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Sample records for death linking sister

  1. Overlap microtubules link sister k-fibres and balance the forces on bi-oriented kinetochores

    PubMed Central

    Kajtez, Janko; Solomatina, Anastasia; Novak, Maja; Polak, Bruno; Vukušić, Kruno; Rüdiger, Jonas; Cojoc, Gheorghe; Milas, Ana; Šumanovac Šestak, Ivana; Risteski, Patrik; Tavano, Federica; Klemm, Anna H.; Roscioli, Emanuele; Welburn, Julie; Cimini, Daniela; Glunčić, Matko; Pavin, Nenad; Tolić, Iva M.

    2016-01-01

    During metaphase, forces on kinetochores are exerted by k-fibres, bundles of microtubules that end at the kinetochore. Interestingly, non-kinetochore microtubules have been observed between sister kinetochores, but their function is unknown. Here we show by laser-cutting of a k-fibre in HeLa and PtK1 cells that a bundle of non-kinetochore microtubules, which we term ‘bridging fibre', bridges sister k-fibres and balances the interkinetochore tension. We found PRC1 and EB3 in the bridging fibre, suggesting that it consists of antiparallel dynamic microtubules. By using a theoretical model that includes a bridging fibre, we show that the forces at the pole and at the kinetochore depend on the bridging fibre thickness. Moreover, our theory and experiments show larger relaxation of the interkinetochore distance for cuts closer to kinetochores. We conclude that the bridging fibre, by linking sister k-fibres, withstands the tension between sister kinetochores and enables the spindle to obtain a curved shape. PMID:26728792

  2. The origin recognition complex links replication, sister chromatid cohesion and transcriptional silencing in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Suter, Bernhard; Tong, Amy; Chang, Michael; Yu, Lisa; Brown, Grant W; Boone, Charles; Rine, Jasper

    2004-01-01

    Mutations in genes encoding the origin recognition complex (ORC) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae affect initiation of DNA replication and transcriptional repression at the silent mating-type loci. To explore the function of ORC in more detail, a screen for genetic interactions was undertaken using large-scale synthetic lethal analysis. Combination of orc2-1 and orc5-1 alleles with the complete set of haploid deletion mutants revealed synthetic lethal/sick phenotypes with genes involved in DNA replication, chromatin structure, checkpoints, DNA repair and recombination, and other genes that were unexpected on the basis of previous studies of ORC. Many of these genetic interactions are shared with other genes that are involved in initiation of DNA replication. Strong synthetic interactions were demonstrated with null mutations in genes that contribute to sister chromatid cohesion. A genetic interaction between orc5-1 and the cohesin mutant scc1-73 suggested that ORC function contributes to sister chromatid cohesion. Thus, comprehensive screening for genetic interactions with a replication gene revealed a connection between initiation of DNA replication and sister chromatid cohesion. Further experiments linked sister chromatid cohesion genes to silencing at mating-type loci and telomeres. PMID:15238513

  3. Tantalizing Thanatos: unexpected links in death pathways.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Isabelle; Castedo, Maria; Kroemer, Guido

    2002-07-01

    Cell death is most frequently the result of apoptosis, an event that is often controlled by mitochondrial membrane permeabilization (MMP). Recent data reveal unexpected functional links between apoptosis and autophagic cell death, in the sense that MMP can trigger autophagy of damaged mitochondria. Conversely, one of the major signal-transducing molecules involved in the activation of autophagy during apoptosis--the so-called DAP kinase--can induce cell death through MMP. Connections are also emerging between apoptosis, autophagy, replicative senescence and cancer-specific metabolic changes. PMID:12185842

  4. Sickle Cell Trait Not Linked to Early Death in Study

    MedlinePlus

    ... html Sickle Cell Trait Not Linked to Early Death in Study However, black soldiers with the gene ... cell gene variant, are at risk of premature death. People with the sickle cell gene variant do ...

  5. Ctf4 Links DNA Replication with Sister Chromatid Cohesion Establishment by Recruiting the Chl1 Helicase to the Replisome.

    PubMed

    Samora, Catarina P; Saksouk, Julie; Goswami, Panchali; Wade, Ben O; Singleton, Martin R; Bates, Paul A; Lengronne, Armelle; Costa, Alessandro; Uhlmann, Frank

    2016-08-01

    DNA replication during S phase is accompanied by establishment of sister chromatid cohesion to ensure faithful chromosome segregation. The Eco1 acetyltransferase, helped by factors including Ctf4 and Chl1, concomitantly acetylates the chromosomal cohesin complex to stabilize its cohesive links. Here we show that Ctf4 recruits the Chl1 helicase to the replisome via a conserved interaction motif that Chl1 shares with GINS and polymerase α. We visualize recruitment by EM analysis of a reconstituted Chl1-Ctf4-GINS assembly. The Chl1 helicase facilitates replication fork progression under conditions of nucleotide depletion, partly independently of Ctf4 interaction. Conversely, Ctf4 interaction, but not helicase activity, is required for Chl1's role in sister chromatid cohesion. A physical interaction between Chl1 and the cohesin complex during S phase suggests that Chl1 contacts cohesin to facilitate its acetylation. Our results reveal how Ctf4 forms a replisomal interaction hub that coordinates replication fork progression and sister chromatid cohesion establishment. PMID:27397686

  6. Oscillation death in diffusively coupled oscillators by local repulsive link.

    PubMed

    Hens, C R; Olusola, Olasunkanmi I; Pal, Pinaki; Dana, Syamal K

    2013-09-01

    A death of oscillation is reported in a network of coupled synchronized oscillators in the presence of additional repulsive coupling. The repulsive link evolves as an averaging effect of mutual interaction between two neighboring oscillators due to a local fault and the number of repulsive links grows in time when the death scenario emerges. Analytical condition for oscillation death is derived for two coupled Landau-Stuart systems. Numerical results also confirm oscillation death in chaotic systems such as a Sprott system and the Rössler oscillator. We explore the effect in large networks of globally coupled oscillators and find that the number of repulsive links is always fewer than the size of the network.

  7. Cervix smear abnormalities: linking pathology data in female twins, their mothers and sisters.

    PubMed

    Vink, Jacqueline M; van Kemenade, Folkert J; Meijer, Chris J L M; Casparie, Mariel K; Meijer, Gerrit A; Boomsma, Dorret I

    2011-01-01

    Mass screening for cervical cancer precursors has decreased the incidence of cervical cancer in several countries, including the Netherlands. Persistent infections of certain types of human papillomavirus are strongly associated with the development of cervical cancer. A number of factors may affect the liability to infection and subsequent progression to cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and cancer. This paper examines whether genetic factors are involved in explaining individual differences in liability. Data of 3178 women registered with the Netherlands Twin Register were successfully linked to the nationwide Dutch Pathology database that contains all results of mass screening for cervical cancer. The data from mono- and dizygotic twins and their female relatives were used to disentangle the influence of heritable and environmental factors on cervix smear abnormalities. Results showed that differences in cervix smear results clustered within families and resemblance was stronger in monozygotic twins (correlation 0.37, 95% confidence interval: 0.12-0.58) compared with other first-degree relatives (correlation 0.14, 95% confidence interval: -0.01-0.29). The familial clustering for an abnormal cervix smear is due to shared genetic factors that explain 37% of the variance in liability. The largest proportion of the variation in cervical smear abnormalities is due to unique environmental factors.

  8. The Link between Health Education and Death Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noland, Melody Powers; Crosby, Richard A.

    1983-01-01

    This article discusses: (1) how death education came to be part of health education; (2) a rationale for including death education in the health education curriculum; and (3) the need to articulate this rationale to the public and to educators. Social, physical, mental, and spiritual aspects of death/health education are explained. (PP)

  9. [What is the link between the sister of the "Titanic" and the history of medicine in Palestine?].

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Zalman

    2006-06-01

    On 21st November 1916, the Royal Navy Hospital ship 'Britannic' (the sister ship of the 'Titanic') was torpedoed near the island of Kea in the Aegean Sea. Captain Dr. John Cropper, aged 52, was one of 30 people who drowned of the 1100 on board. Dr. Cropper was born in 1864, at Guisborough, England. He obtained his medical degree from Cambridge University in 1891. After his marriage to Anne Ellen Walker in 1895, the Church Missionary Society sent him on a medical mission to Palestine. Dr. Cropper stayed in Palestine for about 10 years working in Acre, Nablus, Ramallah and Jerusalem. He published his experiences in 35 articles and letters in English medical periodicals, more than anyone else did in Palestine at that time. In those publications, he described various operations that he carried out and observations on infectious diseases, most of which were the first descriptions from that remote and unhealthy country. His prominent research was in the field of malaria - the most common and important disease in Palestine during that period. It was less than two years after Grassi's discovery of the role of Anopheles mosquitoes as the vector of human malaria that Dr. Cropper carried out surveys of larval and adult mosquitoes in correlation with malarial distribution in Palestine. Dr. Cropper was the first who routinely examined slides microscopically in Palestine and correctly diagnosed the type of malaria. Dr. Cropper was also the first in Palestine to suggest antimalarial measures aimed directly at the mosquito vector and paid attention to ecological aspects such as breeding places and the daily behavior of adult mosquitoes. Dr. Cropper noted the common antimalarial measurements of that time, such as covering of wells, planting of Eucalyptus trees to drain swamps and the routine use of quinine as a preventive medicine, but he wrote that those measures were not effective under the local conditions. He suggested that the only effective measures must be aimed against the

  10. Medico legal investigations into sudden sniffing deaths linked with trichloroethylene.

    PubMed

    Da Broi, Ugo; Colatutto, Antonio; Sala, Pierguido; Desinan, Lorenzo

    2015-08-01

    Sudden deaths attributed to sniffing trichloroethylene are caused by the abuse of this solvent which produces pleasant inebriating effects with rapid dissipation. In the event of repeated cycles of inhalation, a dangerous and uncontrolled systemic accumulation of trichloroethylene may occur, followed by central nervous system depression, coma and lethal cardiorespiratory arrest. Sometimes death occurs outside the hospital environment, without medical intervention or witnesses and without specific necroscopic signs. Medico legal investigations into sudden sniffing deaths associated with trichloroethylene demand careful analysis of the death scene and related circumstances, a detailed understanding of the deceased's medical history and background of substance abuse and an accurate evaluation of all autopsy and laboratory data, with close cooperation between the judiciary, coroners and toxicologists.

  11. Ectrodactyly in sisters and half sisters.

    PubMed Central

    Mufti, M H; Wood, S K

    1987-01-01

    An extended family is described in which four sisters and half sisters presented with ectrodactyly. Two of the sisters had associated agenesis of the tibiae. The paper describes the malformations and discusses the management and possible genetic inheritance involved. An autosomal recessive gene seems likely to be the mode of inheritance. Images PMID:3585937

  12. SUMOylation and Potassium Channels: Links to Epilepsy and Sudden Death.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hongmei; Chen, Xu; Cheng, Jinke; Qi, Yitao

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal potassium ion channels play an essential role in the generation of the action potential and excitability of neurons. The dysfunction of ion channel subunits can cause channelopathies, which are associated in some cases with sudden unexplained death in epilepsy SUDEP. The physiological roles of neuronal ion channels have been largely determined, but little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying neurological channelopathies, especially the determinants of the channels' regulation. SUMO (small ubiquitin-like modifier) proteins covalently conjugate lysine residues in a large number of target proteins and modify their functions. SUMO modification (SUMOylation) has emerged as an important regulatory mechanism for protein stability, function, subcellular localization, and protein-protein interactions. Since SUMO was discovered almost 20 years ago, the biological contribution of SUMOylation has not fully understood. It is until recently that the physiological impacts of SUMOylation on the regulation of neuronal potassium ion channels have been investigated. It is well established that SUMOylation controls many aspects of nuclear function, but it is now clear that it is also a key determinant in the function of potassium channels, and SUMOylation has also been implicated in a wide range of channelopathies, including epilepsy and sudden death. PMID:26920693

  13. Using linked birth and infant death files for program planning and evaluation: NIMS workshop lessons.

    PubMed

    Zahniser, C; Halpin, G; Hollinshead, W; Kessel, S; Koontz, A

    1987-01-01

    Health planners should base program decisions on the best information available. Combining information from different sources can be valuable in identifying problems--the essential first step in program planning. To facilitate this process, a workshop was conducted during the National Infant Mortality Surveillance Conference in Atlanta, GA. Maternal and child health directors explored the use of linked birth and infant death data for program planning and evaluation. Linked birth and infant death certificate files permit evaluation of infant mortality by birth weight and other infant and maternal characteristics, thus providing more detailed information than birth or death certificates alone. An assessment of the birth weight distribution of live births, birth weight specific-mortality risks, distribution of deaths by birth weight, and birth weight-specific causes of death can help identify problems in the childbearing population and with the delivery of health services. Once the infant health problems are defined clearly, the selection and delivery of services can be better targeted and evaluated for the reduction of these problems.

  14. Sisters in Dutch hospitals.

    PubMed

    van den Bergh-Braam, A H

    1985-11-01

    This study focuses on hospital sisters in 30 Dutch hospitals. The so-called role-set approach has been adopted. In this approach the sisters are the focal persons. Direct superiors, specialists, registered nurses and student nurses acted as role-senders. The possible number of respondents is 600 (120 of each group). The response of hospital sisters is 100%, that of role-senders 88%. The study started out as an attempt to collect background information on the causes of wastage of sisters. High wastage rates are generally regarded as an indication of an unfavourable working environment. Since hospital sisters occupy a key position in hospitals, the ward problems will be studied from their angle. Although wastage rates have dropped recently, it does not necessarily follow that the working environment has improved. Wastage is known to act as a safety valve, thus allowing tensions to resolve. The threat of unemployment clogs this outlet, which increases the tensions on the hospital ward. Data from the study show that work overload is one of the major stress factors for sisters. Analyses demonstrated that there exists a relationship between work overload and tensions with the management and direct superiors, tensions in job execution, irritableness on the ward, low self-esteem, health complaints and psychological condition. Sisters with an excessive job involvement refer to work overload more often than their moderate colleagues. There is a relationship between an unfavourable working environment and irritableness of sisters.

  15. [Death].

    PubMed

    Ribas, Jordi Domingo

    2003-12-01

    Intercultural factors are essential for reflection. In this article, the authors deals with a more direct vision on the special edition about Grief and Mourning, about the topic which lies in the depths of all of our consciences: death and the question what lies beyond death? The author provides us elements to reflect about concepts, some accepted in various cases, rejected in others, but always polemical, which help us to penetrate farther into the real mystery of life: death and what follows death.

  16. Goddard Welcomes SISTER

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., hosted a weeklong summer institute, SISTER, for the purpose of increasing the awareness of and providing opportunities for middle school girls to ...

  17. One Sister's Story

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues One Sister's Story Past Issues / Fall 2006 Table of Contents For ... afraid of not understanding what the doctor is telling us, and we infrequently participate in research studies. ...

  18. Embryonic death is linked to maternal identity in the leatherback turtle (Dermochelys coriacea).

    PubMed

    Rafferty, Anthony R; Santidrián Tomillo, Pilar; Spotila, James R; Paladino, Frank V; Reina, Richard D

    2011-01-01

    Leatherback turtles have an average global hatching success rate of ~50%, lower than other marine turtle species. Embryonic death has been linked to environmental factors such as precipitation and temperature, although, there is still a lot of variability that remains to be explained. We examined how nesting season, the time of nesting each season, the relative position of each clutch laid by each female each season, maternal identity and associated factors such as reproductive experience of the female (new nester versus remigrant) and period of egg retention between clutches (interclutch interval) affected hatching success and stage of embryonic death in failed eggs of leatherback turtles nesting at Playa Grande, Costa Rica. Data were collected during five nesting seasons from 2004/05 to 2008/09. Mean hatching success was 50.4%. Nesting season significantly influenced hatching success in addition to early and late stage embryonic death. Neither clutch position nor nesting time during the season had a significant affect on hatching success or the stage of embryonic death. Some leatherback females consistently produced nests with higher hatching success rates than others. Remigrant females arrived earlier to nest, produced more clutches and had higher rates of hatching success than new nesters. Reproductive experience did not affect stage of death or the duration of the interclutch interval. The length of interclutch interval had a significant affect on the proportion of eggs that failed in each clutch and the developmental stage they died at. Intrinsic factors such as maternal identity are playing a role in affecting embryonic death in the leatherback turtle. PMID:21695086

  19. Hyaline membrane disease is underreported in a linked birth-infant death certificate database.

    PubMed Central

    Hamvas, A; Kwong, P; DeBaun, M; Schramm, W; Cole, F S

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study compared the Missouri State Department of Health linked birth-infant death certificate database and medical records with respect to recording hyaline membrane disease in very low-birth-weight infants. METHODS: We reviewed the records for all 976 infants weighing 500 to 1500 g who were born to St. Louis, Mo, residents in 1989, 1991, and 1992. RESULTS: Eighteen percent of the birth certificates and 54% of the medical records documented hyaline membrane disease, resulting in 34% sensitivity and 99% specificity. CONCLUSIONS: The Missouri State Department of Health birth-infant death certificate database underestimates the incidence of hyaline membrane disease, which suggest that national statistics for the disease are also underestimated. PMID:9736884

  20. THREE SISTERS WILDERNESS, OREGON.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    MacLeod, Norman S.; Causey, J. Douglas

    1984-01-01

    A mineral survey of the Three Sisters Wilderness, Oregon indicated little promise for the occcurrence of metallic mineral resources. Block pumice suitable for commercial uses occurs at an undeveloped claim at Rock Mesa in the wilderness, but numerous other sources occur outside the wilderness closer to markets. A broad area centered around South Sister volcano is among the most favorable targets for geothermal resources in the Oregon Cascade Range, based on the very young age and large volume of silicic volcanic rocks that occur in this area. Deep exploration holes could be drilled in areas outside the wilderness south of South Sister to provide data on the subsurface thermal and hydrologic regimes in the southern part of the area most likely to contain geothermal resources.

  1. The Prodigal Sister - Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barlow, Nadine G.

    1995-09-01

    If you think Venus is a hellhole now, be thankful you weren't there 500 million years ago. Those were the days, many planetary scientists believe, of apocalypse on our sister world: Volcanoes wracked the land, while greenhouse gases broiled the air. Is this the Earth's fate, too?

  2. Galectin-3 induces death of Candida species expressing specific beta-1,2-linked mannans.

    PubMed

    Kohatsu, Luciana; Hsu, Daniel K; Jegalian, Armin G; Liu, Fu-Tong; Baum, Linda G

    2006-10-01

    Lectins play a critical role in host protection against infection. The galectin family of lectins recognizes saccharide ligands on a variety of microbial pathogens, including viruses, bacteria, and parasites. Galectin-3, a galectin expressed by macrophages, dendritic cells, and epithelial cells, binds bacterial and parasitic pathogens including Leishmania major, Trypanosoma cruzi, and Neisseria gonorrhoeae. However, there have been no reports of galectins having direct effects on microbial viability. We found that galectin-3 bound only to Candida albicans species that bear beta-1,2-linked oligomannans on the cell surface, but did not bind Saccharomyces cerevisiae that lacks beta-1,2-linked oligomannans. Surprisingly, binding directly induced death of Candida species containing specific beta-1,2-linked oligomannosides. Thus, galectin-3 can act as a pattern recognition receptor that recognizes a unique pathogen-specific oligosaccharide sequence. This is the first description of antimicrobial activity for a member of the galectin family of mammalian lectins; unlike other lectins of the innate immune system that promote opsonization and phagocytosis, galectin-3 has direct fungicidal activity against opportunistic fungal pathogens.

  3. Birth and death of links control disease spreading in empirical contact networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holme, Petter; Liljeros, Fredrik

    2014-05-01

    We investigate what structural aspects of a collection of twelve empirical temporal networks of human contacts are important to disease spreading. We scan the entire parameter spaces of the two canonical models of infectious disease epidemiology--the Susceptible-Infectious-Susceptible (SIS) and Susceptible-Infectious-Removed (SIR) models. The results from these simulations are compared to reference data where we eliminate structures in the interevent intervals, the time to the first contact in the data, or the time from the last contact to the end of the sampling. The picture we find is that the birth and death of links, and the total number of contacts over a link, are essential to predict outbreaks. On the other hand, the exact times of contacts between the beginning and end, or the interevent interval distribution, do not matter much. In other words, a simplified picture of these empirical data sets that suffices for epidemiological purposes is that links are born, is active with some intensity, and die.

  4. A possible link between life and death of a xeric tree in desert.

    PubMed

    Xu, Gui-Qing; McDowell, Nate G; Li, Yan

    2016-05-01

    Understanding the interactions between drought and tree ontogeny or size remains an essential research priority because size-specific mortality patterns have large impacts on ecosystem structure and function, determine forest carbon storage capacity, and are sensitive to climatic change. Here we investigate a xerophytic tree species (Haloxylon ammodendron (C.A. Mey.)) with which the changes in biomass allocation with tree size may play an important role in size-specific mortality patterns. Size-related changes in biomass allocation, root distribution, plant water status, gas exchange, hydraulic architecture and non-structural carbohydrate reserves of this xerophytic tree species were investigated to assess their potential role in the observed U-shaped mortality pattern. We found that excessively negative water potentials (<-4.7MPa, beyond the P50leaf of -4.1MPa) during prolonged drought in young trees lead to hydraulic failure; while the imbalance of photoassimilate allocation between leaf and root system in larger trees, accompanied with declining C reserves (<2% dry matter across four tissues), might have led to carbon starvation. The drought-resistance strategy of this species is preferential biomass allocation to the roots to improve water capture. In young trees, the drought-resistance strategy is not well developed, and hydraulic failure appears to be the dominant driver of mortality during drought. With old trees, excess root growth at the expense of leaf area may lead to carbon starvation during prolonged drought. Our results suggest that the drought-resistance strategy of this xeric tree is closely linked to its life and death: well-developed drought-resistance strategy means life, while underdeveloped or overdeveloped drought-resistance strategy means death. PMID:26968083

  5. Linking families and facilities for care at birth: What works to avert intrapartum-related deaths?

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Anne CC; Lawn, Joy E.; Cousens, Simon; Kumar, Vishwajeet; Osrin, David; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A.; Wall, Steven N.; Nandakumar, Allyala K.; Syed, Uzma; Darmstadt, Gary L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Delays in receiving effective care during labor and at birth may be fatal for the mother and fetus, contributing to 2 million annual intrapartum stillbirths and intrapartum-related neonatal deaths each year. Objective We present a systematic review of strategies to link families and facilities, including community mobilization, financial incentives, emergency referral and transport systems, prenatal risk screening, and maternity waiting homes. Results There is moderate quality evidence that community mobilization with high levels of community engagement can increase institutional births and significantly reduce perinatal and early neonatal mortality. Meta-analysis showed a doubling of skilled birth attendance and a 35% reduction in early neonatal mortality. However, no data are available on intrapartum-specific outcomes. Evidence is limited, but promising, that financial incentive schemes and community referral/transport systems may increase rates of skilled birth attendance and emergency obstetric care utilization; however, impact on mortality is unknown. Current evidence for maternity waiting homes and risk screening is low quality. Conclusions Empowering communities is an important strategy to reduce the large burden of intrapartum complications. Innovations are needed to bring the poor closer to obstetric care, such as financial incentives and cell phone technology. New questions need to be asked of “old” strategies such as risk screening and maternity waiting homes. The effect of all of these strategies on maternal and perinatal mortality, particularly intrapartum-related outcomes, requires further evaluation. PMID:19815201

  6. The link between cell-cycle dependent radiosensitivity and repair pathways: a model based on the local, sister-chromatid conformation dependent switch between NHEJ and HR.

    PubMed

    Hufnagl, Antonia; Herr, Lisa; Friedrich, Thomas; Durante, Marco; Taucher-Scholz, Gisela; Scholz, Michael

    2015-03-01

    The different DNA damage repair pathways like homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) have been linked to the variation of radiosensitivity throughout the cell cycle. However, no attempts have been made to test the various hypotheses derived from these studies in a quantitative way e.g. by using modeling approaches. Here we present the first modeling approach that allows predicting the cell cycle dependent radiosensitivity of repair proficient as well as of repair deficient cell lines after photon irradiation based on a small set of parameters and assumptions. A key element of the model is the classification of DNA damage according to its complexity on the level of chromatin loops of about 2Mbp size. Isolated DSB (iDSB), characterized by a single DSB within a chromatin loop, are distinguished from clustered DSB (cDSB), characterized by two or more DSB within a chromatin loop. The class of iDSB is further subdivided into two sub-classes, characterized by the replication status of the corresponding chromatin loop. For iDSB in replicated loops that are in close contact, error-free homologous recombination is assumed to be effective; in unreplicated loops or in replicated loops that have already been separated, iDSB are assumed to be repaired by error-prone non-homologous end joining. cDSB are assumed not to be repairable effectively by neither HR nor NHEJ. Assigning empirically derived lethalities to these three damage classes and pathways, we demonstrate that the model is able to accurately reproduce cell cycle dependent survival probabilities. Notably, the relevant parameters are derived solely from two survival curves for normal, repair proficient cells in G1 and late-S phase. Based on a comparison of model predictions with a large data set reported in the literature, we show that the lethality values for wild type cells are simultaneously predictive for the cell cycle dependent variation of sensitivity observed for HR-deficient and NHEJ

  7. Sister-sister incest: data from an anonymous computerized survey.

    PubMed

    Stroebel, Sandra S; O'Keefe, Stephen L; Griffee, Karen; Kuo, Shih-Ya; Beard, Keith W; Kommor, Martin J

    2013-01-01

    Retrospective data were entered anonymously by 1,521 adult women using a computer-assisted self-interview. Thirty-one participants were victims of sister-sister incest, 40 were victims of brother-sister incest, 19 were victims of father-daughter incest, 8 were victims of sexual abuse by an adult female (including one mother), and 232 were victims of sexual abuse by an adult male other than their father before reaching 18 years of age. The rest (1,203) served as controls. The victims of sister-sister incest had significantly more problematic outcomes than controls on many measures as adults. Victims of sister-sister incest were more depressed and more likely than controls to be distant from the perpetrator-sister and to have traded sex for money, experienced an unplanned pregnancy, engaged in four different types of masturbation, and engaged in 13 different same-sex behaviors. Our findings were consistent with other reports of early eroticization and persistent hypereroticization of incest victims.

  8. Aluminum adjuvant linked to Gulf War illness induces motor neuron death in mice.

    PubMed

    Petrik, Michael S; Wong, Margaret C; Tabata, Rena C; Garry, Robert F; Shaw, Christopher A

    2007-01-01

    Gulf War illness (GWI) affects a significant percentage of veterans of the 1991 conflict, but its origin remains unknown. Associated with some cases of GWI are increased incidences of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and other neurological disorders. Whereas many environmental factors have been linked to GWI, the role of the anthrax vaccine has come under increasing scrutiny. Among the vaccine's potentially toxic components are the adjuvants aluminum hydroxide and squalene. To examine whether these compounds might contribute to neuronal deficits associated with GWI, an animal model for examining the potential neurological impact of aluminum hydroxide, squalene, or aluminum hydroxide combined with squalene was developed. Young, male colony CD-1 mice were injected with the adjuvants at doses equivalent to those given to US military service personnel. All mice were subjected to a battery of motor and cognitive-behavioral tests over a 6-mo period postinjections. Following sacrifice, central nervous system tissues were examined using immunohistochemistry for evidence of inflammation and cell death. Behavioral testing showed motor deficits in the aluminum treatment group that expressed as a progressive decrease in strength measured by the wire-mesh hang test (final deficit at 24 wk; about 50%). Significant cognitive deficits in water-maze learning were observed in the combined aluminum and squalene group (4.3 errors per trial) compared with the controls (0.2 errors per trial) after 20 wk. Apoptotic neurons were identified in aluminum-injected animals that showed significantly increased activated caspase-3 labeling in lumbar spinal cord (255%) and primary motor cortex (192%) compared with the controls. Aluminum-treated groups also showed significant motor neuron loss (35%) and increased numbers of astrocytes (350%) in the lumbar spinal cord. The findings suggest a possible role for the aluminum adjuvant in some neurological features associated with GWI and possibly an

  9. Where are Sedna's Sisters?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlett, D. F.

    2005-05-01

    Simulations of the formation of the Oort cloud from the Kuiper Belt typically are presented as an animated scatter diagram. Here the orbit of each object appears as a point of perihelion distance q and semi-major axis a. (eg. Levison, Morbidelli, & Dones 2004). These plots show a conspicuous void, bounded by the inequalities: q < a, q > 50 AU, and a < 5000-10000 AU. Brown (2005) calls this void the ``Bermuda Triangle". The only present occupant is Sedna (q=76 AU, a=501 AU). Brown, Trujillo, & Rabinowitz , the discovers of Sedna, have challenged others to explain how Sedna got inside the triangle and to predict where similar objects might be found. Sedna could not have simply formed in its current orbit by the accumulation of smaller objects (Stern 2005). Several authors have suggested that a passing star scattered Sedna into the triangle shortly after the birth of the solar system. Here I offer an alternative which uses the very strong galactic tidal forces of the Sinusoidal potential (Bartlett 2001, 2004). In this potential, the numerator of Newton's law is replaced by GM cos(ko r) where ko = 2 π / lambdao and the 'wavelength' λ o is 425 pc. The 20 radial oscillations between the sun and the center of the Galaxy give tidal forces that are 120 times as big as generally expected. I will show how this tidal force, acting over the lifetime of the solar system, could move the perihelion of Sedna from about 40 to 76 AU. Sedna's sisters are likely to have still larger q & a and to have perihelia in two specific quadrants of the ecliptic plane.

  10. 20 CFR 725.222 - Conditions of entitlement; parent, brother, or sister.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... death, unless the time is extended for good cause (§ 725.226); (4) In the case of a brother or sister... Act, 42 U.S.C. 423(d), at the time of the miner's death; (5) The deceased miner: (i) Was entitled to... disabled due to pneumoconiosis at the time of death or to have died due to pneumoconiosis. A...

  11. Investigations into the Mechanisms of Cell Death: The Common Link between Anticancer Nanotherapeutics and Nanotoxicology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minocha, Shalini

    Nanotoxicology and anticancer nanotherapeutics are essentially two sides of the same coin. The nanotoxicology discipline deals with the nanoparticle (NP)-induced toxicity and mechanisms of cell death in healthy cells, whereas anticancer agents delivered via nano-based approaches aim to induce cell death in abnormally proliferating cancer cells. The objectives of the studies presented herein were two-fold; to (a) systematically study the physico-chemical properties and cell death mechanisms of model NPs and (b) utilize the knowledge gained from cell death-nanotoxicity studies in developing a potentially novel anticancer nanotherapeutic agent. For the first objective, the effect of a distinguishing characteristic, i.e., surface carbon coating on the matched pairs of carbon-coated and non-coated copper and nickel NPs (Cu, C-Cu, Ni and C-Ni) on the physico-chemical properties and toxicity in A549 alveolar epithelial cells were evaluated. The effect of carbon coating on particle size, zeta potential, oxidation state, cellular uptake, release of soluble metal and concentration dependent toxicity of Cu and Ni NPs was systematically evaluated. A significant effect of carbon coating was observed on the physico-chemical properties, interaction with cellular membranes, and overall toxicity of the NPs. C-Cu NPs, compared to Cu NPs, showed four-fold lower release of soluble copper, ten-fold higher cellular uptake and protection against surface oxidation. In toxicity assays, C-Cu NPs induced higher mitochondrial damage than Cu NPs whereas Cu NPs were associated with a significant damage to plasma membrane integrity. Nickel and carbon coated nickel NPs were less toxic compared to Cu and C-Cu NPs. Thus, by studying the effect of carbon coating, correlations between physico-chemical properties and toxicity of NPs were established. The second objective was focused on utilizing nano-based approaches for the intracellular delivery of an anticancer agent, Cytochrome c (Cyt c), to

  12. The Shannoniella sisters (Diptera: Rhinophoridae).

    PubMed

    Nihei, Silvio S; Andrade, Marcos R; Pape, Thomas; Cerretti, Pierfilippo

    2016-01-01

    Shannoniella cuspidata Townsend, 1939 is redescribed and S. setinervis sp. nov. (Brazil, State of Rio de Janeiro) is newly described as its putative sister taxon, thereby allowing for a strict definition of the genus Shannoniella Townsend, 1939 through explicit synapomorphies. An identification key is provided. PMID:27395483

  13. The Shannoniella sisters (Diptera: Rhinophoridae).

    PubMed

    Nihei, Silvio S; Andrade, Marcos R; Pape, Thomas; Cerretti, Pierfilippo

    2016-01-01

    Shannoniella cuspidata Townsend, 1939 is redescribed and S. setinervis sp. nov. (Brazil, State of Rio de Janeiro) is newly described as its putative sister taxon, thereby allowing for a strict definition of the genus Shannoniella Townsend, 1939 through explicit synapomorphies. An identification key is provided.

  14. The Gordon Wilson Lecture: Neurohormonal Signaling Pathways That Link Cardiac Growth and Death

    PubMed Central

    Dorn, Gerald W.

    2007-01-01

    Far from being a simple muscular pump, the heart senses changes in hemodynamic forces and neurohormonal signaling, and responds by elaborating autocrine and paracrine factors that self-regulate cardiomyocyte contraction, growth, and programmed death. Interference with the afferent or efferent arms of this stress-response mechanism, as with inhibition of the β-adrenergic or renin/angiotensin systems, is a mainstay of pharmacological therapy for heart failure. However, despite striking group-mean effects showing mortality benefits of neurohormonal antagonists, inter-individual variability in the therapeutic response to these agents suggests a pharmacogenomic interaction, where common sequence variations of genes that regulate neurohormonal signaling modify the individual response to treatment. Furthermore, there is increasing evidence that, depending upon physiological milieu, conventional neurohormone receptor-ligand pairs can activate non-traditional signaling pathways, with pathological consequences. Recently, studies that integrate the findings from human gene polymorphism discovery, recombinant gene variant expression in cell and animal models, and outcome or risk analysis of polymorphisms in human disease have provided additional understanding into adaptive and maladaptive events that are the consequence of the cardiac stress-response sequence. PMID:18528498

  15. Novel Insights into the Molecular Events Linking to Cell Death Induced by Tetracycline in the Amitochondriate Protozoan Trichomonas vaginalis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Kuo-Yang; Ku, Fu-Man; Cheng, Wei-Hung; Lee, Chi-Ching; Huang, Po-Jung; Chu, Lichieh Julie; Cheng, Chih-Chieh; Fang, Yi-Kai; Wu, Hsueh-Hsia

    2015-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis colonizes the human urogenital tract and causes trichomoniasis, the most common nonviral sexually transmitted disease. Currently, 5-nitroimidazoles are the only recommended drugs for treating trichomoniasis. However, increased resistance of the parasite to 5-nitroimidazoles has emerged as a highly problematic public health issue. Hence, it is essential to identify alternative chemotherapeutic agents against refractory trichomoniasis. Tetracycline (TET) is a broad-spectrum antibiotic with activity against several protozoan parasites, but the mode of action of TET in parasites remains poorly understood. The in vitro effect of TET on the growth of T. vaginalis was examined, and the mode of cell death was verified by various apoptosis-related assays. Next-generation sequencing-based RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) was employed to elucidate the transcriptome of T. vaginalis in response to TET. We show that TET has a cytotoxic effect on both metronidazole (MTZ)-sensitive and -resistant T. vaginalis isolates, inducing some features resembling apoptosis. RNA-seq data reveal that TET significantly alters the transcriptome via activation of specific pathways, such as aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases and carbohydrate metabolism. Functional analyses demonstrate that TET disrupts the hydrogenosomal membrane potential and antioxidant system, which concomitantly elicits a metabolic shift toward glycolysis, suggesting that the hydrogenosomal function is impaired and triggers cell death. Collectively, we provide in vitro evidence that TET is a potential alternative therapeutic choice for treating MTZ-resistant T. vaginalis. The in-depth transcriptomic signatures in T. vaginalis upon TET treatment presented here will shed light on the signaling pathways linking to cell death in amitochondriate organisms. PMID:26303799

  16. Nonzero-temperature entanglement negativity of quantum spin models: Area law, linked cluster expansions, and sudden death.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Nicholas E; Devakul, Trithep; Hastings, Matthew B; Singh, Rajiv R P

    2016-02-01

    We show that the bipartite logarithmic entanglement negativity (EN) of quantum spin models obeys an area law at all nonzero temperatures. We develop numerical linked cluster (NLC) expansions for the "area-law" logarithmic entanglement negativity as a function of temperature and other parameters. For one-dimensional models the results of NLC are compared with exact diagonalization on finite systems and are found to agree very well. The NLC results are also obtained for two dimensional XXZ and transverse field Ising models. In all cases, we find a sudden onset (or sudden death) of negativity at a finite temperature above which the negativity is zero. We use perturbation theory to develop a physical picture for this sudden onset (or sudden death). The onset of EN or its magnitude are insensitive to classical finite-temperature phase transitions, supporting the argument for absence of any role of quantum mechanics at such transitions. On approach to a quantum critical point at T=0, negativity shows critical scaling in size and temperature. PMID:26986309

  17. Nonzero-temperature entanglement negativity of quantum spin models: Area law, linked cluster expansions, and sudden death.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Nicholas E; Devakul, Trithep; Hastings, Matthew B; Singh, Rajiv R P

    2016-02-01

    We show that the bipartite logarithmic entanglement negativity (EN) of quantum spin models obeys an area law at all nonzero temperatures. We develop numerical linked cluster (NLC) expansions for the "area-law" logarithmic entanglement negativity as a function of temperature and other parameters. For one-dimensional models the results of NLC are compared with exact diagonalization on finite systems and are found to agree very well. The NLC results are also obtained for two dimensional XXZ and transverse field Ising models. In all cases, we find a sudden onset (or sudden death) of negativity at a finite temperature above which the negativity is zero. We use perturbation theory to develop a physical picture for this sudden onset (or sudden death). The onset of EN or its magnitude are insensitive to classical finite-temperature phase transitions, supporting the argument for absence of any role of quantum mechanics at such transitions. On approach to a quantum critical point at T=0, negativity shows critical scaling in size and temperature.

  18. Nonzero-temperature entanglement negativity of quantum spin models: Area law, linked cluster expansions, and sudden death

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, Nicholas E.; Devakul, Trithep; Hastings, Matthew B.; Singh, Rajiv R. P.

    2016-02-01

    We show that the bipartite logarithmic entanglement negativity (EN) of quantum spin models obeys an area law at all nonzero temperatures. We develop numerical linked cluster (NLC) expansions for the "area-law" logarithmic entanglement negativity as a function of temperature and other parameters. For one-dimensional models the results of NLC are compared with exact diagonalization on finite systems and are found to agree very well. The NLC results are also obtained for two dimensional X X Z and transverse field Ising models. In all cases, we find a sudden onset (or sudden death) of negativity at a finite temperature above which the negativity is zero. We use perturbation theory to develop a physical picture for this sudden onset (or sudden death). The onset of EN or its magnitude are insensitive to classical finite-temperature phase transitions, supporting the argument for absence of any role of quantum mechanics at such transitions. On approach to a quantum critical point at T =0 , negativity shows critical scaling in size and temperature.

  19. A Brief Analysis of Sister Carrie's Character

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Hanying

    2010-01-01

    Carrie is always dreaming while the rocking chair is rocking again and again, this is the deep impression on us after we read "Sister Carrie" which is the first novel of Theodore Dreiser. In this novel the protagonist Sister Carrie is a controversial person. This paper tries to analyze the character of Sister Carrie in order to find out…

  20. Sister R. Leadership: Doing the Seemingly Impossible

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sena, Rachel; Schoorman, Dilys; Bogotch, Ira

    2013-01-01

    Sister R., the first author, is a Dominican Sister of Peace. Until recently, Sister R. had been the director of the Maya Ministry Family Literacy Program, working with the Maya Community in Lake Worth, Palm Beach County, Florida. She described her work with these indigenous, preliterate, hardworking peoples as "a university of the poor" in which…

  1. Two Sisters with Rett Syndrome. Brief Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haenggeli, Charles A.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Clinical histories and physical findings are presented for 2 sisters with Rett syndrome. The older sister, age 25, was typically affected, whereas the younger sister, 22 years old, was affected with a seizure disorder showing an unusually early onset. The paper discusses hypotheses in genetic causation of Rett syndrome. (JDD)

  2. Cross-linking of cellular proteins by tissue transglutaminase during necrotic cell death: a mechanism for maintaining tissue integrity.

    PubMed

    Nicholas, Ben; Smethurst, Peter; Verderio, Elisabetta; Jones, Richard; Griffin, Martin

    2003-04-15

    Tissue transglutaminase (tTG) is a Ca(2+)-dependent enzyme which cross-links proteins via epsilon(gamma-glutamyl)lysine bridges. There is increasing evidence that tTG is involved in wound repair and tissue stabilization, as well as in physiological mechanisms leading to cell death. To investigate the role of this enzyme in tissue wounding leading to loss of Ca(2+) homoeostasis, we initially used a model involving electroporation to reproduce cell wounding under controlled conditions. Two cell models were used whereby tTG expression is regulated either by antisense silencing in ECV 304 cells or by using transfected Swiss 3T3 cells in which tTG expression is under the control of the tet regulatory system. Using these cells, loss of Ca(2+) homoeostasis following electroporation led to a tTG-dependent formation of highly cross-linked proteinaceous shells from intracellular proteins. Formation of these structures is dependent on elevated intracellular Ca(2+), but it is independent of intracellular proteases and is near maximal after only 20 min post-wounding. Using labelled primary amines as an indicator of tTG activity within these 'wounded cells', we demonstrate that tTG modifies a wide range of proteins that are present in both the perinuclear and intranuclear spaces. The demonstration of entrapped DNA within these shell structures, which showed limited fragmentation, provides evidence that the high degree of transglutaminase cross-linking results in the prevention of DNA release, which may serve to dampen any subsequent inflammatory response. Comparable observations were shown when monolayers of cells were mechanically wounded by scratching. In this second model of cell wounding, redistribution of tTG activity to the extracellular matrix was also demonstrated, an effect which may serve to stabilize tissues post-trauma, and thus contribute to the maintenance of tissue integrity. PMID:12533191

  3. Cross-linking of cellular proteins by tissue transglutaminase during necrotic cell death: a mechanism for maintaining tissue integrity.

    PubMed

    Nicholas, Ben; Smethurst, Peter; Verderio, Elisabetta; Jones, Richard; Griffin, Martin

    2003-04-15

    Tissue transglutaminase (tTG) is a Ca(2+)-dependent enzyme which cross-links proteins via epsilon(gamma-glutamyl)lysine bridges. There is increasing evidence that tTG is involved in wound repair and tissue stabilization, as well as in physiological mechanisms leading to cell death. To investigate the role of this enzyme in tissue wounding leading to loss of Ca(2+) homoeostasis, we initially used a model involving electroporation to reproduce cell wounding under controlled conditions. Two cell models were used whereby tTG expression is regulated either by antisense silencing in ECV 304 cells or by using transfected Swiss 3T3 cells in which tTG expression is under the control of the tet regulatory system. Using these cells, loss of Ca(2+) homoeostasis following electroporation led to a tTG-dependent formation of highly cross-linked proteinaceous shells from intracellular proteins. Formation of these structures is dependent on elevated intracellular Ca(2+), but it is independent of intracellular proteases and is near maximal after only 20 min post-wounding. Using labelled primary amines as an indicator of tTG activity within these 'wounded cells', we demonstrate that tTG modifies a wide range of proteins that are present in both the perinuclear and intranuclear spaces. The demonstration of entrapped DNA within these shell structures, which showed limited fragmentation, provides evidence that the high degree of transglutaminase cross-linking results in the prevention of DNA release, which may serve to dampen any subsequent inflammatory response. Comparable observations were shown when monolayers of cells were mechanically wounded by scratching. In this second model of cell wounding, redistribution of tTG activity to the extracellular matrix was also demonstrated, an effect which may serve to stabilize tissues post-trauma, and thus contribute to the maintenance of tissue integrity.

  4. EarthLabs Meet Sister Corita Kent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quartini, E.; Ellins, K. K.; Cavitte, M. G.; Thirumalai, K.; Ledley, T. S.; Haddad, N.; Lynds, S. E.

    2013-12-01

    The EarthLabs project provides a framework to enhance high school students' climate literacy and awareness of climate change. The project provides climate science curriculum and teacher professional development, followed by research on students' learning as teachers implement EarthLabs climate modules in the classroom. The professional development targets high school teachers whose professional growth is structured around exposure to current climate science research, data observation collection and analysis. During summer workshops in Texas and Mississippi, teachers work through the laboratories, experiments, and hand-on activities developed for their students. In summer 2013, three graduate students from the University of Texas at Austin Institute for Geophysics with expertise in climate science participated in two weeklong workshops. The graduate students partnered with exemplary teacher leaders to provide scientific content and lead the EarthLabs learning activities. As an experiment, we integrated a visit to the Blanton Museum and an associated activity in order to motivate participants to think creatively, as well as analytically, about science. This exercise was inspired by the work and educational philosophy of Sister Corita Kent. During the visit to the Blanton Museum, we steered participants towards specific works of art pre-selected to emphasize aspects of the climate of Texas and to draw participants' attention to ways in which artists convey different concepts. For example, artists use of color, lines, and symbols conjure emotional responses to imagery in the viewer. The second part of the exercise asked participants to choose a climate message and to convey this through a collage. We encouraged participants to combine their experience at the museum with examples of Sister Corita Kent's artwork. We gave them simple guidelines for the project based on techniques and teaching of Sister Corita Kent. Evaluation results reveal that participants enjoyed the

  5. Nuclear localized protein-1 (Nulp1) increases cell death of human osteosarcoma cells and binds the X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein

    SciTech Connect

    Steen, Hakan; Lindholm, Dan

    2008-02-08

    Nuclear localized protein-1 (Nulp1) is a recently identified gene expressed in mouse and human tissues particularly during embryonic development. Nulp1 belongs to the family of basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) proteins that are important in development. The precise function of Nulp1 in cells is however not known. We observed that overexpression of Nulp1 induces a large increase in cell death of human osteosarcoma Saos2 cells with DNA fragmentation. In mouse N2A neuroblastoma cells Nulp1 affected cell proliferation and sensitized cells towards death induced by staurosporine. Staining using a novel antibody localized Nulp1 mainly to the cell nucleus and to some extent to the cytoplasm. Nulp1 binds the X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) and this interaction was increased during cell death. These results indicate that Nulp1 plays a role in cell death control and may influence tumor growth.

  6. Holocentric plant meiosis: first sisters, then homologues.

    PubMed

    Heckmann, Stefan; Schubert, Veit; Houben, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Meiosis is a crucial process of sexual reproduction by forming haploid gametes from diploid precursor cells. It involves 2 subsequent divisions (meiosis I and meiosis II) after one initial round of DNA replication. Homologous monocentric chromosomes are separated during the first and sister chromatids during the second meiotic division. The faithful segregation of monocentric chromosomes is realized by mono-orientation of fused sister kinetochores at metaphase I and by bi-orientation of sister kinetochores at metaphase II. Conventionally this depends on a 2-step loss of cohesion, along chromosome arms during meiosis I and at sister centromeres during meiosis II.

  7. A new X linked neurodegenerative syndrome with mental retardation, blindness, convulsions, spasticity, mild hypomyelination, and early death maps to the pericentromeric region

    PubMed Central

    Hamel, B.; Wesseling, P.; Renier, W.; van den Helm, B.; Ropers, H.; Kremer, H.; Mariman, E.

    1999-01-01

    We report on a family with an X linked neurodegenerative disorder consisting of mental retardation, blindness, convulsions, spasticity, and early death. Neuropathological examination showed mild hypomyelination. By linkage analysis, the underlying genetic defect could be assigned to the pericentromeric region of the X chromosome with a maximum lod score of 3.30 at θ=0.0 for the DXS1204 locus with DXS337 and PGK1P1 as flanking markers.


Keywords: XLMR; hypomyelination; early death; pericentromeric region PMID:10051014

  8. Creating Sister Cities: An Exchange Across Hemispheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, M. T.; Cabezon, S. A.; Hardy, E.; Harrison, R. J.

    2008-06-01

    Sponsored by Associated Universities, Inc. (AUI) and the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO), this project creates a cultural and educational exchange program between communities in South and North America, linking San Pedro de Atacama in Chile and Magdalena, New Mexico in the United States. Both communities have similar demographics, are in relatively undeveloped regions of high-elevation desert, and are located near major international radio astronomy research facilities. The Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) is just 40 km east of San Pedro; the Very Large Array (VLA) is just 40 km west of Magdalena. In February 2007, the Mayor of San Pedro and two teachers visited Magdalena for two weeks; in July 2007 three teachers from Magdalena will visit San Pedro. These visits enable the communities to lay the foundation for a permanent, unique partnership. The teachers are sharing expertise and teaching methodologies for physics and astronomy. In addition to creating science education opportunities, this project offers students linguistic and cultural connections. The town of San Pedro, Chile, hosts nearly 100,000 tourists per year, and English language skills are highly valued by local students. Through exchanges enabled by email and distance conferencing, San Pedro and Magdalena students will improve English and Spanish language skills while teaching each other about science and their respective cultures. This poster describes the AUI/NRAO Sister Cities program, including the challenges of cross-cultural communication and the rewards of interpersonal exchanges between continents and cultures.

  9. Catholic nursing sisters and brothers and racial justice in mid-20th-century America.

    PubMed

    Wall, Barbra Mann

    2009-01-01

    This historical article considers nursing's work for social justice in the 1960s civil rights movement through the lens of religious sisters and brothers who advocated for racial equality. The article examines Catholic nurses' work with African Americans in the mid-20th century that took place amid the prevailing social conditions of poverty and racial disempowerment, conditions that were linked to serious health consequences. Historical methodology is used within the framework of "bearing witness," a term often used in relation to the civil rights movement and one the sisters themselves employed. Two situations involving nurses in the mid-20th century are examined: the civil rights movement in Selma, Alabama, and the actions for racial justice in Chicago, Illinois. The thoughts and actions of Catholic sister and brother nurses in the mid-20th century are chronicled, including those few sister nurses who stepped outside their ordinary roles in an attempt to change an unjust system entirely.

  10. Catholic nursing sisters and brothers and racial justice in mid-20th-century America.

    PubMed

    Wall, Barbra Mann

    2009-01-01

    This historical article considers nursing's work for social justice in the 1960s civil rights movement through the lens of religious sisters and brothers who advocated for racial equality. The article examines Catholic nurses' work with African Americans in the mid-20th century that took place amid the prevailing social conditions of poverty and racial disempowerment, conditions that were linked to serious health consequences. Historical methodology is used within the framework of "bearing witness," a term often used in relation to the civil rights movement and one the sisters themselves employed. Two situations involving nurses in the mid-20th century are examined: the civil rights movement in Selma, Alabama, and the actions for racial justice in Chicago, Illinois. The thoughts and actions of Catholic sister and brother nurses in the mid-20th century are chronicled, including those few sister nurses who stepped outside their ordinary roles in an attempt to change an unjust system entirely. PMID:19461224

  11. Reduced Endoplasmic Reticulum Luminal Calcium Links Saturated Fatty Acid-Mediated Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Cell Death in Liver Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yuren; Wang, Dong; Gentile, Christopher L.; Pagliassotti, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    Chronic exposure to elevated free fatty acids, in particular long chain saturated fatty acids, provokes endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and cell death in a number of cell types. The perturbations to the ER that instigate ER stress and activation of the unfolded protein in response to fatty acids in hepatocytes have not been identified. The present study employed H4IIE liver cells and primary rat hepatocytes to examine the hypothesis that saturated fatty acids induce ER stress via effects on ER luminal calcium stores. Exposure of H4IIE liver cells and primary hepatocytes to palmitate and stearate reduced thapsigargin-sensitive calcium stores and biochemical markers of ER stress over similar time courses (6h). These changes preceded cell death, which was only observed at later time points (16h). Co-incubation with oleate prevented the reduction in calcium stores, induction of ER stress markers and cell death observed in response to palmitate. Inclusion of calcium chelators, BAPTA-AM or EGTA, reduced palmitate- and stearate-mediated enrichment of cytochrome c in post-mitochondrial supernatant fractions and cell death. These data suggest that redistribution of ER luminal calcium contributes to long chain saturated fatty acid-mediated ER stress and cell death. PMID:19444596

  12. When Your Brother or Sister Has Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Tips on what to say to your friends, how to deal with stress, and where to find support – as well as information about cancer and cancer treatments, for young people who have a brother or sister with cancer.

  13. All in the Family: The Sister Study

    MedlinePlus

    ... Study Chief, Epidemiology Branch The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) Photo courtesy of NIH/NIEHS By Dale ... being conducted by the NIH's National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS). The purpose of the Sister Study is ...

  14. Eruptive history of South Sister, Oregon Cascades

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fierstein, J.; Hildreth, W.; Calvert, A.T.

    2011-01-01

    South Sister is southernmost and highest of the Three Sisters, three geologically dissimilar stratovolcanoes that together form a spectacular 20km reach along the Cascade crest in Oregon. North Sister is a monotonously mafic edifice as old as middle Pleistocene, Middle Sister a basalt-andesite-dacite cone built between 48 and 14ka, and South Sister is a basalt-free edifice that alternated rhyolitic and intermediate modes from 50ka to 2ka (largely contemporaneous with Middle Sister). Detailed mapping, 330 chemical analyses, and 42 radioisotopic ages show that the oldest exposed South Sister lavas were initially rhyolitic ~50ka. By ~37ka, rhyolitic lava flows and domes (72-74% SiO2) began alternating with radially emplaced dacite (63-68% SiO2) and andesite (59-63% SiO2) lava flows. Construction of a broad cone of silicic andesite-dacite (61-64% SiO2) culminated ~30ka in a dominantly explosive sequence that began with crater-forming andesitic eruptions that left fragmental deposits at least 200m thick. This was followed at ~27ka by growth of a steeply dipping summit cone of agglutinate-dominated andesite (56-60.5% SiO2) and formation of a summit crater ~800m wide. This crater was soon filled and overtopped by a thick dacite lava flow and then by >150m of dacitic pyroclastic ejecta. Small-volume dacite lavas (63-67% SiO2) locally cap the pyroclastic pile. A final sheet of mafic agglutinate (54-56% SiO2) - the most mafic product of South Sister - erupted from and drapes the small (300-m-wide) present-day summit crater, ending a summit-building sequence that lasted until ~22ka. A 20kyr-long-hiatus was broken by rhyolite eruptions that produced (1) the Rock Mesa coulee, tephra, and satellite domelets (73.5% SiO2) and (2) the Devils Chain of ~20 domes and short coulees (72.3-72.8% SiO2) from N-S vent alignments on South Sister's flanks. The compositional reversal from mafic summit agglutinate to recent rhyolites epitomizes the frequently changing compositional modes of the

  15. [Two Dutch sisters in analysis with Freud].

    PubMed

    Stroeken, Harry

    2010-01-01

    The author provides persuasive or at least plausible data for the identity of two patients recorded by Freud in his working season of 1910/11. They were two sisters, living in The Hague/Leiden, who came from a rich banker's family, the van der Lindens. Whereas the treatment does not seem to have led to any decisive improvement for the older of the two, it may have encouraged the younger sister to seek divorce.

  16. [Two Dutch sisters in analysis with Freud].

    PubMed

    Stroeken, Harry

    2010-01-01

    The author provides persuasive or at least plausible data for the identity of two patients recorded by Freud in his working season of 1910/11. They were two sisters, living in The Hague/Leiden, who came from a rich banker's family, the van der Lindens. Whereas the treatment does not seem to have led to any decisive improvement for the older of the two, it may have encouraged the younger sister to seek divorce. PMID:20503771

  17. 78 FR 45061 - Safety Zone; Sister Bay Marina Fest Fireworks and Ski Show, Sister Bay, WI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-26

    ... Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed Rulemaking TFR Temporary Final... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Sister Bay Marina Fest Fireworks and Ski... intended to restrict vessels from a portion of Sister Bay due to a fireworks display and ski show....

  18. "If I only touch her cloak": the Sisters of Charity of St. Joseph in New Orleans hospital, 1834-1860.

    PubMed

    Kong, Hyejung Grace; Kim, Ock-Joo

    2015-04-01

    wearing a distinctive religious garment, they eschewed female dependence and sexuality. As medical and religious attendants at the sick wards, the sisters played a vital role in preparing the patients for a "good death" as well as spiritual wellness. By waging their own war on the Protestant influences, the sisters did their best to build their own sacred place in caring for sick bodies and saving souls. Through the research on the Sisters of Charity at Charity Hospital, this study ultimately sheds light on the ways in which a nineteenth-century southern hospital functioned as a unique environment for the recovery of wellness of the body and soul, shaped and envisioned by the Catholic sister-nurses' gender and religious identities. PMID:25985782

  19. Sisters' and charge nurses' attitudes to quality.

    PubMed

    Reeve, J

    1997-01-01

    Discovers sisters' and charge nurses' thoughts about quality assurance and whether their needs and those of their patients were satisfied by the process. Reports the results of qualitative research conducted with sisters and charge nurses working within specific clinical areas in a community trust. Shows the differences of opinion within the sample towards quality and illustrates that, although sisters and charge nurses have a good knowledge of what quality is, they acknowledge that others working within their clinical areas may not be similarly aware. Finds that, while some of the respondents felt that quality assurance would benefit patients to some degree, others felt that quality initiatives actually disadvantaged patients. Members of the sample were unhappy with certain problems of quality assurance, associated with external and internal auditing, training needs and financial implications. Recommends that quality needs to be formally included in pre-and post-basic training.

  20. Cross-linking of T-cell receptors on double-positive thymocytes induces a cytokine-mediated stromal activation process linked to cell death.

    PubMed Central

    Lerner, A; Clayton, L K; Mizoguchi, E; Ghendler, Y; van Ewijk, W; Koyasu, S; Bhan, A K; Reinherz, E L

    1996-01-01

    To investigate molecular events associated with the intrathymic process of negative selection, we established an in vivo system using an anti-CD3 epsilon monoclonal antibody to induce synchronous apoptosis in the thymus of AND T-cell receptor (TCR) transgenic RAG-2-/- mice in a non-selecting haplotype. This model eliminates endogenous negative selection as well as gene activation in the mature thymocyte compartment, offering an ideal source of tester (anti-CD3 epsilon-treated) and driver (untreated) thymus RNA for representational difference analysis (RDA). Fourteen mRNA sequences that are up-regulated in the thymuses of such mice 2-6 h after anti-CD3 epsilon treatment were identified. Surprisingly, the majority of these transcripts were derived from stromal cells rather than the TCR-cross-linked CD4+CD8+TCRlow thymocytes including the macrophage products IL-1, the chemokine Mig and the transcription factor LRG-21. IFN-gamma secretion from the CD4+CD8+TCRlow thymocytes regulates macrophage Mig production. Three other cytokines (IL-4, GM-CSF and TNF-alpha), known to activate a variety of stromal cells, are also induced in the same thymocyte population undergoing apoptosis. Expression of a TNF-alpha-inducible gene, B94, in stromal cells after TCR ligation further supports the notion of cross-talk between thymocytes and stroma. Thus, TCR-triggered immature thymocytes elaborate cytokines which may regulate the delivery of further signals from stromal cells required for apoptosis. Images PMID:8918465

  1. Cell biology of cancer: BRCA1 and sister chromatid pairing reactions?

    PubMed

    Skibbens, Robert V

    2008-02-15

    A significant portion of familial breast/ovarian cancer patients harbors a mutation in Breast Cancer Associated gene 1 (BRCA1). Cells deficient for BRCA1 exhibit chromosome aberrations such as whole chromosome duplications, translocations, inter-sister gaps and gene mis-regulation. Here, new evidence is reviewed that defects in sister chromatid cohesion may contribute directly to cancer cell phenotypes-especially those of BRCA1 mutant cells. Linking cohesion to BRCA1-dependent tumorigenesis are reports that BRCA1-associated components (DNA helicase, RFC, PCNA and genome surveillance factors) are required for efficient sister chromatid cohesion. Other cohesion factors (WAPL, EFO2/ESCO2 and hSecurin) are tightly correlated with various cell-type specific carcinogenesis, in support of a generalized model for cohesion in cancer. Recent findings further reveal that a reciprocal relationship exists in that DNA damage induces new Ctf7/Eco1-dependent sister chromatid pairing reactions that, in turn, are required for efficient DNA repair. Future research into sister chromatid pairing mechanisms are likely to provide critical new insights into the underlying causes of cancer.

  2. Mechanics of Sister Chromatids studied with a Polymer Model English</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Zhang, Yang; Isbaner, Sebastian; Heermann, Dieter</p> <p>2013-10-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Sister</span> chromatid cohesion denotes the phenomenon that <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids are initially attached to each other in mitosis to guarantee the error-free distribution into the daughter cells. Cohesion is mediated by binding proteins and only resolved after mitotic chromosome condensation is completed. However, the amount of attachement points required to maintain <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid cohesion while still allowing proper chromosome condensation is not known yet. Additionally the impact of cohesion on the mechanical properties of chromosomes also poses an interesting problem. In this work we study the conformational and mechanical properties of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids by means of computer simulations. We model both protein-mediated cohesion between <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids and chromosome condensation with a dynamic binding mechanisms. We show in a phase diagram that only specific <span class="hlt">link</span> concentrations lead to connected and fully condensed chromatids that do not intermingle with each other nor separate due to entropic forces. Furthermore we show that dynamic bonding between chromatids decrease the Young's modulus compared to non-bonded chromatids.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=crocodile&pg=3&id=EJ537653','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=crocodile&pg=3&id=EJ537653"><span id="translatedtitle">Crocodile Talk: Attributions of Incestuously Abused and Nonabused <span class="hlt">Sisters</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Monahan, Kathleen</p> <p>1997-01-01</p> <p>This qualitative study analyzed the retrospective attributions of adult <span class="hlt">sisters</span> (five abused <span class="hlt">sister</span> dyads, and five abused and nonabused <span class="hlt">sister</span> dyads) who grew up in incestuous families. It examined the attributions of subjects regarding the general sibling group; victim selection and nonselection; and attributions regarding jealousy, protection,…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26842059','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26842059"><span id="translatedtitle">Xenacoelomorpha is the <span class="hlt">sister</span> group to Nephrozoa.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Cannon, Johanna Taylor; Vellutini, Bruno Cossermelli; Smith, Julian; Ronquist, Fredrik; Jondelius, Ulf; Hejnol, Andreas</p> <p>2016-02-01</p> <p>The position of Xenacoelomorpha in the tree of life remains a major unresolved question in the study of deep animal relationships. Xenacoelomorpha, comprising Acoela, Nemertodermatida, and Xenoturbella, are bilaterally symmetrical marine worms that lack several features common to most other bilaterians, for example an anus, nephridia, and a circulatory system. Two conflicting hypotheses are under debate: Xenacoelomorpha is the <span class="hlt">sister</span> group to all remaining Bilateria (= Nephrozoa, namely protostomes and deuterostomes) or is a clade inside Deuterostomia. Thus, determining the phylogenetic position of this clade is pivotal for understanding the early evolution of bilaterian features, or as a case of drastic secondary loss of complexity. Here we show robust phylogenomic support for Xenacoelomorpha as the <span class="hlt">sister</span> taxon of Nephrozoa. Our phylogenetic analyses, based on 11 novel xenacoelomorph transcriptomes and using different models of evolution under maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference analyses, strongly corroborate this result. Rigorous testing of 25 experimental data sets designed to exclude data partitions and taxa potentially prone to reconstruction biases indicates that long-branch attraction, saturation, and missing data do not influence these results. The <span class="hlt">sister</span> group relationship between Nephrozoa and Xenacoelomorpha supported by our phylogenomic analyses implies that the last common ancestor of bilaterians was probably a benthic, ciliated acoelomate worm with a single opening into an epithelial gut, and that excretory organs, coelomic cavities, and nerve cords evolved after xenacoelomorphs separated from the stem lineage of Nephrozoa.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1006063.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1006063.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Sister</span> Mary Emil Penet, I.H.M.: Founder of the <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Formation Conference</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Glisky, Joan</p> <p>2006-01-01</p> <p>Mary Emil Penet, I.H.M., (1916-2001) used her talents and charisma to shape the first national organization of American women religious, the <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Formation Conference (SFC; 1954-1964), facilitating the integrated intellectual, spiritual, psychological, and professional development of vowed women religious. In the decade preceding Vatican II, her…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1461834','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1461834"><span id="translatedtitle">Genes involved in <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid separation and segregation in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Biggins, S; Bhalla, N; Chang, A; Smith, D L; Murray, A W</p> <p>2001-01-01</p> <p>Accurate chromosome segregation requires the precise coordination of events during the cell cycle. Replicated <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids are held together while they are properly attached to and aligned by the mitotic spindle at metaphase. At anaphase, the <span class="hlt">links</span> between <span class="hlt">sisters</span> must be promptly dissolved to allow the mitotic spindle to rapidly separate them to opposite poles. To isolate genes involved in chromosome behavior during mitosis, we microscopically screened a temperature-sensitive collection of budding yeast mutants that contain a GFP-marked chromosome. Nine LOC (loss of cohesion) complementation groups that do not segregate <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids at anaphase were identified. We cloned the corresponding genes and performed secondary tests to determine their function in chromosome behavior. We determined that three LOC genes, PDS1, ESP1, and YCS4, are required for <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid separation and three other LOC genes, CSE4, IPL1, and SMT3, are required for chromosome segregation. We isolated alleles of two genes involved in splicing, PRP16 and PRP19, which impair alpha-tubulin synthesis thus preventing spindle assembly, as well as an allele of CDC7 that is defective in DNA replication. We also report an initial characterization of phenotypes associated with the SMT3/SUMO gene and the isolation of WSS1, a high-copy smt3 suppressor. PMID:11606525</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2743075','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2743075"><span id="translatedtitle">Catholic Nursing <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> and Brothers and Racial Justice in Mid-20th-Century America</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Wall, Barbra Mann</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>This historical article considers nursing’s work for social justice in the 1960s civil rights movement through the lens of religious <span class="hlt">sisters</span> and brothers who advocated for racial equality. The article examines Catholic nurses’ work with African Americans in the mid-20th century that took place amid the prevailing social conditions of poverty and racial disempowerment, conditions that were <span class="hlt">linked</span> to serious health consequences. Historical methodology is used within the framework of “bearing witness,” a term often used in relation to the civil rights movement and one the <span class="hlt">sisters</span> themselves employed. Two situations involving nurses in the mid-20th century are examined: the civil rights movement in Selma, Alabama, and the actions for racial justice in Chicago, Illinois. The thoughts and actions of Catholic <span class="hlt">sister</span> and brother nurses in the mid-20th century are chronicled, including those few <span class="hlt">sister</span> nurses who stepped outside their ordinary roles in an attempt to change an unjust system entirely. PMID:19461224</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/254378','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/254378"><span id="translatedtitle">Two <span class="hlt">sisters</span> with clinical diagnosis of Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome: Is the condition in the family autosomal recessive?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Kondoh, T.; Hayashi, K.; Matsumoto, T.</p> <p>1995-10-09</p> <p>We report two <span class="hlt">sisters</span> in a family representing manifestations of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS), an X-<span class="hlt">linked</span> immunodeficiency disorder. An elder <span class="hlt">sister</span> had suffered from recurrent infections, small thrombocytopenic petechiae, purpura, and eczema for 7 years. The younger <span class="hlt">sister</span> had the same manifestations as the elder <span class="hlt">sister`s</span> for a 2-year period, and died of intracranial bleeding at age 2 years. All the laboratory data of the two patients were compatible with WAS, although they were females. Sialophorin analysis with the selective radioactive labeling method of this protein revealed that in the elder <span class="hlt">sister</span> a 115-KD band that should be specific for sialophorin was reduced in quantity, and instead an additional 135-KD fragment was present as a main band. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis of the sialophorin gene and single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis of the PCR product demonstrated that there were no detectable size-change nor electrophoretic mobility change in the DNA from both patients. The results indicated that their sialophorin gene structure might be normal. Studies on the mother-daughter transmission of X chromosome using a pERT84-MaeIII polymorphic marker mapped at Xp21 and HPRT gene polymorphism at Xq26 suggested that each <span class="hlt">sister</span> had inherited a different X chromosome from the mother. Two explanations are plausible for the occurrence of the WAS in our patients: the WAS in the patients is attributable to an autosomal gene mutation which may regulate the sialophorin gene expression through the WAS gene, or, alternatively, the condition in this family is an autosomal recessive disorder separated etiologically from the X-<span class="hlt">linked</span> WAS. 17 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFM.B21D0073D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFM.B21D0073D"><span id="translatedtitle">Carbon associated nitrate (CAN) in the Ediacaran Johnnie Formation, <span class="hlt">Death</span> Valley, California and <span class="hlt">links</span> to the Shuram negative carbon isotope excursion</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Dilles, Z. Y. G.; Prokopenko, M. G.; Bergmann, K.; Loyd, S. J.; Corsetti, F. A.; Berelson, W.; Gaines, R. R.</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>Nitrogen, a major nutrient of marine primary production whose many redox states are <span class="hlt">linked</span> through biological processes to O2, may afford better understanding of changes in post-Great Oxidation Event (GOE) environmental redox conditions. Using a novel approach to quantify nitrate content in carbonates, we identified a trend of CAN increase in the late-Proterozoic, including several distinct peaks within a carbonate succession of the Sonora province, Mexico, deposited ~630-500 Ma. The goal of the current study was to investigate CAN variability in the context of the global "Shuram" event, a large negative δ13C excursion expressed in Rainstorm member carbonates of the Johnnie Formation in <span class="hlt">Death</span> Valley, CA. The lower Rainstorm Member "Johnnie Oolite", a time-transgressive, regionally extensive, shallow dolomitic oolite, was sampled. CAN concentrations ranged from 7.31 to 127.36 nmol/g, with higher values measured toward the base of the bed. This trend held at each sampled locality, along with a tendency towards decreasing CAN with larger magnitude negative δ13C excursions. Modern analog ooids formed in low-latitude marine environments lack CAN, consistent with their formation in low-nitrate waters of the euphotic zone characteristic of the modern ocean nitrogen cycling. In contrast, maximum values within the Johnnie oolite exceed by a factor of five to seven CAN measured in carbonates deposited below the main nitracline in the modern ocean, implying high nitrate content within shallow depositional environments. Johnnie oolite data, broadly consistent with the Sonora sequence findings, may indicate large perturbations in the Ediacaran nitrogen cycle immediately preceding the negative δ13C excursion. The implication of these findings for possible changes in the Ediacaran nitrogen, oxygen and carbon biogeochemical cycling will be further discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title46-vol7/pdf/CFR-2012-title46-vol7-sec169-307.pdf','CFR2012'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title46-vol7/pdf/CFR-2012-title46-vol7-sec169-307.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">46 CFR 169.307 - Plans for <span class="hlt">sister</span> vessels.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-10-01</p> <p>... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Plans for <span class="hlt">sister</span> vessels. 169.307 Section 169.307 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Construction and Arrangement Plans § 169.307 Plans for <span class="hlt">sister</span> vessels. Plans are not required for any...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title46-vol7/pdf/CFR-2013-title46-vol7-sec169-307.pdf','CFR2013'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title46-vol7/pdf/CFR-2013-title46-vol7-sec169-307.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">46 CFR 169.307 - Plans for <span class="hlt">sister</span> vessels.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-10-01</p> <p>... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Plans for <span class="hlt">sister</span> vessels. 169.307 Section 169.307 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Construction and Arrangement Plans § 169.307 Plans for <span class="hlt">sister</span> vessels. Plans are not required for any...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title46-vol7/pdf/CFR-2011-title46-vol7-sec169-307.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title46-vol7/pdf/CFR-2011-title46-vol7-sec169-307.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">46 CFR 169.307 - Plans for <span class="hlt">sister</span> vessels.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-10-01</p> <p>... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Plans for <span class="hlt">sister</span> vessels. 169.307 Section 169.307 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Construction and Arrangement Plans § 169.307 Plans for <span class="hlt">sister</span> vessels. Plans are not required for any...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title46-vol7/pdf/CFR-2010-title46-vol7-sec169-307.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title46-vol7/pdf/CFR-2010-title46-vol7-sec169-307.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">46 CFR 169.307 - Plans for <span class="hlt">sister</span> vessels.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-10-01</p> <p>... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Plans for <span class="hlt">sister</span> vessels. 169.307 Section 169.307 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Construction and Arrangement Plans § 169.307 Plans for <span class="hlt">sister</span> vessels. Plans are not required for any...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title46-vol7/pdf/CFR-2014-title46-vol7-sec169-307.pdf','CFR2014'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title46-vol7/pdf/CFR-2014-title46-vol7-sec169-307.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">46 CFR 169.307 - Plans for <span class="hlt">sister</span> vessels.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-10-01</p> <p>... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Plans for <span class="hlt">sister</span> vessels. 169.307 Section 169.307 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Construction and Arrangement Plans § 169.307 Plans for <span class="hlt">sister</span> vessels. Plans are not required for any...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Cold+AND+international+AND+relations&pg=3&id=EJ437613','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Cold+AND+international+AND+relations&pg=3&id=EJ437613"><span id="translatedtitle">Building International Relations for Children through <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Schools.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Pryor, Carolyn B.</p> <p>1992-01-01</p> <p>Inspired by <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Cities International and the NASSP's school-to-school exchange program, "<span class="hlt">sister</span> school" pairings have proved to be workable educational programs with long-range impact on participants. Some post-cold war efforts include U.S.-USSR High School Academic Partnerships, Project Harmony, and Center for U.S.-USSR Initiatives. Resource…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1088162','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1088162"><span id="translatedtitle">[Concordant deuteranomaly in monozygotic twin <span class="hlt">sisters</span> (author's transl)].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Franceschetti, A T; Klein, D; Dieterle, P</p> <p>1976-12-01</p> <p>Colorblind twin <span class="hlt">sisters</span> were born from the marriage of a hemizygote with a carrier for colorblindness. The proof of monozygosity is given by the blood-group typing and the dermatoglyphs. The deuteranomaly is of the same degree in each but is more marked in one of the <span class="hlt">sisters</span>. The mother has none of the microsymptoms sometimes found in carriers. PMID:1088162</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25601100','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25601100"><span id="translatedtitle">Partial dosage compensation in Strepsiptera, a <span class="hlt">sister</span> group of beetles.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Mahajan, Shivani; Bachtrog, Doris</p> <p>2015-02-01</p> <p>Sex chromosomes have evolved independently in many different taxa, and so have mechanisms to compensate for expression differences on sex chromosomes in males and females. Different clades have evolved vastly different ways to achieve dosage compensation, including hypertranscription of the single X in male Drosophila, downregulation of both X's in XX Caenorhabditis, or inactivation of one X in female mammals. In the flour beetle Tribolium, the X appears hyperexpressed in both sexes, which might represent the first of two steps to evolve dosage compensation along the paths mammals may have taken (i.e., upregulation of X in both sexes, followed by inactivation of one X in females). Here we test for dosage compensation in Strepsiptera, a <span class="hlt">sister</span> taxon to beetles. We identify sex-<span class="hlt">linked</span> chromosomes in Xenos vesparum based on genomic analysis of males and females, and show that its sex chromosome consists of two chromosomal arms in Tribolium: The X chromosome that is shared between Tribolium and Strepsiptera, and another chromosome that is autosomal in Tribolium and another distantly related Strepsiptera species, but sex-<span class="hlt">linked</span> in X. vesparum. We use RNA-seq (RNA sequencing) to show that dosage compensation along the X of X. vesparum is partial and heterogeneous. In particular, genes that are X-<span class="hlt">linked</span> in both beetles and Strepsiptera appear fully dosage compensated probably through downregulation in both sexes, whereas genes on the more recently added X segment have evolved only partial dosage compensation. In addition, reanalysis of published RNA-seq data suggests that Tribolium has evolved dosage compensation, without hypertranscribing the X in females. Our results demonstrate that patterns of dosage compensation are highly variable across sex-determination systems and even within species.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25601100','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25601100"><span id="translatedtitle">Partial dosage compensation in Strepsiptera, a <span class="hlt">sister</span> group of beetles.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Mahajan, Shivani; Bachtrog, Doris</p> <p>2015-02-01</p> <p>Sex chromosomes have evolved independently in many different taxa, and so have mechanisms to compensate for expression differences on sex chromosomes in males and females. Different clades have evolved vastly different ways to achieve dosage compensation, including hypertranscription of the single X in male Drosophila, downregulation of both X's in XX Caenorhabditis, or inactivation of one X in female mammals. In the flour beetle Tribolium, the X appears hyperexpressed in both sexes, which might represent the first of two steps to evolve dosage compensation along the paths mammals may have taken (i.e., upregulation of X in both sexes, followed by inactivation of one X in females). Here we test for dosage compensation in Strepsiptera, a <span class="hlt">sister</span> taxon to beetles. We identify sex-<span class="hlt">linked</span> chromosomes in Xenos vesparum based on genomic analysis of males and females, and show that its sex chromosome consists of two chromosomal arms in Tribolium: The X chromosome that is shared between Tribolium and Strepsiptera, and another chromosome that is autosomal in Tribolium and another distantly related Strepsiptera species, but sex-<span class="hlt">linked</span> in X. vesparum. We use RNA-seq (RNA sequencing) to show that dosage compensation along the X of X. vesparum is partial and heterogeneous. In particular, genes that are X-<span class="hlt">linked</span> in both beetles and Strepsiptera appear fully dosage compensated probably through downregulation in both sexes, whereas genes on the more recently added X segment have evolved only partial dosage compensation. In addition, reanalysis of published RNA-seq data suggests that Tribolium has evolved dosage compensation, without hypertranscribing the X in females. Our results demonstrate that patterns of dosage compensation are highly variable across sex-determination systems and even within species. PMID:25601100</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4350179','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4350179"><span id="translatedtitle">Partial Dosage Compensation in Strepsiptera, a <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Group of Beetles</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Mahajan, Shivani; Bachtrog, Doris</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Sex chromosomes have evolved independently in many different taxa, and so have mechanisms to compensate for expression differences on sex chromosomes in males and females. Different clades have evolved vastly different ways to achieve dosage compensation, including hypertranscription of the single X in male Drosophila, downregulation of both X’s in XX Caenorhabditis, or inactivation of one X in female mammals. In the flour beetle Tribolium, the X appears hyperexpressed in both sexes, which might represent the first of two steps to evolve dosage compensation along the paths mammals may have taken (i.e., upregulation of X in both sexes, followed by inactivation of one X in females). Here we test for dosage compensation in Strepsiptera, a <span class="hlt">sister</span> taxon to beetles. We identify sex-<span class="hlt">linked</span> chromosomes in Xenos vesparum based on genomic analysis of males and females, and show that its sex chromosome consists of two chromosomal arms in Tribolium: The X chromosome that is shared between Tribolium and Strepsiptera, and another chromosome that is autosomal in Tribolium and another distantly related Strepsiptera species, but sex-<span class="hlt">linked</span> in X. vesparum. We use RNA-seq (RNA sequencing) to show that dosage compensation along the X of X. vesparum is partial and heterogeneous. In particular, genes that are X-<span class="hlt">linked</span> in both beetles and Strepsiptera appear fully dosage compensated probably through downregulation in both sexes, whereas genes on the more recently added X segment have evolved only partial dosage compensation. In addition, reanalysis of published RNA-seq data suggests that Tribolium has evolved dosage compensation, without hypertranscribing the X in females. Our results demonstrate that patterns of dosage compensation are highly variable across sex-determination systems and even within species. PMID:25601100</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25337074','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25337074"><span id="translatedtitle">Evidence of Germline Mosaicism for a Novel BCOR Mutation in Two Indian <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> with Oculo-Facio-Cardio-Dental Syndrome.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Danda, Sumita; van Rahden, Vanessa A; John, Deepa; Paul, Padma; Raju, Renu; Koshy, Santosh; Kutsche, Kerstin</p> <p>2014-08-01</p> <p>In this study, we report on 2 <span class="hlt">sisters</span> from India with oculo-facio-cardio-dental (OFCD) syndrome caused by a novel heterozygous mutation c.3490C>T (p.R1164*) in the BCOR gene. OFCD syndrome is an X-<span class="hlt">linked</span> inherited disorder which is lethal in males. Interestingly, both parents of the <span class="hlt">sisters</span> were phenotypically normal, and DNA analysis from blood and buccal or saliva cells failed to detect the BCOR mutation found in their 2 daughters. To the best of our knowledge, for the first time, we provide indirect evidence of germline mosaicism for the BCOR mutation in one of the parents of the 2 <span class="hlt">sisters</span> affected by OFCD syndrome. Although this condition is lethal in males, gonadal mosaicism could also be present in the father. The relevance of clinical diagnosis and mutation analysis required for genetic counseling is described in this family. PMID:25337074</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_2");'>2</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_3");'>3</a></li> <li class="active"><span>4</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_4 --> <div id="page_5" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_3");'>3</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");'>4</a></li> <li class="active"><span>5</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="81"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9113588','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9113588"><span id="translatedtitle">Pregnant and parenting adolescents and their younger <span class="hlt">sisters</span>: the influence of relationship qualities for younger <span class="hlt">sister</span> outcomes.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>East, P L; Shi, C R</p> <p>1997-04-01</p> <p>On the basis of social modeling theory and a sibling interaction hypothesis, it was hypothesized that specific relationship qualities between a pregnant or parenting teen and her younger <span class="hlt">sister</span> would be associated with permissive younger <span class="hlt">sister</span> outcomes, such as permissive childbearing attitudes and permissive sexual behavior. Results indicated that negative relationship qualities, such as rivalry, competition, and conflict, were more closely related to younger <span class="hlt">sisters</span> engaging in problem delinquent-like behavior and sexual behavior than were positive relationship qualities, such as warmth and closeness. Additionally, a shared friendship network with the older <span class="hlt">sister</span> was found to be associated with extensive younger <span class="hlt">sister</span> problem behavior and sexual behavior. Three potential explanatory processes are discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25999055','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25999055"><span id="translatedtitle">Horsetails are the <span class="hlt">sister</span> group to all other monilophytes and Marattiales are <span class="hlt">sister</span> to leptosporangiate ferns.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Knie, Nils; Fischer, Simon; Grewe, Felix; Polsakiewicz, Monika; Knoop, Volker</p> <p>2015-09-01</p> <p>The "Monilophyte" clade comprising ferns, horsetails and whisk ferns receives unequivocal support from molecular data as the <span class="hlt">sister</span> clade to seed plants. However, the branching order of its earliest emerging lineages, the Equisetales (horsetails), the Marattiales, the Ophioglossales/Psilotales and the large group of leptosporangiate ferns has remained dubious. We investigated the mitochondrial nad2 and rpl2 genes as two new, intron-containing loci for a wide sampling of taxa. We found that both group II introns - nad2i542g2 and rpl2i846g2 - are universally present among monilophytes. Both introns have orthologues in seed plants where nad2i542g2 has evolved into a trans-arrangement. In contrast and despite substantial size extensions to more than 5kb in Psilotum, nad2i542g2 remains cis-arranged in the monilophytes. For phylogenetic analyses, we filled taxonomic gaps in previously investigated mitochondrial (atp1, nad5) and chloroplast (atpA, atpB, matK, rbcL, rps4) loci and created a 9-gene matrix that also included the new mitochondrial nad2 and rpl2 loci. We extended the taxon sampling with two taxa each for all land plant outgroups (liverworts, mosses, hornworts, lycophytes and seed plants) to minimize the risk of phylogenetic artefacts. We ultimately obtained a well-supported molecular phylogeny placing Marattiales as <span class="hlt">sister</span> to leptosporangiate ferns and horsetails as <span class="hlt">sister</span> to all remaining monilophytes. In addition, an indel in an exon of the here introduced rpl2 locus independently supports the placement of horsetails. We conclude that under dense taxon sampling, phylogenetic information from a prudent choice of loci is currently superior to character-rich phylogenomic approaches at low taxon sampling. As here shown the selective choice of loci and taxa enabled us to resolve the long-enigmatic diversifications of the earliest monilophyte lineages.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25999055','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25999055"><span id="translatedtitle">Horsetails are the <span class="hlt">sister</span> group to all other monilophytes and Marattiales are <span class="hlt">sister</span> to leptosporangiate ferns.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Knie, Nils; Fischer, Simon; Grewe, Felix; Polsakiewicz, Monika; Knoop, Volker</p> <p>2015-09-01</p> <p>The "Monilophyte" clade comprising ferns, horsetails and whisk ferns receives unequivocal support from molecular data as the <span class="hlt">sister</span> clade to seed plants. However, the branching order of its earliest emerging lineages, the Equisetales (horsetails), the Marattiales, the Ophioglossales/Psilotales and the large group of leptosporangiate ferns has remained dubious. We investigated the mitochondrial nad2 and rpl2 genes as two new, intron-containing loci for a wide sampling of taxa. We found that both group II introns - nad2i542g2 and rpl2i846g2 - are universally present among monilophytes. Both introns have orthologues in seed plants where nad2i542g2 has evolved into a trans-arrangement. In contrast and despite substantial size extensions to more than 5kb in Psilotum, nad2i542g2 remains cis-arranged in the monilophytes. For phylogenetic analyses, we filled taxonomic gaps in previously investigated mitochondrial (atp1, nad5) and chloroplast (atpA, atpB, matK, rbcL, rps4) loci and created a 9-gene matrix that also included the new mitochondrial nad2 and rpl2 loci. We extended the taxon sampling with two taxa each for all land plant outgroups (liverworts, mosses, hornworts, lycophytes and seed plants) to minimize the risk of phylogenetic artefacts. We ultimately obtained a well-supported molecular phylogeny placing Marattiales as <span class="hlt">sister</span> to leptosporangiate ferns and horsetails as <span class="hlt">sister</span> to all remaining monilophytes. In addition, an indel in an exon of the here introduced rpl2 locus independently supports the placement of horsetails. We conclude that under dense taxon sampling, phylogenetic information from a prudent choice of loci is currently superior to character-rich phylogenomic approaches at low taxon sampling. As here shown the selective choice of loci and taxa enabled us to resolve the long-enigmatic diversifications of the earliest monilophyte lineages. PMID:25999055</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3950021','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3950021"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Death</span> imagery and <span class="hlt">death</span> anxiety.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>McDonald, R T; Hilgendorf, W A</p> <p>1986-01-01</p> <p>This study investigated the relationship between positive/negative <span class="hlt">death</span> imagery and <span class="hlt">death</span> anxiety. Subjects were 179 undergraduate students at a large, private, midwestern university. Results reveal that on five measures of <span class="hlt">death</span> anxiety the subjects with low <span class="hlt">death</span> anxiety scores had significantly more positive <span class="hlt">death</span> images than did those with high <span class="hlt">death</span> anxiety scores. The few subjects who imagined <span class="hlt">death</span> to be young (N = 14) had a significantly more positive image of <span class="hlt">death</span> than those who perceived it to be an old person. <span class="hlt">Death</span> was seen as male by 92% of the male respondents and 74% of the female respondents. Significant differences in <span class="hlt">death</span> imagery and <span class="hlt">death</span> anxiety were found between subjects enrolled in an introductory psychology course and those enrolled in a thanatology course. No sex differences in <span class="hlt">death</span> anxiety or positive/negative <span class="hlt">death</span> imagery were found.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23550483','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23550483"><span id="translatedtitle">Developing skills in clinical leadership for ward <span class="hlt">sisters</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Fenton, Katherine; Phillips, Natasha</p> <p></p> <p>The Francis report has called for a strengthening of the ward <span class="hlt">sister</span>'s role. It recommends that <span class="hlt">sisters</span> should operate in a supervisory capacity and should not be office bound. Effective ward leadership has been recognised as being vital to high-quality patient care and experience, resource management and interprofessional working. However, there is evidence that ward <span class="hlt">sisters</span> are ill equipped to lead effectively and lack confidence in their ability to do so. University College London Hospitals Foundation Trust has recognised that the job has become almost impossible in increasingly large and complex organisations. Ward <span class="hlt">sisters</span> spend less than 40% of their time on clinical leadership and the trust is undertaking a number of initiatives to support them in this role.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/dc0640.photos.036900p/','SCIGOV-HHH'); return false;" href="//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/dc0640.photos.036900p/"><span id="translatedtitle">8. STREAMSIDE PATH NEAR MIDDLE OF THREE <span class="hlt">SISTERS</span> FALLS, LOOKING ...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/">Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>8. STREAM-SIDE PATH NEAR MIDDLE OF THREE <span class="hlt">SISTERS</span> FALLS, LOOKING WEST Photocopy of photograph, 1930s National Park Service, National Capital Region files - Dumbarton Oaks Park, Thirty-second & R Streets Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5020959','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5020959"><span id="translatedtitle">Bardet-Biedl syndrome in two <span class="hlt">sisters</span>: A rare incidence</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Varma, Chaitanya; Bhat, Ramesh Y.; Bhatt, Sonia</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Bardet-Biedl syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by retinitis pigmentosa, obesity, polydactyly, mental retardation and hypogonadism. We present two <span class="hlt">sisters</span> with this rare genetic condition. PMID:27625840</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/mi0639.photos.196598p/','SCIGOV-HHH'); return false;" href="//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/mi0639.photos.196598p/"><span id="translatedtitle">38. 8 <span class="hlt">sisters</span> and powerhouse, pulverizer building for powerhouse, coal ...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/">Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>38. 8 <span class="hlt">sisters</span> and powerhouse, pulverizer building for powerhouse, coal conveyor, blast stoves, "A" furnace, stoves, "B" furnace, stoves, "C" furnace, bottle cars. Looking south - Rouge Steel Company, 3001 Miller Road, Dearborn, MI</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25448148','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25448148"><span id="translatedtitle">Unusual retinal abnormalities in <span class="hlt">sisters</span> with tetralogy of Fallot.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Zanolli, Mario T; Capasso, Jenina; Khetan, Vikas; Aristimuño, Begoña; Levin, Alex V</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) is the most common cyanotic congenital heart disease and can occur in the setting of chromosomal aberrations or multisystem malformation syndromes. We report unusual focal bilateral retinal defects in <span class="hlt">sisters</span> with TOF.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://medlineplus.gov/magazine/issues/fall08/articles/fall08pg14.html','NIH-MEDLINEPLUS'); return false;" href="https://medlineplus.gov/magazine/issues/fall08/articles/fall08pg14.html"><span id="translatedtitle">Cochlear Implants Keep Twin <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> Learning, Discovering Together</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePlus</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>... University. Photo: Johns Hopkins University Keep Twin <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> Learning, Discovering Together Mia and Isabelle Jeppsen, 10, share ... her mother, gratefully, "There's the obvious benefit of learning to read, write and communicate with facility and ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25213378','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25213378"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Sister</span> kinetochores are mechanically fused during meiosis I in yeast.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Sarangapani, Krishna K; Duro, Eris; Deng, Yi; Alves, Flavia de Lima; Ye, Qiaozhen; Opoku, Kwaku N; Ceto, Steven; Rappsilber, Juri; Corbett, Kevin D; Biggins, Sue; Marston, Adèle L; Asbury, Charles L</p> <p>2014-10-10</p> <p>Production of healthy gametes requires a reductional meiosis I division in which replicated <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids comigrate, rather than separate as in mitosis or meiosis II. Fusion of <span class="hlt">sister</span> kinetochores during meiosis I may underlie <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid comigration in diverse organisms, but direct evidence for such fusion has been lacking. We used laser trapping and quantitative fluorescence microscopy to study native kinetochore particles isolated from yeast. Meiosis I kinetochores formed stronger attachments and carried more microtubule-binding elements than kinetochores isolated from cells in mitosis or meiosis II. The meiosis I-specific monopolin complex was both necessary and sufficient to drive these modifications. Thus, kinetochore fusion directs <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid comigration, a conserved feature of meiosis that is fundamental to Mendelian inheritance.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Recombination&pg=3&id=EJ384605','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Recombination&pg=3&id=EJ384605"><span id="translatedtitle">How-to-Do-It: Demonstrating <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Chromatid Exchanges.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Dye, Frank J.</p> <p>1988-01-01</p> <p>Outlines procedures for demonstrating and preparing a permanent slide of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchanges and recombination events between the two chromatids of a single chromosome. Provides the name of an additional resource for making preparations of exchanges. (RT)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9043918','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9043918"><span id="translatedtitle">Three <span class="hlt">sisters</span> with septate uteri: another reference to bidirectional theory.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ergün, A; Pabuccu, R; Atay, V; Kücük, T; Duru, N K; Güngör, S</p> <p>1997-01-01</p> <p>A case report of three <span class="hlt">sisters</span> with different degrees of septate uteri, a rare familial aggregation, is presented. The youngest <span class="hlt">sister</span> was diagnosed with a complete uterine septum with cervical duplication and complete longitudinal vaginal septum. She also had a bilateral partial ureteral duplication. Investigation of the family showed that the eldest <span class="hlt">sister</span> had a complete uterine septum and her pregnancy had terminated with a vaginal delivery following premature rupture of the membranes. The asymptomatic middle <span class="hlt">sister</span> showed an incomplete uterine septum. Finally, the mother was normal with respect to urogenital anatomy. These types of Müllerian anomalies cannot be explained by the classical theory of unidirectional Müllerian duct development; the alternative bidirectional theory is proposed instead. Additionally, the results are suggestive that the prevalence of major uterine malformations may be higher than generally thought, due to asymptomatic cases.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4843159','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4843159"><span id="translatedtitle">Cholangicarcinoma Presenting as a <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Mary Joseph Nodule</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Rangegowda, Devaraja; Vyas, Tanmay; Grover, Shrruti; Joshi, YK; Sharma, Chhagan; Sahney, Amrish</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Sister</span> Mary Joseph nodules represent metastatic cancer of the umbilicus. More than half of these cases are attributable to gastrointestinal malignancies including gastric, colonic, and pancreatic cancer. In addition, gynecologic (ovarian, uterine cancer), unknown primary tumors, and, rarely, bladder or respiratory malignancies may cause umbilical metastasis. We report the case of a <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Mary Joseph nodule originating from a hilar cholangiocarcinoma. Umbilical nodules should prompt clinical evaluation, as these tumors are usually associated with poor prognosis. PMID:27144207</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4825568','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4825568"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Sister</span> chromatid decatenation: bridging the gaps in our knowledge</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Broderick, Ronan; Niedzwiedz, Wojciech</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Faithful chromosome segregation is critical in preventing genome loss or damage during cell division. Failure to properly disentangle catenated <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids can lead to the formation of bulky or ultrafine anaphase bridges, and ultimately genome instability. In this review we present an overview of the current state of knowledge of how <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid decatenation is carried out, with particular focus on the role of TOP2A and TOPBP1 in this process. PMID:26266709</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3127754','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3127754"><span id="translatedtitle">Serum Non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentration and risk of <span class="hlt">death</span> from cardiovascular diseases among U.S. adults with diagnosed diabetes: the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey <span class="hlt">linked</span> mortality study</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Background Non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (non-HDL-C) measures all atherogenic apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins and predicts risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD). The association of non-HDL-C with risk of <span class="hlt">death</span> from CVD in diabetes is not well understood. This study assessed the hypothesis that, among adults with diabetes, non-HDL-C may be related to the risk of <span class="hlt">death</span> from CVD. Methods We analyzed data from 1,122 adults aged 20 years and older with diagnosed diabetes who participated in the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey <span class="hlt">linked</span> mortality study (299 <span class="hlt">deaths</span> from CVD according to underlying cause of <span class="hlt">death</span>; median follow-up length, 12.4 years). Results Compared to participants with serum non-HDL-C concentrations of 35 to 129 mg/dL, those with higher serum levels had a higher risk of <span class="hlt">death</span> from total CVD: the RRs were 1.34 (95% CI: 0.75-2.39) and 2.25 (95% CI: 1.30-3.91) for non-HDL-C concentrations of 130-189 mg/dL and 190-403 mg/dL, respectively (P = 0.003 for linear trend) after adjustment for demographic characteristics and selected risk factors. In subgroup analyses, significant linear trends were identified for the risk of <span class="hlt">death</span> from ischemic heart disease: the RRs were 1.59 (95% CI: 0.76-3.32) and 2.50 (95% CI: 1.28-4.89) (P = 0.006 for linear trend), and stroke: the RRs were 3.37 (95% CI: 0.95-11.90) and 5.81 (95% CI: 1.96-17.25) (P = 0.001 for linear trend). Conclusions In diabetics, higher serum non-HDL-C concentrations were significantly associated with increased risk of <span class="hlt">death</span> from CVD. Our prospective data support the notion that reducing serum non-HDL-C concentrations may be beneficial in the prevention of excess <span class="hlt">death</span> from CVD among affected adults. PMID:21605423</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://pubs.usgs.gov/of/1999/0437/pdf/of1999-0437.pdf','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="https://pubs.usgs.gov/of/1999/0437/pdf/of1999-0437.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Volcano hazards in the Three <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> region, Oregon</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Scott, William E.; Iverson, R.M.; Schilling, S.P.; Fisher, B.J.</p> <p>2001-01-01</p> <p>Three <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> is one of three potentially active volcanic centers that lie close to rapidly growing communities and resort areas in Central Oregon. Two types of volcanoes exist in the Three <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> region and each poses distinct hazards to people and property. South <span class="hlt">Sister</span>, Middle <span class="hlt">Sister</span>, and Broken Top, major composite volcanoes clustered near the center of the region, have erupted repeatedly over tens of thousands of years and may erupt explosively in the future. In contrast, mafic volcanoes, which range from small cinder cones to large shield volcanoes like North <span class="hlt">Sister</span> and Belknap Crater, are typically short-lived (weeks to centuries) and erupt less explosively than do composite volcanoes. Hundreds of mafic volcanoes scattered through the Three <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> region are part of a much longer zone along the High Cascades of Oregon in which birth of new mafic volcanoes is possible. This report describes the types of hazardous events that can occur in the Three <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> region and the accompanying volcano-hazard-zonation map outlines areas that could be at risk from such events. Hazardous events include landslides from the steep flanks of large volcanoes and floods, which need not be triggered by eruptions, as well as eruption-triggered events such as fallout of tephra (volcanic ash) and lava flows. A proximal hazard zone roughly 20 kilometers (12 miles) in diameter surrounding the Three <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> and Broken Top could be affected within minutes of the onset of an eruption or large landslide. Distal hazard zones that follow river valleys downstream from the Three <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> and Broken Top could be inundated by lahars (rapid flows of water-laden rock and mud) generated either by melting of snow and ice during eruptions or by large landslides. Slow-moving lava flows could issue from new mafic volcanoes almost anywhere within the region. Fallout of tephra from eruption clouds can affect areas hundreds of kilometers (miles) downwind, so eruptions at volcanoes elsewhere in the</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=sudden+AND+death&pg=6&id=EJ322555','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=sudden+AND+death&pg=6&id=EJ322555"><span id="translatedtitle">Cot <span class="hlt">Deaths</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Tyrrell, Shelagh</p> <p>1985-01-01</p> <p>Addresses the tragedy of crib <span class="hlt">deaths</span>, giving particular attention to causes, prevention, and medical research on Sudden Infant <span class="hlt">Death</span> Syndrome (SIDS). Gives anecdotal accounts of coping strategies used by parents and families of SIDS infants. (DT)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23574717','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23574717"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Sister</span> chromatid segregation in meiosis II: deprotection through phosphorylation.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Wassmann, Katja</p> <p>2013-05-01</p> <p>Meiotic divisions (meiosis I and II) are specialized cell divisions to generate haploid gametes. The first meiotic division with the separation of chromosomes is named reductional division. The second division, which takes place immediately after meiosis I without intervening S-phase, is equational, with the separation of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids, similar to mitosis. This meiotic segregation pattern requires the two-step removal of the cohesin complex holding <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids together: cohesin is removed from chromosome arms that have been subjected to homologous recombination in meiosis I and from the centromere region in meiosis II. Cohesin in the centromere region is protected from removal in meiosis I, but this protection has to be removed--deprotected--for <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid segregation in meiosis II. Whereas the mechanisms of cohesin protection are quite well understood, the mechanisms of deprotection have been largely unknown until recently. In this review I summarize our current knowledge on cohesin deprotection.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27477908','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27477908"><span id="translatedtitle">A Long Noncoding RNA Regulates <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Chromatid Cohesion.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Marchese, Francesco P; Grossi, Elena; Marín-Béjar, Oskar; Bharti, Sanjay Kumar; Raimondi, Ivan; González, Jovanna; Martínez-Herrera, Dannys Jorge; Athie, Alejandro; Amadoz, Alicia; Brosh, Robert M; Huarte, Maite</p> <p>2016-08-01</p> <p>Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are involved in diverse cellular processes through multiple mechanisms. Here, we describe a previously uncharacterized human lncRNA, CONCR (cohesion regulator noncoding RNA), that is transcriptionally activated by MYC and is upregulated in multiple cancer types. The expression of CONCR is cell cycle regulated, and it is required for cell-cycle progression and DNA replication. Moreover, cells depleted of CONCR show severe defects in <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid cohesion, suggesting an essential role for CONCR in cohesion establishment during cell division. CONCR interacts with and regulates the activity of DDX11, a DNA-dependent ATPase and helicase involved in DNA replication and <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid cohesion. These findings unveil a direct role for an lncRNA in the establishment of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid cohesion by modulating DDX11 enzymatic activity. PMID:27477908</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_3");'>3</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");'>4</a></li> <li class="active"><span>5</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_5 --> <div id="page_6" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");'>4</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li class="active"><span>6</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="101"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19218843','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19218843"><span id="translatedtitle">Catholic <span class="hlt">sister</span> nurses in Selma, Alabama, 1940-1972.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Wall, Barbra Mann</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>This study analyzes the activities of religious <span class="hlt">sister</span> nurses as they confronted racism in the American South from 1940 to 1972. Selma was chosen as a case study because, in the 1960s, events in that southern town marked a turning point in the civil rights movement in the United States. This is a story about the workings of gender, race, religion, and nursing. The <span class="hlt">sisters</span>' work demonstrates how an analysis of race in nursing history is incomplete without an understanding of the roles that a number of Catholic religious women took in reaching out to African Americans in the Deep South.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19218843','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19218843"><span id="translatedtitle">Catholic <span class="hlt">sister</span> nurses in Selma, Alabama, 1940-1972.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Wall, Barbra Mann</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>This study analyzes the activities of religious <span class="hlt">sister</span> nurses as they confronted racism in the American South from 1940 to 1972. Selma was chosen as a case study because, in the 1960s, events in that southern town marked a turning point in the civil rights movement in the United States. This is a story about the workings of gender, race, religion, and nursing. The <span class="hlt">sisters</span>' work demonstrates how an analysis of race in nursing history is incomplete without an understanding of the roles that a number of Catholic religious women took in reaching out to African Americans in the Deep South. PMID:19218843</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27424142','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27424142"><span id="translatedtitle">Paternal smoking and germ cell <span class="hlt">death</span>: A mechanistic <span class="hlt">link</span> to the effects of cigarette smoke on spermatogenesis and possible long-term sequelae in offspring.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Esakky, Prabagaran; Moley, Kelle H</p> <p>2016-11-01</p> <p>Paternal exposure to constituents of cigarette smoke (CS) is reportedly associated with infertility, birth defects and childhood cancers even though the mechanism behind this relationship is still unclear. Chronic cigarette smoking by men leads to poor sperm quality and quantity mainly through oxidative stress and also direct assault by CS metabolites. Among several carcinogenic and teratogenic components of cigarette smoke condensate (CSC), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) display a preeminent role in accelerating germ cell <span class="hlt">death</span> via the cytoplasmic transcription factor, aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) that is present across all stages of spermatogenesis. Activation of AHR by growth factors though benefits normal cellular functions, its mediation by CSC in a spermatocyte cell line [Gc2(spd)ts] adversely affects the expression of a battery of genes associated with antioxidant mechanisms, cell proliferation and apoptosis, and cell cycle progress. Besides, the CSC-mediated cross talk either between AHR and NRF2 or AHR-NRF2 and MAPKs pathways inhibits normal proliferation of the spermatogenic GC-2spd(ts) cells in vitro and cell <span class="hlt">death</span> of spermatocytes in vivo. Pharmacological inactivation of CSC-induced AHR but not its genetic manipulation seems preventing DNA and cell membrane damage in Gc2(spd)ts. Data from recent reports suggest that the cigarette smoke affects both the genomic and epigenomic components of the sperm and attributes any associated changes to developmental defects in the offspring. Thus, the studies discussed here in this review shed light on possible mechanistic factors that could probably be responsible for the paternally mediated birth defects in the offspring following exposure to the toxic constituents of cigarette smoke. PMID:27424142</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2838960','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2838960"><span id="translatedtitle">Autophagy is a Protective Mechanism in Normal Cartilage and its Aging-related Loss is <span class="hlt">Linked</span> with Cell <span class="hlt">Death</span> and Osteoarthritis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Caramés, Beatriz; Taniguchi, Noboru; Otsuki, Shuhei; Blanco, Francisco J.; Lotz, Martin</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Objective Autophagy is a process for turnover of intracellular organelles and molecules that protects cells during stress responses. This study evaluated the potential role of ULK1, an inducer of autophagy, Beclin1, a regulator of autophagy and LC3, which executes autophagy, in the development of osteoarthritis (OA) and in cartilage cell <span class="hlt">death</span>. Methods Expression of ULK1, Beclin1 and LC3 were analyzed in normal and OA human articular cartilage and in knee joints of mice with aging-related and surgically induced OA by using immunohistochemistry (IHC) and western blotting. Poly-ADP(ribose) polymerase (Parp p85) was used to determine the correlation between cell <span class="hlt">death</span> and autophagy. Results In normal human articular cartilage ULK1, Beclin1 and LC3 were constitutively expressed. ULK1, Beclin1 and LC3 protein expression were reduced in OA chondrocytes and cartilage but these three proteins were strongly expressed in the OA cell clusters. In mouse knee joints loss of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) was observed at 9 and 12 months of age and in the surgical OA model 8 weeks after knee destabilization. Expression of ULK1, Beclin1 and LC3 decreased together with GAG loss while Parp p85 was increased. Conclusion Autophagy may be a protective or homeostatic mechanism in normal cartilage. By contrast, human OA, aging-related and surgically-induced OA in mice are associated with a reduction and loss of ULK1, Beclin1 and LC3 expression and a related increase in apoptosis. These results suggest that compromised autophagy represents a novel mechanism in the development of OA. PMID:20187128</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27120695','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27120695"><span id="translatedtitle">Separase Is Required for Homolog and <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Disjunction during Drosophila melanogaster Male Meiosis, but Not for Biorientation of <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Centromeres.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Blattner, Ariane C; Chaurasia, Soumya; McKee, Bruce D; Lehner, Christian F</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>Spatially controlled release of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid cohesion during progression through the meiotic divisions is of paramount importance for error-free chromosome segregation during meiosis. Cohesion is mediated by the cohesin protein complex and cleavage of one of its subunits by the endoprotease separase removes cohesin first from chromosome arms during exit from meiosis I and later from the pericentromeric region during exit from meiosis II. At the onset of the meiotic divisions, cohesin has also been proposed to be present within the centromeric region for the unification of <span class="hlt">sister</span> centromeres into a single functional entity, allowing bipolar orientation of paired homologs within the meiosis I spindle. Separase-mediated removal of centromeric cohesin during exit from meiosis I might explain <span class="hlt">sister</span> centromere individualization which is essential for subsequent biorientation of <span class="hlt">sister</span> centromeres during meiosis II. To characterize a potential involvement of separase in <span class="hlt">sister</span> centromere individualization before meiosis II, we have studied meiosis in Drosophila melanogaster males where homologs are not paired in the canonical manner. Meiosis does not include meiotic recombination and synaptonemal complex formation in these males. Instead, an alternative homolog conjunction system keeps homologous chromosomes in pairs. Using independent strategies for spermatocyte-specific depletion of separase complex subunits in combination with time-lapse imaging, we demonstrate that separase is required for the inactivation of this alternative conjunction at anaphase I onset. Mutations that abolish alternative homolog conjunction therefore result in random segregation of univalents during meiosis I also after separase depletion. Interestingly, these univalents become bioriented during meiosis II, suggesting that <span class="hlt">sister</span> centromere individualization before meiosis II does not require separase.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4847790','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4847790"><span id="translatedtitle">Separase Is Required for Homolog and <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Disjunction during Drosophila melanogaster Male Meiosis, but Not for Biorientation of <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Centromeres</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Blattner, Ariane C.; McKee, Bruce D.; Lehner, Christian F.</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Spatially controlled release of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid cohesion during progression through the meiotic divisions is of paramount importance for error-free chromosome segregation during meiosis. Cohesion is mediated by the cohesin protein complex and cleavage of one of its subunits by the endoprotease separase removes cohesin first from chromosome arms during exit from meiosis I and later from the pericentromeric region during exit from meiosis II. At the onset of the meiotic divisions, cohesin has also been proposed to be present within the centromeric region for the unification of <span class="hlt">sister</span> centromeres into a single functional entity, allowing bipolar orientation of paired homologs within the meiosis I spindle. Separase-mediated removal of centromeric cohesin during exit from meiosis I might explain <span class="hlt">sister</span> centromere individualization which is essential for subsequent biorientation of <span class="hlt">sister</span> centromeres during meiosis II. To characterize a potential involvement of separase in <span class="hlt">sister</span> centromere individualization before meiosis II, we have studied meiosis in Drosophila melanogaster males where homologs are not paired in the canonical manner. Meiosis does not include meiotic recombination and synaptonemal complex formation in these males. Instead, an alternative homolog conjunction system keeps homologous chromosomes in pairs. Using independent strategies for spermatocyte-specific depletion of separase complex subunits in combination with time-lapse imaging, we demonstrate that separase is required for the inactivation of this alternative conjunction at anaphase I onset. Mutations that abolish alternative homolog conjunction therefore result in random segregation of univalents during meiosis I also after separase depletion. Interestingly, these univalents become bioriented during meiosis II, suggesting that <span class="hlt">sister</span> centromere individualization before meiosis II does not require separase. PMID:27120695</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20524537','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20524537"><span id="translatedtitle">Letters from a suicide: Van Gogh and his <span class="hlt">sister</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Lester, David</p> <p>2010-04-01</p> <p>An analysis of trends over a 3-yr. period in the letters of Vincent Van Gogh to his <span class="hlt">sister</span> as the time of his suicide approached identified 8 trends, including an increase in words concerned with anxiety and words concerned with the past.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/dc0640.photos.036899p/','SCIGOV-HHH'); return false;" href="//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/dc0640.photos.036899p/"><span id="translatedtitle">7. STREAMSIDE PATH BETWEEN THREE BRIDGE FALLS AND THREE <span class="hlt">SISTERS</span> ...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/">Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>7. STREAM-SIDE PATH BETWEEN THREE BRIDGE FALLS AND THREE <span class="hlt">SISTERS</span> FALLS, LOOKING WEST Photocopy of photograph, 1930s National Park Service, National Capital Region files - Dumbarton Oaks Park, Thirty-second & R Streets Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=freud&id=EJ827914','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=freud&id=EJ827914"><span id="translatedtitle">Freud on Brothers and <span class="hlt">Sisters</span>: A Neglected Topic</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Sherwin-White, Susan</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>This paper explores Freud's developing thought on brothers and <span class="hlt">sisters</span>, and their importance in his psychoanalytical writings and clinical work. Freud's work on sibling psychology has been seriously undervalued. This paper aims to give due recognition to Freud's work in this area. (Contains 1 note.)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=identical+AND+twin+AND+studies&pg=6&id=ED313842','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=identical+AND+twin+AND+studies&pg=6&id=ED313842"><span id="translatedtitle">Language and Cognitive Development of Deaf and Hearing Twin <span class="hlt">Sisters</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Schirmer, Barbara R.</p> <p></p> <p>In this case study, the language and cognitive development of a 4-year 5-month old profoundly deaf girl and her normally hearing identical twin <span class="hlt">sister</span> were investigated by videotaping the twins in their home interacting with each other, the investigator, and family members. Materials used with the children were designed to elicit spontaneous,…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5051942','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5051942"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">SISTER</span>-CHROMATID EXCHANGE IN 4 HUMAN RACES</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>BUTLER, MERLIN G.</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>SUMMARY The frequencies of <span class="hlt">sister</span>-chromatid exchanges (SCE) were investigated in lymphocytes in 32 normal adult individuals of both sexes with no interracial familial backgrounds from Caucasian, American black, oriental and native American races. There was no significant difference in the average frequency of SCEs in the 4 races. PMID:7266577</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=joy&pg=7&id=EJ1069817','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=joy&pg=7&id=EJ1069817"><span id="translatedtitle">Adult Sibling Relationships with Brothers and <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> with Severe Disabilities</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Rossetti, Zach; Hall, Sarah</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>The purpose of this qualitative study was to examine perceptions of adult sibling relationships with a brother or <span class="hlt">sister</span> with severe disabilities and the contexts affecting the relationships. Adult siblings without disabilities (N = 79) from 19 to 72 years of age completed an online survey with four open-ended questions about their relationship…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1006059.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1006059.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Sister</span> M. Madeleva Wolff, C.S.C.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Petit, M. Loretta</p> <p>2006-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Sister</span> M. Madeleva Wolff, C.S.C., teacher, essayist, poet, and college administrator, through her creative ability and innovative practices made possible major contributions to Catholic education in her lifetime. Without her strong personality and boundless energy, many of her dreams for an ideal college curriculum would not have come to fruition.…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Kelly+innovation&pg=4&id=EJ667313','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Kelly+innovation&pg=4&id=EJ667313"><span id="translatedtitle">Clinical Design Sciences: A View from <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Design Efforts.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Zaritsky, Raul; Kelly, Anthony E.; Flowers, Woodie; Rogers, Everett; O'Neill, Patrick</p> <p>2003-01-01</p> <p>Asserts that the social sciences are clinical-like endeavors, and the way that "<span class="hlt">sister</span>" fields discover and validate their results may inform research practice in education. Describes three fields of design that confront similar societal demands for improvement (engineering product design, research on the diffusion of innovations, and management…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED024095.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED024095.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Some Effects of Having a Brother or <span class="hlt">Sister</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Leventhal, Gerald S.</p> <p></p> <p>The data indicate that the influence of a brother or <span class="hlt">sister</span> is considerably greater upon the second born than upon the first born. The magnitude of the sex of sibling effect is probably dependent upon whether a sibling is present during the first few years of life, a period during which many enduring response patterns are being acquired. The…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26634863','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26634863"><span id="translatedtitle">Iatrogenic and sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in 2 <span class="hlt">sisters</span> without mutation in the prion protein gene.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Frontzek, Karl; Moos, Rita; Schaper, Elke; Jann, Lukas; Herfs, Gregor; Zimmermann, Dieter R; Aguzzi, Adriano; Budka, Herbert</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Human genetic prion diseases have invariably been <span class="hlt">linked</span> to alterations of the prion protein (PrP) gene PRNP. Two <span class="hlt">sisters</span> died from probable Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) in Switzerland within 14 y. At autopsy, both patients had typical spongiform change in their brains accompanied by punctuate deposits of PrP. Biochemical analyses demonstrated proteinase K-resistant PrP. Sequencing of PRNP showed 2 wild-type alleles in both siblings. Retrospectively, clinical data revealed a history of dural transplantation in the initially deceased <span class="hlt">sister</span>, compatible with a diagnosis of iatrogenic CJD. Clinical and familial histories provided no evidence for potential horizontal transmission. This observation of 2 siblings suffering from CJD without mutations in the PRNP gene suggests potential involvement of non-PRNP genes in prion disease etiology. PMID:26634863</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26634863','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26634863"><span id="translatedtitle">Iatrogenic and sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in 2 <span class="hlt">sisters</span> without mutation in the prion protein gene.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Frontzek, Karl; Moos, Rita; Schaper, Elke; Jann, Lukas; Herfs, Gregor; Zimmermann, Dieter R; Aguzzi, Adriano; Budka, Herbert</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Human genetic prion diseases have invariably been <span class="hlt">linked</span> to alterations of the prion protein (PrP) gene PRNP. Two <span class="hlt">sisters</span> died from probable Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) in Switzerland within 14 y. At autopsy, both patients had typical spongiform change in their brains accompanied by punctuate deposits of PrP. Biochemical analyses demonstrated proteinase K-resistant PrP. Sequencing of PRNP showed 2 wild-type alleles in both siblings. Retrospectively, clinical data revealed a history of dural transplantation in the initially deceased <span class="hlt">sister</span>, compatible with a diagnosis of iatrogenic CJD. Clinical and familial histories provided no evidence for potential horizontal transmission. This observation of 2 siblings suffering from CJD without mutations in the PRNP gene suggests potential involvement of non-PRNP genes in prion disease etiology.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://pubs.usgs.gov/sim/3186/data/pdf/sim3186_pamphlet.pdf','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="https://pubs.usgs.gov/sim/3186/data/pdf/sim3186_pamphlet.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Geologic map of Three <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> volcanic cluster, Cascade Range, Oregon</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Hildreth, Wes; Fierstein, Judy; Calvert, Andrew T.</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>The cluster of glaciated stratovolcanoes called the Three Sisters—South <span class="hlt">Sister</span>, Middle <span class="hlt">Sister</span>, and North Sister—forms a spectacular 20-km-long reach along the crest of the Cascade Range in Oregon. The three eponymous stratocones, though contiguous and conventionally lumped sororally, could hardly display less family resemblance. North <span class="hlt">Sister</span> (10,085 ft), a monotonously mafic edifice at least as old as 120 ka, is a glacially ravaged stratocone that consists of hundreds of thin rubbly lava flows and intercalated falls that dip radially and steeply; remnants of two thick lava flows cap its summit. Middle <span class="hlt">Sister</span> (10,047 ft), an andesite-basalt-dacite cone built between 48 and 14 ka, is capped by a thick stack of radially dipping, dark-gray, thin mafic lava flows; asymmetrically glaciated, its nearly intact west flank contrasts sharply with its steep east face. Snow and ice-filled South <span class="hlt">Sister</span> is a bimodal rhyolitic-intermediate edifice that was constructed between 50 ka and 2 ka; its crater (rim at 10,358 ft) was created between 30 and 22 ka, during the most recent of several explosive summit eruptions; the thin oxidized agglutinate that mantles its current crater rim protects a 150-m-thick pyroclastic sequence that helped fill a much larger crater. For each of the three, the eruptive volume is likely to have been in the range of 15 to 25 km³, but such estimates are fairly uncertain, owing to glacial erosion. The map area consists exclusively of Quaternary volcanic rocks and derivative surficial deposits. Although most of the area has been modified by glaciation, the volcanoes are young enough that the landforms remain largely constructional. Furthermore, twelve of the 145 eruptive units on the map are postglacial, younger than the deglaciation that was underway by about 17 ka. The most recent eruptions were of rhyolite near South <span class="hlt">Sister</span>, about 2,000 years ago, and of mafic magma near McKenzie Pass, about 1,500 years ago. As observed by trailblazing volcanologist</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1949219','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1949219"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Death</span> duties</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Myers, Kathryn A.; Eden, David</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>PROBLEM BEING ADDRESSED Family physicians are often called upon to pronounce and certify the <span class="hlt">deaths</span> of patients. Inadequate knowledge of the Coroners Act (in the province of Ontario) and of the correct process of certifying <span class="hlt">death</span> can make physicians uncomfortable when confronted with these tasks. OBJECTIVE OF PROGRAM To educate family physicians about how to perform the administrative tasks required of them when patients die. PROGRAM DESCRIPTION The program included an educational video, a tutorial outlining the process of <span class="hlt">death</span> certification, and discussion with a regional coroner about key features of the Coroners Act. In small groups, participants worked through cases of patient <span class="hlt">deaths</span> in which they were asked to determine whether a coroner needed to be involved, to determine the manner of <span class="hlt">death</span>, and to complete a mock <span class="hlt">death</span> certificate for each case. CONCLUSION All participants reported a high level of satisfaction with the workshop and thought the main objective of the program had been achieved. Results of a test given 3 months after the workshop showed substantial improvement in participants’ knowledge of the coroner’s role and of the process of <span class="hlt">death</span> certification. PMID:17872782</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1922223','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1922223"><span id="translatedtitle">Idiopathic Steatorrhea Presenting with Different Manifestations in <span class="hlt">Sisters</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Rally, C. R.; Munroe, D. S.; Bogoch, A.</p> <p>1964-01-01</p> <p>Although it is well known that the incidence of idiopathic steatorrhea is much higher in relatives of patients with this disease than it is in the general population, there has been little comment on the variability of symptoms in familial cases. Two <span class="hlt">sisters</span> with this disease are reported. One presented with a relatively acute history of diarrhea, weight loss, fatigue and peripheral edema and was found to have a normal hemoglobin, hypocalcemia and a markedly decreased prothrombin activity. Her elder <span class="hlt">sister</span> tended to constipation and had a 10-year history of refractory iron-deficiency anemia. The diagnosis was confirmed in both by peroral jejunal biopsy. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2 PMID:14122463</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");'>4</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li class="active"><span>6</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_6 --> <div id="page_7" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li class="active"><span>7</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="121"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1013318','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1013318"><span id="translatedtitle">45,X Turner's syndrome in monozygotic twin <span class="hlt">sisters</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Pescia, G; Ferrier, P E; Wyss-Hutin, D; Klein, D</p> <p>1975-01-01</p> <p>A 7-year-old girl was admitted to the hospital for anaemia, secondary to intestinal blood los (melaena). She was found to have 45,X Turner's syndrome. Her identical twin <span class="hlt">sister</span> also had Turner's syndrome with a 45,X chromosome complement. According to various criteria the probability of monozygosity was 0.9905. Although the incidence of twinning is greater than usual in families of patients with Turner's syndrome, affected cases have only been observed in twin <span class="hlt">sisters</span> on six occasions. It seems therefore that the 45,X chromosome complement itself is not a factor predisposing to twinning, but that in some families, a factor is at play, which cuases either twinning or the 45,X aneuploidy, or both. Images PMID:1240972</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22380719','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22380719"><span id="translatedtitle">Lipschütz ulcers in twin <span class="hlt">sisters</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Truchuelo, Maria T; Vano-Galván, Sergio; Alcántara, Javier; Pérez, Bibiana; Jaén, Pedro</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Lipschütz ulcer (LU) is an uncommon condition that usually affects prepubertal and pubertal girls. It can be misdiagnosed as a sexually transmitted disease or even as a sign of child abuse, causing great anxiety to patients and their families. We present two cases of LU consecutively affecting twin <span class="hlt">sisters</span>. To our knowledge, this is the first case in two family members, supporting infectious transmission. We propose airborne transmission as the most probable cause in our cases.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.marchofdimes.org/complications/neonatal-death.aspx','NIH-MEDLINEPLUS'); return false;" href="http://www.marchofdimes.org/complications/neonatal-death.aspx"><span id="translatedtitle">Neonatal <span class="hlt">Death</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePlus</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>... story First Candle Centering Corporation The Compassionate Friends Star Legacy Foundation Last reviewed: November, 2015 Neonatal <span class="hlt">death</span> ... story First Candle Centering Corporation The Compassionate Friends Star Legacy Foundation Last reviewed: November, 2015 Complications & Loss ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4465693','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4465693"><span id="translatedtitle">Malignant Triton Tumors in <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> with Clinical Neurofibromatosis Type 1</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Alina, Basnet; Sebastian, Jofre A.; Gerardo, Capo</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Malignant triton tumors (MTTs) are rare and aggressive sarcomas categorized as a subgroup of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs). MTTs arise from Schwann cells of peripheral nerves or existing neurofibromas and have elements of rhabdomyoblastic differentiation. We report the occurrence of MTTs in two <span class="hlt">sisters</span>. The first patient is a 36-year-old female who presented with left sided chest wall swelling. She also had clinical features consistent with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF-1). Debulking of the mass showed high-grade malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor with skeletal muscle differentiation (MTT). The patient was treated with ifosfamide and adriamycin along with radiation. Four years after treatment, she still has no evidence of disease recurrence. Her <span class="hlt">sister</span> subsequently presented to us at the age of 42 with left sided lateral chest wall pain. Imaging showed a multicompartmental retroperitoneal cystic mass with left psoas involvement. The tumor was resected and, similarly to her <span class="hlt">sister</span>, it showed high-grade malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor with rhabdomyoblastic differentiation (MTT). The patient was started on chemotherapy and radiation as described above. PMID:26114002</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22253761','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22253761"><span id="translatedtitle">Broad phylogenomic sampling and the <span class="hlt">sister</span> lineage of land plants.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Timme, Ruth E; Bachvaroff, Tsvetan R; Delwiche, Charles F</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>The tremendous diversity of land plants all descended from a single charophyte green alga that colonized the land somewhere between 430 and 470 million years ago. Six orders of charophyte green algae, in addition to embryophytes, comprise the Streptophyta s.l. Previous studies have focused on reconstructing the phylogeny of organisms tied to this key colonization event, but wildly conflicting results have sparked a contentious debate over which lineage gave rise to land plants. The dominant view has been that 'stoneworts,' or Charales, are the <span class="hlt">sister</span> lineage, but an alternative hypothesis supports the Zygnematales (often referred to as "pond scum") as the <span class="hlt">sister</span> lineage. In this paper, we provide a well-supported, 160-nuclear-gene phylogenomic analysis supporting the Zygnematales as the closest living relative to land plants. Our study makes two key contributions to the field: 1) the use of an unbiased method to collect a large set of orthologs from deeply diverging species and 2) the use of these data in determining the <span class="hlt">sister</span> lineage to land plants. We anticipate this updated phylogeny not only will hugely impact lesson plans in introductory biology courses, but also will provide a solid phylogenetic tree for future green-lineage research, whether it be related to plants or green algae.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22253761','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22253761"><span id="translatedtitle">Broad phylogenomic sampling and the <span class="hlt">sister</span> lineage of land plants.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Timme, Ruth E; Bachvaroff, Tsvetan R; Delwiche, Charles F</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>The tremendous diversity of land plants all descended from a single charophyte green alga that colonized the land somewhere between 430 and 470 million years ago. Six orders of charophyte green algae, in addition to embryophytes, comprise the Streptophyta s.l. Previous studies have focused on reconstructing the phylogeny of organisms tied to this key colonization event, but wildly conflicting results have sparked a contentious debate over which lineage gave rise to land plants. The dominant view has been that 'stoneworts,' or Charales, are the <span class="hlt">sister</span> lineage, but an alternative hypothesis supports the Zygnematales (often referred to as "pond scum") as the <span class="hlt">sister</span> lineage. In this paper, we provide a well-supported, 160-nuclear-gene phylogenomic analysis supporting the Zygnematales as the closest living relative to land plants. Our study makes two key contributions to the field: 1) the use of an unbiased method to collect a large set of orthologs from deeply diverging species and 2) the use of these data in determining the <span class="hlt">sister</span> lineage to land plants. We anticipate this updated phylogeny not only will hugely impact lesson plans in introductory biology courses, but also will provide a solid phylogenetic tree for future green-lineage research, whether it be related to plants or green algae. PMID:22253761</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22144223','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22144223"><span id="translatedtitle">Familial acromegaly - case study of two <span class="hlt">sisters</span> with acromegaly.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Malicka, Joanna; Świrska, Joanna; Nowakowski, Andrzej</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>In the majority of cases, acromegaly is sporadic. However, it can also occur in a familial setting as a component of MEN-1, MEN-4, Carney complex (CNC) or as the extremely rare syndrome of isolated familial somatotropinoma (IFS), the latter belonging to familial isolated pituitary adenomas (FIPA). The diagnosis of IFS is based on the recognition of acromegaly/gigantism in at least two family members, given that the family is not affected by MEN-1, MEN-4 or CNC. The authors present a case study of two <span class="hlt">sisters</span>: a 56 year-old patient (case no. 1) and a 61 year-old patient (case no. 2). In both <span class="hlt">sisters</span>, acromegaly was recognised in the course of pituitary macroadenoma. Neither of the <span class="hlt">sisters</span> showed features of MEN-1, MEN-4 or Carney complex. The authors suppose that the presented cases are manifestations of IFS. However, this diagnosis has not been confirmed yet because of the poor availability of genetic tests. PMID:22144223</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19838015','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19838015"><span id="translatedtitle">[Cancer treatment and <span class="hlt">death</span> studies].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Shimazono, Susumu</p> <p>2009-10-01</p> <p>In the West, <span class="hlt">death</span> studies has become a new academic area since around 1970. The driving force is the hospice movement. People now ask questions such as how to care for dying people and their relatives. Because the main clients in hospice and palliative care are cancer patients, cancer treatment and <span class="hlt">death</span> studies are closely <span class="hlt">linked</span> to each other. The rise of <span class="hlt">death</span> studies is connected with the awareness of the limits of modern medicine. Medical staffs are forced to learn how to care for those patients facing <span class="hlt">death</span>. But modern medicine has put exclusive emphasis on biomedical treatment to cure. Contemporary medicine is becoming more and more aware of the psychological and spiritual needs of the patient. Today medicine and medical education have to incorporate the perspectives from <span class="hlt">death</span> studies, learning how human beings facing <span class="hlt">death</span> can live a better life not only in physical terms but also in psychological, social and spiritual terms.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19537765','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19537765"><span id="translatedtitle">Chalcogen bond: a <span class="hlt">sister</span> noncovalent bond to halogen bond.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Wang, Weizhou; Ji, Baoming; Zhang, Yu</p> <p>2009-07-16</p> <p>A <span class="hlt">sister</span> noncovalent bond to halogen bond, termed chalcogen bond, is defined in this article. By selecting the complexes H(2)CS...Cl(-), F(2)CS...Cl(-), OCS...Cl(-), and SCS...Cl(-) as models, the bond-length change, interaction energy, topological property of the electron charge density and its Laplacian, and the charge transfer of the chalcogen bond have been investigated in detail theoretically. It was found that the similar misshaped electron clouds of the chalcogen atom and the halogen atom result in the similar properties of the chalcogen bond and the halogen bond. Experimental results are in good agreement with the theoretical predictions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2758051','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2758051"><span id="translatedtitle">Catholic <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Nurses in Selma, Alabama, 1940–1972</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Wall, Barbra Mann</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>This study analyzes the activities of religious <span class="hlt">sister</span> nurses as they confronted racism in the American South from 1940 to 1972. Selma was chosen as a case study because, in the 1960s, events in that southern town marked a turning point in the civil rights movement in the United States. This is a story about the workings of gender, race, religion, and nursing. The sisters’ work demonstrates how an analysis of race in nursing history is incomplete without an understanding of the roles that a number of Catholic religious women took in reaching out to African Americans in the Deep South. PMID:19218843</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/tn0124.photos.154039p/','SCIGOV-HHH'); return false;" href="//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/tn0124.photos.154039p/"><span id="translatedtitle">10. Photocopy of photograph showing the three Walker <span class="hlt">sisters</span> ginning ...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/">Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>10. Photocopy of photograph showing the three Walker <span class="hlt">sisters</span> ginning cotton. Misses Hettie, Martha and Louisa are from left to right. The original photograph was taken on May 21, 1936 by Edouard E. Exline and is one of five photographs in the album, 'A Sketch of Mountain Life: Great Smoky Mountains National Park', compiled by Edouard E. Exline and C.S. Grossman. The album is on file at the Great Smoky Mountains National Park; the photograph number is III-A-HSE-9642. - Walker Family Farm (General views), Gatlinburg, Sevier County, TN</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1577959','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1577959"><span id="translatedtitle">Pregnancy risk among the younger <span class="hlt">sisters</span> of pregnant and childbearing adolescents.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>East, P L; Felice, M E</p> <p>1992-04-01</p> <p>There is increasing evidence that younger <span class="hlt">sisters</span> of childbearing teenagers are at increased risk for adolescent childbearing. We critically review this research and discuss three plausible theoretical explanations (social modeling, shared parenting influences, and shared societal risk) why the younger <span class="hlt">sisters</span> of childbearing adolescents would themselves be at risk for teenage pregnancy. Considerations for preventive interventions aimed at the younger <span class="hlt">sisters</span> of pregnant teenagers and directions for future research are discussed. PMID:1577959</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27541002','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27541002"><span id="translatedtitle">Investigating the Interplay between <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Chromatid Cohesion and Homolog Pairing in Drosophila Nuclei.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Senaratne, T Niroshini; Joyce, Eric F; Nguyen, Son C; Wu, C-Ting</p> <p>2016-08-01</p> <p>Following DNA replication, <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids must stay connected for the remainder of the cell cycle in order to ensure accurate segregation in the subsequent cell division. This important function involves an evolutionarily conserved protein complex known as cohesin; any loss of cohesin causes premature <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid separation in mitosis. Here, we examined the role of cohesin in <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid cohesion prior to mitosis, using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to assay the alignment of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids in interphase Drosophila cells. Surprisingly, we found that <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid cohesion can be maintained in G2 with little to no cohesin. This capacity to maintain cohesion is widespread in Drosophila, unlike in other systems where a reduced dependence on cohesin for <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid segregation has been observed only at specific chromosomal regions, such as the rDNA locus in budding yeast. Additionally, we show that condensin II antagonizes the alignment of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids in interphase, supporting a model wherein cohesin and condensin II oppose each other's functions in the alignment of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids. Finally, because the maternal and paternal homologs are paired in the somatic cells of Drosophila, and because condensin II has been shown to antagonize this pairing, we consider the possibility that condensin II-regulated mechanisms for aligning homologous chromosomes may also contribute to <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid cohesion. PMID:27541002</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4991795','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4991795"><span id="translatedtitle">Investigating the Interplay between <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Chromatid Cohesion and Homolog Pairing in Drosophila Nuclei</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Senaratne, T. Niroshini; Joyce, Eric F.; Wu, C.-ting</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Following DNA replication, <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids must stay connected for the remainder of the cell cycle in order to ensure accurate segregation in the subsequent cell division. This important function involves an evolutionarily conserved protein complex known as cohesin; any loss of cohesin causes premature <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid separation in mitosis. Here, we examined the role of cohesin in <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid cohesion prior to mitosis, using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to assay the alignment of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids in interphase Drosophila cells. Surprisingly, we found that <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid cohesion can be maintained in G2 with little to no cohesin. This capacity to maintain cohesion is widespread in Drosophila, unlike in other systems where a reduced dependence on cohesin for <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid segregation has been observed only at specific chromosomal regions, such as the rDNA locus in budding yeast. Additionally, we show that condensin II antagonizes the alignment of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids in interphase, supporting a model wherein cohesin and condensin II oppose each other’s functions in the alignment of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids. Finally, because the maternal and paternal homologs are paired in the somatic cells of Drosophila, and because condensin II has been shown to antagonize this pairing, we consider the possibility that condensin II-regulated mechanisms for aligning homologous chromosomes may also contribute to <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid cohesion. PMID:27541002</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26100636','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26100636"><span id="translatedtitle">Inhibition of N-Methyl-D-aspartate-induced Retinal Neuronal <span class="hlt">Death</span> by Polyarginine Peptides Is <span class="hlt">Linked</span> to the Attenuation of Stress-induced Hyperpolarization of the Inner Mitochondrial Membrane Potential.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Marshall, John; Wong, Kwoon Y; Rupasinghe, Chamila N; Tiwari, Rakesh; Zhao, Xiwu; Berberoglu, Eren D; Sinkler, Christopher; Liu, Jenney; Lee, Icksoo; Parang, Keykavous; Spaller, Mark R; Hüttemann, Maik; Goebel, Dennis J</p> <p>2015-09-01</p> <p>It is widely accepted that overactivation of NMDA receptors, resulting in calcium overload and consequent mitochondrial dysfunction in retinal ganglion neurons, plays a significant role in promoting neurodegenerative disorders such as glaucoma. Calcium has been shown to initiate a transient hyperpolarization of the mitochondrial membrane potential triggering a burst of reactive oxygen species leading to apoptosis. Strategies that enhance cell survival signaling pathways aimed at preventing this adverse hyperpolarization of the mitochondrial membrane potential may provide a novel therapeutic intervention in retinal disease. In the retina, brain-derived neurotrophic factor has been shown to be neuroprotective, and our group previously reported a PSD-95/PDZ-binding cyclic peptide (CN2097) that augments brain-derived neurotrophic factor-induced pro-survival signaling. Here, we examined the neuroprotective properties of CN2097 using an established retinal in vivo NMDA toxicity model. CN2097 completely attenuated NMDA-induced caspase 3-dependent and -independent cell <span class="hlt">death</span> and PARP-1 activation pathways, blocked necrosis, and fully prevented the loss of long term ganglion cell viability. Although neuroprotection was partially dependent upon CN2097 binding to the PDZ domain of PSD-95, our results show that the polyarginine-rich transport moiety C-R(7), <span class="hlt">linked</span> to the PDZ-PSD-95-binding cyclic peptide, was sufficient to mediate short and long term protection via a mitochondrial targeting mechanism. C-R(7) localized to mitochondria and was found to reduce mitochondrial respiration, mitochondrial membrane hyperpolarization, and the generation of reactive oxygen species, promoting survival of retinal neurons.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4571956','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4571956"><span id="translatedtitle">Inhibition of N-Methyl-d-aspartate-induced Retinal Neuronal <span class="hlt">Death</span> by Polyarginine Peptides Is <span class="hlt">Linked</span> to the Attenuation of Stress-induced Hyperpolarization of the Inner Mitochondrial Membrane Potential*</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Marshall, John; Wong, Kwoon Y.; Rupasinghe, Chamila N.; Tiwari, Rakesh; Zhao, Xiwu; Berberoglu, Eren D.; Sinkler, Christopher; Liu, Jenney; Lee, Icksoo; Parang, Keykavous; Spaller, Mark R.; Hüttemann, Maik; Goebel, Dennis J.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>It is widely accepted that overactivation of NMDA receptors, resulting in calcium overload and consequent mitochondrial dysfunction in retinal ganglion neurons, plays a significant role in promoting neurodegenerative disorders such as glaucoma. Calcium has been shown to initiate a transient hyperpolarization of the mitochondrial membrane potential triggering a burst of reactive oxygen species leading to apoptosis. Strategies that enhance cell survival signaling pathways aimed at preventing this adverse hyperpolarization of the mitochondrial membrane potential may provide a novel therapeutic intervention in retinal disease. In the retina, brain-derived neurotrophic factor has been shown to be neuroprotective, and our group previously reported a PSD-95/PDZ-binding cyclic peptide (CN2097) that augments brain-derived neurotrophic factor-induced pro-survival signaling. Here, we examined the neuroprotective properties of CN2097 using an established retinal in vivo NMDA toxicity model. CN2097 completely attenuated NMDA-induced caspase 3-dependent and -independent cell <span class="hlt">death</span> and PARP-1 activation pathways, blocked necrosis, and fully prevented the loss of long term ganglion cell viability. Although neuroprotection was partially dependent upon CN2097 binding to the PDZ domain of PSD-95, our results show that the polyarginine-rich transport moiety C-R(7), <span class="hlt">linked</span> to the PDZ-PSD-95-binding cyclic peptide, was sufficient to mediate short and long term protection via a mitochondrial targeting mechanism. C-R(7) localized to mitochondria and was found to reduce mitochondrial respiration, mitochondrial membrane hyperpolarization, and the generation of reactive oxygen species, promoting survival of retinal neurons. PMID:26100636</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26898580','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26898580"><span id="translatedtitle">Pediatric familial neuromyelitis optica in two <span class="hlt">sisters</span> with long term follow-up.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Chuquilin, Miguel; Mullaguri, Naresh; Weinshenker, Brian</p> <p>2016-07-01</p> <p>Neuromyelitis optica causes bilateral optic neuritis and longitudinal extensive transverse myelitis. Although usually sporadic, 3% of cases of neuromyelitis optica are familial. The interval over which attacks continue and the long term prognosis for pediatric-onset neuromyelitis optica are not well defined. We describe two patients with pediatric familial neuromyelitis optica with the longest clinical follow-up of a pediatric case reported in the literature to our knowledge. One woman developed blindness with bilateral eye involvement within a few weeks at age 3. This was followed by transverse myelitis with paraparesis at age 19 leading to diagnosis of neuromyelitis optica. Her serum anti-aquaporin 4 antibody was later found to be positive. She continued with sporadic myelitis-related relapses but remained ambulant until age 40 when she had a more severe relapse. There was evidence of longitudinal extensive T2 hyperintensity in the thoracic spinal cord. Her <span class="hlt">sister</span> also developed blindness at age 3.5 followed by myelitis 1year later with multiple relapses of gait impairment until her <span class="hlt">death</span> from pneumonia at age 21. These patients represent the rare occurrence of neuromyelitis optica in children within the same family and show that this disease can have prolonged periods of remission but a continued tendency to relapse, supporting the need for lifelong immunosuppression.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002AGUFM.V21B1201V','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002AGUFM.V21B1201V"><span id="translatedtitle">Helium and Carbon Isotope Systematics of Springs in the Separation Creek Drainage System, Three <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> area, Central Oregon Cascades.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>van Soest, M. C.; Kennedy, B.; Evans, W. C.; Mariner, R. H.; Schmidt, M. E.</p> <p>2002-12-01</p> <p> isotope data remains unclear. To date there is no clear evidence that <span class="hlt">links</span> the geochemical data to the recent and on-going uplift, but work currently in progress may shed more light on this issue. Evans, W. C., Mariner, R. H., Ingebritsen, S. E., Kennedy, B. M., Van Soest, M. C., and Huebner, M. A. Report of hydrologic investigations in the Three <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> area of central Oregon, Summer 2001. USGS Water-Resources Investigations Report 02-4061, 11p., 2002. Van Soest, M. C., Kennedy, B. M. Evans, W. C., and Mariner, R. H. Helium Isotope Compositions in Springs from the Three <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> Region, Central Oregon, USA. Eos Trans. AGU 82(47), Fall Meet. Suppl., Abstract V51C-1028, 2001. Wicks, C. Jr., Dzurisin, D, Ingebritsen, S. E., Thatcher, W., Lu, Z., and Iversen, J. Magmatic activity beneath the quiescent Three <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> volcanic center, central Oregon Cascade Range, USA, inferred from InSAR. Eos Trans. AGU 82(47), Fall Meet. Suppl., Abstract G31C-0155, 2001.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2096814','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2096814"><span id="translatedtitle">A Bangladeshi family with three <span class="hlt">sisters</span> 'Bombay' or Oh phenotype.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Rahman, M; Abdullah, A Z; Husain, M; Hague, K M; Hossain, M M</p> <p>1990-12-01</p> <p>Three <span class="hlt">sisters</span> in a same family (MIAH FAMILY) are of 'Bombay' phenotype. These being the first known female examples of 'Bombay' blood group have been detected in Bangladesh. As predicted by current theory their red cells are Le(a+b-) and their saliva do not contain any of the antigens A, B and H except Lea substance. Family studies showed that individuals with 'Bombay' or Oh phenotype may have A or B gene which are not expressed. This very particular type of blood is one of the rarest in any other parts of world except in India. Due to the presence of anti-H antibody in the plasma of Oh phenotype, when considering such patients for transfusion only blood of identical Bombay type can be safely transfused.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/978252','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/978252"><span id="translatedtitle">Telomere <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchange in telomerase deficient murine cells</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Wang, Yisong; Giannone, Richard J; Liu, Yie</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>We have recently demonstrated that several types of genomic rearrangements (i.e., telomere <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchange (T-SCE), genomic-SCE, or end-to-end fusions) were more often detected in long-term cultured murine telomerase deficient embryonic stem (ES) cells than in freshly prepared murine splenocytes, even through they possessed similar frequencies of critically short telomeres. The high rate of genomic rearrangements in telomerase deficient ES cells, when compared to murine splenocytes, may reflect the cultured cells' gained ability to protect chromosome ends with eroded telomeres allowing them to escape 'end crisis'. However, the possibility that ES cells were more permissive to genomic rearrangements than other cell types or that differences in the microenvironment or genetic background of the animals might consequentially determine the rate of T-SCEs or other genomic rearrangements at critically short telomeres could not be ruled out.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li class="active"><span>7</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_7 --> <div id="page_8" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li class="active"><span>8</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="141"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4468237','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4468237"><span id="translatedtitle">Mercury poisoning in two 13-year-old twin <span class="hlt">sisters</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Khodashenas, Ezzat; Aelami, Mohammadhassan; Balali-Mood, Mahdi</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Mercury (Hg) is a toxic agent that evaporates in room temperature and its inhalation may cause poisoning. Due to the nonspecific symptoms, diagnosis is difficult in special circumstances with no initial history of Hg exposure. We report two such cases of Hg poisoning. The patients were two <span class="hlt">sisters</span>, presenting with pain in extremities, itchy rashes, sweating, salivation, weakness, and mood changes. They have used a compound that contains mercury, for treatment of pedicullosis three months before admission. This compound was purchased from a herbal shop and was applied locally on the scalps for 2 days. Their urinary mercury concentrations were 50 and 70 mg/L. They were successfully treated by D-penicillamine and gabapentin. In a patient with any kind of bone and joint pain, skin rash erythema and peripheral neuropathy, mercury poisoning should be considered as a differential diagnosis. PMID:26109979</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12294414','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12294414"><span id="translatedtitle">Interview: Tatyana Lipovskaya, <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> Sexual Assault Recovery Centre, Moscow, Russia.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p></p> <p>1998-11-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">Sisters</span>' Sexual Assault Recovery Center was established in Moscow, Russia, in 1993, to address the needs of victims of sexual violence. The Center's help-line received 4029 crisis calls in 1994-97. Most clients are seeking information about medical services or legal aid. Others call about employment, HIV/AIDS, alcoholism, and drug abuse. Services are available without regard to age, sex, occupation, or sexual orientation. Program funding has come entirely from Western foundations and organizations. Although Russia has not passed a law on domestic violence, the post-Communism government is reluctantly starting to acknowledge that rape and domestic violence are serious social problems. The Center runs an educational program for law enforcement officers to increase their sensitivity and create an environment of safety for women who report sexual violence. PMID:12294414</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21452027','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21452027"><span id="translatedtitle">Bold vision: Catholic <span class="hlt">sisters</span> and the creation of American hospitals.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Levin, Peter J</p> <p>2011-06-01</p> <p>American hospitals were started by religious, ethnic and community groups to serve local health care needs. Immigration into the eastern cities and the constant movement west of the frontier required the creation of educational and service facilities to serve these populations and localities. In the nineteenth century, Catholic <span class="hlt">sisters</span> went all across the country establishing schools and hospitals. They were motivated to care for the sick, establish charitable institutions and spread their religious beliefs. Their impact on the development of the American health system was enormous. They also supported the importance of nursing for the provision of scientifically based medical care and created schools of nursing. Their historical record as founders, builders, financiers and managers of hospitals is unmatched by any other group between 1850 and 1950. And, this was accomplished at a time when women played no similar leadership and institutional ownership role elsewhere in society. PMID:21452027</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23772196','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23772196"><span id="translatedtitle">Narcolepsy with cataplexy mimicry: the strange case of two <span class="hlt">sisters</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Pizza, Fabio; Vandi, Stefano; Poli, Francesca; Moghadam, Keivan Kaveh; Franceschini, Christian; Bellucci, Claudia; Cipolli, Carlo; Ingravallo, Francesca; Natalini, Giuliana; Mignot, Emmanuel; Plazzi, Giuseppe</p> <p>2013-06-15</p> <p>We report on two <span class="hlt">sisters</span>, 17 and 12 years of age, with clinical features suggesting narcolepsy with cataplexy (NC): daytime sleepiness, spontaneous and emotionally triggered sudden falls to the ground, and overweight/obesity. MSLT showed borderline sleep latency, with 1 and 0 sleep onset REM periods. HLA typing disclosed the DQB1*0602 allele. Video-polygraphy of the spells ruled out NC diagnosis by demonstrating their easy elicitation by suggestion, with wake EEG, electromyographic persistence of muscle tone, and stable presence of tendon reflexes (i.e., pseudo-cataplexy), together with normal cerebrospinal hypocretin-1 levels. Our cases emphasize the need of a clear depiction of cataplexy pattern at the different ages, the usefulness of examining ictal neurophysiology, and collecting all available disease markers in ambiguous cases.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21188869','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21188869"><span id="translatedtitle">[Accompany <span class="hlt">death</span>].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Salvador Borrell, Montserrat</p> <p>2010-11-01</p> <p>One of the roles of nursing is to take care of the patients in terminal situation. The time, the experience, the formation, and the personal and professional attitudes that the nurse has will propitiate that taking care of moribund patients might turn into one of the more rewarding human experiences in life. There for, it is indispensable that nurses assume <span class="hlt">death</span> as a natural and inevitable reality to achieve. The principal aim of the study is to evaluate the competence of confrontation and the autoefficiency of the welfare among nurses who work with adult patients at the end of the life. Descriptive study realized in the units of Oncology, Hametology and Palliative Care of the following centers: La Fe, Clínico, Dr. Peset, H. General, Arnau de Vilanova and Dr. Moliner de Portacoelli in Valencia (Spain). The following instruments were used: the Bugen Scale of confrontation of the <span class="hlt">Death</span> (1980-1981) and the Robbins Scale of Autoefficiency (1992). Data suggests that major coping gives major autoeffciency and vice versa. The realized study opens numerous questions, specially related with training and the burden of preparation along the whole professional career, in order to achieve competence for coping and autoefficiency.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title20-vol3/pdf/CFR-2010-title20-vol3-sec725-224.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title20-vol3/pdf/CFR-2010-title20-vol3-sec725-224.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">20 CFR 725.224 - Determination of relationship; parent, brother, or <span class="hlt">sister</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-04-01</p> <p>... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Determination of relationship; parent... Benefits) § 725.224 Determination of relationship; parent, brother, or <span class="hlt">sister</span>. (a) An individual will be considered to be the parent, brother, or <span class="hlt">sister</span> of a miner if the courts of the State in which the miner...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title20-vol2/pdf/CFR-2010-title20-vol2-sec410-215.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title20-vol2/pdf/CFR-2010-title20-vol2-sec410-215.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">20 CFR 410.215 - Duration of entitlement; parent, brother, or <span class="hlt">sister</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-04-01</p> <p>... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Duration of entitlement; parent, brother, or...; Duration of Entitlement; Filing of Claims and Evidence § 410.215 Duration of entitlement; parent, brother, or <span class="hlt">sister</span>. (a) parent, brother, or <span class="hlt">sister</span> is entitled to benefits beginning with the month all...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title40-vol17/pdf/CFR-2013-title40-vol17-sec79-65.pdf','CFR2013'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title40-vol17/pdf/CFR-2013-title40-vol17-sec79-65.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">40 CFR 79.65 - In vivo <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchange assay.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-07-01</p> <p>... references should be consulted. (1) 40 CFR 798.5915, In vivo <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Chromatid Exchange Assay. (2) Kato, H...) assay detects the ability of a chemical to enhance the exchange of DNA between two <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids of... ligation of at least two DNA helices. (c) Test method—(1) Principle of the test method. (i) Groups...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title40-vol17/pdf/CFR-2014-title40-vol17-sec79-65.pdf','CFR2014'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title40-vol17/pdf/CFR-2014-title40-vol17-sec79-65.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">40 CFR 79.65 - In vivo <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchange assay.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-07-01</p> <p>... references should be consulted. (1) 40 CFR 798.5915, In vivo <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Chromatid Exchange Assay. (2) Kato, H...) assay detects the ability of a chemical to enhance the exchange of DNA between two <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids of... ligation of at least two DNA helices. (c) Test method—(1) Principle of the test method. (i) Groups...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=regimen&pg=3&id=EJ1021763','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=regimen&pg=3&id=EJ1021763"><span id="translatedtitle">Addressing the Apparent Paradox of the Catholic <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Principal: 1940-1965</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>O'Donoghue, Tom; Harford, Judith</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>A body of scholarship on the history of the lives of Catholic teaching <span class="hlt">sisters</span> has thrown up various challenges to educational historians. One challenge can be posed by asking how teaching <span class="hlt">sisters</span> were able to go on to take up leadership positions. This is prompted by the observation that a particular body of literature for the period 1940-1965…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=age+AND+care&pg=5&id=EJ860713','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=age+AND+care&pg=5&id=EJ860713"><span id="translatedtitle">Youths' Caretaking of Their Adolescent <span class="hlt">Sisters</span>' Children: Results from Two Longitudinal Studies</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>East, Patricia L.; Weisner, Thomas S.; Slonim, Ashley</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>The extent and experiences of youths' caretaking of their adolescent <span class="hlt">sisters</span>' children have been assessed in two longitudinal studies. The first study examines the caretaking patterns of 132 Latino and African American youth during middle and late adolescence. The second study involves 110 Latino youth whose teenage <span class="hlt">sister</span> has recently given…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5063037','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5063037"><span id="translatedtitle">Invariant <span class="hlt">death</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Frank, Steven A.</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>In nematodes, environmental or physiological perturbations alter death’s scaling of time. In human cancer, genetic perturbations alter death’s curvature of time. Those changes in scale and curvature follow the constraining contours of death’s invariant geometry. I show that the constraints arise from a fundamental extension to the theories of randomness, invariance and scale. A generalized Gompertz law follows. The constraints imposed by the invariant Gompertz geometry explain the tendency of perturbations to stretch or bend death’s scaling of time. Variability in <span class="hlt">death</span> rate arises from a combination of constraining universal laws and particular biological processes. PMID:27785361</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1205336','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1205336"><span id="translatedtitle">Replication-Dependent <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Chromatid Recombination in Rad1 Mutants of Saccharomyces Cerevisiae</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Kadyk, L. C.; Hartwell, L. H.</p> <p>1993-01-01</p> <p>Homolog recombination and unequal <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid recombination were monitored in rad1-1/rad1-1 diploid yeast cells deficient for excision repair, and in control cells, RAD1/rad1-1, after exposure to UV irradiation. In a rad1-1/rad1-1 diploid, UV irradiation stimulated much more <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid recombination relative to homolog recombination when cells were irradiated in the G(1) or the G(2) phases of the cell cycle than was observed in RAD1/rad1-1 cells. Since <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids are not present during G(1), this result suggested that unexcised lesions can stimulate <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid recombination events during or subsequent to DNA replication. The results of mating rescue experiments suggest that unexcised UV dimers do not stimulate <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid recombination during the G(2) phase, but only when they are present during DNA replication. We propose that there are two types of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid recombination in yeast. In the first type, unexcised UV dimers and other bulky lesions induce <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid recombination during DNA replication as a mechanism to bypass lesions obstructing the passage of DNA polymerase, and this type is analogous to the type of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchange commonly observed cytologically in mammalian cells. In the second type, strand scissions created by X-irradiation or the excision of damaged bases create recombinogenic sites that result in <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid recombination directly in G(2). Further support for the existence of two types of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid recombination is the fact that events induced in rad1-1/rad1-1 were due almost entirely to gene conversion, whereas those in RAD1/rad1-1 cells were due to a mixture of gene conversion and reciprocal recombination. PMID:8454200</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=suicide+AND+ethics&pg=6&id=ED346375','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=suicide+AND+ethics&pg=6&id=ED346375"><span id="translatedtitle">Encountering <span class="hlt">Death</span>: Structured Activities for <span class="hlt">Death</span> Awareness.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Welch, Ira David; And Others</p> <p></p> <p>This book is intended to be used as a supplement to standard textbooks on <span class="hlt">death</span> and dying for college students. Chapter 1 "Encountering <span class="hlt">Death</span> in the Self" builds the foundation for increased self-awareness for the study of <span class="hlt">death</span> and dying. Chapter 2 "Encountering <span class="hlt">Death</span> in the Family" provides activities which are appropriate for a wide variety of…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12193834','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12193834"><span id="translatedtitle">Hypochondriasis and fear of <span class="hlt">death</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Noyes, Russell; Stuart, Scott; Longley, Susan L; Langbehn, Douglas R; Happel, Rachel L</p> <p>2002-08-01</p> <p>Although fear of <span class="hlt">death</span> has been <span class="hlt">linked</span> to hypochondriasis, the relationship of this fear to the disorder has received little study. To address this deficiency, we administered a fear of <span class="hlt">death</span> scale along with measures of hypochondriasis, including the Whiteley Index and Somatic Symptom Inventory, to 162 general medical outpatients. Partial correlations, controlling for age, between the fear of <span class="hlt">death</span> scale and both the Whiteley Index and Somatic Symptom Inventory were strongly positive. A factor analysis of the fear of <span class="hlt">death</span> scale yielded three dimensions-fear of dying, loss of meaning, and fear of separation-that were also highly correlated with hypochondriasis. Fear of <span class="hlt">death</span> and hypochondriasis showed comparable relationships to age and gender as well as to personality dimensions measured by the NEO Five-Factor Inventory. Fear of <span class="hlt">death</span> appears to be an integral part of hypochondriasis. Its presence lends support to three models of hypochondriasis-the perceptual, existential, and interpersonal-that correspond to the dimensions of fear of <span class="hlt">death</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4817899','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4817899"><span id="translatedtitle">X-inactivation in the clinical phenotype of fragile X premutation carrier <span class="hlt">sisters</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Robertson-Dick, Erin E.; O'Keefe, Joan A.; Hadd, Andrew G.; Zhou, Lili; Berry-Kravis, Elizabeth</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Objective: The purpose of this study is to describe a case series of 4 <span class="hlt">sisters</span> with discordant clinical phenotypes associated with fragile X–associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS) that may be explained by varying CGG repeat sizes and activation ratios (ARs) (the ratio of cells carrying the normal fragile X mental retardation 1 [FMR1] allele on the active X chromosome). Methods: Four <span class="hlt">sisters</span> with premutation size FMR1 gene repeats underwent detailed clinical characterization. CGG repeat length was determined by PCR, and AR was determined using a newly developed commercial methylation PCR assay and was compared with the results from Southern blot with densitometric image analysis. Results: <span class="hlt">Sister</span> 1 had the largest CGG expansion (82) and the lowest AR (12%), with the most severe clinical presentation. <span class="hlt">Sister</span> 2 had a lower CGG expansion (70) and an AR of 10% but had a milder clinical presentation.<span class="hlt">Sister</span> 3 had a similar CGG expansion (79) but a slightly higher AR of 15% and less neurologic involvement. <span class="hlt">Sister</span> 4 had a similar CGG expansion size of 80 but had the largest AR (40%) and was the only <span class="hlt">sister</span> not to be affected by FXTAS or have any neurologic signs on examination. Conclusions: These results suggest that premutation carrier women who have higher ARs may be less likely to show manifestations of FXTAS. If larger studies show similar patterns, AR data could potentially be beneficial to supplement CGG repeat size when counseling premutation carrier women in the clinic. PMID:27066582</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2632674','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2632674"><span id="translatedtitle">Two <span class="hlt">sisters</span> in the same dress: Heliconius cryptic species</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p></p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>Background <span class="hlt">Sister</span> species divergence and reproductive isolation commonly results from ecological adaptation. In mimetic Heliconius butterflies, shifts in colour pattern contribute to pre- and post-mating reproductive isolation and are commonly correlated with speciation. Closely related mimetic species are therefore not expected, as they should lack several important sources of reproductive isolation. Results Here we present phenotypic, behavioral and genetic evidence for the coexistence of two sympatric 'cryptic' species near Florencia in the eastern Andes of Colombia that share the same orange rayed colour pattern. These represent H. melpomene malleti and a novel taxon in the H. cydno group, here designated as novel race of Heliconius timareta, Heliconius timareta florencia. No-choice mating experiments show that these sympatric forms have strong assortative mating (≈96%) despite great similarity in colour pattern, implying enhanced divergence in pheromonal signals. Conclusion We hypothesize that these species might have resulted from recent convergence in colour pattern, perhaps facilitated by hybrid introgression of wing pattern genes. PMID:19040737</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23315384','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23315384"><span id="translatedtitle">Chloroplast phylogenomics indicates that Ginkgo biloba is <span class="hlt">sister</span> to cycads.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Wu, Chung-Shien; Chaw, Shu-Miaw; Huang, Ya-Yi</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Molecular phylogenetic studies have not yet reached a consensus on the placement of Ginkgoales, which is represented by the only living species, Ginkgo biloba (common name: ginkgo). At least six discrepant placements of ginkgo have been proposed. This study aimed to use the chloroplast phylogenomic approach to examine possible factors that lead to such disagreeing placements. We found the sequence types used in the analyses as the most critical factor in the conflicting placements of ginkgo. In addition, the placement of ginkgo varied in the trees inferred from nucleotide (NU) sequences, which notably depended on breadth of taxon sampling, tree-building methods, codon positions, positions of Gnetopsida (common name: gnetophytes), and including or excluding gnetophytes in data sets. In contrast, the trees inferred from amino acid (AA) sequences congruently supported the monophyly of a ginkgo and Cycadales (common name: cycads) clade, regardless of which factors were examined. Our site-stripping analysis further revealed that the high substitution saturation of NU sequences mainly derived from the third codon positions and contributed to the variable placements of ginkgo. In summary, the factors we surveyed did not affect results inferred from analyses of AA sequences. Congruent topologies in our AA trees give more confidence in supporting the ginkgo-cycad <span class="hlt">sister</span>-group hypothesis.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5118742','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5118742"><span id="translatedtitle">Detection of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchanges induced by volatile genotoxicants</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Tucker, J.D.; Xu, J.; Stewart, J.; Baciu, P.C.; Ong, T.M.</p> <p>1986-01-01</p> <p>To test the recently developed method of exposing cells to volatile compounds, phytohemagglutinin-stimulated human peripheral lymphocyte cultures were exposed to gaseous methyl bromide, ethylene oxide, and propylene oxide, as well as diesel exhaust. The cultures were placed in sterile dialysis tubing and inserted into enclosed flasks containing additional culture medium. The test compounds (in gaseous state) were diluted with air and bubbled through the flasks for various lengths of time. The cells were then washed and incubated for a total of 75 h. The harvest was performed according to established procedures, and second-division cells were scored for induction of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchanges (SCEs). The SCE frequency was more than doubled in the cultures treated with ethylene oxide and propylene oxide; methyl bromide also induced SCEs. Cultures treated with diesel exhaust showed an increase in the SCE frequency in cells from two of four donors tested. These results further substantiate the use of this method for detecting the induction of SCEs by airborne genotoxins.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2567467','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2567467"><span id="translatedtitle">Newly discovered <span class="hlt">sister</span> lineage sheds light on early ant evolution</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Rabeling, Christian; Brown, Jeremy M.; Verhaagh, Manfred</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>Ants are the world's most conspicuous and important eusocial insects and their diversity, abundance, and extreme behavioral specializations make them a model system for several disciplines within the biological sciences. Here, we report the discovery of a new ant that appears to represent the <span class="hlt">sister</span> lineage to all extant ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae). The phylogenetic position of this cryptic predator from the soils of the Amazon rainforest was inferred from several nuclear genes, sequenced from a single leg. Martialis heureka (gen. et sp. nov.) also constitutes the sole representative of a new, morphologically distinct subfamily of ants, the Martialinae (subfam. nov.). Our analyses have reduced the likelihood of long-branch attraction artifacts that have troubled previous phylogenetic studies of early-diverging ants and therefore solidify the emerging view that the most basal extant ant lineages are cryptic, hypogaeic foragers. On the basis of morphological and phylogenetic evidence we suggest that these specialized subterranean predators are the sole surviving representatives of a highly divergent lineage that arose near the dawn of ant diversification and have persisted in ecologically stable environments like tropical soils over great spans of time. PMID:18794530</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li class="active"><span>8</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_8 --> <div id="page_9" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li class="active"><span>9</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="161"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20203608','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20203608"><span id="translatedtitle">Ecologically distinct dinosaurian <span class="hlt">sister</span> group shows early diversification of Ornithodira.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Nesbitt, Sterling J; Sidor, Christian A; Irmis, Randall B; Angielczyk, Kenneth D; Smith, Roger M H; Tsuji, Linda A</p> <p>2010-03-01</p> <p>The early evolutionary history of Ornithodira (avian-line archosaurs) has hitherto been documented by incomplete (Lagerpeton) or unusually specialized forms (pterosaurs and Silesaurus). Recently, a variety of Silesaurus-like taxa have been reported from the Triassic period of both Gondwana and Laurasia, but their relationships to each other and to dinosaurs remain a subject of debate. Here we report on a new avian-line archosaur from the early Middle Triassic (Anisian) of Tanzania. Phylogenetic analysis places Asilisaurus kongwe gen. et sp. nov. as an avian-line archosaur and a member of the Silesauridae, which is here considered the <span class="hlt">sister</span> taxon to Dinosauria. Silesaurids were diverse and had a wide distribution by the Late Triassic, with a novel ornithodiran bauplan including leaf-shaped teeth, a beak-like lower jaw, long, gracile limbs, and a quadrupedal stance. Our analysis suggests that the dentition and diet of silesaurids, ornithischians and sauropodomorphs evolved independently from a plesiomorphic carnivorous form. As the oldest avian-line archosaur, Asilisaurus demonstrates the antiquity of both Ornithodira and the dinosaurian lineage. The initial diversification of Archosauria, previously documented by crocodilian-line archosaurs in the Anisian, can now be shown to include a contemporaneous avian-line radiation. The unparalleled taxonomic diversity of the Manda archosaur assemblage indicates that archosaur diversification was well underway by the Middle Triassic or earlier. PMID:20203608</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20203608','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20203608"><span id="translatedtitle">Ecologically distinct dinosaurian <span class="hlt">sister</span> group shows early diversification of Ornithodira.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Nesbitt, Sterling J; Sidor, Christian A; Irmis, Randall B; Angielczyk, Kenneth D; Smith, Roger M H; Tsuji, Linda A</p> <p>2010-03-01</p> <p>The early evolutionary history of Ornithodira (avian-line archosaurs) has hitherto been documented by incomplete (Lagerpeton) or unusually specialized forms (pterosaurs and Silesaurus). Recently, a variety of Silesaurus-like taxa have been reported from the Triassic period of both Gondwana and Laurasia, but their relationships to each other and to dinosaurs remain a subject of debate. Here we report on a new avian-line archosaur from the early Middle Triassic (Anisian) of Tanzania. Phylogenetic analysis places Asilisaurus kongwe gen. et sp. nov. as an avian-line archosaur and a member of the Silesauridae, which is here considered the <span class="hlt">sister</span> taxon to Dinosauria. Silesaurids were diverse and had a wide distribution by the Late Triassic, with a novel ornithodiran bauplan including leaf-shaped teeth, a beak-like lower jaw, long, gracile limbs, and a quadrupedal stance. Our analysis suggests that the dentition and diet of silesaurids, ornithischians and sauropodomorphs evolved independently from a plesiomorphic carnivorous form. As the oldest avian-line archosaur, Asilisaurus demonstrates the antiquity of both Ornithodira and the dinosaurian lineage. The initial diversification of Archosauria, previously documented by crocodilian-line archosaurs in the Anisian, can now be shown to include a contemporaneous avian-line radiation. The unparalleled taxonomic diversity of the Manda archosaur assemblage indicates that archosaur diversification was well underway by the Middle Triassic or earlier.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4359759','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4359759"><span id="translatedtitle">The Bacterial Nucleoid: Nature, Dynamics and <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Segregation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Kleckner, Nancy; Fisher, Jay K.; Stouf, Mathieu; White, Martin A.; Bates, David; Witz, Guillaume</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Recent studies reveal that the bacterial nucleoid has a defined, self-adherent shape and an underlying longitudinal organization and comprises a viscoelastic matrix. Within this shape, mobility is enhanced by ATP-dependent processes and individual loci can undergo ballistic off-equilibrium movements. In E.coli, two global dynamic nucleoid behaviors emerge pointing to nucleoid-wide accumulation and relief of internal stress. <span class="hlt">Sister</span> segregation begins with local splitting of individual loci, which is delayed at origin, terminus and specialized interstitial snap regions. Globally, as studied in several systems, segregation is a multi-step process in which internal nucleoid state plays critical roles that involve both compaction and expansion. The origin and terminus regions undergo specialized programs partially driven by complex ATP burning mechanisms such as a ParAB Brownian ratchet and a septum-associated FtsK motor. These recent findings reveal strong, direct parallels among events in different systems and between bacterial nucleoids and mammalian chromosomes with respect to physical properties, internal organization and dynamic behaviors. PMID:25460806</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23315384','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23315384"><span id="translatedtitle">Chloroplast phylogenomics indicates that Ginkgo biloba is <span class="hlt">sister</span> to cycads.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Wu, Chung-Shien; Chaw, Shu-Miaw; Huang, Ya-Yi</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Molecular phylogenetic studies have not yet reached a consensus on the placement of Ginkgoales, which is represented by the only living species, Ginkgo biloba (common name: ginkgo). At least six discrepant placements of ginkgo have been proposed. This study aimed to use the chloroplast phylogenomic approach to examine possible factors that lead to such disagreeing placements. We found the sequence types used in the analyses as the most critical factor in the conflicting placements of ginkgo. In addition, the placement of ginkgo varied in the trees inferred from nucleotide (NU) sequences, which notably depended on breadth of taxon sampling, tree-building methods, codon positions, positions of Gnetopsida (common name: gnetophytes), and including or excluding gnetophytes in data sets. In contrast, the trees inferred from amino acid (AA) sequences congruently supported the monophyly of a ginkgo and Cycadales (common name: cycads) clade, regardless of which factors were examined. Our site-stripping analysis further revealed that the high substitution saturation of NU sequences mainly derived from the third codon positions and contributed to the variable placements of ginkgo. In summary, the factors we surveyed did not affect results inferred from analyses of AA sequences. Congruent topologies in our AA trees give more confidence in supporting the ginkgo-cycad <span class="hlt">sister</span>-group hypothesis. PMID:23315384</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1691261','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1691261"><span id="translatedtitle">Wild female baboons bias their social behaviour towards paternal half-<span class="hlt">sisters</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Smith, Kerri; Alberts, Susan C; Altmann, Jeanne</p> <p>2003-01-01</p> <p>Adult female cercopithecines have long been known to bias their social behaviour towards close maternal kin. However, much less is understood about the behaviour of paternal kin, especially in wild populations. Here, we show that wild adult female baboons bias their affiliative behaviour towards their adult paternal half-<span class="hlt">sisters</span> in the same manner and to the same extent that they bias their behaviour towards adult maternal half-<span class="hlt">sisters</span>. Females appear to rely heavily on social familiarity as a means of biasing their behaviour towards paternal half-<span class="hlt">sisters</span>, but may use phenotype matching as well. PMID:12641905</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1446932','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1446932"><span id="translatedtitle">Autocrine Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha <span class="hlt">Links</span> Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress to the Membrane <span class="hlt">Death</span> Receptor Pathway through IRE1α-Mediated NF-κB Activation and Down-Regulation of TRAF2 Expression</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Hu, Ping; Han, Zhang; Couvillon, Anthony D.; Kaufman, Randal J.; Exton, John H.</p> <p>2006-01-01</p> <p>NF-κB is critical for determining cellular sensitivity to apoptotic stimuli by regulating both mitochondrial and <span class="hlt">death</span> receptor apoptotic pathways. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) emerges as a new apoptotic signaling initiator. However, the mechanism by which ER stress activates NF-κB and its role in regulation of ER stress-induced cell <span class="hlt">death</span> are largely unclear. Here, we report that, in response to ER stress, IKK forms a complex with IRE1α through the adapter protein TRAF2. ER stress-induced NF-κB activation is impaired in IRE1α knockdown cells and IRE1α−/− MEFs. We found, however, that inhibiting NF-κB significantly decreased ER stress-induced cell <span class="hlt">death</span> in a caspase-8-dependent manner. Gene expression analysis revealed that ER stress-induced expression of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) was IRE1α and NF-κB dependent. Blocking TNF receptor 1 signaling significantly inhibited ER stress-induced cell <span class="hlt">death</span>. Further studies suggest that ER stress induces down-regulation of TRAF2 expression, which impairs TNF-α-induced activation of NF-κB and c-Jun N-terminal kinase and turns TNF-α from a weak to a powerful apoptosis inducer. Thus, ER stress induces two signals, namely TNF-α induction and TRAF2 down-regulation. They work in concert to amplify ER-initiated apoptotic signaling through the membrane <span class="hlt">death</span> receptor. PMID:16581782</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=fear+AND+death&pg=5&id=EJ154079','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=fear+AND+death&pg=5&id=EJ154079"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Death</span> Education and <span class="hlt">Death</span> Fear Reduction</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Mueller, Mary Louise</p> <p>1976-01-01</p> <p>The study examined the possibility of reducing the fear of <span class="hlt">death</span> in early adolescents through a 12-lesson unit designed to assist the student to achieve an attitude of integration toward life and <span class="hlt">death</span>. (NQ)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4682810','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4682810"><span id="translatedtitle">Solution Radioactivated by Hadron Radiation Can Increase <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Chromatid Exchanges</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Maeda, Junko; Yurkon, Charles R.; Fujii, Yoshihiro; Fujisawa, Hiroshi; Kato, Sayaka; Brents, Colleen A.; Uesaka, Mitsuru; Fujimori, Akira; Kitamura, Hisashi; Kato, Takamitsu A.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>When energetic particles irradiate matter, it becomes activated by nuclear reactions. Radioactivation induced cellular effects are not clearly understood, but it could be a part of bystander effects. This investigation is aimed at understanding the biological effects from radioactivation in solution induced by hadron radiation. Water or phosphate buffered saline was activated by being exposed to hadron radiation including protons, carbon- and iron-ions. 1 mL of radioactivated solution was transferred to flasks with Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells cultured in 5 mL of complete media. The induction of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchanges (SCE) was used to observe any increase in DNA damage responses. The energy spectrum and the half-lives of the radioactivation were analyzed by NaI scintillation detector in order to identify generated radionuclides. In the radioactivated solution, 511 keV gamma-rays were observed, and their half-lives were approximately 2 min, 10 min, and 20 min. They respectively correspond to the beta+ decay of 15O, 13N, and 11C. The SCE frequencies in CHO cells increased depending on the amount of radioactivation in the solution. These were suppressed with a 2-hour delayed solution transfer or pretreatment with dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). Our results suggest that the SCE induction by radioactivated solution was mediated by free radicals produced by the annihilated gamma-rays. Since the SCE induction and DMSO modulation are also reported in radiation-induced bystander effects, our results imply that radioactivation of the solution may have some contribution to the bystander effects from hadron radiation. Further investigations are required to assess if radioactivation effects would attribute an additional level of cancer risk of the hadron radiation therapy itself. PMID:26657140</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26657140','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26657140"><span id="translatedtitle">Solution Radioactivated by Hadron Radiation Can Increase <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Chromatid Exchanges.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Maeda, Junko; Yurkon, Charles R; Fujii, Yoshihiro; Fujisawa, Hiroshi; Kato, Sayaka; Brents, Colleen A; Uesaka, Mitsuru; Fujimori, Akira; Kitamura, Hisashi; Kato, Takamitsu A</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>When energetic particles irradiate matter, it becomes activated by nuclear reactions. Radioactivation induced cellular effects are not clearly understood, but it could be a part of bystander effects. This investigation is aimed at understanding the biological effects from radioactivation in solution induced by hadron radiation. Water or phosphate buffered saline was activated by being exposed to hadron radiation including protons, carbon- and iron-ions. 1 mL of radioactivated solution was transferred to flasks with Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells cultured in 5 mL of complete media. The induction of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchanges (SCE) was used to observe any increase in DNA damage responses. The energy spectrum and the half-lives of the radioactivation were analyzed by NaI scintillation detector in order to identify generated radionuclides. In the radioactivated solution, 511 keV gamma-rays were observed, and their half-lives were approximately 2 min, 10 min, and 20 min. They respectively correspond to the beta+ decay of 15O, 13N, and 11C. The SCE frequencies in CHO cells increased depending on the amount of radioactivation in the solution. These were suppressed with a 2-hour delayed solution transfer or pretreatment with dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). Our results suggest that the SCE induction by radioactivated solution was mediated by free radicals produced by the annihilated gamma-rays. Since the SCE induction and DMSO modulation are also reported in radiation-induced bystander effects, our results imply that radioactivation of the solution may have some contribution to the bystander effects from hadron radiation. Further investigations are required to assess if radioactivation effects would attribute an additional level of cancer risk of the hadron radiation therapy itself. PMID:26657140</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title40-vol17/pdf/CFR-2012-title40-vol17-sec79-65.pdf','CFR2012'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title40-vol17/pdf/CFR-2012-title40-vol17-sec79-65.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">40 CFR 79.65 - In vivo <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchange assay.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-07-01</p> <p>... references should be consulted. (1) 40 CFR 798.5915, In vivo <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Chromatid Exchange Assay. (2) Kato, H.... (6) Kligerman, A., et al., “Cytogenetic Studies of Mice Exposed to Styrene by Inhalation.”,...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3212099','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3212099"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Sister</span> Circles as a Culturally Relevant Intervention for Anxious African American Women</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Neal-Barnett, Angela; Stadulis, Robert; Murray, Marsheena; Payne, Margaret Ralston; Thomas, Anisha; Salley, Bernadette B.</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Research on anxiety treatment with African American women reveals a need to develop interventions that address factors relevant to their lives. Such factors include feelings of isolation, multiple roles undertaken by Black women, and faith. A recurrent theme across treatment studies is the importance of having support from other Black women. <span class="hlt">Sister</span> circles are support groups that build upon existing friendships, fictive kin networks, and the sense of community found among African Americans females. <span class="hlt">Sister</span> circles appear to offer many of the components Black women desire in an anxiety intervention. In this article, we explore <span class="hlt">sister</span> circles as an intervention for anxious African American women. Culturally-infused aspects from our <span class="hlt">sister</span> circle work with middle-class African American women are presented. Further research is needed. PMID:22081747</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_161446.html','NIH-MEDLINEPLUS'); return false;" href="https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_161446.html"><span id="translatedtitle">How to Prepare Your Child for A New Brother or <span class="hlt">Sister</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePlus</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>... html How to Prepare Your Child for a New Brother or <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Children's reactions to family changes ... joy. Mom and Dad should talk about the new baby and let kids feel their enthusiasm. Parents ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title20-vol4/pdf/CFR-2012-title20-vol4-sec725-223.pdf','CFR2012'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title20-vol4/pdf/CFR-2012-title20-vol4-sec725-223.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">20 CFR 725.223 - Duration of entitlement; parent, brother, or <span class="hlt">sister</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-04-01</p> <p>... the parent dies. (c) The last month for which such brother or <span class="hlt">sister</span> is entitled to benefits is the month before the month in which any of the following events first occurs: (1) The individual dies;...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title20-vol4/pdf/CFR-2014-title20-vol4-sec725-223.pdf','CFR2014'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title20-vol4/pdf/CFR-2014-title20-vol4-sec725-223.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">20 CFR 725.223 - Duration of entitlement; parent, brother, or <span class="hlt">sister</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-04-01</p> <p>... the parent dies. (c) The last month for which such brother or <span class="hlt">sister</span> is entitled to benefits is the month before the month in which any of the following events first occurs: (1) The individual dies;...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001566.htm','NIH-MEDLINEPLUS'); return false;" href="https://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001566.htm"><span id="translatedtitle">Sudden infant <span class="hlt">death</span> syndrome</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePlus</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Crib <span class="hlt">death</span>; SIDS ... However, SIDS is still a major cause of <span class="hlt">death</span> in infants under 1 year old. Thousands of ... affects boys more often than girls. Most SIDS <span class="hlt">deaths</span> occur in the winter. The following may increase ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23054426','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23054426"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Death</span>: 'nothing' gives insight.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ettema, Eric J</p> <p>2013-08-01</p> <p>According to a widely accepted belief, we cannot know our own <span class="hlt">death--death</span> means 'nothing' to us. At first sight, the meaning of 'nothing' just implies the negation or absence of 'something'. <span class="hlt">Death</span> then simply refers to the negation or absence of life. As a consequence, however, <span class="hlt">death</span> has no meaning of itself. This leads to an ontological paradox in which <span class="hlt">death</span> is both acknowledged and denied: <span class="hlt">death</span> is … nothing. In this article, I investigate whether insight into the ontological paradox of the nothingness of <span class="hlt">death</span> can contribute to a good end-of-life. By analysing Aquinas', Heidegger's and Derrida's understanding of <span class="hlt">death</span> as nothingness, I explore how giving meaning to <span class="hlt">death</span> on different ontological levels connects to, and at the same time provides resistance against, the harsh reality of <span class="hlt">death</span>. By doing so, I intend to demonstrate that insight into the nothingness of <span class="hlt">death</span> can count as a framework for a meaningful dealing with <span class="hlt">death</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1128680','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1128680"><span id="translatedtitle">DNA single strand breakage, DNA adducts, and <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchange in lymphocytes and phenanthrene and pyrene metabolites in urine of coke oven workers.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Popp, W; Vahrenholz, C; Schell, C; Grimmer, G; Dettbarn, G; Kraus, R; Brauksiepe, A; Schmeling, B; Gutzeit, T; von Bülow, J; Norpoth, K</p> <p>1997-01-01</p> <p>OBJECTIVES: To investigate the specificity of biological monitoring variables (excretion of phenanthrene and pyrene metabolites in urine) and the usefulness of some biomarkers of effect (alkaline filter elution, 32P postlabelling assay, measurement of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchange) in workers exposed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). METHODS: 29 coke oven workers and a standardised control group were investigated for frequencies of DNA single strand breakage, DNA protein cross <span class="hlt">links</span> (alkaline filter elution assay), <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchange, and DNA adducts (32P postlabelling assay) in lymphocytes. Phenanthrene and pyrene metabolites were measured in 24 hour urine samples. 19 different PAHs (including benzo(a)pyrene, pyrene, and phenanthrene) were measured at the workplace by personal air monitoring. The GSTT1 activity in erythrocytes and lymphocyte subpopulations in blood was also measured. RESULTS: Concentrations of phenanthrene, pyrene, and benzo(a)pyrene in air correlated well with the concentration of total PAHs in air; they could be used for comparisons of different workplaces if the emission compositions were known. The measurement of phenanthrene metabolites in urine proved to be a better biological monitoring variable than the measurement of 1-hydroxypyrene. Significantly more DNA strand breaks in lymphocytes of coke oven workers were found (alkaline filter elution assay); the DNA adduct rate was not significantly increased in workers, but correlated with exposure to PAHs in a semiquantitative manner. The number of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchanges was lower in coke oven workers but this was not significant; thus counting <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchanges was not a good variable for biomonitoring of coke oven workers. Also, indications for immunotoxic influences (changes in lymphocyte subpopulations) were found. CONCLUSIONS: The measurement of phenanthrene metabolites in urine seems to be a better biological monitoring variable for exposure to PAHs than</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26621703','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26621703"><span id="translatedtitle">Genomic data do not support comb jellies as the <span class="hlt">sister</span> group to all other animals.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Pisani, Davide; Pett, Walker; Dohrmann, Martin; Feuda, Roberto; Rota-Stabelli, Omar; Philippe, Hervé; Lartillot, Nicolas; Wörheide, Gert</p> <p>2015-12-15</p> <p>Understanding how complex traits, such as epithelia, nervous systems, muscles, or guts, originated depends on a well-supported hypothesis about the phylogenetic relationships among major animal lineages. Traditionally, sponges (Porifera) have been interpreted as the <span class="hlt">sister</span> group to the remaining animals, a hypothesis consistent with the conventional view that the last common animal ancestor was relatively simple and more complex body plans arose later in evolution. However, this premise has recently been challenged by analyses of the genomes of comb jellies (Ctenophora), which, instead, found ctenophores as the <span class="hlt">sister</span> group to the remaining animals (the "Ctenophora-<span class="hlt">sister</span>" hypothesis). Because ctenophores are morphologically complex predators with true epithelia, nervous systems, muscles, and guts, this scenario implies these traits were either present in the last common ancestor of all animals and were lost secondarily in sponges and placozoans (Trichoplax) or, alternatively, evolved convergently in comb jellies. Here, we analyze representative datasets from recent studies supporting Ctenophora-<span class="hlt">sister</span>, including genome-scale alignments of concatenated protein sequences, as well as a genomic gene content dataset. We found no support for Ctenophora-<span class="hlt">sister</span> and conclude it is an artifact resulting from inadequate methodology, especially the use of simplistic evolutionary models and inappropriate choice of species to root the metazoan tree. Our results reinforce a traditional scenario for the evolution of complexity in animals, and indicate that inferences about the evolution of Metazoa based on the Ctenophora-<span class="hlt">sister</span> hypothesis are not supported by the currently available data. PMID:26621703</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26621703','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26621703"><span id="translatedtitle">Genomic data do not support comb jellies as the <span class="hlt">sister</span> group to all other animals.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Pisani, Davide; Pett, Walker; Dohrmann, Martin; Feuda, Roberto; Rota-Stabelli, Omar; Philippe, Hervé; Lartillot, Nicolas; Wörheide, Gert</p> <p>2015-12-15</p> <p>Understanding how complex traits, such as epithelia, nervous systems, muscles, or guts, originated depends on a well-supported hypothesis about the phylogenetic relationships among major animal lineages. Traditionally, sponges (Porifera) have been interpreted as the <span class="hlt">sister</span> group to the remaining animals, a hypothesis consistent with the conventional view that the last common animal ancestor was relatively simple and more complex body plans arose later in evolution. However, this premise has recently been challenged by analyses of the genomes of comb jellies (Ctenophora), which, instead, found ctenophores as the <span class="hlt">sister</span> group to the remaining animals (the "Ctenophora-<span class="hlt">sister</span>" hypothesis). Because ctenophores are morphologically complex predators with true epithelia, nervous systems, muscles, and guts, this scenario implies these traits were either present in the last common ancestor of all animals and were lost secondarily in sponges and placozoans (Trichoplax) or, alternatively, evolved convergently in comb jellies. Here, we analyze representative datasets from recent studies supporting Ctenophora-<span class="hlt">sister</span>, including genome-scale alignments of concatenated protein sequences, as well as a genomic gene content dataset. We found no support for Ctenophora-<span class="hlt">sister</span> and conclude it is an artifact resulting from inadequate methodology, especially the use of simplistic evolutionary models and inappropriate choice of species to root the metazoan tree. Our results reinforce a traditional scenario for the evolution of complexity in animals, and indicate that inferences about the evolution of Metazoa based on the Ctenophora-<span class="hlt">sister</span> hypothesis are not supported by the currently available data.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3691390','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3691390"><span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">link</span> in <span class="hlt">Linking</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Caldwell, Jane C; Chiale, Pablo A; Gonzalez, Mario D; Baranchuk, Adrian</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>We present 2 cases of the slow-fast form of AVNRT with initially narrow QRS complexes followed by sudden unexpected transition to persistently wide QRS complexes due to aberrant intraventricular conduction. Introduction of a properly timed extrastimulus in one case and critical oscillations in cycle length due to short-long coupling in the second case set the stage for the initial bundle branch block. However, persistence of the aberrancy pattern once the initial event abated was maintained by the "<span class="hlt">linking</span>" phenomenon. Delayed, retrograde concealed activation from the contralateral bundle branch perpetuated the initial bundle branch block. PMID:23840106</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li class="active"><span>9</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_9 --> <div id="page_10" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li class="active"><span>10</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="181"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Death&id=EJ1012746','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Death&id=EJ1012746"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Deaths</span> among Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults with Down Syndrome</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Miodrag, Nancy; Silverberg, Sophie E.; Urbano, Richard C.; Hodapp, Robert M.</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Background: Although life expectancies in Down syndrome (DS) have doubled over the past 3-4 decades, there continue to be many early <span class="hlt">deaths</span>. Yet, most research focuses on infant mortality or later adult <span class="hlt">deaths</span>. Materials and Methods: In this US study, hospital discharge and <span class="hlt">death</span> records from the state of Tennessee were <span class="hlt">linked</span> to examine 2046…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003AGUFM.V32D1049C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003AGUFM.V32D1049C"><span id="translatedtitle">Silicic Eruptions of the Past 50 kyr at the Three <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> Volcanic Cluster</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Calvert, A. T.; Hildreth, W.; Fierstein, J.</p> <p>2003-12-01</p> <p>The Three <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> volcanic cluster in the central Oregon Cascades consists of mafic to intermediate stratovolcanoes surrounded by mafic and silicic flows and domes. The bulk of South and Middle <span class="hlt">Sister</span> are late Pleistocene while North <span class="hlt">Sister</span> is middle Pleistocene (Schmidt and Grunder, 2003 GSA abs.). Thick rhyolite and dacite lava flows and domes are rich in potassium, and young glaciation exposes holocrystalline groundmass textures ideal for argon geochronology. Several of these silicic flows bracket stratovolcano growth, and precise geochronology illuminates a rich basalt to rhyolite history in the cluster over the past 50 kyr. Careful step-heating 40Ar/39Ar experiments yield excellent plateau ages with radiogenic yields often above 5% on rocks as young as 20 ka. Most samples have well-determined isochrons with atmospheric (40/36 = 295.5) intercepts, although several have intercepts as low as 286. South <span class="hlt">Sister</span> is a composite cone with an andesite/dacite base (Hodge Crest) and a young andesite summit sequence. The basal flow of the 300m-thick, youngest conformable stack of andesite lavas at the summit is 27+/-3 ka. Unconformably underlying portions date back to at least 50 ka based on ages of overlapping silicic flows. The base of Middle <span class="hlt">Sister</span> is andesite overlain by ˜300m of olivine basalt. Some Middle <span class="hlt">Sister</span> andesites and all basalts overlie a distinctive dacite agglutinate (20+/-2 ka) in the South/Middle <span class="hlt">Sister</span> saddle. All Middle <span class="hlt">Sister</span> lavas underlie a thick dacite flow (14+/-3 ka) that vented at 8500 ft (2600m) on its S flank. Dacite lava flows erupted from the Middle/North <span class="hlt">Sister</span> saddle at 27+/-2 and 18+/-2 ka. Additionally, several >100m-thick rhyolite and dacite lavas vented low on the flanks of the cluster. Obsidian Cliff rhyolite (37.8+/-1.8 ka) and Lane Plateau dacite (21.4+/-1.9 ka) erupted W of Middle <span class="hlt">Sister</span>, the Dew Lake dacite (32.3+/-1.8 ka) located near the locus of the INSAR anomaly W of South <span class="hlt">Sister</span> flowed around a 148+/-4 ka (knob 6482) basalt</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1891806','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1891806"><span id="translatedtitle">Sudden Unexpected <span class="hlt">Death</span> in Infancy: place and time of <span class="hlt">death</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Glasgow, JFT; Thompson, AJ; Ingram, PJ</p> <p>2006-01-01</p> <p>In recent years, many babies who die of Sudden Unexpected <span class="hlt">Death</span> in Infancy (SUDI) in Northern Ireland are found dead in bed – i.e. co-sleeping – with an adult. In order to assess its frequency autopsy reports between April 1996 and August 2001 were reviewed and <span class="hlt">linked</span> to temporal factors. The day and month of <span class="hlt">death</span>, and the place where the baby was found were compared to a reference population of infant <span class="hlt">deaths</span> between one week of age and the second birthday. Although the rate of SUDI was lower than the UK average, 43 cases of SUDI were identified, and two additional <span class="hlt">deaths</span> with virtually identical autopsy findings that were attributed to asphyxia caused by suffocation due to overlaying. Thirty-two of the 45 (71%) were less than four months of age. In 30 of the 45 cases (67%) the history stated that the baby was bed sharing with others; 19 died sleeping in an adult bed, and 11 on a sofa or armchair. In 16 of the 30 (53%) there were at least two other people sharing the sleeping surface, and in one case, three. SUDI was twice as frequent at weekends (found dead Saturday – Monday mornings) compared to weekdays (p<0.02), and significantly more common compared to reference <span class="hlt">deaths</span> (p<0.002). Co-sleeping <span class="hlt">deaths</span> were also more frequent at weekends. Almost half of all SUDI (49%) occurred in the summer months – more than twice the frequency of reference <span class="hlt">deaths</span>. While sharing a place of sleep per se may not increase the risk of <span class="hlt">death</span>, our findings may be <span class="hlt">linked</span> to factors such as habitual smoking, consumption of alcohol or illicit drugs as reported in case-control studies. In advising parents on safer childcare practices, health professionals must be knowledgeable of current research and when, for example, giving advice on co-sleeping this needs to be person-specific cognisant of the risks within a household. New and better means of targeting such information needs to be researched if those with higher risk life-styles are to be positively influenced. PMID:16457407</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=skeleton+AND+Organization&id=ED246995','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=skeleton+AND+Organization&id=ED246995"><span id="translatedtitle">Children and <span class="hlt">Death</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Brennan, Andrew J. J.</p> <p></p> <p>Health professionals and educators should develop their abilities to educate about <span class="hlt">death</span> and to comfort the bereaved. Due to lower <span class="hlt">death</span> rates, the lack of philosophical religious views, and distorted perceptions of <span class="hlt">death</span> contributed by television, <span class="hlt">death</span> has become a mystery instead of a segment of the common experience. Particularly when a child…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19883489','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19883489"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Death</span>, life, scarcity, and value: an alternative perspective on the meaning of <span class="hlt">death</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>King, Laura A; Hicks, Joshua A; Abdelkhalik, Justin</p> <p>2009-12-01</p> <p>That the scarcity of objects enhances their value is a widely known principle in the behavioral sciences. In addition, research has demonstrated that attaching high value to an object produces biased perceptions of its scarcity. Three studies applied this bidirectional <span class="hlt">link</span> between scarcity and value to the meaning of <span class="hlt">death</span>, testing the prediction that <span class="hlt">death</span> represents the scarcity of life. In Study 1, reminders of <span class="hlt">death</span> led to enhanced evaluations of life. In Studies 2 and 3, the monetary (Study 2) and psychological (Study 3) value of life were manipulated. In both studies, when human life was highly valuable, the concept of <span class="hlt">death</span> was more accessible, as predicted from the association between value and scarcity. Previous theoretical treatments of the meaning of <span class="hlt">death</span> have shared the notion that <span class="hlt">death</span> is essentially a threat requiring psychological defenses. The present results suggest that, from an informational perspective, <span class="hlt">death</span> represents the scarcity of life.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7132836','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7132836"><span id="translatedtitle">Study of maternal <span class="hlt">deaths</span> in Kerian (1976 - 1980).</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Yadav, H</p> <p>1982-06-01</p> <p>An investigation was conducted of all maternal <span class="hlt">deaths</span> by residence which occurred in the district of Kerian, Malaysia over the 1976-1980 period. All female <span class="hlt">deaths</span> between the years 15-45 were investigated to identify whether it was a maternal <span class="hlt">death</span> due to obstetrical cause or otherwise. Each of the cases was investigated by the public health nurse, public health <span class="hlt">sister</span>, and the medical officer of health before a report was made. All the maternal <span class="hlt">death</span> reports from 1976-1980 were studied and a report compiled. The health infrastructure of Kerian district consists of 1 district hospital with 141 beds, 8 health centers, and 32 midwife clinics. The total number of deliveries in Kerian from 1976-1980 was 22,977. The hospital deliveries constituted 7040 (30.6%), the government midwives 6395 (27.8%), and traditional birth attendants (TBAs) 9505 (41.4%). The period 1976-1980 showed a decline in the various mortality rates. The infant mortality rate which is 27.11/1000 declined by 33% from 1976-1980 and toddler mortality rate declined by 37.7% from 1976-1980. The most significant decline was maternal mortality which declined from 1.89/1000 live births to 1.10/1000 live births which registered a 41.8% decline. There were a total of 35 maternal <span class="hlt">deaths</span> registered from 1976-1980 in the district. Ethnically the Malays constituted 32 (91.4%) of all <span class="hlt">deaths</span> and Chinese 2 (5.7%) of all <span class="hlt">deaths</span> with Indians with 1 <span class="hlt">death</span> (2.8%). Most of the women were from the lower income group. 19 (54.3%) of the women died at home, and 15 (42.8%) died in the hospitals. Most of the women died at gravida 6-9. Gravida 1 had 8 or 22.8% of all maternal <span class="hlt">deaths</span>. Para 0 consisted of 9 (25.7%) of all maternal <span class="hlt">deaths</span> and para 6 and above consisted of 11 (31.4%) of all maternal <span class="hlt">deaths</span>. Women in the 31-40 year age group had 57.2% of the maternal <span class="hlt">deaths</span>. PPH and PPH with retained placenta were the main causes of the maternal <span class="hlt">deaths</span>, constituting 60% of the maternal <span class="hlt">deaths</span>. In 1980 all 5 maternal <span class="hlt">deaths</span> were due</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25194324','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25194324"><span id="translatedtitle">Identifying possible <span class="hlt">sister</span> groups of Cryptocercidae+Isoptera: a combined molecular and morphological phylogeny of Dictyoptera.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Djernæs, Marie; Klass, Klaus-Dieter; Eggleton, Paul</p> <p>2015-03-01</p> <p>Termites (Isoptera) offer an alternative model for the development of eusociality which is not dependent on a high degree of relatedness as found between <span class="hlt">sisters</span> in hymenopterans (bees, wasps, ants). Recent phylogenetic studies have established that termites belong within the cockroaches as <span class="hlt">sister</span> to the subsocial Cryptocercidae. Cryptocercidae shares several important traits with termites, thus we need to understand the phylogenetic position of Cryptocercidae+Isoptera to determine how these traits evolved. However, placement of Cryptocercidae+Isoptera is still uncertain. We used both molecular (12S, 16S, COII, 18S, 28S, H3) and morphological characters to reconstruct the phylogeny of Dictyoptera. We included all previously suggested <span class="hlt">sister</span> groups of Cryptocercidae+Isoptera as well as taxa which might represent additional major cockroach lineages. We used Bayes factors to test different <span class="hlt">sister</span> groups for Cryptocercidae+Isoptera and assessed character support for the consensus tree based on morphological characters and COII amino acid data. We used the molecular data and fossil calibration to estimate divergence times. We found the most likely <span class="hlt">sister</span> groups of Cryptocercidae+Isoptera to be Tryonicidae, Anaplecta or Tryonicidae+Anaplecta. Anaplecta has never previously been suggested as <span class="hlt">sister</span> group or even close to Cryptocercidae+Isoptera, but was formerly placed in Blaberoidea as <span class="hlt">sister</span> to the remaining taxa. Topological tests firmly supported our new placement of Anaplecta. We discuss the morphological characters (e.g. retractable genitalic hook) that have contributed to the previous placement of Anaplecta in Blaberoidea as well as the factors that might have contributed to a parallel development of genitalic features in Anaplecta and Blaberoidea. Cryptocercidae+Isoptera is placed in a clade with Tryonicidae, Anaplecta and possibly Lamproblattidae. Based on this, we suggest that wood-feeding, and the resultant need to conserve nitrogen, may have been an important</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1221/','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="https://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1221/"><span id="translatedtitle">Digital Data for Volcano Hazards of the Three <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> Region, Oregon</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Schilling, S.P.; Doelger, S.; Scott, W.E.; Iverson, R.M.</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>Three <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> is one of three active volcanic centers that lie close to rapidly growing communities and resort areas in Central Oregon. The major composite volcanoes of this area are clustered near the center of the region and include South <span class="hlt">Sister</span>, Middle <span class="hlt">Sister</span>, and Broken Top. Additionally, hundreds of mafic volcanoes are scattered throughout the Three <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> area. These range from small cinder cones to large shield volcanoes like North <span class="hlt">Sister</span> and Belknap Crater. Hazardous events include landslides from the steep flanks of large volcanoes and floods, which need not be triggered by eruptions, as well as eruption-triggered events such as fallout of tephra (volcanic ash) and lava flows. A proximal hazard zone roughly 20 kilometers (12 miles) in diameter surrounding the Three <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> and Broken Top could be affected within minutes of the onset of an eruption or large landslide. Distal hazard zones that follow river valleys downstream from the Three <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> and Broken Top could be inundated by lahars (rapid flows of water-laden rock and mud) generated either by melting of snow and ice during eruptions or by large landslides. Slow-moving lava flows could issue from new mafic volcanoes almost anywhere within the region. Fallout of tephra from eruption clouds can affect areas hundreds of kilometers (miles) downwind, so eruptions at volcanoes elsewhere in the Cascade Range also contribute to volcano hazards in Central Oregon. Scientists at the Cascades Volcano Observatory created a geographic information system (GIS) data set which depicts proximal and distal lahar hazard zones as well as a regional lava flow hazard zone for Three <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> (USGS Open-File Report 99-437, Scott and others, 1999). The various distal lahar zones were constructed from LaharZ software using 20, 100, and 500 million cubic meter input flow volumes. Additionally, scientists used the depositional history of past events in the Three <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> Region as well as experience and judgment derived from the</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2567865','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2567865"><span id="translatedtitle">Shugoshin1 May Play Important Roles in Separation of Homologous Chromosomes and <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Chromatids during Mouse Oocyte Meiosis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Yin, Shen; Ai, Jun-Shu; Shi, Li-Hong; Wei, Liang; Yuan, Ju; Ouyang, Ying-Chun; Hou, Yi; Chen, Da-Yuan; Schatten, Heide; Sun, Qing-Yuan</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>Background Homologous chromosomes separate in meiosis I and <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids separate in meiosis II, generating haploid gametes. To address the question why <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids do not separate in meiosis I, we explored the roles of Shogoshin1 (Sgo1) in chromosome separation during oocyte meiosis. Methodology/Principal Findings Sgo1 function was evaluated by exogenous overexpression to enhance its roles and RNAi to suppress its roles during two meioses of mouse oocytes. Immunocytochemistry and chromosome spread were used to evaluate phenotypes. The exogenous Sgo1 overexpression kept homologous chromosomes and <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids not to separate in meiosis I and meiosis II, respectively, while the Sgo1 RNAi promoted premature separation of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids. Conclusions Our results reveal that prevention of premature separation of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids in meiosis I requires the retention of centromeric Sgo1, while normal separation of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids in meiosis II requires loss of centromeric Sgo1. PMID:18949044</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25194162','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25194162"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Sisters</span> unbound is required for meiotic centromeric cohesion in Drosophila melanogaster.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Krishnan, Badri; Thomas, Sharon E; Yan, Rihui; Yamada, Hirotsugu; Zhulin, Igor B; McKee, Bruce D</p> <p>2014-11-01</p> <p>Regular meiotic chromosome segregation requires <span class="hlt">sister</span> centromeres to mono-orient (orient to the same pole) during the first meiotic division (meiosis I) when homologous chromosomes segregate, and to bi-orient (orient to opposite poles) during the second meiotic division (meiosis II) when <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids segregate. Both orientation patterns require cohesion between <span class="hlt">sister</span> centromeres, which is established during meiotic DNA replication and persists until anaphase of meiosis II. Meiotic cohesion is mediated by a conserved four-protein complex called cohesin that includes two structural maintenance of chromosomes (SMC) subunits (SMC1 and SMC3) and two non-SMC subunits. In Drosophila melanogaster, however, the meiotic cohesion apparatus has not been fully characterized and the non-SMC subunits have not been identified. We have identified a novel Drosophila gene called <span class="hlt">sisters</span> unbound (sunn), which is required for stable <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid cohesion throughout meiosis. sunn mutations disrupt centromere cohesion during prophase I and cause high frequencies of non-disjunction (NDJ) at both meiotic divisions in both sexes. SUNN co-localizes at centromeres with the cohesion proteins SMC1 and SOLO in both sexes and is necessary for the recruitment of both proteins to centromeres. Although SUNN lacks sequence homology to cohesins, bioinformatic analysis indicates that SUNN may be a structural homolog of the non-SMC cohesin subunit stromalin (SA), suggesting that SUNN may serve as a meiosis-specific cohesin subunit. In conclusion, our data show that SUNN is an essential meiosis-specific Drosophila cohesion protein. PMID:25194162</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3033573','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3033573"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Sister</span> cohesion and structural axis components mediate homolog bias of meiotic recombination</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Kim, Keun P.; Weiner, Beth M.; Zhang, Liangran; Jordan, Amy; Dekker, Job; Kleckner, Nancy</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>SUMMARY Meiotic recombination occurs between one chromatid of each maternal and paternal homolog (homolog bias) versus between <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids (<span class="hlt">sister</span> bias). Physical DNA analysis reveals that meiotic cohesin/axis component Rec8 promotes <span class="hlt">sister</span> bias, likely via its cohesion activity. Two meiosis-specific axis components, Red1/Mek1kinase, counteract this effect. With this precondition satisfied, other molecules directly specify homolog bias per se. Rec8 also acts positively to maintain homolog bias during crossover recombination. These observations point to sequential release of double-strand break ends from association with their <span class="hlt">sister</span>. Red1 and Rec8 are found to play distinct roles for <span class="hlt">sister</span> cohesion, DSB formation and recombination progression kinetics. Also, the two components are enriched in spatially distinct domains of axial structure that develop prior to DSB formation. We propose that Red1 and Rec8 domains provide functionally complementary environments whereby inputs evolved from DSB repair and late-stage chromosome morphogenesis are integrated to give the complete meiotic chromosomal program. PMID:21145459</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7773517','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7773517"><span id="translatedtitle">The management of professionals: the preferences of hospital <span class="hlt">sisters</span> and charge nurses.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Foster, D</p> <p>1995-05-01</p> <p>This analysis of the preferences of how <span class="hlt">sisters</span> and charge nurses are managed is the result of a two centre descriptive study using theoretical models of professionalism, developing preferences and exercising situational leadership. It was conducted to determine if the management structure preferred by <span class="hlt">sisters</span> and charge nurses, in a general acute hospital setting, supported the professionalism of nursing. The outcomes were intended to help develop a strategic plan for the future of nursing and the management of nurses. The research instruments were a self-completed questionnaire (19 were returned, a response rate of 31.1%) and four semi-structured interviews. The findings disclosed some dissatisfaction with the present management arrangements. The <span class="hlt">sisters</span> and charge nurses felt that their priorities for practice and professional issues were better supported by clinically involved, ward-based senior nurses than by unit-based senior nurses with a general management function. However, <span class="hlt">sisters</span>' and charge nurses' discussions with ward-based senior nurses were apparently less effective than discussions in peer groups which led to influential collegial autonomy. This preferred management style can be supported by the use of situational leadership theory which would enhance collegial autonomy and professional satisfaction. Recognition of the <span class="hlt">sisters</span> and charge nurses preferences and adjustment of their management would therefore enable them to participate effectively in organizational decision-making.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4224182','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4224182"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Sisters</span> Unbound Is Required for Meiotic Centromeric Cohesion in Drosophila melanogaster</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Krishnan, Badri; Thomas, Sharon E.; Yan, Rihui; Yamada, Hirotsugu; Zhulin, Igor B.; McKee, Bruce D.</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Regular meiotic chromosome segregation requires <span class="hlt">sister</span> centromeres to mono-orient (orient to the same pole) during the first meiotic division (meiosis I) when homologous chromosomes segregate, and to bi-orient (orient to opposite poles) during the second meiotic division (meiosis II) when <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids segregate. Both orientation patterns require cohesion between <span class="hlt">sister</span> centromeres, which is established during meiotic DNA replication and persists until anaphase of meiosis II. Meiotic cohesion is mediated by a conserved four-protein complex called cohesin that includes two structural maintenance of chromosomes (SMC) subunits (SMC1 and SMC3) and two non-SMC subunits. In Drosophila melanogaster, however, the meiotic cohesion apparatus has not been fully characterized and the non-SMC subunits have not been identified. We have identified a novel Drosophila gene called <span class="hlt">sisters</span> unbound (sunn), which is required for stable <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid cohesion throughout meiosis. sunn mutations disrupt centromere cohesion during prophase I and cause high frequencies of non-disjunction (NDJ) at both meiotic divisions in both sexes. SUNN co-localizes at centromeres with the cohesion proteins SMC1 and SOLO in both sexes and is necessary for the recruitment of both proteins to centromeres. Although SUNN lacks sequence homology to cohesins, bioinformatic analysis indicates that SUNN may be a structural homolog of the non-SMC cohesin subunit stromalin (SA), suggesting that SUNN may serve as a meiosis-specific cohesin subunit. In conclusion, our data show that SUNN is an essential meiosis-specific Drosophila cohesion protein. PMID:25194162</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4687580','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4687580"><span id="translatedtitle">Genomic data do not support comb jellies as the <span class="hlt">sister</span> group to all other animals</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Pisani, Davide; Pett, Walker; Dohrmann, Martin; Feuda, Roberto; Rota-Stabelli, Omar; Philippe, Hervé; Lartillot, Nicolas; Wörheide, Gert</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Understanding how complex traits, such as epithelia, nervous systems, muscles, or guts, originated depends on a well-supported hypothesis about the phylogenetic relationships among major animal lineages. Traditionally, sponges (Porifera) have been interpreted as the <span class="hlt">sister</span> group to the remaining animals, a hypothesis consistent with the conventional view that the last common animal ancestor was relatively simple and more complex body plans arose later in evolution. However, this premise has recently been challenged by analyses of the genomes of comb jellies (Ctenophora), which, instead, found ctenophores as the <span class="hlt">sister</span> group to the remaining animals (the “Ctenophora-sister” hypothesis). Because ctenophores are morphologically complex predators with true epithelia, nervous systems, muscles, and guts, this scenario implies these traits were either present in the last common ancestor of all animals and were lost secondarily in sponges and placozoans (Trichoplax) or, alternatively, evolved convergently in comb jellies. Here, we analyze representative datasets from recent studies supporting Ctenophora-<span class="hlt">sister</span>, including genome-scale alignments of concatenated protein sequences, as well as a genomic gene content dataset. We found no support for Ctenophora-<span class="hlt">sister</span> and conclude it is an artifact resulting from inadequate methodology, especially the use of simplistic evolutionary models and inappropriate choice of species to root the metazoan tree. Our results reinforce a traditional scenario for the evolution of complexity in animals, and indicate that inferences about the evolution of Metazoa based on the Ctenophora-<span class="hlt">sister</span> hypothesis are not supported by the currently available data. PMID:26621703</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10934469','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10934469"><span id="translatedtitle">Cohesin ensures bipolar attachment of microtubules to <span class="hlt">sister</span> centromeres and resists their precocious separation.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Tanaka, T; Fuchs, J; Loidl, J; Nasmyth, K</p> <p>2000-08-01</p> <p>The multisubunit protein complex cohesin is required to establish cohesion between <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids during S phase and to maintain it during G2 and M phases. Cohesin is essential for mitosis, and even partial defects cause very high rates of chromosome loss. In budding yeast, cohesin associates with specific sites which are distributed along the entire length of a chromosome but are more dense in the vicinity of the centromere. Real-time imaging of individual centromeres tagged with green fluorescent protein suggests that cohesin bound to centromeres is important for bipolar attachment to microtubules. This cohesin is, however, incapable of resisting the consequent force, which leads to <span class="hlt">sister</span> centromere splitting and chromosome stretching. Meanwhile, cohesin bound to sequences flanking the centromeres prevents <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids from completely unzipping and is required to pull back together <span class="hlt">sister</span> centromeres that have already split. Cohesin therefore has a central role in generating a dynamic tension between microtubules and <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid cohesion at centromeres, which lasts until chromosome segregation is finally promoted by separin-dependent cleavage of the cohesin subunit Scc1p.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21479528','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21479528"><span id="translatedtitle">Bartter syndrome in two <span class="hlt">sisters</span> with a novel mutation of the CLCNKB gene, one with deafness.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Robitaille, Pierre; Merouani, Aicha; He, Ning; Pei, York</p> <p>2011-09-01</p> <p>This article describes two <span class="hlt">sisters</span> with type III Bartter syndrome (BS) due to a novel missense variant of the CLCNKB gene. The phenotypic expression of the disease was very different in these two siblings. In one <span class="hlt">sister</span>, the disease followed a very severe course, especially in the neonatal period and as a toddler. Both the classic symptoms and the biochemical features of the syndrome were striking. In addition, she presented with sensorineural deafness, a complication yet unreported in this subtype of BS In contrast, the least affected <span class="hlt">sister</span> was symptom free and the biochemical features of the disease although present remained discrete throughout the prolonged follow-up. It is suggested that such a difference in the phenotypic expression of the disease is possibly secondary to the modifier effect of a gene and/or results from environmental factor(s). PMID:21479528</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19418332','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19418332"><span id="translatedtitle">Sexual and physical abuse: a comparison between lesbians and their heterosexual <span class="hlt">sisters</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Stoddard, Joel P; Dibble, Suzanne L; Fineman, Norman</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>The purpose of this study was to investigate similarities and differences in the incidence and patterns of abuse experienced by lesbians and their heterosexual <span class="hlt">sisters</span>. In a matched sample of 324 lesbian/heterosexual <span class="hlt">sister</span> pairs, the lesbians reported a greater incidence than their <span class="hlt">sisters</span> of childhood physical and sexual abuse, as well as adult sexual abuse. Both groups identified male relatives as the most common perpetrator of both childhood physical and sexual abuse. Male relatives were most commonly identified as perpetrators of adult physical abuse and male strangers were most commonly identified as adult sexual abusers. Our results demonstrate that both sexual and physical abuse are common experiences for lesbian and heterosexual women; however, since the context of these experiences is different, each group will have special needs for services and treatment.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26349188','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26349188"><span id="translatedtitle">CLINICAL VARIABILITY IN TWO <span class="hlt">SISTERS</span> WITH KEUTEL SYNDROME DUE TO A HOMOZYGOUS MUTATION IN MGP GENE.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Tüysüz, B; Cinar, B; Laçiner, S; Onay, H; Mittaz-Crettol, L</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Keutel syndrome (KS) is an autosomal recessive disease characterised by abnormal cartilage calcification, brachytelephalangism, peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis, hearing loss and midface retrusion. KS is caused by homozygous mutations in MGP, a gene encoding Matrix Gla protein which acts as a calcification inhibitor in extracellular matrix. We present two Turkish <span class="hlt">sisters</span> (22 and 13 years old) who had abnormal cartilage calcification, brachytelephalangism, congenital heart defect and chronic asthmatic bronchitis. The patients were homozygous for c.62-2A>G (IVS1-2 A>G) mutation in MGP gene. Abnormal cartilage calcification, brachytelephalangism and midfacial retrusion are the hallmarks of KS. It was observed that the younger <span class="hlt">sister</span> had striking cartilaginous calcifications, midfacial retrusion and severe brachytelephalangism while her older <span class="hlt">sister</span> had mild costal cartilaginous calcifications and brachytelephalangism without any midfacial retrusion. Intrafamiliar clinical variability for KS has not been described previously. PMID:26349188</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2005NW.....92..586B&link_type=ABSTRACT','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2005NW.....92..586B&link_type=ABSTRACT"><span id="translatedtitle">Osteological evidence for <span class="hlt">sister</span> group relationship between pseudo-toothed birds (Aves: Odontopterygiformes) and waterfowls (Anseriformes)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Bourdon, Estelle</p> <p>2005-12-01</p> <p>The phylogenetic affinities of the extinct pseudo-toothed birds have remained controversial. Some authors noted that they resemble both pelicans and allies (Pelecaniformes) and tube-nosed birds (Procellariiformes), but assigned them to a distinct taxon, the Odontopterygiformes. In most recent studies, the pseudo-toothed birds are referred to the family Pelagornithidae inside the Pelecaniformes. Here, I perform a cladistic analysis with five taxa of the pseudo-toothed birds including two undescribed new species from the Early Tertiary of Morocco. The present hypothesis strongly supports a <span class="hlt">sister</span> group relationship of pseudo-toothed birds (Odontopterygiformes) and waterfowls (Anseriformes). The Odontoanserae (Odontopterygiformes plus Anseriformes) are the <span class="hlt">sister</span> group of Neoaves. The placement of the landfowls (Galliformes) as the <span class="hlt">sister</span> taxon of all other neognathous birds does not support the consensus view that the Galloanserae (Galliformes plus Anseriformes) are monophyletic.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23076835','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23076835"><span id="translatedtitle">Using a sibling design to compare childhood adversities in female patients with BPD and their <span class="hlt">sisters</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Laporte, Lise; Paris, Joel; Guttman, Herta; Russell, Jennifer; Correa, José A</p> <p>2012-11-01</p> <p>Abuse and neglect are well-established risk correlates of borderline personality disorder (BPD). The goal of this study was to examine whether BPD probands can be differentiated from their <span class="hlt">sisters</span> with respect to a range of developmental adversity and maltreatment indicators, including retrospective self-reports of past experiences of childhood abuse and neglect, dysfunctional parent-child relationships and peer victimization and dysfunctional peer relationships. A total of 53 patients with BPD were compared to 53 <span class="hlt">sisters</span> who were currently free of psychopathology on measures assessing childhood adversities. Both probands and <span class="hlt">sisters</span> reported similar prevalence of intrafamilial abuse, although BPD patients reported more severe physical and emotional abuse. BPD patients reported higher prevalence of physical abuse by peers. These findings generally support the principle of multifinality, in which similar histories of adversities can be associated with a variety of outcomes, ranging from psychopathology to resilience.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li class="active"><span>10</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_10 --> <div id="page_11" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li class="active"><span>11</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="201"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2279116','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2279116"><span id="translatedtitle">Single mitochondrial gene barcodes reliably identify <span class="hlt">sister</span>-species in diverse clades of birds</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p></p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>Background DNA barcoding of life using a standardized COI sequence was proposed as a species identification system, and as a method for detecting putative new species. Previous tests in birds showed that individuals can be correctly assigned to species in ~94% of the cases and suggested a threshold of 10× mean intraspecific difference to detect potential new species. However, these tests were criticized because they were based on a single maternally inherited gene rather than multiple nuclear genes, did not compare phylogenetically identified <span class="hlt">sister</span> species, and thus likely overestimated the efficacy of DNA barcodes in identifying species. Results To test the efficacy of DNA barcodes we compared ~650 bp of COI in 60 <span class="hlt">sister</span>-species pairs identified in multigene phylogenies from 10 orders of birds. In all pairs, individuals of each species were monophyletic in a neighbor-joining (NJ) tree, and each species possessed fixed mutational differences distinguishing them from their <span class="hlt">sister</span> species. Consequently, individuals were correctly assigned to species using a statistical coalescent framework. A coalescent test of taxonomic distinctiveness based on chance occurrence of reciprocal monophyly in two lineages was verified in known <span class="hlt">sister</span> species, and used to identify recently separated lineages that represent putative species. This approach avoids the use of a universal distance cutoff which is invalidated by variation in times to common ancestry of <span class="hlt">sister</span> species and in rates of evolution. Conclusion Closely related <span class="hlt">sister</span> species of birds can be identified reliably by barcodes of fixed diagnostic substitutions in COI sequences, verifying coalescent-based statistical tests of reciprocal monophyly for taxonomic distinctiveness. Contrary to recent criticisms, a single DNA barcode is a rapid way to discover monophyletic lineages within a metapopulation that might represent undiscovered cryptic species, as envisaged in the unified species concept. This identifies a smaller</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21595367','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21595367"><span id="translatedtitle">An illness in the family: Dr. Maude Abbott and her <span class="hlt">sister</span>, Alice Abbott.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Brookes, Barbara</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>This paper explores Maude Abbott's internationally significant career in medicine and her parallel commitment to caring for her <span class="hlt">sister</span>, Alice Abbott. An examination of Abbott's life reveals the difficulties faced by an ambitious Canadian woman in medicine from the 1890s to the 1920s; difficulties compounded by caring for a <span class="hlt">sister</span> with a mental illness. The Abbott archive suggests that it was far more difficult for a woman doctor to make the kind of sharp distinction between public and private life that might be expected of professional men.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12473346','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12473346"><span id="translatedtitle">Caspase-independent cell <span class="hlt">deaths</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Lockshin, Richard A; Zakeri, Zahra</p> <p>2002-12-01</p> <p>A very common and the best understood of the mechanisms of physiological cell <span class="hlt">death</span> is apoptosis, resulting from the activation, through either of two primary pathways, of site-specific proteases called caspases. There are, however, many other routes to cell <span class="hlt">death</span>, prominently including autophagy and proteasomal degradation of critical constituents of cells. These routes are frequently seen in experimental situations in which initiator or effector caspases are inhibited or blocked through genetic means, but they are also encountered during normal physiological and pathological processes. Most frequently, autophagic or proteasomal degradation is used to eliminate massive cytoplasm of very large cells, especially post-mitotic cells, and these pathways are prominent even though caspase genes, messages, and pro-enzymes are found in the cells. These forms of cell <span class="hlt">death</span> are fully physiological and not simply a default pathway for a defective cell; and they are distinct from necrosis. We do not yet understand the extent to which the pathways are <span class="hlt">linked</span>, what mechanisms trigger the caspase-independent <span class="hlt">deaths</span>, and how the choices are made.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://medlineplus.gov/suddeninfantdeathsyndrome.html','NIH-MEDLINEPLUS'); return false;" href="https://medlineplus.gov/suddeninfantdeathsyndrome.html"><span id="translatedtitle">Sudden Infant <span class="hlt">Death</span> Syndrome</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePlus</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Sudden infant <span class="hlt">death</span> syndrome (SIDS) is the sudden, unexplained <span class="hlt">death</span> of an infant younger than one year old. Some people call ... boys, African Americans, and American Indian/Alaska Native infants have a higher risk of SIDS. Although health ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12353556','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12353556"><span id="translatedtitle">Suicide on <span class="hlt">death</span> row.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Lester, David; Tartaro, Christine</p> <p>2002-09-01</p> <p>The suicide rate on <span class="hlt">death</span> row for the period 1976 through 1999 was found to be high (113 per 100,000 per year), some five times higher than the suicide rate for the male population of the United States. The <span class="hlt">death</span> row suicide rate was predicted by features of the <span class="hlt">death</span> row population (negatively with the population on <span class="hlt">death</span> row) and by social indicators of the society as a whole (negatively with birth and divorce rates and positively with marriage rates).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17419943','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17419943"><span id="translatedtitle">No life without <span class="hlt">death</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Krammer, Peter H; Kamiński, Marcin; Kiessling, Michael; Gülow, Karsten</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>Apoptosis-programed cell <span class="hlt">death</span>-is the most common form of <span class="hlt">death</span> in the body. Once apoptosis is induced, proper execution of the cell <span class="hlt">death</span> program requires the coordinated activation and execution of multiple molecular processes. Here, we describe the pathways and the basic components of the <span class="hlt">death</span>-inducing machinery. Since apoptosis is a key regulator of tissue homeostasis, an imbalance of apoptosis results in severe diseases like cancer, autoimmunity, and AIDS.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Afterlife&pg=3&id=EJ381557','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Afterlife&pg=3&id=EJ381557"><span id="translatedtitle">Dreams of <span class="hlt">Death</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Barrett, Deirdre</p> <p>1989-01-01</p> <p>Examined frequency and characteristics of overt dreams of dying among healthy young adults. Dreams of dying were found to be rare but distinctive content category, representing overwhelmingly pleasant dreams. Over one-half of <span class="hlt">death</span> dreams involved lengthy afterlife sequence, remainder focused on process of <span class="hlt">death</span>. <span class="hlt">Death</span> dreams of these healthy…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25140559','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25140559"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Sister</span> Mary Joseph Nodules on 99mTc HYNIC-TOC scintigraphy in patients with neuroendocrine tumors.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Jing, Hongli; Zhang, Yingqiang; Li, Fang</p> <p>2015-02-01</p> <p>A <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Mary Joseph nodule represents an umbilical metastasis, which is more commonly caused by a primary malignancy in gastrointestinal tract or from reproductive system. We report <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Mary Joseph nodules caused by neuroendocrine tumor and revealed on Tc HYNIC-TOC scintigraphy.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title20-vol1/pdf/CFR-2014-title20-vol1-sec222-40.pdf','CFR2014'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title20-vol1/pdf/CFR-2014-title20-vol1-sec222-40.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">20 CFR 222.40 - When determinations of relationship are made for parent, grandchild, brother or <span class="hlt">sister</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-04-01</p> <p>... RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACT FAMILY RELATIONSHIPS Relationship as Parent, Grandchild, Brother or <span class="hlt">Sister</span> § 222.40 When determinations of relationship are made for parent, grandchild, brother or <span class="hlt">sister</span>. (a) Parent. The claimant's relationship as a parent of the employee is determined...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title20-vol1/pdf/CFR-2012-title20-vol1-sec222-40.pdf','CFR2012'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title20-vol1/pdf/CFR-2012-title20-vol1-sec222-40.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">20 CFR 222.40 - When determinations of relationship are made for parent, grandchild, brother or <span class="hlt">sister</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-04-01</p> <p>... RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACT FAMILY RELATIONSHIPS Relationship as Parent, Grandchild, Brother or <span class="hlt">Sister</span> § 222.40 When determinations of relationship are made for parent, grandchild, brother or <span class="hlt">sister</span>. (a) Parent. The claimant's relationship as a parent of the employee is determined...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title20-vol1/pdf/CFR-2011-title20-vol1-sec222-40.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title20-vol1/pdf/CFR-2011-title20-vol1-sec222-40.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">20 CFR 222.40 - When determinations of relationship are made for parent, grandchild, brother or <span class="hlt">sister</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-04-01</p> <p>... RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACT FAMILY RELATIONSHIPS Relationship as Parent, Grandchild, Brother or <span class="hlt">Sister</span> § 222.40 When determinations of relationship are made for parent, grandchild, brother or <span class="hlt">sister</span>. (a) Parent. The claimant's relationship as a parent of the employee is determined...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title20-vol1/pdf/CFR-2010-title20-vol1-sec222-40.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title20-vol1/pdf/CFR-2010-title20-vol1-sec222-40.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">20 CFR 222.40 - When determinations of relationship are made for parent, grandchild, brother or <span class="hlt">sister</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-04-01</p> <p>... RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACT FAMILY RELATIONSHIPS Relationship as Parent, Grandchild, Brother or <span class="hlt">Sister</span> § 222.40 When determinations of relationship are made for parent, grandchild, brother or <span class="hlt">sister</span>. (a) Parent. The claimant's relationship as a parent of the employee is determined...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title20-vol1/pdf/CFR-2013-title20-vol1-sec222-40.pdf','CFR2013'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title20-vol1/pdf/CFR-2013-title20-vol1-sec222-40.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">20 CFR 222.40 - When determinations of relationship are made for parent, grandchild, brother or <span class="hlt">sister</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-04-01</p> <p>... RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACT FAMILY RELATIONSHIPS Relationship as Parent, Grandchild, Brother or <span class="hlt">Sister</span> § 222.40 When determinations of relationship are made for parent, grandchild, brother or <span class="hlt">sister</span>. (a) Parent. The claimant's relationship as a parent of the employee is determined...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED434287.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED434287.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">The Effectiveness of Mentoring for Adolescent Mothers and Their Infants: A Comparative Study between <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Friend and Cal Learn.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Tebb, Kathleen P.</p> <p></p> <p>This study evaluated <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Friend, a mentoring program in Yolo County, California, serving low-income adolescent mothers and their infants. The primary objective was to determine if participating in the <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Friend program improved the adolescent mother's parenting class attendance, the home environment, parenting behavior, and child…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Death&id=EJ927986','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Death&id=EJ927986"><span id="translatedtitle">Evidence That Thinking about <span class="hlt">Death</span> Relates to Time-Estimation Behavior</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Martens, Andy; Schmeichel, Brandon J.</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Time and <span class="hlt">death</span> are <span class="hlt">linked</span>--the passing of time brings us closer to <span class="hlt">death</span>. Terror management theory proposes that awareness of <span class="hlt">death</span> represents a potent problem that motivates a variety of psychological defenses (Greenberg, Pyszczynski, & Solomon, 1997). We tested the hypothesis that thinking about <span class="hlt">death</span> motivates elongated perceptions of brief…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=bean+AND+plants&id=EJ797780','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=bean+AND+plants&id=EJ797780"><span id="translatedtitle">Three <span class="hlt">Sisters</span>: Lessons of Traditional Story Honored in Assessment and Accreditation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Chenault, Venida S.</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>The three <span class="hlt">sisters</span> story is shared across many tribes. It explains the practice of planting corn, beans, and squash together. The corn stalks provide support for the bean vines; the beans provide nitrogen for the corn; and the squash prevents weed growth between the mounds. Such stories explain not only the science of agricultural methods in tribal…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=birth+AND+order+AND+personality&pg=4&id=EJ484723','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=birth+AND+order+AND+personality&pg=4&id=EJ484723"><span id="translatedtitle">Family Adaptation and Coping among Siblings of Cancer Patients, Their Brothers and <span class="hlt">Sisters</span>, and Nonclinical Controls.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Madan-Swain, Avi; And Others</p> <p>1993-01-01</p> <p>Examined coping and family adaptation in siblings (n=32) of cancer patients, their ill brothers and <span class="hlt">sisters</span> (n=19), and control group of nonclinical children (n=10) with healthy siblings. Gender and age of sibling, birth order, and number of siblings were examined. Found better adaptation in larger families and decreased family involvement among…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=moral+AND+enhancement&id=EJ755531','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=moral+AND+enhancement&id=EJ755531"><span id="translatedtitle">Meanings of Sisterhood and Developmental Disability: Narratives from White Nondisabled <span class="hlt">Sisters</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>McGraw, Lori A.; Walker, Alexis J.</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>Integrating thought from critical feminist and disability theorists via a strategic social constructionist perspective, the authors analyzed 10 in-depth qualitative interviews to begin to understand the dialogue between (a) how nondisabled <span class="hlt">sisters</span> understand themselves and their siblings with developmental disabilities and (b) wider systems of…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=british+AND+manners&pg=2&id=EJ1088123','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=british+AND+manners&pg=2&id=EJ1088123"><span id="translatedtitle">Living with a Brother Who Has an Autism Spectrum Disorder: A <span class="hlt">Sister</span>'s Perspective</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Connell, Zara O.; Halloran, Maeve O.; Doody, Owen</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>People with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) are born into families and influence family functioning both positively and negatively. One of the most enduring relationships a person with ASD will have is their relationship with a brother or <span class="hlt">sister</span>. Services for people with ASD should provide effective support to families, which include brothers,…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1050774','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1050774"><span id="translatedtitle">Two <span class="hlt">sisters</span> with a syndrome of ocular, skeletal, and abdominal abnormalities (OSA syndrome).</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Mingarelli, R; Castriota Scanderbeg, A; Dallapiccola, B</p> <p>1996-01-01</p> <p>Two adult <span class="hlt">sisters</span> are described who had a unique association of facial, ocular, and skeletal defects, and abdominal muscle hypoplasia, indicating autosomal recessive inheritance. Many of these features overlap those previously found in other malformation syndromes. However, the constellation of defects observed in these patients appears to represent a previously unreported syndrome and autosomal recessive inheritance is likely. Images PMID:8933348</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li class="active"><span>11</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_11 --> <div id="page_12" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li class="active"><span>12</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="221"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=aesthetics&pg=2&id=EJ1003992','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=aesthetics&pg=2&id=EJ1003992"><span id="translatedtitle">Empirical Psycho-Aesthetics and Her <span class="hlt">Sisters</span>: Substantive and Methodological Issues--Part II</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Konecni, Vladimir J.</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Empirical psycho-aesthetics is approached in this two-part article from two directions. Part I, which appeared in the Winter 2012 issue of "JAE," addressed definitional and organizational issues, including the field's origins, its relation to "<span class="hlt">sister</span>" disciplines (experimental philosophy, cognitive neuroscience of art, and neuroaesthetics), and…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=symptoms+AND+turner+AND+syndrome&id=EJ579567','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=symptoms+AND+turner+AND+syndrome&id=EJ579567"><span id="translatedtitle">Social Functioning among Girls with Fragile X or Turner Syndrome and Their <span class="hlt">Sisters</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Mazzocco, Michele M. M.; Baumgardner, Thomas; Freund, Lisa S.; Reiss, Allan L.</p> <p>1998-01-01</p> <p>Social behaviors among girls (ages 6-16) with fragile X (n=8) or Turner syndrome (n=9) were examined to address the role of family environment versus biological determinants of social dysfunction. Compared to their <span class="hlt">sisters</span>, subjects had lower IQS and higher rating of social and attention problems. (Author/CR)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=BSA&pg=2&id=ED390973','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=BSA&pg=2&id=ED390973"><span id="translatedtitle">Making a Difference. An Impact Study of Big Brothers/Big <span class="hlt">Sisters</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Tierney, Joseph P.; And Others</p> <p></p> <p>This report provides reliable evidence that mentoring programs can positively affect young people. The evidence is derived from research conducted at local affiliates of Big Brothers/Big <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> of America (BB/BSA), the oldest, best-known, and arguably most sophisticated of the country's mentoring programs. Public/Private Ventures, Inc. conducted…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=deal+AND+bullying&pg=3&id=EJ830840','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=deal+AND+bullying&pg=3&id=EJ830840"><span id="translatedtitle">Brothers and <span class="hlt">Sisters</span>: A Source of Support for Children in School?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Hadfield, Lucy; Edwards, Rosalind; Mauthner, Melanie</p> <p>2006-01-01</p> <p>Whilst UK schools move towards U.S "big brother" style mentoring systems for children, are actual brothers and <span class="hlt">sisters</span> becoming an invisible source of support to deal with bullying in everyday life? This paper reports on research with children aged 7-13 about their experiences and understandings of their relationships with their brothers and…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=chess&pg=3&id=EJ939604','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=chess&pg=3&id=EJ939604"><span id="translatedtitle">Does High-Level Intellectual Performance Depend on Practice Alone? Debunking the Polgar <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> Case</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Howard, Robert W.</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>The famous Polgar <span class="hlt">sisters</span> started chess very young, undertook extensive study, and two became grandmasters. This case often is cited as decisive evidence that practice alone is key in development of expertise, that innate talent is unimportant or non-existent, and that almost anyone can become a grandmaster. But on close examination these claims…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=men+AND+women+AND+leadership&pg=6&id=ED530841','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=men+AND+women+AND+leadership&pg=6&id=ED530841"><span id="translatedtitle">When the <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> Said Farewell: The Transition of Leadership in Catholic Elementary Schools</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Caruso, Michael P., S.J.</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>"When the <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> Said Farewell" tells an important story of the contributions of Catholic elementary schools to the United States by chronicling the experiences and insights of religious women (nuns) who were the last members of their communities to serve in parish elementary schools, and of those lay men and women who were the first to serve in…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2776007','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2776007"><span id="translatedtitle">Effect of borax on immune cell proliferation and <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchange in human chromosomes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Pongsavee, Malinee</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>Background Borax is used as a food additive. It becomes toxic when accumulated in the body. It causes vomiting, fatigue and renal failure. Methods The heparinized blood samples from 40 healthy men were studied for the impact of borax toxicity on immune cell proliferation (lymphocyte proliferation) and <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchange in human chromosomes. The MTT assay and <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Chromatid Exchange (SCE) technic were used in this experiment with the borax concentrations of 0.1, 0.15, 0.2, 0.3 and 0.6 mg/ml. Results It showed that the immune cell proliferation (lymphocyte proliferation) was decreased when the concentrations of borax increased. The borax concentration of 0.6 mg/ml had the most effectiveness to the lymphocyte proliferation and had the highest cytotoxicity index (CI). The borax concentrations of 0.15, 0.2, 0.3 and 0.6 mg/ml significantly induced <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchange in human chromosomes (P < 0.05). Conclusion Borax had effects on immune cell proliferation (lymphocyte proliferation) and induced <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchange in human chromosomes. Toxicity of borax may lead to cellular toxicity and genetic defect in human. PMID:19878537</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25902535','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25902535"><span id="translatedtitle">Error, signal, and the placement of Ctenophora <span class="hlt">sister</span> to all other animals.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Whelan, Nathan V; Kocot, Kevin M; Moroz, Leonid L; Halanych, Kenneth M</p> <p>2015-05-01</p> <p>Elucidating relationships among early animal lineages has been difficult, and recent phylogenomic analyses place Ctenophora <span class="hlt">sister</span> to all other extant animals, contrary to the traditional view of Porifera as the earliest-branching animal lineage. To date, phylogenetic support for either ctenophores or sponges as <span class="hlt">sister</span> to other animals has been limited and inconsistent among studies. Lack of agreement among phylogenomic analyses using different data and methods obscures how complex traits, such as epithelia, neurons, and muscles evolved. A consensus view of animal evolution will not be accepted until datasets and methods converge on a single hypothesis of early metazoan relationships and putative sources of systematic error (e.g., long-branch attraction, compositional bias, poor model choice) are assessed. Here, we investigate possible causes of systematic error by expanding taxon sampling with eight novel transcriptomes, strictly enforcing orthology inference criteria, and progressively examining potential causes of systematic error while using both maximum-likelihood with robust data partitioning and Bayesian inference with a site-heterogeneous model. We identified ribosomal protein genes as possessing a conflicting signal compared with other genes, which caused some past studies to infer ctenophores and cnidarians as <span class="hlt">sister</span>. Importantly, biases resulting from elevated compositional heterogeneity or elevated substitution rates are ruled out. Placement of ctenophores as <span class="hlt">sister</span> to all other animals, and sponge monophyly, are strongly supported under multiple analyses, herein. PMID:25902535</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED452094.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED452094.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Sisters</span> in Science: Using Sports as a Vehicle for Science Learning.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Hammrich, Penny L.; Richardson, Greer M.; Green, Tina Sloan; Livingston, Beverly</p> <p></p> <p>This paper describes a project for upper elementary and middle school minority girl students called the <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> in Sport Science (SISS). The SISS program addresses the needs of urban girls in gaining access to equal education in science and mathematics by using athletics as a vehicle for learning. The program provides a non-competitive and…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3955356','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3955356"><span id="translatedtitle">Spotlights on our <span class="hlt">sister</span> journals: ChemistryOpen 1/2014</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>On these pages, we feature a selection of the excellent work that has recently been published in our <span class="hlt">sister</span> journals. If you are reading these pages on a computer, click on any of the items to read the full article. Otherwise please see the DOIs for easy online access through Wiley Online Library. PMID:24688888</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=life+AND+satisfaction+AND+young+AND+adults&pg=5&id=EJ965819','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=life+AND+satisfaction+AND+young+AND+adults&pg=5&id=EJ965819"><span id="translatedtitle">Youths' Caretaking of Their Adolescent <span class="hlt">Sisters</span>' Children: Its Costs and Benefits for Youths' Development</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>East, Patricia L.; Weisner, Thomas S.; Reyes, Barbara T.</p> <p>2006-01-01</p> <p>This study examined how time spent caring for a teenage <span class="hlt">sister</span>'s child and experiences in providing care related to youths' young adult outcomes. Latino and African American youths (N = 108) were studied during middle and late adolescence. Results indicated that youths who provided many hours of child care were more stressed and had lower school…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1006061.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1006061.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Catherine Spalding: Co-Foundress of the <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> of Charity of Nazareth</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Shaughnessy, Mary Angela</p> <p>2006-01-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> of Charity of Nazareth (SCN) maintain a vibrant presence in ministry in the US. This article presents an overview of their co-foundress, Catherine Spalding, and shows Mother Catherine to be the creative, mission-driven, and articulate leader that is still very much in need in today's society.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=incest&id=EJ1011495','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=incest&id=EJ1011495"><span id="translatedtitle">Brother-<span class="hlt">Sister</span> Incest: Data from Anonymous Computer-Assisted Self Interviews</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Stroebel, Sandra S.; O'Keefe, Stephen L.; Beard, Keith W.; Kuo, Shih-Ya; Swindell, Samuel; Stroupe, Walter</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Retrospective data were entered anonymously by 1,521 adult women using computer-assisted self interview. Forty were classified as victims of brother-<span class="hlt">sister</span> incest, 19 were classified as victims of father-daughter incest, and 232 were classified as victims of sexual abuse by an adult other than their father before reaching 18 years of age. The…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title20-vol2/pdf/CFR-2011-title20-vol2-sec410-215.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title20-vol2/pdf/CFR-2011-title20-vol2-sec410-215.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">20 CFR 410.215 - Duration of entitlement; parent, brother, or <span class="hlt">sister</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-04-01</p> <p>... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Duration of entitlement; parent, brother, or <span class="hlt">sister</span>. 410.215 Section 410.215 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL COAL MINE HEALTH AND SAFETY ACT OF 1969, TITLE IV-BLACK LUNG BENEFITS (1969- ) Requirements for...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title20-vol2/pdf/CFR-2010-title20-vol2-sec410-340.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title20-vol2/pdf/CFR-2010-title20-vol2-sec410-340.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">20 CFR 410.340 - Determination of relationship; parent, brother, or <span class="hlt">sister</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-04-01</p> <p>... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Determination of relationship; parent, brother, or <span class="hlt">sister</span>. 410.340 Section 410.340 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL COAL MINE HEALTH AND SAFETY ACT OF 1969, TITLE IV-BLACK LUNG BENEFITS (1969- ) Relationship...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title20-vol2/pdf/CFR-2011-title20-vol2-sec410-380.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title20-vol2/pdf/CFR-2011-title20-vol2-sec410-380.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">20 CFR 410.380 - Determination of dependency; parent, brother, or <span class="hlt">sister</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-04-01</p> <p>... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Determination of dependency; parent, brother, or <span class="hlt">sister</span>. 410.380 Section 410.380 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL COAL MINE HEALTH AND SAFETY ACT OF 1969, TITLE IV-BLACK LUNG BENEFITS (1969- ) Relationship and...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title20-vol2/pdf/CFR-2010-title20-vol2-sec410-380.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title20-vol2/pdf/CFR-2010-title20-vol2-sec410-380.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">20 CFR 410.380 - Determination of dependency; parent, brother, or <span class="hlt">sister</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-04-01</p> <p>... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Determination of dependency; parent, brother, or <span class="hlt">sister</span>. 410.380 Section 410.380 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL COAL MINE HEALTH AND SAFETY ACT OF 1969, TITLE IV-BLACK LUNG BENEFITS (1969- ) Relationship and...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title20-vol2/pdf/CFR-2011-title20-vol2-sec410-340.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title20-vol2/pdf/CFR-2011-title20-vol2-sec410-340.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">20 CFR 410.340 - Determination of relationship; parent, brother, or <span class="hlt">sister</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-04-01</p> <p>... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Determination of relationship; parent, brother, or <span class="hlt">sister</span>. 410.340 Section 410.340 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL COAL MINE HEALTH AND SAFETY ACT OF 1969, TITLE IV-BLACK LUNG BENEFITS (1969- ) Relationship...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title20-vol2/pdf/CFR-2011-title20-vol2-sec410-214.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title20-vol2/pdf/CFR-2011-title20-vol2-sec410-214.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">20 CFR 410.214 - Conditions of entitlement; parent, brother, or <span class="hlt">sister</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-04-01</p> <p>... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Conditions of entitlement; parent, brother, or <span class="hlt">sister</span>. 410.214 Section 410.214 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL COAL MINE HEALTH AND SAFETY ACT OF 1969, TITLE IV-BLACK LUNG BENEFITS (1969- ) Requirements for...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16698532','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16698532"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Sister</span> Mary Joseph's nodule as the first presenting sign of primary fallopian tube adenocarcinoma.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kirshtein, Boris; Meirovitz, Mihai; Okon, Elimelech; Piura, Benjamin</p> <p>2006-01-01</p> <p>Umbilical metastasis (<span class="hlt">Sister</span> Mary Joseph's nodule) is often the first sign of intraabdominal and/or pelvic carcinoma. We describe the fourth case reported in the literature of <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Mary Joseph's nodule originating from fallopian tube carcinoma. In a 54-year-old woman, <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Mary Joseph's nodule was unexpectedly detected during umbilical hernia repair. Subsequent laparoscopy revealed a 2-cm friable tumor located at the fimbriated end of right fallopian tube and 1-cm peritoneal implant in the pouch of Douglas. Laparoscopic bilateral adnexectomy and resection of the peritoneal implant were performed. Because frozen section examination revealed fallopian tube carcinoma, the procedure was continued with laparotomy including total abdominal hysterectomy, omentectomy, and pelvic lymph node sampling. Final diagnosis was stage IIIB fallopian tube carcinoma. The patient received postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy with single-agent carboplatin and has remained alive and with no evidence of disease. It is concluded that in cases of <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Mary Joseph's nodule, laparoscopy can be a useful tool in the search of the primary tumor in the abdomen and/or pelvis. Laparoscopy can provide crucial information with respect to the location, size, and feasibility of optimal surgical resection of the intraabdominal and/or pelvic tumors.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li class="active"><span>12</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_12 --> <div id="page_13" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li class="active"><span>13</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="241"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24939933','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24939933"><span id="translatedtitle">Tension-dependent removal of pericentromeric shugoshin is an indicator of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromosome biorientation.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Nerusheva, Olga O; Galander, Stefan; Fernius, Josefin; Kelly, David; Marston, Adele L</p> <p>2014-06-15</p> <p>During mitosis and meiosis, <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid cohesion resists the pulling forces of microtubules, enabling the generation of tension at kinetochores upon chromosome biorientation. How tension is read to signal the bioriented state remains unclear. Shugoshins form a pericentromeric platform that integrates multiple functions to ensure proper chromosome biorientation. Here we show that budding yeast shugoshin Sgo1 dissociates from the pericentromere reversibly in response to tension. The antagonistic activities of the kinetochore-associated Bub1 kinase and the Sgo1-bound phosphatase protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A)-Rts1 underlie a tension-dependent circuitry that enables Sgo1 removal upon <span class="hlt">sister</span> kinetochore biorientation. Sgo1 dissociation from the pericentromere triggers dissociation of condensin and Aurora B from the centromere, thereby stabilizing the bioriented state. Conversely, forcing <span class="hlt">sister</span> kinetochores to be under tension during meiosis I leads to premature Sgo1 removal and precocious loss of pericentromeric cohesion. Overall, we show that the pivotal role of shugoshin is to build a platform at the pericentromere that attracts activities that respond to the absence of tension between <span class="hlt">sister</span> kinetochores. Disassembly of this platform in response to intersister kinetochore tension signals the bioriented state. Therefore, tension sensing by shugoshin is a central mechanism by which the bioriented state is read.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=new&pg=7&id=EJ1048143','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=new&pg=7&id=EJ1048143"><span id="translatedtitle">They Came with a Purpose: Educational Journeys of Nineteenth-Century Irish Dominican <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Teachers</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Collins, Jenny</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Irish Catholic teaching <span class="hlt">sisters</span> were major actors in the development of education systems in New World countries such as the United States, Canada, South Africa, Australia and New Zealand. Immigrants themselves, they faced a number of key challenges as they sought to adapt Old World cultural and educational ideas to the education of the immigrant…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=bebe&id=EJ604478','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=bebe&id=EJ604478"><span id="translatedtitle">"Brothers and <span class="hlt">Sisters</span>": A Novel Way to Teach Human Resources Management.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Bumpus, Minnette</p> <p>2000-01-01</p> <p>The novel "Brothers and <span class="hlt">Sisters</span>" by Bebe Moore Campbell was used in a management course to explore human resource management issues, concepts, and theories. The course included prereading and postreading surveys, lecture, book review, and examination. Most of the students (92%) felt the novel was an appropriate way to meet course objectives. (SK)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25902535','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25902535"><span id="translatedtitle">Error, signal, and the placement of Ctenophora <span class="hlt">sister</span> to all other animals.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Whelan, Nathan V; Kocot, Kevin M; Moroz, Leonid L; Halanych, Kenneth M</p> <p>2015-05-01</p> <p>Elucidating relationships among early animal lineages has been difficult, and recent phylogenomic analyses place Ctenophora <span class="hlt">sister</span> to all other extant animals, contrary to the traditional view of Porifera as the earliest-branching animal lineage. To date, phylogenetic support for either ctenophores or sponges as <span class="hlt">sister</span> to other animals has been limited and inconsistent among studies. Lack of agreement among phylogenomic analyses using different data and methods obscures how complex traits, such as epithelia, neurons, and muscles evolved. A consensus view of animal evolution will not be accepted until datasets and methods converge on a single hypothesis of early metazoan relationships and putative sources of systematic error (e.g., long-branch attraction, compositional bias, poor model choice) are assessed. Here, we investigate possible causes of systematic error by expanding taxon sampling with eight novel transcriptomes, strictly enforcing orthology inference criteria, and progressively examining potential causes of systematic error while using both maximum-likelihood with robust data partitioning and Bayesian inference with a site-heterogeneous model. We identified ribosomal protein genes as possessing a conflicting signal compared with other genes, which caused some past studies to infer ctenophores and cnidarians as <span class="hlt">sister</span>. Importantly, biases resulting from elevated compositional heterogeneity or elevated substitution rates are ruled out. Placement of ctenophores as <span class="hlt">sister</span> to all other animals, and sponge monophyly, are strongly supported under multiple analyses, herein.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4426464','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4426464"><span id="translatedtitle">Error, signal, and the placement of Ctenophora <span class="hlt">sister</span> to all other animals</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Whelan, Nathan V.; Kocot, Kevin M.; Moroz, Leonid L.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Elucidating relationships among early animal lineages has been difficult, and recent phylogenomic analyses place Ctenophora <span class="hlt">sister</span> to all other extant animals, contrary to the traditional view of Porifera as the earliest-branching animal lineage. To date, phylogenetic support for either ctenophores or sponges as <span class="hlt">sister</span> to other animals has been limited and inconsistent among studies. Lack of agreement among phylogenomic analyses using different data and methods obscures how complex traits, such as epithelia, neurons, and muscles evolved. A consensus view of animal evolution will not be accepted until datasets and methods converge on a single hypothesis of early metazoan relationships and putative sources of systematic error (e.g., long-branch attraction, compositional bias, poor model choice) are assessed. Here, we investigate possible causes of systematic error by expanding taxon sampling with eight novel transcriptomes, strictly enforcing orthology inference criteria, and progressively examining potential causes of systematic error while using both maximum-likelihood with robust data partitioning and Bayesian inference with a site-heterogeneous model. We identified ribosomal protein genes as possessing a conflicting signal compared with other genes, which caused some past studies to infer ctenophores and cnidarians as <span class="hlt">sister</span>. Importantly, biases resulting from elevated compositional heterogeneity or elevated substitution rates are ruled out. Placement of ctenophores as <span class="hlt">sister</span> to all other animals, and sponge monophyly, are strongly supported under multiple analyses, herein. PMID:25902535</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/827476','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/827476"><span id="translatedtitle">Los Alamos National Laboratory's <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Laboratory Collaborations on Low and Intermediate Level Radioactive Waste Management</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Newell, D. L.; Sinkule, B. J.; Apt, K. E.</p> <p>2003-02-25</p> <p>The DOE/National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) ''<span class="hlt">Sister</span> Laboratory'' program allows for bilateral technical cooperation in peaceful uses of nuclear energy for developing nations. The program establishes a direct line of communication between U.S. scientists and the nuclear research and scientific communities in participating countries.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-03-07/pdf/2012-5533.pdf','FEDREG'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-03-07/pdf/2012-5533.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">77 FR 13585 - Three <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> Irrigation District; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing and Soliciting...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-03-07</p> <p>... inspection: ] a. Type of Application: Conduit Exemption. b. Project No.: 14364-000. c. Date filed: February 8... Project would be located on the north pipe of the Three <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> Irrigation District's Main Canal Pipeline... Hydroelectric Project would consist of: (1) An intake pipe approximately 40 feet in length; (2) a...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=networking&pg=3&id=EJ1078896','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=networking&pg=3&id=EJ1078896"><span id="translatedtitle">Teaching <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> and Transnational Networks: Recruitment and Education Expansion in the Long Nineteenth Century</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Raftery, Deirdre</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>This article examines the management of the education enterprise of teaching <span class="hlt">Sisters</span>, with reference to their transnational networking. The article suggests that orders of women religious were the first all-female transnational networks, engaged constantly in work that was characterised by "movement, ebb and circulation". The mobility of…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4307833','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4307833"><span id="translatedtitle">Effect of Cause-of-<span class="hlt">Death</span> Training on Agreement Between Hospital Discharge Diagnoses and Cause of <span class="hlt">Death</span> Reported, Inpatient Hospital <span class="hlt">Deaths</span>, New York City, 2008–2010</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Ong, Paulina; Gambatese, Melissa; Begier, Elizabeth; Zimmerman, Regina; Soto, Antonio</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Introduction Accurate cause-of-<span class="hlt">death</span> reporting is required for mortality data to validly inform public health programming and evaluation. Research demonstrates overreporting of heart disease on New York City <span class="hlt">death</span> certificates. We describe changes in reported causes of <span class="hlt">death</span> following a New York City health department training conducted in 2009 to improve accuracy of cause-of-<span class="hlt">death</span> reporting at 8 hospitals. The objective of our study was to assess the degree to which <span class="hlt">death</span> certificates citing heart disease as cause of <span class="hlt">death</span> agreed with hospital discharge data and the degree to which training improved accuracy of reporting. Methods We analyzed 74,373 <span class="hlt">death</span> certificates for 2008 through 2010 that were <span class="hlt">linked</span> with hospital discharge records for New York City inpatient <span class="hlt">deaths</span> and calculated the proportion of discordant <span class="hlt">deaths</span>, that is, <span class="hlt">death</span> certificates reporting an underlying cause of heart disease with no corresponding discharge record diagnosis. We also summarized top principal diagnoses among discordant reports and calculated the proportion of inpatient <span class="hlt">deaths</span> reporting sepsis, a condition underreported in New York City, to assess whether documentation practices changed in response to clarifications made during the intervention. Results Citywide discordance between <span class="hlt">death</span> certificates and discharge data decreased from 14.9% in 2008 to 9.6% in 2010 (P < .001), driven by a decrease in discordance at intervention hospitals (20.2% in 2008 to 8.9% in 2010; P < .001). At intervention hospitals, reporting of sepsis increased from 3.7% of inpatient <span class="hlt">deaths</span> in 2008 to 20.6% in 2010 (P < .001). Conclusion Overreporting of heart disease as cause of <span class="hlt">death</span> declined at intervention hospitals, driving a citywide decline, and sepsis reporting practices changed in accordance with health department training. Researchers should consider the effect of overreporting and data-quality changes when analyzing New York City heart disease mortality trends. Other vital records jurisdictions</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1325454','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1325454"><span id="translatedtitle">Experimental Test Plan for PWR <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Rods in the High Burnup Spent Fuel Data Project</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Montgomery, Rose; Scaglione, John M; Bevard, Bruce Balkcom; Hanson, Brady; Billone, Dr. Michael</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>The High Burnup Spent Fuel Data project pulled 25 <span class="hlt">sister</span> rods (9 from the project assemblies and 16 from similar HBU assemblies) for characterization. The 25 <span class="hlt">sister</span> rods are all high burnup and cover the range of modern domestic cladding alloys. The 25 <span class="hlt">sister</span> rods were shipped to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in early 2016 for detailed non-destructive and destructive examination. Examinations are intended to provide baseline data on the initial physical state of the cladding and fuel prior to the loading, drying, and long-term dry storage process. Further examinations are focused on determining the effects of temperatures encountered during and following drying. Similar tests will be performed on rods taken from the project assemblies at the end of their long-term storage in a TN-32 dry storage cask (the cask rods ) to identify any significant changes in the fuel rods that may have occurred during the dry storage period. Additionally, some of the <span class="hlt">sister</span> rods will be used for separate effects testing to expand the applicability of the project data to the fleet, and to address some of the data-related gaps associated with extended storage and subsequent transportation of high burnup fuel. A draft test plan is being developed that describes the experimental work to be conducted on the <span class="hlt">sister</span> rods. This paper summarizes the draft test plan and necessary coordination activities for the multi-year experimental program to supply data relevant to the assessment of the safety of long-term storage followed by transportation of high burnup spent fuel.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1985AmJPh..53.1092B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1985AmJPh..53.1092B"><span id="translatedtitle">Carnot and the Universal Heat <span class="hlt">Death</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Bailyn, M.</p> <p>1985-11-01</p> <p>The relation between Kelvin's Heat <span class="hlt">Death</span> and Carnot's prohibition of perpetual motion machines is traced. The <span class="hlt">link</span> between them is that Carnot's proposition implies a perpetual destruction machine, whereas Kelvin's implies a perpetual degradation machine, the one historically evolving into the other.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=strength+AND+of+AND+materials&pg=3&id=EJ972941','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=strength+AND+of+AND+materials&pg=3&id=EJ972941"><span id="translatedtitle">Addiction to near <span class="hlt">Death</span> in Adolescence</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Shaw, Janet</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>This paper takes Betty Joseph's concept of "addiction to near <span class="hlt">death</span>," which describes a clinical situation in which sadism and masochism dominate the relationships of a particular group of patients, and applies it specifically to the case material of a girl in adolescent psychotherapy treatment. A <span class="hlt">link</span> is made between the patient's retreat from…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_161641.html','NIH-MEDLINEPLUS'); return false;" href="https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_161641.html"><span id="translatedtitle">Smoking Still Takes Big Toll in U.S. Cancer <span class="hlt">Deaths</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePlus</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>... gov/news/fullstory_161641.html Smoking Still Takes Big Toll in U.S. Cancer <span class="hlt">Deaths</span> Habit is <span class="hlt">linked</span> ... new study finds. Researchers tracking 2014 federal government data found that more than 167,000 cancer <span class="hlt">deaths</span> ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21896763','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21896763"><span id="translatedtitle">MicroRNAs and phylogenomics resolve the relationships of Tardigrada and suggest that velvet worms are the <span class="hlt">sister</span> group of Arthropoda.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Campbell, Lahcen I; Rota-Stabelli, Omar; Edgecombe, Gregory D; Marchioro, Trevor; Longhorn, Stuart J; Telford, Maximilian J; Philippe, Hervé; Rebecchi, Lorena; Peterson, Kevin J; Pisani, Davide</p> <p>2011-09-20</p> <p>Morphological data traditionally group Tardigrada (water bears), Onychophora (velvet worms), and Arthropoda (e.g., spiders, insects, and their allies) into a monophyletic group of invertebrates with walking appendages known as the Panarthropoda. However, molecular data generally do not support the inclusion of tardigrades within the Panarthropoda, but instead place them closer to Nematoda (roundworms). Here we present results from the analyses of two independent genomic datasets, expressed sequence tags (ESTs) and microRNAs (miRNAs), which congruently resolve the phylogenetic relationships of Tardigrada. Our EST analyses, based on 49,023 amino acid sites from 255 proteins, significantly support a monophyletic Panarthropoda including Tardigrada and suggest a <span class="hlt">sister</span> group relationship between Arthropoda and Onychophora. Using careful experimental manipulations--comparisons of model fit, signal dissection, and taxonomic pruning--we show that support for a Tardigrada + Nematoda group derives from the phylogenetic artifact of long-branch attraction. Our small RNA libraries fully support our EST results; no miRNAs were found to <span class="hlt">link</span> Tardigrada and Nematoda, whereas all panarthropods were found to share one unique miRNA (miR-276). In addition, Onychophora and Arthropoda were found to share a second miRNA (miR-305). Our study confirms the monophyly of the legged ecdysozoans, shows that past support for a Tardigrada + Nematoda group was due to long-branch attraction, and suggests that the velvet worms are the <span class="hlt">sister</span> group to the arthropods.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21896763','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21896763"><span id="translatedtitle">MicroRNAs and phylogenomics resolve the relationships of Tardigrada and suggest that velvet worms are the <span class="hlt">sister</span> group of Arthropoda.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Campbell, Lahcen I; Rota-Stabelli, Omar; Edgecombe, Gregory D; Marchioro, Trevor; Longhorn, Stuart J; Telford, Maximilian J; Philippe, Hervé; Rebecchi, Lorena; Peterson, Kevin J; Pisani, Davide</p> <p>2011-09-20</p> <p>Morphological data traditionally group Tardigrada (water bears), Onychophora (velvet worms), and Arthropoda (e.g., spiders, insects, and their allies) into a monophyletic group of invertebrates with walking appendages known as the Panarthropoda. However, molecular data generally do not support the inclusion of tardigrades within the Panarthropoda, but instead place them closer to Nematoda (roundworms). Here we present results from the analyses of two independent genomic datasets, expressed sequence tags (ESTs) and microRNAs (miRNAs), which congruently resolve the phylogenetic relationships of Tardigrada. Our EST analyses, based on 49,023 amino acid sites from 255 proteins, significantly support a monophyletic Panarthropoda including Tardigrada and suggest a <span class="hlt">sister</span> group relationship between Arthropoda and Onychophora. Using careful experimental manipulations--comparisons of model fit, signal dissection, and taxonomic pruning--we show that support for a Tardigrada + Nematoda group derives from the phylogenetic artifact of long-branch attraction. Our small RNA libraries fully support our EST results; no miRNAs were found to <span class="hlt">link</span> Tardigrada and Nematoda, whereas all panarthropods were found to share one unique miRNA (miR-276). In addition, Onychophora and Arthropoda were found to share a second miRNA (miR-305). Our study confirms the monophyly of the legged ecdysozoans, shows that past support for a Tardigrada + Nematoda group was due to long-branch attraction, and suggests that the velvet worms are the <span class="hlt">sister</span> group to the arthropods. PMID:21896763</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3179045','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3179045"><span id="translatedtitle">MicroRNAs and phylogenomics resolve the relationships of Tardigrada and suggest that velvet worms are the <span class="hlt">sister</span> group of Arthropoda</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Campbell, Lahcen I.; Rota-Stabelli, Omar; Edgecombe, Gregory D.; Marchioro, Trevor; Longhorn, Stuart J.; Telford, Maximilian J.; Philippe, Hervé; Rebecchi, Lorena; Peterson, Kevin J.; Pisani, Davide</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Morphological data traditionally group Tardigrada (water bears), Onychophora (velvet worms), and Arthropoda (e.g., spiders, insects, and their allies) into a monophyletic group of invertebrates with walking appendages known as the Panarthropoda. However, molecular data generally do not support the inclusion of tardigrades within the Panarthropoda, but instead place them closer to Nematoda (roundworms). Here we present results from the analyses of two independent genomic datasets, expressed sequence tags (ESTs) and microRNAs (miRNAs), which congruently resolve the phylogenetic relationships of Tardigrada. Our EST analyses, based on 49,023 amino acid sites from 255 proteins, significantly support a monophyletic Panarthropoda including Tardigrada and suggest a <span class="hlt">sister</span> group relationship between Arthropoda and Onychophora. Using careful experimental manipulations—comparisons of model fit, signal dissection, and taxonomic pruning—we show that support for a Tardigrada + Nematoda group derives from the phylogenetic artifact of long-branch attraction. Our small RNA libraries fully support our EST results; no miRNAs were found to <span class="hlt">link</span> Tardigrada and Nematoda, whereas all panarthropods were found to share one unique miRNA (miR-276). In addition, Onychophora and Arthropoda were found to share a second miRNA (miR-305). Our study confirms the monophyly of the legged ecdysozoans, shows that past support for a Tardigrada + Nematoda group was due to long-branch attraction, and suggests that the velvet worms are the <span class="hlt">sister</span> group to the arthropods. PMID:21896763</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25993682','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25993682"><span id="translatedtitle">X-<span class="hlt">linked</span> adrenal hypoplasia congenita: clinical and follow-up findings of two kindreds, one with a novel NR0B1 mutation.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Pereira, Bernardo Dias; Pereira, Iris; Portugal, Jorge Ralha; Gonçalves, João; Raimundo, Luísa</p> <p>2015-04-01</p> <p>X-<span class="hlt">linked</span> adrenal hypoplasia congenita typically manifests as primary adrenal insufficiency in the newborn age and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism in males, being caused by mutations in NR0B1 gene. We present the clinical and follow-up findings of two kindreds with NR0B1 mutations. The proband of kindred A had a diagnosis of primary adrenal insufficiency when he was a newborn. Family history was relevant for a maternal uncle <span class="hlt">death</span> at the newborn age. Beyond 2 year-old steroid measurements rendered undetectable and delayed bone age was noticed. Molecular analysis of NR0B1 gene revealed a previously unreported mutation (c.1084A>T), leading to a premature stop codon, p.Lys362*, in exon 1. His mother and <span class="hlt">sister</span> were asymptomatic carriers. At 14 year-old he had 3 mL of testicular volume and biochemical surveys (LH < 0.1 UI/L, total testosterone < 10 ng/dL) concordant with hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism. Kindred B had two males diagnosed with adrenal insufficiency at the newborn age. By 3 year-old both siblings had undetectable androgen levels and delayed bone age. NR0B1 molecular analysis identified a nonsense mutation in both cases, c.243C>G; p.Tyr81*, in exon 1. Their mother and <span class="hlt">sister</span> were asymptomatic carriers. At 14 year-old (Tanner stage 1) hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis evaluation in both males (LH < 0.1UI/L, total testosterone < 10 ng/dL) confirmed hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. In conclusion, biochemical profiles, bone age and an X-<span class="hlt">linked</span> inheritance led to suspicion of NR0B1 mutations. Two nonsense mutations were detected in both kindreds, one previously unreported (c.1084A>T; p.Lys362*). Mutation identification allowed the timely institution of testosterone in patients at puberty and an appropriate genetic counselling for relatives.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25993682','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25993682"><span id="translatedtitle">X-<span class="hlt">linked</span> adrenal hypoplasia congenita: clinical and follow-up findings of two kindreds, one with a novel NR0B1 mutation.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Pereira, Bernardo Dias; Pereira, Iris; Portugal, Jorge Ralha; Gonçalves, João; Raimundo, Luísa</p> <p>2015-04-01</p> <p>X-<span class="hlt">linked</span> adrenal hypoplasia congenita typically manifests as primary adrenal insufficiency in the newborn age and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism in males, being caused by mutations in NR0B1 gene. We present the clinical and follow-up findings of two kindreds with NR0B1 mutations. The proband of kindred A had a diagnosis of primary adrenal insufficiency when he was a newborn. Family history was relevant for a maternal uncle <span class="hlt">death</span> at the newborn age. Beyond 2 year-old steroid measurements rendered undetectable and delayed bone age was noticed. Molecular analysis of NR0B1 gene revealed a previously unreported mutation (c.1084A>T), leading to a premature stop codon, p.Lys362*, in exon 1. His mother and <span class="hlt">sister</span> were asymptomatic carriers. At 14 year-old he had 3 mL of testicular volume and biochemical surveys (LH < 0.1 UI/L, total testosterone < 10 ng/dL) concordant with hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism. Kindred B had two males diagnosed with adrenal insufficiency at the newborn age. By 3 year-old both siblings had undetectable androgen levels and delayed bone age. NR0B1 molecular analysis identified a nonsense mutation in both cases, c.243C>G; p.Tyr81*, in exon 1. Their mother and <span class="hlt">sister</span> were asymptomatic carriers. At 14 year-old (Tanner stage 1) hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis evaluation in both males (LH < 0.1UI/L, total testosterone < 10 ng/dL) confirmed hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. In conclusion, biochemical profiles, bone age and an X-<span class="hlt">linked</span> inheritance led to suspicion of NR0B1 mutations. Two nonsense mutations were detected in both kindreds, one previously unreported (c.1084A>T; p.Lys362*). Mutation identification allowed the timely institution of testosterone in patients at puberty and an appropriate genetic counselling for relatives. PMID:25993682</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Thanatology&pg=2&id=ED200878','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Thanatology&pg=2&id=ED200878"><span id="translatedtitle">The Effects of <span class="hlt">Death</span> Education.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Freitag, Carl B.; Hassler, Shawn David</p> <p></p> <p>Although fear of <span class="hlt">death</span> is recorded in the writings of the oldest major religions, the study of <span class="hlt">death</span> and the fear of <span class="hlt">death</span> have only occurred for the last few decades. <span class="hlt">Death</span> education courses have grown in number since the early 1970's. College students participated in an investigation of the effects of <span class="hlt">death</span> education on <span class="hlt">death</span> anxiety by…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160325.html','NIH-MEDLINEPLUS'); return false;" href="https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160325.html"><span id="translatedtitle">Zika May Have Caused <span class="hlt">Death</span> of Texas Newborn</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePlus</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160325.html Zika May Have Caused <span class="hlt">Death</span> of Texas Newborn Baby ... birth defect <span class="hlt">linked</span> to fetal exposure to the Zika virus, state health officials say. According to a ...</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li class="active"><span>13</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_13 --> <div id="page_14" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li class="active"><span>14</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="261"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24965436','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24965436"><span id="translatedtitle">Understanding <span class="hlt">death</span> in custody: a case for a comprehensive definition.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ruiz, Géraldine; Wangmo, Tenzin; Mutzenberg, Patrick; Sinclair, Jessica; Elger, Bernice Simone</p> <p>2014-09-01</p> <p>Prisoners sometimes die in prison, either due to natural illness, violence, suicide, or a result of imprisonment. The purpose of this study is to understand <span class="hlt">deaths</span> in custody using qualitative methodology and to argue for a comprehensive definition of <span class="hlt">death</span> in custody that acknowledges <span class="hlt">deaths</span> related to the prison environment. Interviews were conducted with 33 experts, who primarily work as lawyers or forensic doctors with national and/or international organisations. Responses were coded and analysed qualitatively. Defining <span class="hlt">deaths</span> in custody according to the place of <span class="hlt">death</span> was deemed problematic. Experts favoured a dynamic approach emphasising the <span class="hlt">link</span> between the detention environment and occurrence of <span class="hlt">death</span> rather than the actual place of <span class="hlt">death</span>. Causes of <span class="hlt">deaths</span> and different patterns of <span class="hlt">deaths</span> were discussed, indicating that many of these <span class="hlt">deaths</span> are preventable. Lack of an internationally recognised standard definition of <span class="hlt">death</span> in custody is a major concern. Key aspects such as place, time, and causes of <span class="hlt">death</span> as well as relation to the prison environment should be debated and incorporated into the definition. Systematic identification of violence within prison institutions is critical and efforts are needed to prevent unnecessary <span class="hlt">deaths</span> in prison and to protect vulnerable prisoners.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24965436','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24965436"><span id="translatedtitle">Understanding <span class="hlt">death</span> in custody: a case for a comprehensive definition.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ruiz, Géraldine; Wangmo, Tenzin; Mutzenberg, Patrick; Sinclair, Jessica; Elger, Bernice Simone</p> <p>2014-09-01</p> <p>Prisoners sometimes die in prison, either due to natural illness, violence, suicide, or a result of imprisonment. The purpose of this study is to understand <span class="hlt">deaths</span> in custody using qualitative methodology and to argue for a comprehensive definition of <span class="hlt">death</span> in custody that acknowledges <span class="hlt">deaths</span> related to the prison environment. Interviews were conducted with 33 experts, who primarily work as lawyers or forensic doctors with national and/or international organisations. Responses were coded and analysed qualitatively. Defining <span class="hlt">deaths</span> in custody according to the place of <span class="hlt">death</span> was deemed problematic. Experts favoured a dynamic approach emphasising the <span class="hlt">link</span> between the detention environment and occurrence of <span class="hlt">death</span> rather than the actual place of <span class="hlt">death</span>. Causes of <span class="hlt">deaths</span> and different patterns of <span class="hlt">deaths</span> were discussed, indicating that many of these <span class="hlt">deaths</span> are preventable. Lack of an internationally recognised standard definition of <span class="hlt">death</span> in custody is a major concern. Key aspects such as place, time, and causes of <span class="hlt">death</span> as well as relation to the prison environment should be debated and incorporated into the definition. Systematic identification of violence within prison institutions is critical and efforts are needed to prevent unnecessary <span class="hlt">deaths</span> in prison and to protect vulnerable prisoners. PMID:24965436</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22459036','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22459036"><span id="translatedtitle">Effects of brain <span class="hlt">death</span> on organ quality and transplant outcome.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Floerchinger, Bernhard; Oberhuber, Rupert; Tullius, Stefan G</p> <p>2012-04-01</p> <p>The inferiority of organs from brain dead donors is reflected by impaired graft survival and patient outcome. Brain <span class="hlt">death</span> effects hemodynamic stability, hormonal changes, and neuroimmunologic effects and unleashes a cascade of inflammatory events. Despite considerable efforts in experimental and clinical research, most of the mechanisms <span class="hlt">linked</span> to brain <span class="hlt">death</span> are only appreciated on a descriptive level. This overview presents our current understanding of the pathophysiology and consequences of brain <span class="hlt">death</span> on organ injury and summarizes available therapeutic interventions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17102636','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17102636"><span id="translatedtitle">Intersection between the regulators of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid cohesion establishment and maintenance in budding yeast indicates a multi-step mechanism.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Noble, Daniel; Kenna, Margaret A; Dix, Melissa; Skibbens, Robert V; Unal, Elçin; Guacci, Vincent</p> <p>2006-11-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Sister</span> chromatid cohesion is established during S phase and maintained until anaphase. The cohesin complex (Mcd1p/Scc1p, Smc1p, Smc3p Irr1p/Scc3p in budding yeast) serves a structural role as it is required at all times when cohesion exists. Pds5p colocalizes temporally and spatially with cohesin on chromosomes but is thought to serve as a regulator of cohesion maintenance during mitosis. In contrast, Ctf7p/Eco1p is required during S phase for establishment but is not required during mitosis. Here we provide genetic and biochemical evidence that the pathways of cohesion establishment and maintenance are intimately <span class="hlt">linked</span>. Our results show that mutants in ctf7 and pds5 are synthetically lethal. Moreover, over-expression of either CTF7 or PDS5 exhibits reciprocal suppression of the other mutant's temperature sensitivity. The suppression by CTF7 is specific for pds5 mutants as CTF7 over-expression increases the temperature sensitivity of an mcd1 mutant but has no effect on smc1 or smc3 mutants. Three additional findings provide new insights into the process of cohesion establishment. First, over-expression of ctf7 alleles deficient in acetylase activity exhibit significantly reduced suppression of the pds5 mutant but exacerbated toxicity to the mcd1 mutant. Second, using chromosome spreads and chromatin immuno-precipitation, we find either cohesin complex or Pds5p chromosomal localization is altered in ctf7 mutants. Finally, biochemical analysis reveals that Ctf7p and Pds5p coimmunoprecipitate, which physically <span class="hlt">links</span> these regulators of cohesion establishment and maintenance. We propose a model whereby Ctf7p and Pds5p cooperate to facilitate efficient establishment by mediating changes in cohesin complex on chromosomes after its deposition. PMID:17102636</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4188144','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4188144"><span id="translatedtitle">Brain <span class="hlt">Death</span> and Islam</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Ziad-Miller, Amna; Elamin, Elamin M.</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>How one defines <span class="hlt">death</span> may vary. It is important for clinicians to recognize those aspects of a patient’s religious beliefs that may directly influence medical care and how such practices may interface with local laws governing the determination of <span class="hlt">death</span>. Debate continues about the validity and certainty of brain <span class="hlt">death</span> criteria within Islamic traditions. A search of PubMed, Scopus, EMBASE, Web of Science, PsycNet, Sociological Abstracts, DIALOGUE ProQuest, Lexus Nexus, Google, and applicable religious texts was conducted to address the question of whether brain <span class="hlt">death</span> is accepted as true <span class="hlt">death</span> among Islamic scholars and clinicians and to discuss how divergent opinions may affect clinical care. The results of the literature review inform this discussion. Brain <span class="hlt">death</span> has been acknowledged as representing true <span class="hlt">death</span> by many Muslim scholars and medical organizations, including the Islamic Fiqh Academies of the Organization of the Islamic Conference and the Muslim World League, the Islamic Medical Association of North America, and other faith-based medical organizations as well as legal rulings by multiple Islamic nations. However, consensus in the Muslim world is not unanimous, and a sizable minority accepts <span class="hlt">death</span> by cardiopulmonary criteria only. PMID:25287999</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Death&pg=5&id=EJ936886','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Death&pg=5&id=EJ936886"><span id="translatedtitle">Conflicting Thoughts about <span class="hlt">Death</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Harris, Paul L.</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Most research on children's conception of <span class="hlt">death</span> has probed their understanding of its biological aspects: its inevitability, irreversibility and terminal impact. Yet many adults subscribe to a religious conception implying that <span class="hlt">death</span> marks the beginning of a new life. Two recent empirical studies confirm that in the course of development, children…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Death&pg=6&id=EJ923799','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Death&pg=6&id=EJ923799"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Death</span> Acceptance through Ritual</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Reeves, Nancy C.</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>This article summarizes the author's original research, which sought to discover the elements necessary for using <span class="hlt">death</span>-related ritual as a psychotherapeutic technique for grieving people who experience their grief as "stuck," "unending," "maladaptive," and so on. A "<span class="hlt">death</span>-related ritual" is defined as a ceremony, directly involving at least 1…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8683504','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8683504"><span id="translatedtitle">Near-<span class="hlt">death</span> experiences.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Blackmore, S J</p> <p>1996-02-01</p> <p>Reactions to claims of near-<span class="hlt">death</span> experiences (NDE) range from the popular view that this must be evidence for life after <span class="hlt">death</span>, to outright rejection of the experiences as, at best, drug induced hallucinations or, at worse, pure invention. Twenty years, and much research, later, it is clear that neither extreme is correct.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Black+AND+Death&pg=4&id=EJ152542','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Black+AND+Death&pg=4&id=EJ152542"><span id="translatedtitle">The Psychology of <span class="hlt">Death</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Fields, B. Celestine</p> <p>1976-01-01</p> <p>Forty-eight black men and women living and/or attending school in the St. Louis and Washington, D.C. areas responded to questionnaires concerning feelings, attitudes, emotions, etc. towards <span class="hlt">death</span> and dying. It is concluded that blacks see <span class="hlt">death</span> as a very significant happening; and that although in some areas blacks have become Americanized in…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Thanatology&id=EJ692045','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Thanatology&id=EJ692045"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Death</span> Writ Large</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Kastenbaum, Robert</p> <p>2004-01-01</p> <p>Mainstream thanatology has devoted its efforts to improving the understanding, care, and social integration of people who are confronted with life-threatening illness or bereavement. This article suggests that it might now be time to expand the scope and mission to include large-scale <span class="hlt">death</span> and <span class="hlt">death</span> that occurs through complex and multi-domain…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1295660','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1295660"><span id="translatedtitle">Near-<span class="hlt">death</span> experiences.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Blackmore, S J</p> <p>1996-01-01</p> <p>Reactions to claims of near-<span class="hlt">death</span> experiences (NDE) range from the popular view that this must be evidence for life after <span class="hlt">death</span>, to outright rejection of the experiences as, at best, drug induced hallucinations or, at worse, pure invention. Twenty years, and much research, later, it is clear that neither extreme is correct. PMID:8683504</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1439384','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1439384"><span id="translatedtitle">Mozart's illnesses and <span class="hlt">death</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Davies, P J</p> <p>1983-01-01</p> <p>Throughout his life Mozart suffered frequent attacks of tonsillitis. In 1784 he developed post-streptococcal Schönlein-Henoch syndrome which caused chronic glomerular nephritis and chronic renal failure. His fatal illness was due to Schönlein-Henoch purpura, with <span class="hlt">death</span> from cerebral haemorrhage and bronchopneumonia. Venesection(s) may have contributed to his <span class="hlt">death</span>. PMID:6352940</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=death+AND+grips&id=EJ153201','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=death+AND+grips&id=EJ153201"><span id="translatedtitle">Reflections on <span class="hlt">Death</span> Education</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Riskey, Raymond J.</p> <p>1977-01-01</p> <p>The author comments on the need to discuss <span class="hlt">death</span> openly in the classroom, noting that engaging students with the idea of coming to grips with the fact of their own <span class="hlt">death</span> can prepare them for living, working, and loving more fully. (SH)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26595302','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26595302"><span id="translatedtitle">SUICIDE ON <span class="hlt">DEATH</span> ROW.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Tartaro, Christine; Lester, David</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>For the period 1976-2011, the suicide rate on <span class="hlt">death</span> rows in the United States was only weakly (and non-significantly) associated with the marriage, birth, divorce, and unemployment rates in the general population. Possible explanations for why social indicators in the larger society might be associated with the behavior of prisoners on <span class="hlt">death</span> row were discussed. PMID:26595302</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Fulton%2c+AND+Robert&id=EJ161921','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Fulton%2c+AND+Robert&id=EJ161921"><span id="translatedtitle">The Sociology of <span class="hlt">Death</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Fulton, Robert</p> <p>1977-01-01</p> <p>When we start to look at the issues associated with dying and <span class="hlt">death</span>, we must do so in terms of the broadest parameters imaginable. Presented at the Conference on <span class="hlt">Death</span> and Dying: Education, Counseling, and Care, December 1-3, 1976, Orlando, Florida. (Author)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/373873','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/373873"><span id="translatedtitle">Programmed cell <span class="hlt">death</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p></p> <p>1995-12-31</p> <p>The purpose of this conference to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on the role programmed cell <span class="hlt">death</span> plays in normal development and homeostasis of many organisms. This volume contains abstracts of papers in the following areas: invertebrate development; immunology/neurology; bcl-2 family; biochemistry; programmed cell <span class="hlt">death</span> in viruses; oncogenesis; vertebrate development; and diseases.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3612079','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3612079"><span id="translatedtitle">Natural <span class="hlt">death</span> while driving.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Oström, M; Eriksson, A</p> <p>1987-07-01</p> <p>Of sudden natural <span class="hlt">deaths</span> while driving, 126 occurred during 1980 through 1985 in the northern half of Sweden. The mean age of the 69 car driver victims was 59 years, considerably higher than that of traumatic car <span class="hlt">deaths</span>, and all but 2 were males. The mean age of 57 operators of other vehicles was 66 years, and of these, 6 were women. Seven car drivers were stricken during commercial employment. Most accidents occurred during daytime and the distribution of the weekdays was fairly even. Ischemic heart disease accounted for 112 <span class="hlt">deaths</span>, and other cardiovascular diseases for an additional 9 <span class="hlt">deaths</span>. Only 1/5 of the victims experienced previous symptoms of disease. Out of at least 31 other persons at risk in the car <span class="hlt">deaths</span>, only 2 passengers suffered minor injuries. The trauma in the deceased was in most cases minor in both car and other vehicle <span class="hlt">deaths</span>. Property damage was also minimal. At least 1/3 of the drivers were able to stop the car before becoming unconscious. In none of the car cases was alcohol detected in the blood, while alcohol was identified in at least 2 of the other vehicle victims. The findings here agree with previous studies that natural <span class="hlt">deaths</span> at the wheel are fairly uncommon, and that the risk for other persons is not significant. The value of adequate postmortem examinations of drivers dying in traffic is stressed--natural <span class="hlt">deaths</span> can otherwise be overlooked. PMID:3612079</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=obsession&pg=4&id=EJ729503','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=obsession&pg=4&id=EJ729503"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Death</span> Obsession in Palestinians</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Abdel-Khalek, Ahmed M.; Al-Arja, Nahida S.; Abdalla, Taysir</p> <p>2006-01-01</p> <p>The authors explored <span class="hlt">death</span> obsession level and correlates among a sample (N=601) of Palestinians living in the city of Beit Jala, the village of Al-Khader, and the Aida refugee camp in the Bethlehem area. They live in war conditions; the houses of half of them have been demolished. The <span class="hlt">Death</span> Obsession Scale (DOS) was administered. Its alpha…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27172728','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27172728"><span id="translatedtitle">[WILSON-KONOVALOV'S DISEASE IN TWO <span class="hlt">SISTERS</span>: DIFFERENCES IN THE CLINICAL PICTURE AND SUCCESSFUL THERAPY].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ignatova, T M; Solov'eva O V; Arion, E A; Balashova, M S; Rozina, T P</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Wilson-Konovalov's disease is a rare genetic pathology of copper metabolism that in the first place affects liver and CNS. Due to autosomal-recessive inheritance of this condition, it most frequently occurs in sibs. We report a case of Wilson-Konovalov's disease in two <span class="hlt">sisters</span> differing in its clinical course: severe abdominal variant in the younger <span class="hlt">sister</span> and largely neurologic form in the elder one. This observation demonstrates clinical variability of Wilson-Konovalov's disease, the possibility of its late clinical manifestation (at the age 45 years), the necessity of examination of all sibs of a proband regardless of age, and the possibility of radical improvement of prognosis even when the disease is diagnosed at the stage of decompensated liver cirrhosis.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16309949','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16309949"><span id="translatedtitle">Evaluation of genotoxic effects of Apitol (cymiazole hydrochloride) in vitro by measurement of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchange.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Stanimirovic, Zoran; Stevanovic, Jevrosima; Jovanovic, Slobodan; Andjelkovic, Marko</p> <p>2005-12-30</p> <p>Apitol, with cymiazole hydrochloride as the active ingredient, is used in bee-keeping against the ectoparasitic mite Varroa destructor. The preparation was evaluated for genotoxicity in cultured human peripheral blood lymphocytes. <span class="hlt">Sister</span> chromatid exchange, the mitotic index and the cell proliferation index were determined for three experimental concentrations of Apitol (0.001, 0.01 and 0.1 mg/ml). All concentrations significantly (p < 0.001) increased the mitotic index (MI = 7.35+/-0.18%, 8.31+/-0.20% and 12.33+/-0.25%, respectively), the proliferative index (PI = 1.83+/-0.01, 1.84+/-0.01 and 1.88+/-0.02, respectively) and the frequency of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchange (SCE = 8.19+/-1.81, 8.78+/-1.80 and 13.46+/-1.88, respectively), suggesting that cymiazole hydrochloride has genotoxic potential. PMID:16309949</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li class="active"><span>14</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_14 --> <div id="page_15" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li class="active"><span>15</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="281"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16309949','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16309949"><span id="translatedtitle">Evaluation of genotoxic effects of Apitol (cymiazole hydrochloride) in vitro by measurement of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchange.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Stanimirovic, Zoran; Stevanovic, Jevrosima; Jovanovic, Slobodan; Andjelkovic, Marko</p> <p>2005-12-30</p> <p>Apitol, with cymiazole hydrochloride as the active ingredient, is used in bee-keeping against the ectoparasitic mite Varroa destructor. The preparation was evaluated for genotoxicity in cultured human peripheral blood lymphocytes. <span class="hlt">Sister</span> chromatid exchange, the mitotic index and the cell proliferation index were determined for three experimental concentrations of Apitol (0.001, 0.01 and 0.1 mg/ml). All concentrations significantly (p < 0.001) increased the mitotic index (MI = 7.35+/-0.18%, 8.31+/-0.20% and 12.33+/-0.25%, respectively), the proliferative index (PI = 1.83+/-0.01, 1.84+/-0.01 and 1.88+/-0.02, respectively) and the frequency of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchange (SCE = 8.19+/-1.81, 8.78+/-1.80 and 13.46+/-1.88, respectively), suggesting that cymiazole hydrochloride has genotoxic potential.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10393269','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10393269"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Sister</span> chromatid exchange data fit with a mixture of Poisson distributions.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Byers, R H; Shenton, L R</p> <p>1999-06-30</p> <p>Bowman et al. [K.O. Bowman, Wesley Eddings, Marvin A. Kastenbaum, L. R. Shenton. <span class="hlt">Sister</span> chromatid exchange data and Gram-Charlier series, Mutat. Res., 403 (1998) 159-169.] have shown that a Gram-Charlier modification of a negative binomial distribution gives a reasonable fit to counts of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchange (SCE) data originally presented by Bender et al. [M.A. Bender, R.J. Preston, R. C. Leonard, B.E. Pyatt, P.C. Gooch, On the distribution of spontaneous SCE in human peripheral blood lymphocytes, Mutat. Res., 281 (1992) 227-232. ]. Here we show that a mixture of a generalized Poisson distributions also fits the data. Advantages of the generalized Poisson mixture include a simplified model involving only four parameters which fits the data more closely according to the chi-squared goodness-of-fit criterion. PMID:10393269</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2789710','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2789710"><span id="translatedtitle">Self-healing photo-neuropathy and cervical spinal arthrosis in four <span class="hlt">sisters</span> with brachioradial pruritus</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p></p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>The cause of brachioradial pruritus (a localized itching on the arms or shoulders) is controversial. The role of sun and cervical spine disease has been discussed. This is a report on four <span class="hlt">sisters</span> suffering from brachioradial pruritus recurring every summer. The <span class="hlt">sisters</span> spent much time outdoors and exposed themselves extensively to the sun. They also had occupations requiring heavy lifting. Cervical radiographs indicated arthrosis. The density of sensory nerve fibers in the skin biopsies from the itchy skin of the arms, visualized by antibodies against a pan-neuronal marker, protein gene product 9.5, was reduced compared with biopsies from the same skin region during the symptom-free period in the winter. This data exemplifies that brachioradial pruritus is a self healing photoneuropathy occurring in middle aged adults predisposed by cervical arthrosis. PMID:19919691</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6103588','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6103588"><span id="translatedtitle">Mutagenicity, <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchange inducibility and in vitro cell transforming ability of particulates from Athens air</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Athanasiou, K.; Arzimanoglou, I.; Piccoli, C.; Yamasaki, H.</p> <p>1987-09-01</p> <p>Airborne particulates were collected over a period of twelve months by the use of Hi-Vol samplers in the basin of Athens, Greece. N-Hexane extracts were tested in a battery of in vitro tests for their ability to induce mutation in bacteria as well as mutations, <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchange and morphological transformation in cultured mammalian cells. Positive results were found for mutagenicity with Salmonella strain TA98 in the Ames assay, for <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchange induction in CHO cells and for transformation in BALB/c 3T3 cells in culture. They also showed weak non-dose-related induction of ouabain resistance in BALB/c 3T3 cells. The contribution of oxidizing and nitrating agents found in the Athens atmosphere, together with sunlight UV irradiation in the formation of direct acting mutagens and potential carcinogens from ambient polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, is suggested.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3429432','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3429432"><span id="translatedtitle">The First Record of a Trans-Oceanic <span class="hlt">Sister</span>-Group Relationship between Obligate Vertebrate Troglobites</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Chakrabarty, Prosanta; Davis, Matthew P.; Sparks, John S.</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>We show using the most complete phylogeny of one of the most species-rich orders of vertebrates (Gobiiformes), and calibrations from the rich fossil record of teleost fishes, that the genus Typhleotris, endemic to subterranean karst habitats in southwestern Madagascar, is the <span class="hlt">sister</span> group to Milyeringa, endemic to similar subterranean systems in northwestern Australia. Both groups are eyeless, and our phylogenetic and biogeographic results show that these obligate cave fishes now found on opposite ends of the Indian Ocean (separated by nearly 7,000 km) are each others closest relatives and owe their origins to the break up of the southern supercontinent, Gondwana, at the end of the Cretaceous period. Trans-oceanic <span class="hlt">sister</span>-group relationships are otherwise unknown between blind, cave-adapted vertebrates and our results provide an extraordinary case of Gondwanan vicariance. PMID:22937155</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22937155','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22937155"><span id="translatedtitle">The first record of a trans-oceanic <span class="hlt">sister</span>-group relationship between obligate vertebrate troglobites.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Chakrabarty, Prosanta; Davis, Matthew P; Sparks, John S</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>We show using the most complete phylogeny of one of the most species-rich orders of vertebrates (Gobiiformes), and calibrations from the rich fossil record of teleost fishes, that the genus Typhleotris, endemic to subterranean karst habitats in southwestern Madagascar, is the <span class="hlt">sister</span> group to Milyeringa, endemic to similar subterranean systems in northwestern Australia. Both groups are eyeless, and our phylogenetic and biogeographic results show that these obligate cave fishes now found on opposite ends of the Indian Ocean (separated by nearly 7,000 km) are each others closest relatives and owe their origins to the break up of the southern supercontinent, Gondwana, at the end of the Cretaceous period. Trans-oceanic <span class="hlt">sister</span>-group relationships are otherwise unknown between blind, cave-adapted vertebrates and our results provide an extraordinary case of Gondwanan vicariance. PMID:22937155</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1375910','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1375910"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Death</span> in Denmark.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Evans, M</p> <p>1990-01-01</p> <p>Does it matter that the hearts of 'brainstem dead' patients may persist in beating spontaneously? Hostile reactions, to the Danish inclusion of cardiac criteria in the determination of <span class="hlt">death</span>, betray reductionist views of human life at the core of 'brainstem' conceptions of <span class="hlt">death</span>. Such views (whether centred on neurological function or on abstractions concerning 'personhood') supplant the richness of human life and <span class="hlt">death</span> with the poverty of essentialism: and mask the lethal nature of beating-heart organ retrieval. The affirmation of cardiac criteria for <span class="hlt">death</span> is not an alternative form of essentialism as some critics suppose, but part of an understanding of human life and <span class="hlt">death</span> which rejects essentialism altogether. The spontaneously persistent heartbeat does not constitute human life, but most certainly counts for it. PMID:2287015</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2287015','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2287015"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Death</span> in Denmark.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Evans, M</p> <p>1990-12-01</p> <p>Does it matter that the hearts of 'brainstem dead' patients may persist in beating spontaneously? Hostile reactions, to the Danish inclusion of cardiac criteria in the determination of <span class="hlt">death</span>, betray reductionist views of human life at the core of 'brainstem' conceptions of <span class="hlt">death</span>. Such views (whether centred on neurological function or on abstractions concerning 'personhood') supplant the richness of human life and <span class="hlt">death</span> with the poverty of essentialism: and mask the lethal nature of beating-heart organ retrieval. The affirmation of cardiac criteria for <span class="hlt">death</span> is not an alternative form of essentialism as some critics suppose, but part of an understanding of human life and <span class="hlt">death</span> which rejects essentialism altogether. The spontaneously persistent heartbeat does not constitute human life, but most certainly counts for it.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Moraines&pg=2&id=EJ124667','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Moraines&pg=2&id=EJ124667"><span id="translatedtitle">Community <span class="hlt">Links</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Nelson, Mary</p> <p>1975-01-01</p> <p>At Moraine Valley Community College (Illinois), a chain of events, programs, activities, and services has <span class="hlt">linked</span> the college and community in such areas as fine arts, ethnic groups, public services, community action, community service, and community education. (Author/NHM)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1048657','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1048657"><span id="translatedtitle">Retinitis pigmentosa, metaphyseal chondrodysplasia, and brachydactyly: an affected brother and <span class="hlt">sister</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Phillips, C I; Wynne-Davies, R; Stokoe, N L; Newton, M</p> <p>1981-01-01</p> <p>A brother and <span class="hlt">sister</span>, children of normal parents are described. They had retinitis pigmentosa, causing near-blindness as a result of very narrow fields of vision, associated with metaphyseal chondrodysplasia and marked shortening of the metacarpals and terminal phalanges. Autosomal recessive inheritance is suggested with a common biochemical cause for all these defects. This apparently new association of retinitis pigmentosa with a systemic bone dysplasia emphasises that this not uncommon clinical diagnosis has a variety of different possible causes. Images PMID:7252997</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6885703','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6885703"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Sister</span> chromatid exchange analysis to monitor genotoxic chemicals. (Latest citations from Pollution Abstracts). Published Search</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Not Available</p> <p>1993-03-01</p> <p>The bibliography contains citations concerning the use of the <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchange (SCE) analysis for toxicological studies. SCE analysis are very sensitive measures of genotoxic damage to chromosomes. SCE toxicological studies analyzing ionizing radiation, chromium compounds, styrene, paint thinner, mercury, cigarette smoke, coal dust, fuel oil, insecticides, ethylene oxide, diesel exhaust, and polychlorinated biphenyls are discussed. SCE studies using both human and animal tissue cultures are described. (Contains a minimum of 191 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/4058437','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/4058437"><span id="translatedtitle">Induction of <span class="hlt">sister</span>-chromatid exchanges in Chinese hamster ovary cells by the biotic ketoaldehyde methylglyoxal.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Faggin, P; Bassi, A M; Finollo, R; Brambilla, G</p> <p>1985-11-01</p> <p>The number of <span class="hlt">sister</span>-chromatid exchanges (SCEs) per metaphase was determined in Chinese hamster ovary cells after 16 h exposure to methylglyoxal (MG) concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 0.75 mM. MG produced an increase of SCE frequency that proved to be dose-dependent, and to reach a maximum of 2 X baseline at the highest nontoxic concentration (0.5 mM).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17545637','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17545637"><span id="translatedtitle">Short telomere length and breast cancer risk: a study in <span class="hlt">sister</span> sets.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Shen, Jing; Terry, Mary Beth; Gurvich, Irina; Liao, Yuyan; Senie, Ruby T; Santella, Regina M</p> <p>2007-06-01</p> <p>Telomeres consist of a tandem repeats of the sequence TTAGGG at the ends of chromosomes and play a key role in the maintenance of chromosomal stability. Previous studies indicated that short telomeres are associated with increased risk for human bladder, head and neck, lung, and renal cell cancer. We investigated the association between white blood cell telomere length and breast cancer risk among 268 family sets (287 breast cancer cases and 350 <span class="hlt">sister</span> controls). Telomere length was assessed by quantitative PCR. The mean telomere length was shorter in cases (mean, 0.70; range, 0.03-1.95) than in unaffected control <span class="hlt">sisters</span> (mean, 0.74; range, 0.03-2.29), but no significant difference was observed (P = 0.11). When subjects were categorized according to the median telomere length in controls (0.70), affected <span class="hlt">sisters</span> had shorter telomeres compared with unaffected <span class="hlt">sisters</span> after adjusting for age at blood donation and smoking status [odds ratio (OR), 1.3; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 0.9-1.8], but the association was not statistically significant. The association by quartile of telomere length (Q4 shortest versus Q1 longest) also supported an increase in risk from shorter telomere length, although the association was not statistically significant (OR, 1.6; 95% CI, 0.9-2.7). This association was more pronounced among premenopausal women (OR, 2.1; 95% CI, 0.8-5.5) than postmenopausal women (OR, 1.3; 95% CI, 0.5-3.6 for Q4 versus Q1). If these associations are replicated in larger studies, they provide modest epidemiologic evidence that shortened telomere length may be associated with breast cancer risk.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2670183','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2670183"><span id="translatedtitle">Characterization of the components of the putative mammalian <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid cohesion complex</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Darwiche, N.; Freeman, L.A.; Strunnikov, A.</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>Establishing and maintaining proper <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid cohesion throughout the cell cycle are essential for maintaining genome integrity. To understand how <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid cohesion occurs in mammals, we have cloned and characterized mouse orthologs of proteins known to be involved in <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid cohesion in other organisms. The cDNAs for the mouse orthologs of SMC1S.c. and SMC3S.c., mSMCB and mSMCD respectively, were cloned and the corresponding transcripts and proteins were characterized. mSMCB and mSMCD are transcribed at similar levels in adult mouse tissues except in testis, which has an excess of mSMCD transcripts. The mSMCB and mSMCD proteins, as well as the PW29 protein, a mouse homolog of Mcd1pS.c./Rad21S.p., form a complex similar to cohesin in X. laevis. mSMCB, mSMCD and PW29 protein levels show no significant cell-cycle dependence. The bulk of the mSMCB, mSMCD and PW29 proteins undergo redistribution from the chromosome vicinity to the cytoplasm during prometaphase and back to the chromatin in telophase. This pattern of intracellular localization suggests a complex role for this group of SMC proteins in chromosome dynamics. The PW29 protein and PCNA, which have both been implicated in <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid cohesion, do not colocalize, indicating that these proteins may not function in the same cohesion pathway. Overexpression of a PW29-GFP fusion protein in mouse fibroblasts leads to inhibition of proliferation, implicating this protein and its complex with SMC proteins in the control of mitotic cycle progression. PMID:10375619</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010dmak.book..355D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010dmak.book..355D"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Link</span> Analysis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Donoho, Steve</p> <p></p> <p><span class="hlt">Link</span> analysis is a collection of techniques that operate on data that can be represented as nodes and <span class="hlt">links</span>. This chapter surveys a variety of techniques including subgraph matching, finding cliques and K-plexes, maximizing spread of influence, visualization, finding hubs and authorities, and combining with traditional techniques (classification, clustering, etc). It also surveys applications including social network analysis, viral marketing, Internet search, fraud detection, and crime prevention.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11888707','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11888707"><span id="translatedtitle">The association between frequencies of mitomycin C-induced <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchange and cancer risk in arseniasis.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Liou, Saou-Hsing; Chen, Yeong-Hwang; Loh, Ching-Hui; Yang, Tsan; Wu, Trong-Neng; Chen, Chien-Jen; Hsieh, Ling-Ling</p> <p>2002-03-28</p> <p>In order to examine whether biomarkers of cytogenetic damage and susceptibility, such as spontaneous and mitomycin C-induced <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchange (SCE) can predict cancer development, a nested case-control study was performed in a blackfoot endemic area with known high cancer risk. A cohort of 686 residents was recruited from three villages in the arseniasis area. Personal characteristics were collected and venous blood was drawn for lymphocyte culture and stored in a refrigerator. The vital status and cancer development was followed using the National <span class="hlt">Death</span> Registry, Cancer Registry, and Blackfoot Disease Registry. The follow up period was from August 1991 to July 1997. During this 6-year-period, 55 residents developed various types of cancer. Blood culture samples from 23 of these subjects were unsuitable for spontaneous SCE experiments and 45 of these subjects were unsuitable for mitomycin C-induced SCE experiments due to improper storage. Finally, a total of 32 cancer cases had cytogenetic samples that could be analyzed. About 32 control subjects were selected from those who did not develop cancer in the study period and these subjects were matched to cases by sex, age, smoking habits, and residential area. The results showed that there was no significant difference in the frequencies of spontaneous and mitomycin C-induced SCE between the case and control groups. There was also no significant difference in the net difference of spontaneous and mitomycin C-induced SCE between the case and control groups. These results suggest that SCEs, either spontaneous or mitomycin C-induced, might not be good markers to predict cancer risk.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/871313','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/871313"><span id="translatedtitle">The relationship between <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchanges and chromosome aberrations in Bloom's syndrome.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Shiraishi, Y; Sandberg, A A</p> <p>1977-01-01</p> <p>The distribution of the break points of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchanges (SCE) was compared with that of chromosome aberrations in Bloom's syndrome by using differential <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid staining and banding techniques. A comparison was made of the distribution in chromosomes 1, 2, and 3, since the exact identification of other chromosomes is difficult with the differential <span class="hlt">sister</span>-chromatid staining technique. It was shown that SCE and chromosome breaks do not necessarily correlate as to location. Some chromosome break points, e.g., 1q21, 1p36, 2q31, 3q12, and 3p13, were common with those of SCE, whereas others (at 1p13, 2p11, 2q11, and 3q11) showed little or no SCE. SCE breaks were not observed in the centromeric regions. In addition, the SCE frequency was examined in Bloom's syndrome cells with and without chromosome aberrations, and no significant differences of SCE frequency were observed between cells with chromatid- or chromosome-type of aberrations and those with normal complements. Banding analyses indicated a nonrandom distribution of chromosome breaks in the lymphocytes and marrow cells of the Bloom's syndrome patient.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24162982','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24162982"><span id="translatedtitle">A historical overview of bromo-substituted DNA and <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid differentiation.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Mezzanotte, Roberto; Nieddu, Mariella</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>The thymidine analogue 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) has been widely used to make <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid differentiation (SCD) evident in metaphase chromosomes of cells grown for two cycles in BrdU and, thus, containing varying amounts of the thymidine analogue. A direct consequence was the possibility of making <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchange (SCE) evident without using autoradiographic procedures. The latter phenomenon was first discovered in 1953, and its frequency is considered a reliable marker of pathological cell situations, as well as an indicator of mutagenic compounds. Several experimental procedures were found which produced SCD, such as the use of fluorochromes like 33258 Hoechst or acridine orange, whose observation under fluorescence microscopy was directly recorded by photos or stained with Giemsa to make chromosome preparations permanent. Other treatments followed by Giemsa staining required the use of saline hot solutions, acid solutions, nuclease attack and specific monoclonal antibodies. Basically two molecular mechanisms were invoked to explain the different affinity of Giemsa stain for differential BrdU-substituted chromatid DNA. The first implied debromination of chromatid DNA, whose occurrence would be greater in chromatids containing an amount of BrdU greater than that present in <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids. The second mechanism, although not denying the importance of DNA debromination, postulated that chromatin structural organization, in terms of DNA-protein and/or protein-protein DNA interaction, is responsible for SCD production.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23590349','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23590349"><span id="translatedtitle">Brother-<span class="hlt">sister</span> incest: data from anonymous computer-assisted self interviews.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Stroebel, Sandra S; O'Keefe, Stephen L; Beard, Keith W; Kuo, Shih-Ya; Swindell, Samuel; Stroupe, Walter</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Retrospective data were entered anonymously by 1,521 adult women using computer-assisted self interview. Forty were classified as victims of brother-<span class="hlt">sister</span> incest, 19 were classified as victims of father-daughter incest, and 232 were classified as victims of sexual abuse by an adult other than their father before reaching 18 years of age. The other 1,230 served as controls. The victims of brother-<span class="hlt">sister</span> incest had significantly more problematic outcomes than controls on many measures (e.g., more likely than the controls to endorse feeling like damaged goods, thinking that they had suffered psychological injury, and having undergone psychological treatment for childhood sexual abuse). However, victims of brother-<span class="hlt">sister</span> incest also had significantly less problematic outcomes than victims of father-daughter incest on some measures (e.g., significantly less likely than the father-daughter incest victims to endorse feeling like damaged goods, thinking that they had suffered psychological injury, and having undergone psychological treatment for childhood sexual abuse).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4766734','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4766734"><span id="translatedtitle">An Smc3 Acetylation Cycle Is Essential for Establishment of <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Chromatid Cohesion</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Beckouët, Frederic; Hu, Bin; Roig, Maurici B.; Sutani, Takashi; Komata, Makiko; Uluocak, Pelin; Katis, Vittorio L.; Shirahige, Katsuhiko; Nasmyth, Kim</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>SUMMARY <span class="hlt">Sister</span> chromatid cohesion is thought to involve entrapment of <span class="hlt">sister</span> DNAs by a tripartite ring composed of the cohesin subunits Smc1, Smc3, and Scc1. Establishment of cohesion during S phase depends on acetylation of Smc3’s nucleotide-binding domain (NBD) by the Eco1 acetyl transferase. It is destroyed at the onset of anaphase due to Scc1 cleavage by separase. In yeast, Smc3 acetylation is reversed at anaphase by the Hos1 deacetylase as a consequence of Scc1 cleavage. Smc3 molecules that remain acetylated after mitosis due to Hos1 inactivation cannot generate cohesion during the subsequent S phase, implying that cohesion establishment depends on de novo acetylation during DNA replication. By inducing Smc3 deacetylation in postreplicative cells due to Hos1 overexpression, we provide evidence that Smc3 acetylation contributes to the maintenance of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid cohesion. A cycle of Smc3 NBD acetylation is therefore an essential aspect of the chromosome cycle in eukaryotic cells. PMID:20832721</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li class="active"><span>15</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_15 --> <div id="page_16" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li class="active"><span>16</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="301"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4755749','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4755749"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Sister</span> kinetochore splitting and precocious disintegration of bivalents could explain the maternal age effect</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Zielinska, Agata P; Holubcova, Zuzana; Blayney, Martyn; Elder, Kay; Schuh, Melina</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Aneuploidy in human eggs is the leading cause of pregnancy loss and Down’s syndrome. Aneuploid eggs result from chromosome segregation errors when an egg develops from a progenitor cell, called an oocyte. The mechanisms that lead to an increase in aneuploidy with advanced maternal age are largely unclear. Here, we show that many <span class="hlt">sister</span> kinetochores in human oocytes are separated and do not behave as a single functional unit during the first meiotic division. Having separated <span class="hlt">sister</span> kinetochores allowed bivalents to rotate by 90 degrees on the spindle and increased the risk of merotelic kinetochore-microtubule attachments. Advanced maternal age led to an increase in <span class="hlt">sister</span> kinetochore separation, rotated bivalents and merotelic attachments. Chromosome arm cohesion was weakened, and the fraction of bivalents that precociously dissociated into univalents was increased. Together, our data reveal multiple age-related changes in chromosome architecture that could explain why oocyte aneuploidy increases with advanced maternal age. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11389.001 PMID:26670547</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17483211','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17483211"><span id="translatedtitle">Attitude toward <span class="hlt">death</span>: does it influence dental fear?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Fábián, Gábor; Müller, Orsolya; Kovács, Szilvia; Nguyen, Minh Tú; Fábián, Tibor Károly; Csermely, Péter; Fejérdy, Pál</p> <p>2007-10-01</p> <p>The possible influence of fear of <span class="hlt">death</span> and attitude toward <span class="hlt">death</span> were studied related to dental anxiety in Hungarian elementary and secondary school subjects (n = 277; 114 males, 163 females; age between 8 and 18 years). Dental fear and anxiety scores were DAS: 10.8 +/- 3.6; DFS: 40.6 +/- 15.6; STAI-S: 38.0 +/- 11.0; STAI-T: 40.3 +/- 10.0. Lester's Attitude Toward <span class="hlt">Death</span> Scale scores were 6.3 +/- 1.3. Girls scored higher on DAS, STAI-S, and STAI-T scales (P < or = 0.05). Age influenced STAI-S, STAI-T, and Lester's Scale scores (P < or = 0.05). Lester's Scale scores influenced the expectations of the subjects about the dental fear of their surrounding people (parents, brother, <span class="hlt">sister</span>, friends) (P < or = 0.05). A percentage of 7.22 of the subjects indicated a rather strong connection between dental fear and fear of <span class="hlt">death</span>. These subjects had significantly higher dental fear and anxiety scores as compared to others (P < or = 0.01). <span class="hlt">Death</span>-related content was found in 4.3% of drawings and in 10.5% of free associations (couplings) related to teeth (in 12.6% either in drawings or in couplings). The appearance of <span class="hlt">death</span>-related content was higher with higher age, and higher expected dental fear of surrounding people (P < or = 0.01). Our data indicate a detectable influence of fear of <span class="hlt">death</span> on dental fear, especially in subjects with higher dental fear scores.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=fear+AND+death&pg=6&id=EJ480744','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=fear+AND+death&pg=6&id=EJ480744"><span id="translatedtitle">Effects of <span class="hlt">Death</span> Education on Conscious and Unconscious <span class="hlt">Death</span> Anxiety.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Hayslip, Bert, Jr.; And Others</p> <p>1994-01-01</p> <p>Adults (n=162) varying in extent of participation in didactic or experiential forms of <span class="hlt">death</span> education versus those who had no such exposure to <span class="hlt">death</span> and dying-related issues completed measures of conscious and unconscious <span class="hlt">death</span> fears. Findings suggest that didactic <span class="hlt">death</span> education was effective in altering <span class="hlt">death</span> anxiety, although effects were…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14969198','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14969198"><span id="translatedtitle">[<span class="hlt">Death</span> experience. Antidote against fear to <span class="hlt">death</span>].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Fericgla, Josep M</p> <p>2003-12-01</p> <p>Fortunately, anthropology has brought to our modern society a higher interest for mankind's cultural dimension and the values which each people employ in order to make sense out of the changes which occur during our lives. It is this cultural dimension which permits men to develop our innate capacities and to become humans. However, in order to achieve this, we need experiences which are codified and interpreted by a values system which each individual has made his/her own. Some of these experiences take place inside cultural mores constructed expressly so that they are useful for one's lifestyle; these are known as rites. A rite, therefore, is an experience which leaves an impression, which implies social and biographical changes, which provides meaning to human beings' universal interests. Nonetheless, since rites usually are organized by diverse religions, it is convenient, as we enter the 21st Century, to speak about Experiences which Activate Structures as means to approach, to come to grasp with, some of the great causes of anxiety in humans: <span class="hlt">death</span> and insanity. These Experiences which Activate Structures allow us to subjectively experiment, to conquer our fears and to be more conscious of our here and our now. Workshops on the Living Integration of One's Own <span class="hlt">Death</span> are included in this context as an appropriate forum through which to approach <span class="hlt">death</span> with knowledge and serenity, inducing changes in our own lifestyle as well and helping us to overcome situations of existential blockage.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2279660','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2279660"><span id="translatedtitle">Unusual sudden <span class="hlt">death</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Warren, J. V.</p> <p>1985-01-01</p> <p>In contrast to usual sudden <span class="hlt">death</span> seen in the course of coronary artery disease, individuals dying suddenly from other causes form a complex array of situations. In some the causes are readily identifiable. No simple pattern is available to identify the potential candidate, but on review of the many causes some moves by the physician may be helpful. For example, a more complete physical evaluation of young individuals participating in competitive athletics is in order. This is particularly true if the athlete reports an episode of unexplained syncope. This may well be the warning of a propensity towards sudden <span class="hlt">death</span> under physical and emotional stress. Knowledge of the specific problems in underwater swimming and diving, in high altitude exposure and in various circumstances such as certain weight reduction diets and industrial exposures may lead to control of some types of unusual sudden <span class="hlt">death</span>. Clearly, more studies are needed to give answers in so called crib <span class="hlt">death</span>. As the incidence of usual sudden <span class="hlt">death</span> falls, these unusual forms of sudden <span class="hlt">death</span> will represent a more important fraction of sudden <span class="hlt">death</span> in general. PMID:6537674</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4302726','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4302726"><span id="translatedtitle">A Sibling <span class="hlt">Death</span> in the Family: Common and Consequential</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Fletcher, Jason; Mailick, Marsha; Song, Jieun</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Although a large literature analyzes the determinants of child mortality and suggests policy and medical interventions aimed at its reduction, there is little existing analysis illuminating the consequences of child mortality for other family members. In particular, there is little evidence exploring the consequences of experiencing the <span class="hlt">death</span> of a sibling on one’s own development and transition to adulthood. This article examines the prevalence and consequences of experiencing a sibling <span class="hlt">death</span> during one’s childhood using two U.S. data sets. We show that even in a rich developed country, these experiences are quite common, affecting between 5 % and 8 % of the children with one or more siblings in our two data sets. We then show that these experiences are associated with important reductions in years of schooling as well as a broad range of adult socioeconomic outcomes. Our findings also suggest that <span class="hlt">sisters</span> are far more affected than brothers and that the cause of <span class="hlt">death</span> is an important factor in sibling effects. Overall, our findings point to important previously unexamined consequences of child mortality, adding to the societal costs associated with childhood mortality as well as suggesting additional benefits from policy and medical innovations aimed at curbing both such <span class="hlt">deaths</span> and subsequent effects on family members. PMID:23073753</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1717785','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1717785"><span id="translatedtitle">Unnatural sudden infant <span class="hlt">death</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Meadow, R.</p> <p>1999-01-01</p> <p>AIM—To identify features to help paediatricians differentiate between natural and unnatural infant <span class="hlt">deaths</span>.
METHOD—Clinical features of 81 children judged by criminal and family courts to have been killed by their parents were studied. Health and social service records, court documents, and records from meetings with parents, relatives, and social workers were studied.
RESULTS—Initially, 42 children had been certified as dying from sudden infant <span class="hlt">death</span> syndrome (SIDS), and 29 were given another cause of natural <span class="hlt">death</span>. In 24 families, more than one child died; 58died before the age of 6 months and most died in the afternoon or evening. Seventy per cent had experienced unexplained illnesses; over half were admitted to hospital within the previous month, and 15 had been discharged within 24 hours of <span class="hlt">death</span>. The mother, father, or both were responsible for <span class="hlt">death</span> in 43, five, and two families, respectively. Most homes were disadvantaged—no regular income, receiving income support—and mothers smoked. Half the perpetrators had a history of somatising or factitious disorder. <span class="hlt">Death</span> was usually by smothering and 43% of children had bruises, petechiae, or blood on the face.
CONCLUSIONS—Although certain features are indicative of unnatural infant <span class="hlt">death</span>, some are also associated with SIDS. Despite the recent reduction in numbers of infants dying suddenly, inadequacies in the assessment of their <span class="hlt">deaths</span> exist. Until a thorough postmortem examination is combined with evaluation of the history and circumstances of <span class="hlt">death</span> by an experienced paediatrician, most cases of covert fatal abuse will go undetected. The term SIDS requires revision or abandonment.

 PMID:10325752</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4262626','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4262626"><span id="translatedtitle">Eaten to <span class="hlt">death</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Nelson, Charles; Baehrecke, Eric H.</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Macro-autophagy (hereafter referred to as autophagy) delivers cytoplasmic material to the lysosome for degradation, and has been implicated in many cellular processes, including stress, infection, survival, and <span class="hlt">death</span>. While the regulation and role that autophagy plays in stress, infection, and survival is apparent, the regulation of and role that autophagy has during cell <span class="hlt">death</span> remains relatively unclear. In this review, we highlight what is known about the role that autophagy can play during physiological cell <span class="hlt">death</span>, and discuss the implications of better understanding cellular destruction that involves autophagy. PMID:25323556</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8220049','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8220049"><span id="translatedtitle">[Brain <span class="hlt">death</span> and thanatology].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Zwierlein, E</p> <p>1993-09-01</p> <p>New technologies in medicine dramatically open a twilight-zone of ignorance between life and <span class="hlt">death</span>. The argument shows that the present definition of brain <span class="hlt">death</span> as the <span class="hlt">death</span> of a human person is a convention with a specific philosophy behind. You will meet the problem with more accuracy when referring to an ethics of intransparence that allows an individual decision with respect to certain qualified conditions. Only from this starting-point the informed ex ante consent for an organ donation seems to become the only conclusive but at the same time justified decision.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15129691','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15129691"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Death</span> writ large.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kastenbaum, Robert</p> <p>2004-05-01</p> <p>Mainstream thanatology has devoted its efforts to improving the understanding, care, and social integration of people who are confronted with life-threatening illness or bereavement. This article suggests that it might now be time to expand the scope and mission to include large-scale <span class="hlt">death</span> and <span class="hlt">death</span> that occurs through complex and multi-domain processes. Obstacles to developing a systematic macrothanatology are identified. The 9-11-01 terrorist attacks on America are discussed as an example of mass <span class="hlt">death</span> with complex correlates and consequences. Other examples are taken from the realms of war, disease, disaster, and extinction.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFM.V43A2548M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFM.V43A2548M"><span id="translatedtitle">U-series Isotope Constraints on Rhyolite Generation at South <span class="hlt">Sister</span> and Newberry Volcanoes, Central Oregon</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Mitchell, E. C.; Asmerom, Y.</p> <p>2011-12-01</p> <p>The central Oregon Cascades are unique due to an abundance of mafic post-glacial volcanism found nowhere else within the arc, as well as an exceptional volume of rhyolite, which is typically restricted to rear-arc centers in the rest of the Cascades. Within central Oregon, South <span class="hlt">Sister</span> and Newberry, a large stratovolcano and major rear-arc center respectively, have both erupted bimodal basalt-rhyolite suites during the Holocene, with compositional gaps at ˜ 56-72 wt.% SiO2. The mafic lavas are generally accepted to be mantle-derived melts, variously modified by AFC processes. However, the origin of the felsic rocks is more contentious. Numerous studies have focused on South <span class="hlt">Sister</span>, and have invoked a variety of processes to explain the bimodal suite there, including assimilation-fractional crystallization from a mafic parent, and partial to complete melting of a variety of crustal lithologies ranging from mafic amphibolite to granite. The Holocene obsidian flows of Newberry volcano have received less attention, although they have also been interpreted as discrete, small volume melts of a granitic source. In order to place further constraints on the processes involved in their genesis, we have obtained 238U-230Th-226Ra, 87Sr/86Sr, and 143Nd/144Nd whole rock data for three South <span class="hlt">Sister</span> rhyolites and two Newberry obsidians. The South <span class="hlt">Sister</span> rhyolites have homogeneous 87Sr/86Sr and 143Nd/144Nd ratios of ˜ 0.7036 and 0.51286 respectively. In contrast, the two Newberry obsidians have distinct 87Sr/86Sr (0.70366 vs. 0.70385) and 143Nd/144Nd (0.512879 vs. 0.512848) ratios. These values range from the same as, to slightly more radiogenic than, corresponding ratios measured in mafic lavas from the same region. The South <span class="hlt">Sister</span> rhyolites are in (230Th/238U) secular equilibrium, while the Newberry obsidians have small 230Th excesses of 4 and 7% at (230Th/232Th) of 1.20. All samples are in (226Ra/230Th) secular equilibrium implying > ˜ 8000 years since the pair were last</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Black+AND+Death&pg=4&id=EJ221183','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Black+AND+Death&pg=4&id=EJ221183"><span id="translatedtitle">Children's <span class="hlt">Death</span> Concepts and Ethnicity.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Wass, Hannelore; Towry, Betty J.</p> <p>1980-01-01</p> <p>Relationships between <span class="hlt">death</span> concepts of Black and White children and their racial status were examined. Lower-middle-class elementary children completed a four-item questionnaire on <span class="hlt">death</span>. Most children defined <span class="hlt">death</span> as the end of living and listed physical causes as the explanation of <span class="hlt">death</span>. In general, children's <span class="hlt">death</span> concepts were similar.…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19079286','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19079286"><span id="translatedtitle">Autophagy and cell <span class="hlt">death</span> in model organisms.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kourtis, N; Tavernarakis, N</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>Autophagy evolved in unicellular eukaryotes as a means for surviving nutrient stress. During the course of evolution, as multicellular organisms developed specialized cell types and complex intracellular signalling networks, autophagy has been summoned to serve additional cellular functions. Numerous recent studies indicate that apart from its pro-survival role under nutrient limitation, autophagy also participates in cell <span class="hlt">death</span>. However, the precise role of this catabolic process in dying cells is not fully understood. Although in certain situations autophagy has a protective function, in other types of cell <span class="hlt">death</span> it actually contributes to cellular destruction. Simple model organisms ranging from the unicellular Saccharomyces cerevisiae to the soil amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum and the metazoans Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster provide clearly defined cell <span class="hlt">death</span> paradigms that can be used to dissect the involvement of autophagy in cell <span class="hlt">death</span>, at the molecular level. In this review, we survey current research in simple organisms, <span class="hlt">linking</span> autophagy to cell <span class="hlt">death</span> and discuss the complex interplay between autophagy, cell survival and cell <span class="hlt">death</span>. PMID:19079286</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6596678','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6596678"><span id="translatedtitle">Manifestations of X-<span class="hlt">linked</span> congenital stationary night blindness in three daughters of an affected male: Demonstration of homozygosity</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Bech-Hansen, N.T. Univ. of Calgary, Alberta ); Pearce, W.G. )</p> <p>1993-01-01</p> <p>X-<span class="hlt">linked</span> congenital stationary night blindness (CSNB1) is a hereditary retinal disorder in which clinical features in affected males usually include myopia, nystagmus, and impaired visual acuity. Electroretinography demonstrates a marked reduction in b-wave amplitude. In the study of a large Mennonite family with CSNB1, three of five <span class="hlt">sisters</span> in one sibship were found to have manifestations of CSNB1. All the sons of these three <span class="hlt">sisters</span> were affected. Each of the two nonmanifesting <span class="hlt">sisters</span> had at least one unaffected son. Analysis of Xp markers in the region Xp21.1-Xp11.22 showed that the two <span class="hlt">sisters</span> who were unaffected had inherited the same maternal X chromosome (i.e., M2). Two of the daughters who manifested with CSNB had inherited the other maternal X chromosome (M1). The third manifesting <span class="hlt">sister</span> inherited a recombinant X chromosome with a crossover between TIMP and DXS255, which suggests that the CSNB1 locus lies proximal to TIMP. One of the affected daughters' sons had inherited the maternal M1 X chromosome, a finding consistent with that chromosome carrying a mutant CSNB gene; the other affected sons inherited the grandfather's X chromosome (i.e., P). Molecular analysis of DNA from three <span class="hlt">sisters</span> with manifestations of CSNB is consistent with their being homozygous at the CSNB1 locus and with their mother being a carrier of CSNB1. 23 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=mesa&pg=6&id=EJ566437','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=mesa&pg=6&id=EJ566437"><span id="translatedtitle">Powerful <span class="hlt">Sisters</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Chenoweth, Karin; Stephens, Angela; Evelyn, Jamilah</p> <p>1998-01-01</p> <p>Five black women presiding over college campuses with over 20,000 students are profiled: Del M. Anderson (City College of San Francisco, CA); Constance M. Carroll (San Diego Mesa College, CA); Ruth Burgos-Sasscer (Houston Community College System, TX); Jerry Sue Thornton (Cuyahoga Community College, OH); and Belle S. Wheelan (Northern Virginia…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1470669','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1470669"><span id="translatedtitle">Chl1p, a DNA helicase-like protein in budding yeast, functions in <span class="hlt">sister</span>-chromatid cohesion.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Skibbens, Robert V</p> <p>2004-01-01</p> <p>From the time of DNA replication until anaphase onset, <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids remain tightly paired along their length. Ctf7p/Eco1p is essential to establish <span class="hlt">sister</span>-chromatid pairing during S-phase and associates with DNA replication components. DNA helicases precede the DNA replication fork and thus will first encounter chromatin sites destined for cohesion. In this study, I provide the first evidence that a DNA helicase is required for proper <span class="hlt">sister</span>-chromatid cohesion. Characterizations of chl1 mutant cells reveal that CHL1 interacts genetically with both CTF7/ECO1 and CTF18/CHL12, two genes that function in <span class="hlt">sister</span>-chromatid cohesion. Consistent with genetic interactions, Chl1p physically associates with Ctf7p/Eco1p both in vivo and in vitro. Finally, a functional assay reveals that Chl1p is critical for <span class="hlt">sister</span>-chromatid cohesion. Within the budding yeast genome, Chl1p exhibits the highest degree of sequence similarity to human CHL1 isoforms and BACH1. Previous studies revealed that human CHLR1 exhibits DNA helicase-like activities and that BACH1 is a helicase-like protein that associates with the tumor suppressor BRCA1 to maintain genome integrity. Our findings document a novel role for Chl1p in <span class="hlt">sister</span>-chromatid cohesion and provide new insights into the possible mechanisms through which DNA helicases may contribute to cancer progression when mutated. PMID:15020404</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title20-vol3/pdf/CFR-2011-title20-vol3-sec725-222.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title20-vol3/pdf/CFR-2011-title20-vol3-sec725-222.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">20 CFR 725.222 - Conditions of entitlement; parent, brother, or <span class="hlt">sister</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-04-01</p> <p>... disabled due to pneumoconiosis at the time of <span class="hlt">death</span> or to have died due to pneumoconiosis. A surviving... establish that the miner's <span class="hlt">death</span> was due to pneumoconiosis in order to establish entitlement to...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title20-vol4/pdf/CFR-2013-title20-vol4-sec725-222.pdf','CFR2013'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title20-vol4/pdf/CFR-2013-title20-vol4-sec725-222.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">20 CFR 725.222 - Conditions of entitlement; parent, brother, or <span class="hlt">sister</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-04-01</p> <p>... disabled due to pneumoconiosis at the time of <span class="hlt">death</span> or to have died due to pneumoconiosis. A surviving... establish that the miner's <span class="hlt">death</span> was due to pneumoconiosis in order to establish entitlement to...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://kidshealth.org/en/teens/someone-died.html','NIH-MEDLINEPLUS'); return false;" href="http://kidshealth.org/en/teens/someone-died.html"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Death</span> and Grief</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePlus</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>... for Parents for Kids for Teens Teens Home Body Mind Sexual Health Food & Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Q& ... a <span class="hlt">death</span> or loss. Grief can affect our body, mind, emotions, and spirit. People might notice or show ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Hitlers+AND+death&id=EJ517010','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Hitlers+AND+death&id=EJ517010"><span id="translatedtitle">Hitler's <span class="hlt">Death</span> Camps.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Wieser, Paul</p> <p>1995-01-01</p> <p>Presents a high school lesson on Hitler's <span class="hlt">death</span> camps and the widespread policy of brutality and oppression against European Jews. Includes student objectives, instructional procedures, and a chart listing the value of used clothing taken from the Jews. (CFR)</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li class="active"><span>16</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_16 --> <div id="page_17" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li class="active"><span>17</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="321"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=death+AND+penalty&pg=3&id=EJ354907','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=death+AND+penalty&pg=3&id=EJ354907"><span id="translatedtitle">Eighth Amendment & <span class="hlt">Death</span> Penalty.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Shortall, Joseph M.; Merrill, Denise W.</p> <p>1987-01-01</p> <p>Presents a lesson on capital punishment for juveniles based on three hypothetical cases. The goal of the lesson is to have students understand the complexities of decisions regarding the <span class="hlt">death</span> penalty for juveniles. (JDH)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=wheatgrass&id=EJ755974','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=wheatgrass&id=EJ755974"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Death</span> and Wheatgrass</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Coleman, Jon T.</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">death</span> of his father prompts the author and university professor to reflect on the acts of grieving and teaching. He offers a tribute to his deceased father while commenting on the importance of teaching in his life.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2171664','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2171664"><span id="translatedtitle">Hydrogen peroxide as a signal controlling plant programmed cell <span class="hlt">death</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Gechev, Tsanko S.; Hille, Jacques</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) has established itself as a key player in stress and programmed cell <span class="hlt">death</span> responses, but little is known about the signaling pathways leading from H2O2 to programmed cell <span class="hlt">death</span> in plants. Recently, identification of key regulatory mutants and near-full genome coverage microarray analysis of H2O2-induced cell <span class="hlt">death</span> have begun to unravel the complexity of the H2O2 network. This review also describes a novel <span class="hlt">link</span> between H2O2 and sphingolipids, two signals that can interplay and regulate plant cell <span class="hlt">death</span>. PMID:15631987</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12470346','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12470346"><span id="translatedtitle">Incest, gamete donation by siblings and the importance of the genetic <span class="hlt">link</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Pennings, G</p> <p>2002-01-01</p> <p>Recently, several requests have emerged in which women wished to be impregnated with donor eggs fertilized with spermatozoa of their brother. An important argument advanced against such applications is that it is a kind of incest. Four definitions of incest are reviewed in this article to evaluate the acceptability of these demands. The first three (sexual intercourse, reproduction with gametes of first-degree relatives and symbolic incest) do not apply to the cases. However, when the <span class="hlt">sister</span> and her brother intend to raise the child as social mother and father, these requests should be considered as "intentional incest". If the brother only functions as an uncle, the request of the woman resembles the currently accepted practice of oocyte donation from <span class="hlt">sister</span> to <span class="hlt">sister</span>. In that case, the wish to receive gametes from a first-degree relative is motivated by the wish to establish as far as possible a genetic <span class="hlt">link</span> with the child.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7991282','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7991282"><span id="translatedtitle">Autoerotic <span class="hlt">deaths</span>: four cases.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Cooke, C T; Cadden, G A; Margolius, K A</p> <p>1994-07-01</p> <p>We describe the circumstances and post mortem medical findings of 4 unusual fatalities where <span class="hlt">death</span> occurred during autoerotic practice. Three cases occurred in young to middle-aged men--hanging, electrocution and inhalation of a zucchini. The manner of <span class="hlt">death</span> in each was accidental. The fourth case was an elderly man who died of ischemic heart disease, apparently whilst masturbating with a vacuum cleaner and a hair dryer.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4784493','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4784493"><span id="translatedtitle">Funerals against <span class="hlt">death</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Bailey, Tara; Walter, Tony</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>While anthropological studies in non-Western societies show how funerals protect the community from the threat of <span class="hlt">death</span>, sociological studies of British funerals have so far focused on meanings for the private family. The article reports on results from a Mass Observation directive – the first British study to focus specifically on the entire funeral congregation – and shows how attendees experience the contemporary life-centred funeral as a symbolic conquest of <span class="hlt">death</span>. While the eulogy’s accuracy is important, even more so – at least for some – is its authenticity, namely that the speaker has personal knowledge of the deceased. Whereas Davies analyses the power of professionally delivered ritual words against <span class="hlt">death</span>, our data reveals how admired is the courage exercised by non-professionals in speaking against <span class="hlt">death</span>, however faltering their words. Further, the very presence of a congregation whose members have known the deceased in diverse ways embodies a configurational eulogy, which we term relationships against <span class="hlt">death</span>. We thus argue that funerals symbolically conquer <span class="hlt">death</span> not only through words delivered by ritual specialists, but also through those who knew the deceased congregating and speaking. PMID:27019605</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3427251','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3427251"><span id="translatedtitle">Autophagic cell <span class="hlt">death</span> exists</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Clarke, Peter G.H.; Puyal, Julien</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>The term autophagic cell <span class="hlt">death</span> (ACD) initially referred to cell <span class="hlt">death</span> with greatly enhanced autophagy, but is increasingly used to imply a <span class="hlt">death</span>-mediating role of autophagy, as shown by a protective effect of autophagy inhibition. In addition, many authors require that autophagic cell <span class="hlt">death</span> must not involve apoptosis or necrosis. Adopting these new and restrictive criteria, and emphasizing their own failure to protect human osteosarcoma cells by autophagy inhibition, the authors of a recent Editor’s Corner article in this journal argued for the extreme rarity or nonexistence of autophagic cell <span class="hlt">death</span>. We here maintain that, even with the more stringent recent criteria, autophagic cell <span class="hlt">death</span> exists in several situations, some of which were ignored by the Editor’s Corner authors. We reject their additional criterion that the autophagy in ACD must be the agent of ultimate cell dismantlement. And we argue that rapidly dividing mammalian cells such as cancer cells are not the most likely situation for finding pure ACD. PMID:22652592</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2744427','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2744427"><span id="translatedtitle">Classification of cell <span class="hlt">death</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Kroemer, G; Galluzzi, L; Vandenabeele, P; Abrams, J; Alnemri, ES; Baehrecke, EH; Blagosklonny, MV; El-Deiry, WS; Golstein, P; Green, DR; Hengartner, M; Knight, RA; Kumar, S; Lipton, SA; Malorni, W; Nuñez, G; Peter, ME; Tschopp, J; Yuan, J; Piacentini, M; Zhivotovsky, B; Melino, G</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>Different types of cell <span class="hlt">death</span> are often defined by morphological criteria, without a clear reference to precise biochemical mechanisms. The Nomenclature Committee on Cell <span class="hlt">Death</span> (NCCD) proposes unified criteria for the definition of cell <span class="hlt">death</span> and of its different morphologies, while formulating several caveats against the misuse of words and concepts that slow down progress in the area of cell <span class="hlt">death</span> research. Authors, reviewers and editors of scientific periodicals are invited to abandon expressions like ‘percentage apoptosis’ and to replace them with more accurate descriptions of the biochemical and cellular parameters that are actually measured. Moreover, at the present stage, it should be accepted that caspase-independent mechanisms can cooperate with (or substitute for) caspases in the execution of lethal signaling pathways and that ‘autophagic cell death’ is a type of cell <span class="hlt">death</span> occurring together with (but not necessarily by) autophagic vacuolization. This study details the 2009 recommendations of the NCCD on the use of cell <span class="hlt">death</span>-related terminology including ‘entosis’, ‘mitotic catastrophe’, ‘necrosis’, ‘necroptosis’ and ‘pyroptosis’. PMID:18846107</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16463464','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16463464"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Death</span> obsession in Palestinians.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Abdel-Khalek, Ahmed M; Al-Arja, Nahida S; Abdalla, Taysir</p> <p>2006-04-01</p> <p>The authors explored <span class="hlt">death</span> obsession level and correlates among a sample (N = 601) of Palestinians living in the city of Beit Jala, the village of Al-Khader, and the Aida refugee camp in the Bethlehem area. They live in war conditions; the houses of half of them have been demolished. The <span class="hlt">Death</span> Obsession Scale (DOS) was administered. Its alpha reliability was .92, denoting high internal consistency. Among women, it yielded 1 factor, (General <span class="hlt">Death</span> Obsession), whereas among men it yielded 3 factors: <span class="hlt">Death</span> Rumination, <span class="hlt">Death</span> Dominance, and <span class="hlt">Death</span> Idea Repetition. Palestinian men and women attained significantly lower DOS mean scores than participants from 4 Arab countries: Egypt, Kuwait, Syria, and Lebanon in 7 out of 8 comparisons. However, Palestinian women had significantly higher DOS mean score than their Spanish, American and British counterparts, whereas Palestinian men had significantly higher mean DOS score than Spanish peers. The low DOS scores of Palestinians, in proportion to other Arab samples, may reflect their adaptation to strife and violence.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5847397','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5847397"><span id="translatedtitle">Environmental causes of cancer <span class="hlt">death</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Greenberg, E.R.; Meier, F.A.</p> <p>1982-12-01</p> <p>People increasingly look to the forensic autopsy as a way of determining whether a particular cancer <span class="hlt">death</span> was environmentally caused. The forensic pathologist must be diligent pursuing evidence that <span class="hlt">links</span> potential environmental causes to cancer but must also educate the public providing reassurance that most cancers are not due to industrial pollution. Cigarette smoking and various life-style factors appear to account for more cancers than do man-made environmental contaminants. Assessing the possibility that a cancer <span class="hlt">death</span> is due to a specific environmental agent requires extensive information. First, one must obtain an accurate history of lifetime occupational and environmental exposures. Second, one must analyze this information in view of epidemiologic data on the cancer risks associated with each exposure. Finally, one should seek to document through the autopsy that exposure to a potentially harmful agent actually occurred. The carefully done forensic autopsy can alert the public to dangerous conditions and can provide individuals a basis for recovery in court for damages due to harmful exposures.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160982.html','NIH-MEDLINEPLUS'); return false;" href="https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160982.html"><span id="translatedtitle">Early Menopause <span class="hlt">Linked</span> to Higher Heart Disease, <span class="hlt">Death</span> Risks</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePlus</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>... findings were published Sept. 14 online in JAMA Cardiology . "These findings suggest that women with early onset ... published online Sept. 14 in the journal JAMA Cardiology . The study was sponsored and funded by Metagenics ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20642257','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20642257"><span id="translatedtitle">[<span class="hlt">Deaths</span> in hotels].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Risse, Manfred; Weilbächer, Nadine; Birngruber, Christoph; Verhoff, Marcel A</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>There are no verified statistics about <span class="hlt">deaths</span> occurring in hotels, and only a few cases have been described in the literature. A recent case induced us to conduct a systematic search for <span class="hlt">deaths</span> in hotels in the autopsy reports of the Institute of Legal Medicine in Giessen for the period from 1968 to 2009. This search yielded 22 evaluable cases in which persons had been found dead or had died in hotels. Data evaluated in the study were sex and age of the deceased, reason for the stay in the hotel and cause of <span class="hlt">death</span>. Among the <span class="hlt">deaths</span>, 18 were males and 4 females and the average age was 41 and 40 years respectively. 6 of the male guests had died from a natural and 10 from a non-natural cause. In the remaining two cases, the cause of <span class="hlt">death</span> could not be determined, but as there was no evidence that another party had been involved, the cases were not further investigated. Of the 4 female guests, 3 had died of a natural cause; in one case, the cause of <span class="hlt">death</span> remained unclear even after morphological and toxicological investigations. Surprisingly, a third of the men were found to be temporarily living in hotels due to social circumstances. This was not true for any of the women. Our retrospective analysis is based on a comparatively small number of <span class="hlt">deaths</span> in what were mostly hotels in small to medium-sized towns. Interestingly, the gender ratio of 18:4 for deceased men and women was significantly higher than the usual gender ratio of 2:1 found for forensic autopsies. To be able to draw further conclusions, a greater number of cases would have to be analysed, for example by recruiting additional case files from other institutes of legal medicine. This would also open up the option of investigating possible regional variations.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2001AGUFM.V51C1028V','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2001AGUFM.V51C1028V"><span id="translatedtitle">Helium Isotope Compositions in Springs From the Three <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> Region, Central Oregon, USA.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Van Soest, M. C.; Kennedy, B. M.; Evans, W. C.; Mariner, R. H.</p> <p>2001-12-01</p> <p>The Three <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> region has recently come under increased scrutiny after the discovery by Satellite Radar Interferometry (InSAR) of a broad area of uplift centered approximately 5 km west of the South <span class="hlt">Sister</span> volcanic edifice (Wicks et al., 2001). The bulge, which at its center reaches a maximum of 10 cm, formed between 1998-2000. The exact cause for the uplift is unknown, but observations from other volcanoes and results from numerical modeling imply that the most likely cause is the movement of magma up to mid-crustal ( ~6.5 km depth) levels (Wicks et al., 2001). The area of uplift coincides with an area where spring chemistry shows anomalously high levels of chloride and carbon emissions (Ingebritsen et al., 1994). These features pre-date the bulge by at least a decade and can also be indicative of a magmatic source. It is unclear if the bulge and the geochemical anomalies are directly related, but both point to the presence of magma below the Three <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> area. Within the scope of a monitoring project that has recently been initiated to study the development of the bulge and any accompanying changes in the fluid/gas chemistry of springs in the Three <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> area, 10 gas samples were collected for noble gas analysis in July 2001. Two of these samples were taken from cold bubbling springs located close to the center of the bulge and the remaining 8 were obtained from well documented geothermal springs within the general area of Central Oregon. Helium isotope ratios (reported as Rc/Ra where Rc = air corrected 3He/4Hesample and Ra = 3He/4Heair) for these 8 samples range from 2.8 to 5.1 Ra which is in agreement with existing data reported in a study carried out by Unocal in the early 1980's of geothermal springs in this area. The data show a relationship with distance to the bulge/South <span class="hlt">Sister</span> volcano: all samples within a radius of ~30 km have helium isotope ratios in the range of 4.5 to 5.1 Ra, while samples that fall outside this radius have distinctly lower</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2386441','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2386441"><span id="translatedtitle">Flying lemurs – The 'flying tree shrews'? Molecular cytogenetic evidence for a Scandentia-Dermoptera <span class="hlt">sister</span> clade</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Nie, Wenhui; Fu, Beiyuan; O'Brien, Patricia CM; Wang, Jinhuan; Su, Weiting; Tanomtong, Alongkoad; Volobouev, Vitaly; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm A; Yang, Fengtang</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>Background Flying lemurs or Colugos (order Dermoptera) represent an ancient mammalian lineage that contains only two extant species. Although molecular evidence strongly supports that the orders Dermoptera, Scandentia, Lagomorpha, Rodentia and Primates form a superordinal clade called Supraprimates (or Euarchontoglires), the phylogenetic placement of Dermoptera within Supraprimates remains ambiguous. Results To search for cytogenetic signatures that could help to clarify the evolutionary affinities within this superordinal group, we have established a genome-wide comparative map between human and the Malayan flying lemur (Galeopterus variegatus) by reciprocal chromosome painting using both human and G. variegatus chromosome-specific probes. The 22 human autosomal paints and the X chromosome paint defined 44 homologous segments in the G. variegatus genome. A putative inversion on GVA 11 was revealed by the hybridization patterns of human chromosome probes 16 and 19. Fifteen associations of human chromosome segments (HSA) were detected in the G. variegatus genome: HSA1/3, 1/10, 2/21, 3/21, 4/8, 4/18, 7/15, 7/16, 7/19, 10/16, 12/22 (twice), 14/15, 16/19 (twice). Reverse painting of G. variegatus chromosome-specific paints onto human chromosomes confirmed the above results, and defined the origin of the homologous human chromosomal segments in these associations. In total, G. variegatus paints revealed 49 homologous chromosomal segments in the HSA genome. Conclusion Comparative analysis of our map with published maps from representative species of other placental orders, including Scandentia, Primates, Lagomorpha and Rodentia, suggests a signature rearrangement (HSA2q/21 association) that <span class="hlt">links</span> Scandentia and Dermoptera to one <span class="hlt">sister</span> clade. Our results thus provide new evidence for the hypothesis that Scandentia and Dermoptera have a closer phylogenetic relationship to each other than either of them has to Primates. PMID:18452598</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26771079','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26771079"><span id="translatedtitle">Sexual dimorphism in <span class="hlt">sister</span> species of Leucoraja skate and its relationship to reproductive strategy and life history.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Martinez, Christopher M; Rohlf, F James; Frisk, Michael G</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Instances of sexual dimorphism occur in a great variety of forms and manifestations. Most skates (Batoidea: Rajoidei) display some level of body shape dimorphism in which the pectoral fins of mature males develop to create a distinct bell-shaped body not found in females. This particular form of dimorphism is present in each of the <span class="hlt">sister</span> species Leucoraja erinacea and Leucoraja ocellata, but differences between sexes are much greater in the former. In order to understand the nature and potential causes of pectoral dimorphism, we used geometric morphometrics to investigate allometry of fin shape in L. erinacea and L. ocellata and its relationship to the development of reproductive organs, based on previous work on the bonnethead shark, Sphyrna tiburo. We found that allometric trajectories of overall pectoral shape were different in both species of skate, but only L. erinacea varied significantly with respect to endoskeleton development. Male maturation was characterized by a number of sex-specific morphological changes, which appeared concurrently in developmental timing with elongation of cartilage-supported claspers. We suggest that external sexual dimorphism of pectoral fins in skates is a byproduct of skeletal growth needed for clasper development. Further, the magnitude of male shape change appears to be <span class="hlt">linked</span> to the differential life histories of species. This work reports for the first time that pectoral dimorphism is a persistent feature in rajoid fishes, occurring in varying degrees across several genera. Lastly, our results suggest that pectoral morphology may be useful as a relative indicator of reproductive strategy in some species. PMID:26771079</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3363008','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3363008"><span id="translatedtitle">[Seizure episodes and <span class="hlt">death</span> by drowning].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Mundt, B; Tretzel, H</p> <p>1988-01-01</p> <p>473 cases of <span class="hlt">death</span> by drowning were examined for evidence of previous neurological disorders <span class="hlt">linked</span> with the occurrence of epileptic fits. It was found that 16 persons (3.4%) were undergoing medical treatment for epilepsy. In a further 10 cases there was evidence of the possibility of previous disorders in which epileptic fits and syncopal attacks played a dominant part. Besides the risks from the previous disorders, additional risk factors are discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26866777','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26866777"><span id="translatedtitle">Stroke and cardiac cell <span class="hlt">death</span>: Two peas in a pod.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Gonzales-Portillo, Chiara; Ishikawa, Hiroto; Shinozuka, Kazutaka; Tajiri, Naoki; Kaneko, Yuji; Borlongan, Cesar V</p> <p>2016-03-01</p> <p>A close pathological <span class="hlt">link</span> between stroke brain and heart failure may exist. Here, we discuss relevant laboratory and clinical reports demonstrating neural and cardiac myocyte cell <span class="hlt">death</span> following ischemic stroke. Although various overlapping risk factors exist between cerebrovascular incidents and cardiac incidents, stroke therapy has largely neglected the cardiac pathological consequences. Recent preclinical stroke studies have implicated an indirect cell <span class="hlt">death</span> pathway, involving toxic molecules, that originates from the stroke brain and produces cardiac cell <span class="hlt">death</span>. In concert, previous laboratory reports have revealed a reverse cell <span class="hlt">death</span> cascade, in that cardiac arrest leads to ischemic cell <span class="hlt">death</span> in the brain. A deeper understanding of the crosstalk of cell <span class="hlt">death</span> pathways between stroke and cardiac failure will facilitate the development of novel treatments designed to arrest the global pathology of both diseases thereby improving the clinical outcomes of patients diagnosed with stroke and heart failure.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24709435','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24709435"><span id="translatedtitle">Non-syndromic multiple hyperdontia in monozygotic twin <span class="hlt">sisters</span>: a report of two cases.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ratson, Tal; Peretz, Benjamin</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Supernumerary teeth are common in the general population, with a prevalence that varies between 0.1 percent to 3.8 percent. Multiple supernumerary teeth are associated with Gardner's syndrome, Fabry-Anderson syndrome, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, labial palatal cleft, and cleidocranial dysplasia. Multiple hyperdontia not associated with syndromes is rare and ranges between 0.04 percent to 0.1 percent. The purpose of this report was to describe the occurrence of nonsyndromic multiple hyperdontia in monozygotic twin <span class="hlt">sisters</span>. PMID:24709435</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4993918','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4993918"><span id="translatedtitle">Two Cases of Endometrial Cancer in Twin <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> with Myotonic Dystrophy</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p></p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>We describe two cases of endometrial cancer (EC) occurring in nulligravid twin <span class="hlt">sisters</span> with myotonic dystrophy. Both tested negative for Lynch syndrome and both were treated with laparoscopic hysterectomy with bilateral salpingooophorectomy and adjuvant radiotherapy. Although EC tends to run in families, the diagnosis in itself is not considered sufficient cause for screening or prophylactic measures in close relatives. However, the presence of additional risk factors, such as nulligravidity and myotonic dystrophy in the underlying cases, may call for extra vigilance in first-degree family members. PMID:27595026</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26850509','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26850509"><span id="translatedtitle">Pre- and post-natal growth in two <span class="hlt">sisters</span> with 3-M syndrome.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Lugli, Licia; Bertucci, Emma; Mazza, Vincenzo; Elmakky, Amira; Ferrari, Fabrizio; Neuhaus, Christine; Percesepe, Antonio</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>3-M syndrome (OMIM #273750) is a rare autosomal recessive growth disorder characterized by severe pre- and post-natal growth restriction, associated with minor skeletal abnormalities and dysmorphisms. Although the 3-M syndrome is well known as a primordial dwarfism, descriptions of the prenatal growth are missing. We report a family with variable phenotypic features of 3-M syndrome and we describe the prenatal and postnatal growth pattern of two affected <span class="hlt">sisters</span> with a novel homozygous CUL7 mutation (c.3173-1G>C), showing a pre- and post-natal growth deficiency and a normal cranial circumference. PMID:26850509</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li class="active"><span>17</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_17 --> <div id="page_18" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li class="active"><span>18</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="341"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/254004','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/254004"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Sister</span> chromatid exchange analysis to monitor genotoxic chemicals. (Latest citations from Pollution abstracts). Published Search</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p></p> <p>1996-04-01</p> <p>The bibliography contains citations concerning the use of the <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchange (SCE) analysis for toxicological studies. SCE analysis are very sensitive measures of genotoxic damage to chromosomes. SCE toxicological studies analyzing ionizing radiation, chromium compounds, styrene, paint thinner, mercury, cigarette smoke, coal dust, fuel oil, insecticides, ethylene oxide, diesel exhaust, and polychlorinated biphenyls are discussed. SCE studies using both human and animal tissue cultures are described. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26787157','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26787157"><span id="translatedtitle">Mitochondrial Genes Reveal Triatoma jatai as a <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Species to Triatoma costalimai (Reduviidae: Triatominae).</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Teves, Simone Caldas; Gardim, Sueli; Carbajal de la Fuente, Ana Laura; Lopes, Catarina Macedo; Gonçalves, Teresa Cristina Monte; dos Santos Mallet, Jacenir Reis; da Rosa, João Aristeu; Almeida, Carlos Eduardo</p> <p>2016-03-01</p> <p>Triatoma jatai was described using a set of morphological structures from specimens collected in Paranã municipality of Tocantins State, Brazil. Under a Bayesian framework and using two mitochondrial genes (16S and COI), phylogenetic analysis recovered T. jatai as a <span class="hlt">sister</span> species to Triatoma costalimai with higher genetic distances than between other well-recognized species. Our results agree with previous suggestions based on morphometric analysis. In the light of the non-monophyly of Matogrossensis subcomplex, the inclusion of T. jatai shall be considered for reevaluating this group.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15037712','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15037712"><span id="translatedtitle">SPTLC1 mutation in twin <span class="hlt">sisters</span> with hereditary sensory neuropathy type I.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Verhoeven, K; Coen, K; De Vriendt, E; Jacobs, A; Van Gerwen, V; Smouts, I; Pou-Serradell, A; Martin, J J; Timmerman, V; De Jonghe, P</p> <p>2004-03-23</p> <p>Hereditary sensory neuropathy type I (HSN I) is an autosomal dominant ulceromutilating disorder of the peripheral nervous system characterized by progressive sensory loss. HSN I locus maps to chromosome 9q22.1-22.3 and is caused by mutations in the gene coding for serine palmitoyltransferase long-chain base subunit 1 (SPTLC1). A novel missense mutation in exon 13 of the SPTLC1 gene (c.1160G-->C; p.G387A) in twin <span class="hlt">sisters</span> with a severe HSN I phenotype is reported. PMID:15037712</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26787157','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26787157"><span id="translatedtitle">Mitochondrial Genes Reveal Triatoma jatai as a <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Species to Triatoma costalimai (Reduviidae: Triatominae).</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Teves, Simone Caldas; Gardim, Sueli; Carbajal de la Fuente, Ana Laura; Lopes, Catarina Macedo; Gonçalves, Teresa Cristina Monte; dos Santos Mallet, Jacenir Reis; da Rosa, João Aristeu; Almeida, Carlos Eduardo</p> <p>2016-03-01</p> <p>Triatoma jatai was described using a set of morphological structures from specimens collected in Paranã municipality of Tocantins State, Brazil. Under a Bayesian framework and using two mitochondrial genes (16S and COI), phylogenetic analysis recovered T. jatai as a <span class="hlt">sister</span> species to Triatoma costalimai with higher genetic distances than between other well-recognized species. Our results agree with previous suggestions based on morphometric analysis. In the light of the non-monophyly of Matogrossensis subcomplex, the inclusion of T. jatai shall be considered for reevaluating this group. PMID:26787157</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20010290','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20010290"><span id="translatedtitle">Adolescent Russian roulette <span class="hlt">deaths</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Collins, Kim A</p> <p>2010-03-01</p> <p>Adolescence, between the ages of 10 and 19 years, is a unique period both physically and emotionally. During this time of life, individuals are known to experiment and engage in risky behavior, sometimes with unforeseen morbidity and mortality. We also see suicide emerge as a manner of <span class="hlt">death</span> in this age group. The most common method is gunshot wound and sometimes in the form of Russian roulette. Few studies have looked at <span class="hlt">deaths</span> by Russian roulette, the victims, and scenarios. In particular, no study examines the adolescent victim of Russian roulette. To better understand and classify this entity, adolescent Russian roulette autopsy cases over a 20-year period were examined looking at the victims, scenarios, autopsy findings, cause and manner of <span class="hlt">death</span>, and the weapons. All victims were males, ages 13 to 19 years, with a Black-to-White ratio of 1:1. No victim had a previous psychiatric history. Toxicology was positive for alcohol and/or marijuana in 50% of the victims. Friends were present when the victim shot himself which occurred in the home the majority of the time. In all but 1 case, premeditation of the game was involved as the victim provided the weapon for the roulette. The cause of <span class="hlt">death</span> was gunshot wound to the head (6 to the right side, 1 to the mouth, 1 to the forehead), and the manner of <span class="hlt">death</span> was suicide in 6 cases and accident in 2 cases. A review of the literature discusses the adolescent victim, suicide, and Russian roulette.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Thanatology&pg=2&id=EJ191396','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Thanatology&pg=2&id=EJ191396"><span id="translatedtitle">Perspectives on <span class="hlt">Death</span>: An Experiential Course on <span class="hlt">Death</span> Education.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Stefan, Edwin S.</p> <p>1978-01-01</p> <p>Describes and evaluates a college psychology course on <span class="hlt">death</span> education (thanatology). Course objectives were to help students become aware of the feelings involved in facing <span class="hlt">death</span>, encourage discussion on the subject of <span class="hlt">death</span>, motivate students to change their attitudes about <span class="hlt">death</span>, and encourage practical planning for funeral arrangements.…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Thanatology&id=EJ231704','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Thanatology&id=EJ231704"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Death</span> Threat and <span class="hlt">Death</span> Concerns in the College Student.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Tobacyk, Jerome; Eckstein, Daniel</p> <p>1980-01-01</p> <p>Thanatology students reported significantly lesser <span class="hlt">death</span> threat and significantly greater <span class="hlt">death</span> concerns. Trait anxiety was found to be a significant predictor of change in <span class="hlt">death</span> threat in the Thanatology Group, with lesser anxiety associated with greater decline in <span class="hlt">death</span> threat. (Author)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26665963','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26665963"><span id="translatedtitle">The Impact of <span class="hlt">Death</span> Education on Fear of <span class="hlt">Death</span> and <span class="hlt">Death</span> Anxiety Among Human Services Students.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>McClatchey, Irene Searles; King, Steve</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Human services professionals will undoubtedly work with the dying and bereaved populations at one time or other. Yet, they are poorly prepared to do so since <span class="hlt">death</span> education, that is, lessons about the human and emotional aspects of <span class="hlt">death</span>, its implications, and subsequent bereavement issues, is often not part of their curriculum. This nonequivalent comparison group study (N = 86) examined <span class="hlt">death</span> fear and <span class="hlt">death</span> anxiety among human services students before and after receiving <span class="hlt">death</span> education using the Multidimensional Fear of <span class="hlt">Death</span> Scale. The results showed a statistically significant decrease in <span class="hlt">death</span> anxiety among the group of students who participated in <span class="hlt">death</span> education compared to those who did not.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16645674','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16645674"><span id="translatedtitle">[Sexuality and <span class="hlt">death</span>].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Sapetti, Adrián</p> <p>2006-01-01</p> <p>It is intented to show two apparently antithetic poles: Sexuality and <span class="hlt">Death</span>, in fact interpenetrate themselves, disguising the fear of <span class="hlt">death</span>, or the desire to die, Eros' world. Different expressions of culture are analyzed, especially the one known as The Profane Time, the time for work, which is characterized by the submission to interdicts (prohibitions) and, on the other hand, the Time for Joy or The Sacred Time, characterized by the transgression of such prohibitions. Its relationship with the interdicts'violations in the sexual as well as in the <span class="hlt">death</span> arena is analyzed in order to connect the human being's fear in the presence of the unrestraint, the overflow and the abandonment of the time established for work that would imply free sexuality. The latter is connected with some conclusions that could be considered useful in the field of Sexual Therapies, with a certain critical look at the mechanist settlement applied to those treatments.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/973858','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/973858"><span id="translatedtitle">[Sudden infant <span class="hlt">death</span> syndrome].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Espinosa Morett, A; Shkurovich, M; Carlos Ugartechea, J; Mallet Arelano, A; Salmón Rodríguez, L E</p> <p>1976-01-01</p> <p>This report is based on a review of the present situation of the sudden infant <span class="hlt">death</span> syndrome through the presentation of four cases studied at the Unidad de Pediatría, Hospital General de México, S.S.A. All cases were in apparent good health before <span class="hlt">death</span>. All babies were less than ten months of age. In three cases, necropsy was not performed, and the other one did not show significant abnormalities at the post-mortem examination. A complete review of the literature was made including: historical, epidemiological, genetic, clinical and pathological aspects. Special emphasis is made on the pathophysiology of the syndrome during MOR phase of sleep and muscular hypertrophy of the lungs arteriolae suggesting chronic hypoxia which are the most relevant theories in the sudden infant <span class="hlt">death</span> syndrome. Psychological aspects and the family management by the physician and detection of possible future victims of the syndrome are finally discussed. PMID:973858</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8075771','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8075771"><span id="translatedtitle">Cocaine-related <span class="hlt">deaths</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Lora-Tamayo, C; Tena, T; Rodriguez, A</p> <p>1994-07-15</p> <p>Cocaine availability has been increasing in Spain in the past few years. A review of all the toxicological analyses carried out at the Madrid Department of the Instituto Nacional de Toxicología, with subjects who had died of drugs from 1990 to 1992, found 533 persons who had cocaine in their blood and/or tissues; 450 (84%) <span class="hlt">deaths</span> involved cocaine and heroin together whereas 83 (16%) <span class="hlt">deaths</span> involved cocaine with an absence of heroin. This paper reports the circumstances, cocaine and benzoylecgonine concentrations in the blood and other toxicological findings for the two major groups of <span class="hlt">deaths</span> where cocaine was found with an absence of heroin, i.e., possible overdose cases (35 cases) and traffic accidents (23 cases).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24343674','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24343674"><span id="translatedtitle">Infant <span class="hlt">deaths</span> in slings.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Madre, Chrystèle; Rambaud, Caroline; Avran, David; Michot, Charlotte; Sachs, Philippe; Dauger, Stéphane</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>Although the incidence of sudden unexpected <span class="hlt">death</span> in infancy (SUDI) decreased markedly after campaigns to promote supine positioning during sleeping, it has remained unchanged over the last decade. Epidemiological data suggest a role for new causes such as suffocation, asphyxia, and entrapment. Health authorities in several countries have issued warnings about slings used to carry infants. However, few reports of infant <span class="hlt">deaths</span> in slings have been published in medical journals. Our paediatric intensive care unit has admitted two infants who experienced cardiorespiratory arrest while carried in a sling. Diagnostic investigations including a post-mortem examination established asphyxia as the mechanism of <span class="hlt">death</span>. In conclusion, baby slings may carry a risk of SUDI, either by compression of the baby into a forward-flexed position or by direct suffocation. European recommendations for the cautious use of baby slings should be disseminated to families and professionals involved in caring for infants, as done recently in Australia, Canada, and the USA. PMID:24343674</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1238183','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1238183"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Death</span> on Denali</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Wilson, Rodman; Mills, William J.; Rogers, Donald R.; Propst, Michael T.</p> <p>1978-01-01</p> <p>Between 1903 and 1975 about 1 percent of climbers on Mount McKinley (Denali) and Mount Foraker in Alaska died. In 1976 a total of ten (1.7 percent) of 587 mountaineers died, but this rate of <span class="hlt">death</span> was not significantly higher than previously. Nineteen percent of climbers in 1976 suffered major or minor injuries, illness or <span class="hlt">death</span>. Acute mountain sickness (AMS), frostbite and fractures were common. Thirty-three rescues or retrievals of bodies were mounted at a cost of more than $82,000. Inexperience (particularly with arctic mountaineering), poor leadership, faulty equipment and undue reliance on rescue by helicopter contributed to the alarming incidence of accident, illness and <span class="hlt">death</span> on big peaks in Mount McKinley National Park in 1976. PMID:664648</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26176278','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26176278"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Death</span> Dilemma and Organism Recovery in Ecotoxicology.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ashauer, Roman; O'Connor, Isabel; Hintermeister, Anita; Escher, Beate I</p> <p>2015-08-18</p> <p>Why do some individuals survive after exposure to chemicals while others die? Either, the tolerance threshold is distributed among the individuals in a population, and its exceedance leads to certain <span class="hlt">death</span>, or all individuals share the same threshold above which <span class="hlt">death</span> occurs stochastically. The previously published General Unified Threshold model of Survival (GUTS) established a mathematical relationship between the two assumptions. According to this model stochastic <span class="hlt">death</span> would result in systematically faster compensation and damage repair mechanisms than individual tolerance. Thus, we face a circular conclusion dilemma because inference about the <span class="hlt">death</span> mechanism is inherently <span class="hlt">linked</span> to the speed of damage recovery. We provide empirical evidence that the stochastic <span class="hlt">death</span> model consistently infers much faster toxicodynamic recovery than the individual tolerance model. Survival data can be explained by either, slower damage recovery and a wider individual tolerance distribution, or faster damage recovery paired with a narrow tolerance distribution. The toxicodynamic model parameters exhibited meaningful patterns in chemical space, which is why we suggest toxicodynamic model parameters as novel phenotypic anchors for in vitro to in vivo toxicity extrapolation. GUTS appears to be a promising refinement of traditional survival curve analysis and dose response models.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17847954','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17847954"><span id="translatedtitle">General beliefs about the world as defensive mechanisms against <span class="hlt">death</span> anxiety.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Hui, Victoria Ka-Ying; Bond, Michael Harris; Ng, Timmy Sze Wing</p> <p></p> <p><span class="hlt">Death</span> ideation and <span class="hlt">death</span> anxiety represent the cognitive and affective dimensions of <span class="hlt">death</span> attitudes, respectively. General beliefs about the world are proposed to be useful defensive mechanisms protecting persons against the <span class="hlt">death</span> anxiety provoked by <span class="hlt">death</span> ideation. SEM is employed to test the proposed mediation model, using a sample of 133 Hong Kong Chinese university students. Results showed that <span class="hlt">death</span> ideation was significantly and inversely <span class="hlt">linked</span> to belief in social cynicism, reward for application, and fate control. Moreover, higher levels of belief in fate control and lower levels of religiosity predicted greater <span class="hlt">death</span> anxiety. Only belief in fate control partially mediated the relationship between <span class="hlt">death</span> ideation and <span class="hlt">death</span> anxiety. Discussion focused on how social axioms serve as useful defensive mechanisms against <span class="hlt">death</span> anxiety.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24294729','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24294729"><span id="translatedtitle">[Near <span class="hlt">death</span> experiences].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Rubia Vila, Francisco José</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Near <span class="hlt">Death</span> Experiences are those accounted by people who after being clinically dead return to life spontaneously or after reanimation. These experiences have been used traditionally to support the belief in the existence of the soul and of life after <span class="hlt">death</span>. However, today neuroscience tries to explain these experiences from the scientific point of view, i.e. explaining them based on their brain substrates. Their resemblance to mystic experiences and to altered states of consciousness seems to indicate that they may be produced by hyperactivity of limbic structures caused by anoxia or hypercapnia.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24294729','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24294729"><span id="translatedtitle">[Near <span class="hlt">death</span> experiences].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Rubia Vila, Francisco José</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Near <span class="hlt">Death</span> Experiences are those accounted by people who after being clinically dead return to life spontaneously or after reanimation. These experiences have been used traditionally to support the belief in the existence of the soul and of life after <span class="hlt">death</span>. However, today neuroscience tries to explain these experiences from the scientific point of view, i.e. explaining them based on their brain substrates. Their resemblance to mystic experiences and to altered states of consciousness seems to indicate that they may be produced by hyperactivity of limbic structures caused by anoxia or hypercapnia. PMID:24294729</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20503640','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20503640"><span id="translatedtitle">[The <span class="hlt">death</span> of Cleopatra].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Guillemain, Bernard</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>The image of a queen bitten by a snake is controversial and the facts, such as the swiftness of her <span class="hlt">death</span> and her servants, and scientific experiments are in favour of a deadly poisoning. The author reminds that in the ancient texts the snake had sacred virtues and it was a symbolic image to embellish the suicide of the one who was sentenced to <span class="hlt">death</span> by the Romans. Octaves set up the myth of a fatal bite which became an iconographic image for the cinema.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=death+AND+penalty&pg=2&id=EJ615673','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=death+AND+penalty&pg=2&id=EJ615673"><span id="translatedtitle">Teaching about the <span class="hlt">Death</span> Penalty.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Ryan, John Paul; Eden, John Michael</p> <p>1998-01-01</p> <p>Examines the reasons for the <span class="hlt">death</span> penalty, the reasons why the <span class="hlt">death</span> penalty attracts so much attention, whether the <span class="hlt">death</span> penalty is applied consistently, and the evidence that the application of the <span class="hlt">death</span> penalty may be racially biased. Provides an accompanying article on "Teaching Ideas" by Ronald A. Banaszak. (CMK)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23883091','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23883091"><span id="translatedtitle">Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart: the <span class="hlt">death</span> of a genius.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Hatzinger, Martin; Hatzinger, Jurgen; Sohn, Michael</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>The early and unexpected <span class="hlt">death</span> of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (Salzburg, 1756 - Vienna, 1791) was a mystery from the very first day and the subject of wildest speculations and adventurous assertions. Over the last 100 years, medical science has investigated the physical sufferings and the mysterious <span class="hlt">death</span> of Mozart with increasing intensity. The aim of this article was to recreate Mozart's pathography relying on the his correspondence with father Leopold and <span class="hlt">sister</span> Nannerl and on reports from his physicians and contemporaries. The rumour that Mozart was poisoned followed shortly after his <span class="hlt">death</span> on 5 December 1791, at the age of 35, and has survived to this day. The alleged culprits were his physician van Swieten, Mozart's freemasons lodge, and the Imperial Chapel Master Salieri. Mozart however died of chronic kidney disease and ultimately of uraemia. If kidney damage reaches a critical point, even a minimum additional stress can lead to its failure. This usually occurs in the fourth decade of life. Next time we listen to Mozart, we should remember that this apparently happy person was actually a precocious boy, ripped of his childhood, whose short life was an endless chain of complaints, fatigue, misery, concern, and malady.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li class="active"><span>18</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_18 --> <div id="page_19" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li class="active"><span>19</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="361"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23883091','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23883091"><span id="translatedtitle">Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart: the <span class="hlt">death</span> of a genius.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Hatzinger, Martin; Hatzinger, Jurgen; Sohn, Michael</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>The early and unexpected <span class="hlt">death</span> of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (Salzburg, 1756 - Vienna, 1791) was a mystery from the very first day and the subject of wildest speculations and adventurous assertions. Over the last 100 years, medical science has investigated the physical sufferings and the mysterious <span class="hlt">death</span> of Mozart with increasing intensity. The aim of this article was to recreate Mozart's pathography relying on the his correspondence with father Leopold and <span class="hlt">sister</span> Nannerl and on reports from his physicians and contemporaries. The rumour that Mozart was poisoned followed shortly after his <span class="hlt">death</span> on 5 December 1791, at the age of 35, and has survived to this day. The alleged culprits were his physician van Swieten, Mozart's freemasons lodge, and the Imperial Chapel Master Salieri. Mozart however died of chronic kidney disease and ultimately of uraemia. If kidney damage reaches a critical point, even a minimum additional stress can lead to its failure. This usually occurs in the fourth decade of life. Next time we listen to Mozart, we should remember that this apparently happy person was actually a precocious boy, ripped of his childhood, whose short life was an endless chain of complaints, fatigue, misery, concern, and malady. PMID:23883091</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18639540','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18639540"><span id="translatedtitle">Securin and not CDK1/cyclin B1 regulates <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid disjunction during meiosis II in mouse eggs.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Nabti, Ibtissem; Reis, Alexandra; Levasseur, Mark; Stemmann, Olaf; Jones, Keith T</p> <p>2008-09-15</p> <p>Mammalian eggs remain arrested at metaphase of the second meiotic division (metII) for an indeterminate time before fertilization. During this period, which can last several hours, the continued attachment of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids is thought to be achieved by inhibition of the protease separase. Separase is known to be inhibited by binding either securin or Maturation (M-Phase)-Promoting Factor, a heterodimer of CDK1/cyclin B1. However, the relative contribution of securin and CDK/cyclin B1 to <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid attachment during metII arrest has not been assessed. Although there are conditions in which either CDK1/cyclinB1 activity or securin can prevent <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid disjunction, principally by overexpression of non-degradable cyclin B1 or securin, we find here that separase activity is primarily regulated by securin and not CDK1/cyclin B1. Thus the CDK1 inhibitor roscovitine and an antibody we designed to block the interaction of CDK1/cyclin B1 with separase, both failed to induce <span class="hlt">sister</span> disjunction. In contrast, securin morpholino knockdown specifically induced loss of <span class="hlt">sister</span> attachment, that could be restored by securin cRNA rescue. During metII arrest separase appears primarily regulated by securin binding, not CDK1/cyclin B1. PMID:18639540</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19239614','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19239614"><span id="translatedtitle">Models of development for blowfly <span class="hlt">sister</span> species Chrysomya chloropyga and Chrysomya putoria.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Richards, C S; Crous, K L; Villet, M H</p> <p>2009-03-01</p> <p>Developmental curves for the <span class="hlt">sister</span> species Chrysomya chloropyga (Wiedemann, 1818) and Chrysomya putoria (Wiedemann, 1830) (Diptera: Calliphoridae) were established at eight and 10 different constant temperatures, respectively, using developmental landmarks and body length as measures of age. The thermal summation constants (K) and developmental threshold (D(0)) were calculated for five developmental landmarks using a previously described method. Isomorphen and isomegalen diagrams were also constructed for the purpose of estimating postmortem intervals (PMIs). Chrysomya chloropyga had an average developmental threshold value (D(0)) of 10.91 degrees C (standard error [SE] = 0.94 degrees C, n = 5), significantly lower than that of C. putoria (13.42 degrees C, SE = 0.45 degrees C, n = 5) (paired t-test: t = - 4.63, d.f. = 8, P < 0.00). Similarly, K values for C. chloropyga were larger than those for C. putoria for all developmental events except onset of the wandering phase. These are the first data that can be used to calculate minimum PMIs and predict population growth of C. chloropyga and C. putoria in Africa; the data indicate that developmental data for one of these species cannot be used as surrogate data for the <span class="hlt">sister</span> species.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25640518','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25640518"><span id="translatedtitle">A novel <span class="hlt">sister</span> clade to the enterobacteria microviruses (family Microviridae) identified in methane seep sediments.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Bryson, Samuel Joseph; Thurber, Andrew R; Correa, Adrienne M S; Orphan, Victoria J; Vega Thurber, Rebecca</p> <p>2015-10-01</p> <p>Methane seep microbial communities perform a key ecosystem service by consuming the greenhouse gas methane prior to its release into the hydrosphere, minimizing the impact of marine methane sources on our climate. Although previous studies have examined the ecology and biochemistry of these communities, none has examined viral assemblages associated with these habitats. We employed virus particle purification, genome amplification, pyrosequencing and gene/genome reconstruction and annotation on two metagenomic libraries, one prepared for ssDNA and the other for all DNA, to identify the viral community in a methane seep. Similarity analysis of these libraries (raw and assembled) revealed a community dominated by phages, with a significant proportion of similarities to the Microviridae family of ssDNA phages. We define these viruses as the Eel River Basin Microviridae (ERBM). Assembly and comparison of 21 ERBM closed circular genomes identified five as members of a novel <span class="hlt">sister</span> clade to the Microvirus genus of Enterobacteria phages. Comparisons among other metagenomes and these Microviridae major-capsid sequences indicated that this clade of phages is currently unique to the Eel River Basin sediments. Given this ERBM clade's relationship to the Microviridae genus Microvirus, we define this <span class="hlt">sister</span> clade as the candidate genus Pequeñovirus. PMID:25640518</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24815211','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24815211"><span id="translatedtitle">Tracheole investment does not vary with body size among bumblebee (Bombus impatiens) <span class="hlt">sisters</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Vogt, Jessica R; Dillon, Megan K; Dillon, Michael E</p> <p>2014-08-01</p> <p>Body size is a key organism trait with critical implications for the physiology, life history, and ecology of organisms. Modern insects vary in body mass by over 6 orders of magnitude, but are small by comparison to many other metazoan taxa. The small size of modern insects may reflect limitations imposed by their open respiratory systems which rely, in part, on diffusion. Diffusion rates decline with distance such that, absent compensation, the capacity for larger insects to deliver oxygen to their tissues may be compromised. To compensate, larger grasshoppers, beetles, and bumblebees devote proportionally more of their body volume to the respiratory system, as demonstrated by hypermetric scaling of tracheal volume with body mass(>1). Among bumblebee <span class="hlt">sisters</span>, total respiratory volume scaled with mass(2.6), but it is unclear at what level or levels of the tracheal system (main tracheal trunks, air sacs, tracheoles) bumblebees express this extreme hypermetry. Here we use transmission electron microscopy to examine the morphology of tracheoles in bumblebee flight muscle among <span class="hlt">sister</span> bumblebees varying nearly four-fold in body mass. Neither tracheole density nor tracheole diameter changed with body mass. The total cross-sectional area of tracheoles was also invariant with body mass. Together, these results reveal that bumblebees do not compensate for size-related limitations on oxygen delivery by increasing investment at the level of the tracheoles.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5025379','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5025379"><span id="translatedtitle">Origins of dacite and rhyodacite of the South <span class="hlt">Sister</span> magmatic system, central high Cascades, Oregon</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Price, J.D.; Parker, D.F. )</p> <p>1993-04-01</p> <p>A gap from 66 to 72 weight percent silica (48--62 ppm Rb) separates dacite from rhyodacite of the South <span class="hlt">Sister</span> system. The authors results indicate that rhyodacite can not be produced by fractional crystallization from dacite. Variation among rhyodacite and associated rhyolite is, however, most likely the result of fractional crystallization, in agreement with previous studies. Dacite in the South <span class="hlt">Sister</span> system probably had multiple origins, as suggested by trace element plots for Y, Nb and Zr. Some dacite was produced by fractional crystallization from andesitic magmas, while others were largely the result of mixing between andesite and rhyodacite. Mafic enclaves occurring in dacite are compositional similar to Holocene basalt, and their mixing with dacitic magma may have triggered eruptions, but they are probably not directly related genetically to their host rocks. The rhyodacites are probably crustal melts. Previous workers have suggested high-level melting of hypabyssal silicic plutons or amphibolite sources for the rhyodacites. The authors suggest melting of granitic plutonic sources, similar to those exposed in the Klamath Mountains, for the origin of the rhyodacites.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25071202','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25071202"><span id="translatedtitle">Clade extinction appears to balance species diversification in <span class="hlt">sister</span> lineages of Afro-Oriental passerine birds.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ricklefs, Robert E; Jønsson, Knud A</p> <p>2014-08-12</p> <p>Recent analyses suggest that the number of species in a clade often increases rapidly at first, but that diversification subsequently slows, apparently as species fill ecological space. Support for diversity dependence comes largely from the failure of species richness to increase with clade age in some analyses of contemporary diversity. However, clades chosen for analysis generally are named taxa and thus are not selected at random. To avoid this potential bias, we analyzed the numbers of species and estimated ages of 150 pairs of <span class="hlt">sister</span> clades established by dispersal of ancestral species between the Oriental and African biogeographic regions. The observed positive exponential relationship between clade size and age suggests that species diversify within clades without apparent limit. If this were true, the pattern of accumulation of <span class="hlt">sister</span>-clade pairs with increasing age would be consistent with the random decline and extinction of entire clades, maintaining an overall balance in species richness. This "pulse" model of diversification is consistent with the fossil record of most groups and reconciles conflicting evidence concerning diversity dependence of clade growth.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22987150','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22987150"><span id="translatedtitle">Understanding the origins of UV-induced recombination through manipulation of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid cohesion.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Covo, Shay; Ma, Wenjian; Westmoreland, James W; Gordenin, Dmitry A; Resnick, Michael A</p> <p>2012-11-01</p> <p>Ultraviolet light (UV) can provoke genome instability, partly through its ability to induce homologous recombination (HR). However, the mechanism(s) of UV-induced recombination is poorly understood. Although double-strand breaks (DSBs) have been invoked, there is little evidence for their generation by UV. Alternatively, single-strand DNA lesions that stall replication forks could provoke recombination. Recent findings suggest efficient initiation of UV-induced recombination in G1 through processing of closely spaced single-strand lesions to DSBs. However, other scenarios are possible, since the recombination initiated in G1 can be completed in the following stages of the cell cycle. We developed a system that could address UV-induced recombination events that start and finish in G2 by manipulating the activity of the <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid cohesion complex. Here we show that <span class="hlt">sister</span>-chromatid cohesion suppresses UV-induced recombination events that are initiated and resolved in G2. By comparing recombination frequencies and survival between UV and ionizing radiation, we conclude that a substantial portion of UV-induced recombination occurs through DSBs. This notion is supported by a direct physical observation of UV-induced DSBs that are dependent on nucleotide excision repair. However, a significant role of nonDSB intermediates in UV-induced recombination cannot be excluded.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4254975','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4254975"><span id="translatedtitle">Different Parasite Faunas in Sympatric Populations of <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Hedgehog Species in a Secondary Contact Zone</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Pfäffle, Miriam; Černá Bolfíková, Barbora; Hulva, Pavel; Petney, Trevor</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Providing descriptive data on parasite diversity and load in <span class="hlt">sister</span> species is a first step in addressing the role of host-parasite coevolution in the speciation process. In this study we compare the parasite faunas of the closely related hedgehog species Erinaceus europaeus and E. roumanicus from the Czech Republic where both occur in limited sympatry. We examined 109 hedgehogs from 21 localities within this secondary contact zone. Three species of ectoparasites and nine species of endoparasites were recorded. Significantly higher abundances and prevalences were found for Capillaria spp. and Brachylaemus erinacei in E. europaeus compared to E. roumanicus and higher mean infection rates and prevalences for Hymenolepis erinacei, Physaloptera clausa and Nephridiorhynchus major in E. roumanicus compared to E. europaeus. Divergence in the composition of the parasite fauna, except for Capillaria spp., which seem to be very unspecific, may be related to the complicated demography of their hosts connected with Pleistocene climate oscillations and consequent range dynamics. The fact that all parasite species with different abundances in E. europaeus and E. roumanicus belong to intestinal forms indicates a possible diversification of trophic niches between both <span class="hlt">sister</span> hedgehog species. PMID:25469872</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15607004','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15607004"><span id="translatedtitle">A deletion mutation in GDF9 in <span class="hlt">sisters</span> with spontaneous DZ twins.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Montgomery, Grant W; Zhao, Zhen Zhen; Marsh, Anna J; Mayne, Renee; Treloar, Susan A; James, Michael; Martin, Nicholas G; Boomsma, Dorret I; Duffy, David L</p> <p>2004-12-01</p> <p>A loss of function mutation in growth differentiation factor 9 (GDF9) in sheep causes increased ovulation rate and infertility in a dosage-sensitive manner. Spontaneous dizygotic (DZ) twinning in the human is under genetic control and women with a history of DZ twinning have an increased incidence of multiple follicle growth and multiple ovulation. We sequenced the GDF9 coding region in DNA samples from 20 women with DZ twins and identified a four-base pair deletion in GDF9 in two <span class="hlt">sisters</span> with twins from one family. We screened a further 429 families and did not find the loss of function mutation in any other families. We genotyped eight single nucleotide polymorphisms across the GDF9 locus in 379 families with two <span class="hlt">sisters</span> who have both given birth to spontaneous DZ twins (1527 individuals) and 226 triad families with mothers of twins and their parents (723 individuals). Using case control analysis and the transmission disequilibrium test we found no evidence for association between common variants in GDF9 and twinning in the families. We conclude that rare mutations in GDF9 may influence twinning, but twinning frequency is not associated with common variation in GDF9.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3804956','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3804956"><span id="translatedtitle">Sibling relationships of children with autistic, mentally retarded, and nonhandicapped brothers and <span class="hlt">sisters</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>McHale, S M; Sloan, J; Simeonsson, R J</p> <p>1986-12-01</p> <p>The subjects were 90 children between 6 and 15 years of age, 30 with autistic, 30 with mentally retarded, and 30 with nonhandicapped brothers or <span class="hlt">sisters</span>. The children were questioned about their sibling relationships in an open-ended interview, and, in the case of children with handicapped siblings, they also responded to questions about particular problems they faced in regard to their brothers or <span class="hlt">sisters</span>. In addition, mothers filled out a behavior rating scale in which they described the positive and negative aspects of their children's behavior toward the sibling. In general, children and mothers rated the sibling relationships positively. Group comparisons indicated that children with autistic and mentally retarded siblings did not differ on any self-report measures. Children with nonhandicapped siblings reported that their family relations were slightly more cohesive but otherwise did not differ in terms of their self-reports from children with handicapped siblings. Mothers of nonhandicapped children, however, rated the sibling relationships more negatively than did mothers of handicapped children. Further analyses revealed that status variables (age, gender, family size) were not as highly correlated with the quality of sibling relationships with handicapped children as were specific problem areas (e.g., perceptions of parental favoritism, coping ability, concerns about the handicapped child's future). PMID:3804956</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18202362','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18202362"><span id="translatedtitle">Role of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rad51 paralogs in <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid recombination.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Mozlin, Amy M; Fung, Cindy W; Symington, Lorraine S</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>Rad51 requires a number of other proteins, including the Rad51 paralogs, for efficient recombination in vivo. Current evidence suggests that the yeast Rad51 paralogs, Rad55 and Rad57, are important in formation or stabilization of the Rad51 nucleoprotein filament. To gain further insights into the function of the Rad51 paralogs, reporters were designed to measure spontaneous or double-strand break (DSB)-induced <span class="hlt">sister</span> or nonsister recombination. Spontaneous <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid recombination (SCR) was reduced 6000-fold in the rad57 mutant, significantly more than in the rad51 mutant. Although the DSB-induced recombination defect of rad57 was suppressed by overexpression of Rad51, elevated temperature, or expression of both mating-type alleles, the rad57 defect in spontaneous SCR was not strongly suppressed by these same factors. In addition, the UV sensitivity of the rad57 mutant was not strongly suppressed by MAT heterozygosity, even though Rad51 foci were restored under these conditions. This lack of suppression suggests that Rad55 and Rad57 have different roles in the recombinational repair of stalled replication forks compared with DSB repair. Furthermore, these data suggest that most spontaneous SCR initiates from single-stranded gaps formed at stalled replication forks rather than DSBs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25366522','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25366522"><span id="translatedtitle">Familial hypomagnesemia with hypercalciuria and nephrocalcinosis: variable phenotypic expression in three affected <span class="hlt">sisters</span> from Mexican ancestry.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Arteaga, María E; Hunziker, Walter; Teo, Audrey S M; Hillmer, Axel M; Mutchinick, Osvaldo M</p> <p>2015-02-01</p> <p>Familial hypomagnesemia with hypercalciuria and nephrocalcinosis is a rare autosomal recessive renal disease caused by mutations in genes for the tight junction transmembrane proteins Claudin-16 (CLDN16) and Claudin-19 (CLDN19). We present the first case report of a Mexican family with three affected <span class="hlt">sisters</span> carrying a p.Gly20Asp mutation in CLDN19 whose heterozygous mother showed evident hypercalciuria and normal low magnesemia without any other clinical, laboratory, and radiological symptoms of renal disease making of her an unsuitable donor. The affected <span class="hlt">sisters</span> showed variable phenotypic expression including age of first symptoms, renal urinary tract infections, nephrolithiasis, nephrocalcinosis, and eye symptoms consisting in retinochoroiditis, strabismus, macular scars, bilateral anisocoria, and severe myopia and astigmatism. End stage renal disease due to renal failure needed kidney transplantation in the three of them. Interesting findings were a heterozygous mother with asymptomatic hypercalciuria warning on the need of carefully explore clinical, laboratory, kidney ultrasonograpy, and mutation status in first degree asymptomatic relatives to avoid inappropriate kidney donors; an evident variable phenotypic expression among patients; the identification of a mutation almost confined to Spanish cases and a 3.5 Mb block of genomic homozygosis strongly suggesting a common remote parental ancestor for the gene mutation reported.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25071202','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25071202"><span id="translatedtitle">Clade extinction appears to balance species diversification in <span class="hlt">sister</span> lineages of Afro-Oriental passerine birds.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ricklefs, Robert E; Jønsson, Knud A</p> <p>2014-08-12</p> <p>Recent analyses suggest that the number of species in a clade often increases rapidly at first, but that diversification subsequently slows, apparently as species fill ecological space. Support for diversity dependence comes largely from the failure of species richness to increase with clade age in some analyses of contemporary diversity. However, clades chosen for analysis generally are named taxa and thus are not selected at random. To avoid this potential bias, we analyzed the numbers of species and estimated ages of 150 pairs of <span class="hlt">sister</span> clades established by dispersal of ancestral species between the Oriental and African biogeographic regions. The observed positive exponential relationship between clade size and age suggests that species diversify within clades without apparent limit. If this were true, the pattern of accumulation of <span class="hlt">sister</span>-clade pairs with increasing age would be consistent with the random decline and extinction of entire clades, maintaining an overall balance in species richness. This "pulse" model of diversification is consistent with the fossil record of most groups and reconciles conflicting evidence concerning diversity dependence of clade growth. PMID:25071202</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED289086.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED289086.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Lifespan Attitudes toward <span class="hlt">Death</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Walker, Gail; Maiden, Robert</p> <p></p> <p>To more fully understand how attitudes toward <span class="hlt">death</span> and dying develop and change across the lifespan, 90 male and female subjects between the ages of 2 and 18 years and 90 male and female subjects between the ages of 18 and 97 were administered questionnaires and interviews about dying. The results revealed that children's attitudes were…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3805564','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3805564"><span id="translatedtitle">Digital Language <span class="hlt">Death</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Kornai, András</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Of the approximately 7,000 languages spoken today, some 2,500 are generally considered endangered. Here we argue that this consensus figure vastly underestimates the danger of digital language <span class="hlt">death</span>, in that less than 5% of all languages can still ascend to the digital realm. We present evidence of a massive die-off caused by the digital divide. PMID:24167559</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=death+AND+children+AND+developmental+AND+psychology&pg=3&id=EJ205335','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=death+AND+children+AND+developmental+AND+psychology&pg=3&id=EJ205335"><span id="translatedtitle">Children's Concepts of <span class="hlt">Death</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Kane, Barbara</p> <p>1979-01-01</p> <p>A total of 122 middle-class White boys and girls aged 3 through 12 years were interviewed to determine the nature and the development of their concepts of <span class="hlt">death</span> and the impact of experience on those concepts. (Author/BH)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=brain+AND+tumor&pg=2&id=EJ487867','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=brain+AND+tumor&pg=2&id=EJ487867"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Death</span> of a Leader.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>McLaughlin, Thomas E.</p> <p>1994-01-01</p> <p>When Issaquah (Washington) superintendent, after battling a brain tumor, entered the hospital for the last time, school district had to develop a crisis plan to deal with the possible <span class="hlt">death</span> of the superintendent. A contingency planning team developed a telephone tree for school officials to keep in close contact with teachers and administrators.…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=immunology&pg=6&id=ED219367','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=immunology&pg=6&id=ED219367"><span id="translatedtitle">Sudden Infant <span class="hlt">Death</span> Syndrome.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Barnett, Henry L.; And Others</p> <p></p> <p>There is a growing body of evidence that Sudden Infant <span class="hlt">Death</span> Syndrome (SIDS) victims are not completely normal and healthy, as was once believed. A variety of new information from several disciplines strongly suggests that the infant who dies suddenly and unexpectedly may do so because of subtle developmental, neurologic, cardiorespiratory, and…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=death+AND+penalty&pg=4&id=EJ541959','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=death+AND+penalty&pg=4&id=EJ541959"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Death</span> Penalty in America.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Clifford, Amie L.</p> <p>1997-01-01</p> <p>Examines the legal and moral issues, controversies, and unique trial procedures involved with the <span class="hlt">death</span> penalty. Discusses the 1972 landmark Supreme Court decision that resulted in many states abolishing this punishment, only to reintroduce it later with different provisions. Reviews the controversial case of Sam Sheppard. (MJP)</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li class="active"><span>19</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_19 --> <div id="page_20" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li class="active"><span>20</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="381"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=death+AND+penalty&pg=4&id=EJ409542','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=death+AND+penalty&pg=4&id=EJ409542"><span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">Death</span> Penalty.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Crockett, Mark</p> <p>1990-01-01</p> <p>Provides a lesson plan on the Eighth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution and the imposition of the <span class="hlt">death</span> penalty. Focuses on the controversy concerning capital punishment and stimulates critical thinking in an analysis and discussion of eight hypothetical situations. Includes suggestions for readings, videotapes, and writing assignments. (NL)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=death+AND+america&pg=2&id=EJ269665','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=death+AND+america&pg=2&id=EJ269665"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Death</span> in Contemporary America.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Feifel, Herman, Ed.</p> <p>1982-01-01</p> <p>In five articles, considers the history and nature of <span class="hlt">death</span> in America. Discusses dilemmas that face the helping professions as a consequence of improving medical capability. Highlights the effects of social change upon the mourning experience. Discusses the hospice movement. (RC)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/580270','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/580270"><span id="translatedtitle">Psychiatry on <span class="hlt">death</span> row.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Hussain, A H; Tozman, S</p> <p>1978-03-01</p> <p>The authors present the personal experiences of an attending physician in a <span class="hlt">Death</span> Row in Ceylon (Sri-Lanka). Aspects of the execution scenario are presented and discussed with its implications for the protagonists: the condemned, witnesses, standers-by, authorities and society-at large.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18095535','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18095535"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Death</span> understanding and fear of <span class="hlt">death</span> in young children.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Slaughter, Virginia; Griffiths, Maya</p> <p>2007-10-01</p> <p>The purpose of this study was to test whether the developmental acquisition of a mature concept of <span class="hlt">death</span>, that is, understanding <span class="hlt">death</span> as a biological event, affects young children's fear of <span class="hlt">death</span>. Ninety children between the ages of 4 and 8 participated in an interview study in which their understanding of <span class="hlt">death</span> and their fear of <span class="hlt">death</span> were both assessed. Levels of general anxiety were also measured via parent report. A regression analysis indicated that more mature <span class="hlt">death</span> understanding was associated with lower levels of <span class="hlt">death</span> fear, when age and general anxiety were controlled. These data provide some empirical support for the widely held belief that discussing <span class="hlt">death</span> and dying in biological terms is the best way to alleviate fear of <span class="hlt">death</span> in young children.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002JPhA...35.9309W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002JPhA...35.9309W"><span id="translatedtitle">Population <span class="hlt">death</span> sequences and Cox processes driven by interacting Feller diffusions</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Wei, Gang; Clifford, Peter; Feng, Jianfeng</p> <p>2002-11-01</p> <p>We carry out a complete study on the relationship between Cox processes driven by interacting Feller diffusions and <span class="hlt">death</span> sequences of immigration-emigration <span class="hlt">linked</span> population networks. It is first proved that the Cox process driven by a Feller diffusion is equivalent to the <span class="hlt">death</span> sequence of a birth and <span class="hlt">death</span> process. The conclusion is then generalized to the case of Cox processes driven by interacting Feller diffusions and <span class="hlt">death</span> sequences of interacting populations.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27150866','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27150866"><span id="translatedtitle">Two <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> with Graves' Disease and Similar Clinical Features who Tested Positive for Anti-insulin Antibodies after Thiamazole Treatment.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Torimoto, Keiichi; Okada, Yosuke; Mori, Hiroko; Tanaka, Yoshiya</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>The older of a pair of <span class="hlt">sisters</span> experienced hypoglycemia after the start of thiamazole (MMI) treatment. Based on a high insulin antibody level, she was diagnosed with insulin autoimmune syndrome (IAS). HLA-DNA typing identified DRB1*04:06. Although a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) showed biphasic insulin secretion, the secretion pattern became monophasic after discontinuation of the MMI. The younger <span class="hlt">sister</span> was diagnosed with IAS after the start of MMI treatment. HLA-DNA typing identified DRB1*04:06. The 75-g OGTT showed biphasic insulin secretion, but it became monophasic after discontinuation of the MMI. According to the similar insulin secretion kinetics in the two <span class="hlt">sisters</span> with IAS, we suspect that a genetic predisposition may be associated with the features of anti-insulin antibodies. PMID:27150866</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27225848','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27225848"><span id="translatedtitle">Novel HPS6 mutations identified by whole-exome sequencing in two Japanese <span class="hlt">sisters</span> with suspected ocular albinism.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Miyamichi, Daisuke; Asahina, Miki; Nakajima, Junya; Sato, Miho; Hosono, Katsuhiro; Nomura, Takahito; Negishi, Takashi; Miyake, Noriko; Hotta, Yoshihiro; Ogata, Tsutomu; Matsumoto, Naomichi</p> <p>2016-09-01</p> <p>Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by oculocutaneous albinism, platelet dysfunction and ceroid deposition. We report suspected ocular albinism in two Japanese <span class="hlt">sisters</span>, caused by mutations in the HPS6 (Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome 6) gene. Trio-based whole-exome sequencing (WES) identified novel compound heterozygous mutations in HPS6 (c.1898delC: mother origin and c.2038C>T: father origin) in the two <span class="hlt">sisters</span>. To date, 10 associated mutations have been detected in HPS6. Although we detected no general manifestations, including platelet dysfunction, in the <span class="hlt">sisters</span>, even in long-term follow-up, we established a diagnosis of HPS type 6 based on the HPS6 mutations and absence of dense bodies in the platelets, indicating that WES can identify cases of HPS type 6. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of HPS6 mutations in Japanese patients. PMID:27225848</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27225848','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27225848"><span id="translatedtitle">Novel HPS6 mutations identified by whole-exome sequencing in two Japanese <span class="hlt">sisters</span> with suspected ocular albinism.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Miyamichi, Daisuke; Asahina, Miki; Nakajima, Junya; Sato, Miho; Hosono, Katsuhiro; Nomura, Takahito; Negishi, Takashi; Miyake, Noriko; Hotta, Yoshihiro; Ogata, Tsutomu; Matsumoto, Naomichi</p> <p>2016-09-01</p> <p>Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by oculocutaneous albinism, platelet dysfunction and ceroid deposition. We report suspected ocular albinism in two Japanese <span class="hlt">sisters</span>, caused by mutations in the HPS6 (Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome 6) gene. Trio-based whole-exome sequencing (WES) identified novel compound heterozygous mutations in HPS6 (c.1898delC: mother origin and c.2038C>T: father origin) in the two <span class="hlt">sisters</span>. To date, 10 associated mutations have been detected in HPS6. Although we detected no general manifestations, including platelet dysfunction, in the <span class="hlt">sisters</span>, even in long-term follow-up, we established a diagnosis of HPS type 6 based on the HPS6 mutations and absence of dense bodies in the platelets, indicating that WES can identify cases of HPS type 6. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of HPS6 mutations in Japanese patients.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7229635','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7229635"><span id="translatedtitle">Do "near <span class="hlt">death</span> experiences" occur only near <span class="hlt">death</span>?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Gabbard, G O; Twemlow, S W; Jones, F C</p> <p>1981-06-01</p> <p>Near <span class="hlt">deaths</span> experiences are being reported with increasing frequency, but whether the constellation of factors comprising these experiences is unique to near <span class="hlt">death</span> situations is unknown. This investigation compared near <span class="hlt">death</span> experiences to other out-of-body experiences to determine if there are unique features associated with near <span class="hlt">death</span> experiences. Our results indicate that there are no characteristics which are exclusive to near <span class="hlt">death</span> situations, but our analysis of t-tests is highly suggestive of a number of distinguishing features which differentiate near <span class="hlt">death</span> experiences from other out-of-body experiences.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24834668','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24834668"><span id="translatedtitle">Near-<span class="hlt">death</span> experiences and the psychology of <span class="hlt">death</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Tassell-Matamua, Natasha A</p> <p></p> <p>Little is known about the psychological phenomenology of <span class="hlt">death</span>. Reported across known history and in all cultures by those who have died or been close to <span class="hlt">death</span>, NDEs challenge objective-mechanistic models by suggesting the phenomenology of <span class="hlt">death</span> may involve a variety of complex psychological processes. This article discusses three notable characteristics of the NDE--loss of the fear of <span class="hlt">death</span>, psychological sequelae, and complex conscious abilities--supporting this claim. The implications these have for advancing societal understandings of <span class="hlt">death</span> are discussed, and their pragmatic application for professions where <span class="hlt">death</span> is frequently encountered, such as palliative care, is addressed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27627306','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27627306"><span id="translatedtitle">Amplitude <span class="hlt">death</span> of identical oscillators in networks with direct coupling.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Illing, Lucas</p> <p>2016-08-01</p> <p>It is known that amplitude <span class="hlt">death</span> can occur in networks of coupled identical oscillators if they interact via diffusive time-delayed coupling <span class="hlt">links</span>. Here we consider networks of oscillators that interact via direct time-delayed coupling <span class="hlt">links</span>. It is shown analytically that amplitude <span class="hlt">death</span> is impossible for directly coupled Stuart-Landau oscillators, in contradistinction to the case of diffusive coupling. We demonstrate that amplitude <span class="hlt">death</span> in the strict sense does become possible in directly coupled networks if the node dynamics is governed by second-order delay differential equations. Finally, we analyze in detail directly coupled nodes whose dynamics are described by first-order delay differential equations and find that, while amplitude <span class="hlt">death</span> in the strict sense is impossible, other interesting oscillation quenching scenarios exist. PMID:27627306</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhRvE..94b2215I','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhRvE..94b2215I"><span id="translatedtitle">Amplitude <span class="hlt">death</span> of identical oscillators in networks with direct coupling</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Illing, Lucas</p> <p>2016-08-01</p> <p>It is known that amplitude <span class="hlt">death</span> can occur in networks of coupled identical oscillators if they interact via diffusive time-delayed coupling <span class="hlt">links</span>. Here we consider networks of oscillators that interact via direct time-delayed coupling <span class="hlt">links</span>. It is shown analytically that amplitude <span class="hlt">death</span> is impossible for directly coupled Stuart-Landau oscillators, in contradistinction to the case of diffusive coupling. We demonstrate that amplitude <span class="hlt">death</span> in the strict sense does become possible in directly coupled networks if the node dynamics is governed by second-order delay differential equations. Finally, we analyze in detail directly coupled nodes whose dynamics are described by first-order delay differential equations and find that, while amplitude <span class="hlt">death</span> in the strict sense is impossible, other interesting oscillation quenching scenarios exist.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title20-vol2/pdf/CFR-2010-title20-vol2-sec410-214.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title20-vol2/pdf/CFR-2010-title20-vol2-sec410-214.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">20 CFR 410.214 - Conditions of entitlement; parent, brother, or <span class="hlt">sister</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-04-01</p> <p>... MINE HEALTH AND SAFETY ACT OF 1969, TITLE IV-BLACK LUNG BENEFITS (1969- ) Requirements for Entitlement... years after the miner's <span class="hlt">death</span>, whichever is later, or it is shown to the satisfaction of the... chapter), at the time of the miner's <span class="hlt">death</span>. (c) In addition to the requirements set forth in paragraphs...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4590742','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4590742"><span id="translatedtitle">Long-Term Air Pollution Exposure and Blood Pressure in the <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Study</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Chan, Stephanie H.; Van Hee, Victor C.; Bergen, Silas; Szpiro, Adam A.; DeRoo, Lisa A.; London, Stephanie J.; Marshall, Julian D.; Sandler, Dale P.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Background Exposure to air pollution has been consistently associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, but mechanisms remain uncertain. Associations with blood pressure (BP) may help to explain the cardiovascular effects of air pollution. Objective We examined the cross-sectional relationship between long-term (annual average) residential air pollution exposure and BP in the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences’ <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Study, a large U.S. cohort study investigating risk factors for breast cancer and other outcomes. Methods This analysis included 43,629 women 35–76 years of age, enrolled 2003–2009, who had a <span class="hlt">sister</span> with breast cancer. Geographic information systems contributed to satellite-based nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and fine particulate matter (≤ 2.5 μm; PM2.5) predictions at participant residences at study entry. Generalized additive models were used to examine the relationship between pollutants and measured BP at study entry, adjusting for cardiovascular disease risk factors and including thin plate splines for potential spatial confounding. Results A 10-μg/m3 increase in PM2.5 was associated with 1.4-mmHg higher systolic BP (95% CI: 0.6, 2.3; p < 0.001), 1.0-mmHg higher pulse pressure (95% CI: 0.4, 1.7; p = 0.001), 0.8-mmHg higher mean arterial pressure (95% CI: 0.2, 1.4; p = 0.01), and no significant association with diastolic BP. A 10-ppb increase in NO2 was associated with a 0.4-mmHg (95% CI: 0.2, 0.6; p < 0.001) higher pulse pressure. Conclusions Long-term PM2.5 and NO2 exposures were associated with higher blood pressure. On a population scale, such air pollution–related increases in blood pressure could, in part, account for the increases in cardiovascular disease morbidity and mortality seen in prior studies. Citation Chan SH, Van Hee VC, Bergen S, Szpiro AA, DeRoo LA, London SJ, Marshall JD, Kaufman JD, Sandler DP. 2015. Long-term air pollution exposure and blood pressure in the <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Study. Environ Health</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12159274','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12159274"><span id="translatedtitle">Reducing <span class="hlt">deaths</span> from pregnancy and childbirth. Asia.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Pillai, G</p> <p>1993-01-01</p> <p>99% of all maternal <span class="hlt">deaths</span> occur in the developing world, and South Asian countries account for most <span class="hlt">deaths</span>. The causes are obstructed labor, hemorrhage, pregnancy-related hypertension (eclampsia), or unsafe abortion. The United Nation's Children's Fund estimates 340 maternal <span class="hlt">deaths</span> for every 100,000 live births in India. In Indian rural areas, the maternal mortality rate is between 800 and 900 <span class="hlt">deaths</span> per 100,000 live births in Bangladesh, 600; in Nepal, 830; and in Bhutan, 1710. IN comparison, the rate in the United States is 8 <span class="hlt">deaths</span> per 100,000 live births. The technology for reducing maternal mortality has been utilized in most developed countries, as well as in parts of South Asia, in particular in Sri Lanka. The goal of the Safe Motherhood Initiative was to reduce maternal mortality by 50% by the year 2000. The immediate causes of maternal mortality include pregnancy and delivery and the management of complications such as hemorrhage, toxic and bacterial infections (sepsis), eclampsia, and obstructed labor. The poor health, nutrition, and socioeconomic status of women are the underlying causes of maternal <span class="hlt">death</span>. One study in India found that inadequate medical treatment contributes to 36% to 47% of maternal <span class="hlt">deaths</span> in hospitals. In India, abortion services are legal and acceptable on social, religious, and political grounds, but services are inaccessible. In Bangladesh, the availability of menstrual regulation is estimated to save 100,000 to 160,000 women from unsafe abortions each year. However, the inaccessibility of this service accounts for 700,000 unsafe abortions and 7000 maternal <span class="hlt">deaths</span>. Gender bias in the allocation of meager food supplies results in the poor health and nutritional status of women, rendering a woman's pelvis too small, which causes obstructed labor and even <span class="hlt">death</span>. Socioeconomic status is <span class="hlt">linked</span> to access the family planning and health services which affect mortality and reproductive health. In Sri Lanka and Kerala, government</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26258592','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26258592"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Death</span> from Nitrous Oxide.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Bäckström, Björn; Johansson, Bengt; Eriksson, Anders</p> <p>2015-11-01</p> <p>Nitrous oxide is an inflammable gas that gives no smell or taste. It has a history of abuse as long as its clinical use, and <span class="hlt">deaths</span>, although rare, have been reported. We describe two cases of accidental <span class="hlt">deaths</span> related to voluntary inhalation of nitrous oxide, both found dead with a gas mask covering the face. In an attempt to find an explanation to why the victims did not react properly to oncoming hypoxia, we performed experiments where a test person was allowed to breath in a closed system, with or without nitrous oxide added. Vital signs and gas concentrations as well as subjective symptoms were recorded. The experiments indicated that the explanation to the fact that neither of the descendents had reacted to oncoming hypoxia and hypercapnia was due to the inhalation of nitrous oxide. This study raises the question whether nitrous oxide really should be easily, commercially available. PMID:26258592</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1084192','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1084192"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Death</span> by necrosis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Syntichaki, Popi; Tavernarakis, Nektarios</p> <p>2002-01-01</p> <p>Cells suffer necrotic <span class="hlt">death</span> when exposed to extreme environmental conditions, adverse and excessive stimuli, or when deleterious mutations are encoded in their genetic material. Unlike apoptosis, which involves a highly regulated and elaborate network of biochemical events and cascades, necrosis has been considered generally to be a chaotic decadence process that effects the inexorable demise of cells otherwise not destined to die. This grim prospect is now slowly being overturned, mostly by exciting new findings in two simple model organisms, Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster. Despite the wide spectrum of necrosis-initiating conditions, evidence is accumulating that execution of necrotic or neurodegenerative cell <span class="hlt">death</span> may be carried out by a finite common set of mechanisms. PMID:12101090</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11037214','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11037214"><span id="translatedtitle">Negotiating natural <span class="hlt">death</span> in intensive care.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Seymour, J E</p> <p>2000-10-01</p> <p>Recent empirical evidence of barriers to palliative care in acute hospital settings shows that dying patients may receive invasive medical treatments immediately before <span class="hlt">death</span>, in spite of evidence of their poor prognosis being available to clinicians. The difficulties of ascertaining treatment preferences, predicting the trajectory of dying in critically ill people, and assessing the degree to which further interventions are futile are well documented. Further, enduring ethical complexities attending end of life care mean that the process of withdrawing or withholding medical care is associated with significant problems for clinical staff. Specific difficulties attend the legitimation of treatment withdrawal, the perceived differences between 'killing' and 'letting die' and the cultural constraints which attend the orchestration of 'natural' <span class="hlt">death</span> in situations where human agency is often required before <span class="hlt">death</span> can follow dying. This paper draws on ethnographic research to examine the way in which these problems are resolved during medical work within intensive care. Building on insights from the literature, an analysis of observational case study data is presented which suggests that the negotiation of natural <span class="hlt">death</span> in intensive care hinges upon four strategies. These, which form a framework with which to interpret social interaction between physicians during end of life decision-making in intensive care, are as follows: firstly, the establishment of a 'technical' definition of dying--informed by results of investigations and monitoring equipment--over and above 'bodily' dying informed by clinical experience. Secondly, the alignment of the trajectories of technical and bodily dying to ensure that the events of non-treatment have no perceived causative <span class="hlt">link</span> to <span class="hlt">death</span>. Thirdly, the balancing of medical action with non-action, allowing a diffusion of responsibility for <span class="hlt">death</span> to the patient's body; and lastly, the incorporation of patient's companions and nursing staff</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4589785','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4589785"><span id="translatedtitle">The lethal response to Cdk1 inhibition depends on <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid alignment errors generated by KIF4 and isoform 1 of PRC1</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Voets, Erik; Marsman, Judith; Demmers, Jeroen; Beijersbergen, Roderick; Wolthuis, Rob</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1) is absolutely essential for cell division. Complete ablation of Cdk1 precludes the entry of G2 phase cells into mitosis, and is early embryonic lethal in mice. Dampening Cdk1 activation, by reducing gene expression or upon treatment with cell-permeable Cdk1 inhibitors, is also detrimental for proliferating cells, but has been associated with defects in mitotic progression, and the formation of aneuploid daughter cells. Here, we used a large-scale RNAi screen to identify the human genes that critically determine the cellular toxicity of Cdk1 inhibition. We show that Cdk1 inhibition leads to fatal <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid alignment errors and mitotic arrest in the spindle checkpoint. These problems start early in mitosis and are alleviated by depletion of isoform 1 of PRC1 (PRC1-1), by gene ablation of its binding partner KIF4, or by abrogation of KIF4 motor activity. Our results show that, normally, Cdk1 activity must rise above the level required for mitotic entry. This prevents KIF4-dependent PRC1-1 translocation to astral microtubule tips and safeguards proper chromosome congression. We conclude that cell <span class="hlt">death</span> in response to Cdk1 inhibitors directly relates to chromosome alignment defects generated by insufficient repression of PRC1-1 and KIF4 during prometaphase. PMID:26423135</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26423135','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26423135"><span id="translatedtitle">The lethal response to Cdk1 inhibition depends on <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid alignment errors generated by KIF4 and isoform 1 of PRC1.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Voets, Erik; Marsman, Judith; Demmers, Jeroen; Beijersbergen, Roderick; Wolthuis, Rob</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1) is absolutely essential for cell division. Complete ablation of Cdk1 precludes the entry of G2 phase cells into mitosis, and is early embryonic lethal in mice. Dampening Cdk1 activation, by reducing gene expression or upon treatment with cell-permeable Cdk1 inhibitors, is also detrimental for proliferating cells, but has been associated with defects in mitotic progression, and the formation of aneuploid daughter cells. Here, we used a large-scale RNAi screen to identify the human genes that critically determine the cellular toxicity of Cdk1 inhibition. We show that Cdk1 inhibition leads to fatal <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid alignment errors and mitotic arrest in the spindle checkpoint. These problems start early in mitosis and are alleviated by depletion of isoform 1 of PRC1 (PRC1-1), by gene ablation of its binding partner KIF4, or by abrogation of KIF4 motor activity. Our results show that, normally, Cdk1 activity must rise above the level required for mitotic entry. This prevents KIF4-dependent PRC1-1 translocation to astral microtubule tips and safeguards proper chromosome congression. We conclude that cell <span class="hlt">death</span> in response to Cdk1 inhibitors directly relates to chromosome alignment defects generated by insufficient repression of PRC1-1 and KIF4 during prometaphase. PMID:26423135</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li class="active"><span>20</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_20 --> <div id="page_21" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li class="active"><span>21</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="401"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/7262664','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/7262664"><span id="translatedtitle">Atypical autoerotic <span class="hlt">deaths</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Gowitt, G.T.; Hanzlick, R.L. )</p> <p>1992-06-01</p> <p>So-called typical' autoerotic fatalities are the result of asphyxia due to mechanical compression of the neck, chest, or abdomen, whereas atypical' autoeroticism involves sexual self-stimulation by other means. The authors present five atypical autoerotic fatalities that involved the use of dichlorodifluoromethane, nitrous oxide, isobutyl nitrite, cocaine, or compounds containing 1-1-1-trichloroethane. Mechanisms of <span class="hlt">death</span> are discussed in each case and the pertinent literature is reviewed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15709218','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15709218"><span id="translatedtitle">Fear of <span class="hlt">death</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Penson, Richard T; Partridge, Rosamund A; Shah, Muhammad A; Giansiracusa, David; Chabner, Bruce A; Lynch, Thomas J</p> <p>2005-02-01</p> <p>Shortly before his <span class="hlt">death</span> in 1995, Kenneth B. Schwartz, a cancer patient at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) founded The Kenneth B. Schwartz Center at MGH. The Schwartz Center is a nonprofit organization dedicated to supporting and advancing compassionate health care delivery, which provides hope to the patient and support to caregivers and encourages the healing process. The center sponsors the Schwartz Center Rounds, a monthly multidisciplinary forum where caregivers reflect on important psychosocial issues faced by patients, their families, and their caregivers, and gain insight and support from fellow staff members. For many, cancer is synonymous with <span class="hlt">death</span>. Fearing <span class="hlt">death</span> is a rational response. For too long, medicine has ignored this primeval fear. Increasingly, clinicians recognize and address end-of-life issues, facing patients' and our own emotional vulnerabilities in order to connect and explore problems and fears. Listening and learning from the patient guides us as we acknowledge much of the mystery that still surrounds the dying process. Rarely is there a simple or right answer. An empathetic response to suffering patients is the best support. Support is vital in fostering the adjustment of patients. A silent presence may prove more helpful than well-meant counsel for many patients. Through an examination of eight caregiver narratives of their patients' experiences, the role of the health care provider in the dying process, particularly in regard to challenging fear, is reviewed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23251487','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23251487"><span id="translatedtitle">Incestuous <span class="hlt">sisters</span>: mate preference for brothers over unrelated males in Drosophila melanogaster.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Loyau, Adeline; Cornuau, Jérémie H; Clobert, Jean; Danchin, Etienne</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>The literature is full of examples of inbreeding avoidance, while recent mathematical models predict that inbreeding tolerance or even inbreeding preference should be expected under several realistic conditions like e.g. polygyny. We investigated male and female mate preferences with respect to relatedness in the fruit fly D. melanogaster. Experiments offered the choice between a first order relative (full-sibling or parent) and an unrelated individual with the same age and mating history. We found that females significantly preferred mating with their brothers, thus supporting inbreeding preference. Moreover, females did not avoid mating with their fathers, and males did not avoid mating with their <span class="hlt">sisters</span>, thus supporting inbreeding tolerance. Our experiments therefore add empirical evidence for inbreeding preference, which strengthens the prediction that inbreeding tolerance and preference can evolve under specific circumstances through the positive effects on inclusive fitness.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26917595','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26917595"><span id="translatedtitle">Mouse oocytes differentiate through organelle enrichment from <span class="hlt">sister</span> cyst germ cells.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Lei, Lei; Spradling, Allan C</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>Oocytes differentiate in diverse species by receiving organelles and cytoplasm from <span class="hlt">sister</span> germ cells while joined in germline cysts or syncytia. Mouse primordial germ cells form germline cysts, but the role of cysts in oogenesis is unknown. We find that mouse germ cells receive organelles from neighboring cyst cells and build a Balbiani body to become oocytes, whereas nurselike germ cells die. Organelle movement, Balbiani body formation, and oocyte fate determination are selectively blocked by low levels of microtubule-dependent transport inhibitors. Membrane breakdown within the cyst and an apoptosis-like process are associated with organelle transfer into the oocyte, events reminiscent of nurse cell dumping in Drosophila We propose that cytoplasmic and organelle transport plays an evolutionarily conserved and functionally important role in mammalian oocyte differentiation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27532052','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27532052"><span id="translatedtitle">Genomic analysis reveals hidden biodiversity within colugos, the <span class="hlt">sister</span> group to primates.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Mason, Victor C; Li, Gang; Minx, Patrick; Schmitz, Jürgen; Churakov, Gennady; Doronina, Liliya; Melin, Amanda D; Dominy, Nathaniel J; Lim, Norman T-L; Springer, Mark S; Wilson, Richard K; Warren, Wesley C; Helgen, Kristofer M; Murphy, William J</p> <p>2016-08-01</p> <p>Colugos are among the most poorly studied mammals despite their centrality to resolving supraordinal primate relationships. Two described species of these gliding mammals are the sole living members of the order Dermoptera, distributed throughout Southeast Asia. We generated a draft genome sequence for a Sunda colugo and a Philippine colugo reference alignment, and used these to identify colugo-specific genetic changes that were enriched in sensory and musculoskeletal-related genes that likely underlie their nocturnal and gliding adaptations. Phylogenomic analysis and catalogs of rare genomic changes overwhelmingly support the contested hypothesis that colugos are the <span class="hlt">sister</span> group to primates (Primatomorpha), to the exclusion of treeshrews. We captured ~140 kb of orthologous sequence data from colugo museum specimens sampled across their range and identified large genetic differences between many geographically isolated populations that may result in a >300% increase in the number of recognized colugo species. Our results identify conservation units to mitigate future losses of this enigmatic mammalian order. PMID:27532052</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1004997','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1004997"><span id="translatedtitle">HLA antigen familial study in complete Behçet's syndrome affecting three <span class="hlt">sisters</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Villanueva, J L; Gonzalez-Dominguez, J; Gonzalez-Fernandez, R; Prada, J L; Peña, J; Solana, R</p> <p>1993-01-01</p> <p>Behçet's disease is a multisystemic disease affecting most organs. Although a tendency towards an association with a certain genetic type and with HLA-B51 is suspected, the incidence of several siblings with Behçet's disease in a single family is rare. A family, in which three <span class="hlt">sisters</span> were affected with Behçet's disease, uveitis being the most severe manifestation, was studied. In this family all siblings were B51 positive. Only the female siblings, however, with a positive identical HLA phenotype: A2, A11, B51, B44, Cw6, Cw5, DR4, DRw13, DRw53, DRw52, DQw7, DQw6, developed the disease symptoms, whereas none of the male siblings was affected. PMID:8447696</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26917595','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26917595"><span id="translatedtitle">Mouse oocytes differentiate through organelle enrichment from <span class="hlt">sister</span> cyst germ cells.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Lei, Lei; Spradling, Allan C</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>Oocytes differentiate in diverse species by receiving organelles and cytoplasm from <span class="hlt">sister</span> germ cells while joined in germline cysts or syncytia. Mouse primordial germ cells form germline cysts, but the role of cysts in oogenesis is unknown. We find that mouse germ cells receive organelles from neighboring cyst cells and build a Balbiani body to become oocytes, whereas nurselike germ cells die. Organelle movement, Balbiani body formation, and oocyte fate determination are selectively blocked by low levels of microtubule-dependent transport inhibitors. Membrane breakdown within the cyst and an apoptosis-like process are associated with organelle transfer into the oocyte, events reminiscent of nurse cell dumping in Drosophila We propose that cytoplasmic and organelle transport plays an evolutionarily conserved and functionally important role in mammalian oocyte differentiation. PMID:26917595</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4980104','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4980104"><span id="translatedtitle">Genomic analysis reveals hidden biodiversity within colugos, the <span class="hlt">sister</span> group to primates</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Mason, Victor C.; Li, Gang; Minx, Patrick; Schmitz, Jürgen; Churakov, Gennady; Doronina, Liliya; Melin, Amanda D.; Dominy, Nathaniel J.; Lim, Norman T-L.; Springer, Mark S.; Wilson, Richard K.; Warren, Wesley C.; Helgen, Kristofer M.; Murphy, William J.</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Colugos are among the most poorly studied mammals despite their centrality to resolving supraordinal primate relationships. Two described species of these gliding mammals are the sole living members of the order Dermoptera, distributed throughout Southeast Asia. We generated a draft genome sequence for a Sunda colugo and a Philippine colugo reference alignment, and used these to identify colugo-specific genetic changes that were enriched in sensory and musculoskeletal-related genes that likely underlie their nocturnal and gliding adaptations. Phylogenomic analysis and catalogs of rare genomic changes overwhelmingly support the contested hypothesis that colugos are the <span class="hlt">sister</span> group to primates (Primatomorpha), to the exclusion of treeshrews. We captured ~140 kb of orthologous sequence data from colugo museum specimens sampled across their range and identified large genetic differences between many geographically isolated populations that may result in a >300% increase in the number of recognized colugo species. Our results identify conservation units to mitigate future losses of this enigmatic mammalian order. PMID:27532052</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1998603','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1998603"><span id="translatedtitle">Frequency of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchange and chromosomal aberrations in asbestos cement workers.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Fatma, N; Jain, A K; Rahman, Q</p> <p>1991-02-01</p> <p>Exposure to asbestos minerals has been associated with a wide variety of adverse health effects including lung cancer, pleural mesothelioma, and cancer of other organs. It was shown previously that asbestos samples collected from a local asbestos factory enhanced <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchanges (SCEs) and chromosomal aberrations in vitro using human lymphocytes. In the present study, 22 workers from the same factory and 12 controls were further investigated. Controls were matched for age, sex, and socioeconomic state. The peripheral blood lymphocytes were cultured and harvested at 48 hours for studies of chromosomal aberrations and at 72 hours for SCE frequency determinations. Asbestos workers had a raised mean SCE rate and increased numbers of chromosomal aberrations compared with a control population. Most of the chromosomal aberrations were chromatid gap and break types.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70024793','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70024793"><span id="translatedtitle">Magmatic activity beneath the quiescent Three <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> volcanic center, central Oregon Cascade Range, USA</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Wicks, Charles W.; Dzurisin, Daniel; Ingebritsen, Steven E.; Thatcher, Wayne R.; Lu, Zhong; Iverson, Justin</p> <p>2002-01-01</p> <p>Images from satellite interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) reveal uplift of a broad ???10 km by 20 km area in the Three <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> volcanic center of the central Oregon Cascade Range, ???130 km south of Mt. St. Helens. The last eruption in the volcanic center occurred ???1500 years ago. Multiple satellite images from 1992 through 2000 indicate that most if not all of ???100 mm of observed uplift occurred between September 1998 and October 2000. Geochemical (water chemistry) anomalies, first noted during 1990, coincide with the area of uplift and suggest the existence of a crustal magma reservoir prior to the uplift. We interpret the uplift as inflation caused by an ongoing episode of magma intrusion at a depth of ???6.5 km.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3519633','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3519633"><span id="translatedtitle">Incestuous <span class="hlt">Sisters</span>: Mate Preference for Brothers over Unrelated Males in Drosophila melanogaster</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Loyau, Adeline; Cornuau, Jérémie H.; Clobert, Jean; Danchin, Étienne</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>The literature is full of examples of inbreeding avoidance, while recent mathematical models predict that inbreeding tolerance or even inbreeding preference should be expected under several realistic conditions like e.g. polygyny. We investigated male and female mate preferences with respect to relatedness in the fruit fly D. melanogaster. Experiments offered the choice between a first order relative (full-sibling or parent) and an unrelated individual with the same age and mating history. We found that females significantly preferred mating with their brothers, thus supporting inbreeding preference. Moreover, females did not avoid mating with their fathers, and males did not avoid mating with their <span class="hlt">sisters</span>, thus supporting inbreeding tolerance. Our experiments therefore add empirical evidence for inbreeding preference, which strengthens the prediction that inbreeding tolerance and preference can evolve under specific circumstances through the positive effects on inclusive fitness. PMID:23251487</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10723702','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10723702"><span id="translatedtitle">Elevated plasma bile acid concentrations in two <span class="hlt">sisters</span> with tyrosinaemia type I.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Sass, J O; Skladal, D</p> <p>2000-02-01</p> <p>A 21-month-old girl suffering from tyrosinaemia type I and undergoing treatment with 2-(2-nitro-4-trifluoro-methylbenzoyl)-1,3-cyclohexanedione (NTBC) presented with pruritus which rapidly ceased with administration of high doses of ursodeoxycholic acid. Determination of plasma bile acids revealed clearly elevated levels both in samples taken before and after the onset of NTBC therapy, thus indicating, that the increase was not related to the administration of this drug. This result is corroborated by data from the first patient's newborn <span class="hlt">sister</span>, diagnosed with the same disease, who showed elevated plasma bile acid concentrations in all samples examined, except for the cord plasma. This is the first report on altered bile acid concentrations in tyrosinaemia type I, and underlines the need for thorough investigation of bile acid metabolism in this disease.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26643143','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26643143"><span id="translatedtitle">PICH promotes <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid disjunction and co-operates with topoisomerase II in mitosis.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Nielsen, Christian F; Huttner, Diana; Bizard, Anna H; Hirano, Seiki; Li, Tian-Neng; Palmai-Pallag, Timea; Bjerregaard, Victoria A; Liu, Ying; Nigg, Erich A; Wang, Lily Hui-Ching; Hickson, Ian D</p> <p>2015-12-08</p> <p>PICH is a SNF2 family DNA translocase that binds to ultra-fine DNA bridges (UFBs) in mitosis. Numerous roles for PICH have been proposed from protein depletion experiments, but a consensus has failed to emerge. Here, we report that deletion of PICH in avian cells causes chromosome structural abnormalities, and hypersensitivity to an inhibitor of Topoisomerase II (Topo II), ICRF-193. ICRF-193-treated PICH(-/-) cells undergo <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid non-disjunction in anaphase, and frequently abort cytokinesis. PICH co-localizes with Topo IIα on UFBs and at the ribosomal DNA locus, and the timely resolution of both structures depends on the ATPase activity of PICH. Purified PICH protein strongly stimulates the catalytic activity of Topo II in vitro. Consistent with this, a human PICH(-/-) cell line exhibits chromosome instability and chromosome condensation and decatenation defects similar to those of ICRF-193-treated cells. We propose that PICH and Topo II cooperate to prevent chromosome missegregation events in mitosis.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5059761','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5059761"><span id="translatedtitle">Evolutionary interplay between <span class="hlt">sister</span> cytochrome P450 genes shapes plasticity in plant metabolism</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Liu, Zhenhua; Tavares, Raquel; Forsythe, Evan S.; André, François; Lugan, Raphaël; Jonasson, Gabriella; Boutet-Mercey, Stéphanie; Tohge, Takayuki; Beilstein, Mark A.; Werck-Reichhart, Danièle; Renault, Hugues</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Expansion of the cytochrome P450 gene family is often proposed to have a critical role in the evolution of metabolic complexity, in particular in microorganisms, insects and plants. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the evolution of this complexity are poorly understood. Here we describe the evolutionary history of a plant P450 retrogene, which emerged and underwent fixation in the common ancestor of Brassicales, before undergoing tandem duplication in the ancestor of Brassicaceae. Duplication leads first to gain of dual functions in one of the copies. Both <span class="hlt">sister</span> genes are retained through subsequent speciation but eventually return to a single copy in two of three diverging lineages. In the lineage in which both copies are maintained, the ancestral functions are split between paralogs and a novel function arises in the copy under relaxed selection. Our work illustrates how retrotransposition and gene duplication can favour the emergence of novel metabolic functions. PMID:27713409</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16621615','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16621615"><span id="translatedtitle">Seed plant phylogeny: gnetophytes are derived conifers and a <span class="hlt">sister</span> group to Pinaceae.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Hajibabaei, Mehrdad; Xia, Junnan; Drouin, Guy</p> <p>2006-07-01</p> <p>The phylogenetic position of gnetophytes has long been controversial. We sequenced parts of the genes coding for the largest subunit of nuclear RNA polymerase I, II, and III and combined these sequences with those of four chloroplast genes, two mitochondrial genes, and 18S rRNA genes to address this issue. Both maximum likelihood and maximum parsimony analyses of the sites not affected by high substitution levels strongly support a phylogeny where gymnosperms and angiosperms are monophyletic, where cycads are at the base of gymnosperm tree and are followed by ginkgos, and where gnetophytes are grouped within conifers as the <span class="hlt">sister</span> group of pines. The evolution of several morphological and molecular characters of gnetophytes and conifers will therefore need to be reinterpreted. PMID:16621615</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16200328','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16200328"><span id="translatedtitle">Dying to be thin: attachment to <span class="hlt">death</span> in anorexia nervosa.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Latzer, Yael; Hochdorf, Zipora</p> <p>2005-09-29</p> <p>Anorexia Nervosa (AN) usually follows a prolonged course accompanied by significant morbidity and high mortality. AN patients have been found to have elevated and attempted suicide rates, with suicide being the second most common cause of <span class="hlt">death</span> in AN after the complications of the disorder itself. The suicide risk in AN is similar to that in major depression or conduct disorder and <span class="hlt">linked</span> mainly to longer duration of illness, lower weight, bingeing and purging, impulsivity-related manifestations, comorbid substance abuse, and affective disorder. This paper reviews suicidal tendency and disturbed body image, <span class="hlt">death</span> and eating disorders, and attachment and <span class="hlt">death</span> with clinical implications related to AN. PMID:16200328</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Death&pg=5&id=EJ821627','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Death&pg=5&id=EJ821627"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Death</span> Sentences: A Content Analysis of Children's <span class="hlt">Death</span> Literature</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Poling, Devereaux A.; Hupp, Julie M.</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>A multidimensional concept of <span class="hlt">death</span> must include biological, sociocultural, and emotional components. Children glean information about <span class="hlt">death</span> in many ways, one of which is through books. In this study, the authors compared the 3 dimensions of <span class="hlt">death</span>-related information (irreversibility, inevitability, nonfunctionality) in 24 young children's picture…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Black+AND+Death&id=EJ1005425','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Black+AND+Death&id=EJ1005425"><span id="translatedtitle">A <span class="hlt">Death</span> in the Family: <span class="hlt">Death</span> as a Zen Concept</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Black, Helen K.; Rubinstein, Robert L.</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>This study is based on original research that explored family reaction to the <span class="hlt">death</span> of an elderly husband and father. We interviewed 34 families (a family included a widow and two adult biological children) approximately 6 to 10 months after the <span class="hlt">death</span>. In one-on-one interviews, we discussed family members' initial reaction to the <span class="hlt">death</span>, how the…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/978251','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/978251"><span id="translatedtitle">An increase in telomere <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchange in murine embryonic stem cells possessing critically shortened telomeres</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Wang, Yisong; Giannone, Richard J; Wu, Jun; Gomez, Marla V; Liu, Yie</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>Telomerase deficiency leads to a progressive loss of telomeric DNA that eventually triggers cell apoptosis in human primary cells during prolonged growth in culture. Rare survivors can maintain telomere length through either activation of telomerase or recombination-based telomere lengthening, and thus proliferate indefinitely. We have explored the possibility that telomeres may be maintained through telomere <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchange (T-SCE) in murine telomere reverse transcriptase-deficient (mTert -/-) splenocytes and ES cells. Because telomerase deficiency leads to gradual loss of telomeric DNA in mTert -/- splenocytes and ES cells and eventually to chromosomes with telomere signal-free ends (SFEs), we examined these cell types for evidence of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchange at telomeres, and observed an increase in T-SCEs only in a subset of mTert -/- splenocytes or ES cells that possessed multiple SFEs. Furthermore, T-SCEs were more often detected in ES cells than in splenocytes that harbored a similar frequency of SFEs. In mTert heterozygous (mTert +/-) ES cells or splenocytes, which are known to exhibit a decrease in average telomere length but no SFEs, no increase in T-SCE was observed. In addition to T-SCE, other genomic rearrangements (i.e., SCE) were also significantly increased in mTert -/- ES cells possessing critically short telomeres, but not in splenocytes. Our results suggest that animals and cell culture differ in their ability to carry out genomic rearrangements as a means of maintaining telomere integrity when telomeres become critically shortened.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://pubs.usgs.gov/pp/1365/report.pdf','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="https://pubs.usgs.gov/pp/1365/report.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Ice Volumes on Cascade Volcanoes: Mount Rainier, Mount Hood, Three <span class="hlt">Sisters</span>, and Mount Shasta</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Driedger, Carolyn L.; Kennard, Paul M.</p> <p>1986-01-01</p> <p>During the eruptions of Mount St. Helens the occurrence of floods and mudflows made apparent the need for predictive water-hazard analysis of other Cascade volcanoes. A basic requirement for such analysis is information about the volumes and distributions of snow and ice on other volcanoes. A radar unit contained in a backpack was used to make point measurements of ice thickness on major glaciers of Mount Rainier, Wash.; Mount Hood, Oreg.; the Three <span class="hlt">Sisters</span>, Oreg.; and Mount Shasta, Calif. The measurements were corrected for slope and were used to develop subglacial contour maps from which glacier volumes were measured. These values were used to develop estimation methods for finding volumes of unmeasured glaciers. These methods require a knowledge of glacier slope, altitude, and area and require an estimation of basal shear stress, each estimate derived by using topographic maps updated by aerial photographs. The estimation methods were found to be accurate within ?20 percent on measured glaciers and to be within ?25 percent when applied to unmeasured glaciers on the Cascade volcanoes. The estimation methods may be applicable to other temperate glaciers in similar climatic settings. Areas and volumes of snow and ice are as follows: Mount Rainier, 991 million ft2, 156 billion ft3; Mount Hood, 145 million ft2, 12 billion ft3; Three <span class="hlt">Sisters</span>, 89 million ft2, 6 billion ft3; and Mount Shasta, 74 million ft2, 5 billion ft3. The distribution of ice and firn patches within 58 glacierized basins on volcanoes is mapped and listed by altitude and by watershed to facilitate water-hazard analysis.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li class="active"><span>21</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_21 --> <div id="page_22" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li class="active"><span>22</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="421"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4592412','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4592412"><span id="translatedtitle">Overall and Central Adiposity and Breast Cancer Risk in the <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Study</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>White, Alexandra J.; Nichols, Hazel B.; Bradshaw, Patrick T.; Sandler, Dale P.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Background Greater body mass index (BMI), a measure of overall adiposity, is associated with higher risk of postmenopausal breast cancer. The role of central adiposity, often measured by waist circumference, is less well understood especially among premenopausal women. We aimed to examine multiple measures of adiposity in relation to breast cancer in a prospective cohort study. Methods 50,884 <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Study cohort participants ages 35–74 were enrolled from 2003–2009. Inclusion criteria for the cohort included having a <span class="hlt">sister</span> previously diagnosed with breast cancer. Trained study personnel measured height, weight, waist and hip circumference during a home visit and study participants completed a detailed questionnaire. Using Cox regression, we estimated multivariable hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for breast cancer risk associated with adiposity measurements, considering tumor subtype and menopausal status. Results In total, 2,009 breast cancers were diagnosed during follow-up (mean=5.4 years). Weight, BMI, waist circumference and waist-hip-ratio were positively associated with overall breast cancer risk and HRs were greater among postmenopausal women, those with hormonally responsive tumors and non-current postmenopausal hormone users. In models that adjusted for BMI, waist circumference associations persisted among both postmenopausal women (81–88cm vs ≤80cm, HR=1.16, 95%CI 1.01, 1.35; >88cm vs ≤80cm, HR=1.30, 95% CI 1.10, 1.54) and premenopausal women (81–88cm vs ≤80cm, HR=1.56, 95%CI 1.19, 2.04; >88cm vs ≤80cm, HR=1.30, 95% CI 0.91, 1.87). Conclusions Findings from this large, prospective study with examiner-measured body size indicate that waist circumference is independently and positively associated with both premenopausal and postmenopausal breast cancer risk. PMID:26193782</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=kuala+AND+lumpur&pg=4&id=EJ506682','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=kuala+AND+lumpur&pg=4&id=EJ506682"><span id="translatedtitle">Childhood <span class="hlt">Deaths</span> from Physical Abuse.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Kasim, Mohd. Sham; and Others</p> <p>1995-01-01</p> <p>This paper describes 30 cases of childhood <span class="hlt">deaths</span> caused by physical abuse in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Data presented include ethnic origins, age, causes of <span class="hlt">death</span>, identity of perpetrators, and marital situation of parents. (DB)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23087443','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23087443"><span id="translatedtitle">The time of <span class="hlt">death</span>'s badness.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Johansson, Jens</p> <p>2012-10-01</p> <p>Those who endorse the view that <span class="hlt">death</span> is in some cases bad for the deceased--a view that, as I shall explain, has considerable bearing on many bioethical issues--need to address the following, Epicurean question: When is <span class="hlt">death</span> bad for the one who dies? The two most popular answers are "before <span class="hlt">death</span>" (priorism) and "after <span class="hlt">death</span>" (subsequentism). Part of the support for these two views consists in the idea that a third answer, "at no time" (atemporalism), makes <span class="hlt">death</span> unsatisfyingly different from other evils. I argue that this objection is mistaken, and that priorism and subsequentism face problems that atemporalism avoids. Moreover, I argue that if it is nonetheless insisted that we must find a time at which my <span class="hlt">death</span> is bad for me, we can appeal to periods that begin before my <span class="hlt">death</span> and end after my <span class="hlt">death</span>. I end with some implications for posthumous harm.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://medlineplus.gov/magazine/issues/fall07/articles/fall07pg16-17.html','NIH-MEDLINEPLUS'); return false;" href="https://medlineplus.gov/magazine/issues/fall07/articles/fall07pg16-17.html"><span id="translatedtitle">Life, <span class="hlt">Death</span>, and Second Chances</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePlus</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>... Home Current Issue Past Issues Special Section Life, <span class="hlt">Death</span>, and Second Chances Past Issues / Fall 2007 Table ... New Asthma Guidelines: What You Should Know / Life, <span class="hlt">Death</span>, and Second Chances / Asthma Research: The NIH-NJRC ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.nichd.nih.gov/health/topics/sids/conditioninfo/Pages/default.aspx','NIH-MEDLINEPLUS'); return false;" href="https://www.nichd.nih.gov/health/topics/sids/conditioninfo/Pages/default.aspx"><span id="translatedtitle">Sudden Infant <span class="hlt">Death</span> Syndrome (SIDS)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePlus</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications Sudden Infant <span class="hlt">Death</span> Syndrome (SIDS): Condition Information Skip sharing on social ... Share this: Page Content SIDS is the sudden <span class="hlt">death</span> of an infant younger than 1 year of ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1376008','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1376008"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Death</span> in Denmark: a reply.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Lamb, D</p> <p>1991-01-01</p> <p>This reply to Martyn Evans's support for a cardiac-centered concept of <span class="hlt">death</span> attempts to meet some objections to the brainstem definition of <span class="hlt">death</span>. Evans's appeal to Wittgenstein's philosophy is also criticised. PMID:1870081</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1870081','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1870081"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Death</span> in Denmark: a reply.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Lamb, D</p> <p>1991-06-01</p> <p>This reply to Martyn Evans's support for a cardiac-centered concept of <span class="hlt">death</span> attempts to meet some objections to the brainstem definition of <span class="hlt">death</span>. Evans's appeal to Wittgenstein's philosophy is also criticised.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16586256','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16586256"><span id="translatedtitle">[Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy (1809 - 1847): the mystery of his early <span class="hlt">death</span>].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Schmideler, S; Somburg, O; Steinberg, H; Splett, T</p> <p>2006-09-01</p> <p>Composer and director of music at Leipzig's Gewandhaus Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy died remarkably young, on 4 November 1847, at the age of 38. The cause of his early <span class="hlt">death</span> has been a mystery ever since. Three contemporary doctors diagnosed Nervenschlag ("nervous stroke"). Starting with a short outline of Mendelssohn's pathography, this paper includes and quotes for the first time all the contemporary accounts of his <span class="hlt">death</span>. After considering the older medical interpretations, the paper considers these reports from the point of view of present-day neurological and psychiatric expertise. It reveals that all the accounts had been filed by medical laymen, so their personal impressions had played a major role in their reports. However, it is indisputable that it was pathologic brain alterations that lead to Mendelssohn's <span class="hlt">death</span>. Weighing up and carefully considering the sources, the authors regard subarachnoidal hemorrhage (SAH) as a likely cause of <span class="hlt">death</span>. There may even have been some kind of genetic predisposition, since what is reported in this paper regarding Mendelssohn's <span class="hlt">death</span> also applies to the very similar symptoms and circumstances surrounding his <span class="hlt">sister</span> Fanny's <span class="hlt">death</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24666149','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24666149"><span id="translatedtitle">Self-related consequences of <span class="hlt">death</span> fear and <span class="hlt">death</span> denial.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Cozzolino, Philip J; Blackie, Laura E R; Meyers, Lawrence S</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>This study explores self-related outcomes (e.g., esteem, self-concept clarity, existential well-being) as a function of the interaction between self-reported levels of <span class="hlt">death</span> fear and <span class="hlt">death</span> denial. Consistent with the idea that positive existential growth can come from individuals facing, rather than denying, their mortality (Cozzolino, 2006 ), the authors observed that not fearing and denying <span class="hlt">death</span> can bolster important positive components of the self. That is, individuals low in <span class="hlt">death</span> denial and <span class="hlt">death</span> fear evidenced an enhanced self that is valued, clearly conceived, efficacious, and that has meaning and purpose.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26030202','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26030202"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">DEATH</span> CONCERN AND <span class="hlt">DEATH</span> OBSESSION IN IRANIAN NURSES.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Dadfar, Mahboubeh; Lester, David</p> <p>2015-06-01</p> <p>The goal of the present study was to examine whether nurses had increased <span class="hlt">death</span> concern and <span class="hlt">death</span> obsession compared to non-nursing staff. A <span class="hlt">Death</span> Concern Scale and a <span class="hlt">Death</span> Obsession Scale, translated into Persian, were administered to 56 female Iranian nurses (55% in their 30s) and compared to 56 female hospital staff members (45% in their 30s). The two groups did not differ significantly in their scores on either scale. It is, therefore, recommended that <span class="hlt">death</span> education programs in hospitals be given to all staff, nursing and non-nursing.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4436877','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4436877"><span id="translatedtitle">Thymineless <span class="hlt">death</span>, at the origin</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Guzmán, Elena C.; Martín, Carmen M.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Thymineless <span class="hlt">death</span> (TLD) in bacteria has been a focus of research for decades. Nevertheless, the advances in the last 5 years, with Escherichia coli as the model organism, have been outstanding. Independent research groups have presented compelling results that establish that the initiation of chromosome replication under thymine starvation is a key element in the scenario of TLD. Here we review the experimental results <span class="hlt">linking</span> the initiation of replication to the lethality under thymine starvation and the proposed mechanisms by which TLD occurs. The concept of this relationship was ‘in the air,’ but approaches were not sufficiently developed to demonstrate the crucial role of DNA initiation in TLD. Genome-wide marker frequency analysis and Two Dimensional agarose gel electrophoresis have been critical methods employed to reveal that initiation events and the degradation of the oriC region occur during thymine starvation. The relationships between these events and TLD have established them to be the main underlying causes of the lethality under thymine starvation. Furthermore, we summarize additional important findings from the study of different mutant strains, which support the idea that the initiation of chromosomal replication and TLD are connected. PMID:26042116</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2761079','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2761079"><span id="translatedtitle">Risk stratification for sudden cardiac <span class="hlt">death</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Cutler, Michael J; Rosenbaum, David S.</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>The proportion of cardiovascular <span class="hlt">deaths</span> attributable to sudden cardiac <span class="hlt">death</span> (SCD) is on the rise. Herein lies the rationale for developing risk stratification strategies to predict who will benefit from prophylactic ICD implantation. Current guidelines recommend prophylactic ICD therapy in patients with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). However, there are clear limitations in using LVEF alone to decide who should receive an ICD. There is mounting evidence that microvolt-level T wave alternans (TWA) is an important marker of arrhythmic risk. TWA is appealing because it non-invasively probes underlying electrophysiological substrate and has been <span class="hlt">linked</span> to cellular mechanisms for arrhythmias. This review considers the clinical role of TWA for risk stratification of SCD. PMID:19631909</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.compassionatefriends.org/brochures/death_of_an_adult_child.aspx','NIH-MEDLINEPLUS'); return false;" href="http://www.compassionatefriends.org/brochures/death_of_an_adult_child.aspx"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Death</span> of an Adult Child</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePlus</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>... iGive.com Purchase Through AmazonSmile Contact Us Donate <span class="hlt">Death</span> of an Adult Child The <span class="hlt">death</span> of any child, regardless of cause or age, ... the situations that may have caused their child’s <span class="hlt">death</span>. Judgmental statements from others indicating that the child ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=death+AND+children+AND+developmental+AND+psychology&pg=2&id=EJ239498','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=death+AND+children+AND+developmental+AND+psychology&pg=2&id=EJ239498"><span id="translatedtitle">Helping Students Cope with <span class="hlt">Death</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Rodabough, Tillman</p> <p>1980-01-01</p> <p>Classroom teachers need to understand the broad differences that exist between a child's perception of <span class="hlt">death</span> and that of an adult and should be prepared to confront and cope with the effects of <span class="hlt">death</span> and grief upon students. Children's perceptions of <span class="hlt">death</span> and ways in which the teacher can help the child with his grief are described. (JN)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED123503.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED123503.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Winning the Race with <span class="hlt">Death</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Goodman, Lisl M.</p> <p></p> <p>The hypothesis of a negative relationship between level of self-actualization and fear of <span class="hlt">death</span> was based on the assumption that people are not afraid of <span class="hlt">death</span> per se but of the incompleteness of their lives. Fear of <span class="hlt">death</span> was furthermore assumed to inhibit orientation toward the future, thereby restricting movement toward achievement and…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Euthanasia&pg=7&id=ED166116','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Euthanasia&pg=7&id=ED166116"><span id="translatedtitle">Teaching about <span class="hlt">Death</span> to Undergraduates.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Pine, Vanderlyn R.; And Others</p> <p></p> <p>Development, implementation, and teaching of a college-level course on dying and <span class="hlt">death</span> are described. The authors review their own experiences in becoming involved with <span class="hlt">death</span> education and describe teaching methods, problems, and content of their current course in dying and <span class="hlt">death</span> at the State University of New York, College at New Paltz. Because…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED270785.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED270785.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Death</span>: Realism in Children's Books.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Danielson, Kathy Everts</p> <p></p> <p>In the past, books for children treated <span class="hlt">death</span> fearfully, morbidly, and didactically, but now children's literature treats <span class="hlt">death</span> in a more realistic manner and is sensitive to its emotional aspects. Current theories suggest that children perceive <span class="hlt">death</span> differently at various ages. G. P. Koocher (1973) used J. Piaget's cognitive stages as the basis…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED443928.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED443928.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Deaths</span>: Final Data for 1998.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Murphy, Sherry L.</p> <p>2000-01-01</p> <p>This report presents final 1998 data on U.S. <span class="hlt">deaths</span> and <span class="hlt">death</span> rates according to demographic and medical characteristics such as age, sex, race, Hispanic origin, marital status, educational attainment, injury at work, state of residence, and cause of <span class="hlt">death</span>. Trends and patterns in general mortality, life expectancy, and infant and maternal…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Brittany&pg=2&id=EJ358873','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Brittany&pg=2&id=EJ358873"><span id="translatedtitle">Changing Breton Responses to <span class="hlt">Death</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Badone, Ellen</p> <p>1988-01-01</p> <p>Based on fieldwork conducted in Brittany, France, during 1983 and 1984, discusses changes in Breton responses to <span class="hlt">death</span> which have accompanied modernization and economic development. Suggests that familiarity with <span class="hlt">death</span> and acceptance of it are being replaced by the "denial of <span class="hlt">death</span>" characteristic of contemporary Western culture. Notes parallel…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED513452.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED513452.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Untapped Potential: Fulfilling the Promise of Big Brothers Big <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> and the Bigs and Littles They Represent</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Bridgeland, John M.; Moore, Laura A.</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>American children represent a great untapped potential in our country. For many young people, choices are limited and the goal of a productive adulthood is a remote one. This report paints a picture of who these children are, shares their insights and reflections about the barriers they face, and offers ways forward for Big Brothers Big <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> as…</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li class="active"><span>22</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_22 --> <div id="page_23" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li class="active"><span>23</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="441"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=fat+AND+food&pg=3&id=EJ825688','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=fat+AND+food&pg=3&id=EJ825688"><span id="translatedtitle">Dietary Behaviors and Portion Sizes of Black Women Who Enrolled in "<span class="hlt">Sister</span>Talk" and Variation by Demographic Characteristics</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Gans, Kim M.; Risica, Patricia Markham; Kirtania, Usree; Jennings, Alishia; Strolla, Leslie O.; Steiner-Asiedu, Matilda; Hardy, Norma; Lasater, Thomas M.</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>Objective: To describe the dietary behaviors of black women who enrolled in the <span class="hlt">Sister</span>Talk weight control study. Design: Baseline data collected via telephone survey and in-person screening. Setting: Boston, Massachusetts and surrounding areas. Participants: 461 black women completed the baseline assessments. Main Outcome Measures: Measured height…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20088901','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20088901"><span id="translatedtitle">The Arabidopsis B-<span class="hlt">sister</span> MADS-box protein, GORDITA, represses fruit growth and contributes to integument development.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Prasad, Kalika; Zhang, Xiuwen; Tobón, Emilio; Ambrose, Barbara A</p> <p>2010-04-01</p> <p>The MADS-box family of transcription factors have diverse developmental roles in flower pattern formation, gametophyte cell division and fruit differentiation. The B-<span class="hlt">sister</span> MADS-box proteins are most similar to the B-class floral homeotic proteins, and are expressed in female reproductive organs. The Arabidopsis B-<span class="hlt">sister</span> MADS-box protein, TT16, is necessary for inner integument differentiation. We have functionally characterized the only other B-<span class="hlt">sister</span> MADS-box gene in Arabidopsis, AGL63, renamed here as GORDITA (GOA). A loss-of-function mutation in goa or reduction of endogenous GOA expression results in larger fruits, illustrating its novel function in regulating fruit growth. Consistent with its function, GOA expression is detected in the walls of the valves and throughout the replum of the fruit. Our phenotypic and molecular analyses of 35S::GOA and goa plants show that GOA controls organ size via cell expansion. Further, functional studies of goa tt16 double mutants have shown their additive role in controlling seed coat development, and have revealed the importance of GOA expression in the outer integument. Together, our studies provide evidence of a new regulatory role for a B-<span class="hlt">sister</span> MADS-box gene in the control of organ growth. PMID:20088901</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Big+AND+data+AND+analysis&pg=4&id=ED503112','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Big+AND+data+AND+analysis&pg=4&id=ED503112"><span id="translatedtitle">High School Students as Mentors: Findings from the Big Brothers Big <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> School-Based Mentoring Impact Study</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Herrera, Carla; Kauh, Tina J.; Cooney, Siobhan M.; Grossman, Jean Baldwin; McMaken, Jennifer</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>High schools have recently become a popular source of mentors for school-based mentoring (SBM) programs. The high school Bigs program of Big Brothers Big <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> of America, for example, currently involves close to 50,000 high-school-aged mentors across the country. While the use of these young mentors has several potential advantages, their age…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12030983','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12030983"><span id="translatedtitle">Comparative phylogeography of sympatric <span class="hlt">sister</span> species, Clevelandia ios and Eucyclogobius newberryi (Teleostei, Gobiidae), across the California Transition Zone.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Dawson, M N; Louie, K D; Barlow, M; Jacobs, D K; Swift, C C</p> <p>2002-06-01</p> <p>It is paradigmatic in marine species that greater dispersal ability often, but not always, results in greater gene flow and less population structure. Some of the exceptions may be attributable to studies confounded by comparison of species with dissimilar evolutionary histories, i.e. co-occurring species that are not closely related or species that are closely related but allopatric. Investigation of sympatric <span class="hlt">sister</span> species, in contrast, should allow differences in phylogeographic structure to be attributed reliably to recently derived differences in dispersal ability. Here, using mitochondrial DNA control region sequence, we first confirm that Clevelandia ios and Eucyclogobius newberryi are sympatric <span class="hlt">sister</span> taxa, then demonstrate considerably shallower phylogeographic structure in C. ios than in E. newberryi. This shallower phylogeographic structure is consistent with the higher dispersal ability of C. ios, which most likely results from the interaction of habitat and life-history differences between the species. We suggest that the paradigm will be investigated most rigorously by similar studies of other sympatric <span class="hlt">sister</span> species, appended by thorough ecological studies, and by extending this <span class="hlt">sister</span>-taxon approach to comparative phylogeographic studies of monophyletic clades of sympatric species. PMID:12030983</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3424243','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3424243"><span id="translatedtitle">LAB-1 Targets PP1 and Restricts Aurora B Kinase upon Entrance into Meiosis to Promote <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Chromatid Cohesion</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Tzur, Yonatan B.; Egydio de Carvalho, Carlos; Nadarajan, Saravanapriah; Van Bostelen, Ivo; Gu, Yanjie; Chu, Diana S.; Cheeseman, Iain M.; Colaiácovo, Monica P.</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Successful execution of the meiotic program depends on the timely establishment and removal of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid cohesion. LAB-1 has been proposed to act in the latter by preventing the premature removal of the meiosis-specific cohesin REC-8 at metaphase I in C. elegans, yet the mechanism and scope of LAB-1 function remained unknown. Here we identify an unexpected earlier role for LAB-1 in promoting the establishment of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid cohesion in prophase I. LAB-1 and REC-8 are both required for the chromosomal association of the cohesin complex subunit SMC-3. Depletion of lab-1 results in partial loss of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid cohesion in rec-8 and coh-4 coh-3 mutants and further enhanced chromatid dissociation in worms where all three kleisins are mutated. Moreover, lab-1 depletion results in increased Aurora B kinase (AIR-2) signals in early prophase I nuclei, coupled with a parallel decrease in signals for the PP1 homolog, GSP-2. Finally, LAB-1 directly interacts with GSP-1 and GSP-2. We propose that LAB-1 targets the PP1 homologs to the chromatin at the onset of meiosis I, thereby antagonizing AIR-2 and cooperating with the cohesin complex to promote <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid association and normal progression of the meiotic program. PMID:22927794</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-08-15/pdf/2012-20067.pdf','FEDREG'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-08-15/pdf/2012-20067.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">77 FR 48993 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request; The <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Study: A Prospective Study of the Genetic and...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-08-15</p> <p>... Environmental Risk Factors for Breast Cancer SUMMARY: In compliance with the requirement of Section 3506(c)(2)(A... Prospective Study of the Genetic and Environmental Risk Factors for Breast Cancer. Type of Information... breast cancer in a high-risk cohort of <span class="hlt">sisters</span> of women who have had breast cancer. The etiology...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-11-07/pdf/2012-27237.pdf','FEDREG'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-11-07/pdf/2012-27237.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">77 FR 66851 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request The <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Study: A Prospective Study of the Genetic...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-11-07</p> <p>...: A Prospective Study of the Genetic and Environmental Risk Factors for Breast Cancer SUMMARY: Under... Breast Cancer. Type of Information Collection Request: Revision. Need and Use of Information Collection... risk factors for the development of breast cancer in a high-risk cohort of <span class="hlt">sisters</span> of women who...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=egg&pg=7&id=EJ698372','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=egg&pg=7&id=EJ698372"><span id="translatedtitle">A Gift from the Heart: The Experiences of Women Whose Egg Donations Helped Their <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> Become Mothers.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Winter, Alanna; Daniluk, Judith C.</p> <p>2004-01-01</p> <p>During in-depth interviews, 3 women whose egg donations resulted in the birth of a child or children for their <span class="hlt">sisters</span> discussed their donation motivations and decisions, the challenges of the donation procedure, and their postdonation feelings and experiences in the years since the birth of their nieces and nephews. The findings of this narrative…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4244149','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4244149"><span id="translatedtitle">Using Ecological Niche Models and Niche Analyses to Understand Speciation Patterns: The Case of <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Neotropical Orchid Bees</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Silva, Daniel P.; Vilela, Bruno; De Marco, Paulo; Nemésio, André</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>The role of past connections between the two major South American forested biomes on current species distribution has been recognized a long time ago. Climatic oscillations that further separated these biomes have promoted parapatric speciation, in which many species had their continuous distribution split, giving rise to different but related species (i.e., different potential distributions and realized niche features). The distribution of many <span class="hlt">sister</span> species of orchid bees follow this pattern. Here, using ecological niche models and niche analyses, we (1) tested the role of ecological niche differentiation on the divergence between <span class="hlt">sister</span> orchid-bees (genera Eulaema and Eufriesea) from the Amazon and Atlantic forests, and (2) highlighted interesting areas for new surveys. Amazonian species occupied different realized niches than their Atlantic <span class="hlt">sister</span> species. Conversely, species of sympatric but distantly related Eulaema bees occupied similar realized niches. Amazonian species had a wide potential distribution in South America, whereas Atlantic Forest species were more limited to the eastern coast of the continent. Additionally, we identified several areas in need of future surveys. Our results show that the realized niche of Atlantic-Amazonian <span class="hlt">sister</span> species of orchid bees, which have been previously treated as allopatric populations of three species, had limited niche overlap and similarity. These findings agree with their current taxonomy, which treats each of those populations as distinct valid species. PMID:25422941</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2627303','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2627303"><span id="translatedtitle">How should we measure maternal mortality in the developing world? A comparison of household <span class="hlt">deaths</span> and sibling history approaches.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Hill, Kenneth; El Arifeen, Shams; Koenig, Michael; Al-Sabir, Ahmed; Jamil, Kanta; Raggers, Han</p> <p>2006-01-01</p> <p>OBJECTIVE: A reduction in the maternal mortality ratio (MMR) is one of six health-related Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). However, there is no consensus about how to measure MMR in the many countries that do not have complete registration of <span class="hlt">deaths</span> and accurate ascertainment of cause of <span class="hlt">death</span>. In this study, we compared estimates of pregnancy-related <span class="hlt">deaths</span> and maternal mortality in a developing country from three different household survey measurement approaches: a module collecting information on <span class="hlt">deaths</span> of respondents' <span class="hlt">sisters</span>; collection of information about recent household <span class="hlt">deaths</span> with a time-of-<span class="hlt">death</span> definition of maternal <span class="hlt">deaths</span>; and a verbal autopsy instrument to identify maternal <span class="hlt">deaths</span>. METHODS: We used data from a very large nationally-representative household sample survey conducted in Bangladesh in 2001. A total of 104 323 households were selected for participation, and 99 202 households (95.1% of selected households, 98.8% of contacted households) were successfully interviewed. FINDINGS: The sisterhood and household <span class="hlt">death</span> approaches gave very similar estimates of all-cause and pregnancy-related mortality; verbal autopsy gave an estimate of maternal <span class="hlt">deaths</span> that was about 15% lower than the pregnancy-related <span class="hlt">deaths</span>. Even with a very large sample size, however, confidence intervals around mortality estimates were similar for all approaches and exceeded +/- 15%. CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that with improved training for survey data collectors, both the sisterhood and household <span class="hlt">deaths</span> methods are viable approaches for measuring pregnancy-related mortality. However, wide confidence intervals around the estimates indicate that routine sample surveys cannot provide the information needed to monitor progress towards the MDG target. Other approaches, such as inclusion of questions about household <span class="hlt">deaths</span> in population censuses, should be considered. PMID:16583075</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7417187','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7417187"><span id="translatedtitle">Body cooling after <span class="hlt">death</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kuehn, L A; Tikuisis, P; Livingstone, S; Limmer, R</p> <p>1980-09-01</p> <p>In the analyses of cases of <span class="hlt">death</span> in cold air environments, it is often of interest to determine the time required for the body of the individual to cool to ambient temperature. Usually such determinations have been based on Newton's law of cooling. This paper describes a case history in which this technique was experimentally tested and consequently abandoned in favour of a more complex biophysical model which more accurately described the thermo-physical events inherent in body cooling. This model is recommended for determination of the times required for various body parts to cool to ambient environmental temperatures.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20158001','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20158001"><span id="translatedtitle">Computer implants and <span class="hlt">death</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Gert, Bernard</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>Although a patient whose whole brain has ceased to function may have his heart, lungs, and other organs continue to function if they are connected to the appropriate machines, the patient is still dead and the machines can be disconnected. In the future, nanotechnology, or other technology, may allow putting implants in the brainstem that can keep a patient's heart, lungs and other organs functioning, even though the whole natural brain has ceased to function. It would be useful to consider how this technology might affect the criterion of <span class="hlt">death</span> before it is actually available.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19179521','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19179521"><span id="translatedtitle">Sudden <span class="hlt">death</span> of entanglement.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Yu, Ting; Eberly, J H</p> <p>2009-01-30</p> <p>A new development in the dynamical behavior of elementary quantum systems is the surprising discovery that correlation between two quantum units of information called qubits can be degraded by environmental noise in a way not seen previously in studies of dissipation. This new route for dissipation attacks quantum entanglement, the essential resource for quantum information as well as the central feature in the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen so-called paradox and in discussions of the fate of Schrödinger's cat. The effect has been labeled ESD, which stands for early-stage disentanglement or, more frequently, entanglement sudden <span class="hlt">death</span>. We review recent progress in studies focused on this phenomenon.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=obsession&pg=5&id=EJ721468','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=obsession&pg=5&id=EJ721468"><span id="translatedtitle">Happiness and <span class="hlt">Death</span> Distress: Two Separate Factors</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Abdel-Khalek, Ahmed M.</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>The aim of the present study was to explore the relationship between happiness and <span class="hlt">death</span> distress (<span class="hlt">death</span> anxiety, <span class="hlt">death</span> depression, and <span class="hlt">death</span> obsession) in 275 volunteer Kuwaiti undergraduates. They responded to the Oxford Happiness Inventory, the <span class="hlt">Death</span> Anxiety Scale, the Arabic Scale of <span class="hlt">Death</span> Anxiety, the <span class="hlt">Death</span> Depression Scale-Revised, and the…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26475683','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26475683"><span id="translatedtitle">Speciation processes in putative island endemic <span class="hlt">sister</span> bat species: false impressions from mitochondrial DNA and microsatellite data.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kuo, Hao-Chih; Chen, Shiang-Fan; Fang, Yin-Ping; Cotton, James A; Parker, Joe D; Csorba, Gábor; Lim, Burton K; Eger, Judith L; Chen, Chia-Hong; Chou, Cheng-Han; Rossiter, Stephen J</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>Cases of geographically restricted co-occurring <span class="hlt">sister</span> taxa are rare and may point to potential divergence with gene flow. The two bat species Murina gracilis and Murina recondita are both endemic to Taiwan and are putative <span class="hlt">sister</span> species. To test for nonallopatric divergence and gene flow in these taxa, we generated sequences using Sanger and next-generation sequencing, and combined these with microsatellite data for coalescent-based analyses. MtDNA phylogenies supported the reciprocally monophyletic <span class="hlt">sister</span> relationship between M. gracilis and M. recondita; however, clustering of microsatellite genotypes revealed several cases of species admixture suggesting possible introgression. Sequencing of microsatellite flanking regions revealed that admixture signatures stemmed from microsatellite allele homoplasy rather than recent introgressive hybridization, and also uncovered an unexpected <span class="hlt">sister</span> relationship between M. recondita and the continental species Murina eleryi, to the exclusion of M. gracilis. To dissect the basis of these conflicts between ncDNA and mtDNA, we analysed sequences from 10 anonymous ncDNA loci with *beast and isolation-with-migration and found two distinct clades of M. eleryi, one of which was <span class="hlt">sister</span> to M. recondita. We conclude that Taiwan was colonized by the ancestor of M. gracilis first, followed by the ancestor of M. recondita after a period of allopatric divergence. After colonization, the mitochondrial genome of M. recondita was replaced by that of the resident M. gracilis. This study illustrates how apparent signatures of sympatric divergence can arise from complex histories of allopatric divergence, colonization and hybridization, thus highlighting the need for rigorous analyses to distinguish between such scenarios.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=147488','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=147488"><span id="translatedtitle">Detection of programmed cell <span class="hlt">death</span> using fluorescence energy transfer.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Xu, X; Gerard, A L; Huang, B C; Anderson, D C; Payan, D G; Luo, Y</p> <p>1998-01-01</p> <p>Fluorescence energy transfer (FRET) can be generated when green fluorescent protein (GFP) and blue fluorescent protein (BFP) are covalently <span class="hlt">linked</span> together by a short peptide. Cleavage of this linkage by protease completely eliminates FRET effect. Caspase-3 (CPP32) is an important cellular protease activated during programmed cell <span class="hlt">death</span>. An 18 amino acid peptide containing CPP32 recognition sequence, DEVD, was used to <span class="hlt">link</span> GFP and BFP together. CPP32 activation can be monitored by FRET assay during the apoptosis process. PMID:9518501</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007SPIE.6427E..02K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007SPIE.6427E..02K"><span id="translatedtitle">PDT: <span class="hlt">death</span> pathways</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kessel, David</p> <p>2007-02-01</p> <p>Cellular targets of photodynamic therapy include mitochondria, lysosomes, the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the plasma membrane. PDT can evoke necrosis, autophagy and apoptosis, or combinations of these, depending on the PDT dose, the site(s) of photodamage and the cellular phenotype. It has been established that loss of viability occurs even when the apoptotic program is inhibited. Studies assessing effects of ER or mitochondrial photodamage, involving loss of Bcl-2 function, indicate that low-dose PDT elicited a rapid autophagic response in L1210 cells. This was attributed to the ability of autophagy to recycle photodamaged organelles, and there was partial protection from loss of viability. This effect was not observed in L1210/Atg7, where autophagy was silenced. At higher PDT doses, apoptotic cells were observed within 60 min in both cell lines, but more so in L1210. The ability of L1210 cells to undergo autophagy did not offer protection from cell <span class="hlt">death</span> at the higher PDT dose. Previous studies had indicated that autophagy can contribute to cell <span class="hlt">death</span>, since L1210 cells that do not undergo an initial apoptotic response often contain multiple autophagic vacuoles 24 hr later. With L1210/Atg7, apoptosis alone may account for the loss of viability at an LD 90 PDT dose.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26034855','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26034855"><span id="translatedtitle">Sudden infant <span class="hlt">death</span> syndrome.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Adams, Stephen M; Ward, Chad E; Garcia, Karla L</p> <p>2015-06-01</p> <p>Sudden infant <span class="hlt">death</span> syndrome (SIDS) is the sudden unexpected <span class="hlt">death</span> of a child younger than one year during sleep that cannot be explained after a postmortem evaluation including autopsy, a thorough history, and scene evaluation. The incidence of SIDS has decreased more than 50% in the past 20 years, largely as a result of the Back to Sleep campaign. The most important risk factors relate to the sleep environment. Prone and side sleeping positions are significantly more dangerous than the supine position. Bed sharing with a parent is strongly correlated with an increased risk of SIDS, especially in infants younger than 12 weeks. Apparent life-threatening events are not a risk factor for SIDS. Parents should place infants on their backs to sleep, should not share a bed, and should avoid exposing the infant to tobacco smoke. Other risk-reducing measures include using a firm crib mattress, breastfeeding, keeping vaccinations up to date, avoiding overheating due to overbundling, avoiding soft bedding, and considering the use of a pacifier during sleep once breastfeeding is established. One consequence of the Back to Sleep campaign is a significant increase in the incidence of occipital flattening. Infants who develop a flat spot should be placed with the head facing alternating directions each time he or she is put to bed. Supervised prone positioning while the infant is awake, avoiding excessive use of carriers, and upright positioning while awake are also recommended. PMID:26034855</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12654863','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12654863"><span id="translatedtitle">Defining senescence and <span class="hlt">death</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Thomas, Howard; Ougham, Helen J; Wagstaff, Carol; Stead, Anthony D</p> <p>2003-04-01</p> <p>This article evaluates features of leaf and flower senescence that are shared with, or are different from, those of other terminal events in plant development. Alterations of plastid structure and function in senescence are often reversible and it is argued that such changes represent a process of transdifferentiation or metaplasia rather than deterioration. It may be that the irreversible senescence of many flowers and some leaves represents the loss of ancestral plasticity during evolution. Reversibility serves to distinguish senescence fundamentally from programmed cell <span class="hlt">death</span> (PCD), as does the fact that viability is essential for the initiation and progress of cell senescence. Senescence (particularly its timing and location) requires new gene transcription, but the syndrome is also subject to significant post- transcriptional and post-translational regulation. The reversibility of senescence must relate to the plastic, facultative nature of underlying molecular controls. Senescence appears to be cell-autonomous, though definitive evidence is required to substantiate this. The vacuole plays at least three key roles in the development of senescing cells: it defends the cell against biotic and abiotic damage, thus preserving viability, it accumulates metabolites with other functions, such as animal attractants, and it terminates senescence by becoming autolytic and facilitating true cell <span class="hlt">death</span>. The mechanisms of PCD in plants bear a certain relation to those of apoptosis, and some processes, such as nucleic acid degradation, are superficially similar to aspects of the senescence syndrome. It is concluded that, in terms of physiological components and their controls, senescence and PCD are at best only distantly related.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24926440','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24926440"><span id="translatedtitle">Stressing mitosis to <span class="hlt">death</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Burgess, Andrew; Rasouli, Mina; Rogers, Samuel</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>The final stage of cell division (mitosis), involves the compaction of the duplicated genome into chromatid pairs. Each pair is captured by microtubules emanating from opposite spindle poles, aligned at the metaphase plate, and then faithfully segregated to form two identical daughter cells. Chromatids that are not correctly attached to the spindle are detected by the constitutively active spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC). Any stress that prevents correct bipolar spindle attachment, blocks the satisfaction of the SAC, and induces a prolonged mitotic arrest, providing the cell time to obtain attachment and complete segregation correctly. Unfortunately, during mitosis repairing damage is not generally possible due to the compaction of DNA into chromosomes, and subsequent suppression of gene transcription and translation. Therefore, in the presence of significant damage cell <span class="hlt">death</span> is instigated to ensure that genomic stability is maintained. While most stresses lead to an arrest in mitosis, some promote premature mitotic exit, allowing cells to bypass mitotic cell <span class="hlt">death</span>. This mini-review will focus on the effects and outcomes that common stresses have on mitosis, and how this impacts on the efficacy of mitotic chemotherapies. PMID:24926440</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li class="active"><span>23</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_23 --> <div id="page_24" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li class="active"><span>24</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="461"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002050.htm','NIH-MEDLINEPLUS'); return false;" href="https://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002050.htm"><span id="translatedtitle">Sex-<span class="hlt">linked</span> dominant</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePlus</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Inheritance - sex-<span class="hlt">linked</span> dominant; Genetics - sex-<span class="hlt">linked</span> dominant; X-<span class="hlt">linked</span> dominant; Y-<span class="hlt">linked</span> dominant ... can be either an autosomal chromosome or a sex chromosome. It also depends on whether the trait ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22701929','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22701929"><span id="translatedtitle">Under the shadow of maternity: birth, <span class="hlt">death</span> and puerperal insanity in Victorian Britain.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Marland, Hilary</p> <p>2012-03-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Death</span> and fear of <span class="hlt">death</span> in cases of puerperal insanity can be <span class="hlt">linked</span> to a much broader set of anxieties surrounding childbirth in Victorian Britain. Compared with other forms of mental affliction, puerperal insanity was known for its good prognosis, with many women recovering over the course of several months. Even so, a significant number of <span class="hlt">deaths</span> were associated with the disorder, and a large proportion of sufferers struggled with urges to destroy their infants and themselves. The disorder evoked powerful delusions concerning <span class="hlt">death</span>, with patients expressing intimations of mortality and longing for <span class="hlt">death</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3684869','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3684869"><span id="translatedtitle">Behavior of chickens prior to <span class="hlt">death</span> from sudden <span class="hlt">death</span> syndrome.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Newberry, R C; Gardiner, E E; Hunt, J R</p> <p>1987-09-01</p> <p>A study was made to determine if chickens dying from sudden <span class="hlt">death</span> syndrome (SDS) showed any unusual behavioral characteristics during the final 12 h preceding <span class="hlt">death</span>. Continuous video recordings were made of floor pens of 50 to 120 individually marked male broiler chickens between 3 and 10 wk of age. Behavioral data were obtained from video tapes played back following <span class="hlt">death</span> of chickens from SDS. Analysis of the video tapes revealed no significant differences between 10 SDS chickens and their matched controls in the frequencies or proportions of time spent in each of 19 different behavioral activities. All SDS chickens exhibited a sudden attack prior to <span class="hlt">death</span> lasting an average of 53 s and characterized by loss of balance, violent flapping, and strong muscular contractions. There was no evidence that <span class="hlt">death</span> was preceded by a particular environmental or behavioral event. It was concluded that there were no consistent behavioral symptoms which could be used to identify SDS chickens prior to <span class="hlt">death</span>. PMID:3684869</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=STS059%28S%29026&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D80%26Ntt%3Ds','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=STS059%28S%29026&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D80%26Ntt%3Ds"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Death</span> Valley, California</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p></p> <p>1994-01-01</p> <p>This is an image of <span class="hlt">Death</span> Valley, California, centered at 36.629 degrees north latitude, 117.069 degrees west longitude. The image shows Furnace Creek alluvial fan and Furnace Creek Ranch at the far right, and the sand dunes near Stove Pipe Wells at the center. The dark fork-shaped feature between Furnace Creek fan and the dunes is a smooth flood-plain which encloses Cottonball Basin. The bright dots near the center of the image are corner refectors that have been set-up to calibrate the radar as the Shuttle passes overhead with the SIR-C/X-SAR system. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory alternative photo number is P-43883.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3101564','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3101564"><span id="translatedtitle">A <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Group Contrast Using Untargeted Global Metabolomic Analysis Delineates the Biochemical Regulation Underlying Desiccation Tolerance in Sporobolus stapfianus[C][W][OA</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Oliver, Melvin J.; Guo, Lining; Alexander, Danny C.; Ryals, John A.; Wone, Bernard W.M.; Cushman, John C.</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Understanding how plants tolerate dehydration is a prerequisite for developing novel strategies for improving drought tolerance. The desiccation-tolerant (DT) Sporobolus stapfianus and the desiccation-sensitive (DS) Sporobolus pyramidalis formed a <span class="hlt">sister</span> group contrast to reveal adaptive metabolic responses to dehydration using untargeted global metabolomic analysis. Young leaves from both grasses at full hydration or at 60% relative water content (RWC) and from S. stapfianus at lower RWCs were analyzed using liquid and gas chromatography <span class="hlt">linked</span> to mass spectrometry or tandem mass spectrometry. Comparison of the two species in the fully hydrated state revealed intrinsic differences between the two metabolomes. S. stapfianus had higher concentrations of osmolytes, lower concentrations of metabolites associated with energy metabolism, and higher concentrations of nitrogen metabolites, suggesting that it is primed metabolically for dehydration stress. Further reduction of the leaf RWC to 60% instigated a metabolic shift in S. stapfianus toward the production of protective compounds, whereas S. pyramidalis responded differently. The metabolomes of S. stapfianus leaves below 40% RWC were strongly directed toward antioxidant production, nitrogen remobilization, ammonia detoxification, and soluble sugar production. Collectively, the metabolic profiles obtained uncovered a cascade of biochemical regulation strategies critical to the survival of S. stapfianus under desiccation. PMID:21467579</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26114245','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26114245"><span id="translatedtitle">The Role of <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Cities' Staff Exchanges in Developing "Learning Cities": Exploring Necessary and Sufficient Conditions in Social Capital Development Utilizing Proportional Odds Modeling.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Buckley, Patrick Henry; Takahashi, Akio; Anderson, Amy</p> <p>2015-07-01</p> <p>In the last half century former international adversaries have become cooperators through networking and knowledge sharing for decision making aimed at improving quality of life and sustainability; nowhere has this been more striking then at the urban level where such activity is seen as a key component in building "learning cities" through the development of social capital. Although mega-cities have been leaders in such efforts, mid-sized cities with lesser resource endowments have striven to follow by focusing on more frugal <span class="hlt">sister</span> city type exchanges. The underlying thesis of our research is that great value can be derived from city-to-city exchanges through social capital development. However, such a study must differentiate between necessary and sufficient conditions. Past studies assumed necessary conditions were met and immediately jumped to demonstrating the existence of structural relationships by measuring networking while further assuming that the existence of such demonstrated a parallel development of cognitive social capital. Our research addresses this lacuna by stepping back and critically examining these assumptions. To accomplish this goal we use a Proportional Odds Modeling with a Cumulative Logit <span class="hlt">Link</span> approach to demonstrate the existence of a common latent structure, hence asserting that necessary conditions are met. PMID:26114245</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4515646','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4515646"><span id="translatedtitle">The Role of <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Cities’ Staff Exchanges in Developing “Learning Cities”: Exploring Necessary and Sufficient Conditions in Social Capital Development Utilizing Proportional Odds Modeling</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Buckley, Patrick Henry; Takahashi, Akio; Anderson, Amy</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>In the last half century former international adversaries have become cooperators through networking and knowledge sharing for decision making aimed at improving quality of life and sustainability; nowhere has this been more striking then at the urban level where such activity is seen as a key component in building “learning cities” through the development of social capital. Although mega-cities have been leaders in such efforts, mid-sized cities with lesser resource endowments have striven to follow by focusing on more frugal <span class="hlt">sister</span> city type exchanges. The underlying thesis of our research is that great value can be derived from city-to-city exchanges through social capital development. However, such a study must differentiate between necessary and sufficient conditions. Past studies assumed necessary conditions were met and immediately jumped to demonstrating the existence of structural relationships by measuring networking while further assuming that the existence of such demonstrated a parallel development of cognitive social capital. Our research addresses this lacuna by stepping back and critically examining these assumptions. To accomplish this goal we use a Proportional Odds Modeling with a Cumulative Logit <span class="hlt">Link</span> approach to demonstrate the existence of a common latent structure, hence asserting that necessary conditions are met. PMID:26114245</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5276942','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5276942"><span id="translatedtitle">Effect of oral administration of mutagens found in food on the frequency of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchanges in the colonic epithelium of mice</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Couch, D.B.; Stuart, E.; Heddle, J.A.</p> <p>1987-01-01</p> <p>Epidemiological studies indicate there is a <span class="hlt">link</span> between dietary factors and the incidence of colon cancer, and it has been suggested mutagens in foods might be responsible for initiating the carcinogenic process. Some food mutagens are formed during the cooking process. For example, certain heterocyclic amines, including Trp-P-2 (3-amino-1-methyl-5H-pyrido(4,3-n) indole) and MeIQ (2-amino-3,4-dimethylimidazo(4,5-f)quinoline), which have been isolated from broiled meat and fish at low (ng/g) levels, are extremely potent mutagens in the Ames Salmonella/microsome test and can induce mutation in cultured mammalian cells as well. Other mutagens in foods are natural products; quercetin, a flavanoid widely distributed in plant products, is mutagenic to Salmonella and cultured mammalian cells. As most of the evidence implicating substance in food as mutagenic carcinogens comes from in vitro studies, it is of interest to determine whether these compounds can also exert genotoxic effects in vivo, particularly in colonic tissue. The ability to induce nuclear aberrations in vivo in murine colonic epithelial tissue has been suggested to be a property of colon carcinogens specifically, and several mutagens found in cooked food, including MeIQ and Trp-P-2, have been found to produce such nucleotoxicity. The authors report here tests of the ability of MeIQ, Trp-P-2, and quercetin to induce <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchanges (SCEs) in the colonic epithelium of mice.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26114245','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26114245"><span id="translatedtitle">The Role of <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Cities' Staff Exchanges in Developing "Learning Cities": Exploring Necessary and Sufficient Conditions in Social Capital Development Utilizing Proportional Odds Modeling.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Buckley, Patrick Henry; Takahashi, Akio; Anderson, Amy</p> <p>2015-06-24</p> <p>In the last half century former international adversaries have become cooperators through networking and knowledge sharing for decision making aimed at improving quality of life and sustainability; nowhere has this been more striking then at the urban level where such activity is seen as a key component in building "learning cities" through the development of social capital. Although mega-cities have been leaders in such efforts, mid-sized cities with lesser resource endowments have striven to follow by focusing on more frugal <span class="hlt">sister</span> city type exchanges. The underlying thesis of our research is that great value can be derived from city-to-city exchanges through social capital development. However, such a study must differentiate between necessary and sufficient conditions. Past studies assumed necessary conditions were met and immediately jumped to demonstrating the existence of structural relationships by measuring networking while further assuming that the existence of such demonstrated a parallel development of cognitive social capital. Our research addresses this lacuna by stepping back and critically examining these assumptions. To accomplish this goal we use a Proportional Odds Modeling with a Cumulative Logit <span class="hlt">Link</span> approach to demonstrate the existence of a common latent structure, hence asserting that necessary conditions are met.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18820646','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18820646"><span id="translatedtitle">Novel cell <span class="hlt">death</span> by downregulation of eEF1A1 expression in tetraploids.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kobayashi, Y; Yonehara, S</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>When duplicated <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids are not properly compacted in mitosis, chromosomes are mis-segregated, inducing genetically unstable tetraploidy known to facilitate aneuploid malignancies. Here, we show that tetraploid cells produced by impaired chromosomal condensation are eliminated by a novel type of cell <span class="hlt">death</span> different from caspase-dependent apoptosis. The cell <span class="hlt">death</span> was associated with downregulation of eukaryotic translation elongation factor-1 alpha 1 (eEF1A1/EF-1alpha) expression in conjunction with accumulation of its mRNA in processing bodies (P bodies). Importantly, expression of exogenous eEF1A1 was shown to inhibit the caspase-independent cell <span class="hlt">death</span>, and a similar cell <span class="hlt">death</span> was observed after inducing the expression of short hairpin RNA specific for eEF1A1. Furthermore, the number of spontaneously arising binucleated cells was indicated to increase several fold during 1- to 2-week cultivation after initiation of exogenous eEF1A expression. Taken together, the novel cell <span class="hlt">death</span> machinery should help to eliminate abnormal tetraploid cells and inhibit tumorigenesis. PMID:18820646</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21432870','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21432870"><span id="translatedtitle">A primatological perspective on <span class="hlt">death</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Anderson, James R</p> <p>2011-05-01</p> <p>Some questions that arise from observations of responses to dead and dying individuals by nonhuman primates are discussed, focusing on psychological issues. The phenomenon of transport and care of dead infants is reviewed, along with the consequences of the mother dying for orphaned offspring. It is argued that particular attention should be paid to how the context of a <span class="hlt">death</span> affects individuals, for example, traumatic accidental or predation-induced <span class="hlt">death</span> versus peaceful <span class="hlt">death</span> following illness. Some primates kill others of their own or other species, which raises additional questions about <span class="hlt">death</span> awareness and empathy. Observations from both the field and captivity can contribute toward a better understanding of the psychological meaning of <span class="hlt">death</span> for primates. Some aspects of <span class="hlt">death</span> awareness recognized by developmental psychologists might help guide research efforts in this area.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25456618','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25456618"><span id="translatedtitle">Challenging stereotypes? The older woman in the TV series Brothers & <span class="hlt">Sisters</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Oró-Piqueras, Maricel</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>The TV series, Brothers & <span class="hlt">Sisters</span>, broadcast from 2006 to 2011 by ABC (USA) and a year later by Channel 4 (UK) with quite high audience rates, starts when the patriarchal figure, William Walker, dies of a heart attack and two female figures around their sixties come center stage: his wife, Nora Walker, and his long-term lover, Holly Harper. Once the patriarchal figure disappears, the female characters regain visibility by entering the labor market and starting relationships with other men. In that sense, both protagonists experience aging as a time in which they are increasingly freed from social and family constraints. However, their roles as nurturers keep on bringing them back to the domestic space in which they are safe from being involved in uncomfortable and unsuitable situations. Drawing on previous studies on the representation of the older woman in fictional media, this article intends to discern to what extent stereotypes related to the older woman are challenged through the two main protagonists of a contemporary TV series. PMID:25456618</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8266327','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8266327"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Sister</span> chromatid exchanges in mouse after exposure to pulse-wave ultrasound in utero.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Shintaku, Y; Takabayashi, T; Sasaki, H; Ozawa, N; Yajima, A</p> <p>1993-06-01</p> <p>The induction of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchanges (SCEs) was investigated in mice after a ten min exposure, in vivo, to 2 MHz focused, pulse-wave ultrasound with a pulse repetition rate of 1000 Hz, pulse duration of 10 microseconds. The bone marrow cells of the pregnant female mice and the fetal liver cells were analyzed. The cell cycle specific metaphase patterns were additionally evaluated. In the bone marrow cells, the mean frequencies of SCEs were 2.77 in control, 3.56 in the cells exposed to ultrasound at 586.2 mW/cm2 (spatial average temporal average, SATA); in the fetal liver cells, 2.64 in control, 3.84 in the cells exposed. The frequencies of SCEs significantly were increased by the treatment. Faster cell kinetics was observed in fetal liver cells than bone marrow cells of pregnant female. But there was no cell-growth inhibitory effect of ultrasound on both bone marrow and fetal liver cells. In fetal liver cells, the critical acoustic power was 160.0-278.9 mW/cm2 (SATA).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3346098','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3346098"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Sister</span> chromatid exchanges and chromosomal aberrations in lymphocytes of nurses handling cytostatic agents.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Benhamou, S; Pot-Deprun, J; Sancho-Garnier, H; Chouroulinkov, I</p> <p>1988-03-15</p> <p>A cohort study of 29 nurses who constantly handled cytostatic drugs, and 29 controls matched according to sex and age, was carried out between 1983 and 1986. Cytogenetic damage was assessed by <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchanges (SCE) and chromosomal aberrations. No significant increase in mean number of SCE was found for nurses (7.37) as compared to matched controls (7.00), whereas a significant excess of SCE (p less than 0.001) was observed for smokers (8.23) as compared to non-smokers (6.75). The number of SCE was studied in relation to the amount and nature of cytostatics handled as well as to the duration of exposure. A significant association (p less than 0.05) was found between individual mean number of SCE and the total number of drugs handled after adjustment for confounding factors. In contrast, the number of SCE was not significantly related to the nature of drugs handled or to the duration of exposure. With regard to chromosomal damage, no significant difference was observed between nurses and controls in gap, break, dicentric and translocation frequencies.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20232130','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20232130"><span id="translatedtitle">Birth order and ratio of brothers to <span class="hlt">sisters</span> in Spanish transsexuals.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Gómez-Gil, Esther; Esteva, Isabel; Carrasco, Rocío; Almaraz, M Cruz; Pasaro, Eduardo; Salamero, Manel; Guillamon, Antonio</p> <p>2011-06-01</p> <p>Three Western studies have shown that male-to-female (MF) homosexual transsexuals tend to be born later than their siblings and to come from sibships with more brothers than <span class="hlt">sisters</span>. The objective of this study was to determine whether these variables would be replicated in 530 MF and female-to-male (FM) Spanish transsexuals according to sexual orientation. The results showed that MF homosexual transsexuals had significantly more older brothers than the non-homosexual MF group. Compared with the expected rates in the general population, birth order was significantly higher in both MF (Slater's Index = 0.59; Fraternal Index = 0.61; Sororal Index = 0.58) and FM homosexual transsexuals (Slater's Index = 0.65; Fraternal Index = 0.68; Sororal Index = 0.67), and sibling sex ratio was significantly higher than expected in homosexual MF (sex ratio = 0.55) but not in homosexual FM transsexuals. No significant differences were found in the non-homosexual subgroups. The replication of the later birth order and sibling sex-ratio effect in MF homosexual transsexuals corroborates previous findings in a variety of groups from different cultures and may suggest a common mechanism underlying the etiology of transsexualism.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24797474','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24797474"><span id="translatedtitle">Meiotic cohesin STAG3 is required for chromosome axis formation and <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid cohesion.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Winters, Tristan; McNicoll, Francois; Jessberger, Rolf</p> <p>2014-06-01</p> <p>The cohesin complex is essential for mitosis and meiosis. The specific meiotic roles of individual cohesin proteins are incompletely understood. We report in vivo functions of the only meiosis-specific STAG component of cohesin, STAG3. Newly generated STAG3-deficient mice of both sexes are sterile with meiotic arrest. In these mice, meiotic chromosome architecture is severely disrupted as no bona fide axial elements (AE) form and homologous chromosomes do not synapse. Axial element protein SYCP3 forms dot-like structures, many partially overlapping with centromeres. Asynapsis marker HORMAD1 is diffusely distributed throughout the chromatin, and SYCP1, which normally marks synapsed axes, is largely absent. Centromeric and telomeric <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid cohesion are impaired. Centromere and telomere clustering occurs in the absence of STAG3, and telomere structure is not severely affected. Other cohesin proteins are present, localize throughout the STAG3-devoid chromatin, and form complexes with cohesin SMC1β. No other deficiency in a single meiosis-specific cohesin causes a phenotype as drastic as STAG3 deficiency. STAG3 emerges as the key STAG cohesin involved in major functions of meiotic cohesin. PMID:24797474</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24086141','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24086141"><span id="translatedtitle">Histone chaperone NAP1 mediates <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid resolution by counteracting protein phosphatase 2A.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Moshkin, Yuri M; Doyen, Cecile M; Kan, Tsung-Wai; Chalkley, Gillian E; Sap, Karen; Bezstarosti, Karel; Demmers, Jeroen A; Ozgur, Zeliha; van Ijcken, Wilfred F J; Verrijzer, C Peter</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Chromosome duplication and transmission into daughter cells requires the precisely orchestrated binding and release of cohesin. We found that the Drosophila histone chaperone NAP1 is required for cohesin release and <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid resolution during mitosis. Genome-wide surveys revealed that NAP1 and cohesin co-localize at multiple genomic loci. Proteomic and biochemical analysis established that NAP1 associates with the full cohesin complex, but it also forms a separate complex with the cohesin subunit stromalin (SA). NAP1 binding to cohesin is cell-cycle regulated and increases during G2/M phase. This causes the dissociation of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) from cohesin, increased phosphorylation of SA and cohesin removal in early mitosis. PP2A depletion led to a loss of centromeric cohesion. The distinct mitotic phenotypes caused by the loss of either PP2A or NAP1, were both rescued by their concomitant depletion. We conclude that the balanced antagonism between NAP1 and PP2A controls cohesin dissociation during mitosis. PMID:24086141</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4368666','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4368666"><span id="translatedtitle">Phylogenomic Analyses of Echinodermata Support the <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Groups of Asterozoa and Echinozoa</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Reich, Adrian; Dunn, Casey; Akasaka, Koji; Wessel, Gary</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Echinoderms (sea urchins, sea stars, brittle stars, sea lilies and sea cucumbers) are a group of diverse organisms, second in number within deuterostome species to only the chordates. Echinoderms serve as excellent model systems for developmental biology due to their diverse developmental mechanisms, tractable laboratory use, and close phylogenetic distance to chordates. In addition, echinoderms are very well represented in the fossil record, including some larval features, making echinoderms a valuable system for studying evolutionary development. The internal relationships of Echinodermata have not been consistently supported across phylogenetic analyses, however, and this has hindered the study of other aspects of their biology. In order to test echinoderm phylogenetic relationships, we sequenced 23 de novo transcriptomes from all five clades of echinoderms. Using multiple phylogenetic methods at a variety of sampling depths we have constructed a well-supported phylogenetic tree of Echinodermata, including support for the <span class="hlt">sister</span> groups of Asterozoa (sea stars and brittle stars) and Echinozoa (sea urchins and sea cucumbers). These results will help inform developmental and evolutionary studies specifically in echinoderms and deuterostomes in general. PMID:25794146</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17431321','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17431321"><span id="translatedtitle">Elevated <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchange frequencies in New Zealand Vietnam War veterans.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Rowland, R E; Edwards, L A; Podd, J V</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>From July 1965 until November 1971, New Zealand Defence Force Personnel fought in the Vietnam War. During this time more than 76,500,000 litres of phenoxylic herbicides were sprayed over parts of Southern Vietnam and Laos, the most common being known as 'Agent Orange'. The current study aimed to ascertain whether or not New Zealand Vietnam War veterans show evidence of genetic disturbance arising as a consequence of their now confirmed exposure to these defoliants. A sample group of 24 New Zealand Vietnam War veterans and 23 control volunteers were compared using an SCE (<span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchange) analysis. The results from the SCE study show a highly significant difference (P < 0.001) between the mean of the experimental group (11.05) and the mean of a matched control group (8.18). The experimental group also has an exceptionally high proportion of HFCs (cells with high SCE frequencies) above the 95th percentile compared to the controls (11.0 and 0.07%, respectively). We conclude that the New Zealand Vietnam War veterans studied here were exposed to a clastogenic substance(s) which continues to exert an observable genetic effect today, and suggest that this is attributable to their service in Vietnam.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4995168','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4995168"><span id="translatedtitle">Increased anticipatory but decreased consummatory brain responses to food in <span class="hlt">sisters</span> of anorexia nervosa patients</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Horndasch, Stefanie; O’Keefe, Sophie; Lamond, Anneka; Brown, Katie</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Background We have previously shown increased anticipatory and consummatory neural responses to rewarding and aversive food stimuli in women recovered from anorexia nervosa (AN). Aims To determine whether these differences are trait markers for AN, we examined the neural response in those with a familial history but no personal history of AN. Method Thirty-six volunteers were recruited: 15 who had a <span class="hlt">sister</span> with anorexia nervosa (family history) and 21 control participants. Using fMRI we examined the neural response during an anticipatory phase (food cues, rewarding and aversive), an effort phase and a consummatory phase (rewarding and aversive tastes). Results Family history (FH) volunteers showed increased activity in the caudate during the anticipation of both reward and aversive food and in the thalamus and amygdala during anticipation of aversive only. FH had decreased activity in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, the pallidum and the superior frontal gyrus during taste consumption. Conclusions Increased neural anticipatory but decreased consummatory responses to food might be a biomarker for AN. Interventions that could normalise these differences may help to prevent disorder onset. Declaration of interest C.M. has acted as a consultant to P1VITAL, Givaudan, GWPharma, the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) and Channel 4. Copyright and usage © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2016. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Non-Commercial, No Derivatives (CC BY-NC-ND) license. PMID:27703784</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li class="active"><span>24</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_24 --> <div id="page_25" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li class="active"><span>25</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="481"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8575421','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8575421"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Sister</span> chromatid exchange in human lymphocytes induced by propoxur following plant activation by Vicia faba.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Gómez-Arroyo, S; Calderón-Segura, M E; Villalobos-Pietrini, R</p> <p>1995-01-01</p> <p>Because the carbamate insecticide propoxur induced <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchanges (SCE) in Vicia faba but was ineffective in producing SCE in lymphocytes in culture, it was hardly suspected that plant metabolism was involved. Experiments were conducted in which metabolic activation was afforded by Vicia faba roots, and SCE in human lymphocytes in vitro was used to assess cytogenetic damage. Several concentrations of propoxur (250, 500, 1,000, 1,500, and 2,000 ppm) were applied for 4 hr to the roots of Vicia faba. Extracts prepared from these treatments were added to the lymphocyte cultures and a significant increase of SCE frequencies with a concentration-response relationship could be detected. The lymphocyte proliferation kinetics and the proliferation rate index (PRI) were not affected (except in the highest concentration, of 2,000 ppm). This general behavior was in agreement with the presence of an enzymatic system (S10 fraction) in Vicia roots capable of metabolizing or activating the propoxur. With 2,000 ppm, cell necrosis was produced in Vicia; therefore, this extract did not induce SCE in lymphocytes. However, lymphocyte proliferation kinetics were delayed and PRI was significantly decreased. Ethanol, a promutagen activated by this plant, was applied directly to the lymphocyte cultures as a positive control, and the response was negative. On the other hand, the extracts of roots treated with ethanol increased the SCE to more than twice that of the negative control, but the lymphocyte proliferation kinetics and PRI were not affected.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25990877','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25990877"><span id="translatedtitle">p53 gene discriminates two ecologically divergent <span class="hlt">sister</span> species of pine voles.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Quina, A S; Bastos-Silveira, C; Miñarro, M; Ventura, J; Jiménez, R; Paulo, O S; da Luz Mathias, M</p> <p>2015-11-01</p> <p>Genes with relevant roles in the differentiation of closely-related species are likely to have diverged simultaneously with the species and more accurately reproduce the species tree. The Lusitanian (Microtus lusitanicus) and Mediterranean (M. duodecimcostatus) pine voles are two recently separated <span class="hlt">sister</span> species with fossorial lifestyles whose different ecological, physiological and morphological phenotypes reflect the better adaptation of M. duodecimcostatus to the underground habitat. Here we asked whether the differentiation of M. lusitanicus and M. duodecimcostatus involved genetic variations within the tumour suppressor p53 gene, given its role in stress-associated responses. We performed a population-genetic analysis through sequencing of exons and introns of p53 in individuals from sympatric and allopatric populations of both the species in the Iberian Peninsula in which a unidirectional introgression of mitochondrial DNA was previously observed. We were able to discriminate the two species to a large extent. We show that M. duodecimcostatus is composed of one genetically unstructured group of populations sharing a P53 protein that carries a mutation in the DNA-binding region not observed in M. lusitanicus, raising the possibility that this mutation may have been central in the evolutionary history of M. duodecimcostatus. Our results provide suggestive evidence for the involvement of a master transcription factor in the separation of M. lusitanicus and M. duodecimcostatus during Microtus radiation in the Quaternary presumably via a differential adaptive role of the novel p53 in M. duodecimcostatus.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25077515','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25077515"><span id="translatedtitle">Coalescent versus concatenation methods and the placement of Amborella as <span class="hlt">sister</span> to water lilies.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Xi, Zhenxiang; Liu, Liang; Rest, Joshua S; Davis, Charles C</p> <p>2014-11-01</p> <p>The molecular era has fundamentally reshaped our knowledge of the evolution and diversification of angiosperms. One outstanding question is the phylogenetic placement of Amborella trichopoda Baill., commonly thought to represent the first lineage of extant angiosperms. Here, we leverage publicly available data and provide a broad coalescent-based species tree estimation of 45 seed plants. By incorporating 310 nuclear genes, our coalescent analyses strongly support a clade containing Amborella plus water lilies (i.e., Nymphaeales) that is <span class="hlt">sister</span> to all other angiosperms across different nucleotide rate partitions. Our results also show that commonly applied concatenation methods produce strongly supported, but incongruent placements of Amborella: slow-evolving nucleotide sites corroborate results from coalescent analyses, whereas fast-evolving sites place Amborella alone as the first lineage of extant angiosperms. We further explored the performance of coalescent versus concatenation methods using nucleotide sequences simulated on (i) the two alternate placements of Amborella with branch lengths and substitution model parameters estimated from each of the 310 nuclear genes and (ii) three hypothetical species trees that are topologically identical except with respect to the degree of deep coalescence and branch lengths. Our results collectively suggest that the Amborella alone placement inferred using concatenation methods is likely misled by fast-evolving sites. This appears to be exacerbated by the combination of long branches in stem group angiosperms, Amborella, and Nymphaeales with the short internal branch separating Amborella and Nymphaeales. In contrast, coalescent methods appear to be more robust to elevated substitution rates.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17013597','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17013597"><span id="translatedtitle">Recombinant chromosome 4 resulting from a maternal pericentric inversion in two <span class="hlt">sisters</span> presenting consistent dysmorphic features.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Stembalska, Agnieszka; Laczmanska, Izabela; Schlade-Bartusiak, Kamila; Czemarmazowicz, Halina; Murawski, Marek; Sasiadek, Maria</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>The chromosome 4 inversion with breakpoints p13-p15q35 results in a recombinant 4 [rec(4)] chromosome with a partial 4p duplication/4q deletion in approximately 80% of the carriers' offspring. However, whether the recombinant 4p syndrome can be recognized as a clinical entity is still open to controversy. We report on two <span class="hlt">sisters</span> diagnosed with rec(4) resulting in a partial 4p trisomy/4q deletion that was inherited from their mother, who is a carrier of inv(4)(p14q35). Both probands presented phenotypes consistent with those observed in other children with rec(4)parental, supporting the proposal that the rec(4)parental syndrome is a distinct entity among dup(4p) cases and may be suspected on the basis of the pattern of clinical symptoms. To the best of our knowledge this is only the second report of family with two probands affected with a recombinant chromosome 4 arising from a parental pericentric inversion.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25652835','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25652835"><span id="translatedtitle">Comparison of <span class="hlt">sister</span> species identifies factors underpinning plastid compatibility in green sea slugs.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>de Vries, Jan; Woehle, Christian; Christa, Gregor; Wägele, Heike; Tielens, Aloysius G M; Jahns, Peter; Gould, Sven B</p> <p>2015-03-01</p> <p>The only animal cells known that can maintain functional plastids (kleptoplasts) in their cytosol occur in the digestive gland epithelia of sacoglossan slugs. Only a few species of the many hundred known can profit from kleptoplasty during starvation long-term, but why is not understood. The two <span class="hlt">sister</span> taxa Elysia cornigera and Elysia timida sequester plastids from the same algal species, but with a very different outcome: while E. cornigera usually dies within the first two weeks when deprived of food, E. timida can survive for many months to come. Here we compare the responses of the two slugs to starvation, blocked photosynthesis and light stress. The two species respond differently, but in both starvation is the main denominator that alters global gene expression profiles. The kleptoplasts' ability to fix CO2 decreases at a similar rate in both slugs during starvation, but only E. cornigera individuals die in the presence of functional kleptoplasts, concomitant with the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the digestive tract. We show that profiting from the acquisition of robust plastids, and key to E. timida's longer survival, is determined by an increased starvation tolerance that keeps ROS levels at bay. PMID:25652835</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1635493','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1635493"><span id="translatedtitle">Effects of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid cohesion proteins on cut gene expression during wing development in Drosophila</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Dorsett, Dale; Eissenberg, Joel C.; Misulovin, Ziva; Martens, Andrew; Redding, Bethany; McKim, Kim</p> <p>2006-01-01</p> <p>Summary The cohesin protein complex is a conserved structural component of chromosomes. Cohesin binds numerous sites along interphase chromosomes and is essential for <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid cohesion and DNA repair. Here, we test the idea that cohesin also regulates gene expression. This idea arose from the finding that the Drosophila Nipped-B protein, a functional homolog of the yeast Scc2 factor that loads cohesin onto chromosomes, facilitates the transcriptional activation of certain genes by enhancers located many kilobases away from their promoters. We find that cohesin binds between a remote wing margin enhancer and the promoter at the cut locus in cultured cells, and that reducing the dosage of the Smc1 cohesin subunit increases cut expression in the developing wing margin. We also find that cut expression is increased by a unique pds5 gene mutation that reduces the binding of cohesin to chromosomes. On the basis of these results, we posit that cohesin inhibits long-range activation of the Drosophila cut gene, and that Nipped-B facilitates activation by regulating cohesin-chromosome binding. Such effects of cohesin on gene expression could be responsible for many of the developmental deficits that occur in Cornelia de Lange syndrome, which is caused by mutations in the human homolog of Nipped-B. PMID:16207752</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24147743','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24147743"><span id="translatedtitle">Schmidingerothrix salinarum nov. spec. is the molecular <span class="hlt">sister</span> of the large oxytrichid clade (ciliophora, hypotricha).</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Foissner, Wilhelm; Filker, Sabine; Stoeck, Thorsten</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>In 2012, Foissner described a curious hypotrich: Schmidingerothrix extraordinaria. This ciliate, which he discovered in hypersaline soils (~100‰) from Namibia, had a frayed buccal lip, three-rowed adoral membranelles, only one frontal cirrus, and a miniaturized first frontal membranelle, while a paroral membrane, dorsal bristle rows and buccal, transverse and caudal cirri were absent. All opisthe structures developed de novo, while parental structures were involved in the proter. When Foissner's study became available, we discovered a similar species in a Portuguese solar saltern, differing from S. extraordinaria mainly by the number of frontoventral cirral rows (3 vs. 1). Furthermore, parental structures were involved in the ontogenesis of both proter and opisthe. The small subunit (SSU) rDNA shows Schmidingerothrix as <span class="hlt">sister</span> of a large clade containing most classical oxytrichids (e.g. Sterkiella, Oxytricha, Steinia) and many related taxa (e.g. Pattersoniella, Bistichella, Uroleptus). This clade shows a bifurcation named "Oxytricha subclade" and "Uroleptus subclade". Foissner () interpreted the peculiarities of Schmidingerothrix as a reduction caused by the extreme habitat. However, the molecular data do not exclude that Schmidingerothrix presents an ancient state. A morphology-based scheme is presented, showing how the subclades might have evolved from a Schmidingerothrix-like ancestor.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4976385','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4976385"><span id="translatedtitle">Ringiculid bubble snails recovered as the <span class="hlt">sister</span> group to sea slugs (Nudipleura)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Kano, Yasunori; Brenzinger, Bastian; Nützel, Alexander; Wilson, Nerida G.; Schrödl, Michael</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Euthyneuran gastropods represent one of the most diverse lineages in Mollusca (with over 30,000 species), play significant ecological roles in aquatic and terrestrial environments and affect many aspects of human life. However, our understanding of their evolutionary relationships remains incomplete due to missing data for key phylogenetic lineages. The present study integrates such a neglected, ancient snail family Ringiculidae into a molecular systematics of Euthyneura for the first time, and is supplemented by the first microanatomical data. Surprisingly, both molecular and morphological features present compelling evidence for the common ancestry of ringiculid snails with the highly dissimilar Nudipleura—the most species-rich and well-known taxon of sea slugs (nudibranchs and pleurobranchoids). A new taxon name Ringipleura is proposed here for these long-lost <span class="hlt">sisters</span>, as one of three major euthyneuran clades with late Palaeozoic origins, along with Acteonacea (Acteonoidea + Rissoelloidea) and Tectipleura (Euopisthobranchia + Panpulmonata). The early Euthyneura are suggested to be at least temporary burrowers with a characteristic ‘bubble’ shell, hypertrophied foot and headshield as exemplified by many extant subtaxa with an infaunal mode of life, while the expansion of the mantle might have triggered the explosive Mesozoic radiation of the clade into diverse ecological niches. PMID:27498754</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24336965','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24336965"><span id="translatedtitle">Geographic determinants of gene flow in two <span class="hlt">sister</span> species of tropical Andean frogs.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Guarnizo, Carlos E; Cannatella, David C</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Complex interactions between topographic heterogeneity, climatic and environmental gradients, and thermal niche conservatism are commonly assumed to indicate the degree of biotic diversification in montane regions. Our aim was to investigate factors that disrupt gene flow between populations and to determine if there is evidence of downslope asymmetric migration in highland frogs with wide elevational ranges and thermal niches. We determined the role of putative impediments to gene flow (as measured by least-cost path (LCP) distances, topographic complexity, and elevational range) in promoting genetic divergence between populations of 2 tropical Andean frog <span class="hlt">sister</span> species (Dendropsophus luddeckei, N = 114; Dendropsophus labialis, N = 74) using causal modeling and multiple matrix regression. Although the effect of geographic features was species specific, elevational range and LCP distances had the strongest effect on gene flow, with mean effect sizes (Mantel r and regression coefficients β), between 5 and 10 times greater than topographic complexity. Even though causal modeling and multiple matrix regression produced congruent results, the latter provided more information on the contribution of each geographic variable. We found moderate support for downslope migration. We conclude that the climatic heterogeneity of the landscape, the elevational distance between populations, and the inability to colonize suboptimal habitats due to thermal niche conservatism influence the magnitude of gene flow. Asymmetric migration, however, seems to be influenced by life history traits. PMID:24336965</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25077515','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25077515"><span id="translatedtitle">Coalescent versus concatenation methods and the placement of Amborella as <span class="hlt">sister</span> to water lilies.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Xi, Zhenxiang; Liu, Liang; Rest, Joshua S; Davis, Charles C</p> <p>2014-11-01</p> <p>The molecular era has fundamentally reshaped our knowledge of the evolution and diversification of angiosperms. One outstanding question is the phylogenetic placement of Amborella trichopoda Baill., commonly thought to represent the first lineage of extant angiosperms. Here, we leverage publicly available data and provide a broad coalescent-based species tree estimation of 45 seed plants. By incorporating 310 nuclear genes, our coalescent analyses strongly support a clade containing Amborella plus water lilies (i.e., Nymphaeales) that is <span class="hlt">sister</span> to all other angiosperms across different nucleotide rate partitions. Our results also show that commonly applied concatenation methods produce strongly supported, but incongruent placements of Amborella: slow-evolving nucleotide sites corroborate results from coalescent analyses, whereas fast-evolving sites place Amborella alone as the first lineage of extant angiosperms. We further explored the performance of coalescent versus concatenation methods using nucleotide sequences simulated on (i) the two alternate placements of Amborella with branch lengths and substitution model parameters estimated from each of the 310 nuclear genes and (ii) three hypothetical species trees that are topologically identical except with respect to the degree of deep coalescence and branch lengths. Our results collectively suggest that the Amborella alone placement inferred using concatenation methods is likely misled by fast-evolving sites. This appears to be exacerbated by the combination of long branches in stem group angiosperms, Amborella, and Nymphaeales with the short internal branch separating Amborella and Nymphaeales. In contrast, coalescent methods appear to be more robust to elevated substitution rates. PMID:25077515</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25999054','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25999054"><span id="translatedtitle">Phylogenomic analyses reveal subclass Scuticociliatia as the <span class="hlt">sister</span> group of subclass Hymenostomatia within class Oligohymenophorea.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Feng, Jin-Mei; Jiang, Chuan-Qi; Warren, Alan; Tian, Miao; Cheng, Jun; Liu, Guang-Long; Xiong, Jie; Miao, Wei</p> <p>2015-09-01</p> <p>Scuticociliates and hymenostomes are two groups of the ciliate class Oligohymenophorea, a diverse clade that includes two model genera, Tetrahymena and Paramecium, which have been intensively studied due to their ease of culture and their amenability to a wide range of biochemical and genetic investigations. However, phylogenetic relationships among the subclasses of the Oligohymenophorea, and especially between the Scuticociliatia and Hymenostomatia, are not clearly resolved. Here, we investigate the phylogenetic relationship between the subclasses Scuticociliatia and Hymenostomatia based on omics data. The transcriptomes of five species, comprising four oligohymenophoreans and one colpodean, were sequenced. A supermatrix was constructed for phylogenomic analyses based on 113 genes encoding 43,528 amino acid residues from 26 taxa, including ten representatives of the class Oligohymenophorea. Our phylogenomic analyses revealed that the monophyletic Scuticociliatia is <span class="hlt">sister</span> to the monophyletic Hymenostomatia, which together form the terminal branch within the monophyletic class Oligohymenophorea. Competing hypotheses for this relationship were rejected by topological tests. Our results provide corroborative evidence for the close relationship between the subclasses Scuticociliatia and Hymenostomatia, justifying the possible use of the model hymenostome T. thermophila as an effective experimental system to study the molecular and cellular biology of the scuticociliates. PMID:25999054</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1617475','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1617475"><span id="translatedtitle">Effects of older brother-younger <span class="hlt">sister</span> incest: a study of the dynamics of 17 cases.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Laviola, M</p> <p>1992-01-01</p> <p>The purpose of this study was to explore the effects of older brother-younger <span class="hlt">sister</span> incest from the perspective of the women who experienced it in childhood or adolescent years. Dynamics in the families-of-origin were also explored, as these related or contributed to the effects from the incest. Seventeen women were interviewed, using an in-depth, semi-structured interview. Four self-report objective instruments were also administered that measure dynamics in the family-of-origin and symptomatology that is often associated with the effects of trauma. Interview and objective data were analyzed by systematically organizing the women's perceptions and conceptualizations into common themes. All of the women's families of origin were described as dysfunctional. Common effects reported included mistrust of men and women, chronic low or negative self-esteem, sexual response difficulties, and intrusive thoughts of the incest. Women regarded individual therapy, talking with supportive family and friends, and validating themselves as victims at the time of the incest as ways in which they have helped themselves to deal with the effects of the incest. These results have important implications for therapy, including serious consideration of the impact and contribution of this kind of incest on reported symptomatology, and on emerging issues and conflicts in the therapeutic process.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2955145','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2955145"><span id="translatedtitle">[<span class="hlt">Sister</span> chromatid exchanges and chromosome aberrations as parameters for human risk of cancer development].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Morimoto, K</p> <p>1987-04-01</p> <p>Chromosome alterations, which are directly visible changes in the DNA, have close associations to cancer development, non-specific ageing, and heritable genetic status. Human lymphocyte cultures can be used for cytogenetic monitoring of genetic health because many cancers and genetic effects are caused by long-term unhealthy life-styles. We have investigated the sensitivities of lymphocytes from inherited-cancer-prone diseases to the induction of the chromosome alterations by mutagens and carcinogens, and the correlations between the frequency of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchanges (SCEs) in peripheral lymphocytes and life-styles or daily ways of living. Lymphocytes from patients with Down syndrome, Fanconi anemia, xeroderma pigmentosum, ataxia telangiectasia, and Bloom syndromes showed altered (usually enhanced) susceptibilities to the induction of chromosome aberrations and SCEs by mutagens and carcinogens in our environments. Mean frequencies of baseline SCEs in lymphocytes from normal men with poor life-styles have also been shown to be significantly higher than those in cells from men having good life-styles. The former cells have further been shown to have hyper sensitivities to the induction of SCEs by mitomycin-C' treatment compared to latter cells. Unhealthy life-styles also make the lymphocytes to be more sensitive to ara-C's enhancement of radiation-induced chromosome aberrations.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27026021','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27026021"><span id="translatedtitle">Divergence in male cricket song and female preference functions in three allopatric <span class="hlt">sister</span> species.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Hennig, Ralf Matthias; Blankers, Thomas; Gray, David A</p> <p>2016-05-01</p> <p>Multivariate female preference functions for male sexual signals have rarely been investigated, especially in a comparative context among <span class="hlt">sister</span> species. Here we examined male signal and female preference co-variation in three closely related, but allopatric species of Gryllus crickets and quantified male song traits as well as female preferences. We show that males differ conspicuously in either one of two relatively static song traits, carrier frequency or pulse rate; female preference functions for these traits also differed, and would in combination enhance species discrimination. In contrast, the relatively dynamic song traits, chirp rate and chirp duty cycle, show minimal divergence among species and relatively greater conservation of female preference functions. Notably, among species we demonstrate similar mechanistic rules for the integration of pulse and chirp time scales, despite divergence in pulse rate preferences. As these are allopatric taxa, selection for species recognition per se is unlikely. More likely sexual selection combined with conserved properties of preference filters enabled divergent coevolution of male song and female preferences. PMID:27026021</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6415339','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6415339"><span id="translatedtitle">Induction of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchanges by coal dust and tobacco snuff extracts in human peripheral lymphocytes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Tucker, J.D.; Ong, T.</p> <p>1985-01-01</p> <p>The organic solvent extracts of sub-bituminous coal dust and tobacco snuff, both together and separately, were tested for the induction of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchanges (SCEs) in human peripheral lymphocytes. The results indicate that these extracts induced SCEs, and that when tested together synergistically induced SCEs in two of three donors. Studies with the organic solvent extracts of all five ranks of coal indicate that the extracts of bituminous, lignite, and peat, but not anthracite, induced SCEs. Similar experiments conducted with water extracts, induced SCEs, and that anthracite was equivocal. To determine whether individuals differed in their SCE responses to coal dust extracts, lymphocytes from five donors were tested with organic solvent extracts of bituminous and sub-bituminous coal. An analysis of variance indicates that the SCE response was significantly influenced by the donor and each of the two coal extracts. The findings presented here suggest that coal dust, with or without tobacco snuff, may play a role in the elevated incidence of gastric cancer in coal miners. Because water extracts of some ranks of coal induced SCEs, there exists the possibility of adverse environmental effects due to coal leachates.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=49836','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=49836"><span id="translatedtitle">Elevated <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchange phenotype of Bloom syndrome cells is complemented by human chromosome 15.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>McDaniel, L D; Schultz, R A</p> <p>1992-01-01</p> <p>Bloom syndrome (BSx) is a rare autosomal-recessive chromosome-instability disorder manifested by a constellation of clinical features including a significant predisposition to early onset of neoplasia. BSx cells display cytogenetic abnormalities, the pathognomonic feature being an increased rate of spontaneous <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchanges (SCEs), 10- to 15-fold more frequent than SCEs seen in control cells. Identification of the primary biochemical defect in BSx and its relationship to SCE frequency and neoplasia have been complicated by reports that BSx cell lines exhibit defects in the structure and/or activity of a number of different enzymes. The rare occurrence of the disorder and lack of informative families have precluded mapping of the primary defect by standard linkage analysis. We have utilized BSx cells as recipients for microcell-mediated chromosome transfer to map a locus that renders complementation of the elevated SCE phenotype. Studies with the BSx cell line GM08505 demonstrated a stable frequency of SCEs 10-fold higher than control values, offering a phenotype suitable for complementation studies. Transfer of different independent human chromosomes from somatic cell hybrids into BSx cells permitted identification of a single chromosome that dramatically reduced the SCE frequency to a level near that seen in control cells. Detailed characterization revealed this complementing element to be human chromosome 15. Images PMID:1518822</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18219312','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18219312"><span id="translatedtitle">BRC-1 acts in the inter-<span class="hlt">sister</span> pathway of meiotic double-strand break repair.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Adamo, Adele; Montemauri, Paolo; Silva, Nicola; Ward, Jordan D; Boulton, Simon J; La Volpe, Adriana</p> <p>2008-03-01</p> <p>The breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility protein BRCA1 is evolutionarily conserved and functions in DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair through homologous recombination, but its role in meiosis is poorly understood. By using genetic analysis, we investigated the role of the Caenorhabditis elegans BRCA1 orthologue (brc-1) during meiotic prophase. The null mutant in the brc-1 gene is viable, fertile and shows the wild-type complement of six bivalents in most diakinetic nuclei, which is indicative of successful crossover recombination. However, brc-1 mutants show an abnormal increase in apoptosis and RAD-51 foci at pachytene that are abolished by loss of spo-11 function, suggesting a defect in meiosis rather than during premeiotic DNA replication. In genetic backgrounds in which chiasma formation is abrogated, such as him-14/MSH4 and syp-2, loss of brc-1 leads to chromosome fragmentation suggesting that brc-1 is dispensable for crossing over but essential for DSB repair through inter-<span class="hlt">sister</span> recombination.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17431321','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17431321"><span id="translatedtitle">Elevated <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchange frequencies in New Zealand Vietnam War veterans.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Rowland, R E; Edwards, L A; Podd, J V</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>From July 1965 until November 1971, New Zealand Defence Force Personnel fought in the Vietnam War. During this time more than 76,500,000 litres of phenoxylic herbicides were sprayed over parts of Southern Vietnam and Laos, the most common being known as 'Agent Orange'. The current study aimed to ascertain whether or not New Zealand Vietnam War veterans show evidence of genetic disturbance arising as a consequence of their now confirmed exposure to these defoliants. A sample group of 24 New Zealand Vietnam War veterans and 23 control volunteers were compared using an SCE (<span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchange) analysis. The results from the SCE study show a highly significant difference (P < 0.001) between the mean of the experimental group (11.05) and the mean of a matched control group (8.18). The experimental group also has an exceptionally high proportion of HFCs (cells with high SCE frequencies) above the 95th percentile compared to the controls (11.0 and 0.07%, respectively). We conclude that the New Zealand Vietnam War veterans studied here were exposed to a clastogenic substance(s) which continues to exert an observable genetic effect today, and suggest that this is attributable to their service in Vietnam. PMID:17431321</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1456524','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1456524"><span id="translatedtitle">A Segmental Deletion Series Generated by <span class="hlt">Sister</span>-Chromatid Transposition of Ac Transposable Elements in Maize</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Zhang, Jianbo; Peterson, Thomas</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>Certain configurations of maize Ac/Ds transposon termini can undergo alternative transposition reactions leading to chromosome breakage and various types of stable chromosome rearrangements. Here, we show that a particular allele of the maize p1 gene containing an intact Ac element and a nearby terminally deleted Ac element (fAc) can undergo <span class="hlt">sister</span>-chromatid transposition (SCT) reactions that generate large flanking deletions. Among 35 deletions characterized, all begin at the Ac termini in the p1 gene and extend to various flanking sites proximal to p1. The deletions range in size from the smallest of 12,567 bp to the largest of >4.6 cM; >80% of the deletions removed the p2 gene, a paralog of p1 located ∼60 kb from p1 in the p1-vv allele and its derivatives. Sequencing of representative cases shows that the deletions have precise junctions between the transposon termini and the flanking genomic sequences. These results show that SCT events can efficiently generate interstitial deletions that are useful for in vivo dissection of local genome regions and for the rapid correlation of genetic and physical maps. Finally, we discuss evidence suggesting that deletions induced by alternative transposition reactions can occur at other genomic loci, indicating that this mechanism may have had a significant impact on genome evolution. PMID:15965263</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5462220','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5462220"><span id="translatedtitle">Induction of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchanges and bacterial revertants by organic extracts of airborne particles. [Humans</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Lockard, J.M.; Viau, C.J.; Lee-Stephens, C.; Caldwell, J.C.; Wojciechowski, J.P.; Enoch, H.G.; Sabharwal, P.S.</p> <p>1981-01-01</p> <p>The genotoxicities of organic extracts of airborne particles have been studied extensively in the Salmonella/mammalian microsome (Ames) test, but in few other bioassays. In these studies, we tested benzene-acetone extracts of particulate pollutants collected in Lexington, Kentucky, for capacity to induce increases in <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchanges (SCE) in human lumphocytes and V79 cells, as well as in the Ames assay. Extracts induced linear dose-related increases in SCE in human lumphocytes and in bacterial revertants.However, variable responses were observed in SCE assays in V79 cells with and without activation by rat liver S9 or feeder layers of irradiated Syrian hamster fetal cells. We conclude that the SCE assay in human lumphocytes may be a useful indicator of the potential risks to humans of airborne particulate pollutants, as it utilizes human cells recently taken from the host, is rapid and economical, and requires small quantities of test materials. However, thorough studies of the quantitative relationships between SCE induction and mutagenicity in human cells are needed.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li class="active"><span>25</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_25 --> <center> <div class="footer-extlink text-muted"><small>Some links on this page may take you to non-federal websites. Their policies may differ from this site.</small> </div> </center> <div id="footer-wrapper"> <div class="footer-content"> <div id="footerOSTI" class=""> <div class="row"> <div class="col-md-4 text-center col-md-push-4 footer-content-center"><small><a href="http://www.science.gov/disclaimer.html">Privacy and Security</a></small> <div class="visible-sm visible-xs push_footer"></div> </div> <div class="col-md-4 text-center col-md-pull-4 footer-content-left"> <img src="https://www.osti.gov/images/DOE_SC31.png" alt="U.S. Department of Energy" usemap="#doe" height="31" width="177"><map style="display:none;" name="doe" id="doe"><area shape="rect" coords="1,3,107,30" href="http://www.energy.gov" alt="U.S. Deparment of Energy"><area shape="rect" coords="114,3,165,30" href="http://www.science.energy.gov" alt="Office of Science"></map> <a ref="http://www.osti.gov" style="margin-left: 15px;"><img src="https://www.osti.gov/images/footerimages/ostigov53.png" alt="Office of Scientific and Technical Information" height="31" width="53"></a> <div class="visible-sm visible-xs push_footer"></div> </div> <div class="col-md-4 text-center footer-content-right"> <a href="http://www.osti.gov/nle"><img src="https://www.osti.gov/images/footerimages/NLElogo31.png" alt="National Library of Energy" height="31" width="79"></a> <a href="http://www.science.gov"><img src="https://www.osti.gov/images/footerimages/scigov77.png" alt="science.gov" height="31" width="98"></a> <a href="http://worldwidescience.org"><img src="https://www.osti.gov/images/footerimages/wws82.png" alt="WorldWideScience.org" height="31" width="90"></a> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <p><br></p> </div><!-- container --> </body> </html>