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Sample records for decarboxylases

  1. Genetics Home Reference: aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase deficiency aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase deficiency Printable PDF Open All Close All ... view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) deficiency is an inherited disorder that ...

  2. Zymographic detection of cinnamic acid decarboxylase activity.

    PubMed

    Prim, Núria; Pastor, F I Javier; Diaz, Pilar

    2002-11-01

    The manuscript includes a concise description of a new, fast and simple method for detection of cinnamic acid decarboxylase activity. The method is based on a color shift caused a by pH change and may be an excellent procedure for large screenings of samples from natural sources, as it involves no complex sample processing or purification. The method developed can be used in preliminary approaches to biotransformation processes involving detection of hydroxycinnamic acid decarboxylase activity.

  3. Dopa Decarboxylase Modulates Tau Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Kow, Rebecca L; Sikkema, Carl; Wheeler, Jeanna M; Wilkinson, Charles W; Kraemer, Brian C

    2017-06-15

    The microtubule-associated protein tau accumulates into toxic aggregates in multiple neurodegenerative diseases. We found previously that loss of D2-family dopamine receptors ameliorated tauopathy in multiple models including a Caenorhabditis elegans model of tauopathy. To better understand how loss of D2-family dopamine receptors can ameliorate tau toxicity, we screened a collection of C. elegans mutations in dopamine-related genes (n = 45) for changes in tau transgene-induced behavioral defects. These included many genes responsible for dopamine synthesis, metabolism, and signaling downstream of the D2 receptors. We identified one dopamine synthesis gene, dopa decarboxylase (DDC), as a suppressor of tau toxicity in tau transgenic worms. Loss of the C. elegans DDC gene, bas-1, ameliorated the behavioral deficits of tau transgenic worms, reduced phosphorylated and detergent-insoluble tau accumulation, and reduced tau-mediated neuron loss. Loss of function in other genes in the dopamine and serotonin synthesis pathways did not alter tau-induced toxicity; however, their function is required for the suppression of tau toxicity by bas-1. Additional loss of D2-family dopamine receptors did not synergize with bas-1 suppression of tauopathy phenotypes. Loss of the DDC bas-1 reduced tau-induced toxicity in a C. elegans model of tauopathy, while loss of no other dopamine or serotonin synthesis genes tested had this effect. Because loss of activity upstream of DDC could reduce suppression of tau by DDC, this suggests the possibility that loss of DDC suppresses tau via the combined accumulation of dopamine precursor levodopa and serotonin precursor 5-hydroxytryptophan. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Biosynthetic arginine decarboxylase in phytopathogenic fungi.

    PubMed

    Khan, A J; Minocha, S C

    1989-01-01

    It has been reported that while bacteria and higher plants possess two different pathways for the biosynthesis of putrescine, via ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) and arginine decarboxylase (ADC); the fungi, like animals, only use the former pathway. We found that contrary to the earlier reports, two of the phytopathogenic fungi (Ceratocystis minor and Verticillium dahliae) contain significant levels of ADC activity with very little ODC. The ADC in these fungi has high pH optimum (8.4) and low Km (0.237 mM for C. minor, 0.103 mM for V. dahliae), and is strongly inhibited by alpha-difluoromethylarginine (DFMA), putrescine and spermidine, further showing that this enzyme is probably involved in the biosynthesis of polyamines and not in the catabolism of arginine as in Escherichia coli. The growth of these fungi is strongly inhibited by DFMA while alpha-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) has little effect.

  5. Structures of Bacterial Biosynthetic Arginine Decarboxylases

    SciTech Connect

    F Forouhar; S Lew; J Seetharaman; R Xiao; T Acton; G Montelione; L Tong

    2011-12-31

    Biosynthetic arginine decarboxylase (ADC; also known as SpeA) plays an important role in the biosynthesis of polyamines from arginine in bacteria and plants. SpeA is a pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme and shares weak sequence homology with several other PLP-dependent decarboxylases. Here, the crystal structure of PLP-bound SpeA from Campylobacter jejuni is reported at 3.0 {angstrom} resolution and that of Escherichia coli SpeA in complex with a sulfate ion is reported at 3.1 {angstrom} resolution. The structure of the SpeA monomer contains two large domains, an N-terminal TIM-barrel domain followed by a {beta}-sandwich domain, as well as two smaller helical domains. The TIM-barrel and {beta}-sandwich domains share structural homology with several other PLP-dependent decarboxylases, even though the sequence conservation among these enzymes is less than 25%. A similar tetramer is observed for both C. jejuni and E. coli SpeA, composed of two dimers of tightly associated monomers. The active site of SpeA is located at the interface of this dimer and is formed by residues from the TIM-barrel domain of one monomer and a highly conserved loop in the {beta}-sandwich domain of the other monomer. The PLP cofactor is recognized by hydrogen-bonding, {pi}-stacking and van der Waals interactions.

  6. Complex evolution of orthologous and paralogous decarboxylase genes.

    PubMed

    Sáenz-de-Miera, L E; Ayala, F J

    2004-01-01

    The decarboxylases are involved in neurotransmitter synthesis in animals, and in pathways of secondary metabolism in plants. Different decarboxylase proteins are characterized for their different substrate specificities, but are encoded by homologous genes. We study, within a maximum-likelihood framework, the evolutionary relationships among dopa decarboxylase (Ddc), histidine decarboxylase (Hdc) and alpha-methyldopa hypersensitive (amd) in animals, and tryptophan decarboxylase (Wdc) and tyrosine decarboxylase (Ydc) in plants. The evolutionary rates are heterogeneous. There are differences between paralogous genes in the same lineages: 4.13 x 10(-10) nucleotide substitutions per site per year in mammalian Ddc vs. 1.95 in Hdc; between orthologous genes in different lineages, 7.62 in dipteran Ddc vs. 4.13 in mammalian Ddc; and very large temporal variations in some lineages, from 3.7 up to 54.9 in the Drosophila Ddc lineage. Our results are inconsistent with the molecular clock hypothesis.

  7. Induction of aromatic-L-amino acid decarboxylase by decarboxylase inhibitors in idiopathic parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Boomsma, F; Meerwaldt, J D; Man in 't Veld, A J; Hovestadt, A; Schalekamp, M A

    1989-06-01

    We evaluated the effect of administration of L-dopa, alone or in combination with a peripheral decarboxylase inhibitor, on plasma levels of aromatic-L-amino acid decarboxylase (ALAAD). After single-dose administration of L-dopa plus benserazide (Madopar) in healthy subjects and in chronically treated patients with parkinsonism, plasma ALAAD followed for 2 to 3 hours fell, but returned to predosing levels within 90 minutes. Four groups of patients with idiopathic parkinsonism were studied during chronic treatment: Group I, no L-dopa treatment (n = 31); Group II, L-dopa alone (n = 15); Group III, L-dopa plus benserazide (n = 28); and Group IV, L-dopa plus carbidopa (Sinemet, n = 30). Plasma ALAAD 2 hours after dosing was normal in Groups I and II. ALAAD was increased threefold in Groups III and IV, suggesting induction of ALAAD by the coadministration of a peripheral decarboxylase inhibitor. In a study of 3 patients in whom L-dopa/benserazide was started, plasma ALAAD rose gradually over 3 to 4 weeks. Further detailed pharmacokinetic studies of L-dopa, dopamine, and ALAAD in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid are required to determine if the apparent ALAAD induction by a peripheral decarboxylase inhibitor may be related to the loss of clinical efficacy of combination therapy in some patients and how it is related to end-of-dose deterioration and on-off phenomena.

  8. Genetics Home Reference: malonyl-CoA decarboxylase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... link) ACT Sheet: Elevated C3-DC acylcarnitine (PDF) Genetic Testing (1 link) Genetic Testing Registry: Deficiency of malonyl-CoA decarboxylase Other ... Topic: Lipid Metabolism Disorders Health Topic: Newborn Screening Genetic and Rare ... decarboxylase deficiency Educational Resources (3 links) ...

  9. Arginine Decarboxylase Is Localized in Chloroplasts.

    PubMed Central

    Borrell, A.; Culianez-Macia, F. A.; Altabella, T.; Besford, R. T.; Flores, D.; Tiburcio, A. F.

    1995-01-01

    Plants, unlike animals, can use either ornithine decarboxylase or arginine decarboxylase (ADC) to produce the polyamine precursor putrescine. Lack of knowledge of the exact cellular and subcellular location of these enzymes has been one of the main obstacles to our understanding of the biological role of polyamines in plants. We have generated polyclonal antibodies to oat (Avena sativa L.) ADC to study the spatial distribution and subcellular localization of ADC protein in different oat tissues. By immunoblotting and immunocytochemistry, we show that ADC is organ specific. By cell fractionation and immunoblotting, we show that ADC is localized in chloroplasts associated with the thylakoid membrane. The results also show that increased levels of ADC protein are correlated with high levels of ADC activity and putrescine in osmotically stressed oat leaves. A model of compartmentalization for the arginine pathway and putrescine biosynthesis in active photosynthetic tissues has been proposed. In the context of endosymbiote-driven metabolic evolution in plants, the location of ADC in the chloroplast compartment may have major evolutionary significance, since it explains (a) why plants can use two alternative pathways for putrescine biosynthesis and (b) why animals do not possess ADC. PMID:12228631

  10. Three Distinct Glutamate Decarboxylase Genes in Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Grone, Brian P.; Maruska, Karen P.

    2016-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a widely conserved signaling molecule that in animals has been adapted as a neurotransmitter. GABA is synthesized from the amino acid glutamate by the action of glutamate decarboxylases (GADs). Two vertebrate genes, GAD1 and GAD2, encode distinct GAD proteins: GAD67 and GAD65, respectively. We have identified a third vertebrate GAD gene, GAD3. This gene is conserved in fishes as well as tetrapods. We analyzed protein sequence, gene structure, synteny, and phylogenetics to identify GAD3 as a homolog of GAD1 and GAD2. Interestingly, we found that GAD3 was lost in the hominid lineage. Because of the importance of GABA as a neurotransmitter, GAD3 may play important roles in vertebrate nervous systems. PMID:27461130

  11. Dopa decarboxylase activity of the living human brain

    SciTech Connect

    Gjedde, A.; Reith, J.; Dyve, S.; Leger, G.; Guttman, M.; Diksic, M.; Evans, A.; Kuwabara, H. )

    1991-04-01

    Monoaminergic neurons use dopa decarboxylase to form dopamine from L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-dopa). We measured regional dopa decarboxylase activity in brains of six healthy volunteers with 6-({sup 18}F)fluoro-L-dopa and positron emission tomography. We calculated the enzyme activity, relative to its Km, with a kinetic model that yielded the relative rate of conversion of 6-({sup 18}F)fluoro-L-dopa to ({sup 18}F)fluorodopamine. Regional values of relative dopa decarboxylase activity ranged from nil in occipital cortex to 1.9 h-1 in caudate nucleus and putamen, in agreement with values obtained in vitro.

  12. Improved Purification and Spectroscopic Properties of Squash Glutamate Decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, T; Yamaura, I; Funatsu, M

    1996-01-01

    Squash glutamate decarboxylase was purified by DEAE-Cellulose batchwise followed by Blue-Sepharose, Cellulofine GCL-2000, and Toyopearl HW-55F column chromatography. The purified glutamate decarboxylase had a high specific activity (95.0 u/mg). The absorption spectrum of glutamate decarboxylase had an absorption maximum at 420 nm in the range 300-500 nm. A pH change from 5.3 to 7.8 was accompanied by a decrease in absorbancy at 420 nm. One mole of glutamate decarboxylase contained 3.8 and 1.3 mol of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate at pH 5.8 and pH 7.8, respectively.

  13. Peripheral neuropathy associated with antiglutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies.

    PubMed

    Saltık, Sema; Türkeş, Muzaffer; Tüzün, Erdem; Cakır, Arif; Ulusoy, Canan

    2013-05-01

    Autoantibodies to glutamic acid decarboxylase are found in some rare neurological diseases. However, acute peripheral neuropathy associated with antiglutamic acid decarboxylase autoimmunity has not been reported previously. Here we report a case of a patient who presented with acute cranial and peripheral neuropathy in association with the presence of serum antiglutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies. A 13-year-old boy was admitted to our pediatric neurology clinic with diplopia due to sixth cranial nerve palsy and ascending motor weakness in all extremities. The nerve conduction studies showed bilateral motor and sensory demyelinating neuropathy. Full recovery was achieved following intravenous immunoglobulin treatment. Glutamic acid decarboxylase autoimmunity-associated neurological diseases spectrum may also include acute demyelinating peripheral neuropathy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Keto-isovalerate decarboxylase enzymes and methods of use thereof

    DOEpatents

    McElvain, Jessica; O'Keefe, Daniel P.; Paul, Brian James; Payne, Mark S.; Rothman, Steven Cary; He, Hongxian

    2016-01-19

    Provided herein are polypeptides and polynucleotides encoding such polypeptides which have ketoisovalerate decarboxylase activity. Also provided are recombinant host cells comprising such polypeptides and polynucleotides and methods of use thereof.

  15. Identification of Novel Benzoylformate Decarboxylases by Growth Selection▿†

    PubMed Central

    Henning, Helge; Leggewie, Christian; Pohl, Martina; Müller, Michael; Eggert, Thorsten; Jaeger, Karl-Erich

    2006-01-01

    A growth selection system was established using Pseudomonas putida, which can grow on benzaldehyde as the sole carbon source. These bacteria presumably metabolize benzaldehyde via the β-ketoadipate pathway and were unable to grow in benzoylformate-containing selective medium, but the growth deficiency could be restored by expression in trans of genes encoding benzoylformate decarboxylases. The selection system was used to identify three novel benzoylformate decarboxylases, two of them originating from a chromosomal library of P. putida ATCC 12633 and the third from an environmental-DNA library. The novel P. putida enzymes BfdB and BfdC exhibited 83% homology to the benzoylformate decarboxylase from P. aeruginosa and 63% to the enzyme MdlC from P. putida ATCC 12633, whereas the metagenomic BfdM exhibited 72% homology to a putative benzoylformate decarboxylase from Polaromonas naphthalenivorans. BfdC was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and the enzymatic activity was determined to be 22 U/ml using benzoylformate as the substrate. Our results clearly demonstrate that P. putida KT2440 is an appropriate selection host strain suitable to identify novel benzoylformate decarboxylase-encoding genes. In principle, this system is also applicable to identify a broad range of different industrially important enzymes, such as benzaldehyde lyases, benzoylformate decarboxylases, and hydroxynitrile lyases, which all catalyze the formation of benzaldehyde. PMID:17012586

  16. A Porphodimethene Chemical Inhibitor of Uroporphyrinogen Decarboxylase

    PubMed Central

    Yip, Kenneth W.; Zhang, Zhan; Sakemura-Nakatsugawa, Noriko; Huang, Jui-Wen; Vu, Nhu Mai; Chiang, Yi-Kun; Lin, Chih-Lung; Kwan, Jennifer Y. Y.; Yue, Shijun; Jitkova, Yulia; To, Terence; Zahedi, Payam; Pai, Emil F.; Schimmer, Aaron D.; Lovell, Jonathan F.; Sessler, Jonathan L.; Liu, Fei-Fei

    2014-01-01

    Uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase (UROD) catalyzes the conversion of uroporphyrinogen to coproporphyrinogen during heme biosynthesis. This enzyme was recently identified as a potential anticancer target; its inhibition leads to an increase in reactive oxygen species, likely mediated by the Fenton reaction, thereby decreasing cancer cell viability and working in cooperation with radiation and/or cisplatin. Because there is no known chemical UROD inhibitor suitable for use in translational studies, we aimed to design, synthesize, and characterize such a compound. Initial in silico-based design and docking analyses identified a potential porphyrin analogue that was subsequently synthesized. This species, a porphodimethene (named PI-16), was found to inhibit UROD in an enzymatic assay (IC50 = 9.9 µM), but did not affect porphobilinogen deaminase (at 62.5 µM), thereby exhibiting specificity. In cellular assays, PI-16 reduced the viability of FaDu and ME-180 cancer cells with half maximal effective concentrations of 22.7 µM and 26.9 µM, respectively, and only minimally affected normal oral epithelial (NOE) cells. PI-16 also combined effectively with radiation and cisplatin, with potent synergy being observed in the case of cisplatin in FaDu cells (Chou-Talalay combination index <1). This work presents the first known synthetic UROD inhibitor, and sets the foundation for the design, synthesis, and characterization of higher affinity and more effective UROD inhibitors. PMID:24587102

  17. Properties of oxaloacetate decarboxylase from Veillonella parvula.

    PubMed Central

    Ng, S K; Wong, M; Hamilton, I R

    1982-01-01

    Oxaloacetate decarboxylase was purified to 136-fold from the oral anaerobe Veillonella parvula. The purified enzyme was substantially free of contaminating enzymes or proteins. Maximum activity of the enzyme was exhibited at pH 7.0 for both carboxylation and decarboxylation. At this pH, the Km values for oxaloacetate and Mg2+ were at 0.06 and 0.17 mM, respectively, whereas the Km values for pyruvate, CO2, and Mg2+ were 3.3, 1.74, and 1.85 mM, respectively. Hyperbolic kinetics were observed with all of the aforementioned compounds. The Keq' was 2.13 X 10(-3) mM-1 favoring the decarboxylation of oxaloacetate. In the carboxylation step, avidin, acetyl coenzyme A, biotin, and coenzyme A were not required. ADP and NADH had no effect on either the carboxylation or decarboxylation step, but ATP inhibited the carboxylation step competitively and the decarboxylation step noncompetitively. These types of inhibition fitted well with the overall lactate metabolism of the non-carbohydrate-fermenting anaerobe. PMID:7076619

  18. Localization of arginine decarboxylase in tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Bortolotti, Cristina; Cordeiro, Alexandra; Alcázar, Rubén; Borrell, Antoni; Culiañez-Macià, Francisco A.; Tiburcio, Antonio F.; Altabella, Teresa

    2004-01-01

    The lack of knowledge about the tissue and subcellular distribution of polyamines (PAs) and the enzymes involved in their metabolism remains one of the main obstacles in our understanding of the biological role of PAs in plants. Arginine decarboxylase (ADC; EC 4.1.1.9) is a key enzyme in polyamine biosynthesis in plants. We have characterized a cDNA coding for ADC from Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Petit Havana SR1. The deduced ADC polypeptide had 721 amino acids and a molecular mass of 77 kDa. The ADC cDNA was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and the ADC fusion protein obtained was used to produce polyclonal antibodies. Using immunological methods, we demonstrate the presence of the ADC protein in all plant organs analysed: flowers, seeds, stems, leaves and roots. Moreover, depending on the tissue, the protein is localized in two different subcellular compartments, the nucleus and the chloroplast. In photosynthetic tissues, ADC is located mainly in chloroplasts, whereas in non-photosynthetic tissues the protein appears to be located in nuclei. The different compartmentation of ADC may be related to distinct functions of the protein in different cell types.

  19. Mapping of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) genes

    SciTech Connect

    Edelhoff, S.; Adler, D.A.; Disteche, C.M.; Grubin, C.E.; Karlsen, A.E.; Lernmark, A.; Foster, D. )

    1993-07-01

    Glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) catalyzes the synthesis of [gamma]-aminobutyric acid (GABA), which is known as a major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system (CNS), but is also present outside the CNS. Recent studies showed that GAD is the major target of autoantibodies associated with the development of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and of the rare stiff man syndrome. Studies of GAD expression have demonstrated multiple transcripts, suggesting several isoforms of GAD. In this study, three different genes were mapped by in situ hybridization to both human and mouse chromosomes. The GAD1 gene was mapped to human chromosome 2q31 and to mouse chromosome 2D in a known region of conservation between human and mouse. GAD2, previously mapped to human chromosome 10p11.2-p12, was mapped to mouse chromosome 2A2-B, which identifies a new region of conservation between human and mouse chromosomes. A potential GAD3 transcript was mapped to human chromosome 22q13 and to mouse chromosome 15E in a known region of conservation between human and mouse. It is concluded that the GAD genes may form a family with as many as three related members. 30 refs., 5 figs.

  20. Phosphatidylserine decarboxylases, key enzymes of lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Schuiki, Irmgard; Daum, Günther

    2009-02-01

    Phosphatidylserine decarboxylases (PSDs) (E.C. 4.1.1.65) are enzymes which catalyze the formation of phosphatidylethanolamine (PtdEtn) by decarboxylation of phosphatidylserine (PtdSer). This enzymatic activity has been identified in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. PSDs occur as two types of proteins depending on their localization and the sequence of a conserved motif. Type I PSDs include enzymes of eukaryotic mitochondria and bacterial origin which contain the amino acid sequence LGST as a characteristic motif. Type II PSDs are found in the endomembrane system of eukaryotes and contain a typical GGST motif. These characteristic motifs are considered as autocatalytic cleavage sites where proenzymes are split into alpha- and beta-subunits. The S-residue set free by this cleavage serves as an attachment site of a pyruvoyl group which is required for the activity of the enzymes. Moreover, PSDs harbor characteristic binding sites for the substrate PtdSer. Substrate supply to eukaryotic PSDs requires lipid transport because PtdSer synthesis and decarboxylation are spatially separated. Targeting of PSDs to their proper locations requires additional intramolecular domains. Mitochondrially localized type I PSDs are directed to the inner mitochondrial membrane by N-terminal targeting sequences. Type II PSDs also contain sequences in their N-terminal extensions which might be required for subcellular targeting. Lack of PSDs causes various defects in different cell types. The physiological relevance of these findings and the central role of PSDs in lipid metabolism will be discussed in this review.

  1. Post-transcriptional regulation of ornithine decarboxylase

    PubMed Central

    Nowotarski, Shannon L.; Origanti, Sofia; Shantz, Lisa M.

    2013-01-01

    Activity of the polyamine biosynthetic enzyme ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), and intracellular levels of ODC protein are controlled very tightly. Numerous studies have described ODC regulation at the levels of transcription, translation and protein degradation in normal cells, and dysregulation of these processes in response to oncogenic stimuli. Although post-transcriptional regulation of ODC has been well-documented, the RNA binding proteins (RBPs) that interact with ODC mRNA and control synthesis of the ODC protein have not been defined. Using Ras-transformed rat intestinal epithelial cells (Ras12V cells) as a model, we have begun identifying the RBPs that associate with the ODC transcript. Binding of RBPs could potentially regulate ODC synthesis by either changing mRNA stability or rate of mRNA translation. Techniques for measuring RBP binding and translation initiation are described here. Targeting control of ODC translation or mRNA decay could be a valuable method of limiting polyamine accumulation and subsequent tumor development in a variety of cancers. PMID:21318880

  2. Cysteinesulfinate decarboxylase: Characterization, inhibition, and metabolic role in taurine formation

    SciTech Connect

    Weinstein, C.L.

    1988-01-01

    Cysteinesulfinate decarboxylase, an enzyme that plays a major role in the formation of taurine from cysteine, has been purified from rat liver to homogeneity and characterized. The physical properties of the enzyme were studied, along with its substrate specificity. Multiple forms of the enzyme were found in rat liver, kidney, and brain with isoelectric points ranging from pH 5.6 to 4.9. These multiple forms did not differ in their substrate specificity. It was found by using gel electrofocusing and polyclonal antibodies raised to the liver enzyme that the different forms of cysteinesulfinate decarboxylase are identical in the various rat tissues studied. Various inhibitors of the enzyme were tested both in vitro and in vivo in order to evaluate the role of cysteinesulfinate decarboxylase in taurine formation in mammalian tissues. In in vitro studies, cysteinesulfinate decarboxylase was irreversibly inhibited by {beta}-ethylidene-DL-aspartate (Ki = 10 mM), and competitive inhibition was found using mercaptomethylsuccinate (Ki = 0.1 mM) and D-cysteinesulfinate (Ki = 0.32 mM) when L-cysteinesulfinate was used as a substrate. In order to be able to test these inhibitors in vivo, L-(1-{sup 14}C)cysteinesulfonate was evaluated as a probe for the in vivo measurement of cysteinesulfinate decarboxylase activity. The metabolism of cysteinesulfonate and the product of its transamination, {beta}-sulfopyruvate, was studied, and it was found that L-(1-{sup 14}C)cysteinesulfonate is an accurate and convenient probe for cysteinesulfinate decarboxylase activity. Using L-(1-{sup 14}C)cysteinesulfonate, it was found that D-cysteinesulfinate inhibits cysteinesulfinate decarboxylase activity by greater than 90% in the intact mouse and that inhibition lasts for up to fifteen hours.

  3. Characterization of a second lysine decarboxylase isolated from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Kikuchi, Y; Kojima, H; Tanaka, T; Takatsuka, Y; Kamio, Y

    1997-01-01

    We report here on the existence of a new gene for lysine decarboxylase in Escherichia coli K-12. The hybridization experiments with a cadA probe at low stringency showed that the homologous region of cadA was located in lambda Kohara phage clone 6F5 at 4.7 min on the E. coli chromosome. We cloned the 5.0-kb HindIII fragment of this phage clone and sequenced the homologous region of cadA. This region contained a 2,139-nucleotide open reading frame encoding a 713-amino-acid protein with a calculated molecular weight of 80,589. Overexpression of the protein and determination of its N-terminal amino acid sequence defined the translational start site of this gene. The deduced amino acid sequence showed 69.4% identity to that of lysine decarboxylase encoded by cadA at 93.7 min on the E. coli chromosome. In addition, the level of lysine decarboxylase activity increased in strains carrying multiple copies of the gene. Therefore, the gene encoding this lysine decarboxylase was designated Idc. Analysis of the lysine decarboxylase activity of strains containing cadA, ldc, or cadA ldc mutations indicated that ldc was weakly expressed under various conditions but is a functional gene in E. coli. PMID:9226257

  4. Ornithine Decarboxylase, Polyamines, and Pyrrolizidine Alkaloids in Senecio and Crotalaria

    PubMed Central

    Birecka, Helena; Birecki, Mieczyslaw; Cohen, Eric J.; Bitonti, Alan J.; McCann, Peter P.

    1988-01-01

    When tested for ornithine and arginine decarboxylases, pyrrolizidine alkaloid-bearing Senecio riddellii, S. longilobus (Compositae), and Crotalaria retusa (Leguminosae) plants exhibited only ornithine decarboxylase activity. This contrasts with previous studies of four species of pyrrolizidine alkaloid-bearing Heliotropium (Boraginaceae) in which arginine decarboxylase activity was very high relative to that of ornithine decarboxylase. Unlike Heliotropium angiospermum and Heliotropium indicum, in which endogenous arginine was the only detectable precursor of putrescine channeled into pyrrolizidines, in the species studied here—using difluoromethylornithine and difluoromethylarginine as the enzyme inhibitors—endogenous ornithine was the main if not the only precursor of putrescine converted into the alkaloid aminoalcohol moiety. In S. riddellii and C. retusa at flowering, ornithine decarboxylase activity was present mainly in leaves, especially the young ones. However, other very young organs such as inflorescence and growing roots exhibited much lower or very low activities; the enzyme activity in stems was negligible. There was no correlation between the enzyme activity and polyamine or alkaloid content in either species. In both species only free polyamines were detected except for C. retusa roots and inflorescence—with relatively very high levels of these compounds—in which conjugated putrescine, spermidine, and spermine were also found; agmatine was not identified by HPLC in any plant organ except for C. retusa roots with rhizobial nodules. Organ- or age-dependent differences in the polyamine levels were small or insignificant. The highest alkaloid contents were found in young leaves and inflorescence. PMID:16665870

  5. Effects of aliphatic diamines on rat liver ornithine decarboxylase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Pegg, A E; Conover, C; Wrona, A

    1978-01-01

    Rat liver ornithine decarboxylase activity was decreased by administration of putrescine (1,4-diaminobutane) or other diamines, including 1,3-diaminopropane, 1,5-diaminopentane and 1,6-diaminohexane. This effect was seen in control rats and in rats in which hepatic ornithine decarboxylase activity had been increased by administration of growth hormone (somatotropin) or thioacetamide. Loss of activity was not dependent on the conversion of putrescine into polyamines and was short-lived. Within 6h after intraperitoneal administration of 0.8 mmol/kg body wt., ornithine decarboxylase activity had returned to normal values. This return correlated with the rapid loss of the diamines from the liver, and the decrease in activity could be slightly prolonged by treatment with aminoguanidine, a diamine oxidase inhibitor. A decrease in ornithine decarboxylase activity by these diamines was accompanied by the accumulation in the liver of a nondiffusible inhibitor that decreased the activity of a purified ornithine decarboxylase preparation. The possibility that administration of non-physiological diamines that are not converted into polyamines might be useful for the inhibition of polyamine synthesis is discussed. PMID:646807

  6. Pyruvate decarboxylases from the petite-negative yeast Saccharomyces kluyveri.

    PubMed

    Møller, K; Langkjaer, R B; Nielsen, J; Piskur, J; Olsson, L

    2004-01-01

    Saccharomyces kluyveri is a petite-negative yeast, which is less prone to form ethanol under aerobic conditions than is S. cerevisiae. The first reaction on the route from pyruvate to ethanol is catalysed by pyruvate decarboxylase, and the differences observed between S. kluyveri and S. cerevisiae with respect to ethanol formation under aerobic conditions could be caused by differences in the regulation of this enzyme activity. We have identified and cloned three genes encoding functional pyruvate decarboxylase enzymes (PDCgenes) from the type strain of S. kluyveri (Sk- PDC11, Sk- PDC12 and Sk- PDC13). The regulation of pyruvate decarboxylase in S. kluyveri was studied by measuring the total level of Sk- PDC mRNA and the overall enzyme activity under various growth conditions. It was found that the level of Sk- PDC mRNA was enhanced by glucose and oxygen limitation, and that the level of enzyme activity was controlled by variations in the amount of mRNA. The mRNA level and the pyruvate decarboxylase activity responded to anaerobiosis and growth on different carbon sources in essentially the same fashion as in S. cerevisiae. This indicates that the difference in ethanol formation between these two yeasts is not due to differences in the regulation of pyruvate decarboxylase(s), but rather to differences in the regulation of the TCA cycle and the respiratory machinery. However, the PDC genes of Saccharomyces/ Kluyveromyces yeasts differ in their genetic organization and phylogenetic origin. While S. cerevisiae and S. kluyveri each have three PDC genes, these have apparently arisen by independent duplications and specializations in each of the two yeast lineages.

  7. Comparison between activation of ornithine decarboxylase and histidine decarboxylase in rat stomach.

    PubMed

    Ding, X Q; Chen, D; Rosengren, E; Persson, L; Hakanson, R

    1996-03-01

    We compared the responses of rat stomach ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) and histidine decarboxylase (HDC) to food intake, oral treatment with antisecretagogues, NaHCO3, and hypertonic NaCl, antrectomy, intravenous infusion of gastrin-17, the selective cholecystokinin (CCK)-B/gastrin receptor antagonist L-365,260, and the somatostatin analogue RC-160. The serum gastrin concentration and oxyntic mucosal ODC and HDC activities were higher in freely fed rats than in fasted rats. Food intake in fasted rats raised the serum gastrin concentration and the ODC and HDC activities. Ranitidine, omeprazole, and NaHCO3 raised the serum gastrin concentration and activated ODC and HDC. Hypertonic NaCl raised the ODC activity 200-fold, whereas circulating gastrin and HDC activity were increased only moderately. Infusion of gastrin-17 activated HDC but not ODC. L-365,260 prevented the activation of HDC but not of ODC in response to food intake and treatment with omeprazole, NaHCO3, or hypertonic NaCl. Antrectomy prevented the food- and omeprazole-evoked rise in oxyntic mucosal HDC activity but not the rise in ODC activity. RC-160 suppressed HDC activity after food intake and treatment with omeprazole, NaHCO3, or NaCl. In contrast, RC-160 suppressed omeprazole- and NaHCO3-evoked ODC activation but not that evoked by food intake or NaCl. The results support the view that HDC in the oxyntic mucosa is activated by gastrin and suppressed by somatostatin. The induction of ODC is not mediated by gastrin; ODC activation appears to be related to acid inhibition per se or to mucosal maintenance and repair; somatostatin, or rather the lack of it, might contribute to the induction of ODC after acid blockade. The mechanism behind the activation of rat stomach ODC seems to differ depending on the type of stimulus.

  8. Nucleotide sequence of the pyruvate decarboxylase gene from Zymomonas mobilis.

    PubMed

    Neale, A D; Scopes, R K; Wettenhall, R E; Hoogenraad, N J

    1987-02-25

    Pyruvate decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.1), the penultimate enzyme in the alcoholic fermentation pathway of Zymomonas mobilis, converts pyruvate to acetaldehyde and carbon dioxide. The complete nucleotide sequence of the structural gene encoding pyruvate decarboxylase from Zymomonas mobilis has been determined. The coding region is 1704 nucleotides long and encodes a polypeptide of 567 amino acids with a calculated subunit mass of 60,790 daltons. The amino acid sequence was confirmed by comparison with the amino acid sequence of a selection of tryptic fragments of the enzyme. The amino acid composition obtained from the nucleotide sequence is in good agreement with that obtained experimentally.

  9. Catecholamine toxicity in aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Anselm, Irina A; Darras, Basil T

    2006-08-01

    This report presents the case of an adult male with aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase deficiency who developed serious cardiac rhythm disturbances during treatment with intravenous dopamine and norepinephrine for severe hypotension. Three weeks later, he spontaneously developed atrial fibrillation while not receiving exogenous catecholamines. He died suddenly after several months. We presume cardiac arrhythmia was the most likely cause of his death. Patients with aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase deficiency may be prone to cardiac arrhythmias at rest and also may be exceptionally sensitive to exogenous catecholamines. Therefore, close cardiac monitoring is indicated at baseline and during treatment with pressors.

  10. Arginine decarboxylase as the source of putrescine for tobacco alkaloids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiburcio, A. F.; Galston, A. W.

    1986-01-01

    The putrescine which forms a part of nicotine and other pyrrolidine alkaloids is generally assumed to arise through the action of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC). However, we have previously noted that changes in the activity of arginine decarboxylase (ADC), an alternate source of putrescine, parallel changes in tissue alkaloids, while changes in ODC activity do not. This led us to undertake experiments to permit discrimination between ADC and ODC as enzymatic sources of putrescine destined for alkaloids. Two kinds of evidence presented here support a major role for ADC in the generation of putrescine going into alkaloids: (a) A specific 'suicide inhibitor' of ADC effectively inhibits the biosynthesis of nicotine and nornicotine in tobacco callus, while the analogous inhibitor of ODC is less effective, and (b) the flow of 14C from uniformly labelled arginine into nicotine is much more efficient than that from ornithine.

  11. Lotus hairy roots expressing inducible arginine decarboxylase activity.

    PubMed

    Chiesa, María A; Ruiz, Oscar A; Sánchez, Diego H

    2004-05-01

    Biotechnological uses of plant cell-tissue culture usually rely on constitutive transgene expression. However, such expression of transgenes may not always be desirable. In those cases, the use of an inducible promoter could be an alternative approach. To test this hypothesis, we developed two binary vectors harboring a stress-inducible promoter from Arabidopsis thaliana, driving the beta-glucuronidase reporter gene and the oat arginine decarboxylase. Transgenic hairy roots of Lotus corniculatus were obtained with osmotic- and cold-inducible beta-glucuronidase and arginine decarboxylase activities. The increase in the activity of the latter was accompanied by a significant rise in total free polyamines level. Through an organogenesis process, we obtained L. corniculatus transgenic plants avoiding deleterious phenotypes frequently associated with the constitutive over-expression of arginine decarboxylation and putrescine accumulation.

  12. Arginine decarboxylase as the source of putrescine for tobacco alkaloids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiburcio, A. F.; Galston, A. W.

    1986-01-01

    The putrescine which forms a part of nicotine and other pyrrolidine alkaloids is generally assumed to arise through the action of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC). However, we have previously noted that changes in the activity of arginine decarboxylase (ADC), an alternate source of putrescine, parallel changes in tissue alkaloids, while changes in ODC activity do not. This led us to undertake experiments to permit discrimination between ADC and ODC as enzymatic sources of putrescine destined for alkaloids. Two kinds of evidence presented here support a major role for ADC in the generation of putrescine going into alkaloids: (a) A specific 'suicide inhibitor' of ADC effectively inhibits the biosynthesis of nicotine and nornicotine in tobacco callus, while the analogous inhibitor of ODC is less effective, and (b) the flow of 14C from uniformly labelled arginine into nicotine is much more efficient than that from ornithine.

  13. Effect of L-glutamate on 2-oxoglutarate decarboxylase in Euglena gracilis.

    PubMed Central

    Shigeoka, S; Hanaoka, T; Kishi, N; Nakano, Y

    1992-01-01

    The effect of tricarboxylic acid-cycle intermediates and related compounds on 2-oxoglutarate decarboxylase activity was investigated. The addition of L-glutamate to Euglena cells grown on glucose/(NH4)2SO4 medium resulted in an increase in 2-oxoglutarate decarboxylase activity, which was abolished by the simultaneous addition of cycloheximide. Immunochemical titration, immunoblot analysis and labelling in vivo with antibody raised against 2-oxoglutarate decarboxylase showed that the increase in 2-oxoglutarate decarboxylase activity was due to synthesis of new protein and not to activation of pre-existing protein. The experimental results reported here demonstrate that L-glutamate is assimilated by the pathway, via 2-oxoglutarate, that consists of L-glutamate-oxaloacetate aminotransferase, 2-oxoglutarate decarboxylase and succinate semialdehyde dehydrogenase, rather than by the gamma-aminobutyrate shunt, consisting of L-glutamate decarboxylase and gamma-aminobutyrate aminotransferase. Images Fig. 4. PMID:1347680

  14. Ornithine decarboxylase activity and: [125I]iododeoxyuridine incorporation in rat prostate.

    PubMed Central

    Fuller, D J; Donaldson, L J; Thomas, G H

    1975-01-01

    The relationship between ornithine decarboxylase activity and [125I]iododexyuridine incorporation was studied in prostates from castrated rats (aged 5, 26 and 80 weeks) injected daily with testosterone for up to 10 days. The results suggest that ornithine decarboxylase activity is a parameter of secretory activity, rather than growth, in the ventral prostate. In the dorsolateral prostate, ornithine decarboxylase activity tends to parallel [125I]iododeoxyuridine incorporation. PMID:1212206

  15. Resolution of brewers' yeast pyruvate decarboxylase into two isozymes.

    PubMed

    Kuo, D J; Dikdan, G; Jordan, F

    1986-03-05

    A novel purification method was developed for brewers' yeast pyruvate decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.1) that for the first time resolved the enzyme into two isozymes on DEAE-Sephadex chromatography. The isozymes were found to be distinct according to sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis: the first one to be eluted gave rise to one band, the second to two bands. The isozymes were virtually the same so far as specific activity, KM, inhibition kinetics and irreversible binding properties by the mechanism-based inhibitor (E)-4-(4-chlorophenyl)-2-oxo-3-butenoic acid are concerned. This finding resolves a longstanding controversy concerning the quaternary structure of this enzyme.

  16. Cell biology, physiology and enzymology of phosphatidylserine decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Di Bartolomeo, Francesca; Wagner, Ariane; Daum, Günther

    2017-01-01

    Phosphatidylethanolamine is one of the most abundant phospholipids whose major amounts are formed by phosphatidylserine decarboxylases (PSD). Here we provide a comprehensive description of different types of PSDs in the different kingdoms of life. In eukaryotes, type I PSDs are mitochondrial enzymes, whereas other PSDs are localized to other cellular compartments. We describe the role of mitochondrial Psd1 proteins, their function, enzymology, biogenesis, assembly into mitochondria and their contribution to phospholipid homeostasis in much detail. We also discuss briefly the cellular physiology and the enzymology of Psd2. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Lipids of Mitochondria edited by Guenther Daum.

  17. Acyloin formation by benzoylformate decarboxylase from Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed Central

    Wilcocks, R; Ward, O P; Collins, S; Dewdney, N J; Hong, Y; Prosen, E

    1992-01-01

    Whole cells and cell extracts of Pseudomonas putida grown in a medium containing ammonium mandelate have the capacity to produce the acyloin compound 2-hydroxypropiophenone when incubated with benzoylformate and acetaldehyde. Benzaldehyde and benzyl alcohol were formed as reaction by-products. The enantiomeric excess of the 2-hydroxypropiophenone product was found to be 91 to 92%. The absolute configuration of the enzymatically prepared product at the carbinol carbon was found to be S. The thiamine PPi-linked enzyme benzoylformate decarboxylase, purified to give a single protein band on polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, was shown to be responsible for the catalysis of this novel condensation reaction. Images PMID:1622241

  18. Molecular and functional analyses of amino acid decarboxylases involved in cuticle tanning in Tribolium castaneum

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Aspartate 1-decarboxylase (ADC) and dopa decarboxylase (DDC) provide b–alanine and dopamine used in insect cuticle tanning. Beta-alanine is conjugated with dopamine to yield N-b-alanyldopamine (NBAD), a substrate for the phenoloxidase laccase that catalyzes the synthesis of cuticle protein cross-li...

  19. Vector-mediated chromosomal integration of the glutamate decarboxylase gene in streptococcus thermophilus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The integrative vector pINTRS was used to transfer glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) activity to Streptococcus thermophilus ST128, thus allowing for the production of '-aminobutyric acid (GABA). In pINTRS, the gene encoding glutamate decarboxylase, gadB, was flanked by DNA fragments homologous to a S. ...

  20. Crystal structure of pyruvate decarboxylase from Zymobacter palmae

    PubMed Central

    Buddrus, Lisa; Andrews, Emma S. V.; Leak, David J.; Danson, Michael J.; Arcus, Vickery L.; Crennell, Susan J.

    2016-01-01

    Pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC; EC 4.1.1.1) is a thiamine pyrophosphate- and Mg2+ ion-dependent enzyme that catalyses the non-oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate to acetaldehyde and carbon dioxide. It is rare in bacteria, but is a key enzyme in homofermentative metabolism, where ethanol is the major product. Here, the previously unreported crystal structure of the bacterial pyruvate decarboxylase from Zymobacter palmae is presented. The crystals were shown to diffract to 2.15 Å resolution. They belonged to space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 204.56, b = 177.39, c = 244.55 Å and R r.i.m. = 0.175 (0.714 in the highest resolution bin). The structure was solved by molecular replacement using PDB entry 2vbi as a model and the final R values were R work = 0.186 (0.271 in the highest resolution bin) and R free = 0.220 (0.300 in the highest resolution bin). Each of the six tetramers is a dimer of dimers, with each monomer sharing its thiamine pyrophosphate across the dimer interface, and some contain ethylene glycol mimicking the substrate pyruvate in the active site. Comparison with other bacterial PDCs shows a correlation of higher thermostability with greater tetramer interface area and number of interactions. PMID:27599861

  1. Functionally diverse biotin-dependent enzymes with oxaloacetate decarboxylase activity.

    PubMed

    Lietzan, Adam D; St Maurice, Martin

    2014-02-15

    Biotin-dependent enzymes catalyze carboxylation, decarboxylation and transcarboxylation reactions that participate in the primary metabolism of a wide range of organisms. In all cases, the overall reaction proceeds via two half reactions that take place in physically distinct active sites. In the first half-reaction, a carboxyl group is transferred to the 1-N' of a covalently tethered biotin cofactor. The tethered carboxybiotin intermediate subsequently translocates to a second active site where the carboxyl group is either transferred to an acceptor substrate or, in some bacteria and archaea, is decarboxylated to biotin and CO2 in order to power the export of sodium ions from the cytoplasm. A homologous carboxyltransferase domain is found in three enzymes that catalyze diverse overall reactions: carbon fixation by pyruvate carboxylase, decarboxylation and sodium transport by the biotin-dependent oxaloacetate decarboxylase complex, and transcarboxylation by transcarboxylase from Propionibacterium shermanii. Over the past several years, structural data have emerged which have greatly advanced the mechanistic description of these enzymes. This review assembles a uniform description of the carboxyltransferase domain structure and catalytic mechanism from recent studies of pyruvate carboxylase, oxaloacetate decarboxylase and transcarboxylase, three enzymes that utilize an analogous carboxyltransferase domain to catalyze the biotin-dependent decarboxylation of oxaloacetate.

  2. Crystal Structure of Uroporphyrinogen Decarboxylase from Bacillus subtilis▿

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jun; Liu, Qun; Hao, Quan; Teng, Maikun; Niu, Liwen

    2007-01-01

    Uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase (UROD) is a branch point enzyme in the biosynthesis of the tetrapyrroles. It catalyzes the decarboxylation of four acetate groups of uroporphyrinogen III to yield coproporphyrinogen III, leading to heme and chlorophyll biosynthesis. UROD is a special type of nonoxidative decarboxylase, since no cofactor is essential for catalysis. In this work, the first crystal structure of a bacterial UROD, Bacillus subtilis UROD (URODBs), has been determined at a 2.3 Å resolution. The biological unit of URODBs was determined by dynamic light scattering measurements to be a homodimer in solution. There are four molecules in the crystallographic asymmetric unit, corresponding to two homodimers. Structural comparison of URODBs with eukaryotic URODs reveals a variation of two loops, which possibly affect the binding of substrates and release of products. Structural comparison with the human UROD-coproporphyrinogen III complex discloses a similar active cleft, with five invariant polar residues (Arg29, Arg33, Asp78, Tyr154, and His322) and three invariant hydrophobic residues (Ile79, Phe144, and Phe207), in URODBs. Among them, Asp78 may interact with the pyrrole NH groups of the substrate, and Arg29 is a candidate for positioning the acetate groups of the substrate. Both residues may also play catalytic roles. PMID:17122346

  3. Tyrosine decarboxylase from Lactobacillus brevis: soluble expression and characterization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kai; Ni, Ye

    2014-02-01

    Tyrosine decarboxylase (TDC, EC 4.1.1.25) is an enzyme that catalyzes the decarboxylation of l-tyrosine to produce tyramine and CO2. In this study, a 1881-bp tdc gene from Lactobacillus brevis was cloned and heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). Glucose was discovered to play an important role in the soluble expression of rLbTDC. After optimization, recombinant TDC (rLbTDC) was achieved in excellent solubility and a yield of 224mg rLbTDC/L broth. The C-terminal His-Tagged rLbTDC was one-step purified with 90% recovery. Based on SDS-PAGE and gel filtration analysis, rLbTDC is a dimer composed of two identical subunits of approximately 70kDa. Using l-tyrosine as substrate, the specific activity of rLbTDC was determined to be 133.5U/mg in the presence of 0.2mM pyridoxal-5'-phosphate at 40°C and pH 5.0. The Km and Vmax values of rLbTDC were 0.59mM and 147.1μmolmin(-1)mg(-1), respectively. In addition to l-tyrosine, rLbTDC also exhibited decarboxylase activity towards l-DOPA. This study has demonstrated, for the first time, the soluble expression of tdc gene from L. brevis in heterologous host.

  4. Uncovering the Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1 Gallate Decarboxylase Involved in Tannin Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez, Natalia; Curiel, José Antonio; Reverón, Inés; de las Rivas, Blanca

    2013-01-01

    Lactobacillus plantarum is a lactic acid bacterium able to degrade tannins by the subsequent action of tannase and gallate decarboxylase enzymes. The gene encoding tannase had previously been identified, whereas the gene encoding gallate decarboxylase is unknown. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) of gallic-acid induced L. plantarum extracts showed a 54-kDa protein which was absent in the uninduced cells. This protein was identified as Lp_2945, putatively annotated UbiD. Homology searches identified ubiD-like genes located within three-gene operons which encoded the three subunits of nonoxidative aromatic acid decarboxylases. L. plantarum is the only bacterium in which the lpdC (lp_2945) gene and the lpdB and lpdD (lp_0271 and lp_0272) genes are separated in the chromosome. Combination of extracts from recombinant Escherichia coli cells expressing the lpdB, lpdC, and lpdC genes demonstrated that LpdC is the only protein required to yield gallate decarboxylase activity. However, the disruption of these genes in L. plantarum revealed that the lpdB and lpdC gene products are essential for gallate decarboxylase activity. Similar to L. plantarum tannase, which exhibited activity only in esters derived from gallic and protocatechuic acids, purified His6-LpdC protein from E. coli showed decarboxylase activity against gallic and protocatechuic acids. In contrast to the tannase activity, gallate decarboxylase activity is widely present among lactic acid bacteria. This study constitutes the first genetic characterization of a gallate decarboxylase enzyme and provides new insights into the role of the different subunits of bacterial nonoxidative aromatic acid decarboxylases. PMID:23645198

  5. An endosymbiont positively modulates ornithine decarboxylase in host trypanosomatids

    SciTech Connect

    Frossard, Mariana Lins; Seabra, Sergio Henrique; Matta, Renato Augusto da; Souza, Wanderley de; Garcia de Mello, Fernando; Motta, Maria Cristina Machado . E-mail: motta@biof.ufrj.br

    2006-05-05

    Summary: Some trypanosomatids, such as Crithidia deanei, are endosymbiont-containing species. Aposymbiotic strains are obtained after antibiotic treatment, revealing interesting aspects of this symbiotic association. Ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) promotes polyamine biosynthesis and contributes to cell proliferation. Here, we show that ODC activity is higher in endosymbiont-bearing trypanosomatids than in aposymbiotic cells, but isolated endosymbionts did not display this enzyme activity. Intriguingly, expressed levels of ODC were similar in both strains, suggesting that ODC is positively modulated in endosymbiont-bearing cells. When the aposymbiotic strain was grown in conditioned medium, obtained after cultivation of the endosymbiont-bearing strain, cellular proliferation as well as ODC activity and localization were similar to that observed in the endosymbiont-containing trypanosomatids. Furthermore, dialyzed-heated medium and trypsin treatment reduced ODC activity of the aposymbiont strain. Taken together, these data indicate that the endosymbiont can enhance the protozoan ODC activity by providing factors of protein nature, which increase the host polyamine metabolism.

  6. Altered subcellular localization of ornithine decarboxylase in Alzheimer's disease brain

    SciTech Connect

    Nilsson, Tatjana . E-mail: Tatjana.Nilsson@ki.se; Bogdanovic, Nenad; Volkman, Inga; Winblad, Bengt; Folkesson, Ronnie; Benedikz, Eirikur

    2006-06-02

    The amyloid precursor protein can through ligand-mimicking induce expression of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), the initial and rate-limiting enzyme in polyamine biosynthesis. We report here the regional distribution and cellular localization of ODC immunoreactivity in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brains. In frontal cortex and hippocampus of control cases, the most pronounced ODC immunoreactivity was found in the nucleus. In possible and definite AD the immunoreactivity had shifted to the cytoplasm. In cerebellum of control cases, ODC staining was found in a small portion of Purkinje cells, mostly in the nucleus. In AD, both possible and definite, the number of stained Purkinje cells increased significantly and immunoreactivity was shifted to the cytoplasm, even though it was still prominent in the nucleus. In conclusion, our study reveals an early shift of the ODC immunoreactivity in AD from the nuclear compartment towards the cytoplasm.

  7. Kinetic challenges facing oxalate, malonate, acetoacetate, and oxaloacetate decarboxylases.

    PubMed

    Wolfenden, Richard; Lewis, Charles A; Yuan, Yang

    2011-04-20

    To compare the powers of the corresponding enzymes as catalysts, the rates of uncatalyzed decarboxylation of several aliphatic acids (oxalate, malonate, acetoacetate, and oxaloacetate) were determined at elevated temperatures and extrapolated to 25 °C. In the extreme case of oxalate, the rate of the uncatalyzed reaction at pH 4.2 was 1.1 × 10(-12) s(-1), implying a 2.5 × 10(13)-fold rate enhancement by oxalate decarboxylase. Whereas the enzymatic decarboxylation of oxalate requires O(2) and Mn(II), the uncatalyzed reaction is unaffected by the presence of these cofactors and appears to proceed by heterolytic elimination of CO(2).

  8. Levodopa combined with peripheral decarboxylase inhibition in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Barbeau, André; Mars, Harold; Botez, Mihai I.; Joubert, Marie

    1972-01-01

    The authors report their experience, over a 26-month period, in the management of 60 parkinsonian patients with the combination of levodopa and an inhibitor of peripheral dopa-decarboxylase, Ro 4-4602. This approach to Parkinson's disease is useful, safe, and at least as effective as levodopa alone. To date there have been no recognizable toxic effects attributable to Ro 4-4602. This agent appears to prolong the duration of action of levodopa, smoothing out its therapeutic effects. The percentage of patients obtaining a very good and excellent response is slightly increased. There is a possible diminution in the late-occurring bradykinetic and hypotonic freezing episodes. Nausea and cardiac arrhythmias are lessened, as are the incidence and severity of hypotension. Abnormal involuntary movements remain the limiting adverse side effect. PMID:5034697

  9. Glutamic acid decarboxylase autoimmunity in Batten disease and other disorders.

    PubMed

    Pearce, David A; Atkinson, Mark; Tagle, Danilo A

    2004-12-14

    Degenerative diseases of the CNS, such as stiff-person syndrome (SPS), progressive cerebellar ataxia, and Rasmussen encephalitis, have been characterized by the presence of autoantibodies. Recent findings in individuals with Batten disease and in animal models for the disorder indicate that this condition may be associated with autoantibodies against glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), an enzyme that converts the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate to the inhibitory neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Anti-GAD autoantibodies could result in excess excitatory neurotransmitters, leading to the seizures and other symptoms observed in patients with Batten disease. The pathogenic potential of GAD autoantibodies is examined in light of what is known for other autoimmune disorders, such as multiple sclerosis, SPS, Rasmussen encephalitis, and type 1 diabetes, and may have radical implications for diagnosis and management of Batten disease.

  10. [Inhibitory effect of essential oils, food additives, peracetic acid and detergents on bacterial histidine decarboxylase].

    PubMed

    Kamii, Eri; Terada, Gaku; Akiyama, Jyunki; Isshiki, Kenji

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine whether various essential oils, food additives, peracetic acid and detergents inhibit bacterial histidine decarboxylase. Crude extract of Morganella morganii NBRC3848 was prepared and incubated with various agents. Histidine decarboxylase activity was significantly inhibited (p<0.05) by 26 of 45 compounds tested. Among the 26 agents, sodium hypochlorite completely decomposed both histidine and histamine, while peracetic acid caused slight decomposition. Histidine and histamine were stable in the presence of the other 24 agents. These results indicated that 25 of the agents examined were inhibitors of histidine decarboxylase.

  11. Mouse ornithine decarboxylase gene: cloning, structure, and expression.

    PubMed Central

    Brabant, M; McConlogue, L; van Daalen Wetters, T; Coffino, P

    1988-01-01

    We used molecular cloning to isolate a functional gene for mouse ornithine decarboxylase (OrnDCase; L-ornithine carboxy-lyase, EC 4.1.1.17) from a cell line in which that gene had been selectively amplified. The position of the 5' terminus of the mRNA was identified, and the coding sequence was shown to be preceded by a 312- or 313-nucleotide (nt) untranslated leader. The latter is highly G + C rich, particularly in its 5'-most portion. The leader can be anticipated to have extensive and stable secondary structure. The transcription unit of the gene is of relatively small size, approximately equal to 6.2 kilobases (kb) from the start site to the proximal site of polyadenylylation. Sequence analysis of DNA near the transcription start position demonstrated the presence of a "TATA" box, but no "CAAT" box. Functional properties of the cloned gene were tested by transfecting it into cultured cells. Expression of the putative full-length gene efficiently conferred ornithine decarboxylase activity on recipient mutant cells deficient in that activity. To assess the function and strength of the OrnDCase promoter region and to delimit its boundaries, we used a transient expression assay. Upstream of a bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene was placed a portion of the OrnDCase gene, including the presumed promoter region, spanning a region from approximately equal to 3.0 kb 5' of the site of transcription initiation to the first 250 nt of the transcript. When expressed in mouse NIH 3T3 cells, this OrnDCase genomic element was comparable in strength to the Rous sarcoma virus long terminal repeat promoter. A similar construct, truncated so as to retain only 264 base pairs of the OrnDCase gene 5' to the site of transcription start, yielded undiminished levels of expression. Images PMID:3353375

  12. Histidine decarboxylase, DOPA decarboxylase, and vesicular monoamine transporter 2 expression in neuroendocrine tumors: immunohistochemical study and gene expression analysis.

    PubMed

    Uccella, Silvia; Cerutti, Roberta; Vigetti, Davide; Furlan, Daniela; Oldrini, Rita; Carnevali, Ileana; Pelosi, Giuseppe; La Rosa, Stefano; Passi, Alberto; Capella, Carlo

    2006-08-01

    Histidine decarboxylase (HDC) and vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (v-MAT2) are involved in the biosynthesis and storage of histamine. DOPA decarboxylase (DDC) is involved in the biosynthesis of a variety of amines and shares a high degree of homology with HDC. HDC and v-MAT2 immunoreactivities (IR) have recently been detected in well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumors (WDNETs) and poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas (PDNECs) of various sites and have been proposed as general endocrine markers. We evaluated HDC and v-MAT2 IR in a series of 117 WDNETs and PDNECs from different sites. Western blotting analysis was performed to verify the specificity of anti-DDC and anti-HDC antibodies. Real-time RT-PCR was performed using specific probes for HDC and DDC on 42 cases, examined also for DDC IR. HDC and v-MAT2 IR were observed in the majority of WDNETs and PDNECs of all sites and HDC-IR cases were always also DDC-IR. In contrast, high levels of HDC mRNA were detected only in the gastroenteropancreatic WDNETs, which did not show increased DDC mRNA levels. On the other hand, bronchial carcinoids and lung PDNECs showed high DDC mRNA levels, but nearly undetectable HDC mRNA levels. Western blotting analysis showed a cross-reaction between anti-HDC and anti-DDC antibodies. HDC should not be considered as a general endocrine marker and HDC IR in bronchial carcinoids and PDNECs of the lung can probably be attributed to a cross-reaction with DDC.

  13. Structural Basis of the Substrate Specificity and Enzyme Catalysis of a Papaver somniferum Tyrosine Decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Guan, Huai; Song, Shuaibao; Robinson, Howard; Liang, Jing; Ding, Haizhen; Li, Jianyong; Han, Qian

    2017-01-01

    Tyrosine decarboxylase (TyDC), a type II pyridoxal 5'-phosphate decarboxylase, catalyzes the decarboxylation of tyrosine. Due to a generally high sequence identity to other aromatic amino acid decarboxylases (AAADs), primary sequence information is not enough to understand substrate specificities with structural information. In this study, we selected a typical TyDC from Papaver somniferum as a model to study the structural basis of AAAD substrate specificities. Analysis of the native P. somniferum TyDC crystal structure and subsequent molecular docking and dynamics simulation provide some structural bases that explain substrate specificity for tyrosine. The result confirmed the previous proposed mechanism for the enzyme selectivity of indolic and phenolic substrates. Additionally, this study yields the first crystal structure for a plant type II pyridoxal-5'-phosphate decarboxylase.

  14. Structural Basis of the Substrate Specificity and Enzyme Catalysis of a Papaver somniferum Tyrosine Decarboxylase

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Huai; Song, Shuaibao; Robinson, Howard; Liang, Jing; Ding, Haizhen; Li, Jianyong; Han, Qian

    2017-01-01

    Tyrosine decarboxylase (TyDC), a type II pyridoxal 5′-phosphate decarboxylase, catalyzes the decarboxylation of tyrosine. Due to a generally high sequence identity to other aromatic amino acid decarboxylases (AAADs), primary sequence information is not enough to understand substrate specificities with structural information. In this study, we selected a typical TyDC from Papaver somniferum as a model to study the structural basis of AAAD substrate specificities. Analysis of the native P. somniferum TyDC crystal structure and subsequent molecular docking and dynamics simulation provide some structural bases that explain substrate specificity for tyrosine. The result confirmed the previous proposed mechanism for the enzyme selectivity of indolic and phenolic substrates. Additionally, this study yields the first crystal structure for a plant type II pyridoxal-5'-phosphate decarboxylase. PMID:28232911

  15. A Liquid-Based Colorimetric Assay of Lysine Decarboxylase and Its Application to Enzymatic Assay.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong Hyun; Sathiyanarayanan, Ganesan; Kim, Hyun Joong; Bhatia, Shashi Kant; Seo, Hyung-Min; Kim, Jung-Ho; Song, Hun-Seok; Kim, Yun-Gon; Park, Kyungmoon; Yang, Yung-Hun

    2015-12-28

    A liquid-based colorimetric assay using a pH indicator was introduced for high-throughput monitoring of lysine decarboxylase activity. The assay is based on the color change of bromocresol purple, measured at 595 nm in liquid reaction mixture, due to an increase of pH by the production of cadaverine. Bromocresol purple was selected as the indicator because it has higher sensitivity than bromothymol blue and pheonol red within a broad range and shows good linearity within the applied pH. We applied this for simple determination of lysine decarboxylase reusability using 96-well plates, and optimization of conditions for enzyme overexpression with different concentrations of IPTG on lysine decarboxylase. This assay is expected to be applied for monitoring and quantifying the liquid-based enzyme reaction in biotransformation of decarboxylase in a high-throughput way.

  16. Coenzyme A biosynthesis: steric course of 4'-phosphopantothenoyl-L-cysteine decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Aberhart, D J; Ghoshal, P K; Cotting, J A; Russell, D J

    1985-12-03

    4'-Phosphopantothenoyl-L-cysteine decarboxylase (PPC decarboxylase) was partially purified from rat liver. 4'-Phosphopantothenoyl[2-2H1]-L-cysteine was synthesized and converted by PPC decarboxylase to 4'-phosphol[1-2H1]pantetheine. The product was degraded by reduction with Raney nickel followed by acidic hydrolysis to [1-2H1]ethylamine. The latter was converted to the (-)-camphanamide derivative, NMR studies of which revealed that the deuterium was located in the pro-1S position. Also, unlabeled 4'-phosphopantothenoyl-L-cysteine was incubated with PPC decarboxylase in D2O, giving, after degradation, the (-)-camphanamide of (1R)-[1-2H1]ethylamine. The results show that the decarboxylation takes place with retention of configuration. These results are discussed in terms of possible mechanisms for the decarboxylation.

  17. Regulation of glutamic acid decarboxylase mRNA expression in rat brain after sertraline treatment.

    PubMed

    Giardino, L; Zanni, M; Bettelli, C; Savina, M A; Calzà, L

    1996-09-26

    We now investigated the effect of chronic treatment with sertraline on glutamic acid decarboxylase mRNA expression in different rat brain areas by means of in situ hybridization. We found a reduced glutamic acid decarboxylase mRNA expression in the prefrontal cortex, accumbens nucleus, olfactory tubercle and reticular nucleus of the thalamus. The involvement of presynaptic modulation of gamma-amino-butyric acid transmission in the anxiolytic effect of sertraline is discussed.

  18. Glutamic acid decarboxylase isoform distribution in transgenic mouse septum: an anti-GFP immunofluorescence study.

    PubMed

    Verimli, Ural; Sehirli, Umit S

    2016-09-01

    The septum is a basal forebrain region located between the lateral ventricles in rodents. It consists of lateral and medial divisions. Medial septal projections regulate hippocampal theta rhythm whereas lateral septal projections are involved in processes such as affective functions, memory formation, and behavioral responses. Gamma-aminobutyric acidergic neurons of the septal region possess the 65 and 67 isoforms of the enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase. Although data on the glutamic acid decarboxylase isoform distribution in the septal region generally appears to indicate glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 dominance, different studies have given inconsistent results in this regard. The aim of this study was therefore to obtain information on the distributions of both of these glutamic acid decarboxylase isoforms in the septal region in transgenic mice. Two animal groups of glutamic acid decarboxylase-green fluorescent protein knock-in transgenic mice were utilized in the experiment. Brain sections from the region were taken for anti-green fluorescent protein immunohistochemistry in order to obtain estimated quantitative data on the number of gamma-aminobutyric acidergic neurons. Following the immunohistochemical procedures, the mean numbers of labeled cells in the lateral and medial septal nuclei were obtained for the two isoform groups. Statistical analysis yielded significant results which indicated that the 65 isoform of glutamic acid decarboxylase predominates in both lateral and medial septal nuclei (unpaired two-tailed t-test p < 0.0001 for LS, p < 0.01 for MS). This study is the first to reveal the dominance of glutamic acid decarboxylase isoform 65 in the septal region in glutamic acid decarboxylase-green fluorescent protein transgenic mice.

  19. Post-transcriptional regulation of ornithine decarboxylase in Xenopus laevis oocytes.

    PubMed

    Bassez, T; Paris, J; Omilli, F; Dorel, C; Osborne, H B

    1990-11-01

    The level at which ornithine decarboxylase expression is regulated in growing oocytes has been investigated. Immunoprecipitation of the in vivo labelled proteins showed that ornithine decarboxylase accumulated less rapidly in stage IV oocytes than in previtellogenic stage I + II oocytes. Quantitative Northern analysis showed that ornithine decarboxylase mRNA is abundant in oocytes (about 8 x 10(8) transcripts/cell) and this number does not significantly change during oogenesis. Polysome analysis showed that this mRNA is present in polysomes in stage I + II oocytes but has passed into puromycin-insensitive mRNP particles by stage IV of oogenesis. Therefore, during the growth phase of oogenesis, ornithine decarboxylase expression is regulated at a translational level. These results are discussed relative to the temporal expression of ornithine decarboxylase and of other proteins whose expression also decreases during oogenesis. In order to perform these experiments, the cDNA (XLODC1) corresponding to Xenopus laevis ornithine decarboxylase mRNA was cloned and sequenced.

  20. Structure and Function of 4-Hydroxyphenylacetate Decarboxylase and Its Cognate Activating Enzyme.

    PubMed

    Selvaraj, Brinda; Buckel, Wolfgang; Golding, Bernard T; Ullmann, G Matthias; Martins, Berta M

    2016-01-01

    4-Hydroxyphenylacetate decarboxylase (4Hpad) is the prototype of a new class of Fe-S cluster-dependent glycyl radical enzymes (Fe-S GREs) acting on aromatic compounds. The two-enzyme component system comprises a decarboxylase responsible for substrate conversion and a dedicated activating enzyme (4Hpad-AE). The decarboxylase uses a glycyl/thiyl radical dyad to convert 4-hydroxyphenylacetate into p-cresol (4-methylphenol) by a biologically unprecedented Kolbe-type decarboxylation. In addition to the radical dyad prosthetic group, the decarboxylase unit contains two [4Fe-4S] clusters coordinated by an extra small subunit of unknown function. 4Hpad-AE reductively cleaves S-adenosylmethionine (SAM or AdoMet) at a site-differentiated [4Fe-4S]2+/+ cluster (RS cluster) generating a transient 5'-deoxyadenosyl radical that produces a stable glycyl radical in the decarboxylase by the abstraction of a hydrogen atom. 4Hpad-AE binds up to two auxiliary [4Fe-4S] clusters coordinated by a ferredoxin-like insert that is C-terminal to the RS cluster-binding motif. The ferredoxin-like domain with its two auxiliary clusters is not vital for SAM-dependent glycyl radical formation in the decarboxylase, but facilitates a longer lifetime for the radical. This review describes the 4Hpad and cognate AE families and focuses on the recent advances and open questions concerning the structure, function and mechanism of this novel Fe-S-dependent class of GREs.

  1. Glucose elevates ornithine decarboxylase expression in Vero cells.

    PubMed

    Lundgren, D W; Prokay, S L

    1988-12-01

    The addition of Earle's balanced salt solution (EBSS) of amino acids that are transported by a Na+-dependent cotransport system was not required by Vero cells for ornithine decarboxylase (ODC:EC 4.1.1.17) amplification. Vero cell ODC activity was elevated tenfold above basal levels when confluent cells were incubated for 5 hr in EBSS alone. ODC activity increased as a function of the incubation time in EBSS and was not elevated above basal enzyme levels when cells were incubated in EBSS minus glucose. ODC expression increased as a function of the glucose concentration in EBSS, with 20 mM glucose producing a 90-fold increase in ODC activity. ODC expression is more responsive to glucose in high-density quiescent cultures than in low-density growing cultures. Enhanced ODC expression by glucose depended on Na+ and K+ concentrations. The specific activity of ODC was also elevated above basal levels when mannose or fructose replaced glucose in EBSS. The addition of alanine or asparagine to EBSS enhanced ODC activity above levels obtained with EBSS containing standard (5.5 mM) glucose concentrations. In the absence of glucose, alanine was more effective than asparagine in enhancing ODC expression. These results suggest that the transport of amino acids is not an absolute requirement for Vero cell ODC expression and that ODC expression is linked to changes in cellular energetics and/or ion fluxes.

  2. Ornithine decarboxylase antizyme inhibitor 2 regulates intracellular vesicle trafficking

    SciTech Connect

    Kanerva, Kristiina; Maekitie, Laura T.; Baeck, Nils; Andersson, Leif C.

    2010-07-01

    Antizyme inhibitor 1 (AZIN1) and 2 (AZIN2) are proteins that activate ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), the key enzyme of polyamine biosynthesis. Both AZINs release ODC from its inactive complex with antizyme (AZ), leading to formation of the catalytically active ODC. The ubiquitously expressed AZIN1 is involved in cell proliferation and transformation whereas the role of the recently found AZIN2 in cellular functions is unknown. Here we report the intracellular localization of AZIN2 and present novel evidence indicating that it acts as a regulator of vesicle trafficking. We used immunostaining to demonstrate that both endogenous and FLAG-tagged AZIN2 localize to post-Golgi vesicles of the secretory pathway. Immuno-electron microscopy revealed that the vesicles associate mainly with the trans-Golgi network (TGN). RNAi-mediated knockdown of AZIN2 or depletion of cellular polyamines caused selective fragmentation of the TGN and retarded the exocytotic release of vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein. Exogenous addition of polyamines normalized the morphological changes and reversed the inhibition of protein secretion. Our findings demonstrate that AZIN2 regulates the transport of secretory vesicles by locally activating ODC and polyamine biosynthesis.

  3. Expression of arginine decarboxylase in brain regions and neuronal cells

    PubMed Central

    Iyo, Abiye H.; Zhu, Meng-Yang; Ordway, Gregory A.; Regunathan, Soundar

    2010-01-01

    After our initial report of a mammalian gene for arginine decarboxylase, an enzyme for the synthesis of agmatine from arginine, we have determined the regional expression of ADC in rat. We have analyzed the expression of ADC in rat brain regions by activity, protein and mRNA levels, and the regulation of expression in neuronal cells by RNA interference. In rat brain, ADC was widely expressed in major brain regions, with a substantial amount in hypothalamus, followed by cortex, and with least amounts in locus coeruleus and medulla. ADC mRNA was detected in primary astrocytes and C6 glioma cells. While no ADC message was detected in fresh neurons (3 days old), significant message appeared in differentiated neurons (3 weeks old). PC12 cells, treated with nerve growth factor, had higher ADC mRNA compared with naive cells. The siRNA mixture directed towards the N-terminal regions of ADC cDNA down-regulated the levels of mRNA and protein in cultured neurons/C6 glioma cells and these cells produced lower agmatine. Thus, this study demonstrates that ADC message is expressed in rat brain regions, that it is regulated in neuronal cells and that the down-regulation of ADC activity by specific siRNA leads to lower agmatine production. PMID:16445852

  4. Interaction of NAP-22 with brain glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD).

    PubMed

    Maekawa, Shohei; Kobayashi, Yuumi; Odagaki, Sin-Ichi; Makino, Midori; Kumanogoh, Haruko; Nakamura, Shun; Morita, Mitsuhiro; Hayashi, Fumio

    2013-03-14

    NAP-22 (also called BASP1 or CAP-23) is a neuron-enriched protein localized mainly in the synaptic vesicles and the synaptic plasma membrane. Biochemically, it is recovered in the lipid raft fraction. In order to understand the physiological function of the neuronal lipid raft, NAP-22 binding proteins were screened with a pull-down assay. Glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) was detected through LC-MS/MS, and Western blotting using a specific antibody confirmed the result. Two isoforms of GAD, GAD65 and GAD67, were expressed in bacteria as GST-fusion forms and the interaction with NAP-22 was confirmed in vitro. Partial co-localization of NAP-22 with GAD65 and GAD67 was also observed in cultured neurons. The binding showed no effect on the enzymatic activity of GAD65 and GAD67. These results hence suggest that NAP-22 could participate in the transport of GAD65 and GAD67 to the presynaptic termini and their retention on the synaptic vesicles as an anchoring protein.

  5. Reactivation of substrate-inactivated brain glutamate decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Meeley, M P; Martin, D L

    1983-03-01

    The effects of ATP and inorganic phosphate (Pi) on the reactivation of glutamate apodecarboxylase by its cofactor pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (pyridoxal-P) was studied. Apoenzyme was prepared by preincubation with glutamate. Apoenzyme prepared with glutamate alone was reactivated slowly and incompletely by adding a saturating concentration of pyridoxal-P (20 microM). Reactivation was slightly enhanced by 1-10 mM Pi. Reactivation by pyridoxal-P plus Pi was greatly enhanced by the presence of low concentrations (less than 100 microM) of ATP during the preparation of apoenzyme with glutamate. Reactivation was much lower if Pi was omitted. Enhancement of reactivation by ATP was due to its effect during apoenzyme formation, since ATP did not enhance reactivation if added only during reactivation and since the enhancing effect persisted after the removal of free ATP by chromatography on Sephadex G-25 after apoenzyme preparation and before reactivation. Reactivation was inhibited by high concentrations of ATP (greater than 100 microM), possibly by competition of ATP for the cofactor binding site. Four factors (glutamate, pyridoxal-P, ATP, and Pi) control a cycle of inactivation and reactivation that appears to be important in the regulation of brain glutamate decarboxylase.

  6. Anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody positive neurological syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Tohid, Hassaan

    2016-01-01

    A rare kind of antibody, known as anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) autoantibody, is found in some patients. The antibody works against the GAD enzyme, which is essential in the formation of gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA), an inhibitory neurotransmitter found in the brain. Patients found with this antibody present with motor and cognitive problems due to low levels or lack of GABA, because in the absence or low levels of GABA patients exhibit motor and cognitive symptoms. The anti-GAD antibody is found in some neurological syndromes, including stiff-person syndrome, paraneoplastic stiff-person syndrome, Miller Fisher syndrome (MFS), limbic encephalopathy, cerebellar ataxia, eye movement disorders, and epilepsy. Previously, excluding MFS, these conditions were called ‘hyperexcitability disorders’. However, collectively, these syndromes should be known as “anti-GAD positive neurological syndromes.” An important limitation of this study is that the literature is lacking on the subject, and why patients with the above mentioned neurological problems present with different symptoms has not been studied in detail. Therefore, it is recommended that more research is conducted on this subject to obtain a better and deeper understanding of these anti-GAD antibody induced neurological syndromes. PMID:27356651

  7. Chemical modification of oxalate decarboxylase to improve adsorption capacity.

    PubMed

    Lin, Rihui; He, Junbin; Wu, Jia; Cai, Xinghua; Long, Han; Chen, Shengfeng; Liu, Haiqian

    2017-05-01

    In order to enhance the adsorption capacity of oxalate decarboxylase (Oxdc) on calcium oxalate monohydrate crystals and improve the application performance of Oxdc, chemical modification of Oxdc with ethylenediaminetetraacetic dianhydride (EDTAD) was investigated in this work. The sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS) analysis results demonstrated that Oxdc and EDTAD have been covalently bound, and suggested that the chemical modification occurred at the free amino of the side chain and the α-amine of the N-terminus of Oxdc. Fluorescene and circular dichroic measurement showed that the structure and conformation of Oxdc were tinily altered after modification by EDTAD. The optimum pH of EDTAD-modified Oxdc was shifted to the alkaline side about 1.5 unit and it has a higher thermostability. The analysis of kinetic parameters indicated that the EDTAD-modified Oxdc showed a higher affinity towards the substrate. Through modification the adsorption capacity of Oxdc onto CaOx monohydrate crystals was increased by 42.42%. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Histidine Decarboxylase Deficiency Prevents Autoimmune Diabetes in NOD Mice

    PubMed Central

    Alkan, Manal; Machavoine, François; Rignault, Rachel; Dam, Julie; Dy, Michel; Thieblemont, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence has highlighted the role of histamine in inflammation. Since this monoamine has also been strongly implicated in the pathogenesis of type-1 diabetes, we assessed its effect in the nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse model. To this end, we used mice (inactivated) knocked out for the gene encoding histidine decarboxylase, the unique histamine-forming enzyme, backcrossed on a NOD genetic background. We found that the lack of endogenous histamine in NOD HDC−/− mice decreased the incidence of diabetes in relation to their wild-type counterpart. Whereas the proportion of regulatory T and myeloid-derived suppressive cells was similar in both strains, histamine deficiency was associated with increased levels of immature macrophages, as compared with wild-type NOD mice. Concerning the cytokine pattern, we found a decrease in circulating IL-12 and IFN-γ in HDC−/− mice, while IL-6 or leptin remained unchanged, suggesting that histamine primarily modulates the inflammatory environment. Paradoxically, exogenous histamine given to NOD HDC−/− mice provided also protection against T1D. Our study supports the notion that histamine is involved in the pathogenesis of diabetes, thus providing additional evidence for its role in the regulation of the immune response. PMID:26090474

  9. Nitrogen isotope effects on glutamate decarboxylase from Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Abell, L.M.; O'Leary, M.H.

    1988-05-03

    The nitrogen isotope effect on the decarboxylation of glutamic acid by glutamate decarboxylase from Escherichia coli has been measured by comparison of the isotopic composition of the amino nitrogen of the product ..gamma..-aminobutyric acid isolated after 10-20% reaction with that of the starting glutamic acid. At pH 4.7, 37 /sup 0/C, the isotope effect is k/sup 14//k/sup 15/ = 0.9855 +/- 0.0006 when compared to unprotonated glutamic acid. Interpretation of this result requires knowledge of the equilibrium nitrogen isotope effect for Schiff base formation. This equilibrium isotope effect is K/sup 14//K/sup 15/ - 0.9824 for the formation of the unprotonated Schiff base between unprotonated valine and salicylaldehyde. Analysis of the nitrogen isotope effect on decarboxylation of glutamic acid and of the previously measured carbon isotope effect on this same reaction shows that decarboxylation and Schiff base formation are jointly rate limiting. The enzyme-bound Schiff base between glutamate and pyridoxal 5'-phosphate partitions approximately 2:1 between decarboxylation and return to the starting state. The nitrogen isotope effect also reveals that the Schiff base nitrogen is protonated in this intermediate.

  10. The Origin of the electrostatic Perturbation in Acetoacetate Decarboxylase

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, M.; Menetret, J; Tsuruta, H; Allen, K

    2009-01-01

    Acetoacetate decarboxylase (AADase) has long been cited as the prototypical example of the marked shifts in the pKa values of ionizable groups that can occur in an enzyme active site. In 1966, it was hypothesized that in AADase the origin of the large pKa perturbation (-4.5 log units) observed in the nucleophilic Lys 115 results from the proximity of Lys 116, marking the first proposal of microenvironment effects in enzymology. The electrostatic perturbation hypothesis has been demonstrated in a number of enzymes, but never for the enzyme that inspired its conception, owing to the lack of a three-dimensional structure. Here we present the X-ray crystal structures of AADase and of the enamine adduct with the substrate analogue 2,4-pentanedione. Surprisingly, the shift of the pKa of Lys 115 is not due to the proximity of Lys 116, the side chain of which is oriented away from the active site. Instead, Lys 116 participates in the structural anchoring of Lys 115 in a long, hydrophobic funnel provided by the novel fold of the enzyme. Thus, AADase perturbs the pKa of the nucleophile by means of a desolvation effect by placement of the side chain into the protein core while enforcing the proximity of polar residues, which facilitate decarboxylation through electrostatic and steric effects.

  11. Amiloride inhibits rat mucosal ornithine decarboxylase activity and DNA synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Ulrich-Baker, M.G.; Wang, P.; Fitzpatrick, L.; Johnson, L.R. )

    1988-03-01

    Refeeding fasted rats induces a dramatic trophic response in gastrointestinal mucosa and is associated with elevations in both rate of DNA synthesis and ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) activity. The signal for these increases is unknown. Amiloride prevents cell alkalinization by blocking Na{sup +}-H{sup +} exchange at apical epithelial cell membranes. In study 1, rats were fasted 48 h, treated with amiloride (0.5 to 500 mg/kg), and refed for 4 h. Refeeding increased ODC activities in the jejunal mucosa (X8) and liver (X19) but not in the oxyntic gland mucosa. In the jejunum, but not the liver, the activation of ODC was completely abolished by 100 mg/kg amiloride. In study 2, the rate of DNA synthesis was determine by measuring the rate of ({sup 3}H)thymidine incorporation 16 h after refeeding. Refeeding resulted in significantly increased rates of DNA synthesis over fasted levels, and amiloride at 100 mg/kg significantly reduced the elevations in the jejenum and liver. In conclusion, amiloride inhibits the postprandial increases in jejunal ODC activity and DNA synthesis in the jejunum and liver. The results indicate that (1) the Na{sup +}-H{sup +} antiport is essential to the increased ODC activity in the jejunum and liver after a meal and (2) increases in DNA synthesis and their suppression by amiloride are not necessary linked to ODC activity.

  12. Multiple roles of the active site lysine of Dopa decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Bertoldi, Mariarita; Voltattorni, Carla Borri

    2009-08-15

    The pyridoxal 5'-phosphate dependent-enzyme Dopa decarboxylase, responsible for the irreversible conversion of l-Dopa to dopamine, is an attractive drug target. The contribution of the pyridoxal-Lys303 to the catalytic mechanisms of decarboxylation and oxidative deamination is analyzed. The K303A variant binds the coenzyme with a 100-fold decreased apparent equilibrium binding affinity with respect to the wild-type enzyme. Unlike the wild-type, K303A in the presence of l-Dopa displays a parallel progress course of formation of both dopamine and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetaldehyde (plus ammonia) with a burst followed by a linear phase. Moreover, the finding that the catalytic efficiencies of decarboxylation and of oxidative deamination display a decrease of 1500- and 17-fold, respectively, with respect to the wild-type, is indicative of a different impact of Lys303 mutation on these reactions. Kinetic analyses reveal that Lys303 is involved in external aldimine formation and hydrolysis as well as in product release which affects the rate-determining step of decarboxylation.

  13. Molecular cloning and expression of the mouse ornithine decarboxylase gene.

    PubMed Central

    McConlogue, L; Gupta, M; Wu, L; Coffino, P

    1984-01-01

    We used mRNA from a mutant S49 mouse lymphoma cell line that produces ornithine decarboxylase (OrnDCase) as its major protein product to synthesize and clone cDNA. Plasmids containing OrnDCase cDNA were identified by hybrid selection of OrnDCase mRNA and in vitro translation. The two of these with the largest inserts together span 2.05 kilobases of cDNA. Southern blot analysis of DNA from wild-type or mutant S49 cells, cleaved with EcoRI or with BamHI, revealed multiple bands homologous to OrnD-Case cDNA, only one of which was amplified in the mutant cells. RNA transfer blot analysis showed that the major OrnD-Case mRNA in the mouse lymphoma cells is 2.0 kilobases long. A similar size mRNA was found in mouse kidney and was more abundant in the kidneys of mice treated with testosterone, an inducer of OrnDCase activity in that tissue. Images PMID:6582509

  14. Glutamate decarboxylase from Lactobacillus brevis: activation by ammonium sulfate.

    PubMed

    Hiraga, Kazumi; Ueno, Yoshie; Oda, Kohei

    2008-05-01

    In this study, the glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) gene from Lactobacillus brevis IFO12005 (Biosci. Biotechnol. Biochem., 61, 1168-1171 (1997)), was cloned and expressed. The deduced amino acid sequence showed 99.6% and 53.1% identity with GAD of L. brevis ATCC367 and L. lactis respectively. The His-tagged recombinant GAD showed an optimum pH of 4.5-5.0, and 54 kDa on SDS-PAGE. The GAD activity and stability was significantly dependent on the ammonium sulfate concentration, as observed in authentic GAD. Gel filtration showed that the inactive form of the GAD was a dimer. In contrast, the ammonium sulfate-activated form was a tetramer. CD spectral analyses at pH 5.5 revealed that the structures of the tetramer and the dimer were similar. Treatment of the GAD with high concentrations of ammonium sulfate and subsequent dilution with sodium glutamate was essential for tetramer formation and its activation. Thus the biochemical properties of the GAD from L. brevis IFO12005 were significantly different from those from other sources.

  15. Ornithine decarboxylase as a marker for premalignancy in the stomach.

    PubMed Central

    Patchett, S E; Alstead, E M; Butruk, L; Przytulski, K; Farthing, M J

    1995-01-01

    Assessment of mucosal ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) activity in the human large bowel may be of value as a marker of potential malignant risk. Its value as a marker of premalignancy in the upper gastrointestinal tract is less clear. Using a [14C]-ornithine bioassay, gastric mucosal ODC activity was measured in 32 normal subjects and 22 patients with confirmed gastric cancer. These results were compared with 47 patients at increased risk of upper gastrointestinal malignancy, (32 patients with partial gastric resection, 15 patients with familial adenomatous polyposis). Median ODC activity in normal subjects was 371 pmol/mg protein/h, (interquartile range (IQR), 230-617). There was no variation with age or sex and no relation to Helicobacter pylori status. Normal subjects had significantly lower ODC activity than patients with a gastric resection or confirmed gastric cancer, but similar to patients with familial adenomatous polyposis. Furthermore, no difference in activity was identified between patients with a gastric resection and established gastric cancer. ODC activity was, however, significantly increased in areas of gastric atrophy or intestinal metaplasia, regardless of the clinical group from which the samples were obtained. It is concluded that measurement of mucosal ODC activity does not provide additional predictive information of malignant risk in the stomach and investigation of other potential biomarkers of malignancy is warranted. PMID:7672662

  16. Ornithine decarboxylase encoded by chlorella virus PBCV-1.

    PubMed

    Morehead, Tiara A; Gurnon, James R; Adams, Byron; Nickerson, Kenneth W; Fitzgerald, Lisa A; Van Etten, James L

    2002-09-15

    Sequence analysis of the 330-kb genome of chlorella virus PBCV-1 revealed an open reading frame, A207R, which encodes a protein with 37-41% amino acid identity to ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) from many eukaryotic organisms. The a207r gene was cloned and the protein was expressed as a His-A207R fusion protein in Escherichia coli. The recombinant protein catalyzes pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-dependent decarboxylation of ornithine to putrescine, the first step in the polyamine biosynthetic pathway. The enzyme has a pH optimum of 9.0 and a temperature optimum of 42 degrees C, and it requires dithiothreitol for maximal activity. The enzyme has a K(m) for ornithine of 0.78 mM and a specific activity of 100 micromol/min/mg protein. PBCV-1 ODC is quite sensitive to the competitive inhibitor L-arginine and the irreversible inhibitor difluoromethylarginine but it is less sensitive to the irreversible inhibitor difluoromethylornithine. The a207r gene is expressed both early and late in PBCV-1 infection and is highly conserved among the chlorella viruses. The 42-kDa PBCV-1 ODC (372 amino acids) is the smallest ODC in the databases and, to our knowledge, is the first virus-encoded ODC.

  17. Studies on uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase from Chlorella kessleri (Trebouxiophyceae, Chlorophyta).

    PubMed

    Juárez, Angela B; Aldonatti, Carmen; Vigna, María S; Ríos de Molina, María Del C

    2007-02-01

    Uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase (UroD) (EC 4.1.1.37) is an enzyme from the tetrapyrrole biosynthetic pathway, in which chlorophyll is the main final product in algae. This is the first time that a study on UroD activity has been performed in a green alga (Chlorella). We isolated and partially purified the enzyme from a Chlorella kessleri (Trebouxiophyceae, Chlorophyta) strain (Copahue, Neuquén, Argentina), and describe for the first time some of its properties. In C. kessleri, the decarboxylation of uroporphyrinogen III occurs in two stages, via 7 COOH and then 6 and 5 COOH intermediates, with the decarboxylation of the 7 COOH compound being the rate-limiting step for the reaction. Cultures in the exponential growth phase showed the highest specific activity values. The most suitable conditions to measure UroD activity in C. kessleri were as follows: 0.23-0.3 mg protein/mL, approximately 6-8 micromol/L uroporphyrinogen III, and 20 min incubation time. Gel filtration chromatography and Western blot assays indicated that UroD from C. kessleri is a dimer of approximately 90 kDa formed by species of lower molecular mass, which conserves enzymatic activity.

  18. Expression of ornithine decarboxylase in precancerous and cancerous gastric lesions

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Xin-Pu; Li, Jian-Sheng; Li, Hui-Yan; Zeng, Shi-Ping; Zhao, Ye; Zeng, Jiang-Zheng

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the expression of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) in precancerous and cancerous gastric lesions. METHODS: We studied the expression of ODC in gastric mucosa from patients with chronic superficial gastritis (CSG, n = 32), chronic atrophic gastritis [CAG, n = 43; 15 with and 28 without intestinal metaplasia (IM)], gastric dysplasia (DYS, n = 11) and gastric cancer (GC, n = 48) tissues using immunohistochemical staining. All 134 biopsy specimens of gastric mucosa were collected by gastroscopy. METHODS: The positive rate of ODC expression was 34.4%, 42.9%, 73.3%, 81.8% and 91.7% in cases with CSG, CAG without IM, CAG with IM, DYS and GC, respectively (P < 0.01), The positive rate of ODC expression increased in the order of CSG < CAG (without IM) < CAG (with IM) < DYS and finally, GC. In addition, ODC positive immunostaining rate was lower in well-differentiated GC than in poorly-differentiated GC (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: The expression of ODC is positively correlated with the degree of malignity of gastric mucosa and development of gastric lesions. This finding indicates that ODC may be used as a good biomarker in the screening and diagnosis of precancerous lesions. PMID:17569126

  19. Ornithine Decarboxylase Inhibition: A strategy to combat various diseases.

    PubMed

    Rai, Priyanshu R; Somani, Rakesh R; Kandpile, Pooja S

    2017-09-27

    Ornithine decarboxylase is the first enzyme in the polyamine biosynthetic pathway. It is the rate-limiting enzyme which is included in the change of ornithine to putrescine which is the first polyamine. Polyamines (putrescine, spermidine, spermine) are natural and synthetic compounds which contains two or more amino group. Polyamines are highly implicated in cellular functions such as cell-growth & multiplication, DNA stabilization, gene transcription and translation, ion-channel activity, etc. Elevated levels of polyamines were found in highly proliferating tumour cells. Hence inhibition of this enzyme was found useful in cancer. α-DL-difluoromethylornithine(DFMO) (Eflornithine) an enzyme-activated irreversible inhibitor was the first of this type. However its use as an anticancer agent did not continue for long due to various reasons. Polyamines were also found to play important role in other infectious microorganism. Eflornithine is successfully used in diseases such as African sleeping sickness and are being researched against number of tropical diseases. It is widely used against hirsutism in women. Various other product (putrscine) based analogues and transition state or PLP (cofactor) based analagoues are being synthesized against diseases such as Leishmaniasis, malaria and others discussed in the article. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  20. Arginase, Arginine Decarboxylase, Ornithine Decarboxylase, and Polyamines in Tomato Ovaries (Changes in Unpollinated Ovaries and Parthenocarpic Fruits Induced by Auxin or Gibberellin).

    PubMed Central

    Alabadi, D.; Aguero, M. S.; Perez-Amador, M. A.; Carbonell, J.

    1996-01-01

    Arginase (EC 3.5.3.1) activity has been found in the ovaries and Young fruits of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. cv Rutgers).Changes in arginase, arginine decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.19), and ornithine decarboxylase activity (EC 4.1.1.17) and levels of free and conjugated putrescine, spermidine, and spermine were determined in unpollinated ovaries and in parthenocarpic fruits during the early stages of development induced by 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) or gibberellic acid (GA3). Levels of arginase, free spermine, and conjugates of the three polyamines were constant in unpollinated ovaries and characteristic of a presenescent step. A marked decrease in arginase activity, free spermine, and polyamine conjugates was associated with the initiation of fruit growth due to cell division, and when cell expansion was initiated, the absence of arginase indicated a redirection of nitrogen metabolism to the synthesis of arginine. A transient increase in arginine decarboxylase and ornithine decarboxylase was also observed in 2,4-D-induced fruits. In general, 2,4-D treatments produced faster changes than GA3, and without treatment, unpollinated ovaries developed only slightly and senescence was hardly visible. Sensitivity to 2,4-D and GA3 treatment remained for at least 2 weeks postanthesis. PMID:12226441

  1. Differential stimulation of S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase by difluoromethylornithine in the rat colon and small intestine.

    PubMed Central

    Halline, A G; Dudeja, P K; Brasitus, T A

    1989-01-01

    The effects of chronic inhibition of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) by the specific inhibitor difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) in the rat colon and small intestine on mucosal contents of polyamines, decarboxylated S-adenosylmethionine (decarboxylated AdoMet) and S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (AdoMet decarboxylase) activity were studied. Administration of 1% DFMO in the drinking water for 10 or 15 weeks resulted in inhibition of ODC and decreases in intracellular putrescine and spermidine contents in both proximal and distal segments of small intestine and colon. At both time points DFMO administration resulted in a dramatic stimulation of AdoMet decarboxylase activity and a rise in decarboxylated AdoMet content in the proximal and distal small-intestinal segments compared with controls, which was not seen in either colonic segment of DFMO-treated animals. This differential stimulation of AdoMet decarboxylase by DFMO in the small intestine and colon could not be entirely explained on the basis of differences in polyamine contents, which are known to regulate this enzyme activity. Kinetic and inhibition studies of AdoMet decarboxylase in control small and large intestine revealed that: (1) there was no difference in Vmax. values between the tissues; (2) the Km for AdoMet was higher in the small intestine than in the colon; and (3) the Ki for product inhibition by decarboxylated AdoMet was higher in the small intestine than in the colon. These results suggest that the differential stimulation of AdoMet decarboxylase by DFMO in the small intestine and colon may be due to different isoenzymes and could play a significant role in the regulation of polyamine contents throughout the gut. PMID:2497738

  2. Nucleotide sequence and expression of the Enterobacter aerogenes alpha-acetolactate decarboxylase gene in brewer's yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Sone, H; Fujii, T; Kondo, K; Shimizu, F; Tanaka, J; Inoue, T

    1988-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of a 1.4-kilobase DNA fragment containing the alpha-acetolactate decarboxylase gene of Enterobacter aerogenes was determined. The sequence contains an entire protein-coding region of 780 nucleotides which encodes an alpha-acetolactate decarboxylase of 260 amino acids. The DNA sequence coding for alpha-acetolactate decarboxylase was placed under the control of the alcohol dehydrogenase I promoter of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae in a plasmid capable of autonomous replication in both S. cerevisiae and Escherichia coli. Brewer's yeast cells transformed by this plasmid showed alpha-acetolactate decarboxylase activity and were used in laboratory-scale fermentation experiments. These experiments revealed that the diacetyl concentration in wort fermented by the plasmid-containing yeast strain was significantly lower than that in wort fermented by the parental strain. These results indicated that the alpha-acetolactate decarboxylase activity produced by brewer's yeast cells degraded alpha-acetolactate and that this degradation caused a decrease in diacetyl production. PMID:3278689

  3. Feedback repression of ornithine decarboxylase synthesis mediated by antizyme.

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, J L; Choe, C Y; Judd, G G

    1996-01-01

    The induction of antizyme by spermidine and the resulting enhancement of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) degradation have been well studied; however, little is known about the mechanism whereby elevated spermidine levels decrease synthesis of the polyamine biosynthetic enzyme. To evaluate the relative contribution of inhibited synthesis, as distinct from enhanced degradation of ODC, spermidine levels were manipulated in a variant cell line that overproduces a stable form of ODC. Spermidine did not selectively inhibit ODC synthesis in these variant cells, supporting the concept that spermidine diminishes ODC synthesis in normal cells owing to enhanced degradation of the protein in the presence of elevated antizyme levels. This model was further investigated in vitro by use of rabbit reticulocyte lysate, which catalyses simultaneous ODC mRNA translation and antizyme-stimulated degradation of ODC protein. Antizyme strongly repressed the incorporation of labelled amino acids into normal rat ODC. Unexpectedly it also diminished the apparent translation of ODC mRNA species coding for enzyme forms that are not destabilized by the post-translational addition of antizyme. The effect of antizyme on ODC translation was not observed in wheatgerm extract, in which there is no antizyme-induced degradation. Further, deletion of a short segment of antizyme necessary for the destabilization of ODC (amino acid residues 113-118) resulted in a form that bound ODC but did not diminish its apparent translation. These results suggest that the co-translational addition of antizyme to ODC results in a complex that is different from, and innately less stable than, that formed when antizyme is added post-translationally. PMID:9003359

  4. Hepatic ornithine decarboxylase induction by potato glycoalkaloids in rats.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, K A; Grosjean, O K; Henika, P R; Friedman, M

    1991-08-01

    The induction of hepatic ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) activity in rat livers by the potato glycoalkaloids alpha-solanine, alpha-chaconine, and their aglycone solanidine, has been studied. Ip administration of alpha-solanine at 7.5, 15 and 30 mg/kg body weight produced markedly elevated enzyme activity at 4 hr after treatment, with a linear dose response. The increase was four-fold at the lowest dose administered to 12-fold at the highest. ODC activity was measured at 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, and 24hr after alpha-solanine was given. A statistically significant increase in enzyme activity was evident at 3 hr after treatment; maximal activity occurred at 5 hr and was approximately 12 times greater than the dimethylsulphoxide (DMSO) control level. Elevated activities persisted for several hours, decreasing to about one-third of the maximal level at 8 hr. The relative effects of alpha-solanine, alpha-chaconine and solanidine on ODC activities were studied at 4 hr using an equimolar dose of 17 mM/kg body weight. ODC activity induced by alpha-chaconine was higher than that induced by alpha-solanine; the latter activity was two-thirds that of the former. The aglycone solanidine did not induce any increase in activity compared with the DMSO control. ODC activity with dexamethasone, a glucocorticoid, at 4 mg/kg body weight, followed a pattern similar to that of alpha-solanine. However, maximal activity occurred slightly earlier at 4 hr after treatment. The results show that the extent of induced ODC activity depends on the structure of the potato alkaloid.

  5. Bacopa monniera recombinant mevalonate diphosphate decarboxylase: Biochemical characterization.

    PubMed

    Abbassi, Shakeel J; Vishwakarma, Rishi K; Patel, Parth; Kumari, Uma; Khan, Bashir M

    2015-08-01

    Mevalonate diphosphate decarboxylase (MDD; EC 4.1.1.33) is an important enzyme in the mevalonic acid pathway catalyzing the Mg(2+)-ATP dependant decarboxylation of mevalonate 5-diphosphate (MVAPP) to isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP). Bacopa monniera recombinant MDD (BmMDD) protein was overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) strain and purified to apparent homogeneity. Km and Vmax for MVAPP were 144 μM and 52 U mg(-1) respectively. The values of turnover (kcat) and kcat/Km for mevalonate 5-diphosphate were determined to be 40s(-1) and 2.77×10(5) M(-1) s(-1) and kcat and kcat/Km values for ATP were found to be 30 s(-1) and 2.20×10(4) M(-1) s(-1), respectively. pH activity profile indicated the involvement of carboxylate ion, lysine and arginine for the activity of enzyme. The apparent activation energy for the BmMDD catalyzed reaction was 12.7 kJ mol(-1). Optimum pH and temperature for the forward reaction was found to be 8.0 and 45 °C. The enzyme was most stable at pH 7 at 20 °C with the deactivation rate constant (Kd(*)) of 1.69×10(-4) and half life (t1/2) of 68 h. The cation studies suggested that BmMDD is a cation dependant enzyme and optimum activity was achieved in the presence of Mg(2+).

  6. Ultraviolet radiation induction of ornithine decarboxylase in rat keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, C.F.; Gajic, D.; Drucker, D.J. )

    1990-05-01

    UV radiation plays an important role in the induction of cutaneous malignancy, including basal cell and squamous cell carcinomas and malignant melanoma. In addition to its effects on DNA damage and repair mechanisms, UV radiation has been shown to modulate the expression of specific genes, altering the levels of their mRNAs and the synthesis of their corresponding proteins. In order to gain further information about the molecular effects of UV radiation, we have studied the regulation of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) gene expression in response to UVB radiation. ODC is the rate-limiting enzyme in polyamine biosynthesis, is involved in growth and differentiation, and has been implicated in carcinogenesis. Keratinocytes grown in culture were either sham-irradiated or exposed to increasing doses of UVB (1-5 mJ/cm2). Northern blot analysis of keratinocyte RNA under basal conditions demonstrated the presence of two ODC mRNA transcripts. Increasing exposure to UVB resulted in a dose-dependent increase in the levels of both ODC mRNA transcripts. The induction of ODC gene expression following UVB was noted 2 h after UVB exposure, and ODC mRNA levels continued to increase up to 24 h after UVB exposure. The UVB-induced increase in ODC gene expression was not serum dependent, despite the ability of serum alone to induce ODC gene expression. The mRNA transcripts for actin and hexosaminidase A were not induced after UVB exposure. These studies show that the UVB-induced increase in ODC activity is due, at least in part, to an increase in ODC gene expression and they provide a useful model for the analysis of the molecular effects of UVB radiation.

  7. Biofilm Lysine Decarboxylase, a New Therapeutic Target for Periodontal Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Lohinai, Zsolt; Keremi, Beata; Szöko, Eva; Tábi, Tamás; Szabo, Csaba; Tulassay, Zsolt; DiCesare, John C; Davis, Carole A; Collins, Lindsay M; Levine, Martin

    2015-10-01

    Lysine, a nutritionally essential amino acid, enters the oral cavity in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF). During oral hygiene restriction (OHR), lysine decarboxylase (LDC) in dento-gingival biofilms converts lysine to cadaverine. Lysine depletion impairs the dental epithelial barrier to bacterial proinflammatory products. Antibodies to LDC from Eikenella corrodens (Ecor-LDC) inhibit LDC activity and retard gingival inflammation in beagle dogs. Whether E. corrodens is the major source of LDC in dental biofilms and whether the lysine analog tranexamic acid (TA) inhibits LDC activity, biofilm accumulation, and GCF exudation in a human gingivitis model were examined. Antibodies raised in goats to LDC-rich extracts from E. corrodens cell surfaces were used to inhibit Ecor-LDC and detect it in biofilm extracts using Western blots. Ecor-LDC activity was measured at pH 4.0 to 11.0 and its TA dissociation constant (Ki) at pH 7.0. Young adults used a 5% or 10% TA mouthwash three times daily during OHR for 1 week. Ecor-LDC antibodies and TA inhibited biofilm LDC. Ki of TA for Ecor-LDC was 940 μM. TA reduced plaque index (PI) by downshifting the PI correlation with biofilm lysine content after OHR without TA. GCF was correspondingly suppressed. However, greater TA retention in saliva partially relieved GCF suppression but not biofilm lysine depletion. TA slightly inhibits LDC but strongly reduces biofilm by inhibiting bacterial lysine uptake. Unfortunately, TA may impair dental epithelial attachments by also inhibiting lysine transporter uptake. Ecor-LDC inhibitors other than lysine analogs may maintain sufficient lysine levels and attachment integrity to prevent periodontal inflammation.

  8. Purification and properties of diaminopimelate decarboxylase from Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    White, P. J.; Kelly, Bridget

    1965-01-01

    1. Diaminopimelate decarboxylase from a soluble extract of Escherichia coli A.T.C.C. 9637 was purified 200-fold by precipitation of nucleic acids, fractionation with acetone and then with ammonium sulphate, adsorption on calcium phosphate gel and chromatography on DEAE-cellulose or DEAE-Sephadex. 2. The purified enzyme showed only one component in the ultracentrifuge, with a sedimentation coefficient of 5·4s. One major peak and three much smaller peaks were observed on electrophoresis of the enzyme at pH8·9. 3. The mol.wt. of the enzyme was approx. 200000. The catalytic constant was 2000mol. of meso-diaminopimelic acid decomposed/min./mol. of enzyme, at 37°. The relative rates of decarboxylation at 25°, 37° and 45° were 0·17:1·0:1·6. At 37° the Michaelis constant was 1·7mm and the optimum pH was 6·7–6·8. 4. There was an excess of acidic amino acids over basic amino acids in the enzyme, which was bound only on basic cellulose derivatives at pH6·8. 5. The enzyme had an absolute requirement for pyridoxal phosphate as a cofactor; no other derivative of pyridoxine had activity. A thiol compound (of which 2,3-dimercaptopropan-1-ol was the most effective) was also needed as an activator. 6. In the presence of 2,3-dimercaptopropan-1-ol (1mm), heavy-metal ions (Cu2+, Hg2+) did not inhibit the enzyme, but there was inhibition by several amino acids with analogous structures to diaminopimelate, generally at high concentrations relative to the substrate. Penicillamine was inhibitory at relatively low concentrations; its action was prevented by pyridoxal phosphate. PMID:14343156

  9. Conformational stabilization of rat s-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase by putrescine.

    PubMed

    Wada, Makiko; Shirahata, Akira

    2010-01-01

    The activity and processing of mammalian S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (AdoMetDC) is stimulated by putrescine. To obtain new insights into the mechanism through which putrescine stimulates AdoMetDC, we investigated conformational changes in rat prostate AdoMetDC in the presence or absence of putrescine. We examined the reactivity of purified rat prostate AdoMetDC to the SH-reagent iodoacetic acid (IAA) and its susceptibility to proteolysis in the presence or absence of putrescine using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). The activity of AdoMetDC treated with IAA in the absence of putrescine was reduced, but about 80% of its activity remained after treatment with IAA in the presence of putrescine. In the presence of putrescine, IAA incorporation was 1.9 mol IAA/mol of AdoMetDC α-subunit, while there was no incorporation of IAA in the β-subunit of AdoMetDC. In the absence of putrescine, 5.0 mol of IAA/mol of α-subunit and 0.9 mol of IAA/mol of β-subunit were incorporated. Only Cys292 and Cys310 were carboxymethylated by IAA in the presence of putrescine. In contrast, in the absence of putrescine all cysteines were carboxymethylated by IAA. In addition, putrescine slowed the rate of AdoMetDC degradation by trypsin. These results demonstrate that the conformation of AdoMetDC purified from rat prostate is stabilized by putrescine.

  10. Prevalence of glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies amongst young Malaysian diabetics.

    PubMed

    Wan Nazaimoon, W M; Faridah, I; Singaraveloo, M; Ismail, I S; Wan Mohamad, W B; Letchuman, R; Rasat, R; Pendek, R; Hew, F L; Sheriff, I H; Khalid, B A

    1999-01-01

    This study determined the prevalence of glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies (GAD Ab) in a group of 926 young Malaysian diabetics of three ethnic groups, Malay, Chinese, and Indian. Patients were clinically diagnosed to be Type 1 or Type 2 before the age of 40 years. The overall GAD Ab positivity was 17.4% (161/926), significantly higher in the Type 1 than the Type 2 diabetics (35.5%, 116/329 vs. 7.5%, 45/597, P=0.0001). Compared to GAD Ab negative patients, seropositive diabetics were diagnosed at younger age (21.2+/-0.9 vs. 27.4+/-0.3 y, P=0.0001), had lower fasting (289+/-27.4 vs. 640+/-17.6 pmol/l, P=0.0001) and post-glucagon C-peptide levels (527+/-51.8 vs. 1030+/-28.9 pmol/l, P=0.0001). There were no racial differences in the prevalence of GAD Ab; of the total Type 1, 30.8, 36.4, and 39.4% were Malay, Chinese, and Indian diabetics, respectively and of the total Type 2, 8.8, 8.2, and 4.4% were Malay, Chinese, and Indian diabetics respectively. There was a curvilinear relationship between GAD Ab and the post-glucagon C-peptide levels, suggesting that GAD Ab do play a role in the beta-cells destruction and could be an important immune marker for the LADA group. This study reconfirmed previous reports that the autoimmune mechanisms in the Type 1 Asian diabetics are indeed different from the Caucasians, and further investigations should be carried out to explain the differences.

  11. Chromosomal Integration and Expression of Two Bacterial α-Acetolactate Decarboxylase Genes in Brewer's Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Blomqvist, K.; Suihko, M.-L.; Knowles, J.; Penttilä, M.

    1991-01-01

    A bacterial gene encoding α-acetolactate decarboxylase, isolated from Klebsiella terrigena or Enterobacter aerogenes, was expressed in brewer's yeast. The genes were expressed under either the yeast phosphoglycerokinase (PGK1) or the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH1) promoter and were integrated by gene replacement by using cotransformation into the PGK1 or ADH1 locus, respectively, of a brewer's yeast. The expression level of the α-acetolactate decarboxylase gene of the PGK1 integrant strains was higher than that of the ADH1 integrants. Under pilot-scale brewing conditions, the α-acetolactate decarboxylase activity of the PGK1 integrant strains was sufficient to reduce the formation of diacetyl below the taste threshold value, and no lagering was needed. The brewing properties of the recombinant yeast strains were otherwise unaltered, and the quality (most importantly, the flavor) of the trial beers produced was as good as that of the control beer. Images PMID:16348559

  12. The effect of a high fat diet on pyruvate decarboxylase deficiency without central nervous system involvement.

    PubMed

    Kodama, S; Yagi, R; Ninomiya, M; Goji, K; Takahashi, T; Morishita, Y; Matsuo, T

    1983-01-01

    A nine-year-old Japanese boy with low pyruvate decarboxylase activity in fibroblasts showed no central nervous symptoms except for muscle fatigue. The pyruvate decarboxylase activities in fibroblasts of the patient and two control subjects were 0.407 +/- 0.083, 1.029 +/- 0.137 and 1.607 +/- 0.096 mumoles/g protein/30 min, respectively. The Michaelis-Menten constant (Km) was the same in the patient and controls. There was no inhibitor of pyruvate decarboxylase in the patient's fibroblasts. A high fat diet has been given to the patient for five years. At present he does not complain of any kind of muscle fatigue, except after severe exercise. Mental and physiological development of the patient are within the normal ranges. However, trials of orally administered thiamine hydrochloride or thiamine hydrochloride combined with lipoamide did not improve his muscle fatigue.

  13. Optimization of a Non-Radioactive High-Throughput Assay for Decarboxylase Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Herein, we describe the optimization of a linked enzyme assay suitable for high-throughput screening of decarboxylases, a target family whose activity has historically been difficult to quantify. Our approach uses a commercially available bicarbonate detection reagent to measure decarboxylase activity. The assay is performed in a fully enclosed automated screening system under inert nitrogen atmosphere to minimize perturbation by exogenous CO2. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis following a pilot screen of a small library of ∼3,600 unique molecules for inhibitors of Trypanosoma brucei ornithine decarboxylase quantitatively demonstrates that the assay has excellent discriminatory power (area under the curve = 0.90 with 95% confidence interval between 0.82 and 0.97). PMID:20085486

  14. Cloning and nucleotide sequence of wild type and a mutant histidine decarboxylase from Lactobacillus 30a.

    PubMed

    Vanderslice, P; Copeland, W C; Robertus, J D

    1986-11-15

    Prohistidine decarboxylase from Lactobacillus 30a is a protein that autoactivates to histidine decarboxylase by cleaving its peptide chain between serines 81 and 82 and converting Ser-82 to a pyruvoyl moiety. The pyruvoyl group serves as the prosthetic group for the decarboxylation reaction. We have cloned and determined the nucleotide sequence of the gene for this enzyme from a wild type strain and from a mutant with altered autoactivation properties. The nucleotide sequence modifies the previously determined amino acid sequence of the protein. A tripeptide missed in the chemical sequence is inserted, and three other amino acids show conservative changes. The activation mutant shows a single change of Gly-58 to an Asp. Sequence analysis up- and downstream from the gene suggests that histidine decarboxylase is part of a polycistronic message, and that the transcriptional promotor region is strongly homologous to those of other Gram-positive organisms.

  15. 21 CFR 173.115 - Alpha-acetolactate decarboxylase (α-ALDC) enzyme preparation derived from a recombinant Bacillus...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Alpha-acetolactate decarboxylase (α-ALDC) enzyme...) SECONDARY DIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Enzyme Preparations and Microorganisms § 173.115 Alpha-acetolactate decarboxylase (α-ALDC) enzyme preparation derived from a recombinant...

  16. 21 CFR 173.115 - Alpha-acetolactate decarboxylase (α-ALDC) enzyme preparation derived from a recombinant Bacillus...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Alpha-acetolactate decarboxylase (α-ALDC) enzyme...) SECONDARY DIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Enzyme Preparations and Microorganisms § 173.115 Alpha-acetolactate decarboxylase (α-ALDC) enzyme preparation derived from a recombinant...

  17. 21 CFR 173.115 - Alpha-acetolactate decarboxylase (α-ALDC) enzyme preparation derived from a recombinant Bacillus...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Alpha-acetolactate decarboxylase (α-ALDC) enzyme...) SECONDARY DIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Enzyme Preparations and Microorganisms § 173.115 Alpha-acetolactate decarboxylase (α-ALDC) enzyme preparation derived from a recombinant...

  18. 21 CFR 173.115 - Alpha-acetolactate decarboxylase (α-ALDC) enzyme preparation derived from a recombinant Bacillus...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Alpha-acetolactate decarboxylase (α-ALDC) enzyme...) SECONDARY DIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Enzyme Preparations and Microorganisms § 173.115 Alpha-acetolactate decarboxylase (α-ALDC) enzyme preparation derived from a recombinant...

  19. 21 CFR 173.115 - Alpha-acetolactate decarboxylase (α-ALDC) enzyme preparation derived from a recombinant Bacillus...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Alpha-acetolactate decarboxylase (α-ALDC) enzyme... FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Enzyme Preparations and Microorganisms § 173.115 Alpha-acetolactate decarboxylase (α-ALDC) enzyme preparation derived from a recombinant Bacillus subtilis. The food additive alpha...

  20. Ornithine Decarboxylase Activity Is Required for Prostatic Budding in the Developing Mouse Prostate

    PubMed Central

    Gamat, Melissa; Malinowski, Rita L.; Parkhurst, Linnea J.; Steinke, Laura M.; Marker, Paul C.

    2015-01-01

    The prostate is a male accessory sex gland that produces secretions in seminal fluid to facilitate fertilization. Prostate secretory function is dependent on androgens, although the mechanism by which androgens exert their effects is still unclear. Polyamines are small cationic molecules that play pivotal roles in DNA transcription, translation and gene regulation. The rate-limiting enzyme in polyamine biosynthesis is ornithine decarboxylase, which is encoded by the gene Odc1. Ornithine decarboxylase mRNA decreases in the prostate upon castration and increases upon administration of androgens. Furthermore, testosterone administered to castrated male mice restores prostate secretory activity, whereas administering testosterone and the ornithine decarboxylase inhibitor D,L-α-difluromethylornithine (DFMO) to castrated males does not restore prostate secretory activity, suggesting that polyamines are required for androgens to exert their effects. To date, no one has examined polyamines in prostate development, which is also androgen dependent. In this study, we showed that ornithine decarboxylase protein was expressed in the epithelium of the ventral, dorsolateral and anterior lobes of the adult mouse prostate. Ornithine decarboxylase protein was also expressed in the urogenital sinus (UGS) epithelium of the male and female embryo prior to prostate development, and expression continued in prostatic epithelial buds as they emerged from the UGS. Inhibiting ornithine decarboxylase using DFMO in UGS organ culture blocked the induction of prostatic buds by androgens, and significantly decreased expression of key prostate transcription factor, Nkx3.1, by androgens. DFMO also significantly decreased the expression of developmental regulatory gene Notch1. Other genes implicated in prostatic development including Sox9, Wif1 and Srd5a2 were unaffected by DFMO. Together these results indicate that Odc1 and polyamines are required for androgens to exert their effect in mediating

  1. Molecular Evolution and Functional Characterization of a Bifunctional Decarboxylase Involved in Lycopodium Alkaloid Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Bunsupa, Somnuk; Hanada, Kousuke; Maruyama, Akira; Aoyagi, Kaori; Komatsu, Kana; Ueno, Hideki; Yamashita, Madoka; Sasaki, Ryosuke; Oikawa, Akira; Saito, Kazuki; Yamazaki, Mami

    2016-08-01

    Lycopodium alkaloids (LAs) are derived from lysine (Lys) and are found mainly in Huperziaceae and Lycopodiaceae. LAs are potentially useful against Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, and myasthenia gravis. Here, we cloned the bifunctional lysine/ornithine decarboxylase (L/ODC), the first gene involved in LA biosynthesis, from the LA-producing plants Lycopodium clavatum and Huperzia serrata We describe the in vitro and in vivo functional characterization of the L. clavatum L/ODC (LcL/ODC). The recombinant LcL/ODC preferentially catalyzed the decarboxylation of l-Lys over l-ornithine (l-Orn) by about 5 times. Transient expression of LcL/ODC fused with the amino or carboxyl terminus of green fluorescent protein, in onion (Allium cepa) epidermal cells and Nicotiana benthamiana leaves, showed LcL/ODC localization in the cytosol. Transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) hairy roots and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants expressing LcL/ODC enhanced the production of a Lys-derived alkaloid, anabasine, and cadaverine, respectively, thus, confirming the function of LcL/ODC in plants. In addition, we present an example of the convergent evolution of plant Lys decarboxylase that resulted in the production of Lys-derived alkaloids in Leguminosae (legumes) and Lycopodiaceae (clubmosses). This convergent evolution event probably occurred via the promiscuous functions of the ancestral Orn decarboxylase, which is an enzyme involved in the primary metabolism of polyamine. The positive selection sites were detected by statistical analyses using phylogenetic trees and were confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis, suggesting the importance of those sites in granting the promiscuous function to Lys decarboxylase while retaining the ancestral Orn decarboxylase function. This study contributes to a better understanding of LA biosynthesis and the molecular evolution of plant Lys decarboxylase. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  2. Molecular Evolution and Functional Characterization of a Bifunctional Decarboxylase Involved in Lycopodium Alkaloid Biosynthesis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Bunsupa, Somnuk; Hanada, Kousuke; Maruyama, Akira; Aoyagi, Kaori; Komatsu, Kana; Ueno, Hideki; Yamashita, Madoka; Sasaki, Ryosuke; Oikawa, Akira; Yamazaki, Mami

    2016-01-01

    Lycopodium alkaloids (LAs) are derived from lysine (Lys) and are found mainly in Huperziaceae and Lycopodiaceae. LAs are potentially useful against Alzheimer’s disease, schizophrenia, and myasthenia gravis. Here, we cloned the bifunctional lysine/ornithine decarboxylase (L/ODC), the first gene involved in LA biosynthesis, from the LA-producing plants Lycopodium clavatum and Huperzia serrata. We describe the in vitro and in vivo functional characterization of the L. clavatum L/ODC (LcL/ODC). The recombinant LcL/ODC preferentially catalyzed the decarboxylation of l-Lys over l-ornithine (l-Orn) by about 5 times. Transient expression of LcL/ODC fused with the amino or carboxyl terminus of green fluorescent protein, in onion (Allium cepa) epidermal cells and Nicotiana benthamiana leaves, showed LcL/ODC localization in the cytosol. Transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) hairy roots and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants expressing LcL/ODC enhanced the production of a Lys-derived alkaloid, anabasine, and cadaverine, respectively, thus, confirming the function of LcL/ODC in plants. In addition, we present an example of the convergent evolution of plant Lys decarboxylase that resulted in the production of Lys-derived alkaloids in Leguminosae (legumes) and Lycopodiaceae (clubmosses). This convergent evolution event probably occurred via the promiscuous functions of the ancestral Orn decarboxylase, which is an enzyme involved in the primary metabolism of polyamine. The positive selection sites were detected by statistical analyses using phylogenetic trees and were confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis, suggesting the importance of those sites in granting the promiscuous function to Lys decarboxylase while retaining the ancestral Orn decarboxylase function. This study contributes to a better understanding of LA biosynthesis and the molecular evolution of plant Lys decarboxylase. PMID:27303024

  3. NUTRITIONAL REQUIREMENTS OF LACTOBACILLUS 30a FOR GROWTH AND HISTIDINE DECARBOXYLASE PRODUCTION

    PubMed Central

    Guirard, Beverly M.; Snell, Esmond E.

    1964-01-01

    Guirard, Beverly M. (University of California, Berkeley), and Esmond E. Snell. Nutritional requirements of Lactobacillus 30a for growth and histidine decarboxylase production. J. Bacteriol. 87:370–376. 1964.—The nutritional requirements of Lactobacillus 30a include each of the naturally occurring amino acids, several B vitamins, ascorbic acid, glucose, acetate, and oleate. The nutritional requirements for optimal histidine decarboxylase production (up to 900 μliters of CO2 per hr per mg of cells) differ to some extent from those for optimal growth. Wholly synthetic and partially defined media are described which produce high enzyme activity, together with rapid and luxuriant growth. PMID:14151059

  4. Cloning and sequencing of pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC) genes from bacteria and uses therefor

    DOEpatents

    Maupin-Furlow, Julie A [Gainesville, FL; Talarico, Lee Ann [Gainesville, FL; Raj, Krishnan Chandra [Tamil Nadu, IN; Ingram, Lonnie O [Gainesville, FL

    2008-02-05

    The invention provides isolated nucleic acids molecules which encode pyruvate decarboxylase enzymes having improved decarboxylase activity, substrate affinity, thermostability, and activity at different pH. The nucleic acids of the invention also have a codon usage which allows for high expression in a variety of host cells. Accordingly, the invention provides recombinant expression vectors containing such nucleic acid molecules, recombinant host cells comprising the expression vectors, host cells further comprising other ethanologenic enzymes, and methods for producing useful substances, e.g., acetaldehyde and ethanol, using such host cells.

  5. Paraneoplastic Neurological Syndromes and Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Ariño, Helena; Höftberger, Romana; Gresa-Arribas, Nuria; Martínez-Hernandez, Eugenia; Armangue, Thaís; Kruer, Michael C.; Arpa, Javier; Domingo, Julio; Rojc, Bojan; Bataller, Luis; Saiz, Albert; Dalmau, Josep; Graus, Francesc

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Little is known of glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies (GAD-abs) in the paraneoplastic context. Clinical recognition of such cases will lead to prompt tumor diagnosis and appropriate treatment. OBJECTIVE To report the clinical and immunological features of patients with paraneoplastic neurological syndromes (PNS) and GAD-abs. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Retrospective case series study and immunological investigations conducted in February 2014 in a center for autoimmune neurological disorders. Fifteen cases with GAD65-abs evaluated between 1995 and 2013 who fulfilled criteria of definite or possible PNS without concomitant onconeural antibodies were included in this study. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Analysis of the clinical records of 15 patients and review of 19 previously reported cases. Indirect immunofluorescence with rat hippocampal neuronal cultures and cell-based assays with known neuronal cell-surface antigens were used. One hundred six patients with GAD65-abs and no cancer served as control individuals. RESULTS Eight of the 15 patients with cancer presented as classic paraneoplastic syndromes (5 limbic encephalitis, 1 paraneoplastic encephalomyelitis, 1 paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration, and 1 opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome). When compared with the 106 non-PNS cases, those with PNS were older (median age, 60 years vs 48 years; P = .03), more frequently male (60% vs 13%; P < .001), and had more often coexisting neuronal cell-surface antibodies, mainly against γ-aminobutyric acid receptors (53%vs 11%; P < .001). The tumors more frequently involved were lung (n = 6) and thymic neoplasms (n = 4). The risk for an underlying tumor was higher if the presentation was a classic PNS, if it was different from stiff-person syndrome or cerebellar ataxia (odds ratio, 10.5; 95%CI, 3.2–34.5), or if the patient had coexisting neuronal cell-surface antibodies (odds ratio, 6.8; 95%CI, 1.1–40.5). Compared with the current series, the 19 previously

  6. Phosphorylation of Ser-204 and Tyr-405 in human malonyl-CoA decarboxylase expressed in silkworm Bombyx mori regulates catalytic decarboxylase activity.

    PubMed

    Hwang, In-Wook; Makishima, Yu; Suzuki, Tomohiro; Kato, Tatsuya; Park, Sungjo; Terzic, Andre; Chung, Shin-Kyo; Park, Enoch Y

    2015-11-01

    Decarboxylation of malonyl-CoA to acetyl-CoA by malonyl-CoA decarboxylase (MCD; EC 4.1.1.9) is a vital catalytic reaction of lipid metabolism. While it is established that phosphorylation of MCD modulates the enzymatic activity, the specific phosphorylation sites associated with the catalytic function have not been documented due to lack of sufficient production of MCD with proper post-translational modifications. Here, we used the silkworm-based Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV) bacmid system to express human MCD (hMCD) and mapped phosphorylation effects on enzymatic function. Purified MCD from silkworm displayed post-translational phosphorylation and demonstrated coherent enzymatic activity with high yield (-200 μg/silkworm). Point mutations in putative phosphorylation sites, Ser-204 or Tyr-405 of hMCD, identified by bioinformatics and proteomics analyses reduced the catalytic activity, underscoring the functional significance of phosphorylation in modulating decarboxylase-based catalysis. Identified phosphorylated residues are distinct from the decarboxylation catalytic site, implicating a phosphorylation-induced global conformational change of MCD as responsible in altering catalytic function. We conclude that phosphorylation of Ser-204 and Tyr-405 regulates the decarboxylase function of hMCD leveraging the silkworm-based BmNPV bacmid expression system that offers a fail-safe eukaryotic production platform implementing proper post-translational modification such as phosphorylation.

  7. The ornithine decarboxylase gene of Caenorhabditis elegans: Cloning, mapping and mutagenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Macrae, M.; Coffino, P.; Plasterk, R.H.A.

    1995-06-01

    The gene (odc-1) encoding ornithine decarboxylase, a key enzyme in polyamine biosynthesis, was cloned and characterized. Two introns interrupt the coding sequence of the gene. The deduced protein contains 442 amino acids and is homologous to ornithine decarboxylases of other eukaryotic species. In vitro translation of a transcript of the cDNA yielded an enzymatically active product. The mRNA is 1.5 kb in size and is formed by trans-splicing to SL1, a common 5{prime} RNA segment. odc-1 maps to the middle of LG V, between dpy-11 and unc-42 and near a breakpoint of the nDf32 deficiency strain. Enzymatic activity is low in starved 1 (L1) larva and, after feeding, rises progressively as the worms develop. Targeted gene disruption was used to create a null allele. Homozygous mutants are normally viable and show no apparent defects, with the exception of a somewhat reduced brood size. In vitro assays for ornithine decarboxylase activity, however, show no detectable enzymatic activity, suggesting that ornithine decarboxylase is dispensible for nematode growth in the laboratory. 37 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Membrane Inlet for Mass Spectrometric Measurement of Catalysis by Enzymatic Decarboxylases

    PubMed Central

    Moral, Mario E. G.; Tu, Chingkuang; Richards, Nigel G. J.; Silverman, David N.

    2011-01-01

    Membrane inlet mass spectrometry (MIMS) uses diffusion across a permeable membrane to detect in solution uncharged molecules of small molecular weight. We point out here the application of MIMS to determine catalytic properties of decarboxylases using as an example catalysis by oxalate decarboxylase (OxDC) from Bacillus subtilis. The decarboxylase activity generates carbon dioxide and formate from the non-oxidative reaction, but is accompanied by a concomitant oxidase activity that consumes oxalate and oxygen and generates CO2 and hydrogen peroxide. The application of MIMS in measuring catalysis by OxDC involves the real-time and continuous detection of oxygen and product CO2 from the ion currents of their respective mass peaks. Steady-state catalytic constants for the decarboxylase activity obtained by measuring product CO2 using MIMS are comparable to those acquired by the traditional endpoint assay based on the coupled reaction with formate dehydrogenase, and measuring consumption of O2 using MIMS also estimates the oxidase activity. Use of isotope-labeled substrate (13C2-enriched oxalate) in MIMS provides a method to characterize the catalytic reaction in cell suspensions by detecting the mass peak for product 13CO2 (m/z 45), avoiding inaccuracies due to endogenous 12CO2. PMID:21782782

  9. Membrane inlet for mass spectrometric measurement of catalysis by enzymatic decarboxylases.

    PubMed

    Moral, Mario E G; Tu, Chingkuang; Richards, Nigel G J; Silverman, David N

    2011-11-01

    Membrane inlet mass spectrometry (MIMS) uses diffusion across a permeable membrane to detect in solution uncharged molecules of small molecular weight. We point out here the application of MIMS to determine catalytic properties of decarboxylases using as an example catalysis by oxalate decarboxylase (OxDC) from Bacillus subtilis. The decarboxylase activity generates carbon dioxide and formate from the nonoxidative reaction but is accompanied by a concomitant oxidase activity that consumes oxalate and oxygen and generates CO(2) and hydrogen peroxide. The application of MIMS in measuring catalysis by OxDC involves the real-time and continuous detection of oxygen and product CO(2) from the ion currents of their respective mass peaks. Steady-state catalytic constants for the decarboxylase activity obtained by measuring product CO(2) using MIMS are comparable to those acquired by the traditional endpoint assay based on the coupled reaction with formate dehydrogenase, and measuring consumption of O(2) using MIMS also estimates the oxidase activity. The use of isotope-labeled substrate ((13)C(2)-enriched oxalate) in MIMS provides a method to characterize the catalytic reaction in cell suspensions by detecting the mass peak for product (13)CO(2) (m/z 45), avoiding inaccuracies due to endogenous (12)CO(2). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Structural and Mechanistic Studies on Klebsiella pneumoniae 2-Oxo-4-hydroxy-4-carboxy-5-ureidoimidazoline Decarboxylase

    SciTech Connect

    French, Jarrod B.; Ealick, Steven E.

    2010-11-12

    The stereospecific oxidative degradation of uric acid to (S)-allantoin was recently shown to proceed via three enzymatic steps. The final conversion is a decarboxylation of the unstable intermediate 2-oxo-4-hydroxy-4-carboxy-5-ureidoimidazoline (OHCU) and is catalyzed by OHCU decarboxylase. Here we present the structures of Klebsiella pneumoniae OHCU decarboxylase in unliganded form and with bound allantoin. These structures provide evidence that ligand binding organizes the active site residues for catalysis. Modeling of the substrate and intermediates provides additional support for this hypothesis. In addition we characterize the steady state kinetics of this enzyme and report the first OHCU decarboxylase inhibitor, allopurinol, a structural isomer of hypoxanthine. This molecule is a competitive inhibitor of K. pneumoniae OHCU decarboxylase with a K{sub i} of 30 {+-} 2 {micro}m. Circular dichroism measurements confirm structural observations that this inhibitor disrupts the necessary organization of the active site. Our structural and biochemical studies also provide further insights into the mechanism of catalysis of OHCU decarboxylation.

  11. Presentation of opsoclonus myoclonus ataxia syndrome with glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, Hanul Srinivas

    2012-08-08

    In this rare case, the patient presented with opsoclonus, myoclonus and ataxia. Serological and imaging studies revealed high glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody (GAD-Ab) levels. High-dose corticosteroids were of no benefit and subsequent intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) administration proved resolution of the condition. Levetiracetam proved useful in symptomatically controlling the myoclonus. Follow-up GAD-Ab levels were within normal limits.

  12. Inhibition of pyruvate decarboxylase from Z. mobilis by novel analogues of thiamine pyrophosphate: investigating pyrophosphate mimics.

    PubMed

    Erixon, Karl M; Dabalos, Chester L; Leeper, Finian J

    2007-03-07

    Replacement of the thiazolium ring of thiamine pyrophosphate with a triazole gives extremely potent inhibitors of pyruvate decarboxylase from Z. mobilis, with K(I) values down to 20 pM; this system was used to explore pyrophosphate mimics and several effective analogues were discovered.

  13. Detection and transfer of the glutamate decarboxylase gene in Streptococcus thermophilus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid) is generated from glutamate by the action of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and characterized by hypotensive, diuretic and tranquilizing effects in humans and animals. The production of GABA by lactic acid starter bacteria would enhance the functionality of fermen...

  14. Molecular analysis of the glutamate decarboxylase locus in Streptococcus thermophilus ST110

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    GABA ('-aminobutyric acid) is generated from glutamate by the action of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and characterized by hypotensive, diuretic and tranquilizing effects in humans and animals. The production of GABA by lactic acid starter bacteria would enhance the functionality of fermented da...

  15. DPD epitope-specific glutamic acid decarboxylase GAD)65 autoantibodies in children with Type 1 diabetes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    To study whether DPD epitope-specific glutamate decarboxylase autoantibodies are found more frequently in children with milder forms of Type 1 diabetes. We prospectively evaluated 75 children with new-onset autoimmune Type 1 diabetes, in whom we collected demographic, anthropometric and clinical dat...

  16. The Degradation of 14C-Glutamic Acid by L-Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dougherty, Charles M; Dayan, Jean

    1982-01-01

    Describes procedures and semi-micro reaction apparatus (carbon dioxide trap) to demonstrate how a particular enzyme (L-Glutamic acid decarboxylase) may be used to determine the site or sites of labeling in its substrate (carbon-14 labeled glutamic acid). Includes calculations, solutions, and reagents used. (Author/SK)

  17. The enzymatic activities of the Escherichia coli basic aliphatic amino acid decarboxylases exhibit a pH zone of inhibition.

    PubMed

    Kanjee, Usheer; Gutsche, Irina; Ramachandran, Shaliny; Houry, Walid A

    2011-11-01

    The stringent response regulator ppGpp has recently been shown by our group to inhibit the Escherichia coli inducible lysine decarboxylase, LdcI. As a follow-up to this observation, we examined the mechanisms that regulate the activities of the other four E. coli enzymes paralogous to LdcI: the constitutive lysine decarboxylase LdcC, the inducible arginine decarboxylase AdiA, the inducible ornithine decarboxylase SpeF, and the constitutive ornithine decarboxylase SpeC. LdcC and SpeC are involved in cellular polyamine biosynthesis, while LdcI, AdiA, and SpeF are involved in the acid stress response. Multiple mechanisms of regulation were found for these enzymes. In addition to LdcI, LdcC and SpeC were found to be inhibited by ppGpp; AdiA activity was found to be regulated by changes in oligomerization, while SpeF and SpeC activities were regulated by GTP. These findings indicate the presence of multiple mechanisms regulating the activity of this important family of decarboxylases. When the enzyme inhibition profiles are analyzed in parallel, a "zone of inhibition" between pH 6 and pH 8 is observed. Hence, the data suggest that E. coli utilizes multiple mechanisms to ensure that these decarboxylases remain inactive around neutral pH possibly to reduce the consumption of amino acids at this pH.

  18. Substrate Specificity of Thiamine Pyrophosphate-Dependent 2-Oxo-Acid Decarboxylases in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Romagnoli, Gabriele; Luttik, Marijke A. H.; Kötter, Peter; Pronk, Jack T.

    2012-01-01

    Fusel alcohols are precursors and contributors to flavor and aroma compounds in fermented beverages, and some are under investigation as biofuels. The decarboxylation of 2-oxo acids is a key step in the Ehrlich pathway for fusel alcohol production. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, five genes share sequence similarity with genes encoding thiamine pyrophosphate-dependent 2-oxo-acid decarboxylases (2ODCs). PDC1, PDC5, and PDC6 encode differentially regulated pyruvate decarboxylase isoenzymes; ARO10 encodes a 2-oxo-acid decarboxylase with broad substrate specificity, and THI3 has not yet been shown to encode an active decarboxylase. Despite the importance of fusel alcohol production in S. cerevisiae, the substrate specificities of these five 2ODCs have not been systematically compared. When the five 2ODCs were individually overexpressed in a pdc1Δ pdc5Δ pdc6Δ aro10Δ thi3Δ strain, only Pdc1, Pdc5, and Pdc6 catalyzed the decarboxylation of the linear-chain 2-oxo acids pyruvate, 2-oxo-butanoate, and 2-oxo-pentanoate in cell extracts. The presence of a Pdc isoenzyme was also required for the production of n-propanol and n-butanol in cultures grown on threonine and norvaline, respectively, as nitrogen sources. These results demonstrate the importance of pyruvate decarboxylases in the natural production of n-propanol and n-butanol by S. cerevisiae. No decarboxylation activity was found for Thi3 with any of the substrates tested. Only Aro10 and Pdc5 catalyzed the decarboxylation of the aromatic substrate phenylpyruvate, with Aro10 showing superior kinetic properties. Aro10, Pdc1, Pdc5, and Pdc6 exhibited activity with all branched-chain and sulfur-containing 2-oxo acids tested but with markedly different decarboxylation kinetics. The high affinity of Aro10 identified it as a key contributor to the production of branched-chain and sulfur-containing fusel alcohols. PMID:22904058

  19. Substrate specificity of thiamine pyrophosphate-dependent 2-oxo-acid decarboxylases in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Romagnoli, Gabriele; Luttik, Marijke A H; Kötter, Peter; Pronk, Jack T; Daran, Jean-Marc

    2012-11-01

    Fusel alcohols are precursors and contributors to flavor and aroma compounds in fermented beverages, and some are under investigation as biofuels. The decarboxylation of 2-oxo acids is a key step in the Ehrlich pathway for fusel alcohol production. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, five genes share sequence similarity with genes encoding thiamine pyrophosphate-dependent 2-oxo-acid decarboxylases (2ODCs). PDC1, PDC5, and PDC6 encode differentially regulated pyruvate decarboxylase isoenzymes; ARO10 encodes a 2-oxo-acid decarboxylase with broad substrate specificity, and THI3 has not yet been shown to encode an active decarboxylase. Despite the importance of fusel alcohol production in S. cerevisiae, the substrate specificities of these five 2ODCs have not been systematically compared. When the five 2ODCs were individually overexpressed in a pdc1Δ pdc5Δ pdc6Δ aro10Δ thi3Δ strain, only Pdc1, Pdc5, and Pdc6 catalyzed the decarboxylation of the linear-chain 2-oxo acids pyruvate, 2-oxo-butanoate, and 2-oxo-pentanoate in cell extracts. The presence of a Pdc isoenzyme was also required for the production of n-propanol and n-butanol in cultures grown on threonine and norvaline, respectively, as nitrogen sources. These results demonstrate the importance of pyruvate decarboxylases in the natural production of n-propanol and n-butanol by S. cerevisiae. No decarboxylation activity was found for Thi3 with any of the substrates tested. Only Aro10 and Pdc5 catalyzed the decarboxylation of the aromatic substrate phenylpyruvate, with Aro10 showing superior kinetic properties. Aro10, Pdc1, Pdc5, and Pdc6 exhibited activity with all branched-chain and sulfur-containing 2-oxo acids tested but with markedly different decarboxylation kinetics. The high affinity of Aro10 identified it as a key contributor to the production of branched-chain and sulfur-containing fusel alcohols.

  20. Monomeric S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase from plants provides an alternative to putrescine stimulation.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Eric M; Ekstrom, Jennifer L; Pegg, Anthony E; Ealick, Steven E

    2002-12-10

    S-Adenosylmethionine decarboxylase has been implicated in cell growth and differentiation and is synthesized as a proenzyme, which undergoes autocatalytic cleavage to generate an active site pyruvoyl group. In mammals, S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase is active as a dimer in which each protomer contains one alpha subunit and one beta subunit. In many higher organisms, autocatalysis and decarboxylation are stimulated by putrescine, which binds in a buried site containing numerous negatively charged residues. In contrast, plant S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylases are fully active in the absence of putrescine, with rapid autocatalysis that is not stimulated by putrescine. We have determined the structure of the S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase from potato, Solanum tuberosum, to 2.3 A resolution. Unlike the previously determined human enzyme structure, the potato enzyme is a monomer in the crystal structure. Ultracentrifugation studies show that the potato enzyme is also a monomer under physiological conditions, with a weak self-association constant of 6.5 x 10(4) M(-)(1) for the monomer-dimer association. Although the potato enzyme contains most of the buried charged residues that make up the putrescine binding site in the human enzyme, there is no evidence for a putrescine binding site in the potato enzyme. Instead, several amino acid substitutions, including Leu13/Arg18, Phe111/Arg114, Asp174/Val181, and Phe285/His294 (human/potato), provide side chains that mimic the role of putrescine in the human enzyme. In the potato enzyme, the positively charged residues form an extensive network of hydrogen bonds bridging a cluster of highly conserved negatively charged residues and the active site, including interactions with the catalytic residues Glu16 and His249. The results explain the constitutively high activity of plant S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylases in the absence of putrescine and are consistent with previously proposed models for how putrescine together

  1. Immunohistochemical evidence for the coexistence of histidine decarboxylase-like and glutamate decarboxylase-like immunoreactivities in nerve cells of the magnocellular nucleus of the posterior hypothalamus of rats.

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, N; Inagaki, S; Shiosaka, S; Taguchi, Y; Oertel, W H; Tohyama, M; Watanabe, T; Wada, H

    1984-01-01

    Immunohistochemical staining of alternate consecutive sections revealed numerous histidine decarboxylase (L-histidine carboxy-lyase, EC 4.1.1.22)-like immunoreactive neurons that also contained glutamate decarboxylase (L-glutamate 1-carboxy-lyase, EC 4.1.1.15)-like immunoreactive structures in the tuberal magnocellular nucleus, the caudal magnocellular nucleus, and the postmammillary caudal magnocellular nucleus of the posterior hypothalamus of rats. Furthermore, in immunohistochemical double-staining procedures, almost all neurons in the magnocellular nuclei had both histidine decarboxylase-like and glutamate decarboxylase-like immunoreactivities. These results suggest the coexistence of histamine and gamma-aminobutyric acid in single neurons in these nuclei. Images PMID:6594708

  2. Effect of the hexapeptide dalargin on ornithine decarboxylase activity in the duodenal mucosa of rats with experimental duodenal ulcer

    SciTech Connect

    Yarygin, K.N.; Shitin, A.G.; Polonskii, V.M.; Vinogradov, V.A.

    1987-08-01

    The authors study the effect of dalargin on ornithine decarboxylase in homogenates of the duodenal ulcer from rats with experimental duodenal ulcer induced by cysteamine. Activity of the enzyme was expressed in pmoles /sup 14/CO/sub 2//mg protein/h. Protein was determined by Lowry's method. The findings indicate that stimulation of ornithine decarboxylase and the antiulcerative effect of dalargin may be due to direct interaction of the peptide with cells of the intestinal mucosa and with enterocytes.

  3. HemQ: An iron-coproporphyrin oxidative decarboxylase for protoheme synthesis in Firmicutes and Actinobacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Dailey, Harry A.; Gerdes, Svetlana

    2015-02-21

    Genes for chlorite dismutase-like proteins are found widely among heme-synthesizing bacteria and some Archaea. It is now known that among the Firmicutes and Actinobacteria these proteins do not possess chlorite dismutase activity but instead are essential for heme synthesis. These proteins, named HemQ, are ironcoproporphyrin (coproheme) decarboxylases that catalyze the oxidative decarboxylation of coproheme III into protoheme IX. As purified, HemQs do not contain bound heme, but readily bind exogeneously supplied heme with low micromolar affinity. We find that the heme-bound form of HemQ has low peroxidase activity and in the presence of peroxide the bound heme may be destroyed. Furthermore, it is possible that HemQ may serve a dual role as a decarboxylase in heme biosynthesis and a regulatory protein in heme homeostasis.

  4. HemQ: An iron-coproporphyrin oxidative decarboxylase for protoheme synthesis in Firmicutes and Actinobacteria

    DOE PAGES

    Dailey, Harry A.; Gerdes, Svetlana

    2015-02-21

    Genes for chlorite dismutase-like proteins are found widely among heme-synthesizing bacteria and some Archaea. It is now known that among the Firmicutes and Actinobacteria these proteins do not possess chlorite dismutase activity but instead are essential for heme synthesis. These proteins, named HemQ, are ironcoproporphyrin (coproheme) decarboxylases that catalyze the oxidative decarboxylation of coproheme III into protoheme IX. As purified, HemQs do not contain bound heme, but readily bind exogeneously supplied heme with low micromolar affinity. We find that the heme-bound form of HemQ has low peroxidase activity and in the presence of peroxide the bound heme may be destroyed.more » Furthermore, it is possible that HemQ may serve a dual role as a decarboxylase in heme biosynthesis and a regulatory protein in heme homeostasis.« less

  5. Increase of histidine decarboxylase activity in mice hypothalamus after intracerebroventricular administration of lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Niimi, M; Mochizuki, T; Cacabelos, R; Yamatodani, A

    1993-10-01

    The effect of intracerebroventricular (icv) administration of lipopolysaccharide on histidine decarboxylase activity and histamine content in the hypothalamus were investigated in male mice of ddY strain in vivo. Two-fold increase in histidine decarboxylase activity (HDC) was observed 4 h after administration of 50 mcg lipopolysaccharide, and HDC activity returned to the basal level within 12 h after injection. Furthermore, histamine contents showed a slight decrease at 1 and 2 h and a mild increase at 12 h after administration. However, changes in histamine content were not statistically significant. These results suggest that the increase of HDC activity in the hypothalamus by lipopolysaccharide may be involved in the central neuroimmune responses.

  6. Identification of FAH Domain-containing Protein 1 (FAHD1) as Oxaloacetate Decarboxylase*

    PubMed Central

    Pircher, Haymo; von Grafenstein, Susanne; Diener, Thomas; Metzger, Christina; Albertini, Eva; Taferner, Andrea; Unterluggauer, Hermann; Kramer, Christian; Liedl, Klaus R.; Jansen-Dürr, Pidder

    2015-01-01

    Fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase (FAH) domain-containing proteins occur in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, where they carry out diverse enzymatic reactions, probably related to structural differences in their respective FAH domains; however, the precise relationship between structure of the FAH domain and the associated enzyme function remains elusive. In mammals, three FAH domain-containing proteins, FAHD1, FAHD2A, and FAHD2B, are known; however, their enzymatic function, if any, remains to be demonstrated. In bacteria, oxaloacetate is subject to enzymatic decarboxylation; however, oxaloacetate decarboxylases (ODx) were so far not identified in eukaryotes. Based on molecular modeling and subsequent biochemical investigations, we identified FAHD1 as a eukaryotic ODx enzyme. The results presented here indicate that dedicated oxaloacetate decarboxylases exist in eukaryotes. PMID:25575590

  7. Observation of Superoxide Production During Catalysis of Bacillus subtilis Oxalate Decarboxylase at pH4

    PubMed Central

    Twahir, Umar T.; Stedwell, Corey N.; Lee, Cory T.; Richards, Nigel G. J.; Polfer, Nicolas C.; Angerhofer, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    This contribution describes the trapping of the hydroperoxyl radical at a pH of 4 during turnover of wild-type oxalate decarboxylase and its T165V mutant using the spin trap BMPO. Radicals were detected and identified by a combination of EPR and mass spectrometry. Superoxide, or its conjugate acid, the hydroperoxyl radical, is expected as an intermediate in the decarboxylation and oxidation reactions of the oxalate monoanion both of which are promoted by oxalate decarboxylase. Another intermediate, the carbon dioxide radical anion was also observed. The quantitative yields of superoxide trapping is similar in the wild type and the mutant while it is significantly different for the trapping of the carbon dioxide radical anion. This suggests that the two radicals are released from different sites of the protein. PMID:25526893

  8. Unusual space-group pseudo symmetry in crystals of human phosphopantothenoylcysteine decarboxylase

    SciTech Connect

    Manoj, N.; Ealick, S.E.

    2010-12-01

    Phosphopantothenoylcysteine (PPC) decarboxylase is an essential enzyme in the biosynthesis of coenzyme A and catalyzes the decarboxylation of PPC to phosphopantetheine. Human PPC decarboxylase has been expressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized. The Laue class of the diffraction data appears to be {bar 3}m, suggesting space group R32 with two monomers per asymmetric unit. However, the crystals belong to the space group R3 and the asymmetric unit contains four monomers. The structure has been solved using molecular replacement and refined to a current R factor of 29%. The crystal packing can be considered as two interlaced lattices, each consistent with space group R32 and with the corresponding twofold axes parallel to each other but separated along the threefold axis. Thus, the true space group is R3 with four monomers per asymmetric unit.

  9. A coenzyme-independent decarboxylase/oxygenase cascade for the efficient synthesis of vanillin.

    PubMed

    Furuya, Toshiki; Miura, Misa; Kino, Kuniki

    2014-10-13

    Vanillin is one of the most widely used flavor compounds in the world as well as a promising versatile building block. The biotechnological production of vanillin from plant-derived ferulic acid has attracted much attention as a new alternative to chemical synthesis. One limitation of the known metabolic pathway to vanillin is its requirement for expensive coenzymes. Here, we developed a novel route to vanillin from ferulic acid that does not require any coenzymes. This artificial pathway consists of a coenzyme-independent decarboxylase and a coenzyme-independent oxygenase. When Escherichia coli cells harboring the decarboxylase/oxygenase cascade were incubated with ferulic acid, the cells efficiently synthesized vanillin (8.0 mM, 1.2 g L(-1) ) via 4-vinylguaiacol in one pot, without the generation of any detectable aromatic by-products. The efficient method described here might be applicable to the synthesis of other high-value chemicals from plant-derived aromatics.

  10. HemQ: an iron-coproporphyrin oxidative decarboxylase for protoheme synthesis in Firmicutes and Actinobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Dailey, Harry A.; Gerdes, Svetlana

    2015-01-01

    Genes for chlorite dismutase-like proteins are found widely among hemesynthesizing bacteria and some Archaea. It is now known that among the Firmicutes and Actinobacteria these proteins do not possess chlorite dismutase activity but instead are essential for heme synthesis. These proteins, named HemQ, are ironcoproporphyrin (coproheme) decarboxylases that catalyze the oxidative decarboxylation of coproheme III into protoheme IX. As purified, HemQs do not contain bound heme, but readily bind exogeneously supplied heme with low micromolar affinity. The heme-bound form of HemQ has low peroxidase activity and in the presence of peroxide the bound heme may be destroyed. Thus, it is possible that HemQ may serve a dual role as a decarboxylase in heme biosynthesis and a regulatory protein in heme homeostasis. PMID:25711532

  11. Perturbation of the Monomer-Monomer Interfaces of the Benzoylformate Decarboxylase Tetramer

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, Forest H.; Rogers, Megan P.; Paul, Lake N.; McLeish, Michael J.

    2014-08-14

    The X-ray structure of benzoylformate decarboxylase (BFDC) from Pseudomonas putida ATCC 12633 shows it to be a tetramer. This was believed to be typical of all thiamin diphosphate-dependent decarboxylases until recently when the structure of KdcA, a branched-chain 2-keto acid decarboxylase from Lactococcus lactis, showed it to be a homodimer. This lent credence to earlier unfolding experiments on pyruvate decarboxylase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae that indicated that it might be active as a dimer. To investigate this possibility in BFDC, we sought to shift the equilibrium toward dimer formation. Point mutations were made in the noncatalytic monomer–monomer interfaces, but these had a minimal effect on both tetramer formation and catalytic activity. Subsequently, the R141E/Y288A/A306F variant was shown by analytical ultracentrifugation to be partially dimeric. It was also found to be catalytically inactive. Further experiments revealed that just two mutations, R141E and A306F, were sufficient to markedly alter the dimer–tetramer equilibrium and to provide an ~450-fold decrease in kcat. Equilibrium denaturation studies suggested that the residual activity was possibly due to the presence of residual tetramer. The structures of the R141E and A306F variants, determined to <1.5 Å resolution, hinted that disruption of the monomer interfaces will be accompanied by movement of a loop containing Leu109 and Leu110. As these residues contribute to the hydrophobicity of the active site and the correct positioning of the substrate, it seems that tetramer formation may well be critical to the catalytic activity of BFDC.

  12. Arginine and lysine decarboxylases and the acid tolerance response of Salmonella Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Ordóñez, Avelino; Fernández, Ana; Bernardo, Ana; López, Mercedes

    2010-01-01

    Salmonella Typhimurium CECT 443 inactivation at pH 2.5 in Mineral Medium (MM) and MM supplemented with 0.01% (w/v) arginine, lysine or glutamic acid was studied using stationary-phase cells grown in buffered BHI pH 7.0 (non-acid adapted cells) and acidified BHI up to pH 4.5 with acetic, citric, lactic and hydrochloric acids (acid adapted cells). In all cases, acid adapted cells, with D-values ranging from 23.34 to 86.90 min, showed a significantly higher acid resistance than non-acid adapted cells, with D-values between 8.90 and 10.29 min. Whereas the conditions used for acid adaptation did not exert a significant effect on the acid resistance of the S. Typhimurium CECT 443 resulting cells, the inclusion of lysine and arginine in the challenge medium protected them against acid inactivation, reaching D-values of about 2 and 3 times higher, respectively, than those found in MM or MM supplemented with glutamic acid. None of these three amino acids significantly modified the acid resistance of non-acid adapted cells. The relative expression level of adiA (encoding the arginine decarboxylase), adiY (encoding the transcriptional activator of adiA), cadA (encoding the lysine decarboxylase) and cadB (encoding the lysine/cadaverine transport protein) was examined by quantitative PCR. Acid adapted cells showed higher relative expression levels for both systems, arginine decarboxylase and lysine decarboxylase, which demonstrates that the induction of specialized pH-homeostatic systems plays an important role in S. Typhimurium CECT 443 protection against acid stress. However, the increased acid resistance showed by acid adapted cells challenged in MM arginine or lysine free suggests the existence of other microbial survival strategies.

  13. Cell density-correlated induction of pyruvate decarboxylase under aerobic conditions in the yeast Pichia stipitis.

    PubMed

    Mergler, M; Klinner, U

    2001-01-01

    During the aerobic batch cultivation of P. stipitis CBS 5776 with glucose, pyruvate decarboxylase was activated in a cell number-correlated manner. Activation started when a cell number between 7 x 10(7) and x 10(8) cells ml(-1) was reached and the enzyme activity increased during further cultivation. This induction might have been triggered either by an unknown quorum sensing system or by a shortage of cytoplasmic acetyl-CoA.

  14. Gene controlling L-glutamic acid decarboxylase synthesis in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Lupo, M; Halpern, Y S

    1970-08-01

    Genetically related Escherichia coli K-12 strains were found to differ widely in their l-glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) activity. This variation is due to differences in the amount of GAD produced by the different cultures, rather than to the appearance of altered enzymes differing in catalytic activity. A regulatory gene, gadR, which controls the amount of GAD was mapped on the E. coli K-12 chromosome. A strain with a lesion in the structural gene for GAD is described.

  15. Autoradiographic measurement of relative changes in ornithine decarboxylase in axotomized superior cervical ganglion neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, M.R.

    1986-05-01

    An autoradiographic method is described for detecting changes in ornithine decarboxylase in axotomized superior cervical ganglion neurons of rats using (3H)difluoromethylornithine. An increase in binding to neurons was seen at 12 h and 1 day after crushing the postganglionic nerves. Binding returned to control values between 3 and 5 days postoperation. The patterns found using this method were in general agreement with prior reports of enzymatic changes in whole ganglia.

  16. Overexpression, purification, crystallization and preliminary structural studies of p-coumaric acid decarboxylase from Lactobacillus plantarum

    SciTech Connect

    Rodríguez, Héctor; Rivas, Blanca de las; Muñoz, Rosario; Mancheño, José M.

    2007-04-01

    The enzyme p-coumaric acid decarboxylase (PDC) from L. plantarum has been recombinantly expressed, purified and crystallized. The structure has been solved at 2.04 Å resolution by the molecular-replacement method. The substrate-inducible p-coumaric acid decarboxylase (PDC) from Lactobacillus plantarum has been overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified and confirmed to possess decarboxylase activity. The recombinant His{sub 6}-tagged enzyme was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method from a solution containing 20%(w/v) PEG 4000, 12%(w/v) 2-propanol, 0.2 M sodium acetate, 0.1 M Tris–HCl pH 8.0 with 0.1 M barium chloride as an additive. Diffraction data were collected in-house to 2.04 Å resolution. Crystals belonged to the tetragonal space group P4{sub 3}, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 43.15, c = 231.86 Å. The estimated Matthews coefficient was 2.36 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1}, corresponding to 48% solvent content, which is consistent with the presence of two protein molecules in the asymmetric unit. The structure of PDC has been determined by the molecular-replacement method. Currently, the structure of PDC complexed with substrate analogues is in progress, with the aim of elucidating the structural basis of the catalytic mechanism.

  17. Novel protein–protein interaction between spermidine synthase and S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase from Leishmania donovani

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, Arjun K.; Agnihotri, Pragati; Srivastava, Vijay Kumar; Pratap, J. Venkatesh

    2015-01-09

    Highlights: • L. donovani spermidine synthase and S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase have been cloned and purified. • S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase has autocatalytic property. • GST pull down assay shows the two proteins to form a metabolon. • Isothermal titration calorimetry shows that binding was exothermic having K{sub d} value of 0.4 μM. • Interaction confirmed by fluorescence spectroscopy and size exclusion chromatography. - Abstract: Polyamine biosynthesis pathway has long been considered an essential drug target for trypanosomatids including Leishmania. S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (AdoMetDc) and spermidine synthase (SpdSyn) are enzymes of this pathway that catalyze successive steps, with the product of the former, decarboxylated S-adenosylmethionine (dcSAM), acting as an aminopropyl donor for the latter enzyme. Here we have explored the possibility of and identified the protein–protein interaction between SpdSyn and AdoMetDc. The protein–protein interaction has been identified using GST pull down assay. Isothermal titration calorimetry reveals that the interaction is thermodynamically favorable. Fluorescence spectroscopy studies also confirms the interaction, with SpdSyn exhibiting a change in tertiary structure with increasing concentrations of AdoMetDc. Size exclusion chromatography suggests the presence of the complex as a hetero-oligomer. Taken together, these results suggest that the enzymes indeed form a heteromer. Computational analyses suggest that this complex differs significantly from the corresponding human complex, implying that this complex could be a better therapeutic target than the individual enzymes.

  18. Different mRNAs code for dopa decarboxylase in tissues of neuronal and nonneuronal origin

    SciTech Connect

    Krieger, M.; Coge, F.; Gros, F.; Thibault, J. )

    1991-03-15

    A cDNA clone for dopa decarboxylase has been isolated from a rat pheochromocytoma cDNA library and the cDNA sequence has been determined. It corresponds to an mRNA of 2094 nucleotides. The length of the mRNA was measured by primer-extension of rat pheochromocytoma RNA and the 5{prime} end of the sequence of the mRNA was confirmed by the PCR. A probe spanning the translation initiation site of the mRNA was used to hybridize with mRNAs from various organs of the rat. S1 nuclease digestion of the mRNAs annealed with this probe revealed two classes of mRNAs. The comparison of the cDNA sequence and published sequences for rat liver, human pheochromocytoma, and Droxophila dopa decarboxylase supported the conclusion that two mRNAs are produced: one is specific for tissue of neuronal origin and the other is specific for tissues of nonneuronal (mesodermal or endodermal) origin. The neuronal mRNA contains a 5{prime} untranslated sequence that is highly conserved between human and rat pheochromocytoma including a GA stretch. The coding sequence and the 3{prime} untranslated sequence of mRNAs from rat liver and pheochromocytoma are identical. The rat mRNA differs only in the 5{prime} untranslated region. Thus a unique gene codes for dopa decarboxylase and this gene gives rise to at least two transcripts presumably in response to different signals during development.

  19. Experimental Evidence and In Silico Identification of Tryptophan Decarboxylase in Citrus Genus.

    PubMed

    De Masi, Luigi; Castaldo, Domenico; Pignone, Domenico; Servillo, Luigi; Facchiano, Angelo

    2017-02-11

    Plant tryptophan decarboxylase (TDC) converts tryptophan into tryptamine, precursor of indolealkylamine alkaloids. The recent finding of tryptamine metabolites in Citrus plants leads to hypothesize the existence of TDC activity in this genus. Here, we report for the first time that, in Citrus x limon seedlings, deuterium labeled tryptophan is decarboxylated into tryptamine, from which successively deuterated N,N,N-trimethyltryptamine is formed. These results give an evidence of the occurrence of the TDC activity and the successive methylation pathway of the tryptamine produced from the tryptophan decarboxylation. In addition, with the aim to identify the genetic basis for the presence of TDC, we carried out a sequence similarity search for TDC in the Citrus genomes using as a probe the TDC sequence reported for the plant Catharanthus roseus. We analyzed the genomes of both Citrus clementina and Citrus sinensis, available in public database, and identified putative protein sequences of aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase. Similarly, 42 aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase sequences from 23 plant species were extracted from public databases. Potential sequence signatures for functional TDC were then identified. With this research, we propose for the first time a putative protein sequence for TDC in the genus Citrus.

  20. EPR Spin Trapping of an Oxalate-Derived Free Radical in the Oxalate Decarboxylase Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Imaram, Witcha; Saylor, Benjamin T.; Centonze, Christopher P.; Richards, Nigel G. J.; Angerhofer, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    EPR spin trapping experiments on bacterial oxalate decarboxylase from Bacillus subtilis under turn-over conditions are described. The use of doubly 13C-labeled oxalate leads to a characteristic splitting of the observed radical adducts using the spin trap N-tert-butyl-α-phenylnitrone linking them directly to the substrate. The radical was identified as the carbon dioxide radical anion which is a key intermediate in the hypothetical reaction mechanism of both decarboxylase and oxidase activities. X-ray crystallography had identified a flexible loop, SENS161-4, which acts as a lid to the putative active site. Site directed mutagenesis of the hinge amino acids, S161 and T165 was explored and showed increased radical trapping yields compared to the wild type. In particular, T165V shows approximately ten times higher radical yields while at the same time its decarboxylase activity was reduced by about a factor of ten. This mutant lacks a critical H-bond between T165 and R92 resulting in compromised control over its radical chemistry allowing the radical intermediate to leak into the surrounding solution. PMID:21277974

  1. Molecular cloning and functional identification of a plant ornithine decarboxylase cDNA.

    PubMed

    Michael, A J; Furze, J M; Rhodes, M J; Burtin, D

    1996-02-15

    A cDNA for a plant ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), a key enzyme in putrescine and polyamine biosynthesis, has been isolated from root cultures of the solanaceous plant Datura stramonium. Reverse transcription-PCR employing degenerate oligonucleotide primers representing conserved motifs from other eukaryotic ODCs was used to isolate the cDNA. The longest open reading frame potentially encodes a peptide of 431 amino acids and exhibits similarity to other eukaryotic ODCs, prokaryotic and eukaryotic arginine decarboxylases (ADCs), prokaryotic meso-diaminopimelate decarboxylases and the product of the tabA gene of Pseudomonas syringae cv. tabaci. Residues involved at the active site of the mouse ODC are conserved in the plant enzyme. The plant ODC does not possess the C-terminal extension found in the mammalian enzyme, implicated in rapid turnover of the protein, suggesting that the plant ODC may have a longer half-life. Expression of the plant ODC in Escherichia coli and demonstration of ODC activity confirmed that the cDNA encodes an active ODC enzyme. This is the first description of the primary structure of a eukaryotic ODC isolated from an organism where the alternative ADC routine to putrescine is present.

  2. 3,4-Dihydroxyphenylalanine (dopa) decarboxylase activity in the arthropod nervous system.

    PubMed

    Murdock, L L; Wirtz, R A; Köhler, G

    1973-04-01

    1. When homogenates of brains from mature adult locusts (Locusta migratoria) were incubated with l-3-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)[3-(14)C]alanine the major radioactive metabolite was dopamine, suggesting the presence of a dopa (3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine) decarboxylase. 2. Decarboxylation of l-dopa by this tissue, measured under optimum conditions by a radiochemical method, was 21mumol of CO(2)/h per g wet wt. Apparent decarboxylation of l-tyrosine proceeded at 0.34mumol of CO(2)/h per g wet wt. There was no detectable decarboxylation of l-tryptophan, l-histidine or l-phenylalanine. 3. Dopa decarboxylase activity was found in all major regions of the ventral nerve cord of the mature locust (range: 4-7mumol of CO(2)/h per g wet wt.) but was low or absent in thoracic peripheral nerve. 4. Marked decarboxylation of l-dopa was found in homogenates of brains of four other species of insects, and in brain and ventral nerve cord, but not in the claw nerve, of the crayfish. 5. The activity of the locust brain enzyme may be slightly lower at the time of imaginal ecdysis than during the mature period. By contrast, the dopa decarboxylase that produces dopamine as an intermediate in cuticle biosynthesis is known to be high in activity at the time of ecdysis and low in activity during the intermoult stages.

  3. Isolation and sequence of the gene encoding ornithine decarboxylase, SPE1, from Candida albicans by complementation of a spe1 delta strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    McNemar, M D; Gorman, J A; Buckley, H R

    1997-11-01

    The gene encoding ornithine decarboxylase, SPE1, from the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans has been isolated by complementation of an ornithine decarboxylase-negative (spe1 delta) strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Four transformants, three of which contain plasmids with the SPE1 gene, were isolated by selection on polyamine-free medium. The C. albicans ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) showed high homology with other eukaryotic ODCs at both the amino acid and nucleic acid levels.

  4. Enhancing muconic acid production from glucose and lignin-derived aromatic compounds via increased protocatechuate decarboxylase activity

    DOE PAGES

    Johnson, Christopher W.; Salvachua, Davinia; Khanna, Payal; ...

    2016-04-22

    The conversion of biomass-derived sugars and aromatic molecules to cis,cis-muconic acid (referred to hereafter as muconic acid or muconate) has been of recent interest owing to its facile conversion to adipic acid, an important commodity chemical. Metabolic routes to produce muconate from both sugars and many lignin-derived aromatic compounds require the use of a decarboxylase to convert protocatechuate (PCA, 3,4-dihydroxybenzoate) to catechol (1,2-dihydroxybenzene), two central aromatic intermediates in this pathway. Several studies have identified the PCA decarboxylase as a metabolic bottleneck, causing an accumulation of PCA that subsequently reduces muconate production. A recent study showed that activity of the PCAmore » decarboxylase is enhanced by co-expression of two genetically associated proteins, one of which likely produces a flavin-derived cofactor utilized by the decarboxylase. Using entirely genome-integrated gene expression, we have engineered Pseudomonas putida KT2440-derived strains to produce muconate from either aromatic molecules or sugars and demonstrate in both cases that co-expression of these decarboxylase associated proteins reduces PCA accumulation and enhances muconate production relative to strains expressing the PCA decarboxylase alone. In bioreactor experiments, co-expression increased the specific productivity (mg/g cells/h) of muconate from the aromatic lignin monomer p-coumarate by 50% and resulted in a titer of >15 g/L. In strains engineered to produce muconate from glucose, co-expression more than tripled the titer, yield, productivity, and specific productivity, with the best strain producing 4.92+/-0.48 g/L muconate. Furthermore, this study demonstrates that overcoming the PCA decarboxylase bottleneck can increase muconate yields from biomass-derived sugars and aromatic molecules in industrially relevant strains and cultivation conditions.« less

  5. Enhancing muconic acid production from glucose and lignin-derived aromatic compounds via increased protocatechuate decarboxylase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Christopher W.; Salvachua, Davinia; Khanna, Payal; Smith, Holly; Peterson, Darren J.; Beckham, Gregg T.

    2016-04-22

    The conversion of biomass-derived sugars and aromatic molecules to cis,cis-muconic acid (referred to hereafter as muconic acid or muconate) has been of recent interest owing to its facile conversion to adipic acid, an important commodity chemical. Metabolic routes to produce muconate from both sugars and many lignin-derived aromatic compounds require the use of a decarboxylase to convert protocatechuate (PCA, 3,4-dihydroxybenzoate) to catechol (1,2-dihydroxybenzene), two central aromatic intermediates in this pathway. Several studies have identified the PCA decarboxylase as a metabolic bottleneck, causing an accumulation of PCA that subsequently reduces muconate production. A recent study showed that activity of the PCA decarboxylase is enhanced by co-expression of two genetically associated proteins, one of which likely produces a flavin-derived cofactor utilized by the decarboxylase. Using entirely genome-integrated gene expression, we have engineered Pseudomonas putida KT2440-derived strains to produce muconate from either aromatic molecules or sugars and demonstrate in both cases that co-expression of these decarboxylase associated proteins reduces PCA accumulation and enhances muconate production relative to strains expressing the PCA decarboxylase alone. In bioreactor experiments, co-expression increased the specific productivity (mg/g cells/h) of muconate from the aromatic lignin monomer p-coumarate by 50% and resulted in a titer of >15 g/L. In strains engineered to produce muconate from glucose, co-expression more than tripled the titer, yield, productivity, and specific productivity, with the best strain producing 4.92+/-0.48 g/L muconate. Furthermore, this study demonstrates that overcoming the PCA decarboxylase bottleneck can increase muconate yields from biomass-derived sugars and aromatic molecules in industrially relevant strains and cultivation conditions.

  6. Parasite-specific inserts in the bifunctional S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase/ornithine decarboxylase of Plasmodium falciparum modulate catalytic activities and domain interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Birkholtz, Lyn-Marie; Wrenger, Carsten; Joubert, Fourie; Wells, Gordon A; Walter, Rolf D; Louw, Abraham I

    2004-01-01

    Polyamine biosynthesis of the malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, is regulated by a single, hinge-linked bifunctional PfAdoMetDC/ODC [ P. falciparum AdoMetDC (S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase)/ODC (ornithine decarboxylase)] with a molecular mass of 330 kDa. The bifunctional nature of AdoMetDC/ODC is unique to Plasmodia and is shared by at least three species. The PfAdoMetDC/ODC contains four parasite-specific regions ranging in size from 39 to 274 residues. The significance of the parasite-specific inserts for activity and protein-protein interactions of the bifunctional protein was investigated by a single- and multiple-deletion strategy. Deletion of these inserts in the bifunctional protein diminished the corresponding enzyme activity and in some instances also decreased the activity of the neighbouring, non-mutated domain. Intermolecular interactions between AdoMetDC and ODC appear to be vital for optimal ODC activity. Similar results have been reported for the bifunctional P. falciparum dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase [Yuvaniyama, Chitnumsub, Kamchonwongpaisan, Vanichtanankul, Sirawaraporn, Taylor, Walkinshaw and Yuthavong (2003) Nat. Struct. Biol. 10, 357-365]. Co-incubation of the monofunctional, heterotetrameric approximately 150 kDa AdoMetDC domain with the monofunctional, homodimeric ODC domain (approximately 180 kDa) produced an active hybrid complex of 330 kDa. The hinge region is required for bifunctional complex formation and only indirectly for enzyme activities. Deletion of the smallest, most structured and conserved insert in the ODC domain had the biggest impact on the activities of both decarboxylases, homodimeric ODC arrangement and hybrid complex formation. The remaining large inserts are predicted to be non-globular regions located on the surface of these proteins. The large insert in AdoMetDC in contrast is not implicated in hybrid complex formation even though distinct interactions between this insert and the two domains

  7. Comparative assessment of native and heterologous 2-oxo acid decarboxylases for application in isobutanol production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Milne, N; van Maris, A J A; Pronk, J T; Daran, J M

    2015-01-01

    Decarboxylation of α-ketoisovalerate to isobutyraldehyde is a key reaction in metabolic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for isobutanol production with published studies relying on overexpression of either the native ARO10 gene or of the Lactococcus lactis kivD decarboxylase gene resulting in low enzymatic activities. Here, we compare relevant properties for isobutanol production of Aro10, KivD and an additional, less studied, L. lactis decarboxylase KdcA. To eliminate interference by native decarboxylases, each 2-oxo acid decarboxylase was overexpressed in a 'decarboxylase-negative' (pdc1Δ pdc5Δ pdc6Δ aro10Δ) S. cerevisiae background. Kinetic analyses in cell extracts revealed a superior V max/K m ratio of KdcA for α-ketoisovalerate and a wide range of linear and branched-chain 2-oxo acids. However, KdcA also showed the highest activity with pyruvate which, in engineered strains, can contribute to formation of ethanol as a by-product. Removal of native decarboxylase genes eliminated growth on valine as sole nitrogen source and subsequent complementation of this growth impairment by expression of each decarboxylase indicated that based on the increased growth rate, the in vivo activity of KdcA with α-ketoisovalerate was higher than that of KivD and Aro10. Moreover, during oxygen-limited incubation in the presence of glucose, strains expressing kdcA or kivD showed a ca. twofold higher in vivo rate of conversion of α-ketoisovalerate into isobutanol than an ARO10-expressing strain. Finally, cell extracts from cultures grown on different nitrogen sources revealed increased activity of constitutively expressed KdcA after growth on both valine and phenylalanine, while KivD and Aro10 activity was only increased after growth on phenylalanine suggesting a difference in the regulation of these enzymes. This study illustrates important differences in substrate specificity, enzyme kinetics and functional expression between different decarboxylases in the context

  8. An Archaeal Glutamate Decarboxylase Homolog Functions as an Aspartate Decarboxylase and Is Involved in β-Alanine and Coenzyme A Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Tomita, Hiroya; Yokooji, Yuusuke; Ishibashi, Takuya; Imanaka, Tadayuki

    2014-01-01

    β-Alanine is a precursor for coenzyme A (CoA) biosynthesis and is a substrate for the bacterial/eukaryotic pantothenate synthetase and archaeal phosphopantothenate synthetase. β-Alanine is synthesized through various enzymes/pathways in bacteria and eukaryotes, including the direct decarboxylation of Asp by aspartate 1-decarboxylase (ADC), the degradation of pyrimidine, or the oxidation of polyamines. However, in most archaea, homologs of these enzymes are not present; thus, the mechanisms of β-alanine biosynthesis remain unclear. Here, we performed a biochemical and genetic study on a glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) homolog encoded by TK1814 from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus kodakarensis. GADs are distributed in all three domains of life, generally catalyzing the decarboxylation of Glu to γ-aminobutyrate (GABA). The recombinant TK1814 protein displayed not only GAD activity but also ADC activity using pyridoxal 5′-phosphate as a cofactor. Kinetic studies revealed that the TK1814 protein prefers Asp as its substrate rather than Glu, with nearly a 20-fold difference in catalytic efficiency. Gene disruption of TK1814 resulted in a strain that could not grow in standard medium. Addition of β-alanine, 4′-phosphopantothenate, or CoA complemented the growth defect, whereas GABA could not. Our results provide genetic evidence that TK1814 functions as an ADC in T. kodakarensis, providing the β-alanine necessary for CoA biosynthesis. The results also suggest that the GAD activity of TK1814 is not necessary for growth, at least under the conditions applied in this study. TK1814 homologs are distributed in a wide range of archaea and may be responsible for β-alanine biosynthesis in these organisms. PMID:24415726

  9. Kinetic, Mutational, and Structural Analysis of Malonate Semialdehyde Decarboxylase from Coryneform bacterium strain FG41: Mechanistic Implications for the Decarboxylase and Hydratase Activities

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Youzhong; Serrano, Hector; Poelarends, Gerrit J.; Johnson, William H.; Hackert, Marvin L.; Whitman, Christian P.

    2013-01-01

    Malonate semialdehyde decarboxylase from Pseudomonas pavonaceae 170 (designated Pp MSAD) is in a bacterial catabolic pathway for the nematicide 1,3-dichloropropene. MSAD has two known activities: it catalyzes the metal-ion independent decarboxylation of malonate semialdehyde to produce acetaldehyde and carbon dioxide, as well as a low-level hydration of 2-oxo-3-pentynoate to yield acetopyruvate. The latter activity is not known to be biologically relevant. Previous studies identified Pro-1, Asp-37, and a pair of arginines (Arg-73 and Arg-75) as critical residues in these activities. MSAD from Coryneform bacterium strain FG41 (designated FG41 MSAD) shares 38% pairwise sequence identity with the Pseudomonas enzyme including Pro-1 and Asp-37. However, Gln-73 replaces Arg-73, and the second arginine is shifted to Arg-76 by the insertion of a glycine. In order to determine how these changes relate to the activities of FG41 MSAD, the gene was cloned and the enzyme expressed and characterized. The enzyme has a comparable decarboxylase activity, but a significantly reduced hydratase activity. Mutagenesis along with crystal structures of the native enzyme (2.0 Å resolution) and the enzyme modified by a 3-oxopropanoate moiety (resulting from the incubation of enzyme and 3-bromopropiolate) (2.2 Å resolution) provided a structural basis. The roles of Pro-1 and Asp-37 are likely the same as those proposed for MSAD. However, the side chains of Thr-72, Gln-73, and Tyr-123 replace those of Arg-73 and Arg-75 in the mechanism and play a role in binding and catalysis. The structures also show that Arg-76 is likely too distant to play a direct role in the mechanism. FG41 MSAD is the second functionally annotated homologue in the MSAD family of the tautomerase superfamily and could represent a new subfamily. PMID:23781927

  10. An archaeal glutamate decarboxylase homolog functions as an aspartate decarboxylase and is involved in β-alanine and coenzyme A biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Hiroya; Yokooji, Yuusuke; Ishibashi, Takuya; Imanaka, Tadayuki; Atomi, Haruyuki

    2014-03-01

    β-Alanine is a precursor for coenzyme A (CoA) biosynthesis and is a substrate for the bacterial/eukaryotic pantothenate synthetase and archaeal phosphopantothenate synthetase. β-Alanine is synthesized through various enzymes/pathways in bacteria and eukaryotes, including the direct decarboxylation of Asp by aspartate 1-decarboxylase (ADC), the degradation of pyrimidine, or the oxidation of polyamines. However, in most archaea, homologs of these enzymes are not present; thus, the mechanisms of β-alanine biosynthesis remain unclear. Here, we performed a biochemical and genetic study on a glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) homolog encoded by TK1814 from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus kodakarensis. GADs are distributed in all three domains of life, generally catalyzing the decarboxylation of Glu to γ-aminobutyrate (GABA). The recombinant TK1814 protein displayed not only GAD activity but also ADC activity using pyridoxal 5'-phosphate as a cofactor. Kinetic studies revealed that the TK1814 protein prefers Asp as its substrate rather than Glu, with nearly a 20-fold difference in catalytic efficiency. Gene disruption of TK1814 resulted in a strain that could not grow in standard medium. Addition of β-alanine, 4'-phosphopantothenate, or CoA complemented the growth defect, whereas GABA could not. Our results provide genetic evidence that TK1814 functions as an ADC in T. kodakarensis, providing the β-alanine necessary for CoA biosynthesis. The results also suggest that the GAD activity of TK1814 is not necessary for growth, at least under the conditions applied in this study. TK1814 homologs are distributed in a wide range of archaea and may be responsible for β-alanine biosynthesis in these organisms.

  11. NADH: ubiquinone oxidoreductase inhibitors block induction of ornithine decarboxylase activity in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Rowlands, J C; Casida, J E

    1998-11-01

    Rotenone is the classical inhibitor of NADH: ubiquinone oxidoreductase and its analogue deguelin is a potent inhibitor of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA)-induced ornithine decarboxylase mRNA steady state level and enzyme activity in mouse 308 cells (Gerhäuser et al. 1995). In MCF-7 human breast cancer cells, rotenone, deguelin and two structurally-unrelated miticides (pyridaben and fenazaquin) inhibit not only NADH: ubiquinone oxidoreductase but also induced ornithine decarboxylase activity with IC50 values of < 1 to 70 nM. Rotenone inhibits ornithine decarboxylase activity equally well as induced by TPA, insulin-like growth factor I and 17 beta-oestradiol. Pyridaben is the most potent of the four inhibitors not only for NADH: ubiquinone oxidoreductase activity (bovine heart enzyme) and TPA-induced ornithine decarboxylase activity and mRNA steady state level but also for TPA-induced reactive oxygen species. It is therefore proposed that NADH: ubiquinone oxidoreductase inhibitors block multiple and possibly reactive oxygen species-modulated pathways which regulate ornithine decarboxylase activity.

  12. Carbon Dioxide Effects on Ethanol Production, Pyruvate Decarboxylase, and Alcohol Dehydrogenase Activities in Anaerobic Sweet Potato Roots 1

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ling A.; Hammett, Larry K.; Pharr, David M.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of varied anaerobic atmospheres on the metabolism of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas [L.] Lam.) roots was studied. The internal gas atmospheres of storage roots changed rapidly when the roots were submerged under water. O2 and N2 gases disappeared quickly and were replaced by CO2. There were no appreciable differences in gas composition among the four cultivars that were studied. Under different anaerobic conditions, ethanol concentration in the roots was highest in a CO2 environment, followed by submergence and a N2 environment in all the cultivars except one. A positive relationship was found between ethanol production and pyruvate decarboxylase activity from both 100% CO2-treated and 100% N2-treated roots. CO2 atmospheres also resulted in higher pyruvate decarboxylase activity than did N2 atmospheres. Concentrations of CO2 were higher within anaerobic roots than those in the ambient anaerobic atmosphere. The level of pyruvate decarboxylase and ethanol in anaerobic roots was proportional to the ambient CO2 concentration. The measurable activity of pyruvate decarboxylase that was present in the roots was about 100 times less than that of alcohol dehydrogenase. Considering these observations, it is suggested that the rate-limiting enzyme for ethanol biosynthesis in sweet potato storage roots under anoxia is likely to be pyruvate decarboxylase rather than alcohol dehydrogenase. PMID:16662798

  13. Biochemical Evaluation of the Decarboxylation and Decarboxylation-Deamination Activities of Plant Aromatic Amino Acid Decarboxylases*

    PubMed Central

    Torrens-Spence, Michael P.; Liu, Pingyang; Ding, Haizhen; Harich, Kim; Gillaspy, Glenda; Li, Jianyong

    2013-01-01

    Plant aromatic amino acid decarboxylase (AAAD) enzymes are capable of catalyzing either decarboxylation or decarboxylation-deamination on various combinations of aromatic amino acid substrates. These two different activities result in the production of arylalkylamines and the formation of aromatic acetaldehydes, respectively. Variations in product formation enable individual enzymes to play different physiological functions. Despite these catalytic variations, arylalkylamine and aldehyde synthesizing AAADs are indistinguishable without protein expression and characterization. In this study, extensive biochemical characterization of plant AAADs was performed to identify residues responsible for differentiating decarboxylation AAADs from aldehyde synthase AAADs. Results demonstrated that a tyrosine residue located on a catalytic loop proximal to the active site of plant AAADs is primarily responsible for dictating typical decarboxylase activity, whereas a phenylalanine at the same position is primarily liable for aldehyde synthase activity. Mutagenesis of the active site phenylalanine to tyrosine in Arabidopsis thaliana and Petroselinum crispum aromatic acetaldehyde synthases primarily converts the enzymes activity from decarboxylation-deamination to decarboxylation. The mutation of the active site tyrosine to phenylalanine in the Catharanthus roseus and Papaver somniferum aromatic amino acid decarboxylases changes the enzymes decarboxylation activity to a primarily decarboxylation-deamination activity. Generation of these mutant enzymes enables the production of unusual AAAD enzyme products including indole-3-acetaldehyde, 4-hydroxyphenylacetaldehyde, and phenylethylamine. Our data indicates that the tyrosine and phenylalanine in the catalytic loop region could serve as a signature residue to reliably distinguish plant arylalkylamine and aldehyde synthesizing AAADs. Additionally, the resulting data enables further insights into the mechanistic roles of active site

  14. Gene cloning, recombinant expression, purification and characterization of l-methionine decarboxylase from Streptomyces sp. 590.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Masaya; Okada, Akane; Yamamoto, Kumiko; Okugochi, Tomomi; Kusaka, Chika; Kudou, Daizou; Nemoto, Michiko; Inagaki, Junko; Hirose, Yuu; Okajima, Toshihide; Tamura, Takashi; Soda, Kenji; Inagaki, Kenji

    2017-04-01

    l-Methionine decarboxylase (MetDC) from Streptomyces sp. 590 depends on pyridoxal 5'-phosphate and catalyzes the non-oxidative decarboxylation of l-methionine to produce 3-methylthiopropylamine and carbon dioxide. MetDC gene (mdc) was determined to consist of 1,674 bp encoding 557 amino acids, and the amino acid sequence is similar to that of l-histidine decarboxylases and l-valine decarboxylases from Streptomyces sp. strains. The mdc gene was cloned and recombinant MetDC was heterologously expressed by Escherichia coli. The purification of recombinant MetDC was carried out by DEAE-Toyopearl and Ni-NTA agarose column chromatography. The recombinant enzyme was homodimeric with a molecular mass of 61,000 Da and showed optimal activity between 45 to 55 °C and at pH 6.6, and the stability below 30 °C and between pH 4.6 to 7.0. l-Methionine and l-norleucine were good substrates for MetDC. The Michaelis constants for l-methionine and l-norleucine were 30 and 73 mM, respectively. The recombinant MetDC (0.50 U/ml) severely inhibited growth of human tumour cells A431 (epidermoid ovarian carcinoma cell line) and MDA-MB-231 (breast cancer cell line), however showed relatively low cytotoxicity for human normal cell NHDF-Neo (dermal fibroblast cell line from neonatal foreskin). This study revealed the properties of the gene and the protein sequence of MetDC for the first time. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Japanese Biochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  15. Molecular Modeling and Virtual Screening Approach to Discover Potential Antileishmanial Inhibitors Against Ornithine Decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Rajan Kumar; Prajapati, Priyanka; Goyal, Sukriti; Grover, Abhinav; Prajapati, Vijay Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is a tropical neglected disease, which encounters poorest of poor people living in Asia, Africa and Latin America; causing the mortality of more than 30,000 people worldwide. The armamentarium for the treatment of VL cases is limited and continuously facing decreasing of efficacy for existing drugs. Ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) is one of the interesting drug targets in Leishmania donovani, due to its association with redox metabolism. To search an antileishmanial compound showing the inhibitory effect against ornithine decarboxylase of Leishmania donovani Method: In this study, we have modelled the three dimensional structure of ODC using Phyre2 (Protein Homology/analog Y Recognition Engine V 2.0), followed by validation using VADAR (Volume, Area, Dihedral Angle Reporter), RAMPAGE, ERRAT, Verify3D and ProSA (Protein Structure Analysis). In order to develop potential antileishmanial, we conducted a high throughput virtual screening of ZINC database ligands comprising of 135,966 compounds. Furthermore, QikProp, ADMET predictor and MM-GBSA was performed for ADME (Absorption, Distribution, Metabolism and Elimination), toxicity and binding energy prediction for top ligands, respectively. Finally, molecular dynamics simulation was performed to get potential antileishmanial compounds. Screening of zinc database compounds using high throughput virtual screening has given twelve compounds with good inhibition activity against ornithine decarboxylase. Furthermore, the molecular dynamics simulation work reveals that ZINC67909154 could be a potent inhibitor and this compound can be used to combat VL disease Conclusion: This study concludes that ZINC67909154 has the great potential to inhibit L. donovani ODC and would add to the drug discovery process against visceral leishmaniasis. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  16. Cloning of aldB, which encodes alpha-acetolactate decarboxylase, an exoenzyme from Bacillus brevis.

    PubMed Central

    Diderichsen, B; Wedsted, U; Hedegaard, L; Jensen, B R; Sjøholm, C

    1990-01-01

    A gene for alpha-acetolactate decarboxylase (ALDC) was cloned from Bacillus brevis in Escherichia coli and in Bacillus subtilis. The 1.3-kilobase-pair nucleotide sequence of the gene, aldB, encoding ALDC and its flanking regions was determined. An open reading frame of 285 amino acids included a typical N-terminal signal peptide of 24 or 27 amino acids. A B. subtilis strain harboring the aldB gene on a recombinant plasmid processed and secreted ALDC. In contrast, a similar enzyme from Enterobacter aerogenes is intracellular. Images PMID:2198252

  17. Apraxia in anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase-associated stiff person syndrome: link to corticobasal degeneration?

    PubMed

    Bowen, Lauren N; Subramony, S H; Heilman, Kenneth M

    2015-01-01

    Corticobasal syndrome (CBS) is associated with asymmetrical rigidity as well as asymmetrical limb-kinetic and ideomotor apraxia. Stiff person syndrome (SPS) is characterized by muscle stiffness and gait difficulties. Whereas patients with CBS have several forms of pathology, many patients with SPS have glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies (GAD-ab), but these 2 disorders have not been reported to coexist. We report 2 patients with GAD-ab-positive SPS who also had signs suggestive of CBS, including asymmetrical limb rigidity associated with both asymmetrical limb-kinetic and ideomotor apraxia. Future studies should evaluate patients with CBS for GAD-ab and people with SPS for signs of CBS.

  18. Endogenous Inactivators of Arginase, l-Arginine Decarboxylase, and Agmatine Amidinohydrolase in Evernia prunastri Thallus 1

    PubMed Central

    Legaz, María Estrella; Vicente, Carlos

    1983-01-01

    Arginase (EC 3.5.3.1), l-arginine decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.19), and agmatine amidinohydrolase (EC 3.5.3.11) activities spontaneously decay in Evernia prunastri thalli incubated on 40 millimolar l-arginine used as inducer of the three enzymes if dithiothreitol is not added to the media. Lichen thalli accumulate both chloroatranorin and evernic acid in parallel to the loss of activity. These substances behave as inactivators of the enzymes at a range of concentrations between 2 and 20 micromolar, whereas several concentrations of dithiothreitol reverse, to some extent, the in vitro inactivation. PMID:16662821

  19. Endogenous Inactivators of Arginase, l-Arginine Decarboxylase, and Agmatine Amidinohydrolase in Evernia prunastri Thallus.

    PubMed

    Legaz, M E; Vicente, C

    1983-02-01

    Arginase (EC 3.5.3.1), l-arginine decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.19), and agmatine amidinohydrolase (EC 3.5.3.11) activities spontaneously decay in Evernia prunastri thalli incubated on 40 millimolar l-arginine used as inducer of the three enzymes if dithiothreitol is not added to the media. Lichen thalli accumulate both chloroatranorin and evernic acid in parallel to the loss of activity. These substances behave as inactivators of the enzymes at a range of concentrations between 2 and 20 micromolar, whereas several concentrations of dithiothreitol reverse, to some extent, the in vitro inactivation.

  20. Vanadate stimulates ornithine decarboxylase activity in C3H/10T1/2 cells.

    PubMed

    Davison, A J; Stern, A; Fatur, D J; Tsang, S S

    1991-06-01

    Ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) activity of C3H/10T1/2 cells reflects their response to conflicting actions of many tumor promoters and tumor suppressors. In cultured C3H/10T1/2 cells, addition of vanadate (50 nM) increased ODC activity. Over the range 0.05-5 microM, vanadate increased ODC levels in a dose dependent manner to 11 times control levels. The presence of retinoic acid (5 microM) or the absence of fetal calf serum blocked the stimulation by vanadate.

  1. Fluorimetric assay for ornithine decarboxylase by high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Haraguchi, K; Kai, M; Kohashi, K; Ohkura, Y

    1980-12-05

    A highly sensitive method for the assay of ornithine decarboxylase in sample solutions prepared from rat tissue homogenate is described which employs high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection. Putrescine formed from ornithine under the optimal conditions for the enzyme reaction is treated by Cellex P column chromatography for clean-up and converted into the fluorescamine derivative in the presence of cupric ion which inhibits the reaction of interfering amines with fluorescamine. The derivative is separated by reversed-phase chromatography on LiChrosorb RP-18 with linear gradient elution. The lower limit of detection for putrescine formed enzymatically is 5 pmol.

  2. Fusion of pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase increases ethanol production in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Lewicka, Aleksandra J; Lyczakowski, Jan J; Blackhurst, Gavin; Pashkuleva, Christiana; Rothschild-Mancinelli, Kyle; Tautvaišas, Dainius; Thornton, Harry; Villanueva, Hugo; Xiao, Weike; Slikas, Justinas; Horsfall, Louise; Elfick, Alistair; French, Christopher

    2014-12-19

    Ethanol is an important biofuel. Heterologous expression of Zymomonas mobilis pyruvate decarboxylase (Pdc) and alcohol dehydrogenase (AdhB) increases ethanol production in Escherichia coli. A fusion of PDC and ADH was generated and expressed in E. coli. The fusion enzyme was demonstrated to possess both activities. AdhB activity was significantly lower when fused to PDC than when the two enzymes were expressed separately. However, cells expressing the fusion protein generated ethanol more rapidly and to higher levels than cells coexpressing Pdc and AdhB, suggesting a specific rate enhancement due to the fusion of the two enzymes.

  3. Effects of glutamate decarboxylase and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporter on the bioconversion of GABA in engineered Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Le Vo, Tam Dinh; Kim, Tae Wan; Hong, Soon Ho

    2012-05-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a non-essential amino acid and a precursor of pyrrolidone, a monomer of nylon 4. GABA can be biosynthesized through the decarboxylation of L: -glutamate by glutamate decarboxylase. In this study, the effects of glutamate decarboxylase (gadA, gadB), glutamate/GABA antiporter (gadC) and GABA aminotransferase (gabT) on GABA production were investigated in Escherichia coli. Glutamate decarboxylase was overexpressed alone or with the glutamate/GABA antiporter to enhance GABA synthesis. GABA aminotransferase, which redirects GABA into the TCA cycle, was knock-out mutated. When gadB and gadC were co-overexpressed in the gabT mutant strain, a final GABA concentration of 5.46 g/l was obtained from 10 g/l of monosodium glutamate (MSG), which corresponded to a GABA yield of 89.5%.

  4. Expression of Ornithine Decarboxylase Is Transiently Increased by Pollination, 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic Acid, and Gibberellic Acid in Tomato Ovaries1

    PubMed Central

    Alabadí, David; Carbonell, Juan

    1998-01-01

    A cDNA encoding for a functional ornithine decarboxylase has been isolated from a cDNA library of carpels of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.). Ornithine decarboxylase in tomato is represented by a single-copy gene that we show to be up-regulated during early fruit growth induced by 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid and gibberellic acid. PMID:9733552

  5. Inhibition of ornithine decarboxylase of HeLa cells by diamines and polyamines. Effect on cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Branca, Andrew A.; Herbst, Edward J.

    1980-01-01

    1. Ornithine decarboxylase activity is stimulated in high-density HeLa-cell cultures by dilution of or replacement of spent culture medium with fresh medium containing 10% (v/v) horse serum. 2. After stimulation, ornithine decarboxylase activity reaches a peak at 4–6h, then rapidly declines to the low enzyme activity characteristic of quiescent cultures, where it remains during the remainder of the cell cycle. 3. The stimulation of ornithine decarboxylase is eliminated by the addition of 0.5μm-spermine or -spermidine or 10μm-putrescine to the HeLa-cell cultures at the time of re-feeding with fresh medium. Much higher concentrations (1mm) of the non-physiological diamines, 1,3-diamino-propane or 1,3-diamino-2-hydroxypropane, are required to eliminate the stimulation of ornithine decarboxylase in re-fed HeLa-cell cultures. 4. A heat-labile, non-diffusible inhibitor, comparable with the inhibitory protein ornithine decarboxylase antizyme, is induced in HeLa cells by the addition of exogenous diamines or polyamines. 5. Intracellular putrescine is eliminated, intracellular spermidine and spermine are severely decreased and proliferation of HeLa cells is inhibited when cultures are maintained for 48h in the presence of the non-physiological inducer of ornithine decarboxylase antizyme, 1,3-diamino-2-hydroxypropane. Exogenous putrescine, a physiological inducer of the antizyme, does not decrease intracellular polyamines or interfere with proliferation of HeLa cells. PMID:7396844

  6. Amine cations promote concurrent conversion of prohistidine decarboxylase from Lactobacillus 30a to active enzyme and a modified proenzyme.

    PubMed Central

    van Poelje, P D; Snell, E E

    1988-01-01

    Activation of prohistidine decarboxylase (pi 6) from Lactobacillus 30a proceeds by an intramolecular, pH- and monovalent cation-dependent reaction in which its constituent pi chains are cleaved nonhydrolytically between Ser-81 and Ser-82 with loss of NH3 and conversion of Ser-82 to the pyruvoyl residue of active histidine decarboxylase (alpha beta)6. Amines with pKa values more than 7.0 substitute for K+ or NH4+ in the activation of prohistidine decarboxylase, but they also catalyze its inactivation in a competing reaction, pi 6----pi'6. Sequence analysis of the appropriate tryptic peptide from amine-inactivated prohistidine decarboxylase established that inactivation results from conversion of Ser-82 of the pi chain to an aminoacrylate residue. The inactivated proenzyme (pi'6) does not form histidine decarboxylase; this fact eliminates one of two postulated mechanisms of activation and, thus, favors activation by beta-elimination of the acyl group of an intermediate ester formed between Ser-81 and Ser-82. L-Histidine is bound by the proenzyme (Kd = 1.7 x 10(-4) M) and is an effective activator; one binding site is present per pi subunit. K+, NH4+, and Na+ competitively inhibit (Ki values = 2.8-4.4 x 10(-3) M) activation by histidine. The data suggest the presence of two classes of monovalent cation binding sites on prohistidine decarboxylase: one (near Ser-82) is readily saturable and one is unsaturable even by 2.4 M K+. Images PMID:3250558

  7. Local anesthetics inhibit induction of ornithine decarboxylase by the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate.

    PubMed Central

    Yuspa, S H; Lichti, U; Ben, T

    1980-01-01

    The induction of ornithine decarboxylase (L-ornithine carboxy-lyase, EC 4.1.1.17) activity in mouse epidermal cells in vivo and in vitro occurs rapidly after exposure to the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA). This induction has characteristics of a cell surface receptor-mediated process. Local anesthetics modify a variety of cellular responses mediated by membrane receptors. When cultured mouse epidermal cells were exposed to the local anesthetics lidocaine, tetracaine, or procaine (0.1-1 mM), induction of the decarboxylase by TPA was inhibited by more than 90%. In vivo, lidocaine essentially abolishes the decarboxylase response of mouse epidermis when applied shortly after TPA. In contrast, local anesthetics have no effect on the enzyme's activity when added directly to the assay mixture and, in concert with TPA, have only a minimal effect on overall protein synthesis relative to controls. However, lidocaine has no effect on TPA-stimulated DNA synthesis in vitro (12-fold with or without lidocaine). Local anesthetics also markedly inhibit induction of the decarboxylase by ultraviolet light, which is probably not membrane mediated. Furthermore, in culture, lidocaine has only a small inhibitory effect on ornithine decarboxylase when given before TPA but is an effective inhibitor even when given up to 4-5 hr after the promoter, a time when decarboxylase activity has already increased. These findings suggest that local anesthetics, which are tertiary amines, do not act at the site of interaction of TPA and its putative receptor but may be acting specifically on polyamine biosynthesis. These drugs could be useful agents to determine the role of the polyamine pathway in tumor promotion. PMID:6933562

  8. Polyamine formation by arginine decarboxylase as a transducer of hormonal, environmental and stress stimuli in higher plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galston, A. W.; Flores, H. E.; Kaur-Sawhney, R.

    1982-01-01

    Recent evidence implicates polyamines including putrescine in the regulation of such diverse plant processes as cell division, embryogenesis and senescence. We find that the enzyme arginine decarboxylase, which controls the rate of putrescine formation in some plant systems, is activated by light acting through P(r) phytochrome as a receptor, by the plant hormone gibberellic acid, by osmotic shock and by other stress stimuli. We therefore propose arginine decarboxylase as a possible transducer of the various initially received tropistic stimuli in plants. The putrescine formed could act by affecting cytoskeletal components.

  9. Acetolactate synthase from Bacillus subtilis serves as a 2-ketoisovalerate decarboxylase for isobutanol biosynthesis in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Atsumi, Shota; Li, Zhen; Liao, James C

    2009-10-01

    A pathway toward isobutanol production previously constructed in Escherichia coli involves 2-ketoacid decarboxylase (Kdc) from Lactococcus lactis that decarboxylates 2-ketoisovalerate (KIV) to isobutyraldehyde. Here, we showed that a strain lacking Kdc is still capable of producing isobutanol. We found that acetolactate synthase from Bacillus subtilis (AlsS), which originally catalyzes the condensation of two molecules of pyruvate to form 2-acetolactate, is able to catalyze the decarboxylation of KIV like Kdc both in vivo and in vitro. Mutational studies revealed that the replacement of Q487 with amino acids with small side chains (Ala, Ser, and Gly) diminished only the decarboxylase activity but maintained the synthase activity.

  10. Acetolactate Synthase from Bacillus subtilis Serves as a 2-Ketoisovalerate Decarboxylase for Isobutanol Biosynthesis in Escherichia coli▿

    PubMed Central

    Atsumi, Shota; Li, Zhen; Liao, James C.

    2009-01-01

    A pathway toward isobutanol production previously constructed in Escherichia coli involves 2-ketoacid decarboxylase (Kdc) from Lactococcus lactis that decarboxylates 2-ketoisovalerate (KIV) to isobutyraldehyde. Here, we showed that a strain lacking Kdc is still capable of producing isobutanol. We found that acetolactate synthase from Bacillus subtilis (AlsS), which originally catalyzes the condensation of two molecules of pyruvate to form 2-acetolactate, is able to catalyze the decarboxylation of KIV like Kdc both in vivo and in vitro. Mutational studies revealed that the replacement of Q487 with amino acids with small side chains (Ala, Ser, and Gly) diminished only the decarboxylase activity but maintained the synthase activity. PMID:19684168

  11. Characterization of Plasmodium phosphatidylserine decarboxylase expressed in yeast and application for inhibitor screening

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jae-Yeon; Lawres, Lauren; Toh, Justin Y.; Voelker, Dennis R.; Ben Mamoun, Choukri

    2016-01-01

    Summary Phospholipid biosynthesis is critical for the development, differentiation and pathogenesis of several eukaryotic pathogens. Genetic studies have validated the pathway for phosphatidylethanolamine synthesis from phosphatidylserine catalyzed by phosphatidylserine decarboxylase enzymes (PSD) as a suitable target for development of antimicrobials; however no inhibitors of this class of enzymes have been discovered. We show that the Plasmodium falciparum PSD can restore the essential function of the yeast gene in strains requiring PSD for growth. Genetic, biochemical and metabolic analyses demonstrate that amino acids between positions 40 and 70 of the parasite enzyme are critical for proenzyme processing and decarboxylase activity. We used the essential role of Plasmodium PSD in yeast as a tool for screening a library of anti-malarials. One of these compounds is 7-chloro-N-(4-ethoxyphenyl)-4-quinolinamine, an inhibitor with potent activity against P. falciparum, and low toxicity toward mammalian cells. We synthesized an analog of this compound and showed that it inhibits PfPSD activity and eliminates Plasmodium yoelii infection in mice. These results highlight the importance of 4-quinolinamines as a novel class of drugs targeting membrane biogenesis via inhibition of PSD activity PMID:26585333

  12. Does the aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase contribute to thyronamine biosynthesis?

    PubMed

    Hoefig, Carolin S; Renko, Kostja; Piehl, Susanne; Scanlan, Thomas S; Bertoldi, Mariarita; Opladen, Thomas; Hoffmann, Georg Friedrich; Klein, Jeannette; Blankenstein, Oliver; Schweizer, Ulrich; Köhrle, Josef

    2012-02-26

    Thyronamines (TAM), recently described endogenous signaling molecules, exert metabolic and pharmacological actions partly opposing those of the thyromimetic hormone T(3). TAM biosynthesis from thyroid hormone (TH) precursors requires decarboxylation of the L-alanine side chain and several deiodination steps to convert e.g. L-thyroxine (T(4)) into the most potent 3-T(1)AM. Aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) was proposed to mediate TAM biosynthesis via decarboxylation of TH. This hypothesis was tested by incubating recombinant human AADC, which actively catalyzes dopamine production from DOPA, with several TH. Under all reaction conditions tested, AADC failed to catalyze TH decarboxylation, thus challenging the initial hypothesis. These in vitro observations are supported by detection of 3-T(1)AM in plasma of patients with AADC-deficiency at levels (46 ± 18 nM, n=4) similar to those of healthy controls. Therefore, we propose that the enzymatic decarboxylation needed to form TAM from TH is catalyzed by another unique, perhaps TH-specific, decarboxylase. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Hypothalamic L-Histidine Decarboxylase Is Up-Regulated During Chronic REM Sleep Deprivation of Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Gloria E.; Koban, Michael

    2016-01-01

    A competition of neurobehavioral drives of sleep and wakefulness occurs during sleep deprivation. When enforced chronically, subjects must remain awake. This study examines histaminergic neurons of the tuberomammillary nucleus of the posterior hypothalamus in response to enforced wakefulness in rats. We tested the hypothesis that the rate-limiting enzyme for histamine biosynthesis, L-histidine decarboxylase (HDC), would be up-regulated during chronic rapid eye movement sleep deprivation (REM-SD) because histamine plays a major role in maintaining wakefulness. Archived brain tissues of male Sprague Dawley rats from a previous study were used. Rats had been subjected to REM-SD by the flowerpot paradigm for 5, 10, or 15 days. For immunocytochemistry, rats were transcardially perfused with acrolein-paraformaldehyde for immunodetection of L-HDC; separate controls used carbodiimide-paraformaldehyde for immunodetection of histamine. Immunolocalization of histamine within the tuberomammillary nucleus was validated using carbodiimide. Because HDC antiserum has cross-reactivity with other decarboxylases at high antibody concentrations, titrations localized L-HDC to only tuberomammillary nucleus at a dilution of ≥ 1:300,000. REM-SD increased immunoreactive HDC by day 5 and it remained elevated in both dorsal and ventral aspects of the tuberomammillary complex. Our results suggest that up-regulation of L-HDC within the tuberomammillary complex during chronic REM-SD may be responsible for maintaining wakefulness. PMID:27997552

  14. Evolutionary Trails of Plant Group II Pyridoxal Phosphate-Dependent Decarboxylase Genes

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rahul

    2016-01-01

    Type II pyridoxal phosphate-dependent decarboxylase (PLP_deC) enzymes play important metabolic roles during nitrogen metabolism. Recent evolutionary profiling of these genes revealed a sharp expansion of histidine decarboxylase genes in the members of Solanaceae family. In spite of the high sequence homology shared by PLP_deC orthologs, these enzymes display remarkable differences in their substrate specificities. Currently, limited information is available on the gene repertoires and substrate specificities of PLP_deCs which renders their precise annotation challenging and offers technical challenges in the immediate identification and biochemical characterization of their full gene complements in plants. Herein, we explored their evolutionary trails in a comprehensive manner by taking advantage of high-throughput data accessibility and computational approaches. We discussed the premise that has enabled an improved reconstruction of their evolutionary lineage and evaluated the factors offering constraints in their rapid functional characterization, till date. We envisage that the synthesized information herein would act as a catalyst for the rapid exploration of their biochemical specificity and physiological roles in more plant species. PMID:27602045

  15. NUTRITIONAL FACTORS STIMULATING THE FORMATION OF LYSINE DECARBOXYLASE IN ESCHERICHIA COLI

    PubMed Central

    Maretzki, Andrew; Mallette, M. F.

    1962-01-01

    Maretzki, Andrew (Pennsylvania State University, University Park) and M. F. Mallette. Nutritional factors stimulating the formation of lysine decarboxylase in Escherichia coli. J. Bacteriol. 83:720–726. 1962 — Inclusion of complex nitrogen sources in the induction medium was shown to be necessary for the synthesis of appreciable amounts of l-lysine decarboxylase by Escherichia coli B. Hy-case, a commercial acid hydrolyzate of casein, was especially effective in enzyme production, which was assayed manometrically after lysis of the bacteria from without by bacteriophage. Partial fractionation of the Hy-case, identification of the free amino acids, and addition of these amino acids to test media revealed stimulatory effects by methionine, threonine, proline, leucine, and tyrosine. A full complement of amino acids did not match the enzyme levels reached in the presence of Hy-case. Certain peptide fractions obtained from this mixture supplemented the effects of the amino acids in such a way as to suggest direct incorporation of peptide rather than transport or protective roles. Added purines, pyrimidines, iron, and water-soluble vitamins were without effect. Neither carbohydrates nor phosphorylated materials could be detected in the stimulatory fractions. PMID:14469751

  16. Molecular cloning, heterologous expression, and characterization of Ornithine decarboxylase from Oenococcus oeni.

    PubMed

    Bonnin-Jusserand, Maryse; Grandvalet, Cosette; David, Vanessa; Alexandre, Hervé

    2011-08-01

    Ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) is responsible for the production of putrescine, the major biogenic amine found in wine. Oenococcus oeni is the most important lactic acid bacterium in the winemaking process and is involved in malolactic fermentation. We report here the characterization of ODC from an O. oeni strain isolated from wine. Screening of 263 strains isolated from wine and cider from all over the world revealed that the presence of the odc gene appears to be strain specific in O. oeni. After cloning, heterologous expression in Escherichia coli, and characterization, the enzyme was found to have a molecular mass of 85 kDa and a pI of 6.2 and revealed maximal activity at pH 5.5 and an optimum temperature of 35°C. Kinetic studies showed that O. oeni ODC is specific for L-ornithine with a K(m) value of 1 mM and a V(max) of 0.57 U·mg(-1). The hypothesis that cadaverine, which results from lysine decarboxylation, may be linked to putrescine production is not valid since O. oeni ODC cannot decarboxylate L-lysine. As no lysine decarboxylase was detected in any of the O. oeni genomes sequenced, cadaverine synthesis may result from another metabolic pathway. This work is the first characterization of an ODC from a lactic acid bacterium isolated from a fermented product.

  17. Crystal Structure and Substrate Specificity of Drosophila 3,4-Dihydroxyphenylalanine Decarboxylase

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Q.; Ding, H; Robinson, H; Christensen, B; Li, J

    2010-01-01

    3,4-Dihydroxyphenylalanine decarboxylase (DDC), also known as aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase, catalyzes the decarboxylation of a number of aromatic L-amino acids. Physiologically, DDC is responsible for the production of dopamine and serotonin through the decarboxylation of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine and 5-hydroxytryptophan, respectively. In insects, both dopamine and serotonin serve as classical neurotransmitters, neuromodulators, or neurohormones, and dopamine is also involved in insect cuticle formation, eggshell hardening, and immune responses. In this study, we expressed a typical DDC enzyme from Drosophila melanogaster, critically analyzed its substrate specificity and biochemical properties, determined its crystal structure at 1.75 Angstrom resolution, and evaluated the roles residues T82 and H192 play in substrate binding and enzyme catalysis through site-directed mutagenesis of the enzyme. Our results establish that this DDC functions exclusively on the production of dopamine and serotonin, with no activity to tyrosine or tryptophan and catalyzes the formation of serotonin more efficiently than dopamine. The crystal structure of Drosophila DDC and the site-directed mutagenesis study of the enzyme demonstrate that T82 is involved in substrate binding and that H192 is used not only for substrate interaction, but for cofactor binding of drDDC as well. Through comparative analysis, the results also provide insight into the structure-function relationship of other insect DDC-like proteins.

  18. Engineering a Thermostable Keto Acid Decarboxylase Using Directed Evolution and Computationally Directed Protein Design.

    PubMed

    Soh, Lemuel M J; Mak, Wai Shun; Lin, Paul P; Mi, Luo; Chen, Frederic Y-H; Damoiseaux, Robert; Siegel, Justin B; Liao, James C

    2017-04-21

    Keto acid decarboxylase (Kdc) is a key enzyme in producing keto acid derived higher alcohols, like isobutanol. The most active Kdc's are found in mesophiles; the only reported Kdc activity in thermophiles is 2 orders of magnitude less active. Therefore, the thermostability of mesophilic Kdc limits isobutanol production temperature. Here, we report development of a thermostable 2-ketoisovalerate decarboxylase (Kivd) with 10.5-fold increased residual activity after 1h preincubation at 60 °C. Starting with mesophilic Lactococcus lactis Kivd, a library was generated using random mutagenesis and approximately 8,000 independent variants were screened. The top single-mutation variants were recombined. To further improve thermostability, 16 designs built using Rosetta Comparative Modeling were screened and the most active was recombined to form our best variant, LLM4. Compared to wild-type Kivd, a 13 °C increase in melting temperature and over 4-fold increase in half-life at 60 °C were observed. LLM4 will be useful for keto acid derived alcohol production in lignocellulosic thermophiles.

  19. Isobutanol production in engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae by overexpression of 2-ketoisovalerate decarboxylase and valine biosynthetic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Won-Heong; Seo, Seung-Oh; Bae, Yi-Hyun; Nan, Hong; Jin, Yong-Su; Seo, Jin-Ho

    2012-11-01

    Engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to produce advanced biofuels such as isobutanol has received much attention because this yeast has a natural capacity to produce higher alcohols. In this study, construction of isobutanol production systems was attempted by overexpression of effective 2-keto acid decarboxylase (KDC) and combinatorial overexpression of valine biosynthetic enzymes in S. cerevisiae D452-2. Among the six putative KDC enzymes from various microorganisms, 2-ketoisovalerate decarboxylase (Kivd) from L. lactis subsp. lactis KACC 13877 was identified as the most suitable KDC for isobutanol production in the yeast. Isobutanol production by the engineered S. cerevisiae was assessed in micro-aerobic batch fermentations using glucose as a sole carbon source. 93 mg/L isobutanol was produced in the Kivd overexpressing strain, which corresponds to a fourfold improvement as compared with the control strain. Isobutanol production was further enhanced to 151 mg/L by additional overexpression of acetolactate synthase (Ilv2p), acetohydroxyacid reductoisomerase (Ilv5p), and dihydroxyacid dehydratase (Ilv3p) in the cytosol.

  20. Phosphatidylserine synthase 2 and phosphatidylserine decarboxylase are essential for aminophospholipid synthesis in T rypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    Farine, Luce; Jelk, Jennifer; Choi, Jae‐Yeon; Voelker, Dennis R.; Nunes, Jon

    2017-01-01

    Summary Phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and phosphatidylserine (PS) are ubiquitously expressed and metabolically interconnected glycerophospholipids in eukaryotes and prokaryotes. In Trypanosoma brucei, PE synthesis has been shown to occur mainly via the Kennedy pathway, one of the three routes leading to PE synthesis in eukaryotes, while PS synthesis has not been studied experimentally. We now reveal the importance of T. brucei PS synthase 2 (TbPSS2) and T. brucei PS decarboxylase (TbPSD), two key enzymes involved in aminophospholipid synthesis, for trypanosome viability. By using tetracycline‐inducible down‐regulation of gene expression and in vivo and in vitro metabolic labeling, we found that TbPSS2 (i) is necessary for normal growth of procyclic trypanosomes, (ii) localizes to the endoplasmic reticulum and (iii) represents the unique route for PS formation in T. brucei. In addition, we identified TbPSD as type I PS decarboxylase in the mitochondrion and found that it is processed proteolytically at a WGSS cleavage site into a heterodimer. Down‐regulation of TbPSD expression affected mitochondrial integrity in both procyclic and bloodstream form trypanosomes, decreased ATP production via oxidative phosphorylation in procyclic form and affected parasite growth. PMID:28142188

  1. Phosphatidylserine synthase 2 and phosphatidylserine decarboxylase are essential for aminophospholipid synthesis in Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Farine, Luce; Jelk, Jennifer; Choi, Jae-Yeon; Voelker, Dennis R; Nunes, Jon; Smith, Terry K; Bütikofer, Peter

    2017-05-01

    Phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and phosphatidylserine (PS) are ubiquitously expressed and metabolically interconnected glycerophospholipids in eukaryotes and prokaryotes. In Trypanosoma brucei, PE synthesis has been shown to occur mainly via the Kennedy pathway, one of the three routes leading to PE synthesis in eukaryotes, while PS synthesis has not been studied experimentally. We now reveal the importance of T. brucei PS synthase 2 (TbPSS2) and T. brucei PS decarboxylase (TbPSD), two key enzymes involved in aminophospholipid synthesis, for trypanosome viability. By using tetracycline-inducible down-regulation of gene expression and in vivo and in vitro metabolic labeling, we found that TbPSS2 (i) is necessary for normal growth of procyclic trypanosomes, (ii) localizes to the endoplasmic reticulum and (iii) represents the unique route for PS formation in T. brucei. In addition, we identified TbPSD as type I PS decarboxylase in the mitochondrion and found that it is processed proteolytically at a WGSS cleavage site into a heterodimer. Down-regulation of TbPSD expression affected mitochondrial integrity in both procyclic and bloodstream form trypanosomes, decreased ATP production via oxidative phosphorylation in procyclic form and affected parasite growth. © 2017 The Authors Molecular Microbiology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Molecular cloning, characterization, and function analysis of a mevalonate pyrophosphate decarboxylase gene from Ganoderma lucidum.

    PubMed

    Shi, Liang; Qin, Lei; Xu, Yingjie; Ren, Ang; Fang, Xing; Mu, Dashuai; Tan, Qi; Zhao, Mingwen

    2012-05-01

    This study investigated the role of the mevalonate pyrophosphate decarboxylase gene in the triterpene biosynthetic pathway of Ganoderma lucidum. The mevalonate pyrophosphate decarboxylase gene (mvd) was isolated using a degenerate primer-PCR technique. An analysis of the Gl-mvd transcription profile revealed a positive correlation between the expression of the Gl-mvd gene and triterpene content changes in G. lucidum during development. Furthermore, a promoter deletion analysis was conducted in G. lucidum to investigate the promoter activity and the role of methyl jasmonate (MeJA) responsive elements in the mvd promoter under the MeJA elicitor. The overexpression of Gl-mvd increased triterpene accumulation compared with the wild-type strain and increased the expression of several genes involved in the triterpene biosynthetic pathway. The findings of this study suggest that mvd may play an important role in triterpene biosynthesis regulation. Moreover, there may be the interactions among the genes involved in the triterpene biosynthetic pathway in the G. lucidum. Additionally, this study provides an approach for improving triterpene content through the overexpression of a key gene.

  3. Crystal structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis diaminopimelate decarboxylase, an essential enzyme in bacterial lysine biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Gokulan, Kuppan; Rupp, Bernhard; Pavelka, Martin S; Jacobs, William R; Sacchettini, James C

    2003-05-16

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis lysA gene encodes the enzyme meso-diaminopimelate decarboxylase (DAPDC), a pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme. The enzyme catalyzes the final step in the lysine biosynthetic pathway converting meso-diaminopimelic acid (DAP) to l-lysine. The lysA gene of M. tuberculosis H37Rv has been established as essential for bacterial survival in immunocompromised mice, demonstrating that de novo biosynthesis of lysine is essential for in vivo viability. Drugs targeted against DAPDC could be efficient anti-tuberculosis drugs, and the three-dimensional structure of DAPDC from M. tuberculosis complexed with reaction product lysine and the ternary complex with PLP and lysine in the active site has been determined. The first structure of a DAPDC confirms its classification as a fold type III PLP-dependent enzyme. The structure shows a stable 2-fold dimer in head-to-tail arrangement of a triose-phosphate isomerase (TIM) barrel-like alpha/beta domain and a C-terminal beta sheet domain, similar to the ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) fold family. PLP is covalently bound via an internal aldimine, and residues from both domains and both subunits contribute to the binding pocket. Comparison of the structure with eukaryotic ODCs, in particular with a di-fluoromethyl ornithine (DMFO)-bound ODC from Trypanosoma bruceii, indicates that corresponding DAP-analogues might be potential inhibitors for mycobacterial DAPDCs.

  4. Aromatic L-Amino Acid Decarboxylase (AADC) Is Crucial for Brain Development and Motor Functions

    PubMed Central

    Shih, De-Fen; Hsiao, Chung-Der; Min, Ming-Yuan; Lai, Wen-Sung; Yang, Chianne-Wen; Lee, Wang-Tso; Lee, Shyh-Jye

    2013-01-01

    Aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) deficiency is a rare pediatric neuro-metabolic disease in children. Due to the lack of an animal model, its pathogenetic mechanism is poorly understood. To study the role of AADC in brain development, a zebrafish model of AADC deficiency was generated. We identified an aadc gene homolog, dopa decarboxylase (ddc), in the zebrafish genome. Whole-mount in situ hybridization analysis showed that the ddc gene is expressed in the epiphysis, locus caeruleus, diencephalic catecholaminergic clusters, and raphe nuclei of 36-h post-fertilization (hpf) zebrafish embryos. Inhibition of Ddc by AADC inhibitor NSD-1015 or anti-sense morpholino oligonucleotides (MO) reduced brain volume and body length. We observed increased brain cell apoptosis and loss of dipencephalic catecholaminergic cluster neurons in ddc morphants (ddc MO-injected embryos). Seizure-like activity was also detected in ddc morphants in a dose-dependent manner. ddc morphants had less sensitive touch response and impaired swimming activity that could be rescued by injection of ddc plasmids. In addition, eye movement was also significantly impaired in ddc morphants. Collectively, loss of Ddc appears to result in similar phenotypes as that of ADCC deficiency, thus zebrafish could be a good model for investigating pathogenetic mechanisms of AADC deficiency in children. PMID:23940784

  5. Overexpression, purification, crystallization and preliminary structural studies of p-coumaric acid decarboxylase from Lactobacillus plantarum

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Héctor; de las Rivas, Blanca; Muñoz, Rosario; Mancheño, José M.

    2007-01-01

    The substrate-inducible p-coumaric acid decarboxylase (PDC) from Lactobacillus plantarum has been overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified and confirmed to possess decarboxylase activity. The recombinant His6-tagged enzyme was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method from a solution containing 20%(w/v) PEG 4000, 12%(w/v) 2-propanol, 0.2 M sodium acetate, 0.1 M Tris–HCl pH 8.0 with 0.1 M barium chloride as an additive. Diffraction data were collected in-house to 2.04 Å resolution. Crystals belonged to the tetragonal space group P43, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 43.15, c = 231.86 Å. The estimated Matthews coefficient was 2.36 Å3 Da−1, corresponding to 48% solvent content, which is consistent with the presence of two protein molecules in the asymmetric unit. The structure of PDC has been determined by the molecular-replacement method. Currently, the structure of PDC complexed with substrate analogues is in progress, with the aim of elucidating the structural basis of the catalytic mechanism. PMID:17401200

  6. Environmental stress causes oxidative damage to plant mitochondria leading to inhibition of glycine decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Nicolas L; Day, David A; Millar, A Harvey

    2002-11-08

    A cytotoxic product of lipid peroxidation, 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE), rapidly inhibited glycine, malate/pyruvate, and 2-oxoglutarate-dependent O2 consumption by pea leaf mitochondria. Dose- and time-dependence of inhibition showed that glycine oxidation was the most severely affected with a K(0.5) of 30 microm. Several mitochondrial proteins containing lipoic acid moieties differentially lost their reactivity to a lipoic acid antibody following HNE treatment. The most dramatic loss of antigenicity was seen with the 17-kDa glycine decarboxylase complex (GDC) H-protein, which was correlated with the loss of glycine-dependent O2 consumption. Paraquat treatment of pea seedlings induced lipid peroxidation, which resulted in the rapid loss of glycine-dependent respiration and loss of H-protein reactivity with lipoic acid antibodies. Pea plants exposed to chilling and water deficit responded similarly. In contrast, the damage to other lipoic acid-containing mitochondrial enzymes was minor under these conditions. The implication of the acute sensitivity of glycine decarboxylase complex H-protein to lipid peroxidation products is discussed in the context of photorespiration and potential repair mechanisms in plant mitochondria.

  7. Pattern of expression of glutamic acid decarboxylase mRNA in the developing rat brain.

    PubMed

    Bond, R W; Jansen, K R; Gottlieb, D I

    1988-05-01

    The time and pattern of appearance of glutamic acid decarboxylase (glutamate decarboxylase; EC 4.1.1.15) (GAD) mRNA during the development of the rat brain were analyzed. RNA transfer blot analysis of poly(A)+ RNA from whole brain shows that a 3.7-kilobase transcript is the most abundant form of the message from embryonic day 15 (E15) through adulthood. By E15 this form is present at about 50% of its adult abundance relative to other poly(A)+ mRNA species. At birth the abundance is approximately the same as in the adult. In contrast, the enzyme activity level is only 8% of the adult level at birth and takes 3 weeks to reach adult levels. There are qualitative changes in GAD mRNA during development. Several large (7-9 kilobases) transcripts with strong homology to GAD are enriched in early developmental stages but are barely detectable in the adult. A nuclease protection assay shows a developmentally regulated heterogeneity in a coding portion of the mRNA.

  8. Characterization of Plasmodium phosphatidylserine decarboxylase expressed in yeast and application for inhibitor screening.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jae-Yeon; Kumar, Vidya; Pachikara, Niseema; Garg, Aprajita; Lawres, Lauren; Toh, Justin Y; Voelker, Dennis R; Ben Mamoun, Choukri

    2016-03-01

    Phospholipid biosynthesis is critical for the development, differentiation and pathogenesis of several eukaryotic pathogens. Genetic studies have validated the pathway for phosphatidylethanolamine synthesis from phosphatidylserine catalyzed by phosphatidylserine decarboxylase enzymes (PSD) as a suitable target for development of antimicrobials; however no inhibitors of this class of enzymes have been discovered. We show that the Plasmodium falciparum PSD can restore the essential function of the yeast gene in strains requiring PSD for growth. Genetic, biochemical and metabolic analyses demonstrate that amino acids between positions 40 and 70 of the parasite enzyme are critical for proenzyme processing and decarboxylase activity. We used the essential role of Plasmodium PSD in yeast as a tool for screening a library of anti-malarials. One of these compounds is 7-chloro-N-(4-ethoxyphenyl)-4-quinolinamine, an inhibitor with potent activity against P. falciparum, and low toxicity toward mammalian cells. We synthesized an analog of this compound and showed that it inhibits PfPSD activity and eliminates Plasmodium yoelii infection in mice. These results highlight the importance of 4-quinolinamines as a novel class of drugs targeting membrane biogenesis via inhibition of PSD activity.

  9. Transport of phosphatidylserine from the endoplasmic reticulum to the site of phosphatidylserine decarboxylase2 in yeast.

    PubMed

    Kannan, Muthukumar; Riekhof, Wayne R; Voelker, Dennis R

    2015-02-01

    Over the past two decades, most of the genes specifying lipid synthesis and metabolism in yeast have been identified and characterized. Several of these biosynthetic genes and their encoded enzymes have provided valuable tools for the genetic and biochemical dissection of interorganelle lipid transport processes in yeast. One such pathway involves the synthesis of phosphatidylserine (PtdSer) in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and its non-vesicular transport to the site of phosphatidylserine decarboxylase2 (Psd2p) in membranes of the Golgi and endosomal sorting system. In this review, we summarize the identification and characterization of the yeast phosphatidylserine decarboxylases, and examine their role in studies of the transport-dependent pathways of de novo synthesis of phosphatidylethanolamine (PtdEtn). The emerging picture of the Psd2p-specific transport pathway is one in which the enzyme and its non-catalytic N-terminal domains act as a hub to nucleate the assembly of a multiprotein complex, which facilitates PtdSer transport at membrane contact sites between the ER and Golgi/endosome membranes. After transport to the catalytic site of Psd2p, PtdSer is decarboxylated to form PtdEtn, which is disseminated throughout the cell to support the structural and functional needs of multiple membranes.

  10. Production of pyruvate from mannitol by mannitol-assimilating pyruvate decarboxylase-negative Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Shiori; Tanaka, Hideki; Hirayama, Makoto; Murata, Kousaku; Kawai, Shigeyuki

    2015-01-01

    Mannitol is contained in brown macroalgae up to 33% (w/w, dry weight), and thus is a promising carbon source for white biotechnology. However, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a key cell factory, is generally regarded to be unable to assimilate mannitol for growth. We have recently succeeded in producing S. cerevisiae that can assimilate mannitol through spontaneous mutations of Tup1-Cyc8, each of which constitutes a general corepressor complex. In this study, we demonstrate production of pyruvate from mannitol using this mannitol-assimilating S. cerevisiae through deletions of all 3 pyruvate decarboxylase genes. The resultant mannitol-assimilating pyruvate decarboxylase-negative strain produced 0.86 g/L pyruvate without use of acetate after cultivation for 4 days, with an overall yield of 0.77 g of pyruvate per g of mannitol (the theoretical yield was 79%). Although acetate was not needed for growth of this strain in mannitol-containing medium, addition of acetate had a significant beneficial effect on production of pyruvate. This is the first report of production of a valuable compound (other than ethanol) from mannitol using S. cerevisiae, and is an initial platform from which the productivity of pyruvate from mannitol can be improved. PMID:26588105

  11. Catalytic irreversible inhibition of bacterial and plant arginine decarboxylase activities by novel substrate and product analogues.

    PubMed

    Bitonti, A J; Casara, P J; McCann, P P; Bey, P

    1987-02-15

    Arginine decarboxylase (ADC) activity from Escherichia coli and two plant species (oats and barley) was inhibited by five new substrate (arginine) and product (agmatine) analogues. The five compounds, (E)-alpha-monofluoromethyldehydroarginine (delta-MFMA), alpha-monofluoromethylarginine (MFMA), alpha-monofluoromethylagatine (FMA), alpha-ethynylagmatine (EA) and alpha-allenylagmatine (AA), were all more potent inhibitors of ADC activity than was alpha-difluoromethylarginine (DFMA), the only irreversible inhibitor of this enzyme described previously. The inhibition caused by the five compounds was apparently enzyme-activated and irreversible, since the loss of enzyme activity followed pseudo-first-order kinetics, was time-dependent, the natural substrate of ADC (arginine) blocked the effects of the inhibitors, and the inhibition remained after chromatography of inhibited ADC on Sephadex G-25 or on overnight dialysis of the enzyme. DFMA, FMA, delta-MFMA and MFMA were effective at very low concentrations (10 nM-10 microM) at inhibiting ADC activity in growing E. coli. FMA was also shown to deplete putrescine effectively in E. coli, particularly when combined with an inhibitor of ornithine decarboxylase, alpha-monofluoromethyl-putrescine. The potential uses of the compounds for the study of the role of polyamine biosynthesis in bacteria and plants is discussed.

  12. Catalytic irreversible inhibition of bacterial and plant arginine decarboxylase activities by novel substrate and product analogues.

    PubMed Central

    Bitonti, A J; Casara, P J; McCann, P P; Bey, P

    1987-01-01

    Arginine decarboxylase (ADC) activity from Escherichia coli and two plant species (oats and barley) was inhibited by five new substrate (arginine) and product (agmatine) analogues. The five compounds, (E)-alpha-monofluoromethyldehydroarginine (delta-MFMA), alpha-monofluoromethylarginine (MFMA), alpha-monofluoromethylagatine (FMA), alpha-ethynylagmatine (EA) and alpha-allenylagmatine (AA), were all more potent inhibitors of ADC activity than was alpha-difluoromethylarginine (DFMA), the only irreversible inhibitor of this enzyme described previously. The inhibition caused by the five compounds was apparently enzyme-activated and irreversible, since the loss of enzyme activity followed pseudo-first-order kinetics, was time-dependent, the natural substrate of ADC (arginine) blocked the effects of the inhibitors, and the inhibition remained after chromatography of inhibited ADC on Sephadex G-25 or on overnight dialysis of the enzyme. DFMA, FMA, delta-MFMA and MFMA were effective at very low concentrations (10 nM-10 microM) at inhibiting ADC activity in growing E. coli. FMA was also shown to deplete putrescine effectively in E. coli, particularly when combined with an inhibitor of ornithine decarboxylase, alpha-monofluoromethyl-putrescine. The potential uses of the compounds for the study of the role of polyamine biosynthesis in bacteria and plants is discussed. PMID:3297044

  13. Production of pyruvate from mannitol by mannitol-assimilating pyruvate decarboxylase-negative Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Shiori; Tanaka, Hideki; Hirayama, Makoto; Murata, Kousaku; Kawai, Shigeyuki

    2015-01-01

    Mannitol is contained in brown macroalgae up to 33% (w/w, dry weight), and thus is a promising carbon source for white biotechnology. However, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a key cell factory, is generally regarded to be unable to assimilate mannitol for growth. We have recently succeeded in producing S. cerevisiae that can assimilate mannitol through spontaneous mutations of Tup1-Cyc8, each of which constitutes a general corepressor complex. In this study, we demonstrate production of pyruvate from mannitol using this mannitol-assimilating S. cerevisiae through deletions of all 3 pyruvate decarboxylase genes. The resultant mannitol-assimilating pyruvate decarboxylase-negative strain produced 0.86 g/L pyruvate without use of acetate after cultivation for 4 days, with an overall yield of 0.77 g of pyruvate per g of mannitol (the theoretical yield was 79%). Although acetate was not needed for growth of this strain in mannitol-containing medium, addition of acetate had a significant beneficial effect on production of pyruvate. This is the first report of production of a valuable compound (other than ethanol) from mannitol using S. cerevisiae, and is an initial platform from which the productivity of pyruvate from mannitol can be improved.

  14. Rational design of ornithine decarboxylase with high catalytic activity for the production of putrescine.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyang; Kyeong, Hyun-Ho; Choi, Jung Min; Kim, Hak-Sung

    2014-09-01

    Putrescine finds wide industrial applications in the synthesis of polymers, pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, and surfactants. Owing to economic and environmental concerns, the microbial production of putrescine has attracted a great deal of attention, and ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) is known to be a key enzyme in the biosynthetic pathway. Herein, we present the design of ODC from Escherichia coli with high catalytic efficiency using a structure-based rational approach. Through a substrate docking into the model structure of the enzyme, we first selected residues that might lead to an increase in catalytic activity. Of the selected residues that are located in the α-helix and the loops constituting the substrate entry site, a mutational analysis of the single mutants identified two key residues, I163 and E165. A combination of two single mutations resulted in a 62.5-fold increase in the catalytic efficiency when compared with the wild-type enzyme. Molecular dynamics simulations of the best mutant revealed that the substrate entry site becomes more flexible through mutations, while stabilizing the formation of the dimeric interface of the enzyme. Our approach can be applied to the design of other decarboxylases with high catalytic efficiency for the production of various chemicals through bio-based processes.

  15. Decarboxylase gene expression and cadaverine and putrescine production by Serratia proteamaculans in vitro and in beef.

    PubMed

    De Filippis, Francesca; Pennacchia, Carmela; Di Pasqua, Rosangela; Fiore, Alberto; Fogliano, Vincenzo; Villani, Francesco; Ercolini, Danilo

    2013-08-01

    Studies of the molecular basis of microbial metabolic activities that are important for the changes in food quality are valuable in order to help in understanding the behavior of spoiling bacteria in food. The growth of a psychrotrophic Serratia proteamaculans strain was monitored in vitro and in artificially inoculated raw beef. Two growth temperatures (25°C and 4°C) were tested in vitro, while growth at 15°C and 4°C was monitored in beef. During growth, the expression of inducible lysine and ornithine-decarboxylase genes was evaluated by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR), while the presence of cadaverine and putrescine was quantified by LC-ESI-MS/MS. The expression of the decarboxylase genes, and the consequent production of cadaverine and putrescine were shown to be influenced by the temperature, as well as by the complexity of the growth medium. Generally, the maximum gene expression and amine production took place during the exponential and early stationary phase, respectively. In addition, lower temperatures caused slower growth and gene downregulation. Higher amounts of cadaverine compared to putrescine were found during growth in beef with the highest concentrations corresponding to microbial loads of ca. 9CFU/g. The differences found in gene expression evaluated in vitro and in beef suggested that such activities are more reliably investigated in situ in specific food matrices.

  16. Arginine and Ornithine Decarboxylases, the Polyamine Biosynthetic Enzymes of Mung Bean Seedlings 1

    PubMed Central

    Altman, Arie; Friedman, Ra'Anan; Levin, Nitsa

    1982-01-01

    General properties and relative activities of l-arginine decarboxylase (ADC) (EC 4.1.1.19) and l-ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) (EC 4.1.1.17), two important enzymes in putrescine and polyamine biosynthesis, were investigated in mung bean (Vigna radiata L.) tissues. Both activities increase linearly with increasing concentrations of crude enzyme, but the increase in ADC activity is considerably greater. The decarboxylation reaction is linear for up to 30 to 60 minutes, and both enzymes have a pH optimum of 7.2. α-Difluoromethyl-ornithine inhibits ODC activity of excised roots, while increasing ADC activity. High specific activity of both enzymes is detected in terminal buds and leaves, while root and hypocotyl activity is low. Different ADC-to-ODC activity ratios are found in various tissues of mung bean plants. Substantial increase in the activity of both enzymes is detected in incubated sections as compared with intact plants. A comparison of several plant species indicates a wide range of ADC-to-ODC activity ratio. It is suggested that both ADC and ODC are active in plant tissues and that their relative contribution to putrescine biosynthesis is dependent upon the type of tissue and growth process. PMID:16662312

  17. Hypothalamic L-Histidine Decarboxylase Is Up-Regulated During Chronic REM Sleep Deprivation of Rats.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Gloria E; Koban, Michael

    2016-01-01

    A competition of neurobehavioral drives of sleep and wakefulness occurs during sleep deprivation. When enforced chronically, subjects must remain awake. This study examines histaminergic neurons of the tuberomammillary nucleus of the posterior hypothalamus in response to enforced wakefulness in rats. We tested the hypothesis that the rate-limiting enzyme for histamine biosynthesis, L-histidine decarboxylase (HDC), would be up-regulated during chronic rapid eye movement sleep deprivation (REM-SD) because histamine plays a major role in maintaining wakefulness. Archived brain tissues of male Sprague Dawley rats from a previous study were used. Rats had been subjected to REM-SD by the flowerpot paradigm for 5, 10, or 15 days. For immunocytochemistry, rats were transcardially perfused with acrolein-paraformaldehyde for immunodetection of L-HDC; separate controls used carbodiimide-paraformaldehyde for immunodetection of histamine. Immunolocalization of histamine within the tuberomammillary nucleus was validated using carbodiimide. Because HDC antiserum has cross-reactivity with other decarboxylases at high antibody concentrations, titrations localized L-HDC to only tuberomammillary nucleus at a dilution of ≥ 1:300,000. REM-SD increased immunoreactive HDC by day 5 and it remained elevated in both dorsal and ventral aspects of the tuberomammillary complex. Our results suggest that up-regulation of L-HDC within the tuberomammillary complex during chronic REM-SD may be responsible for maintaining wakefulness.

  18. Identification, Cloning, and Characterization of a Lactococcus lactis Branched-Chain α-Keto Acid Decarboxylase Involved in Flavor Formation

    PubMed Central

    Smit, Bart A.; van Hylckama Vlieg, Johan E. T.; Engels, Wim J. M.; Meijer, Laura; Wouters, Jan T. M.; Smit, Gerrit

    2005-01-01

    The biochemical pathway for formation of branched-chain aldehydes, which are important flavor compounds derived from proteins in fermented dairy products, consists of a protease, peptidases, a transaminase, and a branched-chain α-keto acid decarboxylase (KdcA). The activity of the latter enzyme has been found only in a limited number of Lactococcus lactis strains. By using a random mutagenesis approach, the gene encoding KdcA in L. lactis B1157 was identified. The gene for this enzyme is highly homologous to the gene annotated ipd, which encodes a putative indole pyruvate decarboxylase, in L. lactis IL1403. Strain IL1403 does not produce KdcA, which could be explained by a 270-nucleotide deletion at the 3′ terminus of the ipd gene encoding a truncated nonfunctional decarboxylase. The kdcA gene was overexpressed in L. lactis for further characterization of the decarboxylase enzyme. Of all of the potential substrates tested, the highest activity was observed with branched-chain α-keto acids. Moreover, the enzyme activity was hardly affected by high salinity, and optimal activity was found at pH 6.3, indicating that the enzyme might be active under cheese ripening conditions. PMID:15640202

  19. Absence of malonyl coenzyme A decarboxylase in mice increases cardiac glucose oxidation and protects the heart from ischemic injury

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Acute pharmacological inhibition of cardiac malonyl coenzyme A decarboxylase (MCD) protects the heart from ischemic damage by inhibiting fatty acid oxidation and stimulating glucose oxidation. However, it is unknown whether chronic inhibition of MCD results in altered cardiac function, energy metabo...

  20. CONFIRMATIONAL IDENTIFICATION OF ESCHERICHIA COLI, A COMPARISON OF GENOTYPIC AND PHENOTYPIC ASSAYS FOR GLUTAMATE DECARBOXYLASE AND B-D-GLUCURONIDASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Genotypic and phenotypic assays for glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) and B-D-glucuronidase (GUD) were compared for their abilities to detect various strains of Escherichia coli and to discriminate among other bacterial species. Test strains included nonpathogenic E.coli, three major...

  1. Arginine decarboxylase (ADC) and agmatinase (AGMAT): an alternative pathway for synthesis of polyamines in pig conceptuses and uteri

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Arginine, a precursor for the synthesis of nitric oxide (NO) and polyamines, is critical for implantation and development of the conceptus. We first reported that the arginine decarboxylase (ADC)/agmatinase(AGMAT) pathway as an alternative pathway for synthesis of polyamines in the ovine conceptuses...

  2. In vitro Characterization of Phenylacetate Decarboxylase, a Novel Enzyme Catalyzing Toluene Biosynthesis in an Anaerobic Microbial Community

    SciTech Connect

    Zargar, K.; Saville, R.; Phelan, R. M.; Tringe, S. G.; Petzold, C. J.; Keasling, J. D.; Beller, H. R.

    2016-08-10

    Anaerobic bacterial biosynthesis of toluene from phenylacetate was reported more than two decades ago, but the biochemistry underlying this novel metabolism has never been elucidated. Here we report results of in vitro characterization studies of a novel phenylacetate decarboxylase from an anaerobic, sewage-derived enrichment culture that quantitatively produces toluene from phenylacetate; complementary metagenomic and metaproteomic analyses are also presented. Among the noteworthy findings is that this enzyme is not the well-characterized clostridial p-hydroxyphenylacetate decarboxylase (CsdBC). However, the toluene synthase under study appears to be able to catalyze both phenylacetate and p-hydroxyphenylacetate decarboxylation. Observations suggesting that phenylacetate and p-hydroxyphenylacetate decarboxylation in complex cell-free extracts were catalyzed by the same enzyme include the following: (i) the specific activity for both substrates was comparable in cell-free extracts, (ii) the two activities displayed identical behavior during chromatographic separation of cell-free extract s, (iii) both activities were irreversibly inactivated upon exposure to O 2, and (iv) both activities were similarly inhibited by an amide analog of p-hydroxyphenylacetate. Based upon these and other data, we hypothesize that the toluene synthase reaction involves a glycyl radical decarboxylase. This first-time study of the phenylacetate decarboxylase reaction constitutes an important step in understanding and ultimately harnessing it for making bio-based toluene.

  3. Carboxyspermidine decarboxylase of the prominent intestinal microbiota species Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron is required for spermidine biosynthesis and contributes to normal growth.

    PubMed

    Sakanaka, Mikiyasu; Sugiyama, Yuta; Kitakata, Aya; Katayama, Takane; Kurihara, Shin

    2016-10-01

    Recent studies have indicated that polyamines produced by gut microbes significantly influence host health; however, little is known about the microbial polyamine biosynthetic pathway except for that in Escherichia coli, a minor component of the gastrointestinal microbiota. Here, we investigated the polyamine biosynthetic ability of Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, a predominant gastrointestinal bacterial species in humans. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis revealed that B. thetaiotaomicron cultured in polyamine-free minimal medium accumulated spermidine intracellularly at least during the mid-log and stationary phases. Deletion of the gene encoding a putative carboxyspermidine decarboxylase (casdc), which converts carboxyspermidine to spermidine, resulted in the depletion of spermidine and loss of decarboxylase activity in B. thetaiotaomicron. The Δcasdc strain also showed growth defects in polyamine-free growth medium. The complemented Δcasdc strain restored the spermidine biosynthetic ability, decarboxylase activity, and growth. These results indicate that carboxyspermidine decarboxylase is essential for synthesizing spermidine in B. thetaiotaomicron and contributes to the growth of this species.

  4. CONFIRMATIONAL IDENTIFICATION OF ESCHERICHIA COLI, A COMPARISON OF GENOTYPIC AND PHENOTYPIC ASSAYS FOR GLUTAMATE DECARBOXYLASE AND B-D-GLUCURONIDASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Genotypic and phenotypic assays for glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) and B-D-glucuronidase (GUD) were compared for their abilities to detect various strains of Escherichia coli and to discriminate among other bacterial species. Test strains included nonpathogenic E.coli, three major...

  5. Molecular analysis of a new member of the opium poppy tyrosine/3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine decarboxylase gene family.

    PubMed Central

    Maldonado-Mendoza, I E; López-Meyer, M; Galef, J R; Burnett, R J; Nessler, C L

    1996-01-01

    An aromatic amino acid decarboxylase DNA fragment was generated from opium poppy (Papaver somniferum L.) genomic DNA by the PCR using primers designed from conserved amino acid sequences of other aromatic amino acid decarboxylase genes. Using this fragment as a probe, a genomic clone was isolated that encodes a new member of the opium poppy tyrosine/3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine decarboxylase gene family (TyDC5). The predicted TyDC5 amino acid sequence shares extensive identity with other opium poppy tyrosine/3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine decarboxylases (84%), and when expressed in Escherichia coli, it is active against tyrosine and to a lesser extent against 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine. Ribonuclease protection assays indicate that TyDC5 is expressed primarily in the roots of mature poppy plants. A peak of TyDC5 expression was also observed during germination, coincident with the emergence of the radicle from the seed coat. Parallel results were obtained in transgenic tobacco using a TyDC5 promoter fragment (-2060) translationally fused to the beta-glucuronidase reporter gene (GUS). IN TyDC5::GUS tobacco, GUS activity transiently appeared in all parts of the seedling during germination, but was limited to the roots in older plants. These results indicate that TyDC5 expression is transcriptionally regulated and suggest that the TyDC5 enzyme may play an important role in providing precursors for alkaloid synthesis in the roots and germinating seedlings of opium poppy. PMID:8587993

  6. In vitro Characterization of Phenylacetate Decarboxylase, a Novel Enzyme Catalyzing Toluene Biosynthesis in an Anaerobic Microbial Community

    DOE PAGES

    Zargar, K.; Saville, R.; Phelan, R. M.; ...

    2016-08-10

    Anaerobic bacterial biosynthesis of toluene from phenylacetate was reported more than two decades ago, but the biochemistry underlying this novel metabolism has never been elucidated. Here we report results of in vitro characterization studies of a novel phenylacetate decarboxylase from an anaerobic, sewage-derived enrichment culture that quantitatively produces toluene from phenylacetate; complementary metagenomic and metaproteomic analyses are also presented. Among the noteworthy findings is that this enzyme is not the well-characterized clostridial p-hydroxyphenylacetate decarboxylase (CsdBC). However, the toluene synthase under study appears to be able to catalyze both phenylacetate and p-hydroxyphenylacetate decarboxylation. Observations suggesting that phenylacetate and p-hydroxyphenylacetate decarboxylation inmore » complex cell-free extracts were catalyzed by the same enzyme include the following: (i) the specific activity for both substrates was comparable in cell-free extracts, (ii) the two activities displayed identical behavior during chromatographic separation of cell-free extract s, (iii) both activities were irreversibly inactivated upon exposure to O 2, and (iv) both activities were similarly inhibited by an amide analog of p-hydroxyphenylacetate. Based upon these and other data, we hypothesize that the toluene synthase reaction involves a glycyl radical decarboxylase. This first-time study of the phenylacetate decarboxylase reaction constitutes an important step in understanding and ultimately harnessing it for making bio-based toluene.« less

  7. Effects of polyamine biosynthesis inhibitors on S-adenosylmethionine synthetase and S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase activities in carrot cell cultures

    Treesearch

    S.C. Minocha; R. Minocha; A. Komamine

    1991-01-01

    Changes in the activites of S-adcnosylmethionine (SAM) synthetase (methionine adenosyltransferase, EC 2.5.1.6.) and SAM decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.50) were studied in carrot (Daucus carota) cell cultures in response to 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and several inhibitors of polyamine biosynthesis. Activity of SAM synthetase increased...

  8. In vitro Characterization of Phenylacetate Decarboxylase, a Novel Enzyme Catalyzing Toluene Biosynthesis in an Anaerobic Microbial Community

    PubMed Central

    Zargar, K.; Saville, R.; Phelan, R. M.; Tringe, S. G.; Petzold, C. J.; Keasling, J. D.; Beller, H. R.

    2016-01-01

    Anaerobic bacterial biosynthesis of toluene from phenylacetate was reported more than two decades ago, but the biochemistry underlying this novel metabolism has never been elucidated. Here we report results of in vitro characterization studies of a novel phenylacetate decarboxylase from an anaerobic, sewage-derived enrichment culture that quantitatively produces toluene from phenylacetate; complementary metagenomic and metaproteomic analyses are also presented. Among the noteworthy findings is that this enzyme is not the well-characterized clostridial p-hydroxyphenylacetate decarboxylase (CsdBC). However, the toluene synthase under study appears to be able to catalyze both phenylacetate and p-hydroxyphenylacetate decarboxylation. Observations suggesting that phenylacetate and p-hydroxyphenylacetate decarboxylation in complex cell-free extracts were catalyzed by the same enzyme include the following: (i) the specific activity for both substrates was comparable in cell-free extracts, (ii) the two activities displayed identical behavior during chromatographic separation of cell-free extracts, (iii) both activities were irreversibly inactivated upon exposure to O2, and (iv) both activities were similarly inhibited by an amide analog of p-hydroxyphenylacetate. Based upon these and other data, we hypothesize that the toluene synthase reaction involves a glycyl radical decarboxylase. This first-time study of the phenylacetate decarboxylase reaction constitutes an important step in understanding and ultimately harnessing it for making bio-based toluene. PMID:27506494

  9. Control by Ethylene of Arginine Decarboxylase Activity in Pea Seedlings and Its Implication for Hormonal Regulation of Plant Growth 1

    PubMed Central

    Apelbaum, Akiva; Goldlust, Arie; Icekson, Isaac

    1985-01-01

    Activity of arginine decarboxylase in etiolated pea seedlings appears 24 hours after seed imbibition, reaches its highest level on the 4th day, and levels off until the 7th day. This activity was found in the apical and subapical tissue of the roots and shoots where intensive DNA synthesis occurs. Exposure of the seedlings to ethylene greatly reduced the specific activity of this enzyme. The inhibition was observed within 30 min of the hormone application, and maximal effect—90% inhibition—after 18 hours. Ethylene at physiological concentrations affected the enzyme activity; 50% inhibitory rate was recorded at 0.12 microliters per liter ethylene and maximal response at 1.2 microliters per liter. Ethylene provoked a 5-fold increase in the Kmapp of arginine decarboxylase for its substrate and reduced the Vmaxapp by 10-fold. However, the enzyme recovered from the inhibition and regained control activity 7 hours after transferral of the seedlings to ethylene-free atmosphere. Reducing the endogenous level of ethylene in the tissue by hypobaric pressure, or by exposure to light, as well as interfering with ethylene action by treatment with silver thiosulfate or 2,5-norbornadiene, caused a gradual increase in the specific activity of arginine decarboxylase in the apical tissue of the etiolated seedlings. On the basis of these findings, the possible control of arginine decarboxylase activity by endogenous ethylene, and its implication for the hormone effect on plant growth, are discussed. PMID:16664464

  10. In vitro Characterization of Phenylacetate Decarboxylase, a Novel Enzyme Catalyzing Toluene Biosynthesis in an Anaerobic Microbial Community.

    PubMed

    Zargar, K; Saville, R; Phelan, R M; Tringe, S G; Petzold, C J; Keasling, J D; Beller, H R

    2016-08-10

    Anaerobic bacterial biosynthesis of toluene from phenylacetate was reported more than two decades ago, but the biochemistry underlying this novel metabolism has never been elucidated. Here we report results of in vitro characterization studies of a novel phenylacetate decarboxylase from an anaerobic, sewage-derived enrichment culture that quantitatively produces toluene from phenylacetate; complementary metagenomic and metaproteomic analyses are also presented. Among the noteworthy findings is that this enzyme is not the well-characterized clostridial p-hydroxyphenylacetate decarboxylase (CsdBC). However, the toluene synthase under study appears to be able to catalyze both phenylacetate and p-hydroxyphenylacetate decarboxylation. Observations suggesting that phenylacetate and p-hydroxyphenylacetate decarboxylation in complex cell-free extracts were catalyzed by the same enzyme include the following: (i) the specific activity for both substrates was comparable in cell-free extracts, (ii) the two activities displayed identical behavior during chromatographic separation of cell-free extracts, (iii) both activities were irreversibly inactivated upon exposure to O2, and (iv) both activities were similarly inhibited by an amide analog of p-hydroxyphenylacetate. Based upon these and other data, we hypothesize that the toluene synthase reaction involves a glycyl radical decarboxylase. This first-time study of the phenylacetate decarboxylase reaction constitutes an important step in understanding and ultimately harnessing it for making bio-based toluene.

  11. Identification and measurement of acid (specific) histidine decarboxylase activity in rabbit gastric mucosa: ending an old controversy?

    PubMed

    Neugebauer, E; Lorenz, W

    1985-04-01

    One of the main obstacles in assigning any distinct function to histamine in health and disease was the longlasting controversy on the existence of any physiological, endogenous histamine formation in man and most of the other mammals except the rat. Using a modification of Schayer's isotope dilution method, a renewed attempt was made to identify the very low activities of an acid (specific) histidine decarboxylase in rabbit gastric mucosa capable of producing endogenous histamine in physiological conditions, to develop tests for its identification in crude enzyme extracts and to demonstrate the specificity of the enzymatic assay by excluding any relevant Dopa decarboxylase activity and also nonenzymatic decarboxylation interfering with the determination of acid (specific) histidine decarboxylase. To achieve this aim five tests were developed: In the pH profile (test 1), a pH optimum was found at 7.0 in the presence of a low substrate concentration (1.6 X 10(-6)M L-[ring-2-14C]-histidine). The apparent Michaelis concentration at the pH optimum (test 2) was 1.8 X 10(-4)M, the maximum rate 12.5pmol [14C]histamine formed X min-1. To increase the specificity of inhibition experiments with alpha-methylhistidine and alpha-methyl-L-Dopa a pH profile was determined in the presence of these two enzymatic inhibitors (test 3 and 4). alpha-Methylhistidine was used for a reliable diagnostic confirmation test, alpha-methyl-L-Dopa for a reliable exclusion test. Benzene showed no influence on either blanks or recovery rates, but inhibited the enzymic activity at pH 7.0, not however that of unspecific histidine decarboxylase and hence was very valuable as an additional diagnostic exclusion test (test 5). Although these new tests identifying acid (specific) histidine decarboxylase and demonstrating the specificity of its determination were tedious, despite the use of the modified isotope dilution method, they excluded the presence of any Dopa decarboxylase activity in mixtures with

  12. Expression and stereochemical and isotope effect studies of active 4-oxalocrotonate decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Stanley, T M; Johnson, W H; Burks, E A; Whitman, C P; Hwang, C C; Cook, P F

    2000-02-01

    4-Oxalocrotonate decarboxylase (4-OD) and vinylpyruvate hydratase (VPH) from Pseudomonas putida mt-2 form a complex that converts 2-oxo-3-hexenedioate to 2-oxo-4-hydroxypentanoate in the catechol meta fission pathway. To facilitate mechanistic and structural studies of the complex, the two enzymes have been coexpressed and the complex has been purified to homogeneity. In addition, Glu-106, a potential catalytic residue in VPH, has been changed to glutamine, and the resulting E106QVPH mutant has been coexpressed with 4-OD and purified to homogeneity. The 4-OD/E106QVPH complex retains full decarboxylase activity, with comparable kinetic parameters to those observed for 4-OD in the wild-type complex, but is devoid of any detectable hydratase activity. Decarboxylation of (5S)-2-oxo-3-[5-D]hexenedioate by either the 4-OD/VPH complex or the mutant complex generates 2-hydroxy-2,4E-[5-D]pentadienoate in D(2)O. Ketonization of 2-hydroxy-2,4-pentadienoate by the wild-type complex is highly stereoselective and results in the formation of 2-oxo-(3S)-[3-D]-4-pentenoate, while the mutant complex generates a racemic mixture. These results indicate that 2-hydroxy-2, 4-pentadienoate is the product of 4-OD and that 2-oxo-4-pentenoate results from a VPH-catalyzed process. On this basis, the previously proposed hypothesis for the conversion of 2-oxo-3-hexenedioate to 2-oxo-4-hydroxypentanoate has been revised [Lian, H., and Whitman, C. P. (1994) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 116, 10403-10411]. Finally, the observed (13)C kinetic isotope effect on the decarboxylation of 2-oxo-3-hexenedioate by the 4-OD/VPH complex suggests that the decarboxylation step is nearly rate-limiting. Because the value is not sensitive to either magnesium or manganese, it is likely that the transition state for carbon-carbon bond cleavage is late and that the metal positions the substrate and polarizes the carbonyl group, analogous to its role in oxalacetate decarboxylase.

  13. Contribution of glutamate decarboxylase in Lactobacillus reuteri to acid resistance and persistence in sourdough fermentation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Acid stress impacts the persistence of lactobacilli in industrial sourdough fermentations, and in intestinal ecosystems. However, the contribution of glutamate to acid resistance in lactobacilli has not been demonstrated experimentally, and evidence for the contribution of acid resistance to the competitiveness of lactobacilli in sourdough is lacking. It was therefore the aim of this study to investigate the ecological role of glutamate decarboxylase in L. reuteri. Results A gene coding for a putative glutamate decarboxylase, gadB, was identified in the genome of L. reuteri 100-23. Different from the organization of genetic loci coding for glutamate decarboxylase in other lactic acid bacteria, gadB was located adjacent to a putative glutaminase gene, gls3. An isogenic deletion mutant, L. reuteri ∆gadB, was generated by a double crossover method. L. reuteri 100-23 but not L. reuteri ∆gadB converted glutamate to γ-aminobutyrate (GABA) in phosphate butter (pH 2.5). In sourdough, both strains converted glutamine to glutamate but only L. reuteri 100-23 accumulated GABA. Glutamate addition to phosphate buffer, pH 2.5, improved survival of L. reuteri 100-23 100-fold. However, survival of L. reuteri ∆gadB remained essentially unchanged. The disruption of gadB did not affect growth of L. reuteri in mMRS or in sourdough. However, the wild type strain L. reuteri 100-23 displaced L. reuteri ∆gadB after 5 cycles of fermentation in back-slopped sourdough fermentations. Conclusions The conversion of glutamate to GABA by L. reuteri 100-23 contributes to acid resistance and to competitiveness in industrial sourdough fermentations. The organization of the gene cluster for glutamate conversion, and the availability of amino acids in cereals imply that glutamine rather than glutamate functions as the substrate for GABA formation. The exceptional coupling of glutamine deamidation to glutamate decarboxylation in L. reuteri likely reflects adaptation to cereal

  14. Aeromonas veronii, a new ornithine decarboxylase-positive species that may cause diarrhea.

    PubMed Central

    Hickman-Brenner, F W; MacDonald, K L; Steigerwalt, A G; Fanning, G R; Brenner, D J; Farmer, J J

    1987-01-01

    In 1983, the vernacular name Enteric Group 77 was coined for a group of strains that had been referred to our laboratory as "possible Vibrio cholerae except for gas production." By DNA-DNA hybridization (hydroxyapatite, 32P), 8 of 10 strains of Enteric Group 77 were very highly related to the labeled strain 1169-83 (74 to 100% at 60 degrees C and 75 to 100% at 75 degrees C; percent divergence, 0.0 to 2.5). Type strains of six other Aeromonas species were 45 to 66% related (60 degrees C) to strain 1169-83, but type strains of 27 Vibrio species were only 2 to 6% related. The name Aeromonas veronii is proposed for the highly related group of nine strains formerly known as Enteric Group 77. The type strain is designated as ATCC 35604 (CDC 1169-83). Strains of A. veronii grew well at 36 degrees C and had positive reactions at this temperature for indole, methyl red, Voges-Proskauer, citrate, lysine and ornithine decarboxylases, DNase, lipase, and motility; the strains had negative reactions for arginine decarboxylase, H2S, urea, and malonate. The following sugars were fermented: D-glucose (acid and gas), cellobiose (seven of nine strains), D-galactose, maltose, D-mannitol, D-mannose, alpha-methyl-D-glucoside (eight of nine strains), salicin, sucrose, and trehalose. The following sugars were not fermented: adonitol, L-arabinose, D-arabitol, dulcitol, erythritol, myo-inositol, lactose, raffinose, L-rhamnose, D-sorbitol, and D-xylose. The positive ornithine decarboxylase reaction differentiates A. veronii from other Aeromonas species. The antibiogram of A. veronii is typical of other Aeromonas strains (resistance to ampicillin and carbenicillin and susceptibility to most other agents). A. veronii strains were isolated from three clinical sources: respiratory secretions of four victims of drowning or near drowning in fresh water (probably not clinically significant); infected wounds of two patients previously exposed to fresh water (unknown clinical significance); and

  15. Regioselective Enzymatic β-Carboxylation of para-Hydroxy- styrene Derivatives Catalyzed by Phenolic Acid Decarboxylases

    PubMed Central

    Wuensch, Christiane; Pavkov-Keller, Tea; Steinkellner, Georg; Gross, Johannes; Fuchs, Michael; Hromic, Altijana; Lyskowski, Andrzej; Fauland, Kerstin; Gruber, Karl; Glueck, Silvia M; Faber, Kurt

    2015-01-01

    We report on a ‘green’ method for the utilization of carbon dioxide as C1 unit for the regioselective synthesis of (E)-cinnamic acids via regioselective enzymatic carboxylation of para-hydroxystyrenes. Phenolic acid decarboxylases from bacterial sources catalyzed the β-carboxylation of para-hydroxystyrene derivatives with excellent regio- and (E/Z)-stereoselectivity by exclusively acting at the β-carbon atom of the C=C side chain to furnish the corresponding (E)-cinnamic acid derivatives in up to 40% conversion at the expense of bicarbonate as carbon dioxide source. Studies on the substrate scope of this strategy are presented and a catalytic mechanism is proposed based on molecular modelling studies supported by mutagenesis of amino acid residues in the active site. PMID:26190963

  16. Structural characterization of the mechanism through which human glutamic acid decarboxylase auto-activates

    PubMed Central

    Langendorf, Christopher G.; Tuck, Kellie L.; Key, Trevor L. G.; Fenalti, Gustavo; Pike, Robert N.; Rosado, Carlos J.; Wong, Anders S. M.; Buckle, Ashley M.; Law, Ruby H. P.; Whisstock, James C.

    2012-01-01

    Imbalances in GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid) homoeostasis underlie psychiatric and movement disorders. The ability of the 65 kDa isoform of GAD (glutamic acid decarboxylase), GAD65, to control synaptic GABA levels is influenced through its capacity to auto-inactivate. In contrast, the GAD67 isoform is constitutively active. Previous structural insights suggest that flexibility in the GAD65 catalytic loop drives enzyme inactivation. To test this idea, we constructed a panel of GAD65/67 chimaeras and compared the ability of these molecules to auto-inactivate. Together, our data reveal the important finding that the C-terminal domain of GAD plays a key role in controlling GAD65 auto-inactivation. In support of these findings, we determined the X-ray crystal structure of a GAD65/67 chimaera that reveals that the conformation of the catalytic loop is intimately linked to the C-terminal domain. PMID:23126365

  17. Structural determinants for the inhibitory ligands of orotidine-5′-monophosphate decarboxylase

    SciTech Connect

    Meza-Avina, Maria Elena; Wei, Lianhu; Liu, Yan; Poduch, Ewa; Bello, Angelica M.; Mishra, Ram K.; Pai, Emil F.; Kotra, Lakshmi P.

    2010-06-14

    In recent years, orotidine-5{prime}-monophosphate decarboxylase (ODCase) has gained renewed attention as a drug target. As a part of continuing efforts to design novel inhibitors of ODCase, we undertook a comprehensive study of potent, structurally diverse ligands of ODCase and analyzed their structural interactions in the active site of ODCase. These ligands comprise of pyrazole or pyrimidine nucleotides including the mononucleotide derivatives of pyrazofurin, barbiturate ribonucleoside, and 5-cyanouridine, as well as, in a computational approach, 1,4-dihydropyridine-based non-nucleoside inhibitors such as nifedipine and nimodipine. All these ligands bind in the active site of ODCase exhibiting distinct interactions paving the way to design novel inhibitors against this interesting enzyme. We propose an empirical model for the ligand structure for rational modifications in new drug design and potentially new lead structures.

  18. Ornithine decarboxylase, mitogen-activated protein kinase and matrix metalloproteinase-2 expressions in human colon tumors

    PubMed Central

    Nemoto, Takahiro; Kubota, Shunichiro; Ishida, Hideyuki; Murata, Nobuo; Hashimoto, Daijo

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the expressions of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), MMP-2, and Erk, and their relationship in human colon tumors. METHODS: ODC activity, MMP-2 expression, and mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase activity (Erk phosphorylation) were determined in 58 surgically removed human colon tumors and their adjacent normal tissues, using [1-14C]-ornithine as a substrate, ELISA assay, and Western blotting, respectively. RESULTS: ODC activity, MMP-2 expression, and Erk phosphorylation were significantly elevated in colon tumors, compared to those in adjacent normal tissues. A significant correlation was observed between ODC activities and MMP-2 levels. CONCLUSION: This is the first report showing a significant correlation between ODC activities and MMP-2 levels in human colon tumors. As MMP-2 is involved in cancer invasion and metastasis, and colon cancer overexpresses ODC, suppression of ODC expression may be a rational approach to treat colon cancer which overexpresses ODC. PMID:15918191

  19. Histidine decarboxylase deficiency causes Tourette syndrome: parallel findings in humans and mice

    PubMed Central

    Baldan, Lissandra Castellan; Rapanelli, Maximiliano; Crowley, Michael; Anderson, George M.; Loring, Erin; Gorczyca, Roxanne; Billingslea, Eileen; Wasylink, Suzanne; Panza, Kaitlyn E.; Ercan-Sencicek, A. Gulhan; Krusong, Kuakarun; Leventhal, Bennett L.; Ohtsu, Hiroshi; Bloch, Michael H.; Hughes, Zoë A.; Krystal, John H.; Mayes, Linda; de Araujo, Ivan; Ding, Yu-Shin; State, Matthew W.; Pittenger, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is characterized by tics, sensorimotor gating deficiencies, and abnormalities of cortico-basal ganglia circuits. A mutation in histidine decarboxylase (Hdc), the key enzyme for the biosynthesis of histamine (HA), has been implicated as a rare genetic cause. Hdc knockout mice exhibited potentiated tic-like stereotypies, recapitulating core phenomenology of TS; these were mitigated by the dopamine D2 antagonist haloperidol, a proven pharmacotherapy, and by HA infusion into the brain. Prepulse inhibition was impaired in both mice and humans carrying Hdc mutations. HA infusion reduced striatal dopamine (DA) levels; in Hdc knockout mice, striatal DA was increased and the DA-regulated immediate early gene Fos was upregulated. Dopamine D2/D3 receptor binding was altered both in mice and in humans carrying the Hdc mutation. These data confirm HDC deficiency as a rare cause of TS and identify histamine-dopamine interactions in the basal ganglia as an important locus of pathology. PMID:24411733

  20. Some Aspects of Yeast Anaerobic Metabolism Examined by the Inhibition of Pyruvate Decarboxylase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Earl V.

    1998-10-01

    Incubation of yeast cells with various sugars in aqueous alkaline phosphate solutions under anaerobic conditions results in the accumulation of pyruvate in the cell medium after short periods of up to 15 minutes. This accumulation of pyruvate as the end product of glycolysis results from the inhibition of pyruvate decarboxylase under the conditions. This pyruvate production can be readily measured in the cell-free medium by a spectrophotometric assay using lactic dehydrogenase and NADH. The production of pyruvate can be directly related to the ability of the yeast cells to metabolize particular carbon sources provided. Comparison of pyruvate production by yeast from a variety of common sugars, for example, provides students with a means to assess what sugars are readily utilized by this organism. An additional advantage for student laboratory studies is the availability of Sacchromyces cerevisiae at minimal cost as dry granules which are easily weighed and quickly activated.

  1. Improvement of the Process Stability of Arylmalonate Decarboxylase by Immobilization for Biocatalytic Profen Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Aßmann, Miriam; Mügge, Carolin; Gaßmeyer, Sarah Katharina; Enoki, Junichi; Hilterhaus, Lutz; Kourist, Robert; Liese, Andreas; Kara, Selin

    2017-01-01

    The enzyme arylmalonate decarboxylase (AMDase) enables the selective synthesis of enantiopure (S)-arylpropinates in a simple single-step decarboxylation of dicarboxylic acid precursors. However, the poor enzyme stability with a half-life time of about 1.2 h under process conditions is a serious limitation of the productivity, which results in a need for high catalyst loads. By immobilization on an amino C2 acrylate carrier the operational stability of the (S)-selective AMDase variant G74C/M159L/C188G/V43I/A125P/V156L was increased to a half-life of about 8.6 days, which represents a 158-fold improvement. Further optimization was achieved by simple immobilization of the cell lysate to eliminate the cost- and time intensive enzyme purification step. PMID:28360905

  2. Maternal immune activation alters glutamic acid decarboxylase-67 expression in the brains of adult rat offspring

    PubMed Central

    Cassella, Sarah N.; Hemmerle, Ann M.; Lundgren, Kerstin H.; Kyser, Tara L.; Ahlbrand, Rebecca; Bronson, Stefanie L.; Richtand, Neil M.; Seroogy, Kim B.

    2016-01-01

    Activation of the maternal innate immune system, termed “maternal immune activation” (MIA), represents a common environmental risk factor for schizophrenia. Whereas evidence suggests dysregulation of GABA systems may underlie the pathophysiology of schizophrenia, a role for MIA in alteration of GABAergic systems is less clear. Here, pregnant rats received either the viral mimetic polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidilic acid or vehicle injection on gestational day 14. Glutamic acid decarboxylase-67 (GAD67) mRNA expression was examined in male offspring at postnatal day (P)14, P30 and P60. At P60, GAD67 mRNA was elevated in hippocampus and thalamus and decreased in prefrontal cortex of MIA offspring. MIA-induced alterations in GAD expression could contribute to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. PMID:26830319

  3. Opsoclonus-myoclonus-ataxia syndrome with autoantibodies to glutamic acid decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Markakis, Ioannis; Alexiou, Eleni; Xifaras, Michael; Gekas, Georgios; Rombos, Antonios

    2008-06-01

    Opsoclonus-myoclonus-ataxia syndrome (OMS) is a rare neurological disorder of probably autoimmune origin. Most cases are associated with a remote neoplasm or a viral infection; however in some instances no underlying aetiology can be demonstrated. We report the presence of anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies (anti-GAD Abs) in the serum and CSF of a patient with idiopathic OMS. Treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin led to a remarkable clinical improvement with parallel reduction of anti-GAD titers. Anti-GAD Abs have been associated with several neurological syndromes. They could also be responsible for the clinical triad of OMS, by impairing GABAergic transmission in specific brainstem and cerebellar circuits. We propose that testing for anti-GAD Abs should be performed in OMS, especially when no other aetiological association can be demonstrated.

  4. Molecular mechanism of allosteric substrate activation in a thiamine diphosphate-dependent decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Versées, Wim; Spaepen, Stijn; Wood, Martin D H; Leeper, Finian J; Vanderleyden, Jos; Steyaert, Jan

    2007-11-30

    Thiamine diphosphate-dependent enzymes are involved in a wide variety of metabolic pathways. The molecular mechanism behind active site communication and substrate activation, observed in some of these enzymes, has since long been an area of debate. Here, we report the crystal structures of a phenylpyruvate decarboxylase in complex with its substrates and a covalent reaction intermediate analogue. These structures reveal the regulatory site and unveil the mechanism of allosteric substrate activation. This signal transduction relies on quaternary structure reorganizations, domain rotations, and a pathway of local conformational changes that are relayed from the regulatory site to the active site. The current findings thus uncover the molecular mechanism by which the binding of a substrate in the regulatory site is linked to the mounting of the catalytic machinery in the active site in this thiamine diphosphate-dependent enzyme.

  5. Identification and molecular cloning of glutamate decarboxylase gene from Lactobacillus casei

    PubMed Central

    Tavakoli, Yasaman; Esmaeili, Abolghasem; Rabbani, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA) possesses several physiological functions such as neurotransmission, induction of hypotension, diuretic and tranquilizer effects. Production of GABA-enriched products by lactic acid bacteria has been a focus of different researches in recent years because of their safety and health-promoting specifities. In this study, glutamate decarboxylase (gad) gene of a local strains Lactobacillus casei was identified and cloned. In order to clone the gad gene from this strain, the PCR was carried out using primers designed based on conserved regions. The PCR product was purified and ligated into PGEM-T vector. Comparison of obtained sequences shows that this fragment codes the pyridoxal 5′-phosphate binding region. This strain could possibly be used for the industrial GABA production and also for development of functional fermented foods. Gad gene manipulation can also either decrease or increase the activity of enzyme in bacteria. PMID:27844008

  6. Extralimbic autoimmune encephalitis associated with glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies: an underdiagnosed entity?

    PubMed

    Najjar, Souhel; Pearlman, Daniel; Najjar, Amanda; Ghiasian, Vahid; Zagzag, David; Devinsky, Orrin

    2011-07-01

    Nonparaneoplastic glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody (GADAb)-related autoimmune encephalitis is a syndrome characterized by refractory seizures, progressive cognitive deficits, and psychiatric manifestations. The limbic subtype is well described, has characteristic affective and memory disturbances, and typical mesial temporal MRI abnormalities. We found only one single case report of the extralimbic subtype. We report clinical, radiological, and pathological findings of two additional cases with contrast-enhancing lesions. One of our cases presented as vasculitis, and the other imitated a tumor. Pathological evidence of both vasculitis and encephalitis has never been previously reported in any inflammatory condition affecting the brain. Our cases confirm prior reports that immune therapy can better control seizures associated with GADAb autoimmune encephalitis, and support the rationale for assaying for GADAb titers in patients with etiologically unclear extralimbic lesions and refractory epilepsy, independent of seizure types.

  7. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the inducible lysine decarboxylase from Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Alexopoulos, E.; Kanjee, U.; Snider, J.; Houry, W.A.; Pai, E.F.

    2010-02-11

    The decameric inducible lysine decarboxylase (LdcI) from Escherichia coli has been crystallized in space groups C2 and C222{sub 1}; the Ta{sub 6}Br{sub 12}{sup 2+} cluster was used to derivatize the C2 crystals. The method of single isomorphous replacement with anomalous scattering (SIRAS) as implemented in SHELXD was used to solve the Ta{sub 6}Br{sub 12}{sup 2+}-derivatized structure to 5 {angstrom} resolution. Many of the Ta{sub 6}Br{sub 12}{sup 2+}-binding sites had twofold and fivefold noncrystallographic symmetry. Taking advantage of this feature, phase modification was performed in DM. The electron-density map of LdcI displays many features in agreement with the low-resolution negative-stain electron-density map [Snider et al. (2006), J. Biol. Chem. 281, 1532-1546].

  8. [Glutamate decarboxylase (GAD)--an autoantigen in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM)].

    PubMed

    Tursky, T; Bandzuchova, E

    1999-02-01

    The number of antibodies to pancreatic beta-cell antigens in IDDM increased in the last years, involving antibodies to glutamic acid decarboxylase (GADab). A short review is given about the diagnostic and prognostic value of GADab determination in IDDM. The GAD plays an important, possibly a key role in the initial immunological events leading to the destruction of beta cells. The question is open whether the immunological reaction against GAD is a primary one, or if it is a result of mimicry of a part of an infectious protein antigen (Coxackie virus). The immunological reaction to GAD is associated with both humoral and cellular responses. The cellular response seems to be more important than the humoral one. The cellular response may be mediated through the HLA complex class I cells (cytotoxic lymphocytes) and the HLA complex class II cells (helper lymphocytes). There are arguments for both possibilities. The principles of GADab determination are shortly described. (Ref. 34.)

  9. Heterologous expression of a plant arginine decarboxylase gene in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Carrillo, Carolina; Serra, María P; Pereira, Claudio A; Huber, Alejandra; González, Nélida S; Algranati, Israel D

    2004-11-01

    Wild-type Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes lack arginine decarboxylase (ADC) enzymatic activity. However, the transformation of these parasites with a recombinant plasmid containing the oat ADC cDNA coding region gave rise to the transient heterologous expression of the enzyme, suggesting the absence of endogenous mechanisms that could inhibit the expression of a hypothetical own ADC gene or the assay used to measure its enzymatic activity. The foreign ADC enzyme expressed in the transgenic T. cruzi was characterized by identification of the products, the stoichiometry of the catalysed reaction, the specific inhibition by alpha-difluoromethylarginine (DFMA) and the study of its metabolic turnover. The half-life of the heterologous ADC activity in T. cruzi was about 150 min. Bioinformatics studies and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analyses seem to indicate the absence of ADC-like DNA sequences in the wild-type T. cruzi genome.

  10. [Proteolytic resistance and thermostability of catalase and histidine decarboxylase from Micrococcus sp. n].

    PubMed

    Romantsev, F E; Prozorovskiĭ, V N

    1984-04-01

    Catalase from Micrococcus sp. n. is not hydrolyzed by trypsin at the protein/protease (pn/pe) exceeding 10/1. Histidine decarboxylase (HDC) loses 50% of activity after the first nine minutes of hydrolysis at the pn/pe ratio equal to 6/1, followed by a slow linear inactivation. Investigation of thermal stability at varying pH and temperatures demonstrated that catalase and HDC preserve 70-80% of activity after 5 minutes of incubation at 72 degrees C only at pH approaching the optimal pH of enzymatic activity (pH 7.45 for catalase and pH 5.55 for HDC).

  11. Hydroxydibenzoylmethane induces apoptosis through repressing ornithine decarboxylase in human promyelocytic leukemia HL-60 cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ming-Fu; Liao, Ya-Fan; Hung, Ying-Cheng; Lin, Chih-Li; Hour, Tzyh-Chyuan; Lue, Ko-Huang; Hung, Hui-Chih

    2011-01-01

    Ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) is the rate-limiting enzyme in polyamine biosynthesis and a target for chemoprevention. Hydroxydibenzoylmethane (HDB), a derivative of dibenzoylmethane of licorice, is a promising chemopreventive agent. In this paper, we investigated whether HDB would inhibit the ODC pathway to enhance apoptosis in human promyelocytic leukemia HL-60 cells. We found ODC enzyme activity was reduced during HDB treatment. Overexpression of ODC in HL-60 parental cells could reduce HDB-induced apoptosis, which leads to loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm), through lessening intracellular ROS. Furthermore, ODC overexpression protected cytochrome c release and the activation of caspase-3 following HDB treatment. The results demonstrated HDB-induced apoptosis was through a mechanism of down-regulation of ODC and occurred along a ROS-dependent mitochondria-mediated pathway. PMID:21372632

  12. Genetic Confirmation of the Role of Sulfopyruvate Decarboxylase in Coenzyme M Biosynthesis in Methanococcus maripaludis

    DOE PAGES

    Sarmiento, Felipe; Ellison, Courtney K.; Whitman, William B.

    2013-01-01

    Coenzyme M is an essential coenzyme for methanogenesis. The proposed biosynthetic pathway consists of five steps, of which the fourth step is catalyzed by sulfopyruvate decarboxylase (ComDE). Disruption of the gene comE by transposon mutagenesis resulted in a partial coenzyme M auxotroph, which grew poorly in the absence of coenzyme M and retained less than 3% of the wild type level of coenzyme M biosynthesis. Upon coenzyme M addition, normal growth of the mutant was restored. Moreover, complementation of the mutation with the wild type comE gene in trans restored full growth in the absence of coenzyme M. Thesemore » results confirm that ComE plays an important role in coenzyme M biosynthesis. The inability to yield a complete CoM auxotroph suggests that either the transposon insertion failed to completely inactivate the gene or M. maripaludis possesses a promiscuous activity that partially complemented the mutation.« less

  13. Molecular analysis of the glutamate decarboxylase locus in Streptococcus thermophilus ST110.

    PubMed

    Somkuti, G A; Renye, J A; Steinberg, D H

    2012-07-01

    γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is generated from glutamate by the action of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and characterized by hypotensive, diuretic, and tranquilizing effects in humans and animals. The production of GABA by lactic acid starter bacteria would enhance the functionality of fermented dairy foods including cheeses and yogurt. The survey of 42 strains of the yogurt starter culture Streptococcus thermophilus by PCR techniques indicated the presence of a glutamate decarboxylase gene (gadB) in 16 strains. DNA sequencing data indicated that the GAD/GABA antiporter locus (gadB/gadC) in GAD(+) S. thermophilus strains is flanked by transposase elements (5' and 3') and positioned between the luxS (5') and the HD-superfamily hydrolase genes (3'). The PCR amplification product of a ca. 2-kb genomic fragment that included the gadB and its putative promoter region was inserted into a shuttle vector, which was used to transform Escherichia coli DH5α. Subsequently, the recombinant plasmid pMEU5a-1/gadB (7.24 kb) was electrotransformed into the GAD-negative strain S. thermophilus ST128. The ST128 transformants carrying the plasmid-encoded gadB produced functional GAD enzyme as evidenced by the conversion of glutamate to GABA at a rate similar to strains with the gadB/gadC operon located on the chromosome. The results demonstrated the potential to impart to non-GABA-producing strains of S. thermophilus and other lactic acid bacteria the GAD(+) phenotype that improves their appeal in possible applications in the development of health-promoting functional foods.

  14. Withania coagulans tryptophan decarboxylase gene cloning, heterologous expression, and catalytic characteristics of the recombinant enzyme.

    PubMed

    Jadaun, Jyoti Singh; Sangwan, Neelam Singh; Narnoliya, Lokesh Kumar; Tripathi, Sandhya; Sangwan, Rajender Singh

    2017-01-01

    Tryptophan decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.28) catalyzes pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent decarboxylation of tryptophan to produce tryptamine for recruitment in a myriad of biosynthetic pathways of metabolites possessing indolyl moiety. A recent report of certain indolyl metabolites in Withania species calls for a possible predominant functional role of tryptophan decarboxylase (TDC) in the genome of Withania species to facilitate production of the indolyl progenitor molecule, tryptamine. Therefore, with this metabolic prospection, we have identified and cloned a full-length cDNA sequence of TDC from aerial tissues of Withania coagulans. The functional WcTDC gene comprises of 1506 bp open reading frame (ORF) encoding a 502 amino acid protein with calculated molecular mass and pI value of 56.38 kDa and 8.35, respectively. The gene was expressed in Escherichia coli, and the recombinant enzyme was affinity-purified to homogeneity to discern its kinetics of catalysis. The enzyme (WcTDC) exhibited much higher Km value for tryptophan than for pyridoxal 5'-phosphate and was dedicated to catalyze decarboxylation of only tryptophan or, to a limited extent, of its analogue (like 5-hydroxy tryptophan). The observed optimal catalytic functionality of the enzyme on the slightly basic side of the pH scale and at slightly higher temperatures reflected adaptability of the plant to hot and arid regions, the predominant natural habitat of the herb. This pertains to be the first report on cloning and characterization of heterologously expressed recombinant enzyme from W. coagulans and forms a starting point to further understanding of withanamide biosynthesis.

  15. Glutamate alteration of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) in GABAergic neurons: the role of cysteine proteases.

    PubMed

    Monnerie, Hubert; Le Roux, Peter D

    2008-09-01

    Brain cell vulnerability to neurologic insults varies greatly, depending on their neuronal subpopulation. Among cells that survive a pathological insult such as ischemia or brain trauma, some may undergo morphological and/or biochemical changes that could compromise brain function. We previously reported that surviving cortical GABAergic neurons exposed to glutamate in vitro displayed an NMDA receptor (NMDAR)-mediated alteration in the levels of the GABA synthesizing enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD65/67) [Monnerie, H., Le Roux, P., 2007. Reduced dendrite growth and altered glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) 65- and 67-kDa isoform protein expression from mouse cortical GABAergic neurons following excitotoxic injury in vitro. Exp. Neurol. 205, 367-382]. In this study, we examined the mechanisms by which glutamate excitotoxicity caused a change in cortical GABAergic neurons' GAD protein levels. Removing extracellular calcium prevented the NMDAR-mediated decrease in GAD protein levels, measured using Western blot techniques, whereas inhibiting calcium entry through voltage-gated calcium channels had no effect. Glutamate's effect on GAD protein isoforms was significantly attenuated by preincubation with the cysteine protease inhibitor N-Acetyl-L-Leucyl-L-Leucyl-L-norleucinal (ALLN). Using class-specific protease inhibitors, we observed that ALLN's effect resulted from the blockade of calpain and cathepsin protease activities. Cell-free proteolysis assay confirmed that both proteases were involved in glutamate-induced alteration in GAD protein levels. Together these results suggest that glutamate-induced excitotoxic stimulation of NMDAR in cultured cortical neurons leads to altered GAD protein levels from GABAergic neurons through intracellular calcium increase and protease activation including calpain and cathepsin. Biochemical alterations in surviving cortical GABAergic neurons in various disease states may contribute to the altered balance between excitation

  16. A substantial oxygen isotope effect at O2 in the OMP decarboxylase reaction: mechanistic implications.

    PubMed

    Wepukhulu, Wickliffe O; Smiley, Vanessa L; Vemulapalli, Bhargavi; Smiley, Jeffrey A; Phillips, Linda M; Lee, Jeehiun K

    2008-12-21

    Orotidine-5'-monophosphate decarboxylase (OMP decarboxylase, ODCase) catalyzes the decarboxylation of orotidine-5'-monophosphate (OMP) to uridine-5'-monophosphate (UMP). Despite extensive enzymological, structural, and computational studies, the mechanism of ODCase remains incompletely characterized. Herein, carbon kinetic isotope effects were measured for both the natural abundance substrate and a substrate mixture synthesized for the purpose of carrying out the remote double label isotope effect procedure, with O2 of the substrate as the remote position. The carbon kinetic isotope effect on enzymatic decarboxylation of this substrate mix was measured to be 1.0199 +/- 0.0007, compared to the value of 1.0289 +/- 0.0009 for natural abundance OMP, revealing an (18)O2 isotope effect of 0.991 +/- 0.001. This value equates to an intrinsic isotope effect of approximately 0.983, using a calculated commitment factor derived from previous isotope effect data. The measured (18)O2 isotope effect requires a mechanism with one or more enzymatic processes, including binding and/or chemistry, that contribute to this substantial inverse isotope effect. (18)O2 kinetic isotope effects were calculated for four proposed mechanisms: decarboxylation preceded by proton transfer to 1) O2; 2) O4; and 3) C5; and 4) decarboxylation without a preceding protonation step. A mechanism involving no pre-decarboxylation step does not appear to have any steps with the necessary substantial inverse (18)O2 effect, thus calling into question any mechanism involving simple direct decarboxylation. Protonation at O2, O4, or C5 are all calculated to proceed with inverse (18)O2 effects, and could contribute to the experimentally measured value. Recent crystal structures indicate that O2 of the substrate appears to be involved in an intricate bonding arrangement involving the substrate phosphoryl group, an enzyme Gln side chain, and a bound water molecule; this interaction likely contributes to the observed

  17. [Cloning, prokaryotic expression and characterization of lysine decarboxylase gene from Huperzia serrata].

    PubMed

    Di, Ci; Li, Jing; Tang, Yuntao; Peng, Qingzhong

    2014-08-01

    Huperzine A is a promising drug to treat Alzheimer's disease (AD). To date, its biosynthetic pathway is still unknown. Lysine decarboxylase (LDC) has been proposed to catalyze the first-step of the biosynthesis of huperzine A. To identify and characterize LDCs from Huperzia serrata, we isolated two LDC fragments (LDC1 and LDC2) from leaves of H. serrata by RT-PCR and then cloned them into pMD 19-T vector. Sequence analysis showed that LDC1 and LDC2 genes shared 95.3% identity and encoded the protein of 212 and 202 amino acid residues respectively. Thus, we ligated LDC genes into pET-32a(+) to obtain recombinant expressing vectors pET-32a(+)/LDC1 and pET-32a(+)/LDC2 respectively. We further introduced two expression vectors into Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) and cultured positive colonies of E. coli in liquid LB medium. After inducing for 4 hours with 260 μg/mL IPTG at 30 degrees C, soluble recombinant Trx-LDC1 and Trx-LDC2 were obtained and isolated for purification using a Ni-NTA affinity chromatography. We incubated purified recombinant proteins with L-lysine in the enzyme reaction buffer at 37 degrees C and then derived the reaction products using dansyl chloride. It was found that both Trx-LDC1 and Trx-LDC2 had decarboxylase activity, could convert L-lysine into cadaverine by way of thin layer chromatography assay. Further, bioinformatics analysis indicated that deduced LDC1 and LDC2 had different physicochemical properties, but similar secondary and three-dimensional structures.

  18. The genetics of dopa decarboxylase in Drosophila melanogaster. I. Isolation and characterization of deficiencies that delete the dopa-decarboxylase-dosage-sensitive region and the alpha-methyl-dopa-hypersensitive locus.

    PubMed

    Wright, T R; Hodgetts, R B; Sherald, A F

    1976-10-01

    A detailed cytogenetic investigation of 16 overlapping deficiencies in the 36C-40A region on the left arm of the second chromosome (2L) in Drosophila melanogaster is reported. These deficiencies permit a localization of both the dopa-decarboxylase-dosage-sensitive region and the alpha-methyl-dopa-hypersensitive locus, l(2) amd, to the same region, 37B10-37C7.

  19. Threonine 57 is required for the post-translational activation of Escherichia coli aspartate α-decarboxylase

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Michael E.; Yorke, Briony A.; Kershaw, Tom; Lovelock, Sarah; Lobley, Carina M. C.; Kilkenny, Mairi L.; Smith, Alison G.; Blundell, Tom L.; Pearson, Arwen R.; Abell, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Aspartate α-decarboxylase is a pyruvoyl-dependent decarboxylase required for the production of β-alanine in the bacterial pantothenate (vitamin B5) biosynthesis pathway. The pyruvoyl group is formed via the intramolecular rearrangement of a serine residue to generate a backbone ester intermediate which is cleaved to generate an N-terminal pyruvoyl group. Site-directed mutagenesis of residues adjacent to the active site, including Tyr22, Thr57 and Tyr58, reveals that only mutation of Thr57 leads to changes in the degree of post-translational activation. The crystal structure of the site-directed mutant T57V is consistent with a non-rearranged backbone, supporting the hypothesis that Thr57 is required for the formation of the ester intermediate in activation. PMID:24699660

  20. Threonine 57 is required for the post-translational activation of Escherichia coli aspartate α-decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Webb, Michael E; Yorke, Briony A; Kershaw, Tom; Lovelock, Sarah; Lobley, Carina M C; Kilkenny, Mairi L; Smith, Alison G; Blundell, Tom L; Pearson, Arwen R; Abell, Chris

    2014-04-01

    Aspartate α-decarboxylase is a pyruvoyl-dependent decarboxylase required for the production of β-alanine in the bacterial pantothenate (vitamin B5) biosynthesis pathway. The pyruvoyl group is formed via the intramolecular rearrangement of a serine residue to generate a backbone ester intermediate which is cleaved to generate an N-terminal pyruvoyl group. Site-directed mutagenesis of residues adjacent to the active site, including Tyr22, Thr57 and Tyr58, reveals that only mutation of Thr57 leads to changes in the degree of post-translational activation. The crystal structure of the site-directed mutant T57V is consistent with a non-rearranged backbone, supporting the hypothesis that Thr57 is required for the formation of the ester intermediate in activation.

  1. Computational, structural, and kinetic evidence that Vibrio vulnificus FrsA is not a cofactor-independent pyruvate decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Kellett, Whitney F; Brunk, Elizabeth; Desai, Bijoy J; Fedorov, Alexander A; Almo, Steven C; Gerlt, John A; Rothlisberger, Ursula; Richards, Nigel G J

    2013-03-19

    The fermentation-respiration switch (FrsA) protein in Vibrio vulnificus was recently reported to catalyze the cofactor-independent decarboxylation of pyruvate. We now report quantum mechanical/molecular mechenical calculations that examine the energetics of C-C bond cleavage for a pyruvate molecule bound within the putative active site of FrsA. These calculations suggest that the barrier to C-C bond cleavage in the bound substrate is 28 kcal/mol, which is similar to that estimated for the uncatalyzed decarboxylation of pyruvate in water at 25 °C. In agreement with the theoretical predictions, no pyruvate decarboxylase activity was detected for recombinant FrsA protein that could be crystallized and structurally characterized. These results suggest that the functional annotation of FrsA as a cofactor-independent pyruvate decarboxylase is incorrect.

  2. Computational, Structural and Kinetic Evidence that Vibrio vulnificus FrsA is not a Cofactor-Independent Pyruvate Decarboxylase

    PubMed Central

    Kellett, Whitney F.; Brunk, Elizabeth; Desai, Bijoy J.; Fedorov, Alexander A.; Almo, Steven C.; Gerlt, John A.; Rothlisberger, Ursula; Richards, Nigel G. J.

    2013-01-01

    The fermentation-respiration switch (FrsA) protein in Vibrio vulnificus was recently reported to catalyze the cofactor-independent decarboxylation of pyruvate. We now report QM/MM calculations that examine the energetics of C-C bond cleavage for a pyruvate molecule bound within the putative active site of FrsA. These calculations suggest that the barrier to C-C bond cleavage in the bound substrate is 28 kcal/mol, which is similar to that estimated for the uncatalyzed decarboxylation of pyruvate in water at 25 °C. In agreement with the theoretical predictions, no pyruvate decarboxylase activity was detected for recombinant FrsA protein that could be crystallized and structurally characterized. These results suggest that the functional annotation of FrsA as a cofactor-independent pyruvate decarboxylase is incorrect. PMID:23452154

  3. Correlation between Ornithine Decarboxylase and Putrescine in Tomato Plants Infected by Citrus Exocortis Viroid or Treated with Ethephon.

    PubMed Central

    Belles, J. M.; Perez-Amador, M. A.; Carbonell, J.; Conejero, V.

    1993-01-01

    We have investigated the arginine decarboxylase (ADC, EC 4.1.1.19) and ornithine decarboxylase (ODC, EC 4.1.1.17) activities and the levels of conjugated polyamines to explain the decrease of free putrescine level caused by citrus exocortis viroid (CEVd) and ethephon treatment in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. cv Rutgers) plants (J.M. Belles, J. Carbonell, V. Conejero [1991] Plant Physiol 96: 1053-1059). This decrease correlates with a decrease in ODC activity in CEVd-infected or ethephon-treated plants; ADC activity was not altered. CEVd infection had no effect on polyamine conjugates, and ethephon produced a decrease in putrescine conjugates. Interference with ethylene action by silver ions prevented the decrease in ODC activity and in free and conjugated putrescine. It is suggested that changes in putrescine level after CEVd infection and ethephon treatment are regulated via ODC activity and that conjugation is not involved. PMID:12231879

  4. The yeast Dekkera bruxellensis genome contains two orthologs of the ARO10 gene encoding for phenylpyruvate decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    de Souza Liberal, Anna Theresa; Carazzolle, Marcelo Falsarella; Pereira, Gonçalo Amarante; Simões, Diogo Ardaillon; de Morais, Marcos Antonio

    2012-07-01

    The yeast Dekkera bruxellensis possesses important physiological traits that enable it to grow in industrial environments as either spoiling yeast of wine production or a fermenting strain used for lambic beer, or fermenting yeast in the bioethanol production process. In this work, in silico analysis of the Dekkera genome database allowed the identification of two paralogous genes encoding for phenylpyruvate decarboxylase (DbARO10) that represents a unique trait among the hemiascomycetes. The molecular analysis of the theoretical protein confirmed its protein identity. Upon cultivation of the cell in medium containing phenylpyruvate, both increases in gene expression and in phenylpyruvate decarboxylase activity were observed. Both genes were differentially expressed depending on the culture condition and the type of metabolism, which indicated the difference in the biological function of their corresponding proteins. The importance of the duplicated DbARO10 genes in the D. bruxellensis genome was discussed and represents the first effort to understand the production of flavor by this yeast.

  5. /sup 3/H-DFMA metabolism in tobacco: non-specific, arginase mediated inhibition of ornithine decarboxylase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Slocum, R.D.; Feirer, R.L.

    1987-04-01

    ..cap alpha..-Difluoromethylarginine (DFMA) is a specific, enzyme-activated, irreversible inhibit of arginine decarboxylase (ADC) in vitro. ADC catalyzes the first step leading to putrescine biosynthesis and the activity of this enzyme is closely linked to overall polyamine (PA) biosynthesis in non-meristematic plant tissues. Consequently, ADC represents an important target enzyme for inhibitors of PA metabolism. DFMA has been shown to inhibit ADC activity in a variety of tissues in vivo but its specificity in tobacco was questioned since ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) activity was also inhibited. Further studies have shown that (/sup 3/H)-DFMA is efficiently hydrolyzed in tobacco to (/sup 3/H)-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO), an irreversible inhibitor of ODC. Tobacco and bovine arginases also catalyze the hydrolysis of DFMA in vitro, suggesting a role for this enzyme in mediating the non-specific inhibition of ODC by DFMA in tobacco flowers.

  6. Effects of down-regulating ornithine decarboxylase upon putrescine-associated metabolism and growth in Nicotiana tabacum L.

    PubMed

    Dalton, Heidi L; Blomstedt, Cecilia K; Neale, Alan D; Gleadow, Ros; DeBoer, Kathleen D; Hamill, John D

    2016-05-01

    Transgenic plants of Nicotiana tabacum L. homozygous for an RNAi construct designed to silence ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) had significantly lower concentrations of nicotine and nornicotine, but significantly higher concentrations of anatabine, compared with vector-only controls. Silencing of ODC also led to significantly reduced concentrations of polyamines (putrescine, spermidine and spermine), tyramine and phenolamides (caffeoylputrescine and dicaffeoylspermidine) with concomitant increases in concentrations of amino acids ornithine, arginine, aspartate, glutamate and glutamine. Root transcript levels of S-adenosyl methionine decarboxylase, S-adenosyl methionine synthase and spermidine synthase (polyamine synthesis enzymes) were reduced compared with vector controls, whilst transcript levels of arginine decarboxylase (putrescine synthesis), putrescine methyltransferase (nicotine production) and multi-drug and toxic compound extrusion (alkaloid transport) proteins were elevated. In contrast, expression of two other key proteins required for alkaloid synthesis, quinolinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase (nicotinic acid production) and a PIP-family oxidoreductase (nicotinic acid condensation reactions), were diminished in roots of odc-RNAi plants relative to vector-only controls. Transcriptional and biochemical differences associated with polyamine and alkaloid metabolism were exacerbated in odc-RNAi plants in response to different forms of shoot damage. In general, apex removal had a greater effect than leaf wounding alone, with a combination of these injury treatments producing synergistic responses in some cases. Reduced expression of ODC appeared to have negative effects upon plant growth and vigour with some leaves of odc-RNAi lines being brittle and bleached compared with vector-only controls. Together, results of this study demonstrate that ornithine decarboxylase has important roles in facilitating both primary and secondary metabolism in Nicotiana.

  7. Identification and assessment of the effects of yeast decarboxylases expressed in Escherichia coli for producing higher alcohols.

    PubMed

    Su, H; Zhao, Y; Zhao, H; Wang, M; Li, Q; Jiang, J; Lu, Q

    2014-07-01

    To contribute to the improvement of methods for the regulation and production of higher alcohols using micro-organisms, we assessed the yields achieved using 10 decarboxylase genes from three different yeast species (Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Candida tropicalis and Pichia pastoris) by cloning them into vectors and overexpressing them in Escherichia coli hosts of different genotypes. Genes that produced the greatest yields in higher alcohol production were further assessed for the catalytic effects of the decarboxylase enzymes in the different E. coli hosts. A major metabolic pathway is structured via overexpressing a series of five genes, to detect the effect of decarboxylase on the production of higher alcohols. Results suggested that these genes can facilitate production of specific types of higher alcohols by diverse types of E. coli. We also showed that they play direct roles in the metabolic pathways that lead to production of higher alcohols in E. coli. The gene ARO10 from S. cerevisiae produced the highest yields for producing isobutanol and isopentanol in the host JM109. Significant differences were found in the types of higher alcohols and yields produced within the same host, for the genes PAD1, GAD1, SPE1 from S. cerevisiae. Similar results were observed for the genes ODC1 and gadB from Candida tropicalis and P. pastoris, respectively. Investigation of these genes for identification of the key enzymatic steps or regulatory pathways involved in the Ehrlich metabolic network to produce higher alcohols is paramount for producing biofuels. The selected genes are promising targets for the development of improved production strains. This is the first published assessment of the effects of decarboxylases from different yeast species that were expressed in E. coli, for the production of higher alcohols. Our results provide guidance for future studies about the use of yeast enzymes for transforming or constructing a new metabolic pathway utilizing E. coli for the

  8. Effects of down-regulating ornithine decarboxylase upon putrescine-associated metabolism and growth in Nicotiana tabacum L.

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, Heidi L.; Blomstedt, Cecilia K.; Neale, Alan D.; Gleadow, Ros; DeBoer, Kathleen D.; Hamill, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Transgenic plants of Nicotiana tabacum L. homozygous for an RNAi construct designed to silence ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) had significantly lower concentrations of nicotine and nornicotine, but significantly higher concentrations of anatabine, compared with vector-only controls. Silencing of ODC also led to significantly reduced concentrations of polyamines (putrescine, spermidine and spermine), tyramine and phenolamides (caffeoylputrescine and dicaffeoylspermidine) with concomitant increases in concentrations of amino acids ornithine, arginine, aspartate, glutamate and glutamine. Root transcript levels of S-adenosyl methionine decarboxylase, S-adenosyl methionine synthase and spermidine synthase (polyamine synthesis enzymes) were reduced compared with vector controls, whilst transcript levels of arginine decarboxylase (putrescine synthesis), putrescine methyltransferase (nicotine production) and multi-drug and toxic compound extrusion (alkaloid transport) proteins were elevated. In contrast, expression of two other key proteins required for alkaloid synthesis, quinolinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase (nicotinic acid production) and a PIP-family oxidoreductase (nicotinic acid condensation reactions), were diminished in roots of odc-RNAi plants relative to vector-only controls. Transcriptional and biochemical differences associated with polyamine and alkaloid metabolism were exacerbated in odc-RNAi plants in response to different forms of shoot damage. In general, apex removal had a greater effect than leaf wounding alone, with a combination of these injury treatments producing synergistic responses in some cases. Reduced expression of ODC appeared to have negative effects upon plant growth and vigour with some leaves of odc-RNAi lines being brittle and bleached compared with vector-only controls. Together, results of this study demonstrate that ornithine decarboxylase has important roles in facilitating both primary and secondary metabolism in Nicotiana. PMID

  9. The role of residues glutamate-50 and phenylalanine-496 in Zymomonas mobilis pyruvate decarboxylase.

    PubMed Central

    Candy, J M; Koga, J; Nixon, P F; Duggleby, R G

    1996-01-01

    Several enzymes require thiamine diphosphate (ThDP) as an essential cofactor, and we have used one of these, pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC; EC 4.1.1.1) from Zymomonas mobilis, as a model for this group of enzymes. It is well suited for this purpose because of its stability, ease of purification, homotetrameric subunit structure and simple kinetic properties. Crystallographic analyses of three ThDP-dependent enzymes [Müller, Lindqvist, Furey, Schulz, Jordan and Schneider (1993) Structure 1, 95-103] have suggested that an invariant glutamate participates in catalysis. In order to evaluate the role of this residue, identified in PDC from Zymomonas mobilis as Glu-50, it has been altered to glutamine and aspartate by site-directed mutagenesis of the cloned gene. The mutant proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli. Here we demonstrate that substitution with aspartate yields an enzyme with 3% of the activity of the wild-type, but with normal kinetics for pyruvate. Replacement of Glu-50 with glutamine yields an enzyme with only 0.5% of the catalytic activity of the wild-type enzyme. Each of these mutant enzymes has a decreased affinity for both ThDP and Mg2+. It has been reported that the binding of cofactors to apoPDC quenches the intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence [Diefenbach and Duggleby (1991) Biochem. J. 276, 439-445] and we have identified the residue responsible as Trp-487 [Diefenbach, Candy, Mattick and Duggleby (1992) FEBS Lett. 296, 95-98]. Although this residue is some distance from the cofactor binding site, it lies in the dimer interface, and the proposal has been put forward [Dyda, Furey, Swaminathan, Sax, Farrenkopf and Jordan (1993) Biochemistry 32, 6165-6170] that alteration of ring stacking with Phe-496 of the adjacent subunit is the mechanism of fluorescence quenching when cofactors bind. The closely related enzyme indolepyruvate decarboxylase (from Enterobacter cloacae) has a leucine residue at the position corresponding to Phe-496 but shows

  10. Lysine decarboxylase catalyzes the first step of quinolizidine alkaloid biosynthesis and coevolved with alkaloid production in leguminosae.

    PubMed

    Bunsupa, Somnuk; Katayama, Kae; Ikeura, Emi; Oikawa, Akira; Toyooka, Kiminori; Saito, Kazuki; Yamazaki, Mami

    2012-03-01

    Lysine decarboxylase (LDC) catalyzes the first-step in the biosynthetic pathway of quinolizidine alkaloids (QAs), which form a distinct, large family of plant alkaloids. A cDNA of lysine/ornithine decarboxylase (L/ODC) was isolated by differential transcript screening in QA-producing and nonproducing cultivars of Lupinus angustifolius. We also obtained L/ODC cDNAs from four other QA-producing plants, Sophora flavescens, Echinosophora koreensis, Thermopsis chinensis, and Baptisia australis. These L/ODCs form a phylogenetically distinct subclade in the family of plant ornithine decarboxylases. Recombinant L/ODCs from QA-producing plants preferentially or equally catalyzed the decarboxylation of L-lysine and L-ornithine. L. angustifolius L/ODC (La-L/ODC) was found to be localized in chloroplasts, as suggested by the transient expression of a fusion protein of La-L/ODC fused to the N terminus of green fluorescent protein in Arabidopsis thaliana. Transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) suspension cells and hairy roots produced enhanced levels of cadaverine-derived alkaloids, and transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing (La-L/ODC) produced enhanced levels of cadaverine, indicating the involvement of this enzyme in lysine decarboxylation to form cadaverine. Site-directed mutagenesis and protein modeling studies revealed a structural basis for preferential LDC activity, suggesting an evolutionary implication of L/ODC in the QA-producing plants.

  11. Lysine Decarboxylase Catalyzes the First Step of Quinolizidine Alkaloid Biosynthesis and Coevolved with Alkaloid Production in Leguminosae[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Bunsupa, Somnuk; Katayama, Kae; Ikeura, Emi; Oikawa, Akira; Toyooka, Kiminori; Saito, Kazuki; Yamazaki, Mami

    2012-01-01

    Lysine decarboxylase (LDC) catalyzes the first-step in the biosynthetic pathway of quinolizidine alkaloids (QAs), which form a distinct, large family of plant alkaloids. A cDNA of lysine/ornithine decarboxylase (L/ODC) was isolated by differential transcript screening in QA-producing and nonproducing cultivars of Lupinus angustifolius. We also obtained L/ODC cDNAs from four other QA-producing plants, Sophora flavescens, Echinosophora koreensis, Thermopsis chinensis, and Baptisia australis. These L/ODCs form a phylogenetically distinct subclade in the family of plant ornithine decarboxylases. Recombinant L/ODCs from QA-producing plants preferentially or equally catalyzed the decarboxylation of l-lysine and l-ornithine. L. angustifolius L/ODC (La-L/ODC) was found to be localized in chloroplasts, as suggested by the transient expression of a fusion protein of La-L/ODC fused to the N terminus of green fluorescent protein in Arabidopsis thaliana. Transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) suspension cells and hairy roots produced enhanced levels of cadaverine-derived alkaloids, and transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing (La-L/ODC) produced enhanced levels of cadaverine, indicating the involvement of this enzyme in lysine decarboxylation to form cadaverine. Site-directed mutagenesis and protein modeling studies revealed a structural basis for preferential LDC activity, suggesting an evolutionary implication of L/ODC in the QA-producing plants. PMID:22415272

  12. Increased Putrescine Biosynthesis through Transfer of Mouse Ornithine Decarboxylase cDNA in Carrot Promotes Somatic Embryogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Bastola, D. R.; Minocha, S. C.

    1995-01-01

    Carrot (Daucus carota L.) cells were transformed with Agrobacterium tumefaciens strains containing 3[prime]-truncated mouse ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) cDNA under the control of a cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter. A neomycin phosphotransferase gene linked with a nopaline synthase promoter was used to select transformed cell lines on kanamycin. Although the nontransformed cells contained no ODC, high amounts of mouse-specific ODC activity were observed in the transformed cells. Transgenic cells showed a significant increase in the cellular content of putrescine compared to control cells. Spermidine, however, remained unaffected. Not only did the transformed cells exhibit improved somatic embryogenesis in the auxin-free medium, they also regenerated some embryos in the presence of inhibitory concentrations of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid. These cells acquired tolerance to [alpha]-difluoromethylarginine (a potent inhibitor of arginine decarboxylase) at concentrations that inhibit growth as well as embryogenesis in nontransformed carrot cells, showing that the mouse ODC can replace the carrot arginine decarboxylase for putrescine biosynthesis in the transgenic cells. PMID:12228581

  13. Cloning and characterization of a locus encoding an indolepyruvate decarboxylase involved in indole-3-acetic acid synthesis in Erwinia herbicola.

    PubMed Central

    Brandl, M T; Lindow, S E

    1996-01-01

    Erwinia herbicola 299R synthesizes indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) primarily by the indole-3-pyruvic acid pathway. A gene involved in the biosynthesis of IAA was cloned from strain 299R. This gene (ipdC) conferred the synthesis of indole-3-acetaldehyde and tryptophol upon Escherichia coli DH5 alpha in cultures supplemented with L-tryptophan. The deduced amino acid sequence of the gene product has high similarity to that of the indolepyruvate decarboxylase of Enterobacter cloacae. Regions within pyruvate decarboxylases of various fungal and plant species also exhibited considerable homology to portions of this gene. This gene therefore presumably encodes an indolepyruvate decarboxylase (IpdC) which catalyzes the conversion of indole-3-pyruvic acid to indole-3-acetaldehyde. Insertions of Tn3-spice within ipdC abolished the ability of strain 299R to synthesize indole-3-acetaldehyde and tryptophol and reduced its IAA production in tryptophan-supplemented minimal medium by approximately 10-fold, thus providing genetic evidence for the role of the indolepyruvate pathway in IAA synthesis in this strain. An ipdC probe hybridized strongly with the genomic DNA of all E. herbicola strains tested in Southern hybridization studies, suggesting that the indolepyruvate pathway is common in this species. Maximum parsimony analysis revealed that the ipdC gene is highly conserved within this group and that strains of diverse geographic origin were very similar with respect to ipdC. PMID:8900003

  14. Characterisation of a thiamine diphosphate-dependent alpha-keto acid decarboxylase from Proteus mirabilis JN458.

    PubMed

    Wang, Biying; Bai, Yajun; Fan, Taiping; Zheng, Xiaohui; Cai, Yujie

    2017-10-01

    Alpha-keto acid decarboxylases can convert keto acids to their corresponding aldehydes, which are often volatile aroma compounds. The gene encoding α-keto acid decarboxylase in Proteus mirabilis JN458 was cloned, and the enzyme overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3), purified in high yield, and characterised. The molecular weight is 62.291kDa by MALDI-TOF MS, and optimum activity at pH 6.0 and 40-50°C. The enzyme is a typical decarboxylase, dependent on thiamine diphosphate and Mg(2+) as cofactors. For the decarboxylation reaction, the enzyme displayed a broad substrate range. Kinetic parameters were determined using 4-methyl-2-oxopentanoic acid, phenyl pyruvate and 3-methyl-2-oxopentanoic acid as substrates. Km and kcat values for phenyl pyruvate were 0.62mM and 77.38s(-1), respectively, and the kcat/Km value was 124.81mM(-1)s(-1). The enzyme properties suggest it may act effectively under cheese ripening conditions. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Targeting ornithine decarboxylase reverses the LIN28/Let-7 axis and inhibits glycolytic metabolism in neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Lozier, Ann M; Rich, Maria E; Grawe, Anissa Pedersen; Peck, Anderson S; Zhao, Ping; Chang, Anthony Ting-Tung; Bond, Jeffrey P; Sholler, Giselle Saulnier

    2015-01-01

    LIN28 has emerged as an oncogenic driver in a number of cancers, including neuroblastoma (NB). Overexpression of LIN28 correlates with poor outcome in NB, therefore drugs that impact the LIN28/Let-7 pathway could be beneficial in treating NB patients. The LIN28/Let-7 pathway affects many cellular processes including the regulation of cancer stem cells and glycolytic metabolism. Polyamines, regulated by ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) modulate eIF-5A which is a direct regulator of the LIN28/Let-7 axis. We propose that therapy inhibiting ODC will restore balance to the LIN28/Let-7 axis, suppress glycolytic metabolism, and decrease MYCN protein expression in NB. Difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) is an inhibitor of ODC in clinical trials for children with NB. In vitro experiments using NB cell lines, BE(2)-C, SMS-KCNR, and CHLA90 show that DFMO treatment reduced LIN28B and MYCN protein levels and increased Let-7 miRNA and decreased neurosphere formation. Glycolytic metabolic activity decreased with DFMO treatment in vivo. Additionally, sensitivity to DFMO treatment correlated with LIN28B overexpression (BE(2)-C>SMS-KCNR>CHLA90). This is the first study to demonstrate that DFMO treatment restores balance to the LIN28/Let-7 axis and inhibits glycolytic metabolism and neurosphere formation in NB and that PET scans may be a meaningful imaging tool to evaluate the therapeutic effects of DFMO treatment.

  16. Hepatoerythropoietic Porphyria Caused by a Novel Homoallelic Mutation in Uroporphyrinogen Decarboxylase Gene in Egyptian Patients.

    PubMed

    Farrag, M S; Mikula, I; Richard, E; Saudek, V; De Verneuil, H; Martásek, P

    2015-01-01

    Porphyrias are metabolic disorders resulting from mutations in haem biosynthetic pathway genes. Hepatoerythropoietic porphyria (HEP) is a rare type of porphyria caused by the deficiency of the fifth enzyme (uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase, UROD) in this pathway. The defect in the enzymatic activity is due to biallelic mutations in the UROD gene. Currently, 109 UROD mutations are known. The human disease has an early onset, manifesting in infancy or early childhood with red urine, skin photosensitivity in sun-exposed areas, and hypertrichosis. Similar defects and links to photosensitivity and hepatopathy exist in several animal models, including zebrafish and mice. In the present study, we report a new mutation in the UROD gene in Egyptian patients with HEP. We show that the homozygous c.T163A missense mutation leads to a substitution of a conserved phenylalanine (amino acid 55) for isoleucine in the enzyme active site, causing a dramatic decrease in the enzyme activity (19 % of activity of wild-type enzyme). Inspection of the UROD crystal structure shows that Phe-55 contacts the substrate and is located in the loop that connects helices 2 and 3. Phe-55 is strictly conserved in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic UROD. The F55I substitution likely interferes with the enzyme-substrate interaction.

  17. PET-positive extralimbic presentation of anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody-associated encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Gotaro; Inaba, Michiko; Bruno, Michiko K

    2014-09-01

    Anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) antibody-associated autoimmune encephalitis has been reported mostly as limbic encephalitis. Only few cases with extralimbic involvement are reported with limited investigation. Here, we report an extensive investigation with MRI, PET, and pathological examination. A 66-year-old Japanese female with a history of hypothyroidism, colon cancer, pheochromocytoma, and thymoma-associated myasthenia gravis presented with generalised tonic-clonic seizures. MRI showed multiple hyperintense lesions and PET showed hypermetabolic lesions in the brain. Biopsy showed non-specific gliosis, microglial proliferation, and perivascular lymphohistiocytic infiltrates. Various neuronal antibodies were negative, except for anti-GAD antibody. Anti-GAD antibody-associated encephalitis is an increasingly recognised CNS disease. Pathophysiology of this encephalitis is unclear. While PET showed hypermetabolic lesions, the biopsy showed non-specific changes. The treatments may include immunosuppressants, IVIg, and plasma exchange. One should consider to measure this antibody, in addition to others, when autoimmune encephalitis is suspected [Published with video sequences] .

  18. Production of L-phenylacetylcarbinol (L-PAC) from benzaldehyde using partially purified pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC).

    PubMed

    Shin, H S; Rogers, P L

    1996-01-05

    Biotransformation of benzaldehyde to L-phenylacetylcarbinol (L-PAC) as a key intermediate for L-ephedrine synthesis has been evaluated using pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC) partially purified from Candida utilis. PDC activity was enhanced by controlled fermentative metabolism and pulse feeding of glucose prior to the enzyme purification. With partially purified PDC, several enzymatic reactions occurred simultaneously and gave rise to by-products (acetaldehyde and acetoin) as well as L-PAC production. Optimal reaction conditions were determined for temperature, pH, addition of ethanol, PDC activity, benzaldehyde, and pyruvate:benzaldehyde ratio to maximize L-PAC, and minimize by-products. The highest L-PAC concentration of 28.6 g/L (190.6 mM) was achieved at 7 U/mL PDC activity and 200 mM benzaldehyde with 2.0 molar ratio of pyruvate to benzaldehyde in 40 mM potassium phosphate buffer (pH 7.0) containing 2.0 M ethanol at 4 degrees C.

  19. Biochemical and Genetic Characterization of the Enterococcus faecalis Oxaloacetate Decarboxylase Complex

    PubMed Central

    Repizo, Guillermo D.; Blancato, Víctor S.; Mortera, Pablo; Lolkema, Juke S.

    2013-01-01

    Enterococcus faecalis encodes a biotin-dependent oxaloacetate decarboxylase (OAD), which is constituted by four subunits: E. faecalis carboxyltransferase subunit OadA (termed Ef-A), membrane pump Ef-B, biotin acceptor protein Ef-D, and the novel subunit Ef-H. Our results show that in E. faecalis, subunits Ef-A, Ef-D, and Ef-H form a cytoplasmic soluble complex (termed Ef-AHD) which is also associated with the membrane. In order to characterize the role of the novel Ef-H subunit, coexpression of oad genes was performed in Escherichia coli, showing that this subunit is vital for Ef-A and Ef-D interaction. Diminished growth of the oadA and oadD single deletion mutants in citrate-supplemented medium indicated that the activity of the complex is essential for citrate utilization. Remarkably, the oadB-deficient strain was still capable of growing to wild-type levels but with a delay during the citrate-consuming phase, suggesting that the soluble Ef-AHD complex is functional in E. faecalis. These results suggest that the Ef-AHD complex is active in its soluble form, and that it is capable of interacting in a dynamic way with the membrane-bound Ef-B subunit to achieve its maximal alkalinization capacity during citrate fermentation. PMID:23435880

  20. The impact of serotonergic stimulation on reelin and glutamate decarboxylase gene expression in adult female rats.

    PubMed

    Lakatosova, S; Celec, P; Schmidtova, E; Kubranska, A; Durdiakova, J; Ostatnikova, D

    2011-01-01

    Reelin plays an important role in the regulation of synaptic plasticity in adulthood. Administration of 5-metoxytryptamine (5MT), an agonist of serotonin receptors, during natal and neonatal periods results in decreased reelin expression. In adulthood, reelin is expressed by GABAergic neurons. The purpose of this study was to reveal the effect of elevated serotonergic stimulation on the expression of reelin and glutamate decarboxylase (GAD1) in adulthood as well as on depressive behavior and spatial cognitive abilities in adult female rats. Rats were injected with 5MT. A forced swimming test was used for evaluation of the depressive behavior and Morris water maze test was used for evaluation of spatial cognition. Brains were used for measuring the expression of reelin and GAD1. We found a significant decrease in reelin expression in the cerebellum and prefrontal cortex of 5MT-treated rats. GAD1 expression was decreased in the cerebellum of 5MT-treated rats. 5MT-treated rats reached a lower immobility score in the forced swimming test. The Morris water maze test did not reveal any significant differences. We have shown that administration of serotonin receptor agonist resulted in a decreased RELN and GAD1 expression in the cerebellum of adult female rats. We propose that this phenomenon might be relevant in the pathogenesis of autism (Fig. 3, Ref. 38). Full Text in free PDF www.bmj.sk.

  1. Tryptamine-induced resistance in tryptophan decarboxylase transgenic poplar and tobacco plants against their specific herbivores.

    PubMed

    Gill, Rishi I S; Ellis, Brian E; Isman, Murray B

    2003-04-01

    The presence of amines and their derivatives in plant tissues is known to influence insect feeding and reproduction. The enzyme tryptophan decarboxylase (TDC) catalyzes the decarboxylation of tryptophan to tryptamine, which is both a bioactive amine and a precursor of other indole derivatives. Transgenic poplar and tobacco plants ectopically expressing TDC1 accumulated elevated levels of tryptamine without affecting plant growth and development. This accumulation was consistently associated with adverse effects on feeding behavior and physiology of Malacosoma disstria Hub. (forest tent caterpillar, FTC) and Manduca sexta L. (tobacco hornworm, THW). Behavior studies with FTC and THW larvae showed that acceptability of the leaf tissue to larvae was inversely related to foliar tryptamine levels. Physiological studies with FTC and THW larvae showed that consumption of leaf tissue from the transgenic lines is deleterious to larvae growth, apparently due to a postingestive mechanism. Thus, ectopic expression of TDC1 can allow sufficient tryptamine to accumulate in poplar and tobacco leaf tissue to suppress significantly the growth of insect pests that normally feed on these plants.

  2. Ornithine decarboxylase regulates M1 macrophage activation and mucosal inflammation via histone modifications

    PubMed Central

    Hardbower, Dana M.; Asim, Mohammad; Luis, Paula B.; Singh, Kshipra; Barry, Daniel P.; Yang, Chunying; Steeves, Meredith A.; Cleveland, John L.; Schneider, Claus; Piazuelo, M. Blanca; Gobert, Alain P.; Wilson, Keith T.

    2017-01-01

    Macrophage activation is a critical step in host responses during bacterial infections. Ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), the rate-limiting enzyme in polyamine metabolism, has been well studied in epithelial cells and is known to have essential roles in many different cellular functions. However, its role in regulating macrophage function during bacterial infections is not well characterized. We demonstrate that macrophage-derived ODC is a critical regulator of M1 macrophage activation during both Helicobacter pylori and Citrobacter rodentium infection. Myeloid-specific Odc deletion significantly increased gastric and colonic inflammation, respectively, and enhanced M1 activation. Add-back of putrescine, the product of ODC, reversed the increased macrophage activation, indicating that ODC and putrescine are regulators of macrophage function. Odc-deficient macrophages had increased histone 3, lysine 4 (H3K4) monomethylation, and H3K9 acetylation, accompanied by decreased H3K9 di/trimethylation both in vivo and ex vivo in primary macrophages. These alterations in chromatin structure directly resulted in up-regulated gene transcription, especially M1 gene expression. Thus, ODC in macrophages tempers antimicrobial, M1 macrophage responses during bacterial infections through histone modifications and altered euchromatin formation, leading to the persistence and pathogenesis of these organisms. PMID:28096401

  3. Complexes of Thermotoga maritima S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase provide insights into substrate specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Bale, Shridhar; Baba, Kavita; McCloskey, Diane E.; Pegg, Anthony E.; Ealick, Steven E.

    2010-06-25

    The polyamines putrescine, spermidine and spermine are ubiquitous aliphatic cations and are essential for cellular growth and differentiation. S-Adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (AdoMetDC) is a critical pyruvoyl-dependent enzyme in the polyamine-biosynthetic pathway. The crystal structures of AdoMetDC from humans and plants and of the AdoMetDC proenzyme from Thermotoga maritima have been obtained previously. Here, the crystal structures of activated T. maritima AdoMetDC (TmAdoMetDC) and of its complexes with S-adenosylmethionine methyl ester and 5{prime}-deoxy-5{prime}-dimethylthioadenosine are reported. The results demonstrate for the first time that TmAdoMetDC autoprocesses without the need for additional factors and that the enzyme contains two complete active sites, both of which use residues from both chains of the homodimer. The complexes provide insights into the substrate specificity and ligand binding of AdoMetDC in prokaryotes. The conservation of the ligand-binding mode and the active-site residues between human and T. maritima AdoMetDC provides insight into the evolution of AdoMetDC.

  4. Increasing thermal stability and catalytic activity of glutamate decarboxylase in E. coli: An in silico study.

    PubMed

    Tavakoli, Yasaman; Esmaeili, Abolghasem; Saber, Hossein

    2016-10-01

    Glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) is an enzyme that converts l-glutamate to gamma amino butyric acid (GABA) that is a widely used drug to treat mental disorders like Alzheimer's disease. In this study for the first time point mutation was performed virtually in the active site of the E. coli GAD in order to increase thermal stability and catalytic activity of the enzyme. Energy minimization and addition of water box were performed using GROMACS 5.4.6 package. PoPMuSiC 2.1 web server was used to predict potential spots for point mutation and Modeller software was used to perform point mutation on three dimensional model. Molegro virtual docker software was used for cavity detection and stimulated docking study. Results indicate that performing mutation separately at positions 164, 302, 304, 393, 396, 398 and 410 increase binding affinity to substrate. The enzyme is predicted to be more thermo- stable in all 7 mutants based on ΔΔG value.

  5. [Enhancing glutamate decarboxylase activity by site-directed mutagenesis: an insight from Ramachandran plot].

    PubMed

    Ke, Piyu; Huang, Jun; Hu, Sheng; Zhao, Weirui; Lü, Changjiang; Yu, Kai; Lei, Yinlin; Wang, Jinbo; Mei, Lehe

    2016-01-01

    Glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) can catalyze the decarboxylation of glutamate into γ-aminobutyrate (GABA) and is the only enzyme of GABA biosynthesis. Improving GAD activity and thermostability will be helpful for the highly efficient biosynthesis of GABA. According to the Ramachandran plot information of GAD 1407 three-dimensional structure from Lactobacillus brevis CGMCC No. 1306, we identified the unstable site K413 as the mutation target, constructed the mutant GAD by site-directed mutagenesis and measured the thermostability and activity of the wide type and mutant GAD. Mutant K413A led to a remarkably slower inactivation rate, and its half-life at 50 °C reached 105 min which was 2.1-fold higher than the wild type GAD1407. Moreover, mutant K413I exhibited 1.6-fold higher activity in comparison with the wide type GAD1407, although it had little improvement in thermostability of GAD. Ramachandran plot can be considered as a potential approach to increase GAD thermostability and activity.

  6. Elevated production of melatonin in transgenic rice seeds expressing rice tryptophan decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Byeon, Yeong; Park, Sangkyu; Lee, Hyoung Yool; Kim, Young-Soon; Back, Kyoungwhan

    2014-04-01

    A major goal of plant biotechnology is to improve the nutritional qualities of crop plants through metabolic engineering. Melatonin is a well-known bioactive molecule with an array of health-promoting properties, including potent antioxidant capability. To generate melatonin-rich rice plants, we first independently overexpressed three tryptophan decarboxylase isogenes in the rice genome. Melatonin levels were altered in the transgenic lines through overexpression of TDC1, TDC2, and TDC3; TDC3 transgenic seed (TDC3-1) had melatonin concentrations 31-fold higher than those of wild-type seeds. In TDC3 transgenic seedlings, however, only a doubling of melatonin content occurred over wild-type levels. Thus, a seed-specific accumulation of melatonin appears to occur in TDC3 transgenic lines. In addition to increased melatonin content, TDC3 transgenic lines also had enhanced levels of melatonin intermediates including 5-hydroxytryptophan, tryptamine, serotonin, and N-acetylserotonin. In contrast, expression levels of melatonin biosynthetic mRNA did not increase in TDC3 transgenic lines, indicating that increases in melatonin and its intermediates in these lines are attributable exclusively to overexpression of the TDC3 gene.

  7. Quantitative expression analysis and prognostic significance of L-DOPA decarboxylase in colorectal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kontos, C K; Papadopoulos, I N; Fragoulis, E G; Scorilas, A

    2010-01-01

    Background: L-DOPA decarboxylase (DDC) is an enzyme that catalyses, mainly, the decarboxylation of L-DOPA to dopamine and was found to be involved in many malignancies. The aim of this study was to investigate the mRNA expression levels of the DDC gene and to evaluate its clinical utility in tissues with colorectal adenocarcinoma. Methods: Total RNA was isolated from colorectal adenocarcinoma tissues of 95 patients. After having tested RNA quality, we prepared cDNA by reverse transcription. Highly sensitive quantitative real-time PCR method for DDC mRNA quantification was developed using the SYBR Green chemistry. GAPDH served as a housekeeping gene. Relative quantification analysis was performed using the comparative CT method (2−ΔΔCT). Results: DDC mRNA expression varied remarkably among colorectal tumours examined in this study. High DDC mRNA expression levels were found in well-differentiated and Dukes' stage A and B tumours. Kaplan–Meier survival curves showed that patients with DDC-positive tumours have significantly longer disease-free survival (P=0.009) and overall survival (P=0.027). In Cox regression analysis of the entire cohort of patients, negative DDC proved to be a significant predictor of reduced disease-free (P=0.021) and overall survival (P=0.047). Conclusions: The results of the study suggest that DDC mRNA expression may be regarded as a novel potential tissue biomarker in colorectal adenocarcinoma. PMID:20424616

  8. Substrate Shuttling Between Active Sites of Uroporphyrinogen Decarboxylase in Not Required to Generate Coproporphyrinogen

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, J.; Warby, C; Whitby, F; Kushner, J; Hill, C

    2009-01-01

    Uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase (URO-D; EC 4.1.1.37), the fifth enzyme of the heme biosynthetic pathway, is required for the production of heme, vitamin B12, siroheme, and chlorophyll precursors. URO-D catalyzes the sequential decarboxylation of four acetate side chains in the pyrrole groups of uroporphyrinogen to produce coproporphyrinogen. URO-D is a stable homodimer, with the active-site clefts of the two subunits adjacent to each other. It has been hypothesized that the two catalytic centers interact functionally, perhaps by shuttling of reaction intermediates between subunits. We tested this hypothesis by construction of a single-chain protein (single-chain URO-D) in which the two subunits were connected by a flexible linker. The crystal structure of this protein was shown to be superimposable with wild-type activity and to have comparable catalytic activity. Mutations that impaired one or the other of the two active sites of single-chain URO-D resulted in approximately half of wild-type activity. The distributions of reaction intermediates were the same for mutant and wild-type sequences and were unaltered in a competition experiment using I and III isomer substrates. These observations indicate that communication between active sites is not required for enzyme function and suggest that the dimeric structure of URO-D is required to achieve conformational stability and to create a large active-site cleft.

  9. Enhanced production of butanol and acetoin by heterologous expression of an acetolactate decarboxylase in Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xiaoning; Liu, Dong; Liu, Jun; Wang, Yanyan; Xu, Jiahui; Yang, Zhengjiao; Guo, Ting; Niu, Huanqing; Ying, Hanjie

    2016-09-01

    Butanol is an important industrial chemical and an attractive transportation fuel. However, the deficiency of reducing equivalents NAD(P)H in butanol fermentation results in a large quantity of oxidation products, which is a major problem limiting the atom economy and economic viability of bio-butanol processes. Here, we integrated the butanol fermentation process with a NADH-generating, acetoin biosynthesis process to improve the butanol production. By overexpressing the α-acetolactate decarboxylase gene alsD from Bacillus subtilis in Clostridium acetobutylicum, acetoin yield was significantly increased at the cost of acetone. After optimization of fermentation conditions, butanol (12.9g/L), acetoin (6.5g/L), and ethanol (1.9g/L) were generated by the recombinant strain, with acetone no more than 1.8g/L. Thus, both mass yield and product value were greatly improved. This study demonstrates that reducing power compensation is effective to improve the atom economy of butanol fermentation, and provides a novel approach to improve the economic viability of bio-butanol production. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Interaction between photorespiration and respiration in transgenic potato plants with antisense reduction in glycine decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Bykova, Natalia V; Keerberg, Olav; Pärnik, Tiit; Bauwe, Hermann; Gardeström, Per

    2005-09-01

    Potato (Solanum tuberosum L. cv. Désirée) plants with an antisense reduction in the P-protein of the glycine decarboxylase complex (GDC) were used to study the interaction between respiration and photorespiration. Mitochondria isolated from transgenic plants had a decreased capacity for glycine oxidation and glycine accumulated in the leaves. Malate consumption increased in leaves of GDC deficient plants and the capacity for malate and NADH oxidation increased in isolated mitochondria. A lower level of alternative oxidase protein and decreased partitioning of electrons to the alternative pathway was found in these plants. The adenylate status was altered in protoplasts from transgenic plants, most notably the chloroplastic ATP/ADP ratio increased. The lower capacity for photorespiration in leaves of GDC deficient plants was compensated for by increased respiratory decarboxylations in the light. This is interpreted as a decreased light suppression of the tricarboxylic acid cycle in GDC deficient plants in comparison to wild-type plants. The results support the view that respiratory decarboxylations in the light are restricted at the level of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex and/or isocitrate dehydrogenase and that this effect is likely to be mediated by mitochondrial photorespiratory products.

  11. The bifunctional pyruvate decarboxylase/pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase from Thermococcus guaymasensis.

    PubMed

    Eram, Mohammad S; Oduaran, Erica; Ma, Kesen

    2014-01-01

    The hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus guaymasensis produces ethanol as a metabolic end product, and an alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) catalyzing the reduction of acetaldehyde to ethanol has been purified and characterized. However, the enzyme catalyzing the formation of acetaldehyde has not been identified. In this study an enzyme catalyzing the production of acetaldehyde from pyruvate was purified and characterized from T. guaymasensis under strictly anaerobic conditions. The enzyme had both pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC) and pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase (POR) activities. It was oxygen sensitive, and the optimal temperatures were 85°C and >95°C for the PDC and POR activities, respectively. The purified enzyme had activities of 3.8 ± 0.22 U mg(-1) and 20.2 ± 1.8 U mg(-1), with optimal pH-values of 9.5 and 8.4 for each activity, respectively. Coenzyme A was essential for both activities, although it did not serve as a substrate for the former. Enzyme kinetic parameters were determined separately for each activity. The purified enzyme was a heterotetramer. The sequences of the genes encoding the subunits of the bifunctional PDC/POR were determined. It is predicted that all hyperthermophilic β -keto acids ferredoxin oxidoreductases are bifunctional, catalyzing the activities of nonoxidative and oxidative decarboxylation of the corresponding β -keto acids.

  12. Partial purification and characterization of arginine decarboxylase from avocado fruit, a thermostable enzyme.

    PubMed

    Winer, L; Vinkler, C; Apelbaum, A

    1984-09-01

    A partially purified preparation of arginine decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.19), a key enzyme in polyamine metabolism in plants, was isolated from avocado (Persea americana Mill. cv Fuerte) fruit. The preparation obtained from the crude extract after ammonium sulfate precipitation, dialysis, and heat treatment, had maximal activity between pH 8.0 and 9.0 at 60 degrees C, in the presence of 1.2 millimolar MnCl(2), 2 millimolar dithiothreitol, and 0.06 millimolar pyridoxal phosphate. The K(m), of arginine for the decarboxylation reaction was determined for enzymes prepared from the seed coat of both 4-week-old avocado fruitlet and fully developed fruit, and was found to have a value of 1.85 and 2.84 millimolar, respectively. The value of V(app) (max) of these enzymes was 1613 and 68 nanomoles of CO(2) produced per milligram of protein per hour for the fruitlet and the fully developed fruit, respectively. Spermine, an end product of polyamine metabolism, caused less than 5% inhibition of the enzyme from fully developed fruit and 65% inhibition of the enzyme from the seed coat of 4-week-old fruitlets at 1 millimolar under similar conditions. The effect of different inhibitors on the enzyme and the change in the nature of the enzyme during fruit development are discussed.

  13. S-adenosyl-L-methionine decarboxylase activity in the rat epididymis: ontogeny and androgenic control.

    PubMed

    de las Heras, M A; Calandra, R S

    1991-01-01

    The authors describe the occurrence of high levels of S-adenosyl-L-methionine decarboxylase (SAMDC) activity in the rat epididymis, and its ontogeny and androgenic control. As early as 15 days of age, SAMDC activity exists, although a peak of activity is observed at 25 days. Bilateral orchidectomy resulted in a decline of epididymal SAMDC activity. However, an androgen-independent fraction, accounting for 34% of total activity, appears to exist in the epididymis. In 45-day-old orchidectomized rats, SAMDC activity was stimulated by testosterone treatment in a dose-dependent manner. However, treatment of 45-day-old intact animals with a high dose of the androgen failed to modify SAMDC activity, indicating that, at this age, the enzyme is maximally stimulated by endogenous androgens. The observed effect of testosterone on castrated rats was completely abolished by concomitant treatment with the antiandrogen flutamide. This compound was ineffective on the androgen-insensitive fraction. To assess the contribution of circulating and luminal androgens to the maintenance of epididymal SAMDC, rats were unilaterally orchidectomized and activity was determined in both epididymides after 7 days. The SAMDC activity was identical in epididymides from both sides, suggesting circulating androgens suffice to maintain normal levels of activity. It was concluded that androgens regulate epididymal SAMDC activity, although an androgen-independent fraction appears to exist.

  14. Acute effect of prolactin on ornithine decarboxylase activity in the rat testis.

    PubMed

    de Las Heras, M A; Calandra, R S

    1992-01-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the effect of the acute treatment with prolactin (PRL) on ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) activity in the rat testis. Injection of a single SC dose of ovine PRL to puberal rats resulted in the activation of ODC from whole testis. This effect was maximal at 4 h after injection, and statistically significant at the dose of 500 micrograms. The effect of PRL was confined to the interstitial space; no change was observed in seminiferous tubules. PRL was unable to further increase testicular ODC activity when injected together with a stimulatory dose of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). The effect of PRL was mimicked by injection of a single dose of the dopamine antagonist sulpiride, which provoked a ninefold increase in serum PRL levels. In contrast, PRL did not stimulate testicular ODC activity in hypophysectomized rats, either under basal conditions or during treatment with PRL-hCG, indicating the requirement of a functional hypophysis for the expression of PRL action. These results suggest that the stimulation of testicular ODC activity by PRL is a marker of the trophic response of the testis to this hormone, different from the stimulation of steroidogenesis. This activity could be useful for the study of PRL action on the testis as well as of the interaction between PRL and LH at the testicular level.

  15. Cadaverine Production by Using Cross-Linked Enzyme Aggregate of Escherichia coli Lysine Decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Park, Se Hyeon; Soetyono, Feilicia; Kim, Hyung Kwoun

    2017-02-28

    Lysine decarboxylase (CadA) converts L-lysine into cadaverine (1,5-pentanediamine), which is an important platform chemical with many industrial applications. Although there have been many efforts to produce cadaverine through the soluble CadA enzyme or Escherichia coli whole cells overexpressing the CadA enzyme, there have been few reports concerning the immobilization of the CadA enzyme. Here, we have prepared a cross-linked enzyme aggregate (CLEA) of E. coli CadA and performed bioconversion using CadA(CLEA). CadA(free) and CadA(CLEA) were characterized for their enzymatic properties. The optimum temperatures of CadA(free) and CadA(CLEA) were 60°C and 55°C, respectively. The thermostability of CadA(CLEA) was significantly higher than that of CadA(free). The optimum pH of both enzymes was 6.0. CadA(free) could not be recovered after use, whereas CadA(CLEA) was rapidly recovered and the residual activity was 53% after the 10(th) recycle. These results demonstrate that CadA(CLEA) can be used as a potential catalyst for efficient production of cadaverine.

  16. Biochemical evaluation of a parsley tyrosine decarboxylase results in a novel 4-hydroxyphenylacetaldehyde synthase enzyme.

    PubMed

    Torrens-Spence, Michael P; Gillaspy, Glenda; Zhao, Bingyu; Harich, Kim; White, Robert H; Li, Jianyong

    2012-02-10

    Plant aromatic amino acid decarboxylases (AAADs) are effectively indistinguishable from plant aromatic acetaldehyde syntheses (AASs) through primary sequence comparison. Spectroscopic analyses of several characterized AASs and AAADs were performed to look for absorbance spectral identifiers. Although this limited survey proved inconclusive, the resulting work enabled the reevaluation of several characterized plant AAS and AAAD enzymes. Upon completion, a previously reported parsley AAAD protein was demonstrated to have AAS activity. Substrate specificity tests demonstrate that this novel AAS enzyme has a unique substrate specificity towards tyrosine (km 0.46mM) and dopa (km 1.40mM). Metabolite analysis established the abundance of tyrosine and absence of dopa in parsley extracts. Such analysis indicates that tyrosine is likely to be the sole physiological substrate. The resulting information suggests that this gene is responsible for the in vivo production of 4-hydroxyphenylacetaldehyde (4-HPAA). This is the first reported case of an AAS enzyme utilizing tyrosine as a primary substrate and the first report of a single enzyme capable of producing 4-HPAA from tyrosine. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Polyamine metabolism and osmotic stress. II. Improvement of oat protoplasts by an inhibitor of arginine decarboxylase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiburcio, A. F.; Kaur-Sawhney, R.; Galston, A. W.

    1986-01-01

    We have attempted to improve the viability of cereal mesophyll protoplasts by pretreatment of leaves with DL-alpha-difluoromethylarginine (DFMA), a specific 'suicide' inhibitor of the enzyme (arginine decarboxylase) responsible for their osmotically induced putrescine accumulation. Leaf pretreatment with DFMA before a 6 hour osmotic shock caused a 45% decrease of putrescine and a 2-fold increase of spermine titer. After 136 hours of osmotic stress, putrescine titer in DFMA-pretreated leaves increased by only 50%, but spermidine and spermine titers increased dramatically by 3.2- and 6-fold, respectively. These increases in higher polyamines could account for the reduced chlorophyll loss and enhanced ability of pretreated leaves to incorporate tritiated thymidine, uridine, and leucine into macromolecules. Pretreatment with DFMA significantly improved the overall viability of the protoplasts isolated from these leaves. The results support the view that the osmotically induced rise in putrescine and blockage of its conversion to higher polyamines may contribute to the lack of sustained cell division in cereal mesophyll protoplasts, although other undefined factors must also play a major role.

  18. Cloning and primary structure of a human islet isoform of glutamic acid decarboxylase from chromosome 10

    SciTech Connect

    Karlsen, A.E.; Hagopian, W.A.; Grubin, C.E.; Dube, S.; Disteche, C.M.; Adler, D.A.; Baermeier, H.; Lernmark, A. ); Mathewes, S.; Grant, F.J.; Foster, D. )

    1991-10-01

    Glutamic acid decarboxylase which catalyzes formation of {gamma}-aminobutyric acid from L-glutamic acid, is detectable in different isoforms with distinct electrophoretic and kinetic characteristics. GAD has also been implicated as an autoantigen in the vastly differing autoimmune disease stiff-man syndrome and insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Despite the differing GAD isoforms, only one type of GAD cDNA (GAD-1), localized to a syntenic region of chromosome 2, has been isolated from rat, mouse, and cat. Using sequence information from GAD-1 to screen a human pancreatic islet cDNA library, the authors describe the isolation of an additional GAD cDNA (GAD-2), which was mapped to the short arm of human chromosome 10. Genomic Southern blotting with GAD-2 demonstrated a hybridization pattern different form that detected by GAD-1. GAD-2 recognizes a 5.6-kilobase transcript in both islets and brain, in contrast to GAD-1, which detects a 3.7-kilobase transcript in brain only. The deduced 585-amino acid sequence coded for by GAD-2 shows < 65% identify to previously published, highly conserved GAD-1 brain sequences, which show > 96% deduced amino acid sequence homology among the three species.

  19. pH shift enhancement of Candida utilis pyruvate decarboxylase production.

    PubMed

    Chen, Allen Kuan-Liang; Breuer, Michael; Hauer, Bernhard; Rogers, Peter L; Rosche, Bettina

    2005-10-20

    Pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC) catalyses the synthesis of asymmetric carbinols, e.g., chiral precursors for pharmaceuticals such as ephedrine and pseudoephedrine. The production of PDC by Candida utilis in a minimal medium was improved by manipulating the pH during fermentation in a 5 L bioreactor. At an aeration rate of 0.1 vvm with a stirrer speed of 300 rpm at constant pH 6, a specific PDC activity of 141 U/g dry cell weight (DCW) was achieved (average of two fermentations +/-13%). By allowing the yeast to acidify the growth medium from pH 6 to 2.9, the final specific PDC activity increased by a factor of 2.7 to 385 U/g DCW (average from 4 fermentations +/-16%). The effect of this pH drift on PDC production was confirmed by another experiment with a manual shift of pH from 6 to 3 by addition of 5 M sulfuric acid. The final PDC activity was 392 U/g DCW (average from two fermentations +/-5%). However, experiments with constant pH of 6, 5, 4, or 3 resulted in average specific activities of only 102 to 141 U/g DCW, suggesting that a transitional pH change rather than the absolute pH value was responsible for the increased specific PDC activity.

  20. Polyamines directly promote antizyme-mediated degradation of ornithine decarboxylase by the proteasome

    PubMed Central

    Beenukumar, R. R.; Gödderz, Daniela; Palanimurugan, R.; Dohmen, R. J.

    2015-01-01

    Ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), a ubiquitin-independent substrate of the proteasome, is a homodimeric protein with a rate-limiting function in polyamine biosynthesis. Polyamines regulate ODC levels by a feedback mechanism mediated by ODC antizyme (OAZ). Higher cellular polyamine levels trigger the synthesis of OAZ and also inhibit its ubiquitin-dependent proteasomal degradation. OAZ binds ODC monomers and targets them to the proteasome. Here, we report that polyamines, aside from their role in the control of OAZ synthesis and stability, directly enhance OAZ-mediated ODC degradation by the proteasome. Using a stable mutant of OAZ, we show that polyamines promote ODC degradation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells even when OAZ levels are not changed. Furthermore, polyamines stimulated the in vitro degradation of ODC by the proteasome in a reconstituted system using purified components. In these assays, spermine shows a greater effect than spermidine. By contrast, polyamines do not have any stimulatory effect on the degradation of ubiquitin-dependent substrates. PMID:28357293

  1. Phosphatidylethanolamine from phosphatidylserine decarboxylase2 is essential for autophagy under cadmium stress in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Muthukumar, Kannan; Nachiappan, Vasanthi

    2013-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a potent toxic element used in several industries and in the process contaminates air, soil, and water. Exposure of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to Cd increases the major phospholipids, and profound increase was observed in phosphatidylethanolamine (PE). In yeast, there are four different pathways contributing to the biosynthesis of PE, and contribution to PE pool through phosphatidylserine decarboxylase2 (psd2) is not significant in normal conditions. Upon Cd exposure, psd2Δ strain showed a significant decrease in major phospholipids including PE. When exposed to Cd, wild-type (WT) cells depicted an increase in ER stress and autophagy, whereas in psd2, ER stress was noted but autophagy process was impaired. The supplementation of ethanolamine did not overcome the Cd stress and also the autophagy process, whereas overexpression of PSD2 in psd2Δ increased the cellular tolerance, PE levels, and the autophagy process against Cd stress. From our studies, we can suggest that PSD2 of S. cerevisiae has an important role in PE synthesis and in autophagy process under Cd stress.

  2. Characterization of an avian histidine decarboxylase and localization of histaminergic neurons in the chicken brain.

    PubMed

    Bessho, Yuki; Iwakoshi-Ukena, Eiko; Tachibana, Tetsuya; Maejima, Sho; Taniuchi, Shusuke; Masuda, Keiko; Shikano, Kenshiro; Kondo, Kunihiro; Furumitsu, Megumi; Ukena, Kazuyoshi

    2014-08-22

    In mammals, it is established that histamine is a neurotransmitter and/or neuromodulator in the central nervous system. It is produced by the enzyme histidine decarboxylase (HDC) in the tuberomammillary nucleus of the posterior hypothalamus. However, HDC as well as histaminergic neurons have not yet been characterized in the avian brain. We have cloned the cDNA for HDC from the chicken hypothalamus and demonstrated that the chicken HDC sequence is highly homologous to the mammalian counterpart, and that the expressed protein shows high enzymatic activity. The expression of HDC mRNA at various sites in the brain was investigated using quantitative RT-PCR. The results showed that the HDC mRNA was highly expressed in the hypothalamic infundibulum. In situ hybridization analyses revealed that the cells containing HDC mRNA were localized in the medial mammillary nucleus of the hypothalamic infundibulum. Intracerebroventricular injection of histamine in chicks resulted in inhibition of feeding behavior. This is the first report of the characterization of histaminergic neurons in the avian brain, and our findings indicate that neuronal histamine exerts anorexigenic effects in chicks.

  3. Expanding the active pH range of Escherichia coli glutamate decarboxylase by breaking the cooperativeness.

    PubMed

    Thu Ho, Ngoc Anh; Hou, Chen Yuan; Kim, Woo Hyun; Kang, Taek Jin

    2013-02-01

    Bacterial glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) transforms glutamate into γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) with the consumption of a proton. The enzyme is active under acidic environments only and sharply loses its activity as pH approaches neutrality with concomitant structural deformation. In an attempt to understand better the role of this cooperative loss of activity upon pH shifts, we prepared and studied a series of GAD site-specific mutants. In this report, we show that the cooperativeness was kept intact by at least two residues, Glu89 and His465, of which Glu89 is newly identified to be involved in the cooperativity system of GAD. Double mutation on these residues not only broke the cooperativity in the activity change but also yielded a mutant GAD that retained the activity at neutral pH. The resulting mutant GAD that was active at neutral pH inhibited the cell growth in a glycerol medium by converting intracellular Glu into GABA in an uncontrolled manner, which explains in part why the cooperativeness of GAD has to be kept by several layers of safety keepers. This unexpected result might be utilized to convert a low-valued by-product of biodiesel production, glycerol, into value-added product, GABA. Copyright © 2012 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Functional and conformational transitions of mevalonate diphosphate decarboxylase from Bacopa monniera.

    PubMed

    Abbassi, Shakeel; Patel, Krunal; Khan, Bashir; Bhosale, Siddharth; Gaikwad, Sushama

    2016-02-01

    Functional and conformational transitions of mevalonate diphosphate decarboxylase (MDD), a key enzyme of mevalonate pathway in isoprenoid biosynthesis, from Bacopa monniera (BmMDD), cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli were studied under thermal, chemical and pH-mediated denaturation conditions using fluorescence and Circular dichroism spectroscopy. Native BmMDD is a helix dominant structure with 45% helix and 11% sheets and possesses seven tryptophan residues with two residues exposed on surface, three residues partially exposed and two situated in the interior of the protein. Thermal denaturation of BmMDD causes rapid structural transitions at and above 40°C and transient exposure of hydrophobic residues at 50°C, leading to aggregation of the protein. An acid induced molten globule like structure was observed at pH 4, exhibiting altered but compact secondary structure, distorted tertiary structure and exposed hydrophobic residues. The molten globule displayed different response at higher temperature and similar response to chemical denaturation as compared to the native protein. The surface tryptophans have predominantly positively charged amino acids around them, as indicated by higher KSV for KI as compared to that for CsCl. The native enzyme displayed two different lifetimes, τ1 (1.203±0.036 ns) and τ2 (3.473±0.12 ns) indicating two populations of tryptophan.

  5. Partial purification and characterization of a novel histidine decarboxylase from Enterobacter aerogenes DL-1.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yu; Hu, Wenzhong; Jiang, Aili; Tian, Mixia

    2015-08-18

    Histidine decarboxylase (HDC) from Enterobacter aerogenes DL-1 was purified in a three-step procedure involving ammonium sulfate precipitation, Sephadex G-100, and DEAE-Sepharose column chromatography. The partially purified enzyme showed a single protein band of 52.4 kD on sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The optimum pH for HDC activity was 6.5, and the enzyme was stable between pH 4 and 8. Enterobacter aerogenes HDC had optimal activity at 40°C and retained most of its activity between 4 and 50°C. HDC activity was reduced in the presence of numerous tested compounds. Particularly with SDS, it significantly (p < 0.01) inhibited enzyme activity. Conversely, Ca(2+) and Mn(2+) showed prominent activation effects (p < 0.01) with activity increasing to 117.20% and 123.42%, respectively. The Lineweaver-Burk plot showed that K m and V max values of the enzyme for L-histidine were 0.21 mM and 71.39 µmol/min, respectively. In comparison with most HDCs from other microorganisms and animals, HDC from E. aerogenes DL-1 displayed higher affinity and greater reaction velocity toward L-histidine.

  6. Induction of histidine decarboxylase in macrophages inhibited by the novel NF-{kappa}B inhibitor (-)-DHMEQ

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Eriko Ninomiya, Yoko; Umezawa, Kazuo

    2009-02-06

    Histamine often causes inflammation, and this amine is produced by histidine decarboxylase (HDC). We found that (-)-DHMEQ, an NF-{kappa}B inhibitor, inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced histamine production and HDC induction in mouse macrophage cell line RAW264.7. However, as there is no {kappa}B site in the HDC promoter, we studied the mechanism of inhibition. Knockdown of the transcription factor C/EBP{beta} reduced the HDC expression in LPS-treated cells. (-)-DHMEQ inhibited the C/EBP{beta} transcriptional activity in a reporter assay and in an electrophoresis mobility shift assay. But it did not inhibit the in vitro binding of C/EBP{beta} to DNA. It also did not lower the nuclear amount of C/EBP{beta}. On the other hand, the addition of recombinant p65, a component of NF-{kappa}B, enhanced the activity of C/EBP{beta} acting as a cofactor in vitro. Then, we found that (-)-DHMEQ lowered the nuclear amount of p65. Thus, inhibition of the C/EBP{beta} activity by (-)-DHMEQ would be due to a reduction in the amount of nuclear p65, which has a co-activator activity for C/EBP{beta} that is essential for the HDC induction. (-)-DHMEQ may be useful as an anti-inflammatory agent by lowering the histamine production in the body.

  7. Pyruvate Decarboxylase, the Target for Omeprazole in Metronidazole-Resistant and Iron-Restricted Tritrichomonas foetus

    PubMed Central

    Sutak, Róbert; Tachezy, Jan; Kulda, Jaroslav; Hrdý, Ivan

    2004-01-01

    The substituted benzimidazole omeprazole, used for the treatment of human peptic ulcer disease, inhibits the growth of the metronidazole-resistant bovine pathogen Tritrichomonas foetus in vitro (MIC at which the growth of parasite cultures is inhibited by 50%, 22 μg/ml [63 μM]). The antitrichomonad activity appears to be due to the inhibition of pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC), which is the key enzyme responsible for ethanol production and which is strongly upregulated in metronidazole-resistant trichomonads. PDC was purified to homogeneity from the cytosol of metronidazole-resistant strain. The tetrameric enzyme of 60-kDa subunits is inhibited by omeprazole (50% inhibitory concentration, 16 μg/ml). Metronidazole-susceptible T. foetus, which expresses very little PDC, is only slightly affected. Omeprazole has the same inhibitory effect on T. foetus cells grown under iron-limited conditions. Similarly to metronidazole-resistant cells, T. foetus cells grown under iron-limited conditions have nonfunctional hydrogenosomal metabolism and rely on cytosolic PDC-mediated ethanol fermentation. PMID:15155220

  8. Substrate shuttling between active sites of uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase is not required to generate coproporphyrinogen

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, John D.; Warby, Christy A.; Whitby, Frank G.; Kushner, James P.; Hill, Christopher P.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Uroporphyrinogen Decarboxylase (URO-D; EC 4.1.1.37), the fifth enzyme of the heme biosynthetic pathway, is required for the production of heme, vitamin B12, siroheme, and chlorophyll precursors. URO-D catalyzes the sequential decarboxylation of the four acetate side chains on the pyrrole groups of uroporphyrinogen to produce coproporphyrinogen. URO-D is a stable homodimer with the active site clefts of the two subunits adjacent to each other. It has been hypothesized that the two catalytic centers interact functionally, perhaps by shuttling of reaction intermediates between subunits. We tested this hypothesis by construction of a single chain protein (scURO-D) in which the two subunits were connected by a flexible linker. The crystal structure of this protein was shown to be superimposible with wild-type activity and have comparable catalytic activity. Mutations that impaired one or the other of the two active sites of scURO-D resulted in approximately half of wild-type activity. The distribution of reaction intermediates was the same for mutant and wild-type sequences, and was unaltered in a competition experiment using the I and III isomer substrates. These observations indicate that communication between active sites is not required for enzyme function, and suggest that the dimeric structure of URO-D is required to achieve conformational stability and create a large active site cleft. PMID:19362562

  9. Differential roles of pyruvate decarboxylase in aerial and embedded mycelia of the ascomycete Gibberella zeae.

    PubMed

    Son, Hokyoung; Min, Kyunghun; Lee, Jungkwan; Choi, Gyung Ja; Kim, Jin-Cheol; Lee, Yin-Won

    2012-04-01

    The pyruvate-acetaldehyde-acetate (PAA) pathway has diverse roles in eukaryotes. Our previous study on acetyl-coenzyme A synthetase 1 (ACS1) in Gibberella zeae suggested that the PAA pathway is important for lipid production, which is required for perithecia maturation. In this study, we deleted all three pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC) genes, which encode enzymes that function upstream of ACS1 in the PAA pathway. Results suggest PDC1 is required for lipid accumulation in the aerial mycelia, and deletion of PDC1 resulted in highly wettable mycelia. However, the total amount of lipids in the PDC1 deletion mutants was similar to that of the wild-type strain, likely due to compensatory lipid production processes in the embedded mycelia. PDC1 was expressed both in the aerial and embedded mycelia, whereas ACS1 was observed only in the aerial mycelia in a PDC1-dependent manner. PDC1 is also involved in vegetative growth of embedded mycelia in G. zeae, possibly through initiating the ethanol fermentation pathway. Thus, PDC1 may function as a key metabolic enzyme crucial for lipid production in the aerial mycelia, but play a different role in the embedded mycelia, where it might be involved in energy generation by ethanol fermentation.

  10. Aspartate Decarboxylase is Required for a Normal Pupa Pigmentation Pattern in the Silkworm, Bombyx mori

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Fangyin; Qiao, Liang; Cao, Cun; Liu, Xiaofan; Tong, Xiaoling; He, Songzhen; Hu, Hai; Zhang, Li; Wu, Songyuan; Tan, Duan; Xiang, Zhonghuai; Lu, Cheng

    2015-01-01

    The pigmentation pattern of Lepidoptera varies greatly in different development stages. To date, the effects of key genes in the melanin metabolism pathway on larval and adult body color are distinct, yet the effects on pupal pigmentation remains unclear. In the silkworm, Bombyx mori, the black pupa (bp) mutant is only specifically melanized at the pupal stage. Using positional cloning, we found that a mutation in the Aspartate decarboxylase gene (BmADC) is causative in the bp mutant. In the bp mutant, a SINE-like transposon with a length of 493 bp was detected ~2.2 kb upstream of the transcriptional start site of BmADC. This insertion causes a sharp reduction in BmADC transcript levels in bp mutants, leading to deficiency of β-alanine and N-β-alanyl dopamine (NBAD), but accumulation of dopamine. Following injection of β-alanine into bp mutants, the color pattern was reverted that of the wild-type silkworms. Additionally, melanic pupae resulting from knock-down of BmADC in the wild-type strain were obtained. These findings show that BmADC plays a crucial role in melanin metabolism and in the pigmentation pattern of the silkworm pupal stage. Finally, this study contributes to a better understanding of pupa pigmentation patterns in Lepidoptera. PMID:26077025

  11. Extracellular expression of glutamate decarboxylase B in Escherichia coli to improve gamma-aminobutyric acid production.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Anqi; Hu, Xiaoqing; Li, Ye; Chen, Cheng; Wang, Xiaoyuan

    2016-12-01

    Escherichia coli overexpressing glutamate decarboxylase GadB can produce gamma-aminobutyric acid with addition of monosodium glutamate. The yield and productivity of gamma-aminobutyric acid might be significantly improved if the overexpressed GadB in E. coli cells can be excreted outside, where it can directly transforms monosodium glutamate to gamma-aminobutyric acid. In this study, GadB was fused to signal peptides TorA or PelB, respectively, and overexpressed in E. coli BL21(DE3). It was found that TorA could facilitate GadB secretion much better than PelB. Conditions for GadB secretion and gamma-aminobutyric acid production were optimized in E. coli BL21(DE3)/pET20b-torA-gadB, leading the secretion of more than half of the overexpressed GadB. Fed-batch fermentation for GadB expression and gamma-aminobutyric acid production of BL21(DE3)/pET20b-torA-gadB was sequentially performed in one fermenter; 264.4 and 313.1 g/L gamma-aminobutyric acid were obtained with addition of monosodium glutamate after 36 and 72 h, respectively.

  12. Ornithine decarboxylase or gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase overexpression protects Leishmania (Vianna) guyanensis against antimony.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Maisa S; Comini, Marcelo A; Resende, Bethânia V; Santi, Ana Maria M; Zoboli, Antônio P; Moreira, Douglas S; Murta, Silvane M F

    2017-04-01

    Trypanosomatids present a unique mechanism for detoxification of peroxides that is dependent on trypanothione (bisglutathionylspermidine). Ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) and γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase (GSH1) produce molecules that are direct precursors of trypanothione. In this study, Leishmania guyanensis odc and gsh1 overexpressor cell lines were generated to investigate the contribution of these genes to the trivalent antimony (Sb(III))-resistance phenotype. The ODC- or GSH1-overexpressors parasites presented an increase of two and four-fold in Sb(III)-resistance index, respectively, when compared with the wild-type line. Pharmacological inhibition of ODC and GSH1 with the specific inhibitors α-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) and buthionine sulfoximine (BSO), respectively, increased the antileishmanial effect of Sb(III) in all cell lines. However, the ODC- and GSH1-overexpressor were still more resistant to Sb(III) than the parental cell line. Together, our data shows that modulation of ODC and GSH1 levels and activity is sufficient to affect L. guyanensis susceptibility to Sb(III), and confirms a role of these genes in the Sb(III)-resistance phenotype.

  13. Effect of undernutrition on the regional development of transmitter enzymes: glutamate decarboxylase and choline acetyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Patel, A J; del Vecchio, M; Atkinson, D J

    1978-01-01

    The effect of undernutrition on the activity of glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) and choline acetyltransferase (ChAc) (markers for the GABA-ergic and the cholinergic transmitter system, respectively) was studied in various parts of the rat brain at the age of 10, 15 and 21 days, and at day 54 following 33 days of rehabilitation. The brain regions investigated were the olfactory bulbs, cerebellum, pons-medulla, hypothalamus, colliculi, cerebral cortex hippocampus and the residual brain. Undernutrition resulted in a marked retardation of the developmental rise of the activities of both enzymes, expressed in terms of either total brain part or unit weight or protein. The effect diminished with age even during the period of nutritional deprivation. In most brain regions the enzyme activities were restored to normal after rehabilitation. In the cerebral cortex the total activity of both enzymes was persistently reduced, although the concentration of GAD exceeded the control levels. A negative correlation was manifested between the activities of GAD and ChAc in the different brain parts (except the cerebellum) during development. The correlation became significant by day 21 in the controls, but only after postweaning rehabilitation of the undernourished rats. The results showed therefore that undernutrition caused a reversible retardation in the development of these two transmitter enzymes, and they suggested that even the balance of the GABA-ergic and cholinergic systems throughout the brain can be restored to normal by rehabilitation.

  14. Aspartate beta-decarboxylase from Alcaligenes faecalis: carbon-13 kinetic isotope effect and deuterium exchange experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, R.M.; O'Leary, M.H.

    1985-03-26

    The authors have measured the /sup 13/C kinetic isotope effect at pH 4.0, 5.0, 6.0, and 6.5 and in D/sub 2/O at pH 5.0 and the rate of D-H exchange of the alpha and beta protons of aspartic acid in D/sub 2/O at pH 5.0 for the reaction catalyzed by the enzyme aspartate beta-decarboxylase from Alcaligenes faecalis. The /sup 13/C kinetic isotope effect, with a value of 1.0099 +/- 0.0002 at pH 5.0, is less than the intrinsic isotope effect for the decarboxylation step, indicating that the decarboxylation step is not entirely rate limiting. The authors have been able to estimate probable values of the relative free energies of the transition states of the enzymatic reaction up to and including the decarboxylation step from the /sup 13/C kinetic isotope effect and the rate of D-H exchange of alpha-H. The pH dependence of the kinetic isotope effect reflects the pKa of the pyridine nitrogen of the coenzyme pyridoxal 5'-phosphate but not that of the imine nitrogen. A mechanism is proposed for the exchange of aspartate beta-H that is consistent with the stereochemistry suggested earlier.

  15. Transcriptional response to deletion of the phosphatidylserine decarboxylase Psd1p in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Gsell, Martina; Mascher, Gerald; Schuiki, Irmgard; Ploier, Birgit; Hrastnik, Claudia; Daum, Günther

    2013-01-01

    In the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the synthesis of the essential phospholipid phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) is accomplished by a network of reactions which comprises four different pathways. The enzyme contributing most to PE formation is the mitochondrial phosphatidylserine decarboxylase 1 (Psd1p) which catalyzes conversion of phosphatidylserine (PS) to PE. To study the genome wide effect of an unbalanced cellular and mitochondrial PE level and in particular the contribution of Psd1p to this depletion we performed a DNA microarray analysis with a ∆psd1 deletion mutant. This approach revealed that 54 yeast genes were significantly up-regulated in the absence of PSD1 compared to wild type. Surprisingly, marked down-regulation of genes was not observed. A number of different cellular processes in different subcellular compartments were affected in a ∆psd1 mutant. Deletion mutants bearing defects in all 54 candidate genes, respectively, were analyzed for their growth phenotype and their phospholipid profile. Only three mutants, namely ∆gpm2, ∆gph1 and ∆rsb1, were affected in one of these parameters. The possible link of these mutations to PE deficiency and PSD1 deletion is discussed.

  16. Herbacetin is a novel allosteric inhibitor of ornithine decarboxylase with antitumor activity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mee-Hyun; Oi, Naomi; Lim, Do Young; Kim, Myoung Ok; Cho, Young-Yeon; Pugliese, Angelo; Shim, Jung-Hyun; Chen, Hanyong; Cho, Eun Jin; Kim, Jong-Eun; Kang, Sun Chul; Paul, Souren; Kang, Hee Eun; Jung, Ji Won; Lee, Sung-Young; Kim, Sung-Hyun; Reddy, Kanamata; Yeom, Young Il; Bode, Ann M; Dong, Zigang

    2015-01-01

    Ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) is a rate-limiting enzyme in the first step of polyamine biosynthesis that is associated with cell growth and tumor formation. Existing catalytic inhibitors of ODC have lacked efficacy in clinical testing or displayed unacceptable toxicity. In this study, we report the identification of an effective and nontoxic allosteric inhibitor of ODC. Using computer docking simulation and an in vitro ODC enzyme assay, we identified herbacetin, a natural compound found in flax and other plants, as a novel ODC inhibitor. Mechanistic investigations defined aspartate 44 in ODC as critical for binding. Herbacetin exhibited potent anticancer activity in colon cancer cell lines expressing high levels of ODC. Intraperitoneal or oral administration of herbacetin effectively suppressed HCT116 xenograft tumor growth and also reduced the number and size of polyps in a mouse model of APC-driven colon cancer (ApcMin/+). Unlike the well established ODC inhibitor DFMO, herbacetin treatment was not associated with hearing loss. Taken together, our findings defined the natural product herbacetin as an allosteric inhibitor of ODC with chemopreventive and antitumor activity in preclinical models of colon cancer, prompting its further investigation in clinical trials. PMID:26676750

  17. Regulation of ornithine decarboxylase gene expression by the Wilms' tumor suppressor WT1.

    PubMed Central

    Moshier, J A; Skunca, M; Wu, W; Boppana, S M; Rauscher, F J; Dosescu, J

    1996-01-01

    The importance of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) to cell proliferation is underscored by the complex array of cell-specific mechanisms invoked to regulate its synthesis and activity. Misregulation of ODC has severe negative consequences on normal cell function, including the acquisition of tumorigenic growth properties by cells overexpressing ODC. We hypothesize that ODC gene expression is a candidate target for the anti-proliferative function of certain tumor suppressors. Here we show that the Wilms' tumor suppressor WT1 binds to multiple sites within the human ODC promoter, as determined by DNase I protection and methylation interference assays. The expression of WT1 in transfected HCT 116, NIH/3T3 and HepG2 cells represses activity of the ODC promoter controlling expression of a luciferase reporter gene. In contrast WT1 expression enhances ODC promoter activity in SV40-transfected HepG2 cells. Both the extent of modulation of ODC gene expression and the mediating WT1 binding elements are cell specific. Constructs expressing WT1 deletion mutants implicate two regions required for repressor function, as well as an intrinsic activation domain. Understanding the regulation of ODC gene expression by WT1 may provide valuable insights into the roles of both WT1 and ODC in development and tumorigenesis. PMID:8604351

  18. Ornithine decarboxylase regulates the activity and localization of rhoA via polyamination

    SciTech Connect

    Maekitie, Laura T.; Kanerva, Kristiina; Andersson, Leif C.

    2009-04-01

    Ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) is the rate-limiting enzyme of polyamine synthesis. Polyamines and ODC are connected to cell proliferation and transformation. Resting cells display a low ODC activity while normal, proliferating cells display fluctuations in ODC activity that coincide with changes in the actin cytoskeleton during the cell cycle. Cancerous cells display constitutively elevated ODC activity. Overexpression of ODC in NIH 3T3 fibroblasts induces a transformed phenotype. The cytoskeletal rearrangements during cytokinesis and cell transformation are intimately coupled to the ODC activity but the molecular mechanisms have remained elusive. In this study we investigated how ODC and polyamines influence the organization of the cytoskeleton. Given that the small G-proteins of the rho family are key modulators of the actin cytoskeleton, we investigated the molecular interactions of rhoA with ODC and polyamines. Our results show that transglutaminase-catalyzed polyamination of rhoA regulates its activity. The polyamination status of rhoA crucially influences the progress of the cell cycle as well as the rate of transformation of rat fibroblasts infected with temperature-sensitive v-src. We also show that ODC influences the intracellular distribution of rhoA. These findings provide novel insights into the mechanisms by which ODC and polyamines regulate the dynamics of the cytoskeleton during cell proliferation and transformation.

  19. Simultaneous Silencing of Two Arginine Decarboxylase Genes Alters Development in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Rangel, Diana; Chávez-Martínez, Ana I.; Rodríguez-Hernández, Aída A.; Maruri-López, Israel; Urano, Kaoru; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Jiménez-Bremont, Juan F.

    2016-01-01

    Polyamines (PAs) are small aliphatic polycations that are found ubiquitously in all organisms. In plants, PAs are involved in diverse biological processes such as growth, development, and stress responses. In Arabidopsis thaliana, the arginine decarboxylase enzymes (ADC1 and 2) catalyze the first step of PA biosynthesis. For a better understanding of PA biological functions, mutants in PA biosynthesis have been generated; however, the double adc1/adc2 mutant is not viable in A. thaliana. In this study, we generated non-lethal A. thaliana lines through an artificial microRNA that simultaneously silenced the two ADC genes (amiR:ADC). The generated transgenic lines (amiR:ADC-L1 and -L2) showed reduced AtADC1 and AtADC2 transcript levels. For further analyses the amiR:ADC-L2 line was selected. We found that the amiR:ADC-L2 line showed a significant decrease of their PA levels. The co-silencing revealed a stunted growth in A. thaliana seedlings, plantlets and delay in its flowering rate; these phenotypes were reverted with PA treatment. In addition, amiR:ADC-L2 plants displayed two seed phenotypes, such as yellow and brownish seeds. The yellow mutant seeds were smaller than adc1, adc2 mutants and wild type seeds; however, the brownish were the smallest seeds with arrested embryos at the torpedo stage. These data reinforce the importance of PA homeostasis in the plant development processes. PMID:27014322

  20. Ornithine decarboxylase, kidney size, and the tubular hypothesis of glomerular hyperfiltration in experimental diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Scott C.; Deng, Aihua; Bao, Dingjiu; Satriano, Joseph; Blantz, Roland C.; Vallon, Volker

    2001-01-01

    In early diabetes, the kidney grows and the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) increases. This growth is linked to ornithine decarboxylase (ODC). The study of hyperfiltration has focused on microvascular abnormalities, but hyperfiltration may actually result from a prior increase in capacity for proximal reabsorption which reduces the signal for tubuloglomerular feedback (TGF). Experiments were performed in Wistar rats after 1 week of streptozotocin diabetes. Kidney weight, ODC activity, and GFR were correlated in diabetic and control rats given difluoromethylornithine (DFMO; Marion Merrell Dow, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA) to inhibit ODC. We assessed proximal reabsorption by micropuncture, using TGF as a tool for manipulating single-nephron GFR (SNGFR), then plotting proximal reabsorption versus SNGFR. ODC activity was elevated 15-fold in diabetic kidneys and normalized by DFMO, which also attenuated hyperfiltration and hypertrophy. Micropuncture data revealed an overall increase in proximal reabsorption in diabetic rats too great to be accounted for by glomerulotubular balance. DFMO prevented the overall increase in proximal reabsorption. These data confirm that ODC is required for the full effect of diabetes on kidney size and proximal reabsorption in early streptozotocin diabetes and are consistent with the hypothesis that diabetic hyperfiltration results from normal physiologic actions of TGF operating in a larger kidney, independent of any primary malfunction of the glomerular microvasculature. PMID:11160138

  1. Gene cloning, expression, and characterization of phenolic acid decarboxylase from Lactobacillus brevis RM84.

    PubMed

    Landete, José María; Rodríguez, Héctor; Curiel, José Antonio; de las Rivas, Blanca; Mancheño, José Miguel; Muñoz, Rosario

    2010-06-01

    Phenolic acid decarboxylase (PAD) catalyzes the synthesis of vinyl phenols from hydroxycinnamic acids. The gene encoding PAD from Lactobacillus brevis was cloned and expressed as a fusion protein in Escherichia coli. The recombinant PAD enzyme is a heat-labile enzyme that functions optimally at 22 degrees C and pH 6.0. The purified enzyme did not show thermostability at temperatures above 22 degrees C. L. brevis PAD is able to decarboxylate exclusively the hydroxycinnamic acids, such as p-coumaric, caffeic, and ferulic acids, with K (m) values of 0.98, 0.96, and 0.78 mM, respectively. The substrate specificity exhibited by L. brevis PAD is similar to the PAD isolated from Bacillus subtilis and B. pumilus, but different from that of L. plantarum and Pediococcus pentosaceus. As the C-terminal region may be involved in determining PAD substrate specificity and catalytic capacity, amino acid differences among these proteins could explain the differences observed. The substrate specificity shown by L. brevis PAD shows promise for the synthesis of high-added value products from plant wastes.

  2. Taurine homeostasis requires de novo synthesis via cysteine sulfinic acid decarboxylase during zebrafish early embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yen-Chia; Ding, Shih-Torng; Lee, Yen-Hua; Wang, Ya-Ching; Huang, Ming-Feng; Liu, I-Hsuan

    2013-02-01

    Cysteine sulfinic acid decarboxylase (Csad) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the de novo biosynthesis of taurine. There are a number of physiological roles of taurine, such as bile salt synthesis, osmoregulation, lipid metabolism, and oxidative stress inhibition. To investigate the role of de novo synthesis of taurine during embryonic development, zebrafish csad was cloned and functionally analyzed. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR showed that csad transcripts are maternally deposited, while whole-mount in situ hybridization demonstrated that csad is expressed in yolk syncytial layer and various embryonic tissues such as notochord, brain, retina, pronephric duct, liver, and pancreas. Knockdown of csad significantly reduced the embryonic taurine level, and the affected embryos had increased early mortality and cardiac anomalies. mRNA coinjection and taurine supplementation rescued the cardiac phenotypes suggesting that taurine originating from the de novo synthesis pathway plays a role in cardiac development. Our findings indicated that the de novo synthesis pathway via Csad plays a critical role in taurine homeostasis and cardiac development in zebrafish early embryos.

  3. Dynamic expression of a glutamate decarboxylase gene in multiple non-neural tissues during mouse development

    PubMed Central

    Maddox, Dennis M; Condie, Brian G

    2001-01-01

    Background Glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) is the biosynthetic enzyme for the neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Mouse embryos lacking the 67-kDa isoform of GAD (encoded by the Gad1 gene) develop a complete cleft of the secondary palate. This phenotype suggests that this gene may be involved in the normal development of tissues outside of the CNS. Although Gad1 expression in adult non-CNS tissues has been noted previously, no systematic analysis of its embryonic expression outside of the nervous system has been performed. The objective of this study was to define additional structures outside of the central nervous system that express Gad1, indicating those structures that may require its function for normal development. Results Our analysis detected the localized expression of Gad1 transcripts in several developing tissues in the mouse embryo from E9.0-E14.5. Tissues expressing Gad1 included the tail bud mesenchyme, the pharyngeal pouches and arches, the ectodermal placodes of the developing vibrissae, and the apical ectodermal ridge (AER), mesenchyme and ectoderm of the limb buds. Conclusions Some of the sites of Gad1 expression are tissues that emit signals required for patterning and differentiation (AER, vibrissal placodes). Other sites correspond to proliferating stem cell populations that give rise to multiple differentiated tissues (tail bud mesenchyme, pharyngeal endoderm and mesenchyme). The dynamic expression of Gad1 in such tissues suggests a wider role for GABA signaling in development than was previously appreciated. PMID:11178105

  4. Novel interactions of fluorinated nucleotide derivatives targeting orotidine-5′-monophosphate decarboxylase

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Melissa; Avina, Maria Elena Meza; Wei, Lianhu; Crandall, Ian E.; Bello, Angelica Mara; Poduch, Ewa; Liu, Yan; Paige, Christopher J.; Kain, Kevin C.; Pai, Emil F.; Kotra, Lakshmi P.

    2011-01-01

    Fluorinated nucleosides and nucleotides are of considerable interest to medicinal chemists due to their antiviral, anticancer, and other biological activities. However, their direct interactions at target binding sites are not well understood. A new class of 2′-deoxy-2′-fluoro-C6-substituted uridine and UMP derivatives were synthesized and evaluated as inhibitors of orotidine-5′-monophosphate decarboxylase (ODCase). These compounds were synthesized from the key intermediate, fully-protected 2′-deoxy-2′-fluorouridine. Among the synthesized compounds, 2′-deoxy-2′-fluoro-6-iodo-UMP covalently inhibited human ODCase with a second-order rate constant of 0.62 ± 0.02 M−1sec−1. Interestingly, the 6-cyano-2′-fluoro derivative covalently interacted with ODCase defying the conventional thinking, where its ribosyl derivative undergoes transformation into BMP by ODCase. This confirms that the 2′-fluoro moiety influences the chemistry at the C6 position of the nucleotides, thus interactions in the active site of ODCase. Molecular interactions of the 2′-fluorinated nucleotides are compared to those with the 3′-fluorinated nucleotides bound to the corresponding target enzyme, and the carbohydrate moieties were shown to bind in different conformations. PMID:21417464

  5. Aspartate Decarboxylase is Required for a Normal Pupa Pigmentation Pattern in the Silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Dai, Fangyin; Qiao, Liang; Cao, Cun; Liu, Xiaofan; Tong, Xiaoling; He, Songzhen; Hu, Hai; Zhang, Li; Wu, Songyuan; Tan, Duan; Xiang, Zhonghuai; Lu, Cheng

    2015-06-16

    The pigmentation pattern of Lepidoptera varies greatly in different development stages. To date, the effects of key genes in the melanin metabolism pathway on larval and adult body color are distinct, yet the effects on pupal pigmentation remains unclear. In the silkworm, Bombyx mori, the black pupa (bp) mutant is only specifically melanized at the pupal stage. Using positional cloning, we found that a mutation in the Aspartate decarboxylase gene (BmADC) is causative in the bp mutant. In the bp mutant, a SINE-like transposon with a length of 493 bp was detected ~2.2 kb upstream of the transcriptional start site of BmADC. This insertion causes a sharp reduction in BmADC transcript levels in bp mutants, leading to deficiency of β-alanine and N-β-alanyl dopamine (NBAD), but accumulation of dopamine. Following injection of β-alanine into bp mutants, the color pattern was reverted that of the wild-type silkworms. Additionally, melanic pupae resulting from knock-down of BmADC in the wild-type strain were obtained. These findings show that BmADC plays a crucial role in melanin metabolism and in the pigmentation pattern of the silkworm pupal stage. Finally, this study contributes to a better understanding of pupa pigmentation patterns in Lepidoptera.

  6. Ornithine decarboxylase and extracellular polyamines regulate microvascular sprouting and actin cytoskeleton dynamics in endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kucharzewska, Paulina; Welch, Johanna E.; Svensson, Katrin J.; Belting, Mattias

    2010-10-01

    The polyamines are essential for cancer cell proliferation during tumorigenesis. Targeted inhibition of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), i.e. a key enzyme of polyamine biosynthesis, by {alpha}-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) has shown anti-neoplastic activity in various experimental models. This activity has mainly been attributed to the anti-proliferative effect of DFMO in cancer cells. Here, we provide evidence that unperturbed ODC activity is a requirement for proper microvessel sprouting ex vivo as well as the migration of primary human endothelial cells. DFMO-mediated ODC inhibition was reversed by extracellular polyamine supplementation, showing that anti-angiogenic effects of DFMO were specifically related to polyamine levels. ODC inhibition was associated with an abnormal morphology of the actin cytoskeleton during cell spreading and migration. Moreover, our data suggest that de-regulated actin cytoskeleton dynamics in DFMO treated endothelial cells may be related to constitutive activation of the small GTPase CDC42, i.e. a well-known regulator of cell motility and actin cytoskeleton remodeling. These insights into the potential role of polyamines in angiogenesis should stimulate further studies testing the combined anti-tumor effect of polyamine inhibition and established anti-angiogenic therapies in vivo.

  7. The Ornithine Decarboxylase Gene Is Essential for Cell Survival during Early Murine Development

    PubMed Central

    Pendeville, Hélène; Carpino, Nick; Marine, Jean-Christophe; Takahashi, Yutaka; Muller, Marc; Martial, Joseph A.; Cleveland, John L.

    2001-01-01

    Overexpression and inhibitor studies have suggested that the c-Myc target gene for ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), the enzyme which converts ornithine to putrescine, plays an important role in diverse biological processes, including cell growth, differentiation, transformation, and apoptosis. To explore the physiological function of ODC in mammalian development, we generated mice harboring a disrupted ODC gene. ODC-heterozygous mice were viable, normal, and fertile. Although zygotic ODC is expressed throughout the embryo prior to implantation, loss of ODC did not block normal development to the blastocyst stage. Embryonic day E3.5 ODC-deficient embryos were capable of uterine implantation and induced maternal decidualization yet failed to develop substantially thereafter. Surprisingly, analysis of ODC-deficient blastocysts suggests that loss of ODC does not affect cell growth per se but rather is required for survival of the pluripotent cells of the inner cell mass. Therefore, ODC plays an essential role in murine development, and proper homeostasis of polyamine pools appears to be required for cell survival prior to gastrulation. PMID:11533243

  8. Glycine decarboxylase deficiency causes neural tube defects and features of non-ketotic hyperglycinemia in mice

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Yun Jin; Leung, Kit-Yi; Savery, Dawn; Hutchin, Tim; Prunty, Helen; Heales, Simon; Brosnan, Margaret E.; Brosnan, John T.; Copp, Andrew J.; Greene, Nicholas D.E.

    2015-01-01

    Glycine decarboxylase (GLDC) acts in the glycine cleavage system to decarboxylate glycine and transfer a one-carbon unit into folate one-carbon metabolism. GLDC mutations cause a rare recessive disease non-ketotic hyperglycinemia (NKH). Mutations have also been identified in patients with neural tube defects (NTDs); however, the relationship between NKH and NTDs is unclear. We show that reduced expression of Gldc in mice suppresses glycine cleavage system activity and causes two distinct disease phenotypes. Mutant embryos develop partially penetrant NTDs while surviving mice exhibit post-natal features of NKH including glycine accumulation, early lethality and hydrocephalus. In addition to elevated glycine, Gldc disruption also results in abnormal tissue folate profiles, with depletion of one-carbon-carrying folates, as well as growth retardation and reduced cellular proliferation. Formate treatment normalizes the folate profile, restores embryonic growth and prevents NTDs, suggesting that Gldc deficiency causes NTDs through limiting supply of one-carbon units from mitochondrial folate metabolism. PMID:25736695

  9. Coexpression of pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase genes in Lactobacillus brevis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Siqing; Dien, Bruce S; Nichols, Nancy N; Bischoff, Kenneth M; Hughes, Stephen R; Cotta, Michael A

    2007-09-01

    Lactobacillus brevis ATCC367 was engineered to express pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC) and alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) genes in order to increase ethanol fermentation from biomass-derived residues. First, a Gram-positive Sarcina ventriculi PDC gene (Svpdc) was introduced into L. brevis ATCC 367 to obtain L. brevis bbc03. The SvPDC was detected by immunoblot using an SvPDC oligo peptide antiserum, but no increased ethanol was detected in L. brevis bbc03. Then, an ADH gene from L. brevis (Bradh) was cloned behind the Svpdc gene that generated a pdc/adh-coupled ethanol cassette pBBC04. The pBBC04 restored anaerobic growth and conferred ethanol production of Escheirichia coli NZN111 (a fermentative defective strain incapable of growing anaerobically). Approximately 58 kDa (SvPDC) and 28 kDa (BrADH) recombinant proteins were observed in L. brevis bbc04. These results indicated that the Gram-positive ethanol production genes can be expressed in L. brevis using a Gram-positive promoter and pTRKH2 shuttle vector. This work provides evidence that expressing Gram-positive ethanol genes in pentose utilizing L. brevis will further aid manipulation of this microbe toward biomass to ethanol production.

  10. Tyrosine decarboxylase activity of Lactobacillus brevis IOEB 9809 isolated from wine and L. brevis ATCC 367.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Arribas, V; Lonvaud-Funel, A

    1999-11-01

    Tyramine, a frequent amine in wines, is produced from tyrosine by the tyrosine decarboxylase (TDC) activity of bacteria. The tyramine-producing strain Lactobacillus brevis IOEB 9809 isolated from wine and the reference strain L. brevis ATCC 367 were studied. At the optimum pH, 5.0, K(m) values of IOEB 9809 and ATCC 367 crude extracts for L-tyrosine were 0.58 mM and 0.67 mM, and V(max) was higher for the wine strain (115 U) than the ATCC 367 (66 U). TDC exhibited a preference for L-tyrosine over L-DOPA as substrate. Enzyme activity was pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent and it was stabilized by the substrate and coenzyme. In contrast, glycerol and beta-mercaptoethanol strongly inhibited TDC. Tyramine competitively inhibited TDC for both strains. Citric acid, lactic acid and ethanol had an inhibitory effect on cells and crude extracts, but none could inhibit TDC at the usual concentrations in wines.

  11. [Spectroscopic study of the structure and intramolecular mobility of yeast pyruvate decarboxylase].

    PubMed

    Maskevich, S A; Maskevich, A A; Kivach, L N; Chernikevich, I P; Zabrodskaia, S V; Oparin, D A

    1993-12-01

    Steady-state and time-resolved fluorimetry were used to study the properties of holo- and apopyruvate decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.1, PDC) from Brewer's yeast after interaction with substrate (pyruvate), cofactor (thiamine diphosphate, ThDP) and Mg2+ ions. The analysis of the enzyme's intrinsic fluorescence as well as of its complex with the probe 2-(p-toluidinylnaphthalene)-6-sulphonate (TNS) revealed that ThDP was found at the polar region of the PDC active sites, inducing a decrease in the mobility of the protein's nearest surroundings. The fluorescent probe had three different sites of binding to the protein apoform, two of which being located at the catalytic site and having different rotation freedom. The study of the PDC complex with thiochrome pyrophosphate, a ThDP structural analogue, pointed to the occurrence of a non-polar region of the enzyme active site for pyruvate absorption besides the polar region. The binding of pyruvate to the protein does not depend upon the cofactor's binding. On the basis of the fluorescent studies a model of the ThDP and pyruvate arrangement at the PDC active site is suggested.

  12. Polyamine metabolism and osmotic stress. II. Improvement of oat protoplasts by an inhibitor of arginine decarboxylase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiburcio, A. F.; Kaur-Sawhney, R.; Galston, A. W.

    1986-01-01

    We have attempted to improve the viability of cereal mesophyll protoplasts by pretreatment of leaves with DL-alpha-difluoromethylarginine (DFMA), a specific 'suicide' inhibitor of the enzyme (arginine decarboxylase) responsible for their osmotically induced putrescine accumulation. Leaf pretreatment with DFMA before a 6 hour osmotic shock caused a 45% decrease of putrescine and a 2-fold increase of spermine titer. After 136 hours of osmotic stress, putrescine titer in DFMA-pretreated leaves increased by only 50%, but spermidine and spermine titers increased dramatically by 3.2- and 6-fold, respectively. These increases in higher polyamines could account for the reduced chlorophyll loss and enhanced ability of pretreated leaves to incorporate tritiated thymidine, uridine, and leucine into macromolecules. Pretreatment with DFMA significantly improved the overall viability of the protoplasts isolated from these leaves. The results support the view that the osmotically induced rise in putrescine and blockage of its conversion to higher polyamines may contribute to the lack of sustained cell division in cereal mesophyll protoplasts, although other undefined factors must also play a major role.

  13. Characterization of the activity and expression of arginine decarboxylase in human and animal Chlamydia pathogens.

    PubMed

    Bliven, Kimberly A; Fisher, Derek J; Maurelli, Anthony T

    2012-12-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae encodes a functional arginine decarboxylase (ArgDC), AaxB, that activates upon self-cleavage and converts l-arginine to agmatine. In contrast, most Chlamydia trachomatis serovars carry a missense or nonsense mutation in aaxB abrogating activity. The G115R missense mutation was not predicted to impact AaxB functionality, making it unclear whether AaxB variations in other Chlamydia species also result in enzyme inactivation. To address the impact of gene polymorphism on functionality, we investigated the activity and production of the Chlamydia AaxB variants. Because ArgDC plays a critical role in the Escherichia coli acid stress response, we studied the ability of these Chlamydia variants to complement an E. coli ArgDC mutant in an acid shock assay. Active AaxB was detected in four additional species: Chlamydia caviae, Chlamydia pecorum, Chlamydia psittaci, and Chlamydia muridarum. Of the C. trachomatis serovars, only E appears to encode active enzyme. To determine when functional enzyme is present during the chlamydial developmental cycle, we utilized an anti-AaxB antibody to detect both uncleaved and cleaved enzyme throughout infection. Uncleaved enzyme production peaked around 20 h postinfection, with optimal cleavage around 44 h. While the role ArgDC plays in Chlamydia survival or virulence is unclear, our data suggest a niche-specific function.

  14. Effect of cocaine, ethanol or nicotine on ornithine decarboxylase activity in early chick embryo brain.

    PubMed

    Beeker, K; Smith, C; Pennington, S

    1992-09-18

    Fetal drug exposure causes multiple deficits in the developing child. For both humans and animal models, the single most common drug-related problem is fetal growth suppression. This defect is associated with significant perinatal morbidity and mortality and may also be related to significant behavioral problems appearing later in life. Studies focussed on the molecular mechanism of fetal drug effects in placental models are complicated by multiple interactions of the drug with mother, placenta and fetus. Using early (76-168 h) chick embryos as a non-placental model, and three common drugs of abuse (nicotine, ethanol and cocaine) it was found that each drug suppressed the peak in fetal brain ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) activity that normally occurs at 120 h of development. For each drug, the decrease in ODC activity at 120 h was followed by a small but significant increase in ODC. Thus, although the drug-treated embryos were smaller in size, they appeared to be undergoing compensatory growth and, in fact, became equal in weight to the vehicle-treated animals, if allowed to hatch.

  15. Isotope effect studies of the pyruvate-dependent histidine decarboxylase from Lactobacillus 30a

    SciTech Connect

    Abell, L.M.; O'Leary, M.H.

    1988-08-09

    The decarboxylation of histidine by the pyruvate-dependent histidine decarboxylase of Lactobacillus 30 a shows a carbon isotope effect k/sup 12//k/sup 13/ = 1.0334 +/- 0.0005 and a nitrogen isotope effect k/sup 14//k/sup 15/ = 0.9799 +/- 0.0006 at pH 4.8, 37/sup 0/C. The carbon isotope effect is slightly increased by deuteriation of the substrate and slightly decreased in D/sub 2/O. The observed nitrogen isotope effect indicates that the imine nitrogen in the substrate-Schiff base intermediate complex is ordinarily protonated, and the pH dependence of the carbon isotope effect indicates that both protonated and unprotonated forms of this intermediate are capable of undergoing decarboxylation. As with the pyridoxal 5'-phosphate dependent enzyme, Schiff base formation and decarboxylation are jointly rate-limiting, with the intermediate histidine-pyruvate Schiff base showing a decarboxylation/Schiff base hydrolysis ratio of 0.5-1.0 at pH 4.8. The decarboxylation transition state is more reactant-like for the pyruvate-dependent enzyme than for the pyridoxal 5'-phosphate dependent enzyme. These studies find no particular energetic or catalytic advantage to the use of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate over covalently bound pyruvate in catalysis of the decarboxylation of histidine.

  16. The role of arginine decarboxylase in modulating the sensitivity of barley to ozone.

    PubMed

    Rowland-Bamford, A J; Borland, A M; Lea, P J; Mansfield, T A

    1989-01-01

    Polyamines (PA) are known to be involved in the areas of plant physiology and biochemistry which are related to the response of a plant to air pollution. This study examines the role of arginine decarboxylase (ADC), an important rate-limiting enzyme in polyamine synthesis, in barley plants exposed to ozone (O(3)). The activity of ADC increased significantly in O(3)-treated leaves when visible injury was hardly apparent. The increase in ADC activity may be a mechanism to increase the PA levels in O(3)-treated leaves and so minimize the damaging effects of O(3). Supporting this, foliar applications of DL-alpha-difluoromethylarginine (DFMA), a specific inhibitor of ADC, prevented the rise in ADC activity and visible injury was considerable on exposure to O(3). This damage was not due to the foliar sprays, as little visible injury was seen in leaves in the O(3)-free controls. The results are discussed in terms of the roles of PA in conferring O(3) resistance in plants.

  17. Polyamine metabolism and osmotic stress. II. Improvement of oat protoplasts by an inhibitor of arginine decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Tiburcio, A F; Kaur-Sawhney, R; Galston, A W

    1986-01-01

    We have attempted to improve the viability of cereal mesophyll protoplasts by pretreatment of leaves with DL-alpha-difluoromethylarginine (DFMA), a specific 'suicide' inhibitor of the enzyme (arginine decarboxylase) responsible for their osmotically induced putrescine accumulation. Leaf pretreatment with DFMA before a 6 hour osmotic shock caused a 45% decrease of putrescine and a 2-fold increase of spermine titer. After 136 hours of osmotic stress, putrescine titer in DFMA-pretreated leaves increased by only 50%, but spermidine and spermine titers increased dramatically by 3.2- and 6-fold, respectively. These increases in higher polyamines could account for the reduced chlorophyll loss and enhanced ability of pretreated leaves to incorporate tritiated thymidine, uridine, and leucine into macromolecules. Pretreatment with DFMA significantly improved the overall viability of the protoplasts isolated from these leaves. The results support the view that the osmotically induced rise in putrescine and blockage of its conversion to higher polyamines may contribute to the lack of sustained cell division in cereal mesophyll protoplasts, although other undefined factors must also play a major role.

  18. Pathogenic Roles of Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase 65 Autoantibodies in Cerebellar Ataxias.

    PubMed

    Mitoma, Hiroshi; Manto, Mario; Hampe, Christiane S

    2017-01-01

    Reports suggesting a pathogenic role of autoantibodies directed against glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GAD65Abs) in cerebellar ataxias (CAs) are reviewed, and debatable issues such as internalization of antibodies by neurons and roles of epitopes are discussed. GAD65 is one of two enzymes that catalyze the conversion of glutamate to the inhibitory neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). A pathogenic role of GAD65Ab in CAs is suggested by in vivo and in vitro studies. (1) Intracerebellar administration of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) immunoglobulins (IgGs) obtained from GAD65Ab-positive CA patients impairs cerebellar modulation of motor control in rats. (2) CSF IgGs act on terminals of GABAergic neurons and decrease the release of GABA in cerebellar slices from rats and mice. (3) Absorption of GAD65Ab by recombinant GAD65 diminishes the above effects, and monoclonal human GAD65Ab (b78) mimic the effects of CSF IgGs in vivo and in vitro. Studies using GAD65-KO mice confirm that the target molecule is GAD65. (4) Notably, the effects of GAD65Ab depend on the epitope specificity of the monoclonal GAD65Ab. Taken together, these results indicate that epitope-specific GAD65Ab-induced impairment of GABA release is involved in the pathogenesis of GAD65Ab-positive CA and support the early detection of GAD65Ab-associated CA to initiate immunotherapy before irreversible neuronal death in the cerebellum.

  19. Effects of anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies associated with neurological diseases.

    PubMed

    Manto, Mario-Ubaldo; Laute, Marie-Aline; Aguera, Michèle; Rogemond, Véronique; Pandolfo, Massimo; Honnorat, Jérome

    2007-06-01

    Glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) catalyzes the conversion of glutamic acid into GABA. GAD autoantibodies (GAD-Ab) have been described in diabetes mellitus and in diseases involving the central nervous system such as stiff-person syndrome and cerebellar ataxia. However, the pathogenic role of GAD-Ab in neurological diseases remains a matter of debate. Using neurophysiological and neurochemical methods, we analyzed the effects of intracerebellar and paraspinal administration of GAD-Ab in rats. Intracerebellar administration of IgG from patients with GAD-Ab and neurological involvement (IgG-GAD) blocked the potentiation of the corticomotor response normally associated with trains of repetitive peripheral nerve stimulation. When injected in the lumbar paraspinal region, IgG-GAD induced continuous motor activity with repetitive discharges, abnormal exteroceptive reflexes, and increased excitability of anterior horn neurons, as assessed by F/M ratios. Furthermore, IgG-GAD significantly reduced the N-methyl-D-aspartate-mediated production of nitric oxide in cerebellar nuclei and impaired the synaptic regulation of glutamate after N-methyl-D-aspartate administration. These effects were not observed after administration of IgG from the following groups: (1) patients with GAD-Ab, diabetes mellitus, and without neurological complications; and (2) control patients. These results indicate that stiff-person syndrome and cerebellar ataxia are the direct consequence of antibody-mediated neuronal dysfunction.

  20. Overexpression of Tyrosine hydroxylase and Dopa decarboxylase associated with pupal melanization in Spodoptera exigua

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Sisi; Wang, Mo; Li, Xianchun

    2015-01-01

    Melanism has been found in a wide range of species, but the molecular mechanisms involved remain largely elusive. In this study, we studied the molecular mechanisms of the pupal melanism in Spodoptera exigua. The full length cDNA sequences of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and dopa decarboxylase (DDC), two key enzymes in the biosynthesis pathway of melanin, were cloned, and their temporal expression patterns in the integument were compared during the larval-pupal metamorphosis process of the S. exigua wild type (SEW) and melanic mutant (SEM) strains. No amino acid change in the protein sequence of TH and DDC was found between the two strains. Both DDC and TH were significantly over-expressed in the integument of the SEM strain at late-prepupa and 0 h pupa, respectively, compared with those of the SEW strain. Feeding 5th instar larvae of SEM with diets incorporated with 1 mg/g of the DDC inhibitor L-α-Methyl-DOPA and 0.75 mg/g of the TH inhibitor 3-iodo-tyrosine (3-IT) resulted in 20% pupae with partially-rescued phenotype and 68.2% of pupae with partially- or fully-rescued phenotype, respectively. These results indicate that overexpressions of TH and DDC are involved in the pupal melanization of S. exigua. PMID:26084938

  1. Enhanced histamine production through the induction of histidine decarboxylase expression by phorbol ester in Jurkat cells.

    PubMed

    Nagashima, Yusuke; Kako, Koichiro; Kim, Jun-Dal; Fukamizu, Akiyoshi

    2012-11-01

    Histamine (HA), a mediator of inflammation, type I allergic responses and neurotransmission, is synthesized from L-histidine, the reaction of which is catalyzed by histidine decarboxylase (HDC). HDC has been reported to be induced by various stimuli, not only in mast cells and basophils, but also in T lymphocytes and macrophages. Although its mRNA has been shown to be increased in Jurkat cells when treated with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (TPA), little is known concerning the induced production of HA by HDC. The present study quantified the trace amounts of intracellular HA using ultra-high liquid chromatography in combination with the 6-aminoquinoline carbamate-derivatization technique. To test whether the cellular level of HA is elevated by the induction of HDC in Jurkat cells treated with TPA, the peak corresponding to authentic HA in the cell lysate was fractioned and its molecular weight determined by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization quadrupole ion trap time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The results of this study show that the HA level is increased by the induction of HDC expression by TPA in Jurkat cells. Therefore, this method is useful in elucidating the physiological significance of HA production.

  2. Deletion of pyruvate decarboxylase by a new method for efficient markerless gene deletions in Gluconobacter oxydans.

    PubMed

    Peters, Björn; Junker, Anja; Brauer, Katharina; Mühlthaler, Bernadette; Kostner, David; Mientus, Markus; Liebl, Wolfgang; Ehrenreich, Armin

    2013-03-01

    Gluconobacter oxydans, a biotechnologically relevant species which incompletely oxidizes a large variety of carbohydrates, alcohols, and related compounds, contains a gene for pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC). This enzyme is found only in very few species of bacteria where it is normally involved in anaerobic ethanol formation via acetaldehyde. In order to clarify the role of PDC in the strictly oxidative metabolism of acetic acid bacteria, we developed a markerless in-frame deletion system for strain G. oxydans 621H which uses 5-fluorouracil together with a plasmid-encoded uracil phosphoribosyltransferase as counter selection method and used this technique to delete the PDC gene (GOX1081) of G. oxydans 621H. The PDC deletion mutant accumulated large amounts of pyruvate but almost no acetate during growth on D-mannitol, D-fructose or in the presence of L-lactate. This suggested that in G. oxydans acetate formation occurs by decarboxylation of pyruvate and subsequent oxidation of acetaldehyde to acetate. This observation and the efficiency of the markerless deletion system were confirmed by constructing deletion mutants of two acetaldehyde dehydrogenases (GOX1122 and GOX2018) and of the acetyl-CoA-synthetase (GOX0412). Acetate formation during growth of these mutants on mannitol did not differ significantly from the wild-type strain.

  3. Multiple promoter elements govern expression of the human ornithine decarboxylase gene in colon carcinoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Moshier, J A; Osborne, D L; Skunca, M; Dosescu, J; Gilbert, J D; Fitzgerald, M C; Polidori, G; Wagner, R L; Friezner Degen, S J; Luk, G D

    1992-01-01

    Overexpression of the ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) gene may be important to the development and maintenance of colonic neoplasms, as well as tumors in general. In this study, we examined the promoter elements governing constitutive expression of the human ODC gene in HCT 116 human colon carcinoma cells and, for comparison, K562 human erythro-leukemia cells. It was determined by functional analysis that the promoter elements responsible reside within the 378 bp immediately upstream from the transcription start site. Within this sequence, there are at least three regions that modulate the efficiency of the ODC promoter cooperatively. Both DNA bandshift and footprint assays demonstrated all three regions to be rich in sites that bind to nuclear proteins isolated from HCT 116 and K562 cells; the protein binding pattern of non-transformed, diploid fibroblasts was found to be much less complex. Several of the protein binding sequences have little or no homology to common regulatory elements. We suggest that the constitutive activity of the ODC gene in HCT 116 colon carcinoma cells, and perhaps transformed cells in general, involves a complex interaction of multiple regulatory sequences and their associated nuclear proteins. Finally, the saturation of the promoter in these transformed cell lines suggests that high levels of protein binding in the ODC promoter may contribute to elevated constitutive expression of this gene. Images PMID:1598217

  4. Structural requirements for novel coenzyme-substrate derivatives to inhibit intracellular ornithine decarboxylase and cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fang; Gehring, Heinz

    2009-02-01

    Creating transition-state mimics has proven to be a powerful strategy in developing inhibitors to treat malignant diseases in several cases. In the present study, structurally diverse coenzyme-substrate derivatives mimicking this type for pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-dependent human ornithine decarboxylase (hODC), a potential anticancer target, were designed, synthesized, and tested to elucidate the structural requirements for optimal inhibition of intracellular ODC as well as of tumor cell proliferation. Of 23 conjugates, phosphopyridoxyl- and pyridoxyl-L-tryptophan methyl ester (pPTME, PTME) proved significantly more potent in suppression proliferation (IC(50) up to 25 microM) of glioma cells (LN229) than alpha-DL-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO), a medically used irreversible inhibitor of ODC. In agreement with molecular modeling predictions, the inhibitory action of pPTME and PTME toward intracellular ODC of LN229 cells exceeded that of the previous designed lead compound POB. The inhibitory active compounds feature hydrophobic side chain fragments and a kind of polyamine motif (-NH-(CH(X))(4)-NH-). In addition, they induce, as polyamine analogs often do, the activity of the polyamine catabolic enzymes polyamine oxidase and spermine/spermidine N(1)-acetyltransferase up to 250 and 780%, respectively. The dual-action mode of these compounds in LN229 cells affects the intracellular polyamine metabolism and might underlie the more favorable cell proliferation inhibition in comparison with DFMO.

  5. Renal ornithine decarboxylase activity, polyamines, and compensatory renal hypertrophy in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Humphreys, M.H.; Etheredge, S.B.; Lin, Shanyan; Ribstein, J.; Marton, L.J. Univ. of California, San Francisco )

    1988-08-01

    The authors determined the role of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) in compensatory renal hypertrophy (CRH) by relating renal ODC activity and polyamine content to kidney size, expressed as a percent of body weight, 1 wk after unilateral nephrectomy (UN). In normal rats, renal ODC activity increased after UN; 1 wk later the remaining kidney weight had increased. Renal concentration of putrescine, the product of ODC's decarboxylation of ornithine, was increased 3, 8, and 48 h after UN, but concentrations of polyamines synthesized later in the pathway, spermidine and spermine, were not appreciably affected. Pretreatment with difluoromethylornithine (DFMO), an irreversible inhibitor of ODC inhibited both base-line renal ODC activity and putrescine concentration as well as increases stimulated by UN, although concentrations of spermidine and spermine were not decreased. In hypophysectomized rats, both increased renal ODC activity and CRH occurred as well, indicating that these two consequences of UN do not require intact pituitary function. Thus stimulation of renal ODC activity and putrescine content do not appear critical to the process of CRH after UN.

  6. Molecular engineering of L-aspartate-α-decarboxylase for improved activity and catalytic stability.

    PubMed

    Pei, Wanli; Zhang, Junli; Deng, Siying; Tigu, Fitsum; Li, Yongxian; Li, Qi; Cai, Zhen; Li, Yin

    2017-08-01

    β-Alanine is an important precursor for the production of food additives, pharmaceuticals, and nitrogen-containing chemicals. Compared with the conventional chemical routes for β-alanine production, the biocatalytic routes using L-aspartate-α-decarboxylase (ADC) are more attractive when energy and environment are concerned. However, ADC's poorly understood properties and its inherent mechanism-based inactivation significantly limited the application of this enzyme. In this study, three genes encoding the ADC enzymes from Escherichia coli, Corynebacterium glutamicum, and Bacillus subtilis were overexpressed in E. coli. Their properties including specific activity, thermostability, and mechanism-based inactivation were characterized. The ADC enzyme from B. subtilis, which had higher specific activity and thermostability than the others, was selected for further study. In order to improve its activity and relieve its mechanism-based inactivation by molecular engineering so as to improve its catalytic stability, a high-throughput fluorometric assay of β-alanine was developed. From a library of 4000 mutated enzymes, two variants with 18-22% higher specific activity and 29-64% higher catalytic stability were obtained. The best variant showed 50% higher β-alanine production than the wild type after 8 h of conversion of L-aspartate, showing great potential for industrial biocatalytic production of β-alanine.

  7. Induction of an oxalate decarboxylase in the filamentous fungus Trametes versicolor by addition of inorganic acids.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Cui Xia; Hong, Feng

    2010-01-01

    In order to improve yields and to reduce the cost of oxalate decarboxylase (OxDC, EC 4.1.1.2), the induction of OxDC in the white-rot fungus Trametes versicolor was studied in this work. OxDC was induced by addition of inorganic acids including hydrochloric acid, sulfuric acid, and phosphoric acid to culture media. The results showed that all the acids could enhance OxDC expression. The activity of the acid-induced OxDC rose continuously. All of the OxDC volumetric activities induced by the inorganic acids were higher than 20.0 U/L and were two times higher than that obtained with oxalic acid. OxDC productivity was around 4.0 U*L(-1)*day(-1). The highest specific activity against total protein was 3.2 U/mg protein at day 8 after induction of sulfuric acid, and the specific activity against mycelial dry weight was 10.6 U/g at day 9 after induction of hydrochloric acid. The growth of mycelia was inhibited slightly when the pH values in culture media was around 2.5-3.0, while the growth was inhibited heavily when the pH was lower than 2.5.

  8. A high-throughput colorimetric assay to measure the activity of glutamate decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Yu, Kai; Hu, Sheng; Huang, Jun; Mei, Le-He

    2011-08-10

    A pH-sensitive colorimetric assay has been established to quantitatively measure glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) activity in bacterial cell extracts using a microplate format. GAD catalyzes the irreversible α-decarboxylation of L-glutamate to γ-aminobutyrate. The assay is based on the color change of bromocresol green due to an increase in pH as protons are consumed during the enzyme-catalyzed reaction. Bromocresol green was chosen as the indicator because it has a similar pK(a) to the acetate buffer used. The corresponding absorbance change at 620 nm was recorded with a microplate reader as the reaction proceeded. A difference in the enzyme preparation pH and optimal pH for GAD activity of 2.5 did not prevent this method from successfully allowing the determination of reaction kinetic parameters and the detection of improvements in enzymatic activity with a low coefficient of variance. Our assay is simple, rapid, requires minimal sample concentration and can be carried out in robotic high-throughput devices used as standard in directed evolution experiments. In addition, it is also applicable to other reactions that involve a change in pH.

  9. Quaternary Structure of the Oxaloacetate Decarboxylase Membrane Complex and Mechanistic Relationships to Pyruvate Carboxylases*

    PubMed Central

    Balsera, Monica; Buey, Ruben M.; Li, Xiao-Dan

    2011-01-01

    The oxaloacetate decarboxylase primary Na+ pump (OAD) is an essential membrane protein complex that functions in the citrate fermentation pathway of some pathogenic bacteria under anaerobic conditions. OAD contains three different subunits: Oad-α, a biotinylated extrinsic protein that catalyzes the α-ketodecarboxylation of oxaloacetate; Oad-γ, a structural bitopic membrane protein whose cytosolic tail (named as Oad-γ′) binds tightly to Oad-α; and Oad-β, a multispan transmembrane α-helical protein that constitutes the Na+ channel. How OAD is organized structurally at the membrane and what the molecular determinants are that lead to an efficient energy coupling mechanism remain elusive. In the present work, we elucidate the stoichiometry of the native complex as well as the low resolution structure of the peripheral components of OAD (Oad-α and Oad-γ′) by small angle x-ray scattering. Our results point to a quaternary assembly similar to the pyruvate carboxylase complex organization. Herein, we propose a model in which the association in pairs of Oad-α dimers, mediated by Oad-γ, results in the acquisition of a functional oligomeric state at the bacterial membrane. New structural insights for the conformational rearrangements associated with the carboxylbiotin transfer reaction within OAD are provided. PMID:21209096

  10. Structural analysis of Bacillus pumilus phenolic acid decarboxylase, a lipocalin-fold enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Matte, Allan; Grosse, Stephan; Bergeron, Hélène; Abokitse, Kofi; Lau, Peter C.K.

    2012-04-30

    The decarboxylation of phenolic acids, including ferulic and p-coumaric acids, to their corresponding vinyl derivatives is of importance in the flavoring and polymer industries. Here, the crystal structure of phenolic acid decarboxylase (PAD) from Bacillus pumilus strain UI-670 is reported. The enzyme is a 161-residue polypeptide that forms dimers both in the crystal and in solution. The structure of PAD as determined by X-ray crystallography revealed a -barrel structure and two -helices, with a cleft formed at one edge of the barrel. The PAD structure resembles those of the lipocalin-fold proteins, which often bind hydrophobic ligands. Superposition of structurally related proteins bound to their cognate ligands shows that they and PAD bind their ligands in a conserved location within the -barrel. Analysis of the residue-conservation pattern for PAD-related sequences mapped onto the PAD structure reveals that the conservation mainly includes residues found within the hydrophobic core of the protein, defining a common lipocalin-like fold for this enzyme family. A narrow cleft containing several conserved amino acids was observed as a structural feature and a potential ligand-binding site.

  11. Immobilization and characterization of benzoylformate decarboxylase from Pseudomonas putida on spherical silica carrier.

    PubMed

    Peper, Stephanie; Kara, Selin; Long, Wei Sing; Liese, Andreas; Niemeyer, Bernd

    2011-08-01

    If an adequate biocatalyst is identified for a specific reaction, immobilization is one possibility to further improve its properties. The immobilization allows easy recycling, improves the enzyme performance, and it often enhances the stability of the enzyme. In this work, the immobilization of the benzoylformate decarboxylase (BFD) variant, BFD A460I-F464I, from Pseudomonas putida was accomplished on spherical silica. Silicagel is characterized by its high mechanical stability, which allows its application in different reactor types without restrictions. The covalently bound enzyme was characterized in terms of its activity, stability, and kinetics for the formation of chiral 2-hydroxypropiophenone (2-HPP) from benzaldehyde and acetaldehyde. Moreover, temperature as well as pressure dependency of immobilized BFD A460I-F464I activity and enantioselectivity were analyzed. The used wide-pore silicagel shows a good accessibility of the immobilized enzyme. The activity of the immobilized BFD A460I-F464I variant was determined to be 70% related to the activity of the free enzyme. Thereby, the enantioselectivity of the enzyme was not influenced by the immobilization. In addition, a pressure-induced change in stereoselectivity was found both for the free and for the immobilized enzyme. With increasing pressure, the enantiomeric excess (ee) of (R)-2-HPP can be increased from 44% (0.1 MPa) to 76% (200 MPa) for the free enzyme and from 43% (0.1 MPa) to 66% (200 MPa) for the immobilized enzyme.

  12. The importance of SERINE DECARBOXYLASE1 (SDC1) and ethanolamine biosynthesis during embryogenesis of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Yunus, Ian Sofian; Liu, Yu-Chi; Nakamura, Yuki

    2016-11-01

    In plants, ethanolamine is considered a precursor for the synthesis of choline, which is an essential dietary nutrient for animals. An enzyme serine decarboxylase (SDC) has been identified and characterized in Arabidopsis, which directly converts serine to ethanolamine, a precursor to phosphorylethanolamine and its subsequent metabolites in plants. However, the importance of SDC and ethanolamine production in plant growth and development remains unclear. Here, we show that SDC is required for ethanolamine biosynthesis in vivo and essential in plant embryogenesis in Arabidopsis. The knockout of SDC1 caused an embryonic lethal defect due to the developmental arrest of the embryos at the heart stage. During embryo development, the expression was observed at the later stages, at which developmental defect occurred in the knockout mutant. Overexpression of SDC1 in planta increased levels of ethanolamine, phosphatidylethanolamine, and phosphatidylcholine both in leaves and siliques. These results suggest that SDC1 plays an essential role in ethanolamine biosynthesis during the embryogenesis in Arabidopsis. © 2016 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Partial Purification and Characterization of Arginine Decarboxylase from Avocado Fruit, A Thermostable Enzyme 1

    PubMed Central

    Winer, Leo; Vinkler, Chana; Apelbaum, Akiva

    1984-01-01

    A partially purified preparation of arginine decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.19), a key enzyme in polyamine metabolism in plants, was isolated from avocado (Persea americana Mill. cv Fuerte) fruit. The preparation obtained from the crude extract after ammonium sulfate precipitation, dialysis, and heat treatment, had maximal activity between pH 8.0 and 9.0 at 60°C, in the presence of 1.2 millimolar MnCl2, 2 millimolar dithiothreitol, and 0.06 millimolar pyridoxal phosphate. The Km, of arginine for the decarboxylation reaction was determined for enzymes prepared from the seed coat of both 4-week-old avocado fruitlet and fully developed fruit, and was found to have a value of 1.85 and 2.84 millimolar, respectively. The value of Vappmax of these enzymes was 1613 and 68 nanomoles of CO2 produced per milligram of protein per hour for the fruitlet and the fully developed fruit, respectively. Spermine, an end product of polyamine metabolism, caused less than 5% inhibition of the enzyme from fully developed fruit and 65% inhibition of the enzyme from the seed coat of 4-week-old fruitlets at 1 millimolar under similar conditions. The effect of different inhibitors on the enzyme and the change in the nature of the enzyme during fruit development are discussed. PMID:16663805

  14. Differential induction of pyruvate decarboxylase subunits and transcripts in anoxic rice seedlings.

    PubMed Central

    Rivoal, J; Thind, S; Pradet, A; Ricard, B

    1997-01-01

    In 2-d-old rice (Oryza sativa L.) seedlings subjected to anoxic stress, pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC) activity increased 9-fold during a 168-h period. A polyclonal PDC antiserum that recognized alpha- and beta-subunits was used to quantify PDC protein by an enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay and showed a 5.6-fold increase, suggesting that the anoxically induced enzyme has a higher specific activity than the PDC isoform present under normoxia. Immunoblot analysis showed that levels of both PDC subunits were induced by anoxia. Immunoprecipitation of proteins labeled in vivo during anoxic treatment demonstrated that the alpha-subunit was preferentially synthesized at the onset of anoxia. Two partial cDNAs, including a novel sequence, were cloned from a cDNA library made from seedlings subjected to anoxia for 6 h. Gene-specific probes used to quantify northern blots showed that two or three PDC mRNAs are differentially induced by anoxia in rice seedlings. Immunoprecipitation of in vitro translation products of mRNAs isolated a different times of anoxic treatment confirmed this findings Our results suggest that anoxic induction of rice PDC involves transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression as well as differences in enzyme characteristics. PMID:9232881

  15. The Bifunctional Pyruvate Decarboxylase/Pyruvate Ferredoxin Oxidoreductase from Thermococcus guaymasensis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus guaymasensis produces ethanol as a metabolic end product, and an alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) catalyzing the reduction of acetaldehyde to ethanol has been purified and characterized. However, the enzyme catalyzing the formation of acetaldehyde has not been identified. In this study an enzyme catalyzing the production of acetaldehyde from pyruvate was purified and characterized from T. guaymasensis under strictly anaerobic conditions. The enzyme had both pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC) and pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase (POR) activities. It was oxygen sensitive, and the optimal temperatures were 85°C and >95°C for the PDC and POR activities, respectively. The purified enzyme had activities of 3.8 ± 0.22 U mg−1 and 20.2 ± 1.8 U mg−1, with optimal pH-values of 9.5 and 8.4 for each activity, respectively. Coenzyme A was essential for both activities, although it did not serve as a substrate for the former. Enzyme kinetic parameters were determined separately for each activity. The purified enzyme was a heterotetramer. The sequences of the genes encoding the subunits of the bifunctional PDC/POR were determined. It is predicted that all hyperthermophilic β-keto acids ferredoxin oxidoreductases are bifunctional, catalyzing the activities of nonoxidative and oxidative decarboxylation of the corresponding β-keto acids. PMID:24982594

  16. A heterozygous deletion in the glutamate decarboxylase 67 gene enhances maternal and fetal stress vulnerability.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Taku; Oki, Yutaka; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Fukuda, Atsuo

    2011-04-01

    Both down-regulation of glutamate decarboxylase 67 (GAD67) and maternal exposure to severe stress during pregnancy can increase the risk of schizophrenia and related psychotic disorders in the offspring. To investigate a gene-environment interaction, we performed the restraint-and-light stress to pregnant GAD67-GFP knock-in (GAD67(+/GFP)) and wild-type (GAD67(+/+)) mice three times a day for 45 min per session during gestational day (G) 15.0-17.5. The stress hormone (corticosterone) level of pregnant GAD67(+/GFP) mice (the overall GABA content is reduced because of the destruction of one allele of the endogenous GAD67 gene) was higher than that of GAD67(+/+), even without stress. The fetal body weights (GAD67(+/+)) in the GAD67(+/GFP) mothers were lower than those in the GAD67(+/+) mothers. GAD67(+/GFP) fetuses exhibited higher corticosterone (CORT) levels than GAD67(+/+) fetuses, even in non-stressed GAD67(+/+) mothers. Fetal body weight-decreases and CORT-increases by maternal stress (GAD67(+/+) mother) were significantly more in the GAD67(+/GFP) fetuses than the GAD67(+/+) fetuses. These results indicate that a GAD67 heterozygous deletion itself enhances vulnerability by many aspects, e.g., maternal stress, maternity, and being in utero. Thus, an abnormality in GAD67 could interact with environmental risk factors of psychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia.

  17. Identification and characterization of barley mutants lacking glycine decarboxylase and carboxyl esterase activities

    SciTech Connect

    Blackwell, R.; Lewis, K.; Lea, P. )

    1990-05-01

    A barley mutant has been isolated, from a selection of fifty air-sensitive seed-lines, using a standard gel stain technique which lacks carboxyl esterase activity, but has normal levels of carbonic anhydrase. In addition, two barley mutants lacking the ability to convert glycine to serine in the mitochondria, have been characterized. Both plants accumulate glycine in air and are unable to metabolize ({sup 14}C)glycine in the short-term. When ({sup 14}C)glycine was supplied over 2h LaPr 85/55 metabolized 90%, whereas the second mutant (LaPr 87/30) metabolized 10%. Results indicate that the mutation in LaPr 85/55 is almost certainly in the glycine transporter into the mitochondrion. The mutation in LaPr 87/30 has been shown, using western blotting, to be in both the P and H proteins, two of four proteins which comprise glycine decarboxylase (P, H, T and L).

  18. Pathogenic Roles of Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase 65 Autoantibodies in Cerebellar Ataxias

    PubMed Central

    Hampe, Christiane S.

    2017-01-01

    Reports suggesting a pathogenic role of autoantibodies directed against glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GAD65Abs) in cerebellar ataxias (CAs) are reviewed, and debatable issues such as internalization of antibodies by neurons and roles of epitopes are discussed. GAD65 is one of two enzymes that catalyze the conversion of glutamate to the inhibitory neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). A pathogenic role of GAD65Ab in CAs is suggested by in vivo and in vitro studies. (1) Intracerebellar administration of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) immunoglobulins (IgGs) obtained from GAD65Ab-positive CA patients impairs cerebellar modulation of motor control in rats. (2) CSF IgGs act on terminals of GABAergic neurons and decrease the release of GABA in cerebellar slices from rats and mice. (3) Absorption of GAD65Ab by recombinant GAD65 diminishes the above effects, and monoclonal human GAD65Ab (b78) mimic the effects of CSF IgGs in vivo and in vitro. Studies using GAD65-KO mice confirm that the target molecule is GAD65. (4) Notably, the effects of GAD65Ab depend on the epitope specificity of the monoclonal GAD65Ab. Taken together, these results indicate that epitope-specific GAD65Ab-induced impairment of GABA release is involved in the pathogenesis of GAD65Ab-positive CA and support the early detection of GAD65Ab-associated CA to initiate immunotherapy before irreversible neuronal death in the cerebellum. PMID:28386570

  19. Cloning and sequence analysis of ornithine decarboxylase gene fragments from the Ascomycota.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Bremont, Juan Francisco; Rodríguez-Kessler, Margarita; Rodríguez-Guerra, Raul; Cortes-Penagos, Carlos; Torres-Guzman, Juan Carlos; Williamson, June Simpson

    2006-06-01

    Ornithine decarboxylase (ODC; EC 4.1.1.17) catalyzes the initial step in the biosynthesis of polyamines, the conversion of ornithine to putrescine. Based on the most conserved regions of fungal ODCs, we designed and synthesized oligonucleotides to amplify homologous fragments of three important plant pathogenic Pyrenomycete fungi (Ascomycota), Magnaporthe grisea, Colletotrichum lindemuthianum and Fusarium solani, and one insect pathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae. Cloning and sequencing of the amplified fragments revealed homologies of between 37 to 88% with other fungal ODCs. The predicted peptide sequences were compared by Clustal analysis and conserved sequences corresponding to the substrate and cofactor binding sites were identified. Comparative analyses of the ODC fragments isolated in this study, revealed high homology between them (68.3-81.1%) and also with other Pyrenomycetes such as Neurospora crassa (order Sordariales; 68.6-72.9%) and Fusarium graminearum (order Hypocreales; 70.8-88.1%). Data obtained in this work revealed that these fungi constitute a compact group separated from other eukaryotic ODCs.

  20. Crystal Structure and Pyridoxal 5-Phosphate Binding Property of Lysine Decarboxylase from Selenomonas ruminantium

    PubMed Central

    Sagong, Hye-Young; Son, Hyeoncheol Francis; Kim, Sunghwan; Kim, Yong-Hwan; Kim, Il-Kwon; Kim, Kyung-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Lysine decarboxylase (LDC) is a crucial enzyme for acid stress resistance and is also utilized for the biosynthesis of cadaverine, a promising building block for bio-based polyamides. We determined the crystal structure of LDC from Selenomonas ruminantium (SrLDC). SrLDC functions as a dimer and each monomer consists of two distinct domains; a PLP-binding barrel domain and a sheet domain. We also determined the structure of SrLDC in complex with PLP and cadaverine and elucidated the binding mode of cofactor and substrate. Interestingly, compared with the apo-form of SrLDC, the SrLDC in complex with PLP and cadaverine showed a remarkable structural change at the PLP binding site. The PLP binding site of SrLDC contains the highly flexible loops with high b-factors and showed an open-closed conformational change upon the binding of PLP. In fact, SrLDC showed no LDC activity without PLP supplement, and we suggest that highly flexible PLP binding site results in low PLP affinity of SrLDC. In addition, other structurally homologous enzymes also contain the flexible PLP binding site, which indicates that high flexibility at the PLP binding site and low PLP affinity seems to be a common feature of these enzyme family. PMID:27861532

  1. Overexpression of Actinidia deliciosa pyruvate decarboxylase 1 gene enhances waterlogging stress in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ji-Yu; Huang, Sheng-Nan; Wang, Gang; Xuan, Ji-Ping; Guo, Zhong-Ren

    2016-09-01

    Ethanolic fermentation is classically associated with waterlogging tolerance when plant cells switch from respiration to anaerobic fermentation. Pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC), which catalyzes the first step in this pathway, is thought to be the main regulatory enzyme. Here, we cloned a full-length PDC cDNA sequence from kiwifruit, named AdPDC1. We determined the expression of the AdPDC1 gene in kiwifruit under different environmental stresses using qRT-PCR, and the results showed that the increase of AdPDC1 expression during waterlogging stress was much higher than that during salt, cold, heat and drought stresses. Overexpression of kiwifruit AdPDC1 in transgenic Arabidopsis enhanced the resistance to waterlogging stress but could not enhance resistance to cold stress at five weeks old seedlings. Overexpression of kiwifruit AdPDC1 in transgenic Arabidopsis could not enhance resistance to NaCl and mannitol stresses at the stage of seed germination and in early seedlings. These results suggested that the kiwifruit AdPDC1 gene is required during waterlogging but might not be required during other environmental stresses. Expression of the AdPDC1 gene was down-regulated by abscisic acid (ABA) in kiwifruit, and overexpression of the AdPDC1 gene in Arabidopsis inhibited seed germination and root length under ABA treatment, indicating that ABA might negatively regulate the AdPDC1 gene under waterlogging stress.

  2. Characterization of the p-coumaric acid decarboxylase from Lactobacillus plantarum CECT 748(T).

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Héctor; Landete, José María; Curiel, José Antonio; de Las Rivas, Blanca; Mancheño, José Miguel; Muñoz, Rosario

    2008-05-14

    It was previously reported that cell cultures from Lactobacillus plantarum CECT 748 (T) were able to decarboxylate phenolic acids, such as p-coumaric, m-coumaric, caffeic, ferulic, gallic, and protocatechuic acid. The p-coumaric acid decarboxylase (PDC) from this strain has been overexpressed and purified. This PDC differs at its C-terminal end when compared to the previously reported PDC from L. plantarum LPCHL2. Because the C-terminal region of PDC is involved in enzymatic activity, especially in substrate activity, it was decided to biochemically characterize the PDC from L. plantarum CECT 748 (T). Contrarily to L. plantarum LPCHL2 PDC, the recombinant PDC from L. plantarum CECT 748 (T) is a heat-labile enzyme, showing optimal activity at 22 degrees C. This PDC is able to decarboxylate exclusively the hydroxycinnamic acids p-coumaric, caffeic, and ferulic acids. Kinetic analysis showed that the enzyme has a 14-fold higher K(M) value for p-coumaric and caffeic acids than for ferulic acid. PDC catalyzes the formation of the corresponding 4-vinyl derivatives (vinylphenol and vinylguaiacol) from p-coumaric and ferulic acids, respectively, which are valuable food additives that have been approved as flavoring agents. The biochemical characteristics showed by L. plantarum PDC should be taken into account for its potential use in the food-processing industry.

  3. Functional Characterization of a Novel Member of the Amidohydrolase 2 Protein Family, 2-Hydroxy-1-Naphthoic Acid Nonoxidative Decarboxylase from Burkholderia sp. Strain BC1

    PubMed Central

    Pal Chowdhury, Piyali; Basu, Soumik; Dutta, Arindam

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The gene encoding a nonoxidative decarboxylase capable of catalyzing the transformation of 2-hydroxy-1-naphthoic acid (2H1NA) to 2-naphthol was identified, recombinantly expressed, and purified to homogeneity. The putative gene sequence of the decarboxylase (hndA) encodes a 316-amino-acid protein (HndA) with a predicted molecular mass of 34 kDa. HndA exhibited high identity with uncharacterized amidohydrolase 2 proteins of various Burkholderia species, whereas it showed a modest 27% identity with γ-resorcylate decarboxylase, a well-characterized nonoxidative decarboxylase belonging to the amidohydrolase superfamily. Biochemically characterized HndA demonstrated strict substrate specificity toward 2H1NA, whereas inhibition studies with HndA indicated the presence of zinc as the transition metal center, as confirmed by atomic absorption spectroscopy. A three-dimensional structural model of HndA, followed by docking analysis, identified the conserved metal-coordinating and substrate-binding residues, while their importance in catalysis was validated by site-directed mutagenesis. IMPORTANCE Microbial nonoxidative decarboxylases play a crucial role in the metabolism of a large array of carboxy aromatic chemicals released into the environment from a variety of natural and anthropogenic sources. Among these, hydroxynaphthoic acids are usually encountered as pathway intermediates in the bacterial degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The present study reveals biochemical and molecular characterization of a 2-hydroxy-1-naphthoic acid nonoxidative decarboxylase involved in an alternative metabolic pathway which can be classified as a member of the small repertoire of nonoxidative decarboxylases belonging to the amidohydrolase 2 family of proteins. The strict substrate specificity and sequence uniqueness make it a novel member of the metallo-dependent hydrolase superfamily. PMID:27068590

  4. Treatment of idiopathic parkinsonism with L-dopa in the absence and presence of decarboxylase inhibitors: effects on plasma levels of L-dopa, dopa decarboxylase, catecholamines and 3-O-methyl-dopa.

    PubMed

    Boomsma, F; Meerwaldt, J D; Man in't Veld, A J; Hovestadt, A; Schalekamp, M A

    1989-05-01

    The effect of levodopa (L-dopa), alone or in combination with a peripheral decarboxylase inhibitor (PDI), on plasma levels of aromatic-L-amino acid decarboxylase (ALAAD, = dopa decarboxylase), L-dopa, 3-O-methyl-dopa (3-OMD), dopamine (DA), noradrenaline, adrenaline and dopamine beta-hydroxylase has been studied. In healthy subjects and in patients with parkinsonism plasma ALAAD level fell after administration of L-dopa + benserazide, but returned to previous levels within 90 min. In a cross-sectional study blood was obtained, 2 h after dosing, from 104 patients with idiopathic parkinsonism, divided into four groups: no L-dopa treatment (group 1), L-dopa alone (group 2), L-dopa + benserazide (Madopar) (group 3) and L-dopa + carbidopa (Sinemet) (group 4). Plasma ALAAD, which was normal in groups 1 and 2, was increased 3-fold in groups 3 and 4, indicating that there was induction of ALAAD by the co-administration of PDI. Despite this induction of ALAAD, in groups 3 and 4, with half the daily L-dopa dose compared with group 2, plasma L-dopa and 3-OMD levels were 5 times higher, while plasma DA levels were not different. The DA/L-dopa ratio was decreased 5-fold in group 2 and 16-fold in groups 3 and 4 as compared with group 1. Neither 3-OMD levels nor 3-OMD/L-dopa ratios correlated with the occurrence of on-off fluctuations. In a longitudinal study of three patients started on Madopar treatment the induction of plasma ALAAD was found to occur gradually over 3-4 weeks. Further detailed pharmacokinetic studies in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid are required in order to elucidate whether the ALAAD induction by PDI may be related to the loss of clinical efficacy of combination therapy in some patients and how it is related to end-of-dose deterioration and on-off phenomena.

  5. Isolation and characterization of a benzoylformate decarboxylase and a NAD+/NADP+-dependent benzaldehyde dehydrogenase involved in D-phenylglycine metabolism in Pseudomonas stutzeri ST-201.

    PubMed

    Saehuan, Choedchai; Rojanarata, Theerasak; Wiyakrutta, Suthep; McLeish, Michael J; Meevootisom, Vithaya

    2007-11-01

    Following induction with D-phenylglycine both d-phenylglycine aminotransferase activity and benzoylformate decarboxylase activity were observed in cultures of Pseudomonas stutzeri ST-201. Induction with benzoylformate, on the other hand, induced only benzoylformate decarboxylase activity. Purification of the benzoylformate decarboxylase, followed by N-terminal sequencing, enabled the design of probes for hybridization with P. stutzeri ST-201 genomic DNA libraries. Sequencing of two overlapping genomic DNA restriction fragments revealed two open reading frames which were denoted dpgB and dpgC. Sequence alignments suggested that the genes encoded a thiamin-diphosphate-dependent decarboxylase and an aldehyde dehydrogenase, respectively. Both genes were isolated and expressed in Escherichia coli. The dpgB gene product was confirmed as a benzoylformate decarboxylase while the dpgC gene product was characterized as a NAD+/NADP+-dependent benzaldehyde dehydrogenase. In keeping with their high sequence identities (both greater than 85%) the kinetic properties of the two enzymes were similar to those of the homologous enzymes in the mandelate pathway of Pseudomonas putida ATCC 12633. However, Pseudomonas stutzeri ST-201 was unable to grow on either isomer of mandelate, and sequencing indicated that the dpgB gene did not form part of an operon. Thus it appears that the two enzymes form part of a d-phenylglycine, rather than mandelate, degrading pathway.

  6. Hepatoerythropoietic porphyria due to a novel mutation in the uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase gene

    PubMed Central

    To-Figueras, J.; Phillips, J.; Gonzalez-López, J.M.; Badenas, C.; Madrigal, I.; González-Romarís, E.M.; Ramos, C.; Aguirre, J.M.; Herrero, C.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background Hepatoerythropoietic porphyria (HEP) is a rare form of porphyria that results from a deficiency of uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase (UROD). The disease is caused by homoallelism or heteroallelism for mutations in the UROD gene. Objective To study a 19 year-old woman from Equatorial Guinea, one of the few cases of HEP of African descent and to characterize a new mutation causing HEP. Methods Excretion of porphyrins and residual UROD activity in erythrocytes were measured and compared to other HEP patients. UROD gene of the proband was sequenced and a new mutation identified. The recombinant UROD protein was purified and assayed for enzymatic activity. The aminoacid change mapped to the UROD protein and the functional consequences were predicted. Results The patient presented a novel G170D missense mutation in homozygosity. Porphyrin excretion showed an atypical pattern in stool with a high pentaporphyrin III to isocoproporphyrin ratio. Erythrocyte UROD activity was 42 % of normal and higher than the activity found in HEP patients with a G281E mutation. The recombinant UROD protein showed a relative activity of 17 % and 60 % of wild-type towards uroporphyrinogen I and III respectively. Molecular modelling showed that glycine 170 is located on the dimer interface of UROD, in a loop containing residues 167-172 that are critical for optimal enzymatic activity and that carboxyl side chain from aspartic acid is predicted to cause negative interactions between the protein and the substrate. Conclusions The results emphasize the complex relationship between the genetic defects and the biochemical phenotype in homozygous porphyria. PMID:21668429

  7. Refractory status epilepticus and glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies in adults: presentation, treatment and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Khawaja, Ayaz M; Vines, Brannon L; Miller, David W; Szaflarski, Jerzy P; Amara, Amy W

    2016-03-01

    Glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies (GAD-Abs) have been implicated in refractory epilepsy. The association with refractory status epilepticus in adults has been rarely described. We discuss our experience in managing three adult patients who presented with refractory status epilepticus associated with GAD-Abs. Case series with retrospective chart and literature review. Three patients without pre-existing epilepsy who presented to our institution with generalized seizures between 2013 and 2014 were identified. Seizures proved refractory to first and second-line therapies and persisted beyond 24 hours. Patient 1 was a 22-year-old female who had elevated serum GAD-Ab titres at 0.49 mmol/l (normal: <0.02) and was treated with multiple immuno- and chemotherapies, with eventual partial seizure control. Patient 2 was a 61-year-old black female whose serum GAD-Ab titre was 0.08 mmol/l. EEG showed persistent generalized periodic discharges despite maximized therapy with anticonvulsants but no immunotherapy, resulting in withdrawal of care and discharge to nursing home. Patient 3 was a 50-year-old black female whose serum GAD-Ab titre was 0.08 mmol/l, and was discovered to have pulmonary sarcoidosis. Treatment with steroids and intravenous immunoglobulin resulted in seizure resolution. Due to the responsiveness to immunotherapy, there may be an association between GAD-Abs and refractory seizures, including refractory status epilepticus. Causation cannot be established since GAD-Abs may be elevated secondary to concurrent autoimmune diseases or formed de novo in response to GAD antigen exposure by neuronal injury. Based on this report and available literature, there may be a role for immuno- and chemotherapy in the management of refractory status epilepticus associated with GAD-Abs.

  8. Aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase-immunoreactive structures in human midbrain, pons, and medulla.

    PubMed

    Kitahama, Kunio; Ikemoto, Keiko; Jouvet, Anne; Araneda, Silvia; Nagatsu, Ikuko; Raynaud, Brigitte; Nishimura, Akiyoshi; Nishi, Katsuji; Niwa, Shin-Ichi

    2009-10-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine with precision the localization of neurons and fibers immunoreactive (ir) for aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC), the second-step enzyme responsible for conversion of L-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) to dopamine (DA) and 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP) to serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine: 5-HT) in the midbrain, pons, and medulla oblongata of the adult human brain. Intense AADC immunoreactivity was observed in a large number of presumptive 5-HT neuronal cell bodies distributed in all of the raphe nuclei, as well as in regions outside the raphe nuclei such as the ventral portions of the pons and medulla. Moderate to strong immunoreaction was observable in presumptive DA cells in the mesencephalic reticular formation, substantia nigra, and ventral tegmental area of Tsai, as well as in presumptive noradrenergic (NA) cells, which were aggregated in the locus coeruleus and dispersed in the subcoeruleus nuclei. In the medulla oblongata, immunoreaction of moderate intensity was distributed in the mid and ventrolateral portions of the intermediate reticular nucleus, which constitutes the oblique plate of A1/C1 presumptive adrenergic and/or NA neurons. The dorsal vagal AADC-ir neurons were fewer in number and stained more weakly than cells immunoreactive for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH). AADC immunoreactivity was not identified in an aggregate of TH-ir neurons lying in the gelatinous subnucleus of the solitary nucleus, a restricted region just rostroventral to the area postrema. Nonaminergic AADC-positive neurons (D neurons), which are abundant in the rat and cat midbrain, pons, and medulla, were hardly detectable in homologous regions in the human brain, although they were clearly distinguishable in the forebrain.

  9. Structural Basis for Nucleotide Binding and Reaction Catalysis in Mevalonate Diphosphate Decarboxylase

    SciTech Connect

    Barta, Michael L.; McWhorter, William J.; Miziorko, Henry M.; Geisbrecht, Brian V.

    2012-09-17

    Mevalonate diphosphate decarboxylase (MDD) catalyzes the final step of the mevalonate pathway, the Mg{sup 2+}-ATP dependent decarboxylation of mevalonate 5-diphosphate (MVAPP), producing isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP). Synthesis of IPP, an isoprenoid precursor molecule that is a critical intermediate in peptidoglycan and polyisoprenoid biosynthesis, is essential in Gram-positive bacteria (e.g., Staphylococcus, Streptococcus, and Enterococcus spp.), and thus the enzymes of the mevalonate pathway are ideal antimicrobial targets. MDD belongs to the GHMP superfamily of metabolite kinases that have been extensively studied for the past 50 years, yet the crystallization of GHMP kinase ternary complexes has proven to be difficult. To further our understanding of the catalytic mechanism of GHMP kinases with the purpose of developing broad spectrum antimicrobial agents that target the substrate and nucleotide binding sites, we report the crystal structures of wild-type and mutant (S192A and D283A) ternary complexes of Staphylococcus epidermidis MDD. Comparison of apo, MVAPP-bound, and ternary complex wild-type MDD provides structural information about the mode of substrate binding and the catalytic mechanism. Structural characterization of ternary complexes of catalytically deficient MDD S192A and D283A (k{sub cat} decreased 10{sup 3}- and 10{sup 5}-fold, respectively) provides insight into MDD function. The carboxylate side chain of invariant Asp{sup 283} functions as a catalytic base and is essential for the proper orientation of the MVAPP C3-hydroxyl group within the active site funnel. Several MDD amino acids within the conserved phosphate binding loop ('P-loop') provide key interactions, stabilizing the nucleotide triphosphoryl moiety. The crystal structures presented here provide a useful foundation for structure-based drug design.

  10. Arginine Decarboxylase expression, polyamines biosynthesis and reactive oxygen species during organogenic nodule formation in hop.

    PubMed

    Fortes, Ana M; Costa, Joana; Santos, Filipa; Seguí-Simarro, José M; Palme, Klaus; Altabella, Teresa; Tiburcio, Antonio F; Pais, Maria S

    2011-02-01

    Hop (Humulus lupulus L.) is an economically important plant species used in beer production and as a health-promoting medicine. Hop internodes develop upon stress treatments organogenic nodules which can be used for genetic transformation and micropropagation. Polyamines are involved in plant development and stress responses. Arginine decarboxylase (ADC; EC 4·1.1·19) is a key enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of putrescine in plants. Here we show that ADC protein was increasingly expressed at early stages of hop internode culture (12h). Protein continued accumulating until organogenic nodule formation after 28 days, decreasing thereafter. The same profile was observed for ADC transcript suggesting transcriptional regulation of ADC gene expression during morphogenesis. The highest transcript and protein levels observed after 28 days of culture were accompanied by a peak in putrescine levels. Reactive oxygen species accumulate in nodular tissues probably due to stress inherent to in vitro conditions and enhanced polyamine catabolism. Conjugated polyamines increased during plantlet regeneration from nodules suggesting their involvement in plantlet formation and/or in the control of free polyamine levels. Immunogold labeling revealed that ADC is located in plastids, nucleus and cytoplasm of nodular cells. In vacuolated cells, ADC immunolabelling in plastids doubled the signal of proplastids in meristematic cells. Location of ADC in different subcellular compartments may indicate its role in metabolic pathways taking place in these compartments. Altogether these data suggest that polyamines play an important role in organogenic nodule formation and represent a progress towards understanding the role played by these growth regulators in plant morphogenesis.

  11. Bile acid increases expression of the histamine-producing enzyme, histidine decarboxylase, in gastric cells.

    PubMed

    Ku, Hye Jin; Kim, Hye Young; Kim, Hyeong Hoe; Park, Hee Ju; Cheong, Jae Hun

    2014-01-07

    To investigate the effect of bile acid on the expression of histidine decarboxylase (HDC), which is a major enzyme involved in histamine production, and gene expression of gastric transcription factors upon cooperative activation. HDC expression was examined by immunohistochemistry, reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, and promoter assay in human gastric precancerous tissues, normal stomach tissue, and gastric cancer cell lines. The relationship between gastric precancerous state and HDC expression induced by bile acid was determined. The association between the expression of HDC and various specific transcription factors in gastric cells was also evaluated. MKN45 and AGS human gastric carcinoma cell lines were transfected with farnesoid X receptor (FXR), small heterodimer partner (SHP), and caudal-type homeodomain transcription factor (CDX)1 expression plasmids. The effects of various transcription factors on HDC expression were monitored by luciferase-reporter promoter assay. Histamine production and secretion in the stomach play critical roles in gastric acid secretion and in the pathogenesis of gastric diseases. Here, we show that bile acid increased the expression of HDC, which is a rate-limiting enzyme of the histamine production pathway. FXR was found to be a primary regulatory transcription factor for bile acid-induced HDC expression. In addition, the transcription factors CDX1 and SHP synergistically enhanced bile acid-induced elevation of HDC gene expression. We confirmed similar expression patterns for HDC, CDX1, and SHP in patient tissues. HDC production in the stomach is associated with bile acid exposure and its related transcriptional regulation network of FXR, SHP, and CDX1.

  12. Decreased ornithine decarboxylase activity in the kidneys of Dahl salt-sensitive rats.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Takeshi; Tsujino, Takeshi; Iwata, Sachiyo; Nonaka, Hidemi; Emoto, Noriaki; Yano, Yoshihisa; Otani, Shuzo; Hayashi, Yoshitake; Itoh, Hiroshi; Yokoyama, Mitsuhiro

    2002-09-01

    To assess the roles of polyamines (putrescine, spermidine, and spermine) and ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), the rate-limiting enzyme of polyamine synthesis, in the development of salt-sensitive hypertension, we evaluated activity and expression of ODC, urinary polyamine excretion, and antizyme (endogenous ODC inhibitor protein) expression in Dahl salt-sensitive (SS) and salt-resistant (SR) rats after they were fed on a low (0.3%) or high (4%) salt diet for 4 weeks. We also examined the effects of spermidine and difluoromethylornithine (DFMO: a specific inhibitor of ODC) on the systolic blood pressure and ODC protein expression in SS rats fed a high salt diet. Renal ODC activity and urinary polyamine excretion in SS rats were lower than those in SR rats after 4 weeks treatment with a low or high salt diet. The renal ODC protein expression of SS rats was paradoxically increased as compared to the SR group. A high salt diet did not alter ODC activity but increased ODC protein only in SS rats. ODC mRNA and antizyme protein expressions were not significantly different among the four groups. Spermidine supplementation attenuated and DFMO exaggerated hypertension in SS rats fed a high salt diet. Spermidine down-regulated and DFMO up-regulated renal ODC protein in SS rats on a high salt diet. ODC activity was decreased but protein was paradoxically increased in kidneys of SS rats. ODC protein was suggested to increase in compensation for the inhibition of its activity. Impaired ODC activity and polyamine production in the kidney may exaggerate salt-sensitive hypertension in SS rats.

  13. Functional Roles of the Dimer-Interface Residues in Human Ornithine Decarboxylase

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chien-Yun; Liu, Yi-Liang; Lin, Chih-Li; Liu, Guang-Yaw; Hung, Hui-Chih

    2014-01-01

    Ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) catalyzes the decarboxylation of ornithine to putrescine and is the rate-limiting enzyme in the polyamine biosynthesis pathway. ODC is a dimeric enzyme, and the active sites of this enzyme reside at the dimer interface. Once the enzyme dissociates, the enzyme activity is lost. In this paper, we investigated the roles of amino acid residues at the dimer interface regarding the dimerization, protein stability and/or enzyme activity of ODC. A multiple sequence alignment of ODC and its homologous protein antizyme inhibitor revealed that 5 of 9 residues (residues 165, 277, 331, 332 and 389) are divergent, whereas 4 (134, 169, 294 and 322) are conserved. Analytical ultracentrifugation analysis suggested that some dimer-interface amino acid residues contribute to formation of the dimer of ODC and that this dimerization results from the cooperativity of these interface residues. The quaternary structure of the sextuple mutant Y331S/Y389D/R277S/D332E/V322D/D134A was changed to a monomer rather than a dimer, and the Kd value of the mutant was 52.8 µM, which is over 500-fold greater than that of the wild-type ODC (ODC_WT). In addition, most interface mutants showed low but detectable or negligible enzyme activity. Therefore, the protein stability of these interface mutants was measured by differential scanning calorimetry. These results indicate that these dimer-interface residues are important for dimer formation and, as a consequence, are critical for enzyme catalysis. PMID:25140796

  14. Mesomere-derived glutamate decarboxylase-expressing blastocoelar mesenchyme cells of sea urchin larvae

    PubMed Central

    Katow, Hideki; Katow, Tomoko; Abe, Kouki; Ooka, Shioh; Kiyomoto, Masato; Hamanaka, Gen

    2014-01-01

    Summary The ontogenetic origin of blastocoelar glutamate decarboxylase (GAD)-expressing cells (GADCs) in larvae of the sea urchin Hemicentrotus pulcherrimus was elucidated. Whole-mount in situ hybridisation (WISH) detected transcription of the gene that encodes GAD in H. pulcherrimus (Hp-gad) in unfertilised eggs and all blastomeres in morulae. However, at and after the swimming blastula stage, the transcript accumulation was particularly prominent in clumps of ectodermal cells throughout the embryonic surface. During the gastrula stage, the transcripts also accumulated in the endomesoderm and certain blastocoelar cells. Consistent with the increasing number of Hp-gad transcribing cells, immunoblot analysis indicated that the relative abundance of Hp-Gad increased considerably from the early gastrula stage until the prism stage. The expression pattern of GADCs determined by immunohistochemistry was identical to the pattern of Hp-gad transcript accumulation determined using WISH. In early gastrulae, GADCs formed blastocoelar cell aggregates around the blastopore with primary mesenchyme cells. The increase in the number of blastocoelar GADCs was inversely proportional to the number of ectodermal GADCs ranging from a few percent of total GADCs in early gastrulae to 80% in late prism larvae; this depended on ingression of ectodermal GADCs into the blastocoel. Some of the blastocoelar GADCs were fluorescein-positive in the larvae that developed from the 16-cell stage chimeric embryos; these comprised fluorescein-labeled mesomeres and unlabelled macromeres and micromeres. Our finding indicates that some of the blastocoelar GADCs are derived from the mesomeres and thus they are the new group of mesenchyme cells, the tertiary mesenchyme cells. PMID:24357228

  15. Hepatic porphyrin concentration and uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase activity in hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Brudieux, E; de Lédinghen, V; Moran, M J; Fontanellas, A; Oui, B; Trimoulet, P; Belleannée, G; Piton, A; Raymond, J M; Doutre, M S; Amouretti, M; de Verneuil, H; Couzigou, P

    2001-01-01

    Previous studies have shown a high prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in patients with porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT). The aim of this study was to assess hepatic porphyrin concentrations (HPC) and hepatic uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase (UROD) activity in HCV-infected patients free of PCT. Thirty-two HCV-infected patients (20 M, 12 F, mean age 51 years) and seven control patients (4 M, 3 F, mean age 59 years) free of liver disease, were studied. Knodell's score was determined on liver biopsy by two independent anatomopathologists. Measurement of HPC and hepatic UROD activity levels were carried out on liver biopsy. Relative to controls, HCV-infected patients had high HPC levels (mean +/- SD: 47 +/- 20 vs. 17 +/- 6 pmol/mg protein, P < 0.001) and low hepatic UROD activity levels (514 +/- 95 vs. 619 +/- 125 pmol Copro/h/mg protein, P < 0.05). HPC was not correlated with hepatic UROD activity and the increase was due to coproporphyrin accumulation. No correlation was observed between HPC or hepatic UROD activity values and HCV-RNA concentrations, Knodell's score, hepatic fibrosis, periportal necrosis, periportal inflammation or hepatic iron content in HCV-infected patients. Hepatocellular necrosis was significantly correlated with HPC value (P < 0.005). Hence, in HCV-infected patients, HPC is significantly increased and hepatic UROD activity is very slightly decreased as compared to controls. HPC values and UROD activity are not correlated with HCV-RNA concentrations, hepatic iron content and hepatic fibrosis. The small increase in HPC values in hepatitis C infection is linked with hepatic injury and not with a direct effect on hepatic UROD enzyme.

  16. Purification of calmodulin from rice bran and activation of glutamate decarboxylase by Ca2+/calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Liu, Min; Lv, Ying Guo; Zhang, Hui

    2010-03-15

    gamma-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) is an important bioactive regulator, and its biosynthesis is primarily through the alpha-decarboxylation of glutamate by glutamate decarboxylase (GAD). In plants, it was verified that the production of GABA is regulated, in part, via Ca(2+)/calmodulin (CaM). Our preliminary studies showed that rice bran GAD is probably also a Ca(2+)/CaM dependent enzyme; hence, in the current investigation, we purified calmodulin from rice bran, and studied the effect of the Ca(2+)/calmodulin complex on the activity of rice bran GAD in vitro. CaM was purified to homogeneity from the rice bran by a combined protocol involving TCA precipitation, heat treatment, and hydrophobic interaction chromatography, with the purification fold and recovery of 851.7 and 55.6%, respectively. This protein had similar amino acid composition as the CaMs from other higher plants. The rice bran GAD was found to be quite sensitive to the Ca(2+)/CaM complex at pH 7.0, and addition of exogenous EGTA or TFP efficiently inhibited the stimulatory effect of Ca(2+)/CaM complex. At a separate concentration of Ca(2+) and CaM of 200 micromol L(-1) and 150 nmol L(-1), the rice bran GAD was significantly enhanced 3-fold. Moreover, upon binding Ca(2+), CaM underwent a conformational change that facilitated a more obvious emergency of phenylalanine and tyrosine residues. This investigation provided preliminary information for the development of a GABA-based, cost-effective rice bran GAD-related functional food.

  17. Snapshot of a Reaction Intermediate: Analysis of Benzoylformate Decarboxylase in Complex with a Benzoylphosphonate Inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, Gabriel S.; Kneen, Malea M.; Chakraborty, Sumit; Baykal, Ahmet T.; Nemeria, Natalia; Yep, Alejandra; Ruby, David I.; Petsko, Gregory A.; Kenyon, George L.; McLeish, Michael J.; Jordan, Frank; Ringe, Dagmar

    2009-04-22

    Benzoylformate decarboxylase (BFDC) is a thiamin diphosphate- (ThDP-) dependent enzyme acting on aromatic substrates. In addition to its metabolic role in the mandelate pathway, BFDC shows broad substrate specificity coupled with tight stereo control in the carbon-carbon bond-forming reverse reaction, making it a useful biocatalyst for the production of chiral-hydroxy ketones. The reaction of methyl benzoylphosphonate (MBP), an analogue of the natural substrate benzoylformate, with BFDC results in the formation of a stable analogue (C2{alpha}-phosphonomandelyl-ThDP) of the covalent ThDP-substrate adduct C2{alpha}-mandelyl-ThDP. Formation of the stable adduct is confirmed both by formation of a circular dichroism band characteristic of the 1',4'-iminopyrimidine tautomeric form of ThDP (commonly observed when ThDP forms tetrahedral complexes with its substrates) and by high-resolution mass spectrometry of the reaction mixture. In addition, the structure of BFDC with the MBP inhibitor was solved by X-ray crystallography to a spatial resolution of 1.37 {angstrom} (PDB ID 3FSJ). The electron density clearly shows formation of a tetrahedral adduct between the C2 atom of ThDP and the carbonyl carbon atom of the MBP. This adduct resembles the intermediate from the penultimate step of the carboligation reaction between benzaldehyde and acetaldehyde. The combination of real-time kinetic information via stopped-flow circular dichroism with steady-state data from equilibrium circular dichroism measurements and X-ray crystallography reveals details of the first step of the reaction catalyzed by BFDC. The MBP-ThDP adduct on BFDC is compared to the recently solved structure of the same adduct on benzaldehyde lyase, another ThDP-dependent enzyme capable of catalyzing aldehyde condensation with high stereospecificity.

  18. Ornithine decarboxylase activity as a marker of androgen and antiandrogen action in the rat epididymis.

    PubMed

    de las Heras, M A; Suescun, M O; Calandra, R S

    1988-05-01

    After castration, there was a marked decrease in serum androgen concentration at 6 h, and a dramatic inhibition of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) at 12 h. Administration of testosterone propionate to castrated rats at a dose of 0.05 mg/animal restored ODC activity to the normal value. However, no change was observed when intact rats were treated with testosterone even at a 40-fold higher dose, indicating that endogenous androgens present in intact rats are far in excess for maintenance of maximal levels of activity. Administration of the antiandrogen flutamide to intact rats caused a moderate decrease in epididymal weight, whereas this effect was more pronounced in castrated, androgen-treated rats. In the latter, the effect of flutamide was significant at the lowest dose used (0.5 mg/day). ODC activity was significantly decreased by flutamide treatment of intact rats, but even at the highest dose used (10 mg/day) only a 39% inhibition was observed. In flutamide-treated rats, LH concentrations were markedly increased, as were serum and epididymal androgens. In androgen-treated castrated rats, flutamide caused epididymal ODC to fall to undetectable values. These results show that: (1) androgens are essential for the maintenance of ODC activity in the epididymis; (2) epididymal ODC activity is maximally stimulated by endogenous androgens, at least in the pubertal rat; (3) the apparent potency of flutamide is substantially lowered by an increase in epididymal androgens. We suggest that ODC is a sensitive marker of the action of androgens and antiandrogens in the epididymis.

  19. Substrate Distortion and the Catalytic Reaction Mechanism of 5-Carboxyvanillate Decarboxylase

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    5-Carboxyvanillate decarboxylase (LigW) catalyzes the conversion of 5-carboxyvanillate to vanillate in the biochemical pathway for the degradation of lignin. This enzyme was shown to require Mn2+ for catalytic activity and the kinetic constants for the decarboxylation of 5-carboxyvanillate by the enzymes from Sphingomonas paucimobilis SYK-6 (kcat = 2.2 s–1 and kcat/Km = 4.0 × 104 M–1 s–1) and Novosphingobium aromaticivorans (kcat = 27 s–1 and kcat/Km = 1.1 × 105 M–1 s–1) were determined. The three-dimensional structures of both enzymes were determined in the presence and absence of ligands bound in the active site. The structure of LigW from N. aromaticivorans, bound with the substrate analogue, 5-nitrovanillate (Kd = 5.0 nM), was determined to a resolution of 1.07 Å. The structure of this complex shows a remarkable enzyme-induced distortion of the nitro-substituent out of the plane of the phenyl ring by approximately 23°. A chemical reaction mechanism for the decarboxylation of 5-carboxyvanillate by LigW was proposed on the basis of the high resolution X-ray structures determined in the presence ligands bound in the active site, mutation of active site residues, and the magnitude of the product isotope effect determined in a mixture of H2O and D2O. In the proposed reaction mechanism the enzyme facilitates the transfer of a proton to C5 of the substrate prior to the decarboxylation step. PMID:26714575

  20. Role of modulation on the effect of microwaves on ornithine decarboxylase activity in L929 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Penafiel, L.M.; Litovitz, T.; Krause, D.; Desta, A.; Mullins, J.M.

    1997-05-01

    The effect of 835 MHz microwaves on the activity of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) in L929 murine cells was investigated at an SAR of {approximately}2.5 W/kg. The results depended upon the type of modulation employed. AM frequencies of 16 Hz and 60 Hz produced a transient increase in ODC activity that reached a peak at 8 h of exposure and returned to control levels after 24 h of exposure. In this case, ODC was increased by a maximum of 90% relative to control levels. A 40% increase in ODC activity was also observed after 8 h of exposure with a typical signal from a TDMA digital cellular telephone operating in the middle of its transmission frequency range. This signal was burst modulated at 50 Hz, with approximately 30% duty cycle. By contrast, 8 h exposure with 835 MHz microwaves amplitude modulated with speech produced no significant change in ODC activity. Further investigations, with 8 h of exposure to AM microwaves, as a function of modulation frequency, revealed that the response is frequency dependent, decreasing sharply at 6 Hz and 600 Hz. Exposure with 835 MHz microwaves, frequency modulated with a 60 Hz sinusoid, yielded no significant enhancement in ODC activity for exposure times ranging between 2 and 24 h. Similarly, exposure with a typical signal from an AMPS analog cellular telephone, which uses a form of frequency modulation, produced no significant enhancement in ODC activity. Exposure with 835 MHz continuous wave microwaves produced no effects for exposure times between 2 and 24 h, except for a small but statistically significant enhancement in ODC activity after 6 h of exposure.

  1. L-arginine Attenuates Hypobaric Hypoxia-Induced Increase in Ornithine Decarboxylase 1.

    PubMed

    Yuhong, Li; Zhengzhong, Bai; Feng, Tang; Quanyu, Yang; Ge, Ri-Li

    2017-07-20

    Chronic hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension and vascular remodeling have been shown to be associated with ornithine decarboxylase 1 (ODC1). However, few animal studies have investigated the role of ODC1 in acute hypoxia. We investigated ODC1 gene expression, morphologic and functional changes, and the effect of L-arginine as an attenuator in lung tissues of rats exposed to acute hypobaric hypoxia at a simulated altitude of 6000 m. Sprague-Dawley rats exposed to simulated hypobaric hypoxia (6000 m) for 24, 48, or 72 hours were treated with L-arginine (L-arginine group, 20 mg/100 g intraperitoneal; n=15) or untreated (non-L-arginine group, n=15). Control rats (n=5) were maintained at 2260 m in a normal environment for the same amount of time but were treated without L-arginine. The mean pulmonary artery pressure was measured by PowerLab system. The morphologic and immunohistochemical changes in lung tissue were observed under a microscope. The mRNA and protein levels of ODC1 were measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western-blot, respectively. Hypobaric hypoxia induced pulmonary interstitial hyperemia and capillary expansion in the lungs of rats exposed to acute hypoxia at 6000 m. The mean pulmonary artery pressure and the mRNA and protein levels of ODC1 were significantly increased, which could be attenuated by treatment with L-arginine. L-arginine attenuates acute hypobaric hypoxia-induced increase in mean pulmonary artery pressure and ODC1 gene expression in lung tissues of rats. ODC1 gene contributes to the development of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Extraction, partial purification and characterisation of vanillic acid decarboxylase from Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris DSM 3923.

    PubMed

    Cai, Rui; Li, Dongyu; Yuan, Yahong; Wang, Zhouli; Guo, Chunfeng; Liu, Bin; Yue, Tianli

    2016-06-01

    Vanillic acid decarboxylase (VAD) is the key enzyme responsible for guaiacol production in Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris; however, information related to this enzyme is currently unavailable. The aim of this study is to characterise the VAD from A. acidoterrestris. Specific activity of VAD in vanillic acid-induced A. acidoterrestris DSM 3923 cells was highest in the early stage of the log phase, and almost undetectable in the stationary and death phases. Of the four techniques used to extract VAD, sonication was found to be the most effective and recovered 3.23 U mg(-1) of VAD. Through optimisation of the crucial parameters for sonication, the recovery of VAD had more than doubled (6.81 U mg(-1) ). The crude enzyme extract was purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation and a 9.87-fold purification was obtained. The partially purified VAD exhibited optimum activity at pH 6.0-6.5, 45°C and was stable at pH 5.0-7.5, 20-45°C. The Km and Vmax values of the VAD were 0.53 mmol L(-1) and 96 U mg(-1) protein, respectively. VAD activity was stimulated by Co(2+) and Mn(2+) , but was inhibited by Ni(2+) , Cu(2+) , Ba(2+) and Fe(3+) . Cinnamic acid, ferulic acid, resveratrol, quercetin and rutin at the concentration of 1 mmol L(-1) could completely inhibit the activity of VAD. The present study provides the first report on the characteristics of the VAD from A. acidoterrestris, which will contribute to the development of more effective control methods to minimise A. acidoterrestris-related spoilage in fruit juices. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  3. Saturation mutagenesis of putative catalytic residues of benzoylformate decarboxylase provides a challenge to the accepted mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Yep, Alejandra; Kenyon, George L.; McLeish, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    Benzoylformate decarboxylase from Pseudomonas putida (PpBFDC) is a thiamin diphosphate-dependent enzyme that carries out the nonoxidative decarboxylation of aromatic 2-keto acids. The x-ray structure of PpBFDC suggested that Ser-26, His-70, and His-281 would play important roles in its catalytic mechanism, and the S26A, H70A, and H281A variants all exhibited greatly impaired catalytic activity. Based on stopped-flow studies with the alanine mutants, it was proposed that the histidine residues acted as acid-base catalysts, whereas Ser-26 was involved in substrate binding and played a significant, albeit less well defined, role in catalysis. While developing a saturation mutagenesis protocol to examine residues involved in PpBFDC substrate specificity, we tested the procedure on His-281. To our surprise, we found that His-281, which is thought to be necessary for protonation of the carbanion/enamine intermediate, could be replaced by phenyl alanine with only a 5-fold decrease in kcat. Even more surprising were our subsequent observations (i) that His-70 could be replaced by threonine or leucine with approximately a 30-fold decrease in kcat/Km compared with a 4,000-fold decrease for the H70A variant and (ii) that Ser-26, which forms hydrogen bonds with the substrate carboxylate, could be replaced by threonine, leucine, or methionine without significant loss of activity. These results call into question the assigned roles for Ser-26, His-70, and His-281. Further, they demonstrate the danger in assigning catalytic function based solely on results with alanine mutants and show that saturation mutagenesis is a valuable tool in assessing the role and relative importance of putative catalytic residues. PMID:18398009

  4. Cloning and expression of rat pancreatic beta-cell malonyl-CoA decarboxylase.

    PubMed Central

    Voilley, N; Roduit, R; Vicaretti, R; Bonny, C; Waeber, G; Dyck, J R; Lopaschuk, G D; Prentki, M

    1999-01-01

    To gain insight into the function and regulation of malonyl-CoA decarboxylase (MCD) we have cloned rat MCD cDNA from a differentiated insulin-secreting pancreatic beta-cell-line cDNA library. The full-length cDNA sequence shows 69% identity with the cDNA cloned previously from the goose uropygial gland, and predicts a 492 amino acid protein of 54.7 kDa. The open reading frame contains an N-terminal mitochondrial targeting sequence and the C-terminal part of the enzyme ends with a peroxisomal (Ser-Lys-Leu) targeting motif. Since the sequence does not reveal hydrophobic domains, MCD is most likely expressed in the mitochondrial matrix and inside the peroxisomes. A second methionine residue, located 3' of the mitochondrial presequence, might be the first amino acid of a putative cytosolic MCD, since the nucleotide sequence around it fits fairly well with a consensus Kozak site for translation initiation. However, primer extension detects the presence of only one transcript initiating upstream of the first ATG, indicating that the major, if not exclusive, transcript expressed in the pancreatic beta-cell encodes MCD with its mitochondrial presequence. The sequence also shows multiple possible sites of phosphorylation by casein kinase II and protein kinase C. mRNA tissue-distribution analysis indicates a transcript of 2.2 kb, and that the MCD gene is expressed over a wide range of rat tissues. The distribution of the enzyme shows a broad range of activities from very low in the brain to elevated in the liver and heart. The results provide the foundations for further studies of the role of MCD in lipid metabolism and metabolic signalling in various tissues. PMID:10229677

  5. Effects of immunization with natural and recombinant lysine decarboxylase on canine gingivitis development.

    PubMed

    Peters, Jennifer L; DeMars, Paul L; Collins, Lindsay M; Stoner, Julie A; Matsumoto, Hiroyuki; Komori, Naoka; Singh, Anil; Feasley, Christa L; Haddock, James A; Levine, Martin

    2012-10-19

    Periodontal disease, gingival inflammation (gingivitis) and periodontal attachment loss (periodontitis), causes tooth loss and susceptibility to chronic inflammation. Professionally scaling and cleaning the teeth regularly controls the disease, but is expensive in companion animals. Eikenella corrodens is common in canine oral cavities where it is a source of lysine decarboxylase (LDC). In human dental biofilms (plaques), LDC converts lysine to cadaverine and impairs the gingival epithelial barrier to bacteria. LDC vaccination may therefore retard gingivitis development. Year-old beagle dogs provided blood samples, and had weight and clinical measurements (biofilm and gingivitis) recorded. After scaling and cleaning, two dogs were immunized subcutaneously with 0.2mg native LDC from E. corrodens and 2 sets of four dogs with 0.2mg recombinant LDC purified from Escherichia coli. A third set of 4 dogs was immunized intranasally. Rehydragel(®), Emulsigen(®), Polygen™ or Carbigen™ were used as adjuvant. Four additional pairs of dogs were sham-immunized with each adjuvant alone (controls). Immunizations were repeated twice, 3 weeks apart, and clinical measurements were obtained after another 2 weeks, when the teeth were scaled and cleaned again. Tooth brushing was then stopped and the diet was changed from hard to soft chow. Clinical measurements were repeated after 1, 2, 3, 4, 6 and 8 weeks. Compared with sham-immunized dogs, gingivitis was reduced over all 8 weeks of soft diet after subcutaneous immunization with native LDC, or after intranasal immunization with recombinant LDC in Carbigen™, but for only 6 of the 8 weeks after subcutaneous immunization with recombinant LDC in Emulsigen(®) (repeated measures ANOVA). Subcutaneous vaccination induced a strong serum IgG antibody response that decreased during the soft diet period, whereas intranasal immunization induced a weak serum IgA antibody response that did not decrease. Immunization with recombinant LDC may

  6. Structural Basis for Putrescine Activation of Human S-Adenosylmethionine Decarboxylase

    SciTech Connect

    Bale, Shridhar; Lopez, Maria M.; Makhatadze, George I.; Fang, Qingming; Pegg, Anthony E.; Ealick, Steven E.

    2009-01-23

    Putrescine (1,4-diaminobutane) activates the autoprocessing and decarboxylation reactions of human S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (AdoMetDC), a critical enzyme in the polyamine biosynthetic pathway. In human AdoMetDC, putrescine binds in a buried pocket containing acidic residues Asp174, Glu178, and Glu256. The pocket is away from the active site but near the dimer interface; however, a series of hydrophilic residues connect the putrescine binding site and the active site. Mutation of these acidic residues modulates the effects of putrescine. D174N, E178Q, and E256Q mutants were expressed and dialyzed to remove putrescine and studied biochemically using X-ray crystallography, UV-CD spectroscopy, analytical ultracentrifugation, and ITC binding studies. The results show that the binding of putrescine to the wild type dimeric protein is cooperative. The D174N mutant does not bind putrescine, and the E178Q and E256Q mutants bind putrescine weakly with no cooperativity. The crystal structure of the mutants with and without putrescine and their complexes with S-adenosylmethionine methyl ester were obtained. Binding of putrescine results in a reorganization of four aromatic residues (Phe285, Phe315, Tyr318, and Phe320) and a conformational change in the loop 312-320. The loop shields putrescine from the external solvent, enhancing its electrostatic and hydrogen bonding effects. The E256Q mutant with putrescine added shows an alternate conformation of His243, Glu11, Lys80, and Ser229, the residues that link the active site and the putrescine binding site, suggesting that putrescine activates the enzyme through electrostatic effects and acts as a switch to correctly orient key catalytic residues.

  7. Role of glutamate decarboxylase-like protein 1 (GADL1) in taurine biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pingyang; Ge, Xiaomei; Ding, Haizhen; Jiang, Honglin; Christensen, Bruce M; Li, Jianyong

    2012-11-30

    This manuscript concerns the tissue-specific transcription of mouse and cattle glutamate decarboxylase-like protein 1 (GADL1) and the biochemical activities of human GADL1 recombinant protein. Bioinformatic analysis suggested that GADL1 appears late in evolution, only being found in reptiles, birds, and mammals. RT-PCR determined that GADL1 mRNA is transcribed at high levels in mouse and cattle skeletal muscles and also in mouse kidneys. Substrate screening determined that GADL1, unlike its name implies, has no detectable GAD activity, but it is able to efficiently catalyze decarboxylation of aspartate, cysteine sulfinic acid, and cysteic acid to β-alanine, hypotaurine, and taurine, respectively. Western blot analysis verified the presence of GADL1 in mouse muscles, kidneys, C2C12 myoblasts, and C2C12 myotubes. Incubation of the supernatant of fresh muscle or kidney extracts with cysteine sulfinic acid resulted in the detection of hypotaurine or taurine in the reaction mixtures, suggesting the possible involvement of GADL1 in taurine biosynthesis. However, when the tissue samples were incubated with aspartate, no β-alanine production was observed. We proposed several possibilities that might explain the inactivation of ADC activity of GADL1 in tissue protein extracts. Although β-alanine-producing activity was not detected in the supernatant of tissue protein extracts, its potential role in β-alanine synthesis cannot be excluded. There are several inhibitors of the ADC activity of GADL1 identified. The discovery of GADL1 biochemical activities, in conjunction with its expression and activities in muscles and kidneys, provides some tangible insight toward establishing its physiological function(s).

  8. Epilepsy and hippocampal neurodegeneration induced by glutamate decarboxylase inhibitors in awake rats.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Patricia; Tapia, Ricardo

    2015-10-01

    Glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), the enzyme responsible for GABA synthesis, requires pyridoxal phosphate (PLP) as a cofactor. Thiosemicarbazide (TSC) and γ-glutamyl-hydrazone (PLPGH) inhibit the free PLP-dependent isoform (GAD65) activity after systemic administration, leading to epilepsy in mice and in young, but not in adult rats. However, the competitive GAD inhibitor 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) induces convulsions in both immature and adult rats. In the present study we tested comparatively the epileptogenic and neurotoxic effects of PLPGH, TSC and MPA, administered by microdialysis in the hippocampus of adult awake rats. Cortical EEG and motor behavior were analyzed during the next 2h, and aspartate, glutamate and GABA were measured by HPLC in the microdialysis-collected fractions. Twenty-four hours after drug administration rats were fixed for histological analysis of the hippocampus. PLPGH or TSC did not affect the motor behavior, EEG or cellular morphology, although the extracellular concentration of GABA was decreased. In contrast, MPA produced intense wet-dog shakes, EEG epileptiform discharges, a >75% reduction of extracellular GABA levels and remarkable neurodegeneration of the CA1 region, with >80% neuronal loss. The systemic administration of the NMDA glutamate receptor antagonist MK-801 30 min before MPA did not prevent the MPA-induced epilepsy but significantly protected against its neurotoxic effect, reducing neuronal loss to <30%. We conclude that in adult awake rats, drugs acting on PLP availability have only a weak effect on GABA neurotransmission, whereas direct GAD inhibition produced by MPA induces hyperexcitation leading to epilepsy and hippocampal neurodegeneration. Because this degeneration was prevented by the blockade of NMDA receptors, we conclude that it is due to glutamate-mediated excitotoxicity consequent to disinhibition of the hippocampal excitatory circuits.

  9. The Arginine Decarboxylase Pathways of Host and Pathogen Interact to Impact Inflammatory Pathways in the Lung

    PubMed Central

    Dalluge, Joseph J.; Welchlin, Cole W.; Hughes, John; Han, Wei; Blackwell, Timothy S.; Laguna, Theresa A.; Williams, Bryan J.

    2014-01-01

    The arginine decarboxylase pathway, which converts arginine to agmatine, is present in both humans and most bacterial pathogens. In humans agmatine is a neurotransmitter with affinities towards α2-adrenoreceptors, serotonin receptors, and may inhibit nitric oxide synthase. In bacteria agmatine serves as a precursor to polyamine synthesis and was recently shown to enhance biofilm development in some strains of the respiratory pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We determined agmatine is at the center of a competing metabolism in the human lung during airways infections and is influenced by the metabolic phenotypes of the infecting pathogens. Ultra performance liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry detection was used to measure agmatine in human sputum samples from patients with cystic fibrosis, spent supernatant from clinical sputum isolates, and from bronchoalvelolar lavage fluid from mice infected with P. aeruginosa agmatine mutants. Agmatine in human sputum peaks during illness, decreased with treatment and is positively correlated with inflammatory cytokines. Analysis of the agmatine metabolic phenotype in clinical sputum isolates revealed most deplete agmatine when grown in its presence; however a minority appeared to generate large amounts of agmatine presumably driving sputum agmatine to high levels. Agmatine exposure to inflammatory cells and in mice demonstrated its role as a direct immune activator with effects on TNF-α production, likely through NF-κB activation. P. aeruginosa mutants for agmatine detection and metabolism were constructed and show the real-time evolution of host-derived agmatine in the airways during acute lung infection. These experiments also demonstrated pathogen agmatine production can upregulate the inflammatory response. As some clinical isolates have adapted to hypersecrete agmatine, these combined data would suggest agmatine is a novel target for immune modulation in the host-pathogen dynamic. PMID:25350753

  10. Uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase: Complete human gene sequence and molecular study of three families with hepatoerythropoietic porphyria

    SciTech Connect

    Moran-Jimenez, M.J.; Ged, C.; Verneuil, H. de

    1996-04-01

    A deficiency in uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase (UROD) enzyme activity, the fifth enzyme of the heme biosynthetic pathway, is found in patients with sporadic porphyria cutanea tarda (s-PCT), familial porphyria cutanea tarda (f-PCT), and hepatoerythropoietic porphyria (HEP). Subnormal UROD activity is due to mutations of the UROD gene in both f-PCT and HEP, but no mutations have been found in s-PCT. Genetic analysis has determined that f-PCT is transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait. In contrast, HEP, a severe form of cutaneous porphyria, is transmitted as an autosomal recessive trait. HEP is characterized by a profound deficiency of UROD activity, and the disease is usually manifest in childhood. In this study, a strategy was designed to identify alleles responsible for the HEP phenotype in three unrelated families. Mutations of UROD were identified by direct sequencing of four amplified fragments that contained the entire coding sequence of the UROD gene. Two new missense mutations were observed at the homoallelic state: P62L (proline-to-leucine substitution at codon 62) in a Portuguese family and Y311C (tyrosine-to-cysteine substitution at codon 311) in an Italian family. A third mutation, G281E, was observed in a Spanish family. This mutation has been previously described in three families from Spain and one from Tunisia. In the Spanish family described in this report, a paternal uncle of the proband developed clinically overt PCT as an adult and proved to be heterozygous for the G281E mutation. Mutant cDNAs corresponding to the P62L and Y311C changes detected in these families were created by site-directed mutagenesis. Recombinant proteins proved to have subnormal enzyme activity, and the Y311C mutant was thermolabile. 24 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. Uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase: complete human gene sequence and molecular study of three families with hepatoerythropoietic porphyria.

    PubMed Central

    Moran-Jimenez, M. J.; Ged, C.; Romana, M.; Enriquez De Salamanca, R.; Taïeb, A.; Topi, G.; D'Alessandro, L.; de Verneuil, H.

    1996-01-01

    A deficiency in uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase (UROD) enzyme activity, the fifth enzyme of the heme biosynthetic pathway, is found in patients with sporadic porphyria cutanea tarda (s-PCT), familial porphyria cutanea tarda (f-PCT), and hepatoerythropoietic porphyria (HEP). Subnormal UROD activity is due to mutations of the UROD gene in both f-PCT and HEP, but no mutations have been found in s-PCT. Genetic analysis has determined that f-PCT is transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait. In contrast, HEP, a severe form of cutaneous porphyria, is transmitted as an autosomal recessive trait. HEP is characterized by a profound deficiency of UROD activity, and the disease is usually manifest in childhood. In this study, a strategy was designed to identify alleles responsible for the HEP phenotype in three unrelated families. Mutations of UROD were identified by direct sequencing of four amplified fragments that contained the entire coding sequence of the UROD gene. Two new missense mutations were observed at the homoallelic state: P62L (proline-to-leucine substitution at codon 62) in a Portuguese family and Y311C (tyrosine-to-cysteine substitution at codon 311) in an Italian family. A third mutation, G281E, was observed in a Spanish family. This mutation has been previously described in three families from Spain and one from Tunisia. In the Spanish family described in this report, a paternal uncle of the proband developed clinically overt PCT as an adult and proved to be heterozygous for the G281E mutation. Mutant cDNAs corresponding to the P62L and Y311C changes detected in these families were created by site-directed mutagenesis. Recombinant proteins proved to have subnormal enzyme activity, and the Y311C mutant was thermolabile. Images Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8644733

  12. Effects of vaccination with heat shock proteins on streptozotocin induced diabetes in histidine decarboxylase knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Szebeni, A; Prohászka, Z; Buzás, E; Falus, A; Kecskeméti, V

    2008-04-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D) is an immune mediated disease in which heat shock proteins (hsps) may be involved in the development of the disease. Furthermore, vaccination with different hsps prevented the development of multiple low-dose streptozotocin (STZ) induced autoimmune diabetes in C57BL/KSJ mice. Histamine influences many aspects of the immune response, including Th1/Th2 balance and antibody production. Therefore, a study of diabetes-related immune processes was considered of interest in histidine decarboxylase knockout (HDC-KO) mice. The aim of our study was i) to characterize antibody production in response to vaccination with p277 or hsp65 in wild type (WT) BALB/c and HDC-KO mice, and ii) to establish a possible correlation between vaccination and the changes in the pattern of STZ diabetes. An ELISA was employed to measure the hsp65- and p277-specific antibody levels. To induce diabetes multiple low-dose of STZ was used. Vaccination with p277 and hsp65 altered the pattern of STZ diabetes both in HDC-KO and WT animals, characterized by a transient increase followed by sustained reduction of blood sugar levels as compared to controls. However, vaccination with hsp65 and p277 caused a significant anti-p277 and anti-hsp65 antibody level increase only in WT animals. Multiple low-doses of STZ were able to induce diabetes in HDC-KO mice and the development of diabetes was prevented by vaccination with hsps. This protection developed in spite of the fact that vaccination caused a significant antibody level increase only in WT animals. To explain the therapeutic effect of vaccination we need further examination of the HDC KO strain.

  13. Role of modulation on the effect of microwaves on ornithine decarboxylase activity in L929 cells.

    PubMed

    Penafiel, L M; Litovitz, T; Krause, D; Desta, A; Mullins, J M

    1997-01-01

    The effect of 835 MHz microwaves on the activity of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) in L929 murine cell was investigated at an SAR of approximately 2.5 W/kg. The results depended upon the type of modulation employed. AM frequencies of 16 Hz and 60 Hz produced a transient increase in ODC activity that reached a peak at 8 h of exposure and returned to control levels after 24 h of exposure. In this case, ODC was increased by a maximum of 90% relative to control levels. A 40% increase in ODC activity was also observed after 8 h of exposure with a typical signal from a TDMA digital cellular telephone operating in the middle of its transmission frequency range (approximately 840 MHz). This signal was burst modulated at 50 Hz, with approximately 30% duty cycle. By contrast, 8 h exposure with 835 MHz microwaves amplitude modulated with speech produced no significant change in ODC activity. Further investigations, with 8 h of exposure to AM microwaves, as a function of modulation frequency, revealed that the response is frequency dependent, decreasing sharply at 6 Hz an 600 Hz. Exposure with 835 MHz microwaves, frequency modulated with a 60 Hz sinusoid, yielded no significant enhancement in ODC activity for exposure times ranging between 2 and 24 h. Similarly, exposure with a typical signal from an AMPS analog cellular telephone, which uses a form of frequency modulation, produced no significant enhancement in ODC activity. Exposure with 835 MHz continuous wave microwaves produced no effects for exposure times between 2 and 24 h, except for a small but statistically significant enhancement in ODC activity after 6 h of exposure. Comparison of these results suggests that effects are much more robust when the modulation causes low-frequency periodic changes in the amplitude of the microwave carrier.

  14. Expression and localization of cysteine sulfinate decarboxylase in major salivary glands of male mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shengnan; Liu, Ying; Ma, Qiwang; Cui, Sheng; Liu, Jiali

    2015-04-01

    Taurine (2-aminoethanesulfonic acid) is the most abundant free amino acid in mammalian cells. It plays a significant role in cell development, nutrition, and survival, such as in the regulation of ion transport and osmoregulation. Cysteine sulfinate decarboxylase (CSD) is the rate-limiting biosynthetic enzyme of taurine. Recently, the synthesis of taurine has been observed in the central nervous system, kidney, liver, and muscle. However, the synthesis of taurine in the salivary glands has still not been described in detail. We have detected CSD expression in the major salivary glands of adult male mice by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), Western blot, and immunofluorescence. In addition, we determined the content of taurine by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The results show that taurine is present in high concentrations in the major salivary glands of male mice. CSD messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein are expressed in the major salivary glands of male mice. The relative levels of CSD mRNA increase from the submandibular gland (SMG) to the sublingual gland (SLG) and parotid gland (PG), but the levels of the CSD protein are the opposite. The immunofluorescence results indicate that CSD is mainly located in the excretory ducts (EDs) and interlobular duct (IL) of SMG and ED in SLG, respectively. These results suggest that the major salivary glands of male mice produce taurine through the CSD pathway, and the synthesis of taurine might be related to sodium reabsorption in the salivary glands. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Spermidine mediates degradation of ornithine decarboxylase by a non-lysosomal, ubiquitin-independent mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, J.R.; Gerner, E.W.

    1987-01-01

    The mechanism of spermidine-induced ornithine decarboxylase (OCD, E.C. 4.1.1.17) inactivation was investigated using Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, maintained in serum-free medium, which display a stabilization of ODC owing to the lack of accumulation of putrescine and spermidine. Treatment of cells with 10 ..mu..M exogenous spermidine leads to rapid decay of ODC activity accompanied by a parallel decrease in enzyme protein. Analysis of the decay of (/sup 35/S)methionine-labeled ODC and separation by two-dimensional electrophoresis revealed no detectable modification in ODC structure during enhanced degradation. Spermidine-mediated inactivation of ODC occurred in a temperature-dependent manner exhibiting pseudo-first-order kinetics over a temperature range of 22-37/sup 0/C. In cultures treated continuously, an initial lag was observed after treatment with spermidine, followed by a rapid decline in activity as an apparent critical concentration of intracellular spermidine was achieved. Treating cells at 22/sup 0/C for 3 hours with 10 ..mu.. M spermidine, followed by removal of exogenous polyamine, and then shifting to varying temperatures, resulted in rates of ODC inactivation identical with that determined with a continuous treatment. Arrhenius analysis showed that polyamine mediated inactivation of ODC occurred with an activation energy of approximately 16 kcal/mol. Treatment of cells with lysosomotrophic agents had no effect of ODC degradation. ODC turnover was not dependent on ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis. These data support the hypothesis that spermidine regulates ODC degradation via a mechanism requiring new protein synthesis, and that this occurs via a non-lysosomal, ubiquitin-independent pathway.

  16. Formation of isobutene from 3-hydroxy-3-methylbutyrate by diphosphomevalonate decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Gogerty, David S; Bobik, Thomas A

    2010-12-01

    Isobutene is an important commercial chemical used for the synthesis of butyl rubber, terephthalic acid, specialty chemicals, and a gasoline performance additive known as alkylate. Currently, isobutene is produced from petroleum and hence is nonrenewable. Here, we report that the Saccharomyces cerevisiae mevalonate diphosphate decarboxylase (ScMDD) can convert 3-hydroxy-3-methylbutyrate (3-HMB) to isobutene. Whole cells of Escherichia coli producing ScMDD with an N-terminal 6×His tag (His(6)-ScMDD) formed isobutene from 3-HMB at a rate of 154 pmol h(-1) g cells(-1). In contrast, no isobutene was detected from control cells lacking ScMDD. His(6)-ScMDD was purified by nickel affinity chromatography and shown to produce isobutene from 3-HMB at a rate of 1.33 pmol min(-1) mg(-1) protein. Controls showed that both His(6)-ScMDD and 3-HMB were required for detectable isobutene formation. Isobutene was identified by gas chromatography (GC) with flame ionization detection as well as by GC-mass spectrometry (MS). ScMDD was subjected to error-prone PCR, and two improved variants were characterized, ScMDD1 (I145F) and ScMDD2 (R74H). Whole cells of E. coli producing ScMDD1 and ScMDD2 produced isobutene from 3-HMB at rates of 3,000 and 5,888 pmol h(-1) g cells(-1), which are 19- and 38-fold increases compared to rates for cells producing His(6)-ScMDD. This showed that genetic modifications can be used to increase the rate at which ScMDD converts 3-HMB to isobutene. Because 3-HMB can be produced from l-leucine, ScMDD has a potential application for the production of renewable isobutene. Moreover, isobutene is a gas, which might simplify its purification from a fermentation medium, substantially reducing production costs.

  17. Molecular cloning and expression analysis of an arginine decarboxylase gene from peach (Prunus persica).

    PubMed

    Liu, Ji Hong; Ban, Yusuke; Wen, Xiao-Peng; Nakajima, Ikuko; Moriguchi, Takaya

    2009-01-15

    Arginine decarboxylase (ADC), one of the enzymes responsible for putrescine (Put) biosynthesis, has been shown to be implicated in stress response. In the current paper attempts were made to clone and characterize a gene encoding ADC from peach (Prunus persica (L.) Batsch, 'Akatsuki'). Rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) gave rise to a full-length ADC cDNA (PpADC) with a complete open reading frame of 2178 bp, encoding a 725 amino acid polypeptide. Homology search and sequence multi-alignment demonstrated that the deduced PpADC protein sequence shared a high identity with ADCs from other plants, including several highly conservative motifs and amino acids. Southern blotting indicated that PpADC existed in peach genome as a single gene. Expression levels of PpADC in different tissues of peach (P. persica 'Akatsuki') were spatially and developmentally regulated. Treatment of peach shoots from 'Mochizuki' with exogenous 5 mM Put, an indirect product of ADC, remarkably induced accumulation of PpADC mRNA. Transcripts of PpADC in peach leaves from 'Mochizuki' were quickly induced, either transiently or continuously, in response to dehydration, high salinity (200 mM NaCl), low temperature (4 degrees C) and heavy metal (150 microM CdCl(2)), but repressed by high temperature 37 degrees C) during a 2-day treatment, which changed in an opposite direction when the stresses were otherwise removed with the exception of CdCl(2) treatment. In addition, steady-state of PpADC mRNA could be also transiently up-regulated by abscisic acid (ABA) in 'Mochizuki' leaves. All of these, taken together, suggest that PpADC is a stress-responsive gene and can be considered as a potential target that is genetically manipulated so as to create novel germplasms with enhanced stress tolerance in the future.

  18. Role of Arginine decarboxylase (ADC) in Arabidopsis thaliana defence against the pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas viridiflava.

    PubMed

    Rossi, F R; Marina, M; Pieckenstain, F L

    2015-07-01

    Polyamine biosynthesis starts with putrescine production through the decarboxylation of arginine or ornithine. In Arabidopsis thaliana, putrescine is synthesised exclusively by arginine decarboxylase (ADC), which exists as two isoforms (ADC1 and 2) that are differentially regulated by abiotic stimuli, but their role in defence against pathogens has not been studied in depth. This work analysed the participation of ADC in Arabidopsis defence against Pseudomonas viridiflava. ADC activity and expression, polyamine levels and bacterial resistance were analysed in null mutants of each ADC isoform. In non-infected wild-type (WT) plants, ADC2 expression was much higher than ADC1. Analysis of adc mutants demonstrated that ADC2 contributes to a much higher extent than ADC1 to basal ADC activity and putrescine biosynthesis. In addition, adc2 mutants showed increased basal expression of salicylic acid- and jasmonic acid-dependent PR genes. Bacterial infection induced putrescine accumulation and ADC1 expression in WT plants, but pathogen-induced putrescine accumulation was blocked in adc1 mutants. Results suggest a specific participation of ADC1 in defence, although basal resistance was not decreased by dysfunction of either of the two ADC genes. In addition, and as opposed to WT plants, bacterial infection increased ADC2 expression and ADC activity in adc1 mutants, which could counterbalance the lack of ADC1. Results demonstrate a major contribution of ADC2 to total ADC activity and the specific induction of ADC1 in response to infection. A certain degree of functional redundancy between the two isoforms in relation to their contribution to basal resistance is also evident.

  19. Sequestered end products and enzyme regulation: the case of ornithine decarboxylase.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, R H; Morris, D R; Coffino, P

    1992-01-01

    The polyamines (putrescine, spermidine, and spermine) are synthesized by almost all organisms and are universally required for normal growth. Ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), an initial enzyme of polyamine synthesis, is one of the most highly regulated enzymes of eucaryotic organisms. Unusual mechanisms have evolved to control ODC, including rapid, polyamine-mediated turnover of the enzyme and control of the synthetic rate of the protein without change of its mRNA level. The high amplitude of regulation and the rapid variation in the level of the protein led biochemists to infer that polyamines had special cellular roles and that cells maintained polyamine concentrations within narrow limits. This view was sustained in part because of our continuing uncertainty about the actual biochemical roles of polyamines. In this article, we challenge the view that ODC regulation is related to precise adjustment of polyamine levels. In no organism does ODC display allosteric feedback inhibition, and in three types of organism, bacteria, fungi, and mammals, the size of polyamine pools may vary radically without having a profound effect on growth. We suggest that the apparent stability of polyamine pools in unstressed cells is due to their being largely bound to cellular polyanions. We further speculate that allosteric feedback inhibition, if it existed, would be inappropriately responsive to changes in the small, freely diffusible polyamine pool. Instead, mechanisms that control the amount of the ODC protein have appeared in most organisms, and even these are triggered inappropriately by variation of the binding of polyamines to ionic binding sites. In fact, feedback inhibition of ODC might be maladaptive during hypoosmotic stress or at the onset of growth, when organisms appear to require rapid increases in the size of their cellular polyamine pools. PMID:1620066

  20. Support for involvement of glutamate decarboxylase 1 and neuropeptide Y in anxiety susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Donner, Jonas; Sipilä, Tessa; Ripatti, Samuli; Kananen, Laura; Chen, Xiangning; Kendler, Kenneth S; Lönnqvist, Jouko; Pirkola, Sami; Hettema, John M; Hovatta, Iiris

    2012-04-01

    Genetic mapping efforts have identified putative susceptibility genes for human anxiety disorders. The most intensively studied genes are involved in neurotransmitter metabolism and signaling or stress response. In addition, neuropeptides and targets of anxiolytics have been examined. It has become apparent that gene × environment interactions may explain individual variation in stress resilience and predisposition to mental disorders. We aimed to replicate previous genetic findings in 16 putative anxiety susceptibility genes and further test whether they modulate the risk for developing an anxiety disorder in adulthood after childhood stress exposure. We tested 93 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for genetic association to anxiety disorders in the Finnish population-based Health 2000 sample (282 cases and 575 matched controls). In addition, we examined by logistic regression modeling whether the SNP genotypes modified the effect of the number of self-reported childhood adversities on anxiety disorder risk. The most significant evidence for association was observed in glutamate decarboxylase 1 (GAD1) with phobias (P = 0.0005). A subsequent meta-analysis (N = 1985) incorporating previously published findings supported involvement of a single GAD1 risk haplotype in determining susceptibility to a broad range of internalizing disorders (P = 0.0009). We additionally found that SNPs and haplotypes in neuropeptide Y (NPY) modified the effect of childhood adversities on anxiety susceptibility (P = 0.003). In conclusion, we provide further support for involvement of mainly GAD1, but also NPY in determining predisposition to anxiety disorders. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Glutamate Decarboxylase 1 Overexpression as a Poor Prognostic Factor in Patients with Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yi-Ying; Chao, Tung-Bo; Sheu, Ming-Jen; Tian, Yu-Feng; Chen, Tzu-Ju; Lee, Sung-Wei; He, Hong-Lin; Chang, I-Wei; Hsing, Chung-Hsi; Lin, Ching-Yih; Li, Chien-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Background: Glutamate decarboxylase 1 (GAD1) which serves as a rate-limiting enzyme involving in the production of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), exists in the GABAergic neurons in the central nervous system (CNS). Little is known about the relevance of GAD1 to nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Through data mining on a data set derived from a published transcriptome database, this study first identified GAD1 as a differentially upregulated gene in NPC. We aimed to evaluate GAD1 expression and its prognostic effect on patients with early and locoregionally advanced NPC. Methods: We evaluated GAD1 immunohistochemistry and performed an H-score analysis on biopsy specimens from 124 patients with nonmetastasized NPC receiving treatment. GAD1 overexpression was defined as an H score higher than the median value. The findings of such an analysis are correlated with clinicopathological behaviors and survival rates, namely disease-specific survival (DSS), distant-metastasis-free survival (DMeFS), and local recurrence-free survival (LRFS) rates. Results: GAD1 overexpression was significantly associated with an increase in the primary tumor status (p < 0.001) and American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stages III-IV (p = 0.002) and was a univariate predictor of adverse outcomes of DSS (p = 0.002), DMeFS (p < 0.0001), and LRFS (p = 0.001). In the multivariate comparison, in addition to advanced AJCC stages III-IV, GAD1 overexpression remained an independent prognosticator of short DSS (p = 0.004, hazard ratio = 2.234), DMeFS (p < 0.001, hazard ratio = 4.218), and LRFS (p = 0.013, hazard ratio = 2.441) rates. Conclusions: Our data reveal that GAD1 overexpression was correlated with advanced disease status and may thus be a critical prognostic indicator of poor outcomes in NPC and a potential therapeutic target to facilitate the development of effective treatment modalities. PMID:27698909

  2. Developmental PCB Exposure Increases Audiogenic Seizures and Decreases Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase in the Inferior Colliculus.

    PubMed

    Bandara, Suren B; Eubig, Paul A; Sadowski, Renee N; Schantz, Susan L

    2016-02-01

    Previously, we observed that developmental polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) exposure resulted in an increase in audiogenic seizures (AGSs) in rats. However, the rats were exposed to loud noise in adulthood, and were not tested for AGS until after 1 year of age, either of which could have interacted with early PCB exposure to increase AGS susceptibility. This study assessed susceptibility to AGS in young adult rats following developmental PCB exposure alone (without loud noise exposure) and investigated whether there was a decrease in GABA inhibitory neurotransmission in the inferior colliculus (IC) that could potentially explain this effect. Female Long-Evans rats were dosed orally with 0 or 6 mg/kg/day of an environmentally relevant PCB mixture from 28 days prior to breeding until the pups were weaned at postnatal day 21. One male-female pair from each litter was retained for the AGS study whilst another was retained for Western blot analysis of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and GABAAα1 receptor in the IC, the site in the auditory midbrain where AGS are initiated. There was a significant increase in the number and severity of AGSs in the PCB groups, with females somewhat more affected than males. GAD65 was decreased but there was no change in GAD67 or GABAAα1 in the IC indicating decreased inhibitory regulation in the PCB group. These results confirm that developmental PCB exposure alone is sufficient to increase susceptibility to AGS, and provide the first evidence for a possible mechanism of action at the level of the IC. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Developmental PCB Exposure Increases Audiogenic Seizures and Decreases Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase in the Inferior Colliculus

    PubMed Central

    Bandara, Suren B.; Eubig, Paul A.; Sadowski, Renee N.; Schantz, Susan L.

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we observed that developmental polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) exposure resulted in an increase in audiogenic seizures (AGSs) in rats. However, the rats were exposed to loud noise in adulthood, and were not tested for AGS until after 1 year of age, either of which could have interacted with early PCB exposure to increase AGS susceptibility. This study assessed susceptibility to AGS in young adult rats following developmental PCB exposure alone (without loud noise exposure) and investigated whether there was a decrease in GABA inhibitory neurotransmission in the inferior colliculus (IC) that could potentially explain this effect. Female Long-Evans rats were dosed orally with 0 or 6 mg/kg/day of an environmentally relevant PCB mixture from 28 days prior to breeding until the pups were weaned at postnatal day 21. One male-female pair from each litter was retained for the AGS study whilst another was retained for Western blot analysis of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and GABAAα1 receptor in the IC, the site in the auditory midbrain where AGS are initiated. There was a significant increase in the number and severity of AGSs in the PCB groups, with females somewhat more affected than males. GAD65 was decreased but there was no change in GAD67 or GABAAα1 in the IC indicating decreased inhibitory regulation in the PCB group. These results confirm that developmental PCB exposure alone is sufficient to increase susceptibility to AGS, and provide the first evidence for a possible mechanism of action at the level of the IC. PMID:26543103

  4. Effects of Pyruvate Decarboxylase Overproduction on Flux Distribution at the Pyruvate Branch Point in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    van Hoek, Pim; Flikweert, Marcel T.; van der Aart, Quirina J. M.; Steensma, H. Yde; van Dijken, Johannes P.; Pronk, Jack T.

    1998-01-01

    A multicopy plasmid carrying the PDC1 gene (encoding pyruvate decarboxylase; Pdc) was introduced in Saccharomyces cerevisiae CEN.PK113-5D. The physiology of the resulting prototrophic strain was compared with that of the isogenic prototrophic strain CEN.PK113-7D and an empty-vector reference strain. In glucose-grown shake-flask cultures, the introduction of the PDC1 plasmid caused a threefold increase in the Pdc level. In aerobic glucose-limited chemostat cultures growing at a dilution rate of 0.10 h−1, Pdc levels in the overproducing strain were 14-fold higher than those in the reference strains. Levels of glycolytic enzymes decreased by ca. 15%, probably due to dilution by the overproduced Pdc protein. In chemostat cultures, the extent of Pdc overproduction decreased with increasing dilution rate. The high degree of overproduction of Pdc at low dilution rates did not affect the biomass yield. The dilution rate at which aerobic fermentation set in decreased from 0.30 h−1 in the reference strains to 0.23 h−1 in the Pdc-overproducing strain. In the latter strain, the specific respiration rate reached a maximum above the dilution rate at which aerobic fermentation first occurred. This result indicates that a limited respiratory capacity was not responsible for the onset of aerobic fermentation in the Pdc-overproducing strain. Rather, the results indicate that Pdc overproduction affected flux distribution at the pyruvate branch point by influencing competition for pyruvate between Pdc and the mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex. In respiratory cultures (dilution rate, <0.23 h−1), Pdc overproduction did not affect the maximum glycolytic capacity, as determined in anaerobic glucose-pulse experiments. PMID:9603825

  5. Suppression of rat stomach histidine decarboxylase activity by histamine: H2-receptor-mediated feed-back

    PubMed Central

    Håkanson, R.; Larsson, L.-I.; Liedberg, G.; Rehfeld, J. F.; Sundler, F.

    1977-01-01

    1. Gastrin activates rat stomach histidine decarboxylase. Exogenous histamine suppressed the basal enzyme activity in unoperated, in nephrectomized, in vagally denervated and in antrectomized rats, and counteracted the pentagastrin-induced enzyme activation in unoperated rats. 2. Kinetic analysis of enzyme-catalysed histidine decarboxylation in extracts from untreated vagotomized and from histamine-treated vagotomized rats showed that the histamine-induced suppression of histidine decarboxylase activity probably reflects a reduced enzyme concentration. Moreover, the enzyme half-life in vagotomized rats after treatment with histamine was shorter than the half-life observed after inhibition of enzyme synthesis. These observations suggest that administration of histamine not only inhibits enzyme synthesis but also causes an accelerated rate of elimination of histidine decarboxylase. 3. Intravenous infusion of histamine caused marked displacement of the pentagastrin dose—response curve, in a manner suggesting a reduced sensitivity to pentagastrin. 4. After H2-receptor blockade, but not after H1-receptor blockade, histamine was less effective in suppressing the enzyme activity. Furthermore, H2-receptor blockade augmented the pentagastrin-induced enzyme activation. 5. The results suggest that histamine (via H2-receptors) reduces the sensitivity of the histamine-storing cells to gastrin and that H2-receptor blockade induces the opposite effects. 6. We propose that the histamine-storing cells in the rat stomach are endowed with H2-receptors and that exogenous histamine is capable of acting directly on the histamine cells. This may reflect a physiological control mechanism whereby mobilized endogenous histamine modifies its own synthesis and release. PMID:894608

  6. Human Monoclonal Islet Cell Antibodies From a Patient with Insulin- Dependent Diabetes Mellitus Reveal Glutamate Decarboxylase as the Target Antigen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, Wiltrud; Endl, Josef; Eiermann, Thomas H.; Brandt, Michael; Kientsch-Engel, Rosemarie; Thivolet, Charles; Jungfer, Herbert; Scherbaum, Werner A.

    1992-09-01

    The autoimmune phenomena associated with destruction of the β cell in pancreatic islets and development of type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus (IDDM) include circulating islet cell antibodies. We have immortalized peripheral blood lymphocytes from prediabetic individuals and patients with newly diagnosed IDDM by Epstein-Barr virus transformation. IgG-positive cells were selected by anti-human IgG-coupled magnetic beads and expanded in cell culture. Supernatants were screened for cytoplasmic islet cell antibodies using the conventional indirect immunofluorescence test on cryostat sections of human pancreas. Six islet cell-specific B-cell lines, originating from a patient with newly diagnosed IDDM, could be stabilized on a monoclonal level. All six monoclonal islet cell antibodies (MICA 1-6) were of the IgG class. None of the MICA reacted with human thyroid, adrenal gland, anterior pituitary, liver, lung, stomach, and intestine tissues but all six reacted with pancreatic islets of different mammalian species and, in addition, with neurons of rat cerebellar cortex. MICA 1-6 were shown to recognize four distinct antigenic epitopes in islets. Islet cell antibody-positive diabetic sera but not normal human sera blocked the binding of the monoclonal antibodies to their target epitopes. Immunoprecipitation of 35S-labeled human islet cell extracts revealed that a protein of identical size to the enzyme glutamate decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.15) was a target of all MICA. Furthermore, antigen immunotrapped by the MICA from brain homogenates showed glutamate decarboxylase enzyme activity. MICA 1-6 therefore reveal glutamate decarboxylase as the predominant target antigen of cytoplasmic islet cell autoantibodies in a patient with newly diagnosed IDDM.

  7. Hippocampal interneurons expressing glutamic acid decarboxylase and calcium-binding proteins decrease with aging in Fischer 344 rats.

    PubMed

    Shetty, A K; Turner, D A

    1998-05-04

    Aging leads to alterations in the function and plasticity of hippocampal circuitry in addition to behavioral changes. To identify critical alterations in the substrate for inhibitory circuitry as a function of aging, we evaluated the numbers of hippocampal interneurons that were positive for glutamic acid decarboxylase and those that expressed calcium-binding proteins (parvalbumin, calbindin, and calretinin) in young adult (4-5 months old) and aged (23-25 months old) male Fischer 344 rats. Both the overall interneuron population and specific subpopulations of interneurons demonstrated a commensurate decline in numbers throughout the hippocampus with aging. Interneurons positive for glutamic acid decarboxylase were significantly depleted in the stratum radiatum of CA1, the strata oriens, radiatum and pyramidale of CA3, the dentate molecular layer, and the dentate hilus. Parvalbumin interneurons showed significant reductions in the strata oriens and pyramidale of CA1, the stratum pyramidale of CA3, and the dentate hilus. The reductions in calbindin interneurons were more pronounced than other calcium-binding protein-positive interneurons and were highly significant in the strata oriens and radiatum of both CA1 and CA3 subfields and in the dentate hilus. Calretinin interneurons were decreased significantly in the strata oriens and radiatum of CA3, in the dentate granule cell and molecular layers, and in the dentate hilus. However, the relative ratio of parvalbumin-, calbindin-, and calretinin-positive interneurons compared with glutamic acid decarboxylase-positive interneurons remained constant with aging, suggesting actual loss of interneurons expressing calcium-binding proteins with age. This loss contrasts with the reported preservation of pyramidal neurons with aging in the hippocampus. Functional decreases in inhibitory drive throughout the hippocampus may occur due to this loss, particularly alterations in the processing of feed-forward information through the

  8. Anti glutamate-decarboxylase antibodies: a liaison between localisation related epilepsy, stiff-person syndrome and type-1 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Szűcs, Anna; Barcs, Gábor; Winkler, Gábor; Soós, Zsuzsanna; Folyovich, András; Kelemen, Anna; Várallyay, Péter; Kamondi, Anita

    2014-07-30

    We present two patients with partial epilepsy, type-1 diabetes and stiff person syndrome associated with high serum auto-antibody levels to glutamate-decarboxylase (anti-GAD). Both patients were or have suffered from additional autoimmune conditions. The presence of stiff person syndrome and elevated anti-GAD levels have to make clinicians look for additional autoimmune conditions including type-1 diabetes. On the other hand, the co-morbidity of partial epilepsy with autoimmune conditions in patients with elevated serum anti-GAD suggests an autoimmune mechanism of partial epilepsy in these cases.

  9. Oxalate decarboxylase and oxalate oxidase activities can be interchanged with a specificity switch of up to 282,000 by mutating an active site lid.

    PubMed

    Burrell, Matthew R; Just, Victoria J; Bowater, Laura; Fairhurst, Shirley A; Requena, Laura; Lawson, David M; Bornemann, Stephen

    2007-10-30

    Oxalate decarboxylases and oxalate oxidases are members of the cupin superfamily of proteins that have many common features: a manganese ion with a common ligand set, the substrate oxalate, and dioxygen (as either a unique cofactor or a substrate). We have hypothesized that these enzymes share common catalytic steps that diverge when a carboxylate radical intermediate becomes protonated. The Bacillus subtilis decarboxylase has two manganese binding sites, and we proposed that Glu162 on a flexible lid is the site 1 general acid. We now demonstrate that a decarboxylase can be converted into an oxidase by mutating amino acids of the lid that include Glu162 with specificity switches of 282,000 (SEN161-3DAS), 275,000 (SENS161-4DSSN), and 225,000 (SENS161-4DASN). The structure of the SENS161-4DSSN mutant showed that site 2 was not affected. The requirement for substitutions other than of Glu162 was, at least in part, due to the need to decrease the Km for dioxygen for the oxidase reaction. Reversion of decarboxylase activity could be achieved by reintroducing Glu162 to the SENS161-4DASN mutant to give a relative specificity switch of 25,600. This provides compelling evidence for the crucial role of Glu162 in the decarboxylase reaction consistent with it being the general acid, for the role of the lid in controlling the Km for dioxygen, and for site 1 being the sole catalytically active site. We also report the trapping of carboxylate radicals produced during turnover of the mutant with the highest oxidase activity. Such radicals were also observed with the wild-type decarboxylase.

  10. Heat Resistance of Histidine Decarboxylase from Gram-Negative Histamine-Producing Bacteria in Seafood.

    PubMed

    Bjornsdottir-Butler, K; Bencsath, F A; McCarthy, S; Benner, R A

    2017-08-01

    Precooking of tuna is a potential critical control point (CCP) in the commercial manufacturing of canned tuna. To assess the efficacy of precooking as a CCP, an understanding of the thermal properties of histamine-producing bacteria (HPB) and their histidine decarboxylase (HDC) enzymes is required. The thermal properties of many HPB have been determined, but the thermal resistances of the HDC enzymes are unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine the D- and z-values of selected HDC enzymes to evaluate the CCP of precooking during the canning process and provide scientific data to support U.S. Food and Drug Administration guidelines. HDC (hdc) genes from three strains each of Morganella morganii, Enterobacter aerogenes, Raoultella planticola, and Photobacterium damselae were cloned, expressed, and purified using the Champion pET Directional TOPO Expression System, pET100 cloning vector, and HisPur Cobalt resin. The heat resistances of all enzymes were compared at 50°C, and the D- and z-values from one strain of each HPB were determined at 50 to 60°C. To evaluate the heat inactivation of HDC enzymes during canned tuna processing, tuna tissue was inoculated with HDCs and heated to 60°C in a water bath set at 65 and 100°C. The D-values for the HDC enzymes from M. morganii, E. aerogenes, R. planticola, and P. damselae ranged from 1.6 to 4.1, 1.6 to 6.3, 1.9 to 4.3, and 1.6 to 2.9 min, respectively, at 50 to 60°C. The z-values for M. morganii, E. aerogenes, R. planticola, and P. damselae were 19.2, 18.0, 22.0, and 13.3°C, respectively. The HDCs from all HPB except E. aerogenes showed no significant activity after being heated to 60°C. The data generated in this study will help refine current guidelines for the thermal destruction of the HDC enzymes.

  11. Adaptive mutations in sugar metabolism restore growth on glucose in a pyruvate decarboxylase negative yeast strain.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yiming; Liu, Guodong; Engqvist, Martin K M; Krivoruchko, Anastasia; Hallström, Björn M; Chen, Yun; Siewers, Verena; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-08-08

    A Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain carrying deletions in all three pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC) genes (also called Pdc negative yeast) represents a non-ethanol producing platform strain for the production of pyruvate derived biochemicals. However, it cannot grow on glucose as the sole carbon source, and requires supplementation of C2 compounds to the medium in order to meet the requirement for cytosolic acetyl-CoA for biosynthesis of fatty acids and ergosterol. In this study, a Pdc negative strain was adaptively evolved for improved growth in glucose medium via serial transfer, resulting in three independently evolved strains, which were able to grow in minimal medium containing glucose as the sole carbon source at the maximum specific rates of 0.138, 0.148, 0.141 h(-1), respectively. Several genetic changes were identified in the evolved Pdc negative strains by genomic DNA sequencing. Among these genetic changes, 4 genes were found to carry point mutations in at least two of the evolved strains: MTH1 encoding a negative regulator of the glucose-sensing signal transduction pathway, HXT2 encoding a hexose transporter, CIT1 encoding a mitochondrial citrate synthase, and RPD3 encoding a histone deacetylase. Reverse engineering of the non-evolved Pdc negative strain through introduction of the MTH1 (81D) allele restored its growth on glucose at a maximum specific rate of 0.053 h(-1) in minimal medium with 2% glucose, and the CIT1 deletion in the reverse engineered strain further increased the maximum specific growth rate to 0.069 h(-1). In this study, possible evolving mechanisms of Pdc negative strains on glucose were investigated by genome sequencing and reverse engineering. The non-synonymous mutations in MTH1 alleviated the glucose repression by repressing expression of several hexose transporter genes. The non-synonymous mutations in HXT2 and CIT1 may function in the presence of mutated MTH1 alleles and could be related to an altered central carbon metabolism in

  12. Cholera Toxin B Subunit Linked to Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase Suppresses Dendritic Cell Maturation and Function

    PubMed Central

    Odumosu, Oludare; Nicholas, Dequina; Payne, Kimberly; Langridge, William

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic cells are the largest population of antigen presenting cells in the body. One of their main functions is to regulate the delicate balance between immunity and tolerance responsible for maintenance of immunological homeostasis. Disruption of this delicate balance often results in chronic inflammation responsible for initiation of organ specific autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis and type I diabetes. The cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) is a weak mucosal adjuvant known for its ability to stimulate immunity to antigenic proteins. However, conjugation of CTB to many autoantigens can induce immunological tolerance resulting in suppression of autoimmunity. In this study, we examined whether linkage of CTB to a 5 kDa C-terminal protein fragment of the major diabetes autoantigen glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD35), can block dendritic cell (DC) functions such as biosynthesis of co-stimulatory factor proteins CD86, CD83, CD80 and CD40 and secretion of inflammatory cytokines. The results of human umbilical cord blood monocyte-derived DC - GAD35 autoantigen incubation experiments showed that inoculation of immature DCs (iDCs), with CTB-GAD35 protein dramatically suppressed levels of CD86, CD83, CD80 and CD40 co-stimulatory factor protein biosynthesis in comparison with GAD35 alone inoculated iDCs. Surprisingly, incubation of iDCs in the presence of the CTB-autoantigen and the strong immunostimulatory molecules PMA and Ionomycin revealed that CTB-GAD35 was capable of arresting PMA + Ionomycin induced DC maturation. Consistant with this finding, CTB-GAD35 mediated suppression of DC maturation was accompanied by a dramatic decrease in the secretion of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-12/23p40 and IL-6 and a significant increase in secretion of the immunosuppressive cytokine IL-10. Taken together, our experimental data suggest that linkage of the weak adjuvant CTB to the dominant type 1 diabetes autoantigen GAD strongly inhibits DC

  13. Mechanism of the Orotidine 5′-Monophosphate Decarboxylase-Catalyzed Reaction: Evidence for Substrate Destabilization

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, K.; Wood, M; Fedorov, A; Fedorov, E; Imker, H; Amyes, T; Richard, J; Almo, S; Gerlt, J

    2009-01-01

    The reaction catalyzed by orotidine 5'-monophosphate decarboxylase (OMPDC) involves a stabilized anionic intermediate, although the structural basis for the rate acceleration (kcat/knon, 7.1 x 1016) and proficiency (kcat/KM)/knon, 4.8 x 1022 M-1 is uncertain. That the OMPDCs from Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus (MtOMPDC) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae (ScOMPDC) catalyze the exchange of H6 of the UMP product with solvent deuterium allows an estimate of a lower limit on the rate acceleration associated with stabilization of the intermediate and its flanking transition states (=1010). The origin of the 'missing' contribution, =107 (1017 total - =1010), is of interest. Based on structures of liganded complexes, unfavorable electrostatic interactions between the substrate carboxylate group and a proximal Asp (Asp 70 in MtOMPDC and Asp 91 in ScOMPDC) have been proposed to contribute to the catalytic efficiency. We investigated that hypothesis by structural and functional characterization of the D70N and D70G mutants of MtOMPDC and the D91N mutant of ScOMPDC. The substitutions for Asp 70 in MtOMPDC significantly decrease the value of kcat for decarboxylation of FOMP (a more reactive substrate analogue) but have little effect on the value of kex for exchange of H6 of FUMP with solvent deuterium; the structures of wild-type MtOMPDC and its mutants are superimposable when complexed with 6-azaUMP. In contrast, the D91N mutant of ScOMPDC does not catalyze exchange of H6 of FUMP; the structures of wild-type ScOMPDC and its D91N mutant are not superimposable when complexed with 6-azaUMP, with differences in both the conformation of the active site loop and the orientation of the ligand vis vis the active site residues. We propose that the differential effects of substitutions for Asp 70 of MtOMPDC on decarboxylation and exchange provide additional evidence for a carbanionic intermediate as well as the involvement of Asp 70 in substrate destabilization.

  14. Rate and Equilibrium Constants for an Enzyme Conformational Change during Catalysis by Orotidine 5'-Monophosphate Decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Goryanova, Bogdana; Goldman, Lawrence M; Ming, Shonoi; Amyes, Tina L; Gerlt, John A; Richard, John P

    2015-07-28

    The caged complex between orotidine 5'-monophosphate decarboxylase (ScOMPDC) and 5-fluoroorotidine 5'-monophosphate (FOMP) undergoes decarboxylation ∼300 times faster than the caged complex between ScOMPDC and the physiological substrate, orotidine 5'-monophosphate (OMP). Consequently, the enzyme conformational changes required to lock FOMP at a protein cage and release product 5-fluorouridine 5'-monophosphate (FUMP) are kinetically significant steps. The caged form of ScOMPDC is stabilized by interactions between the side chains from Gln215, Tyr217, and Arg235 and the substrate phosphodianion. The control of these interactions over the barrier to the binding of FOMP and the release of FUMP was probed by determining the effect of all combinations of single, double, and triple Q215A, Y217F, and R235A mutations on kcat/Km and kcat for turnover of FOMP by wild-type ScOMPDC; its values are limited by the rates of substrate binding and product release, respectively. The Q215A and Y217F mutations each result in an increase in kcat and a decrease in kcat/Km, due to a weakening of the protein-phosphodianion interactions that favor fast product release and slow substrate binding. The Q215A/R235A mutation causes a large decrease in the kinetic parameters for ScOMPDC-catalyzed decarboxylation of OMP, which are limited by the rate of the decarboxylation step, but much smaller decreases in the kinetic parameters for ScOMPDC-catalyzed decarboxylation of FOMP, which are limited by the rate of enzyme conformational changes. By contrast, the Y217A mutation results in large decreases in kcat/Km for ScOMPDC-catalyzed decarboxylation of both OMP and FOMP, because of the comparable effects of this mutation on rate-determining decarboxylation of enzyme-bound OMP and on the rate-determining enzyme conformational change for decarboxylation of FOMP. We propose that kcat = 8.2 s(-1) for decarboxylation of FOMP by the Y217A mutant is equal to the rate constant for cage formation from the

  15. Homology-based molecular modelling of PLP-dependent histidine decarboxylase from Mmorganella morganii.

    PubMed

    Tahanejad, F S; Naderi-Manesh, H; Habibinejad, B; Mahmoudian, M

    2000-06-01

    The 3-D structural information is a prerequisite for a rational ligand design. In the absence of experimental data, model building on the basis of a known 3-D structure of a homologous protein is at present the only reliable method to obtain structural information. A homology model building study of the pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent histidine decarboxylase from Morganella morganii (HDC-MM) has been carried out based on the crystal structure of the aspartate aminotransferase from Escherichia coli (AAT-EC). The primary sequences of AAT-EC and HDC-MM were aligned by automated alignment procedure. A 3-D model of HDC-MM was constructed by copying the coordinates of the residues from the crystal structure of AAT-EC into the corresponding residues in HDC-MM. After energy-minimization of the resulting 3-D model of HDC-MM, possible active site residues were identified by fitting the substrate (l-histidine) into the proposed active-site. In our model, several residues, which have an important role in the AAT-EC active-site, are located in positions spatially identical to those in AAT-EC structure. The back-bone of the modelled active site pocket is constructed by residues; Gly-92, Gly-93, Thr-93, Ser-115, Asp-200, Ala-202, Ser-229 and Lys-232 together with residues Asn-8, His-119, Thr-171, His-198, Leu-203, His-231, Ser-236 and Ile-238. In the ligand binding site, it appears that the HDC-MM model will position l-histidine (substrate) in the area consisting of the residues; Glu-29, Ser-30, Leu-38, His-231 and Lys-232. The nitrogen atom of the imidazole ring (N2) of the substrate is predicted to interact with the carboxylate group of Ser-30. The alpha-carboxylate of histidine points toward the Lys-232 to have electrostatic interaction with its side chain nitrogen atom (N(Z)). In conclusion, this combination of sequence and 3-D structural homology between AAT-EC and HDC-MM model could provide insight in assigning the probable active site residues.

  16. Determinants of the Differential Antizyme-Binding Affinity of Ornithine Decarboxylase

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yen-Chin; Hsu, Den-Hua; Huang, Chi-Liang; Liu, Yi-Liang; Liu, Guang-Yaw; Hung, Hui-Chih

    2011-01-01

    Ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) is a ubiquitous enzyme that is conserved in all species from bacteria to humans. Mammalian ODC is degraded by the proteasome in a ubiquitin-independent manner by direct binding to the antizyme (AZ). In contrast, Trypanosoma brucei ODC has a low binding affinity toward AZ. In this study, we identified key amino acid residues that govern the differential AZ binding affinity of human and Trypanosoma brucei ODC. Multiple sequence alignments of the ODC putative AZ-binding site highlights several key amino acid residues that are different between the human and Trypanosoma brucei ODC protein sequences, including residue 119, 124,125, 129, 136, 137 and 140 (the numbers is for human ODC). We generated a septuple human ODC mutant protein where these seven bases were mutated to match the Trypanosoma brucei ODC protein sequence. The septuple mutant protein was much less sensitive to AZ inhibition compared to the WT protein, suggesting that these amino acid residues play a role in human ODC-AZ binding. Additional experiments with sextuple mutants suggest that residue 137 plays a direct role in AZ binding, and residues 119 and 140 play secondary roles in AZ binding. The dissociation constants were also calculated to quantify the affinity of the ODC-AZ binding interaction. The Kd value for the wild type ODC protein-AZ heterodimer ([ODC_WT]-AZ) is approximately 0.22 μM, while the Kd value for the septuple mutant-AZ heterodimer ([ODC_7M]-AZ) is approximately 12.4 μM. The greater than 50-fold increase in [ODC_7M]-AZ binding affinity shows that the ODC-7M enzyme has a much lower binding affinity toward AZ. For the mutant proteins ODC_7M(-Q119H) and ODC_7M(-V137D), the Kd was 1.4 and 1.2 μM, respectively. These affinities are 6-fold higher than the WT_ODC Kd, which suggests that residues 119 and 137 play a role in AZ binding. PMID:22073206

  17. Substrate Binding Mode and Molecular Basis of a Specificity Switch in Oxalate Decarboxylase

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Oxalate decarboxylase (OxDC) catalyzes the conversion of oxalate into formate and carbon dioxide in a remarkable reaction that requires manganese and dioxygen. Previous studies have shown that replacing an active-site loop segment Ser161-Glu162-Asn163-Ser164 in the N-terminal domain of OxDC with the cognate residues Asp161-Ala162-Ser-163-Asn164 of an evolutionarily related, Mn-dependent oxalate oxidase gives a chimeric variant (DASN) that exhibits significantly increased oxidase activity. The mechanistic basis for this change in activity has now been investigated using membrane inlet mass spectrometry (MIMS) and isotope effect (IE) measurements. Quantitative analysis of the reaction stoichiometry as a function of oxalate concentration, as determined by MIMS, suggests that the increased oxidase activity of the DASN OxDC variant is associated with only a small fraction of the enzyme molecules in solution. In addition, IE measurements show that C–C bond cleavage in the DASN OxDC variant proceeds via the same mechanism as in the wild-type enzyme, even though the Glu162 side chain is absent. Thus, replacement of the loop residues does not modulate the chemistry of the enzyme-bound Mn(II) ion. Taken together, these results raise the possibility that the observed oxidase activity of the DASN OxDC variant arises from an increased level of access of the solvent to the active site during catalysis, implying that the functional role of Glu162 is to control loop conformation. A 2.6 Å resolution X-ray crystal structure of a complex between oxalate and the Co(II)-substituted ΔE162 OxDC variant, in which Glu162 has been deleted from the active site loop, reveals the likely mode by which the substrate coordinates the catalytically active Mn ion prior to C–C bond cleavage. The “end-on” conformation of oxalate observed in the structure is consistent with the previously published V/K IE data and provides an empty coordination site for the dioxygen ligand that is thought to

  18. Inhibition of ornithine decarboxylase potentiates nitric oxide production in LPS-activated J774 cells

    PubMed Central

    Baydoun, Anwar R; Morgan, David M L

    1998-01-01

    We have examined whether modulation of the polyamine biosynthetic pathway, through inhibition by α-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) of the rate limiting enzyme, ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), modulates NO synthesis in J774 macrophages.DFMO potentiated LPS-stimulated nitrite production in both a concentration- and time-dependent manner, increasing nitrite levels by 48±5% at 10 mM. This effect was observed in cells pre-treated with DFMO for 24 h prior to stimulation with LPS. Addition of DFMO 12 h after LPS failed to potentiate LPS-induced nitrite production.Supplementation of the culture medium with horse serum (10%) in place of foetal calf serum (10%) caused no significant change in either LPS-induced nitrite production or in the ability of DFMO (10  mM) to potentiate LPS-induced NO synthesis.Metabolism of L-[3H]arginine to L-[3H]citrulline by partially purified inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) was not significantly altered by either DFMO (1–10 mM) or by putrescine (0.001–1 mM), spermidine (0.001–1 mM) or spermine (0.001–1 mM). iNOS activity was also unaffected by 1 mM EGTA but was markedly attenuated (70±0.07%) by L-NMMA (100 μM).Pre-incubation of cells with DFMO (10 mM; 24 h) prior to activation with LPS resulted in enhanced (∼2 fold) iNOS protein expression.These results show that DFMO potentiates LPS-induced nitrite production in the murine macrophage cell line J774. Since the only known mechanism of action of DFMO is inhibition of ODC, and thus polyamine biosynthesis, we conclude that expression of iNOS can be critically regulated by endogenous polyamines. PMID:9884080

  19. Reactions of Ferrous Coproheme Decarboxylase (HemQ) with O2 and H2O2 Yield Ferric Heme b.

    PubMed

    Streit, Bennett R; Celis, Arianna I; Shisler, Krista; Rodgers, Kenton R; Lukat-Rodgers, Gudrun S; DuBois, Jennifer L

    2017-01-10

    A recently discovered pathway for the biosynthesis of heme b ends in an unusual reaction catalyzed by coproheme decarboxylase (HemQ), where the Fe(II)-containing coproheme acts as both substrate and cofactor. Because both O2 and H2O2 are available as cellular oxidants, pathways for the reaction involving either can be proposed. Analysis of reaction kinetics and products showed that, under aerobic conditions, the ferrous coproheme-decarboxylase complex is rapidly and selectively oxidized by O2 to the ferric state. The subsequent second-order reaction between the ferric complex and H2O2 is slow, pH-dependent, and further decelerated by D2O2 (average kinetic isotope effect of 2.2). The observation of rapid reactivity with peracetic acid suggested the possible involvement of Compound I (ferryl porphyrin cation radical), consistent with coproheme and harderoheme reduction potentials in the range of heme proteins that heterolytically cleave H2O2. Resonance Raman spectroscopy nonetheless indicated a remarkably weak Fe-His interaction; how the active site structure may support heterolytic H2O2 cleavage is therefore unclear. From a cellular perspective, the use of H2O2 as an oxidant in a catalase-positive organism is intriguing, as is the unusual generation of heme b in the Fe(III) rather than Fe(II) state as the end product of heme synthesis.

  20. Two UDP-glucuronic acid decarboxylases involved in the biosynthesis of a bacterial exopolysaccharide in Paenibacillus elgii.

    PubMed

    Li, Ou; Qian, Chao-Dong; Zheng, Dao-Qiong; Wang, Pin-Mei; Liu, Yu; Jiang, Xin-Hang; Wu, Xue-Chang

    2015-04-01

    Xylose is described as a component of bacterial exopolysaccharides in only a limited number of bacterial strains. A bacterial strain, Paenibacillus elgii, B69 was shown to be efficient in producing a xylose-containing exopolysaccharide. Sequence analysis was performed to identify the genes encoding the uridine diphosphate (UDP)-glucuronic acid decarboxylase required for the synthesis of UDP-xylose, the precursor of the exopolysaccharide. Two sequences, designated as Peuxs1 and Peuxs2, were found as the candidate genes for such enzymes. The activities of the UDP-glucuronic acid decarboxylases were proven by heterologous expression and real-time nuclear magnetic resonance analysis. The intracellular activity and effect of these genes on the synthesis of exopolysaccharide were further investigated by developing a thymidylate synthase based knockout system. This system was used to substitute the conventional antibiotic resistance gene system in P. elgii, a natural multi-antibiotic resistant strain. Results of intracellular nucleotide sugar analysis showed that the intracellular UDP-xylose and UDP-glucuronic acid levels were affected in Peuxs1 or Peuxs2 knockout strains. The knockout of either Peuxs1 or Peuxs2 reduced the polysaccharide production and changed the monosaccharide ratio. No polysaccharide was found in the Peuxs1/Peuxs2 double knockout strain. Our results show that P. elgii can be efficient in forming UDP-xylose, which is then used for the synthesis of xylose-containing exopolysaccharide.

  1. In vitro translation of the upstream open reading frame in the mammalian mRNA encoding S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Raney, A; Baron, A C; Mize, G J; Law, G L; Morris, D R

    2000-08-11

    The upstream open reading frame (uORF) in the mRNA encoding S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase is a polyamine-responsive element that suppresses translation of the associated downstream cistron in vivo. In this paper, we provide the first direct evidence of peptide synthesis from the S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase uORF using an in vitro translation system. We examine both the influence of cation concentration on peptide synthesis and the effect of altering the uORF sequence on peptide synthesis. Synthesis of wild type and altered peptides was similar at all concentrations of magnesium tested. In contrast, synthesis of the wild type peptide was more sensitive than that of altered peptides to elevated concentrations of the naturally occurring polyamines, spermidine and spermine, as well as several polyamine analogs. The sensitivity of in vitro synthesis to spermidine was influenced by both the amino acid sequence and the length of the peptide product of the uORF. Findings from the present study correlate with the effects of the uORF and polyamines on translation of a downstream cistron in vivo and support the hypothesis that polyamines and the structure of the nascent peptide create a rate-limiting step in uORF translation, perhaps through a ribosome stalling mechanism.

  2. Structural insights into the Escherichia coli lysine decarboxylases and molecular determinants of interaction with the AAA+ ATPase RavA

    PubMed Central

    Kandiah, Eaazhisai; Carriel, Diego; Perard, Julien; Malet, Hélène; Bacia, Maria; Liu, Kaiyin; Chan, Sze W. S.; Houry, Walid A.; Ollagnier de Choudens, Sandrine; Elsen, Sylvie; Gutsche, Irina

    2016-01-01

    The inducible lysine decarboxylase LdcI is an important enterobacterial acid stress response enzyme whereas LdcC is its close paralogue thought to play mainly a metabolic role. A unique macromolecular cage formed by two decamers of the Escherichia coli LdcI and five hexamers of the AAA+ ATPase RavA was shown to counteract acid stress under starvation. Previously, we proposed a pseudoatomic model of the LdcI-RavA cage based on its cryo-electron microscopy map and crystal structures of an inactive LdcI decamer and a RavA monomer. We now present cryo-electron microscopy 3D reconstructions of the E. coli LdcI and LdcC, and an improved map of the LdcI bound to the LARA domain of RavA, at pH optimal for their enzymatic activity. Comparison with each other and with available structures uncovers differences between LdcI and LdcC explaining why only the acid stress response enzyme is capable of binding RavA. We identify interdomain movements associated with the pH-dependent enzyme activation and with the RavA binding. Multiple sequence alignment coupled to a phylogenetic analysis reveals that certain enterobacteria exert evolutionary pressure on the lysine decarboxylase towards the cage-like assembly with RavA, implying that this complex may have an important function under particular stress conditions. PMID:27080013

  3. The role of aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase in bacillamide C biosynthesis by Bacillus atrophaeus C89.

    PubMed

    Yuwen, Lei; Zhang, Feng-Li; Chen, Qi-Hua; Lin, Shuang-Jun; Zhao, Yi-Lei; Li, Zhi-Yong

    2013-01-01

    For biosynthesis of bacillamide C by Bacillus atrophaeus C89 associated with South China sea sponge Dysidea avara, it is hypothesized that decarboxylation from L-tryptophan to tryptamine could be performed before amidation by the downstream aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) to the non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS) gene cluster for biosynthesizing bacillamide C. The structural analysis of decarboxylases' known substrates in KEGG database and alignment analysis of amino acid sequence of AADC have suggested that L-tryptophan and L-phenylalanine are the potential substrates of AADC. The enzymatic kinetic experiment of the recombinant AADC proved that L-tryptophan is a more reactive substrate of AADC than L-phenylalanine. Meanwhile, the AADC-catalyzed conversion of L-tryptophan into tryptamine was confirmed by means of HPLC and LC/MS. Thus during bacillamide C biosynthesis, the decarboxylation of L-tryptophan to tryptamine is likely conducted first under AADC catalysis, followed by the amidation of tryptamine with the carboxylic product of NRPS gene cluster.

  4. Evaluation of the Substrate Scope of Benzoic Acid (De)carboxylases According to Chemical and Biochemical Parameters.

    PubMed

    Pesci, Lorenzo; Kara, Selin; Liese, Andreas

    2016-10-04

    The enzymatic carboxylation of phenolic compounds has been attracting increasing interest in recent years, owing to its regioselectivity and technical potential as a biocatalytic equivalent for the Kolbe-Schmitt reaction. Mechanistically the reaction was demonstrated to occur through electrophilic aromatic substitution/water elimination with bicarbonate as a cosubstrate. The effects of the substituents on the phenolic ring have not yet been elucidated in detail, but this would give detailed insight into the substrate-activity relationship and would provide predictability for the acceptance of future substrates. In this report we show how the kinetic and (apparent) thermodynamic behavior can be explained through the evaluation of linear free energy relationships based on electronic, steric, and geometric parameters and through the consideration of enzyme-ligand interactions. Moreover, the similarity between the benzoic acid decarboxylases and the amidohydrolases superfamily is investigated, and promiscuous hydrolytic activity of the decarboxylase in the context of the hydrolysis of an activated ester bond has been established. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Biogenic Amine Degradation by Bacillus Species Isolated from Traditional Fermented Soybean Food and Detection of Decarboxylase-Related Genes.

    PubMed

    Eom, Jeong Seon; Seo, Bo Young; Choi, Hye Sun

    2015-09-01

    Biogenic amines in some food products present considerable toxicological risks as potential human carcinogens when consumed in excess concentrations. In this study, we investigated the degradation of the biogenic amines histamine and tyramine and the presence of genes encoding histidine and tyrosine decarboxylases and amine oxidase in Bacillus species isolated from fermented soybean food. No expression of histidine and tyrosine decarboxylase genes (hdc and tydc) were detected in the Bacillus species isolated (B. subtilis HJ0-6, B. subtilis D'J53-4, and B. idriensis RD13-10), although substantial levels of amine oxidase gene (yobN) expression were observed. We also found that the three selected strains, as non-biogenic amineproducing bacteria, were significantly able to degrade the biogenic amines histamine and tyramine. These results indicated that the selected Bacillus species could be used as a starter culture for the control of biogenic amine accumulation and degradation in food. Our study findings also provided the basis for the development of potential biological control agents against these biogenic amines for use in the food preservation and food safety sectors.

  6. Characterization of a pyridoxal-5'-phosphate-dependent l-lysine decarboxylase/oxidase from Burkholderia sp. AIU 395.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Asami; Matsui, Daisuke; Takahashi, Narumi; Yamada, Miwa; Asano, Yasuhisa; Isobe, Kimiyasu

    2014-11-01

    A novel enzyme, which catalyzed decarboxylation of l-lysine into cadaverine with release of carbon dioxide and oxidative deamination of l-lysine into l-2-aminoadipic 5-semialdehyde with release of ammonia and hydrogen peroxide, was found from a newly isolated Burkholderia sp. AIU 395. The enzyme was specific to l-lysine and did not exhibit enzyme activities for other l-amino acids, l-lysine derivatives, d-amino acids, and amines. The apparent Km values for l-lysine in the oxidation and decarboxylation reactions were estimated to be 0.44 mM and 0.84 mM, respectively. The molecular mass was estimated to be 150 kDa, which was composed of two identical subunits with molecular mass of 76.5 kDa. The enzyme contained one mol of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate per subunit as a prosthetic group. The enzyme exhibiting decarboxylase and oxidase activities for l-lysine was first reported here, while the deduced amino acid sequence was homologous to that of putative lysine decarboxylases from the genus Burkholderia.

  7. Orotic acid decarboxylation in water and nonpolar solvents: a potential role for desolvation in the action of OMP decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Charles A; Wolfenden, Richard

    2009-09-15

    OMP decarboxylase (ODCase) generates a very large rate enhancement without the assistance of metals or other cofactors. The uncatalyzed decarboxylation of 1-methylorotate in water is shown to involve the monoanion, although uncharged 1-methylorotic acid is decarboxylated at a similar rate. To measure the extent to which the rate of the nonenzymatic decarboxylation of orotate derivatives might be enhanced by their removal from solvent water, the 1-phosphoribosyl moiety of OMP was replaced with 1-substituents that would allow it to enter less polar solvents. When the tetrabutylammonium salt of 1-cyclohexylorotate was transferred from water to a series of dipolar aprotic solvents, its rate of decarboxylation increased markedly, varying with the relative ability of each solvent to release the substrate in the ground state from stabilization by solvent water acting as a proton donor. These findings are consistent with the view that separation of the substrate from solvent water may contribute, at least to a limited extent, to the rate enhancement produced by ODCase. This enzyme's active site, like that of another cofactorless enzyme recently shown to produce a rate enhancement similar in magnitude (uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase), is equipped with an ammonium group positioned in such a way as to balance the electrostatic charge of the carboxylate group of the substrate and later supply a proton to the incipient carbanion in a relatively waterless environment.

  8. Structural Characterization of the Molecular Events during a Slow Substrate-Product Transition in Orotidine 5'-Monophosphate Decarboxylase

    SciTech Connect

    Fujihashi, Masahiro; Wei, Lianhu; Kotra, Lakshmi P; Pai, Emil F

    2009-04-06

    Crystal structures of substrate-product complexes of Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum orotidine 5'-monophosphate decarboxylase, obtained at various steps in its catalysis of the unusual transformation of 6-cyano-uridine 5'-monophosphate (UMP) into barbituric acid ribosyl monophosphate, show that the cyano substituent of the substrate, when bound to the active site, is first bent significantly from the plane of the pyrimidine ring and then replaced by an oxygen atom. Although the K72A and D70A/K72A mutants are either catalytically impaired or even completely inactive, they still display bending of the C6 substituent. Interestingly, high-resolution structures of the D70A and D75N mutants revealed a covalent bond between C6 of UMP and the Lys72 side chain after the -CN moiety's release. The same covalent bond was observed when the native enzyme was incubated with 6-azido-UMP and 6-iodo-UMP; in contrast, the K72A mutant transformed 6-iodo-UMP to barbituric acid ribosyl 5'-monophosphate. These results demonstrate that, given a suitable environment, native orotidine 5'-monophosphate decarboxylase and several of its mutants are not restricted to the physiologically relevant decarboxylation; they are able to catalyze even nucleophilic substitution reactions but consistently maintain distortion on the C6 substituent as an important feature of catalysis.

  9. Hetero- and homodimerization of Arabidopsis thaliana arginine decarboxylase AtADC1 and AtADC2.

    PubMed

    Maruri-López, Israel; Jiménez-Bremont, Juan F

    2017-03-11

    The arginine decarboxylase enzyme (ADC) carries out the production of agmatine from arginine, which is the precursor of the first polyamine (PA) known as putrescine; subsequently, putrescine is turned into the higher PAs, spermidine and spermine. In Arabidopsis thaliana PA production occurs only from arginine and this step is initiated by two ADC paralogues, AtADC1 and AtADC2. PA production is essential for A. thaliana life cycle. Here, we analyzed the sub-cellular localization of AtADC1 and AtADC2 enzymes through GFP translational fusions. Our data revealed that the A. thaliana arginine decarboxylase enzymes exhibit a dual sub-cellular localization both in the cytosol and chloroplast. Moreover, we examined the protein dimer assembly using a Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation (BiFC) approach, which showed that AtADC1 and AtADC2 proteins were able to form homodimers in the cytosol and chloroplast. Interestingly, we found the formation of AtADC1/AtADC2 heterodimers with similar sub-cellular localization than homodimers. This study reveals that both ADC proteins are located in the same cell compartments, and they are able to form protein interaction complexes with each other.

  10. Acidic residues important for substrate binding and cofactor reactivity in eukaryotic ornithine decarboxylase identified by alanine scanning mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Osterman, A L; Kinch, L N; Grishin, N V; Phillips, M A

    1995-05-19

    Ornithine decarboxylases from Trypanosoma brucei, mouse, and Leishmania donovani share strict specificity for three basic amino acids, ornithine, lysine, and arginine. To identify residues involved in this substrate specificity and/or in the reaction chemistry, six conserved acidic resides (Asp-88, Glu-94, Asp-233, Glu-274, Asp-361, and Asp-364) were mutated to alanine in the T. brucei enzyme. Each mutation causes a substantial loss in enzyme efficiency. Most notably, mutation of Asp-361 increases the Km for ornithine by 2000-fold, with little effect on kcat, suggesting that this residue is an important substrate binding determinant. Mutation of the only strictly conserved acidic residue, Glu-274, decreases kcat 50-fold; however, substitution of N-methylpyridoxal-5'-phosphate for pyridoxal-5'-phosphate as the cofactor in the reaction restores the kcat of E274A to wild-type levels. These data demonstrate that Glu-274 interacts with the protonated pyridine nitrogen of the cofactor to enhance the electron withdrawing capability of the ring, analogous to Asp-222 in aspartate aminotransferase (Onuffer, J. J., and Kirsch, J. F. (1994) Protein Eng. 7, 413-424). Eukaryotic ornithine decarboxylase is a homodimer with two shared active sites. Residues 88, 94, 233, and 274 are contributed to each active site from the same subunit as Lys-69, while residues 361 and 364 are part of the Cys-360 subunit.

  11. Functional Study of Lysine Decarboxylases from Klebsiella pneumoniae in Escherichia coli and Application of Whole Cell Bioconversion for Cadaverine Production.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung-Ho; Kim, Hyun Joong; Kim, Yong Hyun; Jeon, Jong Min; Song, Hun Suk; Kim, Junyoung; No, So-Young; Shin, Ji-Hyun; Choi, Kwon-Young; Park, Kyung Moon; Yang, Yung-Hun

    2016-09-28

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is a gram-negative, non-motile, rod-shaped, and encapsulated bacterium in the normal flora of the intestines, mouth, skin, and food, and has decarboxylation activity, which results in generation of diamines (cadaverine, agmatine, and putrescine). However, there is no specific information on the exact mechanism of decarboxylation in K. pnuemoniae. Specifically lysine decarboxylases that generate cadaverine with a wide range of applications has not been shown. Therefore, we performed a functional study of lysine decarboxylases. Enzymatic characteristics such as optimal pH, temperature, and substrates were examined by overexpressing and purifying CadA and LdcC. CadA and LdcC from K. pneumoniae had a preference for L-lysine, and an optimal reaction temperature of 37°C and an optimal pH of 7. Although the activity of purified CadA from K. pneumoniae was lower than that of CadA from E. coli, the activity of K. pneumoniae CadA in whole cell bioconversion was comparable to that of E. coli CadA, resulting in 90% lysine conversion to cadaverine with pyridoxal 5'-phosphate L-lysine.

  12. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of orotidine 5′-monophosphate decarboxylase from the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum

    SciTech Connect

    Krungkrai, Sudaratana R.; Tokuoka, Keiji; Kusakari, Yukiko; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Adachi, Hiroaki; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi; Takano, Kazufumi; Murakami, Satoshi; Mori, Yusuke; Kai, Yasushi; Krungkrai, Jerapan; Horii, Toshihiro

    2006-06-01

    Orotidine 5′-monophosphate decarboxylase of human malaria parasite P. falciparum was crystallized by the seeding method in a hanging drop using PEG 3000 as a precipitant. A complete set of diffraction data from a native crystal was collected to 2.7 Å resolution at 100 K using synchrotron radiation. Orotidine 5′-monophosphate (OMP) decarboxylase (OMPDC; EC 4.1.1.23) catalyzes the final step in the de novo synthesis of uridine 5′-monophosphate (UMP) and defects in the enzyme are lethal in the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Active recombinant P. falciparum OMPDC (PfOMPDC) was crystallized by the seeding method in a hanging drop using PEG 3000 as a precipitant. A complete set of diffraction data from a native crystal was collected to 2.7 Å resolution at 100 K using synchrotron radiation at the Swiss Light Source. The crystal exhibits trigonal symmetry (space group R3), with hexagonal unit-cell parameters a = b = 201.81, c = 44.03 Å. With a dimer in the asymmetric unit, the solvent content is 46% (V{sub M} = 2.3 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1})

  13. Steady-state and transient-state analysis of growth and metabolite production in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain with reduced pyruvate-decarboxylase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Flikweert, M.T.; Kuyper, M.; Maris, A.J.A. van; Koetter, P.; Dijken, J.P. van; Pronk, J.T.

    1999-07-01

    Pyruvate decarboxylase is a key enzyme in the production of low-molecular-weight byproducts (ethanol, acetate) in biomass-directed applications of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To investigate whether decreased expression levels of pyruvate decarboxylase can reduce byproduct formation, the PDC2 gene, which encodes a positive regulator of pyruvate-decarboxylase synthesis, was inactivated in the prototrophic strain S. cerevisiae CEN.PK113-7D. This caused a 3--4-fold reduction of pyruvate-decarboxylase activity in glucose-limited, aerobic chemostat cultures grown at a dilution rate of 0.10 h{sup {minus}1}. Upon exposure of such cultures to a 50 mM glucose pulse, ethanol and acetate were the major byproducts formed by the wild type. In the pdc2{Delta} strain, formation of ethanol and acetate was reduced by 60--70%. In contrast to the wild type, the pdc2{Delta} strain produced substantial amounts of pyruvate after a glucose pulse. Nevertheless, its overall byproduct formation was ca. 50% lower. The specific rate of glucose consumption after a glucose pulse to pdc2{Delta} cultures was about 40% lower than in wild-type cultures.

  14. Identification of a tyrosine decarboxylase gene (tdcA) in Streptococcus thermophilus 1TT45 and analysis of its expression and tyramine production in milk.

    PubMed

    La Gioia, Federica; Rizzotti, Lucia; Rossi, Franca; Gardini, Fausto; Tabanelli, Giulia; Torriani, Sandra

    2011-02-01

    In this study, a tyrosine decarboxylase gene (tdcA) was identified in 1 among 83 Streptococcus thermophilus strains tested. Its sequence, nearly identical to that of a tdcA of Lactobacillus curvatus, indicated a horizontal gene transfer event. Transcription in milk and the formation of critical levels of tyramine were observed in the presence of tyrosine.

  15. Requirement of a Functional Flavin Mononucleotide Prenyltransferase for the Activity of a Bacterial Decarboxylase in a Heterologous Muconic Acid Pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Weber, Heike E; Gottardi, Manuela; Brückner, Christine; Oreb, Mislav; Boles, Eckhard; Tripp, Joanna

    2017-05-15

    Biotechnological production of cis,cis-muconic acid from renewable feedstocks is an environmentally sustainable alternative to conventional, petroleum-based methods. Even though a heterologous production pathway for cis,cis-muconic acid has already been established in the host organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the generation of industrially relevant amounts of cis,cis-muconic acid is hampered by the low activity of the bacterial protocatechuic acid (PCA) decarboxylase AroY isomeric subunit C(iso) (AroY-C(iso)), leading to secretion of large amounts of the intermediate PCA into the medium. In the present study, we show that the activity of AroY-C(iso) in S. cerevisiae strongly depends on the strain background. We could demonstrate that the strain dependency is caused by the presence or absence of an intact genomic copy of PAD1, which encodes a mitochondrial enzyme responsible for the biosynthesis of a prenylated form of the cofactor flavin mononucleotide (prFMN). The inactivity of AroY-C(iso) in strain CEN.PK2-1 could be overcome by plasmid-borne expression of Pad1 or its bacterial homologue AroY subunit B (AroY-B). Our data reveal that the two enzymes perform the same function in decarboxylation of PCA by AroY-C(iso), although coexpression of Pad1 led to higher decarboxylase activity. Conversely, AroY-B can replace Pad1 in its function in decarboxylation of phenylacrylic acids by ferulic acid decarboxylase Fdc1. Targeting of the majority of AroY-B to mitochondria by fusion to a heterologous mitochondrial targeting signal did not improve decarboxylase activity of AroY-C(iso), suggesting that mitochondrial localization has no major impact on cofactor biosynthesis.IMPORTANCE In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the decarboxylation of protocatechuic acid (PCA) to catechol is the bottleneck reaction in the heterologous biosynthetic pathway for production of cis,cis-muconic acid, a valuable precursor for the production of bulk chemicals. In our work, we demonstrate the

  16. The ferredoxin-like domain of the activating enzyme is required for generating a lasting glycyl radical in 4-hydroxyphenylacetate decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Selvaraj, Brinda; Pierik, Antonio J; Bill, Eckhard; Martins, Berta M

    2014-12-01

    4-Hydroxyphenylacetate decarboxylase-activating enzyme (4Hpad-AE) uses S-adenosylmethionine (SAM or AdoMet) and a [4Fe-4S] ²⁺/⁺cluster (RS cluster) to generate a stable glycyl radical on the decarboxylase. 4Hpad-AE might bind up to two auxiliary [4Fe-4S] clusters coordinated by a ferredoxin-like insert C-terminal to the RS cluster-binding motif. Except for the AEs of pyruvate formate-lyase and anaerobic ribonucleotide reductase, all glycyl radical-activating enzymes possess a similar ferredoxin-like domain, whose functional role is still poorly understood. To assess the role of the putative ferredoxin clusters from 4Hpad-AE, we combined biochemical and spectroscopic methods to characterize a truncated version of the protein (Δ66-AE) devoid of the ferredoxin-like domain. We found that Δ66-AE is stable, harbors a fully active RS cluster and can activate the decarboxylase. From the similar cleavage rates for S-adenosylmethionine of Δ66-AE and wild-type AE, we infer the reactivity of the RS cluster is unperturbed by the absence of the ferredoxin-like domain. Thus, the auxiliary clusters are not required as electron conduit to the RS cluster for effective reductive cleavage of SAM. The activation of the decarboxylase by Δ66-AE is almost as fast as with wild-type AE, but the generated glycyl radical is short living. We postulate that the ferredoxin-like domain is not required for SAM-dependent glycyl radical generation in the decarboxylase, but is necessary for producing a lasting glycyl radical.

  17. Pyruvate Decarboxylase Catalyzes Decarboxylation of Branched-Chain 2-Oxo Acids but Is Not Essential for Fusel Alcohol Production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    ter Schure, Eelko G.; Flikweert, Marcel T.; van Dijken, Johannes P.; Pronk, Jack T.; Verrips, C. Theo

    1998-01-01

    The fusel alcohols 3-methyl-1-butanol, 2-methyl-1-butanol, and 2-methyl-propanol are important flavor compounds in yeast-derived food products and beverages. The formation of these compounds from branched-chain amino acids is generally assumed to occur via the Ehrlich pathway, which involves the concerted action of a branched-chain transaminase, a decarboxylase, and an alcohol dehydrogenase. Partially purified preparations of pyruvate decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.1) have been reported to catalyze the decarboxylation of the branched-chain 2-oxo acids formed upon transamination of leucine, isoleucine, and valine. Indeed, in a coupled enzymatic assay with horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase, cell extracts of a wild-type Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain exhibited significant decarboxylation rates with these branched-chain 2-oxo acids. Decarboxylation of branched-chain 2-oxo acids was not detectable in cell extracts of an isogenic strain in which all three PDC genes had been disrupted. Experiments with cell extracts from S. cerevisiae mutants expressing a single PDC gene demonstrated that both PDC1- and PDC5-encoded isoenzymes can decarboxylate branched-chain 2-oxo acids. To investigate whether pyruvate decarboxylase is essential for fusel alcohol production by whole cells, wild-type S. cerevisiae and an isogenic pyruvate decarboxylase-negative strain were grown on ethanol with a mixture of leucine, isoleucine, and valine as the nitrogen source. Surprisingly, the three corresponding fusel alcohols were produced in both strains. This result proves that decarboxylation of branched-chain 2-oxo acids via pyruvate decarboxylase is not an essential step in fusel alcohol production. PMID:9546164

  18. Ornithine and arginine decarboxylase activities and effect of some polyamine biosynthesis inhibitors on Gigaspora rosea germinating spores.

    PubMed

    Sannazzaro, Analía I; Alvarez, Cora L; Menéndez, Ana B; Pieckenstain, Fernando L; Albertó, Edgardo O; Ruiz, Oscar A

    2004-01-15

    The pathways for putrescine biosynthesis and the effects of polyamine biosynthesis inhibitors on the germination and hyphal development of Gigaspora rosea spores were investigated. Incubation of spores with different radioactive substrates demonstrated that both arginine and ornithine decarboxylase pathways participate in putrescine biosynthesis in G. rosea. Spermidine and spermine were the most abundant polyamines in this fungus. The putrescine biosynthesis inhibitors alpha-difluoromethylarginine and alpha-difluoromethylornithine, as well as the spermidine synthase inhibitor cyclohexylamine, slightly decreased polyamine levels. However, only the latter interfered with spore germination. The consequences of the use of putrescine biosynthesis inhibitors for the control of plant pathogenic fungi on the viability of G. rosea spores in soil are discussed.

  19. Improved conversion of cinnamaldehyde derivatives to diol compounds via a pyruvate decarboxylase-dependent mechanism in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Miyakoshi, Shunichi; Negishi, Yukari; Sekiya, Yusuke; Nakajima, Satoshi

    2016-03-01

    Cinnamaldehyde is stereospecifically converted to (2S,3R) 5-phenylpent-4-ene-2,3-diol, an important starting material for the synthesis of biologically active compounds, by the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Immobilization of the yeast in calcium alginate capsules suppressed the formation of by-products and increased accumulation of the diol compounds. The mechanism of cinnamaldehyde conversion was investigated by using recombinant strains of Escherichia coli and S. cerevisiae carrying the pyruvate decarboxylase gene PDC1. As a result, condensation of the substrate with acetaldehyde was enhanced by PDC and flow to the diol product was altered. Copyright © 2015 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Structure of lpg0406, a carboxymuconolactone decarboxylase family protein possibly involved in antioxidative response from Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaofang; Hu, Yanjin; Yang, Bo; Gong, Xiaojian; Zhang, Nannan; Niu, Liwen; Wu, Yun; Ge, Honghua

    2015-12-01

    Lpg0406, a hypothetical protein from Legionella pneumophila, belongs to carboxymuconolactone decarboxylase (CMD) family. We determined the crystal structure of lpg0406 both in its apo and reduced form. The structures reveal that lpg0406 forms a hexamer and have disulfide exchange properties. The protein has an all-helical fold with a conserved thioredoxin-like active site CXXC motif and a proton relay system similar to that of alkylhydroperoxidase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtAhpD), suggesting that lpg0406 might function as an enzyme with peroxidase activity and involved in antioxidant defense. A comparison of the size and the surface topology of the putative substrate-binding region between lpg0406 and MtAhpD indicates that the two enzymes accommodate the different substrate preferences. The structural findings will enhance understanding of the CMD family protein structure and its various functions.

  1. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of orotidine 5′-monophosphate decarboxylase from the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Krungkrai, Sudaratana R.; Tokuoka, Keiji; Kusakari, Yukiko; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Adachi, Hiroaki; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi; Takano, Kazufumi; Murakami, Satoshi; Mori, Yusuke; Kai, Yasushi; Krungkrai, Jerapan; Horii, Toshihiro

    2006-01-01

    Orotidine 5′-monophosphate (OMP) decarboxylase (OMPDC; EC 4.1.1.23) catalyzes the final step in the de novo synthesis of uridine 5′-monophosphate (UMP) and defects in the enzyme are lethal in the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Active recombinant P. falciparum OMPDC (PfOMPDC) was crystallized by the seeding method in a hanging drop using PEG 3000 as a precipitant. A complete set of diffraction data from a native crystal was collected to 2.7 Å resolution at 100 K using synchrotron radiation at the Swiss Light Source. The crystal exhibits trigonal symmetry (space group R3), with hexagonal unit-cell parameters a = b = 201.81, c = 44.03 Å. With a dimer in the asymmetric unit, the solvent content is 46% (V M = 2.3 Å3 Da−1). PMID:16754976

  2. Amino acids allosterically regulate the thiamine diphosphate-dependent alpha-keto acid decarboxylase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Werther, Tobias; Spinka, Michael; Tittmann, Kai; Schütz, Anja; Golbik, Ralph; Mrestani-Klaus, Carmen; Hübner, Gerhard; König, Stephan

    2008-02-29

    The gene rv0853c from Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain H37Rv codes for a thiamine diphosphate-dependent alpha-keto acid decarboxylase (MtKDC), an enzyme involved in the amino acid degradation via the Ehrlich pathway. Steady state kinetic experiments were performed to determine the substrate specificity of MtKDC. The mycobacterial enzyme was found to convert a broad spectrum of branched-chain and aromatic alpha-keto acids. Stopped-flow kinetics showed that MtKDC is allosterically activated by alpha-keto acids. Even more, we demonstrate that also amino acids are potent activators of this thiamine diphosphate-dependent enzyme. Thus, metabolic flow through the Ehrlich pathway can be directly regulated at the decarboxylation step. The influence of amino acids on MtKDC catalysis was investigated, and implications for other thiamine diphosphate-dependent enzymes are discussed.

  3. Atomic Resolution Structure of the Orotidine 5′-Monophosphate Decarboxylase Product Complex Combined with Surface Plasmon Resonance Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fujihashi, Masahiro; Mito, Kazuya; Pai, Emil F.; Miki, Kunio

    2013-01-01

    Orotidine 5′-monophosphate decarboxylase (ODCase) accelerates the decarboxylation of its substrate by 17 orders of magnitude. One argument brought forward against steric/electrostatic repulsion causing substrate distortion at the carboxylate substituent as part of the catalysis has been the weak binding affinity of the decarboxylated product (UMP). The crystal structure of the UMP complex of ODCase at atomic resolution (1.03 Å) shows steric competition between the product UMP and the side chain of a catalytic lysine residue. Surface plasmon resonance analysis indicates that UMP binds 5 orders of magnitude more tightly to a mutant in which the interfering side chain has been removed than to wild-type ODCase. These results explain the low affinity of UMP and counter a seemingly very strong argument against a contribution of substrate distortion to the catalytic reaction mechanism of ODCase. PMID:23395822

  4. Inhibition of placental ornithine decarboxylase by DL-alpha-difluoro-methyl ornithine causes fetal growth restriction in rat.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Makoto; Hiramatsu, Yuji; Masuyama, Hisashi; Mizutani, Yasushi; Kudo, Takafumi

    2002-02-08

    The roles of polyamines in intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) is studied. The DL-alpha-difluoromethyl ornithine (DFMO), an irreversible inhibitor of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) which is a rate limiting enzyme of polyamine synthesis was administrated to pregnant rats so that we obtained rat fetuses with IUGR. The changes of maternal nutrition, damage of the placenta, and the direct effect of DFMO on the fetus were examined in this IUGR model. Administration of DFMO did not induced changes of maternal nutrition except for triglyceride and the fetal metabolic state. But the placental weight, ODC activity, and DNA in the placenta were decreased significantly. The ODC activity in the total placenta decreased to less than 10% of that of the control. Depression of ODC activity in the placenta may be the major cause of IUGR induced by DFMO administration, and polyamines play important roles to carry pregnancy.

  5. Improvement of ethanol production by recombinant expression of pyruvate decarboxylase in the white-rot fungus Phanerochaete sordida YK-624.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianqiao; Hirabayashi, Sho; Mori, Toshio; Kawagishi, Hirokazu; Hirai, Hirofumi

    2016-07-01

    To improve ethanol production by Phanerochaete sordida YK-624, the pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC) gene was cloned from and reintroduced into this hyper lignin-degrading fungus; the gene encodes a key enzyme in alcoholic fermentation. We screened 16 transformant P. sordida YK-624 strains that each expressed a second, recombinant PDC gene (pdc) and then identified the transformant strain (designated GP7) with the highest ethanol production. Direct ethanol production from hardwood was 1.41 higher with GP7 than with wild-type P. sordida YK-624. RT-PCR analysis indicated that the increased PDC activity was caused by elevated recombinant pdc expression. Taken together, these results suggested that ethanol production by P. sordida YK-624 can be improved by the stable expression of an additional, recombinant pdc.

  6. Inhibition of Morganella morganii Histidine Decarboxylase Activity and Histamine Accumulation in Mackerel Muscle Derived from Filipendula ulumaria Extracts.

    PubMed

    Nitta, Yoko; Yasukata, Fumiko; Kitamoto, Noritoshi; Ito, Mikiko; Sakaue, Motoyoshi; Kikuzaki, Hiroe; Ueno, Hiroshi

    2016-03-01

    Filipendula ulmaria, also known as meadowsweet, is an herb; its extract was examined for the prevention of histamine production, primarily that caused by contaminated fish. The efficacy of meadowsweet was assessed using two parameters: inhibition of Morganella morganii histidine decarboxylase (HDC) and inhibition of histamine accumulation in mackerel. Ellagitannins from F. ulmaria (rugosin D, rugosin A methyl ester, tellimagrandin II, and rugosin A) were previously shown to be potent inhibitors of human HDC; and in the present work, these compounds inhibited M. morganii HDC, with half maximal inhibitory concentration values of 1.5, 4.4, 6.1, and 6.8 μM, respectively. Application of the extracts (at 2 wt%) to mackerel meat yielded significantly decreased histamine accumulation compared with treatment with phosphate-buffered saline as a control. Hence, F. ulmaria exhibits inhibitory activity against bacterial HDC and might be effective for preventing food poisoning caused by histamine.

  7. Determination of glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies (GADA) IgG subclasses – comparison of three immunoprecipitation assays (IPAs)

    PubMed Central

    Hillman, M; Törn, C; Landin-Olsson, M

    2007-01-01

    IgG subclasses of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD65) antibodies (GADA) may reflect the immunological state in the pancreas of GADA-positive patients with autoimmune diabetes. The use of biotin-conjugated antibodies and streptavidin Sepharose are used commonly in immunoprecipitation assays (IPA) based on 125I- or 35S-labelled antigens to capture IgG subclasses directed against IA-2 or GAD65. We have compared three different immunoprecipitation assays for the determination of GADA IgG subclasses. Two of the assays were based on the biotin and streptavidin systems provided in a solid (immobilized) or liquid (mobilized) phase binding environment. The third assay was based on N-hydroxysuccinimide (immobilized) interaction with primary amines (i.e. lysine residues) on the antibody. We found the liquid phase binding assay (LPBA) to be the most stable assay, with a comparatively low coefficient of variation and background. PMID:17666094

  8. Engineering Salidroside Biosynthetic Pathway in Hairy Root Cultures of Rhodiola crenulata Based on Metabolic Characterization of Tyrosine Decarboxylase

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Lingjiang; Liu, Xiaoqiang; Qiu, Fei; Zheng, Weilie; Quan, Hong; Liao, Zhihua; Chen, Min; Huang, Wenlin; Liu, Wanhong; Wang, Qiang

    2013-01-01

    Tyrosine decarboxylase initializes salidroside biosynthesis. Metabolic characterization of tyrosine decarboxylase gene from Rhodiola crenulata (RcTYDC) revealed that it played an important role in salidroside biosynthesis. Recombinant 53 kDa RcTYDC converted tyrosine into tyramine. RcTYDC gene expression was induced coordinately with the expression of RcUDPGT (the last gene involved in salidroside biosynthesis) in SA/MeJA treatment; the expression of RcTYDC and RcUDPGT was dramatically upregulated by SA, respectively 49 folds and 36 folds compared with control. MeJA also significantly increased the expression of RcTYDC and RcUDPGT in hairy root cultures. The tissue profile of RcTYDC and RcUDPGT was highly similar: highest expression levels found in stems, higher expression levels in leaves than in flowers and roots. The gene expressing levels were consistent with the salidroside accumulation levels. This strongly suggested that RcTYDC played an important role in salidroside biosynthesis in R. crenulata. Finally, RcTYDC was used to engineering salidroside biosynthetic pathway in R. crenulata hairy roots via metabolic engineering strategy of overexpression. All the transgenic lines showed much higher expression levels of RcTYDC than non-transgenic one. The transgenic lines produced tyramine, tyrosol and salidroside at higher levels, which were respectively 3.21–6.84, 1.50–2.19 and 1.27–3.47 folds compared with the corresponding compound in non-transgenic lines. In conclusion, RcTYDC overexpression promoted tyramine biosynthesis that facilitated more metabolic flux flowing toward the downstream pathway and as a result, the intermediate tyrosol was accumulated more that led to the increased production of the end-product salidroside. PMID:24124492

  9. Engineering salidroside biosynthetic pathway in hairy root cultures of Rhodiola crenulata based on metabolic characterization of tyrosine decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Lan, Xiaozhong; Chang, Kai; Zeng, Lingjiang; Liu, Xiaoqiang; Qiu, Fei; Zheng, Weilie; Quan, Hong; Liao, Zhihua; Chen, Min; Huang, Wenlin; Liu, Wanhong; Wang, Qiang

    2013-01-01

    Tyrosine decarboxylase initializes salidroside biosynthesis. Metabolic characterization of tyrosine decarboxylase gene from Rhodiola crenulata (RcTYDC) revealed that it played an important role in salidroside biosynthesis. Recombinant 53 kDa RcTYDC converted tyrosine into tyramine. RcTYDC gene expression was induced coordinately with the expression of RcUDPGT (the last gene involved in salidroside biosynthesis) in SA/MeJA treatment; the expression of RcTYDC and RcUDPGT was dramatically upregulated by SA, respectively 49 folds and 36 folds compared with control. MeJA also significantly increased the expression of RcTYDC and RcUDPGT in hairy root cultures. The tissue profile of RcTYDC and RcUDPGT was highly similar: highest expression levels found in stems, higher expression levels in leaves than in flowers and roots. The gene expressing levels were consistent with the salidroside accumulation levels. This strongly suggested that RcTYDC played an important role in salidroside biosynthesis in R. crenulata. Finally, RcTYDC was used to engineering salidroside biosynthetic pathway in R. crenulata hairy roots via metabolic engineering strategy of overexpression. All the transgenic lines showed much higher expression levels of RcTYDC than non-transgenic one. The transgenic lines produced tyramine, tyrosol and salidroside at higher levels, which were respectively 3.21-6.84, 1.50-2.19 and 1.27-3.47 folds compared with the corresponding compound in non-transgenic lines. In conclusion, RcTYDC overexpression promoted tyramine biosynthesis that facilitated more metabolic flux flowing toward the downstream pathway and as a result, the intermediate tyrosol was accumulated more that led to the increased production of the end-product salidroside.

  10. Trypanosoma cruzi has not lost its S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase: characterization of the gene and the encoded enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Persson, K; Aslund, L; Grahn, B; Hanke, J; Heby, O

    1998-01-01

    All attempts to identify ornithine decarboxylase in the human pathogen Trypanosoma cruzi have failed. The parasites have instead been assumed to depend on putrescine uptake and S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (AdoMetDC) for their synthesis of the polyamines spermidine and spermine. We have now identified the gene encoding AdoMetDC in T. cruzi by PCR cloning, with degenerate primers corresponding to conserved amino acid sequences in AdoMetDC proteins of other trypanosomatids. The amplified DNA fragment was used as a probe to isolate the complete AdoMetDC gene from a T. cruzi genomic library. The AdoMetDC gene was located on chromosomes with a size of approx. 1.4 Mbp, and contained a coding region of 1110 bp, specifying a sequence of 370 amino acid residues. The protein showed a sequence identity of only 25% with human AdoMetDC, the major differences being additional amino acids present in the terminal regions of the T. cruzi enzyme. As expected, a higher sequence identity (68-72%) was found in comparison with trypanosomatid AdoMetDCs. When the coding region was expressed in Escherichia coli, the recombinant protein underwent autocatalytic cleavage, generating a 33-34 kDa alpha subunit and a 9 kDa beta subunit. The encoded protein catalysed the decarboxylation of AdoMet (Km 0.21 mM) and was stimulated by putrescine but inhibited by the polyamines, weakly by spermidine and strongly by spermine. Methylglyoxal-bis(guanylhydrazone) (MGBG), a potent inhibitor of human AdoMetDC, was a poor inhibitor of the T. cruzi enzyme. This differential sensitivity to MGBG suggests that the two enzymes are sufficiently different to warrant the search for compounds that might interfere with the progression of Chagas' disease by selectively inhibiting T. cruzi AdoMetDC. PMID:9677309

  11. Malate decarboxylases: evolution and roles of NAD(P)-ME isoforms in species performing C(4) and C(3) photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Maier, Alexandra; Zell, Martina B; Maurino, Veronica G

    2011-05-01

    In the C(4) pathway of photosynthesis two types of malate decarboxylases release CO(2) in bundle sheath cells, NADP- and NAD-dependent malic enzyme (NADP-ME and NAD-ME), located in the chloroplasts and the mitochondria of these cells, respectively. The C(4) decarboxylases involved in C(4) photosynthesis did not evolve de novo; they were recruited from existing housekeeping isoforms. NADP-ME housekeeping isoforms would function in the control of malate levels during hypoxia, pathogen defence responses, and microspore separation, while NAD-ME participates in the respiration of malate in the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Recently, the existence of three enzymatic NAD-ME entities in Arabidopsis, occurring by alternative association of two subunits, was described as a novel mechanism to regulate NAD-ME activity under changing metabolic environments. The C(4) NADP-ME is thought to have evolved from a C(3) chloroplastic ancestor, which in turn would have evolved from an ancient cytosolic enzyme. In this way, the C(4) NADP-ME would have emerged through gene duplication, acquisition of a new promoter, and neo-functionalization. In contrast, there would exist a unique NAD-ME in C(4) plants, which would have been adapted to perform a dual function through changes in the kinetic and regulatory properties of the C(3) ancestors. In addition to this, for the evolution of C(4) NAD-ME, insertion of promoters or enhancers into the single-copy genes of the C(3) ancestors would have changed the expression without gene duplication.

  12. Redox Cycling, pH Dependence, and Ligand Effects of Mn(III) in Oxalate Decarboxylase from Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Twahir, Umar T; Ozarowski, Andrew; Angerhofer, Alexander

    2016-11-29

    This contribution describes electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) experiments on Mn(III) in oxalate decarboxylase of Bacillus subtilis, an interesting enzyme that catalyzes the redox-neutral dissociation of oxalate into formate and carbon dioxide. Chemical redox cycling provides strong evidence that both Mn centers can be oxidized, although the N-terminal Mn(II) appears to have the lower reduction potential and is most likely the carrier of the +3 oxidation state under moderate oxidative conditions, in agreement with the general view that it represents the active site. Significantly, Mn(III) was observed in untreated OxDC in succinate and acetate buffers, while it could not be directly observed in citrate buffer. Quantitative analysis showed that up to 16% of the EPR-visible Mn is in the +3 oxidation state at low pH in the presence of succinate buffer. The fine structure and hyperfine structure parameters of Mn(III) are affected by small carboxylate ligands that can enter the active site and have been recorded for formate, acetate, and succinate. The results from a previous report [Zhu, W., et al. (2016) Biochemistry 55, 429-434] could therefore be reinterpreted as evidence of formate-bound Mn(III) after the enzyme is allowed to turn over oxalate. The pH dependence of the Mn(III) EPR signal compares very well with that of enzymatic activity, providing strong evidence that the catalytic reaction of oxalate decarboxylase is driven by Mn(III), which is generated in the presence of dioxygen.

  13. Production and phenotypic analysis of rice transgenics with altered levels of pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase proteins.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Sangeeta; Kapoor, Avnish; Lakshmi, O Satya; Grover, Anil

    2007-09-01

    Pyruvate decarboxylase (Pdc) and alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) enzymes are responsible for the operation of ethanolic fermentation pathway that appears to correlate to an extent with anoxia tolerance in plants. This study was undertaken with the objective of (a) analysing the rice pdc gene family and (b) altering the efficacy of the ethanolic fermentation process, through production of transgenic rice plants over- and under-expressing pyruvate decarboxylase (employing Ospdc1 gene from rice) as well as over-expressing alcohol dehydrogenase (employing Ghadh2 gene from cotton) proteins. Correlations noted in this study between the pattern of expression of the Pdc alpha-subunit and Ospdc2 transcript as well as between the Pdc beta-subunit and Ospdc1 transcript suggest the possibility that alpha-subunit is encoded by Ospdc2 and that beta-subunit is encoded by Ospdc1. The fact that levels of Pdc beta-subunit were particularly high in pUH-sPdc1 (plasmid construct designed for over-expression of Ospdc1) seedlings while levels of beta-subunit levels were negligible or lower in pUH-asPdc1 (plasmid construct designed for under-expression of Ospdc1) seedlings also support these observations. Transgenics raised for over-expression of Pdc and Adh and under-expression of Pdc were confirmed for the transgene presence and effects by PCR, Southern blotting, Northern blotting, Western blotting and isozyme assays. Pdc and Adh over-expressing rice transgenics at early seedling stage under unstressed control growth conditions showed slight, consistent advantage in root vigour as compared to that of wild-type seedlings.

  14. The first step in the biosynthesis of cocaine in Erythroxylum coca: the characterization of arginine and ornithine decarboxylases.

    PubMed

    Docimo, Teresa; Reichelt, Michael; Schneider, Bernd; Kai, Marco; Kunert, Grit; Gershenzon, Jonathan; D'Auria, John C

    2012-04-01

    Despite the long history of cocaine use among humans and its social and economic significance today, little information is available about the biochemical and molecular aspects of cocaine biosynthesis in coca (Erythroxylum coca) in comparison to what is known about the formation of other pharmacologically-important tropane alkaloids in species of the Solanaceae. In this work, we investigated the site of cocaine biosynthesis in E. coca and the nature of the first step. The two principal tropane alkaloids of E. coca, cocaine and cinnamoyl cocaine, were present in highest concentrations in buds and rolled leaves. These are also the organs in which the rate of alkaloid biosynthesis was the highest based on the incorporation of ¹³CO₂. In contrast, tropane alkaloids in the Solanaceae are biosynthesized in the roots and translocated to the leaves. A collection of EST sequences from a cDNA library made from young E. coca leaves was employed to search for genes encoding the first step in tropane alkaloid biosynthesis. Full-length cDNA clones were identified encoding two candidate enzymes, ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) and arginine decarboxylase (ADC), and the enzymatic activities of the corresponding proteins confirmed by heterologous expression in E. coli and complementation of a yeast mutant. The transcript levels of both ODC and ADC genes were highest in buds and rolled leaves and lower in other organs. The levels of both ornithine and arginine themselves showed a similar pattern, so it was not possible to assign a preferential role in cocaine biosynthesis to one of these proteins.

  15. Aspartate 203 of the oxaloacetate decarboxylase beta-subunit catalyses both the chemical and vectorial reaction of the Na+ pump.

    PubMed Central

    Di Berardino, M; Dimroth, P

    1996-01-01

    We report here a new mode of coupling between the chemical and vectorial reaction explored for the oxaloacetate decarboxylase Na+ pump from Klebsiella pneumoniae. The membrane-bound beta-subunit is responsible for the decarboxylation of carboxybiotin and the coupled translocation of Na+ ions across the membrane. The biotin prosthetic group which is attached to the alpha-subunit becomes carboxylated by carboxyltransfer from oxaloacetate. The two conserved aspartic acid residues within putative membrane-spanning domains of the beta-subunit (Asp149 and Asp203) were exchanged by site-directed mutagenesis. Mutants D149Q and D149E retained oxaloacetate decarboxylase and Na+ transport activities. Mutants D203N and D203E, however, had lost these two activities, but retained the ability to form the carboxybiotin enzyme. Direct participation of Asp203 in the catalysis of the decarboxylation reaction is therefore indicated. In addition, all previous and present data on the enzyme support a model in which the same aspartic acid residue provides a binding site for the metal ion catalysing its movement across the membrane. The model predicts that asp203 in its dissociated form binds Na+ and promotes its translocation, while the protonated residue transfers the proton to the acid-labile carboxybiotin which initiates its decarboxylation. Strong support for the model comes from the observation that Na+ transport by oxaloacetate decarboxylation is accompanied by H+ transport in the opposite direction. The inhibition of oxaloacetate decarboxylation by high Na+ concentrations in a pH-dependent manner is also in agreement with the model. Images PMID:8617230

  16. Expression of uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase or coproporphyrinogen oxidase antisense RNA in tobacco induces pathogen defense responses conferring increased resistance to tobacco mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Mock, H P; Heller, W; Molina, A; Neubohn, B; Sandermann, H; Grimm, B

    1999-02-12

    Transgenic tobacco plants with reduced activity of either uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase or coproporphyrinogen oxidase, two enzymes of the tetrapyrrole biosynthetic pathway, are characterized by the accumulation of photosensitizing tetrapyrrole intermediates, antioxidative responses, and necrotic leaf lesions. In this study we report on cellular responses in uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase and coproporphyrinogen oxidase antisense plants, normally associated with pathogen defense. These plants accumulate the highly fluorescent coumarin scopolin in their leaves. They also display increased pathogenesis-related protein expression and higher levels of free and conjugated salicylic acid. Upon tobacco mosaic virus inoculation, the plants with leaf lesions and high levels of PR-1 mRNA expression show reduced accumulation of virus RNA relative to wild-type controls. This result is indicative of an increased resistance to tobacco mosaic virus. We conclude that porphyrinogenesis as a result of deregulated tetrapyrrole synthesis induces a set of defense responses that resemble the hypersensitive reaction observed after pathogen attack.

  17. Cloning and functional analysis of the orotidine-5'-phosphate decarboxylase gene (PbrURA3) of the pathogenic fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis.

    PubMed

    Reinoso, Cristina; Sorais, Françoise; Niño-Vega, Gustavo A; Fermiñán, Encarnación; San-Blas, Gioconda; Domínguez, Angel

    2005-07-15

    A genomic clone encoding the Paracoccidioides brasiliensis orotidine monophosphate decarboxylase gene (PbrURA3) was isolated by screening a subgenomic plasmid DNA library of this fungus, using a PCR amplification product of the gene as a probe. Sequence analysis revealed that the gene contains an open reading frame of 855 bp with a single intron (162 bp), and encodes a putative 285 amino acids polypeptide of estimated molecular weight 31.1 kDa and isoelectric point 6.5. The deduced amino acid sequence predicted a 73.4% identity with orotidine monophosphate decarboxylase of Aspergillus nidulans. Functionality of the gene was demonstrated by transformation into a Saccharomyces cerevisiae ura3 null mutant.

  18. Modulation of ornithine decarboxylase activity in the normal and regenerating rat liver by various doses of the peptide morphogen of Hydra

    SciTech Connect

    Yarygin, K.N.; Kazimirskii, A.N.; Kositskii, G.I.; Rubina, A.Yu.; Vinogradov, V.A.; Pylaev, A.S.

    1986-11-01

    In this investigation, changes in ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) activity were studied in the normal and regenerating liver of rats receiving injections of various doses of Hydra peptide morphogen (HPM). Activity of ODC was determined by a radioisotope method based on liberation of /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ from L-(1-/sup 14/C)-ornithine. The results indicate in the author's opinion that HPM may have a role in the regulation of anabolic processes and, in particular, of regenerative processes in mammals.

  19. Endosperm-specific expression of tyramine N-hydroxycinnamoyltransferase and tyrosine decarboxylase from a single self-processing polypeptide produces high levels of tyramine derivatives in rice seeds.

    PubMed

    Park, Sangkyu; Kang, Kiyoon; Kim, Young Soon; Back, Kyoungwhan

    2009-06-01

    The plant-specific tyramine derivatives, feruloyltyramine (FT) and 4-coumaroyltyramine (CT), represent bioactive compounds found at low levels in many plant species. We generated transgenic rice seeds that produce high levels of CT (14 microg g(-1) seeds) and FT (2.7 microg g(-1) seeds) through the dual expression of tyramine N-hydroxycinnamoyltransferase and tyrosine decarboxylase, using the self-processing foot-and-mouth disease virus 2A sequence and the endosperm-specific prolamin promoter.

  20. A metabolic strategy to enhance long-term survival by Phx1 through stationary phase-specific pyruvate decarboxylases in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji-Yoon; Kim, Eun-Jung; Lopez-Maury, Luis; Bähler, Jürg; Roe, Jung-Hye

    2014-07-01

    In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the stationary phase-specific transcription factor Phx1 contributes to long-term survival, stress tolerance, and meiosis. We identified Phx1-dependent genes through transcriptome analysis, and further analyzed those related with carbohydrate and thiamine metabolism, whose expression decreased in ∆phx1. Consistent with mRNA changes, the level of thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP) and TPP-utilizing pyruvate decarboxylase activity that converts pyruvate to acetaldehyde were also reduced in the mutant. Therefore, Phx1 appears to shift metabolic flux by diverting pyruvate from the TCA cycle and respiration to ethanol fermentation. Among the four predicted genes for pyruvate decarboxylase, only the Phx1-dependent genes (pdc201+ and pdc202+) contributed to long-term survival as judged by mutation and overexpression studies. These findings indicate that the Phx1-mediated long-term survival is achieved primarily through increasing the synthesis and activity of pyruvate decarboxylase. Consistent with this hypothesis, we observed that Phx1 curtailed respiration when cells entered stationary phase. Introduction of Δphx1 mutation compromised the long-lived phenotypes of Δpka1 and Δsck2 mutants that are devoid of pro-aging kinases of nutrient-signalling pathways, and of the Δpyp1 mutant with constitutively activated stress-responsive kinase Sty1. Therefore, achievement of long-term viability through both nutrient limitation and anti-stress response appears to be dependent on Phx1.

  1. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae mevalonate diphosphate decarboxylase is essential for viability, and a single Leu-to-Pro mutation in a conserved sequence leads to thermosensitivity.

    PubMed Central

    Bergès, T; Guyonnet, D; Karst, F

    1997-01-01

    The mevalonate diphosphate decarboxylase is an enzyme which converts mevalonate diphosphate to isopentenyl diphosphate, the building block of isoprenoids. We used the Saccharomyces cerevisiae temperature-sensitive mutant defective for mevalonate diphosphate decarboxylase previously described (C. Chambon, V. Ladeveve, M. Servouse, L. Blanchard, C. Javelot, B. Vladescu, and F. Karst, Lipids 26:633-636, 1991) to characterize the mutated allele. We showed that a single change in a conserved amino acid accounts for the temperature-sensitive phenotype of the mutant. Complementation experiments were done both in the erg19-mutated background and in a strain in which the ERG19 gene, which was shown to be an essential gene for yeast, was disrupted. Epitope tagging of the wild-type mevalonate diphosphate decarboxylase allowed us to isolate the enzyme in an active form by a versatile one-step immunoprecipitation procedure. Furthermore, during the course of this study, we observed that a high level of expression of the wild-type ERG19 gene led to a lower sterol steady-state accumulation compared to that of a wild-type strain, suggesting that this enzyme may be a key enzyme in mevalonate pathway regulation. PMID:9244250

  2. Anti-Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase Antibody-Associated Ataxia as an Extrahepatic Autoimmune Manifestation of Hepatitis C Infection: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Awad, Amer; Stüve, Olaf; Mayo, Marlyn; Alkawadri, Rafeed; Estephan, Bachir

    2011-01-01

    Extrahepatic immunological manifestations of hepatitis C virus (HCV) are well described. In addition, antiglutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) antibody-associated cerebellar ataxia is well-established entity. However, there have been no reports in the literature of anti-GAD antibody-associated ataxia as an extrahepatic manifestation of HCV infection. We report the case of a young woman with chronic hepatitis C virus and multiple extrahepatic autoimmune diseases including Sjögren syndrome and pernicious anemia who presented with subacute midline cerebellar syndrome and was found to have positive antiglutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) antibody in the serum and cerebrospinal fluid. An extensive diagnostic workup to rule out neoplastic growths was negative, suggesting the diagnosis of nonparaneoplastic antiglutamic acid decarboxylase antibody-associated cerebellar ataxia as an additional extrahepatic manifestation of hepatitis C virus infection. The patient failed to respond to high-dose steroids and intravenous immunoglobulin. Treatment with the monoclonal antibody rituximab stabilized the disease. We postulate that anti-GAD associated ataxia could be an extrahepatic manifestation of HCV infection. PMID:22937348

  3. Stereospecificity of malonyl-CoA decarboxylase, acetyl-CoA carboxylase, and fatty acid synthetase from the uropygial gland of goose.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y S; Kolattukudy, P E

    1980-01-25

    Malonyl-CoA decarboxylase from the uropygial gland of goose decarboxylated (R,S)-methylmalonyl-CoA at a slow rate and introduced 3H from [3H]2O into the resulting propionyl-CoA. Carboxylation of this labeled propionyl-CoA by propionyl-CoA carboxylase from pig heart and acetyl-CoA carboxylase from the uropygial gland completely removed 3H. Repeated treatment of (R,S)-[methyl-14C]methylmalonyl-CoA with the decarboxylase converted 50% of the substrate into propionyl-CoA, whereas (S)-methylmalonyl-CoA, generated by both carboxylases, was completely decarboxylated. Radioactive (R)- (S), and (R,S)-methylmalonyl-CoA were equally incorporated into fatty acids by fatty acid synthetase from the uropygial gland. The residual methylmalonyl-CoA remaining after fatty acid synthetase reaction on (R,S)-methylmalonyl-CoA was also racemic. These results show that: (a) the decarboxylase is stereospecific, (b) replacement of the carboxyl group by hydrogen occurs with retention of configuration, (c) acetyl-CoA carboxylase of the uropygial gland generates (S)-methylmalonyl-CoA from propionyl-CoA, and (d) fatty acid synthetase is not stereospecific for methylmalonyl-CoA.

  4. Cloning and sequencing of two Ceriporiopsis subvermispora bicupin oxalate oxidase allelic isoforms: implications for the reaction specificity of oxalate oxidases and decarboxylases.

    PubMed

    Escutia, Marta R; Bowater, Laura; Edwards, Anne; Bottrill, Andrew R; Burrell, Matthew R; Polanco, Rubén; Vicuña, Rafael; Bornemann, Stephen

    2005-07-01

    Oxalate oxidase is thought to be involved in the production of hydrogen peroxide for lignin degradation by the dikaryotic white rot fungus Ceriporiopsis subvermispora. This enzyme was purified, and after digestion with trypsin, peptide fragments of the enzyme were sequenced using quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Starting with degenerate primers based on the peptide sequences, two genes encoding isoforms of the enzyme were cloned, sequenced, and shown to be allelic. Both genes contained 14 introns. The sequences of the isoforms revealed that they were both bicupins that unexpectedly shared the greatest similarity to microbial bicupin oxalate decarboxylases rather than monocupin plant oxalate oxidases (also known as germins). We have shown that both fungal isoforms, one of which was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli, are indeed oxalate oxidases that possess < or =0.2% oxalate decarboxylase activity and that the organism is capable of rapidly degrading exogenously supplied oxalate. They are therefore the first bicupin oxalate oxidases to have been described. Heterologous expression of active enzyme was dependent on the addition of manganese salts to the growth medium. Molecular modeling provides new and independent evidence for the identity of the catalytic site and the key amino acid involved in defining the reaction specificities of oxalate oxidases and oxalate decarboxylases.

  5. Is there a difference between levodopa/ dopa-decarboxylase inhibitor and entacapone and levodopa/dopa-decarboxylase inhibitor dose fractionation strategies in Parkinson's disease patients experiencing symptom re-emergence due to wearing-off? The Honeymoon Study.

    PubMed

    Destée, Alain; Rérat, Karin; Bourdeix, Isabelle

    2009-01-01

    Two strategies to manage symptom re-emergence due to wearing-off with conventional levodopa/dopa-decarboxylase inhibitor (DDCI) therapy were compared in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) in this randomized, open-label trial. PD patients receiving 3 daily doses of levodopa/DDCI were randomized to either levodopa/DDCI and entacapone or an increased dose frequency of levodopa/DDCI with or without an increased total daily dose (dose fractionation). After 1 month of treatment, patients were followed up for 1 year. A greater proportion of levodopa/DDCI and entacapone-treated patients had treatment success compared with dose-fractionated patients, according to investigator Clinical Global Impression of Change scores at 1 month (68 vs. 59%, respectively) and 1 year (60 vs. 51%, respectively). Mean 'off' time (time with symptoms) was improved in both groups at 1 month and 1 year, despite a reduction in the mean daily levodopa dose in the levodopa/DDCI and entacapone group at 1 month. The mean daily levodopa dose was increased in the dose fractionation group. At 1 month, there was a 4% reduction in patients experiencing dyskinesia with levodopa/DDCI and entacapone and a 3% increase with dose fractionation. These data suggest that levodopa/DDCI and entacapone reduces time with symptoms, the rate of motor complications and the daily levodopa dose compared with dose fractionation. However, as the observed differences were not statistically significant, further studies are required to confirm these results.

  6. Diurnal rhythms in ornithine decarboxylase activity and norepinephrine and acetylcholine synthesis in submaxillary lymph nodes and spleen of young and aged rats during Freund's adjuvant-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Cardinali, D P; Brusco, L I; Selgas, L; Esquifino, A I

    1998-04-13

    Aging has been associated with attenuation of amplitude and changes in period of many circadian rhythms. The present study was carried out to examine, in young (50 days old) and old (18 months old) rats, whether 24-h rhythms of cell proliferation (as assessed by measuring ornithine decarboxylase activity) and of presynaptic adrenergic and cholinergic markers change in lymph nodes and spleen during Freund's adjuvant-induced arthritis. Groups of young and old Sprague-Dawley rats were studied the day before, and on days 6, 12 and 18 after Freund's adjuvant injection. On day 16 after adjuvant injection, inflammation of hind paws, mainly in the ankle joints, was less marked in old than in young rats. Lymph node and splenic ornithine decarboxylase activity exhibited significant 24-h variations with maximal activity during daily hours. Before treatment, enzyme activity values were significantly lower in old rats in both tissues examined. During the immune reaction, lymph node and splenic ornithine decarboxylase augmented 8-10-fold, with progressively smaller amplitude of daily variations as arthritis developed. In every case, mesor and amplitude of ornithine decarboxylase activity were lowest in old rats. Submaxillary lymph node and splenic tyrosine hydroxylase activity attained maximal values at night. At every time interval after mycobacterium adjuvant injection, amplitude and mesor of tyrosine hydroxylase activity rhythm were lowest in old rats. A maximum in submaxillary lymph node 3H-acetylcholine synthesis occurred at the afternoon. On day 6 and 12 after Freund's adjuvant injection, lymph node 3H-acetylcholine synthesis was significantly smaller in old rats. Day-night differences in submaxillary lymph node or splenic ornithine decarboxylase and tyrosine hydroxylase activities, or in submaxillary lymph node 3H-acetylcholine synthesis, of rats treated with the adjuvant's vehicle, did not differ significantly from those seen in untreated controls. The results are

  7. Steady-state and transient-state analysis of growth and metabolite production in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain with reduced pyruvate-decarboxylase activity.

    PubMed

    Flikweert, M T; Kuyper, M; van Maris, A J; Kötter, P; van Dijken, J P; Pronk, J T

    1999-01-01

    Pyruvate decarboxylase is a key enzyme in the production of low-molecular-weight byproducts (ethanol, acetate) in biomass-directed applications of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To investigate whether decreased expression levels of pyruvate decarboxylase can reduce byproduct formation, the PDC2 gene, which encodes a positive regulator of pyruvate-decarboxylase synthesis, was inactivated in the prototrophic strain S. cerevisiae CEN. PK113-7D. This caused a 3-4-fold reduction of pyruvate-decarboxylase activity in glucose-limited, aerobic chemostat cultures grown at a dilution rate of 0.10 h(-1). Upon exposure of such cultures to a 50 mM glucose pulse, ethanol and acetate were the major byproducts formed by the wild type. In the pdc2Delta strain, formation of ethanol and acetate was reduced by 60-70%. In contrast to the wild type, the pdc2Delta strain produced substantial amounts of pyruvate after a glucose pulse. Nevertheless, its overall byproduct formation was ca. 50% lower. The specific rate of glucose consumption after a glucose pulse to pdc2Delta cultures was about 40% lower than in wild-type cultures. This suggests that, at reduced pyruvate-decarboxylase activities, glycolytic flux is controlled by NADH reoxidation. In aerobic, glucose-limited chemostat cultures, the wild type exhibited a mixed respiro-fermentative metabolism at dilution rates above 0.30 h(-1). Below this dilution rate, sugar metabolism was respiratory. At dilution rates up to 0.20 h(-1), growth of the pdc2Delta strain was respiratory and biomass yields were similar to those of wild-type cultures. Above this dilution rate, washout occurred. The low micro(max) of the pdc2Delta strain in glucose-limited chemostat cultures indicates that occurrence of respiro-fermentative metabolism in wild-type cultures is not solely caused by competition of respiration and fermentation for pyruvate. Furthermore, it implies that inactivation of PDC2 is not a viable option for reducing byproduct formation in industrial

  8. Loss of glutamic acid decarboxylase (Gad67) in Gpr88-expressing neurons induces learning and social behavior deficits in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, K; Hill, K; Labak, S; Blatt, G J; Soghomonian, J-J

    2014-09-05

    GABA is the neurotransmitter of striatal projection neurons, however the contribution of the striatal GABAergic output to behavior is not well understood. We assessed motor function, spatial learning, social behavior, olfactory and object recognition preferences in mice lacking the GABA-synthesizing enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase, Gad67, in neurons expressing the protein Gpr88, an orphan G-protein-coupled receptor primarily expressed in the striatum. Gad67-deficient mice show no impairments in motor coordination and balance, but exhibit enhanced locomotor activity and stereotypic grooming behavior. Furthermore, Gad67-deficient mice show impairments in spatial learning, social behavior, olfactory preferences, and they prefer a familiar compared to a novel object in the object recognition test. These findings provide original evidence that striatal Gad67 expression is involved in the modulation of learning and social behavior. Some of the behavioral abnormalities observed in Gad67-deficient mice are reminiscent of Autism-spectrum-disorder (ASD) deficits, suggesting that abnormal striatal GABAergic output may contribute to behavioral deficits in ASD. Copyright © 2014 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The Histidine Decarboxylase Gene Cluster of Lactobacillus parabuchneri Was Gained by Horizontal Gene Transfer and Is Mobile within the Species

    PubMed Central

    Wüthrich, Daniel; Berthoud, Hélène; Wechsler, Daniel; Eugster, Elisabeth; Irmler, Stefan; Bruggmann, Rémy

    2017-01-01

    Histamine in food can cause intolerance reactions in consumers. Lactobacillus parabuchneri (L. parabuchneri) is one of the major causes of elevated histamine levels in cheese. Despite its significant economic impact and negative influence on human health, no genomic study has been published so far. We sequenced and analyzed 18 L. parabuchneri strains of which 12 were histamine positive and 6 were histamine negative. We determined the complete genome of the histamine positive strain FAM21731 with PacBio as well as Illumina and the genomes of the remaining 17 strains using the Illumina technology. We developed the synteny aware ortholog finding algorithm SynOrf to compare the genomes and we show that the histidine decarboxylase (HDC) gene cluster is located in a genomic island. It is very likely that the HDC gene cluster was transferred from other lactobacilli, as it is highly conserved within several lactobacilli species. Furthermore, we have evidence that the HDC gene cluster was transferred within the L. parabuchneri species. PMID:28261177

  10. SIRT4 coordinates the balance between lipid synthesis and catabolism by repressing malonyl CoA decarboxylase

    PubMed Central

    Laurent, Gaëlle; German, Natalie J.; Saha, Asish K.; de Boer, Vincent C. J.; Davies, Michael; Koves, Timothy R.; Dephoure, Noah; Fischer, Frank; Boanca, Gina; Vaitheesvaran, Bhavapriya; Lovitch, Scott B.; Sharpe, Arlene H.; Kurland, Irwin J.; Steegborn, Clemens; Gygi, Steven P.; Muoio, Deborah M.; Ruderman, Neil B.; Haigis, Marcia C.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Lipid metabolism is tightly controlled by the nutritional state of the organism. Nutrient-rich conditions increase lipogenesis whereas nutrient deprivation promotes fat oxidation. In this study, we identify the mitochondrial sirtuin, SIRT4, as a novel regulator of lipid homeostasis. SIRT4 is active in nutrient-replete conditions to repress fatty acid oxidation while promoting lipid anabolism. SIRT4 deacetylates and inhibits malonyl CoA decarboxylase (MCD), an enzyme that produces acetyl CoA from malonyl CoA. Malonyl CoA provides the carbon skeleton for lipogenesis and also inhibits fat oxidation. Mice lacking SIRT4 display elevated MCD activity and decreased malonyl CoA in skeletal muscle and white adipose tissue. Consequently, SIRT4 KO mice display deregulated lipid metabolism leading to increased exercise tolerance and protection against diet-induced obesity. In sum, this work elucidates SIRT4 as an important regulator of lipid homeostasis, identifies MCD as a novel SIRT4 target, and deepens our understanding of the malonyl CoA regulatory axis. PMID:23746352

  11. Kinetic evaluation of biotransformation of benzaldehyde to L-phenylacetylcarbinol by immobilized pyruvate decarboxylase from Candida utilis.

    PubMed

    Shin, H S; Rogers, P L

    1996-02-20

    Biotransformation of benzaldehyde to L-phenylacetylcarbinol (L-PAC) as a key intermediate for L-ephedrine has been evaluated using immobilized pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC) from Candida utilis. PDC immobilized in spherical polyacrylamide beads was found to have a longer half-life compared with free enzyme. In a batch process, the immobilized PDC generally produced lower L-PAC than free enzyme at the same concentrations of substrates due to increased by-products acetaldehyde and acetoin and reduced benzaldehyde uptake. With immobilized PDC, L-PAC formation occurred at higher benzaldehyde concentrations (up to 300 mM) with the highest L-PAC concentration being 181 mM (27.1 g/L). For a continuous process, when 50 mM benzaldehyde and 100 mM sodium pyruvate were fed into a packed-bed reactor at 4 degrees C and pH 6.5, a productivity of 3.7 mM/h (0.56 g/L . h) L-PAC was obtained at an average concentration of 30 mM (4.5 g/L). The half-life of immobilized PDC reactor was 32 days. (c) 1996 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  12. The krebs cycle enzyme α-ketoglutarate decarboxylase is an essential glycosomal protein in bloodstream African trypanosomes.

    PubMed

    Sykes, Steven; Szempruch, Anthony; Hajduk, Stephen

    2015-03-01

    α-Ketoglutarate decarboxylase (α-KDE1) is a Krebs cycle enzyme found in the mitochondrion of the procyclic form (PF) of Trypanosoma brucei. The bloodstream form (BF) of T. brucei lacks a functional Krebs cycle and relies exclusively on glycolysis for ATP production. Despite the lack of a functional Krebs cycle, α-KDE1 was expressed in BF T. brucei and RNA interference knockdown of α-KDE1 mRNA resulted in rapid growth arrest and killing. Cell death was preceded by progressive swelling of the flagellar pocket as a consequence of recruitment of both flagellar and plasma membranes into the pocket. BF T. brucei expressing an epitope-tagged copy of α-KDE1 showed localization to glycosomes and not the mitochondrion. We used a cell line transfected with a reporter construct containing the N-terminal sequence of α-KDE1 fused to green fluorescent protein to examine the requirements for glycosome targeting. We found that the N-terminal 18 amino acids of α-KDE1 contain overlapping mitochondrion- and peroxisome-targeting sequences and are sufficient to direct localization to the glycosome in BF T. brucei. These results suggest that α-KDE1 has a novel moonlighting function outside the mitochondrion in BF T. brucei. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  13. Uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase as a potential target for specific components of traditional Chinese medicine: a virtual screening and molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Tsou, Yung-An; Chen, Kuan-Chung; Lin, Hung-Che; Chang, Su-Sen; Chen, Calvin Yu-Chian

    2012-01-01

    Uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase (UROD) has been suggested as a protectant against radiation for head and neck cancer (HNC). In this study, we employed traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) compounds from TCM Database@Taiwan (http://tcm.cmu.edu.tw/) to screen for drug-like candidates with potential UROD inhibition characteristics using virtual screening techniques. Isopraeroside IV, scopolin, and nodakenin exhibited the highest Dock Scores, and were predicted to have good Absorption, Distribution, Metabolism, Excretion, and Toxicity (ADMET) properties. Two common moieties, 2H-chromen-2-one and glucoside, were observed among the top TCM candidates. Cross comparison of the docking poses indicated that candidates formed stable interactions with key binding and catalytic residues of UROD through these two moieties. The 2H-chromen-2-one moiety enabled pi-cation interactions with Arg37 and H-bonds with Tyr164. The glucoside moiety was involved in forming H-bonds with Arg37 and Asp86. From our computational results, we propose isopraeroside IV, scopolin, and nodakenin as ligands that might exhibit drug-like inhibitory effects on UROD. The glucoside and 2H-chromen-2-one moieties may potentially be used for designing inhibitors of UROD.

  14. Uroporphyrinogen Decarboxylase as a Potential Target for Specific Components of Traditional Chinese Medicine: A Virtual Screening and Molecular Dynamics Study

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hung-Che; Chang, Su-Sen; Chen, Calvin Yu-Chian

    2012-01-01

    Uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase (UROD) has been suggested as a protectant against radiation for head and neck cancer (HNC). In this study, we employed traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) compounds from TCM Database@Taiwan (http://tcm.cmu.edu.tw/) to screen for drug-like candidates with potential UROD inhibition characteristics using virtual screening techniques. Isopraeroside IV, scopolin, and nodakenin exhibited the highest Dock Scores, and were predicted to have good Absorption, Distribution, Metabolism, Excretion, and Toxicity (ADMET) properties. Two common moieties, 2H-chromen-2-one and glucoside, were observed among the top TCM candidates. Cross comparison of the docking poses indicated that candidates formed stable interactions with key binding and catalytic residues of UROD through these two moieties. The 2H-chromen-2-one moiety enabled pi-cation interactions with Arg37 and H-bonds with Tyr164. The glucoside moiety was involved in forming H-bonds with Arg37 and Asp86. From our computational results, we propose isopraeroside IV, scopolin, and nodakenin as ligands that might exhibit drug-like inhibitory effects on UROD. The glucoside and 2H-chromen-2-one moieties may potentially be used for designing inhibitors of UROD. PMID:23209648

  15. Assessment of virulence factors, antibiotic resistance and amino-decarboxylase activity in Enterococcus faecium MXVK29 isolated from Mexican chorizo.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Cisneros, Y M; Fernández, F J; Sainz-Espuñez, T; Ponce-Alquicira, E

    2017-02-01

    Enterococcus faecium MXVK29 has the ability to produce an antimicrobial compound that belongs to Class IIa of the Klaenhammer classification, and could be used as part of a biopreservation technology through direct inoculation of the strain as a starter or protective culture. However, Enterococcus is considered as an opportunistic pathogen, hence, the purpose of this work was to study the food safety determinants of E. faecium MXVK29. The strain was sensitive to all of the antibiotics tested (penicillin, tetracycline, vancomycin, erythromycin, chloramphenicol, gentamicin, neomycin, kanamycin and netilmicin) and did not demonstrate histamine, cadaverine or putrescine formation. Furthermore, tyrosine-decarboxylase activity was detected by qualitative assays and PCR. Among the virulence factors analysed for the strain, only the genes encoding the sexual pheromone cCF10 precursor lipoprotein (ccf) and cell-wall adhesion (efaAfm ) were amplified. The presence of these genes has low impact on pathogenesis, as there are no other genes encoding for virulence factors, such as aggregation proteins. Therefore, Enterococcus faecium could be employed as part of a bioconservation method, because it does not produce risk factors for consumer's health; in addition, it could be used as part of the hurdle technology in foods.

  16. Thiol Redox Sensitivity of Two Key Enzymes of Heme Biosynthesis and Pentose Phosphate Pathways: Uroporphyrinogen Decarboxylase and Transketolase

    PubMed Central

    Pedrajas, José Rafael; Padilla, C. Alicia; Bárcena, José Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase (Hem12p) and transketolase (Tkl1p) are key mediators of two critical processes within the cell, heme biosynthesis, and the nonoxidative part of the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP). The redox properties of both Hem12p and Tkl1p from Saccharomyces cerevisiae were investigated using proteomic techniques (SRM and label-free quantification) and biochemical assays in cell extracts and in vitro with recombinant proteins. The in vivo analysis revealed an increase in oxidized Cys-peptides in the absence of Grx2p, and also after treatment with H2O2 in the case of Tkl1p, without corresponding changes in total protein, demonstrating a true redox response. Out of three detectable Cys residues in Hem12p, only the conserved residue Cys52 could be modified by glutathione and efficiently deglutathionylated by Grx2p, suggesting a possible redox control mechanism for heme biosynthesis. On the other hand, Tkl1p activity was sensitive to thiol redox modification and although Cys622 could be glutathionylated to a limited extent, it was not a natural substrate of Grx2p. The human orthologues of both enzymes have been involved in certain cancers and possess Cys residues equivalent to those identified as redox sensitive in yeast. The possible implication for redox regulation in the context of tumour progression is put forward. PMID:23970950

  17. Reduction of oxalate levels in tomato fruit and consequent metabolic remodeling following overexpression of a fungal oxalate decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Niranjan; Ghosh, Rajgourab; Ghosh, Sudip; Narula, Kanika; Tayal, Rajul; Datta, Asis; Chakraborty, Subhra

    2013-05-01

    The plant metabolite oxalic acid is increasingly recognized as a food toxin with negative effects on human nutrition. Decarboxylative degradation of oxalic acid is catalyzed, in a substrate-specific reaction, by oxalate decarboxylase (OXDC), forming formic acid and carbon dioxide. Attempts to date to reduce oxalic acid levels and to understand the biological significance of OXDC in crop plants have met with little success. To investigate the role of OXDC and the metabolic consequences of oxalate down-regulation in a heterotrophic, oxalic acid-accumulating fruit, we generated transgenic tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants expressing an OXDC (FvOXDC) from the fungus Flammulina velutipes specifically in the fruit. These E8.2-OXDC fruit showed up to a 90% reduction in oxalate content, which correlated with concomitant increases in calcium, iron, and citrate. Expression of OXDC affected neither carbon dioxide assimilation rates nor resulted in any detectable morphological differences in the transgenic plants. Comparative proteomic analysis suggested that metabolic remodeling was associated with the decrease in oxalate content in transgenic fruit. Examination of the E8.2-OXDC fruit proteome revealed that OXDC-responsive proteins involved in metabolism and stress responses represented the most substantially up- and down-regulated categories, respectively, in the transgenic fruit, compared with those of wild-type plants. Collectively, our study provides insights into OXDC-regulated metabolic networks and may provide a widely applicable strategy for enhancing crop nutritional value.

  18. Reduction of Oxalate Levels in Tomato Fruit and Consequent Metabolic Remodeling Following Overexpression of a Fungal Oxalate Decarboxylase1[W

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Niranjan; Ghosh, Rajgourab; Ghosh, Sudip; Narula, Kanika; Tayal, Rajul; Datta, Asis; Chakraborty, Subhra

    2013-01-01

    The plant metabolite oxalic acid is increasingly recognized as a food toxin with negative effects on human nutrition. Decarboxylative degradation of oxalic acid is catalyzed, in a substrate-specific reaction, by oxalate decarboxylase (OXDC), forming formic acid and carbon dioxide. Attempts to date to reduce oxalic acid levels and to understand the biological significance of OXDC in crop plants have met with little success. To investigate the role of OXDC and the metabolic consequences of oxalate down-regulation in a heterotrophic, oxalic acid-accumulating fruit, we generated transgenic tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants expressing an OXDC (FvOXDC) from the fungus Flammulina velutipes specifically in the fruit. These E8.2-OXDC fruit showed up to a 90% reduction in oxalate content, which correlated with concomitant increases in calcium, iron, and citrate. Expression of OXDC affected neither carbon dioxide assimilation rates nor resulted in any detectable morphological differences in the transgenic plants. Comparative proteomic analysis suggested that metabolic remodeling was associated with the decrease in oxalate content in transgenic fruit. Examination of the E8.2-OXDC fruit proteome revealed that OXDC-responsive proteins involved in metabolism and stress responses represented the most substantially up- and down-regulated categories, respectively, in the transgenic fruit, compared with those of wild-type plants. Collectively, our study provides insights into OXDC-regulated metabolic networks and may provide a widely applicable strategy for enhancing crop nutritional value. PMID:23482874

  19. Crystal Structures of Malonyl-Coenzyme A Decarboxylase Provide Insights into Its Catalytic Mechanism and Disease-Causing Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Froese, D. Sean; Forouhar, Farhad; Tran, Timothy H.; Vollmar, Melanie; Kim, Yi Seul; Lew, Scott; Neely, Helen; Seetharaman, Jayaraman; Shen, Yang; Xiao, Rong; Acton, Thomas B.; Everett, John K.; Cannone, Giuseppe; Puranik, Sriharsha; Savitsky, Pavel; Krojer, Tobias; Pilka, Ewa S.; Kiyani, Wasim; Lee, Wen Hwa; Marsden, Brian D.; von Delft, Frank; Allerston, Charles K.; Spagnolo, Laura; Gileadi, Opher; Montelione, Gaetano T.; Oppermann, Udo; Yue, Wyatt W.; Tong, Liang

    2013-01-01

    Summary Malonyl-coenzyme A decarboxylase (MCD) is found from bacteria to humans, has important roles in regulating fatty acid metabolism and food intake, and is an attractive target for drug discovery. We report here four crystal structures of MCD from human, Rhodopseudomonas palustris, Agrobacterium vitis, and Cupriavidus metallidurans at up to 2.3 Å resolution. The MCD monomer contains an N-terminal helical domain involved in oligomerization and a C-terminal catalytic domain. The four structures exhibit substantial differences in the organization of the helical domains and, consequently, the oligomeric states and intersubunit interfaces. Unexpectedly, the MCD catalytic domain is structurally homologous to those of the GCN5-related N-acetyltransferase superfamily, especially the curacin A polyketide synthase catalytic module, with a conserved His-Ser/Thr dyad important for catalysis. Our structures, along with mutagenesis and kinetic studies, provide a molecular basis for understanding pathogenic mutations and catalysis, as well as a template for structure-based drug design. PMID:23791943

  20. Ameliorating effect of histamine on impairment of cued fear extinction induced by morphine withdrawal in histidine decarboxylase gene knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Gong, Ying-xia; Shou, Wen-ting; Feng, Bo; Zhang, Wei-ping; Wang, Hui-juan; Ohtsu, Hiroshi; Chen, Zhong

    2010-11-01

    Histamine plays an important role in morphine addiction and memory-dependent behavior. However, little is known about the effect of histamine on the impairment of memory after morphine withdrawal. This study was designed to investigate the effect of histamine on memory impairment induced by morphine withdrawal in histidine decarboxylase knockout (HDC-KO) and wild-type (WT) mice. WT and HDC-KO mice were given subcutaneous morphine or saline twice daily for 5 consecutive days. The mice received a cued or contextual fear conditioning session 7 days after the last injection. During subsequent days, mice received 4 cued or contextual extinction sessions (one session per day). Western blot was used to assess extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation in the amygdala and hippocampus. Morphine withdrawal did not affect the acquisition of cued or contextual fear responses. It impaired cued but not contextual fear extinction. The acquisition of cued and contextual fear responses was accelerated in HDC-KO mice. Histamine deficiency aggravated the impairment of cued fear extinction induced by morphine withdrawal, whereas histamine (icv, 5 μg/mouse) reversed this effect. Morphine withdrawal decreased ERK phosphorylation in the amygdala after cued fear extinction, especially in HDC-KO mice. These results suggest that morphine withdrawal specifically impairs cued fear extinction and histamine ameliorates this impairment. Its action might be mediated by the modulation of ERK phosphorylation in the amygdala. Histamine should be explored for possible roles in the prevention or treatment of morphine abuse and relapse.

  1. Active site binding modes of inhibitors of Staphylococcus aureus mevalonate diphosphate decarboxylase from docking and molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Addo, James K; Skaff, D Andrew; Miziorko, Henry M

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial mevalonate diphosphate decarboxylase (MDD) is an attractive therapeutic target for antibacterial drug development. In this work, we discuss a combined docking and molecular dynamics strategy toward inhibitor binding to bacterial MDD. The docking parameters utilized in this study were first validated with observations for the inhibitors 6-fluoromevalonate diphosphate (FMVAPP) and diphosphoglycolylproline (DPGP) using existing structures for the Staphylococcus epidermidis enzyme. The validated docking protocol was then used to predict structures of the inhibitors bound to Staphylococcus aureus MDD using the unliganded crystal structure of Staphylococcus aureus MDD. We also investigated a possible interactions improvement by combining this docking method with molecular dynamics simulations. Thus, the predicted docking structures were analyzed in a molecular dynamics trajectory to generate dynamic models and reinforce the predicted binding modes. FMVAPP is predicted to make more extensive contacts with S. aureus MDD, forming stable hydrogen bonds with Arg144, Arg193, Lys21, Ser107, and Tyr18, as well as making stable hydrophobic interactions with Tyr18, Trp19, and Met196. The differences in predicted binding are supported by experimentally determined Ki values of 0.23 ± 0.02 and 34 ± 8 μM, for FMVAPP and DPGP, respectively. The structural information coupled with the kinetic characterization obtained from this study should be useful in defining the requirements for inhibition as well as in guiding the selection of active compounds for inhibitor optimization.

  2. Tomato aromatic amino acid decarboxylases participate in synthesis of the flavor volatiles 2-phenylethanol and 2-phenylacetaldehyde

    PubMed Central

    Tieman, Denise; Taylor, Mark; Schauer, Nicolas; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Hanson, Andrew D.; Klee, Harry J.

    2006-01-01

    An important phenylalanine-derived volatile compound produced by plants is 2-phenylethanol. It is a major contributor to flavor in many foods, including fresh fruits, such as tomato, and an insect-attracting scent in roses and many other flowers. Despite the centrality of 2-phenylethanol to flavor and fragrance, the plant genes responsible for its synthesis have not been identified. Here, we describe a biosynthetic pathway for 2-phenylethanol and other phenylalanine-derived volatiles in tomato fruits and a small family of decarboxylases (LeAADC1A, LeAADC1B, and LeAADC2) that can mediate that pathway's first step. These enzymes each catalyze conversion of phenylalanine to phenethylamine and tyrosine to tyramine. Although tyrosine is the preferred substrate in vitro, phenylalanine levels in tomato fruits far exceed those of tyrosine, indicating that phenylalanine is a physiological substrate. Consistent with this view, overexpression of either LeAADC1A or LeAADC2 in transgenic tomato plants resulted in fruits with up to 10-fold increased emissions of the products of the pathway, including 2-phenylacetaldehyde, 2-phenylethanol, and 1-nitro-2-phenylethane. Further, antisense reduction of LeAADC2 significantly reduced emissions of these volatiles. Besides establishing a biosynthetic route, these results show that it is possible to change phenylalanine-based flavor and aroma volatiles in plants by manipulating expression of a single gene. PMID:16698923

  3. Crystal structure of tyrosine decarboxylase and identification of key residues involved in conformational swing and substrate binding

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Haixia; Xu, Guochao; Zhang, Kai; Kong, Xudong; Han, Ruizhi; Zhou, Jiahai; Ni, Ye

    2016-01-01

    Tyrosine decarboxylase (TDC) is a pyridoxal 5-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme and is mainly responsible for the synthesis of tyramine, an important biogenic amine. In this study, the crystal structures of the apo and holo forms of Lactobacillus brevis TDC (LbTDC) were determined. The LbTDC displays only 25% sequence identity with the only reported TDC structure. Site-directed mutagenesis of the conformationally flexible sites and catalytic center was performed to investigate the potential catalytic mechanism. It was found that H241 in the active site plays an important role in PLP binding because it has different conformations in the apo and holo structures of LbTDC. After binding to PLP, H241 rotated to the position adjacent to the PLP pyridine ring. Alanine scanning mutagenesis revealed several crucial regions that determine the substrate specificity and catalytic activity. Among the mutants, the S586A variant displayed increased catalytic efficiency and substrate affinity, which is attributed to decreased steric hindrance and increased hydrophobicity, as verified by the saturation mutagenesis at S586. Our results provide structural information about the residues important for the protein engineering of TDC to improve catalytic efficiency in the green manufacturing of tyramine. PMID:27292129

  4. Buffer-free production of gamma-aminobutyric acid using an engineered glutamate decarboxylase from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kang, Taek Jin; Ho, Ngoc Anh Thu; Pack, Seung Pil

    2013-08-15

    Escherichia coli glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) converts glutamate into γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) through decarboxylation using proton as a co-substrate. Since GAD is active only at acidic conditions even though pH increases as the reaction proceeds, the conventional practice of using this enzyme involved the use of relatively high concentration of buffers, which might complicate the downstream purification steps. Here we show by simulation and experiments that the free acid substrate, glutamic acid, rather than its monosodium salt can act as a substrate and buffer at the same time. This yielded the buffer- and salt-free synthesis of GABA conveniently in a batch mode. Furthermore, we engineered GAD to hyper active ones by extending or reducing the length of the enzyme by just one residue at its C-terminus. Through the buffer-free reaction with engineered GAD, we could synthesize 1M GABA in 3h, which can be translated into a space-time yield of 34.3g/L/h. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid Production Using Immobilized Glutamate Decarboxylase Followed by Downstream Processing with Cation Exchange Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seungwoon; Ahn, Jungoh; Kim, Yeon-Gu; Jung, Joon-Ki; Lee, Hongweon; Lee, Eun Gyo

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) production technique using his-tag mediated immobilization of Escherichia coli-derived glutamate decarboxylase (GAD), an enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of glutamate to GABA. The GAD was obtained at 1.43 g/L from GAD-overexpressed E. coli fermentation and consisted of 59.7% monomer, 29.2% dimer and 2.3% tetramer with a 97.6% soluble form of the total GAD. The harvested GAD was immobilized to metal affinity gel with an immobilization yield of 92%. Based on an investigation of specific enzyme activity and reaction characteristics, glutamic acid (GA) was chosen over monosodium glutamate (MSG) as a substrate for immobilized GAD, resulting in conversion of 2.17 M GABA in a 1 L reactor within 100 min. The immobilized enzymes retained 58.1% of their initial activities after ten consecutive uses. By using cation exchange chromatography followed by enzymatic conversion, GABA was separated from the residual substrate and leached GAD. As a consequence, the glutamic acid was mostly removed with no detectable GAD, while 91.2% of GABA was yielded in the purification step. PMID:23322022

  6. Pyridoxine Supplementation Improves the Activity of Recombinant Glutamate Decarboxylase and the Enzymatic Production of Gama-Aminobutyric Acid

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yan; Su, Lingqia; Wu, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) catalyzes the irreversible decarboxylation of L-glutamate to the valuable food supplement γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). In this study, GAD from Escherichia coli K12, a pyridoxal phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme, was overexpressed in E. coli. The GAD produced in media supplemented with 0.05 mM soluble vitamin B6 analog pyridoxine hydrochloride (GAD-V) activity was 154.8 U mL-1, 1.8-fold higher than that of GAD obtained without supplementation (GAD-C). Purified GAD-V exhibited increased activity (193.4 U mg-1, 1.5-fold higher than that of GAD-C), superior thermostability (2.8-fold greater than that of GAD-C), and higher kcat/Km (1.6-fold higher than that of GAD-C). Under optimal conditions in reactions mixtures lacking added PLP, crude GAD-V converted 500 g L-1 monosodium glutamate (MSG) to GABA with a yield of 100%, and 750 g L-1 MSG with a yield of 88.7%. These results establish the utility of pyridoxine supplementation and lay the foundation for large-scale enzymatic production of GABA. PMID:27438707

  7. Enhanced triterpene accumulation in Panax ginseng hairy roots overexpressing mevalonate-5-pyrophosphate decarboxylase and farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Kyoung; Kim, Yeon Bok; Uddin, Md Romij; Lee, Sanghyun; Kim, Soo-Un; Park, Sang Un

    2014-10-17

    To elucidate the function of mevalonate-5-pyrophosphate decarboxylase (MVD) and farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase (FPS) in triterpene biosynthesis, the genes governing the expression of these enzymes were transformed into Panax ginseng hairy roots. All the transgenic lines showed higher expression levels of PgMVD and PgFPS than that by the wild-type control. Among the hairy root lines transformed with PgMVD, M18 showed the highest level of transcription compared to the control (14.5-fold higher). Transcriptions of F11 and F20 transformed with PgFPS showed 11.1-fold higher level compared with control. In triterpene analysis, M25 of PgMVD produced 4.4-fold higher stigmasterol content (138.95 μg/100 mg, dry weight [DW]) than that by the control; F17 of PgFPS showed the highest total ginsenoside (36.42 mg/g DW) content, which was 2.4-fold higher compared with control. Our results indicate that metabolic engineering in P. ginseng was successfully achieved through Agrobacterium rhizogenes-mediated transformation and that the accumulation of phytosterols and ginsenosides was enhanced by introducing the PgMVD and PgFPS genes into the hairy roots of the plant. Our results suggest that PgMVD and PgFPS play an important role in the triterpene biosynthesis of P. ginseng.

  8. Newly-diagnosed pediatric epilepsy is associated with elevated autoantibodies to glutamic acid decarboxylase but not cardiolipin.

    PubMed

    Veri, Kadi; Uibo, Oivi; Talvik, Tiina; Talvik, Inga; Metsküla, Kaja; Napa, Aita; Vaher, Ulvi; Õiglane-Šlik, Eve; Rein, Reet; Kolk, Anneli; Traat, Aili; Uibo, Raivo

    2013-07-01

    Glutamic acid decarboxylase autoantibodies (GADA) and anti-cardiolipin autoantibodies (ACA) have been detected in adult subjects with epilepsy, though the functional implications of these findings are a matter of debate. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of GADA and ACA and to investigate their clinical significance in pediatric subjects with newly-diagnosed epilepsy. For this purpose GADA and ACA were assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays in 208 pediatric patients with newly-diagnosed epilepsy and 128 controls. The clinical data (results of electroencephalography, magnetic resonance imaging, 6-month outcome etc.) was compared to antibody test results. Our study revealed GADA in 14 (6.7%) patients with epilepsy and in 1 (0.8%) control, which was a statistically significant difference (P=0.010; Chi-square test). The GADA-positive and -negative patients had similar clinical characteristics. The prevalence of ACA in patients with epilepsy (6.3%) was not significantly different than controls (2.6%). These results suggest that GADA is associated with epilepsy in a subgroup of newly-diagnosed pediatric patients. Further studies are required to determine the prognostic significance and pathogenic role of GADA among pediatric subjects with epilepsy.

  9. Molecular identification and characterization of the pyruvate decarboxylase gene family associated with latex regeneration and stress response in rubber tree.

    PubMed

    Long, Xiangyu; He, Bin; Wang, Chuang; Fang, Yongjun; Qi, Jiyan; Tang, Chaorong

    2015-02-01

    In plants, ethanolic fermentation occurs not only under anaerobic conditions but also under aerobic conditions, and involves carbohydrate and energy metabolism. Pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC) is the first and the key enzyme of ethanolic fermentation, which branches off the main glycolytic pathway at pyruvate. Here, four PDC genes were isolated and identified in a rubber tree, and the protein sequences they encode are very similar. The expression patterns of HbPDC4 correlated well with tapping-simulated rubber productivity in virgin rubber trees, indicating it plays an important role in regulating glycometabolism during latex regeneration. HbPDC1, HbPDC2 and HbPDC3 had striking expressional responses in leaves and bark to drought, low temperature and high temperature stresses, indicating that the HbPDC genes are involve in self-protection and defense in response to various abiotic and biotic stresses during rubber tree growth and development. To understand ethanolic fermentation in rubber trees, it will be necessary to perform an in-depth study of the regulatory pathways controlling the HbPDCs in the future.

  10. Ornithine decarboxylase, transglutaminase, diamine oxidase and total diamines and polyamines in maternal liver and kidney throughout rat pregnancy.

    PubMed Central

    Piacentini, M; Sartori, C; Beninati, S; Bargagli, A M; Cerù-Argento, M P

    1986-01-01

    Ornithine decarboxylase (ODC; EC 4.1.1.17), transglutaminase (EC 2.3.2.13), diamine oxidase (DAO; EC 1.4.3.6) and total di- and poly-amines were studied in rat liver and kidney cortex throughout pregnancy. In liver, ODC activity exhibited two major peaks (4.5-5 times the control activities) on days 15 and 17. Also putrescine and spermidine increased biphasically (3-4-fold), but no variation in spermine content was observed. Transglutaminase activity showed slight variations only near the end of gestation. In kidney, ODC activity did not fluctuate significantly during pregnancy, whereas both transglutaminase activity and putrescine content showed three major increases, in very early, middle and late pregnancy. No significant variations in spermidine and spermine were observed. In both organs, DAO activity, very low or undetectable until day 10, dramatically increased (10- and 20-fold in kidney and liver respectively) in the second half of pregnancy, reaching maxima on days 16-17 and 19. The results obtained for transglutaminase, ODC and total di- and poly-amines are interpreted on the basis of hyperplastic and hypertrophic events in the liver and kidney respectively. The behaviour of DAO suggests that the enzyme plays an important role in the control of intracellular diamine concentration. PMID:2872883

  11. Improving nutritional quality and fungal tolerance in soya bean and grass pea by expressing an oxalate decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vinay; Chattopadhyay, Arnab; Ghosh, Sumit; Irfan, Mohammad; Chakraborty, Niranjan; Chakraborty, Subhra; Datta, Asis

    2016-06-01

    Soya bean (Glycine max) and grass pea (Lathyrus sativus) seeds are important sources of dietary proteins; however, they also contain antinutritional metabolite oxalic acid (OA). Excess dietary intake of OA leads to nephrolithiasis due to the formation of calcium oxalate crystals in kidneys. Besides, OA is also a known precursor of β-N-oxalyl-L-α,β-diaminopropionic acid (β-ODAP), a neurotoxin found in grass pea. Here, we report the reduction in OA level in soya bean (up to 73%) and grass pea (up to 75%) seeds by constitutive and/or seed-specific expression of an oxalate-degrading enzyme, oxalate decarboxylase (FvOXDC) of Flammulina velutipes. In addition, β-ODAP level of grass pea seeds was also reduced up to 73%. Reduced OA content was interrelated with the associated increase in seeds micronutrients such as calcium, iron and zinc. Moreover, constitutive expression of FvOXDC led to improved tolerance to the fungal pathogen Sclerotinia sclerotiorum that requires OA during host colonization. Importantly, FvOXDC-expressing soya bean and grass pea plants were similar to the wild type with respect to the morphology and photosynthetic rates, and seed protein pool remained unaltered as revealed by the comparative proteomic analysis. Taken together, these results demonstrated improved seed quality and tolerance to the fungal pathogen in two important legume crops, by the expression of an oxalate-degrading enzyme. © 2016 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Molecular and biochemical characterization of bifunctional pyruvate decarboxylases and pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductases from Thermotoga maritima and Thermotoga hypogea.

    PubMed

    Eram, Mohammad S; Wong, Alton; Oduaran, Erica; Ma, Kesen

    2015-12-01

    Hyperthermophilic bacteria Thermotoga maritima and Thermotoga hypogea produce ethanol as a metabolic end product, which is resulted from acetaldehyde reduction catalysed by an alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH). However, the enzyme that is involved in the production of acetaldehyde from pyruvate is not well characterized. An oxygen sensitive and coenzyme A-dependent pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC) activity was found to be present in cell free extracts of T. maritima and T. hypogea. Both enzymes were purified and found to have pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase (POR) activity, indicating their bifunctionality. Both PDC and POR activities from each of the purified enzymes were characterized in regards to their optimal assay conditions including pH dependency, oxygen sensitivity, thermal stability, temperature dependency and kinetic parameters. The close relatedness of the PORs that was shown by sequence analysis could be an indication of the presence of such bifunctionality in other hyperthermophilic bacteria. This is the first report of a bifunctional PDC/POR enzyme in hyperthermophilic bacteria. The PDC and the previously reported ADHs are most likely the key enzymes catalysing the production of ethanol from pyruvate in bacterial hyperthermophiles.

  13. QSAR study of malonyl-CoA decarboxylase inhibitors using GA-MLR and a new strategy of consensus modeling.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiazhong; Lei, Beilei; Liu, Huanxiang; Li, Shuyan; Yao, Xiaojun; Liu, Mancang; Gramatica, Paola

    2008-12-01

    Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) of a series of structural diverse malonyl-CoA decarboxylase (MCD) inhibitors have been investigated by using the predictive single model as well as the consensus analysis based on a new strategy proposed by us. Self-organizing map (SOM) neural network was employed to divide the whole data set into representative training set and test set. Then a multiple linear regressions (MLR) model population was built based on the theoretical molecular descriptors selected by Genetic Algorithm using the training set. In order to analyze the diversity of these models, multidimensional scaling (MDS) was employed to explore the model space based on the Hamming distance matrix calculated from each two models. In this space, Q(2) (cross-validated R(2)) guided model selection (QGMS) strategy was performed to select submodels. Then consensus modeling was built by two strategies, average consensus model (ACM) and weighted consensus model (WCM), where each submodel had a different weight according to the contribution of model expressed by MLR regression coefficients. The obtained results prove that QGMS is a reliable and practical method to guide the submodel selection in consensus modeling building and our weighted consensus model (WCM) strategy is superior to the simple ACM. 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Product feedback regulation implicated in translational control of the Trypanosoma brucei S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase regulatory subunit prozyme

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yanjing; Nguyen, Suong; Kim, Sok Ho; Volkov, Oleg A.; Tu, Benjamin P.; Phillips, Margaret A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Human African sleeping sickness (HAT) is caused by the parasitic protozoan Trypanosoma brucei. Polyamine biosynthesis is an important drug target in the treatment of HAT. Previously we showed that trypanosomatid S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (AdoMetDC), a key enzyme for biosynthesis of the polyamine spermidine, is activated by heterodimer formation with an inactive paralog termed prozyme. Furthermore, prozyme protein levels were regulated in response reduced AdoMetDC activity. Herein we show that T. brucei encodes three prozyme transcripts. The 3’UTRs of these transcripts were mapped and chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) reporter constructs were used to identify a 1.2 kb region that contained a 3’UTR prozyme regulatory element sufficient to up regulate CAT protein levels (but not RNA) upon AdoMetDC inhibition, supporting the hypothesis that prozyme expression is regulated translationally. To gain insight into trans-acting factors, genetic rescue of AdoMetDC RNAi knockdown lines with human AdoMetDC was performed leading to rescue of the cell growth block, and restoration of prozyme protein to wild-type levels. Polyamine and AdoMet metabolite analysis showed that prozyme protein levels were inversely proportional to intracellular levels of decarboxylated AdoMet (dcAdoMet). These data suggest that prozyme translation may be regulated by dcAdoMet, a metabolite not previously identified to play a regulatory role. PMID:23634831

  15. Constitutive S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase gene expression increases drought tolerance through inhibition of reactive oxygen species accumulation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Wi, Soo Jin; Kim, Soo Jin; Kim, Woo Taek; Park, Ky Young

    2014-05-01

    Using subtractive hybridization analysis, the S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (SAMDC) gene from Capsicum annuum was isolated and renamed CaSAMDC. We generated independent transgenic Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) lines constitutively expressing a 35S::CaSAMDC construct. Drought tolerance was significantly enhanced in Arabidopsis T4 transgenic homozygous lines as compared to wild-type (WT) plants. The levels of main polyamines (PAs) were more significantly increased in CaSAMDC-overexpressing transgenic plants after 6 h of drought stress as compared to stressed WT plants. Basal transcription of polyamine oxidase (PAO) showed at a much higher level in unstressed-transgenic plants as compared to unstressed WT plants. However, the difference in PAO transcription level between WT and transgenic plants was reduced after drought stress. Cellular accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was significantly reduced following drought stress in transgenic Arabidopsis plants as compared to WT plants. These results were in agreement with additional observations that stress-induced ROS generation, as determined by qRT-PCR analysis of NADPH oxidase (RbohD and RbohF), was significantly suppressed while transcription of ROS-detoxifying enzymes was notably elevated in transgenic lines in response to drought stress. Further, ROS-induced transcription of the metacaspase II gene was remarkably inhibited in transgenic plants. Collectively, these results suggest that drought stress tolerance due to reduction of ROS production and enhancement of ROS detoxification can be attributed to elevation of PAs.

  16. Mutation-adapted U1 snRNA corrects a splicing error of the dopa decarboxylase gene.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ni-Chung; Lee, Yu-May; Chen, Pin-Wen; Byrne, Barry J; Hwu, Wuh-Liang

    2016-12-01

    Aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) deficiency is an inborn error of monoamine neurotransmitter synthesis, which results in dopamine, serotonin, epinephrine and norepinephrine deficiencies. The DDC gene founder mutation IVS6 + 4A > T is highly prevalent in Chinese patients with AADC deficiency. In this study, we designed several U1 snRNA vectors to adapt U1 snRNA binding sequences of the mutated DDC gene. We found that only the modified U1 snRNA (IVS-AAA) that completely matched both the intronic and exonic U1 binding sequences of the mutated DDC gene could correct splicing errors of either the mutated human DDC minigene or the mouse artificial splicing construct in vitro. We further injected an adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector to express IVS-AAA in the brain of a knock-in mouse model. This treatment was well tolerated and improved both the survival and brain dopamine and serotonin levels of mice with AADC deficiency. Therefore, mutation-adapted U1 snRNA gene therapy can be a promising method to treat genetic diseases caused by splicing errors, but the efficiency of such a treatment still needs improvements. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. The HemQ coprohaem decarboxylase generates reactive oxygen species: implications for the evolution of classical haem biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Hobbs, Charlie; Dailey, Harry A.; Shepherd, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria require a haem biosynthetic pathway for the assembly of a variety of protein complexes, including cytochromes, peroxidases, globins, and catalase. Haem is synthesised via a series of tetrapyrrole intermediates, including non-metallated porphyrins, such as protoporphyrin IX, which is well known to generate reactive oxygen species in the presence of light and oxygen. Staphylococcus aureus has an ancient haem biosynthetic pathway that proceeds via the formation of coproporphyrin III, a less reactive porphyrin. Here, we demonstrate, for the first time, that HemY of S. aureus is able to generate both protoporphyrin IX and coproporphyrin III, and that the terminal enzyme of this pathway, HemQ, can stimulate the generation of protoporphyrin IX (but not coproporphyrin III). Assays with hydrogen peroxide, horseradish peroxidase, superoxide dismutase, and catalase confirm that this stimulatory effect is mediated by superoxide. Structural modelling reveals that HemQ enzymes do not possess the structural attributes that are common to peroxidases that form compound I [FeIV==O]+, which taken together with the superoxide data leaves Fenton chemistry as a likely route for the superoxide-mediated stimulation of protoporphyrinogen IX oxidase activity of HemY. This generation of toxic free radicals could explain why HemQ enzymes have not been identified in organisms that synthesise haem via the classical protoporphyrin IX pathway. This work has implications for the divergent evolution of haem biosynthesis in ancestral microorganisms, and provides new structural and mechanistic insights into a recently discovered oxidative decarboxylase reaction. PMID:27597779

  18. Dynamic changes in gamma-aminobutyric acid and glutamate decarboxylase activity in oats (Avena nuda L.) during steeping and germination.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jian Guo; Hu, Qing Ping; Duan, Jiang Lian; Tian, Cheng Rui

    2010-09-08

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the principal inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system and provides beneficial effects for human and other animals health. To accumulate GABA, samples from two different naked oat cultivars, Baiyan II and Bayou I, were steeped and germinated in an incubator. The content of GABA and glutamic acid as well as the activity of the glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) in oats during steeping and germination were investigated with an amino acid automatic analyzer. Compared with raw groats, an increase in GABA content of oat groats during steeping and germination was continuously observed for two oat cultivars. The activity of GAD increased greatly at the end of steeping and the second stage of germination for Baiyan II and Bayou I, respectively. Glutamic acid content of treated oat groats was significantly lower than that in raw groats until the later period of germination. GABA was correlated (p<0.01) significantly and positively with the glutamic acid rather than GAD activity in the current study. The results indicates that steeping and germination process under highly controlled conditions can effectively accumulate the GABA in oat groats for Baiyan II and Bayou I, which would greatly facilitate production of nutraceuticals or food ingredients that enable consumers to gain greater access to the health benefits of oats. However, more assays need to be further performed with more oat cultivars.

  19. Pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase overexpression in Escherichia coli resulted in high ethanol production and rewired metabolic enzyme networks.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mingfeng; Li, Xuefeng; Bu, Chunya; Wang, Hui; Shi, Guanglu; Yang, Xiushan; Hu, Yong; Wang, Xiaoqin

    2014-11-01

    Pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase are efficient enzymes for ethanol production in Zymomonas mobilis. These two enzymes were over-expressed in Escherichia coli, a promising candidate for industrial ethanol production, resulting in high ethanol production in the engineered E. coli. To investigate the intracellular changes to the enzyme overexpression for homoethanol production, 2-DE and LC-MS/MS were performed. More than 1,000 protein spots were reproducibly detected in the gel by image analysis. Compared to the wild-type, 99 protein spots showed significant changes in abundance in the recombinant E. coli, in which 46 were down-regulated and 53 were up-regulated. Most proteins related to tricarboxylic acid cycle, glycerol metabolism and other energy metabolism were up-regulated, whereas proteins involved in glycolysis and glyoxylate pathway were down-regulated, indicating the rewired metabolism in the engineered E. coli. As glycolysis is the main pathway for ethanol production, and it was inhibited significantly in engineered E. coli, further efforts should be directed at minimizing the repression of glycolysis to optimize metabolism network for higher yields of ethanol production.

  20. A polymorphic (GA/CT)n- SSR influences promoter activity of Tryptophan decarboxylase gene in Catharanthus roseus L. Don

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Santosh; Bhatia, Sabhyata

    2016-01-01

    Simple Sequence Repeats (SSRs) of polypurine-polypyrimidine type motifs occur very frequently in the 5′ flanks of genes in plants and have recently been implicated to have a role in regulation of gene expression. In this study, 2 accessions of Catharanthus roseus having (CT)8 and (CT)21 varying motifs in the 5′UTR of Tryptophan decarboxylase (Tdc) gene, were investigated for its role in regulation of gene expression. Extensive Tdc gene expression analysis in the 2 accessions was carried out both at the level of transcription and translation. Transcript abundance was estimated using Northern analysis and qRT-PCR, whereas the rate of Tdc gene transcription was assessed using in-situ nuclear run-on transcription assay. Translation status of Tdc gene was monitored by quantification of polysome associated Tdc mRNA using qRT-PCR. These observations were validated through transient expression analysis using the fusion construct [CaM35S:(CT)8–21:GUS]. Our study demonstrated that not only does the length of (CT)n -SSRs influences the promoter activity, but the presence of SSRs per se in the 5′-UTR significantly enhances the level of gene expression. We termed this phenomenon as “microsatellite mediated enhancement” (MME) of gene expression. Results presented here will provide leads for engineering plants with enhanced amounts of medicinally important alkaloids. PMID:27623355

  1. Removal kinetics of antibodies against glutamic acid decarboxylase by various plasmapheresis modalities in the treatment of neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Ohkubo, Atsushi; Okado, Tomokazu; Kurashima, Naoki; Maeda, Takuma; Miyamoto, Satoko; Nakamura, Ayako; Seshima, Hiroshi; Iimori, Soichiro; Sohara, Eisei; Uchida, Shinichi; Rai, Tatemitsu

    2014-06-01

    Plasmapheresis is one of the acute treatment modalities for neurological disorders associated with antibodies against glutamic acid decarboxylase (anti-GAD). However, there is little information about the removal kinetics of anti-GAD by various plasmapheresis modalities. Here, we investigated the removal rate of anti-GAD and fibrinogen (Fib) by immunoadsorption (IA), plasma exchange using a conventional plasma separator (OP-PE), and plasma exchange using a high cut-off selective membrane plasma separator (EC-PE) in two cases of anti-GAD-associated neurological diseases. In case 1, IA and OP-PE were used, and the percent reductions were as follows: anti-GAD: 38.2% and 69.1% and Fib: 67.7% and 68.2%, respectively. In case 2, OP-PE and EC-PE were used, and the percent reductions were as follows: anti-GAD: 65.8% and 48.5% and Fib: 68.5% and 19.8%, respectively. OP-PE could remove anti-GAD more efficiently than IA. Further, EC-PE could maintain coagulation factors such as Fib better than IA and OP-PE. It is important to select the appropriate plasmapheresis modality on the basis of the removal kinetics.

  2. Ornithine decarboxylase, polyamines and CD11b expression in HL-60 cells during differentiation induced by retinoic acid.

    PubMed

    Stabellini, Giordano; Brugnoli, F; Calastrini, C; Vizzotto, L; Vertemati, M; Baroni, T; Caramelli, E; Marinucci, L; Pellati, A; Bertagnolo, V

    2004-01-01

    Polyamines (PA) and retinoic acid affect mammalian cell growth, differentiation and apoptosis. Retinoic acid induces granulocytic differentiation of mieloid cell lines and, during this process, is responsible for the expression of CD11b, a surface antigen. In this study we investigate the effects of retinoic acid on HL-60 cells, monitoring ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) activity (enzyme rate of PA), putrescine (PUT), spermidine (SPD), spermine (SPM) levels, CD11b myeloid surface marker differentiation, cell cycle, and apoptosis. ODC activity and PUT levels are correlated with mieloid cell differentiation induced by retinoic acid treatment. Only the ODC/PUT ratio is connected with retinoic acid treated HL-60 cells. Treated cultures show a decrease of proliferation and a cell block in the G0/G1 phase, with consequent diminished S phase. The G0/G1 and S phases are significantly related to ODC activity and to PUT and SPD behavior, whereas in differentiating condition only the decrease of PUT is related to the S phase. CD11b expression, stimulated by retinoic acid treatment, is associated with the SPM trend. Total PA behavior agrees with apoptotic cell increase after 96 h of stimulation. Our data show that retinoic acid treatment modifies ODC activity and the turnover of PA. PUT, SPD and SPM, therefore, have a different role, and may be involved in the differentiative/apoptotic program of retinoic acid treated HL-60 cells.

  3. Effects of psoralen from Psoralea corylifolia on quinone reductase, ornithine decarboxylase, and JB6 cells transformation promotion.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung-Jin; Nam, Kung-Woo; Mar, Woongchon

    2011-01-01

    The cancer chemopreventive effect of psoralen isolated from the seeds of Psoralea corylifolia was investigated in the induction of quinone reductase (QR) activity, intracellular detoxification enzyme, inhibition of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA)-induced ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) activity, a key regulatory enzyme for polyamine metabolism, and tumor promotion in mouse epidermal JB6 cells, sensitive to tumor promoters (clone 415a P+ cells), which are related to suppress multistage carcinogenesis including initiation and promotion. Psoralen was isolated and identified from the ethyl acetate-soluble fraction of the methanolic extract from the seeds. Psoralen was active in induction of QR activity, the concentration of psoralen required to induce 1.5 fold QR activity was 14.8 μg/mL. Also, this pure compound inhibited TPA-induced ODC activity by 50% (designated IC(50)) at the concentration 15.6 μg/mL and exhibited inhibition of TPA-induced tumor promotion in mouse epidermal JB6 cells with an IC(50) value of 17.1 μg/mL. Therefore, it is extrapolated that psoralen has the potential capable of inhibiting the initiation and/or promotion stage of carcinogenesis by induction of QR activity, inhibition of TPA-induced ODC activity and mouse epidermal JB6 cells tumor promotion.

  4. Purification, properties and cDNA cloning of glutamate decarboxylase in germinated faba bean (Vicia faba L.).

    PubMed

    Yang, Runqiang; Yin, Yongqi; Guo, Qianghui; Gu, Zhenxin

    2013-06-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a non-protein amino acid with bioactive functions in humans. In this work, glutamate decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.15, GAD) which is key in the GABA bioformation was purified from 5-day germinated faba beans and characterized. A single band was observed at 58 kDa using sodium dodecyl sulphate gel electrophoresis. GAD optimal activity was at pH 6.0 at 40°C with a K(m) value for glutamic acid (Glu) of 2.63 mM. The enzyme was inhibited significantly by Cu(2+), Fe(3+), Mg(2+), Ba(2+), aminoxyacetate, EGTA, Na(2)EDTA, l-cysteine and beta-mercaptoethanol; and activated at low Ca(2+) 0.2mM. Using RT-PCR, the GAD cDNA was sequenced which indicated 1787 bp long, containing a 1527 bp open reading frame (ORF) that encoded 509 amino-acid peptides with a calculated molecular weight of 57.74 kDa and a pI of 5.41 (GenBank accession number: JX444699).

  5. Cyclobutane-type pyrimidine photodimer formation and induction of ornithine decarboxylase in human skin fibroblasts after UV irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Niggli, H.J.; Roethlisberger, R.

    1988-12-01

    Cyclobutane-type pyrimidine photodimers as well as the induction of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) may serve as biochemical markers of the mutagenic and carcinogenic effects of ultraviolet light (UV). For this reason, it is important to compare the formation of pyrimidine dimers with the induction of ODC in human skin fibroblasts after irradiation with UVC (200-290 nm) and UVB (290-320 nm). In our studies we determined cytosine-thymine (C-T) as well as thymine-thymine dimer yields (T-T) by high-pressure liquid chromatography in cultures of neonatal normal human foreskin-derived fibroblasts after irradiation with UVC and UVB light. It was found that the yield of dimerization and the ratio of T-T/C-T decreased from the UVC to the UVB region. Time-course studies of ODC-induction in the same cells indicated that the maximal activity after UVB irradiation was retarded compared to UVC exposure. For the UV-induced ODC-levels, however, no significant difference in maximal induction could be measured after UVC and UVB irradiation at fluences where comparable yields of thymine dimerization are produced. Similar ODC-maxima were obtained with strains from children, while cells from adults showed significantly less pronounced ODC induction, indicating that ODC-response decreases with age and may therefore be used as a marker of aging.

  6. Distribution of messenger RNAs encoding the enzymes glutaminase, aspartate aminotransferase and glutamic acid decarboxylase in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Najlerahim, A; Harrison, P J; Barton, A J; Heffernan, J; Pearson, R C

    1990-05-01

    In situ hybridization histochemistry (ISHH) using synthetic oligonucleotide probes has been used to identify cells containing the mRNAs coding for glutaminase (GluT), aspartate aminotransferase (AspT) and glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD). The distribution of GAD mRNA confirms previous descriptions and matches the distribution of GAD detected using specific antibodies. AspT mRNA is widely distributed in the brain, but is present at high levels in GABAergic neuronal populations, some that may be glutamatergic, and in a subset of neurons which do not contain significant levels of either GAD or GluT mRNA. Particularly prominent are the neurons of the magnocellular division of the red nucleus, the large cells in the deep cerebellar nuclei and the vestibular nuclei and neurons of the lateral superior olivary nucleus. GluT mRNA does not appear to be present at high levels in all GAD-containing neurons, but is seen prominently in many neuronal populations that may use glutamate as a neurotransmitter, such as neocortical and hippocampal pyramidal cells, the granule cells of the cerebellum and neurons of the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. The heaviest labelling of GluT mRNA is seen in the lateral reticular nucleus of the medulla. ISHH using probes directed against the mRNAs encoding these enzymes may be an important technique for identifying glutamate and aspartate using neuronal populations and for examining their regulation in a variety of experimental and pathological circumstances.

  7. Efficient Production of γ-GABA Using Recombinant E. coli Expressing Glutamate Decarboxylase (GAD) Derived from Eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Qiang; Xu, Zheng; Xu, Lu; Yao, Zhong; Li, Sha; Xu, Hong

    2017-06-27

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (γ-GABA) is a non-proteinogenic amino acid, which acts as a major regulator in the central nervous system. Glutamate decarboxylase (namely GAD, EC 4.1.1.15) is known to be an ideal enzyme for γ-GABA production using L-glutamic acid as substrate. In this study, we cloned and expressed GAD gene from eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae (ScGAD) in E. coli BL21(DE3). This enzyme was further purified and its optimal reaction temperature and pH were 37 °C and pH 4.2, respectively. The cofactor of ScGAD was verified to be either pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) or pyridoxal hydrochloride. The optimal concentration of either cofactor was 50 mg/L. The optimal medium for E. coli-ScGAD cultivation and expression were 10 g/L lactose, 5 g/L glycerol, 20 g/L yeast extract, and 10 g/L sodium chloride, resulting in an activity of 55 U/mL medium, three times higher than that of using Luria-Bertani (LB) medium. The maximal concentration of γ-GABA was 245 g/L whereas L-glutamic acid was near completely converted. These findings provided us a good example for bio-production of γ-GABA using recombinant E. coli expressing a GAD enzyme derived from eukaryote.

  8. The Krebs Cycle Enzyme α-Ketoglutarate Decarboxylase Is an Essential Glycosomal Protein in Bloodstream African Trypanosomes

    PubMed Central

    Sykes, Steven; Szempruch, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    α-Ketoglutarate decarboxylase (α-KDE1) is a Krebs cycle enzyme found in the mitochondrion of the procyclic form (PF) of Trypanosoma brucei. The bloodstream form (BF) of T. brucei lacks a functional Krebs cycle and relies exclusively on glycolysis for ATP production. Despite the lack of a functional Krebs cycle, α-KDE1 was expressed in BF T. brucei and RNA interference knockdown of α-KDE1 mRNA resulted in rapid growth arrest and killing. Cell death was preceded by progressive swelling of the flagellar pocket as a consequence of recruitment of both flagellar and plasma membranes into the pocket. BF T. brucei expressing an epitope-tagged copy of α-KDE1 showed localization to glycosomes and not the mitochondrion. We used a cell line transfected with a reporter construct containing the N-terminal sequence of α-KDE1 fused to green fluorescent protein to examine the requirements for glycosome targeting. We found that the N-terminal 18 amino acids of α-KDE1 contain overlapping mitochondrion- and peroxisome-targeting sequences and are sufficient to direct localization to the glycosome in BF T. brucei. These results suggest that α-KDE1 has a novel moonlighting function outside the mitochondrion in BF T. brucei. PMID:25416237

  9. Characterization of the arginine decarboxylase gene (ORF HP0422, speA) involved in acid tolerance in Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, Manuel; Cáceres, Aníbal; Almarza, Oscar; Bravo, Denisse; Soto, Sarita; Cerda, Oscar; Toledo, Héctor

    2014-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a motile microaerophilic bacterium that colonizes the human stomach. H. pylori infection triggers gastric diseases, such as gastritis, peptic ulcer and gastric cancer. Stomach represents a barrier for microorganism colonization, particularly because of its high hydrochloric acid concentration. The main mechanism developed by H. pylori to maintain intracellular pH homeostasis in this environment is the urease activity. However, urease negative strains can be also isolated from clinical samples, suggesting that H. pylori presents other components involved in acid resistance. Here, we present some evidence that the arginine decarboxylase gene (speA) in H. pylori could be involved in an acid adaptation mechanism similar to the one in Enterobacteriaceae, which is dependent on the presence of arginine. Indeed, speA mRNA and protein expression are acutely induced by acid stress. Moreover, we showed that H. pylori uses arginine in an acid response mechanism required for its growth in acid conditions. Altogether, these results provide novel information regarding the H. pylori physiology and acid response mechanism. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Structural Asymmetry and Disulfide Bridges among Subunits Modulate the Activity of Human Malonyl-CoA Decarboxylase*

    PubMed Central

    Aparicio, David; Pérez-Luque, Rosa; Carpena, Xavier; Díaz, Mireia; Ferrer, Joan C.; Loewen, Peter C.; Fita, Ignacio

    2013-01-01

    Decarboxylation of malonyl-CoA to acetyl-CoA by malonyl-CoA decarboxylase (MCD; EC 4.1.1.9) is an essential facet in the regulation of fatty acid metabolism. The structure of human peroxisomal MCD reveals a molecular tetramer that is best described as a dimer of structural heterodimers, in which the two subunits present markedly different conformations. This molecular organization is consistent with half-of-the-sites reactivity. Each subunit has an all-helix N-terminal domain and a catalytic C-terminal domain with an acetyltransferase fold (GNAT superfamily). Intersubunit disulfide bridges, Cys-206–Cys-206 and Cys-243–Cys-243, can link the four subunits of the tetramer, imparting positive cooperativity to the catalytic process. The combination of a half-of-the-sites mechanism within each structural heterodimer and positive cooperativity in the tetramer produces a complex regulatory picture that is further complicated by the multiple intracellular locations of the enzyme. Transport into the peroxisome has been investigated by docking human MCD onto the peroxisomal import protein peroxin 5, which revealed interactions that extend beyond the C-terminal targeting motif. PMID:23482565

  11. The VP1 structural protein of enterovirus 71 interacts with human ornithine decarboxylase and gene trap ankyrin repeat.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Wee M; Chow, Vincent T K

    2007-04-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is a major etiological agent of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD). Several outbreaks in East Asia were associated with neurological complications and numerous deaths. EV71 possesses four structural proteins VP1-VP4 that are necessary in the formation of the pentameric icosahedral capsid. The viral capsid contributes to virulence, and VP1 is a prime target for EV71 vaccine development. Using yeast two-hybrid analysis, we demonstrated binding affinity between VP1 and three human proteins, i.e. ornithine decarboxylase (ODC1), gene trap ankyrin repeat (GTAR), and KIAA0697 expressed in brain tissue. These interactions were authenticated by co-immunoprecipitation experiments, and by indirect immunofluorescent confocal microscopy of transfected and EV71-infected Vero cells. The significant interaction between VP1 and ODC1 may compromise the latter's activity, and interfere with polyamine biosynthesis, growth and proliferation of EV71-infected cells. The interaction between VP1 and GTAR is noteworthy, since ankyrin proteins are associated with certain neural cell adhesion molecules and with the CRASH neurological syndrome. Given that VP1 is synthesized in large amounts during productive infection, these viral-host protein interactions may provide insights into the role of VP1 in the pathogenesis of EV71 disease and its neurological complications such as acute flaccid paralysis and encephalitis.

  12. Estradiol decreases taurine level by reducing cysteine sulfinic acid decarboxylase via the estrogen receptor-α in female mice liver.