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Sample records for deacetylases controls g1

  1. Invasive Cell Fate Requires G1 Cell-Cycle Arrest and Histone Deacetylase-Mediated Changes in Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Matus, David Q; Lohmer, Lauren L; Kelley, Laura C; Schindler, Adam J; Kohrman, Abraham Q; Barkoulas, Michalis; Zhang, Wan; Chi, Qiuyi; Sherwood, David R

    2015-10-26

    Despite critical roles in development and cancer, the mechanisms that specify invasive cellular behavior are poorly understood. Through a screen of transcription factors in Caenorhabditis elegans, we identified G1 cell-cycle arrest as a precisely regulated requirement of the anchor cell (AC) invasion program. We show that the nuclear receptor nhr-67/tlx directs the AC into G1 arrest in part through regulation of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor cki-1. Loss of nhr-67 resulted in non-invasive, mitotic ACs that failed to express matrix metalloproteinases or actin regulators and lack invadopodia, F-actin-rich membrane protrusions that facilitate invasion. We further show that G1 arrest is necessary for the histone deacetylase HDA-1, a key regulator of differentiation, to promote pro-invasive gene expression and invadopodia formation. Together, these results suggest that invasive cell fate requires G1 arrest and that strategies targeting both G1-arrested and actively cycling cells may be needed to halt metastatic cancer.

  2. Mechanisms of G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in myeloma cells induced by hybrid-compound histone deacetylase inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, Seiko; Okinaga, Toshinori; Ariyoshi, Wataru; Takahashi, Osamu; Iwanaga, Kenjiro; Nishino, Norikazu; Tominaga, Kazuhiro; Nishihara, Tatsuji

    2013-05-10

    Highlights: •Novel histone deacetylase inhibitor Ky-2, remarkably inhibits myeloma cell growth. •Ky-2 demonstrates no cytotoxicity against normal lymphocytic cells. •Ky-2 induces cell cycle arrest through the cell cycle-associated proteins. •Ky-2 induces Bcl-2-inhibitable apoptosis through a caspase-dependent cascade. -- Abstract: Objectives: Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are new therapeutic agents, used to treat various types of malignant cancers. In the present study, we investigated the effects of Ky-2, a hybrid-compound HDAC inhibitor, on the growth of mouse myeloma cells. Materials and methods: Myeloma cells, HS-72, P3U1, and mouse normal cells were used in this study. Effect of HDAC inhibitors on cell viability was determined by WST-assay and trypan blue assay. Cell cycle was analyzed using flow cytometer. The expression of cell cycle regulatory and the apoptosis associated proteins were examined by Western blot analysis. Hoechst’s staining was used to detect apoptotic cells. Results: Our findings showed that Ky-2 decreased the levels of HDACs, while it enhanced acetylation of histone H3. Myeloma cell proliferation was inhibited by Ky-2 treatment. Interestingly, Ky-2 had no cytotoxic effects on mouse normal cells. Ky-2 treatment induced G1-phase cell cycle arrest and accumulation of a sub-G1 phase population, while Western blotting analysis revealed that expressions of the cell cycle-associated proteins were up-regulated. Also, Ky-2 enhanced the cleavage of caspase-9 and -3 in myeloma cells, followed by DNA fragmentation. In addition, Ky-2 was not found to induce apoptosis in bcl-2 overexpressing myeloma cells. Conclusion: These findings suggest that Ky-2 induces apoptosis via a caspase-dependent cascade and Bcl-2-inhibitable mechanism in myeloma cells.

  3. G1/S control of anchorage-independent growth in the fibroblast cell cycle

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    We have developed methodology to identify the block to anchorage- independent growth and position it within the fibroblast cell cycle. Results with NRK fibroblasts show that mitogen stimulation of the G0/G1 transition and G1-associated increases in cell size are minimally affected by loss of cell anchorage. In contrast, the induction of G1/S cell cycle genes and DNA synthesis is markedly inhibited when anchorage is blocked. Moreover, we demonstrate that the anchorage-dependent transition maps to late G1 and shortly before activation of the G1/S p34cdc2-like kinase. The G1/S block was also detectable in NIH-3T3 cells. Our results: (a) distinguish control of cell cycle progression by growth factors and anchorage; (b) indicate that anchorage mediates G1/S control in fibroblasts; and (c) identify a physiologic circumstance in which the phenotype of mammalian cell cycle arrest would closely resemble Saccharomyces cerevisiae START. The close correlation between anchorage independence in vitro and tumorigenicity in vivo emphasizes the key regulatory role for G1/S control in mammalian cells. PMID:1955482

  4. Defective in Mitotic Arrest 1 (Dma1) Ubiquitin Ligase Controls G1 Cyclin Degradation*

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Ortega, Sara; Bru, Samuel; Ricco, Natalia; Ramírez, Sara; Casals, Núria; Jiménez, Javier; Isasa, Marta; Crosas, Bernat; Clotet, Josep

    2013-01-01

    Progression through the G1 phase of the cell cycle is controlled by diverse cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) that might be associated to numerous cyclin isoforms. Given such complexity, regulation of cyclin degradation should be crucial for coordinating progression through the cell cycle. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, SCF is the only E3 ligase known to date to be involved in G1 cyclin degradation. Here, we report the design of a genetic screening that uncovered Dma1 as another E3 ligase that targets G1 cyclins in yeast. We show that the cyclin Pcl1 is ubiquitinated in vitro and in vivo by Dma1, and accordingly, is stabilized in dma1 mutants. We demonstrate that Pcl1 must be phosphorylated by its own CDK to efficiently interact with Dma1 and undergo degradation. A nonphosphorylatable version of Pcl1 accumulates throughout the cell cycle, demonstrating the physiological relevance of the proposed mechanism. Finally, we present evidence that the levels of Pcl1 and Cln2 are independently controlled in response to nutrient availability. This new previously unknown mechanism for G1 cyclin degradation that we report here could help elucidate the specific roles of the redundant CDK-cyclin complexes in G1. PMID:23264631

  5. Production of stable bispecific IgG1 by controlled Fab-arm exchange

    PubMed Central

    Gramer, Michael J; van den Bremer, Ewald TJ; van Kampen, Muriel D; Kundu, Amitava; Kopfmann, Peter; Etter, Eric; Stinehelfer, David; Long, Justin; Lannom, Tom; Noordergraaf, Esther H; Gerritsen, Jolanda; Labrijn, Aran F; Schuurman, Janine; van Berkel, Patrick HC; Parren, Paul WHI

    2013-01-01

    The manufacturing of bispecific antibodies can be challenging for a variety of reasons. For example, protein expression problems, stability issues, or the use of non-standard approaches for manufacturing can result in poor yield or poor facility fit. In this paper, we demonstrate the use of standard antibody platforms for large-scale manufacturing of bispecific IgG1 by controlled Fab-arm exchange. Two parental antibodies that each contain a single matched point mutation in the CH3 region were separately expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells and manufactured at 1000 L scale using a platform fed-batch and purification process that was designed for standard antibody production. The bispecific antibody was generated by mixing the two parental molecules under controlled reducing conditions, resulting in efficient Fab-arm exchange of >95% at kg scale. The reductant was removed via diafiltration, resulting in spontaneous reoxidation of interchain disulfide bonds. Aside from the bispecific nature of the molecule, extensive characterization demonstrated that the IgG1 structural integrity was maintained, including function and stability. These results demonstrate the suitability of this bispecific IgG1 format for commercial-scale manufacturing using standard antibody manufacturing techniques. PMID:23995617

  6. Recruitment of Cln3 Cyclin to Promoters Controls Cell Cycle Entry via Histone Deacetylase and Other Targets

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Ying; Wijnen, Herman; Futcher, Bruce

    2009-01-01

    In yeast, the G1 cyclin Cln3 promotes cell cycle entry by activating the transcription factor SBF. In mammals, there is a parallel system for cell cycle entry in which cyclin dependent kinase (CDK) activates transcription factor E2F/Dp. Here we show that Cln3 regulates SBF by at least two different pathways, one involving the repressive protein Whi5, and the second involving Stb1. The Rpd3 histone deacetylase complex is also involved. Cln3 binds to SBF at the CLN2 promoter, and removes previously bound Whi5 and histone deacetylase. Adding extra copies of the SBF binding site to the cell delays Start, possibly by titrating Cln3. Since Rpd3 is the yeast ortholog of mammalian HDAC1, there is now a virtually complete analogy between the proteins regulating cell cycle entry in yeast (SBF, Cln3, Whi5 and Stb1, Rpd3) and mammals (E2F, Cyclin D, Rb, HDAC1). The cell may titrate Cln3 molecules against the number of SBF binding sites, and this could be the underlying basis of the size-control mechanism for Start. PMID:19823669

  7. A Whi7-anchored loop controls the G1 Cdk-cyclin complex at start.

    PubMed

    Yahya, Galal; Parisi, Eva; Flores, Alba; Gallego, Carme; Aldea, Martí

    2014-01-09

    Cells commit to a new cell cycle at Start by activation of the G1 Cdk-cyclin complex which, in turn, triggers a genome-wide transcriptional wave that executes the G1/S transition. In budding yeast, the Cdc28-Cln3 complex is regulated by an ER-retention mechanism that is important for proper cell size control. We have isolated small-cell-size CDC28 mutants showing impaired retention at the ER and premature accumulation of the Cln3 cyclin in the nucleus. The differential interactome of a quintuple Cdc28(wee) mutant pinpointed Whi7, a Whi5 paralog targeted by Cdc28 that associates to the ER in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. Our results demonstrate that the Cln3 cyclin and Whi7 act in a positive feedback loop to release the G1 Cdk-cyclin complex and trigger Start once a critical size has been reached, thus uncovering a key nonlinear mechanism at the earliest known events of cell-cycle entry.

  8. p53 controls CDC7 levels to reinforce G1 cell cycle arrest upon genotoxic stress

    PubMed Central

    Tudzarova, Slavica; Dey, Ayona; Stoeber, Kai; Okorokov, Andrei L.; Williams, Gareth H.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT DNA replication initiation is a key event in the cell cycle, which is dependent on 2 kinases - CDK2 and CDC7. Here we report a novel mechanism in which p53 induces G1 checkpoint and cell cycle arrest by downregulating CDC7 kinase in response to genotoxic stress. We demonstrate that p53 controls CDC7 stability post-transcriptionally via miR-192/215 and post-translationally via Fbxw7β E3 ubiquitin ligase. The p53-dependent pathway of CDC7 downregulation is interlinked with the p53-p21-CDK2 pathway, as p21-mediated inhibition of CDK2-dependent phosphorylation of CDC7 on Thr376 is required for GSK3ß-phosphorylation and Fbxw7ß-dependent degradation of CDC7. Notably, sustained oncogenic high levels of active CDC7 exert a negative feedback onto p53, leading to unrestrained S-phase progression and accumulation of DNA damage. Thus, p53-dependent control of CDC7 levels is essential for blocking G1/S cell-cycle transition upon genotoxic stress, thereby safeguarding the genome from instability and thus representing a novel general stress response. PMID:27611229

  9. Plant D-type cyclins and the control of G1 progression.

    PubMed Central

    Oakenfull, E Ann; Riou-Khamlichi, Catherine; Murray, James A H

    2002-01-01

    The basic pattern of controls that operate during the G1 phase of the plant cell cycle shows much closer similarity to animals than to the yeasts and other fungi. The activity of D-type cyclin (CycD) kinases is induced in response to stimulatory signals, and these phosphorylate the plant homologue of the retinoblastoma tumour susceptibility (Rb) protein. It is likely that Rb phosphorylation results in the activation of genes under the control of E2F transcription factors, including those required for S phase entry. As the initial triggers of the cascade, attention has focused on the CycDs, and a family of 10 genes is present in Arabidopsis, divided into three major and three minor groups. Analysis to date suggests that these groups are functionally distinct. PMID:12079670

  10. CDK-Dependent Hsp70 Phosphorylation Controls G1 Cyclin Abundance and Cell-Cycle Progression

    PubMed Central

    Truman, Andrew W.; Kristjansdottir, Kolbrun; Wolfgeher, Donald; Hasin, Naushaba; Polier, Sigrun; Zhang, Hong; Perrett, Sarah; Prodromou, Chrisostomos; Jones, Gary W.; Kron, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    Summary In budding yeast, the essential functions of Hsp70 chaperones Ssa1–4 are regulated through expression level, isoform specificity, and cochaperone activity. Suggesting a novel regulatory paradigm, we find that phosphorylation of Ssa1 T36 within a cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) consensus site conserved among Hsp70 proteins alters cochaperone and client interactions. T36 phosphorylation triggers displacement of Ydj1, allowing Ssa1 to bind the G1 cyclin Cln3 and promote its degradation. The stress CDK Pho85 phosphorylates T36 upon nitrogen starvation or pheromone stimulation, destabilizing Cln3 to delay onset of S phase. In turn, the mitotic CDK Cdk1 phosphorylates T36 to block Cln3 accumulation in G2/M. Suggesting broad conservation from yeast to human, CDK-dependent phosphorylation of Hsc70 T38 similarly regulates Cyclin D1 binding and stability. These results establish an active role for Hsp70 chaperones as signal transducers mediating growth control of G1 cyclin abundance and activity. PMID:23217712

  11. Genes involved in cell cycle G1 checkpoint control are frequently mutated in human melanoma metastases.

    PubMed Central

    Platz, A.; Sevigny, P.; Norberg, T.; Ring, P.; Lagerlöf, B.; Ringborg, U.

    1996-01-01

    A common characteristic of cancer cells is unrestrained cell division. This may be caused by mutational changes in genes coding for components of cell cycle-controlling networks. Alterations in genes involved in G1 checkpoint control have been registered in many human tumours, and investigations from several laboratories show that such alterations, taken together, are the most frequent changes detected in cancer cells. The present paper describes mutational analysis by polymerase chain reaction-single-strand conformation polymorphism (PCR/SSCP) and nucleotide sequence analysis of the genes coding for the p15, p53 and N-ras proteins in 26 metastases from 25 melanoma patients. The registered mutation frequencies add together with previously registered mutations in p16 in the same patient samples to a substantial total frequency of 44% of patients with mutation in at least one of the investigated genes. These results show the occurrence of heterogeneous defects among components of the cell cycle controlling machinery in a human melanoma tumour sample collection and demonstrate that the total frequency of detected alterations increases with the number of cell cycle controlling genes included in the screening panel. Images Figure 1 PMID:8826861

  12. Singularity-conquering ZG controllers of z2g1 type for tracking control of the IPC system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yunong; Yu, Xiaotian; Yin, Yonghua; Peng, Chen; Fan, Zhengping

    2014-09-01

    With wider investigations and applications of autonomous robotics and intelligent vehicles, the inverted pendulum on a cart (IPC) system has become more attractive for numerous researchers due to its concise and representative structure. In this article, the tracking-control problem of the IPC system is considered and investigated. Based on Zhang dynamics (ZD) and gradient dynamics (GD), a novel kind of ZG controllers are developed and investigated for achieving the tracking-control purpose, which contains controllers of z2g0 and z2g1 types according to the number of times of using the ZD and GD methods. Besides, theoretical analyses are presented to guarantee the global and exponential convergence performance of both z2g0 and z2g1 controllers. Computer simulations are further performed to substantiate the feasibility and effectiveness of ZG controllers. More importantly, comparative simulation results demonstrate that controllers of z2g1 type can conquer the singularity problem (i.e. the division-by-zero problem).

  13. First passage times in M2[X ]|G |1 |R queue with hysteretic overload control policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pechinkin, Alexander V.; Razumchik, Rostislav R.; Zaryadov, Ivan S.

    2016-06-01

    One of the reported approaches towards the solution of overload problem in networks of SIP servers is the implementation of multi-level hysteretic control of arrivals in SIP servers. Each level, being the parameter of the policy, specifies operation mode of SIP server i.e. it implicitly indicates what SIP server must do with the arriving packets. The choice of parameters' values is not guided by standards and is usually left for the network owner. In general, all operation modes of the considered policy can be grouped into two groups: normal mode (when all arriving packets are accepted) and congested mode (when part or all arriving packets are being dropped). Such grouping may serve as the criteria for choosing parameters' values of the policy: pick those values which minimize SIP server sojourn time in congested mode. In this short note we propose some analytical results which facilitate the solution of stated minimization problem. The considered mathematical model of SIP server is the queueing system M2[X ]|G |1 |R with batch arrivals and bi-level hysteretic control policy, which specifies three operation modes: normal (customers both flows are accepted), overload (only customers from one flow are accepted), discard (customers from both flows are blocked/lost)). The switching between modes can occur only on service completions. Analytical method allowing computation of stationary sojourn times in different operation modes (as well as first passage times between modes) is presented in brief. Numerical example is given.

  14. Whi5 phosphorylation embedded in the G1/S network dynamically controls critical cell size and cell fate

    PubMed Central

    Palumbo, Pasquale; Vanoni, Marco; Cusimano, Valerio; Busti, Stefano; Marano, Francesca; Manes, Costanzo; Alberghina, Lilia

    2016-01-01

    In budding yeast, overcoming of a critical size to enter S phase and the mitosis/mating switch—two central cell fate events—take place in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Here we present a mathematical model of the basic molecular mechanism controlling the G1/S transition, whose major regulatory feature is multisite phosphorylation of nuclear Whi5. Cln3–Cdk1, whose nuclear amount is proportional to cell size, and then Cln1,2–Cdk1, randomly phosphorylate both decoy and functional Whi5 sites. Full phosphorylation of functional sites releases Whi5 inhibitory activity, activating G1/S transcription. Simulation analysis shows that this mechanism ensures coherent release of Whi5 inhibitory action and accounts for many experimentally observed properties of mitotically growing or conjugating G1 cells. Cell cycle progression and transcriptional analyses of a Whi5 phosphomimetic mutant verify the model prediction that coherent transcription of the G1/S regulon and ensuing G1/S transition requires full phosphorylation of Whi5 functional sites. PMID:27094800

  15. Whi5 phosphorylation embedded in the G1/S network dynamically controls critical cell size and cell fate.

    PubMed

    Palumbo, Pasquale; Vanoni, Marco; Cusimano, Valerio; Busti, Stefano; Marano, Francesca; Manes, Costanzo; Alberghina, Lilia

    2016-04-20

    In budding yeast, overcoming of a critical size to enter S phase and the mitosis/mating switch--two central cell fate events--take place in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Here we present a mathematical model of the basic molecular mechanism controlling the G1/S transition, whose major regulatory feature is multisite phosphorylation of nuclear Whi5. Cln3-Cdk1, whose nuclear amount is proportional to cell size, and then Cln1,2-Cdk1, randomly phosphorylate both decoy and functional Whi5 sites. Full phosphorylation of functional sites releases Whi5 inhibitory activity, activating G1/S transcription. Simulation analysis shows that this mechanism ensures coherent release of Whi5 inhibitory action and accounts for many experimentally observed properties of mitotically growing or conjugating G1 cells. Cell cycle progression and transcriptional analyses of a Whi5 phosphomimetic mutant verify the model prediction that coherent transcription of the G1/S regulon and ensuing G1/S transition requires full phosphorylation of Whi5 functional sites.

  16. Physiological electric fields control the G1/S phase cell cycle checkpoint to inhibit endothelial cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Entong; Yin, Yili; Zhao, Min; Forrester, John V; McCaig, Colin D

    2003-03-01

    Vascular endothelial cell (VEC) proliferation is a key event in angiogenesis and is tightly regulated. Electric potential differences exist around the vascular endothelium and give rise to endogenous electric fields (EFs), whether these EFs influence VEC proliferation is unclear. We exposed cultured VECs to applied EFs of physiological strengths for up to 72 h. EF at 50 or 100 mV/mm did not influence cell proliferation, but at 200 mV/mm, cell density, cell growth rate, and mitosis index decreased significantly. EF-induced reduction in VEC proliferation was not due to increased apoptosis, because caspase apoptosis inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK (20 microM), had no effect on this response. Rather, EF responses were mediated via decreased entry of cells into S phase from G1 phase, as shown by flow cytometry. Western blot showed that EFs decreased G1-specific cyclin E expression and increased cyclin/cyclin-dependent kinase complex inhibitor p27kipl expression. Thus EFs controlled VEC proliferation through induction of cell cycle arrest at G1 by down-regulation of cyclin E expression and up-regulation of p27kipl expression, rather than by promoting apoptosis. If control of the cell cycle by endogenous EFs extends beyond VECs, this would be of widespread biological significance in vivo.

  17. Murine hematopoietic stem cell dormancy controlled by induction of a novel short form of PSF1 by histone deacetylase inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Yinglu; Gong, Zhi-Yuan; Takakura, Nobuyuki

    2015-06-10

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) can survive long-term in a state of dormancy. Little is known about how histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) affect HSC kinetics. Here, we use trichostatin A (TSA), a histone deacetylase inhibitor, to enforce histone acetylation and show that this suppresses cell cycle entry by dormant HSCs. Previously, we found that haploinsufficiency of PSF1, a DNA replication factor, led to attenuation of the bone marrow (BM) HSC pool size and lack of acute proliferation after 5-FU ablation. Because PSF1 protein is present in CD34{sup +} transiently amplifying HSCs but not in CD34{sup −} long-term reconstituting-HSCs which are resting in a dormant state, we analyzed the relationship between dormancy and PSF1 expression, and how a histone deacetylase inhibitor affects this. We found that CD34{sup +} HSCs produce long functional PSF1 (PSF1a) but CD34{sup −} HSCs produce a shorter possibly non-functional PSF1 (PSF1b, c, dominantly PSF1c). Using PSF1a-overexpressing NIH-3T3 cells in which the endogenous PSF1 promoter is suppressed, we found that TSA treatment promotes production of the shorter form of PSF1 possibly by inducing recruitment of E2F family factors upstream of the PSF1 transcription start site. Our data document one mechanism by which histone deacetylase inhibitors affect the dormancy of HSCs by regulating the DNA replication factor PSF1. - Highlights: • Hematopoetic stem cell dormancy is controlled by histone deacetylation inhibitors. • Dormancy of HSCs is associated with a shorter form of non-functional PSF1. • Histone deacetylase inhibitors suppress PSF1 promoter activity.

  18. Histone deacetylases control module-specific phenotypic plasticity in beetle weapons

    PubMed Central

    Ozawa, Takane; Mizuhara, Tomoko; Arata, Masataka; Shimada, Masakazu; Niimi, Teruyuki; Okada, Kensuke; Okada, Yasukazu; Ohta, Kunihiro

    2016-01-01

    Nutritional conditions during early development influence the plastic expression of adult phenotypes. Among several body modules of animals, the development of sexually selected exaggerated traits exhibits striking nutrition sensitivity, resulting in positive allometry and hypervariability distinct from other traits. Using de novo RNA sequencing and comprehensive RNA interference (RNAi) for epigenetic modifying factors, we found that histone deacetylases (HDACs) and polycomb group (PcG) proteins preferentially influence the size of mandibles (exaggerated male weapon) and demonstrate nutrition-dependent hypervariability in the broad-horned flour beetle, Gnatocerus cornutus. RNAi-mediated HDAC1 knockdown (KD) in G. cornutus larvae caused specific curtailment of mandibles in adults, whereas HDAC3 KD led to hypertrophy. Notably, these KDs conferred opposite effects on wing size, but little effect on the size of the core body and genital modules. PcG RNAi also reduced adult mandible size. These results suggest that the plastic development of exaggerated traits is controlled in a module-specific manner by HDACs. PMID:27956627

  19. Cytoplasmic-nuclear trafficking of G1/S cell cycle molecules and adult human β-cell replication: a revised model of human β-cell G1/S control.

    PubMed

    Fiaschi-Taesch, Nathalie M; Kleinberger, Jeffrey W; Salim, Fatimah G; Troxell, Ronnie; Wills, Rachel; Tanwir, Mansoor; Casinelli, Gabriella; Cox, Amy E; Takane, Karen K; Srinivas, Harish; Scott, Donald K; Stewart, Andrew F

    2013-07-01

    Harnessing control of human β-cell proliferation has proven frustratingly difficult. Most G1/S control molecules, generally presumed to be nuclear proteins in the human β-cell, are in fact constrained to the cytoplasm. Here, we asked whether G1/S molecules might traffic into and out of the cytoplasmic compartment in association with activation of cell cycle progression. Cdk6 and cyclin D3 were used to drive human β-cell proliferation and promptly translocated into the nucleus in association with proliferation. In contrast, the cell cycle inhibitors p15, p18, and p19 did not alter their location, remaining cytoplasmic. Conversely, p16, p21, and p27 increased their nuclear frequency. In contrast once again, p57 decreased its nuclear frequency. Whereas proliferating β-cells contained nuclear cyclin D3 and cdk6, proliferation generally did not occur in β-cells that contained nuclear cell cycle inhibitors, except p21. Dynamic cytoplasmic-nuclear trafficking of cdk6 was confirmed using green fluorescent protein-tagged cdk6 and live cell imaging. Thus, we provide novel working models describing the control of cell cycle progression in the human β-cell. In addition to known obstacles to β-cell proliferation, cytoplasmic-to-nuclear trafficking of G1/S molecules may represent an obstacle as well as a therapeutic opportunity for human β-cell expansion.

  20. Histone Deacetylases

    PubMed Central

    Parbin, Sabnam; Kar, Swayamsiddha; Shilpi, Arunima; Sengupta, Dipta; Deb, Moonmoon; Rath, Sandip Kumar

    2014-01-01

    In the current era of genomic medicine, diseases are identified as manifestations of anomalous patterns of gene expression. Cancer is the principal example among such maladies. Although remarkable progress has been achieved in the understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in the genesis and progression of cancer, its epigenetic regulation, particularly histone deacetylation, demands further studies. Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are one of the key players in the gene expression regulation network in cancer because of their repressive role on tumor suppressor genes. Higher expression and function of deacetylases disrupt the finely tuned acetylation homeostasis in both histone and non-histone target proteins. This brings about alterations in the genes implicated in the regulation of cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis and other cellular processes. Moreover, the reversible nature of epigenetic modulation by HDACs makes them attractive targets for cancer remedy. This review summarizes the current knowledge of HDACs in tumorigenesis and tumor progression as well as their contribution to the hallmarks of cancer. The present report also describes briefly various assays to detect histone deacetylase activity and discusses the potential role of histone deacetylase inhibitors as emerging epigenetic drugs to cure cancer. PMID:24051359

  1. A General G1/S-Phase Cell-Cycle Control Module in the Flowering Plant Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xin'Ai; Harashima, Hirofumi; Dissmeyer, Nico; Pusch, Stefan; Weimer, Annika K.; Bramsiepe, Jonathan; Bouyer, Daniel; Rademacher, Svenja; Nowack, Moritz K.; Novak, Bela; Sprunck, Stefanie; Schnittger, Arp

    2012-01-01

    The decision to replicate its DNA is of crucial importance for every cell and, in many organisms, is decisive for the progression through the entire cell cycle. A comparison of animals versus yeast has shown that, although most of the involved cell-cycle regulators are divergent in both clades, they fulfill a similar role and the overall network topology of G1/S regulation is highly conserved. Using germline development as a model system, we identified a regulatory cascade controlling entry into S phase in the flowering plant Arabidopsis thaliana, which, as a member of the Plantae supergroup, is phylogenetically only distantly related to Opisthokonts such as yeast and animals. This module comprises the Arabidopsis homologs of the animal transcription factor E2F, the plant homolog of the animal transcriptional repressor Retinoblastoma (Rb)-related 1 (RBR1), the plant-specific F-box protein F-BOX-LIKE 17 (FBL17), the plant specific cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors KRPs, as well as CDKA;1, the plant homolog of the yeast and animal Cdc2+/Cdk1 kinases. Our data show that the principle of a double negative wiring of Rb proteins is highly conserved, likely representing a universal mechanism in eukaryotic cell-cycle control. However, this negative feedback of Rb proteins is differently implemented in plants as it is brought about through a quadruple negative regulation centered around the F-box protein FBL17 that mediates the degradation of CDK inhibitors but is itself directly repressed by Rb. Biomathematical simulations and subsequent experimental confirmation of computational predictions revealed that this regulatory circuit can give rise to hysteresis highlighting the here identified dosage sensitivity of CDK inhibitors in this network. PMID:22879821

  2. Deletion of histone deacetylase 3 reveals critical roles in S phase progression and DNA damage control.

    PubMed

    Bhaskara, Srividya; Chyla, Brenda J; Amann, Joseph M; Knutson, Sarah K; Cortez, David; Sun, Zu-Wen; Hiebert, Scott W

    2008-04-11

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are enzymes that modify key residues in histones to regulate chromatin architecture, and they play a vital role in cell survival, cell-cycle progression, and tumorigenesis. To understand the function of Hdac3, a critical component of the N-CoR/SMRT repression complex, a conditional allele of Hdac3 was engineered. Cre-recombinase-mediated inactivation of Hdac3 led to a delay in cell-cycle progression, cell-cycle-dependent DNA damage, and apoptosis in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). While no overt defects in mitosis were observed in Hdac3-/- MEFs, including normal H3Ser10 phosphorylation, DNA damage was observed in Hdac3-/- interphase cells, which appears to be associated with defective DNA double-strand break repair. Moreover, we noted that Hdac3-/- MEFs were protected from DNA damage when quiescent, which may provide a mechanistic basis for the action of HDAC inhibitors on cycling tumor cells.

  3. A circadian rhythm orchestrated by histone deacetylase 3 controls hepatic lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Feng, Dan; Liu, Tao; Sun, Zheng; Bugge, Anne; Mullican, Shannon E; Alenghat, Theresa; Liu, X Shirley; Lazar, Mitchell A

    2011-03-11

    Disruption of the circadian clock exacerbates metabolic diseases, including obesity and diabetes. We show that histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3) recruitment to the genome displays a circadian rhythm in mouse liver. Histone acetylation is inversely related to HDAC3 binding, and this rhythm is lost when HDAC3 is absent. Although amounts of HDAC3 are constant, its genomic recruitment in liver corresponds to the expression pattern of the circadian nuclear receptor Rev-erbα. Rev-erbα colocalizes with HDAC3 near genes regulating lipid metabolism, and deletion of HDAC3 or Rev-erbα in mouse liver causes hepatic steatosis. Thus, genomic recruitment of HDAC3 by Rev-erbα directs a circadian rhythm of histone acetylation and gene expression required for normal hepatic lipid homeostasis.

  4. G1/S Inhibitors and the SWI/SNF Complex Control Cell-Cycle Exit during Muscle Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ruijtenberg, Suzan; van den Heuvel, Sander

    2015-07-16

    The transition from proliferating precursor cells to post-mitotic differentiated cells is crucial for development, tissue homeostasis, and tumor suppression. To study cell-cycle exit during differentiation in vivo, we developed a conditional knockout and lineage-tracing system for Caenorhabditis elegans. Combined lineage-specific gene inactivation and genetic screening revealed extensive redundancies between previously identified cell-cycle inhibitors and the SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complex. Muscle precursor cells missing either SWI/SNF or G1/S inhibitor function could still arrest cell division, while simultaneous inactivation of these regulators caused continued proliferation and a C. elegans tumor phenotype. Further genetic analyses support that SWI/SNF acts in concert with hlh-1 MyoD, antagonizes Polycomb-mediated transcriptional repression, and suppresses cye-1 Cyclin E transcription to arrest cell division of muscle precursors. Thus, SWI/SNF and G1/S inhibitors provide alternative mechanisms to arrest cell-cycle progression during terminal differentiation, which offers insight into the frequent mutation of SWI/SNF genes in human cancers.

  5. TEAD4-YAP interaction regulates tumoral growth by controlling cell-cycle arrest at the G1 phase.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Shin; Kasamatsu, Atsushi; Yamatoji, Masanobu; Nakashima, Dai; Endo-Sakamoto, Yosuke; Koide, Nao; Takahara, Toshikazu; Shimizu, Toshihiro; Iyoda, Manabu; Ogawara, Katsunori; Shiiba, Masashi; Tanzawa, Hideki; Uzawa, Katsuhiro

    2017-04-29

    TEA domain transcription factor 4 (TEAD4), which has critical functions in the process of embryonic development, is expressed in various cancers. However, the important role of TEAD4 in human oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCCs) remain unclear. Here we investigated the TEAD4 expression level and the functional mechanism in OSCC using quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, Western blot analysis, and immunohistochemistry. Furthermore, TEAD4 knockdown model was used to evaluate cellular proliferation, cell-cycle analysis, and the interaction between TEAD4 and Yes-associated protein (YAP) which was reported to be a transcription coactivator of cellular proliferation. In the current study, we found that TEAD4 expression increased significantly in vitro and in vivo and correlated with tumoral size in OSCC patients. TEAD4 knockdown OSCC cells showed decreased cellular proliferation resulting from cell-cycle arrest in the G1 phase by down-regulation of cyclins, cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), and up-regulation of CDK inhibitors. We also found that the TEAD4-YAP complex in the nuclei may be related closely to transcriptions of G1 arrest-related genes. Taken together, we concluded that TEAD4 might play an important role in tumoral growth and have potential to be a therapeutic target in OSCCs.

  6. Non-sirtuin histone deacetylases in the control of cardiac aging.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Bradley S; McKinsey, Timothy A

    2015-06-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) catalyze the removal of acetyl-groups from lysine residues within nucelosomal histone tails and thousands of non-histone proteins. The 18 mammalian HDACs are grouped into four classes. Classes I, II and IV HDACs employ zinc as a co-factor for catalytic activity, while class III HDACs (also known as sirtuins) require NAD+ for enzymatic function. Small molecule inhibitors of zinc-dependent HDACs are efficacious in multiple pre-clinical models of pressure overload and ischemic cardiomyopathy, reducing pathological hypertrophy and fibrosis, and improving contractile function. Emerging data have revealed numerous mechanisms by which HDAC inhibitors benefit the heart, including suppression of oxidative stress and inflammation, inhibition of MAP kinase signaling, and enhancement of cardiac protein aggregate clearance and autophagic flux. Here, we summarize recent findings with zinc-dependent HDACs and HDAC inhibitors in the heart, focusing on newly described functions for distinct HDAC isoforms (e.g. HDAC2, HDAC3 and HDAC6). Potential for pharmacological HDAC inhibition as a means of treating age-related cardiac dysfunction is also discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: CV Aging.

  7. Histone deacetylase enzymes as drug targets for the control of the sheep blowfly, Lucilia cuprina

    PubMed Central

    Kotze, Andrew C.; Hines, Barney M.; Bagnall, Neil H.; Anstead, Clare A.; Gupta, Praveer; Reid, Robert C.; Ruffell, Angela P.; Fairlie, David P.

    2015-01-01

    The Australian sheep blowfly, Lucilia cuprina, is an ecto-parasite that causes significant economic losses in the sheep industry. Emerging resistance to insecticides used to protect sheep from this parasite is driving the search for new drugs that act via different mechanisms. Inhibitors of histone deacetylases (HDACs), enzymes essential for regulating eukaryotic gene transcription, are prospective new insecticides based on their capacity to kill human parasites. The blowfly genome was found here to contain five HDAC genes corresponding to human HDACs 1, 3, 4, 6 and 11. The catalytic domains of blowfly HDACs 1 and 3 have high sequence identity with corresponding human and other Dipteran insect HDACs (Musca domestica and Drosophila melanogaster). On the other hand, HDACs 4, 6 and 11 from the blowfly and the other Dipteran species showed up to 53% difference in catalytic domain amino acids from corresponding human sequences, suggesting the possibility of developing HDAC inhibitors specific for insects as desired for a commercial insecticide. Differences in transcription patterns for different blowfly HDACs through the life cycle, and between the sexes of adult flies, suggest different functions in regulating gene transcription within this organism and possibly different vulnerabilities. Data that supports HDACs as possible new insecticide targets is the finding that trichostatin A and suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid retarded growth of early instar blowfly larvae in vitro, and reduced the pupation rate. Trichostatin A was 8-fold less potent than the commercial insecticide cyromazine in inhibiting larval growth. Our results support further development of inhibitors of blowfly HDACs with selectivity over human and other mammalian HDACs as a new class of prospective insecticides for sheep blowfly. PMID:27120067

  8. The Hos2 Histone Deacetylase Controls Ustilago maydis Virulence through Direct Regulation of Mating-Type Genes

    PubMed Central

    Elías-Villalobos, Alberto; Fernández-Álvarez, Alfonso; Moreno-Sánchez, Ismael; Helmlinger, Dominique; Ibeas, José I.

    2015-01-01

    Morphological changes are critical for host colonisation in plant pathogenic fungi. These changes occur at specific stages of their pathogenic cycle in response to environmental signals and are mediated by transcription factors, which act as master regulators. Histone deacetylases (HDACs) play crucial roles in regulating gene expression, for example by locally modulating the accessibility of chromatin to transcriptional regulators. It has been reported that HDACs play important roles in the virulence of plant fungi. However, the specific environment-sensing pathways that control fungal virulence via HDACs remain poorly characterised. Here we address this question using the maize pathogen Ustilago maydis. We find that the HDAC Hos2 is required for the dimorphic switch and pathogenic development in U. maydis. The deletion of hos2 abolishes the cAMP-dependent expression of mating type genes. Moreover, ChIP experiments detect Hos2 binding to the gene bodies of mating-type genes, which increases in proportion to their expression level following cAMP addition. These observations suggest that Hos2 acts as a downstream component of the cAMP-PKA pathway to control the expression of mating-type genes. Interestingly, we found that Clr3, another HDAC present in U. maydis, also contributes to the cAMP-dependent regulation of mating-type gene expression, demonstrating that Hos2 is not the only HDAC involved in this control system. Overall, our results provide new insights into the role of HDACs in fungal phytopathogenesis. PMID:26317403

  9. Geothermal district G1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-12-01

    Geothermal District G1 includes 37 northeastern California counties and six geothermal fields: Lake City, Susanville, Litchfield, Wendel, Amedee, and Casa Diablo. Electrical generation from geothermal resources occurs in three of the fields: Wendel, Amedee, and Casa Diablo. Low-temperature geothermal projects are underway throughout the district and are described in a road log format. The ten projects described are located at Big Bend, Glass Mountain, Bieber, Alturas, Cedarville, Lake City, Honey Lake Valley, Greenville, and in Sierra and Mono Counties.

  10. The histone deacetylase HDA19 controls root cell elongation and modulates a subset of phosphate starvation responses in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chun-Ying; Wu, Keqiang; Schmidt, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    The length of root epidermal cells and their patterning into files of hair-bearing and non-hair cells are genetically determined but respond with high plasticity to environmental cues. Limited phyto-availability of the essential mineral nutrient phosphate (Pi) increases the number of root hairs by longitudinal shortening of epidermal cells and by reprogramming the fate of cells in positions normally occupied by non-hair cells. Through analysis of the root morphology and transcriptional profiles from transgenic Arabidopsis lines with altered expression of the histone deacetylase HDA19, we show that in an intricate interplay of Pi availability and intrinsic factors, HDA19 controls the epidermal cell length, probably by altering the positional bias that dictates epidermal patterning. In addition, HDA19 regulates several Pi-responsive genes that encode proteins with important regulatory or metabolic roles in the acclimation to Pi deficiency. In particular, HDA19 affects genes encoding SPX (SYG1/Pho81/XPR) domain-containing proteins and genes involved in membrane lipid remodeling, a key response to Pi starvation that increases the free Pi in plants. Our data add a novel, non-transcriptionally regulated component of the Pi signaling network and emphasize the importance of reversible post-translational histone modification for the integration of external signals into intrinsic developmental and metabolic programs. PMID:26508133

  11. Production of stable bispecific IgG1 by controlled Fab-arm exchange: scalability from bench to large-scale manufacturing by application of standard approaches.

    PubMed

    Gramer, Michael J; van den Bremer, Ewald T J; van Kampen, Muriel D; Kundu, Amitava; Kopfmann, Peter; Etter, Eric; Stinehelfer, David; Long, Justin; Lannom, Tom; Noordergraaf, Esther H; Gerritsen, Jolanda; Labrijn, Aran F; Schuurman, Janine; van Berkel, Patrick H C; Parren, Paul W H I

    2013-01-01

    The manufacturing of bispecific antibodies can be challenging for a variety of reasons. For example, protein expression problems, stability issues, or the use of non-standard approaches for manufacturing can result in poor yield or poor facility fit. In this paper, we demonstrate the use of standard antibody platforms for large-scale manufacturing of bispecific IgG1 by controlled Fab-arm exchange. Two parental antibodies that each contain a single matched point mutation in the CH3 region were separately expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells and manufactured at 1000 L scale using a platform fed-batch and purification process that was designed for standard antibody production. The bispecific antibody was generated by mixing the two parental molecules under controlled reducing conditions, resulting in efficient Fab-arm exchange of>95% at kg scale. The reductant was removed via diafiltration, resulting in spontaneous reoxidation of interchain disulfide bonds. Aside from the bispecific nature of the molecule, extensive characterization demonstrated that the IgG1 structural integrity was maintained, including function and stability. These results demonstrate the suitability of this bispecific IgG1 format for commercial-scale manufacturing using standard antibody manufacturing techniques.

  12. Chitin deacetylases: properties and applications.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yong; Park, Ro-Dong; Muzzarelli, Riccardo A A

    2010-01-14

    Chitin deacetylases, occurring in marine bacteria, several fungi and a few insects, catalyze the deacetylation of chitin, a structural biopolymer found in countless forms of marine life, fungal cell and spore walls as well as insect cuticle and peritrophic matrices. The deacetylases recognize a sequence of four GlcNAc units in the substrate, one of which undergoes deacetylation: the resulting chitosan has a more regular deacetylation pattern than a chitosan treated with hot NaOH. Nevertheless plain chitin is a poor substrate, but glycolated, reprecipitated or depolymerized chitins are good ones. The marine Vibrio sp. colonize the chitin particles and decompose the chitin thanks to the concerted action of chitinases and deacetylases, otherwise they could not tolerate chitosan, a recognized antibacterial biopolymer. In fact, chitosan is used to prevent infections in fishes and crustaceans. Considering that chitin deacetylases play very important roles in the biological attack and defense systems, they may find applications for the biological control of fungal plant pathogens or insect pests in agriculture and for the biocontrol of opportunistic fungal human pathogens.

  13. Ablation of the Retinoblastoma gene family deregulates G1 control causing immortalization and increased cell turnover under growth-restricting conditions

    PubMed Central

    Dannenberg, Jan-Hermen; van Rossum, Agnes; Schuijff, Leontine; te Riele, Hein

    2000-01-01

    The retinoblastoma suppressor pRB belongs to the family of so-called pocket proteins, which also includes p107 and p130. These proteins may functionally overlap in cell cycle control and tumor suppression. We have generated an isogenic set of embryonic stem (ES) cell lines carrying single or compound loss-of-function mutations in the Rb gene family, including a cell line completely devoid of all three pocket proteins. None of the knockout combinations affected the growth characteristics of ES cells; however, concomitant ablation of all three pocket proteins strongly impaired their differentiation capacity. For the generated genotypes, primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) also were obtained. While inactivation of Rb alone did not alleviate the senescence response of MEFs, pRB/p107-deficient MEFs, after having adapted to in vitro culturing, continued to proliferate at modest rate. Additional ablation of p130 rendered MEFs completely insensitive to senescence-inducing signals and strongly increased their proliferation rate. Although triple-knockout MEFs retained anchorage dependence, they lacked proper G1 control and showed increased cell turnover under growth-inhibiting conditions. PMID:11114893

  14. Chitin deacetylase product inhibition.

    PubMed

    Jaworska, Malgorzata M

    2011-02-01

    Chitin deacetylase is the only known enzyme catalyzing the hydrolysis of the acetamino linkage in the N-acetylglucosamine units of chitin and chitosan. This reaction can play an important role in enzymatic production of chitosan from chitin, or in enzymatic modification of chitosan, which has applications in medicine, pharmacy or plant protection. It was previously shown that acetic acid, a product of the deacetylation process, may act as an inhibitor of chitin deacetylase. Here we show the mechanism of inhibition of chitin deacetylase isolated from Absidia orchidis vel coerulea by acetic acid released during the deacetylation process. The process follows competitive inhibition with respect to acetic acid with an inhibition constant of K(i) = 0.286 mmol/L. These results will help to find the optimal system to carry out the enzymatic deacetylation process for industrial applications.

  15. Arabidopsis seed germination speed is controlled by SNL histone deacetylase-binding factor-mediated regulation of AUX1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhi; Chen, Fengying; Li, Xiaoying; Cao, Hong; Ding, Meng; Zhang, Cun; Zuo, Jinghong; Xu, Chaonan; Xu, Jimei; Deng, Xin; Xiang, Yong; Soppe, Wim J. J.; Liu, Yongxiu

    2016-01-01

    Histone acetylation is known to affect the speed of seed germination, but the molecular regulatory basis of this remains ambiguous. Here we report that loss of function of two histone deacetylase-binding factors, SWI-INDEPENDENT3 (SIN3)-LIKE1 (SNL1) and SNL2, results in accelerated radicle protrusion and growth during seed germination. AUXIN RESISTANT 1 (AUX1) is identified as a key factor in this process, enhancing germination speed downstream of SNL1 and SNL2. AUX1 expression and histone H3 acetylation at lysines 9 and 18 is regulated by SNL1 and SNL2. The D-type cyclins encoding genes CYCD1;1 and CYCD4;1 display increased expression in AUX1 over-expression lines and the snl1snl2 double mutant. Accordingly, knockout of CYCD4;1 reduces seed germination speed of AUX1 over-expression lines and snl1snl2 suggesting the importance of cell cycling for radicle protrusion during seed germination. Together, our work identifies AUX1 as a link between histone acetylation mediated by SNL1 and SNL2, and radicle growth promoted by CYCD1;1 and CYCD4;1 during seed germination. PMID:27834370

  16. Valproic Acid, a Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor, in Combination with Paclitaxel for Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer: Results of a Multicenter Randomized Controlled Phase II/III Trial

    PubMed Central

    Pugliese, Mariateresa; Gallo, Marco; Brignardello, Enrico; Milla, Paola; Orlandi, Fabio; Limone, Paolo Piero; Arvat, Emanuela; Boccuzzi, Giuseppe; Piovesan, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) has a median survival less than 5 months and, to date, no effective therapy exists. Taxanes have recently been stated as the main drug treatment for ATC, and the histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid efficiently potentiates the effects of paclitaxel in vitro. Based on these data, this trial assessed the efficacy and safety of the combination of paclitaxel and valproic acid for the treatment of ATC. This was a randomized, controlled phase II/III trial, performed on 25 ATC patients across 5 centers in northwest Italy. The experimental arm received the combination of paclitaxel (80 mg/m2/weekly) and valproic acid (1,000 mg/day); the control arm received paclitaxel alone. Overall survival and disease progression, evaluated in terms of progression-free survival, were the primary outcomes. The secondary outcome was the pharmacokinetics of paclitaxel. The coadministration of valproic acid did not influence the pharmacokinetics of paclitaxel. Neither median survival nor median time to progression was statistically different in the two arms. Median survival of operated-on patients was significantly better than that of patients who were not operated on. The present trial demonstrates that the addition of valproic acid to paclitaxel has no effect on overall survival and disease progression of ATC patients. This trial is registered with EudraCT 2008-005221-11. PMID:27766105

  17. Histone Deacetylases 6 and 9 and Sirtuin-1 Control Foxp3+ Regulatory T Cell Function Through Shared and Isotype-Specific Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Beier, Ulf H.; Wang, Liqing; Han, Rongxiang; Akimova, Tatiana; Liu, Yujie; Hancock, Wayne W.

    2013-01-01

    Therapeutic targeting of histone/protein deacetylase 6 (HDAC6), HDAC9, or the sirtuin-1 (Sirt1) augments the suppressive functions of regulatory T cells (Tregs) that contain the transcription factor Foxp3. However, it is unclear whether distinct mechanisms are involved or whether combined inhibition of these targets would be more beneficial. We compared the suppressive functions of Tregs from wild-type C57BL/6 mice with those from mice with either global (HDAC6−/−, HDAC9−/−, and HDAC6−/−HDAC9−/−), or conditional (fl-Sirt1/CD4-Cre or fl-Sirt1/Foxp3-Cre) HDAC deletion, as well as treatment with isoform-selective HDAC inhibitors. We found that the heat shock response was important for the improvement of Treg suppressive function mediated by HDAC6 inhibition, but not Sirt1 inhibition. Furthermore, although HDAC6, HDAC9, and Sirt1 all deacetylated Foxp3, each protein had diverse effects on transcription factors controlling Foxp3 gene expression. For example, loss of HDAC9 was associated with stabilization of the acetylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) and of its transcriptional activity. Hence, targeting different HDACs increased Treg function by multiple and additive mechanisms, which indicates the therapeutic potential for combinations of HDAC inhibitors in the management of autoimmunity and organ transplantation. PMID:22715468

  18. Histone Deacetylases and Cardiometabolic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Yiew, Kan Hui; Chatterjee, Tapan K.; Hui, David Y.; Weintraub, Neal L.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiometabolic disease, emerging as a worldwide epidemic, is a combination of metabolic derangements leading to type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Genetic and environmental factors are linked through epigenetic mechanisms to the pathogenesis of cardiometabolic disease. Post-translational modifications of histone tails, including acetylation and deacetylation, epigenetically alter chromatin structure and dictate cell-specific gene expression patterns. The histone deacetylase (HDAC) family is comprised of 18 members that regulate gene expression by altering the acetylation status of nucleosomal histones and by functioning as nuclear transcriptional co-repressors. HDACs regulate key aspects of metabolism, inflammation, and vascular function pertinent to cardiometabolic disease in a cell- and tissue-specific manner. HDACs also likely play a role in the “metabolic memory” of diabetes, an important clinical aspect of the disease. Understanding the molecular, cellular, and physiological functions of HDACs in cardiometabolic disease is expected to provide insight into disease pathogenesis, risk factor control, and therapeutic development. PMID:26183616

  19. Histone deacetylases and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xia-xia; Zhou, Tian; Wang, Xin-An; Tong, Xiao-hong; Ding, Jia-wang

    2015-06-01

    Atherosclerosis is the most common pathological process that leads to cardiovascular diseases, a disease of large- and medium-sized arteries that is characterized by a formation of atherosclerotic plaques consisting of necrotic cores, calcified regions, accumulated modified lipids, smooth muscle cells (SMCs), endothelial cells, leukocytes, and foam cells. Recently, the question about how to suppress the occurrence of atherosclerosis and alleviate the progress of cardiovascular disease becomes the hot topic. Accumulating evidence suggests that histone deacetylases(HDACs) play crucial roles in arteriosclerosis. This review summarizes the effect of HDACs and HDAC inhibitors(HDACi) on the progress of atherosclerosis.

  20. Role of RhoA, mDia, and ROCK in cell shape-dependent control of the Skp2-p27kip1 pathway and the G1/S transition.

    PubMed

    Mammoto, Akiko; Huang, Sui; Moore, Kimberly; Oh, Philmo; Ingber, Donald E

    2004-06-18

    Cell shape-dependent control of cell-cycle progression underlies the spatial differentials of growth that drive tissue morphogenesis, yet little is known about how cell distortion impacts the biochemical signaling machinery that is responsible for growth control. Here we show that the Rho family GTPase, RhoA, conveys the "cell shape signal" to the cell-cycle machinery in human capillary endothelial cells. Cells accumulating p27(kip1) and arrested in mid G(1) phase when spreading were inhibited by restricted extracellular matrix adhesion, whereas constitutively active RhoA increased expression of the F-box protein Skp2 required for ubiquitination-dependent degradation of p27(kip1) and restored G(1) progression in these cells. Studies with dominant-negative and constitutively active forms of mDia1, a downstream effector of RhoA, and with a pharmacological inhibitor of ROCK, another RhoA target, revealed that RhoA promoted G(1) progression by altering the balance of activities between these two downstream effectors. These data indicate that signaling proteins such as mDia1 and ROCK, which are thought to be involved primarily in cytoskeletal remodeling, also mediate cell growth regulation by coupling cell shape to the cell-cycle machinery at the level of signal transduction.

  1. The extracellular constitutive production of chitin deacetylase in Metarhizium anisopliae: possible edge to entomopathogenic fungi in the biological control of insect pests.

    PubMed

    Nahar, Pallavi; Ghormade, Vandana; Deshpande, Mukund V

    2004-02-01

    The possible contribution of extracellular constitutively produced chitin deacetylase by Metarhizium anisopliae in the process of insect pathogenesis has been evaluated. Chitin deacetylase converts chitin, a beta-1,4-linked N-acetylglucosamine polymer, into its deacetylated form chitosan, a glucosamine polymer. When grown in a yeast extract-peptone medium, M. anisopliae constitutively produced the enzymes protease, lipase, and two chitin-metabolizing enzymes, viz. chitin deacetylase (CDA) and chitosanase. Chitinase activity was induced in chitin-containing medium. Staining of 7.5% native polyacrylamide gels at pH 8.9 revealed CDA activity in three bands. SDS-PAGE showed that the apparent molecular masses of the three isoforms were 70, 37, and 26 kDa, respectively. Solubilized melanin (10microg) inhibited chitinase activity, whereas CDA was unaffected. Following germination of M. anisopliae conidia on isolated Helicoverpa armigera, cuticle revealed the presence of chitosan by staining with 3-methyl-2-benzothiazoline hydrazone. Blue patches of chitosan were observed on cuticle, indicating conversion of chitin to chitosan. Hydrolysis of chitin with constitutively produced enzymes of M. anisopliae suggested that CDA along with chitosanase contributed significantly to chitin hydrolysis. Thus, chitin deacetylase was important in initiating pathogenesis of M. anisopliae softening the insect cuticle to aid mycelial penetration. Evaluation of CDA and chitinase activities in other isolates of Metarhizium showed that those strains had low chitinase activity but high CDA activity. Chemical assays of M. anisopliae cell wall composition revealed the presence of chitosan. CDA may have a dual role in modifying the insect cuticular chitin for easy penetration as well as for altering its own cell walls for defense from insect chitinase.

  2. Butyrate Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Boosalis, Michael S.; Perrine, Susan P.; Sangerman, José

    2012-01-01

    Abstract In addition to being a part of the metabolic fatty acid fuel cycle, butyrate is also capable of inducing growth arrest in a variety of normal cell types and senescence-like phenotypes in gynecological cancer cells, inhibiting DNA synthesis and cell growth in colonic tumor cell lines, suppressing hTERT mRNA expression and telomerase activity in human prostate cancer cells, and inducing stem cell differentiation and apoptosis by DNA fragmentation. It regulates gene expression by inhibiting histone deacetylases (HDACs), enhances memory recovery and formation in mice, stimulates neurogenesis in the ischemic brain, promotes osteoblast formation, selectively blocks cell replication in transformed cells (compared to healthy cells), and can prevent and treat diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance in mouse models of obesity, as well as stimulate fetal hemoglobin expression in individuals with hematologic diseases such as the thalassemias and sickle-cell disease, in addition to a multitude of other biochemical effects in vivo. However, efforts to exploit the potential of butyrate in the clinical treatment of cancer and other medical disorders are thwarted by its poor pharmacological properties (short half-life and first-pass hepatic clearance) and the multigram doses needed to achieve therapeutic concentrations in vivo. Herein, we review some of the methods used to overcome these difficulties with an emphasis on HDAC inhibition. PMID:23514803

  3. Saccharomyces cerevisiae TORC1 Controls Histone Acetylation by Signaling Through the Sit4/PP6 Phosphatase to Regulate Sirtuin Deacetylase Nuclear Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Workman, Jason J.; Chen, Hongfeng; Laribee, R. Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    The epigenome responds to changes in the extracellular environment, yet how this information is transmitted to the epigenetic regulatory machinery is unclear. Using a Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast model, we demonstrate that target of rapamycin complex 1 (TORC1) signaling, which is activated by nitrogen metabolism and amino acid availability, promotes site-specific acetylation of histone H3 and H4 N-terminal tails by opposing the activity of the sirtuin deacetylases Hst3 and Hst4. TORC1 does so through suppression of the Tap42-regulated Sit4 (PP6) phosphatase complex, as sit4Δ rescues histone acetylation under TORC1-repressive conditions. We further demonstrate that TORC1 inhibition, and subsequent PP6 activation, causes a selective, rapid, nuclear accumulation of Hst4, which correlates with decreased histone acetylation. This increased Hst4 nuclear localization precedes an elevation in Hst4 protein expression, which is attributed to reduced protein turnover, suggesting that nutrient signaling through TORC1 may limit Hst4 nuclear accumulation to facilitate Hst4 degradation and maintain histone acetylation. This pathway is functionally relevant to TORC1 signaling since the stress sensitivity of a nonessential TORC1 mutant (tco89Δ) to hydroxyurea and arsenic can be reversed by combining tco89Δ with either hst3Δ, hst4Δ, or sit4Δ. Surprisingly, while hst3Δ or hst4Δ rescues the sensitivity tco89Δ has to low concentrations of the TORC1 inhibitor rapamycin, sit4Δ fails to do so. These results suggest Sit4 provides an additional function necessary for TORC1-dependent cell growth and proliferation. Collectively, this study defines a novel mechanism by which TORC1 suppresses a PP6-regulated sirtuin deacetylase pathway to couple nutrient signaling to epigenetic regulation. PMID:27343235

  4. Knockdown of selenocysteine-specific elongation factor in Amblyomma maculatum alters the pathogen burden of Rickettsia parkeri with epigenetic control by the Sin3 histone deacetylase corepressor complex.

    PubMed

    Adamson, Steven W; Browning, Rebecca E; Budachetri, Khemraj; Ribeiro, José M C; Karim, Shahid

    2013-01-01

    Selenocysteine is the 21st naturally-occurring amino acid. Selenoproteins have diverse functions and many remain uncharacterized, but they are typically associated with antioxidant activity. The incorporation of selenocysteine into the nascent polypeptide chain recodes the TGA stop codon and this process depends upon a number of essential factors including the selenocysteine elongation factor (SEF). The transcriptional expression of SEF did not change significantly in tick midguts throughout the blood meal, but decreased in salivary glands to 20% at the end of the fast feeding phase. Since selenoprotein translation requires this specialized elongation factor, we targeted this gene for knockdown by RNAi to gain a global view of the role selenoproteins play in tick physiology. We found no significant differences in tick engorgement and embryogenesis but detected no antioxidant capacity in tick saliva. The transcriptional profile of selenoproteins in R. parkeri-infected Amblyomma maculatum revealed declined activity of selenoprotein M and catalase and increased activity of selenoprotein O, selenoprotein S, and selenoprotein T. Furthermore, the pathogen burden was significantly altered in SEF-knockdowns. We then determined the global impact of SEF-knockdown by RNA-seq, and mapped huge shifts in secretory gene expression that could be the result of downregulation of the Sin3 histone deacetylase corepressor complex.

  5. Knockdown of Selenocysteine-Specific Elongation Factor in Amblyomma maculatum Alters the Pathogen Burden of Rickettsia parkeri with Epigenetic Control by the Sin3 Histone Deacetylase Corepressor Complex

    PubMed Central

    Adamson, Steven W.; Browning, Rebecca E.; Budachetri, Khemraj; Ribeiro, José M. C.; Karim, Shahid

    2013-01-01

    Selenocysteine is the 21st naturally-occurring amino acid. Selenoproteins have diverse functions and many remain uncharacterized, but they are typically associated with antioxidant activity. The incorporation of selenocysteine into the nascent polypeptide chain recodes the TGA stop codon and this process depends upon a number of essential factors including the selenocysteine elongation factor (SEF). The transcriptional expression of SEF did not change significantly in tick midguts throughout the blood meal, but decreased in salivary glands to 20% at the end of the fast feeding phase. Since selenoprotein translation requires this specialized elongation factor, we targeted this gene for knockdown by RNAi to gain a global view of the role selenoproteins play in tick physiology. We found no significant differences in tick engorgement and embryogenesis but detected no antioxidant capacity in tick saliva. The transcriptional profile of selenoproteins in R. parkeri-infected Amblyomma maculatum revealed declined activity of selenoprotein M and catalase and increased activity of selenoprotein O, selenoprotein S, and selenoprotein T. Furthermore, the pathogen burden was significantly altered in SEF-knockdowns. We then determined the global impact of SEF-knockdown by RNA-seq, and mapped huge shifts in secretory gene expression that could be the result of downregulation of the Sin3 histone deacetylase corepressor complex. PMID:24282621

  6. Rho-kinase signaling controls nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of class IIa Histone Deacetylase (HDAC7) and transcriptional activation of orphan nuclear receptor NR4A1

    SciTech Connect

    Compagnucci, Claudia; Barresi, Sabina; Petrini, Stefania; Bertini, Enrico; Zanni, Ginevra

    2015-04-03

    Rho-kinase (ROCK) has been well documented to play a key role in RhoA-induced actin remodeling. ROCK activation results in myosin light chain (MLC) phosphorylation either by direct action on MLC kinase (MLCK) or by inhibition of MLC phosphatase (MLCP), modulating actin–myosin contraction. We found that inhibition of the ROCK pathway in induced pluripotent stem cells, leads to nuclear export of HDAC7 and transcriptional activation of the orphan nuclear receptor NR4A1 while in cells with constitutive ROCK hyperactivity due to loss of function of the RhoGTPase activating protein Oligophrenin-1 (OPHN1), the orphan nuclear receptor NR4A1 is downregulated. Our study identify a new target of ROCK signaling via myosin phosphatase subunit (MYPT1) and Histone Deacetylase (HDAC7) at the nuclear level and provide new insights in the cellular functions of ROCK. - Highlights: • ROCK regulates nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of HDAC7 via phosphorylation of MYPT1. • Nuclear export of HDAC7 and upregulation of NR4A1 occurs with low ROCK activity. • High levels of ROCK activity due to OPHN1 loss of function downregulate NR4A1.

  7. Analysis of the interplay between all-trans retinoic acid and histone deacetylase inhibitors in leukemic cells.

    PubMed

    Noack, Katrin; Mahendrarajah, Nisintha; Hennig, Dorle; Schmidt, Luisa; Grebien, Florian; Hildebrand, Dagmar; Christmann, Markus; Kaina, Bernd; Sellmer, Andreas; Mahboobi, Siavosh; Kubatzky, Katharina; Heinzel, Thorsten; Krämer, Oliver H

    2016-11-02

    The treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) with all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) induces granulocytic differentiation. This process renders APL cells resistant to cytotoxic chemotherapies. Epigenetic regulators of the histone deacetylases (HDACs) family, which comprise four classes (I-IV), critically control the development and progression of APL. We set out to clarify the parameters that determine the interaction between ATRA and histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi). Our assays included drugs against class I HDACs (MS-275, VPA, and FK228), pan-HDACi (LBH589, SAHA), and the novel HDAC6-selective compound Marbostat-100. We demonstrate that ATRA protects APL cells from cytotoxic effects of SAHA, MS-275, and Marbostat-100. However, LBH589 and FK228, which have a superior substrate-inhibitor dissociation constant (Ki) for the class I deacetylases HDAC1, 2, 3, are resistant against ATRA-dependent cytoprotective effects. We further show that HDACi evoke DNA damage, measured as induction of phosphorylated histone H2AX and by the comet assay. The ability of ATRA to protect APL cells from the induction of p-H2AX by HDACi is a readout for the cytoprotective effects of ATRA. Moreover, ATRA increases the fraction of cells in the G1 phase, together with an accumulation of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21 and a reduced expression of thymidylate synthase (TdS). In contrast, the ATRA-dependent activation of the transcription factors STAT1, NF-κB, and C/EBP hardly influences the responses of APL cells to HDACi. We conclude that the affinity of HDACi for class I HDACs determines whether such drugs can kill naïve and maturated APL cells.

  8. Properties of the yeast nuclear histone deacetylase.

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez del Pino, M M; Lopez-Rodas, G; Sendra, R; Tordera, V

    1994-01-01

    A nuclear histone deacetylase from yeast was partially purified and some of its characteristics were studied. Histone deacetylase activity was stimulated in vitro by high-mobility-group nonhistone chromatin proteins 1 and 2 and ubiquitin and inhibited by spermine and spermidine, whereas n-butyrate had no significant inhibitory effect. Like the mammalian enzyme, partially purified histone deacetylase from yeast was strongly inhibited by trichostatin A. However, in crude extract preparations the yeast enzyme was not inhibited and treatment with trichostatin in vivo did not show any effect, either on the histone acetylation level or on cell viability. At low ionic strength, the enzyme can be isolated as a complex of high molecular mass that is much less inhibited by trichostatin A than is partially purified histone deacetylase activity. Furthermore, radiolabelled oligonucleosomes were more efficiently deacetylated by the complex than by the low-molecular-mass form of the enzyme. The histone deacetylase activity was separated from a polyamine deacetylase activity and its specificity studied. Using h.p.l.c.-purified core histone species as substrate, histone deacetylase from yeast is able to deacetylate all core histones with a slight preference for H3. Our results support the idea that the yeast histone deacetylase may act as a high-molecular-mass complex in vivo. Images Figure 3 PMID:7980438

  9. Histone deacetylase inhibitor MS-275 augments expression of a subset of IFN-γ-regulated genes in Toxoplasma gondii-infected macrophages but does not improve parasite control.

    PubMed

    Sumpf, Kristina; Nast, Roswitha; Downie, Bryan; Salinas, Gabriela; Lüder, Carsten G K

    2017-02-09

    Toxoplasma gondii is a ubiquitous apicomplexan parasite of mammals and birds and an important pathogen of humans. IFN-γ is the major mediator of host resistance against T. gondii but intriguingly, parasite-infected host cells including macrophages are severely impaired to respond to IFN-γ due to defective transcriptional activation of target genes. Here, we tested the possibility that the impaired responsiveness of T. gondii-infected macrophages to IFN-γ can be restored by inhibiting histone deacetylases (HDACs) using the class I-specific inhibitor MS-275. Treatment of RAW264.7 cells with MS-275 indeed increased MHC class II surface expression in infected and non-infected cells and largely abolished the inhibition of IFN-γ-regulated MHC class II expression exerted by T. gondii. Genome-wide transcriptome profiling revealed that MS-275 increased mean mRNA levels of IFN-γ-regulated genes particularly in non-infected macrophages. Transcript levels of 33% of IFN-γ secondary response genes but only those of a few primary response genes were also increased by MS-275 in T. gondii-infected cells. Importantly, the unresponsiveness of parasite-infected cells to IFN-γ was however not abolished by MS-275. Furthermore, MS-275 also up-regulated several anti-inflammatory cytokines or signaling molecules in T. gondii-infected macrophages. It additionally regulated expression of more than 2500 genes in non-infected macrophages expression of which was surprisingly counteracted by prior infection with T. gondii. FACS analysis and immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that MS-275 did not considerably diminish the number of parasite-positive cells or the intracellular replication in macrophages stimulated or not with IFN-γ. Thus, a supportive therapy using MS-275 appears inappropriate for treatment of toxoplasmosis.

  10. Strategic Cell-Cycle Regulatory Features That Provide Mammalian Cells with Tunable G1 Length and Reversible G1 Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Pfeuty, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    Transitions between consecutive phases of the eukaryotic cell cycle are driven by the catalytic activity of selected sets of cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks). Yet, their occurrence and precise timing is tightly scheduled by a variety of means including Cdk association with inhibitory/adaptor proteins (CKIs). Here we focus on the regulation of G1-phase duration by the end of which cells of multicelled organisms must decide whether to enter S phase or halt, and eventually then, differentiate, senesce or die to obey the homeostatic rules of their host. In mammalian cells, entry in and progression through G1 phase involve sequential phosphorylation and inactivation of the retinoblastoma Rb proteins, first, by cyclin D-Cdk4,6 with the help of CKIs of the Cip/Kip family and, next, by the cyclin E-Cdk2 complexes that are negatively regulated by Cip/Kip proteins. Using a dynamical modeling approach, we show that the very way how the Rb and Cip/Kip regulatory modules interact differentially with cyclin D-Cdk4,6 and cyclin E-Cdk2 provides to mammalian cells a powerful means to achieve an exquisitely-sensitive control of G1-phase duration and fully reversible G1 arrests. Consistently, corruption of either one of these two modules precludes G1 phase elongation and is able to convert G1 arrests from reversible to irreversible. This study unveils fundamental design principles of mammalian G1-phase regulation that are likely to confer to mammalian cells the ability to faithfully control the occurrence and timing of their division process in various conditions. PMID:22558136

  11. Epigenetic targeting of histone deacetylase: therapeutic potential in Parkinson's disease?

    PubMed

    Harrison, Ian F; Dexter, David T

    2013-10-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the most common movement disorder affecting more than 4million people worldwide. The primary motor symptoms of the disease are due to degeneration of dopaminergic nigrostriatal neurons. Dopamine replacement therapies have therefore revolutionised disease management by partially controlling these symptoms. However these drugs can produce debilitating side effects when used long term and do not protect degenerating neurons against death. Recent evidence has highlighted a pathological imbalance in PD between the acetylation and deacetylation of the histone proteins around which deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is coiled, in favour of excessive histone deacetylation. This mechanism of adding/removing acetyl groups to histone lysine residues is one of many epigenetic regulatory processes which control the expression of genes, many of which will be essential for neuronal survival. Hence, such epigenetic modifications may have a pathogenic role in PD. It has therefore been hypothesised that if this pathological imbalance can be corrected with the use of histone deacetylase inhibiting agents then neurodegeneration observed in PD can be ameliorated. This article will review the current literature with regard to epigenetic changes in PD and the use of histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) in PD: examining the evidence of the neuroprotective effects of numerous HDACIs in cellular and animal models of Parkinsonian cell death. Ultimately answering the question: does epigenetic targeting of histone deacetylases hold therapeutic potential in PD?

  12. Nonpeptide Macrocyclic Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Oyelere, Adegboyega K.; Chen, Po C.; Guerrant, William; Mwakwari, Sandra C.; Hood, Rebecca; Zhang, Yunzhe; Fan, Yuhong

    2009-01-01

    Inhibition of Histone Deacetylases inhibitors (HDACi) hold great promise in cancer therapy due to their demonstrated ability to arrest proliferation of nearly all transformed cell types. Of the several structurally distinct small molecules HDACi reported, macrocyclic depsipeptides have the most complex recognition cap-group moieties and present an excellent opportunity for the modulation of the biological activities of HDACi. Unfortunately, the structure–activity relationship (SAR) studies for this class of compounds have been impaired largely because most macrocyclic HDACi known to date are comprised of complex peptide macrocycles. In addition to retaining the pharmacologically disadvantaged peptidyl-backbone, they offer only limited opportunity for side-chain modifications. Here we report the discovery of a new class of macrocyclic HDACi based on the macrolide antibiotics skeletons. SAR studies revealed that these compounds displayed both linker-length and macrolide-type dependent HDAC inhibition activities with IC50 in low nanomolar range. In addition, these nonpeptide macrocyclic HDACi are more selective against HDAC 1 and 2 relative to HDAC 8, another class I HDAC isoform, hence have sub-class HDAC isoform selectivity. PMID:19093884

  13. Charge variants in IgG1

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Sirj; Hutchinson, Ryan; Kwong, Zephania W; Yang, Jihong; Wang, Xiangdan; Yao, Zhenling; Sreedhara, Alavattam; Cano, Tony; Tesar, Devin; Nijem, Ihsan; Allison, David E; Wong, Pin Yee; Kao, Yung-Hsiang; Quan, Cynthia; Joshi, Amita; Harris, Reed J; Motchnik, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Antibody charge variants have gained considerable attention in the biotechnology industry due to their potential influence on stability and biological activity. Subtle differences in the relative proportions of charge variants are often observed during routine biomanufacture or process changes and pose a challenge to demonstrating product comparability. To gain further insights into the impact on biological activity and pharmacokinetics (PK) of monoclonal antibody (mAb) charge heterogeneity, we isolated the major charge forms of a recombinant humanized IgG1 and compared their in vitro properties and in vivo PK. The mAb starting material had a pI range of 8.7–9.1 and was composed of about 20% acidic variants, 12% basic variants and 68% main peak. Cation exchange displacement chromatography was used to isolate the acidic, basic and main peak fractions for animal studies. Detailed analyses were performed on the isolated fractions to identify specific chemical modification contributing to the charge differences and were also characterized for purity and in vitro potency prior to being administered either subcutaneously (SC) or intravenously (IV) in rats. All isolated materials had similar potency and rat FcRn binding relative to the starting material. Following IV or SC administration (10 mg/kg) in rats, no difference in serum PK was observed, indicating that physiochemical modifications and pI differences among charge variants were not sufficient to result in PK changes. Thus, these results provided meaningful information for the comparative evaluation of charge-related heterogeneity of mAbs and suggested that charge variants of IgGs do not affect the in vitro potency, FcRn binding affinity or the PK properties in rats. PMID:20818176

  14. Cloning and expression of two chitin deacetylase genes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Mishra, C; Semino, C E; McCreath, K J; de la Vega, H; Jones, B J; Specht, C A; Robbins, P W

    1997-03-30

    Chitin deacetylase (EC 3.5.1.41), which hydrolyses the N-acetamido groups of N-acetyl-D-glucosamine residues in chitin, has been demonstrated in crude extracts from sporulating Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Two S. cerevisiae open reading frames (ORFs), identified by the Yeast Genome Project, have protein sequence homology to a chitin deacetylase from Mucor rouxii. Northern blot hybridizations show each ORF was transcribed in diploid cells after transfer to sporulation medium and prior to formation of asci. Each ORF was cloned in a vector under transcriptional control of the GAL 1, 10 promoter and introduced back into haploid strains of S. cerevisiae. Chitin deacetylase activity was detected by in vitro assays from vegetative cells grown in galactose. Chemical analysis of these cells also demonstrated the synthesis of chitosam in vivo. Both recombinant chitin deacetylases showed similar qualitative and quantitative activities toward chitooligosaccharides in vitro. A diploid strain deleted to both ORFs, when sporulated, did not show deacetylase activity. The mutant spores were hypersensitive to lytic enzymes (Glusulase or Zymolyase).

  15. Erasers of Histone Acetylation: The Histone Deacetylase Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Seto, Edward; Yoshida, Minoru

    2014-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are enzymes that catalyze the removal of acetyl functional groups from the lysine residues of both histone and nonhistone proteins. In humans, there are 18 HDAC enzymes that use either zinc- or NAD+-dependent mechanisms to deacetylate acetyl lysine substrates. Although removal of histone acetyl epigenetic modification by HDACs regulates chromatin structure and transcription, deacetylation of nonhistones controls diverse cellular processes. HDAC inhibitors are already known potential anticancer agents and show promise for the treatment of many diseases. PMID:24691964

  16. Histone deacetylases in kidney development: implications for disease and therapy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shaowei; El-Dahr, Samir S

    2013-05-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are an evolutionarily conserved group of enzymes that regulate a broad range of biological processes through removal of acetyl groups from histones as well as non-histone proteins. Recent studies using a variety of pharmacological inhibitors and genetic models of HDACs have revealed a central role of HDACs in control of kidney development. These findings provide new insights into the epigenetic mechanisms underlying congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) and implicate the potential of HDACs as therapeutic targets in kidney diseases, such as cystic kidney diseases and renal cell cancers. Determining the specific functions of individual HDAC members would be an important task of future research.

  17. 26 CFR 1.149(g)-1 - Hedge bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hedge bonds. 1.149(g)-1 Section 1.149(g)-1...) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Tax Exemption Requirements for State and Local Bonds § 1.149(g)-1 Hedge bonds... of replacement proceeds (other than amounts in a bona fide debt service fund or a reasonably...

  18. 26 CFR 1.149(g)-1 - Hedge bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hedge bonds. 1.149(g)-1 Section 1.149(g)-1...) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Tax Exemption Requirements for State and Local Bonds § 1.149(g)-1 Hedge bonds... of replacement proceeds (other than amounts in a bona fide debt service fund or a reasonably...

  19. 26 CFR 1.149(g)-1 - Hedge bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hedge bonds. 1.149(g)-1 Section 1.149(g)-1...) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Tax Exemption Requirements for State and Local Bonds § 1.149(g)-1 Hedge bonds... of replacement proceeds (other than amounts in a bona fide debt service fund or a reasonably...

  20. 26 CFR 1.149(g)-1 - Hedge bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hedge bonds. 1.149(g)-1 Section 1.149(g)-1...) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Tax Exemption Requirements for State and Local Bonds § 1.149(g)-1 Hedge bonds... of replacement proceeds (other than amounts in a bona fide debt service fund or a reasonably...

  1. 26 CFR 1.149(g)-1 - Hedge bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hedge bonds. 1.149(g)-1 Section 1.149(g)-1...) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Tax Exemption Requirements for State and Local Bonds § 1.149(g)-1 Hedge bonds... for purposes of section 149(g) and this section. In addition, the following terms have the...

  2. 26 CFR 1.56(g)-1 - Adjusted current earnings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 1 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Adjusted current earnings. 1.56(g)-1 Section 1.56(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY INCOME TAX INCOME TAXES Regulations Applicable to Taxable Years Beginning in 1969 and Ending in 1970 § 1.56(g)-1 Adjusted current earnings. (a) Adjustment for...

  3. Caspase-mediated specific cleavage of human histone deacetylase 4.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fang; Dowling, Melissa; Yang, Xiang-Jiao; Kao, Gary D

    2004-08-13

    Histone deacetylase 4 (HDAC4) is a class II HDAC implicated in controlling gene expression important for diverse cellular functions, but little is known about how its expression and stability are regulated. We report here that this deacetylase is unusually unstable, with a half-life of less than 8 h. Consistent with the instability of HDAC4 protein, its mRNA was also highly unstable (with a half-life of less than 4 h). The degradation of HDAC4 could be accelerated by exposure of cells to ultraviolet irradiation. HDAC4 degradation was not dependent on proteasome or CRM1-mediated export activity but instead was caspase-dependent and was detectable in diverse human cancer lines. Of two potential caspase consensus motifs in HDAC4, both lying within a region containing proline-, glutamic acid-, serine-, and threonine-rich (PEST) sequences, we identified, by site-directed mutagenesis, Asp-289 as the prime cleavage site. Notably, this residue is not conserved among other class IIa members, HDAC5, -7, and -9. Finally, the induced expression of caspase-cleavable HDAC4 led to markedly increased apoptosis. These results therefore unexpectedly link the regulation of HDAC4 protein stability to caspases, enzymes that are important for controlling cell death and differentiation.

  4. Targeting Histone Deacetylases in Diseases: Where Are We?

    PubMed Central

    Benedetti, Rosaria; Conte, Mariarosaria

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Epigenetic inactivation of pivotal genes involved in cell growth is a hallmark of human pathologies, in particular cancer. Histone acetylation balance obtained through opposing actions of histone deacetylases (HDACs) and histone acetyltransferases is one epigenetic mechanism controlling gene expression and is, thus, associated with disease etiology and progression. Interfering pharmacologically with HDAC activity can correct abnormalities in cell proliferation, migration, vascularization, and death. Recent Advances: Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) represent a new class of cytostatic agents that interfere with the function of HDACs and are able to increase gene expression by indirectly inducing histone acetylation. Several HDACi, alone or in combination with DNA-demethylating agents, chemopreventive, or classical chemotherapeutic drugs, are currently being used in clinical trials for solid and hematological malignancies, and are, thus, promising candidates for cancer therapy. Critical Issues: (i) Non-specific (off-target) HDACi effects due to activities unassociated with HDAC inhibition. (ii) Advantages/disadvantages of non-selective or isoform-directed HDACi. (iii) Limited number of response-predictive biomarkers. (iv) Toxicity leading to dysfunction of critical biological processes. Future Directions: Selective HDACi could achieve enhanced clinical utility by reducing or eliminating the serious side effects associated with current first-generation non-selective HDACi. Isoform-selective and pan-HDACi candidates might benefit from the identification of biomarkers, enabling better patient stratification and prediction of response to treatment. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 23, 99–126. PMID:24382114

  5. Most of the G1 period in hamster cells is eliminated by lengthening the S period.

    PubMed Central

    Stancel, G M; Prescott, D M; Liskay, R M

    1981-01-01

    Two Chinese hamster cell lines, G1+-1 and CHO, have been grown in the presence of low concentrations of hydroxyurea to determine how a slowing DNA synthesis (i.e., a lengthening of the S period) affects the length of the G1 period. Hydroxyurea concentrations of approximately 10 microM do not alter the generation times of these cell lines but do cause increases in S with corresponding decreases in G1. In both cell lines, 10 microM hydroxyurea reduces G1 to an absolute value of 1 hr, which represents decreases of 70% (G1+-1) and 60% (CHO) from control values. Higher concentrations of hydroxyurea increase the generation times and lengths of S for both cell lines but do not reduce G1 below the minimum value of 1 hr. These observations indicate that the majority of G1 is expendable and most of G1 therefore cannot contain specific events required for the initiation of DNA synthesis. This result supports the hypothesis that G1 is a portion of the cell growth cycle but not of the chromosome cycle. PMID:6947230

  6. Structure of Prokaryotic Polyamine Deacetylase Reveals Evolutionary Functional Relationships with Eukaryotic Histone Deacetylases

    PubMed Central

    Lombardi, Patrick M.; Angell, Heather D.; Whittington, Douglas A.; Flynn, Erin F.; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Christianson, David W.

    2011-01-01

    Polyamines are a ubiquitous class of polycationic small molecules that can influence gene expression by binding to nucleic acids. Reversible polyamine acetylation regulates nucleic acid binding and is required for normal cell cycle progression and proliferation. Here, we report the structures of Mycoplana ramosa acetylpolyamine amidohydrolase (APAH) complexed with a transition state analogue and a hydroxamate inhibitor, and an inactive mutant complexed with two acetylpolyamine substrates. The structure of APAH is the first of a histone deacetylase-like oligomer and reveals that an 18-residue insert in the L2 loop promotes dimerization and the formation of an 18-Å long “L”-shaped active site tunnel at the dimer interface, accessible only to narrow and flexible substrates. The importance of dimerization for polyamine deacetylase function leads to the suggestion that a comparable dimeric or double-domain histone deacetylase could catalyze polyamine deacetylation reactions in eukaryotes. PMID:21268586

  7. Structure of Prokaryotic Polyamine Deacetylase Reveals Evolutionary Functional Relationships with Eukaryotic Histone Deacetylases

    SciTech Connect

    P Lombardi; H Angell; D Whittington; E Flynn; K Rajashankar; D Christianson

    2011-12-31

    Polyamines are a ubiquitous class of polycationic small molecules that can influence gene expression by binding to nucleic acids. Reversible polyamine acetylation regulates nucleic acid binding and is required for normal cell cycle progression and proliferation. Here, we report the structures of Mycoplana ramosa acetylpolyamine amidohydrolase (APAH) complexed with a transition state analogue and a hydroxamate inhibitor and an inactive mutant complexed with two acetylpolyamine substrates. The structure of APAH is the first of a histone deacetylase-like oligomer and reveals that an 18-residue insert in the L2 loop promotes dimerization and the formation of an 18 {angstrom} long 'L'-shaped active site tunnel at the dimer interface, accessible only to narrow and flexible substrates. The importance of dimerization for polyamine deacetylase function leads to the suggestion that a comparable dimeric or double-domain histone deacetylase could catalyze polyamine deacetylation reactions in eukaryotes.

  8. Inhibitors of Histone Deacetylases for Radiosensitization of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-02-01

    AD Award Number: W81XWH-04-1-0170 TITLE: Inhibitors of Histone Deacetylases for Radiosensitization of Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Mira 0...of Histone Deacetylases for Radiosensitization W81XWH-04-1-0170 of Prostate Cancer 6. AUTHOR(S) Mira 0. Jung, Ph.D. 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZA TION NAME(S...cellular radiation sensitivity. 14. SUBJECT TERMS 15. NUMBER OF PA GES Radiation sensitivity, histone deacetylase , cytotoxicity 13 16. PRICE CODE 17

  9. 26 CFR 301.6503(g)-1 - Suspension pending correction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Suspension pending correction. 301.6503(g)-1... Collection § 301.6503(g)-1 Suspension pending correction. The running of the periods of limitations provided... making correction under section 4963(e)(1)(B)....

  10. 26 CFR 301.6503(g)-1 - Suspension pending correction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Suspension pending correction. 301.6503(g)-1... Collection § 301.6503(g)-1 Suspension pending correction. The running of the periods of limitations provided... making correction under section 4963(e)(1)(B)....

  11. 26 CFR 1.475(g)-1 - Effective dates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Effective dates. 1.475(g)-1 Section 1.475(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED...-customer relationship) applies to taxable years beginning on or after January 1, 1995. (i) (ii) Section...

  12. 26 CFR 1.514(g)-1 - Business lease indebtedness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Business lease indebtedness. 1.514(g)-1 Section... TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Taxation of Business Income of Certain Exempt Organizations § 1.514(g)-1 Business lease indebtedness. (a) Definition. The term business lease indebtedness...

  13. 26 CFR 1.514(g)-1 - Business lease indebtedness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Business lease indebtedness. 1.514(g)-1 Section 1... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Taxation of Business Income of Certain Exempt Organizations § 1.514(g)-1 Business lease indebtedness. (a) Definition. The term business lease indebtedness means, with respect...

  14. Immunoglobulin G1 Fc domain motions: implications for Fc engineering

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Martin; Walker, Ross C.; Lanzilotta, William N.; Prestegard, James H.; Barb, Adam W.

    2014-01-01

    The fragment crystallizable (Fc) region links the key pathogen identification and destruction properties of immunoglobulin G(IgG). Pathogen opsonization positions Fcs to activate pro-inflammatory Fcγ receptors (FcγRs) on immune cells. The cellular response and committal to a damaging, though protective, immune response is tightly controlled at multiple levels. Control mechanisms are diverse and in many cases unclear, but one frequently suggested contribution originates in Fcγ receptor affinity being modulated through shifts in Fc conformational sampling. Here we report a previously unseen IgG1 Fc conformation. This observation motivated an extensive molecular dynamics (MD) investigation of polypeptide and glycan motions that revealed greater amplitude of motion for the N-terminal Cγ2 domains and N-glycan than previously observed. Residues in the Cγ2/Cγ3 interface and disulphide-bonded hinge were identified as influencing the Cγ2 motion. Our results are consistent with a model of Fc that is structurally dynamic. Conformational states that are competent to bind immune-stimulating FcγRs interconverted with Fc conformations distinct from those observed in FcγR complexes, which may represent a transient, nonbinding population. PMID:24522230

  15. Chitin oligosaccharide deacetylase from Shewanella baltica ATCC BAA-1091.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Takako; Shiraishi, Haruka; Ikejima, Masafumi; Uehara, Rie; Hakamata, Wataru; Nishio, Toshiyuki

    2017-03-01

    Chitin oligosaccharide deacetylase (COD) from bacteria that have been examined so far typically comprise two carbohydrate-binding domains (CBDs) and one polysaccharide deacetylase domain. In contrast, Shewanella baltica ATCC BAA-1091 COD (Sb-COD) has only one CBD, yet exhibits chitin-binding properties and substrate specificities similar to those of other CODs.

  16. Histone deacetylases: Targets for antifungal drug development

    PubMed Central

    Kmetzsch, Livia

    2015-01-01

    The interaction of pathogens and its hosts causes a drastic change in the transcriptional landscape in both cells. Among the several mechanisms of gene regulation, transcriptional initiation is probably the main point. In such scenario, the access of transcriptional machinery to promoter is highly regulated by post-translational modification of histones, such as acetylation, phosphorylation and others. Inhibition of histone deacetylases is able to reduce fungal pathogens fitness during infection and, therefore, is currently being considered for the development of new antifungal therapy strategies. PMID:26151486

  17. Bla g 1 allergen levels in Zagreb area household dust.

    PubMed

    Prester, Ljerka; Macan, Jelena

    2011-03-01

    Cockroach allergy is a health problem in many parts of the world. In urban environments, indoor exposure to cockroach allergens involves a risk of asthma. The aim of this study was to measure the mass fraction of Bla g 1, a major allergen of the German cockroach (Blatella germanica) in 30 house samples, collected at random from Zagreb area households, Croatia. Dust samples were collected on cellulose filters by vacuuming living rooms floors. After extraction, Bla g 1 was detected using the commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Only four of the thirty households had detectable Bla g 1 levels, and only in one was its concentration higher than 2.0 U g(-1), the threshold associated with sensitisation. The Bla g 1 ELISA proved highly sensitive, with the detection limit of 0.12 U g(-1). The within- and between-assay imprecision was 8.9 % and 14.4 %, respectively, and accuracy 85 % to 120 %. Low Bla g 1 levels in the household dust support previously reported low prevalence of skin sensitisation to B. germanica among Zagreb residents. Further monitoring should reveal if there are differences in cockroach allergen exposure and sensitisation between households from other geographic areas in Croatia.

  18. Heart failure: the pivotal role of histone deacetylases.

    PubMed

    Hewitson, Ruth; Dargan, James; Collis, David; Green, Aneta; Moorjani, Narain; Ohri, Sunil; Townsend, Paul A

    2013-02-01

    Heart failure, a state in which cardiac output is unable to meet the metabolic demands of the tissues, poses a significant health burden; following an initial hospital admission with heart failure, five-year mortality is close to 50%. Cardiac hypertrophy, characterised by increased cardiomyocyte size and protein synthesis, has deleterious effects when prolonged and contributes to heart failure. Cardiac hypertrophy itself increases risk of morbidity and mortality. Histone deacetylases are chromatin modifiers which deacetylate the N-terminal tails of histones and have been implicated in common cardiac pathologies associated with hypertrophy. There are 18 histone deacetylases separated into four classes. Class I histone deacetylases interact with heat shock proteins and are pro-hypertrophic, class IIa histone deacetylases repress hypertrophy by inhibiting the activity of transcription factors such as myocyte enhancer factor 2. Histone deacetylases present an exciting new target in combating cardiac hypertrophy and progression to heart failure.

  19. The retinoblastoma protein: functions beyond the G1-S regulator.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Chiharu

    2012-12-01

    Retinoblastoma protein (pRB) is functionally inactivated in a large number of tumors including retinoblastoma, osteosarcoma, small-cell lung carcinoma, as well as bladder, breast and prostate cancers. The best known role of pRB in preventing cancer is inhibition of cell cycle progression by controlling the exit from the cell cycle into G0/G1. In addition, increasing evidence has suggested that pRB has important roles in DNA replication during S phase and G2/M transition. The tumor suppressor function of pRB has also been demonstrated by directly promoting differentiation via cell cycle exit with specific gene expression. Inactivation of pRB function during these cell cycle phases leads to dysregulated cell proliferation and/or chromosomal instability, which are strongly linked to cancer development. Thus pRB plays important roles through multiple functions in determining cell fate, i.e., normal growth/death and differentiation, or tumor formation. Therapeutic intervention by reactivation of pRB function would be expected to be an effective treatment against various cancers.

  20. Histone deacetylases play distinct roles in telomeric VSG expression site silencing in African trypanosomes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiao-Ping; Kawahara, Taemi; Horn, David

    2010-09-01

    African trypanosomes evade the host immune response through antigenic variation, which is achieved by periodically expressing different variant surface glycoproteins (VSGs). VSG expression is monoallelic such that only one of approximately 15 telomeric VSG expression sites (ESs) is transcribed at a time. Epigenetic regulation is involved in VSG control but our understanding of the mechanisms involved remains incomplete. Histone deacetylases are potential drug targets for diseases caused by protozoan parasites. Here, using recombinant expression we show that the essential Trypanosoma brucei deacetylases, DAC1 (class I) and DAC3 (class II) display histone deacetylase activity. Both DAC1 and DAC3 are nuclear proteins in the bloodstream stage parasite, while only DAC3 remains concentrated in the nucleus in insect-stage cells. Consistent with developmentally regulated localization, DAC1 antagonizes SIR2rp1-dependent telomeric silencing only in the bloodstream form, indicating a conserved role in the control of silent chromatin domains. In contrast, DAC3 is specifically required for silencing at VSG ES promoters in both bloodstream and insect-stage cells. We conclude that DAC1 and DAC3 play distinct roles in subtelomeric gene silencing and that DAC3 represents the first readily druggable target linked to VSG ES control in the African trypanosome.

  1. Structure of the histone deacetylase SIRT2.

    PubMed

    Finnin, M S; Donigian, J R; Pavletich, N P

    2001-07-01

    Sir2 is an NAD-dependent histone deacetylase that mediates transcriptional silencing at mating-type loci, telomeres and ribosomal gene clusters, and has a critical role in the determination of life span in yeast and Caenorhabditis elegans. The 1.7 A crystal structure of the 323 amino acid catalytic core of human SIRT2, a homolog of yeast Sir2, reveals an NAD-binding domain, which is a variant of the Rossmann fold, and a smaller domain composed of a helical module and a zinc-binding module. A conserved large groove at the interface of the two domains is the likely site of catalysis based on mutagenesis. Intersecting this large groove, there is a pocket formed by the helical module. The pocket is lined with hydrophobic residues conserved within each of the five Sir2 classes, suggesting that it is a class-specific protein-binding site.

  2. The Histone Deacetylase SIRT6 Regulates Glucose Homeostasis via Hif1α

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Lei; D'Urso, Agustina; Toiber, Debra; Sebastian, Carlos; Henry, Ryan E.; Vadysirisack, Douangsone D.; Guimaraes, Alexander; Marinelli, Brett; Wikstrom, Jakob D.; Nir, Tomer; Clish, Clary B.; Vaitheesvaran, Bhavapriya; Iliopoulos, Othon; Kurland, Irwin; Dor, Yuval; Weissleder, Ralph; Shirihai, Orian S.; Ellisen, Leif W.; Espinosa, Joaquin M.; Mostoslavsky, Raul

    2010-01-01

    Summary SIRT6 is a member of a highly conserved family of NAD+-dependent deacetylases with various roles in metabolism, stress resistance and lifespan. SIRT6 deficient mice develop normally but succumb to a lethal hypoglycemia early in life; however, the mechanism underlying this hypoglycemia remained unclear. Here, we demonstrate that SIRT6 functions as a histone H3K9 deacetylase to control the expression of multiple glycolytic genes. Specifically, SIRT6 appears to function as a co-repressor of the transcription factor Hif1α, a critical regulator of nutrient stress responses. Consistent with this notion, SIRT6 deficient cells exhibit increased Hif1α activity and show increased glucose uptake with up-regulation of glycolysis and diminished mitochondrial respiration. Our studies uncover a novel role for the chromatin factor SIRT6 as a master regulator of glucose homeostasis, and may provide the basis for novel therapeutic approaches against metabolic diseases, such as diabetes and obesity. PMID:20141841

  3. 26 CFR 1.514(g)-1 - Business lease indebtedness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Business lease indebtedness. 1.514(g)-1 Section 1... Business lease indebtedness. (a) Definition. The term business lease indebtedness means, with respect to... subsidiary corporations. (b) Examples. The rules of section 514(g) respecting business leases also...

  4. Rapid biodegradation of organophosphorus pesticides by Stenotrophomonas sp. G1.

    PubMed

    Deng, Shuyan; Chen, Yao; Wang, Daosheng; Shi, Taozhong; Wu, Xiangwei; Ma, Xin; Li, Xiangqiong; Hua, Rimao; Tang, Xinyun; Li, Qing X

    2015-10-30

    Organophosphorus insecticides have been widely used, which are highly poisonous and cause serious concerns over food safety and environmental pollution. A bacterial strain being capable of degrading O,O-dialkyl phosphorothioate and O,O-dialkyl phosphate insecticides, designated as G1, was isolated from sludge collected at the drain outlet of a chlorpyrifos manufacture plant. Physiological and biochemical characteristics and 16S rDNA gene sequence analysis suggested that strain G1 belongs to the genus Stenotrophomonas. At an initial concentration of 50 mg/L, strain G1 degraded 100% of methyl parathion, methyl paraoxon, diazinon, and phoxim, 95% of parathion, 63% of chlorpyrifos, 38% of profenofos, and 34% of triazophos in 24 h. Orthogonal experiments showed that the optimum conditions were an inoculum volume of 20% (v/v), a substrate concentration of 50 mg/L, and an incubation temperature in 40 °C. p-Nitrophenol was detected as the metabolite of methyl parathion, for which intracellular methyl parathion hydrolase was responsible. Strain G1 can efficiently degrade eight organophosphorus pesticides (OPs) and is a very excellent candidate for applications in OP pollution remediation.

  5. 26 CFR 1.167(g)-1 - Basis for depreciation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Basis for depreciation. 1.167(g)-1 Section 1.167... for depreciation. The basis upon which the allowance for depreciation is to be computed with respect... property at that time, is the basis for computing depreciation....

  6. IgG1 Is Pathogenic in Leishmania mexicana Infection

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Niansheng; Thomas, Bolaji N.; Patel, Supriya R.; Buxbaum, Laurence U.

    2010-01-01

    There are over 2 million new cases of leishmaniasis annually, and no effective vaccine has been developed to prevent infection. In murine infection, Leishmania mexicana, which lives intracellularly in host macrophages, has developed pathways to hijack host IgG to induce a suppressive IL-10 response through FcγRs, the cell-surface receptors for IgG. To guide vaccine development away from detrimental Ab responses, which can accompany attempts to induce cell-mediated immunity, it is crucial to know which isotypes of IgG are pathogenic in this infection. We have found that IgG1 and IgG2a/c induce IL-10 from macrophages in vitro equally well but through different FcγR subtypes: IgG1 through FcγRIII, and IgG2a/c through FcγRI primarily, but also through FcγRIII. In sharp contrast, mice lacking IgG1 develop earlier and stronger IgG2a/c, IgG3, and IgM responses to L. mexicana infection and yet are more resistant to the infection. Thus, IgG1, but not IgG2a/c or IgG3, is pathogenic in vivo, in agreement with prior studies indicating that FcγRIII is required for chronic disease. This calls into question the assumption that macrophages, which should secrete IL-10 in response to both IgG1 and IgG2a/c immune complexes, are the most important source of IL-10 generated by IgG-FcγR engagement in L. mexicana infection. Further investigations are required to better determine the cell type responsible for this immunosuppressive FcγRIII-induced IL-10 pathway and whether IgG2a/c is protective. PMID:21037092

  7. Characterization and cloning of chitin deacetylases from Rhizopus circinans.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, Carole; Clerisse, Fabienne; Dommes, Jacques; Jaspar-Versali, Marie-France

    2008-05-01

    Chitin deacetylase catalyzes hydrolysis of the acetamido groups of N-acetylglucosamine of chitin in fungal cell walls. Here a chitin deacetylase secreted by Rhizopus circinans was purified to homogeneity and partially characterized. The enzyme exhibits an apparent molecular weight of approximately 75kDa. At 37 degrees C it shows optimal activity at pH 5.5-6. Its pH stability and thermal stability are good. Mn(2+) and Mg(2+) slightly enhance the activity of the enzyme and Cu(2+) strongly inhibits it. An R. circinans cDNA library was constructed and screened with a homologous probe synthesized by RT-PCR or with synthetic primers derived from the N-terminal amino-acid sequence of the native purified chitin deacetylase. Three chitin deacetylase cDNAs (RC, D2, and I3/2) were isolated from the cDNA library and sequenced. These cDNAs exhibit features characteristic of chitin deacetylase sequences: the presence of a polysaccharide deacetylase domain, a metal-binding triad, the conserved catalytic residues, and high homology with various chitin deacetylase genes. The cDNAs were cloned in a Pichia pastoris expression system and produced as polyhistidine-tagged proteins. Only one recombinant enzyme (called RC) was active under the tested conditions. It was purified to homogeneity in a single step and further characterized. The protein showed an apparent molecular mass of approximately 75kDa and, like the native enzyme, showed optimal activity at pH 5.5-6 at 37 degrees C. It was strongly inhibited by Cu(2+). The isolation of several chitin deacetylase cDNAs from the same microorganism is discussed.

  8. Anti-breast cancer effects of histone deacetylase inhibitors and calpain inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Mataga, Megan A; Rosenthal, Shoshana; Heerboth, Sarah; Devalapalli, Amrita; Kokolus, Shannon; Evans, Leah R; Longacre, McKenna; Housman, Genevieve; Sarkar, Sibaji

    2012-07-01

    Development of new breast cancer therapies is needed, particularly as cells become refractory or develop increased drug resistance. In an effort to develop such treatments, class I and II histone deacetylases (HDACs), alone and in combination with other cytotoxic agents, are currently in clinical trial. Herein, we discuss the effects of histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) when used in combination with calpeptin, an inhibitor of the regulatory protease, calpain. We present results of study in two breast cancer cells lines with distinct characteristics: MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7. When used in combination with calpeptin, two chemically distinct HDACi significantly inhibited growth and increased cell death by inducing cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis. MCF-7 cells exhibited a greater proportion of arrest at the G(1) phase, whereas triple-negative MDA-MB-231 cells exhibited increased cell cycle arrest at the S phase. Methylation of the imprinted and silenced proapoptoic tumor suppressor gene aplasia Ras homolog member I (ARHI) was reduced in both cell lines after treatment with HDACi. However, it was only re-expressed on such treatment in MDA-MB-231 cells, suggesting that re-expression operates under differential mechanisms in these two cell lines. Collectively, these results showed that the combination of HDACi and calpeptin inhibited the growth of two distinctly different types of breast cancer cells and could have wide clinical applications, though the mechanisms of inhibition are possibly different.

  9. Human recombinant antimannan immunoglobulin G1 antibody confers resistance to hematogenously disseminated candidiasis in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mason X; Bohlman, M Charlotte; Itatani, Carol; Burton, Dennis R; Parren, Paul W H I; St Jeor, Stephen C; Kozel, Thomas R

    2006-01-01

    Mannan is a major cell wall component found in Candida species. Natural antimannan antibody is present in sera from most normal adults, but its role in host resistance to hematogenously disseminated candidiasis is unknown. The purpose of this study was to develop recombinant human antimannan antibody and to study its protective function. A phage Fab display combinatorial library containing Fab genes from bone marrow lymphocytes was screened with Candida albicans yeast cells and chemically purified mannan. One antimannan Fab, termed M1, was converted to a full-length immunoglobulin G1 antibody, M1g1, and M1g1 was produced in CHO cells. The M1g1 epitope was found in C. albicans serotypes A and B, Candida tropicalis, Candida guilliermondii, Candida glabrata, and Candida parapsilosis. Its expression was active at both 23 degrees C and 37 degrees C and uniform over the cell surface. BALB/c mice passively immunized with M1g1 were more resistant than control mice to a lethal hematogenous infection by C. albicans, as evidenced by extension of survival in an M1g1 dose-dependent manner (P, 0.08 to <0.001) and by reduction in number of infection foci and their size in the kidney. In vitro studies found that M1g1 promoted phagocytosis and phagocytic killing of C. albicans yeast cells by mouse peritoneal macrophages and was required for activation of the mouse complement cascade. Thus, human antimannan antibody may have a protective role in host resistance to systemic candidiasis.

  10. Crack azimuths on Europa: The G1 lineament sequence revisited

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sarid, A.R.; Greenberg, R.; Hoppa, G.V.; Brown, D.M.; Geissler, P.

    2005-01-01

    The tectonic sequence in the anti-jovian area covered by regional mapping images from Galileo's orbit E15 is determined from a study of cross-cutting relationships among lineament features. The sequence is used to test earlier results from orbit G1, based on lower resolution images, which appeared to display a progressive change in azimuthal orientation over about 90?? in a clockwise sense. Such a progression is consistent with expected stress variations that would accompany plausible non-synchronous rotation. The more recent data provide a more complete record than the G1 data did. We find that to fit the sequence into a continual clockwise change of orientation would require at least 1000?? (> 5 cycles) of azimuthal rotation. If due to non-synchronous rotation of Europa, this result implies that we are seeing back further into the tectonic record than the G1 results had suggested. The three sets of orientations found by Geissler et al. now appear to have been spaced out over several cycles, not during a fraction of one cycle. While our more complete sequence of lineament formation is consistent with non-synchronous rotation, a statistical test shows that it cannot be construed as independent evidence. Other lines of evidence do support non-synchronous rotation, but azimuths of crack sequences do not show it, probably because only a couple of cracks form in a given region in any given non-synchronous rotation period. ?? 2004 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Human Hydatid Disease in Peru Is Basically Restricted to Echinococcus granulosus Genotype G1

    PubMed Central

    Santivañez, Saul J.; Gutierrez, Ariana M.; Rosenzvit, Mara C.; Muzulin, Patricia M.; Rodriguez, Mary L.; Vasquez, Julio C.; Rodriguez, Silvia; Gonzalez, Armando E.; Gilman, Robert H.; Garcia, Hector H.

    2009-01-01

    A molecular PCR study using DNA from 21 hydatid cysts was performed to determine which strain type is responsible for human infection in Peru. The mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (CO1) gene was amplified in 20 out of 21 samples, revealing that all but 1 sample (19/20, 95%) belonged to the common sheep strain (G1). The remaining samples belonged to the camel strain (G6). The G1 genotype was most frequently found in human cases of cystic hydatid disease (CHD) in Peru. Local control measures should focus primarily on decreasing dog and sheep infection rather than intermediate reservoirs. PMID:18606769

  12. Enzymatic production of defined chitosan oligomers with a specific pattern of acetylation using a combination of chitin oligosaccharide deacetylases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamer, Stefanie Nicole; Cord-Landwehr, Stefan; Biarnés, Xevi; Planas, Antoni; Waegeman, Hendrik; Moerschbacher, Bruno Maria; Kolkenbrock, Stephan

    2015-03-01

    Chitin and chitosan oligomers have diverse biological activities with potentially valuable applications in fields like medicine, cosmetics, or agriculture. These properties may depend not only on the degrees of polymerization and acetylation, but also on a specific pattern of acetylation (PA) that cannot be controlled when the oligomers are produced by chemical hydrolysis. To determine the influence of the PA on the biological activities, defined chitosan oligomers in sufficient amounts are needed. Chitosan oligomers with specific PA can be produced by enzymatic deacetylation of chitin oligomers, but the diversity is limited by the low number of chitin deacetylases available. We have produced specific chitosan oligomers which are deacetylated at the first two units starting from the non-reducing end by the combined use of two different chitin deacetylases, namely NodB from Rhizobium sp. GRH2 that deacetylates the first unit and COD from Vibrio cholerae that deacetylates the second unit starting from the non-reducing end. Both chitin deacetylases accept the product of each other resulting in production of chitosan oligomers with a novel and defined PA. When extended to further chitin deacetylases, this approach has the potential to yield a large range of novel chitosan oligomers with a fully defined architecture.

  13. Enzymatic production of defined chitosan oligomers with a specific pattern of acetylation using a combination of chitin oligosaccharide deacetylases

    PubMed Central

    Hamer, Stefanie Nicole; Cord-Landwehr, Stefan; Biarnés, Xevi; Planas, Antoni; Waegeman, Hendrik; Moerschbacher, Bruno Maria; Kolkenbrock, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Chitin and chitosan oligomers have diverse biological activities with potentially valuable applications in fields like medicine, cosmetics, or agriculture. These properties may depend not only on the degrees of polymerization and acetylation, but also on a specific pattern of acetylation (PA) that cannot be controlled when the oligomers are produced by chemical hydrolysis. To determine the influence of the PA on the biological activities, defined chitosan oligomers in sufficient amounts are needed. Chitosan oligomers with specific PA can be produced by enzymatic deacetylation of chitin oligomers, but the diversity is limited by the low number of chitin deacetylases available. We have produced specific chitosan oligomers which are deacetylated at the first two units starting from the non-reducing end by the combined use of two different chitin deacetylases, namely NodB from Rhizobium sp. GRH2 that deacetylates the first unit and COD from Vibrio cholerae that deacetylates the second unit starting from the non-reducing end. Both chitin deacetylases accept the product of each other resulting in production of chitosan oligomers with a novel and defined PA. When extended to further chitin deacetylases, this approach has the potential to yield a large range of novel chitosan oligomers with a fully defined architecture. PMID:25732514

  14. Enzymatic production of defined chitosan oligomers with a specific pattern of acetylation using a combination of chitin oligosaccharide deacetylases.

    PubMed

    Hamer, Stefanie Nicole; Cord-Landwehr, Stefan; Biarnés, Xevi; Planas, Antoni; Waegeman, Hendrik; Moerschbacher, Bruno Maria; Kolkenbrock, Stephan

    2015-03-03

    Chitin and chitosan oligomers have diverse biological activities with potentially valuable applications in fields like medicine, cosmetics, or agriculture. These properties may depend not only on the degrees of polymerization and acetylation, but also on a specific pattern of acetylation (PA) that cannot be controlled when the oligomers are produced by chemical hydrolysis. To determine the influence of the PA on the biological activities, defined chitosan oligomers in sufficient amounts are needed. Chitosan oligomers with specific PA can be produced by enzymatic deacetylation of chitin oligomers, but the diversity is limited by the low number of chitin deacetylases available. We have produced specific chitosan oligomers which are deacetylated at the first two units starting from the non-reducing end by the combined use of two different chitin deacetylases, namely NodB from Rhizobium sp. GRH2 that deacetylates the first unit and COD from Vibrio cholerae that deacetylates the second unit starting from the non-reducing end. Both chitin deacetylases accept the product of each other resulting in production of chitosan oligomers with a novel and defined PA. When extended to further chitin deacetylases, this approach has the potential to yield a large range of novel chitosan oligomers with a fully defined architecture.

  15. Autophagy induction by histone deacetylase inhibitors inhibits HIV type 1.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Grant R; Bruckman, Rachel S; Chu, Yen-Lin; Spector, Stephen A

    2015-02-20

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) are being evaluated in a "shock-and-kill" therapeutic approach to reverse human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV) latency from CD4(+) T cells. Using this approach, HDACi have induced HIV RNA synthesis in latently infected cells from some patients. The hope is that the increase in viral production will lead to killing of the infected cell either by the virus itself or by the patient's immune system, a "sterilizing cure." Although administered within the context of combination antiretroviral therapy, the infection of bystander cells remains a concern. In this study, we investigated the effect of HDACi (belinostat, givinostat, panobinostat, romidepsin, and vorinostat) on the productive infection of macrophages. We demonstrate that the HDACi tested do not alter the initial susceptibility of macrophages to HIV infection. However, we demonstrate that HDACi decrease HIV release from macrophages in a dose-dependent manner (belinostat < givinostat < vorinostat < panobinostat < romidepsin) via degradation of intracellular HIV through the canonical autophagy pathway. This mechanism involves unc-51-like autophagy-activating kinase 1 (ULK1) and the inhibition of the mammalian target of rapamycin and requires the formation of autophagosomes and their maturation into autolysosomes in the absence of increased cell death. These data provide further evidence in support of a role for autophagy in the control of HIV infection and suggest that careful consideration of off-target effects will be essential if HDACi are to be a component of a multipronged approach to eliminate latently infected cells.

  16. Inhibition of histone deacetylase as a new mechanism of teratogenesis.

    PubMed

    Menegola, Elena; Di Renzo, Francesca; Broccia, Maria Luisa; Giavini, Erminio

    2006-12-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are nuclear and cytoplasmic enzymes that deacetylate a number of substrates, of which histones are the best known and described in the literature. HDACs are present in eukaryotic and bacteria cells, and are fundamental for a number of cellular functions, including correct gene expression. Surprisingly, only up to 20% of the whole genome is controlled by HDACs, but key processes for survival, proliferation, and differentiation have been strictly linked to HDAC enzyme functioning. The use of HDAC inhibitors (HDACi) has been proposed for the treatment of neoplastic diseases. Their effectiveness has been suggested for a number of liquid and solid tumors, particularly acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). The role of HDACs in embryo development is currently under investigation. Published data indicate knockout phenotype analysis to be of particular interest, in which a number of HDACs play a key role during development. Little data have been published on the effects of HDACi on embryonic development, although for valproic acid (VPA), literature from the 1980s described its teratogenic effects in experimental animals and humans. To date, all tested HDACi have shown teratogenic effects similar to those described for VPA when tested in zebrafish, Xenopus laevis, and mice. HDACs were also able to alter embryo development in invertebrates and plants. A model, similar to that proposed in APL, involving retinoic acid receptors (RAR) and tissue specific Hox gene expression, is suggested to explain the HDAC effects on embryo development.

  17. Histone Deacetylases and Their Inhibition in Candida Species

    PubMed Central

    Garnaud, Cécile; Champleboux, Morgane; Maubon, Danièle; Cornet, Muriel; Govin, Jérôme

    2016-01-01

    Fungi are generally benign members of the human mucosal flora or live as saprophytes in the environment. However, they can become pathogenic, leading to invasive and life threatening infections in vulnerable patients. These invasive fungal infections are regarded as a major public health problem on a similar scale to tuberculosis or malaria. Current treatment for these infections is based on only four available drug classes. This limited therapeutic arsenal and the emergence of drug-resistant strains are a matter of concern due to the growing number of patients to be treated, and new therapeutic strategies are urgently needed. Adaptation of fungi to drug pressure involves transcriptional regulation, in which chromatin dynamics and histone modifications play a major role. Histone deacetylases (HDACs) remove acetyl groups from histones and actively participate in controlling stress responses. HDAC inhibition has been shown to limit fungal development, virulence, biofilm formation, and dissemination in the infected host, while also improving the efficacy of existing antifungal drugs toward Candida spp. In this article, we review the functional roles of HDACs and the biological effects of HDAC inhibitors on Candida spp., highlighting the correlations between their pathogenic effects in vitro and in vivo. We focus on how HDAC inhibitors could be used to treat invasive candidiasis while also reviewing recent developments in their clinical evaluation. PMID:27547205

  18. Hypothalamic leptin action is mediated by histone deacetylase 5

    PubMed Central

    Kabra, Dhiraj G.; Pfuhlmann, Katrin; García-Cáceres, Cristina; Schriever, Sonja C.; Casquero García, Veronica; Kebede, Adam Fiseha; Fuente-Martin, Esther; Trivedi, Chitrang; Heppner, Kristy; Uhlenhaut, N. Henriette; Legutko, Beata; Kabra, Uma D.; Gao, Yuanqing; Yi, Chun-Xia; Quarta, Carmelo; Clemmensen, Christoffer; Finan, Brian; Müller, Timo D.; Meyer, Carola W.; Paez-Pereda, Marcelo; Stemmer, Kerstin; Woods, Stephen C.; Perez-Tilve, Diego; Schneider, Robert; Olson, Eric N.; Tschöp, Matthias H.; Pfluger, Paul T.

    2016-01-01

    Hypothalamic leptin signalling has a key role in food intake and energy-balance control and is often impaired in obese individuals. Here we identify histone deacetylase 5 (HDAC5) as a regulator of leptin signalling and organismal energy balance. Global HDAC5 KO mice have increased food intake and greater diet-induced obesity when fed high-fat diet. Pharmacological and genetic inhibition of HDAC5 activity in the mediobasal hypothalamus increases food intake and modulates pathways implicated in leptin signalling. We show HDAC5 directly regulates STAT3 localization and transcriptional activity via reciprocal STAT3 deacetylation at Lys685 and phosphorylation at Tyr705. In vivo, leptin sensitivity is substantially impaired in HDAC5 loss-of-function mice. Hypothalamic HDAC5 overexpression improves leptin action and partially protects against HFD-induced leptin resistance and obesity. Overall, our data suggest that hypothalamic HDAC5 activity is a regulator of leptin signalling that adapts food intake and body weight to our dietary environment. PMID:26923837

  19. Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs): multitargeted anticancer agents

    PubMed Central

    Ververis, Katherine; Hiong, Alison; Karagiannis, Tom C; Licciardi, Paul V

    2013-01-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are an emerging class of therapeutics with potential as anticancer drugs. The rationale for developing HDAC inhibitors (and other chromatin-modifying agents) as anticancer therapies arose from the understanding that in addition to genetic mutations, epigenetic changes such as dysregulation of HDAC enzymes can alter phenotype and gene expression, disturb homeostasis, and contribute to neoplastic growth. The family of HDAC inhibitors is large and diverse. It includes a range of naturally occurring and synthetic compounds that differ in terms of structure, function, and specificity. HDAC inhibitors have multiple cell type-specific effects in vitro and in vivo, such as growth arrest, cell differentiation, and apoptosis in malignant cells. HDAC inhibitors have the potential to be used as monotherapies or in combination with other anticancer therapies. Currently, there are two HDAC inhibitors that have received approval from the US FDA for the treatment of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma: vorinostat (suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid, Zolinza) and depsipeptide (romidepsin, Istodax). More recently, depsipeptide has also gained FDA approval for the treatment of peripheral T-cell lymphoma. Many more clinical trials assessing the effects of various HDAC inhibitors on hematological and solid malignancies are currently being conducted. Despite the proven anticancer effects of particular HDAC inhibitors against certain cancers, many aspects of HDAC enzymes and HDAC inhibitors are still not fully understood. Increasing our understanding of the effects of HDAC inhibitors, their targets and mechanisms of action will be critical for the advancement of these drugs, especially to facilitate the rational design of HDAC inhibitors that are effective as antineoplastic agents. This review will discuss the use of HDAC inhibitors as multitargeted therapies for malignancy. Further, we outline the pharmacology and mechanisms of action of HDAC inhibitors while

  20. Tau--an inhibitor of deacetylase HDAC6 function.

    PubMed

    Perez, Mar; Santa-Maria, Ismael; Gomez de Barreda, Elena; Zhu, Xiongwei; Cuadros, Raquel; Cabrero, Jose Roman; Sanchez-Madrid, Francisco; Dawson, Hana N; Vitek, Michael P; Perry, George; Smith, Mark A; Avila, Jesus

    2009-06-01

    Analysis of brain microtubule protein from patients with Alzheimer's disease showed decreased alpha tubulin levels along with increased acetylation of the alpha tubulin subunit, mainly in those microtubules from neurons containing neurofibrillary tau pathology. To determine the relationship of tau protein and increased tubulin acetylation, we studied the effect of tau on the acetylation-deacetylation of tubulin. Our results indicate that tau binds to the tubulin-deacetylase, histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6), decreasing its activity with a consequent increase in tubulin acetylation. As expected, increased acetylation was also found in tubulin from wild-type mice compared with tubulin from mice lacking tau because of the tau-mediated inhibition of the deacetylase. In addition, we found that an excess of tau protein, as a HDAC6 inhibitor, prevents induction of autophagy by inhibiting proteasome function.

  1. Suppression of caspase-11 expression by histone deacetylase inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Heo, Hyejung; Yoo, Lang; Shin, Ki Soon; Kang, Shin Jung

    2009-01-02

    It has been well documented that histone deacetylase inhibitors suppress inflammatory gene expression. Therefore, we investigated whether histone deacetylase inhibitors modulate the expression of caspase-11 that is known as an inducible caspase regulating both inflammation and apoptosis. In the present study, we show that sodium butyrate and trichostatin A, two structurally unrelated inhibitors of histone deacetylase (HDAC), effectively suppressed the induction of caspase-11 in mouse embryonic fibroblasts stimulated with lipopolysaccharides. Sodium butyrate inhibited the activation of upstream signaling events for the caspase-11 induction such as activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and c-Jun N-terminal kinase, degradation of inhibitor of {kappa}B, and activation of nuclear factor-{kappa}B. These results suggest that the HDAC inhibitor suppressed cytosolic signaling events for the induction of caspase-11 by inhibiting the deacetylation of non-histone proteins.

  2. ATP6V1G1 — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    ATP6V1G1 is a subunit of vacuolar ATPase (V-ATPase), a multisubunit enzyme. V-ATPase is an enzyme transporter that functions to acidify intracellular compartments in eukaryotic cells. This acidification process is necessary for such intracellular processes as protein sorting, zymogen activation, receptor-mediated endocytosis, and synaptic vesicle proton gradient generation. V-ATPase is ubiquitously expressed and is present in endomembrane organelles such as vacuoles, lysosomes, endosomes, the Golgi apparatus, chromaffin granules and coated vesicles, as well as in the plasma membrane. V-ATPase is composed of a cytosolic V1 domain and a transmembrane V0 domain. The V1 domain consists of three A, three B, and two G subunits, as well as a C, D, E, F, and H subunit. The V1 domain contains the ATP catalytic site.

  3. Production and application of high quality stable isotope-labeled human immunoglobulin G1 for mass spectrometry analysis.

    PubMed

    Phillip, Amsler; Thierry, Wolf; Christian, Lanshoeft; Anja, Bettighofer; Jochen, Eisfeld; Thomas, Moenius; Claudia, Probst; Coralie, Etter; Olivier, Heudi

    2016-12-12

    Here, we describe the production of stable isotope-labeled human immunoglobulin G1 ([(13) C]-hIgG1) using [(13) C]-L-lysine/arginine-labeled hIgG1. The fermentation process was run in shake flasks containing labeled arginine and lysinethat were incorporated into the produced recombinant hIgG1. The [(13) C]-hIgG1 was purified, and label incorporation was determined to be >99% at all lysine and arginine moieties. Sequence coverage was confirmed by peptide mapping. [(13) C]-hIgG1 was then used as an internal standard (IS) for the development of a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method applicable to the quantitative analysis of all human types of hIgG1 in rat serum. Four conserved peptides, namely, GPSVFPLAPSSK, TTPPVLDSDGSFFLYSK, VVSVLTVLHQDWLNGK, and FNWYVDGVEVHNAK, originating from different parts of the fraction crystallizable region of hIgG1, were used for quantitation of hIgG1 in rat serum. The calibration curves with a coefficient of determination (r(2) ) between 0.9950 and 0.9962 resulting from the peak area ratio of each peptide to its respective labeled IS were reproducible. A mean bias within ±20.0% of the nominal values and a precision of ≤20.0 % were obtained for the calibration standards and quality control samples for each peptide. [(13) C]-hIgG1 was shown as a suitable IS for quantitative hIgG1 analysis in preclinical species by LC-MS/MS.

  4. A mechanism for the suppression of homologous recombination in G1 cells

    PubMed Central

    Orthwein, Alexandre; Noordermeer, Sylvie M.; Wilson, Marcus D.; Landry, Sébastien; Enchev, Radoslav I.; Sherker, Alana; Munro, Meagan; Pinder, Jordan; Salsman, Jayme; Dellaire, Graham; Xia, Bing; Peter, Matthias; Durocher, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    DNA repair by homologous recombination (HR)1 is highly suppressed in G1 cells2,3 to ensure that mitotic recombination occurs solely between sister chromatids4. Although many HR factors are cell cycle-regulated, the identity of the events that are both necessary and sufficient to suppress recombination in G1 cells is unknown. Here we report that the cell cycle controls the interaction of BRCA1 with PALB2-BRCA2 in order to constrain BRCA2 function to the S/G2 phases. We found that the BRCA1-interaction site on PALB2 is targeted by an E3 ubiquitin ligase composed of KEAP1, a PALB2-interacting protein5, in complex with CUL3-RBX16. PALB2 ubiquitylation suppresses its interaction with BRCA1 and is counteracted by the deubiquitylase USP11, which is itself under cell cycle control. Restoration of the BRCA1-PALB2 interaction combined with the activation of DNA end resection is sufficient to induce HR in G1, as measured by RAD51 recruitment, unscheduled DNA synthesis and a CRISPR/Cas9-based gene targeting assay. We conclude that the mechanism prohibiting HR in G1 minimally consists of the suppression of DNA end resection coupled to a multi-step block to BRCA2 recruitment to DNA damage sites that involves the inhibition of BRCA1-PALB2-BRCA2 complex assembly. We speculate that the ability to induce HR in G1 cells with defined factors could spur the development of gene targeting applications in non-dividing cells. PMID:26649820

  5. Phosphate-Activated Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Stabilizes G1 Cyclin To Trigger Cell Cycle Entry

    PubMed Central

    Menoyo, S.; Ricco, N.; Bru, S.; Hernández-Ortega, S.; Escoté, X.; Aldea, M.

    2013-01-01

    G1 cyclins, in association with a cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK), are universal activators of the transcriptional G1-S machinery during entry into the cell cycle. Regulation of cyclin degradation is crucial for coordinating progression through the cell cycle, but the mechanisms that modulate cyclin stability to control cell cycle entry are still unknown. Here, we show that a lack of phosphate downregulates Cln3 cyclin and leads to G1 arrest in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The stability of Cln3 protein is diminished in strains with low activity of Pho85, a phosphate-sensing CDK. Cln3 is an in vitro substrate of Pho85, and both proteins interact in vivo. More interestingly, cells that carry a CLN3 allele encoding aspartic acid substitutions at the sites of Pho85 phosphorylation maintain high levels of Cln3 independently of Pho85 activity. Moreover, these cells do not properly arrest in G1 in the absence of phosphate and they die prematurely. Finally, the activity of Pho85 is essential for accumulating Cln3 and for reentering the cell cycle after phosphate refeeding. Taken together, our data indicate that Cln3 is a molecular target of the Pho85 kinase that is required to modulate cell cycle entry in response to environmental changes in nutrient availability. PMID:23339867

  6. Enhancement of memory consolidation by the histone deacetylase inhibitor sodium butyrate in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Blank, Martina; Werenicz, Aline; Velho, Luciana Azevedo; Pinto, Diana F; Fedi, Ana Cláudia; Lopes, Mark William; Peres, Tanara Vieira; Leal, Rodrigo Bainy; Dornelles, Arethuza S; Roesler, Rafael

    2015-05-06

    Here we show that a systemic injection of the histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) sodium butyrate (NaB) immediately after training in a step-down inhibitory avoidance task produced an enhancement of memory consolidation that persisted across consecutive retention tests during 14 days in aged rats, while it did not significantly affect memory in young adults. Control aged and young adult rats showed comparable basal levels of memory retention. Our results suggest that HDACis can display memory-enhancing effects specific for aged animals, even in the absence of age-related memory impairment.

  7. G0/G1 Switch Gene 2 Regulates Cardiac Lipolysis*

    PubMed Central

    Heier, Christoph; Radner, Franz P. W.; Moustafa, Tarek; Schreiber, Renate; Grond, Susanne; Eichmann, Thomas O.; Schweiger, Martina; Schmidt, Albrecht; Cerk, Ines K.; Oberer, Monika; Theussl, H.-Christian; Wojciechowski, Jacek; Penninger, Josef M.; Zimmermann, Robert; Zechner, Rudolf

    2015-01-01

    The anabolism and catabolism of myocardial triacylglycerol (TAG) stores are important processes for normal cardiac function. TAG synthesis detoxifies and stockpiles fatty acids to prevent lipotoxicity, whereas TAG hydrolysis (lipolysis) remobilizes fatty acids from endogenous storage pools as energy substrates, signaling molecules, or precursors for complex lipids. This study focused on the role of G0/G1 switch 2 (G0S2) protein, which was previously shown to inhibit the principal TAG hydrolase adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL), in the regulation of cardiac lipolysis. Using wild-type and mutant mice, we show the following: (i) G0S2 is expressed in the heart and regulated by the nutritional status with highest expression levels after re-feeding. (ii) Cardiac-specific overexpression of G0S2 inhibits cardiac lipolysis by direct protein-protein interaction with ATGL. This leads to severe cardiac steatosis. The steatotic hearts caused by G0S2 overexpression are less prone to fibrotic remodeling or cardiac dysfunction than hearts with a lipolytic defect due to ATGL deficiency. (iii) Conversely to the phenotype of transgenic mice, G0S2 deficiency results in a de-repression of cardiac lipolysis and decreased cardiac TAG content. We conclude that G0S2 acts as a potent ATGL inhibitor in the heart modulating cardiac substrate utilization by regulating cardiac lipolysis. PMID:26350455

  8. The interplay between G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) and histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) at the crossroads of epithelial cell motility

    PubMed Central

    Lafarga, Vanesa; Mayor, Jr, Federico; Penela, Petronila

    2012-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) is emerging as a key integrative node in cell migration control. In addition to its canonical role in the desensitization of G protein-coupled receptors involved in chemotaxis, novel recently identified GRK2 substrates and interacting partners appear to mediate the GRK2-dependent modulation of diverse molecular processes involved in motility, such as gradient sensing, cell polarity or cytoskeletal reorganization. We have recently identified an interaction between GRK2 and histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6), a major cytoplasmic α-tubulin deacetylase involved in cell motility and adhesion. GRK2 dynamically associates with and phosphorylates HDAC6 to stimulate its α-tubulin deacetylase activity at specific cellular localizations such as the leading edge of migrating cells, thus promoting local tubulin deacetylation and enhanced motility. This GRK2-HDAC6 functional interaction may have important implications in pathological contexts related to aberrant epithelial cell migration. PMID:23076141

  9. The existence of inflection points for generalized log-aesthetic curves satisfying G1 data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpagavalli, R.; Gobithaasan, R. U.; Miura, K. T.; Shanmugavel, Madhavan

    2015-12-01

    Log-Aesthetic (LA) curves have been implemented in a CAD/CAM system for various design feats. LA curves possess linear Logarithmic Curvature Graph (LCG) with gradient (shape parameter) denoted as α. In 2009, a generalized form of LA curves called Generalized Log-Aesthetic Curves (GLAC) has been proposed which has an extra shape parameter as ν compared to LA curves. Recently, G1 continuous GLAC algorithm has been proposed which utilizes the extra shape parameter using four control points. This paper discusses on the existence of inflection points in a GLAC segment satisfying G1 Hermite data and the effect of inflection point on convex hull property. It is found that the existence of inflection point can be avoided by manipulating the value of α. Numerical experiments show that the increase of α may remove the inflection point (if any) in a GLAC segment.

  10. Balanced Production of Ribosome Components Is Required for Proper G1/S Transition in Saccharomyces cerevisiae *

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Herreros, Fernando; Rodríguez-Galán, Olga; Morillo-Huesca, Macarena; Maya, Douglas; Arista-Romero, María; de la Cruz, Jesús; Chávez, Sebastián; Muñoz-Centeno, Mari Cruz

    2013-01-01

    Cell cycle regulation is a very accurate process that ensures cell viability and the genomic integrity of daughter cells. A fundamental part of this regulation consists in the arrest of the cycle at particular points to ensure the completion of a previous event, to repair cellular damage, or to avoid progression in potentially risky situations. In this work, we demonstrate that a reduction in nucleotide levels or the depletion of RNA polymerase I or III subunits generates a cell cycle delay at the G1/S transition in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This delay is concomitant with an imbalance between ribosomal RNAs and proteins which, among others, provokes an accumulation of free ribosomal protein L5. Consistently with a direct impact of free L5 on the G1/S transition, rrs1 mutants, which weaken the assembly of L5 and L11 on pre-60S ribosomal particles, enhance both the G1/S delay and the accumulation of free ribosomal protein L5. We propose the existence of a surveillance mechanism that couples the balanced production of yeast ribosomal components and cell cycle progression through the accumulation of free ribosomal proteins. This regulatory pathway resembles the p53-dependent nucleolar-stress checkpoint response described in human cells, which indicates that this is a general control strategy extended throughout eukaryotes. PMID:24043628

  11. The SIT4 protein phosphatase functions in late G1 for progression into S phase.

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, A; Immanuel, D; Arndt, K T

    1991-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains containing temperature-sensitive mutations in the SIT4 protein phosphatase arrest in late G1 at the nonpermissive temperature. Order-of-function analysis shows that SIT4 is required in late G1 for progression into S phase. While the levels of SIT4 do not change in the cell cycle, SIT4 associates with two high-molecular-weight phosphoproteins in a cell-cycle-dependent fashion. In addition, we have identified a polymorphic gene, SSD1, that in some versions can suppress the lethality due to a deletion of SIT4 and can also partially suppress the phenotypic defects due to a null mutation in BCY1. The SSD1 protein is implicated in G1 control and has a region of similarity to the dis3 protein of Schizosaccharomyces pombe. We have also identified a gene, PPH2alpha, that in high copy number can partially suppress the growth defect of sit4 strains. The PPH2 alpha gene encodes a predicted protein that is 80% identical to the catalytic domain of mammalian type 2A protein phosphatases but also has an acidic amino-terminal extension not present in other phosphatases. Images PMID:1848673

  12. Dux4 induces cell cycle arrest at G1 phase through upregulation of p21 expression

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Hongliang; Wang, Zhaoxia; Jin, Suqin; Hao, Hongjun; Zheng, Lemin; Zhou, Boda; Zhang, Wei; Lv, He; Yuan, Yun

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • Dux4 induced TE671 cell proliferation defect and G1 phase arrest. • Dux4 upregulated p21 expression without activating p53. • Silencing p21 rescued Dux4 mediated proliferation defect and cell cycle arrest. • Sp1 binding site was required for Dux4-induced p21 promoter activation. - Abstract: It has been implicated that Dux4 plays crucial roles in development of facioscapulohumeral dystrophy. But the underlying myopathic mechanisms and related down-stream events of this retrogene were far from clear. Here, we reported that overexpression of Dux4 in a cell model TE671 reduced cell proliferation rate, and increased G1 phase accumulation. We also determined the impact of Dux4 on p53/p21 signal pathway, which controls the checkpoint in cell cycle progression. Overexpression of Dux4 increased p21 mRNA and protein level, while expression of p53, phospho-p53 remained unchanged. Silencing p21 rescued Dux4 mediated proliferation defect and cell cycle arrest. Furthermore, we demonstrated that enhanced Dux4 expression increased p21 promoter activity and elevated expression of Sp1 transcription factor. Mutation of Sp1 binding site decreased dux4 induced p21 promoter activation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays confirmed the Dux4-induced binding of Sp1 to p21 promoter in vivo. These results suggest that Dux4 might induce proliferation inhibition and G1 phase arrest through upregulation of p21.

  13. 26 CFR 1.904(g)-1 - Overall domestic loss and the overall domestic loss account.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... loss account. 1.904(g)-1 Section 1.904(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... States § 1.904(g)-1 Overall domestic loss and the overall domestic loss account. For further guidance, see § 1.904(g)-1T....

  14. Preferential synthesis of the G1m(1) allotype of IgG1 in the central nervous system of multiple sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Salier, J P; Goust, J M; Pandey, J P; Fudenberg, H H

    1981-09-18

    Quantitations of the G1m(1) and G1m(3) allotypic determinants of human immunoglobulin G were performed by radioimmunoassay on cerebrospinal fluid and serum samples from patients with multiple sclerosis and from patients with other neurological disorders. In multiple sclerosis patients that were heterozygous for these determinants, G1m(1) concentration in the cerebrospinal fluid was greatly increased-reflected by an increased ratio of G1m(1)-in comparison with that of patients with other neurological disorders. These results suggest that in the heterozygous multiple sclerosis patients, most of the plasma cells in the central nervous system that secrete oligoclonal immunoglobulin G preferentially synthesize G1m(1) IgG1 molecules.

  15. Histone Deacetylase 6 Regulates Bladder Architecture and Host Susceptibility to Uropathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Adam J.; Dhakal, Bijaya K.; Liu, Ting; Mulvey, Matthew A.

    2016-01-01

    Histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) is a non-canonical, mostly cytosolic histone deacetylase that has a variety of interacting partners and substrates. Previous work using cell-culture based assays coupled with pharmacological inhibitors and gene-silencing approaches indicated that HDAC6 promotes the actin- and microtubule-dependent invasion of host cells by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC). These facultative intracellular pathogens are the major cause of urinary tract infections. Here, we examined the involvement of HDAC6 in bladder colonization by UPEC using HDAC6 knockout mice. Though UPEC was unable to invade HDAC6−/− cells in culture, the bacteria had an enhanced ability to colonize the bladders of mice that lacked HDAC6. This effect was transient, and by six hours post-inoculation bacterial titers in the HDAC6−/− mice were reduced to levels seen in wild type control animals. Subsequent analyses revealed that the mutant mice had greater bladder volume capacity and fluid retention, along with much higher levels of acetylated α-tubulin. In addition, infiltrating neutrophils recovered from the HDAC6−/− bladder harbored significantly more viable bacteria than their wild type counterparts. Cumulatively, these changes may negate any inhibitory effects that the lack of HDAC6 has on UPEC entry into individual host cells, and suggest roles for HDAC6 in other urological disorders such as urinary retention. PMID:26907353

  16. Phosphorus-based SAHA analogues as histone deacetylase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kapustin, Galina V; Fejér, György; Gronlund, Jennifer L; McCafferty, Dewey G; Seto, Edward; Etzkorn, Felicia A

    2003-08-21

    [structure: see text] Three analogues of suberoyl anilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) with phosphorus metal-chelating functionalities were synthesized as inhibitors of histone deacetylases (HDACs). The compounds showed weak activity for HeLa nuclear extracts (IC(50) = 0.57-6.1 mM), HDAC8 (IC(50) = 0.28-0.41 mM), and histone-deacetylase-like protein (HDLP, IC(50) = 0.33-1.9 mM), suggesting that the transition state of HDAC is not analogous to zinc proteases. Antiproliferative activity against A2780 cancer cells (IC(50) = 0.11-0.12 mM), comparable to SAHA (0.15 mM), was observed.

  17. Activation of p53 Transcriptional Activity by SMRT: a Histone Deacetylase 3-Independent Function of a Transcriptional Corepressor

    PubMed Central

    Adikesavan, Anbu Karani; Karmakar, Sudipan; Pardo, Patricia; Wang, Liguo; Liu, Shuang; Li, Wei

    2014-01-01

    The silencing mediator of retinoic acid and thyroid hormone receptors (SMRT) is an established histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3)-dependent transcriptional corepressor. Microarray analyses of MCF-7 cells transfected with control or SMRT small interfering RNA revealed SMRT regulation of genes involved in DNA damage responses, and the levels of the DNA damage marker γH2AX as well as poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage were elevated in SMRT-depleted cells treated with doxorubicin. A number of these genes are established p53 targets. SMRT knockdown decreased the activity of two p53-dependent reporter genes as well as the expression of p53 target genes, such as CDKN1A (which encodes p21). SMRT bound directly to p53 and was recruited to p53 binding sites within the p21 promoter. Depletion of GPS2 and TBL1, components of the SMRT corepressor complex, but not histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3) decreased p21-luciferase activity. p53 bound to the SMRT deacetylase activation domain (DAD), which mediates HDAC3 binding and activation, and HDAC3 could attenuate p53 binding to the DAD region of SMRT. Moreover, an HDAC3 binding-deficient SMRT DAD mutant coactivated p53 transcriptional activity. Collectively, these data highlight a biological role for SMRT in mediating DNA damage responses and suggest a model where p53 binding to the DAD limits HDAC3 interaction with this coregulator, thereby facilitating SMRT coactivation of p53-dependent gene expression. PMID:24449765

  18. Chemical origins of isoform selectivity in histone deacetylase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Butler, Kyle V; Kozikowski, Alan P

    2008-01-01

    Histones undergo extensive posttranslational modifications that affect gene expression. Acetylation is a key histone modification that is primarily regulated by two enzymes, one of which is histone deacetylase (HDAC). The activity of HDAC causes transcriptional silencing of DNA. Eleven distinct zinc-dependent histone deacetylase isoforms have been identified in humans. Each isoform has a unique structure and function, and regulates a unique set of genes. HDAC is responsible for the regulation of many genes involved in cancer cell proliferation, and it has been implicated in the pathogenesis of many neurological conditions. HDAC inhibitors are known to be very effective anti-cancer agents, and research has shown them to be potential treatments for many other conditions. Histone deacetylase inhibitors modify the expression of many genes, and it is possible that inhibition of one isoform could cause epigenetic changes that are beneficial to treatment of a disease, while inhibition of another isoform could cause contradictory changes. Selective HDAC inhibitors will be better able to avoid these types of situations than non-specific inhibitors, and may also be less toxic than pan-HDAC inhibitors. Many potent pan-HDAC inhibitors have already been developed, leaving the development of selective inhibitors at the forefront of HDAC drug development. Certain structural moieties may be added to HDAC inhibitors to give isoform selectivity, and these will be discussed in this review. This review will focus on the applications of selective HDAC inhibitors, inhibitors reported to show selectivity, and the relationship between inhibitor structure and selectivity.

  19. FACT Prevents the Accumulation of Free Histones Evicted from Transcribed Chromatin and a Subsequent Cell Cycle Delay in G1

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Centeno, Mari Cruz; Singh, Rakesh Kumar; Oreal, Vincent; Reddy, Gajjalaiahvari Ugander; Liang, Dun; Géli, Vincent; Gunjan, Akash; Chávez, Sebastián

    2010-01-01

    The FACT complex participates in chromatin assembly and disassembly during transcription elongation. The yeast mutants affected in the SPT16 gene, which encodes one of the FACT subunits, alter the expression of G1 cyclins and exhibit defects in the G1/S transition. Here we show that the dysfunction of chromatin reassembly factors, like FACT or Spt6, down-regulates the expression of the gene encoding the cyclin that modulates the G1 length (CLN3) in START by specifically triggering the repression of its promoter. The G1 delay undergone by spt16 mutants is not mediated by the DNA–damage checkpoint, although the mutation of RAD53, which is otherwise involved in histone degradation, enhances the cell-cycle defects of spt16-197. We reveal how FACT dysfunction triggers an accumulation of free histones evicted from transcribed chromatin. This accumulation is enhanced in a rad53 background and leads to a delay in G1. Consistently, we show that the overexpression of histones in wild-type cells down-regulates CLN3 in START and causes a delay in G1. Our work shows that chromatin reassembly factors are essential players in controlling the free histones potentially released from transcribed chromatin and describes a new cell cycle phenomenon that allows cells to respond to excess histones before starting DNA replication. PMID:20502685

  20. High Dub3 expression in mouse ESCs couples the G1/S checkpoint to pluripotency.

    PubMed

    van der Laan, Siem; Tsanov, Nikolay; Crozet, Carole; Maiorano, Domenico

    2013-11-07

    The molecular mechanism underlying G1/S checkpoint bypass in mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) remains unknown. DNA damage blocks S phase entry by inhibiting the CDK2 kinase through destruction of its activator, the Cdc25A phosphatase. We observed high Cdc25A levels in G1 that persist even after DNA damage in mouse ESCs. We also found higher expression of Dub3, a deubiquitylase that controls Cdc25A protein abundance. Moreover, we demonstrate that the Dub3 gene is a direct target of Esrrb, a key transcription factor of the self-renewal machinery. We show that Dub3 expression is strongly downregulated during neural conversion and precedes Cdc25A destabilization, while forced Dub3 expression in ESCs becomes lethal upon differentiation, concomitant to cell-cycle remodeling and lineage commitment. Finally, knockdown of either Dub3 or Cdc25A induced spontaneous differentiation of ESCs. Altogether, these findings couple the self-renewal machinery to cell-cycle control through a deubiquitylase in ESCs.

  1. The G1 restriction point as critical regulator of neocortical neuronogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caviness, V. S. Jr; Takahashi, T.; Nowakowski, R. S.

    1999-01-01

    Neuronogenesis in the pseudostratified ventricular epithelium is the initial process in a succession of histogenetic events which give rise to the laminate neocortex. Here we review experimental findings in mouse which support the thesis that the restriction point of the G1 phase of the cell cycle is the critical point of regulation of the overall neuronogenetic process. The neuronogenetic interval in mouse spans 6 days. In the course of these 6 days the founder population and its progeny execute 11 cell cycles. With each successive cycle there is an increase in the fraction of postmitotic cells which leaves the cycle (the Q fraction) and also an increase in the length of the cell cycle due to an increase in the length of the G1 phase of the cycle. Q corresponds to the probability that postmitotic cells will exit the cycle at the restriction point of the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Q increases non-linearly, but the rate of change of Q with cycle (i.e., the first derivative) over the course of the neuronogenetic interval is a constant, k, which appears to be set principally by cell internal mechanisms which are species specific. Q also seems to be modulated, but at low amplitude, by a balance of mitogenic and antimitogenic influences acting from without the cell. We suggest that intracellular signal transduction systems control a general advance of Q during development and thereby determine the general developmental plan (i.e., cell number and laminar composition) of the neocortex and that external mitogens and anti-mitogens modulate this advance regionally and temporally and thereby produce regional modifications of the general plan.

  2. 26 CFR 301.6511(g)-1 - Special rule for partnership items of federally registered partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Special rule for partnership items of federally registered partnerships. 301.6511(g)-1 Section 301.6511(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... Limitations on Assessment and Collection § 301.6511(g)-1 Special rule for partnership items of...

  3. 26 CFR 301.6511(g)-1 - Special rule for partnership items of federally registered partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Special rule for partnership items of federally registered partnerships. 301.6511(g)-1 Section 301.6511(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... Limitations on Assessment and Collection § 301.6511(g)-1 Special rule for partnership items of...

  4. 26 CFR 301.6511(g)-1 - Special rule for partnership items of federally registered partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Special rule for partnership items of federally registered partnerships. 301.6511(g)-1 Section 301.6511(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... Limitations on Assessment and Collection § 301.6511(g)-1 Special rule for partnership items of...

  5. 26 CFR 301.6511(g)-1 - Special rule for partnership items of federally registered partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Special rule for partnership items of federally registered partnerships. 301.6511(g)-1 Section 301.6511(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... Limitations on Assessment and Collection § 301.6511(g)-1 Special rule for partnership items of...

  6. 16 CFR Appendix G1 to Part 305 - Furnaces-Gas

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Furnaces-Gas G1 Appendix G1 to Part 305... RULEâ) Appendix G1 to Part 305—Furnaces—Gas Furnace type Range of annual fuel utilization efficiencies (AFUEs) Low High Gas Furnaces Manufactured Before the Compliance Date of DOE Regional...

  7. 26 CFR 25.2523(g)-1 - Special rule for charitable remainder trusts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    .... 25.2523(g)-1 Section 25.2523(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE....2523(g)-1 Special rule for charitable remainder trusts. (a) In general. (1) With respect to gifts made... passing to the spouse qualifies for a marital deduction under section 2523(g) and the value of...

  8. 26 CFR 1.143(g)-1 - Requirements related to arbitrage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Requirements related to arbitrage. 1.143(g)-1 Section 1.143(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED....143(g)-1 Requirements related to arbitrage. (a) In general. Under section 143, for an issue to be...

  9. 26 CFR 301.6501(g)-1 - Certain income tax returns of corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Certain income tax returns of corporations. 301.6501(g)-1 Section 301.6501(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY... and Collection § 301.6501(g)-1 Certain income tax returns of corporations. (a) Trusts or...

  10. 26 CFR 1.665(g)-1A - Capital gain distribution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Capital gain distribution. 1.665(g)-1A Section 1.665(g)-1A Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX... Or After January 1, 1969 § 1.665(g)-1A Capital gain distribution. For any taxable year of a...

  11. 26 CFR 301.6511(g)-1 - Special rule for partnership items of federally registered partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... registered partnerships. 301.6511(g)-1 Section 301.6511(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... Limitations on Assessment and Collection § 301.6511(g)-1 Special rule for partnership items of federally...(g) must also be taken into account in applying the various special periods of limitation...

  12. 26 CFR 1.404(g)-1 - Deduction of employer liability payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...(g)-1 Section 1.404(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Pension, Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.404(g)-1... employer. (c) Limitations, etc.—(1) Permissible expenses. A payment shall be deductible under section...

  13. Recruitment of Cdc28 by Whi3 restricts nuclear accumulation of the G1 cyclin-Cdk complex to late G1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongyin; Garí, Eloi; Vergés, Emili; Gallego, Carme; Aldea, Martí

    2004-01-14

    The G1 cyclin Cln3 is a key activator of cell-cycle entry in budding yeast. Here we show that Whi3, a negative G1 regulator of Cln3, interacts in vivo with the cyclin-dependent kinase Cdc28 and regulates its localization in the cell. Efficient interaction with Cdc28 depends on an N-terminal domain of Whi3 that is also required for cytoplasmic localization of Cdc28, and for proper regulation of G1 length and filamentous growth. On the other hand, nuclear accumulation of Cdc28 requires the nuclear localization signal of Cln3, which is also found in Whi3 complexes. Both Cln3 and Cdc28 are mainly cytoplasmic during early G1, and become nuclear in late G1. However, Whi3-deficient cells show a distinct nuclear accumulation of Cln3 and Cdc28 already in early G1. We propose that Whi3 constitutes a cytoplasmic retention device for Cln3-Cdc28 complexes, thus defining a key G1 event in yeast cells.

  14. Recruitment of Cdc28 by Whi3 restricts nuclear accumulation of the G1 cyclin–Cdk complex to late G1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongyin; Garí, Eloi; Vergés, Emili; Gallego, Carme; Aldea, Martí

    2004-01-01

    The G1 cyclin Cln3 is a key activator of cell-cycle entry in budding yeast. Here we show that Whi3, a negative G1 regulator of Cln3, interacts in vivo with the cyclin-dependent kinase Cdc28 and regulates its localization in the cell. Efficient interaction with Cdc28 depends on an N-terminal domain of Whi3 that is also required for cytoplasmic localization of Cdc28, and for proper regulation of G1 length and filamentous growth. On the other hand, nuclear accumulation of Cdc28 requires the nuclear localization signal of Cln3, which is also found in Whi3 complexes. Both Cln3 and Cdc28 are mainly cytoplasmic during early G1, and become nuclear in late G1. However, Whi3-deficient cells show a distinct nuclear accumulation of Cln3 and Cdc28 already in early G1. We propose that Whi3 constitutes a cytoplasmic retention device for Cln3–Cdc28 complexes, thus defining a key G1 event in yeast cells. PMID:14685274

  15. Revised direct radiocarbon dating of the Vindija G1 Upper Paleolithic Neandertals

    PubMed Central

    Higham, Tom; Ramsey, Christopher Bronk; Karavanić, Ivor; Smith, Fred H.; Trinkaus, Erik

    2006-01-01

    The 1998/1999 direct dating of two Neandertal specimens from level G1 of Vindija Cave in Croatia to ≈28,000 and ≈29,000 radiocarbon (14C) years ago has led to interpretations concerning the late survival of Neandertals in south-central Europe, patterns of interaction between Neandertals and in-dispersing early modern humans in Europe, and complex biocultural scenarios for the earlier phases of the Upper Paleolithic. Given improvements, particularly in sample pretreatment techniques for bone radiocarbon samples, especially ultrafiltration of collagen samples, these Vindija G1 Neandertal fossils are redated to ≈32,000–33,000 14C years ago and possibly earlier. These results and the recent redating of a number of purportedly old modern human skeletal remains in Europe to younger time periods highlight the importance of fine chronological control when studying this biocultural time period and the tenuous nature of monolithic scenarios for the establishment of modern humans and earlier phases of the Upper Paleolithic in Europe. PMID:16407102

  16. Revised direct radiocarbon dating of the Vindija G1 Upper Paleolithic Neandertals.

    PubMed

    Higham, Tom; Ramsey, Christopher Bronk; Karavanić, Ivor; Smith, Fred H; Trinkaus, Erik

    2006-01-17

    The 1998/1999 direct dating of two Neandertal specimens from level G(1) of Vindija Cave in Croatia to approximately 28,000 and approximately 29,000 radiocarbon ((14)C) years ago has led to interpretations concerning the late survival of Neandertals in south-central Europe, patterns of interaction between Neandertals and in-dispersing early modern humans in Europe, and complex biocultural scenarios for the earlier phases of the Upper Paleolithic. Given improvements, particularly in sample pretreatment techniques for bone radiocarbon samples, especially ultrafiltration of collagen samples, these Vindija G(1) Neandertal fossils are redated to approximately 32,000-33,000 (14)C years ago and possibly earlier. These results and the recent redating of a number of purportedly old modern human skeletal remains in Europe to younger time periods highlight the importance of fine chronological control when studying this biocultural time period and the tenuous nature of monolithic scenarios for the establishment of modern humans and earlier phases of the Upper Paleolithic in Europe.

  17. Donor cells at the G1 phase enhance homogeneous gene expression among blastomeres in bovine somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Daisaku; Kasamatsu, Aya; Ideta, Atsushi; Urakawa, Manami; Matsumoto, Kazuya; Hosoi, Yoshihiko; Iritani, Akira; Aoyagi, Yoshito; Saeki, Kazuhiro

    2012-02-01

    The success rate of bovine somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) embryos to full term has been reported to be higher with G1 cells than with G0 cells. To better understand the reason for this, we analyzed the kinetics of luminescence activity in bovine SCNT embryos from G0 and G1 cells carrying a luciferase gene under the control of the β-actin promoter during early embryonic development. At 60-h postfusion, when bovine embryonic gene activation (EGA) begins, the luminescence activity was higher in G1-SCNT embryos than G0-SCNT embryos. Moreover, half of the G1-SCNT embryos exhibited homogeneous luminescence among the blastomeres, whereas more than half of the G0-SCNT embryos exhibited mosaic luminescence. To characterize the differential luminescence pattern in SCNT embryos, the expressions of several endogenous genes and the level of DNA methylation were determined in all blastomeres of SCNT embryos with or without luminescence. The expressions of several development-related genes (H2AFZ, GJA1, and BAX) and level of DNA methylation of the SCNT embryos with luminescence were the same as those of normal embryos produced by in vitro fertilization. A higher success rate in G1-SCNT embryos is thought to contribute to homogeneous expression among all blastomeres at EGA.

  18. Histone deacetylase 9 is a negative regulator of adipogenic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Tapan K; Idelman, Gila; Blanco, Victor; Blomkalns, Andra L; Piegore, Mark G; Weintraub, Daniel S; Kumar, Santosh; Rajsheker, Srinivas; Manka, David; Rudich, Steven M; Tang, Yaoliang; Hui, David Y; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda; Olson, Eric N; Lingrel, Jerry B; Ho, Shuk-Mei; Weintraub, Neal L

    2011-08-05

    Differentiation of preadipocytes into mature adipocytes capable of efficiently storing lipids is an important regulatory mechanism in obesity. Here, we examined the involvement of histone deacetylases (HDACs) and histone acetyltransferases (HATs) in the regulation of adipogenesis. We find that among the various members of the HDAC and HAT families, only HDAC9 exhibited dramatic down-regulation preceding adipogenic differentiation. Preadipocytes from HDAC9 gene knock-out mice exhibited accelerated adipogenic differentiation, whereas HDAC9 overexpression in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes suppressed adipogenic differentiation, demonstrating its direct role as a negative regulator of adipogenesis. HDAC9 expression was higher in visceral as compared with subcutaneous preadipocytes, negatively correlating with their potential to undergo adipogenic differentiation in vitro. HDAC9 localized in the nucleus, and its negative regulation of adipogenesis segregates with the N-terminal nuclear targeting domain, whereas the C-terminal deacetylase domain is dispensable for this function. HDAC9 co-precipitates with USF1 and is recruited with USF1 at the E-box region of the C/EBPα gene promoter in preadipocytes. Upon induction of adipogenic differentiation, HDAC9 is down-regulated, leading to its dissociation from the USF1 complex, whereas p300 HAT is up-regulated to allow its association with USF1 and accumulation at the E-box site of the C/EBPα promoter in differentiated adipocytes. This reciprocal regulation of HDAC9 and p300 HAT in the USF1 complex is associated with increased C/EBPα expression, a master regulator of adipogenic differentiation. These findings provide new insights into mechanisms of adipogenic differentiation and document a critical regulatory role for HDAC9 in adipogenic differentiation through a deacetylase-independent mechanism.

  19. Inhibitors of Histone Deacetylases Attenuate Noise-Induced Hearing Loss.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Hill, Kayla; Sha, Su-Hua

    2016-08-01

    Loss of auditory sensory hair cells is the major pathological feature of noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). Currently, no established clinical therapies for prevention or amelioration of NIHL are available. The absence of treatments is due to our lack of a comprehensive understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying noise-induced damage. Our previous study indicates that epigenetic modification of histones alters hair cell survival. In this study, we investigated the effect of noise exposure on histone H3 lysine 9 acetylation (H3K9ac) in the inner ear of adult CBA/J mice and determined if inhibition of histone deacetylases by systemic administration of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) could attenuate NIHL. Our results showed that H3K9ac was decreased in the nuclei of outer hair cells (OHCs) and marginal cells of the stria vascularis in the basal region after exposure to a traumatic noise paradigm known to induce permanent threshold shifts (PTS). Consistent with these results, levels of histone deacetylases 1, 2, and 3 (HDAC1, HDAC2 and HDAC3) were increased predominately in the nuclei of cochlear cells. Silencing of HDAC1, HDAC2, or HDAC3 with siRNA reduced the expression of the target HDAC in OHCs, but did not attenuate noise-induced PTS, whereas treatment with the pan-HDAC inhibitor SAHA, also named vorinostat, reduced OHC loss, and attenuated PTS. These findings suggest that histone acetylation is involved in the pathogenesis of noise-induced OHC death and hearing loss. Pharmacological targeting of histone deacetylases may afford a strategy for protection against NIHL.

  20. Histone deacetylase inhibitor activity in royal jelly might facilitate caste switching in bees.

    PubMed

    Spannhoff, Astrid; Kim, Yong Kee; Raynal, Noel J-M; Gharibyan, Vazganush; Su, Ming-Bo; Zhou, Yue-Yang; Li, Jia; Castellano, Sabrina; Sbardella, Gianluca; Issa, Jean-Pierre J; Bedford, Mark T

    2011-03-01

    Worker and queen bees are genetically indistinguishable. However, queen bees are fertile, larger and have a longer lifespan than their female worker counterparts. Differential feeding of larvae with royal jelly controls this caste switching. There is emerging evidence that the queen-bee phenotype is driven by epigenetic mechanisms. In this study, we show that royal jelly--the secretion produced by the hypopharyngeal and mandibular glands of worker bees--has histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) activity. A fatty acid, (E)-10-hydroxy-2-decenoic acid (10HDA), which accounts for up to 5% of royal jelly, harbours this HDACi activity. Furthermore, 10HDA can reactivate the expression of epigenetically silenced genes in mammalian cells. Thus, the epigenetic regulation of queen-bee development is probably driven, in part, by HDACi activity in royal jelly.

  1. Histone Deacetylase (HDAC) Inhibitors - Emerging Roles in Neuronal Memory, Learning, Synaptic Plasticity and Neural Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad Ganai, Shabir; Ramadoss, Mahalakshmi; Mahadevan, Vijayalakshmi

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic regulation of neuronal signalling through histone acetylation dictates transcription programs that govern neuronal memory, plasticity and learning paradigms. Histone Acetyl Transferases (HATs) and Histone Deacetylases (HDACs) are antagonistic enzymes that regulate gene expression through acetylation and deacetylation of histone proteins around which DNA is wrapped inside a eukaryotic cell nucleus. The epigenetic control of HDACs and the cellular imbalance between HATs and HDACs dictate disease states and have been implicated in muscular dystrophy, loss of memory, neurodegeneration and autistic disorders. Altering gene expression profiles through inhibition of HDACs is now emerging as a powerful technique in therapy. This review presents evolving applications of HDAC inhibitors as potential drugs in neurological research and therapy. Mechanisms that govern their expression profiles in neuronal signalling, plasticity and learning will be covered. Promising and exciting possibilities of HDAC inhibitors in memory formation, fear conditioning, ischemic stroke and neural regeneration have been detailed. PMID:26487502

  2. Dynamic phosphorylation of Histone Deacetylase 1 by Aurora kinases during mitosis regulates zebrafish embryos development

    PubMed Central

    Loponte, Sara; Segré, Chiara V.; Senese, Silvia; Miccolo, Claudia; Santaguida, Stefano; Deflorian, Gianluca; Citro, Simona; Mattoscio, Domenico; Pisati, Federica; Moser, Mirjam A.; Visintin, Rosella; Seiser, Christian; Chiocca, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) catalyze the removal of acetyl molecules from histone and non-histone substrates playing important roles in chromatin remodeling and control of gene expression. Class I HDAC1 is a critical regulator of cell cycle progression, cellular proliferation and differentiation during development; it is also regulated by many post-translational modifications (PTMs). Herein we characterize a new mitosis-specific phosphorylation of HDAC1 driven by Aurora kinases A and B. We show that this phosphorylation affects HDAC1 enzymatic activity and it is critical for the maintenance of a proper proliferative and developmental plan in a complex organism. Notably, we find that Aurora-dependent phosphorylation of HDAC1 regulates histone acetylation by modulating the expression of genes directly involved in the developing zebrafish central nervous system. Our data represent a step towards the comprehension of HDAC1 regulation by its PTM code, with important implications in unravelling its roles both in physiology and pathology. PMID:27458029

  3. Delaying histone deacetylase response to injury accelerates conversion into repair Schwann cells and nerve regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Brügger, Valérie; Duman, Mert; Bochud, Maëlle; Münger, Emmanuelle; Heller, Manfred; Ruff, Sophie; Jacob, Claire

    2017-01-01

    The peripheral nervous system (PNS) regenerates after injury. However, regeneration is often compromised in the case of large lesions, and the speed of axon reconnection to their target is critical for successful functional recovery. After injury, mature Schwann cells (SCs) convert into repair cells that foster axonal regrowth, and redifferentiate to rebuild myelin. These processes require the regulation of several transcription factors, but the driving mechanisms remain partially understood. Here we identify an early response to nerve injury controlled by histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC2), which coordinates the action of other chromatin-remodelling enzymes to induce the upregulation of Oct6, a key transcription factor for SC development. Inactivating this mechanism using mouse genetics allows earlier conversion into repair cells and leads to faster axonal regrowth, but impairs remyelination. Consistently, short-term HDAC1/2 inhibitor treatment early after lesion accelerates functional recovery and enhances regeneration, thereby identifying a new therapeutic strategy to improve PNS regeneration after lesion. PMID:28139683

  4. Acetylation of EGF Receptor Contributes to Tumor Cell Resistance to Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hui; Li, Chia-Wei; Labaff, Adam M.; Lim, Seung-Oe; Li, Long-Yuan; Kan, Shu-Fen; Chen, Yue; Zhang, Kai; Lang, Jingyu; Xie, Xiaoming; Wang, Yan; Huo, Long-Fei; Hsu, Sheng-Chieh; Chen, Xiaomin; Zhao, Yingming; Hung, Mien-Chie

    2011-01-01

    Alteration of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is involved in various human cancers and has been intensively investigated. A plethora of evidence demonstrates that posttranslational modifications of EGFR play a pivotal role in controlling its function and metabolism. Here, we show that EGFR can be acetylated by CREB binding protein (CBP) acetyltransferase. Interestingly, EGFR acetylation affects its tyrosine phosphorylation, which may contribute to cancer cell resistance to histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs). Since there is an increasing interest in using HDACIs to treat various cancers in the clinic, our current study provides insights and rationale for selecting effective therapeutic regimen. Consistent with the previous reports, we also show that HDACI combined with EGFR inhibitors achieves better therapeutic outcomes and provides a molecular rationale for the enhanced effect of combination therapy. Our results unveil a critical role of EGFR acetylation that regulates EGFR function, which may have an important clinical implication. PMID:21094134

  5. A non-isotopic assay for histone deacetylase activity.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, K; Brosch, G; Loidl, P; Jung, M

    1999-05-01

    Inhibitors of histone deacetylase (HD) bear great potential as new drugs due to their ability to modulate transcription and to induce apoptosis or differentiation in cancer cells. To study the activity of HD and the effect of potential inhibitors in vitro so far only radio-active assays have existed. For the search of new inhibitors and for the use in HD identification and purification we established a simple, non-radioactive assay that allows screening of large numbers of compounds. The assay is based on an aminocoumarin derivative of an Omega-acetylated lysine as enzyme substrate.

  6. Design and synthesis of a potent histone deacetylase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tao; Kapustin, Galina; Etzkorn, Felicia A

    2007-05-03

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors have potential for cancer therapy. An HDAC inhibitor based on a cyclic peptide mimic of known structure, linked by an aliphatic chain to a hydroxamic acid, was designed and synthesized. The chimeric compound showed potent competitive inhibition of nuclear HDACs, with an IC50 value of 46 nM and a Ki value of 13.7 nM. The designed inhibitor showed 4-fold selectivity for HDAC1 (57 nM) over HDAC8 (231 nM).

  7. The potential of histone deacetylase inhibitors in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Aparicio, Ana

    2006-03-01

    In the nucleus, DNA is wrapped around octamers of histone proteins. Histones, like other proteins, are posttranslationally modified by the addition of an array of chemical groups that affect their interactions with surrounding structures. Histone acetyltransferases and histone deacetylases (HDACs) are the enzymes involved in the addition and removal, respectively, of acetyl groups from the aminoterminal tails of histones. A number of structurally diverse compounds are capable of inhibiting HDACs and exert a variety of biologic effects on cancer cells in preclinical models. Early clinical trials with the first generation of HDAC inhibitors (HDACIs) have demonstrated promising therapeutic activity, and HDACs have become one of the hottest targets in drug development today.

  8. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors (HDACi) Cause the Selective Depletion of Bromodomain Containing Proteins (BCPs).

    PubMed

    Mackmull, Marie-Therese; Iskar, Murat; Parca, Luca; Singer, Stephan; Bork, Peer; Ori, Alessandro; Beck, Martin

    2015-05-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) and acetyltransferases control the epigenetic regulation of gene expression through modification of histone marks. Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) are small molecules that interfere with histone tail modification, thus altering chromatin structure and epigenetically controlled pathways. They promote apoptosis in proliferating cells and are promising anticancer drugs. While some HDACi have already been approved for therapy and others are in different phases of clinical trials, the exact mechanism of action of this drug class remains elusive. Previous studies have shown that HDACis cause massive changes in chromatin structure but only moderate changes in gene expression. To what extent these changes manifest at the protein level has never been investigated on a proteome-wide scale. Here, we have studied HDACi-treated cells by large-scale mass spectrometry based proteomics. We show that HDACi treatment affects primarily the nuclear proteome and induces a selective decrease of bromodomain-containing proteins (BCPs), the main readers of acetylated histone marks. By combining time-resolved proteome and transcriptome profiling, we show that BCPs are affected at the protein level as early as 12 h after HDACi treatment and that their abundance is regulated by a combination of transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms. Using gene silencing, we demonstrate that the decreased abundance of BCPs is sufficient to mediate important transcriptional changes induced by HDACi. Our data reveal a new aspect of the mechanism of action of HDACi that is mediated by an interplay between histone acetylation and the abundance of BCPs. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001660 and NCBI Gene Expression Omnibus with identifier GSE64689.

  9. Crystal Structures of Lipoglycopeptide Antibiotic Deacetylases: Implications for the Biosynthesis of A40926 and Teicoplanin

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, Yaozhong; Brunzelle, Joseph S.; Nair, Satish K.

    2008-07-08

    The lipoglycopeptide antibiotics teicoplanin and A40926 have proven efficacy against Gram-positive pathogens. These drugs are distinguished from glycopeptide antibiotics by N-linked long chain acyl-D-glucosamine decorations that contribute to antibacterial efficacy. During the biosynthesis of lipoglycopeptides, tailoring glycosyltransferases attach an N-acetyl-D-glucosamine to the aglycone, and this N-acetyl-glucosaminyl pseudoaglycone is deacetylated prior to long chain hydrocarbon attachment. Here we present several high-resolution crystal structures of the pseudoaglycone deacetylases from the biosynthetic pathways of teicoplanin and A40926. The cocrystal structure of the teicoplanin pseudoaglycone deacetylase with a fatty acid product provides further insights into the roles of active-site residues, and suggests mechanistic similarities with structurally distinct zinc deacetylases, such as peptidoglycan deacetylase and LpxC. A unique, structurally mobile capping lid, located at the apex of these pseudoaglycone deacetylases, likely serves as a determinant of substrate specificity.

  10. Histone deacetylases and their role in motor neuron degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Lazo-Gómez, Rafael; Ramírez-Jarquín, Uri N.; Tovar-y-Romo, Luis B.; Tapia, Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease, characterized by the progressive loss of motor neurons. The cause of this selective neuronal death is unknown, but transcriptional dysregulation is recently emerging as an important factor. The physical substrate for the regulation of the transcriptional process is chromatin, a complex assembly of histones and DNA. Histones are subject to several post-translational modifications, like acetylation, that are a component of the transcriptional regulation process. Histone acetylation and deacetylation is performed by a group of enzymes (histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and deacetylases, respectively) whose modulation can alter the transcriptional state of many regions of the genome, and thus may be an important target in diseases that share this pathogenic process, as is the case for ALS. This review will discuss the present evidence of transcriptional dysregulation in ALS, the role of histone deacetylases (HDACs) in disease pathogenesis, and the novel pharmacologic strategies that are being comprehensively studied to prevent motor neuron death, with focus on sirtuins (SIRT) and their effectors. PMID:24367290

  11. Activity of chitin deacetylase from Colletotrichum gloeosporioides on chitinous substrates.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Neith; Trombotto, Stéphane; David, Laurent; Shirai, Keiko

    2013-07-01

    Production of chitin deacetylases from the phytopathogenic fungus Colletotrichum gloeosporioides was successfully achieved by submerged fermentation. The highest specific activity of 0.018 U mg(-1) of protein was obtained after 96 h of cultivation at pH 6 and 28°C. Two bands with molecular weights of 35 kDa and 170 kDa determined with SDS-PAGE displayed deacetylase activities as detected in the zymograms. Reacetylated commercial chitosan (52% acetylation degree) was used as substrate for the extracellular crude extract in order to estimate the kinetic parameters of acetate production as undirected deacetylation measurement. The highest acetate production of 12.8 μmol mL(-1) was obtained using 7.5 mg mL(-1) of substrate. The produced enzyme from C. gloeosporioides achieved up to 25% deacetylation of a chitin substrate (hydrolyzed biological chitin) having 80% degree of acetylation, MW of 102×10(3) g mol(-1) and a crystallinity index of ca. 60%.

  12. Purification and characterization of chitin deacetylase from Colletotrichum lindemuthianum.

    PubMed

    Tsigos, I; Bouriotis, V

    1995-11-03

    Chitin deacetylase (EC 3.5.1.41), the enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of acetamido groups of N-acetyl-D-glucosamine in chitin, has been purified to homogeneity from the culture filtrate of the fungus Colletotrichum lindemuthianum and further characterized. The enzyme is a glycoprotein, and its apparent molecular mass was determined to be approximately 150 kDa. The glycosylation pattern of the enzyme is consistent with a mixture of N-linked glycans including oligomannosidic hybrid and/or complex type, and its carbohydrate content is approximately 67% by weight. Chitin deacetylase is active on several chitinous substrates and chitin derivatives, is not considerably inhibited by carboxylic acids, especially acetic acid, and exhibits a remarkable thermostability. The enzyme requires at least two N-acetyl-D-glucosamine residues (chitobiose) for catalysis. When glycol chitin (a water-soluble chitin derivative) was used as substrate, the optimum temperature for enzyme activity was determined to be 50 degrees C, and the optimum pH was approximately 8.5.

  13. Overexpression of Histone Deacetylase 6 Enhances Resistance to Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiuyan; Li, Zhiguo; Wang, Meng; Liu, Lin; Tian, Kegong; Li, Ning

    2017-01-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is one of the most economically relevant viral pathogens in pigs and causes substantial losses in the pig industry worldwide each year. At present, PRRSV vaccines do not effectively prevent and control this disease. Consequently, it is necessary to develop new antiviral strategies to compensate for the inefficacy of the available vaccines. Histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) is an important member of the histone deacetylase family that is responsible for regulating many important biological processes. Studies have shown that HDAC6 has anti-viral activities during the viral life cycle. However, whether HDAC6 overexpression enhances resistance to PRRSV in pigs remains unknown. In this study, we used a somatic cell cloning method to produce transgenic (TG) pigs that constitutively overexpress porcine HDAC6. These TG pigs showed germ line transmission with continued overexpression of HDAC6. In vitro, virus-challenged porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs) overexpressed HDAC6, which suppressed viral gene expression and PRRSV production. In vivo, resistance to PRRSV in TG pigs was evaluated by direct or cohabitation mediated infection with a highly pathogenic PRRSV (HP-PRRSV) strain. Compared with non-TG (NTG) siblings, TG pigs showed a significantly lower viral load in the lungs and an extended survival time after infection with HP-PRRSV via intramuscular injection. In the cohabitation study, NTG pigs housed with challenged NTG pigs exhibited significantly worse clinical symptoms than the other three in-contact groups. These results collectively suggest that HDAC6 overexpression enhances resistance to PRRSV infection both in vitro and in vivo. Our findings suggest the potential involvement of HDAC6 in the response to PRRSV, which will facilitate the development of novel therapies for PRRSV. PMID:28052127

  14. Detrimental effect of class-selective histone deacetylase inhibitors during tissue regeneration following hindlimb ischemia.

    PubMed

    Spallotta, Francesco; Tardivo, Silvia; Nanni, Simona; Rosati, Jessica D; Straino, Stefania; Mai, Antonello; Vecellio, Matteo; Valente, Sergio; Capogrossi, Maurizio C; Farsetti, Antonella; Martone, Julie; Bozzoni, Irene; Pontecorvi, Alfredo; Gaetano, Carlo; Colussi, Claudia

    2013-08-09

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors (DIs) are promising drugs for the treatment of several pathologies including ischemic and failing heart where they demonstrated efficacy. However, adverse side effects and cardiotoxicity have also been reported. Remarkably, no information is available about the effect of DIs during tissue regeneration following acute peripheral ischemia. In this study, mice made ischemic by femoral artery excision were injected with the DIs MS275 and MC1568, selective for class I and IIa histone deacetylases (HDACs), respectively. In untreated mice, soon after damage, class IIa HDAC phosphorylation and nuclear export occurred, paralleled by dystrophin and neuronal nitric-oxide synthase (nNOS) down-regulation and decreased protein phosphatase 2A activity. Between 14 and 21 days after ischemia, dystrophin and nNOS levels recovered, and class IIa HDACs relocalized to the nucleus. In this condition, the MC1568 compound increased the number of newly formed muscle fibers but delayed their terminal differentiation, whereas MS275 abolished the early onset of the regeneration process determining atrophy and fibrosis. The selective DIs had differential effects on the vascular compartment: MC1568 increased arteriogenesis whereas MS275 inhibited it. Capillarogenesis did not change. Chromatin immunoprecipitations revealed that class IIa HDAC complexes bind promoters of proliferation-associated genes and of class I HDAC1 and 2, highlighting a hierarchical control between class II and I HDACs during tissue regeneration. Our findings indicate that class-selective DIs interfere with normal mouse ischemic hindlimb regeneration and suggest that their use could be limited by alteration of the regeneration process in peripheral ischemic tissues.

  15. A Recombinant Fungal Chitin Deacetylase Produces Fully Defined Chitosan Oligomers with Novel Patterns of Acetylation.

    PubMed

    Naqvi, Shoa; Cord-Landwehr, Stefan; Singh, Ratna; Bernard, Frank; Kolkenbrock, Stephan; El Gueddari, Nour Eddine; Moerschbacher, Bruno M

    2016-11-15

    Partially acetylated chitosan oligosaccharides (paCOS) are potent biologics with many potential applications, and their bioactivities are believed to be dependent on their structure, i.e., their degrees of polymerization and acetylation, as well as their pattern of acetylation. However, paCOS generated via chemical N-acetylation or de-N-acetylation of GlcN or GlcNAc oligomers, respectively, typically display random patterns of acetylation, making it difficult to control and predict their bioactivities. In contrast, paCOS produced from chitin deacetylases (CDAs) acting on chitin oligomer substrates may have specific patterns of acetylation, as shown for some bacterial CDAs. However, compared to what we know about bacterial CDAs, we know little about the ability of fungal CDAs to produce defined paCOS with known patterns of acetylation. Therefore, we optimized the expression of a chitin deacetylase from the fungus Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici in Escherichia coli The best yield of functional enzyme was obtained as a fusion protein with the maltose-binding protein (MBP) secreted into the periplasmic space of the bacterial host. We characterized the MBP fusion protein from P. graminis (PgtCDA) and tested its activity on different chitinous substrates. Mass spectrometric sequencing of the products obtained by enzymatic deacetylation of chitin oligomers, i.e., tetramers to hexamers, revealed that PgtCDA generated paCOS with specific acetylation patterns of A-A-D-D, A-A-D-D-D, and A-A-D-D-D-D, respectively (A, GlcNAc; D, GlcN), indicating that PgtCDA cannot deacetylate the two GlcNAc units closest to the oligomer's nonreducing end. This unique property of PgtCDA significantly expands the so far very limited library of well-defined paCOS available to test their bioactivities for a wide variety of potential applications.

  16. Evidence of bovine immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) protease activity in partially purified culture supernate of Pasteurella haemolytica A1.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, C W; Shewen, P E

    1996-01-01

    In the bovine respiratory tract, IgG1 is a major secretory immunoglobulin (Ig), and both IgG1 and IgG2 are believed to be important in defense against pneumonic pasteurellosis (shipping fever) in calves. Here we provide evidence for hydrolysis of IgG1 in the presence of partially purified culture supernate (ppCS) from the respiratory pathogen Pasteurella haemolytica A1. Bovine IgG1 was hydrolysed sequentially into three distinct bands (approximately 39, 12, and 7 kDa respectively). Furthermore, partial hydrolysis of bovine IgG2 was observed, but neither bovine IgA nor IgM were affected by incubation with ppCS. These findings suggest that the production of an IgG1-specific protease by P. haemolytica A1 may be a virulence mechanism contributing to the pathogenesis of bovine pneumonic pasteurellosis. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5. PMID:8785718

  17. Antibacterial activity of the nitrovinylfuran G1 (Furvina) and its conversion products

    PubMed Central

    Allas, Ülar; Toom, Lauri; Selyutina, Anastasia; Mäeorg, Uno; Medina, Ricardo; Merits, Andres; Rinken, Ago; Hauryliuk, Vasili; Kaldalu, Niilo; Tenson, Tanel

    2016-01-01

    2-Bromo-5-(2-bromo-2-nitrovinyl)furan (G1 or Furvina) is an antimicrobial with a direct reactivity against thiol groups. It is active against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, yeasts and filamentous fungi. By reacting with thiol groups it causes direct damage to proteins but, as a result, is very short-living and interconverts into an array of reaction products. Our aim was to characterize thiol reactivity of G1 and its conversion products and establish how much of antimicrobial and cytotoxic effects are due to the primary activity of G1 and how much can be attributed to its reaction products. Stability of G1 in growth media as well as its conversion in the presence of thiols was characterized. The structures of G1 decomposition products were determined using NMR and mass-spectroscopy. Concentration- and time-dependent killing curves showed that G1 is bacteriostatic for Escherichia coli at the concentration of 16 μg/ml and bactericidal at 32 μg/ml. However, G1 is inefficient against non-growing E. coli. Addition of cysteine to medium reduces the antimicrobial potency of G1. Nevertheless, the reaction products of G1 and cysteine enabled prolonged antimicrobial action of the drug. Therefore, the activity of 2-bromo-5-(2-bromo-2-nitrovinyl)furan is a sum of its immediate reactivity and the antibacterial effects of the conversion products. PMID:27830730

  18. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors Inhibit the Proliferation of Gallbladder Carcinoma Cells by Suppressing AKT/mTOR Signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Guo, Zhiyong; Wu, Ying; Hu, Ronglin; Du, Jun; He, Xiaoshun; Jiao, Xingyuan; Zhu, Xiaofeng

    2015-01-01

    Gallbladder carcinoma is an aggressive malignancy with high mortality mainly due to the limited potential for curative resection and its resistance to chemotherapeutic agents. Here, we show that the histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) trichostatin-A (TSA) and suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) reduce the proliferation and induce apoptosis of gallbladder carcinoma cells by suppressing the AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling. Gallbladder carcinoma SGC-996 cells were treated with different concentrations of TSA and SAHA for different lengths of time. Cell proliferation and morphology were assessed with MTT assay and microscopy, respectively. Cell cycle distribution and cell apoptosis were analyzed with flow cytometry. Western blotting was used to detect the proteins related to apoptosis, cell cycle, and the AKT/mTOR signaling pathway. Our data showed that TSA and SAHA reduced SGC-996 cell viability and arrested cell cycle at the G1 phase in a dose- and time-dependent manner. TSA and SAHA promoted apoptosis of SGC-996 cells, down-regulated the expression of cyclin D1, c-Myc and Bmi1, and decreased the phosphorylation of AKT, mTOR p70S6K1, S6 and 4E-BP1. Additionally, the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin further reduced the cell viability of TSA- and SAHA-treated SGC-996 cells and the phosphorylation of mTOR, whereas the mTOR activator 1,2-dioctanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphate (C8-PA) exerted the opposite influence. Our results demonstrate that histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) suppress the proliferation of gallbladder carcinoma cell via inhibition of AKT/mTOR signaling. These findings offer a mechanistic rationale for the application of HDACIs in gallbladder carcinoma treatment.

  19. Molecular basis for the dissociation dynamics of protein A-immunoglobulin G1 complex.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fu-Feng; Huang, Bo; Dong, Xiao-Yan; Sun, Yan

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus protein A (SpA) is the most popular affinity ligand for immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1). However, the molecular basis for the dissociation dynamics of SpA-IgG1 complex is unclear. Herein, coarse-grained (CG) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with the Martini force field were used to study the dissociation dynamics of the complex. The CG-MD simulations were first verified by the agreement in the structural and interactional properties of SpA and human IgG1 (hIgG1) in the association process between the CG-MD and all-atom MD at different NaCl concentrations. Then, the CG-MD simulation studies focused on the molecular insight into the dissociation dynamics of SpA-hIgG1 complex at pH 3.0. It is found that there are four steps in the dissociation process of the complex. First, there is a slight conformational adjustment of helix II in SpA. This is followed by the phenomena that the electrostatic interactions provided by the three hot spots (Glu143, Arg146 and Lys154) of helix II of SpA break up, leading to the dissociation of helix II from the binding site of hIgG1. Subsequently, breakup of the hydrophobic interactions between helix I (Phe132, Tyr133 and His137) in SpA and hIgG1 occurs, resulting in the disengagement of helix I from its binding site of hIgG1. Finally, the non-specific interactions between SpA and hIgG1 decrease slowly till disappearance, leading to the complete dissociation of the SpA-hIgG1 complex. This work has revealed that CG-MD coupled with the Martini force field is an effective method for studying the dissociation dynamics of protein-protein complex.

  20. Underlying principles of cell fate determination during G1 phase of the mammalian cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Pfeuty, Benjamin; David-Pfeuty, Thérèse; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2008-10-01

    Upon their exit from mitosis, mammalian cells enter a G(1) phase during which they acutely sense all sorts of environmental stimuli. On the basis of these signals that they first need to decipher and integrate, they decide whether to undergo division, differentiation, senescence or apoptosis. We questioned whether, despite the complexity of the G(1) regulatory network, simple organizing principles might be identified that could explain how specific input signals are converted into appropriate cell fates. For this purpose, we formulated a mathematical model of the G(1) regulatory network using a simplified description of activities linked to signal transduction, cell growth, cell division and cell death. Bifurcation analysis of the model revealed the existence of multistability between several attractor states corresponding to G(0)-arrest, G(1)-arrest, S-phase entry and apoptosis cell fates. We further unravelled interlinked feedback and feedforward loops within the G(1) regulatory network that drive the signal-dependent transition between G(0) arrest and the other cell fates. Initially, exit from G(0) and progression in early G(1) entail growth factor-dependent activation of an upstream positive feedback loop that activates the cell-growth machinery. Once ribosome synthesis is restored in G(1), a competition develops between a downstream positive feedback loop, which, upon activation, triggers S phase entry, and stress-activated pathways that promote G(1) arrest. If S phase entry prevails over G(1) arrest, cells are sensitized to apoptosis due to stress-induced activation of pro-apoptotic pathways or repression of pro-survival pathways. Thus, the choice between the four possible cell fates in the G(1) phase relies on the flexibly interlinked growth-activatory and division-activatory modules, certain components of which have antagonistic effects on pathways involved in driving apoptosis and G(1) arrest. The final outcome ultimately depends on the context

  1. Resetting the epigenetic histone code in the MRL-lpr/lpr mouse model of lupus by histone deacetylase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Benjamin A; Busby, Scott A; Shabanowitz, Jeffrey; Hunt, Donald F; Mishra, Nilamadhab

    2005-01-01

    The baseline level of gene expression varies between healthy controls and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients, and among SLE patients themselves. These variations may explain the different clinical manifestations and severity of disease observed in SLE. Epigenetic mechanisms, which involve DNA and histone modifications, are predictably associated with distinct transcriptional states. To understand the interplay between various histone modifications, including acetylation and methylation, and lupus disease, we performed differential expression histone modification analysis in splenocytes from the MRL-lpr/lpr mouse model of lupus. Using stable isotope labeling in combination with mass spectrometry, we found global site-specific hypermethylation (except H3 K4 methylation) and hypoacetylation in histone H3 and H4 MRL-lpr/lpr mice compared to control MRL/MPJ mice. Moreover, we have identified novel histone modifications such as H3 K18 methylation, H4 K31 methylation, and H4 K31 acetylation that are differentially expressed in MRL-lpr/lpr mice compared to controls. Finally, in vivo administration of the histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A (TSA) corrected the site-specific hypoacetylation states on H3 and H4 in MRL-lpr/lpr mice with improvement of disease phenotype. Thus, this study is the first to establish the association between aberrant histone codes and pathogenesis of autoimmune disease SLE. These aberrant post-translational histone modifications can therefore be reset with histone deacetylase inhibition in vivo.

  2. The TCP4 transcription factor of Arabidopsis blocks cell division in yeast at G1 {yields} S transition

    SciTech Connect

    Aggarwal, Pooja; Padmanabhan, Bhavna; Bhat, Abhay; Sarvepalli, Kavitha; Sadhale, Parag P.; Nath, Utpal

    2011-07-01

    Highlights: {yields} TCP4 is a class II TCP transcription factor, that represses cell division in Arabidopsis. {yields} TCP4 expression in yeast retards cell division by blocking G1 {yields} S transition. {yields} Genome-wide expression studies and Western analysis reveals stabilization of cell cycle inhibitor Sic1, as possible mechanism. -- Abstract: The TCP transcription factors control important aspects of plant development. Members of class I TCP proteins promote cell cycle by regulating genes directly involved in cell proliferation. In contrast, members of class II TCP proteins repress cell division. While it has been postulated that class II proteins induce differentiation signal, their exact role on cell cycle has not been studied. Here, we report that TCP4, a class II TCP protein from Arabidopsis that repress cell proliferation in developing leaves, inhibits cell division by blocking G1 {yields} S transition in budding yeast. Cells expressing TCP4 protein with increased transcriptional activity fail to progress beyond G1 phase. By analyzing global transcriptional status of these cells, we show that expression of a number of cell cycle genes is altered. The possible mechanism of G1 {yields} S arrest is discussed.

  3. 26 CFR 1.45G-1 - Railroad track maintenance credit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Railroad track maintenance credit. 1.45G-1... TAXES Rules for Computing Credit for Investment in Certain Depreciable Property § 1.45G-1 Railroad track maintenance credit. (a) In general. For purposes of section 38, the railroad track maintenance credit...

  4. 26 CFR 1.45G-1 - Railroad track maintenance credit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Railroad track maintenance credit. 1.45G-1... TAXES Rules for Computing Credit for Investment in Certain Depreciable Property § 1.45G-1 Railroad track maintenance credit. (a) In general. For purposes of section 38, the railroad track maintenance credit...

  5. 26 CFR 1.45G-1 - Railroad track maintenance credit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 1 2014-04-01 2013-04-01 true Railroad track maintenance credit. 1.45G-1... TAXES Rules for Computing Credit for Investment in Certain Depreciable Property § 1.45G-1 Railroad track maintenance credit. (a) In general. For purposes of section 38, the railroad track maintenance credit...

  6. Acrocentric Chromosomes in Cultured Leukocytes from Mothers of Children Affected With the G1- Trisomy Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    And Others; Cotton, James E.

    1973-01-01

    Analysis of venous blood samples from 24 mothers of G1-trisomy-affected (Down's Syndrome) children and 23 mothers of chromosomally normal children indicated that mothers of G1-trisomy-affected children had a greater than expected involvement of the G-chromosomes in associations of acrocentric satellited (chromosome configuration) chromosomes.…

  7. 16 CFR Appendix G1 to Part 305 - Furnaces-Gas

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Furnaces-Gas G1 Appendix G1 to Part 305 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION REGULATIONS UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS RULE CONCERNING... Part 305—Furnaces—Gas Manufacturer's rated heating capacities (Btu's/hr.) Range of annual...

  8. 16 CFR Appendix G1 to Part 305 - Furnaces-Gas

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Furnaces-Gas G1 Appendix G1 to Part 305 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION REGULATIONS UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS RULE CONCERNING... Part 305—Furnaces—Gas Manufacturer's rated heating capacities (Btu's/hr.) Range of annual...

  9. 16 CFR Appendix G1 to Part 305 - Furnaces-Gas

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Furnaces-Gas G1 Appendix G1 to Part 305 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION REGULATIONS UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS RULE CONCERNING... Part 305—Furnaces—Gas Manufacturer's rated heating capacities (Btu's/hr.) Range of annual...

  10. 16 CFR Appendix G1 to Part 305 - Furnaces-Gas

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Furnaces-Gas G1 Appendix G1 to Part 305 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION REGULATIONS UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS RULE CONCERNING... Part 305—Furnaces—Gas Manufacturer's rated heating capacities (Btu's/hr.) Range of annual...

  11. Enhanced HIV-1 neutralization by a CD4-VH3-IgG1 fusion protein

    SciTech Connect

    Meyuhas, Ronit; Noy, Hava; Fishman, Sigal; Margalit, Alon; Montefiori, David C.; Gross, Gideon

    2009-08-21

    HIV-1 gp120 is an alleged B cell superantigen, binding certain VH3+ human antibodies. We reasoned that a CD4-VH3 fusion protein could possess higher affinity for gp120 and improved HIV-1 inhibitory capacity. To test this we produced several human IgG1 immunoligands harboring VH3. Unlike VH3-IgG1 or VH3-CD4-IgG1, CD4-VH3-IgG1 bound gp120 considerably stronger than CD4-IgG1. CD4-VH3-IgG1 exhibited {approx}1.5-2.5-fold increase in neutralization of two T-cell laboratory-adapted strains when compared to CD4-IgG1. CD4-VH3-IgG1 improved neutralization of 7/10 clade B primary isolates or pseudoviruses, exceeding 20-fold for JR-FL and 13-fold for Ba-L. It enhanced neutralization of 4/8 clade C viruses, and had negligible effect on 1/4 clade A pseudoviruses. We attribute this improvement to possible pairing of VH3 with CD4 D1 and stabilization of an Ig Fv-like structure, rather than to superantigen interactions. These novel findings support the current notion that CD4 fusion proteins can act as better HIV-1 entry inhibitors with potential clinical implications.

  12. 26 CFR 1.414(g)-1 - Definition of plan administrator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Definition of plan administrator. 1.414(g)-1 Section 1.414(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Pension, Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. §...

  13. 26 CFR 1.415(g)-1 - Disqualification of plans and trusts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Disqualification of plans and trusts. 1.415(g)-1 Section 1.415(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Pension, Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. §...

  14. 26 CFR 301.6323(g)-1 - Refiling of notice of tax lien.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Refiling of notice of tax lien. 301.6323(g)-1 Section 301.6323(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION Collection General Provisions §...

  15. A Hot, Extended Horizontal Branch in the Massive M31 Globular Cluster G1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rich, Robert M.; Piotto, G.; Reitzel, D.; Origlia, L.; Bedin, L.

    2013-01-01

    The globular cluster G1 in M31 is among the most massive in the Local Group and may host a supermassive central black hole of ~20,000 Msun. We have used WFC3 on HST to image G1 in the F275, B, and V bands. G1 has also been proposed as likely to host a complex stellar population like that of ω Cen, which has been proposed as a possible nucleus of a dwarf galaxy. We find an extended blue horizontal branch in G1, although it appears the blue HB is <20% of the red clump population. Although we detect a wide red giant branch, neither the RGB nor HB have the complexity of those observed in Omega Cen. We have a solid detection of an extended HB in G1, but we do not strong evidence for the extreme complexity exhibited by ω Cen.

  16. Lysine Deacetylase Inhibitors in Parasites: Past, Present, and Future Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Hailu, Gebremedhin S; Robaa, Dina; Forgione, Mariantonietta; Sippl, Wolfgang; Rotili, Dante; Mai, Antonello

    2017-03-15

    Current therapies for human parasite infections rely on a few drugs, most of which have severe side effects, and their helpfulness is being seriously compromised by the drug resistance problem. Globally, this is pushing discovery research of antiparasitic drugs toward new agents endowed with new mechanisms of action. By using a "drug repurposing" strategy, histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi), which are presently clinically approved for cancer use, are now under investigation for various parasite infections. Because parasitic Zn(2+)- and NAD(+)-dependent HDACs play crucial roles in the modulation of parasite gene expression and many of them are pro-survival for several parasites under various conditions, they are now emerging as novel potential antiparasitic targets. This Perspective summarizes the state of knowledge of HDACi (both class I/II HDACi and sirtuin inhibitors) targeted to the main human parasitic diseases (schistosomiasis, malaria, trypanosomiasis, leishmaniasis, and toxoplasmosis) and provides visions into the main issues that challenge their development as antiparasitic agents.

  17. Treatment of chronic kidney diseases with histone deacetylase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Na; Zhuang, Shougang

    2015-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) induce deacetylation of both histone and non-histone proteins and play a critical role in the modulation of physiological and pathological gene expression. Pharmacological inhibition of HDAC has been reported to attenuate progression of renal fibrogenesis in obstructed kidney and reduce cyst formation in polycystic kidney disease. HDAC inhibitors (HDACis) are also able to ameliorate renal lesions in diabetes nephropathy, lupus nephritis, aristolochic acid nephropathy, and transplant nephropathy. The beneficial effects of HDACis are associated with their anti-fibrosis, anti-inflammation, and immunosuppressant effects. In this review, we summarize recent advances on the treatment of various chronic kidney diseases with HDACis in pre-clinical models. PMID:25972812

  18. Histone deacetylases 9 and 10 are required for homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Kotian, Shweta; Liyanarachchi, Sandhya; Zelent, Arthur; Parvin, Jeffrey D

    2011-03-11

    We tested the role of histone deacetylases (HDACs) in the homologous recombination process. A tissue-culture based homology-directed repair assay was used in which repair of a double-stranded break by homologous recombination results in gene conversion of an inactive GFP allele to an active GFP gene. Our rationale was that hyperacetylation caused by HDAC inhibitor treatment would increase chromatin accessibility to repair factors, thereby increasing homologous recombination. Contrary to expectation, treatment of cells with the inhibitors significantly reduced homologous recombination activity. Using RNA interference to deplete each HDAC, we found that depletion of either HDAC9 or HDAC10 specifically inhibited homologous recombination. By assaying for sensitivity of cells to the interstrand cross-linker mitomycin C, we found that treatment of cells with HDAC inhibitors or depletion of HDAC9 or HDAC10 resulted in increased sensitivity to mitomycin C. Our data reveal an unanticipated function of HDAC9 and HDAC10 in the homologous recombination process.

  19. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors Preserve Function in Aging Axons

    PubMed Central

    Baltan, Selva

    2012-01-01

    Aging increases the vulnerability of aging white matter to ischemic injury. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors preserve young adult white matter structure and function during ischemia by conserving ATP and reducing excitotoxicity. In isolated optic nerve from 12 month old mice, deprived of oxygen and glucose, we show that pan- and Class I specific HDAC inhibitors promote functional recovery of axons. This protection correlates with preservation of axonal mitochondria. The cellular expression of HDAC 3, in the central nervous system (CNS) and HDAC 2 in optic nerve considerably changed with age expanding to more cytoplasmic domains from nuclear compartments suggesting that changes in glial cell protein acetylation may confer protection to aging axons. Our results indicate manipulation of HDAC activities in glial cells may have a universal potential for stroke therapy across age groups. PMID:23050648

  20. Novel Antiproliferative Chimeric Compounds with Marked Histone Deacetylase Inhibitory Activity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Given our interest in finding potential antitumor agents and in view of the multifactorial mechanistic nature of cancer, in the present work, taking advantage of the multifunctional ligands approach, new chimeric molecules were designed and synthesized by combining in single chemical entities structural features of SAHA, targeting histone deacetylases (HDACs), with substituted stilbene or terphenyl derivatives previously obtained by us and endowed with antiproliferative and pro-apoptotic activity. The new chimeric derivatives were characterized with respect to their cytotoxic activity and their effects on cell cycle progression on different tumor cell lines, as well as their HDACs inhibition. Among the other, trans-6 showed the most interesting biological profile, as it exhibited a strong pro-apoptotic activity in tumor cell lines in comparison with both of its parent compounds and a marked HDAC inhibition. PMID:25221651

  1. Msa1 and Msa2 Modulate G1-Specific Transcription to Promote G1 Arrest and the Transition to Quiescence in Budding Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Miles, Shawna; Croxford, Matthew W.; Abeysinghe, Amali P.; Breeden, Linda L.

    2016-01-01

    Yeast that naturally exhaust their glucose source can enter a quiescent state that is characterized by reduced cell size, and high cell density, stress tolerance and longevity. The transition to quiescence involves highly asymmetric cell divisions, dramatic reprogramming of transcription and global changes in chromatin structure and chromosome topology. Cells enter quiescence from G1 and we find that there is a positive correlation between the length of G1 and the yield of quiescent cells. The Swi4 and Swi6 transcription factors, which form the SBF transcription complex and promote the G1 to S transition in cycling cells, are also critical for the transition to quiescence. Swi6 forms a second complex with Mbp1 (MBF), which is not required for quiescence. These are the functional analogues of the E2F complexes of higher eukaryotes. Loss of the RB analogue, Whi5, and the related protein Srl3/Whi7, delays G1 arrest, but it also delays recovery from quiescence. Two MBF- and SBF-Associated proteins have been identified that have little effect on SBF or MBF activity in cycling cells. We show that these two related proteins, Msa1 and Msa2, are specifically required for the transition to quiescence. Like the E2F complexes that are quiescence-specific, Msa1 and Msa2 are required to repress the transcription of many SBF target genes, including SWI4, the CLN2 cyclin and histones, specifically after glucose is exhausted from the media. They also activate transcription of many MBF target genes. msa1msa2 cells fail to G1 arrest and rapidly lose viability upon glucose exhaustion. msa1msa2 mutants that survive this transition are very large, but they attain the same thermo-tolerance and longevity of wild type quiescent cells. This indicates that Msa1 and Msa2 are required for successful transition to quiescence, but not for the maintenance of that state. PMID:27272642

  2. Role of HLA-G1 in trophoblast cell proliferation, adhesion and invasion

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Feng; Zhao, Hongxi; Wang, Li; Guo, Xinyu; Wang, Xiaohong; Yin, Guowu; Hu, Yunsheng; Li, Yi; Yao, Yuanqing

    2015-02-27

    Trophoblast cells are important in embryo implantation and fetomaternal tolerance. HLA-G is specifically expressed at the maternal–fetal interface and is a regulator in pregnancy. The aim of the present study was to detect the effect of HLA-G1 on trophoblast cell proliferation, adhesion, and invasion. Human trophoblast cell lines (JAR and HTR-8/SVneo cells) were infected with HLA-G1-expressing lentivirus. After infection, HLA-G1 expression of the cells was detected by western blotting. Cell proliferation was detected by the BrdU assay. The cell cycle and apoptosis of JAR and HTR-8/SVneo cells was measured by flow cytometry (FCM). The invasion of the cells under different conditions was detected by the transwell invasion chamber assay. HLA-G1 didn't show any significant influence on the proliferation, apoptosis, adhesion, and invasion of trophocytes in normal culture conditions. However, HLA-G1 inhibited JAR and HTR-8/SVneo cells invasion induced by hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) under normal oxygen conditions. In conditions of hypoxia, HLA-G1 couldn't inhibit the induction of cell invasion by HGF. HLA-G1 is not an independent factor for regulating the trophocytes. It may play an indirect role in embryo implantation and formation of the placenta. - Highlights: • HLA-G1 could not influence trophocytes under normal conditions. • HLA-G1 inhibited cell invasion induced by HGF under normal oxygen condition. • HLA-G1 could not influence cell invasion under hypoxia conditions.

  3. Histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACI) mechanisms of action: emerging insights.

    PubMed

    Bose, Prithviraj; Dai, Yun; Grant, Steven

    2014-09-01

    Initially regarded as "epigenetic modifiers" acting predominantly through chromatin remodeling via histone acetylation, HDACIs, alternatively referred to as lysine deacetylase or simply deacetylase inhibitors, have since been recognized to exert multiple cytotoxic actions in cancer cells, often through acetylation of non-histone proteins. Some well-recognized mechanisms of HDACI lethality include, in addition to relaxation of DNA and de-repression of gene transcription, interference with chaperone protein function, free radical generation, induction of DNA damage, up-regulation of endogenous inhibitors of cell cycle progression, e.g., p21, and promotion of apoptosis. Intriguingly, this class of agents is relatively selective for transformed cells, at least in pre-clinical studies. In recent years, additional mechanisms of action of these agents have been uncovered. For example, HDACIs interfere with multiple DNA repair processes, as well as disrupt cell cycle checkpoints, critical to the maintenance of genomic integrity in the face of diverse genotoxic insults. Despite their pre-clinical potential, the clinical use of HDACIs remains restricted to certain subsets of T-cell lymphoma. Currently, it appears likely that the ultimate role of these agents will lie in rational combinations, only a few of which have been pursued in the clinic to date. This review focuses on relatively recently identified mechanisms of action of HDACIs, with particular emphasis on those that relate to the DNA damage response (DDR), and discusses synergistic strategies combining HDACIs with several novel targeted agents that disrupt the DDR or antagonize anti-apoptotic proteins that could have implications for the future use of HDACIs in patients with cancer.

  4. Histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACI) mechanisms of action: emerging insights

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Prithviraj; Dai, Yun; Grant, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Initially regarded as “epigenetic modifiers” acting predominantly through chromatin remodeling via histone acetylation, HDACIs, alternatively referred to as lysine deacetylase or simply deacetylase inhibitors, have since been recognized to exert multiple cytotoxic actions in cancer cells, often through acetylation of non-histone proteins. Some well-recognized mechanisms of HDACI lethality include, in addition to relaxation of DNA and de-repression of gene transcription, interference with chaperone protein function, free radical generation, induction of DNA damage, up-regulation of endogenous inhibitors of cell cycle progression, e.g., p21, and promotion of apoptosis. Intriguingly, this class of agents is relatively selective for transformed cells, at least in pre-clinical studies. In recent years, additional mechanisms of action of these agents have been uncovered. For example, HDACIs interfere with multiple DNA repair processes, as well as disrupt cell cycle checkpoints, critical to the maintenance of genomic integrity in the face of diverse genotoxic insults. Despite their pre-clinical potential, the clinical use of HDACIs remains restricted to certain subsets of T-cell lymphoma. Currently, it appears likely that the ultimate role of these agents will lie in rational combinations, only a few of which have been pursued in the clinic to date. This review focuses on relatively recently identified mechanisms of action of HDACIs, with particular emphasis on those that relate to the DNA damage response (DDR), and discuss synergistic strategies combining HDACIs with several novel targeted agents that disrupt the DDR or antagonize anti-apoptotic proteins that could have implications for the future use of HDACIs in patients with cancer. PMID:24769080

  5. Neuroblastoma stem cells - mechanisms of chemoresistance and histone deacetylase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Khalil, M A; Hrabeta, J; Cipro, S; Stiborova, M; Vicha, A; Eckschlager, T

    2012-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) form a small proportion of tumor cells that have stem cell properties: self-renewal capacity, the ability to develop into different lineages and proliferative potential. The interest in CSCs emerged from their expected role in initiation, progression and recurrence of many tumors. They are generally resistant to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy. There are two hypotheses about their origin: The first assumes that CSCs may arise from normal stem cells, and the second supposes that differentiated cells acquire the properties of CSCs. Both hypotheses are not mutually exclusive, as it is possible that CSCs have a diverse origin in different tumors. CD133+ cells (CD133 is marker of CSC in some tumors) isolated from NBL, osteosarcoma and Ewing sarcoma cell lines are resistant to cisplatin, carboplatin, etoposide and doxorubicin than the CD133- ones. Being resistant to chemotherapy, there were many attempts to target CSCs epigenetically including the use of histone deacetylase inhibitors. The diverse influence of valproic acid (histone deacetylase inhibitor) on normal and cancer stem cells was proved in different experiments. We have found an increase percentage of CD133+ NBL cells after their incubation with VPA in a dose that does not induce apoptosis. Further researches on CSCs and clinical application for their detection are necessary: (i) to define the CSC function in carcinogenesis, cancer development and their role in metastasis; (ii) to find a specific marker for CSCs in different tumors; (iii) to explain the role of different pathways that determine their behavior and (iv) to explain mechanisms of chemoresistance of CSCs.

  6. Shrimp chitin as substrate for fungal chitin deacetylase.

    PubMed

    Win, N N; Stevens, W F

    2001-10-01

    The fungal chitin deacetylases (CDA) studied so far are able to perform heterogeneous enzymatic deacetylation on their solid substrate, but only to a limited extent. Kinetic data show that about 5-10% of the N-acetyl glucosamine residues are deacetylated rapidly. Thereafter enzymatic deacetylation is slow. In this study, chitin was exposed to various physical and chemical conditions such as heating, sonicating, grinding, derivatization and interaction with saccharides and presented as a substrate to the CDA of the fungus Absidia coerulea. None of these treatments of the substrate resulted in a more efficient enzymatic deacetylation. Dissolution of chitin in specific solvents followed by fast precipitation by changing the composition of the solvent was not successful either in making microparticles that would be more accessible to the enzyme. However, by treating chitin in this way, a decrystallized chitin with a very small particle size called superfine (SF) chitin could be obtained. This SF chitin, pretreated with 18% formic acid, appeared to be a good substrate for fungal deacetylase. This was confirmed both by enzyme-dependent deacetylation measured by acetate production as well as by isolation and assay for the degree of deacetylation (DD). In this way chitin (10% DD) was deacetylated by the enzyme into chitosan with DD of 90%. The formic acid treatment reduced the molecular weight of the polymeric chain from 2x10(5) in chitin to 1.2 x 10(4) in the chitosan product. It is concluded that nearly complete enzymatic deacetylation has been demonstrated for low-molecular chitin.

  7. Cytoplasmic-Nuclear Trafficking of G1/S Cell Cycle Molecules and Adult Human β-Cell Replication

    PubMed Central

    Fiaschi-Taesch, Nathalie M.; Kleinberger, Jeffrey W.; Salim, Fatimah G.; Troxell, Ronnie; Wills, Rachel; Tanwir, Mansoor; Casinelli, Gabriella; Cox, Amy E.; Takane, Karen K.; Srinivas, Harish; Scott, Donald K.; Stewart, Andrew F.

    2013-01-01

    Harnessing control of human β-cell proliferation has proven frustratingly difficult. Most G1/S control molecules, generally presumed to be nuclear proteins in the human β-cell, are in fact constrained to the cytoplasm. Here, we asked whether G1/S molecules might traffic into and out of the cytoplasmic compartment in association with activation of cell cycle progression. Cdk6 and cyclin D3 were used to drive human β-cell proliferation and promptly translocated into the nucleus in association with proliferation. In contrast, the cell cycle inhibitors p15, p18, and p19 did not alter their location, remaining cytoplasmic. Conversely, p16, p21, and p27 increased their nuclear frequency. In contrast once again, p57 decreased its nuclear frequency. Whereas proliferating β-cells contained nuclear cyclin D3 and cdk6, proliferation generally did not occur in β-cells that contained nuclear cell cycle inhibitors, except p21. Dynamic cytoplasmic-nuclear trafficking of cdk6 was confirmed using green fluorescent protein–tagged cdk6 and live cell imaging. Thus, we provide novel working models describing the control of cell cycle progression in the human β-cell. In addition to known obstacles to β-cell proliferation, cytoplasmic-to-nuclear trafficking of G1/S molecules may represent an obstacle as well as a therapeutic opportunity for human β-cell expansion. PMID:23493571

  8. Transformation abrogates an early G1-phase arrest point required for specification of the Chinese hamster DHFR replication origin.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, J R; Keezer, S M; Gilbert, D M

    1998-01-01

    The origin decision point (ODP) was originally identified as a distinct point during G1-phase when Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell nuclei experience a transition that is required for specific recognition of the dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) origin locus by Xenopus egg extracts. Passage of cells through the ODP requires a mitogen-independent protein kinase that is activated prior to restriction point control. Here we show that inhibition of an early G1-phase protein kinase pathway by the addition of 2-aminopurine (2-AP) prior to the ODP arrests CHO cells in G1-phase. Transformation with simian virus 40 (SV40) abrogated this arrest point, resulting in the entry of cultured cells into S-phase in the presence of 2-AP and a disruption of the normal pattern of initiation sites at the DHFR locus. Cells treated with 2-AP after the ODP initiated replication specifically within the DHFR origin locus. Transient exposure of transformed cells to 2-AP during the ODP transition also disrupted origin choice, whereas non-transformed cells arrested in G1-phase and then passed through a delayed ODP after removal of 2-AP from the medium. We conclude that mammalian cells have many potential sites at which they can initiate replication. Normally, events occurring during the early G1-phase ODP transition determine which of these sites will be the preferred initiation site. However, if chromatin is exposed to S-phase-promoting factors prior to this transition, mammalian cells, like Xenopus and Drosophila embryos, can initiate replication without origin specification. PMID:9501102

  9. Increased expression of histone deacetylases 2 in temporal lobe epilepsy: a study of epileptic patients and rat models.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuanyuan; Zhao, Fenghua; Wang, Liang; Yin, Huan; Zhou, Chunlei; Wang, Xuefeng

    2012-02-01

    Histone deacetylases 2 (HDAC2) is expressed in the central nervous system; it has multiple functions in neural plasticity. However, we do not know if HDAC2 is also involved in the pathology of epilepsy. Here we report that HDAC2 was expressed in the brain tissues of both control and temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) patients. Results from immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry showed that HDAC2 was primarily located in the nucleus and that TLE patients exhibit significantly more HDAC2 positive cells than control. Western blotting showed that HDAC2 protein levels were significantly higher in TLE than in control brain. Moreover, in the rat model of TLE, there was a sustained enhancement of HDAC2 expression in rat models of TLE. HDAC2 was significantly increased in both the acute (1 day) and chronic (60 days) animals compared with control group. These results suggest that HDAC2 play an important role in the pathogenesis of human TLE.

  10. Deacetylase inhibitors as a novel modality in the treatment of multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Paul G; Moreau, Philippe; Laubach, Jacob P; Maglio, Michelle E; Lonial, Sagar; San-Miguel, Jesus

    2017-03-01

    Deacetylase enzymes remove acetyl groups from histone and nonhistone proteins. Dysregulation of deacetylase activity is a hallmark of malignancy, including multiple myeloma (MM). Deacetylase inhibitors (DACi) cause epigenetic modification and inhibition of the aggresome pathway, resulting in death of MM cells. Panobinostat, a pan-DACi, has shown significant clinical benefit and is the first DACi approved for the treatment of MM. It is approved for use in combination with bortezomib and dexamethasone for the treatment of patients with relapsed or relapsed and refractory MM who have received ≥2 prior regimens including bortezomib and an immunomodulatory drug. Ricolinostat and ACY-241, which selectively inhibit HDAC6 and the aggresome pathway, are currently being studied in combination with dexamethasone and bortezomib or an immunomodulatory drug for the treatment of relapsed and refractory MM. In this review, we discuss the data from key clinical trials investigating deacetylase inhibitors as novel treatment options for MM.

  11. The multifaceted influence of histone deacetylases on DNA damage signalling and DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    Roos, Wynand Paul; Krumm, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Histone/protein deacetylases play multiple roles in regulating gene expression and protein activation and stability. Their deregulation during cancer initiation and progression cause resistance to therapy. Here, we review the role of histone deacetylases (HDACs) and the NAD+ dependent sirtuins (SIRTs) in the DNA damage response (DDR). These lysine deacetylases contribute to DNA repair by base excision repair (BER), nucleotide excision repair (NER), mismatch repair (MMR), non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), homologous recombination (HR) and interstrand crosslink (ICL) repair. Furthermore, we discuss possible mechanisms whereby these histone/protein deacetylases facilitate the switch between DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair pathways, how SIRTs play a central role in the crosstalk between DNA repair and cell death pathways due to their dependence on NAD+, and the influence of small molecule HDAC inhibitors (HDACi) on cancer cell resistance to genotoxin based therapies. Throughout the review, we endeavor to identify the specific HDAC targeted by HDACi leading to therapy sensitization. PMID:27738139

  12. Quarter variation and correlations of colostrum albumin, immunoglobulin G1 and G2 in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Samarütel, Jaak; Baumrucker, Craig R; Gross, Josef J; Dechow, Chad D; Bruckmaier, Rupert M

    2016-05-01

    A high variation in immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) concentration in first milked quarter colostrum has been reported, but BSA quarter colostrum variation is not known. The occurrence of serum albumin in milk has been attributed to increased blood-milk barrier penetration. Reports of serum albumin binding to the Fc Receptor of the neonate, the receptor thought to be responsible for IgG1 transcytosis, suggested that a correlation with the appearance of IgG1 in colostrum of dairy cows was likely. The objective of the study was to establish the quarter colostrum concentration and mass of immunoglobulins and serum albumin. First colostrum was quarter collected within 4 h of parturition from healthy udders of 31 multiparous dairy cows. Individual quarter colostrum weight was determined and a sample of each was frozen for subsequent analysis. Concentrations of immunoglobulin G1, G2, and BSA were measured by ELISA and total mass of components was calculated. In addition, colostrum was also analysed for L-lactate dehydrogenase activity. Analysis of concentration and mass of BSA, immunoglobulin G1, G2 established that the quarter variations were different by cow, quarter and quarter within cow. Partial correlations corrected for colostrum weight indicated that BSA and IgG2 concentration and mass are closely correlated while that of BSA and IgG1 concentration and mass exhibited no correlation suggesting that BSA and IgG1 may have different transport mechanisms. Interestingly, immunoglobulin G1 and G2 concentration and mass exhibited strong correlations suggesting that also some unknown mechanism of immunoglobulin G2 appearance in colostrum is occurring. Finally, no measured protein exhibited any correlation with the activity of lactate dehydrogenase in colostrum.

  13. A distinct G1 step required to specify the Chinese hamster DHFR replication origin.

    PubMed

    Wu, J R; Gilbert, D M

    1996-03-01

    Nuclei isolated from Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells at various times during the G1 phase of the cell cycle were stimulated to enter S phase by incubation in Xenopus egg cytosol. Replication of DNA initiated within the dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) origin locus in nuclei isolated late in G1, but at random sites in nuclei isolated early in G1. A discrete transition point occurred 3 to 4 hours after metaphase. Neither replication licensing nor nuclear assembly was sufficient for origin recognition. Thus, a distinct cell cycle-regulated event in the nucleus restricts the initiation of replication to specific sites downstream of the DHFR gene.

  14. Cystathionine γ-lyase protects vascular endothelium: a role for inhibition of histone deacetylase 6.

    PubMed

    Leucker, Thorsten M; Nomura, Yohei; Kim, Jae Hyung; Bhatta, Anil; Wang, Victor; Wecker, Andrea; Jandu, Sandeep; Santhanam, Lakshmi; Berkowitz, Dan; Romer, Lewis; Pandey, Deepesh

    2017-04-01

    Endothelial cystathionine γ-lyase (CSEγ) contributes to cardiovascular homeostasis, mainly through production of H2S. However, the molecular mechanisms that control CSEγ gene expression in the endothelium during cardiovascular diseases are unclear. The aim of the current study is to determine the role of specific histone deacetylases (HDACs) in the regulation of endothelial CSEγ. Reduced CSEγ mRNA expression and protein abundance were observed in human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC) exposed to oxidized LDL (OxLDL) and in aortas from atherogenic apolipoprotein E knockout (ApoE(-/-)) mice fed a high-fat diet compared with controls. Intact murine aortic rings exposed to OxLDL (50 μg/ml) for 24 h exhibited impaired endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation that was blocked by CSEγ overexpression or the H2S donor NaHS. CSEγ expression was upregulated by pan-HDAC inhibitors and by class II-specific HDAC inhibitors, but not by other class-specific inhibitors. The HDAC6 selective inhibitor tubacin and HDAC6-specific siRNA increased CSEγ expression and blocked OxLDL-mediated reductions in endothelial CSEγ expression and CSEγ promoter activity, indicating that HDAC6 is a specific regulator of CSEγ expression. Consistent with this finding, HDAC6 mRNA, protein expression, and activity were upregulated in OxLDL-exposed HAEC, but not in human aortic smooth muscle cells. HDAC6 protein levels in aortas from high-fat diet-fed ApoE(-/-) mice were comparable to those in controls, whereas HDAC6 activity was robustly upregulated. Together, our findings indicate that HDAC6 is upregulated by atherogenic stimuli via posttranslational modifications and is a critical regulator of CSEγ expression in vascular endothelium. Inhibition of HDAC6 activity may improve endothelial function and prevent or reverse the development of atherosclerosis.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Oxidative injury to endothelial cells by oxidized LDL reduced cystathionine γ-lyase (CSEγ) expression and H2S production

  15. Cation exchange surface-mediated denaturation of an aglycosylated immunoglobulin (IgG1).

    PubMed

    Gillespie, Ron; Nguyen, Thao; Macneil, Sean; Jones, Laurie; Crampton, Shon; Vunnum, Suresh

    2012-08-17

    Cation exchange chromatography of an aglycosylated IgG1 resulted in two distinct peaks during gradient elution. The early eluting peak contained <1% high molecular weight (HMW) species, while the later peak contained 23% HMW species. Analysis by hydrogen-deuterium exchange and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) indicated that aggregate formation and generation of the second peak were caused by antibody denaturation on the resin surface. Denaturation and HMW generation was increased by the use of strong cation exchange media, by increasing antibody residence time on the exchanger, or increasing temperature. Denaturation and HMW generation was reduced by increasing pH or ionic strength, by the use of preferentially excluded solutes such as citrate or glycine and controlled entirely by addition of 125 mM arginine to the process buffers. This leads to the hypothesis that denaturation and HMW generation of this antibody can be managed by reducing the strength of binding, by increasing its conformational stability, or by suppressing non-native protein-protein interactions. The glycosylated version of this antibody exhibited less than 2% denatured form, suggesting that glycosylation contributes significantly to the stability of this antibody. These findings may be helpful in managing aggregation in other antibodies, and particularly useful in developing purification processes for aglycosylated antibodies.

  16. Liquid high concentration IgG1 antibody formulations by precipitation.

    PubMed

    Matheus, Susanne; Friess, Wolfgang; Schwartz, Daniel; Mahler, Hanns-Christian

    2009-09-01

    A manufacturing approach for liquid high concentration antibody formulations based on precipitation and subsequent re-dissolution was investigated. IgG1 antibody solutions were concentrated from 20 to 100 mg/mL by intermediate precipitation, with a recovery exceeding 95%, retention of the native secondary structure and binding activity as well as adequate stability. Quantitative, reproducible precipitation was performed using 1.45 M ammonium sulphate (pH 5.5 and 8.0), 0.67 M sodium citrate (pH 8.0) and 9% (w/v) PEG 4000 (pH 5.5 and 8.0). Scalability was confirmed from 1 to 100 mL. The concentrations achievable in the re-dissolution step were less affected by the re-dissolution medium, but limited by the residual precipitant. Both, improved removal of remaining precipitant liquid and larger precipitation scales were successful in increasing the final protein concentration. SEC and turbidity analysis directly after re-dissolution indicated that similar protein qualities were obtained, independent from the precipitant used. However, increased aggregate formation was observed after short term storage of the precipitated protein particles at either 2-8 degrees C or ambient temperature. An accelerated mechanical and thermal stability program verified comparable stability of the re-dissolved liquid 100 mg/mL formulations produced by intermediate precipitation to a control formulation obtained by standard ultrafiltration.

  17. Bacillus amyloliquefaciens G1: A Potential Antagonistic Bacterium against Eel-Pathogenic Aeromonas hydrophila

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Haipeng; He, Shan; Wei, Ruopeng; Diong, Marek; Lu, Liqun

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed that the use of probiotics is an alternative to control marine aeromonas. However, few probiotics are available against Aeromonas hydrophila infections in eels. In the present study, a potential antagonistic strain G1 against the eel-pathogenic A. hydrophila was isolated from sediment underlying brackish water. Its extracellular products with antibacterial activities were shown to be stable under wide range of pH, temperature, and proteinase K. It was initially identified as Bacillus amyloliquefaciens using API identification kits and confirmed to be B. amyloliquefaciens strain (GenBank accession number DQ422953) by phylogenetic analysis. In addition, it was shown to be safe for mammalians, had a wide anti-A. hydrophila spectrum, and exhibited significant effects on inhibiting the growth of the eel-pathogenic A. hydrophila both in vitro and in vivo. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on a promising antagonistic Bacillus amyloliquefaciens strain from brackish water sediment against eel-pathogenic A. hydrophila. PMID:21754944

  18. Moments of the Spin Structure Functions g1p and g1d for 0.05 < Q2 < 3.0 GeV2

    SciTech Connect

    Prok, Yelena; Bosted, Peter; Burkert, Volker; Deur, Alexandre; Dharmawardane, Kahanawita; Dodge, Gail; Griffioen, Keith; Kuhn, Sebastian; Minehart, Ralph; Adams, Gary; Amaryan, Moscov; Amaryan, Moskov; Anghinolfi, Marco; Asryan, G.; Audit, Gerard; Avagyan, Harutyun; Baghdasaryan, Hovhannes; Baillie, Nathan; Ball, J.P.; Ball, Jacques; Baltzell, Nathan; Barrow, Steve; Battaglieri, Marco; Beard, Kevin; Bedlinskiy, Ivan; Bektasoglu, Mehmet; Bellis, Matthew; Benmouna, Nawal; Berman, Barry; Biselli, Angela; Blaszczyk, Lukasz; Boyarinov, Sergey; Bonner, Billy; Bouchigny, Sylvain; Bradford, Robert; Branford, Derek; Briscoe, William; Brooks, William; Bultmann, S.; Bueltmann, Stephen; Butuceanu, Cornel; Calarco, John; Careccia, Sharon; Carman, Daniel; Casey, Liam; Cazes, Antoine; Chen, Shifeng; Cheng, Lu; Cole, Philip; Collins, Patrick; Coltharp, Philip; Cords, Dieter; Corvisiero, Pietro; Crabb, Donald; Crede, Volker; Cummings, John; Dale, Daniel; Dashyan, Natalya; De Masi, Rita; De Vita, Raffaella; De Sanctis, Enzo; Degtiarenko, Pavel; Denizli, Haluk; Dennis, Lawrence; Dhuga, Kalvir; Dickson, Richard; Djalali, Chaden; Doughty, David; Dugger, Michael; Dytman, Steven; Dzyubak, Oleksandr; Egiyan, Hovanes; Egiyan, Kim; Elfassi, Lamiaa; Elouadrhiri, Latifa; Eugenio, Paul; Fatemi, Renee; Fedotov, Gleb; Feldman, Gerald; Fersch, Robert; Feuerbach, Robert; Forest, Tony; Fradi, Ahmed; Funsten, Herbert; Garcon, Michel; Gavalian, Gagik; Gevorgyan, Nerses; Gilfoyle, Gerard; Giovanetti, Kevin; Girod, Francois-Xavier; Goetz, John; Golovach, Evgeny; Gothe, Ralf; Guidal, Michel; Guillo, Matthieu; Guler, Nevzat; Guo, Lei; Gyurjyan, Vardan; Hadjidakis, Cynthia; Hafidi, Kawtar; Hakobyan, Hayk; Hanretty, Charles; Hardie, John; Hassall, Neil; Heddle, David; Hersman, F.; Hicks, Kenneth; Hleiqawi, Ishaq; Holtrop, Maurik; Huertas, Marco; Hyde, Charles; Ilieva, Yordanka; Ireland, David; Ishkhanov, Boris; Isupov, Evgeny; Ito, Mark; Jenkins, David; Jo, Hyon-Suk; Johnstone, John; Joo, Kyungseon; Juengst, Henry; Kalantarians, Narbe; Keith, Christopher; Kellie, James; Khandaker, Mahbubul; Kim, Kui; Kim, Kyungmo; Kim, Wooyoung; Klein, Andreas; Klein, Franz; Klusman, Mike; Kossov, Mikhail; Krahn, Zebulun; Kramer, Laird; Kubarovsky, Valery; Kuhn, Joachim; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kuznetsov, Viacheslav; Lachniet, Jeff; Laget, Jean; Langheinrich, Jorn; Lawrence, Dave; Lima, Ana; Livingston, Kenneth; Lu, Haiyun; Lukashin, K.; MacCormick, Marion; Marchand, Claude; Markov, Nikolai; Mattione, Paul; McAleer, Simeon; McKinnon, Bryan; McNabb, John; Mecking, Bernhard; Mestayer, Mac; Meyer, Curtis; Mibe, Tsutomu; Mikhaylov, Konstantin; Mirazita, Marco; Miskimen, Rory; Mokeev, Viktor; Morand, Ludyvine; Moreno, Brahim; Moriya, Kei; Morrow, Steven; Moteabbed, Maryam; Mueller, James; Munevar Espitia, Edwin; Mutchler, Gordon; Nadel-Turonski, Pawel; Nasseripour, Rakhsha; Niccolai, Silvia; Niculescu, Gabriel; Niculescu, Maria-Ioana; Niczyporuk, Bogdan; Niroula, Megh; Niyazov, Rustam; Nozar, Mina; O'Rielly, Grant; Osipenko, Mikhail; Ostrovidov, Alexander; Park, Kijun; Pasyuk, Evgueni; Paterson, Craig; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Philips, Sasha; Pierce, J.; Pivnyuk, Nikolay; Pocanic, Dinko; Pogorelko, Oleg; Popa, Iulian; Pozdnyakov, Sergey; Preedom, Barry; Price, John; Procureur, Sebastien; Protopopescu, Dan; Qin, Liming; Raue, Brian; Riccardi, Gregory; Ricco, Giovanni; Ripani, Marco; Ritchie, Barry; Rosner, Guenther; Rossi, Patrizia; Rowntree, David; Rubin, Philip; Sabatie, Franck; Salamanca, Julian; Salgado, Carlos; Santoro, Joseph; Sapunenko, Vladimir; Schumacher, Reinhard; Seely, Mikell; Serov, Vladimir; Sharabian, Youri; Sharov, Dmitri; Shaw, Jeffrey; Shvedunov, Nikolay; Skabelin, Alexander; Smith, Elton; Smith, Lee; Sober, Daniel; Sokhan, Daria; Stavinskiy, Aleksey; Stepanyan, Samuel; Stepanyan, Stepan; Stokes, Burnham; Stoler, Paul; Strakovski, Igor; Strauch, Steffen; Suleiman, Riad; Taiuti, Mauro; Tedeschi, David; Tkabladze, Avtandil; Tkachenko, Svyatoslav; Todor, Luminita; Ungaro, Maurizio; V

    2009-02-01

    The spin structure functions $g_1$ for the proton and the deuteron have been measured over a wide kinematic range in $x$ and \\Q2 using 1.6 and 5.7 GeV longitudinally polarized electrons incident upon polarized NH$_3$ and ND$_3$ targets at Jefferson Lab. Scattered electrons were detected in the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer, for $0.05 < Q^2 < 5 $\\ GeV$^2$ and $W < 3$ GeV. The first moments of $g_1$ for the proton and deuteron are presented -- both have a negative slope at low \\Q2, as predicted by the extended Gerasimov-Drell-Hearn sum rule. The first result for the generalized forward spin polarizability of the proton $\\gamma_0^p$ is also reported, and shows evidence of scaling above $Q^2$ = 1.5 GeV$^2$. Although the first moments of $g_1$ are consistent with Chiral Perturbation Theory (\\ChPT) calculations up to approximately $Q^2 = 0.06$ GeV$^2$, a significant discrepancy is observed between the $\\gamma_0^p$ data and \\ChPT\\ for $\\gamma_0^p$,even at the lowest \\Q2.

  19. miR-150 inhibits proliferation and tumorigenicity via retarding G1/S phase transition in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiangyong; Liu, Fumei; Lin, Bihua; Luo, Haiqing; Liu, Meilian; Wu, Jinhua; Li, Caihong; Li, Ronggang; Zhang, Xin; Zhou, Keyuan; Ren, Dong

    2017-01-01

    Cancer cells are characterized by a pathological manifestation of uncontrolled proliferation, which results in tumor formation. Therefore, it is necessary to improve understanding of the underlying mechanism of cell cycle control. Here, we report that miR-150 is downregulated in nasopharyngeal carcinoma tissues and cells. Upregulation of miR-150 suppresses nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) cell proliferation and induces G1/S arrest in vitro, and inhibits tumorigenesis in vivo. Conversely, silencing miR-150 yields the opposite effect. Our results further demonstrate that miR-150 retards nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell proliferation and G1/S transition via targeting multiple cell cycle-related genes, including CCND1, CCND2, CDK2 and CCNE2. Therefore, our results uncover a novel mechanistic understanding of miR-150-mediated tumor suppression in NPC, which will facilitate the development of effective cancer therapies against nasopharyngeal carcinoma. PMID:28350089

  20. Redox-mediated bypass of restriction point via skipping of G1pm

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Arnold; Greene, James J; Spetner, Lee M; Burke, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Background It is well known that cancer cells bypass the restriction point, R, and undergo uncontrolled cell proliferation. Hypothesis and evidence We suggest here that fibrosarcoma cells enter G1ps directly from M, skipping G1pm, hence bypassing R, in response to redox modulation. Evidence is presented from the published literature that demonstrate a shortening of the cycle period of transformed fibroblasts (SV-3T3) compared to the nontransformed 3T3 fibroblasts, corresponding to the duration of G1pm in the 3T3 fibroblasts. Evidence is also presented that demonstrate that redox modulation can induce the CUA-4 fibroblasts to bypass R, resulting in a cycle period closely corresponding to the cycle period of fibrosarcoma cells (HT1080). Conclusion The evidence supports our hypothesis that a low internal redox potential can cause fibrosarcoma cells to skip the G1pm phase of the cell cycle. PMID:16867189

  1. Hcp and VgrG1 are secreted components of the Helicobacter hepaticus type VI secretion system and VgrG1 increases the bacterial colitogenic potential.

    PubMed

    Bartonickova, Lucie; Sterzenbach, Torsten; Nell, Sandra; Kops, Friederike; Schulze, Jessika; Venzke, Annika; Brenneke, Birgit; Bader, Sophie; Gruber, Achim D; Suerbaum, Sebastian; Josenhans, Christine

    2013-06-01

    The enterohepatic Epsilonproteobacterium Helicobacter hepaticus persistently colonizes the intestine of mice and causes chronic inflammatory symptoms in susceptible mouse strains. The bacterial factors causing intestinal inflammation are poorly characterized. A large genomic pathogenicity island, HHGI1, which encodes components of a type VI secretion system (T6SS), was previously shown to contribute to the colitogenic potential of H. hepaticus. We have now characterized the T6SS components Hcp, VgrG1, VgrG2 and VgrG3, encoded on HHGI1, including the potential impact of the T6SS on intestinal inflammation in a mouse T-cell transfer model. The H. hepaticus T6SS components were expressed during the infection and secreted in a T6SS-dependent manner, when the bacteria were cultured either in the presence or in the absence of mouse intestinal epithelial cells. Mutants deficient in VgrG1 displayed a significantly lower colitogenic potential in T-cell-transferred C57BL/6 Rag2(-/-) mice, despite an unaltered ability to colonize mice persistently. Intestinal microbiota analyses demonstrated only minor changes in mice infected with wild-typeH. hepaticus as compared with mice infected with VgrG1-deficient isogenic bacteria. In addition, competitive assays between both wild-type and T6SS-deficient H. hepaticus, and between wild-type H. hepaticus and Campylobacter jejuni or Enterobacteriaceae species did not show an effect of the T6SS on interbacterial competitiveness. Therefore, we suggest that microbiota alterations did not play a major role in the changes of pro-inflammatory potential mediated by the T6SS. Cellular innate pro-inflammatory responses were increased by the secreted T6SS proteins VgrG1 and VgrG2. We therefore concluded that the type VI secretion component VgrG1 can modulate and specifically exacerbate the innate pro-inflammatory effect of the chronic H. hepaticus infection.

  2. Nuclear levels and patterns of histone H3 modification and HP1 proteins after inhibition of histone deacetylases.

    PubMed

    Bártová, Eva; Pacherník, Jirí; Harnicarová, Andrea; Kovarík, Ales; Kovaríková, Martina; Hofmanová, Jirina; Skalníková, Magdalena; Kozubek, Michal; Kozubek, Stanislav

    2005-11-01

    The effects of the histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) trichostatin A (TSA) and sodium butyrate (NaBt) were studied in A549, HT29 and FHC human cell lines. Global histone hyperacetylation, leading to decondensation of interphase chromatin, was characterized by an increase in H3(K9) and H3(K4) dimethylation and H3(K9) acetylation. The levels of all isoforms of heterochromatin protein, HP1, were reduced after HDAC inhibition. The observed changes in the protein levels were accompanied by changes in their interphase patterns. In control cells, H3(K9) acetylation and H3(K4) dimethylation were substantially reduced to a thin layer at the nuclear periphery, whereas TSA and NaBt caused the peripheral regions to become intensely acetylated at H3(K9) and dimethylated at H3(K4). The dispersed pattern of H3(K9) dimethylation was stable even at the nuclear periphery of HDACi-treated cells. After TSA and NaBt treatment, the HP1 proteins were repositioned more internally in the nucleus, being closely associated with interchromatin compartments, while centromeric heterochromatin was relocated closer to the nuclear periphery. These findings strongly suggest dissociation of HP1 proteins from peripherally located centromeres in a hyperacetylated and H3(K4) dimethylated environment. We conclude that inhibition of histone deacetylases caused dynamic reorganization of chromatin in parallel with changes in its epigenetic modifications.

  3. IgG1 variations in the colostrum of Holstein dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Le Cozler, Y; Guatteo, R; Le Dréan, E; Turban, H; Leboeuf, F; Pecceu, K; Guinard-Flament, J

    2016-02-01

    High-immune quality colostrum (IgG1 concentration ⩾50 g/l) is crucial for the health and development of the young calf. Studies on colostrum quality tend to focus on external factors such as breed, parity or dry period length, but few have focused on within-cow variations. Here we ran experiments to gain a deeper insight into within-cow variation in IgG1 concentrations in dairy cow colostrum. Trials were performed in an experimental farm, located in the Western part of France. Colostrum from each quarter and a composite sample (mix of four quarters) were concomitantly collected on 77 Holstein dairy cows just after calving to assess the influence of sample type on IgG1 concentrations. Variation in IgG1 concentrations during the first milking was studied on samples from nine cows collected every minute from the start of milking. Repeatability of colostral IgG1 concentration was estimated from 2009 and 2010 data on 16 healthy cows. IgG1 concentrations were tested using a radial immunodiffusion method. Sensitivity and specificity were similar regardless of sample type tested (individual quarter or composite milk). Mean average IgG1 concentration was 54.1 g/l in composite colostrum, and was significantly higher in hind quarter teats (56.2 g/l) than front quarter teats (53.1 g/l). Average IgG1 concentration did not change significantly during colostrum milking, and the variations observed (15% or less) were likely due to the laboratory method (CV 15%). IgG1 concentrations in dam colostrum increased slightly from 2009 to 2010 due to BW and parity effects. In 56% of cases, colostrum quality could have been assessed on either individual or composite colostrum samples collected at any time during the first milking without affecting the reliability of the measurement. However, in other cases, differences were significant enough to mean that estimates of average IgG1 concentration in colostrum from any one quarter would not be reliable. It is concluded that colostrum quality

  4. Comprehensive phenotypic analysis of knockout mice deficient in cyclin G1 and cyclin G2

    PubMed Central

    Ohno, Shouichi; Ikeda, Jun-ichiro; Naito, Yoko; Okuzaki, Daisuke; Sasakura, Towa; Fukushima, Kohshiro; Nishikawa, Yukihiro; Ota, Kaori; Kato, Yorika; Wang, Mian; Torigata, Kosuke; Kasama, Takashi; Uchihashi, Toshihiro; Miura, Daisaku; Yabuta, Norikazu; Morii, Eiichi; Nojima, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Cyclin G1 (CycG1) and Cyclin G2 (CycG2) play similar roles during the DNA damage response (DDR), but their detailed roles remain elusive. To investigate their distinct roles, we generated knockout mice deficient in CycG1 (G1KO) or CycG2 (G2KO), as well as double knockout mice (DKO) deficient in both proteins. All knockouts developed normally and were fertile. Generation of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) from these mice revealed that G2KO MEFs, but not G1KO or DKO MEFs, were resistant to DNA damage insults caused by camptothecin and ionizing radiation (IR) and underwent cell cycle arrest. CycG2, but not CycG1, co-localized with γH2AX foci in the nucleus after γ-IR, and γH2AX-mediated DNA repair and dephosphorylation of CHK2 were delayed in G2KO MEFs. H2AX associated with CycG1, CycG2, and protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), suggesting that γH2AX affects the function of PP2A via direct interaction with its B’γ subunit. Furthermore, expression of CycG2, but not CycG1, was abnormal in various cancer cell lines. Kaplan–Meier curves based on TCGA data disclosed that head and neck cancer patients with reduced CycG2 expression have poorer clinical prognoses. Taken together, our data suggest that reduced CycG2 expression could be useful as a novel prognostic marker of cancer. PMID:27982046

  5. Dillapiol and Apiol as specific inhibitors of the biosynthesis of aflatoxin G1 in Aspergillus parasiticus.

    PubMed

    Razzaghi-Abyaneh, Mehdi; Yoshinari, Tomoya; Shams-Ghahfarokhi, Masoomeh; Rezaee, Mohammad-Bagher; Nagasawa, Hiromichi; Sakuda, Shohei

    2007-09-01

    Dillapiol was isolated from the essential oil of dill as a specific inhibitor of aflatoxin G1 production. It inhibited aflatoxin G1 production by Aspergillus parasiticus with an IC50 value of 0.15 microM without inhibiting aflatoxin B1 production or fungal growth. Apiol and myristicin, congeners of dillapiol, showed similar activity with IC50 values of 0.24 and 3.5 microM, respectively.

  6. APOL1-G1 in Nephrocytes Induces Hypertrophy and Accelerates Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yulong; Zhu, Jun-Yi; Richman, Adam; Zhang, Yi; Xie, Xuefang; Das, Jharna R; Li, Jinliang; Ray, Patricio E; Han, Zhe

    2017-04-01

    People of African ancestry carrying certain APOL1 mutant alleles are at elevated risk of developing renal diseases. However, the mechanisms underlying APOL1-associated renal diseases are unknown. Because the APOL1 gene is unique to humans and some primates, new animal models are needed to understand the function of APOL1 in vivo We generated transgenic Drosophila fly lines expressing the human APOL1 wild type allele (G0) or the predominant APOL1 risk allele (G1) in different tissues. Ubiquitous expression of APOL1 G0 or G1 in Drosophila induced lethal phenotypes, and G1 was more toxic than was G0. Selective expression of the APOL1 G0 or G1 transgene in nephrocytes, fly cells homologous to mammalian podocytes, induced increased endocytic activity and accumulation of hemolymph proteins, dextran particles, and silver nitrate. As transgenic flies with either allele aged, nephrocyte function declined, cell size increased, and nephrocytes died prematurely. Compared with G0-expressing cells, however, G1-expressing cells showed more dramatic phenotypes, resembling those observed in cultured mammalian podocytes overexpressing APOL1-G1. Expressing the G0 or G1 APOL1 transgene in nephrocytes also impaired the acidification of organelles. We conclude that expression of an APOL1 transgene initially enhances nephrocyte function, causing hypertrophy and subsequent cell death. This new Drosophila model uncovers a novel mechanism by which upregulated expression of APOL1-G1 could precipitate renal disease in humans. Furthermore, this model may facilitate the identification of APOL1-interacting molecules that could serve as new drug targets to treat APOL1-associated renal diseases.

  7. IgG1 Fc N-glycan galactosylation as a biomarker for immune activation

    PubMed Central

    de Jong, Sanne E.; Selman, Maurice H. J.; Adegnika, Ayola A.; Amoah, Abena S.; van Riet, Elly; Kruize, Yvonne C. M.; Raynes, John G.; Rodriguez, Alejandro; Boakye, Daniel; von Mutius, Erika; Knulst, André C.; Genuneit, Jon; Cooper, Philip J.; Hokke, Cornelis H.; Wuhrer, Manfred; Yazdanbakhsh, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Immunoglobulin G (IgG) Fc N-glycosylation affects antibody-mediated effector functions and varies with inflammation rooted in both communicable and non-communicable diseases. Worldwide, communicable and non-communicable diseases tend to segregate geographically. Therefore, we studied whether IgG Fc N-glycosylation varies in populations with different environmental exposures in different parts of the world. IgG Fc N-glycosylation was analysed in serum/plasma of 700 school-age children from different communities of Gabon, Ghana, Ecuador, the Netherlands and Germany. IgG1 galactosylation levels were generally higher in more affluent countries and in more urban communities. High IgG1 galactosylation levels correlated with low total IgE levels, low C-reactive protein levels and low prevalence of parasitic infections. Linear mixed modelling showed that only positivity for parasitic infections was a significant predictor of reduced IgG1 galactosylation levels. That IgG1 galactosylation is a predictor of immune activation is supported by the observation that asthmatic children seemed to have reduced IgG1 galactosylation levels as well. This indicates that IgG1 galactosylation levels could be used as a biomarker for immune activation of populations, providing a valuable tool for studies examining the epidemiological transition from communicable to non-communicable diseases. PMID:27306703

  8. GPER agonist G-1 decreases adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) cell growth in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zolea, Fabiana; Rizza, Pietro; Avena, Paola; Malivindi, Rocco; De Luca, Arianna; Campana, Carmela; Martire, Emilia; Domanico, Francesco; Fallo, Francesco; Carpinelli, Giulia; Cerquetti, Lidia; Amendola, Donatella; Stigliano, Antonio; Pezzi, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that estrogen receptor (ER) alpha (ESR1) increases proliferation of adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) through both an estrogen-dependent and -independent (induced by IGF-II/IGF1R pathways) manner. Then, the use of tamoxifen, a selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM), appears effective in reducing ACC growth in vitro and in vivo. However, tamoxifen not only exerts antiestrogenic activity, but also acts as full agonist on the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER). Aim of this study was to investigate the effect of a non-steroidal GPER agonist G-1 in modulating ACC cell growth. We found that G-1 is able to exert a growth inhibitory effect on H295R cells both in vitro and, as xenograft model, in vivo. Treatment of H295R cells with G-1 induced cell cycle arrest, DNA damage and cell death by the activation of the intrinsic apoptotic mechanism. These events required sustained extracellular regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 activation. Silencing of GPER by a specific shRNA partially reversed G-1-mediated cell growth inhibition without affecting ERK activation. These data suggest the existence of G-1 activated but GPER-independent effects that remain to be clarified. In conclusion, this study provides a rational to further study G-1 mechanism of action in order to include this drug as a treatment option to the limited therapy of ACC. PMID:26131713

  9. Guiding bispecific monovalent antibody formation through proteolysis of IgG1 single-chain.

    PubMed

    Dimasi, Nazzareno; Fleming, Ryan; Sachsenmeier, Kris F; Bezabeh, Binyam; Hay, Carl; Wu, Jincheng; Sult, Erin; Rajan, Saravanan; Zhuang, Li; Cariuk, Peter; Buchanan, Andrew; Bowen, Michael A; Wu, Herren; Gao, Changshou

    2017-04-01

    We developed an IgG1 domain-tethering approach to guide the correct assembly of 2 light and 2 heavy chains, derived from 2 different antibodies, to form bispecific monovalent antibodies in IgG1 format. We show here that assembling 2 different light and heavy chains by sequentially connecting them with protease-cleavable polypeptide linkers results in the generation of monovalent bispecific antibodies that have IgG1 sequence, structure and functional properties. This approach was used to generate a bispecific monovalent antibody targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor and the type I insulin-like growth factor receptor that: 1) can be produced and purified using standard IgG1 techniques; 2) exhibits stability and structural features comparable to IgG1; 3) binds both targets simultaneously; and 4) has potent anti-tumor activity. Our strategy provides new engineering opportunities for bispecific antibody applications, and, most importantly, overcomes some of the limitations (e.g., half-antibody and homodimer formation, light chains mispairing, multi-step purification), inherent with some of the previously described IgG1-based bispecific monovalent antibodies.

  10. Evaluation of the hydrometer for testing immunoglobulin G1 concentrations in Holstein colostrum.

    PubMed

    Pritchett, L C; Gay, C C; Hancock, D D; Besser, T E

    1994-06-01

    Hydrometer measurement in globulin and IgG1 concentration measured by the radial immunodiffusion technique were compared for 915 samples of first milking colostrum from Holstein cows. Least squares analysis of the relationship between hydrometer measurement and IgG1 concentration was improved by log transformation of IgG1 concentration and resulted in a significant linear relationship between hydrometer measurement and log10 IgG1 concentration; r2 = .469. At 50 mg of globulin/ml of colostrum, the recommended hydrometer cutoff point for colostrum selection, the sensitivity of the hydrometer as a test of IgG1 concentration in Holstein colostrum was 26%, and the negative predictive value was 67%. The negative predictive value and sensitivity of the hydrometer as a test of IgG1 in Holstein colostrum was improved, and the cost of misclassification of colostrum was minimized, when the cutoff point for colostrum selection was increased above the recommended 50 mg/ml.

  11. Effect of high mobility group nonhistone proteins HMG-20 (ubiquitin) and HMG-17 on histone deacetylase activity assayed in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Mezquita, J; Chiva, M; Vidal, S; Mezquita, C

    1982-01-01

    We have used a method previously described by Reeves and Candido (1) to partially release histone deacetylase from cell nuclei together with putative regulators of the enzyme. Histone deacetylase released from testis cell nuclei and its putative regulators were separated by gel filtration in Sepharose 6B. A peak of low molecular weight contains a heat-stable factor that stimulate histone deacetylase in vitro. Many of the properties of the activator coincide with those of the protein HMG-20 (ubiquitin). Ubiquitin isolated from testis cell nuclei stimulated histone deacetylase in vitro. It has been suggested that HMG-17 partially inhibits histone deacetylase in Fried cell nuclei (2). In our system, HMG-17 shows no inhibitory effect on histone deacetylase activity Images PMID:6280157

  12. Dominant recognition of a cross-reactive B-cell epitope in Mycobacterium leprae 10 K antigen by immunoglobulin G1 antibodies across the disease spectrum in leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, R; Dockrell, H M; Chiang, T J

    1999-01-01

    Mycobacterium leprae-specific immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) antibodies in patients with leprosy show a direct correlation with bacterial load (ρ=0·748; P < 0002) suggesting that IgG1 B-cell responses may be surrogate markers of disease progression. To investigate if this upregulation was a general feature of IgG1 responses to all M. leprae (ML) antigens, we analysed responses to several recombinant purified ML heat-shock proteins (HSP). Three recombinant HSPs (ML10 K, ML 18 K and ML 65 K) were tested for their ability to induce various IgG subclasses in patients with either the lepromatous (LL/BL, n = 26) or tuberculoid form (BT/TT, n = 39) of the disease as well as in healthy households (HC, n = 14) and endemic controls (EC = 19). Our major findings were: (1) selective augmentation of IgG1 antibody responses to ML10 K; (2) recognition of a restricted number of epitopes across the disease spectrum and healthy controls by IgG1 antibodies; (3) dominant recognition of cross-reactive epitopes which were common to both ML and MT 10 K. This response was not related to contamination with endotoxin. Epitope mapping using 15-mer overlapping peptides spanning the ML 10 000 MW revealed an immunodominant IgG1 binding peptide (aa41–55) in patients as well as healthy controls. This peptide is a shared epitope with M. tuberculosis 10 K suggesting that postswitched IgG1 B cells recognizing this epitope rather than naive B cells are being expanded. PMID:10233750

  13. Design, synthesis, and antitumor evaluation of histone deacetylase inhibitors with l-phenylglycine scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yingjie; Li, Xiaoguang; Hou, Jinning; Huang, Yongxue; Xu, Wenfang

    2015-01-01

    In our previous research, a novel series of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors with l-phenylglycine scaffold were designed and synthesized, among which amides D3 and D7 and ureido D18 were far superior to the positive control (suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid [SAHA]) in HDAC inhibition, but were only comparable to SAHA in antiproliferation on tumor cell lines. Herein, further structural derivation of lead compounds D3, D7, and D18 was carried out to improve their cellular activities. Most of our newly synthesized compounds exhibited more potent HDAC inhibitory activities than the positive control SAHA, and several derivatives were even better than their parent compounds. However, compared with SAHA and our lead compounds, only secondary amine series compounds exhibited improved antiproliferative activities, likely due to their appropriate topological polar surface area values and cell permeabilities. In a human histiocytic lymphoma (U937) xenograft model, the most potent secondary amine 9d exhibited similar in vivo antitumor activity to that of SAHA. PMID:26504374

  14. Polycomb- and REST-associated histone deacetylases are independent pathways toward a mature neuronal phenotype

    PubMed Central

    McGann, James C; Oyer, Jon A; Garg, Saurabh; Yao, Huilan; Liu, Jun; Feng, Xin; Liao, Lujian; Yates, John R; Mandel, Gail

    2014-01-01

    The bivalent hypothesis posits that genes encoding developmental regulators required for early lineage decisions are poised in stem/progenitor cells by the balance between a repressor histone modification (H3K27me3), mediated by the Polycomb Repressor Complex 2 (PRC2), and an activator modification (H3K4me3). In this study, we test whether this mechanism applies equally to genes that are not required until terminal differentiation. We focus on the RE1 Silencing Transcription Factor (REST) because it is expressed highly in stem cells and is an established global repressor of terminal neuronal genes. Elucidation of the REST complex, and comparison of chromatin marks and gene expression levels in control and REST-deficient stem cells, shows that REST target genes are poised by a mechanism independent of Polycomb, even at promoters which bear the H3K27me3 mark. Specifically, genes under REST control are actively repressed in stem cells by a balance of the H3K4me3 mark and a repressor complex that relies on histone deacetylase activity. Thus, chromatin distinctions between pro-neural and terminal neuronal genes are established at the embryonic stem cell stage by two parallel, but distinct, repressor pathways. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04235.001 PMID:25250711

  15. Histone deacetylases: revealing the molecular base of dimorphism in pathogenic fungi

    PubMed Central

    Elías-Villalobos, Alberto; Helmlinger, Dominique; Ibeas, José I.

    2015-01-01

    Fungi, as every living organism, interact with the external world and have to adapt to its fluctuations. For pathogenic fungi, such interaction involves adapting to the hostile environment of their host. Survival depends on the capacity of fungi to detect and respond to external stimuli, which is achieved through a tight and efficient genetic control. Chromatin modifications represent a well-known layer of regulation that controls gene expression in response to environmental signals. However, less is known about the chromatin modifications that are involved in fungal virulence and the specific cues and signalling pathways that target chromatin modifications to specific genes. In a recently published study, our research group identified one such regulatory pathway. We demonstrated that the histone deacetylase (HDAC) Hos2 is involved in yeast-to-hyphal transition (dimorphism) and it is associated with the virulence of the maize pathogen Ustilago maydis, the causative agent of smut disease in corn. Hos2 activates mating-type genes by directly binding to their gene bodies. Furthermore, Hos2 acts downstream of the nutrient-sensing cyclic AMP-Protein Kinase A pathway. We also found that another HDAC, Clr3, contributes to this regulation, possibly in cooperation with Hos2. As a whole, our data suggest that there is a direct link between changes in the environment and acetylation of nucleosomes within certain genes. We propose that histone acetylation is critical to the proper timing and induction of transcription of the genes encoding factors that coordinate changes in morphology with pathogenesis.

  16. Heterochromatin assembly and transcriptome repression by Set1 in coordination with a class II histone deacetylase.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, David R; Meyer, Lauren F; Grady, Patrick J R; Meyer, Michelle M; Cam, Hugh P

    2014-12-15

    Histone modifiers play essential roles in controlling transcription and organizing eukaryotic genomes into functional domains. Here, we show that Set1, the catalytic subunit of the highly conserved Set1C/COMPASS complex responsible for histone H3K4 methylation (H3K4me), behaves as a repressor of the transcriptome largely independent of Set1C and H3K4me in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Intriguingly, while Set1 is enriched at highly expressed and repressed loci, Set1 binding levels do not generally correlate with the levels of transcription. We show that Set1 is recruited by the ATF/CREB homolog Atf1 to heterochromatic loci and promoters of stress-response genes. Moreover, we demonstrate that Set1 coordinates with the class II histone deacetylase Clr3 in heterochromatin assembly at prominent chromosomal landmarks and repression of the transcriptome that includes Tf2 retrotransposons, noncoding RNAs, and regulators of development and stress-responses. Our study delineates a molecular framework for elucidating the functional links between transcriptome control and chromatin organization.

  17. A Plasmodium falciparum histone deacetylase regulates antigenic variation and gametocyte conversion.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Bradley I; Skillman, Kristen M; Jiang, Rays H Y; Childs, Lauren M; Altenhofen, Lindsey M; Ganter, Markus; Leung, Yvette; Goldowitz, Ilana; Kafsack, Björn F C; Marti, Matthias; Llinás, Manuel; Buckee, Caroline O; Duraisingh, Manoj T

    2014-08-13

    The asexual forms of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum are adapted for chronic persistence in human red blood cells, continuously evading host immunity using epigenetically regulated antigenic variation of virulence-associated genes. Parasite survival on a population level also requires differentiation into sexual forms, an obligatory step for further human transmission. We reveal that the essential nuclear gene, P. falciparum histone deacetylase 2 (PfHda2), is a global silencer of virulence gene expression and controls the frequency of switching from the asexual cycle to sexual development. PfHda2 depletion leads to dysregulated expression of both virulence-associated var genes and PfAP2-g, a transcription factor controlling sexual conversion, and is accompanied by increases in gametocytogenesis. Mathematical modeling further indicates that PfHda2 has likely evolved to optimize the parasite's infectious period by achieving low frequencies of virulence gene expression switching and sexual conversion. This common regulation of cellular transcriptional programs mechanistically links parasite transmissibility and virulence.

  18. Histone deacetylases 1 and 2 regulate autophagy flux and skeletal muscle homeostasis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Moresi, Viviana; Carrer, Michele; Grueter, Chad E.; Rifki, Oktay F.; Shelton, John M.; Richardson, James A.; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda; Olson, Eric N.

    2012-01-01

    Maintenance of skeletal muscle structure and function requires efficient and precise metabolic control. Autophagy plays a key role in metabolic homeostasis of diverse tissues by recycling cellular constituents, particularly under conditions of caloric restriction, thereby normalizing cellular metabolism. Here we show that histone deacetylases (HDACs) 1 and 2 control skeletal muscle homeostasis and autophagy flux in mice. Skeletal muscle-specific deletion of both HDAC1 and HDAC2 results in perinatal lethality of a subset of mice, accompanied by mitochondrial abnormalities and sarcomere degeneration. Mutant mice that survive the first day of life develop a progressive myopathy characterized by muscle degeneration and regeneration, and abnormal metabolism resulting from a blockade to autophagy. HDAC1 and HDAC2 regulate skeletal muscle autophagy by mediating the induction of autophagic gene expression and the formation of autophagosomes, such that myofibers of mice lacking these HDACs accumulate toxic autophagic intermediates. Strikingly, feeding HDAC1/2 mutant mice a high-fat diet from the weaning age releases the block in autophagy and prevents myopathy in adult mice. These findings reveal an unprecedented and essential role for HDAC1 and HDAC2 in maintenance of skeletal muscle structure and function and show that, at least in some pathological conditions, myopathy may be mitigated by dietary modifications. PMID:22307625

  19. Histone deacetylase inhibitor significantly improved the cloning efficiency of porcine somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yongye; Tang, Xiaochun; Xie, Wanhua; Zhou, Yan; Li, Dong; Yao, Chaogang; Zhou, Yang; Zhu, Jianguo; Lai, Liangxue; Ouyang, Hongsheng; Pang, Daxin

    2011-12-01

    Valproic acid (VPA), a histone deacetylase inbibitor, has been shown to generate inducible pluripotent stem (iPS) cells from mouse and human fibroblasts with a significant higher efficiency. Because successful cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) undergoes a full reprogramming process in which the epigenetic state of a differentiated donor nuclear is converted into an embryonic totipotent state, we speculated that VPA would be useful in promoting cloning efficiency. Therefore, in the present study, we examined whether VPA can promote the developmental competence of SCNT embryos by improving the reprogramming state of donor nucleus. Here we report that 1 mM VPA for 14 to 16 h following activation significantly increased the rate of blastocyst formation of porcine SCNT embryos constructed from Landrace fetal fibroblast cells compared to the control (31.8 vs. 11.4%). However, we found that the acetylation level of Histone H3 lysine 14 and Histone H4 lysine 5 and expression level of Oct4, Sox2, and Klf4 was not significantly changed between VPA-treated and -untreated groups at the blastocyst stage. The SCNT embryos were transferred to 38 surrogates, and the cloning efficiency in the treated group was significantly improved compared with the control group. Taken together, we have demonstrated that VPA can improve both in vitro and in vivo development competence of porcine SCNT embryos.

  20. Impact of the GeoMIP G1 sunshade geoengineering experiment on the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Yu; Moore, John C.; Jevrejeva, Svetlana; Ji, Duoying; Phipps, Steven J.; Lenton, Andrew; Tilmes, Simone; Watanabe, Shingo; Zhao, Liyun

    2017-03-01

    We analyze the multi-earth system model responses of ocean temperatures and the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) under an idealized solar radiation management scenario (G1) from the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project. All models simulate warming of the northern North Atlantic relative to no geoengineering, despite geoengineering substantially offsetting the increases in mean global ocean temperatures. Increases in the temperature of the North Atlantic Ocean at the surface (∼0.25 K) and at a depth of 500 m (∼0.10 K) are mainly due to a 10 Wm‑2 reduction of total heat flux from ocean to atmosphere. Although the AMOC is slightly reduced under the solar dimming scenario, G1, relative to piControl, it is about 37% stronger than under abrupt4 × CO2 . The reduction of the AMOC under G1 is mainly a response to the heat flux change at the northern North Atlantic rather than to changes in the water flux and the wind stress. The AMOC transfers heat from tropics to high latitudes, helping to warm the high latitudes, and its strength is maintained under solar dimming rather than weakened by greenhouse gas forcing acting alone. Hence the relative reduction in high latitude ocean temperatures provided by solar radiation geoengineering, would tend to be counteracted by the correspondingly active AMOC circulation which furthermore transports warm surface waters towards the Greenland ice sheet, warming Arctic sea ice and permafrost.

  1. Histone deacetylase inhibitor BML-210 induces growth inhibition and apoptosis and regulates HDAC and DAPC complex expression levels in cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Borutinskaite, Veronika V; Magnusson, Karl-Eric; Navakauskiene, Ruta

    2012-12-01

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) represent a new class of targeted anti-cancer agents and different other diseases, like muscular disorders. A number of studies have shown that extracellular signal-activated kinases can target chromatin-modifying complexes directly and regulate their function. The molecular connection between the dystrophin-associated protein complex (DAPC) and chromatin has been described, by showing that NO signaling regulates histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity and influences gene expression in different cell types. In present study, we investigated HDACs changes in HeLa cells undergoing growth inhibition and apoptosis, caused by HDACI BML-210 and retinoic acid (ATRA). Cell cycle analysis indicated that HeLa cell treatment with 20 and 30 μM concentration of BML-210 increased the proportion of cells in G0/G1 phase, and caused accumulation in subG1, indicating that the cells are undergoing apoptosis. We determined down-regulation of HDAC 1-5 and 7 after treatment with BML-210. Also, we demonstrated expression of different isoforms of alpha-dystrobrevin (α-DB) and other components of DAPC such as syntrophin, dystrophin, beta-dystrobrevin (β-DB) and NOS in HeLa cells after treatments. We determined changes in protein expression level of dystrophin, NOS1, α- and β-DB and in subcellular localization of α-DB after treatments with BML-210 and ATRA. In conclusion, these results suggest that HDACI BML-210 can inhibit cell growth and induce apoptosis in cervical cancer cells, what correlates with down-regulation of HDAC class I and II and changes in the DAPC expression levels. This can be important for identifying target proteins in DAPC signaling to HDACs, as a target of pharmacological intervention for treatment of muscular dystrophies and other diseases.

  2. 26 CFR 6a.6652(g)-1 - Failure to make return or furnish statement required under section 6039C.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... required under section 6039C. 6a.6652(g)-1 Section 6a.6652(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... OMNIBUS RECONCILIATION ACT OF 1980 § 6a.6652(g)-1 Failure to make return or furnish statement required... limitation under § 6a.6652(g)-1(b)(3) with respect to failure to meet the requirements of section 6039C(c),...

  3. IL-27 induces the production of IgG1 by human B cells.

    PubMed

    Boumendjel, Amel; Tawk, Lina; Malefijt, René de Waal; Boulay, Vera; Yssel, Hans; Pène, Jérôme

    2006-12-01

    It has been reported that IL-27 specifically induces the production of IgG2a by mouse B cells and inhibits IL-4-induced IgG1 synthesis. Here, we show that human naïve cord blood expresses a functional IL-27 receptor, consisting of the TCCR and gp130 subunits, although at lower levels as compared to naïve and memory splenic B cells. IL-27 does not induce proliferative responses and does not increase IgG1 production by CD19(+)CD27(+) memory B cells. However, it induces a low, but significant production of IgG1 by naïve CD19(+)CD27(-)IgD(+)IgG(-) spleen and cord blood B cells, activated via CD40, whereas it has no effect on the production of the other IgG subclasses. In addition, IL-27 induces the differentiation of a population of B cells that express high levels of CD38, in association with a down-regulation of surface IgD expression, and that are surface IgG(+/int), CD20(low), CD27(high), indicating that IL-27 promotes isotype switching and plasma cell differentiation of naive B cells. However, as compared to the effects of IL-21 and IL-10, both switch factors for human IgG1 and IgG3, those of IL-27 are modest and regulate exclusively the production of IgG1. Finally, although IL-27 has no effect on IL-4 and anti-CD40-induced Cepsilon germline promoter activity, it up-regulates IL-4-induced IgE production by naive B cells. These results point to a partial redundancy of switch factors regulating the production of IgG1 in humans, and furthermore indicate the existence of a common regulation of the human IgG1and murine IgG2a isotypes by IL-27.

  4. Detection of G1 proteins in Chinese hamster cells synchronized by isoleucine deprivation or mitotic selection.

    PubMed

    Ley, K D

    1975-07-01

    Examination of labeling patterns of proteins in Chinese hamster cells(line CHO) revealed the presence of a class of protein(s) that is synthesized during G1 phase of the cell cycle. Cells arrested in G1 by isoleucine (Ile) deprivation were prelabeded with [14-C]Ile, induced to traverse G1 by addition of unlabeled Ile, and labeled with [3-H]Ile at hourly intervals. Cells were fractionated into neclear and cytoplasmic portions, and proteins were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide get electrophoresis. Gel profiles of proteins in the 45,000-160,000 mol wt range from the cytoplasm of cells in G1 were similar to those from cells arrested in G1 except for the presence of a mojor peak of [1-H]Ile incorporated into a protein(s) of approximately 80,000 mol wt. Peaks of net [3-H]Ile incorporation were not detected in neclear preparations. Cellular fractionation by differential centrifugation showed the peak I protein was located in the soluble supernatant fraction of the cytoplasm. Time-course studies showed that synthesis of this protein began 1-2 h after initiation of G1 traverse; the protein reached maximum levels in 4-6 h and was reduced to undetectable levels by 9 h. A cytoplasmic protein with similar electrophoretic mobility was found in G1 phase of cells synchronized by mitotic selection. This class of proteins is synthesized by cells before entry into S phase and may be involved in initiation of DNA synthesis.

  5. IgG1 deficiency exacerbates experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Huda, Ruksana; Strait, Richard T; Tüzün, Erdem; Finkelman, Fred D; Christadoss, Premkumar

    2015-04-15

    Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disease characterized by muscle weakness due to neuromuscular junction (NMJ) damage by anti-acetylcholine receptor (AChR) auto-antibodies and complement. In experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG), which is induced by immunization with Torpedo AChR in CFA, anti-AChR IgG2b and IgG1 are the predominant isotypes in the circulation. Complement activation by isotypes such as IgG2b plays a crucial role in EAMG pathogenesis; this suggested the possibility that IgG1, which does not activate complement through the classical pathway, may suppress EAMG. In this study, we show that AChR-immunized BALB/c mice genetically deficient for IgG1 produce higher levels of complement-activating isotypes of anti-AChR, especially IgG3 and IgG2a, and develop increased IgG3/IgG2a deposits at the NMJ, as compared to wild type (WT) BALB/c mice. Consistent with this, AChR-immunized IgG1(-/-) BALB/c mice lose muscle strength and muscle AChR to a greater extent than AChR-immunized WT mice. These observations demonstrate that IgG1 deficiency leads to increased severity of EAMG associated with an increase in complement activating IgG isotypes. Further studies are needed to dissect the specific role or mechanism of IgG1 in limiting EAMG and that of EAMG exacerbating role of complement activating IgG3 and IgG2a in IgG1 deficiency.

  6. Histone deacetylase inhibitors: understanding a new wave of anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Villar-Garea, Ana; Esteller, Manel

    2004-11-01

    Cancer is as much an epigenetic disease as it is a genetic and cytogenetic disease. The discovery that drastic changes in DNA methylation and histone modifications are commonly found in human tumors has inspired various laboratories and pharmaceutical companies to develop and study epigenetic drugs. One of the most promising groups of agents is the inhibitors of histone deacetylases (HDACs), which have different biochemical and biologic properties but have a single common activity: induction of acetylation in histones, the key proteins in nucleosome and chromatin structure. One of the main mechanisms of action of HDAC inhibitors is the transcriptional reactivation of dormant tumor-suppressor genes, such as p21WAF1. However, their pleiotropic nature leaves open the possibility that their well-known differentiation, cell-cycle arrest and apoptotic properties are also involved in other functions associated with HDAC inhibition. Many phase I clinical trials indicate that HDAC inhibitors appear to be well-tolerated drugs. Thus, the field is ready for rigorous biologic and clinical scrutiny to validate the therapeutic potential of these drugs. Our current data indicate that the use of HDAC inhibitors, probably in association with classical chemotherapy drugs or in combination with DNA-demethylating agents, could be promising for cancer patients.

  7. HDACiDB: a database for histone deacetylase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Murugan, Kasi; Sangeetha, Shanmugasamy; Ranjitha, Shanmugasamy; Vimala, Antony; Al-Sohaibani, Saleh; Rameshkumar, Gopal

    2015-01-01

    An histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor database (HDACiDB) was constructed to enable rapid access to data relevant to the development of epigenetic modulators (HDAC inhibitors [HDACi]), helping bring precision cancer medicine a step closer. Thousands of HDACi targeting HDACs are in various stages of development and are being tested in clinical trials as monotherapy and in combination with other cancer agents. Despite the abundance of HDACi, information resources are limited. Tools for in silico experiments on specific HDACi prediction, for designing and analyzing the generated data, as well as custom-made specific tools and interactive databases, are needed. We have developed an HDACiDB that is a composite collection of HDACi and currently comprises 1,445 chemical compounds, including 419 natural and 1,026 synthetic ones having the potential to inhibit histone deacetylation. Most importantly, it will allow application of Lipinski's rule of five drug-likeness and other physicochemical property-based screening of the inhibitors. It also provides easy access to information on their source of origin, molecular properties, drug likeness, as well as bioavailability with relevant references cited. Being the first comprehensive database on HDACi that contains all known natural and synthetic HDACi, the HDACiDB may help to improve our knowledge concerning the mechanisms of actions of available HDACi and enable us to selectively target individual HDAC isoforms and establish a new paradigm for intelligent epigenetic cancer drug design. The database is freely available on the http://hdacidb.bioinfo.au-kbc.org.in/hdacidb/website.

  8. Targeting macrophage Histone deacetylase 3 stabilizes atherosclerotic lesions

    PubMed Central

    Hoeksema, Marten A; Gijbels, Marion JJ; Van den Bossche, Jan; van der Velden, Saskia; Sijm, Ayestha; Neele, Annette E; Seijkens, Tom; Stöger, J Lauran; Meiler, Svenja; Boshuizen, Marieke CS; Dallinga-Thie, Geesje M; Levels, Johannes HM; Boon, Louis; Mullican, Shannon E; Spann, Nathanael J; Cleutjens, Jack P; Glass, Chris K; Lazar, Mitchell A; de Vries, Carlie JM; Biessen, Erik AL; Daemen, Mat JAP; Lutgens, Esther; de Winther, Menno PJ

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages are key immune cells found in atherosclerotic plaques and critically shape atherosclerotic disease development. Targeting the functional repertoire of macrophages may hold novel approaches for future atherosclerosis management. Here, we describe a previously unrecognized role of the epigenomic enzyme Histone deacetylase 3 (Hdac3) in regulating the atherosclerotic phenotype of macrophages. Using conditional knockout mice, we found that myeloid Hdac3 deficiency promotes collagen deposition in atherosclerotic lesions and thus induces a stable plaque phenotype. Also, macrophages presented a switch to anti-inflammatory wound healing characteristics and showed improved lipid handling. The pro-fibrotic phenotype was directly linked to epigenetic regulation of the Tgfb1 locus upon Hdac3 deletion, driving smooth muscle cells to increased collagen production. Moreover, in humans, HDAC3 was the sole Hdac upregulated in ruptured atherosclerotic lesions, Hdac3 associated with inflammatory macrophages, and HDAC3 expression inversely correlated with pro-fibrotic TGFB1 expression. Collectively, we show that targeting the macrophage epigenome can improve atherosclerosis outcome and we identify Hdac3 as a potential novel therapeutic target in cardiovascular disease. PMID:25007801

  9. Histone deacetylases inhibitors effects on Cryptococcus neoformans major virulence phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Brandão, Fabiana As; Derengowski, Lorena S; Albuquerque, Patrícia; Nicola, André M; Silva-Pereira, Ildinete; Poças-Fonseca, Marcio J

    2015-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans undergoes phenotypical changes during host infection in order to promote persistence and survival. Studies have demonstrated that such adaptations require alterations in gene transcription networks by distinct mechanisms. Drugs such as the histone deacetylases inhibitors (HDACi) Sodium Butyrate (NaBut) and Trichostatin A (TSA) can alter the chromatin conformation and have been used to modulate epigenetic states in the treatment of diseases such as cancer. In this work, we have studied the effect of NaBut and TSA on the expression of C. neoformans major virulence phenotypes and on the survival rate of an animal model infected with drugs-treated yeasts. Both drugs affected fungal growth at 37°C more intensely than at 30°C; nonetheless, drugs did not affect cell viability at the concentrations we studied. HDACi also provoked the reduction of the fungal capsule expansion. Phospholipases enzyme activity decreased; mating process and melanin synthesis were also affected by both inhibitors. NaBut led to an increase in the population of cells in G2/M. Treated yeast cells, which were washed in order to remove the drugs from the culture medium prior to the inoculation in the Galleria mellonela infection model, did not cause significant difference at the host survival curve when compared to non-treated cells. Overall, NaBut effects on the impairment of C. neoformans main virulence factors were more intense and stable than the TSA effects.

  10. Histone Deacetylase Inhibition Restores Retinal Pigment Epithelium Function in Hyperglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Desjardins, Danielle; Liu, Yueying; Crosson, Craig E.; Ablonczy, Zsolt

    2016-01-01

    In diabetic individuals, macular edema is a major cause of vision loss. This condition is refractory to insulin therapy and has been attributed to metabolic memory. The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is central to maintaining fluid balance in the retina, and this function is compromised by the activation of advanced glycation end-product receptors (RAGE). Here we provide evidence that acute administration of the RAGE agonist, glycated-albumin (gAlb) or vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), increased histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity in RPE cells. The administration of the class I/II HDAC inhibitor, trichostatin-A (TSA), suppressed gAlb-induced reductions in RPE transepithelial resistance (in vitro) and fluid transport (in vivo). Systemic TSA also restored normal RPE fluid transport in rats with subchronic hyperglycemia. Both gAlb and VEGF increased HDAC activity and reduced acetyl-α-tubulin levels. Tubastatin-A, a relatively specific antagonist of HDAC6, inhibited gAlb-induced changes in RPE cell resistance. These data are consistent with the idea that RPE dysfunction following exposure to gAlb, VEGF, or hyperglycemia is associated with increased HDAC6 activity and decreased acetyl-α-tubulin. Therefore, we propose inhibiting HDAC6 in the RPE as a potential therapy for preserving normal fluid homeostasis in the hyperglycemic retina. PMID:27617745

  11. Screening of selective histone deacetylase inhibitors by proteochemometric modeling

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Histone deacetylase (HDAC) is a novel target for the treatment of cancer and it can be classified into three classes, i.e., classes I, II, and IV. The inhibitors selectively targeting individual HDAC have been proved to be the better candidate antitumor drugs. To screen selective HDAC inhibitors, several proteochemometric (PCM) models based on different combinations of three kinds of protein descriptors, two kinds of ligand descriptors and multiplication cross-terms were constructed in our study. Results The results show that structure similarity descriptors are better than sequence similarity descriptors and geometry descriptors in the leftacterization of HDACs. Furthermore, the predictive ability was not improved by introducing the cross-terms in our models. Finally, a best PCM model based on protein structure similarity descriptors and 32-dimensional general descriptors was derived (R2 = 0.9897, Qtest2 = 0.7542), which shows a powerful ability to screen selective HDAC inhibitors. Conclusions Our best model not only predict the activities of inhibitors for each HDAC isoform, but also screen and distinguish class-selective inhibitors and even more isoform-selective inhibitors, thus it provides a potential way to discover or design novel candidate antitumor drugs with reduced side effect. PMID:22913517

  12. Role of histone deacetylases in gene regulation at nuclear lamina.

    PubMed

    Milon, Beatrice C; Cheng, Haibo; Tselebrovsky, Mikhail V; Lavrov, Sergei A; Nenasheva, Valentina V; Mikhaleva, Elena A; Shevelyov, Yuri Y; Nurminsky, Dmitry I

    2012-01-01

    Theoretical models suggest that gene silencing at the nuclear periphery may involve "closing" of chromatin by transcriptional repressors, such as histone deacetylases (HDACs). Here we provide experimental evidence confirming these predictions. Histone acetylation, chromatin compactness, and gene repression in lamina-interacting multigenic chromatin domains were analyzed in Drosophila S2 cells in which B-type lamin, diverse HDACs, and lamina-associated proteins were downregulated by dsRNA. Lamin depletion resulted in decreased compactness of the repressed multigenic domain associated with its detachment from the lamina and enhanced histone acetylation. Our data reveal the major role for HDAC1 in mediating deacetylation, chromatin compaction, and gene silencing in the multigenic domain, and an auxiliary role for HDAC3 that is required for retention of the domain at the lamina. These findings demonstrate the manifold and central involvement of class I HDACs in regulation of lamina-associated genes, illuminating a mechanism by which these enzymes can orchestrate normal and pathological development.

  13. Role of Histone Deacetylases in Gene Regulation at Nuclear Lamina

    PubMed Central

    Milon, Beatrice C.; Cheng, Haibo; Tselebrovsky, Mikhail V.; Lavrov, Sergei A.; Nenasheva, Valentina V.; Mikhaleva, Elena A.; Shevelyov, Yuri Y.; Nurminsky, Dmitry I.

    2012-01-01

    Theoretical models suggest that gene silencing at the nuclear periphery may involve “closing” of chromatin by transcriptional repressors, such as histone deacetylases (HDACs). Here we provide experimental evidence confirming these predictions. Histone acetylation, chromatin compactness, and gene repression in lamina-interacting multigenic chromatin domains were analyzed in Drosophila S2 cells in which B-type lamin, diverse HDACs, and lamina-associated proteins were downregulated by dsRNA. Lamin depletion resulted in decreased compactness of the repressed multigenic domain associated with its detachment from the lamina and enhanced histone acetylation. Our data reveal the major role for HDAC1 in mediating deacetylation, chromatin compaction, and gene silencing in the multigenic domain, and an auxiliary role for HDAC3 that is required for retention of the domain at the lamina. These findings demonstrate the manifold and central involvement of class I HDACs in regulation of lamina-associated genes, illuminating a mechanism by which these enzymes can orchestrate normal and pathological development. PMID:23226217

  14. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors Equipped with Estrogen Receptor Modulation Activity

    PubMed Central

    Gryder, Berkley E.; Rood, Michael K.; Johnson, Kenyetta A.; Patil, Vishal; Raftery, Eric D.; Yao, Li-Pan D.; Rice, Marcie; Azizi, Bahareh; Doyle, Donald F.; Oyelere, Adegboyega K.

    2013-01-01

    We described a set of novel histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) equipped with either an antagonist or an agonist of the estrogen receptor (ER) to confer selective activity against breast cancers. These bifunctional compounds potently inhibit HDAC at nanomolar concentrations, and either agonize or antagonize ERα and ERβ. The ER antagonist activities of tamoxifen-HDACi conjugates (Tam-HDACi) are nearly identical to those of tamoxifen. Conversely, ethynyl-estradiol HDACi conjugates (EED-HDACi) have attenuated ER agonist activities relative to the parent ethynyl-estradiol. In silico docking analysis provides structural basis for the trends of ER agonism/antagonism and ER subtype selectivity. Excitingly, lead Tam-HDACi conjugates show anticancer activity that is selectively more potent against MCF-7 (ERα positive breast) compared to MDA-MB-231 (triple negative breast cancer), DU145 (prostate cancer) or Vero (non-cancerous cell line). This dual-targeting approach illustrates the utility of designing small molecules with an emphasis on cell-type selectivity, not merely improved potency, working towards a higher therapeutic index at the earliest stages of drug development. PMID:23786452

  15. Class IIa Histone Deacetylases Are Conserved Regulators of Circadian Function*

    PubMed Central

    Fogg, Paul C. M.; O'Neill, John S.; Dobrzycki, Tomasz; Calvert, Shaun; Lord, Emma C.; McIntosh, Rebecca L. L.; Elliott, Christopher J. H.; Sweeney, Sean T.; Hastings, Michael H.; Chawla, Sangeeta

    2014-01-01

    Class IIa histone deacetylases (HDACs) regulate the activity of many transcription factors to influence liver gluconeogenesis and the development of specialized cells, including muscle, neurons, and lymphocytes. Here, we describe a conserved role for class IIa HDACs in sustaining robust circadian behavioral rhythms in Drosophila and cellular rhythms in mammalian cells. In mouse fibroblasts, overexpression of HDAC5 severely disrupts transcriptional rhythms of core clock genes. HDAC5 overexpression decreases BMAL1 acetylation on Lys-537 and pharmacological inhibition of class IIa HDACs increases BMAL1 acetylation. Furthermore, we observe cyclical nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of HDAC5 in mouse fibroblasts that is characteristically circadian. Mutation of the Drosophila homolog HDAC4 impairs locomotor activity rhythms of flies and decreases period mRNA levels. RNAi-mediated knockdown of HDAC4 in Drosophila clock cells also dampens circadian function. Given that the localization of class IIa HDACs is signal-regulated and influenced by Ca2+ and cAMP signals, our findings offer a mechanism by which extracellular stimuli that generate these signals can feed into the molecular clock machinery. PMID:25271152

  16. Current evidence for histone deacetylase inhibitors in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Koutsounas, Ioannis; Giaginis, Constantinos; Patsouris, Efstratios; Theocharis, Stamatios

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most aggressive human cancers, with more than 200 000 deaths worldwide every year. Despite recent efforts, conventional treatment approaches, such as surgery and classic chemotherapy, have only slightly improved patient outcomes. More effective and well-tolerated therapies are required to reverse the current poor prognosis of this type of neoplasm. Among new agents, histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) are now being tested. HDACIs have multiple biological effects related to acetylation of histones and many non-histone proteins that are involved in regulation of gene expression, apoptosis, cell cycle progression and angiogenesis. HDACIs induce cell cycle arrest and can activate the extrinsic and intrinsic pathways of apoptosis in different cancer cell lines. In the present review, the main mechanisms by which HDACIs act in pancreatic cancer cells in vitro, as well as their antiproliferative effects in animal models are presented. HDACIs constitute a promising treatment for pancreatic cancer with encouraging anti-tumor effects, at well-tolerated doses. PMID:23430136

  17. Attenuation of Choroidal Neovascularization by Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Nymph; He, Shikun; Spee, Christine K.; Ishikawa, Keijiro; Hinton, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Choroidal neovascularization (CNV) is a blinding complication of age-related macular degeneration that manifests as the growth of immature choroidal blood vessels through Bruch’s membrane, where they can leak fluid or hemorrhage under the retina. Here, we demonstrate that the histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) trichostatin A (TSA) can down-regulate the pro-angiogenic hypoxia-inducible factor-1α and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and up-regulate the anti-angiogenic and neuro-protective pigment epithelium derived factor in human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells. Most strikingly, TSA markedly down-regulates the expression of VEGF receptor-2 in human vascular endothelial cells and, thus, can knock down pro-angiogenic cell signaling. Additionally, TSA suppresses CNV-associated wound healing response and RPE epithelial-mesenchymal transdifferentiation. In the laser-induced model of CNV using C57Bl/6 mice, systemic administration of TSA significantly reduces fluorescein leakage and the size of CNV lesions at post—laser days 7 and 14 as well as the immunohistochemical expression of VEGF, VEGFR2, and smooth muscle actin in CNV lesions at post-laser day 7. This report suggests that TSA, and possibly HDACi’s in general, should be further evaluated for their therapeutic potential for the treatment of CNV. PMID:25807249

  18. Comparative and pharmacophore model for deacetylase SIRT1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huhtiniemi, Tero; Wittekindt, Carsten; Laitinen, Tuomo; Leppänen, Jukka; Salminen, Antero; Poso, Antti; Lahtela-Kakkonen, Maija

    2006-09-01

    Sirtuins are NAD-dependent histone deacetylases, which cleave the acetyl-group from acetylated proteins, such as histones but also the acetyl groups from several transcription factors, and in this way can change their activities. Of all seven mammalian SirTs, the human sirtuin SirT1 has been the most extensively studied. However, there is no crystal structure or comparative model reported for SirT1. We have therefore built up a three-dimensional comparison model of the SirT1 protein catalytic core (domain area from residues 244 to 498 of the full length SirT1) in order to assist in the investigation of active site-ligand interactions and in the design of novel SirT1 inhibitors. In this study we also propose the binding-mode of recently reported set of indole-based inhibitors in SirT1. The site of interaction and the ligand conformation were predicted by the use of molecular docking techniques. To distinguish between active and inactive compounds, a post-docking filter based on H-bond network was constructed. Docking results were used to investigate the pharmacophore and to identify a filter for database mining.

  19. Histone deacetylase inhibitors promote the tumoricidal effect of HAMLET.

    PubMed

    Brest, Patrick; Gustafsson, Mattias; Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Gustafsson, Lotta; Duringer, Caroline; Hamiche, Ali; Svanborg, Catharina

    2007-12-01

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDIs) and HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells) interact with histones, modify the structure of chromatin, and trigger tumor cell death. This study investigated how the combination of HDIs and HAMLET influences cell viability, histone acetylation, and DNA integrity. The pretreatment of tumor cells with HDIs was shown to enhance the lethal effect of HAMLET and the histone hyperacetylation response to HDIs increased even further after HAMLET treatment. HDIs and HAMLET were shown to target different histone domains as HAMLET bound tailless core histones, whereas HDIs modify the acetylation of the histone tail. DNA damage in response to HAMLET was increased by HDIs. The DNA repair response (p21WAFI expression) was induced by both agonists but abolished when the two agonists were combined. The results suggest that the synergy of HDIs and HAMLET is based on different but converging death pathways, both involving chromatin alterations. We speculate that HAMLET and HDIs might be combined to promote tumor cell death in vivo.

  20. Histone deacetylase inhibitors induce autophagy through FOXO1-dependent pathways.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianbin; Ng, Shukie; Wang, Jigang; Zhou, Jing; Tan, Shi-Hao; Yang, Naidi; Lin, Qingsong; Xia, Dajing; Shen, Han-Ming

    2015-04-03

    Autophagy is a catabolic process in response to starvation or other stress conditions to sustain cellular homeostasis. At present, histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) are known to induce autophagy in cells through inhibition of mechanistic target of rapamycin (MTOR) pathway. FOXO1, an important transcription factor regulated by AKT, is also known to play a role in autophagy induction. At present, the role of FOXO1 in the HDACIs-induced autophagy has not been reported. In this study, we first observed that HDACIs increased the expression of FOXO1 at the mRNA and protein level. Second, we found that FOXO1 transcriptional activity was enhanced by HDACIs, as evidenced by increased FOXO1 nuclear accumulation and transcriptional activity. Third, suppression of FOXO1 function by siRNA knockdown or by a chemical inhibitor markedly blocked HDACIs-induced autophagy. Moreover, we found that FOXO1-mediated autophagy is achieved via its transcriptional activation, leading to a dual effect on autophagy induction: (i) enhanced expression of autophagy-related (ATG) genes, and (ii) suppression of MTOR via transcription of the SESN3 (sestrin 3) gene. Finally, we found that inhibition of autophagy markedly enhanced HDACIs-mediated cell death, indicating that autophagy serves as an important cell survival mechanism. Taken together, our studies reveal a novel function of FOXO1 in HDACIs-mediated autophagy in human cancer cells and thus support the development of a novel therapeutic strategy by combining HDACIs and autophagy inhibitors in cancer therapy.

  1. Production of chitin deacetylase by Aspergillus flavus in submerged conditions.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Karthik; Parameswaran, Binod; Pandey, Ashok

    2016-07-03

    Chitosan is a biopolymer obtained by deacetylation of chitin and has been proven to have various applications in industry and biomedicine. Deacetylation of chitin using the enzyme chitin deacetylase (CDA) is favorable in comparison to the hazardous chemical method involving strong alkali and high temperature. A fungal strain producing CDA was isolated from environmental samples collected from coastal regions of South Kerala, India. It was identified as Aspergillus flavus by morphological characteristics and ITS DNA analysis. Nutritional requirement for maximum production of CDA under submerged condition was optimized using statistical methods including Plackett-Burman and response surface methodology central composite design. A 5.98-fold enhancement in CDA production was attained in shake flasks when the fermentation process parameters were used at their optimum levels. The highest CDA activity was 57.69 ± 1.68 U under optimized bioprocess conditions that included 30 g L(-1) glucose, 40 g L(-1) yeast extract, 15 g L(-1) peptone, and 7 g L(-1) MgCl2 at initial media pH of 7 and incubation temperature of 32°C after 48 hr of incubation, while the unoptimized basal medium yielded 9.64 ± 2.04 U.

  2. Histone deacetylases (HDACs): characterization of the classical HDAC family.

    PubMed Central

    de Ruijter, Annemieke J M; van Gennip, Albert H; Caron, Huib N; Kemp, Stephan; van Kuilenburg, André B P

    2003-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation in eukaryotes occurs within a chromatin setting, and is strongly influenced by the post-translational modification of histones, the building blocks of chromatin, such as methylation, phosphorylation and acetylation. Acetylation is probably the best understood of these modifications: hyperacetylation leads to an increase in the expression of particular genes, and hypoacetylation has the opposite effect. Many studies have identified several large, multisubunit enzyme complexes that are responsible for the targeted deacetylation of histones. The aim of this review is to give a comprehensive overview of the structure, function and tissue distribution of members of the classical histone deacetylase (HDAC) family, in order to gain insight into the regulation of gene expression through HDAC activity. SAGE (serial analysis of gene expression) data show that HDACs are generally expressed in almost all tissues investigated. Surprisingly, no major differences were observed between the expression pattern in normal and malignant tissues. However, significant variation in HDAC expression was observed within tissue types. HDAC inhibitors have been shown to induce specific changes in gene expression and to influence a variety of other processes, including growth arrest, differentiation, cytotoxicity and induction of apoptosis. This challenging field has generated many fascinating results which will ultimately lead to a better understanding of the mechanism of gene transcription as a whole. PMID:12429021

  3. RESEARCH PAPER: Old stellar population synthesis: new age and mass estimates for Mayall II = G1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jun; de Grijs, Richard; Fan, Zhou; Rey, Soo-Chang; Wu, Zhen-Yu; Zhou, Xu; Wu, Jiang-Hua; Jiang, Zhao-Ji; Chen, Jian-Sheng; Lee, Kyungsook; Sohn, Sangmo Tony

    2009-06-01

    Mayall II = G1 is one of the most luminous globular clusters (GCs) in M31. Here, we determine its age and mass by comparing multicolor photometry with theoretical stellar population synthesis models. Based on far- and near-ultraviolet GALEX photometry, broad-band UBVRI, and infrared JHKS 2MASS data, we construct the most extensive spectral energy distribution of G1 to date, spanning the wavelength range from 1538 to 20 000 Å. A quantitative comparison with a variety of simple stellar population (SSP) models yields a mean age which is consistent with G1 being among the oldest building blocks of M31 and having formed within ~1.7 Gyr after the Big Bang. Irrespective of the SSP model or stellar initial mass function adopted, the resulting mass estimates (of order 107 Modot) indicate that G1 is one of the most massive GCs in the Local Group. However, we speculate that the cluster's exceptionally high mass suggests that it may not be a genuine GC. Our results also suggest that G1 may contain, on average, (1.65±0.63) × 102 Lodot far-ultraviolet-bright, hot, extreme horizontal-branch stars, depending on the adopted SSP model. In addition, we demonstrate that extensive multi-passband photometry coupled with SSP analysis enables one to obtain age estimates for old SSPs that have similar accuracies as those from integrated spectroscopy or resolved stellar photometry, provided that some of the free parameters can be constrained independently.

  4. Echinococcus granulosus genotypes in livestock of Iran indicating high frequency of G1 genotype in camels.

    PubMed

    Sharbatkhori, Mitra; Mirhendi, Hossein; Harandi, Majid Fasihi; Rezaeian, Mostafa; Mohebali, Mehdi; Eshraghian, Mohammadreza; Rahimi, Hamidreza; Kia, Eshrat Beigom

    2010-04-01

    In this study, 112 Echinococcus granulosus isolates from different livestock of Iran were genotyped by PCR amplification of ribosomal DNA-internal transcribed spacer 1 (rDNA-ITS1) region followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) with the enzyme RsaI. The possibility of intra-genotype variation was also investigated using randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis. Isolates from sheep, goats, cattle and the majority of camels (12 of 18; 66.7%) were identified as the G1 genotype and a few camel isolates (6 of 18; 33.3%) belonged to the G6 genotype. Overall G1 and G6 genotypes were identified in 94.6% (106 of 112) and 5.3% (6 of 112) of all isolates, respectively. RAPD analysis based on 15 separate primers showed 7-14 bands of 200-3000bp for strain G1. Considering each individual primer, no differences observed among isolates from different hosts and between livers and lungs. This study confirmed the existence of G1 and G6 genotypes in Iran. Moreover, G1 is much more prevalent even in camels, indicating the importance of sheep-dog cycle in public health. Studying intra-genotypic variation of E. granulosus warrants more research using other primers and methods.

  5. A Dynamical Framework for the All-or-None G1/S Transition

    PubMed Central

    Barr, Alexis R.; Heldt, Frank S.; Zhang, Tongli; Bakal, Chris; Novák, Béla

    2016-01-01

    Summary The transition from G1 into DNA replication (S phase) is an emergent behavior resulting from dynamic and complex interactions between cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks), Cdk inhibitors (CKIs), and the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C). Understanding the cellular decision to commit to S phase requires a quantitative description of these interactions. We apply quantitative imaging of single human cells to track the expression of G1/S regulators and use these data to parametrize a stochastic mathematical model of the G1/S transition. We show that a rapid, proteolytic, double-negative feedback loop between Cdk2:Cyclin and the Cdk inhibitor p27Kip1 drives a switch-like entry into S phase. Furthermore, our model predicts that increasing Emi1 levels throughout S phase are critical in maintaining irreversibility of the G1/S transition, which we validate using Emi1 knockdown and live imaging of G1/S reporters. This work provides insight into the general design principles of the signaling networks governing the temporally abrupt transitions between cell-cycle phases. PMID:27136687

  6. The role of RBF in the introduction of G1 regulation during Drosophila embryogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Du, W; Dyson, N

    1999-01-01

    The first appearance of G1 during Drosophila embryogenesis, at cell cycle 17, is accompanied by the down-regulation of E2F-dependent transcription. Mutant alleles of rbf were generated and analyzed to determine the role of RBF in this process. Embryos lacking both maternal and zygotic RBF products show constitutive expression of PCNA and RNR2, two E2F-regulated genes, indicating that RBF is required for their transcriptional repression. Despite the ubiquitous expression of E2F target genes, most epidermal cells enter G1 normally. Rather than pausing in G1 until the appropriate time for cell cycle progression, many of these cells enter an ectopic S-phase. These results indicate that the repression of E2F target genes by RBF is necessary for the maintenance but not the initiation of a G1 phase. The phenotype of RBF-deficient embryos suggests that rbf has a function that is complementary to the roles of dacapo and fizzy-related in the introduction of G1 during Drosophila embryogenesis. PMID:10022834

  7. A comparative genomic analysis of the alkalitolerant soil bacterium Bacillus lehensis G1.

    PubMed

    Noor, Yusuf Muhammad; Samsulrizal, Nurul Hidayah; Jema'on, Noor Azah; Low, Kheng Oon; Ramli, Aizi Nor Mazila; Alias, Noor Izawati; Damis, Siti Intan Rosdianah; Fuzi, Siti Fatimah Zaharah Mohd; Isa, Mohd Noor Mat; Murad, Abdul Munir Abdul; Raih, Mohd Firdaus Mohd; Bakar, Farah Diba Abu; Najimudin, Nazalan; Mahadi, Nor Muhammad; Illias, Rosli Md

    2014-07-25

    Bacillus lehensis G1 is a Gram-positive, moderately alkalitolerant bacterium isolated from soil samples. B. lehensis produces cyclodextrin glucanotransferase (CGTase), an enzyme that has enabled the extensive use of cyclodextrin in foodstuffs, chemicals, and pharmaceuticals. The genome sequence of B. lehensis G1 consists of a single circular 3.99 Mb chromosome containing 4017 protein-coding sequences (CDSs), of which 2818 (70.15%) have assigned biological roles, 936 (23.30%) have conserved domains with unknown functions, and 263 (6.55%) have no match with any protein database. Bacillus clausii KSM-K16 was established as the closest relative to B. lehensis G1 based on gene content similarity and 16S rRNA phylogenetic analysis. A total of 2820 proteins from B. lehensis G1 were found to have orthologues in B. clausii, including sodium-proton antiporters, transport proteins, and proteins involved in ATP synthesis. A comparative analysis of these proteins and those in B. clausii and other alkaliphilic Bacillus species was carried out to investigate their contributions towards the alkalitolerance of the microorganism. The similarities and differences in alkalitolerance-related genes among alkalitolerant/alkaliphilic Bacillus species highlight the complex mechanism of pH homeostasis. The B. lehensis G1 genome was also mined for proteins and enzymes with potential viability for industrial and commercial purposes.

  8. Acute appendicitis with a neuroendocrine tumor G1 (carcinoid): pitfalls of conservative treatment.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hiroyuki A; Fujimoto, Taketoshi; Kato, Yo; Sasaki, Mayumi; Ikusue, Toshikazu

    2016-08-01

    A man in his early thirties presented to our clinic with right lower abdominal pain. Computed tomography (CT) and ultrasonography (US) revealed a swollen appendix and an appendicolith. Abscess formation was not observed but ongoing appendiceal rupture was not ruled out. Three months after successful conservative therapy, the lumen of the apical portion was kept dilated and laparoscopic interval appendectomy was performed. No tumorous findings were observed macroscopically. However, histology revealed many tiny nests infiltrating the submucosa, muscular layer, and subserosa at the root of the appendix. An appendiceal neuroendocrine tumor G1 (NET G1; carcinoid) was diagnosed immunohistologically. Neither CT nor US visualized the tumor because of its non-tumor-forming but infiltrative growth. In conclusion, after successful conservative treatment, interval appendectomy should be considered to uncover a possible appendiceal NET G1 (carcinoid), particularly when dilatation of the distal lumen is kept under observation.

  9. Nonuniform expansion and brightening of the youngest Galactic SNR G1.9+0.3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borkowski, Kazimierz

    2014-09-01

    We propose a 400-ks observation of the youngest Galactic supernova remnant (SNR) G1.9+0.3, to study its nonuniform expansion and monitor increase in brightness. Expansion along the major axis of G1.9+0.3 has been found to decrease with radius. The longer time baseline should help in understanding these surprising variations in expansion. No other Galactic SNR is brightening. The X-rays are mainly produced as synchrotron radiation from 10 -- 100 TeV electrons, so the magnitude and spatial dependence of the brightening rate have important implications for the physics of particle acceleration and magnetic-field amplification in fast shock waves. G1.9+0.3 is a unique SNR whose continued monitoring should greatly advance our understanding of Type Ia supernovae and nonthermal shock physics.

  10. Asymmetric High-Velocity Ejecta in the Youngest Galactic SNR G1.9+0.3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borkowski, Kazimierz

    2014-11-01

    Chandra has revealed highly asymmetric supernova ejecta in G1.9+0.3. Iron dominates thermal emission in the radio-bright northern rim, while only intermediate-mass elements are found along the SE-NW axis. The measured X-ray expansion rates decrease radially by about 60% along this axis from 0.84% yr^{-1) to 0.52% yr^{-1}. This corresponds to undecelerated ages of 120 - 190 yr, confirming the young age of G1.9+0.3, and implying that the blast wave is much more decelerated than the reverse shock. Only the outermost ejecta with very high (>18,000 km s^{-1}) free-expansion velocities have been shocked so far. We discuss G1.9+0.3 in the framework of recent asymmetric 3D delayed-detonation Type Ia explosions from Seitenzahl et al. (2013). Their N3 model provides the best match.

  11. The effect of limited proteolysis by trypsin and chymotrypsin on bovine colostral IgG1.

    PubMed Central

    Brock, J H; Arzabe, F R; Ortega, F; Piñeiro, A

    1977-01-01

    Limited proteolysis of bovine colostral IgG1 by trypsin caused loss of specific antibody activity but column chromatography showed that relatively little cleavage into fragements had occurred. Polyacrlamide-agarose SDS electrophoresis of the 2-mercaptoethanol-treated digest revealed, however, that extensive cleavage of light chains had occurred even though most of the material before reduction had a mol. wt close to that of undigested IgG1. Although a Fab-type fragment was detected in the digest by immunoelectrophoresis it appeared to be only a minor component. Chymotrypsin had little effect upon either the structure or antibody activity of IgG1. These findings may explain the effect of trypsin and chymotrypsin on the bactericidal activity of colostral antibodies. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:321343

  12. Twisted K-theory in /g>1 from D-branes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isidro, José M.

    2002-07-01

    We study the wrapping of N-type IIB D p-branes on a compact Riemann surface Σ in genus g>1 by means of the Sen-Witten construction, as a superposition of N'-type IIB D p'-brane/antibrane pairs, with p'> p. A background Neveu-Schwarz field B deforms the commutative C -algebra of functions on Σ to a non-commutative C -algebra. Our construction provides an explicit example of the N'→∞ limit advocated by Bouwknegt-Mathai and Witten in order to deal with twisted K-theory. We provide the necessary elements to formulate M(atrix) theory on this new C -algebra, by explicitly constructing a family of projective C -modules admitting constant-curvature connections. This allows us to define the g>1 analogue of the BPS spectrum of states in g=1, by means of Donaldson's formulation of the Narasimhan-Seshadri theorem.

  13. A Novel Continuous Assay for the Deacylase Sirtuin 5 and Other Deacetylases.

    PubMed

    Roessler, Claudia; Tüting, Christian; Meleshin, Marat; Steegborn, Clemens; Schutkowski, Mike

    2015-09-24

    Sirtuins are NAD(+) dependent lysine deacylases involved in many regulatory processes like control of metabolic pathways, DNA repair, and stress response. Modulators of sirtuin activity are needed as tools for uncovering the biological function of these enzymes and as potential therapeutics. Systematic discovery of such modulators is hampered by the lack of efficient and simple continuous activity assays running at low sirtuin concentrations in microtiter plates. Here we describe an improved continuous sirtuin 5 assay based on the coupling of the sirtuin reaction to a proteolytic cleavage using internally fluorescence-quenched substrates. Systematic optimization of a carbamoyl phosphate synthetase 1 derived, glutarylated peptide yielded a Sirt5 substrate with k(cat)/K(M) value of 337,000 M(-1) s(-1), which represents the best sirtuin substrate described so far. These extraordinary substrate properties allowed reliable determination of Ki values for different inhibitors in the presence of only 10 nM sirtuin in microtiter plate format. Assay conditions could be transferred effectively to other lysine deacetylases, like sirtuin 2 and sirtuin 3, which now enables more efficient development of sirtuin targeting drugs.

  14. Characterization and Expression Analysis of Common Bean Histone Deacetylase 6 during Development and Cold Stress Response

    PubMed Central

    Ligaba-Osena, Ayalew; Subramani, Mayavan; Brown, Adrianne; Melmaiee, Kalpalatha; Hossain, Khwaja

    2017-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are important regulators of gene transcription thus controlling multiple cellular processes. Despite its essential role in plants, HDA6 is yet to be validated in common bean. In this study, we show that HDA6 is involved in plant development and stress response. Differential expression of HDA6 was determined in various tissues and the expression was seen to be upregulated with plant age (seedling < flowering < maturity). Higher expression was observed in flowers and pods than in stem, leaf, and root. Upregulation of HDA6 gene during cold stress implies its prominent role in abiotic stress. Furthermore, the HDA6 gene was isolated from three common bean genotypes and sequence analyses revealed homology with functionally characterized homologs in model species. The 53 kDa translated product was detected using an HDA6 specific antibody and recombinant protein overexpressed in Escherichia coli showed HDAC activity in vitro. To our knowledge, this is the first report in the agriculturally important crop common bean describing the functional characterization and biological role of HDA6. PMID:28127547

  15. Antitumor Action of a Novel Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor, YF479, in Breast Cancer1

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tao; Chen, Yihua; Li, Jingjie; Yang, Feifei; Wu, Haigang; Dai, Fujun; Hu, Meichun; Lu, Xiaoling; Peng, Yi; Liu, Mingyao; Zhao, Yongxiang; Yi, Zhengfang

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence demonstrates important roles for histone deacetylase in tumorigenesis (HDACs), highlighting them as attractive targets for antitumor drug development. Histone deactylase inhibitors (HDACIs), which have shown favorable anti-tumor activity with low toxicity in clinical investigations, are a promising class of anticancer therapeutics. Here, we screened our compound library to explore small molecules that possess anti-HDAC activity and identified a novel HDACI, YF479. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), which was the first approved HDAC inhibitor for clinical treatment by the FDA, was as positive control in our experiments. We further demonstrated YF479 abated cell viability, suppressed colony formation and tumor cell motility in vitro. To investigate YF479 with superior pharmacodynamic properties, we developed spontaneous and experimental breast cancer animal models. Our results showed YF479 significantly inhibited breast tumor growth and metastasis in vivo. Further study indicated YF479 suppressed both early and end stages of metastatic progression. Subsequent adjuvant chemotherapy animal experiment revealed the elimination of local-regional recurrence (LRR) and distant metastasis by YF479. More important, YF479 remarkably prolonged the survival of tumor-bearing mice. Intriguingly, YF479 displayed more potent anti-tumor activity in vitro and in vivo compared with SAHA. Together, our results suggest that YF479, a novel HDACI, inhibits breast tumor growth, metastasis and recurrence. In light of these results, YF479 may be an effective therapeutic option in clinical trials for patients burdened by breast cancer. PMID:25220594

  16. Histone deacetylase inhibitors mediate DNA damage repair in ameliorating hemorrhagic cystitis

    PubMed Central

    Haldar, Subhash; Dru, Christopher; Mishra, Rajeev; Tripathi, Manisha; Duong, Frank; Angara, Bryan; Fernandez, Ana; Arditi, Moshe; Bhowmick, Neil A.

    2016-01-01

    Hemorrhagic cystitis is an inflammatory and ulcerative bladder condition associated with systemic chemotherapeutics, like cyclophosphomide. Earlier, we reported reactive oxygen species resulting from cyclophosphamide metabolite, acrolein, causes global methylation followed by silencing of DNA damage repair genes. Ogg1 (8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase) is one such silenced base excision repair enzyme that can restore DNA integrity. The accumulation of DNA damage results in subsequent inflammation associated with pyroptotic death of bladder smooth muscle cells. We hypothesized that reversing inflammasome-induced imprinting in the bladder smooth muscle could prevent the inflammatory phenotype. Elevated recruitment of Dnmt1 and Dnmt3b to the Ogg1 promoter in acrolein treated bladder muscle cells was validated by the pattern of CpG methylation revealed by bisulfite sequencing. Knockout of Ogg1 in detrusor cells resulted in accumulation of reactive oxygen mediated 8-Oxo-dG and spontaneous pyroptotic signaling. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), restored Ogg1 expression in cells treated with acrolein and mice treated with cyclophosphamide superior to the standard of care, mesna or nicotinamide-induced DNA demethylation. SAHA restored cyclophosphamide-induced bladder pathology to that of untreated control mice. The observed epigenetic imprinting induced by inflammation suggests a new therapeutic target for the treatment of hemorrhagic cystitis. PMID:27995963

  17. Histone deacetylase inhibitors: Future therapeutics for insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sorabh; Taliyan, Rajeev

    2016-11-01

    Insulin resistance is a common feature of obesity and predisposes the affected individuals to a variety of pathologies, including type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), dyslipidemias, hypertension, cardiovascular disease etc. Insulin resistance is the primary cause of T2DM and it occurs many years before the disease onset. Although Thiazolidinediones (TZDs) such as rosiglitazone and pioglitazone are outstanding insulin sensitizers and are in clinical use since 1990s, however, their serious side effects such as heart attack and bladder cancer have limited their utilization. Thus, there is an unmet need to identify a new class of drugs with insulin sensitizing activity and minimal side effects. In the recent years, Histone deacetylase (HDAC) has emerged as a new molecular target in the control of insulin resistance and T2DM. The level of histone acetylation/deacetylation has been found to be altered during insulin resistance and T2DM conditions. HDAC inhibitors have been found to effectively manage insulin resistance and T2DM in various preclinical models and clinical trials. In this review we will focus on various aspects related to regulation of insulin signalling by HDACs and the future scope of HDAC inhibitors as therapeutics for insulin resistance.

  18. The Histone Deacetylase Gene Rpd3 Is Required for Starvation Stress Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Ei; Shimaji, Kouhei; Umegawachi, Takanari; Tomida, Saki; Yoshida, Hideki; Yoshimoto, Nana; Izawa, Shingo; Kimura, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Masamitsu

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic regulation in starvation is important but not fully understood yet. Here we identified the Rpd3 gene, a Drosophila homolog of histone deacetylase 1, as a critical epigenetic regulator for acquiring starvation stress resistance. Immunostaining analyses of Drosophila fat body revealed that the subcellular localization and levels of Rpd3 dynamically changed responding to starvation stress. In response to starvation stress, the level of Rpd3 rapidly increased, and it accumulated in the nucleolus in what appeared to be foci. These observations suggest that Rpd3 plays a role in regulation of rRNA synthesis in the nucleolus. The RT-qPCR and ChIP-qPCR analyses clarified that Rpd3 binds to the genomic region containing the rRNA promoters and activates rRNA synthesis in response to starvation stress. Polysome analyses revealed that the amount of polysomes was decreased in Rpd3 knockdown flies under starvation stress compared with the control flies. Since the autophagy-related proteins are known to be starvation stress tolerance proteins, we examined autophagy activity, and it was reduced in Rpd3 knockdown flies. Taken together, we conclude that Rpd3 accumulates in the nucleolus in the early stage of starvation, upregulates rRNA synthesis, maintains the polysome amount for translation, and finally increases stress tolerance proteins, such as autophagy-related proteins, to acquire starvation stress resistance. PMID:27907135

  19. Histone deacetylase 3 associates with MeCP2 to regulate FOXO and social behavior

    PubMed Central

    Nott, Alexi; Cheng, Jemmie; Gao, Fan; Lin, Yuan-Ta; Gjoneska, Elizabeta; Ko, Tak; Minhas, Paras; Zamudio, Alicia Viridiana; Meng, Jia; Zhang, Feiran; Jin, Peng; Tsai, Li-Huei

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in MECP2 cause the neurodevelopmental disorder Rett syndrome (RTT). The RTT missense MECP2R306C mutation prevents MeCP2 interaction with NCoR/Histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3); however, the neuronal function of HDAC3 is incompletely understood. We report that neuronal deletion of Hdac3 in mice elicits abnormal locomotor coordination, sociability, and cognition. Transcriptional and chromatin profiling revealed HDAC3 positively regulates a subset of genes and is recruited to active gene promoters via MeCP2. HDAC3-associated promoters are enriched for the FOXO transcription factors, and FOXO acetylation is elevated in Hdac3 KO and Mecp2 KO neurons. Human RTT patient-derived MECP2R306C neural progenitor cells have deficits in HDAC3 and FOXO recruitment and gene expression. Gene editing of MECP2R306C cells to generate isogenic controls rescued HDAC3-FOXO-mediated impairments in gene expression. Our data suggests that HDAC3 interaction with MeCP2 positively regulates a subset of neuronal genes through FOXO deacetylation, and disruption of HDAC3 contributes to cognitive and social impairment. PMID:27428650

  20. Glycolysis-dependent histone deacetylase 4 degradation regulates inflammatory cytokine production.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Liu, Ting-Yu; Lai, Chun-Hsiang; Rao, Yan-hua; Choi, Moon-Chang; Chi, Jen-Tsan; Dai, Jian-wu; Rathmell, Jeffrey C; Yao, Tso-Pang

    2014-11-01

    Activation of the inflammatory response is accompanied by a metabolic shift to aerobic glycolysis. Here we identify histone deacetylase 4 (HDAC4) as a new component of the immunometabolic program. We show that HDAC4 is required for efficient inflammatory cytokine production activated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Surprisingly, prolonged LPS treatment leads to HDAC4 degradation. LPS-induced HDAC4 degradation requires active glycolysis controlled by GSK3β and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Inhibition of GSK3β or iNOS suppresses nitric oxide (NO) production, glycolysis, and HDAC4 degradation. We present evidence that sustained glycolysis induced by LPS treatment activates caspase-3, which cleaves HDAC4 and triggers its degradation. Of importance, a caspase-3-resistant mutant HDAC4 escapes LPS-induced degradation and prolongs inflammatory cytokine production. Our findings identify the GSK3β-iNOS-NO axis as a critical signaling cascade that couples inflammation to metabolic reprogramming and a glycolysis-driven negative feedback mechanism that limits inflammatory response by triggering HDAC4 degradation.

  1. Boric acid inhibits embryonic histone deacetylases: a suggested mechanism to explain boric acid-related teratogenicity.

    PubMed

    Di Renzo, Francesca; Cappelletti, Graziella; Broccia, Maria L; Giavini, Erminio; Menegola, Elena

    2007-04-15

    Histone deacetylases (HDAC) control gene expression by changing histonic as well as non histonic protein conformation. HDAC inhibitors (HDACi) are considered to be among the most promising drugs for epigenetic treatment for cancer. Recently a strict relationship between histone hyperacetylation in specific tissues of mouse embryos exposed to two HDACi (valproic acid and trichostatin A) and specific axial skeleton malformations has been demonstrated. The aim of this study is to verify if boric acid (BA), that induces in rodents malformations similar to those valproic acid and trichostatin A-related, acts through similar mechanisms: HDAC inhibition and histone hyperacetylation. Pregnant mice were treated intraperitoneally with a teratogenic dose of BA (1000 mg/kg, day 8 of gestation). Western blot analysis and immunostaining were performed with anti hyperacetylated histone 4 (H4) antibody on embryos explanted 1, 3 or 4 h after treatment and revealed H4 hyperacetylation at the level of somites. HDAC enzyme assay was performed on embryonic nuclear extracts. A significant HDAC inhibition activity (compatible with a mixed type partial inhibition mechanism) was evident with BA. Kinetic analyses indicate that BA modifies substrate affinity by a factor alpha=0.51 and maximum velocity by a factor beta=0.70. This work provides the first evidence for HDAC inhibition by BA and suggests such a molecular mechanism for the induction of BA-related malformations.

  2. Histone deacetylase 8 regulates cortactin deacetylation and contraction in smooth muscle tissues.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia; Chen, Shu; Cleary, Rachel A; Wang, Ruping; Gannon, Olivia J; Seto, Edward; Tang, Dale D

    2014-08-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are a family of enzymes that mediate nucleosomal histone deacetylation and gene expression. Some members of the HDAC family have also been implicated in nonhistone protein deacetylation, which modulates cell-cycle control, differentiation, and cell migration. However, the role of HDACs in smooth muscle contraction is largely unknown. Here, HDAC8 was localized both in the cytoplasm and the nucleus of mouse and human smooth muscle cells. Knockdown of HDAC8 by lentivirus-encoding HDAC8 shRNA inhibited force development in response to acetylcholine. Treatment of smooth muscle tissues with HDAC8 inhibitor XXIV (OSU-HDAC-44) induced relaxation of precontracted smooth muscle tissues. In addition, cortactin is an actin-regulatory protein that undergoes deacetylation during migration of NIH 3T3 cells. In this study, acetylcholine stimulation induced cortactin deacetylation in mouse and human smooth muscle tissues, as evidenced by immunoblot analysis using antibody against acetylated lysine. Knockdown of HDAC8 by RNAi or treatment with the inhibitor attenuated cortactin deacetylation and actin polymerization without affecting myosin activation. Furthermore, expression of a charge-neutralizing cortactin mutant inhibited contraction and actin dynamics during contractile activation. These results suggest a novel mechanism for the regulation of smooth muscle contraction. In response to contractile stimulation, HDAC8 may mediate cortactin deacetylation, which subsequently promotes actin filament polymerization and smooth muscle contraction.

  3. Histone Deacetylase 4 promotes cholestatic liver injury in the absence of Prohibitin-1

    PubMed Central

    Barbier-Torres, Lucía; Beraza, Naiara; Fernández-Tussy, Pablo; Lopitz-Otsoa, Fernando; Fernández-Ramos, David; Zubiete-Franco, Imanol; Varela-Rey, Marta; Delgado, Teresa C; Gutiérrez, Virginia; Anguita, Juan; Pares, Albert; Banales, Jesús M; Villa, Erica; Caballería, Juan; Alvarez, Luis; Lu, Shelly C; Mato, Jose M; Martínez-Chantar, María Luz

    2015-01-01

    Prohibitin 1 (PHB1) is an evolutionary conserved pleiotropic protein that participates in diverse processes depending on its subcellular localization and interactome. Recent data have indicated a diverse role for PHB1 in the pathogenesis of obesity, cancer and inflammatory bowel disease, among others. Data presented here suggest that PHB1 is also linked to cholestatic liver disease. PHB1 expression is markedly reduced in patients with primary billiary cirrhosis and biliary atresia and Alagille syndrome, two major pediatric cholestatic conditions. In the experimental model of bile duct ligation, silencing of PHB1 induced liver fibrosis, reduced animal survival and induced bile duct proliferation. Importantly, the modulatory effect of PHB1 is not dependent on its known mitochondrial function. Importantly, d PHB1 interacts with Histone Deacetylase 4 (HDAC4) in the presence of bile acids. Hence, PHB1 depletion leads to increased nuclear HDAC4 content and its associated epigenetic changes. Remarkably, HDAC4 silencing and the administration of the HDAC inhibitor parthenolide during obstructive cholestasis in vivo promote genomic reprogramming leading to the regression of the fibrotic phenotype in the liver-specific Phb1 KO mice. Conclusion Our data identify PHB1 as an important mediator of cholestatic liver injury regulating the activity of HDAC4, which controls specific epigenetic marks. These results identify potential novel strategies to treat liver injury and fibrosis, particularly as a consequence of chronic cholestasis. PMID:26109312

  4. Selective transcription and cellular proliferation induced by PDGF require histone deacetylase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Catania, Annunziata; Iavarone, Carlo; Carlomagno, Stella M.; Chiariello, Mario . E-mail: chiariel@unina.it

    2006-05-05

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are key regulatory enzymes involved in the control of gene expression and their inhibition by specific drugs has been widely correlated to cell cycle arrest, terminal differentiation, and apoptosis. Here, we investigated whether HDAC activity was required for PDGF-dependent signal transduction and cellular proliferation. Exposure of PDGF-stimulated NIH3T3 fibroblasts to the HDAC inhibitor trichostatin A (TSA) potently repressed the expression of a group of genes correlated to PDGF-dependent cellular growth and pro-survival activity. Moreover, we show that TSA interfered with STAT3-dependent transcriptional activity induced by PDGF. Still, neither phosphorylation nor nuclear translocation and DNA-binding in vitro and in vivo of STAT3 were affected by using TSA to interfere with PDGF stimulation. Finally, TSA treatment resulted in the suppression of PDGF-dependent cellular proliferation without affecting cellular survival of NIH3T3 cells. Our data indicate that inhibition of HDAC activity antagonizes the mitogenic effect of PDGF, suggesting that these drugs may specifically act on the expression of STAT-dependent, PDGF-responsive genes.

  5. RPD3 histone deacetylase and nutrition have distinct but interacting effects on Drosophila longevity.

    PubMed

    Frankel, Stewart; Woods, Jared; Ziafazeli, Tahereh; Rogina, Blanka

    2015-12-01

    Single-gene mutations that extend longevity have revealed regulatory pathways related to aging and longevity. RPD3 is a conserved histone deacetylase (Class I HDAC). Previously we showed that Drosophila rpd3 mutations increase longevity. Here we tested the longevity effects of RPD3 on multiple nutrient levels. Dietary restriction (DR) has additive effects on RPD3-mediated longevity extension, but the effect may be modestly attenuated relative to controls. RPD3 and DR therefore appear to operate by distinct but interacting mechanisms. Since RPD3 regulates transcription, the mRNA levels for two proteins involved in nutrient signaling, 4E-BP and Tor, were examined in rpd3 mutant flies. 4E-BP mRNA was reduced under longevity-increasing conditions. Epistasis between RPD3 and 4E-BP with regard to longevity was then tested. Flies only heterozygous for a mutation in Thor, the 4E-BP gene, have modestly decreased life spans. Flies mutant for both rpd3 and Thor show a superposition of a large RPD3-mediated increase and a small Thor-mediated decrease in longevity at all food levels, consistent with each gene product having distinct effects on life span. However, DR-mediated extension was absent in males carrying both mutations and lessened in females. Our results support the view that multiple discrete but interacting mechanisms regulate longevity.

  6. Histone Deacetylase 3 Depletion in Osteo/Chondroprogenitor Cells Decreases Bone Density and Increases Marrow Fat

    PubMed Central

    Casper, Michelle E.; McGee-Lawrence, Meghan E.; Stensgard, Bridget A.; Li, Xiaodong; Secreto, Frank J.; Knutson, Sarah K.; Hiebert, Scott W.; Westendorf, Jennifer J.

    2010-01-01

    Histone deacetylase (Hdac)3 is a nuclear enzyme that contributes to epigenetic programming and is required for embryonic development. To determine the role of Hdac3 in bone formation, we crossed mice harboring loxP sites around exon 7 of Hdac3 with mice expressing Cre recombinase under the control of the osterix promoter. The resulting Hdac3 conditional knockout (CKO) mice were runted and had severe deficits in intramembranous and endochondral bone formation. Calvarial bones were significantly thinner and trabecular bone volume in the distal femur was decreased 75% in the Hdac3 CKO mice due to a substantial reduction in trabecular number. Hdac3-CKO mice had fewer osteoblasts and more bone marrow adipocytes as a proportion of tissue area than their wildtype or heterozygous littermates. Bone formation rates were depressed in both the cortical and trabecular regions of Hdac3 CKO femurs. Microarray analyses revealed that numerous developmental signaling pathways were affected by Hdac3-deficiency. Thus, Hdac3 depletion in osterix-expressing progenitor cells interferes with bone formation and promotes bone marrow adipocyte differentiation. These results demonstrate that Hdac3 inhibition is detrimental to skeletal health. PMID:20628553

  7. Histone Deacetylases and Mood Disorders: Epigenetic Programming in Gene-Environment Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Machado-Vieira, Rodrigo; Ibrahim, Lobna; Zarate, Carlos A.

    2010-01-01

    Epigenetics involves molecular mechanisms related to gene expression independent of DNA sequence, mostly mediated by modification of chromatin histones. It has recently been suggested that these transcriptional changes may be implicated in the pathophysiology of mood disorders. In addition, histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors have been shown to control epigenetic programming associated with the regulation of cognition and behavior, and may reverse dysfunctional epigenetic regulation associated with early life events in preclinical models. In this context, the active and continuous adaptation of chromatin, and the access of gene promoters to transcription factor mechanisms may represent a potential therapeutic target in the treatment of mood disorders such as bipolar disorder (BD) and major depressive disorder (MDD). Notably, the standard mood stabilizer valproate (VPA) has been shown to modulate the epigenome by inhibiting HDACs. However, several potential limitations are associated with this class of agents, including lack of selectivity for specific HDAC isoforms as well as risk of potentially serious side effects. Further studies regarding the potential role of chromatin remodeling in the mechanism of action of antidepressants and mood stabilizers are necessary to clarify the potential role of this class of agents as therapeutics for mood disorders. PMID:20961400

  8. Boric acid inhibits embryonic histone deacetylases: A suggested mechanism to explain boric acid-related teratogenicity

    SciTech Connect

    Di Renzo, Francesca; Cappelletti, Graziella; Broccia, Maria L.; Giavini, Erminio; Menegola, Elena . E-mail: elena.menegola@unimi.it

    2007-04-15

    Histone deacetylases (HDAC) control gene expression by changing histonic as well as non histonic protein conformation. HDAC inhibitors (HDACi) are considered to be among the most promising drugs for epigenetic treatment for cancer. Recently a strict relationship between histone hyperacetylation in specific tissues of mouse embryos exposed to two HDACi (valproic acid and trichostatin A) and specific axial skeleton malformations has been demonstrated. The aim of this study is to verify if boric acid (BA), that induces in rodents malformations similar to those valproic acid and trichostatin A-related, acts through similar mechanisms: HDAC inhibition and histone hyperacetylation. Pregnant mice were treated intraperitoneally with a teratogenic dose of BA (1000 mg/kg, day 8 of gestation). Western blot analysis and immunostaining were performed with anti hyperacetylated histone 4 (H4) antibody on embryos explanted 1, 3 or 4 h after treatment and revealed H4 hyperacetylation at the level of somites. HDAC enzyme assay was performed on embryonic nuclear extracts. A significant HDAC inhibition activity (compatible with a mixed type partial inhibition mechanism) was evident with BA. Kinetic analyses indicate that BA modifies substrate affinity by a factor {alpha} = 0.51 and maximum velocity by a factor {beta} = 0.70. This work provides the first evidence for HDAC inhibition by BA and suggests such a molecular mechanism for the induction of BA-related malformations.

  9. Improving allogeneic islet transplantation by suppressing Th17 and enhancing Treg with histone deacetylase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Koji; Itoh, Takeshi; Takita, Morihito; Shimoda, Masayuki; Chujo, Daisuke; SoRelle, Jeff A; Naziruddin, Bashoo; Levy, Marlon F; Shimada, Mitsuo; Matsumoto, Shinichi

    2014-04-01

    Islet transplantation is a new treatment for achieving insulin independence for patients with severe diabetes. However, major drawbacks of this treatment are the long graft survival, the necessity for immunosuppressive drugs, and the efficacy of transplantation. Donor-specific transfusion (DST) has been shown to reduce rejection after organ transplantation, potentially through enhanced regulatory T-cell (Treg) activity. However, recent findings have shown that activated Treg can be converted into Th17 cells. We focused on histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) because it was reported that inhibition of HDAC activity prevented Treg differentiation into IL17-producing cells. We therefore sought to enhance Treg while suppressing Th17 cells using DST with HDACi to prolong graft survival. To stimulate Treg by DST, we used donor splenocytes. In DST with HDACi group, Foxp3 mRNA expression and Treg population increased in the thymus and spleen, whereas Th17 population decreased. qPCR analysis of lymphocyte mRNA indicated that Foxp3, IL-10, and TGF-b expression increased. However, interleukin 17a, Stat3 (Th17), and IFN-g expression decreased in DST + HDACi group, relative to DST alone. Moreover, DST treated with HDACi prolonged graft survival relative to controls in mice islet transplantation. DST with HDACi may therefore have utility in islet transplantation.

  10. Histone deacetylase inhibitors mediate DNA damage repair in ameliorating hemorrhagic cystitis.

    PubMed

    Haldar, Subhash; Dru, Christopher; Mishra, Rajeev; Tripathi, Manisha; Duong, Frank; Angara, Bryan; Fernandez, Ana; Arditi, Moshe; Bhowmick, Neil A

    2016-12-20

    Hemorrhagic cystitis is an inflammatory and ulcerative bladder condition associated with systemic chemotherapeutics, like cyclophosphomide. Earlier, we reported reactive oxygen species resulting from cyclophosphamide metabolite, acrolein, causes global methylation followed by silencing of DNA damage repair genes. Ogg1 (8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase) is one such silenced base excision repair enzyme that can restore DNA integrity. The accumulation of DNA damage results in subsequent inflammation associated with pyroptotic death of bladder smooth muscle cells. We hypothesized that reversing inflammasome-induced imprinting in the bladder smooth muscle could prevent the inflammatory phenotype. Elevated recruitment of Dnmt1 and Dnmt3b to the Ogg1 promoter in acrolein treated bladder muscle cells was validated by the pattern of CpG methylation revealed by bisulfite sequencing. Knockout of Ogg1 in detrusor cells resulted in accumulation of reactive oxygen mediated 8-Oxo-dG and spontaneous pyroptotic signaling. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), restored Ogg1 expression in cells treated with acrolein and mice treated with cyclophosphamide superior to the standard of care, mesna or nicotinamide-induced DNA demethylation. SAHA restored cyclophosphamide-induced bladder pathology to that of untreated control mice. The observed epigenetic imprinting induced by inflammation suggests a new therapeutic target for the treatment of hemorrhagic cystitis.

  11. Inhibition of histone deacetylase in utero causes sociability deficits in postnatal mice.

    PubMed

    Moldrich, Randal X; Leanage, Gayeshika; She, David; Dolan-Evans, Elliot; Nelson, Michael; Reza, Nargis; Reutens, David C

    2013-11-15

    Exposure to sodium valproate (VPA) in utero increases the risk of language impairment and a diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Mice exposed to VPA while in utero have also shown postnatal social deficits. Inhibition of histone deacetylase (HDAC) is one of VPA's many biological effects. The main objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that HDAC inhibition causes these behavioral outcomes following prenatal VPA exposure in mice. We exposed embryonic mice to VPA, the HDAC inhibitor trichostatin A (TSA), or vehicle controls. TSA (1mg/kg) inhibited HDAC in embryonic tissue at a level comparable to 600 mg/kg VPA, resulting in significant increases in histone H3 and H4 acetylation, and histone H3 lysine 4 tri-methylation. Postnatally, decreases in ultrasonic vocalization, olfactory motivation and sociability were observed in TSA and VPA-exposed pups. Treated mice exhibited elevated digging and grooming suggestive of mild restrictive and repetitive behaviors. Olfactory social preference, social novelty and habituation were normal. Together, these data indicate that embryonic HDAC inhibition alone can cause abnormal social behaviors in mice. This result serves as a molecular understanding of infant outcomes following mild VPA exposure in utero.

  12. Regulation of androgen receptor and histone deacetylase 1 by Mdm2-mediated ubiquitylation.

    PubMed

    Gaughan, Luke; Logan, Ian R; Neal, David E; Robson, Craig N

    2005-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) is a member of the nuclear hormone receptor family of transcription factors and plays a critical role in regulating the expression of genes involved in androgen-dependent and -independent tumour formation. Regulation of the AR is achieved by alternate binding of either histone acetyltransferase (HAT)-containing co-activator proteins, or histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1). Factors that control AR stability may also constitute an important regulatory mechanism, a notion that has been confirmed with the finding that the AR is a direct target for Mdm2-mediated ubiquitylation and proteolysis. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and re-ChIP analyses, we show that Mdm2 associates with AR and HDAC1 at the active androgen-responsive PSA promoter in LNCaP prostate cancer cells. Furthermore, we demonstrate that Mdm2-mediated modification of AR and HDAC1 catalyses protein destabilization and attenuates AR sactivity, suggesting that ubiquitylation of the AR and HDAC1 may constitute an additional mechanism for regulating AR function. We also show that HDAC1 and Mdm2 function co-operatively to reduce AR-mediated transcription that is attenuated by the HAT activity of the AR co-activator Tip60, suggesting interplay between acetylation status and receptor ubiquitylation in AR regulation. In all, our data indicates a novel role for Mdm2 in regulating components of the AR transcriptosome.

  13. Molecular Analysis of VP7 Gene of Rotavirus G1 Strains Isolated from North India.

    PubMed

    Jain, Swapnil; Vashistt, Jitendraa; Gupta, Kanika; Kumar, Ashok; Changotra, Harish

    2016-12-01

    Rotavirus G1 strains are the predominant cause of diarrhoea in children. Universally common rotavirus vaccines (Rotarix and RotaTeq) include G1 as the immunological component. India has recently introduced rotavirus vaccine in Universal Immunization Programme. Therefore, in the present study, VP7 gene of rotavirus G1 strains circulating in Himachal Pradesh, India is analysed to study their phylogenetic characteristics, and further comparative analysis was performed for assessment of their divergence from the vaccine strains. The rotavirus strains (JU-SOL-5, JU-SOL-58, JU-SOL-77, JU-SOL-173 and JU-SHI-14) analysed in the study were isolated from the faeces of diarrhoeic children during active surveillance for rotaviruses. The Himachal strains clustered together in G1-Lineage 1 in the phylogenetic analysis. All five isolates showed 96.4-98.8 % similarity with the other G1-Lineage 1 strains at amino acid level. However, none of them clustered in the pre-defined sublineages within lineage 1. Interestingly, all the strains were distantly related to the vaccine strains having 93.9-94.5 and 91.9-92.6 % similarities at amino acid level with Rotarix and RotaTeq strains, respectively. The comparative sequence and structural analysis of the Himachal strains with vaccine strains revealed differences in amino acids in epitope region of the protein especially at the antibody neutralization sites. The study highlights variations between the G1 strains from Himachal Pradesh, India and Rotarix and RotaTeq vaccine strains. These differences might have an impact on the neutralization efficiency of vaccine and subsequently on vaccine efficacy. This underscores further investigation to study intragenotype antigenic variability and also impact of viral evolution on vaccine effectiveness.

  14. Cytosolic phospholipase A2α regulates G1 progression through modulating FOXO1 activity

    PubMed Central

    Naini, Said Movahedi; Choukroun, Gabriel J.; Ryan, James R.; Hentschel, Dirk M.; Shah, Jagesh V.; Bonventre, Joseph V.

    2016-01-01

    Group IVA phospholipase A2 [cytosolic phospholipase A2α (cPLA2α)] is a key mediator of inflammation and tumorigenesis. In this study, by using a combination of chemical inhibition and genetic approaches in zebrafish and murine cells, we identify a mechanism by which cPLA2α promotes cell proliferation. We identified 2 cpla2α genes in zebrafish, cpla2αa and cpla2αb, with conserved phospholipase activity. In zebrafish, loss of cpla2α expression or inhibition of cpla2α activity diminished G1 progression through the cell cycle. This phenotype was also seen in both mouse embryonic fibroblasts and mesangial cells. G1 progression was rescued by the addition of arachidonic acid or prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), indicating a phospholipase-dependent mechanism. We further show that PGE2, through PI3K/AKT activation, promoted Forkhead box protein O1 (FOXO1) phosphorylation and FOXO1 nuclear export. This led to up-regulation of cyclin D1 and down-regulation of p27Kip1, thus promoting G1 progression. Finally, using pharmacologic inhibitors, we show that cPLA2α, rapidly accelerated fibrosarcoma (RAF)/MEK/ERK, and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways cooperatively regulate G1 progression in response to platelet-derived growth factor stimulation. In summary, these data indicate that cPLA2α, through its phospholipase activity, is a critical effector of G1 phase progression through the cell cycle and suggest that pharmacological targeting of this enzyme may have important therapeutic benefits in disease mechanisms that involve excessive cell proliferation, in particular, cancer and proliferative glomerulopathies.—Naini, S. M., Choukroun, G. J., Ryan, J. R., Hentschel, D. M., Shah, J. V., Bonventre, J. V. Cytosolic phospholipase A2α regulates G1 progression through modulating FOXO1 activity. PMID:26644349

  15. Replication licensing promotes cyclin D1 expression and G1 progression in untransformed human cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Peijun; Slater, Damien M.; Lenburg, Marc; Nevis, Kathleen; Cook, Jeanette Gowen; Vaziri, Cyrus

    2011-01-01

    Defects in DNA replication are implicated as early and causal events in malignancy. However, the immediate effects of impaired DNA replication licensing on cell cycle progression of non-malignant human cells are unknown. Therefore, we have investigated the acute effects of Mcm7 ablation using synchronized cultures of untransformed Human Dermal Fibroblasts (HDF). Mcm7 ablation elicited a G1 delay associated with impaired activation of CDK4 and CDK2 and reduced Rb phosphorylation. The cell cycle delay of Mcm7-ablated cells was not associated with a DNA damage response. However, levels of cyclin D1 mRNA were specifically reduced and binding of RNA Polymerase II to the CYCD1 promoter was decreased in Mcm7-depleted cells. Similar to Mcm7-deficiency, Mcm2- or Cdc6-depletion led to impaired cyclin D expression. Ectopic overexpression of Cdc6 in quiescent cells promoted cyclin D1 expression, CDK4 activation and G1 progression. Therefore timely and efficient expression of cyclin D1 during G1 phase requires replication licensing. Reconstitution of cyclin D1 expression was insufficient to correct the G1 delay of Mcm7-depleted cells, indicating that additional cell cycle events during G1 are dependent on replication licensing. However, ectopic expression of the HPV-E7 oncoprotein, and the resulting bypass of the requirement for cyclin D1-Rb signaling enabled Mcm7-depleted cells to enter S-phase. HPV-E7-induced S-phase entry of Mcm7-depleted cells led to a DNA damage response, a hallmark of pre-malignancy. Taken together, our results suggest the existence of a ‘replication licensing restriction point’ that couples pre-RC assembly with G1 progression in normal cells to minimize replication stress, DNA damage and tumorigenesis. PMID:19106611

  16. Extraction of monoclonal antibodies (IgG1) using anionic and anionic/nonionic reverse micelles.

    PubMed

    George, Daliya A; Stuckey, David C

    2010-01-01

    Purification schemes for antibody production based on affinity chromatography are trying to keep pace with increases in cell culture expression levels and many current research initiatives are focused on finding alternatives to chromatography for the purification of Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). In this article, we have investigated an alternative separation technique based on liquid-liquid extraction called the reverse micellar extraction. We extracted MAb (IgG1) using reverse micelles of an anionic surfactant, sodium bis 2-ethyl-hexyl sulfosuccinate (AOT) and a combination of anionic (AOT) and nonionic surfactants (Brij-30, Tween-85, Span-85) using isooctane as the solvent system. The extraction efficiency of IgG1 was studied by varying parameters, such as pH of the aqueous phase, cation concentration, and type and surfactant concentration. Using the AOT/Isooctane reverse micellar system, we could achieve good overall extraction of IgG1 (between 80 and 90%), but only 30% of the bioactivity of IgG1 could be recovered at the end of the extraction by using its binding to affinity chromatography columns as a surrogate measure of activity. As anionic surfactants were suspected as being one of the reasons for the reduced activity, we decided to combine a nonionic surfactant with an anionic surfactant and then study its effect on the extraction efficiency and bioactivity. The best results were obtained using an AOT/Brij-30/Isooctane reverse micellar system, which gave an overall extraction above 90 and 59% overall activity recovery. An AOT/Tween-85/Isooctane reverse micellar system gave an overall extraction of between 75 and 80% and overall activity recovery of around 40-45%. The results showed that the activity recovery of IgG1 can be significantly enhanced using different surfactant combination systems, and if the recovery of IgG1 can be further enhanced, the technique shows considerable promise for the downstream purification of MAbs.

  17. Rectal Neuroendocrine Tumor G1 with a Solitary Hepatic Metastatic Lesion

    PubMed Central

    Nagata, Kohei; Tajiri, Kazuto; Shimada, Seitarou; Ando, Takayuki; Hosokawa, Ayumu; Matsui, Koshi; Imura, Joji; Sugiyama, Toshiro

    2017-01-01

    Rectal neuroendocrine tumor (NET) is a relatively rare tumor. NET is classified as G1, G2, or G3 according to the degree of mitosis or Ki-67 proliferation index, which reflect the malignant potential of the tumor, such as metastasis. Advanced cases with metastasis are indicated for chemotherapy treatment. However, the efficacy of chemotherapy is limited. Therefore, resection is considered, even in metastatic cases, if complete resection is possible. We herein report a case of small rectal NET discovered with hepatic metastasis classified as G1. The patient showed good progress with no recurrence after undergoing hepatectomy and endoscopic resection of rectal NET. PMID:28154272

  18. Structural and functional characterization of a putative polysaccharide deacetylase of the human parasite Encephalitozoon cuniculi.

    PubMed

    Urch, Jonathan E; Hurtado-Guerrero, Ramon; Brosson, Damien; Liu, Zhanliang; Eijsink, Vincent G H; Texier, Catherine; van Aalten, Daan M F

    2009-06-01

    The microsporidian Encephalitozoon cuniculi is an intracellular eukaryotic parasite considered to be an emerging opportunistic human pathogen. The infectious stage of this parasite is a unicellular spore that is surrounded by a chitin containing endospore layer and an external proteinaceous exospore. A putative chitin deacetylase (ECU11_0510) localizes to the interface between the plasma membrane and the endospore. Chitin deacetylases are family 4 carbohydrate esterases in the CAZY classification, and several bacterial members of this family are involved in evading lysis by host glycosidases, through partial de-N-acetylation of cell wall peptidoglycan. Similarly, ECU11_0510 could be important for E. cuniculi survival in the host, by protecting the chitin layer from hydrolysis by human chitinases. Here, we describe the biochemical, structural, and glycan binding properties of the protein. Enzymatic analyses showed that the putative deacetylase is unable to deacetylate chitooligosaccharides or crystalline beta-chitin. Furthermore, carbohydrate microarray analysis revealed that the protein bound neither chitooligosaccharides nor any of a wide range of other glycans or chitin. The high resolution crystal structure revealed dramatic rearrangements in the positions of catalytic and substrate binding residues, which explain the loss of deacetylase activity, adding to the unusual structural plasticity observed in other members of this esterase family. Thus, it appears that the ECU11_0510 protein is not a carbohydrate deacetylase and may fulfill an as yet undiscovered role in the E. cuniculi parasite.

  19. Regulation of p27Kip1 phosphorylation and G1 cell cycle progression by protein phosphatase PPM1G

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Chuang; Wang, Gaohang; Wrighton, Katharine H; Lin, Han; Songyang, Zhou; Feng, Xin-Hua; Lin, Xia

    2016-01-01

    The cell cycle, an essential process leading to the cell division, is stringently controlled by the key cell cycle regulators, cyclin-CDK complexes, whose activity is further regulated by a variety of mechanisms. p27Kip1 is a cyclin-CDK inhibitor that arrests the cell cycle at the G1 phase by blocking the activation of cyclin E-CDK2 complex, preventing the improper entry to the cell cycle. Dysfunction of p27 has been frequently observed in many types of human cancers, resulting from p27 protein degradation and cytoplasmic mislocalization, which are highly regulated by the phosphorylation status of p27. Although the kinases that phosphorylate p27 have been extensively studied, phosphatases that dephosphorylate p27 remain to be elucidated. By using genomic phosphatase screening, we identified a PPM family phosphatase, PPM1G, which could reduce p27 phosphorylation at T198. We further confirmed that PPM1G is a novel p27 phosphatase by demonstrating that PPM1G can interact with and dephosphorylate p27 in cells and in vitro. Functionally, ectopic expression of PPM1G enhanced p27 protein stability and delayed cell cycle progression from G1 to S phase. In accordance, knockdown of PPM1G accelerated p27 degradation during G1 phase and rendered cells resistant to the cell cycle arrest induced by serum deprivation. Mechanistically, PPM1G inhibited the interaction of p27 to 14-3-3θ, a chaperone protein that facilitates p27 nuclear export. Knockdown of PPM1G promoted the cytoplasmic localization of p27. Taken together, our studies identified PPM1G as a novel regulator of p27 that dephosphorylates p27 at T198 site and, together with p27 kinases, PPM1G controls cell cycle progression by maintaining the proper level of p27 protein. PMID:27822412

  20. Histone Deacetylases in Bone Development and Skeletal Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Elizabeth W.; Carpio, Lomeli R.; van Wijnen, Andre J.; McGee-Lawrence, Meghan E.; Westendorf, Jennifer J.

    2015-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (Hdacs) are conserved enzymes that remove acetyl groups from lysine side chains in histones and other proteins. Eleven of the 18 Hdacs encoded by the human and mouse genomes depend on Zn2+ for enzymatic activity, while the other 7, the sirtuins (Sirts), require NAD2+. Collectively, Hdacs and Sirts regulate numerous cellular and mitochondrial processes including gene transcription, DNA repair, protein stability, cytoskeletal dynamics, and signaling pathways to affect both development and aging. Of clinical relevance, Hdacs inhibitors are United States Food and Drug Administration-approved cancer therapeutics and are candidate therapies for other common diseases including arthritis, diabetes, epilepsy, heart disease, HIV infection, neurodegeneration, and numerous aging-related disorders. Hdacs and Sirts influence skeletal development, maintenance of mineral density and bone strength by affecting intramembranous and endochondral ossification, as well as bone resorption. With few exceptions, inhibition of Hdac or Sirt activity though either loss-of-function mutations or prolonged chemical inhibition has negative and/or toxic effects on skeletal development and bone mineral density. Specifically, Hdac/Sirt suppression causes abnormalities in physiological development such as craniofacial dimorphisms, short stature, and bone fragility that are associated with several human syndromes or diseases. In contrast, activation of Sirts may protect the skeleton from aging and immobilization-related bone loss. This knowledge may prolong healthspan and prevent adverse events caused by epigenetic therapies that are entering the clinical realm at an unprecedented rate. In this review, we summarize the general properties of Hdacs/Sirts and the research that has revealed their essential functions in bone forming cells (e.g., osteoblasts and chondrocytes) and bone resorbing osteoclasts. Finally, we offer predictions on future research in this area and the utility of

  1. Alcohol-induced serotonergic modulation: the role of histone deacetylases.

    PubMed

    Agudelo, Marisela; Yoo, Changwon; Nair, Madhavan P

    2012-11-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that alcohol use disorders (AUDs) are regulated by multiple mechanisms such as neurotransmitters and enzymes. The neurotransmitter, serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) may contribute to alcohol effects and serotonin receptors, including 5-HT3, play an important role in AUDs. Recent studies have also implicated histone deacetylases (HDACs) and acetyltransferases (HATS) in regulation of drug addiction, and HDAC inhibitors (HDACi) have been reported as transcriptional modulators of monoaminergic neurotransmission. Therefore, we hypothesize that HDACs may play a role in ethanol-induced serotonergic modulation. The effects of ethanol on serotonin and 5-HT3, and the role HDACs, HDAC activity and the HDACi, trichostatin A (TSA), play in alcohol-induced serotonergic effects were studied. Human SK-N-MC and neurons, were treated with ethanol (0.05, 0.1 and 0.2%), and/or TSA (50 nM), and 5-HT3 levels were assessed at 24-72 h. Gene expression was evaluated by qRT-PCR and protein by western blot and flow cytometry. Serotonin release was assessed by ELISA and HDAC activity by fluorometric assay. Our results show an increase in 5-HT3 gene after ethanol treatment. Further, ethanol significantly increased HDACs 1 and 3 genes accompanied by an increased in HDAC activity while TSA significantly inhibited HDACs. Studies with TSA show a significant upregulation of ethanol effects on 5-HT3, while surprisingly TSA inhibited ethanol-induced serotonin production. These results suggest that ethanol affects 5-HT3 and serotonin through mechanisms involving HDACs and HATs. In summary, our studies demonstrate some of the novel properties of HDAC inhibitors and contribute to the understanding of the mechanisms involve in alcohol-serotonergic modulation in the CNS.

  2. Inhibitors of Histone Deacetylases Enhance Neurotoxicity of DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Vashishta, A.

    2014-01-01

    The nonselective inhibitors of class I/II histone deacetylases (HDACs) including trichostatin A and the clinically used suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA, vorinostat) are neuroprotective in several models of neuronal injury. Here, we report that in cultured cortical neurons from newborn rats and in the cerebral cortex of whole neonate rats, these HDAC inhibitors exacerbated cytotoxicity of the DNA double-strand break (DSB)-inducing anticancer drug etoposide by enhancing apoptosis. Similar neurotoxic interactions were also observed in neurons that were treated with other DNA damaging drugs including cisplatin and camptothecin. In addition, in rat neonates, SAHA increased cortical neuron apoptosis that was induced by a single injection of the NMDA receptor antagonist dizocilpine (MK801). In etoposide-treated neurons, the nonselective HDAC inhibition resulted in more DSBs. It also potentiated etoposide-induced accumulation and phosphorylation of the pro-apoptotic transcription factor p53. Moreover, nonselective HDAC inhibition exacerbated neuronal apoptosis that was induced by the overexpressed p53. Importantly, such effects cannot be fully explained by inhibition of HDAC1, which is known to play a role in DSB repair and regulation of p53. The specific HDAC1 inhibitor MS275 only moderately enhanced etoposide-induced neuronal death. Although in etoposide-treated neurons MS275 increased DSBs, it did not affect activation of p53. Our findings suggest that besides HDAC1, there are other class I/II HDACs that participate in neuronal DNA damage response attenuating neurotoxic consequences of genotoxic insults to the developing brain. PMID:25063076

  3. Human arylacetamide deacetylase is a principal enzyme in flutamide hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Akinobu; Fukami, Tatsuki; Nakajima, Miki; Takamiya, Masataka; Aoki, Yasuhiro; Yokoi, Tsuyoshi

    2009-07-01

    Flutamide, an antiandrogen drug, is widely used for the treatment of prostate cancer. The initial metabolic pathways of flutamide are hydroxylation and hydrolysis. It was recently reported that the hydrolyzed product, 4-nitro-3-(trifluoromethyl)phenylamine (FLU-1), is further metabolized to N-hydroxy FLU-1, an assumed hepatotoxicant. However, the esterase responsible for the flutamide hydrolysis has not been characterized. In the present study, we found that human arylacetamide deacetylase (AADAC) efficiently hydrolyzed flutamide using recombinant AADAC expressed in COS7 cells. In contrast, carboxylesterase1 (CES1) and CES2, which are responsible for the hydrolysis of many drugs, could not hydrolyze flutamide. AADAC is specifically expressed in the endoplasmic reticulum. Flutamide hydrolase activity was highly detected in human liver microsomes (K(m), 794 +/- 83 microM; V(max), 1.1 +/- 0.0 nmol/min/mg protein), whereas the activity was extremely low in human liver cytosol. The flutamide hydrolase activity in human liver microsomes was strongly inhibited by bis-(p-nitrophenyl)phosphate [corrected], diisopropylphosphorofluoride, and physostigmine sulfate (eserine) but moderately inhibited by sodium fluoride, phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride, and disulfiram. The same inhibition pattern was obtained with the recombinant AADAC. Moreover, human liver and jejunum microsomes showing AADAC expression could hydrolyze flutamide, but human pulmonary and renal microsomes, which do not express AADAC, showed slight activity. In human liver microsomal samples (n = 50), the flutamide hydrolase activities were significantly correlated with the expression levels of AADAC protein (r = 0.66, p < 0.001). In conclusion, these results clearly showed that flutamide is exclusively hydrolyzed by AADAC. AADAC would be an important enzyme responsible for flutamide-induced hepatotoxicity.

  4. Identification and characterization of histone deacetylases in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum)

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Linmao; Lu, Jingxia; Zhang, Jianxia; Wu, Pei-Ying; Yang, Songguang; Wu, Keqiang

    2015-01-01

    Histone acetylation and deacetylation at the N-terminus of histone tails play crucial roles in the regulation of eukaryotic gene activity. Histone acetylation and deacetylation are catalyzed by histone acetyltransferases and histone deacetylases (HDACs), respectively. A growing number of studies have demonstrated the importance of histone deacetylation/acetylation on genome stability, transcriptional regulation, development and response to stress in Arabidopsis. However, the biological functions of HDACs in tomato have not been investigated previously. Fifteen HDACs identified from tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) can be grouped into RPD3/HDA1, SIR2 and HD2 families based on phylogenetic analysis. Meanwhile, 10 members of the RPD3/HDA1 family can be further subdivided into four groups, namely Class I, Class II, Class III, and Class IV. High similarities of protein sequences and conserved domains were identified among SlHDACs and their homologs in Arabidopsis. Most SlHDACs were expressed in all tissues examined with different transcript abundance. Transient expression in Arabidopsis protoplasts showed that SlHDA8, SlHDA1, SlHDA5, SlSRT1 and members of the HD2 family were localized to the nucleus, whereas SlHDA3 and SlHDA4 were localized in both the cytoplasm and nucleus. The difference in the expression patterns and subcellular localization of SlHDACs suggest that they may play distinct functions in tomato. Furthermore, we found that three members of the RPD3/HDA1 family, SlHDA1, SIHDA3 and SlHDA4, interacted with TAG1 (TOMATO AGAMOUS1) and TM29 (TOMATO MADS BOX29), two MADS-box proteins associated with tomato reproductive development, indicating that these HDACs may be involved in gene regulation in reproductive development. PMID:25610445

  5. Histone deacetylases: unique players in shaping the epigenetic histone code.

    PubMed

    Thiagalingam, Sam; Cheng, Kuang-Hung; Lee, Hyunjoo J; Mineva, Nora; Thiagalingam, Arunthathi; Ponte, Jose F

    2003-03-01

    The epigenome is defined by DNA methylation patterns and the associated posttranslational modifications of histones. This histone code determines the expression status of individual genes dependent upon their localization on the chromatin. The silencing of gene expression is associated with deacetylated histones, which are often found to be associated with regions of DNA methylation as well as methylation at the lysine 4 residue of histone 3. In contrast, the activation of gene expression is associated with acetylated histones and methylation at the lysine 9 residue of histone 3. The histone deactylases play a major role in keeping the balance between the acetylated and deacetylated states of chromatin. Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are divided into three classes: class I HDACs (HDACs 1, 2, 3, and 8) are similar to the yeast RPD3 protein and localize to the nucleus; class II HDACs (HDACs 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, and 10) are homologous to the yeast HDA1 protein and are found in both the nucleus and cytoplasm; and class III HDACs form a structurally distinct class of NAD-dependent enzymes that are similar to the yeast SIR2 proteins. Since inappropriate silencing of critical genes can result in one or both hits of tumor suppressor gene (TSG) inactivation in cancer, theoretically the reactivation of affected TSGs could have an enormous therapeutic value in preventing and treating cancer. Indeed, several HDAC inhibitors are currently being developed and tested for their potency in cancer chemotherapy. Importantly, these agents are also potentially applicable to chemoprevention if their toxicity can be minimized. Despite the toxic side effects and lack of specificity of some of the inhibitors, progress is being made. With the elucidation of the structures, functions and modes of action of HDACs, finding agents that may be targeted to specific HDACs and potentially reactivate expression of only a defined set of affected genes in cancer will be more attainable.

  6. Conversion of 11-hydroxy-O-methylsterigmatocystin to aflatoxin G1 in Aspergillus parasiticus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In aflatoxin biosynthesis, aflatoxins G1 (AFG1) and B1 (AFB1) are independently produced from a common precursor, O-methylsterigmatocystin (OMST). Recently, 11-hydroxy-O-methylsterigmatocystin (HOMST) was identified as a later precursor involved in the conversion of OMST to AFB1. However, the invo...

  7. Radio-Continuum Emission from the Young Galactic Supernova Remnant G1.9+0.3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Horta, A. Y.; Filipovic, M. D.; Crawford, E. J.; Stootman, F. H.; Pannuti, T. G.; Bozzetto, L. M.; Collier, J. D.; Sommer, E. R.; Kosakowski, A. R.

    2014-12-01

    We present an analysis of a new Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) radio-continuum observation of supernova remnant (SNR) G1.9+0.3, which at an age of ˜181±25 years is the youngest known in the Galaxy. We analysed all available radio-continuum observations at 6-cm from the ATCA and Very Large Array. Using this data we estimate an expansion rate for G1.9+0.3 of 0.563±0.078 percent per year between 1984 and 2009. We note that in the 1980's G1.9+0.3 expanded somewhat slower (0.484 percent per year) than more recently (0.641 percent per year). We estimate that the average spectral index between 20-cm and 6-cm, across the entire SNR is α=-0.72±0.26 which is typical for younger SNRs. At 6-cm, we detect an average of 6 percent fractionally polarised radio emission with a peak of 17±3 percent. The polarised emission follows the contours of the strongest of X-ray emission. Using the new equipartition formula we estimate a magnetic field strength of B≈273~μ G, which to date, is one of the highest magnetic field strength found for any SNR and consistent with G1.9+0.3 being a very young remnant.

  8. Positive feedback of G1 cyclins ensures coherent cell cycle entry.

    PubMed

    Skotheim, Jan M; Di Talia, Stefano; Siggia, Eric D; Cross, Frederick R

    2008-07-17

    In budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the Start checkpoint integrates multiple internal and external signals into an all-or-none decision to enter the cell cycle. Here we show that Start behaves like a switch due to systems-level feedback in the regulatory network. In contrast to current models proposing a linear cascade of Start activation, transcriptional positive feedback of the G1 cyclins Cln1 and Cln2 induces the near-simultaneous expression of the approximately 200-gene G1/S regulon. Nuclear Cln2 drives coherent regulon expression, whereas cytoplasmic Cln2 drives efficient budding. Cells with the CLN1 and CLN2 genes deleted frequently arrest as unbudded cells, incurring a large fluctuation-induced fitness penalty due to both the lack of cytoplasmic Cln2 and insufficient G1/S regulon expression. Thus, positive-feedback-amplified expression of Cln1 and Cln2 simultaneously drives robust budding and rapid, coherent regulon expression. A similar G1/S regulatory network in mammalian cells, comprised of non-orthologous genes, suggests either conservation of regulatory architecture or convergent evolution.

  9. Human IgG1 antibodies suppress angiogenesis in a target-independent manner

    PubMed Central

    Bogdanovich, Sasha; Kim, Younghee; Mizutani, Takeshi; Yasuma, Reo; Tudisco, Laura; Cicatiello, Valeria; Bastos-Carvalho, Ana; Kerur, Nagaraj; Hirano, Yoshio; Baffi, Judit Z; Tarallo, Valeria; Li, Shengjian; Yasuma, Tetsuhiro; Arpitha, Parthasarathy; Fowler, Benjamin J; Wright, Charles B; Apicella, Ivana; Greco, Adelaide; Brunetti, Arturo; Ruvo, Menotti; Sandomenico, Annamaria; Nozaki, Miho; Ijima, Ryo; Kaneko, Hiroki; Ogura, Yuichiro; Terasaki, Hiroko; Ambati, Balamurali K; Leusen, Jeanette HW; Langdon, Wallace Y; Clark, Michael R; Armour, Kathryn L; Bruhns, Pierre; Verbeek, J Sjef; Gelfand, Bradley D; De Falco, Sandro; Ambati, Jayakrishna

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant angiogenesis is implicated in diseases affecting nearly 10% of the world’s population. The most widely used anti-angiogenic drug is bevacizumab, a humanized IgG1 monoclonal antibody that targets human VEGFA. Although bevacizumab does not recognize mouse Vegfa, it inhibits angiogenesis in mice. Here we show bevacizumab suppressed angiogenesis in three mouse models not via Vegfa blockade but rather Fc-mediated signaling through FcγRI (CD64) and c-Cbl, impairing macrophage migration. Other approved humanized or human IgG1 antibodies without mouse targets (adalimumab, alemtuzumab, ofatumumab, omalizumab, palivizumab and tocilizumab), mouse IgG2a, and overexpression of human IgG1-Fc or mouse IgG2a-Fc, also inhibited angiogenesis in wild-type and FcγR humanized mice. This anti-angiogenic effect was abolished by Fcgr1 ablation or knockdown, Fc cleavage, IgG-Fc inhibition, disruption of Fc-FcγR interaction, or elimination of FcRγ-initated signaling. Furthermore, bevacizumab’s Fc region potentiated its anti-angiogenic activity in humanized VEGFA mice. Finally, mice deficient in FcγRI exhibited increased developmental and pathological angiogenesis. These findings reveal an unexpected anti-angiogenic function for FcγRI and a potentially concerning off-target effect of hIgG1 therapies. PMID:26918197

  10. Targeting GPR30 with G-1: a new therapeutic target for castration-resistant prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Hung-Ming; Ouyang, Bin; Chen, Jing; Ying, Jun; Wang, Jiang; Wu, Chin-Lee; Li, Jia; Medvedovic, Mario; Vessella, Robert L.; Ho, Shuk-Mei

    2014-01-01

    Castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is an advanced-stage prostate cancer (PC) associated with high mortality. We reported that G-1, a selective agonist of G protein-coupled receptor 30 (GPR30), inhibited PC cell growth by inducing G2 cell cycle arrest and arrested PC-3 xenograft growth. However, therapeutic actions of G-1 and their relationships with androgen in vivo are unclear. Using the LNCaP xenograft to model PC growth during androgen-sensitive (AS) versus castration-resistant (CR) phase, we found that G-1 inhibited growth of CR but not AS tumors with no observable toxicity to the host. Substantial necrosis (~65%) accompanied by marked intratumoral infiltration of neutrophils was observed only in CR tumors. Global transcriptome profiling of human genes identified 99 differential expressed genes with “interplay between innate and adaptive immune response” as the top pathway. Quantitative-PCR confirmed upregulation of neutrophil-related chemokines and inflammation-mediated cytokines only in the G-1-treated CR tumors. Expression of murine neutrophil-related cytokines also was elevated in these tumors. GPR30 expression was significantly higher in CR than AS tumors. In cell-based experiments, androgen repressed GPR30 expression, a response reversible by anti-androgen or siRNA-induced androgen receptor silencing. Finally, in clinical specimens, 80% of CRPC metastases (n=123) express a high level of GPR30 whereas only 54% of the primary PCs (n=232) showed high GPR30 expression. Together, these results provide the first evidence that GPR30 is an androgen-repressed target and G-1 mediates the anti-tumor effect via neutrophil infiltration-associated necrosis in CRPC. Additional studies are warranted to firmly establish GPR30 as a therapeutic target in CRPC. PMID:25287069

  11. G1-4A, a Polysaccharide from Tinospora cordifolia Inhibits the Survival of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by Modulating Host Immune Responses in TLR4 Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Pramod Kumar; Chakraborty, Pampi; Kumar, Santosh; Singh, Prafull Kumar; Rajan, M. G. R.; Sainis, Krishna B.; Kulkarni, Savita

    2016-01-01

    Rapid emergence of drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) is a major health concern and demands the development of novel adjunct immunotherapeutic agents capable of modulating the host immune responses in order to control the pathogen. In the present study, we sought to investigate the immunomodulatory effects of G1-4A, a polysaccharide derived from the Indian medicinal plant Tinospora cordifolia, in in-vitro and aerosol mouse models of MTB infection. G1-4A treatment of MTB infected RAW264.7 macrophages significantly induced the surface expression of MHC-II and CD-86 molecules, secretion of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-β, IL-6, IL-12, IFN-γ) and nitric oxide leading to reduced intracellular survival of both drug sensitive (H37Rv) as well as multi drug resistant strains (Beijing and LAM) of MTB, which was partially attributed to G1-4A induced NO production in TLR4-MyD88 dependent manner. Similarly, bacillary burden was significantly reduced in the lungs of MTB infected BALB/c mice treated with G1-4A, with simultaneous up-regulation of the expression of TNF-α, INF-γ and NOS2 in the mouse lung along with increased levels of Th1 cytokines like IFN-γ, IL-12 and decreased levels of Th2 cytokine like IL-4 in the serum. Furthermore, combination of G1-4A with Isoniazid (INH) exhibited better protection against MTB compared to that due to INH or G1-4A alone, suggesting its potential as adjunct therapy. Our results demonstrate that modulation of host immune responses by G1-4A might improve the therapeutic efficacy of existing anti-tubercular drugs and provide an attractive strategy for the development of alternative therapies to control tuberculosis. PMID:27148868

  12. Inhibition of class IIb histone deacetylase significantly improves cloning efficiency in mice.

    PubMed

    Ono, Tetsuo; Li, Chong; Mizutani, Eiji; Terashita, Yukari; Yamagata, Kazuo; Wakayama, Teruhiko

    2010-12-01

    Since the first mouse clone was produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer, the success rate of cloning in mice has been extremely low. Some histone deacetylase inhibitors, such as trichostatin A and scriptaid, have improved the full-term development of mouse clones significantly, but the mechanisms allowing for this are unclear. Here, we found that two other specific inhibitors, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid and oxamflatin, could also reduce the rate of apoptosis in blastocysts, improve the full-term development of cloned mice, and increase establishment of nuclear transfer-generated embryonic stem cell lines significantly without leading to obvious abnormalities. However, another inhibitor, valproic acid, could not improve cloning efficiency. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid, oxamflatin, trichostatin A, and scriptaid are inhibitors for classes I and IIa/b histone deacetylase, whereas valproic acid is an inhibitor for classes I and IIa, suggesting that inhibiting class IIb histone deacetylase is an important step for reprogramming mouse cloning efficiency.

  13. Deacetylase inhibitors dissociate the histone-targeting ING2 subunit from the Sin3 complex

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Karen T.; Martin-Brown, Skylar A.; Florens, Laurence; Washburn, Michael P.; Workman, Jerry L.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are in clinical development for several diseases, including cancers and neurodegenerative disorders. HDACs1 and 2 are among the targets of these inhibitors and are part of multisubunit protein complexes. HDAC inhibitors (HDACi) block the activity of HDACs by chelating a zinc molecule in their catalytic sites. It is not known if the inhibitors have any additional functional effects on the multisubunit HDAC complexes. Here, we find that suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), the recently FDA approved HDACi, causes the dissociation of the PHD-finger containing ING2 subunit from the Sin3 deacetylase complex. Loss of ING2 disrupts the in vivo binding of the Sin3 complex to the p21 promoter, an important target gene for cell growth inhibition by SAHA. Our findings reveal a new molecular mechanism by which HDAC inhibitors disrupt deacetylase function. PMID:20142042

  14. Insecticidal activities of histone deacetylase inhibitors against a dipteran parasite of sheep, Lucilia cuprina.

    PubMed

    Bagnall, Neil H; Hines, Barney M; Lucke, Andrew J; Gupta, Praveer K; Reid, Robert C; Fairlie, David P; Kotze, Andrew C

    2017-04-01

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) are being investigated for the control of various human parasites. Here we investigate their potential as insecticides for the control of a major ecto-parasite of sheep, the Australian sheep blowfly, Lucilia cuprina. We assessed the ability of HDACi from various chemical classes to inhibit the development of blowfly larvae in vitro, and to inhibit HDAC activity in nuclear protein extracts prepared from blowfly eggs. The HDACi prodrug romidepsin, a cyclic depsipeptide that forms a thiolate, was the most potent inhibitor of larval growth, with equivalent or greater potency than three commercial blowfly insecticides. Other HDACi with potent activity were hydroxamic acids (trichostatin, CUDC-907, AR-42), a thioester (KD5170), a disulphide (Psammaplin A), and a cyclic tetrapeptide bearing a ketone (apicidin). On the other hand, no insecticidal activity was observed for certain other hydroxamic acids, fatty acids, and the sesquiterpene lactone parthenolide. The structural diversity of the 31 hydroxamic acids examined here revealed some structural requirements for insecticidal activity; for example, among compounds with flexible linear zinc-binding extensions, greater potency was observed in the presence of branched capping groups that likely make multiple interactions with the blowfly HDAC enzymes. The insecticidal activity correlated with inhibition of HDAC activity in blowfly nuclear protein extracts, indicating that the toxicity was most likely due to inhibition of HDAC enzymes in the blowfly larvae. The inhibitor potencies against blowfly larvae are different from inhibition of human HDACs, suggesting some selectivity for human over blowfly HDACs, and a potential for developing compounds with the inverse selectivity. In summary, these novel findings support blowfly HDAC enzymes as new targets for blowfly control, and point to development of HDAC inhibitors as a promising new class of insecticides.

  15. Acetyl-lysine analog peptides as mechanistic probes of protein deacetylases.

    PubMed

    Smith, Brian C; Denu, John M

    2007-12-21

    Class III histone deacetylases (Sir2 or sirtuins) catalyze the NAD+-dependent conversion of acetyl-lysine residues to nicotinamide, 2'-O-acetyl-ADP-ribose (OAADPr), and deacetylated lysine. Class I and II HDACs utilize a different deacetylation mechanism, utilizing an active site zinc to direct hydrolysis of acetyl-lysine residues to lysine and acetate. Here, using ten acetyl-lysine analog peptides, we have probed the substrate binding pockets of sirtuins and investigated the catalytic differences among sirtuins and class I and II deacetylases. For the sirtuin Hst2, acetyl-lysine analog peptide binding correlated with the hydrophobic substituent parameter pi with a slope of -0.35 from a plot of log Kd versus pi. Interestingly, propionyl- and butyryl-lysine peptides were found to bind tighter to Hst2 compared with acetyl-lysine peptide and showed measurable rates of catalysis with Hst2, Sirt1, Sirt2, and Sirt3, suggesting propionyl- and butyryl-lysine proteins may be sirtuin substrates in vivo. Unique among the acetyl-lysine analog peptides examined, homocitrulline peptide produced ADP-ribose instead of the corresponding OAADPr analog. The electron-withdrawing nature of each acetyl analog had a profound impact on the deacylation rate between deacetylase classes. The rate of catalysis with the acetyl-lysine analog peptides varied over five orders of magnitude with the class III deacetylase Hst2, revealing a linear free energy relationship with a slope of -1.57 when plotted versus the Taft constant, sigma*. HDAC8, a class I deacetylase, displayed the opposite trend with a slope of +0.79. These results are applicable toward the development of selective substrates and other mechanistic probes of protein deacetylases.

  16. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Rv1096 protein: gene cloning, protein expression, and peptidoglycan deacetylase activity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Many bacteria modulate and evade the immune defenses of their hosts through peptidoglycan (PG) deacetylation. The PG deacetylases from Streptococcus pneumonia, Listeria monocytogenes and Lactococcus lactis have been characterized. However, thus far, the PG deacetylase of Mycobacterium tuberculosis has not been identified. Results In this study, we cloned the Rv1096 gene from the M. tuberculosis H37Rv strain and expressed Rv1096 protein in both Escherichia coli and M. smegmatis. The results showed that the purified Rv1096 protein possessed metallo-dependent PG deacetylase activity, which increased in the presence of Co2+. The kinetic parameters of the PG deacetylase towards M. smegmatis PG as a substrate were as follows: Km, 0.910 ± 0.007 mM; Vmax, 0.514 ± 0.038 μMmin-1; and Kcat = 0.099 ± 0.007 (S-1). Additionally, the viability of M. smegmatis in the presence of over-expressed Rv1096 protein was 109-fold higher than that of wild-type M. smegmatis after lysozyme treatment. Additionally, light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy showed that in the presence of over-expressed Rv1096 protein, M. smegmatis kept its regular shape, with an undamaged cell wall and smooth surface. These results indicate that Rv1096 caused deacetylation of cell wall PG, leading to lysozyme resistance in M. smegmatis. Conclusion We have determined that M. tuberculosis Rv1096 is a PG deacetylase. The PG deacetylase activity of Rv1096 contributed to lysozyme resistance in M. smegmatis. Our findings suggest that deacetylation of cell wall PG may be involved in evasion of host immune defenses by M. tuberculosis. PMID:24975018

  17. Overexpression of a glycosyltransferase gene SrUGT74G1 from Stevia improved growth and yield of transgenic Arabidopsis by catechin accumulation.

    PubMed

    Guleria, Praveen; Yadav, Sudesh Kumar

    2014-03-01

    Steviol glycoside and gibberellin biosynthetic routes are known as divergent branches of a common origin in Stevia. A UDP-glycosyltransferase encoded by SrUGT74G1 catalyses the conversion of steviolbioside into stevioside in Stevia rebaudiana leaves. In the present study, transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana overexpressing SrUGT74G1 cDNA from Stevia were developed to check the probability of stevioside biosynthesis in them. However, stevioside accumulation was not evident in transgenics. Also, the transgenic Arabidopsis showed no change in GA3 content on SrUGT74G1 overexpression. Surprisingly, significant accumulation of catechin was noticed in transgenics. The transgenics showed a considerable increase in shoot length, root length and rosette area. An increase in free radical scavenging activity of transgenics was noticed. Moreover, the seed yield of transgenics was also increased by 6-15% than control. Additionally, variation in trichome branching pattern on leaf surface of transgenics was observed. The trichome branching pattern was also validated by exogenous catechin exposure (10, 50, 100 ng ml(-1)) to control plants. Hence, present study reports the probable role of SrUGT74G1 from Stevia in catechin accumulation of transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana. Thus, detailed study in present perspective has revealed the role of Stevia SrUGT74G1 gene in trichome branching pattern, improved vegetative growth, scavenging potential and seed yield by catechin accumulation in transgenic Arabidopsis.

  18. Skewed Fc glycosylation profiles of anti-proteinase 3 immunoglobulin G1 autoantibodies from granulomatosis with polyangiitis patients show low levels of bisection, galactosylation, and sialylation.

    PubMed

    Wuhrer, Manfred; Stavenhagen, Kathrin; Koeleman, Carolien A M; Selman, Maurice H J; Harper, Lorraine; Jacobs, Bart C; Savage, Caroline O S; Jefferis, Roy; Deelder, André M; Morgan, Matthew

    2015-04-03

    Granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA) is associated with circulating immunoglobulin (Ig) G anti-proteinase 3 specific (anti-PR3) anti-neutrophil cytoplasm antibodies (ANCA), which activate cytokine primed neutrophils via Fcgamma receptors. ANCA are class switched IgG antibodies implying T cell help in their production. Glycosylation of IgG Fc, under the control of T cell cytokines, determines the interaction between IgG and its receptors. Previous studies have reported aberrant glycosylation of Ig Fc in GPA patients. We investigated whether aberrant Fc glycosylation was present on anti-PR3 ANCA as well as whole IgG subclass preparations compared to healthy controls and whether this correlated with Birmingham vasculitis activity scores (BVAS), serum cytokines, and time to remission. Here, IgG Fc glycosylation of GPA patients and controls and anti-PR3 ANCA Fc glycosylation were determined by mass spectrometry of glycopeptides. IgG1 and IgG2 subclasses from GPA patients showed reduced galactosylation, sialylation, and bisection compared to healthy controls. Anti-PR3 IgG1 ANCA Fc galactosylation, sialylation, and bisection were reduced compared to total IgG1 in GPA. Galactosylation of anti-PR3 ANCA Fc correlated with inflammatory cytokines and time to remission but not BVAS. Bisection of anti-PR3 ANCA Fc correlated with BVAS. Total IgG1 and anti-PR3 IgG1 Fc galactosylation were weakly correlated, while bisection of IgG1 and anti-PR3 showed no correlation. Our data indicate that aberrant ANCA galactosylation may be driven in an antigen-specific manner.

  19. Histone deacetylase inhibitors: a potential epigenetic treatment for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Consalvi, Silvia; Saccone, Valentina; Mozzetta, Chiara

    2014-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a life-threatening genetic disease that currently has no available cure. A number of pharmacological strategies that aim to target events downstream of the genetic defect are currently under clinical investigation, and some of these are outlined in this report. In particular, we focus on the ability of histone deacetylase inhibitors to promote muscle regeneration and prevent the fibro-adipogenic degeneration of dystrophic mice. We describe the rationale behind the translation of histone deacetylase inhibitors into a clinical approach, which inspired the first clinical trial with an epigenetic drug as a potential therapeutic option for DMD patients.

  20. 17 CFR 270.17g-1 - Bonding of officers and employees of registered management investment companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Bonding of officers and employees of registered management investment companies. 270.17g-1 Section 270.17g-1 Commodity and... ACT OF 1940 § 270.17g-1 Bonding of officers and employees of registered management...

  1. 17 CFR 270.17g-1 - Bonding of officers and employees of registered management investment companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bonding of officers and employees of registered management investment companies. 270.17g-1 Section 270.17g-1 Commodity and... ACT OF 1940 § 270.17g-1 Bonding of officers and employees of registered management...

  2. 17 CFR 240.17g-1 - Application for registration as a nationally recognized statistical rating organization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... as a nationally recognized statistical rating organization. 240.17g-1 Section 240.17g-1 Commodity and... Statistical Rating Organizations § 240.17g-1 Application for registration as a nationally recognized statistical rating organization. (a) Initial application. A credit rating agency applying to the Commission...

  3. 17 CFR 240.17g-1 - Application for registration as a nationally recognized statistical rating organization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... as a nationally recognized statistical rating organization. 240.17g-1 Section 240.17g-1 Commodity and... Statistical Rating Organizations § 240.17g-1 Application for registration as a nationally recognized statistical rating organization. (a) Initial application. A credit rating agency applying to the Commission...

  4. 17 CFR 240.17g-1 - Application for registration as a nationally recognized statistical rating organization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... as a nationally recognized statistical rating organization. 240.17g-1 Section 240.17g-1 Commodity and... Statistical Rating Organizations § 240.17g-1 Application for registration as a nationally recognized statistical rating organization. (a) Initial application. A credit rating agency applying to the Commission...

  5. 17 CFR 240.17g-1 - Application for registration as a nationally recognized statistical rating organization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... as a nationally recognized statistical rating organization. 240.17g-1 Section 240.17g-1 Commodity and... Statistical Rating Organizations § 240.17g-1 Application for registration as a nationally recognized statistical rating organization. (a) Initial application. A credit rating agency applying to the Commission...

  6. 17 CFR 240.17g-1 - Application for registration as a nationally recognized statistical rating organization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... as a nationally recognized statistical rating organization. 240.17g-1 Section 240.17g-1 Commodity and... Statistical Rating Organizations § 240.17g-1 Application for registration as a nationally recognized statistical rating organization. (a) Initial application. A credit rating agency applying to the Commission...

  7. 26 CFR 1.1402(g)-1 - Treatment of certain remuneration erroneously reported as net earnings from self-employment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... reported as net earnings from self-employment. 1.1402(g)-1 Section 1.1402(g)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL...-Employment Income § 1.1402(g)-1 Treatment of certain remuneration erroneously reported as net earnings from... request, and should indicate clearly that it is a request that, pursuant to section 1402(g) of the...

  8. 26 CFR 1.904(g)-1T - Overall domestic loss and the overall domestic loss account (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... loss account (temporary). 1.904(g)-1T Section 1.904(g)-1T Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... United States § 1.904(g)-1T Overall domestic loss and the overall domestic loss account (temporary). (a... accounts for purposes of section 904(g). Section 1.904(g)-2T provides rules for recapturing the balance...

  9. G1 to S phase cell cycle transition in somatic and embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Neganova, Irina; Lako, Majlinda

    2008-01-01

    It is well known that G1 to S phase transition is tightly regulated by the expression and phosphorylation of a number of well-characterized cyclins, cyclin-dependent kinases and members of the retinoblastoma gene family. In this review we discuss the role of these components in regulation of G1 to S phase transition in somatic cells and human embryonic stem cells. Most importantly, we discuss some new tenable links between maintenance of pluripotency and cell cycle regulation in embryonic stem cells by describing the role that master transcription factors play in this process. Finally, the differences in cell cycle regulation between murine and human embryonic stem cells are highlighted, raising interesting questions regarding their biology and stages of embryonic development from which they have been derived. PMID:18638068

  10. EXPANSION OF THE YOUNGEST GALACTIC SUPERNOVA REMNANT G1.9+0.3

    SciTech Connect

    Carlton, Ashley K.; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Reynolds, Stephen P.; Hwang, Una; Petre, Robert; Krishnamurthy, Kalyani; Willett, Rebecca

    2011-08-10

    We present a measurement of the expansion and brightening of G1.9 + 0.3, the youngest Galactic supernova remnant (SNR), comparing Chandra X-ray images obtained in 2007 and 2009. A simple uniform-expansion model describes the data well, giving an expansion rate of 0.642% {+-} 0.049% yr{sup -1} and a flux increase of 1.7% {+-} 1.0% yr{sup -1}. Without deceleration, the remnant age would then be 156 {+-} 11 yr, consistent with earlier results. Since deceleration must have occurred, this age is an upper limit; we estimate an age of about 110 yr or an explosion date of about 1900. The flux increase is comparable to reported increases at radio wavelengths. G1.9+0.3 is the only Galactic SNR increasing in flux, with implications for the physics of electron acceleration in shock waves.

  11. PBOV1 promotes prostate cancer proliferation by promoting G1/S transition

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Tiejun; Wu, Rongpei; Liu, Bo; Wen, Handong; Tu, Zhong; Guo, Jun; Yang, Jiarong; Shen, Guoqiu

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PC) is one of the leading causes of cancer death in men, and thus, finding new regulators is critical for PC therapy. Prostate and breast cancer overexpressed 1 (PBOV1) is overexpressed in breast, prostate, and bladder cancers, as it is upregulated in the serum of patients with PC, but the role of PBOV1 in PC has not been studied. In this article, we found that PBOV1 was indeed overexpressed in PC cells; PBOV1 overexpression promoted cell proliferation and colony formation ability and arrested cell cycle in the G0/G1 phase and tumorigenicity ability in vitro, whereas knockdown of PBOV1 reduced these effects. Further analysis of PBOV1 overexpression inhibited cell cycle inhibitors, P21 and P27, and increased the phosphorylation level of Rb and cyclin D1 expression, suggesting that PBOV1 promoted cell proliferation through promoting G1/S transition. PMID:26937201

  12. Permanent draft genome sequence of the gliding predator Saprospira grandis strain Sa g1 (= HR1)

    SciTech Connect

    Mavromatis, K; Chertkov, Olga; Lapidus, Alla L.; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Tice, Hope; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Han, Cliff; Tapia, Roxanne; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Huntemann, Marcel; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, N; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Rohde, Manfred; Spring, Stefan; Goker, Markus; Detter, J. Chris; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Woyke, Tanja

    2012-01-01

    Saprospira grandis Gross et al. 1911 is a member of the Saprospiraceae, a family in the class 'Sphingobacteria' that remains poorly characterized at the genomic level. The species is known for preying on other marine bacteria via 'ixotrophy'. S. grandis strain Sa g1 was isolated from decaying crab carapace in France and was selected for genome sequencing because of its isolated location in the tree of life. Only one type strain genome has been published so far from the Saprospiraceae, while the sequence of strain Sa g1 represents the second genome to be published from a non-type strain of S. grandis. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. The 4,495,250 bp long Improved-High-Quality draft of the genome with its 3,536 protein-coding and 62 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  13. Implications of intermediate mass black hole in globular cluster G1 on dark matter detection.

    SciTech Connect

    Zaharijas, G.; High Energy Physics

    2008-07-01

    Recently there has been growing evidence in favor of the presence of an intermediate mass black hole in the globular cluster G1, in Andromeda Galaxy. Under the assumption that formation of this globular cluster occurred within a dark matter halo, we explore whether the presence of a black hole could result in an observable gamma ray signal due to dark matter annihilation in this globular cluster. Starting from an initial Navarro-Frenk-White matter profile, with density parameters consistent with G1 observations, we find that indeed, if the spike in the density has been formed and has survived until the present, the signal could be observed by GLAST and current atmospheric Cerenkov telescope detectors.

  14. Global Structure of HIV-1 Neutralizing Antibody IgG1 b12 is Asymmetric

    SciTech Connect

    Ashish, F.; Solanki, A; Boone, C; Krueger, J

    2010-01-01

    Human antibody IgG1 b12 is one of the four antibodies known to neutralize a broad range of human immunodeficiency virus-1. The crystal structure of this antibody displayed an asymmetric disposition of the Fab arms relative to its Fc portion. Comparison of structures solved for other IgG1 antibodies led to a notion that crystal packing forces entrapped a 'snap-shot' of different conformations accessible to this antibody. To elucidate global structure of this unique antibody, we acquired small-angle X-ray scattering data from its dilute solution. Data analysis indicated that b12 adopts a bilobal globular structure in solution with a radius of gyration and a maximum linear dimension of {approx}54 and {approx}180 {angstrom}, respectively. Extreme similarity between its solution and crystal structure concludes that non-flexible, asymmetric shape is an inherent property of this rare antibody.

  15. Class IIa histone deacetylases affect neuronal remodeling and functional outcome after stroke.

    PubMed

    Kassis, Haifa; Shehadah, Amjad; Li, Chao; Zhang, Yi; Cui, Yisheng; Roberts, Cynthia; Sadry, Neema; Liu, Xianshuang; Chopp, Michael; Zhang, Zheng Gang

    2016-06-01

    We have previously demonstrated that stroke induces nuclear shuttling of class IIa histone deacetylase 4 (HDAC4). Stroke-induced nuclear shuttling of HDAC4 is positively and significantly correlated with improved indices of neuronal remodeling in the peri-infarct cortex. In this study, using a rat model for middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO), we tested the effects of selective inhibition of class IIa HDACs on functional recovery and neuronal remodeling when administered 24hr after stroke. Adult male Wistar rats (n = 15-17/group) were subjected to 2 h MCAO and orally gavaged with MC1568 (a selective class IIa HDAC inhibitor), SAHA (a non-selective HDAC inhibitor), or vehicle-control for 7 days starting 24 h after MCAO. A battery of behavioral tests was performed. Lesion volume measurement and immunohistochemistry were performed 28 days after MCAO. We found that stroke increased total HDAC activity in the ipsilateral hemisphere compared to the contralateral hemisphere. Stroke-increased HDAC activity was significantly decreased by the administration of SAHA as well as by MC1568. However, SAHA significantly improved functional outcome compared to vehicle control, whereas selective class IIa inhibition with MC1568 increased mortality and lesion volume and did not improve functional outcome. In addition, MC1568 decreased microtubule associated protein 2 (MAP2, dendrites), phosphorylated neurofilament heavy chain (pNFH, axons) and myelin basic protein (MBP, myelination) immunoreactivity in the peri-infarct cortex. Quantitative RT-PCR of cortical neurons isolated by laser capture microdissection revealed that MC1568, but not SAHA, downregulated CREB and c-fos expression. Additionally, MC1568 decreased the expression of phosphorylated CREB (active) in neurons. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that selective inhibition of class IIa HDACs impairs neuronal remodeling and neurological outcome. Inactivation of CREB and c-fos by MC1568 likely contributes to

  16. Histone deacetylase enzyme silencing using shRNAs enhances radiosensitivity of SW579 thyroid cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ye; Jin, Tao; Dai, Xueming; Yan, Dongwang; Peng, Zhihai

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to screen the enzymes that are associated with the radiosensitivity of SW579 thyroid cancer cells, and investigate whether radiation, combined with specific RNA interference on the screened enzymes, enhances radiosensitivity of SW579 thyroid cancer cells. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) was used to analyze epigenetic enzyme expression changes before and after radiotherapy, and four enzymes, histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1), HDAC2, HDAC4 and HDAC6 were screened. Western blot analysis was performed to analyze the change in HDAC1, HDAC2, HDAC4 and HDAC6 protein expression following radiotherapy. Short hairpin RNA (ShRNA)-HDAC1, shRNA-HDAC2, shRNA-HDAC4 and shRNA-HDAC6 plasmids were constructed and SW579 cells were transfected with corresponding shRNA-HDACs. Reverse transcription-qPCR was used to detect whether downregulation of HDAC mRNAs had been effective. In addition, shRNA and shRNA negative control (NC) pools were established and transfected into the SW579 cells. The samples were divided into four groups; control, trichostatin A, shRNA pool and shRNA NC pool, to analyze the effective enhancement of specific shRNA on radiosensitivity in thyroid cancer cells. The morphological changes were observed in the SW579 cells, and the number of tumor cells decreased markedly in the shRNA pool group compared with that of the other three groups. Therefore, it was concluded that HDACs present a potential target for increasing the sensitivity of thyroid cancer cells to radiotherapy, and shRNA-HDAC interference combined with radiotherapy promotes the radiosensitivity of tumors. PMID:27600599

  17. Aircraft measurements of aerosol properties during GoAmazon - G1 and HALO inter-comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, F.; Cecchini, M. A.; Wang, J.; Tomlinson, J. M.; Comstock, J. M.; Hubbe, J. M.; Pekour, M. S.; Machado, L.; Wendisch, M.; Longo, K.; Martin, S. T.; Schmid, B.; Weinzierl, B.; Krüger, M. L.; Zöger, M.

    2015-12-01

    Currently, the indirect effects of atmospheric aerosols remain the most uncertain components in forcing of climate change over the industrial period (IPCC, 2013). This large uncertainty is partially a result of our incomplete understanding of the ability of particles to form cloud droplets under atmospherically relevant supersaturations. One objective of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Green Ocean Amazon Project (GoAmazon2014/5) is to understand the influence of the emission from Manaus, a tropical megacity, on aerosol size, concentration, and chemical composition, and their impact on cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) spectrum. The GoAmazon2014/5 study was an international campaign with the collaboration efforts from US, Brazil and Germany. During the intensive operation period, in the dry season (Sep. 1st - Oct. 10th, 2014), aerosol concentration, size distributions, and CCN spectra, both under pristine conditions and inside the Manaus plume, were characterized in-situ from the DOE Gulfstream-1 (G-1) research aircraft and German HALO aircraft during 4 coordinated flights on Sep. 9th, Sep. 16th, Sep 21st and Oct. 1st, 2014. During those four flights, aerosol number concentrations and CCN concentrations at two supersaturations (0.25% and 0.5%) were measured by condensation particle counters (CPCs) and a DMT dual column CCN counter onboard both G-1 and HALO. Aerosol size distribution was also measured by a Fast Integrated Mobility Spectrometer (FIMS) aboard the G-1 and is compared with the size distribution from Ultra High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer - Airborne (UHSAS-A, DMT), which were deployed both on the G-1 and the HALO. Good agreement between the aerosol properties measured from the two aircraft has been achieved. The vertical profiles of aerosol size distribution and CCN spectrum will be discussed.

  18. NONUNIFORM EXPANSION OF THE YOUNGEST GALACTIC SUPERNOVA REMNANT G1.9+0.3

    SciTech Connect

    Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Reynolds, Stephen P.; Green, David A.; Hwang, Una; Petre, Robert; Willett, Rebecca

    2014-08-01

    We report measurements of the X-ray expansion of the youngest Galactic supernova remnant, G1.9+0.3, using Chandra observations in 2007, 2009, and 2011. The measured rates strongly deviate from uniform expansion, decreasing radially by about 60% along the X-ray bright SE-NW axis from 0.84% ± 0.06% yr{sup –1} to 0.52% ± 0.03% yr{sup –1}. This corresponds to undecelerated ages of 120-190 yr, confirming the young age of G1.9+0.3 and implying a significant deceleration of the blast wave. The synchrotron-dominated X-ray emission brightens at a rate of 1.9% ± 0.4% yr{sup –1}. We identify bright outer and inner rims with the blast wave and reverse shock, respectively. Sharp density gradients in either the ejecta or ambient medium are required to produce the sudden deceleration of the reverse shock or the blast wave implied by the large spread in expansion ages. The blast wave could have been decelerated recently by an encounter with a modest density discontinuity in the ambient medium, such as may be found at a wind termination shock, requiring strong mass loss in the progenitor. Alternatively, the reverse shock might have encountered an order-of-magnitude density discontinuity within the ejecta, such as may be found in pulsating delayed-detonation Type Ia models. We demonstrate that the blast wave is much more decelerated than the reverse shock in these models for remnants at ages similar to G1.9+0.3. Similar effects may also be produced by dense shells possibly associated with high-velocity features in Type Ia spectra. Accounting for the asymmetry of G1.9+0.3 will require more realistic three-dimensional Type Ia models.

  19. M/G/1 Subject to an Initial Quorum of Customers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-11-01

    size" for : i M/G/1(m). (Note: In that prior report m stands for the current m+1. The change simplifies somewhat the typography of many formulas.) We...2*A+x)+ 4)(A+2 x)+ 4(3*x)a + p (w.) ". where w. is the delay conditioned upon the server working. We simplify the typography of (1.4) and (1.4) by

  20. Nonuniform Expansion of the Youngest Galactic Supernova Remnant G1.9+0.3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Reynolds, Stephen P.; Green, David A.; Hwang, Una; Petre, Robert; Krishnamurthy, Kalyani; Willett, Rebecca

    2014-08-01

    We report measurements of the X-ray expansion of the youngest Galactic supernova remnant, G1.9+0.3, using Chandra observations in 2007, 2009, and 2011. The measured rates strongly deviate from uniform expansion, decreasing radially by about 60% along the X-ray bright SE-NW axis from 0.84% ± 0.06% yr-1 to 0.52% ± 0.03% yr-1. This corresponds to undecelerated ages of 120-190 yr, confirming the young age of G1.9+0.3 and implying a significant deceleration of the blast wave. The synchrotron-dominated X-ray emission brightens at a rate of 1.9% ± 0.4% yr-1. We identify bright outer and inner rims with the blast wave and reverse shock, respectively. Sharp density gradients in either the ejecta or ambient medium are required to produce the sudden deceleration of the reverse shock or the blast wave implied by the large spread in expansion ages. The blast wave could have been decelerated recently by an encounter with a modest density discontinuity in the ambient medium, such as may be found at a wind termination shock, requiring strong mass loss in the progenitor. Alternatively, the reverse shock might have encountered an order-of-magnitude density discontinuity within the ejecta, such as may be found in pulsating delayed-detonation Type Ia models. We demonstrate that the blast wave is much more decelerated than the reverse shock in these models for remnants at ages similar to G1.9+0.3. Similar effects may also be produced by dense shells possibly associated with high-velocity features in Type Ia spectra. Accounting for the asymmetry of G1.9+0.3 will require more realistic three-dimensional Type Ia models.

  1. On the first G 1 stiff fluid spike solution in General Relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coley, A. A.; Gregoris, D.; Lim, W. C.

    2016-11-01

    Using the Geroch transformation we obtain the first example of an exact stiff fluid spike solution to the Einstein field equations in a closed form exhibiting a spacelike G 1 group of symmetries (i.e., with a single isometry). This new solution is of Petrov type I and exhibits a spike crossing which persists to the past, which allows us to better understand spike crossings in the context of structure formation.

  2. Localization of the X-ray source in the globular cluster G1 with Chandra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, A. K. H.; Heinke, C. O.; di Stefano, R.; Cohn, H. N.; Lugger, P. M.; Barmby, P.; Lewin, W. H. G.; Primini, F. A.

    2010-09-01

    We report the most accurate X-ray position of the X-ray source in the giant globular cluster G1 in M31 by using the Chandra X-ray Observatory, Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT). G1 is clearly detected with Chandra and by cross-registering with HST and CFHT images, we derive a 1σ error radius of 0.15arcsec, significantly smaller than the previous measurement by XMM-Newton. We conclude that the X-ray emission of G1 is likely to come from within the core radius of the cluster. We have considered a number of possibilities for the origin of the X-ray emission but can rule all but two scenarios out: it could be due to either accretion on to a central intermediate-mass black hole (IMBH) or an ordinary low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB). Based on the X-ray luminosity and the Bondi accretion rate, an IMBH accreting from the cluster gas seems unlikely and we suggest that the X-rays are due to accretion from a companion. Alternatively, the probability that a 1.5 Msolar cluster LMXB lies within the 95 per cent X-ray error circle is about 0.7. Therefore we cannot rule out a single LMXB as the origin of the X-ray emission. While we cannot distinguish between different models with current observations, future high-resolution and high-sensitivity radio imaging observations will reveal whether there is an IMBH at the centre of G1.

  3. The Absence of Radio Emission from the Globular Cluster G1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller-Jones, J. C. A.; Wrobel, J. M.; Sivakoff, G. R.; Heinke, C. O.; Miller, R. E.; Plotkin, R. M.; Di Stefano, R.; Greene, J. E.; Ho, L. C.; Joseph, T. D.; Kong, A. K. H.; Maccarone, T. J.

    2012-08-01

    The detections of both X-ray and radio emission from the cluster G1 in M31 have provided strong support for existing dynamical evidence for an intermediate-mass black hole (IMBH) of mass (1.8 ± 0.5) × 104 M ⊙ at the cluster center. However, given the relatively low significance and astrometric accuracy of the radio detection, and the non-simultaneity of the X-ray and radio measurements, this identification required further confirmation. Here we present deep, high angular resolution, strictly simultaneous X-ray and radio observations of G1. While the X-ray emission (L X = 1.74+0.53 -0.44 × 1036 (d/750 kpc)2 erg s-1 in the 0.5-10 keV band) remained fully consistent with previous observations, we detected no radio emission from the cluster center down to a 3σ upper limit of 4.7 μJy beam-1. Our favored explanation for the previous radio detection is flaring activity from a black hole low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB). We performed a new regression of the "Fundamental Plane" of black hole activity, valid for determining black hole mass from radio and X-ray observations of sub-Eddington black holes, finding log M BH = (1.638 ± 0.070)log L R - (1.136 ± 0.077)log L X - (6.863 ± 0.790), with an empirically determined uncertainty of 0.44 dex. This constrains the mass of the X-ray source in G1, if a black hole, to be <9.7 × 103 M ⊙ at 95% confidence, suggesting that it is a persistent LMXB. This annuls what was previously the most convincing evidence from radiation for an IMBH in the Local Group, though the evidence for an IMBH in G1 from velocity dispersion measurements remains unaffected by these results.

  4. Histone deacetylase activators: N-acetylthioureas serve as highly potent and isozyme selective activators for human histone deacetylase-8 on a fluorescent substrate.

    PubMed

    Singh, Raushan K; Mandal, Tanmay; Balsubramanian, Narayanaganesh; Viaene, Tajae; Leedahl, Travis; Sule, Nitesh; Cook, Gregory; Srivastava, D K

    2011-10-01

    We report, for the first time, that certain N-acetylthiourea derivatives serve as highly potent and isozyme selective activators for the recombinant form of human histone deacetylase-8 in the assay system containing Fluor-de-Lys as a fluorescent substrate. The experimental data reveals that such activating feature is manifested via decrease in the K(m) value of the enzyme's substrate and increase in the catalytic turnover rate of the enzyme.

  5. HJURP interaction with the condensin II complex during G1 promotes CENP-A deposition

    PubMed Central

    Barnhart-Dailey, Meghan C.; Trivedi, Prasad; Stukenberg, P. Todd; Foltz, Daniel R.

    2017-01-01

    Centromeric chromatin is required for kinetochore assembly during mitosis and accurate chromosome segregation. A unique nucleosome containing the histone H3–specific variant CENP-A is the defining feature of centromeric chromatin. In humans, CENP-A nucleosome deposition occurs in early G1 just after mitotic exit at the time when the CENP-A deposition machinery localizes to centromeres. The mechanism by which CENP-A is deposited onto an existing, condensed chromatin template is not understood. Here we identify the selective association of the CENP-A chaperone HJURP with the condensin II complex and not condensin I. We show CAPH2 is present at centromeres during early G1 at the time when CENP-A deposition is occurring. CAPH2 localization to early G1 centromeres is dependent on HJURP. The CENP-A chaperone and assembly factor HJURP induces decondensation of a noncentromeric LacO array, and this decondensation is modulated by the condensin II complex. We show that condensin II function at the centromere is required for new CENP-A deposition in human cells. These data demonstrate that HJURP selectively recruits the condensin II chromatin-remodeling complex to facilitate CENP-A deposition in human cells. PMID:27807043

  6. SUMOylation of Rb enhances its binding with CDK2 and phosphorylation at early G1 phase.

    PubMed

    Meng, Fengxi; Qian, Jiang; Yue, Han; Li, Xiaofeng; Xue, Kang

    2016-07-02

    Retinoblastoma protein (Rb) is a prototypical tumor suppressor that is vital to the negative regulation of the cell cycle and tumor progression. Hypo-phosphorylated Rb is associated with G0/G1 arrest by suppressing E2F transcription factor activity, whereas Rb hyper-phosphorylation allows E2F release and cell cycle progression from G0/G1 to S phase. However, the factors that regulate cyclin-dependent protein kinase (CDK)-dependent hyper-phosphorylation of Rb during the cell cycle remain obscure. In this study, we show that throughout the cell cycle, Rb is specifically small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO)ylated at early G1 phase. SUMOylation of Rb stimulates its phosphorylation level by recruiting a SUMO-interaction motif (SIM)-containing kinase CDK2, leading to Rb hyper-phosphorylation and E2F-1 release. In contrast, a SUMO-deficient Rb mutant results in reduced SUMOylation and phosphorylation, weakened CDK2 binding, and attenuated E2F-1 sequestration. Furthermore, we reveal that Rb SUMOylation is required for cell proliferation. Therefore, our study describes a novel mechanism that regulates Rb phosphorylation during cell cycle progression.

  7. An APC/C-Cdh1 Biosensor Reveals the Dynamics of Cdh1 Inactivation at the G1/S Transition

    PubMed Central

    Ondracka, Andrej; Robbins, Jonathan A.; Cross, Frederick R.

    2016-01-01

    B-type cyclin-dependent kinase activity must be turned off for mitotic exit and G1 stabilization. B-type cyclin degradation is mediated by the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C); during and after mitotic exit, APC/C is dependent on Cdh1. Cdh1 is in turn phosphorylated and inactivated by cyclin-CDK at the Start transition of the new cell cycle. We developed a biosensor to assess the cell cycle dynamics of APC/C-Cdh1. Nuclear exit of the G1 transcriptional repressor Whi5 is a known marker of Start; APC/C-Cdh1 is inactivated 12 min after Whi5 nuclear exit with little measurable cell-to-cell timing variability. Multiple phosphorylation sites on Cdh1 act in a redundant manner to repress its activity. Reducing the number of phosphorylation sites on Cdh1 can to some extent be tolerated for cell viability, but it increases variability in timing of APC/C-Cdh1 inactivation. Mutants with minimal subsets of phosphorylation sites required for viability exhibit striking stochasticity in multiple responses including budding, nuclear division, and APC/C-Cdh1 activity itself. Multiple cyclin-CDK complexes, as well as the stoichiometric inhibitor Acm1, contribute to APC/C-Cdh1 inactivation; this redundant control is likely to promote rapid and reliable APC/C-Cdh1 inactivation immediately following the Start transition. PMID:27410035

  8. TopBP1 is required at mitosis to reduce transmission of DNA damage to G1 daughter cells

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Rune Troelsgaard; Kruse, Thomas; Nilsson, Jakob

    2015-01-01

    Genome integrity is critically dependent on timely DNA replication and accurate chromosome segregation. Replication stress delays replication into G2/M, which in turn impairs proper chromosome segregation and inflicts DNA damage on the daughter cells. Here we show that TopBP1 forms foci upon mitotic entry. In early mitosis, TopBP1 marks sites of and promotes unscheduled DNA synthesis. Moreover, TopBP1 is required for focus formation of the structure-selective nuclease and scaffold protein SLX4 in mitosis. Persistent TopBP1 foci transition into 53BP1 nuclear bodies (NBs) in G1 and precise temporal depletion of TopBP1 just before mitotic entry induced formation of 53BP1 NBs in the next cell cycle, showing that TopBP1 acts to reduce transmission of DNA damage to G1 daughter cells. Based on these results, we propose that TopBP1 maintains genome integrity in mitosis by controlling chromatin recruitment of SLX4 and by facilitating unscheduled DNA synthesis. PMID:26283799

  9. p67SRF is a constitutive nuclear protein implicated in the modulation of genes required throughout the G1 period.

    PubMed Central

    Gauthier-Rouvière, C; Cavadore, J C; Blanchard, J M; Lamb, N J; Fernandez, A

    1991-01-01

    Indirect immunofluorescence analysis, using antibodies directed against peptide sequences outside the DNA-binding domain of the 67-kDa serum response factor (p67SRF), revealed a punctuated nuclear staining, constant throughout the cell cycle and in all different cell lines tested. p67SRF was also tightly associated with chromatin through all stages of mitosis. Inhibition of p67SRF activity in vivo, through microinjection of anti-p67SRF antibodies, specifically suppressed DNA synthesis induced after serum addition or ras microinjection, suggesting that these antibodies were effective in preventing expression of serum response element (SRE)-regulated genes. A similar inhibition was also obtained in cells injected with oligonucleotides corresponding to the DNA binding sequence for p67SRF protein, SRE. Moreover, this inhibition of DNA synthesis by anti-p67SRF or SRE injection was still observed in cells injected during late G1, well after c-fos induction. These data imply that genes regulated by p67SRF are continuously involved in the proliferation pathway throughout G1 and that p67SRF forms an integral component of mammalian cell transcriptional control. Images PMID:1782216

  10. Ethanol extract of Innotus obliquus (Chaga mushroom) induces G1 cell cycle arrest in HT-29 human colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun Sook; Kim, Eun Ji

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Inonotus obliquus (I. obliquus, Chaga mushroom) has long been used as a folk medicine to treat cancer. In the present study, we examined whether or not ethanol extract of I. obliquus (EEIO) inhibits cell cycle progression in HT-29 human colon cancer cells, in addition to its mechanism of action. MATERIALS/METHODS To examine the effects of Inonotus obliquus on the cell cycle progression and the molecular mechanism in colon cancer cells, HT-29 human colon cancer cells were cultured in the presence of 2.5 - 10 µg/mL of EEIO, and analyzed the cell cycle arrest by flow cytometry and the cell cycle controlling protein expression by Western blotting. RESULTS Treatment cells with 2.5 - 10 µg/mL of EEIO reduced viable HT-29 cell numbers and DNA synthesis, increased the percentage of cells in G1 phase, decreased protein expression of CDK2, CDK4, and cyclin D1, increased expression of p21, p27, and p53, and inhibited phosphorylation of Rb and E2F1 expression. Among I. obliquus fractions, fraction 2 (fractionated by dichloromethane from EEIO) showed the same effect as EEIO treatment on cell proliferation and cell cycle-related protein levels. CONCLUSIONS These results demonstrate that fraction 2 is the major fraction that induces G1 arrest and inhibits cell proliferation, suggesting I. obliquus could be used as a natural anti-cancer ingredient in the food and/or pharmaceutical industry. PMID:25861415

  11. G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis induction by nuclear Smad4/Dpc4: Phenotypes reversed by a tumorigenic mutation

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Jia Le; Bansal, Ravi K.; Kern, Scott E.

    1999-01-01

    The tumor suppressor Smad4/Dpc4 is a transcription activator that binds specific DNA sequences and whose nuclear localization is induced after exposure to type β transforming growth factor-like cytokines. We explored an inducible system in which Smad4 protein is activated by translocation to the nucleus when cell lines that stably express wild-type or mutant Smad4 proteins fused to a murine estrogen receptor domain are treated with 4-hydroxytamoxifen. This induced Smad4-mediated transcriptional activation and a decrease in growth rate, attributable to a cell cycle arrest at the G1 phase and an induction of apoptosis. A tumor-derived mutation (Arg-100 → Thr) affecting a residue critical for DNA-binding demonstrated an “oncogenic” phenotype, having decreases in both the G1 fraction and apoptosis and, consequently, an augmentation of population growth. This model should be useful in the exploration and control of components that lie further downstream in the Smad4 tumor-suppressor pathway. PMID:9990040

  12. An APC/C-Cdh1 Biosensor Reveals the Dynamics of Cdh1 Inactivation at the G1/S Transition.

    PubMed

    Ondracka, Andrej; Robbins, Jonathan A; Cross, Frederick R

    2016-01-01

    B-type cyclin-dependent kinase activity must be turned off for mitotic exit and G1 stabilization. B-type cyclin degradation is mediated by the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C); during and after mitotic exit, APC/C is dependent on Cdh1. Cdh1 is in turn phosphorylated and inactivated by cyclin-CDK at the Start transition of the new cell cycle. We developed a biosensor to assess the cell cycle dynamics of APC/C-Cdh1. Nuclear exit of the G1 transcriptional repressor Whi5 is a known marker of Start; APC/C-Cdh1 is inactivated 12 min after Whi5 nuclear exit with little measurable cell-to-cell timing variability. Multiple phosphorylation sites on Cdh1 act in a redundant manner to repress its activity. Reducing the number of phosphorylation sites on Cdh1 can to some extent be tolerated for cell viability, but it increases variability in timing of APC/C-Cdh1 inactivation. Mutants with minimal subsets of phosphorylation sites required for viability exhibit striking stochasticity in multiple responses including budding, nuclear division, and APC/C-Cdh1 activity itself. Multiple cyclin-CDK complexes, as well as the stoichiometric inhibitor Acm1, contribute to APC/C-Cdh1 inactivation; this redundant control is likely to promote rapid and reliable APC/C-Cdh1 inactivation immediately following the Start transition.

  13. The histone deacetylase inhibitor belinostat (PXD101) suppresses bladder cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, Michael T; Yoon, Joanne; Yee, Herman; Chiriboga, Luis; Liebes, Leonard; Ara, Gulshan; Qian, Xiaozhong; Bajorin, Dean F; Sun, Tung-Tien; Wu, Xue-Ru; Osman, Iman

    2007-01-01

    Background Treatment options for patients with recurrent superficial bladder cancer are limited, necessitating aggressive exploration of new treatment strategies that effectively prevent recurrence and progression to invasive disease. We assessed the effects of belinostat (previously PXD101), a novel histone deacetylase inhibitor, on a panel of human bladder cancer cell lines representing superficial and invasive disease, and on a transgenic mouse model of superficial bladder cancer. Methods Growth inhibition and cell cycle distribution effect of belinostat on 5637, T24, J82, and RT4 urothelial lines were assessed. Ha-ras transgenic mice with established superficial bladder cancer were randomized to receive either belinostat or vehicle alone, and assessed for bladder weight, hematuria, gene expression profiling, and immunohistochemistry (IHC). Results Belinostat had a significant linear dose-dependent growth inhibition on all cell lines (IC50 range of 1.0–10.0 μM). The 5637 cell line, which was derived from a superficial papillary tumor, was the most sensitive to treatment. Belinostat (100 mg/kg, intraperitoneal, 5 days each week for 3 weeks) treated mice had less bladder weight (p < 0.05), and no hematuria compared with 6/10 control mice that developed at least one episode. IHC of bladder tumors showed less cell proliferation and a higher expression of p21WAF1 in the belinostat-treated mice. Gene expression profile analysis revealed 56 genes significantly different in the treated group; these included the upregulation of p21WAF1, induction of core histone deacetylase (HDAC), and cell communication genes. Conclusion Our data demonstrate that belinostat inhibits bladder cancer and supports the clinical evaluation of belinostat for the treatment of patients with superficial bladder cancer. PMID:17935615

  14. A novel G1-specific enhancer identified in the human heat shock protein 70 gene.

    PubMed Central

    Taira, T; Narita, T; Iguchi-Ariga, S M; Ariga, H

    1997-01-01

    Expression of the human heat shock protein 70 gene (hsp70) is induced by various kinds of stress and by oncogenes. In the absence of stress, hsp70 is mainly expressed in the G1and S phases of the cell cycle, but the elements contributing to cell cycle-dependent expression from the hsp70 promoter remain elusive. We have previously reported that two elements, named HSP-MYCA and HSP-MYCB, located approximately 200 bp upstream (-200) from the transcription start site (+1) of human hsp70, are important for initiation of DNA replication at the hsp70 locus. In this report we examine the effect of these two elements on transcriptional activity from the hsp70 promoter, especially in terms of cell cycle-dependent expression. Various segments of the hsp70 promoter region (up to -300) were linked to the luciferase gene and the constructs were transfected into mouse L cells to examine their transcriptional activity. A strong enhancer activity was defined in the HSP-MYCB element, but not in HSP-MYCA. Mutations introduced within HSP-MYCB abolished the transcriptional activation. In synchronized cells, pHB-Luc (a luciferase construct containing approximately 2.4 kb of the hsp70 promoter region) as well as endogenous hsp70 showed two peaks of expression; one in G1 and the other in the S phase. Site-directed mutagenesis of HSP-MYCB in pHB-Luc abolished the expression peak in G1, but not that in the S phase. To test promoter specificity, wild-type and mutant HSP-MYCB elements were then linked to the luciferase gene in combination with the hsp70 , the cyclin A or the PCNA promoter. Both in transient experiments and established cell lines, a strong peak of expression in mid-G1phase was observed with all the constructs containing wild-type HSP-MYCB, but not with the constructs containing the mutant sequence. These results suggest that the HSP-MYCB sequence is a G1-specific enhancer and is responsible for cell cycle-dependent expression of hsp70. PMID:9115365

  15. Involvement of miR-15a in G0/G1 Phase Cell Cycle Arrest Induced by Porcine Circovirus Type 2 Replication

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Rong; Wei, Li; Zhu, Shanshan; Wang, Jing; Cao, Yongchang; Xue, Chunyi; Yan, Xu; Liu, Jue

    2016-01-01

    Many viruses exploit the host cell division cycle to favour their own growth. Here we demonstrated that porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2), which is a major causative agent of an emerging and important swine disease complex, PCV2-associated diseases, caused G0/G1 cell cycle arrest through degradation of cyclin D1 and E followed by reduction of retinoblastoma phosphorylation in synchronized PCV2-infected cells dependent upon virus replication. This induction of G0/G1 cell cycle arrest promoted PCV2 replication as evidenced by increased viral protein expression and progeny virus production in the synchronized PCV2-infected cells. To delineate a mechanism of miRNAs in regulating PCV2-induced G0/G1 cell cycle arrest, we determined expression levels of some relevant miRNAs and found that only miR-15a but not miR-16, miR-21, and miR-34a was significantly changed in the PCV2-infected cells. We further demonstrated that upregulation of miR-15a promoted PCV2-induced G0/G1 cell cycle arrest via mediating cyclins D1 and E degradation, in which involves PCV2 growth. These results reveal that G0/G1 cell cycle arrest induced by PCV2 may provide favourable conditions for viral protein expression and progeny production and that miR-15a is implicated in PCV2-induced cell cycle control, thereby contributing to efficient viral replication. PMID:27302568

  16. A functional interaction between the histone deacetylase Rpd3 and the corepressor Groucho in Drosophila development

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guoqing; Fernandez, Joseph; Mische, Sheenah; Courey, Albert J.

    1999-01-01

    The Drosophila gene groucho (gro) encodes a transcriptional corepressor that has critical roles in many development processes. In an effort to illuminate the mechanism of Gro-mediated repression, we have employed Gro as an affinity reagent to purify Gro-binding proteins from embryonic nuclear extracts. One of these proteins was found to be the histone deacetylase Rpd3. Protein–protein interaction assays suggest that Gro and Rpd3 form a complex in vivo and that they interact directly via the glycine/proline rich (GP) domain in Gro. Cell culture assays demonstrate that Rpd3 potentiates repression by the GP domain. Furthermore, experiments employing a histone deacetylase inhibitor, as well as a catalytically inactive form of Rpd3, imply that histone deacetylase activity is required for efficient Gro-mediated repression. Finally, mutations in gro and rpd3 have synergistic effects on embryonic lethality and pattern formation. These findings support the view that Gro mediates repression, at least in part, by the direct recruitment of the histone deacetylase Rpd3 to the template, where it can modulate local chromatin structure. They also provide evidence for a specific role of Rpd3 in early development. PMID:10485845

  17. A phosphorescent rhenium(I) histone deacetylase inhibitor: mitochondrial targeting and paraptosis induction.

    PubMed

    Ye, Rui-Rong; Tan, Cai-Ping; Lin, Yan-Nan; Ji, Liang-Nian; Mao, Zong-Wan

    2015-05-14

    In this report, we designed a histone deacetylase-targeted phosphorescent Re(I) complex ReLMito. Colocalization studies suggested that ReLMito could specially localize to mitochondria. We also demonstrated that ReLMito could induce paraptosis in cancer cells. These features endowed the complex with potential to induce and monitor mitochondrial morphological changes during the paraptosis simultaneously.

  18. A Role for Histone Deacetylases in the Cellular and Behavioral Mechanisms Underlying Learning and Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahgoub, Melissa; Monteggia, Lisa M.

    2014-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are a family of chromatin remodeling enzymes that restrict access of transcription factors to the DNA, thereby repressing gene expression. In contrast, histone acetyltransferases (HATs) relax the chromatin structure allowing for an active chromatin state and promoting gene transcription. Accumulating data have…

  19. Analysis of functions of the chitin deacetylase gene family in Tribolium castaneum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The expression profiles of nine genes encoding chitin deacetylase (CDA)-like proteins were studied during development and in various tissues of the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, by RT-PCR. TcCDA1, TcCDA2 and TcCDA5 were expressed throughout all stages of development, while TcCDA6 – 9 were ...

  20. Cloning and expression of chitin deacetylase gene from a Deuteromycete, Colletotrichum lindemuthianum.

    PubMed

    Tokuyasu, K; Ohnishi-Kameyama, M; Hayashi, K; Mori, Y

    1999-01-01

    The chitin deacetylase gene was cloned from cDNA of Colletotrichum lindemuthianum ATCC 56676, and the open reading frame consisted of a possible prepro-sequence of 27 amino acids at the N-terminus and a mature chitin deacetylase. The deduced amino acid sequence of the mature enzyme revealed 26% identity and 46% similarity with a chitin deacetylase from Mucor rouxii. The molecular mass of the protein estimated from the amino acid sequence data was 24.3 kDa, which was in good agreement with the MALDI-TOF MS analysis data of the purified protein (24.17-24.36 kDa). The gene product was overexpressed in Escherichia coli cells as a fusion protein with six histidine residues at its C-terminus. The fusion protein formed inclusion bodies, but chitin deacetylase activity was restored from the inclusion bodies by a simple renaturation step with 8 M urea treatment. The recombinant enzyme was purified by affinity chromatography and gel filtration steps, and had a final specific activity of 4.22 units mg(-1) of protein. Trypsin digestion of the recombinant enzyme resulted in 2.1-fold increase in activity, suggesting that the removal of the prepro-domain from the recombinant enzyme resulted in an increase in its activity.

  1. Production of a recombinant chitin deacetylase in the culture medium of Escherichia coli cells.

    PubMed

    Tokuyasu, K; Kaneko, S; Hayashi, K; Mori, Y

    1999-09-10

    With the aid of a signal sequence of a chitinase from Streptomyces lividans, a recombinant chitin deacetylase, whose gene originated from a Deuteromycete, Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, was produced in the culture medium of Escherichia coli cells, existing as a highly active form without the signal peptide. During the production of the recombinant chitin deacetylase, both a slight increase in the value of OD600 nm in the culture medium and a drastic decrease in viable cell number were observed. When penta-N-acetyl-chitopentaose was used as the substrate, the recombinant chitin deacetylase had comparable kinetic parameters to those of the original enzyme from the fungus. The addition of a C-terminal six histidine sequence to the recombinant enzyme caused a slight decrease in the kcat value, and the further addition of a 12 amino acid sequence at its N-terminus caused a further decrease in the value. This production system allowed us to easily produce in the culture media the recombinant chitin deacetylases possessing as good properties as the original enzyme, without any disruption steps of the E. coli cells.

  2. Comparative effects of histone deacetylase inhibitors on p53 target gene expression, cell cycle and apoptosis in MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Knutson, Andrew Kekapa'a; Welsh, Jennifer; Taylor, Travis; Roy, Somdutta; Wang, Wei-Lin Winnie; Tenniswood, Martin

    2012-03-01

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors are currently being evaluated for their therapeutic potential and have shown considerable promise as adjuvant therapies for a number of cancers. This study compared the effects of 2 hydroxamic acid based inhibitors, CG-1521 and SAHA, on gene expression, cell cycle and cell death in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. Both compounds show a dose- and time-dependent effect on cell number (evaluated using crystal violet), however CG-1521 exerts its effects significantly earlier than SAHA, and CG-1521 induces apoptosis (assessed by Apo-BrdU staining and flow cytometry) more rapidly than SAHA. qPCR of cell cycle regulatory and apoptotic genes shows that CG-1521 and SAHA modulate similar cohorts of p53-responsive genes, however, the levels of induction and the timing of the induction differs significantly between the 2 inhibitors. In particular SAHA downregulates cell cycle-associated genes that modulate the G1/S transition (including cyclin D1 and cdc25a) and the G2/M transition [cyclin B1, Plk1, Stk6 (serine-threonine kinase 6, Aurora kinase A) and Kntc2] more significantly than CG-1521. In contrast, CG-1521 significantly induces the expression of several p53 target genes associated with apoptosis including Bnip3/Bnip3L, p21/p21B and Gdf15. The differential levels of gene induction provide molecular evidence of both cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, and suggest a molecular mechanism that explains the difference in the biological effects of the 2 histone deacetylase inhibitors.

  3. Long-term antiepileptic treatment with histone deacetylase inhibitors may reduce the risk of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Stettner, Mark; Krämer, Günter; Strauss, Arne; Kvitkina, Tatjana; Ohle, Sandra; Kieseier, Bernd C; Thelen, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Various antiepileptic drugs such as valproic acid, carbamazepine, oxcarbazepine, lamotrigine and levetiracetam are known to exert histone deacetylase inhibitory (HDACi) properties, which can modify aberrantly silenced gene expression by an epigenetic mechanism. This study was initiated to examine a potential beneficial effect of these drugs on prostate cancer (PC) development. The prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels of 106 patients under long-term treatment with antiepileptic drugs and known HDACi properties were examined. PSA represents a hallmark in the early detection of PC, and its levels may predict an invasive disease in subsequent years. For in-vitro experiments, the PC cell line LNCaP was treated with HDACi drugs; subsequently, PSA and further PC markers were assessed. When men over 50 years of age were treated with HDACi drugs they had lower age-corrected PSA levels compared with control groups, according to the following ranking: valproic acid>levetiracetam>carbamazepine/oxcarbazepine>lamotrigine. Furthermore, there was a correlation between PSA reduction and the number of HDACi drugs within the medication, lending credence to the idea that a synergistic effect might be possible. Moreover, in vitro, HDACi drugs decrease PSA on mRNA and protein levels and exhibit further oncoprotective properties.The fact that HDACi drugs exert antiproliferative effects on neoplastic cells in vitro and in vivo, which are paralleled by expression alterations of aberrantly regulated genes, underlines the potential therapeutic value of HDACi drugs. These data suggest that long-term HDACi treatment can positively influence the characteristically slow transformation of tumour precursor cells in the prostate and may thus reduce a patient's risk of developing PC.

  4. Inhibition of histone deacetylases enhances DNA damage repair in SCNT embryos.

    PubMed

    Bohrer, Rodrigo Camponogara; Duggavathi, Raj; Bordignon, Vilceu

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that DNA damage affects embryo development and also somatic cell reprogramming into induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. It has been also shown that treatment with histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) improves development of embryos produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) and enhances somatic cell reprogramming. There is evidence that increasing histone acetylation at the sites of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) is critical for DNA damage repair. Therefore, we hypothesized that HDACi treatment enhances cell programming and embryo development by facilitating DNA damage repair. To test this hypothesis, we first established a DNA damage model wherein exposure of nuclear donor cells to ultraviolet (UV) light prior to nuclear transfer reduced the development of SCNT embryos proportional to the length of UV exposure. Detection of phosphorylated histone H2A.x (H2AX139ph) foci confirmed that exposure of nuclear donor cells to UV light for 10 s was sufficient to increase DSBs in SCNT embryos. Treatment with HDACi during embryo culture increased development and reduced DSBs in SCNT embryos produced from UV-treated cells. Transcript abundance of genes involved in either the homologous recombination (HR) or nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathways for DSBs repair was reduced by HDACi treatment in developing embryos at day 5 after SCNT. Interestingly, expression of HR and NHEJ genes was similar between HDACi-treated and control SCNT embryos that developed to the blastocyst stage. This suggested that the increased number of embryos that could achieve the blastocyst stage in response to HDACi treatment have repaired DNA damage. These results demonstrate that DNA damage in nuclear donor cells is an important component affecting development of SCNT embryos, and that HDACi treatment after nuclear transfer enhances DSBs repair and development of SCNT embryos.

  5. Nitric Oxide Modulates Histone Acetylation at Stress Genes by Inhibition of Histone Deacetylases1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Mengel, Alexander; Ageeva, Alexandra; Durner, Jörg

    2017-01-01

    Histone acetylation, which is an important mechanism to regulate gene expression, is controlled by the opposing action of histone acetyltransferases and histone deacetylases (HDACs). In animals, several HDACs are subjected to regulation by nitric oxide (NO); in plants, however, it is unknown whether NO affects histone acetylation. We found that treatment with the physiological NO donor S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) increased the abundance of several histone acetylation marks in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), which was strongly diminished in the presence of the NO scavenger 2-4-carboxyphenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide. This increase was likely triggered by NO-dependent inhibition of HDAC activity, since GSNO and S-nitroso-N-acetyl-dl-penicillamine significantly and reversibly reduced total HDAC activity in vitro (in nuclear extracts) and in vivo (in protoplasts). Next, genome-wide H3K9/14ac profiles in Arabidopsis seedlings were generated by chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing, and changes induced by GSNO, GSNO/2-4-carboxyphenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide or trichostatin A (an HDAC inhibitor) were quantified, thereby identifying genes that display putative NO-regulated histone acetylation. Functional classification of these genes revealed that many of them are involved in the plant defense response and the abiotic stress response. Furthermore, salicylic acid, which is the major plant defense hormone against biotrophic pathogens, inhibited HDAC activity and increased histone acetylation by inducing endogenous NO production. These data suggest that NO affects histone acetylation by targeting and inhibiting HDAC complexes, resulting in the hyperacetylation of specific genes. This mechanism might operate in the plant stress response by facilitating the stress-induced transcription of genes. PMID:27980017

  6. Overlapping and Divergent Actions of Structurally Distinct Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors in Cardiac Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Schuetze, Katherine B; Stratton, Matthew S; Blakeslee, Weston W; Wempe, Michael F; Wagner, Florence F; Holson, Edward B; Kuo, Yin-Ming; Andrews, Andrew J; Gilbert, Tonya M; Hooker, Jacob M; McKinsey, Timothy A

    2017-04-01

    Inhibitors of zinc-dependent histone deacetylases (HDACs) profoundly affect cellular function by altering gene expression via changes in nucleosomal histone tail acetylation. Historically, investigators have employed pan-HDAC inhibitors, such as the hydroxamate trichostatin A (TSA), which simultaneously targets members of each of the three zinc-dependent HDAC classes (classes I, II, and IV). More recently, class- and isoform-selective HDAC inhibitors have been developed, providing invaluable chemical biology probes for dissecting the roles of distinct HDACs in the control of various physiologic and pathophysiological processes. For example, the benzamide class I HDAC-selective inhibitor, MGCD0103 [N-(2-aminophenyl)-4-[[(4-pyridin-3-ylpyrimidin-2-yl)amino]methyl] benzamide], was shown to block cardiac fibrosis, a process involving excess extracellular matrix deposition, which often results in heart dysfunction. Here, we compare the mechanisms of action of structurally distinct HDAC inhibitors in isolated primary cardiac fibroblasts, which are the major extracellular matrix-producing cells of the heart. TSA, MGCD0103, and the cyclic peptide class I HDAC inhibitor, apicidin, exhibited a common ability to enhance histone acetylation, and all potently blocked cardiac fibroblast cell cycle progression. In contrast, MGCD0103, but not TSA or apicidin, paradoxically increased expression of a subset of fibrosis-associated genes. Using the cellular thermal shift assay, we provide evidence that the divergent effects of HDAC inhibitors on cardiac fibroblast gene expression relate to differential engagement of HDAC1- and HDAC2-containing complexes. These findings illustrate the importance of employing multiple compounds when pharmacologically assessing HDAC function in a cellular context and during HDAC inhibitor drug development.

  7. Contrasting Effects of Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors on Reward and Aversive Olfactory Memories in the Honey Bee.

    PubMed

    Lockett, Gabrielle A; Wilkes, Fiona; Helliwell, Paul; Maleszka, Ryszard

    2014-06-10

    Much of what we have learnt from rodent models about the essential role of epigenetic processes in brain plasticity has made use of aversive learning, yet the role of histone acetylation in aversive memory in the honey bee, a popular invertebrate model for both memory and epigenetics, was previously unknown. We examined the effects of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibition on both aversive and reward olfactory associative learning in a discrimination proboscis extension reflex (PER) assay. We report that treatment with the HDAC inhibitors APHA compound 8 (C8), phenylbutyrate (PB) or sodium butyrate (NaB) impaired discrimination memory due to impairment of aversive memory in a dose-dependent manner, while simultaneously having no effect on reward memory. Treatment with C8 1 h before training, 1 h after training or 1 h before testing, impaired aversive but not reward memory at test. C8 treatment 1 h before training also improved aversive but not reward learning during training. PB treatment only impaired aversive memory at test when administered 1 h after training, suggesting an effect on memory consolidation specifically. Specific impairment of aversive memory (but not reward memory) by HDAC inhibiting compounds was robust, reproducible, occurred following treatment with three drugs targeting the same mechanism, and is likely to be genuinely due to alterations to memory as sucrose sensitivity and locomotion were unaffected by HDAC inhibitor treatment. This pharmacological dissection of memory highlights the involvement of histone acetylation in aversive memory in the honey bee, and expands our knowledge of epigenetic control of neural plasticity in invertebrates.

  8. Pheromone sensing regulates Caenorhabditis elegans lifespan and stress resistance via the deacetylase SIR-2.1

    PubMed Central

    Ludewig, Andreas H.; Izrayelit, Yevgeniy; Park, Donha; Malik, Rabia U.; Zimmermann, Anna; Mahanti, Parag; Fox, Bennett W.; Bethke, Axel; Doering, Frank; Riddle, Donald L.; Schroeder, Frank C.

    2013-01-01

    Lifespan in Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila, and mice is regulated by conserved signaling networks, including the insulin/insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) signaling cascade and pathways depending on sirtuins, a family of NAD+-dependent deacetylases. Small molecules such as resveratrol are of great interest because they increase lifespan in many species in a sirtuin-dependent manner. However, no endogenous small molecules that regulate lifespan via sirtuins have been identified, and the mechanisms underlying sirtuin-dependent longevity are not well understood. Here, we show that in C. elegans, two endogenously produced small molecules, the dauer-inducing ascarosides ascr#2 and ascr#3, regulate lifespan and stress resistance through chemosensory pathways and the sirtuin SIR-2.1. Ascarosides extend adult lifespan and stress resistance without reducing fecundity or feeding rate, and these effects are reduced or abolished when nutrients are restricted. We found that ascaroside-mediated longevity is fully abolished by loss of SIR-2.1 and that the effect of ascr#2 requires expression of the G protein-coupled receptor DAF-37 in specific chemosensory neurons. In contrast to many other lifespan-modulating factors, ascaroside-mediated lifespan increases do not require insulin signaling via the FOXO homolog DAF-16 or the insulin/IGF-1-receptor homolog DAF-2. Our study demonstrates that C. elegans produces specific small molecules to control adult lifespan in a sirtuin-dependent manner, supporting the hypothesis that endogenous regulation of metazoan lifespan functions, in part, via sirtuins. These findings strengthen the link between chemosensory inputs and conserved mechanisms of lifespan regulation in metazoans and suggest a model for communal lifespan regulation in C. elegans. PMID:23509272

  9. Pheromone sensing regulates Caenorhabditis elegans lifespan and stress resistance via the deacetylase SIR-2.1.

    PubMed

    Ludewig, Andreas H; Izrayelit, Yevgeniy; Park, Donha; Malik, Rabia U; Zimmermann, Anna; Mahanti, Parag; Fox, Bennett W; Bethke, Axel; Doering, Frank; Riddle, Donald L; Schroeder, Frank C

    2013-04-02

    Lifespan in Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila, and mice is regulated by conserved signaling networks, including the insulin/insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) signaling cascade and pathways depending on sirtuins, a family of NAD(+)-dependent deacetylases. Small molecules such as resveratrol are of great interest because they increase lifespan in many species in a sirtuin-dependent manner. However, no endogenous small molecules that regulate lifespan via sirtuins have been identified, and the mechanisms underlying sirtuin-dependent longevity are not well understood. Here, we show that in C. elegans, two endogenously produced small molecules, the dauer-inducing ascarosides ascr#2 and ascr#3, regulate lifespan and stress resistance through chemosensory pathways and the sirtuin SIR-2.1. Ascarosides extend adult lifespan and stress resistance without reducing fecundity or feeding rate, and these effects are reduced or abolished when nutrients are restricted. We found that ascaroside-mediated longevity is fully abolished by loss of SIR-2.1 and that the effect of ascr#2 requires expression of the G protein-coupled receptor DAF-37 in specific chemosensory neurons. In contrast to many other lifespan-modulating factors, ascaroside-mediated lifespan increases do not require insulin signaling via the FOXO homolog DAF-16 or the insulin/IGF-1-receptor homolog DAF-2. Our study demonstrates that C. elegans produces specific small molecules to control adult lifespan in a sirtuin-dependent manner, supporting the hypothesis that endogenous regulation of metazoan lifespan functions, in part, via sirtuins. These findings strengthen the link between chemosensory inputs and conserved mechanisms of lifespan regulation in metazoans and suggest a model for communal lifespan regulation in C. elegans.

  10. MicroRNA-1 regulates chondrocyte phenotype by repressing histone deacetylase 4 during growth plate development.

    PubMed

    Li, Pengcui; Wei, Xiaochun; Guan, Yingjie; Chen, Qian; Zhao, Tingcun; Sun, Changqi; Wei, Lei

    2014-09-01

    MicroRNAs (miRs) are noncoding RNAs (17-25 nt) that control translation and/or mRNA degradation. Using Northern blot analysis, we identified that miR-1 is specifically expressed in growth plate cartilage in addition to muscle tissue, but not in brain, intestine, liver, or lung. We obtained the first evidence that miR-1 is highly expressed in the hypertrophic zone of the growth plate, with an 8-fold increase compared with the proliferation zone; this location coincides with the Ihh and Col X expression regions in vivo. MiR-1 significantly induces chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation. We further identified histone deacetylase 4 (HDAC4) as a target of miR-1. HDAC4 negatively regulates chondrocyte hypertrophy by inhibiting Runx2, a critical transcription factor for chondrocyte hypertrophy. MiR-1 inhibits both endogenous HDAC4 protein by 2.2-fold and the activity of a reporter gene bearing the 3'-untranslated region (UTR) of HDAC4 by 3.3-fold. Conversely, knockdown of endogenous miR-1 relieves the repression of HDAC4. Deletion of the miR-1 binding site in HDAC4 3'-UTR or mutated miR-1 abolishes miR-1-mediated inhibition of the reporter gene activity. Overexpression of HDAC4 reverses miR-1 induction of chondrocyte differentiation markers Col X and Ihh. HDAC4 inhibits Runx2 promoter activity in a dosage-dependent manner. Thus, miR-1 plays an important role in the regulation of the chondrocyte phenotype during the growth plate development via direct targeting of HDAC4.

  11. Histone deacetylase inhibition enhances antimicrobial peptide but not inflammatory cytokine expression upon bacterial challenge

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Natalie; Sechet, Emmanuel; Friedman, Robin; Amiot, Aurélien; Sobhani, Iradj; Nigro, Giulia; Sansonetti, Philippe J.; Sperandio, Brice

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMP) are defense effectors of the innate immunity playing a crucial role in the intestinal homeostasis with commensals and protection against pathogens. Herein we aimed to investigate AMP gene regulation by deciphering specific characteristics allowing their enhanced expression among innate immune genes, particularly those encoding proinflammatory mediators. Our emphasis was on epigenetic regulation of the gene encoding the AMP β-defensin 2 (HBD2), taken as a model of possibly specific induction, upon challenge with a commensal bacterium, compared with the proinflammatory cytokine IL-8. Using an in vitro model of colonic epithelial cells challenged with Escherichia coli K12, we showed that inhibition of histone deacetylases (HDAC) by trichostatin A dramatically enhanced induction of HBD2 expression, without affecting expression of IL-8. This mechanism was supported by an increased phosphorylation of histone H3 on serine S10, preferentially at the HBD2 promoter. This process occurred through activation of the IκB kinase complex, which also led to activation of NF-κB. Moreover, we demonstrated that NF-κB was modified by acetylation upon HDAC inhibition, partly by the histone acetyltransferase p300, and that both NF-κB and p300 supported enhanced induction of HBD2 expression. Furthermore, we identified additional genes belonging to antimicrobial defense and epithelial restitution pathways that showed a similar pattern of epigenetic control. Finally, we confirmed our finding in human colonic primary cells using an ex vivo organoid model. This work opens the way to use epigenetic pharmacology to achieve induction of epithelial antimicrobial defenses, while limiting the deleterious risk of an inflammatory response. PMID:27162363

  12. Histone deacetylase inhibition and the regulation of cell growth with particular reference to liver pathobiology.

    PubMed

    Joanna, Fraczek; van Grunsven, Leo A; Mathieu, Vinken; Sarah, Snykers; Sarah, Deleu; Karin, Vanderkerken; Tamara, Vanhaecke; Vera, Rogiers

    2009-09-01

    The transcriptional activity of genes largely depends on the accessibility of specific chromatin regions to transcriptional regulators. This process is controlled by diverse post-transcriptional modifications of the histone amino termini of which reversible acetylation plays a vital role. Histone acetyltransferases (HATs) are responsible for the addition of acetyl groups and histone deacetylases (HDACs) catalyse the reverse reaction. In general, though not exclusively, histone acetylation is associated with a positive regulation of transcription, whereas histone deacetylation is correlated with transcriptional silencing. The elucidation of unequivocal links between aberrant action of HDACs and tumorigenesis lies at the base of key scientific importance of these enzymes. In particular, the potential benefit of HDAC inhibition has been confirmed in various tumour cell lines, demonstrating antiproliferative, differentiating and pro-apoptotic effects. Consequently, the dynamic quest for HDAC inhibitors (HDIs) as a new class of anticancer drugs was set off, resulting in a number of compounds that are currently evaluated in clinical trials. Ironically, the knowledge with respect to the expression pattern and function of individual HDAC isoenzymes remains largely elusive. In the present review, we provide an update of the current knowledge on the involvement of HDACs in the regulation of fundamental cellular processes in the liver, being the main site for drug metabolism within the body. Focus lies on the involvement of HDACs in the regulation of growth of normal and transformed hepatocytes and the transdifferentiation process of stellate cells. Furthermore, extrapolation of our present knowledge on HDAC functionality towards innovative treatment of malignant and non-malignant, hyperproliferative and inflammatory disorders is discussed.

  13. Radiosensitizing Effect of a Phenylbutyrate-Derived Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Yen-Shen; Chou, Chia-Hung; Tzen, Kai-Yuan; Gao, Ming; Cheng, Ann-Lii; Kulp, Samuel K.; Cheng, Jason Chia-Hsien

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy is integrated into the multimodal treatment of localized hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) refractory to conventional treatment. Tumor control remains unsatisfactory and the sublethal effect associates with secondary spread. The use of an effective molecularly targeted agent in combination with radiotherapy is a potential therapeutic approach. Our aim was to assess the effect of combining a phenylbutyrate-derived histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, AR-42, with radiotherapy in in vitro and in vivo models of human HCC. Methods and Materials: Human HCC cell lines (Huh-7 and PLC-5) were used to evaluate the in vitro synergism of combining AR-42 with irradiation. Flow cytometry analyzed the cell cycle changes, whereas Western blot investigated the protein expressions after the combined treatment. Severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice bearing ectopic and orthotopic HCC xenografts were treated with AR-42 and/or radiotherapy for the in vivo response. Results: AR-42 significantly enhanced radiation-induced cell death by the inhibition of the DNA end-binding activity of Ku70, a highly versatile regulatory protein for DNA repair, telomere maintenance, and apoptosis. In ectopic xenografts of Huh-7 and PLC-5, pretreatment with AR-42 significantly enhanced the tumor-suppressive effect of radiotherapy by 48% and 66%, respectively. A similar combinatorial effect of AR-42 (10 and 25 mg/kg) and radiotherapy was observed in Huh-7 orthotopic model of tumor growth by 52% and 82%, respectively. This tumor suppression was associated with inhibition of intratumoral Ku70 activity as well as reductions in markers of HDAC activity and proliferation, and increased apoptosis. Conclusion: AR-42 is a potent, orally bioavailable inhibitor of HDAC with therapeutic value as a radiosensitizer of HCC.

  14. AAF G1 and Millimeter Wavelength ARM Radar Observations and Analysis from the ACAPEX Field Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, A. A.; Hardin, J. C.; Comstock, J. M.; Bharadwaj, N.; Mei, F.

    2015-12-01

    From late January to early March of 2015, the ARM Cloud Aerosol Precipitation Experiment (ACAPEX) deployed a variety of instruments to study atmospheric rivers as they made landfall on the western United States. These atmospheric rivers are an important source of rainfall for the drought-ridden regions of California, so it is important to understand the cloud characteristics and processes that occur during the events. For this study, the KAZR zenith pointing millimeter wavelength radar aboard the Ron Brown research vessel as well as two cloud probes, namely the Two-Dimensional Stereo Probe (2DS) and High Volume Precipitation Spectrometer-3 (HVPS3), flown on the ARM Aerial Facility Gulfstream-1 (AAF G1) aircraft were used to analyze the clouds associated with the atmospheric rivers. PyDisdrometer, an open-source software, is used to calculate radar reflectivity values based on the drop size distributions observed by the cloud probes so that the aircraft data may be directly compared to the KAZR data. This research will focus on two flight days. First, a coordinated flight flown on February 5, where the G1 flew a spiral pattern over the Ron Brown while the KAZR was running will be used to examine the clouds over the ocean. This will also allow for a direct comparison between the calculated radar reflectivity from the cloud probes and the KAZR measured reflectivity. The second case was chosen to be the atmospheric river landfall event on February 6. This case will be analyzed over the ocean using the KAZR, then over the shoreline, Sacramento, and the inland mountains using the cloud probe data, as well as other instrumentations onboard the G1, such as those that measure cloud thickness and liquid water content. In this way, the changes that occur to the clouds as they move from open-ocean to land may be examined in greater detail.

  15. Study of the genetic variability in a Parkinson's Disease gene: EIF4G1.

    PubMed

    Tucci, Arianna; Charlesworth, Gavin; Sheerin, Una-Marie; Plagnol, Vincent; Wood, Nicholas W; Hardy, John

    2012-06-14

    Chartier-Harlin and colleagues [2] recently reported mutations in the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4-gamma (EIF4G1) gene in families with parkinsonism. Large-scale screening found two mutations (p.R1205H and p.A502V) only in affected individuals, although their relative frequency was very low. The aim of this study was to investigate EIF4G1 parkinsonism-related variants in two separate cohorts and study coding variability across the gene. We first screened a series of familial Parkinson's Disease (PD) patients in an attempt to confirm previous results by showing segregation. Then, to determine the extent of coding variation in the gene, we first screened a cohort of sub-Saharan African individuals from the Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humain - Human Genome Diversity Cell Line Panel (HGDP) [1] and then analyzed data from 5350 individuals National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) exome sequencing project. We failed to identify any PD-related mutations in the familial samples. Conversely we found the p.A502V variant in the NHLBI population. We observed a high number of coding polymorphism in the exons where the two PD variants have been previously reported. We conclude that either EIF4G1 variants are an extremely rare cause of familial PD in Caucasian cohorts, or that A502V is in fact a rare benign variant not involved in PD aetiology. Our data also suggests that the protein can tolerate some extent of variability particularly at this point of the gene.

  16. Overexpression of c-Myc alters G(1)/S arrest following ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Sheen, Joon-Ho; Dickson, Robert B

    2002-03-01

    Study of the mechanism(s) of genomic instability induced by the c-myc proto-oncogene has the potential to shed new light on its well-known oncogenic activity. However, an underlying mechanism(s) for this phenotype is largely unknown. In the present study, we investigated the effects of c-Myc overexpression on the DNA damage-induced G(1)/S checkpoint, in order to obtain mechanistic insights into how deregulated c-Myc destabilizes the cellular genome. The DNA damage-induced checkpoints are among the primary safeguard mechanisms for genomic stability, and alterations of cell cycle checkpoints are known to be crucial for certain types of genomic instability, such as gene amplification. The effects of c-Myc overexpression were studied in human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) as one approach to understanding the c-Myc-induced genomic instability in the context of mammary tumorigenesis. Initially, flow-cytometric analyses were used with two c-Myc-overexpressing, nontransformed immortal lines (184A1N4 and MCF10A) to determine whether c-Myc overexpression leads to alteration of cell cycle arrest following ionizing radiation (IR). Inappropriate entry into S phase was then confirmed with a bromodeoxyuridine incorporation assay measuring de novo DNA synthesis following IR. Direct involvement of c-Myc overexpression in alteration of the G(1)/S checkpoint was then confirmed by utilizing the MycER construct, a regulatable c-Myc. A transient excess of c-Myc activity, provided by the activated MycER, was similarly able to induce the inappropriate de novo DNA synthesis following IR. Significantly, the transient expression of full-length c-Myc in normal mortal HMECs also facilitated entry into S phase and the inappropriate de novo DNA synthesis following IR. Furthermore, irradiated, c-Myc-infected, normal HMECs developed a sub-G(1) population and a >4N population of cells. The c-Myc-induced alteration of the G(1)/S checkpoint was also compared to the effects of expression of MycS (N

  17. Nonuniform Expansion of the Youngest Galactic Supernova Remnant G1.9+0.3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, Stephen P.; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Green, David; Hwang, Una; Petre, Robert

    2014-08-01

    G1.9+0.3 is the youngest known Galactic supernova remnant (SNR), about 100 yr old from global expansion measurements, and most likely the result of an asymmetric Type Ia supernova explosion. We smoothed a Chandra image from a 1 Ms observation in 2011 and fit the resulting model to unsmoothed images from 2007 and 2009, allowing for expansion and image shifts. The measured expansion rates strongly deviate from uniform expansion, increasing inward by about 60% along the X-ray bright SE-NW axis, from 0.52% +- 0.03% per yr to 0.84% +- 0.06% per yr. This corresponds to undecelerated ages of 120 - 190 yr, confirming the young age of G1.9 +0.3, and implying a significant (deceleration parameter m < 0.6) deceleration of the blast wave. The spatially-integrated X-ray flux, strongly dominated by synchrotron emission, increases at a rate of 1.9% +- 0.7% per year, in agreement with previous measurements. G1.9+0.3 is the only Galactic SNR brightening at X-ray and radio wavelengths. We identify the inner rims with the reverse shock and more slowly-expanding rims farther out with the blast wave. The large spread in expansion ages between the reverse shock and the blast wave requires abrupt density gradients in either the ejecta or the ambient medium, to suddenly decelerate the reverse shock or the blast wave. The blast wave could have been decelerated recently by an encounter with a modest (factor of several) density discontinuity in the ambient medium, such as found at a wind termination shock, implying a strong presupernova wind from the progenitor system. Alternatively, the reverse shock might have encountered a larger (factor of 10 or more) density discontinuity within the SN ejecta, such as found in pulsating delayed-detonation Type Ia SN models. Through 1D hydrodynamical simulations, we demonstrate that the blast wave is much more decelerated than the reverse shock in these models for remnants at ages similar to G1.9+0.3. The presence of strong density gradients in the outer

  18. Asymmetric expansion of the youngest Galactic supernova remnant G1.9+0.3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, Stephen P.

    2016-06-01

    The youngest Galactic supernova remnant (SNR) G1.9+0.3, produced by a (probable) Type Ia SN that exploded around CE 1900, is strongly asymmetric at radio wavelengths, with a single bright maximum in its shell, but exhibits a bilaterally symmetric morphology in X-rays. It has been difficult to understand the origin of these contrasting morphologies. We present the results of expansion measurements of G1.9+0.3 that illuminate the origin of the radio asymmetry. These measurements are based on a comparison of our 2015 400-ks Chandra observation with earlier Chandra observations, including a 1-Ms observation in 2011. The mean expansion rate from 2011 to 2015 is 0.58% per yr, in agreement with previous measurements. We also confirm that the expansion decreases radially away from the remnant's center along the major E-W axis, from 0.77% per yr to 0.53% per yr. Large variations in expansion are also present along the minor N-S axis, but expansion there is strongly asymmetric and varies on small spatial scales. We use the “Demons” method to study the complex motions within G1.9+0.3. This method provides a nonparametric way for measuring these motions globally. We find motions varying by a factor of 5, from 0.09" to 0.44" per year. The slowest shocks are in the north, at the outer boundary of the bright radio emission, with speeds there as low as 3,600 km/s (for an assumed distance of 8.5 kpc), much less than the average shock speed of 12,000 km/s. Such strong deceleration of the northern blast wave most likely arises from the collision of SN ejecta with a much denser than average ambient medium there. The presence of this asymmetric ambient medium naturally explains the radio asymmetry. The SN ejecta have also been strongly decelerated in the N, but they expand faster than the blast wave. In several locations, significant morphological changes and strongly nonradial motions are apparent. The spatially-integrated X-ray flux continues to increase with time. As with Kepler

  19. Some alkali and titania analyses of tektites before and after G-1 precision monitoring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tatlock, D.B.

    1966-01-01

    A comparison of 55 older analyses of Australasian tektites with 110 modern precisely monitored analyses suggests that more than half of the older alkali and titania determinations are decidedly inaccurate and misleading. Deviations of the older analyses from the restricted values of the modern analyses are comparable to the imprecisions shown by early analyses of G-1 granite and W-1 diabase. This suggests that a high percentage of older alkali and titania analyses, such as those of Washington's tables, are of questionable quality. ?? 1966.

  20. Downregulation of HMGA2 by the pan-deacetylase inhibitor panobinostat is dependent on hsa-let-7b expression in liver cancer cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Di Fazio, Pietro; Montalbano, Roberta; Neureiter, Daniel; Alinger, Beate; Schmidt, Ansgar; Merkel, Anna Lena; Quint, Karl; Ocker, Matthias

    2012-09-10

    Inhibitors of protein deacetylases represent a novel therapeutic option for cancer diseases due to their effects on transcriptional regulation by interfering with histones acetylation and on several other cellular pathways. Recently, their ability to modulate several transcription factors and, interestingly, also co-factors, which actively participate in formation and modulation of transcription complexes was shown. We here investigate whether HMGA2 (High Mobility Group AT-2 hook), a nuclear non-histone transcriptional co-factor with known oncogenic properties, can be influenced by the novel pan-deacetylase inhibitor panobinostat (LBH589) in human hepatocellular carcinoma models. Panobinostat strongly downregulated HMGA2 in HepG2 and Hep3B cells; this effect was mediated by transcriptional upregulation and promotion of the maturation of the tumorsuppressor miRNA hsa-let-7b, which could inhibit HMGA2 expression via RNA interference pathways. siRNA knockdown of HMGA2 or transfection of hsa-let-7b mimicking oligonucleotides confirmed the role of HMGA2 in regulating cell proliferation and apoptosis in liver cancer cell lines. Co-incubation with panobinostat showed an additive effect on inhibition of cell proliferation using an impedance-based real-time cell analyzer. Treatment of HepG2 xenografts with panobinostat also led to a downregulation of HMGA2 in vivo. These findings show that pan-deacetylase inhibitors also modulate other signaling pathways and networks than histone modifications to influence cell fate. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Panobinostat for the treatment of liver cancer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Panobinostat meddles with miRNAs-dependent transcriptional and translational control. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tumorsuppressor miRNA hsa-let-7b upregulation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HMGA2 is downregulated via RNA interference pathways mediated by hsa-let-7b. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Panobinostat determines inhibition of

  1. Arctigenin, a natural lignan compound, induces G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in human glioma cells

    PubMed Central

    Maimaitili, Aisha; Shu, Zunhua; Cheng, Xiaojiang; Kaheerman, Kadeer; Sikandeer, Alifu; Li, Weimin

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to investigate the anticancer potential of arctigenin, a natural lignan compound, in malignant gliomas. The U87MG and T98G human glioma cell lines were treated with various concentrations of arctigenin for 48 h and the effects of arctigenin on the aggressive phenotypes of glioma cells were assessed. The results demonstrated that arctigenin dose-dependently inhibited the growth of U87MG and T98G cells, as determined using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and bromodeoxyuridine incorporation assays. Arctigenin exposure also induced a 60–75% reduction in colony formation compared with vehicle-treated control cells. However, arctigenin was not observed to affect the invasiveness of glioma cells. Arctigenin significantly increased the proportion of cells in the G0/G1 phase and reduced the number of cells in the S phase, as compared with the control group (P<0.05). Western blot analysis demonstrated that arctigenin increased the expression levels of p21, retinoblastoma and p53 proteins, and significantly decreased the expression levels of cyclin D1 and cyclin-dependent kinase 4 proteins. Additionally, arctigenin was able to induce apoptosis in glioma cells, coupled with increased expression levels of cleaved caspase-3 and the pro-apoptotic BCL2-associated X protein. Furthermore, arctigenin-induced apoptosis was significantly suppressed by the pretreatment of cells with Z-DEVD-FMK, a caspase-3 inhibitor. In conclusion, the results suggest that arctigenin is able to inhibit cell proliferation and may induce apoptosis and cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 phase in glioma cells. These results warrant further investigation of the anticancer effects of arctigenin in animal models of gliomas. PMID:28356992

  2. Arctigenin, a natural lignan compound, induces G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in human glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Maimaitili, Aisha; Shu, Zunhua; Cheng, Xiaojiang; Kaheerman, Kadeer; Sikandeer, Alifu; Li, Weimin

    2017-02-01

    The aim of the current study was to investigate the anticancer potential of arctigenin, a natural lignan compound, in malignant gliomas. The U87MG and T98G human glioma cell lines were treated with various concentrations of arctigenin for 48 h and the effects of arctigenin on the aggressive phenotypes of glioma cells were assessed. The results demonstrated that arctigenin dose-dependently inhibited the growth of U87MG and T98G cells, as determined using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and bromodeoxyuridine incorporation assays. Arctigenin exposure also induced a 60-75% reduction in colony formation compared with vehicle-treated control cells. However, arctigenin was not observed to affect the invasiveness of glioma cells. Arctigenin significantly increased the proportion of cells in the G0/G1 phase and reduced the number of cells in the S phase, as compared with the control group (P<0.05). Western blot analysis demonstrated that arctigenin increased the expression levels of p21, retinoblastoma and p53 proteins, and significantly decreased the expression levels of cyclin D1 and cyclin-dependent kinase 4 proteins. Additionally, arctigenin was able to induce apoptosis in glioma cells, coupled with increased expression levels of cleaved caspase-3 and the pro-apoptotic BCL2-associated X protein. Furthermore, arctigenin-induced apoptosis was significantly suppressed by the pretreatment of cells with Z-DEVD-FMK, a caspase-3 inhibitor. In conclusion, the results suggest that arctigenin is able to inhibit cell proliferation and may induce apoptosis and cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 phase in glioma cells. These results warrant further investigation of the anticancer effects of arctigenin in animal models of gliomas.

  3. Expression of a chitin deacetylase gene, up-regulated in Cryptococcus laurentii strain RY1, under nitrogen limitation.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Writachit; Sarkar, Soumyadev; Chakravorty, Somnath; Bhattacharya, Semantee; Bhattacharya, Debanjana; Gachhui, Ratan

    2016-05-01

    This study reports the identification of a chitin deacetylase gene in Cryptococcus laurentii strain RY1 over-expressing under nitrogen limitation by differential display. The up-regulation took place in robustly growing cells rather than in starving quiescent autophagic cells. Quantitative Real Time-PCR, enzyme activity in cell lysate and cell wall analysis corroborated the up-regulation of chitin deacetylase under nitrogen limitation. These results suggest chitin deacetylase might play a significant role in nitrogen limiting growth of Cryptococcus laurentii strain RY1.

  4. Induction of immunoglobulin G1, interleukin-6 and interleukin-10 by Taenia crassiceps metacestode carbohydrates

    PubMed Central

    Dissanayake, Senarath; Khan, Nasir; Shahin, Allen; Wijesinghe, Shanaka; Lukic, Miodrag

    2002-01-01

    T helper type 2 (Th2) -polarized immune responses are characteristically dominant in helminth infections. Two murine models that show a Th1 to Th2 polarization with infection progression are those of Schistosoma mansoni and Taenia crassiceps. In both, an early Th1 response is replaced by a late Th2 response. We report that the nucleic acid-, protein- and lipid-free carbohydrate fraction of T. crassiceps metacestodes (denoted T-CHO) possesses Th2-like immunomodulatory activity. Immunization of two strains of rats (Dark Agouti and Albino Oxford) and BALB/c mice with chicken albumin in the presence of T-CHO resulted in selective enhancement of immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) antibodies, considered to be associated with Th2 responses in both rats and mice. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) followed by IL-10 were the dominant cytokines detected in in vitro cultures of mouse spleen cells stimulated with T-CHO. IL-4 and IL-5 were not detected in these culture supernates. Furthermore, Taenia carbohydrates were mitogenic to spleen cells, activated serine phosphorylation of proteins and up-regulated the expression of the anti-apoptotic protein, Bcl-2. When mouse spleen cells were cultured in the presence of Taenia carbohydrates, a concentration-dependent down-regulation of IL-2 and an overlapping up-regulation of IL-6 secretion were seen. PMID:12460185

  5. Shaken, not stirred: mechanical stress testing of an IgG1 antibody.

    PubMed

    Kiese, Sylvia; Papppenberger, Astrid; Friess, Wolfgang; Mahler, Hanns-Christian

    2008-10-01

    Protein aggregation is known to occur under different stress conditions and displays a wide variety of morphologies. In this work, the aggregation behavior of a monoclonal antibody (IgG1) was investigated using two different mechanical stress methods namely stirring and shaking at two temperatures, various fill volumes and headspaces and different amounts of polysorbate present in the formulation. The detection of aggregates in terms of size and number was carried out using various analytical techniques including visible particle inspection, turbidity, sub-visible particle analysis, size exclusion chromatography and dynamic light scattering. The data showed that shaking and stirring resulted in different species of aggregates both qualitatively and quantitatively, where stirring was found more stressful than shaking on the IgG1 formulation. Mechanical stress testing performed at 5 and 25 degrees C only showed a difference on samples stressed by shaking and not by stirring. The headspace in the vials had great influence on the stability of the protein formulation when stressed by shaking. The presence of polysorbate had a protective effect on the antibody, however certain polysorbate concentrations even resulted in increased protein aggregation. An array of analytical methods was essential in order to cover the vast aggregate morphologies, which occurred during agitation.

  6. Nonuniform Expansion of the Youngest Galactic Supernova Remnant G1.9+0.3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Reynolds, Stephen P.; Green, David A.; Hwang, Una; Petre, Robert; Krishnamurthy, Kalyani; Willett, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    We report measurements of the X-ray expansion of the youngest Galactic supernova remnant, G1.9+0.3, using Chandra observations in 2007, 2009, and 2011. The measured rates strongly deviate from uniform expansion, decreasing radially by about 60 along the X-ray bright SE-NW axis from 0.84 plus or minus 0.06% yr(exp -1) to 0.52% plus or minus 0.03 yr(exp -1). This corresponds to undecelerated ages of 120-190 yr, confirming the young age of G1.9+0.3 and implying a significant deceleration of the blast wave. The synchrotron-dominated X-ray emission brightens at a rate of 1.9% plus or minus 0.4% yr(exp -1). We identify bright outer and inner rims with the blast wave and reverse shock, respectively. Sharp density gradients in either the ejecta or ambient medium are required to produce the sudden deceleration of the reverse shock or the blast wave implied by the large spread in expansion ages. The blast wave could have been decelerated recently by an encounter with a modest density discontinuity in the ambient medium, such as may be found at a wind termination shock, requiring strong mass loss in the progenitor.

  7. SNM1A Acts Downstream of ATM to Promote the G1 Cell Cycle Checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    Akhter, Shamima; Legerski, Randy J.

    2008-01-01

    We have shown previously that SNM1A co-localizes with 53BP1 at sites of double-strand breaks (DSBs) induced by IR, and that these proteins interact with or without DNA damage. However, the role of SNM1A in the DNA damage response has not been elucidated. Here, we show that SNM1A is required for an efficient G1 checkpoint arrest after IR exposure. Interestingly, the localization of SNM1A to sites of DSBs does not require either 53BP1 or H2AX, nor does the localization of 53BP1 require SNM1A. However, the localization of SNM1A does require ATM. Furthermore, SNM1A is shown to be a phosphorylation substrate of ATM in vitro, and to interact with ATM in vivo particularly after exposure of cells to IR. In addition, in the absence of SNM1A the activation of the downstream ATM target p53 is reduced. These findings suggest that SNM1A acts with ATM to promote the G1 cell cycle checkpoint. PMID:18848520

  8. The extraction of the spin structure function, g2 (and g1) at low Bjorken x

    SciTech Connect

    Ndukum, Luwani Z.

    2015-08-01

    The Spin Asymmetries of the Nucleon Experiment (SANE) used the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility at Jefferson Laboratory in Newport News, VA to investigate the spin structure of the proton. The experiment measured inclusive double polarization electron asymmetries using a polarized electron beam, scattered off a solid polarized ammonia target with target polarization aligned longitudinal and near transverse to the electron beam, allowing the extraction of the spin asymmetries A1 and A2, and spin structure functions g1 and g2. Polarized electrons of energies of 4.7 and 5.9 GeV were used. The scattered electrons were detected by a novel, non-magnetic array of detectors observing a four-momentum transfer range of 2.5 to 6.5 GeV*V. This document addresses the extraction of the spin asymmetries and spin structure functions, with a focus on spin structure function, g2 (and g1) at low Bjorken x. The spin structure functions were measured as a function of x and W in four Q square bins. A full understanding of the low x region is necessary to get clean results for SANE and extend our understanding of the kinematic region at low x.

  9. Detection of IgG1 antibodies against Mycobacterium tuberculosis DosR and Rpf antigens in tuberculosis patients before and after chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Mattos, Ana Márcia Menezes; Chaves, Alexandre Silva; Franken, Kees L M C; Figueiredo, Bárbara Bruna Muniz; Ferreira, Ana Paula; Ottenhoff, Tom H M; Teixeira, Henrique Couto

    2016-01-01

    Diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB) remains challenging. Serum IgG1 antibodies against Mycobacterium tuberculosis active growth phase antigens (ESAT-6/CFP-10, Rv0717 and Rv3353), DosR regulon-encoded proteins (Rv1733, Rv1737, Rv2628 and Rv2029), and resuscitation-promoting factors (Rv0867 and Rv2389) were evaluated in TB patients using ELISA. Active TB patients showed elevated levels of IgG1 antibodies against ESAT-6/CFP-10, Rv0717, Rv3353, Rv1733, Rv2628, Rv2029 and Rv0867 in comparison to healthy controls (p < 0.001). These levels remained high after the initiation of treatment, while responses to Rv0717 and Rv1733 peaked early during treatment. IgG1 responses to ESAT-6/CFP-10, Rv3353, Rv2628, Rv2029 and Rv0867 declined to control levels after the completion of 6 months chemotherapy. ROC analysis confirmed the good diagnostic performance of Rv0717, Rv1733, Rv3353, Rv2628, Rv2029 and Rv0867antigens. These data suggest that detecting IgG1 antibodies against M. tuberculosis antigens, including DosR and Rpf proteins, may represent an additional tool in the diagnosis of tuberculosis.

  10. The puc1 Cyclin Regulates the G1 Phase of the Fission Yeast Cell Cycle in Response to Cell Size

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Castellanos, Cristina; Blanco, Miguel A.; de Prada, José M.; Moreno, Sergio

    2000-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells coordinate cell size with cell division by regulating the length of the G1 and G2 phases of the cell cycle. In fission yeast, the length of the G1 phase depends on a precise balance between levels of positive (cig1, cig2, puc1, and cdc13 cyclins) and negative (rum1 and ste9-APC) regulators of cdc2. Early in G1, cyclin proteolysis and rum1 inhibition keep the cdc2/cyclin complexes inactive. At the end of G1, the balance is reversed and cdc2/cyclin activity down-regulates both rum1 and the cyclin-degrading activity of the APC. Here we present data showing that the puc1 cyclin, a close relative of the Cln cyclins in budding yeast, plays an important role in regulating the length of G1. Fission yeast cells lacking cig1 and cig2 have a cell cycle distribution similar to that of wild-type cells, with a short G1 and a long G2. However, when the puc1+ gene is deleted in this genetic background, the length of G1 is extended and these cells undergo S phase with a greater cell size than wild-type cells. This G1 delay is completely abolished in cells lacking rum1. Cdc2/puc1 function may be important to down-regulate the rum1 Cdk inhibitor at the end of G1. PMID:10679013

  11. Asymmetric Expansion of the Youngest Galactic Supernova Remnant G1.9+0.3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Green, David; Gwynne, Peter; Hwang, Una; Petre, Robert; Reynolds, Stephen P.; Willett, Rebecca

    2016-04-01

    The youngest Galactic supernova remnant (SNR) G1.9+0.3, produced by a (likely) Type Ia SN that exploded around CE 1900, is strongly asymmetric at radio wavelengths but exhibits a bilaterally symmetric morphology in X-rays. It has been difficult to understand the origin of these contrasting morphologies. We present results of X-ray expansion measurements of G1.9+0.3 that illuminate the origin of the radio asymmetry. These measurements are based on comparing recent (2015), 400 ks-long Chandra observations with earlier Chandra observations that include 1 Ms-long 2011 observations. The mean expansion rate from 2011 to 2015 is 0.58% yr-1, in agreement with previous measurements. We also confirm that expansion decreases radially away from the remnant's center along the major E-W axis, from 0.77% yr-1 to 0.53% yr-1. Large variations in expansion are also present along the minor N-S axis. Expansion of the faint S rim and the outermost faint N rim is comparable to the mean expansion. But the prominent X-ray rim in the N, coincident with the outer edge of the bright radio rim that marks the primary blast wave there, is expanding more slowly. Its expansion relative to the S rim is only 0.47% yr-1. At 8.5 kpc, this corresponds to a speed of about 5000 km/s, less than half of the overall blast wave speed of 12,000 km/s. Such strong deceleration of the northern blast wave most likely arises from the collision of SN ejecta with a much denser than average ambient medium there. The presence of the asymmetric ambient medium naturally explains the radio asymmetry. The SN ejecta have also been strongly decelerated in the N, but they expand faster than the blast wave. In several locations, significant morphological changes and strongly nonradial motions are apparent. The spatially-integrated X-ray flux continues to increase with time. As with Kepler's SN - the most recent historical SN in the Galaxy - the SN ejecta are likely colliding with the asymmetric circumstellar medium (CSM

  12. The Absence of Radio Emission from the Globular Cluster G1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrobel, J. M.; Miller-Jones, J. C. A.; Heinke, C. O.; Sivakoff, G. R.; Miller, R. E.; Di Stefano, R.; Kong, A. K. H.; Greene, J. E.; Ho, L. C.

    2012-01-01

    The globular cluster G1 in M31 has been suggested as a good candidate to host an intermediate-mass black hole. An excess of dark mass at the cluster center was inferred from studies of the stellar dynamics, and the subsequent detection of both X-ray and radio emission from positions consistent with the cluster core suggested the presence of an accreting black hole. From the ratio of radio to X-ray luminosities, the black hole mass was believed to fall in the range 500-19,000 solar masses, although a variable stellar-mass X-ray binary could not be ruled out owing to the non-simultaneity of the radio and X-ray observations. We therefore made strictly-simultaneous observations in 2011 with Chandra and the Expanded Very Large Array (EVLA) to determine the ratio of radio to X-ray luminosities. The EVLA was in its A configuration, providing a FWHM resolution of 0.4 arcsec near 6 GHz. While the X-ray emission was consistent with the previously-reported level of about 2x1036 ergs/s (2-10 keV), no radio emission was detected from the cluster to a 5-sigma upper limit of 8 microJy/beam, about 3.5 times lower than the previously-reported radio detection in 2006. We discuss two possible explanations for the dramatic radio non-detection, namely that the radio source in G1 is time-variable, or that the previous 4.5-sigma source was an artifact, possibly caused by the mix of VLA and EVLA electronics in use in 2006. Although our simultaneous measurements in 2011 can constrain the mass of a central black hole through the empirical radio--X-ray--mass relation for accreting systems, the simplest explanation is that the X-ray emission from G1 arises from a low-mass X-ray binary. The NRAO is a facility of the NSF operated under cooperative agreement by AUI.

  13. Linear models of ovine IgG1 and IgG2 subclasses and predicted pepsin cleavage sites.

    PubMed

    Jones, Russell G A; Martino, Angela

    2016-01-05

    Highly purified specific Fab antibody fragments derived from sheep have a long history of therapeutic use as safe and effective emergency medicines. In more recent years simple low-cost methods have been developed, which take advantage of the ability of pepsin under optimally controlled conditions to preferentially digest ovine IgG within the Fc region to produce F(ab')2 and easy to remove low MW Fc sub-fragments. Despite these developments no information is currently available on the pepsin digestion of ovine IgG at the amino acid level hindering the development of improved F(ab')2 processing methods. To gain knowledge of the fragments properties we have constructed linear models of ovine IgG1 and IgG2 subclasses, starting from the gamma-1 and gamma-2 chain amino acid sequences, which also incorporate the inter- and intra-chain disulphide bonds. Any potential pepsin cleavage site was initially predicted in silico, then high probability points identified for each of the molecules and mapped onto the individual models. A theoretical order of digestion was subsequently constructed, which appeared to agree with the experimental data, suggesting an accurate prediction model for ovine IgG1 and IgG2 subclasses. These findings lay the foundations for a more detailed analysis of pepsin cleavage fragments in the future. Additionally, the F(ab')2 generated following pepsin digestion were predicted to contain subclass unique C-terminal octapeptide neoepitopes, despite the high 89% sequence identity of the intact gamma-1 and gamma-2 chain constant regions. These neoepitopes have the potential to be utilised for identification purposes once confirmed experimentally.

  14. Histone Deacetylase 3 Coordinates Deacetylase-independent Epigenetic Silencing of Transforming Growth Factor-β1 (TGF-β1) to Orchestrate Second Heart Field Development*

    PubMed Central

    Lewandowski, Sara L.; Janardhan, Harish P.; Trivedi, Chinmay M.

    2015-01-01

    About two-thirds of human congenital heart disease involves second heart field-derived structures. Histone-modifying enzymes, histone deacetylases (HDACs), regulate the epigenome; however, their functions within the second heart field remain elusive. Here we demonstrate that histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3) orchestrates epigenetic silencing of Tgf-β1, a causative factor in congenital heart disease pathogenesis, in a deacetylase-independent manner to regulate development of second heart field-derived structures. In murine embryos lacking HDAC3 in the second heart field, increased TGF-β1 bioavailability is associated with ascending aortic dilatation, outflow tract malrotation, overriding aorta, double outlet right ventricle, aberrant semilunar valve development, bicuspid aortic valve, ventricular septal defects, and embryonic lethality. Activation of TGF-β signaling causes aberrant endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition and altered extracellular matrix homeostasis in HDAC3-null outflow tracts and semilunar valves, and pharmacological inhibition of TGF-β rescues these defects. HDAC3 recruits components of the PRC2 complex, methyltransferase EZH2, EED, and SUZ12, to the NCOR complex to enrich trimethylation of Lys-27 on histone H3 at the Tgf-β1 regulatory region and thereby maintains epigenetic silencing of Tgf-β1 specifically within the second heart field-derived mesenchyme. Wild-type HDAC3 or catalytically inactive HDAC3 expression rescues aberrant endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition and epigenetic silencing of Tgf-β1 in HDAC3-null outflow tracts and semilunar valves. These findings reveal that epigenetic dysregulation within the second heart field is a predisposing factor for congenital heart disease. PMID:26420484

  15. Histone Deacetylase 3 Coordinates Deacetylase-independent Epigenetic Silencing of Transforming Growth Factor-β1 (TGF-β1) to Orchestrate Second Heart Field Development.

    PubMed

    Lewandowski, Sara L; Janardhan, Harish P; Trivedi, Chinmay M

    2015-11-06

    About two-thirds of human congenital heart disease involves second heart field-derived structures. Histone-modifying enzymes, histone deacetylases (HDACs), regulate the epigenome; however, their functions within the second heart field remain elusive. Here we demonstrate that histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3) orchestrates epigenetic silencing of Tgf-β1, a causative factor in congenital heart disease pathogenesis, in a deacetylase-independent manner to regulate development of second heart field-derived structures. In murine embryos lacking HDAC3 in the second heart field, increased TGF-β1 bioavailability is associated with ascending aortic dilatation, outflow tract malrotation, overriding aorta, double outlet right ventricle, aberrant semilunar valve development, bicuspid aortic valve, ventricular septal defects, and embryonic lethality. Activation of TGF-β signaling causes aberrant endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition and altered extracellular matrix homeostasis in HDAC3-null outflow tracts and semilunar valves, and pharmacological inhibition of TGF-β rescues these defects. HDAC3 recruits components of the PRC2 complex, methyltransferase EZH2, EED, and SUZ12, to the NCOR complex to enrich trimethylation of Lys-27 on histone H3 at the Tgf-β1 regulatory region and thereby maintains epigenetic silencing of Tgf-β1 specifically within the second heart field-derived mesenchyme. Wild-type HDAC3 or catalytically inactive HDAC3 expression rescues aberrant endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition and epigenetic silencing of Tgf-β1 in HDAC3-null outflow tracts and semilunar valves. These findings reveal that epigenetic dysregulation within the second heart field is a predisposing factor for congenital heart disease.

  16. Birth of Archaeal Cells: Molecular Phylogenetic Analyses of G1P Dehydrogenase, G3P Dehydrogenases, and Glycerol Kinase Suggest Derived Features of Archaeal Membranes Having G1P Polar Lipids

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria and Eukarya have cell membranes with sn-glycerol-3-phosphate (G3P), whereas archaeal membranes contain sn-glycerol-1-phosphate (G1P). Determining the time at which cells with either G3P-lipid membranes or G1P-lipid membranes appeared is important for understanding the early evolution of terrestrial life. To clarify this issue, we reconstructed molecular phylogenetic trees of G1PDH (G1P dehydrogenase; EgsA/AraM) which is responsible for G1P synthesis and G3PDHs (G3P dehydrogenase; GpsA and GlpA/GlpD) and glycerol kinase (GlpK) which is responsible for G3P synthesis. Together with the distribution of these protein-encoding genes among archaeal and bacterial groups, our phylogenetic analyses suggested that GlpA/GlpD in the Commonote (the last universal common ancestor of all extant life with a cellular form, Commonote commonote) acquired EgsA (G1PDH) from the archaeal common ancestor (Commonote archaea) and acquired GpsA and GlpK from a bacterial common ancestor (Commonote bacteria). In our scenario based on this study, the Commonote probably possessed a G3P-lipid membrane synthesized enzymatically, after which the archaeal lineage acquired G1PDH followed by the replacement of a G3P-lipid membrane with a G1P-lipid membrane. PMID:27774041

  17. A close-look to the photoionisation mechanisms in ESO138-G1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinucci, Andrea

    2011-10-01

    We propose a 120 ks observation of ESO138-G1 to exploit the full range of XMM-Newton capabilities by studying the properties of the different materials found in the nucleus of this object. It is one of the brightest Compton thick AGN, thus being one of the few sources which presently permit this kind of analysis. The proposed 120 ks EPIC spectrum will allow us to analyse in detail the properties of the obscuring torus. On the other hand, the RGS high resolution spectrum will allow us to take advantage of several diagnostic tools to understand the nature of the soft X-ray spectrum. The comparison with the other few bright Compton-thick Seyfert 2s will permit to search for differencies and commonalities in the physical properties of their circumnuclear environments.

  18. Nuclear vasohibin-2 promotes cell proliferation by inducing G0/G1 to S phase progression.

    PubMed

    Ge, Qianqian; Zhou, Jia; Tu, Min; Xue, Xiaofeng; Li, Zhanjun; Lu, Zipeng; Wei, Jishu; Song, Guoxin; Chen, Jianmin; Guo, Feng; Jiang, Kuirong; Miao, Yi; Gao, Wentao

    2015-09-01

    As a member of the vasohibin (VASH2) family, VASH2 is localized intracellularly as a nuclear and cytoplasmic type. Cytoplasmic VASH2 is associated with carcinoma angiogenesis and malignant transformation and promotes cancer growth. However, the function of nuclear VASH2 has yet to be investigated. The aim of the present study was to detect the nuclear VASH2 expression profile in human organs and tissues by protein microarray technique. To examine the function of nuclear VASH2, we analyzed the relationship between nuclear VASH2 and Ki-67, and stably constructed VASH2 overexpression and knockdown in LO2 and HepG2 cell lines, based on a previous study in hepatic cells. The study was conducted using bromodeoxyuridine, immunofluorescent staining, western blot analysis and flow cytometry. Nuclear VASH2 was highly expressed in actively dividing cells in normal and cancer tissues. There was a significant positive correlation between nuclear VASH2 and Ki-67, indicating that nuclear VASH2 positively correlated with cell proliferation in normal and cancer tissues. The bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) proliferation test showed that nuclear VASH2 increased the S-phase population and promoted cell proliferation, while VASH2 knockdown reduced BrdU absorbance. Cell cycle analysis revealed that nuclear VASH2 overexpression increased the S-phase population in LO2 and HepG2 cells, while nuclear VASH2 knockdown reduced the S-phase population and increased the G0/G1 population. The findings of this study challenge the classic view of VASH2, which was previously reported as an angiogenesis factor. Furthermore, to the best of our knowledge, these results are the first clinical data indicating that nuclear VASH2, but not cytoplasmic VASH2, promotes cell proliferation by driving the cell cycle from the G0/G1 to S phase.

  19. Preliminary stratigraphic and petrologic characterization of core samples from USW-G1, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Waters, A.C.; Carroll, P.R.

    1981-11-01

    Tuffs of the Nevada Test Site are currently under investigation to determine their potential for long-term storage of radioactive waste. As part of this program, hole USW-G1 was drilled to a depth of 6000 ft below the surface, in the central part of the Yucca Mountain area, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. Petrographic study of the USW-G1 core is presented in this report and shows the tuffs (which generally were variably welded ash flows) are partly recrystallized to a variety of secondary minerals. The important alteration products are zeolites (heulandite, clinoptilolite, mordenite and analcime), smectite clays with minor interstratified illite, albite, micas, potassium feldspar, and various forms of silica. Iijima`s zeolite zones I through IV of burial metamorphism can be recognized in the core. Zeolites are first observed at about the 1300-ft depth, and the high-temperature boundary of zeolite stability in this core occurs at about 4350 ft. Analcime persists, either metastably or as a retrograde mineral, deeper in the core. The oxidation state of Fe-Ti oxide minerals, through most of the core, increases as the degree of welding decreases, but towards the bottom of the hole, reducing conditions generally prevail. Four stratigraphic units transected by the core may be potentially favorable sites for a waste repository. These four units, in order of increasing depth in the core, are (1) the lower cooling unit of the Topopah Spring Member, (2) cooling unit II of the Bullfrog Member, (3) the upper part of the Tram tuff, and (4) the Lithic-rich tuff.

  20. Supernova Ejecta in the Youngest Galactic Supernova Remnant G1.9+0.3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Reynolds, Stephen P.; Hwang, Una; Green, David A.; Petre, Robert; Krishnamurthy, Kalyani; Willett, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    G1.9+0.3 is the youngest known Galactic supernova remnant (SNR), with an estimated supernova (SN) explosion date of approximately 1900, and most likely located near the Galactic Center. Only the outermost ejecta layers with free-expansion velocities (is) approximately greater than 18,000 km s-1 have been shocked so far in this dynamically young, likely Type Ia SNR. A long (980 ks) Chandra observation in 2011 allowed spatially-resolved spectroscopy of heavy-element ejecta. We denoised Chandra data with the spatio-spectral method of Krishnamurthy et al., and used a wavelet based technique to spatially localize thermal emission produced by intermediate-mass elements (IMEs: Si and S) and iron. The spatial distribution of both IMEs and Fe is extremely asymmetric, with the strongest ejecta emission in the northern rim. Fe K alpha emission is particularly prominent there, and fits with thermal models indicate strongly oversolar Fe abundances. In a localized, outlying region in the northern rim, IMEs are less abundant than Fe, indicating that undiluted Fe-group elements (including 56Ni) with velocities greater than 18,000 km s-1 were ejected by this SN. But in the inner west rim, we find Si- and S-rich ejecta without any traces of Fe, so high-velocity products of O-burning were also ejected. G1.9+0.3 appears similar to energetic Type Ia SNe such as SN 2010jn where iron-group elements at such high free-expansion velocities have been recently detected. The pronounced asymmetry in the ejecta distribution and abundance inhomogeneities are best explained by a strongly asymmetric SN explosion, similar to those produced in some recent 3D delayed-detonation Type Ia models.

  1. The impact of geoengineering on vegetation in experiment G1 of the GeoMIP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glienke, Susanne; Irvine, Peter J.; Lawrence, Mark G.

    2015-10-01

    Solar Radiation Management (SRM) has been proposed as a mean to partly counteract global warming. The Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP) has simulated the climate consequences of a number of SRM techniques. Thus far, the effects on vegetation have not yet been thoroughly analyzed. Here the vegetation response to the idealized GeoMIP G1 experiment from eight fully coupled Earth system models (ESMs) is analyzed, in which a reduction of the solar constant counterbalances the radiative effects of quadrupled atmospheric CO2 concentrations (abrupt4 × CO2). For most models and regions, changes in net primary productivity (NPP) are dominated by the increase in CO2, via the CO2 fertilization effect. As SRM will reduce temperatures relative to abrupt4 × CO2, in high latitudes this will offset increases in NPP. In low latitudes, this cooling relative to the abrupt4 × CO2 simulation decreases plant respiration while having little effect on gross primary productivity, thus increasing NPP. In Central America and the Mediterranean, generally dry regions which are expected to experience increased water stress with global warming, NPP is highest in the G1 experiment for all models due to the easing of water limitations from increased water use efficiency at high-CO2 concentrations and the reduced evaporative demand in a geoengineered climate. The largest differences in the vegetation response are between models with and without a nitrogen cycle, with a much smaller CO2 fertilization effect for the former. These results suggest that until key vegetation processes are integrated into ESM predictions, the vegetation response to SRM will remain highly uncertain.

  2. Phosphorylation-triggered CUEDC2 degradation promotes UV-induced G1 arrest through APC/C(Cdh1) regulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei-Na; Zhou, Jie; Zhou, Tao; Li, Ai-Ling; Wang, Na; Xu, Jin-Jing; Chang, Yan; Man, Jiang-Hong; Pan, Xin; Li, Tao; Li, Wei-Hua; Mu, Rui; Liang, Bing; Chen, Liang; Jin, Bao-Feng; Xia, Qing; Gong, Wei-Li; Zhang, Xue-Min; Wang, Li; Li, Hui-Yan

    2013-07-02

    DNA damage triggers cell cycle arrest to provide a time window for DNA repair. Failure of arrest could lead to genomic instability and tumorigenesis. DNA damage-induced G1 arrest is generally achieved by the accumulation of Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1 (p21). However, p21 is degraded and does not play a role in UV-induced G1 arrest. The mechanism of UV-induced G1 arrest thus remains elusive. Here, we have identified a critical role for CUE domain-containing protein 2 (CUEDC2) in this process. CUEDC2 binds to and inhibits anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome-Cdh1 (APC/C(Cdh1)), a critical ubiquitin ligase in G1 phase, thereby stabilizing Cyclin A and promoting G1-S transition. In response to UV irradiation, CUEDC2 undergoes ERK1/2-dependent phosphorylation and ubiquitin-dependent degradation, leading to APC/C(Cdh1)-mediated Cyclin A destruction, Cyclin-dependent kinase 2 inactivation, and G1 arrest. A nonphosphorylatable CUEDC2 mutant is resistant to UV-induced degradation. Expression of this stable mutant effectively overrides UV-induced G1-S block. These results establish CUEDC2 as an APC/C(Cdh1) inhibitor and indicate that regulated CUEDC2 degradation is critical for UV-induced G1 arrest.

  3. Histone deacetylases: salesmen and customers in the post-translational modification market.

    PubMed

    Brandl, André; Heinzel, Thorsten; Krämer, Oliver H

    2009-04-01

    HDACs (histone deacetylases) are enzymes that remove the acetyl moiety from N-epsilon-acetylated lysine residues in histones and non-histone proteins. In recent years, it has turned out that HDACs themselves are also subject to post-translational modification. Such structural alterations can determine the stability, localization, activity and protein-protein interactions of HDACs. This subsequently affects the modification of their substrates and the co-ordination of cellular signalling networks. Intriguingly, physiologically relevant non-histone proteins are increasingly found to be deacetylated by HDACs, and aberrant deacetylase activity contributes to several severe human diseases. Targeting the catalytic activity of these enzymes and their post-translational modifications are therefore attractive targets for therapeutical intervention strategies. To achieve this ambitious goal, details on the molecular mechanisms regulating post-translational modifications of HDACs are required. This review summarizes aspects of the current knowledge on the biological role and enzymology of the phosphorylation, acetylation, ubiquitylation and sumoylation of HDACs.

  4. Structure-based analysis of domain function of chitin oligosaccharide deacetylase from Vibrio parahaemolyticus.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Takako; Sugiyama, Kanako; Sakaki, Yuta; Hakamata, Wataru; Park, Sam-Yong; Nishio, Toshiyuki

    2015-01-02

    The X-ray crystal structure of chitin oligosaccharide deacetylase from Vibrio parahaemolyticus (Vp-COD) was determined at an 1.35 Å resolution. The amino acid sequence and structure of Vp-COD show that the enzyme comprises one polysaccharide deacetylase domain (PDD) and two carbohydrate-binding domains (CBDs). On the basis of a chitin-binding assay with Vp-COD and its CBDs-deleted mutant, it was confirmed that CBDs can adhere to chitin. The catalytic activity of the CBDs-deleted mutant was only mildly depressed compared with that of Vp-COD, indicating that CBDs are unlikely to affect the configuration of the active center residues in active site of PDD.

  5. Synthesis and high expression of chitin deacetylase from Colletotrichum lindemuthianum in Pichia pastoris GS115.

    PubMed

    Kang, Lixin; Chen, Xiaomei; Zhai, Chao; Ma, Lixin

    2012-09-01

    A gene, ClCDA, encoding chitin deacetylase from Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, was optimized according to the codon usage bias of Pichia pastoris and synthesized in vitro by overlap extension PCR. It was secretorily expressed in P. pastoris GS115 using the constitutive expression vector pHMB905A. The expression level reached the highest with 110 mg/l culture supernatant after 72 h of methanol induction, which comprised 77.27 U/mg chitin deacetylase activity. SDS-PAGE, mass spectrometry, and deglycosylation assays demonstrated that partial recombinant protein was glycosylated with an apparent molecular mass of 33 kDa. The amino acid sequences of recombinant proteins were confirmed by mass spectrometry.

  6. Bioconversion to chitosan: a two stage process employing chitin deacetylase from Penicillium oxalicum SAEM-51.

    PubMed

    Pareek, Nidhi; Vivekanand, V; Agarwal, Pragati; Saroj, Samta; Singh, Rajesh P

    2013-07-25

    Chitin deacetylase from Penicillium oxalicum SAEM-51 was evaluated for bioconversion of chitin to chitosan in a two stage chemical and enzymatic process. Variations in morphology, crystallinity and thermal properties following chemical treatment were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetric analysis. Degree of deacetylation of the substrates was determined using FT-IR and elemental analysis. The pretreatment of substrate led to the decrease in crystallinity and formation of amorphous chitinous substrates to facilitate enzyme reaction. The treated chitin was further subjected to enzymatic deacetylation employing chitin deacetylase from P. oxalicum SAEM-51 to produce chitosan with considerably higher degree of deacetylation. Maximum deacetylation (79.52%) was achieved using superfine chitin, owing to its porous structure and low crystallinity. Further, derivation of reaction variables, i.e. substrate amount and enzyme dose through full-factorial central composite design led to enhanced degree of deacetylation with formation of 90% deacetylated chitosan.

  7. Structural Basis of Inhibition of the Human NAD+ -Dependent Deacetylase SIRT5 by Suramin

    SciTech Connect

    Schuetz,A.; Min, J.; Antoshenko, T.; Wang, C.; Allali-Hassani, A.; Dong, A.; Loppnau, P.; vedadi, M.; Bochkarev, A.; et al.

    2007-01-01

    Sirtuins are NAD+-dependent protein deacetylases and are emerging as molecular targets for the development of pharmaceuticals to treat human metabolic and neurological diseases and cancer. To date, several sirtuin inhibitors and activators have been identified, but the structural mechanisms of how these compounds modulate sirtuin activity have not yet been determined. We identified suramin as a compound that binds to human SIRT5 and showed that it inhibits SIRT5 NAD+-dependent deacetylase activity with an IC50 value of 22 {mu}M. To provide insights into how sirtuin function is altered by inhibitors, we determined two crystal structures of SIRT5, one in complex with ADP-ribose, the other bound to suramin. Our structural studies provide a view of a synthetic inhibitory compound in a sirtuin active site revealing that suramin binds into the NAD+, the product, and the substrate-binding site. Finally, our structures may enable the rational design of more potent inhibitors.

  8. SQSTM1/p62 interacts with HDAC6 and regulates deacetylase activity.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jin; Seibenhener, Michael Lamar; Calderilla-Barbosa, Luis; Diaz-Meco, Maria-Theresa; Moscat, Jorge; Jiang, Jianxiong; Wooten, Marie W; Wooten, Michael C

    2013-01-01

    Protein aggregates can form in the cytoplasm of the cell and are accumulated at aggresomes localized to the microtubule organizing center (MTOC) where they are subsequently degraded by autophagy. In this process, aggregates are engulfed into autophagosomes which subsequently fuse with lysosomes for protein degradation. A member of the class II histone deacetylase family, histone deacetylase 6(HDAC6) has been shown to be involved in both aggresome formation and the fusion of autophagosomes with lysosomes making it an attractive target to regulate protein aggregation. The scaffolding protein sequestosome 1(SQSTM1)/p62 has also been shown to regulate accumulation and autophagic clearance of protein aggregates. Recent studies have revealed colocalization of HDAC6 and p62 to ubiquitinated mitochondria, as well as, ubiquitinated protein aggregates associated with the E3 ubiquitin ligase TRIM50. HDAC6 deacetylase activity is required for aggresome formation and can be regulated by protein interaction with HDAC6. Due to their colocalization at ubiquitinated protein aggregates, we sought to examine if p62 specifically interacted with HDAC6 and if so, if this interaction had any effect on HDAC6 activity and/or the physiological function of cortactin-F-actin assembly. We succeeded in identifying and mapping the direct interaction between HDAC6 and p62. We further show that this interaction regulates HDAC6 deacetylase activity. Data are presented demonstrating that the absence of p62 results in hyperactivation of HDAC6 and deacetylation of α-tubulin and cortactin. Further, upon induction of protein misfolding we show that p62 is required for perinuclear co-localization of cortactin-F-actin assemblies. Thus, our findings indicate that p62 plays a key role in regulating the recruitment of F-actin network assemblies to the MTOC, a critical cellular function that is required for successful autophagic clearance of protein aggregates.

  9. Solid state fermentation production of chitin deacetylase by Colletotrichum lindemuthianum ATCC 56676 using different substrates.

    PubMed

    Suresh, P V; Sachindra, N M; Bhaskar, N

    2011-06-01

    Production of extracellular chitin deacetylase by Colletotrichum lindemuthianum ATCC 56676 under solid substrate fermentation was studied. The suitability of shrimp shell chitin waste (SSCW) and commercial wheat bran (CWB) was evaluated for maximal enzyme production. CWB medium (pH 6.4 ± 0.2) supplemented with chitosan favoured maximal chitin deacetylase yield of 460.4 ± 14.7 unit/g initial dry substrate (U/g IDS) at 96 h as compared to maximal yield of 392.0 ± 6.4 U/g IDS at 192 h in SSCW medium (pH 8.7 ± 0.2) at 25 °C incubation temperature and 60% (w/w) initial moisture content of medium. Along with chitin deacetylase, C. lindemuthianum ATCC 56676 produced maximum endo-chitinase (0.28 ± 0.03 U/g IDS at 144 h) and β-N-acetylhexosaminidase (0.79 ± 0.009 U/g IDS at 192 h) in CWB medium and 0.49 ± 0.05 U/g IDS of endo-chitinase at 264 h and 0.38 ± 0.04 U/g IDS of β-N-acetylhexosaminidase at 96 h of incubation in SSCW medium. SEM studies indicated the difference in the morphology of mycelia and hyphae of C. lindemuthianum ATCC 56676 when grown on different solid substrates. Production of chitin deacetylase by SSF is being reported for the first time.

  10. Life without post-transcriptional addition of G-1: two alternatives for tRNAHis identity in Eukarya.

    PubMed

    Rao, Bhalchandra S; Jackman, Jane E

    2015-02-01

    The identity of tRNA(His) is strongly associated with the presence of an additional 5'-guanosine residue (G-1) in all three domains of life. The critical nature of the G-1 residue is underscored by the fact that two entirely distinct mechanisms for its acquisition are observed, with cotranscriptional incorporation observed in Bacteria, while post-transcriptional addition of G-1 occurs in Eukarya. Here, through our investigation of eukaryotes that lack obvious homologs of the post-transcriptional G-1-addition enzyme Thg1, we identify alternative pathways to tRNA(His) identity that controvert these well-established rules. We demonstrate that Trypanosoma brucei, like Acanthamoeba castellanii, lacks the G-1 identity element on tRNA(His) and utilizes a noncanonical G-1-independent histidyl-tRNA synthetase (HisRS). Purified HisRS enzymes from A. castellanii and T. brucei exhibit a mechanism of tRNA(His) recognition that is distinct from canonical G-1-dependent synthetases. Moreover, noncanonical HisRS enzymes genetically complement the loss of THG1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, demonstrating the biological relevance of the G-1-independent aminoacylation activity. In contrast, in Caenorhabditis elegans, which is another Thg1-independent eukaryote, the G-1 residue is maintained, but here its acquisition is noncanonical. In this case, the G-1 is encoded and apparently retained after 5' end processing, which has so far only been observed in Bacteria and organelles. Collectively, these observations unearth a widespread and previously unappreciated diversity in eukaryotic tRNA(His) identity mechanisms.

  11. Characterization of an anti-Bla g 1 scFv: epitope mapping and cross-reactivity.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Geoffrey A; Ankney, John A; Glesner, Jill; Khurana, Taruna; Edwards, Lori L; Pedersen, Lars C; Perera, Lalith; Slater, Jay E; Pomés, Anna; London, Robert E

    2014-06-01

    Bla g 1 is a major allergen from Blatella germanica and one of the primary allergens used to assess cockroach allergen exposure. The epitope of an anti-Bla g 1 scFv was mapped in order to better understand cross reactivity with other group 1 cockroach allergens and patient IgE epitopes. X-ray crystallography was used to determine the structure of the scFv. The scFv epitope on Bla g 1 was located by alanine scanning site-directed mutagenesis and ELISA. Twenty-six rBla g 1-GST alanine mutants were evaluated for variations in binding to the scFv compared to the wild type allergen. Six mutants showed a significant difference in scFv binding affinity. These mutations clustered to form a discontinuous epitope mainly comprising two helices of Bla g 1. The allergen-scFv complex was modeled based on the results, and the epitope region was found to have low sequence similarity with Per a 1, especially among the residues identified as functionally important for the scFv binding to Bla g 1. Indeed, the scFv failed to bind Per a 1 in American cockroach extract. The scFv was unable to inhibit the binding of IgE antibodies from a highly cockroach allergic patient to Bla g 1. Based on the surface area of Bla g 1 occluded by the scFv, putative regions of patient IgE-Bla g 1 interactions can be inferred. This scFv could be best utilized as a capture antibody in an IgE detection ELISA, or to differentiate Bla g 1 from Per a 1 in environmental exposure assays.

  12. IgG1 antibodies to acetylcholine receptors in ‘seronegative’ myasthenia gravis†

    PubMed Central

    Leite, Maria Isabel; Jacob, Saiju; Viegas, Stuart; Cossins, Judy; Clover, Linda; Morgan, B. Paul; Beeson, David; Willcox, Nick

    2008-01-01

    Only around 80% of patients with generalized myasthenia gravis (MG) have serum antibodies to acetylcholine receptor [AChR; acetylcholine receptor antibody positive myasthenia gravis (AChR-MG)] by the radioimmunoprecipitation assay used worldwide. Antibodies to muscle specific kinase [MuSK; MuSK antibody positive myasthenia gravis (MuSK-MG)] make up a variable proportion of the remaining 20%. The patients with neither AChR nor MuSK antibodies are often called seronegative (seronegative MG, SNMG). There is accumulating evidence that SNMG patients are similar to AChR-MG in clinical features and thymic pathology. We hypothesized that SNMG patients have low-affinity antibodies to AChR that cannot be detected in solution phase assays, but would be detected by binding to the AChRs on the cell membrane, particularly if they were clustered at the high density that is found at the neuromuscular junction. We expressed recombinant AChR subunits with the clustering protein, rapsyn, in human embryonic kidney cells and tested for binding of antibodies by immunofluorescence. To identify AChRs, we tagged either AChR or rapsyn with enhanced green fluorescence protein, and visualized human antibodies with Alexa Fluor-labelled secondary or tertiary antibodies, or by fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS). We correlated the results with the thymic pathology where available. We detected AChR antibodies to rapsyn-clustered AChR in 66% (25/38) of sera previously negative for binding to AChR in solution and confirmed the results with FACS. The antibodies were mainly IgG1 subclass and showed ability to activate complement. In addition, there was a correlation between serum binding to clustered AChR and complement deposition on myoid cells in patients’ thymus tissue. A similar approach was used to demonstrate that MuSK antibodies, although mainly IgG4, were partially IgG1 subclass and capable of activating complement when bound to MuSK on the cell surface. These observations throw new

  13. Thermodynamics of ligand binding to histone deacetylase like amidohydrolase from Bordetella/Alcaligenes.

    PubMed

    Meyners, Christian; Baud, Matthias G J; Fuchter, Matthew J; Meyer-Almes, Franz-Josef

    2014-03-01

    Thermodynamic studies on ligand-protein binding have become increasingly important in the process of drug design. In combination with structural data and molecular dynamics simulations, thermodynamic studies provide relevant information about the mode of interaction between compounds and their target proteins and therefore build a sound basis for further drug optimization. Using the example of histone deacetylases (HDACs), particularly the histone deacetylase like amidohydrolase (HDAH) from Bordetella/Alcaligenes, a novel sensitive competitive fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based binding assay was developed and the thermodynamics of interaction of both fluorescent ligands and inhibitors to histone deacetylase like amidohydrolase were investigated. The assay consumes only small amounts of valuable target proteins and is suitable for fast kinetic and mechanistic studies as well as high throughput screening applications. Binding affinity increased with increasing length of aliphatic spacers (n = 4-7) between the hydroxamate moiety and the dansyl head group of ligand probes. Van't Hoff plots revealed an optimum in enthalpy contribution to the free energy of binding for the dansyl-ligand with hexyl spacer. The selectivity in the series of dansyl-ligands against human class I HDAC1 but not class II HDACs 4 and 6 increased with the ratio of ΔH(0)/ΔG(0). The data clearly emphasize the importance of thermodynamic signatures as useful general guidance for the optimization of ligands or rational drug design.

  14. Evaluation of histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) as therapeutic leads for human African trypanosomiasis (HAT).

    PubMed

    Carrillo, Angela K; Guiguemde, W Armand; Guy, R Kiplin

    2015-08-15

    Two of the histone deacetylases, TbDAC1 and TbDAC3, have been reported to be essential genes in trypanosomes. Therefore, we tested the activity of a panel of human histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) for their ability to block proliferation of Trypanosoma brucei brucei. Among the HDACi's, the hydroxamic acid derivatives panobinostat and belinostat exhibited potency that appeared to make them viable candidates for development due to their reported pharmacokinetic characteristics. However, cellular pharmacodynamic analysis demonstrated that these drugs were unable to kill cultured parasites at exposures seen in patients at their tolerated doses and additionally failed to show any synergistic effects in combination with pentamidine, suramin, melarsoprol, or nifurtimox. Analysis of the potency of the entire HDACi panel revealed no correlations between potency against any human HDAC isoform and inhibition of T. brucei proliferation, suggesting that the trypanosome histone deacetylases possess a unique specificity. These studies confirmed that HDAC inhibitors have potential as leads against human African trypanosomiasis but that none of the current clinical candidates can be directly repurposed. Therefore, development of HDACi's with appropriate specificity and potency may be a viable route to a new class of anti-trypanosomal drugs.

  15. Search for the Pharmacophore of Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors Using Pharmacophore Query and Docking Study

    PubMed Central

    Haji Agha Bozorgi, Atefeh; Zarghi, Afshin

    2014-01-01

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors have gained a great deal of attention recently for the treatment of cancers and inflammatory diseases. So design of new inhibitors is of great importance in pharmaceutical industries and labs. Creating pharmacophor models in order to design new molecules or search a library for finding lead compounds is of great interest. This approach reduces the overall cost associated with the discovery and development of a new drug. Here we elaborated an exact pharmacophore model for histone deacetylase inhibitors by using pharmacophore query and docking study. The data set used for the modelling exercise comprised of 383 molecules collated from the original literature. These molecules were used to crating the model and docking study was held with Zolinza, the recently FDA approved drug as potent histone deacetylase inhibitor. Our model consists of 5 features: Hydrogen bond donors, Hydrogen bond acceptors, H-bond donor/acceptors, Aromatic ring centers, and hydrophobic centers. With the aid of this pharmacophore model and docking result, 3D searches in large databases can be performed, leading to a significant enrichment of active analogs. PMID:25587304

  16. CHD4 Is a Peripheral Component of the Nucleosome Remodeling and Deacetylase Complex.

    PubMed

    Low, Jason K K; Webb, Sarah R; Silva, Ana P G; Saathoff, Hinnerk; Ryan, Daniel P; Torrado, Mario; Brofelth, Mattias; Parker, Benjamin L; Shepherd, Nicholas E; Mackay, Joel P

    2016-07-22

    Chromatin remodeling enzymes act to dynamically regulate gene accessibility. In many cases, these enzymes function as large multicomponent complexes that in general comprise a central ATP-dependent Snf2 family helicase that is decorated with a variable number of regulatory subunits. The nucleosome remodeling and deacetylase (NuRD) complex, which is essential for normal development in higher organisms, is one such macromolecular machine. The NuRD complex comprises ∼10 subunits, including the histone deacetylases 1 and 2 (HDAC1 and HDAC2), and is defined by the presence of a CHD family remodeling enzyme, most commonly CHD4 (chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 4). The existing paradigm holds that CHD4 acts as the central hub upon which the complex is built. We show here that this paradigm does not, in fact, hold and that CHD4 is a peripheral component of the NuRD complex. A complex lacking CHD4 that has HDAC activity can exist as a stable species. The addition of recombinant CHD4 to this nucleosome deacetylase complex reconstitutes a NuRD complex with nucleosome remodeling activity. These data contribute to our understanding of the architecture of the NuRD complex.

  17. Therapeutic Effect of Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor, Sodium Butyrate, on Allergic Rhinitis In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie; Wen, Liting; Wang, Ye; Chen, Fuquan

    2016-04-01

    Despite the well-documented therapeutic effects of histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) on various diseases, including arthritis and asthma, the therapeutic effect of HDACi on allergic rhinitis remains unmentioned in the literature. This study investigated the therapeutic effect of sodium butyrate (SoB), a form of HDACi, on mice with allergic rhinitis. The results showed that the expression levels of histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1), histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3), and thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) were significantly upregulated in mice with allergic rhinitis, whereas H3 acetylation at lysine 9 (H3AcK9) was decreased. The intranasal application of SoB inhibited the expression levels of TSLP levels and upregulated the expression of H3AcK9 in a mouse model of allergic rhinitis. Furthermore, SoB treatment significantly decreased the increased levels of ovalbumin-specific IgE and improved clinical symptoms and nasal mucosa epithelial morphology in the mouse model of allergic rhinitis. In addition, we further demonstrated that SoB treatment significantly increased the serum levels of IL-2 and IFN-γ and decreased the serum levels of IL-4 and IL-10, correcting the Th1/Th2 imbalance in the mouse model of allergic rhinitis. Taken together, our study suggests that SoB has the potential to treat allergic rhinitis.

  18. cda1+, encoding chitin deacetylase is required for proper spore formation in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Yasuhiro; Tanaka, Katsunori; Matsuda, Hideyuki; Kawamukai, Makoto

    2005-05-09

    In Schizosaccharomyces pombe, a major role of chitin is to build up a complete spore. Here, we analyzed the cda1(+) gene (SPAC19G12.03), which encodes a protein homologous to chitin deacetylases, to know whether it is required for spore formation in S. pombe. The homothallic Deltacda1 strain constructed by homologous recombination was found to form a little amount of abnormal spores that contained one, two, or three asci, similar to (but not as strong as) the phenotype observed in a deletion mutant of chs1 encoding chitin synthase 1. This phenotype is reversed by expression of S. cerevisiae chitin deacetylase CDA1 or CDA2, suggesting that cda1 encodes a chitin deacetylase. To support the role of Cda1 in sporulation, the timing of expression of cda1(+) mRNA increased during sporulation process. We also found that the Cda1 protein self-associated when its binding was tested both by two-hybrid system and immunoprecipitation. Thus, these data indicated that cda1(+) is required for proper spore formation in S. pombe.

  19. Expression of chitin deacetylase from Colletotrichum lindemuthianum in Pichia pastoris: purification and characterization.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Binesh; Blondeau, Karine; Stevens, Willem F; Hegarat, Françoise L

    2004-12-01

    The chitin deacetylase gene from Colletotrichum lindemuthianum UPS9 was isolated and cloned in Pichia pastoris as a tagged protein with six added terminal histidine residues. The expressed enzyme was recovered from the culture supernatant and further characterized. A single-step purification based on specific binding of the histidine residues was achieved. The purified enzyme has a molecular mass of 25 kDa and is not glycosylated as determined by mass spectrometry. The activity of the recombinant chitin deacetylase on chitinous substrates was investigated. With chitotetraose as substrate, the optimum temperature and pH for enzyme activity are 60 degrees C and 8.0, respectively. The specific activity of the pure protein is 72 U/mg. One unit of enzyme activity is defined as the amount of enzyme that produces 1 micromol of acetate per minute under the assay conditions employed. The enzyme activity is enhanced in the presence of Co2+ ions. A possible use of the recombinant chitin deacetylase for large-scale biocatalytic conversion of chitin to chitosan is discussed.

  20. Expression, refolding, and purification of active diacetylchitobiose deacetylase from Pyrococcus horikoshii.

    PubMed

    Mine, Shouhei; Ikegami, Takahisa; Kawasaki, Kazunori; Nakamura, Tsutomu; Uegaki, Koichi

    2012-08-01

    A chitinase from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus degrades chitin to produce diacetylchitobiose [(GlcNAc)(2)] as the end product. To further investigate the degradation mechanism of (GlcNAc)(2) in Pyrococcus spp., we cloned the gene of PH0499 from Pyrococcus horikoshii, which encodes a protein homologous to the diacetylchitobiose deacetylase of Thermococcus kodakaraensis. The deacetylase (Ph-Dac) was overexpressed as inclusion bodies in Escherichia coli Rosetta (DE3) pLys. The insoluble inclusion body was solubilized and reactivated through a refolding procedure. After several purification steps, 40 mg of soluble, thermostable (up to 80°C) Ph-Dac was obtained from 1L of culture. The apparent molecular mass of the refolded Ph-Dac was 180 kDa, indicating Ph-Dac to be a homohexamer. The refolded Ph-Dac also exhibited deacetylase activity toward (GlcNAc)(2), and the deacetylation site was revealed to be specific to the nonreducing end residue of (GlcNAc)(2). These expression and purification systems are useful for further characterization of Ph-Dac.

  1. Expression studies of Bacillus licheniformis chitin deacetylase in E. coli Rosetta cells.

    PubMed

    Raval, Ritu; Simsa, Robin; Raval, Keyur

    2017-02-20

    Chitin, the biopolymer of the N-acetylglucosamine, is the most abundant biopolymer on the planet after cellulose. However owing to its crystalline nature, its deacetylated derivative; chitosan is industrially more potent. This conversion on an enzymatic scale can be made using chitin deacetylase. The metagenomics library constructed from the soil exposed to chitin and chitosan yielded chitin modifying enzymes, one of them being chitin deacetylase (CDA) utilized for the present study. The gene was amplified and expressed using the pET 22b vector in E. coli Rosetta cells. The effect of two additives; chitin and glycerol on the CDA activity were studied. The inclusion of glycerol in the medium improved the biomass by 50% from the initial value of 1.25g/l to 2.5g/l. The activity of CDA increased from 90μmol/min/ml to 343μmol/min/ml. The CDA activity reported in the present paper is the highest observed for any strain. The addition of glycerol to the media not only helped improve the yield of the chitin deacetylase but also imparted value addition to the waste of the biofuel industry.

  2. Mice lacking histone deacetylase 6 have hyperacetylated tubulin but are viable and develop normally.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Kwon, Sohee; Yamaguchi, Teppei; Cubizolles, Fabien; Rousseaux, Sophie; Kneissel, Michaela; Cao, Chun; Li, Na; Cheng, Hwei-Ling; Chua, Katrin; Lombard, David; Mizeracki, Adam; Matthias, Gabriele; Alt, Frederick W; Khochbin, Saadi; Matthias, Patrick

    2008-03-01

    Posttranslational modifications play important roles in regulating protein structure and function. Histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) is a mostly cytoplasmic class II HDAC, which has a unique structure with two catalytic domains and a domain binding ubiquitin with high affinity. This enzyme was recently identified as a multisubstrate protein deacetylase that can act on acetylated histone tails, alpha-tubulin and Hsp90. To investigate the in vivo functions of HDAC6 and the relevance of tubulin acetylation/deacetylation, we targeted the HDAC6 gene by homologous recombination in embryonic stem cells and generated knockout mice. HDAC6-deficient mice are viable and fertile and show hyperacetylated tubulin in most tissues. The highest level of expression of HDAC6 is seen in the testis, yet development and function of this organ are normal in the absence of HDAC6. Likewise, lymphoid development is normal, but the immune response is moderately affected. Furthermore, the lack of HDAC6 results in a small increase in cancellous bone mineral density, indicating that this deacetylase plays a minor role in bone biology. HDAC6-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts show apparently normal microtubule organization and stability and also show increased Hsp90 acetylation correlating with impaired Hsp90 function. Collectively, these data demonstrate that mice survive well without HDAC6 and that tubulin hyperacetylation is not detrimental to normal mammalian development.

  3. Inhibition of Plasmodium falciparum proliferation in vitro by double-stranded RNA directed against malaria histone deacetylase

    SciTech Connect

    Sriwilaijaroen, N.; Boonma, S.; Attasart, P.; Pothikasikorn, J.; Panyim, S.; Noonpakdee, W.

    2009-04-03

    Acetylation and deacetylation of histones play important roles in transcription regulation, cell cycle progression and development events. The steady state status of histone acetylation is controlled by a dynamic equilibrium between competing histone acetylase and deacetylase (HDAC). We have used long PfHDAC-1 double-stranded (ds)RNA to interfere with its cognate mRNA expression and determined the effect on malaria parasite growth and development. Chloroquine- and pyrimethamine-resistant Plasmodium falciparum K1 strain was exposed to 1-25 {mu}g of dsRNA/ml of culture for 48 h and growth was determined by [{sup 3}H]-hypoxanthine incorporation and microscopic examination. Parasite culture treated with 10 {mu}g/ml pfHDAC-1 dsRNA exhibited 47% growth inhibition when compared with either untreated control or culture treated with an unrelated dsRNA. PfHDAC-1 dsRNA specifically blocked maturation of trophozoite to schizont stages and decreased PfHDAC-1 transcript 44% in treated trophozoites. These results indicate the potential of HDAC-1 as a target for development of novel antimalarials.

  4. Inhibition of Histone Deacetylase Activity in Human Endometrial Stromal Cells Promotes Extracellular Matrix Remodelling and Limits Embryo Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Atkinson, Stuart P.; Quiñonero, Alicia; Martínez, Sebastián; Pellicer, Antonio; Simón, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Invasion of the trophoblast into the maternal decidua is regulated by both the trophoectoderm and the endometrial stroma, and entails the action of tissue remodeling enzymes. Trophoblast invasion requires the action of metalloproteinases (MMPs) to degrade extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins and in turn, decidual cells express tissue inhibitors of MMPs (TIMPs). The balance between these promoting and restraining factors is a key event for the successful outcome of pregnancy. Gene expression is post-transcriptionally regulated by histone deacetylases (HDACs) that unpacks condensed chromatin activating gene expression. In this study we analyze the effect of histone acetylation on the expression of tissue remodeling enzymes and activity of human endometrial stromal cells (hESCs) related to trophoblast invasion control. Treatment of hESCs with the HDAC inhibitor trichostatin A (TSA) increased the expression of TIMP-1 and TIMP-3 while decreased MMP-2, MMP-9 and uPA and have an inhibitory effect on trophoblast invasion. Moreover, histone acetylation is detected at the promoters of TIMP-1 and TIMP-3 genes in TSA-treated. In addition, in an in vitro decidualized hESCs model, the increase of TIMP-1 and TIMP-3 expression is associated with histone acetylation at the promoters of these genes. Our results demonstrate that histone acetylation disrupt the balance of ECM modulators provoking a restrain of trophoblast invasion. These findings are important as an epigenetic mechanism that can be used to control trophoblast invasion. PMID:22291969

  5. A Novel Intracellular Peptide Derived from G1/S Cyclin D2 Induces Cell Death*

    PubMed Central

    de Araujo, Christiane B.; Russo, Lilian C.; Castro, Leandro M.; Forti, Fábio L.; do Monte, Elisabete R.; Rioli, Vanessa; Gozzo, Fabio C.; Colquhoun, Alison; Ferro, Emer S.

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular peptides are constantly produced by the ubiquitin-proteasome system, and many are probably functional. Here, the peptide WELVVLGKL (pep5) from G1/S-specific cyclin D2 showed a 2-fold increase during the S phase of HeLa cell cycle. pep5 (25–100 μm) induced cell death in several tumor cells only when it was fused to a cell-penetrating peptide (pep5-cpp), suggesting its intracellular function. In vivo, pep5-cpp reduced the volume of the rat C6 glioblastoma by almost 50%. The tryptophan at the N terminus of pep5 is essential for its cell death activity, and N terminus acetylation reduced the potency of pep5-cpp. WELVVL is the minimal active sequence of pep5, whereas Leu-Ala substitutions totally abolished pep5 cell death activity. Findings from the initial characterization of the cell death/signaling mechanism of pep5 include caspase 3/7 and 9 activation, inhibition of Akt2 phosphorylation, activation of p38α and -γ, and inhibition of proteasome activity. Further pharmacological analyses suggest that pep5 can trigger cell death by distinctive pathways, which can be blocked by IM-54 or a combination of necrostatin-1 and q-VD-OPh. These data further support the biological and pharmacological potential of intracellular peptides. PMID:24764300

  6. 3D structural fluctuation of IgG1 antibody revealed by individual particle electron tomography

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Xing; Zhang, Lei; Tong, Huimin; ...

    2015-05-05

    Commonly used methods for determining protein structure, including X-ray crystallography and single-particle reconstruction, often provide a single and unique three-dimensional (3D) structure. However, in these methods, the protein dynamics and flexibility/fluctuation remain mostly unknown. Here, we utilized advances in electron tomography (ET) to study the antibody flexibility and fluctuation through structural determination of individual antibody particles rather than averaging multiple antibody particles together. Through individual-particle electron tomography (IPET) 3D reconstruction from negatively-stained ET images, we obtained 120 ab-initio 3D density maps at an intermediate resolution (~1–3 nm) from 120 individual IgG1 antibody particles. Using these maps as a constraint, wemore » derived 120 conformations of the antibody via structural flexible docking of the crystal structure to these maps by targeted molecular dynamics simulations. Statistical analysis of the various conformations disclosed the antibody 3D conformational flexibility through the distribution of its domain distances and orientations. This blueprint approach, if extended to other flexible proteins, may serve as a useful methodology towards understanding protein dynamics and functions.« less

  7. 3D structural fluctuation of IgG1 antibody revealed by individual particle electron tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xing; Zhang, Lei; Tong, Huimin; Peng, Bo; Rames, Matthew J.; Zhang, Shengli; Ren, Gang

    2015-05-05

    Commonly used methods for determining protein structure, including X-ray crystallography and single-particle reconstruction, often provide a single and unique three-dimensional (3D) structure. However, in these methods, the protein dynamics and flexibility/fluctuation remain mostly unknown. Here, we utilized advances in electron tomography (ET) to study the antibody flexibility and fluctuation through structural determination of individual antibody particles rather than averaging multiple antibody particles together. Through individual-particle electron tomography (IPET) 3D reconstruction from negatively-stained ET images, we obtained 120 ab-initio 3D density maps at an intermediate resolution (~1–3 nm) from 120 individual IgG1 antibody particles. Using these maps as a constraint, we derived 120 conformations of the antibody via structural flexible docking of the crystal structure to these maps by targeted molecular dynamics simulations. Statistical analysis of the various conformations disclosed the antibody 3D conformational flexibility through the distribution of its domain distances and orientations. This blueprint approach, if extended to other flexible proteins, may serve as a useful methodology towards understanding protein dynamics and functions.

  8. Serum-induced G0/G1 transition in chemically transformed 3T3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, H.E.; Buchou, T.; Mester, J.

    1987-03-01

    Quiescent, chemically transformed (benzo-a-pyrene) BALB/c 3T3 cells (BP A31) enter the cell division cycle when exposed to complete medium containing 10% fetal calf serum (FCS); the number of cells recruited is a function of the duration of serum exposure. The recruitment of cells by short (<4 h) serum pulses is not inhibited by simultaneous exposure to cycloheximide (CH), and therefore the initial commitment does not require protein synthesis. The cells enter S phase with a constant delay following the removal of CH, even if CH exposure has been continued for as long as 20 h after the end of the serum pulse. The cell recruitment by serum pulses was inhibited by 5,6-dichloro-1-..beta..-D-ribofuranosyl-benzimidazole (DRB), an inhibitor of cytoplasmic mRNA accumulation. These data suggest that serum exposure produces a stable memory that is necessary and sufficient for the eventual progression through G1 to S phase that occurs when protein synthesis is resumed after the removal of CH; this memory probably consists of mRNA species that are induced by serum and that are stable in the absence of protein synthesis. Unexpectedly, pretreatment of quiescent BP A31 cells with CH (8-24 h) dramatically increased the fraction of the total cell population that is recruited by a serum pulse of fixed duration.

  9. TGFβ lengthens the G1 phase of stem cells in aged mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Daynac, Mathieu; Pineda, Jose R; Chicheportiche, Alexandra; Gauthier, Laurent R; Morizur, Lise; Boussin, François D; Mouthon, Marc-André

    2014-12-01

    Neurogenesis decreases during aging causing a progressive cognitive decline but it is still controversial whether proliferation defects in neurogenic niches result from a loss of neural stem cells or from an impairment of their progression through the cell cycle. Using an accurate fluorescence-activated cell sorting technique, we show that the pool of neural stem cells is maintained in the subventricular zone of middle-aged mice while they have a reduced proliferative potential eventually leading to the subsequent decrease of their progeny. In addition, we demonstrate that the G1 phase is lengthened during aging specifically in activated stem cells, but not in transit-amplifying cells, and directly impacts on neurogenesis. Finally, we report that inhibition of TGFβ signaling restores cell cycle progression defects in stem cells. Our data highlight the significance of cell cycle dysregulation in stem cells in the aged brain and provide an attractive foundation for the development of anti-TGFβ regenerative therapies based on stimulating endogenous neural stem cells.

  10. Radioactive Scandium in the Youngest Galactic Supernova Remnant G1.9+0.3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Reynolds, Stephen P.; Green, David A.; Hwang, Una; Petre, Robert; Krishnamurthy, Kalyani; Willett, Rebecca

    2010-12-01

    We report the discovery of thermal X-ray emission from the youngest Galactic supernova remnant G1.9+0.3, from a 237 ks Chandra observation. We detect strong Kα lines of Si, S, Ar, Ca, and Fe. In addition, we detect a 4.1 keV line with 99.971% confidence which we attribute to 44Sc, produced by electron capture from 44Ti. Combining the data with our earlier Chandra observation allows us to detect the line in two regions independently. For a remnant age of 100 yr, our measured total line strength indicates synthesis of (1-7) × 10-5 M sun of 44Ti, in the range predicted for both Type Ia and core-collapse supernovae (SNe), but somewhat smaller than the 2 × 10-4 M sun reported for Cas A. The line spectrum indicates supersolar abundances. The Fe emission has a width of about 28,000 km s-1, consistent with an age of ~100 yr and with the inferred mean shock velocity of 14,000 km s-1 deduced assuming a distance of 8.5 kpc. Most thermal emission comes from regions of lower X-ray but higher radio surface brightness. Deeper observations should allow more detailed spatial mapping of 44Sc, with significant implications for models of nucleosynthesis in Type Ia SNe.

  11. Recovery of Saccharomyces cerevisiae mating-type a cells from G1 arrest by alpha factor.

    PubMed Central

    Chan, R K

    1977-01-01

    Mating-type a cells of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae that had been specifically arrested in the G1 phase of the cell cycle by alpha factor, an oligopeptide pheromone made by alpha cells, recovered and resumed cell division after a period of inhibition which was dependent on the concentration of alpha factor used. These treated a cells were more resistant to alpha factor than untreated a cells, but lost their resistance upon further cell division. However, cells arrested for 6 h were no more resistant to alpha factor than cells arrested for only 2.5 h. Mating-type a strains could inactivate or remove alpha factor from the culture fluid, but two a sterile (nonmating) mutants and an a/alpha diploid strain could not. These results suggest that a cells have a mechanism, which may involve uptake or inactivation of alpha factor, for recovering from alpha factor arrest. However, the results do not distinguish between a recovery mechanism which is constitutive and one which is induced by alpha factor. The loss of alpha factor activity during recovery appeared to be primarily cell contact mediated, although an extracellular, diffusible inhibitor of alpha factor that is labile or that functions stoichiometrically could not be ruled out. PMID:400792

  12. A gradient in the duration of the G1 phase in the murine neocortical proliferative epithelium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyama, S.; Takahashi, T.; Nowakowski, R. S.; Caviness, V. S. Jr

    1997-01-01

    Neuronogenesis in the neocortical pseudostratified ventricular epithelium (PVE) is initiated rostrolaterally and progresses caudo-medially as development progresses. Here we have measured the cytokinetic parameters and the fractional neuronal output parameter, Q, of laterally located early-maturing regions over the principal embryonic days (E12-E15) of neocortical neuronogenesis in the mouse. These measures are compared with ones previously made of a medial, late-maturing portion of the PVE. Laterally, as medially, the duration of the neuronogenetic interval is 6 days and comprises 11 integer cell cycles. Also, in both lateral and medial areas the length of G1 phase (TG1) increases nearly 4-fold and is the only cell cycle parameter to change. Q progresses essentially identically laterally and medially with respect to the succession of integer cell cycles. Most importantly, from E12 to E13 there is a steeply declining lateral to medial gradient in TG1. The gradient is due both to the lateral to medial graded stage of neuronogenesis and to the stepwise increase in TG1 with each integer cycle during the neuronogenetic interval. To our knowledge this gradient in TG1 of the cerebral PVE is the first cell biological gradient to be demonstrated experimentally in such an extensive proliferative epithelial sheet. We suggest that this gradient in TG1 is the cellular mechanism for positionally encoding a protomap of the neocortex within the PVE.

  13. Screening of recombinant glycosyltransferases reveals the broad acceptor specificity of stevia UGT-76G1.

    PubMed

    Dewitte, Griet; Walmagh, Maarten; Diricks, Margo; Lepak, Alexander; Gutmann, Alexander; Nidetzky, Bernd; Desmet, Tom

    2016-09-10

    UDP-glycosyltransferases (UGTs) are a promising class of biocatalysts that offer a sustainable alternative for chemical glycosylation of natural products. In this study, we aimed to characterize plant-derived UGTs from the GT-1 family with an emphasis on their acceptor promiscuity and their potential application in glycosylation processes. Recombinant expression in E. coli provided sufficient amounts of enzyme for the in-depth characterization of the salicylic acid UGT from Capsella rubella (UGT-SACr) and the stevia UGT from Stevia rebaudiana (UGT-76G1Sr). The latter was found to have a remarkably broad specificity with activities on a wide diversity of structures, from aliphatic and branched alcohols, over small phenolics to larger flavonoids, terpenoids and even higher glycoside compounds. As an example for its industrial potential, the glycosylation of curcumin was thoroughly evaluated. Under optimized conditions, 96% of curcumin was converted within 24h into the corresponding curcumin β-glycosides. In addition, the reaction was performed in a coupled system with sucrose synthase from Glycine max, to enable the cost-efficient (re)generation of UDP-Glc from sucrose as abundant and renewable resource.

  14. Inhibition of G0/G1 Switch 2 Ameliorates Renal Inflammation in Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Naoya; Ikeda, Eriko; Kakimoto, Keisuke; Watanabe, Miyako; Shindo, Naoya; Tsuruta, Akito; Ikeyama, Hisako; Hamamura, Kengo; Higashi, Kazuhiro; Yamashita, Tomohiro; Kondo, Hideaki; Yoshida, Yuya; Matsuda, Masaki; Ogino, Takashi; Tokushige, Kazutaka; Itcho, Kazufumi; Furuichi, Yoko; Nakao, Takaharu; Yasuda, Kaori; Doi, Atsushi; Amamoto, Toshiaki; Aramaki, Hironori; Tsuda, Makoto; Inoue, Kazuhide; Ojida, Akio; Koyanagi, Satoru; Ohdo, Shigehiro

    2016-11-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a global health problem, and novel therapies to treat CKD are urgently needed. Here, we show that inhibition of G0/G1 switch 2 (G0s2) ameliorates renal inflammation in a mouse model of CKD. Renal expression of chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (Ccl2) was increased in response to p65 activation in the kidneys of wild-type 5/6 nephrectomy (5/6Nx) mice. Moreover, 5/6Nx Clk/Clk mice, which carry homozygous mutations in the gene encoding circadian locomotor output cycles kaput (CLOCK), did not exhibit aggravation of apoptosis or induction of F4/80-positive cells. The renal expression of G0s2 in wild-type 5/6Nx mice was important for the transactivation of Ccl2 by p65. These pathologies were ameliorated by G0s2 knockdown. Furthermore, a novel small-molecule inhibitor of G0s2 expression was identified by high-throughput chemical screening, and the inhibitor suppressed renal inflammation in 5/6Nx mice. These findings indicated that G0s2 inhibitors may have applications in the treatment of CKD.

  15. Biosimilarity Assessments of Model IgG1-Fc Glycoforms Using a Machine Learning Approach.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae Hyun; Joshi, Sangeeta B; Tolbert, Thomas J; Middaugh, C Russell; Volkin, David B; Smalter Hall, Aaron

    2016-02-01

    Biosimilarity assessments are performed to decide whether 2 preparations of complex biomolecules can be considered "highly similar." In this work, a machine learning approach is demonstrated as a mathematical tool for such assessments using a variety of analytical data sets. As proof-of-principle, physical stability data sets from 8 samples, 4 well-defined immunoglobulin G1-Fragment crystallizable glycoforms in 2 different formulations, were examined (see More et al., companion article in this issue). The data sets included triplicate measurements from 3 analytical methods across different pH and temperature conditions (2066 data features). Established machine learning techniques were used to determine whether the data sets contain sufficient discriminative power in this application. The support vector machine classifier identified the 8 distinct samples with high accuracy. For these data sets, there exists a minimum threshold in terms of information quality and volume to grant enough discriminative power. Generally, data from multiple analytical techniques, multiple pH conditions, and at least 200 representative features were required to achieve the highest discriminative accuracy. In addition to classification accuracy tests, various methods such as sample space visualization, similarity analysis based on Euclidean distance, and feature ranking by mutual information scores are demonstrated to display their effectiveness as modeling tools for biosimilarity assessments.

  16. Effects of Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor (HDACi); Trichostatin-A (TSA) on the expression of housekeeping genes.

    PubMed

    Mogal, Ashish; Abdulkadir, Sarki A

    2006-04-01

    In quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR), analysis of gene expression is dependent on normalization using housekeeping genes such as 18S rRNA, GAPDH and beta actin. However, variability in their expression has been reported to be caused by factors like drug treatment, pathological states and cell-cycle phase. An emerging area of cancer research focuses on identifying the role of epigenetic alterations such as histone modifications and DNA methylation in the initiation and progression of cancer. Histone acetylation is the best studied modification so far and has been probed through the use of histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi). Further, modulation of histone acetylation is currently being explored as a therapeutic strategy in the treatment of cancer and HDACis have shown promise in inhibiting tumorigenesis and metastasis. Trichostatin-A (TSA) is the most widely used HDACi. Therefore, we were driven to identify a suitable internal control for RT-PCR following TSA treatment. We performed quantitative RT-PCR analysis using mouse prostate tissue explants, human prostate cancer (LNCaP) cells and human breast cancer (T-47D and ZR-75-1) cells following TSA treatment. Expression of housekeeping genes including 18S rRNA, beta actin, GAPDH and ribosomal highly-basic 23-kDa protein (rb 23-kDa, RPL13A) were compared in vehicle versus TSA treated samples. Our results showed marked variations in 18S rRNA, beta actin mRNA and GAPDH mRNA levels in mouse prostate explants and a human prostate cancer (LNCaP) cell line following TSA treatment. Furthermore, in two human breast cancer cell lines (T-47D and ZR-75-1) 18S rRNA, beta actin mRNA and GAPDH mRNA levels varied significantly. However, RPL13A mRNA levels remained constant in all the conditions tested. Therefore, we recommend use of RPL13A as a standard for normalization during TSA treatment.

  17. Exploring inhibitor release pathways in histone deacetylases using random acceleration molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Kalyaanamoorthy, Subha; Chen, Yi-Ping Phoebe

    2012-02-27

    Molecular channel exploration perseveres to be the prominent solution for eliciting structure and accessibility of active site and other internal spaces of macromolecules. The volume and silhouette characterization of these channels provides answers for the issues of substrate access and ligand swapping between the obscured active site and the exterior of the protein. Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are metal-dependent enzymes that are involved in the cell growth, cell cycle regulation, and progression, and their deregulations have been linked with different types of cancers. Hence HDACs, especially the class I family, are widely recognized as the important cancer targets, and the characterizations of their structures and functions have been of special interest in cancer drug discovery. The class I HDACs are known to possess two different protein channels, an 11 Å and a 14 Å (named channels A and B1, respectively), of which the former is a ligand or substrate occupying tunnel that leads to the buried active site zinc ion and the latter is speculated to be involved in product release. In this work, we have carried out random acceleration molecular dynamics (RAMD) simulations coupled with the classical molecular dynamics to explore the release of the ligand, N-(2-aminophenyl) benzamide (LLX) from the active sites of the recently solved X-ray crystal structure of HDAC2 and the computationally modeled HDAC1 proteins. The RAMD simulations identified significant structural and dynamic features of the HDAC channels, especially the key 'gate-keeping' amino acid residues that control these channels and the ligand release events. Further, this study identified a novel and unique channel B2, a subchannel from channel B1, in the HDAC1 protein structure. The roles of water molecules in the LLX release from the HDAC1 and HDAC2 enzymes are also discussed. Such structural and dynamic properties of the HDAC protein channels that govern the ligand escape reactions will provide

  18. 26 CFR 1.45G-1 - Railroad track maintenance credit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... rules for computing the amount of the RTMC in the case of a controlled group, and for the allocation of the group credit among members of the controlled group. (b) Definitions. For purposes of section 45G... to the controlled group rules under section 45G(e)(2). (2) Eligible railroad track is railroad...

  19. Glyco-engineering of human IgG1-Fc through combined yeast expression and in vitro chemoenzymatic glycosylation

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yadong; Li, Cishan; Huang, Wei; Li, Bing; Strome, Scott; Wang, Lai-Xi

    2009-01-01

    The presence and precise structures of the glycans attached at the Fc domain of monoclonal antibodies play an important role in determining antibody's effector functions such as antibody-dependent cell cytotoxicity (ADCC), complement activation, and anti-inflammatory activity. This paper describes a novel approach for glyco-engineering of human IgG1-Fc that combines high-yield expression of human IgG1-Fc in yeast and subsequent in vitro enzymatic glycosylation, using the endoglycosidase-catalyzed transglycosylation as the key reaction. Human IgG1-Fc was first overproduced in Pichia pastoris. Then the heterogeneous yeast glycans were removed by Endo-H treatment to give the GlcNAc-containing IgG1-Fc as a homodimer. Finally, selected homogeneous glycans were attached to the GlcNAc-primer in the IgG1-Fc through an endoglycosidase-catalyzed transglycosylation, using sugar oxazolines as the donor substrates. It was found that the enzymatic transglycosylation was efficient with native GlcNAc-containing IgG1-Fc homodimer without the need to denature the protein, and the reaction could proceed to completion to give homogeneous glycoforms of IgG1-Fc when excess of oligosaccharide oxazolines was used as the donor substrates. The binding of the synthetic IgG1-Fc glycoforms to the FcγIIIa receptor was also investigated. This novel glyco-engineering approach should be useful for providing various homogeneous, natural or synthetic glycoforms of IgG1-Fc for structure-function relationship studies, and for future clinical applications. PMID:18771295

  20. PKCeta enhances cell cycle progression, the expression of G1 cyclins and p21 in MCF-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Fima, E; Shtutman, M; Libros, P; Missel, A; Shahaf, G; Kahana, G; Livneh, E

    2001-10-11

    Protein kinase C encodes a family of enzymes implicated in cellular differentiation, growth control and tumor promotion. However, not much is known with respect to the molecular mechanisms that link protein kinase C to cell cycle control. Here we report that the expression of PKCeta in MCF-7 cells, under the control of a tetracycline-responsive inducible promoter, enhanced cell growth and affected the cell cycle at several points. The induced expression of another PKC isoform, PKCdelta, in MCF-7 cells had opposite effects and inhibited their growth. PKCeta expression activated cellular pathways in these cells that resulted in the increased expression of the G1 phase cyclins, cyclin D and cyclin E. Expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21(WAF1) was also specifically elevated in PKCeta expressing cells, but its overall effects were not inhibitory. Although, the protein levels of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27(KIP1) were not altered by the induced expression of PKCeta, the cyclin E associated Cdk2 kinase activity was in correlation with the p27(KIP1) bound to the cyclin E complex and not by p21(WAF1) binding. PKCeta expression enhanced the removal of p27(KIP1) from this complex, and its re-association with the cyclin D/Cdk4 complex. Reduced binding of p27(KIP1) to the cyclin D/Cdk4 complex at early time points of the cell cycle also enhanced the activity of this complex, while at later time points the decrease in bound p21(WAF1) correlated with its increased activity in PKCeta-expressing cells. Thus, PKCeta induces altered expression of several cell cycle functions, which may contribute to its ability to affect cell growth.

  1. Asymmetric Expansion of the Youngest Galactic Supernova Remnant G1.9+0.3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Gwynne, Peter; Reynolds, Stephen P.; Green, David A.; Hwang, Una; Petre, Robert; Willett, Rebecca

    2017-03-01

    The youngest Galactic supernova remnant (SNR) G1.9+0.3, produced by a (probable) SN Ia that exploded ∼1900 CE, is strongly asymmetric at radio wavelengths, much brighter in the north, but bilaterally symmetric in X-rays. We present the results of X-ray expansion measurements that illuminate the origin of the radio asymmetry. We confirm the mean expansion rate (2011–2015) of 0.58% yr‑1, but large spatial variations are present. Using the nonparametric “Demons” method, we measure the velocity field throughout the entire SNR, finding that motions vary by a factor of 5, from 0\\buildrel{\\prime\\prime}\\over{.} 09 to 0\\buildrel{\\prime\\prime}\\over{.} 44 yr‑1. The slowest shocks are at the outer boundary of the bright northern radio rim, with velocities v s as low as 3600 km s‑1 (for an assumed distance of 8.5 kpc), much less than v s = 12,000–13,000 km s‑1 along the X-ray-bright major axis. Such strong deceleration of the northern blast wave most likely arises from the collision of SN ejecta with a much denser than average ambient medium there. This asymmetric ambient medium naturally explains the radio asymmetry. In several locations, significant morphological changes and strongly nonradial motions are apparent. The spatially integrated X-ray flux continues to increase with time. Based on Chandra observations spanning 8.3 yr, we measure its increase at 1.3 % +/- 0.8 % yr‑1. The SN ejecta are likely colliding with the asymmetric circumstellar medium ejected by the SN progenitor prior to its explosion.

  2. The impact of geoengineering on vegetation in experiment G1 of the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irvine, Peter; Glienke, Susanne; Lawrence, Mark

    2015-04-01

    Solar Radiation Management (SRM) has been proposed as a means to partly counteract global warming. The Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP) simulated the climate consequences of a number of SRM techniques, but the effects on vegetation have not yet been thoroughly studied. Here, the vegetation response to the idealized GeoMIP G1 experiment is analyzed, in which a reduction of the solar constant counterbalances the radiative effects of quadrupled atmospheric CO2 concentrations; the results from eight fully coupled earth system models (ESMs) are included. For most models and regions, changes in net primary productivity (NPP) are dominated by the increase in CO2, via the CO2 fertilization effect. As SRM will lower temperatures, in high latitudes this will reverse gains in NPP from the lifting of temperature limitations. In low latitudes this cooling relative to the 4xCO2 simulation decreases plant respiration whilst having little effect on gross primary productivity, increasing NPP. Despite reductions in precipitation in most regions in response to SRM, runoff and NPP increase in many regions including those previously highlighted as potentially being at risk of drought under SRM. This is due to simultaneous reductions in evaporation and increases in water use efficiency by plants due to higher CO2 concentrations. The relative differences between models in the vegetation response are substantially larger than the differences in their climate responses. The largest differences between models are for those with and without a nitrogen-cycle, with a much smaller CO2 fertilization effect for the former. These results suggest that until key vegetation processes are integrated into ESM predictions, the vegetation response to SRM will remain highly uncertain.

  3. Asymmetric Expansion of the Youngest Galactic Supernova Remnant G1.9+0.3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borkowski, Kazimerz J.; Gwynne, Peter; Reynolds, Stephen P.; Green, David A.; Hwang, Una; Petre, Robert; Willett, Rebecca

    2017-01-01

    The youngest Galactic supernova remnant (SNR) G1.9+0.3, produced by a (probable) SN Ia that exploded approximately 1900 CE, is strongly asymmetric at radio wavelengths, much brighter in the north, but bilaterally symmetric in X-rays. We present the results of X-ray expansion measurements that illuminate the origin of the radio asymmetry. We confirm the mean expansion rate (2011-2015) of 0.58% per yr, but large spatial variations are present. Using the nonparametric 'Demons' method, we measure the velocity field throughout the entire SNR, finding that motions vary by a factor of 5, from 0.''09 to 0.''44 per yr. The slowest shocks are at the outer boundary of the bright northern radio rim, with velocities v(sub s) as low as 3600 km per sec (for an assumed distance of 8.5 kpc), much less than v(sub s) = 12,000-13,000 km per sec along the X-ray-bright major axis. Such strong deceleration of the northern blast wave most likely arises from the collision of SN ejecta with a much denser than average ambient medium there. This asymmetric ambient medium naturally explains the radio asymmetry. In several locations, significant morphological changes and strongly nonradial motions are apparent. The spatially integrated X-ray flux continues to increase with time. Based on Chandra observations spanning 8.3 yr, we measure its increase at 1.3% +/- 0.8% per yr. The SN ejecta are likely colliding with the asymmetric circumstellar medium ejected by the SN progenitor prior to its explosion.

  4. Adipocyte ATP-binding cassette G1 promotes triglyceride storage, fat mass growth, and human obesity.

    PubMed

    Frisdal, Eric; Le Lay, Soazig; Hooton, Henri; Poupel, Lucie; Olivier, Maryline; Alili, Rohia; Plengpanich, Wanee; Villard, Elise F; Gilibert, Sophie; Lhomme, Marie; Superville, Alexandre; Miftah-Alkhair, Lobna; Chapman, M John; Dallinga-Thie, Geesje M; Venteclef, Nicolas; Poitou, Christine; Tordjman, Joan; Lesnik, Philippe; Kontush, Anatol; Huby, Thierry; Dugail, Isabelle; Clement, Karine; Guerin, Maryse; Le Goff, Wilfried

    2015-03-01

    The role of the ATP-binding cassette G1 (ABCG1) transporter in human pathophysiology is still largely unknown. Indeed, beyond its role in mediating free cholesterol efflux to HDL, the ABCG1 transporter equally promotes lipid accumulation in a triglyceride (TG)-rich environment through regulation of the bioavailability of lipoprotein lipase (LPL). Because both ABCG1 and LPL are expressed in adipose tissue, we hypothesized that ABCG1 is implicated in adipocyte TG storage and therefore could be a major actor in adipose tissue fat accumulation. Silencing of Abcg1 expression by RNA interference in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes compromised LPL-dependent TG accumulation during the initial phase of differentiation. Generation of stable Abcg1 knockdown 3T3-L1 adipocytes revealed that Abcg1 deficiency reduces TG storage and diminishes lipid droplet size through inhibition of Pparγ expression. Strikingly, local inhibition of adipocyte Abcg1 in adipose tissue from mice fed a high-fat diet led to a rapid decrease of adiposity and weight gain. Analysis of two frequent ABCG1 single nucleotide polymorphisms (rs1893590 [A/C] and rs1378577 [T/G]) in morbidly obese individuals indicated that elevated ABCG1 expression in adipose tissue was associated with increased PPARγ expression and adiposity concomitant to increased fat mass and BMI (haplotype AT>GC). The critical role of ABCG1 in obesity was further confirmed in independent populations of severe obese and diabetic obese individuals. This study identifies for the first time a major role of adipocyte ABCG1 in adiposity and fat mass growth and suggests that adipose ABCG1 might represent a potential therapeutic target in obesity.

  5. Learning progression of ecological system reasoning for lower elementary (G1-4) students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hokayem, Hayat Al

    In this study, I utilized a learning progression framework to investigate lower elementary students (G1-4) systemic reasoning in ecology and I related students reasoning to their sources of knowledge. I used semi-structured interviews with 44 students from first through fourth grade, four teachers, and eight parents. The results revealed that a hypothetical learning progression begins with anthropomorphic reasoning as the lower anchor and ends with complex causal reasoning as the upper anchor for students in this age. However the results showed that many students revealed mixed-level reasoning -- meaning that they can reason at different levels in the same context. Very few students were able to use scientific terms and even those who did use the terms were not able to capture the scientific meaning of those terms. The results also revealed that students' accounts about scenarios in the various categories of systemic reasoning were inconsistent. Finally, the results concerning sources of knowledge revealed that students acquire their ideas from various sources, the media being the most frequently mentioned source, followed by books, personal experiences and parents. Those results have implications for defining the learning progression in general, for the validation of the hypothetical learning progression and for practical development of curriculum and instruction. With regard to defining the learning progression, the presence of mixed-level reasoning opens the discussion whether learning progression levels should be strictly pure levels or should include combinations of various levels to identify students' reasoning. With regard to validation of the hypothetical learning progression, the inconsistencies of students' answers and low correlations across various categories of systemic reasoning suggest that the categories used in this study were distinct. Finally the results of students' sources of knowledge has implications for designing a curriculum that

  6. The G1/S Specific Cyclin D2 Is a Regulator of HIV-1 Restriction in Non-proliferating Cells

    PubMed Central

    Badia, Roger; Pujantell, Maria; Riveira-Muñoz, Eva; Puig, Teresa; Torres-Torronteras, Javier; Martí, Ramón; Clotet, Bonaventura; Ampudia, Rosa M.; Ballana, Ester

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages are a heterogeneous cell population strongly influenced by differentiation stimuli that become susceptible to HIV-1 infection after inactivation of the restriction factor SAMHD1 by cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK). Here, we have used primary human monocyte-derived macrophages differentiated through different stimuli to evaluate macrophage heterogeneity on cell activation and proliferation and susceptibility to HIV-1 infection. Stimulation of monocytes with GM-CSF induces a non-proliferating macrophage population highly restrictive to HIV-1 infection, characterized by the upregulation of the G1/S-specific cyclin D2, known to control early steps of cell cycle progression. Knockdown of cyclin D2, enhances HIV-1 replication in GM-CSF macrophages through inactivation of SAMHD1 restriction factor by phosphorylation. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments show that cyclin D2 forms a complex with CDK4 and p21, a factor known to restrict HIV-1 replication by affecting the function of the downstream cascade that leads to SAMHD1 deactivation. Thus, we demonstrate that cyclin D2 acts as regulator of cell cycle proteins affecting SAMHD1-mediated HIV-1 restriction in non-proliferating macrophages. PMID:27541004

  7. G1 phase arrest induced by Wilms tumor protein WT1 is abrogated by cyclin/CDK complexes.

    PubMed Central

    Kudoh, T; Ishidate, T; Moriyama, M; Toyoshima, K; Akiyama, T

    1995-01-01

    WT1, the Wilms tumor-suppressor gene, maps to the human chromosomal region 11p13 and encodes a transcriptional repressor, WT1, implicated in controlling normal urogenital development. Microinjection of the WT1 cDNA into quiescent cells or cells in early to mid G1 phase blocked serum-induced cell cycle progression into S phase. The activity of WT1 varied significantly depending on the presence or absence of an alternatively spliced region located upstream of the zinc finger domain. The inhibitory activity of WT1 was abrogated by the overexpression of cyclin E/CDK2 as well as cyclin D1/CDK4. Furthermore, both CDK4- and CDK2-associated kinase activities were downregulated in cells overexpressing WT1, whereas the levels of CDK4, CDK2, and cyclin D1 expression were unchanged. These findings suggest that inhibition of the activity of cyclin/CDK complexes may be involved in mediating the WT1-induced cell cycle block. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:7753836

  8. Growth rate and cell size modulate the synthesis of, and requirement for, G1-phase cyclins at start.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Brandt L; Zhang, Jian; Markwardt, J; Tokiwa, George; Volpe, Tom; Honey, Sangeet; Futcher, Bruce

    2004-12-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, commitment to cell cycle progression occurs at Start. Progression past Start requires cell growth and protein synthesis, a minimum cell size, and G(1)-phase cyclins. We examined the relationships among these factors. Rapidly growing cells expressed, and required, dramatically more Cln protein than did slowly growing cells. To clarify the role of cell size, we expressed defined amounts of CLN mRNA in cells of different sizes. When Cln was expressed at nearly physiological levels, a critical threshold of Cln expression was required for cell cycle progression, and this critical threshold varied with both cell size and growth rate: as cells grew larger, they needed less CLN mRNA, but as cells grew faster, they needed more Cln protein. At least in part, large cells had a reduced requirement for CLN mRNA because large cells generated more Cln protein per unit of mRNA than did small cells. When Cln was overexpressed, it was capable of promoting Start rapidly, regardless of cell size or growth rate. In summary, the amount of Cln required for Start depends dramatically on both cell size and growth rate. Large cells generate more Cln1 or Cln2 protein for a given amount of CLN mRNA, suggesting the existence of a novel posttranscriptional size control mechanism.

  9. γ-Glutamylcyclotransferase Knockdown Inhibits Growth of Lung Cancer Cells Through G0/G1 Phase Arrest.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhifeng; Xiong, Liwen; Zhou, Jianhua; Wang, Jin; Li, Zhao; Hu, Haiyang; Lin, Qiang

    2015-06-01

    Lung cancer as an aggressive type tumor is rapidly growing and has become the leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. γ-Glutamylcyclotransferase (GGCT) has been shown as a diagnostic marker in various cancers. To reveal whether there is a correlation between GGCT and lung cancer, GGCT expression in human lung cancer cell lines was first determined by real-time quantitative PCR and western blot. GGCT is expressed in all tested lung cancer cell lines, A549, H1299, and H460. Then, a lentivirus-based system was applied to knock down GGCT in A549 cells, which were thus divided into Lv-shGGCT, Lv-shCon, and Con (noninfected) groups. Methylthiazol tetrazolium assay showed that the cell proliferation was decreased by over 50% in the Lv-shGGCT group compared with controls. The size and number of colonies were dramatically reduced in the GGCT knockdown group, as measured by colony formation assay. Moreover, A549 cells infected with Lv-shGGCT were arrested in the G0/G1 phase as assayed by flow cytometry. Furthermore, the expression levels of CDK4, CDK6, and cyclin D1 were decreased and the cleaved level of PARP was increased in GGCT knockdown cells. In conclusion, GGCT plays a critical role in lung cancer cell proliferation and may be a potential cancer therapeutic target.

  10. G0/G1 switch gene-2 regulates human adipocyte lipolysis by affecting activity and localization of adipose triglyceride lipase.

    PubMed

    Schweiger, Martina; Paar, Margret; Eder, Christina; Brandis, Janina; Moser, Elena; Gorkiewicz, Gregor; Grond, Susanne; Radner, Franz P W; Cerk, Ines; Cornaciu, Irina; Oberer, Monika; Kersten, Sander; Zechner, Rudolf; Zimmermann, Robert; Lass, Achim

    2012-11-01

    The hydrolysis of triglycerides in adipocytes, termed lipolysis, provides free fatty acids as energy fuel. Murine lipolysis largely depends on the activity of adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL), which is regulated by two proteins annotated as comparative gene identification-58 (CGI-58) and G0/G1 switch gene-2 (G0S2). CGI-58 activates and G0S2 inhibits ATGL activity. In contrast to mice, the functional role of G0S2 in human adipocyte lipolysis is poorly characterized. Here we show that overexpression or silencing of G0S2 in human SGBS adipocytes decreases and increases lipolysis, respectively. Human G0S2 is upregulated during adipocyte differentiation and inhibits ATGL activity in a dose-dependent manner. Interestingly, C-terminally truncated ATGL mutants, which fail to localize to lipid droplets, translocate to the lipid droplet upon coexpression with G0S2, suggesting that G0S2 anchors ATGL to lipid droplets independent of ATGL's C-terminal lipid binding domain. Taken together, our results indicate that G0S2 also regulates human lipolysis by affecting enzyme activity and intracellular localization of ATGL. Increased lipolysis is known to contribute to the pathogenesis of insulin resistance, and G0S2 expression has been shown to be reduced in poorly controlled type 2 diabetic patients. Our data indicate that downregulation of G0S2 in adipose tissue could represent one of the underlying causes leading to increased lipolysis in the insulin-resistant state.

  11. Compound K, a metabolite of ginseng saponin, inhibits colorectal cancer cell growth and induces apoptosis through inhibition of histone deacetylase activity.

    PubMed

    Kang, Kyoung Ah; Piao, Mei Jing; Kim, Ki Cheon; Zheng, Jian; Yao, Cheng Wen; Cha, Ji Won; Kim, Hye Sun; Kim, Dong Hyun; Bae, Suk Chul; Hyun, Jin Won

    2013-12-01

    In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying the anti-proliferative effects of Compound K, with specific reference to histone modification. Exposure of HT-29 human colon cancer cells to Compound K resulted in time-dependent inhibition of histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity, mRNA and protein expression. Compound K treatment induced unmethylation of the RUNX3 promoter region such as TSA treatment and an accumulation of acetylated histones H3 and H4 within the total cellular chromatin, resulting in an enhanced ability of these histones to bind to the promoter sequences of the tumor suppressor gene Runt-related transcription factor 3 (RUNX3). Treatment of cells with Compound K increased the mRNA and protein expression of RUNX3, as well as p21, a downstream target of RUNX3. These alterations were consistent with cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 phases and induction of apoptosis. Our results provide new insights into the mechanisms of Compound K action in human colorectal cancer cells and suggest that HDAC inhibition presents a novel approach to prevent or treat colorectal cancer.

  12. Highly efficient synthesis and characterization of the GPR30-selective agonist G-1 and related tetrahydroquinoline analogs

    PubMed Central

    Burai, Ritwik; Ramesh, Chinnasamy; Shorty, Marvin; Curpan, Ramona; Bologa, Cristian; Sklar, Larry A.; Oprea, Tudor; Prossnitz, Eric R.

    2010-01-01

    The GPR30 agonist probe G-1 and structural analogs were efficiently synthesized using multicomponent or stepwise Sc(III)-catalyzed aza-Diels Alder cyclization. Optimization of solvent and reaction temperature provided enhanced endo-diastereoselectivity. PMID:20401403

  13. Review of geochemical reference sample programs since G-1 and W-1: progress to date and remaining challenges

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kane, J.S.

    1991-01-01

    A brief history of programs to develop geochemical reference samples and certified reference samples for use in geochemical analysis is presented. While progress has been made since G-1 and W-1 were issued, many challenges remain. ?? 1991.

  14. Galactosylation of IgG1 modulates FcγRIIB-mediated inhibition of murine autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Kazunori; Ito, Kiyoaki; Furukawa, Jun-Ichi; Nakata, Junichiro; Alvarez, Montserrat; Verbeek, J Sjef; Shinohara, Yasuro; Izui, Shozo

    2013-12-01

    Murine immune effector cells express three different stimulatory FcγRs (FcγRI, FcγRIII and FcγRIV) and one inhibitory receptor, FcγRIIB. Competitive engagement of stimulatory and inhibitory FcγRs has been shown to be critical for the development of immune complex-mediated inflammatory disorders. Because of the previous demonstration that FcγRIIB was unable to inhibit FcγRIII-mediated autoimmune hemolytic anemia induced by 105-2H IgG1 anti-RBC mAb, we reevaluated the regulatory role of FcγRIIB on the development of anemia using two additional IgG1 anti-RBC mAbs (34-3C and 3H5G1) and different 34-3C IgG subclass-switch variants. We were able to induce a more severe anemia in FcγRIIB-deficient mice than in FcγRIIB-sufficient mice after injection of 34-3C and 3H5G1 IgG1, but not 105-2H IgG1. Structural analysis of N-linked oligosaccharides attached to the CH2 domain revealed that 105-2H was poorly galactosylated as compared with the other mAbs, while the extent of sialylation was comparable between all mAbs. In addition, we observed that a more galactosylated 105-2H variant provoked more severe anemia in FcγRIIB-deficient mice than FcγRIIB-sufficient mice. In contrast, the development of anemia induced by three non-IgG1 subclass variants of the 34-3C mAb was not down-regulated by FcγRIIB, although they were more galactosylated than its IgG1 variant. These data indicate that FcγRIIB-mediated inhibition of autoimmune hemolytic anemia is restricted to the IgG1 subclass and that galactosylation, but not sialylation, of IgG1 (but not other IgG subclasses) is critical for the interaction with FcγR, thereby determining the pathogenic potential of IgG1 autoantibodies.

  15. Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Hog1 Mediates Adaptation to G1 Checkpoint Arrest during Arsenite and Hyperosmotic Stress▿

    PubMed Central

    Migdal, Iwona; Ilina, Yulia; Tamás, Markus J.; Wysocki, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Cells slow down cell cycle progression in order to adapt to unfavorable stress conditions. Yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) responds to osmotic stress by triggering G1 and G2 checkpoint delays that are dependent on the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) Hog1. The high-osmolarity glycerol (HOG) pathway is also activated by arsenite, and the hog1Δ mutant is highly sensitive to arsenite, partly due to increased arsenite influx into hog1Δ cells. Yeast cell cycle regulation in response to arsenite and the role of Hog1 in this process have not yet been analyzed. Here, we found that long-term exposure to arsenite led to transient G1 and G2 delays in wild-type cells, whereas cells that lack the HOG1 gene or are defective in Hog1 kinase activity displayed persistent G1 cell cycle arrest. Elevated levels of intracellular arsenite and “cross talk” between the HOG and pheromone response pathways, observed in arsenite-treated hog1Δ cells, prolonged the G1 delay but did not cause a persistent G1 arrest. In contrast, deletion of the SIC1 gene encoding a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor fully suppressed the observed block of G1 exit in hog1Δ cells. Moreover, the Sic1 protein was stabilized in arsenite-treated hog1Δ cells. Interestingly, Sic1-dependent persistent G1 arrest was also observed in hog1Δ cells during hyperosmotic stress. Taken together, our data point to an important role of the Hog1 kinase in adaptation to stress-induced G1 cell cycle arrest. PMID:18552285

  16. FoxG1, a member of the forkhead family, is a corepressor of the androgen receptor.

    PubMed

    Obendorf, Maik; Meyer, Rene; Henning, Konstanze; Mitev, Youri A; Schröder, Jens; Patchev, Vladimir K; Wolf, Siegmund S

    2007-05-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) is a ligand-dependent transcriptional regulator which belongs to the nuclear receptor superfamily. The basal transcriptional activity of the androgen receptor is regulated by interaction with coactivator or corepressor proteins. The exact mechanism whereby comodulators influence target gene transcription is only partially understood, especially for corepressors. Whereas several coactivators are described for the AR, only a few corepressors are known. Here, we describe the discovery of a new androgen receptor corepressor, FoxG1, which belongs to the forkhead family. By using a fragment of the AR (aa 325-919) as bait in a yeast two hybrid screen, the C-terminal region (aa 175-489) of FoxG1 (also known as BF1), was identified as AR-interacting protein. Binding of AR to the FoxG1 fragment was verified by one- and two-hybrid assays, and pull-down experiments. In addition, we show that the full-length form of FoxG1 functions as a strong corepressor in the AR-mediated transactivation. The FoxG1 expression profile in adult individuals is restricted to brain and testis in human and decreases during aging in the rodent brain. Both AR and FoxG1 expression are developmentally regulated. Besides its reported role in neurogenesis, the strong expression of FoxG1 in AR-abundant areas of the adult brain suggests possible involvement in neuroendocrine regulation. Taken together, the data presented suggest that, in addition to repression of transcription by direct binding to DNA, FoxG1 may interact with AR in vivo, thereby targeting its repressor function specifically to sex hormone signaling.

  17. IgE-binding reactivity of peptide fragments of Bla g 1.02, a major German cockroach allergen.

    PubMed

    Yi, Myung-Hee; Jeong, Kyoung Yong; Kim, Chung-Ryul; Yong, Tai-Soon

    2009-01-01

    Cockroaches cause allergic diseases and are closely linked with the development of asthma. Bla g 1 is one of the major allergen proteins produced by German cockroaches. It consists of tandem repeats of approximately 100 amino acids. The aim of the present study was to identify linear IgE-binding epitopes of Bla g 1.02. RT-PCR was used to clone a cDNA sequence encoding Bla g 1.02 (EF202179) which shared 98.6-99.8% identity with a previously reported Bla g 1.02 (AF072220). To investigate IgE binding regions, five separate but overlapping Bla g 1.02 peptide fragments (A: aa 1-111, B: aa 102-215, C: aa 206-299, D: aa 289-403, E: aa 394-491) were amplified and cloned. The full-length and five peptide fragments were overexpressed in Pichia pastoris and E. coli, respectively, and their IgE binding reactivities were measured by ELISA using 37 serum samples isolated from cockroach-sensitized patients. The sera of 24 patients (64.9%) recognized the full-length Bla g 1.02 recombinant protein. Among 19 selected serum samples, 11 sera (57.9%) reacted to peptide fragment A, 5 sera (31.3%) to B, 4 sera (21.1%) to C, 9 sera (47.4%) to D, and 10 sera (52.6%) to peptide fragment E. IgE-binding epitopes are found to be distributed to each tandem repeat of Bla g 1. The combination of peptide fragments A, D, and E may able to detect all Bla g 1-sensitized subjects. We suggest that these peptide fragments may be useful in allergy diagnosis and the design of novel immunotherapeutics.

  18. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors Enhance CD4 T Cell Susceptibility to NK Cell Killing but Reduce NK Cell Function.

    PubMed

    Pace, Matthew; Williams, James; Kurioka, Ayako; Gerry, Andrew B; Jakobsen, Bent; Klenerman, Paul; Nwokolo, Nneka; Fox, Julie; Fidler, Sarah; Frater, John

    2016-08-01

    In the search for a cure for HIV-1 infection, histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) are being investigated as activators of latently infected CD4 T cells to promote their targeting by cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTL). However, HDACi may also inhibit CTL function, suggesting different immunotherapy approaches may need to be explored. Here, we study the impact of different HDACi on both Natural Killer (NK) and CTL targeting of HIV-1 infected cells. We found HDACi down-regulated HLA class I expression independently of HIV-1 Nef which, without significantly compromising CTL function, led to enhanced targeting by NK cells. HDACi-treated HIV-1-infected CD4 T cells were also more effectively cleared than untreated controls during NK co-culture. However, HDACi impaired NK function, reducing degranulation and killing capacity. Depending on the HDACi and dose, this impairment could counteract the benefit gained by treating infected target cells. These data suggest that following HDACi-induced HLA class I down-regulation NK cells kill HIV-1-infected cells, although HDACi-mediated NK cell inhibition may negate this effect. Our data emphasize the importance of studying the effects of potential interventions on both targets and effectors.

  19. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors Resensitize EGFR/EGFRvIII-Overexpressing, Erlotinib-Resistant Glioblastoma Cells to Tyrosine Kinase Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Liffers, Katrin; Kolbe, Katarina; Westphal, Manfred; Lamszus, Katrin; Schulte, Alexander

    2016-02-01

    Although the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is overexpressed and/or amplified in more than 50 % of all glioblastomas (GBM), therapeutic targeting of the EGFR has not yet been successful. Since histone deacetylases (HDAC) have been described as controlling EGFR expression, we combined the EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor erlotinib with different HDAC inhibitors (HDACi) and investigated the benefit of combinatorial therapy for glioblastoma cells. Using representative models of EGFR-amplified, erlotinib-sensitive and -resistant GBM with or without EGFRvIII expression, we determined proliferation, migration, and EGFR-dependent signaling in response to erlotinib and HDACi alone or in combination. HDACi significantly inhibited proliferation of erlotinib-resistant GBM cells, partially restored their sensitivity to erlotinib, and also significantly reduced proliferation of all treatment-naïve cell lines tested. In combination with erlotinib, the development of resistance was prevented. The multitargeted EGFR/HDAC-inhibitor CUDC-101 exhibited similar effects. However, inhibition of cell migration was only achieved by targeting EGFR, and HDACi exhibited no additive effect. Mechanistically, we identified an HDACi-dependent decrease of EGFR/EGFRvIII protein expression underlying the anti-proliferative effects of HDACi. In conclusion, HDACi in combination with erlotinib might serve as a treatment option for newly diagnosed, treatment-naïve tumors irrespective of their EGFR status, as well as for treatment-refractory, EGFR-overexpressing GBM.

  20. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor kinetic rate constants correlate with cellular histone acetylation but not transcription and cell viability.

    PubMed

    Lauffer, Benjamin E L; Mintzer, Robert; Fong, Rina; Mukund, Susmith; Tam, Christine; Zilberleyb, Inna; Flicke, Birgit; Ritscher, Allegra; Fedorowicz, Grazyna; Vallero, Roxanne; Ortwine, Daniel F; Gunzner, Janet; Modrusan, Zora; Neumann, Lars; Koth, Christopher M; Lupardus, Patrick J; Kaminker, Joshua S; Heise, Christopher E; Steiner, Pascal

    2013-09-13

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are critical in the control of gene expression, and dysregulation of their activity has been implicated in a broad range of diseases, including cancer, cardiovascular, and neurological diseases. HDAC inhibitors (HDACi) employing different zinc chelating functionalities such as hydroxamic acids and benzamides have shown promising results in cancer therapy. Although it has also been suggested that HDACi with increased isozyme selectivity and potency may broaden their clinical utility and minimize side effects, the translation of this idea to the clinic remains to be investigated. Moreover, a detailed understanding of how HDACi with different pharmacological properties affect biological functions in vitro and in vivo is still missing. Here, we show that a panel of benzamide-containing HDACi are slow tight-binding inhibitors with long residence times unlike the hydroxamate-containing HDACi vorinostat and trichostatin-A. Characterization of changes in H2BK5 and H4K14 acetylation following HDACi treatment in the neuroblastoma cell line SH-SY5Y revealed that the timing and magnitude of histone acetylation mirrored both the association and dissociation kinetic rates of the inhibitors. In contrast, cell viability and microarray gene expression analysis indicated that cell death induction and changes in transcriptional regulation do not correlate with the dissociation kinetic rates of the HDACi. Therefore, our study suggests that determining how the selective and kinetic inhibition properties of HDACi affect cell function will help to evaluate their therapeutic utility.

  1. Dual influences of early-life maternal deprivation on histone deacetylase activity and recognition memory in rats.

    PubMed

    Albuquerque Filho, Manoel Osório; de Freitas, Betânia Souza; Garcia, Rebeca Carvalho Lacerda; Crivelaro, Pedro Castilhos de Freitas; Schröder, Nadja; de Lima, Maria Noêmia Martins

    2017-03-06

    Exposure to stress early in life may negatively impact nervous system functioning, including increasing the proneness to learning and memory impairments later in life. Maternal deprivation, a model of early-life stress, hinders memory in adult rats and lessens brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels in the hippocampus in a very heterogeneous way among individuals. The main goal of the present study was to investigate the possible epigenetic modulation underlying recognition memory impairment and reduced BDNF levels in the hippocampus of adult maternally deprived rats. We also evaluated the potential ameliorating properties of the histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, sodium butyrate, on memory deficits and BDNF changes related to maternal deprivation. Maternally deprived animals were categorized as 'inferior learners' and 'superior learners' according to their performance in object recognition memory task in comparison to controls. Results indicated that HDAC activity was higher in individuals submitted to maternal deprivation with the worst cognitive performance (inferior learners). Acute administration of sodium butyrate increased histone H3 acetylation and BDNF levels, and restored recognition memory in maternally deprived animals with the worst cognitive performance. Moreover, we also showed that there is a positive correlation between BDNF levels and memory performance. Taken together, the results indicated that HDAC inhibitors could be considered as a possible therapeutic agent to improve cognitive performance in inferior learners. Further studies need to be conducted for a better comprehension of the mechanisms related to persistent alterations observed in adult life induced by early stressful circumstances and those leading to resilience.

  2. Anticancer potential of the histone deacetylase inhibitor-like effects of flavones, a subclass of polyphenolic compounds: a review.

    PubMed

    Singh, Prabhat; Tomar, Raghuvir Singh; Rath, Srikanta Kumar

    2015-11-01

    Cancer is characterized by the uncontrolled division of cells, followed by their invasion to other tissues. These kinds of cellular abnormalities arise as a result of the accumulation of genetic mutations or epigenetic alterations. Targeting genetic mutations by drugs is a conventional treatment approach. Nowadays, the development and use of epigenetic drugs are burgeoning, owing to the advancements in epigenetic research. The therapeutic intervention of cancer development by histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) holds promise for helping to control the disease, but their nonspecific functions impose certain side effects. Therefore, the search for more HDACIs becomes essential. Plentiful literature on the versatility of dietary components including flavones, a class of the flavonoid group, has already established these compounds to be better anticancer agents. The present review focuses on the significance of flavones with regard to their HDACI-mimicking effects as suggested by the recent evidences. The review also proposes an in-depth screening of flavones in future studies, in the hope that flavones may provide a better alternative to synthetic HDACIs.

  3. Intercellular transfer of P-glycoprotein in human blood-brain barrier endothelial cells is increased by histone deacetylase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Noack, Andreas; Noack, Sandra; Buettner, Manuela; Naim, Hassan Y.; Löscher, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    The blood–brain barrier (BBB) controls the entry of compounds into the brain, thereby regulating brain homeostasis. Efflux transporters such as P-glycoprotein (Pgp) significantly contribute to BBB function. Multiple signaling pathways modulate the expression and activity of Pgp in response to xenobiotics and disease. A non-genetic way of intercellular transfer of Pgp occurs in cancer cells, but whether this also occurs in non-cancer cells such as endothelial cells that form the BBB is not known. A human brain endothelial cell line (hCMEC/D3) was used to study whether cell-to-cell Pgp transfer occurs during co-culturing with Pgp-EGFP expressing hCMEC/D3 cells. The Pgp-EGFP fusion protein was transferred from donor to recipient cells by cell-to-cell contact and Pgp-EGFP enriched vesicles, which were exocytosed by donor cells and endocytosed by adherent recipient cells. Flow cytometry experiments with the Pgp substrate eFLUXX-ID Gold demonstrated that the transferred Pgp is functional in the recipient cells. Exposure of the donor cells with inhibitors of histone deacetylases (HDACs) resulted in an enhanced intercellular Pgp transfer. Non-genetic transfer of a resistance phenotype and its regulation by HDACs is a novel mechanism of altering BBB functionality. This mechanism may have important implications for understanding drug-induced alterations in Pgp expression and activity. PMID:27375084

  4. Identification of Components of the Murine Histone Deacetylase 6 Complex: Link between Acetylation and Ubiquitination Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Seigneurin-Berny, Daphné; Verdel, André; Curtet, Sandrine; Lemercier, Claudie; Garin, Jérôme; Rousseaux, Sophie; Khochbin, Saadi

    2001-01-01

    The immunopurification of the endogenous cytoplasmic murine histone deacetylase 6 (mHDAC6), a member of the class II HDACs, from mouse testis cytosolic extracts allowed the identification of two associated proteins. Both were mammalian homologues of yeast proteins known to interact with each other and involved in the ubiquitin signaling pathway: p97/VCP/Cdc48p, a homologue of yeast Cdc48p, and phospholipase A2-activating protein, a homologue of yeast UFD3 (ubiquitin fusion degradation protein 3). Moreover, in the C-terminal region of mHDAC6, a conserved zinc finger-containing domain named ZnF-UBP, also present in several ubiquitin-specific proteases, was discovered and was shown to mediate the specific binding of ubiquitin by mHDAC6. By using a ubiquitin pull-down approach, nine major ubiquitin-binding proteins were identified in mouse testis cytosolic extracts, and mHDAC6 was found to be one of them. All of these findings strongly suggest that mHDAC6 could be involved in the control of protein ubiquitination. The investigation of biochemical properties of the mHDAC6 complex in vitro further supported this hypothesis and clearly established a link between protein acetylation and protein ubiquitination. PMID:11689694

  5. SCARECROW-LIKE15 interacts with HISTONE DEACETYLASE19 and is essential for repressing the seed maturation programme

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Ming-Jun; Li, Xiang; Huang, Jun; Gropp, Gordon M.; Gjetvaj, Branimir; Lindsay, Donna L.; Wei, Shu; Coutu, Cathy; Chen, Zhixiang; Wan, Xiao-Chun; Hannoufa, Abdelali; Lydiate, Derek J.; Gruber, Margaret Y.; Chen, Z. Jeffrey; Hegedus, Dwayne D.

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic regulation of gene expression is critical for controlling embryonic properties during the embryo-to-seedling phase transition. Here we report that a HISTONE DEACETYLASE19 (HDA19)-associated regulator, SCARECROW-LIKE15 (SCL15), is essential for repressing the seed maturation programme in vegetative tissues. SCL15 is expressed in and GFP-tagged SCL15 predominantly localizes to, the vascular bundles particularly in the phloem companion cells and neighbouring specialized cells. Mutation of SCL15 leads to a global shift in gene expression in seedlings to a profile resembling late embryogenesis in seeds. In scl15 seedlings, many genes involved in seed maturation are markedly derepressed with concomitant accumulation of seed 12S globulin; this is correlated with elevated levels of histone acetylation at a subset of seed-specific loci. SCL15 physically interacts with HDA19 and direct targets of HDA19–SCL15 association are identified. These studies reveal that SCL15 acts as an HDA19-associated regulator to repress embryonic traits in seedlings. PMID:26129778

  6. Netrin-G1 regulates fear-like and anxiety-like behaviors in dissociable neural circuits

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qi; Sano, Chie; Masuda, Akira; Ando, Reiko; Tanaka, Mika; Itohara, Shigeyoshi

    2016-01-01

    In vertebrate mammals, distributed neural circuits in the brain are involved in emotion-related behavior. Netrin-G1 is a glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol-anchored synaptic adhesion molecule whose deficiency results in impaired fear-like and anxiety-like behaviors under specific circumstances. To understand the cell type and circuit specificity of these responses, we generated netrin-G1 conditional knockout mice with loss of expression in cortical excitatory neurons, inhibitory neurons, or thalamic neurons. Genetic deletion of netrin-G1 in cortical excitatory neurons resulted in altered anxiety-like behavior, but intact fear-like behavior, whereas loss of netrin-G1 in inhibitory neurons resulted in attenuated fear-like behavior, but intact anxiety-like behavior. These data indicate a remarkable double dissociation of fear-like and anxiety-like behaviors involving netrin-G1 in excitatory and inhibitory neurons, respectively. Our findings support a crucial role for netrin-G1 in dissociable neural circuits for the modulation of emotion-related behaviors, and provide genetic models for investigating the mechanisms underlying the dissociation. The results also suggest the involvement of glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol-anchored synaptic adhesion molecules in the development and pathogenesis of emotion-related behavior. PMID:27345935

  7. Inhibitors of Histone Deacetylases for Radiosensitization of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-01

    was used as a loading control. Effects of candidate HDACIs and siRNA HDAC isoforms on radiation clonogenic survivals: Previously, HDAC inhibitory...by candidate HDACIs , we focused on class I HDAC isoforms. In vitro HDAC activity assays were performed using immunoprecipitates (HDAC1, HDAC2, HDAC3

  8. Overproduction of Rb protein after the G1/S boundary causes G2 arrest.

    PubMed Central

    Karantza, V; Maroo, A; Fay, D; Sedivy, J M

    1993-01-01

    The Rb protein is known to exert its activity at decision points in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. To investigate whether it may also play some role(s) at later points in the cell cycle, we used a system of rapid inducible gene amplification to conditionally overexpress Rb protein during G2 phase. A cell line expressing a temperature-sensitive simian virus 40 large T antigen (T-Ag) was stably transfected with plasmids containing the Rb cDNA linked to the simian virus 40 origin of replication: pRB-wt, pRB-fs, and pRB-Dra, carrying wild-type murine Rb cDNA, a frameshift mutation close to the beginning of the Rb coding region, and a single-amino-acid deletion in the E1A/T-Ag binding pocket, respectively. Numerous independent cell lines were isolated at the nonpermissive temperature; cell lines displaying a high level of episomal amplification of an intact Rb expression cassette following shiftdown to the permissive temperature were chosen for further analysis. Plasmid pRB-fs did not express detectable Rb antigen, while pRB-Dra expressed full-length Rb protein. The Dra mutation has previously been shown to abrogate phosphorylation as well as T-Ag binding. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis revealed that cultures induced to overexpress either wild-type or Dra mutant Rb proteins were significantly enriched for cells with a G2 DNA content. Cultures that amplified pRB-fs or rearranged pRB-wt and did not express Rb protein had normal cell cycle profiles. Double-label FACS analysis showed that cells overexpressing Rb or Rb-Dra proteins were uniformly accumulating in G2, whereas cells expressing endogenous levels of Rb were found throughout the cell cycle. These results indicate that Rb protein is interacting with some component(s) of the cell cycle-regulatory machinery during G2 phase. Images PMID:8413260

  9. Relative biological effectiveness of 6 MeV neutrons with respect to cell inactivation and disturbances of the G1 phase.

    PubMed

    Zölzer, F; Streffer, C

    2008-02-01

    The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of neutrons and other types of densely ionizing radiation appears to be close to 1.0 for the induction of strand breaks, but considerably higher RBEs have been found for cellular end points such as colony-forming ability. This may be due to differences in the processing of strand breaks or to the involvement of other lesions whose yields are more dependent on radiation quality. Because cell cycle delays may be of great importance in the processing of DNA damage, we determined the RBE for disturbances of the G1 phase in four different cell types (Be11 melanoma, 4197 squamous cell carcinoma, EA14 glioma, GM6419 fibroblasts) and compared them with the RBE for cell inactivation. The method we used to determine the progress from G1 into S was as follows: Cells were serum-deprived for a number of days and then stimulated to grow with culture medium containing normal amounts of serum. Immediately before the change of medium, cells were exposed to graded doses of either 240 kV X rays or 6 MeV neutrons. At different times afterward, cells were labeled with BrdU and the numbers of active S-phase cells were assessed using two-parameter flow cytometry. For all four cell types, cells started to progress from G1 into S after a few hours. Radiation suppressed this process in all cases, but there were some interesting differences. For Be11 and 4197 cells, the most obvious effect was a delay in G1; the labeling index increased a few hours later in irradiated samples than in controls, and there was no significant effect on the maximum labeling index. For EA14 and GM6419 cells, although smaller doses were used because of greater radiosensitivity, a delay of the entry into S phase was again noticeable, but the most significant effect was a reduction in the maximum percentage of active S-phase cells after stimulation, indicating a permanent or long-term arrest in G1. The RBE for the G1 delay was the same for all four cell types, about 2

  10. Characterization and changes in neurotrophin receptor p75-Expressing motor neurons in SOD1(G93A) G1H mice [corrected].

    PubMed

    Smith, Kevin S; Rush, Robert A; Rogers, Mary-Louise

    2015-08-01

    Mice with high numbers of the Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase-1 G93A transgene (SOD1(G93A) G1H) have become the most commonly used animal model to study amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. This study investigated changes in size, numbers, and cell stress/death markers of motor neuron numbers in G1H mice that re-express the common p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR). SOD1(G93A) G1H mice and age-matched C57BL/6J controls at 60, 80, 100, 120 days and end stage/140 days were analyzed for p75NTR, choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3), and cleaved caspase-3. In addition, motor neuron counts and soma sizes were recorded. Motor neurons re-expressing p75NTR in SOD1(G93A) G1H mice were first observed at 80 days, and this continued to 140 days, peaking at 100-120 days at ∼5%. The soma area of motor neurons re-expressing p75NTR was always 600-800 µm(2) , suggesting that these are alpha motor neurons, which was confirmed after examination of somas post injection of a retrogradely transported antibody to p75NTR in 110-day-old SOD1(G93A) G1H mice. In motor neurons not re-expressing p75NTR, the frequency of small soma 200-400 µm2 motor neurons increased, whereas the larger 600-900 µm2 motor neurons decreased with progression, indicating that large motor neurons were dying off and shrinking in the process. There was minimal coexpression of p75NTR with ATF3, a marker for cell stress, but 85% coexpressed the apoptotic marker cleaved caspase-3. These findings indicate that in SOD1(G93A) G1H mice, p75NTR re-expression is detectable from 80 days in a small population of large motor neurons that represent 5% of the total motor neurons. Furthermore, p75NTR re-expression occurs in larger alpha motor neurons that express cleaved caspsase-3 and are destined to die.

  11. HDAC2 blockade by nitric oxide and histone deacetylase inhibitors reveals a common target in Duchenne muscular dystrophy treatment

    PubMed Central

    Colussi, Claudia; Mozzetta, Chiara; Gurtner, Aymone; Illi, Barbara; Rosati, Jessica; Straino, Stefania; Ragone, Gianluca; Pescatori, Mario; Zaccagnini, Germana; Antonini, Annalisa; Minetti, Giulia; Martelli, Fabio; Piaggio, Giulia; Gallinari, Paola; Steinkuhler, Christian; Clementi, Emilio; Dell'Aversana, Carmela; Altucci, Lucia; Mai, Antonello; Capogrossi, Maurizio C.; Puri, Pier Lorenzo; Gaetano, Carlo

    2008-01-01

    The overlapping histological and biochemical features underlying the beneficial effect of deacetylase inhibitors and NO donors in dystrophic muscles suggest an unanticipated molecular link among dystrophin, NO signaling, and the histone deacetylases (HDACs). Higher global deacetylase activity and selective increased expression of the class I histone deacetylase HDAC2 were detected in muscles of dystrophin-deficient MDX mice. In vitro and in vivo siRNA-mediated down-regulation of HDAC2 in dystrophic muscles was sufficient to replicate the morphological and functional benefits observed with deacetylase inhibitors and NO donors. We found that restoration of NO signaling in vivo, by adenoviral-mediated expression of a constitutively active endothelial NOS mutant in MDX muscles, and in vitro, by exposing MDX-derived satellite cells to NO donors, resulted in HDAC2 blockade by cysteine S-nitrosylation. These data reveal a special contribution of HDAC2 in the pathogenesis of Duchenne muscular dystrophy and indicate that HDAC2 inhibition by NO-dependent S-nitrosylation is important for the therapeutic response to NO donors in MDX mice. They also define a common target for independent pharmacological interventions in the treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. PMID:19047631

  12. HDAC2 blockade by nitric oxide and histone deacetylase inhibitors reveals a common target in Duchenne muscular dystrophy treatment.

    PubMed

    Colussi, Claudia; Mozzetta, Chiara; Gurtner, Aymone; Illi, Barbara; Rosati, Jessica; Straino, Stefania; Ragone, Gianluca; Pescatori, Mario; Zaccagnini, Germana; Antonini, Annalisa; Minetti, Giulia; Martelli, Fabio; Piaggio, Giulia; Gallinari, Paola; Steinkuhler, Christian; Steinkulher, Christian; Clementi, Emilio; Dell'Aversana, Carmela; Altucci, Lucia; Mai, Antonello; Capogrossi, Maurizio C; Puri, Pier Lorenzo; Gaetano, Carlo

    2008-12-09

    The overlapping histological and biochemical features underlying the beneficial effect of deacetylase inhibitors and NO donors in dystrophic muscles suggest an unanticipated molecular link among dystrophin, NO signaling, and the histone deacetylases (HDACs). Higher global deacetylase activity and selective increased expression of the class I histone deacetylase HDAC2 were detected in muscles of dystrophin-deficient MDX mice. In vitro and in vivo siRNA-mediated down-regulation of HDAC2 in dystrophic muscles was sufficient to replicate the morphological and functional benefits observed with deacetylase inhibitors and NO donors. We found that restoration of NO signaling in vivo, by adenoviral-mediated expression of a constitutively active endothelial NOS mutant in MDX muscles, and in vitro, by exposing MDX-derived satellite cells to NO donors, resulted in HDAC2 blockade by cysteine S-nitrosylation. These data reveal a special contribution of HDAC2 in the pathogenesis of Duchenne muscular dystrophy and indicate that HDAC2 inhibition by NO-dependent S-nitrosylation is important for the therapeutic response to NO donors in MDX mice. They also define a common target for independent pharmacological interventions in the treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

  13. Binding of fusion protein FLSC IgG1 to CCR5 is enhanced by CCR5 antagonist Maraviroc.

    PubMed

    Latinovic, Olga; Schneider, Kate; Szmacinski, Henryk; Lakowicz, Joseph R; Heredia, Alonso; Redfield, Robert R

    2014-12-01

    The CCR5 chemokine receptor is crucial for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection, acting as the principal coreceptor for HIV-1 entry and transmission and is thus an attractive target for antiviral therapy. Studies have suggested that CCR5 surface density and its conformational changes subsequent to virion engagement are rate limiting for entry, and consequently, infection. Not all CCR5 antibodies inhibit HIV-1 infection, suggesting a need for more potent reagents. Here we evaluated full length single chain (FLSC) IgG1, a novel IgG-CD4-gp120(BAL) fusion protein with several characteristics that make it an attractive candidate for treatment of HIV-1 infections, including bivalency and a potentially increased serum half-life over FLSC, the parental molecule. FLSC IgG1 binds two domains on CCR5, the N-terminus and the second extracellular loop, lowering the levels of available CCR5 viral attachment sites. Furthermore, FLSC IgG1 synergizes with Maraviroc (MVC), the only licensed CCR5 antagonist. In this study, we used both microscopy and functional assays to address the mechanistic aspects of the interactions of FLSC IgG1 and MVC in the context of CCR5 conformational changes and viral infection. We used a novel stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM), based on high resolution localization of photoswitchable dyes to visualize direct contacts between FLSC IgG1 and CCR5. We compared viral entry inhibition by FLSC IgG1 with that of other CCR5 blockers and showed FLSC IgG1 to be the most potent. We also showed that lower CCR5 surface densities in HIV-1 infected primary cells result in lower FLSC IgG1 EC50 values. In addition, CCR5 binding by FLSC IgG1, but not CCR5 Ab 2D7, was significantly increased when cells were treated with MVC, suggesting MVC allosterically increases exposure of the FLSC IgG1 binding site. These data have implications for future antiviral therapy development.

  14. Orc1 Binding to Mitotic Chromosomes Precedes Spatial Patterning during G1 Phase and Assembly of the Origin Recognition Complex in Human Cells.

    PubMed

    Kara, Nihan; Hossain, Manzar; Prasanth, Supriya G; Stillman, Bruce

    2015-05-08

    Replication of eukaryotic chromosomes occurs once every cell division cycle in normal cells and is a tightly controlled process that ensures complete genome duplication. The origin recognition complex (ORC) plays a key role during the initiation of DNA replication. In human cells, the level of Orc1, the largest subunit of ORC, is regulated during the cell division cycle, and thus ORC is a dynamic complex. Upon S phase entry, Orc1 is ubiquitinated and targeted for destruction, with subsequent dissociation of ORC from chromosomes. Time lapse and live cell images of human cells expressing fluorescently tagged Orc1 show that Orc1 re-localizes to condensing chromatin during early mitosis and then displays different nuclear localization patterns at different times during G1 phase, remaining associated with late replicating regions of the genome in late G1 phase. The initial binding of Orc1 to mitotic chromosomes requires C-terminal amino acid sequences that are similar to mitotic chromosome-binding sequences in the transcriptional pioneer protein FOXA1. Depletion of Orc1 causes concomitant loss of the mini-chromosome maintenance (Mcm2-7) helicase proteins on chromatin. The data suggest that Orc1 acts as a nucleating center for ORC assembly and then pre-replication complex assembly by binding to mitotic chromosomes, followed by gradual removal from chromatin during the G1 phase.

  15. A novel nucleolar protein, PAPA-1, induces growth arrest as a result of cell cycle arrest at the G1 phase.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Taruho S; Maita, Hiroshi; Tabata, Takanori; Taira, Takahiro; Kitaura, Hirotake; Ariga, Hiroyoshi; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M M

    2004-09-29

    We have identified a novel nucleolar protein, PAP-1-associated protein-1 (PAPA-1), after screening the interacting proteins with Pim-1-associated protein-1 (PAP-1), a protein that is a phosphorylation target of Pim-1 kinase. PAPA-1 comprises 345 amino acids with a basic amino-acid cluster. PAPA-1 was found to be localized in the nucleolus in transfected HeLa cells, and the lysine/histidine cluster was essential for nucleolar localization of PAPA-1. PAPA-1 protein and mRNA expression decreased upon serum restimulation of starvation-synchronized cells, which displayed maximum level of PAPA-1 expression at G0 and early G1 phase of the cell cycle. Ectopic expression of PAPA-1 induced growth suppression of cells, and the effect was dependent on its nucleolar localization in established HeLa cell lines that inducibly express PAPA-1 or its deletion mutant under the control of a tetracycline-inducible promoter. Furthermore, when PAPA-1-inducible HeLa cells were synchronized by thymidine, colcemid or mimosine, and then PAPA-1 was expressed, the proportion of cells at the G1 phase was obviously increased. These results suggest that PAPA-1 induces growth and cell cycle arrests at the G1 phase of the cell cycle.

  16. Olive Oil Polyphenols Differentially Inhibit Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation through a G1/S Cell Cycle Block Regulated by ERK1/2

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Rei; Beckett, Joel; Abe, Ryuzo; Nixon, Alexander; Rochier, Adrienne; Yamashita, Norio; Sumpio, Bauer

    2012-01-01

    We hypothesized that polyphenols contained in olive oil play a role in reducing the risk of atherosclerosis. The aim of this study was to determine if the polyphenols in olive oil, oleuropein (Ole), hydroxytyrosol (HT), and tyrosol (Tyr) could inhibit smooth muscle cell (SMC) proliferation through its influence on cell cycle regulation. Bovine vascular SMC were cultured in the presence of Ole, HT, or Tyr at concentration of 1, 10, or 100 μmol/L. On days 1, 3, and 5, numbers of cells were counted. Cell cycle analysis was performed by flow cytometry on day 1 after SMC were stained with propidium iodide. Cell populations grown in the presence of Ole or HT at 100 μmol/L concentration were significantly inhibited after 5 days of exposure. Tyr had a similar tendency but it did not attain significance. Cell cycle analysis revealed that 66% of cells were in G1 phase in Ole group, compared with 48% in control group. To examine the cell cycle block between G1 and S phases, we performed Western blotting and found that ERK1/2 activation was inhibited by Ole or HT. We conclude that olive oil polyphenols could inhibit SMC proliferation through a cell cycle block between G1 and S phases which may be regulated by ERK1/2. These results demonstrate a mechanism by which olive oil consumption may be atheroprotective by inhibiting SMC proliferation. PMID:23730132

  17. RABL6A promotes G1-S phase progression and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor cell proliferation in an Rb1-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Hagen, Jussara; Muniz, Viviane P.; Falls, Kelly; Reed, Sara M.; Taghiyev, Agshin F.; Quelle, Frederick W.; Gourronc, Francoise; Klingelhutz, Aloysius J.; Major, Heather J.; Askeland, Ryan; Sherman, Scott K.; O'Dorisio, Thomas M.; Bellizzi, Andrew M.; Howe, James R.; Darbro, Benjamin W.; Quelle, Dawn E.

    2014-01-01

    Mechanisms of neuroendocrine tumor (NET) proliferation are poorly understood and therapies that effectively control NET progression and metastatic disease are limited. We found amplification of a putative oncogene, RABL6A, in primary human pancreatic NETs(PNETs) that correlated with high level RABL6A protein expression. Consistent with those results, stable silencing of RABL6A in cultured BON-1 PNET cells revealed that it is essential for their proliferation and survival. Cells lacking RABL6A predominantly arrested in G1 phase with a moderate mitotic block. Pathway analysis of microarray data suggested activation of the p53 and retinoblastoma (Rb1) tumor suppressor pathways in the arrested cells. Loss of p53 had no effect on the RABL6A knockdown phenotype, indicating RABL6A functions independent of p53 in this setting. By comparison, Rb1 inactivation partially restored G1 to S phase progression in RABL6A knockdown cells although it was insufficient to override the mitotic arrest and cell death caused by RABL6A loss. Thus, RABL6A promotes G1 progression in PNET cells by inactivating Rb1, an established suppressor of PNET proliferation and development. This work identifies RABL6A as a novel negative regulator of Rb1 that is essential for PNET proliferation and survival. We suggest RABL6A is a new potential biomarker and target for anticancer therapy in PNET patients. PMID:25273089

  18. RABL6A promotes G1-S phase progression and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor cell proliferation in an Rb1-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Hagen, Jussara; Muniz, Viviane P; Falls, Kelly C; Reed, Sara M; Taghiyev, Agshin F; Quelle, Frederick W; Gourronc, Francoise A; Klingelhutz, Aloysius J; Major, Heather J; Askeland, Ryan W; Sherman, Scott K; O'Dorisio, Thomas M; Bellizzi, Andrew M; Howe, James R; Darbro, Benjamin W; Quelle, Dawn E

    2014-11-15

    Mechanisms of neuroendocrine tumor (NET) proliferation are poorly understood, and therapies that effectively control NET progression and metastatic disease are limited. We found amplification of a putative oncogene, RABL6A, in primary human pancreatic NETs (PNET) that correlated with high-level RABL6A protein expression. Consistent with those results, stable silencing of RABL6A in cultured BON-1 PNET cells revealed that it is essential for their proliferation and survival. Cells lacking RABL6A predominantly arrested in G1 phase with a moderate mitotic block. Pathway analysis of microarray data suggested activation of the p53 and retinoblastoma (Rb1) tumor-suppressor pathways in the arrested cells. Loss of p53 had no effect on the RABL6A knockdown phenotype, indicating that RABL6A functions independent of p53 in this setting. By comparison, Rb1 inactivation partially restored G1 to S phase progression in RABL6A-knockdown cells, although it was insufficient to override the mitotic arrest and cell death caused by RABL6A loss. Thus, RABL6A promotes G1 progression in PNET cells by inactivating Rb1, an established suppressor of PNET proliferation and development. This work identifies RABL6A as a novel negative regulator of Rb1 that is essential for PNET proliferation and survival. We suggest RABL6A is a new potential biomarker and target for anticancer therapy in PNET patients.

  19. Reduced vasorelaxation to estradiol and G-1 in aged female and adult male rats is associated with GPR30 downregulation.

    PubMed

    Lindsey, Sarah H; da Silva, Ariel S; Silva, Mauro S; Chappell, Mark C

    2013-07-01

    Previously, we reported that chronic activation of the estrogen receptor GPR30 by its selective agonist G-1 decreases blood pressure in ovariectomized hypertensive mRen2.Lewis (mRen2) rats but not intact male littermates. Furthermore, G-1 relaxes female mesenteric resistance arteries via both endothelium-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Because of the lack of a blood pressure-lowering effect by G-1 in males and the potential influence of aging on estrogen receptor expression, we hypothesized that GPR30-dependent vasodilation and receptor expression are altered in males and aged females. Thus, we assessed the response to 17β-estradiol or G-1 in mesenteric arteries obtained from 15-wk-old normotensive Lewis and hypertensive mRen2 females and males as well as 52-wk-old Lewis females. Vasodilation to 17β-estradiol (E₂) and G-1 was significantly attenuated in 15-wk-old Lewis and mRen2 males compared with age-matched females. Pretreatment of male vessels with the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-NAME had no significant effect on the estradiol or G-1 response. In aged females, E₂ and G-1 vasorelaxation was also significantly blunted; however, L-NAME essentially abolished the response. Associated with the reduced vascular responses, GPR30 expression in mesenteric arteries was approximately 50% lower in males and aged females compared with young females. We conclude that alterations in GPR30 expression and signaling may contribute to vascular dysfunction in aging females and a greater blood pressure in hypertensive males.

  20. A functional genome-wide genetic screening identifies new pathways controlling the G1/S transcriptional wave.

    PubMed

    Gaspa, Laura; González-Medina, Alberto; Hidalgo, Elena; Ayté, José

    2016-01-01

    The Schizosaccharomyces pombe MBF complex activates the transcription of genes required for DNA synthesis and S phase. The MBF complex contains several proteins, including the core components Cdc10, Res1 and Res2, the co-repressor proteins Yox1 and Nrm1 and the co-activator Rep2. It has recently been shown how MBF is regulated when either the DNA damage or the DNA synthesis checkpoints are activated. However, how MBF is regulated in a normal unperturbed cell cycle is still not well understood. We have set up a genome-wide genomic screen searching for global regulators of MBF. We have crossed our knock-out collection library with a reporter strain that allows the measurement of MBF activity in live cells by flow cytometry. We confirm previously known regulators of MBF and show that COP9/signalosome and tRNA methyltransferases also regulate MBF activity.

  1. [Cloning, expression and biochemical characterization of a novel diacetylchitobiose deacetylase from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus horikoshii].

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; Ni, Jin-Feng; Shen, Yu-Long

    2006-04-01

    Chitin is the second most abundant organic compound in nature and the degradation of this biomass is an important process in the recycling of nutrients in the environments. Several biodegradation pathway of chitin have been classified in eukaryotes and bacteria, and a unique chitin degradation pathway was proposed according to recent studies on hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus kodakaraensis. In the genome of Pyrococcus horikoshii, several ORFs show high homology to the chitin-degrading related genes from T. kodakararaensis, therefore P. horikoshii is likely to have the same chitin degrading pathway as that of T. kodakaraensis. In order to further characterize the novel chitin degrading pathway in thermophilic archaea, a diacetylchitobiose deacetylase from P. horikoshii (Dacph) was studied in the present study. Dacph belongs to the LmbE-like protein family and the amino sequence is not related to the other deacetylases studied before (except that in T. kodakararaensis). The gene (Dacph, PH0499) from the hyperthermophilic archaeon P. horikoshii was amplified by polymerase chain reaction, cloned into expression vector pET15b, and expressed in E. coli BL21-codonPlus (DE3)-RIL. A soluble fraction of Dacph (31.6kDa) was obtained as shown by SDS-PAGE. TLC analysis showed that Dacph is able to deacetylate one acetyl group of GlcNAc2 and GlcNAc. By the concerted reaction with the Exo-beta-D-Glucosaminid-ase (BglAph), it is also able to convert GlcNAc2 into GlcN. It is concluded that PH0499 is a diacetylchit-obiose deacetylase. By reaction together with Exo-beta-D-Glucosaminidase in P. horikoshii, Dacph probably plays a key role in the new chitin degradation pathway in hyperthermophilic archaea (the genera Thermococcus and Pyrococcus).

  2. Panobinostat (LBH589): a potent pan-deacetylase inhibitor with promising activity against hematologic and solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Prince, H Miles; Bishton, Mark J; Johnstone, Ricky W

    2009-06-01

    The deacetylase inhibitors are a structurally diverse class of targeted antineoplastic agents that have demonstrated in vitro and in vivo preclinical activity in a wide range of malignancies. Based on this preclinical activity, several deacetylase inhibitors have undergone rapid clinical development in recent years. Among these, the deacetylase inhibitor panobinostat is one of the most widely studied, with extensive pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic and dose-finding data available across a wide variety of hematologic and solid tumors. Furthermore, panobinostat has demonstrated favorable clinical activity against various hematologic malignancies, most notably lymphomas and myeloid malignancies in Phase I and II studies. In this article, we discuss the preclinical data on panobinostat and emerging data from Phase I and II studies in cancer patients.

  3. Efficacy of Combined Histone Deacetylase and Checkpoint Kinase Inhibition in a Preclinical Model of Human Burkitt Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Kong, YanGuo; Barisone, Gustavo A; Sidhu, Ranjit S; O’Donnell, Robert T; Tuscano, Joseph M

    2015-01-01

    Checkpoint kinase inhibition has been studied as a way of enhancing the effectiveness of DNA-damaging agents. More recently, histone deacetylase inhibitors have shown efficacy in several cancers, including non-Hodgkin lymphoma. To evaluate the effectiveness of this combination for the treatment of lymphoma, we examined the combination of AR42, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, and checkpoint kinase 2 (CHEK2) inhibitor II in vitro and in vivo. The combination resulted in up to 10-fold increase in potency in five Burkitt lymphoma cell lines when compared with either drug alone. Both drugs inhibited tumor progression in xenograft models, but the combination was more effective than either agent alone, resulting in regression of established tumors. No toxicity was observed. These results suggest that the combination of histone deacetylase inhibition and checkpoint kinase inhibition represent an effective and nontoxic treatment option that should be further explored in preclinical and clinical studies. PMID:26322845

  4. A Photoactivatable Platinum(IV) Complex Targeting Genomic DNA and Histone Deacetylases.

    PubMed

    Kasparkova, Jana; Kostrhunova, Hana; Novakova, Olga; Křikavová, Radka; Vančo, Ján; Trávníček, Zdeněk; Brabec, Viktor

    2015-11-23

    We report toxic effects of a photoactivatable platinum(IV) complex conjugated with suberoyl-bis-hydroxamic acid in tumor cells. The conjugate exerts, after photoactivation, two functions: activity as both a platinum(II) anticancer drug and histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor in cancer cells. This approach relies on the use of a Pt(IV) pro-drug, acting by two independent mechanisms of biological action in a cooperative manner, which can be selectively photoactivated to a cytotoxic species in and around a tumor, thereby increasing selectivity towards cancer cells. These results suggest that this strategy is a valuable route to design new platinum agents with higher efficacy for photodynamic anticancer chemotherapy.

  5. Histone deacetylase inhibitors relieve morphine resistance in neuropathic pain after peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Hitoshi; Matsushita, Yosuke; Araki, Kohei; Mukae, Takehiro; Ueda, Hiroshi

    2015-08-01

    Neuropathic pain is often insensitive to morphine. Our previous study has demonstrated that neuron-restrictive silencer factor represses mu opioid receptor (MOP) gene expression in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) via histone hypoacetylation-mediated mechanisms after peripheral nerve injury, thereby causing loss of peripheral morphine analgesia. Here, we showed that histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors, such as trichostatin A and valproic acid, restored peripheral and systemic morphine analgesia in neuropathic pain. Also, these agents blocked nerve injury-induced MOP down-regulation in the DRG. These results suggest that HDAC inhibitors could serve as adjuvant analgesics to morphine for the management of neuropathic pain.

  6. Computational identification of novel histone deacetylase inhibitors by docking based QSAR.

    PubMed

    Nair, Syam B; Teli, Mahesh Kumar; Pradeep, H; Rajanikant, G K

    2012-06-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are enzymes that modify chromatin structure and contribute to aberrant gene expression in cancer. A series compounds with well-assigned HDAC inhibitory activity was used for docking based 3D-QSAR analysis. The 3D-QSAR acquired had excellent correlation coefficient value (q2=0.753) and high Fisher ratio (F=300.2). A validated pharmacophore model (AAAPR) was employed for virtual screening. After manual selection, molecular docking and further refinement, six compounds with good absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) properties were selected as potential HDAC inhibitors. Further, the molecular interactions of these inhibitors with the HDAC active site residues were discussed in detail.

  7. Histone deacetylase 6 promotes growth of glioblastoma through inhibition of SMAD2 signaling.

    PubMed

    Li, Shun; Liu, Xiao; Chen, Xiangrong; Zhang, Liu; Wang, Xiangyu

    2015-12-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) play a role in the tumorigenesis of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), whereas the underlying mechanism has not been elucidated. Here, we reported significantly higher HDAC6 levels in GBM from the patients. GBM cell growth was significantly inhibited by ACY-1215, a specific HDAC6 inhibitor. Further analyses show that HDAC6 may promote growth of GBM cells through inhibition of SMAD2 phosphorylation to downregulate p21. Thus, our data demonstrate a previously unrecognized regulation pathway in that HDAC6 increases GBM growth through attenuating transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) receptor signaling.

  8. Synthesis and biological evaluation of histone deacetylase inhibitors that are based on FR235222

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Erinprit K.; Ravula, Suchitra; Pan, Chung-Mao; Pan, Po-Shen; Vasko, Robert C.; Lapera, Stephanie A.; Weerasinghe, Sujith V. W.; Pflum, Mary Kay H.; McAlpine, Shelli R.

    2008-01-01

    We outline the synthesis of six novel derivatives that are based on a recently discovered HDAC inhibitor FR235222. Our work is the first report utilizing a novel binding element, guanidine, as metal coordinators in HDAC inhibitors. Further, we demonstrate that these compounds show cytotoxicity that parallels their ability to inhibit deacetylase activity, and that the most potent compounds maintain an l-Phe at position 1, and a d-Pro at position 4. Both inhibition of HDAC activity and cytotoxicity against the pancreatic cancer cell line BxPC3 are exhibited by these compounds, establishing that a guanidine unit can be utilized successfully to inhibit HDAC activity. PMID:18381239

  9. 1,3,4-Oxadiazole-containing histone deacetylase inhibitors: anticancer activities in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Valente, Sergio; Trisciuoglio, Daniela; De Luca, Teresa; Nebbioso, Angela; Labella, Donatella; Lenoci, Alessia; Bigogno, Chiara; Dondio, Giulio; Miceli, Marco; Brosch, Gerald; Del Bufalo, Donatella; Altucci, Lucia; Mai, Antonello

    2014-07-24

    We describe 1,3,4-oxadiazole-containing hydroxamates (2) and 2-aminoanilides (3) as histone deacetylase inhibitors. Among them, 2t, 2x, and 3i were the most potent and selective against HDAC1. In U937 leukemia cells, 2t was more potent than SAHA in inducing apoptosis, and 3i displayed cell differentiation with a potency similar to MS-275. In several acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cell lines, as well as in U937 cells in combination with doxorubicin, 3i showed higher antiproliferative effects than SAHA.

  10. Transcriptional activation of NAD{sup +}-dependent protein deacetylase SIRT1 by nuclear receptor TLX

    SciTech Connect

    Iwahara, Naotoshi; Hisahara, Shin; Hayashi, Takashi; Horio, Yoshiyuki

    2009-09-04

    An orphan nuclear receptor TLX is a transcriptional repressor that promotes the proliferation and self-renewal of neural precursor cells (NPCs). SIRT1, an NAD{sup +}-dependent protein deacetylase, is highly expressed in the NPCs and participates in neurogenesis. Here, we found that TLX colocalized with SIRT1 and knockdown of TLX by small interfering RNAs decreased SIRT1 levels in NPCs. TLX increased the SIRT1 expression by binding to the newly identified TLX-activating element in the SIRT1 gene promoter in HEK293 cells. Thus, TLX is an inducer of SIRT1 and may contribute to neurogenesis both as a transactivator and as a repressor.

  11. Statistical optimization for production of chitin deacetylase from Rhodococcus erythropolis HG05.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuying; Zhang, Jiquan; Wu, Shengjun; Wang, Shujun

    2014-02-15

    A strain producing chitin deacetylase (CDA) was isolated and identified as Rhodococcus erythropolis by morphological characteristics and 16S rDNA analysis, named as R. erythropolis HG05. By Plackett-Burman and central composite design, CDA production from R. erythropolis HG05 was increased from 58.00 U/mL to 238.89 U/mL. With the crude enzyme from R. erythropolis HG05, the hydrolysate components from colloid chitin were chito-oligosaccharides with polymerization number larger than hexaose.

  12. Isoform-specific toxicity of Mecp2 in postmitotic neurons: Suppression of neurotoxicity by FoxG1

    PubMed Central

    Dastidar, Somasish Ghosh; Bardai, Farah H.; Ma, Chi; Price, Valerie; Rawat, Varun; Verma, Pragya; Narayanan, Vinodh; D’Mello, Santosh R.

    2012-01-01

    The methyl-CpG Binding Protein 2 (MeCP2) is a widely expressed protein, mutations of which cause Rett syndrome. The level of MeCP2 is highest in the brain where it is expressed selectively in mature neurons. Its functions in postmitotic neurons are not known. The MeCP2 gene is alternatively-spliced to generate two proteins with different N-termini, designated as MeCP2-e1 and MeCP2-e2. The physiological significance of these two isoforms has not been elucidated and it is generally assumed they are functionally equivalent. We report that in cultured cerebellar granule neurons induced to die by low potassium treatment and in Aβ-treated cortical neurons, Mecp2-e2 expression is upregulated whereas expression of the Mecp2-e1 isoform is downregulated. Knockdown of Mecp2-e2 protects neurons from death whereas knockdown of the e1 isoform has no effect. Forced expression of MeCP2-e2, but not MeCP2-e1, promotes apoptosis in otherwise healthy neurons. We find that MeCP2-e2 interacts with the forkhead protein FoxG1, mutations of which also cause Rett syndrome. FoxG1 has been shown to promote neuronal survival and its downregulation leads to neuronal death. We find that elevated FoxG1 expression inhibits MeCP2-e2 neurotoxicity. MeCP2-e2 neurotoxicity is also inhibited by IGF-1, which prevents the neuronal death-associated downregulation of FoxG1 expression, and by Akt, activation of which is necessary for FoxG1-mediated neuroprotection. Finally, MeCP2-e2 neurotoxicity is enhanced if FoxG1 expression is suppressed or in neurons cultured from FoxG1-haplodeficient mice. Our results indicate that Mecp2-e2 promotes neuronal death and that this activity is normally inhibited by FoxG1. Reduced FoxG1expression frees Mecp2-e2 to promote neuronal death. PMID:22357867

  13. Characterization of cysteine-linked conjugation profiles of immunoglobulin G1 and immunoglobulin G2 antibody-drug conjugates.

    PubMed

    Wiggins, Brian; Liu-Shin, Lily; Yamaguchi, Hideto; Ratnaswamy, Gayathri

    2015-04-01

    Two US FDA-approved antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs; Kadcyla(®) and Adcetris(®) ) have accelerated clinical interest in the potential of targeted cancer therapeutics as the next generation of oncology drugs that are designed to increase efficacy while reducing overall toxicity. Thiol conjugates are produced by partial reduction of the interchain disulfides, followed by conjugation with a drug-linker, resulting in a heterogeneous mix of molecules that differ with respect to the site of conjugation and the number of drugs per antibody. ADCs that have been characterized in this class have an immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) framework and there is little information available on IgG2 ADCs. As IgG1s and IgG2s differ in the number of disulfides and molecular conformations, each subclass could lead to unique combinations of possible conjugation sites. We conducted in-depth characterization of two ADCs, an IgG1 and an IgG2 conjugated to monomethyl auristatin E. The results demonstrate that the IgG1 monoclonal antibodies favor conjugation to the cysteines between the light and heavy chains, whereas IgG2s demonstrate preference for the hinge region cysteines. The drug-loading distribution and conjugation sites of ADCs have been reported to influence pharmacokinetics, toxicity, and clearance. Therefore, an understanding of the conjugation profiles is important for the selection and engineering of ADCs.

  14. Myocarditis in different experimental models infected by Trypanosoma cruzi is correlated with the production of IgG1 isotype.

    PubMed

    Caldas, Ivo Santana; Diniz, Livia de Figueiredo; Guedes, Paulo Marcos da Matta; Nascimento, Álvaro Fernando da Silva do; Galvão, Lúcia Maria da Cunha; Lima, Wanderson Geraldo de; Caldas, Sérgio; Bahia, Maria Terezinha

    2017-03-01

    This study was designed to verify the relationship between IgG antibodies isotypes and myocarditis in Trypanosoma cruzi infection using mice and dogs infected with different T. cruzi strains. The animals were infected with benznidazole-susceptible Berenice-78 and benznidazole-resistant AAS and VL-10 strains. The IgG subtypes were measured in serum samples from dogs (IgG, IgG1, and IgG2) and mice (IgG, IgG1, IgG2a, and IgG2b). The infection of dogs with VL-10 strain induced the highest levels of heart inflammation while intermediate and lower levels were detected with Berenice-78 and AAS strains, respectively. Similar results were found in mice infected with VL-10, but not in those infected with AAS or Berenice-78 strains. The AAS strain induced higher levels of heart inflammation in mice, while Berenice-78 strain was not able to induce it. Correlation analysis between myocarditis and antibody reactivity index revealed very interesting results, mainly for IgG and IgG1, the latter being the most exciting. High IgG1 showed a significant correlation with myocarditis in both experimental models, being more significant in dogs (r=0.94, p<0.0001) than in mice (r=0.58, p=0.047). Overall, our data suggest that IgG1 could be a good marker to demonstrate myocarditis intensity in Chagas disease.

  15. Impacts, Effectiveness and Regional Inequalities of the GeoMIP G1 to G4 Solar Radiation Management Scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Xiaoyong; Moore, John; Cui, Xuefeng; Rinke, Annette; Ji, Duoying; Kravitz, Benjamin S.; Yoon, Jin-Ho

    2015-06-01

    We evaluate the regional effectiveness of solar radiation management (SRM) to compensate for simultaneous changes in temperature and precipitation induced by increased greenhouse gas concentrations. We analyze results from multiple earth system models under four Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project(GeoMIP) experiments with a modified form of the Residual Climate Response approach. Under the solar dimming geoengineering experiments G1(4xCO2) and G2(increasing CO2 by 1% per year), global average temperature is successfully restored to pre-industrial level over 50 years simulations. However, these two SRM experiments also produce a robust global precipitation decrease. The stratospheric aerosol GeoMIP geoengineering experiment, G4 has significantly greater regional inequality and lower effectiveness for compensating temperature change than G1 and G2. G4 also has significantly larger regional inequality for compensating precipitation change than G1and G2. However, there is no significant difference between precipitation change compensation effectiveness of G4 and G2, though there is much larger across model variability in G4 results. G3 has significant greater regional inequality for compensating temperature change than G1 and G2, and has significant lower effectiveness than G1. The effectiveness of four SRMs to compensate for temperature change is much higher than for precipitation. The large cross-model variation in adjustment percentage of compensated SAT and precipitation change by SRM to achieve optimal compensation effectiveness shed a light on the uncertainty accumulation effect in optimizing compensation effectiveness of SRM.

  16. Molecular dynamics simulation of the crystallizable fragment of IgG1-insights for the design of Fcabs.

    PubMed

    Lai, Balder; Hasenhindl, Christoph; Obinger, Christian; Oostenbrink, Chris

    2014-01-02

    An interesting format in the development of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies uses the crystallizable fragment of IgG1 as starting scaffold. Engineering of its structural loops allows generation of an antigen binding site. However, this might impair the molecule's conformational stability, which can be overcome by introducing stabilizing point mutations in the CH3 domains. These point mutations often affect the stability and unfolding behavior of both the CH2 and CH3 domains. In order to understand this cross-talk, molecular dynamics simulations of the domains of the Fc fragment of human IgG1 are reported. The structure of human IgG1-Fc obtained from X-ray crystallography is used as a starting point for simulations of the wild-type protein at two different pH values. The stabilizing effect of a single point mutation in the CH3 domain as well as the impact of the hinge region and the glycan tree structure connected to the CH2 domains is investigated. Regions of high local flexibility were identified as potential sites for engineering antigen binding sites. Obtained data are discussed with respect to the available X-ray structure of IgG1-Fc, directed evolution approaches that screen for stability and use of the scaffold IgG1-Fc in the design of antigen binding Fc proteins.

  17. A seasonal switch in histone deacetylase gene expression in the hypothalamus and their capacity to modulate nuclear signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Stoney, Patrick N; Rodrigues, Diana; Helfer, Gisela; Khatib, Thabat; Ashton, Anna; Hay, Elizabeth A; Starr, Robert; Kociszewska, Dagmara; Morgan, Peter; McCaffery, Peter

    2017-03-01

    Seasonal animals undergo changes in physiology and behavior between summer and winter conditions. These changes are in part driven by a switch in a series of hypothalamic genes under transcriptional control by hormones and, of recent interest, inflammatory factors. Crucial to the control of transcription are histone deacetylases (HDACs), generally acting to repress transcription by local histone modification. Seasonal changes in hypothalamic HDAC transcripts were investigated in photoperiod-sensitive F344 rats by altering the day-length (photoperiod). HDAC4, 6 and 9 were found to change in expression. The potential influence of HDACs on two hypothalamic signaling pathways that regulate transcription, inflammatory and nuclear receptor signaling, was investigated. For inflammatory signaling the focus was on NF-κB because of the novel finding made that its expression is seasonally regulated in the rat hypothalamus. For nuclear receptor signaling it was discovered that expression of retinoic acid receptor beta was regulated seasonally. HDAC modulation of NF-κB-induced pathways was examined in a hypothalamic neuronal cell line and primary hypothalamic tanycytes. HDAC4/5/6 inhibition altered the control of gene expression (Fos, Prkca, Prkcd and Ptp1b) by inducers of NF-κB that activate inflammation. These inhibitors also modified the action of nuclear receptor ligands thyroid hormone and retinoic acid. Thus seasonal changes in HDAC4 and 6 have the potential to epigenetically modify multiple gene regulatory pathways in the hypothalamus that could act to limit inflammatory pathways in the hypothalamus during long-day summer-like conditions.

  18. 3,3'-Diindolylmethane induces G1 arrest and apoptosis in human acute T-cell lymphoblastic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Shorey, Lyndsey E; Hagman, Amanda M; Williams, David E; Ho, Emily; Dashwood, Roderick H; Benninghoff, Abby D

    2012-01-01

    Certain bioactive food components, including indole-3-carbinol (I3C) and 3,3'-diindolylmethane (DIM) from cruciferous vegetables, have been shown to target cellular pathways regulating carcinogenesis. Previously, our laboratory showed that dietary I3C is an effective transplacental chemopreventive agent in a dibenzo[def,p]chrysene (DBC)-dependent model of murine T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma. The primary objective of the present study was to extend our chemoprevention studies in mice to an analogous human neoplasm in cell culture. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that I3C or DIM may be chemotherapeutic in human