In this work, I discuss the optical characterization of 3 types of III-nitride nanowire laser devices. Two devices were designed to reduce the number of lasing modes to achieve single-mode operation. The third device implements low-group velocity mode lasing with a photonic crystal constructed of an array of nanowires. Single-mode operation is necessary in any application where high beam quality and single frequency operation is required. III-Nitride nanowire lasers typically operate in a combined multi-longitudinal and multi-transverse mode state. Two schemes are introduced here for controlling the optical modes and achieving single-mode operation. The first method involves reducing the diameter of individual nanowires to the cut-off condition, where only one optical mode propagates in the wire. The second method employs distributed feedback (DFB) to achieve single-mode lasing by placing individual GaN nanowires onto substrates with etched gratings. The nanowire-grating substrate acted as a distributed feedback mirror producing single mode operation at 370 nm with a mode suppression ratio (MSR) of 17 dB. The usage of lasers for solid state lighting has the potential to further reduce U.S. lighting energy usage through an increase in emitter efficiency. Advances in nanowire fabrication, specifically a two-step top-down approach, have allowed for the demonstration of a multi-color array of lasers on a single chip

  12. Triple voltage dc-to-dc converter and method

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Gui-Jia

    2008-08-05

    A circuit and method of providing three dc voltage buses and transforming power between a low voltage dc converter and a high voltage dc converter, by coupling a primary dc power circuit and a secondary dc power circuit through an isolation transformer; providing the gating signals to power semiconductor switches in the primary and secondary circuits to control power flow between the primary and secondary circuits and by controlling a phase shift between the primary voltage and the secondary voltage. The primary dc power circuit and the secondary dc power circuit each further comprising at least two tank capacitances arranged in series as a tank leg, at least two resonant switching devices arranged in series with each other and arranged in parallel with the tank leg, and at least one voltage source arranged in parallel with the tank leg and the resonant switching devices, said resonant switching devices including power semiconductor switches that are operated by gating signals. Additional embodiments having a center-tapped battery on the low voltage side and a plurality of modules on both the low voltage side and the high voltage side are also disclosed for the purpose of reducing ripple current and for reducing the size of the components.

  13. Method of nitriding refractory metal articles

    DOEpatents

    Tiegs, T.N.; Holcombe, C.E.; Dykes, N.L.; Omatete, O.O.; Young, A.C.

    1994-03-15

    A method of nitriding a refractory-nitride forming metal or metalloid articles and composite articles. A consolidated metal or metalloid article or composite is placed inside a microwave oven and nitrogen containing gas is introduced into the microwave oven. The metal or metalloid article or composite is heated to a temperature sufficient to react the metal or metalloid with the nitrogen by applying a microwave energy within the microwave oven. The metal or metalloid article or composite is maintained at that temperature for a period of time sufficient to convert the article of metal or metalloid or composite to an article or composite of refractory nitride. In addition, a method of applying a coating, such as a coating of an oxide, a carbide, or a carbo-nitride, to an article of metal or metalloid by microwave heating.

  14. Method of nitriding refractory metal articles

    DOEpatents

    Tiegs, Terry N.; Holcombe, Cressie E.; Dykes, Norman L.; Omatete, Ogbemi O.; Young, Albert C.

    1994-01-01

    A method of nitriding a refractory-nitride forming metal or metalloid articles and composite articles. A consolidated metal or metalloid article or composite is placed inside a microwave oven and nitrogen containing gas is introduced into the microwave oven. The metal or metalloid article or composite is heated to a temperature sufficient to react the metal or metalloid with the nitrogen by applying a microwave energy within the microwave oven. The metal or metalloid article or composite is maintained at that temperature for a period of time sufficient to convert the article of metal or metalloid or composite to an article or composite of refractory nitride. In addition, a method of applying a coating, such as a coating of an oxide, a carbide, or a carbo-nitride, to an article of metal or metalloid by microwave heating.

  15. Low temperature route to uranium nitride

    DOEpatents

    Burrell, Anthony K.; Sattelberger, Alfred P.; Yeamans, Charles; Hartmann, Thomas; Silva, G. W. Chinthaka; Cerefice, Gary; Czerwinski, Kenneth R.

    2009-09-01

    A method of preparing an actinide nitride fuel for nuclear reactors is provided. The method comprises the steps of a) providing at least one actinide oxide and optionally zirconium oxide; b) mixing the oxide with a source of hydrogen fluoride for a period of time and at a temperature sufficient to convert the oxide to a fluoride salt; c) heating the fluoride salt to remove water; d) heating the fluoride salt in a nitrogen atmosphere for a period of time and at a temperature sufficient to convert the fluorides to nitrides; and e) heating the nitrides under vacuum and/or inert atmosphere for a period of time sufficient to convert the nitrides to mononitrides.

  16. Determination of nitrogen in titanium nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philipp, W. H.; Tetzlaff, J. E.

    1970-01-01

    Quantitative determination of nitrogen in titanium nitride involves dissolution of TiN in 10M hydrofluoric acid containing an oxidant. Released nitrogen is determined as ammonia. Best oxidizers are ferric chloride, potassium iodate, and potassium dichromate.

  17. Dissolution of bulk specimens of silicon nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, W. F.; Merkle, E. J.

    1981-01-01

    An accurate chemical characterization of silicon nitride has become important in connection with current efforts to incorporate components of this material into advanced heat engines. However, there are problems concerning a chemical analysis of bulk silicon nitride. Current analytical methods require the pulverization of bulk specimens. A pulverization procedure making use of grinding media, on the other hand, will introduce contaminants. A description is given of a dissolution procedure which overcomes these difficulties. It has been found that up to at least 0.6 g solid pieces of various samples of hot pressed and reaction bonded silicon nitride can be decomposed in a mixture of 3 mL hydrofluoric acid and 1 mL nitric acid overnight at 150 C in a Parr bomb. High-purity silicon nitride is completely soluble in nitric acid after treatment in the bomb. Following decomposition, silicon and hydrofluoric acid are volatilized and insoluble fluorides are converted to a soluble form.

  18. Joining of silicon nitrides using oxynitride glasses

    SciTech Connect

    O`Brien, M.H.

    1993-03-01

    This report presents a study on commercial silicon nitrides that were successfully joined using oxynitride glasses. Sintered silicon nitride was joined by either closed or glass-filled joints. Glass-filled joints were successfully used on hot-pressed silicon nitrides and were comparable in fast fracture strength to unjoined silicon nitrides up to approximately 1000C. Above that temperature, strengths decreased rapidly and glass flow failure began. The study observed that time-dependent failure currently limits the service temperatures of glass-filled joints. Creep failure occurred in excess of 1000C. Between 900 and 1000C, slow crack growth failure was observed. Cavitation (or viscous deformation) was the rate-controlling mechanism of slow crack growth.

  19. Silicon nitride reinforced with molybdenum disilicide

    DOEpatents

    Petrovic, John J.; Honnell, Richard E.

    1991-01-01

    Compositions of matter comprised of silicon nitride and molybdenum disilicide and methods of making the compositions, where the molybdenum disilicide is present in amounts ranging from about 5 to about 50 vol. %.

  20. Plasmonic spectral tunability of conductive ternary nitrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassavetis, S.; Bellas, D. V.; Abadias, G.; Lidorikis, E.; Patsalas, P.

    2016-06-01

    Conductive binary transition metal nitrides, such as TiN and ZrN, have emerged as a category of promising alternative plasmonic materials. In this work, we show that ternary transition metal nitrides such as TixTa1-xN, TixZr1-xN, TixAl1-xN, and ZrxTa1-xN share the important plasmonic features with their binary counterparts, while having the additional asset of the exceptional spectral tunability in the entire visible (400-700 nm) and UVA (315-400 nm) spectral ranges depending on their net valence electrons. In particular, we demonstrate that such ternary nitrides can exhibit maximum field enhancement factors comparable with gold in the aforementioned broadband range. We also critically evaluate the structural features that affect the quality factor of the plasmon resonance and we provide rules of thumb for the selection and growth of materials for nitride plasmonics.

  1. Bi-Directional DC-DC Converter for PHEV Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Abas Goodarzi

    2011-01-31

    Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles (PHEV) require high power density energy storage system (ESS) for hybrid operation and high energy density ESS for Electric Vehicle (EV) mode range. However, ESS technologies to maximize power density and energy density simultaneously are not commercially feasible. The use of bi-directional DC-DC converter allows use of multiple energy storage, and the flexible DC-link voltages can enhance the system efficiency and reduce component sizing. This will improve fuel consumption, increase the EV mode range, reduce the total weight, reduce battery initial and life cycle cost, and provide flexibility in system design.

  2. The Nitrogen-Nitride Anode.

    SciTech Connect

    Delnick, Frank M.

    2014-10-01

    Nitrogen gas N 2 can be reduced to nitride N -3 in molten LiCl-KCl eutectic salt electrolyte. However, the direct oxidation of N -3 back to N 2 is kinetically slow and only occurs at high overvoltage. The overvoltage for N -3 oxidation can be eliminated by coordinating the N -3 with BN to form the dinitridoborate (BN 2 -3 ) anion which forms a 1-D conjugated linear inorganic polymer with -Li-N-B-N- repeating units. This polymer precipitates out of solution as Li 3 BN 2 which becomes a metallic conductor upon delithiation. Li 3 BN 2 is oxidized to Li + + N 2 + BN at about the N 2 /N -3 redox potential with very little overvoltage. In this report we evaluate the N 2 /N -3 redox couple as a battery anode for energy storage.

  3. Band anticrossing in dilute nitrides

    SciTech Connect

    Shan, W.; Yu, K.M.; Walukiewicz, W.; Wu, J.; Ager III, J.W.; Haller, E.E.

    2003-12-23

    Alloying III-V compounds with small amounts of nitrogen leads to dramatic reduction of the fundamental band-gap energy in the resulting dilute nitride alloys. The effect originates from an anti-crossing interaction between the extended conduction-band states and localized N states. The interaction splits the conduction band into two nonparabolic subbands. The downward shift of the lower conduction subband edge is responsible for the N-induced reduction of the fundamental band-gap energy. The changes in the conduction band structure result in significant increase in electron effective mass and decrease in the electron mobility, and lead to a large enhance of the maximum doping level in GaInNAs doped with group VI donors. In addition, a striking asymmetry in the electrical activation of group IV and group VI donors can be attributed to mutual passivation process through formation of the nearest neighbor group-IV donor nitrogen pairs.

  4. III-Nitride UV Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asif Khan, M.; Shatalov, M.; Maruska, H. P.; Wang, H. M.; Kuokstis, E.

    2005-10-01

    The need for efficient, compact and robust solid-state UV optical sources and sensors had stimulated the development of optical devices based on III-nitride material system. Rapid progress in material growth, device fabrication and packaging enabled demonstration of high efficiency visible-blind and solar-blind photodetectors, deep-UV light-emitting diodes with emission from 400 to 250 nm, and UV laser diodes with operation wavelengths ranging from 340 to 350 nm. Applications of these UV optical devices include flame sensing; fluorescence-based biochemical sensing; covert communications; air, water and food purification and disinfection; and biomedical instrumentation. This paper provides a review of recent advances in the development of UV optical devices. Performance of state-of-the-art devices as well as future prospects and challenges are discussed.

  5. Precursors for Carbon Nitride Synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Prashantha, M.; Gopal, E. S. R.; Ramesh, K.

    2011-07-15

    Nano structured carbon nitride films were prepared by pyrolysis assisted chemical vapour deposition. Pyrrole (C{sub 4}H{sub 5}N), Pyrrolidine (C{sub 4}H{sub 9}N), Azabenzimidazole (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}N{sub 3}) and Triazine (C{sub 6}H{sub 15}N{sub 3}) were used as precursors. The vibrational modes observed for C-N and C = N from FTIR spectra confirms the bonding of nitrogen with carbon. XPS core level spectra of C 1s and N 1s also show the formation of bonding between carbon and nitrogen atoms. The nitrogen content in the prepared samples was found to be around 25 atomic %.

  6. Etch Characteristics of GaN using Inductively Coupled Cl{sub 2} Plasma Etching

    SciTech Connect

    Rosli, Siti Azlina; Aziz, A. Abdul

    2008-05-20

    In this study, the plasma characteristics and GaN etch properties of inductively coupled Cl{sub 2}/Ar plasmas were investigated. It has shown that the results of a study of inductively coupled plasma (ICP) etching of gallium nitride by using Cl{sub 2}/Ar is possible to meet the requirement (anisotropy, high etch rate and high selectivity), simultaneously. We have investigated the etching rate dependency on the percentage of Argon in the gas mixture, the total pressure and DC voltage. We found that using a gas mixture with 20 sccm of Ar, the optimum etch rate of GaN was achieved. The etch rate were found to increase with voltage, attaining a maximum rate 2500 A/min at -557 V. The addition of an inert gas, Ar is found to barely affect the etch rate. Surface morphology of the etched samples was verified by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. It was found that the etched surface was anisotropic and the smoothness of the etched surface is comparable to that of polished wafer.

  7. Design of a Sputtering Cathode for Binary Alloys Deposition in Plasma Source Ion Implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, Shamim; Breun, Robert; Fetherston, Paul; Sridharan, Kumar; Conrad, John

    1996-10-01

    In Plasma Source Ion Implantation (PSII)1,2 a target is immersed in a plasma and pulse biased to a high negative voltage ( 50kV). Ions are injected into the near surface of target material under the influence of the electric field. In order to produce Ion Assisted Deposition (IAD) films in PSII, materials of interest are sputtered using DC or RF bias and up to 20 kV negative bias pulses are applied while depositing films. We have performed deposition of titanium aluminum nitride (TiAlN) films using a perforated aluminum cathode stacked on a planar titanium cathode. Design characteristics of the sputtering cathodes as a function of the ratio of material area, plasma parameters, and stoichiometric deposition rates have been evaluated. Analysis of these results will be presented. * This work was supported by NSF. No DMI-9528746, US-Army No. DAALH 03-94-G-0283 1 J. R. Conrad, et al. J. Appl. Phys.62, 4951 (1987). 2 M.M. Shamim et al., J. Vac. Sci. Technol. 12, 843 (1994).

  8. Corrosion behavior of mesoporous transition metal nitrides

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Minghui; Allen, Amy J.; Nguyen, Minh T.; Ralston, Walter T.; MacLeod, Michelle J.; DiSalvo, Francis J.

    2013-09-15

    Transition metal nitrides (TMN) have many desirable characteristics such as high hardness and good thermal stability under reducing conditions. This work reports an initial survey of the chemical stability of mesoporous TMNs (TM=Nb, V, Cr and Ti) in water at 80 °C at neutral, acidic and alkaline pH. The mesoporous TMNs had specific surface areas of 25–60 m{sup 2}/g with average pore sizes ranging from 10 to 50 nm. The high surface areas of these materials enhance the rate of corrosion per unit mass over that of a bulk material, making detection of corrosion much easier. The products were characterized by Rietveld refinement of powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) patterns and by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Several nitrides have corrosion rates that are, within error, not distinguishable from zero (±1 Å/day). Of the nitrides examined, CrN appears to be the most corrosion resistant under acidic conditions. None of the nitrides studied are corrosion resistant under alkaline conditions. - Graphical abstract: Corrosion behavior of mesoporous transition metal nitrides (TM=Nb, V, Cr and Ti) in acidic and alkaline solutions at 80 °C for 2 weeks. Display Omitted - highlights: • Corrosion rates of mesoporous transition metal nitrides in aqueous solution is reported. • The mesoporous TMNs had surface areas of 25–60 m{sup 2}/g. • CrN is the most corrosion resistant under the conditions studied.

  9. Silicon nitride ceramic-based two-dimensional microcombustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Shuji; Yamada, Takashi; Sugimoto, Shinya; Li, Jing-Feng; Esashi, Masayoshi

    2003-05-01

    In this paper we describe silicon nitride (Si3N4) ceramic-based microdiffusion combustors with a two-dimensional structure, which is potentially batch-producible by microelectromechanical systems machining technology such as deep reactive ion etching. Si3N4 ceramic structures were fabricated by the nitridation of a spark-plasma-sintered silicon green compact after mechanical micromilling. Five types of combustor with a combustion chamber volume of 181 mul and depths of 1, 2 and 3 mm were tested. The combustors with combustion chamber depths of 2 or 3 mm achieved stable combustion at equivalence ratios from 0.28 to 1.3 and total flow rates from 4.0 to 11.3 SLM. They formed a flame at the center of the combustion chamber as designed, when the equivalence ratio was low. However, the combustor with a combustion chamber depth of 1 mm could not maintain a flame in the combustion chamber. This may be because combustion was not completed due to the shallow combustion chamber with a depth equivalent to the quenching distance of hydrogen.

  10. Reactive magnetron cosputtering of hard and conductive ternary nitride thin films: Ti-Zr-N and Ti-Ta-N

    SciTech Connect

    Abadias, G.; Koutsokeras, L. E.; Dub, S. N.; Tolmachova, G. N.; Debelle, A.; Sauvage, T.; Villechaise, P.

    2010-07-15

    Ternary transition metal nitride thin films, with thickness up to 300 nm, were deposited by dc reactive magnetron cosputtering in Ar-N{sub 2} plasma discharges at 300 deg. C on Si substrates. Two systems were comparatively studied, Ti-Zr-N and Ti-Ta-N, as representative of isostructural and nonisostructural prototypes, with the aim of characterizing their structural, mechanical, and electrical properties. While phase-separated TiN-ZrN and TiN-TaN are the bulk equilibrium states, Ti{sub 1-x}Zr{sub x}N and Ti{sub 1-y}Ta{sub y}N solid solutions with the Na-Cl (B1-type) structure could be stabilized in a large compositional range (up to x=1 and y=0.75, respectively). Substituting Ti atoms by either Zr or Ta atoms led to significant changes in film texture, microstructure, grain size, and surface morphology, as evidenced by x-ray diffraction, x-ray reflectivity, and scanning electron and atomic force microscopies. The ternary Ti{sub 1-y}Ta{sub y}N films exhibited superior mechanical properties to Ti{sub 1-x}Zr{sub x}N films as well as binary compounds, with hardness as high as 42 GPa for y=0.69. All films were metallic, the lowest electrical resistivity {rho}{approx}65 {mu}{Omega} cm being obtained for pure ZrN, while for Ti{sub 1-y}Ta{sub y}N films a minimum was observed at y{approx}0.3. The evolution of the different film properties is discussed based on microstructrural investigations.

  11. Reactive Plasma Spraying of Fine Al2O3/AlN Feedstock Powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahien, Mohammed; Yamada, Motohiro; Yasui, Toshiaki; Fukumoto, Masahiro

    2013-12-01

    Reactive plasma spraying (RPS) is a promising technology for in situ formation of aluminum nitride (AlN) coatings. Recently, AlN-based coatings were fabricated by RPS of alumina (Al2O3) powder in N2/H2 thermal plasma. This study investigated the feasibility of RPS of a fine Al2O3/AlN mixture and the influence of the plasma gases (N2, H2) on the nitriding conversion, and coating microstructure and properties. Thick AlN/Al2O3 coatings with high nitride content were successfully fabricated. The coatings consist of h-AlN, c-AlN, Al5O6N, γ-Al2O3, and a small amount of α-Al2O3. Use of fine particles enhanced the nitriding conversion and the melting tendency by increasing the surface area. Furthermore, the AlN additive improved the AlN content in the coatings. Increasing the N2 gas flow rate improved the nitride content and complete crystal growth to the h-AlN phase, and enhanced the coating thickness. On the other hand, though the H2 gas is required for plasma nitriding of the Al2O3 particles, increasing its flow rate decreased the nitride content and the coating thickness. Remarkable influence of the plasma gases on the coating composition, microstructure, and properties was observed during RPS of the fine particles.

  12. Direct access to macroporous chromium nitride and chromium titanium nitride with inverse opal structure.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Weitian; DiSalvo, Francis J

    2015-03-21

    We report a facile synthesis of single-phase, nanocrystalline macroporous chromium nitride and chromium titanium nitride with an inverse opal morphology. The material is characterized using XRD, SEM, HR-TEM/STEM, TGA and XPS. Interconversion of macroporous CrN to Cr2O3 and back to CrN while retaining the inverse opal morphology is also demonstrated. PMID:25705745

  13. Direct access to macroporous chromium nitride and chromium titanium nitride with inverse opal structure.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Weitian; DiSalvo, Francis J

    2015-03-21

    We report a facile synthesis of single-phase, nanocrystalline macroporous chromium nitride and chromium titanium nitride with an inverse opal morphology. The material is characterized using XRD, SEM, HR-TEM/STEM, TGA and XPS. Interconversion of macroporous CrN to Cr2O3 and back to CrN while retaining the inverse opal morphology is also demonstrated.

  14. Surface Chemistry, Microstructure, and Tribological Properties of Cubic Boron Nitride Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watanabe, Shuichi; Wheeler, Donald R.; Abel, Phillip B.; Street, Kenneth W.; Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Murakawa, Masao; Miyake, Shojiro

    1998-01-01

    This report deals with the surface chemistry, microstructure, bonding state, morphology, and friction and wear properties of cubic boron nitride (c-BN) films that were synthesized by magnetically enhanced plasma ion plating. Several analytical techniques - x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and electron diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, and surface profilometry - were used to characterize the films. Sliding friction experiments using a ball-on-disk configuration were conducted for the c-BN films in sliding contact with 440C stainless-steel balls at room temperature in ultrahigh vacuum (pressure, 10(exp -6), in ambient air, and under water lubrication. Results indicate that the boron-to-nitrogen ratio on the surface of the as-deposited c-BN film is greater than 1 and that not all the boron is present as boron nitride but a small percentage is present as an oxide. Both in air and under water lubrication, the c-BN film in sliding contact with steel showed a low wear rate, whereas a high wear rate was observed in vacuum. In air and under water lubrication, c-BN exhibited wear resistance superior to that of amorphous boron nitride, titanium nitride, and titanium carbide.

  15. Group III-nitride thin films grown using MBE and bismuth

    DOEpatents

    Kisielowski, Christian K.; Rubin, Michael

    2000-01-01

    The present invention comprises growing gallium nitride films in the presence of bismuth using MBE at temperatures of about 1000 K or less. The present invention further comprises the gallium nitride films fabricated using the inventive fabrication method. The inventive films may be doped with magnesium or other dopants. The gallium nitride films were grown on sapphire substrates using a hollow anode Constricted Glow Discharge nitrogen plasma source. When bismuth was used as a surfactant, two-dimensional gallium nitride crystal sizes ranging between 10 .mu.m and 20 .mu.m were observed. This is 20 to 40 times larger than crystal sizes observed when GaN films were grown under similar circumstances but without bismuth. It is thought that the observed increase in crystal size is due bismuth inducing an increased surface diffusion coefficient for gallium. The calculated value of 4.7.times.10.sup.-7 cm.sup.2 /sec. reveals a virtual substrate temperature of 1258 K which is 260 degrees higher than the actual one.

  16. Group III-nitride thin films grown using MBE and bismuth

    DOEpatents

    Kisielowski, Christian K.; Rubin, Michael

    2002-01-01

    The present invention comprises growing gallium nitride films in the presence of bismuth using MBE at temperatures of about 1000 K or less. The present invention further comprises the gallium nitride films fabricated using the inventive fabrication method. The inventive films may be doped with magnesium or other dopants. The gallium nitride films were grown on sapphire substrates using a hollow anode Constricted Glow Discharge nitrogen plasma source. When bismuth was used as a surfactant, two-dimensional gallium nitride crystal sizes ranging between 10 .mu.m and 20 .mu.m were observed. This is 20 to 40 times larger than crystal sizes observed when GaN films were grown under similar circumstances but without bismuth. It is thought that the observed increase in crystal size is due bismuth inducing an increased surface diffusion coefficient for gallium. The calculated value of 4.7.times.10.sup.-7 cm.sup.2 /sec. reveals a virtual substrate temperature of 1258 K which is 260 degrees higher than the actual one.

  17. DC-Compensated Current Transformer.

    PubMed

    Ripka, Pavel; Draxler, Karel; Styblíková, Renata

    2016-01-20

    Instrument current transformers (CTs) measure AC currents. The DC component in the measured current can saturate the transformer and cause gross error. We use fluxgate detection and digital feedback compensation of the DC flux to suppress the overall error to 0.15%. This concept can be used not only for high-end CTs with a nanocrystalline core, but it also works for low-cost CTs with FeSi cores. The method described here allows simultaneous measurements of the DC current component.

  18. DC-Compensated Current Transformer.

    PubMed

    Ripka, Pavel; Draxler, Karel; Styblíková, Renata

    2016-01-01

    Instrument current transformers (CTs) measure AC currents. The DC component in the measured current can saturate the transformer and cause gross error. We use fluxgate detection and digital feedback compensation of the DC flux to suppress the overall error to 0.15%. This concept can be used not only for high-end CTs with a nanocrystalline core, but it also works for low-cost CTs with FeSi cores. The method described here allows simultaneous measurements of the DC current component. PMID:26805830

  19. Nitride Fuel Modeling Recommendation for Nitride Fuel Material Property Measurement Priority

    SciTech Connect

    William Carmack; Richard Moore

    2005-09-01

    The purpose of this effort was to provide the basis for a model that effectively predicts nitride fuel behavior. Material property models developed for the uranium nitride fuel system have been used to approximate the general behavior of nitride fuels with specific property models for the transuranic nitride fuels utilized as they become available. The AFCI fuel development program now has the means for predicting the behavior of the transuranic nitride fuel compositions. The key data and models needed for input into this model include: Thermal conductivity with burnup Fuel expansion coefficient Fuel swelling with burnup Fission gas release with burnup. Although the fuel performance model is a fully functional FEA analysis tool, it is limited by the input data and models.

  20. Digital Control Technologies for Modular DC-DC Converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Button, Robert M.; Kascak, Peter E.; Lebron-Velilla, Ramon

    2002-01-01

    Recent trends in aerospace Power Management and Distribution (PMAD) systems focus on using commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) components as standard building blocks. This move to more modular designs has been driven by a desire to reduce costs and development times, but is also due to the impressive power density and efficiency numbers achieved by today's commercial DC-DC converters. However, the PMAD designer quickly learns of the hidden "costs" of using COTS converters. The most significant cost is the required addition of external input filters to meet strict electromagnetic interference (MIAMI) requirements for space systems. In fact, the high power density numbers achieved by the commercial manufacturers are greatly due to the lack of necessary input filters included in the COTS module. The NASA Glenn Research Center is currently pursuing a digital control technology that addresses this problem with modular DC-DC converters. This paper presents the digital control technologies that have been developed to greatly reduce the input filter requirements for paralleled, modular DC-DC converters. Initial test result show that the input filter's inductor size was reduced by 75 percent, and the capacitor size was reduced by 94 percent while maintaining the same power quality specifications.