Science.gov

Sample records for dc resins

  1. Suppression of surface charge accumulation on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-filled epoxy resin insulator under dc voltage by direct fluorination

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Boya; Zhang, Guixin Li, Chuanyang; He, Jinliang; Wang, Qiang; An, Zhenlian

    2015-12-15

    Surface charge accumulation on insulators under high dc voltage is a major factor that may lead to the reduction of insulation levels in gas insulated devices. In this paper, disc insulators made of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-filled epoxy resin were surface fluorinated using a F{sub 2}/N{sub 2} mixture (12.5% F{sub 2}) at 50 °C and 0.1 MPa for different durations of 15 min, 30 min and 60 min. A dc voltage was applied to the insulator for 30 min and the charge density on its surface was measured by an electrostatic probe. The results revealed significant lower surface charge densities on the fluorinated insulators in comparison with the original one. Surface conductivity measurements indicated a higher surface conductivity by over three orders of magnitude after fluorination, which would allow the charges to transfer along the surface and thus may suppress their accumulation. Further, attenuated total reflection infrared analysis and surface morphology observations of the samples revealed that the introduction of fluoride groups altered the surface physicochemical properties. These structure changes, especially the physical defects reduced the depth of charge traps in the surface layer, which was verified by the measurement of energy distributions of the electron and hole traps based on the isothermal current theory. The results in this paper demonstrate that fluorination can be a promising and effective method to suppress surface charge accumulation on epoxy insulators in gas insulated devices.

  2. Milliwatt dc/dc Inverter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclyman, C. W.

    1983-01-01

    Compact dc/dc inverter uses single integrated-circuit package containing six inverter gates that generate and amplify 100-kHz square-wave switching signal. Square-wave switching inverts 10-volt local power to isolated voltage at another desired level. Relatively high operating frequency reduces size of filter capacitors required, resulting in small package unit.

  3. Plastic casting resin poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Epoxy poisoning; Resin poisoning ... Epoxy and resin can be poisonous if they are swallowed or their fumes are breathed in. ... Plastic casting resins are found in various plastic casting resin products.

  4. Composite resins.

    PubMed

    Leinfelder, K F

    1985-04-01

    The interest in posterior composite resins has grown rapidly during the last several years. Much of the interest has been initiated by a demand for esthetic dentistry. Some has developed as a result of a concern by some for mercury sensitivity. Despite their growing popularity, a number of major problems persist. Some of these deal with the restorative material, whereas others relate to the clinical techniques associated with their use. Before the clinician considers the use of composite resins in posterior teeth, he or she should be familiar with conditions that strongly influence clinical behavior.

  5. Adaptable DC offset correction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golusky, John M. (Inventor); Muldoon, Kelly P. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Methods and systems for adaptable DC offset correction are provided. An exemplary adaptable DC offset correction system evaluates an incoming baseband signal to determine an appropriate DC offset removal scheme; removes a DC offset from the incoming baseband signal based on the appropriate DC offset scheme in response to the evaluated incoming baseband signal; and outputs a reduced DC baseband signal in response to the DC offset removed from the incoming baseband signal.

  6. High-Efficiency dc/dc Converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturman, J.

    1982-01-01

    High-efficiency dc/dc converter has been developed that provides commonly used voltages of plus or minus 12 Volts from an unregulated dc source of from 14 to 40 Volts. Unique features of converter are its high efficiency at low power level and ability to provide output either larger or smaller than input voltage.

  7. The effect of resin thickness on polymerization characteristics of silorane-based composite resin

    PubMed Central

    Son, Sung-Ae; Roh, Hyoung-Mee; Hur, Bock; Kwon, Yong-Hoon

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This study examined the influence of the resin thickness on the polymerization of silorane- and methacrylate-based composites. Materials and Methods One silorane-based (Filtek P90, 3M ESPE) and two methacrylate-based (Filtek Z250 and Z350, 3M ESPE) composite resins were used. The number of photons were detected using a photodiode detector at the different thicknesses (thickness, 1, 2 and 3 mm) specimens. The microhardness of the top and bottom surfaces was measured (n = 15) using a Vickers hardness with 200 gf load and 15 sec dwell time conditions. The degree of conversion (DC) of the specimens was determined using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Scratched powder of each top and bottom surface of the specimen dissolved in ethanol for transmission FTIR spectroscopy. The refractive index was measured using a Abbe-type refractometer. To measure the polymerization shrinkage, a linometer was used. The results were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test at p < 0.05 level. Results The silorane-based resin composite showed the lowest filler content and light attenuation among the specimens. P90 showed the highest values in the DC and the lowest microhardness at all depth. In the polymerization shrinkage, P90 showed a significantly lower shrinkage than the rest two resin products (p < 0.05). P90 showed a significantly lower refractive index than the remaining two resin products (p < 0.05). Conclusions DC, microhardness, polymerization rate and refractive index linearly decreased as specimen thickness linearly increased. P90 showed much less polymerization shrinkage compared to other specimens. P90, even though achieved the highest DC, showed the lowest microhardness and refractive index. PMID:25383351

  8. Synthesis of fluorinated dimethacrylate monomer and its application in preparing Bis-GMA free dental resin.

    PubMed

    Yin, Mei; Guo, Sen; Liu, Fang; He, Jingwei

    2015-11-01

    With the aim to reduce human exposure to Bis-phenol A derivatives, a novel fluorinated dimethacrylate monomer FUDMA was synthesized and mixed with triethyleneglycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) to prepare 2,2-bis[4-(2-hydroxy-3-methacryloy- loxypropyl)phenyl]propane (Bis-GMA) free dental resin system. Physicochemical properties, such as double bond conversion (DC), polymerization shrinkage (VS), water sorption (WS) and solubility (SL), flexural strength (FS) and modulus (FM), and fracture energy of FUDMA/TEGDMA resin system were investigated. Bis-GMA/TEGDMA resin system was used as a control. The results showed that, compared with Bis-GMA/TEGDMA resin system, FUDMA/TEGDMA had advantages like higher DC, lower VS, and higher fracture energy, but had no disadvantages. Therefore, FUDMA/TEGDMA resin system had better comprehensive physicochemical properties than Bis-GMA/TEGDMA resin system, and FUDMA had potential to be used as a substitute for Bis-GMA. PMID:26282076

  9. Synthesis of fluorinated dimethacrylate monomer and its application in preparing Bis-GMA free dental resin.

    PubMed

    Yin, Mei; Guo, Sen; Liu, Fang; He, Jingwei

    2015-11-01

    With the aim to reduce human exposure to Bis-phenol A derivatives, a novel fluorinated dimethacrylate monomer FUDMA was synthesized and mixed with triethyleneglycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) to prepare 2,2-bis[4-(2-hydroxy-3-methacryloy- loxypropyl)phenyl]propane (Bis-GMA) free dental resin system. Physicochemical properties, such as double bond conversion (DC), polymerization shrinkage (VS), water sorption (WS) and solubility (SL), flexural strength (FS) and modulus (FM), and fracture energy of FUDMA/TEGDMA resin system were investigated. Bis-GMA/TEGDMA resin system was used as a control. The results showed that, compared with Bis-GMA/TEGDMA resin system, FUDMA/TEGDMA had advantages like higher DC, lower VS, and higher fracture energy, but had no disadvantages. Therefore, FUDMA/TEGDMA resin system had better comprehensive physicochemical properties than Bis-GMA/TEGDMA resin system, and FUDMA had potential to be used as a substitute for Bis-GMA.

  10. DC/DC Converter Stability Testing Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Bright L.

    2008-01-01

    This report presents study results on hybrid DC/DC converter stability testing methods. An input impedance measurement method and a gain/phase margin measurement method were evaluated to be effective to determine front-end oscillation and feedback loop oscillation. In particular, certain channel power levels of converter input noises have been found to have high degree correlation with the gain/phase margins. It becomes a potential new method to evaluate stability levels of all type of DC/DC converters by utilizing the spectral analysis on converter input noises.

  11. Degree of conversion and microhardness of dental composite resin materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marovic, D.; Panduric, V.; Tarle, Z.; Ristic, M.; Sariri, K.; Demoli, N.; Klaric, E.; Jankovic, B.; Prskalo, K.

    2013-07-01

    Dental composite resins (CRs) are commonly used materials for the replacement of hard dental tissues. Degree of conversion (DC) of CR measures the amount of the un-polymerized monomers in CR, which can cause adverse biological reactions and weakening of the mechanical properties. In the past, studies have determined the positive correlation of DC values determined by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and microhardness (MH) values. The aim of this study was to establish whether MH can replace FTIR for the determination of DC of contemporary CR.

  12. Effects of resin formulation and nanofiller surface treatment on the properties of experimental hybrid resin composite.

    PubMed

    Musanje, Lawrence; Ferracane, Jack L

    2004-08-01

    This study evaluated the effects of nanofiller surface treatment and resin viscosity on the early and long-term properties of experimental hybrid composites. Three resin formulations (low, medium and high viscosity) were prepared by varying the ratio of TEGDMA:UDMA:bis-GMA (47:33:16 wt%; 30:33:33 wt%; 12:33:51 wt%). Composites contained 71.3 wt% silanated strontium glass (1-3 microm) and 12.6 wt% of either silanated or unsilanated silica (OX-50; 0.04 microm). Specimens (n=10) for flexural strength, flexural modulus, fracture toughness and Knoop hardness were tested after 24 h, 1 and 6 months exposure to water at 37 degrees C. Degree of conversion (DC) was determined 24 h after photoinitiation using FTIR. Resin viscosity only had a marginal influence on the mechanical response of composites but it can be adjusted to achieve a balance between DC and mechanical properties. Adding non-bonded nanofiller to hybrid composites had no systematic effect on DC. Non-bonded nanofillers had no significant effect on the long-term properties of hybrid composites. PMID:15046897

  13. [Radiopacity of composite resins].

    PubMed

    Tamburús, J R

    1990-01-01

    The author studied the radiopacity of six composite resins, submitted to radiographic examination in standardized conditions, only with kilovoltage variations. Along with resins it was radiographed an aluminium penetrometer, to compare their optical densities. The results showed that kilovoltagem variations interfered in optical densities of the resins, being more pronounced in 50-55, 55-60 and 60-65 kilovoltages. Despite this, the relations of optical densities as compared with that of penetrometer steps kept unaltered most fo the kilovoltages used.

  14. Polyester Resin Hazards

    PubMed Central

    Bourne, L. B.; Milner, F. J. M.

    1963-01-01

    Polyester resins are being increasingly used in industry. These resins require the addition of catalysts and accelerators. The handling of polyester resin system materials may give rise to skin irritations, allergic reactions, and burns. The burns are probably due to styrene and organic peroxides. Atmospheric pollution from styrene and explosion and fire risks from organic peroxides must be prevented. Where dimethylaniline is used scrupulous cleanliness and no-touch technique must be enforced. Handling precautions are suggested. Images PMID:14014495

  15. Effect of Different Thicknesses of Pressable Ceramic Veneers on Polymerization of Light-cured and Dual-cured Resin Cements

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Seok-Hwan; Lopez, Arnaldo; Berzins, David W.; Prasad, Soni; Ahn, Kwang Woo

    2015-01-01

    Aim This study evaluated the effects of ceramic veneer thicknesses on the polymerization of two different resin cements. Materials and Methods A total of 80 ceramic veneer discs were fabricated by using a pressable ceramic material (e.max Press; Ivoclar Vivadent) from a Low Translucency (LT) ingot (A1 shade). These discs were divided into light-cured (LC; NX3 Nexus LC; Kerr) and dual-cured (DC; NX3 Nexus DC; Kerr) and each group was further divided into 4 subgroups, based on ceramic disc thickness (0.3 mm, 0.6 mm, 0.9 mm, and 1.2 mm). The values of Vickers microhardness (MH) and degree of conversion (DOC) were obtained for each specimen after a 24-hour storage period. Association between ceramic thickness, resin cement type, and light intensity readings (mW/cm2) with respect to microhardness and degree of conversion was statistically evaluated by using ANOVA. Results For the DOC values, there was no significant difference observed among the LC resin cement subgroups, except in the 1.2 mm subgroup; only the DOC value (14.0 ± 7.4%) of 1.2 mm DC resin cement had significantly difference from that value (28.9 ± 7.5%) of 1.2 mm LC resin cement (P<.05). For the MH values between LC and DC resin cement groups, there was statistically significant difference (P<.05); overall, the MH values of LC resin cement groups demonstrated higher values than DC resin cement groups. On the other hands, among the DC resin cement subgroups, the MH values of 1.2 mm DC subgroup was significantly lower than the 0.3 mm and 0.6 mm subgroups (P<.05). However, among the LC subgroups, there was no statistically significant difference among them (P >.05). Conclusion The degree of conversion and hardness of the resin cement was unaffected with veneering thicknesses between 0.3 and 0.9 mm. However, the DC resin cement group resulted in a significantly lower DOC and MH values for the 1.2 mm subgroup. Clinical Significance While clinically adequate polymerization of LC resin cement can be achieved

  16. DC source assemblies

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, Jeremy B; Newson, Steve

    2013-02-26

    Embodiments of DC source assemblies of power inverter systems of the type suitable for deployment in a vehicle having an electrically grounded chassis are provided. An embodiment of a DC source assembly comprises a housing, a DC source disposed within the housing, a first terminal, and a second terminal. The DC source also comprises a first capacitor having a first electrode electrically coupled to the housing, and a second electrode electrically coupled to the first terminal. The DC source assembly further comprises a second capacitor having a first electrode electrically coupled to the housing, and a second electrode electrically coupled to the second terminal.

  17. Delayed cure bismaleimide resins

    DOEpatents

    Not Available

    1982-08-12

    Prior art polybismaleimides begin to polymerize at or just above the melting point of the monomer. This patent describes new bismaleimide resins which have an increased pot life and provide longer time periods in which the monomer remains fluid. The resins can be polymerized into molded articles with a high uniformity of properties. (DLC)

  18. Erosion of composite resins.

    PubMed

    Powers, J M; Fan, P L

    1980-05-01

    The surface degradation of composite resins caused by accelerated aging was studied. Accelerated aging for 900 hours caused erosion of the resin matrices and exposure of filler particles. Differences in surface profiles after aging suggest that the materials eroded at different rates. Accelerated aging may model erosive wear of composites.

  19. Incombustible resin composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akima, T.

    1982-01-01

    Incombustible resin compositions composed of aromatic compounds were obtained through (1) combustion polymer material and (2) bisphenol A or halogenated bisphenol A and bisphenol A diglycidl ether or halogenated bisphenol A diglycidyl ether. The aromatic compound is an adduct of bifunctional phenols and bifunctional epoxy resins.

  20. Interfacial ultramorphology evaluation of resin luting cements to dentin: a correlative scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy analysis.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, Thaiane Rodrigues; Vermelho, Paulo Moreira; André, Carolina Bosso; Giannini, Marcelo

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the dentin-resin cements interfacial ultramorphologies using two different methods: scanning (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Four commercial products were evaluated: two conventional cementing system (RelyX ARC/Adper™ Scotchbond™ Multi-Purpose Plus, 3M ESPE and Clearfil Esthetic Cement/DC Bond, Kuraray) and two self-adhesive resin cements (RelyX Unicem, 3M ESPE and Clearfil SA Cement, Kuraray). Prepolymerized resin disks (Sinfony, 3M ESPE) were cemented on oclusal dentin surfaces of 24 third human molars, simulating the indirect restorations. After 24 h, teeth were sectioned into 0.9-mm thick slabs and processed for microscopy analyses (SEM or TEM/ n = 3). Qualitative characterization of dentin-resin cement interface was performed. Hybrid layer formation with long and dense resin tags was observed only for RelyX ARC cementing system. Clearfil Esthetic Cement/DC Bond system revealed few and short resin tags formation, whereas no hybridization and resin tags were detected for self-adhesive resin cements. Some interfacial regions exhibited that the self-adhesive resin cements were not bonded to dentin, presenting bubbles or voids at the interfaces. In conclusion, TEM and SEM bonding interface analyses showed ultramorphological variations among resin cements, which are directly related to dental bonding strategies used for each resin cement tested.

  1. Development of resins for composites by resin transfer molding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woo, Edmund P.; Puckett, Paul M.; Maynard, Shawn J.

    1991-01-01

    Designed to cover a wide range of resin technology and to meet the near-term and long-term needs of the aircraft industry, this research has three objectives: to produce resin transfer molding (RES) resins with improved processability, to produce prepreg systems with high toughness and service temperature, and to produce new resin systems. Progress on reaching the objectives is reported.

  2. Repair bond strength of dual-cured resin composite core buildup materials.

    PubMed

    El-Deeb, Heba A; Ghalab, Radwa M; Elsayed Akah, Mai M; Mobarak, Enas H

    2016-03-01

    The reparability of dual-cured resin composite core buildup materials using a light-cured one following one week or three months storage, prior to repair was evaluated. Two different dual-cured resin composites; Cosmecore™ DC automix and Clearfil™ DC automix core buildup materials and a light-cured nanofilled resin composite; Filtek™ Z350 XT were used. Substrate specimens were prepared (n = 12/each substrate material) and stored in artificial saliva at 37 °C either for one week or three months. Afterward, all specimens were ground flat, etched using Scotchbond™ phosphoric acid etchant and received Single Bond Universal adhesive system according to the manufacturers' instructions. The light-cured nanofilled resin composite (Filtek™ Z350 XT) was used as a repair material buildup. To determine the cohesive strength of each solid substrate material, additional specimens from each core material (n = 12) were prepared and stored for the same periods. Five sticks (0.8 ± 0.01 mm(2)) were obtained from each specimen (30 sticks/group) for microtensile bond strength (μTBS) testing. Modes of failure were also determined. Two-way ANOVA revealed a significant effect for the core materials but not for the storage periods or their interaction. After one week, dual-cured resin composite core buildup materials (Cosmecore™ DC and Clearfil™ DC) achieved significantly higher repair μTBS than the light-cured nanofilled resin composite (Filtek™ Z350 XT). However, Clearfil™ DC revealed the highest value, then Cosmecore™ DC and Filtek™ Z350 XT, following storage for 3-month. Repair strength values recovered 64-86% of the cohesive strengths of solid substrate materials. The predominant mode of failure was the mixed type. Dual-cured resin composite core buildup materials revealed acceptable repair bond strength values even after 3-month storage. PMID:26966567

  3. Repair bond strength of dual-cured resin composite core buildup materials.

    PubMed

    El-Deeb, Heba A; Ghalab, Radwa M; Elsayed Akah, Mai M; Mobarak, Enas H

    2016-03-01

    The reparability of dual-cured resin composite core buildup materials using a light-cured one following one week or three months storage, prior to repair was evaluated. Two different dual-cured resin composites; Cosmecore™ DC automix and Clearfil™ DC automix core buildup materials and a light-cured nanofilled resin composite; Filtek™ Z350 XT were used. Substrate specimens were prepared (n = 12/each substrate material) and stored in artificial saliva at 37 °C either for one week or three months. Afterward, all specimens were ground flat, etched using Scotchbond™ phosphoric acid etchant and received Single Bond Universal adhesive system according to the manufacturers' instructions. The light-cured nanofilled resin composite (Filtek™ Z350 XT) was used as a repair material buildup. To determine the cohesive strength of each solid substrate material, additional specimens from each core material (n = 12) were prepared and stored for the same periods. Five sticks (0.8 ± 0.01 mm(2)) were obtained from each specimen (30 sticks/group) for microtensile bond strength (μTBS) testing. Modes of failure were also determined. Two-way ANOVA revealed a significant effect for the core materials but not for the storage periods or their interaction. After one week, dual-cured resin composite core buildup materials (Cosmecore™ DC and Clearfil™ DC) achieved significantly higher repair μTBS than the light-cured nanofilled resin composite (Filtek™ Z350 XT). However, Clearfil™ DC revealed the highest value, then Cosmecore™ DC and Filtek™ Z350 XT, following storage for 3-month. Repair strength values recovered 64-86% of the cohesive strengths of solid substrate materials. The predominant mode of failure was the mixed type. Dual-cured resin composite core buildup materials revealed acceptable repair bond strength values even after 3-month storage.

  4. Radiation effects on DC-DC Converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Dexin; Attia, John O.; Kankam, Mark D. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    DC-DC switching converters are circuits that can be used to convert a DC voltage of one value to another by switching action. They are increasing being used in space systems. Most of the popular DC-DC switching converters utilize power MOSFETs. However power MOSFETs, when subjected to radiation, are susceptible to degradation of device characteristics or catastrophic failure. This work focuses on the effects of total ionizing dose on converter performance. Four fundamental switching converters (buck converter, buck-boost converter, cuk converter, and flyback converter) were built using Harris IRF250 power MOSFETs. These converters were designed for converting an input of 60 volts to an output of about 12 volts with a switching frequency of 100 kHz. The four converters were irradiated with a Co-60 gamma source at dose rate of 217 rad/min. The performances of the four converters were examined during the exposure to the radiation. The experimental results show that the output voltage of the converters increases as total dose increases. However, the increases of the output voltage were different for the four different converters, with the buck converter and cuk converter the highest and the flyback converter the lowest. We observed significant increases in output voltage for cuk converter at a total dose of 24 krad (si).

  5. DC-to-DC switching converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuk, Slobodan M. (Inventor); Middlebrook, Robert D. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A dc-to-dc converter having nonpulsating input and output current uses two inductances, one in series with the input source, the other in series with the output load. An electrical energy transferring device with storage, namely storage capacitance, is used with suitable switching means between the inductances to DC level conversion. For isolation between the source and load, the capacitance may be divided into two capacitors coupled by a transformer, and for reducing ripple, the inductances may be coupled. With proper design of the coupling between the inductances, the current ripple can be reduced to zero at either the input or the output, or the reduction achievable in that way may be divided between the input and output.

  6. Biocidal quaternary ammonium resin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janauer, G. E.

    1983-01-01

    Activated carbon (charcoal) and polymeric resin sorbents are widely used in the filtration and treatment of drinking water, mainly to remove dissolved organic and inorganic impurities and to improve the taste. Earlier hopes that activated carbon might "disinfect' water proved to be unfounded. The feasibility of protecting against microbial infestation in charcoal and resin beds such as those to be incorporated into total water reuse systems in spacecraft was investigated. The biocidal effect of IPCD (insoluable polymeric contact disinfectants) in combination with a representative charcoal was assessed. The ion exchange resins (IPCD) were shown to adequately protect charcoal and ion exchange beds.

  7. Radiation Effects on DC-DC Converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, De-Xin; AbdulMazid, M. D.; Attia, John O.; Kankam, Mark D. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In this work, several DC-DC converters were designed and built. The converters are Buck Buck-Boost, Cuk, Flyback, and full-bridge zero-voltage switched. The total ionizing dose radiation and single event effects on the converters were investigated. The experimental results for the TID effects tests show that the voltages of the Buck Buck-Boost, Cuk, and Flyback converters increase as total dose increased when using power MOSFET IRF250 as a switching transistor. The change in output voltage with total dose is highest for the Buck converter and the lowest for Flyback converter. The trend of increase in output voltages with total dose in the present work agrees with those of the literature. The trends of the experimental results also agree with those obtained from PSPICE simulation. For the full-bridge zero-voltage switch converter, it was observed that the dc-dc converter with IRF250 power MOSFET did not show a significant change of output voltage with total dose. In addition, for the dc-dc converter with FSF254R4 radiation-hardened power MOSFET, the output voltage did not change significantly with total dose. The experimental results were confirmed by PSPICE simulation that showed that FB-ZVS converter with IRF250 power MOSFET's was not affected with the increase in total ionizing dose. Single Event Effects (SEE) radiation tests were performed on FB-ZVS converters. It was observed that the FB-ZVS converter with the IRF250 power MOSFET, when the device was irradiated with Krypton ion with ion-energy of 150 MeV and LET of 41.3 MeV-square cm/mg, the output voltage increased with the increase in fluence. However, for Krypton with ion-energy of 600 MeV and LET of 33.65 MeV-square cm/mg, and two out of four transistors of the converter were permanently damaged. The dc-dc converter with FSF254R4 radiation hardened power MOSFET's did not show significant change at the output voltage with fluence while being irradiated by Krypton with ion energy of 1.20 GeV and LET of 25

  8. Thermally stable laminating resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. J.; Vaughan, R. W.; Burns, E. A.

    1972-01-01

    Improved thermally stable laminating resins were developed based on the addition-type pyrolytic polymerization. Detailed monomer and polymer synthesis and characterization studies identified formulations which facilitate press molding processing and autoclave fabrication of glass and graphite fiber reinforced composites. A specific resin formulation, termed P10P was utilized to prepare a Courtaulds HMS reinforced simulated airfoil demonstration part by an autoclave molding process.

  9. Multilevel DC link inverter

    DOEpatents

    Su, Gui-Jia

    2003-06-10

    A multilevel DC link inverter and method for improving torque response and current regulation in permanent magnet motors and switched reluctance motors having a low inductance includes a plurality of voltage controlled cells connected in series for applying a resulting dc voltage comprised of one or more incremental dc voltages. The cells are provided with switches for increasing the resulting applied dc voltage as speed and back EMF increase, while limiting the voltage that is applied to the commutation switches to perform PWM or dc voltage stepping functions, so as to limit current ripple in the stator windings below an acceptable level, typically 5%. Several embodiments are disclosed including inverters using IGBT's, inverters using thyristors. All of the inverters are operable in both motoring and regenerating modes.

  10. Acetylene terminated matrix resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldfarb, I. J.; Lee, Y. C.; Arnold, F. E.; Helminiak, T. E.

    1985-01-01

    The synthesis of resins with terminal acetylene groups has provided a promising technology to yield high performance structural materials. Because these resins cure through an addition reaction, no volatile by-products are produced during the processing. The cured products have high thermal stability and good properties retention after exposure to humidity. Resins with a wide variety of different chemical structures between the terminal acetylene groups are synthesized and their mechanical properties studied. The ability of the acetylene cured polymers to give good mechanical properties is demonstrated by the resins with quinoxaline structures. Processibility of these resins can be manipulated by varying the chain length between the acetylene groups or by blending in different amounts of reactive deluents. Processing conditions similar to the state-of-the-art epoxy can be attained by using backbone structures like ether-sulfone or bis-phenol-A. The wide range of mechanical properties and processing conditions attainable by this class of resins should allow them to be used in a wide variety of applications.

  11. 40 CFR 414.50 - Applicability; description of the thermosetting resins subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... *Epoxy Resins *Fumaric Acid Polyesters *Furan Resins Glyoxal-Urea Formaldehyde Textile Resin *Ketone-Formaldehyde Resins *Melamine Resins *Phenolic Resins *Polyacetal Resins Polyacrylamide *Polyurethane Prepolymers *Polyurethane Resins *Urea Formaldehyde Resins *Urea Resins...

  12. 40 CFR 414.50 - Applicability; description of the thermosetting resins subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... *Epoxy Resins *Fumaric Acid Polyesters *Furan Resins Glyoxal-Urea Formaldehyde Textile Resin *Ketone-Formaldehyde Resins *Melamine Resins *Phenolic Resins *Polyacetal Resins Polyacrylamide *Polyurethane Prepolymers *Polyurethane Resins *Urea Formaldehyde Resins *Urea Resins...

  13. 40 CFR 414.50 - Applicability; description of the thermosetting resins subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... *Epoxy Resins *Fumaric Acid Polyesters *Furan Resins Glyoxal-Urea Formaldehyde Textile Resin *Ketone-Formaldehyde Resins *Melamine Resins *Phenolic Resins *Polyacetal Resins Polyacrylamide *Polyurethane Prepolymers *Polyurethane Resins *Urea Formaldehyde Resins *Urea Resins...

  14. 40 CFR 414.50 - Applicability; description of the thermosetting resins subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... *Epoxy Resins *Fumaric Acid Polyesters *Furan Resins Glyoxal-Urea Formaldehyde Textile Resin *Ketone-Formaldehyde Resins *Melamine Resins *Phenolic Resins *Polyacetal Resins Polyacrylamide *Polyurethane Prepolymers *Polyurethane Resins *Urea Formaldehyde Resins *Urea Resins...

  15. Spectroscopic and mechanical properties of dental resin composites cured with different light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conti, C.; Giorgini, E.; Landi, L.; Putignano, A.; Tosi, Giorgio

    2005-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of polymerization in order to achieve an adequate clinical composite filling. Photopolymerization of new micro matrix restorative resin composite, Esthet-x, shade A3, from Dentsply Corp., was performed with plasma xenon, halogen and light emitting diode (LED) lamps. The degree of conversion (DC) of the resins was determined by means of middle, near infrared and Raman spectroscopy in transmittance and in DRIFT modes. The resin conversion was influenced by the nature of the light source, the distance from the irradiated surface, the exposure time and the depth from the surface. High DC values were obtained with all lamps but they resulted almost constant with the depth only in the LED unit. Micro-hardness and differential thermal analysis were in satisfactory agreement with DC data.

  16. Graphite fiber reinforced thermoplastic resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novak, R. C.

    1975-01-01

    Mechanical properties of neat resin samples and graphite fiber reinforced samples of thermoplastic resins were characterized with particular emphasis directed to the effects of environmental exposure (humidity, temperature and ultraviolet radiation). Tensile, flexural, interlaminar shear, creep and impact strengths were measured for polysulfone, polyarylsulfone and a state-of-the-art epoxy resin samples. In general, the thermoplastic resins exhibited environmental degradation resistance equal to or superior to the reference epoxy resin. Demonstration of the utility and quality of a graphite/thermoplastic resin system was accomplished by successfully thermoforming a simulated compressor blade and a fan exit guide vane.

  17. Influence of irradiance on Knoop hardness, degree of conversion, and polymerization shrinkage of nanofilled and microhybrid composite resins.

    PubMed

    Fugolin, Ana Paula Piovezan; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenço; Correr, Américo Bortolazzo; Sinhoreti, Mário Alexandre Coelho; Guiraldo, Ricardo Danil; Consani, Simonides

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of the irradiance emitted by a light-curing unit on microhardness, degree of conversion (DC), and gaps resulting from shrinkage of 2 dental composite resins. Cylinders of nanofilled and microhybrid composites were fabricated and light cured. After 24 hours, the tops and bottoms of the specimens were evaluated via indentation testing and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy to determine Knoop hardness number (KHN) and DC, respectively. Gap width (representing polymerization shrinkage) was measured under a scanning electron microscope. The nanofilled composite specimens presented significantly greater KHNs than did the microhybrid specimens (P < 0.05). The microhybrid composite resin exhibited significantly greater DC and gap width than the nanofilled material (P < 0.05). Irradiance had a mostly material-dependent influence on the hardness and DC, but not the polymerization shrinkage, of composite resins. PMID:26943085

  18. Radiation-Tolerant DC-DC Converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skutt, Glenn; Sable, Dan; Leslie, Leonard; Graham, Shawn

    2012-01-01

    A document discusses power converters suitable for space use that meet the DSCC MIL-PRF-38534 Appendix G radiation hardness level P classification. A method for qualifying commercially produced electronic parts for DC-DC converters per the Defense Supply Center Columbus (DSCC) radiation hardened assurance requirements was developed. Development and compliance testing of standard hybrid converters suitable for space use were completed for missions with total dose radiation requirements of up to 30 kRad. This innovation provides the same overall performance as standard hybrid converters, but includes assurance of radiation- tolerant design through components and design compliance testing. This availability of design-certified radiation-tolerant converters can significantly reduce total cost and delivery time for power converters for space applications that fit the appropriate DSCC classification (30 kRad).

  19. Forback DC-to-DC converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukemire, Alan T.

    1993-03-01

    A pulse-width modulated DC-to-DC power converter including a first inductor, i.e. a transformer or an equivalent fixed inductor equal to the inductance of the secondary winding of the transformer, coupled across a source of DC input voltage via a transistor switch which is rendered alternately conductive (ON) and nonconductive (OFF) in accordance with a signal from a feedback control circuit is described. A first capacitor capacitively couples one side of the first inductor to a second inductor which is connected to a second capacitor which is coupled to the other side of the first inductor. A circuit load shunts the second capacitor. A semiconductor diode is additionally coupled from a common circuit connection between the first capacitor and the second inductor to the other side of the first inductor. A current sense transformer generating a current feedback signal for the switch control circuit is directly coupled in series with the other side of the first inductor so that the first capacitor, the second inductor and the current sense transformer are connected in series through the first inductor. The inductance values of the first and second inductors, moreover, are made identical. Such a converter topology results in a simultaneous voltsecond balance in the first inductance and ampere-second balance in the current sense transformer.

  20. Forback DC-to-DC converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukemire, Alan T.

    1995-05-01

    A pulse-width modulated DC-to-DC power converter including a first inductor, i.e. a transformer or an equivalent fixed inductor equal to the inductance of the secondary winding of the transformer, coupled across a source of DC input voltage via a transistor switch which is rendered alternately conductive (ON) and nonconductive (OFF) in accordance with a signal from a feedback control circuit is described. A first capacitor capacitively couples one side of the first inductor to a second inductor which is connected to a second capacitor which is coupled to the other side of the first inductor. A circuit load shunts the second capacitor. A semiconductor diode is additionally coupled from a common circuit connection between the first capacitor and the second inductor to the other side of the first inductor. A current sense transformer generating a current feedback signal for the switch control circuit is directly coupled in series with the other side of the first inductor so that the first capacitor, the second inductor and the current sense transformer are connected in series through the first inductor. The inductance values of the first and second inductors, moreover, are made identical. Such a converter topology results in a simultaneous voltsecond balance in the first inductance and ampere-second balance in the current sense transformer.

  1. Forback DC-to-DC converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lukemire, Alan T. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A pulse-width modulated DC-to-DC power converter including a first inductor, i.e. a transformer or an equivalent fixed inductor equal to the inductance of the secondary winding of the transformer, coupled across a source of DC input voltage via a transistor switch which is rendered alternately conductive (ON) and nonconductive (OFF) in accordance with a signal from a feedback control circuit is described. A first capacitor capacitively couples one side of the first inductor to a second inductor which is connected to a second capacitor which is coupled to the other side of the first inductor. A circuit load shunts the second capacitor. A semiconductor diode is additionally coupled from a common circuit connection between the first capacitor and the second inductor to the other side of the first inductor. A current sense transformer generating a current feedback signal for the switch control circuit is directly coupled in series with the other side of the first inductor so that the first capacitor, the second inductor and the current sense transformer are connected in series through the first inductor. The inductance values of the first and second inductors, moreover, are made identical. Such a converter topology results in a simultaneous voltsecond balance in the first inductance and ampere-second balance in the current sense transformer.

  2. Degradation of resin composites in a simulated deep cavity.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Luana; Amaral, Cristiane Mariote; Poskus, Laiza Tatiana; Guimarães, José Guilherme Antunes; Silva, Eduardo Moreira da

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the sorption and solubility of a nanofilled (Filtek Z350) and a midifilled (Filtek P60) resin composite in oral environment-like substances, in a simulated deep cavity. A cylindrical cavity prepared in a bovine incisor root was incrementally filled with resin composites. The obtained resin composite cylinders were cut perpendicularly to the axis to obtain 1-mm-thick discs that were divided into fifteen groups (n=5) according to depth (1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 mm) and immersion media (distilled water - DW, artificial saliva - AS and lactic acid - LA). The sorption and solubility were calculated based on ISO 4049:2000. Additionally, the degree of conversion (DC%) was calculated by FT-IR spectroscopy. Data were analyzed using multifactor analysis of variance (MANOVA) followed by Tukey's HSD post-hoc test and linear regression analysis (a=0.05). The DC% was higher for the midifilled resin composite and was negatively influenced by cavity depth (p<0.05). The nanofilled resin composite presented higher sorption and solubility than did the midifilled (p<0.05). The immersion media influenced the sorption and the solubility as follows: LA>AS>DW, (p<0.05). Both phenomena were influenced by cavity depth, with the sorption and solubility increasing from 1 to 5 mm (p<0.05). The degradation of resin composite restorations may be greater in the deepest regions of class II restorations when the composite is exposed to organic acids present in the oral biofilm (lactic acid). PMID:25590201

  3. Method for removing contaminants from plastic resin

    DOEpatents

    Bohnert, George W.; Hand, Thomas E.; DeLaurentiis, Gary M.

    2008-12-09

    A resin recycling method that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material in an environmentally safe and economical manner. The method includes receiving the resin in container form. The containers are then ground into resin particles. The particles are exposed to a solvent, the solvent contacting the resin particles and substantially removing contaminants on the resin particles. After separating the particles and the resin, a solvent removing agent is used to remove any residual solvent remaining on the resin particles after separation.

  4. Cytotoxicity of dental resin composites: an in vitro evaluation.

    PubMed

    Ausiello, Pietro; Cassese, Angela; Miele, Claudia; Beguinot, Francesco; Garcia-Godoy, Franklin; Di Jeso, Bruno; Ulianich, Luca

    2013-06-01

    Resin-based dental restorative materials release residual monomers that may affect the vitality of pulp cells. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the cytotoxic effect of two light-cured restorative materials with and without bis-GMA resin, respectively (Clearfil Majesty Posterior and Clearfil Majesty Flow) and a self-curing one (Clearfil DC Core Automix) when applied to the fibroblast cell line NIH-3T3. Samples of the materials were light-cured and placed directly in contact to cells for 24, 48, 72 and 96 h. Cytotoxicity was evaluated by measuring cell death by flow cytometry, cell proliferation by proliferation curves analysis and morphological changes by optical microscopy analysis. All the composite materials tested caused a decrease in cell proliferation, albeit at different degrees. However, only Clearfil DC Core Automix induced cell death, very likely by increasing apoptosis. Morphological alteration of treated cells was also evident, particularly in the Clearfil DC Core Automix-treated cells. The different cytotoxic effects of dental composites should be considered when selecting an appropriate resin-based dental restorative material for operative restorations.

  5. Phosphonic acid based exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Alexandratos, S.D.; Gatrone, R.C.; Chiarizia, R.

    1995-09-12

    An ion exchange resin is described for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene diphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene. 10 figs.

  6. Phosphonic acid based exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Alexandratos, Spiro D.; Gatrone, Ralph C.; Chiarizia, Ronato

    1995-01-01

    An ion exchange resin for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene diphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene.

  7. Intelligent dc-dc Converter Technology Developed and Tested

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Button, Robert M.

    2001-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center and the Cleveland State University have developed a digitally controlled dc-dc converter to research the benefits of flexible, digital control on power electronics and systems. Initial research and testing has shown that conventional dc-dc converters can benefit from improved performance by using digital-signal processors and nonlinear control algorithms.

  8. Adsorption of three pharmaceuticals on two magnetic ion-exchange resins.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Miao; Yang, Weiben; Zhang, Ziwei; Yang, Zhen; Wang, Yuping

    2015-05-01

    The presence of pharmaceuticals in aquatic environments poses potential risks to the ecology and human health. This study investigated the removal of three widely detected and abundant pharmaceuticals, namely, ibuprofen (IBU), diclofenac (DC), and sulfadiazine (SDZ), by two magnetic ion-exchange resins. The adsorption kinetics of the three adsorbates onto both resins was relatively fast and followed pseudo-second-order kinetics. Despite the different pore structures of the two resins, similar adsorption patterns of DC and SDZ were observed, implying the existence of an ion-exchange mechanism. IBU demonstrated a combination of interactions during the adsorption process. These interactions were dependent on the specific surface area and functional groups of the resin. The adsorption isotherm fittings verified the differences in the behavior of the three pharmaceuticals on the two magnetic ion-exchange resins. The presence of Cl- and SO4(2-) suppressed the adsorption amount, but with different inhibition levels for different adsorbates. This work facilitates the understanding of the adsorption behavior and mechanism of pharmaceuticals on magnetic ion-exchange resins. The results will expand the application of magnetic ion-exchange resins to the removal of pharmaceuticals in waters.

  9. Preparation and evaluation of dental resin with antibacterial and radio-opaque functions.

    PubMed

    He, Jingwei; Söderling, Eva; Vallittu, Pekka K; Lassila, Lippo V J

    2013-03-07

    In order to prepare antibacterial and radio-opaque dental resin, a methacrylate monomer named 2-Dimethyl-2-dodecyl-1-methacryloxyethyl ammonium iodine (DDMAI) with both antibacterial and radio-opaque activities was added into a 2,2-bis[4-(2-hydroxy-3-methacryloyloxypropyl)-phenyl]propane (Bis-GMA)/methyl methacrylate (MMA) dental resin system. Degree of conversion (DC), flexural strength (FS) and modulus (FM), water sorption (WS) and solubility (WSL), antibacterial activity, and radio-opacity (ROX) of the obtained dental resin system were investigated. Bis-GMA/MMA resin system without DDMAI was used as a control. The results showed that DDMAI could endow BIS-GMA/MMA resin system with good antibacterial (p < 0.05) and radio-opaque function without influencing the DC (p > 0.05). However, incorporating DDMAI into Bis-GMA/MMA resin could reduce mechanical properties (p < 0.05) and increase WS and WSL (p < 0.05), thus further work is needed in order to optimize the resin formulation.

  10. Resin impregnation process for producing a resin-fiber composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Raymond J. (Inventor); Moore, William E. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    Process for vacuum impregnation of a dry fiber reinforcement with a curable resin to produce a resin-fiber composite, by drawing a vacuum to permit flow of curable liquid resin into and through a fiber reinforcement to impregnate same and curing the resin-impregnated fiber reinforcement at a sufficient temperature and pressure to effect final curing. Both vacuum and positive pressure, e.g. autoclave pressure, are applied to the dry fiber reinforcement prior to application of heat and prior to any resin flow to compact the dry fiber reinforcement, and produce a resin-fiber composite of reduced weight, thickness and resin content, and improved mechanical properties. Preferably both a vacuum and positive pressure, e.g. autoclave pressure, are also applied during final curing.

  11. Nontoxic Resins Advance Aerospace Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    The 2008 NASA Commercial Invention of the Year, PETI-330, is a polyimide matrix resin that performs well at high temperatures and is easily processed into composites in a simple, short curing cycle. Invented by scientists at Langley Research Center, PETI-330 is now licensed to Ube Industries, based in Japan with its American headquarters in New York. In addition to being durable and lightweight, the resin is also nontoxic, which makes it safe for workers to handle. PETI-330 was created specifically for heat-resistant composites formed with resin transfer molding and resin infusion, which formerly could only be used with low temperature resin systems.

  12. RISK D/C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dias, W. C.

    1994-01-01

    RISK D/C is a prototype program which attempts to do program risk modeling for the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) architectures proposed in the Synthesis Group Report. Risk assessment is made with respect to risk events, their probabilities, and the severities of potential results. The program allows risk mitigation strategies to be proposed for an exploration program architecture and to be ranked with respect to their effectiveness. RISK D/C allows for the fact that risk assessment in early planning phases is subjective. Although specific to the SEI in its present form, RISK D/C can be used as a framework for developing a risk assessment program for other specific uses. RISK D/C is organized into files, or stacks, of information, including the architecture, the hazard, and the risk event stacks. Although predefined, all stacks can be upgraded by a user. The architecture stack contains information concerning the general program alternatives, which are subsequently broken down into waypoints, missions, and mission phases. The hazard stack includes any background condition which could result in a risk event. A risk event is anything unfavorable that could happen during the course of a specific point within an architecture, and the risk event stack provides the probabilities, consequences, severities, and any mitigation strategies which could be used to reduce the risk of the event, and how much the risk is reduced. RISK D/C was developed for Macintosh series computers. It requires HyperCard 2.0 or later, as well as 2Mb of RAM and System 6.0.8 or later. A Macintosh II series computer is recommended due to speed concerns. The standard distribution medium for this package is one 3.5 inch 800K Macintosh format diskette. RISK D/C was developed in 1991 and is a copyrighted work with all copyright vested in NASA. Macintosh and HyperCard are trademarks of Apple Computer, Inc.

  13. DC Breakdown Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Calatroni, S.; Descoeudres, A.; Levinsen, Y.; Taborelli, M.; Wuensch, W.

    2009-01-22

    In the context of the CLIC (Compact Linear Collider) project investigations of DC breakdown in ultra high vacuum are carried out in parallel with high power RF tests. From the point of view of saturation breakdown field the best material tested so far is stainless steel, followed by titanium. Copper shows a four times weaker breakdown field than stainless steel. The results indicate clearly that the breakdown events are initiated by field emission current and that the breakdown field is limited by the cathode. In analogy to RF, the breakdown probability has been measured in DC and the data show similar behaviour as a function of electric field.

  14. DC attenuation meter

    DOEpatents

    Hargrove, Douglas L.

    2004-09-14

    A portable, hand-held meter used to measure direct current (DC) attenuation in low impedance electrical signal cables and signal attenuators. A DC voltage is applied to the signal input of the cable and feedback to the control circuit through the signal cable and attenuators. The control circuit adjusts the applied voltage to the cable until the feedback voltage equals the reference voltage. The "units" of applied voltage required at the cable input is the system attenuation value of the cable and attenuators, which makes this meter unique. The meter may be used to calibrate data signal cables, attenuators, and cable-attenuator assemblies.

  15. Correlation between clinical performance and degree of conversion of resin cements: a literature review

    PubMed Central

    DE SOUZA, Grace; BRAGA, Roberto Ruggiero; CESAR, Paulo Francisco; LOPES, Guilherme Carpena

    2015-01-01

    Resin-based cements have been frequently employed in clinical practice to lute indirect restorations. However, there are numerous factors that may compromise the clinical performance of those cements. The aim of this literature review is to present and discuss some of the clinical factors that may affect the performance of current resin-based luting systems. Resin cements may have three different curing mechanisms: chemical curing, photo curing or a combination of both. Chemically cured systems are recommended to be used under opaque or thick restorations, due to the reduced access of the light. Photo-cured cements are mainly indicated for translucent veneers, due to the possibility of light transmission through the restoration. Dual-cured are more versatile systems and, theoretically, can be used in either situation, since the presence of both curing mechanisms might guarantee a high degree of conversion (DC) under every condition. However, it has been demonstrated that clinical procedures and characteristics of the materials may have many different implications in the DC of currently available resin cements, affecting their mechanical properties, bond strength to the substrate and the esthetic results of the restoration. Factors such as curing mechanism, choice of adhesive system, indirect restorative material and light-curing device may affect the degree of conversion of the cement and, therefore, have an effect on the clinical performance of resin-based cements. Specific measures are to be taken to ensure a higher DC of the luting system to be used. PMID:26398507

  16. Correlation between clinical performance and degree of conversion of resin cements: a literature review.

    PubMed

    De Souza, Grace; Braga, Roberto Ruggiero; Cesar, Paulo Francisco; Lopes, Guilherme Carpena

    2015-01-01

    Resin-based cements have been frequently employed in clinical practice to lute indirect restorations. However, there are numerous factors that may compromise the clinical performance of those cements. The aim of this literature review is to present and discuss some of the clinical factors that may affect the performance of current resin-based luting systems. Resin cements may have three different curing mechanisms: chemical curing, photo curing or a combination of both. Chemically cured systems are recommended to be used under opaque or thick restorations, due to the reduced access of the light. Photo-cured cements are mainly indicated for translucent veneers, due to the possibility of light transmission through the restoration. Dual-cured are more versatile systems and, theoretically, can be used in either situation, since the presence of both curing mechanisms might guarantee a high degree of conversion (DC) under every condition. However, it has been demonstrated that clinical procedures and characteristics of the materials may have many different implications in the DC of currently available resin cements, affecting their mechanical properties, bond strength to the substrate and the esthetic results of the restoration. Factors such as curing mechanism, choice of adhesive system, indirect restorative material and light-curing device may affect the degree of conversion of the cement and, therefore, have an effect on the clinical performance of resin-based cements. Specific measures are to be taken to ensure a higher DC of the luting system to be used.

  17. Correlation between clinical performance and degree of conversion of resin cements: a literature review.

    PubMed

    De Souza, Grace; Braga, Roberto Ruggiero; Cesar, Paulo Francisco; Lopes, Guilherme Carpena

    2015-01-01

    Resin-based cements have been frequently employed in clinical practice to lute indirect restorations. However, there are numerous factors that may compromise the clinical performance of those cements. The aim of this literature review is to present and discuss some of the clinical factors that may affect the performance of current resin-based luting systems. Resin cements may have three different curing mechanisms: chemical curing, photo curing or a combination of both. Chemically cured systems are recommended to be used under opaque or thick restorations, due to the reduced access of the light. Photo-cured cements are mainly indicated for translucent veneers, due to the possibility of light transmission through the restoration. Dual-cured are more versatile systems and, theoretically, can be used in either situation, since the presence of both curing mechanisms might guarantee a high degree of conversion (DC) under every condition. However, it has been demonstrated that clinical procedures and characteristics of the materials may have many different implications in the DC of currently available resin cements, affecting their mechanical properties, bond strength to the substrate and the esthetic results of the restoration. Factors such as curing mechanism, choice of adhesive system, indirect restorative material and light-curing device may affect the degree of conversion of the cement and, therefore, have an effect on the clinical performance of resin-based cements. Specific measures are to be taken to ensure a higher DC of the luting system to be used. PMID:26398507

  18. Distance and protective barrier effects on the composite resin degree of conversion

    PubMed Central

    Coutinho, Margareth; Trevizam, Natália Carvalho; Takayassu, Renata Nakase; Leme, Ariene Arcas; Soares, Giulliana Panfiglio

    2013-01-01

    Context: The food wrap films are used to cover the tip of curing light units in order to avoid contamination and prevent damage to the light guide. However, their effects on resin polymerization are not fully known. Aims: We investigated the effects on restoration efficiency of a food wrap protective barrier used on the tip of curing light units. Materials and Methods: For each treatment, five replications were performed, a total of 60 bovine incisor. The degree of conversion (%DC) of restorations with the composite resin Opallis EA2 was evaluated using 3 curing light devices (Optilux 501, Optilight and Ultra LED) and 2 curing distances (0 and 5 mm). The composite resin was tested for restoration of cavities in bovine crowns. %DC values were measured by the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy-attenuated total reflectance technique. Statistical Analysis Used: The data were analyzed using 3-way ANOVA and Tukey's test. Results: Use of the protective film lowered %DC (F = 4.13; P = 0.05), and the effects of curing distance were associated to the curing light device (F = 3.61; P = 0.03). Conclusions: The distance from the light curing tip and use of a translucent protective barrier on the light-cure device can both impair composite resin %DC. PMID:24015001

  19. Synthesis and characterization of new dimethacrylate monomer and its application in dental resin.

    PubMed

    He, Jingwei; Liu, Fang; Vallittu, Pekka K; Lassila, Lippo V J

    2013-01-01

    In this study, a dimethacrylate monomer, 1,4-Bis[2-(4-(2'-hydroxy-3'-methacryloyloxy-propoxy)phenyl)-2propyl]benzene (BMPPB) was synthesized to replace 2,2-bis[4-(2'-hydroxyl-3'-methacryloyloxy-propoxy)phenyl]propane (Bis-GMA) as one component of dental restorative materials. The structure of BMPPB and its intermediate product 1,4-bis[2-(4-(oxiranylmethoxy)phenyl)-2propyl]benzene (BOPPB) were confirmed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-NMR), and elemental analysis. In order to evaluate the possibility of replacing Bis-GMA with BMPPB in dental resin, double bond conversion (DC), polymerization shrinkage, contact angle, water sorption (WS) and solubility (SL), and flexural strength (FS) and modulus of BMPPB/tri(ethylene glycol)dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) (50/50 wt) resin system and Bis-GMA/BMPPB/TEGDMA (25/25/50 wt) resin system were studied. Commercially used Bis-GMA/TEGDMA (50/50 wt) dental resin system was used as reference. The results showed that BMPPB-contained copolymer had higher DC, higher WS and SL than the copolymer that only contained Bis-GMA (p<0.05). All of the copolymers had nearly the same contact angle (p>0.05). BMPPB/TEGDMA resin system had lower polymerization shrinkage, higher FS and modulus (p<0.05) than Bis-GMA/TEGDMA resin system. There was no significant difference on polymerization shrinkage, FS and modulus (p>0.05) between Bis-GMA/BMPPB/TEGDMA resin system and Bis-GMA/TEGDMA resin system. Before and after water immersion, both FS and modulus of every copolymer did not change significantly (p>0.05). Therefore, BMPPB had potential to be used to replace Bis-GMA as base resin in dental restorative materials, but many studies should be undertaken further.

  20. DYLOS DC110

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Dylos DC1100 air quality monitor measures particulate matter (PM) to provide a continuous assessment of indoor air quality. The unit counts particles in two size ranges: large and small. According to the manufacturer, large particles have diameters between 2.5 and 10 micromet...

  1. DC arc weld starter

    DOEpatents

    Campiotti, Richard H.; Hopwood, James E.

    1990-01-01

    A system for starting an arc for welding uses three DC power supplies, a high voltage supply for initiating the arc, an intermediate voltage supply for sustaining the arc, and a low voltage welding supply directly connected across the gap after the high voltage supply is disconnected.

  2. DC-DC powering for the CMS pixel upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feld, Lutz; Fleck, Martin; Friedrichs, Marcel; Hensch, Richard; Karpinski, Waclaw; Klein, Katja; Rittich, David; Sammet, Jan; Wlochal, Michael

    2013-12-01

    The CMS experiment plans to replace its silicon pixel detector with a new one with improved rate capability and an additional detection layer at the end of 2016. In order to cope with the increased number of detector modules the new pixel detector will be powered via DC-DC converters close to the sensitive detector volume. This paper reviews the DC-DC powering scheme and reports on the ongoing R&D program to develop converters for the pixel upgrade. Design choices are discussed and results from the electrical and thermal characterisation of converter prototypes are shown. An emphasis is put on system tests with up to 24 converters. The performance of pixel modules powered by DC-DC converters is compared to conventional powering. The integration of the DC-DC powering scheme into the pixel detector is described and system design issues are reviewed.

  3. Flame Retardant Epoxy Resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, C. M.; Smith, J. G., Jr.; Connell, J. W.; Hergenrother, P. M.; Lyon, R. E.

    2004-01-01

    As part of a program to develop fire resistant exterior composite structures for future subsonic commercial aircraft, flame retardant epoxy resins are under investigation. Epoxies and their curing agents (aromatic diamines) containing phosphorus were synthesized and used to prepare epoxy formulations. Phosphorus was incorporated within the backbone of the epoxy resin and not used as an additive. The resulting cured epoxies were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis, propane torch test, elemental analysis and microscale combustion calorimetry. Several formulations showed excellent flame retardation with phosphorous contents as low as 1.5% by weight. The fracture toughness of plaques of several cured formulations was determined on single-edge notched bend specimens. The chemistry and properties of these new epoxy formulations are discussed.

  4. System for removing contaminants from plastic resin

    DOEpatents

    Bohnert, George W.; Hand, Thomas E.; DeLaurentiis, Gary M.

    2010-11-23

    A resin recycling system that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material in an environmentally safe and economical manner. The system includes receiving the resin in container form. A grinder grinds the containers into resin particles. The particles are exposed to a solvent in one or more solvent wash vessels, the solvent contacting the resin particles and substantially removing contaminants on the resin particles. A separator is used to separate the resin particles and the solvent. The resin particles are then placed in solvent removing element where they are exposed to a solvent removing agent which removes any residual solvent remaining on the resin particles after separation.

  5. Indirect posterior composite resins.

    PubMed

    Leinfelder, Karl F

    2005-07-01

    The use of indirect posterior composite restorations has facilitated the generation of ideal anatomic form, marginal adaptation, and appropriate proximal contact and contour. Unfortunately, however, the use of post-cure heat treatments has done little to enhance the overall clinical performance of the restoration. The development of new curing techniques in conjunction with modifications of the formulae have contributed to a substantial improvement in both the mechanical characteristics and long-term clinical performance of indirect posterior composite resins.

  6. Synthesis of a liquid-crystalline resin monomer with the property of low shrinkage polymerization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenwen; Chen, Su; Liu, Yiran; Ma, Yuanping; Wang, Na; Zhang, Zhenting; Yang, Yuzhe

    2013-01-01

    To reduce the polymerization shrinkage of the dental resin composites, a new liquid-crystalline resin monomer was developed. The acrylate liquid crystalline resin monomer (ALCRM), (4-3-(acryloyloxy)-2-hydroxypropoxy) phenyl 4-(3-(acryloyloxy)-2-hydroxypropoxy) benzoate, was synthesized by a three-step method. Using the ALCRM as the main monomer, the degree of conversion (DC) and the volume shrinkage of the resin matrix were compared with the traditional composite resin monomer (Bis-GMA), 2,2-bis[4-(2-hydroxy-3-methacryloyloxy-propoxy)-phenyl] propane. The new monomer showed liquid crystalline characteristics with a mesomorphic phasetransition temperature between 18ºC and 42ºC. When copolymerized with triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) at a weight ratio of 7:3, the DC of ALCRM was higher and the volume shrinkage was 3.62±0.26%, which was less than that of the Bis-GMA. The ALCRM exhibits promising potential for the development of superior dental resins with low volume shrinkage.

  7. Early Oscillation Detection for DC/DC Converter Fault Diagnosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Bright L.

    2011-01-01

    The electrical power system of a spacecraft plays a very critical role for space mission success. Such a modern power system may contain numerous hybrid DC/DC converters both inside the power system electronics (PSE) units and onboard most of the flight electronics modules. One of the faulty conditions for DC/DC converter that poses serious threats to mission safety is the random occurrence of oscillation related to inherent instability characteristics of the DC/DC converters and design deficiency of the power systems. To ensure the highest reliability of the power system, oscillations in any form shall be promptly detected during part level testing, system integration tests, flight health monitoring, and on-board fault diagnosis. The popular gain/phase margin analysis method is capable of predicting stability levels of DC/DC converters, but it is limited only to verification of designs and to part-level testing on some of the models. This method has to inject noise signals into the control loop circuitry as required, thus, interrupts the DC/DC converter's normal operation and increases risks of degrading and damaging the flight unit. A novel technique to detect oscillations at early stage for flight hybrid DC/DC converters was developed.

  8. Advanced thermoplastic resins, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, C. L.; Hill, S. G.; Falcone, A.; Gerken, N. T.

    1991-01-01

    Eight thermoplastic polyimide resin systems were evaluated as composite matrix materials. Two resins were selected for more extensive mechanical testing and both were versions of LaRC-TPI (Langley Research Center - Thermoplastic Polyimide). One resin was made with LaRC-TPI and contained 2 weight percent of a di(amic acid) dopant as a melt flow aid. The second system was a 1:1 slurry of semicrystalline LaRC-TPI powder in a polyimidesulfone resin diglyme solution. The LaRC-TPI powder melts during processing and increases the melt flow of the resin. Testing included dynamic mechanical analysis, tension and compression testing, and compression-after-impact testing. The test results demonstrated that the LaRC-TPI resins have very good properties compared to other thermoplastics, and that they are promising matrix materials for advanced composite structures.

  9. Vitrification of ion exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Cicero-Herman, Connie A.; Workman, Rhonda Jackson

    2001-01-01

    The present invention relates to vitrification of ion exchange resins that have become loaded with hazardous or radioactive wastes, in a way that produces a homogenous and durable waste form and reduces the disposal volume of the resin. The methods of the present invention involve directly adding borosilicate glass formers and an oxidizer to the ion exchange resin and heating the mixture at sufficient temperature to produce homogeneous glass.

  10. Dry PMR-15 Resin Powders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vannucci, Raymond D.; Roberts, Gary D.

    1988-01-01

    Shelf lives of PMR-15 polymides lengthened. Procedure involves quenching of monomer reactions by vacuum drying of PRM-15 resin solutions at 70 to 90 degree F immediately after preparation of solutions. Absence of solvent eliminates formation of higher esters and reduces formation of imides to negligible level. Provides fully-formulated dry PMR-15 resin powder readily dissolvable in solvent at room temperature immediately before use. Resins used in variety of aerospace, aeronautical, and commercial applications.

  11. Preparation and characterization of Bis-GMA free dental resin system with synthesized dimethacrylate monomer TDDMMA derived from tricyclo[5.2.1.0(2,6)]-decanedimethanol.

    PubMed

    Yin, Mei; Liu, Fang; He, Jingwei

    2016-04-01

    As a substitute for 2,2-bis[4-(2-hydroxy-3- methacryloxypropoxy)phenyl] propane (Bis-GMA) in dental materials, a new dimethacrylate monomer TDDMMA without bisphenol-A structure was synthesized through the reaction between tricyclo[5.2.1.0(2,6)]- decanedimethanol and 2-isocyanatoethyl methacrylate. The TDDMMA was mixed with triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) to prepare Bis-GMA free dental resin. Physicochemical properties, such as double bond conversion (DC), polymerization shrinkage (VS), water sorption (WS) and solubility (SL), flexural strength (FS) and modulus (FM) and fracture energy of TDDMMA/TEGDMA resin system were investigated. Bis-GMA/TEGDMA resin system was used as a control. The results showed that, compared with Bis-GMA/TEGDMA resin system, TDDMMA/TEGDMA resin system had comparable VS and several advantages like higher DC, lower SL and better mechanical properties after water immersion. PMID:26717250

  12. Preparation and characterization of Bis-GMA free dental resin system with synthesized dimethacrylate monomer TDDMMA derived from tricyclo[5.2.1.0(2,6)]-decanedimethanol.

    PubMed

    Yin, Mei; Liu, Fang; He, Jingwei

    2016-04-01

    As a substitute for 2,2-bis[4-(2-hydroxy-3- methacryloxypropoxy)phenyl] propane (Bis-GMA) in dental materials, a new dimethacrylate monomer TDDMMA without bisphenol-A structure was synthesized through the reaction between tricyclo[5.2.1.0(2,6)]- decanedimethanol and 2-isocyanatoethyl methacrylate. The TDDMMA was mixed with triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) to prepare Bis-GMA free dental resin. Physicochemical properties, such as double bond conversion (DC), polymerization shrinkage (VS), water sorption (WS) and solubility (SL), flexural strength (FS) and modulus (FM) and fracture energy of TDDMMA/TEGDMA resin system were investigated. Bis-GMA/TEGDMA resin system was used as a control. The results showed that, compared with Bis-GMA/TEGDMA resin system, TDDMMA/TEGDMA resin system had comparable VS and several advantages like higher DC, lower SL and better mechanical properties after water immersion.

  13. Phosphorus-containing bisimide resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varma, I. K.; Fohlen, G. M.; Parker, J. A. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    The production of fire-resistant resins particularly useful for making laminates with inorganic fibers such as graphite fibers is discussed. The resins are by (1) condensation of an ethylenically unsaturated cyclic anhydride with a bis(diaminophenyl) phosphine oxide, and (2) by addition polymerization of the bisimide so obtained. Up to about 50%, on a molar basis, of benzophenonetetracarboxylic acid anhydride can be substituted for some of the cyclic anhydride to alter the properties of the products. Graphite cloth laminates made with these resins show 800 C char yields greater than 70% by weight in nitrogen. Limiting oxygen indexes of more than 100% are determined for these resins.

  14. Bond strength between acrylic resin and maxillofacial silicone

    PubMed Central

    HADDAD, Marcela Filié; GOIATO, Marcelo Coelho; dos SANTOS, Daniela Micheline; CREPALDI, Nádia de Marchi; PESQUEIRA, Aldiéris Alves; BANNWART, Lisiane Cristina

    2012-01-01

    The development of implant dentistry improved the possibilities of rehabilitation with maxillofacial prosthesis. However, clinically it is difficult to bond the silicone to the attachment system. Objectives This study aimed to evaluate the effect of an adhesive system on the bond strength between acrylic resin and facial silicone. Material and Methods A total of 120 samples were fabricated with auto-polymerized acrylic resin and MDX 4-4210 facial silicone. Both materials were bonded through mechanical retentions and/or application of primers (DC 1205 primer and Sofreliner primer S) and adhesive (Silastic Medical Adhesive Type A) or not (control group). Samples were divided into 12 groups according to the method used to attach the silicone to the acrylic resin. All samples were subjected to a T-peel test in a universal testing machine. Failures were classified as adhesive, cohesive or mixed. The data were evaluated by the analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the Tukey's HSD test (α=.05). Results The highest bond strength values (5.95 N/mm; 3.07 N/mm; 4.75 N/mm) were recorded for the samples that received a Sofreliner primer application. These values were significantly higher when the samples had no scratches and did not receive the application of Silastic Medical Adhesive Type A. Conclusions The most common type of failure was adhesive. The use of Sofreliner primer increased the bond strength between the auto-polymerized acrylic resin and the Silastic MDX 4-4210 facial silicone. PMID:23329247

  15. Imide modified epoxy matrix resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scola, D. A.; Pater, R. H.

    1981-01-01

    High char yield epoxy using novel bisimide amines (BIA's) as curing agents with a state of the art epoxy resin was developed. Stoichiometric quantities of the epoxy resin and the BIA's were studied to determine the cure cycle required for preparation of resin specimens. The bisimide cured epoxies were designated IME's (imide modified epoxy). The physical, thermal and mechanical properties of these novel resins were determined. The levels of moisture absorption exhibited by the bisimide amine cured expoxies (IME's) were considerably lower than the state of the art epoxies. The strain-to-failure of the control resin system was improved 25% by replacement of DDS with 6F-DDS. Each BIA containing resin exhibited twice the char yield of the control resin MY 720/DDS. Graphite fiber reinforced control (C) and IME resins were fabricated and characterized. Two of the composite systems showed superior properties compared to the other Celion 6000/IME composite systems and state of the art graphite epoxy systems. The two systems exhibited excellent wet shear and flexural strengths and moduli at 300 and 350 F.

  16. Auxiliary resonant DC tank converter

    DOEpatents

    Peng, Fang Z.

    2000-01-01

    An auxiliary resonant dc tank (ARDCT) converter is provided for achieving soft-switching in a power converter. An ARDCT circuit is coupled directly across a dc bus to the inverter to generate a resonant dc bus voltage, including upper and lower resonant capacitors connected in series as a resonant leg, first and second dc tank capacitors connected in series as a tank leg, and an auxiliary resonant circuit comprising a series combination of a resonant inductor and a pair of auxiliary switching devices. The ARDCT circuit further includes first clamping means for holding the resonant dc bus voltage to the dc tank voltage of the tank leg, and second clamping means for clamping the resonant dc bus voltage to zero during a resonant period. The ARDCT circuit resonantly brings the dc bus voltage to zero in order to provide a zero-voltage switching opportunity for the inverter, then quickly rebounds the dc bus voltage back to the dc tank voltage after the inverter changes state. The auxiliary switching devices are turned on and off under zero-current conditions. The ARDCT circuit only absorbs ripples of the inverter dc bus current, thus having less current stress. In addition, since the ARDCT circuit is coupled in parallel with the dc power supply and the inverter for merely assisting soft-switching of the inverter without participating in real dc power transmission and power conversion, malfunction and failure of the tank circuit will not affect the functional operation of the inverter; thus a highly reliable converter system is expected.

  17. Resin composite repair: Quantitative microleakage evaluation of resin-resin and resin-tooth interfaces with different surface treatments

    PubMed Central

    Celik, Cigdem; Cehreli, Sevi Burcak; Arhun, Neslihan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim was to evaluate the effect of different adhesive systems and surface treatments on the integrity of resin-resin and resin-tooth interfaces after partial removal of preexisting resin composites using quantitative image analysis for microleakage testing protocol. Materials and Methods: A total of 80 human molar teeth were restored with either of the resin composites (Filtek Z250/GrandioSO) occlusally. The teeth were thermocycled (1000×). Mesial and distal 1/3 parts of the restorations were removed out leaving only middle part. One side of the cavity was finished with course diamond bur and the other was air-abraded with 50 μm Al2O3. They were randomly divided into four groups (n = 10) to receive: Group 1: Adper Single Bond 2; Group 2: All Bond 3; Group 3: ClearfilSE; Group 4: BeautiBond, before being repaired with the same resin composite (Filtek Z250). The specimens were re-thermocycled (1000×), sealed with nail varnish, stained with 0.5% basic fuchsin, sectioned mesiodistally and photographed digitally. The extent of dye penetration was measured by image analysis software (ImageJ) for both bur-finished and air-abraded surfaces at resin-tooth and resin-resin interfaces. The data were analyzed statistically. Results: BeautiBond exhibited the most microleakage at every site. Irrespective of adhesive and initial composite type, air-abrasion showed less microleakage except for BeautiBond. The type of initial repaired restorative material did not affect the microleakage. BeautiBond adhesive may not be preferred in resin composite repair in terms of microleakage prevention. Conclusions: Surface treatment with air-abrasion produced the lowest microleakage scores, independent of the adhesive systems and the pre-existing resin composite type. Pre-existing composite type does not affect the microleakage issue. All-in-one adhesive resin (BeautiBond) may not be preferred in resin composite repair in terms of microleakage prevention. PMID:25713491

  18. High performance dc-dc conversion with voltage multipliers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrigill, W. T.; Myers, I. T.

    1974-01-01

    The voltage multipliers using capacitors and diodes first developed by Cockcroft and Walton in 1932 were reexamined in terms of state of the art fast switching transistors and diodes, and high energy density capacitors. Because of component improvements, the voltage multiplier, used without a transformer, now appears superior in weight to systems now in use for dc-dc conversion. An experimental 100-watt 1000-volt dc-dc converter operating at 100 kHz was built, with a component weight of about 1 kg/kW. Calculated and measured values of output voltage and efficiency agreed within experimental error.

  19. Improved DC Gun Insulator

    SciTech Connect

    M.L. Neubauer, K.B. Beard, R. Sah, C. Hernandez-Garcia, G. Neil

    2009-05-01

    Many user facilities such as synchrotron light sources and free electron lasers require accelerating structures that support electric fields of 10-100 MV/m, especially at the start of the accelerator chain where ceramic insulators are used for very high gradient DC guns. These insulators are difficult to manufacture, require long commissioning times, and have poor reliability, in part because energetic electrons bury themselves in the ceramic, creating a buildup of charge and causing eventual puncture. A novel ceramic manufacturing process is proposed. It will incorporate bulk resistivity in the region where it is needed to bleed off accumulated charge caused by highly energetic electrons. This process will be optimized to provide an appropriate gradient in bulk resistivity from the vacuum side to the air side of the HV standoff ceramic cylinder. A computer model will be used to determine the optimum cylinder dimensions and required resistivity gradient for an example RF gun application. A ceramic material example with resistivity gradient appropriate for use as a DC gun insulator will be fabricated by glazing using doping compounds and tested.

  20. [Acrylic resin removable partial dentures].

    PubMed

    de Baat, C; Witter, D J; Creugers, N H J

    2011-01-01

    An acrylic resin removable partial denture is distinguished from other types of removable partial dentures by an all-acrylic resin base which is, in principle, solely supported by the edentulous regions of the tooth arch and in the maxilla also by the hard palate. When compared to the other types of removable partial dentures, the acrylic resin removable partial denture has 3 favourable aspects: the economic aspect, its aesthetic quality and the ease with which it can be extended and adjusted. Disadvantages are an increased risk of caries developing, gingivitis, periodontal disease, denture stomatitis, alveolar bone reduction, tooth migration, triggering of the gag reflex and damage to the acrylic resin base. Present-day indications are ofa temporary or palliative nature or are motivated by economic factors. Special varieties of the acrylic resin removable partial denture are the spoon denture, the flexible denture fabricated of non-rigid acrylic resin, and the two-piece sectional denture. Furthermore, acrylic resin removable partial dentures can be supplied with clasps or reinforced by fibers or metal wires.

  1. 21 CFR 177.1655 - Polysulfone resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Polysulfone resins. 177.1655 Section 177.1655 Food... of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1655 Polysulfone resins. Polysulfone resins... purpose of this section, polysulfone resins are: (1)...

  2. 21 CFR 178.3930 - Terpene resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Terpene resins. 178.3930 Section 178.3930 Food and... and Production Aids § 178.3930 Terpene resins. The terpene resins identified in paragraph (a) of this... the terpene resins identified in paragraph (b) of this section may be safely used as components...

  3. 21 CFR 177.1680 - Polyurethane resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Polyurethane resins. 177.1680 Section 177.1680... Contact Surfaces § 177.1680 Polyurethane resins. The polyurethane resins identified in paragraph (a) of..., polyurethane resins are those produced when one or more of the isocyanates listed in paragraph (a)(1) of...

  4. 21 CFR 178.3930 - Terpene resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Terpene resins. 178.3930 Section 178.3930 Food and... and Production Aids § 178.3930 Terpene resins. The terpene resins identified in paragraph (a) of this... the terpene resins identified in paragraph (b) of this section may be safely used as components...

  5. 21 CFR 177.1655 - Polysulfone resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Polysulfone resins. 177.1655 Section 177.1655 Food... of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1655 Polysulfone resins. Polysulfone resins... purpose of this section, polysulfone resins are: (1)...

  6. 21 CFR 872.3140 - Resin applicator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Resin applicator. 872.3140 Section 872.3140 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3140 Resin applicator. (a) Identification. A resin applicator is a brushlike device intended for use in spreading dental resin on a tooth during application...

  7. 21 CFR 178.3930 - Terpene resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Terpene resins. 178.3930 Section 178.3930 Food and... and Production Aids § 178.3930 Terpene resins. The terpene resins identified in paragraph (a) of this... the terpene resins identified in paragraph (b) of this section may be safely used as components...

  8. 21 CFR 178.3930 - Terpene resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Terpene resins. 178.3930 Section 178.3930 Food and... and Production Aids § 178.3930 Terpene resins. The terpene resins identified in paragraph (a) of this... the terpene resins identified in paragraph (b) of this section may be safely used as components...

  9. 21 CFR 178.3930 - Terpene resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Terpene resins. 178.3930 Section 178.3930 Food and... Terpene resins. The terpene resins identified in paragraph (a) of this section may be safely used as components of polypropylene film intended for use in contact with food, and the terpene resins identified...

  10. Chromatography resin support

    DOEpatents

    Dobos, James G.

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus and method of using an improved chromatography resin support is disclosed. The chromatography support platform is provided by a stainless steel hollow cylinder adapted for being inserted into a chromatography column. An exterior wall of the stainless steel cylinder defines a groove for carrying therein an "O"-ring. The upper surface of the stainless steel column is covered by a fine stainless steel mesh welded to the edges of the stainless steel cylinder. When placed upon a receiving ledge defined within a chromatography column, the "O"-ring provides a fluid tight seal with the inner edge wall of the chromatography cylinder. The stainless steel mesh supports the chromatography matrix and provides a back flushable support which is economical and simple to construct.

  11. Indirect resin composites

    PubMed Central

    Nandini, Suresh

    2010-01-01

    Aesthetic dentistry continues to evolve through innovations in bonding agents, restorative materials, and conservative preparation techniques. The use of direct composite restoration in posterior teeth is limited to relatively small cavities due to polymerization stresses. Indirect composites offer an esthetic alternative to ceramics for posterior teeth. This review article focuses on the material aspect of the newer generation of composites. This review was based on a PubMed database search which we limited to peer-reviewed articles in English that were published between 1990 and 2010 in dental journals. The key words used were ‘indirect resin composites,’ composite inlays,’ and ‘fiber-reinforced composites.’ PMID:21217945

  12. Resin polymerization problems--are they caused by resin curing lights, resin formulations, or both?

    PubMed

    Christensen, R P; Palmer, T M; Ploeger, B J; Yost, M P

    1999-01-01

    Negative effects of rapid, high-intensity resin curing have been predicted for both argon lasers and plasma-arc curing lights. To address these questions, six different resin restorative materials were cured with 14 different resin curing lights representing differences in intensities ranging from 400 mW/cm2 to 1,900 mW/cm2; delivery modes using constant, ramped, and stepped methods; cure times ranging from 1 second to 40 seconds; and spot sizes of 6.7 mm to 10.9 mm. Two lasers, five plasma-arc lights, and seven halogen lights were used. Shrinkage, modulus, heat generation, strain, and physical changes on the teeth and resins during strain testing were documented. Results showed effects associated with lights were not statistically significant, but resin formulation was highly significant. Microfill resins had the least shrinkage and the lowest modulus. An autocure resin had shrinkage and modulus as high as or higher than the light-cured hybrid resins. Lasers and plasma-arc lights produced the highest heat increases on the surface (up to 21 degrees C) and within the resin restorations (up to 14 degrees C), and the halogen lights produced the most heat within the pulp chamber (up to 2 degrees C). Strain within the tooth was least with Heliomolar and greatest with Z100 Restorative and BISFIL II autocure resin. Clinical effects of strain relief were evident as white lines at the tooth-resin interface and cracks in enamel adjacent to the margins. This work implicates resin formulation, rather than light type or curing mode, as the important factor in polymerization problems. Lower light intensity and use of ramped and stepped curing modes did not provide significant lowering of shrinkage, modulus, or strain, and did not prevent enamel cracking adjacent to margins and formation of "white line" defects at the margins. Until materials with lower shrinkage and modulus are available, use of low-viscosity surface sealants as a final step in resin placement is suggested to

  13. Flammability screening tests of resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arhart, R. W.; Farrar, D. G.; Hughes, B. M.

    1979-01-01

    Selected flammability characteristics of glass cloth laminates of thermosetting resins are evaluated. A protocol for the evaluation of the flammability hazards presented by glass cloth laminates of thermosetting resins and the usefulness of that protocol with two laminates are presented. The glass laminates of an epoxy resin, M-751 are evaluated for: (1) determination of smoke generation from the laminates; (2) analysis of products of oxidative degradation of the laminates; (3) determination of minimum oxygen necessary to maintain flaming oxidation; (4) evaluation of toxicological hazards.

  14. Grafted methylenediphosphonate ion exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Trochimcznk, Andrzej W.; Gatrone, Ralph C.; Alexandratos, Spiro; Horwitz, E. Philip

    1997-01-01

    An ion exchange resin is disclosed that is comprised of an insoluble copolymer onto which are grafted pendent groups that provide 1.0 to about 10 mmol/g dry weight phosphorous. The pendent groups have the formula ##STR1## wherein R is hydrogen, a cation or mixtures thereof; and R.sup.1 is hydrogen or an C.sub.1 -C.sub.2 alkyl group. The resin also contains zero to about 5 mmol/g dry weight of pendent aromatic sulfonate groups. Processes for making and using an ion exchange resin are also disclosed.

  15. Grafted methylenediphosphonate ion exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Trochimcznk, A.W.; Gatrone, R.C.; Alexandratos, S.; Horwitz, E.P.

    1997-04-08

    An ion exchange resin is disclosed that is comprised of an insoluble copolymer onto which are grafted pendent groups that provide 1.0 to about 10 mmol/g dry weight phosphorus. The pendent groups have the formula as shown in the patent wherein R is hydrogen, a cation or mixtures thereof; and R{sup 1} is hydrogen or an C{sub 1}-C{sub 2} alkyl group. The resin also contains zero to about 5 mmol/g dry weight of pendent aromatic sulfonate groups. Processes for making and using an ion exchange resin are also disclosed.

  16. Resin/graphite fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavano, P. J.; Jones, R. J.; Vaughan, R. W.

    1972-01-01

    High temperature resin matrices suitable for use in advanced graphite fiber composites for jet engine applications were evaluated. A series of planned, sequential screening experiments with resin systems in composite form were performed to reduce the number of candidates to a single A-type polyimide resin that repetitively produced void-free, high strength and modulus composites acceptable for use in the 550 F range for 1000 hours. An optimized processing procedure was established for this system. Extensive mechanical property studies characterized this single system, at room temperature, 500 F, 550 F and 600 F, for various exposure times.

  17. Grafted methylenediphosphonate ion exchange resins

    SciTech Connect

    Trochimcznk, Andrzej W.; Gatrone, Ralph C.; Alexandratos, Spiro; Horwitz, E. Philip

    1998-01-27

    An ion exchange resin is disclosed that is comprised of an insoluble copolymer onto which are grafted pendent groups that provide 1.0 to about 10 mmol/g dry weight phosphorous. The pendent groups have the formula ##STR1## wherein R is hydrogen, a cation or mixtures thereof; and R.sup.1 is hydrogen or an C.sub.1 -C.sub.2 alkyl group. The resin also contains zero to about 5 mmol/g dry weight of pendent aromatic sulfonate groups. Processes for making and using an ion exchange-resin are also disclosed.

  18. Dc-To-Dc Converter Uses Reverse Conduction Of MOSFET's

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruber, Robert P.; Gott, Robert W.

    1991-01-01

    In modified high-power, phase-controlled, full-bridge, pulse-width-modulated dc-to-dc converters, switching devices power metal oxide/semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFET's). Decreases dissipation of power during switching by eliminating approximately 0.7-V forward voltage drop in anti-parallel diodes. Energy-conversion efficiency increased.

  19. Efficient Design in a DC to DC Converter Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruemmer, Joel E.; Williams, Fitch R.; Schmitz, Gregory V.

    2002-01-01

    Space Flight hardware requires high power conversion efficiencies due to limited power availability and weight penalties of cooling systems. The International Space Station (ISS) Electric Power System (EPS) DC-DC Converter Unit (DDCU) power converter is no exception. This paper explores the design methods and tradeoffs that were utilized to accomplish high efficiency in the DDCU. An isolating DC to DC converter was selected for the ISS power system because of requirements for separate primary and secondary grounds and for a well-regulated secondary output voltage derived from a widely varying input voltage. A flyback-current-fed push-pull topology or improved Weinberg circuit was chosen for this converter because of its potential for high efficiency and reliability. To enhance efficiency, a non-dissipative snubber circuit for the very-low-Rds-on Field Effect Transistors (FETs) was utilized, redistributing the energy that could be wasted during the switching cycle of the power FETs. A unique, low-impedance connection system was utilized to improve contact resistance over a bolted connection. For improved consistency in performance and to lower internal wiring inductance and losses a planar bus system is employed. All of these choices contributed to the design of a 6.25 KW regulated dc to dc converter that is 95 percent efficient. The methodology used in the design of this DC to DC Converter Unit may be directly applicable to other systems that require a conservative approach to efficient power conversion and distribution.

  20. A Plasma-Based DC-DC Electrical Transformer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nebel, Richard; Finn, John

    2013-10-01

    Previous work has indicated that it may be possible to make DC-DC electrical transformers using plasmas. The mechanism is an MHD electromagnetic relaxation process induced by helical electrodes. This process is now being tested on the Bismark device at Tibbar Technologies.

  1. A DC Transformer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngquist, Robert C.; Ihlefeld, Curtis M.; Starr, Stanley O.

    2013-01-01

    A component level dc transformer is described in which no alternating currents or voltages are present. It operates by combining features of a homopolar motor and a homopolar generator, both de devices, such that the output voltage of a de power supply can be stepped up (or down) with a corresponding step down (or up) in current. The basic theory for this device is developed, performance predictions are made, and the results from a small prototype are presented. Based on demonstrated technology in the literature, this de transformer should be scalable to low megawatt levels, but it is more suited to high current than high voltage applications. Significant development would be required before it could achieve the kilovolt levels needed for de power transmission.

  2. Early Oscillation Detection Technique for Hybrid DC/DC Converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Bright L.

    2011-01-01

    Oscillation or instability is a situation that must be avoided for reliable hybrid DC/DC converters. A real-time electronics measurement technique was developed to detect catastrophic oscillations at early stages for hybrid DC/DC converters. It is capable of identifying low-level oscillation and determining the degree of the oscillation at a unique frequency for every individual model of the converters without disturbing their normal operations. This technique is specially developed for space-used hybrid DC/DC converters, but it is also suitable for most of commercial and military switching-mode power supplies. This is a weak-electronic-signal detection technique to detect hybrid DC/DC converter oscillation presented as a specific noise signal at power input pins. It is based on principles of feedback control loop oscillation and RF signal modulations, and is realized by using signal power spectral analysis. On the power spectrum, a channel power amplitude at characteristic frequency (CPcf) and a channel power amplitude at switching frequency (CPsw) are chosen as oscillation level indicators. If the converter is stable, the CPcf is a very small pulse and the CPsw is a larger, clear, single pulse. At early stage of oscillation, the CPcf increases to a certain level and the CPsw shows a small pair of sideband pulses around it. If the converter oscillates, the CPcf reaches to a higher level and the CPsw shows more high-level sideband pulses. A comprehensive stability index (CSI) is adopted as a quantitative measure to accurately assign a degree of stability to a specific DC/DC converter. The CSI is a ratio of normal and abnormal power spectral density, and can be calculated using specified and measured CPcf and CPsw data. The novel and unique feature of this technique is the use of power channel amplitudes at characteristic frequency and switching frequency to evaluate stability and identify oscillations at an early stage without interfering with a DC/DC converter s

  3. Effect of Light Intensity on the Degree of Conversion of Dual-cured Resin Cement at Different Depths with the use of Translucent Fiber Posts

    PubMed Central

    Bahari, Mahmoud; Savadi Oskoee, Siavash; Kimyai, Soodabeh; Mohammadi, Narmin; Saati Khosroshahi, Elmira

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the effect of different light intensities on the degree of conversion (DC) of dual-cured resin cement at different depths of translucent fiber posts. Materials and Methods: Thirty translucent fiber posts were randomly assigned into three (n=10) groups. They were cemented in the simulated canal spaces using Duo-Link dual-cured resin cement. The cement was light-cured under 600, 800 and 1100 mW/cm2 light intensities for 40 seconds. DC of the resin cement was calculated at cervical, middle and apical thirds using the spectra of FT-Raman spectrometer. Data were analyzed by repeated measurement ANOVA and Tukey’s post hoc tests (α=0.05). Results: In all the groups, the least DC was obtained at the apical region. There were no significant differences in the DC with different light intensities between the cervical and middle regions (p>0.05). However, in the apical region, the DC in both 800 and 1100 mw/cm2 was similar (p>0.05), but greater with 600 mW/cm2 light intensity (p=0.02 and p<0.001, respectively). Conclusion: In comparison with the light intensity of 600 mW/cm2, the light intensity of 800 mW/cm2 significantly increased the DC of dual-cured resin cement in the apical region. However, DC was not significantly different between 800 and 1100 mw/cm2 light intensities. If the resin cement, especially in the apical areas is not sufficiently cured, microleakage might increase and post retention might be jeopardized. In comparison with 600 mW/cm2 light intensity, 800 mW/cm2 significantly increases DC at the apical third that might be clinically beneficial. PMID:25628659

  4. Oxygen inhibition in dental resins.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, M A; Stangel, I; Ellis, T H; Zhu, X X

    2005-08-01

    Oxygen inhibits free radical polymerization and yields polymers with uncured surfaces. This is a concern when thin layers of resin are being polymerized, or in circumstances where conventional means of eliminating inhibition are inappropriate. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that viscosity, filler content, and polymerization temperature modify oxygen diffusion in the resin or the reactivity of radical species, and affect the degree of conversion near the surface. Confocal Raman micro-spectroscopy was used to measure monomer conversion from the surface to the bulk of cured resins. Increased viscosity was shown to limit oxygen diffusion and increase conversion near the surface, without necessarily modifying the depth of inhibition. The filler material was shown to increase, simultaneously, oxygen diffusivity and the viscosity of the resin, which have opposite effects on conversion. Polymerization at a temperature above approximately 110 degrees C was shown to eliminate oxygen inhibition.

  5. Epoxy hydantoins as matrix resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, J.

    1983-01-01

    Tensile strength and fracture toughness of castings of the hydantoin resins cured with methylenedianiline are significantly higher than MY 720 control castings. Water absorption of an ethyl, amyl hydantoin formulation is 2.1 percent at equilibrium and Tg's are about 160 C, approximately 15 deg below the final cure temperature. Two series of urethane and ester-extended hydantoin epoxy resins were synthesized to determine the effect of crosslink density and functional groups on properties. Castings cured with methylenedianiline or with hexahydrophthalic anhydride were made from these compounds and evaluated. The glass transition temperatures, tensile strengths and moduli, and fracture toughness values were all much lower than that of the simple hydantoin epoxy resins. Using a methylene bishydantoin epoxy with a more rigid structure gave brittle, low-energy fractures, while a more flexible, ethoxy-extended hydantoin epoxy resin gave a very low Tg.

  6. Regenerating Water-Sterilizing Resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colombo, G. V.; Putnam, D. F.

    1982-01-01

    Iodine-dispensing resin can be regenerated after iodine content has been depleted, without being removed from water system. Resin is used to make water potable by killing bacteria, fungi, and viruses. Regeneration technique may be come basis of water purifier for very long space missions. Enough crystalline iodine for multiple regenerations during mission can be stored in one small cartridge. Cartridge could be inserted in waterline as necessary on signal from iodine monitor or timer.

  7. Liquid monobenzoxazine based resin system

    SciTech Connect

    Tietze, Roger; Nguyen, Yen-Loan; Bryant, Mark

    2014-10-07

    The present invention provides a liquid resin system including a liquid monobenzoxazine monomer and a non-glycidyl epoxy compound, wherein the weight ratio of the monobenzoxazine monomer to the non-glycidyl epoxy compound is in a range of about 25:75 to about 60:40. The liquid resin system exhibits a low viscosity and exceptional stability over an extended period of time making its use in a variety of composite manufacturing methods highly advantageous.

  8. Young's Modulus and Degree of Conversion of Different Combination of Light-Cure Dental Resins

    PubMed Central

    Emami, N; Söderholm, KJ

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate Young's modulus and degree of conversion of several combinations of bisGMA, UEDMA, TEGDMA light-cure dental resin. Methods: Young's modulus and DC% were studied for 21 different resin combinations of bisGMA, TEGDMA and UEDMA. Small universal testing machine and photo-calorimetry were used for the tests. The results were evaluated using ANOVA and Duncan's multiple range tests and regular t-test. Results: Young's modulus varied between 2.37±0.2 GPa (100% TEGDMA) and 4.15±0.2 GPa (100% bisGMA). By adding TEGDMA to bisGMA or UEDMA, the Young's modulus decreased significantly (p<0.05). Degree of conversion was significantly (p<0.05) higher when the wt% of TEGDMA was high in the mixtures than for highly concentrated bis-GMA (resin mixtures with TEGDMA in comparison to mixture with bisGMA had higher degree of conversion). DC% was significantly higher (p<0.05) for binary mixtures of UEDMA and TEGDMA, and significantly lower for 100 wt% bis-GMA (p<0.05). The DC% values were between 53.1%±0.9% (100% bisGMA) and 85.6%±1% (80% UEDMA-20% TEGDMA). The concentration of bisGMA, in the monomer mixture, affected DC% and Young's modulus oppositely. Conclusions: The differences in the values for DC% were mostly justified by the differences in the molecular structures of the different monomers. It was also revealed that higher DC% does not always result in a higher Young's modulus, because molecular and network structural parameters play major roles in the final physical properties of the mixtures. PMID:19838309

  9. Curing behavior and reaction kinetics of binder resins for 3D-printing investigated by dielectric analysis (DEA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möginger, B.; Kehret, L.; Hausnerova, B.; Steinhaus, J.

    2016-05-01

    3D-Printing is an efficient method in the field of additive manufacturing. In order to optimize the properties of manufactured parts it is essential to adapt the curing behavior of the resin systems with respect to the requirements. Thus, effects of resin composition, e.g. due to different additives such as thickener and curing agents, on the curing behavior have to be known. As the resin transfers from a liquid to a solid glass the time dependent ion viscosity was measured using DEA with flat IDEX sensors. This allows for a sensitive measurement of resin changes as the ion viscosity changes two to four decades. The investigated resin systems are based on the monomers styrene and HEMA. To account for the effects of copolymerization in the calculation of the reaction kinetics it was assumed that the reaction can be considered as a homo-polymerization having a reaction order n≠1. Then the measured ion viscosity curves are fitted with the solution of the reactions kinetics - the time dependent degree of conversion (DC-function) - for times exceeding the initiation phase representing the primary curing. The measured ion viscosity curves can nicely be fitted with the DC-function and the determined fit parameters distinguish distinctly between the investigated resin compositions.

  10. Triple voltage dc-to-dc converter and method

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Gui-Jia

    2008-08-05

    A circuit and method of providing three dc voltage buses and transforming power between a low voltage dc converter and a high voltage dc converter, by coupling a primary dc power circuit and a secondary dc power circuit through an isolation transformer; providing the gating signals to power semiconductor switches in the primary and secondary circuits to control power flow between the primary and secondary circuits and by controlling a phase shift between the primary voltage and the secondary voltage. The primary dc power circuit and the secondary dc power circuit each further comprising at least two tank capacitances arranged in series as a tank leg, at least two resonant switching devices arranged in series with each other and arranged in parallel with the tank leg, and at least one voltage source arranged in parallel with the tank leg and the resonant switching devices, said resonant switching devices including power semiconductor switches that are operated by gating signals. Additional embodiments having a center-tapped battery on the low voltage side and a plurality of modules on both the low voltage side and the high voltage side are also disclosed for the purpose of reducing ripple current and for reducing the size of the components.

  11. Dual ambroxal and chlorpheniramine resinate as an alternative carrier in concurrent resinate administration.

    PubMed

    Akkaramongkolporn, P; Ngawhirunpat, T

    2003-03-01

    Two classical resinates, ambroxal (AMX) resinate and chlorpheniramine (CPM) resinate, and a novel formulation of dual AMX and CPM resinate were prepared by the batch method. The dissolution behavior of the drug from the classical resinates, a mixture of two classical resinates, and the dual-drug resinate in simulated gastric fluid (SGF) and simulated intestinal fluid (SIF) was examined and compared. The equilibrium of drug on to the resin and the re-exchange of the drug on to the resinate were also investigated. The drug release pattern from the resinate followed the particle diffusion process. The type of dissolution medium affected the amount of drug released from the resinate. The amount of drug released from the dual AMX and CPM resinate was not significantly different from that from the classical AMX resinate or CPM resinate (p < 0.05), but was considerably higher than that from the concurrent administration of two classical resinates (p > 0.05). These results indicated that the concurrent administration of the resinates affected drug release from the resinate, and the dual-drug resinate can be used as an alternative carrier for an ion-exchange delivery system.

  12. Bi-Directional DC-DC Converter for PHEV Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Abas Goodarzi

    2011-01-31

    Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles (PHEV) require high power density energy storage system (ESS) for hybrid operation and high energy density ESS for Electric Vehicle (EV) mode range. However, ESS technologies to maximize power density and energy density simultaneously are not commercially feasible. The use of bi-directional DC-DC converter allows use of multiple energy storage, and the flexible DC-link voltages can enhance the system efficiency and reduce component sizing. This will improve fuel consumption, increase the EV mode range, reduce the total weight, reduce battery initial and life cycle cost, and provide flexibility in system design.

  13. Degree of conversion and leached monomers of urethane dimethacrylate-hydroxypropyl methacrylate-based dental resin systems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Meng; Puska, Mervi A; Botelho, Michael G; Säilynoja, Eija S; Matinlinna, Jukka P

    2016-01-01

    The degree of conversion (DC) and monomer leaching of three experimental urethane dimethacrylate (UEDMA)-hydroxypropyl methacrylate (HPMA)-based resin systems were studied. Three experimental resins (E1: 70.6 wt% UEDMA + 27.4 wt% HPMA, E2: 80.6 wt% UEDMA + 17.4 wt% HPMA, E3: 90.6 wt% UEDMA + 7.4 wt% HPMA) and one control resin [C: 70.6 wt% bis-phenol A glycidyl methacrylate (bis-GMA) + 27.4 wt% methyl methacrylate (MMA)] were prepared. For the DC test, cylindrical specimens [1.5 mm (h) × 6 mm (d)] were scanned with an ATR-FTIR instrument before and after light-curing (n = 5). For the monomer leaching test, block-shaped specimens [5.67 mm (l) × 2.00 mm (w) × 2.00 mm (h)] were light-cured (n = 6), stored in a 75% ethanol:water solution for 3 days, and then analyzed with HPLC. The UEDMA-HPMA-based experimental groups showed higher DC (62-78%) than the bis-GMA-MMA-based control group (58-66%), and the DC decreased as the UEDMA content increased (P < 0.05). Amongst the four groups, E3 exhibited the lowest leaching of both mono methacrylate (0.1% HPMA) and dimethacrylate (<0.043% UEDMA) monomers after 30 or 40 s of curing. The UEDMA-HPMA-based resins, therefore, exhibited higher DC and less monomer leaching compared to the bis-GMA-MMA-based resin. (J Oral Sci 58, 15-22, 2016). PMID:27021535

  14. Degree of conversion and leached monomers of urethane dimethacrylate-hydroxypropyl methacrylate-based dental resin systems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Meng; Puska, Mervi A; Botelho, Michael G; Säilynoja, Eija S; Matinlinna, Jukka P

    2016-01-01

    The degree of conversion (DC) and monomer leaching of three experimental urethane dimethacrylate (UEDMA)-hydroxypropyl methacrylate (HPMA)-based resin systems were studied. Three experimental resins (E1: 70.6 wt% UEDMA + 27.4 wt% HPMA, E2: 80.6 wt% UEDMA + 17.4 wt% HPMA, E3: 90.6 wt% UEDMA + 7.4 wt% HPMA) and one control resin [C: 70.6 wt% bis-phenol A glycidyl methacrylate (bis-GMA) + 27.4 wt% methyl methacrylate (MMA)] were prepared. For the DC test, cylindrical specimens [1.5 mm (h) × 6 mm (d)] were scanned with an ATR-FTIR instrument before and after light-curing (n = 5). For the monomer leaching test, block-shaped specimens [5.67 mm (l) × 2.00 mm (w) × 2.00 mm (h)] were light-cured (n = 6), stored in a 75% ethanol:water solution for 3 days, and then analyzed with HPLC. The UEDMA-HPMA-based experimental groups showed higher DC (62-78%) than the bis-GMA-MMA-based control group (58-66%), and the DC decreased as the UEDMA content increased (P < 0.05). Amongst the four groups, E3 exhibited the lowest leaching of both mono methacrylate (0.1% HPMA) and dimethacrylate (<0.043% UEDMA) monomers after 30 or 40 s of curing. The UEDMA-HPMA-based resins, therefore, exhibited higher DC and less monomer leaching compared to the bis-GMA-MMA-based resin. (J Oral Sci 58, 15-22, 2016).

  15. FB-Line resin testing final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bannochie, C.J.

    1992-01-23

    The Dowex 50W-X8 and 50W-Xl2 resin samples are both strong acid cation materials in the hydrogen form. Each material has a water retention capacity characteristic of its respective marketed degree of cross-linking. Dowex 21K gives confirmatory responses to tests for a strong anion exchange resin in the nitrate form. All three resins have the manufacturer's specified ionic type and form, and the Dowex 50W resins have characteristic water retention capacities. These tests conclude that the ion exchange resins in use in FB-Line meet the approved safety document criteria for cross-linking, ionic form, and resin type.

  16. FB-Line resin testing final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bannochie, C.J.

    1992-01-23

    The Dowex 50W-X8 and 50W-Xl2 resin samples are both strong acid cation materials in the hydrogen form. Each material has a water retention capacity characteristic of its respective marketed degree of cross-linking. Dowex 21K gives confirmatory responses to tests for a strong anion exchange resin in the nitrate form. All three resins have the manufacturer`s specified ionic type and form, and the Dowex 50W resins have characteristic water retention capacities. These tests conclude that the ion exchange resins in use in FB-Line meet the approved safety document criteria for cross-linking, ionic form, and resin type.

  17. Disposal of bead ion exchange resin wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Gay, R.L.; Granthan, L.F.

    1985-12-17

    Bead ion exchange resin wastes are disposed of by a process which involves spray-drying a bead ion exchange resin waste in order to remove substantially all of the water present in such waste, including the water on the surface of the ion exchange resin beads and the water inside the ion exchange resin beads. The resulting dried ion exchange resin beads can then be solidified in a suitable solid matrix-forming material, such as a polymer, which solidifies to contain the dried ion exchange resin beads in a solid monolith suitable for disposal by burial or other conventional means.

  18. DC-Compensated Current Transformer.

    PubMed

    Ripka, Pavel; Draxler, Karel; Styblíková, Renata

    2016-01-20

    Instrument current transformers (CTs) measure AC currents. The DC component in the measured current can saturate the transformer and cause gross error. We use fluxgate detection and digital feedback compensation of the DC flux to suppress the overall error to 0.15%. This concept can be used not only for high-end CTs with a nanocrystalline core, but it also works for low-cost CTs with FeSi cores. The method described here allows simultaneous measurements of the DC current component.

  19. DC-Compensated Current Transformer.

    PubMed

    Ripka, Pavel; Draxler, Karel; Styblíková, Renata

    2016-01-01

    Instrument current transformers (CTs) measure AC currents. The DC component in the measured current can saturate the transformer and cause gross error. We use fluxgate detection and digital feedback compensation of the DC flux to suppress the overall error to 0.15%. This concept can be used not only for high-end CTs with a nanocrystalline core, but it also works for low-cost CTs with FeSi cores. The method described here allows simultaneous measurements of the DC current component. PMID:26805830

  20. Changes in degree of conversion and microhardness of dental resin cements.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yong Li; Kim, Young Kyung; Kim, Kyo-Han; Kwon, Tae-Yub

    2010-01-01

    There are few studies available on the post-light activation or post-mix polymerization of dental resin cements as a function of time. This in vitro study evaluated the successive changes in the degree of conversion (DC) and microhardness during polymerization of six commercial resin cements (light-cured [Choice 2, RelyX Veneer], chemical-cured [Multilink, C&B Cement] and dual-cured [Calibra, RelyX ARC]) within the first 24 hours and up to seven days. Resin specimens were prepared for Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and microhardness testing to determine the DC and Vickers hardness (VH), respectively. The light-cured materials or mixed pastes of the dual-cured materials were irradiated with a light-curing unit (Elipar TriLight) through a precured composite overlay for 40 seconds. The FTIR spectra and microhardness readings were taken at specified times: 1, 2, 5, 10, 15, 30 and 60 minutes; 24 hours and after two days and seven days. According to the FTIR study, most of the curing reaction of Choice 2 and RelyX Veneer occurred within 10 and 30 minutes, respectively. Multilink, C&B Cement and Calibra exhibited gradual increases in the DC up to 24 hours, with no further statistically significant increase (p > 0.05). RelyX ARC attained a DC value within five minutes, similar to that at seven days (p > 0.05). Choice 2 and RelyXARC showed gradual increases in the VH, up to 15 minutes, with no further significant change over the remaining observation time (p > 0.05). For RelyX Veneer, Multilink, C&B Cement and Calibra, there were no significant increases in the VH value after 24 hours (p > 0.05). The light-cured materials produced significantly higher DC values than the chemical-cured materials (p < 0.05). The DC values of the two dual-cured resin cements were significantly different from each other (p < 0.001). The results suggest that the significant polymerization reaction was finished within 24 hours post-mix or post-light activation for all resin

  1. Digital Control Technologies for Modular DC-DC Converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Button, Robert M.; Kascak, Peter E.; Lebron-Velilla, Ramon

    2002-01-01

    Recent trends in aerospace Power Management and Distribution (PMAD) systems focus on using commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) components as standard building blocks. This move to more modular designs has been driven by a desire to reduce costs and development times, but is also due to the impressive power density and efficiency numbers achieved by today's commercial DC-DC converters. However, the PMAD designer quickly learns of the hidden "costs" of using COTS converters. The most significant cost is the required addition of external input filters to meet strict electromagnetic interference (MIAMI) requirements for space systems. In fact, the high power density numbers achieved by the commercial manufacturers are greatly due to the lack of necessary input filters included in the COTS module. The NASA Glenn Research Center is currently pursuing a digital control technology that addresses this problem with modular DC-DC converters. This paper presents the digital control technologies that have been developed to greatly reduce the input filter requirements for paralleled, modular DC-DC converters. Initial test result show that the input filter's inductor size was reduced by 75 percent, and the capacitor size was reduced by 94 percent while maintaining the same power quality specifications.

  2. Low Melt Viscosity Resins for Resin Transfer Molding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Frank W.

    2002-01-01

    In recent years, resin transfer molding (RTM) has become one of the methods of choice for high performance composites. Its cost effectiveness and ease of fabrication are major advantages of RTM. RTM process usually requires resins with very low melt viscosity (less than 10 Poise). The optimum RTM resins also need to display high thennal-oxidative stability, high glass transition temperature (T(sub g)), and good toughness. The traditional PMR-type polyimides (e.g. PMR-15) do not fit this requirement, because the viscosities are too high and the nadic endcap cures too fast. High T(sub g), low-melt viscosity resins are highly desirable for aerospace applications and NASA s Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) program. The objective of this work is to prepare low-melt viscosity polyimide resins for RTM or resin film infusion (RFI) processes. The approach involves the synthesis of phenylethynyl-terminated imide oligomers. These materials have been designed to minimize their melt viscosity so that they can be readily processed. During the cure, the oligomers undergo both chain extension and crosslinking via the thermal polymerization of the phenylethynyl groups. The Phenylethynyl endcap is preferred over the nadic group due to its high curing temperature, which provides broader processing windows. This work involved the synthesis and polymerization of oligomers containing zig-zag backbones and twisted biphenyl structures. Some A-B type precursors which possessed both nitro and anhydride functionality, or both nitro and amine functionality, were also synthesized in order to obtain the well defined oligomers. The resulting zig-zag structured oligomers were then end-capped with 4-phenylethynylphthalic anhydride (PEPA) for further cure. The properties of these novel imide oligomers are evaluated.

  3. Phosphonic acid based ion exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Alexandratos, S.D.; Gatrone, R.C.; Chiarizia, R.

    1994-01-25

    An ion exchange resin is described for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene diphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene. 9 figures.

  4. Soluble high molecular weight polyimide resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. J.; Lubowitz, H. R.

    1970-01-01

    High molecular weight polyimide resins have greater than 20 percent /by weight/ solubility in polar organic solvents. They permit fabrication into films, fibers, coatings, reinforced composite, and adhesive product forms. Characterization properties for one typical polyimide resin are given.

  5. Phosphonic acid based ion exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Alexandratos, S.D.; Gatrone, R.C.; Chiarizia, R.

    1996-07-23

    An ion exchange resin is described for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene diphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene. 10 figs.

  6. Phosphonic acid based ion exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Alexandratos, Spiro D.; Gatrone, Ralph C.; Chiarizia, Ronato

    1994-01-01

    An ion exchange resin for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene disphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene.

  7. Phosphonic acid based ion exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Alexandratos, Spiro D.; Gatrone, Ralph C.; Chiarizia, Ronato

    1996-01-01

    An ion exchange resin for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene diphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene.

  8. DC superconducting fault current limiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tixador, P.; Villard, C.; Cointe, Y.

    2006-03-01

    There is a lack of satisfying solutions for fault currents using conventional technologies, especially in DC networks, where a superconducting fault current limiter could play a very important part. DC networks bring a lot of advantages when compared to traditional AC ones, in particular within the context of the liberalization of the electric market. Under normal operation in a DC network, the losses in the superconducting element are nearly zero and only a small, i.e. a low cost, refrigeration system is then required. The absence of zero crossing of a DC fault current favourably accelerates the normal zone propagation. The very high current slope at the time of the short circuit in a DC grid is another favourable parameter. The material used for the experiments is YBCO deposited on Al2O3 as well as YBCO coated conductors. The DC limitation experiments are compared to AC ones at different frequencies (50-2000 Hz). Careful attention is paid to the quench homogenization, which is one of the key issues for an SC FCL. The University of Geneva has proposed constrictions. We have investigated an operating temperature higher than 77 K. As for YBCO bulk, an operation closer to the critical temperature brings a highly improved homogeneity in the electric field development. The material can then absorb large energies without degradation. We present tests at various temperatures. These promising results are to be confirmed over long lengths.

  9. Tensile strength of restorative resins.

    PubMed

    Zidan, O; Asmussen, E; Jørgensen, K D

    1980-06-01

    The purpose of the present work was to measure the tensile strength of restorative resins and to study the effect of the method of measurement on the recorded results. A direct pull method using dumb-bell shaped specimens was used. The tensile strength of the resins was also tested using the diametral compression method suggested by the A.D.A. It was found that the method of testing affects the results. Although the diametral compression method is a simple method, it cannot be considered reliable for all types of material. The tensile strength of the conventional composites was significantly higher than the tensile strength of the microfilled composites.

  10. Method of removing contaminants from plastic resins

    DOEpatents

    Bohnert, George W.; Hand, Thomas E.; DeLaurentiis, Gary M.

    2008-11-18

    A method for removing contaminants from synthetic resin material containers using a first organic solvent system and a second carbon dioxide system. The organic solvent is utilized for removing the contaminants from the synthetic resin material and the carbon dioxide is used to separate any residual organic solvent from the synthetic resin material.

  11. Method of removing contaminants from plastic resins

    DOEpatents

    Bohnert,George W.; Hand,Thomas E.; Delaurentiis,Gary M.

    2007-08-07

    A method for removing contaminants from synthetic resin material containers using a first organic solvent system and a second carbon dioxide system. The organic solvent is utilized for removing the contaminants from the synthetic resin material and the carbon dioxide is used to separate any residual organic solvent from the synthetic resin material.

  12. Method for removing contaminants from plastic resin

    DOEpatents

    Bohnert, George W.; Hand, Thomas E.; DeLaurentiis, Gary M.

    2008-12-30

    A method for removing contaminants from synthetic resin material containers using a first organic solvent system and a second carbon dioxide system. The organic solvent is utilized for removing the contaminants from the synthetic resin material and the carbon dioxide is used to separate any residual organic solvent from the synthetic resin material.

  13. 21 CFR 177.1555 - Polyarylate resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Polyarylate resins. 177.1555 Section 177.1555 Food... of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1555 Polyarylate resins. Polyarylate resins... contact with food in accordance with the following prescribed conditions: (a) Identity. Polyarylate...

  14. 21 CFR 177.1595 - Polyetherimide resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Polyetherimide resin. 177.1595 Section 177.1595... Components of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1595 Polyetherimide resin. The polyetherimide resin identified in this section may be safely used as an article or component of an...

  15. 21 CFR 172.280 - Terpene resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Terpene resin. 172.280 Section 172.280 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN..., Films and Related Substances § 172.280 Terpene resin. The food additive terpene resin may be safely...

  16. 21 CFR 177.1680 - Polyurethane resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Polyurethane resins. 177.1680 Section 177.1680... Components of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1680 Polyurethane resins. The polyurethane resins identified in paragraph (a) of this section may be safely used as the food-contact surface...

  17. 21 CFR 177.1556 - Polyaryletherketone resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Polyaryletherketone resins. 177.1556 Section 177... Components of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1556 Polyaryletherketone resins. The poly...) resins (CAS Reg. No. 55088-54-5 and CAS Reg. No. 60015-05-6 and commonly referred to...

  18. 40 CFR 721.9495 - Acrylosilane resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Acrylosilane resins. 721.9495 Section... Substances § 721.9495 Acrylosilane resins. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified as acrylosilane resins (PMNs P-95-1024/1040) are...

  19. 21 CFR 177.1680 - Polyurethane resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Polyurethane resins. 177.1680 Section 177.1680... Components of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1680 Polyurethane resins. The polyurethane...) For the purpose of this section, polyurethane resins are those produced when one or more of...

  20. 21 CFR 177.1680 - Polyurethane resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Polyurethane resins. 177.1680 Section 177.1680... Components of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1680 Polyurethane resins. The polyurethane...) For the purpose of this section, polyurethane resins are those produced when one or more of...

  1. 21 CFR 177.1580 - Polycarbonate resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Polycarbonate resins. 177.1580 Section 177.1580... Components of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1580 Polycarbonate resins. Polycarbonate resins may be safely used as articles or components of articles intended for use in...

  2. 40 CFR 721.9495 - Acrylosilane resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Acrylosilane resins. 721.9495 Section... Substances § 721.9495 Acrylosilane resins. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified as acrylosilane resins (PMNs P-95-1024/1040) are...

  3. 21 CFR 177.1585 - Polyestercarbonate resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Polyestercarbonate resins. 177.1585 Section 177... Components of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1585 Polyestercarbonate resins. Polyestercarbonate resins may be safely used as articles or components of articles intended for use in...

  4. 21 CFR 177.1556 - Polyaryletherketone resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Polyaryletherketone resins. 177.1556 Section 177... Components of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1556 Polyaryletherketone resins. The poly...) resins (CAS Reg. No. 55088-54-5 and CAS Reg. No. 60015-05-6 and commonly referred to...

  5. 21 CFR 177.1680 - Polyurethane resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Polyurethane resins. 177.1680 Section 177.1680 Food... of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1680 Polyurethane resins. The polyurethane resins identified in paragraph (a) of this section may be safely used as the food-contact surface...

  6. 21 CFR 177.1550 - Perfluorocarbon resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Perfluorocarbon resins. 177.1550 Section 177.1550... Components of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1550 Perfluorocarbon resins. Perfluorocarbon resins identified in this section may be safely used as articles or components of...

  7. 21 CFR 177.1595 - Polyetherimide resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Polyetherimide resin. 177.1595 Section 177.1595... Components of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1595 Polyetherimide resin. The polyetherimide resin identified in this section may be safely used as an article or component of an...

  8. 21 CFR 177.1555 - Polyarylate resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Polyarylate resins. 177.1555 Section 177.1555 Food... of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1555 Polyarylate resins. Polyarylate resins... contact with food in accordance with the following prescribed conditions: (a) Identity. Polyarylate...

  9. 21 CFR 172.280 - Terpene resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Terpene resin. 172.280 Section 172.280 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN..., Films and Related Substances § 172.280 Terpene resin. The food additive terpene resin may be safely...

  10. 21 CFR 172.280 - Terpene resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Terpene resin. 172.280 Section 172.280 Food and... Terpene resin. The food additive terpene resin may be safely used in accordance with the following prescribed conditions: (a) The food additive is the betapinene polymer obtained by polymerizing...

  11. 21 CFR 172.280 - Terpene resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Terpene resin. 172.280 Section 172.280 Food and..., Films and Related Substances § 172.280 Terpene resin. The food additive terpene resin may be safely used... polymer obtained by polymerizing terpene hydrocarbons derived from wood. It has a softening point of...

  12. 21 CFR 172.280 - Terpene resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Terpene resin. 172.280 Section 172.280 Food and..., Films and Related Substances § 172.280 Terpene resin. The food additive terpene resin may be safely used... polymer obtained by polymerizing terpene hydrocarbons derived from wood. It has a softening point of...

  13. Degree of conversion of different composite resins photo-activated with light-emitting diode and argon ion laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messias, A. M.; Galvão, M. R.; Boaventura, J. M. C.; Jacomassi, D. P.; Bernardi, M. I. B.; Bagnato, V. S.; Rastelli, A. N. S.; Andrade, M. F.

    2015-02-01

    This study evaluated the degree of conversion (DC%) of one experimental and different brands of composite resins light-cured by two light sources (one LED and one argon laser). The percentage of unreacted C = C was determined from the ratio of absorbance intensities of aliphatic C = C (peak at 1637 cm-1) against internal standards before and after curing: aromatic C-C (peak at 1610 cm-1) except for P90, where %C = C bonds was given for C-O-C (883 cm-1) and C-C (1257 cm-1). ANOVA and Tukey’s test revealed no statistically significant difference among Z350 (67.17), Z250 (69.52) and experimental (66.61  ±  2.03) with LED, just among them and Evolu-X (75.51) and P90 (32.05) that showed higher and lower DC%, respectively. For the argon laser, there were no differences among Z250 (70.67), Z350 (69.60), experimental (65.66) and Evolu-X (73, 37), however a significant difference was observed for P90 (36.80), which showed lowest DC%. The light sources showed similar DC%, however the main difference was observed regarding the composite resins. The lowest DC% was observed for the argon laser. P90 showed the lowest DC% for both light-curing sources.

  14. 75 FR 36298 - Airworthiness Directives; McDonnell Douglas Corporation Model DC-8-31, DC-8-32, DC-8-33, DC-8-41...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-25

    ...-09-04, Amendment 39-15484 (73 FR 21523, April 22, 2008), for all Model DC-8-31, DC-8-32, DC-8-33, DC... ``significant rule'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); and 3... removing Amendment 39-15484 (73 FR 21523, April 22, 2008) and adding the following new AD:...

  15. Transformerless dc-to-dc converters with large conversion ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middlebrook, R. D.

    1988-10-01

    A novel switching dc-dc converter is introduced in which large voltage step-down ratios can be achieved without a very small duty ratio and without a transformer. The circuit is an extension of the Cuk converter to incorporate a multistage capacitor divider. A particularly suitable application would be a 50-V to 5-V converter in which dc isolation is not required. The absence of a transformer and the larger duty ratio permit operation at a high switching frequency and make the circuit amenable to partial integration and hybrid construction techniques. An experimental 50-W three-stage voltage-divider Cuk converter converts 50 V to 5 V at 500 kHz, with efficiency higher than for a basic Cuk converter operated at the same conditions. A corresponding voltage-multiplier Cuk converter is described, as well as dual buck-boost-derived step-down and step-up converters.

  16. Bond performance of "Touch and Cure" adhesives on resin core systems.

    PubMed

    Kadowaki, Yoshitaka; Kakuda, Shinichi; Kawano, Shimpei; Katsumata, Aiichiro; Ting, Shihchun; Hoshika, Shuhei; Ikeda, Takatsumi; Tanaka, Toru; Carvalho, Ricardo Marinsde; Sano, Hidehiko

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the micro-tensile bond strength (µTBS) of three resin core composites to dentin and to examine the bonded interface of the composites. One experimental TDK-03(TD) and, two commercial, DC core Automix One (DC) and Unifil core EM(UN) were used. Flat dentin surfaces of human molars were exposed using #600 SiC paper and bonded with the respective adhesive of each system. After bonding, the composites were built up on the surfaces and cured under two conditions: "light condition" or "dark condition". µTBSs (MPa) in the light condition were: TD; 60.02±17.08, DC; 38.21±13.70, and UN; 29.50±9.71; in the dark condition: TD; 54.62±17.11, DC; 8.40±4.81, and UN; 9.47±6.56. Dark curing negatively affected the bond strength of the two commercial resin-core materials. The experimental material was not affected by the curing conditions. PMID:27251993

  17. Process for curing bismaleimide resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, John A. (Inventor); OTHY S.imides alone. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    This invention relates to vinyl pyridine group containing compounds and oligomers, their advantageous copolymerization with bismaleimide resins, and the formation of reinforced composites based on these copolymers. When vinyl pyridines including vinyl stilbazole materials and vinyl styrylpyridine oligomer materials are admixed with bismaleimides and cured to form copolymers the cure temperatures of the copolymers are substantially below the cure temperatures of the bismaleimides alone.

  18. Synthesis of improved phenolic resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delano, C. B.; Mcleod, A. H.

    1979-01-01

    Twenty seven addition cured phenolic resin compositions were prepared and tested for their ability to give char residues comparable to state-of-the-art phenolic resins. Cyanate, epoxy, allyl, acrylate, methacrylate and ethynyl derivatized phenolic oligomers were investigated. The novolac-cyanate and propargyl-novolac resins provided anaerobic char yields at 800 C of 58 percent. A 59 percent char yield was obtained from modified epoxy novolacs. A phosphonitrilic derivative was found to be effective as an additive for increasing char yields. The novolac-cyanate, epoxy-novolac and methacrylate-epoxy-novolac systems were investigated as composite matrices with Thornel 300 graphite fiber. All three resins showed good potential as composite matrices. The free radical cured methacrylate-epoxy-novolac graphite composite provided short beam shear strengths at room temperature of 93.3 MPa (13.5 ksi). The novolac-cyanate graphite composite produced a short beam shear strength of 74 MPa (10.7 ksi) and flexural strength of 1302 MPa (189 ksi) at 177 C. Air heat aging of the novolac-cyanate and epoxy novolac based composites for 12 weeks at 204 C showed good property retention.

  19. Fiber reinforced composite resin systems.

    PubMed

    Giordano, R

    2000-01-01

    The Targis/Vectris and Sculpture/FibreKor systems were devised to create a translucent maximally reinforced resin framework for fabrication of crowns, bridges, inlays, and onlays. These materials are esthetic, have translucency similar to castable glass-ceramics such as OPC and Empress, and have fits that are reported to be acceptable in clinical and laboratory trials. These restorations rely on proper bonding to the remaining tooth structure; therefore, careful attention to detail must be paid to this part of the procedure. Cementation procedures should involve silane treatment of the cleaned abraded internal restoration surface, application of bonding agent to the restoration as well as the etched/primed tooth, and finally use of a composite resin. Each manufacturer has a recommended system which has been tested for success with its resin system. These fiber reinforced resins are somewhat different than classical composites, so not all cementation systems will necessarily work with them. Polishing of the restoration can be accomplished using diamond or alumina impregnated rubber wheels followed by diamond paste. The glass fibers can pose a health risk. They are small enough to be inhaled and deposited in the lungs, resulting in a silicosis-type problem. Therefore, if fibers are exposed and ground on, it is extremely important to wear a mask. Also, the fibers can be a skin irritant, so gloves also should be worn. If the fibers become exposed intraorally, they can cause gingival inflammation and may attract plaque. The fibers should be covered with additional composite resin. If this cannot be accomplished, the restoration should be replaced. The bulk of these restorations are formed using a particulate filled resin, similar in structure to conventional composite resins. Therefore, concerns as to wear resistance, color stability, excessive expansion/contraction, and sensitivity remain until these materials are proven in long-term clinical trials. They do hold the

  20. Oxygen index tests of thermosetting resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilwee, W. J., Jr.; Parker, J. A.; Kourtides, D. A.

    1980-01-01

    The flammability characteristics of nine thermosetting resins under evaluation for use in aircraft interiors are described. These resins were evaluated using the Oxygen Index (ASTM 2863) testing procedure. The test specimens consisted of both neat resin and glass reinforced resin. When testing glass-reinforced samples it was observed that Oxygen Index values varied inversely with resin content. Oxygen values were also obtained on specimens exposed to temperatures up to 300 C. All specimens experienced a decline in Oxygen Index when tested at an elevated temperature.

  1. Fractionation and utilization of gossypol resin

    SciTech Connect

    Tursunov, A.K.; Dzhailov, A.T.; Fatkhullaev, E.; Sadykov, A.A.

    1985-10-01

    Gossypol resin is formed as a secondary waste product during distillation of fatty acides isolated from cottonseed oil soap stocks; it is insoluble in water but soluble in products of petroleum distillation. For fractionation, gossypol resin was saponified with caustic soda or caustic potash. Using this method, the resin was separated into unsaponifiable (21-24%) and saponifiable (76-79%) parts. Details of the individual fractions of gossypol resin are presented. The unsaponifiable fraction contains hydrocarbons, alcohols, beta-sito-sterol, beta-amyrin, and vitamin E. The fatty acid fraction of the resin is a mixture of fatty acids and lactones.

  2. A Method for Characterizing PMR-15 Resin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, G. D.; Lauver, R. W.

    1986-01-01

    Quantitative analysis technique based on reverse-phase, highperformance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and paired-ion chromatography (PIC) developed for PMR-15 resins. In reverse-phase HPLC experiment, polar solvent containing material to be analyzed passed through column packed with nonpolar substrate. Composition of PMR-15 Resin of 50 weight percent changes as resin ages at room temperature. Verification of proper resin formulation and analysis of changes in resin composition during storage important to manufacturers of PMR-15 polymer matrix composite parts. Technique especially suitable for commercial use by manufacturers of high-performance composite components.

  3. Light-weight DC to very high voltage DC converter

    DOEpatents

    Druce, R.L.; Kirbie, H.C.; Newton, M.A.

    1998-06-30

    A DC-DC converter capable of generating outputs of 100 KV without a transformer comprises a silicon opening switch (SOS) diode connected to allow a charging current from a capacitor to flow into an inductor. When a specified amount of charge has flowed through the SOS diode, it opens up abruptly; and the consequential collapsing field of the inductor causes a voltage and current reversal that is steered into a load capacitor by an output diode. A switch across the series combination of the capacitor, inductor, and SOS diode closes to periodically reset the SOS diode by inducing a forward-biased current. 1 fig.

  4. Light-weight DC to very high voltage DC converter

    DOEpatents

    Druce, Robert L.; Kirbie, Hugh C.; Newton, Mark A.

    1998-01-01

    A DC-DC converter capable of generating outputs of 100 KV without a transformer comprises a silicon opening switch (SOS) diode connected to allow a charging current from a capacitor to flow into an inductor. When a specified amount of charge has flowed through the SOS diode, it opens up abruptly; and the consequential collapsing field of the inductor causes a voltage and current reversal that is steered into a load capacitor by an output diode. A switch across the series combination of the capacitor, inductor, and SOS diode closes to periodically reset the SOS diode by inducing a forward-biased current.

  5. Commercial Of-The Shelf DC/DC Converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denzinger, W.; Baumel, S.

    2011-10-01

    A commercial of-the-shelf (COTS) DC/DC converter for the supply of digital electronics on board of spacecraft has been developed with special emphasis on: *Low cost Readily available *Easy manufacturing *No use of ITAR listed EEE parts like rad-hard mosfets *Minimum number of rad-hard digital and analog IC's *Design tolerance against SEE by appropriate filtering The study was supported by the European Space Agency (ESA) under the contract number 21729/08/NL7LvH.

  6. Low dose failures of hardened DC-DC power converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehman, J.; Yui, C.; Rax, B. G.; Miyahira, T. F.; Weideman, M.; Schrick, P.; Swift, G. M.; Johnston, A. H.

    2002-01-01

    Box-level total dose testing of the FOG (Fiber Optic Gyro) by IXSEA at ESA's GammabeamFacility were abruptly terminated at 8krad (Si) due to catastrophic failure (complete shutdown). This was unexpected because all components within the gyro were supposedly radiation tolerant. Further testing showed that the components responsible for the failure were two DC-DC converters, manufactured by Interpoint, that stopped regulating shortly before shutdown. This paper summarizes diagnostic test results for the converters to determine the underlying cause of the unexpected failure at low levels of radiation.

  7. 14 CFR 93.339 - Requirements for operating in the DC SFRA, including the DC FRZ.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., including the DC FRZ. (a) Except as provided in paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section and in § 93.345, or... operating within the DC SFRA; (5) For VFR operations, the pilot must file and activate a DC FRZ or DC SFRA..., out of, or through the Washington, DC Tri-Area Class B Airspace Area, the pilot receives a...

  8. 14 CFR 93.339 - Requirements for operating in the DC SFRA, including the DC FRZ.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., including the DC FRZ. (a) Except as provided in paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section and in § 93.345, or... operating within the DC SFRA; (5) For VFR operations, the pilot must file and activate a DC FRZ or DC SFRA..., out of, or through the Washington, DC Tri-Area Class B Airspace Area, the pilot receives a...

  9. 14 CFR 93.339 - Requirements for operating in the DC SFRA, including the DC FRZ.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., including the DC FRZ. (a) Except as provided in paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section and in § 93.345, or... operating within the DC SFRA; (5) For VFR operations, the pilot must file and activate a DC FRZ or DC SFRA..., out of, or through the Washington, DC Tri-Area Class B Airspace Area, the pilot receives a...

  10. 14 CFR 93.339 - Requirements for operating in the DC SFRA, including the DC FRZ.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ..., including the DC FRZ. (a) Except as provided in paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section and in § 93.345, or... operating within the DC SFRA; (5) For VFR operations, the pilot must file and activate a DC FRZ or DC SFRA..., out of, or through the Washington, DC Tri-Area Class B Airspace Area, the pilot receives a...

  11. Phenoxy resins containing pendent ethynyl groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hergenrother, P. M.; Jensen, B. J.; Havens, S. J.

    1984-01-01

    As part of an effort on tougher/solvent resistant matrix resins for composites, research was directed towards exploring methods to improve the solvent resistance of linear amorphous thermoplastics. Ethyl reactive groups were placed on the ends of oligomers and pendent along the polymer chain and subsequently thermally reacted to provide crosslinking and thus improvement in solvent resistance. This concept is extended to another thermoplastic, a phenoxy resin. A commercially available phenoxy resin (PKHH) was systematically modified by reaction of the pendent hydroxyl groups on the phenoxy resin with various amounts of 4-ethynylbenzoyl chloride. As the pendent ethynyl group content in the phenoxy resin increased, the cured resin exhibited a higher glass transition temperature, better solvent resistance and less flexibility. The solvent resistance was further improved by correcting a low molecular weight diethynyl compound, 2,2-bis(4-ethynylbenzoyloxy-4'-phenyl)propane, with a phenoxy resin containing pendent ethynyl groups.

  12. Photoacoustic analysis of dental resin polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coloiano, E. C. R.; Rocha, R.; Martin, A. A.; da Silva, M. D.; Acosta-Avalos, D.; Barja, P. R.

    2005-06-01

    In this work, we use the photoacoustic technique to monitor the curing process of diverse dental materials, as the resins chemically activated (RCA). The results obtained reveal that the composition of a determined RCA significantly alters its activation kinetics. Photoacoustic data also show that temperature is a significant parameter in the activation kinetics of resins. The photoacoustic technique was also applied to evaluate the polymerization kinetics of photoactivated resins. Such resins are photoactivated by incidence of continuous light from a photodiode. This leads to the polymerization of the resin, modifying its thermal properties and, consequently, the level of the photoacoustic signal. Measurements show that the polymerization of the resin changes the photoacoustic signal amplitude, indicating that photoacoustic measurements can be utilized to monitor the polymerization kinetic and the degree of polymerization of photoactivated dental resins.

  13. An integrated dc SQUID cascade

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, A.

    1983-05-01

    An integrated tunnel junction dc SQUID cascade has been built and some of its operating characteristics measured. It is shown for the first time that good modulation can be achieved with a remote termination for the tunnel junction shunts. Response time of one of the SQUID's in the cascade was measured to be better than 5 nanoseconds. Maintenance of this high speed is an advantage of the cascade arrangement over other schemes for matching and reading-out dc tunnel junction SQUID's. True cascade operation was not obtained, due to coupling of Josephson oscillations from the first stage of the cascade to the second.

  14. AC and DC power transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    The technical and economic assessment of AC and DC transmission systems; long distance transmission, cable transmission, system inter-connection, voltage support, reactive compensation, stabilisation of systems; parallel operation of DC links with AC systems; comparison between alternatives for particular schemes. Design and application equipment: design, testing and application of equipment for HVDC, series and shunt static compensated AC schemes, including associated controls. Installations: overall design of stations and conductor arrangements for HVDC, series and shunt static AC schemes including insulation co-ordination. System analysis and modelling.

  15. Piezometer completion report for borehole cluster sites DC-19, DC-20, and DC-22

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, R.L.; Diediker, L.D.; Ledgerwood, R.K.; Veatch, M.D.

    1984-07-01

    This report describes the design and installation of multi-level piezometers at borehole cluster sites DC-19, DC-20 and DC-22. The network of borehole cluster sites will provide facilities for multi-level water-level monitoring across the RRL for piezometer baseline monitoring and for large-scale hydraulic stress testing. These groundwater-monitoring facilities were installed between August 1983 and March 1984. Three series of piezometer nests (A-, C- and D-series) were installed in nine hydrogeologic units (monitoring horizons) within the Columbia River Basalt Group at each borehole cluster site. In addition to the piezometer facilities, a B-series pumping well was installed at borehole cluster sites DC-20 and DC-22. The A-series piezometer nest monitors the basal Ringold sediments and the Rattlesnake Ridge interbed. The C-series piezometer nests monitors the six deepest horizons, which are in increasing depth, the Priest Rapids interflow, Sentinel Gap flow top, Ginkgo flow top, Rocky Coulee flow top, Cohassett flow top and Umtanum flow top. The D-series piezometer monitors the Mabton interbed. The B-series pumping well was completed in the Priest Rapids interflow. 21 refs., 6 figs., 6 tabs.

  16. Foam, Foam-resin composite and method of making a foam-resin composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cranston, John A. (Inventor); MacArthur, Doug E. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    This invention relates to a foam, a foam-resin composite and a method of making foam-resin composites. The foam set forth in this invention comprises a urethane modified polyisocyanurate derived from an aromatic amino polyol and a polyether polyol. In addition to the polyisocyanurate foam, the composite of this invention further contains a resin layer, wherein the resin may be epoxy, bismaleimide, or phenolic resin. Such resins generally require cure or post-cure temperatures of at least 350.degree. F.

  17. Switching coordination of distributed dc-dc converters for highly efficient photovoltaic power plants

    DOEpatents

    Agamy, Mohammed; Elasser, Ahmed; Sabate, Juan Antonio; Galbraith, Anthony William; Harfman Todorovic, Maja

    2014-09-09

    A distributed photovoltaic (PV) power plant includes a plurality of distributed dc-dc converters. The dc-dc converters are configured to switch in coordination with one another such that at least one dc-dc converter transfers power to a common dc-bus based upon the total system power available from one or more corresponding strings of PV modules. Due to the coordinated switching of the dc-dc converters, each dc-dc converter transferring power to the common dc-bus continues to operate within its optimal efficiency range as well as to optimize the maximum power point tracking in order to increase the energy yield of the PV power plant.

  18. DC coupled Doppler radar physiological monitor.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xi; Song, Chenyan; Lubecke, Victor; Boric-Lubecke, Olga

    2011-01-01

    One of the challenges in Doppler radar systems for physiological monitoring is a large DC offset in baseband outputs. Typically, AC coupling is used to eliminate this DC offset. Since the physiological signals of interest include frequency content near DC, it is not desirable to simply use AC coupling on the radar outputs. While AC coupling effectively removes DC offset, it also introduces a large time delay and distortion. This paper presents the first DC coupled IQ demodulator printed circuit board (PCB) design and measurements. The DC coupling is achieved by using a mixer with high LO to RF port isolation, resulting in a very low radar DC offset on the order of mV. The DC coupled signals from the PCB radar system were successfully detected with significant LNA gain without saturation. Compared to the AC coupled results, the DC coupled results show great advantages of less signal distortion and more accurate rate estimation.

  19. DC coupled Doppler radar physiological monitor.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xi; Song, Chenyan; Lubecke, Victor; Boric-Lubecke, Olga

    2011-01-01

    One of the challenges in Doppler radar systems for physiological monitoring is a large DC offset in baseband outputs. Typically, AC coupling is used to eliminate this DC offset. Since the physiological signals of interest include frequency content near DC, it is not desirable to simply use AC coupling on the radar outputs. While AC coupling effectively removes DC offset, it also introduces a large time delay and distortion. This paper presents the first DC coupled IQ demodulator printed circuit board (PCB) design and measurements. The DC coupling is achieved by using a mixer with high LO to RF port isolation, resulting in a very low radar DC offset on the order of mV. The DC coupled signals from the PCB radar system were successfully detected with significant LNA gain without saturation. Compared to the AC coupled results, the DC coupled results show great advantages of less signal distortion and more accurate rate estimation. PMID:22254704

  20. Pharmaceutical Applications of Ion-Exchange Resins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elder, David P.

    2005-04-01

    The historical uses of ion-exchange resins and a summary of the basic chemical principles involved in the ion-exchange process are discussed. Specific applications of ion-exchange resins are provided. The utility of these agents to stabilize drugs are evaluated. Commonly occurring chemical and physical incompatibilities are reviewed. Ion-exchange resins have found applicability as inactive pharmaceutical constituents, particularly as disintegrants (inactive tablet ingredient whose function is to rapidly disrupt the tablet matrix on contact with gastric fluid). One of the more elegant approaches to improving palatability of ionizable drugs is the use of ion-exchange resins as taste-masking agents. The selection, optimization of drug:resin ratio and particle size, together with a review of scaleup of typical manufacturing processes for taste-masked products are provided. Ion-exchange resins have been extensively utilized in oral sustained-release products. The selection, optimization of drug:resin ratio and particle size, together with a summary of commonly occurring commercial sustained-release products are discussed. Ion-exchange resins have also been used in topical products for local application to the skin, including those where drug flux is controlled by a differential electrical current (ionotophoretic delivery). General applicability of ion-exchange resins, including ophthalmic delivery, nasal delivery, use as drugs in their own right (e.g., colestyramine, formerly referred to as cholestyramine), as well as measuring gastrointestinal transit times, are discussed. Finally, pharmaceutical monographs for ion-exchange resins are reviewed.

  1. DC-Powered Jumping Ring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeffery, Rondo N.; Farhang, Amiri

    2016-01-01

    The classroom jumping ring demonstration is nearly always performed using alternating current (AC), in which the ring jumps or flies off the extended iron core when the switch is closed. The ring jumps higher when cooled with liquid nitrogen (LN2). We have performed experiments using DC to power the solenoid and find similarities and significant…

  2. Experiments with a DC Motor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2010-01-01

    Experiments with an electric motor provide good opportunity to demonstrate some basic laws of electricity and magnetism. The aim of the experiments with a low-power dc motor is to show how the motor approaches its steady rotation and how its torque, mechanical power and efficiency depend on the rotation velocity. The tight relationship between the…

  3. High Temperature Transfer Molding Resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G., Jr. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    High temperature resins containing phenylethynyl groups that are processable by transfer molding have been prepared. These phenylethynyl containing oligomers were prepared from aromatic diamines containing phenylethynyl groups and various ratios of phthalic anhydride and 4-phenylethynlphthalic anhydride in glacial acetic acid to form a mixture of imide compounds in one step. This synthetic approach is advantageous since the products are a mixture of compounds and consequently exhibit a relatively low melting temperature. In addition, these materials exhibit low melt viscosities which are stable for several hours at 210-275 C, and since the thermal reaction of the phenylethynyl group does not occur to any appreciable extent at temperatures below 300 C, these materials have a broad processing window. Upon thermal cure at approximately 300-350 C, the phenylethynyl groups react to provide a crosslinked resin system. These new materials exhibit excellent properties and are potentially useful as adhesives, coatings, films, moldings and composite matrices.

  4. Advanced thermoplastic resins, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, A. M.; Hill, S. G.; Falcone, A.

    1991-01-01

    High temperature structural resins are required for use on advanced aerospace vehicles as adhesives and composite matrices. NASA-Langley developed polyimide resins were evaluated as high temperature structural adhesives for metal to metal bonding and as composite matrices. Adhesive tapes were prepared on glass scrim fabric from solutions of polyamide acids of the semicrystalline polyimide LARC-CPI, developed at the NASA-Langley Research Center. Using 6Al-4V titanium adherends, high lap shear bond strengths were obtained at ambient temperature (45.2 MPa, 6550 psi) and acceptable strengths were obtained at elevated temperature (14.0 MPa, 2030 psi) using the Pasa-Jell 107 conversion coating on the titanium and a bonding pressure of 1.38 MPa (200 psi). Average zero degree composite tensile and compressive strengths of 1290 MPa (187 ksi) and 883 MPa (128 ksi) respectively were obtained at ambient temperature with unsized AS-4 carbon fiber reinforcement.

  5. Optimizing the concentration of quaternary ammonium dimethacrylate monomer in bis-GMA/TEGDMA dental resin system for antibacterial activity and mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiaoxu; Söderling, Eva; Liu, Fang; He, Jingwei; Lassila, Lippo V J; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2014-05-01

    Four novel quaternary ammonium dimethacrylate monomers named IMQ (side alkyl chain length from 12 to 18) were synthesized with the aim to synthesize dental resin with antibacterial activity. All of IMQs were added into bis-GMA/TEGDMA dental resin system with a series of mass ratio (5, 10, and 20 wt%), double bond conversion (DC), flexural strength (FS), modulus of elasticity (FM) and biofilm formation inhibitory effect were studied. According to the results of DC, FS, FM, and the biofilm inhibitory effect, IMQ-16 containing polymer had the best comprehensive properties, and the optimal concentration of IMQ-16 in bis-GMA/TEGDMA dental resin would be in the range of 5-10 wt%.

  6. Phosphorus-containing imide resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varma, I. K.; Fohlen, G. M.; Parker, J. A. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    Flame-resistant reinforced bodies are disclosed which are composed of reinforcing fibers, filaments or fabrics in a cured body of bis- and tris-imide resins derived from tris(m-aminophenyl) phosphine oxides by reaction with maleic anhydride or its derivatives, or of addition polymers of such imides, including a variant in which a mono-imide is condensed with a dianhydride and the product is treated with a further quantity of maleic anhydride.

  7. 21 CFR 177.2510 - Polyvinylidene fluoride resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Polyvinylidene fluoride resins. 177.2510 Section... Repeated Use § 177.2510 Polyvinylidene fluoride resins. Polyvinylidene fluoride resins may be safely used... fluoride resins consist of basic resins produced by the polymerization of vinylidene fluoride. (b)...

  8. Synthesis of improved polyester resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcleod, A. H.; Delano, C. B.

    1979-01-01

    Eighteen aromatic unsaturated polyester prepolymers prepared by a modified interfacial condensation technique were investigated for their solubility in vinyl monomers and ability to provide high char yield forming unsaturated polyester resins. The best resin system contained a polyester prepolymer of phthalic, fumaric and diphenic acids reacted with 2,7-naphthalene diol and 9,9-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)fluorene. This prepolymer is very soluble in styrene, divinyl benzene, triallyl cyanurate, diallyl isophthalate and methylvinylpyridine. It provided anaerobic char yields as high as 41 percent at 800 C. The combination of good solubility and char yield represents a significant improvement over state-of-the-art unsaturated polyester resins. The majority of the other prepolymers had only low or no solubility in vinyl monomers. Graphite composites from this prepolymer with styrene were investigated. The cause for the observed low shear strengths of the composites was not determined, however 12-week aging of the composites at 82 C showed that essentially no changes in the composites had occurred.

  9. ELUTION OF URANIUM FROM RESIN

    DOEpatents

    McLEan, D.C.

    1959-03-10

    A method is described for eluting uranium from anion exchange resins so as to decrease vanadium and iron contamination and permit recycle of the major portion of the eluats after recovery of the uranium. Diminution of vanadium and iron contamination of the major portion of the uranium is accomplished by treating the anion exchange resin, which is saturated with uranium complex by adsorption from a sulfuric acid leach liquor from an ore bearing uranium, vanadium and iron, with one column volume of eluant prepared by passing chlorine into ammonium hydroxide until the chloride content is about 1 N and the pH is about 1. The resin is then eluted with 8 to 9 column volumes of 0.9 N ammonium chloride--0.1 N hydrochloric acid solution. The eluants are collected separately and treated with ammonia to precipitate ammonium diuranate which is filtered therefrom. The uranium salt from the first eluant is contaminated with the major portion of ths vanadium and iron and is reworked, while the uranium recovered from the second eluant is relatively free of the undesirable vanadium and irons. The filtrate from the first eluant portion is discarded. The filtrate from the second eluant portion may be recycled after adding hydrochloric acid to increase the chloride ion concentration and adjust the pH to about 1.

  10. Influence of Curing Light Attenuation Caused by Aesthetic Indirect Restorative Materials on Resin Cement Polymerization

    PubMed Central

    Pick, Bárbara; Gonzaga, Carla Castiglia; Junior, Washington Steagall; Kawano, Yoshio; Braga, Roberto Ruggiero; Cardoso, Paulo Eduardo Capel

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To verify the effect of interposing different indirect restorative materials on degree of conversion (DC), hardness, and flexural strength of a dual-cure resin cement. Methods: Discs (2 mm-thick, n=5) of four indirect restorative materials were manufactured: a layered glass-ceramic (GC); a heat-pressed lithium disilicate-based glass-ceramic veneered with the layered glass-ceramic (LD); a micro-hybrid (MH); and a micro-filled (MF) indirect composite resin. The light transmittance of these materials was determined using a double-beam spectrophotometer with an integrating sphere. Bar-shaped specimens of a dual-cure resin cement (Nexus 2/SDS Kerr), with (dual-cure mode) and without the catalyst paste (light-cure mode), were photoactivated through the discs using either a quartz-tungsten-halogen (QTH) or a light-emitting diode (LED) unit. As a control, specimens were photoactivated without the interposed discs. Specimens were stored at 37ºC for 24h before being submitted to FT-Raman spectrometry (n=3), Knoop microhardness (n=6) and three-point bending (n=6) tests. Data were analyzed by ANOVA/Tukey’s test (α=0.05). Results: MH presented the highest transmittance. The DC was lower in light-cure mode than in dual-cure mode. All restorative materials reduced the cement microhardness in light-cure mode. GC and LD with QTH and GC with LED decreased the strength of the cement for both activation modes compared to the controls. Curing units did not affect DC or microhardness, except when the dual-cure cement was photoactivated through LD (LED>QTH). Flexural strength was higher with QTH compared to LED. Conclusions: Differences in transmittance among the restorative materials significantly influenced cement DC and flexural strength, regardless of the activation mode, as well as the microhardness of the resin cement tested in light-cure mode. Microhardness was not impaired by the interposed materials when the resin cement was used in dual-cure mode. PMID:20613921

  11. Identification of cDC1- and cDC2-committed DC progenitors reveals early lineage priming at the common DC progenitor stage in the bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Schlitzer, Andreas; Sivakamasundari, V; Chen, Jinmiao; Sumatoh, Hermi Rizal Bin; Schreuder, Jaring; Lum, Josephine; Malleret, Benoit; Zhang, Sanqian; Larbi, Anis; Zolezzi, Francesca; Renia, Laurent; Poidinger, Michael; Naik, Shalin; Newell, Evan W; Robson, Paul; Ginhoux, Florent

    2015-07-01

    Mouse conventional dendritic cells (cDCs) can be classified into two functionally distinct lineages: the CD8α(+) (CD103(+)) cDC1 lineage, and the CD11b(+) cDC2 lineage. cDCs arise from a cascade of bone marrow (BM) DC-committed progenitor cells that include the common DC progenitors (CDPs) and pre-DCs, which exit the BM and seed peripheral tissues before differentiating locally into mature cDCs. Where and when commitment to the cDC1 or cDC2 lineage occurs remains poorly understood. Here we found that transcriptional signatures of the cDC1 and cDC2 lineages became evident at the single-cell level from the CDP stage. We also identified Siglec-H and Ly6C as lineage markers that distinguished pre-DC subpopulations committed to the cDC1 lineage (Siglec-H(-)Ly6C(-) pre-DCs) or cDC2 lineage (Siglec-H(-)Ly6C(+) pre-DCs). Our results indicate that commitment to the cDC1 or cDC2 lineage occurs in the BM and not in the periphery.

  12. Evaluation of adhesion of reline resins to the thermoplastic denture base resin for non-metal clasp denture.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Hye; Choe, Han Cheol; Son, Mee Kyoung

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the tensile and transverse bond strength of chairside reline resins (Tokuyama Rebase II, Mild Rebaron LC) to a thermoplastic acrylic resin (Acrytone) used for non metal clasp denture. The results were compared with those of a conventional heat polymerized acrylic resin (Paladent 20) and a thermoplastic polyamide resin (Biotone). The failure sites were examined by scanning electron microscopy to evaluate the mode of failure. As results, the bond strength of reline resins to a thermoplastic acrylic resin was similar to the value of a conventional heat polymerized acrylic resin. However, thermoplastic polyamide resin showed the lowest value. The results of this study indicated that a thermoplastic acrylic resin for non metal clasps denture allows chairside reline and repair. It was also found that the light-polymerized reline resin had better bond strength than the autopolymerizing reline resin in relining for a conventional heat polymerized acrylic resin and a thermoplastic acrylic resin.

  13. New modified hydrocarbon resins; An alternative to styrenated terpene resins in hot melts

    SciTech Connect

    Carper, J.D. )

    1990-06-01

    This paper reports on the development of two hydrocarbon-based resin formulations that could be used with different thermoplastic block copolymers to formulate pressure-sensitive adhesives. Results are examined with one of these resins in formulations with styrene-isoprene-styrene (SIS) and styrene-butadiene (SB) compounds. The new modified hydrocarbon resin, with a softening point of 98{degrees} C, matches the adhesive performance of a terpene resin with a softening point of 105{degrees} C. The resin performs as well as the modified terpene in SIS-, SB-, and EVA-based adhesives. The new hydrocarbon resin is especially well suited for hot-melt adhesives. It exhibits low volatility, good color stability, and excellent melt viscosity stability. Since the new resin is based on petroleum hydrocarbon feedstocks, it should be available at moderate, stable prices. The other hydrocarbon resin, with a softening point of 85{degrees} C, produced comparable results.

  14. Scintillating 99Tc Selective Ion Exchange Resins

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell Greenhalgh; Richard D. Tillotson

    2012-07-01

    Scintillating technetium (99Tc) selective ion exchange resins have been developed and evaluated for equilibrium capacities and detection efficiencies. These resins can be utilized for the in-situ concentration and detection of low levels of pertechnetate anions (99TcO4-) in natural waters. Three different polystyrene type resin support materials were impregnated with varying amounts of tricaprylmethylammonium chloride (Aliquat 336) extractant, several different scintillating fluors and wavelength shifters. The prepared resins were contacted batch-wise to equilibrium over a wide range of 99TcO4- concentrations in natural water. The measured capacities were used to develop Langmuir adsorption isotherms for each resin. 99Tc detection efficiencies were determined and up to 71.4 ± 2.6% was achieved with some resins. The results demonstrate that a low level detection limit for 99TcO4- in natural waters can be realized.

  15. Development of tough, moisture resistant laminating resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brand, R. A.; Harrison, E. S.

    1982-01-01

    Tough, moisture resistant laminating resins for employment with graphite fibers were developed. The new laminating resins exhibited cost, handleability and processing characteristics equivalent to 394K (250 F) curing epoxies. The laminating resins were based on bisphenol A dicyanate and monofunctional cyanates with hydrophobic substituents. These resins sorb only small quantities of moisture at equilibrium (0.5% or less) with minimal glass transition temperature depression and represent an improvement over epoxies which sorb around 2% moisture at equilibrium. Toughening was accomplished by the precipitation of small diameter particles of butadiene nitrile rubber throughout the resin matrix. The rubber domains act as microcrack termini and energy dissipation sites, allowing increased stress accommodation prior to catastrophic failure. A unique blend of amine terminated butadiene nitrile elastomer (MW 2,000) and a high nitrile content butadiene nitrile rubber yielded the desired resin morphology.

  16. Influence of nanometer scale particulate fillers on some properties of microfilled composite resin.

    PubMed

    Garoushi, Sufyan; Lassila, Lippo V J; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different weight fractions of nanometer sized particulate filler on properties of microfilled composite resin. Composite resin was prepared by mixing 33 wt% of resin matrix to the 67 wt% of silane treated microfine silica particulate fillers with various fractions of nanometer sized fillers (0, 10, 15, 20, 30 wt%) using a high speed mixing machine. Test specimens made of the composites were tested with a three-point bending test with a speed of 1.0 mm/min until fracture. Surface microhardess (Vicker's microhardness) was also determined. The volumetric shrinkage in percent was calculated as a buoyancy change in distilled water by means of the Archimedes principle. The degree of monomer conversion (DC%) of the experimental composites containing different nanofiller fractions was measured using FTIR spectroscopy. Surface roughness (Ra) was determined using a surface profilometer. Nanowear measurements were carried out using a nanoindentation device. The water uptake of specimens was also measured. Parameters were statistically analysed by ANOVA (P < 0.05). The group without nanofillers showed the highest flexural strength and modulus, DC% and Ra value. The group with 30% nanofillers had the highest water uptake and volumetric shrinkage. No significant difference was found in Vicker's microhardness and the nanowear of the composites. The plain microfilled composite demonstrated superior properties compared to the composites loaded with nanofillers with the exception of surface roughness. PMID:21611793

  17. DC to DC power converters and methods of controlling the same

    DOEpatents

    Steigerwald, Robert Louis; Elasser, Ahmed; Sabate, Juan Antonio; Todorovic, Maja Harfman; Agamy, Mohammed

    2012-12-11

    A power generation system configured to provide direct current (DC) power to a DC link is described. The system includes a first power generation unit configured to output DC power. The system also includes a first DC to DC converter comprising an input section and an output section. The output section of the first DC to DC converter is coupled in series with the first power generation unit. The first DC to DC converter is configured to process a first portion of the DC power output by the first power generation unit and to provide an unprocessed second portion of the DC power output of the first power generation unit to the output section.

  18. Resin selection criteria for tough composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Smith, G. T.

    1983-01-01

    Resin selection criteria are derived using a structured methodology consisting of an upward integrated mechanistic theory and its inverse (top-down structured theory). These criteria are expressed in a "criteria selection space" which are used to identify resin bulk properties for improved composite "toughness". The resin selection criteria correlate with a variety of experimental data including laminate strength, elevated temperature effects and impact resistance.

  19. Porous Ceramic Spheres from Ion Exchange Resin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dynys, Fred

    2005-01-01

    A commercial cation ion exchange resin, cross-linked polystyrene, has been successfully used as a template to fabricate 20 to 50 micron porous ceramic spheres. Ion exchange resins have dual template capabilities. Pore architecture of the ceramic spheres can be altered by changing the template pattern. Templating can be achieved by utilizing the internal porous structure or the external surface of the resin beads. Synthesis methods and chemical/physical characteristics of the ceramic spheres will be reported.

  20. Dilation and Curettage (D&C)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Dilation and Curettage (D&C) Home For Patients Search FAQs Dilation and ... FAQ062, February 2016 PDF Format Dilation and Curettage (D&C) Special Procedures What is dilation and curettage ( ...

  1. Mesoscopic electronics beyond DC transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Carlo, Leonardo

    Since the inception of mesoscopic electronics in the 1980's, direct current (dc) measurements have underpinned experiments in quantum transport. Novel techniques complementing dc transport are becoming paramount to new developments in mesoscopic electronics, particularly as the road is paved toward quantum information processing. This thesis describes seven experiments on GaAs/AlGaAs and graphene nanostructures unified by experimental techniques going beyond traditional dc transport. Firstly, dc current induced by microwave radiation applied to an open chaotic quantum dot is investigated. Asymmetry of mesoscopic fluctuations of induced current in perpendicular magnetic field is established as a tool for separating the quantum photovoltaic effect from classical rectification. A differential charge sensing technique is next developed using integrated quantum point contacts to resolve the spatial distribution of charge inside a double quantum clot. An accurate method for determining interdot tunnel coupling and electron temperature using charge sensing is demonstrated. A two-channel system for detecting current noise in mesoscopic conductors is developed, enabling four experiments where shot noise probes transmission properties not available in dc transport and Johnson noise serves as an electron thermometer. Suppressed shot noise is observed in quantum point contacts at zero parallel magnetic field, associated with the 0.7 structure in conductance. This suppression evolves with increasing field into the shot-noise signature of spin-lifted mode degeneracy. Quantitative agreement is found with a phenomenological model for density-dependent mode splitting. Shot noise measurements of multi-lead quantum-dot structures in the Coulomb blockade regime distill the mechanisms by which Coulomb interaction and quantum indistinguishability correlate electron flow. Gate-controlled sign reversal of noise cross correlation in two capacitively-coupled dots is observed, and shown to

  2. Advanced resin systems for graphite epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilwee, W. J.; Jayarajan, A.

    1980-01-01

    The value of resin/carbon fiber composites as lightweight structures for aircraft and other vehicle applications is dependent on many properties: environmental stability, strength, toughness, resistance to burning, smoke produced when burning, raw material costs, and complexity of processing. A number of woven carbon fiber and epoxy resin composites were made. The epoxy resin was commercially available tetraglycidylmethylene dianiline. In addition, composites were made using epoxy resin modified with amine and carboxyl terminated butadiene acrylonitrile copolymer. Strength and toughness in flexure as well as oxygen index flammability and NBS smoke chamber tests of the composites are reported.

  3. Conservative full-mouth resin renewal.

    PubMed

    Morgan, M J

    1999-12-01

    The treatment of this patient involved the coordination of periodontal, orthodontic, restorative, and aesthetic considerations. It was unique because it involved only resin as the primary restorative material, which allowed for conservative preparations and restorations. In the posterior, the use of direct and indirect resins resulted in the removal of little or no healthy tooth structure. In the anterior, the use of direct resin veneers required minimal removal of enamel, while still achieving proper function and aesthetics. Resin restorations in this particular case allowed for an acceptable clinical result and a highly satisfied patient.

  4. Resin composites in minimally invasive dentistry.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    The concept of minimally invasive dentistry will provide favorable conditions for the use of composite resin. However, a number of factors must be considered when placing composite resins in conservatively prepared cavities, including: aspects on the adaptation of the composite resin to the cavity walls; the use of adhesives; and techniques for obtaining adequate proximal contacts. The clinician must also adopt an equally conservative approach when treating failed restorations. The quality of the composite resin restoration will not only be affected by the outline form of the preparation but also by the clinician's technique and understanding of the materials.

  5. Novel silica-based ion exchange resin

    SciTech Connect

    1997-11-01

    Eichrom`s highly successful Diphonixo resin resembles a conventional ion exchange resin in its use of sulfonic acid ligands on a styrene- divinylbenzene matrix. Diphonix resin exhibits rapid exchange kinetics that allow economical operation of ion exchange systems. Unlike conventional resins, Diphonix resin contains chelating ligands that are diphosphonic acid groups that recognize and remove the targeted metals and reject the more common elements such as sodium, calcium and magnesium. This latter property makes Diphonix ideal for many industrial scale applications, including those involving waste treatment. For treatment of low-level, transuranic (TRU) and high- level radioactive wastes, Diphonix`s polystyrene backbone hinders its application due to radiolytic stability of the carbon-hydrogen bonds and lack of compatibility with expected vitrification schemes. Polystyrene-based Diphonix is approximately 60% carbon- hydrogen. In response to an identified need within the Department of Energy for a resin with the positive attributes of Diphonix that also exhibits greater radiolytic stability and final waste form compatibility, Eichrom has successfully developed a new, silica-based resin version of Diphonix. Target application for this new resin is for use in environmental restoration and waste management situations involving the processing of low-level, transuranic and high-level radioactive wastes. The resin can also be used for processing liquid mixed waste (waste that contains low level radioactivity and hazardous constituents) including mixed wastes contaminated with organic compounds. Silica-based Diphonix is only 10% carbon-hydrogen, with the bulk of the matrix silica.

  6. Characterization of PMR polyimide resin and prepreg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindenmeyer, P. H.; Sheppard, C. H.

    1984-01-01

    Procedures for the chemical characterization of PMR-15 resin solutions and graphite-reinforced prepregs were developed, and a chemical data base was established. In addition, a basic understanding of PMR-15 resin chemistry was gained; this was translated into effective processing procedures for the production of high quality graphite composites. During the program the PMR monomers and selected model compounds representative of postulated PMR-15 solution chemistry were acquired and characterized. Based on these data, a baseline PMR-15 resin was formulated and evaluated for processing characteristics and composite properties. Commercially available PMR-15 resins were then obtained and chemically characterized. Composite panels were fabricated and evaluated.

  7. Sand control with resin and explosive

    SciTech Connect

    Dees, J.M.; Begnaud, W.J.; Sahr, N.L.

    1992-09-08

    This patent describes a method for treating a well having perforated casing to prevent solids movement through the perforations and into the wellbore. It comprises positioning a quantity of liquid resin solution such that the solution occupies the interval of the casing having perforations; positioning an explosive in proximity with the liquid resin solution; detonating the explosive; displacing the liquid resin solution remaining in the wellbore after step (c) through the perforations with a displacing fluid; and injecting a chemical solution through the perforations to cause the resin to polymerize to form a consolidated permeable matrix.

  8. Bending rigidity of composite resin coating clasps.

    PubMed

    Ikebe, K; Kibi, M; Ono, T; Nokubi, T

    1993-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the bending profiles of composite resin coating cast clasps. The cobalt-chromium alloy cast clasps were made using tapered wax pattern. Silane coupling method (Silicoater MD, Kulzer Co.) was used to attach composite resin to metal surface. The breakage and the bending rigidity of composite resin coating clasps were evaluated. Results were as follows: 1) After the repeated bending test to the tips of clasp arm at 10,000 times in 0.25 mm deflection, neither crack on composite resin surface nor separation at resin/metal interface was observed in any specimen. 2) There was no significant difference in the bending rigidity of clasp arms between before and after composite resin coating. From these results, it was demonstrated that the composite resin coating cast clasp was available in clinical cases and coating with composite resin had little influence on the bending rigidity of clasp arms. Therefore, it was suggested that our clasp designing and fabricating system to control the bending rigidity of clasp arms could be applied to composite resin coating clasps. PMID:8935086

  9. Lightweight, Low-Loss dc Transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagano, S.; Koerner, T.; Brisendine, P.; Weiner, H.; Detwiler, R.

    1982-01-01

    Direct current is measured by lightweight, magnetically coupled transducer that weighs only 4 grams, without actually being wired into circuit under test. Miniature dc transducer has five windings: 2 for ac excitation inputs, 2 for dc control inputs, and 1 for feedback. Wire gages are selected for minimum size and weight. Size and number of turns of dc windings are selected according to dc current range to be measured.

  10. Evaluation of Polymerization Efficacy in Composite Resins via FT-IR Spectroscopy and Vickers Microhardness Test

    PubMed Central

    Jafarzadeh, Tahereh-Sadat; Erfan, Mohammad; Behroozibakhsh, Marjan; Fatemi, Mostafa; Masaeli, Reza; Rezaei, Yashar; Bagheri, Hossein; Erfan, Yasaman

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. Polymerization efficacy affects the properties and performance of composite resin restorations.The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of polymerization of two micro-hybrid, two nano-hybrid and one nano-filled ormocer-based composite resins, cured by two different light-curing systems, using Fourier transformation infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and Vickers microhardness testing at two different depths (top surface, 2 mm). Materials and methods. For FT-IR spectrometry, five cylindrical specimens (5mm in diameter × 2 mm in length) were prepared from each composite resin using Teflon molds and polymerized for 20 seconds. Then, 70-μm wafers were sectioned at the top surface and at2mm from the top surface. The degree of conversion for each sample was calculated using FT-IR spectroscopy. For Vickers micro-hardness testing, three cylindrical specimens were prepared from each composite resin and polymerized for 20 seconds. The Vickers microhardness test (Shimadzu, Type M, Japan) was performed at the top and bottom (depth=2 mm) surfaces of each specimen. Three-way ANOVA with independent variables and Tukey tests were performed at 95% significance level. Results. No significant differences were detected in degree of conversion and microhardness between LED and QTH light-curing units except for the ormocer-based specimen, CeramX, which exhibited significantly higher DC by LED. All the composite resins showed a significantly higher degree of conversion at the surface. Microhardness was not significantly affected by depth, except for Herculite XRV Ultra and CeramX, which showed higher values at the surface. Conclusion. Composite resins containing nano-particles generally exhibited more variations in degree of conversion and microhardness. PMID:26889359

  11. 49 CFR 372.219 - Washington, DC

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Washington, DC 372.219 Section 372.219... ZONES, AND TERMINAL AREAS Commercial Zones § 372.219 Washington, DC The zone adjacent to, and... points within a line drawn 15 miles beyond the municipal limits of Washington, DC (c) All points...

  12. 49 CFR 372.219 - Washington, DC

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Washington, DC 372.219 Section 372.219... ZONES, AND TERMINAL AREAS Commercial Zones § 372.219 Washington, DC The zone adjacent to, and... points within a line drawn 15 miles beyond the municipal limits of Washington, DC (c) All points...

  13. 49 CFR 372.219 - Washington, DC

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Washington, DC 372.219 Section 372.219... ZONES, AND TERMINAL AREAS Commercial Zones § 372.219 Washington, DC The zone adjacent to, and... points within a line drawn 15 miles beyond the municipal limits of Washington, DC (c) All points...

  14. 49 CFR 372.219 - Washington, DC

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Washington, DC 372.219 Section 372.219... ZONES, AND TERMINAL AREAS Commercial Zones § 372.219 Washington, DC The zone adjacent to, and... points within a line drawn 15 miles beyond the municipal limits of Washington, DC (c) All points...

  15. Washington: A DC Circuit Tour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halpern, Paul

    2010-12-01

    I explore the history of physics in Washington, D.C., and its environs through a tour of notable sites and personalities. Highlights include visits to the Smithsonian and Carnegie Institutions, stops at the Einstein Memorial, George Washington University, the University of Maryland, and the American Center for Physics, and biographical sketches of physicists Joseph Henry, George Gamow, Edward Teller, and others who worked in the District of Columbia.

  16. Transformerless dc-Isolated Converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rippel, Wally E.

    1987-01-01

    Efficient voltage converter employs capacitive instead of transformer coupling to provide dc isolation. Offers buck/boost operation, minimal filtering, and low parts count, with possible application in photovoltaic power inverters, power supplies and battery charges. In photovoltaic inverter circuit with transformerless converter, Q2, Q3, Q4, and Q5 form line-commutated inverter. Switching losses and stresses nil because switching performed when current is zero.

  17. Effect of dual-peak LED unit on the polymerization of coinitiator-containing composite resins.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Soo; Jeong, Tae-Sung; Kim, Shin; Kim, Hyung-Il; Kwon, Yong Hoon

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effect of dual-peak LED on the polymerization of coinitiator-containing composite resins. For this, microhardness, degree of conversion (DC), and polymerization shrinkage were evaluated. Specimens (coinitiator-containing: Aelite LS Posterior, Tetric EvoCeram, and Vit-l-escence; only camphorquinone-containng: Filtek Z350 and Grandio) were light cured using a quartz-tungsten-halogen (QTH: OP), a single-peak light-emitting diode (LED) (L. E. Demetron: DM), and a dual-peak LED (G-light: GL), respectively. All specimens light cured using GL showed the highest microhardness both on the top and bottom surfaces compared with the values obtained using the rest light-curing units (LCUs). DC had no consistent trend correspond to the LCU, but rather product specific. OP yielded the lowest polymerization shrinkage on the specimens. The coinitiator-containing composite resins achieved the highest microhardness by the dual-peak LED (GL). However, the influence of GL on DC and polymerization shrinkage of the specimens was not consistent. PMID:22864221

  18. Advanced DC/DC Converters towards higher Volumetric Efficiencies for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plante, Jeannette; Shue, Jack; Liu, David; Wang, Bright; Shaw, Harry

    2005-01-01

    Contents include the following: 1. NASA mission outlook. 2. Issues with DC/DC converter for space. 3. Statement of newly initiated engineering activities for DC/DC converter. 4. Overview of prototyping work with novel materials. 5. Results of cryogenic testing.

  19. 76 FR 68745 - DC Energy, LLC; DC Energy Mid-Atlantic, LLC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission DC Energy, LLC; DC Energy Mid-Atlantic, LLC v. PJM Interconnection, L.L.C... Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (Commission), 18 CFR 385.206 (2011), DC Energy, LLC (DC Energy)...

  20. FT-Raman spectroscopy study of organic matrix degradation in nanofilled resin composite.

    PubMed

    Soares, Luís Eduardo Silva; Nahórny, Sídnei; Martin, Airton Abrahão

    2013-04-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the effect of light curing unit (LCU) type, mouthwashes, and soft drink on chemical degradation of a nanofilled resin composite. Samples (80) were divided into eight groups: halogen LCU, HS--saliva (control); HPT--Pepsi Twist®; HLC--Listerine®; HCP--Colgate Plax®; LED LCU, LS--saliva (control); LPT--Pepsi Twist®; LLC--Listerine®; LCP--Colgate Plax®. The degree of conversion analysis and the measure of the peak area at 2,930 cm-1 (organic matrix) of resin composite were done by Fourier-transform Raman spectroscopy (baseline, after 7 and 14 days). The data were subjected to multifactor analysis of variance (ANOVA) at a 95% confidence followed by Tukey's HSD post-hoc test. The DC ranged from 58.0% (Halogen) to 59.3% (LED) without significance. Differences in the peak area between LCUs were found after 7 days of storage in S and PT. A marked increase in the peak intensity of HLC and LLC groups was found. The soft-start light-activation may influence the chemical degradation of organic matrix in resin composite. Ethanol contained in Listerine® Cool Mint mouthwash had the most significant degradation effect. Raman spectroscopy is shown to be a useful tool to investigate resin composite degradation. PMID:23388411

  1. FT-Raman spectroscopy study of organic matrix degradation in nanofilled resin composite.

    PubMed

    Soares, Luís Eduardo Silva; Nahórny, Sídnei; Martin, Airton Abrahão

    2013-04-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the effect of light curing unit (LCU) type, mouthwashes, and soft drink on chemical degradation of a nanofilled resin composite. Samples (80) were divided into eight groups: halogen LCU, HS--saliva (control); HPT--Pepsi Twist®; HLC--Listerine®; HCP--Colgate Plax®; LED LCU, LS--saliva (control); LPT--Pepsi Twist®; LLC--Listerine®; LCP--Colgate Plax®. The degree of conversion analysis and the measure of the peak area at 2,930 cm-1 (organic matrix) of resin composite were done by Fourier-transform Raman spectroscopy (baseline, after 7 and 14 days). The data were subjected to multifactor analysis of variance (ANOVA) at a 95% confidence followed by Tukey's HSD post-hoc test. The DC ranged from 58.0% (Halogen) to 59.3% (LED) without significance. Differences in the peak area between LCUs were found after 7 days of storage in S and PT. A marked increase in the peak intensity of HLC and LLC groups was found. The soft-start light-activation may influence the chemical degradation of organic matrix in resin composite. Ethanol contained in Listerine® Cool Mint mouthwash had the most significant degradation effect. Raman spectroscopy is shown to be a useful tool to investigate resin composite degradation.

  2. Imide modified epoxy matrix resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scola, D. A.

    1982-01-01

    Results of a program designed to develop tough imide modified epoxy (IME) resins cured by bisimide amine (BIA) hardeners are presented. State of the art epoxy resin, MY720, was used. Three aromatic bisimide amines and one aromatic aliphatic BIA were evaluated. BIA's derived from 6F anhydride (3,3 prime 4,4 prime-(hexafluoro isopropyl idene) bis (phthalic anhydride) and diamines, 3,3 prime-diam nodiphenyl sulfone (3,3 prime-DDS), 4,4 prime-diamino diphenyl sulfone (4,4 prime-DDS), 1.12-dodecane diamine (1,12-DDA) were used. BIA's were abbreviated 6F-3,3 prime-DDS, 6F-4,4 prime-DDS, 6F-3,3 prime-DDS-4,4 prime DDS, and 6F-3,3 prime-DDS-1,12-DDA corresponding to 6F anhydride and diamines mentioned. Epoxy resin and BIA's (MY720/6F-3,3 prime-DDS, MY720/6F-3,3 prime-DDS-4,4 prime-DDS, MY720/6F-3,3 prime-DDS-1,12-DDA and a 50:50 mixture of a BIA and parent diamine, MY720/6F-3,3 prime-DDS/3,3 prime-DDS, MY720/6F-3,3 prime-DDS-4,4 prime-DDS/3,3 prime-DDS, MY720/6F-3,3 prime-DDS-1,12-DDA/3,3 prime-DDS were studied to determine effect of structure and composition. Effect of the addition of two commercial epoxies, glyamine 200 and glyamine 100 on the properties of several formulations was evaluated. Bisimide amine cured epoxies were designated IME's (imide modified epoxy). Physical, thermal and mechanical properties of these resins were determined. Moisture absorption in boiling water exhibited by several of the IME's was considerably lower than the state of the art epoxies (from 3.2% for the control and state of the art to 2.0 wt% moisture absorption). Char yields are increased from 20% for control and state of the art epoxies to 40% for IME resins. Relative toughness characteristics of IME resins were measured by 10 deg off axis tensile tests of Celion 6000/IME composites. Results show that IME's containing 6F-3,3 prime-DDS or 6F-3,3 prime-DDS-1,12-DDA improved the "toughness" characteristics of composites by about 35% (tensile strength), about 35% (intralaminar shear

  3. Physical and chemical properties of an antimicrobial Bis-GMA free dental resin with quaternary ammonium dimethacrylate monomer.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qi-ting; He, Jing-wei; Lin, Zheng-mei; Liu, Fang; Lassila, Lippo V J; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial activity, physicochemical properties of the quaternary ammonium dimethacrylate monomer N,N-bis[2-(3-(methacryloyloxy)propanamido)-ethyl]-N-methylhexadecyl ammonium bromide (IMQ-16) containing diurethane dimethacrylate (UDMA)/tricyclodecane dimethanol diacrylate (SR833s) resin system and compare with bisphenylglycidyl dimethacrylate (Bis-GMA)/triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) resin system. It was hypothesized that the physical and chemical properties of the experimental polymers would be comparable with Bis-GMA/TEGDMA polymer and IMQ-16 monomer could endow the UDMA/SR833s resin with antibacterial activity. Double bond conversion (DC) was measured using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Mechanical properties including flexural strength (FS) and flexural modulus (FM) were measured by three-point bending test with bars of 2mm×2mm×25mm. Water sorption (WS) and solubility (WSL) were also investigated. Antibacterial activity of obtained polymers against Streptococcus mutans Ingbitt (S. mutans) was tested through direct contact test (DCT). The presence of antibacterial activity due to soluble components was also investigated by agar diffusion test (ADT). All of the polymers containing IMQ-16 exhibited improvements in WS and WSL, while maintaining equivalent DC and FS relative to the Bis-GMA/TEGDMA control system. Incorporation of 17% and 20% of IMQ-16 into UDMA/SR833s resin reduced the viable counts of S. mutans after incubation on the surface of the materials and produced no inhibition zones around the cured discs in ADT. UDMA/SR833s resin system is promising to formulate an antibacterial polymer with equivalent or even higher physicochemical properties relative to Bis-GMA/TEGDMA formulation. IMQ-16 is capable to endow UDMA/SR833s resin system with significant antibacterial activity when the mass ratio is 17% or 20%. PMID:26688422

  4. Physical and chemical properties of an antimicrobial Bis-GMA free dental resin with quaternary ammonium dimethacrylate monomer.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qi-ting; He, Jing-wei; Lin, Zheng-mei; Liu, Fang; Lassila, Lippo V J; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial activity, physicochemical properties of the quaternary ammonium dimethacrylate monomer N,N-bis[2-(3-(methacryloyloxy)propanamido)-ethyl]-N-methylhexadecyl ammonium bromide (IMQ-16) containing diurethane dimethacrylate (UDMA)/tricyclodecane dimethanol diacrylate (SR833s) resin system and compare with bisphenylglycidyl dimethacrylate (Bis-GMA)/triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) resin system. It was hypothesized that the physical and chemical properties of the experimental polymers would be comparable with Bis-GMA/TEGDMA polymer and IMQ-16 monomer could endow the UDMA/SR833s resin with antibacterial activity. Double bond conversion (DC) was measured using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Mechanical properties including flexural strength (FS) and flexural modulus (FM) were measured by three-point bending test with bars of 2mm×2mm×25mm. Water sorption (WS) and solubility (WSL) were also investigated. Antibacterial activity of obtained polymers against Streptococcus mutans Ingbitt (S. mutans) was tested through direct contact test (DCT). The presence of antibacterial activity due to soluble components was also investigated by agar diffusion test (ADT). All of the polymers containing IMQ-16 exhibited improvements in WS and WSL, while maintaining equivalent DC and FS relative to the Bis-GMA/TEGDMA control system. Incorporation of 17% and 20% of IMQ-16 into UDMA/SR833s resin reduced the viable counts of S. mutans after incubation on the surface of the materials and produced no inhibition zones around the cured discs in ADT. UDMA/SR833s resin system is promising to formulate an antibacterial polymer with equivalent or even higher physicochemical properties relative to Bis-GMA/TEGDMA formulation. IMQ-16 is capable to endow UDMA/SR833s resin system with significant antibacterial activity when the mass ratio is 17% or 20%.

  5. 21 CFR 175.380 - Xylene-formaldehyde resins condensed with 4,4′-isopropylidenediphenol-epichlorohydrin epoxy resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... condensation of xylene-formaldehyde resin and 4,4′-isopropylidenediphenol-epichlorohydrin epoxy resins, to... include resins produced by the condensation of allyl ether of mono-, di-, or trimethylol phenol and...

  6. Input to Resin Column Structural Analysis if Autocatalytic Resin Reaction Occurs in HB-Line Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Hallman, D.F.

    2001-07-10

    Solutions of plutonium in nitric acid are purified and concentrated using anion resin prior to precipitation. There have been instances of resin column explosions caused by autocatalytic reactions of anion resins in nitric acid within the DOE complex

  7. Power Network impedance effects on noise emission of DC-DC converters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esteban, M. C.; Arteche, F.; Iglesias, M.; Gimeno, A.; Arcega, F. J.; Johnson, M.; Cooper, W. E.

    2012-01-01

    The characterization of electromagnetic noise emissions of DC-DC converters is a critical issue that has been analyzed during the desing phase of CMS tracker upgrade. Previous simulation studies showed important variations in the level of conducted emissions when DC-DC converters are loaded/driven by different impedances and power network topologies. Several tests have been performed on real DC-DC converters to validate the Pspice model and simulation results. This paper presents these test results. Conducted noise emissions at the input and at the output terminals of DC-DC converters has been measured for different types of power and FEE impedances. Special attention has been paid to influence on the common-mode emissions by the carbon fiber material used to build the mechanical structure of the central detector. These study results show important recommendations and criteria to be applied in order to decrease the system noise level when integrating the DC-DC.

  8. Effect of resin rheology on macro- and micro-flows in resin transfer molding

    SciTech Connect

    Chih-Hsin Shih; Lee, L.J.; Koelling, K.

    1996-12-31

    Resin transfer molding (RTM) is a relatively new and high potential process for near net shape composite manufacturing because of its short cycle time, low labor requirements and low equipment cost. The major material variables in the RTM process are the resin rheology and the fiber reinforcement structure. The presence of low profile additives or fillers tends to change the resin mixture from a Newtonian fluid to a Non-Newtonian fluid. Different fiber architectures may result in different flow patterns that will influence the mold filling and curing processes. This paper will discuss how the resin rheology and fiber structure effect the resin transfer molding process.

  9. Flexure fatigue of 10 commonly used denture base resins.

    PubMed

    Johnston, E P; Nicholls, J I; Smith, D E

    1981-11-01

    The flexure fatigue properties of 10 denture base resins (four different types) were tested. Each specimen underwent two-way testing in a water bath maintained at 37 degrees +/- 1 degree C. A load of 3,650 gm was applied a 342 flexures per minute until the specimen broke. The resin types listed in order of increasing resistance to flexure fatigue are polymethylmethacrylate (PMM) pour resins, PMM thermosetting resins, vinyl resins, and a PMM grafted resin. Although small samples size and scatter of results limit broad application of this data, it is of some significance that the grafted resin Lucitone 199 tended to withstand repeated flexure when compared to the other resins.

  10. Phosphorus-containing imide resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varma, I. K.; Fohlen, G. M.; Parker, J. A. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    Cured polymers of bis and tris-imides derived from tris(m-aminophenyl) phosphine oxides by reaction with maleic anhydride or its derivatives, and addition polymers of such imides, including a variant in which a monoimide is condensed with a dianhydride and the product is treated with a further quantity of maleic anhydride prior to curing are disclosed and claimed. Such polymers are flame resistant. Also disclosed are an improved method of producing tris(m-aminophenyl) phosphine oxides from the nitro analogues by reduction with hydrazine hydrate using palladized charcoal or Raney nickel as the catalyst and fiber reinforced cured resin composites.

  11. Polyimide Resins Resist Extreme Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Spacecraft and aerospace engines share a common threat: high temperature. The temperatures experienced during atmospheric reentry can reach over 2,000 F, and the temperatures in rocket engines can reach well over 5,000 F. To combat the high temperatures in aerospace applications, Dr. Ruth Pater of Langley Research Center developed RP-46, a polyimide resin capable of withstanding the most brutal temperatures. The composite material can push the service temperature to the limits of organic materials. Designed as an environmentally friendly alternative to other high-temperature resins, the RP-46 polyimide resin system was awarded a 1992 "R&D 100" award, named a "2001 NASA Technology of the Year," and later, due to its success as a spinoff technology, "2004 NASA Commercial Invention of the Year." The technology s commercial success also led to its winning the Langley s "Paul F. Holloway Technology Transfer Award" as well as "Richard T. Whitcom Aerospace Technology Transfer Award" both for 2004. RP-46 is relatively inexpensive and it can be readily processed for use as an adhesive, composite, resin molding, coating, foam, or film. Its composite materials can be used in temperatures ranging from minus 150 F to 2,300 F. No other organic materials are known to be capable of such wide range and extreme high-temperature applications. In addition to answering the call for environmentally conscious high-temperature materials, RP-46 provides a slew of additional advantages: It is extremely lightweight (less than half the weight of aluminum), chemical and moisture resistant, strong, and flexible. Pater also developed a similar technology, RP-50, using many of the same methods she used with RP-46, and very similar in composition to RP-46 in terms of its thermal capacity and chemical construction, but it has different applications, as this material is a coating as opposed to a buildable composite. A NASA license for use of this material outside of the Space Agency as well as

  12. Technique for sensing inductor and dc output currents of PWM dc-dc converter

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, K.; Lee, Y. . Dept. of Electronic Engineering)

    1994-05-01

    The design, analysis and trade-offs of a novel method to sense the inductor and dc output currents of PWM converters are presented. By sensing and adding appropriately the currents in the transistor, rectifier and capacitors of a converter using current transformers, the waveforms of inductor and dc output currents can be reconstructed accurately while maintaining isolation. This method offers high bandwidth, clean waveform, practically zero power dissipation and simple circuit. The technique is applicable to all PWM converters in both continuous and discontinuous modes, and is most suitable for the implementation of current mode control schemes like hysteretic, PWM conductance control, and output current feedforward. This approach has been experimentally verified at a wide range of current levels, duty cycles, and switching frequencies up to 1.4 MHz.

  13. Optical and color stabilities of paint-on resins for shade modification of restorative resins.

    PubMed

    Arikawa, Hiroyuki; Kanie, Takahito; Fujii, Koichi; Ban, Seiji; Homma, Tetsuya; Takahashi, Hideo

    2004-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the optical and color stabilities of the paint-on resin used for shade modification of restorative resins. Three shades of paint-on resin and two crown and bridge resins were used. The light transmittance characteristics of the materials during accelerated aging tests such as water immersion, toothbrush abrasion, ultraviolet (UV) light irradiation, and staining tests were measured. Discolorations of materials resulting from tests were also determined. There were no significant effects of water immersion, toothbrush abrasion and UV light irradiation on the light transmittance and visible color change of paint-on resins, whereas the staining tests significantly decreased the light transmittance and increased color change of the translucent shades of materials. Our results indicate that the paint-on resins exhibit stable optical properties and color appearance, which are at least as good as the crown and bridge resins.

  14. Fluorinated diamond bonded in fluorocarbon resin

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, Gene W.

    1982-01-01

    By fluorinating diamond grit, the grit may be readily bonded into a fluorocarbon resin matrix. The matrix is formed by simple hot pressing techniques. Diamond grinding wheels may advantageously be manufactured using such a matrix. Teflon fluorocarbon resins are particularly well suited for using in forming the matrix.

  15. TMI-2 purification demineralizer resin study

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, J D; Osterhoudt, T R

    1984-05-01

    Study of the Makeup and Purification System demineralizers at TMI-2 has established that fuel quantities in the vessels are low, precluding criticality, that the high radioactive cesium concentration on the demineralizer resins can be chemically removed, and that the demineralizer resins can probably be removed from the vessels by sluicing through existing plant piping. Radiation measurements from outside the demineralizers establishing that there is between 1.5 and 5.1 (probably 3.3) lb of fuel in the A vessel and less than that amount in the B vessel. Dose rates up to 2780 R per hour were measured on contact with the A demineralizer. Remote visual observation of the A demineralizer showed a crystalline crust overlaying amber-colored resins. The cesium activity in solid resin samples ranged from 220 to 16,900 ..mu..Ci/g. Based on this information, researchers concluded that the resins cannot be removed through the normal pathway in their present condition. Studies do show that the resins will withstand chemical processing designed to rinse and elute cesium from the resins. The process developed should work on the TMI-2 resins.

  16. VOLUMETRIC POLYMERIZATION SHRINKAGE OF CONTEMPORARY COMPOSITE RESINS

    PubMed Central

    Nagem, Halim; Nagem, Haline Drumond; Francisconi, Paulo Afonso Silveira; Franco, Eduardo Batista; Mondelli, Rafael Francisco Lia; Coutinho, Kennedy Queiroz

    2007-01-01

    The polymerization shrinkage of composite resins may affect negatively the clinical outcome of the restoration. Extensive research has been carried out to develop new formulations of composite resins in order to provide good handling characteristics and some dimensional stability during polymerization. The purpose of this study was to analyze, in vitro, the magnitude of the volumetric polymerization shrinkage of 7 contemporary composite resins (Definite, Suprafill, SureFil, Filtek Z250, Fill Magic, Alert, and Solitaire) to determine whether there are differences among these materials. The tests were conducted with precision of 0.1 mg. The volumetric shrinkage was measured by hydrostatic weighing before and after polymerization and calculated by known mathematical equations. One-way ANOVA (á=0.05) was used to determine statistically significant differences in volumetric shrinkage among the tested composite resins. Suprafill (1.87±0.01) and Definite (1.89±0.01) shrank significantly less than the other composite resins. SureFil (2.01±0.06), Filtek Z250 (1.99±0.03), and Fill Magic (2.02±0.02) presented intermediate levels of polymerization shrinkage. Alert and Solitaire presented the highest degree of polymerization shrinkage. Knowing the polymerization shrinkage rates of the commercially available composite resins, the dentist would be able to choose between using composite resins with lower polymerization shrinkage rates or adopting technical or operational procedures to minimize the adverse effects deriving from resin contraction during light-activation. PMID:19089177

  17. 21 CFR 177.1555 - Polyarylate resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...-4′-(1-methylethylidine) bis(phenol)) are formed by melt polycondensation of bisphenol-A with... contact with food in accordance with the following prescribed conditions: (a) Identity. Polyarylate resins... of polymer units derived from diphenylterephthalate. (2) Polyarylate resins shall have a...

  18. 21 CFR 177.1555 - Polyarylate resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...-4′-(1-methylethylidine) bis(phenol)) are formed by melt polycondensation of bisphenol-A with... contact with food in accordance with the following prescribed conditions: (a) Identity. Polyarylate resins... of polymer units derived from diphenylterephthalate. (2) Polyarylate resins shall have a...

  19. 21 CFR 872.3140 - Resin applicator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Resin applicator. 872.3140 Section 872.3140 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3140 Resin applicator. (a) Identification. A...

  20. 21 CFR 177.1500 - Nylon resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... percent by weight of resin) Water 95percent ethyl alcohol Ethyl acetate Benzene 1. Nylon 66 resins 1.14... chapter, except those containing more than 8 percent alcohol, under conditions of use B through H... percent alcohol (by volume) at temperatures not to exceed 49 °C (120 °F) (conditions of use E, F, and G...

  1. 21 CFR 177.1500 - Nylon resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... percent by weight of resin) Water 95percent ethyl alcohol Ethyl acetate Benzene 1. Nylon 66 resins 1.14... chapter, except those containing more than 8 percent alcohol, under conditions of use B through H... percent alcohol (by volume) at temperatures not to exceed 49 °C (120 °F) (conditions of use E, F, and G...

  2. 21 CFR 177.1500 - Nylon resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... percent by weight of resin) Water 95percent ethyl alcohol Ethyl acetate Benzene 1. Nylon 66 resins 1.14... chapter, except those containing more than 8 percent alcohol, under conditions of use B through H... percent alcohol (by volume) at temperatures not to exceed 49 °C (120 °F) (conditions of use E, F, and G...

  3. 21 CFR 177.1500 - Nylon resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... percent by weight of resin) Water 95percent ethyl alcohol Ethyl acetate Benzene 1. Nylon 66 resins 1.14... chapter, except those containing more than 8 percent alcohol, under conditions of use B through H... percent alcohol (by volume) at temperatures not to exceed 49 °C (120 °F) (conditions of use E, F, and G...

  4. Modified resins for solid-phase extraction

    DOEpatents

    Fritz, James S.; Sun, Jeffrey J.

    1991-12-10

    A process of treating aqueous solutions to remove organic solute contaminants by contacting an aqueous solution containing polar organic solute contaminants with a functionalized polystyrene-divinyl benzene adsorbent resin, with the functionalization of said resin being accomplished by organic hydrophilic groups such as hydroxymethyl, acetyl and cyanomethyl.

  5. Modified resins for solid-phase extraction

    DOEpatents

    Fritz, James S.; Sun, Jeffrey J.

    1993-07-27

    A process of treating aqueous solutions to remove organic solute contaminants by contacting an aqueous solution containing polar organic solute contaminants with a functionalized polystyrene-divinyl benzene adsorbent resin, with the functionalization of said resin being accomplished by organic hydrophilic groups such as hydroxymethyl, acetyl and cyanomethyl.

  6. Novel silica-based ion exchange resin

    SciTech Connect

    Gula, M.; Harvey, J.

    1996-12-31

    Shortcomings of chelating resins have been addressed by a new class of ion exchange resins called dual mechanism bifunctional polymers (DMBPs). DMBPs use hydrophilic cation exchange ligands with rapid uptake kinetics and use chelating ligands for selectivity for one or more metals; result is a resin that quickly recognizes and removes targeted metals from waste, remediation, and process streams. Eichrom`s Diphonix {reg_sign} resin is the first DMBP to be widely released as a commercial product; it is polystyrene based. Objective of this work is to synthesize commercial quantities of a silica-based ion exchange resin with the same or better metal ion selectivity, metal uptake kinetics, and acid stability as Diphonix. Feasibility was determined, however the process needs to be optimized. Studies at Eichrom and ANL of the performance of Diphonix resin over a broad range of HNO3 and HCl conditions and inorganic salt loadings are discussed together with the proposed method of incorporating similar characteristics into a silica-based resin. The new, silica-based resin functionalized with diphosphonic acid ligands can be used in environmental restoration and waste management situations involving processing of low-level, transuranic, and high-level radioactive wastes; it can also be used for processing liquid mixed waste including wastes contaminated with organic compounds.

  7. 40 CFR 721.9495 - Acrylosilane resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Acrylosilane resins. 721.9495 Section 721.9495 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9495 Acrylosilane resins. (a)...

  8. 40 CFR 721.9495 - Acrylosilane resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Acrylosilane resins. 721.9495 Section 721.9495 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9495 Acrylosilane resins. (a)...

  9. 40 CFR 721.9495 - Acrylosilane resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Acrylosilane resins. 721.9495 Section 721.9495 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9495 Acrylosilane resins. (a)...

  10. Dental resin cure monitoring by inherent fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qun; Zhou, Jack X.; Li, Qingxiong; Wang, Sean X.

    2008-02-01

    It is demonstrated that the inherent fluorescence of a dental composite resin can be utilized to monitor the curing status, i.e. degree of conversion of the resin. The method does not require any sample preparation and is potentially very fast for real time cure monitoring. The method is verified by Raman spectroscopy analysis.

  11. A percolation context evidenced by thermostimulated currents in oil-resin art media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagès, O.; Ajjoun, M.; Tite, T.; Chafi, A.; Laurenti, J. P.; Townsend, J.

    Degradation over time of home-made thixotropic oil/resin mixtures, similar to those used as natural media by the art painter J.M. William Turner (1775-1851) is investigated by using a combination of dielectric methods, i.e., low-frequency dielectric spectroscopy (LFDS) and the technique of thermostimulated currents (TSC). These address the direct conductivity (d.c.), i.e., the circulation of free charges, and the anelastic orientation of permanent dipoles, respectively. The oil/resin mixtures can be regarded as conducting/insulating-like composite systems with respect to the two conductivities. This provides the opportunity to follow selectively the behavior of the oil, at any composition. In fresh mixtures, LFDS measurements give evidence for three d.c. regimes, delimited by the critical resin-contents (R) R1 30% and R2 60%. This parallels observation with the naked eye of phase separation at R<40% and color change at R>R2 in four-year-old naturally-aged samples. Such a stable composition-dependent context with two marked thresholds encourages a discussion of the time-behavior in terms of percolation, i.e., relative spatial organization of the parent substances, rather than by using a microscopic approach at the molecular scale. At R>R1 the surveillance of the TSC signal indicates that the oil clusters tend to coalesce so as to form bigger clusters with aging. The coalescence process appears to be more efficient when the resin forms a continuum (R>R2) than a dispersion (R

  12. Release and toxicity of dental resin composite

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Saurabh K.; Saxena, Payal; Pant, Vandana A.; Pant, Aditya B.

    2012-01-01

    Dental resin composite that are tooth-colored materials have been considered as possible substitutes to mercury-containing silver amalgam filling. Despite the fact that dental resin composites have improved their physico-chemical properties, the concern for its intrinsic toxicity remains high. Some components of restorative composite resins are released in the oral environment initially during polymerization reaction and later due to degradation of the material. In vitro and in vivo studies have clearly identified that these components of restorative composite resins are toxic. But there is a large gap between the results published by research laboratories and clinical reports. The objective of this manuscript was to review the literature on release phenomenon as well as in vitro and in vivo toxicity of dental resin composite. Interpretation made from the recent data was also outlined. PMID:23293458

  13. Physical Properties of Synthetic Resin Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishbein, Meyer

    1939-01-01

    A study was made to determine the physical properties of synthetic resins having paper, canvas, and linen reinforcements, and of laminated wood impregnated with a resin varnish. The results show that commercial resins have moduli of elasticity that are too low for structural considerations. Nevertheless, there do exist plastics that have favorable mechanical properties and, with further development, it should be possible to produce resin products that compare favorably with the light-metal alloys. The results obtained from tests on Compound 1840, resin-impregnated wood, show that this material can stand on its own merit by virtue of a compressive strength four times that of the natural wood. This increase in compressive strength was accomplished with an increase of density to a value slightly below three times the normal value and corrected one of the most serious defects of the natural product.

  14. Chemoviscosity modeling for thermosetting resins, 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, T. H.

    1985-01-01

    A new analytical model for simulating chemoviscosity of thermosetting resin was formulated. The model is developed by modifying the Williams-Landel-Ferry (WLF) theory in polymer rheology for thermoplastic materials. By assuming a linear relationship between the glass transition temperature and the degree of cure of the resin system under cure, the WLF theory can be modified to account for the factor of reaction time. Temperature dependent functions of the modified WLF theory constants were determined from the isothermal cure data of Lee, Loos, and Springer for the Hercules 3501-6 resin system. Theoretical predictions of the model for the resin under dynamic heating cure cycles were shown to compare favorably with the experimental data reported by Carpenter. A chemoviscosity model which is capable of not only describing viscosity profiles accurately under various cure cycles, but also correlating viscosity data to the changes of physical properties associated with the structural transformations of the thermosetting resin systems during cure was established.

  15. Release and toxicity of dental resin composite.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Saurabh K; Saxena, Payal; Pant, Vandana A; Pant, Aditya B

    2012-09-01

    Dental resin composite that are tooth-colored materials have been considered as possible substitutes to mercury-containing silver amalgam filling. Despite the fact that dental resin composites have improved their physico-chemical properties, the concern for its intrinsic toxicity remains high. Some components of restorative composite resins are released in the oral environment initially during polymerization reaction and later due to degradation of the material. In vitro and in vivo studies have clearly identified that these components of restorative composite resins are toxic. But there is a large gap between the results published by research laboratories and clinical reports. The objective of this manuscript was to review the literature on release phenomenon as well as in vitro and in vivo toxicity of dental resin composite. Interpretation made from the recent data was also outlined.

  16. Resin/graphite fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavano, P. J.

    1974-01-01

    Techniques were developed that provided thermo-oxidatively stable A-type polyimide/graphite fiber composites using the approach of in situ polymerization of monomeric reactants directly on reinforcing fibers, rather than employing separately prepared prepolymer varnish. This was accomplished by simply mixing methylene dianiline and two ester-acids and applying this solution to the fibers for subsequent molding. Five different formulated molecular weight resins were examined, and an optimized die molding procedure established for the 1500 formulated molecular weight system. Extensive ultrasonic inspection of composites was successfully utilized as a technique for monitoring laminate quality. Composite mechanical property studies were conducted with this polyimide resin at room temperature and after various time exposures in a thermo-oxidative environment at 561 K (550 F), 589 K (600 F) and 617 K (650 F). It was determined that such composites have a long term life in the temperature range of 561 K to 589 K. The final phase involved the fabrication and evaluation of a series of demonstration airfoil specimens.

  17. Solidification of ion exchange resin wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-08-01

    Solidification media investigated included portland type I, portland type III and high alumina cements, a proprietary gypsum-based polymer modified cement, and a vinyl ester-styrene thermosetting plastic. Samples formulated with hydraulic cement were analyzed to investigate the effects of resin type, resin loading, waste-to-cement ratio, and water-to-cement ratio. The solidification of cation resin wastes with portland cement was characterized by excessive swelling and cracking of waste forms, both after curing and during immersion testing. Mixed bed resin waste formulations were limited by their cation component. Additives to improve the mechanical properties of portland cement-ion exchange resin waste forms were evaluated. High alumina cement formulations dislayed a resistance to deterioration of mechanical integrity during immersion testing, thus providing a significant advantage over portland cements for the solidification of resin wastes. Properties of cement-ion exchange resin waste forms were examined. An experiment was conducted to study the leachability of /sup 137/Cs, /sup 85/Sr, and /sup 60/Co from resins modified in portland type III and high alumina cements. The cumulative /sup 137/Cs fraction release was at least an order of magnitude greater than that of either /sup 85/Sr or /sup 60/Co. Release rates of /sup 137/Cs in high alumina cement were greater than those in portland III cement by a factor of two.Compressive strength and leach testing were conducted for resin wastes solidified with polymer-modified gypsum based cement. /sup 137/Cs, /sup 85/Sr, and /sup 60/Co fraction releases were about one, two and three orders of magnitude higher, respectively, than in equivalent portland type III cement formulations. As much as 28.6 wt % dry ion exchange resin was successfully solidified using vinyl ester-styrene compared with a maximum of 25 wt % in both portland and gypsum-based cement.

  18. Optimal depth of cure for nanohybrid resin composite using quartz tungsten halogen and new high intensity light-emitting diode curing units.

    PubMed

    Tanthanuch, Saijai; Ruengsri, Prapansri; Kukiattrakoon, Boonlert

    2013-08-01

    This study sought to evaluate the effects of quartz tungsten halogen (QTH) and light-emitting diode (LED) photocuring units on the degree of conversion (DC) and surface microhardness of a resin composite that had been cured for optimal depth of cure (DoC) assessment. Two hundred and forty cylindrical specimens (4.0 mm in diameter, 2.0-4.0 mm thick) of shade A2 resin composite were prepared and cured with either a QTH or an LED. The DC and top and bottom surface hardness were recorded, and data were analyzed using 2-way ANOVA, Tukey's test, t-test (α = 0.05) and linear regression analysis. The results showed that surface microhardness values and DC were affected by light intensity (P < 0.01), and resin composite thickness (2, 3, and 4 mm) (P < 0.01). Resin composite polymerized by the QTH had an optimal DoC of 3 mm, compared to 4 mm for the LED.

  19. Arcing on dc power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moores, Greg; Heller, R. P.; Sutanto, Surja; Dugal-Whitehead, Norma R.

    1992-01-01

    Unexpected and undesirable arcing on dc power systems can produce hazardous situations aboard space flights. The potential for fire and shock might exist in a situation where there is a broken conductor, a loose power connection, or a break in the insulation of the power cable. Such arcing has been found to be reproducible in a laboratory environment. Arcing tests show that the phenomena can last for several seconds and yet be undetectable by present protection schemes used in classical power relaying and remote power controller applications. This paper characterizes the arcing phenomena and suggests future research that is needed.

  20. Structure Property Relationships of Biobased Epoxy Resins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiorana, Anthony Surraht

    The thesis is about the synthesis, characterization, development, and application of epoxy resins derived from sustainable feedstocks such as lingo-cellulose, plant oils, and other non-food feedstocks. The thesis can be divided into two main topics 1) the synthesis and structure property relationship investigation of new biobased epoxy resin families and 2) mixing epoxy resins with reactive diluents, nanoparticles, toughening agents, and understanding co-curing reactions, filler/matrix interactions, and cured epoxy resin thermomechanical, viscoelastic, and dielectric properties. The thesis seeks to bridge the gap between new epoxy resin development, application for composites and advanced materials, processing and manufacturing, and end of life of thermoset polymers. The structures of uncured epoxy resins are characterized through traditional small molecule techniques such as nuclear magnetic resonance, high resolution mass spectrometry, and infrared spectroscopy. The structure of epoxy resin monomers are further understood through the process of curing the resins and cured resins' properties through rheology, chemorheology, dynamic mechanical analysis, tensile testing, fracture toughness, differential scanning calorimetry, scanning electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and notched izod impact testing. It was found that diphenolate esters are viable alternatives to bisphenol A and that the structure of the ester side chain can have signifi-cant effects on monomer viscosity. The structure of the cured diphenolate based epoxy resins also influence glass transition temperature and dielectric properties. Incorporation of reactive diluents and flexible resins can lower viscosity, extend gel time, and enable processing of high filler content composites and increase fracture toughness. Incorpora-tion of high elastic modulus nanoparticles such as graphene can provide increases in physical properties such as elastic modulus and fracture toughness. The synthesis

  1. Block clustering based on difference of convex functions (DC) programming and DC algorithms.

    PubMed

    Le, Hoai Minh; Le Thi, Hoai An; Dinh, Tao Pham; Huynh, Van Ngai

    2013-10-01

    We investigate difference of convex functions (DC) programming and the DC algorithm (DCA) to solve the block clustering problem in the continuous framework, which traditionally requires solving a hard combinatorial optimization problem. DC reformulation techniques and exact penalty in DC programming are developed to build an appropriate equivalent DC program of the block clustering problem. They lead to an elegant and explicit DCA scheme for the resulting DC program. Computational experiments show the robustness and efficiency of the proposed algorithm and its superiority over standard algorithms such as two-mode K-means, two-mode fuzzy clustering, and block classification EM.

  2. Mineralogy of fossil resins in Northern Eurasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdasarov, M. A.

    2007-12-01

    The investigation is focused on identification and origin of fossil resins from the Cretaceous, Tertiary, and Quaternary sediments of Northern Eurasia on the basis of detailed study of their physical and chemical characteristics: morphology; size; mass; density; optical, mechanical, and thermal properties; chemical composition; etc. The composition of amorphous organic minerals with polymeric structure, fossil resins included, is studied with IR spectrometry, the EPR method, derivatography at low heating rates, XRD, chemical analysis, emission spectrometry, etc. The results of investigation summarized for the Baltic-Dnieper, North Siberian, and Far East amber-bearing provinces show some similarity of fossil resins in combination with specific features inherent to each province. Resins from the Baltic-Dnieper province should be termed as amber (succinite). Their variety is the most characteristic of Northern and Eastern Europe. Amber-like fossil resins from the North Siberian and Far East provinces are irrelevant to succinite. They usually occur as brittle resins, namely, retinite and gedanite, without jewelry value. Viscous fossil resin rumänite with an expected high economic value occurs in the Far East, on the shore of Sakhalin Island.

  3. 49 CFR 173.165 - Polyester resin kits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Polyester resin kits. 173.165 Section 173.165... Polyester resin kits. (a) Except for transportation by aircraft, polyester resin kits consisting of a base.... Additionally, unless otherwise excepted in this subchapter, polyester resin kits must be packaged...

  4. 76 FR 4936 - Granular Polytetrafluoroethylene Resin From Italy

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-27

    ... on granular PTFE resin from Italy and Japan (75 FR 67082-67083 and 67105-67108, November 1, 2010... COMMISSION Granular Polytetrafluoroethylene Resin From Italy AGENCY: United States International Trade... antidumping duty order on granular polytetrafluoroethylene resin (``granular PTFE resin'') from Italy....

  5. 21 CFR 181.32 - Acrylonitrile copolymers and resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Acrylonitrile copolymers and resins. 181.32 Section... Ingredients § 181.32 Acrylonitrile copolymers and resins. (a) Acrylonitrile copolymers and resins listed in... of the vinyl chloride resin) resin—for use only in contact with oleomargarine. (iv)...

  6. 21 CFR 177.2490 - Polyphenylene sulfide resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Polyphenylene sulfide resins. 177.2490 Section 177... Components of Articles Intended for Repeated Use § 177.2490 Polyphenylene sulfide resins. Polyphenylene sulfide resins (poly(1,4-phenylene sulfide) resins) may be safely used as coatings or components...

  7. 21 CFR 177.2260 - Filters, resin-bonded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Filters, resin-bonded. 177.2260 Section 177.2260... Components of Articles Intended for Repeated Use § 177.2260 Filters, resin-bonded. Resin-bonded filters may... of this section. (a) Resin-bonded filters are prepared from natural or synthetic fibers to which...

  8. 21 CFR 176.110 - Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins. 176.110 Section... Paper and Paperboard § 176.110 Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins. Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins may be...) Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins are produced by the polymerization of acrylamide with partial hydrolysis or...

  9. Resin/graphite fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavano, P. J.

    1974-01-01

    Processing techniques were developed for the fabrication of both polyphenylquinoxaline and polyimide composites by the in situ polymerization of monomeric reactants directly on the graphite reinforcing fibers, rather than using previously prepared prepolymer varnishes. Void-free polyphenylquinoxaline composites were fabricated and evaluated for room and elevated flexure and shear properties. The technology of the polyimide system was advanced to the point where the material is ready for commercial exploitation. A reproducible processing cycle free of operator judgment factors was developed for fabrication of void-free composites exhibiting excellent mechanical properties and a long time isothermal life in the range of 288 C to 316 C. The effects of monomer reactant stoichiometry and process modification on resin flow were investigated. Demonstration of the utility and quality of this polyimide system was provided through the successful fabrication and evaluation of four complex high tip speed fan blades.

  10. Cobalt Ions Improve the Strength of Epoxy Resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoakley, D. M.; St. Clair, A. K.

    1986-01-01

    Technique developed for improving mechanical strength of epoxy resins by adding cobalt ions in form of tris(acetylacetonato)cobalt (III) complex. Solid cast disks prepared from cobalt ion-containing epoxy resins tested for flexural strength and stiffness. Incorporation of cobalt ions into epoxies increased flexural strength of resins by 10 to 95 percent. Suitable resins for this technique include any liquid or solid TGMDA resins. Improved epoxy formulation proves useful as composite matrix resin, adhesive, or casting resin for applications on commercial and advanced aircraft.

  11. Chemical Characterization of Phenol/Formaldehyde Resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brayden, T. H.

    1986-01-01

    Report discusses tests of commercial phenol/formaldehyde resins to establish relationships among composition before use, behavior during curing, and strength after curing. Resin used in carbon/carbon laminates. In curing process, two molecules of phenol joined together in sequence of reactions involving molecule of formaldehyde. Last step of sequence, molecule of water released. Sequence repeats until one of ingredients used up, leaving solidified thermoset plastic. Issues to be resolved: number and relative abundances of ingredients, presence of certain chemical groups, heat-producing ability of resin, and range of molecular weights present.

  12. Improved microbial-check-valve resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colombo, G. V.; Putnam, D. F.

    1980-01-01

    Improved microbial-check-valve resins have been tested for their microbicidal effectiveness and long-term stability. Resins give more-stable iodine concentrations than previous preparations and do not impart objectionable odor or taste to treated water. Microbial check valve is small cylindrical device, packed with iodide-saturated resin, that is installed in water line where contamination by micro-organisms is to be prevented. Prototype microbial check valve was tested for stability and performance under harsh environmental conditions. Effectiveness was 100 percent at 35 deg, 70 deg, and 160 deg F (2 deg, 21 deg, and 71 deg C).

  13. Class II Resin Composites: Restorative Options.

    PubMed

    Patel, Minesh; Mehta, Shamir B; Banerji, Subir

    2015-10-01

    Tooth-coloured, resin composite restorations are amongst the most frequently prescribed forms of dental restoration to manage defects in posterior teeth. The attainment of a desirable outcome when placing posterior resin composite restorations requires the clinician to have a good understanding of the benefits (as well as the limitations) posed by this material, together with a sound knowledge of placement technique. Numerous protocols and materials have evolved to assist the dental operator with this type of demanding posterior restoration. With the use of case examples, four techniques available are reported here. CPD/Clinical Relevance: This article explores varying techniques for the restoration of Class II cavities using resin composite.

  14. Hydraulic Permeability of Resorcinol-Formaldehyde Resin

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Paul Allen

    2010-01-01

    An ion exchange process using spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) resin is the baseline process for removing cesium from the dissolved salt solution in the high-level waste tanks at the Hanford Site, using large scale columns as part of the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP). The RF resin is also being evaluated for use in the proposed small column ion exchange (SCIX) system, which is an alternative treatment option at Hanford and at the Savannah River Site (SRS). A recirculating test loop with a small ion exchange column was used to measure the effect of oxygen uptake and radiation exposure on the permeability of a packed bed of the RF resin. The lab-scale column was designed to be prototypic of the proposed Hanford columns at the WTP. Although the test equipment was designed to model the Hanford ion exchange columns, the data on changes in the hydraulic permeability of the resin will also be valuable for determining potential pressure drops through the proposed SCIX system. The superficial fluid velocity in the lab-scale test (3.4-5.7 cm/s) was much higher than is planned for the full-scale Hanford columns to generate the maximum pressure drop expected in those columns (9.7 psig). The frictional drag from this high velocity produced forces on the resin in the lab-scale tests that matched the design basis of the full-scale Hanford column. Any changes in the resin caused by the radiation exposure and oxygen uptake were monitored by measuring the pressure drop through the lab-scale column and the physical properties of the resin. Three hydraulic test runs were completed, the first using fresh RF resin at 25 C, the second using irradiated resin at 25 C, and the third using irradiated resin at 45 C. A Hanford AP-101 simulant solution was recirculated through a test column containing 500 mL of Na-form RF resin. Known amounts of oxygen were introduced into the primary recirculation loop by saturating measured volumes of the simulant solution with oxygen and reintroducing

  15. Simultaneous distribution of AC and DC power

    DOEpatents

    Polese, Luigi Gentile

    2015-09-15

    A system and method for the transport and distribution of both AC (alternating current) power and DC (direct current) power over wiring infrastructure normally used for distributing AC power only, for example, residential and/or commercial buildings' electrical wires is disclosed and taught. The system and method permits the combining of AC and DC power sources and the simultaneous distribution of the resulting power over the same wiring. At the utilization site a complementary device permits the separation of the DC power from the AC power and their reconstruction, for use in conventional AC-only and DC-only devices.

  16. 21 CFR 175.380 - Xylene-formaldehyde resins condensed with 4,4′-isopropylidenediphenol-epichlorohydrin epoxy resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Xylene-formaldehyde resins condensed with 4,4â²-isopropylidenediphenol-epichlorohydrin epoxy resins. 175.380 Section 175.380 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... Xylene-formaldehyde resins condensed with 4,4′-isopropylidenediphenol-epichlorohydrin epoxy resins....

  17. 21 CFR 175.380 - Xylene-formaldehyde resins condensed with 4,4′-isopropylidenediphenol-epichlorohydrin epoxy resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Xylene-formaldehyde resins condensed with 4,4â²-isopropylidenediphenol-epichlorohydrin epoxy resins. 175.380 Section 175.380 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... Xylene-formaldehyde resins condensed with 4,4′-isopropylidenediphenol-epichlorohydrin epoxy resins....

  18. Development of a DC-DC conversion powering scheme for the CMS Phase-1 pixel upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feld, L.; Fimmers, C.; Karpinski, W.; Klein, K.; Lipinski, M.; Preuten, M.; Rauch, M.; Rittich, D.; Sammet, J.; Wlochal, M.

    2014-01-01

    A novel powering scheme based on the DC-DC conversion technique will be exploited to power the CMS Phase-1 pixel detector. DC-DC buck converters for the CMS pixel project have been developed, based on the AMIS5 ASIC designed by CERN. The powering system of the Phase-1 pixel detector is described and the performance of the converter prototypes is detailed, including power efficiency, stability of the output voltage, shielding, and thermal management. Results from a test of the magnetic field tolerance of the DC-DC converters are reported. System tests with pixel modules using many components of the future pixel barrel system are summarized. Finally first impressions from a pre-series of 200 DC-DC converters are presented.

  19. Hybrid-Circuit Module For Dc-To-Dc Power Converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vorperian, Vatche; Detwiler, Robert; Karmon, Dan

    1996-01-01

    Power hybrid module is general-purpose power-switching module providing flexibility in design and application. Complete dc-to-dc power converter constructed by adding input/output filters and feedback circuitry to module to suit specific application.

  20. Method for regenerating magnetic polyamine-epichlorohydrin resin

    DOEpatents

    Kochen, Robert L.; Navratil, James D.

    1997-07-29

    Magnetic polymer resins capable of efficient removal of actinides and heavy metals from contaminated water are disclosed together with methods for making, using, and regenerating them. The resins comprise polyamine-epichlorohydrin resin beads with ferrites attached to the surfaces of the beads. Markedly improved water decontamination is demonstrated using these magnetic polymer resins of the invention in the presence of a magnetic field, as compared with water decontamination methods employing ordinary ion exchange resins or ferrites taken separately.

  1. Method for regenerating magnetic polyamine-epichlorohydrin resin

    DOEpatents

    Kochen, R.L.; Navratil, J.D.

    1997-07-29

    Magnetic polymer resins capable of efficient removal of actinides and heavy metals from contaminated water are disclosed together with methods for making, using, and regenerating them. The resins comprise polyamine-epichlorohydrin resin beads with ferrites attached to the surfaces of the beads. Markedly improved water decontamination is demonstrated using these magnetic polymer resins of the invention in the presence of a magnetic field, as compared with water decontamination methods employing ordinary ion exchange resins or ferrites taken separately. 9 figs.

  2. DC-10 winglet flight evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The results of a flight evaluation of winglets on a DC-10 Series 10 aircraft are presented. For sensitive areas of comparison, effects of winglets were determined back to back with and without winglets. Basic and reduced span winglet configurations were tested. After initial encounter with low speed buffet, a number of acceptable configurations were developed. For maximum drag reduction at both cruise and low speeds, lower winglets were required, having leading edge devices on upper and lower winglets for the latter regime. The cruise benefits were enhanced by adding outboard aileron droop to the reduced span winglet aircraft. Winglets had no significant impact on stall speeds, high speed buffet boundary, and stability and control characteristics. Flutter test results agreed with predictions and ground vibration data. Flight loads measurement also agreed with predictions.

  3. High voltage DC power supply

    DOEpatents

    Droege, T.F.

    1989-12-19

    A high voltage DC power supply having a first series resistor at the output for limiting current in the event of a short-circuited output, a second series resistor for sensing the magnitude of output current, and a voltage divider circuit for providing a source of feedback voltage for use in voltage regulation is disclosed. The voltage divider circuit is coupled to the second series resistor so as to compensate the feedback voltage for a voltage drop across the first series resistor. The power supply also includes a pulse-width modulated control circuit, having dual clock signals, which is responsive to both the feedback voltage and a command voltage, and also includes voltage and current measuring circuits responsive to the feedback voltage and the voltage developed across the second series resistor respectively. 7 figs.

  4. High voltage DC power supply

    DOEpatents

    Droege, Thomas F.

    1989-01-01

    A high voltage DC power supply having a first series resistor at the output for limiting current in the event of a short-circuited output, a second series resistor for sensing the magnitude of output current, and a voltage divider circuit for providing a source of feedback voltage for use in voltage regulation is disclosed. The voltage divider circuit is coupled to the second series resistor so as to compensate the feedback voltage for a voltage drop across the first series resistor. The power supply also includes a pulse-width modulated control circuit, having dual clock signals, which is responsive to both the feedback voltage and a command voltage, and also includes voltage and current measuring circuits responsive to the feedback voltage and the voltage developed across the second series resistor respectively.

  5. Phenoxy resins containing pendent ethynyl groups and cured resins obtained therefrom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hergenrother, P. M. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    Phenoxy resins containing pendent ethynyl groups, the process for preparing the same, and the cured resin products obtained therefrom are disclosed. Upon the application of heat, the ethynyl groups react to provide branching and crosslinking with the cure temperature being lowered by using a catalyst if desired but not required. The cured phenoxy resins containing pendent ethynyl groups have improved solvent resistance and higher use temperature than linear uncrosslinked phenoxy resins and are applicable for use as coatings, films, adhesives, composited matrices and molding compounds.

  6. Dental repair material: a resin-modified glass-ionomer bioactive ionic resin-based composite.

    PubMed

    Croll, Theodore P; Berg, Joel H; Donly, Kevin J

    2015-01-01

    This report documents treatment and repair of three carious teeth that were restored with a new dental repair material that features the characteristics of both resin-modified glass-ionomer restorative cement (RMGI) and resin-based composite (RBC). The restorative products presented are reported by the manufacturer to be the first bioactive dental materials with an ionic resin matrix, a shock-absorbing resin component, and bioactive fillers that mimic the physical and chemical properties of natural teeth. The restorative material and base/liner, which feature three hardening mechanisms, could prove to be a notable advancement in the adhesive dentistry restorative materials continuum.

  7. Dental repair material: a resin-modified glass-ionomer bioactive ionic resin-based composite.

    PubMed

    Croll, Theodore P; Berg, Joel H; Donly, Kevin J

    2015-01-01

    This report documents treatment and repair of three carious teeth that were restored with a new dental repair material that features the characteristics of both resin-modified glass-ionomer restorative cement (RMGI) and resin-based composite (RBC). The restorative products presented are reported by the manufacturer to be the first bioactive dental materials with an ionic resin matrix, a shock-absorbing resin component, and bioactive fillers that mimic the physical and chemical properties of natural teeth. The restorative material and base/liner, which feature three hardening mechanisms, could prove to be a notable advancement in the adhesive dentistry restorative materials continuum. PMID:25822408

  8. Chemical derivatization of Resorcinol-Formaldehyde resin leading to enhanced chemical/oxidative stability of the resin

    SciTech Connect

    Hubler, T.L.; Franz, J.A.

    1996-10-01

    Resorcinol-Formaldehyde (R-F) resin is a candidate regenerable ion-exchange resin for removal of radioactive cesium from highly alkaline waste tank supernates at both the Hanford and Savannah River sites. Our previous investigations into the structure/function relationships of R-F resin have shown that the R-F resin undergoes facile oxidation to produce, para-bisquinones, with loss of ion-exchange sites, hence lowered performance of the resin for cesium ion-exchange. Our studies have also shown that Phenol-Formaldehyde (P-F) resin has a substantially lower capacity compared to R-F resin, based on predicted values, because over half the ion-exchange sites of the P-F resin undergo etherification during the standard synthetic procedures used for preparation of these resins. In this report, we present our studies into rational synthetic solutions to enhance the chemical/oxidative stability of R-F resin.

  9. Synthesis of improved phenolic and polyester resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delano, C. B.

    1980-01-01

    Thirty-seven cured phenolic resin compositions were prepared and tested for their ability to provide improved char residues and moisture resistance over state of the art epoxy resin composite matrices. Cyanate, epoxy novolac and vinyl ester resins were investigated. Char promoter additives were found to increase the anaerobic char yield at 800 C of epoxy novolacs and vinyl esters. Moisture resistant cyanate and vinyl ester compositions were investigated as composite matrices with Thornel 300 graphite fiber. A cyanate composite matrix provided state of the art composite mechanical properties before and after humidity exposure and an anaerobic char yield of 46 percent at 800 C. The outstanding moisture resistance of the matrix was not completely realized in the composite. Vinyl ester resins showed promise as candidates for improved composite matrix systems.

  10. Improved high-temperature resistant matrix resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, H. E.; Chang, G. E.; Wright, W. F.; Ueda, K.; Orell, M. K.

    1989-01-01

    A study was performed with the objective of developing matrix resins that exhibit improved thermo-oxidative stability over state-of-the-art high temperature resins for use at temperatures up to 644 K (700 F) and air pressures up to 0.7 MPa (100 psia). The work was based upon a TRW discovered family of polyimides currently licensed to and marketed by Ethyl Corporation as EYMYD(R) resins. The approach investigated to provide improved thermo-oxidative properties was to use halogenated derivatives of the diamine, 2, 2-bis (4-(4-aminophenoxy)phenyl) hexafluoropropane (4-BDAF). Polyimide neat resins and Celion(R) 12,000 composites prepared from fluorine substituted 4-BDAF demonstrated unexpectedly lower glass transition temperatures (Tg) and thermo-oxidative stabilities than the baseline 4-BDAF/PMDA polymer.

  11. [Characterization of resin-containing glass ionomers].

    PubMed

    Gladys, S; Van Meerbeek, B; Braem, M; Lambrechts, P; Vanherle, G

    1996-01-01

    Recently, several new resin-modified glassionomers have been introduced on the dental market. At the moment a real confusion exists over the right terminology of the products and its limits in use. Therefore, an in vitro and in vivo study with simultaneously a comparison with conventional glassionomers and composite resins was really necessary. This study revealed that resin-modified glassionomers have physico-mechanical properties that are situated between those of conventional glassionomers and composite resins. The manufacturers have a different approach concerning the particle size distribution. The new materials give a rough surface. They are not indicated for posterior restorations, because their surface hardness is too low compared to that of enamel, and their fatigue resistance is insufficient. The elasticity decreases during setting and maturation. Consequently, they are mainly indicated in situations that require a moderate strength and esthetics, for patients with a high caries activity and when ease in use is requested.

  12. 21 CFR 177.1380 - Fluorocarbon resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 1 CFR part 51. Copies may be obtained from the American Society for Testing and Materials, 1916 Race... of the resin pellets, when extracted with 100 milliliters of 50 percent (by volume) ethyl alcohol...

  13. 21 CFR 177.1380 - Fluorocarbon resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 1 CFR part 51. Copies may be obtained from the American Society for Testing and Materials, 1916 Race... of the resin pellets, when extracted with 100 milliliters of 50 percent (by volume) ethyl alcohol...

  14. 21 CFR 177.1380 - Fluorocarbon resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 1 CFR part 51. Copies may be obtained from the American Society for Testing and Materials, 1916 Race... of the resin pellets, when extracted with 100 milliliters of 50 percent (by volume) ethyl alcohol...

  15. 21 CFR 177.1380 - Fluorocarbon resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 1 CFR part 51. Copies may be obtained from the American Society for Testing and Materials, 1916 Race... of the resin pellets, when extracted with 100 milliliters of 50 percent (by volume) ethyl alcohol...

  16. 21 CFR 177.1580 - Polycarbonate resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... optional adjuvant substances required in the production of the resins; or by (2) The reaction of molten 4,4′-iso-propylidenediphenol with molten diphenyl carbonate in the presence of the disodium salt of...

  17. 21 CFR 177.1580 - Polycarbonate resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... optional adjuvant substances required in the production of the resins; or by (2) The reaction of molten 4,4′-iso-propylidenediphenol with molten diphenyl carbonate in the presence of the disodium salt of...

  18. Determining resin/fiber content of laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrard, G. G.; Houston, D. W.

    1979-01-01

    Article discusses procedure where hydrazine is used to extract graphite fibers from cured polyimide resin. Method does not attack graphite fibers and is faster than hot-concentrated-acid digestion process.

  19. 21 CFR 872.3140 - Resin applicator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... applicator is a brushlike device intended for use in spreading dental resin on a tooth during application of tooth shade material. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from...

  20. 21 CFR 872.3140 - Resin applicator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... applicator is a brushlike device intended for use in spreading dental resin on a tooth during application of tooth shade material. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from...

  1. 21 CFR 872.3140 - Resin applicator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... applicator is a brushlike device intended for use in spreading dental resin on a tooth during application of tooth shade material. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from...

  2. Silicone modified resins for graphite fiber laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, L. W.; Bower, G. M.

    1979-01-01

    The development of silicon modified resins for graphite fiber laminates which will prevent the dispersal of graphite fibers when the composites are burned is discussed. Eighty-five silicone modified resins were synthesized and evaluated including unsaturated polyesters, thermosetting methacrylates, epoxies, polyimides, and phenolics. Neat resins were judged in terms of Si content, homogeneity, hardness, Char formation, and thermal stability. Char formation was estimated by thermogravimetry to 1,000 C in air and in N2. Thermal stability was evaluated by isothermal weight loss measurements for 200 hrs in air at three temperatures. Four silicone modified epoxies were selected for evaluation in unidirectional filament wound graphite laminates. Neat samples of these resins had 1,000 C char residues of 25 to 50%. The highest flexural values measured for the laminates were a strength of 140 kpsi and a modulus of 10 Mpsi. The highest interlaminar shear strength was 5.3 kpsi.

  3. Indirect composite resin materials for posterior applications.

    PubMed

    Shellard, E; Duke, E S

    1999-12-01

    Indirect composite resin restorations were introduced a number of years ago as possible alternatives to traditional metallic or ceramic-based indirect restorations. However, the earlier formulations did not provide evidence of improvement in mechanical and physical properties over chairside-placed direct composite resin materials. Because they required more tooth structure removal than direct restorations, their use became unpopular and was abandoned by most clinicians. Over the past few years, a new class of composite resin indirect materials has surfaced in the profession. Various technologies have been suggested as reinforcement mechanisms. Fibers, matrix modifications, and an assortment of innovations have been proposed for enhancing indirect composite resin restorations. Applications are from inlay restorations all the way to multi-unit fixed prostheses. This manuscript summarizes some of the progress made in this area. When available, data is presented to provide clinicians with guidelines and indications for the use of these materials.

  4. 21 CFR 177.1655 - Polysulfone resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Polysulfone resins. 177.1655 Section 177.1655 Food... (CAS Reg. No. 25154-01-2) consisting of basic resins produced when the disodium salt of 4,4...; or (2) 1,1′-Sulfonylbis polymer with 4,4′-(1-methylethylidene)bis (minimum 92 percent) and...

  5. Cesium-specific phenolic ion exchange resin

    DOEpatents

    Bibler, J.P.; Wallace, R.M.

    1995-08-15

    A phenolic, cesium-specific, cation exchange resin is prepared by neutralizing resorcinol with potassium hydroxide, condensing/polymerizing the resulting intermediate with formaldehyde, heat-curing the resulting polymer to effect cross-linking and grinding it to desired particle size for use. This resin will selectively and efficiently adsorb cesium ions in the presence of a high concentration of sodium ions with a low carbon to cesium ratio. 2 figs.

  6. Cesium-specific phenolic ion exchange resin

    DOEpatents

    Bibler, Jane P.; Wallace, Richard M.

    1995-01-01

    A phenolic, cesium-specific, cation exchange resin is prepared by neutralizing resorcinol with potassium hydroxide, condensing/polymerizing the resulting intermediate with formaldehyde, heat-curing the resulting polymer to effect cross-linking and grinding it to desired particle size for use. This resin will selectively and efficiently adsorb cesium ions in the presence of a high concentration of sodium ions with a low carbon to cesium ratio.

  7. Contraction stresses of composite resin filling materials.

    PubMed

    Hegdahl, T; Gjerdet, N R

    1977-01-01

    The polymerization shrinkage of composite resin filling materials and the tensile stresses developed when the shrinkage is restrained were measured in an in vitro experiment. This allows an estimation to be made of the forces exerted upon the enamel walls of cavities filled with the resin in the acid etch technique. The results indicate that the stresses acting on the enamel are low compared to the tensile strength of the enamel.

  8. Reduction of polyester resin shrinkage by means of epoxy resin—I. Epoxy resin modified with acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietrzak, M.; Brzostowski, A.

    An attempt was made to decrease the shrinkage of unsaturated polyester resin, taking place during radiation-induced curing, by the addition of epoxy resin. In order to combine chemically both resins, the epoxy component was modified with cinnamic and acrylic acids. A composition of 90 parts of polyesster resin, 10 parts of epoxy resin modified with cinnamic acid, and 150 parts of a silica filler showed a volume shrinkage of 1.2%.

  9. Used powdex resin for liquid waste processing

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, C.J.; Bramblett, J.W.

    1995-05-01

    Powdex resin has traditionally been used on the Secondary side for condensate polishing. The resins on these polishers are backwashed periodically based on chemical breakthrough or high differential pressure. Upon the backwash, the ion exchange capacity on the powdex resin is not completely exhausted. In the past, this partially used powdex resin was sluiced to a liner and treated as waste for disposal. In an effort to reduce radioactivity being released from segregated, high chemical concentration wastes, the idea of trying used powdex resin was initiated. In 1992, Duke Power Company began processing problem liquid waste streams with used Secondary powdex and subsequent decanting of the waste water for release. the results have shown significant reductions in the activity of this water. This paper will detail the history, method, and the results of using Secondary powdex for liquid radwaste processing. It will also describe the benefits, such as: (1) Processing waste streams not suitable for bead resin demineralizers. (2) Ability to process large volumes of waste water in a short period of time. (3) Recycling media thought to be useless. (4) > 80% Reduction in activity of water processed. (5) Overall curies reduction. (6) Improved bead demineralizer performance.

  10. Ion Exchange Temperature Testing with SRF Resin

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, Renee L.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Brown, Garrett N.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2012-03-01

    Ion exchange using the Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde (SRF) resin has been selected by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of River Protection for use in the Pretreatment Facility of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and for potential application in an at-tank deployment for removing 137Cs. Recent proposed changes to the WTP ion exchange process baseline indicate that higher temperatures (50°C) to alleviate post-filtration precipitation issues prior to reaching the ion exchange columns may be required. Therefore, it is important to understand the behavior of SRF resin performance under the conditions expected with the new equipment and process changes. This research examined the impact of elevated temperature on resin loading and resin degradation during extended solution flow using elevated temperature (45°, 50°, 55°, 60°, 65°, 75°C). Testing for extended times at elevated temperatures showed that the resin does degrade and loading capacity is reduced at and above 45°C. Above 60°C the resin appears to not load at all.

  11. Dual wound dc brush motor gearhead

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henson, Barrie W.

    1986-01-01

    The design requirements, the design, development tests and problems, the qualification and life test and the findings of the strip examination of a dual wound DC brushed motor gearhead are described. It is the only space qualified dual wound dc brushed motor gearhead in Europe.

  12. DC KIDS COUNT e-Databook Indicators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DC Action for Children, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This report presents indicators that are included in DC Action for Children's 2012 KIDS COUNT e-databook, their definitions and sources and the rationale for their selection. The indicators for DC KIDS COUNT represent a mix of traditional KIDS COUNT indicators of child well-being, such as the number of children living in poverty, and indicators of…

  13. DC3 Data and Information Page

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-03-16

    Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry (DC3) Data and Information The Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry ( DC3 ) field campaign is investigating the impact of deep, ... processes, on upper tropospheric (UT) composition and chemistry. The primary science objectives are:   To quantify and ...

  14. DC-based magnetic field controller

    DOEpatents

    Kotter, D.K.; Rankin, R.A.; Morgan, J.P.

    1994-05-31

    A magnetic field controller is described for laboratory devices and in particular to dc operated magnetic field controllers for mass spectrometers, comprising a dc power supply in combination with improvements to a Hall probe subsystem, display subsystem, preamplifier, field control subsystem, and an output stage. 1 fig.

  15. DC-based magnetic field controller

    DOEpatents

    Kotter, Dale K.; Rankin, Richard A.; Morgan, John P,.

    1994-01-01

    A magnetic field controller for laboratory devices and in particular to dc operated magnetic field controllers for mass spectrometers, comprising a dc power supply in combination with improvements to a hall probe subsystem, display subsystem, preamplifier, field control subsystem, and an output stage.

  16. ALA 2010: Where to Eat in DC

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library Journal, 2010

    2010-01-01

    As host to visitors and transplants from around the world, Washington, DC, benefits from the constant infusion of different cultures. Although most neighborhoods lack a unified culinary flavor, make no mistake: DC is a city of distinctive areas, each with its own style, ensuring that hungry American Library Association (ALA) 2010 conference…

  17. Close-Range Gunfire around DC Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bieler, Sam; La Vigne, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    This report examines the incidence of gunfire as measured by gunshot detection technology using data from the 2011-2012 school year. It finds that a disproportionate volume of gunfire happened near a small share of DC schools. About half of DC schools covered by gunshot detection sensors are in close proximity to gunfire, and four schools were…

  18. Modeling of DC spacecraft power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, F. C.

    1995-01-01

    Future spacecraft power systems must be capable of supplying power to various loads. This delivery of power may necessitate the use of high-voltage, high-power dc distribution systems to transmit power from the source to the loads. Using state-of-the-art power conditioning electronics such as dc-dc converters, complex series and parallel configurations may be required at the interface between the source and the distribution system and between the loads and the distribution system. This research will use state-variables to model and simulate a dc spacecraft power system. Each component of the dc power system will be treated as a multiport network, and a state model will be written with the port voltages as the inputs. The state model of a component will be solved independently from the other components using its state transition matrix. A state-space averaging method is developed first in general for any dc-dc switching converter, and then demonstrated in detail for the particular case of the boost power stage. General equations for both steady-state (dc) and dynamic effects (ac) are obtained, from which important transfer functions are derived and applied to a special case of the boost power stage.

  19. The dc power circuits: A compilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    A compilation of reports concerning power circuits is presented for the dissemination of aerospace information to the general public as part of the NASA Technology Utilization Program. The descriptions for the electronic circuits are grouped as follows: dc power supplies, power converters, current-voltage power supply regulators, overload protection circuits, and dc constant current power supplies.

  20. Modeling of DC spacecraft power systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, F. C.

    1995-07-01

    Future spacecraft power systems must be capable of supplying power to various loads. This delivery of power may necessitate the use of high-voltage, high-power dc distribution systems to transmit power from the source to the loads. Using state-of-the-art power conditioning electronics such as dc-dc converters, complex series and parallel configurations may be required at the interface between the source and the distribution system and between the loads and the distribution system. This research will use state-variables to model and simulate a dc spacecraft power system. Each component of the dc power system will be treated as a multiport network, and a state model will be written with the port voltages as the inputs. The state model of a component will be solved independently from the other components using its state transition matrix. A state-space averaging method is developed first in general for any dc-dc switching converter, and then demonstrated in detail for the particular case of the boost power stage. General equations for both steady-state (dc) and dynamic effects (ac) are obtained, from which important transfer functions are derived and applied to a special case of the boost power stage.

  1. Calcium and phosphate release from resin-based materials containing different calcium orthophosphate nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Marcela C; Natale, Livia C; Arana-Chaves, Victor E; Braga, Roberto R

    2015-11-01

    The study compared ion release from resin-based materials containing calcium orthophosphates. Amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP), dicalcium phosphate anhydrous (DCPA), dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD), and tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS), and surface area (nitrogen adsorption isotherms, BET method). Nanoparticles were added to a dimethacrylate-based resin and materials were tested for degree of conversion (DC) and calcium/phosphate release up to 28 days under pH 5.5 and 7.0. Data were analyzed by ANOVA/Tukey test (alpha: 0.05).The crystallinity of DCPA, DCPD, and β-TCP were confirmed, as well as the ACP amorphous nature. DCPD and β-TCP presented larger agglomerates than DCPA and ACP. The surface area of ACP was 5-11 times higher than those of the other nanoparticles. Materials showed similar DC. The material containing ACP released significantly more ions than the others, which released similar amounts of calcium and, in most cases, phosphate. Ion release was not affected by pH. Calcium release decreased between 7 and 21 days, while phosphate levels remained constant after 14 days. In conclusion, ACP higher ion release can be ascribed to its high surface area. DCPA, DCPD, and β-TCP had similar performances as ion-releasing fillers.

  2. Effect of modulated photo-activation on polymerization shrinkage behavior of dental restorative resin composites.

    PubMed

    Tauböck, Tobias T; Feilzer, Albert J; Buchalla, Wolfgang; Kleverlaan, Cornelis J; Krejci, Ivo; Attin, Thomas

    2014-08-01

    This study investigated the influence of modulated photo-activation on axial polymerization shrinkage, shrinkage force, and hardening of light- and dual-curing resin-based composites. Three light-curing resin composites (SDR bulk-fill, Esthet X flow, and Esthet X HD) and one dual-curing material (Rebilda DC) were subjected to different irradiation protocols with identical energy density (27 J cm(-2) ): high-intensity continuous light (HIC), low-intensity continuous light (LIC), soft-start (SS), and pulse-delay curing (PD). Axial shrinkage and shrinkage force of 1.5-mm-thick specimens were recorded in real time for 15 min using custom-made devices. Knoop hardness was determined at the end of the observation period. Statistical analysis revealed no significant differences among the curing protocols for both Knoop hardness and axial shrinkage, irrespective of the composite material. Pulse-delay curing generated the significantly lowest shrinkage forces within the three light-curing materials SDR bulk-fill, Esthet X flow, and Esthet X HD. High-intensity continuous light created the significantly highest shrinkage forces within Esthet X HD and Rebilda DC, and caused significantly higher forces than LIC within Esthet X flow. In conclusion, both the composite material and the applied curing protocol control shrinkage force formation. Pulse-delay curing decreases shrinkage forces compared with high-intensity continuous irradiation without affecting hardening and axial polymerization shrinkage. PMID:25039287

  3. Effect of modulated photo-activation on polymerization shrinkage behavior of dental restorative resin composites.

    PubMed

    Tauböck, Tobias T; Feilzer, Albert J; Buchalla, Wolfgang; Kleverlaan, Cornelis J; Krejci, Ivo; Attin, Thomas

    2014-08-01

    This study investigated the influence of modulated photo-activation on axial polymerization shrinkage, shrinkage force, and hardening of light- and dual-curing resin-based composites. Three light-curing resin composites (SDR bulk-fill, Esthet X flow, and Esthet X HD) and one dual-curing material (Rebilda DC) were subjected to different irradiation protocols with identical energy density (27 J cm(-2) ): high-intensity continuous light (HIC), low-intensity continuous light (LIC), soft-start (SS), and pulse-delay curing (PD). Axial shrinkage and shrinkage force of 1.5-mm-thick specimens were recorded in real time for 15 min using custom-made devices. Knoop hardness was determined at the end of the observation period. Statistical analysis revealed no significant differences among the curing protocols for both Knoop hardness and axial shrinkage, irrespective of the composite material. Pulse-delay curing generated the significantly lowest shrinkage forces within the three light-curing materials SDR bulk-fill, Esthet X flow, and Esthet X HD. High-intensity continuous light created the significantly highest shrinkage forces within Esthet X HD and Rebilda DC, and caused significantly higher forces than LIC within Esthet X flow. In conclusion, both the composite material and the applied curing protocol control shrinkage force formation. Pulse-delay curing decreases shrinkage forces compared with high-intensity continuous irradiation without affecting hardening and axial polymerization shrinkage.

  4. Preparation and cured properties of novel cycloaliphatic epoxy resins

    SciTech Connect

    Tokizawa, Makoto; Okada, Hiroyoshi; Wakabayashi, Nobukatsu; Kimura, Tomiaki . Research Center)

    1993-10-20

    Preparation and characterization of novel cycloaliphatic epoxy resins, which are derived from octadienyl compounds, were studied. From a model peracetic acid epoxidation reaction using 2,7-octadienyl acetate-1, the structure of the liquid resins is estimated to be mainly terminal epoxides and some amount of inner epoxide depending on the epoxide content. The epoxy resins offer lower toxicity and lower vapor pressure. The reactivity of the resin with acid anhydrides is moderate but faster than that of traditional cyclohexane epoxide-type resins and slower than that of the glycidyl ester-type resins. This reactivity was also examined using model compounds. The heat deflection temperature of the hexahydro-phthalic anhydride-cured resins is shown to be directly proportional to the number of epoxy groups in the molecules. The flexural strength of the cured resins is nearly equivalent to that of the commercial resins, although the flexural elongation of the resins is larger than that of the rigid cyclohexane epoxide-type resins. The thermal stability of the cured resins is compared to typical rigid cycloaliphatic resins; furthermore, high water resistance of the cured resins is suggested to be attributed to the hydrophobic character of the C[sub 8] chain by cross-linking.

  5. Imide modified epoxy matrix resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scola, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    The results of a program designed to develop tough imide modified epoxy resins cured by bisimide amine (BIA) hardeners are described. State-of-the-art epoxides MY720 and DER383 were used, and four bismide amines were evaluated. These were the BIA's derived from the 6F anhydride (4,4'-(hexafluoroisopropylidene) bis(phthalic anhydride) and the diamines 3,3'-diaminodiphynyl sulfone, 4,4'-oxygianiline, 4,4'-methylene dianiline, and 1,12-dodecane diamine. A key intermediate, designated 6F anhydride, is required for the synthesis of the bisimide amines. Reaction parameters to synthesize a precursor to the 6F anhydride (6FHC) in high yields were investigated. The catalyst trifluoromethane sulfonic acid was studied. Although small scale runs yielded the 6FHC in 50 percent yield, efforts to ranslate these results to a larger scale synthesis gave the 6FHC in only 9 percent yield. Results show that the concept of using bisimide amine as curing agents to improve the toughness properties of epoxies is valid.

  6. Effect of ceramic type, thickness, and time of irradiation on degree of polymerization of dual – cure resin cement

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Rashi; Taneja, Sonali; Kumari, Manju

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the study is to evaluate the effect of ceramic type, thickness, and time of irradiation on degree of polymerization of dual-cure resin cement. Materials and Methods: Dual-cure resin cement (SoloCem) was used to prepare disk-shaped samples (0.5 mm thick × 5 mm diameter). Study group samples (n = 5) were light-cured for 40, 60, and 80 s through all ceramic leucite-reinforced (Cergo Kiss), lithium disilicate-reinforced (IPS e.max), and monolithic zirconia-reinforced (Ziecon) of three thicknesses (2, 3, and 4 mm). Negative control group samples were cured through metal disks and positive control samples were cured without the presence of ceramic. The degree of conversion (DC) was evaluated by Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. The recorded data were subjected to one-way analysis of variance, followed by post hoc analysis (Tukey HSD). Results and Conclusion: Greatest light transmission and DC were seen through Cergo Kiss, followed by IPS e.max Press and Ziecon, with insignificant difference between the latter two. The attenuation of light irradiance increased with increasing thickness of ceramic disks, with statistically significant values between 3 and 4 mm. Increasing time of irradiation to cure dual-cure resin cement did not always result in greater degree of polymerization.

  7. Effect of ceramic type, thickness, and time of irradiation on degree of polymerization of dual – cure resin cement

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Rashi; Taneja, Sonali; Kumari, Manju

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the study is to evaluate the effect of ceramic type, thickness, and time of irradiation on degree of polymerization of dual-cure resin cement. Materials and Methods: Dual-cure resin cement (SoloCem) was used to prepare disk-shaped samples (0.5 mm thick × 5 mm diameter). Study group samples (n = 5) were light-cured for 40, 60, and 80 s through all ceramic leucite-reinforced (Cergo Kiss), lithium disilicate-reinforced (IPS e.max), and monolithic zirconia-reinforced (Ziecon) of three thicknesses (2, 3, and 4 mm). Negative control group samples were cured through metal disks and positive control samples were cured without the presence of ceramic. The degree of conversion (DC) was evaluated by Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. The recorded data were subjected to one-way analysis of variance, followed by post hoc analysis (Tukey HSD). Results and Conclusion: Greatest light transmission and DC were seen through Cergo Kiss, followed by IPS e.max Press and Ziecon, with insignificant difference between the latter two. The attenuation of light irradiance increased with increasing thickness of ceramic disks, with statistically significant values between 3 and 4 mm. Increasing time of irradiation to cure dual-cure resin cement did not always result in greater degree of polymerization. PMID:27656058

  8. A high voltage ratio and low ripple interleaved DC-DC converter for fuel cell applications.

    PubMed

    Chang, Long-Yi; Chao, Kuei-Hsiang; Chang, Tsang-Chih

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes a high voltage ratio and low ripple interleaved boost DC-DC converter, which can be used to reduce the output voltage ripple. This converter transfers the low DC voltage of fuel cell to high DC voltage in DC link. The structure of the converter is parallel with two voltage-doubler boost converters by interleaving their output voltages to reduce the voltage ripple ratio. Besides, it can lower the current stress for the switches and inductors in the system. First, the PSIM software was used to establish a proton exchange membrane fuel cell and a converter circuit model. The simulated and measured results of the fuel cell output characteristic curve are made to verify the correctness of the established simulation model. In addition, some experimental results are made to validate the effectiveness in improving output voltage ripple of the proposed high voltage ratio interleaved boost DC-DC converters.

  9. A high voltage ratio and low ripple interleaved DC-DC converter for fuel cell applications.

    PubMed

    Chang, Long-Yi; Chao, Kuei-Hsiang; Chang, Tsang-Chih

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes a high voltage ratio and low ripple interleaved boost DC-DC converter, which can be used to reduce the output voltage ripple. This converter transfers the low DC voltage of fuel cell to high DC voltage in DC link. The structure of the converter is parallel with two voltage-doubler boost converters by interleaving their output voltages to reduce the voltage ripple ratio. Besides, it can lower the current stress for the switches and inductors in the system. First, the PSIM software was used to establish a proton exchange membrane fuel cell and a converter circuit model. The simulated and measured results of the fuel cell output characteristic curve are made to verify the correctness of the established simulation model. In addition, some experimental results are made to validate the effectiveness in improving output voltage ripple of the proposed high voltage ratio interleaved boost DC-DC converters. PMID:23365536

  10. A High Voltage Ratio and Low Ripple Interleaved DC-DC Converter for Fuel Cell Applications

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Long-Yi; Chao, Kuei-Hsiang; Chang, Tsang-Chih

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes a high voltage ratio and low ripple interleaved boost DC-DC converter, which can be used to reduce the output voltage ripple. This converter transfers the low DC voltage of fuel cell to high DC voltage in DC link. The structure of the converter is parallel with two voltage-doubler boost converters by interleaving their output voltages to reduce the voltage ripple ratio. Besides, it can lower the current stress for the switches and inductors in the system. First, the PSIM software was used to establish a proton exchange membrane fuel cell and a converter circuit model. The simulated and measured results of the fuel cell output characteristic curve are made to verify the correctness of the established simulation model. In addition, some experimental results are made to validate the effectiveness in improving output voltage ripple of the proposed high voltage ratio interleaved boost DC-DC converters. PMID:23365536

  11. DC/DC Power Converter for Super-Capacitor Supplied by Electric Power Splitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haubert, T.; Mindl, P.

    The aim of the article is design of DC/DC converter and discussing of problematic supply using electric power splitter. The electric power splitter with AC/DC converter is source for the DC/DC converter, which is dedicated for charging and discharging of hybrid car drive super-capacitor energy storage. The electric power splitter is synchronous machine with two rotating parts. First rotor contains permanent magnet and the second rotor contains three-phase windings. The amplitude of output voltage depends on difference between first and second rotor speed. The main role of the DC/DC converter is to optimize energy content in super-capacitor storage used to acceleration and deceleration driving period of the passenger car with hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) drive system using electric power splitter.

  12. Lessons learned: DC-X

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinmeyer, D. A.

    1996-01-01

    The DC-X was conceived and developed specifically to lay the ground work for significantly lowering the cost of space operations. The system design was based on an initial set of program goals and a finite, limited set of resources. The goal in its simplest terms was to demonstrate vertical landing after rotation of the vehicle from a nose-first to an engines-first altitude. Finite resources actually drove the selection of a robust design to reduce fabrication and preflight testing costs. The result was a system with a large amount of flexibility which allowed expansion of the test goals as the system, and test program, evolved. The use of the vehicle flight computer interfacing with the ground control system for flight crew training was also not an initial concept. However, by defining an architecture for the system control modes which allowed additions and modifications as learning progressed, the 6 DOF codes used for flight controls software development were transported to the operating system to be used in a simulated flight mode. Flight data reduction was also greatly improved as the program progressed, and the data needs and presentation were refined. The software, avionics hardware, and the FOCC system development proceeded ahead of the vehicle, primarily because most of the hardware elements were existing at the outset of the program. The Built-in-Test (BIT) for avionics and propulsion systems were adequate. Particularly the flight readiness system which verified the vehicle health after engine start and before throttle-up for flight.

  13. DC-10 winglet flight evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, A. B.

    1983-01-01

    Results of a flight evaluation of winglets on a DC-10 Series 10 aircraft are presented. For sensitive areas of comparison, effects of winglets were determined back-to-back with and without winglets. Basic and reduced-span winglet configurations were tested. After initial encounter with low-speed buffet, a number of acceptable configurations were developed. For maximum drag reduction at both cruise and low speeds, lower winglets were required, having leading edge devices on upper and lower winglets for the latter regime. The cruise benefits were enhanced by adding outboard aileron droop to the reduced-span winglet aircraft. Winglets had no significant impact on stall speeds, high-speed buffet boundary, and stability and control. Flutter test results agreed with predictions and ground vibration data. Flight loads measurement, provided in a concurrent program, also agreed with predictions. It was estimated that a production version of the aircraft, using the reduced-span winglet and aileron droop, would yield a 3-percent reduction in fuel burned with capacity payload. This range was 2% greater than with winglets. A 5% reduction in takeoff distance at maximum takeoff weight would also result.

  14. Tc-99 Ion Exchange Resin Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Valenta, Michelle M.; Parker, Kent E.; Pierce, Eric M.

    2010-08-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was contracted by CHPRC to evaluate the release of 99Tc from spent resin used to treat water from well 299-W15-765 and stored for several years. The key questions to be answered are: 1) does 99Tc readily release from the spent ion exchange resin after being in storage for several years; 2) if hot water stripping is used to remove the co-contaminant carbon tetrachloride, will 99Tc that has been sequestered by the resin be released; and 3) can spent resin be encapsulated into a cementitious waste form; if so, how much 99Tc would be released from the weathering of the monolith waste form? The results from the long term stability leach test results confirm that the resin is not releasing a significant amount of the sequestered 99Tc, evident by the less than 0.02% of the total 99Tc loaded being identified in the solution. Furthermore, it is possible that the measured 99Tc concentration is the result of 99Tc contained in the pore spaces of the resin. In addition to these results, analyses conducted to examine the impact of hot water on the release of 99Tc suggest that only a small percentage of the total is being released. This suggest that hot water stripping to remove carbon tetrachloride will not have a significant affect on the resin’s ability to hold-on to sequestered 99Tc. Finally, encapsulation of spent resin in a cementitious material may be a viable disposal option, but additional tests are needed to examine the extent of physical degradation caused by moisture loss and the effect this degradation process can have on the release of 99Tc.

  15. Thermal cycling effects on adhesion of resin-bovine enamel junction among different composite resins.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Cheng; Ko, Chia-Ling; Wu, Hui-Yu; Lai, Pei-Ling; Shih, Chi-Jen

    2014-10-01

    Thermal cycling is used to mimic the changes in oral cavity temperature experienced by composite resins when used clinically. The purpose of this study is to assess the thermal cycling effects of in-house produced composite resin on bonding strength. The dicalcium phosphate anhydrous filler surfaces are modified using nanocrystals and silanization (w/NP/Si). The resin is compared with commercially available composite resins Filtek Z250, Z350, and glass ionomer restorative material GIC Fuji-II LC (control). Different composite resins were filled into the dental enamel of bovine teeth. The bond force and resin-enamel junction graphical structures of the samples were determined after thermal cycling between 5 and 55°C in deionized water for 600 cycles. After thermal cycling, the w/NP/Si 30wt%, 50wt% and Filtek Z250, Z350 groups showed higher shear forces than glass ionomer GIC, and w/NP/Si 50wt% had the highest shear force. Through SEM observations, more of the fillings with w/NP/Si 30wt% and w/NP/Si 50wt% groups flowed into the enamel tubule, forming closed tubules with the composite resins. The push-out force is proportional to the resin flow depth and uniformity. The push-out tubule pore and resin shear pattern is the most uniform and consistent in the w/NP/Si 50wt% group. Accordingly, this developed composite resin maintains great mechanical properties after thermal cycling. Thus, it has the potential to be used in a clinical setting when restoring non-carious cervical lesions.

  16. High sensitivity ancilla assisted nanoscale DC magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yixiang; Ajoy, Ashok; Marseglia, Luca; Saha, Kasturi; Cappellaro, Paola

    2016-05-01

    Sensing slowly varying magnetic fields are particularly relevant to many real world scenarios, where the signals of interest are DC or close to static. Nitrogen Vacancy (NV) centers in diamond are a versatile platform for such DC magnetometry on nanometer length scales. Using NV centers, the standard technique for measuring DC magnetic fields is via the Ramsey protocol, where sensitivities can approach better than 1 μ T/vHz, but are limited by the sensor fast dephasing time T2*. In this work we instead present a method of sensing DC magnetic fields that is intrinsically limited by the much longer T2 coherence time. The method exploits a strongly-coupled ancillary nuclear spin to achieve high DC field sensitivities potentially exceeding that of the Ramsey method. In addition, through this method we sense the perpendicular component of the DC magnetic field, which in conjunction with the parallel component sensed by the Ramsey method provides a valuable tool for vector DC magnetometry at the nanoscale.

  17. Cytotoxicity of Resin Composites Containing Bioactive Glass Fillers

    PubMed Central

    Salehi, Satin; Gwinner, Fernanda; Mitchell, John C; Pfeifer, Carmem; Ferracane, Jack L

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the in vitro cytotoxicity of dental composites containing bioactive glass fillers. Methods Dental composites (50:50 Bis-GMA/TEGDMA resin: 72.5wt% filler, 67.5%Sr-glass and 5% OX50) containing different concentrations (0, 5, 10 and 15 wt %) of two sol-gel bioactive glasses, BAG65 (65 mole% SiO2, 31 mole% CaO, 4 mole% P2O5) and BAG62 (3 mole% F added) were evaluated for cytotoxicity using Alamar Blue assay. First, composite extracts were obtained from 7 day incubations of composite in cell culture medium at 37° C. Undifferentiated pulp cells (OD-21) were exposed to dilutions of the original extracts for 3, 5, and 7 days. Then freshly cured composite disks were incubated with OD-21 cells (n=5) for 2 days. Subsequently, fresh composite disks were incubated in culture medium at 37°C for 7 days, and then the extracted disks were incubated with OD-21 cells for 2 days. Finally, fresh composites disks were light cured for 3, 5, and 20 seconds and incubated with OD-21 cells (n=5) for 1, 3, 5, and 7 days. To verify that the three different curing modes produced different levels of degree of conversion (DC), the DC of each composite was determined by FTIR. Groups (n=5) were compared with ANOVA/Tukey’s (α≤0.05). Results Extracts from all composites significantly reduced cell viability until a dilution of 1:8 or lower, where the extract became equal to the control. All freshly-cured composites showed significantly reduced cell viability at two days. However, no reduction in cell viability was observed for any composite that had been previously soaked in media before exposure to the cells. Composites with reduced DC (3 s vs. 20 s cure), as verified by FTIR, showed significantly reduced cell viability. Significance The results show that the composites, independent of composition, had equivalent potency in terms of reducing the viability of the cells in culture. Soaking the composites for 7 days before exposing them to the cells suggested that the

  18. 76 FR 42114 - Granular Polytetrafluoroethylene Resin From Italy: Continuation of Antidumping Duty Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-18

    ... Granular Polytetrafluoroethylene Resin From Italy, 76 FR 39896 (July 7, 2011), and USITC Publication 4240... International Trade Administration Granular Polytetrafluoroethylene Resin From Italy: Continuation of... the antidumping duty order on granular polytetrafluoroethylene resin (``PTFE resin'') from Italy...

  19. DC-Compensated Current Transformer †

    PubMed Central

    Ripka, Pavel; Draxler, Karel; Styblíková, Renata

    2016-01-01

    Instrument current transformers (CTs) measure AC currents. The DC component in the measured current can saturate the transformer and cause gross error. We use fluxgate detection and digital feedback compensation of the DC flux to suppress the overall error to 0.15%. This concept can be used not only for high-end CTs with a nanocrystalline core, but it also works for low-cost CTs with FeSi cores. The method described here allows simultaneous measurements of the DC current component. PMID:26805830

  20. DC isolation and protection system and circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, Charles A. (Inventor); Kellogg, Gary V. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A precision analog electronic circuit that is capable of sending accurate signals to an external device that has hostile electric characteristics, including the presence of very large common mode voltages. The circuit is also capable of surviving applications of normal mode overvoltages of up to 120 VAC/VDC for unlimited periods of time without damage or degradation. First, the circuit isolates the DC signal output from the computer. Means are then provided for amplifying the isolated DC signal. Further means are provided for stabilizing and protecting the isolating and amplifying means, and the isolated and amplified DC signal which is output to the external device, against overvoltages and overcurrents.

  1. High power density dc/dc converter: Selection of converter topology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divan, Deepakraj M.

    1990-01-01

    The work involved in the identification and selection of a suitable converter topology is described. Three new dc/dc converter topologies are proposed: Phase-Shifted Single Active Bridge DC/DC Converter; Single Phase Dual Active Bridges DC/DC Converter; and Three Phase Dual Active Bridges DC/DC Converter (Topology C). The salient features of these topologies are: (1) All are minimal in structure, i.e., each consists of an input and output bridge, input and output filter and a transformer, all components essential for a high power dc/dc conversion process; (2) All devices of both the bridges can operate under near zero-voltage conditions, making possible a reduction of device switching losses and hence, an increase in switching frequency; (3) All circuits operate at a constant frequency, thus simplifying the task of the magnetic and filter elements; (4) Since, the leakage inductance of the transformer is used as the main current transfer element, problems associated with the diode reverse recovery are eliminated. Also, this mode of operation allows easy paralleling of multiple modules for extending the power capacity of the system; (5) All circuits are least sensitive to parasitic impedances, infact the parasitics are efficently utilized; and (6) The soft switching transitions, result in low electromagnetic interference. A detailed analysis of each topology was carried out. Based on the analysis, the various device and component ratings for each topology operating at an optimum point, and under the given specifications, are tabulated and discussed.

  2. Robust DC/DC converter control for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ya-Xiong; Yu, Duck-Hyun; Chen, Shi-An; Kim, Young-Bae

    2014-09-01

    This study investigates a robust controller in regulating the pulse width modulation (PWM) of a DC/DC converter for a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) application. A significant variation in the output voltage of a PEMFC depends on the power requirement and prevents a PEMFC from directly connecting to a subsequent power bus. DC/DC converters are utilized to step-up or step-down voltage to match the subsequent power bus voltage. In this study, a full dynamic model, which includes a PEMFC and boost and buck DC/DC converters, is developed under MATLAB/Simulink environment for control. A robust PWM duty ratio control for the converters is designed using time delay control (TDC). This control enables state variables to accurately follow the dynamics of a reference model using time-delayed information of plant input and output information within a few sampling periods. To prove the superiority of the TDC performance, traditional proportional-integral control (PIC) and model predictive control (MPC) are designed and implemented, and the simulation results are compared. The efficacies of TDC for the PEMFC-fed PWM DC/DC converters are validated through experimental test results using a 100 W PEMFC as well as boost and buck DC/DC converters.

  3. Novel bidirectional DC-DC converters based on the three-state switching cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva Júnior, José Carlos; Robles Balestero, Juan Paulo; Lessa Tofoli, Fernando

    2016-05-01

    It is well known that there is an increasing demand for bidirectional DC-DC converters for applications that range from renewable energy sources to electric vehicles. Within this context, this work proposes novel DC-DC converter topologies that use the three-state switching cell (3SSC), whose well-known advantages over conventional existing structures are ability to operate at high current levels, while current sharing is maintained by a high frequency transformer; reduction of cost and dimensions of magnetics; improved distribution of losses, with consequent increase of global efficiency and reduction of cost associated to the need of semiconductors with lower current ratings. Three distinct topologies can be derived from the 3SSC: one DC-DC converter with reversible current characteristic able to operate in the first and second quadrants; one DC-DC converter with reversible voltage characteristic able to operate in the first and third quadrants and one DC-DC converter with reversible current and voltage characteristics able to operate in four quadrants. Only the topology with bidirectional current characteristic is analysed in detail in terms of the operating stages in both nonoverlapping and overlapping modes, while the design procedure of the power stage elements is obtained. In order to validate the theoretical assumptions, an experimental prototype is also implemented, so that relevant issues can be properly discussed.

  4. Diffusion of residual monomer in polymer resins.

    PubMed

    Piver, W T

    1976-10-01

    A simplified mathematical model which made use of Fick's laws of diffusion written in spherical coordinates was developed to describe the rate of diffusion of residual monomers from polymer resins. The properties of the monomer-polymer system which influenced the amount of monomer remaining in the polymer as a function of time were the diffusivity and solubility of the monomer in the polymer, and the particle size of the polymer resin. This model was used to analyze literature data on the diffusion of residual vinyl chloride monomer in polyvinyl chloride resins made by the suspension process. It was concluded that particle size of the resin was a significant parameter which should be taken advantage of in process equipment designed to remove residual monomer from PVC resins. The diffusivity of the monomer in the polymer was a function of the solubility of the monomer in the polymer. Monomer solubility can be determined from Henry's law. It was suggested that this model could be adapted to describe diffusion of monomers from any monomer-polymer system, and would be a useful approach to modeling the transport of nonreactive chemical additives from plastics.

  5. Diffusion of residual monomer in polymer resins.

    PubMed Central

    Piver, W T

    1976-01-01

    A simplified mathematical model which made use of Fick's laws of diffusion written in spherical coordinates was developed to describe the rate of diffusion of residual monomers from polymer resins. The properties of the monomer-polymer system which influenced the amount of monomer remaining in the polymer as a function of time were the diffusivity and solubility of the monomer in the polymer, and the particle size of the polymer resin. This model was used to analyze literature data on the diffusion of residual vinyl chloride monomer in polyvinyl chloride resins made by the suspension process. It was concluded that particle size of the resin was a significant parameter which should be taken advantage of in process equipment designed to remove residual monomer from PVC resins. The diffusivity of the monomer in the polymer was a function of the solubility of the monomer in the polymer. Monomer solubility can be determined from Henry's law. It was suggested that this model could be adapted to describe diffusion of monomers from any monomer-polymer system, and would be a useful approach to modeling the transport of nonreactive chemical additives from plastics. PMID:1026410

  6. Characterization of Polyimide Matrix Resins and Prepregs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maximovich, M. G.; Galeos, R. M.

    1985-01-01

    Graphite/polyimide composite materials are attractive candidates for a wide range of aerospace applications. They have many of the virtues of graphite/epoxies, i.e., high specific strengths and stiffness, and also outstanding thermal/oxidative stability. Yet they are not widely used in the aerospace industry due to problems of procesability. By their nature, modern addition polyimide (PI) resins and prepregs are more complex than epoxies; the key to processing lies in characterizing and understanding the materials. Chemical and rheological characterizations are carried out on several addition polyimide resins and graphite reinforced prepregs, including those based on PMR-15, LARC 160 (AP 22), LARC 160 (Curithane 103) and V378A. The use of a high range torque transducer with a Rheometrics mechanical spectrometer allows rheological data to be generated on prepreg materials as well as neat resins. The use of prepreg samples instead of neat resins eliminates the need for preimidization of the samples and the data correlates well with processing behavior found in the shop. Rheological characterization of the resins and prepregs finds significant differences not readily detected by conventional chemical characterization techniques.

  7. Development of a heterogeneous laminating resin system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biermann, T. F.; Hopper, L. C.

    1985-01-01

    The factors which effect the impact resistance of laminating resin systems and yet retain equivalent performance with the conventional 450 K curing epoxy matrix systems in other areas were studied. Formulation work was conducted on two systems, an all-epoxy and an epoxy/bismaleimide, to gain fundamental information on the effect formulation changes have upon neat resin and composite properties. The all-epoxy work involved formulations with various amounts and combinations of eight different epoxy resins, four different hardeners, fifteen different toughening agents, a filler, and a catalyst. The epoxy/bismaleimide effort improved formulations with various amounts and combinations of nine different resins, four different hardeners, eight different toughening agents, four different catalysts, and a filler. When a formulation appeared to offer the proper combination of properties required for a laminating resin Celion 3K-70P fabric was prepregged. Initial screening tests on composites primarily involved Gardner type impact and measurement of short beam shear strengths under dry and hot/wet conditions.

  8. Ponderosa pine resin defenses and growth: metrics matter.

    PubMed

    Hood, Sharon; Sala, Anna

    2015-11-01

    Bark beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae) cause widespread tree mortality in coniferous forests worldwide. Constitutive and induced host defenses are important factors in an individual tree's ability to survive an attack and in bottom-up regulation of bark beetle population dynamics, yet quantifying defense levels is often difficult. For example, in Pinus spp., resin flow is important for resistance to bark beetles but is extremely variable among individuals and within a season. While resin is produced and stored in resin ducts, the specific resin duct metrics that best correlate with resin flow remain unclear. The ability and timing of some pine species to produce induced resin is also not well understood. We investigated (i) the relationships between ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Lawson & C. Lawson) resin flow and axial resin duct characteristics, tree growth and physiological variables, and (ii) if mechanical wounding induces ponderosa pine resin flow and resin ducts in the absence of bark beetles. Resin flow increased later in the growing season under moderate water stress and was highest in faster growing trees. The best predictors of resin flow were nonstandardized measures of resin ducts, resin duct size and total resin duct area, both of which increased with tree growth. However, while faster growing trees tended to produce more resin, models of resin flow using only tree growth were not statistically significant. Further, the standardized measures of resin ducts, density and duct area relative to xylem area, decreased with tree growth rate, indicating that slower growing trees invested more in resin duct defenses per unit area of radial growth, despite a tendency to produce less resin overall. We also found that mechanical wounding induced ponderosa pine defenses, but this response was slow. Resin flow increased after 28 days, and resin duct production did not increase until the following year. These slow induced responses may allow

  9. Ponderosa pine resin defenses and growth: metrics matter.

    PubMed

    Hood, Sharon; Sala, Anna

    2015-11-01

    Bark beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae) cause widespread tree mortality in coniferous forests worldwide. Constitutive and induced host defenses are important factors in an individual tree's ability to survive an attack and in bottom-up regulation of bark beetle population dynamics, yet quantifying defense levels is often difficult. For example, in Pinus spp., resin flow is important for resistance to bark beetles but is extremely variable among individuals and within a season. While resin is produced and stored in resin ducts, the specific resin duct metrics that best correlate with resin flow remain unclear. The ability and timing of some pine species to produce induced resin is also not well understood. We investigated (i) the relationships between ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Lawson & C. Lawson) resin flow and axial resin duct characteristics, tree growth and physiological variables, and (ii) if mechanical wounding induces ponderosa pine resin flow and resin ducts in the absence of bark beetles. Resin flow increased later in the growing season under moderate water stress and was highest in faster growing trees. The best predictors of resin flow were nonstandardized measures of resin ducts, resin duct size and total resin duct area, both of which increased with tree growth. However, while faster growing trees tended to produce more resin, models of resin flow using only tree growth were not statistically significant. Further, the standardized measures of resin ducts, density and duct area relative to xylem area, decreased with tree growth rate, indicating that slower growing trees invested more in resin duct defenses per unit area of radial growth, despite a tendency to produce less resin overall. We also found that mechanical wounding induced ponderosa pine defenses, but this response was slow. Resin flow increased after 28 days, and resin duct production did not increase until the following year. These slow induced responses may allow

  10. Investigation of double bond conversion, mechanical properties, and antibacterial activity of dental resins with different alkyl chain length quaternary ammonium methacrylate monomers (QAM).

    PubMed

    He, Jingwei; Söderling, Eva; Vallittu, Pekka K; Lassila, Lippo V J

    2013-01-01

    In order to endow dental resin with antibacterial activity, a series of antibacterial quaternary ammonium methacrylate monomers (QAM) with different substituted alkyl chain length (from 10 to 18) were incorporated into commonly used 2,2-bis[4-(2'-hydroxy-3'-methacryloyloxy-propoxy)-phenyl]propane (Bis-GMA)/triethyleneglycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) (50 wt/50 wt) dental resin as immobilized antibacterial agents. Double bond conversion (DC), flexural strength (FS) and modulus (FM), and young and mature biofilms inhibition effectiveness of prepared dental resins were studied and Bis-GMA/TEGDMA without QAM was used as reference. Results showed that there was no significant difference on DC, FS, and FM between copolymer with and without 5 wt% QAM. Substituted alkyl chain length of QAM had no influence on DC, FS, and FM of copolymer, but had influence on antibacterial activity of copolymer. Antibacterial activity of copolymer increased with increasing of substituted alkyl chain length of QAM, and the sequence followed as 5%C10 < 5%C11 ≈ 5%C12 < 5%C16 ≈ 5%C18. Copolymers containing C18 and C16 had the best inhibition effectiveness on both young biofilm and mature biofilm, copolymers containing C12 and C11 only had inhibition effectiveness on young biofilm and copolymer containing C10 had none inhibition effectiveness on neither young biofilm nor mature biofilm.

  11. DC graphite arc furnace, a simple system to reduce mixed waste volume

    SciTech Connect

    Wittle, J.K.; Hamilton, R.A.; Trescot, J.

    1995-12-31

    The volume of low-level radioactive waste can be reduced by the high temperature in a DC Graphite Arc Furnace. This volume reduction can take place with the additional benefit of having the solid residue being stabilized by the vitrified product produced in the process. A DC Graphite Arc Furnace is a simple system in which electricity is used to generate heat to vitrify the material and thermally decompose any organic matter in the waste stream. Examples of this type of waste are protective clothing, resins, and grit blast materials produced in the nuclear industry. The various Department of Energy (DOE) complexes produce similar low-level waste streams. Electro-Pyrolysis, Inc. and Svedala/Kennedy Van Saun are engineering and building small 50-kg batch and up to 3,000 kg/hr continuous feed DC furnaces for the remediation, pollution prevention, and decontamination and decommissioning segments of the treatment community. This process has been demonstrated under DOE sponsorship at several facilities and has been shown to produce stable waste forms from surrogate waste materials.

  12. Development of a fuzzy logic controller for dc/dc converters: Design, computer simulation, and experimental evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    So, W.C.; Tse, C.K.; Lee, Y.S.

    1996-01-01

    The design of a fuzzy logic controller for dc/dc converters is described in this paper. A brief review of fuzzy logic and its application to control is first given. Then, the derivation of a fuzzy control algorithm for regulating dc/dc converters is described in detail. The proposed fuzzy control is evaluated by computer simulations as well as experimental measurements of the closed-loop performance of simple dc/dc converters in respect of load regulation and line regulation.

  13. DC-8 Takeoff in Kiruna, Sweden

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA is using a DC-8 aircraft as a flying science laboratory. The platform aircraft, based at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif., collects data for many experiments in support of...

  14. Variable load automatically tests dc power supplies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, H. C., Jr.; Sullivan, R. M.

    1965-01-01

    Continuously variable load automatically tests dc power supplies over an extended current range. External meters monitor current and voltage, and multipliers at the outputs facilitate plotting the power curve of the unit.

  15. dc power system for deuteron accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Creek, K.O.; Liska, D.J.

    1981-01-01

    The Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) Facility dc power system provides excitation current for all linac and High-Energy Beam Transport (HEBT) quadrupole and bending magnets, excitation for horizontal and vertical beam steering, and current-bypass shunts.

  16. REDFORD CORE MAKING MACHINE. RESIN IMPREGNATED SAND IS BLOWN INTO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    REDFORD CORE MAKING MACHINE. RESIN IMPREGNATED SAND IS BLOWN INTO THE HEATED CORE BOX THAT SETS THE RESIN CREATING THE HARDENED CORE SHOWN HERE. - Southern Ductile Casting Company, Core Making, 2217 Carolina Avenue, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  17. Performance Properties of Graphite Reinforced Composites with Advanced Resin Matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, Demetrius A.

    1980-01-01

    This article looks at the effect of different resin matrices on thermal and mechanical properties of graphite composites, and relates the thermal and flammability properties to the anaerobic char yield of the resins. The processing parameters of graphite composites utilizing graphite fabric and epoxy or other advanced resins as matrices are presented. Thermoset resin matrices studied were: aminecured polyfunctional glycidyl aminetype epoxy (baseline), phenolicnovolac resin based on condensation of dihydroxymethyl-xylene and phenol cured with hexamine, two types of polydismaleimide resins, phenolic resin, and benzyl resin. The thermoplastic matrices studied were polyethersulfone and polyphenylenesulfone. Properties evaluated in the study included anaerobic char yield, limiting oxygen index, smoke evolution, moisture absorption, and mechanical properties at elevated temperatures including tensile, compressive, and short-beam shear strengths. Generally, it was determined that graphite composites with the highest char yield exhibited optimum fire-resistant properties.

  18. Additive effects on the toughening of unsaturated polyester resins

    SciTech Connect

    Suspene, L.; Yang, Y.S.; Pascault, J.P.

    1993-12-31

    An elastomer additive, carboxy-terminated acrylonitrile-butadiene copolymer, was used for toughening in the free radical cross-linking copolymerization of unsaturated polyester (UP) resins. For molded parts, Charpy impact behavior was generally enhanced and the number of catastrophic failures was reduced. The miscibility and interfacial properties of additive and resin blends play important roles in the toughening process. Phase-diagram studies showed that the elastomer additive is immiscible with the UP resin and is phase-separated from the resin matrix during curing. This phase-separation phenomenon is similar to that in the low-profile mechanism of UP resins. Additive-resin system miscibility greatly influences curing morphology. Microvoids occurred in the additive phase of cured resin because of shrinkage stress. The intrinsic inhomogeneity of the polyester network and the existence of microvoids in the final product limit the toughening effect of additives on unsaturated polyester resins. 49 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Standard tests for toughened resin composites, revised edition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Several toughened resin systems are evaluated to achieve commonality for certain kinds of tests used to characterize toughened resin composites. Specifications for five tests were standardized; these test standards are described.

  20. Try-in Pastes Versus Resin Cements: A Color Comparison.

    PubMed

    Vaz, Edenize Cristina; Vaz, Maysa Magalhães; Rodrigues Gonçalves de Oliveira, Maria Beatriz; Takano, Alfa Emília; de Carvalho Cardoso, Paula; de Torres, Érica Miranda; Gonzaga Lopes, Lawrence

    2016-05-01

    This study aimed to compare the color of ceramic veneer restorations using different shades of try-in pastes and resin cement. Researchers found no differences between try-in pastes and resin cements after cementation. PMID:27213935

  1. 21 CFR 173.10 - Modified polyacrylamide resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... conditions: (a) The modified polyacrylamide resin is produced by the copolymerization of acrylamide with not... polyacrylamide resin contains not more than 0.05 percent residual acrylamide. (c) The modified...

  2. The Creep of Laminated Synthetic Resin Plastics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkuhn, H

    1941-01-01

    The long-time loading strength of a number of laminated synthetic resin plastics was ascertained and the effect of molding pressure and resin content determined. The best value was observed with a 30 to 40 percent resin content. The long-time loading strength also increases with increasing molding pressure up to 250 kg/cm(exp 2); a further rise in pressure affords no further substantial improvement. The creep strength is defined as the load which in the hundredth hour of loading produces a rate of elongation of 5 X 10(exp -4) percent per hour. The creep strength values of different materials were determined and tabulated. The effect of humidity during long-term tests is pointed out.

  3. Composite resin in medicine and dentistry.

    PubMed

    Stein, Pamela S; Sullivan, Jennifer; Haubenreich, James E; Osborne, Paul B

    2005-01-01

    Composite resin has been used for nearly 50 years as a restorative material in dentistry. Use of this material has recently increased as a result of consumer demands for esthetic restorations, coupled with the public's concern with mercury-containing dental amalgam. Composite is now used in over 95% of all anterior teeth direct restorations and in 50% of all posterior teeth direct restorations. Carbon fiber reinforced composites have been developed for use as dental implants. In medicine, fiber-reinforced composites have been used in orthopedics as implants, osseous screws, and bearing surfaces. In addition, hydroxyapatite composite resin has become a promising alternative to acrylic cement in stabilizing fractures and cancellous screw fixation in elderly and osteoporotic patients. The use of composite resin in dentistry and medicine will be the focus of this review, with particular attention paid to its physical properties, chemical composition, clinical applications, and biocompatibility.

  4. Treatment of Methaqualone overdose with resin hemoperfusion.

    PubMed

    Baggish, D; Gray, S; Jatlow, P; Bia, M J

    1981-01-01

    We recently utilized the technique of resin hemoperfusion (employing an Amberlite XAD-4 resin cartridge) to remove drug from a patient i deep coma after an estimated ingestion of greater than 4.5 grams of methaqualone. At plasma flow rates of 204 ml/min, the mean value for plasma clearance of methaqualone was 179 ml/min. The amount of methaqualone recovered from the cartridge at the end of the 10-hour procedure was 1,565 mg measured by gas chromatography. The patient became responsive to deep pain by the end of the procedure. The only complication encountered was a transient decrease in the formed blood elements. The present study verifies that a large, pharmacologically significance quantity of methaqualone can be removed in a short time using resin hemoperfusion.

  5. [Allergic contact eczema from epoxy resin].

    PubMed

    Calzado, Leticia; Ortiz-de Frutos, Francisco J; del Prado Sánchez-Caminero, María; Galera, Carmen María; Valverde, Ricardo; Vanaclocha, Francisco

    2005-11-01

    Epoxy resins are plastics that are widely used as electrical insulation, in coatings, and as adhesives and paints. They have strong sensitizing power and are one of the main causes of allergic contact eczema, both in the workplace and elsewhere. We present the case of a worker at a plastics/chemical plant, who handled aeronautical components in the process of manufacturing fuselage parts. He consulted his physician because of eczematous lesions on his fingers, hands and forearms which had developed over a two-year period and were clearly related to his work. The standard battery of skin tests was performed, along with the plastics and adhesives series and tests using the products from his workplace. Positivity was shown to epoxy resins (standard battery) and to the products from his workplace, which included different fiberglass and carbon fiber sheets impregnated with epoxy resins and epoxy adhesives.

  6. Improved high temperature resistant matrix resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, G. E.; Powell, S. H.; Jones, R. J.

    1983-01-01

    The objective was to develop organic matrix resins suitable for service at temperatures up to 644 K (700 F) and at air pressures up to 0.4 MPa (60 psia) for time durations of a minimum of 100 hours. Matrix resins capable of withstanding these extreme oxidative environmental conditions would lead to increased use of polymer matrix composites in aircraft engines and provide significant weight and cost savings. Six linear condensation, aromatic/heterocyclic polymers containing fluorinated and/or diphenyl linkages were synthesized. The thermo-oxidative stability of the resins was determined at 644 K and compressed air pressures up to 0.4 MPa. Two formulations, both containing perfluoroisopropylidene linkages in the polymer backbone structure, exhibited potential for 644 K service to meet the program objectives. Two other formulations could not be fabricated into compression molded zero defect specimens.

  7. Investigations of toughening mechanisms of epoxy resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, T.

    1986-01-01

    Composite material technology was applied to the solid rocket booster by the development of a carbon filament-epoxy resin case which yields a net increase of 4000 lbs. in payload in the shuttle. The question of reusability of the new composite tanks has not yet been answered and will depend on the toughness of the matrix resin. The present study was aimed at providing conditions whereby test specimens of the epoxy resin (EPON/85) and curing agents of systematically varied structures could be produced in a controlled manner. Three sets of conditions were found that might allow the isolation of the structural effects on toughness from the cure effects. The kinetic methods leading to the determination of these conditions are described.

  8. Jetted mixtures of particle suspensions and resins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoath, S. D.; Hsiao, W.-K.; Hutchings, I. M.; Tuladhar, T. R.

    2014-10-01

    Drop-on-demand (DoD) ink-jetting of hard particle suspensions with volume fraction Φ ˜ 0.25 has been surveyed using 1000 ultra-high speed videos as a function of particle size (d90 = 0.8—3.6 μm), with added 2 wt. % acrylic (250 kDa) or 0.5 wt. % cellulose (370 kDa) resin, and also compared with Newtonian analogues. Jet break-off times from 80 μm diameter nozzles were insensitive (120 ± 10 μs) to particle size, and resin jet break-off times were not significantly altered by >30 wt. % added particles. Different particle size grades can be jetted equally well in practice, while resin content effectively controls DoD break-off times.

  9. 40 CFR 63.5714 - How do I demonstrate compliance if I use filled resins?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... filled resins? (a) If you are using a filled production resin or filled tooling resin, you must.... ER22au01.015 Where: PVF = The as-applied MACT model point value for a filled production resin or tooling... resin is used as a production resin and the value of PVF calculated by equation 1 of this section...

  10. 40 CFR 63.5714 - How do I demonstrate compliance if I use filled resins?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... filled resins? (a) If you are using a filled production resin or filled tooling resin, you must.... ER22au01.015 Where: PVF = The as-applied MACT model point value for a filled production resin or tooling... resin is used as a production resin and the value of PVF calculated by equation 1 of this section...

  11. 40 CFR 414.50 - Applicability; description of the thermosetting resins subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... thermosetting resins subcategory. 414.50 Section 414.50 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Thermosetting Resins § 414.50 Applicability; description of the thermosetting resins subcategory. The provisions... the products classified under SIC 28214 thermosetting resins including those resins and resin...

  12. 40 CFR 414.40 - Applicability; description of the thermoplastic resins subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... thermoplastic resins subcategory. 414.40 Section 414.40 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Thermoplastic Resins § 414.40 Applicability; description of the thermoplastic resins subcategory. The provisions... the products classified under SIC 28213 thermoplastic resins including those resins and resin...

  13. Advanced DC/DC Converters Towards Higher Volumetric Efficiencies For Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, Harry; Shue, Jack; Liu, David; Wang, Bright; Plante, Jeanette

    2005-01-01

    A new emphasis on planetary exploration by NASA drives the need for small, high power DC/DC converters which are functionally modular. NASA GSFC and other government space organizations are supporting technology development in the DC/DC converter area to both meet new needs and to promote more sources of supply. New technologies which enable miniaturization such as embedded passive technologies and thermal management using high thermal conductivity materials are features of the new designs. Construction of some simple DC/DC converter core circuits using embedded components was found to be successful for increasing volumetric efficiency to 37 W/inch. The embedded passives were also able to perform satisfactorily in this application in cryogenic temperatures.

  14. Test Results of Selected Commercial DC/DC Converters under Cryogenic Temperatures - A Digest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard; Hammoud, Ahmad

    2010-01-01

    DC/DC converters are widely used in space power systems in the areas of power management and distribution, signal conditioning, and motor control. Design of DC/DC converters to survive cryogenic temperatures will improve the power system performance, simplify design, and reduce development and launch costs. In this work, the performance of nine COTS modular, low-tomedium power DC/DC converters was investigated under cryogenic temperatures. The converters were evaluated in terms of their output regulation, efficiency, and input and output currents. At a given temperature, these properties were obtained at various input voltages and at different load levels. A summary on the performance of the tested converters was given. More comprehensive testing and in-depth analysis of performance under long-term exposure to extreme temperatures are deemed necessary to establish the suitability of these and other devices for use in the harsh environment of space exploration missions.

  15. The DC-DC conversion power system of the CMS Phase-1 pixel upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feld, L.; Karpinski, W.; Klein, K.; Lipinski, M.; Preuten, M.; Rauch, M.; Schmitz, St.; Wlochal, M.

    2015-01-01

    The pixel detector of the CMS experiment will be exchanged during the year-end technical stop in 2016/2017, as part of the experiment's Phase-1 upgrade. The new device will feature approximately twice the number of readout channels, and consequently the power consumption will be doubled. By moving to a DC-DC conversion powering scheme, it is possible to power the new pixel detector with the existing power supplies and cable plant. The power system of the Phase-1 pixel detector is described and the performance of the new components, including DC-DC converters, DC-DC converter motherboards and various power distribution boards, is detailed. The outcome of system tests in terms of electrical behaviour, thermal management and pixel module performance is discussed.

  16. Current Fed Step-up DC/DC Converter for Fuel Cell Inverter Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreičiks, Aleksandrs; Vitols, Kristaps; Krievs, Oskars; Steiks, Ingars

    2009-01-01

    In order to use hydrogen fuel cells in domestic applications either as main power supply or backup source, their low DC output voltage has to be matched to the level and frequency of the utility grid AC voltage. Such power converter systems usually consist of a DC-DC converter and a DC-AC inverter. Comparison of different current fed step-up DC/DC converters is done in this paper and a double inductor step-up push-pull converter investigated, presenting simulation and experimental results. The converter is elaborated for 1200 W power to match the rated power of the proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell located in hydrogen fuel cell research laboratory of Riga Technical University.

  17. DC-DC converters with reduced mass for trackers at the HL-LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Affolder, A.; Allongue, B.; Blanchot, G.; Faccio, F.; Fuentes, C.; Greenall, A.; Michelis, S.

    2011-11-01

    The development at CERN of low noise DC-DC converters for the powering of front-end systems enables the implementation of efficient powering schemes for the physics experiments at the HL-LHC. Recent tests made on the ATLAS short strip tracker modules confirm the full electromagnetic compatibility of the DC-DC converter prototypes with front-end detectors. The integration of the converters in the trackers front-ends needs to address also the material budget constraints. The impact of the DC-DC converters onto the material budget of the ATLAS tracker modules is discussed and mass reduction techniques are explored, leading to a compromise between electromagnetic compatibility and mass. Low mass shield implementations and Aluminum core inductors are proposed. Also, the impact on emitted noise due to a size reduction of critical components is discussed. Finally, material reduction techniques are discussed at the board layout and manufacturing levels.

  18. Nonlinear Phenomena and Resonant Parametric Perturbation Control in QR-ZCS Buck DC-DC Converters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Fei-Hu; Liu, Feng-Shao; Hsieh, Hui-Chang

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the chaotic phenomena and to control in current-mode controlled quasi-resonant zero-current-switching (QR-ZCS) DC-DC buck converters, and to present control of chaos by resonant parametric perturbation control methods. First of all, MATLAB/SIMULINK is used to derive a mathematical model for QR-ZCS DC-DC buck converters, and to simulate the converters to observe the waveform of output voltages, inductance currents and phase-plane portraits from the period-doubling bifurcation to chaos by changing the load resistances. Secondly, using resonant parametric perturbation control in QR-ZCS buck DC-DC converters, the simulation results of the chaotic converter form chaos state turn into stable state period 1, and improve ripple amplitudes of converters under the chaos, to verify the validity of the proposes method.

  19. Critical conditions of saddle-node bifurcations in switching DC-DC converters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Chung-Chieh

    2013-08-01

    Although existence of multiple periodic orbits in some DC-DC converters have been known for decades, linking the multiple periodic orbits with the saddle-node bifurcation (SNB) is rarely reported. The SNB occurs in popular DC-DC converters, but it is generally reported as a strange instability. Recently, design-oriented instability critical conditions are of great interest. In this article, average, sampled-data and harmonic balance analyses are applied and they lead to equivalent results. Many new critical conditions are derived. They facilitate future research on the instability associated with multiple periodic orbits, sudden voltage jumps or disappearances of periodic orbits observed in DC-DC converters. The effects of various converter parameters on the instability can be readily seen from the derived critical conditions. New Nyquist-like plots are also proposed to predict or prevent the occurrence of the instability.

  20. Application handbook for a Standardized Control Module (SCM) for DC-DC converters, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, F. C.; Mahmoud, M. F.; Yu, Y.

    1980-01-01

    The standardized control module (SCM) was developed for application in the buck, boost and buck/boost DC-DC converters. The SCM used multiple feedback loops to provide improved input line and output load regulation, stable feedback control system, good dynamic transient response and adaptive compensation of the control loop for changes in open loop gain and output filter time constraints. The necessary modeling and analysis tools to aid the design engineer in the application of the SCM to DC-DC Converters were developed. The SCM functional block diagram and the different analysis techniques were examined. The average time domain analysis technique was chosen as the basic analytical tool. The power stage transfer functions were developed for the buck, boost and buck/boost converters. The analog signal and digital signal processor transfer functions were developed for the three DC-DC Converter types using the constant on time, constant off time and constant frequency control laws.

  1. Modelling and Simulation of Digital Compensation Technique for dc-dc Converter by Pole Placement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shenbagalakshmi, R.; Sree Renga Raja, T.

    2015-09-01

    A thorough and effective analysis of the dc-dc converters is carried out in order to achieve the system stability and to improve the dynamic performance. A small signal modelling based on state space averaging technique for dc-dc converters is carried out. A digital state feedback gain matrix is derived by pole placement technique in order to achieve the stability of a completely controllable system. A prediction observer for the dc-dc converters is designed and a dynamic compensation (observer plus control law) is provided using separation principle. The output is very much improved with zero output voltage ripples, zero peak overshoot, and much lesser settling time in the range of ms and with higher overall efficiency (>90 %).

  2. Biphenyl liquid crystalline epoxy resin as a low-shrinkage resin-based dental restorative nanocomposite.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Sheng-Hao; Chen, Rung-Shu; Chang, Yuan-Ling; Chen, Min-Huey; Cheng, Kuo-Chung; Su, Wei-Fang

    2012-11-01

    Low-shrinkage resin-based photocurable liquid crystalline epoxy nanocomposite has been investigated with regard to its application as a dental restoration material. The nanocomposite consists of an organic matrix and an inorganic reinforcing filler. The organic matrix is made of liquid crystalline biphenyl epoxy resin (BP), an epoxy resin consisting of cyclohexylmethyl-3,4-epoxycyclohexanecarboxylate (ECH), the photoinitiator 4-octylphenyl phenyliodonium hexafluoroantimonate and the photosensitizer champhorquinone. The inorganic filler is silica nanoparticles (∼70-100 nm). The nanoparticles were modified by an epoxy silane of γ-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane to be compatible with the organic matrix and to chemically bond with the organic matrix after photo curing. By incorporating the BP liquid crystalline (LC) epoxy resin into conventional ECH epoxy resin, the nanocomposite has improved hardness, flexural modulus, water absorption and coefficient of thermal expansion. Although the incorporation of silica filler may dilute the reinforcing effect of crystalline BP, a high silica filler content (∼42 vol.%) was found to increase the physical and chemical properties of the nanocomposite due to the formation of unique microstructures. The microstructure of nanoparticle embedded layers was observed in the nanocomposite using scanning and transmission electron microscopy. This unique microstructure indicates that the crystalline BP and nanoparticles support each other and result in outstanding mechanical properties. The crystalline BP in the LC epoxy resin-based nanocomposite was partially melted during exothermic photopolymerization, and the resin expanded via an order-to-disorder transition. Thus, the post-gelation shrinkage of the LC epoxy resin-based nanocomposite is greatly reduced, ∼50.6% less than in commercialized methacrylate resin-based composites. This LC epoxy nanocomposite demonstrates good physical and chemical properties and good biocompatibility

  3. Influence of light-activation protocol on methacrylate resin-composite evaluated by dynamic mechanical analysis and degree of conversion.

    PubMed

    Giorgi, Maria Cecília C; Pistor, Vinícius; Mauler, Raquel S; Lima, Débora A N L; Marchi, Giselle M; Aguiar, Flávio H B

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the degree of conversion (DC) and to identify the viscoelastic properties: storage modulus (E'), loss modulus (E"), tangent delta (tan δ), and glass transition temperature (T g ) of a microhybrid resin-composite light-activated by three different protocols. A Filtek Z250 (3 M ESPE) shade A3 was inserted in a Teflon mold (21 mm × 5 mm × 1 mm for viscoelastic properties; and 5 mm × 1 mm for DC) and light-activated according to the following light-activation protocols: (S) 1,000 mW/cm(2) × 19 s, (HP) 1,400 mW/cm(2) × 14 s, and (PE) 3,200 mW/cm(2) × 6 s, all set up to deliver 19 J/cm(2). Viscoelastic properties was assessed by dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) (n = 3), performed in single cantilever clamped mode. DC (n = 5) was measured by FTIR on top (T) and bottom (B) surfaces, and the data was submitted to a split-plot one-way ANOVA. For DC, there was a significant effect for surface factor and light-activation protocols factor. Top surface showed higher DC than B in all experimental conditions. Light-activation protocols S and HP resulted in higher DC than PE and were similar between them. Viscoelastic properties (E', E", tan δ, T g ) were not affected by light-activation protocols. It could be concluded that light-activation protocols influenced DC but not influenced the viscoelastic properties. PMID:24740520

  4. Influence of light-activation protocol on methacrylate resin-composite evaluated by dynamic mechanical analysis and degree of conversion.

    PubMed

    Giorgi, Maria Cecília C; Pistor, Vinícius; Mauler, Raquel S; Lima, Débora A N L; Marchi, Giselle M; Aguiar, Flávio H B

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the degree of conversion (DC) and to identify the viscoelastic properties: storage modulus (E'), loss modulus (E"), tangent delta (tan δ), and glass transition temperature (T g ) of a microhybrid resin-composite light-activated by three different protocols. A Filtek Z250 (3 M ESPE) shade A3 was inserted in a Teflon mold (21 mm × 5 mm × 1 mm for viscoelastic properties; and 5 mm × 1 mm for DC) and light-activated according to the following light-activation protocols: (S) 1,000 mW/cm(2) × 19 s, (HP) 1,400 mW/cm(2) × 14 s, and (PE) 3,200 mW/cm(2) × 6 s, all set up to deliver 19 J/cm(2). Viscoelastic properties was assessed by dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) (n = 3), performed in single cantilever clamped mode. DC (n = 5) was measured by FTIR on top (T) and bottom (B) surfaces, and the data was submitted to a split-plot one-way ANOVA. For DC, there was a significant effect for surface factor and light-activation protocols factor. Top surface showed higher DC than B in all experimental conditions. Light-activation protocols S and HP resulted in higher DC than PE and were similar between them. Viscoelastic properties (E', E", tan δ, T g ) were not affected by light-activation protocols. It could be concluded that light-activation protocols influenced DC but not influenced the viscoelastic properties.

  5. Technical assessment for quality control of resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosnell, R. B.

    1977-01-01

    Survey visits to companies involved in the manufacture and use of graphite-epoxy prepregs were conducted to assess the factors which may contribute to variability in the mechanical properties of graphite-epoxy composites. In particular, the purpose was to assess the contributions of the epoxy resins to variability. Companies represented three segments of the composites industry - aircraft manufacturers, prepreg manufacturers, and epoxy resin manufacturers. Several important sources of performance variability were identified from among the complete spectrum of potential sources which ranged from raw materials to composite test data interpretation.

  6. New phosphorus-containing bisimide resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varma, I. K.; Fohlen, G. M.; Hsu, M.-T.; Parker, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    Phosphorus-based flame retardants have been effectively used in a wide variety of polymeric materials. Such additives, however, may either influence the decomposition reaction in polymers or lack durability due to a tendency to be leached out by solvents. Attention is given to the synthesis, characterization, thermal stability and degradation mechanisms of bisimide resins, and an evaluation is conducted of the flammability and mechanical properties of graphite cloth-reinforced laminates fabricated from one of the six phosphorus-containing bisimide resins considered.

  7. Advances in the history of composite resins.

    PubMed

    Minguez, Nieves; Ellacuria, Joseba; Soler, José Ignacio; Triana, Rodrigo; Ibaseta, Guillermo

    2003-11-01

    The use of composite resins as direct restoration material in posterior teeth has demonstrated a great increase, due to esthetic requirements and the controversy regarding the mercury content in silver amalgams. In this article, we have reviewed the composition modifications which have occurred in materials based on resins since their introduction over a half a century ago which have enabled great improvements in their physical and mechanical properties. Likewise, we have highlighted current lines of research, centered on finding the ideal material for replacing silver amalgam as a direct filling material.

  8. Clinical guidelines for indirect resin restorations.

    PubMed

    Shannon, A

    1997-06-01

    Ongoing advances in adhesive dentistry have made it possible to successfully and predictably bond tooth-supporting restorations using conservative preparation techniques. Improvements in the durability and esthetic properties of tooth-colored restorative materials have also increased the range of available treatment options. However, dentists have been slow to accept both direct and indirect posterior esthetics. This article provides a step-by-step technique for practitioners who choose to treat their patients with indirect resin esthetic restorations. It will not discuss other posterior restorative treatment techniques or materials (i.e. gold, porcelain, amalgam, bonded amalgam, or direct resin).

  9. Occupational dermatitis to epoxydic and phenolic resins.

    PubMed

    Geraut, Christian; Tripodi, Dominique; Brunet-Courtois, Béatrice; Leray, Fabrice; Geraut, Laurent

    2009-01-01

    Contact dermatitis to epoxydic and phenolic resins are the most frequent contact dermatoses due to plastics, in particular in the form of airborne dermatitis. The chemical formulas of the various components of these resins and their additives are complex and the patch tests available in the trade are insufficient and often arrive at a late stage in the progress of industry, in particular in advanced technologies like aeronautical engineering, shipbuilding or the new floor and wall coverings in buildings. This article is a review of the actions to be taken with these allergies, as well as with regards to their diagnosis, prevention and medico-legal compensation. PMID:19349256

  10. Electronic structure and optical properties of resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Zhi-Fan; Zhou, Rong-Feng

    2013-03-01

    We used the density of functional theory (DFT) to study the electronic structure and density of states of resin by ab initio calculation. The results show the band gap of resin is 1.7 eV. The covalent bond is combined C/O atoms with H atoms. The O 2p orbital is the biggest effect near the Fermi level. The results of optical properties show the reflectivity is low, and the refractive index is 1.7 in visible light range. The highest absorption coefficient peak is in 490 nm and the value is 75,000.

  11. Resin transfer molding of textile composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falcone, Anthony; Dursch, Harry; Nelson, Karl; Avery, William

    1993-01-01

    The design and manufacture of textile composite panels, tubes, and angle sections that were provided to NASA for testing and evaluation are documented. The textile preform designs and requirements were established by NASA in collaboration with Boeing and several vendors of textile reinforcements. The following four types of preform architectures were used: stitched uniweave, 2D-braids, 3D-braids, and interlock weaves. The preforms consisted primarily of Hercules AS4 carbon fiber; Shell RSL-1895 resin was introduced using a resin transfer molding process. All the finished parts were inspected using ultrasonics.

  12. Photopolymerization of dental resin as restorative material using an argon laser.

    PubMed

    Khosroshahi, M E; Atai, M; Nourbakhsh, M S

    2008-10-01

    The effect of the 488-nm wavelength of argon laser at different power densities and irradiation times on the degree of conversion (DC), temperature rise, water sorption, solubility, flexural strength, flexural modulus, and microhardness of bisphenole A glycol dimethacrylate and triethylen glycol dimethacrylate with a mass ratio of 75:25 was studied. Camphorquinone and N,N'-dimethyl aminoethyl methacrylate were added to the monomer as a photo initiator system. The DC% of the resin was measured using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The maximum DC% (50%), which was reached in 20 s, and temperature rise because of the reaction (13.5 degrees C) were both higher at 1075 than 700 mW/cm(2). Water sorption and solubility were measured according to ISO4049, which in our case were 23.7 and 2.20 microg/mm(3) at 1075 mW/cm(2), respectively. A flexural modulus of 1.1 GPa and microhardness of 19.6 kg/mm(2) were achieved above the power density. No significant difference was observed (i.e., p>0.05) for water sorption and flexural strength at 700 and 1075 mW/cm(2).

  13. Photopolymerization of dental resin as restorative material using an argon laser.

    PubMed

    Khosroshahi, M E; Atai, M; Nourbakhsh, M S

    2008-10-01

    The effect of the 488-nm wavelength of argon laser at different power densities and irradiation times on the degree of conversion (DC), temperature rise, water sorption, solubility, flexural strength, flexural modulus, and microhardness of bisphenole A glycol dimethacrylate and triethylen glycol dimethacrylate with a mass ratio of 75:25 was studied. Camphorquinone and N,N'-dimethyl aminoethyl methacrylate were added to the monomer as a photo initiator system. The DC% of the resin was measured using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The maximum DC% (50%), which was reached in 20 s, and temperature rise because of the reaction (13.5 degrees C) were both higher at 1075 than 700 mW/cm(2). Water sorption and solubility were measured according to ISO4049, which in our case were 23.7 and 2.20 microg/mm(3) at 1075 mW/cm(2), respectively. A flexural modulus of 1.1 GPa and microhardness of 19.6 kg/mm(2) were achieved above the power density. No significant difference was observed (i.e., p>0.05) for water sorption and flexural strength at 700 and 1075 mW/cm(2). PMID:17934770

  14. High power density dc/dc converter: Component selection and design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divan, Deepakraj M.

    1989-01-01

    Further work pertaining to design considerations for the new high power, high frequency dc/dc converters is discussed. The goal of the project is the development of high power, high power density dc/dc converters at power levels in the multi-kilowatt to megawatt range for aerospace applications. The prototype converter is rated for 50 kW at a switching frequency of 50 kHz, with an input voltage of 200 Vdc and an output of 2000 Vdc. The overall power density must be in the vicinity of 0.2 to 0.3 kg/kW.

  15. The application of standardized control and interface circuits to three dc to dc power converters.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Y.; Biess, J. J.; Schoenfeld, A. D.; Lalli, V. R.

    1973-01-01

    Standardized control and interface circuits were applied to the three most commonly used dc to dc converters: the buck-boost converter, the series-switching buck regulator, and the pulse-modulated parallel inverter. The two-loop ASDTIC regulation control concept was implemented by using a common analog control signal processor and a novel digital control signal processor. This resulted in control circuit standardization and superior static and dynamic performance of the three dc-to-dc converters. Power components stress control, through active peak current limiting and recovery of switching losses, was applied to enhance reliability and converter efficiency.

  16. Analysis of a class of pulse modulated dc-to-dc power converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burger, P.

    1975-01-01

    The basic operational characteristics of dc-to-dc converters are analyzed. The basic physical characteristics of power converters are identified. A simple class of dc-to-dc power converters is chosen which could satisfy any set of operating requirements. Three different controlling methods in this class are described in detail. Necessary conditions for the stability of these converters are measured through analog computer simulation. These curves are related to other operational characteristics, such as ripple and regulation. Finally, further research is suggested for the solution of the physical design of absolutely stable, reliable, and efficient power converters of this class.

  17. Model predictive control of bidirectional isolated DC-DC converter for energy conversion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akter, Parvez; Uddin, Muslem; Mekhilef, Saad; Tan, Nadia Mei Lin; Akagi, Hirofumi

    2015-08-01

    Model predictive control (MPC) is a powerful and emerging control algorithm in the field of power converters and energy conversion systems. This paper proposes a model predictive algorithm to control the power flow between the high-voltage and low-voltage DC buses of a bidirectional isolated full-bridge DC-DC converter. The predictive control algorithm utilises the discrete nature of the power converters and predicts the future nature of the system, which are compared with the references to calculate the cost function. The switching state that minimises the cost function is selected for firing the converter in the next sampling time period. The proposed MPC bidirectional DC-DC converter is simulated with MATLAB/Simulink and further verified with a 2.5 kW experimental configuration. Both the simulation and experimental results confirm that the proposed MPC algorithm of the DC-DC converter reduces reactive power by avoiding the phase shift between primary and secondary sides of the high-frequency transformer and allow power transfer with unity power factor. Finally, an efficiency comparison is performed between the MPC and dual-phase-shift-based pulse-width modulation controlled DC-DC converter which ensures the effectiveness of the MPC controller.

  18. Analysis of high voltage step-up nonisolated DC-DC boost converters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alisson Alencar Freitas, Antônio; Lessa Tofoli, Fernando; Junior, Edilson Mineiro Sá; Daher, Sergio; Antunes, Fernando Luiz Marcelo

    2016-05-01

    A high voltage step-up nonisolated DC-DC converter based on coupled inductors suitable to photovoltaic (PV) systems applications is proposed in this paper. Considering that numerous approaches exist to extend the voltage conversion ratio of DC-DC converters that do not use transformers, a detailed comparison is also presented among the proposed converter and other popular topologies such as the conventional boost converter and the quadratic boost converter. The qualitative analysis of the coupled-inductor-based topology is developed so that a design procedure can be obtained, from which an experimental prototype is implemented to validate the theoretical assumptions.

  19. A Reduced-Part, Triple-Voltage DC-DC Converter for Electric Vehicle Power Management

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Gui-Jia; Tang, Lixin

    2007-01-01

    Electrical power systems in future hybrid and fuel cell vehicles may consist of three voltage nets; 14 V, 42 V and high voltage (>200 V) buses. A soft-switched, bi-directional dc-dc converter using only four switches was proposed for interconnecting the three nets. This paper presents a reduced- part dc-dc converter, which decreases the converter cost while retaining all the favorable features of the original topology. Simulation and experimental data are included to verify a simple power flow control scheme.

  20. Efficiency and Regulation of Commercial Low Power DC/DC Converter Modules at Low Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elbuluk, Malik E.; Gerber, Scott; Hammoud, Ahmad; Patterson, Richard L.

    2000-01-01

    DC/DC converters that are capable of operating at cryogenic temperatures are anticipated to play an important role in the power systems of future NASA deep space missions. Design of these converters to survive cryogenic temperatures will improve the power system performance, and reduce development and launch costs. At the NASA Glenn Research Center Low Temperature Electronics Laboratory, several commercial off-the-shelf dc/dc converter modules were evaluated for their low temperature performance. Various parameters were investigated as a function of temperature, in the range of 20 C to -190 C. Data pertaining to the efficiency and voltage regulation of the tested converters is presented and discussed.

  1. Interleaved DC-DC Converter with Discrete Duty Cycle and Open Loop Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroics, K.; Sokolovs, A.

    2016-08-01

    The authors present the control principle of the multiphase interleaved DC-DC converter that can be used to vastly reduce output current ripple of the converter. The control algorithm can be easily implemented by using microcontroller without current loop in each phase. The converter works in discontinuous conduction mode (DCM) but close to boundary conduction mode (BCM). The DC-DC converter with such a control algorithm is useful in applications that do not require precise current adjustment. The prototype of the converter has been built. The experimental results of the current ripple are presented in the paper.

  2. 40 CFR 721.4380 - Modified hydrocarbon resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Modified hydrocarbon resin. 721.4380... Substances § 721.4380 Modified hydrocarbon resin. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a modified hydrocarbon resin (P-91-1418)...

  3. 40 CFR 721.4380 - Modified hydrocarbon resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Modified hydrocarbon resin. 721.4380... Substances § 721.4380 Modified hydrocarbon resin. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a modified hydrocarbon resin (P-91-1418)...

  4. 40 CFR 721.4380 - Modified hydrocarbon resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Modified hydrocarbon resin. 721.4380... Substances § 721.4380 Modified hydrocarbon resin. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a modified hydrocarbon resin (P-91-1418)...

  5. 40 CFR 721.4380 - Modified hydrocarbon resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Modified hydrocarbon resin. 721.4380... Substances § 721.4380 Modified hydrocarbon resin. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a modified hydrocarbon resin (P-91-1418)...

  6. 21 CFR 177.1600 - Polyethylene resins, carboxyl modified.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Polyethylene resins, carboxyl modified. 177.1600..., carboxyl modified. Carboxyl-modified polyethylene resins may be safely used as the food-contact surface of...) For the purpose of this section, carboxyl-modified polyethylene resins consist of basic...

  7. 21 CFR 177.1600 - Polyethylene resins, carboxyl modified.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Polyethylene resins, carboxyl modified. 177.1600..., carboxyl modified. Carboxyl-modified polyethylene resins may be safely used as the food-contact surface of...) For the purpose of this section, carboxyl-modified polyethylene resins consist of basic...

  8. 21 CFR 872.3770 - Temporary crown and bridge resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Temporary crown and bridge resin. 872.3770 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3770 Temporary crown and bridge resin. (a) Identification. A temporary crown and bridge resin is a device composed of a material, such...

  9. 21 CFR 872.3770 - Temporary crown and bridge resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Temporary crown and bridge resin. 872.3770 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3770 Temporary crown and bridge resin. (a) Identification. A temporary crown and bridge resin is a device composed of a material, such...

  10. 21 CFR 872.3770 - Temporary crown and bridge resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Temporary crown and bridge resin. 872.3770 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3770 Temporary crown and bridge resin. (a) Identification. A temporary crown and bridge resin is a device composed of a material, such...

  11. 40 CFR 721.2752 - Epoxy resin containing phosphorus (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Epoxy resin containing phosphorus... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2752 Epoxy resin containing phosphorus (generic). (a) Chemical substance... epoxy resin containing phosphorus (PMN P-00-912) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  12. 40 CFR 721.2752 - Epoxy resin containing phosphorus (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Epoxy resin containing phosphorus... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2752 Epoxy resin containing phosphorus (generic). (a) Chemical substance... epoxy resin containing phosphorus (PMN P-00-912) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  13. 40 CFR 721.2752 - Epoxy resin containing phosphorus (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Epoxy resin containing phosphorus... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2752 Epoxy resin containing phosphorus (generic). (a) Chemical substance... epoxy resin containing phosphorus (PMN P-00-912) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  14. 21 CFR 872.3820 - Root canal filling resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Root canal filling resin. 872.3820 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3820 Root canal filling resin. (a) Identification. A root canal filling resin is a device composed of material, such as methylmethacrylate,...

  15. 21 CFR 872.3820 - Root canal filling resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Root canal filling resin. 872.3820 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3820 Root canal filling resin. (a) Identification. A root canal filling resin is a device composed of material, such as methylmethacrylate,...

  16. 21 CFR 872.3820 - Root canal filling resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Root canal filling resin. 872.3820 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3820 Root canal filling resin. (a) Identification. A root canal filling resin is a device composed of material, such as methylmethacrylate,...

  17. 21 CFR 872.3820 - Root canal filling resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Root canal filling resin. 872.3820 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3820 Root canal filling resin. (a) Identification. A root canal filling resin is a device composed of material, such as methylmethacrylate,...

  18. 21 CFR 177.2510 - Polyvinylidene fluoride resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Polyvinylidene fluoride resins. 177.2510 Section... as Components of Articles Intended for Repeated Use § 177.2510 Polyvinylidene fluoride resins. Polyvinylidene fluoride resins may be safely used as articles or components of articles intended for repeated...

  19. 21 CFR 177.2510 - Polyvinylidene fluoride resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Polyvinylidene fluoride resins. 177.2510 Section... as Components of Articles Intended for Repeated Use § 177.2510 Polyvinylidene fluoride resins. Polyvinylidene fluoride resins may be safely used as articles or components of articles intended for repeated...

  20. 21 CFR 177.2430 - Polyether resins, chlorinated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Polyether resins, chlorinated. 177.2430 Section... as Components of Articles Intended for Repeated Use § 177.2430 Polyether resins, chlorinated. Chlorinated polyether resins may be safely used as articles or components of articles intended for...

  1. 40 CFR 721.2752 - Epoxy resin containing phosphorus (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Epoxy resin containing phosphorus... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2752 Epoxy resin containing phosphorus (generic). (a) Chemical substance... epoxy resin containing phosphorus (PMN P-00-912) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  2. 21 CFR 175.270 - Poly(vinyl fluoride) resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Poly(vinyl fluoride) resins. 175.270 Section 175... Substances for Use as Components of Coatings § 175.270 Poly(vinyl fluoride) resins. Poly(vinyl fluoride) resins identified in this section may be safely used as components of food-contact coatings...

  3. 40 CFR 721.2755 - Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (generic... Substances § 721.2755 Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as cycloaliphatic epoxy resin...

  4. 40 CFR 721.2673 - Aromatic epoxide resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Aromatic epoxide resin (generic). 721... Substances § 721.2673 Aromatic epoxide resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as aromatic epoxide resin (PMN...

  5. 40 CFR 721.5762 - Aromatic aldehyde phenolic resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Aromatic aldehyde phenolic resin... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5762 Aromatic aldehyde phenolic resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance... aromatic aldehyde phenolic resin (PMN P-01-573) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  6. 21 CFR 177.1600 - Polyethylene resins, carboxyl modified.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Polyethylene resins, carboxyl modified. 177.1600... Basic Components of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1600 Polyethylene resins, carboxyl modified. Carboxyl-modified polyethylene resins may be safely used as the food-contact surface...

  7. 21 CFR 181.32 - Acrylonitrile copolymers and resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Acrylonitrile copolymers and resins. 181.32...-Sanctioned Food Ingredients § 181.32 Acrylonitrile copolymers and resins. (a) Acrylonitrile copolymers and resins listed in this section, containing less than 30 percent acrylonitrile and complying with...

  8. 21 CFR 177.2415 - Poly(aryletherketone) resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Poly(aryletherketone) resins. 177.2415 Section 177... Components of Articles Intended for Repeated Use § 177.2415 Poly(aryletherketone) resins. Poly(aryletherketone) resins identified in paragraph (a) of this section may be safely used as articles or...

  9. 40 CFR 721.9499 - Modified silicone resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Modified silicone resin. 721.9499... Substances § 721.9499 Modified silicone resin. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a modified silicone resin (PMN P-96-1649)...

  10. 40 CFR 721.3135 - Phosphorous modified epoxy resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Phosphorous modified epoxy resin... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3135 Phosphorous modified epoxy resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance... phosphorous modified epoxy resin (PMNs P-00-992 and P-01-471) is subject to reporting under this section...

  11. 21 CFR 177.2500 - Polyphenylene sulfone resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Polyphenylene sulfone resins. 177.2500 Section 177... Components of Articles Intended for Repeated Use § 177.2500 Polyphenylene sulfone resins. The polyphenylene sulfone resins (CAS Reg. No. 31833-61-1) identified in paragraph (a) of this section may be safely used...

  12. 40 CFR 721.5905 - Modified phenolic resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Modified phenolic resin (generic). 721... Substances § 721.5905 Modified phenolic resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a modified phenolic resin...

  13. 21 CFR 173.40 - Molecular sieve resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Molecular sieve resins. 173.40 Section 173.40 Food... Polymer Substances and Polymer Adjuvants for Food Treatment § 173.40 Molecular sieve resins. Molecular sieve resins may be safely used in the processing of food under the following prescribed conditions:...

  14. 40 CFR 721.5908 - Modified phenolic resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Modified phenolic resin (generic). 721... Substances § 721.5908 Modified phenolic resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as modified phenolic resin (PMN...

  15. 21 CFR 872.3670 - Resin impression tray material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3670 Resin impression tray material. (a) Identification. Resin impression tray material is a device intended for use in a two-step dental mold fabricating... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Resin impression tray material. 872.3670...

  16. 21 CFR 872.3310 - Coating material for resin fillings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3310 Coating material for resin fillings. (a) Identification. A coating material for resin fillings is a device intended to be applied to the... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Coating material for resin fillings....

  17. 21 CFR 872.3310 - Coating material for resin fillings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3310 Coating material for resin fillings. (a) Identification. A coating material for resin fillings is a device intended to be applied to the... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Coating material for resin fillings....

  18. 21 CFR 872.3310 - Coating material for resin fillings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3310 Coating material for resin fillings. (a) Identification. A coating material for resin fillings is a device intended to be applied to the... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Coating material for resin fillings....

  19. 21 CFR 872.3670 - Resin impression tray material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3670 Resin impression tray material. (a) Identification. Resin impression tray material is a device intended for use in a two-step dental mold fabricating... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Resin impression tray material. 872.3670...

  20. 21 CFR 177.1600 - Polyethylene resins, carboxyl modified.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Polyethylene resins, carboxyl modified. 177.1600... Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1600 Polyethylene resins, carboxyl modified. Carboxyl-modified... paragraph (b) of this section are not applicable to carboxyl-modified polyethylene resins used in...

  1. 21 CFR 173.10 - Modified polyacrylamide resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Modified polyacrylamide resin. 173.10 Section 173... Adjuvants for Food Treatment § 173.10 Modified polyacrylamide resin. Modified polyacrylamide resin may be safely used in food in accordance with the following prescribed conditions: (a) The...

  2. 21 CFR 872.3770 - Temporary crown and bridge resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Temporary crown and bridge resin. 872.3770 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3770 Temporary crown and bridge resin. (a) Identification. A temporary crown and bridge resin is a device composed of a material, such...

  3. 40 CFR 721.9499 - Modified silicone resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Modified silicone resin. 721.9499... Substances § 721.9499 Modified silicone resin. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a modified silicone resin (PMN P-96-1649)...

  4. 21 CFR 173.40 - Molecular sieve resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Molecular sieve resins. 173.40 Section 173.40 Food... Polymer Substances and Polymer Adjuvants for Food Treatment § 173.40 Molecular sieve resins. Molecular sieve resins may be safely used in the processing of food under the following prescribed conditions:...

  5. 40 CFR 721.2752 - Epoxy resin containing phosphorus (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Epoxy resin containing phosphorus... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2752 Epoxy resin containing phosphorus (generic). (a) Chemical substance... epoxy resin containing phosphorus (PMN P-00-912) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  6. 21 CFR 872.3200 - Resin tooth bonding agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Resin tooth bonding agent. 872.3200 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3200 Resin tooth bonding agent. (a) Identification. A resin tooth bonding agent is a device material, such as methylmethacrylate, intended to be...

  7. 40 CFR 721.5905 - Modified phenolic resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Modified phenolic resin (generic). 721... Substances § 721.5905 Modified phenolic resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a modified phenolic resin...

  8. 21 CFR 173.5 - Acrylate-acrylamide resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Acrylate-acrylamide resins. 173.5 Section 173.5... CONSUMPTION Polymer Substances and Polymer Adjuvants for Food Treatment § 173.5 Acrylate-acrylamide resins. Acrylate-acrylamide resins may be safely used in food under the following prescribed conditions: (a)...

  9. 21 CFR 872.3690 - Tooth shade resin material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tooth shade resin material. 872.3690 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3690 Tooth shade resin material. (a) Identification. Tooth shade resin material is a device composed of materials such as bisphenol-A...

  10. 40 CFR 721.5908 - Modified phenolic resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Modified phenolic resin (generic). 721... Substances § 721.5908 Modified phenolic resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as modified phenolic resin (PMN...

  11. 21 CFR 176.110 - Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins. 176.110 Section 176... Substances for Use Only as Components of Paper and Paperboard § 176.110 Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins. Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins may be safely used as components of articles intended for use in...

  12. 40 CFR 721.5762 - Aromatic aldehyde phenolic resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Aromatic aldehyde phenolic resin... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5762 Aromatic aldehyde phenolic resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance... aromatic aldehyde phenolic resin (PMN P-01-573) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  13. 21 CFR 177.2430 - Polyether resins, chlorinated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Polyether resins, chlorinated. 177.2430 Section 177... Components of Articles Intended for Repeated Use § 177.2430 Polyether resins, chlorinated. Chlorinated polyether resins may be safely used as articles or components of articles intended for repeated use...

  14. 21 CFR 177.2500 - Polyphenylene sulfone resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Polyphenylene sulfone resins. 177.2500 Section 177... Components of Articles Intended for Repeated Use § 177.2500 Polyphenylene sulfone resins. The polyphenylene sulfone resins (CAS Reg. No. 31833-61-1) identified in paragraph (a) of this section may be safely used...

  15. 21 CFR 175.270 - Poly(vinyl fluoride) resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Poly(vinyl fluoride) resins. 175.270 Section 175... Substances for Use as Components of Coatings § 175.270 Poly(vinyl fluoride) resins. Poly(vinyl fluoride) resins identified in this section may be safely used as components of food-contact coatings...

  16. 40 CFR 721.4380 - Modified hydrocarbon resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Modified hydrocarbon resin. 721.4380... Substances § 721.4380 Modified hydrocarbon resin. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a modified hydrocarbon resin (P-91-1418)...

  17. 21 CFR 872.3670 - Resin impression tray material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Resin impression tray material. 872.3670 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3670 Resin impression tray material. (a) Identification. Resin impression tray material is a device intended for use in a two-step dental mold...

  18. 21 CFR 177.2510 - Polyvinylidene fluoride resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Polyvinylidene fluoride resins. 177.2510 Section... as Components of Articles Intended for Repeated Use § 177.2510 Polyvinylidene fluoride resins. Polyvinylidene fluoride resins may be safely used as articles or components of articles intended for repeated...

  19. 21 CFR 173.10 - Modified polyacrylamide resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Modified polyacrylamide resin. 173.10 Section 173... CONSUMPTION Polymer Substances and Polymer Adjuvants for Food Treatment § 173.10 Modified polyacrylamide resin. Modified polyacrylamide resin may be safely used in food in accordance with the following...

  20. 40 CFR 721.3135 - Phosphorous modified epoxy resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Phosphorous modified epoxy resin... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3135 Phosphorous modified epoxy resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance... phosphorous modified epoxy resin (PMNs P-00-992 and P-01-471) is subject to reporting under this section...

  1. 75 FR 67105 - Granular Polytetrafluoroethylene Resin From Italy and Japan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-01

    ... granular polytetrafluoroethylene resin from Japan (53 FR 32267). On August 30, 1988, Commerce issued an antidumping duty order on imports of granular polytetrafluoroethylene resin from Italy (53 FR 33163... orders on imports of granular polytetrafluoroethylene resin from Italy and Japan (70 FR 76026)....

  2. 40 CFR 721.2673 - Aromatic epoxide resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Aromatic epoxide resin (generic). 721... Substances § 721.2673 Aromatic epoxide resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as aromatic epoxide resin (PMN...

  3. 76 FR 39896 - Granular Polytetrafluoroethylene Resin From Italy

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-07

    ... COMMISSION Granular Polytetrafluoroethylene Resin From Italy Determination On the basis of the record \\1... antidumping duty order on granular polytetrafluoroethylene resin from Italy would be likely to lead to... Granular Polytetrafluoroethylene Resin from Italy: Investigation No. 731-TA-385 (Third Review). By order...

  4. 40 CFR 721.2755 - Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (generic... Substances § 721.2755 Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as cycloaliphatic epoxy resin...

  5. 21 CFR 177.2410 - Phenolic resins in molded articles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Phenolic resins in molded articles. 177.2410... as Components of Articles Intended for Repeated Use § 177.2410 Phenolic resins in molded articles. Phenolic resins identified in this section may be safely used as the food-contact surface of...

  6. 21 CFR 872.3300 - Hydrophilic resin coating for dentures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hydrophilic resin coating for dentures. 872.3300... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3300 Hydrophilic resin coating for dentures. (a) Identification. A hydrophilic resin coating for dentures is a device that consists of a...

  7. 21 CFR 177.2355 - Mineral reinforced nylon resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Mineral reinforced nylon resins. 177.2355 Section... as Components of Articles Intended for Repeated Use § 177.2355 Mineral reinforced nylon resins. Mineral reinforced nylon resins identified in paragraph (a) of this section may be safely used as...

  8. 21 CFR 872.3310 - Coating material for resin fillings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Coating material for resin fillings. 872.3310... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3310 Coating material for resin fillings. (a) Identification. A coating material for resin fillings is a device intended to be applied to...

  9. 21 CFR 177.2415 - Poly(aryletherketone) resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Poly(aryletherketone) resins. 177.2415 Section 177... Components of Articles Intended for Repeated Use § 177.2415 Poly(aryletherketone) resins. Poly(aryletherketone) resins identified in paragraph (a) of this section may be safely used as articles or...

  10. 21 CFR 177.1600 - Polyethylene resins, carboxyl modified.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Polyethylene resins, carboxyl modified. 177.1600... Basic Components of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1600 Polyethylene resins, carboxyl modified. Carboxyl-modified polyethylene resins may be safely used as the food-contact surface...

  11. 21 CFR 176.110 - Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins. 176.110 Section... Substances for Use Only as Components of Paper and Paperboard § 176.110 Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins. Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins may be safely used as components of articles intended for use in...

  12. 21 CFR 573.120 - Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin. 573.120 Section 573... Food Additive Listing § 573.120 Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin. Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin... acrylamide with partial hydrolysis, or by copolymerization of acrylamide and acrylic acid with the...

  13. 21 CFR 573.120 - Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin. 573.120 Section 573... Food Additive Listing § 573.120 Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin. Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin... acrylamide with partial hydrolysis, or by copolymerization of acrylamide and acrylic acid with the...

  14. 21 CFR 176.110 - Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins. 176.110 Section... Substances for Use Only as Components of Paper and Paperboard § 176.110 Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins. Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins may be safely used as components of articles intended for use in...

  15. 21 CFR 177.2450 - Polyamide-imide resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., each having such resin-coated surface area of 100 square inches. The cured-resin film coatings shall be... spaced, coated stainless steel plates, exposed to the respective food simulating solvents. The resin...) Distilled water at 250 °F for 2 hours: Not to exceed 0.01 milligram per square inch. (2) Three...

  16. ELUTION OF URANIUM VALUES FROM ION EXCHANGE RESINS

    DOEpatents

    Kennedy, R.H.

    1959-11-24

    A process is described for eluting complex uranium ions absorbed on ion exchange resins. The resin is subjected to the action of an aqueous eluting solution contuining sulfuric acid and an alkali metal, ammonium, or magnesium chloride or nitrate, the elution being carried out until the desired amount of the uranium is removed from the resin.

  17. Synthesis and toughness properties of resins and composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, N. J.

    1984-01-01

    Tensile and shear moduli of four ACEE (Aircraft Energy Efficiency Program) resins are presented along with ACEE composite material modulus predictions based on micromechanics. Compressive strength and fracture toughness of the resins and composites were discussed. In addition, several resin synthesis techniques are reviewed.

  18. Bismaleimide resins for flame resistant honeycomb sandwich panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    A 60 kg batch of Resin M751 was produced in pilot plant scale. The resin was delivered to the prepreg company as an NMP solution. 100 kg of glass-fabric prepregs were fabricated. Prepreg characteristics and curing cycles for laminate fabrication were provided. A new batch of Resin M756 (Code M756 - 2) was synthesized.

  19. Photosensitive filler minimizes internal stresses in epoxy resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dillon, J. N.

    1967-01-01

    Photosensitive filler is added to curable epoxy resins to minimize stress from internal shrinkage during curing or polymerization. Cinnamic acid resins and cinnamal ketones may be added in the amount of 1 to 3 percent by weight of the resin mixture.

  20. 21 CFR 177.2355 - Mineral reinforced nylon resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Mineral reinforced nylon resins. 177.2355 Section... as Components of Articles Intended for Repeated Use § 177.2355 Mineral reinforced nylon resins. Mineral reinforced nylon resins identified in paragraph (a) of this section may be safely used as...

  1. 21 CFR 177.2355 - Mineral reinforced nylon resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Mineral reinforced nylon resins. 177.2355 Section... Repeated Use § 177.2355 Mineral reinforced nylon resins. Mineral reinforced nylon resins identified in... accordance with the following prescribed conditions: (a) For the purpose of this section the...

  2. 21 CFR 177.2355 - Mineral reinforced nylon resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Mineral reinforced nylon resins. 177.2355 Section... as Components of Articles Intended for Repeated Use § 177.2355 Mineral reinforced nylon resins. Mineral reinforced nylon resins identified in paragraph (a) of this section may be safely used as...

  3. 21 CFR 177.2355 - Mineral reinforced nylon resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Mineral reinforced nylon resins. 177.2355 Section... as Components of Articles Intended for Repeated Use § 177.2355 Mineral reinforced nylon resins. Mineral reinforced nylon resins identified in paragraph (a) of this section may be safely used as...

  4. 21 CFR 573.120 - Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin. 573.120 Section 573... Food Additive Listing § 573.120 Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin. Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin... acrylamide with partial hydrolysis, or by copolymerization of acrylamide and acrylic acid with the...

  5. 21 CFR 573.120 - Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin. 573.120 Section 573... Food Additive Listing § 573.120 Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin. Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin... acrylamide with partial hydrolysis, or by copolymerization of acrylamide and acrylic acid with the...

  6. 21 CFR 176.110 - Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins. 176.110 Section... Substances for Use Only as Components of Paper and Paperboard § 176.110 Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins. Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins may be safely used as components of articles intended for use in...

  7. 40 CFR 721.2673 - Aromatic epoxide resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Aromatic epoxide resin (generic). 721... Substances § 721.2673 Aromatic epoxide resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as aromatic epoxide resin (PMN...

  8. 40 CFR 721.10307 - Acrylate resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Acrylate resin (generic). 721.10307... Substances § 721.10307 Acrylate resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as acrylate resin (PMN P-01-343) is subject...

  9. 40 CFR 721.5762 - Aromatic aldehyde phenolic resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Aromatic aldehyde phenolic resin... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5762 Aromatic aldehyde phenolic resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance... aromatic aldehyde phenolic resin (PMN P-01-573) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  10. 40 CFR 721.5905 - Modified phenolic resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Modified phenolic resin (generic). 721... Substances § 721.5905 Modified phenolic resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a modified phenolic resin...

  11. 40 CFR 721.5762 - Aromatic aldehyde phenolic resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Aromatic aldehyde phenolic resin... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5762 Aromatic aldehyde phenolic resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance... aromatic aldehyde phenolic resin (PMN P-01-573) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  12. 40 CFR 721.9499 - Modified silicone resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Modified silicone resin. 721.9499... Substances § 721.9499 Modified silicone resin. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a modified silicone resin (PMN P-96-1649)...

  13. 40 CFR 721.5908 - Modified phenolic resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Modified phenolic resin (generic). 721... Substances § 721.5908 Modified phenolic resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as modified phenolic resin (PMN...

  14. 40 CFR 721.10307 - Acrylate resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Acrylate resin (generic). 721.10307... Substances § 721.10307 Acrylate resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as acrylate resin (PMN P-01-343) is subject...

  15. 40 CFR 721.2673 - Aromatic epoxide resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Aromatic epoxide resin (generic). 721... Substances § 721.2673 Aromatic epoxide resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as aromatic epoxide resin (PMN...

  16. 40 CFR 721.9499 - Modified silicone resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Modified silicone resin. 721.9499... Substances § 721.9499 Modified silicone resin. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a modified silicone resin (PMN P-96-1649)...

  17. 40 CFR 721.2755 - Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (generic... Substances § 721.2755 Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as cycloaliphatic epoxy resin...

  18. 40 CFR 721.2755 - Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (generic... Substances § 721.2755 Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as cycloaliphatic epoxy resin...

  19. 40 CFR 721.5908 - Modified phenolic resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Modified phenolic resin (generic). 721... Substances § 721.5908 Modified phenolic resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as modified phenolic resin (PMN...

  20. 40 CFR 721.5905 - Modified phenolic resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Modified phenolic resin (generic). 721... Substances § 721.5905 Modified phenolic resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a modified phenolic resin...