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Sample records for death linking sister

  1. Linking chromosome duplication and segregation via sister chromatid cohesion.

    PubMed

    Leman, Adam R; Noguchi, Eishi

    2014-01-01

    DNA replication during S phase generates two identical copies of each chromosome. Each chromosome is destined for a daughter cell, but each daughter must receive one and only one copy of each chromosome. To ensure accurate chromosome segregation, eukaryotic cells are equipped with a mechanism to pair the chromosomes during chromosome duplication and hold the pairs until a bi-oriented mitotic spindle is formed and the pairs are pulled apart. This mechanism is known as sister chromatid cohesion, and its actions span the entire cell cycle. During G1, before DNA is copied during S phase, proteins termed cohesins are loaded onto DNA. Paired chromosomes are held together through G2 phase, and finally the cohesins are dismantled during mitosis. The processes governing sister chromatid cohesion ensure that newly replicated sisters are held together from the moment they are generated to the metaphase-anaphase transition, when sisters separate.

  2. Overlap microtubules link sister k-fibres and balance the forces on bi-oriented kinetochores.

    PubMed

    Kajtez, Janko; Solomatina, Anastasia; Novak, Maja; Polak, Bruno; Vukušić, Kruno; Rüdiger, Jonas; Cojoc, Gheorghe; Milas, Ana; Šumanovac Šestak, Ivana; Risteski, Patrik; Tavano, Federica; Klemm, Anna H; Roscioli, Emanuele; Welburn, Julie; Cimini, Daniela; Glunčić, Matko; Pavin, Nenad; Tolić, Iva M

    2016-01-05

    During metaphase, forces on kinetochores are exerted by k-fibres, bundles of microtubules that end at the kinetochore. Interestingly, non-kinetochore microtubules have been observed between sister kinetochores, but their function is unknown. Here we show by laser-cutting of a k-fibre in HeLa and PtK1 cells that a bundle of non-kinetochore microtubules, which we term 'bridging fibre', bridges sister k-fibres and balances the interkinetochore tension. We found PRC1 and EB3 in the bridging fibre, suggesting that it consists of antiparallel dynamic microtubules. By using a theoretical model that includes a bridging fibre, we show that the forces at the pole and at the kinetochore depend on the bridging fibre thickness. Moreover, our theory and experiments show larger relaxation of the interkinetochore distance for cuts closer to kinetochores. We conclude that the bridging fibre, by linking sister k-fibres, withstands the tension between sister kinetochores and enables the spindle to obtain a curved shape.

  3. Overlap microtubules link sister k-fibres and balance the forces on bi-oriented kinetochores

    PubMed Central

    Kajtez, Janko; Solomatina, Anastasia; Novak, Maja; Polak, Bruno; Vukušić, Kruno; Rüdiger, Jonas; Cojoc, Gheorghe; Milas, Ana; Šumanovac Šestak, Ivana; Risteski, Patrik; Tavano, Federica; Klemm, Anna H.; Roscioli, Emanuele; Welburn, Julie; Cimini, Daniela; Glunčić, Matko; Pavin, Nenad; Tolić, Iva M.

    2016-01-01

    During metaphase, forces on kinetochores are exerted by k-fibres, bundles of microtubules that end at the kinetochore. Interestingly, non-kinetochore microtubules have been observed between sister kinetochores, but their function is unknown. Here we show by laser-cutting of a k-fibre in HeLa and PtK1 cells that a bundle of non-kinetochore microtubules, which we term ‘bridging fibre', bridges sister k-fibres and balances the interkinetochore tension. We found PRC1 and EB3 in the bridging fibre, suggesting that it consists of antiparallel dynamic microtubules. By using a theoretical model that includes a bridging fibre, we show that the forces at the pole and at the kinetochore depend on the bridging fibre thickness. Moreover, our theory and experiments show larger relaxation of the interkinetochore distance for cuts closer to kinetochores. We conclude that the bridging fibre, by linking sister k-fibres, withstands the tension between sister kinetochores and enables the spindle to obtain a curved shape. PMID:26728792

  4. Siblings' experiences of their brother's or sister's cancer death: a nationwide follow-up 2-9 years later.

    PubMed

    Lövgren, Malin; Jalmsell, Li; Eilegård Wallin, Alexandra; Steineck, Gunnar; Kreicbergs, Ulrika

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to examine siblings' experiences of their brother's or sister's cancer death and if these experiences influenced levels of anxiety 2-9 years later. This nationwide survey was conducted in Sweden in 2009. All siblings who had a brother/sister who was diagnosed with cancer before the age of 17 years and who died before the age of 25 years during 2000-2007 were invited. Of those, 174 siblings participated (participation rate: 73%). Mixed data from the survey about the siblings' experiences of death were included as well as data from the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. To examine the experiences, descriptive statistics and content analysis were used. Mann-Whitney U-test was conducted to investigate if the experiences influenced anxiety 2-9 years later. The siblings reported poor knowledge and experienced a lack of communication about their brother's/sister's death, for example, about the time frame, bodily changes near death, and about their own experiences. Siblings who reported that no one talked with them about what to expect when their brother/sister was going to die reported higher levels of anxiety 2-9 years after the loss. Seventy percent reported that they witnessed their brother/sister suffering in the last hours in life. Many of those who were not present during the illness period and at the time of death expressed regret. It is important to prepare siblings for their brother's/sister's illness and death as it may decrease anxiety and regrets later on. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Deaths linked to bullying and hazing.

    PubMed

    Srabstein, Jorge

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the extent of news reports of deaths associated with bullying and hazing among young people over a period of 57 years. This study was based on a survey of death events linked to bullying or hazing reported in English newspapers from January 1, 1950 through December 31, 2007. The search was based on the review of major United States and world publications, written in English, using the terms "bullying, hazing, ragging, and death." In the last 57 years, at least 250 reported cases of deaths were linked to bullying, hazing, or ragging, reported in English language newspapers from around the world. Of these news stories (n = 121), 76% contained an alleged history that the victim was bullied. Twenty-two per cent (n = 55) of these reports were associated with suspected hazing or ragging. In only four cases (2%), those who died had a history of bullying others. The majority of the reports of bullying related deaths (62.3%) originated in Europe, with most of them (93%) occurring in the United Kingdom. Sixty-seven percent of bullying-related deaths were reported during the last 10 years. The significant increment in news reports concerning deaths associated with bullying may be the result of a rise in public awareness about the lethal aspects of this type of maltreatment. An urgent global public health need exists to ascertain the regional mortality prevalence related to bullying and hazing, along the lifespan.

  6. The familial technique for linking maternal death with poverty.

    PubMed

    Graham, Wendy J; Fitzmaurice, Ann E; Bell, Jacqueline S; Cairns, John A

    2004-01-03

    Recognition of the synergy between health and poverty is now apparent in the development strategies of many low-income countries, and markers are needed to monitor progress towards poverty-relevant goals. Maternal mortality has been proposed as a possible candidate but evidence is lacking on the link with poverty at the level of individuals. We introduce a new approach to exploring the relation--the familial technique. We used data from 11 household surveys in ten developing countries to create percentage distributions of women according to their poverty-related characteristics and survival status (alive, non-maternal death, maternal death). These women were identified as the sisters of the adult female respondents in the surveys, and were assigned the same poverty status as their respondent sibling. The analysis showed significant associations, across a diverse set of countries, between women's poverty status (proxied by educational level, source of water, and type of toilet and floor) and survival. These associations indicated a gradient within and across the survival categories. With increasing poverty, the proportion of women dying of non-maternal causes generally increased, and the proportion dying of maternal causes increased consistently. Further analysis reported here for one of the countries--Indonesia, revealed that about 32-34% of the maternal deaths occurred among women from the poorest quintile of the population. The risk of maternal death in this country was around 3-4 times greater in the poorest than the richest group. This new method makes efficient use of existing survey data to explore the relation between maternal mortality and poverty, and has wider potential for examining the poor-rich gap.

  7. Links between sisters' sexual and dating victimization: the roles of neighborhood crime and parental controls.

    PubMed

    East, Patricia L; Chien, Nina C; Adams, Joyce A; Hokoda, Audrey; Maier, Ashley

    2010-12-01

    This study examined the extent to which a sister's prior sexual and dating victimization is a risk factor for young women being similarly victimized and the possible factors underlying a co-occurrence. The sample involved 122 young adult Latina or African American sister pairs (244 women; ages 16-25) who resided in low-income, urban neighborhoods. Results indicated that women whose sisters had been victimized had increased risk of victimization even after controlling for neighborhood crime, parental controls, age and race-ethnicity (odds ratios were 4.0 for unwanted touching, 6.2 for a forced sex act, and 16.7 for dating violence). In high-crime neighborhoods, the presence of two adult parent figures in the home was associated with women's reduced likelihood of unwanted touching, and mothers' high monitoring during adolescence was associated with women's lower risk of dating aggression. Survival analysis results showed that the risk period of a second sister being victimized lasts between 7 and 10 years after a first sister's victimization. The prevention implications of study findings are discussed.

  8. Linking Shorebird Conservation and Education Along Flyways: An Overview of the Shorebird Sister Schools Program

    Treesearch

    Hillary Chapman; Heather Johnson

    2005-01-01

    The Shorebird Sister Schools Program (SSSP) is an internet-based environmental education program that provides a forum for students, biologists, and shorebird enthusiasts to track shorebird migration and share observations along flyways. The program?s vision is to engage public participation in the conservation of shorebirds and their wetland, grassland, and shoreline...

  9. Metazoan Scc4 Homologs Link Sister Chromatid Cohesion to Cell and Axon Migration Guidance

    PubMed Central

    Seitan, Vlad C; Banks, Peter; Laval, Steve; Majid, Nazia A; Dorsett, Dale; Rana, Amer; Smith, Jim; Bateman, Alex; Krpic, Sanja; Hostert, Arnd; Rollins, Robert A; Erdjument-Bromage, Hediye; Tempst, Paul; Benard, Claire Y; Hekimi, Siegfried; Newbury, Sarah F

    2006-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae Scc2 binds Scc4 to form an essential complex that loads cohesin onto chromosomes. The prevalence of Scc2 orthologs in eukaryotes emphasizes a conserved role in regulating sister chromatid cohesion, but homologs of Scc4 have not hitherto been identified outside certain fungi. Some metazoan orthologs of Scc2 were initially identified as developmental gene regulators, such as Drosophila Nipped-B, a regulator of cut and Ultrabithorax, and delangin, a protein mutant in Cornelia de Lange syndrome. We show that delangin and Nipped-B bind previously unstudied human and fly orthologs of Caenorhabditis elegans MAU-2, a non-axis-specific guidance factor for migrating cells and axons. PSI-BLAST shows that Scc4 is evolutionarily related to metazoan MAU-2 sequences, with the greatest homology evident in a short N-terminal domain, and protein–protein interaction studies map the site of interaction between delangin and human MAU-2 to the N-terminal regions of both proteins. Short interfering RNA knockdown of human MAU-2 in HeLa cells resulted in precocious sister chromatid separation and in impaired loading of cohesin onto chromatin, indicating that it is functionally related to Scc4, and RNAi analyses show that MAU-2 regulates chromosome segregation in C. elegans embryos. Using antisense morpholino oligonucleotides to knock down Xenopus tropicalis delangin or MAU-2 in early embryos produced similar patterns of retarded growth and developmental defects. Our data show that sister chromatid cohesion in metazoans involves the formation of a complex similar to the Scc2-Scc4 interaction in the budding yeast. The very high degree of sequence conservation between Scc4 homologs in complex metazoans is consistent with increased selection pressure to conserve additional essential functions, such as regulation of cell and axon migration during development. PMID:16802858

  10. Hip Fracture's Link to Early Death May Last Years

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163802.html Hip Fracture's Link to Early Death May Last Years People ... HealthDay News) -- Older people who suffer a hip fracture face a much higher risk of death soon ...

  11. Both cross-links and monoadducts induced in DNA by psoralens can lead to sister chromatid exchange formation

    SciTech Connect

    Cortes, F. Facultad de Biologia, Sevilla ); Morgan, W.F.; Varcarcel, E.R.; Cleaver, J.E.; Wolff, S. )

    1991-09-01

    The relative importance of DNA-DNA cross-links and bulky monoadducts in sister chromatid exchange (SCE) formation was investigated in three human fibroblast cell lines with different repair capabilities. These cell lines included normal cells, which can repair both classes of lesion; xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) cells, which cannot repair either psoralen-induced cross-links or monoadducts; and an XP revertant that repairs only cross-links and not monoadducts. SCEs were induced by two psoralen derivatives. After activation with long-wave ultraviolet light, HMT produces cross-links and monoadducts in DNA, whereas 5-MIP produces only monoadducts. In normal human cells both psoralens induced SCEs, but if cells were allowed to repair for 18 h before bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd) was added for SCE analysis, the SCE frequency was significantly reduced. XP cells showed an SCE frequency that remained high regardless of whether SCEs were analyzed immediately after psoralen exposure of 18 h later. In the XP revertant that repairs only cross-links, both psoralens induced a high yield of SCEs when BrdUrd was added immediately after psoralen treatment. These observations indicate that both cross-links and monoadducts are lesions in DNA that can lead to SCE formation.

  12. Skin Cancer Cream Linked to 5 Dog Deaths:

    MedlinePlus

    ... 163145.html Skin Cancer Cream Linked to 5 Dog Deaths: FDA Even ingesting small amounts of fluorouracil ... 2017 THURSDAY, Jan. 19, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Five dogs have died from exposure to a skin cancer ...

  13. Air Mattresses Linked to More Than 100 Infant Deaths

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_166189.html Air Mattresses Linked to More Than 100 Infant Deaths ... 2017 FRIDAY, June 2, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- An air mattress can be a dangerous place for babies, ...

  14. BID links ferroptosis to mitochondrial cell death pathways.

    PubMed

    Neitemeier, Sandra; Jelinek, Anja; Laino, Vincenzo; Hoffmann, Lena; Eisenbach, Ina; Eying, Roman; Ganjam, Goutham K; Dolga, Amalia M; Oppermann, Sina; Culmsee, Carsten

    2017-03-09

    Ferroptosis has been defined as an oxidative and iron-dependent pathway of regulated cell death that is distinct from caspase-dependent apoptosis and established pathways of death receptor-mediated regulated necrosis. While emerging evidence linked features of ferroptosis induced e.g. by erastin-mediated inhibition of the Xc(-) system or inhibition of glutathione peroxidase 4 (Gpx4) to an increasing number of oxidative cell death paradigms in cancer cells, neurons or kidney cells, the biochemical pathways of oxidative cell death remained largely unclear. In particular, the role of mitochondrial damage in paradigms of ferroptosis needs further investigation. In the present study, we find that erastin-induced ferroptosis in neuronal cells was accompanied by BID transactivation to mitochondria, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, enhanced mitochondrial fragmentation and reduced ATP levels. These hallmarks of mitochondrial demise are also established features of oxytosis, a paradigm of cell death induced by Xc(-) inhibition by millimolar concentrations of glutamate. Bid knockout using CRISPR/Cas9 approaches preserved mitochondrial integrity and function, and mediated neuroprotective effects against both, ferroptosis and oxytosis. Furthermore, the BID-inhibitor BI-6c9 inhibited erastin-induced ferroptosis, and, in turn, the ferroptosis inhibitors ferrostatin-1 and liproxstatin-1 prevented mitochondrial dysfunction and cell death in the paradigm of oxytosis. These findings show that mitochondrial transactivation of BID links ferroptosis to mitochondrial damage as the final execution step in this paradigm of oxidative cell death.

  15. Crossovers trigger a remodeling of meiotic chromosome axis composition that is linked to two-step loss of sister chromatid cohesion

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Perez, Enrique; Schvarzstein, Mara; Barroso, Consuelo; Lightfoot, James; Dernburg, Abby F.; Villeneuve, Anne M.

    2008-01-01

    Segregation of homologous chromosomes during meiosis depends on linkages (chiasmata) created by crossovers and on selective release of a subset of sister chromatid cohesion at anaphase I. During Caenorhabditis elegans meiosis, each chromosome pair forms a single crossover, and the position of this event determines which chromosomal regions will undergo cohesion release at anaphase I. Here we provide insight into the basis of this coupling by uncovering a large-scale regional change in chromosome axis composition that is triggered by crossovers. We show that axial element components HTP-1 and HTP-2 are removed during late pachytene, in a crossover-dependent manner, from the regions that will later be targeted for anaphase I cohesion release. We demonstrate correspondence in position and number between chiasmata and HTP-1/2-depleted regions and provide evidence that HTP-1/2 depletion boundaries mark crossover sites. In htp-1 mutants, diakinesis bivalents lack normal asymmetrical features, and sister chromatid cohesion is prematurely lost during the meiotic divisions. We conclude that HTP-1 is central to the mechanism linking crossovers with late-prophase bivalent differentiation and defines the domains where cohesion will be protected until meiosis II. Further, we discuss parallels between the pattern of HTP-1/2 removal in response to crossovers and the phenomenon of crossover interference. PMID:18923085

  16. Ectrodactyly in sisters and half sisters.

    PubMed Central

    Mufti, M H; Wood, S K

    1987-01-01

    An extended family is described in which four sisters and half sisters presented with ectrodactyly. Two of the sisters had associated agenesis of the tibiae. The paper describes the malformations and discusses the management and possible genetic inheritance involved. An autosomal recessive gene seems likely to be the mode of inheritance. Images PMID:3585937

  17. [What is the link between the sister of the "Titanic" and the history of medicine in Palestine?].

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Zalman

    2006-06-01

    On 21st November 1916, the Royal Navy Hospital ship 'Britannic' (the sister ship of the 'Titanic') was torpedoed near the island of Kea in the Aegean Sea. Captain Dr. John Cropper, aged 52, was one of 30 people who drowned of the 1100 on board. Dr. Cropper was born in 1864, at Guisborough, England. He obtained his medical degree from Cambridge University in 1891. After his marriage to Anne Ellen Walker in 1895, the Church Missionary Society sent him on a medical mission to Palestine. Dr. Cropper stayed in Palestine for about 10 years working in Acre, Nablus, Ramallah and Jerusalem. He published his experiences in 35 articles and letters in English medical periodicals, more than anyone else did in Palestine at that time. In those publications, he described various operations that he carried out and observations on infectious diseases, most of which were the first descriptions from that remote and unhealthy country. His prominent research was in the field of malaria - the most common and important disease in Palestine during that period. It was less than two years after Grassi's discovery of the role of Anopheles mosquitoes as the vector of human malaria that Dr. Cropper carried out surveys of larval and adult mosquitoes in correlation with malarial distribution in Palestine. Dr. Cropper was the first who routinely examined slides microscopically in Palestine and correctly diagnosed the type of malaria. Dr. Cropper was also the first in Palestine to suggest antimalarial measures aimed directly at the mosquito vector and paid attention to ecological aspects such as breeding places and the daily behavior of adult mosquitoes. Dr. Cropper noted the common antimalarial measurements of that time, such as covering of wells, planting of Eucalyptus trees to drain swamps and the routine use of quinine as a preventive medicine, but he wrote that those measures were not effective under the local conditions. He suggested that the only effective measures must be aimed against the

  18. Food Stamp Use Linked to Raised Early Death Risk in Study

    MedlinePlus

    ... html Food Stamp Use Linked to Raised Early Death Risk in Study Highlights need to improve health ... food stamps have a higher risk of premature death than people who aren't eligible for them, ...

  19. Two infant deaths linked to intussusception without peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Iwase, Hirotaro; Motani, Hisako; Yajima, Daisuke; Hayakawa, Mutsumi; Kobayashi, Kazuhiro; Sato, Kaoru; Otsuka, Katsura; Nakatani, Yukio

    2010-05-01

    We report two infant deaths attributable to intussusception, but without clear evidence of peritonitis. In the first instance, a 3-year-old girl had presented with abdominal pain, vomiting, and melena before her demise. Aspirated vomitus was subsequently ascertained as the immediate cause of death, due to intussusception-induced ileus. The other infant, a 2-month-old male, showed autopsy evidence of intussusception at two sites, with likely aspiration of gastric mucus. Since the circumstances surrounding his death were vague, timing of the intussusception was difficult to pinpoint. Thus, an inconsequential, agonal event could not be discounted. Taken together, however, death from intussusception, without peritonitis, is the most viable postmortem interpretation for both patients. The causes of death in such cases are established by comprehensive delineation of preceding clinical events, plus autopsy documentation of coexistent intussusception and vomitus aspiration. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Medico legal investigations into sudden sniffing deaths linked with trichloroethylene.

    PubMed

    Da Broi, Ugo; Colatutto, Antonio; Sala, Pierguido; Desinan, Lorenzo

    2015-08-01

    Sudden deaths attributed to sniffing trichloroethylene are caused by the abuse of this solvent which produces pleasant inebriating effects with rapid dissipation. In the event of repeated cycles of inhalation, a dangerous and uncontrolled systemic accumulation of trichloroethylene may occur, followed by central nervous system depression, coma and lethal cardiorespiratory arrest. Sometimes death occurs outside the hospital environment, without medical intervention or witnesses and without specific necroscopic signs. Medico legal investigations into sudden sniffing deaths associated with trichloroethylene demand careful analysis of the death scene and related circumstances, a detailed understanding of the deceased's medical history and background of substance abuse and an accurate evaluation of all autopsy and laboratory data, with close cooperation between the judiciary, coroners and toxicologists.

  1. Linking sudden oak death with spatial economic value transfer

    Treesearch

    Tom Holmes; Bill Smith

    2008-01-01

    Sudden oak death (caused by Phytophthora ramorum) is currently having a dramatic impact on the flow of ecosystem services provided by trees and forests in California. Timber species in California are not thought to be at risk of mortality from this pathogen and, consequently, economic impacts accrue to non-market values of trees such as aesthetics,...

  2. Climate niches of milkweeds with plesiomorphic traits (Secamonoideae; Apocynaceae) and the milkweed sister group link ancient African climates and floral evolution.

    PubMed

    Livshultz, Tatyana; Mead, Jerry V; Goyder, David J; Brannin, Michelle

    2011-12-01

    Climate change that increases mortality of plants and pollinators can create mate-finding Allee effects and thus act as a strong selective force on floral morphology. Milkweeds (Secamonoideae and Asclepiadoideae; Apocynaceae) are typically small plants of seasonally dry habitats, with pollinia and high pollen-transfer efficiency. Their sister group (tribe Baisseeae and Dewevrella) is mostly comprised of giant lianas of African rainforests, with pollen in monads. Comparison of the two groups motivated a new hypothesis: milkweeds evolved in the context of African aridification and the shifting of rainforest to dry forest. Pollinia and high pollen-transfer efficiency may have been adaptations that alleviated mate-finding Allee effects generated by high mortality during droughts. We formally tested whether milkweeds have a drier climate niche by comparing milkweeds with plesiomorphic traits (Secamonoideae) and the milkweed sister group in continental Africa. We georeferenced specimens of the milkweed sister group and Secamonoideae in continental Africa, extracted 19 climatic variables from the Worldclim model, conducted factor analysis to identify correlated suites of variables, and compared the frequency distributions of the two lineages relative to each factor. The distributions of Secamonoideae and the milkweed sister group differed significantly relative to four factors, each correlated with a distinct suite of climate parameters: (1) air temperature (Secamonoideae: cooler), (2) total and (3) summer precipitation (Secamonoideae: drier), and (4) temperature seasonality and isothermality (Secamonoideae: more seasonal and less isothermal). Secamonoideae in continental Africa inhabit drier, cooler sites than do the milkweed sister group, consistent with a shift from rainforests to dry forests in a cooling climate.

  3. Birth and death of genes linked to chromosomal inversion

    PubMed Central

    Furuta, Yoshikazu; Kawai, Mikihiko; Yahara, Koji; Takahashi, Noriko; Handa, Naofumi; Tsuru, Takeshi; Oshima, Kenshiro; Yoshida, Masaru; Azuma, Takeshi; Hattori, Masahira; Uchiyama, Ikuo; Kobayashi, Ichizo

    2011-01-01

    The birth and death of genes is central to adaptive evolution, yet the underlying genome dynamics remain elusive. The availability of closely related complete genome sequences helps to follow changes in gene contents and clarify their relationship to overall genome organization. Helicobacter pylori, bacteria in our stomach, are known for their extreme genome plasticity through mutation and recombination and will make a good target for such an analysis. In comparing their complete genome sequences, we found that gain and loss of genes (loci) for outer membrane proteins, which mediate host interaction, occurred at breakpoints of chromosomal inversions. Sequence comparison there revealed a unique mechanism of DNA duplication: DNA duplication associated with inversion. In this process, a DNA segment at one chromosomal locus is copied and inserted, in an inverted orientation, into a distant locus on the same chromosome, while the entire region between these two loci is also inverted. Recognition of this and three more inversion modes, which occur through reciprocal recombination between long or short sequence similarity or adjacent to a mobile element, allowed reconstruction of synteny evolution through inversion events in this species. These results will guide the interpretation of extensive DNA sequencing results for understanding long- and short-term genome evolution in various organisms and in cancer cells. PMID:21212362

  4. Goddard Welcomes SISTER

    NASA Image and Video Library

    The Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., hosted a weeklong summer institute, SISTER, for the purpose of increasing the awareness of and providing opportunities for middle school girls to ...

  5. Mechanism of cell death resulting from DNA interstrand cross-linking in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Osawa, T; Davies, D; Hartley, J A

    2011-01-01

    DNA interstrand cross-links (ICLs) are critical cytotoxic lesions produced by cancer chemotherapeutic agents such as the nitrogen mustards and platinum drugs; however, the exact mechanism of ICL-induced cell death is unclear. Here, we show a novel mechanism of p53-independent apoptotic cell death involving prolonged cell-cycle (G2) arrest, ICL repair involving HR, transient mitosis, incomplete cytokinesis, and gross chromosomal abnormalities resulting from ICLs in mammalian cells. This characteristic ‘giant' cell death, observed by using time-lapse video microscopy, was reduced in ICL repair ERCC1- and XRCC3-deficient cells. Collectively, the results illustrate the coordination of ICL-induced cellular responses, including cell-cycle arrest, DNA damage repair, and cell death. PMID:21814285

  6. THREE SISTERS WILDERNESS, OREGON.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    MacLeod, Norman S.; Causey, J. Douglas

    1984-01-01

    A mineral survey of the Three Sisters Wilderness, Oregon indicated little promise for the occcurrence of metallic mineral resources. Block pumice suitable for commercial uses occurs at an undeveloped claim at Rock Mesa in the wilderness, but numerous other sources occur outside the wilderness closer to markets. A broad area centered around South Sister volcano is among the most favorable targets for geothermal resources in the Oregon Cascade Range, based on the very young age and large volume of silicic volcanic rocks that occur in this area. Deep exploration holes could be drilled in areas outside the wilderness south of South Sister to provide data on the subsurface thermal and hydrologic regimes in the southern part of the area most likely to contain geothermal resources.

  7. The Sister Libraries Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sager, Don

    2000-01-01

    These articles describe the Sister Libraries program, part of the White House Millennium project, sponsored by the National Commission on Libraries and Information Science and the American Library Association to build relationships with libraries in other cultures. Discusses projects with public and school libraries and library development in…

  8. Adolescent early death perception: links to behavioral and life outcomes in young adulthood.

    PubMed

    Duke, Naomi N; Borowsky, Iris W; Pettingell, Sandra L; Skay, Carol L; McMorris, Barbara J

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between changes in adolescent perception of risk for early death over time and behavioral and life outcomes in young adulthood. This is a secondary data analysis of 7202 respondents participating in waves 1 (1995), 2 (1996), and 3 (2001-2002) of the in-home interviews from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. Linear and logistic regression models were used to determine the predictive ability of adolescent early death perception at waves 1 and 2 on young adult outcomes of health risk, human capital, and prosocial development, and fitness at wave 3. Nearly one in four youth (23%) expressed perceived risk of premature death at some point in time; 6% of youth persisted in this outlook. Perceived risk of premature death during adolescence was linked to poor health and productivity on multiple levels in young adulthood. Adolescent perceived risk for premature death portends poor outcomes in young adulthood. Findings support incorporating screening questions on adolescents' mortality beliefs into psychosocial assessments and interviews. Copyright © 2011 National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Embryonic Death Is Linked to Maternal Identity in the Leatherback Turtle (Dermochelys coriacea)

    PubMed Central

    Rafferty, Anthony R.; Santidrián Tomillo, Pilar; Spotila, James R.; Paladino, Frank V.; Reina, Richard D.

    2011-01-01

    Leatherback turtles have an average global hatching success rate of ∼50%, lower than other marine turtle species. Embryonic death has been linked to environmental factors such as precipitation and temperature, although, there is still a lot of variability that remains to be explained. We examined how nesting season, the time of nesting each season, the relative position of each clutch laid by each female each season, maternal identity and associated factors such as reproductive experience of the female (new nester versus remigrant) and period of egg retention between clutches (interclutch interval) affected hatching success and stage of embryonic death in failed eggs of leatherback turtles nesting at Playa Grande, Costa Rica. Data were collected during five nesting seasons from 2004/05 to 2008/09. Mean hatching success was 50.4%. Nesting season significantly influenced hatching success in addition to early and late stage embryonic death. Neither clutch position nor nesting time during the season had a significant affect on hatching success or the stage of embryonic death. Some leatherback females consistently produced nests with higher hatching success rates than others. Remigrant females arrived earlier to nest, produced more clutches and had higher rates of hatching success than new nesters. Reproductive experience did not affect stage of death or the duration of the interclutch interval. The length of interclutch interval had a significant affect on the proportion of eggs that failed in each clutch and the developmental stage they died at. Intrinsic factors such as maternal identity are playing a role in affecting embryonic death in the leatherback turtle. PMID:21695086

  10. Embryonic death is linked to maternal identity in the leatherback turtle (Dermochelys coriacea).

    PubMed

    Rafferty, Anthony R; Santidrián Tomillo, Pilar; Spotila, James R; Paladino, Frank V; Reina, Richard D

    2011-01-01

    Leatherback turtles have an average global hatching success rate of ~50%, lower than other marine turtle species. Embryonic death has been linked to environmental factors such as precipitation and temperature, although, there is still a lot of variability that remains to be explained. We examined how nesting season, the time of nesting each season, the relative position of each clutch laid by each female each season, maternal identity and associated factors such as reproductive experience of the female (new nester versus remigrant) and period of egg retention between clutches (interclutch interval) affected hatching success and stage of embryonic death in failed eggs of leatherback turtles nesting at Playa Grande, Costa Rica. Data were collected during five nesting seasons from 2004/05 to 2008/09. Mean hatching success was 50.4%. Nesting season significantly influenced hatching success in addition to early and late stage embryonic death. Neither clutch position nor nesting time during the season had a significant affect on hatching success or the stage of embryonic death. Some leatherback females consistently produced nests with higher hatching success rates than others. Remigrant females arrived earlier to nest, produced more clutches and had higher rates of hatching success than new nesters. Reproductive experience did not affect stage of death or the duration of the interclutch interval. The length of interclutch interval had a significant affect on the proportion of eggs that failed in each clutch and the developmental stage they died at. Intrinsic factors such as maternal identity are playing a role in affecting embryonic death in the leatherback turtle.

  11. Cause of death and potentially avoidable deaths in Australian adults with intellectual disability using retrospective linked data

    PubMed Central

    Srasuebkul, Preeyaporn; Xu, Han; Howlett, Sophie

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To investigate mortality and its causes in adults over the age of 20 years with intellectual disability (ID). Design, setting and participants Retrospective population-based standardised mortality of the ID and Comparison cohorts. The ID cohort comprised 42 204 individuals who registered for disability services with ID as a primary or secondary diagnosis from 2005 to 2011 in New South Wales (NSW). The Comparison cohort was obtained from published deaths in NSW from the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) from 2005 to 2011. Main outcome measures We measured and compared Age Standardised Mortality Rate (ASMR), Comparative Mortality Figure (CMF), years of productive life lost (YPLL) and proportion of deaths with potentially avoidable causes in an ID cohort with an NSW general population cohort. Results There were 19 362 adults in the ID cohort which experienced 732 (4%) deaths at a median age of 54 years. Age Standardised Mortality Rates increased with age for both cohorts. Overall comparative mortality figure was 1.3, but was substantially higher for the 20–44 (4.0) and 45–64 (2.3) age groups. YPLL was 137/1000 people in the ID cohort and 49 in the comparison cohort. Cause of death in ID cohort was dominated by respiratory, circulatory, neoplasm and nervous system. After recoding deaths previously attributed to the aetiology of the disability, 38% of deaths in the ID cohort and 17% in the comparison cohort were potentially avoidable. Conclusions Adults with ID experience premature mortality and over-representation of potentially avoidable deaths. A national system of reporting of deaths in adults with ID is required. Inclusion in health policy and services development and in health promotion programmes is urgently required to address premature deaths and health inequalities for adults with ID. PMID:28179413

  12. Pituitary cretinism in two sisters.

    PubMed Central

    Kohno, H; Watanabe, N; Ootsuka, M; Kajiwara, M; Gohya, N

    1980-01-01

    Two sisters with cretinism are reported. Each showed low levels of serum triiodothyronine, thyroxine, and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH). In the elder sister, serum TSH did not increase after administration of thyrotropin-releasing hormone. We conclude that cretinism in these 2 sisters was due to TSH deficiency. This is the second report of 'familial' pituitary cretinism (TSH-deficient congenital hypothyroidism). PMID:7436542

  13. Sister-sister incest: data from an anonymous computerized survey.

    PubMed

    Stroebel, Sandra S; O'Keefe, Stephen L; Griffee, Karen; Kuo, Shih-Ya; Beard, Keith W; Kommor, Martin J

    2013-01-01

    Retrospective data were entered anonymously by 1,521 adult women using a computer-assisted self-interview. Thirty-one participants were victims of sister-sister incest, 40 were victims of brother-sister incest, 19 were victims of father-daughter incest, 8 were victims of sexual abuse by an adult female (including one mother), and 232 were victims of sexual abuse by an adult male other than their father before reaching 18 years of age. The rest (1,203) served as controls. The victims of sister-sister incest had significantly more problematic outcomes than controls on many measures as adults. Victims of sister-sister incest were more depressed and more likely than controls to be distant from the perpetrator-sister and to have traded sex for money, experienced an unplanned pregnancy, engaged in four different types of masturbation, and engaged in 13 different same-sex behaviors. Our findings were consistent with other reports of early eroticization and persistent hypereroticization of incest victims.

  14. The link between death anxiety and post-traumatic symptomatology during terror: Direct links and possible moderators.

    PubMed

    Hamama-Raz, Yaira; Mahat-Shamir, Michal; Pitcho-Prelorentzos, Shani; Zaken, Adi; David, Udi Y; Ben-Ezra, Menachem; Bergman, Yoav S

    2016-11-30

    The current wave of terrorism which is taking place in Israel is characterized by increased arbitrary attacks by individual terrorists, acting independently, with reduced ability to anticipate when and where the next attack will take place. This situation creates an atmosphere of fear and insecurity in the lives of many citizens. Accordingly, the current study aims to establish a connection between death anxiety and PTSD symptom severity, as well as to examine whether major personality characteristics may moderate this connection. Using an online survey, 429 adult participants were recruited, and filled out death anxiety and PTSD symptomatology scales, as well as a short version of the Big Five personality scale. Findings revealed that death anxiety was a significant predictor of posttraumatic symptom severity, as were personality characteristics. Moreover, two personality traits, emotional stability and conscientiousness, moderated the association between death anxiety and PTSD symptomatology. The importance of death anxiety as a factor which is associated with PTSD symptomatology is discussed.

  15. A possible link between life and death of a xeric tree in desert.

    PubMed

    Xu, Gui-Qing; McDowell, Nate G; Li, Yan

    2016-05-01

    Understanding the interactions between drought and tree ontogeny or size remains an essential research priority because size-specific mortality patterns have large impacts on ecosystem structure and function, determine forest carbon storage capacity, and are sensitive to climatic change. Here we investigate a xerophytic tree species (Haloxylon ammodendron (C.A. Mey.)) with which the changes in biomass allocation with tree size may play an important role in size-specific mortality patterns. Size-related changes in biomass allocation, root distribution, plant water status, gas exchange, hydraulic architecture and non-structural carbohydrate reserves of this xerophytic tree species were investigated to assess their potential role in the observed U-shaped mortality pattern. We found that excessively negative water potentials (<-4.7MPa, beyond the P50leaf of -4.1MPa) during prolonged drought in young trees lead to hydraulic failure; while the imbalance of photoassimilate allocation between leaf and root system in larger trees, accompanied with declining C reserves (<2% dry matter across four tissues), might have led to carbon starvation. The drought-resistance strategy of this species is preferential biomass allocation to the roots to improve water capture. In young trees, the drought-resistance strategy is not well developed, and hydraulic failure appears to be the dominant driver of mortality during drought. With old trees, excess root growth at the expense of leaf area may lead to carbon starvation during prolonged drought. Our results suggest that the drought-resistance strategy of this xeric tree is closely linked to its life and death: well-developed drought-resistance strategy means life, while underdeveloped or overdeveloped drought-resistance strategy means death.

  16. Chromosome segregation: Samurai separation of Siamese sisters.

    PubMed

    Glotzer, M

    1999-07-15

    How do cells ensure that sister chromatids are precisely partitioned in mitosis? New studies on budding yeast have revealed that sister chromatid separation at anaphase requires endoproteolytic cleavage of a protein that maintains the association between sister chromatids.

  17. Links between deterministic and stochastic approaches for invasion in growth-fragmentation-death models.

    PubMed

    Campillo, Fabien; Champagnat, Nicolas; Fritsch, Coralie

    2016-12-01

    We present two approaches to study invasion in growth-fragmentation-death models. The first one is based on a stochastic individual based model, which is a piecewise deterministic branching process with a continuum of types, and the second one is based on an integro-differential model. The invasion of the population is described by the survival probability for the former model and by an eigenproblem for the latter one. We study these two notions of invasion fitness, giving different characterizations of the growth of the population, and we make links between these two complementary points of view. In particular we prove that the two approaches lead to the same criterion of possible invasion. Based on Krein-Rutman theory, we also give a proof of the existence of a solution to the eigenproblem, which satisfies the conditions needed for our study of the stochastic model, hence providing a set of assumptions under which both approaches can be carried out. Finally, we motivate our work in the context of adaptive dynamics in a chemostat model.

  18. Linking families and facilities for care at birth: what works to avert intrapartum-related deaths?

    PubMed

    Lee, Anne C C; Lawn, Joy E; Cousens, Simon; Kumar, Vishwajeet; Osrin, David; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A; Wall, Steven N; Nandakumar, Allyala K; Syed, Uzma; Darmstadt, Gary L

    2009-10-01

    Delays in receiving effective care during labor and at birth may be fatal for the mother and fetus, contributing to 2 million annual intrapartum stillbirths and intrapartum-related neonatal deaths each year. We present a systematic review of strategies to link families and facilities, including community mobilization, financial incentives, emergency referral and transport systems, prenatal risk screening, and maternity waiting homes. There is moderate quality evidence that community mobilization with high levels of community engagement can increase institutional births and significantly reduce perinatal and early neonatal mortality. Meta-analysis showed a doubling of skilled birth attendance and a 36% reduction in early neonatal mortality. However, no data are available on intrapartum-specific outcomes. Evidence is limited, but promising, that financial incentive schemes and community referral/transport systems may increase rates of skilled birth attendance and emergency obstetric care utilization; however, impact on mortality is unknown. Current evidence for maternity waiting homes and risk screening is low quality. Empowering communities is an important strategy to reduce the large burden of intrapartum complications. Innovations are needed to bring the poor closer to obstetric care, such as financial incentives and cell phone technology. New questions need to be asked of "old" strategies such as risk screening and maternity waiting homes. The effect of all of these strategies on maternal and perinatal mortality, particularly intrapartum-related outcomes, requires further evaluation.

  19. Linking families and facilities for care at birth: What works to avert intrapartum-related deaths?

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Anne CC; Lawn, Joy E.; Cousens, Simon; Kumar, Vishwajeet; Osrin, David; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A.; Wall, Steven N.; Nandakumar, Allyala K.; Syed, Uzma; Darmstadt, Gary L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Delays in receiving effective care during labor and at birth may be fatal for the mother and fetus, contributing to 2 million annual intrapartum stillbirths and intrapartum-related neonatal deaths each year. Objective We present a systematic review of strategies to link families and facilities, including community mobilization, financial incentives, emergency referral and transport systems, prenatal risk screening, and maternity waiting homes. Results There is moderate quality evidence that community mobilization with high levels of community engagement can increase institutional births and significantly reduce perinatal and early neonatal mortality. Meta-analysis showed a doubling of skilled birth attendance and a 35% reduction in early neonatal mortality. However, no data are available on intrapartum-specific outcomes. Evidence is limited, but promising, that financial incentive schemes and community referral/transport systems may increase rates of skilled birth attendance and emergency obstetric care utilization; however, impact on mortality is unknown. Current evidence for maternity waiting homes and risk screening is low quality. Conclusions Empowering communities is an important strategy to reduce the large burden of intrapartum complications. Innovations are needed to bring the poor closer to obstetric care, such as financial incentives and cell phone technology. New questions need to be asked of “old” strategies such as risk screening and maternity waiting homes. The effect of all of these strategies on maternal and perinatal mortality, particularly intrapartum-related outcomes, requires further evaluation. PMID:19815201

  20. Where are Sedna's Sisters?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlett, D. F.

    2005-05-01

    Simulations of the formation of the Oort cloud from the Kuiper Belt typically are presented as an animated scatter diagram. Here the orbit of each object appears as a point of perihelion distance q and semi-major axis a. (eg. Levison, Morbidelli, & Dones 2004). These plots show a conspicuous void, bounded by the inequalities: q < a, q > 50 AU, and a < 5000-10000 AU. Brown (2005) calls this void the ``Bermuda Triangle". The only present occupant is Sedna (q=76 AU, a=501 AU). Brown, Trujillo, & Rabinowitz , the discovers of Sedna, have challenged others to explain how Sedna got inside the triangle and to predict where similar objects might be found. Sedna could not have simply formed in its current orbit by the accumulation of smaller objects (Stern 2005). Several authors have suggested that a passing star scattered Sedna into the triangle shortly after the birth of the solar system. Here I offer an alternative which uses the very strong galactic tidal forces of the Sinusoidal potential (Bartlett 2001, 2004). In this potential, the numerator of Newton's law is replaced by GM cos(ko r) where ko = 2 π / lambdao and the 'wavelength' λ o is 425 pc. The 20 radial oscillations between the sun and the center of the Galaxy give tidal forces that are 120 times as big as generally expected. I will show how this tidal force, acting over the lifetime of the solar system, could move the perihelion of Sedna from about 40 to 76 AU. Sedna's sisters are likely to have still larger q & a and to have perihelia in two specific quadrants of the ecliptic plane.

  1. Herceptin Conjugates Linked by EDC Boost Direct Tumor Cell Death via Programmed Tumor Cell Necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Dennis; Esteva, Francisco J.; Liu, Bolin; Chandra, Joya; Li, Shulin

    2011-01-01

    Tumor-targeted antibody therapy is one of the safest biological therapeutics for cancer patients, but it is often ineffective at inducing direct tumor cell death and is ineffective against resistant tumor cells. Currently, the antitumor efficacy of antibody therapy is primarily achieved by inducing indirect tumor cell death, such as antibody-dependent cell cytotoxicity. Our study reveals that Herceptin conjugates, if generated via the crosslinker EDC (1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide hydrochloride), are capable of engendering human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (Her2) positive tumor cells death. Using a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) system, three peaks with estimated molecular weights of antibody monomer, dimer, and trimer were isolated. Both Herceptin trimer and dimer separated by HPLC induced significant levels of necrotic tumor cell death, although the trimer was more effective than the dimer. Notably, the Herceptin trimer also induced Herceptin-resistant tumor cell death. Surprisingly different from the known cell death mechanism that often results from antibody treatment, the Herceptin trimer elicited effective and direct tumor cell death via a novel mechanism: programmed cell necrosis. In Her2-positive cells, inhibition of necrosis pathways significantly reversed Herceptin trimer-induced cell death. In summary, the Herceptin trimer reported herein harbors great potential for overcoming tumor cell resistance to Herceptin treatment. PMID:21853100

  2. A mouse model to study the link between hypoxia, long QT interval and sudden infant death syndrome.

    PubMed

    Neary, Marianne T; Mohun, Timothy J; Breckenridge, Ross A

    2013-03-01

    The pathology of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is poorly understood. Many risk factors, including hypoxia, have been identified. Prolongation of the ECG QTc interval is associated with elevated risk of SIDS but its aetiology in most cases remains unknown. We have characterised ECG changes in the newborn mouse in the hours and days following birth. There was a steady increase in heart rate alongside significant decreases in QTc interval, QRS duration and QTc dispersion over the first 10 postnatal days. Birth into hypoxia (10% FiO2) prevented electrocardiac maturation, downregulated cardiac ion-channel expression and led to neonatal death. We found that risk of death decreased with increasing age of exposure to hypoxia. Genetic elevation of cardiac hypoxia-signalling after birth in αMHC-Cre::VHL(fl/fl) mice also prevented electrocardiographic maturation, leading to arrhythmia and death before weaning. Immunohistochemistry and western blotting revealed internalisation and dephosphorylation of Connexin43. We conclude that increased ambient oxygen concentration after birth drives maturation of the cardiac electrical conduction system, failure of which leads to aberrant ion channel and Connexin43 expression and predisposes to arrhythmia and sudden death. This is consistent with known risk factors of SIDS and provides a link between neonatal hypoxia, ECG abnormalities and sudden death.

  3. On the feasibility of linking census samples to the National Death Index for epidemiologic studies: a progress report.

    PubMed Central

    Rogot, E; Feinleib, M; Ockay, K A; Schwartz, S H; Bilgrad, R; Patterson, J E

    1983-01-01

    To test the feasibility of using large national probability samples provided by the US Census Bureau, a pilot project was initiated to link 230,000 Census-type records to the National Death Index (NDI). Using strict precautions to maintain the complete confidentiality of individual records, the Current Population Survey files of one month in 1973 and one month in 1978 were matched by computer to the 1979 NDI file. The basic question to be addressed was whether deaths so obtained are seriously underestimated when there is no Social Security Number (SSN) in the Census record. The search of the NDI file resulted in 5,542 matches of which about 1,800 appear to be "true positives" representing deaths, the remainder are "false positives." Of the deaths, 80 per cent would still have been detected without SSN in the Census record. The main reasons for missing deaths (false negatives) were discrepancies in the year of birth and in the given name. Assuming certain changes in the NDI matching algorithm, the 80 per cent figure could increase to 85 per cent or higher; however, this could also cause significant increases in the number of false positives. The National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI) and Census Bureau staff are currently developing a probabilistic method to eliminate false positives from the NDI output tape. The results of the pilot study indicate that a larger research project is clearly feasible. PMID:6625029

  4. Linking definitions, mechanisms, and modeling of drought-induced tree death.

    PubMed

    Anderegg, William R L; Berry, Joseph A; Field, Christopher B

    2012-12-01

    Tree death from drought and heat stress is a critical and uncertain component in forest ecosystem responses to a changing climate. Recent research has illuminated how tree mortality is a complex cascade of changes involving interconnected plant systems over multiple timescales. Explicit consideration of the definitions, dynamics, and temporal and biological scales of tree mortality research can guide experimental and modeling approaches. In this review, we draw on the medical literature concerning human death to propose a water resource-based approach to tree mortality that considers the tree as a complex organism with a distinct growth strategy. This approach provides insight into mortality mechanisms at the tree and landscape scales and presents promising avenues into modeling tree death from drought and temperature stress.

  5. Linking Support Systems for Students and Families: Helping Disenfranchised Mourners Grieve a Death.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tramonte, Michael R.

    A self-inventory for school psychologists to become cognizant of their own understanding of and feelings about disenfranchised grief is presented. In death-related behavior, grief is socially constructed. There are social standards that apply to expressing grief; however, there are times when "grieving rules" may not coincide with the situation,…

  6. A population study of mutations and LOH at breast cancer gene loci in tumours from sister pairs: two recurrent mutations seem to account for all BRCA1/BRCA2 linked breast cancer in Iceland.

    PubMed Central

    Arason, A; Jonasdottir, A; Barkardottir, R B; Bergthorsson, J T; Teare, M D; Easton, D F; Egilsson, V

    1998-01-01

    The majority of breast cancer in high risk families is believed to result from a mutation in either of two genes named BRCA1 and BRCA2. A germline defect in either gene is usually followed by chromosomal deletion of the normal allele in the tumour. In Iceland two recurrent mutations have been identified, 999del5 BRCA2 and G5193A BRCA1. In this study, randomly selected pairs of sisters diagnosed with breast cancer at the age of 60 years or younger were analysed to evaluate the proportion of breast cancer resulting from BRCA1 and BRCA2. Genotypes and allele loss in tumour tissue from 42 sister pairs were compared using markers within and around the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. Eleven sister pairs were highly suggestive of BRCA2 linkage, and no obvious BRCA1 linkage was seen. Screening for the G5193A BRCA1 and 999del5 BRCA2 mutations showed the 999del5 mutation in the 11 BRCA2 suggestive pairs plus three pairs less indicative of linkage, and the G5193A BRCA1 mutation in one pair. When known mutation carriers are removed from the group, no indication of further linkage to BRCA1 or BRCA2 is seen. The results of our studies suggest that a large proportion of familial breast cancer in Iceland is the result of the 999del5 BRCA2 mutation, and it is unlikely that BRCA1 and BRCA2 germline mutations other than 999del5 and G5193A play a significant role in hereditary breast cancer in Iceland. Furthermore it can be concluded that most families with BRCA1 or BRCA2 linkage are easily identified by studying LOH around the defective gene in as few as two affected relatives. PMID:9643283

  7. A population study of mutations and LOH at breast cancer gene loci in tumours from sister pairs: two recurrent mutations seem to account for all BRCA1/BRCA2 linked breast cancer in Iceland.

    PubMed

    Arason, A; Jonasdottir, A; Barkardottir, R B; Bergthorsson, J T; Teare, M D; Easton, D F; Egilsson, V

    1998-06-01

    The majority of breast cancer in high risk families is believed to result from a mutation in either of two genes named BRCA1 and BRCA2. A germline defect in either gene is usually followed by chromosomal deletion of the normal allele in the tumour. In Iceland two recurrent mutations have been identified, 999del5 BRCA2 and G5193A BRCA1. In this study, randomly selected pairs of sisters diagnosed with breast cancer at the age of 60 years or younger were analysed to evaluate the proportion of breast cancer resulting from BRCA1 and BRCA2. Genotypes and allele loss in tumour tissue from 42 sister pairs were compared using markers within and around the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. Eleven sister pairs were highly suggestive of BRCA2 linkage, and no obvious BRCA1 linkage was seen. Screening for the G5193A BRCA1 and 999del5 BRCA2 mutations showed the 999del5 mutation in the 11 BRCA2 suggestive pairs plus three pairs less indicative of linkage, and the G5193A BRCA1 mutation in one pair. When known mutation carriers are removed from the group, no indication of further linkage to BRCA1 or BRCA2 is seen. The results of our studies suggest that a large proportion of familial breast cancer in Iceland is the result of the 999del5 BRCA2 mutation, and it is unlikely that BRCA1 and BRCA2 germline mutations other than 999del5 and G5193A play a significant role in hereditary breast cancer in Iceland. Furthermore it can be concluded that most families with BRCA1 or BRCA2 linkage are easily identified by studying LOH around the defective gene in as few as two affected relatives.

  8. Educational differentials in cancer mortality and avoidable deaths in Lithuania, 2001-2009: a census-linked study.

    PubMed

    Jasilionis, Domantas; Smailyte, Giedre; Vincerzevskiene, Ieva; Shkolnikov, Vladimir M

    2015-12-01

    We investigate relative mortality inequalities by education for detailed cancer sites and provide estimates of deaths which could have been avoided through the elimination of these inequalities. A census-linked dataset based on a follow-up of all residents registered in the 2001 census was used for the analysis. Mortality rate ratios were estimated by employing multivariate Poisson regression models for count data. An inverse educational gradient was observed for 11 cancer sites among men and for three cancer sites among women. Substantial shares of these cancer deaths would have been avoided if mortality among less educated groups had been the same as mortality among highly educated groups. Cancer control plans must consider socioeconomic inequalities and propose ways to improve prevention measures aimed at disadvantaged groups.

  9. A Brief Analysis of Sister Carrie's Character

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Hanying

    2010-01-01

    Carrie is always dreaming while the rocking chair is rocking again and again, this is the deep impression on us after we read "Sister Carrie" which is the first novel of Theodore Dreiser. In this novel the protagonist Sister Carrie is a controversial person. This paper tries to analyze the character of Sister Carrie in order to find out…

  10. Two Sisters with Rett Syndrome. Brief Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haenggeli, Charles A.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Clinical histories and physical findings are presented for 2 sisters with Rett syndrome. The older sister, age 25, was typically affected, whereas the younger sister, 22 years old, was affected with a seizure disorder showing an unusually early onset. The paper discusses hypotheses in genetic causation of Rett syndrome. (JDD)

  11. Two Sisters with Rett Syndrome. Brief Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haenggeli, Charles A.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Clinical histories and physical findings are presented for 2 sisters with Rett syndrome. The older sister, age 25, was typically affected, whereas the younger sister, 22 years old, was affected with a seizure disorder showing an unusually early onset. The paper discusses hypotheses in genetic causation of Rett syndrome. (JDD)

  12. Sister R. Leadership: Doing the Seemingly Impossible

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sena, Rachel; Schoorman, Dilys; Bogotch, Ira

    2013-01-01

    Sister R., the first author, is a Dominican Sister of Peace. Until recently, Sister R. had been the director of the Maya Ministry Family Literacy Program, working with the Maya Community in Lake Worth, Palm Beach County, Florida. She described her work with these indigenous, preliterate, hardworking peoples as "a university of the poor"…

  13. Sister R. Leadership: Doing the Seemingly Impossible

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sena, Rachel; Schoorman, Dilys; Bogotch, Ira

    2013-01-01

    Sister R., the first author, is a Dominican Sister of Peace. Until recently, Sister R. had been the director of the Maya Ministry Family Literacy Program, working with the Maya Community in Lake Worth, Palm Beach County, Florida. She described her work with these indigenous, preliterate, hardworking peoples as "a university of the poor"…

  14. Evidence Links Increases In Public Health Spending To Declines In Preventable Deaths

    PubMed Central

    Mays, Glen P.; Smith, Sharla A.

    2014-01-01

    Public health encompasses a broad array of programs designed to prevent the occurrence of disease and injury within communities. But policy makers have little evidence to draw on when determining the value of investments in these program activities, which currently account for less than 5 percent of US health spending. We examine whether changes in spending by local public health agencies over a thirteen-year period contributed to changes in rates of community mortality from preventable causes of death, including infant mortality and deaths due to cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and cancer. We found that mortality rates fell between 1.1 percent and 6.9 percent for each 10 percent increase in local public health spending. These results suggest that increased public health investments can produce measurable improvements in health, especially in low-resource communities. However, more money by itself is unlikely to generate significant and sustainable health gains; improvements in public health practices are needed as well. PMID:21778174

  15. Constructing and enacting kinship in sister-to-sister egg donation families: a multi-family member interview study.

    PubMed

    Van Parys, Hanna; Provoost, Veerle; Zeiler, Kristin; De Sutter, Petra; Pennings, Guido; Buysse, Ann

    2016-12-05

    Although intra-familial egg donation has been practiced for more than 15 years in several countries, little is known about family relationships in this family type. Framed within the new kinship studies, this article focuses on the experiential dimension of kinship in sister-to-sister egg donation families: how is kinship 'unpacked' and 'reconstructed' in this specific family constellation? Qualitative data analysis of interviews with receiving parents, their donating sisters and the donor children revealed six themes: (1) being connected as an extended family; (2) disambiguating motherhood; (3) giving and receiving as structuring processes; (4) acknowledging and managing the 'special' link between donor and child; (5) making sense of the union between father and donor; and (6) kinship constructions being challenged. This study showed the complex and continuous balancing of meanings related to the mother-child dyad, the donor-child dyad and the donor-father dyad. What stood out was the complexity of, on the one hand cherishing the genetic link with the child allowed by the sisters' egg donation, while, on the other, managing the meanings related to this link, by, for instance, acknowledging, downsizing, symbolising, and differentiating it from the mother-child bond. (A Virtual Abstract of this paper can be accessed at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_979cmCmR9rLrKuD7z0ycA).

  16. Strange attractors: DAMPs and autophagy link tumor cell death and immunity

    PubMed Central

    Hou, W; Zhang, Q; Yan, Z; Chen, R; Zeh III, H J; Kang, R; Lotze, M T; Tang, D

    2013-01-01

    Resistance to ‘apoptotic' cell death is one of the major hallmarks of cancer, contributing to tumor development and therapeutic resistance. Damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) are molecules released or exposed by dead, dying, injured, or stressed non-apoptotic cells, with multiple roles in inflammation and immunity. Release of DAMPs not only contributes to tumor growth and progression but also mediates skewing of antitumor immunity during so-called immunogenic tumor cell death (ICD). Autophagy is a lysosome-mediated homeostatic degradation process in which cells digest their own effete organelles and macromolecules to meet bioenergetic needs and enable protein synthesis. For tumor cells, autophagy is a double-edged sword. Autophagy, in balance with apoptosis, can function as a tumor suppressor; autophagy deficiency, associated with alterations in apoptosis, initiates tumorigenesis in many settings. In contrast, autophagy-related stress tolerance generally promotes cell survival, which enables tumor growth and promotes therapeutic resistance. Most anticancer therapies promote DAMP release and enhance autophagy. Autophagy not only regulates DAMP release and degradation, but also is triggered and regulated by DAMPs. This interplay between autophagy and DAMPs, serving as ‘strange attractors' in the dynamic system that emerges in cancer, regulates the effectiveness of antitumor treatment. This interplay also shapes the immune response to dying cells upon ICD, culling the least fit tumor cells and promoting survival of others. Thus, DAMPs and autophagy are suitable emergent targets for cancer therapy, considering their more nuanced role in tumor progression. PMID:24336086

  17. Investigations into the Mechanisms of Cell Death: The Common Link between Anticancer Nanotherapeutics and Nanotoxicology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minocha, Shalini

    Nanotoxicology and anticancer nanotherapeutics are essentially two sides of the same coin. The nanotoxicology discipline deals with the nanoparticle (NP)-induced toxicity and mechanisms of cell death in healthy cells, whereas anticancer agents delivered via nano-based approaches aim to induce cell death in abnormally proliferating cancer cells. The objectives of the studies presented herein were two-fold; to (a) systematically study the physico-chemical properties and cell death mechanisms of model NPs and (b) utilize the knowledge gained from cell death-nanotoxicity studies in developing a potentially novel anticancer nanotherapeutic agent. For the first objective, the effect of a distinguishing characteristic, i.e., surface carbon coating on the matched pairs of carbon-coated and non-coated copper and nickel NPs (Cu, C-Cu, Ni and C-Ni) on the physico-chemical properties and toxicity in A549 alveolar epithelial cells were evaluated. The effect of carbon coating on particle size, zeta potential, oxidation state, cellular uptake, release of soluble metal and concentration dependent toxicity of Cu and Ni NPs was systematically evaluated. A significant effect of carbon coating was observed on the physico-chemical properties, interaction with cellular membranes, and overall toxicity of the NPs. C-Cu NPs, compared to Cu NPs, showed four-fold lower release of soluble copper, ten-fold higher cellular uptake and protection against surface oxidation. In toxicity assays, C-Cu NPs induced higher mitochondrial damage than Cu NPs whereas Cu NPs were associated with a significant damage to plasma membrane integrity. Nickel and carbon coated nickel NPs were less toxic compared to Cu and C-Cu NPs. Thus, by studying the effect of carbon coating, correlations between physico-chemical properties and toxicity of NPs were established. The second objective was focused on utilizing nano-based approaches for the intracellular delivery of an anticancer agent, Cytochrome c (Cyt c), to

  18. Linking mortuary data improves vital statistics on cause of death of children under five years in the Western Cape Province of South Africa.

    PubMed

    Groenewald, Pam; Bradshaw, Debbie; Neethling, Ian; Martin, Lorna J; Dempers, Johan; Morden, Erna; Zinyakatira, Nesbert; Coetzee, David

    2016-01-01

    Reducing child mortality requires good information on its causes. Whilst South African vital registration data have improved, the quality of cause-of-death data remains inadequate. To improve this, data from death certificates were linked with information from forensic mortuaries in Western Cape Province. A local mortality surveillance system was established in 2007 by the Western Cape Health Department to improve data quality. Cause-of-death data were captured from copies of death notification forms collected at Department of Home Affairs Offices. Using unique identifiers, additional forensic mortuary data were linked with mortality surveillance system records. Causes of death were coded to the ICD-10 classification. Causes of death in children under five were compared with those from vital registration data for 2011. Cause-of-death data were markedly improved with additional data from forensic mortuaries. The proportion of ill-defined causes was halved (25-12%), and leading cause rankings changed. Lower respiratory tract infections moved above prematurity to rank first, accounting for 20.8% of deaths and peaking in infants aged 1-3 months. Only 11% of deaths from lower respiratory tract infections occurred in hospital, resulting in 86% being certified in forensic mortuaries. Road traffic deaths increased from 1.1-3.1% (27-75) and homicides from 3 to 28. The quality and usefulness of cause-of-death information for children in the WC was enhanced by linking mortuary and vital registration data. Given the death profile, interventions are required to prevent and manage LRTI, diarrhoea and injuries and to reduce neonatal deaths. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Teenage pregnancy: the impact of maternal adolescent childbearing and older sister's teenage pregnancy on a younger sister.

    PubMed

    Wall-Wieler, Elizabeth; Roos, Leslie L; Nickel, Nathan C

    2016-05-25

    Risk factors for teenage pregnancy are linked to many factors, including a family history of teenage pregnancy. This research examines whether a mother's teenage childbearing or an older sister's teenage pregnancy more strongly predicts teenage pregnancy. This study used linkable administrative databases housed at the Manitoba Centre for Health Policy (MCHP). The original cohort consisted of 17,115 women born in Manitoba between April 1, 1979 and March 31, 1994, who stayed in the province until at least their 20(th) birthday, had at least one older sister, and had no missing values on key variables. Propensity score matching (1:2) was used to create balanced cohorts for two conditional logistic regression models; one examining the impact of an older sister's teenage pregnancy and the other analyzing the effect of the mother's teenage childbearing. The adjusted odds of becoming pregnant between ages 14 and 19 for teens with at least one older sister having a teenage pregnancy were 3.38 (99 % CI 2.77-4.13) times higher than for women whose older sister(s) did not have a teenage pregnancy. Teenage daughters of mothers who had their first child before age 20 had 1.57 (99 % CI 1.30-1.89) times higher odds of pregnancy than those whose mothers had their first child after age 19. Educational achievement was adjusted for in a sub-population examining the odds of pregnancy between ages 16 and 19. After this adjustment, the odds of teenage pregnancy for teens with at least one older sister who had a teenage pregnancy were reduced to 2.48 (99 % CI 2.01-3.06) and the odds of pregnancy for teen daughters of teenage mothers were reduced to 1.39 (99 % CI 1.15-1.68). Although both were significant, the relationship between an older sister's teenage pregnancy and a younger sister's teenage pregnancy is much stronger than that between a mother's teenage childbearing and a younger daughter's teenage pregnancy. This study contributes to understanding of the broader topic "who is

  20. X-Linked Inhibitor of Apoptosis Protein – A Critical Death Resistance Regulator and Therapeutic Target for Personalized Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Obexer, Petra; Ausserlechner, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Defects in apoptosis regulation are one main cause of cancer development and may result from overexpression of anti-apoptotic proteins such as inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs). IAPs are cell death regulators that, among other functions, bind caspases, and interfere with apoptotic signaling via death receptors or intrinsic cell death pathways. All IAPs share one to three common structures, the so called baculovirus-IAP-repeat (BIR)-domains that allow them to bind caspases and other proteins. X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) is the most potent and best-defined anti-apoptotic IAP family member that directly neutralizes caspase-9 via its BIR3 domain and the effector caspases-3 and -7 via its BIR2 domain. A natural inhibitor of XIAP is SMAC/Diablo, which is released from mitochondria in apoptotic cells and displaces bound caspases from the BIR2/BIR3 domains of XIAP thereby reactivating cell death execution. The central apoptosis-inhibitory function of XIAP and its overexpression in many different types of advanced cancers have led to significant efforts to identify therapeutics that neutralize its anti-apoptotic effect. Most of these drugs are chemical derivatives of the N-terminal part of SMAC/Diablo. These “SMAC-mimetics” either specifically induce apoptosis in cancer cells or act as drug-sensitizers. Several “SMAC-mimetics” are currently tested by the pharmaceutical industry in Phase I and Phase II trials. In this review, we will discuss recent advances in understanding the function of IAPs in normal and malignant cells and focus on approaches to specifically neutralize XIAP in cancer cells. PMID:25120954

  1. IRAKM-Mincle axis links cell death to inflammation: Pathophysiological implications for chronic alcoholic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hao; Yu, Minjia; Zhao, Junjie; Martin, Bradley N; Roychowdhury, Sanjoy; McMullen, Megan R; Wang, Emily; Fox, Paul L; Yamasaki, Sho; Nagy, Laura E; Li, Xiaoxia

    2016-12-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated activation of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) in hepatic macrophages and injury to hepatocytes are major contributors to the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease. However, the mechanisms by which TLR-dependent inflammatory responses and alcohol-induced hepatocellular damage coordinately lead to alcoholic liver disease are not completely understood. In this study, we found that mice deficient in interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase M (IRAKM), a proximal TLR pathway molecule typically associated with inhibition of TLR signaling, were actually protected from chronic ethanol-induced liver injury. In bone marrow-derived macrophages challenged with low concentrations of LPS, which reflect the relevant pathophysiological levels of LPS in both alcoholic patients and ethanol-fed mice, the IRAKM Myddosome was preferentially formed. Further, the IRAKM Myddosome mediated the up-regulation of Mincle, a sensor for cell death. Mincle-deficient mice were also protected from ethanol-induced liver injury. The endogenous Mincle ligand spliceosome-associated protein 130 (SAP130) is a danger signal released by damaged cells; culture of hepatocytes with ethanol increased the release of SAP130. Ex vivo studies in bone marrow-derived macrophages suggested that SAP130 and LPS synergistically activated inflammatory responses, including inflammasome activation.

  2. Cardiac arrhythmia and death of teenager linked to rare genetic disorder diagnosed at autopsy.

    PubMed

    Quick, Jennifer Sue; Dobersen, Michael

    2014-06-01

    A 17-year-old male adolescent sustained cardiac arrest after participating in a wrestling match, where he was thrown down. He had no pulse, and cardiopulmonary resuscitation was immediately initiated along with application of an automatic external defibrillator. Upon arrival of emergency medical services, an electrocardiogram showed the patient to be in ventricular tachycardia, torsades, and ventricular fibrillation. The patient was ultimately transported to the hospital and, with ACLS protocol being performed, was resuscitated to a junctional rhythm with bradycardia and borderline prolonged QT. His hospital stay was characterized by refractory cardiac failure, and 2 days after the incident, a decision was made to remove him from life support. At autopsy, there were no external or internal injuries that could be considered a contributing cause of death. On external examination, observations were made about the decedent's facial features including his nose, eyes, ears, fingers, and toes. A careful review of the decedent's medical history was initiated to reveal birth defects including syndactyly of the third and fourth digit of the upper extremity as well as complete lack of dental enamel. A tentative diagnosis of oculodentodigital dysplasia was made and confirmed by genetic testing of heart muscle taken from the decedent. This case report examines the rare association of oculodentodigital dysplasia with cardiac arrhythmia as well as places emphasis on the features of the disorder that can aid in its diagnosis.

  3. EarthLabs Meet Sister Corita Kent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quartini, E.; Ellins, K. K.; Cavitte, M. G.; Thirumalai, K.; Ledley, T. S.; Haddad, N.; Lynds, S. E.

    2013-12-01

    The EarthLabs project provides a framework to enhance high school students' climate literacy and awareness of climate change. The project provides climate science curriculum and teacher professional development, followed by research on students' learning as teachers implement EarthLabs climate modules in the classroom. The professional development targets high school teachers whose professional growth is structured around exposure to current climate science research, data observation collection and analysis. During summer workshops in Texas and Mississippi, teachers work through the laboratories, experiments, and hand-on activities developed for their students. In summer 2013, three graduate students from the University of Texas at Austin Institute for Geophysics with expertise in climate science participated in two weeklong workshops. The graduate students partnered with exemplary teacher leaders to provide scientific content and lead the EarthLabs learning activities. As an experiment, we integrated a visit to the Blanton Museum and an associated activity in order to motivate participants to think creatively, as well as analytically, about science. This exercise was inspired by the work and educational philosophy of Sister Corita Kent. During the visit to the Blanton Museum, we steered participants towards specific works of art pre-selected to emphasize aspects of the climate of Texas and to draw participants' attention to ways in which artists convey different concepts. For example, artists use of color, lines, and symbols conjure emotional responses to imagery in the viewer. The second part of the exercise asked participants to choose a climate message and to convey this through a collage. We encouraged participants to combine their experience at the museum with examples of Sister Corita Kent's artwork. We gave them simple guidelines for the project based on techniques and teaching of Sister Corita Kent. Evaluation results reveal that participants enjoyed the

  4. Programmed cell death genes are linked to elevated creatine kinase levels in unhealthy male nonagenarians

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sangkyu; Simon, Eric; Myers, Leann; Hamm, L. Lee; Jazwinski, S. Michal

    2016-01-01

    Declining health in the oldest-old takes an energy toll for simple maintenance of body functions. The underlying mechanisms, however, differ in males and females. In females, the declines are explained by loss of muscle mass, but this is not the case in males in whom they are associated with increased levels of circulating creatine kinase. This relationship raises the possibility that muscle damage rather than muscle loss is the cause of the increased energy demands of unhealthy aging in males. We have now examined factors that contribute to the increase in creatine kinase. Much of it (60%) can be explained by a history of cardiac problems and lower kidney function, while being mitigated by moderate physical activity, reinforcing the notion that tissue damage is a likely source. In a search for genetic risk factors associated with elevated creatine kinase, the Ku70 gene XRCC6 and the ceramide synthase gene LASS1 were investigated because of their roles in telomere length and longevity and healthy aging, respectively. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms in these two genes were independently associated with creatine kinase levels. The XRCC6 variant was epistatic to one of the LASS1 variants but not to the other. These gene variants have potential regulatory activity. Ku70 is an inhibitor of the pro-apoptotic Bax, while the product of Lass1, ceramide, operates in both caspase-dependent and independent pathways of programmed cell death, providing a potential cellular mechanism for the effects of these genes on tissue damage and circulating creatine kinase. PMID:26913518

  5. Novel Insights into the Molecular Events Linking to Cell Death Induced by Tetracycline in the Amitochondriate Protozoan Trichomonas vaginalis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Kuo-Yang; Ku, Fu-Man; Cheng, Wei-Hung; Lee, Chi-Ching; Huang, Po-Jung; Chu, Lichieh Julie; Cheng, Chih-Chieh; Fang, Yi-Kai; Wu, Hsueh-Hsia

    2015-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis colonizes the human urogenital tract and causes trichomoniasis, the most common nonviral sexually transmitted disease. Currently, 5-nitroimidazoles are the only recommended drugs for treating trichomoniasis. However, increased resistance of the parasite to 5-nitroimidazoles has emerged as a highly problematic public health issue. Hence, it is essential to identify alternative chemotherapeutic agents against refractory trichomoniasis. Tetracycline (TET) is a broad-spectrum antibiotic with activity against several protozoan parasites, but the mode of action of TET in parasites remains poorly understood. The in vitro effect of TET on the growth of T. vaginalis was examined, and the mode of cell death was verified by various apoptosis-related assays. Next-generation sequencing-based RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) was employed to elucidate the transcriptome of T. vaginalis in response to TET. We show that TET has a cytotoxic effect on both metronidazole (MTZ)-sensitive and -resistant T. vaginalis isolates, inducing some features resembling apoptosis. RNA-seq data reveal that TET significantly alters the transcriptome via activation of specific pathways, such as aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases and carbohydrate metabolism. Functional analyses demonstrate that TET disrupts the hydrogenosomal membrane potential and antioxidant system, which concomitantly elicits a metabolic shift toward glycolysis, suggesting that the hydrogenosomal function is impaired and triggers cell death. Collectively, we provide in vitro evidence that TET is a potential alternative therapeutic choice for treating MTZ-resistant T. vaginalis. The in-depth transcriptomic signatures in T. vaginalis upon TET treatment presented here will shed light on the signaling pathways linking to cell death in amitochondriate organisms. PMID:26303799

  6. Novel insights into the molecular events linking to cell death induced by tetracycline in the amitochondriate protozoan Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kuo-Yang; Ku, Fu-Man; Cheng, Wei-Hung; Lee, Chi-Ching; Huang, Po-Jung; Chu, Lichieh Julie; Cheng, Chih-Chieh; Fang, Yi-Kai; Wu, Hsueh-Hsia; Tang, Petrus

    2015-11-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis colonizes the human urogenital tract and causes trichomoniasis, the most common nonviral sexually transmitted disease. Currently, 5-nitroimidazoles are the only recommended drugs for treating trichomoniasis. However, increased resistance of the parasite to 5-nitroimidazoles has emerged as a highly problematic public health issue. Hence, it is essential to identify alternative chemotherapeutic agents against refractory trichomoniasis. Tetracycline (TET) is a broad-spectrum antibiotic with activity against several protozoan parasites, but the mode of action of TET in parasites remains poorly understood. The in vitro effect of TET on the growth of T. vaginalis was examined, and the mode of cell death was verified by various apoptosis-related assays. Next-generation sequencing-based RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) was employed to elucidate the transcriptome of T. vaginalis in response to TET. We show that TET has a cytotoxic effect on both metronidazole (MTZ)-sensitive and -resistant T. vaginalis isolates, inducing some features resembling apoptosis. RNA-seq data reveal that TET significantly alters the transcriptome via activation of specific pathways, such as aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases and carbohydrate metabolism. Functional analyses demonstrate that TET disrupts the hydrogenosomal membrane potential and antioxidant system, which concomitantly elicits a metabolic shift toward glycolysis, suggesting that the hydrogenosomal function is impaired and triggers cell death. Collectively, we provide in vitro evidence that TET is a potential alternative therapeutic choice for treating MTZ-resistant T. vaginalis. The in-depth transcriptomic signatures in T. vaginalis upon TET treatment presented here will shed light on the signaling pathways linking to cell death in amitochondriate organisms.

  7. Nonzero-temperature entanglement negativity of quantum spin models: Area law, linked cluster expansions, and sudden death

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, Nicholas E.; Devakul, Trithep; Hastings, Matthew B.; Singh, Rajiv R. P.

    2016-02-01

    We show that the bipartite logarithmic entanglement negativity (EN) of quantum spin models obeys an area law at all nonzero temperatures. We develop numerical linked cluster (NLC) expansions for the "area-law" logarithmic entanglement negativity as a function of temperature and other parameters. For one-dimensional models the results of NLC are compared with exact diagonalization on finite systems and are found to agree very well. The NLC results are also obtained for two dimensional X X Z and transverse field Ising models. In all cases, we find a sudden onset (or sudden death) of negativity at a finite temperature above which the negativity is zero. We use perturbation theory to develop a physical picture for this sudden onset (or sudden death). The onset of EN or its magnitude are insensitive to classical finite-temperature phase transitions, supporting the argument for absence of any role of quantum mechanics at such transitions. On approach to a quantum critical point at T =0 , negativity shows critical scaling in size and temperature.

  8. Nonzero-temperature entanglement negativity of quantum spin models: Area law, linked cluster expansions, and sudden death.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Nicholas E; Devakul, Trithep; Hastings, Matthew B; Singh, Rajiv R P

    2016-02-01

    We show that the bipartite logarithmic entanglement negativity (EN) of quantum spin models obeys an area law at all nonzero temperatures. We develop numerical linked cluster (NLC) expansions for the "area-law" logarithmic entanglement negativity as a function of temperature and other parameters. For one-dimensional models the results of NLC are compared with exact diagonalization on finite systems and are found to agree very well. The NLC results are also obtained for two dimensional XXZ and transverse field Ising models. In all cases, we find a sudden onset (or sudden death) of negativity at a finite temperature above which the negativity is zero. We use perturbation theory to develop a physical picture for this sudden onset (or sudden death). The onset of EN or its magnitude are insensitive to classical finite-temperature phase transitions, supporting the argument for absence of any role of quantum mechanics at such transitions. On approach to a quantum critical point at T=0, negativity shows critical scaling in size and temperature.

  9. Holocentric plant meiosis: first sisters, then homologues.

    PubMed

    Heckmann, Stefan; Schubert, Veit; Houben, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Meiosis is a crucial process of sexual reproduction by forming haploid gametes from diploid precursor cells. It involves 2 subsequent divisions (meiosis I and meiosis II) after one initial round of DNA replication. Homologous monocentric chromosomes are separated during the first and sister chromatids during the second meiotic division. The faithful segregation of monocentric chromosomes is realized by mono-orientation of fused sister kinetochores at metaphase I and by bi-orientation of sister kinetochores at metaphase II. Conventionally this depends on a 2-step loss of cohesion, along chromosome arms during meiosis I and at sister centromeres during meiosis II.

  10. Creating Sister Cities: An Exchange Across Hemispheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, M. T.; Cabezon, S. A.; Hardy, E.; Harrison, R. J.

    2008-06-01

    Sponsored by Associated Universities, Inc. (AUI) and the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO), this project creates a cultural and educational exchange program between communities in South and North America, linking San Pedro de Atacama in Chile and Magdalena, New Mexico in the United States. Both communities have similar demographics, are in relatively undeveloped regions of high-elevation desert, and are located near major international radio astronomy research facilities. The Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) is just 40 km east of San Pedro; the Very Large Array (VLA) is just 40 km west of Magdalena. In February 2007, the Mayor of San Pedro and two teachers visited Magdalena for two weeks; in July 2007 three teachers from Magdalena will visit San Pedro. These visits enable the communities to lay the foundation for a permanent, unique partnership. The teachers are sharing expertise and teaching methodologies for physics and astronomy. In addition to creating science education opportunities, this project offers students linguistic and cultural connections. The town of San Pedro, Chile, hosts nearly 100,000 tourists per year, and English language skills are highly valued by local students. Through exchanges enabled by email and distance conferencing, San Pedro and Magdalena students will improve English and Spanish language skills while teaching each other about science and their respective cultures. This poster describes the AUI/NRAO Sister Cities program, including the challenges of cross-cultural communication and the rewards of interpersonal exchanges between continents and cultures.

  11. Catholic nursing sisters and brothers and racial justice in mid-20th-century America.

    PubMed

    Wall, Barbra Mann

    2009-01-01

    This historical article considers nursing's work for social justice in the 1960s civil rights movement through the lens of religious sisters and brothers who advocated for racial equality. The article examines Catholic nurses' work with African Americans in the mid-20th century that took place amid the prevailing social conditions of poverty and racial disempowerment, conditions that were linked to serious health consequences. Historical methodology is used within the framework of "bearing witness," a term often used in relation to the civil rights movement and one the sisters themselves employed. Two situations involving nurses in the mid-20th century are examined: the civil rights movement in Selma, Alabama, and the actions for racial justice in Chicago, Illinois. The thoughts and actions of Catholic sister and brother nurses in the mid-20th century are chronicled, including those few sister nurses who stepped outside their ordinary roles in an attempt to change an unjust system entirely.

  12. Nuclear localized protein-1 (Nulp1) increases cell death of human osteosarcoma cells and binds the X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein

    SciTech Connect

    Steen, Hakan; Lindholm, Dan

    2008-02-08

    Nuclear localized protein-1 (Nulp1) is a recently identified gene expressed in mouse and human tissues particularly during embryonic development. Nulp1 belongs to the family of basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) proteins that are important in development. The precise function of Nulp1 in cells is however not known. We observed that overexpression of Nulp1 induces a large increase in cell death of human osteosarcoma Saos2 cells with DNA fragmentation. In mouse N2A neuroblastoma cells Nulp1 affected cell proliferation and sensitized cells towards death induced by staurosporine. Staining using a novel antibody localized Nulp1 mainly to the cell nucleus and to some extent to the cytoplasm. Nulp1 binds the X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) and this interaction was increased during cell death. These results indicate that Nulp1 plays a role in cell death control and may influence tumor growth.

  13. All in the Family: The Sister Study

    MedlinePlus

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues All in the Family: The Sister Study Past Issues / ... that may ultimately eliminate this dreaded disease. We all know that breast cancer does not discriminate. Whether ...

  14. When Your Brother or Sister Has Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Tips on what to say to your friends, how to deal with stress, and where to find support – as well as information about cancer and cancer treatments, for young people who have a brother or sister with cancer.

  15. Eruptive history of South Sister, Oregon Cascades

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fierstein, J.; Hildreth, W.; Calvert, A.T.

    2011-01-01

    South Sister is southernmost and highest of the Three Sisters, three geologically dissimilar stratovolcanoes that together form a spectacular 20km reach along the Cascade crest in Oregon. North Sister is a monotonously mafic edifice as old as middle Pleistocene, Middle Sister a basalt-andesite-dacite cone built between 48 and 14ka, and South Sister is a basalt-free edifice that alternated rhyolitic and intermediate modes from 50ka to 2ka (largely contemporaneous with Middle Sister). Detailed mapping, 330 chemical analyses, and 42 radioisotopic ages show that the oldest exposed South Sister lavas were initially rhyolitic ~50ka. By ~37ka, rhyolitic lava flows and domes (72-74% SiO2) began alternating with radially emplaced dacite (63-68% SiO2) and andesite (59-63% SiO2) lava flows. Construction of a broad cone of silicic andesite-dacite (61-64% SiO2) culminated ~30ka in a dominantly explosive sequence that began with crater-forming andesitic eruptions that left fragmental deposits at least 200m thick. This was followed at ~27ka by growth of a steeply dipping summit cone of agglutinate-dominated andesite (56-60.5% SiO2) and formation of a summit crater ~800m wide. This crater was soon filled and overtopped by a thick dacite lava flow and then by >150m of dacitic pyroclastic ejecta. Small-volume dacite lavas (63-67% SiO2) locally cap the pyroclastic pile. A final sheet of mafic agglutinate (54-56% SiO2) - the most mafic product of South Sister - erupted from and drapes the small (300-m-wide) present-day summit crater, ending a summit-building sequence that lasted until ~22ka. A 20kyr-long-hiatus was broken by rhyolite eruptions that produced (1) the Rock Mesa coulee, tephra, and satellite domelets (73.5% SiO2) and (2) the Devils Chain of ~20 domes and short coulees (72.3-72.8% SiO2) from N-S vent alignments on South Sister's flanks. The compositional reversal from mafic summit agglutinate to recent rhyolites epitomizes the frequently changing compositional modes of the

  16. [Two Dutch sisters in analysis with Freud].

    PubMed

    Stroeken, Harry

    2010-01-01

    The author provides persuasive or at least plausible data for the identity of two patients recorded by Freud in his working season of 1910/11. They were two sisters, living in The Hague/Leiden, who came from a rich banker's family, the van der Lindens. Whereas the treatment does not seem to have led to any decisive improvement for the older of the two, it may have encouraged the younger sister to seek divorce.

  17. Perceptions of "Big Sisters" and Their "Little Sisters" Regarding Mentoring Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quarles, Alice; Maldonado, Nancy L.; Lacey, Candace H.; Thompson, Steve D.

    2008-01-01

    This qualitative study explored the relationships between six Little Sisters (mentees) and their Big Sisters (mentors) to develop an understanding of the perceptions of high-risk adolescent female mentees and their mentors regarding their mentoring relationships. Participants were purposefully selected--those actively involved in a formal…

  18. Substance P/Neurokinin 1 and Trigeminal System: A Possible Link to the Pathogenesis in Sudden Perinatal Deaths

    PubMed Central

    Mehboob, Riffat

    2017-01-01

    Sudden demise of a healthy fetus or a neonate is a very tragic episode in the life of parents. These deaths have been a mystery since ages but still remain unexplained. This review proposes the involvement of trigeminal nerve, neurotransmitter substance P (SP), and its receptor neurokinin 1 (NK-1R) in regulation of cardiorespiratory control in fetuses and newborns. Anomalies and immaturity of neuroregulatory systems such as trigeminal system in medulla oblongata of brainstem may provide a possible mechanism of sudden perinatal deaths. Vulnerable infants are born with respiratory center immaturity which in combination with any stressor such as cold, hypoxia, and smoking may lead to cessation of breathing and ventilatory response. SP/NK-1R may be involved in regulating the ventilatory control in neonates while it is decreased in fetal and adult life in humans, and any alterations from these may lead to irreversible sleep apnea and fatal breathing, ultimately sudden death. This review summarizes the studies performed to highlight the expression of SP or NK-1R in sudden perinatal deaths and proposes the involvement of trigeminal ganglion along with its nerve and SP/NK-1R expression alteration as one of the possible pathophysiological underlying mechanism. However, further studies are required to explore the role of SP, NK-1R, and trigeminal system in the pathogenesis of sudden infant deaths, sudden intrauterine deaths, stillbirths, and sudden deaths later in human life. PMID:28348544

  19. Sister chromatid segregation in meiosis II

    PubMed Central

    Wassmann, Katja

    2013-01-01

    Meiotic divisions (meiosis I and II) are specialized cell divisions to generate haploid gametes. The first meiotic division with the separation of chromosomes is named reductional division. The second division, which takes place immediately after meiosis I without intervening S-phase, is equational, with the separation of sister chromatids, similar to mitosis. This meiotic segregation pattern requires the two-step removal of the cohesin complex holding sister chromatids together: cohesin is removed from chromosome arms that have been subjected to homologous recombination in meiosis I and from the centromere region in meiosis II. Cohesin in the centromere region is protected from removal in meiosis I, but this protection has to be removed—deprotected”—for sister chromatid segregation in meiosis II. Whereas the mechanisms of cohesin protection are quite well understood, the mechanisms of deprotection have been largely unknown until recently. In this review I summarize our current knowledge on cohesin deprotection. PMID:23574717

  20. "If I only touch her cloak": the Sisters of Charity of St. Joseph in New Orleans hospital, 1834-1860.

    PubMed

    Kong, Hyejung Grace; Kim, Ock-Joo

    2015-04-01

    wearing a distinctive religious garment, they eschewed female dependence and sexuality. As medical and religious attendants at the sick wards, the sisters played a vital role in preparing the patients for a "good death" as well as spiritual wellness. By waging their own war on the Protestant influences, the sisters did their best to build their own sacred place in caring for sick bodies and saving souls. Through the research on the Sisters of Charity at Charity Hospital, this study ultimately sheds light on the ways in which a nineteenth-century southern hospital functioned as a unique environment for the recovery of wellness of the body and soul, shaped and envisioned by the Catholic sister-nurses' gender and religious identities.

  1. The Seven Sisters Pose for Spitzer

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-04-16

    The Seven Sisters, also known as the Pleiades star cluster, seem to float on a bed of feathers in a new infrared image from NASA Spitzer Space Telescope. Clouds of dust sweep around the stars, swaddling them in a cushiony veil.

  2. When Your Brother or Sister Has Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Help when a brother or sister has cancer. Learn how families cope and find support when a sibling has cancer. Tips to help you talk with your friends, deal with stress, and take care of your mind and body are also shared.

  3. Subcortical laminar heterotopia in two sisters and their mother: MRI, clinical findings and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    van der Valk, P H; Snoeck, I; Meiners, L C; des Portes, V; Chelly, J; Pinard, J M; Ippel, P F; van Nieuwenhuizen, O; Peters, A C

    1999-06-01

    MR imaging, clinical data and underlying pathogenesis of subcortical laminar heterotopia (SCLH), also known as band heterotopia, in two sisters and their mother are presented. On MR imaging a different degree of SCLH was found in all three affected family-members. The inversion recovery sequence was considered most useful in the demonstration of the heterotopic band of gray matter and the assessment of cortical thickness. The younger sister presented with epileptic seizures at the age of five months and a delayed achievement of developmental milestones. The older sister of seven years had epileptic seizures since the age of one year, and developmental delay. Their mother has only had one seizure-like episode at the age of 39. Her psychomotor development had been normal. Investigation of DNA samples of the three female family-members revealed a mutation in the X-linked doublecortin gene. Within families with band heterotopia, this gene has also been related to male family members with lissencephaly.

  4. Decreases in Suicide Deaths and Attempts Linked to the White Mountain Apache Suicide Surveillance and Prevention System, 2001-2012.

    PubMed

    Cwik, Mary F; Tingey, Lauren; Maschino, Alexandra; Goklish, Novalene; Larzelere-Hinton, Francene; Walkup, John; Barlow, Allison

    2016-12-01

    We evaluated the impact of a comprehensive, multitiered youth suicide prevention program among the White Mountain Apache of Arizona since its implementation in 2006. Using data from the tribally mandated Celebrating Life surveillance system, we compared the rates, numbers, and characteristics of suicide deaths and attempts from 2007 to 2012 with those from 2001 to 2006. The overall Apache suicide death rates dropped from 40.0 to 24.7 per 100 000 (38.3% decrease), and the rate among those aged 15 to 24 years dropped from 128.5 to 99.0 per 100 000 (23.0% decrease). The annual number of attempts also dropped from 75 (in 2007) to 35 individuals (in 2012). National rates remained relatively stable during this time, at 10 to 13 per 100 000. Although national rates remained stable or increased slightly, the overall Apache suicide death rates dropped following the suicide prevention program. The community surveillance system served a critical role in providing a foundation for prevention programming and evaluation.

  5. Mechanics of Sister Chromatids studied with a Polymer Model English</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Zhang, Yang; Isbaner, Sebastian; Heermann, Dieter</p> <p>2013-10-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Sister</span> chromatid cohesion denotes the phenomenon that <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids are initially attached to each other in mitosis to guarantee the error-free distribution into the daughter cells. Cohesion is mediated by binding proteins and only resolved after mitotic chromosome condensation is completed. However, the amount of attachement points required to maintain <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid cohesion while still allowing proper chromosome condensation is not known yet. Additionally the impact of cohesion on the mechanical properties of chromosomes also poses an interesting problem. In this work we study the conformational and mechanical properties of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids by means of computer simulations. We model both protein-mediated cohesion between <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids and chromosome condensation with a dynamic binding mechanisms. We show in a phase diagram that only specific <span class="hlt">link</span> concentrations lead to connected and fully condensed chromatids that do not intermingle with each other nor separate due to entropic forces. Furthermore we show that dynamic bonding between chromatids decrease the Young's modulus compared to non-bonded chromatids.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=crocodile&pg=3&id=EJ537653','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=crocodile&pg=3&id=EJ537653"><span>Crocodile Talk: Attributions of Incestuously Abused and Nonabused <span class="hlt">Sisters</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Monahan, Kathleen</p> <p>1997-01-01</p> <p>This qualitative study analyzed the retrospective attributions of adult <span class="hlt">sisters</span> (five abused <span class="hlt">sister</span> dyads, and five abused and nonabused <span class="hlt">sister</span> dyads) who grew up in incestuous families. It examined the attributions of subjects regarding the general sibling group; victim selection and nonselection; and attributions regarding jealousy, protection,…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=crocodile&pg=3&id=EJ537653','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=crocodile&pg=3&id=EJ537653"><span>Crocodile Talk: Attributions of Incestuously Abused and Nonabused <span class="hlt">Sisters</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Monahan, Kathleen</p> <p>1997-01-01</p> <p>This qualitative study analyzed the retrospective attributions of adult <span class="hlt">sisters</span> (five abused <span class="hlt">sister</span> dyads, and five abused and nonabused <span class="hlt">sister</span> dyads) who grew up in incestuous families. It examined the attributions of subjects regarding the general sibling group; victim selection and nonselection; and attributions regarding jealousy, protection,…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED358935.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED358935.pdf"><span>Differences in Two <span class="hlt">Sisters</span>' Acquisition of First Verbs.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Braunwald, Susan R.</p> <p></p> <p>This study examined prior qualitative differences in the process of the emergence of verb use in two <span class="hlt">sisters</span> when they were each 12 to 24 months of age (the older <span class="hlt">sister</span> is 2 years and 9 months older than the younger <span class="hlt">sister</span>). Daily diaries on both children were kept by the mother, who noted emergent structure and vocabulary. Systematic Analysis of…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3778269','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3778269"><span>Identifying potential functional impact of mutations and polymorphisms: <span class="hlt">linking</span> heart failure, increased risk of arrhythmias and sudden cardiac <span class="hlt">death</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Jagu, Benoît; Charpentier, Flavien; Toumaniantz, Gilles</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Researchers and clinicians have discovered several important concepts regarding the mechanisms responsible for increased risk of arrhythmias, heart failure, and sudden cardiac <span class="hlt">death</span>. One major step in defining the molecular basis of normal and abnormal cardiac electrical behavior has been the identification of single mutations that greatly increase the risk for arrhythmias and sudden cardiac <span class="hlt">death</span> by changing channel-gating characteristics. Indeed, mutations in several genes encoding ion channels, such as SCN5A, which encodes the major cardiac Na+ channel, have emerged as the basis for a variety of inherited cardiac arrhythmias such as long QT syndrome, Brugada syndrome, progressive cardiac conduction disorder, sinus node dysfunction, or sudden infant <span class="hlt">death</span> syndrome. In addition, genes encoding ion channel accessory proteins, like anchoring or chaperone proteins, which modify the expression, the regulation of endocytosis, and the degradation of ion channel a-subunits have also been reported as susceptibility genes for arrhythmic syndromes. The regulation of ion channel protein expression also depends on a fine-tuned balance among different other mechanisms, such as gene transcription, RNA processing, post-transcriptional control of gene expression by miRNA, protein synthesis, assembly and post-translational modification and trafficking. The aim of this review is to inventory, through the description of few representative examples, the role of these different biogenic mechanisms in arrhythmogenesis, HF and SCD in order to help the researcher to identify all the processes that could lead to arrhythmias. Identification of novel targets for drug intervention should result from further understanding of these fundamental mechanisms. PMID:24065925</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16618062','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16618062"><span>Suicide pact among three young <span class="hlt">sisters</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Altindag, Abdurrahman; Yanik, Medaim</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>A suicide pact is an agreement between two or more people to kill themselves. They represent 0.6-4.0% of all suicides, the vast majority being double suicides. We present a triple suicide pact involving three young <span class="hlt">sisters</span>. Atypical features of this case include the number of participants, their young ages, and their good health conditions. Similarities to previously reported cases include participants having family disturbances, histories of depression and borderline personality.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-03-07/pdf/2012-5533.pdf','FEDREG'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-03-07/pdf/2012-5533.pdf"><span>77 FR 13585 - Three <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> Irrigation District; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing and Soliciting...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-03-07</p> <p>... COMMISSION Three <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> Irrigation District; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing and Soliciting..., 2012. d. Applicant: Three <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> Irrigation District. e. Name of Project: Three <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> Irrigation District Hydroelectric Project. f. Location: The proposed Three <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> Irrigation District Hydroelectric...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5343486','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5343486"><span>Management of E. coli <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid cohesion in response to genotoxic stress</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Vickridge, Elise; Planchenault, Charlene; Cockram, Charlotte; Junceda, Isabel Garcia; Espéli, Olivier</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>Aberrant DNA replication is a major source of the mutations and chromosomal rearrangements associated with pathological disorders. In bacteria, several different DNA lesions are repaired by homologous recombination, a process that involves <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid pairing. Previous work in Escherichia coli has demonstrated that <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid interactions (SCIs) mediated by topological <span class="hlt">links</span> termed precatenanes, are controlled by topoisomerase IV. In the present work, we demonstrate that during the repair of mitomycin C-induced lesions, topological <span class="hlt">links</span> are rapidly substituted by an SOS-induced <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid cohesion process involving the RecN protein. The loss of SCIs and viability defects observed in the absence of RecN were compensated by alterations in topoisomerase IV, suggesting that the main role of RecN during DNA repair is to promote contacts between <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids. RecN also modulates whole chromosome organization and RecA dynamics suggesting that SCIs significantly contribute to the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). PMID:28262707</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24501821','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24501821"><span>Ageism and risk-taking in young adults: evidence for a <span class="hlt">link</span> between <span class="hlt">death</span> anxiety and ageism.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Popham, Lauren E; Kennison, Shelia M; Bradley, Kristopher I</p> <p>2011-09-01</p> <p>The authors investigated the relationship between ageism and risk-taking in young adults. They hypothesized that young adults may attempt to distance themselves from their future older selves and from an awareness of their mortality by seeking out experiences that make them feel strong, energetic, and invulnerable (i.e., experiences involving risk-taking). We report a study whose results confirmed the hypothesis. Our study involved 408 undergraduates (226 women, 182 men) who completed the Centers for Disease Control's 2007 State and Local Youth Risk Behavior Survey and measures of 2 distinct aspects of ageism: (a) ageist attitudes and (b) ageist behaviors. Both ageist attitudes and behaviors correlated positively with risk-taking (i.e., sexual behavior, alcohol use, cigarette use, and drug use). The results are consistent with terror management theory's view of ageism as a buffer against <span class="hlt">death</span> anxiety.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17208925','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17208925"><span><span class="hlt">Death</span> of a G-6-P-D deficient child with co-morbid HIV infection <span class="hlt">linked</span> to scarification.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Uwaezuoke, S N; Nneli, R O</p> <p>2007-02-01</p> <p>Facial scarification is a process of engraving marks on selected portions of the face at infanthood for various cultural purposes. It is a common cultural practice in Africa especially Nigeria. The induction is associated with fever and severe crying in infants. Usage of the same unsterile tools for the induction in different children and the unhygienic environment are possible means of contracting HIV infection. Occurence of G-6-P-D deficiency and malaria predipose to severe anaemia often requiring blood transfusion. Blood screening facilities are grossly lacking in most rural areas in developing countries. This report is on a 2-year-old male child who presented with facial marks, lacked G-6-P-D and died of HIV infection after a follow-up of 6 months. We suggest that HIV infection contracted from facial scarification in the presence of G-6-P-D deficiency caused the child's <span class="hlt">death</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2543085','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2543085"><span>Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1α Inactivation Unveils a <span class="hlt">Link</span> between Tumor Cell Metabolism and Hypoxia-Induced Cell <span class="hlt">Death</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Favaro, Elena; Nardo, Giorgia; Persano, Luca; Masiero, Massimo; Moserle, Lidia; Zamarchi, Rita; Rossi, Elisabetta; Esposito, Giovanni; Plebani, Mario; Sattler, Ulrike; Mann, Thomas; Mueller-Klieser, Wolfgang; Ciminale, Vincenzo; Amadori, Alberto; Indraccolo, Stefano</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>Hypoxia and the acquisition of a glycolytic phenotype are intrinsic features of the tumor microenvironment. The hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) pathway is activated under hypoxic conditions and orchestrates a complex transcriptional program that enhances cell survival. Although the consequences of HIF-1α inactivation in cancer cells have been widely investigated, only a few studies have addressed the role of HIF-1α in the survival of cancer cells endowed with different glycolytic capacities. In this study, we investigated this aspect in ovarian cancer cells. Hypoxia-induced toxicity was increased in highly glycolytic cells compared with poorly glycolytic cells; it was also associated with a sharp decrease in intracellular ATP levels and was prevented by glucose supplementation. Stable HIF-1α silencing enhanced hypoxia-induced cell <span class="hlt">death</span> in vitro due to a lack of cell cycle arrest. Tumors bearing attenuated HIF-1α levels had similar growth rates and vascularization as did controls, but tumors showed higher proliferation levels and increased necrosis. Moreover, tumors formed by HIF-1α deficient cells had higher levels of lactate and lower ATP concentrations than controls as shown by metabolic imaging. The findings that such metabolic properties can affect the survival of cancer cells under hypoxic conditions and that these properties contribute to the determination of the consequences of HIF-1α inactivation could have important implications on the understanding of the effects of anti-angiogenic and HIF-1α-targeting drugs in cancer. PMID:18772337</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1166798','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1166798"><span>Familial qt prolongation and risk of sudden <span class="hlt">death</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Furberg, C; Hörnell, H</p> <p>1975-09-01</p> <p>Two <span class="hlt">sisters</span> with the syndrome of familial QT prolongation in the ECG and syncope are presented. A recently suggested mechanism of the syndrome is presented and preventive measures to reduce the risk of sudden <span class="hlt">death</span> associated with it are proposed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5381993','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5381993"><span>Reassessing the <span class="hlt">Link</span> between Airborne Arsenic Exposure among Anaconda Copper Smelter Workers and Multiple Causes of <span class="hlt">Death</span> Using the Parametric g-Formula</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Keil, Alexander P.; Richardson, David B.</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Background: Prior studies have indicated associations between ingestion of inorganic arsenic and ischemic heart disease, nonmalignant respiratory disease, and lung, skin, bladder, and kidney cancers. In contrast, inhaled arsenic has been consistently associated only with lung cancer. Evidence for health effects of inhaled arsenic derives mainly from occupational studies that are subject to unique biases that may attenuate or obscure such associations. Objectives: We estimated the excess mortality from respiratory cancers, heart disease, and other causes resulting from occupational arsenic exposure while controlling for confounding using the parametric g-formula. Methods: Using a cohort of 8,014 male copper smelter workers who were hired between 1938 and 1955 and followed through 1990, we estimated the impacts of hypothetical workplace interventions on arsenic exposure on the risk of mortality from all causes, heart disease, and lung cancer using the parametric g-formula. Results: We estimate that eliminating arsenic exposure at work would have prevented 22 <span class="hlt">deaths</span> by age 70 per 1,000 workers [95% confidence interval (CI): 10, 35]. Of those 22 excess <span class="hlt">deaths</span>, we estimate that 7.2 (95% CI: –1.2, 15) would be due to heart disease, 4.0 (95% CI: –0.8, 8.2) due to respiratory cancers, and 11 (95% CI: 0.0, 23) due to other causes. Conclusions: Our analyses suggest that the excess <span class="hlt">deaths</span> from causes other than respiratory cancers comprise the majority of the excess <span class="hlt">deaths</span> caused by inhaled arsenic exposure. Healthy worker survivor bias may have masked such associations in previous analyses. These results emphasize the need for consideration of all exposure routes for upcoming risk assessment by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Citation: Keil AP, Richardson DB. 2017. Reassessing the <span class="hlt">link</span> between airborne arsenic exposure among Anaconda copper smelter workers and multiple causes of <span class="hlt">death</span> using the parametric g-formula. Environ Health Perspect 125:608–614;</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19760166','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19760166"><span>Association of maternal medical conditions and unfavorable birth outcomes: findings from the 1996-2003 Mississippi <span class="hlt">linked</span> birth and <span class="hlt">death</span> data.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Zhang, Lei; Cox, Reagan G; Graham, Juanita; Johnson, Dick</p> <p>2011-10-01</p> <p>This study aimed to identify factors contributing to high rates of preterm birth (PTB), low birth weight (LBW) and infant mortality in Mississippi while considering both traditional risk factors and maternal medical conditions. The retrospective cohort study used 1996-2003 Mississippi <span class="hlt">linked</span> birth and infant <span class="hlt">death</span> files. Multiple logistic regression was used to investigate association between maternal medical conditions and unfavorable birth outcomes. Along with traditional risk factors, hypertension was significantly associated with PTB and LBW. Women with hypertension were about 2.2 and 3.2 times as likely to have PTB and LBW, respectively. Hydramnios/oligohydramnios increased 1.8-4.4 folds of risk for PTB, LBW and infant <span class="hlt">death</span> and was significantly associated with the unfavorable birth outcomes. Non-Hispanic black women were about 1.5-2.0 times as likely to have an unfavorable birth outcome compared to non-Hispanic white women. Maternal education and prenatal care effect appeared to be modified by maternal race. Certain maternal medical conditions may be contributing to PTB, LBW and infant mortality rates identifying preconception and prenatal healthcare as possible strategies for reducing unfavorable outcomes. Results suggest that different risk profiles for unfavorable outcomes may exist according to maternal race highlighting the need to consider racial groups separately when further exploring the sociodemographic and/or health-related factors that contribute to unfavorable birth outcomes.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2743075','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2743075"><span>Catholic Nursing <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> and Brothers and Racial Justice in Mid-20th-Century America</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Wall, Barbra Mann</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>This historical article considers nursing’s work for social justice in the 1960s civil rights movement through the lens of religious <span class="hlt">sisters</span> and brothers who advocated for racial equality. The article examines Catholic nurses’ work with African Americans in the mid-20th century that took place amid the prevailing social conditions of poverty and racial disempowerment, conditions that were <span class="hlt">linked</span> to serious health consequences. Historical methodology is used within the framework of “bearing witness,” a term often used in relation to the civil rights movement and one the <span class="hlt">sisters</span> themselves employed. Two situations involving nurses in the mid-20th century are examined: the civil rights movement in Selma, Alabama, and the actions for racial justice in Chicago, Illinois. The thoughts and actions of Catholic <span class="hlt">sister</span> and brother nurses in the mid-20th century are chronicled, including those few <span class="hlt">sister</span> nurses who stepped outside their ordinary roles in an attempt to change an unjust system entirely. PMID:19461224</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1461834','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1461834"><span>Genes involved in <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid separation and segregation in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Biggins, S; Bhalla, N; Chang, A; Smith, D L; Murray, A W</p> <p>2001-01-01</p> <p>Accurate chromosome segregation requires the precise coordination of events during the cell cycle. Replicated <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids are held together while they are properly attached to and aligned by the mitotic spindle at metaphase. At anaphase, the <span class="hlt">links</span> between <span class="hlt">sisters</span> must be promptly dissolved to allow the mitotic spindle to rapidly separate them to opposite poles. To isolate genes involved in chromosome behavior during mitosis, we microscopically screened a temperature-sensitive collection of budding yeast mutants that contain a GFP-marked chromosome. Nine LOC (loss of cohesion) complementation groups that do not segregate <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids at anaphase were identified. We cloned the corresponding genes and performed secondary tests to determine their function in chromosome behavior. We determined that three LOC genes, PDS1, ESP1, and YCS4, are required for <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid separation and three other LOC genes, CSE4, IPL1, and SMT3, are required for chromosome segregation. We isolated alleles of two genes involved in splicing, PRP16 and PRP19, which impair alpha-tubulin synthesis thus preventing spindle assembly, as well as an allele of CDC7 that is defective in DNA replication. We also report an initial characterization of phenotypes associated with the SMT3/SUMO gene and the isolation of WSS1, a high-copy smt3 suppressor. PMID:11606525</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_3");'>3</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");'>4</a></li> <li class="active"><span>5</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_5 --> <div id="page_6" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");'>4</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li class="active"><span>6</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="101"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11201933','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11201933"><span><span class="hlt">Death</span> foretold.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Biderman, A; Herman, J</p> <p>2000-01-01</p> <p>We briefly trace the history of a belief in the possibility that a person in apparent good health may accurately predict his or her own demise. The phenomenon is referred to as <span class="hlt">death</span> foretold and we present presumed examples of it from the Bible, world literature, medical writings and newspaper reports without pretending to completeness. In two widely quoted scientific papers, <span class="hlt">death</span> foretold is subsumed under the wider heading of decease due to psychic stress. We speculate on a possible <span class="hlt">link</span> between the two, taking into consideration the fact that most people who prophesy their end are of an advanced age.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26511516','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26511516"><span>Regulation of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid cohesion during the mitotic cell cycle.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Zheng, Ge; Yu, HongTao</p> <p>2015-11-01</p> <p>Orderly execution of two critical events during the cell cycle--DNA replication and chromosome segregation--ensures the stable transmission of genetic materials. The cohesin complex physically connects <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids during DNA replication in a process termed <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid cohesion. Timely establishment and dissolution of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid cohesion is a prerequisite for accurate chromosome segregation, and is tight regulated by the cell cycle machinery and cohesin-associated proteins. In this review, we discuss recent progress in the molecular understanding of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid cohesion during the mitotic cell cycle.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/254378','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/254378"><span>Two <span class="hlt">sisters</span> with clinical diagnosis of Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome: Is the condition in the family autosomal recessive?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Kondoh, T.; Hayashi, K.; Matsumoto, T.</p> <p>1995-10-09</p> <p>We report two <span class="hlt">sisters</span> in a family representing manifestations of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS), an X-<span class="hlt">linked</span> immunodeficiency disorder. An elder <span class="hlt">sister</span> had suffered from recurrent infections, small thrombocytopenic petechiae, purpura, and eczema for 7 years. The younger <span class="hlt">sister</span> had the same manifestations as the elder <span class="hlt">sister`s</span> for a 2-year period, and died of intracranial bleeding at age 2 years. All the laboratory data of the two patients were compatible with WAS, although they were females. Sialophorin analysis with the selective radioactive labeling method of this protein revealed that in the elder <span class="hlt">sister</span> a 115-KD band that should be specific for sialophorin was reduced in quantity, and instead an additional 135-KD fragment was present as a main band. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis of the sialophorin gene and single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis of the PCR product demonstrated that there were no detectable size-change nor electrophoretic mobility change in the DNA from both patients. The results indicated that their sialophorin gene structure might be normal. Studies on the mother-daughter transmission of X chromosome using a pERT84-MaeIII polymorphic marker mapped at Xp21 and HPRT gene polymorphism at Xq26 suggested that each <span class="hlt">sister</span> had inherited a different X chromosome from the mother. Two explanations are plausible for the occurrence of the WAS in our patients: the WAS in the patients is attributable to an autosomal gene mutation which may regulate the sialophorin gene expression through the WAS gene, or, alternatively, the condition in this family is an autosomal recessive disorder separated etiologically from the X-<span class="hlt">linked</span> WAS. 17 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28475874','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28475874"><span>Unprotected Replication Forks Are Converted into Mitotic <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Chromatid Bridges.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ait Saada, Anissia; Teixeira-Silva, Ana; Iraqui, Ismail; Costes, Audrey; Hardy, Julien; Paoletti, Giulia; Fréon, Karine; Lambert, Sarah A E</p> <p>2017-05-04</p> <p>Replication stress and mitotic abnormalities are key features of cancer cells. Temporarily paused forks are stabilized by the intra-S phase checkpoint and protected by the association of Rad51, which prevents Mre11-dependent resection. However, if a fork becomes dysfunctional and cannot resume, this terminally arrested fork is rescued by a converging fork to avoid unreplicated parental DNA during mitosis. Alternatively, dysfunctional forks are restarted by homologous recombination. Using fission yeast, we report that Rad52 and the DNA binding activity of Rad51, but not its strand-exchange activity, act to protect terminally arrested forks from unrestrained Exo1-nucleolytic activity. In the absence of recombination proteins, large ssDNA gaps, up to 3 kb long, occur behind terminally arrested forks, preventing efficient fork merging and leading to mitotic <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid bridging. Thus, Rad52 and Rad51 prevent temporarily and terminally arrested forks from degrading and, despite the availability of converging forks, converting to anaphase bridges causing aneuploidy and cell <span class="hlt">death</span>. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=human+AND+capital+AND+mentoring&pg=2&id=EJ811809','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=human+AND+capital+AND+mentoring&pg=2&id=EJ811809"><span>Mentoring At-Risk Adolescent Girls: Listening to "Little <span class="hlt">Sisters</span>"</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Maldonado, Nancy L.; Quarles, Alice; Lacey, Candace H.; Thompson, Steve D.</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>In order to develop an understanding of mentoring relationships and the impact these relationships might have on the development of high-risk adolescent girls, this qualitative study explored the relationships between six "Little <span class="hlt">Sisters</span>" and their "Big <span class="hlt">Sister</span>" mentors. The purposefully-selected sample includes women and girls…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1088162','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1088162"><span>[Concordant deuteranomaly in monozygotic twin <span class="hlt">sisters</span> (author's transl)].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Franceschetti, A T; Klein, D; Dieterle, P</p> <p>1976-12-01</p> <p>Colorblind twin <span class="hlt">sisters</span> were born from the marriage of a hemizygote with a carrier for colorblindness. The proof of monozygosity is given by the blood-group typing and the dermatoglyphs. The deuteranomaly is of the same degree in each but is more marked in one of the <span class="hlt">sisters</span>. The mother has none of the microsymptoms sometimes found in carriers.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20157418','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20157418"><span>One <span class="hlt">sister</span> and brother with mirror image myopic anisometropia.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Park, Sung Joon; Kim, Joo Yeon; Baek, Seung-Hee; Kim, Eung Suk; Kim, Ungsoo S</p> <p>2010-02-01</p> <p>We report a case of one <span class="hlt">sister</span> and brother with mirror image myopic anisometropia. One <span class="hlt">sister</span> and brother complained visual disturbance. The <span class="hlt">sister</span> was 10 years 11 months old, and brother was 8 years 4 months old. Full ophthalmic examinations were performed, including slit lamp examination, intraocular pressure, keratometry, anterior chamber depth, axial length, fundus examination and the cycloplegic refraction. The cycloplegic refractive power was -15.50 dpt cyl.+4.50 dpt Ax 85 degrees (right eye), -1.00 dpt cyl.+0.50 dpt Ax 90 degrees (left eye) in the <span class="hlt">sister</span>; -1.75 dpt cyl.+2.25 dpt Ax 90 degrees (right eye), -9.50 dpt cyl.+4.00 dpt Ax 80 degrees (left eye) in the brother. The co-occurrence of severe myopic anisometropia in a <span class="hlt">sister</span> and brother is extremely rare. The present case suggests that severe myopic anisometropia may be related by genetic inheritance.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27791309','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27791309"><span>A very human being: <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Marie Simone Roach, 1922-2016.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Villeneuve, Michael J; Tschudin, Verena; Storch, Janet; Fowler, Marsha D M; Peter, Elizabeth</p> <p>2016-12-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Sister</span> (Sr.) Marie Simone Roach, of the <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> of St. Martha of Antigonish, Nova Scotia, died at the Motherhouse on 2 July 2016 at the age of 93, leaving behind a rich legacy of theoretical and practical work in the areas of care, caring and nursing ethics. She was a humble soul whose deep and scholarly thinking thrust her onto the global nursing stage where she will forever be tied to a central concept in nursing, caring, through her Six Cs of Caring model. In Canada, she was the lead architect of the Canadian Nurses Association's first code of ethics, and her influence on revisions to it is still profound more than 35 years later. In this paper, four global scholars in nursing and ethics are invited to reflect on Sr. Simone's contribution to nursing and health-care, and we <span class="hlt">link</span> her work to nursing and health-care going forward. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9113588','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9113588"><span>Pregnant and parenting adolescents and their younger <span class="hlt">sisters</span>: the influence of relationship qualities for younger <span class="hlt">sister</span> outcomes.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>East, P L; Shi, C R</p> <p>1997-04-01</p> <p>On the basis of social modeling theory and a sibling interaction hypothesis, it was hypothesized that specific relationship qualities between a pregnant or parenting teen and her younger <span class="hlt">sister</span> would be associated with permissive younger <span class="hlt">sister</span> outcomes, such as permissive childbearing attitudes and permissive sexual behavior. Results indicated that negative relationship qualities, such as rivalry, competition, and conflict, were more closely related to younger <span class="hlt">sisters</span> engaging in problem delinquent-like behavior and sexual behavior than were positive relationship qualities, such as warmth and closeness. Additionally, a shared friendship network with the older <span class="hlt">sister</span> was found to be associated with extensive younger <span class="hlt">sister</span> problem behavior and sexual behavior. Three potential explanatory processes are discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9553790','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9553790"><span><span class="hlt">Sister</span> chromatid exchanges in rotogravure printing plant workers.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Hammer, K D; Mayer, N; Pfeiffer, E H</p> <p>1998-03-01</p> <p>The individual burden of inhaled ambient-air toluene and its <span class="hlt">link</span> to genotoxic phenomena in exposed printing workers. The influence of toluene on <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchange (SCE) was investigated by monitoring of the individual toluene burden of 42 exposed printing workers. Therefore, the urinary hippuric acid (HA) excretion was measured directly after the work shift. The results were compared with those recorded for a control group consisting of 45 blood donors. SCE frequencies were determined from peripheral lymphocytes for both groups. The median HA excretion of the exposed and nonexposed groups amounted to 1.94 and 0.45 g/g creatinine, respectively. For both groups, different SCE rates were detected: 10.13 and 6.84 counts/lymphocyte for exposed and nonexposed persons, respectively. The independence of the measured values proved to be significant at a high confidence level (P = 0.000) for both groups. The influences of smoking and alcohol consumption on SCE as well as on HA values could be clearly separated from those induced by toluene. The results of our study indicate a strong relationship between the individual toluene burden and the genotoxic risk of the exposed persons. Since toluene was used for dilution of the letter-press ink, the influence of ink mist on the genotoxic effects could not be completely excluded.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27473157','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27473157"><span>Life expectancy of different ethnic groups using <span class="hlt">death</span> records <span class="hlt">linked</span> to population census data for 4.62 million people in Scotland.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Gruer, Laurence; Cézard, Geneviève; Clark, Esta; Douglas, Anne; Steiner, Markus; Millard, Andrew; Buchanan, Duncan; Katikireddi, Srinivasa Vittal; Sheikh, Aziz; Bhopal, Raj</p> <p>2016-07-29</p> <p>Few countries record the data needed to estimate life expectancy by ethnic group. Such information is helpful in assessing the extent of health inequality. Life tables were created using 3 years of <span class="hlt">deaths</span> (May 2001-April 2004) <span class="hlt">linked</span> to Scottish 2001 Census data for 4.62 million individuals with self-reported ethnicity. We created 8 ethnic groups based on the census definitions, each with at least 5000 individuals and 40 <span class="hlt">deaths</span>. Life expectancy at birth was calculated using the revised Chiang method. The life expectancy of White Scottish males at birth was 74.7 years (95% CI 74.6 to 74.8), similar to Mixed Background (73.0; 70.2 to 75.8) and White Irish (75.0; 74.0 to 75.9), but shorter than Indian (80.9; 78.4 to 83.4), Pakistani (79.3; 76.9 to 81.6), Chinese (79.0; 76.5 to 81.5), Other White British (78.9; 78.6 to 79.2) and Other White (77.2; 76.4 to 78.1). The life expectancy of White Scottish females was 79.4 years (79.3 to 79.5), similar to mixed background (79.3; 76.6 to 82.0), but shorter than Pakistani (84.6; 82.0 to 87.3), Chinese (83.4; 81.1 to 85.7), Indian (83.3; 80.7 to 85.9), Other White British (82.6; 82.3 to 82.9), other White (82.0; 81.3 to 82.8) and White Irish (81; 80.2 to 81.8). Males and females in most of the larger ethnic minority groups in Scotland have longer life expectancies than the majority White Scottish population. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6639024','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6639024"><span>Breast cancer after Hodgkin's disease in two <span class="hlt">sisters</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Li, F.P.; Corkery, J.; Canellos, G.; Neitlich, H.W.</p> <p>1981-01-01</p> <p>Two <span class="hlt">sisters</span> had breast cancer at four years and 11 years after diagnosis of Hodgkin's disease. The affected breast tissues had received several hundred rads of scatter radiation during treatment of the lymphoma. Family history revealed breast cancer in a third <span class="hlt">sister</span> and five other women in the paternal line. Cytogenetic and HLA studies showed no markers of susceptibility to neoplasia. Development of second primary neoplasms of the breast in the two <span class="hlt">sisters</span> may have resulted from interactions between genetic factors and carcinogenic effects of radiation exposure.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25158281','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25158281"><span>A non-<span class="hlt">sister</span> act: recombination template choice during meiosis.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Humphryes, Neil; Hochwagen, Andreas</p> <p>2014-11-15</p> <p>Meiotic recombination has two key functions: the faithful assortment of chromosomes into gametes and the creation of genetic diversity. Both processes require that meiotic recombination occurs between homologous chromosomes, rather than <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids. Accordingly, a host of regulatory factors are activated during meiosis to distinguish <span class="hlt">sisters</span> from homologs, suppress recombination between <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids and promote the chromatids of the homologous chromosome as the preferred recombination partners. Here, we discuss the recent advances in our understanding of the mechanistic basis of meiotic recombination template choice, focusing primarily on developments in the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, where the regulation is currently best understood.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25999055','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25999055"><span>Horsetails are the <span class="hlt">sister</span> group to all other monilophytes and Marattiales are <span class="hlt">sister</span> to leptosporangiate ferns.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Knie, Nils; Fischer, Simon; Grewe, Felix; Polsakiewicz, Monika; Knoop, Volker</p> <p>2015-09-01</p> <p>The "Monilophyte" clade comprising ferns, horsetails and whisk ferns receives unequivocal support from molecular data as the <span class="hlt">sister</span> clade to seed plants. However, the branching order of its earliest emerging lineages, the Equisetales (horsetails), the Marattiales, the Ophioglossales/Psilotales and the large group of leptosporangiate ferns has remained dubious. We investigated the mitochondrial nad2 and rpl2 genes as two new, intron-containing loci for a wide sampling of taxa. We found that both group II introns - nad2i542g2 and rpl2i846g2 - are universally present among monilophytes. Both introns have orthologues in seed plants where nad2i542g2 has evolved into a trans-arrangement. In contrast and despite substantial size extensions to more than 5kb in Psilotum, nad2i542g2 remains cis-arranged in the monilophytes. For phylogenetic analyses, we filled taxonomic gaps in previously investigated mitochondrial (atp1, nad5) and chloroplast (atpA, atpB, matK, rbcL, rps4) loci and created a 9-gene matrix that also included the new mitochondrial nad2 and rpl2 loci. We extended the taxon sampling with two taxa each for all land plant outgroups (liverworts, mosses, hornworts, lycophytes and seed plants) to minimize the risk of phylogenetic artefacts. We ultimately obtained a well-supported molecular phylogeny placing Marattiales as <span class="hlt">sister</span> to leptosporangiate ferns and horsetails as <span class="hlt">sister</span> to all remaining monilophytes. In addition, an indel in an exon of the here introduced rpl2 locus independently supports the placement of horsetails. We conclude that under dense taxon sampling, phylogenetic information from a prudent choice of loci is currently superior to character-rich phylogenomic approaches at low taxon sampling. As here shown the selective choice of loci and taxa enabled us to resolve the long-enigmatic diversifications of the earliest monilophyte lineages.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1732112','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1732112"><span>Is the <span class="hlt">link</span> between alcohol and cardiovascular <span class="hlt">death</span> among young Russian men attributable to misclassification of acute alcohol intoxication? Evidence from the city of Izhevsk</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Shkolnikov, V; McKee, M; Chervyakov, V; Kyrianov, N</p> <p>2002-01-01</p> <p>Background: Research on the aetiology of sudden cardiac <span class="hlt">death</span> among young men in Russia strongly suggests an association with binge drinking. However, the possibility remains that such <span class="hlt">deaths</span> are misclassified as being attributable to cardiovascular disease when they are really caused by acute alcohol poisoning. Objective: To describe postmortem levels of blood alcohol in Russian men dying from various causes and so determine whether <span class="hlt">deaths</span> from alcohol poisoning are being misclassified as cardiovascular <span class="hlt">deaths</span>. Setting: Ishevsk, capital of the Udmurt Republic, situated in the Ural region of the Russian Federation. Methods: The study was part of a larger one on adult mortality. The study sample was 309 <span class="hlt">deaths</span> among men aged 20–55 dying between August 1998 and March 1999 from other than neoplasms, infectious diseases or unspecified causes and on whom necropsy records could be obtained. Information on cause of <span class="hlt">death</span> was extracted from <span class="hlt">death</span> certificates and data on postmortem blood alcohol concentration (BAC) from forensic records. Blood alcohol concentrations were adjusted where necessary to allow for delay in necropsy. Results: Medium or greater levels of intoxication occurred in a quarter of those recorded as dying from cardiovascular disease but in over half of those dying from external causes. BAC levels consistent with at least strong intoxication were seen in 13.5% of <span class="hlt">deaths</span> from cardiovascular disease and 27.1% from external causes. No cardiovascular <span class="hlt">deaths</span> had BAC at levels usually thought to be fatal while this level was seen in 26% of <span class="hlt">deaths</span> from accidental poisoning. Conclusion: Evidence of recent consumption of alcohol is common among Russian men dying under the age of 55, with severe intoxication common where <span class="hlt">death</span> is from external causes. However, the high <span class="hlt">death</span> rates from cardiovascular disease in Russia cannot be explained by misclassification of <span class="hlt">deaths</span> attributable to acute alcohol poisoning. This study thus resolves one of the outstanding</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFM.B21D0073D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFM.B21D0073D"><span>Carbon associated nitrate (CAN) in the Ediacaran Johnnie Formation, <span class="hlt">Death</span> Valley, California and <span class="hlt">links</span> to the Shuram negative carbon isotope excursion</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Dilles, Z. Y. G.; Prokopenko, M. G.; Bergmann, K.; Loyd, S. J.; Corsetti, F. A.; Berelson, W.; Gaines, R. R.</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>Nitrogen, a major nutrient of marine primary production whose many redox states are <span class="hlt">linked</span> through biological processes to O2, may afford better understanding of changes in post-Great Oxidation Event (GOE) environmental redox conditions. Using a novel approach to quantify nitrate content in carbonates, we identified a trend of CAN increase in the late-Proterozoic, including several distinct peaks within a carbonate succession of the Sonora province, Mexico, deposited ~630-500 Ma. The goal of the current study was to investigate CAN variability in the context of the global "Shuram" event, a large negative δ13C excursion expressed in Rainstorm member carbonates of the Johnnie Formation in <span class="hlt">Death</span> Valley, CA. The lower Rainstorm Member "Johnnie Oolite", a time-transgressive, regionally extensive, shallow dolomitic oolite, was sampled. CAN concentrations ranged from 7.31 to 127.36 nmol/g, with higher values measured toward the base of the bed. This trend held at each sampled locality, along with a tendency towards decreasing CAN with larger magnitude negative δ13C excursions. Modern analog ooids formed in low-latitude marine environments lack CAN, consistent with their formation in low-nitrate waters of the euphotic zone characteristic of the modern ocean nitrogen cycling. In contrast, maximum values within the Johnnie oolite exceed by a factor of five to seven CAN measured in carbonates deposited below the main nitracline in the modern ocean, implying high nitrate content within shallow depositional environments. Johnnie oolite data, broadly consistent with the Sonora sequence findings, may indicate large perturbations in the Ediacaran nitrogen cycle immediately preceding the negative δ13C excursion. The implication of these findings for possible changes in the Ediacaran nitrogen, oxygen and carbon biogeochemical cycling will be further discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26062662','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26062662"><span>Influence of offence type and prior imprisonment on risk of <span class="hlt">death</span> following release from prison: a whole-population <span class="hlt">linked</span> data study.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Jama-Alol, Khadra Abdi; Malacova, Eva; Ferrante, Anna; Alan, Janine; Stewart, Louise; Preen, David</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>The purpose of this paper is to examine the influence of offence type, prior imprisonment and various socio-demographic characteristics on mortality at 28 and 365 days following prison release. Using whole-population <span class="hlt">linked</span>, routinely collected administrative state-based imprisonment and mortality data, the authors conducted a retrospective study of 12,677 offenders released from Western Australian prisons in the period 1994-2003. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to examine the association between mortality at 28 and 365 days post-release and offence type, prior imprisonment, and a range of socio-demographic characteristics (age, gender, social disadvantage and Indigenous status). Overall, 135 (1.1 per cent) died during the 365 days follow-up period, of these, 17.8 per cent (n=24) died within the first 28 days (four weeks) of their index release. Ex-prisoners who had committed drug-related offences had significantly higher risk of 28-day post-release mortality (HR=28.4; 95 per cent CI: 1.3-615.3, p=0.033), than those who had committed violent (non-sexual) offences. A significant association was also found between the number of previous incarcerations and post-release mortality at 28 days post-release, with three prior prison terms carrying the highest mortality risk (HR=73.8; 95 per cent CI: 1.8-3,092.5, p=0.024). No association between mortality and either offence type or prior imprisonment was seen at 365 days post-release. Post-release mortality at 28 days was significantly associated with offence type (with drug-related offences carrying the greatest risk) and with prior imprisonment, but associations did not persist to 365 days after release. Targeting of short-term transitional programmes to reduce preventable <span class="hlt">deaths</span> after return to the community could be tailored to these high-risk ex-prisoners.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/mi0639.photos.196598p/','SCIGOV-HHH'); return false;" href="//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/mi0639.photos.196598p/"><span>38. 8 <span class="hlt">sisters</span> and powerhouse, pulverizer building for powerhouse, coal ...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/">Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>38. 8 <span class="hlt">sisters</span> and powerhouse, pulverizer building for powerhouse, coal conveyor, blast stoves, "A" furnace, stoves, "B" furnace, stoves, "C" furnace, bottle cars. Looking south - Rouge Steel Company, 3001 Miller Road, Dearborn, MI</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Recombination&pg=4&id=EJ384605','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Recombination&pg=4&id=EJ384605"><span>How-to-Do-It: Demonstrating <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Chromatid Exchanges.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Dye, Frank J.</p> <p>1988-01-01</p> <p>Outlines procedures for demonstrating and preparing a permanent slide of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchanges and recombination events between the two chromatids of a single chromosome. Provides the name of an additional resource for making preparations of exchanges. (RT)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25213378','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25213378"><span><span class="hlt">Sister</span> kinetochores are mechanically fused during meiosis I in yeast.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Sarangapani, Krishna K; Duro, Eris; Deng, Yi; Alves, Flavia de Lima; Ye, Qiaozhen; Opoku, Kwaku N; Ceto, Steven; Rappsilber, Juri; Corbett, Kevin D; Biggins, Sue; Marston, Adèle L; Asbury, Charles L</p> <p>2014-10-10</p> <p>Production of healthy gametes requires a reductional meiosis I division in which replicated <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids comigrate, rather than separate as in mitosis or meiosis II. Fusion of <span class="hlt">sister</span> kinetochores during meiosis I may underlie <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid comigration in diverse organisms, but direct evidence for such fusion has been lacking. We used laser trapping and quantitative fluorescence microscopy to study native kinetochore particles isolated from yeast. Meiosis I kinetochores formed stronger attachments and carried more microtubule-binding elements than kinetochores isolated from cells in mitosis or meiosis II. The meiosis I-specific monopolin complex was both necessary and sufficient to drive these modifications. Thus, kinetochore fusion directs <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid comigration, a conserved feature of meiosis that is fundamental to Mendelian inheritance.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");'>4</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li class="active"><span>6</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_6 --> <div id="page_7" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li class="active"><span>7</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="121"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23550483','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23550483"><span>Developing skills in clinical leadership for ward <span class="hlt">sisters</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Fenton, Katherine; Phillips, Natasha</p> <p></p> <p>The Francis report has called for a strengthening of the ward <span class="hlt">sister</span>'s role. It recommends that <span class="hlt">sisters</span> should operate in a supervisory capacity and should not be office bound. Effective ward leadership has been recognised as being vital to high-quality patient care and experience, resource management and interprofessional working. However, there is evidence that ward <span class="hlt">sisters</span> are ill equipped to lead effectively and lack confidence in their ability to do so. University College London Hospitals Foundation Trust has recognised that the job has become almost impossible in increasingly large and complex organisations. Ward <span class="hlt">sisters</span> spend less than 40% of their time on clinical leadership and the trust is undertaking a number of initiatives to support them in this role.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/or0493.photos.200307p/','SCIGOV-HHH'); return false;" href="//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/or0493.photos.200307p/"><span>UNDERSIDE FROM SOUTH BANKS; NOTICE NEW GLUE LAM CROSSBEAMS <span class="hlt">SISTERED</span> ...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/">Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>UNDERSIDE FROM SOUTH BANKS; NOTICE NEW GLUE LAM CROSSBEAMS <span class="hlt">SISTERED</span> TO OLDER BEAMS, NEW STRINGERS AND COMPONENTS MAKE UP A NEARLY NEW SUPPORT SYSTEM - Short Bridge, Spanning South Santiam River at High Deck Road, Cascadia, Linn County, OR</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Recombination&pg=3&id=EJ384605','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Recombination&pg=3&id=EJ384605"><span>How-to-Do-It: Demonstrating <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Chromatid Exchanges.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Dye, Frank J.</p> <p>1988-01-01</p> <p>Outlines procedures for demonstrating and preparing a permanent slide of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchanges and recombination events between the two chromatids of a single chromosome. Provides the name of an additional resource for making preparations of exchanges. (RT)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1013031','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1013031"><span>Agenesis of the Corpus Callosum in Two <span class="hlt">Sisters</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Shapira, Yehuda; Cohen, Tirza</p> <p>1973-01-01</p> <p>Two <span class="hlt">sisters</span> are described. They are offspring of Arabic parents who are both first and second cousins, through both sets of grandparents; additionally the father's parents are first cousins. The diagnosis of agenesis of the corpus callosum in the propositae was made by the characteristic picture on the pneumoencephalogram. The clinical symptoms in the two <span class="hlt">sisters</span> varied considerably. The older <span class="hlt">sister</span> had shown delayed psychomotor development in infancy, mild mental retardation, and developed seizures at 7 years of age of both the grand mal and akinetic types. Her physical and neurological examination did not show any abnormalities. The EEG was severely abnormal with slow wave activity over the posterior parts of the brain and focal spiking. The younger <span class="hlt">sister</span> presented at 6 months of age with failure to thrive, generalized hypotonia, but without seizures. Her EEG was within normal limits. This anomaly was probably transmitted by an autosomal recessive gene. The clinical and genetic aspects of this syndrome are discussed. Images PMID:4204338</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4825568','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4825568"><span><span class="hlt">Sister</span> chromatid decatenation: bridging the gaps in our knowledge</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Broderick, Ronan; Niedzwiedz, Wojciech</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Faithful chromosome segregation is critical in preventing genome loss or damage during cell division. Failure to properly disentangle catenated <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids can lead to the formation of bulky or ultrafine anaphase bridges, and ultimately genome instability. In this review we present an overview of the current state of knowledge of how <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid decatenation is carried out, with particular focus on the role of TOP2A and TOPBP1 in this process. PMID:26266709</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21910232','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21910232"><span>Two <span class="hlt">sisters</span> resembling Gorlin-Chaudhry-Moss syndrome.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Aravena, Teresa; Passalacqua, Cristóbal; Pizarro, Oscar; Aracena, Mariana</p> <p>2011-10-01</p> <p>The Gorlin-Chaudhry-Moss syndrome (GCMS), was describe initially by Gorlin et al. [Gorlin et al. (1960)] in two <span class="hlt">sisters</span> with craniosynostosis, hypertrichosis, hypoplastic labia majora, dental defects, eye anomalies, patent ductus arteriosus, and normal intelligence. Two other sporadic instances have been documented. Here, we report on two <span class="hlt">sisters</span> with a condition with some similarities to GCMS as well as some differences, which could represent either previously unreported variability in GCMS, or it may represent a novel disorder.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=death+AND+anxiety&pg=4&id=EJ332705','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=death+AND+anxiety&pg=4&id=EJ332705"><span><span class="hlt">Death</span> Imagery and <span class="hlt">Death</span> Anxiety.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>McDonald, Rita T.; Hilgendorf, William A.</p> <p>1986-01-01</p> <p>Investigated the relationship between <span class="hlt">death</span> imagery and <span class="hlt">death</span> anxiety among 179 undergraduate students. Results reveal subjects with low <span class="hlt">death</span> anxiety scores had more positive <span class="hlt">death</span> images. Subjects who imagined <span class="hlt">death</span> to be young had a more positive image of <span class="hlt">death</span>. <span class="hlt">Death</span> was seen as male by majority of respondents. (Author/BL)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5360625','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5360625"><span>A brother and <span class="hlt">sister</span> with breast cancer, BRCA2 mutations and bilateral supernumerary nipples</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Coad, Ryan</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>We describe a 54-year-old man with breast cancer and a BRCA2 mutation who was also found to have bilateral supernumerary nipples. His <span class="hlt">sister</span>, also with a BRCA2 mutation, was diagnosed with breast cancer in her late forties; she also had bilateral supernumerary nipples. We address the significance of breast cancer arising in breast tissue underlying supernumerary nipples; the known association between supernumerary nipples and genitourinary malignancies/malformations and the possible <span class="hlt">link</span> between BRCA2 and supernumerary nipple development. We believe that this is the first described case of the latter. We then outline an approach to further management for supernumerary nipple cases. PMID:28361071</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=263285','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=263285"><span>Bacteriological study of periodontal lesions in two <span class="hlt">sisters</span> with juvenile periodontitis and their mother.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Okuda, K; Naito, Y; Ohta, K; Fukumoto, Y; Kimura, Y; Ishikawa, I; Kinoshita, S; Takazoe, I</p> <p>1984-01-01</p> <p>A total of five bacteriological samples from the periodontal pockets of two <span class="hlt">sisters</span> with localized juvenile periodontitis and their mother with advanced periodontitis was studied. Gram-negative anaerobic rods were predominant in the samples. Bacteroides intermedius and Bacteroides loescheii were the most predominant species. The antigenicity and bacteriocinogenicity of these isolates were quite similar. Serum immunoglobulin G antibody levels of the subjects to gram-negative periodontopathic bacteria were measured by using the micro-enzyme-<span class="hlt">linked</span> immunosorbent assay. The levels of antibodies to saccharolytic black-pigmented Bacteroides species were significantly higher than the levels in healthy young females. Images PMID:6429040</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21142977','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21142977"><span>Geographic variance of cardiovascular risk factors among community women: the national <span class="hlt">Sister</span> to <span class="hlt">Sister</span> campaign.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Jarvie, Jennifer L; Johnson, Caitlin E; Wang, Yun; Wan, Yun; Aslam, Farhan; Athanasopoulos, Leonidas V; Pollin, Irene; Foody, JoAnne M</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>There are substantial variations in cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk and outcomes among women. We sought to determine geographic variation in risk factor prevalence in a contemporary sample of U.S. women. Using 2008-2009 <span class="hlt">Sister</span> to <span class="hlt">Sister</span> (STS) free heart screening data from 17 U.S. cities, we compared rates of obesity (body mass index [BMI] ≥30 kg/m(2)), hypertension (HTN ≥140/90 mm Hg), low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C <40 mg/dL), and hyperglycemia (≥126 mg/dL) with national rates. In 18,892 women (mean age 49.8 ± 14.3 years, 37% black, 32% white, 14% Hispanic), compared to overall STS rates, significantly higher rates were observed for obesity in Baltimore (42.4%), Atlanta (40.0%), Dallas (37.9%), and Jacksonville (36.0%); for HTN in Atlanta (43.9%), Baltimore (42.5%), and New York (39.1%); for hyperglycemia in Jacksonville (20.3%), Philadelphia (18.1%), and Tampa (17.8%); and for HDL-C <40 mg/dL in Phoenix (37.4%), Dallas (26.5%), and Jacksonville (18.1%). Compared to national American Heart Association (AHA) 2010 update rates, most STS cities had higher rates of hyperglycemia and low HDL-C. In a large, community-based sample of women nationwide, this comprehensive analysis shows remarkable geographic variation in risk factors, which provides opportunities to improve and reduce a woman's CVD risk. Further investigation is required to understand the reasons behind such variation, which will provide insight toward tailoring preventive interventions to narrow gaps in CVD risk reduction in women.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://pubs.usgs.gov/of/1999/0437/pdf/of1999-0437.pdf','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="https://pubs.usgs.gov/of/1999/0437/pdf/of1999-0437.pdf"><span>Volcano hazards in the Three <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> region, Oregon</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Scott, William E.; Iverson, R.M.; Schilling, S.P.; Fisher, B.J.</p> <p>2001-01-01</p> <p>Three <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> is one of three potentially active volcanic centers that lie close to rapidly growing communities and resort areas in Central Oregon. Two types of volcanoes exist in the Three <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> region and each poses distinct hazards to people and property. South <span class="hlt">Sister</span>, Middle <span class="hlt">Sister</span>, and Broken Top, major composite volcanoes clustered near the center of the region, have erupted repeatedly over tens of thousands of years and may erupt explosively in the future. In contrast, mafic volcanoes, which range from small cinder cones to large shield volcanoes like North <span class="hlt">Sister</span> and Belknap Crater, are typically short-lived (weeks to centuries) and erupt less explosively than do composite volcanoes. Hundreds of mafic volcanoes scattered through the Three <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> region are part of a much longer zone along the High Cascades of Oregon in which birth of new mafic volcanoes is possible. This report describes the types of hazardous events that can occur in the Three <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> region and the accompanying volcano-hazard-zonation map outlines areas that could be at risk from such events. Hazardous events include landslides from the steep flanks of large volcanoes and floods, which need not be triggered by eruptions, as well as eruption-triggered events such as fallout of tephra (volcanic ash) and lava flows. A proximal hazard zone roughly 20 kilometers (12 miles) in diameter surrounding the Three <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> and Broken Top could be affected within minutes of the onset of an eruption or large landslide. Distal hazard zones that follow river valleys downstream from the Three <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> and Broken Top could be inundated by lahars (rapid flows of water-laden rock and mud) generated either by melting of snow and ice during eruptions or by large landslides. Slow-moving lava flows could issue from new mafic volcanoes almost anywhere within the region. Fallout of tephra from eruption clouds can affect areas hundreds of kilometers (miles) downwind, so eruptions at volcanoes elsewhere in the</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10165751','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10165751"><span>Fulfilling the <span class="hlt">sisters</span>' promise. The heritage of healthcare's early days.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Friedman, E</p> <p>1997-01-01</p> <p>Members of religious orders--the <span class="hlt">sisters</span>--built not just Catholic healthcare, but healthcare in America. A good 50 years before Henry and Edgar Kaiser got the idea, prepaid capitated health insurance was being offered by <span class="hlt">sisters</span> who looked at what was needed and realized this was simply the best way to get it done. The <span class="hlt">sisters</span> also created the integrated healthcare system at a time when the emerging medical elite wanted nothing to do with any patient who was not socially acceptable and potentially curable. They arranged a continuum of care for the aging <span class="hlt">sisters</span> within their own communities. And they understood the concept of social medicine, of population-based healthcare, of healthy communities, long before these ideas became commonplace. But the <span class="hlt">sisters</span> are gone, most of them. The question today is, How do we preserve the <span class="hlt">sisters</span>' heritage and transfer it to a new millennium, a new healthcare system, and a new set of rules? First, it is important to understand that much of what we remember the <span class="hlt">sisters</span> for--courage, compassion, vision-was not unique. They created many of the structures that today are the new models; but they were not alone. However, three aspects of how they expressed their vision and their faith were unique to the <span class="hlt">sisters</span> and must be understood by those who wish to treat the path the <span class="hlt">sisters</span> blazed. The purity of their commitment and its underlying philosophy--that the helpless and the sick must always be the point of the exercise--should pervade Catholic healthcare to its soul. These women, living in poverty, represented, and still represent, a singular group: a group of women who, having told the world that their only wish is to serve others, humble became CEOs of vast systems and trustees of huge enterprises, without ever abandoning that simple, original pledge. Although they bowed to the rule of obedience, and they were humble, the were fighters. They spoke out against poverty, bigotry, the shunning of those with certain diseases, lack of</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2099466','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2099466"><span>Protein requirements for <span class="hlt">sister</span> telomere association in human cells</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Canudas, Silvia; Houghtaling, Benjamin R; Kim, Ju Youn; Dynek, Jasmin N; Chang, William G; Smith, Susan</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>Previous studies in human cells indicate that <span class="hlt">sister</span> telomeres have distinct requirements for their separation at mitosis. In cells depleted for tankyrase 1, a telomeric poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid arms and centromeres separate normally, but telomeres remain associated and cells arrest in mitosis. Here, we use biochemical and genetic approaches to identify proteins that might mediate the persistent association at <span class="hlt">sister</span> telomeres. We use immunoprecipitation analysis to show that the telomeric proteins, TRF1 (an acceptor of PARsylation by tankyrase 1) and TIN2 (a TRF1 binding partner) each bind to the SA1 ortholog of the cohesin Scc3 subunit. Sucrose gradient sedimentation shows that TRF1 cosediments with the SA1–cohesin complex. Depletion of the SA1 cohesin subunit or the telomeric proteins (TRF1 and TIN2) restores the normal resolution of <span class="hlt">sister</span> telomeres in mitosis in tankyrase 1-depleted cells. Moreover, depletion of TRF1 and TIN2 or SA1 abrogates the requirement for tankyrase 1 in mitotic progression. Our studies indicate that <span class="hlt">sister</span> telomere association in human cells is mediated by a novel association between a cohesin subunit and components of telomeric chromatin. PMID:17962804</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21826413','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21826413"><span>The template choice decision in meiosis: is the <span class="hlt">sister</span> important?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Pradillo, Mónica; Santos, Juan L</p> <p>2011-10-01</p> <p>Recombination between homologous chromosomes is crucial to ensure their proper segregation during meiosis. This is achieved by regulating the choice of recombination template. In mitotic cells, double-strand break repair with the <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid appears to be preferred, whereas interhomolog recombination is favoured during meiosis. However, in the last year, several studies in yeast have shown the importance of the meiotic recombination between <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids. Although this thinking seems to be new, evidences for <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchange during meiosis were obtained more than 50 years ago in non-model organisms. In this mini-review, we comment briefly on the most recent advances in this hot topic and also describe observations which suggest the existence of inter-<span class="hlt">sister</span> repair during meiotic recombination. For instance, the behaviour of mammalian XY bivalents and that of trivalents in heterozygotes for chromosomal rearrangements are cited as examples. The "rediscovering" of the requirement for the <span class="hlt">sister</span> template, although it seems to occur at a low frequency, will probably prompt further investigations in organisms other than yeast to understand the complexity of the partner choice during meiosis.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27618205','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27618205"><span>little <span class="hlt">sister</span>: An Afro-Temporal Solo-Play.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>De Berry, Misty</p> <p>2016-09-12</p> <p>little <span class="hlt">sister</span>: An Afro-Temporal Solo-Play is at once a memory-scape and a mytho-biography set to poetry, movement, and mixed media. A performance poem spanning from the Antebellum South to present-moment Chicago, it tells the story of a nomadic spirit named little-she who shape-shifts through the memories and imaginings of her <span class="hlt">sister</span>, the narrator. Through the characters little-she and the narrator, the solo-performance explores embodied ways to rupture and relieve the impact of macro forms of violence in the micro realm of the everyday. To this end, little <span class="hlt">sister</span> witnesses and disrupts the legacy of violence in the lives of queer Black women through a trans-temporal navigation of everyday encounters within familial, small groups and intimate partner spaces.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23574717','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23574717"><span><span class="hlt">Sister</span> chromatid segregation in meiosis II: deprotection through phosphorylation.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Wassmann, Katja</p> <p>2013-05-01</p> <p>Meiotic divisions (meiosis I and II) are specialized cell divisions to generate haploid gametes. The first meiotic division with the separation of chromosomes is named reductional division. The second division, which takes place immediately after meiosis I without intervening S-phase, is equational, with the separation of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids, similar to mitosis. This meiotic segregation pattern requires the two-step removal of the cohesin complex holding <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids together: cohesin is removed from chromosome arms that have been subjected to homologous recombination in meiosis I and from the centromere region in meiosis II. Cohesin in the centromere region is protected from removal in meiosis I, but this protection has to be removed--deprotected--for <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid segregation in meiosis II. Whereas the mechanisms of cohesin protection are quite well understood, the mechanisms of deprotection have been largely unknown until recently. In this review I summarize our current knowledge on cohesin deprotection.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22144223','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22144223"><span>Familial acromegaly - case study of two <span class="hlt">sisters</span> with acromegaly.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Malicka, Joanna; Świrska, Joanna; Nowakowski, Andrzej</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>In the majority of cases, acromegaly is sporadic. However, it can also occur in a familial setting as a component of MEN-1, MEN-4, Carney complex (CNC) or as the extremely rare syndrome of isolated familial somatotropinoma (IFS), the latter belonging to familial isolated pituitary adenomas (FIPA). The diagnosis of IFS is based on the recognition of acromegaly/gigantism in at least two family members, given that the family is not affected by MEN-1, MEN-4 or CNC. The authors present a case study of two <span class="hlt">sisters</span>: a 56 year-old patient (case no. 1) and a 61 year-old patient (case no. 2). In both <span class="hlt">sisters</span>, acromegaly was recognised in the course of pituitary macroadenoma. Neither of the <span class="hlt">sisters</span> showed features of MEN-1, MEN-4 or Carney complex. The authors suppose that the presented cases are manifestations of IFS. However, this diagnosis has not been confirmed yet because of the poor availability of genetic tests.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22229665','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22229665"><span>Parallel phylogeographic structure in ecologically similar sympatric <span class="hlt">sister</span> taxa.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Dawson, Michael N</p> <p>2012-02-01</p> <p>Present-day phylogeographic patterns have been shaped by the dual histories of lineages and places, producing a diversity of relationships that may challenge discovery of general rules. For example, the predicted positive correlation between dispersal ability and gene flow has been supported inconsistently, suggesting unaccounted complexity in theory or the comparative framework. Here, I extend the sympatric <span class="hlt">sister</span>-species approach, in which variance between lineages and places is minimized, to <span class="hlt">sister</span> clades and test a fundamental assumption of comparative genetic studies of dispersal: that taxa which evolved at the same time and in the same place will, if they have similar life histories and ecologies, have essentially the same phylogeographic structure. Phylogenetic analyses of 197 Stigmatopora pipefishes using two nuclear (creatine kinase intron 6, α-tropomyosin) and two mitochondrial (16S, noncoding region) loci revealed largely synchronous parallel diversification of <span class="hlt">sister</span> clades that are codistributed from Western Australia to New Zealand, supporting the null hypothesis. Only one comparison, however, yielded a sympatric <span class="hlt">sister</span>-species pair (the two stem species), so I also explored the potential for extant species sharing a substantial proportion of their evolutionary histories in sympatry to substitute for <span class="hlt">sister</span> taxon comparisons. In eastern Australia, where strong environmental structure is lacking, phylogeographic differences between species that have been codistributed for ~85% of their evolutionary histories were consistent with tendencies favoured by their modest life-history differences, that is the larger, rarer species had lower genetic diversity. In contrast, in New Zealand, two species codistributed for ~70% of their evolutionary histories were both structured similarly by a strong biogeographic filter despite differences in life history. Rigorously quantifying the influence of intrinsic and extrinsic factors on phylogeographic structure may</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19218843','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19218843"><span>Catholic <span class="hlt">sister</span> nurses in Selma, Alabama, 1940-1972.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Wall, Barbra Mann</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>This study analyzes the activities of religious <span class="hlt">sister</span> nurses as they confronted racism in the American South from 1940 to 1972. Selma was chosen as a case study because, in the 1960s, events in that southern town marked a turning point in the civil rights movement in the United States. This is a story about the workings of gender, race, religion, and nursing. The <span class="hlt">sisters</span>' work demonstrates how an analysis of race in nursing history is incomplete without an understanding of the roles that a number of Catholic religious women took in reaching out to African Americans in the Deep South.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9780920','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9780920"><span>Japanese <span class="hlt">sisters</span> with Pfeiffer syndrome and achondroplasia: a mutation analysis.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Nagase, T; Nagase, M; Hirose, S; Ohmori, K</p> <p>1998-09-01</p> <p>The authors report the rare existence of a family that includes an older <span class="hlt">sister</span> with Pfeiffer syndrome and a younger <span class="hlt">sister</span> with achondroplasia. Gene analysis of these patients showed a T341P mutation in the FGFR2 gene in the patient with Pfeiffer syndrome, and a G380R mutation in the FGFR3 gene in the patient with achondroplasia. Both mutations have been reported previously. Their parents had no mutation in either locus. This result suggests the possibility that there may be predisposing factors for different FGFR mutations.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li class="active"><span>7</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_7 --> <div id="page_8" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li class="active"><span>8</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="141"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12557736','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12557736"><span>The Essene's <span class="hlt">sister</span> sect in Egypt: another medical site?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Moss, G A</p> <p>2002-12-01</p> <p>The Essenes were, allegedly, the authors of the Dead Sea Scrolls and were settled by the Dead Sea. An ancient source locates their <span class="hlt">sister</span> sect, The 'Therapeutae', as being by the shores of Lake Mareotis in Egypt. No scholar has previously sought to locate where exactly on Lake Mareotis they were settled. Using clues from Essene sites around the Dead Sea, an attempt is made to suggest a specific location for the Therapeutae. Since there are signs of medical activity at many of the Essene sites, a site with medical association is also sought for the location of the Essene's <span class="hlt">sister</span> sect in Egypt. A suitable site is found at Canopus.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27120695','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27120695"><span>Separase Is Required for Homolog and <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Disjunction during Drosophila melanogaster Male Meiosis, but Not for Biorientation of <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Centromeres.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Blattner, Ariane C; Chaurasia, Soumya; McKee, Bruce D; Lehner, Christian F</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>Spatially controlled release of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid cohesion during progression through the meiotic divisions is of paramount importance for error-free chromosome segregation during meiosis. Cohesion is mediated by the cohesin protein complex and cleavage of one of its subunits by the endoprotease separase removes cohesin first from chromosome arms during exit from meiosis I and later from the pericentromeric region during exit from meiosis II. At the onset of the meiotic divisions, cohesin has also been proposed to be present within the centromeric region for the unification of <span class="hlt">sister</span> centromeres into a single functional entity, allowing bipolar orientation of paired homologs within the meiosis I spindle. Separase-mediated removal of centromeric cohesin during exit from meiosis I might explain <span class="hlt">sister</span> centromere individualization which is essential for subsequent biorientation of <span class="hlt">sister</span> centromeres during meiosis II. To characterize a potential involvement of separase in <span class="hlt">sister</span> centromere individualization before meiosis II, we have studied meiosis in Drosophila melanogaster males where homologs are not paired in the canonical manner. Meiosis does not include meiotic recombination and synaptonemal complex formation in these males. Instead, an alternative homolog conjunction system keeps homologous chromosomes in pairs. Using independent strategies for spermatocyte-specific depletion of separase complex subunits in combination with time-lapse imaging, we demonstrate that separase is required for the inactivation of this alternative conjunction at anaphase I onset. Mutations that abolish alternative homolog conjunction therefore result in random segregation of univalents during meiosis I also after separase depletion. Interestingly, these univalents become bioriented during meiosis II, suggesting that <span class="hlt">sister</span> centromere individualization before meiosis II does not require separase.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4847790','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4847790"><span>Separase Is Required for Homolog and <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Disjunction during Drosophila melanogaster Male Meiosis, but Not for Biorientation of <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Centromeres</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Blattner, Ariane C.; McKee, Bruce D.; Lehner, Christian F.</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Spatially controlled release of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid cohesion during progression through the meiotic divisions is of paramount importance for error-free chromosome segregation during meiosis. Cohesion is mediated by the cohesin protein complex and cleavage of one of its subunits by the endoprotease separase removes cohesin first from chromosome arms during exit from meiosis I and later from the pericentromeric region during exit from meiosis II. At the onset of the meiotic divisions, cohesin has also been proposed to be present within the centromeric region for the unification of <span class="hlt">sister</span> centromeres into a single functional entity, allowing bipolar orientation of paired homologs within the meiosis I spindle. Separase-mediated removal of centromeric cohesin during exit from meiosis I might explain <span class="hlt">sister</span> centromere individualization which is essential for subsequent biorientation of <span class="hlt">sister</span> centromeres during meiosis II. To characterize a potential involvement of separase in <span class="hlt">sister</span> centromere individualization before meiosis II, we have studied meiosis in Drosophila melanogaster males where homologs are not paired in the canonical manner. Meiosis does not include meiotic recombination and synaptonemal complex formation in these males. Instead, an alternative homolog conjunction system keeps homologous chromosomes in pairs. Using independent strategies for spermatocyte-specific depletion of separase complex subunits in combination with time-lapse imaging, we demonstrate that separase is required for the inactivation of this alternative conjunction at anaphase I onset. Mutations that abolish alternative homolog conjunction therefore result in random segregation of univalents during meiosis I also after separase depletion. Interestingly, these univalents become bioriented during meiosis II, suggesting that <span class="hlt">sister</span> centromere individualization before meiosis II does not require separase. PMID:27120695</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28490282','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28490282"><span><span class="hlt">Death</span> Cafe.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Miles, Lizzy; Corr, Charles A</p> <p>2017-06-01</p> <p>This article explains the meaning of the phrase <span class="hlt">Death</span> Cafe and describes what typically occurs at a <span class="hlt">Death</span> Cafe gathering. The article traces the history of the <span class="hlt">Death</span> Cafe movement, explores some reasons why people take part in a <span class="hlt">Death</span> Cafe gathering, and gives examples of what individuals think they might derive from their participation. In addition, this article notes similarities between the <span class="hlt">Death</span> Cafe movement and three other developments in the field of <span class="hlt">death</span>, dying, and bereavement. Finally, this article identifies two provisional lessons that can be drawn from <span class="hlt">Death</span> Cafe gatherings and the <span class="hlt">Death</span> Cafe movement itself.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=freud&id=EJ827914','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=freud&id=EJ827914"><span>Freud on Brothers and <span class="hlt">Sisters</span>: A Neglected Topic</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Sherwin-White, Susan</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>This paper explores Freud's developing thought on brothers and <span class="hlt">sisters</span>, and their importance in his psychoanalytical writings and clinical work. Freud's work on sibling psychology has been seriously undervalued. This paper aims to give due recognition to Freud's work in this area. (Contains 1 note.)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=freud&id=EJ827914','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=freud&id=EJ827914"><span>Freud on Brothers and <span class="hlt">Sisters</span>: A Neglected Topic</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Sherwin-White, Susan</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>This paper explores Freud's developing thought on brothers and <span class="hlt">sisters</span>, and their importance in his psychoanalytical writings and clinical work. Freud's work on sibling psychology has been seriously undervalued. This paper aims to give due recognition to Freud's work in this area. (Contains 1 note.)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11102820','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11102820"><span><span class="hlt">Sister</span> chromatid separation: falling apart at the seams.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Cohen-Fix, O</p> <p>2000-11-16</p> <p>Cohesion between <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids must be dissolved at the time of chromosome segregation. Recent studies reveal that the principles of cohesion dissolution in mitosis and meiosis are the same, but that there are important differences that stem from the distinct natures of these two processes.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title46-vol7/pdf/CFR-2010-title46-vol7-sec177-210.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title46-vol7/pdf/CFR-2010-title46-vol7-sec177-210.pdf"><span>46 CFR 177.210 - Plans for <span class="hlt">sister</span> vessels.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-10-01</p> <p>... at the Marine Safety Center or in the files of the cognizant OCMI; (2) The owner of the plans... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Plans for <span class="hlt">sister</span> vessels. 177.210 Section 177.210 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title46-vol4/pdf/CFR-2012-title46-vol4-sec116-210.pdf','CFR2012'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title46-vol4/pdf/CFR-2012-title46-vol4-sec116-210.pdf"><span>46 CFR 116.210 - Plans for <span class="hlt">sister</span> vessels.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-10-01</p> <p>... vessel, provided: (1) Approved plans for the original vessel are on file at the Marine Safety Center or.... (b) If approved plans for original vessel are not on file at the Marine Safety Center (MSC) or with... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Plans for <span class="hlt">sister</span> vessels. 116.210 Section...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title46-vol7/pdf/CFR-2014-title46-vol7-sec177-210.pdf','CFR2014'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title46-vol7/pdf/CFR-2014-title46-vol7-sec177-210.pdf"><span>46 CFR 177.210 - Plans for <span class="hlt">sister</span> vessels.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-10-01</p> <p>... at the Marine Safety Center or in the files of the cognizant OCMI; (2) The owner of the plans... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Plans for <span class="hlt">sister</span> vessels. 177.210 Section 177.210 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20352243','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20352243"><span><span class="hlt">Sister</span> chromatid resolution: a cohesin releasing network and beyond.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Shintomi, Keishi; Hirano, Tatsuya</p> <p>2010-10-01</p> <p>When chromosomes start to assemble in mitotic prophase, duplicated chromatids are not discernible within each chromosome. As condensation proceeds, they gradually show up, culminating in two rod-shaped structures apposed along their entire length within a metaphase chromosome. This process, known as <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid resolution, is thought to be a prerequisite for rapid and synchronous separation of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids in anaphase. From a mechanistic point of view, the resolution process can be dissected into three distinct steps: (1) release of cohesin from chromosome arms; (2) formation of chromatid axes mediated by condensins; and (3) untanglement of inter-<span class="hlt">sister</span> catenation catalyzed by topoisomerase II (topo II). In this review article, we summarize recent progress in our understanding the molecular mechanisms of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid resolution with a major focus on its first step, cohesin release. An emerging idea is that this seemingly simple step is regulated by an intricate network of positive and negative factors, including cohesin-binding proteins and mitotic kinases. Interestingly, some key factors responsible for cohesin release in early mitosis also play important roles in controlling cohesin functions during interphase. Finally, we discuss how the step of cohesin release might mechanistically be coordinated with the actions of condensins and topo II.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2766539','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2766539"><span>Precocious <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Chromatid Separation (PSCS) in Cornelia de Lange Syndrome</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Kaur, Maninder; DeScipio, Cheryl; McCallum, Jennifer; Yaeger, Dinah; Devoto, Marcella; Jackson, Laird G.; Spinner, Nancy B.; Krantz, Ian D.</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>The Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) (OMIM# 122470) is a dominantly inherited multisystem developmental disorder. The phenotype consists of characteristic facial features, hirsutism, abnormalities of the upper extremities ranging from subtle changes in the phalanges and metacarpal bones to oligodactyly and phocomelia, gastroesophageal dysfunction, growth retardation, and neurodevelopmental delay. Prevalence is estimated to be as high as 1 in 10,000. Recently, mutations in NIPBL were identified in sporadic and familial CdLS cases. To date, mutations in this gene have been identified in over 45% of individuals with CdLS. NIPBL is the human homolog of the Drosophila Nipped-B gene. Although its function in mammalian systems has not yet been elucidated, sequence homologs of Nipped-B in yeast (Scc2 and Mis4) are required for <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid cohesion during mitosis, and a similar role was recently demonstrated for Nipped-B in Drosophila. In order to evaluate NIPBL role in <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid cohesion in humans, metaphase spreads on 90 probands (40 NIPBL mutation positive and 50 NIPBL mutation negative) with CdLS were evaluated for evidence of precocious <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid separation (PSCS). We screened 50 metaphases from each proband and found evidence of PSCS in 41% (compared to 9% in control samples). These studies indicate that NIPBL may play a role in <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid cohesion in humans as has been reported for its homologs in Drosophila and yeast. PMID:16100726</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=relationship&pg=7&id=EJ1069817','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=relationship&pg=7&id=EJ1069817"><span>Adult Sibling Relationships with Brothers and <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> with Severe Disabilities</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Rossetti, Zach; Hall, Sarah</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>The purpose of this qualitative study was to examine perceptions of adult sibling relationships with a brother or <span class="hlt">sister</span> with severe disabilities and the contexts affecting the relationships. Adult siblings without disabilities (N = 79) from 19 to 72 years of age completed an online survey with four open-ended questions about their relationship…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20524537','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20524537"><span>Letters from a suicide: Van Gogh and his <span class="hlt">sister</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Lester, David</p> <p>2010-04-01</p> <p>An analysis of trends over a 3-yr. period in the letters of Vincent Van Gogh to his <span class="hlt">sister</span> as the time of his suicide approached identified 8 trends, including an increase in words concerned with anxiety and words concerned with the past.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5193219','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5193219"><span>Analysis of meiotic <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid cohesion in Caenorhabditis elegans</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Severson, Aaron F.</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>In sexually reproducing organisms, the formation of healthy gametes (sperm and eggs) requires the proper establishment and release of meiotic <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid cohesion (SCC). SCC tethers replicated <span class="hlt">sisters</span> from their formation in premeiotic S phase until the stepwise removal of cohesion in anaphase of meiosis I and II allows the separation of homologs and then <span class="hlt">sisters</span>. Defects in the establishment or release of meiotic cohesion cause chromosome segregation errors that lead to the formation of aneuploid gametes and inviable embryos. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is an excellent model for studies of meiotic <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid cohesion due to its genetic tractability and the excellent cytological properties of the hermaphrodite gonad. Moreover, mutants defective in the establishment or maintenance of meiotic SCC nevertheless produce abundant gametes, allowing analysis of the pattern of chromosome segregation. Here I will describe two approaches for analysis of meiotic cohesion in C. elegans. The first approach relies on cytology to detect and quantify defects in SCC. The second approach relies on PCR and restriction digests to identify embryos that inherited an incorrect complement of chromosomes due to aberrant meiotic chromosome segregation. Both approaches are sensitive enough to identify rare errors and precise enough to reveal distinctive phenotypes resulting from mutations that perturb meiotic SCC in different ways. The robust, quantitative nature of these assays should strengthen phenotypic comparisons of different meiotic mutants and enhance the reproducibility of data generated by different investigators. PMID:27797074</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Bryn&pg=3&id=EJ566969','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Bryn&pg=3&id=EJ566969"><span>The Racial Integration of the Seven <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Colleges.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Perkins, Linda M.</p> <p>1998-01-01</p> <p>Although the number of African-American women who attended the elite Seven <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> colleges prior to 1900 was small, these women were highly influential. Early integration is discussed for: (1) Wellesley College; (2) Radcliffe College; (3) Smith College; (4) Mount Holyoke College; (5) Bryn Mawr College; (6) Vassar College; and (7) Barnard College.…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=relationships&pg=5&id=EJ1069817','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=relationships&pg=5&id=EJ1069817"><span>Adult Sibling Relationships with Brothers and <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> with Severe Disabilities</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Rossetti, Zach; Hall, Sarah</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>The purpose of this qualitative study was to examine perceptions of adult sibling relationships with a brother or <span class="hlt">sister</span> with severe disabilities and the contexts affecting the relationships. Adult siblings without disabilities (N = 79) from 19 to 72 years of age completed an online survey with four open-ended questions about their relationship…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21448804','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21448804"><span><span class="hlt">Sister</span> Mary Joseph's nodule that originated from lung adenocarcinoma.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Haruki, Tomohiro; Nakamura, Hiroshige; Kubouchi, Yasuaki; Taniguchi, Yuji; Miwa, Ken; Adachi, Yoshin; Fujioka, Shinji; Ito, Hisao</p> <p>2011-03-01</p> <p>Umbilical metastasis of cancer, known as <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Mary Joseph's nodule (SMJN), is a rare phenomenon. It is usually due to intraabdominal malignancies and is quite rare from lung cancer. Here we describe a case of SMJN that originated from advanced lung adenocarcinoma. SMJN should be noted as an important sign of some hidden malignancy including lung cancer.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED355467.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED355467.pdf"><span>Hearing My Mother's Voice: A Study of <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> and Mothers.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Morris, Beverley</p> <p></p> <p>There seems to be an assumption among many people that parents can mold the later adult personality of their offspring by manipulating their childhood upbringing. To tease out the variables in childrearing and to discover some of the sources of the childbearing practices of mothers in the 1980s, a study of <span class="hlt">sisters</span> and their mothers (N=48) in the…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15120415','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15120415"><span>Comparing breast cancer risk between lesbians and their heterosexual <span class="hlt">sisters</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Dibble, Suzanne L; Roberts, Stephanie A; Nussey, Brenda</p> <p>2004-01-01</p> <p>The purpose of this study was to explore the similarities and differences between lesbians and their heterosexual <span class="hlt">sisters</span> in the established risks for developing breast cancer. The design for this study was a matched (lesbian with heterosexual <span class="hlt">sister</span>) cross-sectional, mail-back, anonymous survey. We distributed the surveys throughout the state of California to English-speaking women who identified themselves as lesbians, age 40 and older, and their <span class="hlt">sisters</span>. Using the modified Gail Breast Cancer Risk model as well as other well-established factors associated with the development of breast cancer, we compared the breast cancer risk potential for 324 <span class="hlt">sister</span> pairs (N = 648). Data were analyzed using paired t-tests, analysis of covariance (ANCOVA), McNemar's chi(2), or the Bowker statistic, as appropriate for the level of data. The lesbians had significantly higher 5-year (p <.0001) and lifetime (p =.001) risk for developing breast cancer. The reasons for lesbians' predicted rate of breast cancer were most likely their higher scores on all pregnancy-related variables and the relatively high number of breast biopsies they reported. The lesbians had used birth control pills less (p <. 0001), had significantly fewer pregnancies (p <.0001), children (p <.0001), abortions (p <.0001), and miscarriages (p <.0001) as well as significantly more breast biopsies (p =.02) than did their heterosexual <span class="hlt">sisters</span>. A lesbian who comes out to her clinician is relying on the clinician to be informed and be open to discuss her life. When a lesbian has a lump or a suspicious mammogram, she needs her clinician to advocate for her within the health care system because she is at higher risk for having cancer than a heterosexual woman.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li class="active"><span>8</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_8 --> <div id="page_9" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li class="active"><span>9</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="161"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19893489','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19893489"><span>Tipin/Tim1/And1 protein complex promotes Pol alpha chromatin binding and <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid cohesion.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Errico, Alessia; Cosentino, Claudia; Rivera, Teresa; Losada, Ana; Schwob, Etienne; Hunt, Tim; Costanzo, Vincenzo</p> <p>2009-12-02</p> <p>The Tipin/Tim1 complex plays an important role in the S-phase checkpoint and replication fork stability. However, the biochemical function of this complex is poorly understood. Using Xenopus laevis egg extract we show that Tipin is required for DNA replication in the presence of limiting amount of replication origins. Under these conditions the DNA replication defect correlates with decreased levels of DNA Polalpha on chromatin. We identified And1, a Polalpha chromatin-loading factor, as new Tipin-binding partner. We found that both Tipin and And1 promote stable binding of Polalpha to chromatin and that this is required for DNA replication under unchallenged conditions. Strikingly, extracts lacking Tipin and And1 also show reduced <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids cohesion. These data indicate that Tipin/Tim1/And1 form a complex that <span class="hlt">links</span> stabilization of replication fork and establishment of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid cohesion.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26634863','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26634863"><span>Iatrogenic and sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in 2 <span class="hlt">sisters</span> without mutation in the prion protein gene.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Frontzek, Karl; Moos, Rita; Schaper, Elke; Jann, Lukas; Herfs, Gregor; Zimmermann, Dieter R; Aguzzi, Adriano; Budka, Herbert</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Human genetic prion diseases have invariably been <span class="hlt">linked</span> to alterations of the prion protein (PrP) gene PRNP. Two <span class="hlt">sisters</span> died from probable Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) in Switzerland within 14 y. At autopsy, both patients had typical spongiform change in their brains accompanied by punctuate deposits of PrP. Biochemical analyses demonstrated proteinase K-resistant PrP. Sequencing of PRNP showed 2 wild-type alleles in both siblings. Retrospectively, clinical data revealed a history of dural transplantation in the initially deceased <span class="hlt">sister</span>, compatible with a diagnosis of iatrogenic CJD. Clinical and familial histories provided no evidence for potential horizontal transmission. This observation of 2 siblings suffering from CJD without mutations in the PRNP gene suggests potential involvement of non-PRNP genes in prion disease etiology.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23747271','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23747271"><span>Radiation-induced mitotic cell <span class="hlt">death</span> and glioblastoma radioresistance: a new regulating pathway controlled by integrin-<span class="hlt">linked</span> kinase, hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha and survivin in U87 cells.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Lanvin, Olivia; Monferran, Sylvie; Delmas, Caroline; Couderc, Bettina; Toulas, Christine; Cohen-Jonathan-Moyal, Elizabeth</p> <p>2013-09-01</p> <p>We have previously shown that integrin-<span class="hlt">linked</span> kinase (ILK) regulates U87 glioblastoma cell radioresistance by modulating the main radiation-induced cell <span class="hlt">death</span> mechanism in solid tumours, the mitotic cell <span class="hlt">death</span>. To decipher the biological pathways involved in these mechanisms, we constructed a U87 glioblastoma cell model expressing an inducible shRNA directed against ILK (U87shILK). We then demonstrated that silencing ILK enhanced radiation-induced centrosome overduplication, leading to radiation-induced mitotic cell <span class="hlt">death</span>. In this model, ionising radiations induce hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1α) stabilisation which is inhibited by silencing ILK. Moreover, silencing HIF-1α in U87 cells reduced the surviving fraction after 2 Gy irradiation by increasing cell sensitivity to radiation-induced mitotic cell <span class="hlt">death</span> and centrosome amplification. Because it is known that HIF-1α controls survivin expression, we then looked at the ILK silencing effect on survivin expression. We show that survivin expression is decreased in U87shILK cells. Furthermore, treating U87 cells with the specific survivin suppressor YM155 significantly increased the percentage of giant multinucleated cells, centrosomal overduplication and thus U87 cell radiosensitivity. In consequence, we decipher here a new pathway of glioma radioresistance via the regulation of radiation-induced centrosome duplication and therefore mitotic cell <span class="hlt">death</span> by ILK, HIF-1α and survivin. This work identifies new targets in glioblastoma with the intention of radiosensitising these highly radioresistant tumours. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3960080','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3960080"><span>Sibling Conversations about Dating and Sexuality: <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> as Confidants, Sources of Support, and Mentors</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Killoren, Sarah E.; Roach, Andrea L.</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Using an observational methodology to examine sibling communication, <span class="hlt">sisters</span> (N = 28 dyads) were videotaped discussing their ideas about dating and sexuality. Social provision theory was used as a framework for the examination of roles enacted by <span class="hlt">sisters</span> during these conversations. Inductive thematic analytic procedures were conducted and three roles were identified: <span class="hlt">sisters</span> as confidants, sources of support, and mentors. Older and younger <span class="hlt">sisters</span> both served as confidants and sources of support for one another, whereas, older <span class="hlt">sisters</span> were more likely to be mentors for their younger <span class="hlt">sisters</span> than vice versa. Findings indicate the potential importance of <span class="hlt">sisters</span> in the formation of adolescent girls’ ideas about romantic relationships and sexuality, sibling communication as a socialization mechanism of sisters’ similarities in romantic experiences and sexual behaviors/attitudes, and the inclusion of older <span class="hlt">sisters</span> in prevention intervention programs focused on reducing adolescent sexual risk behaviors and promoting healthy romantic relationships and sexuality development. PMID:24659843</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://pubs.usgs.gov/sim/3186/data/pdf/sim3186_pamphlet.pdf','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="https://pubs.usgs.gov/sim/3186/data/pdf/sim3186_pamphlet.pdf"><span>Geologic map of Three <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> volcanic cluster, Cascade Range, Oregon</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Hildreth, Wes; Fierstein, Judy; Calvert, Andrew T.</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>The cluster of glaciated stratovolcanoes called the Three Sisters—South <span class="hlt">Sister</span>, Middle <span class="hlt">Sister</span>, and North Sister—forms a spectacular 20-km-long reach along the crest of the Cascade Range in Oregon. The three eponymous stratocones, though contiguous and conventionally lumped sororally, could hardly display less family resemblance. North <span class="hlt">Sister</span> (10,085 ft), a monotonously mafic edifice at least as old as 120 ka, is a glacially ravaged stratocone that consists of hundreds of thin rubbly lava flows and intercalated falls that dip radially and steeply; remnants of two thick lava flows cap its summit. Middle <span class="hlt">Sister</span> (10,047 ft), an andesite-basalt-dacite cone built between 48 and 14 ka, is capped by a thick stack of radially dipping, dark-gray, thin mafic lava flows; asymmetrically glaciated, its nearly intact west flank contrasts sharply with its steep east face. Snow and ice-filled South <span class="hlt">Sister</span> is a bimodal rhyolitic-intermediate edifice that was constructed between 50 ka and 2 ka; its crater (rim at 10,358 ft) was created between 30 and 22 ka, during the most recent of several explosive summit eruptions; the thin oxidized agglutinate that mantles its current crater rim protects a 150-m-thick pyroclastic sequence that helped fill a much larger crater. For each of the three, the eruptive volume is likely to have been in the range of 15 to 25 km³, but such estimates are fairly uncertain, owing to glacial erosion. The map area consists exclusively of Quaternary volcanic rocks and derivative surficial deposits. Although most of the area has been modified by glaciation, the volcanoes are young enough that the landforms remain largely constructional. Furthermore, twelve of the 145 eruptive units on the map are postglacial, younger than the deglaciation that was underway by about 17 ka. The most recent eruptions were of rhyolite near South <span class="hlt">Sister</span>, about 2,000 years ago, and of mafic magma near McKenzie Pass, about 1,500 years ago. As observed by trailblazing volcanologist</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19634503','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19634503"><span>Voodoo <span class="hlt">death</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Lester, David</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>Scholarly writing on voodoo <span class="hlt">death</span> is reviewed. Criticisms that voodoo <span class="hlt">deaths</span> in indigenous societies have never been well documented are refuted with cases medically documented in developed nations. The work of Cannon and Richter on sudden <span class="hlt">death</span> in animals is reviewed and dismissed as irrelevant for understanding voodoo <span class="hlt">death</span>. The role of starvation and dehydration is discussed, and it is suggested that the given-up/giving-up hypothesis best fits the phenomenon of voodoo <span class="hlt">death</span>. Hypotheses for future research are suggested.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28965491','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28965491"><span>Compound heterozygous mutations in UBA5 causing early-onset epileptic encephalopathy in two <span class="hlt">sisters</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Arnadottir, Gudny A; Jensson, Brynjar O; Marelsson, Sigurdur E; Sulem, Gerald; Oddsson, Asmundur; Kristjansson, Ragnar P; Benonisdottir, Stefania; Gudjonsson, Sigurjon A; Masson, Gisli; Thorisson, Gudmundur A; Saemundsdottir, Jona; Magnusson, Olafur Th; Jonasdottir, Adalbjorg; Jonasdottir, Aslaug; Sigurdsson, Asgeir; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Arngrimsson, Reynir; Sulem, Patrick; Stefansson, Kari</p> <p>2017-10-02</p> <p>Epileptic encephalopathies are a group of childhood epilepsies that display high phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity. The recent, extensive use of next-generation sequencing has identified a large number of genes in epileptic encephalopathies, including UBA5 in which biallelic mutations were first described as pathogenic in 2016 (Colin E et al., Am J Hum Genet 99(3):695-703, 2016. Muona M et al., Am J Hum Genet 99(3):683-694, 2016). UBA5 encodes an activating enzyme for a post-translational modification mechanism known as ufmylation, and is the first gene from the ufmylation pathway that is <span class="hlt">linked</span> to disease. We sequenced the genomes of two <span class="hlt">sisters</span> with early-onset epileptic encephalopathy along with their unaffected parents in an attempt to find a genetic cause for their condition. The <span class="hlt">sisters</span>, born in 2004 and 2006, presented with infantile spasms at six months of age, which later progressed to recurrent, treatment-resistant seizures. We detected a compound heterozygous genotype in UBA5 in the <span class="hlt">sisters</span>, a genotype not seen elsewhere in an Icelandic reference set of 30,067 individuals nor in public databases. One of the mutations, c.684G > A, is a paternally inherited exonic splicing mutation, occuring at the last nucleotide of exon 7 of UBA5. The mutation is predicted to disrupt the splice site, resulting in loss-of-function of one allele of UBA5. The second mutation is a maternally inherited missense mutation, p.Ala371Thr, previously reported as pathogenic when in compound heterozygosity with a loss-of-function mutation in UBA5 and is believed to produce a hypomorphic allele. Supportive of this, we have identified three adult Icelanders homozygous for the p.Ala371Thr mutation who show no signs of neurological disease. We describe compound heterozygous mutations in the UBA5 gene in two <span class="hlt">sisters</span> with early-onset epileptic encephalopathy. To our knowledge, this is the first description of mutations in UBA5 since the initial discovery that pathogenic biallelic</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=social+AND+cognition+AND+sexual&pg=2&id=EJ906857','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=social+AND+cognition+AND+sexual&pg=2&id=EJ906857"><span>Testing of the "Healthy 'Little' Lives Project": A Training Program for Big <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Mentors</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Kaufman, Michelle R.</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Big Brothers/Big <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> is a national program aimed at providing mentors for disadvantaged children. This study tested whether Big <span class="hlt">Sister</span> mentors could be trained to increase communication with their Little <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> about sexual health issues. The study tested an intervention based on social cognitive theory in which a sexual health communication…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=%22peer+pressure%22&pg=5&id=EJ906857','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=%22peer+pressure%22&pg=5&id=EJ906857"><span>Testing of the "Healthy 'Little' Lives Project": A Training Program for Big <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Mentors</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Kaufman, Michelle R.</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Big Brothers/Big <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> is a national program aimed at providing mentors for disadvantaged children. This study tested whether Big <span class="hlt">Sister</span> mentors could be trained to increase communication with their Little <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> about sexual health issues. The study tested an intervention based on social cognitive theory in which a sexual health communication…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16700831','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16700831"><span>Chromosome and <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchange studies in Behcet's patients.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Oztas, Sitki; Gullulu, Gulay; Tatar, Abdulgani; Astam, Neslihan; Akyol, Ilknur; Karakuzu, Ali; Aktas, Akin; Odabas, Ali Riza</p> <p>2006-06-01</p> <p>Behcet's disease is a chronic multisystemic disease of unknown pathogenesis characterized by four major symptoms: oral aphthous ulcers, skin lesions, ocular symptoms and genital ulcerations. The disease is spread throughout the world, but it is most frequent in Turkey, Japan, Korea and China. Although HLA-Bw51 has been found to predominate in Behcet's cases, the genetic etiology has not yet been clarified. In this study, we investigated the chromosomal abnormalities and <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchange rates in patients with Behcet's diseases. Thirty-eight patients with Behcet's disease (diagnosed for the first time) and 30 healthy subjects (as controls) were included in this study. Although numerical and structural chromosomal abnormalities were not detected in our patients, we found an increased rate of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchange in patients over the control groups (P < 0.01). On the basis of these results, we discuss the genetic etiology of Behcet's disease.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1922223','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1922223"><span>Idiopathic Steatorrhea Presenting with Different Manifestations in <span class="hlt">Sisters</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Rally, C. R.; Munroe, D. S.; Bogoch, A.</p> <p>1964-01-01</p> <p>Although it is well known that the incidence of idiopathic steatorrhea is much higher in relatives of patients with this disease than it is in the general population, there has been little comment on the variability of symptoms in familial cases. Two <span class="hlt">sisters</span> with this disease are reported. One presented with a relatively acute history of diarrhea, weight loss, fatigue and peripheral edema and was found to have a normal hemoglobin, hypocalcemia and a markedly decreased prothrombin activity. Her elder <span class="hlt">sister</span> tended to constipation and had a 10-year history of refractory iron-deficiency anemia. The diagnosis was confirmed in both by peroral jejunal biopsy. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2 PMID:14122463</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1763618','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1763618"><span>Umbilical metastasis (<span class="hlt">Sister</span> Joseph's nodule) from carcinoma of the vagina.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Bakri, Y N; Subhi, J; Hashim, E; Senoussi, M</p> <p>1991-01-01</p> <p>A case is reported of a squamous cell carcinoma of the vagina with metastasis to the umbilicus (<span class="hlt">Sister</span> Mary Joseph's nodule). Systemic cisplatinum chemotherapy resulted in partial response, however, the "nodule" was a sign of poor prognosis and indicative of short-term survival. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of umbilical metastasis from a primary carcinoma of the vagina.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12808731','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12808731"><span>Paternity testing in case of brother-<span class="hlt">sister</span> incest.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Macan, Marijana; Uvodić, Petra; Botica, Vladimir</p> <p>2003-06-01</p> <p>We performed a paternity test in a case of incest between brother and <span class="hlt">sister</span>. DNA from blood samples of the alleged parents and their two children was obtained with Chelex DNA extraction method and quantified with Applied Biosystems QuantiBlot quantitation kit. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of DNA samples was performed with AmpFlSTR SGM Plus PCR amplification kit and GenePrint PowerPlex PCR amplification kit. The amplified products were separated and detected by using the Perkin Elmer's ABI PRISM trade mark 310 Genetic Analyser. DNA and data analysis of 17 loci and Amelogenin confirmed the suspicion of brother-<span class="hlt">sister</span> incest. Since both children had inherited all of the obligate alleles from the alleged father, we could confirm with certainty of 99.999999% that the oldest brother in the family was the biological father of both children. Calculated data showed that even in a case of brother-<span class="hlt">sister</span> incest, paternity could be proved by the analysis of Amelogenin and 17 DNA loci.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3352408','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3352408"><span>Genomic <span class="hlt">sister</span>-disorders of neurodevelopment: an evolutionary approach</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Crespi, Bernard; Summers, Kyle; Dorus, Steve</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>Genomic <span class="hlt">sister</span>-disorders are defined here as diseases mediated by duplications versus deletions of the same region. Such disorders can provide unique information concerning the genomic underpinnings of human neurodevelopment because effects of diametric variation in gene copy number on cognitive and behavioral phenotypes can be inferred. We describe evidence from the literature on deletions versus duplications for the regions underlying the best-known human neurogenetic <span class="hlt">sister</span>-disorders, including Williams syndrome, Velocardiofacial syndrome, and Smith–Magenis syndrome, as well as the X-chromosomal conditions Klinefelter and Turner syndromes. These data suggest that diametric copy-number alterations can, like diametric alterations to imprinted genes, generate contrasting phenotypes associated with autistic-spectrum and psychotic-spectrum conditions. Genomically based perturbations to the development of the human social brain are thus apparently mediated to a notable degree by effects of variation in gene copy number. We also conducted the first analyses of positive selection for genes in the regions affected by these disorders. We found evidence consistent with adaptive evolution of protein-coding genes, or selective sweeps, for three of the four sets of <span class="hlt">sister</span>-syndromes analyzed. These studies of selection facilitate identification of candidate genes for the phenotypes observed and lend a novel evolutionary dimension to the analysis of human cognitive architecture and neurogenetic disorders. PMID:25567849</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12287625','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12287625"><span>Southall Black <span class="hlt">Sisters</span>. Hannana Siddiqui speaks to Rasna Warah.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Warah, R</p> <p>1994-01-01</p> <p>Southall Black <span class="hlt">Sisters</span>, an organization for Asian and Afro-Caribbean women in Great Britain, was established in 1979 at the height of anti-racist protests to address the otherwise neglected issue of women's oppression. The group has campaigned against discriminatory immigration laws, illegal virginity tests at Heathrow airport, domestic violence, and other issues of particular concern to British Asian women. Women who migrate to England for an arranged marriage must remain with their husband at least 1 year or face deportation and denial of any public assistance, placing them at risk of unreported domestic violence. Southall Black <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> has attempted to raise the public consciousness about domestic violence as a criminal issue and garner support for Asian women who leave abusive husbands. However, no support has been forthcoming from the anti-racist movement, which fears that publicity on domestic violence will create a racist backlash against Asian men. More support has been available for the group's campaign to protect battered women who kill their husbands by removing from the law on provocation the need for an immediate response. Another campaign has involved protests against "bounty hunters" hired by Asian families to return girls who have escaped from arranged marriages in their home country or sexual abuse within their family. Southall Black <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> attributes many of the problems faced by its clients to a rise in religious fundamentalism and Muslim attempts to reverse the gains of the feminist movement.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14968331','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14968331"><span>[The umbilical metastasis. <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Mary Joseph and her time].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Trebing, D; Göring, H-D</p> <p>2004-02-01</p> <p>Although Baluff in 1854 and Nelaton in 1860 had already described umbilical metastases, the best known description of the metastasis of carcinomas to this site as "trouser button navel" was published in 1928 by William James Mayo (1861-1939), son of William Worrall Mayo (1815-1911), the founder of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, This phenomenon is supposed to have been pointed out to Mayo by his long-serving head surgical nurse <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Mary Joseph (1856-1939). The English surgeon Hamilton Bailey, in his famous textbook "Physical Signs in Clinical Surgery" in 1949, coined the term "<span class="hlt">Sister</span> Joseph's nodule" for an umbilical metastasis. The expression has become widely accepted and used. <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Mary Joseph, daughter of Irish immigrants, belonged to the 3rd order of the Holy Francis, was distinguished for her skills, intelligence and devotion to nursing which was also her calling. She worked for many decades at the world-famous Mayo Clinic and taught generations of young nurses. In recent years, the original surgical building at Saint Mary's Hospital has been named "Joseph Building" in her memory. Among the numerous eponyms occurring in the dermatology and the medicine, the association with the name of a nurse represents beyond doubt a special feature.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22253761','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22253761"><span>Broad phylogenomic sampling and the <span class="hlt">sister</span> lineage of land plants.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Timme, Ruth E; Bachvaroff, Tsvetan R; Delwiche, Charles F</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>The tremendous diversity of land plants all descended from a single charophyte green alga that colonized the land somewhere between 430 and 470 million years ago. Six orders of charophyte green algae, in addition to embryophytes, comprise the Streptophyta s.l. Previous studies have focused on reconstructing the phylogeny of organisms tied to this key colonization event, but wildly conflicting results have sparked a contentious debate over which lineage gave rise to land plants. The dominant view has been that 'stoneworts,' or Charales, are the <span class="hlt">sister</span> lineage, but an alternative hypothesis supports the Zygnematales (often referred to as "pond scum") as the <span class="hlt">sister</span> lineage. In this paper, we provide a well-supported, 160-nuclear-gene phylogenomic analysis supporting the Zygnematales as the closest living relative to land plants. Our study makes two key contributions to the field: 1) the use of an unbiased method to collect a large set of orthologs from deeply diverging species and 2) the use of these data in determining the <span class="hlt">sister</span> lineage to land plants. We anticipate this updated phylogeny not only will hugely impact lesson plans in introductory biology courses, but also will provide a solid phylogenetic tree for future green-lineage research, whether it be related to plants or green algae.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24240146','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24240146"><span>Mycelium differentiation and development of Streptomyces coelicolor in lab-scale bioreactors: programmed cell <span class="hlt">death</span>, differentiation, and lysis are closely <span class="hlt">linked</span> to undecylprodigiosin and actinorhodin production.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Rioseras, Beatriz; López-García, María Teresa; Yagüe, Paula; Sánchez, Jesús; Manteca, Angel</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Streptomycetes are mycelium-forming bacteria that produce two thirds of clinically relevant secondary metabolites. Secondary metabolite production is activated at specific developmental stages of Streptomyces life cycle. Despite this, Streptomyces differentiation in industrial bioreactors tends to be underestimated and the most important parameters managed are only indirectly related to differentiation: modifications to the culture media, optimization of productive strains by random or directed mutagenesis, analysis of biophysical parameters, etc. In this work the relationship between differentiation and antibiotic production in lab-scale bioreactors was defined. Streptomyces coelicolor was used as a model strain. Morphological differentiation was comparable to that occurring during pre-sporulation stages in solid cultures: an initial compartmentalized mycelium suffers a programmed cell <span class="hlt">death</span>, and remaining viable segments then differentiate to a second multinucleated antibiotic-producing mycelium. Differentiation was demonstrated to be one of the keys to interpreting biophysical fermentation parameters and to rationalizing the optimization of secondary metabolite production in bioreactors.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3858829','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3858829"><span>Mycelium differentiation and development of Streptomyces coelicolor in lab-scale bioreactors: Programmed cell <span class="hlt">death</span>, differentiation, and lysis are closely <span class="hlt">linked</span> to undecylprodigiosin and actinorhodin production</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Rioseras, Beatriz; López-García, María Teresa; Yagüe, Paula; Sánchez, Jesús; Manteca, Ángel</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Streptomycetes are mycelium-forming bacteria that produce two thirds of clinically relevant secondary metabolites. Secondary metabolite production is activated at specific developmental stages of Streptomyces life cycle. Despite this, Streptomyces differentiation in industrial bioreactors tends to be underestimated and the most important parameters managed are only indirectly related to differentiation: modifications to the culture media, optimization of productive strains by random or directed mutagenesis, analysis of biophysical parameters, etc. In this work the relationship between differentiation and antibiotic production in lab-scale bioreactors was defined. Streptomyces coelicolor was used as a model strain. Morphological differentiation was comparable to that occurring during pre-sporulation stages in solid cultures: an initial compartmentalized mycelium suffers a programmed cell <span class="hlt">death</span>, and remaining viable segments then differentiate to a second multinucleated antibiotic-producing mycelium. Differentiation was demonstrated to be one of the keys to interpreting biophysical fermentation parameters and to rationalizing the optimization of secondary metabolite production in bioreactors. PMID:24240146</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27424142','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27424142"><span>Paternal smoking and germ cell <span class="hlt">death</span>: A mechanistic <span class="hlt">link</span> to the effects of cigarette smoke on spermatogenesis and possible long-term sequelae in offspring.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Esakky, Prabagaran; Moley, Kelle H</p> <p>2016-11-05</p> <p>Paternal exposure to constituents of cigarette smoke (CS) is reportedly associated with infertility, birth defects and childhood cancers even though the mechanism behind this relationship is still unclear. Chronic cigarette smoking by men leads to poor sperm quality and quantity mainly through oxidative stress and also direct assault by CS metabolites. Among several carcinogenic and teratogenic components of cigarette smoke condensate (CSC), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) display a preeminent role in accelerating germ cell <span class="hlt">death</span> via the cytoplasmic transcription factor, aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) that is present across all stages of spermatogenesis. Activation of AHR by growth factors though benefits normal cellular functions, its mediation by CSC in a spermatocyte cell line [Gc2(spd)ts] adversely affects the expression of a battery of genes associated with antioxidant mechanisms, cell proliferation and apoptosis, and cell cycle progress. Besides, the CSC-mediated cross talk either between AHR and NRF2 or AHR-NRF2 and MAPKs pathways inhibits normal proliferation of the spermatogenic GC-2spd(ts) cells in vitro and cell <span class="hlt">death</span> of spermatocytes in vivo. Pharmacological inactivation of CSC-induced AHR but not its genetic manipulation seems preventing DNA and cell membrane damage in Gc2(spd)ts. Data from recent reports suggest that the cigarette smoke affects both the genomic and epigenomic components of the sperm and attributes any associated changes to developmental defects in the offspring. Thus, the studies discussed here in this review shed light on possible mechanistic factors that could probably be responsible for the paternally mediated birth defects in the offspring following exposure to the toxic constituents of cigarette smoke.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li class="active"><span>9</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_9 --> <div id="page_10" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li class="active"><span>10</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="181"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=SIDS&pg=3&id=EJ322555','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=SIDS&pg=3&id=EJ322555"><span>Cot <span class="hlt">Deaths</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Tyrrell, Shelagh</p> <p>1985-01-01</p> <p>Addresses the tragedy of crib <span class="hlt">deaths</span>, giving particular attention to causes, prevention, and medical research on Sudden Infant <span class="hlt">Death</span> Syndrome (SIDS). Gives anecdotal accounts of coping strategies used by parents and families of SIDS infants. (DT)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=crib+AND+death&id=EJ322555','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=crib+AND+death&id=EJ322555"><span>Cot <span class="hlt">Deaths</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Tyrrell, Shelagh</p> <p>1985-01-01</p> <p>Addresses the tragedy of crib <span class="hlt">deaths</span>, giving particular attention to causes, prevention, and medical research on Sudden Infant <span class="hlt">Death</span> Syndrome (SIDS). Gives anecdotal accounts of coping strategies used by parents and families of SIDS infants. (DT)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23681657','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23681657"><span>Nonrandom <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid segregation of sex chromosomes in Drosophila male germline stem cells.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Yamashita, Yukiko M</p> <p>2013-05-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Sister</span> chromatids are the product of DNA replication, which is assumed to be a very precise process. Therefore, <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids should be exact copies of each other. However, reports have indicated that <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids are segregated nonrandomly during cell division, suggesting that <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids are not the same, although their DNA sequences are the same. Researchers have speculated that stem cells may retain template strands to avoid replication-induced mutations. An alternative proposal is that cells may segregate distinct epigenetic information carried on <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids. Recently, we found that Drosophila male germline stem cells segregate <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids of X and Y chromosomes with a strong bias. We discuss this finding in relation to existing models for nonrandom <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid segregation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED314204.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED314204.pdf"><span>Early Childhood Injury <span class="hlt">Deaths</span> in Washington State.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Starzyk, Patricia M.</p> <p></p> <p>This paper discusses data on the <span class="hlt">deaths</span> of children aged 1-4 years in Washington State. A two-fold approach was used in the analysis. First, Washington State <span class="hlt">death</span> certificate data for 1979-85 were used to characterize the <span class="hlt">deaths</span> and identify hazardous situations. Second, <span class="hlt">death</span> certificates were <span class="hlt">linked</span> to birth certificates of children born in…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12597776','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12597776"><span>Obstetric prognosis in <span class="hlt">sisters</span> of preeclamptic women - implications for genetic linkage studies.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Heiskanen, Nonna; Heinonen, Seppo; Kirkinen, Pertti</p> <p>2003-02-23</p> <p>BACKGROUND: To investigate obstetric prognosis in <span class="hlt">sisters</span> of preeclamptic women. METHODS: We identified consecutive 635 sib pairs from the Birth Registry data of Kuopio University Hospital who had their first delivery between January 1989 and December 1999 in our institution. Of these, in 530 pairs both <span class="hlt">sisters</span> had non-preeclamptic pregnancies (the reference group), in 63 pairs one of the <span class="hlt">sisters</span> had preeclampsia and the unaffected <span class="hlt">sisters</span> were studied (study group I). In 42 pairs both <span class="hlt">sister</span>'s first delivery was affected (study group II). Pregnancy outcome measures in these groups were compared. RESULTS: Unaffected <span class="hlt">sisters</span> of the index patients had uncompromised fetal growth in their pregnancies, and overall, as good obstetric outcomes as in the reference group. The data on affected <span class="hlt">sisters</span> of the index patients showed an increased prematurity rate, and increased incidences of low birth weight and small-for-gestational age infants, as expected. CONCLUSION: Unaffected <span class="hlt">sisters</span> of the index patients had no signs of utero-placental insufficiency and they were at low risk with regard to adverse obstetric outcome, whereas affected <span class="hlt">sisters</span> were high-risk. Clinically, affected versus unaffected status appears to be clear-cut in first-degree relatives regardless of their genetic susceptibility and unaffected <span class="hlt">sisters</span> do not need special antepartum surveillance.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26754308','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26754308"><span><span class="hlt">Sisters</span> who developed piloerection after administration of milnacipran.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Matsuo, Nobuko; Hori, Satoko; Suehira, Mayu; Satoh, Hiroki; Miki, Akiko; Sawada, Yasufumi</p> <p>2016-03-01</p> <p>We previously reported the first case of piloerection in a patient receiving milnacipran hydrochloride (MLP). Here, we now present a second case of MLP-induced piloerection. We discuss this effect in terms of α1-adrenoceptor occupancy. After the first case of MLP-induced piloerection, we monitored occurrence of piloerection in our patients taking MLP. In response to our interview, a 43-year-old woman who had been prescribed MLP by a psychiatrist for depression mentioned that piloerection occurred frequently all over her body, starting soon after initiation of MLP administration (50 mg/day). Although she was concerned at the time, she assumed it might be related to her depression or to coldness in winter. She also mentioned that the incidence of piloerection increased with MLP dose escalation. The piloerection disappeared after several months. Interestingly, the previous patient and the current patient are biological <span class="hlt">sisters</span>. Changes in α1-adrenoceptor occupancy by endogenous norepinephrine (as an index of the risk of piloerection) in the presence of MLP were estimated. The occupancy values increased with MLP dose escalation, in accordance with the patient's report of the phenomenon. other concomitant drugs, such as nortriptyline, had little effect. Since the two patients were <span class="hlt">sisters</span>, genetic factors might influence the risk of piloerection. The incidence of piloerection appeared to increase with MLP dose escalation in this patient, who was the biological <span class="hlt">sister</span> of the previously reported patient. Clinicians should recognize the possibility of MLP-induced piloerection in view of its potential impact on patients' quality of life and on drug compliance.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23781109','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23781109"><span>FtsK actively segregates <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromosomes in Escherichia coli.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Stouf, Mathieu; Meile, Jean-Christophe; Cornet, François</p> <p>2013-07-02</p> <p>Bacteria use the replication origin-to-terminus polarity of their circular chromosomes to control DNA transactions during the cell cycle. Segregation starts by active migration of the region of origin followed by progressive movement of the rest of the chromosomes. The last steps of segregation have been studied extensively in the case of dimeric <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromosomes and when chromosome organization is impaired by mutations. In these special cases, the divisome-associated DNA translocase FtsK is required. FtsK pumps chromosomes toward the dif chromosome dimer resolution site using polarity of the FtsK-orienting polar sequence (KOPS) DNA motifs. Assays based on monitoring dif recombination have suggested that FtsK acts only in these special cases and does not act on monomeric chromosomes. Using a two-color system to visualize pairs of chromosome loci in living cells, we show that the spatial resolution of <span class="hlt">sister</span> loci is accurately ordered from the point of origin to the dif site. Furthermore, ordered segregation in a region ∼200 kb long surrounding dif depended on the oriented translocation activity of FtsK but not on the formation of dimers or their resolution. FtsK-mediated segregation required the MatP protein, which delays segregation of the dif-surrounding region until cell division. We conclude that FtsK segregates the terminus region of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromosomes whether they are monomeric or dimeric and does so in an accurate and ordered manner. Our data are consistent with a model in which FtsK acts to release the MatP-mediated cohesion and/or interaction with the division apparatus of the terminus region in a KOPS-oriented manner.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2758051','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2758051"><span>Catholic <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Nurses in Selma, Alabama, 1940–1972</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Wall, Barbra Mann</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>This study analyzes the activities of religious <span class="hlt">sister</span> nurses as they confronted racism in the American South from 1940 to 1972. Selma was chosen as a case study because, in the 1960s, events in that southern town marked a turning point in the civil rights movement in the United States. This is a story about the workings of gender, race, religion, and nursing. The sisters’ work demonstrates how an analysis of race in nursing history is incomplete without an understanding of the roles that a number of Catholic religious women took in reaching out to African Americans in the Deep South. PMID:19218843</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4746374','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4746374"><span>Agenesis of the Gallbladder in Monozygotic Twin <span class="hlt">Sisters</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Hoshi, Koki; Irisawa, Atsushi; Shibukawa, Goro; Yamabe, Akane; Fujisawa, Mariko; Igarashi, Ryo; Sato, Ai; Maki, Takumi</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Agenesis of the gallbladder, a rare anomaly, is generally regarded as an organogenic failure. Several reports suggest that this congenital defect is inherited but that supposition remains controversial. We described agenesis of the gallbladder in identical twins. A 21-year-old female presented with a history of acute pain in the epigastrium and right hypochondrium. Various imaging modalities showed “gallbladder agenesis.” Moreover, her older identical twin <span class="hlt">sister</span> had also no visualized gallbladder in imaging modalities. This case report strongly suggested that agenesis of the gallbladder would be caused by a genetic abnormality. PMID:26925274</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26925274','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26925274"><span>Agenesis of the Gallbladder in Monozygotic Twin <span class="hlt">Sisters</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Hoshi, Koki; Irisawa, Atsushi; Shibukawa, Goro; Yamabe, Akane; Fujisawa, Mariko; Igarashi, Ryo; Sato, Ai; Maki, Takumi</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Agenesis of the gallbladder, a rare anomaly, is generally regarded as an organogenic failure. Several reports suggest that this congenital defect is inherited but that supposition remains controversial. We described agenesis of the gallbladder in identical twins. A 21-year-old female presented with a history of acute pain in the epigastrium and right hypochondrium. Various imaging modalities showed "gallbladder agenesis." Moreover, her older identical twin <span class="hlt">sister</span> had also no visualized gallbladder in imaging modalities. This case report strongly suggested that agenesis of the gallbladder would be caused by a genetic abnormality.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22380719','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22380719"><span>Lipschütz ulcers in twin <span class="hlt">sisters</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Truchuelo, Maria T; Vano-Galván, Sergio; Alcántara, Javier; Pérez, Bibiana; Jaén, Pedro</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Lipschütz ulcer (LU) is an uncommon condition that usually affects prepubertal and pubertal girls. It can be misdiagnosed as a sexually transmitted disease or even as a sign of child abuse, causing great anxiety to patients and their families. We present two cases of LU consecutively affecting twin <span class="hlt">sisters</span>. To our knowledge, this is the first case in two family members, supporting infectious transmission. We propose airborne transmission as the most probable cause in our cases. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/4314877','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/4314877"><span>District nursing <span class="hlt">sister</span> attached to hospital surgical department.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Hockey, L</p> <p>1970-04-18</p> <p>An experiment of attaching a district nursing <span class="hlt">sister</span> to the surgical department of a general hospital was designed to show the use of the district nursing service for the after-care of patients discharged from hospital after surgical treatment. In a 15-week period about 590 bed days were saved, and only six out of 126 patients discharged early had to be readmitted. Most of the patients and the general practitioners who replied to questionaries about the scheme were in favour of it.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28126277','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28126277"><span>Weight of evidence evaluation of a network of adverse outcome pathways <span class="hlt">linking</span> activation of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in honey bees to colony <span class="hlt">death</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>LaLone, Carlie A; Villeneuve, Daniel L; Wu-Smart, Judy; Milsk, Rebecca Y; Sappington, Keith; Garber, Kristina V; Housenger, Justin; Ankley, Gerald T</p> <p>2017-04-15</p> <p>Ongoing honey bee (Apis mellifera) colony losses are of significant international concern because of the essential role these insects play in pollinating crops. Both chemical and non-chemical stressors have been implicated as possible contributors to colony failure; however, the potential role(s) of commonly-used neonicotinoid insecticides has emerged as particularly concerning. Neonicotinoids act on the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in the central nervous system to eliminate pest insects. However, mounting evidence indicates that neonicotinoids also may adversely affect beneficial pollinators, such as the honey bee, via impairments on learning and memory, and ultimately foraging success. The specific mechanisms <span class="hlt">linking</span> activation of the nAChR to adverse effects on learning and memory are uncertain. Additionally, clear connections between observed impacts on individual bees and colony level effects are lacking. The objective of this review was to develop adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) as a means to evaluate the biological plausibility and empirical evidence supporting (or refuting) the linkage between activation of the physiological target site, the nAChR, and colony level consequences. Potential for exposure was not a consideration in AOP development and therefore this effort should not be considered a risk assessment. Nonetheless, development of the AOPs described herein has led to the identification of research gaps which, for example, may be of high priority in understanding how perturbation of pathways involved in neurotransmission can adversely affect normal colony functions, causing colony instability and subsequent bee population failure. A putative AOP network was developed, laying the foundation for further insights as to the role of combined chemical and non-chemical stressors in impacting bee populations. Insights gained from the AOP network assembly, which more realistically represents multi-stressor impacts on honey bee colonies, are</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3659383','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3659383"><span>Narcolepsy with Cataplexy Mimicry: The Strange Case of Two <span class="hlt">Sisters</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Pizza, Fabio; Vandi, Stefano; Poli, Francesca; Moghadam, Keivan Kaveh; Franceschini, Christian; Bellucci, Claudia; Cipolli, Carlo; Ingravallo, Francesca; Natalini, Giuliana; Mignot, Emmanuel; Plazzi, Giuseppe</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>We report on two <span class="hlt">sisters</span>, 17 and 12 years of age, with clinical features suggesting narcolepsy with cataplexy (NC): daytime sleepiness, spontaneous and emotionally triggered sudden falls to the ground, and overweight/obesity. MSLT showed borderline sleep latency, with 1 and 0 sleep onset REM periods. HLA typing disclosed the DQB1*0602 allele. Video-polygraphy of the spells ruled out NC diagnosis by demonstrating their easy elicitation by suggestion, with wake EEG, electromyo-graphic persistence of muscle tone, and stable presence of tendon reflexes (i.e., pseudo-cataplexy), together with normal cerebrospinal hypocretin-1 levels. Our cases emphasize the need of a clear depiction of cataplexy pattern at the different ages, the usefulness of examining ictal neurophysiology, and collecting all available disease markers in ambiguous cases. Citation: Pizza F; Vandi S; Poli F; Moghadam KK; Fran-ceschini C; Bellucci C; Cipolli C; Ingravallo F; Natalini G; Mignot E; Plazzi G. Narcolepsy with cataplexy mimicry: the strange case of two <span class="hlt">sisters</span>. J Clin Sleep Med 2013;9(6):611-612. PMID:23772196</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5478172','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5478172"><span>Chromosome breakage and <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchange analysis in computer operators</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Butler, M.G.; Yost, J.; Jenkins, B.B.</p> <p>1987-01-01</p> <p>Chromosome breakage analysis with Mitomycin C (MMC) and <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchanges (SCE) were obtained on 10 computer operators with computer exposure for a minimum of 3 hours per day for 4 years and 10 control subjects matched for age and personal lifestyle. No difference was found between the two groups in the total number of chromatid and chromosome aberrations in cells grown at 48 and/or 96 hours in Mitomycin C (20 or 50 ng/ml-final concentration). The average number of SCE per cell in approximately 30 cells from each person was 6.4 +/- 1.1 (mean +/- standard deviation) for the computer operators and 9.2 +/- 1.6 for the controls. This difference was significant (p < .001). The replicative index was significantly higher (p < .01) in computer operators than in control subjects. The number of SCE appeared not to be influenced by the years of computer exposure. Additional studies with larger sample sizes will be needed to identify if significant differences exist in cell kinetics and <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchanges in individuals employed as computer operators.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16765314','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16765314"><span>The relation between OSH and ergonomics: a 'mother-daughter' or '<span class="hlt">sister-sister</span>' relation?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Hermans, Veerle; Van Peteghem, Jan</p> <p>2006-07-01</p> <p>Despite the growing importance of ergonomics and ergonomists worldwide, the position of ergonomics in companies is often not clear. Today, in many countries ergonomics is mainly (or even only) associated with the reduction of risks of work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs). Therefore, many companies consider ergonomics a part of occupational safety and health (OSH) that focuses mainly on the reduction of risks. This paper aims to analyse the <span class="hlt">links</span> between occupational ergonomics and OSH. The position of occupational ergonomics in legislation, the presence of ergonomics in OSH networks, and the position of ergonomics in OSH company services are discussed. In addition, the added value of ergonomics to companies is examined. From these discussions, it becomes clear that ergonomics should be part of the OSH policy of companies, and should be integrated into today's company strategies to improve labour conditions. If ergonomics is considered as a discipline in its own right, a clear legislative context should be developed that goes beyond voluntary guidelines and the goodwill of employers, and necessitates the presence of ergonomics professionals in companies.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10671808','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10671808"><span>Natural <span class="hlt">death</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Oehmichen, M; Meissner, C</p> <p>2000-01-01</p> <p>The increasing age of every human being is the beginning of the end of life, an obviously natural process, but any attempt to define the term 'natural <span class="hlt">death</span>' soon encounters difficulties in defining what is meant by 'natural'. In the industrialized countries of the West, for example 'natural <span class="hlt">death</span>' is thought of as the opposite of non-natural types of <span class="hlt">death</span> such as accidental <span class="hlt">death</span>, suicide, and homicide. The aim of our present survey is to discuss the meaning of the term 'natural <span class="hlt">death</span>' under a clinical, a forensic and a scientific point of view with regard to recent developments especially in molecular biology. If there are 'external' physical influences, a medical-technical manipulation, a therapeutic or molecular biological intervention cannot be definitely ruled out as the cause of <span class="hlt">death</span>, then use of the term 'natural <span class="hlt">death</span>' in general is open to question. It will only remain meaningful if it can be applied with a specific meaning in definite practical situations. Current research and medical technology, however, do not allow use of the term 'natural <span class="hlt">death</span>' in its conventional sense: it can thus be stricken from the medical vocabulary. Copyright 2000 S. Karger AG, Basel</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2185591','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2185591"><span>Pds5p Is an Essential Chromosomal Protein Required for Both <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Chromatid Cohesion and Condensation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Hartman, Theresa; Stead, Kristen; Koshland, Douglas; Guacci, Vincent</p> <p>2000-01-01</p> <p>The PDS5 gene (precocious dissociation of <span class="hlt">sisters</span>) was identified in a genetic screen designed to identify genes important for chromosome structure. PDS5 is an essential gene and homologues are found from yeast to humans. Pds5p function is important for viability from S phase through mitosis and localizes to chromosomes during this cell cycle window, which encompasses the times when <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid cohesion exists. Pds5p is required to maintain cohesion at centromere proximal and distal sequences. These properties are identical to those of the four cohesion complex members Mcd1p/Scc1p, Smc1p, Smc3p, and Scc3p/Irr1p (Guacci, V., D. Koshland, and A. Strunnikov. 1997. Cell. 91:47–57; Michaelis, C., R. Ciosk, and K. Nasmyth. 1997. Cell. 91:35–45; Toth, A., R. Ciosk, F. Uhlmann, M. Galova, A. Schleiffer, and K. Nasmyth. 1999. Genes Dev. 13:307–319). Pds5p binds to centromeric and arm sequences bound by Mcd1p. Furthermore, Pds5p localization to chromosomes is dependent on Mcd1p. Thus, Pds5p, like the cohesin complex members, is a component of the molecular glue that mediates <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid cohesion. However, Mcd1p localization to chromosomes is independent of Pds5p, which may reflect differences in their roles in cohesion. Finally, Pds5p is required for condensation as well as cohesion, which confirms the <span class="hlt">link</span> between these processes revealed through analysis of Mcd1p (Guacci, V., D. Koshland, and A. Strunnikov. 1997. Cell. 91:47–57). Therefore, the <span class="hlt">link</span> between cohesion and condensation is a general property of yeast chromosomes. PMID:11062262</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27785361','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27785361"><span>Invariant <span class="hlt">death</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Frank, Steven A</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>In nematodes, environmental or physiological perturbations alter <span class="hlt">death</span>'s scaling of time. In human cancer, genetic perturbations alter <span class="hlt">death</span>'s curvature of time. Those changes in scale and curvature follow the constraining contours of <span class="hlt">death</span>'s invariant geometry. I show that the constraints arise from a fundamental extension to the theories of randomness, invariance and scale. A generalized Gompertz law follows. The constraints imposed by the invariant Gompertz geometry explain the tendency of perturbations to stretch or bend <span class="hlt">death</span>'s scaling of time. Variability in <span class="hlt">death</span> rate arises from a combination of constraining universal laws and particular biological processes.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/fastats/leading-causes-of-death.htm','NIH-MEDLINEPLUS'); return false;" href="https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/fastats/leading-causes-of-death.htm"><span>FastStats: Leading Causes of <span class="hlt">Death</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePlus</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>... and Populations Age Groups Adolescent Health Child Health Infant Health Older Persons' Health Births Birth Defects or ... 2013 Related <span class="hlt">Links</span> Mortality data <span class="hlt">Linked</span> birth and infant <span class="hlt">death</span> data Get Email Updates To receive email ...</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li class="active"><span>10</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_10 --> <div id="page_11" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li class="active"><span>11</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="201"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA444255','DTIC-ST'); return false;" href="http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA444255"><span><span class="hlt">Linking</span> <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Chromatid Cohesion to Apoptosis and Aneuploidy in the Development of Breast Cancer</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.dtic.mil/">DTIC Science & Technology</a></p> <p></p> <p>2005-07-01</p> <p>Bunz, S. Loanger, M. R. Speicher, J.-M. 39. Waizenegger, 1. C., S. Ilauf, A. Meinke , and J.-M. Peters. 201)0. Two distinct Peters, K. W. Kinzler, B...Derivation ofhtiman 40. Waizenegger IC, Hasif S, Meinke A, Peters 3Mv. Tsvo distinct pathwvays remoive tumo cels tt itr wihoutwidsprad enaic nstbiliv</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA444254','DTIC-ST'); return false;" href="http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA444254"><span><span class="hlt">Linking</span> <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Chromatid Cohesion to Apoptosis and Aneuploidy in the Development of Breast Cancer</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.dtic.mil/">DTIC Science & Technology</a></p> <p></p> <p>2005-07-01</p> <p>through F) using i unlabeled (nonisotopic) Rad2s ,,16.4ý Fad~l Rad2l monoclonal antibody. Jurkat cells were in wheat germ extract was S Clevd Rd21...Storm imager. (C) Cleavage of in vitro translated (6D & 64 kDa) I. ae ,0,i. unlabeled (nonisotopic) hRad21 in wheat germ extracts by FPLC fractions 13-20...fractions 16 and 17. We confirmed these findings using fractions 13-20 to cleave Rad2l employing in vitro translated unlabelled hRad21 in wheat germ</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002AGUFM.V21B1201V','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002AGUFM.V21B1201V"><span>Helium and Carbon Isotope Systematics of Springs in the Separation Creek Drainage System, Three <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> area, Central Oregon Cascades.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>van Soest, M. C.; Kennedy, B.; Evans, W. C.; Mariner, R. H.; Schmidt, M. E.</p> <p>2002-12-01</p> <p> isotope data remains unclear. To date there is no clear evidence that <span class="hlt">links</span> the geochemical data to the recent and on-going uplift, but work currently in progress may shed more light on this issue. Evans, W. C., Mariner, R. H., Ingebritsen, S. E., Kennedy, B. M., Van Soest, M. C., and Huebner, M. A. Report of hydrologic investigations in the Three <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> area of central Oregon, Summer 2001. USGS Water-Resources Investigations Report 02-4061, 11p., 2002. Van Soest, M. C., Kennedy, B. M. Evans, W. C., and Mariner, R. H. Helium Isotope Compositions in Springs from the Three <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> Region, Central Oregon, USA. Eos Trans. AGU 82(47), Fall Meet. Suppl., Abstract V51C-1028, 2001. Wicks, C. Jr., Dzurisin, D, Ingebritsen, S. E., Thatcher, W., Lu, Z., and Iversen, J. Magmatic activity beneath the quiescent Three <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> volcanic center, central Oregon Cascade Range, USA, inferred from InSAR. Eos Trans. AGU 82(47), Fall Meet. Suppl., Abstract G31C-0155, 2001.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/978252','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/978252"><span>Telomere <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchange in telomerase deficient murine cells</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Wang, Yisong; Giannone, Richard J; Liu, Yie</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>We have recently demonstrated that several types of genomic rearrangements (i.e., telomere <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchange (T-SCE), genomic-SCE, or end-to-end fusions) were more often detected in long-term cultured murine telomerase deficient embryonic stem (ES) cells than in freshly prepared murine splenocytes, even through they possessed similar frequencies of critically short telomeres. The high rate of genomic rearrangements in telomerase deficient ES cells, when compared to murine splenocytes, may reflect the cultured cells' gained ability to protect chromosome ends with eroded telomeres allowing them to escape 'end crisis'. However, the possibility that ES cells were more permissive to genomic rearrangements than other cell types or that differences in the microenvironment or genetic background of the animals might consequentially determine the rate of T-SCEs or other genomic rearrangements at critically short telomeres could not be ruled out.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2096814','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2096814"><span>A Bangladeshi family with three <span class="hlt">sisters</span> 'Bombay' or Oh phenotype.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Rahman, M; Abdullah, A Z; Husain, M; Hague, K M; Hossain, M M</p> <p>1990-12-01</p> <p>Three <span class="hlt">sisters</span> in a same family (MIAH FAMILY) are of 'Bombay' phenotype. These being the first known female examples of 'Bombay' blood group have been detected in Bangladesh. As predicted by current theory their red cells are Le(a+b-) and their saliva do not contain any of the antigens A, B and H except Lea substance. Family studies showed that individuals with 'Bombay' or Oh phenotype may have A or B gene which are not expressed. This very particular type of blood is one of the rarest in any other parts of world except in India. Due to the presence of anti-H antibody in the plasma of Oh phenotype, when considering such patients for transfusion only blood of identical Bombay type can be safely transfused.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6378885','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6378885"><span><span class="hlt">Sister</span> chromatid exchange, DNA repair, and single-gene mutation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Carrano, A.V.; Thompson, L.H.</p> <p>1982-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Sister</span> chromatid exchange (SCE) has been studied in cultured mammalian cells with regard to the nature of the inducing lesion, mutation induction, and factors that modify the observed frequency following mutagen exposure, SCEs can be induced by a wide spectrum of DNA lesions and, for nine agents examined, the frequency of induced SCE is linearly related to induced single-gene mutation. Further, a deficiency in DNA repair may alter the expression of both SCE and mutation in a qualitatively similar manner. The frequency of SCE induced by mitomycin-C is suppressed in heterochromatic relative to euchromatin and, in nondividing lymphocytes, the lesions leading to the formation of SCEs may persist for several months.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4468237','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4468237"><span>Mercury poisoning in two 13-year-old twin <span class="hlt">sisters</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Khodashenas, Ezzat; Aelami, Mohammadhassan; Balali-Mood, Mahdi</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Mercury (Hg) is a toxic agent that evaporates in room temperature and its inhalation may cause poisoning. Due to the nonspecific symptoms, diagnosis is difficult in special circumstances with no initial history of Hg exposure. We report two such cases of Hg poisoning. The patients were two <span class="hlt">sisters</span>, presenting with pain in extremities, itchy rashes, sweating, salivation, weakness, and mood changes. They have used a compound that contains mercury, for treatment of pedicullosis three months before admission. This compound was purchased from a herbal shop and was applied locally on the scalps for 2 days. Their urinary mercury concentrations were 50 and 70 mg/L. They were successfully treated by D-penicillamine and gabapentin. In a patient with any kind of bone and joint pain, skin rash erythema and peripheral neuropathy, mercury poisoning should be considered as a differential diagnosis. PMID:26109979</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26109979','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26109979"><span>Mercury poisoning in two 13-year-old twin <span class="hlt">sisters</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Khodashenas, Ezzat; Aelami, Mohammadhassan; Balali-Mood, Mahdi</p> <p>2015-03-01</p> <p>Mercury (Hg) is a toxic agent that evaporates in room temperature and its inhalation may cause poisoning. Due to the nonspecific symptoms, diagnosis is difficult in special circumstances with no initial history of Hg exposure. We report two such cases of Hg poisoning. The patients were two <span class="hlt">sisters</span>, presenting with pain in extremities, itchy rashes, sweating, salivation, weakness, and mood changes. They have used a compound that contains mercury, for treatment of pedicullosis three months before admission. This compound was purchased from a herbal shop and was applied locally on the scalps for 2 days. Their urinary mercury concentrations were 50 and 70 mg/L. They were successfully treated by D-penicillamine and gabapentin. In a patient with any kind of bone and joint pain, skin rash erythema and peripheral neuropathy, mercury poisoning should be considered as a differential diagnosis.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23342908','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23342908"><span><span class="hlt">Sister</span> chromatid exchange in Polish White improved goats (Capra hircus).</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Wójcik, Ewa; Smalec, Elzbieta</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>The study was aimed at evaluating the frequency of spontaneous <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchange in Polish White Improved goats (Capra hircus). The mean number of SCEs/cell was 2.73 +/- 1.84. The effect of sex and age on SCE incidence was also investigated. No statistically significant differences in the number of SCEs/cell were observed between the males and females. On the other hand, age was found to significantly influence SCE frequency. A lower SCE frequency was observed in younger goats. A positive correlation between chromosome length and SCE number was identified. The longer the chromosome, the more exchanges occurred. The highest number of SCEs was observed in the interstitial region, the lowest in the distal area.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23772196','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23772196"><span>Narcolepsy with cataplexy mimicry: the strange case of two <span class="hlt">sisters</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Pizza, Fabio; Vandi, Stefano; Poli, Francesca; Moghadam, Keivan Kaveh; Franceschini, Christian; Bellucci, Claudia; Cipolli, Carlo; Ingravallo, Francesca; Natalini, Giuliana; Mignot, Emmanuel; Plazzi, Giuseppe</p> <p>2013-06-15</p> <p>We report on two <span class="hlt">sisters</span>, 17 and 12 years of age, with clinical features suggesting narcolepsy with cataplexy (NC): daytime sleepiness, spontaneous and emotionally triggered sudden falls to the ground, and overweight/obesity. MSLT showed borderline sleep latency, with 1 and 0 sleep onset REM periods. HLA typing disclosed the DQB1*0602 allele. Video-polygraphy of the spells ruled out NC diagnosis by demonstrating their easy elicitation by suggestion, with wake EEG, electromyographic persistence of muscle tone, and stable presence of tendon reflexes (i.e., pseudo-cataplexy), together with normal cerebrospinal hypocretin-1 levels. Our cases emphasize the need of a clear depiction of cataplexy pattern at the different ages, the usefulness of examining ictal neurophysiology, and collecting all available disease markers in ambiguous cases.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10224329','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10224329"><span>Increased levels of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchanges in military aircraft pilots.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Silva, M J; Carothers, A; Castelo Branco, N; Dias, A; Boavida, M G</p> <p>1999-04-26</p> <p><span class="hlt">Sister</span> chromatid exchanges (SCEs) were scored in lymphocytes of nine high-performance pilots of alphajet aircrafts and of ten control individuals from the same air base. Statistical analysis of the mean SCE count per cell in the total number of cells analyzed as well as in those having 12 or more SCEs (high-frequency cells, HFCs) revealed a significant difference between pilots and controls, after adjusting for the effect of smoking. Analysis of the cell cycle kinetic data (replication and mitotic indices) revealed no significant differences either between pilots and controls or between smokers and nonsmokers. Previously, we reported an increase in the SCE levels in workers of the aeronautical industry exposed to noise and whole-body vibration. The present results corroborate those findings and indicate that noise and whole-body vibration may cause genotoxic effects in man.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2000JWMSE...6c..20H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2000JWMSE...6c..20H"><span><span class="hlt">Sisters</span> in Science: Confronting Equity in Science and Mathematics Education</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Hammrich, Penny L.; Richardson, Greer M.; Livingston, Beverly D.</p> <p></p> <p>The <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> in Science (SIS) program seeks to increase elementary school girls' interest and achievement in science and mathematics, create a more positive learning climate for minority school girls and their families on academic and community/social levels, and increase the knowledge base and understanding of parents with respect to their influence in promoting girls' interest and achievement in science and mathematics. This article reports on how 577 fourth grade girls changed their interest and achievement in science and mathematics during their involvement in year 1 of the program. Findings show that the girls started the program with positive attitudes and perceptions of science and about science career possibilities. The girls significantly (p < 0.001) increased their science and mathematics skill levels after having participated in the program. It could be stated that the girls' achievement scores on the skills test increased significantly because the girls' attitudes and perceptions were positive before program implementation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28006922','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28006922"><span><span class="hlt">Sister</span> Mary Joseph's nodule as initial pancreatic cancer manifestation.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Vallejo Bernad, Cristina; Casamayor Franco, María Carmen; Hakim Alonso, Sofía</p> <p>2017-02-01</p> <p>We report the case of an 85-year-old female patient who presented with umbilical pain associated with an indurated growth, the whole being apparently consistent with incarcerated umbilical hernia, which prompted an urgent surgical procedure for its removal. The pathology study revealed dermal infiltration by a malignancy. Gland tumor cells expressed an immunohistochemical profile initially consistent with a pancreatic origin. In view of these findings a CT scan was performed, which revealed a pancreatic tail tumor as well as multiple hepatic metastasis. Skin metastasis is a rare sign usually reflecting a carcinoma of unknown origin. Umbilical skin metastasis, called <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Mary Joseph´s nodule, reflect an intra-abdominal tumor, being pancreatic cancer strange.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26898580','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26898580"><span>Pediatric familial neuromyelitis optica in two <span class="hlt">sisters</span> with long term follow-up.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Chuquilin, Miguel; Mullaguri, Naresh; Weinshenker, Brian</p> <p>2016-07-01</p> <p>Neuromyelitis optica causes bilateral optic neuritis and longitudinal extensive transverse myelitis. Although usually sporadic, 3% of cases of neuromyelitis optica are familial. The interval over which attacks continue and the long term prognosis for pediatric-onset neuromyelitis optica are not well defined. We describe two patients with pediatric familial neuromyelitis optica with the longest clinical follow-up of a pediatric case reported in the literature to our knowledge. One woman developed blindness with bilateral eye involvement within a few weeks at age 3. This was followed by transverse myelitis with paraparesis at age 19 leading to diagnosis of neuromyelitis optica. Her serum anti-aquaporin 4 antibody was later found to be positive. She continued with sporadic myelitis-related relapses but remained ambulant until age 40 when she had a more severe relapse. There was evidence of longitudinal extensive T2 hyperintensity in the thoracic spinal cord. Her <span class="hlt">sister</span> also developed blindness at age 3.5 followed by myelitis 1year later with multiple relapses of gait impairment until her <span class="hlt">death</span> from pneumonia at age 21. These patients represent the rare occurrence of neuromyelitis optica in children within the same family and show that this disease can have prolonged periods of remission but a continued tendency to relapse, supporting the need for lifelong immunosuppression. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=postpartum&pg=7&id=EJ860713','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=postpartum&pg=7&id=EJ860713"><span>Youths' Caretaking of Their Adolescent <span class="hlt">Sisters</span>' Children: Results from Two Longitudinal Studies</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>East, Patricia L.; Weisner, Thomas S.; Slonim, Ashley</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>The extent and experiences of youths' caretaking of their adolescent <span class="hlt">sisters</span>' children have been assessed in two longitudinal studies. The first study examines the caretaking patterns of 132 Latino and African American youth during middle and late adolescence. The second study involves 110 Latino youth whose teenage <span class="hlt">sister</span> has recently given…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title20-vol3/pdf/CFR-2011-title20-vol3-sec725-224.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title20-vol3/pdf/CFR-2011-title20-vol3-sec725-224.pdf"><span>20 CFR 725.224 - Determination of relationship; parent, brother, or <span class="hlt">sister</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-04-01</p> <p>... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Determination of relationship; parent... Benefits) § 725.224 Determination of relationship; parent, brother, or <span class="hlt">sister</span>. (a) An individual will be considered to be the parent, brother, or <span class="hlt">sister</span> of a miner if the courts of the State in which the miner...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title20-vol4/pdf/CFR-2013-title20-vol4-sec725-223.pdf','CFR2013'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title20-vol4/pdf/CFR-2013-title20-vol4-sec725-223.pdf"><span>20 CFR 725.223 - Duration of entitlement; parent, brother, or <span class="hlt">sister</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-04-01</p> <p>... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Duration of entitlement; parent, brother, or... Benefits) § 725.223 Duration of entitlement; parent, brother, or <span class="hlt">sister</span>. (a) A parent, <span class="hlt">sister</span>, or brother....222 are met. (b) The last month for which such parent is entitled to benefits is the month in...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title20-vol4/pdf/CFR-2012-title20-vol4-sec725-223.pdf','CFR2012'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title20-vol4/pdf/CFR-2012-title20-vol4-sec725-223.pdf"><span>20 CFR 725.223 - Duration of entitlement; parent, brother, or <span class="hlt">sister</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-04-01</p> <p>... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Duration of entitlement; parent, brother, or... Benefits) § 725.223 Duration of entitlement; parent, brother, or <span class="hlt">sister</span>. (a) A parent, <span class="hlt">sister</span>, or brother....222 are met. (b) The last month for which such parent is entitled to benefits is the month in...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title20-vol4/pdf/CFR-2012-title20-vol4-sec725-222.pdf','CFR2012'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title20-vol4/pdf/CFR-2012-title20-vol4-sec725-222.pdf"><span>20 CFR 725.222 - Conditions of entitlement; parent, brother, or <span class="hlt">sister</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-04-01</p> <p>... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Conditions of entitlement; parent, brother... Benefits) § 725.222 Conditions of entitlement; parent, brother, or <span class="hlt">sister</span>. (a) An individual is eligible for benefits as a surviving parent, brother or <span class="hlt">sister</span> if all of the following requirements are met:...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title20-vol3/pdf/CFR-2010-title20-vol3-sec725-223.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title20-vol3/pdf/CFR-2010-title20-vol3-sec725-223.pdf"><span>20 CFR 725.223 - Duration of entitlement; parent, brother, or <span class="hlt">sister</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-04-01</p> <p>... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Duration of entitlement; parent, brother, or... Benefits) § 725.223 Duration of entitlement; parent, brother, or <span class="hlt">sister</span>. (a) A parent, <span class="hlt">sister</span>, or brother....222 are met. (b) The last month for which such parent is entitled to benefits is the month in...</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li class="active"><span>11</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_11 --> <div id="page_12" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li class="active"><span>12</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="221"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title20-vol3/pdf/CFR-2011-title20-vol3-sec725-225.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title20-vol3/pdf/CFR-2011-title20-vol3-sec725-225.pdf"><span>20 CFR 725.225 - Determination of dependency; parent, brother, or <span class="hlt">sister</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-04-01</p> <p>... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Determination of dependency; parent, brother... Benefits) § 725.225 Determination of dependency; parent, brother, or <span class="hlt">sister</span>. An individual who is the miner's parent, brother, or <span class="hlt">sister</span> will be determined to have been dependent on the miner if, during the...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title20-vol4/pdf/CFR-2014-title20-vol4-sec725-222.pdf','CFR2014'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title20-vol4/pdf/CFR-2014-title20-vol4-sec725-222.pdf"><span>20 CFR 725.222 - Conditions of entitlement; parent, brother, or <span class="hlt">sister</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-04-01</p> <p>... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Conditions of entitlement; parent, brother... Benefits) § 725.222 Conditions of entitlement; parent, brother, or <span class="hlt">sister</span>. (a) An individual is eligible for benefits as a surviving parent, brother or <span class="hlt">sister</span> if all of the following requirements are met:...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title20-vol3/pdf/CFR-2010-title20-vol3-sec725-225.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title20-vol3/pdf/CFR-2010-title20-vol3-sec725-225.pdf"><span>20 CFR 725.225 - Determination of dependency; parent, brother, or <span class="hlt">sister</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-04-01</p> <p>... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Determination of dependency; parent, brother... Benefits) § 725.225 Determination of dependency; parent, brother, or <span class="hlt">sister</span>. An individual who is the miner's parent, brother, or <span class="hlt">sister</span> will be determined to have been dependent on the miner if, during the...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title20-vol4/pdf/CFR-2012-title20-vol4-sec725-225.pdf','CFR2012'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title20-vol4/pdf/CFR-2012-title20-vol4-sec725-225.pdf"><span>20 CFR 725.225 - Determination of dependency; parent, brother, or <span class="hlt">sister</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-04-01</p> <p>... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Determination of dependency; parent, brother... Benefits) § 725.225 Determination of dependency; parent, brother, or <span class="hlt">sister</span>. An individual who is the miner's parent, brother, or <span class="hlt">sister</span> will be determined to have been dependent on the miner if, during the...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title20-vol3/pdf/CFR-2010-title20-vol3-sec725-224.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title20-vol3/pdf/CFR-2010-title20-vol3-sec725-224.pdf"><span>20 CFR 725.224 - Determination of relationship; parent, brother, or <span class="hlt">sister</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-04-01</p> <p>... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Determination of relationship; parent... Benefits) § 725.224 Determination of relationship; parent, brother, or <span class="hlt">sister</span>. (a) An individual will be considered to be the parent, brother, or <span class="hlt">sister</span> of a miner if the courts of the State in which the miner...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title20-vol4/pdf/CFR-2013-title20-vol4-sec725-224.pdf','CFR2013'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title20-vol4/pdf/CFR-2013-title20-vol4-sec725-224.pdf"><span>20 CFR 725.224 - Determination of relationship; parent, brother, or <span class="hlt">sister</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-04-01</p> <p>... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Determination of relationship; parent... Benefits) § 725.224 Determination of relationship; parent, brother, or <span class="hlt">sister</span>. (a) An individual will be considered to be the parent, brother, or <span class="hlt">sister</span> of a miner if the courts of the State in which the miner...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title20-vol2/pdf/CFR-2010-title20-vol2-sec410-215.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title20-vol2/pdf/CFR-2010-title20-vol2-sec410-215.pdf"><span>20 CFR 410.215 - Duration of entitlement; parent, brother, or <span class="hlt">sister</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-04-01</p> <p>... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Duration of entitlement; parent, brother, or...; Duration of Entitlement; Filing of Claims and Evidence § 410.215 Duration of entitlement; parent, brother, or <span class="hlt">sister</span>. (a) parent, brother, or <span class="hlt">sister</span> is entitled to benefits beginning with the month all...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title20-vol3/pdf/CFR-2011-title20-vol3-sec725-223.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title20-vol3/pdf/CFR-2011-title20-vol3-sec725-223.pdf"><span>20 CFR 725.223 - Duration of entitlement; parent, brother, or <span class="hlt">sister</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-04-01</p> <p>... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Duration of entitlement; parent, brother, or... Benefits) § 725.223 Duration of entitlement; parent, brother, or <span class="hlt">sister</span>. (a) A parent, <span class="hlt">sister</span>, or brother....222 are met. (b) The last month for which such parent is entitled to benefits is the month in...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title20-vol4/pdf/CFR-2014-title20-vol4-sec725-224.pdf','CFR2014'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title20-vol4/pdf/CFR-2014-title20-vol4-sec725-224.pdf"><span>20 CFR 725.224 - Determination of relationship; parent, brother, or <span class="hlt">sister</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-04-01</p> <p>... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Determination of relationship; parent... Benefits) § 725.224 Determination of relationship; parent, brother, or <span class="hlt">sister</span>. (a) An individual will be considered to be the parent, brother, or <span class="hlt">sister</span> of a miner if the courts of the State in which the miner...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title20-vol4/pdf/CFR-2014-title20-vol4-sec725-225.pdf','CFR2014'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title20-vol4/pdf/CFR-2014-title20-vol4-sec725-225.pdf"><span>20 CFR 725.225 - Determination of dependency; parent, brother, or <span class="hlt">sister</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-04-01</p> <p>... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Determination of dependency; parent, brother... Benefits) § 725.225 Determination of dependency; parent, brother, or <span class="hlt">sister</span>. An individual who is the miner's parent, brother, or <span class="hlt">sister</span> will be determined to have been dependent on the miner if, during the...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title20-vol4/pdf/CFR-2013-title20-vol4-sec725-222.pdf','CFR2013'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title20-vol4/pdf/CFR-2013-title20-vol4-sec725-222.pdf"><span>20 CFR 725.222 - Conditions of entitlement; parent, brother, or <span class="hlt">sister</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-04-01</p> <p>... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Conditions of entitlement; parent, brother... Benefits) § 725.222 Conditions of entitlement; parent, brother, or <span class="hlt">sister</span>. (a) An individual is eligible for benefits as a surviving parent, brother or <span class="hlt">sister</span> if all of the following requirements are met:...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title20-vol4/pdf/CFR-2014-title20-vol4-sec725-223.pdf','CFR2014'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title20-vol4/pdf/CFR-2014-title20-vol4-sec725-223.pdf"><span>20 CFR 725.223 - Duration of entitlement; parent, brother, or <span class="hlt">sister</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-04-01</p> <p>... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Duration of entitlement; parent, brother, or... Benefits) § 725.223 Duration of entitlement; parent, brother, or <span class="hlt">sister</span>. (a) A parent, <span class="hlt">sister</span>, or brother....222 are met. (b) The last month for which such parent is entitled to benefits is the month in...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title20-vol4/pdf/CFR-2013-title20-vol4-sec725-225.pdf','CFR2013'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title20-vol4/pdf/CFR-2013-title20-vol4-sec725-225.pdf"><span>20 CFR 725.225 - Determination of dependency; parent, brother, or <span class="hlt">sister</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-04-01</p> <p>... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Determination of dependency; parent, brother... Benefits) § 725.225 Determination of dependency; parent, brother, or <span class="hlt">sister</span>. An individual who is the miner's parent, brother, or <span class="hlt">sister</span> will be determined to have been dependent on the miner if, during the...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title20-vol4/pdf/CFR-2012-title20-vol4-sec725-224.pdf','CFR2012'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title20-vol4/pdf/CFR-2012-title20-vol4-sec725-224.pdf"><span>20 CFR 725.224 - Determination of relationship; parent, brother, or <span class="hlt">sister</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-04-01</p> <p>... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Determination of relationship; parent... Benefits) § 725.224 Determination of relationship; parent, brother, or <span class="hlt">sister</span>. (a) An individual will be considered to be the parent, brother, or <span class="hlt">sister</span> of a miner if the courts of the State in which the miner...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title20-vol2/pdf/CFR-2011-title20-vol2-sec410-215.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title20-vol2/pdf/CFR-2011-title20-vol2-sec410-215.pdf"><span>20 CFR 410.215 - Duration of entitlement; parent, brother, or <span class="hlt">sister</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-04-01</p> <p>... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Duration of entitlement; parent, brother, or...; Duration of Entitlement; Filing of Claims and Evidence § 410.215 Duration of entitlement; parent, brother, or <span class="hlt">sister</span>. (a) parent, brother, or <span class="hlt">sister</span> is entitled to benefits beginning with the month all...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=live+AND+teaching&pg=6&id=EJ1021763','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=live+AND+teaching&pg=6&id=EJ1021763"><span>Addressing the Apparent Paradox of the Catholic <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Principal: 1940-1965</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>O'Donoghue, Tom; Harford, Judith</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>A body of scholarship on the history of the lives of Catholic teaching <span class="hlt">sisters</span> has thrown up various challenges to educational historians. One challenge can be posed by asking how teaching <span class="hlt">sisters</span> were able to go on to take up leadership positions. This is prompted by the observation that a particular body of literature for the period 1940-1965…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22069117','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22069117"><span>Mothers' differential treatment of adolescent siblings: predicting college attendance of <span class="hlt">sisters</span> versus brothers.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Bissell-Havran, Joanna M; Loken, Eric; McHale, Susan M</p> <p>2012-10-01</p> <p>Current estimates suggest that by 2015, 60% of college students will be women, a change since 1970 when 59% were men. We investigated family dynamics that might explain the growing gender gap in college attendance, focusing on an ethnically diverse sample of 522 mixed sex sibling dyads from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. We examined whether the difference between <span class="hlt">sisters</span>' and brothers' reports of their mothers' expectations for, and involvement in, their education during adolescence predicted their differential odds of college attendance seven years later. <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> were more likely than brothers to attend college, and this gap was more pronounced among non-Whites and non-Asians. <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> also had higher grades in school than their brothers. Although there were no gender differences overall in maternal educational expectations or involvement, brothers reported greater maternal involvement than <span class="hlt">sisters</span> in non-White and non-Asian families. After controlling for family background factors, the average of siblings' reports of maternal treatment, and differences between siblings' grades, the results revealed that as <span class="hlt">sisters</span> reported greater maternal educational expectations than their brothers, it became more likely that only the <span class="hlt">sister</span> rather than only the brother in the family attended college. The difference between brothers' and <span class="hlt">sisters</span>' reports of their mothers' educational involvement and their odds of attending college showed the same pattern of association but was not statistically significant. These results suggest that within-family social comparisons may play a role in <span class="hlt">sisters</span>' and brothers' choices about attending college.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3348944','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3348944"><span>Having a Brother or <span class="hlt">Sister</span> with Down Syndrome: Perspectives from Siblings</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Skotko, Brian G.; Levine, Susan P.; Goldstein, Richard</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>This study asks brothers and <span class="hlt">sisters</span> about their feelings and perceptions toward their sibling with Down syndrome. We analyzed valid and reliable surveys from 822 brothers and <span class="hlt">sisters</span> whose families were on the mailing lists of six non-profit Down syndrome organizations around the country. More than 96% of brothers/<span class="hlt">sisters</span> that responded to the survey indicated that they had affection toward their sibling with Down syndrome; and 94% of older siblings expressed feelings of pride. Less than 10% felt embarrassed, and less than 5% expressed a desire to trade their sibling in for another brother or <span class="hlt">sister</span> without Down syndrome. Among older siblings, 88% felt that they were better people because of their siblings with Down syndrome, and more than 90% plan to remain involved in their sibling’s lives as they become adults. The vast majority of brothers and <span class="hlt">sisters</span> describe their relationship with their sibling with Down syndrome as positive and enriching. PMID:21910244</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11063630','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11063630"><span>The role of brothers and <span class="hlt">sisters</span> in the gender development of preschool children.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Rust, J; Golombok, S; Hines, M; Johnston, K; Golding, J</p> <p>2000-12-01</p> <p>The study examined whether the sex of older siblings influences the gender role development of younger brothers and <span class="hlt">sisters</span> of age 3 years. Data on the Pre-School Activities Inventory, a measure of gender role behavior that discriminates within as well as between the sexes, were obtained in a general population study for 527 girls and 582 boys with an older <span class="hlt">sister</span>, 500 girls and 561 boys with an older brother, and 1665 singleton girls and 1707 singleton boys. It was found that boys with older brothers and girls with older <span class="hlt">sisters</span> were more sex-typed than same-sex singletons who, in turn, were more sex-typed than children with other-sex siblings. Having an older brother was associated with more masculine and less feminine behavior in both boys and girls, whereas boys with older <span class="hlt">sisters</span> were more feminine but not less masculine and girls with older <span class="hlt">sisters</span> were less masculine but not more feminine.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3053323','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3053323"><span>Chiasmata Promote Monopolar Attachment of <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Chromatids and Their Co-Segregation toward the Proper Pole during Meiosis I</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Ohba, Tatsunori; Hinohara, Yumi; Matsuhara, Hirotada; Yoshida, Masashi; Itabashi, Yuta; Murakami, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Ayumu</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>The chiasma is a structure that forms between a pair of homologous chromosomes by crossover recombination and physically <span class="hlt">links</span> the homologous chromosomes during meiosis. Chiasmata are essential for the attachment of the homologous chromosomes to opposite spindle poles (bipolar attachment) and their subsequent segregation to the opposite poles during meiosis I. However, the overall function of chiasmata during meiosis is not fully understood. Here, we show that chiasmata also play a crucial role in the attachment of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids to the same spindle pole and in their co-segregation during meiosis I in fission yeast. Analysis of cells lacking chiasmata and the cohesin protector Sgo1 showed that loss of chiasmata causes frequent bipolar attachment of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids during anaphase. Furthermore, high time-resolution analysis of centromere dynamics in various types of chiasmate and achiasmate cells, including those lacking the DNA replication checkpoint factor Mrc1 or the meiotic centromere protein Moa1, showed the following three outcomes: (i) during the pre-anaphase stage, the bipolar attachment of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids occurs irrespective of chiasma formation; (ii) the chiasma contributes to the elimination of the pre-anaphase bipolar attachment; and (iii) when the bipolar attachment remains during anaphase, the chiasmata generate a bias toward the proper pole during poleward chromosome pulling that results in appropriate chromosome segregation. Based on these results, we propose that chiasmata play a pivotal role in the selection of proper attachments and provide a backup mechanism that promotes correct chromosome segregation when improper attachments remain during anaphase I. PMID:21423721</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li class="active"><span>12</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_12 --> <div id="page_13" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li class="active"><span>13</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="241"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24452025','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24452025"><span>The geography and ecology of plant speciation: range overlap and niche divergence in <span class="hlt">sister</span> species.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Anacker, Brian L; Strauss, Sharon Y</p> <p>2014-03-07</p> <p>A goal of evolutionary biology is to understand the roles of geography and ecology in speciation. The recent shared ancestry of <span class="hlt">sister</span> species can leave a major imprint on their geographical and ecological attributes, possibly revealing processes involved in speciation. We examined how ecological similarity, range overlap and range asymmetry are related to time since divergence of 71 <span class="hlt">sister</span> species pairs in the California Floristic Province (CFP). We found that plants exhibit strikingly different age-range correlation patterns from those found for animals; the latter broadly support allopatric speciation as the primary mode of speciation. By contrast, plant <span class="hlt">sisters</span> in the CFP were sympatric in 80% of cases and range sizes of <span class="hlt">sisters</span> differed by a mean of 10-fold. Range overlap and range asymmetry were greatest in younger <span class="hlt">sisters</span>. These results suggest that speciation mechanisms broadly grouped under 'budding' speciation, in which a larger ranged progenitor gives rise to a smaller ranged derivative species, are probably common. The ecological and reproductive similarity of <span class="hlt">sisters</span> was significantly greater than that of <span class="hlt">sister-non-sister</span> congeners for every trait assessed. However, shifts in at least one trait were present in 93% of the <span class="hlt">sister</span> pairs; habitat and soil shifts were especially common. Ecological divergence did not increase with range overlap contrary to expectations under character displacement in sympatry. Our results suggest that vicariant speciation is more ubiquitous in animals than plants, perhaps owing to the sensitivity of plants to fine-scale environmental heterogeneity. Despite high levels of range overlap, ecological shifts in the process of budding speciation may result in low rates of fine-scale spatial co-occurrence. These results have implications for ecological studies of trait evolution and community assembly; despite high levels of sympatry, <span class="hlt">sister</span> taxa and potentially other close relatives, may be missing from local communities.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=wheeler&pg=7&id=ED419047','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=wheeler&pg=7&id=ED419047"><span><span class="hlt">Sisters</span> Helping <span class="hlt">Sisters</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Wright, Madeleine E.</p> <p></p> <p>This book is a comprehensive guide to the philosophy, organization, and management of a mentoring program for African American girls. It is based on a program sponsored by the Wheeler Avenue Baptist Church in Houston (Texas). This program matches between 25 and 50 young women with Christian women mentors. The program emphasizes Christian values,…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18477654','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18477654"><span>Further characterization of the genotoxicity of formaldehyde in vitro by the <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchange test and co-cultivation experiments.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Neuss, Simone; Speit, Günter</p> <p>2008-09-01</p> <p>The induction of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchanges (SCE) was used to further characterize the genotoxic action of formaldehyde (FA) on cultured mammalian cells. FA induced SCE in V79 Chinese hamster cells and A549 human lung cells in a concentration-related manner. Addition of 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd) for the differentiation of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids to visualize SCE 4 h after the FA treatment led to a clearly reduced induction of SCE in agreement with the repair kinetics of FA-induced DNA-protein cross-<span class="hlt">links</span>. When A549 cells were treated with FA for 1 h and then co-cultivated with V79 cells in the presence of BrdUrd, a clear induction of SCE was measured in V79 cells. When the same experiment was performed including washing and change of medium after the FA treatment, no induction of SCE was measured in V79 cells. These results indicate that reactive FA remains in the cell culture medium for a longer time period despite the high reactivity of FA with macromolecules. However, FA that has entered a cell is not released and does not damage other cells. Possible implications for the mutagenicity of FA in vivo will be discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3771506','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3771506"><span>Chromosome orientation fluorescence in situ hybridization (CO-FISH) to study <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid segregation in vivo</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Falconer, Ester; Chavez, Elizabeth; Henderson, Alexander; Lansdorp, Peter M.</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Previously, assays for <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid segregation patterns relied on incorporation of BrdU and indirect methods to infer segregation patterns after two cell divisions. Here we describe a method to differentially label <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids of murine cells and directly assay <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid segregation patterns following one cell division in vitro and in vivo by adaptation of the well-established CO-FISH (chromosome orientation fluorescent in situ hybridization) technique. 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU) is incorporated into newly-formed DNA strands, followed by photolysis and exonuclease digestion to create single-stranded <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids containing parental template DNA only. Such single-stranded <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids are differentially labeled using unidirectional probes to major satellite sequences coupled to fluorescent markers. Differentially-labeled <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids in post-mitotic cells are visualized using fluorescence microscopy and <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid segregation patterns can be directly assayed after one cell division. This procedure requires four days for in vivo mouse tissues, and two days for in vitro cultured cells. PMID:20595964</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28648112','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28648112"><span>Narrative research on mental health recovery: two <span class="hlt">sister</span> paradigms.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Spector-Mersel, Gabriela; Knaifel, Evgeny</p> <p>2017-06-24</p> <p>Despite the breadth of narrative studies on individuals with severe mental illness, the suitability of narrative inquiry to exploring mental health recovery (MHR) has not been examined. (1) Examining the appropriateness of narrative inquiry to studying MHR; (2) assessing the extent to which narrative studies on MHR conform to the unique features of narrative research, as a distinctive form of qualitative inquiry. Review of empirical, theoretical and methodological literature on recovery and narrative inquiry. Considering the perspectives of recovery and narrative as paradigms, the similarity between their ontology and epistemology is shown, evident in 10 common emphases: meaning, identity, change and development, agency, holism, culture, uniqueness, context, language and giving voice. The resemblance between these "<span class="hlt">sister</span>" paradigms makes narrative methodology especially fruitful for accessing the experiences of individuals in recovery. Reviewing narrative studies on MHR suggests that, currently, narrative research's uniqueness, centered on the holistic principle, is blurred on the philosophical, methodological and textual levels. Well-established narrative research has major implications for practice and policy in recovery-oriented mental health care. The narrative inquiry paradigm offers a possible path to enhancing the distinctive virtues of this research, realizing its potential in understanding and promoting MHR.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5118742','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5118742"><span>Detection of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchanges induced by volatile genotoxicants</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Tucker, J.D.; Xu, J.; Stewart, J.; Baciu, P.C.; Ong, T.M.</p> <p>1986-01-01</p> <p>To test the recently developed method of exposing cells to volatile compounds, phytohemagglutinin-stimulated human peripheral lymphocyte cultures were exposed to gaseous methyl bromide, ethylene oxide, and propylene oxide, as well as diesel exhaust. The cultures were placed in sterile dialysis tubing and inserted into enclosed flasks containing additional culture medium. The test compounds (in gaseous state) were diluted with air and bubbled through the flasks for various lengths of time. The cells were then washed and incubated for a total of 75 h. The harvest was performed according to established procedures, and second-division cells were scored for induction of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchanges (SCEs). The SCE frequency was more than doubled in the cultures treated with ethylene oxide and propylene oxide; methyl bromide also induced SCEs. Cultures treated with diesel exhaust showed an increase in the SCE frequency in cells from two of four donors tested. These results further substantiate the use of this method for detecting the induction of SCEs by airborne genotoxins.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4359759','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4359759"><span>The Bacterial Nucleoid: Nature, Dynamics and <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Segregation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Kleckner, Nancy; Fisher, Jay K.; Stouf, Mathieu; White, Martin A.; Bates, David; Witz, Guillaume</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Recent studies reveal that the bacterial nucleoid has a defined, self-adherent shape and an underlying longitudinal organization and comprises a viscoelastic matrix. Within this shape, mobility is enhanced by ATP-dependent processes and individual loci can undergo ballistic off-equilibrium movements. In E.coli, two global dynamic nucleoid behaviors emerge pointing to nucleoid-wide accumulation and relief of internal stress. <span class="hlt">Sister</span> segregation begins with local splitting of individual loci, which is delayed at origin, terminus and specialized interstitial snap regions. Globally, as studied in several systems, segregation is a multi-step process in which internal nucleoid state plays critical roles that involve both compaction and expansion. The origin and terminus regions undergo specialized programs partially driven by complex ATP burning mechanisms such as a ParAB Brownian ratchet and a septum-associated FtsK motor. These recent findings reveal strong, direct parallels among events in different systems and between bacterial nucleoids and mammalian chromosomes with respect to physical properties, internal organization and dynamic behaviors. PMID:25460806</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23315384','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23315384"><span>Chloroplast phylogenomics indicates that Ginkgo biloba is <span class="hlt">sister</span> to cycads.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Wu, Chung-Shien; Chaw, Shu-Miaw; Huang, Ya-Yi</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Molecular phylogenetic studies have not yet reached a consensus on the placement of Ginkgoales, which is represented by the only living species, Ginkgo biloba (common name: ginkgo). At least six discrepant placements of ginkgo have been proposed. This study aimed to use the chloroplast phylogenomic approach to examine possible factors that lead to such disagreeing placements. We found the sequence types used in the analyses as the most critical factor in the conflicting placements of ginkgo. In addition, the placement of ginkgo varied in the trees inferred from nucleotide (NU) sequences, which notably depended on breadth of taxon sampling, tree-building methods, codon positions, positions of Gnetopsida (common name: gnetophytes), and including or excluding gnetophytes in data sets. In contrast, the trees inferred from amino acid (AA) sequences congruently supported the monophyly of a ginkgo and Cycadales (common name: cycads) clade, regardless of which factors were examined. Our site-stripping analysis further revealed that the high substitution saturation of NU sequences mainly derived from the third codon positions and contributed to the variable placements of ginkgo. In summary, the factors we surveyed did not affect results inferred from analyses of AA sequences. Congruent topologies in our AA trees give more confidence in supporting the ginkgo-cycad <span class="hlt">sister</span>-group hypothesis.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2567467','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2567467"><span>Newly discovered <span class="hlt">sister</span> lineage sheds light on early ant evolution</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Rabeling, Christian; Brown, Jeremy M.; Verhaagh, Manfred</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>Ants are the world's most conspicuous and important eusocial insects and their diversity, abundance, and extreme behavioral specializations make them a model system for several disciplines within the biological sciences. Here, we report the discovery of a new ant that appears to represent the <span class="hlt">sister</span> lineage to all extant ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae). The phylogenetic position of this cryptic predator from the soils of the Amazon rainforest was inferred from several nuclear genes, sequenced from a single leg. Martialis heureka (gen. et sp. nov.) also constitutes the sole representative of a new, morphologically distinct subfamily of ants, the Martialinae (subfam. nov.). Our analyses have reduced the likelihood of long-branch attraction artifacts that have troubled previous phylogenetic studies of early-diverging ants and therefore solidify the emerging view that the most basal extant ant lineages are cryptic, hypogaeic foragers. On the basis of morphological and phylogenetic evidence we suggest that these specialized subterranean predators are the sole surviving representatives of a highly divergent lineage that arose near the dawn of ant diversification and have persisted in ecologically stable environments like tropical soils over great spans of time. PMID:18794530</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JGRD..12111968C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JGRD..12111968C"><span>Mars' atmosphere: The <span class="hlt">sister</span> planet, our statistical twin</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Chen, Wilbur; Lovejoy, Shaun; Muller, Jan-Peter</p> <p>2016-10-01</p> <p>Satellite-based Martian reanalyses have allowed unprecedented comparisons between our atmosphere and that of our <span class="hlt">sister</span> planet, underlining various similarities and differences in their respective dynamics. Yet by focusing on large scale structures and deterministic mechanisms they have improved our understanding of the dynamics only over fairly narrow ranges of (near) planetary scales. However, the Reynolds numbers of the flows on both planets are larger than 1011 and dissipation only occurs at centimetric (Mars) or millimetric scales (Earth) so that over most of their scale ranges, the dynamics are fully turbulent. In this paper, we therefore examine the high-level, statistical, turbulent laws for the temperature, horizontal wind, and surface pressure, finding that Earth and Mars have virtually identical statistical exponents so that their statistics are very similar over wide ranges. Therefore, it would seem that with the exception of certain aspects of the largest scales (such as the role of dust in atmospheric heating on Mars, or of water in its various phases on Earth), that the nonlinear dynamics are very similar. We argue that this is a prediction of the classical laws of turbulence when extended to planetary scales and that it supports our use of turbulent laws on both planetary atmospheres.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20203608','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20203608"><span>Ecologically distinct dinosaurian <span class="hlt">sister</span> group shows early diversification of Ornithodira.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Nesbitt, Sterling J; Sidor, Christian A; Irmis, Randall B; Angielczyk, Kenneth D; Smith, Roger M H; Tsuji, Linda A</p> <p>2010-03-04</p> <p>The early evolutionary history of Ornithodira (avian-line archosaurs) has hitherto been documented by incomplete (Lagerpeton) or unusually specialized forms (pterosaurs and Silesaurus). Recently, a variety of Silesaurus-like taxa have been reported from the Triassic period of both Gondwana and Laurasia, but their relationships to each other and to dinosaurs remain a subject of debate. Here we report on a new avian-line archosaur from the early Middle Triassic (Anisian) of Tanzania. Phylogenetic analysis places Asilisaurus kongwe gen. et sp. nov. as an avian-line archosaur and a member of the Silesauridae, which is here considered the <span class="hlt">sister</span> taxon to Dinosauria. Silesaurids were diverse and had a wide distribution by the Late Triassic, with a novel ornithodiran bauplan including leaf-shaped teeth, a beak-like lower jaw, long, gracile limbs, and a quadrupedal stance. Our analysis suggests that the dentition and diet of silesaurids, ornithischians and sauropodomorphs evolved independently from a plesiomorphic carnivorous form. As the oldest avian-line archosaur, Asilisaurus demonstrates the antiquity of both Ornithodira and the dinosaurian lineage. The initial diversification of Archosauria, previously documented by crocodilian-line archosaurs in the Anisian, can now be shown to include a contemporaneous avian-line radiation. The unparalleled taxonomic diversity of the Manda archosaur assemblage indicates that archosaur diversification was well underway by the Middle Triassic or earlier.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26903600','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26903600"><span>Sororin actively maintains <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid cohesion.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ladurner, Rene; Kreidl, Emanuel; Ivanov, Miroslav P; Ekker, Heinz; Idarraga-Amado, Maria Helena; Busslinger, Georg A; Wutz, Gordana; Cisneros, David A; Peters, Jan-Michael</p> <p>2016-03-15</p> <p>Cohesion between <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids is established during DNA replication but needs to be maintained to enable proper chromosome-spindle attachments in mitosis or meiosis. Cohesion is mediated by cohesin, but also depends on cohesin acetylation and sororin. Sororin contributes to cohesion by stabilizing cohesin on DNA. Sororin achieves this by inhibiting WAPL, which otherwise releases cohesin from DNA and destroys cohesion. Here we describe mouse models which enable the controlled depletion of sororin by gene deletion or auxin-induced degradation. We show that sororin is essential for embryonic development, cohesion maintenance, and proper chromosome segregation. We further show that the acetyltransferases ESCO1 and ESCO2 are essential for stabilizing cohesin on chromatin, that their only function in this process is to acetylate cohesin's SMC3 subunit, and that DNA replication is also required for stable cohesin-chromatin interactions. Unexpectedly, we find that sororin interacts dynamically with the cohesin complexes it stabilizes. This implies that sororin recruitment to cohesin does not depend on the DNA replication machinery or process itself, but on a property that cohesin acquires during cohesion establishment.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2632674','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2632674"><span>Two <span class="hlt">sisters</span> in the same dress: Heliconius cryptic species</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p></p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>Background <span class="hlt">Sister</span> species divergence and reproductive isolation commonly results from ecological adaptation. In mimetic Heliconius butterflies, shifts in colour pattern contribute to pre- and post-mating reproductive isolation and are commonly correlated with speciation. Closely related mimetic species are therefore not expected, as they should lack several important sources of reproductive isolation. Results Here we present phenotypic, behavioral and genetic evidence for the coexistence of two sympatric 'cryptic' species near Florencia in the eastern Andes of Colombia that share the same orange rayed colour pattern. These represent H. melpomene malleti and a novel taxon in the H. cydno group, here designated as novel race of Heliconius timareta, Heliconius timareta florencia. No-choice mating experiments show that these sympatric forms have strong assortative mating (≈96%) despite great similarity in colour pattern, implying enhanced divergence in pheromonal signals. Conclusion We hypothesize that these species might have resulted from recent convergence in colour pattern, perhaps facilitated by hybrid introgression of wing pattern genes. PMID:19040737</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3906944','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3906944"><span>The geography and ecology of plant speciation: range overlap and niche divergence in <span class="hlt">sister</span> species</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Anacker, Brian L.; Strauss, Sharon Y.</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>A goal of evolutionary biology is to understand the roles of geography and ecology in speciation. The recent shared ancestry of <span class="hlt">sister</span> species can leave a major imprint on their geographical and ecological attributes, possibly revealing processes involved in speciation. We examined how ecological similarity, range overlap and range asymmetry are related to time since divergence of 71 <span class="hlt">sister</span> species pairs in the California Floristic Province (CFP). We found that plants exhibit strikingly different age-range correlation patterns from those found for animals; the latter broadly support allopatric speciation as the primary mode of speciation. By contrast, plant <span class="hlt">sisters</span> in the CFP were sympatric in 80% of cases and range sizes of <span class="hlt">sisters</span> differed by a mean of 10-fold. Range overlap and range asymmetry were greatest in younger <span class="hlt">sisters</span>. These results suggest that speciation mechanisms broadly grouped under ‘budding’ speciation, in which a larger ranged progenitor gives rise to a smaller ranged derivative species, are probably common. The ecological and reproductive similarity of <span class="hlt">sisters</span> was significantly greater than that of sister–non-<span class="hlt">sister</span> congeners for every trait assessed. However, shifts in at least one trait were present in 93% of the <span class="hlt">sister</span> pairs; habitat and soil shifts were especially common. Ecological divergence did not increase with range overlap contrary to expectations under character displacement in sympatry. Our results suggest that vicariant speciation is more ubiquitous in animals than plants, perhaps owing to the sensitivity of plants to fine-scale environmental heterogeneity. Despite high levels of range overlap, ecological shifts in the process of budding speciation may result in low rates of fine-scale spatial co-occurrence. These results have implications for ecological studies of trait evolution and community assembly; despite high levels of sympatry, <span class="hlt">sister</span> taxa and potentially other close relatives, may be missing from local communities</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12313659','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12313659"><span><span class="hlt">Sisters</span> of pregnant teens at risk of unwanted pregnancy, CDC says.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p></p> <p>1985-06-01</p> <p>Researchers at the Centers for Disease Control suggest that family planning professionals focus efforts to prevent unwanted pregnancies on the <span class="hlt">sisters</span> of pregnant teenagers. Dr. Andrew M. Friede states that because <span class="hlt">sisters</span> of pregnant teenagers can be easily identified, they should be sought out and actively enrolled in family planning programs. To determine if the <span class="hlt">sisters</span> of pregnant teenagers are a high risk group for unwanted pregnancy, researchers analyzed the pregnancy hisory of 3731 women aged 12-16 in multisister families receiving Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) in Arkansas from 1978-80. A preliminary analysis revealed that teenagers with pregnant <span class="hlt">sisters</span> had a relative risk of pregnancy of 1.8 compared with teens without pregnant <span class="hlt">sisters</span>. Further analysis permitted researchers to examine such factors as race, number of people in the household eligible for AFDC, degree of urbanization, and history of family planning services. They confirmed that a young woman with a pregnant <span class="hlt">sister</span> was more likely to become pregnant, but they also found that the risk was higher if the pregnant <span class="hlt">sister</span> was older (2.4 relative risk) than if the pregnant <span class="hlt">sister</span> was younger (1.3 relative risk). The analysis revealed that blacks were at increased risk (2.8 relative risk) as were members of households with 9 or more persons eligible for AFDC (1.8 relative risk). Friede noted that 20% of black women who are exposed to a pregnant <span class="hlt">sister</span> may be pregnant by their 17th birthday. He recommended further research to identify other groups at high risk and emphasized that improved understanding of families is needed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26457601','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26457601"><span>Protection From Apoptotic Cell <span class="hlt">Death</span> During Cold Storage Followed by Rewarming in 13-Lined Ground Squirrel Tubular Cells: The Role of Prosurvival Factors X-<span class="hlt">Linked</span> Inhibitor of Apoptosis and PhosphoAkt.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Jain, Swati; Keys, Daniel; Martin, Sandra; Edelstein, Charles L; Jani, Alkesh</p> <p>2016-03-01</p> <p>Hibernators, such as the 13-lined ground squirrel, endure severe hypothermia during torpor followed by periodic rewarming (REW) during interbout arousal (IBA), proapoptotic conditions that are lethal to nonhibernating mammals. We have previously shown that 13-lined ground squirrel tubular cells are protected from apoptotic cell <span class="hlt">death</span> during IBA. To understand the mechanism of protection, we developed an in vitro model of prolonged cold storage (CS) followed by REW, which is akin to the in vivo changes of hypothermia followed by REW observed during IBA. We hypothesized that renal tubular epithelial cells (RTECs) isolated from hibernating ground squirrels would be protected against apoptosis during CS/REW versus nonhibernating mouse RTECs. Isolated hibernating ground squirrel and mouse RTECs were subjected to CS at 4°C for 24 hours followed by REW to 37°C for 24 hours (CS/REW). Ground squirrel RTECs had significantly less apoptosis compared to mouse RTECs when subjected to CS/REW. Next, we hypothesized that the mechanism of protection was related to the antiapoptotic proteins X-<span class="hlt">linked</span> inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP), phospho-Akt (pAkt), and phospho-BAD. There was a significantly increased pAkt and pBAD expression in ground squirrel versus mouse RTECs subjected to CS/REW. The XIAP expression was maintained in ground squirrel RTECs but was significantly decreased in mouse RTECs after CS/REW. Ground squirrel RTECs in which gene expression of Akt1 and XIAP was silenced lost their protection and demonstrated increased apoptosis and cleaved caspase-3 expression after CS/REW. Our findings suggest that ground squirrel RTECs are protected against apoptosis during prolonged CS/REW by the "prosurvival" factors XIAP and pAkt.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1691261','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1691261"><span>Wild female baboons bias their social behaviour towards paternal half-<span class="hlt">sisters</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Smith, Kerri; Alberts, Susan C; Altmann, Jeanne</p> <p>2003-01-01</p> <p>Adult female cercopithecines have long been known to bias their social behaviour towards close maternal kin. However, much less is understood about the behaviour of paternal kin, especially in wild populations. Here, we show that wild adult female baboons bias their affiliative behaviour towards their adult paternal half-<span class="hlt">sisters</span> in the same manner and to the same extent that they bias their behaviour towards adult maternal half-<span class="hlt">sisters</span>. Females appear to rely heavily on social familiarity as a means of biasing their behaviour towards paternal half-<span class="hlt">sisters</span>, but may use phenotype matching as well. PMID:12641905</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24182378','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24182378"><span>Brain <span class="hlt">death</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Wijdicks, Eelco F M</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>The diagnosis of brain <span class="hlt">death</span> should be based on a simple premise. If every possible confounder has been excluded and all possible treatments have been tried or considered, irreversible loss of brain function is clinically recognized as the absence of brainstem reflexes, verified apnea, loss of vascular tone, invariant heart rate, and, eventually, cardiac standstill. This condition cannot be reversed - not even partly - by medical or surgical intervention, and thus is final. Many countries in the world have introduced laws that acknowledge that a patient can be declared brain-dead by neurologic standards. The U.S. law differs substantially from all other brain <span class="hlt">death</span> legislation in the world because the U.S. law does not spell out details of the neurologic examination. Evidence-based practice guidelines serve as a standard. In this chapter, I discuss the history of development of the criteria, the current clinical examination, and some of the ethical and legal issues that have emerged. Generally, the concept of brain <span class="hlt">death</span> has been accepted by all major religions. But patients' families may have different ideas and are mostly influenced by cultural attitudes, traditional customs, and personal beliefs. Suggestions are offered to support these families.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22930868','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22930868"><span>[The <span class="hlt">death</span> of Ignatius Loyola].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Huguier, Michel; Lacaine, Francois</p> <p>2011-12-01</p> <p>A recent examination of a bilioportal fistula led us to suspect a <span class="hlt">link</span> between this case and the <span class="hlt">death</span> of Ignatius of Loyola. Realdo Colombo, professor of anatomy, eviscerated Ignatius prior to his embalming In his book De re anatomica, published in 1559, he wrote that he extracted stones from the portal vein of the venerable Ignatius. Before his <span class="hlt">death</span>, Ignatius suffered from epigastric pain and fever (Monumenta historica societatis Jesu). Colombo latin text is difficult to interpret and the data are meager. Other possible causes of Ignatius' <span class="hlt">death</span> include gastroduodenal ulcer, tuberculosis and hyperparathyroidism, but despite of rarity bilioportal fistula is the best guess.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26657140','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26657140"><span>Solution Radioactivated by Hadron Radiation Can Increase <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Chromatid Exchanges.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Maeda, Junko; Yurkon, Charles R; Fujii, Yoshihiro; Fujisawa, Hiroshi; Kato, Sayaka; Brents, Colleen A; Uesaka, Mitsuru; Fujimori, Akira; Kitamura, Hisashi; Kato, Takamitsu A</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>When energetic particles irradiate matter, it becomes activated by nuclear reactions. Radioactivation induced cellular effects are not clearly understood, but it could be a part of bystander effects. This investigation is aimed at understanding the biological effects from radioactivation in solution induced by hadron radiation. Water or phosphate buffered saline was activated by being exposed to hadron radiation including protons, carbon- and iron-ions. 1 mL of radioactivated solution was transferred to flasks with Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells cultured in 5 mL of complete media. The induction of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchanges (SCE) was used to observe any increase in DNA damage responses. The energy spectrum and the half-lives of the radioactivation were analyzed by NaI scintillation detector in order to identify generated radionuclides. In the radioactivated solution, 511 keV gamma-rays were observed, and their half-lives were approximately 2 min, 10 min, and 20 min. They respectively correspond to the beta+ decay of 15O, 13N, and 11C. The SCE frequencies in CHO cells increased depending on the amount of radioactivation in the solution. These were suppressed with a 2-hour delayed solution transfer or pretreatment with dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). Our results suggest that the SCE induction by radioactivated solution was mediated by free radicals produced by the annihilated gamma-rays. Since the SCE induction and DMSO modulation are also reported in radiation-induced bystander effects, our results imply that radioactivation of the solution may have some contribution to the bystander effects from hadron radiation. Further investigations are required to assess if radioactivation effects would attribute an additional level of cancer risk of the hadron radiation therapy itself.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li class="active"><span>13</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_13 --> <div id="page_14" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li class="active"><span>14</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="261"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4682810','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4682810"><span>Solution Radioactivated by Hadron Radiation Can Increase <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Chromatid Exchanges</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Maeda, Junko; Yurkon, Charles R.; Fujii, Yoshihiro; Fujisawa, Hiroshi; Kato, Sayaka; Brents, Colleen A.; Uesaka, Mitsuru; Fujimori, Akira; Kitamura, Hisashi; Kato, Takamitsu A.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>When energetic particles irradiate matter, it becomes activated by nuclear reactions. Radioactivation induced cellular effects are not clearly understood, but it could be a part of bystander effects. This investigation is aimed at understanding the biological effects from radioactivation in solution induced by hadron radiation. Water or phosphate buffered saline was activated by being exposed to hadron radiation including protons, carbon- and iron-ions. 1 mL of radioactivated solution was transferred to flasks with Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells cultured in 5 mL of complete media. The induction of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchanges (SCE) was used to observe any increase in DNA damage responses. The energy spectrum and the half-lives of the radioactivation were analyzed by NaI scintillation detector in order to identify generated radionuclides. In the radioactivated solution, 511 keV gamma-rays were observed, and their half-lives were approximately 2 min, 10 min, and 20 min. They respectively correspond to the beta+ decay of 15O, 13N, and 11C. The SCE frequencies in CHO cells increased depending on the amount of radioactivation in the solution. These were suppressed with a 2-hour delayed solution transfer or pretreatment with dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). Our results suggest that the SCE induction by radioactivated solution was mediated by free radicals produced by the annihilated gamma-rays. Since the SCE induction and DMSO modulation are also reported in radiation-induced bystander effects, our results imply that radioactivation of the solution may have some contribution to the bystander effects from hadron radiation. Further investigations are required to assess if radioactivation effects would attribute an additional level of cancer risk of the hadron radiation therapy itself. PMID:26657140</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9726016','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9726016"><span><span class="hlt">Sister</span> chromatid exchange data and Gram-Charlier series.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Bowman, K O; Eddings, W; Kastenbaum, M A; Shenton, L R</p> <p>1998-07-17</p> <p>Bowman et al. [K.O. Bowman, M.A. Kastenbaum, L.R. Shenton, Fitting multi-parameter distributions to SCE data, Mutat. Res., 358 (1996) 15-24.] showed how discrete Pearson and discrete Johnson translation-system distributions may be fitted to <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchange (SCE) data presented by Bender et al. [M.A. Bender, R.J. Pearston, R.C. Leonard, B.E. Pyatt, P.C. Gooch, On the distribution of spontaneous SCE in human peripheral blood lymphocytes, Mutat. Res., 281 (1992) 227-232.]. When their performances were measured by the chi-squared test of goodness of fit, these distributions proved to be only moderately better alternatives to the poorly fitting Poisson, binomial, and negative binomial distributions. In this paper, we extend our search for better characterizations of the SCE data by calling upon the Gram-Charlier type B approximation of the negative binomial distribution. We introduce an innovative extension of methods described in a little-known paper by Aitken and Gonin [A.C. Aitken, H.T. Gonin, On fourfold sampling with and without replacement, Proc. R. Soc. Edinburgh, 55 (1934) 114-125.], and show how this leads to fits of the SCE data that, in general, are within acceptable levels of probability. Moreover, we show how a theorem by Cramér [H. Cramér, Mathematical Methods of Statistics, Princeton Univ. Press, 1946.], relating to the scale factor m2/m'1 and its asymptotic distribution, may be used to discriminate between smokers and nonsmokers of the same gender.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006AGUFM.P31D..02M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006AGUFM.P31D..02M"><span>On <span class="hlt">Sister</span>, Where Art Thou? The Galilean Satellites After Galileo</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>McKinnon, W. B.</p> <p>2006-12-01</p> <p>A rich picture has emerged of the four Galileans in the last decade, but for each moon fundamental questions naturally remain unanswered. I will attempt to review a selection of these whose broader application to planetary and satellite science may prove important. Io's volcanic hyperactivity is well known, and offers clues to Io's tidally heated interior state, but the same effusions obscure much of what happens in the interior. The magmas are hot, but how hot? What is the spatial pattern of tidal heating and how is magma transported? Are models based on upwelling of the Earth's upper mantle sufficient, or must more exotic models, such as porous flow through a non-convecting solid matrix, be invoked? What about the canonical (at least at one time) magma ocean? Are Io's spectacular mountains mere "window dressing" or vital clues to otherwise perplexing interior processes? Moving to the exterior moon, Callisto, the central scientific question for this body is how it acquired its ocean yet managed not to be deeply melted (differentiated)? Ganymede (an honorary <span class="hlt">sister</span>) is ostensibly deeply differentiated, but the existence (if not persistence) of a strong magnetic dynamo within its iron core is a profound puzzle. At the surface, the relative roles of ice-water volcanism and tectonic resurfacing in creating the grooved and "smooth" terrains that cover 2/3 of the solar system's largest satellite remain debated. The stakes for understanding ice resurfacing elsewhere (Europa, Enceladus) are great. And it is Europa that commands our greatest attention. A decade of research has reached a level of maturity: while researchers may disagree on shell thickness, the consensus is that the ocean exists. With a massive body of liquid water, multiple energy sources proposed, and different paths to provide C and other biogenic elements, the central question is Europa's potential for life. There is no greater question.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21719678','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21719678"><span>Mechanism of RAD51-dependent DNA interstrand cross-<span class="hlt">link</span> repair.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Long, David T; Räschle, Markus; Joukov, Vladimir; Walter, Johannes C</p> <p>2011-07-01</p> <p>DNA interstrand cross-<span class="hlt">links</span> (ICLs) are toxic DNA lesions whose repair in S phase of eukaryotic cells is incompletely understood. In Xenopus egg extracts, ICL repair is initiated when two replication forks converge on the lesion. Dual incisions then create a DNA double-strand break (DSB) in one <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid, whereas lesion bypass restores the other <span class="hlt">sister</span>. We report that the broken <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid is repaired via RAD51-dependent strand invasion into the regenerated <span class="hlt">sister</span>. Recombination acts downstream of FANCI-FANCD2, yet RAD51 binds ICL-stalled replication forks independently of FANCI-FANCD2 and before DSB formation. Our results elucidate the functional <span class="hlt">link</span> between the Fanconi anemia pathway and the recombination machinery during ICL repair. In addition, they demonstrate the complete repair of a DSB via homologous recombination in vitro.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28932808','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28932808"><span>Two <span class="hlt">sisters</span> with Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser syndrome and serous adenocarcinoma of the ovary.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Huepenbecker, Sarah P; Divine, Laura; Chu, Christina S; Mutch, David G</p> <p>2017-11-01</p> <p>Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser syndrome is a rare entity with proposed genetic underpinnings. Ovarian carcinoma has well-described genetic associations and syndromes, although much of the etiology of the disease remains unknown. Two <span class="hlt">sisters</span> present in the 1970s with primary amenorrhea, 46, XX karyotypes, and absent uteri consistent with MRKH syndrome. In the 2010s, both <span class="hlt">sisters</span> again present for care. Case 1 presents one <span class="hlt">sister</span> with stage IIIC serous ovarian adenocarcinoma and negative BRCA panel. Case No 2 presents the other <span class="hlt">sister</span> with stage IIIC serous ovarian adenocarcinoma and a negative panel for 32 genetic variants associated with ovarian carcinoma. The familial association of two rare diseases and negative genetic workup could point to a new genetic understanding of reproductive structure development and ovarian carcinogenesis.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25037730','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25037730"><span>Radiologic findings of Patterson-Lowry rhizomelic dysplasia in two <span class="hlt">sisters</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Damar, Çağrı; Boyunağa, Öznur; Derinkuyu, Betül Emine; Battaloğlu, Nergiz; Ezgü, Fatih Süheyl</p> <p>2014-11-01</p> <p>We report two <span class="hlt">sisters</span> who have a rare skeletal abnormality termed Patterson-Lowry rhizomelic dysplasia. The typical findings of these cases on bone survey are isolated shortening and proximal metaphyseal enlargement and cupping of the bilateral humeri. The elder <span class="hlt">sister</span> also has coxa vara deformity and dysplastic proximal femoral epiphyses on both sides. The younger <span class="hlt">sister</span> has normal hip joint bones bilaterally, but her proximal femoral epiphyses are smaller than normal. All other bones of the <span class="hlt">sisters</span> are of normal size and configuration. Our patients are two siblings, and their parents are first degree relatives, suggesting autosomal-recessive (AR) inheritance. The present patients help us to understand the genetic relationships and skeletal variabilities of this rare entity.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28286188','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28286188"><span>Endovascular Repair of Internal Mammary Artery Aneurysms in Two <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> with SMAD3 Mutation.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Nevidomskyte, Daiva; Shalhub, Sherene; Aldea, Gabriel S; Byers, Peter H; Schwarze, Ulrike; Murray, Mitzi L; Starnes, Benjamin</p> <p>2017-03-07</p> <p>True aneurysms of the internal mammary artery are rare and have been described in association with vasculitis or connective tissue disorders. Herein we describe two cases of familial internal mammary artery aneurysms in two <span class="hlt">sisters</span> with SMAD3 mutation. The older <span class="hlt">sister</span> presented at the age of 54 with an incidental diagnosis of a multilobed right internal mammary artery aneurysm (IMA) and the younger <span class="hlt">sister</span> presented several years earlier with a ruptured left IMA aneurysm at the age of 49. Both <span class="hlt">sisters</span> had Debakey type I aortic dissections prior to the IMA aneurysm presentation. To our knowledge this is the first time IMA aneurysms has been described in siblings with SMAD3 mutation. In our experience endovascular repair is a feasible and safe treatment option. An assessment of the entire arterial tree is recommended in patients diagnosed with SMAD3 mutations.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21838561','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21838561"><span>Psychopathology, childhood trauma, and personality traits in patients with borderline personality disorder and their <span class="hlt">sisters</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Laporte, Lise; Paris, Joel; Guttman, Herta; Russell, Jennifer</p> <p>2011-08-01</p> <p>The aim of this study was to document and compare adverse childhood experiences, and personality profiles in women with borderline personality disorder (BPD) and their <span class="hlt">sisters</span>, and to determine how these factors impact current psychopathology. Fifty-six patients with BPD and their <span class="hlt">sisters</span> were compared on measures assessing psychopathology, personality traits, and childhood adversities. Most <span class="hlt">sisters</span> showed little evidence of psychopathology. Both groups reported dysfunctional parent-child relationships and a high prevalence of childhood trauma. Subjects with BPD reported experiencing more emotional abuse and intrafamilial sexual abuse, but more similarities than differences between probands and <span class="hlt">sisters</span> were found. In multilevel analyses, personality traits of affective instability and impulsivity predicted DIB-R scores and SCL-90-R scores, above and beyond trauma. There were few relationships between childhood adversities and other measures of psychopathology. Sensitivity to adverse experiences, as reflected in the development of psychopathology, appears to be influenced by personality trait profiles.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3212099','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3212099"><span><span class="hlt">Sister</span> Circles as a Culturally Relevant Intervention for Anxious African American Women</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Neal-Barnett, Angela; Stadulis, Robert; Murray, Marsheena; Payne, Margaret Ralston; Thomas, Anisha; Salley, Bernadette B.</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Research on anxiety treatment with African American women reveals a need to develop interventions that address factors relevant to their lives. Such factors include feelings of isolation, multiple roles undertaken by Black women, and faith. A recurrent theme across treatment studies is the importance of having support from other Black women. <span class="hlt">Sister</span> circles are support groups that build upon existing friendships, fictive kin networks, and the sense of community found among African Americans females. <span class="hlt">Sister</span> circles appear to offer many of the components Black women desire in an anxiety intervention. In this article, we explore <span class="hlt">sister</span> circles as an intervention for anxious African American women. Culturally-infused aspects from our <span class="hlt">sister</span> circle work with middle-class African American women are presented. Further research is needed. PMID:22081747</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15288052','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15288052"><span>A molecular test of alternative hypotheses of tetraodontiform (Acanthomorpha: Tetraodontiformes) <span class="hlt">sister</span> group relationships using data from the RAG1 gene.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Holcroft, Nancy I</p> <p>2004-09-01</p> <p>Two primary competing hypotheses regarding the identity of the <span class="hlt">sister</span> group of the order Tetraodontiformes exist. The first hypothesis holds that some or all acanthuroid fishes represent the <span class="hlt">sister</span> of Tetraodontiformes. The second, proposed in 1984 by Rosen, holds that the order Zeiformes is <span class="hlt">sister</span> to Tetraodontiformes and that the family Caproidae is <span class="hlt">sister</span> to this Zeiformes + Tetraodontiformes clade. These two hypotheses were tested using data from the single-copy nuclear gene RAG1. Representatives of most major orders of acanthomorph fishes were included to provide an appropriate context in which to place Tetraodontiformes and its hypothesized <span class="hlt">sister</span> groups. The results of an unweighted parsimony analysis indicate that Zeiformes is not the <span class="hlt">sister</span> group of Tetraodontiformes. In addition, Caproidae appears unrelated to Zeiformes. A monophyletic Tetraodontiformes was recovered as the <span class="hlt">sister</span> group of the clade Ephippidae + Drepanidae and was more distantly related to the included zeiform and caproid representatives.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26621703','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26621703"><span>Genomic data do not support comb jellies as the <span class="hlt">sister</span> group to all other animals.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Pisani, Davide; Pett, Walker; Dohrmann, Martin; Feuda, Roberto; Rota-Stabelli, Omar; Philippe, Hervé; Lartillot, Nicolas; Wörheide, Gert</p> <p>2015-12-15</p> <p>Understanding how complex traits, such as epithelia, nervous systems, muscles, or guts, originated depends on a well-supported hypothesis about the phylogenetic relationships among major animal lineages. Traditionally, sponges (Porifera) have been interpreted as the <span class="hlt">sister</span> group to the remaining animals, a hypothesis consistent with the conventional view that the last common animal ancestor was relatively simple and more complex body plans arose later in evolution. However, this premise has recently been challenged by analyses of the genomes of comb jellies (Ctenophora), which, instead, found ctenophores as the <span class="hlt">sister</span> group to the remaining animals (the "Ctenophora-<span class="hlt">sister</span>" hypothesis). Because ctenophores are morphologically complex predators with true epithelia, nervous systems, muscles, and guts, this scenario implies these traits were either present in the last common ancestor of all animals and were lost secondarily in sponges and placozoans (Trichoplax) or, alternatively, evolved convergently in comb jellies. Here, we analyze representative datasets from recent studies supporting Ctenophora-<span class="hlt">sister</span>, including genome-scale alignments of concatenated protein sequences, as well as a genomic gene content dataset. We found no support for Ctenophora-<span class="hlt">sister</span> and conclude it is an artifact resulting from inadequate methodology, especially the use of simplistic evolutionary models and inappropriate choice of species to root the metazoan tree. Our results reinforce a traditional scenario for the evolution of complexity in animals, and indicate that inferences about the evolution of Metazoa based on the Ctenophora-<span class="hlt">sister</span> hypothesis are not supported by the currently available data.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23865477','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23865477"><span>Ecological divergence and speciation between lemur (Eulemur) <span class="hlt">sister</span> species in Madagascar.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Blair, M E; Sterling, E J; Dusch, M; Raxworthy, C J; Pearson, R G</p> <p>2013-08-01</p> <p>Understanding ecological niche evolution over evolutionary timescales is crucial to elucidating the biogeographic history of organisms. Here, we used, for the first time, climate-based ecological niche models (ENMs) to test hypotheses about ecological divergence and speciation processes between <span class="hlt">sister</span> species pairs of lemurs (genus Eulemur) in Madagascar. We produced ENMs for eight species, all of which had significant validation support. Among the four <span class="hlt">sister</span> species pairs, we found nonequivalent niches between <span class="hlt">sisters</span>, varying degrees of niche overlap in ecological and geographic space, and support for multiple divergence processes. Specifically, three <span class="hlt">sister</span>-pair comparisons supported the null model that niches are no more divergent than the available background region. These findings are consistent with an allopatric speciation model, and for two <span class="hlt">sister</span> pairs (E. collaris-E. cinereiceps and E. rufus-E. rufifrons), a riverine barrier has been previously proposed for driving allopatric speciation. However, for the fourth <span class="hlt">sister</span> pair E. flavifrons-E. macaco, we found support for significant niche divergence, and consistent with their parapatric distribution on an ecotone and the lack of obvious geographic barriers, these findings most strongly support a parapatric model of speciation. These analyses thus suggest that various speciation processes have led to diversification among closely related Eulemur species.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1128680','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1128680"><span>DNA single strand breakage, DNA adducts, and <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchange in lymphocytes and phenanthrene and pyrene metabolites in urine of coke oven workers.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Popp, W; Vahrenholz, C; Schell, C; Grimmer, G; Dettbarn, G; Kraus, R; Brauksiepe, A; Schmeling, B; Gutzeit, T; von Bülow, J; Norpoth, K</p> <p>1997-01-01</p> <p>OBJECTIVES: To investigate the specificity of biological monitoring variables (excretion of phenanthrene and pyrene metabolites in urine) and the usefulness of some biomarkers of effect (alkaline filter elution, 32P postlabelling assay, measurement of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchange) in workers exposed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). METHODS: 29 coke oven workers and a standardised control group were investigated for frequencies of DNA single strand breakage, DNA protein cross <span class="hlt">links</span> (alkaline filter elution assay), <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchange, and DNA adducts (32P postlabelling assay) in lymphocytes. Phenanthrene and pyrene metabolites were measured in 24 hour urine samples. 19 different PAHs (including benzo(a)pyrene, pyrene, and phenanthrene) were measured at the workplace by personal air monitoring. The GSTT1 activity in erythrocytes and lymphocyte subpopulations in blood was also measured. RESULTS: Concentrations of phenanthrene, pyrene, and benzo(a)pyrene in air correlated well with the concentration of total PAHs in air; they could be used for comparisons of different workplaces if the emission compositions were known. The measurement of phenanthrene metabolites in urine proved to be a better biological monitoring variable than the measurement of 1-hydroxypyrene. Significantly more DNA strand breaks in lymphocytes of coke oven workers were found (alkaline filter elution assay); the DNA adduct rate was not significantly increased in workers, but correlated with exposure to PAHs in a semiquantitative manner. The number of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchanges was lower in coke oven workers but this was not significant; thus counting <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchanges was not a good variable for biomonitoring of coke oven workers. Also, indications for immunotoxic influences (changes in lymphocyte subpopulations) were found. CONCLUSIONS: The measurement of phenanthrene metabolites in urine seems to be a better biological monitoring variable for exposure to PAHs than</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21188869','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21188869"><span>[Accompany <span class="hlt">death</span>].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Salvador Borrell, Montserrat</p> <p>2010-11-01</p> <p>One of the roles of nursing is to take care of the patients in terminal situation. The time, the experience, the formation, and the personal and professional attitudes that the nurse has will propitiate that taking care of moribund patients might turn into one of the more rewarding human experiences in life. There for, it is indispensable that nurses assume <span class="hlt">death</span> as a natural and inevitable reality to achieve. The principal aim of the study is to evaluate the competence of confrontation and the autoefficiency of the welfare among nurses who work with adult patients at the end of the life. Descriptive study realized in the units of Oncology, Hametology and Palliative Care of the following centers: La Fe, Clínico, Dr. Peset, H. General, Arnau de Vilanova and Dr. Moliner de Portacoelli in Valencia (Spain). The following instruments were used: the Bugen Scale of confrontation of the <span class="hlt">Death</span> (1980-1981) and the Robbins Scale of Autoefficiency (1992). Data suggests that major coping gives major autoeffciency and vice versa. The realized study opens numerous questions, specially related with training and the burden of preparation along the whole professional career, in order to achieve competence for coping and autoefficiency.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27207990','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27207990"><span>Sibling Supporters' Experiences of Giving Support to Siblings Who Have a Brother or a <span class="hlt">Sister</span> With Cancer.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Nolbris, Margaretha Jenholt; Nilsson, Stefan</p> <p></p> <p>Siblings of a child with a life-threatening disease, such as cancer, have a right to measures that promote their health and welfare. Siblings may find it hard to understand what is happening to the sick child with cancer and why he or she reacts as he or she does. The aim of the study was to explore sibling supporters' thoughts about the experiences they had in providing support for siblings with a brother or a <span class="hlt">sister</span> with a life-threatening disease such as cancer. All the 12 sibling supporters currently working in Sweden participated in a qualitative, descriptive study from which 5 categories emerged, showing that the sibling supporters supported siblings from diagnosis until possible <span class="hlt">death</span>. They enabled siblings who were in the same situation to meet each other and arranged activities suited to their ages, as well as offering an encouraging environment. To help the siblings, the sibling supporters found it necessary to interact with both the parents and the ward staff. The sibling supporters felt that their support was important and necessary in helping siblings promote their own health both when the sick child was alive and also after his or her <span class="hlt">death</span>. The experience of the sibling supporters was that they listened to the siblings' stories and met them when they were in their crisis. The study confirms that sibling supporters should be a part of the health care team that treat and support the family when a child has cancer.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5063037','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5063037"><span>Invariant <span class="hlt">death</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Frank, Steven A.</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>In nematodes, environmental or physiological perturbations alter death’s scaling of time. In human cancer, genetic perturbations alter death’s curvature of time. Those changes in scale and curvature follow the constraining contours of death’s invariant geometry. I show that the constraints arise from a fundamental extension to the theories of randomness, invariance and scale. A generalized Gompertz law follows. The constraints imposed by the invariant Gompertz geometry explain the tendency of perturbations to stretch or bend death’s scaling of time. Variability in <span class="hlt">death</span> rate arises from a combination of constraining universal laws and particular biological processes. PMID:27785361</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=433916','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=433916"><span>A Manyfold Increase in <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Chromatid Exchanges in Bloom's Syndrome Lymphocytes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Chaganti, R. S. K.; Schonberg, S.; German, James</p> <p>1974-01-01</p> <p>Dividing cells from persons with Bloom's syndrome, an autosomal recessive disorder of growth, exhibit increased numbers of chromatid breaks and rearrangements. A highly characteristic feature of the chromosome instability in this syndrome is the tendency for exchanges to occur between chromatids of homologous chromosomes at homologous sites. In the present experiments, a cytogenetic technique by which the <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids of a metaphase chromosome are stained differentially has been used to demonstrate a striking and possibly specific, but hitherto unrecognized, increase in the frequency with which <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids also exchange segments. The cells were grown in bromodeoxyuridine and stained with 33258 Hoechst and Giemsa. Whereas phytohemagglutinin-stimulated lymphocytes from normal controls had a mean of 6.9 <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchanges per metaphase (range 1-14), those from persons with Bloom's syndrome had a mean of 89.0 (range 45-162). Normal frequencies of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchanges were found in cells heterozygous for the Bloom's syndrome gene, and also in cells either homozygous or heterozygous for the genes of the Louis-Bar (ataxia telangiectasia) syndrome and Fanconi's anemia, two other rare disorders characterized by chromosome instability. In a differentially stained chromatid interchange configuration discovered during the study, it was possible to determine the new distribution of both <span class="hlt">sister</span> and non-<span class="hlt">sister</span>-but-homologous chromatids that had resulted from numerous exchanges. By following shifts in the pattern of staining from chromatid to chromatid, visual evidence was obtained that the quadriradial configurations long recognized as characteristic of Bloom's syndrome represent exchanges between homologous chromosomes, apparently at homologous points. We postulate that the increase in the frequency of exchanges between nonsister-but-homologous chromatids and those between <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids in Bloom's syndrome represents aspects of one and the same</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25839724','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25839724"><span>Brain <span class="hlt">death</span>: the Asian perspective.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Chua, Hoe Chin; Kwek, Tong Kiat; Morihara, Hirofumi; Gao, Daiquan</p> <p>2015-04-01</p> <p>Asia is the largest and most populous continent in the world with people from many diverse ethnic groups, religions and government systems. The authors surveyed 14 countries accounting for the majority of Asia's population and found that, although the concept of brain <span class="hlt">death</span> is widely accepted, there is wide variability in the criteria for certification. Although most Asian countries have adopted the "whole-brain" concept of brain <span class="hlt">death</span>, most countries with past colonial <span class="hlt">links</span> to the United Kingdom follow the UK "brainstem" concept of brain <span class="hlt">death</span>. Despite this difference, most countries require only neurologic testing of irreversible coma and absent brainstem reflexes as criteria for certification of brain <span class="hlt">death</span>. Variability exists in the number of personnel required, qualifications of certifying doctors, need for repeat examination, minimum time interval between examinations, and requirement for and choice of confirmatory tests.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28920724','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28920724"><span>Canadian Military Nurse <span class="hlt">Deaths</span> in the First World War.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Dodd, Dianne</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>This paper examines the lives of sixty-one Canadian Nursing <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> who served during the First World War, and whose <span class="hlt">deaths</span> were attributed, more or less equally, to three categories: general illness, Spanish Influenza, and killed in action. The response by Canadian Army Medical Corps (CAMC) physicians to the loss of these early female officers who were, in fact, Canada's first female war casualties, suggests a gendered construction of illness at work in the CAMC. While nurses tried to prove themselves good soldiers, military physicians were quick to attribute their illnesses and <span class="hlt">deaths</span> to horrific war conditions deemed unsuitable for women. This gendered response is particularly evident in how CAMC physicians invoked a causal role for neurasthenia or shell shock for the nurses' poor health. The health profile of these women also suggests that some of these <span class="hlt">deaths</span> might have occurred had these women stayed in Canada, and it encourages future comparative research into <span class="hlt">death</span> rates among physicians and orderlies.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=CONTROL+AND+IRA&pg=4&id=ED346375','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=CONTROL+AND+IRA&pg=4&id=ED346375"><span>Encountering <span class="hlt">Death</span>: Structured Activities for <span class="hlt">Death</span> Awareness.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Welch, Ira David; And Others</p> <p></p> <p>This book is intended to be used as a supplement to standard textbooks on <span class="hlt">death</span> and dying for college students. Chapter 1 "Encountering <span class="hlt">Death</span> in the Self" builds the foundation for increased self-awareness for the study of <span class="hlt">death</span> and dying. Chapter 2 "Encountering <span class="hlt">Death</span> in the Family" provides activities which are appropriate for a wide variety of…</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li class="active"><span>14</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_14 --> <div id="page_15" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li class="active"><span>15</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="281"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12193834','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12193834"><span>Hypochondriasis and fear of <span class="hlt">death</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Noyes, Russell; Stuart, Scott; Longley, Susan L; Langbehn, Douglas R; Happel, Rachel L</p> <p>2002-08-01</p> <p>Although fear of <span class="hlt">death</span> has been <span class="hlt">linked</span> to hypochondriasis, the relationship of this fear to the disorder has received little study. To address this deficiency, we administered a fear of <span class="hlt">death</span> scale along with measures of hypochondriasis, including the Whiteley Index and Somatic Symptom Inventory, to 162 general medical outpatients. Partial correlations, controlling for age, between the fear of <span class="hlt">death</span> scale and both the Whiteley Index and Somatic Symptom Inventory were strongly positive. A factor analysis of the fear of <span class="hlt">death</span> scale yielded three dimensions-fear of dying, loss of meaning, and fear of separation-that were also highly correlated with hypochondriasis. Fear of <span class="hlt">death</span> and hypochondriasis showed comparable relationships to age and gender as well as to personality dimensions measured by the NEO Five-Factor Inventory. Fear of <span class="hlt">death</span> appears to be an integral part of hypochondriasis. Its presence lends support to three models of hypochondriasis-the perceptual, existential, and interpersonal-that correspond to the dimensions of fear of <span class="hlt">death</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25194324','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25194324"><span>Identifying possible <span class="hlt">sister</span> groups of Cryptocercidae+Isoptera: a combined molecular and morphological phylogeny of Dictyoptera.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Djernæs, Marie; Klass, Klaus-Dieter; Eggleton, Paul</p> <p>2015-03-01</p> <p>Termites (Isoptera) offer an alternative model for the development of eusociality which is not dependent on a high degree of relatedness as found between <span class="hlt">sisters</span> in hymenopterans (bees, wasps, ants). Recent phylogenetic studies have established that termites belong within the cockroaches as <span class="hlt">sister</span> to the subsocial Cryptocercidae. Cryptocercidae shares several important traits with termites, thus we need to understand the phylogenetic position of Cryptocercidae+Isoptera to determine how these traits evolved. However, placement of Cryptocercidae+Isoptera is still uncertain. We used both molecular (12S, 16S, COII, 18S, 28S, H3) and morphological characters to reconstruct the phylogeny of Dictyoptera. We included all previously suggested <span class="hlt">sister</span> groups of Cryptocercidae+Isoptera as well as taxa which might represent additional major cockroach lineages. We used Bayes factors to test different <span class="hlt">sister</span> groups for Cryptocercidae+Isoptera and assessed character support for the consensus tree based on morphological characters and COII amino acid data. We used the molecular data and fossil calibration to estimate divergence times. We found the most likely <span class="hlt">sister</span> groups of Cryptocercidae+Isoptera to be Tryonicidae, Anaplecta or Tryonicidae+Anaplecta. Anaplecta has never previously been suggested as <span class="hlt">sister</span> group or even close to Cryptocercidae+Isoptera, but was formerly placed in Blaberoidea as <span class="hlt">sister</span> to the remaining taxa. Topological tests firmly supported our new placement of Anaplecta. We discuss the morphological characters (e.g. retractable genitalic hook) that have contributed to the previous placement of Anaplecta in Blaberoidea as well as the factors that might have contributed to a parallel development of genitalic features in Anaplecta and Blaberoidea. Cryptocercidae+Isoptera is placed in a clade with Tryonicidae, Anaplecta and possibly Lamproblattidae. Based on this, we suggest that wood-feeding, and the resultant need to conserve nitrogen, may have been an important</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1221/','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="https://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1221/"><span>Digital Data for Volcano Hazards of the Three <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> Region, Oregon</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Schilling, S.P.; Doelger, S.; Scott, W.E.; Iverson, R.M.</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>Three <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> is one of three active volcanic centers that lie close to rapidly growing communities and resort areas in Central Oregon. The major composite volcanoes of this area are clustered near the center of the region and include South <span class="hlt">Sister</span>, Middle <span class="hlt">Sister</span>, and Broken Top. Additionally, hundreds of mafic volcanoes are scattered throughout the Three <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> area. These range from small cinder cones to large shield volcanoes like North <span class="hlt">Sister</span> and Belknap Crater. Hazardous events include landslides from the steep flanks of large volcanoes and floods, which need not be triggered by eruptions, as well as eruption-triggered events such as fallout of tephra (volcanic ash) and lava flows. A proximal hazard zone roughly 20 kilometers (12 miles) in diameter surrounding the Three <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> and Broken Top could be affected within minutes of the onset of an eruption or large landslide. Distal hazard zones that follow river valleys downstream from the Three <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> and Broken Top could be inundated by lahars (rapid flows of water-laden rock and mud) generated either by melting of snow and ice during eruptions or by large landslides. Slow-moving lava flows could issue from new mafic volcanoes almost anywhere within the region. Fallout of tephra from eruption clouds can affect areas hundreds of kilometers (miles) downwind, so eruptions at volcanoes elsewhere in the Cascade Range also contribute to volcano hazards in Central Oregon. Scientists at the Cascades Volcano Observatory created a geographic information system (GIS) data set which depicts proximal and distal lahar hazard zones as well as a regional lava flow hazard zone for Three <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> (USGS Open-File Report 99-437, Scott and others, 1999). The various distal lahar zones were constructed from LaharZ software using 20, 100, and 500 million cubic meter input flow volumes. Additionally, scientists used the depositional history of past events in the Three <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> Region as well as experience and judgment derived from the</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10718528','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10718528"><span>The life, legacy, and premature <span class="hlt">death</span> of Felix Mendelssohn.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Cherington, M; Smith, R; Nielsen, P J</p> <p>1999-01-01</p> <p>Felix Mendelssohn is one of the great classical composers of all time. During his short lifetime in the first half of the nineteenth century, he reached enormous heights as a composer, conductor, and leader in the world of music. Nearly one hundred years after his <span class="hlt">death</span>, the Nazi regime attempted, unsuccessfully, to erase his music and his memory from history. Since the end of World War II, there has been a resurgence in interest in the life and music of Felix Mendelssohn and that of his <span class="hlt">sister</span>, Fanny. Felix Mendelssohn died in 1947 at the age of 38. Both of his <span class="hlt">sisters</span> died suddenly at the ages of 42 and 45. There is insufficient laboratory or post-mortem data to make a medical diagnosis with certainty. However, based on the information available to us, we speculate that Mendelssohn suffered a subarachnoid or intracerebral hemorrhage. The differential diagnosis of familial stroke syndrome is discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2654126','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2654126"><span><span class="hlt">Sister</span> telomeres rendered dysfunctional by persistent cohesion are fused by NHEJ</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Hsiao, Susan J.</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>Telomeres protect chromosome ends from being viewed as double-strand breaks and from eliciting a DNA damage response. Deprotection of chromosome ends occurs when telomeres become critically short because of replicative attrition or inhibition of TRF2. In this study, we report a novel form of deprotection that occurs exclusively after DNA replication in S/G2 phase of the cell cycle. In cells deficient in the telomeric poly(adenosine diphosphate ribose) polymerase tankyrase 1, <span class="hlt">sister</span> telomere resolution is blocked. Unexpectedly, cohered <span class="hlt">sister</span> telomeres become deprotected and are inappropriately fused. In contrast to telomeres rendered dysfunctional by TRF2, which engage in chromatid fusions predominantly between chromatids from different chromosomes (Bailey, S.M., M.N. Cornforth, A. Kurimasa, D.J. Chen, and E.H. Goodwin. 2001. Science. 293:2462–2465; Smogorzewska, A., J. Karlseder, H. Holtgreve-Grez, A. Jauch, and T. de Lange. 2002. Curr. Biol. 12:1635–1644), telomeres rendered dysfunctional by tankyrase 1 engage in chromatid fusions almost exclusively between <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids. We show that cohered <span class="hlt">sister</span> telomeres are fused by DNA ligase IV–mediated nonhomologous end joining. These results demonstrate that the timely removal of <span class="hlt">sister</span> telomere cohesion is essential for the formation of a protective structure at chromosome ends after DNA replication in S/G2 phase of the cell cycle. PMID:19221198</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3033573','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3033573"><span><span class="hlt">Sister</span> cohesion and structural axis components mediate homolog bias of meiotic recombination</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Kim, Keun P.; Weiner, Beth M.; Zhang, Liangran; Jordan, Amy; Dekker, Job; Kleckner, Nancy</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>SUMMARY Meiotic recombination occurs between one chromatid of each maternal and paternal homolog (homolog bias) versus between <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids (<span class="hlt">sister</span> bias). Physical DNA analysis reveals that meiotic cohesin/axis component Rec8 promotes <span class="hlt">sister</span> bias, likely via its cohesion activity. Two meiosis-specific axis components, Red1/Mek1kinase, counteract this effect. With this precondition satisfied, other molecules directly specify homolog bias per se. Rec8 also acts positively to maintain homolog bias during crossover recombination. These observations point to sequential release of double-strand break ends from association with their <span class="hlt">sister</span>. Red1 and Rec8 are found to play distinct roles for <span class="hlt">sister</span> cohesion, DSB formation and recombination progression kinetics. Also, the two components are enriched in spatially distinct domains of axial structure that develop prior to DSB formation. We propose that Red1 and Rec8 domains provide functionally complementary environments whereby inputs evolved from DSB repair and late-stage chromosome morphogenesis are integrated to give the complete meiotic chromosomal program. PMID:21145459</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/478890','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/478890"><span>Neuropsychological profiles of three <span class="hlt">sisters</span> homozygous for the fragile X premutation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Mazzocco, M.M.M.; Holden, J.J.A.</p> <p>1996-08-09</p> <p>Fragile X syndrome (fraX) is associated with an amplification of a CGG repeat within the fraX mental retardation (FMR-1) gene. We describe an exceptional family in which 3 adult <span class="hlt">sisters</span> are homozygous for the FMR-1 premutation. Each <span class="hlt">sister</span> inherited 2 premutation alleles (ca. 80 CGG repeats) from their biologically unrelated parents. The 3 <span class="hlt">sisters</span> were administered measures of executive function, visual spatial, memory, and verbal skills. Deficiencies in the first 2 of these domains have been reported among females with the full mutation. The <span class="hlt">sisters</span>` performances were compared with available normative data and with published group means for females affected by fraX. These women did not appear to have verbal or memory difficulties. None of the women demonstrated a global executive function deficit, and none had global deficits in spatial ability. The profiles of these <span class="hlt">sisters</span> are consistent with reports that the fragile X premutation does not affect cognitive performance. 31 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4687580','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4687580"><span>Genomic data do not support comb jellies as the <span class="hlt">sister</span> group to all other animals</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Pisani, Davide; Pett, Walker; Dohrmann, Martin; Feuda, Roberto; Rota-Stabelli, Omar; Philippe, Hervé; Lartillot, Nicolas; Wörheide, Gert</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Understanding how complex traits, such as epithelia, nervous systems, muscles, or guts, originated depends on a well-supported hypothesis about the phylogenetic relationships among major animal lineages. Traditionally, sponges (Porifera) have been interpreted as the <span class="hlt">sister</span> group to the remaining animals, a hypothesis consistent with the conventional view that the last common animal ancestor was relatively simple and more complex body plans arose later in evolution. However, this premise has recently been challenged by analyses of the genomes of comb jellies (Ctenophora), which, instead, found ctenophores as the <span class="hlt">sister</span> group to the remaining animals (the “Ctenophora-sister” hypothesis). Because ctenophores are morphologically complex predators with true epithelia, nervous systems, muscles, and guts, this scenario implies these traits were either present in the last common ancestor of all animals and were lost secondarily in sponges and placozoans (Trichoplax) or, alternatively, evolved convergently in comb jellies. Here, we analyze representative datasets from recent studies supporting Ctenophora-<span class="hlt">sister</span>, including genome-scale alignments of concatenated protein sequences, as well as a genomic gene content dataset. We found no support for Ctenophora-<span class="hlt">sister</span> and conclude it is an artifact resulting from inadequate methodology, especially the use of simplistic evolutionary models and inappropriate choice of species to root the metazoan tree. Our results reinforce a traditional scenario for the evolution of complexity in animals, and indicate that inferences about the evolution of Metazoa based on the Ctenophora-<span class="hlt">sister</span> hypothesis are not supported by the currently available data. PMID:26621703</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18199077','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18199077"><span>Investigating the etiology of multiple tooth agenesis in three <span class="hlt">sisters</span> with severe oligodontia.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Swinnen, S; Bailleul-Forestier, I; Arte, S; Nieminen, P; Devriendt, K; Carels, C</p> <p>2008-02-01</p> <p>To describe the dentofacial phenotypes of three <span class="hlt">sisters</span> with severe non-syndromic oligodontia, to report on the mutation analysis in three genes, previously shown to cause various phenotypes of non-syndromic oligodontia and in two other suspected genes. Based on the phenotypes in the pedigree of this family, the different possible patterns of transmission are discussed. Anamnestic data and a panoramic radiograph were taken to study the phenotype of the three <span class="hlt">sisters</span> and their first-degree relatives. Blood samples were also taken to obtain their karyotypes and DNA samples. Mutational screening was performed for the MSX1, PAX9, AXIN2, DLX1 and DLX2 genes. The probands' pedigree showed evidence for a recessive or multifactorial inheritance pattern. Normal chromosomal karyotypes were found and - despite the severe oligodontia present in all three <span class="hlt">sisters</span> - no mutation appeared to be present in the five genes studied so far in these patients. In the three <span class="hlt">sisters</span> reported, their common oligodontia phenotype is not caused by mutations in the coding regions of MSX1, PAX9, AXIN2, DLX1 or DLX2 genes, but genetic factors most probably play a role as all three <span class="hlt">sisters</span> were affected. Environmental and epigenetic factors as well as genes regulating odontogenesis need further in vivo and in vitro investigation to explain the phenotypic heterogeneity and to increase our understanding of the odontogenic processes.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4224182','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4224182"><span><span class="hlt">Sisters</span> Unbound Is Required for Meiotic Centromeric Cohesion in Drosophila melanogaster</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Krishnan, Badri; Thomas, Sharon E.; Yan, Rihui; Yamada, Hirotsugu; Zhulin, Igor B.; McKee, Bruce D.</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Regular meiotic chromosome segregation requires <span class="hlt">sister</span> centromeres to mono-orient (orient to the same pole) during the first meiotic division (meiosis I) when homologous chromosomes segregate, and to bi-orient (orient to opposite poles) during the second meiotic division (meiosis II) when <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids segregate. Both orientation patterns require cohesion between <span class="hlt">sister</span> centromeres, which is established during meiotic DNA replication and persists until anaphase of meiosis II. Meiotic cohesion is mediated by a conserved four-protein complex called cohesin that includes two structural maintenance of chromosomes (SMC) subunits (SMC1 and SMC3) and two non-SMC subunits. In Drosophila melanogaster, however, the meiotic cohesion apparatus has not been fully characterized and the non-SMC subunits have not been identified. We have identified a novel Drosophila gene called <span class="hlt">sisters</span> unbound (sunn), which is required for stable <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid cohesion throughout meiosis. sunn mutations disrupt centromere cohesion during prophase I and cause high frequencies of non-disjunction (NDJ) at both meiotic divisions in both sexes. SUNN co-localizes at centromeres with the cohesion proteins SMC1 and SOLO in both sexes and is necessary for the recruitment of both proteins to centromeres. Although SUNN lacks sequence homology to cohesins, bioinformatic analysis indicates that SUNN may be a structural homolog of the non-SMC cohesin subunit stromalin (SA), suggesting that SUNN may serve as a meiosis-specific cohesin subunit. In conclusion, our data show that SUNN is an essential meiosis-specific Drosophila cohesion protein. PMID:25194162</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18060784','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18060784"><span>Mps1 kinase promotes <span class="hlt">sister</span>-kinetochore bi-orientation by a tension-dependent mechanism.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Maure, Jean-François; Kitamura, Etsushi; Tanaka, Tomoyuki U</p> <p>2007-12-18</p> <p>Segregation of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids to opposite spindle poles during anaphase is dependent on the prior capture of <span class="hlt">sister</span> kinetochores by microtubules extending from opposite spindle poles (bi-orientation). If <span class="hlt">sister</span> kinetochores attach to microtubules from the same pole (syntelic attachment), the kinetochore-spindle pole connections must be re-oriented to be converted to proper bi-orientation. This re-orientation is facilitated by Aurora B kinase (Ipl1 in budding yeast), which eliminates kinetochore-spindle pole connections that do not generate tension. Mps1 is another evolutionarily conserved protein kinase, required for spindle-assembly checkpoint and, in some organisms, for duplication of microtubule-organizing centers. Separately from these functions, however, Mps1 has an important role in chromosome segregation. Here we show that, in budding yeast, Mps1 has a crucial role in establishing <span class="hlt">sister</span>-kinetochore bi-orientation on the mitotic spindle. Failure in bi-orientation with inactive Mps1 is not due to a lack of kinetochore-spindle pole connections by microtubules, but due to a defect in properly orienting the connections. Mps1 promotes re-orientation of kinetochore-spindle pole connections and eliminates those that do not generate tension between <span class="hlt">sister</span> kinetochores. We did not find evidence that Ipl1 regulates Mps1 or vice versa; therefore, they play similar, but possibly independent, roles in facilitating bi-orientation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11862488','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11862488"><span>A novel MADS-box gene subfamily with a <span class="hlt">sister</span>-group relationship to class B floral homeotic genes.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Becker, A; Kaufmann, K; Freialdenhoven, A; Vincent, C; Li, M-A; Saedler, H; Theissen, G</p> <p>2002-02-01</p> <p>Class B floral homeotic genes specify the identity of petals and stamens during the development of angiosperm flowers. Recently, putative orthologs of these genes have been identified in different gymnosperms. Together, these genes constitute a clade, termed B genes. Here we report that diverse seed plants also contain members of a hitherto unknown <span class="hlt">sister</span> clade of the B genes, termed B(<span class="hlt">sister</span>) (B(s)) genes. We have isolated members of the B(s) clade from the gymnosperm Gnetum gnemon, the monocotyledonous angiosperm Zea mays and the eudicots Arabidopsis thaliana and Antirrhinum majus. In addition, MADS-box genes from the basal angiosperm Asarum europaeum and the eudicot Petunia hybrida were identified as B(s) genes. Comprehensive expression studies revealed that B(s) genes are mainly transcribed in female reproductive organs (ovules and carpel walls). This is in clear contrast to the B genes, which are predominantly expressed in male reproductive organs (and in angiosperm petals). Our data suggest that the B(s) genes played an important role during the evolution of the reproductive structures in seed plants. The establishment of distinct B and B(s) gene lineages after duplication of an ancestral gene may have accompanied the evolution of male microsporophylls and female megasporophylls 400-300 million years ago. During flower evolution, expression of B(s) genes diversified, but the focus of expression remained in female reproductive organs. Our findings imply that a clade of highly conserved close relatives of class B floral homeotic genes has been completely overlooked until recently and awaits further evaluation of its developmental and evolutionary importance. Electronic supplementary material to this paper can be obtained by using the Springer <span class="hlt">Link</span> server located at http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00438-001-0615-8.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15955849','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15955849"><span>Unzipped and loaded: the role of DNA helicases and RFC clamp-loading complexes in <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid cohesion.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Skibbens, Robert V</p> <p>2005-06-20</p> <p>It is well known that the products of chromosome replication are paired to ensure that the <span class="hlt">sisters</span> segregate away from each other during mitosis. A key issue is how cells pair <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids but preclude the catastrophic pairing of nonsister chromatids. The identification of both replication factor C and DNA helicases as critical for <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid pairing has brought new insights into this fundamental process.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005NW.....92..586B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005NW.....92..586B"><span>Osteological evidence for <span class="hlt">sister</span> group relationship between pseudo-toothed birds (Aves: Odontopterygiformes) and waterfowls (Anseriformes)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Bourdon, Estelle</p> <p>2005-12-01</p> <p>The phylogenetic affinities of the extinct pseudo-toothed birds have remained controversial. Some authors noted that they resemble both pelicans and allies (Pelecaniformes) and tube-nosed birds (Procellariiformes), but assigned them to a distinct taxon, the Odontopterygiformes. In most recent studies, the pseudo-toothed birds are referred to the family Pelagornithidae inside the Pelecaniformes. Here, I perform a cladistic analysis with five taxa of the pseudo-toothed birds including two undescribed new species from the Early Tertiary of Morocco. The present hypothesis strongly supports a <span class="hlt">sister</span> group relationship of pseudo-toothed birds (Odontopterygiformes) and waterfowls (Anseriformes). The Odontoanserae (Odontopterygiformes plus Anseriformes) are the <span class="hlt">sister</span> group of Neoaves. The placement of the landfowls (Galliformes) as the <span class="hlt">sister</span> taxon of all other neognathous birds does not support the consensus view that the Galloanserae (Galliformes plus Anseriformes) are monophyletic.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9730567','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9730567"><span>A case of IgA nephropathy in three <span class="hlt">sisters</span> with thin basement membrane disease.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Yoshida, K; Suzuki, J; Suzuki, S; Kume, K; Suzuki, H; Hujiki, T</p> <p>1998-01-01</p> <p>IgA nephropathy associated with thin basement membrane disease is reported in a 9-year-old female. The diagnosis of IgA nephropathy was made by means of an immunofluorescence investigation, which showed generalized diffuse mesangial deposits. Thin basement membrane disease was identified by electron-microscopic investigations, which disclosed thinning of the basement membrane of several capillary loops and prominence of the lamina densa. Her father, elder <span class="hlt">sister</span> and younger <span class="hlt">sister</span> were also found to have hematuria and her <span class="hlt">sisters</span> were diagnosed as having thin basement membrane disease by renal biopsy. Patients with IgA nephropathy have focal thinning of the glomerular basement membrane, but we consider that urinalysis of the family needs to be done for the diagnosis of familial thin basement membrane disease, when diffuse thinning of the glomerular basement membrane is detected in such patients.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23076835','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23076835"><span>Using a sibling design to compare childhood adversities in female patients with BPD and their <span class="hlt">sisters</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Laporte, Lise; Paris, Joel; Guttman, Herta; Russell, Jennifer; Correa, José A</p> <p>2012-11-01</p> <p>Abuse and neglect are well-established risk correlates of borderline personality disorder (BPD). The goal of this study was to examine whether BPD probands can be differentiated from their <span class="hlt">sisters</span> with respect to a range of developmental adversity and maltreatment indicators, including retrospective self-reports of past experiences of childhood abuse and neglect, dysfunctional parent-child relationships and peer victimization and dysfunctional peer relationships. A total of 53 patients with BPD were compared to 53 <span class="hlt">sisters</span> who were currently free of psychopathology on measures assessing childhood adversities. Both probands and <span class="hlt">sisters</span> reported similar prevalence of intrafamilial abuse, although BPD patients reported more severe physical and emotional abuse. BPD patients reported higher prevalence of physical abuse by peers. These findings generally support the principle of multifinality, in which similar histories of adversities can be associated with a variety of outcomes, ranging from psychopathology to resilience.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16240103','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16240103"><span>Osteological evidence for <span class="hlt">sister</span> group relationship between pseudo-toothed birds (Aves: Odontopterygiformes) and waterfowls (Anseriformes).</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Bourdon, Estelle</p> <p>2005-12-01</p> <p>The phylogenetic affinities of the extinct pseudo-toothed birds have remained controversial. Some authors noted that they resemble both pelicans and allies (Pelecaniformes) and tube-nosed birds (Procellariiformes), but assigned them to a distinct taxon, the Odontopterygiformes. In most recent studies, the pseudo-toothed birds are referred to the family Pelagornithidae inside the Pelecaniformes. Here, I perform a cladistic analysis with five taxa of the pseudo-toothed birds including two undescribed new species from the Early Tertiary of Morocco. The present hypothesis strongly supports a <span class="hlt">sister</span> group relationship of pseudo-toothed birds (Odontopterygiformes) and waterfowls (Anseriformes). The Odontoanserae (Odontopterygiformes plus Anseriformes) are the <span class="hlt">sister</span> group of Neoaves. The placement of the landfowls (Galliformes) as the <span class="hlt">sister</span> taxon of all other neognathous birds does not support the consensus view that the Galloanserae (Galliformes plus Anseriformes) are monophyletic.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3691390','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3691390"><span>The <span class="hlt">link</span> in <span class="hlt">Linking</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Caldwell, Jane C; Chiale, Pablo A; Gonzalez, Mario D; Baranchuk, Adrian</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>We present 2 cases of the slow-fast form of AVNRT with initially narrow QRS complexes followed by sudden unexpected transition to persistently wide QRS complexes due to aberrant intraventricular conduction. Introduction of a properly timed extrastimulus in one case and critical oscillations in cycle length due to short-long coupling in the second case set the stage for the initial bundle branch block. However, persistence of the aberrancy pattern once the initial event abated was maintained by the "<span class="hlt">linking</span>" phenomenon. Delayed, retrograde concealed activation from the contralateral bundle branch perpetuated the initial bundle branch block. PMID:23840106</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23840106','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23840106"><span>The <span class="hlt">link</span> in <span class="hlt">Linking</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Caldwell, Jane C; Chiale, Pablo A; Gonzalez, Mario D; Baranchuk, Adrian</p> <p>2013-05-01</p> <p>We present 2 cases of the slow-fast form of AVNRT with initially narrow QRS complexes followed by sudden unexpected transition to persistently wide QRS complexes due to aberrant intraventricular conduction. Introduction of a properly timed extrastimulus in one case and critical oscillations in cycle length due to short-long coupling in the second case set the stage for the initial bundle branch block. However, persistence of the aberrancy pattern once the initial event abated was maintained by the "<span class="hlt">linking</span>" phenomenon. Delayed, retrograde concealed activation from the contralateral bundle branch perpetuated the initial bundle branch block.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24362571','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24362571"><span>RecA bundles mediate homology pairing between distant <span class="hlt">sisters</span> during DNA break repair.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Lesterlin, Christian; Ball, Graeme; Schermelleh, Lothar; Sherratt, David J</p> <p>2014-02-13</p> <p>DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair by homologous recombination has evolved to maintain genetic integrity in all organisms. Although many reactions that occur during homologous recombination are known, it is unclear where, when and how they occur in cells. Here, by using conventional and super-resolution microscopy, we describe the progression of DSB repair in live Escherichia coli. Specifically, we investigate whether homologous recombination can occur efficiently between distant <span class="hlt">sister</span> loci that have segregated to opposite halves of an E. coli cell. We show that a site-specific DSB in one <span class="hlt">sister</span> can be repaired efficiently using distant <span class="hlt">sister</span> homology. After RecBCD processing of the DSB, RecA is recruited to the cut locus, where it nucleates into a bundle that contains many more RecA molecules than can associate with the two single-stranded DNA regions that form at the DSB. Mature bundles extend along the long axis of the cell, in the space between the bulk nucleoid and the inner membrane. Bundle formation is followed by pairing, in which the two ends of the cut locus relocate at the periphery of the nucleoid and together move rapidly towards the homology of the uncut <span class="hlt">sister</span>. After <span class="hlt">sister</span> locus pairing, RecA bundles disassemble and proteins that act late in homologous recombination are recruited to give viable recombinants 1-2-generation-time equivalents after formation of the initial DSB. Mutated RecA proteins that do not form bundles are defective in <span class="hlt">sister</span> pairing and in DSB-induced repair. This work reveals an unanticipated role of RecA bundles in channelling the movement of the DNA DSB ends, thereby facilitating the long-range homology search that occurs before the strand invasion and transfer reactions.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li class="active"><span>15</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_15 --> <div id="page_16" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li class="active"><span>16</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="301"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28318975','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28318975"><span>A Large and Consistent Phylogenomic Dataset Supports Sponges as the <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Group to All Other Animals.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Simion, Paul; Philippe, Hervé; Baurain, Denis; Jager, Muriel; Richter, Daniel J; Di Franco, Arnaud; Roure, Béatrice; Satoh, Nori; Quéinnec, Éric; Ereskovsky, Alexander; Lapébie, Pascal; Corre, Erwan; Delsuc, Frédéric; King, Nicole; Wörheide, Gert; Manuel, Michaël</p> <p>2017-04-03</p> <p>Resolving the early diversification of animal lineages has proven difficult, even using genome-scale datasets. Several phylogenomic studies have supported the classical scenario in which sponges (Porifera) are the <span class="hlt">sister</span> group to all other animals ("Porifera-<span class="hlt">sister</span>" hypothesis), consistent with a single origin of the gut, nerve cells, and muscle cells in the stem lineage of eumetazoans (bilaterians + ctenophores + cnidarians). In contrast, several other studies have recovered an alternative topology in which ctenophores are the <span class="hlt">sister</span> group to all other animals (including sponges). The "Ctenophora-<span class="hlt">sister</span>" hypothesis implies that eumetazoan-specific traits, such as neurons and muscle cells, either evolved once along the metazoan stem lineage and were then lost in sponges and placozoans or evolved at least twice independently in Ctenophora and in Cnidaria + Bilateria. Here, we report on our reconstruction of deep metazoan relationships using a 1,719-gene dataset with dense taxonomic sampling of non-bilaterian animals that was assembled using a semi-automated procedure, designed to reduce known error sources. Our dataset outperforms previous metazoan gene superalignments in terms of data quality and quantity. Analyses with a best-fitting site-heterogeneous evolutionary model provide strong statistical support for placing sponges as the <span class="hlt">sister</span>-group to all other metazoans, with ctenophores emerging as the second-earliest branching animal lineage. Only those methodological settings that exacerbated long-branch attraction artifacts yielded Ctenophora-<span class="hlt">sister</span>. These results show that methodological issues must be carefully addressed to tackle difficult phylogenetic questions and pave the road to a better understanding of how fundamental features of animal body plans have emerged.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014Natur.506..249L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014Natur.506..249L"><span>RecA bundles mediate homology pairing between distant <span class="hlt">sisters</span> during DNA break repair</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Lesterlin, Christian; Ball, Graeme; Schermelleh, Lothar; Sherratt, David J.</p> <p>2014-02-01</p> <p>DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair by homologous recombination has evolved to maintain genetic integrity in all organisms. Although many reactions that occur during homologous recombination are known, it is unclear where, when and how they occur in cells. Here, by using conventional and super-resolution microscopy, we describe the progression of DSB repair in live Escherichia coli. Specifically, we investigate whether homologous recombination can occur efficiently between distant <span class="hlt">sister</span> loci that have segregated to opposite halves of an E. coli cell. We show that a site-specific DSB in one <span class="hlt">sister</span> can be repaired efficiently using distant <span class="hlt">sister</span> homology. After RecBCD processing of the DSB, RecA is recruited to the cut locus, where it nucleates into a bundle that contains many more RecA molecules than can associate with the two single-stranded DNA regions that form at the DSB. Mature bundles extend along the long axis of the cell, in the space between the bulk nucleoid and the inner membrane. Bundle formation is followed by pairing, in which the two ends of the cut locus relocate at the periphery of the nucleoid and together move rapidly towards the homology of the uncut <span class="hlt">sister</span>. After <span class="hlt">sister</span> locus pairing, RecA bundles disassemble and proteins that act late in homologous recombination are recruited to give viable recombinants 1-2-generation-time equivalents after formation of the initial DSB. Mutated RecA proteins that do not form bundles are defective in <span class="hlt">sister</span> pairing and in DSB-induced repair. This work reveals an unanticipated role of RecA bundles in channelling the movement of the DNA DSB ends, thereby facilitating the long-range homology search that occurs before the strand invasion and transfer reactions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3116551','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3116551"><span>Synergistic convergence and split pons in horizontal gaze palsy and progressive scoliosis in two <span class="hlt">sisters</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Jain, Nitin R; Jethani, Jitendra; Narendran, Kalpana; Kanth, L</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Synergistic convergence is an ocular motor anomaly where on attempted abduction or on attempted horizontal gaze, both the eyes converge. It has been related to peripheral causes such as congenital fibrosis of extraocular muscles (CFEOM), congenital cranial dysinnervation syndrome, ocular misinnervation or rarely central causes like horizontal gaze palsy with progressive scoliosis, brain stem dysplasia. We hereby report the occurrence of synergistic convergence in two <span class="hlt">sisters</span>. Both of them also had kyphoscoliosis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) brain and spine in both the patients showed signs of brain stem dysplasia (split pons sign) differing in degree (younger <span class="hlt">sister</span> had more marked changes). PMID:21350292</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21350292','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21350292"><span>Synergistic convergence and split pons in horizontal gaze palsy and progressive scoliosis in two <span class="hlt">sisters</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Jain, Nitin R; Jethani, Jitendra; Narendran, Kalpana; Kanth, L</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Synergistic convergence is an ocular motor anomaly where on attempted abduction or on attempted horizontal gaze, both the eyes converge. It has been related to peripheral causes such as congenital fibrosis of extraocular muscles (CFEOM), congenital cranial dysinnervation syndrome, ocular misinnervation or rarely central causes like horizontal gaze palsy with progressive scoliosis, brain stem dysplasia. We hereby report the occurrence of synergistic convergence in two <span class="hlt">sisters</span>. Both of them also had kyphoscoliosis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) brain and spine in both the patients showed signs of brain stem dysplasia (split pons sign) differing in degree (younger <span class="hlt">sister</span> had more marked changes).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21595367','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21595367"><span>An illness in the family: Dr. Maude Abbott and her <span class="hlt">sister</span>, Alice Abbott.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Brookes, Barbara</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>This paper explores Maude Abbott's internationally significant career in medicine and her parallel commitment to caring for her <span class="hlt">sister</span>, Alice Abbott. An examination of Abbott's life reveals the difficulties faced by an ambitious Canadian woman in medicine from the 1890s to the 1920s; difficulties compounded by caring for a <span class="hlt">sister</span> with a mental illness. The Abbott archive suggests that it was far more difficult for a woman doctor to make the kind of sharp distinction between public and private life that might be expected of professional men.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=fear+AND+death&pg=5&id=EJ154079','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=fear+AND+death&pg=5&id=EJ154079"><span><span class="hlt">Death</span> Education and <span class="hlt">Death</span> Fear Reduction</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Mueller, Mary Louise</p> <p>1976-01-01</p> <p>The study examined the possibility of reducing the fear of <span class="hlt">death</span> in early adolescents through a 12-lesson unit designed to assist the student to achieve an attitude of integration toward life and <span class="hlt">death</span>. (NQ)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=death+AND+rates&pg=5&id=EJ233744','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=death+AND+rates&pg=5&id=EJ233744"><span>Aging and <span class="hlt">Death</span> Education.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Pinder, Margaret M.; Hayslip, Bert, Jr.</p> <p>1980-01-01</p> <p>The elderly <span class="hlt">death</span> rate is somewhat higher than the <span class="hlt">death</span> rate in general. Numbers of schools with gerontological curricula and frequency of <span class="hlt">death</span> education courses are positively related to elderly <span class="hlt">death</span> rates. The contention that elderly <span class="hlt">deaths</span> have less social impact is not supported. (JAC)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23054426','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23054426"><span><span class="hlt">Death</span>: 'nothing' gives insight.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ettema, Eric J</p> <p>2013-08-01</p> <p>According to a widely accepted belief, we cannot know our own <span class="hlt">death--death</span> means 'nothing' to us. At first sight, the meaning of 'nothing' just implies the negation or absence of 'something'. <span class="hlt">Death</span> then simply refers to the negation or absence of life. As a consequence, however, <span class="hlt">death</span> has no meaning of itself. This leads to an ontological paradox in which <span class="hlt">death</span> is both acknowledged and denied: <span class="hlt">death</span> is … nothing. In this article, I investigate whether insight into the ontological paradox of the nothingness of <span class="hlt">death</span> can contribute to a good end-of-life. By analysing Aquinas', Heidegger's and Derrida's understanding of <span class="hlt">death</span> as nothingness, I explore how giving meaning to <span class="hlt">death</span> on different ontological levels connects to, and at the same time provides resistance against, the harsh reality of <span class="hlt">death</span>. By doing so, I intend to demonstrate that insight into the nothingness of <span class="hlt">death</span> can count as a framework for a meaningful dealing with <span class="hlt">death</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017PhyA..469..767S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017PhyA..469..767S"><span><span class="hlt">Link</span> direction for <span class="hlt">link</span> prediction</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Shang, Ke-ke; Small, Michael; Yan, Wei-sheng</p> <p>2017-03-01</p> <p>Almost all previous studies on <span class="hlt">link</span> prediction have focused on using the properties of the network to predict the existence of <span class="hlt">links</span> between pairs of nodes. Unfortunately, previous methods rarely consider the role of <span class="hlt">link</span> direction for <span class="hlt">link</span> prediction. In fact, many real-world complex networks are directed and ignoring the <span class="hlt">link</span> direction will mean overlooking important information. In this study, we propose a phase-dynamic algorithm of the directed network nodes to analyse the role of <span class="hlt">link</span> directions and demonstrate that the bi-directional <span class="hlt">links</span> and the one-directional <span class="hlt">links</span> have different roles in <span class="hlt">link</span> prediction and network structure formation. From this, we propose new directional prediction methods and use six real networks to test our algorithms. In real networks, we find that compared to a pair of nodes which are connected by a one-directional <span class="hlt">link</span>, a pair of nodes which are connected by a bi-directional <span class="hlt">link</span> always have higher probabilities to connect to the common neighbours with only bi-directional <span class="hlt">links</span> (or conversely by one-directional <span class="hlt">links</span>). We suggest that, in the real networks, the bi-directional <span class="hlt">links</span> will generally be more informative for <span class="hlt">link</span> prediction and network structure formation. In addition, we propose a new directional randomized algorithm to demonstrate that the direction of the <span class="hlt">links</span> plays a significant role in <span class="hlt">link</span> prediction and network structure formation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title20-vol1/pdf/CFR-2014-title20-vol1-sec222-40.pdf','CFR2014'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title20-vol1/pdf/CFR-2014-title20-vol1-sec222-40.pdf"><span>20 CFR 222.40 - When determinations of relationship are made for parent, grandchild, brother or <span class="hlt">sister</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-04-01</p> <p>... for parent, grandchild, brother or <span class="hlt">sister</span>. 222.40 Section 222.40 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACT FAMILY RELATIONSHIPS Relationship as Parent, Grandchild, Brother or <span class="hlt">Sister</span> § 222.40 When determinations of relationship are made for parent,...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title20-vol1/pdf/CFR-2011-title20-vol1-sec222-40.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title20-vol1/pdf/CFR-2011-title20-vol1-sec222-40.pdf"><span>20 CFR 222.40 - When determinations of relationship are made for parent, grandchild, brother or <span class="hlt">sister</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-04-01</p> <p>... for parent, grandchild, brother or <span class="hlt">sister</span>. 222.40 Section 222.40 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACT FAMILY RELATIONSHIPS Relationship as Parent, Grandchild, Brother or <span class="hlt">Sister</span> § 222.40 When determinations of relationship are made for parent,...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title20-vol1/pdf/CFR-2012-title20-vol1-sec222-40.pdf','CFR2012'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title20-vol1/pdf/CFR-2012-title20-vol1-sec222-40.pdf"><span>20 CFR 222.40 - When determinations of relationship are made for parent, grandchild, brother or <span class="hlt">sister</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-04-01</p> <p>... for parent, grandchild, brother or <span class="hlt">sister</span>. 222.40 Section 222.40 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACT FAMILY RELATIONSHIPS Relationship as Parent, Grandchild, Brother or <span class="hlt">Sister</span> § 222.40 When determinations of relationship are made for parent,...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title20-vol1/pdf/CFR-2013-title20-vol1-sec222-40.pdf','CFR2013'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title20-vol1/pdf/CFR-2013-title20-vol1-sec222-40.pdf"><span>20 CFR 222.40 - When determinations of relationship are made for parent, grandchild, brother or <span class="hlt">sister</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-04-01</p> <p>... for parent, grandchild, brother or <span class="hlt">sister</span>. 222.40 Section 222.40 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACT FAMILY RELATIONSHIPS Relationship as Parent, Grandchild, Brother or <span class="hlt">Sister</span> § 222.40 When determinations of relationship are made for parent,...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25140559','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25140559"><span><span class="hlt">Sister</span> Mary Joseph Nodules on 99mTc HYNIC-TOC scintigraphy in patients with neuroendocrine tumors.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Jing, Hongli; Zhang, Yingqiang; Li, Fang</p> <p>2015-02-01</p> <p>A <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Mary Joseph nodule represents an umbilical metastasis, which is more commonly caused by a primary malignancy in gastrointestinal tract or from reproductive system. We report <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Mary Joseph nodules caused by neuroendocrine tumor and revealed on Tc HYNIC-TOC scintigraphy.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10535053','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10535053"><span>[Unobserved <span class="hlt">death</span> of an infant: cot <span class="hlt">death</span>?].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>van Wouwe, J P; Dandachli, T H; Huber, J</p> <p>1999-10-02</p> <p>Three children, two girls aged 8 and 12 months and one boy aged 7 weeks, were found dead unexpectedly. Autopsy revealed pneumonia in two children, following which the diagnosis of 'natural, explained <span class="hlt">death</span>' was made; one child showed no abnormalities and the diagnosis read 'natural, unexplained <span class="hlt">death</span>' (cot <span class="hlt">death</span>). Autopsy may currently only be performed with parental permission or, in case of doubt about unnatural cause of <span class="hlt">death</span>, by order of the public prosecutor. The authors propose routine performance of a protocolled autopsy by GP, pediatrician, pathologist and medical examiner in order to avoid subsequent and possibly incorrect doubt about the cause of <span class="hlt">death</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25902535','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25902535"><span>Error, signal, and the placement of Ctenophora <span class="hlt">sister</span> to all other animals.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Whelan, Nathan V; Kocot, Kevin M; Moroz, Leonid L; Halanych, Kenneth M</p> <p>2015-05-05</p> <p>Elucidating relationships among early animal lineages has been difficult, and recent phylogenomic analyses place Ctenophora <span class="hlt">sister</span> to all other extant animals, contrary to the traditional view of Porifera as the earliest-branching animal lineage. To date, phylogenetic support for either ctenophores or sponges as <span class="hlt">sister</span> to other animals has been limited and inconsistent among studies. Lack of agreement among phylogenomic analyses using different data and methods obscures how complex traits, such as epithelia, neurons, and muscles evolved. A consensus view of animal evolution will not be accepted until datasets and methods converge on a single hypothesis of early metazoan relationships and putative sources of systematic error (e.g., long-branch attraction, compositional bias, poor model choice) are assessed. Here, we investigate possible causes of systematic error by expanding taxon sampling with eight novel transcriptomes, strictly enforcing orthology inference criteria, and progressively examining potential causes of systematic error while using both maximum-likelihood with robust data partitioning and Bayesian inference with a site-heterogeneous model. We identified ribosomal protein genes as possessing a conflicting signal compared with other genes, which caused some past studies to infer ctenophores and cnidarians as <span class="hlt">sister</span>. Importantly, biases resulting from elevated compositional heterogeneity or elevated substitution rates are ruled out. Placement of ctenophores as <span class="hlt">sister</span> to all other animals, and sponge monophyly, are strongly supported under multiple analyses, herein.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=families+AND+linguistics&pg=4&id=EJ997719','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=families+AND+linguistics&pg=4&id=EJ997719"><span>A Tale of Three <span class="hlt">Sisters</span>: Language Ideologies, Identities, and Negotiations in a Bilingual, Transnational Family</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>King, Kendall A.</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>This longitudinal case study investigated how linguistic identity was constructed, constrained, and performed by three <span class="hlt">sisters</span>, aged 1, 12, and 17, within one bilingual, transnational Ecuadorian-U.S. family. Data were collected over 14 months through weekly home visits that included participant observation, informal interviews, and…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=learning+AND+shapes&pg=5&id=EJ997719','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=learning+AND+shapes&pg=5&id=EJ997719"><span>A Tale of Three <span class="hlt">Sisters</span>: Language Ideologies, Identities, and Negotiations in a Bilingual, Transnational Family</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>King, Kendall A.</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>This longitudinal case study investigated how linguistic identity was constructed, constrained, and performed by three <span class="hlt">sisters</span>, aged 1, 12, and 17, within one bilingual, transnational Ecuadorian-U.S. family. Data were collected over 14 months through weekly home visits that included participant observation, informal interviews, and…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=birth+AND+order+AND+personality&pg=4&id=EJ484723','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=birth+AND+order+AND+personality&pg=4&id=EJ484723"><span>Family Adaptation and Coping among Siblings of Cancer Patients, Their Brothers and <span class="hlt">Sisters</span>, and Nonclinical Controls.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Madan-Swain, Avi; And Others</p> <p>1993-01-01</p> <p>Examined coping and family adaptation in siblings (n=32) of cancer patients, their ill brothers and <span class="hlt">sisters</span> (n=19), and control group of nonclinical children (n=10) with healthy siblings. Gender and age of sibling, birth order, and number of siblings were examined. Found better adaptation in larger families and decreased family involvement among…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3955356','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3955356"><span>Spotlights on our <span class="hlt">sister</span> journals: ChemistryOpen 1/2014</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>On these pages, we feature a selection of the excellent work that has recently been published in our <span class="hlt">sister</span> journals. If you are reading these pages on a computer, click on any of the items to read the full article. Otherwise please see the DOIs for easy online access through Wiley Online Library. PMID:24688888</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li class="active"><span>16</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_16 --> <div id="page_17" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li class="active"><span>17</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="321"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19878537','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19878537"><span>Effect of borax on immune cell proliferation and <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchange in human chromosomes.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Pongsavee, Malinee</p> <p>2009-10-30</p> <p>Borax is used as a food additive. It becomes toxic when accumulated in the body. It causes vomiting, fatigue and renal failure. The heparinized blood samples from 40 healthy men were studied for the impact of borax toxicity on immune cell proliferation (lymphocyte proliferation) and <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchange in human chromosomes. The MTT assay and <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Chromatid Exchange (SCE) technic were used in this experiment with the borax concentrations of 0.1, 0.15, 0.2, 0.3 and 0.6 mg/ml. It showed that the immune cell proliferation (lymphocyte proliferation) was decreased when the concentrations of borax increased. The borax concentration of 0.6 mg/ml had the most effectiveness to the lymphocyte proliferation and had the highest cytotoxicity index (CI). The borax concentrations of 0.15, 0.2, 0.3 and 0.6 mg/ml significantly induced <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchange in human chromosomes (P < 0.05). Borax had effects on immune cell proliferation (lymphocyte proliferation) and induced <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchange in human chromosomes. Toxicity of borax may lead to cellular toxicity and genetic defect in human.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2776007','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2776007"><span>Effect of borax on immune cell proliferation and <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchange in human chromosomes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Pongsavee, Malinee</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>Background Borax is used as a food additive. It becomes toxic when accumulated in the body. It causes vomiting, fatigue and renal failure. Methods The heparinized blood samples from 40 healthy men were studied for the impact of borax toxicity on immune cell proliferation (lymphocyte proliferation) and <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchange in human chromosomes. The MTT assay and <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Chromatid Exchange (SCE) technic were used in this experiment with the borax concentrations of 0.1, 0.15, 0.2, 0.3 and 0.6 mg/ml. Results It showed that the immune cell proliferation (lymphocyte proliferation) was decreased when the concentrations of borax increased. The borax concentration of 0.6 mg/ml had the most effectiveness to the lymphocyte proliferation and had the highest cytotoxicity index (CI). The borax concentrations of 0.15, 0.2, 0.3 and 0.6 mg/ml significantly induced <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchange in human chromosomes (P < 0.05). Conclusion Borax had effects on immune cell proliferation (lymphocyte proliferation) and induced <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchange in human chromosomes. Toxicity of borax may lead to cellular toxicity and genetic defect in human. PMID:19878537</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=psychological+AND+treatments&id=EJ1011495','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=psychological+AND+treatments&id=EJ1011495"><span>Brother-<span class="hlt">Sister</span> Incest: Data from Anonymous Computer-Assisted Self Interviews</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Stroebel, Sandra S.; O'Keefe, Stephen L.; Beard, Keith W.; Kuo, Shih-Ya; Swindell, Samuel; Stroupe, Walter</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Retrospective data were entered anonymously by 1,521 adult women using computer-assisted self interview. Forty were classified as victims of brother-<span class="hlt">sister</span> incest, 19 were classified as victims of father-daughter incest, and 232 were classified as victims of sexual abuse by an adult other than their father before reaching 18 years of age. The…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=dialogue+AND+groups+AND+interest&pg=3&id=EJ1003992','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=dialogue+AND+groups+AND+interest&pg=3&id=EJ1003992"><span>Empirical Psycho-Aesthetics and Her <span class="hlt">Sisters</span>: Substantive and Methodological Issues--Part II</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Konecni, Vladimir J.</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Empirical psycho-aesthetics is approached in this two-part article from two directions. Part I, which appeared in the Winter 2012 issue of "JAE," addressed definitional and organizational issues, including the field's origins, its relation to "<span class="hlt">sister</span>" disciplines (experimental philosophy, cognitive neuroscience of art, and neuroaesthetics), and…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=syndrome+AND+turner&pg=3&id=EJ579567','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=syndrome+AND+turner&pg=3&id=EJ579567"><span>Social Functioning among Girls with Fragile X or Turner Syndrome and Their <span class="hlt">Sisters</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Mazzocco, Michele M. M.; Baumgardner, Thomas; Freund, Lisa S.; Reiss, Allan L.</p> <p>1998-01-01</p> <p>Social behaviors among girls (ages 6-16) with fragile X (n=8) or Turner syndrome (n=9) were examined to address the role of family environment versus biological determinants of social dysfunction. Compared to their <span class="hlt">sisters</span>, subjects had lower IQS and higher rating of social and attention problems. (Author/CR)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=chess&pg=3&id=EJ939604','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=chess&pg=3&id=EJ939604"><span>Does High-Level Intellectual Performance Depend on Practice Alone? Debunking the Polgar <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> Case</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Howard, Robert W.</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>The famous Polgar <span class="hlt">sisters</span> started chess very young, undertook extensive study, and two became grandmasters. This case often is cited as decisive evidence that practice alone is key in development of expertise, that innate talent is unimportant or non-existent, and that almost anyone can become a grandmaster. But on close examination these claims…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=ADDRESS+AND+PEOPLE&pg=6&id=EJ1088123','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=ADDRESS+AND+PEOPLE&pg=6&id=EJ1088123"><span>Living with a Brother Who Has an Autism Spectrum Disorder: A <span class="hlt">Sister</span>'s Perspective</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Connell, Zara O.; Halloran, Maeve O.; Doody, Owen</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>People with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) are born into families and influence family functioning both positively and negatively. One of the most enduring relationships a person with ASD will have is their relationship with a brother or <span class="hlt">sister</span>. Services for people with ASD should provide effective support to families, which include brothers,…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Space+AND+Race&pg=2&id=EJ1150329','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Space+AND+Race&pg=2&id=EJ1150329"><span>Exploring Undergraduate Black Womyn's Motivations for Engaging in "<span class="hlt">Sister</span> Circle" Organizations</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Croom, Natasha N.; Beatty, Cameron C.; Acker, Lorraine D.; Butler, Malika</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>The purpose of this critical qualitative inquiry was to explore what motivated undergraduate Black womyn (UBW) to engage in "<span class="hlt">Sister</span> Circle"-type student organizations--or groups that center race and gender. Using a critical race feminist theoretical lens, data were collected through a combination of one-on-one interviews and focus…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19410348','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19410348"><span>[Familial pulmonary fibrosis in 2 Mexican <span class="hlt">sisters</span> with Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Zamora, Ana C; Alonso-Martínez, Delfino; Barrera, Lourdes; Mendoza, Felipe; Gaxiola, Miguel; Carrillo, Guillermo</p> <p>2009-08-01</p> <p>Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder commonly found in individuals of Puerto Rican ancestry. We present 2 cases of familial pulmonary fibrosis in 2 Mexican <span class="hlt">sisters</span> with Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome. Pulmonary fibrosis was biopsy-proven in 1 of the patients. This report shows that Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome may occur in individuals of Mexican ancestry.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=articles+AND+networks&pg=7&id=EJ1078896','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=articles+AND+networks&pg=7&id=EJ1078896"><span>Teaching <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> and Transnational Networks: Recruitment and Education Expansion in the Long Nineteenth Century</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Raftery, Deirdre</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>This article examines the management of the education enterprise of teaching <span class="hlt">Sisters</span>, with reference to their transnational networking. The article suggests that orders of women religious were the first all-female transnational networks, engaged constantly in work that was characterised by "movement, ebb and circulation". The mobility of…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title20-vol2/pdf/CFR-2010-title20-vol2-sec410-214.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title20-vol2/pdf/CFR-2010-title20-vol2-sec410-214.pdf"><span>20 CFR 410.214 - Conditions of entitlement; parent, brother, or <span class="hlt">sister</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-04-01</p> <p>..., or <span class="hlt">sister</span>. 410.214 Section 410.214 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL COAL... the pertinent time (see § 410.380); and (4) Files proof of support before June 1, 1974, or within 2... Administration that there is good cause for failure to file such proof within such period (see § 410.216). (b) In...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=adolescence+AND+life+AND+satisfaction&pg=4&id=EJ965819','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=adolescence+AND+life+AND+satisfaction&pg=4&id=EJ965819"><span>Youths' Caretaking of Their Adolescent <span class="hlt">Sisters</span>' Children: Its Costs and Benefits for Youths' Development</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>East, Patricia L.; Weisner, Thomas S.; Reyes, Barbara T.</p> <p>2006-01-01</p> <p>This study examined how time spent caring for a teenage <span class="hlt">sister</span>'s child and experiences in providing care related to youths' young adult outcomes. Latino and African American youths (N = 108) were studied during middle and late adolescence. Results indicated that youths who provided many hours of child care were more stressed and had lower school…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=moral+AND+enhancement&id=EJ755531','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=moral+AND+enhancement&id=EJ755531"><span>Meanings of Sisterhood and Developmental Disability: Narratives from White Nondisabled <span class="hlt">Sisters</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>McGraw, Lori A.; Walker, Alexis J.</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>Integrating thought from critical feminist and disability theorists via a strategic social constructionist perspective, the authors analyzed 10 in-depth qualitative interviews to begin to understand the dialogue between (a) how nondisabled <span class="hlt">sisters</span> understand themselves and their siblings with developmental disabilities and (b) wider systems of…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=origin+AND+philosophy&pg=4&id=EJ1003992','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=origin+AND+philosophy&pg=4&id=EJ1003992"><span>Empirical Psycho-Aesthetics and Her <span class="hlt">Sisters</span>: Substantive and Methodological Issues--Part II</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Konecni, Vladimir J.</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Empirical psycho-aesthetics is approached in this two-part article from two directions. Part I, which appeared in the Winter 2012 issue of "JAE," addressed definitional and organizational issues, including the field's origins, its relation to "<span class="hlt">sister</span>" disciplines (experimental philosophy, cognitive neuroscience of art, and neuroaesthetics), and…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4426464','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4426464"><span>Error, signal, and the placement of Ctenophora <span class="hlt">sister</span> to all other animals</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Whelan, Nathan V.; Kocot, Kevin M.; Moroz, Leonid L.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Elucidating relationships among early animal lineages has been difficult, and recent phylogenomic analyses place Ctenophora <span class="hlt">sister</span> to all other extant animals, contrary to the traditional view of Porifera as the earliest-branching animal lineage. To date, phylogenetic support for either ctenophores or sponges as <span class="hlt">sister</span> to other animals has been limited and inconsistent among studies. Lack of agreement among phylogenomic analyses using different data and methods obscures how complex traits, such as epithelia, neurons, and muscles evolved. A consensus view of animal evolution will not be accepted until datasets and methods converge on a single hypothesis of early metazoan relationships and putative sources of systematic error (e.g., long-branch attraction, compositional bias, poor model choice) are assessed. Here, we investigate possible causes of systematic error by expanding taxon sampling with eight novel transcriptomes, strictly enforcing orthology inference criteria, and progressively examining potential causes of systematic error while using both maximum-likelihood with robust data partitioning and Bayesian inference with a site-heterogeneous model. We identified ribosomal protein genes as possessing a conflicting signal compared with other genes, which caused some past studies to infer ctenophores and cnidarians as <span class="hlt">sister</span>. Importantly, biases resulting from elevated compositional heterogeneity or elevated substitution rates are ruled out. Placement of ctenophores as <span class="hlt">sister</span> to all other animals, and sponge monophyly, are strongly supported under multiple analyses, herein. PMID:25902535</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=muhammad&pg=3&id=EJ449479','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=muhammad&pg=3&id=EJ449479"><span>The <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Clara Muhammad Schools: Pioneers in the Development of Islamic Education in America.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Rashid, Hakim M.; Muhammad, Zakiyyah</p> <p>1992-01-01</p> <p>Traces the history of <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Clara Muhammad schools from their beginnings in the early 1930s through their transformation into an orthodox Islamic educational system, and reviews the movement's role in the Council of Islamic Schools of North America. Muslim African Americans are increasingly identifying with the worldwide Islamic movement. (SLD)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=pastor%27s+AND+transition&id=ED530841','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=pastor%27s+AND+transition&id=ED530841"><span>When the <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> Said Farewell: The Transition of Leadership in Catholic Elementary Schools</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Caruso, Michael P., S.J.</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>"When the <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> Said Farewell" tells an important story of the contributions of Catholic elementary schools to the United States by chronicling the experiences and insights of religious women (nuns) who were the last members of their communities to serve in parish elementary schools, and of those lay men and women who were the first to…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=big+AND+space&pg=7&id=EJ830840','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=big+AND+space&pg=7&id=EJ830840"><span>Brothers and <span class="hlt">Sisters</span>: A Source of Support for Children in School?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Hadfield, Lucy; Edwards, Rosalind; Mauthner, Melanie</p> <p>2006-01-01</p> <p>Whilst UK schools move towards U.S "big brother" style mentoring systems for children, are actual brothers and <span class="hlt">sisters</span> becoming an invisible source of support to deal with bullying in everyday life? This paper reports on research with children aged 7-13 about their experiences and understandings of their relationships with their brothers…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title20-vol2/pdf/CFR-2011-title20-vol2-sec410-214.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title20-vol2/pdf/CFR-2011-title20-vol2-sec410-214.pdf"><span>20 CFR 410.214 - Conditions of entitlement; parent, brother, or <span class="hlt">sister</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-04-01</p> <p>... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Conditions of entitlement; parent, brother...; Duration of Entitlement; Filing of Claims and Evidence § 410.214 Conditions of entitlement; parent, brother, or <span class="hlt">sister</span>. An individual is entitled to benefits if: (a) Such individual: (1) Is the parent,...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28254474','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28254474"><span>New insights on the <span class="hlt">sister</span> lineage of percomorph fishes with an anchored hybrid enrichment dataset.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Dornburg, Alex; Townsend, Jeffrey P; Brooks, Willa; Spriggs, Elizabeth; Eytan, Ron I; Moore, Jon A; Wainwright, Peter C; Lemmon, Alan; Lemmon, Emily Moriarty; Near, Thomas J</p> <p>2017-05-01</p> <p>Percomorph fishes represent over 17,100 species, including several model organisms and species of economic importance. Despite continuous advances in the resolution of the percomorph Tree of Life, resolution of the <span class="hlt">sister</span> lineage to Percomorpha remains inconsistent but restricted to a small number of candidate lineages. Here we use an anchored hybrid enrichment (AHE) dataset of 132 loci with over 99,000 base pairs to identify the <span class="hlt">sister</span> lineage of percomorph fishes. Initial analyses of this dataset failed to recover a strongly supported <span class="hlt">sister</span> clade to Percomorpha, however, scrutiny of the AHE dataset revealed a bias towards high GC content at fast-evolving codon partitions (GC bias). By combining several existing approaches aimed at mitigating the impacts of convergence in GC bias, including RY coding and analyses of amino acids, we consistently recovered a strongly supported clade comprised of Holocentridae (squirrelfishes), Berycidae (Alfonsinos), Melamphaidae (bigscale fishes), Cetomimidae (flabby whalefishes), and Rondeletiidae (redmouth whalefishes) as the <span class="hlt">sister</span> lineage to Percomorpha. Additionally, implementing phylogenetic informativeness (PI) based metrics as a filtration method yielded this same topology, suggesting PI based approaches will preferentially filter these fast-evolving regions and act in a manner consistent with other phylogenetic approaches aimed at mitigating GC bias. Our results provide a new perspective on a key issue for studies investigating the evolutionary history of more than one quarter of all living species of vertebrates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li class="active"><span>17</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_17 --> <div id="page_18" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li class="active"><span>18</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="341"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=pierce&pg=6&id=EJ605384','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=pierce&pg=6&id=EJ605384"><span>Prejudice and Educational Choice: 75th Anniversary of Pierce v. Society of <span class="hlt">Sisters</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Mizia, Robert Louis</p> <p>2000-01-01</p> <p>Recounts the landmark case of Pierce v. Society of <span class="hlt">Sisters</span>. Reminds readers that parental choice of an appropriate education for their children is a constitutional right and liberty under law and must be sustained. Asserts that true choice will occur only when consensus on public funding issues of school choice (including private and Catholic…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Women%27s+AND+Movement&pg=6&id=EJ1078896','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Women%27s+AND+Movement&pg=6&id=EJ1078896"><span>Teaching <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> and Transnational Networks: Recruitment and Education Expansion in the Long Nineteenth Century</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Raftery, Deirdre</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>This article examines the management of the education enterprise of teaching <span class="hlt">Sisters</span>, with reference to their transnational networking. The article suggests that orders of women religious were the first all-female transnational networks, engaged constantly in work that was characterised by "movement, ebb and circulation". The mobility of…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Beans&pg=4&id=EJ797780','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Beans&pg=4&id=EJ797780"><span>Three <span class="hlt">Sisters</span>: Lessons of Traditional Story Honored in Assessment and Accreditation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Chenault, Venida S.</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>The three <span class="hlt">sisters</span> story is shared across many tribes. It explains the practice of planting corn, beans, and squash together. The corn stalks provide support for the bean vines; the beans provide nitrogen for the corn; and the squash prevents weed growth between the mounds. Such stories explain not only the science of agricultural methods in tribal…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=big+AND+5&pg=5&id=EJ927867','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=big+AND+5&pg=5&id=EJ927867"><span>Mentoring in Schools: An Impact Study of Big Brothers Big <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> School-Based Mentoring</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Herrera, Carla; Grossman, Jean Baldwin; Kauh, Tina J.; McMaken, Jennifer</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>This random assignment impact study of Big Brothers Big <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> School-Based Mentoring involved 1,139 9- to 16-year-old students in 10 cities nationwide. Youth were randomly assigned to either a treatment group (receiving mentoring) or a control group (receiving no mentoring) and were followed for 1.5 school years. At the end of the first school…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED404313.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED404313.pdf"><span><span class="hlt">Sister</span> Schools: An Experience in Culture Vision for Preservice Teachers and Elementary Children.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Black, Sharon J.; Cutler, Beverly R.</p> <p></p> <p>The School of Education at Brigham Young University (BYU) in Utah developed a <span class="hlt">sister</span> school program with teachers and children in Cuauhtemoc and Dublan (Mexico) to increase the culture vision of preservice teachers while simultaneously allowing elementary school children to develop culture awareness by participating in a cross-cultural learning…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=INCEST&id=EJ1011495','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=INCEST&id=EJ1011495"><span>Brother-<span class="hlt">Sister</span> Incest: Data from Anonymous Computer-Assisted Self Interviews</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Stroebel, Sandra S.; O'Keefe, Stephen L.; Beard, Keith W.; Kuo, Shih-Ya; Swindell, Samuel; Stroupe, Walter</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Retrospective data were entered anonymously by 1,521 adult women using computer-assisted self interview. Forty were classified as victims of brother-<span class="hlt">sister</span> incest, 19 were classified as victims of father-daughter incest, and 232 were classified as victims of sexual abuse by an adult other than their father before reaching 18 years of age. The…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=moral+AND+enhancement&id=EJ755531','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=moral+AND+enhancement&id=EJ755531"><span>Meanings of Sisterhood and Developmental Disability: Narratives from White Nondisabled <span class="hlt">Sisters</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>McGraw, Lori A.; Walker, Alexis J.</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>Integrating thought from critical feminist and disability theorists via a strategic social constructionist perspective, the authors analyzed 10 in-depth qualitative interviews to begin to understand the dialogue between (a) how nondisabled <span class="hlt">sisters</span> understand themselves and their siblings with developmental disabilities and (b) wider systems of…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title20-vol2/pdf/CFR-2011-title20-vol2-sec410-340.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title20-vol2/pdf/CFR-2011-title20-vol2-sec410-340.pdf"><span>20 CFR 410.340 - Determination of relationship; parent, brother, or <span class="hlt">sister</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-04-01</p> <p>... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Determination of relationship; parent, brother, or <span class="hlt">sister</span>. 410.340 Section 410.340 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL COAL MINE HEALTH AND SAFETY ACT OF 1969, TITLE IV-BLACK LUNG BENEFITS (1969- ) Relationship...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title20-vol2/pdf/CFR-2010-title20-vol2-sec410-340.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title20-vol2/pdf/CFR-2010-title20-vol2-sec410-340.pdf"><span>20 CFR 410.340 - Determination of relationship; parent, brother, or <span class="hlt">sister</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-04-01</p> <p>... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Determination of relationship; parent, brother, or <span class="hlt">sister</span>. 410.340 Section 410.340 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL COAL MINE HEALTH AND SAFETY ACT OF 1969, TITLE IV-BLACK LUNG BENEFITS (1969- ) Relationship...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title20-vol2/pdf/CFR-2010-title20-vol2-sec410-380.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title20-vol2/pdf/CFR-2010-title20-vol2-sec410-380.pdf"><span>20 CFR 410.380 - Determination of dependency; parent, brother, or <span class="hlt">sister</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-04-01</p> <p>... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Determination of dependency; parent, brother, or <span class="hlt">sister</span>. 410.380 Section 410.380 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL COAL MINE HEALTH AND SAFETY ACT OF 1969, TITLE IV-BLACK LUNG BENEFITS (1969- ) Relationship and...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title20-vol2/pdf/CFR-2011-title20-vol2-sec410-380.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title20-vol2/pdf/CFR-2011-title20-vol2-sec410-380.pdf"><span>20 CFR 410.380 - Determination of dependency; parent, brother, or <span class="hlt">sister</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-04-01</p> <p>... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Determination of dependency; parent, brother, or <span class="hlt">sister</span>. 410.380 Section 410.380 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL COAL MINE HEALTH AND SAFETY ACT OF 1969, TITLE IV-BLACK LUNG BENEFITS (1969- ) Relationship and...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=corn&pg=2&id=EJ797780','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=corn&pg=2&id=EJ797780"><span>Three <span class="hlt">Sisters</span>: Lessons of Traditional Story Honored in Assessment and Accreditation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Chenault, Venida S.</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>The three <span class="hlt">sisters</span> story is shared across many tribes. It explains the practice of planting corn, beans, and squash together. The corn stalks provide support for the bean vines; the beans provide nitrogen for the corn; and the squash prevents weed growth between the mounds. Such stories explain not only the science of agricultural methods in tribal…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=video+AND+games+AND+memory&pg=3&id=ED266892','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=video+AND+games+AND+memory&pg=3&id=ED266892"><span>Walking with Grandfather and Great Wolf and Little Mouse <span class="hlt">Sister</span>. Teacher's Guide.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Lethbridge Univ. (Alberta).</p> <p></p> <p>Written for use with videotaped versions of the stories "Walking with Grandfather" and "Great Wolf and Little Mouse <span class="hlt">Sister</span>," this guide presents 20 lessons that teachers can adapt for students of various ages and use in integrated units or other curriculum approaches. The introductory material describes the use and philosophy of the video stories,…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED514909.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED514909.pdf"><span>Serving, Learning and Mentoring through the Big Brothers Big <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> Program</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Sivukamaran, Thillainatarajan; Holland, Glenda; Clark, Leonard J.</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>This study describes the collaborative partnership between a Big Brothers Big <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> organization, an elementary school and the College of Education at a public university. The partnership utilized a mentoring system consisting of elementary students, college students, elementary teachers and university faculty. Benefits of the various…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED452094.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED452094.pdf"><span><span class="hlt">Sisters</span> in Science: Using Sports as a Vehicle for Science Learning.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Hammrich, Penny L.; Richardson, Greer M.; Green, Tina Sloan; Livingston, Beverly</p> <p></p> <p>This paper describes a project for upper elementary and middle school minority girl students called the <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> in Sport Science (SISS). The SISS program addresses the needs of urban girls in gaining access to equal education in science and mathematics by using athletics as a vehicle for learning. The program provides a non-competitive and…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1068322.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1068322.pdf"><span>Project Exploration's <span class="hlt">Sisters</span>4Science: Involving Urban Girls of Color in Science Out of School</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Lyon, Gabrielle; Jafri, Jameela</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Project Exploration's <span class="hlt">Sisters</span>4Science (S4S) is an afterschool program for middle and high school urban girls of color. Designed to "get" girls interested in science, "keep" girls interested in science, and "equip" girls with skills and experiences that enable them to pursue science, S4S creates a science-rich learning…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=marquez&pg=6&id=EJ903417','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=marquez&pg=6&id=EJ903417"><span>Transitioning from Doctoral Study to the Academy: Theorizing "Trenzas" of Identity for Latina <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Scholars</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Espino, Michelle M.; Munoz, Susana M.; Kiyama, Judy Marquez</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>This article focuses on multiple truths pertaining to doctoral education as expressed by three Latina doctoral recipients. These scholars successfully navigated various educational processes with the support of one another, their families, faculty, and their chosen discipline. The authors, as <span class="hlt">sister</span> scholars, retell their educational journeys…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4764575','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4764575"><span>Super-resolution kinetochore tracking reveals the mechanisms of human <span class="hlt">sister</span> kinetochore directional switching</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Burroughs, Nigel J; Harry, Edward F; McAinsh, Andrew D</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>The congression of chromosomes to the spindle equator involves the directed motility of bi-orientated <span class="hlt">sister</span> kinetochores. <span class="hlt">Sister</span> kinetochores bind bundles of dynamic microtubules and are physically connected through centromeric chromatin. A crucial question is to understand how <span class="hlt">sister</span> kinetochores are coordinated to generate motility and directional switches. Here, we combine super-resolution tracking of kinetochores with automated switching-point detection to analyse <span class="hlt">sister</span> switching dynamics over thousands of events. We discover that switching is initiated by both the leading (microtubules depolymerising) or trailing (microtubules polymerising) kinetochore. Surprisingly, trail-driven switching generates an overstretch of the chromatin that relaxes over the following half-period. This rules out the involvement of a tension sensor, the central premise of the long-standing tension-model. Instead, our data support a model in which clocks set the intrinsic-switching time of the two kinetochore-attached microtubule fibres, with the centromeric spring tension operating as a feedback to slow or accelerate the clocks. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09500.001 PMID:26460545</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=bebes&id=EJ604478','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=bebes&id=EJ604478"><span>"Brothers and <span class="hlt">Sisters</span>": A Novel Way to Teach Human Resources Management.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Bumpus, Minnette</p> <p>2000-01-01</p> <p>The novel "Brothers and <span class="hlt">Sisters</span>" by Bebe Moore Campbell was used in a management course to explore human resource management issues, concepts, and theories. The course included prereading and postreading surveys, lecture, book review, and examination. Most of the students (92%) felt the novel was an appropriate way to meet course…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27801743','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27801743"><span>99mTc-DMSA Uptake in a <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Mary Joseph's Nodule From Ovarian Cancer.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Naddaf, Sleiman; Azzumeea, Fahad; Fahad Alzayed, Mohammed</p> <p>2016-12-01</p> <p>A 50-year-old woman with ovarian cancer underwent Tc-DMSA scan to evaluate the functional status of the right hydronephrotic kidney. The images incidentally revealed a well-defined focus of mild radiotracer uptake at the midanterior abdominal wall, which correlated with a metastatic <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Mary Joseph's nodule seen on CT performed a week earlier.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li class="active"><span>18</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_18 --> <div id="page_19" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li class="active"><span>19</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="361"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=258716','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=258716"><span>A <span class="hlt">sister</span> group metabolomic contrast delineates the biochemical regulation underlying desiccation tolerance in Sporobolus stapfianus</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/find-a-publication/">USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Understanding how plant cells tolerate dehydration is a vital prerequisite for developing strategies for improving drought tolerance. The desiccation tolerant grass Sporobolus stapfianus and the desiccation sensitive S. pyramidalis were used to form a <span class="hlt">sister</span>-group contrast to reveal adaptive metabo...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=World+AND+System&pg=4&id=EJ1048143','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=World+AND+System&pg=4&id=EJ1048143"><span>They Came with a Purpose: Educational Journeys of Nineteenth-Century Irish Dominican <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Teachers</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Collins, Jenny</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Irish Catholic teaching <span class="hlt">sisters</span> were major actors in the development of education systems in New World countries such as the United States, Canada, South Africa, Australia and New Zealand. Immigrants themselves, they faced a number of key challenges as they sought to adapt Old World cultural and educational ideas to the education of the immigrant…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=teenage+AND+pregnancy&pg=5&id=EJ965819','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=teenage+AND+pregnancy&pg=5&id=EJ965819"><span>Youths' Caretaking of Their Adolescent <span class="hlt">Sisters</span>' Children: Its Costs and Benefits for Youths' Development</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>East, Patricia L.; Weisner, Thomas S.; Reyes, Barbara T.</p> <p>2006-01-01</p> <p>This study examined how time spent caring for a teenage <span class="hlt">sister</span>'s child and experiences in providing care related to youths' young adult outcomes. Latino and African American youths (N = 108) were studied during middle and late adolescence. Results indicated that youths who provided many hours of child care were more stressed and had lower school…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=birth+AND+order+AND+personality&pg=4&id=EJ484723','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=birth+AND+order+AND+personality&pg=4&id=EJ484723"><span>Family Adaptation and Coping among Siblings of Cancer Patients, Their Brothers and <span class="hlt">Sisters</span>, and Nonclinical Controls.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Madan-Swain, Avi; And Others</p> <p>1993-01-01</p> <p>Examined coping and family adaptation in siblings (n=32) of cancer patients, their ill brothers and <span class="hlt">sisters</span> (n=19), and control group of nonclinical children (n=10) with healthy siblings. Gender and age of sibling, birth order, and number of siblings were examined. Found better adaptation in larger families and decreased family involvement among…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=New+AND+worlds&id=EJ1048143','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=New+AND+worlds&id=EJ1048143"><span>They Came with a Purpose: Educational Journeys of Nineteenth-Century Irish Dominican <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Teachers</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Collins, Jenny</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Irish Catholic teaching <span class="hlt">sisters</span> were major actors in the development of education systems in New World countries such as the United States, Canada, South Africa, Australia and New Zealand. Immigrants themselves, they faced a number of key challenges as they sought to adapt Old World cultural and educational ideas to the education of the immigrant…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED440885.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED440885.pdf"><span>The <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> in Science Program: Building Girls' Interest and Achievement in Science and Mathematics.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Hammrich, Penny L.; Richardson, Greer M.; Livingston, Beverly</p> <p></p> <p>The <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> in Science program seeks to increase elementary school girls' interest and achievement in science and mathematics, to create a more positive learning climate for minority school girls and their families on academic and community/social levels, and increase the knowledge base and understanding of parents with respect to their influence…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=turner+AND+syndrome&pg=2&id=EJ579567','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=turner+AND+syndrome&pg=2&id=EJ579567"><span>Social Functioning among Girls with Fragile X or Turner Syndrome and Their <span class="hlt">Sisters</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Mazzocco, Michele M. M.; Baumgardner, Thomas; Freund, Lisa S.; Reiss, Allan L.</p> <p>1998-01-01</p> <p>Social behaviors among girls (ages 6-16) with fragile X (n=8) or Turner syndrome (n=9) were examined to address the role of family environment versus biological determinants of social dysfunction. Compared to their <span class="hlt">sisters</span>, subjects had lower IQS and higher rating of social and attention problems. (Author/CR)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27865080','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27865080"><span>Cell <span class="hlt">death</span>-independent activities of the <span class="hlt">death</span> receptors CD95, TRAILR1, and TRAILR2.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Siegmund, Daniela; Lang, Isabell; Wajant, Harald</p> <p>2017-04-01</p> <p>Since their identification more than 20 years ago, the <span class="hlt">death</span> receptors CD95, TRAILR1, and TRAILR2 have been intensively studied with respect to their cell <span class="hlt">death</span>-inducing activities. These receptors, however, can also trigger a variety of cell <span class="hlt">death</span>-independent cellular responses reaching from the activation of proinflammatory gene transcription programs over the stimulation of proliferation and differentiation to induction of cell migration. The cell <span class="hlt">death</span>-inducing signaling mechanisms of CD95 and the TRAIL <span class="hlt">death</span> receptors are well understood. In contrast, despite the increasing recognition of the biological and pathophysiological relevance of the cell <span class="hlt">death</span>-independent activities of CD95, TRAILR1, and TRAILR2, the corresponding signaling mechanisms are less understood and give no fully coherent picture. This review is focused on the cell <span class="hlt">death</span>-independent activities of CD95 and the TRAIL <span class="hlt">death</span> receptors and addresses mainly three questions: (a) how are these receptors <span class="hlt">linked</span> to noncell <span class="hlt">death</span> pathways at the molecular level, (b) which factors determine the balance of cell <span class="hlt">death</span> and cell <span class="hlt">death</span>-independent activities of CD95 and the TRAIL <span class="hlt">death</span> receptors at the cellular level, and (c) what are the consequences of the cell <span class="hlt">death</span>-independent functions of these receptors for their role in cancer and inflammatory diseases. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27996933','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27996933"><span>Using Literal Text From the <span class="hlt">Death</span> Certificate to Enhance Mortality Statistics: Characterizing Drug Involvement in <span class="hlt">Deaths</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Trinidad, James P; Warner, Margaret; Bastian, Brigham A; Minino, Arialdi M; Hedegaard, Holly</p> <p>2016-12-01</p> <p>Objectives-This report describes the development and use of a method for analyzing the literal text from <span class="hlt">death</span> certificates to enhance national mortality statistics on drug-involved <span class="hlt">deaths</span>. Drug-involved <span class="hlt">deaths</span> include drug overdose <span class="hlt">deaths</span> as well as other <span class="hlt">deaths</span> where, according to <span class="hlt">death</span> certificate literal text, drugs were associated with or contributed to the <span class="hlt">death</span>. Methods-The method uses final National Vital Statistics System-Mortality files <span class="hlt">linked</span> to electronic files containing literal text information from <span class="hlt">death</span> certificates. Software programs were designed to search the literal text from three fields of the <span class="hlt">death</span> certificate (the cause of <span class="hlt">death</span> from Part I, significant conditions contributing to the <span class="hlt">death</span> from Part II, and a description of how the injury occurred from Box 43) to identify drug mentions as well as contextual information. The list of drug search terms was developed from existing drug classification systems as well as from manual review of the literal text. Literal text surrounding the identified drug search terms was analyzed to ascertain the context. Drugs mentioned in the <span class="hlt">death</span> certificate literal text were assumed to be involved in the <span class="hlt">death</span> unless contextual information suggested otherwise (e.g., "METHICILLIN RESISTANT STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS INFECTION"). The literal text analysis method was assessed by comparing the results from application of the method with results based on ICD-10 codes, and by conducting a manual review of a sample of records.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25194162','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25194162"><span><span class="hlt">Sisters</span> unbound is required for meiotic centromeric cohesion in Drosophila melanogaster.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Krishnan, Badri; Thomas, Sharon E; Yan, Rihui; Yamada, Hirotsugu; Zhulin, Igor B; McKee, Bruce D</p> <p>2014-11-01</p> <p>Regular meiotic chromosome segregation requires <span class="hlt">sister</span> centromeres to mono-orient (orient to the same pole) during the first meiotic division (meiosis I) when homologous chromosomes segregate, and to bi-orient (orient to opposite poles) during the second meiotic division (meiosis II) when <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids segregate. Both orientation patterns require cohesion between <span class="hlt">sister</span> centromeres, which is established during meiotic DNA replication and persists until anaphase of meiosis II. Meiotic cohesion is mediated by a conserved four-protein complex called cohesin that includes two structural maintenance of chromosomes (SMC) subunits (SMC1 and SMC3) and two non-SMC subunits. In Drosophila melanogaster, however, the meiotic cohesion apparatus has not been fully characterized and the non-SMC subunits have not been identified. We have identified a novel Drosophila gene called <span class="hlt">sisters</span> unbound (sunn), which is required for stable <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid cohesion throughout meiosis. sunn mutations disrupt centromere cohesion during prophase I and cause high frequencies of non-disjunction (NDJ) at both meiotic divisions in both sexes. SUNN co-localizes at centromeres with the cohesion proteins SMC1 and SOLO in both sexes and is necessary for the recruitment of both proteins to centromeres. Although SUNN lacks sequence homology to cohesins, bioinformatic analysis indicates that SUNN may be a structural homolog of the non-SMC cohesin subunit stromalin (SA), suggesting that SUNN may serve as a meiosis-specific cohesin subunit. In conclusion, our data show that SUNN is an essential meiosis-specific Drosophila cohesion protein. Copyright © 2014 by the Genetics Society of America.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26123545','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26123545"><span>Extensive range overlap between heliconiine <span class="hlt">sister</span> species: evidence for sympatric speciation in butterflies?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Rosser, Neil; Kozak, Krzysztof M; Phillimore, Albert B; Mallet, James</p> <p>2015-06-30</p> <p>Sympatric speciation is today generally viewed as plausible, and some well-supported examples exist, but its relative contribution to biodiversity remains to be established. We here quantify geographic overlap of <span class="hlt">sister</span> species of heliconiine butterflies, and use age-range correlations and spatial simulations of the geography of speciation to infer the frequency of sympatric speciation. We also test whether shifts in mimetic wing colour pattern, host plant use and climate niche play a role in speciation, and whether such shifts are associated with sympatry. Approximately a third of all heliconiine <span class="hlt">sister</span> species pairs exhibit near complete range overlap, and analyses of the observed patterns of range overlap suggest that sympatric speciation contributes 32%-95% of speciation events. Müllerian mimicry colour patterns and host plant choice are highly labile traits that seem to be associated with speciation, but we find no association between shifts in these traits and range overlap. In contrast, climatic niches of <span class="hlt">sister</span> species are more conserved. Unlike birds and mammals, <span class="hlt">sister</span> species of heliconiines are often sympatric and our inferences using the most recent comparative methods suggest that sympatric speciation is common. However, if <span class="hlt">sister</span> species spread rapidly into sympatry (e.g. due to their similar climatic niches), then assumptions underlying our methods would be violated. Furthermore, although we find some evidence for the role of ecology in speciation, ecological shifts did not show the associations with range overlap expected under sympatric speciation. We delimit species of heliconiines in three different ways, based on "strict and " "relaxed" biological species concepts (BSC), as well as on a surrogate for the widely-used "diagnostic" version of the phylogenetic species concept (PSC). We show that one reason why more sympatric speciation is inferred in heliconiines than in birds may be due to a different culture of species delimitation in the two</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16080001','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16080001"><span>Mutant analysis, protein-protein interactions and subcellular localization of the Arabidopsis B <span class="hlt">sister</span> (ABS) protein.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kaufmann, Kerstin; Anfang, Nicole; Saedler, Heinz; Theissen, Günter</p> <p>2005-09-01</p> <p>Recently, close relatives of class B floral homeotic genes, termed B(<span class="hlt">sister</span>) genes, have been identified in both angiosperms and gymnosperms. In contrast to the B genes themselves, B(<span class="hlt">sister</span>) genes are exclusively expressed in female reproductive organs, especially in the envelopes or integuments surrounding the ovules. This suggests an important ancient function in ovule or seed development for B(<span class="hlt">sister</span>) genes, which has been conserved for about 300 million years. However, investigation of the first loss-of-function mutant for a B(<span class="hlt">sister</span>) gene (ABS/TT16 from Arabidopsis) revealed only a weak phenotype affecting endothelium formation. Here, we present an analysis of two additional mutant alleles, which corroborates this weak phenotype. Transgenic plants that ectopically express ABS show changes in the growth and identity of floral organs, suggesting that ABS can interact with floral homeotic proteins. Yeast-two-hybrid and three-hybrid analyses indicated that ABS can form dimers with SEPALLATA (SEP) floral homeotic proteins and multimeric complexes that also include the AGAMOUS-like proteins SEEDSTICK (STK) or SHATTERPROOF1/2 (SHP1, SHP2). These data suggest that the formation of multimeric transcription factor complexes might be a general phenomenon among MIKC-type MADS-domain proteins in angiosperms. Heterodimerization of ABS with SEP3 was confirmed by gel retardation assays. Fusion proteins tagged with CFP (Cyan Fluorescent Protein) and YFP (Yellow Fluorescent Protein) in Arabidopsis protoplasts showed that ABS is localized in the nucleus. Phylogenetic analysis revealed the presence of a structurally deviant, but closely related, paralogue of ABS in the Arabidopsis genome. Thus the evolutionary developmental genetics of B(<span class="hlt">sister</span>) genes can probably only be understood as part of a complex and redundant gene network that may govern ovule formation in a conserved manner, which has yet to be fully explored.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1325454','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1325454"><span>Experimental Test Plan for PWR <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Rods in the High Burnup Spent Fuel Data Project</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Montgomery, Rose; Scaglione, John M; Bevard, Bruce Balkcom; Hanson, Brady; Billone, Dr. Michael</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>The High Burnup Spent Fuel Data project pulled 25 <span class="hlt">sister</span> rods (9 from the project assemblies and 16 from similar HBU assemblies) for characterization. The 25 <span class="hlt">sister</span> rods are all high burnup and cover the range of modern domestic cladding alloys. The 25 <span class="hlt">sister</span> rods were shipped to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in early 2016 for detailed non-destructive and destructive examination. Examinations are intended to provide baseline data on the initial physical state of the cladding and fuel prior to the loading, drying, and long-term dry storage process. Further examinations are focused on determining the effects of temperatures encountered during and following drying. Similar tests will be performed on rods taken from the project assemblies at the end of their long-term storage in a TN-32 dry storage cask (the cask rods ) to identify any significant changes in the fuel rods that may have occurred during the dry storage period. Additionally, some of the <span class="hlt">sister</span> rods will be used for separate effects testing to expand the applicability of the project data to the fleet, and to address some of the data-related gaps associated with extended storage and subsequent transportation of high burnup fuel. A draft test plan is being developed that describes the experimental work to be conducted on the <span class="hlt">sister</span> rods. This paper summarizes the draft test plan and necessary coordination activities for the multi-year experimental program to supply data relevant to the assessment of the safety of long-term storage followed by transportation of high burnup spent fuel.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Death&id=EJ1012746','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Death&id=EJ1012746"><span><span class="hlt">Deaths</span> among Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults with Down Syndrome</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Miodrag, Nancy; Silverberg, Sophie E.; Urbano, Richard C.; Hodapp, Robert M.</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Background: Although life expectancies in Down syndrome (DS) have doubled over the past 3-4 decades, there continue to be many early <span class="hlt">deaths</span>. Yet, most research focuses on infant mortality or later adult <span class="hlt">deaths</span>. Materials and Methods: In this US study, hospital discharge and <span class="hlt">death</span> records from the state of Tennessee were <span class="hlt">linked</span> to examine 2046…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=DS&pg=5&id=EJ1012746','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=DS&pg=5&id=EJ1012746"><span><span class="hlt">Deaths</span> among Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults with Down Syndrome</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Miodrag, Nancy; Silverberg, Sophie E.; Urbano, Richard C.; Hodapp, Robert M.</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Background: Although life expectancies in Down syndrome (DS) have doubled over the past 3-4 decades, there continue to be many early <span class="hlt">deaths</span>. Yet, most research focuses on infant mortality or later adult <span class="hlt">deaths</span>. Materials and Methods: In this US study, hospital discharge and <span class="hlt">death</span> records from the state of Tennessee were <span class="hlt">linked</span> to examine 2046…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22067687','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22067687"><span>Changes in siblings after the <span class="hlt">death</span> of a child from cancer.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Foster, Terrah L; Gilmer, Mary Jo; Vannatta, Kathryn; Barrera, Maru; Davies, Betty; Dietrich, Mary S; Fairclough, Diane L; Gerhardt, Cynthia A</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Few studies have examined changes in siblings after the <span class="hlt">death</span> of a brother or <span class="hlt">sister</span>, particularly from mother, father, and sibling perspectives within the first year after <span class="hlt">death</span>. This descriptive study identified and assessed the frequency of changes in siblings after a child's <span class="hlt">death</span> from cancer. Participants were recruited from cancer registries at 3 hospitals in the United States and Canada 3 to 12 months after the child's <span class="hlt">death</span>. Thirty-six mothers, 24 fathers, and 39 siblings from 40 families were included. Semistructured interviews using open-ended questions were conducted with each parent and sibling separately in the home. Content analysis identified emerging themes, and the McNemar tests compared frequencies between each paired set of reports (sibling vs mother, sibling vs father, mother vs father). Sixty-nine percent of participants reported personal changes in siblings (eg, changes in personality, school work, goals/life perspective, activities/interests). Forty-seven percent noted changes in siblings' relationships with family members and peers. Only 21% of participants reported no changes attributed to the <span class="hlt">death</span>. Comparisons of frequencies across informants were not significant. Most siblings experienced changes in multiple areas of their lives after the <span class="hlt">death</span> of a brother or <span class="hlt">sister</span> to cancer. Some changes reflected siblings that were positively adapting to the <span class="hlt">death</span>, whereas other changes reflected difficulties. Our findings offer guidance to improve aftercare for bereaved siblings and their families. Additional research is needed to further delineate the needs of bereaved siblings and to develop strategies to promote adaptation to loss.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=see+AND+literature+AND+Universal&pg=2&id=ED246995','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=see+AND+literature+AND+Universal&pg=2&id=ED246995"><span>Children and <span class="hlt">Death</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Brennan, Andrew J. J.</p> <p></p> <p>Health professionals and educators should develop their abilities to educate about <span class="hlt">death</span> and to comfort the bereaved. Due to lower <span class="hlt">death</span> rates, the lack of philosophical religious views, and distorted perceptions of <span class="hlt">death</span> contributed by television, <span class="hlt">death</span> has become a mystery instead of a segment of the common experience. Particularly when a child…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=blacksmith&pg=2&id=ED220845','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=blacksmith&pg=2&id=ED220845"><span>Forging <span class="hlt">Links</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Stewig, John Warren</p> <p></p> <p>Blacksmiths and their craft have changed with the times, and as times change for teachers, they too should be forgers of <span class="hlt">links</span>. Teacher-to-teacher <span class="hlt">links</span> should extend beyond the faculty lounge to support systems and active groups of individuals concerned about each other. Another personal <span class="hlt">link</span> can be made by developing a grade level, system-wide…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3179045','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3179045"><span>MicroRNAs and phylogenomics resolve the relationships of Tardigrada and suggest that velvet worms are the <span class="hlt">sister</span> group of Arthropoda</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Campbell, Lahcen I.; Rota-Stabelli, Omar; Edgecombe, Gregory D.; Marchioro, Trevor; Longhorn, Stuart J.; Telford, Maximilian J.; Philippe, Hervé; Rebecchi, Lorena; Peterson, Kevin J.; Pisani, Davide</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Morphological data traditionally group Tardigrada (water bears), Onychophora (velvet worms), and Arthropoda (e.g., spiders, insects, and their allies) into a monophyletic group of invertebrates with walking appendages known as the Panarthropoda. However, molecular data generally do not support the inclusion of tardigrades within the Panarthropoda, but instead place them closer to Nematoda (roundworms). Here we present results from the analyses of two independent genomic datasets, expressed sequence tags (ESTs) and microRNAs (miRNAs), which congruently resolve the phylogenetic relationships of Tardigrada. Our EST analyses, based on 49,023 amino acid sites from 255 proteins, significantly support a monophyletic Panarthropoda including Tardigrada and suggest a <span class="hlt">sister</span> group relationship between Arthropoda and Onychophora. Using careful experimental manipulations—comparisons of model fit, signal dissection, and taxonomic pruning—we show that support for a Tardigrada + Nematoda group derives from the phylogenetic artifact of long-branch attraction. Our small RNA libraries fully support our EST results; no miRNAs were found to <span class="hlt">link</span> Tardigrada and Nematoda, whereas all panarthropods were found to share one unique miRNA (miR-276). In addition, Onychophora and Arthropoda were found to share a second miRNA (miR-305). Our study confirms the monophyly of the legged ecdysozoans, shows that past support for a Tardigrada + Nematoda group was due to long-branch attraction, and suggests that the velvet worms are the <span class="hlt">sister</span> group to the arthropods. PMID:21896763</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16054398','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16054398"><span>The phylogenetic relationships among non-diplomystid catfishes as inferred from mitochondrial cytochrome b sequences; the search for the ictalurid <span class="hlt">sister</span> taxon (Otophysi: Siluriformes).</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Hardman, Michael</p> <p>2005-12-01</p> <p>The relationships among families of catfishes are poorly understood and have yet to be the subject of a comprehensive investigation with molecular data. Existing phylogenetic hypotheses are based on morphological data and incompletely resolved. This study analyzed complete sequences of mitochondrial gene cytochrome b for 170 species from 29 of 33 extant families, and focused on the relationships of Ictaluridae to other catfishes. In addition to previous phylogenetic studies, the fossil record, paleogeography, biogeography, and distribution of extant catfish families collectively suggest the location (if extant) of the ictalurid <span class="hlt">sister</span> taxon to be Northern or Eastern Asia. Of the extant catfishes currently native to this area and included in this analysis, parsimony and Bayesian likelihood analyses recovered Cranoglanis bouderius as the most proximal <span class="hlt">sister</span> taxon of Ictaluridae. Seemingly, ictalurids and cranoglanidids represent another biogeographic component <span class="hlt">linking</span> freshwater fishes of North America and eastern Asia, e.g., catostomids and paddlefishes. The results coupled with present-day catfish distributions and inferences from the fossil record collectively suggest the ancestor of Ictaluridae to have invaded freshwaters of North America at the close of the Cretaceous through northeastern Asia and northwestern North America. Other superfamilial nodes supported the results of previous phylogenetic studies of narrower taxonomic scope. Several novel relationships were recovered (including a clade composed of Pimelodidae, Pseudopimelodidae, and Heptapteridae) and these along with sources of systematic error are discussed. A broad sampling of Bagridae permitted an examination of intergeneric relationships within this family and in light of recent morphological and molecular studies.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li class="active"><span>19</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_19 --> <div id="page_20" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li class="active"><span>20</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="381"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009Tecto..28.5015K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009Tecto..28.5015K"><span>Thermal evolution of the <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> shear zone, southern New Zealand; Formation of the Great South Basin and onset of Pacific-Antarctic spreading</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kula, Joseph; Tulloch, Andy J.; Spell, Terry L.; Wells, Michael L.; Zanetti, Kathleen A.</p> <p>2009-10-01</p> <p>The separation of Zealandia from West Antarctica was the final stage in the Cretaceous breakup of the Gondwana Pacific margin. Continental extension resulting in formation of the Great South Basin and thinning of the Campbell Plateau leading to development of the Pacific-Antarctic spreading ridge was partially accommodated along the <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> shear zone. This east-northeast striking brittle-ductile structure exposed along the southeast coast of Stewart Island, New Zealand, is a greenschist facies extensional shear zone that separates a hanging wall of chloritic, brecciated granites, and undeformed conglomerate from a footwall of mylonitic Carboniferous and Early Cretaceous granites. This complex structure exhibits bivergent kinematics and can be subdivided into a northern and southern segment. The 40Ar/39Ar thermochronology indicates that cooling of the shear zone footwall began at ˜94 Ma with accelerated cooling over the interval ˜89-82 Ma. Structural and thermochronological data indicate a spatial and temporal <span class="hlt">link</span> between the <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> shear zone, initial sedimentation within the offshore Great South Basin, extension of the Campbell Plateau, and initiation of the Pacific-Antarctic spreading ridge.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21896763','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21896763"><span>MicroRNAs and phylogenomics resolve the relationships of Tardigrada and suggest that velvet worms are the <span class="hlt">sister</span> group of Arthropoda.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Campbell, Lahcen I; Rota-Stabelli, Omar; Edgecombe, Gregory D; Marchioro, Trevor; Longhorn, Stuart J; Telford, Maximilian J; Philippe, Hervé; Rebecchi, Lorena; Peterson, Kevin J; Pisani, Davide</p> <p>2011-09-20</p> <p>Morphological data traditionally group Tardigrada (water bears), Onychophora (velvet worms), and Arthropoda (e.g., spiders, insects, and their allies) into a monophyletic group of invertebrates with walking appendages known as the Panarthropoda. However, molecular data generally do not support the inclusion of tardigrades within the Panarthropoda, but instead place them closer to Nematoda (roundworms). Here we present results from the analyses of two independent genomic datasets, expressed sequence tags (ESTs) and microRNAs (miRNAs), which congruently resolve the phylogenetic relationships of Tardigrada. Our EST analyses, based on 49,023 amino acid sites from 255 proteins, significantly support a monophyletic Panarthropoda including Tardigrada and suggest a <span class="hlt">sister</span> group relationship between Arthropoda and Onychophora. Using careful experimental manipulations--comparisons of model fit, signal dissection, and taxonomic pruning--we show that support for a Tardigrada + Nematoda group derives from the phylogenetic artifact of long-branch attraction. Our small RNA libraries fully support our EST results; no miRNAs were found to <span class="hlt">link</span> Tardigrada and Nematoda, whereas all panarthropods were found to share one unique miRNA (miR-276). In addition, Onychophora and Arthropoda were found to share a second miRNA (miR-305). Our study confirms the monophyly of the legged ecdysozoans, shows that past support for a Tardigrada + Nematoda group was due to long-branch attraction, and suggests that the velvet worms are the <span class="hlt">sister</span> group to the arthropods.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24227449','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24227449"><span>Brain <span class="hlt">Death</span> Determination.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Spinello, Irene M</p> <p>2015-09-01</p> <p>In the United States, each year 1% to 2% of <span class="hlt">deaths</span> are brain <span class="hlt">deaths</span>. Considerable variation in the practice of determining brain <span class="hlt">death</span> still remains, despite the publication of practice parameters in 1995 and an evidence-based guideline update in 2010. This review is intended to give bedside clinicians an overview of definition, the causes and pitfalls of misdiagnosing brain <span class="hlt">death</span>, and a focus on the specifics of the brain <span class="hlt">death</span> determination process.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4080519','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4080519"><span>CpG Sites Associated with Cigarette Smoking: Analysis of Epigenome-Wide Data from the <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Study</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Harlid, Sophia; Xu, Zongli; Panduri, Vijayalakshmi; Sandler, Dale P.</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Background: Smoking increases the risk of many diseases, and it is also <span class="hlt">linked</span> to blood DNA methylation changes that may be important in disease etiology. Objectives: We sought to identify novel CpG sites associated with cigarette smoking. Methods: We used two epigenome-wide data sets from the <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Study to identify and confirm CpG sites associated with smoking. One included 908 women with methylation measurements at 27,578 CpG sites using the HumanMethylation27 BeadChip; the other included 200 women with methylation measurements for 473,844 CpG sites using the HumanMethylation450 BeadChip. Significant CpGs from the second data set that were not included in the 27K assay were validated by pyrosequencing in a subset of 476 samples from the first data set. Results: Our study successfully confirmed smoking associations for 9 previously established CpGs and identified 2 potentially novel CpGs: cg26764244 in GNG12 (p = 9.0 × 10–10) and cg22335340 in PTPN6 (p = 2.9 × 10–05). We also found strong evidence of an association between smoking status and cg02657160 in CPOX (p = 7.3 × 10–7), which has not been previously reported. All 12 CpGs were undermethylated in current smokers and showed an increasing percentage of methylation in former and never-smokers. Conclusions: We identified 2 potentially novel smoking related CpG sites, and provided independent replication of 10 previously reported CpGs sites related to smoking, one of which is situated in the gene CPOX. The corresponding enzyme is involved in heme biosynthesis, and smoking is known to increase heme production. Our study extends the evidence base for smoking-related changes in DNA methylation. Citation: Harlid S, Xu Z, Panduri V, Sandler DP, Taylor JA. 2014. CpG sites associated with cigarette smoking: analysis of epigenome-wide data from the <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Study. Environ Health Perspect 122:673–678; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1307480 PMID:24704585</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=hoelter&id=EJ199235','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=hoelter&id=EJ199235"><span><span class="hlt">Death</span> Education and <span class="hlt">Death</span>-Related Attitudes.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Hoelter, Jon W.; Epley, Rita J.</p> <p>1979-01-01</p> <p>Assessed the impact of a <span class="hlt">death</span> and dying course. Results showed no significant pre-test/post-test differences for the experimental or the control group, but indicated initial differences between the two groups, suggesting that students enrolling in a <span class="hlt">death</span> and dying course have more favorable attitudes toward both suicide and abortion. (Author)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3429432','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3429432"><span>The First Record of a Trans-Oceanic <span class="hlt">Sister</span>-Group Relationship between Obligate Vertebrate Troglobites</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Chakrabarty, Prosanta; Davis, Matthew P.; Sparks, John S.</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>We show using the most complete phylogeny of one of the most species-rich orders of vertebrates (Gobiiformes), and calibrations from the rich fossil record of teleost fishes, that the genus Typhleotris, endemic to subterranean karst habitats in southwestern Madagascar, is the <span class="hlt">sister</span> group to Milyeringa, endemic to similar subterranean systems in northwestern Australia. Both groups are eyeless, and our phylogenetic and biogeographic results show that these obligate cave fishes now found on opposite ends of the Indian Ocean (separated by nearly 7,000 km) are each others closest relatives and owe their origins to the break up of the southern supercontinent, Gondwana, at the end of the Cretaceous period. Trans-oceanic <span class="hlt">sister</span>-group relationships are otherwise unknown between blind, cave-adapted vertebrates and our results provide an extraordinary case of Gondwanan vicariance. PMID:22937155</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7510022','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7510022"><span>Lymphocyte proliferation kinetics and <span class="hlt">sister</span>-chromatid exchanges in individuals treated with metronidazole.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Elizondo, G; Montero, R; Herrera, J E; Hong, E; Ostrosky-Wegman, P</p> <p>1994-03-01</p> <p>Metronidazole, an effective agent for the treatment of protozoan infections, is frequently used in developing countries. However, the employment of this drug has been questioned in view of its mutagenicity in bacteria and carcinogenicity in mice. A genotoxic study was carried out in which cellular proliferation kinetics and the frequency of <span class="hlt">sister</span>-chromatid exchanges were determined in human peripheral blood lymphocytes from 12 individuals treated with therapeutic doses of metronidazole. No effect was observed on mitotic index with the treatment, although a significant increase was found in three individuals after treatment. No increase of <span class="hlt">sister</span>-chromatid exchanges was detected. The rate of lymphocyte proliferation kinetics showed an increase after the metronidazole treatment in all patients, indicating a possible immunostimulatory action.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3913347','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3913347"><span>[Egon Erwin Kisch and the Blazek <span class="hlt">sisters</span>. A contribution to the history of teratology].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Schierhorn, H</p> <p>1985-01-01</p> <p>A century ago, on April 29th 1885, the "Raving Reporter" Egon Erwin Kisch was born in Prague. On this occasion his news-reporting about the conjoined Bohemian twins Rosa and Josefa Blazek (born 1878) is appreciated and compared respectively contrasted with the observations and papers of contemporary physicians, among them the famous neuropathologist Richard Henneberg from Berlin and the important gynaecologists Breisky and Pitha from Prague and Schauta from Vienna. Kisch's report "The conjoined <span class="hlt">sisters</span>" was published in his book "Sensation fair" during his antifascistic exile firstly 1941 in New York in English, a year later in Mexico-City in the German language. In spite of his stunt-making style Kisch's declining opposite the capitalistic marketing and opposite the disgracing people's exhibition (in this case of the Bohemian pygopage <span class="hlt">sisters</span>) is articulated. Kisch, the founder of the socialistic literary report, died in 1948 in Prague, Czechoslovakia.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1592785','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1592785"><span>Bloom Helicase and DNA Topoisomerase IIIα Are Involved in the Dissolution of <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Chromatids</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Seki, Masayuki; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Seki, Takahiko; Kato, Genta; Tada, Shusuke; Takahashi, Yuriko; Yoshimura, Akari; Kobayashi, Takayuki; Aoki, Ayako; Otsuki, Makoto; Habermann, Felix A.; Tanabe, Hideyuki; Ishii, Yutaka; Enomoto, Takemi</p> <p>2006-01-01</p> <p>Bloom's syndrome (BS) is an autosomal disorder characterized by predisposition to a wide variety of cancers. The gene product whose mutation leads to BS is the RecQ family helicase BLM, which forms a complex with DNA topoisomerase IIIα (Top3α). However, the physiological relevance of the interaction between BLM and Top3α within the cell remains unclear. We show here that Top3α depletion causes accumulation of cells in G2 phase, enlargement of nuclei, and chromosome gaps and breaks that occur at the same position in <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids. The transition from metaphase to anaphase is also inhibited. All of these phenomena except cell lethality are suppressed by BLM gene disruption. Taken together with the biochemical properties of BLM and Top3α, these data indicate that BLM and Top3α execute the dissolution of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids. PMID:16880537</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6052504','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6052504"><span>Frequency of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchange in peripheral lymphocytes of male pesticide applicators</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Rupa, D.S. ); Reddy, P.P. ); Sreemannarayana, K. ); Reddi, O.S. )</p> <p>1991-01-01</p> <p>In the present study 61 male pesticide applicators who worked in cotton fields and regularly sprayed pesticides such as DDT, BHC, endosulfan, malathion, methyl parathion, phosphamidon, dimethoate, monocrotophos, quinalphos fenvelrate, and cypermethrin were analyzed for <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchanges, mitotic index, and cell cycle kinetics in peripheral lymphocytes. Subjects who handled pesticides were non-smokers and teetotalers and the data were compared with the matched control group. Statistical analysis revealed that the frequency of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchanges was significantly higher among the pesticide applicators at all the durations of exposure when compared to controls. Subjects exposed to pesticides also showed cell cycle delay and decrease in mitotic index when compared to the control group.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19919691','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19919691"><span>Self-healing photo-neuropathy and cervical spinal arthrosis in four <span class="hlt">sisters</span> with brachioradial pruritus.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Wallengren, Joanna</p> <p>2009-11-17</p> <p>The cause of brachioradial pruritus (a localized itching on the arms or shoulders) is controversial. The role of sun and cervical spine disease has been discussed. This is a report on four <span class="hlt">sisters</span> suffering from brachioradial pruritus recurring every summer. The <span class="hlt">sisters</span> spent much time outdoors and exposed themselves extensively to the sun. They also had occupations requiring heavy lifting. Cervical radiographs indicated arthrosis. The density of sensory nerve fibers in the skin biopsies from the itchy skin of the arms, visualized by antibodies against a pan-neuronal marker, protein gene product 9.5, was reduced compared with biopsies from the same skin region during the symptom-free period in the winter. This data exemplifies that brachioradial pruritus is a self healing photoneuropathy occurring in middle aged adults predisposed by cervical arthrosis.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2789710','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2789710"><span>Self-healing photo-neuropathy and cervical spinal arthrosis in four <span class="hlt">sisters</span> with brachioradial pruritus</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p></p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>The cause of brachioradial pruritus (a localized itching on the arms or shoulders) is controversial. The role of sun and cervical spine disease has been discussed. This is a report on four <span class="hlt">sisters</span> suffering from brachioradial pruritus recurring every summer. The <span class="hlt">sisters</span> spent much time outdoors and exposed themselves extensively to the sun. They also had occupations requiring heavy lifting. Cervical radiographs indicated arthrosis. The density of sensory nerve fibers in the skin biopsies from the itchy skin of the arms, visualized by antibodies against a pan-neuronal marker, protein gene product 9.5, was reduced compared with biopsies from the same skin region during the symptom-free period in the winter. This data exemplifies that brachioradial pruritus is a self healing photoneuropathy occurring in middle aged adults predisposed by cervical arthrosis. PMID:19919691</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22937155','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22937155"><span>The first record of a trans-oceanic <span class="hlt">sister</span>-group relationship between obligate vertebrate troglobites.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Chakrabarty, Prosanta; Davis, Matthew P; Sparks, John S</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>We show using the most complete phylogeny of one of the most species-rich orders of vertebrates (Gobiiformes), and calibrations from the rich fossil record of teleost fishes, that the genus Typhleotris, endemic to subterranean karst habitats in southwestern Madagascar, is the <span class="hlt">sister</span> group to Milyeringa, endemic to similar subterranean systems in northwestern Australia. Both groups are eyeless, and our phylogenetic and biogeographic results show that these obligate cave fishes now found on opposite ends of the Indian Ocean (separated by nearly 7,000 km) are each others closest relatives and owe their origins to the break up of the southern supercontinent, Gondwana, at the end of the Cretaceous period. Trans-oceanic <span class="hlt">sister</span>-group relationships are otherwise unknown between blind, cave-adapted vertebrates and our results provide an extraordinary case of Gondwanan vicariance.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12836524','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12836524"><span>[Triple malaria infection in twin <span class="hlt">sisters</span> from the Democratic Republic of Congo].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Galeazzi, G; Ardoin, F; Petithory, J C; Laurent, C</p> <p>2003-05-01</p> <p>Infections with 3 species of malaria parasites are rarely encountered and observed in less than 0.05% of cases. We came across such an infection in four year-old, monozygote twin <span class="hlt">sisters</span>, coming from Kinshasa (Democratic Republic of Congo). In both of them, parasitemia was low or very low for P. falciparum and P. ovale and of 0.1-0.2% for P. malariae. The twin <span class="hlt">sisters</span> presented with an iron deficiency anaemia, associated with an heterozygous sickle-cell anaemia and a moderate splenomegaly. The biological tests results were similar. They responded well to treatment. We point out the difficulty in recognizing the concomitant presence of several species of hematozoaire on blood smear.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25046285','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25046285"><span>Whither brain <span class="hlt">death</span>?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Bernat, James L</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>The publicity surrounding the recent McMath and Muñoz cases has rekindled public interest in brain <span class="hlt">death</span>: the familiar term for human <span class="hlt">death</span> determination by showing the irreversible cessation of clinical brain functions. The concept of brain <span class="hlt">death</span> was developed decades ago to permit withdrawal of therapy in hopeless cases and to permit organ donation. It has become widely established medical practice, and laws permit it in all U.S. jurisdictions. Brain <span class="hlt">death</span> has a biophilosophical justification as a standard for determining human <span class="hlt">death</span> but remains poorly understood by the public and by health professionals. The current controversies over brain <span class="hlt">death</span> are largely restricted to the academy, but some practitioners express ambivalence over whether brain <span class="hlt">death</span> is equivalent to human <span class="hlt">death</span>. Brain <span class="hlt">death</span> remains an accepted and sound concept, but more work is necessary to establish its biophilosophical justification and to educate health professionals and the public.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6885703','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6885703"><span><span class="hlt">Sister</span> chromatid exchange analysis to monitor genotoxic chemicals. (Latest citations from Pollution Abstracts). Published Search</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Not Available</p> <p>1993-03-01</p> <p>The bibliography contains citations concerning the use of the <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchange (SCE) analysis for toxicological studies. SCE analysis are very sensitive measures of genotoxic damage to chromosomes. SCE toxicological studies analyzing ionizing radiation, chromium compounds, styrene, paint thinner, mercury, cigarette smoke, coal dust, fuel oil, insecticides, ethylene oxide, diesel exhaust, and polychlorinated biphenyls are discussed. SCE studies using both human and animal tissue cultures are described. (Contains a minimum of 191 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1647488','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1647488"><span>Alaninuria, Associated with Microcephaly, Dwarfism, Enamel Hypoplasia, and Diabetes Mellitus in Two <span class="hlt">Sisters</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Stimmler, L.; Jensen, N.; Toseland, P.</p> <p>1970-01-01</p> <p>Two <span class="hlt">sisters</span>, both microcephalic at birth and of low birthweight, are described. They are both severely mentally retarded and dwarfed, and have developed diabetes mellitus. Their teeth show enamel hypoplasia. Excessive quantities of alanine were found in their urine, which was associated with high levels of alanine pyruvate and lactate in the blood. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2FIG. 3aFIG. 3b PMID:5477682</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA157372','DTIC-ST'); return false;" href="http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA157372"><span>Application of <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Chromatid Exchange in Marine Polychaetes to Black Rock Harbor Sediment. Laboratory Documentation Phase.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.dtic.mil/">DTIC Science & Technology</a></p> <p></p> <p>1985-01-01</p> <p>Continue on reverse eide if necomeay and Identify by block number) Marine pollution --Genetic effects (LC) Polychaeta (LC) Dredged material (WES) Biological...necessary end Identify by block number) Marine pollution --Genetic effects (LC) Polychaeta (LC) Dredged material (WES) Biological assay (LC) <span class="hlt">Sister</span>...populations of marine organisms. 2. The importance of genetic effects in marine pollution studies has been recognized only recently. The International Council</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2101963','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2101963"><span>Congenital adrenal hyperplasia. I: Gender-related behavior and attitudes in female patients and <span class="hlt">sisters</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Dittmann, R W; Kappes, M H; Kappes, M E; Börger, D; Stegner, H; Willig, R H; Wallis, H</p> <p>1990-01-01</p> <p>Thirty-five female patients with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) were compared to a group of 16 healthy <span class="hlt">sisters</span> in regard to gender-related behavioral patterns, present attitudes, and plans for the future. A semi-structured interview with the subjects, ages 11 to 41 yr, and their mothers concentrated on four to five age stages. Results of retrospective data from single items as well as from several related composite scales ("interests and behavior," "appearance," "overall scores") revealed significant group differences: Both in mother-assessment and self-assessment, CAH patients showed a "more masculine" orientation than their <span class="hlt">sisters</span>, but this was far from consistent across all age stages, especially for single items. Unexpectedly, the gender-behavior differences between CAH patients and <span class="hlt">sisters</span> did not hold for certain items and scales of "social behavior" (e.g., assertiveness, dominance, acceptance in peer groups) and, in contrast to some of the existing literature, also not for "high-energy expenditure." With regard to expectations for the future, CAH patients had less of a "wish to have their own children" and a higher preference for "having a career versus staying at home." Age, socioeconomic status, intelligence, and presence or absence of a <span class="hlt">sister</span> as possibly intervening psychosocial/demographic factors could not explain the group differences in behavior. Degree of genital masculinization (Prader stages) or "onset and quality" of therapy as measures of pre- and postnatal androgenization, respectively, could also not account for the degree of the "more masculine" orientation in the CAH group. Nevertheless, the overall results are compatible with earlier findings on the masculinizing effects of prenatal androgens on behavior in humans and point to a time period after sexual differentiation of the genitalia and before birth as the most likely one for the effects of prenatal hormones on behavioral masculinization in humans.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4755749','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4755749"><span><span class="hlt">Sister</span> kinetochore splitting and precocious disintegration of bivalents could explain the maternal age effect</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Zielinska, Agata P; Holubcova, Zuzana; Blayney, Martyn; Elder, Kay; Schuh, Melina</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Aneuploidy in human eggs is the leading cause of pregnancy loss and Down’s syndrome. Aneuploid eggs result from chromosome segregation errors when an egg develops from a progenitor cell, called an oocyte. The mechanisms that lead to an increase in aneuploidy with advanced maternal age are largely unclear. Here, we show that many <span class="hlt">sister</span> kinetochores in human oocytes are separated and do not behave as a single functional unit during the first meiotic division. Having separated <span class="hlt">sister</span> kinetochores allowed bivalents to rotate by 90 degrees on the spindle and increased the risk of merotelic kinetochore-microtubule attachments. Advanced maternal age led to an increase in <span class="hlt">sister</span> kinetochore separation, rotated bivalents and merotelic attachments. Chromosome arm cohesion was weakened, and the fraction of bivalents that precociously dissociated into univalents was increased. Together, our data reveal multiple age-related changes in chromosome architecture that could explain why oocyte aneuploidy increases with advanced maternal age. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11389.001 PMID:26670547</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li class="active"><span>20</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_20 --> <div id="page_21" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li class="active"><span>21</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="401"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3752324','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3752324"><span>Do the <span class="hlt">sisters</span> of childbearing teenagers have increased rates of childbearing?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Friede, A; Hogue, C J; Doyle, L L; Hammerslough, C R; Sniezek, J E; Arrighi, H</p> <p>1986-10-01</p> <p>In 1983, 89,000 children were born to United States women aged less than or equal to 16. To reduce teenage fertility rates, public health workers will need to identify teenagers at elevated risk for childbearing. We tested the hypothesis that the <span class="hlt">sisters</span> of childbearing teenagers may form such a group. We performed an historical cohort study of 3,767 teenagers aged 12-16 years who were enrolled in Arkansas Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC), 1978-81; they had 247 pregnancies. Multivariable log-linear hazard models were used to control and study age, race, number of AFDC-eligibles per household, and county urbanization and family planning services. Teenagers whose <span class="hlt">sisters</span> bore children had elevated rate ratios (RR) for childbearing (RR = 1.8; 95% Confidence Limits [CL] = 1.2-2.6), as did Blacks (RR = 3.1; 95% CL = 2.0-4.8), and members of households with more than nine AFDC-eligibles (RR = 1.7; 95% CL = 1.1-2.6). Because they may have elevated childbearing rates, and would be easy to contact, the <span class="hlt">sisters</span> of pregnant teenagers could form an important target population for family planning efforts.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24162982','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24162982"><span>A historical overview of bromo-substituted DNA and <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid differentiation.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Mezzanotte, Roberto; Nieddu, Mariella</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>The thymidine analogue 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) has been widely used to make <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid differentiation (SCD) evident in metaphase chromosomes of cells grown for two cycles in BrdU and, thus, containing varying amounts of the thymidine analogue. A direct consequence was the possibility of making <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchange (SCE) evident without using autoradiographic procedures. The latter phenomenon was first discovered in 1953, and its frequency is considered a reliable marker of pathological cell situations, as well as an indicator of mutagenic compounds. Several experimental procedures were found which produced SCD, such as the use of fluorochromes like 33258 Hoechst or acridine orange, whose observation under fluorescence microscopy was directly recorded by photos or stained with Giemsa to make chromosome preparations permanent. Other treatments followed by Giemsa staining required the use of saline hot solutions, acid solutions, nuclease attack and specific monoclonal antibodies. Basically two molecular mechanisms were invoked to explain the different affinity of Giemsa stain for differential BrdU-substituted chromatid DNA. The first implied debromination of chromatid DNA, whose occurrence would be greater in chromatids containing an amount of BrdU greater than that present in <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids. The second mechanism, although not denying the importance of DNA debromination, postulated that chromatin structural organization, in terms of DNA-protein and/or protein-protein DNA interaction, is responsible for SCD production.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20637293','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20637293"><span>Expressed sequence tags reveal Proctotrupomorpha (minus Chalcidoidea) as <span class="hlt">sister</span> to Aculeata (Hymenoptera: Insecta).</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Sharanowski, Barbara J; Robbertse, Barbara; Walker, John; Voss, S Randal; Yoder, Ryan; Spatafora, Joseph; Sharkey, Michael J</p> <p>2010-10-01</p> <p>Hymenoptera is one of the most diverse groups of animals on the planet and have vital importance for ecosystem function as pollinators and parasitoids. Higher-level relationships among Hymenoptera have been notoriously difficult to resolve with both morphological and traditional molecular approaches. Here we examined the utility of expressed sequence tags for resolving relationships among hymenopteran superfamilies. Transcripts were assembled for 6 disparate Hymenopteran taxa with additional sequences added from public databases for a final dataset of 24 genes for 16 taxa and over 10 kb of sequence data. The concatenated dataset recovered a robust and well-supported topology demonstrating the monophyly of Holometabola, Hymenoptera, Apocrita, Aculeata, Ichneumonoidea, and a <span class="hlt">sister</span> relationship between the two most closely related proctotrupomorphs in the dataset (Cynipoidea+Proctotrupoidea). The data strongly supported a <span class="hlt">sister</span> relationship between Aculeata and Proctotrupomorpha, contrary to previously proposed hypotheses. Additionally there was strong evidence indicating Ichneumonoidea as <span class="hlt">sister</span> to Aculeata+Proctotrupomorpha. These relationships were robust to missing data, nucleotide composition biases, low taxonomic sampling, and conflicting signal across gene trees. There was also strong evidence indicating that Chalcidoidea is not contained within Proctotrupomorpha. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23590349','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23590349"><span>Brother-<span class="hlt">sister</span> incest: data from anonymous computer-assisted self interviews.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Stroebel, Sandra S; O'Keefe, Stephen L; Beard, Keith W; Kuo, Shih-Ya; Swindell, Samuel; Stroupe, Walter</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Retrospective data were entered anonymously by 1,521 adult women using computer-assisted self interview. Forty were classified as victims of brother-<span class="hlt">sister</span> incest, 19 were classified as victims of father-daughter incest, and 232 were classified as victims of sexual abuse by an adult other than their father before reaching 18 years of age. The other 1,230 served as controls. The victims of brother-<span class="hlt">sister</span> incest had significantly more problematic outcomes than controls on many measures (e.g., more likely than the controls to endorse feeling like damaged goods, thinking that they had suffered psychological injury, and having undergone psychological treatment for childhood sexual abuse). However, victims of brother-<span class="hlt">sister</span> incest also had significantly less problematic outcomes than victims of father-daughter incest on some measures (e.g., significantly less likely than the father-daughter incest victims to endorse feeling like damaged goods, thinking that they had suffered psychological injury, and having undergone psychological treatment for childhood sexual abuse).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19017705','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19017705"><span>Birth weight and fetal growth in infants born to female hairdressers and their <span class="hlt">sisters</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Axmon, A; Rylander, L</p> <p>2009-03-01</p> <p>To investigate birth weight and fetal growth in female hairdressers, while controlling for intergenerational effects and effects related to childhood exposures. A cohort of women who had attended vocational schools for hairdressers were compared to their <span class="hlt">sisters</span> with respect to birth weight and fetal growth (measured as small for gestational age (SGA) or large for gestational age (LGA), respectively) in their infants. In total, 6223 infants born to 3137 hairdressers and 8388 infants born to 3952 hairdressers' <span class="hlt">sisters</span> were studied. Among the infants born to the hairdressers' <span class="hlt">sisters</span>, the distribution of birth weights were wider than that among the infants born to the hairdressers. This was also reflected in that hairdresser cohort affiliation tended to be protective against both SGA (odds ratio 0.80; 95% confidence interval 0.49 to 1.31) and LGA (0.77; 0.54 to 1.09). For LGA, this effect was even more pronounced among women who had actually worked as hairdressers during at least one pregnancy (0.60; 0.39 to 0.92). The infants born to these women also had a significantly lower mean birth weight (3387 g vs 3419 g; p = 0.033). The results from the present study suggest that infants born to hairdressers have a decreased risk of being LGA. This is most likely not caused by a shift in birth weight distribution or abnormal glucose metabolism.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20124417','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20124417"><span>Human Timeless and Tipin stabilize replication forks and facilitate <span class="hlt">sister</span>-chromatid cohesion.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Leman, Adam R; Noguchi, Chiaki; Lee, Candice Y; Noguchi, Eishi</p> <p>2010-03-01</p> <p>The Timeless-Tipin protein complex has been reported to be important for replication checkpoint and normal DNA replication processes. However, the precise mechanisms by which Timeless-Tipin preserves genomic integrity are largely unclear. Here, we describe the roles of Timeless-Tipin in replication fork stabilization and <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid cohesion. We show in human cells that Timeless is recruited to replication origin regions and dissociate from them as replication proceeds. Cdc45, which is known to be required for replication fork progression, shows similar patterns of origin association to those of Timeless. Depletion of Timeless-Tipin causes chromosome fragmentation and defects in damage repair in response to fork collapse, suggesting that it is required for replication fork maintenance under stress. We also demonstrate that depletion of Timeless-Tipin impairs <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid cohesion and causes a defect in mitotic progression. Consistently, Timeless-Tipin co-purifies with cohesin subunits and is required for their stable association with chromatin during S phase. Timeless associates with the cohesion-promoting DNA helicase ChlR1, which, when overexpressed, partially alleviates the cohesion defect of cells depleted of Timeless-Tipin. These results suggest that Timeless-Tipin functions as a replication fork stabilizer that couples DNA replication with <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid cohesion established at replication forks.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3843825','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3843825"><span>Female rhesus macaques discriminate unfamiliar paternal <span class="hlt">sisters</span> in playback experiments: support for acoustic phenotype matching</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Pfefferle, Dana; Ruiz-Lambides, Angelina V.; Widdig, Anja</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Widespread evidence exists that when relatives live together, kinship plays a central role in shaping the evolution of social behaviour. Previous studies showed that female rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) recognize familiar maternal kin using vocal cues. Recognizing paternal kin might, however, be more difficult as rhesus females mate promiscuously during the possible conception period, most probably concealing paternity. Behavioural observations indicate that semi free-ranging female rhesus macaques prefer to associate with their paternal half-<span class="hlt">sisters</span> in comparison to unrelated females within the same group, particularly when born within the same age cohort. However, the cues and mechanism/s used in paternal kin discrimination remain under debate. Here, we investigated whether female rhesus macaques use the acoustic modality to discriminate between paternal half-<span class="hlt">sisters</span> and non-kin, and tested familiarity and phenotype matching as the underlying mechanisms. We found that test females responded more often to calls of paternal half-<span class="hlt">sisters</span> compared with calls of unrelated females, and that this discrimination ability was independent of the level of familiarity between callers and test females, which provides, to our knowledge, the first evidence for acoustic phenotype matching. Our study strengthens the evidence that female rhesus macaques can recognize their paternal kin, and that vocalizations are used as a cue. PMID:24225452</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25257310','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25257310"><span>Functional genomics identifies a requirement of pre-mRNA splicing factors for <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid cohesion.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Sundaramoorthy, Sriramkumar; Vázquez-Novelle, María Dolores; Lekomtsev, Sergey; Howell, Michael; Petronczki, Mark</p> <p>2014-11-18</p> <p><span class="hlt">Sister</span> chromatid cohesion mediated by the cohesin complex is essential for chromosome segregation during cell division. Using functional genomic screening, we identify a set of 26 pre-mRNA splicing factors that are required for <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid cohesion in human cells. Loss of spliceosome subunits increases the dissociation rate of cohesin from chromatin and abrogates cohesion after DNA replication, ultimately causing mitotic catastrophe. Depletion of splicing factors causes defective processing of the pre-mRNA encoding sororin, a factor required for the stable association of cohesin with chromatin, and an associated reduction of sororin protein level. Expression of an intronless version of sororin and depletion of the cohesin release protein WAPL suppress the cohesion defect in cells lacking splicing factors. We propose that spliceosome components contribute to <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid cohesion and mitotic chromosome segregation through splicing of sororin pre-mRNA. Our results highlight the loss of cohesion as an early cellular consequence of compromised splicing. This may have clinical implications because SF3B1, a splicing factor that we identify to be essential for cohesion, is recurrently mutated in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7771381','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7771381"><span><span class="hlt">Death</span> by fraternity hazing.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Boglioli, L R; Taff, M L</p> <p>1995-03-01</p> <p>Fraternity hazing can cause a variety of injuries and <span class="hlt">deaths</span>. We recently had the opportunity to investigate a heat-related <span class="hlt">death</span> that occurred during a college fraternity event. The original <span class="hlt">death</span> investigation did not consider the circumstances of <span class="hlt">death</span>, environmental conditions, or the subtle autopsy findings related to heat stroke. This case is intended to alert health care professionals that <span class="hlt">deaths</span> on college campuses may be related to fraternity hazing and may require in-depth investigations. An analysis of the <span class="hlt">death</span> and a discussion of heat-related injuries are presented.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/538196','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/538196"><span>Fertility attitudes and the fear of <span class="hlt">death</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Hoelter, J W; Whitlock, J L; Epley, R J</p> <p>1979-12-01</p> <p>An attempt to test empirically the general proposition that fear of <span class="hlt">death</span> is related to certain attitudes about fertility, particularly expected number of children. Analysis of data collected from 355 undergraduates at a midwestern U.S. university showed this proposition to be generally supported and dependent, in part, on respondents' sex. Those who are more fearful of <span class="hlt">death</span> tend to perceive procreation as a means for others to reduce fear of <span class="hlt">death</span>, and also tend to expect having a greater number of children than those whose fear is less. Although the interrelationships of the variables appears somewhat complex, they provide an empirical reference for further research <span class="hlt">linking</span> mortality to fertility.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26067667','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26067667"><span>Prolongation of action potential duration and QT interval during epilepsy <span class="hlt">linked</span> to increased contribution of neuronal sodium channels to cardiac late Na+ current: potential mechanism for sudden <span class="hlt">death</span> in epilepsy.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Biet, Michael; Morin, Nathalie; Lessard-Beaudoin, Melissa; Graham, Rona K; Duss, Sandra; Gagné, Jonathan; Sanon, Nathalie T; Carmant, Lionel; Dumaine, Robert</p> <p>2015-08-01</p> <p>Arrhythmias associated with QT prolongation on the ECG often lead to sudden unexpected <span class="hlt">death</span> in epilepsy. The mechanism causing a prolongation of the QT interval during epilepsy remains unknown. Based on observations showing an upregulation of neuronal sodium channels in the brain during epilepsy, we tested the hypothesis that a similar phenomenon occurs in the heart and contributes to QT prolongation by altering cardiac sodium current properties (INa). We used the patch clamp technique to assess the effects of epilepsy on the cardiac action potential and INa in rat ventricular myocytes. Consistent with QT prolongation, epileptic rats had longer ventricular action potential durations attributable to a sustained component of INa (INaL). The increase in INaL was because of a larger contribution of neuronal Na channels characterized by their high sensitivity to tetrodotoxin. As in the brain, epilepsy was associated with an enhanced expression of the neuronal isoform NaV1.1 in cardiomyocyte. Epilepsy was also associated with a lower INa activation threshold resulting in increased cell excitability. This is the first study correlating increased expression of neuronal sodium channels within the heart to epilepsy-related cardiac arrhythmias. This represents a new paradigm in our understanding of cardiac complications related to epilepsy. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21446266','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21446266"><span>Getting SaaS-y. Why the <span class="hlt">sisters</span> of Mercy Health System opted for on-demand portfolio management.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Carter, Jay</p> <p>2011-03-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Sisters</span> of Mercy Health System chose the SaaS model as a simpler way to plan, execute, and monitor strategic business initiatives. It also provided something that was easy to use and offered quick time to value.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23122964','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23122964"><span>Cyclin A2 is required for <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid segregation, but not separase control, in mouse oocyte meiosis.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Touati, Sandra A; Cladière, Damien; Lister, Lisa M; Leontiou, Ioanna; Chambon, Jean-Philippe; Rattani, Ahmed; Böttger, Franziska; Stemmann, Olaf; Nasmyth, Kim; Herbert, Mary; Wassmann, Katja</p> <p>2012-11-29</p> <p>In meiosis, two specialized cell divisions allow the separation of paired chromosomes first, then of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids. Separase removes the cohesin complex holding <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids together in a stepwise manner from chromosome arms in meiosis I, then from the centromere region in meiosis II. Using mouse oocytes, our study reveals that cyclin A2 promotes entry into meiosis, as well as an additional unexpected role; namely, its requirement for separase-dependent <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid separation in meiosis II. Untimely cyclin A2-associated kinase activity in meiosis I leads to precocious <span class="hlt">sister</span> separation, whereas inhibition of cyclin A2 in meiosis II prevents it. Accordingly, endogenous cyclin A is localized to kinetochores throughout meiosis II, but not in anaphase I. Additionally, we found that cyclin B1, but not cyclin A2, inhibits separase in meiosis I. These findings indicate that separase-dependent cohesin removal is differentially regulated by cyclin B1 and A2 in mammalian meiosis.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://kidshealth.org/en/teens/someone-died.html','NIH-MEDLINEPLUS'); return false;" href="https://kidshealth.org/en/teens/someone-died.html"><span><span class="hlt">Death</span> and Grief</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePlus</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>... A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness <span class="hlt">Death</span> and Grief KidsHealth > For Teens > <span class="hlt">Death</span> and Grief Print A ... Yourself en español Muerte y duelo What Is Grief? Grief is the reaction we have in response ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED076237.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED076237.pdf"><span>Children's Experience with <span class="hlt">Death</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Zeligs, Rose</p> <p></p> <p>Children's concepts of <span class="hlt">death</span> grow with their age and development The three-year-old begins to notice that living things move and make sounds. The five-year-old thinks that life and <span class="hlt">death</span> are reversable, but the six-year-old knows that <span class="hlt">death</span> is final and brings sorrow. Children from eight through ten are interested in the causes of <span class="hlt">death</span> and what…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=death+AND+anxiety&pg=4&id=EJ457020','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=death+AND+anxiety&pg=4&id=EJ457020"><span>Are <span class="hlt">Death</span> Anxiety and <span class="hlt">Death</span> Depression Distinct Entities?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Alvarado, Katherine A.; And Others</p> <p>1993-01-01</p> <p>Administered <span class="hlt">Death</span> Anxiety Scale and <span class="hlt">Death</span> Depression Scale to 200 individuals. Two scales correlated 0.55. Factor analysis of combined 32 items revealed factors: "<span class="hlt">death</span> anxiety" having highest factor loadings with <span class="hlt">Death</span> Anxiety Scale, "<span class="hlt">death</span> depression" having highest factor loadings with <span class="hlt">Death</span> Depression Scale, "<span class="hlt">death</span> of…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Alvarado&pg=7&id=EJ457020','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Alvarado&pg=7&id=EJ457020"><span>Are <span class="hlt">Death</span> Anxiety and <span class="hlt">Death</span> Depression Distinct Entities?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Alvarado, Katherine A.; And Others</p> <p>1993-01-01</p> <p>Administered <span class="hlt">Death</span> Anxiety Scale and <span class="hlt">Death</span> Depression Scale to 200 individuals. Two scales correlated 0.55. Factor analysis of combined 32 items revealed factors: "<span class="hlt">death</span> anxiety" having highest factor loadings with <span class="hlt">Death</span> Anxiety Scale, "<span class="hlt">death</span> depression" having highest factor loadings with <span class="hlt">Death</span> Depression Scale, "<span class="hlt">death</span> of…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=death+AND+anxiety&pg=4&id=EJ400179','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=death+AND+anxiety&pg=4&id=EJ400179"><span>Identity and <span class="hlt">Death</span> Anxiety.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Sterling, Christopher M.; Van Horn, K. Roger</p> <p>1989-01-01</p> <p>Examined relationships between <span class="hlt">death</span> anxiety and Erikson's concept of ego identity in White male undergraduates (N=63). Found involvement in identity crisis or decision-making period appeared to have increased <span class="hlt">death</span> anxiety. Recommends further research between <span class="hlt">death</span> anxiety and ego identity development. (Author/ABL)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=death+AND+anxiety&pg=4&id=EJ323296','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=death+AND+anxiety&pg=4&id=EJ323296"><span><span class="hlt">Death</span> Anxiety and Politics.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Peterson, Steven A.</p> <p>1986-01-01</p> <p>Explores the relationship between <span class="hlt">death</span> anxiety and sociopolitical attitudes and political behavior. Data from a sample of 209 undergraduate students indicate that <span class="hlt">death</span> anxiety is modestly related to attitudes reflecting a turning away from the social and political world. <span class="hlt">Death</span> anxiety does not seem related to political behavior. (Author)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=consolation&pg=2&id=EJ556677','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=consolation&pg=2&id=EJ556677"><span>Separation, Part I: <span class="hlt">Death</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Jordan, Anne Devereaux</p> <p>1997-01-01</p> <p>Contends literature is the one place where <span class="hlt">death</span> still abides, where grief is felt and consolation can be sought. States that young readers can gain a recognition in books that <span class="hlt">death</span> is natural. Discusses <span class="hlt">death</span> in folk and fairy tales, in 17th-century didactic children's books and in modern and contemporary literature. Outlines characteristics of…</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li class="active"><span>21</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_21 --> <div id="page_22" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li class="active"><span>22</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="421"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1470669','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1470669"><span>Chl1p, a DNA helicase-like protein in budding yeast, functions in <span class="hlt">sister</span>-chromatid cohesion.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Skibbens, Robert V</p> <p>2004-01-01</p> <p>From the time of DNA replication until anaphase onset, <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids remain tightly paired along their length. Ctf7p/Eco1p is essential to establish <span class="hlt">sister</span>-chromatid pairing during S-phase and associates with DNA replication components. DNA helicases precede the DNA replication fork and thus will first encounter chromatin sites destined for cohesion. In this study, I provide the first evidence that a DNA helicase is required for proper <span class="hlt">sister</span>-chromatid cohesion. Characterizations of chl1 mutant cells reveal that CHL1 interacts genetically with both CTF7/ECO1 and CTF18/CHL12, two genes that function in <span class="hlt">sister</span>-chromatid cohesion. Consistent with genetic interactions, Chl1p physically associates with Ctf7p/Eco1p both in vivo and in vitro. Finally, a functional assay reveals that Chl1p is critical for <span class="hlt">sister</span>-chromatid cohesion. Within the budding yeast genome, Chl1p exhibits the highest degree of sequence similarity to human CHL1 isoforms and BACH1. Previous studies revealed that human CHLR1 exhibits DNA helicase-like activities and that BACH1 is a helicase-like protein that associates with the tumor suppressor BRCA1 to maintain genome integrity. Our findings document a novel role for Chl1p in <span class="hlt">sister</span>-chromatid cohesion and provide new insights into the possible mechanisms through which DNA helicases may contribute to cancer progression when mutated. PMID:15020404</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22425245','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22425245"><span>High prevalence of abdominal aortic aneurysms in brothers and <span class="hlt">sisters</span> of patients despite a low prevalence in the population.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Linné, Anneli; Lindström, David; Hultgren, Rebecka</p> <p>2012-08-01</p> <p>Population-based screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) in elderly men is organized in many regions and countries in the Western world, and the prevalence of disease is reported to decline. Whether the prevalence among those with a family history also is declining is unknown. The primary purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of AAAs among siblings of persons with AAAs and to investigate the proportion of siblings already diagnosed by opportunistic screening. Patients treated for AAAs from January 2008 through December 2010 (n = 412) in Stockholm, Sweden, were screened for siblings. Seven hundred seventy-nine siblings were identified. All siblings <80 years residing in Stockholm County were considered eligible and were invited to participate in the study (n = 174). Deceased siblings were not included in the study, regardless of the cause of <span class="hlt">death</span>. One hundred fifty siblings were enrolled in the study after informed consent was provided. One hundred thirty-four siblings were screened for AAAs with ultrasound scan and maximum aortic, infrarenal, anteroposterior, external (outer-to-outer) aortic diameter was measured. Characteristics of siblings with and without AAAs were compared. The mean age of the screened siblings was 66.4 years (standard deviation, 7.1). Of the siblings, 11% were found to have an AAA, 17% (n = 11) of the brothers, and 6% (n = 5) of the <span class="hlt">sisters</span>. Only 11% of the siblings were screened for AAAs before the study. One of 16 siblings with AAAs was <65 years. Ever smoking was evident in 81% of the AAA siblings compared to 59% in the non-AAA siblings. Factors associated with increased risk of AAAs in the multivariate regression analysis were: male sex (odds ratio, 3.4; 95% confidence interval, 1.1-10.8; P = .04) and age >65 (odds ratio, 10.8; 95% confidence interval, 1.3-86.4; P = .03). Ever smoking was not statistically significant as a risk. A strikingly high prevalence of AAAs in siblings was found as compared to the reported</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Death&id=EJ927986','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Death&id=EJ927986"><span>Evidence That Thinking about <span class="hlt">Death</span> Relates to Time-Estimation Behavior</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Martens, Andy; Schmeichel, Brandon J.</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Time and <span class="hlt">death</span> are <span class="hlt">linked</span>--the passing of time brings us closer to <span class="hlt">death</span>. Terror management theory proposes that awareness of <span class="hlt">death</span> represents a potent problem that motivates a variety of psychological defenses (Greenberg, Pyszczynski, & Solomon, 1997). We tested the hypothesis that thinking about <span class="hlt">death</span> motivates elongated perceptions of brief…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=greenberg&id=EJ927986','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=greenberg&id=EJ927986"><span>Evidence That Thinking about <span class="hlt">Death</span> Relates to Time-Estimation Behavior</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Martens, Andy; Schmeichel, Brandon J.</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Time and <span class="hlt">death</span> are <span class="hlt">linked</span>--the passing of time brings us closer to <span class="hlt">death</span>. Terror management theory proposes that awareness of <span class="hlt">death</span> represents a potent problem that motivates a variety of psychological defenses (Greenberg, Pyszczynski, & Solomon, 1997). We tested the hypothesis that thinking about <span class="hlt">death</span> motivates elongated perceptions of brief…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25642921','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25642921"><span>Infant <span class="hlt">death</span> scene investigation.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Tabor, Pamela D; Ragan, Krista</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>The sudden unexpected <span class="hlt">death</span> of an infant is a tragedy to the family, a concern to the community, and an indicator of national health. To accurately determine the cause and manner of the infant's <span class="hlt">death</span>, a thorough and accurate <span class="hlt">death</span> scene investigation by properly trained personnel is key. Funding and resources are directed based on autopsy reports, which are only as accurate as the scene investigation. The investigation should include a standardized format, body diagrams, and a photographed or videotaped scene recreation utilizing doll reenactment. Forensic nurses, with their basic nursing knowledge and additional forensic skills and abilities, are optimally suited to conduct infant <span class="hlt">death</span> scene investigations as well as train others to properly conduct <span class="hlt">death</span> scene investigations. Currently, 49 states have child <span class="hlt">death</span> review teams, which is an idea avenue for a forensic nurse to become involved in <span class="hlt">death</span> scene investigations.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4307833','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4307833"><span>Effect of Cause-of-<span class="hlt">Death</span> Training on Agreement Between Hospital Discharge Diagnoses and Cause of <span class="hlt">Death</span> Reported, Inpatient Hospital <span class="hlt">Deaths</span>, New York City, 2008–2010</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Ong, Paulina; Gambatese, Melissa; Begier, Elizabeth; Zimmerman, Regina; Soto, Antonio</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Introduction Accurate cause-of-<span class="hlt">death</span> reporting is required for mortality data to validly inform public health programming and evaluation. Research demonstrates overreporting of heart disease on New York City <span class="hlt">death</span> certificates. We describe changes in reported causes of <span class="hlt">death</span> following a New York City health department training conducted in 2009 to improve accuracy of cause-of-<span class="hlt">death</span> reporting at 8 hospitals. The objective of our study was to assess the degree to which <span class="hlt">death</span> certificates citing heart disease as cause of <span class="hlt">death</span> agreed with hospital discharge data and the degree to which training improved accuracy of reporting. Methods We analyzed 74,373 <span class="hlt">death</span> certificates for 2008 through 2010 that were <span class="hlt">linked</span> with hospital discharge records for New York City inpatient <span class="hlt">deaths</span> and calculated the proportion of discordant <span class="hlt">deaths</span>, that is, <span class="hlt">death</span> certificates reporting an underlying cause of heart disease with no corresponding discharge record diagnosis. We also summarized top principal diagnoses among discordant reports and calculated the proportion of inpatient <span class="hlt">deaths</span> reporting sepsis, a condition underreported in New York City, to assess whether documentation practices changed in response to clarifications made during the intervention. Results Citywide discordance between <span class="hlt">death</span> certificates and discharge data decreased from 14.9% in 2008 to 9.6% in 2010 (P < .001), driven by a decrease in discordance at intervention hospitals (20.2% in 2008 to 8.9% in 2010; P < .001). At intervention hospitals, reporting of sepsis increased from 3.7% of inpatient <span class="hlt">deaths</span> in 2008 to 20.6% in 2010 (P < .001). Conclusion Overreporting of heart disease as cause of <span class="hlt">death</span> declined at intervention hospitals, driving a citywide decline, and sepsis reporting practices changed in accordance with health department training. Researchers should consider the effect of overreporting and data-quality changes when analyzing New York City heart disease mortality trends. Other vital records jurisdictions</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25590598','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25590598"><span>Effect of cause-of-<span class="hlt">death</span> training on agreement between hospital discharge diagnoses and cause of <span class="hlt">death</span> reported, inpatient hospital <span class="hlt">deaths</span>, New York City, 2008-2010.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ong, Paulina; Gambatese, Melissa; Begier, Elizabeth; Zimmerman, Regina; Soto, Antonio; Madsen, Ann</p> <p>2015-01-15</p> <p>Accurate cause-of-<span class="hlt">death</span> reporting is required for mortality data to validly inform public health programming and evaluation. Research demonstrates overreporting of heart disease on New York City <span class="hlt">death</span> certificates. We describe changes in reported causes of <span class="hlt">death</span> following a New York City health department training conducted in 2009 to improve accuracy of cause-of-<span class="hlt">death</span> reporting at 8 hospitals. The objective of our study was to assess the degree to which <span class="hlt">death</span> certificates citing heart disease as cause of <span class="hlt">death</span> agreed with hospital discharge data and the degree to which training improved accuracy of reporting. We analyzed 74,373 <span class="hlt">death</span> certificates for 2008 through 2010 that were <span class="hlt">linked</span> with hospital discharge records for New York City inpatient <span class="hlt">deaths</span> and calculated the proportion of discordant <span class="hlt">deaths</span>, that is, <span class="hlt">death</span> certificates reporting an underlying cause of heart disease with no corresponding discharge record diagnosis. We also summarized top principal diagnoses among discordant reports and calculated the proportion of inpatient <span class="hlt">deaths</span> reporting sepsis, a condition underreported in New York City, to assess whether documentation practices changed in response to clarifications made during the intervention. Citywide discordance between <span class="hlt">death</span> certificates and discharge data decreased from 14.9% in 2008 to 9.6% in 2010 (P < .001), driven by a decrease in discordance at intervention hospitals (20.2% in 2008 to 8.9% in 2010; P < .001). At intervention hospitals, reporting of sepsis increased from 3.7% of inpatient <span class="hlt">deaths</span> in 2008 to 20.6% in 2010 (P < .001). Overreporting of heart disease as cause of <span class="hlt">death</span> declined at intervention hospitals, driving a citywide decline, and sepsis reporting practices changed in accordance with health department training. Researchers should consider the effect of overreporting and data-quality changes when analyzing New York City heart disease mortality trends. Other vital records jurisdictions should employ similar interventions to</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ124667.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ124667.pdf"><span>Community <span class="hlt">Links</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Nelson, Mary</p> <p>1975-01-01</p> <p>At Moraine Valley Community College (Illinois), a chain of events, programs, activities, and services has <span class="hlt">linked</span> the college and community in such areas as fine arts, ethnic groups, public services, community action, community service, and community education. (Author/NHM)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6596678','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6596678"><span>Manifestations of X-<span class="hlt">linked</span> congenital stationary night blindness in three daughters of an affected male: Demonstration of homozygosity</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Bech-Hansen, N.T. Univ. of Calgary, Alberta ); Pearce, W.G. )</p> <p>1993-01-01</p> <p>X-<span class="hlt">linked</span> congenital stationary night blindness (CSNB1) is a hereditary retinal disorder in which clinical features in affected males usually include myopia, nystagmus, and impaired visual acuity. Electroretinography demonstrates a marked reduction in b-wave amplitude. In the study of a large Mennonite family with CSNB1, three of five <span class="hlt">sisters</span> in one sibship were found to have manifestations of CSNB1. All the sons of these three <span class="hlt">sisters</span> were affected. Each of the two nonmanifesting <span class="hlt">sisters</span> had at least one unaffected son. Analysis of Xp markers in the region Xp21.1-Xp11.22 showed that the two <span class="hlt">sisters</span> who were unaffected had inherited the same maternal X chromosome (i.e., M2). Two of the daughters who manifested with CSNB had inherited the other maternal X chromosome (M1). The third manifesting <span class="hlt">sister</span> inherited a recombinant X chromosome with a crossover between TIMP and DXS255, which suggests that the CSNB1 locus lies proximal to TIMP. One of the affected daughters' sons had inherited the maternal M1 X chromosome, a finding consistent with that chromosome carrying a mutant CSNB gene; the other affected sons inherited the grandfather's X chromosome (i.e., P). Molecular analysis of DNA from three <span class="hlt">sisters</span> with manifestations of CSNB is consistent with their being homozygous at the CSNB1 locus and with their mother being a carrier of CSNB1. 23 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010dmak.book..355D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010dmak.book..355D"><span><span class="hlt">Link</span> Analysis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Donoho, Steve</p> <p></p> <p><span class="hlt">Link</span> analysis is a collection of techniques that operate on data that can be represented as nodes and <span class="hlt">links</span>. This chapter surveys a variety of techniques including subgraph matching, finding cliques and K-plexes, maximizing spread of influence, visualization, finding hubs and authorities, and combining with traditional techniques (classification, clustering, etc). It also surveys applications including social network analysis, viral marketing, Internet search, fraud detection, and crime prevention.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=sexuality+AND+adolescence&id=EJ972941','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=sexuality+AND+adolescence&id=EJ972941"><span>Addiction to near <span class="hlt">Death</span> in Adolescence</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Shaw, Janet</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>This paper takes Betty Joseph's concept of "addiction to near <span class="hlt">death</span>," which describes a clinical situation in which sadism and masochism dominate the relationships of a particular group of patients, and applies it specifically to the case material of a girl in adolescent psychotherapy treatment. A <span class="hlt">link</span> is made between the patient's retreat from…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=strength+AND+materials&pg=4&id=EJ972941','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=strength+AND+materials&pg=4&id=EJ972941"><span>Addiction to near <span class="hlt">Death</span> in Adolescence</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Shaw, Janet</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>This paper takes Betty Joseph's concept of "addiction to near <span class="hlt">death</span>," which describes a clinical situation in which sadism and masochism dominate the relationships of a particular group of patients, and applies it specifically to the case material of a girl in adolescent psychotherapy treatment. A <span class="hlt">link</span> is made between the patient's retreat from…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15379060','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15379060"><span>[The diagnosis of <span class="hlt">death</span>].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Echeverría, Carlos; Goic, Alejandro; Lavados, Manuel; Quintana, Carlos; Rojas, Alberto; Serani, Alejandro; Vacarezza, Ricardo</p> <p>2004-01-01</p> <p>This paper undertakes an analysis of the scientific criteria used in the diagnosis of <span class="hlt">death</span> and underscores the importance of intellectual rigor in the definition of medical concepts, particularly regarding such a critical issue as the diagnosis of <span class="hlt">death</span>. Under the cardiorespiratory criterion, <span class="hlt">death</span> is defined as "the irreversible cessation of the functioning of an organism as a whole", and the tests used to confirm this criterion (negative life-signs) are sensitive and specific. In this case, cadaverous phenomena appear immediately following the diagnosis of <span class="hlt">death</span>. On the other hand, doubts have arisen concerning the theoretical and the inner consistency of the criterion of brain <span class="hlt">death</span>, since it does not satisfy the definition of "the irreversible cessation of the functioning of an organism as a whole", nor the requirement of "total and irreversible cessation of all functions of the entire brain, including the brain stem". There is evidence to the effect that the tests used to confirm this criterion are not specific enough. It is clear that brain <span class="hlt">death</span> marks the beginning of a process that eventually ends in <span class="hlt">death</span>, though <span class="hlt">death</span> does not occur at that moment. From an ethical point of view, the conflict arises between the need to provide an unequivocal diagnosis of <span class="hlt">death</span> and the possibility of saving a life through organ transplantation. The sensitive issue of brain <span class="hlt">death</span> calls for a more thorough and in-depth discussion among physicians and the community at large.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16737839','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16737839"><span>Three <span class="hlt">sisters</span> with very-late-onset major depression and parkinsonism.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Sechi, GianPietro; Antonio Cocco, Giovanni; Errigo, Alessandra; Deiana, Luca; Rosati, Giulio; Agnetti, Virgilio; Stephen Paulus, Kay; Mario Pes, Giovanni</p> <p>2007-03-01</p> <p>Familiar Parkinson's disease has an age of onset from the second to the sixth decade, whereas Wilson's disease (WD) usually presents in the first decade of life. We studied three <span class="hlt">sisters</span> with a form of very-late-onset major depression and parkinsonism with probable linkage to ATP7B gene. Molecular studies demonstrated a nucleotide deletion at the 5'UTR region in a single allele of ATP7B gene. They did not have a family history of WD, or markers indicative for copper deposition in peripheral tissues. We suggest that single allele mutations of ATP7B gene may confer a susceptibility for late-onset major depression and parkinsonism.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/58452','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/58452"><span>Geologic map of the Three <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> Wilderness, Deschutes, Lane, and Linn counties, Oregon</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Taylor, E.M.; MacLeod, N.S.; Sherrod, D.R.; Walker, G.W.</p> <p>1987-01-01</p> <p>The Wilderness Act (Public Law 88-577, September 3, 1964) and related acts require the U.S. Geological Survey and the U.S. Bureau of Mines to survey certain areas on Federal lands to determine the mineral values, if any, that may be present. Results must be made available to the public and to be submitted to the President and Congress. This report presents the results of a geologic survey of the Three <span class="hlt">Sisters</span> Wilderness, Deschutes and Willamette National Forests, Deschutes, Lane and Linn Counties, Oregon</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25401907','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25401907"><span>Dark three-<span class="hlt">sister</span> rogue waves in normally dispersive optical fibers with random birefringence.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Chen, Shihua; Soto-Crespo, Jose M; Grelu, Philippe</p> <p>2014-11-03</p> <p>We investigate dark rogue wave dynamics in normally dispersive birefringent optical fibers, based on the exact rational solutions of the coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equations. Analytical solutions are derived up to the second order via a nonrecursive Darboux transformation method. Vector dark "three-<span class="hlt">sister</span>" rogue waves as well as their existence conditions are demonstrated. The robustness against small perturbations is numerically confirmed in spite of the onset of modulational instability, offering the possibility to observe such extreme events in normal optical fibers with random birefringence, or in other Manakov-type vector nonlinear media.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4775908','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4775908"><span>Mitochondrial Genes Reveal Triatoma jatai as a <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Species to Triatoma costalimai (Reduviidae: Triatominae)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Teves, Simone Caldas; Gardim, Sueli; Carbajal de la Fuente, Ana Laura; Lopes, Catarina Macedo; Gonçalves, Teresa Cristina Monte; Mallet, Jacenir Reis dos Santos; da Rosa, João Aristeu; Almeida, Carlos Eduardo</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Triatoma jatai was described using a set of morphological structures from specimens collected in Paranã municipality of Tocantins State, Brazil. Under a Bayesian framework and using two mitochondrial genes (16S and COI), phylogenetic analysis recovered T. jatai as a <span class="hlt">sister</span> species to Triatoma costalimai with higher genetic distances than between other well-recognized species. Our results agree with previous suggestions based on morphometric analysis. In the light of the non-monophyly of Matogrossensis subcomplex, the inclusion of T. jatai shall be considered for reevaluating this group. PMID:26787157</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/254004','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/254004"><span><span class="hlt">Sister</span> chromatid exchange analysis to monitor genotoxic chemicals. (Latest citations from Pollution abstracts). Published Search</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p></p> <p>1996-04-01</p> <p>The bibliography contains citations concerning the use of the <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchange (SCE) analysis for toxicological studies. SCE analysis are very sensitive measures of genotoxic damage to chromosomes. SCE toxicological studies analyzing ionizing radiation, chromium compounds, styrene, paint thinner, mercury, cigarette smoke, coal dust, fuel oil, insecticides, ethylene oxide, diesel exhaust, and polychlorinated biphenyls are discussed. SCE studies using both human and animal tissue cultures are described. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3261041','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3261041"><span>Resurrection of the genus Staphisagria J. Hill, <span class="hlt">sister</span> to all the other Delphinieae (Ranunculaceae)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Jabbour, Florian; Renner, Susanne S.</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Abstract Molecular sequence data show that the three species oDelphinium subg. Staphisagria (J. Hill) Peterm. form the <span class="hlt">sister</span> clade to Aconitum L., Aconitella SpachConsolida (DC.) S.F. Gray, and all remaining species of Delphinium L. To account for this finding we resurrect Staphisagria J. Hill (1756). Names in Staphisagria are available for two of the species. We here make the required new combination for the third species, Staphisagria picta (Willd.) F. Jabbour, provide a key to the species, and illustrate one of them. PMID:22287922</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10505905','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10505905"><span>Brother-<span class="hlt">sister</span> incest - father-daughter incest: a comparison of characteristics and consequences.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Rudd, J M; Herzberger, S D</p> <p>1999-09-01</p> <p>One group of women who were sexually abused by brothers and a second group who were sexually abused by fathers are compared with the intent to identify the differing characteristics of each type of abuse and the effects of the abuse on their adult functioning. Our hypothesis was that there would indeed be differences in the characteristics of the abuse and its effects, and that this would necessitate differing treatment strategies. Surveys were distributed to women attending support groups for incest survivors. Of the 62 women completing questionnaires, 14 women (23%) had been sexually abused by a brother. A similar number of women (15) who had been sexually abused by their fathers were chosen from the overall sample for comparison. The absence of the father as a vital force in family life played a key role in the sexual abuse of women by their brothers in every case. The duration of the sexual abuse for brother-abused women and father-abused women was lengthy. The characteristics, including use of force, are equally as serious for <span class="hlt">sisters</span> as for daughters. The family circumstances surrounding the abuse were examined for both groups and the results yielded a fuller understanding of the incestuous family. Despite an appearance of normalcy, the level of family-wide disturbances, for example substance abuse, mental illness and pervasive family-wide violence were profound for both groups. In this study, we also examine the effects in adulthood of the serious disruption of childhood developmental phases for both brother-abused and father-abused women, taking into account the incidence of substance abuse, depression, suicidality, and eating disorders. The authors conclude that the characteristics and consequences of brother-<span class="hlt">sister</span> incest are of equal seriousness to those of father-daughter incest. This would suggest that brother-<span class="hlt">sister</span> incest is one of the current blind spots in incest research, and one that we cannot afford to ignore. In-depth knowledge of the dynamics</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li class="active"><span>22</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_22 --> <div id="page_23" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li class="active"><span>23</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="441"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23395177','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23395177"><span>Shigella strains are not clones of Escherichia coli but <span class="hlt">sister</span> species in the genus Escherichia.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Zuo, Guanghong; Xu, Zhao; Hao, Bailin</p> <p>2013-02-01</p> <p>Shigella species and Escherichia coli are closely related organisms. Early phenotyping experiments and several recent molecular studies put Shigella within the species E. coli. However, the whole-genome-based, alignment-free and parameter-free CVTree approach shows convincingly that four established Shigella species, Shigella boydii, Shigella sonnei, Shigella felxneri and Shigella dysenteriae, are distinct from E. coli strains, and form <span class="hlt">sister</span> species to E. coli within the genus Escherichia. In view of the overall success and high resolution power of the CVTree approach, this result should be taken seriously. We hope that the present report may promote further in-depth study of the Shigella-E. coli relationship.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3442830','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3442830"><span>Indirect intergenic suppression of a radiosensitive mutant of Sordaria macrospora defective in <span class="hlt">sister</span>-chromatid cohesiveness.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Huynh, A D; Leblon, G; Zickler, D</p> <p>1986-01-01</p> <p>Six ultra violet (UV) mutageneses were performed on the spo76 UV-sensitive mutant of Sordaria macrospora. Spo76 shows an early centromere cleavage associated with an arrest at the first meiotic division and therefore does not form ascospores. Moreover, it exhibits altered pairing structure (synaptonemal complex), revealing a defect in the <span class="hlt">sister</span>-chromatid cohesiveness. From 37 revertants which partially restored sporulation, 34 extragenic suppressors of spo76 were isolated. All suppressors are altered in chromosomal pairing but, unlike spo76, show a wild type centromere cleavage. The 34 suppressors were assigned to six different genes and mapped. Only one of the suppressor genes is involved in repair functions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26787157','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26787157"><span>Mitochondrial Genes Reveal Triatoma jatai as a <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Species to Triatoma costalimai (Reduviidae: Triatominae).</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Teves, Simone Caldas; Gardim, Sueli; Carbajal de la Fuente, Ana Laura; Lopes, Catarina Macedo; Gonçalves, Teresa Cristina Monte; dos Santos Mallet, Jacenir Reis; da Rosa, João Aristeu; Almeida, Carlos Eduardo</p> <p>2016-03-01</p> <p>Triatoma jatai was described using a set of morphological structures from specimens collected in Paranã municipality of Tocantins State, Brazil. Under a Bayesian framework and using two mitochondrial genes (16S and COI), phylogenetic analysis recovered T. jatai as a <span class="hlt">sister</span> species to Triatoma costalimai with higher genetic distances than between other well-recognized species. Our results agree with previous suggestions based on morphometric analysis. In the light of the non-monophyly of Matogrossensis subcomplex, the inclusion of T. jatai shall be considered for reevaluating this group.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12516290','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12516290"><span>[Partial lipodystrophy in two HLA identical <span class="hlt">sisters</span> with hypocomplementemia and nephropathy].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Peces, R</p> <p>2002-01-01</p> <p>Partial lipodystrophy is a rare disorder with both autosomal recessive and familial forms. The cutaneous findings, which are often subtle, consist of gradual loss of subcutaneous fat from the face and upper body. Low levels of C3 and the presence of C3NeF help to identify these patients. Associated systemic abnormalities include the development of membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis, insulin resistance and an increased incidence of autoimmune diseases. We report here two HLA identical <span class="hlt">sisters</span> with the typical features of partial lipodystrophy associated with recurrent infections, low levels of C3, and nephropathy. Our data suggest an autosomal recessive transmission. We discuss the genetic and molecular basis of this rare association.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12470346','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12470346"><span>Incest, gamete donation by siblings and the importance of the genetic <span class="hlt">link</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Pennings, G</p> <p>2002-01-01</p> <p>Recently, several requests have emerged in which women wished to be impregnated with donor eggs fertilized with spermatozoa of their brother. An important argument advanced against such applications is that it is a kind of incest. Four definitions of incest are reviewed in this article to evaluate the acceptability of these demands. The first three (sexual intercourse, reproduction with gametes of first-degree relatives and symbolic incest) do not apply to the cases. However, when the <span class="hlt">sister</span> and her brother intend to raise the child as social mother and father, these requests should be considered as "intentional incest". If the brother only functions as an uncle, the request of the woman resembles the currently accepted practice of oocyte donation from <span class="hlt">sister</span> to <span class="hlt">sister</span>. In that case, the wish to receive gametes from a first-degree relative is motivated by the wish to establish as far as possible a genetic <span class="hlt">link</span> with the child.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14647296','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14647296"><span>Programmed cell <span class="hlt">death</span>: Superman meets Dr <span class="hlt">Death</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Meier, Pascal; Silke, John</p> <p>2003-12-01</p> <p>This year's Cold Spring Harbor meeting on programmed cell <span class="hlt">death</span> (September 17-21, 2003), organised by Craig Thompson and Junying Yuan, was proof that the 'golden age' of research in this field is far from over. There was a flurry of fascinating insights into the regulation of diverse apoptotic pathways and unexpected non-apoptotic roles for some of the key apoptotic regulators and effectors. In addition to their role in cell <span class="hlt">death</span>, components of the apoptotic molecular machinery are now known to also function in a variety of essential cellular processes, such as regulating glucose homeostasis, lipid metabolism, cell proliferation and differentiation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3589284','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3589284"><span>TRPM7, the cytoskeleton and neuronal <span class="hlt">death</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Asrar, Suhail; Aarts, Michelle</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Ischemic stroke is one of the leading causes of disability and <span class="hlt">death</span> in the world. Elucidation of the underlying mechanisms associated with neuronal <span class="hlt">death</span> during this detrimental process has been of significant interest in the field of research. One principle component vital to the maintenance of cellular integrity is the cytoskeleton. Studies suggest that abnormalities at the level of this fundamental structure are directly <span class="hlt">linked</span> to adverse effects on cellular well-being, including cell <span class="hlt">death</span>. In recent years, evidence has also emerged regarding an imperative role for the transient receptor potential (TRP) family member TRPM7 in the mediation of excitotoxic-independent neuronal demise. In this review, we will elaborate on the current knowledge and unique properties associated with the functioning of this structure. In addition, we will deliberate the involvement of distinct mechanistic pathways during TRPM7-dependent cell <span class="hlt">death</span>, including modifications at the level of the cytoskeleton. PMID:23247582</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3564271','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3564271"><span>Alternative Cell <span class="hlt">Death</span> Pathways and Cell Metabolism</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Fulda, Simone</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>While necroptosis has for long been viewed as an accidental mode of cell <span class="hlt">death</span> triggered by physical or chemical damage, it has become clear over the last years that necroptosis can also represent a programmed form of cell <span class="hlt">death</span> in mammalian cells. Key discoveries in the field of cell <span class="hlt">death</span> research, including the identification of critical components of the necroptotic machinery, led to a revised concept of cell <span class="hlt">death</span> signaling programs. Several regulatory check and balances are in place in order to ensure that necroptosis is tightly controlled according to environmental cues and cellular needs. This network of regulatory mechanisms includes metabolic pathways, especially those <span class="hlt">linked</span> to mitochondrial signaling events. A better understanding of these signal transduction mechanisms will likely contribute to open new avenues to exploit our knowledge on the regulation of necroptosis signaling for therapeutic application in the treatment of human diseases. PMID:23401689</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6735290','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6735290"><span><span class="hlt">Deaths</span> during recreational activity.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Copeland, A R</p> <p>1984-06-01</p> <p>This study of recreational <span class="hlt">deaths</span> in the "land of sun and fun" has pointed out several useful factors. Firstly, accidental <span class="hlt">deaths</span> are more common than naturals. Secondly, the most common accidental <span class="hlt">death</span> is drowning while swimming. The latter is not usually at public facilities, but rather at unsupervised uninstitutionalized surroundings. Finally, a younger population is involved with a frequent number of them with alcohol detected and/or drugs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27741611','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27741611"><span>A good <span class="hlt">death</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-10-26</p> <p>Definitions of a good <span class="hlt">death</span> often include being at home. Dying at home may be optimal for the patient but could place a significant burden on families and leave them with traumatic memories. <span class="hlt">Death</span> in hospital should not mean that it is a 'bad <span class="hlt">death</span>'. How someone dies is more important than where they die and nurses should be taught to provide good end of life care in all settings.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18622924','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18622924"><span>[The extraordinary <span class="hlt">death</span>].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Plattner, Thomas; Zollinger, Ulrich</p> <p>2008-07-01</p> <p>The examination of a deceased person is an important duty for physicians. It comprises the certification of <span class="hlt">death</span>, the certification of the identity of the deceased, a thorough examination of the body, an estimation of the moment of <span class="hlt">death</span> and ends with the decision, if <span class="hlt">death</span> was caused by a certain or possible violent cause in which case it must be reported to the authorities. Problems and pitfalls are discussed on the basis of practical case presentations.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Thanatology&pg=2&id=ED200878','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Thanatology&pg=2&id=ED200878"><span>The Effects of <span class="hlt">Death</span> Education.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Freitag, Carl B.; Hassler, Shawn David</p> <p></p> <p>Although fear of <span class="hlt">death</span> is recorded in the writings of the oldest major religions, the study of <span class="hlt">death</span> and the fear of <span class="hlt">death</span> have only occurred for the last few decades. <span class="hlt">Death</span> education courses have grown in number since the early 1970's. College students participated in an investigation of the effects of <span class="hlt">death</span> education on <span class="hlt">death</span> anxiety by…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Thanatology&pg=2&id=ED200878','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Thanatology&pg=2&id=ED200878"><span>The Effects of <span class="hlt">Death</span> Education.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Freitag, Carl B.; Hassler, Shawn David</p> <p></p> <p>Although fear of <span class="hlt">death</span> is recorded in the writings of the oldest major religions, the study of <span class="hlt">death</span> and the fear of <span class="hlt">death</span> have only occurred for the last few decades. <span class="hlt">Death</span> education courses have grown in number since the early 1970's. College students participated in an investigation of the effects of <span class="hlt">death</span> education on <span class="hlt">death</span> anxiety by…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18562463','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18562463"><span>Social class and cause of <span class="hlt">death</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Erikson, Robert; Torssander, Jenny</p> <p>2008-10-01</p> <p>Previous studies have shown that causes of <span class="hlt">death</span> differ in their relationship to social class, but we lack a more comprehensive description of this variation. The present study provides a detailed and extensive list of social class differences for a large number of specific causes of <span class="hlt">death</span>. All <span class="hlt">deaths</span> between 1991 and 2003 in Sweden were <span class="hlt">linked</span> with information on household social class from 1990. Relative <span class="hlt">death</span> risks and excess mortality in groups of causes according to the European shortlist were estimated separately for men and women in eight classes using Cox Regression. A clear mortality gradient among employees was found for the majority of causes, from low-relative <span class="hlt">death</span> risks among higher managerial and professional occupations to relatively high risks for the unskilled working class. There is considerable variation in the strength of the association, from causes such as malignant melanoma, breast cancer and transport accidents among women, where no clear class differences were found. At the other extreme, mental and behavioural disorders, endocrine, nutritional and metabolic diseases and diseases of the respiratory system all show steep slopes for both men and women. Circulatory diseases and cancer together account for 15-20% of excess mortality. Exceptions to the general pattern--causes of <span class="hlt">death</span> in which higher social classes are exposed to greater <span class="hlt">death</span> risks or in which there is no mortality gradient--are practically non-existent. There is nevertheless significant variation in the strength of the class differences in specific causes.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25469872','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25469872"><span>Different parasite faunas in sympatric populations of <span class="hlt">sister</span> hedgehog species in a secondary contact zone.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Pfäffle, Miriam; Černá Bolfíková, Barbora; Hulva, Pavel; Petney, Trevor</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Providing descriptive data on parasite diversity and load in <span class="hlt">sister</span> species is a first step in addressing the role of host-parasite coevolution in the speciation process. In this study we compare the parasite faunas of the closely related hedgehog species Erinaceus europaeus and E. roumanicus from the Czech Republic where both occur in limited sympatry. We examined 109 hedgehogs from 21 localities within this secondary contact zone. Three species of ectoparasites and nine species of endoparasites were recorded. Significantly higher abundances and prevalences were found for Capillaria spp. and Brachylaemus erinacei in E. europaeus compared to E. roumanicus and higher mean infection rates and prevalences for Hymenolepis erinacei, Physaloptera clausa and Nephridiorhynchus major in E. roumanicus compared to E. europaeus. Divergence in the composition of the parasite fauna, except for Capillaria spp., which seem to be very unspecific, may be related to the complicated demography of their hosts connected with Pleistocene climate oscillations and consequent range dynamics. The fact that all parasite species with different abundances in E. europaeus and E. roumanicus belong to intestinal forms indicates a possible diversification of trophic niches between both <span class="hlt">sister</span> hedgehog species.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5025379','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5025379"><span>Origins of dacite and rhyodacite of the South <span class="hlt">Sister</span> magmatic system, central high Cascades, Oregon</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Price, J.D.; Parker, D.F. )</p> <p>1993-04-01</p> <p>A gap from 66 to 72 weight percent silica (48--62 ppm Rb) separates dacite from rhyodacite of the South <span class="hlt">Sister</span> system. The authors results indicate that rhyodacite can not be produced by fractional crystallization from dacite. Variation among rhyodacite and associated rhyolite is, however, most likely the result of fractional crystallization, in agreement with previous studies. Dacite in the South <span class="hlt">Sister</span> system probably had multiple origins, as suggested by trace element plots for Y, Nb and Zr. Some dacite was produced by fractional crystallization from andesitic magmas, while others were largely the result of mixing between andesite and rhyodacite. Mafic enclaves occurring in dacite are compositional similar to Holocene basalt, and their mixing with dacitic magma may have triggered eruptions, but they are probably not directly related genetically to their host rocks. The rhyodacites are probably crustal melts. Previous workers have suggested high-level melting of hypabyssal silicic plutons or amphibolite sources for the rhyodacites. The authors suggest melting of granitic plutonic sources, similar to those exposed in the Klamath Mountains, for the origin of the rhyodacites.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4254975','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4254975"><span>Different Parasite Faunas in Sympatric Populations of <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Hedgehog Species in a Secondary Contact Zone</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Pfäffle, Miriam; Černá Bolfíková, Barbora; Hulva, Pavel; Petney, Trevor</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Providing descriptive data on parasite diversity and load in <span class="hlt">sister</span> species is a first step in addressing the role of host-parasite coevolution in the speciation process. In this study we compare the parasite faunas of the closely related hedgehog species Erinaceus europaeus and E. roumanicus from the Czech Republic where both occur in limited sympatry. We examined 109 hedgehogs from 21 localities within this secondary contact zone. Three species of ectoparasites and nine species of endoparasites were recorded. Significantly higher abundances and prevalences were found for Capillaria spp. and Brachylaemus erinacei in E. europaeus compared to E. roumanicus and higher mean infection rates and prevalences for Hymenolepis erinacei, Physaloptera clausa and Nephridiorhynchus major in E. roumanicus compared to E. europaeus. Divergence in the composition of the parasite fauna, except for Capillaria spp., which seem to be very unspecific, may be related to the complicated demography of their hosts connected with Pleistocene climate oscillations and consequent range dynamics. The fact that all parasite species with different abundances in E. europaeus and E. roumanicus belong to intestinal forms indicates a possible diversification of trophic niches between both <span class="hlt">sister</span> hedgehog species. PMID:25469872</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22987150','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22987150"><span>Understanding the origins of UV-induced recombination through manipulation of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid cohesion.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Covo, Shay; Ma, Wenjian; Westmoreland, James W; Gordenin, Dmitry A; Resnick, Michael A</p> <p>2012-11-01</p> <p>Ultraviolet light (UV) can provoke genome instability, partly through its ability to induce homologous recombination (HR). However, the mechanism(s) of UV-induced recombination is poorly understood. Although double-strand breaks (DSBs) have been invoked, there is little evidence for their generation by UV. Alternatively, single-strand DNA lesions that stall replication forks could provoke recombination. Recent findings suggest efficient initiation of UV-induced recombination in G1 through processing of closely spaced single-strand lesions to DSBs. However, other scenarios are possible, since the recombination initiated in G1 can be completed in the following stages of the cell cycle. We developed a system that could address UV-induced recombination events that start and finish in G2 by manipulating the activity of the <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid cohesion complex. Here we show that <span class="hlt">sister</span>-chromatid cohesion suppresses UV-induced recombination events that are initiated and resolved in G2. By comparing recombination frequencies and survival between UV and ionizing radiation, we conclude that a substantial portion of UV-induced recombination occurs through DSBs. This notion is supported by a direct physical observation of UV-induced DSBs that are dependent on nucleotide excision repair. However, a significant role of nonDSB intermediates in UV-induced recombination cannot be excluded.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25640518','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25640518"><span>A novel <span class="hlt">sister</span> clade to the enterobacteria microviruses (family Microviridae) identified in methane seep sediments.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Bryson, Samuel Joseph; Thurber, Andrew R; Correa, Adrienne M S; Orphan, Victoria J; Vega Thurber, Rebecca</p> <p>2015-10-01</p> <p>Methane seep microbial communities perform a key ecosystem service by consuming the greenhouse gas methane prior to its release into the hydrosphere, minimizing the impact of marine methane sources on our climate. Although previous studies have examined the ecology and biochemistry of these communities, none has examined viral assemblages associated with these habitats. We employed virus particle purification, genome amplification, pyrosequencing and gene/genome reconstruction and annotation on two metagenomic libraries, one prepared for ssDNA and the other for all DNA, to identify the viral community in a methane seep. Similarity analysis of these libraries (raw and assembled) revealed a community dominated by phages, with a significant proportion of similarities to the Microviridae family of ssDNA phages. We define these viruses as the Eel River Basin Microviridae (ERBM). Assembly and comparison of 21 ERBM closed circular genomes identified five as members of a novel <span class="hlt">sister</span> clade to the Microvirus genus of Enterobacteria phages. Comparisons among other metagenomes and these Microviridae major-capsid sequences indicated that this clade of phages is currently unique to the Eel River Basin sediments. Given this ERBM clade's relationship to the Microviridae genus Microvirus, we define this <span class="hlt">sister</span> clade as the candidate genus Pequeñovirus. © 2014 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3757227','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3757227"><span>Stress-induced Condensation of Bacterial Genomes Results in Re-pairing of <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Chromosomes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Shechter, Nelia; Zaltzman, Liron; Weiner, Allon; Brumfeld, Vlad; Shimoni, Eyal; Fridmann-Sirkis, Yael; Minsky, Abraham</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Genome condensation is increasingly recognized as a generic stress response in bacteria. To better understand the physiological implications of this response, we used fluorescent markers to locate specific sites on Escherichia coli chromosomes following exposure to cytotoxic stress. We find that stress-induced condensation proceeds through a nonrandom, zipper-like convergence of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromosomes, which is proposed to rely on the recently demonstrated intrinsic ability of identical double-stranded DNA molecules to specifically identify each other. We further show that this convergence culminates in spatial proximity of homologous sites throughout chromosome arms. We suggest that the resulting apposition of homologous sites can explain how repair of double strand DNA breaks might occur in a mechanism that is independent of the widely accepted yet physiologically improbable genome-wide search for homologous templates. We claim that by inducing genome condensation and orderly convergence of <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromosomes, diverse stress conditions prime bacteria to effectively cope with severe DNA lesions such as double strand DNA breaks. PMID:23884460</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li class="active"><span>23</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_23 --> <div id="page_24" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li class="active"><span>24</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="461"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19112184','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19112184"><span>Timeless Maintains Genomic Stability and Suppresses <span class="hlt">Sister</span> Chromatid Exchange during Unperturbed DNA Replication.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Urtishak, Karen A; Smith, Kevin D; Chanoux, Rebecca A; Greenberg, Roger A; Johnson, F Brad; Brown, Eric J</p> <p>2009-03-27</p> <p>Genome integrity is maintained during DNA replication by coordination of various replisome-regulated processes. Although it is known that Timeless (Tim) is a replisome component that participates in replication checkpoint responses to genotoxic stress, its importance for genome maintenance during normal DNA synthesis has not been reported. Here we demonstrate that Tim reduction leads to genomic instability during unperturbed DNA replication, culminating in increased chromatid breaks and translocations (triradials, quadriradials, and fusions). Tim deficiency led to increased H2AX phosphorylation and Rad51 and Rad52 foci formation selectively during DNA synthesis and caused a 3-4-fold increase in <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchange. The <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchange events stimulated by Tim reduction were largely mediated via a Brca2/Rad51-dependent mechanism and were additively increased by deletion of the Blm helicase. Therefore, Tim deficiency leads to an increased reliance on homologous recombination for proper continuation of DNA synthesis. Together, these results indicate a pivotal role for Tim in maintaining genome stability throughout normal DNA replication.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3685581','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3685581"><span>Genomic basis of ecological niche divergence among cryptic <span class="hlt">sister</span> species of non-biting midges</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Background There is a lack of understanding the evolutionary forces driving niche segregation of closely related organisms. In addition, pinpointing the genes driving ecological divergence is a key goal in molecular ecology. Here, larval transcriptome sequences obtained by next-generation-sequencing are used to address these issues in a morphologically cryptic <span class="hlt">sister</span> species pair of non-biting midges (Chironomus riparius and C. piger). Results More than eight thousand orthologous open reading frames were screened for interspecific divergence and intraspecific polymorphisms. Despite a small mean sequence divergence of 1.53% between the <span class="hlt">sister</span> species, 25.1% of 18,115 observed amino acid substitutions were inferred by α statistics to be driven by positive selection. Applying McDonald-Kreitman tests to 715 alignments of gene orthologues identified eleven (1.5%) genes driven by positive selection. Conclusions Three candidate genes were identified as potentially responsible for the observed niche segregation concerning nitrite concentration, habitat temperature and water conductivity. Additionally, signs of positive selection in the hydrogen sulfide detoxification pathway were detected, providing a new plausible hypothesis for the species’ ecological differentiation. Finally, a divergently selected, nuclear encoded mitochondrial ribosomal protein may contribute to reproductive isolation due to cytonuclear coevolution. PMID:23758757</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16732796','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16732796"><span>Investigating the in vitro effect of taurine on the infant lymphocytes by <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchange.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ergun, Mehmet Ali; Soysal, Yasemin; Kismet, Erol; Akay, Cemal; Dundaroz, Rusen; Ilhan, Mustafan; Imirzalioglu, Necat</p> <p>2006-06-01</p> <p>Taurine (2-aminoethane sulphonic acid) is normally present in most mammalian tissues and the most abundant free amino acid in lymphocytes. It participates in various important physiological activities including modulation of the functioning of the central nervous system, cell proliferation, viability and prevention of oxidant-induced injury in many tissues. Its levels in human milk are very high which may be the most important difference from cow's milk. In contrast, an inverse association between breast-feeding and carcinogenesis in childhood or later in life has been suggested by several studies. The study group consisted of eight healthy infants. Peripheral blood was collected and lymphocytes were cultured with either Taurine or Mitomycin C (MMC). <span class="hlt">Sister</span> chromatid exchange in lymphocytes of the infants were calculated. Statistical differences were found between untreated and MMC-treated lymphocytes, untreated and MMC plus taurine-treated lymphocytes, and between MMC and MMC plus taurine-treated lymphocytes (P = 0.012). The results indicated that taurine plays a protective role in MMC-induced <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid exchange in human lymphocytes. The authors suggest that the high levels of taurine found in human milk may induce protecting effects from breast-feeding against DNA damage and malignancy.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3101998','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3101998"><span>Transcriptome asymmetry within mouse zygotes but not between early embryonic <span class="hlt">sister</span> blastomeres</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>VerMilyea, Matthew D; Maneck, Matthias; Yoshida, Naoko; Blochberger, Isabell; Suzuki, Emi; Suzuki, Toru; Spang, Rainer; Klein, Christoph A; Perry, Anthony C F</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Transcriptome regionalization is an essential polarity determinant among metazoans, directing embryonic axis formation during normal development. Although conservation of this principle in mammals is assumed, recent evidence is conflicting and it is not known whether transcriptome asymmetries exist within unfertilized mammalian eggs or between the respective cleavage products of early embryonic divisions. We here address this by comparing transcriptome profiles of paired single cells and sub-cellular structures obtained microsurgically from mouse oocytes and totipotent embryos. Paired microsurgical spindle and remnant samples from unfertilized metaphase II oocytes possessed distinguishable profiles. Fertilization produces a totipotent 1-cell embryo (zygote) and associated spindle-enriched second polar body whose paired profiles also differed, reflecting spindle transcript enrichment. However, there was no programmed transcriptome asymmetry between <span class="hlt">sister</span> cells within 2- or 3-cell embryos. Accordingly, there is transcriptome asymmetry within mouse oocytes, but not between the <span class="hlt">sister</span> blastomeres of early embryos. This work places constraints on pre-patterning in mammals and provides documentation correlating potency changes and transcriptome partitioning at the single-cell level. PMID:21468028</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25366522','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25366522"><span>Familial hypomagnesemia with hypercalciuria and nephrocalcinosis: variable phenotypic expression in three affected <span class="hlt">sisters</span> from Mexican ancestry.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Arteaga, María E; Hunziker, Walter; Teo, Audrey S M; Hillmer, Axel M; Mutchinick, Osvaldo M</p> <p>2015-02-01</p> <p>Familial hypomagnesemia with hypercalciuria and nephrocalcinosis is a rare autosomal recessive renal disease caused by mutations in genes for the tight junction transmembrane proteins Claudin-16 (CLDN16) and Claudin-19 (CLDN19). We present the first case report of a Mexican family with three affected <span class="hlt">sisters</span> carrying a p.Gly20Asp mutation in CLDN19 whose heterozygous mother showed evident hypercalciuria and normal low magnesemia without any other clinical, laboratory, and radiological symptoms of renal disease making of her an unsuitable donor. The affected <span class="hlt">sisters</span> showed variable phenotypic expression including age of first symptoms, renal urinary tract infections, nephrolithiasis, nephrocalcinosis, and eye symptoms consisting in retinochoroiditis, strabismus, macular scars, bilateral anisocoria, and severe myopia and astigmatism. End stage renal disease due to renal failure needed kidney transplantation in the three of them. Interesting findings were a heterozygous mother with asymptomatic hypercalciuria warning on the need of carefully explore clinical, laboratory, kidney ultrasonograpy, and mutation status in first degree asymptomatic relatives to avoid inappropriate kidney donors; an evident variable phenotypic expression among patients; the identification of a mutation almost confined to Spanish cases and a 3.5 Mb block of genomic homozygosis strongly suggesting a common remote parental ancestor for the gene mutation reported.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10373565','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10373565"><span><span class="hlt">Sister</span> chromatid exchanges are mediated by homologous recombination in vertebrate cells.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Sonoda, E; Sasaki, M S; Morrison, C; Yamaguchi-Iwai, Y; Takata, M; Takeda, S</p> <p>1999-07-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Sister</span> chromatid exchange (SCE) frequency is a commonly used index of chromosomal stability in response to environmental or genetic mutagens. However, the mechanism generating cytologically detectable SCEs and, therefore, their prognostic value for chromosomal stability in mitotic cells remain unclear. We examined the role of the highly conserved homologous recombination (HR) pathway in SCE by measuring SCE levels in HR-defective vertebrate cells. Spontaneous and mitomycin C-induced SCE levels were significantly reduced for chicken DT40 B cells lacking the key HR genes RAD51 and RAD54 but not for nonhomologous DNA end-joining (NHEJ)-defective KU70(-/-) cells. As measured by targeted integration efficiency, reconstitution of HR activity by expression of a human RAD51 transgene restored SCE levels to normal, confirming that HR is the mechanism responsible for SCE. Our findings show that HR uses the nascent <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid to repair potentially lethal DNA lesions accompanying replication, which might explain the lethality or tumorigenic potential associated with defects in HR or HR-associated proteins.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11402064','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11402064"><span>HCP-4, a CENP-C-like protein in Caenorhabditis elegans, is required for resolution of <span class="hlt">sister</span> centromeres.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Moore, L L; Roth, M B</p> <p>2001-06-11</p> <p>The centromere plays a critical role in the segregation of chromosomes during mitosis. In mammals, <span class="hlt">sister</span> centromeres are resolved from one another in the G2 phase of the cell cycle. During prophase, chromosomes condense with <span class="hlt">sister</span> centromeres oriented in a back to back configuration enabling only one chromatid to be captured by each half spindle. To study this process, we identified a centromere protein (CENP)-C-like protein, holocentric protein (HCP)-4, in Caenorhabditis elegans based on sequence identity, loss of function phenotype, and centromeric localization. HCP-4 is found in the cytoplasm during interphase, but is nuclear localized in mitosis, where it localizes specifically to the centromere. The localization of HCP-4 to the centromere is dependent on the centromeric histone HCP-3; in addition, HCP-3 and HCP-4 are both required for localization of a CENP-F-like protein, HCP-1, indicating an ordered assembly pathway. Loss of HCP-4 expression by RNA-mediated interference resulted in a failure to generate resolution of <span class="hlt">sister</span> centromeres on chromosomes, suggesting that HCP-4 is required for <span class="hlt">sister</span> centromere resolution. These chromosomes also failed to form a functional kinetochore. Thus, the CENP-C-like protein HCP-4 is essential for both resolution <span class="hlt">sister</span> centromeres and attachment to the mitotic spindle.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24851802','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24851802"><span>Childhood obsessive-compulsive traits in anorexia nervosa patients, their unaffected <span class="hlt">sisters</span> and healthy controls: a retrospective study.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Degortes, Daniela; Zanetti, Tatiana; Tenconi, Elena; Santonastaso, Paolo; Favaro, Angela</p> <p>2014-07-01</p> <p>Although there is evidence that childhood perfectionistic traits predate the onset of eating disorders, few studies to date have examined the prevalence and clinical correlates of these traits in patients with anorexia nervosa (AN) and their unaffected <span class="hlt">sisters</span>. The aim of this work was to study the prevalence of childhood obsessive-compulsive traits in patients with lifetime AN, their unaffected <span class="hlt">sisters</span> and healthy women. A total of 116 AN patients, 32 healthy <span class="hlt">sisters</span> and 119 controls were assessed by the EATATE Interview to assess traits such as perfectionism, inflexibility, rule-bound traits, drive for order and symmetry, and excessive doubt and cautiousness. Both self-report and maternal reports were collected. AN patients reported more childhood obsessive-compulsive traits than their healthy <span class="hlt">sisters</span> and controls. In contrast, no differences between healthy controls and unaffected <span class="hlt">sisters</span> emerged. In patients with AN, a dose-response relationship was found between the number of childhood obsessive-compulsive traits and psychopathology, including body image distortion, thus indicating that these traits are an important feature to be considered in assessing and treating eating disorders.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23434280','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23434280"><span>The PP2A inhibitor I2PP2A is essential for <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid segregation in oocyte meiosis II.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Chambon, Jean-Philippe; Touati, Sandra A; Berneau, Stéphane; Cladière, Damien; Hebras, Céline; Groeme, Rachel; McDougall, Alex; Wassmann, Katja</p> <p>2013-03-18</p> <p>Haploid gametes are generated through two consecutive meiotic divisions, with the segregation of chromosome pairs in meiosis I and <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids in meiosis II. Separase-mediated stepwise removal of cohesion, first from chromosome arms and later from the centromere region, is a prerequisite for maintaining <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids together until their separation in meiosis II [1]. In all model organisms, centromeric cohesin is protected from separase-dependent removal in meiosis I through the activity of PP2A-B56 phosphatase, which is recruited to centromeres by shugoshin/MEI-S332 (Sgo) [2-5]. How this protection of centromeric cohesin is removed in meiosis II is not entirely clear; we find that all the PP2A subunits remain colocalized with the cohesin subunit Rec8 at the centromere of metaphase II chromosomes. Here, we show that <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid separation in oocytes depends on a PP2A inhibitor, namely I2PP2A. I2PP2A colocalizes with the PP2A enzyme at centromeres at metaphase II, independently of bipolar attachment. When I2PP2A is depleted, <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids fail to segregate during meiosis II. Our findings demonstrate that in oocytes I2PP2A is essential for faithful <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid segregation by mediating deprotection of centromeric cohesin in meiosis II.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27422821','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27422821"><span>Opposing Functions of the N-terminal Acetyltransferases Naa50 and NatA in <span class="hlt">Sister</span>-chromatid Cohesion.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Rong, Ziye; Ouyang, Zhuqing; Magin, Robert S; Marmorstein, Ronen; Yu, Hongtao</p> <p>2016-09-02</p> <p>During the cell cycle, <span class="hlt">sister</span>-chromatid cohesion tethers <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatids together from S phase to the metaphase-anaphase transition and ensures accurate segregation of chromatids into daughter cells. N-terminal acetylation is one of the most prevalent protein covalent modifications in eukaryotes and is mediated by a family of N-terminal acetyltransferases (NAT). Naa50 (also called San) has previously been shown to play a role in <span class="hlt">sister</span>-chromatid cohesion in metazoans. The mechanism by which Naa50 contributes to cohesion is not understood however. Here, we show that depletion of Naa50 in HeLa cells weakens the interaction between cohesin and its positive regulator sororin and causes cohesion defects in S phase, consistent with a role of Naa50 in cohesion establishment. Strikingly, co-depletion of NatA, a heterodimeric NAT complex that physically interacts with Naa50, rescues the <span class="hlt">sister</span>-chromatid cohesion defects and the resulting mitotic arrest caused by Naa50 depletion, indicating that NatA and Naa50 play antagonistic roles in cohesion. Purified recombinant NatA and Naa50 do not affect each other's NAT activity in vitro Because NatA and Naa50 exhibit distinct substrate specificity, we propose that they modify different effectors and regulate <span class="hlt">sister</span>-chromatid cohesion in opposing ways.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24965436','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24965436"><span>Understanding <span class="hlt">death</span> in custody: a case for a comprehensive definition.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ruiz, Géraldine; Wangmo, Tenzin; Mutzenberg, Patrick; Sinclair, Jessica; Elger, Bernice Simone</p> <p>2014-09-01</p> <p>Prisoners sometimes die in prison, either due to natural illness, violence, suicide, or a result of imprisonment. The purpose of this study is to understand <span class="hlt">deaths</span> in custody using qualitative methodology and to argue for a comprehensive definition of <span class="hlt">death</span> in custody that acknowledges <span class="hlt">deaths</span> related to the prison environment. Interviews were conducted with 33 experts, who primarily work as lawyers or forensic doctors with national and/or international organisations. Responses were coded and analysed qualitatively. Defining <span class="hlt">deaths</span> in custody according to the place of <span class="hlt">death</span> was deemed problematic. Experts favoured a dynamic approach emphasising the <span class="hlt">link</span> between the detention environment and occurrence of <span class="hlt">death</span> rather than the actual place of <span class="hlt">death</span>. Causes of <span class="hlt">deaths</span> and different patterns of <span class="hlt">deaths</span> were discussed, indicating that many of these <span class="hlt">deaths</span> are preventable. Lack of an internationally recognised standard definition of <span class="hlt">death</span> in custody is a major concern. Key aspects such as place, time, and causes of <span class="hlt">death</span> as well as relation to the prison environment should be debated and incorporated into the definition. Systematic identification of violence within prison institutions is critical and efforts are needed to prevent unnecessary <span class="hlt">deaths</span> in prison and to protect vulnerable prisoners.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2145130','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2145130"><span>The Treatment of PVCs and Prevention of Sudden Cardiac <span class="hlt">Death</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Nattel, Stanley</p> <p>1991-01-01</p> <p>Premature ventricular complexes (PVCs) have traditionally been suppressed using antiarrhythmic drugs. Recent studies have failed to show that reducing the number of PVCs can prevent sudden <span class="hlt">death</span>; moreover, treatment with some antiarrhythmic agents can increase the risk. There is a close <span class="hlt">link</span> between the severity of ischemic heart disease and sudden <span class="hlt">death</span>. PMID:21234088</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17483211','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17483211"><span>Attitude toward <span class="hlt">death</span>: does it influence dental fear?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Fábián, Gábor; Müller, Orsolya; Kovács, Szilvia; Nguyen, Minh Tú; Fábián, Tibor Károly; Csermely, Péter; Fejérdy, Pál</p> <p>2007-10-01</p> <p>The possible influence of fear of <span class="hlt">death</span> and attitude toward <span class="hlt">death</span> were studied related to dental anxiety in Hungarian elementary and secondary school subjects (n = 277; 114 males, 163 females; age between 8 and 18 years). Dental fear and anxiety scores were DAS: 10.8 +/- 3.6; DFS: 40.6 +/- 15.6; STAI-S: 38.0 +/- 11.0; STAI-T: 40.3 +/- 10.0. Lester's Attitude Toward <span class="hlt">Death</span> Scale scores were 6.3 +/- 1.3. Girls scored higher on DAS, STAI-S, and STAI-T scales (P < or = 0.05). Age influenced STAI-S, STAI-T, and Lester's Scale scores (P < or = 0.05). Lester's Scale scores influenced the expectations of the subjects about the dental fear of their surrounding people (parents, brother, <span class="hlt">sister</span>, friends) (P < or = 0.05). A percentage of 7.22 of the subjects indicated a rather strong connection between dental fear and fear of <span class="hlt">death</span>. These subjects had significantly higher dental fear and anxiety scores as compared to others (P < or = 0.01). <span class="hlt">Death</span>-related content was found in 4.3% of drawings and in 10.5% of free associations (couplings) related to teeth (in 12.6% either in drawings or in couplings). The appearance of <span class="hlt">death</span>-related content was higher with higher age, and higher expected dental fear of surrounding people (P < or = 0.01). Our data indicate a detectable influence of fear of <span class="hlt">death</span> on dental fear, especially in subjects with higher dental fear scores.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1439384','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1439384"><span>Mozart's illnesses and <span class="hlt">death</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Davies, P J</p> <p>1983-01-01</p> <p>Throughout his life Mozart suffered frequent attacks of tonsillitis. In 1784 he developed post-streptococcal Schönlein-Henoch syndrome which caused chronic glomerular nephritis and chronic renal failure. His fatal illness was due to Schönlein-Henoch purpura, with <span class="hlt">death</span> from cerebral haemorrhage and bronchopneumonia. Venesection(s) may have contributed to his <span class="hlt">death</span>. PMID:6352940</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=syria&pg=4&id=EJ729503','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=syria&pg=4&id=EJ729503"><span><span class="hlt">Death</span> Obsession in Palestinians</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Abdel-Khalek, Ahmed M.; Al-Arja, Nahida S.; Abdalla, Taysir</p> <p>2006-01-01</p> <p>The authors explored <span class="hlt">death</span> obsession level and correlates among a sample (N=601) of Palestinians living in the city of Beit Jala, the village of Al-Khader, and the Aida refugee camp in the Bethlehem area. They live in war conditions; the houses of half of them have been demolished. The <span class="hlt">Death</span> Obsession Scale (DOS) was administered. Its alpha…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/373873','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/373873"><span>Programmed cell <span class="hlt">death</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p></p> <p>1995-12-31</p> <p>The purpose of this conference to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on the role programmed cell <span class="hlt">death</span> plays in normal development and homeostasis of many organisms. This volume contains abstracts of papers in the following areas: invertebrate development; immunology/neurology; bcl-2 family; biochemistry; programmed cell <span class="hlt">death</span> in viruses; oncogenesis; vertebrate development; and diseases.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ152542.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ152542.pdf"><span>The Psychology of <span class="hlt">Death</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Fields, B. Celestine</p> <p>1976-01-01</p> <p>Forty-eight black men and women living and/or attending school in the St. Louis and Washington, D.C. areas responded to questionnaires concerning feelings, attitudes, emotions, etc. towards <span class="hlt">death</span> and dying. It is concluded that blacks see <span class="hlt">death</span> as a very significant happening; and that although in some areas blacks have become Americanized in…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21140873','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21140873"><span><span class="hlt">Death</span> with dignity.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Mathiews, Ann Kimberlin</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>The concept of <span class="hlt">death</span> with dignity evolves over a nurse's career. A new nurse focuses on the patient as a person. As the nurse gains experience, she facilitates family grieving. As a seasoned professional, the nurse emphasizes the dignity that, through effective nursing, can be restored to dying. Preservation of dignity is found in the way we honor <span class="hlt">death</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=bereavement+AND+care&pg=4&id=EJ692045','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=bereavement+AND+care&pg=4&id=EJ692045"><span><span class="hlt">Death</span> Writ Large</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Kastenbaum, Robert</p> <p>2004-01-01</p> <p>Mainstream thanatology has devoted its efforts to improving the understanding, care, and social integration of people who are confronted with life-threatening illness or bereavement. This article suggests that it might now be time to expand the scope and mission to include large-scale <span class="hlt">death</span> and <span class="hlt">death</span> that occurs through complex and multi-domain…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=kubler+AND+ross&pg=4&id=EJ049415','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=kubler+AND+ross&pg=4&id=EJ049415"><span>Facing Up to <span class="hlt">Death</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Ross, Elizabeth Kubler</p> <p>1972-01-01</p> <p>Doctor urges that Americans accept <span class="hlt">death</span> as a part of life and suggests ways of helping dying patients and their families face reality calmly, with peace. Dying children and their siblings, as well as children's feelings about relatives' <span class="hlt">deaths</span>, are also discussed. (PD)</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li class="active"><span>24</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_24 --> <div id="page_25" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li class="active"><span>25</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="481"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Fulton%2c+AND+Robert&id=EJ161921','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Fulton%2c+AND+Robert&id=EJ161921"><span>The Sociology of <span class="hlt">Death</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Fulton, Robert</p> <p>1977-01-01</p> <p>When we start to look at the issues associated with dying and <span class="hlt">death</span>, we must do so in terms of the broadest parameters imaginable. Presented at the Conference on <span class="hlt">Death</span> and Dying: Education, Counseling, and Care, December 1-3, 1976, Orlando, Florida. (Author)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=KUBLER&pg=5&id=EJ049415','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=KUBLER&pg=5&id=EJ049415"><span>Facing Up to <span class="hlt">Death</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Ross, Elizabeth Kubler</p> <p>1972-01-01</p> <p>Doctor urges that Americans accept <span class="hlt">death</span> as a part of life and suggests ways of helping dying patients and their families face reality calmly, with peace. Dying children and their siblings, as well as children's feelings about relatives' <span class="hlt">deaths</span>, are also discussed. (PD)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Fulton%2c+AND+Robert&id=EJ161921','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Fulton%2c+AND+Robert&id=EJ161921"><span>The Sociology of <span class="hlt">Death</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Fulton, Robert</p> <p>1977-01-01</p> <p>When we start to look at the issues associated with dying and <span class="hlt">death</span>, we must do so in terms of the broadest parameters imaginable. Presented at the Conference on <span class="hlt">Death</span> and Dying: Education, Counseling, and Care, December 1-3, 1976, Orlando, Florida. (Author)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=human+AND+life&pg=7&id=EJ942048','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=human+AND+life&pg=7&id=EJ942048"><span>Education for <span class="hlt">Death</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Puolimatka, Tapio; Solasaari, Ulla</p> <p>2006-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Death</span> is an unavoidable fact of human life, which cannot be totally ignored in education. Children reflect on <span class="hlt">death</span> and raise questions that deserve serious answers. If an educator completely evades the issue, children will seek other conversation partners. It is possible to find arguments both from secular and religious sources, which alleviate…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=people+AND+dying&pg=7&id=ED182766','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=people+AND+dying&pg=7&id=ED182766"><span><span class="hlt">Death</span> in Literature.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Perkins, Lola A.</p> <p></p> <p>"<span class="hlt">Death</span> in Literature," a nine-week elective course for high school juniors and seniors, was added to the English curriculum at a Kansas City high school in 1976. It has proved very popular with students and is being expanded to 18 weeks. The explicit objectives of the course are to help students to explore the theme of <span class="hlt">death</span> in various types of…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Realistic+AND+fiction&pg=7&id=ED168024','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Realistic+AND+fiction&pg=7&id=ED168024"><span><span class="hlt">Death</span>, Children, and Books.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Carr, Robin L.</p> <p></p> <p>The books listed in this annotated bibliography are intended to help children understand the reality of <span class="hlt">death</span> and deal with the mystery and emotions that accompany it. Each entry indicates the genre and reading level of the book and provides a brief description of the attitude toward <span class="hlt">death</span> that it conveys. The selections include fables, fantasy,…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Death&pg=7&id=EJ923799','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Death&pg=7&id=EJ923799"><span><span class="hlt">Death</span> Acceptance through Ritual</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Reeves, Nancy C.</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>This article summarizes the author's original research, which sought to discover the elements necessary for using <span class="hlt">death</span>-related ritual as a psychotherapeutic technique for grieving people who experience their grief as "stuck," "unending," "maladaptive," and so on. A "<span class="hlt">death</span>-related ritual" is defined as a ceremony, directly involving at least 1…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Death&pg=7&id=EJ936886','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Death&pg=7&id=EJ936886"><span>Conflicting Thoughts about <span class="hlt">Death</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Harris, Paul L.</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Most research on children's conception of <span class="hlt">death</span> has probed their understanding of its biological aspects: its inevitability, irreversibility and terminal impact. Yet many adults subscribe to a religious conception implying that <span class="hlt">death</span> marks the beginning of a new life. Two recent empirical studies confirm that in the course of development, children…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Thanatology&id=EJ692045','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Thanatology&id=EJ692045"><span><span class="hlt">Death</span> Writ Large</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Kastenbaum, Robert</p> <p>2004-01-01</p> <p>Mainstream thanatology has devoted its efforts to improving the understanding, care, and social integration of people who are confronted with life-threatening illness or bereavement. This article suggests that it might now be time to expand the scope and mission to include large-scale <span class="hlt">death</span> and <span class="hlt">death</span> that occurs through complex and multi-domain…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1295660','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1295660"><span>Near-<span class="hlt">death</span> experiences.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Blackmore, S J</p> <p>1996-01-01</p> <p>Reactions to claims of near-<span class="hlt">death</span> experiences (NDE) range from the popular view that this must be evidence for life after <span class="hlt">death</span>, to outright rejection of the experiences as, at best, drug induced hallucinations or, at worse, pure invention. Twenty years, and much research, later, it is clear that neither extreme is correct. PMID:8683504</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Death&pg=6&id=EJ923799','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Death&pg=6&id=EJ923799"><span><span class="hlt">Death</span> Acceptance through Ritual</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Reeves, Nancy C.</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>This article summarizes the author's original research, which sought to discover the elements necessary for using <span class="hlt">death</span>-related ritual as a psychotherapeutic technique for grieving people who experience their grief as "stuck," "unending," "maladaptive," and so on. A "<span class="hlt">death</span>-related ritual" is defined as a ceremony, directly involving at least 1…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Death&pg=6&id=EJ936886','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Death&pg=6&id=EJ936886"><span>Conflicting Thoughts about <span class="hlt">Death</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Harris, Paul L.</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Most research on children's conception of <span class="hlt">death</span> has probed their understanding of its biological aspects: its inevitability, irreversibility and terminal impact. Yet many adults subscribe to a religious conception implying that <span class="hlt">death</span> marks the beginning of a new life. Two recent empirical studies confirm that in the course of development, children…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=relationship+AND+disorders+AND+mental+AND+crime&pg=7&id=EJ548670','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=relationship+AND+disorders+AND+mental+AND+crime&pg=7&id=EJ548670"><span>Dyadic <span class="hlt">Death</span>: A Typology.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Berman, Alan L.</p> <p>1996-01-01</p> <p>Describes and illustrates distinct types of dyadic <span class="hlt">death</span> (where a second victim acts in consort with or is killed by a person who then commits suicide). Suggests an organizing dynamic of dyadic <span class="hlt">death</span> and claims that levels of dominance, dependence-enmeshment, and the presence or absence of hostility influence the proposed typology. (RJM)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1337592','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1337592"><span>Physician-assisted <span class="hlt">death</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p></p> <p>1995-01-01</p> <p>Physician-assisted <span class="hlt">death</span> includes both euthanasia and assistance in suicide. The CMA urges its members to adhere to the principles of palliative care. It does not support euthanasia and assisted suicide. The following policy summary includes definitions of euthanasia and assisted suicide, background information, basic ethical principles and physician concerns about legalization of physician-assisted <span class="hlt">death</span>. PMID:7632208</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4188144','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4188144"><span>Brain <span class="hlt">Death</span> and Islam</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Ziad-Miller, Amna; Elamin, Elamin M.</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>How one defines <span class="hlt">death</span> may vary. It is important for clinicians to recognize those aspects of a patient’s religious beliefs that may directly influence medical care and how such practices may interface with local laws governing the determination of <span class="hlt">death</span>. Debate continues about the validity and certainty of brain <span class="hlt">death</span> criteria within Islamic traditions. A search of PubMed, Scopus, EMBASE, Web of Science, PsycNet, Sociological Abstracts, DIALOGUE ProQuest, Lexus Nexus, Google, and applicable religious texts was conducted to address the question of whether brain <span class="hlt">death</span> is accepted as true <span class="hlt">death</span> among Islamic scholars and clinicians and to discuss how divergent opinions may affect clinical care. The results of the literature review inform this discussion. Brain <span class="hlt">death</span> has been acknowledged as representing true <span class="hlt">death</span> by many Muslim scholars and medical organizations, including the Islamic Fiqh Academies of the Organization of the Islamic Conference and the Muslim World League, the Islamic Medical Association of North America, and other faith-based medical organizations as well as legal rulings by multiple Islamic nations. However, consensus in the Muslim world is not unanimous, and a sizable minority accepts <span class="hlt">death</span> by cardiopulmonary criteria only. PMID:25287999</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=mystery+AND+fiction&pg=5&id=ED168024','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=mystery+AND+fiction&pg=5&id=ED168024"><span><span class="hlt">Death</span>, Children, and Books.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Carr, Robin L.</p> <p></p> <p>The books listed in this annotated bibliography are intended to help children understand the reality of <span class="hlt">death</span> and deal with the mystery and emotions that accompany it. Each entry indicates the genre and reading level of the book and provides a brief description of the attitude toward <span class="hlt">death</span> that it conveys. The selections include fables, fantasy,…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Refugee+AND+Camp&pg=5&id=EJ729503','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Refugee+AND+Camp&pg=5&id=EJ729503"><span><span class="hlt">Death</span> Obsession in Palestinians</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Abdel-Khalek, Ahmed M.; Al-Arja, Nahida S.; Abdalla, Taysir</p> <p>2006-01-01</p> <p>The authors explored <span class="hlt">death</span> obsession level and correlates among a sample (N=601) of Palestinians living in the city of Beit Jala, the village of Al-Khader, and the Aida refugee camp in the Bethlehem area. They live in war conditions; the houses of half of them have been demolished. The <span class="hlt">Death</span> Obsession Scale (DOS) was administered. Its alpha…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4302726','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4302726"><span>A Sibling <span class="hlt">Death</span> in the Family: Common and Consequential</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Fletcher, Jason; Mailick, Marsha; Song, Jieun</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Although a large literature analyzes the determinants of child mortality and suggests policy and medical interventions aimed at its reduction, there is little existing analysis illuminating the consequences of child mortality for other family members. In particular, there is little evidence exploring the consequences of experiencing the <span class="hlt">death</span> of a sibling on one’s own development and transition to adulthood. This article examines the prevalence and consequences of experiencing a sibling <span class="hlt">death</span> during one’s childhood using two U.S. data sets. We show that even in a rich developed country, these experiences are quite common, affecting between 5 % and 8 % of the children with one or more siblings in our two data sets. We then show that these experiences are associated with important reductions in years of schooling as well as a broad range of adult socioeconomic outcomes. Our findings also suggest that <span class="hlt">sisters</span> are far more affected than brothers and that the cause of <span class="hlt">death</span> is an important factor in sibling effects. Overall, our findings point to important previously unexamined consequences of child mortality, adding to the societal costs associated with childhood mortality as well as suggesting additional benefits from policy and medical innovations aimed at curbing both such <span class="hlt">deaths</span> and subsequent effects on family members. PMID:23073753</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4286542','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4286542"><span>Polyoma small T antigen triggers cell <span class="hlt">death</span> via mitotic catastrophe</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Fernando, Arun T Pores; Andrabi, Shaida; Cizmecioglu, Onur; Zhu, Cailei; Livingston, David M.; Higgins, Jonathan M.G; Schaffhausen, Brian S; Roberts, Thomas M</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Polyoma small T antigen (PyST), an early gene product of the polyoma virus, has been shown to cause cell <span class="hlt">death</span> in a number of mammalian cells in a protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A)-dependent manner. In the current study, using a cell line featuring regulated expression of PyST, we found that PyST arrests cells in mitosis. Live-cell and immunofluorescence studies showed that the majority of the PyST-expressing cells were arrested in prometaphase with almost no cells progressing beyond metaphase. These cells exhibited defects in chromosomal congression, <span class="hlt">sister</span> chromatid cohesion and spindle positioning, resulting in the activation of the Spindle Assembly Checkpoint (SAC). Prolonged mitotic arrest then led to cell <span class="hlt">death</span> via mitotic catastrophe. Cell cycle inhibitors that block cells in G1/S prevented PyST-induced <span class="hlt">death</span>. PyST-induced cell <span class="hlt">death</span> that occurs during M is not dependent on p53 status. These data suggested, and our results confirmed that, PP2A inhibition could be used to preferentially kill cancer cells with p53 mutations that proliferate normally in the presence of cell cycle inhibitors. PMID:24998850</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1733631','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1733631"><span><span class="hlt">Death</span> with dignity</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Allmark, P.</p> <p>2002-01-01</p> <p>The purpose of this article is to develop a conception of <span class="hlt">death</span> with dignity and to examine whether it is vulnerable to the sort of criticisms that have been made of other conceptions. In this conception "<span class="hlt">death</span>" is taken to apply to the process of dying; "dignity" is taken to be something that attaches to people because of their personal qualities. In particular, someone lives with dignity if they live well (in accordance with reason, as Aristotle would see it). It follows that health care professionals cannot confer on patients either dignity or <span class="hlt">death</span> with dignity. They can, however, attempt to ensure that the patient dies without indignity. Indignities are affronts to human dignity, and include such things as serious pain and the exclusion of patients from involvement in decisions about their lives and <span class="hlt">deaths</span>. This fairly modest conception of <span class="hlt">death</span> with dignity avoids the traps of being overly subjective or of viewing the sick and helpless as "undignified". 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