Science.gov

Sample records for debate vii neurobiology

  1. 'One can always say no.' enriching the bioethical debate on antisocial behaviour, neurobiology and prevention: views of juvenile delinquents.

    PubMed

    Horstkötter, Dorothee; Berghmans, Ron; Feron, Frans; De Wert, Guido

    2014-06-01

    Genomic and neuro-scientific research into the causes and course of antisocial behaviour triggers bioethical debate. Often, these new developments are met with reservation, and possible drawbacks and negative side-effects are pointed out. This article reflects on these scientific developments and the bioethical debate by means of an exploration of the perspectives of one important stakeholder group: juveniles convicted of a serious crime who stay in a juvenile justice institution. The views of juveniles are particularly interesting, as possible applications of current and future scientific findings are considered to be most effective if applied early in life. Based on their statements we come to the following provisional conclusions. Concerns about labelling and stigmatization are recognized and widely shared. Possible effects on one's identity are acknowledged too. Yet, a possible biological underpinning of one's antisocial behaviour is not considered to result in the development of a criminal identity. Nonetheless, psychopharmacological interventions are experienced as endangering one's current self. Concerns regarding the refusal of responsibility and the blaming of one's genes or brain can be put into perspective. Instead, participants emphasize the motive of own choice as underlying their criminal behaviour. Moreover, bioethical debate should pay attention to the role of parents of children at risk and the parent-child relationship in families at-risk. We argue that the short-term and long-term interests of children at risk, as well as their interests and those of society at large, may conflict. In order to deal appropriately with newly arising dilemmas, a normative framework needs to be developed.

  2. The Debate Debate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tumposky, Nancy Rennau

    2004-01-01

    Debate has been a well-known pedagogical technique since there have been written records about teaching and learning. Originally employed for learning philosophy and theology, debate was later used in the fields of history, law, literature, and the physical sciences. This author asserts, however, that, although the benefits of debate are…

  3. Factor VII deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... may be done include: Partial thromboplastin time ( PTT ) Plasma factor VII activity Prothrombin time ( PT ) Mixing study ... controlled by getting intravenous (IV) infusions of normal plasma, concentrates of factor VII, or genetically produced (recombinant) ...

  4. Neurobiology of song learning

    PubMed Central

    Mooney, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Birdsong is a culturally transmitted behavior that depends on a juvenile songbird’s ability to imitate the song of an adult tutor. Neurobiological studies of birdsong can reveal how a complex form of imitative learning, which bears strong parallels to human speech learning, can be understood at the level of underlying circuit, cellular, and synaptic mechanisms. This review focuses on recent studies that illuminate the neurobiological mechanisms for singing and song learning. PMID:19892546

  5. Cannabis and psychosis: Neurobiology.

    PubMed

    Shrivastava, Amresh; Johnston, Megan; Terpstra, Kristen; Bureau, Yves

    2014-01-01

    Cannabis is a known risk factor for schizophrenia, although the exact neurobiological process through which the effects on psychosis occur is not well-understood. In this review, we attempt to develop and discuss a possible pathway for the development of psychosis. We examine the neurobiological changes due to cannabis to see if these changes are similar to those seen in schizophrenic patients the findings show similarities; however, these mere similarities cannot establish a 'cause-effect' relationship as a number of people with similar changes do not develop schizophrenia. Therefore, the 'transition-to-psychosis' due to cannabis, despite being a strong risk factor, remains uncertain based upon neurobiological changes. It appears that other multiple factors might be involved in these processes which are beyond neurobiological factors. Major advances have been made in understanding the underpinning of marijuana dependence, and the role of the cannabinoid system, which is a major area for targeting medications to treat marijuana withdrawal and dependence, as well as other addictions is of now, it is clear that some of the similarities in the neurobiology of cannabis and schizophrenia may indicate a mechanism for the development of psychosis, but its trajectories are undetermined. PMID:24574553

  6. Homosexuals and Title VII

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivera, Juan R.; Galvan, Richard J.

    1975-01-01

    A method of dealing with the problems of discrimination against homosexuals in private employment through the application of Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 is discussed. The scope of the paper is limited to male homosexuals. (LBH)

  7. Neurobiology of panic disorder.

    PubMed

    Bourin, M; Baker, G B; Bradwejn, J

    1998-01-01

    Various provocative agents, including sodium lactate, carbon dioxide (CO2), caffeine, yohimbine, serotoninergic agents, and cholecystokinin (CCK), have been utilized as panicogenics in studies on healthy volunteers as well as in panic disorder patients. An overview of the utilization of these agents to study the neurobiology of panic disorder is presented. The possible roles of several neurotransmitters and neuromodulators in the etiology of panic disorder and in the actions of drugs used in its treatment are also discussed.

  8. The neurobiology of individuality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Bivort, Benjamin

    2015-03-01

    Individuals often display conspicuously different patterns of behavior, even when they are very closely related genetically. These differences give rise to our sense of individuality, but what is their molecular and neurobiological basis? Individuals that are nominally genetically identical differ at various molecular and neurobiological levels: cell-to-cell variation in somatic genomes, cell-to-cell variation in expression patterns, individual-to-individual variation in neuronal morphology and physiology, and individual-to-individual variation in patterns of brain activity. It is unknown which of these levels is fundamentally causal of behavioral differences. To investigate this problem, we use the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, whose genetic toolkit allows the manipulation of each of these mechanistic levels, and whose rapid lifecycle and small size allows for high-throughput automation of behavioral assays. This latter point is crucial; identifying inter-individual behavioral differences requires high sample sizes both within and across individual animals. Automated behavioral characterization is at the heart of our research strategy. In every behavior examined, individual flies have individual behavioral preferences, and we have begun to identify both neural genes and circuits that control the degree of behavioral variability between individuals.

  9. Neurobiological Basis of Hypersexuality.

    PubMed

    Kühn, S; Gallinat, J

    2016-01-01

    Until now, hypersexuality has not found entry into the common diagnostic classification systems. However it is a frequently discussed phenomenon consisting of excessive sexual appetite that is maladaptive for the individual. Initial studies investigated the neurobiological underpinnings of hypersexuality, but current literature is still insufficient to draw unequivocal conclusions. In the present review, we summarize and discuss findings from various perspectives: neuroimaging and lesion studies, studies on other neurological disorders that are sometimes accompanied by hypersexuality, neuropharmacological evidence, genetic as well as animal studies. Taken together, the evidence seems to imply that alterations in the frontal lobe, amygdala, hippocampus, hypothalamus, septum, and brain regions that process reward play a prominent role in the emergence of hypersexuality. Genetic studies and neuropharmacological treatment approaches point at an involvement of the dopaminergic system. PMID:27503448

  10. The Debate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Current Issues in Language and Society, 1997

    1997-01-01

    The transcript of a debate within a group of specialists in translation is presented. The discussion addresses: translator "visibility" in translations and reader reception; the relationship of functionalism in translation, comparative linguistics, and intercultural communication; the client's power; literary translation; the translator's power;…

  11. Neurobiology of social attachments.

    PubMed

    Coria-Avila, Genaro A; Manzo, Jorge; Garcia, Luis I; Carrillo, Porfirio; Miquel, Marta; Pfaus, James G

    2014-06-01

    Many types of social attachments can be observed in nature. We discuss the neurobiology of two types (1) intraspecific (with a partner) and (2) parental (with the offspring). Stimuli related to copulation facilitate the first, whereas pregnancy, parturition and lactation facilitate the second. Both types develop as consequence of cohabitation. These events seem to stimulate similar neural pathways that increase (1) social recognition, (2) motivation, reward; and (3) decrease fear/anxiety. Subregions of the amygdala and cortex facilitate social recognition and also disinhibition to decrease rejection responses. The interrelationship between MeA, BNST, LS may mediate the activation of NAcc via the mPOA to increase motivation and reward. Cortical areas such as the ACC discriminate between stimuli. The interaction between OT and D2-type receptors in NAcc shell facilitates intraspecific attachment, but D1-type appears to facilitate parental attachment. This difference may be important for maternal females to direct their attention, motivation and expression of attachment toward the appropriate target. PMID:24769402

  12. Neurobiology of Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Dobkin, Bruce H.

    2014-01-01

    Rehabilitation aims to lessen the physical and cognitive impairments and disabilities of patients with stroke, multiple sclerosis, spinal cord or brain injury, and other neurologic diseases. Conventional approaches beyond compensatory adjustments to disability may be augmented by applying some of the myriad experimental results about mechanisms of intrinsic biological changes after injury and the effects of extrinsic manipulations on spared neuronal assemblies. The organization and inherent adaptability of the anatomical nodes within distributed pathways of the central nervous system offer a flexible substrate for treatment strategies that drive activity-dependent plasticity. Opportunities for a new generation of approaches are manifested by rodent and non-human primate studies that reveal morphologic and physiologic adaptations induced by injury, by learning-associated practice, by the effects of pharmacologic neuromodulators, by the behavioral and molecular bases for enhancing activity-dependent synaptic plasticity, and by cell replacement, gene therapy, and regenerative biologic strategies. Techniques such as functional magnetic resonance imaging and transcranial magnetic stimulation will help determine the most optimal physiologic effects of interventions in patients as the cortical representations for skilled movements and cognitive processes are modified by the combination of conventional and biologic therapies. As clinicians digest the finer details of the neurobiology of rehabilitation, they will translate laboratory data into controlled clinical trials. By determining how much they can influence neural reorganization, clinicians will extend the opportunities for neurorestoration. PMID:15838110

  13. Gravitational Neurobiology of Fish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmann, H.; Anken, R. H.

    In vertebrates (including man), altered gravitational environments such as weightlessness can induce malfunctions of the inner ears, based on irregular movements of the semicircular cristae or on dislocations of the inner ear otoliths from the corresponding sensory epithelia. This will lead to illusionary tilts, since the vestibular inputs are not confirmed by the other sensory organs, which results in an intersensory conflict. Vertebrates in orbit therefore face severe orientation problems. In humans, the intersensory conflict may additionally lead to a malaise, commonly referred to as space motion sickness (SMS), a kinetosis. During the first days at weightlessness, the orientation problems (and SMS) disappear, since the brain develops a new compensatory interpretation of the available sensory data. The present review reports on the neurobiological responses - particularly of fish - observed at altered gravitational states, concerning behaviour and neuroplastic reactivities. Recent investigations employing microgravity (spaceflight, parabolic aircraft flights, clinostat) and hyper-gravity (laboratory centrifuges as ground based research tools) yielded clues and insights into the understanding of the respective basic phenomena

  14. Optical highlighter molecules in neurobiology.

    PubMed

    Datta, Sandeep Robert; Patterson, George H

    2012-02-01

    The development of advanced optical methods has played a key role in propelling progress in neurobiology. Genetically-encoded fluorescent molecules found in nature have enabled labeling of individual neurons to study their physiology and anatomy. Here we discuss the recent use of both native and synthetic optical highlighter proteins to address key problems in neurobiology, including questions relevant to synaptic function, neuroanatomy, and the organization of neural circuits.

  15. Seniority Rights and Title VII.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarthy, Martha M.

    This chapter provides an analysis of seniority rights under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which bars discrimination in employment. Two legal theories have arisen in assessing Title VII claims: discriminatory treatment, in which the burden of proof of discriminatory intent lies with the plaintiff, and discriminatory impact of neutral…

  16. The 1988 Electoral Debates and Debate Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiler, Michael

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the relationship of debate theory to the 1988 presidential and vice presidential debates. Proposes that the press's involvement retrieves the debates from the category of "joint appearances." Argues that major definitional difficulties are resolved by recognizing the press as one of the adversaries in the debate process. (MM)

  17. The Neurobiology of Cancer Pain.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Brian L

    2015-12-01

    Oral cancers are often severely painful and clinically difficult to manage. Few researchers have investigated the neurobiologic factors responsible for cancer pain; however, the study of oral cancer pain might inform us about the fundamental biology of cancer. The purpose of the present report was to summarize the clinical challenges inherent in oral cancer pain management, oral cancer pain mechanisms and mediators, and the convergence of the investigation of carcinogenesis and pain. PMID:26608142

  18. Recent Insights into the Neurobiology of Impulsivity

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Marci R.; Potenza, Marc N.

    2014-01-01

    Impulsivity is associated with various psychopathologies, and elevated impulsivity is typically disadvantageous. This manuscript reviews recent investigations into the neurobiology of impulsivity using human imaging techniques and animal models. Both human imaging and preclinical pharmacological manipulations have yielded important insights into the neurobiological underpinnings of impulsivity. A more thorough understanding of the complex neurobiology underlying aspects of impulsivity may provide insight into new treatment options that target elevated impulsivity and psychopathologies such as addictions. PMID:25431750

  19. Neurobiology of Circadian Rhythm Regulation.

    PubMed

    Rosenwasser, Alan M; Turek, Fred W

    2015-12-01

    Over the past few decades, multilevel research has elucidated the basic neuroanatomy, neurochemistry, and molecular neurobiology of the master circadian pacemaker located in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). The circadian timing system is composed of a large number of cellular oscillators located in the SCN, in non-SCN brain structures, and throughout the body. Cellular-level oscillations are generated by a molecular feedback loop in which circadian clock genes rhythmically regulate their own transcription, as well as that of hundreds of clock-controlled genes. The maintenance of proper coordination within this network of cellular- and tissue-level clocks is essential for health and well-being. PMID:26568118

  20. Neurobiology of Circadian Rhythm Regulation.

    PubMed

    Rosenwasser, Alan M; Turek, Fred W

    2015-12-01

    Over the past few decades, multilevel research has elucidated the basic neuroanatomy, neurochemistry, and molecular neurobiology of the master circadian pacemaker located in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). The circadian timing system is composed of a large number of cellular oscillators located in the SCN, in non-SCN brain structures, and throughout the body. Cellular-level oscillations are generated by a molecular feedback loop in which circadian clock genes rhythmically regulate their own transcription, as well as that of hundreds of clock-controlled genes. The maintenance of proper coordination within this network of cellular- and tissue-level clocks is essential for health and well-being.

  1. Addiction Science: Uncovering Neurobiological Complexity

    PubMed Central

    Volkow, N. D.; Baler, R. D.

    2013-01-01

    Until very recently addiction-research was limited by existing tools and strategies that were inadequate for studying the inherent complexity at each of the different phenomenological levels. However, powerful new tools (e.g., optogenetics and designer drug receptors) and high throughput protocols are starting to give researchers the potential to systematically interrogate “all” genes, epigenetic marks, and neuronal circuits. These advances, combined with imaging technologies (both for preclinical and clinical studies) and a paradigm shift towards open access have spurred an unlimited growth of datasets transforming the way we investigate the neurobiology of substance use disorders (SUD) and the factors that modulate risk and resilience. PMID:23688927

  2. Neurobiology of Addictions: Implications for Clinical Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spence, Richard T., Ed.; DiNitto, Diana M., Ed.; Straussner, Shulamith Lala Ashenberg, Ed.

    This book offers helping professionals an introduction to the neurobiological aspects of substance abuse. It presents the basic information on the subject, including the various neurobiological theories of addiction, and places them in a psychosocial context. In addition to connecting the theoretical information with practical applications, the…

  3. Highlights of Spanish Astrophysics VII

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guirado, J. C.; Lara, L. M.; Quilis, V.; Gorgas, J.

    2013-05-01

    "Highlights of Astronomy and Astrophysics VII" contains the Proceedings of the biannual meeting of the Spanish Astronomical Society held in Valencia from July 9 to 13, 2012. Over 300 astronomer, both national and international researchers, attended to the conference covering a wide variety of astrophysical topics: Galaxies and Cosmology, The Milky Way and Its Components, Planetary Sciences, Solar Physics, Instrumentation and Computation, and Teaching and Outreach of Astronomy.

  4. Enteric Neurobiology: Discoveries and Directions.

    PubMed

    Wood, Jackie D

    2016-01-01

    Discovery and documentation of noncholinergic-nonadrenergic neurotransmission in the enteric nervous system started a revolution in mechanisms of neural control of the digestive tract that continues into a twenty-first century era of translational gastroenterology, which is now firmly embedded in the term, neurogastroenterology. This chapter, on Enteric Neurobiology: Discoveries and Directions, tracks the step-by-step advances in enteric neuronal electrophysiology and synaptic behavior and progresses to the higher order functions of central pattern generators, hard wired synaptic circuits and libraries of neural programs in the brain-in-the-gut that underlie the several different patterns of motility and secretory behaviors that occur in the specialized, serially-connected compartments extending from the esophagus to the anus.

  5. Fluorescence applications in molecular neurobiology

    PubMed Central

    Taraska, Justin W.; Zagotta, William N.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Macromolecules drive the complex behavior of neurons. For example, channels and transporters control the movements of ions across membranes, SNAREs direct the fusion of vesicles at the synapse, and motors move cargo throughout the cell. Understanding the structure, assembly, and conformational movements of these and other neuronal proteins is essential to understanding the brain. Developments in fluorescence have allowed the architecture and dynamics of proteins to be studied in real time and in a cellular context with great accuracy. In this review, we cover classic and recent methods for studying protein structure, assembly, and dynamics with fluorescence. These methods include fluorescence and luminescence resonance energy transfer, single molecule bleaching analysis, intensity measurements, co-localization microscopy, electron transfer, and bi-molecular complementation analysis. We present the principles of these methods, highlight recent work that uses the methods, and discuss a framework for interpreting results as they apply to molecular neurobiology. PMID:20434995

  6. Neurobiological implications of eating healthy.

    PubMed

    Esch, Tobias; Kim, Jae Won; Stefano, George B

    2006-01-01

    Over the last decades, the importance of food in the development of chronic diseases has been examined, as well as the medical value of eating healthy. The contribution of the eating process itself to health and well-being, however, has not been questioned until most recently. Biology has linked eating to appetitive motivational processes with their underlying neurophysiology, including CNS reward circuitries: Eating uses the pleasure-reward physiology to motivate us to eat. Endogenous opiates, such as morphine, insure our survival by helping us to make eating motivational via pleasure induction. After taking in enough food, we become satisfied, i.e., tolerant to food. Our appetite, and so is our appetence, are then low and need a certain time span to reach their former levels for then inducing food-seeking behaviors, food intake, etc. again. When tolerance passes, we once more engage in this pleasurable process related to positive behavioral motivation. Opioid receptor agonists, however, may induce energy intake even beyond an actual need. This interesting potential of opioidergic signaling may have its roots in biological mechanisms that insured the intake and storage of high energy foods, hence preparing for future famines. In our world of today, however, such neurobiological pathways may pose a threat on our health. Thus, feedback mechanisms, such as tolerance, aversion and satiety, have to be finely tuned. Therefore central autoregulation that involves, for example, limbic mu receptor signaling and other endogenous signaling compounds comes into the focus of modern science. The time where research recognizes the importance of neurobiological pathways such as endogenous opiate autoregulation or CNS reward circuitries for examining the physiology of food intake has yet begun. Many questions remain open and have to be answered through future scientific inquiry.

  7. Whole Language: The Debate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Carl B., Comp.

    This book presents a debate between "reasonable" educators who either claim that there is evidence for the effectiveness of whole language, or who challenge the claim that whole language works across the broad spectrum of learners. The book presents the debate in the form of formal debate resolutions, opening "statements," transcripts of a…

  8. Electrical conductivity of ice VII

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Taku; Iitaka, Toshiaki; Yagi, Takehiko; Aoki, Katsutoshi

    2014-01-01

    It was discovered that a peak appears near a pressure of Pc = 10 GPa in the electrical conductivity of ice VII as measured through impedance spectroscopy in a diamond anvil cell (DAC) during the process of compression from 2 GPa to 40 GPa at room temperature. The activation energy for the conductivity measured in the cooling/heating process between 278 K and 303 K reached a minimum near Pc. Theoretical modelling and molecular dynamics simulations suggest that the origin of this unique peak is the transition of the major charge carriers from the rotational defects to the ionic defects. PMID:25047728

  9. Behavioral inhibition: a neurobiological perspective.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Barak E

    2006-08-01

    Behavioral inhibition (BI) during early childhood has been associated with subsequent development of anxiety disorders. However, understanding of the neuroanatomical substrates of BI in humans generally has not kept pace with that of anxiety disorders. Recent interpretations and implementations of Gray's and Kagan's concepts of BI are examined from the perspective of current neurobiological models. Particular attention is given to evidence pointing to conceptual and operational limitations of self-report scales purported to measure trait BI in adults, and especially to inconsistent correlations between such behavioral inhibition system (BIS) scores and amygdala and autonomic responses to fear- or startle-inducing stimuli. Evidence showing a dissociation of both BI and trait anxiety from the amygdala is considered. Possible reasons for the poor association between BIS and trait anxiety self-report scale scores and predicted physiological outputs of the BIS are identified. Reasons to distinguish between the neural bases of BI as against trait anxiety also are discussed. The need to critically examine the role of the amygdala in BI and trait anxiety, as well as to consider other brain areas that appear to be involved in subserving these emotional traits, is emphasized. PMID:16879790

  10. Toward a Neurobiology of Delusions

    PubMed Central

    Corlett, P.R.; Taylor, J.R.; Wang, X.-J.; Fletcher, P.C.; Krystal, J.H.

    2013-01-01

    Delusions are the false and often incorrigible beliefs that can cause severe suffering in mental illness. We cannot yet explain them in terms of underlying neurobiological abnormalities. However, by drawing on recent advances in the biological, computational and psychological processes of reinforcement learning, memory, and perception it may be feasible to account for delusions in terms of cognition and brain function. The account focuses on a particular parameter, prediction error – the mismatch between expectation and experience – that provides a computational mechanism common to cortical hierarchies, frontostriatal circuits and the amygdala as well as parietal cortices. We suggest that delusions result from aberrations in how brain circuits specify hierarchical predictions, and how they compute and respond to prediction errors. Defects in these fundamental brain mechanisms can vitiate perception, memory, bodily agency and social learning such that individuals with delusions experience an internal and external world that healthy individuals would find difficult to comprehend. The present model attempts to provide a framework through which we can build a mechanistic and translational understanding of these puzzling symptoms. PMID:20558235

  11. Neurobiology of aggression and violence.

    PubMed

    Siever, Larry J

    2008-04-01

    Acts of violence account for an estimated 1.43 million deaths worldwide annually. While violence can occur in many contexts, individual acts of aggression account for the majority of instances. In some individuals, repetitive acts of aggression are grounded in an underlying neurobiological susceptibility that is just beginning to be understood. The failure of "top-down" control systems in the prefrontal cortex to modulate aggressive acts that are triggered by anger provoking stimuli appears to play an important role. An imbalance between prefrontal regulatory influences and hyper-responsivity of the amygdala and other limbic regions involved in affective evaluation are implicated. Insufficient serotonergic facilitation of "top-down" control, excessive catecholaminergic stimulation, and subcortical imbalances of glutamatergic/gabaminergic systems as well as pathology in neuropeptide systems involved in the regulation of affiliative behavior may contribute to abnormalities in this circuitry. Thus, pharmacological interventions such as mood stabilizers, which dampen limbic irritability, or selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), which may enhance "top-down" control, as well as psychosocial interventions to develop alternative coping skills and reinforce reflective delays may be therapeutic.

  12. Jungian metapsychology and neurobiological theory.

    PubMed

    Tresan, D I

    1996-07-01

    This paper deals with brain research and depth psychology. Because brain research is becoming significantly more sophisticated and increasingly able to assay the neurobiology of subjective (i.e., mental) events in vivo, it is suggested that any school of depth psychology will probably not survive as a mainstream treatment modality if its theory and practice is found to be in frank variance with the findings of the modern neurosciences. Jung's psychology is compared to Freud's and shown to be reasonably consonant with such findings. Historical highlights of Jung's non-reductive way of conceptualizing and working are presented and put in the context of more recent scientifically defensible concepts (emergence, supervenience, complexity theory) from the fields of both philosophy of science and philosophy of mind. These concepts postulate a hierarchical model of reality which permits an exploration of the mind/brain relationship without resorting to reductionism or dualism. A sense of the present struggle is conveyed between the proponents of these and more traditional scientific concepts. Finally, the nature of mind/brain confluence is elucidated by examples from the areas of learning, memory and the capacity to symbolize in order to illustrate how clinical practices and observations familiar to experience depth therapists and also in agreement with Jungian theory are compatible with neuroscientific findings. A research suggestion is offered.

  13. Genetics Home Reference: glycogen storage disease type VII

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Conditions glycogen storage disease type VII glycogen storage disease type VII Enable Javascript to view the ... Download PDF Open All Close All Description Glycogen storage disease type VII (GSDVII) is an inherited disorder ...

  14. Neurobiology of early life stress: clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Heim, Christine; Nemeroff, Charles B

    2002-04-01

    A burgeoning number of clinical studies have evaluated the immediate and long-term neurobiological effects of early developmental stress, eg, child abuse and neglect or parental loss, in the past years. This review summarizes and discusses the available findings from neuroendocrine (hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, other neuroendocrine axes), neurochemical (catecholamines, serotonin, other neurotransmitters), psychophysiological (autonomic function, startle reactivity, brain electrical activity) and neuroimaging studies (brain structure, function) conducted in children or adults with a history of early life stress, with or without psychiatric disorders. Early developmental stress in humans appears to be associated with neurobiological alterations that are similar to many findings in animal models of early life stress, and likely represent the biological basis of an enhanced risk for psychopathology. Clinical studies are now beginning to explore potentially differential neurobiological effects of different types of early life stress and the existence of critical developmental periods, which may be sensitive to the neurobiological effects of specific stressors. In addition, the role of a multitude of moderating and mediating factors in the determination of individual vulnerability or resilience to the neurobiological effects of early life stress should be addressed. Findings from such studies may ultimately help to prevent the deleterious neurobiological and psychopathological consequences in the unacceptably high number of children exposed to early life stress in modern society. PMID:11953939

  15. Neurobiology of Anxious Depression: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Ionescu, Dawn F; Niciu, Mark J; Mathews, Daniel C; Richards, Erica M; Zarate, Carlos A

    2013-01-01

    Anxious depression is a common, distinct clinical subtype of major depressive disorder (MDD). This review summarizes current neurobiological knowledge regarding anxious depression. Peer-reviewed articles published January 1970 through September 2012 were identified via PUBMED, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library, using the following key words: anxious depression electroencephalography (EEG), anxious depression functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), anxious depression genetics, anxious depression neurobiology, and anxious melancholia neurobiology. Despite a general dearth of neurobiological research, the results suggest that anxious depression—when defined either syndromally or dimensionally—has distinct neurobiological findings that separate it from non-anxious depression. Structural neuroimaging, EEG, genetics, and neuropsychiatric studies revealed differences in subjects with anxious depression compared to other groups. Endocrine differences between individuals with anxious depression and those with non-anxious depression have also been noted, as evidenced by abnormal responses elicited by exogenous stimulation of the system. Despite these findings, heterogeneity in the definition of anxious depression complicates the results. Because exploring the neurobiology of this depressive subtype is important for improving diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment, enrichment strategies to decrease heterogeneity within the field should be employed for future research. PMID:23495126

  16. Strypi VII R launch vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Wente, H.A.

    1982-01-01

    The Strypi VII R is a three-stage solid propellant launch vehicle designed to boost payloads ranging from 50 to 300 pounds to re-entry environment conditions. The first stage, a fin-stabilized ballistic rocket boosts the final two stages into an exoatmospheric trajectory where an attitude control system (ACS) precesses the spinning stages into the re-entry attitude. The ACS section is then jettisoned, and ignition of the spin-stabilized upper stages is initiated at a time determined to provide a zero angle-of-attack at beginning of re-entry. Four vehicles have been flown carrying three different re-entry test vehicles. Originally designed for use with a Castor II motor, the highly aluminized propellant in the first stage spinning environment contributed to a case rupture resulting in failure of the second flight. The last two flights were flown successfully using Castor I motors. Typically, the Strypi VII R can boost a 100 lbm RV to a speed of 19,500 fps on a flight path of -30 degrees at 300,000 feet altitude.

  17. [Pleasure: Neurobiological conception and Freudian conception].

    PubMed

    Chenu, A; Tassin, J-P

    2014-04-01

    Despite many controversies the debate between psychoanalysis and neuroscience remains intense, all the more since the Freudian theory stands as a reference for a number of medical practitioners and faculty psychiatrists, at least in France. Instead of going on arguing we think that it may be more constructive to favour dialogue through the analysis of a precise concept developed in each discipline. The Freudian theory of pleasure, because it is based on biological principles, appears an appropriate topic to perform this task. In this paper, we aim at comparing Freud's propositions to those issued from recent findings in Neuroscience. Like all emotions, pleasure is acknowledged as a motivating factor in contemporary models. Pleasure can indeed be either rewarding when it follows satisfaction, or incentive when it reinforces behaviours. The Freudian concept of pleasure is more univocal. In Freud's theory, pleasure is assumed to be the result of the discharge of the accumulated excitation which will thus reduce the tension. This quantitative approach corresponds to the classical scheme that associates satisfaction and pleasure. Satisfaction of a need would induce both a decrease in tension and the development of pleasure. However, clinical contradictions to this model, such as the occasional co-existence between pleasure and excitation, drove Freud to suggest different theoretical reversals. Freud's 1905 publication, which describes how preliminary sexual pleasures contribute to an increased excitation and a sexual satisfaction, is the only analysis which provides an adapted answer to the apparent paradox of pleasure and excitation co-existence. Studies on the neurobiological mechanisms responsible for the development of pleasure may help to fill this gap in the Freudian theory. Activity of the mesolimbic dopaminergic pathway is strongly associated with the reward system. Experimental studies performed in animals have shown that increased dopaminergic activity in the

  18. [Pleasure: Neurobiological conception and Freudian conception].

    PubMed

    Chenu, A; Tassin, J-P

    2014-04-01

    Despite many controversies the debate between psychoanalysis and neuroscience remains intense, all the more since the Freudian theory stands as a reference for a number of medical practitioners and faculty psychiatrists, at least in France. Instead of going on arguing we think that it may be more constructive to favour dialogue through the analysis of a precise concept developed in each discipline. The Freudian theory of pleasure, because it is based on biological principles, appears an appropriate topic to perform this task. In this paper, we aim at comparing Freud's propositions to those issued from recent findings in Neuroscience. Like all emotions, pleasure is acknowledged as a motivating factor in contemporary models. Pleasure can indeed be either rewarding when it follows satisfaction, or incentive when it reinforces behaviours. The Freudian concept of pleasure is more univocal. In Freud's theory, pleasure is assumed to be the result of the discharge of the accumulated excitation which will thus reduce the tension. This quantitative approach corresponds to the classical scheme that associates satisfaction and pleasure. Satisfaction of a need would induce both a decrease in tension and the development of pleasure. However, clinical contradictions to this model, such as the occasional co-existence between pleasure and excitation, drove Freud to suggest different theoretical reversals. Freud's 1905 publication, which describes how preliminary sexual pleasures contribute to an increased excitation and a sexual satisfaction, is the only analysis which provides an adapted answer to the apparent paradox of pleasure and excitation co-existence. Studies on the neurobiological mechanisms responsible for the development of pleasure may help to fill this gap in the Freudian theory. Activity of the mesolimbic dopaminergic pathway is strongly associated with the reward system. Experimental studies performed in animals have shown that increased dopaminergic activity in the

  19. NEUROBIOLOGICAL BASES OF ALCOHOL ADDICTION.

    PubMed

    Matošić, Ana; Marušić, Srđan; Vidrih, Branka; Kovak-Mufić, Ana; Cicin-Šain, Lipa

    2016-03-01

    Alcohol addiction is a heterogeneous psychiatric disorder according to both phenotype and etiology. Difference in phenotype characteristics manifests in the manner the addiction arises, history of the alcoholic and history of drinking, comorbid disorders, and the phenomenon of abstinence difficulties. Concerning the etiology of alcoholism, the disease itself is considered to be a consequence of an interactive influence of the environment and genetic factors. Numerous researches conducted in the last decades discovered many aspects of the biochemical, cell and molecular bases of alcohol addiction, leading to a conclusion that alcoholism is, like many other addictions, a brain disease. By recognizing alcoholism as a disease which basically implies changes of the neurobiological mechanisms, as well as a clear genetic basis, it was supposed that the disease, having its basis solely in the symptomatology, is essentially heterogeneous. By trying to solve the problem of a clinically heterogeneous nature of the disease during the last fifty years, various sub-classifications of such patients have been suggested. According to Cloninger, subtypes of alcoholism differ also according to changes in the brain neurotransmission systems, i.e. it is supposed that patients suffering from alcoholism type 1 have a more pronounced dopaminergic transmission deficit, while dopaminergic transmission is not disturbed significantly in patients diagnosed with alcoholism type 2, who, however, have a significant lack of serotonergic transmission. In such a way, Cloninger actually presented the basis of the so-called neurobiological alcoholism model. Since he has connected differences in neurotransmission with differences in personality characteristics, this model is also known as the psychobiological model of alcoholism. The characteristic of alcoholism type 1 is avoiding damage (Harm Avoidance, HA) decreased dopamine transmission and increased serotonin transmission, while the significant

  20. NEUROBIOLOGICAL BASES OF ALCOHOL ADDICTION.

    PubMed

    Matošić, Ana; Marušić, Srđan; Vidrih, Branka; Kovak-Mufić, Ana; Cicin-Šain, Lipa

    2016-03-01

    Alcohol addiction is a heterogeneous psychiatric disorder according to both phenotype and etiology. Difference in phenotype characteristics manifests in the manner the addiction arises, history of the alcoholic and history of drinking, comorbid disorders, and the phenomenon of abstinence difficulties. Concerning the etiology of alcoholism, the disease itself is considered to be a consequence of an interactive influence of the environment and genetic factors. Numerous researches conducted in the last decades discovered many aspects of the biochemical, cell and molecular bases of alcohol addiction, leading to a conclusion that alcoholism is, like many other addictions, a brain disease. By recognizing alcoholism as a disease which basically implies changes of the neurobiological mechanisms, as well as a clear genetic basis, it was supposed that the disease, having its basis solely in the symptomatology, is essentially heterogeneous. By trying to solve the problem of a clinically heterogeneous nature of the disease during the last fifty years, various sub-classifications of such patients have been suggested. According to Cloninger, subtypes of alcoholism differ also according to changes in the brain neurotransmission systems, i.e. it is supposed that patients suffering from alcoholism type 1 have a more pronounced dopaminergic transmission deficit, while dopaminergic transmission is not disturbed significantly in patients diagnosed with alcoholism type 2, who, however, have a significant lack of serotonergic transmission. In such a way, Cloninger actually presented the basis of the so-called neurobiological alcoholism model. Since he has connected differences in neurotransmission with differences in personality characteristics, this model is also known as the psychobiological model of alcoholism. The characteristic of alcoholism type 1 is avoiding damage (Harm Avoidance, HA) decreased dopamine transmission and increased serotonin transmission, while the significant

  1. Music medicine. A neurobiological approach.

    PubMed

    Hassler, Marianne

    2000-01-01

    Music medicine is a relatively new medical specialty for most countries in the world and a rediscovery of a discipline for some countries in Europe. In the scope of music medicine are health problems of musicians like stage fright and psychic stress, pain syndromes and motor disturbances. Specific demands of musicianship like performing before the public, performing under the constant critical scrutiny of conductors, being expected to perform perfectly, and the physical demands of performing on a musical instrument were seen as the determinants of the complaints, and treatment does usually not differ between musicians and non-musicians with comparable diseases. In the present article, growing neurobiological evidence will be summarized showing that musicians differ from non-musicians on brain structure and function and on some hormonal and immunological parameters. Musicians tend to have atypical brain organization for verbal and non-verbal materials, their auditory system tracks sound levels more accurately, musicians attend pre-consciously to musical material and they react to music as if it is a stressor, i.e. with increased activity of the autonomic nervous system and with an increase in stress hormone production. A musician is more likely than a non-musician to be non-righthanded and to be vulnerable to atopic diseases. Testosterone levels are assumed to be lower (male) and higher (female) than controls. Melatonin was found to be elevated, and ACTH was related to musical talent. His/her brain reflects early music practice by enlarged structures, like the anterior part of the corpus callosum and the representation for piano tones and for the left thumb and little finger in string players. In addition, the left planum temporale was found to be larger in musicians with absolute pitch. These differences between musicians and non-musicians may have implications for music medicine in theory and practice, and further research should help to improve treatment of

  2. [MicroRNAs in neurobiology].

    PubMed

    Kawahara, Yukio

    2008-12-01

    MicroRNAs have emerged as a new regulatory factor of gene expression. They mediate translational repression or degradation of their target mRNAs by RNA interference (RNAi). The expression of each microRNA is tightly regulated in a development- and cell-specific manner by various mechanisms such as blockade of let-7 family expression by Lin-28 or RNA editing. They also act as regulatory switches for development, organogenesis, and cellular differentiation or for controlling distinct functions that are required for the maintenance of each tissue and cell subtypes. The abundant expression of microRNAs as well as the exclusive expression of certain microRNAs in the central nervous system highlights their biological importance at all stages of neural development and in postmitotic and differentiated neurons. Further, some microRNAs, such as miRNA-134, and miRNA-132 are localized and are synthesized in part at synaptic sites in dendrites to regulate synaptic formation and plasticity. In addition to the imparting of basic knowledge about the biogenesis and mechanism of action of microRNAs, this review focuses on the recent advances in microRNA studies in neurobiology, including the expression pattern of microRNAs in the mammalian brain, the role of microRNAs in neural differentiation and maturation, formation and plasticity of synaptic connections, and maintenance of neural function such as the synthesis of the neurotransmitters in selected neurons. Finally, the possible connection between microRNA dysfunction and neurological diseases, and future implications for diagnosis, and treatment of defects in human brain development and neurodegenerative diseases are discussed.

  3. Integrated neurobiology of bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Maletic, Vladimir; Raison, Charles

    2014-01-01

    From a neurobiological perspective there is no such thing as bipolar disorder. Rather, it is almost certainly the case that many somewhat similar, but subtly different, pathological conditions produce a disease state that we currently diagnose as bipolarity. This heterogeneity - reflected in the lack of synergy between our current diagnostic schema and our rapidly advancing scientific understanding of the condition - limits attempts to articulate an integrated perspective on bipolar disorder. However, despite these challenges, scientific findings in recent years are beginning to offer a provisional "unified field theory" of the disease. This theory sees bipolar disorder as a suite of related neurodevelopmental conditions with interconnected functional abnormalities that often appear early in life and worsen over time. In addition to accelerated loss of volume in brain areas known to be essential for mood regulation and cognitive function, consistent findings have emerged at a cellular level, providing evidence that bipolar disorder is reliably associated with dysregulation of glial-neuronal interactions. Among these glial elements are microglia - the brain's primary immune elements, which appear to be overactive in the context of bipolarity. Multiple studies now indicate that inflammation is also increased in the periphery of the body in both the depressive and manic phases of the illness, with at least some return to normality in the euthymic state. These findings are consistent with changes in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, which are known to drive inflammatory activation. In summary, the very fact that no single gene, pathway, or brain abnormality is likely to ever account for the condition is itself an extremely important first step in better articulating an integrated perspective on both its ontological status and pathogenesis. Whether this perspective will translate into the discovery of innumerable more homogeneous forms of bipolarity is one of the

  4. Are debatable scientific questions debatable? (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oreskes, N.

    2010-12-01

    Are debatable scientific questions debatable? In 2000, the physicist-philosopher John Ziman posed this pithy—and crucial—question. He noted that scientists were at a disadvantage in public debate, because the rules of engagement are different in scientific discourse than in public discourse in ways that make it difficult for scientists to ‘win’ public arguments, even when the facts are on their side. In this paper, I revisit Ziman’s arguments in light of the difficulties that climate scientists have had in communicating the reality and gravity of global warming. In addition to the problem posed by Ziman, I also address the role of organized disinformation in further increasing the challenges that climate scientists face.

  5. Integrated Neurobiology of Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Maletic, Vladimir; Raison, Charles

    2014-01-01

    From a neurobiological perspective there is no such thing as bipolar disorder. Rather, it is almost certainly the case that many somewhat similar, but subtly different, pathological conditions produce a disease state that we currently diagnose as bipolarity. This heterogeneity – reflected in the lack of synergy between our current diagnostic schema and our rapidly advancing scientific understanding of the condition – limits attempts to articulate an integrated perspective on bipolar disorder. However, despite these challenges, scientific findings in recent years are beginning to offer a provisional “unified field theory” of the disease. This theory sees bipolar disorder as a suite of related neurodevelopmental conditions with interconnected functional abnormalities that often appear early in life and worsen over time. In addition to accelerated loss of volume in brain areas known to be essential for mood regulation and cognitive function, consistent findings have emerged at a cellular level, providing evidence that bipolar disorder is reliably associated with dysregulation of glial–neuronal interactions. Among these glial elements are microglia – the brain’s primary immune elements, which appear to be overactive in the context of bipolarity. Multiple studies now indicate that inflammation is also increased in the periphery of the body in both the depressive and manic phases of the illness, with at least some return to normality in the euthymic state. These findings are consistent with changes in the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis, which are known to drive inflammatory activation. In summary, the very fact that no single gene, pathway, or brain abnormality is likely to ever account for the condition is itself an extremely important first step in better articulating an integrated perspective on both its ontological status and pathogenesis. Whether this perspective will translate into the discovery of innumerable more homogeneous forms of

  6. The Acid Rain Debate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oates-Bockenstedt, Catherine

    1997-01-01

    Details an activity designed to motivate students by incorporating science-related issues into a classroom debate. Includes "The Acid Rain Bill" and "Position Guides" for student roles as committee members, consumers, governors, industry owners, tourism professionals, senators, and debate directors. (DKM)

  7. Towards a neurobiological model of offending.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Ian J; Beech, Anthony R

    2011-07-01

    In this paper we consider how disturbances in the neurobiological/neurochemical processes at a young age lead to problematic attachment styles in later life, and which can potentiate probability of offending behavior. In particular, we will contrast attachment and offending patterns of the more generalist type of offender (i.e., those who have a varied criminal career, committing both violent and non-violent offenses, in extremis the psychopathic type of offender), with the more specialist sexual offender (prototypically, the fixated pedophile), in the light of a preliminary neurobiological model. Here, we will argue that these two extremes of offenders show, or are predicted to show, differential patterns of neurochemical/neurobiological functioning.

  8. 19 CFR Annex Vii to Part 351 - Antidumping Investigations Timeline

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Antidumping Investigations Timeline VII Annex VII to Part 351 Customs Duties INTERNATIONAL TRADE ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ANTIDUMPING AND COUNTERVAILING DUTIES Pt. 351, Annex VII Annex VII to Part 351—Antidumping Investigations Timeline ER19MY97.001...

  9. 19 CFR Annex Vii to Part 351 - Antidumping Investigations Timeline

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Antidumping Investigations Timeline VII Annex VII to Part 351 Customs Duties INTERNATIONAL TRADE ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ANTIDUMPING AND COUNTERVAILING DUTIES Pt. 351, Annex VII Annex VII to Part 351—Antidumping Investigations Timeline ER19MY97.001...

  10. The Neurobiology of Swallowing and Dysphagia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Arthur J.

    2008-01-01

    The neurobiological study of swallowing and its dysfunction, defined as dysphagia, has evolved over two centuries beginning with electrical stimulation applied directly to the central nervous system, and then followed by systematic investigations that have used lesioning, transmagnetic stimulation, magnetoencephalography, and functional magnetic…

  11. Neurobiological Formulations: Integrating Clinical and Biological Psychiatry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Posner, Jonathan; Stewart, Jonathan; Rieder, Ronald

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The authors describe a pilot program allowing psychiatric residents to participate in neurobiological evaluations of patients with Axis I disorders. The program aimed to familiarize residents with available tools for assessing cognitive and neuroanatomical abnormalities in psychiatric patients and to foster greater interest among…

  12. The neurobiology of syntax: beyond string sets.

    PubMed

    Petersson, Karl Magnus; Hagoort, Peter

    2012-07-19

    The human capacity to acquire language is an outstanding scientific challenge to understand. Somehow our language capacities arise from the way the human brain processes, develops and learns in interaction with its environment. To set the stage, we begin with a summary of what is known about the neural organization of language and what our artificial grammar learning (AGL) studies have revealed. We then review the Chomsky hierarchy in the context of the theory of computation and formal learning theory. Finally, we outline a neurobiological model of language acquisition and processing based on an adaptive, recurrent, spiking network architecture. This architecture implements an asynchronous, event-driven, parallel system for recursive processing. We conclude that the brain represents grammars (or more precisely, the parser/generator) in its connectivity, and its ability for syntax is based on neurobiological infrastructure for structured sequence processing. The acquisition of this ability is accounted for in an adaptive dynamical systems framework. Artificial language learning (ALL) paradigms might be used to study the acquisition process within such a framework, as well as the processing properties of the underlying neurobiological infrastructure. However, it is necessary to combine and constrain the interpretation of ALL results by theoretical models and empirical studies on natural language processing. Given that the faculty of language is captured by classical computational models to a significant extent, and that these can be embedded in dynamic network architectures, there is hope that significant progress can be made in understanding the neurobiology of the language faculty. PMID:22688633

  13. Neurobiology of Childhood-Onset Schizophrenia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biswas, Parthasarathy

    2008-01-01

    In the last decade there has been an exponential increase in studies on neurobiological measures in childhood-onset schizophrenia (COS). There seems to be a consensus that structural changes in COS are more marked than in adolescence-onset (AdOS) or adult-onset schizophrenia (AOS). Atrophy of total brain volume is progressive throughout the course…

  14. The neurobiology of syntax: beyond string sets.

    PubMed

    Petersson, Karl Magnus; Hagoort, Peter

    2012-07-19

    The human capacity to acquire language is an outstanding scientific challenge to understand. Somehow our language capacities arise from the way the human brain processes, develops and learns in interaction with its environment. To set the stage, we begin with a summary of what is known about the neural organization of language and what our artificial grammar learning (AGL) studies have revealed. We then review the Chomsky hierarchy in the context of the theory of computation and formal learning theory. Finally, we outline a neurobiological model of language acquisition and processing based on an adaptive, recurrent, spiking network architecture. This architecture implements an asynchronous, event-driven, parallel system for recursive processing. We conclude that the brain represents grammars (or more precisely, the parser/generator) in its connectivity, and its ability for syntax is based on neurobiological infrastructure for structured sequence processing. The acquisition of this ability is accounted for in an adaptive dynamical systems framework. Artificial language learning (ALL) paradigms might be used to study the acquisition process within such a framework, as well as the processing properties of the underlying neurobiological infrastructure. However, it is necessary to combine and constrain the interpretation of ALL results by theoretical models and empirical studies on natural language processing. Given that the faculty of language is captured by classical computational models to a significant extent, and that these can be embedded in dynamic network architectures, there is hope that significant progress can be made in understanding the neurobiology of the language faculty.

  15. The Neurobiology of Learning and Memory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Rihard F.

    1986-01-01

    Describes recent research findings in the area of neurobiology and its relationship to learning and memory. The article provides definitions of associative and nonassociative learning, identifies essential memory trace circuits of the mammalian brain, and discusses some neural mechanisms of learning. (TW)

  16. Debating Climate Change

    SciTech Connect

    Malone, Elizabeth L.

    2009-11-01

    Debating Climate Change explores, both theoretically and empirically, how people argue about climate change and link to each other through various elements in their arguments. As science is a central issue in the debate, the arguments of scientists and the interpretations and responses of non-scientists are important aspects of the analysis. The book first assesses current thinking about the climate change debate and current participants in the debates surrounding the issue, as well as a brief history of various groups’ involvements. Chapters 2 and 3 distill and organize various ways of framing the climate change issue. Beginning in Chapter 4, a modified classical analysis of the elements carried in an argument is used to identify areas and degrees of disagreement and agreement. One hundred documents, drawn from a wide spectrum of sources, map the topic and debate space of the climate change issue. Five elements of each argument are distilled: the authority of the writer, the evidence presented, the formulation of the argument, the worldview presented, and the actions proposed. Then a social network analysis identifies elements of the arguments that point to potential agreements. Finally, the book suggests mechanisms by which participants in the debate can build more general agreements on elements of existing agreement.

  17. Debating Real-World Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koenig, Maureen

    2001-01-01

    Presents three different scientific issues to students and uses debate as a way of gaining information. Involves information collection on the topic, team preparation, and debate between teams. Includes debate format and presentation guidelines, suggestions for debate questions, information on areas to explore when preparing to debate the question…

  18. The neurobiology of the human memory.

    PubMed

    Fietta, Pierluigi; Fietta, Pieranna

    2011-01-01

    Memory can be defined as the ability to acquire, process, store, and retrieve information. Memory is indispensable for learning, adaptation, and survival of every living organism. In humans, the remembering process has acquired great flexibility and complexity, reaching close links with other mental functions, such as thinking and emotions. Changes in synaptic connectivity and interactions among multiple neural networks provide the neurobiological substrates for memory encoding, retention, and consolidation. Memory may be categorized as short-term and long-term memory (according to the storage temporal duration), as implicit and explicit memory (with respect to the consciousness of remembering), as declarative (knowing that [fact]) and procedural (knowing how [skill]) memory, or as sensory (echoic, iconic and haptil), semantic, and episodic memory (according to the various remembering domains). Significant advances have been obtained in understanding memory neurobiology, but much remains to be learned in its cognitive, psychological, and phenomenological aspects. PMID:22220356

  19. History of the neurobiology of the pelvis.

    PubMed

    Burnett, A L; Wesselmann, U

    1999-06-01

    The contemporary clinical management of a variety of pelvic disorders has benefited greatly from both basic science research discoveries and clinical observations in pelvic neurobiology. The foundation of this scientific discipline emanates from historical advances in the neuroanatomy and neurochemistry of the pelvic region. These advances, many of which were controversial when introduced, have served to shape currently accepted views regarding the neuroregulatory basis of pelvic functions. This report highlights the major contributions in the history of pelvic neurobiology, providing both an overview of the evolution of scientific thought in this discipline and insight into the role of this discipline in the development and practice of medicine and surgery related to the pelvic region.

  20. Neurocontrol and neurobiology - New developments and connections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werbos, Paul J.; Pellionisz, Andras J.

    1992-01-01

    At McDonnell-Douglas, controllers which combine adaptive critic networks with the use of backpropagation in real time have solved difficult control problems crucial to the feasibility of building the National Aerospace Plane (NASP) able to reach earth orbit. As details emerged, parallels to neurobiology have grown stronger and have begun to lead to empirical possibilities of importance to neuroscience. This has led to thoughts of institutional collaboration facilitating what could become a Newtonian revolution in neuroscience, with cognitive implications as well. The authors elaborate on each of these points. The topics discussed are recent progress in neurocontrol; progress in optimization and reinforcement learning; implications for neurobiology and science policy; and a new view of the brain.

  1. Successful and unsuccessful psychopaths: a neurobiological model.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yu; Raine, Adrian

    2010-01-01

    Despite increasing interest in psychopathy research, surprisingly little is known about the etiology of non-incarcerated, successful psychopaths. This review provides an analysis of current knowledge on the similarities and differences between successful and unsuccessful psychopaths derived from five population sources: community samples, individuals from employment agencies, college students, industrial psychopaths, and serial killers. An initial neurobiological model of successful and unsuccessful psychopathy is outlined. It is hypothesized that successful psychopaths have intact or enhanced neurobiological functioning that underlies their normal or even superior cognitive functioning, which in turn helps them to achieve their goals using more covert and nonviolent methods. In contrast, in unsuccessful, caught psychopaths, brain structural and functional impairments together with autonomic nervous system dysfunction are hypothesized to underlie cognitive and emotional deficits and more overt violent offending.

  2. The neurobiological link between compassion and love

    PubMed Central

    Esch, Tobias; Stefano, George B.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Love and compassion exert pleasant feelings and rewarding effects. Besides their emotional role and capacity to govern behavior, appetitive motivation, and a general ‘positive state’, even ‘spiritual’ at times, the behaviors shown in love and compassion clearly rely on neurobiological mechanisms and underlying molecular principles. These processes and pathways involve the brain’s limbic motivation and reward circuits, that is, a finely tuned and profound autoregulation. This capacity to self-regulate emotions, approach behaviors and even pair bonding, as well as social contact in general, i.e., love, attachment and compassion, can be highly effective in stress reduction, survival and overall health. Yet, molecular biology is the basis of interpersonal neurobiology, however, there is no answer to the question of what comes first or is more important: It is a cybernetic capacity and complex circuit of autoregulation that is clearly ‘amazing’. PMID:21358615

  3. Neurobiology and treatment of compulsive hoarding.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Sanjaya

    2008-09-01

    Compulsive hoarding is a common and often disabling neuropsychiatric disorder. This article reviews the phenomenology, etiology, neurobiology, and treatment of compulsive hoarding. Compulsive hoarding is part of a discrete clinical syndrome that includes difficulty discarding, urges to save, clutter, excessive acquisition, indecisiveness, perfectionism, procrastination, disorganization, and avoidance. Epidemiological and taxometric studies indicate that compulsive hoarding is a separate but related obsessive-compulsive spectrum disorder that is frequently comorbid with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Compulsive hoarding is a genetically discrete, strongly heritable phenotype. Neuroimaging and neuropsychological studies indicate that compulsive hoarding is neurobiologically distinct from OCD and implicate dysfunction of the anterior cingulate cortex and other ventral and medial prefrontal cortical areas that mediate decision-making, attention, and emotional regulation. Effective treatments for compulsive hoarding include pharmacotherapy and cognitive-behavioral therapy. More research will be required to determine the etiology and pathophysiology of compulsive hoarding, and to develop better treatments for this disorder.

  4. Successful and unsuccessful psychopaths: a neurobiological model.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yu; Raine, Adrian

    2010-01-01

    Despite increasing interest in psychopathy research, surprisingly little is known about the etiology of non-incarcerated, successful psychopaths. This review provides an analysis of current knowledge on the similarities and differences between successful and unsuccessful psychopaths derived from five population sources: community samples, individuals from employment agencies, college students, industrial psychopaths, and serial killers. An initial neurobiological model of successful and unsuccessful psychopathy is outlined. It is hypothesized that successful psychopaths have intact or enhanced neurobiological functioning that underlies their normal or even superior cognitive functioning, which in turn helps them to achieve their goals using more covert and nonviolent methods. In contrast, in unsuccessful, caught psychopaths, brain structural and functional impairments together with autonomic nervous system dysfunction are hypothesized to underlie cognitive and emotional deficits and more overt violent offending. PMID:20422645

  5. The Artilect Debate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Garis, Hugo; Halioris, Sam

    Twenty-first-century technologies will allow the creation of massively intelligent machines, many trillions of times as smart, fast, and durable as humans. Issues concerning industrial, consumer, and military applications of mobile autonomous robots, cyborgs, and computer-based AI systems could divisively split humanity into ideological camps regarding whether "artilects" (artificial intellects) should be built or not. The artilect debate, unlike any before it, could dominate the 21st-century political landscape, and has the potential to cause conflict on a global scale. Research is needed to inform policy and individual decisions; and healthy debate should be initiated now to prepare institutions and individuals alike for the impact of AI.

  6. [Imagination: its definition, purposes and neurobiology].

    PubMed

    Drubach, D; Benarroch, E E; Mateen, F J

    Imagination, distinct from imagery, memory, and cognition, is a poorly understood but fascinating cognitive ability of human beings. Herein, imagination is defined as 'the cognitive process which enables the individual to manipulate intrinsically generated phenomenal information in order to create a representation perceived by the mind's senses.' This definition is expanded within the context of the neurobiology of the brain and the possible purposes the imagination fulfills in daily living, human development, and normal behavior.

  7. The brain decade in debate: II. Panic or anxiety? From animal models to a neurobiological basis.

    PubMed

    Andreatini, R; Blanchard, C; Blanchard, R; Brandão, M L; Carobrez, A P; Griebel, G; Guimarães, F S; Handley, S L; Jenck, F; Leite, J R; Rodgers, J; Schenberg, L C; Da Cunha, C; Graeff, F G

    2001-02-01

    This article is a transcription of an electronic symposium sponsored by the Brazilian Society of Neuroscience and Behavior (SBNeC). Invited researchers from the European Union, North America and Brazil discussed two issues on anxiety, namely whether panic is a very intense anxiety or something else, and what aspects of clinical anxiety are reproduced by animal models. Concerning the first issue, most participants agreed that generalized anxiety and panic disorder are different on the basis of clinical manifestations, drug response and animal models. Also, underlying brain structures, neurotransmitter modulation and hormonal changes seem to involve important differences. It is also common knowledge that existing animal models generate different types of fear/anxiety. A challenge for future research is to establish a good correlation between animal models and nosological classification.

  8. Calcium chloride rhenate(VII) dihydrate.

    PubMed

    Jarek, Urszula; Hołyńska, Małgorzata; Rlepokura, Katarzyna; Lis, Tadeusz

    2007-09-01

    The crystal structure of calcium chloride rhenate(VII) dihydrate, CaCl(ReO4).2H2O, investigated at 85 K, consists of calcium cations, chloride anions, rhenate(VII) anions and water molecules. In the nearly tetrahedral rhenate(VII) anion, all constituent atoms lie on special positions of m2m (Re) and m (O) site symmetries. The Cl- anion and water O atom lie on special positions of m2m and 2 site symmetries, respectively. The Ca2+ ion, also on a special position (m2m), is eight-coordinated in a distorted square-antiprismatic coordination mode. The crystal has a layered structure stabilized by Ca-O coordination bonds and O-H...Cl hydrogen bonds.

  9. The neurobiology of depression and antidepressant action.

    PubMed

    Willner, Paul; Scheel-Krüger, Jørgen; Belzung, Catherine

    2013-12-01

    We present a comprehensive overview of the neurobiology of unipolar major depression and antidepressant drug action, integrating data from affective neuroscience, neuro- and psychopharmacology, neuroendocrinology, neuroanatomy, and molecular biology. We suggest that the problem of depression comprises three sub-problems: first episodes in people with low vulnerability ('simple' depressions), which are strongly stress-dependent; an increase in vulnerability and autonomy from stress that develops over episodes of depression (kindling); and factors that confer vulnerability to a first episode (a depressive diathesis). We describe key processes in the onset of a 'simple' depression and show that kindling and depressive diatheses reproduce many of the neurobiological features of depression. We also review the neurobiological mechanisms of antidepressant drug action, and show that resistance to antidepressant treatment is associated with genetic and other factors that are largely similar to those implicated in vulnerability to depression. We discuss the implications of these conclusions for the understanding and treatment of depression, and make some strategic recommendations for future research.

  10. The Head Start Debates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zigler, Edward, Ed.; Styfco, Sally J., Ed.

    2004-01-01

    The future of Head Start depends on how well people learn from and apply the lessons from its past. That's why everyone involved in early education needs this timely, forward-thinking book from the leader of Head Start. The first book to capture the Head Start debates in all their complexity and diversity, this landmark volume brings together the…

  11. The Immigration Reform Debate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Som, Sonya Olds; Momblanco, Eileen

    2006-01-01

    This article looks at recent government actions that have contributed to the immigration debate, and then considers a number of the key issues: (1) Should the United States grant some sort of legal process, or "amnesty," to undocumented workers already in the U.S. who wish to seek permanent residency and, perhaps, citizenship?; (2) What is the…

  12. The Class Size Debate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mishel, Lawrence, Ed.; Rothstein, Richard, Ed.

    This collection of papers debates the merits of smaller class sizes and research methods used to evaluate the efficacy of this education reform measure. Four chapters focus on (1) "Understanding the Magnitude and Effect of Class Size on Student Achievement" (Alan B. Krueger), which discusses expenditures per student and economic criterion; (2)…

  13. Vitalism and the Darwin Debate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, James

    2012-01-01

    There are currently both scientific and public debates surrounding Darwinism. In the scientific debate, the details of evolution are in dispute, but not the central thesis of Darwin's theory; in the public debate, Darwinism itself is questioned. I concentrate on the public debate because of its direct impact on education in the United States. Some…

  14. 40 CFR Appendix Vii to Part 600 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false VII Appendix VII to Part 600 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND GREENHOUSE GAS EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Appendix VII to Part 600...

  15. 40 CFR Appendix Vii to Part 600 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false VII Appendix VII to Part 600 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND GREENHOUSE GAS EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Appendix VII to Part 600...

  16. Neurobiological correlates of cognitions in fear and anxiety: a cognitive-neurobiological information-processing model.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Stefan G; Ellard, Kristen K; Siegle, Greg J

    2012-01-01

    We review likely neurobiological substrates of cognitions related to fear and anxiety. Cognitive processes are linked to abnormal early activity reflecting hypervigilance in subcortical networks involving the amygdala, hippocampus, and insular cortex, and later recruitment of cortical regulatory resources, including activation of the anterior cingulate cortex and prefrontal cortex to implement avoidant response strategies. Based on this evidence, we present a cognitive-neurobiological information-processing model of fear and anxiety, linking distinct brain structures to specific stages of information processing of perceived threat.

  17. Causal debates in environmentalism.

    PubMed

    Tesh, S N

    1994-01-01

    Many public health policy analysts celebrate the renewed popularity of environmentalism and its importance for public health. But few recognize that there are three competing versions of environmentalism. Each one assigns blame for environmental degradation and responsibility for addressing it to a different group of people. It is incumbent upon public health professionals to take note of the debate and to consider the ramifications for policy should one of these versions come to predominate. PMID:7983192

  18. Causal debates in environmentalism.

    PubMed

    Tesh, S N

    1994-01-01

    Many public health policy analysts celebrate the renewed popularity of environmentalism and its importance for public health. But few recognize that there are three competing versions of environmentalism. Each one assigns blame for environmental degradation and responsibility for addressing it to a different group of people. It is incumbent upon public health professionals to take note of the debate and to consider the ramifications for policy should one of these versions come to predominate.

  19. Neurobiology of Wisdom?: A Literature Overview

    PubMed Central

    Meeks, Thomas W.; Jeste, Dilip V.

    2013-01-01

    Context Wisdom is a unique psychological trait noted since antiquity, long discussed in humanities disciplines, recently operationalized by psychology and sociology researchers, but largely unexamined in psychiatry or biology. Objective We discuss recent neurobiological studies related to subcomponents of wisdom identified from several published definitions/descriptions of wisdom by clinical investigators in the field – i.e., prosocial attitudes/behaviors, social decision-making/pragmatic knowledge of life, emotional homeostasis, reflection/self-understanding, value relativism/tolerance, and acknowledgement of and dealing effectively with uncertainty. Design Literature overview focusing primarily on neuroimaging/brain localization and secondarily on neurotransmitters, including their genetic determinants. Results Functional neuroimaging permits exploration of neural correlates of complex psychological attributes such as those proposed to comprise wisdom. The prefrontal cortex figures prominently in several wisdom subcomponents (e.g., emotional regulation, decision-making, value relativism), primarily via top-down regulation of limbic and striatal regions. The lateral prefrontal cortex facilitates calculated, reason-based decision-making, whereas the medial prefrontal cortex is implicated in emotional valence and prosocial attitudes/behaviors. Reward neurocircuitry (ventral striatum, nucleus accumbens) also appears important for promoting prosocial attitudes/behaviors. Monoaminergic activity (especially dopaminergic and serotonergic), influenced by several genetic polymorphisms, is critical to certain subcomponents of wisdom such as emotional regulation (including impulse control), decision-making, and prosocial behaviors. Conclusions We have proposed a speculative model of the neurobiology of wisdom involving fronto-striatal and fronto-limbic circuits and monoaminergic pathways. Wisdom may involve optimal balance between functions of phylogenetically more

  20. Neurobiological Basis of Language Learning Difficulties.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Saloni; Watkins, Kate E; Bishop, Dorothy V M

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we highlight why there is a need to examine subcortical learning systems in children with language impairment and dyslexia, rather than focusing solely on cortical areas relevant for language. First, behavioural studies find that children with these neurodevelopmental disorders perform less well than peers on procedural learning tasks that depend on corticostriatal learning circuits. Second, fMRI studies in neurotypical adults implicate corticostriatal and hippocampal systems in language learning. Finally, structural and functional abnormalities are seen in the striatum in children with language disorders. Studying corticostriatal networks in developmental language disorders could offer us insights into their neurobiological basis and elucidate possible modes of compensation for intervention. PMID:27422443

  1. [Neurobiological expression of the placebo effect].

    PubMed

    Grabowski, Jakub; Bidzan, Leszek

    2010-01-01

    Neurobiology of the placebo effect dates back to 1978, when Levine discovered that its analgesic action is reversed by naloxone. Since then, various studies have been performed to estimate the impact of placebo on brain metabolism and neurotransmission in analgesia, depression or the Parkinson's disease. A number of involved brain structures have been pinpointed, these including nucleus accumbens and the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), while the role ofopioid regulation has been established as significant to the process. Currently, modern diagnostic appliances such as PET or fMRI are being used to determine the differences between placebo and drug effect on brain metabolism and, consequently, to identify factors responsible for therapeutic response and their potential correlation with a psychological impact. Environmental conditions, which may result in placebo efficacy increase of seven percent per decade during the last years, are also looked into. Although certain ethical and legal dilemmas appear considering the use of placebo, it is beyond any doubt that realising the influence of expectation and conditioning on the neurobiology of the placebo effect, as well as on the proper therapy, should enable better patient handling and treatment in the future. PMID:20677441

  2. Adolescent neurobiological susceptibility to social context.

    PubMed

    Schriber, Roberta A; Guyer, Amanda E

    2016-06-01

    Adolescence has been characterized as a period of heightened sensitivity to social contexts. However, adolescents vary in how their social contexts affect them. According to neurobiological susceptibility models, endogenous, biological factors confer some individuals, relative to others, with greater susceptibility to environmental influences, whereby more susceptible individuals fare the best or worst of all individuals, depending on the environment encountered (e.g., high vs. low parental warmth). Until recently, research guided by these theoretical frameworks has not incorporated direct measures of brain structure or function to index this sensitivity. Drawing on prevailing models of adolescent neurodevelopment and a growing number of neuroimaging studies on the interrelations among social contexts, the brain, and developmental outcomes, we review research that supports the idea of adolescent neurobiological susceptibility to social context for understanding why and how adolescents differ in development and well-being. We propose that adolescent development is shaped by brain-based individual differences in sensitivity to social contexts - be they positive or negative - such as those created through relationships with parents/caregivers and peers. Ultimately, we recommend that future research measure brain function and structure to operationalize susceptibility factors that moderate the influence of social contexts on developmental outcomes. PMID:26773514

  3. Emotional manifestations of PD: Neurobiological basis.

    PubMed

    Castrioto, Anna; Thobois, Stéphane; Carnicella, Sebastien; Maillet, Audrey; Krack, Paul

    2016-08-01

    Neuropsychiatric symptoms are common and disabling in PD. Their neurobiological bases are complex, partly because of the disease itself and partly because of the dopaminergic treatment. The aim of this review is to focus on the emotional manifestations stemming from the neurodegenerative process itself. We focus on depression, anxiety, apathy, and fatigue, which can all be part of the clinical spectrum of premotor disease and may be improved or masked by medications targeting parkinsonian motor signs or psychiatric symptoms as the disease progresses. Findings from clinical, neuroimaging, and animal studies are reviewed, showing a major contribution of the dopaminergic system to the pathophysiology of these disabling symptoms. Degeneration of noradrenergic and serotonergic projection systems also has an impact on psychiatric symptoms of PD. The available literature is reviewed, but at present there is a lack of studies that would allow disentangling the separate contribution of each of the monoaminergic systems. The use of a pragmatic classification of all these symptoms under the umbrella of hypodopaminergic behavioral syndrome seems clinically useful, as it emphasizes the crucial, although not exclusive, nature of their dopaminergic neurobiological basis, which has important implications in the clinical management of PD. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  4. Neurobiological mechanisms of puberty in higher primates.

    PubMed

    Plant, Tony M; Barker-Gibb, Mandi L

    2004-01-01

    Puberty in humans is comprised of two developmental processes; namely, gonadarche and adrenarche. Of the two, gonadarche is fundamentally the most important, and this review examines the neurobiological mechanisms that first prevent, and later trigger, progression into this critically important phase of human development when the ability to first reproduce is established. The review draws extensively upon results obtained by studies of the rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta), a representative higher primate which, like man, exhibits a postnatal pattern in activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis that is characterized by a prolonged period of relative quiescence from late infancy until the initiation of the pubertal process. The proximate cause of the prepubertal quiescence in this neuroendocrine axis is the arrest or restraint of the pulsatile mode of hypothalamic GnRH release by a neurobiological brake that holds in check release of this decapeptide, without seeming to down-regulate the transcriptional activity of the gene encoding GnRH (GnRH-I). Thus, if neurogenomes control the onset of gonadarche, they must reside upstream from that of the GnRH neuron. The genetic and physiological factors (with a particular emphasis on leptin) that time the application and duration of the prepubertal brake on GnRH release are also considered.

  5. Emotional manifestations of PD: Neurobiological basis.

    PubMed

    Castrioto, Anna; Thobois, Stéphane; Carnicella, Sebastien; Maillet, Audrey; Krack, Paul

    2016-08-01

    Neuropsychiatric symptoms are common and disabling in PD. Their neurobiological bases are complex, partly because of the disease itself and partly because of the dopaminergic treatment. The aim of this review is to focus on the emotional manifestations stemming from the neurodegenerative process itself. We focus on depression, anxiety, apathy, and fatigue, which can all be part of the clinical spectrum of premotor disease and may be improved or masked by medications targeting parkinsonian motor signs or psychiatric symptoms as the disease progresses. Findings from clinical, neuroimaging, and animal studies are reviewed, showing a major contribution of the dopaminergic system to the pathophysiology of these disabling symptoms. Degeneration of noradrenergic and serotonergic projection systems also has an impact on psychiatric symptoms of PD. The available literature is reviewed, but at present there is a lack of studies that would allow disentangling the separate contribution of each of the monoaminergic systems. The use of a pragmatic classification of all these symptoms under the umbrella of hypodopaminergic behavioral syndrome seems clinically useful, as it emphasizes the crucial, although not exclusive, nature of their dopaminergic neurobiological basis, which has important implications in the clinical management of PD. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. PMID:27041545

  6. Bird calls: their potential for behavioral neurobiology.

    PubMed

    Marler, Peter

    2004-06-01

    Birdsongs are always part of larger set of sound signals. Every bird uses a repertoire of calls for communication. Calls are shorter and simpler than songs, with a much larger range of functions. Whereas songs are specialized for application in reproduction and territoriality, calls also serve such functions as signaling about food, maintaining social cohesion, contact calls, synchronizing and coordinating flight, and the resolution of aggressive and sexual conflicts. Alarm calls of various kinds are a major component, including distress, mobbing, and hawk alarm calls. Call repertoires vary greatly in size, up to 20 or so distinct call types. Rough estimates for songbirds range between 5 and 10, but some birds, especially galliforms, may have twice as many. Call usage is often sexually dimorphic and commonly varies seasonally and with physiological state. Most calls appear to be innate, but more and more examples of developmental plasticity in bird calls are emerging. Some display well-defined local dialects. A case is made for the value to avian behavioral neurobiology of including bird calls in studies of the psychophysics and sensory physiology of signal perception. They may also help to extend the range of neurobiological investigations of the song system to include circuitry controlling such functionally related behaviors as aggression and reproduction.

  7. The Neurobiological Profile of Girls with ADHD

    PubMed Central

    Mahone, E. Mark; Wodka, Ericka L.

    2012-01-01

    Since boys are more commonly diagnosed with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) than girls, the majority of theories and published research studies of ADHD have been based on samples comprised primarily (or exclusively) of boys. While psychosocial impairment in girls with ADHD is well established, the neuropsychological and neurobiological basis of these deficits is less consistently observed. There is growing evidence that boys’ and girls’ brains develop and mature at different rates, suggesting that the trajectory of early anomalous brain development in ADHD may also be sex-specific. It remains unclear, however, whether earlier brain maturation observed in girls with ADHD is protective. In this review, we outline the current theory and research findings that seek to establish a unique neurobiological profile of girls with ADHD, highlighting sex differences in typical brain development and among children with ADHD. The review highlights findings from neurological, neurocognitive, and behavioral studies. Future research directions are suggested, including the need for longitudinal neuroimaging and neurobehavioral investigation beginning as early as the preschool years, and continuing through adolescence and adulthood, with consideration of identified sex differences in the development of ADHD. PMID:19072756

  8. The neurobiology of aggression and violence.

    PubMed

    Rosell, Daniel R; Siever, Larry J

    2015-06-01

    Aggression and violence represent a significant public health concern and a clinical challenge for the mental healthcare provider. A great deal has been revealed regarding the neurobiology of violence and aggression, and an integration of this body of knowledge will ultimately serve to advance clinical diagnostics and therapeutic interventions. We will review here the latest findings regarding the neurobiology of aggression and violence. First, we will introduce the construct of aggression, with a focus on issues related to its heterogeneity, as well as the importance of refining the aggression phenotype in order to reduce pathophysiologic variability. Next we will examine the neuroanatomy of aggression and violence, focusing on regional volumes, functional studies, and interregional connectivity. Significant emphasis will be on the amygdala, as well as amygdala-frontal circuitry. Then we will turn our attention to the neurochemistry and molecular genetics of aggression and violence, examining the extensive findings on the serotonergic system, as well as the growing literature on the dopaminergic and vasopressinergic systems. We will also address the contribution of steroid hormones, namely, cortisol and testosterone. Finally, we will summarize these findings with a focus on reconciling inconsistencies and potential clinical implications; and, then we will suggest areas of focus for future directions in the field.

  9. Bird calls: their potential for behavioral neurobiology.

    PubMed

    Marler, Peter

    2004-06-01

    Birdsongs are always part of larger set of sound signals. Every bird uses a repertoire of calls for communication. Calls are shorter and simpler than songs, with a much larger range of functions. Whereas songs are specialized for application in reproduction and territoriality, calls also serve such functions as signaling about food, maintaining social cohesion, contact calls, synchronizing and coordinating flight, and the resolution of aggressive and sexual conflicts. Alarm calls of various kinds are a major component, including distress, mobbing, and hawk alarm calls. Call repertoires vary greatly in size, up to 20 or so distinct call types. Rough estimates for songbirds range between 5 and 10, but some birds, especially galliforms, may have twice as many. Call usage is often sexually dimorphic and commonly varies seasonally and with physiological state. Most calls appear to be innate, but more and more examples of developmental plasticity in bird calls are emerging. Some display well-defined local dialects. A case is made for the value to avian behavioral neurobiology of including bird calls in studies of the psychophysics and sensory physiology of signal perception. They may also help to extend the range of neurobiological investigations of the song system to include circuitry controlling such functionally related behaviors as aggression and reproduction. PMID:15313768

  10. Apolipoprotein E: from lipid transport to neurobiology.

    PubMed

    Hauser, Paul S; Narayanaswami, Vasanthy; Ryan, Robert O

    2011-01-01

    Apolipoprotein (apo) E has a storied history as a lipid transport protein. The integral association between cholesterol homeostasis and lipoprotein clearance from circulation are intimately related to apoE's function as a ligand for cell-surface receptors of the low-density lipoprotein receptor family. The receptor binding properties of apoE are strongly influenced by isoform specific amino acid differences as well as the lipidation state of the protein. As understanding of apoE as a structural component of circulating plasma lipoproteins has evolved, exciting developments in neurobiology have revitalized interest in apoE. The strong and enduring correlation between the apoE4 isoform and age of onset and increased risk of Alzheimer's disease has catapulted apoE to the forefront of neurobiology. Using genetic tools generated for study of apoE lipoprotein metabolism, transgenic "knock-in" and gene-disrupted mice are now favored models for study of its role in a variety of neurodegenerative diseases. Key structural knowledge of apoE and isoform-specific differences is driving research activity designed to elucidate how a single amino acid change can manifest such profoundly significant pathological consequences. This review describes apoE through a lens of structure-based knowledge that leads to hypotheses that attempt to explain the functions of apoE and isoform-specific effects relating to disease mechanism.

  11. Research Review: The Neurobiology and Genetics of Maltreatment and Adversity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCrory, Eamon; De Brito, Stephane A.; Viding, Essi

    2010-01-01

    The neurobiological mechanisms by which childhood maltreatment heightens vulnerability to psychopathology remain poorly understood. It is likely that a complex interaction between environmental experiences (including poor caregiving) and an individual's genetic make-up influence neurobiological development across infancy and childhood, which in…

  12. Neurobiology Research Findings: How the Brain Works during Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kweldju, Siusana

    2015-01-01

    In the past, neurobiology for reading was identical with neuropathology. Today, however, the advancement of modern neuroimaging techniques has contributed to the understanding of the reading processes of normal individuals. Neurobiology findings today have uncovered and illuminated the fundamental neural mechanism of reading. The findings have…

  13. Cannabis for posttraumatic stress disorder: A neurobiological approach to treatment.

    PubMed

    Krumm, Bryan A

    2016-01-16

    The endocannabinoid system is intricately involved in regulation of the neurobiological processes, which underlie the symptomatology of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). This article discusses the neurobiological underpinnings of PTSD and the use of cannabis for treating PTSD in the New Mexico Medical Cannabis Program.

  14. A Neurobiological Basis for SLA and First Language Attrition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Bode, Stella

    The two-part paper examines the neurobiological processes of synapse overproduction, synapse elimination, and issues of language acquisition and attrition. The first part consists of diagrams and notes explaining some basic terms and concepts of neurobiology: cortex; white matter; neuron; synapse; synaptogenesis; and development and organization…

  15. Neurobiological Pathways Linking Socioeconomic Position and Health

    PubMed Central

    Gianaros, Peter J.; Manuck, Stephen B.

    2010-01-01

    Across individuals, risk for poor health varies inversely with socioeconomic position (SEP). The pathways by which SEP affects health have been viewed from many epidemiological perspectives. Central to these perspectives is the notion that socioeconomic health disparities arise from an interplay between nested, recursive, and cumulative environmental, social, familial, psychological, behavioral, and physiological processes that unfold over the life span. Epidemiological perspectives on socioeconomic health disparities, however, have not yet formally integrated emerging findings from neuropharmacological, molecular genetic, and neuroimaging studies demonstrating that indicators of SEP relate to patterns of brain neurotransmission, brain morphology, and brain functionality implicated in the etiology of chronic medical conditions and psychological disorders. Here, we survey these emerging findings and consider how future neurobiological studies in this area can enhance our understanding of the pathways by which different dimensions of SEP become embodied by the brain to influence health throughout life. PMID:20498294

  16. Neurobiology of addiction. An integrative review.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Aviel

    2008-01-01

    Evidence that psychoactive substance use disorders, bulimia nervosa, pathological gambling, and sexual addiction share an underlying biopsychological process is summarized. Definitions are offered for addiction and addictive process, the latter being the proposed designation for the underlying biopsychological process that addictive disorders are hypothesized to share. The addictive process is introduced as an interaction of impairments in three functional systems: motivation-reward, affect regulation, and behavioral inhibition. An integrative review of the literature that addresses the neurobiology of addiction is then presented, organized according to the three functional systems that constitute the addictive process. The review is directed toward identifying candidate neurochemical substrates for the impairments in motivation-reward, affect regulation, and behavioral inhibition that could contribute to an addictive process. PMID:17764663

  17. Neurobiology of Inflammation-Associated Anorexia

    PubMed Central

    Gautron, Laurent; Layé, Sophie

    2009-01-01

    Compelling data demonstrate that inflammation-associated anorexia directly results from the action of pro-inflammatory factors, primarily cytokines and prostaglandins E2, on the nervous system. For instance, the aforementioned pro-inflammatory factors can stimulate the activity of peripheral sensory neurons, and induce their own de novo synthesis and release into the brain parenchyma and cerebrospinal fluid. Ultimately, it results in the mobilization of a specific neural circuit that shuts down appetite. The present article describes the different cell groups and neurotransmitters involved in inflammation-associated anorexia and examines how they interact with neural systems regulating feeding such as the melanocortin system. A better understanding of the neurobiological mechanisms underlying inflammation-associated anorexia will help to develop appetite stimulants for cancer and AIDS patients. PMID:20582290

  18. The neurobiology of autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Parellada, M; Penzol, M J; Pina, L; Moreno, C; González-Vioque, E; Zalsman, G; Arango, C

    2014-01-01

    Data is progressively and robustly accumulating regarding the biological basis of autism. Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are currently considered a group of neurodevelopmental disorders with onset very early in life and a complex, heterogeneous, multifactorial aetiology. A comprehensive search of the last five years of the Medline database was conducted in order to summarize recent evidence on the neurobiological bases of autism. The main findings on genetic influence, neuropathology, neurostructure and brain networks are summarized. In addition, findings from peripheral samples of subjects with autism and animal models, which show immune, oxidative, mitochondrial dysregulations, are reported. Then, other biomarkers from very different systems associated with autism are reported. Finally, an attempt is made to try and integrate the available evidence, which points to a oligogenetic, multifactorial aetiology that converges in an aberrant micro-organization of the cortex, with abnormal functioning of the synapses and abnormalities in very general physiological pathways (such as inflammatory, immune and redox systems).

  19. Neurobiological alterations in alcohol addiction: a review.

    PubMed

    Erdozain, Amaia M; Callado, Luis F

    2014-01-01

    The exact mechanism by which ethanol exerts its effects on the brain is still unknown. However, nowadays it is well known that ethanol interacts with specific neuronal membrane proteins involved in signal transmission, resulting in changes in neural activity. In this review different neurochemical alterations produced by ethanol are described. Primarily, ethanol interacts with two membrane receptors: GABAA and NMDA ion channel receptors. Ethanol enhances the GABA action and antagonizes glutamate action, therefore acting as a CNS depressant. In addition, ethanol affects most other neurochemical and endocrine systems. In regard to the brain reward system, both dopaminergic and opioid system are affected by this drug. Furthermore, the serotonergic, noradrenergic, corticotropin-releasing factor and cannabinoid systems seem to play an important role in the neurobiology of alcoholism. At last but not least, ethanol can also modulate cytoplasmic components, including the second messengers. We also review briefly the different actual and putative pharmacological treatments for alcoholism, based on the alterations produced by this drug.

  20. Neurobiological correlates of borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Schmahl, Christian G; McGlashan, Thomas H; Bremner, J Douglas

    2002-01-01

    Although patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD) are commonly seen in psychiatric practice, there has been far less biological research in BPD than in other psychiatric disorders. This article reviews the neurobiological research that has been performed to date in BPD and integrates the biological, psychological, and clinical findings in this disorder. BPD is best thought of in terms of dimensions rather than as a specific disorder. Each dimension has a biological profile and may be expressed differently in different patients. Four core elements are suggested to play a major role in the development of BPD: interpersonal stress, affective instability, impulsivity, and dissociation and self-injurious behavior. Genetic and environmental factors lead to brain alterations that are the basis for specific presentations of the disorder, such as self-injurious and impulsive aggressive behavior.

  1. Neurobiological Adaptations to Violence across Development

    PubMed Central

    Mead, Hilary K.; Beauchaine, Theodore P.; Shannon, Katherine E.

    2009-01-01

    Adaptation to violent environments across development involves a multitude of cascading effects spanning many levels of analysis from genes to behavior. In this review, we (a) examine the potentiating effects of violence on genetic vulnerabilities and the functioning of neurotransmitter systems in producing both internalizing and externalizing psychopathology, (b) consider the impact of violence on the developing human stress and startle responses, and (c) brain development including the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. This review integrates literature on the developmental effects of violence on rodents, non-human primates, and humans. Many neurobiological changes that are adaptive for survival in violent contexts become maladaptive in other environments, conferring life-long risk for psychopathology. PMID:20102643

  2. Towards a new neurobiology of language

    PubMed Central

    Poeppel, David; Emmorey, Karen; Hickok, Gregory; Pylkkänen, Liina

    2012-01-01

    Theoretical advances in language research and the availability of increasingly high-resolution experimental techniques in the cognitive neurosciences are profoundly changing how we investigate and conceive of the neural basis of speech and language processing. Recent work closely aligns language research with issues at the core of systems neuroscience, ranging from neurophysiological and neuroanatomic characterizations to questions about neural coding. Here we highlight, across different aspects of language processing (perception, production, sign language, meaning construction), new insights and approaches to the neurobiology of language, aiming to describe promising new areas of investigation in which the neurosciences intersect with linguistic research more closely than before. This paper summarizes in brief some of the issues that constitute the background for talks presented in a symposium at the annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience. It is not a comprehensive review of any of the issues that are discussed in the symposium. PMID:23055482

  3. Resilience and vulnerability: a neurobiological perspective

    PubMed Central

    Karatsoreos, Ilia N.

    2013-01-01

    The brain is constantly adapting to a changing environment. It detects environmental stimuli, integrates that information with internal states, and engages appropriate behavioral and physiological responses. This process of stability through change is termed “allostasis”, and serves as a mechanism by which an organism can adapt to a changing environment to function optimally, and ultimately ensure survival. The ability to adapt to stressors in the environment by “bending” but not “breaking” can be considered as “resilience”. Individuals that are more able to withstand such challenges to their stability, and bounce back after, can be considered more resilient than those that do not. This review will explore what resilience means in a neurobiological context, the role of stress and allostasis, and focuses on the role of neurotrophins, particularly BDNF, in mediating adaptive plasticity. PMID:23710327

  4. Developmental neurobiology of childhood stress and trauma.

    PubMed

    Teicher, Martin H; Andersen, Susan L; Polcari, Ann; Anderson, Carl M; Navalta, Carryl P

    2002-06-01

    Severe early stress and maltreatment produces a cascade of events that have the potential to alter brain development. The first stage of the cascade involves the stress-induced programming of the glucocorticoid, noradrenergic, and vasopressin-oxytocin stress response systems to augment stress responses. These neurohumors then produce effects on neurogenesis, synaptic overproduction and pruning, and myelination during specific sensitive periods. Major consequences include reduced size of the mid-portions of the corpus callosum; attenuated development of the left neocortex, hippocampus, and amygdala along with abnormal frontotemporal electrical activity; and reduced functional activity of the cerebellar vermis. These alterations, in turn, provide the neurobiological framework through which early abuse increases the risk of developing post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity, borderline personality disorder, dissociative identity disorder, and substance abuse.

  5. Debating personal health budgets.

    PubMed

    Alakeson, Vidhya; Boardman, Jed; Boland, Billy; Crimlisk, Helen; Harrison, Charlotte; Iliffe, Steve; Khan, Masood; O'Shea, Rory; Patterson, Janet

    2016-02-01

    Personal health budgets (PHBs) were piloted in the National Health Service (NHS) in England between 2009 and 2012 and were found to have greater positive effects on quality of life and psychological well-being for those with mental health problems than commissioned service, as well as reducing their use of unplanned care. The government intends to extend PHBs in England for long-term conditions, including mental health, from April 2015. Given the importance of engaging clinicians in the next phase of PHB development, we provide an overview of the approach, synthesise the evidence from the national pilot and debate some of the opportunities and challenges. Balancing individual choice and recovery with concerns for risk, equity and the sustainability of existing community services is the central tension underpinning this innovation in mental health service delivery. PMID:26958358

  6. Debating personal health budgets

    PubMed Central

    Alakeson, Vidhya; Boardman, Jed; Boland, Billy; Crimlisk, Helen; Harrison, Charlotte; Iliffe, Steve; Khan, Masood; O'Shea, Rory; Patterson, Janet

    2016-01-01

    Personal health budgets (PHBs) were piloted in the National Health Service (NHS) in England between 2009 and 2012 and were found to have greater positive effects on quality of life and psychological well-being for those with mental health problems than commissioned service, as well as reducing their use of unplanned care. The government intends to extend PHBs in England for long-term conditions, including mental health, from April 2015. Given the importance of engaging clinicians in the next phase of PHB development, we provide an overview of the approach, synthesise the evidence from the national pilot and debate some of the opportunities and challenges. Balancing individual choice and recovery with concerns for risk, equity and the sustainability of existing community services is the central tension underpinning this innovation in mental health service delivery. PMID:26958358

  7. Neurobiological changes by cytotoxic agents in mice.

    PubMed

    Seigers, R; Loos, M; Van Tellingen, O; Boogerd, W; Smit, A B; Schagen, S B

    2016-02-15

    Cognitive deficit is a frequently reported side-effect of adjuvant chemotherapy. A large number of animal studies has been performed to examine the neurobiological mechanisms underlying this phenomenon, however, definite conclusions from these studies are restricted due to differences in experimental set-up. We systematically investigated the effects of 6 cytotoxic agents on various neurobiological parameters. C57Bl/6J mice were treated with cyclophosphamide, docetaxel, doxorubicin, 5-fluorouracil, methotrexate, or topotecan. The animals were sacrificed 3 or 15 weeks after treatment and the effect on neurogenesis, blood vessel density, and neuroinflammation was analyzed using immunohistochemistry. None of the cytostatic agents tested affected neurogenesis (cell survival or cell proliferation). Blood vessel density was increased in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex 3 weeks after treatment with docetaxel and doxorubicin compared with control animals. A decrease in the number of microglial cells was observed in the prefrontal cortex after treatment with cyclophosphamide, docetaxel, 5-FU, and topotecan compared with control mice. The observed decrease in microglia cells is indicative of inflammation that occurred after treatment. Overall, the magnitude of the effects was relatively modest. Therefore, we conducted a similar study with topotecan in Abcg2;Abcb1a/b knock out and wildtype FVB mice. Animals were sacrificed 3 weeks after treatment and no notable effect was seen in hippocampal cell differentiation (DCX), microglia activation, or blood vessel density. Perhaps the FVB strain is more resistant to the neurotoxic effects of topotecan which makes this not the correct model to study the mechanism of chemotherapy-induced cognitive impairment. PMID:26602283

  8. ENDF/B-VII.1 versus ENDF/B-VII.0: What's Different?

    SciTech Connect

    Cullen, D E

    2012-03-20

    Recently the new ENDF/B-VII.1 library was released; this completely replaces the earlier ENDF/B-VII.0 library. One of the first questions we ask about a new library is: What's Different? Here I attempt to at least partially answer this question. I present results in both tabulated form (so you can quickly determine if any evaluations of interest to you have changed), and graphic form (so that you can see how much evaluations have changed and in what energy ranges). For the table I have compared what I refer to as the ENDF neutron data, namely MF=1 through 6. Here I did a character-by-character comparison of the same sections (MF/MT) that appear I both ENDF/B-VII.0 and VII.1; here I found differences in 170 evaluations. For the plots I have only compared the total cross sections for all evaluations that are common to both libraries, and I found that of the 423 evaluations in ENDF/B-VII.1, 120 of these have total cross sections that differ by 1% or more from the evaluation of the same isotope in ENDF/B-VII.0. This should be considered only a preliminary comparison; obviously there can be more subtle important differences that do not effect of total cross sections. Here I present plots comparing the total cross section of these 120 isotopes. The plots are only broad overviews of the total cross sections over their entire energy range. If you have interest in more detailed plots for specific evaluations, you can download the evaluations [1,2] and the PREPRO [3] codes I used to prepare and view the data. This is all I needed to do my comparisons, and is all you should need to do any more detailed comparisons to meet your individual needs.

  9. [Bioethics and abortion. Debate].

    PubMed

    Diniz, D; Gonzalez Velez, A C

    1998-06-01

    Although abortion has been the most debated of all issues analyzed in bioethics, no moral consensus has been achieved. The problem of abortion exemplifies the difficulty of establishing social dialogue in the face of distinct moral positions, and of creating an independent academic discussion based on writings that are passionately argumentative. The greatest difficulty posed by the abortion literature is to identify consistent philosophical and scientific arguments amid the rhetorical manipulation. A few illustrative texts were selected to characterize the contemporary debate. The terms used to describe abortion are full of moral meaning and must be analyzed for their underlying assumptions. Of the four main types of abortion, only 'eugenic abortion', as exemplified by the Nazis, does not consider the wishes of the woman or couple--a fundamental difference for most bioethicists. The terms 'selective abortion' and 'therapeutic abortion' are often confused, and selective abortion is often called eugenic abortion by opponents. The terms used to describe abortion practitioners, abortion opponents, and the 'product' are also of interest in determining the style of the article. The video entitled "The Silent Scream" was a classic example of violent and seductive rhetoric. Its type of discourse, freely mixing scientific arguments and moral beliefs, hinders analysis. Within writings about abortion three extreme positions may be identified: heteronomy (the belief that life is a gift that does not belong to one) versus reproductive autonomy; sanctity of life versus tangibility of life; and abortion as a crime versus abortion as morally neutral. Most individuals show an inconsistent array of beliefs, and few groups or individuals identify with the extreme positions. The principal argument of proponents of legalization is respect for the reproductive autonomy of the woman or couple based on the principle of individual liberty, while heteronomy is the main principle of

  10. [Bioethics and abortion. Debate].

    PubMed

    Diniz, D; Gonzalez Velez, A C

    1998-06-01

    Although abortion has been the most debated of all issues analyzed in bioethics, no moral consensus has been achieved. The problem of abortion exemplifies the difficulty of establishing social dialogue in the face of distinct moral positions, and of creating an independent academic discussion based on writings that are passionately argumentative. The greatest difficulty posed by the abortion literature is to identify consistent philosophical and scientific arguments amid the rhetorical manipulation. A few illustrative texts were selected to characterize the contemporary debate. The terms used to describe abortion are full of moral meaning and must be analyzed for their underlying assumptions. Of the four main types of abortion, only 'eugenic abortion', as exemplified by the Nazis, does not consider the wishes of the woman or couple--a fundamental difference for most bioethicists. The terms 'selective abortion' and 'therapeutic abortion' are often confused, and selective abortion is often called eugenic abortion by opponents. The terms used to describe abortion practitioners, abortion opponents, and the 'product' are also of interest in determining the style of the article. The video entitled "The Silent Scream" was a classic example of violent and seductive rhetoric. Its type of discourse, freely mixing scientific arguments and moral beliefs, hinders analysis. Within writings about abortion three extreme positions may be identified: heteronomy (the belief that life is a gift that does not belong to one) versus reproductive autonomy; sanctity of life versus tangibility of life; and abortion as a crime versus abortion as morally neutral. Most individuals show an inconsistent array of beliefs, and few groups or individuals identify with the extreme positions. The principal argument of proponents of legalization is respect for the reproductive autonomy of the woman or couple based on the principle of individual liberty, while heteronomy is the main principle of

  11. The Neurobiological Basis of Adolescent-onset Borderline Personality Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Marianne; Mascitelli, Kathryn; Triebwasser, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Over the past two decades, neurobiological studies in adult onset borderline personality disorder have made important strides, but inquiry into adolescent-onset BPD is still in its infancy and our understanding of the neurobiology of adolescent BPD remains highly tentative. Methods: This paper highlights recent findings in genetics, neuroendocrinology and neuroimaging for adult and adolescent-onset BPD. Results: Neurobiological studies of adolescent-onset BPD to date have focused mainly on volumetric studies of various brain regions and measurements of HPA axis components, with comparatively few publications on brain functioning. Conclusion: Such information is essential to developing more effective screening, treatment and preventive strategies. PMID:23970910

  12. Moving beyond the GM Debate

    PubMed Central

    Leyser, Ottoline

    2014-01-01

    Once again, there are calls to reopen the debate on genetically modified (GM) crops. I find these calls frustrating and unnecessarily decisive. In my opinion the GM debate, on both sides, continues to hamper the urgent need to address the diverse and pressing challenges of global food security and environmental sustainability. The destructive power of the debate comes from its conflation of unrelated issues, coupled with deeply rooted misconceptions of the nature of agriculture. PMID:24914954

  13. Star Wars software debate

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, W.

    1986-02-01

    David L. Parnas, Landsdowne Professor of Computer Science at the University of Victoria resigned from the SDI Organization's Panel on Computing in Support of Battle Management on June 28, 1985. Parnas, with 20 years of research on software engineering plus 8 years of work on military aircraft real-time software, says the software portion of SDI cannot be built error-free and he doesn't expect the next 20 years of research to change that fact. Since Parnas resigned, there have been several public debates on Star Wars software questions. In November 1985 the SDIO panel from which Parnas resigned released a draft of its report, reflecting its effort to critics of the project. While one might think that errors could be entirely eliminated with enough care and checking, most software professionals believe there will always be some residue of errors in a system of this size and complexity. The general line of the critics' argument is that the larger the amount of software in a single, unified system, the higher the percentage of errors it will contain. Proponents counter that the one very large system can be divided into a number of smaller, relatively independent pieces, thus reducing the proportionate number of errors in each separate piece. This approach is in turn countered by those who point to the intricate relations between these pieces, which themselves contribute to error.

  14. Debates in Religious Education. The Debates in Subject Teaching Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, L. Philip, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    What are the key debates in Religious Education teaching today? "Debates in Religious Education" explores the major issues all RE teachers encounter in their daily professional lives. It encourages critical reflection and aims to stimulate both novice and experienced teachers to think more deeply about their practice, and link research and…

  15. Debates in Citizenship Education. The Debates in Subject Teaching Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arthur, James, Ed.; Cremin, Hilary, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    What are the key issues in Citizenship Education today? "Debates in Citizenship Education" encourages student and practising teachers to engage with and reflect on some of the key topics, concepts and debates that they will have to address throughout their career. It places the specialist field of Citizenship Education in a wider context and aims…

  16. Debates in English Teaching. The Debates in Subject Teaching Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davison, Jon, Ed.; Daly, Caroline, Ed.; Moss, John, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    "Debates in English Teaching" explores the major issues all English teachers encounter in their daily professional lives. It engages with established and contemporary debates, promotes and supports critical reflection and aims to stimulate both novice and experienced teachers to reach informed judgements and argue their point of view with deeper…

  17. Botswana: abortion "debate" dynamics.

    PubMed

    Mogwe, A

    1992-01-01

    The Penal Code (Amendment) Bill or the abortion bill has the objective of liberalizing the current law on the regulation of abortion. Abortion had been strictly prohibited and carried stiff penalties. Anyone who attempted to assists a woman to procure an abortion could be liable to 7 years' imprisonment. However, medical abortions were distinguished as being medically determined to save the health of the mother. Demands for a reevaluation of the law came from the medical profession, and in response the Minister for Presidential Affairs submitted a bill to Parliament in November, 1990. The expressed government rationale for these proposed amendments was concern about the health of women. In Botswana about 200 women die yearly because of pregnancy. According to the proposed law: an abortion could be carried out within the first 16 weeks of pregnancy if: 1) the pregnancy were a result of rape, incest, or defilement (the impregnation of a girl aged 16 or less, the impregnation of imbeciles or idiots), 2) the physical or mental health of the woman were at risk because of the pregnancy, 3) the child would be born with a serious physical or mental abnormality. The abortion could be carried out only if 2 medical doctors approved it. The amendments fall far short of increasing women's control over their bodies. The Botswana Christian Council issued a statement early in the public debate. While it did not oppose the bill in its entirety, clear concern was expressed concerning the apparent right of determining who lives and who dies depending on the handicap of the child. This rather liberal position was challenged by the Roman Catholic Church which interpreted abortion as the murder of God-given life. The bill was nevertheless passed by Parliament in September 1991, and the President signed it on October 11, 1991. PMID:12288837

  18. A coherent neurobiological framework for functional neuroimaging provided by a model integrating compartmentalized energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Aubert, Agnès; Pellerin, Luc; Magistretti, Pierre J; Costalat, Robert

    2007-03-01

    Functional neuroimaging has undergone spectacular developments in recent years. Paradoxically, its neurobiological bases have remained elusive, resulting in an intense debate around the cellular mechanisms taking place upon activation that could contribute to the signals measured. Taking advantage of a modeling approach, we propose here a coherent neurobiological framework that not only explains several in vitro and in vivo observations but also provides a physiological basis to interpret imaging signals. First, based on a model of compartmentalized energy metabolism, we show that complex kinetics of NADH changes observed in vitro can be accounted for by distinct metabolic responses in two cell populations reminiscent of neurons and astrocytes. Second, extended application of the model to an in vivo situation allowed us to reproduce the evolution of intraparenchymal oxygen levels upon activation as measured experimentally without substantially altering the initial parameter values. Finally, applying the same model to functional neuroimaging in humans, we were able to determine that the early negative component of the blood oxygenation level-dependent response recorded with functional MRI, known as the initial dip, critically depends on the oxidative response of neurons, whereas the late aspects of the signal correspond to a combination of responses from cell types with two distinct metabolic profiles that could be neurons and astrocytes. In summary, our results, obtained with such a modeling approach, support the concept that both neuronal and glial metabolic responses form essential components of neuroimaging signals. PMID:17360498

  19. An embodied view of octopus neurobiology.

    PubMed

    Hochner, Binyamin

    2012-10-23

    Octopuses have a unique flexible body and unusual morphology, but nevertheless they are undoubtedly a great evolutionary success. They compete successfully with vertebrates in their ecological niche using a rich behavioral repertoire more typical of an intelligent predator which includes extremely effective defensive behavior--fast escape swimming and an astonishing ability to adapt their shape and color to their environment. The most obvious characteristic feature of an octopus is its eight long and flexible arms, but these pose a great challenge for achieving the level of motor and sensory information processing necessary for their behaviors. First, coordinating motion is a formidable task because of the infinite degrees of freedom that have to be controlled; and second, it is hard to use body coordinates in this flexible animal to represent sensory information in a central control system. Here I will review experimental results suggesting that these difficulties, arising from the animal's morphology, have imposed the evolution of unique brain/body/behavior relationships best explained as intelligent behavior which emerges from the octopus's embodied organization. The term 'intelligent embodiment' comes from robotics and refers to an approach to designing autonomous robots in which the behavior emerges from the dynamic physical and sensory interactions of the agent's materials, morphology and environment. Consideration of the unusual neurobiology of the octopus in the light of its unique morphology suggests that similar embodied principles are instrumental for understanding the emergence of intelligent behavior in all biological systems.

  20. Neurobiology and clinical implications of lucid dreaming.

    PubMed

    Mota-Rolim, Sérgio A; Araujo, John F

    2013-11-01

    Several lines of evidence converge to the idea that rapid eye movement sleep (REMS) is a good model to foster our understanding of psychosis. Both REMS and psychosis course with internally generated perceptions and lack of rational judgment, which is attributed to a hyperlimbic activity along with hypofrontality. Interestingly, some individuals can become aware of dreaming during REMS, a particular experience known as lucid dreaming (LD), whose neurobiological basis is still controversial. Since the frontal lobe plays a role in self-consciousness, working memory and attention, here we hypothesize that LD is associated with increased frontal activity during REMS. A possible way to test this hypothesis is to check whether transcranial magnetic or electric stimulation of the frontal region during REMS triggers LD. We further suggest that psychosis and LD are opposite phenomena: LD as a physiological awakening while dreaming due to frontal activity, and psychosis as a pathological intrusion of dream features during wake state due to hypofrontality. We further suggest that LD research may have three main clinical implications. First, LD could be important to the study of consciousness, including its pathologies and other altered states. Second, LD could be used as a therapy for recurrent nightmares, a common symptom of depression and post-traumatic stress disorder. Finally, LD may allow for motor imagery during dreaming with possible improvement of physical rehabilitation. In all, we believe that LD research may clarify multiple aspects of brain functioning in its physiological, altered and pathological states. PMID:23838126

  1. Placebo effects: clinical aspects and neurobiology

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Placebo effects are beneficial health outcomes not related to the relatively direct biological effects of an intervention and can be elicited by an agent that, by itself, is inert. Understanding these placebo effects will help to improve clinical trial design, especially for interventions such as surgery, CNS-active drugs and behavioural interventions which are often non-blinded. A literature review was performed to retrieve articles discussing placebo implications of clinical trials, the neurobiology of placebo effects and the implications of placebo effect for several disorders of neurological relevance. Recent research in placebo analgesia and other conditions has demonstrated that several neurotransmitter systems, such as opiate and dopamine, are involved with the placebo effect. Brain regions including anterior cingulate cortex, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and basal ganglia have been activated following administration of placebo. A patient's expectancy of improvement may influence outcomes as much as some active interventions and this effect may be greater for novel interventions and for procedures. Maximizing this expectancy effect is important for clinicians to optimize the health of their patient. There have been many relatively acute placebo studies that are now being extended into clinically relevant models of placebo effect. PMID:18567924

  2. [Drug resistant epilepsy. Clinical and neurobiological concepts].

    PubMed

    Espinosa-Jovel, Camilo A; Sobrino-Mejía, Fidel E

    2015-08-16

    Drug-resistant epilepsy, is a condition defined by the International League Against Epilepsy as persistent seizures despite having used at least two appropriate and adequate antiepileptic drug treatments. Approximately 20-30% of patients with epilepsy are going to be resistant to antiepileptic drugs, with different patterns of clinical presentation, which are related to the biological basis of this disease (de novo resistance, relapsing-remitting and progressive). Drug resistant epilepsy, impacts negatively the quality of life and significantly increases the risk of premature death. From the neurobiological point of view, this medical condition is the result of the interaction of multiple variables related to the underlying disease, drug interactions and proper genetic aspects of each patient. Thanks to advances in pharmacogenetics and molecular biology research, currently some hypotheses may explain the cause of this condition and promote the study of new therapeutic options. Currently, overexpression of membrane transporters such as P-glycoprotein, appears to be one of the most important mechanisms in the development of drug resistant epilepsy. The objective of this review is to deepen the general aspects of this clinical condition, addressing the definition, epidemiology, differential diagnosis and the pathophysiological bases.

  3. [Dreaming and schizophrenia: a common neurobiological background?].

    PubMed

    Gottesmann, Claude

    2006-02-01

    Normal waking mentation is the outcome of the combined action of both electrophysiological and neurochemical antagonistic and complementary activating and inhibitory influences occurring mainly in the cerebral cortex. The chemical ones are supported principally by acetylcholine, and noradrenaline and serotonin, respectively. During rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, the monoaminergic silence - except dopaminergic ongoing activity - disrupts this equilibrium and seems to be responsible for disturbances of mental activity characteristic of dreaming. This imbalance could cause disconnectivity of cortical areas, failure of latent inhibition and possibly the concomitant prefrontal dorsolateral deactivation. Moreover, the decrease of prefrontal dopaminergic functioning could explain the loss of reflectiveness in this sleep stage. All these phenomena are also encountered in schizophrenia. The psychotic-like mentation of dreaming (hallucinations, delusions, bizarre thought processes) could result from the disinhibition of dopamine influence in the nucleus accumbens by the noradrenergic and serotonergic local silence and/or the lifting of glutamate influence from the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus. We hypothesize that, during REM sleep, the increase of dopamine and the decrease of glutamate release observed in nucleus accumbens reach the threshold values at which psychotic disturbances arise during wakefulness. Whatever the precise mechanism, it seems that the functional state of the prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens is the same during dreaming sleep stage and in schizophrenia. The convergent psychological, electrophysiological, tomographic, pharmacological and neurochemical criteria of REM sleep and schizophrenia suggest that this sleep stage could become a good neurobiological model of this psychiatric disease.

  4. An embodied view of octopus neurobiology.

    PubMed

    Hochner, Binyamin

    2012-10-23

    Octopuses have a unique flexible body and unusual morphology, but nevertheless they are undoubtedly a great evolutionary success. They compete successfully with vertebrates in their ecological niche using a rich behavioral repertoire more typical of an intelligent predator which includes extremely effective defensive behavior--fast escape swimming and an astonishing ability to adapt their shape and color to their environment. The most obvious characteristic feature of an octopus is its eight long and flexible arms, but these pose a great challenge for achieving the level of motor and sensory information processing necessary for their behaviors. First, coordinating motion is a formidable task because of the infinite degrees of freedom that have to be controlled; and second, it is hard to use body coordinates in this flexible animal to represent sensory information in a central control system. Here I will review experimental results suggesting that these difficulties, arising from the animal's morphology, have imposed the evolution of unique brain/body/behavior relationships best explained as intelligent behavior which emerges from the octopus's embodied organization. The term 'intelligent embodiment' comes from robotics and refers to an approach to designing autonomous robots in which the behavior emerges from the dynamic physical and sensory interactions of the agent's materials, morphology and environment. Consideration of the unusual neurobiology of the octopus in the light of its unique morphology suggests that similar embodied principles are instrumental for understanding the emergence of intelligent behavior in all biological systems. PMID:23098601

  5. The neurobiology of methamphetamine induced psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Jennifer H.; Stein, Dan J.; Howells, Fleur M.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic methamphetamine abuse commonly leads to psychosis, with positive and cognitive symptoms that are similar to those of schizophrenia. Methamphetamine induced psychosis (MAP) can persist and diagnoses of MAP often change to a diagnosis of schizophrenia over time. Studies in schizophrenia have found much evidence of cortical GABAergic dysfunction. Methamphetamine psychosis is a well studied model for schizophrenia, however there is little research on the effects of methamphetamine on cortical GABAergic function in the model, and the neurobiology of MAP is unknown. This paper reviews the effects of methamphetamine on dopaminergic pathways, with focus on its ability to increase glutamate release in the cortex. Excess cortical glutamate would likely damage GABAergic interneurons, and evidence of this disturbance as a result of methamphetamine treatment will be discussed. We propose that cortical GABAergic interneurons are particularly vulnerable to glutamate overflow as a result of subcellular location of NMDA receptors on interneurons in the cortex. Damage to cortical GABAergic function would lead to dysregulation of cortical signals, resulting in psychosis, and further support MAP as a model for schizophrenia. PMID:25100979

  6. Inhalant abuse among adolescents: neurobiological considerations.

    PubMed

    Lubman, D I; Yücel, M; Lawrence, A J

    2008-05-01

    Experimentation with volatile substances (inhalants) is common during early adolescence, yet limited work has been conducted examining the neurobiological impact of regular binge use during this key stage of development. Human studies consistently demonstrate that chronic use is associated with significant toxic effects, including neurological and neuropsychological impairment, as well as diffuse and subtle changes in white matter. However, most preclinical research has tended to focus on acute exposure, with limited work examining the neuropharmacological or toxicological mechanisms underpinning these changes or their potential reversibility with abstinence. Nevertheless, there is growing evidence that commonly abused inhalants share common cellular mechanisms, and have similar actions to other drugs of abuse. Indeed, the majority of acute behavioural effects appear to be underpinned by changes in receptor and/or ion channel activity (for example, GABA(A), glycine and 5HT(3) receptor activation, NMDA receptor inhibition), although nonspecific interactions can also arise at high concentrations. Recent studies examining the effects of toluene exposure during the early postnatal period are suggestive of long-term alterations in the function of NMDA and GABA(A) receptors, although limited work has been conducted investigating exposure during adolescence. Given the critical role of neurotransmitter systems in cognitive, emotional and brain development, future studies will need to take account of the substantial neuromaturational changes that are known to occur in the brain during childhood and adolescence, and to specifically investigate the neuropharmacological and toxicological profile of inhalant exposure during this period of development. PMID:18332858

  7. Neurobiology and clinical implications of lucid dreaming.

    PubMed

    Mota-Rolim, Sérgio A; Araujo, John F

    2013-11-01

    Several lines of evidence converge to the idea that rapid eye movement sleep (REMS) is a good model to foster our understanding of psychosis. Both REMS and psychosis course with internally generated perceptions and lack of rational judgment, which is attributed to a hyperlimbic activity along with hypofrontality. Interestingly, some individuals can become aware of dreaming during REMS, a particular experience known as lucid dreaming (LD), whose neurobiological basis is still controversial. Since the frontal lobe plays a role in self-consciousness, working memory and attention, here we hypothesize that LD is associated with increased frontal activity during REMS. A possible way to test this hypothesis is to check whether transcranial magnetic or electric stimulation of the frontal region during REMS triggers LD. We further suggest that psychosis and LD are opposite phenomena: LD as a physiological awakening while dreaming due to frontal activity, and psychosis as a pathological intrusion of dream features during wake state due to hypofrontality. We further suggest that LD research may have three main clinical implications. First, LD could be important to the study of consciousness, including its pathologies and other altered states. Second, LD could be used as a therapy for recurrent nightmares, a common symptom of depression and post-traumatic stress disorder. Finally, LD may allow for motor imagery during dreaming with possible improvement of physical rehabilitation. In all, we believe that LD research may clarify multiple aspects of brain functioning in its physiological, altered and pathological states.

  8. Neurobiological evidence for voicing underspecification in English.

    PubMed

    Hestvik, Arild; Durvasula, Karthik

    2016-01-01

    In long-term memory, the phoneme units that make up words are coded for the distinctive features and feature values that are necessary to distinguish between words in the mental lexicon. Underspecification theory says that the phonemes that have unmarked feature values are even more abstract in that the feature is omitted from the representation altogether. This makes phoneme representations in words more sparse than the fully specified phonetic representations of the same words. Eulitz and Lahiri (2004) demonstrated that this theory predicts certain asymmetries in the Mismatch Negativity (MMN) response to phoneme contrasts. We expand on this research by demonstrating underspecification-driven asymmetry in the brain response to laryngeal feature contrasts in English (i.e. what makes /d/ and /t/ different). We add a new test by showing that the asymmetry disappears if the MMN paradigm is modified to encourage the formation of phonetic memory traces instead of phonemic memory traces. This result adds further neurobiological evidence that long-term phonological representations are more sparsely represented than phonetic representations. PMID:26705957

  9. The neurobiology of dysautonomia in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Natale, Gianfranco; Biagioni, Francesca; Vivacqua, Giorgio; D'Este, Loredana; Fumagalli, Lorenzo; Fornai, Francesco

    2013-12-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases (NDs) include a large variety of disorders that affects specific areas of the centralnervous system, leading to psychiatric and movement pathologies. A common feature that characterizes thesedisorders is the neuronal formation and accumulation of misfolded protein aggregates that lead to cell death. Inparticular, different proteinaceous aggregates accumulate to trigger a variety of clinical manifestations: prionprotein (PrPSc) in prion diseases, β-amyloid (Aβ) in Alzheimer's disease (AD), α-synuclein in Parkinson's disease(PD), huntingtin in Huntington's disease (HD), superoxide dismutase and TDP-43 in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis(ALS), tau in tauopathies. Non-motor alterations also occur in several viscera, in particular the gastrointestinaltract. These often precede the onset of motor symptoms by several years. For this reason, dysautonomic changescan be predictive of NDs and their correct recognition is being assuming a remarkable importance. This peculiarfeature led more and more to the concept that neurodegeneration may initiate in the periphery and propagate retrogradelytowards the central nervous system in a prion-like manner. In recent years, a particular attention wasdedicated to the clinical assessment of autonomic disorders in patients affected by NDs. In this respect, experimentalanimal models have been developed to understand the neurobiology underlying these effects as well as toinvestigate autonomic changes in peripheral organs. This review summarizes experimental studies that have beencarried out to understand autonomic symptoms in NDs, with the purpose to provide appropriate tools for comprehensiveand integrated studies. PMID:24873928

  10. Neurobiological alterations in alcohol addiction: a review.

    PubMed

    Erdozain, Amaia M; Callado, Luis F

    2014-01-01

    The exact mechanism by which ethanol exerts its effects on the brain is still unknown. However, nowadays it is well known that ethanol interacts with specific neuronal membrane proteins involved in signal transmission, resulting in changes in neural activity. In this review different neurochemical alterations produced by ethanol are described. Primarily, ethanol interacts with two membrane receptors: GABAA and NMDA ion channel receptors. Ethanol enhances the GABA action and antagonizes glutamate action, therefore acting as a CNS depressant. In addition, ethanol affects most other neurochemical and endocrine systems. In regard to the brain reward system, both dopaminergic and opioid system are affected by this drug. Furthermore, the serotonergic, noradrenergic, corticotropin-releasing factor and cannabinoid systems seem to play an important role in the neurobiology of alcoholism. At last but not least, ethanol can also modulate cytoplasmic components, including the second messengers. We also review briefly the different actual and putative pharmacological treatments for alcoholism, based on the alterations produced by this drug. PMID:25578004

  11. Conversion disorder: towards a neurobiological understanding

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Samuel B; Stanton, Biba R; David, Anthony S

    2006-01-01

    Conversion disorders are a common cause of neurological disability, but the diagnosis remains controversial and the mechanism by which psychological stress can result in physical symptoms “unconsciously” is poorly understood. This review summarises research examining conversion disorder from a neurobiological perspective. Early observations suggesting a role for hemispheric specialization have not been replicated consistently. Patients with sensory conversion symptoms have normal evoked responses in primary and secondary somatosensory cortex but a reduction in the P300 potential, which is thought to reflect a lack of conscious processing of sensory stimuli. The emergence of functional imaging has provided the greatest opportunity for understanding the neural basis of conversion symptoms. Studies have been limited by small patient numbers and failure to control for confounding variables. The evidence available would suggest a broad hypothesis that frontal cortical and limbic activation associated with emotional stress may act via inhibitory basal ganglia–thalamocortical circuits to produce a deficit of conscious sensory or motor processing. The conceptual difficulties that have limited progress in this area are discussed. A better neuropsychiatric understanding of the mechanisms of conversion symptoms may improve our understanding of normal attention and volition and reduce the controversy surrounding this diagnosis. PMID:19412442

  12. Neurobiology of knowledge and misperception of lyrics.

    PubMed

    Beck Lidén, Claudia; Krüger, Oliver; Schwarz, Lena; Erb, Michael; Kardatzki, Bernd; Scheffler, Klaus; Ethofer, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    We conducted two functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiments to investigate the neural underpinnings of knowledge and misperception of lyrics. In fMRI experiment 1, a linear relationship between familiarity with lyrics and activation was found in left-hemispheric speech-related as well as bilateral striatal areas which is in line with previous research on generation of lyrics. In fMRI experiment 2, we employed so called Mondegreens and Soramimi to induce misperceptions of lyrics revealing a bilateral network including middle temporal and inferior frontal areas as well as anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and mediodorsal thalamus. ACC activation also correlated with the extent to which misperceptions were judged as amusing corroborating previous neuroimaging results on the role of this area in mediating the pleasant experience of chills during music perception. Finally, we examined the areas engaged during misperception of lyrics using diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) to determine their structural connectivity. These combined fMRI/DWI results could serve as a neurobiological model for future studies on other types of misunderstanding which are events with potentially strong impact on our social life. PMID:27085504

  13. Neurobiological linkage between stress and sleep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanford, Larry D.; Wellman, Laurie L.

    2012-10-01

    Stress can have a significant negative impact on health and stress-induced alterations in sleep are implicated in both human sleep disorders and in psychiatric disorders in which sleep is affected. We have demonstrated that the amygdala, a region critical for regulating emotion, is a key modulator of sleep. Our current research is focused on understanding how the amygdala and stressful emotion affect sleep and on the role sleep plays in recovery from stress. We have implemented animal models to examine the how stress and stress-related memories impact sleep. Experiencing uncontrollable stress and reminders of uncontrollable stress can produce significant reductions in sleep, in particular rapid eye movement sleep. We are using these models to explore the neurobiology linking stress-related emotion and sleep. This research is relevant for sleep disorders such as insomnia and into mental disorders in which sleep is affected such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), which is typically characterized by a prominent sleep disturbance in the aftermath of exposure to a psychologically traumatic event.

  14. Etiopathogenesis and neurobiology of narcolepsy: a review.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Swarup; Sagili, Haritha

    2014-02-01

    Narcolepsy is a chronic lifelong sleep disorder and it often leaves a debilitating effect on the quality of life of the sufferer. This disorder is characterized by a tetrad of excessive daytime sleepiness, cataplexy (brief loss of muscle tone following strong emotion), hypnogogic hallucinations and sleep paralysis. There are two distinct subgroups of Narcolepsy: Narcolepsy with cataplexy and Narcolepsy without cataplexy. For over 100 years, clinicians have recognised narcolepsy, but only in the last few decades have scientists been able to shed light on the true cause and pathogenesis of narcolepsy. Recent studies have shown that a loss of the hypothalamic neuropeptide Hypocretin/Orexincauses Narcolepsy with cataplexy and that an autoimmune mechanism may be responsible for this loss. Our understanding of the neurophysiologic aspect of narcolepsy has also significantly improved. The basic neural mechanisms behind sleepiness and cataplexy, the two defining symptoms of narcolepsy have started to become clearer. In this review, we have provided a detailed account of the key aspects of etiopathogenesis and neurobiology of narcolepsy, along with a critical appraisal of the more recent and interesting causal associations.We have also looked at the contributions of neuroimaging to the etiopathogenesis of Narcolepsy. PMID:24701532

  15. [Collective violence: neurobiological, psychosocial and sociological condition].

    PubMed

    Möller-Leimkühler, A M; Bogerts, B

    2013-11-01

    Collective violence, despite its often disastrous consequences has widely been disregarded by psychiatry, as was the case for individual violence. Physical violence is not only an individual, mostly male phenomenon but manifests mainly as collective violence among men in multiple forms. Due to the plentitude of theories and findings on collective violence the present article is limited to a few relevant sociological and neurobiological aspects of collective violence as a group and intergroup phenomenon. A special focus is given to the association of the phylogenetic disposition to group violence and constructions of masculinity, to the potential relevance of mirror neurons for social contagion and to the influence of sociostructural factors for male adolescents joining violence-prone groups. In this context group dynamics such as in-group overevaluation and out-group devaluation are of central importance by stabilizing the male sense of self-worth and legitimizing, normalizing and internalizing violent behavior. Instead of mythologizing, biologizing or banalizing violence, transdisciplinary approaches are necessary to improve violence prevention on different ecological levels being obligated to a culture of nonviolent conflict management.

  16. [Drug resistant epilepsy. Clinical and neurobiological concepts].

    PubMed

    Espinosa-Jovel, Camilo A; Sobrino-Mejía, Fidel E

    2015-08-16

    Drug-resistant epilepsy, is a condition defined by the International League Against Epilepsy as persistent seizures despite having used at least two appropriate and adequate antiepileptic drug treatments. Approximately 20-30% of patients with epilepsy are going to be resistant to antiepileptic drugs, with different patterns of clinical presentation, which are related to the biological basis of this disease (de novo resistance, relapsing-remitting and progressive). Drug resistant epilepsy, impacts negatively the quality of life and significantly increases the risk of premature death. From the neurobiological point of view, this medical condition is the result of the interaction of multiple variables related to the underlying disease, drug interactions and proper genetic aspects of each patient. Thanks to advances in pharmacogenetics and molecular biology research, currently some hypotheses may explain the cause of this condition and promote the study of new therapeutic options. Currently, overexpression of membrane transporters such as P-glycoprotein, appears to be one of the most important mechanisms in the development of drug resistant epilepsy. The objective of this review is to deepen the general aspects of this clinical condition, addressing the definition, epidemiology, differential diagnosis and the pathophysiological bases. PMID:26204087

  17. Curriculum Debate and Policy Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elgstrom, Ole; Hellstenius, Mats

    2011-01-01

    This article investigates the underlying themes and principles that inform curriculum debate and how they are articulated in current school policy discussions. This topic is approached with the help of a case study covering the debate on which subjects should be mandatory for students at the upper secondary school curriculum in Sweden. The focus…

  18. Student Pressure Subject of Debate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gewertz, Catherine

    2006-01-01

    This article discusses student pressure as a subject of debate. The latest debate about schoolwork is being fueled by three recent books: "The Homework Myth" by Alfie Kohn, "The Case Against Homework" by Sara Bennett and Nancy Kalish, and "The Overachievers", by Alexandra Robbins, which depicts overextended high school students in a wealthy…

  19. Clash! The World of Debate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Azzam, Amy M.

    2008-01-01

    Debating has been around for a long time, with some pretty spectacular results. Look at Socrates, who was put to death in 399 BCE for corrupting the youth of Athens; his accusers could not forgive him for incessantly questioning their beliefs and making "the worse appear the better cause." More recently, debating has morphed into a sport for the…

  20. The Japanese Domestic Labor Debate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ueno, Chizuko

    The changing role of Japanese women can be seen in the stages of a domestic labor debate which occurred at three different times in the past 30 years. The first debate began with Ayako Ishigaki's (1955) insistence that women should have a job outside the home. Wartime production helped break down traditional divisions of labor by encouraging women…

  1. Recent Neurobiological Insights into the Concept of Insight in Psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Mythri, Starlin Vijay; Sanjay, Y

    2016-01-01

    The concept of insight in psychosis has been an interesting area in clinical psychiatry for well over a century with a surge in research interest over the past 25 years. Moreover, the past 5 years have been particularly fruitful in deciphering its neurobiological underpinnings. This article presents the development of the concept of insight in psychosis and reviews the current neurobiological research findings in this area. PMID:27335512

  2. 32 CFR 2003.7 - Support Staff (Article VII).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Support Staff (Article VII). 2003.7 Section 2003.7 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense INFORMATION SECURITY OVERSIGHT... (ISCAP) BYLAWS, RULES, AND APPEAL PROCEDURES Bylaws § 2003.7 Support Staff (Article VII). The staff...

  3. 32 CFR 2003.7 - Support Staff (Article VII).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Support Staff (Article VII). 2003.7 Section 2003.7 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense INFORMATION SECURITY OVERSIGHT... (ISCAP) BYLAWS, RULES, AND APPEAL PROCEDURES Bylaws § 2003.7 Support Staff (Article VII). The staff...

  4. 40 CFR Appendixes I-Vii to Part 85 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false I Appendixes I-VII to Part 85 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF AIR POLLUTION FROM MOBILE SOURCES Appendixes I-VII to Part 85...

  5. 40 CFR Appendixes I-Vii to Part 85 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false I Appendixes I-VII to Part 85 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF AIR POLLUTION FROM MOBILE SOURCES Appendixes I-VII to Part 85...

  6. 40 CFR Appendixes I-Vii to Part 85 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false I Appendixes I-VII to Part 85 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF AIR POLLUTION FROM MOBILE SOURCES Appendixes I-VII to Part 85...

  7. 40 CFR Appendixes I-Vii to Part 85 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false I Appendixes I-VII to Part 85 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF AIR POLLUTION FROM MOBILE SOURCES Appendixes I-VII to Part 85...

  8. 40 CFR Appendixes I-Vii to Part 85 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false I Appendixes I-VII to Part 85 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF AIR POLLUTION FROM MOBILE SOURCES Appendixes I-VII to Part 85...

  9. Title VII and Public Employers: Did Congress Exceed Its Powers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dean, John P.

    1979-01-01

    The impact of federal legislation aimed at discriminatory practices of state and local governments as mandated by the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Equal Employment Opportunity Act of 1972 is examined. Several Title VII violations are outlined; it is concluded that federal authority can be upheld under Title VII and the Fourteenth Amendment.…

  10. 40 CFR Appendixes Vi-Vii to Part 600 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false VI Appendixes VI-VII to Part 600 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND CARBON-RELATED EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Appendixes VI-VII to Part 600...

  11. 40 CFR Appendixes Vi-Vii to Part 600 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false VI Appendixes VI-VII to Part 600 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND CARBON-RELATED EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Appendixes VI-VII to Part 600...

  12. 77 FR 64400 - Order of Succession for HUD Region VII

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-19

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Order of Succession for HUD Region VII AGENCY: Office of Field Policy and Management, HUD. ACTION: Notice of Order of Succession. SUMMARY: In this notice, the Assistant Deputy Secretary... Succession for the Kansas City Regional Office and its Field Offices (Region VII). This Order of...

  13. Localization of the Gene for Distal Hereditary Motor Neuronopathy VII (dHMN-VII) to Chromosome 2q14

    PubMed Central

    McEntagart, Meriel; Norton, Nadine; Williams, Hywel; Teare, M. Dawn; Dunstan, Melanie; Baker, Philip; Houlden, Henry; Reilly, Mary; Wood, Nick; Harper, Peter S.; Futreal, P. Andrew; Williams, Nigel; Rahman, Nazneen

    2001-01-01

    Distal hereditary motor neuronopathy type VII (dHMN-VII) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by distal muscular atrophy and vocal cord paralysis. We performed a genomewide linkage search in a large Welsh pedigree with dHMN-VII and established linkage to chromosome 2q14. Analyses of a second family with dHMN-VII confirmed the location of the gene and provided evidence for a founder mutation segregating in both pedigrees. The maximum three-point LOD score in the combined pedigree was 7.49 at D2S274. Expansion of a polyalanine tract in Engrailed-1, a transcription factor strongly expressed in the spinal cord, was excluded as the cause of dHMN-VII. PMID:11294660

  14. Translation from neurobiological data to music parameters.

    PubMed

    Minciacchi, Diego

    2003-11-01

    Composers have explored different ways to use biological information for the realization of music. Throughout the decades, biological findings have been repeatedly indicated as a source of inspiration or a reservoir of extramusical material for musical composition. More radical and fertile are attempts to produce music systematically using biological data in processes called data sonification or biofeedback techniques. Presented here is a novel strategy of translation where populations of neurobiological data are converted into relational structures from which sound objects are generated by flexible and homogeneous control of the sound parameters. All brain data originate from experiments performed with standard anatomical and physiological techniques, and results of studies based on these experimental materials have already been published. During the translation processes, the information for every sound parameter (such as pitch, duration, envelope, and dynamics) is never derived from fixed transcriptions of data properties. Rather, the space and/or the time interrelations of data populations are used to obtain indexes for sound construction. In this way, equivalent sets of information are exploited to model, or sculpt, the different parameters of sound objects. Three examples from the last decade's personal productions are given. The first refers to the microformal aspects of sound aggregation and is based on data from a microstimulation experiment in the motor cortex. The second describes the earliest translation process developed for live performance with conventional instruments and is based on experiments using a conventional tract tracing technique to compare selected spinal-projecting cell populations in two differently organized brains. The third outlines a recent music production for three pianos based on data from experiments using the multiple fluorescent tract-tracing technique to simultaneously label different populations of thalamocortical neurons

  15. Quantum neurophysics: From non-living matter to quantum neurobiology and psychopathology.

    PubMed

    Tarlacı, Sultan; Pregnolato, Massimo

    2016-05-01

    The concepts of quantum brain, quantum mind and quantum consciousness have been increasingly gaining currency in recent years, both in scientific papers and in the popular press. In fact, the concept of the quantum brain is a general framework. Included in it are basically four main sub-headings. These are often incorrectly used interchangeably. The first of these and the one which started the quantum mind/consciousness debate was the place of consciousness in the problem of measurement in quantum mechanics. Debate on the problem of quantum measurement and about the place of the conscious observer has lasted almost a century. One solution to this problem is that the participation of a conscious observer in the experiment will radically change our understanding of the universe and our relationship with the outside world. The second topic is that of quantum biology. This topic has become a popular field of research, especially in the last decade. It concerns whether or not the rules of quantum physics operate in biological structures. It has been shown in the latest research on photosynthesis, the sense of smell and magnetic direction finding in animals that the laws of quantum physics may operate in warm-wet-noisy biological structures. The third sub-heading is quantum neurobiology. This topic has not yet gained wide acceptance and is still in its early stages. Its primary purpose is directed to understand whether the laws of quantum physics are effective in the biology of the nervous system or not. A further step in brain neurobiology, toward the understanding of consciousness formation, is the research of quantum laws effects upon neural network functions. The fourth and final topic is quantum psychopathology. This topic takes its basis and its support from quantum neurobiology. It comes from the idea that if quantum physics is involved in the normal working of the brain, diseased conditions of the brain such as depression, anxiety, dementia, schizophrenia and

  16. Quantum neurophysics: From non-living matter to quantum neurobiology and psychopathology.

    PubMed

    Tarlacı, Sultan; Pregnolato, Massimo

    2016-05-01

    The concepts of quantum brain, quantum mind and quantum consciousness have been increasingly gaining currency in recent years, both in scientific papers and in the popular press. In fact, the concept of the quantum brain is a general framework. Included in it are basically four main sub-headings. These are often incorrectly used interchangeably. The first of these and the one which started the quantum mind/consciousness debate was the place of consciousness in the problem of measurement in quantum mechanics. Debate on the problem of quantum measurement and about the place of the conscious observer has lasted almost a century. One solution to this problem is that the participation of a conscious observer in the experiment will radically change our understanding of the universe and our relationship with the outside world. The second topic is that of quantum biology. This topic has become a popular field of research, especially in the last decade. It concerns whether or not the rules of quantum physics operate in biological structures. It has been shown in the latest research on photosynthesis, the sense of smell and magnetic direction finding in animals that the laws of quantum physics may operate in warm-wet-noisy biological structures. The third sub-heading is quantum neurobiology. This topic has not yet gained wide acceptance and is still in its early stages. Its primary purpose is directed to understand whether the laws of quantum physics are effective in the biology of the nervous system or not. A further step in brain neurobiology, toward the understanding of consciousness formation, is the research of quantum laws effects upon neural network functions. The fourth and final topic is quantum psychopathology. This topic takes its basis and its support from quantum neurobiology. It comes from the idea that if quantum physics is involved in the normal working of the brain, diseased conditions of the brain such as depression, anxiety, dementia, schizophrenia and

  17. Cloning: revisiting an old debate.

    PubMed

    Verhey, Allen D

    1994-09-01

    The debate about cloning that took place 25 years ago, although directed toward a different sort of cloning, elucidates fundamental issues currently at stake in reproductive technologies and research. Paul Ramsey and Joseph Fletcher were participants in this early debate. The differences between Ramsey and Fletcher about the meaning and sufficiency of freedom, the understanding and weighing of good and evil, the connection between embodiment and personhood, the relationship of humans with nature, and the meaning of parenthood suggest both a broader agenda for the debate about cloning and a cautious move forward in the development of embryo-splitting.

  18. Exploring the compassion deficit debate.

    PubMed

    Stenhouse, Rosie; Ion, Robin; Roxburgh, Michelle; Devitt, Patric Ffrench; Smith, Stephen D M

    2016-04-01

    Several recent high profile failures in the UK health care system have promoted strong debate on compassion and care in nursing. A number of papers articulating a range of positions within this debate have been published in this journal over the past two and a half years. These articulate a diverse range of theoretical perspectives and have been drawn together here in an attempt to bring some coherence to the debate and provide an overview of the key arguments and positions taken by those involved. In doing this we invite the reader to consider their own position in relation to the issues raised and to consider the impact of this for their own practice. Finally the paper offers some sense of how individual practitioners might use their understanding of the debates to ensure delivery of good nursing care.

  19. Special Feature: Debate the Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanton, Lloyd H.; Russell, Earl B.

    1981-01-01

    This debate focuses on the location of federal-level administration of vocational agriculture and agribusiness: Should the program be administered by the U.S. Department of Agriculture or by the U.S. Department of Education? (CT)

  20. Comparison of ENDF/B-VII.1 and ENDF/B-VII.0 Results for the Expanded Criticality Validation Suite for MCNP and for Selected Additional Criticality Benchmarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosteller, R.

    2014-04-01

    Results obtained with the MCNP5 Monte Carlo code and the ENDF/B-VII.1 and ENDF/B-VII.0 nuclear data libraries have been compared for the 119 benchmarks in the expanded criticality validation suite for MCNP and for 23 additional benchmarks. ENDF/B-VII.1 was found to produce improvements relative to ENDF/B-VII.0 for benchmarks that contain significant amounts of tungsten, zirconium, cadmium, or beryllium, although the results for the benchmarks with beryllium suggest that further improvement still may be needed. In addition, a number of deficiencies previously identified for ENDF/B-VII.0 still remain in ENDF/B-VII.1.

  1. Bleuler and the Neurobiology of Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Heckers, Stephan

    2011-01-01

    Schizophrenia remains a major challenge for psychiatry. One hundred years after the publication of Eugen Bleuler’s monograph, we are still debating the nosology and mechanisms of schizophrenia. We have stalled in the development of more effective treatments, after success with the introduction of antipsychotic medication. Cure and prevention remain in the distance. This article reviews the importance of Bleuler’s monograph for the neuroscientific exploration of schizophrenia. While Bleuler assumed that schizophrenia has a neural basis, he remained agnostic on possible mechanisms and skeptical about the value of pathological diagnosis. He preferred psychological understanding over neural explanation. He gave hope by making schizophrenia dimensional and less predictive of course and outcome. To make progress now, we need to redefine schizophrenia at the level of the brain. PMID:21873614

  2. Lyme disease: neurology, neurobiology, and behavior.

    PubMed

    Halperin, John J

    2014-05-01

    The Lyme disease controversy can be largely linked to the misconception that neurobehavioral effects of illness constitute evidence of nervous system infection. Appropriate differentiation between neuroborreliosis (nervous system Borrelia burgdorferi infection) and Lyme encephalopathy (altered nervous system function in individuals with systemic but not nervous system infection)-or encephalopathies of other etiologies-would lessen the controversy considerably, as the attribution of nonspecific symptoms to supposed ongoing central nervous system infection is a major factor perpetuating the debate. Epidemiologic considerations suggest that the entities referred to as "posttreatment Lyme disease" and "chronic Lyme disease" may not actually exist but rather reflect anchoring bias, linking common, nonspecific symptoms to an antecedent medical event. On the other hand, there are data suggesting possible mechanisms by which posttreatment Lyme disease could occur.

  3. 15 CFR Appendix Vii to Subpart P... - Areas To Be Avoided Boundary Coordinates

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Areas To Be Avoided Boundary Coordinates VII Appendix VII to Subpart P of Part 922 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to... National Marine Sanctuary Pt. 922, Subpt. P, App. VII Appendix VII to Subpart P of Part 922—Areas To...

  4. 15 CFR Appendix Vii to Subpart P... - Areas To Be Avoided Boundary Coordinates

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Areas To Be Avoided Boundary Coordinates VII Appendix VII to Subpart P of Part 922 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to... National Marine Sanctuary Pt. 922, Subpt. P, App. VII Appendix VII to Subpart P of Part 922—Areas To...

  5. 15 CFR Appendix Vii to Subpart P... - Areas To Be Avoided Boundary Coordinates

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Areas To Be Avoided Boundary Coordinates VII Appendix VII to Subpart P of Part 922 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to... National Marine Sanctuary Pt. 922, Subpt. P, App. VII Appendix VII to Subpart P of Part 922—Areas To...

  6. 15 CFR Appendix Vii to Subpart P... - Areas To Be Avoided Boundary Coordinates

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Areas To Be Avoided Boundary Coordinates VII Appendix VII to Subpart P of Part 922 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to... National Marine Sanctuary Pt. 922, Subpt. P, App. VII Appendix VII to Subpart P of Part 922—Areas To...

  7. A review of the neurobiological effects of psychotherapy for depression.

    PubMed

    Sharpley, Christopher F

    2010-12-01

    Although randomized, controlled clinical trials have shown that different forms of psychotherapy may be efficacious for depression, psychotherapy has not been widely reported to have effects upon the neurobiological concomitants of depression in similar ways as medication. Neuroendocrinal changes that occur during depression (principally hypercortisolaemia) produce structural and functional alterations to the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, and amygdala, plus the connectivity between these regions of the brain. This article reviews the evidence to date regarding the neurobiological effects of psychotherapy for depression and suggests a hypothetical pathway linking the nurturing effects of the therapist-patient "bond" and restoration of neuroendocrinal "balance." This pathway may provide a neurobiological causal link between psychotherapy and alleviation of depression in the same way as that which exists for pharmacological treatments, and argues for a model of depression that includes both biological and psychological effects of psychotherapy when considering treatment choice and application.

  8. Reading development and impairment: behavioral, social, and neurobiological factors.

    PubMed

    Noble, Kimberly G; McCandliss, Bruce D

    2005-10-01

    What are the cognitive and neurobiological building blocks necessary for children to acquire literacy, a skill that is crucial for academic and life achievement? In this review we discuss the behavioral and neurobiological evidence concerning the bases of reading development and impairment. The means by which reading achievement may be influenced by the background and experiences that a child brings to the classroom are discussed. Finally, we review a series of experimental studies that have examined the cognitive and neurobiological response prior to and following reading intervention in struggling readers. The importance of appropriate control groups is stressed, as well as the ultimate goal of designing reading interventions that target individual needs. PMID:16222178

  9. Quantum and Multidimensional Explanations in a Neurobiological Context of Mind.

    PubMed

    Korf, Jakob

    2015-08-01

    This article examines the possible relevance of physical-mathematical multidimensional or quantum concepts aiming at understanding the (human) mind in a neurobiological context. Some typical features of the quantum and multidimensional concepts are briefly introduced, including entanglement, superposition, holonomic, and quantum field theories. Next, we consider neurobiological principles, such as the brain and its emerging (physical) mind, evolutionary and ontological origins, entropy, syntropy/neg-entropy, causation, and brain energy metabolism. In many biological processes, including biochemical conversions, protein folding, and sensory perception, the ubiquitous involvement of quantum mechanisms is well recognized. Quantum and multidimensional approaches might be expected to help describe and model both brain and mental processes, but an understanding of their direct involvement in mental activity, that is, without mediation by molecular processes, remains elusive. More work has to be done to bridge the gap between current neurobiological and physical-mathematical concepts with their associated quantum-mind theories.

  10. [ELISA method for the determination of factor VII antigen].

    PubMed

    Jorquera, J I; Aznar, J A; Monteagudo, J; Montoro, J M; Casaña, P; Pascual, I; Bañuls, E; Curats, R; Llopis, F

    1989-12-01

    The low plasma concentration of clotting factor VII makes it difficult to assay its antigenic fraction by the conventional methods of precipitation with specific antigens. Simple and peroxidase-conjugated antisera are currently available from commercial sources, thus allowing one to determine F VII:Ag by enzyme immunoassay. An ELISA method has been developed in this laboratory which provides sensitivity limits about 0.1% of the plasma concentration of F VII and correlates significantly with its functional activity (r = 0.603, n = 44, p less than 0.001). This technique can be highly helpful in characterising molecular variants of F VII, as well as in detecting acquired deficiencies of this factor.

  11. Settling Title VII Disputes: A Role for the Arbitrator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owens, Stephen D.

    1976-01-01

    Selected arbitration cases illustrate the dilemma facing the arbitrator when employment practices that violate both the collective bargaining agreement and Title VII must be resolved. Problems in dealing with race and sex discrimination are discussed. (LBH)

  12. Neurobiology of anorexia and bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Kaye, Walter

    2008-04-22

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN) are related disorders of unknown etiology that most commonly begin during adolescence in women. AN and BN have unique and puzzling symptoms, such as restricted eating or binge-purge behaviors, body image distortions, denial of emaciation, and resistance to treatment. These are often chronic and relapsing disorders, and AN has the highest death rate of any psychiatric disorder. The lack of understanding of the pathogenesis of this illness has hindered the development of effective interventions, particularly for AN. Individuals with AN and BN are consistently characterized by perfectionism, obsessive-compulsiveness, and dysphoric mood. Individuals with AN tend to have high constraint, constriction of affect and emotional expressiveness, ahendonia and asceticism, whereas individuals with BN tend to be more impulsive and sensation seeking. Such symptoms often begin in childhood, before the onset of an eating disorder, and persist after recovery, suggesting they are traits that create a vulnerability for developing an ED. There is growing acknowledgement that neurobiological vulnerabilities make a substantial contribution to the pathogenesis of AN and BN. Considerable evidence suggests that altered brain serotonin (5-HT) function contributes to dysregulation of appetite, mood, and impulse control in AN and BN. Brain imaging studies, using 5-HT specific ligands, show that disturbances of 5-HT function occur when people are ill, and persist after recovery from AN and BN. It is possible that a trait-related disturbance of 5-HT neuronal modulation predates the onset of AN and contributes to premorbid symptoms of anxiety, obsessionality, and inhibition. This dysphoric temperament may involve an inherent dysregulation of emotional and reward pathways which also mediate the hedonic aspects of feeding, thus making these individuals vulnerable to disturbed appetitive behaviors. Restricting food intake may become powerfully

  13. Inhibition of fucosyltransferase VII by gallic acid and its derivatives.

    PubMed

    Niu, Xiaoda; Fan, Xuedong; Sun, Jing; Ting, Pauline; Narula, Satwant; Lundell, Daniel

    2004-05-01

    Gallic acid (GA) and several gallate derivatives were identified as inhibitors of fucosyltransferase VII (FucT VII). The inhibition by GA and (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) is time-dependent and irreversible. GA and EGCG showed inhibition with IC(50) of 60 and 700 nM, respectively, after pre-incubation with FucT VII in the presence of MnCl(2). Absence of MnCl(2) results in significantly weaker inhibition. Complexation of Mn(2+) with GA, EGCG, and gallate esters was observed. Such complexation, however, is not rate-limiting for the inhibition of FucT VII. Therefore, time-dependent inhibition of fucosyltransferases by GA and EGCG is likely due to the slow inactivation by the inhibitors or Mn-inhibitor complex. Although Mg(2+) or Ca(2+) can replace Mn(2+) for FucT VII activation, none forms a complex with GA or EGCG and hence results in weaker inhibition of FucT VII. GA and EGCG also inhibit FucT IV and alpha2,3-(N)-sialyltransferase in the low micromolar range. The structure-function divergence could be observed, as EGCG, but not GA or gallate esters, inhibits Zn(2+) containing metalloproteases such as TNFalpha convertase, matrix metalloproteases 2 and 7.

  14. Validation and Testing of ENDF/B-VII Decay Data

    SciTech Connect

    Gauld, I.C. Pigni, M.T.; Ilas, G.

    2014-06-15

    The nuclear decay library developed for the ORIGEN code was upgraded from ENDF/B-VI.8 to -VII.0 and released in the SCALE nuclear modeling and simulation code system in 2011. Experience with the ENDF/B-VII.0 library identified serious errors and performance issues in the evaluated decay sublibrary. Initially, errors were identified in the decay scheme for the {sup 238}U series, leading to large discrepancies in the gamma emission rate for uranium. Further testing of the fission product decay data revealed significant performance issues with ENDF/B-VII.0 relative to the previous release of ENDF/B-VI. To address the performance issues, the decay data library in SCALE was upgraded to ENDF/B-VII.1 and released as an update for users in 2013. This paper describes the practical impact of the ENDF/B-VII.0 decay data performance issues on common code applications, and the validation and testing performed on the updated ORIGEN libraries developed from the ENDF/B-VII.1 sublibrary.

  15. Validation and Testing of ENDF/B-VII Decay Data

    SciTech Connect

    Gauld, Ian C; Pigni, Marco T; Ilas, Germina

    2014-01-01

    The nuclear decay library developed for the ORIGEN code was upgraded from ENDF/B-VI.8 to -VII.0 and released in the SCALE nuclear modeling and simulation code system in 2011. Experience with the ENDF/B-VII.0 library identified serious errors and performance issues in the evaluated decay sublibrary. Initially, errors were identified in the decay scheme for the 238U series, leading to large discrepancies in the gamma emission rate for uranium. Further testing of the fission product decay data revealed significant performance issues with ENDF/B-VII.0 relative to the previous release of ENDF/B-VI. To address the performance issues, the decay data library in SCALE was upgraded to ENDF/B-VII.1 and released as an update for users in 2013. This paper describes the practical impact of the ENDF/B-VII.0 decay data performance issues on common code applications, and the validation and testing performed on the updated ORIGEN libraries developed from the ENDF/B-VII.1 sublibrary.

  16. Debates in History Teaching. The Debates in Subject Teaching Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Ian, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    "Debates in History Teaching" explores the major issues all history teachers encounter in their daily professional lives. It encourages critical reflection and aims to stimulate both novice and experienced teachers to think more deeply about their practice, and link research and evidence to what they have observed in schools. Written by a range of…

  17. Debating the Socialist Calculation Debate: A Classroom Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zygmont, Zenon X.

    2006-01-01

    The author describes a classroom exercise that introduces the Socialist Calculation Debate (SCD) to undergraduate economics students. The SCD concerns an issue that remains one of the most consequential of the 20th century--the belief in the superiority of socialism and central planning over capitalism and the free market. The exercise presents…

  18. Debates in Music Teaching. The Debates in Subject Teaching Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philpott, Chris, Ed.; Spruce, Gary, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    "Debates in Music Teaching" encourages student and practising teachers to engage with contemporary issues and developments in music education. It aims to introduce a critical approach to the central concepts and practices that have influenced major interventions and initiatives in music teaching, and supports the development of new ways of looking…

  19. Debate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Current Issues in Language & Society, 2000

    2000-01-01

    Presents a roundtable discussion carried out by scholars in the field of minority language broadcasting. Examines the context of minority language broadcasting, broadcasting and language policy and planning, and issues of language survival and success. (Author/VWL)

  20. Matching the Neurobiology of Learning to Teaching Principles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moffett, Nelle; Fleisher, Steven C.

    2013-01-01

    The authors describe principles of good teaching drawn from meta-analyses of research on teaching effectiveness. Recent developments in neurobiology are presented and aligned to provide biological support for these principles. To make it easier for college faculty to try out sample instructional strategies, the authors map principles of good…

  1. A neurobiological nonalternative: rejoinder to Lewis, Baumeister, and Mailman.

    PubMed

    Newsom, C; Lovaas, O I

    1987-01-01

    Certain misrepresentations of our theory of self-stimulatory behavior by Lewis, Baumeister, and Mailman (1987) are corrected and several questions raised by the commentators are answered. Their proposed neurobiological alternative is considered briefly and judged to be insufficiently detailed, inadequate in scope, and therefore premature.

  2. Neurobiological Underpinnings of Math and Reading Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashkenazi, Sarit; Black, Jessica M.; Abrams, Daniel A.; Hoeft, Fumiko; Menon, Vinod

    2013-01-01

    The primary goal of this review is to highlight current research and theories describing the neurobiological basis of math (MD), reading (RD), and comorbid math and reading disability (MD+RD). We first describe the unique brain and cognitive processes involved in acquisition of math and reading skills, emphasizing similarities and differences in…

  3. Neurobiology of chronic mild stress: Parallels to major depression

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Matthew N.; Hellemans, Kim G.C.; Verma, Pamela; Gorzalka, Boris B.; Weinberg, Joanne

    2016-01-01

    The chronic mild (or unpredictable/variable) stress (CMS) model was developed as an animal model of depression more than 20 years ago. The foundation of this model was that following long-term exposure to a series of mild, but unpredictable stressors, animals would develop a state of impaired reward salience that was akin to the anhedonia observed in major depressive disorder. In the time since its inception, this model has also been used for a variety of studies examining neurobiological variables that are associated with depression, despite the fact that this model has never been critically examined to validate that the neurobiological changes induced by CMS are parallel to those documented in depressive disorder. The aim of the current review is to summarize the current state of knowledge regarding the effects of chronic mild stress on neurobiological variables, such as neurochemistry, neurochemical receptor expression and functionality, neurotrophin expression and cellular plasticity. These findings are then compared to those of clinical research examining common variables in populations with depressive disorders to determine if the changes observed following chronic mild stress are in fact consistent with those observed in major depression. We conclude that the chronic mild stress paradigm: (1) evokes an array of neurobiological changes that mirror those seen in depressive disorders and (2) may be a suitable tool to investigate novel systems that could be disturbed in depression, and thus aid in the development of novel targets for the treatment of depression. PMID:22776763

  4. What Artificial Grammar Learning Reveals about the Neurobiology of Syntax

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petersson, Karl-Magnus; Folia, Vasiliki; Hagoort, Peter

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we examine the neurobiological correlates of syntax, the processing of structured sequences, by comparing FMRI results on artificial and natural language syntax. We discuss these and similar findings in the context of formal language and computability theory. We used a simple right-linear unification grammar in an implicit artificial…

  5. Sex Influences on the Neurobiology of Learning and Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andreano, Joseph M.; Cahill, Larry

    2009-01-01

    In essentially every domain of neuroscience, the generally implicit assumption that few, if any, meaningful differences exist between male and female brain function is being challenged. Here we address how this development is influencing studies of the neurobiology of learning and memory. While it has been commonly held that males show an…

  6. The Neurobiology and Neuropsychology of Adult Learning Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bigler, Erin D.

    1992-01-01

    The area of adult learning disabilities is reviewed from a neurobiological and neuropsychological perspective. The paper covers possible pathophysiologic bases in dyslexia, neurobehavioral disorders that may coexist with learning disorders, neuropsychological assessment methods, treatment in the context of brain plasticity and recovery of…

  7. Early Adverse Experiences and the Neurobiology of Facial Emotion Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moulson, Margaret C.; Fox, Nathan A.; Zeanah, Charles H.; Nelson, Charles A.

    2009-01-01

    To examine the neurobiological consequences of early institutionalization, the authors recorded event-related potentials (ERPs) from 3 groups of Romanian children--currently institutionalized, previously institutionalized but randomly assigned to foster care, and family-reared children--in response to pictures of happy, angry, fearful, and sad…

  8. Neurobiological correlates of illness progression in the recurrent affective disorders.

    PubMed

    Post, Robert M; Fleming, Jaclyn; Kapczinski, Flavio

    2012-05-01

    Some clinical aspects of affective illness progression, such as episode-, stress-, and substance-induced sensitization, have been well documented in the literature, but others have received less attention. These include cognitive deficits, treatment-refractoriness, and neurobiological correlates of illness progression, which are the primary focus of this paper. We review the evidence that cognitive dysfunction, treatment resistance, medical comorbidities, and neurobiological abnormalities increase as a function of the number of prior episodes or duration of illness in the recurrent unipolar and bipolar disorders. Substantial evidence supports the view that cognitive dysfunction and vulnerability to a diagnosis of dementia in old age increases as a function of number of prior mood episodes as does non-response to many therapeutic interventions as well as naturalistic treatment. Neurobiological abnormalities that correlate with the number of mood episodes or duration of illness include: anatomical, functional, and biochemical deficits in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus, as well as amygdala hyperactivity and cortisol hyper-secretion. Some neurotrophic factors and inflammatory markers may also change with greater illness burden. Causality cannot be inferred from these correlative relationships. Nonetheless, given the potentially grave consequences of episode recurrence and progression for morbidity and treatment non-responsiveness, it is clinically wise to assume episodes are causing some of the progressive cognitive and neurobiological abnormalities. As such, earlier and more sustained long-term prophylaxis to attempt to reduce these adverse outcomes is indicated.

  9. "Parent Unions" Join Policy Debates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavanagh, Sean

    2012-01-01

    Whether they're organizing events, buttonholing legislators, or simply trading ideas and information, a growing number of "parent unions" are attempting to stake out a place in policy debates over education in states and districts, amid a crowded field of actors and advocates. As the term implies, some of these organizations see themselves as…

  10. The Great Neurolinguistics Methodology Debate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Obler, L. K.

    A major debate exists in the neuropsychology community concerning whether case study is preferable to group study of brain-damaged patients. So far, the discussion has been limited to the advantages and disadvantages of both methods, with the assumption that neurolinguists pursue a single goal attainable by one or the other method. Practical…

  11. Bicentennial Youth Debates: Issue Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huseman, Richard C., Ed.; Luck, James I., Ed.

    This document includes introductory essays, excerpted documents, and selected bibliographies to promote a national dialogue concerning America for its Bicentennial. Bicentennial Youth Debates (BYD) is a national program developed by the Speech Communication Association and supported by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities. The…

  12. Clean Water Act amendments debated

    SciTech Connect

    Deland, M.R.

    1982-08-01

    A short discussion of the debate taking place between Congress, industry and environmental groups with respect to the amendments to the Clean Water Act is presented. The discussion considers the EPA proposal, the reaction to it, and the prognosis for passage. (KRM)

  13. Using Debate in EFL Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alasmari, Ali; Ahmed, Sayed Salahuddin

    2013-01-01

    The countries that use English as a foreign language need effective activities which propel students to practice skills of the language properly inside as well as outside classrooms. Debating is a practice that inspires learners to open their mouth, get into discussion, defend their own positions, place counter arguments and also conduct research…

  14. Cooling Signs in Wake Debate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samuels, Christina A.

    2011-01-01

    More than a year after dismantling a student-assignment policy based on socioeconomic diversity and setting off a wave of reaction that drew national attention, the Wake County, North Carolina, school board took a step that may turn down the temperature of the intense debate. The board, which has been deeply split on an assignment plan for the…

  15. A debate on open inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawking, S. W.

    1999-07-01

    This is a reproduction of Professor Stephen Hawking's part in a debate, which took place at the COSMO 98 Coference, in Monterey, California. Two other physicists, Andrei Linde and Alexander Villenkin, also took part. Professor Hawking is the Lucasian Professor of Mathematics at the University of Cambridge, in England.

  16. Students in Action: Debating the "Mighty Opposites."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Insights on Law & Society, 2000

    2000-01-01

    Focuses on the hate speech, gun, and privacy debates that today's youth will have to address in their future. Includes articles addressing the arguments in each issue: (1) "Debating Hate Speech" (Frank Kopecky); (2) "Debating the Gun Issue" (Denise Barr); and (3) "Debating the Right to Privacy" (Pinky Wassenberg.) (CMK)

  17. Intimate Debate Technique: Medicinal Use of Marijuana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herreid, Clyde Freeman; DeRei, Kristie

    2007-01-01

    Classroom debates used to be familiar exercises to students schooled in past generations. In this article, the authors describe the technique called "intimate debate". To cooperative learning specialists, the technique is known as "structured debate" or "constructive debate". It is a powerful method for dealing with case topics that involve…

  18. Benchmarking ENDF/B-VII.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Marck, Steven C.

    2006-12-01

    The new major release VII.0 of the ENDF/B nuclear data library has been tested extensively using benchmark calculations. These were based upon MCNP-4C3 continuous-energy Monte Carlo neutronics simulations, together with nuclear data processed using the code NJOY. Three types of benchmarks were used, viz., criticality safety benchmarks, (fusion) shielding benchmarks, and reference systems for which the effective delayed neutron fraction is reported. For criticality safety, more than 700 benchmarks from the International Handbook of Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments were used. Benchmarks from all categories were used, ranging from low-enriched uranium, compound fuel, thermal spectrum ones (LEU-COMP-THERM), to mixed uranium-plutonium, metallic fuel, fast spectrum ones (MIX-MET-FAST). For fusion shielding many benchmarks were based on IAEA specifications for the Oktavian experiments (for Al, Co, Cr, Cu, LiF, Mn, Mo, Si, Ti, W, Zr), Fusion Neutronics Source in Japan (for Be, C, N, O, Fe, Pb), and Pulsed Sphere experiments at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (for 6Li, 7Li, Be, C, N, O, Mg, Al, Ti, Fe, Pb, D 2O, H 2O, concrete, polyethylene and teflon). For testing delayed neutron data more than thirty measurements in widely varying systems were used. Among these were measurements in the Tank Critical Assembly (TCA in Japan) and IPEN/MB-01 (Brazil), both with a thermal spectrum, and two cores in Masurca (France) and three cores in the Fast Critical Assembly (FCA, Japan), all with fast spectra. In criticality safety, many benchmarks were chosen from the category with a thermal spectrum, low-enriched uranium, compound fuel (LEU-COMP-THERM), because this is typical of most current-day reactors, and because these benchmarks were previously underpredicted by as much as 0.5% by most nuclear data libraries (such as ENDF/B-VI.8, JEFF-3.0). The calculated results presented here show that this underprediction is no longer there for ENDF/B-VII.0. The average over 257

  19. Clinical course of sly syndrome (mucopolysaccharidosis type VII)

    PubMed Central

    Montaño, Adriana M; Lock-Hock, Ngu; Steiner, Robert D; Graham, Brett H; Szlago, Marina; Greenstein, Robert; Pineda, Mercedes; Gonzalez-Meneses, Antonio; Çoker, Mahmut; Bartholomew, Dennis; Sands, Mark S; Wang, Raymond; Giugliani, Roberto; Macaya, Alfons; Pastores, Gregory; Ketko, Anastasia K; Ezgü, Fatih; Tanaka, Akemi; Arash, Laila; Beck, Michael; Falk, Rena E; Bhattacharya, Kaustuv; Franco, José; White, Klane K; Mitchell, Grant A; Cimbalistiene, Loreta; Holtz, Max; Sly, William S

    2016-01-01

    Background Mucopolysaccharidosis VII (MPS VII) is an ultra-rare disease characterised by the deficiency of β-glucuronidase (GUS). Patients’ phenotypes vary from severe forms with hydrops fetalis, skeletal dysplasia and mental retardation to milder forms with fewer manifestations and mild skeletal abnormalities. Accurate assessments on the frequency and clinical characteristics of the disease have been scarce. The aim of this study was to collect such data. Methods We have conducted a survey of physicians to document the medical history of patients with MPS VII. The survey included anonymous information on patient demographics, family history, mode of diagnosis, age of onset, signs and symptoms, severity, management, clinical features and natural progression of the disease. Results We collected information on 56 patients from 11 countries. Patients with MPS VII were classified based on their phenotype into three different groups: (1) neonatal non-immune hydrops fetalis (NIHF) (n=10), (2) Infantile or adolescent form with history of hydrops fetalis (n=13) and (3) Infantile or adolescent form without known hydrops fetalis (n=33). Thirteen patients with MPS VII who had the infantile form with history of hydrops fetalis and survived childhood, had a wide range of clinical manifestations from mild to severe. Five patients underwent bone marrow transplantation and one patient underwent enzyme replacement therapy with recombinant human GUS. Conclusions MPS VII is a pan-ethnic inherited lysosomal storage disease with considerable phenotypical heterogeneity. Most patients have short stature, skeletal dysplasia, hepatosplenomegaly, hernias, cardiac involvement, pulmonary insufficiency and cognitive impairment. In these respects it resembles MPS I and MPS II. In MPS VII, however, one unique and distinguishing clinical feature is the unexpectedly high proportion of patients (41%) that had a history of NIHF. Presence of NIHF does not, by itself, predict the eventual severity

  20. Pathogenesis of mitral valve disease in mucopolysaccharidosis VII dogs.

    PubMed

    Bigg, Paul W; Baldo, Guilherme; Sleeper, Meg M; O'Donnell, Patricia A; Bai, Hanqing; Rokkam, Venkata R P; Liu, Yuli; Wu, Susan; Giugliani, Roberto; Casal, Margret L; Haskins, Mark E; Ponder, Katherine P

    2013-11-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis VII (MPS VII) is due to the deficient activity of β-glucuronidase (GUSB) and results in the accumulation of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in lysosomes and multisystemic disease with cardiovascular manifestations. The goal here was to determine the pathogenesis of mitral valve (MV) disease in MPS VII dogs. Untreated MPS VII dogs had a marked reduction in the histochemical signal for structurally-intact collagen in the MV at 6 months of age, when mitral regurgitation had developed. Electron microscopy demonstrated that collagen fibrils were of normal diameter, but failed to align into large parallel arrays. mRNA analysis demonstrated a modest reduction in the expression of genes that encode collagen or collagen-associated proteins such as the proteoglycan decorin which helps collagen fibrils assemble, and a marked increase for genes that encode proteases such as cathepsins. Indeed, enzyme activity for cathepsin B (CtsB) was 19-fold normal. MPS VII dogs that received neonatal intravenous injection of a gamma retroviral vector had an improved signal for structurally-intact collagen, and reduced CtsB activity relative to that seen in untreated MPS VII dogs. We conclude that MR in untreated MPS VII dogs was likely due to abnormalities in MV collagen structure. This could be due to upregulation of enzymes that degrade collagen or collagen-associated proteins, to the accumulation of GAGs that compete with proteoglycans such as decorin for binding to collagen, or to other causes. Further delineation of the etiology of abnormal collagen structure may lead to treatments that improve biomechanical properties of the MV and other tissues.

  1. Neurobiological Correlates in Forensic Assessment: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    van der Gronde, Toon; Kempes, Maaike; van El, Carla; Rinne, Thomas; Pieters, Toine

    2014-01-01

    Background With the increased knowledge of biological risk factors, interest in including this information in forensic assessments is growing. Currently, forensic assessments are predominantly focused on psychosocial factors. A better understanding of the neurobiology of violent criminal behaviour and biological risk factors could improve forensic assessments. Objective To provide an overview of the current evidence about biological risk factors that predispose people to antisocial and violent behaviour, and determine its usefulness in forensic assessment. Methods A systematic literature search was conducted using articles from PsycINFO, Embase and Pubmed published between 2000 and 2013. Results This review shows that much research on the relationship between genetic predisposition and neurobiological alterations with aggression is performed on psychiatric patients or normal populations. However, the number of studies comparing offenders is limited. There is still a great need to understand how genetic and neurobiological alterations and/or deficits are related to violent behaviour, specifically criminality. Most studies focus on only one of the genetic or neurobiological fields related to antisocial and/or violent behaviour. To reliably correlate the findings of these fields, a standardization of methodology is urgently needed. Conclusion Findings from the current review suggest that violent aggression, like all forms of human behaviour, both develops under specific genetic and environmental conditions, and requires interplay between these conditions. Violence should be considered as the end product of a chain of life events, during which risks accumulate and potentially reinforce each other, displaying or triggering a specific situation. This systematic review did not find evidence of predispositions or neurobiological alterations that solely explain antisocial or violent behaviour. With better designed studies, more correlation between diverse fields, and more

  2. Newly diagnosed congenital factor VII deficiency and utilization of recombinant activated factor VII (NovoSeven®)

    PubMed Central

    Bartosh, Nicole S; Tomlin, Tara; Cable, Christian; Halka, Kathleen

    2013-01-01

    This case report presents a newly diagnosed congenital factor VII deficiency treated with recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa). Congenital factor VII deficiency is a rare autosomal-recessive bleeding disorder that occurs in fewer than 1/500,000 persons. Its presentation can vary from epistaxis to hemarthroses and severe central nervous system bleeding, and correlates poorly with factor VII levels. Our patient had not had a significant hemostatic challenge prior to his presentation and therefore never had any symptomatology suggestive of this disease. He was treated with rFVIIa, and was able to undergo repair of his fractures without bleeding. Case report A 19-year-old African-American male presented to the emergency room after an altercation that resulted in significant trauma. He sustained bilateral mandibular angle fractures and orbital floor fractures, requiring urgent surgical correction. On initial evaluation, he was noted to have a prolonged prothrombin time of 40.1 seconds, with an International Normalized Ratio of 4.0, a normal activated partial thromboplastin time of 29.9 seconds, and a platelet count of 241. After receiving vitamin K and fresh frozen plasma, he was taken to the operating room for a temporary rigid maxillomandibular fixation. A 1:1 mixing study with normal plasma corrected the prothrombin time (decreasing from 40.7 to 14.7 seconds) and a factor VII assay revealed 5% of the normal factor VII level. The patient was diagnosed with congenital factor VII deficiency. Due to his coagulopathy and the extensive surgical correction needed, rFVIIa was administered and surgery was accomplished without hemorrhagic sequelae. Conclusion This case report and review describes a rare congenital disease, the history of rFVIIa use, and its mechanism. rFVIIA use in our patient provided a treatment option that allowed the necessary surgical correction, but further prospective studies on dose optimization would ensure adequate dosing with minimal risk of

  3. Vitalism and the Darwin Debate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, James

    2012-08-01

    There are currently both scientific and public debates surrounding Darwinism. In the scientific debate, the details of evolution are in dispute, but not the central thesis of Darwin's theory; in the public debate, Darwinism itself is questioned. I concentrate on the public debate because of its direct impact on education in the United States. Some critics of Darwin advocate the teaching of intelligent design theory along with Darwin's theory, and others seek to eliminate even the mention of evolution from science classes altogether. Many of these critics base their objections on the claim that non-living matter cannot give rise to living matter. After considering some of the various meanings assigned to `vitalism' over the years, I argue that a considerable portion of Darwin deniers support a literal version of vitalism that is not scientifically respectable. Their position seems to be that since life cannot arise naturally, Darwin's theory accomplishes nothing: If it can only account for life forms changing from one to another (even this is disputed by some) but not how life arose in the first place, what's the point? I argue that there is every reason to believe that living and non-living matter differ only in degree, not in kind, and that all conversation about Darwinism should start with the assumption that abiogenesis is possible unless or until compelling evidence of its impossibility is presented. That is, I advocate a position that the burden of proof lies with those who claim "Life only comes from life." Until that case is made, little weight should be given to their position.

  4. VII International Congress of Engineering Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-01-01

    In the frame of the fortieth anniversary celebration of the Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana and the Physics Engineering career, the Division of Basic Science and Engineering and its Departments organized the "VII International Congress of Physics Engineering". The Congress was held from 24 to 28 November 2014 in Mexico City, Mexico. This congress is the first of its type in Latin America, and because of its international character, it gathers experts on physics engineering from Mexico and all over the globe. Since 1999, this event has shown research, articles, projects, technological developments and vanguard scientists. These activities aim to spread, promote, and share the knowledge of Physics Engineering. The topics of the Congress were: • Renewable energies engineering • Materials technology • Nanotechnology • Medical physics • Educational physics engineering • Nuclear engineering • High precision instrumentation • Atmospheric physics • Optical engineering • Physics history • Acoustics This event integrates lectures on top trending topics with pre-congress workshops, which are given by recognized scientists with an outstanding academic record. The lectures and workshops allow the exchange of experiences, and create and strengthen research networks. The Congress also encourages professional mobility among all universities and research centres from all countries. CIIF2014 Organizing and Editorial Committee Dr. Ernesto Rodrigo Vázquez Cerón Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana - Azcapotzalco ervc@correo.azc.uam.mx Dr. Luis Enrique Noreña Franco Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana - Azcapotzalco lnf@correo.azc.uam.mx Dr. Alberto Rubio Ponce Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana - Azcapotzalco arp@correo.azc.uam.mx Dr. Óscar Olvera Neria Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana - Azcapotzalco oon@correo.azc.uam.mx Professor Jaime Granados Samaniego Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana - Azcapotzalco jgs@correo.azc.uam.mx Dr. Roberto Tito Hern

  5. Is Brain Banking of Psychiatric Cases Valuable for Neurobiological Research?

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, Andrea; Parlapani, Eleni; Bauer, Manfred; Heinsen, Helmut; Falkai, Peter

    2008-01-01

    It is widely accepted that neurobiological abnormalities underlie the symptoms of psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and unipolar or bipolar affective disorders. New molecular methods, computer-assisted quantification techniques and neurobiological investigation methods that can be applied to the human brain are all used in post-mortem investigations of psychiatric disorders. The following article describes modern quantitative methods and recent post-mortem findings in schizophrenia and affective disorders. Using our brain bank as an example, necessary considerations of modern brain banking are addressed such as ethical considerations, clinical work-up, preparation techniques and the organization of a brain bank, the value of modern brain banking for investigations of psychiatric disorders is summarized. PMID:18438581

  6. Body Dysmorphic Disorder: Neurobiological Features and an Updated Model

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Arienzo, Donatello; Feusner, Jamie D.

    2013-01-01

    Body Dysmorphic Disorder (BDD) affects approximately 2% of the population and involves misperceived defects of appearance along with obsessive preoccupation and compulsive behaviors. There is evidence of neurobiological abnormalities associated with symptoms in BDD, although research to date is still limited. This review covers the latest neuropsychological, genetic, neurochemical, psychophysical, and neuroimaging studies and synthesizes these findings into an updated (yet still preliminary) neurobiological model of the pathophysiology of BDD. We propose a model in which visual perceptual abnormalities, along with frontostriatal and limbic system dysfunction, may combine to contribute to the symptoms of impaired insight and obsessive thoughts and compulsive behaviors expressed in BDD. Further research is necessary to gain a greater understanding of the etiological formation of BDD symptoms and their evolution over time. PMID:25419211

  7. Molecular Neurobiology and Promising New Treatment in Depression

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Sang Won; Kim, Yong-Ku

    2016-01-01

    The limited effects of currently available antidepressants are becoming an urgent issue in depression research. It takes a long time to determine treatment effects, and the overall remission rate is low. Although we expect the development of non-monoamine antidepressants in the near future, efforts in this regard over the past several decades have not yet been compensated. Thus, researchers and clinicians should clarify the neurobiological mechanisms of integrated modulators that regulate changes in genes, cells, the brain, and behaviors associated with depression. In this study, we review molecular neurobiological theories and new treatments for depression. Beyond neuroanatomy and monoamine theory, we discuss cells and molecules, neural plasticity, neurotrophisms, endocrine mechanisms, immunological mechanisms, genetics, circadian rhythms, and metabolic regulation in depression. In addition, we introduce the possibility of new antidepressant drug development using protein translation signaling (mTOR) pathways. PMID:26999106

  8. What frontotemporal dementia reveals about the neurobiological basis of morality.

    PubMed

    Mendez, Mario F

    2006-01-01

    There is evidence that moral behavior is a product of evolution and an innate aspect of the human brain. Functional magnetic resonance studies in normals, investigations of psychopaths, and acquired sociopathy from brain lesions suggest a neurobiology of moral behavior. Reports of sociopathy among patients with frontotemporal dementia (FTD) have provided a further opportunity to clarify the neurobiology of morality. They confirm a morality network that includes the ventromedial frontal cortex, the orbitofrontal cortex, and the amygdalae. The right ventromedial region is critical for the emotional tagging of moral situations, the orbitofrontal cortex responds to social cues and mitigates impulsive reactions, and the amygdalae are necessary for threat detection and moral learning. Alterations in moral behavior in FTD may result from a loss of the emotional label of moral dilemmas, coupled with disinhibited responses. More investigations are needed to fully understand how the brain mediates moral or ethical behavior.

  9. Evolutionary themes in the neurobiology of social cognition.

    PubMed

    Weitekamp, Chelsea A; Hofmann, Hans A

    2014-10-01

    Remarkable examples of social cognition have been described across a diverse range of species, yet surprisingly little is known about the neurobiological underpinnings of these behaviors. Recent studies suggest that the molecular pathways and neural networks that mediate social behavior have been relatively conserved across vertebrate evolution, suggesting that shared mechanisms may drive adaptive behavioral responses to social stimuli. Here, we review recent advances in the neurobiology of flexible and context-dependent social behaviors across vertebrate taxa, focusing on female mate choice, pair-bonding, and aggressive behavior. Furthermore, we highlight the outstanding opportunities for uncovering the mechanisms mediating cooperative behavior, an exemplar of social cognition. We suggest a framework for investigating context-dependent neural organization and the evoked neural response to social stimuli.

  10. 29 CFR 1604.8 - Relationship of title VII to the Equal Pay Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... GUIDELINES ON DISCRIMINATION BECAUSE OF SEX § 1604.8 Relationship of title VII to the Equal Pay Act. (a) The employee coverage of the prohibitions against discrimination based on sex contained in title VII...

  11. 29 CFR 1604.8 - Relationship of title VII to the Equal Pay Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... GUIDELINES ON DISCRIMINATION BECAUSE OF SEX § 1604.8 Relationship of title VII to the Equal Pay Act. (a) The employee coverage of the prohibitions against discrimination based on sex contained in title VII...

  12. The dreaming sleep stage: a new neurobiological model of schizophrenia?

    PubMed

    Gottesmann, C

    2006-07-21

    The rapid eye movement dreaming sleep stage and schizophrenia are both characterized by common intracerebral disconnections, disturbed responsiveness and sensory deafferentation processes. Moreover, in both states, there is dorsolateral prefrontal deactivation as shown by the decrease of blood flow. Finally, identical pharmacological and neurochemical variations are observed for acetylcholine, dopamine, noradrenaline, serotonin and glutamate concentrations. Consequently, rapid eye movement sleep could become a useful new neurobiological model of this mental disease since more functional than current rat models using stimulation, lesion or drugs.

  13. Bridging the Divide between Neuroprosthetic Design, Tissue Engineering and Neurobiology

    PubMed Central

    Leach, Jennie B.; Achyuta, Anil Kumar H.; Murthy, Shashi K.

    2009-01-01

    Neuroprosthetic devices have made a major impact in the treatment of a variety of disorders such as paralysis and stroke. However, a major impediment in the advancement of this technology is the challenge of maintaining device performance during chronic implantation (months to years) due to complex intrinsic host responses such as gliosis or glial scarring. The objective of this review is to bring together research communities in neurobiology, tissue engineering, and neuroprosthetics to address the major obstacles encountered in the translation of neuroprosthetics technology into long-term clinical use. This article draws connections between specific challenges faced by current neuroprosthetics technology and recent advances in the areas of nerve tissue engineering and neurobiology. Within the context of the device–nervous system interface and central nervous system implants, areas of synergistic opportunity are discussed, including platforms to present cells with multiple cues, controlled delivery of bioactive factors, three-dimensional constructs and in vitro models of gliosis and brain injury, nerve regeneration strategies, and neural stem/progenitor cell biology. Finally, recent insights gained from the fields of developmental neurobiology and cancer biology are discussed as examples of exciting new biological knowledge that may provide fresh inspiration toward novel technologies to address the complexities associated with long-term neuroprosthetic device performance. PMID:20161810

  14. Controlling legs for locomotion-insights from robotics and neurobiology.

    PubMed

    Buschmann, Thomas; Ewald, Alexander; von Twickel, Arndt; Büschges, Ansgar

    2015-08-01

    Walking is the most common terrestrial form of locomotion in animals. Its great versatility and flexibility has led to many attempts at building walking machines with similar capabilities. The control of walking is an active research area both in neurobiology and robotics, with a large and growing body of work. This paper gives an overview of the current knowledge on the control of legged locomotion in animals and machines and attempts to give walking control researchers from biology and robotics an overview of the current knowledge in both fields. We try to summarize the knowledge on the neurobiological basis of walking control in animals, emphasizing common principles seen in different species. In a section on walking robots, we review common approaches to walking controller design with a slight emphasis on biped walking control. We show where parallels between robotic and neurobiological walking controllers exist and how robotics and biology may benefit from each other. Finally, we discuss where research in the two fields diverges and suggest ways to bridge these gaps. PMID:26119450

  15. Psychoanalysis, a bridge between attachment research and neurobiology.

    PubMed

    Rendon, Mario

    2008-06-01

    Attachment theory and neurobiology are at the forefront of scientific research, particularly in the area of child psychiatry. Several authors have encountered a surprising isomorphism between findings in these areas and concepts central in psychoanalysis. The author postulates that attachment theory is an outcome of the history of the transformation of the old concept of libido now applied interpersonally. The author also postulates that the neurobiology of attachment mediates but does not substitute psychoanalysis for the final understanding of the human bond. Findings in both fields, attachment theory and psychobiology, often compellingly lead to psychoanalytic concepts; on the other hand, the neurobiology of the psyche does not make full sense without the wealth of research conducted by psychoanalysts during the 20th century. The concept of seduction in particular, in its broad sense, is akin to mirroring and attachment and a useful tool in this regard. Although some cling to the idea of the purity of psychoanalysis and see these kin areas as a threat to its integrity, the author believes that psychoanalysis, serving as a bridge between them, can only be enriched by their empirical and experimental outcomes. The American Journal of Psychoanalysis (2008) 68, 148-155. doi:10.1057/ajp.2008.4.

  16. [The etiopathogenesis of unipolar depression. Neurobiological and psychosocial factors].

    PubMed

    Brakemeier, E-L; Normann, C; Berger, M

    2008-04-01

    Despite its clinical and socio-economic relevance, surprisingly little is known on the etiology of depression. A multitude of neurobiological and psychosocial hypotheses have been postulated but most lack empirical validity or cannot be integrated into comprehensive pathophysiological models. In neurobiological research, most evidence supports a contribution of genetic factors in the causation of depression. However, it seems that only the susceptibility for the disorder is inherited which ultimately causes the onset of depressive symptoms by interacting with psychosocial adversity. More recent research suggests an important role for altered stress responses and disturbed neuroplasticity in the etiopathogenesis of depression. From a psychosocial point of view, the different approaches prioritize different aspects. Psychoanalytical approaches assume a fragile self-worth system developed in early childhood as a decisive vulnerability factor for later depression. Behavioral-cognitive theories focus on dysfunctional cognitions coupled with learned helplessness and behavioural deficits as well as a failing in positive reinforced activities as predisposing factors for affective disorders. Interpersonal theories, however, postulate that the psychosocial and interpersonal context is most important for the development and course of depression. With regard to the etiopathogenesis of the so called difficult-to-treat chronic depression, especially early traumata as well as preoperational patterns of thinking seem to play a decisive role. In conclusion, only bio-psycho-social models which integrate neurobiological and psychosocial vulnerabilities and stressors have the potential to contribute to a better understanding of the etiology of depression. PMID:18357422

  17. Controlling legs for locomotion-insights from robotics and neurobiology.

    PubMed

    Buschmann, Thomas; Ewald, Alexander; von Twickel, Arndt; Büschges, Ansgar

    2015-06-29

    Walking is the most common terrestrial form of locomotion in animals. Its great versatility and flexibility has led to many attempts at building walking machines with similar capabilities. The control of walking is an active research area both in neurobiology and robotics, with a large and growing body of work. This paper gives an overview of the current knowledge on the control of legged locomotion in animals and machines and attempts to give walking control researchers from biology and robotics an overview of the current knowledge in both fields. We try to summarize the knowledge on the neurobiological basis of walking control in animals, emphasizing common principles seen in different species. In a section on walking robots, we review common approaches to walking controller design with a slight emphasis on biped walking control. We show where parallels between robotic and neurobiological walking controllers exist and how robotics and biology may benefit from each other. Finally, we discuss where research in the two fields diverges and suggest ways to bridge these gaps.

  18. The importance of residues 195-206 of human blood clotting factor VII in the interaction of factor VII with tissue factor

    SciTech Connect

    Wildgoose, P.; Kisiel, W.; Kazim, A.L. )

    1990-09-01

    Previous studies indicated that human and bovine factor VII exhibit 71% amino acid sequence identity. In the present study, competition binding experiments revealed that the interaction of human factor VII with cell-surface human tissue factor was not inhibited by 100-fold molar excess of bovine factor VII. This finding indicated that bovine and human factor VII are not structurally homologous in the region(s) where human factor VII interacts with human tissue factor. On this premise, the authors synthesized three peptides corresponding to regions of human factor VII that exhibited marked structural dissimilarity to bovine factor VII; these regions of dissimilarity included residues 195-206, 263-274, and 314-326. Peptide 195-206 inhibited the interaction of factor VII with cell-surface tissue factor and the activation of factor X by a complex of factor VIIa and tissue factor half-maximally at concentrations of 1-2 mM. A structurally rearranged form of peptide 195-206 containing an aspartimide residue inhibited these reactions half-maximally at concentrations of 250-300 {mu}M. In contrast, neither peptide 263-274 nor peptide 314-326, at 2 mM concentration, significantly affected either factor VIIa interaction with tissue factor or factor VIIa-mediated activation of factor X. The data provide presumptive evidence that residues 195-206 of human factor VII are involved in the interaction of human factor VII with the extracellular domain of human tissue factor apoprotein.

  19. The heated debate. [Global warming

    SciTech Connect

    Balling, R.C. Jr.

    1992-01-01

    The Heated Debate challenges head on the popular vision' of anthropogenically-caused global warming as characterized by catastrophic sea level rise, drought-desiccated farmlands, and more frequent and intense hurricanes spinning up and out from warmer tropical seas. The message of this book is that apocalyptic devastation of natural ecosystems and human socio-economic systems will not necessarily follow from a mild warming of earth's climate. According to Balling, the specter of apocalypse is clearly the dominant view held by scientists, decisionmakers and the public specter of apocalypse is clearly the dominant view held by scientists, decisionmakers and the public at large, and, in his view, it is just as clearly incorrect based on a careful examination of the historical evidence. The Heated Debate present the other side' of global warming; a kinder, gentler greenhouse debate, the stated purpose of the book is to provide the reader with some background to the greenhouse issue, present an analysis of the certainties and uncertainties for future climate change, and examine the most probably changes in climate that may occur as the greenhouse gases increase in concentration. Ultimately the author hopes the book will more completely inform decisionmakers so that they do not commit money and resources to what may turn out to be a non-problem. Indeed, global warming may have many more benefits than costs, and, in any event, the (climate) penalty for postponing action a few years is potentially small, while our knowledge base will increase tremendously allowing society to make wiser and more informed decisions.

  20. Competitive bidding debate goes national

    SciTech Connect

    Stoiaken, L.N.

    1987-10-01

    Several states have either adopted or are considering proposal for competitive bidding among prospective cogenerators wishing to supply electric power to a utility. A survey of independent power producers found that an early issue to emerge was whether utilities, themselves, would have to compete for the right to expand. Another issue is access to transmission services. Arguments that this was not the intent of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act forget that diversifying energy sources was a major goal. Congress will continue hearings on the debate this fall on several issues.

  1. 20 CFR Appendix Vii to Subpart C... - “Old-Law” Contribution and Benefit Base

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false âOld-Lawâ Contribution and Benefit Base VII Appendix VII to Subpart C of Part 404 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE... Appendix VII to Subpart C of Part 404—“Old-Law” Contribution and Benefit Base Explanation: We use...

  2. Presidential Debates: Not a Spectator Sport.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Social Education, 2000

    2000-01-01

    Provides two teaching activities to help students analyze political debates from a curriculum for middle and high schools called "Presidential Debates: A Teacher's Guide". Designed by the Commission on Presidential Debates and Kids Voting USA, it includes : (1) "The Techniques of Persuasion"; and (2) "It's Your Turn to be a Political Reporter."…

  3. Affective Learning and the Classroom Debate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jagger, Suzy

    2013-01-01

    A commonly used teaching method to promote student engagement is the classroom debate. This study evaluates how affective characteristics, as defined in Bloom's taxonomy, were stimulated during debates that took place on a professional ethics module for first year computing undergraduates. The debates led to lively interactive group…

  4. Technological Imperatives: Using Computers in Academic Debate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ticku, Ravinder; Phelps, Greg

    Intended for forensic educators and debate teams, this document details how one university debate team, at the University of Iowa, makes use of computer resources on campus to facilitate storage and retrieval of information useful to debaters. The introduction notes the problem of storing and retrieving the amount of information required by debate…

  5. The Power of In-Class Debates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Ruth R.

    2009-01-01

    The students in three sections of a class rated their knowledge and identified their view before and after each of five in-class debates. The degree of self-reported knowledge was significantly different after four of the five debates. Between 31% and 58% of participants changed their views after participating in or observing each debate. Some…

  6. The Importance of High School Debate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hooley, Diana

    2007-01-01

    One of the most important educational objectives of high school is to teach critical-thinking skills, and no class does this better than strategic debate. Professor Mike Allen, lead author in a definitive study on debate and critical thinking, lauded debate's promotion of critical-thinking skills. Additionally, researcher Joe Bellon discusses the…

  7. 11 CFR 100.154 - Candidate debates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Expenditures § 100.154 Candidate debates. Funds used to defray costs incurred in staging candidate debates in accordance with the provisions of 11 CFR 110.13 and 114.4(f) are not expenditures. ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Candidate debates. 100.154 Section...

  8. Literacy as Social Action in City Debate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cridland-Hughes, Susan

    2012-01-01

    This study examines critical literacy and the intersections of oral, aural, written, and performative literate practices in City Debate, an afterschool program dedicated to providing debate instruction to students in a major Southeastern city. Previous research into definitions and beliefs about literacy in an urban debate program over its twenty…

  9. 11 CFR 100.92 - Candidate debates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Contributions § 100.92 Candidate debates. Funds provided to defray costs incurred in staging candidate debates in accordance with the provisions of 11 CFR 110.13 and 114.4(f) are not contributions. ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Candidate debates. 100.92 Section...

  10. [The debate over drug legalization].

    PubMed

    Babín Vich, Francisco de Asís

    2013-01-01

    The debate over drug legalization appears frequently in the media as a potential solution to issues such as drug trafficking and other problems related to drug use. In Spain, private consumption or even the production of small quantities of certain plants, whose active ingredients are considered illegal drugs, if clearly for own consumption are not practices criminalized by any law. In addition, a drug addict is considered a person who is ill. Although it has not always been like that even in the countries that have called for this debate, where at times the law prosecutes consumers. The population of our country, according to the views expressed in the opinion polls, prefer to increase preventive measures, foster the treatment freely assumed by drug addicts and make stricter the repression on drug trafficking. Therefore, when speaking of "legalization" we should be scrupulous with the semantics; legalize and decriminalize are not the same, it is not the same decriminalize consumption than decriminalize trafficking, neither is the same decriminalize private consumption than public consumption. Decriminalize private consumption is a fact in our country. Beyond this, we advocate for the strict need to analyze from a scientific perspective the hypothetical benefits that would result from drug legalization. Certainly, from the public health perspective, they are hard to find. We believe that the same logic applied to tobacco, increasing the restrictions on its use, is the path to follow with any addictive substance.

  11. Subjective Criteria in Employment Decisions Under Title VII

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stacy, Donald R.

    1976-01-01

    Since higher echelon jobs have been drawn into litigation under Title VII, subjective criteria have been employed. The legal ramifications of assessing noncognitive traits such as leadership, aggressiveness, and attitude are discussed. Available from: the University of Georgia School of Law, Athens, Georgia 30602. (LBH)

  12. 29 CFR 1601.93 - Opinions-title VII.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... § 1608.10 (a) or (b) of the Commission's Guidelines on Affirmative Action, 29 CFR part 1608, when such... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Opinions-title VII. 1601.93 Section 1601.93 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY COMMISSION PROCEDURAL REGULATIONS...

  13. Title VII Program, Final Technical Report: 1985-86.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuyler, Nancy B.; Yonan, Barbara

    This report documents the 1985-86 Title VII Program of the Austin (Texas) Independent School District. Major findings indicated the following: (1) three program components--staff training, tutoring, and curriculum development--were implemented as planned; (2) the staff training component included a series of English as a Second Language…

  14. Data Testing for ENDF/B-VII.1beta2

    SciTech Connect

    MacFarlane, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Calculations have been performed for 390 critical assemblies from the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments using the beta2 release of ENDF/B-VII.1. The results are compared to previous results for ENDF/B-VII. Cases that changed between the two versions are highlighted, and the results are discussed. The Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG) is working on a new release of the ENDF/B-VII library of evaluated nuclear data, and the 'beta2' set of files was recently made available by the National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC). A set of about 850 input files for the MCNP Monte Carlo code to run critical assemblies from the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments was available from our previous data testing work for ENDF/B-VII.0. We have now run 390 of those cases using data based on the beta2 files, and those results will be presented below. The ENDF files were downloaded from the NNDC to a Mac workstation. They were then processed using NJOY10 into ACE format files for use in the MCNP Monte Carlo code. The processing was limited to materials needed for the data testing work at this point. The existing MCNP input decks were used. No checking was done to see if any of the benchmarks had been updated since the ENDF/B-VII testing was finished. Most runs used 50 million histories in order to get Monte Carlo statistical uncertainties down the 0.01% range.

  15. Preparation of factor VII concentrate using CNBr-activated Sepharose 4B immunoaffinity chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Mousavi Hosseini, Kamran; Nasiri, Saleh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Factor VII concentrates are used in patients with congenital or acquired factor VII deficiency or treatment of hemophilia patients with inhibitors. In this research, immunoaffinity chromatography was used to purify factor VII from prothrombin complex (Prothrombin- Proconvertin-Stuart Factor-Antihemophilic Factor B or PPSB) which contains coagulation factors II, VII, IX and X. The aim of this study was to improve purity, safety and tolerability as a highly purified factor VII concentrate. Methods: PPSB was prepared using DEAE-Sephadex and was used as the starting material for purification of coagulation factor VII. Prothrombin complex was treated by solvent/detergent at 24°C for 6 h with constant stirring. The mixture of PPSB in the PBS buffer was filtered and then chromatographed using CNBr-activated Sepharose 4B coupled with specific antibody. Factors II, IX, VII, X and VIIa were assayed on the fractions. Fractions of 48-50 were pooled and lyophilized as a factor VII concentrate. Agarose gel electrophoresis was performed and Tween 80 was measured in the factor VII concentrate. Results: Specific activity of factor VII concentrate increased from 0.16 to 55.6 with a purificationfold of 347.5 and the amount of activated factor VII (FVIIa) was found higher than PPSB (4.4-fold). Results of electrophoresis on agarose gel indicated higher purity of Factor VII compared to PPSB; these finding revealed that factor VII migrated as alpha-2 proteins. In order to improve viral safety, solvent-detergent treatment was applied prior to further purification and nearly complete elimination of tween 80 (2 μg/ml). Conclusion: It was concluded that immuonoaffinity chromatography using CNBr-activated Sepharose 4B can be a suitable choice for large-scale production of factor VII concentrate with higher purity, safety and activated factor VII. PMID:26034723

  16. Neurobiological dimensional models of personality: a review of the models of Cloninger, Depue, and Siever.

    PubMed

    Paris, Joel

    2005-04-01

    Neurobiological dimensional models of personality aim to account for the structure of personality traits and disorders through links to neurotransmitter systems. Three such models are reviewed: those of Cloninger, Depue, and Siever. While these proposals have heuristic value, none of them has obtained strong empirical support. Our current understanding of neurobiology is insufficient to develop a model of personality on this basis. At this point, dimensions of personality should be derived from factor analysis rather than from neurobiological theories.

  17. The Clinical Neuroscience Course: Viewing Mental Health from Neurobiological Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Kelly G.

    2005-01-01

    Although the field of neuroscience is booming, a challenge for researchers in mental health disciplines is the integration of basic research findings into applied clinical approaches leading to effective therapies. Recently the National Institute of Mental Health called for translational research grants to encourage collaboration between neuroscientists and mental health professionals. In order for this “clinical neuroscience” to emerge and thrive, an important first step is the provision of appropriate course offerings so that future neuroscience researchers and mental health practitioners will have a common neurobiological base from which to make informed decisions about the most efficacious treatments for mental illnesses. Accordingly, an integrative course, Clinical Neuroscience, was developed to address these issues. After reviewing the historical origins of this emerging discipline, students are exposed to fundamental overviews of neuroanatomy, neurochemistry, and neural development before approaching the neurobiological components of several disorders (e.g., schizophrenia, depression, Tourette’s syndrome, drug abuse, obsessive compulsive disorder). Finally, the maintenance of mental health is emphasized as topics such as psychoneuroimmunology, coping with stress, and eating regulation are discussed. Important themes emphasized in this course include (1) the consideration of only empirically based evidence, (2) the view that mental illness represents a disruption of neurobiological homeostasis, (3) the acknowledgement that, because the brain is a plastic organ, the clinical relevance of environmental and behavioral influences is difficult to overestimate, and (4) the recognition of the value of ecologically relevant animal models in the investigation of various aspects of mental illness. Because of the importance of stress maintenance in mental health, exercises have been developed to increase students’ awareness of their own coping strategies

  18. Neurobiological and clinical effects of the antidepressant tianeptine.

    PubMed

    Kasper, Siegfried; McEwen, Bruce S

    2008-01-01

    The precise neurobiological processes involved in depression are not clear, but it is recognized that numerous factors are involved, including changes in neurotransmitter systems and brain plasticity. Neuroplasticity refers to the ability of the brain to adapt functionally and structurally to stimuli. Impairment of neuroplasticity in the hippocampus, amygdala and cortex is hypothesized to be the mechanism by which cognitive function, learning, memory and emotions are altered in depression. The mechanisms underlying alterations in neuroplasticity are believed to relate to changes in neurotransmitters, hormones and growth factors. Structural changes in the hippocampus that have been proposed to be associated with depression include dendritic atrophy, reduced levels of cerebral metabolites, decreased adult neurogenesis (generation of new nerve cells) and reduced volume. Increased dendritic branching occurs in the basolateral nucleus of the amygdala. Reduced neuronal size and glial cell density occur in the prefrontal cortex. Clinically, tianeptine is an antidepressant effective in reducing symptoms of depression in mild to moderate-to-severe major depression, including over the long term. Tianeptine is also effective in alleviating the symptoms of depression-associated anxiety. It is generally well tolerated, with little sedation or cognitive impairment. The efficacy profile of tianeptine could be explained by its neurobiological properties observed in animal models. Tianeptine prevents or reverses stress-associated structural and cellular changes in the brain and normalizes disrupted glutamatergic neurotransmission. In particular, in the hippocampus, it prevents stress-induced dendritic atrophy, improves neurogenesis, reduces apoptosis and normalizes metabolite levels and hippocampal volume. Tianeptine also has beneficial effects in the amygdala and cortex and can reverse the effects of stress on neuronal and synaptic functioning. The neurobiological properties of

  19. Neurobiological roots of language in primate audition: common computational properties.

    PubMed

    Bornkessel-Schlesewsky, Ina; Schlesewsky, Matthias; Small, Steven L; Rauschecker, Josef P

    2015-03-01

    Here, we present a new perspective on an old question: how does the neurobiology of human language relate to brain systems in nonhuman primates? We argue that higher-order language combinatorics, including sentence and discourse processing, can be situated in a unified, cross-species dorsal-ventral streams architecture for higher auditory processing, and that the functions of the dorsal and ventral streams in higher-order language processing can be grounded in their respective computational properties in primate audition. This view challenges an assumption, common in the cognitive sciences, that a nonhuman primate model forms an inherently inadequate basis for modeling higher-level language functions.

  20. Pain and Depression: A Neurobiological Perspective of Their Relationship

    PubMed Central

    Han, Changsu

    2015-01-01

    Remarkable progresses have been achieved regarding the understanding of the neurobiological bases of pain and depression. The principal role of neurotransmitters, neuromodulators, and neurohormones has been proposed in the development of pain and depression. With the progression of molecular biology, an intricate interaction among biological factors accountable to the development and management of pain and depression has been also shown in a numerous preclinical and clinical researches. This mini-review will briefly describe the current issues and future research direction for better understanding of the relationship between pain and depression. PMID:25670939

  1. Advances in the neurobiological bases for food 'liking' versus 'wanting'.

    PubMed

    Castro, D C; Berridge, K C

    2014-09-01

    The neural basis of food sensory pleasure has become an increasingly studied topic in neuroscience and psychology. Progress has been aided by the discovery of localized brain subregions called hedonic hotspots in the early 2000s, which are able to causally amplify positive affective reactions to palatable tastes ('liking') in response to particular neurochemical or neurobiological stimulations. Those hedonic mechanisms are at least partly distinct from larger mesocorticolimbic circuitry that generates the incentive motivation to eat ('wanting'). In this review, we aim to describe findings on these brain hedonic hotspots, especially in the nucleus accumbens and ventral pallidum, and discuss their role in generating food pleasure and appetite.

  2. Inhibition of Action, Thought, and Emotion: A Selective Neurobiological Review

    PubMed Central

    Dillon, Daniel G.; Pizzagalli, Diego A.

    2007-01-01

    The neural bases of inhibitory function are reviewed, covering data from paradigms assessing inhibition of motor responses (antisaccade, go/nogo, stop-signal), cognitive sets (e.g., Wisconsin Card Sort Test), and emotion (fear extinction). The frontal cortex supports performance on these paradigms, but the specific neural circuitry varies: response inhibition depends upon fronto-basal ganglia networks, inhibition of cognitive sets is supported by orbitofrontal cortex, and retention of fear extinction reflects ventromedial prefrontal cortexamygdala interactions. Inhibition is thus neurobiologically heterogeneous, although right ventrolateral prefrontal cortex may support a general inhibitory process. Dysfunctions in these circuits may contribute to psychopathological conditions marked by inhibitory deficits. PMID:19050749

  3. Neuroeconomics: The neurobiology of value-based decision-making

    PubMed Central

    Rangel, Antonio; Camerer, Colin; Montague, P. Read

    2015-01-01

    Neuroeconomics studies the neurobiological and computational basis of value-based decision-making. Its goal is to provide a biologically-based account of human behavior that can be applied in both the natural and the social sciences. In this review we propose a framework for thinking about decision-making that allows us to bring together recent findings in the field, highlight some of the most important outstanding problems, define a common lexicon that bridges the different disciplines that inform neuroeconomics, and point the way to future applications. PMID:18545266

  4. Using anxiolytics in epilepsy: neurobiological, neuropharmacological and clinical aspects.

    PubMed

    Mula, Marco

    2016-09-01

    Anxiety disorders represent a common psychiatric comorbidity in patients with epilepsy, affecting prognosis and quality of life. However, they are still underdiagnosed and undertreated. In clinical practice, a number of compounds are currently used as anxiolytics, with benzodiazepines being the most popular. Other drug classes, especially antiepileptic drugs, are increasingly prescribed for the treatment of anxiety. This article discusses the neurobiological targets and basic neuropharmacological aspects of anxiolytics in order to give the reader clear insight into their activity and mechanism of action. Clinical data regarding the treatment of anxiety in both adults and children with epilepsy are also summarised, emphasising the need for further studies. PMID:27435111

  5. Neurobiology of Cognitive Aging: Insights from Imaging Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Mattay, Venkata S.; Goldberg, Terry E.; Sambataro, Fabio; Weinberger, Daniel R.

    2010-01-01

    Over the last several years, neuroscientists have been increasingly using neuroimaging techniques to unravel the neurobiology underlying cognitive aging, and in more recent years to explore the role of genes on the variability of the aging process. One of the primary goals of this research is to identify proteins involved in cognitive aging with the hope that this would facilitate the development of novel treatments to combat cognitive impairment. Further, it is likely with early identification of susceptible individuals, early intervention through life-style changes and other methods could increase an individual’s resilience to the effects of aging. PMID:18511173

  6. Current understandings about cognition and the neurobiological correlates in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Kar, Sujita Kumar; Jain, Meha

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a severe mental disorder. Cognitive deficits are one of the core features of schizophrenia. Multiple domains of cognition (executive function, attention/vigilance, working memory, verbal fluency, visuospatial skills, processing speed, and social cognition) are affected in patients with schizophrenia. Deficits in cognition led to impairment in the real world functioning. Identifying the cognitive deficits and early intervention is required for better functional outcome. This review focuses on conceptual understanding of cognition with its neurobiological correlates in schizophrenia and its different clinical implications. PMID:27365960

  7. Neurobiological roots of language in primate audition: common computational properties

    PubMed Central

    Bornkessel-Schlesewsky, Ina; Schlesewsky, Matthias; Small, Steven L.; Rauschecker, Josef P.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a new perspective on an old question: how does the neurobiology of human language relate to brain systems in nonhuman primates? We argue that higher-order language combinatorics – including sentence and discourse processing – can be situated in a unified, cross-species dorsal-ventral streams architecture for higher auditory processing, and that the functions of the dorsal and ventral streams in higher-order language processing can be grounded in their respective computational properties in primate audition. This view challenges an assumption, common in the cognitive sciences, that a nonhuman primate model forms an inherently inadequate basis for modeling higher-level language functions. PMID:25600585

  8. Neurobiological roots of language in primate audition: common computational properties.

    PubMed

    Bornkessel-Schlesewsky, Ina; Schlesewsky, Matthias; Small, Steven L; Rauschecker, Josef P

    2015-03-01

    Here, we present a new perspective on an old question: how does the neurobiology of human language relate to brain systems in nonhuman primates? We argue that higher-order language combinatorics, including sentence and discourse processing, can be situated in a unified, cross-species dorsal-ventral streams architecture for higher auditory processing, and that the functions of the dorsal and ventral streams in higher-order language processing can be grounded in their respective computational properties in primate audition. This view challenges an assumption, common in the cognitive sciences, that a nonhuman primate model forms an inherently inadequate basis for modeling higher-level language functions. PMID:25600585

  9. Application of medical gases in the field of neurobiology

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Medical gases are pharmaceutical molecules which offer solutions to a wide array of medical needs. This can range from use in burn and stroke victims to hypoxia therapy in children. More specifically however, gases such as oxygen, helium, xenon, and hydrogen have recently come under increased exploration for their potential theraputic use with various brain disease states including hypoxia-ischemia, cerebral hemorrhages, and traumatic brain injuries. As a result, this article will review the various advances in medical gas research and discuss the potential therapeutic applications and mechanisms with regards to the field of neurobiology. PMID:22146102

  10. The population debate heats up.

    PubMed

    Malay, R L

    1994-01-01

    60% of the 65 million people in the Philippines have lived below the poverty line amid overall negative GNP growth for almost a decade. The population is growing at the annual rate of 2.4%. These conditions suggest the urgent need to reduce population growth and take measures to improve the performance of the economy. The big debate in the Philippines regarding population and development, however, is not over the redistribution of resources, but about the morality of managing population growth through the promotion of artificial means of contraception. Roman Catholicism predominates among religions in the Philippines. The Catholic Church in the Philippines, as elsewhere around the world, alleges that artificial contraceptives are abortifacient and that only natural methods should be promoted. Although Health Secretary Dr. Juan M. Flavier, a staunch supporter of family planning, points out that the church and state both abhor abortion, accept natural family planning, and would like to offer a better quality of life to the people, it is clear that the government does not agree with the Church's endorsement of only natural family planning methods. Surveys have found that most Filipinos agree with the government; they are in favor of family planning and feel that the Church should stay out of the debate. A people-centered approach to development and concern for the environment are called for to improve the Filipino quality of life. At the global level, the Vatican has allies among believers of Islam in its position against abortion and in favor of a traditional concept of the family. Despite wrangling at the International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD) over a woman's right to abortion and other contentious issues, such as the objection among Southern states to the ICPD committee's exclusion of the right to family reunification, the ICPD was a success because it gave prime importance to the link between population and sustainable development. The ICPD

  11. The population debate heats up.

    PubMed

    Malay, R L

    1994-01-01

    60% of the 65 million people in the Philippines have lived below the poverty line amid overall negative GNP growth for almost a decade. The population is growing at the annual rate of 2.4%. These conditions suggest the urgent need to reduce population growth and take measures to improve the performance of the economy. The big debate in the Philippines regarding population and development, however, is not over the redistribution of resources, but about the morality of managing population growth through the promotion of artificial means of contraception. Roman Catholicism predominates among religions in the Philippines. The Catholic Church in the Philippines, as elsewhere around the world, alleges that artificial contraceptives are abortifacient and that only natural methods should be promoted. Although Health Secretary Dr. Juan M. Flavier, a staunch supporter of family planning, points out that the church and state both abhor abortion, accept natural family planning, and would like to offer a better quality of life to the people, it is clear that the government does not agree with the Church's endorsement of only natural family planning methods. Surveys have found that most Filipinos agree with the government; they are in favor of family planning and feel that the Church should stay out of the debate. A people-centered approach to development and concern for the environment are called for to improve the Filipino quality of life. At the global level, the Vatican has allies among believers of Islam in its position against abortion and in favor of a traditional concept of the family. Despite wrangling at the International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD) over a woman's right to abortion and other contentious issues, such as the objection among Southern states to the ICPD committee's exclusion of the right to family reunification, the ICPD was a success because it gave prime importance to the link between population and sustainable development. The ICPD

  12. Attachment, Neurobiology, and Mentalizing along the Psychosis Continuum

    PubMed Central

    Debbané, Martin; Salaminios, George; Luyten, Patrick; Badoud, Deborah; Armando, Marco; Solida Tozzi, Alessandra; Fonagy, Peter; Brent, Benjamin K.

    2016-01-01

    In this review article, we outline the evidence linking attachment adversity to psychosis, from the premorbid stages of the disorder to its clinical forms. To better understand the neurobiological mechanisms through which insecure attachment may contribute to psychosis, we identify at least five neurobiological pathways linking attachment to risk for developing psychosis. Besides its well documented influence on the hypothalamic-pituary-adrenal (HPA) axis, insecure attachment may also contribute to neurodevelopmental risk through the dopaminergic and oxytonergic systems, as well as bear influence on neuroinflammation and oxidative stress responses. We further consider the neuroscientific and behavioral studies that underpin mentalization as a suite of processes potentially moderating the risk to transition to psychotic disorders. In particular, mentalization may help the individual compensate for endophenotypical impairments in the integration of sensory and metacognitive information. We propose a model where embodied mentalization would lie at the core of a protective, resilience response mitigating the adverse and potentially pathological influence of the neurodevelopmental cascade of risk for psychosis.

  13. The Neurobiology of Bipolar Disorder: An Integrated Approach

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Bipolar disorder is a heterogeneous condition with myriad clinical manifestations and many comorbidities leading to severe disabilities in the biopsychosocial realm. The objective of this review article was to underline recent advances in knowledge regarding the neurobiology of bipolar disorder. A further aim was to draw attention to new therapeutic targets in the treatment of bipolar disorder. To accomplish these goals, an electronic search was undertaken of the PubMed database in August 2015 of literature published during the last 10 years on the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder. A wide-ranging evaluation of the existing work was done with search terms such as "mood disorders and biology," "bipolar disorder and HPA axis," "bipolar disorder and cytokines," "mood disorders and circadian rhythm," "bipolar disorder and oxidative stress," etc. This endeavor showed that bipolar disorder is a diverse condition sharing neurobiological mechanisms with major depressive disorder and psychotic spectrum disorders. There is convincing evidence of crosstalk between different biological systems that act in a deleterious manner causing expression of the disease in genetically predisposed individuals. Inflammatory mediators act in concert with oxidative stress to dysregulate hormonal, metabolic, and circadian homeostasis in precipitating and perpetuating the illness. Stress, whether biologically or psychologically mediated, is responsible for the initiation and progression of the diathesis. Bipolar spectrum disorders have a strong genetic component; severe life stresses acting through various paths cause the illness phenotype. PMID:26865997

  14. Neurobiology of Cognitive Remediation Therapy for Schizophrenia: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Thorsen, Anders Lillevik; Johansson, Kyrre; Løberg, Else-Marie

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive impairment is an important aspect of schizophrenia, where cognitive remediation therapy (CRT) is a promising treatment for improving cognitive functioning. While neurobiological dysfunction in schizophrenia has been the target of much research, the neural substrate of cognitive remediation and recovery has not been thoroughly examined. The aim of the present article is to systematically review the evidence for neural changes after CRT for schizophrenia. The reviewed studies indicate that CRT affects several brain regions and circuits, including prefrontal, parietal, and limbic areas, both in terms of activity and structure. Changes in prefrontal areas are the most reported finding, fitting to previous evidence of dysfunction in this region. Two limitations of the current research are the few studies and the lack of knowledge on the mechanisms underlying neural and cognitive changes after treatment. Despite these limitations, the current evidence suggests that CRT is associated with both neurobiological and cognitive improvement. The evidence from these findings may shed light on both the neural substrate of cognitive impairment in schizophrenia, and how better treatment can be developed and applied. PMID:25177300

  15. Attachment, Neurobiology, and Mentalizing along the Psychosis Continuum.

    PubMed

    Debbané, Martin; Salaminios, George; Luyten, Patrick; Badoud, Deborah; Armando, Marco; Solida Tozzi, Alessandra; Fonagy, Peter; Brent, Benjamin K

    2016-01-01

    In this review article, we outline the evidence linking attachment adversity to psychosis, from the premorbid stages of the disorder to its clinical forms. To better understand the neurobiological mechanisms through which insecure attachment may contribute to psychosis, we identify at least five neurobiological pathways linking attachment to risk for developing psychosis. Besides its well documented influence on the hypothalamic-pituary-adrenal (HPA) axis, insecure attachment may also contribute to neurodevelopmental risk through the dopaminergic and oxytonergic systems, as well as bear influence on neuroinflammation and oxidative stress responses. We further consider the neuroscientific and behavioral studies that underpin mentalization as a suite of processes potentially moderating the risk to transition to psychotic disorders. In particular, mentalization may help the individual compensate for endophenotypical impairments in the integration of sensory and metacognitive information. We propose a model where embodied mentalization would lie at the core of a protective, resilience response mitigating the adverse and potentially pathological influence of the neurodevelopmental cascade of risk for psychosis. PMID:27597820

  16. The Neurobiology of Bipolar Disorder: An Integrated Approach.

    PubMed

    Muneer, Ather

    2016-01-01

    Bipolar disorder is a heterogeneous condition with myriad clinical manifestations and many comorbidities leading to severe disabilities in the biopsychosocial realm. The objective of this review article was to underline recent advances in knowledge regarding the neurobiology of bipolar disorder. A further aim was to draw attention to new therapeutic targets in the treatment of bipolar disorder. To accomplish these goals, an electronic search was undertaken of the PubMed database in August 2015 of literature published during the last 10 years on the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder. A wide-ranging evaluation of the existing work was done with search terms such as "mood disorders and biology," "bipolar disorder and HPA axis," "bipolar disorder and cytokines," "mood disorders and circadian rhythm," "bipolar disorder and oxidative stress," etc. This endeavor showed that bipolar disorder is a diverse condition sharing neurobiological mechanisms with major depressive disorder and psychotic spectrum disorders. There is convincing evidence of crosstalk between different biological systems that act in a deleterious manner causing expression of the disease in genetically predisposed individuals. Inflammatory mediators act in concert with oxidative stress to dysregulate hormonal, metabolic, and circadian homeostasis in precipitating and perpetuating the illness. Stress, whether biologically or psychologically mediated, is responsible for the initiation and progression of the diathesis. Bipolar spectrum disorders have a strong genetic component; severe life stresses acting through various paths cause the illness phenotype.

  17. Neuromorphic implementations of neurobiological learning algorithms for spiking neural networks.

    PubMed

    Walter, Florian; Röhrbein, Florian; Knoll, Alois

    2015-12-01

    The application of biologically inspired methods in design and control has a long tradition in robotics. Unlike previous approaches in this direction, the emerging field of neurorobotics not only mimics biological mechanisms at a relatively high level of abstraction but employs highly realistic simulations of actual biological nervous systems. Even today, carrying out these simulations efficiently at appropriate timescales is challenging. Neuromorphic chip designs specially tailored to this task therefore offer an interesting perspective for neurorobotics. Unlike Von Neumann CPUs, these chips cannot be simply programmed with a standard programming language. Like real brains, their functionality is determined by the structure of neural connectivity and synaptic efficacies. Enabling higher cognitive functions for neurorobotics consequently requires the application of neurobiological learning algorithms to adjust synaptic weights in a biologically plausible way. In this paper, we therefore investigate how to program neuromorphic chips by means of learning. First, we provide an overview over selected neuromorphic chip designs and analyze them in terms of neural computation, communication systems and software infrastructure. On the theoretical side, we review neurobiological learning techniques. Based on this overview, we then examine on-die implementations of these learning algorithms on the considered neuromorphic chips. A final discussion puts the findings of this work into context and highlights how neuromorphic hardware can potentially advance the field of autonomous robot systems. The paper thus gives an in-depth overview of neuromorphic implementations of basic mechanisms of synaptic plasticity which are required to realize advanced cognitive capabilities with spiking neural networks. PMID:26422422

  18. Neurobiological underpinnings of sensation seeking trait in heroin abusers.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Gordon L F; Liu, Yu-Pin; Chan, Chetwyn C H; So, Kwok-Fai; Zeng, Hong; Lee, Tatia M C

    2015-11-01

    Neurobiological investigation of heroin revealed that abusers of this highly addictive substance show dysregulation in brain circuits for reward processing and cognitive control. Psychologically, personality traits related to reward processing and cognitive control differed between heroin abusers and non-abusers. Yet, there is no direct evidence on the relationship between these neurobiological and psychological findings on heroin abusers, and whether such relationship is altered in these abusers. The present study filled this research gap by integrating findings obtained via magnetic resonance imaging (structural volume and resting-state functional connectivity) and self-reported personality trait measures (Zuckerman׳s Sensation Seeking Scale and Barratt Impulsivity Scale) on 33 abstinent heroin users and 30 matched healthy controls. The key finding is a negative relationship between high sensation seeking tendency and midbrain structural volume in the heroin users. Importantly, there was stronger coupling between the midbrain and ventromedial prefrontal cortex and weaker coupling between the midbrain and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in heroin users. Our findings offer significant insight into the neural underpinning of sensation seeking in heroin users. Importantly, the data shed light on a novel relationship between the mesolimbic-prefrontal pathway of the reward system and the high sensation seeking personality trait in heroin abusers.

  19. Neurobiological underpinnings of sensation seeking trait in heroin abusers.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Gordon L F; Liu, Yu-Pin; Chan, Chetwyn C H; So, Kwok-Fai; Zeng, Hong; Lee, Tatia M C

    2015-11-01

    Neurobiological investigation of heroin revealed that abusers of this highly addictive substance show dysregulation in brain circuits for reward processing and cognitive control. Psychologically, personality traits related to reward processing and cognitive control differed between heroin abusers and non-abusers. Yet, there is no direct evidence on the relationship between these neurobiological and psychological findings on heroin abusers, and whether such relationship is altered in these abusers. The present study filled this research gap by integrating findings obtained via magnetic resonance imaging (structural volume and resting-state functional connectivity) and self-reported personality trait measures (Zuckerman׳s Sensation Seeking Scale and Barratt Impulsivity Scale) on 33 abstinent heroin users and 30 matched healthy controls. The key finding is a negative relationship between high sensation seeking tendency and midbrain structural volume in the heroin users. Importantly, there was stronger coupling between the midbrain and ventromedial prefrontal cortex and weaker coupling between the midbrain and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in heroin users. Our findings offer significant insight into the neural underpinning of sensation seeking in heroin users. Importantly, the data shed light on a novel relationship between the mesolimbic-prefrontal pathway of the reward system and the high sensation seeking personality trait in heroin abusers. PMID:26364127

  20. Neuromorphic implementations of neurobiological learning algorithms for spiking neural networks.

    PubMed

    Walter, Florian; Röhrbein, Florian; Knoll, Alois

    2015-12-01

    The application of biologically inspired methods in design and control has a long tradition in robotics. Unlike previous approaches in this direction, the emerging field of neurorobotics not only mimics biological mechanisms at a relatively high level of abstraction but employs highly realistic simulations of actual biological nervous systems. Even today, carrying out these simulations efficiently at appropriate timescales is challenging. Neuromorphic chip designs specially tailored to this task therefore offer an interesting perspective for neurorobotics. Unlike Von Neumann CPUs, these chips cannot be simply programmed with a standard programming language. Like real brains, their functionality is determined by the structure of neural connectivity and synaptic efficacies. Enabling higher cognitive functions for neurorobotics consequently requires the application of neurobiological learning algorithms to adjust synaptic weights in a biologically plausible way. In this paper, we therefore investigate how to program neuromorphic chips by means of learning. First, we provide an overview over selected neuromorphic chip designs and analyze them in terms of neural computation, communication systems and software infrastructure. On the theoretical side, we review neurobiological learning techniques. Based on this overview, we then examine on-die implementations of these learning algorithms on the considered neuromorphic chips. A final discussion puts the findings of this work into context and highlights how neuromorphic hardware can potentially advance the field of autonomous robot systems. The paper thus gives an in-depth overview of neuromorphic implementations of basic mechanisms of synaptic plasticity which are required to realize advanced cognitive capabilities with spiking neural networks.

  1. Bridging the interval: theory and neurobiology of trace conditioning.

    PubMed

    Raybuck, Jonathan D; Lattal, K Matthew

    2014-01-01

    An early finding in the behavioral analysis of learning was that conditioned responding weakens as the conditioned stimulus (CS) and unconditioned stimulus (US) are separated in time. This "trace" conditioning effect has been the focus of years of research in associative learning. Theoretical accounts of trace conditioning have focused on mechanisms that allow associative learning to occur across long intervals between the CS and US. These accounts have emphasized degraded contingency effects, timing mechanisms, and inhibitory learning. More recently, study of the neurobiology of trace conditioning has shown that even a short interval between the CS and US alters the circuitry recruited for learning. Here, we review some of the theoretical and neurobiological mechanisms underlying trace conditioning with an emphasis on recent studies of trace fear conditioning. Findings across many studies have implications not just for how we think about time and conditioning, but also for how we conceptualize fear conditioning in general, suggesting that circuitry beyond the usual suspects needs to be incorporated into current thinking about fear, learning, and anxiety. PMID:24036411

  2. Attachment, Neurobiology, and Mentalizing along the Psychosis Continuum

    PubMed Central

    Debbané, Martin; Salaminios, George; Luyten, Patrick; Badoud, Deborah; Armando, Marco; Solida Tozzi, Alessandra; Fonagy, Peter; Brent, Benjamin K.

    2016-01-01

    In this review article, we outline the evidence linking attachment adversity to psychosis, from the premorbid stages of the disorder to its clinical forms. To better understand the neurobiological mechanisms through which insecure attachment may contribute to psychosis, we identify at least five neurobiological pathways linking attachment to risk for developing psychosis. Besides its well documented influence on the hypothalamic-pituary-adrenal (HPA) axis, insecure attachment may also contribute to neurodevelopmental risk through the dopaminergic and oxytonergic systems, as well as bear influence on neuroinflammation and oxidative stress responses. We further consider the neuroscientific and behavioral studies that underpin mentalization as a suite of processes potentially moderating the risk to transition to psychotic disorders. In particular, mentalization may help the individual compensate for endophenotypical impairments in the integration of sensory and metacognitive information. We propose a model where embodied mentalization would lie at the core of a protective, resilience response mitigating the adverse and potentially pathological influence of the neurodevelopmental cascade of risk for psychosis. PMID:27597820

  3. The Neurobiology of Bipolar Disorder: An Integrated Approach.

    PubMed

    Muneer, Ather

    2016-01-01

    Bipolar disorder is a heterogeneous condition with myriad clinical manifestations and many comorbidities leading to severe disabilities in the biopsychosocial realm. The objective of this review article was to underline recent advances in knowledge regarding the neurobiology of bipolar disorder. A further aim was to draw attention to new therapeutic targets in the treatment of bipolar disorder. To accomplish these goals, an electronic search was undertaken of the PubMed database in August 2015 of literature published during the last 10 years on the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder. A wide-ranging evaluation of the existing work was done with search terms such as "mood disorders and biology," "bipolar disorder and HPA axis," "bipolar disorder and cytokines," "mood disorders and circadian rhythm," "bipolar disorder and oxidative stress," etc. This endeavor showed that bipolar disorder is a diverse condition sharing neurobiological mechanisms with major depressive disorder and psychotic spectrum disorders. There is convincing evidence of crosstalk between different biological systems that act in a deleterious manner causing expression of the disease in genetically predisposed individuals. Inflammatory mediators act in concert with oxidative stress to dysregulate hormonal, metabolic, and circadian homeostasis in precipitating and perpetuating the illness. Stress, whether biologically or psychologically mediated, is responsible for the initiation and progression of the diathesis. Bipolar spectrum disorders have a strong genetic component; severe life stresses acting through various paths cause the illness phenotype. PMID:26865997

  4. Aggression and Anxiety: Social Context and Neurobiological Links

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Inga D.; Veenema, Alexa H.; Beiderbeck, Daniela I.

    2009-01-01

    Psychopathologies such as anxiety- and depression-related disorders are often characterized by impaired social behaviours including excessive aggression and violence. Excessive aggression and violence likely develop as a consequence of generally disturbed emotional regulation, such as abnormally high or low levels of anxiety. This suggests an overlap between brain circuitries and neurochemical systems regulating aggression and anxiety. In this review, we will discuss different forms of male aggression, rodent models of excessive aggression, and neurobiological mechanisms underlying male aggression in the context of anxiety. We will summarize our attempts to establish an animal model of high and abnormal aggression using rats selected for high (HAB) vs. low (LAB) anxiety-related behaviour. Briefly, male LAB rats and, to a lesser extent, male HAB rats show high and abnormal forms of aggression compared with non-selected (NAB) rats, making them a suitable animal model for studying excessive aggression in the context of extremes in innate anxiety. In addition, we will discuss differences in the activity of the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis, brain arginine vasopressin, and the serotonin systems, among others, which contribute to the distinct behavioural phenotypes related to aggression and anxiety. Further investigation of the neurobiological systems in animals with distinct anxiety phenotypes might provide valuable information about the link between excessive aggression and disturbed emotional regulation, which is essential for understanding the social and emotional deficits that are characteristic of many human psychiatric disorders. PMID:20407578

  5. Debating the Controlled Substances Act.

    PubMed

    Spillane, Joseph F

    2004-10-01

    In the United States, the basis of modern drug regulation is the Controlled Substances Act (CSA) of 1970. The CSA laid out the authority of the federal government and provided a framework within which all existing and new substances could be regulated on their abuse potential, safety, and medical utility. The debates over the CSA centered on several critical issues: where to place the authority to make scheduling designations, the impact of scheduling on drug research, and defining what constituted drug "abuse" for purposes of scheduling. Passage of the CSA was aided by broad language that provided a kind of "big tent" which could accommodate diverse points of view. A retrospective assessment of the CSA shows it to have greatly expanded federal administrative authority over the nation's drug supply, much as its authors intended. Other impacts of the CSA, however, are much less certain. This article concludes by highlighting the issues and questions that should guide future retrospective research on the efficacy of drug control regimes. PMID:15380285

  6. Abortion: taking the debate seriously.

    PubMed

    Kottow Lang, Miguel Hugo

    2015-05-19

    Voluntarily induced abortion has been under permanent dispute and legal regulations, because societies invariably condemn extramarital pregnancies. In recent decades, a measure of societal tolerance has led to decriminalize and legalize abortion in accordance with one of two models: a more restricted and conservative model known as therapeutic abortion, and the model that accepts voluntary abortion within the first trimester of pregnancy. Liberalization of abortion aims at ending clandestine abortions and decriminalizes the practice in order to increase reproductive education and accessibility of contraceptive methods, dissuade women from interrupting their pregnancy and, ultimately, make abortion a medically safe procedure within the boundaries of the law, inspired by efforts to reduce the incidence of this practice. The current legal initiative to decriminalize abortion in Chile proposes a notably rigid set of indications which would not resolve the three main objectives that need to be considered: 1) Establish the legal framework of abortion; 2) Contribute to reduce social unrest; 3) Solve the public health issue of clandestine, illegal abortions. Debate must urgently be opened to include alternatives in line with the general tendency to respect women's decision within the first trimester of pregnancy.

  7. PREFACE: VII Mexican School on Gravitation and Mathematical Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcubierre Moya, Miguel; García Compeán, Héctor Hugo; Ureña López, Luis Arturo

    2007-07-01

    The present collection of papers was presented during the VII Mexican School on Gravitation and Mathematical Physics, which was held in Playa del Carmen, Quintana Roo, México, from 26 November to 2 December 2006. The Mexican School on Gravitation and Mathematical Physics, sponsored by the Mexican Physical Society, started in 1994 with the purpose of discussing and exchanging current ideas in gravitational physics. Each school has been devoted to a particular subject, and on previous occasions these subjects have covered topics such as supergravity, branes, black holes, the early Universe, observational cosmology, and quantum gravity. At the dawn of the XXI Century, General Relativity has finally become a standard tool in our understanding of numerous astrophysical phenomena. At the same time, the new generation of large interferometric gravitational wave detectors that are just beginning operation holds the promise of finally allowing the detection of gravitational waves and opening a new window on the Universe. However, because of the complexity of the Einstein field equations, the modelling of realistic astrophysical systems and gravitational wave sources can only be done using numerical simulations. Because of this, we have dedicated our VII School to the topic of relativistic astrophysics and numerical relativity. As in all our previous Schools, international leaders in the field were invited to give courses and plenary lectures. The school was complemented with more specialized talks presented in parallel sessions, some of which are included in these proceedings. All the contributions in this volume have been refereed, and they represent a sample of the courses, invited talks and contributed talks presented during our VII School. Our deep gratitude goes to all those who contributed to these proceedings, and to making our VII Mexican School a great success. Miguel Alcubierre Moya, Héctor Hugo García Compeán and Luis Arturo Ureña López Editors

  8. Implementation is crucial but must be neurobiologically grounded. Comment on “Toward a computational framework for cognitive biology: Unifying approaches from cognitive neuroscience and comparative cognition” by W. Tecumseh Fitch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bornkessel-Schlesewsky, Ina; Schlesewsky, Matthias; Small, Steven L.

    2014-09-01

    From the perspective of language, Fitch's [1] claim that theories of cognitive computation should not be separated from those of implementation surely deserves applauding. Recent developments in the Cognitive Neuroscience of Language, leading to the new field of the Neurobiology of Language [2-4], emphasise precisely this point: rather than attempting to simply map cognitive theories of language onto the brain, we should aspire to understand how the brain implements language. This perspective resonates with many of the points raised by Fitch in his review, such as the discussion of unhelpful dichotomies (e.g., Nature versus Nurture). Cognitive dichotomies and debates have repeatedly turned out to be of limited usefulness when it comes to understanding language in the brain. The famous modularity-versus-interactivity and dual route-versus-connectionist debates are cases in point: in spite of hundreds of experiments using neuroimaging (or other techniques), or the construction of myriad computer models, little progress has been made in their resolution. This suggests that dichotomies proposed at a purely cognitive (or computational) level without consideration of biological grounding appear to be "asking the wrong questions" about the neurobiology of language. In accordance with these developments, several recent proposals explicitly consider neurobiological constraints while seeking to explain language processing at a cognitive level (e.g. [5-7]).

  9. Behavior of Np(VII, VI, V) in Silicate Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Shilov, V P.; Fedoseev, A M.; Yusov, A B.; Delegard, Calvin H.

    2004-11-30

    Spectrophotometric methods were used to investigate the properties of neptunium(VII), (VI), and (V) in silicate solution. The transition of cationic neptunium(VII) to anionic species in non-complexing environments proceeds in the range of ?? 5.5 to 7.5. In the presence of carbonate, this transition occurs at ?? 10.0 to 11.5 and in silicate solutions at ?? 10.5-12.0. These findings show that cationic neptunium(VII) forms complexes with both carbonate and silicate and that the silicate complex is stronger than that of the carbonate. The competition of complex formation reactions for neptunium(VI) with carbonate and silicate and on the known complex stability constant of NpO2(CO3)34- allowed the NpO2SiO3 complex stability constant, log ? = 16.5, to be estimated. Determination of the formation constant of Np(V) complexes with SiO32- was not possible using similar methods.

  10. Water excitation MPRAGE MRI of VII and VIII cranial nerves

    SciTech Connect

    Litt, A.W.; Licata, P.; Knopp, E.A.; Thomasson, D.M.

    1996-03-01

    Our goal was to compare magnetization prepared rapid gradient echo-water excitation (MPR-AGE-WE) with conventional spin echo (CSE) in the evaluation of the VII and VIII cranial nerves. One hundred three consecutive patients with symptoms referable to the VII/VIII nerves were studied with CSE T1 and MPRAGE-WE following intravenous gadolinium, contrast agent. Each right and left nerve pair was independently evaluated for the presence of an enhancing mass and for visualization of the nerves. On the CSE images, 26 definite and 2 possible lesions were identified, whereas 28 definite and 2 possible abnormalities were seen on the MPRAGE-WE. Four cases were better identified on the MPRAGE-WE and one better seen on the CSE. This difference was not statistically significant (p = 0. 19). CSE demonstrated the nerves partially in 23 instances and completely in 6; MPRAGE-WE showed the nerves partially in 35 and completely in 73. This was highly significant (p < 0.001). With equivalent or slightly improved lesion detection and better visualization of the nerves, MPRAGE-WE may replace CSE in studying the VII/VIII nerves. 14 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. CROSS SECTION EVALUATIONS FOR ENDF/B-VII.

    SciTech Connect

    HERMAN, M.; ROCHMAN, D.; OBLOZINSKY, P.

    2006-06-05

    This is the final report of the work performed under the LANL contract on neutron cross section evaluations for ENDF/B-VII (April 2005-May 2006). The purpose of the contract was to ensure seamless integration of the LANL neutron cross section evaluations in the new ENDF/B-VII library. The following work was performed: (1) LANL evaluated data files submitted for inclusion in ENDF/B-VII were checked and, when necessary, formal formatting errors were corrected. As a consequence, ENDF checking codes, run on all LANL files, do not report any errors that would rise concern. (2) LANL dosimetry evaluations for {sup 191}Ir and {sup 193}Ir were completed to match ENDF requirements for the general purpose library suitable for transport calculations. A set of covariances for both isotopes is included in the ENDF files. (3) Library of fission products was assembled and successfully tested with ENDF checking codes, processed with NJOY-99.125 and simple MCNP calculations. (4) KALMAN code has been integrated with the EMPIRE system to allow estimation of covariances based on the combination of measurements and model calculations. Covariances were produced for 155,157-Gd and also for 6 remaining isotopes of Gd.

  12. Comments on the DDREF estimate of the BEIR VII Committee.

    PubMed

    Hoel, David G

    2015-03-01

    Radiation cancer risk estimates have been based primarily on the atomic bomb survivor cohorts, which involve an acute exposure. To adjust for lower dose and continuous exposures, a dose and dose rate effectiveness factor (DDREF) is applied to the acute risk estimates. The commonly accepted value for the DDREF at 1 Gy by the ICRP and the NCRP has been 2. BEIR VII changed this by estimating the value to be 1.5 including an uncertainty distribution. The BEIR VII committee used the atomic bomb solid cancer incidence data to make this estimation, and they chose to truncate the data at 1.5 Gy. The Committee also used the Oak Ridge mouse studies and estimated a DDREF based on these data. Finally they used the animal data-derived DDREF distribution as a Bayesian prior distribution for the atomic bomb survivor DDREF distribution and used the posterior distribution as their DDREF result. The resulting distribution had a maximum likelihood estimate of 1.4, and the Committee chose 1.5 as their best estimate. The purpose of this paper is to reexamine the BEIR VII analysis of both the atomic bomb survivor data and the mouse data. Based upon this analysis, the author concludes that changing the DDREF from 2 to 1.5 is not justified. PMID:25627947

  13. Group VII ethylene response factor diversification and regulation in four species from flood-prone environments.

    PubMed

    van Veen, Hans; Akman, Melis; Jamar, Diaan C L; Vreugdenhil, Dick; Kooiker, Maarten; van Tienderen, Peter; Voesenek, Laurentius A C J; Schranz, M Eric; Sasidharan, Rashmi

    2014-10-01

    Flooding events negatively affect plant performance and survival. Flooding gradients thereby determine the dynamics in vegetation composition and species abundance. In adaptation to flooding, the group VII Ethylene Response Factor genes (ERF-VIIs) play pivotal roles in rice and Arabidopsis through regulation of anaerobic gene expression and antithetical survival strategies. We investigated if ERF-VIIs have a similar role in mediating survival strategies in eudicot species from flood-prone environments. Here, we studied the evolutionary origin and regulation of ERF-VII transcript abundance and the physiological responses in species from two genera of divergent taxonomic lineages (Rumex and Rorippa). Synteny analysis revealed that angiosperm ERF-VIIs arose from two ancestral loci and that subsequent diversification and duplication led to the present ERF-VII variation. We propose that subtle variation in the regulation of ERF-VII transcript abundance could explain variation in tolerance among Rorippa species. In Rumex, the main difference in flood tolerance correlated with the genetic variation in ERF-VII genes. Large transcriptional differences were found by comparing the two genera: darkness and dark submergence-induced Rumex ERF-VIIs, whereas HRE2 expression was increased in submerged Rorippa roots. We conclude that the involvement of ERF-VIIs in flooding tolerance developed in a phylogenetic-dependent manner, with subtle variations within taxonomic clades.

  14. Advances and Future Directions in the Study of Children's Neurobiological Responses to Trauma and Violence Exposure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bevans, Katherine; Cerbone, Arleen B.; Overstreet, Stacy

    2005-01-01

    One of the most exciting developments to emerge from the field in the past 20 years is the increasing attention to neurobiological responses to violence and trauma exposure. Although researchers have yet to identify a consensual pattern of neurobiological response to violence and trauma exposure, it does appear that some type of alteration in the…

  15. Potassium chloride-bearing ice VII and ice planet dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Mark R.; Scott, Henry P.; Aarestad, Elizabeth; Prakapenka, Vitali B.

    2016-02-01

    Accurate modeling of planetary interiors requires that the pressure-volume-temperature (PVT) properties of phases present within the body be well understood. The high-pressure polymorphs of H2O have been studied extensively due to the abundance of ice phases in icy moons and, likely, vast number of extra-solar planetary bodies, with only select studies evaluating impurity-laden ices. In this study, ice formed from a 1.6 mol percent KCl-bearing aqueous solution was studied up to 32.89 ± 0.19 GPa and 625 K, and the incorporation of K+ and Cl- ionic impurities into the ice VII structure was documented. The compression data at 295 K were fit with a third order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state and yielded a bulk modulus (KT0), its pressure derivative (KT0‧), and zero pressure volume (V0) of 24.7 ± 0.9 GPa, 4.44 ± 0.09, and 39.2 ± 0.2 Å3, respectively. The impurity-laden ice was found to be 6-8% denser than ice VII formed from pure H2O. Thermal expansion coefficients were also determined for several isothermal compression curves at elevated temperatures, and a PVT equation of state was obtained. The melting curve of ice VII with incorporated K+ and Cl- was estimated by fitting experimental data up to 10.2 ± 0.4 GPa, where melting occurred at 625 K, to the Simon-Glatzel equation. The melting curve of this impurity-laden ice is systematically depressed relative to that of pure H2O by approximately 45 K and 80 K at 4 and 11 GPa, respectively. A portion of the K+ and Cl- contained within the ice VII structure was observed to exsolve with increasing temperature. This suggests that an internal differentiating process could concentrate a K-rich phase deep within H2O-rich planets, and we speculate that this could supply an additional source of heat through the radioactive decay of 40K. Our data illustrate ice VII can incorporate significant concentrations of K+ and Cl- and increasing the possibility of deep-sourced and solute-rich plumes in moderate to large sized H2O

  16. School Boundary Debate Divides Minnesota Suburb

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samuels, Christina A.

    2011-01-01

    The author discusses how an assignment plan intended to keep schools socioeconomically balanced spurs a bitter debate in suburban Eden Prairie. The boundary debate in the 9,700-student Eden Prairie, Minnesota, district has been bruising. Eden Prairie adopted new school attendance boundaries this year based on socioeconomic balance, ensuring for…

  17. Presidential debates and change in students' attitude.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Everton G

    2002-02-01

    The effects of debates on influencing potential voters' attitudes were assessed in a group of 45 undergraduates who watched the third presidential debate of election year 2000 between candidates Bush and Gore. A repeated measures t test indicated a significant change in immediate ratings of attitude from pretest to posttest, with Gore being rated higher at posttest.

  18. The Subtle Nature of Presidential Debate Influence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfau, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Argues that the influence of televised, general election, presidential debates on prospective voters' perceptions of participating candidates may be larger than previous research suggests. Finds that two sources of debate effects have gone largely undetected to date: those based on candidates' relational communication, and those which are…

  19. 11 CFR 110.13 - Candidate debates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... parties may stage candidate debates in accordance with this section and 11 CFR 114.4(f). (2) Broadcasters...), provided that they are not owned or controlled by a political party, political committee or candidate. In... political party as the sole objective criterion to determine whether to include a candidate in a debate....

  20. The Affirmative Action Debate: A Critical Reflection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Wyk, Berte

    2010-01-01

    In this article I contend that we cannot divorce affirmative action from issues about race and racism. Further, debates on affirmative action have to acknowledge the power of words/concepts/definitions and how they can be constructed and used for the purposes of domination or liberation. I argue that, in debating affirmative action, we have to…

  1. Media Nihilism and the Presidential Debates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hogan, J. Michael

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the function of media nihilism--the rhetoric of "crisis and failure"--in the 1988 Presidential Debates. Examines journalists' debate questions, noting that they painted an almost wholly negative portrait of America. Suggests that the candidate who effectively "skewers" the media on its own hypocrisy should be declared the debate…

  2. Using Debates to Teach Information Ethics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peace, A. Graham

    2011-01-01

    This experience report details the use of debates in a course on Information Ethics. Formal debates have been used in academia for centuries and create an environment in which students must think critically, communicate well and, above all, synthesize and evaluate the relevant classroom material. They also provide a break from the standard…

  3. The United States: A Persistent Debate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Scotter, Richard; Hartoonian, H. Michael; White, William E.; Davis, James E.

    2007-01-01

    American democratic society is sustained through debate among its citizens. Four sets of value tensions--(1) law versus ethics, (2) private wealth versus common wealth, (3) freedom versus equality, and (4) unity versus diversity--are central in allowing citizens to address matters of public interest through debate. These value pairs are the…

  4. Colleges Call Debate Contests out of Order

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jeffrey R.

    2008-01-01

    Competitive debate has traditionally served as a laboratory for the democratic process and an important training ground for future policy makers. In recent years, a growing number of teams have played the game out of traditional bounds. They have turned events into commentaries on debate itself, in performances that bear little resemblance to the…

  5. Debate Revives Old Arguments on HPV Vaccine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shah, Nirvi

    2011-01-01

    The author reports on a Republican presidential debate which revives the contention over requiring middle school girls to be vaccinated against the virus that causes cervical cancer. At the September 12 debate, U.S. Representative Michele Bachmann, of Minnesota, and Rick Santorum, a former U.S. senator from Pennsylvania, attacked Texas Governor…

  6. Industry Interests in the HDTV Debate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neil, Suzanne Chambliss

    This analysis of the pattern of industrial interests in the current debate over high definition television systems argues that the debate involves more than just television; rather, it is an expression of a shift in the conceptualization of the nature of standards, one which conceives of standards as guidelines for the development of specific…

  7. A Taxonomy of CEDA Debate Critics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dudczak, Craig A.; Day, Donald L.

    To develop a taxonomy of Cross Examination Debate Association (CEDA) critics, a study associated professed judging philosophy and responses to survey questions with ballot behavior and elaborated judging profiles. Subjects were debate critics who judged rounds at CEDA tournaments in the Northeast during the Spring 1989 season. In all, 13 critics…

  8. Anticancer Activity of the Antimicrobial Peptide Scolopendrasin VII Derived from the Centipede, Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joon Ha; Kim, In-Woo; Kim, Sang-Hee; Kim, Mi-Ae; Yun, Eun-Young; Nam, Sung-Hee; Ahn, Mi-Young; Kang, Dongchul; Hwang, Jae Sam

    2015-08-01

    Previously, we performed de novo RNA sequencing of Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans using high-throughput sequencing technology and identified several antimicrobial peptide candidates. Among them, a cationic antimicrobial peptide, scolopendrasin VII, was selected based on its physicochemical properties, such as length, charge, and isoelectric point. Here, we assessed the anticancer activities of scolopendrasin VII against U937 and Jurkat leukemia cell lines. The results showed that scolopendrasin VII decreased the viability of the leukemia cells in MTS assays. Furthermore, flow cytometric analysis and acridine orange/ethidium bromide staining revealed that scolopendrasin VII induced necrosis in the leukemia cells. Scolopendrasin VII-induced necrosis was mediated by specific interaction with phosphatidylserine, which is enriched in the membrane of cancer cells. Taken together, these data indicated that scolopendrasin VII induced necrotic cell death in leukemia cells, probably through interaction with phosphatidylserine. The results provide a useful anticancer peptide candidate and an efficient strategy for new anticancer peptide development.

  9. Anticancer Activity of the Antimicrobial Peptide Scolopendrasin VII Derived from the Centipede, Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joon Ha; Kim, In-Woo; Kim, Sang-Hee; Kim, Mi-Ae; Yun, Eun-Young; Nam, Sung-Hee; Ahn, Mi-Young; Kang, Dongchul; Hwang, Jae Sam

    2015-08-01

    Previously, we performed de novo RNA sequencing of Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans using high-throughput sequencing technology and identified several antimicrobial peptide candidates. Among them, a cationic antimicrobial peptide, scolopendrasin VII, was selected based on its physicochemical properties, such as length, charge, and isoelectric point. Here, we assessed the anticancer activities of scolopendrasin VII against U937 and Jurkat leukemia cell lines. The results showed that scolopendrasin VII decreased the viability of the leukemia cells in MTS assays. Furthermore, flow cytometric analysis and acridine orange/ethidium bromide staining revealed that scolopendrasin VII induced necrosis in the leukemia cells. Scolopendrasin VII-induced necrosis was mediated by specific interaction with phosphatidylserine, which is enriched in the membrane of cancer cells. Taken together, these data indicated that scolopendrasin VII induced necrotic cell death in leukemia cells, probably through interaction with phosphatidylserine. The results provide a useful anticancer peptide candidate and an efficient strategy for new anticancer peptide development. PMID:25907065

  10. Slowing Down: Age-Related Neurobiological Predictors of Processing Speed

    PubMed Central

    Eckert, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    Processing speed, or the rate at which tasks can be performed, is a robust predictor of age-related cognitive decline and an indicator of independence among older adults. This review examines evidence for neurobiological predictors of age-related changes in processing speed, which is guided in part by our source based morphometry findings that unique patterns of frontal and cerebellar gray matter predict age-related variation in processing speed. These results, together with the extant literature on morphological predictors of age-related changes in processing speed, suggest that specific neural systems undergo declines and as a result slow processing speed. Future studies of processing speed – dependent neural systems will be important for identifying the etiologies for processing speed change and the development of interventions that mitigate gradual age-related declines in cognitive functioning and enhance healthy cognitive aging. PMID:21441995

  11. Developmental neurobiology of cognitive control and motivational systems

    PubMed Central

    Somerville, Leah H.; Casey, BJ

    2010-01-01

    One form of cognitive control is the ability to resist temptation in favor of long-term goal-oriented behavior. Historically, the development of cognitive control capacity has been described by a linear function from infancy to adulthood. However, the context in which control is required can impact this capacity, such that emotionally charged or rewarding contexts can diminish control. More recently, studies have begun to examine the development of cognitive control in contexts that vary in motivation. These studies suggest specific windows of development in which cognitive control capacity is more vulnerable to incentive-based modulation. In this review we highlight the most recent work on neurobiological changes supporting motivational and cognitive development, underscoring the importance of functional organization and development of the underlying circuitry implicated in these processes, and provide a theoretical perspective that moves away from discussing singular functional regions toward considering functional circuitry. PMID:20167473

  12. Neurobiological basis of head motion in brain imaging.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Ling-Li; Wang, Danhong; Fox, Michael D; Sabuncu, Mert; Hu, Dewen; Ge, Manling; Buckner, Randy L; Liu, Hesheng

    2014-04-22

    Individual differences in brain metrics, especially connectivity measured with functional MRI, can correlate with differences in motion during data collection. The assumption has been that motion causes artifactual differences in brain connectivity that must and can be corrected. Here we propose that differences in brain connectivity can also represent a neurobiological trait that predisposes to differences in motion. We support this possibility with an analysis of intra- versus intersubject differences in connectivity comparing high- to low-motion subgroups. Intersubject analysis identified a correlate of head motion consisting of reduced distant functional connectivity primarily in the default network in individuals with high head motion. Similar connectivity differences were not found in analysis of intrasubject data. Instead, this correlate of head motion was a stable property in individuals across time. These findings suggest that motion-associated differences in brain connectivity cannot fully be attributed to motion artifacts but rather also reflect individual variability in functional organization.

  13. Current understanding of the neurobiology of major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Chiriţă, Anca Livia; Gheorman, Victor; Bondari, Dan; Rogoveanu, Ion

    2015-01-01

    Depression is highly prevalent worldwide and associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Approximately 340 million people worldwide suffer from depression at any given time. Based on estimates from the World Health Organization (WHO), depression is responsible for the greatest proportion of burden associated with non-fatal health outcomes and accounts for approximately 12% total years lived with disability. Probably no single risk factor can be completely isolated in major depressive disorder (MDD), as interactions between many sources of vulnerability are the most likely explanation. Buttressing the identification of grief, demoralization, hopelessness and styles of psychological coping of the depressed patient are vital, ongoing scientific developments that flow from an increased understanding of this interplay amongst the immune system, endocrine system and brain. The rapidly accumulating body of neurobiological knowledge has catalyzed fundamental changes in how we conceptualize depressive symptoms and has important implications regarding the treatment and even prevention of depressive symptoms in patients.

  14. Lessons from fragile X regarding neurobiology, autism, and neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Hagerman, Randi J

    2006-02-01

    The fragile X mental retardation 1 gene (FMR1) mutation causes two disorders: fragile X syndrome (FXS) in those with the full mutation and the fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS) in some older individuals with the premutation. FXS is caused by a deficiency of the FMR1 protein (FMRP) leading to dysregulation of many genes that create a phenotype with ADHD, anxiety, and autism. FXTAS is caused by the elevation of FMR1-mRNA to levels 2 to 8 times normal in the premutation. This causes an RNA gain of function toxicity leading to brain atrophy, white matter disease, neuronal and astrocytic inclusion formation, and subsequent ataxia, intention tremor, peripheral neuropathy, and cognitive decline. The neurobiology and pathophysiology of FXS and FXTAS are described in detail.

  15. New insights on neurobiological mechanisms underlying alcohol addiction.

    PubMed

    Cui, Changhai; Noronha, Antonio; Morikawa, Hitoshi; Alvarez, Veronica A; Stuber, Garret D; Szumlinski, Karen K; Kash, Thomas L; Roberto, Marisa; Wilcox, Mark V

    2013-04-01

    Alcohol dependence/addiction is mediated by complex neural mechanisms that involve multiple brain circuits and neuroadaptive changes in a variety of neurotransmitter and neuropeptide systems. Although recent studies have provided substantial information on the neurobiological mechanisms that drive alcohol drinking behavior, significant challenges remain in understanding how alcohol-induced neuroadaptations occur and how different neurocircuits and pathways cross-talk. This review article highlights recent progress in understanding neural mechanisms of alcohol addiction from the perspectives of the development and maintenance of alcohol dependence. It provides insights on cross talks of different mechanisms and reviews the latest studies on metaplasticity, structural plasticity, interface of reward and stress pathways, and cross-talk of different neural signaling systems involved in binge-like drinking and alcohol dependence. PMID:23159531

  16. A neurobiological approach to the cognitive deficits of psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Etkin, Amit; Gyurak, Anett; O'Hara, Ruth

    2013-12-01

    Deficits in brain networks that support cognitive regulatory functions are prevalent in many psychiatric disorders. Findings across neuropsychology and neuroimaging point to broad-based impairments that cross traditional diagnostic boundaries. These dysfunctions are largely separate from the classical symptoms of the disorders, and manifest in regulatory problems in both traditional cognitive and emotional domains. As such, they relate to the capacity of patients to engage effectively in their daily lives and activity, often persist even in the face of symptomatically effective treatment, and are poorly targeted by current treatments. Advances in cognitive neuroscience now allow us to ground an understanding of these cognitive regulatory deficits in the function and interaction of key brain networks. This emerging neurobiological understanding furthermore points to several promising routes for novel neuroscience-informed treatments targeted more specifically at improving cognitive function in a range of psychiatric disorders.

  17. [From inducers of panic attack to neurobiology of panic disorder].

    PubMed

    Bourin, M

    1996-12-01

    Various provocative agents, including sodium lactate, carbon dioxide (CO2), caffeine, yohimbine and cholecystokinin (CCK), have been utilized as panicogenics in studies on healthy volunteers as well as in panic disorder patients. Most provocative agents are lacking in specificity, limiting their use in identifying neurotransmitter systems involved in panic attacks. CCK appears to offer several advantages over other challenge strategies since it is a putative neurotransmitter in the CNS, with its own neuronal pathways and receptors, and reliably provokes panic attacks in a dose-dependent manner. It is important to clarify the relationships between CCK and other neurotransmitter systems in order to further understand the neurobiology of panic disorder. The possible roles of some of these neurotransmitters in panic disorder are discussed in this review.

  18. Sex Differences in Stress-Related Psychiatric Disorders: Neurobiological Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Bangasser, Debra A.; Valentino, Rita J.

    2014-01-01

    Stress is associated with the onset and severity of several psychiatric disorders that occur more frequently in women than men, including posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression. Patients with these disorders present with dysregulation of several stress response systems, including the neuroendocrine response to stress, corticolimbic responses to negatively valenced stimuli, and hyperarousal. Thus, sex differences within their underlying circuitry may explain sex biases in disease prevalence. This review describes clinical studies that identify sex differences within the activity of these circuits, as well as preclinical studies that demonstrate cellular and molecular sex differences in stress responses systems. These studies reveal sex differences from the molecular to the systems level that increase endocrine, emotional, and arousal responses to stress in females. Exploring these sex differences is critical because this research can reveal the neurobiological underpinnings of vulnerability to stress-related psychiatric disorders and guide the development of novel pharmacotherapies. PMID:24726661

  19. Recent advances in neuroimaging to model eating disorder neurobiology.

    PubMed

    Frank, Guido K W

    2015-04-01

    The eating disorders (EDs) anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia nervosa (BN), and binge eating disorder (BED) are severe psychiatric disorders with high mortality. There are many symptoms, such as food restriction, episodic binge eating, purging, or excessive exercise that are either overlapping or lie on opposite ends of a scale or spectrum across those disorders. Identifying how specific ED behaviors are linked to particular neurobiological mechanisms could help better categorize ED subgroups and develop specific treatments. This review provides support from recent brain imaging research that brain structure and function measures can be linked to disorder-specific biological or behavioral variables, which may help distinguish ED subgroups, or find commonalities between them. Brain structure and function may therefore be suitable research targets to further study the relationship between dimensions of behavior and brain function relevant to EDs and beyond the categorical AN, BN, and BED distinctions.

  20. Optogenetics: a new enlightenment age for zebrafish neurobiology.

    PubMed

    Del Bene, Filippo; Wyart, Claire

    2012-03-01

    Zebrafish became a model of choice for neurobiology because of the transparency of its brain and because of its amenability to genetic manipulation. In particular, at early stages of development the intact larva is an ideal system to apply optical techniques for deep imaging in the nervous system, as well as genetically encoded tools for targeting subsets of neurons and monitoring and manipulating their activity. For these applications,new genetically encoded optical tools, fluorescent sensors, and light-gated channels have been generated,creating the field of "optogenetics." It is now possible to monitor and control neuronal activity with minimal perturbation and unprecedented spatio-temporal resolution.We describe here the main achievements that have occurred in the last decade in imaging and manipulating neuronal activity in intact zebrafish larvae. We provide also examples of functional dissection of neuronal circuits achieved with the applications of these techniques in the visual and locomotor systems.

  1. Astronomers debate diamonds in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-04-01

    This is not the first time the intriguing carbonaceous compound has been detected in space. A peculiar elite of twelve stars are known to produce it. The star now added by ISO to this elite is one of the best representatives of this exclusive family, since it emits a very strong signal of the compound. Additionally ISO found a second new member of the group with weaker emission, and also observed with a spectral resolution never achieved before other already known stars in this class. Astronomers think these ISO results will help solve the mystery of the true nature of the compound. Their publication by two different groups, from Spain and Canada, has triggered a debate on the topic, both in astronomy institutes and in chemistry laboratories. At present, mixed teams of astrophysicists and chemists are investigating in the lab compounds whose chemical signature or "fingerprint" matches that detected by ISO. Neither diamonds nor fullerenes have ever been detected in space, but their presence has been predicted. Tiny diamonds of pre-solar origin --older than the Solar System-- have been found in meteorites, which supports the as yet unconfirmed theory of their presence in interstellar space. The fullerene molecule, made of 60 carbon atoms linked to form a sphere (hence the name "buckyball"), has also been extensively searched for in space but never found. If the carbonaceous compound detected by ISO is a fullerene or a diamond, there will be new data on the production of these industrially interesting materials. Fullerenes are being investigated as "capsules" to deliver new pharmaceuticals to the body. Diamonds are commonly used in the electronics industry and for the development of new materials; if they are formed in the dust surrounding some stars, at relatively low temperatures and conditions of low pressure, companies could learn more about the ideal physical conditions to produce them. A textbook case The latest star in which the compound has been found is

  2. Adolescent Alcohol Exposure Persistently Impacts Adult Neurobiology and Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Vetreno, Ryan P.; Broadwater, Margaret A.; Robinson, Donita L.

    2016-01-01

    Adolescence is a developmental period when physical and cognitive abilities are optimized, when social skills are consolidated, and when sexuality, adolescent behaviors, and frontal cortical functions mature to adult levels. Adolescents also have unique responses to alcohol compared with adults, being less sensitive to ethanol sedative–motor responses that most likely contribute to binge drinking and blackouts. Population studies find that an early age of drinking onset correlates with increased lifetime risks for the development of alcohol dependence, violence, and injuries. Brain synapses, myelination, and neural circuits mature in adolescence to adult levels in parallel with increased reflection on the consequence of actions and reduced impulsivity and thrill seeking. Alcohol binge drinking could alter human development, but variations in genetics, peer groups, family structure, early life experiences, and the emergence of psychopathology in humans confound studies. As adolescence is common to mammalian species, preclinical models of binge drinking provide insight into the direct impact of alcohol on adolescent development. This review relates human findings to basic science studies, particularly the preclinical studies of the Neurobiology of Adolescent Drinking in Adulthood (NADIA) Consortium. These studies focus on persistent adult changes in neurobiology and behavior following adolescent intermittent ethanol (AIE), a model of underage drinking. NADIA studies and others find that AIE results in the following: increases in adult alcohol drinking, disinhibition, and social anxiety; altered adult synapses, cognition, and sleep; reduced adult neurogenesis, cholinergic, and serotonergic neurons; and increased neuroimmune gene expression and epigenetic modifiers of gene expression. Many of these effects are specific to adolescents and not found in parallel adult studies. AIE can cause a persistence of adolescent-like synaptic physiology, behavior, and sensitivity

  3. What artificial grammar learning reveals about the neurobiology of syntax.

    PubMed

    Petersson, Karl-Magnus; Folia, Vasiliki; Hagoort, Peter

    2012-02-01

    In this paper we examine the neurobiological correlates of syntax, the processing of structured sequences, by comparing FMRI results on artificial and natural language syntax. We discuss these and similar findings in the context of formal language and computability theory. We used a simple right-linear unification grammar in an implicit artificial grammar learning paradigm in 32 healthy Dutch university students (natural language FMRI data were already acquired for these participants). We predicted that artificial syntax processing would engage the left inferior frontal region (BA 44/45) and that this activation would overlap with syntax-related variability observed in the natural language experiment. The main findings of this study show that the left inferior frontal region centered on BA 44/45 is active during artificial syntax processing of well-formed (grammatical) sequence independent of local subsequence familiarity. The same region is engaged to a greater extent when a syntactic violation is present and structural unification becomes difficult or impossible. The effects related to artificial syntax in the left inferior frontal region (BA 44/45) were essentially identical when we masked these with activity related to natural syntax in the same subjects. Finally, the medial temporal lobe was deactivated during this operation, consistent with the view that implicit processing does not rely on declarative memory mechanisms that engage the medial temporal lobe. In the context of recent FMRI findings, we raise the question whether Broca's region (or subregions) is specifically related to syntactic movement operations or the processing of hierarchically nested non-adjacent dependencies in the discussion section. We conclude that this is not the case. Instead, we argue that the left inferior frontal region is a generic on-line sequence processor that unifies information from various sources in an incremental and recursive manner, independent of whether there are any

  4. Early interpersonal neurobiological assessment of attachment and autistic spectrum disorders

    PubMed Central

    Schore, Allan N.

    2014-01-01

    There is now a strong if not urgent call in both the attachment and autism literatures for updated, research informed, clinically relevant interventions that can more effectively assess the mother infant dyad during early periods of brain plasticity. In this contribution I describe my work in regulation theory, an overarching interpersonal neurobiological model of the development, psychopathogenesis, and treatment of the early forming subjective self system. The theory models the psychoneurobiological mechanisms by which early rapid, spontaneous and thereby implicit emotionally laden attachment communications indelibly impact the experience-dependent maturation of the right brain, the “emotional brain.” Reciprocal right-lateralized visual-facial, auditory-prosodic, and tactile–gestural non-verbal communications lie at the psychobiological core of the emotional attachment bond between the infant and primary caregiver. These affective communications can in turn be interactively regulated by the primary caregiver, thereby expanding the infant’s developing right brain regulatory systems. Regulated and dysregulated bodily based communications can be assessed in order to determine the ongoing status of both the infant’s emotional and social development as well as the quality and efficiency of the infant–mother attachment relationship. I then apply the model to the assessment of early stages of autism. Developmental neurobiological research documents significant alterations of the early developing right brain in autistic infants and toddlers, as well profound attachment failures and intersubjective deficits in autistic infant–mother dyads. Throughout I offer implications of the theory for clinical assessment models. This work suggests that recent knowledge of the social and emotional functions of the early developing right brain may not only bridge the attachment and autism worlds, but facilitate more effective attachment and autism models of early

  5. What artificial grammar learning reveals about the neurobiology of syntax.

    PubMed

    Petersson, Karl-Magnus; Folia, Vasiliki; Hagoort, Peter

    2012-02-01

    In this paper we examine the neurobiological correlates of syntax, the processing of structured sequences, by comparing FMRI results on artificial and natural language syntax. We discuss these and similar findings in the context of formal language and computability theory. We used a simple right-linear unification grammar in an implicit artificial grammar learning paradigm in 32 healthy Dutch university students (natural language FMRI data were already acquired for these participants). We predicted that artificial syntax processing would engage the left inferior frontal region (BA 44/45) and that this activation would overlap with syntax-related variability observed in the natural language experiment. The main findings of this study show that the left inferior frontal region centered on BA 44/45 is active during artificial syntax processing of well-formed (grammatical) sequence independent of local subsequence familiarity. The same region is engaged to a greater extent when a syntactic violation is present and structural unification becomes difficult or impossible. The effects related to artificial syntax in the left inferior frontal region (BA 44/45) were essentially identical when we masked these with activity related to natural syntax in the same subjects. Finally, the medial temporal lobe was deactivated during this operation, consistent with the view that implicit processing does not rely on declarative memory mechanisms that engage the medial temporal lobe. In the context of recent FMRI findings, we raise the question whether Broca's region (or subregions) is specifically related to syntactic movement operations or the processing of hierarchically nested non-adjacent dependencies in the discussion section. We conclude that this is not the case. Instead, we argue that the left inferior frontal region is a generic on-line sequence processor that unifies information from various sources in an incremental and recursive manner, independent of whether there are any

  6. Speech perception at the interface of neurobiology and linguistics.

    PubMed

    Poeppel, David; Idsardi, William J; van Wassenhove, Virginie

    2008-03-12

    Speech perception consists of a set of computations that take continuously varying acoustic waveforms as input and generate discrete representations that make contact with the lexical representations stored in long-term memory as output. Because the perceptual objects that are recognized by the speech perception enter into subsequent linguistic computation, the format that is used for lexical representation and processing fundamentally constrains the speech perceptual processes. Consequently, theories of speech perception must, at some level, be tightly linked to theories of lexical representation. Minimally, speech perception must yield representations that smoothly and rapidly interface with stored lexical items. Adopting the perspective of Marr, we argue and provide neurobiological and psychophysical evidence for the following research programme. First, at the implementational level, speech perception is a multi-time resolution process, with perceptual analyses occurring concurrently on at least two time scales (approx. 20-80 ms, approx. 150-300 ms), commensurate with (sub)segmental and syllabic analyses, respectively. Second, at the algorithmic level, we suggest that perception proceeds on the basis of internal forward models, or uses an 'analysis-by-synthesis' approach. Third, at the computational level (in the sense of Marr), the theory of lexical representation that we adopt is principally informed by phonological research and assumes that words are represented in the mental lexicon in terms of sequences of discrete segments composed of distinctive features. One important goal of the research programme is to develop linking hypotheses between putative neurobiological primitives (e.g. temporal primitives) and those primitives derived from linguistic inquiry, to arrive ultimately at a biologically sensible and theoretically satisfying model of representation and computation in speech.

  7. Neurobiological mechanisms contributing to alcohol-stress-anxiety interactions.

    PubMed

    Silberman, Yuval; Bajo, Michal; Chappell, Ann M; Christian, Daniel T; Cruz, Maureen; Diaz, Marvin R; Kash, Thomas; Lack, Anna K; Messing, Robert O; Siggins, George R; Winder, Danny; Roberto, Marisa; McCool, Brian A; Weiner, Jeff L

    2009-11-01

    This article summarizes the proceedings of a symposium that was presented at a conference entitled "Alcoholism and Stress: A Framework for Future Treatment Strategies." The conference was held in Volterra, Italy on May 6-9, 2008 and this symposium was chaired by Jeff L. Weiner. The overall goal of this session was to review recent findings that may shed new light on the neurobiological mechanisms that underlie the complex relationships between stress, anxiety, and alcoholism. Dr. Danny Winder described a novel interaction between D1 receptor activation and the corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF) system that leads to an increase in glutamatergic synaptic transmission in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis. Dr. Marisa Roberto presented recent data describing how protein kinase C epsilon, ethanol, and CRF interact to alter GABAergic inhibition in the central nucleus of the amygdala. Dr. Jeff Weiner presented recent advances in our understanding of inhibitory circuitry within the basolateral amygdala (BLA) and how acute ethanol exposure enhances GABAergic inhibition in these pathways. Finally, Dr. Brian McCool discussed recent findings on complementary glutamatergic and GABAergic adaptations to chronic ethanol exposure and withdrawal in the BLA. Collectively, these investigators have identified novel mechanisms through which neurotransmitter and neuropeptide systems interact to modulate synaptic activity in stress and anxiety circuits. Their studies have also begun to describe how acute and chronic ethanol exposure influence excitatory and inhibitory synaptic communication in these pathways. These findings point toward a number of novel neurobiological targets that may prove useful for the development of more effective treatment strategies for alcohol use disorders.

  8. Early interpersonal neurobiological assessment of attachment and autistic spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Schore, Allan N

    2014-01-01

    There is now a strong if not urgent call in both the attachment and autism literatures for updated, research informed, clinically relevant interventions that can more effectively assess the mother infant dyad during early periods of brain plasticity. In this contribution I describe my work in regulation theory, an overarching interpersonal neurobiological model of the development, psychopathogenesis, and treatment of the early forming subjective self system. The theory models the psychoneurobiological mechanisms by which early rapid, spontaneous and thereby implicit emotionally laden attachment communications indelibly impact the experience-dependent maturation of the right brain, the "emotional brain." Reciprocal right-lateralized visual-facial, auditory-prosodic, and tactile-gestural non-verbal communications lie at the psychobiological core of the emotional attachment bond between the infant and primary caregiver. These affective communications can in turn be interactively regulated by the primary caregiver, thereby expanding the infant's developing right brain regulatory systems. Regulated and dysregulated bodily based communications can be assessed in order to determine the ongoing status of both the infant's emotional and social development as well as the quality and efficiency of the infant-mother attachment relationship. I then apply the model to the assessment of early stages of autism. Developmental neurobiological research documents significant alterations of the early developing right brain in autistic infants and toddlers, as well profound attachment failures and intersubjective deficits in autistic infant-mother dyads. Throughout I offer implications of the theory for clinical assessment models. This work suggests that recent knowledge of the social and emotional functions of the early developing right brain may not only bridge the attachment and autism worlds, but facilitate more effective attachment and autism models of early intervention.

  9. Neurobiological Correlates of EMDR Monitoring – An EEG Study

    PubMed Central

    Pagani, Marco; Di Lorenzo, Giorgio; Verardo, Anna Rita; Nicolais, Giampaolo; Monaco, Leonardo; Lauretti, Giada; Russo, Rita; Niolu, Cinzia; Ammaniti, Massimo; Fernandez, Isabel; Siracusano, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Background Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) is a recognized first-line treatment for psychological trauma. However its neurobiological bases have yet to be fully disclosed. Methods Electroencephalography (EEG) was used to fully monitor neuronal activation throughout EMDR sessions including the autobiographical script. Ten patients with major psychological trauma were investigated during their first EMDR session (T0) and during the last one performed after processing the index trauma (T1). Neuropsychological tests were administered at the same time. Comparisons were performed between EEGs of patients at T0 and T1 and between EEGs of patients and 10 controls who underwent the same EMDR procedure at T0. Connectivity analyses were carried out by lagged phase synchronization. Results During bilateral ocular stimulation (BS) of EMDR sessions EEG showed a significantly higher activity on the orbito-frontal, prefrontal and anterior cingulate cortex in patients at T0 shifting towards left temporo-occipital regions at T1. A similar trend was found for autobiographical script with a higher firing in fronto-temporal limbic regions at T0 moving to right temporo-occipital cortex at T1. The comparisons between patients and controls confirmed the maximal activation in the limbic cortex of patients occurring before trauma processing. Connectivity analysis showed decreased pair-wise interactions between prefrontal and cingulate cortex during BS in patients as compared to controls and between fusiform gyrus and visual cortex during script listening in patients at T1 as compared to T0. These changes correlated significantly with those occurring in neuropsychological tests. Conclusions The ground-breaking methodology enabled our study to image for the first time the specific activations associated with the therapeutic actions typical of EMDR protocol. The findings suggest that traumatic events are processed at cognitive level following successful EMDR therapy, thus

  10. Type VII Collagen Expression in the Human Vitreoretinal Interface, Corpora Amylacea and Inner Retinal Layers.

    PubMed

    Wullink, Bart; Pas, Hendri H; Van der Worp, Roelofje J; Kuijer, Roel; Los, Leonoor I

    2015-01-01

    Type VII collagen, as a major component of anchoring fibrils found at basement membrane zones, is crucial in anchoring epithelial tissue layers to their underlying stroma. Recently, type VII collagen was discovered in the inner human retina by means of immunohistochemistry, while proteomic investigations demonstrated type VII collagen at the vitreoretinal interface of chicken. Because of its potential anchoring function at the vitreoretinal interface, we further assessed the presence of type VII collagen at this site. We evaluated the vitreoretinal interface of human donor eyes by means of immunohistochemistry, confocal microscopy, immunoelectron microscopy, and Western blotting. Firstly, type VII collagen was detected alongside vitreous fibers6 at the vitreoretinal interface. Because of its known anchoring function, it is likely that type VII collagen is involved in vitreoretinal attachment. Secondly, type VII collagen was found within cytoplasmic vesicles of inner retinal cells. These cells resided most frequently in the ganglion cell layer and inner plexiform layer. Thirdly, type VII collagen was found in astrocytic cytoplasmic inclusions, known as corpora amylacea. The intraretinal presence of type VII collagen was confirmed by Western blotting of homogenized retinal preparations. These data add to the understanding of vitreoretinal attachment, which is important for a better comprehension of common vitreoretinal attachment pathologies.

  11. Result of Rendezvous Docking Experiment of ETS.35zw .5zw .25mmVII

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawano, Isao; Mokuno, Masaaki; Suzuki, Takashi; Koyama, Hiroshi; Kunugi, Makoto

    ETS VII is a test satellite to perform in-orbit demonstration of autonomous rendezvous docking (RVD) technology, which will be necessary for advanced space activities in the early 21st century. ETS VII performed three RVD experiment flights, and verified all technical items. ETS VII demonstrated first autonomous RVD between unmanned vehicles, and remote piloted rendezvous flight position accuracy at docking was about 1cm, and acceleration was less than 1.5mG (low impact docking). In the second RVD experiment flight, ETS VII detected attitude anomaly and executed disable abort for safety insurance. We present the results and evaluation of three RVD experiment flights in this paper.

  12. Seven Democratic Presidential Candidates Debate Educational Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Equity and Excellence, 1988

    1988-01-01

    Provides the transcript of a debate on educational issues among Democratic presidential candidates Paul Simon, Albert Gore, Joseph Biden, Jesse Jackson, Bruce Babbitt, Richard Gephart, and Michael Dukakis. (BJV)

  13. Ethics and animal experimentation: what is debated?

    PubMed

    Paixão, R L; Schramm, F R

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to raise some points for an understanding of the contemporary debate over the ethics of using animals in scientific experiments. We present the various positions from scientific and moral perspectives establishing different ways of viewing animals, as well as several concepts like 'animal ethics', 'animal rights', and 'animal welfare'. The paper thus aims to analyze the importance and growth of this debate, while proposing to expand the academic approach to this theme in the field of health.

  14. Teaching sociology to nurses: exploring the debate.

    PubMed

    Williamson, G R

    1999-05-01

    This article reviews literature on the current debate concerning teaching sociology to nurses. The debate is limited because it does not take into account the work of Donald Schön, or Anthony Giddens. The article also discusses theories of adult education which support teaching sociology in nurse education. Sociology is essential for nurses, because it can help to develop an understanding and analysis of the context and substance of nursing practice.

  15. [Neurobiological inscriptions of psychological trauma during early childhood].

    PubMed

    Giannopoulou, I

    2012-06-01

    Neurodevelopment is a highly complex process, influenced by a wide range of interacting genetic and environmental factors. Recent developments in fetal, neonatal and infant behavioural genetics and brain imaging methods have allowed for more detailed investigation of the effects of early adverse environment on the developing brain. This review aims to provide background for neurobiological understanding of how the prolonged exposure to stress or trauma during early childhood affects subsequent cognitive, emotional and social development. Initially, a brief overview of brain development is provided - focusing, in particular, on the limbic system structures, which are closely linked to emotional experiences and reactions, learning and memory. Emphasis is placed on the concept of neural plasticity, which is the biological base of memory and learning - the two most important mechanisms through which the environment affects the behavior. Moreover, the concept of sensitive periods, that is to say periods of "vulnerability" or "opportunity" during which particular experiences affect brain growth, functional organization and maturation, is discussed. Brief overview of the neuroendocrine stress response system and the long-term effects of prolonged exposure to stress hormones on early brain development clarify further why children are more vulnerable than adults to the effects of stress. The section dealing with the memory, which is closely linked to the limbic system, attempts to discuss how early exposure to chronic stress or psychological trauma, through neurobiological effects and the process of learning, can lead to dysfunctional behaviors, which in its extreme form can be mental disorders. The two types of memory are discussed: (a) the implicit (nondeclarative), which develops during the prelingual stage of child's development and refers to unconscious memories of previous experiences, and (b) the explicit (declarative) memory, which is closely linked to language

  16. [Neurobiological inscriptions of psychological trauma during early childhood].

    PubMed

    Giannopoulou, I

    2012-06-01

    Neurodevelopment is a highly complex process, influenced by a wide range of interacting genetic and environmental factors. Recent developments in fetal, neonatal and infant behavioural genetics and brain imaging methods have allowed for more detailed investigation of the effects of early adverse environment on the developing brain. This review aims to provide background for neurobiological understanding of how the prolonged exposure to stress or trauma during early childhood affects subsequent cognitive, emotional and social development. Initially, a brief overview of brain development is provided - focusing, in particular, on the limbic system structures, which are closely linked to emotional experiences and reactions, learning and memory. Emphasis is placed on the concept of neural plasticity, which is the biological base of memory and learning - the two most important mechanisms through which the environment affects the behavior. Moreover, the concept of sensitive periods, that is to say periods of "vulnerability" or "opportunity" during which particular experiences affect brain growth, functional organization and maturation, is discussed. Brief overview of the neuroendocrine stress response system and the long-term effects of prolonged exposure to stress hormones on early brain development clarify further why children are more vulnerable than adults to the effects of stress. The section dealing with the memory, which is closely linked to the limbic system, attempts to discuss how early exposure to chronic stress or psychological trauma, through neurobiological effects and the process of learning, can lead to dysfunctional behaviors, which in its extreme form can be mental disorders. The two types of memory are discussed: (a) the implicit (nondeclarative), which develops during the prelingual stage of child's development and refers to unconscious memories of previous experiences, and (b) the explicit (declarative) memory, which is closely linked to language

  17. Evaluated Nuclear Data Covariances: The Journey From ENDF/B-VII.0 to ENDF/B-VII.1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Donald L.

    2011-12-01

    Recent interest from data users on applications that utilize the uncertainties of evaluated nuclear reaction data has stimulated the data evaluation community to focus on producing covariance data to a far greater extent than ever before. Although some uncertainty information has been available in the ENDF/B libraries since the 1970's, this content has been fairly limited in scope, the quality quite variable, and the use of covariance data confined to only a few application areas. Today, covariance data are more widely and extensively utilized than ever before in neutron dosimetry, in advanced fission reactor design studies, in nuclear criticality safety assessments, in national security applications, and even in certain fusion energy applications. The main problem that now faces the ENDF/B evaluator community is that of providing covariances that are adequate both in quantity and quality to meet the requirements of contemporary nuclear data users in a timely manner. In broad terms, the approach pursued during the past several years has been to purge any legacy covariance information contained in ENDF/B-VI.8 that was judged to be subpar, to include in ENDF/B-VII.0 (released in 2006) only those covariance data deemed then to be of reasonable quality for contemporary applications, and to subsequently devote as much effort as the available time and resources allowed to producing additional covariance data of suitable scope and quality for inclusion in ENDF/B-VII.1. Considerable attention has also been devoted during the five years since the release of ENDF/B-VII.0 to examining and improving the methods used to produce covariance data from thermal energies up to the highest energies addressed in the ENDF/B library, to processing these data in a robust fashion so that they can be utilized readily in contemporary nuclear applications, and to developing convenient covariance data visualization capabilities. Other papers included in this issue discuss in considerable

  18. Debating science policy in the physics classroom.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, Shannon

    2010-03-01

    It is critically important that national and international science policy be scientifically grounded. To this end, the next generation of scientists and engineers will need to be technically competent, effective communicators of science, and engaged advisors in the debate and formulation of science policy. We describe three science policy debates developed for the physics classroom aimed at encouraging students to draw connections between their developing technical expertise and important science policy issues. The first debate considers the proposal for a 450-megawatt wind farm on public lands in Nantucket Sound and fits naturally into the curriculum related to alternative forms of energy production. The second debate considers national fuel-economy standards for sport-utility vehicles and can be incorporated into the curriculum related to heat engines. The third debate, suitable for the curriculum in optics, considers solid state lighting and implications of recent United States legislation that places stringent new energy-efficiency and reliability requirements on conventional lighting. The technical foundation for each of these debates fits naturally into the undergraduate physics curriculum and the material is suitable for a wide range of physics courses, including general science courses for non-majors.

  19. Methods for Processing ENDF/B-VII with NJOY

    SciTech Connect

    MacFarlane, R.E.; Kahler, A.C.

    2010-12-15

    The NJOY Nuclear Data Processing System is widely used to convert evaluations in the Evaluated Nuclear Data Files (ENDF) format into forms useful for practical applications such as fission and fusion reactor analysis, stockpile stewardship calculations, criticality safety, radiation shielding, nuclear waste management, nuclear medicine procedures, and more. This paper provides a description of the system's capabilities, summary descriptions of the methods used, and information on how to use the code to process the modern evaluated nuclear data files from ENDF/B-VII. It begins with the generation of pointwise libraries, including reaction and resonance reconstruction, Doppler broadening, radiation heating and damage, thermal scattering data, unresolved resonance data, and gas production. It then reviews the production of libraries for the continuous-energy Monte Carlo code MCNP, multigroup neutron, photon, and particle cross sections and matrices, and photon interaction data. The generation of uncertainty information for ENDF data is discussed, including new capabilities for calculating covariances of resonance data, angular distributions, energy distributions, and radioactive nuclide production. NJOY's ability to prepare thermal scattering data evaluations for bound moderators (which was used during the preparation of the ENDF/B-VII library) is described. The strong plotting capabilities of NJOY are summarized. Many examples of black and white and color Postscript plots are included throughout the paper. The capabilities of NJOY to output multigroup data in several different formats to suit various applications is reviewed. Finally, a section is included that summarizes the history of the development of the NJOY system over the last 37 years.

  20. Methods for Processing ENDF/B-VII with NJOY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacFarlane, R. E.; Kahler, A. C.

    2010-12-01

    The NJOY Nuclear Data Processing System is widely used to convert evaluations in the Evaluated Nuclear Data Files (ENDF) format into forms useful for practical applications such as fission and fusion reactor analysis, stockpile stewardship calculations, criticality safety, radiation shielding, nuclear waste management, nuclear medicine procedures, and more. This paper provides a description of the system's capabilities, summary descriptions of the methods used, and information on how to use the code to process the modern evaluated nuclear data files from ENDF/B-VII. It begins with the generation of pointwise libraries, including reaction and resonance reconstruction, Doppler broadening, radiation heating and damage, thermal scattering data, unresolved resonance data, and gas production. It then reviews the production of libraries for the continuous-energy Monte Carlo code MCNP, multigroup neutron, photon, and particle cross sections and matrices, and photon interaction data. The generation of uncertainty information for ENDF data is discussed, including new capabilities for calculating covariances of resonance data, angular distributions, energy distributions, and radioactive nuclide production. NJOY's ability to prepare thermal scattering data evaluations for bound moderators (which was used during the preparation of the ENDF/B-VII library) is described. The strong plotting capabilities of NJOY are summarized. Many examples of black&white and color Postscript plots are included throughout the paper. The capabilities of NJOY to output multigroup data in several different formats to suit various applications is reviewed. Finally, a section is included that summarizes the history of the development of the NJOY system over the last 37 years.

  1. Defensive burying in rodents: ethology, neurobiology and psychopharmacology.

    PubMed

    De Boer, Sietse F; Koolhaas, Jaap M

    2003-02-28

    Defensive burying refers to the typical rodent behavior of displacing bedding material with vigorous treading-like movements of their forepaws and shoveling movements of their heads directed towards a variety of noxious stimuli that pose a near and immediate threat, such as a wall-mounted electrified shock-prod. Since its introduction 25 years ago by Pinel and Treit [J. Comp. Physiol. Psychol. 92 (1978) 708], defensive (shock-prod) burying has been the focus of a considerable amount of research effort delineating the methodology/ethology, psychopharmacology and neurobiology of this robust and species-specific active avoidance or coping response. The present review gives a summary of this research with special reference to the behavioral (face and construct) and pharmacological (predictive) validity of the shock-prod burying test as an animal model for human anxiety. Emphasis is also placed on some recent modifications of the paradigm that may increase its utility and reliability as to individual differences in expressed emotional coping responses and sensitivity to pharmacological treatments. Overall, the behavioral and physiological responses displayed in the shock-prod paradigm are expressions of normal and functionally adaptive coping patterns and the extremes of either active (i.e., burying) or passive (i.e., freezing) forms of responding in this test cannot simply be regarded as inappropriate, maladaptive or pathological. For this reason, the shock-prod paradigm is not an animal model for anxiety disorder or for any other psychiatric disease, but instead possesses a high degree of face and construct validity for normal and functionally adaptive human fear and anxious apprehension. However, the apparent good pharmacological validation (predictive validity) of this test reinforces the view that normal and pathological anxiety involves, at least partly, common neurobiological substrates. Therefore, this paradigm is not only suitable for screening potential

  2. Alexander v. Gardner-Denver: A Threat to Title VII Rights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Richard F.

    1975-01-01

    An examination of the decision on the rights of an employee, who has unsuccessfully pursued a race or sex discrimination claim through arbitration, to "relitigate" the claim under Title VII, Civil Rights Act of 1964. Conclusion: the decision endangers Title VII rights by granting too much weight to prior arbitration awards. (JT)

  3. Managing Information Technology: Facing the Issues. Track VII: Applications and Technology Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CAUSE, Boulder, CO.

    Eight papers making up Track VII of the 1989 conference of the Professional Association for the Management of Information Technology in Higher Education (known as CAUSE, an acronym of the association's former name) are presented in this document. The focus of Track VII is on applications and technology issues, and the papers include: "The Effect…

  4. 20 CFR Appendix Vii to Subpart C... - “Old-Law” Contribution and Benefit Base

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false âOld-Lawâ Contribution and Benefit Base VII... Appendix VII to Subpart C of Part 404—“Old-Law” Contribution and Benefit Base Explanation: We use these... appendix IV). This is the contribution and benefit base that would have been effective under the...

  5. 20 CFR Appendix Vii to Subpart C... - “Old-Law” Contribution and Benefit Base

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false âOld-Lawâ Contribution and Benefit Base VII... Appendix VII to Subpart C of Part 404—“Old-Law” Contribution and Benefit Base Explanation: We use these... appendix IV). This is the contribution and benefit base that would have been effective under the...

  6. 20 CFR Appendix Vii to Subpart C... - “Old-Law” Contribution and Benefit Base

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false âOld-Lawâ Contribution and Benefit Base VII... Appendix VII to Subpart C of Part 404—“Old-Law” Contribution and Benefit Base Explanation: We use these... appendix IV). This is the contribution and benefit base that would have been effective under the...

  7. 20 CFR Appendix Vii to Subpart C... - “Old-Law” Contribution and Benefit Base

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false âOld-Lawâ Contribution and Benefit Base VII... Appendix VII to Subpart C of Part 404—“Old-Law” Contribution and Benefit Base Explanation: We use these... appendix IV). This is the contribution and benefit base that would have been effective under the...

  8. Turning Back the Title VII Clock: The Resegregation of the American Work Force through Validity Generalization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldstein, Barry L.; Patterson, Patrick O.

    1988-01-01

    Refers to Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Supreme Court's disparate impact interpretation of Title VII in Griggs versus Duke Power Company. Contends that attacks on the Griggs decision are legally unsound and that claims made by advocates of validity generalization are scientifically unsupported. (Author/NB)

  9. 40 CFR Appendix Vii to Part 86 - Standard Bench Cycle (SBC)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    .... VII Appendix VII to Part 86—Standard Bench Cycle (SBC) 1. The standard bench aging durability procedures consist of aging a catalyst-oxygen-sensor system on an aging bench which follows the standard bench cycle (SBC) described in this appendix. 2. The SBC requires use of an aging bench with an...

  10. 40 CFR Appendix Vii to Part 86 - Standard Bench Cycle (SBC)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    .... VII Appendix VII to Part 86—Standard Bench Cycle (SBC) 1. The standard bench aging durability procedures consist of aging a catalyst-oxygen-sensor system on an aging bench which follows the standard bench cycle (SBC) described in this appendix. 2. The SBC requires use of an aging bench with an...

  11. 40 CFR Appendix Vii to Part 86 - Standard Bench Cycle (SBC)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    .... VII Appendix VII to Part 86—Standard Bench Cycle (SBC) 1. The standard bench aging durability procedures consist of aging a catalyst-oxygen-sensor system on an aging bench which follows the standard bench cycle (SBC) described in this appendix. 2. The SBC requires use of an aging bench with an...

  12. 40 CFR Appendix Vii to Part 86 - Standard Bench Cycle (SBC)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    .... VII Appendix VII to Part 86—Standard Bench Cycle (SBC) 1. The standard bench aging durability procedures consist of aging a catalyst-oxygen-sensor system on an aging bench which follows the standard bench cycle (SBC) described in this appendix. 2. The SBC requires use of an aging bench with an...

  13. Underuse of Title VII Funding for Indian Education in Arizona, Nevada, and Utah

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West Comprehensive Center at WestEd, 2015

    2015-01-01

    Title VII provides funding for the education of American Indian/Alaska Native students based on a formula grant available to school districts, charter schools, and local education agencies (LEAs). This report explores why some eligible schools and districts do not apply for federal Title VII, potentially resulting in American Indian/Alaska Native…

  14. 76 FR 57013 - Recordkeeping and Reporting Requirements Under Title VII, the ADA, and GINA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-15

    ... proposed modifications of its recordkeeping and reporting provisions under title VII, the ADA, and GINA. (76 FR 31892, June 2, 2011). No requests to present oral testimony at a hearing concerning the... COMMISSION 29 CFR Part 1602 RIN 3046-AA89 Recordkeeping and Reporting Requirements Under Title VII, the...

  15. 76 FR 79065 - Recordkeeping and Reporting Requirements Under Title VII, the ADA and GINA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-21

    ... Employment Opportunity Commission 29 CFR Part 1602 Recordkeeping and Reporting Requirements Under Title VII, the ADA and GINA CFR Correction In Title 29 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Parts 900 to 1899, revised as of July 1, 2011, in Part 1602, remove the words ``section 709(c) of title VII or section 107...

  16. Congenital factor VII deficiency in a patient with an abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Arroyo, A; Porto, J; Gesto, R

    1996-08-01

    A patient with congenital factor VII deficiency underwent surgery for an inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm. No references in the literature have been found on the management of this coagulation defect in patients who require vascular surgery. We present one such case, with special reference to the perioperative management of factor VII replacement therapy.

  17. 15 CFR Appendix Vii to Subpart P... - Areas To Be Avoided Boundary Coordinates

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Areas To Be Avoided Boundary Coordinates VII Appendix VII to Subpart P of Part 922 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE OCEAN AND COASTAL RESOURCE...

  18. The neurobiology of consolidations, or, how stable is the engram?

    PubMed

    Dudai, Yadin

    2004-01-01

    Consolidation is the progressive postacquisition stabilization of long-term memory. The term is commonly used to refer to two types of processes: synaptic consolidation, which is accomplished within the first minutes to hours after learning and occurs in all memory systems studied so far; and system consolidation, which takes much longer, and in which memories that are initially dependent upon the hippocampus undergo reorganization and may become hippocampal-independent. The textbook account of consolidation is that for any item in memory, consolidation starts and ends just once. Recently, a heated debate has been revitalized on whether this is indeed the case, or, alternatively, whether memories become labile and must undergo some form of renewed consolidation every time they are activated. This debate focuses attention on fundamental issues concerning the nature of the memory trace, its maturation, persistence, retrievability, and modifiability. PMID:14744210

  19. Neurobiologically informed treatment for adults with anorexia nervosa: a novel approach to a chronic disorder

    PubMed Central

    Knatz, Stephanie; Wierenga, Christina E.; Murray, Stuart B.; Hill, Laura; Kaye, Walter H.

    2015-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a severe and debilitating disorder with significant medical and psychological sequelae. To date, there are no effective treatments for adults, resulting in high rates of chronicity, morbidity, and mortality. Recent advances in brain imaging research have led to an improved understanding of etiology and specific neurobiological mechanisms underlying symptoms. Despite this, there are no treatments focused on targeting symptoms using this empirically supported mechanistic understanding of the illness. Updated treatment approaches focused on targeting neurobiological mechanisms underlying core AN symptomatology are necessary to improve treatment out-comes for this population. Neurobiologically Enhanced With Family Eating Disorder Trait Response Treatment (NEW FED TR) is a neurobiologically informed treatment targeting key temperament constructs associated with the illness through the delivery of psychoeducation and skills training to patients and nominated carers. PMID:26246796

  20. Intervention, causal reasoning, and the neurobiology of mental disorders: Pharmacological drugs as experimental instruments.

    PubMed

    Tsou, Jonathan Y

    2012-06-01

    In psychiatry, pharmacological drugs play an important experimental role in attempts to identify the neurobiological causes of mental disorders. Besides being developed in applied contexts as potential treatments for patients with mental disorders, pharmacological drugs play a crucial role in research contexts as experimental instruments that facilitate the formulation and revision of neurobiological theories of psychopathology. This paper examines the various epistemic functions that pharmacological drugs serve in the discovery, refinement, testing, and elaboration of neurobiological theories of mental disorders. I articulate this thesis with reference to the history of antipsychotic drugs and the evolution of the dopamine hypothesis of schizophrenia in the second half of the twentieth century. I argue that interventions with psychiatric patients through the medium of antipsychotic drugs provide researchers with information and evidence about the neurobiological causes of schizophrenia. This analysis highlights the importance of pharmacological drugs as research tools in the generation of psychiatric knowledge and the dynamic relationship between practical and theoretical contexts in psychiatry.

  1. Neurobiological underpinnings of math and reading learning disabilities.

    PubMed

    Ashkenazi, Sarit; Black, Jessica M; Abrams, Daniel A; Hoeft, Fumiko; Menon, Vinod

    2013-01-01

    The primary goal of this review is to highlight current research and theories describing the neurobiological basis of math (MD), reading (RD), and comorbid math and reading disability (MD+RD). We first describe the unique brain and cognitive processes involved in acquisition of math and reading skills, emphasizing similarities and differences in each domain. Next we review functional imaging studies of MD and RD in children, integrating relevant theories from experimental psychology and cognitive neuroscience to characterize the functional neuroanatomy of cognitive dysfunction in MD and RD. We then review recent research on the anatomical correlates of MD and RD. Converging evidence from morphometry and tractography studies are presented to highlight distinct patterns of white matter pathways which are disrupted in MD and RD. Finally, we examine how the intersection of MD and RD provides a unique opportunity to clarify the unique and shared brain systems which adversely impact learning and skill acquisition in MD and RD, and point out important areas for future work on comorbid learning disabilities. PMID:23572008

  2. Neurobiological Mechanisms Supporting Experience-Dependent Resistance to Social Stress

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Matthew A.; Clinard, Catherine T.; Morrison, Kathleen E.

    2015-01-01

    Humans and other animals show a remarkable capacity for resilience following traumatic, stressful events. Resilience is thought to be an active process related to coping with stress, although the cellular and molecular mechanisms that support active coping and stress resistance remain poorly understood. In this review, we focus on the neurobiological mechanisms by which environmental and social experiences promote stress resistance. In male Syrian hamsters, exposure to a brief social defeat stressor leads to increased avoidance of novel opponents, which we call conditioned defeat. Also, hamsters that have achieved dominant social status show reduced conditioned defeat as well as cellular and molecular changes in the neural circuits controlling the conditioned defeat response. We propose that experience-dependent neural plasticity occurs in the prelimbic (PL) cortex, infralimbic (IL) cortex, and ventral medial amygdala (vMeA) during the maintenance of dominance relationships, and that adaptions in these neural circuits support stress resistance in dominant individuals. Overall, behavioral treatments that promote success in competitive interactions may represent valuable interventions for instilling resilience. PMID:25677096

  3. The neurobiology of moral sense: facts or hypotheses?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    One of the most intriguing frontiers of current neuroscientific research is represented by the investigation of the possible neural substrates of morality. The assumption is that in humans an innate moral sense would exist. If this is true, with no doubt it should be regulated by specific brain mechanisms selected over the course of evolution, as they would promote our species’ survival. In the last decade, an increasing number of studies have been carried out to explore the neural bases of human morality. The aim of this paper is to present a comprehensive review of the data regarding the neurobiological origin of the moral sense, through a Medline search of English-language articles from 1980 to February 2012. The available findings would suggest that there might be a main integrative centre for the innate morality, in particular the ventromedial prefrontal cortex, with its multiple connections with the limbic lobe, thalamus and brainstem. The subjective moral sense would be the result of an integration of multiple automatic responses, mainly associated with social emotions and interpretation of others’ behaviours and intentions. Since converging observations outline how lesions of the proposed neural networks may underlie some personality changes and criminal behaviours, the implications of the studies in this field encompass many areas of the scientific domain. PMID:23497376

  4. The Neurobiology of Reference-Dependent Value Computation

    PubMed Central

    De Martino, Benedetto; Kumaran, Dharshan; Holt, Beatrice; Dolan, Raymond J.

    2009-01-01

    A key focus of current research in neuroeconomics concerns how the human brain computes value. Although, value has generally been viewed as an absolute measure (e.g., expected value, reward magnitude), much evidence suggests that value is more often computed with respect to a changing reference point, rather than in isolation. Here, we present the results of a study aimed to dissociate brain regions involved in reference-independent (i.e., “absolute”) value computations, from those involved in value computations relative to a reference point. During functional magnetic resonance imaging, subjects acted as buyers and sellers during a market exchange of lottery tickets. At a behavioral level, we demonstrate that subjects systematically accorded a higher value to objects they owned relative to those they did not, an effect that results from a shift in reference point (i.e., status quo bias or endowment effect). Our results show that activity in orbitofrontal cortex and dorsal striatum track parameters such as the expected value of lottery tickets indicating the computation of reference-independent value. In contrast, activity in ventral striatum indexed the degree to which stated prices, at a within-subjects and between-subjects level, were distorted with respect to a reference point. The findings speak to the neurobiological underpinnings of reference dependency during real market value computations. PMID:19321780

  5. The Neurobiology and Psychology of Pedophilia: Recent Advances and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Tenbergen, Gilian; Wittfoth, Matthias; Frieling, Helge; Ponseti, Jorge; Walter, Martin; Walter, Henrik; Beier, Klaus M.; Schiffer, Boris; Kruger, Tillmann H. C.

    2015-01-01

    A pedophilic disorder is recognized for its impairment to the individual and for the harm it may cause to others. Pedophilia is often considered a side issue and research into the nature of pedophilia is delayed in comparison to research into other psychiatric disorders. However, with the increasing use of neuroimaging techniques, such as functional and structural magnetic resonance imaging (sMRI, fMRI), together with neuropsychological studies, we are increasing our knowledge of predisposing and accompanying factors contributing to pedophilia development. At the same time, we are faced with methodological challenges, such as group differences between studies, including age, intelligence, and comorbidities, together with a lack of careful assessment and control of child sexual abuse. Having this in mind, this review highlights the most important studies investigating pedophilia, with a strong emphasis on (neuro-) biological studies, combined with a brief explanation of research into normal human sexuality. We focus on some of the recent theories on the etiology of pedophilia such as the concept of a general neurodevelopmental disorder and/or alterations of structure and function in frontal, temporal, and limbic brain areas. With this approach, we aim to not only provide an update and overview but also a framework for future research and to address one of the most significant questions of how pedophilia may be explained by neurobiological and developmental alterations. PMID:26157372

  6. Maternal neglect: oxytocin, dopamine and the neurobiology of attachment.

    PubMed

    Strathearn, L

    2011-11-01

    Maternal neglect, including physical and emotional neglect, is a pervasive public health challenge with serious long-term effects on child health and development. I provide an overview of the neurobiological basis of maternal caregiving, aiming to better understand how to prevent and respond to maternal neglect. Drawing from both animal and human studies, key biological systems are identified that contribute to maternal caregiving behaviour, focusing on the oxytocinergic and dopaminergic systems. Mesocorticolimbic and nigrostriatal dopamine pathways contribute to the processing of infant-related sensory cues leading to a behavioural response. Oxytocin may activate the dopaminergic reward pathways in response to social cues. Human neuroimaging studies are summarised that demonstrate parallels between animal and human maternal caregiving responses in the brain. By comparing different patterns of human adult attachment, we gain a clearer understanding of how differences in maternal brain and endocrine responses may contribute to maternal neglect. For example, in insecure/dismissing attachment, which may be associated with emotional neglect, we see reduced activation of the mesocorticolimbic dopamine reward system in response to infant face cues, as well as decreased peripheral oxytocin response to mother-infant contact. We are currently testing whether the administration of intranasal oxytocin, as part of a randomised placebo controlled trial, may reverse some of these neurological differences, and potentially augment psychosocial and behavioural interventions for maternal neglect. PMID:21951160

  7. Neuroscience of exercise: from neurobiology mechanisms to mental health.

    PubMed

    Matta Mello Portugal, Eduardo; Cevada, Thais; Sobral Monteiro-Junior, Renato; Teixeira Guimarães, Thiago; da Cruz Rubini, Ercole; Lattari, Eduardo; Blois, Charlene; Camaz Deslandes, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    The neuroscience of exercise is a growing research area that is dedicated to furthering our understanding of the effects that exercise has on mental health and athletic performance. The present study examined three specific topics: (1) the relationship between exercise and mental disorders (e.g. major depressive disorder, dementia and Parkinson's disease), (2) the effects of exercise on the mood and mental health of athletes, and (3) the possible neurobiological mechanisms that mediate the effects of exercise. Positive responses to regular physical exercise, such as enhanced functional capacity, increased autonomy and improved self-esteem, are frequently described in the recent literature, and these responses are all good reasons for recommending regular exercise. In addition, physical exercise may improve both mood and adherence to an exercise program in healthy individuals and might modulate both the performance and mental health of athletes. Exercise is associated with the increased synthesis and release of both neurotransmitters and neurotrophic factors, and these increases may be associated with neurogenesis, angiogenesis and neuroplasticity. This review is a call-to-action that urges researchers to consider the importance of understanding the neuroscience of physical exercise and its contributions to sports science. PMID:23774826

  8. Targeting Opioid-Induced Hyperalgesia in Clinical Treatment: Neurobiological Considerations.

    PubMed

    Arout, Caroline A; Edens, Ellen; Petrakis, Ismene L; Sofuoglu, Mehmet

    2015-06-01

    Opioid analgesics have become a cornerstone in the treatment of moderate to severe pain, resulting in a steady rise of opioid prescriptions. Subsequently, there has been a striking increase in the number of opioid-dependent individuals, opioid-related overdoses, and fatalities. Clinical use of opioids is further complicated by an increasingly deleterious profile of side effects beyond addiction, including tolerance and opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH), where OIH is defined as an increased sensitivity to already painful stimuli. This paradoxical state of increased nociception results from acute and long-term exposure to opioids, and appears to develop in a substantial subset of patients using opioids. Recently, there has been considerable interest in developing an efficacious treatment regimen for acute and chronic pain. However, there are currently no well-established treatments for OIH. Several substrates have emerged as potential modulators of OIH, including the N-methyl-D-aspartate and γ-aminobutyric acid receptors, and most notably, the innate neuroimmune system. This review summarizes the neurobiology of OIH in the context of clinical treatment; specifically, we review evidence for several pathways that show promise for the treatment of pain going forward, as prospective adjuvants to opioid analgesics. Overall, we suggest that this paradoxical state be considered an additional target of clinical treatment for chronic pain.

  9. Neurobiological Insights from mGlu Receptor Allosteric Modulation

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Daniel E

    2016-01-01

    Allosteric modulation of metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors offers a promising pharmacological approach to normalize neural circuit dysfunction associated with various psychiatric and neurological disorders. As mGlu receptor allosteric modulators progress through discovery and clinical development, both technical advances and novel tool compounds are providing opportunities to better understand mGlu receptor pharmacology and neurobiology. Recent advances in structural biology are elucidating the structural determinants of mGlu receptor–negative allosteric modulation and supplying the means to resolve active, allosteric modulator-bound mGlu receptors. The discovery and characterization of allosteric modulators with novel pharmacological profiles is uncovering the biological significance of their intrinsic agonist activity, biased mGlu receptor modulation, and novel mGlu receptor heterodimers. The development and exploitation of optogenetic and optopharmacological tools is permitting a refined spatial and temporal understanding of both mGlu receptor functions and their allosteric modulation in intact brain circuits. Together, these lines of research promise to provide a more refined understanding of mGlu receptors and their allosteric modulation that will inform the development of mGlu receptor allosteric modulators as neurotherapeutics in the years to come. PMID:26647381

  10. Review. Neurobiological mechanisms for opponent motivational processes in addiction.

    PubMed

    Koob, George F; Le Moal, Michel

    2008-10-12

    The conceptualization of drug addiction as a compulsive disorder with excessive drug intake and loss of control over intake requires motivational mechanisms. Opponent process as a motivational theory for the negative reinforcement of drug dependence has long required a neurobiological explanation. Key neurochemical elements involved in reward and stress within basal forebrain structures involving the ventral striatum and extended amygdala are hypothesized to be dysregulated in addiction to convey the opponent motivational processes that drive dependence. Specific neurochemical elements in these structures include not only decreases in reward neurotransmission such as dopamine and opioid peptides in the ventral striatum, but also recruitment of brain stress systems such as corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), noradrenaline and dynorphin in the extended amygdala. Acute withdrawal from all major drugs of abuse produces increases in reward thresholds, anxiety-like responses and extracellular levels of CRF in the central nucleus of the amygdala. CRF receptor antagonists block excessive drug intake produced by dependence. A brain stress response system is hypothesized to be activated by acute excessive drug intake, to be sensitized during repeated withdrawal, to persist into protracted abstinence and to contribute to stress-induced relapse. The combination of loss of reward function and recruitment of brain stress systems provides a powerful neurochemical basis for the long hypothesized opponent motivational processes responsible for the negative reinforcement driving addiction.

  11. [The neurobiological dimension of meditation--results from neuroimaging studies].

    PubMed

    Neumann, Norbert-Ullrich; Frasch, Karel

    2006-12-01

    Meditation in general can be understood as a state of complete and unintentional silent and motionless concentration on an activity, an item or an idea. Subjectively, meditative experience is said to be fundamentally different from "normal" mental states and is characterized by terms like timelessness, boundlessness and lack of self-experience. In recent years, several fMRI- and PET-studies about meditation which are presented in this paper have been published. Due to different methods, especially different meditation types, the results are hardly comparable. Nevertheless, the data suggest the hypothesis of a "special" neural activity during meditative states being different from that during calm alertness. Main findings were increased activation in frontal, prefrontal and cingulate areas which may represent the mental state of altered self-experience. In the present studies, a considerable lack of scientific standards has to be stated making it of just casuistic value. Today's improved neurobiological examination methods - especially neuroimaging techniques - may contribute to enlighten the phenomenon of qualitatively different states of consciousness.

  12. The dolphin brain--a challenge for synthetic neurobiology.

    PubMed

    Oelschläger, Helmut H A

    2008-03-18

    Toothed whales (odontocetes) are a promising paradigm for neurobiology and evolutionary biology. The ecophysiological implications and structural adaptations of their brain seem to reflect the necessity of effective underwater hearing for echolocation (sonar), navigation, and communication. However, not all components of the auditory system are equally well developed. Other sensory systems are more or less strongly reduced such as the olfactory system and, as an exception among vertebrates, the vestibular system (the semicircular canals and vestibular nuclei). Additional outstanding features are: (1) the hypertrophy of the neocortex, pons, cerebellum (particularly the paraflocculus), the elliptic nucleus, the facial motor nucleus and the medial accessory inferior olive and (2) the reduction of the hippocampus. The screening of brain structures with respect to shared circuitry and shared size correlations resulted in central loops also known from other mammals which overlap in the cerebellum and serve in the integration and processing of sensory input. It is highly probable that for dolphin navigation the ascending auditory pathway, including the inferior colliculus and the medial geniculate body, is of utmost importance. The extended auditory neocortical fields project to the midbrain and rhombencephalon and may influence premotor and motor areas in such a way as to allow the smooth regulation of sound-induced and sound-controlled locomotor activity as well as sophisticated phonation. This sonar-guided acousticomotor system for navigation and vocalization in the aquatic environment may have been a major factor if not the key feature in the relative size increase seen in dolphin brains. PMID:18331914

  13. Neurobiological underpinnings of math and reading learning disabilities.

    PubMed

    Ashkenazi, Sarit; Black, Jessica M; Abrams, Daniel A; Hoeft, Fumiko; Menon, Vinod

    2013-01-01

    The primary goal of this review is to highlight current research and theories describing the neurobiological basis of math (MD), reading (RD), and comorbid math and reading disability (MD+RD). We first describe the unique brain and cognitive processes involved in acquisition of math and reading skills, emphasizing similarities and differences in each domain. Next we review functional imaging studies of MD and RD in children, integrating relevant theories from experimental psychology and cognitive neuroscience to characterize the functional neuroanatomy of cognitive dysfunction in MD and RD. We then review recent research on the anatomical correlates of MD and RD. Converging evidence from morphometry and tractography studies are presented to highlight distinct patterns of white matter pathways which are disrupted in MD and RD. Finally, we examine how the intersection of MD and RD provides a unique opportunity to clarify the unique and shared brain systems which adversely impact learning and skill acquisition in MD and RD, and point out important areas for future work on comorbid learning disabilities.

  14. The importance of neurobiological research to the prevention of psychopathology.

    PubMed

    Fishbein, D

    2000-06-01

    There is both a biological and environmental component to the neural substrates for various forms of psychopathology. Brain dysfunction itself not only constitutes a formidable liability to psychopathology, but also has an impact on environmental and social responses to the individual, compounding the risk for an adverse outcome. Environmental conditions, such as social and physical stimulus deprivation, poverty, traumatic stress, and prenatal drug exposure, can further compromise brain function in the context of existing liabilities. The relationship between genetic and environmental processes is interactive, fluid, and cumulative in their ability to influence an individual's developmental trajectory and alter subsequent behavioral outcomes. Given the codependent relationship between these processes, brain function is now believed to be malleable via manipulations of the environment in ways that may decrease liability for psychopathology. Research that explores these relationships and ways in which interventions can redirect this developmental track may substantially advance both the science and practice of prevention. Studies attempting to isolate the neurobiological effects of socioenvironmental factors are reviewed, implications for intervention strategies are discussed, and a future research agenda is proposed to provide greater insight into specific brain-environment relationships. Armed with this knowledge, prevention scientists may eventually design programs that directly target these effects to reverse or attenuate negative outcomes.

  15. Neurobiological, cognitive, and emotional mechanisms in melodic intonation therapy.

    PubMed

    Merrett, Dawn L; Peretz, Isabelle; Wilson, Sarah J

    2014-01-01

    Singing has been used in language rehabilitation for decades, yet controversy remains over its effectiveness and mechanisms of action. Melodic Intonation Therapy (MIT) is the most well-known singing-based therapy; however, speculation surrounds when and how it might improve outcomes in aphasia and other language disorders. While positive treatment effects have been variously attributed to different MIT components, including melody, rhythm, hand-tapping, and the choral nature of the singing, there is uncertainty about the components that are truly necessary and beneficial. Moreover, the mechanisms by which the components operate are not well understood. Within the literature to date, proposed mechanisms can be broadly grouped into four categories: (1) neuroplastic reorganization of language function, (2) activation of the mirror neuron system and multimodal integration, (3) utilization of shared or specific features of music and language, and (4) motivation and mood. In this paper, we review available evidence for each mechanism and propose that these mechanisms are not mutually exclusive, but rather represent different levels of explanation, reflecting the neurobiological, cognitive, and emotional effects of MIT. Thus, instead of competing, each of these mechanisms may contribute to language rehabilitation, with a better understanding of their relative roles and interactions allowing the design of protocols that maximize the effectiveness of singing therapy for aphasia.

  16. Neurobiological problems in long-term deep space flights.

    PubMed

    Vazquez, M E

    1998-01-01

    Future missions in space may involve long-term travel beyond the magnetic field of the Earth, subjecting astronauts to radiation hazards posed by solar flares and galactic cosmic rays, altered gravitation fields and physiological stress. Thus, it is critical to determine if there will be any reversible or irreversible, detrimental neurological effects from this prolonged exposure to space. A question of particular importance focuses on the long-term effects of the space environment on the central nervous system (CNS) neuroplasticity, with the potential acute and/or delayed effects that such perturbations might entail. Although the short-term effects of microgravity on neural control were studied on previous low earth orbit missions, the late consequences of stress in space, microgravity and space radiation have not been addressed sufficiently at the molecular, cellular and tissue levels. The possibility that space flight factors can interact influencing the neuroplastic response in the CNS looms critical issue not only to understand the ontogeny of the CNS and its functional integrity, but also, ultimately the performance of astronauts in extended space forays. The purpose of this paper is to review the neurobiological modifications that occur in the CNS exposed to the space environment, and its potential consequences for extended deep space flight. PMID:11541395

  17. Neurobiological problems in long-term deep space flights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazquez, M. E.

    Future missions in space may involve long-term travel beyond the magnetic field of the Earth, subjecting astronauts to radiation hazards posed by solar flares and galactic cosmic rays, altered gravitation fields and physiological stress. Thus, it is critical to determine if there will be any reversible or irreversible, detrimental neurological effects from this prolonged exposure to space. A question of particular importance focuses on the long-term effects of the space environment on the central nervous system (CNS) neuroplasticity, with the potential acute and/or delayed effects that such perturbations might entail. Although the short-term effects of microgravity on neural control were studied on previous low earth orbit missions, the late consequences of stress in space, microgravity and space radiation have not been addressed sufficiently at the molecular, cellular and tissue levels. The possibility that space flight factors can interact influencing the neuroplastic response in the CNS looms critical issue not only to understand the ontogeny of the CNS and its functional integrity, but also, ultimately the performance of astronauts in extended space forays. The purpose of this paper is to review the neurobiological modifications that occur in the CNS exposed to the space environment, and its potential consequences for extended deep space flight.

  18. Neuroscience of exercise: from neurobiology mechanisms to mental health.

    PubMed

    Matta Mello Portugal, Eduardo; Cevada, Thais; Sobral Monteiro-Junior, Renato; Teixeira Guimarães, Thiago; da Cruz Rubini, Ercole; Lattari, Eduardo; Blois, Charlene; Camaz Deslandes, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    The neuroscience of exercise is a growing research area that is dedicated to furthering our understanding of the effects that exercise has on mental health and athletic performance. The present study examined three specific topics: (1) the relationship between exercise and mental disorders (e.g. major depressive disorder, dementia and Parkinson's disease), (2) the effects of exercise on the mood and mental health of athletes, and (3) the possible neurobiological mechanisms that mediate the effects of exercise. Positive responses to regular physical exercise, such as enhanced functional capacity, increased autonomy and improved self-esteem, are frequently described in the recent literature, and these responses are all good reasons for recommending regular exercise. In addition, physical exercise may improve both mood and adherence to an exercise program in healthy individuals and might modulate both the performance and mental health of athletes. Exercise is associated with the increased synthesis and release of both neurotransmitters and neurotrophic factors, and these increases may be associated with neurogenesis, angiogenesis and neuroplasticity. This review is a call-to-action that urges researchers to consider the importance of understanding the neuroscience of physical exercise and its contributions to sports science.

  19. The Neurobiology and Psychology of Pedophilia: Recent Advances and Challenges.

    PubMed

    Tenbergen, Gilian; Wittfoth, Matthias; Frieling, Helge; Ponseti, Jorge; Walter, Martin; Walter, Henrik; Beier, Klaus M; Schiffer, Boris; Kruger, Tillmann H C

    2015-01-01

    A pedophilic disorder is recognized for its impairment to the individual and for the harm it may cause to others. Pedophilia is often considered a side issue and research into the nature of pedophilia is delayed in comparison to research into other psychiatric disorders. However, with the increasing use of neuroimaging techniques, such as functional and structural magnetic resonance imaging (sMRI, fMRI), together with neuropsychological studies, we are increasing our knowledge of predisposing and accompanying factors contributing to pedophilia development. At the same time, we are faced with methodological challenges, such as group differences between studies, including age, intelligence, and comorbidities, together with a lack of careful assessment and control of child sexual abuse. Having this in mind, this review highlights the most important studies investigating pedophilia, with a strong emphasis on (neuro-) biological studies, combined with a brief explanation of research into normal human sexuality. We focus on some of the recent theories on the etiology of pedophilia such as the concept of a general neurodevelopmental disorder and/or alterations of structure and function in frontal, temporal, and limbic brain areas. With this approach, we aim to not only provide an update and overview but also a framework for future research and to address one of the most significant questions of how pedophilia may be explained by neurobiological and developmental alterations.

  20. Neurobiological Underpinnings of Math and Reading Learning Disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Ashkenazi, Sarit; Black, Jessica M.; Abrams, Daniel A.; Hoeft, Fumiko; Menon, Vinod

    2013-01-01

    The primary goal of this review is to highlight current research and theories describing the neurobiological basis of math (MD), reading (RD), and comorbid math and reading disability (MD+RD). We first describe the unique brain and cognitive processes involved in acquisition of math and reading skills, emphasizing similarities and differences in each domain. Next we review functional imaging studies of MD and RD in children, integrating relevant theories from experimental psychology and cognitive neuroscience to characterize the functional neuroanatomy of cognitive dysfunction in MD and RD. We then review recent research on the anatomical correlates of MD and RD. Converging evidence from morphometry and tractography studies are presented to highlight distinct patterns of white matter pathways which are disrupted in MD and RD. Finally, we examine how the intersection of MD and RD provides a unique opportunity to clarify the unique and shared brain systems which adversely impact learning and skill acquisition in MD and RD, and point out important areas for future work on comorbid learning disabilities. PMID:23572008

  1. Sensory neurobiological analysis of neuropeptide modulation of meal size.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Gary J; Azzara, Anthony V

    2004-08-01

    Gerry Smith's emphasis on the meal as the functional unit of ingestion spurred experiments designed to (1) identify oral and postoral stimuli that affect meal size, and (2) identify peripheral and central neural mechanisms involved in the processing of sensory signals generated by these stimuli. His observations that gut-brain peptides can limit meal size were important in formulating the idea that neuropeptides involved in the control of food intake modulate the peripheral and central neural processing of meal-stimulated sensory signals. This focus on meal size continues to foster the development of hypotheses and the design of experiments that characterize the sites and modes of action of feeding modulatory neuropeptides. These investigations have focused attention on the gut-brain neuraxis as a critical sensory pathway in the control of ingestive behavior, and have revealed important integrative properties of peripheral and central neurons along this axis. The neuromodulatory function of peptides that alter food intake is supported by their ability to recruit the activation of neurons at multiple central nodes of the gut-brain axis and to affect the neural processing and behavioral potency of meal-related gastrointestinal signals important in the negative feedback control of meal size. This sensory neurobiological perspective may also be applied to determine whether feeding modulatory neuropeptides affect the neural and behavioral potency of oral positive feedback signals that promote ingestion.

  2. The Neurobiology and Psychology of Pedophilia: Recent Advances and Challenges.

    PubMed

    Tenbergen, Gilian; Wittfoth, Matthias; Frieling, Helge; Ponseti, Jorge; Walter, Martin; Walter, Henrik; Beier, Klaus M; Schiffer, Boris; Kruger, Tillmann H C

    2015-01-01

    A pedophilic disorder is recognized for its impairment to the individual and for the harm it may cause to others. Pedophilia is often considered a side issue and research into the nature of pedophilia is delayed in comparison to research into other psychiatric disorders. However, with the increasing use of neuroimaging techniques, such as functional and structural magnetic resonance imaging (sMRI, fMRI), together with neuropsychological studies, we are increasing our knowledge of predisposing and accompanying factors contributing to pedophilia development. At the same time, we are faced with methodological challenges, such as group differences between studies, including age, intelligence, and comorbidities, together with a lack of careful assessment and control of child sexual abuse. Having this in mind, this review highlights the most important studies investigating pedophilia, with a strong emphasis on (neuro-) biological studies, combined with a brief explanation of research into normal human sexuality. We focus on some of the recent theories on the etiology of pedophilia such as the concept of a general neurodevelopmental disorder and/or alterations of structure and function in frontal, temporal, and limbic brain areas. With this approach, we aim to not only provide an update and overview but also a framework for future research and to address one of the most significant questions of how pedophilia may be explained by neurobiological and developmental alterations. PMID:26157372

  3. Maternal Neglect: Oxytocin, Dopamine and the Neurobiology of Attachment

    PubMed Central

    Strathearn, Lane

    2011-01-01

    Maternal neglect, including physical and emotional neglect, is a pervasive public health challenge with serious long-term effects on child health and development. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the neurobiological basis of maternal caregiving, in order to better understand how to prevent and respond to maternal neglect. Drawing from both animal and human studies, key biological systems are identified which contribute to maternal caregiving behavior, focusing on the oxytocinergic and dopaminergic systems. Mesocorticolimbic and nigrostriatal dopamine pathways contribute to the processing of infant-related sensory cues leading to a behavioral response. Oxytocin may activate the dopaminergic reward pathways in response to social cues. Human neuroimaging studies are summarized which demonstrate parallels between animal and human maternal caregiving responses in the brain. By comparing different patterns of human adult attachment, we gain a clearer understanding of how differences in maternal brain and endocrine responses may contribute to maternal neglect. For example, in insecure/dismissing attachment, which may be associated with emotional neglect, we see reduced activation of the mesocorticolimbic dopamine reward system in response to infant face cues, as well as decreased peripheral oxytocin response to mother-infant contact. We are currently testing whether administration of intranasal oxytocin, as part of a randomized placebo controlled trial, may reverse some of these neurological differences, and potentially augment psychosocial and behavioral interventions for maternal neglect. PMID:21951160

  4. A conceptual framework for the neurobiological study of resilience.

    PubMed

    Kalisch, Raffael; Müller, Marianne B; Tüscher, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    The well-replicated observation that many people maintain mental health despite exposure to severe psychological or physical adversity has ignited interest in the mechanisms that protect against stress-related mental illness. Focusing on resilience rather than pathophysiology in many ways represents a paradigm shift in clinical-psychological and psychiatric research that has great potential for the development of new prevention and treatment strategies. More recently, research into resilience also arrived in the neurobiological community, posing nontrivial questions about ecological validity and translatability. Drawing on concepts and findings from transdiagnostic psychiatry, emotion research, and behavioral and cognitive neuroscience, we propose a unified theoretical framework for the neuroscientific study of general resilience mechanisms. The framework is applicable to both animal and human research and supports the design and interpretation of translational studies. The theory emphasizes the causal role of stimulus appraisal (evaluation) processes in the generation of emotional responses, including responses to potential stressors. On this basis, it posits that a positive (non-negative) appraisal style is the key mechanism that protects against the detrimental effects of stress and mediates the effects of other known resilience factors. Appraisal style is shaped by three classes of cognitive processes--positive situation classification, reappraisal, and interference inhibition--that can be investigated at the neural level. Prospects for the future development of resilience research are discussed.

  5. Neurobiology of value integration: when value impacts valuation.

    PubMed

    Park, Soyoung Q; Kahnt, Thorsten; Rieskamp, Jörg; Heekeren, Hauke R

    2011-06-22

    Everyday choice options have advantages (positive values) and disadvantages (negative values) that need to be integrated into an overall subjective value. For decades, economic models have assumed that when a person evaluates a choice option, different values contribute independently to the overall subjective value of the option. However, human choice behavior often violates this assumption, suggesting interactions between values. To investigate how qualitatively different advantages and disadvantages are integrated into an overall subjective value, we measured the brain activity of human subjects using fMRI while they were accepting or rejecting choice options that were combinations of monetary reward and physical pain. We compared different subjective value models on behavioral and neural data. These models all made similar predictions of choice behavior, suggesting that behavioral data alone are not sufficient to uncover the underlying integration mechanism. Strikingly, a direct model comparison on brain data decisively demonstrated that interactive value integration (where values interact and affect overall valuation) predicts neural activity in value-sensitive brain regions significantly better than the independent mechanism. Furthermore, effective connectivity analyses revealed that value-dependent changes in valuation are associated with modulations in subgenual anterior cingulate cortex-amygdala coupling. These results provide novel insights into the neurobiological underpinnings of human decision making involving the integration of different values.

  6. [Autism in females: clinical, neurobiological and genetic aspects].

    PubMed

    Ruggieri, V L; Arberas, C L

    2016-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders are more prevalent in males than in females, and the proportion can range from 1.4 to 1, depending on the samples that are analysed. The smaller difference has been related to those who also manifest an associated intellectual disability, and it is accepted that in those cases females are far more seriously affected. There is likely to be a subregister of females with autism spectrum disorder, especially in those who have high cognitive performance, that is possibly related with the assessment techniques that are used and even with the lack of suitable levels of arousal in girls. In general, females with autism have better early language development, better social skills and their playing can even develop in the expected way. Their interests can be similar to those of their peer group, although they usually vary in intensity and quality. It is accepted as a fact that the difference in the social skills becomes more apparent in adolescence. The extreme male brain theory, the female-specific protective factor, variants in brain plasticity (lower threshold in males with greater susceptibility) and genetic and epigenetic factors, among others, are put forward as possible hypotheses to justify this lower prevalence and the clinical variants in females. This work aims to analyse the clinical and developmental aspects, the variability of expression in females with respect to males, and some of the possible neurobiological and genetic bases that account for the higher prevalence and the differences in expression.

  7. The Neurobiological Grounding of Persistent Stuttering: from Structure to Function.

    PubMed

    Neef, Nicole E; Anwander, Alfred; Friederici, Angela D

    2015-09-01

    Neuroimaging and transcranial magnetic stimulation provide insights into the neuronal mechanisms underlying speech disfluencies in chronic persistent stuttering. In the present paper, the goal is not to provide an exhaustive review of existing literature, but rather to highlight robust findings. We, therefore, conducted a meta-analysis of diffusion tensor imaging studies which have recently implicated disrupted white matter connectivity in stuttering. A reduction of fractional anisotropy in persistent stuttering has been reported at several different loci. Our meta-analysis revealed consistent deficits in the left dorsal stream and in the interhemispheric connections between the sensorimotor cortices. In addition, recent fMRI meta-analyses link stuttering to reduced left fronto-parieto-temporal activation while greater fluency is associated with boosted co-activations of right fronto-parieto-temporal areas. However, the physiological foundation of these irregularities is not accessible with MRI. Complementary, transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) reveals local excitatory and inhibitory regulation of cortical dynamics. Applied to a speech motor area, TMS revealed reduced speech-planning-related neuronal dynamics at the level of the primary motor cortex in stuttering. Together, this review provides a focused view of the neurobiology of stuttering to date and may guide the rational design of future research. This future needs to account for the perpetual dynamic interactions between auditory, somatosensory, and speech motor circuits that shape fluent speech.

  8. Neurobiological effects of melatonin as related to cancer.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Ba X; Shaw, David G; Pham, Phuong T; Levine, Stephen A

    2007-12-01

    Melatonin is a neurohormone naturally found in humans. Melatonin plays a role in maintaining sleep-wake rhythms; supplementation may help to regulate sleep disturbance that occur with jet lag, rotating shift-work and depression. Preliminary study of melatonin has shown potential for use in the treatment of epilepsy, tinnitus, migraine and neurodegenerative diseases. The latest publication in the Journal of Pineal Research by Edward Mills and colleagues has shown a compelling role of melatonin for the treatment of cancer. Melatonin's consistent relationship with cancer has been shown in many studies assessing links between shift work and cancer rates. High levels of melatonin have been linked to slower cancer progression. How melatonin affects cancer remains largely unclear. Although previous studies suggest different possible mechanisms, many of them are far distant from the primary physiological role of melatonin as a neurohormone. Conflicting studies are found on the role of melatonin in neurodegenerative diseases and cancer. In this article, we try to build and substantiate a neurobiological concept for the anticancer effects of melatonin. PMID:18090123

  9. The neurobiology of MMN and implications for schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Michie, Patricia T; Malmierca, Manuel S; Harms, Lauren; Todd, Juanita

    2016-04-01

    Although the scientific community appears to know a lot about MMN, about its neural generators and the computational processes that underlie its generation, do we have sufficient knowledge to understand what causes the reduction of MMN amplitude in schizophrenia? Here we attempt to integrate the evidence presented in this series of papers for the special issue on MMN in schizophrenia together with evidence from other new relevant research and ask--what have we learnt? While MMN research was the purview for decades of psychophysiologists interested in event-related potentials derived from scalp recorded EEG, it is now part of mainstream neuroscience research attracting the interest of basic auditory neuroscientists, neurobiologists and computational modellers. The confluence of these developments together with increasing clinical research has certainly advanced our understanding of the causes of reduced MMN in schizophrenia as this integrative review attempts to demonstrate--but much remains to be learnt. Future advances will rely on the application of multiple methodologies and approaches in order to arrive at better understanding of the neurobiology of MMN and implications for schizophrenia.

  10. Neurobiological considerations in understanding behavioral treatments for pathological gambling

    PubMed Central

    Potenza, Marc N.; Balodis, Iris M.; Franco, Christine A.; Bullock, Scott; Xu, Jiansong; Chung, Tammy; Grant, Jon E.

    2013-01-01

    Pathological gambling (PG), a disorder currently categorized as an impulse-control disorder but being considered as a non-substance addiction in DSM-5 discussions, represents a significant public health concern. Over the past decade, considerable advances have been made with respect to understanding the biological underpinnings of PG. Research has also demonstrated the efficacies of multiple treatments, particularly behavioral therapies, for treating PG. Despite these advances, relatively little is known regarding how biological measures, particularly those assessing brain function, relate to treatments for PG. In this article, we present a conceptual review focusing on the neurobiology of behavioral therapies for PG. To illustrate issues related to study design, we present proof-of-concept preliminary data that link Stroop-related brain activations prior to treatment onset to treatment outcome in individuals with PG receiving a cognitive behavioral treatment incorporating aspects of imaginal desensitization and motivational interviewing. We conclude with recommendations about current and future directions regarding how to incorporate and translate biological findings into improved therapies for individuals with non-substance and substance addictions. PMID:23586456

  11. A cognitive neurobiological account of deception: evidence from functional neuroimaging.

    PubMed Central

    Spence, Sean A; Hunter, Mike D; Farrow, Tom F D; Green, Russell D; Leung, David H; Hughes, Catherine J; Ganesan, Venkatasubramanian

    2004-01-01

    An organism may use misinformation, knowingly (through deception) or unknowingly (as in the case of camouflage), to gain advantage in a competitive environment. From an evolutionary perspective, greater tactical deception occurs among primates closer to humans, with larger neocortices. In humans, the onset of deceptive behaviours in childhood exhibits a developmental trajectory, which may be regarded as 'normal' in the majority and deficient among a minority with certain neurodevelopmental disorders (e.g. autism). In the human adult, deception and lying exhibit features consistent with their use of 'higher' or 'executive' brain systems. Accurate detection of deception in humans may be of particular importance in forensic practice, while an understanding of its cognitive neurobiology may have implications for models of 'theory of mind' and social cognition, and societal notions of responsibility, guilt and mitigation. In recent years, functional neuroimaging techniques (especially functional magnetic resonance imaging) have been used to study deception. Though few in number, and using very different experimental protocols, studies published in the peer-reviewed literature exhibit certain consistencies. Attempted deception is associated with activation of executive brain regions (particularly prefrontal and anterior cingulate cortices), while truthful responding has not been shown to be associated with any areas of increased activation (relative to deception). Hence, truthful responding may comprise a relative 'baseline' in human cognition and communication. The subject who lies may necessarily engage 'higher' brain centres, consistent with a purpose or intention (to deceive). While the principle of executive control during deception remains plausible, its precise anatomy awaits elucidation. PMID:15590616

  12. Neurobiological problems in long-term deep space flights.

    PubMed

    Vazquez, M E

    1998-01-01

    Future missions in space may involve long-term travel beyond the magnetic field of the Earth, subjecting astronauts to radiation hazards posed by solar flares and galactic cosmic rays, altered gravitation fields and physiological stress. Thus, it is critical to determine if there will be any reversible or irreversible, detrimental neurological effects from this prolonged exposure to space. A question of particular importance focuses on the long-term effects of the space environment on the central nervous system (CNS) neuroplasticity, with the potential acute and/or delayed effects that such perturbations might entail. Although the short-term effects of microgravity on neural control were studied on previous low earth orbit missions, the late consequences of stress in space, microgravity and space radiation have not been addressed sufficiently at the molecular, cellular and tissue levels. The possibility that space flight factors can interact influencing the neuroplastic response in the CNS looms critical issue not only to understand the ontogeny of the CNS and its functional integrity, but also, ultimately the performance of astronauts in extended space forays. The purpose of this paper is to review the neurobiological modifications that occur in the CNS exposed to the space environment, and its potential consequences for extended deep space flight.

  13. Trauma, genes, and the neurobiology of personality disorders.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Marianne; New, Antonia; Siever, Larry

    2004-12-01

    A model for personality dysfunction posits an interaction between inherited susceptibility and environmental factors such as childhood trauma. Core biological vulnerabilities in personality include dimensions of affective instability, impulsive aggression, and cognition/perceptual domains. For the dimension of impulsive aggression, often seen in borderline personality disorder (BPD), the underlying neurobiology involves deficits in central serotonin function and alterations in specific brain regions in the cingulate and the medial and orbital prefrontal cortex. The role of trauma in the development of personality disorder and especially for BPD remains unclear. Although recent studies suggest that BPD is not a trauma-spectrum disorder and that it is biologically distinct from posttraumatic stress disorder, high rates of childhood abuse and neglect do exist for individuals with personality dysfunction. Personality symptom clusters seem to be unrelated to specific abuses, but they may relate to more enduring aspects of interpersonal and family environments in childhood. Whereas twin and family studies indicate a partially heritable basis for impulsive aggression, studies of serotonin-related genes to date suggest only modest contributions to behavior. Gene-environment interactions involving childhood maltreatment are demonstrated in recent studies on antisocial behaviors and aggressive rhesus monkeys and highlight the need for further research in this important area.

  14. Heteromeric Dopamine Receptor Signaling Complexes: Emerging Neurobiology and Disease Relevance

    PubMed Central

    Perreault, Melissa L; Hasbi, Ahmed; O'Dowd, Brian F; George, Susan R

    2014-01-01

    The pharmacological modification of dopamine transmission has long been employed as a therapeutic tool in the treatment of many mental health disorders. However, as many of the pharmacotherapies today are not without significant side effects, or they alleviate only a particular subset of symptoms, the identification of novel therapeutic targets is imperative. In light of these challenges, the recognition that dopamine receptors can form heteromers has significantly expanded the range of physiologically relevant signaling complexes as well as potential drug targets. Furthermore, as the physiology and disease relevance of these receptor heteromers is further understood, their ability to exhibit pharmacological and functional properties distinct from their constituent receptors, or modulate the function of endogenous homomeric receptor complexes, may allow for the development of alternate therapeutic strategies and provide new avenues for drug design. In this review, we describe the emerging neurobiology of the known dopamine receptor heteromers, their physiological relevance in brain, and discuss the potential role of these receptor complexes in neuropsychiatric disease. We highlight their value as targets for future drug development and discuss innovative research strategies designed to selectively target these dopamine receptor heteromers in the search for novel and clinically efficacious pharmacotherapies. PMID:23774533

  15. Neurobiological, Cognitive, and Emotional Mechanisms in Melodic Intonation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Merrett, Dawn L.; Peretz, Isabelle; Wilson, Sarah J.

    2014-01-01

    Singing has been used in language rehabilitation for decades, yet controversy remains over its effectiveness and mechanisms of action. Melodic Intonation Therapy (MIT) is the most well-known singing-based therapy; however, speculation surrounds when and how it might improve outcomes in aphasia and other language disorders. While positive treatment effects have been variously attributed to different MIT components, including melody, rhythm, hand-tapping, and the choral nature of the singing, there is uncertainty about the components that are truly necessary and beneficial. Moreover, the mechanisms by which the components operate are not well understood. Within the literature to date, proposed mechanisms can be broadly grouped into four categories: (1) neuroplastic reorganization of language function, (2) activation of the mirror neuron system and multimodal integration, (3) utilization of shared or specific features of music and language, and (4) motivation and mood. In this paper, we review available evidence for each mechanism and propose that these mechanisms are not mutually exclusive, but rather represent different levels of explanation, reflecting the neurobiological, cognitive, and emotional effects of MIT. Thus, instead of competing, each of these mechanisms may contribute to language rehabilitation, with a better understanding of their relative roles and interactions allowing the design of protocols that maximize the effectiveness of singing therapy for aphasia. PMID:24917811

  16. Clinical Progression in Parkinson's Disease and the Neurobiology of Axons

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Hsiao-Chun; Ulane, Christina M.; Burke, Robert E.

    2010-01-01

    In spite of tremendous growth in recent years in our knowledge of the molecular basis of Parkinson's disease and the molecular pathways of cell injury and death, we remain without therapies that forestall disease progression. While there are many possible explanations for this lack of success, one is that experimental therapeutics to date have not adequately focused on an important component of the disease process, that of axon degeneration. It remains unknown what neuronal compartment, either the soma or the axon, is involved at disease onset, although some have proposed that it is the axons and their terminals that take the initial brunt of injury. Nevertheless, this concept has not been formally incorporated into many of the current theories of disease pathogenesis, and it has not achieved a wide consensus. More importantly, in view of growing evidence that the molecular mechanisms of axon degeneration are separate and distinct from the canonical pathways of programmed cell death that mediate soma destruction, the possibility of early involvement of axons in PD has not been adequately emphasized as a rationale to explore the neurobiology of axons for novel therapeutic targets. We propose that it is ongoing degeneration of axons, not cell bodies, that is the primary determinant of clinically apparent progression of disease, and that future experimental therapeutics intended to forestall disease progression will benefit from a new focus on the distinct mechanisms of axon degeneration. PMID:20517933

  17. The dolphin brain--a challenge for synthetic neurobiology.

    PubMed

    Oelschläger, Helmut H A

    2008-03-18

    Toothed whales (odontocetes) are a promising paradigm for neurobiology and evolutionary biology. The ecophysiological implications and structural adaptations of their brain seem to reflect the necessity of effective underwater hearing for echolocation (sonar), navigation, and communication. However, not all components of the auditory system are equally well developed. Other sensory systems are more or less strongly reduced such as the olfactory system and, as an exception among vertebrates, the vestibular system (the semicircular canals and vestibular nuclei). Additional outstanding features are: (1) the hypertrophy of the neocortex, pons, cerebellum (particularly the paraflocculus), the elliptic nucleus, the facial motor nucleus and the medial accessory inferior olive and (2) the reduction of the hippocampus. The screening of brain structures with respect to shared circuitry and shared size correlations resulted in central loops also known from other mammals which overlap in the cerebellum and serve in the integration and processing of sensory input. It is highly probable that for dolphin navigation the ascending auditory pathway, including the inferior colliculus and the medial geniculate body, is of utmost importance. The extended auditory neocortical fields project to the midbrain and rhombencephalon and may influence premotor and motor areas in such a way as to allow the smooth regulation of sound-induced and sound-controlled locomotor activity as well as sophisticated phonation. This sonar-guided acousticomotor system for navigation and vocalization in the aquatic environment may have been a major factor if not the key feature in the relative size increase seen in dolphin brains.

  18. Neurobiological, cognitive, and emotional mechanisms in melodic intonation therapy.

    PubMed

    Merrett, Dawn L; Peretz, Isabelle; Wilson, Sarah J

    2014-01-01

    Singing has been used in language rehabilitation for decades, yet controversy remains over its effectiveness and mechanisms of action. Melodic Intonation Therapy (MIT) is the most well-known singing-based therapy; however, speculation surrounds when and how it might improve outcomes in aphasia and other language disorders. While positive treatment effects have been variously attributed to different MIT components, including melody, rhythm, hand-tapping, and the choral nature of the singing, there is uncertainty about the components that are truly necessary and beneficial. Moreover, the mechanisms by which the components operate are not well understood. Within the literature to date, proposed mechanisms can be broadly grouped into four categories: (1) neuroplastic reorganization of language function, (2) activation of the mirror neuron system and multimodal integration, (3) utilization of shared or specific features of music and language, and (4) motivation and mood. In this paper, we review available evidence for each mechanism and propose that these mechanisms are not mutually exclusive, but rather represent different levels of explanation, reflecting the neurobiological, cognitive, and emotional effects of MIT. Thus, instead of competing, each of these mechanisms may contribute to language rehabilitation, with a better understanding of their relative roles and interactions allowing the design of protocols that maximize the effectiveness of singing therapy for aphasia. PMID:24917811

  19. Neurobiological Indicators of Disinhibition in Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Sadeh, Naomi; Spielberg, Jeffrey M.; Miller, Mark W.; Milberg, William P.; Salat, David H.; Amick, Melissa M.; Fortier, Catherine B.; McGlinchey, Regina E.

    2015-01-01

    Deficits in impulse control are increasingly recognized in association with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). To further our understanding of the neurobiology of PTSD-related disinhibition, we examined alterations in brain morphology and network connectivity associated with response inhibition failures and PTSD severity. The sample consisted of 189 trauma-exposed Operation Enduring Freedom/Operation Iraqi Freedom veterans (89% male, ages 19–62) presenting with a range of current PTSD severity. Disinhibition was measured using commission errors on a Go/No-Go task with emotional stimuli, and PTSD was assessed using a measure of current symptom severity. Whole-brain vertex-wise analyses of cortical thickness revealed two clusters associated with PTSD-related disinhibition (Monte Carlo cluster corrected p< .05). The first cluster included portions of right inferior and middle frontal gyri and frontal pole. The second cluster spanned portions of left medial orbital frontal, rostral anterior cingulate, and superior frontal gyrus. In both clusters, commission errors were associated with reduced cortical thickness at higher (but not lower) levels of PTSD symptoms. Resting-state fMRI analyses revealed alterations in the functional connectivity of the right frontal cluster. Together, study findings suggest that reductions in cortical thickness in regions involved in flexible decision-making, emotion regulation, and response inhibition contribute to impulse control deficits in PTSD. Further, aberrant coupling between frontal regions and networks involved in selective attention, memory/learning, and response preparation suggest disruptions in functional connectivity may also play a role. PMID:25959594

  20. The neurobiology of autism: new pieces of the puzzle.

    PubMed

    Acosta, Maria T; Pearl, Phillip L

    2003-03-01

    The neurobiologic basis of autism is reviewed, with discussion of evidence from genetic, magnetic resonance imaging, neuropathology, and functional neuroimaging studies. Although autism is a behaviorally valid syndrome, it is remarkably heterogeneous and involves multiple developmental domains as well as a wide range of cognitive, language, and socioemotional functioning. Although multiple etiologies are implicated, recent advances have identified common themes in pathophysiology. Genetic factors play a primary role, based on evidence from family studies, identification of putative genes using genome-wide linkage analyses, and comorbidities with known genetic mutations. The RELN gene, which codes for an extracellular protein guiding neuronal migration, has been implicated in autism. Numerous neuropathologic changes have been described, including macroencephaly, acceleration and then deceleration in brain growth, increased neuronal packing and decreased cell size in the limbic system, and decreased Purkinje cell number in the cerebellum. Abnormalities in organization of the cortical minicolumn, representing the fundamental subunit of vertical cortical organization, may underlie the pathology of autism and result in altered thalamocortical connections, cortical disinhibition, and dysfunction of the arousal-modulating system of the brain. The role of acquired factors is speculative, with insufficient evidence to link the measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine with autism or to change immunization practices. PMID:12583844

  1. Neurobiological Correlates of Violent Behavior Among Persons With Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Naudts, Kris; Hodgins, Sheilagh

    2006-01-01

    Men and women who develop schizophrenia are at increased risk, compared with the general population, to engage in violence toward others. The reasons for this robust finding remain obscure. We undertook a review of studies comparing neuropsychological test performance, neurological soft signs, and structural brain images of persons with schizophrenia with and without a history of violence. Our search identified 17 studies. The results are inconsistent and contradictory, mainly due to varying definitions of violence, differences in sample characteristics, and the use of diverse measures to tap the neurobiological correlates of violent behavior. The results suggest, however, that among men with schizophrenia, those who have displayed a stable pattern of antisocial and aggressive behavior since childhood, as compared with those with no such history, perform better on neuropsychological tests tapping specific executive functions and more poorly on assessments of orbitofrontal functions, show fewer neurological soft signs, and display larger reductions in volume of the amygdalae, more structural abnormalities of the orbitofrontal system, more abnormalities of white matter in the amygdala-orbitofrontal system, and smaller reductions in volumes of the hippocampus. PMID:16384876

  2. Neurobiological Sequelae of Witnessing Stressful Events in Adult Mice

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Brandon L.; Vialou, Vincent F.; Iñiguez, Sergio D.; Alcantara, Lyonna F.; Wright, Katherine N.; Feng, Jiang; Kennedy, Pamela J.; LaPlant, Quincey; Shen, Li; Nestler, Eric J.; Bolaños-Guzmán, Carlos A.

    2012-01-01

    Background It is well known that exposure to severe stress increases the risk for developing mood disorders. However, most chronic stress models in rodents involve at least some form of physically experiencing traumatic events. Methods This study assessed the effects of a novel social stress paradigm that is insulated from the effects of physical stress. Specifically, adult male C57BL/6J mice were exposed to either emotional (ES) or physical stress (PS) for ten minutes per day for ten days. ES mice were exposed to the social defeat of a PS mouse by a larger more aggressive CD-1 mouse from the safety of an adjacent compartment. Results Like PS mice, ES mice exhibited a range of depression- and anxiety-like behaviors both 24 hr and 1 month after the stress. Increased levels of serum corticosterone, part of the stress response, accompanied these behavioral deficits. Based on prior work which implicated gene expression changes in the ventral tegmental area (a key brain reward region) in the PS phenotype, we compared genome-wide mRNA expression patterns in this brain region of ES and PS mice using RNA-seq. We found significant overlap between these conditions, which suggests several potential gene targets for mediating the behavioral abnormalities observed. Conclusions Together, these findings demonstrate that witnessing traumatic events is a potent stress in adult male mice capable of inducing long-lasting neurobiological perturbations. PMID:22795644

  3. Social Influences on Neurobiology and Behavior: Epigenetic Effects During Development

    PubMed Central

    Curley, JP; Jensen, CL; Mashoodh, R; Champagne, FA

    2010-01-01

    The quality of the social environment can have profound influences on the development and activity of neural systems with implications for numerous behavioral and physiological responses, including the expression of emotionality. Though social experiences occurring early in development may be particularly influential on the developing brain, there is continued plasticity within these neural circuits amongst juveniles and into early adulthood. In this review, we explore the evidence derived from studies in rodents which illustrates the social modulation during development of neural systems, with a particular emphasis on those systems in which a long-term effect is observed. One possible explanation for the persistence of dynamic changes in these systems in response to the environment is the involvement of epigenetic mechanisms, and here we discuss recent studies which support the role of these mechanisms in mediating the link between social experiences, gene expression, neurobiological changes, and behavioral variation. This literature raises critical questions about the interaction between neural systems, the concordance between neural and behavioral changes, sexual dimorphism in effects, the importance of considering individual differences in response to the social environment, and the potential of an epigenetic perspective in advancing our understanding of the pathways leading to variations in mental health. PMID:20650569

  4. The Phenomenology and Neurobiology of Delusion Formation During Psychosis Onset: Jaspers, Truman Symptoms, and Aberrant Salience

    PubMed Central

    Fusar-Poli, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Following the publication of Karl Jaspers’ General Psychopathology (1913), delusions have been characterized as being nonunderstandable in terms of the person’s biography, motivations, and historical-cultural context. According to Jaspers, this loss of understandability is due to an underlying neurobiological process, which has interrupted the normal development of the individual’s personality. Inheriting the 19th-century division between the natural- and human-historical sciences, Jaspers emphasizes the psychological understanding of mental disorders as narrative-based, holistic, and contextual. By doing so, he embraces cultural, ethnic, and individual differences and anticipates a person-centered medicine. However, he also affirms the value of explanatory neurobiological approaches, especially in the research and diagnosis of delusions. The phenomenological approach leads to neurobiological hypotheses, which can be tested experimentally. The present article addresses these issues by illustrating Jaspers’ fundamental contribution to current neurobiological research concerning the formation of delusions during early phases of psychosis. Specifically, we present delusional mood and Truman symptoms as core phenomenological features at the origin of psychosis onset, and we discuss their neurobiological substrate with the aberrant salience and dopamine dysregulation models. Jaspers and his successors’ phenomenological approach suggests that delusion is formed through loss of context in its experiential-perceptual origins. This is consistent with the more recent neurobiological models. PMID:23354468

  5. The phenomenology and neurobiology of delusion formation during psychosis onset: Jaspers, Truman symptoms, and aberrant salience.

    PubMed

    Mishara, Aaron L; Fusar-Poli, Paolo

    2013-03-01

    Following the publication of Karl Jaspers' General Psychopathology (1913), delusions have been characterized as being nonunderstandable in terms of the person's biography, motivations, and historical-cultural context. According to Jaspers, this loss of understandability is due to an underlying neurobiological process, which has interrupted the normal development of the individual's personality. Inheriting the 19th-century division between the natural- and human-historical sciences, Jaspers emphasizes the psychological understanding of mental disorders as narrative-based, holistic, and contextual. By doing so, he embraces cultural, ethnic, and individual differences and anticipates a person-centered medicine. However, he also affirms the value of explanatory neurobiological approaches, especially in the research and diagnosis of delusions. The phenomenological approach leads to neurobiological hypotheses, which can be tested experimentally. The present article addresses these issues by illustrating Jaspers' fundamental contribution to current neurobiological research concerning the formation of delusions during early phases of psychosis. Specifically, we present delusional mood and Truman symptoms as core phenomenological features at the origin of psychosis onset, and we discuss their neurobiological substrate with the aberrant salience and dopamine dysregulation models. Jaspers and his successors' phenomenological approach suggests that delusion is formed through loss of context in its experiential-perceptual origins. This is consistent with the more recent neurobiological models.

  6. Beyond the mammography debate: a moderate perspective.

    PubMed

    Kaniklidis, C

    2015-06-01

    After some decades of contention, one can almost despair and conclude that (paraphrasing) "the mammography debate you will have with you always." Against that sentiment, in this review I argue, after reflecting on some of the major themes of this long-standing debate, that we must begin to move beyond the narrow borders of claim and counterclaim to seek consensus on what the balance of methodologically sound and critically appraised evidence demonstrates, and also to find overlooked underlying convergences; after acknowledging the reality of some residual and non-trivial harms from mammography, to promote effective strategies for harm mitigation; and to encourage deployment of new screening modalities that will render many of the issues and concerns in the debate obsolete. To these ends, I provide a sketch of what this looking forward and beyond the current debate might look like, leveraging advantages from abbreviated breast magnetic resonance imaging technologies (such as the ultrafast and twist protocols) and from digital breast tomosynthesis-also known as three-dimensional mammography. I also locate the debate within the broader context of mammography in the real world as it plays out not for the disputants, but for the stakeholders themselves: the screening-eligible patients and the physicians in the front lines who are charged with enabling both the acts of screening and the facts of screening at their maximally objective and patient-accessible levels to facilitate informed decisions. PMID:26089721

  7. Beyond the mammography debate: a moderate perspective

    PubMed Central

    Kaniklidis, C

    2015-01-01

    After some decades of contention, one can almost despair and conclude that (paraphrasing) “the mammography debate you will have with you always.” Against that sentiment, in this review I argue, after reflecting on some of the major themes of this long-standing debate, that we must begin to move beyond the narrow borders of claim and counterclaim to seek consensus on what the balance of methodologically sound and critically appraised evidence demonstrates, and also to find overlooked underlying convergences; after acknowledging the reality of some residual and non-trivial harms from mammography, to promote effective strategies for harm mitigation; and to encourage deployment of new screening modalities that will render many of the issues and concerns in the debate obsolete. To these ends, I provide a sketch of what this looking forward and beyond the current debate might look like, leveraging advantages from abbreviated breast magnetic resonance imaging technologies (such as the ultrafast and twist protocols) and from digital breast tomosynthesis—also known as three-dimensional mammography. I also locate the debate within the broader context of mammography in the real world as it plays out not for the disputants, but for the stakeholders themselves: the screening-eligible patients and the physicians in the front lines who are charged with enabling both the acts of screening and the facts of screening at their maximally objective and patient-accessible levels to facilitate informed decisions. PMID:26089721

  8. Tubercle bacilli rely on a type VII army for pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Stoop, Esther J M; Bitter, Wilbert; van der Sar, Astrid M

    2012-10-01

    Mycobacteria, such as the major human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis, have a highly unusual and characteristic diderm cell envelope that protects them against harmful conditions. Protein secretion across this hydrophobic barrier requires specialized secretion systems. Recently, a type VII secretion (T7S) pathway has been identified that fulfills this function. Pathogenic mycobacteria have up to five different T7S systems, some of which play a crucial role in virulence. The interactions between secreted substrates and host molecules are only starting to become clear and will help in furthering our understanding of the persistence of these enigmatic pathogens. In this review, we discuss current knowledge on the role of T7S systems in mycobacterial virulence.

  9. The dust tail of Comet Wilson 1987VII

    SciTech Connect

    Cremonese, G.; Fulle, M. Osservatorio Astronomico, Trieste )

    1990-10-01

    The dust and plasma tails of Comet Wilson 1987VII were studied using photographic plates obtained by means of an ESO Schmidt camera. The plates were digitized adopting a square scanning window of 50 microns and properly calibrated by means of calibration wedges. Dust grains of diameters between 10 microns and 5 cm, ejected during the time interval -600 less than t less than -30 (days related to perihelion), were considered and a total dust mass of (4 + or - 2) x 10 to the 14th g was obtained, together with a power index of the time-averaged size distribution of -3.0 + or - 0.1. The high value of the power index of the time-averaged size distribution with respect to the lower value of old comets might point out intrinsic differences and suggest new formations. 6 refs.

  10. Mucopolysaccharidosis type VII: A powerful experimental system and therapeutic challenge.

    PubMed

    Sands, Mark S

    2014-09-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type VII (MPSVII) is an inborn error of metabolism caused by a deficiency in the lysosomal enzyme B-glucuronidase (GUSB). As such, MPSVII is one of a larger class of inherited diseases referred to as lysosomal storage diseases (LSD). (1) The absence of GUSB activity leads to the progressive accumulation of undegraded glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in many tissues of the body. Mucopolysaccharidosis VII has a complex clinical phenotype, including skeletal dysplasia, hepatosplenomegally, sensory deficits, cognitive impairment, and premature death. Although the natural history of the human disease is not precisely defined, small and large animal models of MPSVII have played a major role in our understanding of the disease process and towards effective treatments. The mouse model of MPSVII is a particularly powerful system due to its similarity to the human disease and the ability to generate large numbers of genetically defined animals. It has been shown in the murine model of MPSVII that recombinant enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) can ameliorate most of the clinical signs of disease if initiated during the neonatal period. Progenitor cell transplantation (hematopoietic, neuronal, mesenchymal) can correct many of the pathological signs of disease in MPSVII mice. Viral-mediated gene therapy has also been shown to decrease the severity of the disease in both the murine and canine models of MPSVII. Although pre-clinical experiments have shown that a number of approaches can effectively treat MPSVII, translation of those therapies into the clinic has lagged behind other LSDs. This is due in large part to the ultra-rare nature of MPSVII. Encouragingly, a clinical trial of ERT for MPSVII has recently been initiated. It will be interesting to determine if the positive pre-clinical data gathered in animal models of MPSVII translate to affected children. This clinical trial may also establish a paradigm for the treatment of other ultra-rare disorders. PMID

  11. Sequence analysis of 203 kilobases from Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosome VII.

    PubMed

    Rieger, M; Brückner, M; Schäfer, M; Müller-Auer, S

    1997-09-15

    The nucleotide sequences of five major regions from chromosome VII of Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been determined and analysed. These regions represent 203 kilobases corresponding to approximately one-fifth of the complete yeast chromosome VII. Two fragments originate from the left arm of this chromosome. The first one of about 15.8 kb starts approximately 75 kb from the left telomere and is bordered by the SK18 chromosomal marker. The second fragment covers the 72.6 kb region between the chromosomal markers CYH2 and ALG2. On the right chromosomal arm three regions, a 70.6 kb region between the MSB2 and the KSS1 chromosomal markers and two smaller regions dominated by the KRE11 marker and another one in the vicinity of the SER2 marker were sequenced. We found a total of 114 open reading frames (ORFs), 13 of which were completely overlapping with larger ORFs running in the opposite direction. A total of 44 yeast genes, the physiological functions of which are known, could be precisely mapped on this chromosome. Of the remaining 57 ORFs, 26 shared sequence homologies with known genes, among which were 13 other S. cerevisiae genes and five genes from other organisms. No homology with any sequence in the databases could be found for 31 ORFs. Furthermore, five Ty elements were found, one of which may not be functional due to a frame shift in its Ty1B amino acid sequence. The five chromosomal regions harboured five potential ARS elements and one sigma element together with eight tRNA genes and two snRNAs, one of which is encoded by an intron of a protein-coding gene. PMID:9290212

  12. A Novice and Novel Approach to Encouraging Participation in Debate, the Novice Debate Association.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauer, Mike

    The Novice Debate Association (NDA) is an organization that is building unity, respecting diversity, and giving students and institutions alike a chance to participate in debate activity. The NDA began in 1987 as a strictly novice tournament. By 1993, the association had enlarged to 24 colleges and universities. The format of the NDA is designed…

  13. No end in sight to cloning debate.

    PubMed

    Graumann, Sigrid; Poltermann, Andreas

    2005-01-01

    Since last August, Great Britain has allowed the cloning for research purposes. This fact has re-generated an existing debate, taking into account the prohibition of cloning of the UN, the States are debating whether cloning should be prohibited or in the contrary, it should also be admitted for reproductive purposes. This situation has generated an international uneasiness due to the lack of a universal consensus. This article analyses this situation, bringing the reader closer to the very controversial texts, such as the European Constitution and the UN Convention on Cloning.

  14. Thinking in circuits: toward neurobiological explanation in cognitive neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Pulvermüller, Friedemann; Garagnani, Max; Wennekers, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    Cognitive theory has decomposed human mental abilities into cognitive (sub) systems, and cognitive neuroscience succeeded in disclosing a host of relationships between cognitive systems and specific structures of the human brain. However, an explanation of why specific functions are located in specific brain loci had still been missing, along with a neurobiological model that makes concrete the neuronal circuits that carry thoughts and meaning. Brain theory, in particular the Hebb-inspired neurocybernetic proposals by Braitenberg, now offers an avenue toward explaining brain-mind relationships and to spell out cognition in terms of neuron circuits in a neuromechanistic sense. Central to this endeavor is the theoretical construct of an elementary functional neuronal unit above the level of individual neurons and below that of whole brain areas and systems: the distributed neuronal assembly (DNA) or thought circuit (TC). It is shown that DNA/TC theory of cognition offers an integrated explanatory perspective on brain mechanisms of perception, action, language, attention, memory, decision and conceptual thought. We argue that DNAs carry all of these functions and that their inner structure (e.g., core and halo subcomponents), and their functional activation dynamics (e.g., ignition and reverberation processes) answer crucial localist questions, such as why memory and decisions draw on prefrontal areas although memory formation is normally driven by information in the senses and in the motor system. We suggest that the ability of building DNAs/TCs spread out over different cortical areas is the key mechanism for a range of specifically human sensorimotor, linguistic and conceptual capacities and that the cell assembly mechanism of overlap reduction is crucial for differentiating a vocabulary of actions, symbols and concepts. PMID:24939580

  15. Pathways Associating Childhood Trauma to the Neurobiology of Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Ruby, Eugene; Polito, Stephanie; McMahon, Kevin; Gorovitz, Marisa; Corcoran, Cheryl; Malaspina, Dolores

    2014-01-01

    While researchers have for decades considered the role of social factors, endocrinology, neural function, hippocampal integrity, and cognition in the development of schizophrenia, there has been a relative paucity of studies considering the participation of the stress cascade in the interplay of these elements. As described in this review, stressful exposures and stress sensitivity may plausibly be argued to play a role in the etiology, neurobiology, and course of schizophrenia and related psychotic disorders. Notably, research conducted over the last decade has made it increasingly clear that childhood traumatic experiences represent a prominent risk factor for the development of psychotic disorders, including schizophrenia. Accumulating evidence suggests that this relationship is mediated by the development of a neuropathological stress response, involving HPA axis dysregulation, aberrant functioning of different neurotransmitter systems, hippocampal damage, and memory deficits. However, it remains difficult to identify exact causal pathways linking early trauma to schizophrenia, including to the individual symptoms associated with the disorder. In addition to the strong association among early trauma, stress sensitization, and positive symptoms in schizophrenia, there is also evidence indicating that the negative and cognitive symptoms are related to these factors. However, the emergence of these symptoms may lie on a distinct and non-interacting pathway in relation to the development of the positive symptoms. The natural increases in stress sensitivity and HPA axis activity during adolescence may act on already maladaptive stress circuitry resulting from early trauma and/or a genetic predisposition to produce full blown stress sensitization and cause epigenetic effects, such as the altered methylation of different genes, that lead to schizophrenia or other psychiatric illnesses. PMID:25419548

  16. The Neurobiology of Retinoic Acid in Affective Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Bremner, J Douglas; McCaffery, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Current models of affective disorders implicate alterations in norepinephrine, serotonin, dopamine, and CRF/cortisol; however treatments targeted at these neurotransmitters or hormones have led to imperfect resolution of symptoms, suggesting that the neurobiology of affective disorders is incompletely understood. Until now retinoids have not been considered as possible contributors to affective disorders. Retinoids represent a family of compounds derived from Vitamin A that perform a large number of functions, many via the vitamin A product, retinoic acid. This signaling molecule binds to specific retinoic acid receptors in the brain which, like the glucocorticoid and thyroid hormone receptors, are part of the nuclear receptor superfamily and regulate gene transcription. Research in the field of retinoic acid in the CNS has focused on the developing brain, in part stimulated by the observation that isotretinoin (13-cis retinoic acid), an isomer of retinoic acid used in the treatment of acne, is highly teratogenic for the CNS. More recent work has suggested that retinoic acid may influence the adult brain; animal studies indicated that the administration of isotretinoin is associated with alterations in behavior as well as inhibition of neurogenesis in the hippocampus. Clinical evidence for an association between retinoids and depression includes case reports in the literature, studies of health care databases, and other sources. A preliminary PET study in human subjects showed that isotretinoin was associated with a decrease in orbitofrontal metabolism. Several studies have shown that the molecular components required for retinoic acid signaling are expressed in the adult brain ; the overlap of brain areas implicated in retinoic acid function and stress and depression suggest that retinoids could play a role in affective disorders. This report reviews the evidence in this area and describes several systems that may be targets of retinoic acid and which contribute

  17. Pathways Associating Childhood Trauma to the Neurobiology of Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Ruby, Eugene; Polito, Stephanie; McMahon, Kevin; Gorovitz, Marisa; Corcoran, Cheryl; Malaspina, Dolores

    2014-01-01

    While researchers have for decades considered the role of social factors, endocrinology, neural function, hippocampal integrity, and cognition in the development of schizophrenia, there has been a relative paucity of studies considering the participation of the stress cascade in the interplay of these elements. As described in this review, stressful exposures and stress sensitivity may plausibly be argued to play a role in the etiology, neurobiology, and course of schizophrenia and related psychotic disorders. Notably, research conducted over the last decade has made it increasingly clear that childhood traumatic experiences represent a prominent risk factor for the development of psychotic disorders, including schizophrenia. Accumulating evidence suggests that this relationship is mediated by the development of a neuropathological stress response, involving HPA axis dysregulation, aberrant functioning of different neurotransmitter systems, hippocampal damage, and memory deficits. However, it remains difficult to identify exact causal pathways linking early trauma to schizophrenia, including to the individual symptoms associated with the disorder. In addition to the strong association among early trauma, stress sensitization, and positive symptoms in schizophrenia, there is also evidence indicating that the negative and cognitive symptoms are related to these factors. However, the emergence of these symptoms may lie on a distinct and non-interacting pathway in relation to the development of the positive symptoms. The natural increases in stress sensitivity and HPA axis activity during adolescence may act on already maladaptive stress circuitry resulting from early trauma and/or a genetic predisposition to produce full blown stress sensitization and cause epigenetic effects, such as the altered methylation of different genes, that lead to schizophrenia or other psychiatric illnesses. PMID:25419548

  18. Paying attention to reading: the neurobiology of reading and dyslexia.

    PubMed

    Shaywitz, Sally E; Shaywitz, Bennett A

    2008-01-01

    Extraordinary progress in functional brain imaging, primarily advances in functional magnetic resonance imaging, now allows scientists to understand the neural systems serving reading and how these systems differ in dyslexic readers. Scientists now speak of the neural signature of dyslexia, a singular achievement that for the first time has made what was previously a hidden disability, now visible. Paralleling this achievement in understanding the neurobiology of dyslexia, progress in the identification and treatment of dyslexia now offers the hope of identifying children at risk for dyslexia at a very young age and providing evidence-based, effective interventions. Despite these advances, for many dyslexic readers, becoming a skilled, automatic reader remains elusive, in great part because though children with dyslexia can be taught to decode words, teaching children to read fluently and automatically represents the next frontier in research on dyslexia. We suggest that to break through this "fluency" barrier, investigators will need to reexamine the more than 20-year-old central dogma in reading research: the generation of the phonological code from print is modular, that is, automatic and not attention demanding, and not requiring any other cognitive process. Recent findings now present a competing view: other cognitive processes are involved in reading, particularly attentional mechanisms, and that disruption of these attentional mechanisms play a causal role in reading difficulties. Recognition of the role of attentional mechanisms in reading now offer potentially new strategies for interventions in dyslexia. In particular, the use of pharmacotherapeutic agents affecting attentional mechanisms not only may provide a window into the neurochemical mechanisms underlying dyslexia but also may offer a potential adjunct treatment for teaching dyslexic readers to read fluently and automatically. Preliminary studies suggest that agents traditionally used to treat

  19. 99Tc(VII) Retardation, Reduction, and Redox Rate Scaling in Naturally Reduced Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yuanyuan; Liu, Chongxuan; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; McKinley, James P.; Zachara, John M.; Plymale, Andrew E.; Miller, Micah D.; Varga, Tamas; Resch, Charles T.

    2015-10-15

    Abstract: An experimental and modeling study was conducted to investigate pertechnetate (Tc(VII)) retardation, reduction, and rate scaling in three sediments from Ringold formation at U.S. Department of Energy’s Hanford site, where 99Tc is a major contaminant in groundwater. Tc(VII) was reduced in all the sediments in both batch reactors and diffusion columns, with a faster rate in a sediment containing a higher concentration of HCl-extractable Fe(II). Tc(VII) migration in the diffusion columns was reductively retarded with retardation degrees correlated with Tc(VII) reduction rates. The reduction rates were faster in the diffusion columns than those in the batch reactors, apparently influenced by the spatial distribution of redox-reactive minerals along transport paths that supplied Tc(VII). X-ray computed tomography and autoradiography were performed to identify the spatial locations of Tc(VII) reduction and transport paths in the sediments, and results generally confirmed the newly found behavior of reaction rate changes from batch to column. The results from this study implied that Tc(VII) migration can be reductively retarded at Hanford site with a retardation degree dependent on reactive Fe(II) content and its distribution in sediments. This study also demonstrated that an effective reaction rate may be faster in transport systems than that in well-mixed reactors.

  20. Innovation Abstracts. Volume VII, Numbers 1-31.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roueche, Suanne D., Ed.

    This series of 34 one- to two-page essays provides brief descriptions of innovative approaches to various aspects of two-year college education. Included in the series are: "Debatable Learning," by Beti Thompson; "Mentors to the Rescue," by Cynthia A. Barnes; "How to Take Line Management Risks: Push Them Downward," by David P. Campbell; "Applying…

  1. Using Role Play to Debate Animal Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agell, Laia; Soria, Vanessa; Carrió, Mar

    2015-01-01

    The use of animals in biomedical research is a socio-scientific issue in which decision-making is complicated. In this article, we describe an experience involving a role play activity performed during school visits to the Barcelona Biomedical Research Park (PRBB) to debate animal testing. Role playing games require students to defend different…

  2. Anonymity in Classroom Voting and Debating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ainsworth, Shaaron; Gelmini-Hornsby, Giulia; Threapleton, Kate; Crook, Charles; O'Malley, Claire; Buda, Marie

    2011-01-01

    The advent of networked environments into the classroom is changing classroom debates in many ways. This article addresses one key attribute of these environments, namely anonymity, to explore its consequences for co-present adolescents anonymous, by virtue of the computer system, to peers not to teachers. Three studies with 16-17 year-olds used a…

  3. Twitter Gets Favorited in the Education Debate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Supovitz, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    The author describes how the interactive study of social media's effect on the Common Core debate was designed and executed. Important findings from the study were: 1) We live in an increasingly interconnected social world. 2) Media has evolved over the last half century from a passive system dominated by a few central opinion makers to the…

  4. Bioethics and the Stem Cell Research Debate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapiro, Robyn S.

    2006-01-01

    Bioethics--the study of ethical issues in science and medicine--has grown to become a significant academic and service-oriented discipline with its own research centers, conferences, journals, and degree programs. As these issues have moved to the center of public debate, the law has assumed an increasingly important place in the discipline of…

  5. The Grade Retention/Social Promotion Debate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindelow, John

    1985-01-01

    This publication focuses on the retention/promotion debate regarding failing and low-achieving students. An introductory essay describes the inherent limitation in the research done on this issue--the impossibility of obtaining an appropriate control group--and suggests that the retention/promotion quandary can best be resolved by accommodating…

  6. Making Sense of the MOOCs Debate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharrock, Geoff

    2015-01-01

    This article considers recent public debates about massive open online courses (MOOCs) and their potential to transform higher education. Drawing on reports and media commentary, it probes the claims and counterclaims of MOOC proponents and MOOC sceptics. It considers the implications for students, governments, institutions and scholars…

  7. Evolution: Don't Debate, Educate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bybee, Rodger W.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses controversy over the teaching of biological evolution and other scientific ideas such as Big Bang theory. Recommends that teachers avoid debating creationists, help students develop a greater understanding and appreciation for science as a way of explaining the natural world, and emphasize inquiry and the nature of science. (Contains 19…

  8. Debating the Merits of Transborder Data Flow.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riddle, Kay

    1979-01-01

    Discusses the highlights of a conference "Data Regulation: European and Third World Realities," during which the merits and demerits of "transborder data flow" regulations were debated with officials from nations that have recently passed or are considering legislation related to privacy and data protection. (CWM)

  9. Contemporary Debates in Childhood Education and Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suggate, Sebastian, Ed.; Reese, Elaine, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    "Contemporary Debates in Childhood Education and Development" is a unique resource and reference work that brings together leading international researchers and thinkers, with divergent points of view, to discuss contemporary problems and questions in childhood education and developmental psychology. Through an innovative format whereby leading…

  10. Debating Diversity: Ethics and Controversial Public Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darr, Christopher R.

    2016-01-01

    Courses: Ethics, Organizational Communication, Political Communication. Objectives: After completing this unit activity, students should be able to (1) apply multiple ethical perspectives to real-world diversity issues in a debate format, and (2) explain the role of informational and social category diversity in current controversies.

  11. 11 CFR 110.13 - Candidate debates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... political parties may stage candidate debates in accordance with this section and 11 CFR 114.4(f). (2... CFR 114.4(f), provided that they are not owned or controlled by a political party, political committee... nomination by a particular political party as the sole objective criterion to determine whether to include...

  12. 11 CFR 110.13 - Candidate debates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... political parties may stage candidate debates in accordance with this section and 11 CFR 114.4(f). (2... CFR 114.4(f), provided that they are not owned or controlled by a political party, political committee... nomination by a particular political party as the sole objective criterion to determine whether to include...

  13. 11 CFR 110.13 - Candidate debates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... political parties may stage candidate debates in accordance with this section and 11 CFR 114.4(f). (2... CFR 114.4(f), provided that they are not owned or controlled by a political party, political committee... nomination by a particular political party as the sole objective criterion to determine whether to include...

  14. 11 CFR 110.13 - Candidate debates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... political parties may stage candidate debates in accordance with this section and 11 CFR 114.4(f). (2... CFR 114.4(f), provided that they are not owned or controlled by a political party, political committee... nomination by a particular political party as the sole objective criterion to determine whether to include...

  15. Gun Control: The Debate and Public Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watkins, Christine

    1997-01-01

    Provides an overview and background information on the debate over gun control, as well as several teaching ideas. Handouts include a list of related topics drawn from various disciplines (economics, U.S. history), seven arguments for and against gun control, and a set of policy evaluation guidelines. (MJP)

  16. Teaching Group Work with "The Great Debaters"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moe, Jeffry; Autry, Linda; Olson, Joann S.; Johnson, Kaprea F.

    2014-01-01

    An experiential learning activity, based on the film "The Great Debaters" (Washington, D., 2007), was used during a group work class. Description and preliminary evaluation of the activity is provided, including analysis of participant scores on the group leader self-efficacy instrument at multiple points. Implications and future…

  17. State Legislatures Debate Tuition for Illegal Immigrants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, Josh

    2007-01-01

    With plans for a sweeping federal immigration bill stuck in Congress, Arizona and a growing number of states have decided to try to deal with the in-state-tuition issue themselves. This spring lawmakers in at least 22 states have already considered or are debating legislation concerning in-state tuition to illegal immigrants. In about half of…

  18. Debate, Research on E-Cigarettes Continues

    Cancer.gov

    Since they first began to be sold in North America in the mid-2000s, electronic cigarettes have been the subject of intense debate. NCI's Dr. Michele Bloch recently presented an update on some of the issues surrounding e-cigarettes.

  19. Debates over School Shutdowns Heating Up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zubrzycki, Jaclyn

    2012-01-01

    As school closures are increasingly used as a remedy to budget woes and a solution to failing schools in many cities, debates are intensifying about their effect on student performance and well-being, on district finances, and on communities and the processes districts use to choose which schools will be shuttered. Student and parent groups in…

  20. China's Succession Battle Stirs Higher Education Debate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleverley, John

    1976-01-01

    Describes the current debate going on in Chinese political and educational circles regarding the quality of university education since the Cultural Revolution. Those being singled out for their bourgeois line are critical of such practices as nonacademic selection criteria and the weight given to practical experience in the shortened courses. (JT)

  1. Debate: Should Abortion Be Available on Request?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nathanson, Bernard; Lawrence, George

    1971-01-01

    Two physicians debate whether abortions should be available on request regardless of medical indications. The crux of the issue is whether the fetus should be considered body tissue over which the woman has complete control or whether society has an interest in the embryo and should protect it. (Author/BY)

  2. Education and Social Cohesion: Recentering the Debate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Andy; Preston, John

    2001-01-01

    Examines the debate over education and social cohesion, reviewing relevant literature, which notes limitations of individual-level analysis of societal issues; outlining alternative models for understanding how education influences social cohesion in different societies (e.g., skills, income distribution, and indicators of social cohesion); and…

  3. United States: Exploring the Marriage Debate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Julie H.

    2004-01-01

    As citizens of the United States respond to legislative and judicial actions that have challenged the prohibition against same-sex couples receiving marriage licenses, schools have a timely opportunity to engage students on this most important debate. Educators can help their students understand the full significance of this issue by encouraging…

  4. Modularity in Cognition: Framing the Debate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, H. Clark; Kurzban, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Modularity has been the subject of intense debate in the cognitive sciences for more than 2 decades. In some cases, misunderstandings have impeded conceptual progress. Here the authors identify arguments about modularity that either have been abandoned or were never held by proponents of modular views of the mind. The authors review arguments that…

  5. The Net Neutrality Debate: The Basics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenfield, Rich

    2006-01-01

    Rich Greenfield examines the basics of today's net neutrality debate that is likely to be an ongoing issue for society. Greenfield states the problems inherent in the definition of "net neutrality" used by Common Cause: "Network neutrality is the principle that Internet users should be able to access any web content they choose and use any…

  6. Voices on Choice: The Education Reform Debate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Billingsley, K. L., Ed.

    This collection presents a sampling of opinions of both proponents and opponents in the school choice debate from a variety of professional perspectives, including academics, bureaucrats, politicians, union leaders, economists, lawyers, parents, and activists. The following essays are included: (1) "School Choice Promotes Educational Excellence in…

  7. Meningitis Deaths Renew Debate About Vaccinating Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reisberg, Leo

    1999-01-01

    The annual incidence of meningococcal disease among 15- to 25-year olds has doubled since 1991, to over 600 cases, and recent studies indicate outbreaks may be increasing on college campuses. Six of the 83 cases appearing at academic institutions have been fatal. The trend has fueled the debate over whether a vaccine should be administered…

  8. Teaching History in Schools: A Canadian Debate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osborne, Ken

    2003-01-01

    This paper examines the debate over the teaching of Canadian history that has been in progress in Canada since the early 1990s. It considers four criticisms: schools do not teach enough Canadian history and students, therefore, do not know it; the history that is taught is no longer sufficiently national; social history has destroyed the old…

  9. The Great Graduation-Rate Debate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolfe, Christine O.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to promote clearer understanding of the graduation-rate debate by distilling the policy developments and controversy surrounding the measurement of these rates over the last decade. The paper concludes with a discussion of the move toward a federally mandated common metric for graduation rates. The No Child Left Behind…

  10. Multiple "Curriculum" Meanings Heighten Debate over Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gewertz, Catherine

    2011-01-01

    Calls for shared curricula for the common standards have triggered renewed debates about who decides what students learn, and even about varied meanings of the word "curriculum," adding layers of complexity to the job of translating the broad learning goals into classroom teaching. The most recent calls for common curricula came from the American…

  11. Applications of Computer Technology in Intercollegiate Debate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kay, Jack, Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Focusing on how computers can and should be used in intercollegiate forensics, this journal issue offers the perspectives of a number of forensics instructors. The lead article, "Applications of Computer Technology in Intercollegiate Debate" by Theodore F. Sheckels, Jr., discusses five areas in which forensics educators might use computer…

  12. Senate begins clean air legislation debate

    SciTech Connect

    Yates, M.

    1990-03-01

    This article reports on Senate debate on the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1989. Topics include acid rain provisions, administration objections, costs of the bill including disparity of costs in different regions and cost-sharing proposals, and the effects the current energy policy will have on the bill. Presidential, Senate, and subcommittee views on the bill are presented.

  13. Debating the Jury System; A Resource Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinzinger, Richard A., Comp.

    This handbook contains basic resource material for debating significant changes in the United States jury system. Chapter 1 outlines available sources of information for preliminary research. Chapters 2 and 3 present background information on the federal and state court systems and the jury system. Chapter 4 discusses an interpretation of the…

  14. Academic Debate Paradigms: An Examination from a Rules Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Himes, Kenneth G.

    Debate paradigms, which at one time established standards to help judges evaluate arguments and rules to guide debaters' argument choice and strategy selection, no longer offer consistent guidance for either judges or debaters. An increased emphasis on creativity and flexibility has led to a general unwillingness to use a rigid debate format. The…

  15. Is Dance a Sport?: A Twenty-First-Century Debate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guarino, Lindsay

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses a new debate which has emerged for dancers. For many years dancers debated dance as art versus entertainment. This age-old debate still exists without a consensus, yet there is suddenly a new generation of dancers with a fresh debate. Legions of young performers are fervently proclaiming that their dance is actually a sport.…

  16. Amino acid sequence and posttranslational modifications of human factor VII sub a from plasma and transfected baby hamster kidney cells

    SciTech Connect

    Thim, L.; Bjoern, S.; Christensen, M.; Nicolaisen, E.M.; Lund-Hansen, T.; Pedersen, A.H.; Hedner, U. )

    1988-10-04

    Blood coagulation factor VII is a vitamin K dependent glycoprotein which in its activated form, factor VII{sub a}, participates in the coagulation process by activating factor X and/or factor IX in the presence of Ca{sup 2+} and tissue factor. Three types of potential posttranslational modifications exist in the human factor VII{sub a} molecule, namely, 10 {gamma}-carboxylated, N-terminally located glutamic acid residues, 1 {beta}-hydroxylated aspartic acid residue, and 2 N-glycosylated asparagine residues. In the present study, the amino acid sequence and posttranslational modifications of recombinant factor VII{sub a} as purified from the culture medium of a transfected baby hamster kidney cell line have been compared to human plasma factor VII{sub a}. By use of HPLC, amino acid analysis, peptide mapping, and automated Edman degradation, the protein backbone of recombinant factor VII{sub a} was found to be identical with human factor VII{sub a}. Asparagine residues 145 and 322 were found to be fully N-glycosylated in human plasma factor VII{sub a}. In the recombinant factor VII{sub a}, asparagine residue 322 was fully glycosylated whereas asparagine residue 145 was only partially (approximately 66%) glycosylated. Besides minor differences in the sialic acid and fucose contents, the overall carbohydrate compositions were nearly identical in recombinant factor VII{sub a} and human plasma factor VII{sub a}. These results show that factor VII{sub a} as produced in the transfected baby hamster kidney cells is very similar to human plasma factor VII{sub a} and that this cell line thus might represent an alternative source for human factor VII{sub a}.

  17. Neurobiology of Sensory Overresponsivity in Youth With Autism Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Green, Shulamite A.; Hernandez, Leanna; Tottenham, Nim; Krasileva, Kate; Bookheimer, Susan Y.; Dapretto, Mirella

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE More than half of youth with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) have sensory overresponsivity (SOR), an extreme negative reaction to sensory stimuli. However, little is known about the neurobiological basis of SOR, and there are few effective treatments. Understanding whether SOR is due to an initial heightened sensory response or to deficits in regulating emotional reactions to stimuli has important implications for intervention. OBJECTIVE To determine differences in brain responses, habituation, and connectivity during exposure to mildly aversive sensory stimuli in youth with ASDs and SOR compared with youth with ASDs without SOR and compared with typically developing control subjects. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to examine brain responses and habituation to mildly aversive auditory and tactile stimuli in 19 high-functioning youths with ASDs and 19 age- and IQ-matched, typically developing youths (age range, 9-17 years). Brain activity was related to parents’ ratings of children's SOR symptoms. Functional connectivity between the amygdala and orbitofrontal cortex was compared between ASDs subgroups with and without SOR and typically developing controls without SOR. The study dates were March 2012 through February 2014. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Relative increases in blood oxygen level–dependent signal response across the whole brain and within the amygdala during exposure to sensory stimuli compared with fixation, as well as correlation between blood oxygen level–dependent signal change in the amygdala and orbitofrontal cortex. RESULTS The mean age in both groups was 14 years and the majority in both groups (16 of 19 each) were male. Compared with neurotypical control participants, participants with ASDs displayed stronger activation in primary sensory cortices and the amygdala (P < .05, corrected). This activity was positively correlated with SOR symptoms after controlling for anxiety. The ASDs

  18. Complexity in neurobiology: perspectives from the study of noise in human motor systems.

    PubMed

    Balasubramaniam, Ramesh; Torre, Kjerstin

    2012-01-01

    This article serves as an introduction to the themed special issue on "Complex Systems in Neurobiology." The study of complexity in neurobiology has been sensitive to the stochastic processes that dominate the micro-level architecture of neurobiological systems and the deterministic processes that govern the macroscopic behavior of these systems. A large body of research has traversed these scales of interest, seeking to determine how noise at one spatial or temporal scale influences the activity of the system at another scale. In introducing this special issue, we pay special attention to the history of inquiry in complex systems and why scientists have tended to favor linear, causally driven, reductionist approaches in Neurobiology. We follow this with an elaboration of how an alternative approach might be formulated. To illustrate our position on how the sciences of complexity and the study of noise can inform neurobiology, we use three systematic examples from the study of human motor control and learning: 1) phase transitions in bimanual coordination; 2) balance, intermittency, and discontinuous control; and 3) sensorimotor synchronization and timing. Using these examples and showing that noise is adaptively utilized by the nervous system, we make the case for the studying complexity with a perspective of understanding the macroscopic stability in biological systems by focusing on component processes at extended spatial and temporal scales. This special issue continues this theme with contributions in topics as diverse as neural network models, physical biology, motor learning, and statistical physics.

  19. The neurobiological basis of temperament: towards a better understanding of psychopathology.

    PubMed

    Whittle, Sarah; Allen, Nicholas B; Lubman, Dan I; Yücel, Murat

    2006-01-01

    The ability to characterise psychopathologies on the basis of their underlying neurobiology is critical in improving our understanding of disorder etiology and making more effective diagnostic and treatment decisions. Given the well-documented relationship between temperament (i.e. core personality traits) and psychopathology, research investigating the neurobiological substrates that underlie temperament is potentially key to our understanding of the biological basis of mental disorder. We present evidence that specific areas of the prefrontal cortex (including the dorsolateral prefrontal, anterior cingulate, and orbitofrontal cortices) and limbic structures (including the amygdala, hippocampus and nucleus accumbens) are key regions associated with three fundamental dimensions of temperament: Negative Affect, Positive Affect, and Constraint. Proposed relationships are based on two types of research: (a) research into the neurobiological correlates of affective and cognitive processes underlying these dimensions; and (b) research into the neurobiology of various psychopathologies, which have been correlated with these dimensions. A model is proposed detailing how these structures might comprise neural networks whose functioning underlies the three temperaments. Recommendations are made for future research into the neurobiology of temperament, including the need to focus on neural networks rather than individual structures, and the importance of prospective, longitudinal, multi-modal imaging studies in at-risk youth.

  20. The Neurobiology of Alcohol Consumption and Alcoholism: An Integrative History1

    PubMed Central

    Tabakoff, Boris; Hoffman, Paula L.

    2013-01-01

    Studies of the neurobiological predisposition to consume alcohol (ethanol) and to transition to uncontrolled drinking behavior (alcoholism), as well as studies of the effects of alcohol on brain function, started a logarithmic growth phase after the repeal of the 18th Amendment to the United States Constitution. Although the early studies were primitive by current technological standards, they clearly demonstrated the effects of alcohol on brain structure and function, and by the end of the 20th century left little doubt that alcoholism is a “disease” of the brain. This review traces the history of developments in the understanding of ethanol’s effects on the most prominent inhibitory and excitatory systems of brain (GABA and glutamate neurotransmission). This neurobiological information is integrated with knowledge of ethanol’s actions on other neurotransmitter systems to produce an anatomical and functional map of ethanol’s properties. Our intent is limited in scope, but is meant to provide context and integration of the actions of ethanol on the major neurobiologic systems which produce reinforcement for alcohol consumption and changes in brain chemistry that lead to addiction. The developmental history of neurobehavioral theories of the transition from alcohol drinking to alcohol addiction is presented and juxtaposed to the neurobiological findings. Depending on one’s point of view, we may, at this point in history, know more, or less, than we think we know about the neurobiology of alcoholism. PMID:24141171

  1. ICSBEP Criticality Benchmark Eigenvalues with ENDF/B-VII.1 Cross Sections

    SciTech Connect

    Kahler, Albert C. III; MacFarlane, Robert

    2012-06-28

    We review MCNP eigenvalue calculations from a suite of International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) Handbook evaluations with the recently distributed ENDF/B-VII.1 cross section library.

  2. Title VII in the Hands of a Principal: A Strategy for Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nieto, Consuelo

    1986-01-01

    Describes the development of a Title VII bilingual program in a California community where Hispanics constitute 46 percent of the population. Examines change strategies used over a ten-year period of renewal. (NEC)

  3. Biological and phylogenetic characterization of a genotype VII Newcastle disease virus from Venezuela: Efficacy of vaccination

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Here we describe the characterization a virulent genotype VII Newcastle disease virus (NDV) from Venezuela and evaluate the efficacy of heterologous genotype commercial vaccination under field and controlled rearing conditions. Biological pathotyping and molecular analysis were applied. Results sh...

  4. Pain and depression: an integrative review of neurobiological and psychological factors.

    PubMed

    Goesling, Jenna; Clauw, Daniel J; Hassett, Afton L

    2013-12-01

    The comorbidity of pain and depression has been well established in the literature and is associated with a greater burden to the individual and society than either condition alone. The relationship between pain and depression is quite complex and multiple factors must be considered when trying to disentangle the pain-depression link including shared neurobiology, precipitating environmental factors and cognitive influences. This article aims to provide an overview of the leading neurobiological and psychosocial theories that have advanced our understanding of the link between pain and depression. To this end we describe the shared neurobiological mechanisms in the brain thought to explain the overlap and consider psychological processes and how they inform a cognitive behavioral model. The article also provides an overview of the evidence based treatment for comorbid pain and depression. PMID:24214740

  5. Towards a comprehensive model of stereotypy: integrating operant and neurobiological interpretations.

    PubMed

    Lanovaz, Marc J

    2011-01-01

    The predominant models on the emergence and maintenance of stereotypy in individuals with developmental disabilities are based on operant and neurobiological interpretations of the behavior. Although the proponents of the two models maintain largely independent lines of research, operant and neurobiological interpretations of stereotypy are not mutually exclusive. The paper reviews the two models of stereotypy and proposes an integrated model using recent findings on the neurobiology of reinforcement. The dopaminergic system and the basal ganglia are both involved in stereotypy and in reinforcement, which provides a potential link between the models. Implications of the integrated model for future research are discussed in terms of improving the assessment and treatment of stereotypy in individuals with developmental disabilities. PMID:21236636

  6. [Neurobiological, psychological and sociological approach to sexual desire and sexual satisfaction].

    PubMed

    Bianchi-Demicheli, Francesco; Ammar, Nadia; Bolmont, Mylène; Dosch, Alessandra; Favez, Nicolas; Van der Linden, Martial; Widmer, Eric

    2016-03-16

    In the last years, University Fund Maurice Chalumeau (FUMC) launched a dynamic of research designed to promote scientific excellence and the development of Sexology with particular interest regarding sexual desire. The FUMC has supported a research project entitled "Neurobiological, psychological and sociological approach to sexual desire and sexual satisfaction". This project, sampled on 600 people (300 men and 300 women) aged between 25 and 46 years, was structured around three studies: a broad sociological study and two more specific ones, focused on some psychological mechanisms and neurobiological factors involved in sexual desire. The results show how the secondary socialization, personal expectations, beliefs and values in sexuality, sexual motivations, body image, as well as the neurobiological foundations and visual patterns, are of vital importance in the dynamics of sexual desire. PMID:27149717

  7. Is there a shared neurobiology between aggression and Internet addiction disorder?

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Changtae; Kim, Dai-Jin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Evidences indicate that Internet addiction disorder (IAD) has a higher risk of developing aggression and violent behavior. A few correlation studies between IAD and aggression have implicated a common biological mechanism. However, neurobiological approaches to IAD and aggression have not yet been studied. Methods: A literature search for studies for Internet addiction disorder or aggression was performed in the PubMed database and we selected articles about neurobiology of IAD or aggression. Results: This review includes (a) common neural substrates such as the prefrontal cortex and the limbic system between aggression and IAD; (b) common neuromodulators such as dopamine, norepinephrine, serotonin, opiate and nicotine between aggression and IAD. Conclusions: Through reviewing the relevant literature, we suggested the possibility of common neurobiology between the two psychiatric phenomena and direction of research on aggression in IAD. PMID:25215210

  8. [Neurobiological, psychological and sociological approach to sexual desire and sexual satisfaction].

    PubMed

    Bianchi-Demicheli, Francesco; Ammar, Nadia; Bolmont, Mylène; Dosch, Alessandra; Favez, Nicolas; Van der Linden, Martial; Widmer, Eric

    2016-03-16

    In the last years, University Fund Maurice Chalumeau (FUMC) launched a dynamic of research designed to promote scientific excellence and the development of Sexology with particular interest regarding sexual desire. The FUMC has supported a research project entitled "Neurobiological, psychological and sociological approach to sexual desire and sexual satisfaction". This project, sampled on 600 people (300 men and 300 women) aged between 25 and 46 years, was structured around three studies: a broad sociological study and two more specific ones, focused on some psychological mechanisms and neurobiological factors involved in sexual desire. The results show how the secondary socialization, personal expectations, beliefs and values in sexuality, sexual motivations, body image, as well as the neurobiological foundations and visual patterns, are of vital importance in the dynamics of sexual desire.

  9. Using guided debates to teach current issues.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Debra R

    2014-06-01

    A guided-debate strategy was developed for a graduate-level core course in current issues based on the Jesuit method of discernment (group decision making). The strategy encourages students to use up-to-date Internet sources to determine the range of opinions on current controversies in the discipline. In addition to providing a structured process to engage in persuasive discussion of difficult issues, the strategy facilitates critical thinking about the quality of the debate itself. Thus, students learn to avoid the pitfalls associated with consensus, such as failing to express reservations or negative opinions that might be important, while learning how to express concerns that might not be easily received by others in a group. PMID:24814355

  10. NORMAL HUMAN VARIATION: REFOCUSSING THE ENHANCEMENT DEBATE

    PubMed Central

    Kahane, Guy; Savulescu, Julian

    2015-01-01

    This article draws attention to several common mistakes in thinking about biomedical enhancement, mistakes that are made even by some supporters of enhancement. We illustrate these mistakes by examining objections that John Harris has recently raised against the use of pharmacological interventions to directly modulate moral decision-making. We then apply these lessons to other influential figures in the debate about enhancement. One upshot of our argument is that many considerations presented as powerful objections to enhancement are really strong considerations in favour of biomedical enhancement, just in a different direction. Another upshot is that it is unfortunate that much of the current debate focuses on interventions that will radically transform normal human capacities. Such interventions are unlikely to be available in the near future, and may not even be feasible. But our argument shows that the enhancement project can still have a radical impact on human life even if biomedical enhancement operated entirely within the normal human range. PMID:23906367

  11. Psychopathy and Personality: Advances and Debates.

    PubMed

    Miller, Joshua D; Lynam, Donald R

    2015-12-01

    Nine original articles comprise this special issue of the Journal of Personality addressing personality-based perspectives of psychopathy. In this introduction to the special issue, we review five advances and areas of agreement that are highlighted across the articles, including the utility of trait perspectives to psychopathy, the emergence of a prototypical trait profile of psychopathy, the importance of recognizing earlier developmental manifestations of psychopathy, the ongoing study and revelation of the basic neural underpinnings of psychopathy, and the important theoretical and empirical association between psychopathy and antisocial behavior. At the same time, several important debates remain, which are also highlighted in the special issue's articles. These debates center around the necessity and sufficiency of certain psychopathy traits, the role of traits alternatively labeled stable Extraversion, fearless dominance, or boldness, and the validity and utility of separating psychopathy from Machiavellianism as is done in research on the Dark Triad.

  12. Venezuelan political debate focuses on Pdvsa

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-14

    This paper reports that another political firestorm has flared over Venezuelan petroleum sector investment. Statements by Venezuela's President Carlos Andres Perez who has provoked a new political debate over oil affairs in Venezuela. Commenting on Pdvsa's overseas interests, it has been ordered that the state oil company to sell part of its shares in Citgo Petroleum Corp., Tulsa, and Ruhr Oel GmbH, a joint venture with Veba Oel AG, Gelsenkirchen.

  13. Inactivation of Anandamide Signaling: A Continuing Debate

    PubMed Central

    Khairy, Hesham; Houssen, Wael E.

    2010-01-01

    Since the first endocannabinoid anandamide was identified in 1992, extensive research has been conducted to characterize the elements of the tightly controlled endocannabinoid signaling system. While it was established that the activity of endocannabinoids are terminated by a two-step process that includes cellular uptake and degradation, there is still a continuing debate about the mechanistic role of these processes in inactivating anandamide signals.

  14. Four themes in recent Swedish bioethics debates.

    PubMed

    Helgesson, Gert; Eriksson, Stefan

    2011-07-01

    A wide variety of bioethical themes have recently been debated and researched in Sweden, including genetic screening, HPV vaccination strategies, end-of-life care, injustices and priority setting in healthcare, dual-use research, and the never-ending story of scientific fraud. Also, there are some new events related to Swedish biobanking that might be of general interest. Here we will concentrate on four themes: end-of-life care, dual-use research, scientific fraud, and biobanking. PMID:21676328

  15. Debate rages over pharmaceutical coverage for seniors.

    PubMed

    Benjamin, G C

    2001-01-01

    Seeking to make good on his promise to provide an interim pharmaceutical benefit for America's seniors, President George W. Bush recently outlined a new prescription drug proposal utilizing private pharmacy benefit managers (PBM). This new plan is designed to make prescription drugs more affordable by setting up a government-endorsed discount program. Here's an overview of the plan and a look to the future debate.

  16. Recombinant activated factor VII in post partum haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Magon, Navneet; Babu, K. M.; Kapur, Krishan; Chopra, Sanjiv; Joneja, Gurdarshan Singh

    2013-01-01

    Post-partum haemorrhage (PPH) is a life-threatening obstetric complication and the leading cause of maternal death. Any bleeding that results in or could result in haemodynamic instability, if untreated, must be considered as PPH. There is no controversy about the need for prevention and treatment of PPH. The keystone of management of PPH entails first, non-invasive and nonsurgical methods and then invasive and surgical methods. However, mortality remains high. Therefore, new advancements in the treatment are most crucial. One such advancement has been the use of recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa) in PPH. First used 12 years back in PPH, this universal haemostatic agent has been effectively used in controlling PPH. The best available indicator of rFVIIa efficacy is the arrest of haemorrhage, which is judged by visual evidence and haemodynamic stabilization. It also reduces costs of therapy and the use of blood components in massive PPH. In cases of intractable PPH with no other obvious indications for hysterectomy, administration of rFVIIa should be considered before surgery. We share our experience in a series of cases of PPH, successfully managed using rFVIIa. PMID:24403703

  17. [Is it still the "royal way"? The dream as a junction of neurobiology and psychoanalysis].

    PubMed

    Simon, Mária

    2011-01-01

    Some decades ago the dream seemed to be randomly generated by brain stem mechanisms in the cortical and subcortical neuronal networks. However, most recent empirical data, studies on brain lesions and functional neuroimaging results have refuted this theory. Several data support that motivation pathways, memory systems, especially implicit, emotional memory play an important role in dream formation. This essay reviews how the results of neurobiology and cognitive psychology can be fitted into the theoretical frameworks and clinical practice of the psychoanalysis. The main aim is to demonstrate that results of neurobiology and empirical observations of psychoanalysis are complementary rather than contradictory. PMID:22354698

  18. The Neurobiology of Motivational Deficits in Depression--An Update on Candidate Pathomechanisms.

    PubMed

    Treadway, Michael T

    2016-01-01

    Anhedonia has long been recognized as a central feature of major depression, yet its neurobiological underpinnings remain poorly understood. While clinical definitions of anhedonia have historically emphasized reductions in pleasure and positive emotionality, there has been growing evidence that motivation may be substantially impaired as well. Here, we review recent evidence suggesting that motivational deficits may reflect an important dimension of symptomatology that is discrete from traditional definitions of anhedonia in terms of both behavior and pathophysiology. In summarizing this work, we highlight two candidate neurobiological mechanisms--elevated inflammation and reduced synaptic plasticity--that may underlie observed reductions in motivation and reinforcement learning in depression.

  19. The Neurobiology of Motivational Deficits in Depression--An Update on Candidate Pathomechanisms.

    PubMed

    Treadway, Michael T

    2016-01-01

    Anhedonia has long been recognized as a central feature of major depression, yet its neurobiological underpinnings remain poorly understood. While clinical definitions of anhedonia have historically emphasized reductions in pleasure and positive emotionality, there has been growing evidence that motivation may be substantially impaired as well. Here, we review recent evidence suggesting that motivational deficits may reflect an important dimension of symptomatology that is discrete from traditional definitions of anhedonia in terms of both behavior and pathophysiology. In summarizing this work, we highlight two candidate neurobiological mechanisms--elevated inflammation and reduced synaptic plasticity--that may underlie observed reductions in motivation and reinforcement learning in depression. PMID:26475160

  20. Identification of a Common Neurobiological Substrate for Mental Illness

    PubMed Central

    Goodkind, Madeleine; Eickhoff, Simon B.; Oathes, Desmond J.; Jiang, Ying; Chang, Andrew; Jones-Hagata, Laura B.; Ortega, Brissa N.; Zaiko, Yevgeniya V.; Roach, Erika L.; Korgaonkar, Mayuresh S.; Grieve, Stuart M.; Galatzer-Levy, Isaac; Fox, Peter T.; Etkin, Amit

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Psychiatric diagnoses are currently distinguished based on sets of specific symptoms. However, genetic and clinical analyses find similarities across a wide variety of diagnoses, suggesting that a common neurobiological substrate may exist across mental illness. OBJECTIVE To conduct a meta-analysis of structural neuroimaging studies across multiple psychiatric diagnoses, followed by parallel analyses of 3 large-scale healthy participant data sets to help interpret structural findings in the meta-analysis. DATA SOURCES PubMed was searched to identify voxel-based morphometry studies through July 2012 comparing psychiatric patients to healthy control individuals for the meta-analysis. The 3 parallel healthy participant data sets included resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging, a database of activation foci across thousands of neuroimaging experiments, and a data set with structural imaging and cognitive task performance data. DATA EXTRACTION AND SYNTHESIS Studies were included in the meta-analysis if they reported voxel-based morphometry differences between patients with an Axis I diagnosis and control individuals in stereotactic coordinates across the whole brain, did not present predominantly in childhood, and had at least 10 studies contributing to that diagnosis (or across closely related diagnoses). The meta-analysis was conducted on peak voxel coordinates using an activation likelihood estimation approach. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES We tested for areas of common gray matter volume increase or decrease across Axis I diagnoses, as well as areas differing between diagnoses. Follow-up analyses on other healthy participant data sets tested connectivity related to regions arising from the meta-analysis and the relationship of gray matter volume to cognition. RESULTS Based on the voxel-based morphometry meta-analysis of 193 studies comprising 15 892 individuals across 6 diverse diagnostic groups (schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression

  1. The Contribution of Prenatal Stress to the Pathogenesis of Autism as a Neurobiological Developmental Disorder: A Dizygotic Twin Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Claassen, M.; Naude, H.; Pretorius, E.; Bosman, M. C.

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports on the contribution of prenatal stress to the pathogenesis of autism as a neurobiological developmental disorder in a dizygotic study. The aim was to explore whether the neurobiological impact of stress prior to week 28 of gestation might be related to the pathogenesis of autism. The following data-generating strategies were…

  2. Europe's abortion wars: womb for debate.

    PubMed

    Blinken, A J

    1991-01-01

    As Europe edges toward some sort of unity, the volatile abortion debate has begun to spill across national boundaries. Reflecting the continent's religious and cultural diversity, abortion laws throughout Europe vary widely. Holland and Sweden have the most liberal abortion laws. The former allows abortion on demand, while the later permits abortion until the 18th week -- and possibly up until term, if the National Health Bureau gives permission. Britain, France, and Belgium have also adopted liberal abortion laws. Other nations, however, have more conservative laws. Since 1983, Ireland has banned abortion entirely. Spain allows abortion only in cases of rape, malformed fetuses, or when the mother's life is in danger. Many countries are also experiencing bitter debates over abortion. Czechoslovakia's liberal abortion law has come under increasing pressure, and in Poland, bishops and legislators have feuded over the legality of abortion. The move towards unification has only intensified these debates. Germany is currently without a national abortion law, as the former East Germany still enjoys a more liberal abortion law than West Germany. Differences over abortion laws have led to what is know in Europe as abortion shipping. Every year, an estimated 15,000 Irish women travel to England, some 7,000 German women go to Holland, and some 3,000 French women travel to England -- all seeking to take advantage of another country's abortion law. Some Europeans have begun to look for continent-wide laws on abortion. Recently, an Irish group argued against its country's law before the European court of Justice. Right-to-life groups have also fought to establish continent-wide restrictions. So far, it seems unlikely that Europe will reach an agreement on the issue of abortion.

  3. Using Simulated Debates to Teach History of Engineering Advances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Terry S.

    1976-01-01

    Described is a technique for utilizing debates of past engineering controversies in the classroom as a means of teaching the history of engineering advances. Included is a bibliography for three debate topics relating to important controversies. (SL)

  4. Beyond Broca's and Wernicke's Areas: A New Perspective on the Neurobiology of Language.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lem, Lawrence

    1992-01-01

    Proposes a neurobiological model in which a greater number of brain structures than previously indicated are involved in language functions, with particular reference to second language learning. The study examines three areas of the brain rarely associated with language: the anterior cingulate gyrus, the prefrontal cortex, and the basal temporal…

  5. The Central Role of Recognition in Auditory Perception: A Neurobiological Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLachlan, Neil; Wilson, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    The model presents neurobiologically plausible accounts of sound recognition (including absolute pitch), neural plasticity involved in pitch, loudness and location information integration, and streaming and auditory recall. It is proposed that a cortical mechanism for sound identification modulates the spectrotemporal response fields of inferior…

  6. Stereotypy II: A Review of Neurobiological Interpretations and Suggestions for an Integration with Behavioral Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rapp, John T.; Vollmer; Timothy R.

    2005-01-01

    Stereotypy is a relatively common behavioral disorder displayed by individuals with developmental disabilities, including autism. In this paper, we review selected studies on neurobiological interpretations of stereotypy and pharmacological interventions for stereotypy. Specifically, we review studies that evaluated the effects of serotonin uptake…

  7. En route to disentangle the impact and neurobiological substrates of early vocalizations: learning from Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    Marschik, Peter B; Kaufmann, Walter E; Bölte, Sven; Sigafoos, Jeff; Einspieler, Christa

    2014-12-01

    Research on acoustic communication and its underlying neurobiological substrates has led to new insights about the functioning of central pattern generators (CPGs). CPG-related atypicalities may point to brainstem irregularities rather than cortical malfunctions for early vocalizations/babbling. The "vocal pattern generator," together with other CPGs, seems to have great potential in disentangling neurodevelopmental disorders and potentially predict neurological development.

  8. Integrating Genetic, Psychopharmacological and Neuroimaging Studies: A Converging Methods Approach to Understanding the Neurobiology of ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durston, Sarah; Konrad, Kerstin

    2007-01-01

    This paper aims to illustrate how combining multiple approaches can inform us about the neurobiology of ADHD. Converging evidence from genetic, psychopharmacological and functional neuroimaging studies has implicated dopaminergic fronto-striatal circuitry in ADHD. However, while the observation of converging evidence from multiple vantage points…

  9. Towards an integrative theory of consciousness: part 1 (neurobiological and cognitive models).

    PubMed

    De Sousa, Avinash

    2013-01-01

    The study of consciousness is poised today at interesting crossroads. There has been a surge of research into various neurobiological underpinnings of consciousness in the past decade. The present article looks at the theories regarding this complex phenomenon, especially the ones that neurobiology, cognitive neuroscience and cognitive psychology have to offer. We will first discuss the origin and etymology of word consciousness and its usage. Neurobiological correlates of consciousness are discussed with structures like the ascending reticular activating system, the amygdala, the cerebellum, the thalamus, the frontoparietal circuits, the prefrontal cortex and the precuneus. The cellular and microlevel theories of consciousness and cerebral activity at the neuronal level contributing to consciousness are highlighted, along with the various theories posited in this area. The role of neuronal assemblies and circuits along with firing patterns and their ramifications for the understanding of consciousness are discussed. A section on the role of anaesthesia and its links to consciousness is presented, along with details of split-brain studies in consciousness and altered states of awareness, including the vegetative states. The article finally discusses the progress cognitive psychology has made in identifying and theorising various perspectives of consciousness, perceptual awareness and conscious processing. Both recent and past researches are highlighted. The importance and salient features of each theory are discussed along with the pitfalls, if present. A need for integration of various theories to understand consciousness from a holistic perspective is stressed, to enable one to reach a theory that explains the ultimate neurobiology of consciousness.

  10. Neurobiological and Memory Models of Risky Decision Making in Adolescents versus Young Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reyna, Valerie F.; Estrada, Steven M.; DeMarinis, Jessica A.; Myers, Regina M.; Stanisz, Janine M.; Mills, Britain A.

    2011-01-01

    Predictions of fuzzy-trace theory and neurobiological approaches are examined regarding risk taking in a classic decision-making task--the framing task--as well as in the context of real-life risk taking. We report the 1st study of framing effects in adolescents versus adults, varying risk and reward, and relate choices to individual differences,…

  11. Neurobiological Processes of Risk and Resilience in Adolescence: Implications for Policy and Prevention Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Busso, Daniel S.

    2014-01-01

    This article focuses on the concepts of risk and resilience and their potential to inform clinical interventions, school-based prevention programs, and social policies. Research suggests that childhood adversity can trigger a cascade of psychological and neurobiological events that can lead to mental disorders in later life. Yet little is known…

  12. Specifying the neuropsychology of affective disorders: clinical, demographic and neurobiological factors.

    PubMed

    Beblo, Thomas; Sinnamon, Grant; Baune, Bernhard T

    2011-12-01

    Neuropsychological research in patients with affective disorders shows heterogeneous results with regard to the severity and profile of cognitive impairments. In this paper we hypothesize that the investigation of clinical (subtypes, comorbidity, traumatization, personality, severity, diurnal swings, course, duration, age of onset, biased processing, rumination, motivation, experience of failure, sleep, suicidal tendencies, computer attitudes), demographic (age, education, gender) and neurobiological factors (structural and functional brain changes, glucocorticoids, medication, ECT) that are related to cognitive performance has specified the understanding of severity and profile of neuropsychological impairments. We reviewed the literature pertaining to clinical, demographic and neurobiological factors following Pubmed and PsychInfo databases using different combinations of general key-terms including "Affective Disorder," "Depression," "Mania," "Neuropsychological," "Neurobiological," "Moderator," and "Review" as well as more specific demographic, clinical and neurobiological search terms. Findings from the literature show that the consideration of these factors has improved knowledge about the severity of neuropsychological impairments in patients with affective disorders whereas the neuropsychological profile is still poorly understood. Despite limited understanding, however, the existent results provide promising suggestions for the development of treatment programs.

  13. Towards An Integrative Theory Of Consciousness: Part 1 (Neurobiological And Cognitive Models)

    PubMed Central

    De Sousa, Avinash

    2013-01-01

    The study of consciousness is poised today at interesting crossroads. There has been a surge of research into various neurobiological underpinnings of consciousness in the past decade. The present article looks at the theories regarding this complex phenomenon, especially the ones that neurobiology, cognitive neuroscience and cognitive psychology have to offer. We will first discuss the origin and etymology of word consciousness and its usage. Neurobiological correlates of consciousness are discussed with structures like the ascending reticular activating system, the amygdala, the cerebellum, the thalamus, the frontoparietal circuits, the prefrontal cortex and the precuneus. The cellular and microlevel theories of consciousness and cerebral activity at the neuronal level contributing to consciousness are highlighted, along with the various theories posited in this area. The role of neuronal assemblies and circuits along with firing patterns and their ramifications for the understanding of consciousness are discussed. A section on the role of anaesthesia and its links to consciousness is presented, along with details of split-brain studies in consciousness and altered states of awareness, including the vegetative states. The article finally discusses the progress cognitive psychology has made in identifying and theorising various perspectives of consciousness, perceptual awareness and conscious processing. Both recent and past researches are highlighted. The importance and salient features of each theory are discussed along with the pitfalls, if present. A need for integration of various theories to understand consciousness from a holistic perspective is stressed, to enable one to reach a theory that explains the ultimate neurobiology of consciousness. PMID:23678241

  14. Bridging Philosophy of Technology and Neurobiological Research: Interpreting Images from the "Slam Freezer"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenberger, Robert

    2005-01-01

    The swiftly growing field of neurobiological research utilizes highly advanced technologies (e.g., magnetic resonance imaging, electron microscopy) to mediate between investigators and the brains they investigate. Here, the author analyzes a device called the "slam freezer" that quick-freezes neurons to be studied under the microscope. Employing…

  15. Neurobiological and psychosocial processes associated with depressive and substance-related disorders in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Rao, Uma; Chen, Li-Ann

    2008-01-01

    Adolescents are at heightened risk for the development of both depressive and substance-related disorders. These two disorders frequently co-occur in adolescents and are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Given the substantial economic and psychosocial burden associated with the comorbid condition, the identification of causal mechanisms associated with their co-occurrence is of great public health importance. Although there is significant understanding of the environmental and neurobiological factors involved in depression and addictive disorders considered separately, the mechanisms underlying the comorbid illness have not been investigated carefully. The purpose of this review is to summarize the extant literature on genetic, environmental and neurobiological processes involved in the etiology of depressive and substance-related disorders in adolescents and adults. It is important to note that the data on common neurobiological systems that link addictive and depressive disorders are primarily from research with adult animals and humans. Given the ongoing maturation of these systems throughout adolescence and early adult life, it is not clear how these neurobiological processes influence the development and progression of both disorders. A better understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms leading to the onset and course of these disorders during adolescence will be helpful in developing more effective preventive and treatment strategies not only for this population but also for adult patients with early-onset illness.

  16. Comparison of results for the MCNP criticality validation suite using ENDF/B-VII and other nuclear data libraries

    SciTech Connect

    Mosteller, R. D.; MacFarlane, R. E.

    2006-07-01

    The latest pre-release version of ENDF/B-VII ('ENDF/B-VII {beta}-2') was made available for testing in April 2006. Calculations were performed for the 31 cases in the MCNP Criticality Validation Suite for ENDF/B-VII {beta}-2, its predecessors ENDF/B-VII {beta}-1 and ENDF/B-VI, and JENDL-3.3. Overall, {beta}-2 produces results similar to {beta}-1, but it produces substantially improved results relative to ENDF/B-VI and JENDL-3.3. However, calculations for some additional benchmarks indicate that further improvements still are needed in certain areas. (authors)

  17. Prophylaxis in congenital factor VII deficiency: indications, efficacy and safety. Results from the Seven Treatment Evaluation Registry (STER).

    PubMed

    Napolitano, Mariasanta; Giansily-Blaizot, Muriel; Dolce, Alberto; Schved, Jean F; Auerswald, Guenter; Ingerslev, Jørgen; Bjerre, Jens; Altisent, Carmen; Charoenkwan, Pimlak; Michaels, Lisa; Chuansumrit, Ampaiwan; Di Minno, Giovanni; Caliskan, Umran; Mariani, Guglielmo

    2013-04-01

    Because of the very short half-life of factor VII, prophylaxis in factor VII deficiency is considered a difficult endeavor. The clinical efficacy and safety of prophylactic regimens, and indications for their use, were evaluated in factor VII-deficient patients in the Seven Treatment Evaluation Registry. Prophylaxis data (38 courses) were analyzed from 34 patients with severe factor VII deficiency (<1-45 years of age, 21 female). Severest phenotypes (central nervous system, gastrointestinal, joint bleeding episodes) were highly prevalent. Twenty-one patients received recombinant activated factor VII (24 courses), four received plasma-derived factor VII, and ten received fresh frozen plasma. Prophylactic schedules clustered into "frequent" courses (three times weekly, n=23) and "infrequent" courses (≤ 2 times weekly, n=15). Excluding courses for menorrhagia, "frequent" and "infrequent" courses produced 18/23 (78%) and 5/12 (41%) "excellent" outcomes, respectively; relative risk, 1.88; 95% confidence interval, 0.93-3.79; P=0.079. Long term prophylaxis lasted from 1 to >10 years. No thrombosis or new inhibitors occurred. In conclusion, a subset of patients with factor VII deficiency needed prophylaxis because of severe bleeding. Recombinant activated factor VII schedules based on "frequent" administrations (three times weekly) and a 90 μg/kg total weekly dose were effective. These data provide a rationale for long-term, safe prophylaxis in factor VII deficiency.

  18. A Judicial Paradigm for the Evaluation of Debates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ulrich, Walter

    Because legal argument shares many of the characteristics of academic debate, it can serve as a paradigm for evaluating debates. Like debate, legal argument is bilateral, the judge is external to the deliberation and excluded from raising his or her own arguments, and reasons have been developed for assigning presumption, determining the wording…

  19. How Do Female Students Participate in Online Debates?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidson-Shivers, Gayle V.; Ellis, Holly Howard; Amarasing, Poonwilas Kay

    2010-01-01

    This case study focused on whether women, enrolled in a graduate course, would engage in online debate, and if so, whether their postings would contain traditional elements of argumentation (i.e., argue, elaborate, critique). Content analyses for two debates were performed. For the most part, the overarching messages in both debates were…

  20. The Dewey-Hutchins Debate: A Dispute over Moral Teleology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, James Scott

    2011-01-01

    In this essay, James Scott Johnston claims that a dispute over moral teleology lies at the basis of the debate between John Dewey and Robert M. Hutchins. This debate has very often been cast in terms of perennialism, classicism, or realism versus progressivism, experimentalism, or pragmatism. Unfortunately, casting the debate in these terms…

  1. The Sponsorship of Presidential Debates: Historical Perspectives and Alternatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hellweg, Susan A.

    This paper provides an overview of the development of sponsors for primary and general election debates at the presidential level and considers the various sponsorship alternatives for future debates. From a historical perspective, the paper discusses the major role that the broadcasting industry played in the early presidential debates and…

  2. Assigned Positions for In-Class Debates Influence Student Opinions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lilly, Emily

    2012-01-01

    In-class debates are frequently used to encourage student engagement. Ideally, after researching both sides of the debate, students will form their own opinions based on what they have learned. However, in a large course of Environmental Science, opinions of students, when surveyed after the debate, were remarkably consistent with the position…

  3. Organizing a Congressional Candidate Debate as Experiential Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boeckelman, Keith; Deitz, Janna L.; Hardy, Richard J.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes a political debate among congressional candidates that the authors organized in 2006. The debate was structured to maximize student involvement both in the planning stages and during the event itself. After discussing relevant literature on experiential learning, the article describes the debate format and details the issues…

  4. Dry needling versus acupuncture: the ongoing debate.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Kehua; Ma, Yan; Brogan, Michael S

    2015-12-01

    Although Western medical acupuncture (WMA) is commonly practised in the UK, a particular approach called dry needling (DN) is becoming increasingly popular in other countries. The legitimacy of the use of DN by conventional non-physician healthcare professionals is questioned by acupuncturists. This article describes the ongoing debate over the practice of DN between physical therapists and acupuncturists, with a particular emphasis on the USA. DN and acupuncture share many similarities but may differ in certain aspects. Currently, little information is available from the literature regarding the relationship between the two needling techniques. Through reviewing their origins, theory, and practice, we found that DN and acupuncture overlap in terms of needling technique with solid filiform needles as well as some fundamental theories. Both WMA and DN are based on modern biomedical understandings of the human body, although DN arguably represents only one subcategory of WMA. The increasing volume of research into needling therapy explains its growing popularity in the musculoskeletal field including sports medicine. To resolve the debate over DN practice, we call for the establishment of a regulatory body to accredit DN courses and a formal, comprehensive educational component and training for healthcare professionals who are not physicians or acupuncturists. Because of the close relationship between DN and acupuncture, collaboration rather than dispute between acupuncturists and other healthcare professionals should be encouraged with respect to education, research, and practice for the benefit of patients with musculoskeletal conditions who require needling therapy. PMID:26546163

  5. Genetic advances require comprehensive bioethical debate.

    PubMed

    ten Have, Henk A M J

    2003-10-01

    In the popular media and scientific literature, the idea of medical utopia seems to have been revived. Medical science and technology are expected to provide solutions for all kinds of daily problems in human existence. The utopian context and optimistic atmosphere are influencing deeply the bio-ethical debate concerning bio-molecular technologies. They a priori direct this debate towards individual perspectives, emphasizing the benefits among which an autonomous person can make his or her choice, and towards practical applications the potential beneficial effects of which are almost there. It is argued that the concept of "geneticization" is useful for the analysis of the interrelations between genetics, medicine, society, and culture. This concept focuses on conceptual issues--the use of genetic vocabulary to define problems; institutional issues--the emergence of bio-ethics experts; cultural issues--the transformation of individual and social attitudes under the influence of genetic knowledge and technology; and philosophical issues--changing views of human identity, interpersonal relationships, and individual responsibility.

  6. Dry needling versus acupuncture: the ongoing debate.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Kehua; Ma, Yan; Brogan, Michael S

    2015-12-01

    Although Western medical acupuncture (WMA) is commonly practised in the UK, a particular approach called dry needling (DN) is becoming increasingly popular in other countries. The legitimacy of the use of DN by conventional non-physician healthcare professionals is questioned by acupuncturists. This article describes the ongoing debate over the practice of DN between physical therapists and acupuncturists, with a particular emphasis on the USA. DN and acupuncture share many similarities but may differ in certain aspects. Currently, little information is available from the literature regarding the relationship between the two needling techniques. Through reviewing their origins, theory, and practice, we found that DN and acupuncture overlap in terms of needling technique with solid filiform needles as well as some fundamental theories. Both WMA and DN are based on modern biomedical understandings of the human body, although DN arguably represents only one subcategory of WMA. The increasing volume of research into needling therapy explains its growing popularity in the musculoskeletal field including sports medicine. To resolve the debate over DN practice, we call for the establishment of a regulatory body to accredit DN courses and a formal, comprehensive educational component and training for healthcare professionals who are not physicians or acupuncturists. Because of the close relationship between DN and acupuncture, collaboration rather than dispute between acupuncturists and other healthcare professionals should be encouraged with respect to education, research, and practice for the benefit of patients with musculoskeletal conditions who require needling therapy.

  7. Debates about assisted suicide in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Burkhardt, Sandra; La Harpe, Romano

    2012-12-01

    Assisted suicide is allowed in 3 states of the United States (Oregon, Washington, Montana) but only if performed by a physician.On the opposite, in Switzerland, at the beginning of the 20th century, the Swiss Penal Code referred to assisted suicide in the context of honor or an unhappy love affair. It was only in 1985 that Exit Deutsche Schweiz (Exit for German-speaking Switzerland) "medically" assisted the first patient to end his life.Even if authorized by the Swiss law upon certain conditions, assisted suicide is subject to debates for ethical reasons. The Swiss Academy of Medical Sciences described directives to guide physicians on this difficult subject.Different studies showed an increase in the number of medical-assisted suicide in Switzerland since the 1990s. Now, this number seems to be quite stable. Assisted suicide is authorized in a few hospitals under strict conditions (especially when returning home is impossible).Thus, according to the Swiss law, any person could perform assisted suicide; this is essentially performed by 3 main associations, using pentobarbital on medical prescription as lethal substance.Generally speaking, the Swiss population is rather in favor of assisted suicide. Among politics, the debate has been tough until 2010, when the Federal Council decided not to modify the Swiss Penal Code concerning assisted suicide.

  8. The labeling debate in the United States.

    PubMed

    Marchant, Gary E; Cardineau, Guy A

    2013-01-01

    The mandatory labeling of genetically modified (GM) food has become the predominant policy issue concerning biotechnology in the United States. The controversy over GM labeling is being debated at several different levels and branches of government. At the federal level, the Food and Drug Administration, which has primary jurisdiction over food safety and labeling, has steadfastly refused to require labeling of GM foods since 1992 based on its conclusion that GM foods as a category present no unique or higher risks than other foods. Proposed legislation has been repeatedly introduced in the US. Congress over the years to mandate GM labeling, but has made very little progress. With federal labeling requirements apparently stalled, the main activity has switched to the state level, where numerous individual states are considering mandatory GM labeling, either through legislation or proposition. The debate over GM labeling, at both the federal and state levels, has focused on five issues: (1) public opinion; (2) the legality of labeling requirements; (3) the risks and benefits of GM foods; (4) the costs and burdens of GM labeling; and (5) consumer choice. While the pro-labeling forces argue that all of these factors weigh in favor of mandatory GM labeling, a more careful evaluation of the evidence finds that all five factors weigh decisively against mandatory GM labeling requirements.

  9. The neurobiology of borderline personality disorder: the synergy of "nature and nurture".

    PubMed

    Pally, Regina

    2002-05-01

    The author reviews the current state of our knowledge concerning the neurobiology of borderline personality disorder (BPD). A converging body of scientific evidence indicates that patients with BPD suffer from impairments in the brain systems that regulate impulsivity, aggression, and affect. This article reviews data on the neurobiology of the symptoms of BPD, including emotional and behavioral dysregulation, identity disturbance, cognitive impairments, and interpersonal difficulties. The author first considers the evolutionary context in which BPD can develop to put the neurobiological findings in perspective, and then discusses the roles of both genetic inheritance and the environment in the development of BPD. The role of neurotransmitter systems in the development of impulsive-aggression and affective instability is reviewed. Possible neurobiological contributors to the identity disturbance seen in BPD are also described. The author then considers environmental contributions to BPD and discusses the synergy of nature and nurture in the development of BPD symptoms. Findings concerning the types of neurobiological impairments that can arise as a result of childhood neglect and abuse and other types of chronic severe stress and trauma are discussed. Finally, the author reviews studies of animal attachment models that suggest that types of maternal care can produce lifelong behavioral and physiological differences in offspring and that this effect is mediated through the regulation of gene expression. The author suggests that the large body of neuroscience research reviewed in this article suggests that, while patients with BPD may be born with innate genetic tendencies for impaired brain systems for regulating impulses and affect, the environment they find themselves born into may be critical in determining whether or not they develop the full blown syndrome of BPD. PMID:15985870

  10. The behavioral neurobiology of self-injurious behavior in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Kraemer, G W; Clarke, A S

    1990-01-01

    1. Self-injurious behavior (SIB) is prevalent among institutionalized children, but the efficacy of current behavioral and pharmacological treatments is marginal. 2. There is evidence that SIB in humans has a neurobiological basis. A better understanding of the neurobiological factors that may promote or cause SIB is necessary for the development of effective pharmacologic treatments. 3. SIB that is similar in some respects to SIB in humans occurs in nonhuman primates that have been deprived of social experience early in life. An analysis of the "cause" of SIB suggests that it is a relatively straight-forward example of the development of neurobiological and behavioral aspects of aggressive behavior in the absence of social factors that would normally bring the behavior under environmental control. Once induced, however, it becomes environmentally autonomous and its proximal cause is neurobiological in nature. 4. There are three lines of evidence that nonhuman primate SIB is linked to malfunctions in the norepinephrine (NE) and serotonin (5HT) neurotransmitter systems. The activity of these systems appears to be altered by psychosocial deprivation. The functional relationship between the two systems appears to be altered or absent in socially deprived monkeys. Pharmacologic agents that act on these systems alter SIB in monkeys. 5. Preliminary data from socially deprived rhesus monkeys are consistent in major respects with studies linking altered serotonin systems to self-injurious behavior and suicidal motivation in humans who also probably suffer from social deprivation. 6. Taken together, these findings indicate that developmental study of biogenic amine systems, particularly finding ways to circumvent deficits in, or restore functional linkages between, the 5HT and NE systems, will lead to a greater understanding of the neurobiologic basis of SIB in humans and animals and will enable us to develop more effective treatments of SIB.

  11. Integrating ecology, psychology and neurobiology within a food-hoarding paradigm.

    PubMed

    Pravosudov, Vladimir V; Smulders, Tom V

    2010-03-27

    Many animals regularly hoard food for future use, which appears to be an important adaptation to a seasonally and/or unpredictably changing environment. This food-hoarding paradigm is an excellent example of a natural system that has broadly influenced both theoretical and empirical work in the field of biology. The food-hoarding paradigm has played a major role in the conceptual framework of numerous fields from ecology (e.g. plant-animal interactions) and evolution (e.g. the coevolution of caching, spatial memory and the hippocampus) to psychology (e.g. memory and cognition) and neurobiology (e.g. neurogenesis and the neurobiology of learning and memory). Many food-hoarding animals retrieve caches by using spatial memory. This memory-based behavioural system has the inherent advantage of being tractable for study in both the field and laboratory and has been shaped by natural selection, which produces variation with strong fitness consequences in a variety of taxa. Thus, food hoarding is an excellent model for a highly integrative approach to understanding numerous questions across a variety of disciplines. Recently, there has been a surge of interest in the complexity of animal cognition such as future planning and episodic-like-memory as well as in the relationship between memory, the environment and the brain. In addition, new breakthroughs in neurobiology have enhanced our ability to address the mechanisms underlying these behaviours. Consequently, the field is necessarily becoming more integrative by assessing behavioural questions in the context of natural ecological systems and by addressing mechanisms through neurobiology and psychology, but, importantly, within an evolutionary and ecological framework. In this issue, we aim to bring together a series of papers providing a modern synthesis of ecology, psychology, physiology and neurobiology and identifying new directions and developments in the use of food-hoarding animals as a model system.

  12. Adenoviral protein VII packages intracellular viral DNA throughout the early phase of infection.

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, P K; Vayda, M E; Flint, S J

    1986-01-01

    The proteins associated with parental, adenoviral DNA in productively-infected HeLa cells have been examined both directly and indirectly. HeLa cells infected with 32P-labelled Ad2 were irradiated with u.v. light at various points in the infectious cycle. Following degradation of the DNA, nuclear proteins carrying cross-linked nucleotides, or oligonucleotides, were distinguished from virion phosphoproteins by the resistance of their 32P radioactivity to 1 M NaOH. The major core protein of the virion, protein VII, was found to be associated with viral DNA throughout infection, even when cells were infected at a multiplicity of 0.14. Micrococcal nuclease digestion of intranuclear viral DNA 4 h after infection liberated two nucleoprotein particles containing viral DNA, neither of which co-migrated with HeLa cell mononucleosomes. These results indicate that core protein VII remains associated with parental adenoviral DNA during productive infections. The observation that protein VII can be cross-linked to DNA in cells infected at very low multiplicity, together with the results of a comparison of proteins cross-linkable to viral DNA in cells infected by wild-type virus and a non-infectious mutant containing the precursor to protein VII, suggest that nucleoproteins comprising viral DNA and protein VII must be the templates for expression of pre-early and early viral genes. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 3. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. PMID:3743550

  13. Delineation of structural domains and identification of functionally important residues in DNA repair enzyme exonuclease VII

    PubMed Central

    Poleszak, Katarzyna; Kaminska, Katarzyna H.; Dunin-Horkawicz, Stanislaw; Lupas, Andrei; Skowronek, Krzysztof J.; Bujnicki, Janusz M.

    2012-01-01

    Exonuclease VII (ExoVII) is a bacterial nuclease involved in DNA repair and recombination that hydrolyses single-stranded DNA. ExoVII is composed of two subunits: large XseA and small XseB. Thus far, little was known about the molecular structure of ExoVII, the interactions between XseA and XseB, the architecture of the nuclease active site or its mechanism of action. We used bioinformatics methods to predict the structure of XseA, which revealed four domains: an N-terminal OB-fold domain, a middle putatively catalytic domain, a coiled-coil domain and a short C-terminal segment. By series of deletion and site-directed mutagenesis experiments on XseA from Escherichia coli, we determined that the OB-fold domain is responsible for DNA binding, the coiled-coil domain is involved in binding multiple copies of the XseB subunit and residues D155, R205, H238 and D241 of the middle domain are important for the catalytic activity but not for DNA binding. Altogether, we propose a model of sequence–structure–function relationships in ExoVII. PMID:22718974

  14. Integrated analysis of proteome and transcriptome changes in the mucopolysaccharidosis type VII mouse hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Parente, Michael K; Rozen, Ramona; Seeholzer, Steven H; Wolfe, John H

    2016-05-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type VII (MPS VII) is a lysosomal storage disease caused by the deficiency of β-glucuronidase. In this study, we compared the changes relative to normal littermates in the proteome and transcriptome of the hippocampus in the C57Bl/6 mouse model of MPS VII, which has well-documented histopathological and neurodegenerative changes. A completely different set of significant changes between normal and MPS VII littermates were found in each assay. Nevertheless, the functional annotation terms generated by the two methods showed agreement in many of the processes, which also corresponded to known pathology associated with the disease. Additionally, assay-specific changes were found, which in the proteomic analysis included mitochondria, energy generation, and cytoskeletal differences in the mutant, while the transcriptome differences included immune, vesicular, and extracellular matrix changes. In addition, the transcriptomic changes in the mutant hippocampus were concordant with those in a MPS VII mouse caused by the same mutation but on a different background inbred strain. PMID:27053151

  15. Onset of ice VII phase during ps laser pulse propagation through liquid water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paturi, Prem Kiran; Vaddapally, Rakesh Kumar; Acrhem Team

    2015-06-01

    Water dominantly present in liquid state on earth gets transformed to crystalline polymorphs under different dynamic loading conditions. Out of 15 different crystalline phases discovered till date, ice VII is observed to be stable over wide pressure (2-63 GPa) and temperature (>273 K) ranges. We present the onset of ice VII phase at low threshold of 2 mJ/pulse during 30 ps (532 nm, 10 Hz) laser pulse induced shock propagating through liquid water. Role of input pulse energy on the evolution of Stoke's and anti-Stoke's Raman shift of the dominant A1g mode of ice VII, filamentation, free-electrons, plasma shielding is presented. The H-bond network rearrangement, electron ion energy transfer time coinciding with the excitation pulse duration supported by the filamentation and plasma shielding of the ps laser pulses reduced the threshold of ice VII structure formation. Filamentation and the plasma shielding have shown the localized creation and sustenance of ice VII structure in liquid water over 3 mm length and 50 μm area of cross-section. The work is supported by Defence Research and Developement Organization, India through Grants-in-Aid Program.

  16. The role of background behavior in televised debates: does displaying nonverbal agreement and/or disagreement benefit either debater?

    PubMed

    Seiter, John S; Weger, Harry; Jensen, Andrea; Kinzer, Harold J

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the effects of background nonverbal behavior displayed with the purpose of undermining one's opponent in televised debates. Students watched one of four versions of a televised debate. In each, while the speaking debater appeared on the main screen, subscreens displayed her nonspeaking opponent's background nonverbal behavior. In one version, the non-speaking debater remained "stone faced" during her opponent's speech, while in the other three she nonverbally displayed occasional disagreement, nearly constant disagreement, or both agreement and disagreement. After viewing the debates, students rated the debaters' credibility, appropriateness, objectivity, and debate skills, in addition to judging who won the debate. Analysis indicated that background nonverbal behavior influenced audience perceptions of debaters' credibility, appropriateness, objectivity, debate skill, and the extent to which the debate was won. These results suggest that adding nonverbal agreement to expressions of nonverbal disagreement do not reduce the negative impacts of communicating disagreement nonverbally during an opponent's speech and may in fact further decrease the audiences' perception of a debater's credibility and overall performance. PMID:20575335

  17. Urban Debate and High School Educational Outcomes for African American Males: The Case of the Chicago Debate League

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mezuk, Briana

    2009-01-01

    This study examines whether participating in competitive policy debate influences high school completion, academic achievement, and college readiness for African American male students. The analysis examines data from the Chicago Debate League from 1997 to 2006. Debate participants were 70% more likely to graduate and three times less likely to…

  18. Technetium (VII) Co-precipitation with Framework Aluminosilicates

    SciTech Connect

    Harsh, James B.; Dickson, Johnbull Otah; Pierce, Eric M.; Bargar, John

    2015-07-13

    Technetium-99 (99Tc), a long-lived radionuclide, is one of the most widespread contaminants within the Hanford subsurface. At some depths, it is only extractable with strong acids, suggesting incorporation into a solid phase. We hypothesized that Tc may have coprecipitated with feldspathoid aluminosilicates under waste tanks that had leaked caustic solutions into the vadose zone. Our objectives were to determine if Tc could be incorporated into the feldspathoids cancrinite and sodalite and under what conditions coprecipitation could occur. Our hypothesis was that sodalite was more likely to incorporate and retain Tc. Our approach was to use known methods of feldspathoid formation in solutions resembling those in Hanford waste tanks contacting sediments in terms of major ion (Na, NO3, OH, Al(OH)4, and Si(OH)4 concentrations. In some cases, Al and Si were supplied from zeolite. We used perrhenate (ReO4) as a surrogate for pertechnetate (TcO4) to avoid the radioactivity. The major findings of this study were 1) ReO4 could be incorporated into either sodalite or cancrinite but the concentration in the solid was < 1% of the competing ion Cl, NO3, or NO2. 2) The small amount of ReO4 incorporated was not exchangeable with NO3 or NO2. 3) In sodalite, NO3 was highly preferred over ReO4 but significant Re-sodalite was formed when the mole fraction in solution (Re/Re+N) exceeded 0.8. 4) A nonlinear relation between the unit cell parameter and amount of Re incorporated suggested that a separate Re-sodalite phase was formed rather than a solid solution. 5) We determined that sodalite preference for sodalite in the presence of different anions increased with the ionic size of the competing anion: Cl < CO3 < NO3 < SO4 < MnO4 < WO4 and significant incorporation did not occur unless the difference in anion radii was less than 12%. 6) Re(VII) was not significantly reduced to Re(IV) under the conditions of this experiment and Re appeared to be a good surrogate for Tc under oxidizing

  19. The Third Presidential Debate: Hillary Clinton And Donald Trump (Full Debate) | NBC News

    NASA Video Gallery

    » Get Breaking News Alerts: http://nbcnews.to/2e4vaHN» Check Out Fact-Checks And More: http://nbcnews.com/debate» Subscribe to NBC News: http://nbcnews.to/SubscribeToNBC» Watch more NBC video: h...

  20. Broadening the Debate: Comments on Michael J. Feuer's "Moderating the Debate"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Emily

    2009-01-01

    In "Moderating the Debate: Rationality and the Promise of American Education", Michael Feuer argues that insights from cognitive science and the theory of bounded rationality can help us understand why educational policy makers overreach in seeking optimal solutions to educational problems. In this essay, Emily Robertson argues that cognitive…