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Sample records for decay time characteristics

  1. Characteristic Time of the Magnetospheric Ring Current Decay FROM EXPIREMENT AND THEORY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biktash(Sizova), L. Z.; Korotova, G. I.

    2006-12-01

    The magnetospheric ring current particles are the most dynamic part of the Earth's radiation belts especially during geomagnetic storms. The processes of the magnetospheric ring current decay are studied as a function of the solar wind electric field. It is shown that the ring current dissipation rate is different during the main and recovery phase of geomagnetic storms. The characteristic time of the ring current decay in the main phase is independent of storm intensity and equals 4 hours. The characteristic time of the ring current decay in a recovery phase increases with storm intensity. We examine the ring current ion lifetimes for the possible mechanisms of its decay. Coulomb scattering, charge exchange and plasma instability mechanisms are used for estimation of lifetime of electrons, protons, helium, and oxygen ions. The values of the characteristic lifetime of ring current dissipation obtained from experiment and theory are compared. It is shown that during main and recovery phase of magnetic storm the different mechanisms can play main role in dissipation of the ring current. Very short characteristic decay time during main phase of geomagnetic storms is associated with plasma instabilities. The available ion composition data of the ring current make possible to assume that the ring current decay is accounted for by ion composition variations with changing the intensity (and hence position) of the ring current and/or by a rise of energetic ion fraction on low L-shells.

  2. The application of time decay characteristics of laser-induced fluorescence in the classification of vegetation.

    PubMed

    Gong, Wei; Yang, Jian; Shi, Shuo; Du, Lin; Sun, Jia; Song, Shalei

    2017-02-01

    In this study, the time decay of the chlorophyll fluorescence intensity (TDCFI) of vegetation was measured based on laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) technology with a 355 nm laser serving as the excitation light source. The pseudo-color diagram of the TDCFI (PDTDCFIs) was proposed for use as a characteristic fingerprint for the analysis of various plant species based on variations in the fluorescence intensity over time. Compared with the steady-state fluorescence spectra, two-dimensional PDTDCFIs contained more spectral information, including variations in both the shape of the laser-induced fluorescence spectra and the relative intensity. The experimental results demonstrated that the PDTDCFIs of various plant species show distinct differences, and this was successfully applied in the classification of plant species. Therefore, the PDTDCFIs of plants could provide researchers with a more reliable and useful tool for the characterization of vegetation. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Decay Time of Cathodoluminescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2009-01-01

    Simple measurements of the decay time of cathodoluminescence are described. Cathodoluminescence is used in many devices, including computer monitors, oscilloscopes, radar displays and television tubes. The experimental setup is simple and easy to build. Two oscilloscopes, a function generator, and a fast photodiode are needed for the experiments.…

  4. 'Stutter timing' for charge decay time measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chubb, John; Harbour, John; Pavey, Ian

    2011-06-01

    The paper describes the approach of 'stutter timing' that has been developed to improve the accuracy of measuring charge decay times in the presence of noise in compact and portable charge decay test instrumentation. The approach involves starting and stopping the timing clock as the noisy signal rises above and falls below the target threshold voltage level.

  5. Radioactive equilibrium: 99Mo/99mTc decay characteristics.

    PubMed

    Chechev, Valery P; Bé, Marie-Martine

    2014-05-01

    Within the Decay Data Evaluation Project, as an example of a radioactive equilibrium with isomer, the (99)Mo/(99m)Tc equilibrium mixture decay characteristics are examined. The results of a new decay data evaluation are presented for (99)Mo/(99m)Tc decay to nuclear levels in (99)Tc. These evaluated data have been obtained using information published up to 2013.

  6. Biologic fluorescence decay characteristics: determination by Laguerre expansion technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Wendy J.; Maarek, Jean-Michel I.; Papaioannou, Thanassis; Marmarelis, Vasilis Z.; Grundfest, Warren S.

    1996-04-01

    Fluorescence decay characteristics are used to identify biologic fluorophores and to characterize interactions with the fluorophore environment. In many studies, fluorescence lifetimes are assessed by iterative reconvolution techniques. We investigated the use of a new approach: the Laguerre expansion of kernels technique (Marmarelis, V.Z., Ann. Biomed., Eng. 1993; 21, 573-589) which yields the fluorescence impulse response function by least- squares fitting of a discrete-time Laguerre functions expansion. Nitrogen (4 ns FWHM) and excimer (120 ns FWHM) laser pulses were used to excite the fluorescence of an anthracene and of type II collagen powder. After filtering (monochromator) and detection (MCP-PMT), the fluorescence response was digitized (digital storage oscilloscope) and transferred to a personal computer. Input and output data were deconvolved by the Laguerre expansion technique to compute the impulse response function which was then fitted to a multiexponential function for determination of the decay constants. A single exponential (time constant: 4.24 ns) best approximated the fluorescence decay of anthracene, whereas the Type II collagen response was best approximated by a double exponential (time constants: 2.24 and 9.92 ns) in agreement with previously reported data. The results of the Laguerre expansion technique were compared to the least-squares iterative reconvolution technique. The Laguerre expansion technique appeared computationally efficient and robust to experimental noise in the data. Furthermore, the proposed method does not impose a set multiexponential form to the decay.

  7. Time-resolved fluorescence decay measurements for flowing particles

    DOEpatents

    Deka, Chiranjit; Steinkamp, John A.

    1999-01-01

    Time-resolved fluorescence decay measurements for flowing particles. An apparatus and method for the measurement and analysis of fluorescence for individual cells and particles in flow are described, wherein the rapid measurement capabilities of flow cytometry and the robust measurement and analysis procedures of time-domain fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy are combined. A pulse-modulated cw laser is employed for excitation of the particles. The characteristics and the repetition rate of the excitation pulses can be readily adjusted to accommodate for fluorescence decays having a wide range of lifetimes.

  8. Time-resolved fluorescence decay measurements for flowing particles

    DOEpatents

    Deka, C.; Steinkamp, J.A.

    1999-06-01

    Time-resolved fluorescence decay measurements are disclosed for flowing particles. An apparatus and method for the measurement and analysis of fluorescence for individual cells and particles in flow are described, wherein the rapid measurement capabilities of flow cytometry and the robust measurement and analysis procedures of time-domain fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy are combined. A pulse-modulated CW laser is employed for excitation of the particles. The characteristics and the repetition rate of the excitation pulses can be readily adjusted to accommodate for fluorescence decays having a wide range of lifetimes. 12 figs.

  9. Time reversal invariance in polarized neutron decay

    SciTech Connect

    Wasserman, E.G.

    1994-03-01

    An experiment to measure the time reversal invariance violating (T-violating) triple correlation (D) in the decay of free polarized neutrons has been developed. The detector design incorporates a detector geometry that provides a significant improvement in the sensitivity over that used in the most sensitive of previous experiments. A prototype detector was tested in measurements with a cold neutron beam. Data resulting from the tests are presented. A detailed calculation of systematic effects has been performed and new diagnostic techniques that allow these effects to be measured have been developed. As the result of this work, a new experiment is under way that will improve the sensitivity to D to 3 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} or better. With higher neutron flux a statistical sensitivity of the order 3 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} is ultimately expected. The decay of free polarized neutrons (n {yields} p + e + {bar v}{sub e}) is used to search for T-violation by measuring the triple correlation of the neutron spin polarization, and the electron and proton momenta ({sigma}{sub n} {center_dot} p{sub p} {times} p{sub e}). This correlation changes sign under reversal of the motion. Since final state effects in neutron decay are small, a nonzero coefficient, D, of this correlation indicates the violation of time reversal invariance. D is measured by comparing the numbers of coincidences in electron and proton detectors arranged symmetrically about a longitudinally polarized neutron beam. Particular care must be taken to eliminate residual asymmetries in the detectors or beam as these can lead to significant false effects. The Standard Model predicts negligible T-violating effects in neutron decay. Extensions to the Standard Model include new interactions some of which include CP-violating components. Some of these make first order contributions to D.

  10. Do aftershock probabilities decay with time?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Michael, Andrew J.

    2012-01-01

    So, do aftershock probabilities decay with time? Consider a thought experiment in which we are at the time of the mainshock and ask how many aftershocks will occur a day, week, month, year, or even a century from now. First we must decide how large a window to use around each point in time. Let's assume that, as we go further into the future, we are asking a less precise question. Perhaps a day from now means 1 day 10% of a day, a week from now means 1 week 10% of a week, and so on. If we ignore c because it is a small fraction of a day (e.g., Reasenberg and Jones, 1989, hereafter RJ89), and set p = 1 because it is usually close to 1 (its value in the original Omori law), then the rate of earthquakes (K=t) decays at 1=t. If the length of the windows being considered increases proportionally to t, then the number of earthquakes at any time from now is the same because the rate decrease is canceled by the increase in the window duration. Under these conditions we should never think "It's a bit late for this to be an aftershock."

  11. Decay time characteristics of La2O2S:Eu and La2O2S:Tb for use within an optical sensor for human skin temperature measurement.

    PubMed

    Yap, Sook Voon; Ranson, Robert M; Cranton, Wayne M; Koutsogeorgis, Demosthenes

    2008-09-20

    We focus on the development of a remote temperature sensing technology, i.e., an optical laser-based sensor, using thermographic phosphors for medical applications, particularly within an electromagnetically hostile magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) environment. A MRI scanner uses a strong magnetic field and radio waves to generate images of the inside of the body. The quality of the image improves with increasing magnetic resonance; however, the drawback of applying a greater magnetic strength is the inducement of heat into the body tissue. Therefore, monitoring the patient's temperature inside MRI is vital, but until now, a practical solution for temperature measurement did not exist. We show europium doped lanthanum oxysulphide (La(2)O(2)S:Eu) and terbium doped lanthanum oxysulphide (La(2)O(2)S:Tb) are both temperature sensitive to a low temperature range of 10-50 degrees C when under ultraviolet (UV) excitation. The emission spectra and decay time characteristics of these phosphors were demonstrated. The results indicate that La(2)O(2)S:Eu has a quenching rate of 13.7 m degrees C(-1) and 4 m degrees C(-1) at 512 nm and 538 nm, respectively. In addition, La(2)O(2)S:Tb has a lower quenching rate of 4.19 m degrees C(-1) at 548 nm due to its faster decay time.

  12. Decay time characteristics of La2O2S:Eu and La2O2S:Tb for use within an optical sensor for human skin temperature measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Yap, Sook Voon; Ranson, Robert M.; Cranton, Wayne M.; Koutsogeorgis, Demosthenes

    2008-09-20

    We focus on the development of a remote temperature sensing technology, i.e., an optical laser-based sensor, using thermographic phosphors for medical applications, particularly within an electromagnetically hostile magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) environment. A MRI scanner uses a strong magnetic field and radio waves to generate images of the inside of the body. The quality of the image improves with increasing magnetic resonance; however, the drawback of applying a greater magnetic strength is the inducement of heat into the body tissue. Therefore, monitoring the patient's temperature inside MRI is vital, but until now, a practical solution for temperature measurement did not exist. We show europium doped lanthanum oxysulphide (La2O2S:Eu) and terbium doped lanthanum oxysulphide (La2O2S:Tb) are both temperature sensitive to a low temperature range of 10-50 deg. C when under ultraviolet (UV) excitation. The emission spectra and decay time characteristics of these phosphors were demonstrated. The results indicate that La2O2S:Eu has a quenching rate of 13.7 m deg. C{sup -1} and 4 m deg. C{sup -1} at 512 nm and 538 nm, respectively. In addition, La2O2S:Tb has a lower quenching rate of 4.19 m deg. C{sup -1} at 548 nm due to its faster decay time.

  13. Late time behavior of false vacuum decay: possible implications for cosmology and metastable inflating states.

    PubMed

    Krauss, Lawrence M; Dent, James

    2008-05-02

    We describe here how the late time behavior of the quantum mechanical decay of unstable states, which is predicted to deviate from an exponential form, may have important cosmological implications. It may increase the likelihood of eternal inflation and may enhance the likelihood of observing a small vacuum energy at late times versus possible late time decay into a large negative energy (anti-de Sitter space) vacuum state. Open questions include the following: How can internal observations made impact upon the wave function of the Universe and hence upon its decay characteristics?

  14. Optical Time Projection Chamber for imaging nuclear decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miernik, K.; Dominik, W.; Czyrkowski, H.; Dabrowski, R.; Fomitchev, A.; Golovkov, M.; Janas, Z.; Kuśmierz, W.; Pfützner, M.; Rodin, A.; Stepantsov, S.; Slepniev, R.; Ter-Akopian, G. M.; Wolski, R.

    2007-10-01

    We present a novel type of a Time Projection Chamber in which tracks of charged particles ionizing an active gas volume are recorded by means of optical signals. By combining a CCD camera image with the electron drift-time profile measured by a photomultiplier, it is possible to reconstruct trajectories of particles in three dimensions. The chamber was developed to study exotic nuclear decays in which charged particles are emitted. The results of first measurements will be demonstrated in which beta-delayed protons from 13O, the two-alpha decay of 8Be, and the triple-alpha decay of 12C excited states were recorded.

  15. Fluorescence decay time measurement - a new optical sensing scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Draxler, Sonja; Lippitsch, Max E.

    1994-02-01

    Optical sensors often suffer from poor long-term stability. This drawback can be overcome by using fluorescence decay-time measurement as the sensing principle. In this way calibration- free chemical sensors can be developed. The sensing scheme has been used so far mainly in connection with dynamic quenching, for example in oxygen sensors. We have succeeded in extending it to ground-state indicator-analyte reactions, thus obtaining stable optical sensors for decay-time sensing of various analytes.

  16. Decay Data Evaluation Project (DDEP): evaluation of the main 233Pa decay characteristics.

    PubMed

    Chechev, Valery P; Kuzmenko, Nikolay K

    2006-01-01

    The results of a decay data evaluation are presented for 233Pa (beta-) decay to nuclear levels in 233U. These evaluated data have been obtained within the Decay Data Evaluation Project using information published up to 2005.

  17. Time evolution of decay of two identical quantum particles

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Calderon, Gaston; Mendoza-Luna, Luis Guillermo

    2011-09-15

    An analytical solution for the time evolution of decay of two identical noninteracting quantum particles seated initially within a potential of finite range is derived using the formalism of resonant states. It is shown that the wave function, and hence also the survival and nonescape probabilities, for factorized symmetric and entangled symmetric or antisymmetric initial states evolve in a distinctive form along the exponentially decaying and nonexponential regimes. Our findings show the influence of the Pauli exclusion principle on decay. We exemplify our results by solving exactly the s-wave {delta} shell potential model.

  18. Fluorescence decay-time constants in organic liquid scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Marrodan Undagoitia, T.; Feilitzsch, F. von; Oberauer, L.; Potzel, W.; Ulrich, A.; Winter, J.; Wurm, M.

    2009-04-15

    The fluorescence decay-time constants have been measured for several scintillator mixtures based on phenyl-o-xylylethane (PXE) and linear alkylbenzene (LAB) solvents. The resulting values are of relevance for the physics performance of the proposed large-volume liquid scintillator detector Low Energy Neutrino Astronomy (LENA). In particular, the impact of the measured values to the search for proton decay via p{yields}K{sup +}{nu} is evaluated in this work.

  19. Correlations of Decay Times of Entangled Composite Unstable Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durt, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The role played by time in the quantum theory is still mysterious by many aspects. In particular it is not clear today whether the distribution of decay times of unstable particles could be described by a time operator (TO). As we shall discuss, different approaches to this problem (one could say interpretations) can be found in the literature on the subject. As we shall show, it is possible to conceive crucial experiments aimed at distinguishing the different approaches, by measuring with accuracy the statistical distribution of decay times of entangled particles. Such experiments can be realized in principle with entangled kaon pairs.

  20. Correlations of Decay Times of Entangled Composite Unstable Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durt, Thomas

    2012-05-01

    The role played by time in the quantum theory is still mysterious by many aspects. In particular it is not clear today whether the distribution of decay times of unstable particles could be described by a time operator (TO). As we shall discuss, different approaches to this problem (one could say interpretations) can be found in the literature on the subject. As we shall show, it is possible to conceive crucial experiments aimed at distinguishing the different approaches, by measuring with accuracy the statistical distribution of decay times of entangled particles. Such experiments can be realized in principle with entangled kaon pairs.

  1. Effective decay time of CF4 secondary scintillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margato, L. M. S.; Morozov, A.; Fraga, M. M. F. R.; Pereira, L.; Fraga, F. A. F.

    2013-07-01

    We report on the time evolution of CF4 secondary scintillation in the pressure range from 1 to 5 bar. Two types of MSGC plates were used for generation of the secondary scintillation in electron avalanches. Time spectra of the scintillation were recorded using several broadband and interference filters in the wavelength range from 220 to 800 nm. The visible emission (450-800 nm) shows a mono-exponential profile with a decay time of ~ 15 ns. The UV emission (220-450 nm) exhibits two components. The fast component has an effective decay time ranging from ~ 2 ns (1 bar) to ~ 10 ns (3-5 bar), while the slow component shows a decay time of ~ 40 ns. The slow component accounts for not more than 10% of the integrated UV emission intensity.

  2. Inverse method for estimating respiration rates from decay time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forney, D. C.; Rothman, D. H.

    2012-09-01

    Long-term organic matter decomposition experiments typically measure the mass lost from decaying organic matter as a function of time. These experiments can provide information about the dynamics of carbon dioxide input to the atmosphere and controls on natural respiration processes. Decay slows down with time, suggesting that organic matter is composed of components (pools) with varied lability. Yet it is unclear how the appropriate rates, sizes, and number of pools vary with organic matter type, climate, and ecosystem. To better understand these relations, it is necessary to properly extract the decay rates from decomposition data. Here we present a regularized inverse method to identify an optimally-fitting distribution of decay rates associated with a decay time series. We motivate our study by first evaluating a standard, direct inversion of the data. The direct inversion identifies a discrete distribution of decay rates, where mass is concentrated in just a small number of discrete pools. It is consistent with identifying the best fitting "multi-pool" model, without prior assumption of the number of pools. However we find these multi-pool solutions are not robust to noise and are over-parametrized. We therefore introduce a method of regularized inversion, which identifies the solution which best fits the data but not the noise. This method shows that the data are described by a continuous distribution of rates, which we find is well approximated by a lognormal distribution, and consistent with the idea that decomposition results from a continuum of processes at different rates. The ubiquity of the lognormal distribution suggest that decay may be simply described by just two parameters: a mean and a variance of log rates. We conclude by describing a procedure that estimates these two lognormal parameters from decay data. Matlab codes for all numerical methods and procedures are provided.

  3. Inverse method for estimating respiration rates from decay time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forney, D. C.; Rothman, D. H.

    2012-03-01

    Long-term organic matter decomposition experiments typically measure the mass lost from decaying organic matter as a function of time. These experiments can provide information about the dynamics of carbon dioxide input to the atmosphere and controls on natural respiration processes. Decay slows down with time, suggesting that organic matter is composed of components (pools) with varied lability. Yet it is unclear how the appropriate rates, sizes, and number of pools vary with organic matter type, climate, and ecosystem. To better understand these relations, it is necessary to properly extract the decay rates from decomposition data. Here we present a regularized inverse method to identify an optimally-fitting distribution of decay rates associated with a decay time series. We motivate our study by first evaluating a standard, direct inversion of the data. The direct inversion identifies a discrete distribution of decay rates, where mass is concentrated in just a small number of discrete pools. It is consistent with identifying the best fitting "multi-pool" model, without prior assumption of the number of pools. However we find these multi-pool solutions are not robust to noise and are over-parametrized. We therefore introduce a method of regularized inversion, which identifies the solution which best fits the data but not the noise. This method shows that the data are described by a continuous distribution of rates which we find is well approximated by a lognormal distribution, and consistent with the idea that decomposition results from a continuum of processes at different rates. The ubiquity of the lognormal distribution suggest that decay may be simply described by just two parameters; a mean and a variance of log rates. We conclude by describing a procedure that estimates these two lognormal parameters from decay data. Matlab codes for all numerical methods and procedures are provided.

  4. Nuclear Decay Data: On-going Studies to Address and Improve Radionuclide Decay Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, Alan L.

    2005-05-01

    Representative decay data studies are described and reviewed, ranging from various measurement programmes to the maintenance of evaluated decay-data libraries. Gross beta-decay measurements are essential to address the decay-data requirements for short-lived fission products, well-defined half-lives are required in assessments of the storage of long-lived radionuclides in waste depositories, and improved decay data continue to be demanded in safeguards, to improve detector-calibration standards, and for medical and analytical applications. Such needs require the measurement of good quality decay data, along with multinational evaluations of decay schemes by means of agreed procedures.

  5. Late Time Decays and the r-Process Abundance Pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelmar, Rebeka

    2014-09-01

    The r-process is the rapid capture of neutrons creating unstable neutron rich nuclei. This process is very quick, lasting only a couple of seconds. Afterwards those nuclei decay to stability over much longer timescales. We wrote a computer program to model the ways that nuclei created by the r-process decay back to stability using theoretical and experimental values for the probabilities that a given nuclei would beta decay, beta delayed neutron emit, alpha decay, and beta delayed fission. We then compared the resulting elemental abundances to abundance patterns from metal poor halo stars. We also examined the ratios of thorium 232 to uranium 238 and uranium 235 to uranium 238. We found the thorium to uranium ratio to be particularly sensitive to how late-time fission is included. The r-process is the rapid capture of neutrons creating unstable neutron rich nuclei. This process is very quick, lasting only a couple of seconds. Afterwards those nuclei decay to stability over much longer timescales. We wrote a computer program to model the ways that nuclei created by the r-process decay back to stability using theoretical and experimental values for the probabilities that a given nuclei would beta decay, beta delayed neutron emit, alpha decay, and beta delayed fission. We then compared the resulting elemental abundances to abundance patterns from metal poor halo stars. We also examined the ratios of thorium 232 to uranium 238 and uranium 235 to uranium 238. We found the thorium to uranium ratio to be particularly sensitive to how late-time fission is included. Department of Energy Office of Science Contract DE-FG02-05ER41398.

  6. Time scales of tunneling decay of a localized state

    SciTech Connect

    Ban, Yue; Muga, J. G.; Sherman, E. Ya.; Buettiker, M.

    2010-12-15

    Motivated by recent time-domain experiments on ultrafast atom ionization, we analyze the transients and time scales that characterize, aside from the relatively long lifetime, the decay of a localized state by tunneling. While the tunneling starts immediately, some time is required for the outgoing flux to develop. This short-term behavior depends strongly on the initial state. For the initial state, tightly localized so that the initial transients are dominated by over-the-barrier motion, the time scale for flux propagation through the barrier is close to the Buettiker-Landauer traversal time. Then a quasistationary, slow-decay process follows, which sets ideal conditions for observing diffraction in time at longer times and distances. To define operationally a tunneling time at the barrier edge, we extrapolate backward the propagation of the wave packet that escaped from the potential. This extrapolated time is considerably longer than the time scale of the flux and density buildup at the barrier edge.

  7. Time reversal violation in radiative beta decay: experimental plans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behr, J. A.; McNeil, J.; Anholm, M.; Gorelov, A.; Melconian, D.; Ashery, D.

    2017-01-01

    Some explanations for the excess of matter over antimatter in the universe involve sources of time reversal violation (TRV) in addition to the one known in the standard model of particle physics. We plan to search for TRV in a correlation between the momenta of the beta, neutrino, and the radiative gamma sometimes emitted in nuclear beta decay. Correlations involving three (out of four) momenta are sensitive at lowest order to different TRV physics than observables involving spin, such as electric dipole moments and spin-polarized beta decay correlations. Such experiments have been done in radiative kaon decay, but not in systems involving the lightest generation of quarks. An explicit low-energy physics model being tested produces TRV effects in the Fermi beta decay of the neutron, tritium, or some positron-decaying isotopes. We will present plans to measure the TRV asymmetry in radiative beta decay of laser-trapped 38mK at better than 0.01 sensitivity, including suppression of background from positron annihilation. Supported by NSERC, D.O.E., Israel Science Foundation. TRIUMF receives federal funding via a contribution agreement with the National Research Council of Canada.

  8. Anorganic fluorescence reference materials for decay time of fluorescence emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, A.; Ottermann, C.; Klahn, J.; Korb, T.; Resch-Genger, U.; Hoffmann, K.; Kynast, U.; Rupertus, V.

    2008-02-01

    Fluorescence techniques are known for their high sensitivity and are widely used as analytical tools, detection methods and imaging applications for product and process control, material sciences, environmental and bio-technical analysis, molecular genetics, cell biology, medical diagnostics, and drug screening. According to DIN/ISO 17025 certified standards are used for steady state fluorescence diagnostics, a method having the drawback of giving relative values for fluorescence intensities only. Therefore reference materials for a quantitative characterization have to be related directly to the materials under investigation. In order to evaluate these figures it is necessary to calculate absolute numbers such as absorption/excitation cross sections and quantum yield. This has been done for different types of dopands in different materials such as glass, glass ceramics, crystals or nano crystalline material embedded in polymer matrices. Samples doped with several fluophores of different emission wavelengths and decay times are required for fluorescent multiplexing applications. Decay times shorter than 100 ns are of special interest. In addition, a proper knowledge is necessary of quantum efficiency in highly scattering media. Recently, quantum efficiency in YAG:Ce glass ceramics has been successfully investigated. Glass and glass ceramics doped with threefold charged rare earth elements are available. However, these samples have the disadvantage of emission decay times much longer than 1 microsecond, due to the excitation and emission of their optical forbidden electronic transitions. Therefore first attempts have been made to produce decay-time standards based on organic and inorganic fluophores. Stable LUMOGEN RED pigments and YAG:Ce phosphors are diluted simultaneously in silicone matrices using a wide range of concentrations between 0.0001 and 2 wt%. Organic LUMOGEN RED has decay times in the lower nanosecond range with a slight dependency on concentration

  9. Imaging nuclear decays with Optical Time Projection Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miernik, K.; Dominik, W.; Janas, Z.; Pfützner, M.; Bingham, C.; Czyrkowski, H.; Ćwiok, M.; Darby, I.; Dȧbrowski, R.; Fomitchev, A.; Gintei, T.; Golovkov, M.; Grzywacz, R.; Karny, M.; Korgul, A.; Kuśmierz, W.; Liddick, S.; Rajabali, M.; Rodin, A.; Rykaczewski, K.; Stepantsov, S.; Slepniev, R.; Stolz, A.; Ter-Akopian, G. M.; Wolski, R.

    2007-11-01

    A novel type of gaseous ionization detector—Optical Time Projection Chamber (OTPC)—developed to study rare nuclear decays is presented. The OTPC records tracks of charged particles ionizing a counting gas by optical imaging of the light generated by electrons multiplied in the amplification structures. By combining an electron drift-time profile measured by a photomultiplier and a CCD camera image we reconstruct three-dimensional trajectories of particles, energies and charges. The capabilities of the OTPC detector to study various decay modes are demonstrated by observation of beta-delayed proton emission from 13O, two-alpha break-up of 8Be, triple-alpha decay of 12C excited states and two-proton radioactivity of 45Fe.

  10. On the Time-Dependent Analysis of Gamow Decay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durr, Detlef; Grummt, Robert; Kolb, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Gamow's explanation of the exponential decay law uses complex "eigenvalues" and exponentially growing "eigenfunctions". This raises the question, how Gamow's description fits into the quantum mechanical description of nature, which is based on real eigenvalues and square integrable wavefunctions. Observing that the time evolution of any…

  11. Time-dependent CP asymmetries in D and B decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bevan, A. J.; Inguglia, G.; Meadows, B.

    2011-12-01

    We examine measurements of time-dependent CP asymmetries that could be made in new and future flavour facilities. In charm decays, where they can provide a unique insight into the flavor changing structure of the Standard Model, we examine a number of decays to CP eigenstates and describe a framework that can be used to interpret the measurements. Such measurements can provide a precise determination of the charm mixing phase, as well as constraints on the Standard Model description of CP violation an possible new physics contributions. We make a preliminary assessment, based on statistical considerations, of the relative capabilities of LHCb with data from pp collisions, with Belle II and Super B using data from Bd, Bs and charm thresholds. We discuss the measurements required to perform direct and indirect tests of the charm unitarity triangle and its relationship with the usual Bd triangle. We find that, while theoretical and experimental systematic uncertainties may limit their interpretation, useful information on the unknown charm mixing phase, and on the possible existence of new physics can be obtained. We point out that, for Bd decays, current experimental bounds on ΔΓBd will translate into a significant systematic uncertainty on future measurements of sin⁡2β from b→cc¯s decays. The possibilities for simplified Bs decay asymmetry measurements at Super B and Belle II are also reviewed.

  12. ANISOTROPY LENGTHENS THE DECAY TIME OF TURBULENCE IN MOLECULAR CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Charles E.; McKee, Christopher F.; Klein, Richard I.

    2011-09-01

    The decay of isothermal turbulence with velocity anisotropy is investigated using computational simulations and synthetic observations. We decompose the turbulence into isotropic and anisotropic components with total velocity dispersions {sigma}{sub iso} and {sigma}{sub ani}, respectively. We find that the decay rate of the turbulence depends on the crossing time of the isotropic component only. A cloud of size L with significant anisotropy in its turbulence has a dissipation time, t{sub diss} = L/(2{sigma}{sub iso}). This translates into turbulent energy decay rates on the cloud scale that can be much lower for anisotropic turbulence than for isotropic turbulence. To help future observations determine whether observed molecular clouds have the level of anisotropy required to maintain the observed level of turbulence over their lifetimes, we performed a principal component analysis on our simulated clouds. Even with projection effects washing out the anisotropic signal, there is a measurable difference in the axis-constrained principal component analysis performed in directions parallel and perpendicular to the direction of maximum velocity dispersion. When this relative difference, {psi}, is 0.1, there is enough anisotropy for the dissipation time to triple the expected isotropic value. We provide a fit for converting {psi} into an estimate for the dissipation time, t{sub diss}.

  13. Predicting the decay time of solid body electric guitar tones.

    PubMed

    Paté, Arthur; Le Carrou, Jean-Loïc; Fabre, Benoît

    2014-05-01

    Although it can be transformed by various electronic devices, the sound of the solid body electric guitar originates from, and is strongly linked with, the string vibration. The coupling of the string with the guitar alters its vibration and can lead to decay time inhomogeneities. This paper implements and justifies a framework for the study of decay times of electric guitar tones. Two damping mechanisms are theoretically and experimentally identified: the string intrinsic damping and the damping due to mechanical coupling with the neck of the guitar. The electromagnetic pickup is shown to not provide any additional damping to the string. The pickup is also shown to be far more sensitive to the out-of-plane polarization of the string. Finally, an accurate prediction of the decay time of electric guitar tones is made possible, whose only requirements are the knowledge of the isolated string dampings and the out-of-plane conductance at the neck of the guitar. This prediction can be of great help for instrument makers and manufacturers.

  14. Universal Long-Time Behavior of Nuclear Spin Decays in Solid Hyperpolarized Xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saam, Brian; Morgan, Steven W.; Fine, Boris V.

    2009-05-01

    We have observed a universal long-time behavior of ^129Xe FIDs and solid echoes in polycrystalline hyperpolarized xenon at 77 K. In all cases, a decay of the form F(t) = Ae^-γt(φt + φ) sets in after just a few times T2; the behavior is universal in the sense that the decay constant γ and the beat frequency φ, which together characterize the long-time decay are the same for the FID and for solid echoes having different interpulse delay times τ. These findings reveal a fundamental property of nuclear spin dynamics and are thus relevant to theoretical efforts that have been ongoing for decades to understand NMR lineshapes in solids. Moreover, the functional form and universality of this behavior were previously predicted on the basis of analogy with resonances in classical chaotic systems [2]. While we expect this behavior to be characteristic of nuclear-spin solids in general, ^129Xe is an ideal system to examine it with high precision because of the relatively long T2 1 ms and because spin-exchange optical pumping can be used to achieve greatly enhanced magnetization, allowing precise examination of the decay over 3-4 orders of magnitude. [1] S.W. Morgan, et al., PRL 101, 067601 (2008). [2] B.V. Fine, PRL 94, 247601 (2005).

  15. Time reversal invariance - a test in free neutron decay

    SciTech Connect

    Lising, Laura Jean

    1999-01-01

    Time reversal invariance violation plays only a small role in the Standard Model, and the existence of a T-violating effect above the predicted level would be an indication of new physics. A sensitive probe of this symmetry in the weak interaction is the measurement of the T-violating ''D''-correlation in the decay of free neutrons. The triple-correlation Dσn∙pe x pv involves three kinematic variables, the neutron spin, electron momentu, and neutrino (or proton) momentum, and changes sign under time reversal. This experiment detects the decay products of a polarized cold neutron beam with an octagonal array of scintillation and solid-state detectors. Data from first run at NIST's Cold Neutron Research Facility give a D-coefficient of -0.1 ± 1.3(stat.) ± 0.7(syst) x 10-3 This measurement has the greatest bearing on extensions to the Standard model that incorporate leptoquarks, although exotic fermion and lift-right symmetric models also allow a D as large as the present limit.

  16. Physical and decay characteristics of commercial LWR spent fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Roddy, J.W.; Claiborne, H.C.; Ashline, R.C.; Johnson, P.J.; Rhyne, B.T.

    1986-01-01

    Information was collected from the literature and from major manufacturers that will be useful in the design and construction of a mined geologic repository for the disposal of light-water-reactor spent fuel. Pertinent data are included on mechanical design characteristics and materials of construction for fuel assemblies and fuel rods and computed values for heat generation rates, radioactivity, and photon and neutron emission rates as a function of time for four reference cases. Calculations were made with the ORIGEN2 computer code for burnups of 27,500 and 40,000 MWd for a typical boiling-water reactor and 33,000 and 60,000 MWd for a typical pressurized-water reactor. The results are presented in figures depicting the individual contributions per metric ton of initial heavy metal for the activation products, fission products, and actinides and their daughters to the radioactivity and thermal power as a function of time. Tables are also presented that list the contribution of each major nuclide to the radioactivity, thermal power, and photons and neutrons emitted for disposal emitted for disposal periods from 1 to 100,000 years.

  17. Physical and decay characteristics of commercial LWR spent fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Roddy, J.W.; Claiborne, H.C.; Ashline, R.C.; Johnson, P.J.; Rhyne, B.T.

    1985-10-01

    Information was collected from the literature and from major manufacturers that will be useful in the design and construction of a mined geologic repository for the disposal of light-water-reactor spent fuel. Pertinent data are included on mechanical design characteristics and materials of construction for fuel assemblies and fuel rods and computed values for heat generation rates, radioactivity, and photon and neutron emission rates as a function of time for four reference cases. Calculations were made with the ORIGEN2 computer code for burnups of 27,500 and 40,000 MWd for a typical boiling-water reactor and 33,000 and 60,000 MWd for a typical pressurized-water reactor. The results are presented in figures depicting the individual contributions per metric ton of initial heavy metal for the activation products, fission products, and actinides and their daughters to the radioactivity and thermal power as a function of time. Tables are also presented that list the contribution of each major nuclide to the radioactivity, thermal power, and photons and neutrons emitted for disposal periods from 1 to 100,000 years.

  18. Asymptotic Time Decay in Quantum Physics: a Selective Review and Some New Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchetti, Domingos H. U.; Wreszinski, Walter F.

    2013-05-01

    Decay of various quantities (return or survival probability, correlation functions) in time are the basis of a multitude of important and interesting phenomena in quantum physics, ranging from spectral properties, resonances, return and approach to equilibrium, to dynamical stability properties and irreversibility and the "arrow of time" in [Asymptotic Time Decay in Quantum Physics (World Scientific, 2013)]. In this review, we study several types of decaydecay in the average, decay in the Lp-sense, and pointwise decay — of the Fourier-Stieltjes transform of a measure, usually identified with the spectral measure, which appear naturally in different mathematical and physical settings. In particular, decay in the Lp-sense is related both to pointwise decay and to decay in the average and, from a physical standpoint, relates to a rigorous form of the time-energy uncertainty relation. Both decay on the average and in the Lp-sense are related to spectral properties, in particular, absolute continuity of the spectral measure. The study of pointwise decay for singular continuous measures (Rajchman measures) provides a bridge between ergodic theory, number theory and analysis, including the method of stationary phase. The theory is illustrated by some new results in the theory of sparse models.

  19. Mid-Infrared Lifetime Imaging for Viability Evaluation of Lettuce Seeds Based on Time-Dependent Thermal Decay Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ghiseok; Kim, Geon Hee; Ahn, Chi-Kook; Yoo, Yoonkyu; Cho, Byoung-Kwan

    2013-01-01

    An infrared lifetime thermal imaging technique for the measurement of lettuce seed viability was evaluated. Thermal emission signals from mid-infrared images of healthy seeds and seeds aged for 24, 48, and 72 h were obtained and reconstructed using regression analysis. The emission signals were fitted with a two-term exponential model that had two amplitudes and two time variables as lifetime parameters. The lifetime thermal decay parameters were significantly different for seeds with different aging times. Single-seed viability was visualized using thermal lifetime images constructed from the calculated lifetime parameter values. The time-dependent thermal signal decay characteristics, along with the decay amplitude and delay time images, can be used to distinguish aged lettuce seeds from normal seeds. PMID:23529120

  20. Mid-infrared lifetime imaging for viability evaluation of lettuce seeds based on time-dependent thermal decay characterization.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ghiseok; Kim, Geon Hee; Ahn, Chi-Kook; Yoo, Yoonkyu; Cho, Byoung-Kwan

    2013-03-01

    An infrared lifetime thermal imaging technique for the measurement of lettuce seed viability was evaluated. Thermal emission signals from mid-infrared images of healthy seeds and seeds aged for 24, 48, and 72 h were obtained and reconstructed using regression analysis. The emission signals were fitted with a two-term exponential model that had two amplitudes and two time variables as lifetime parameters. The lifetime thermal decay parameters were significantly different for seeds with different aging times. Single-seed viability was visualized using thermal lifetime images constructed from the calculated lifetime parameter values. The time-dependent thermal signal decay characteristics, along with the decay amplitude and delay time images, can be used to distinguish aged lettuce seeds from normal seeds.

  1. The time dependence of chromospheric decay for solar type stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barry, D. C.; Hege, K.; Cromwell, R. H.

    1984-02-01

    For solar type stars in clusters ranging from 10 million to 6 billion years in age, a lower resolution (2.5 A) analog of the Mount Wilson S index of stellar chromospheric activity has been measured. This was done in an attempt to surmount the problem of cluster star faintness. The new index is found by forming the ratio of the residual flux at the bottoms of H and K to the height of the local pseudo-continuum as defined by flux maxima near 3775-3815 and 4010-4030 A. The lower resolution analog is just the quantity (1 - KH), where KH is a measure of the calcium H and K line depths. A temperature-corrected analog (1 - HK0) is also formed. Because of the uncertainties in assigning accurate ages and the scarcity of data for both intermediate and old age clusters, the data do not yet identify a unique form for the time dependence of chromospheric decay. However, they do place far more restrictive constraints on theory than previously available. Further observations of intermediate and old clusters are required to distinguish between the two empirical models developed.

  2. Decay Characteristics of Surface Mounds with Contrasting Interlayer Mass Transport Channels

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Maozhi; Wendelken, J. F.; Liu, Bang-Gui; Wang, E. G.; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2001-03-12

    The decay characteristics of three-dimensional (3D) islands formed on surfaces are investigated theoretically considering two types of interlayer mass transport mechanisms. If an adatom on a given layer can easily descend from any site along the periphery of the layer, an optimal island slope and a constant terrace width will be selected during the decay. In contrast, if the adatom can descend primarily through selective (such as kinked) sites, the decay will be accompanied by a gradual increase in the island slope. These generic conclusions provide the basis for a microscopic understanding of the decay of nanostructures in fcc(111) and fcc(100) metal homoepitaxy and are applicable to other systems as well.

  3. Decay characteristics of surface mounds with contrasting interlayer mass transport channels.

    PubMed

    Li, M; Wendelken, J F; Liu, B G; Wang, E G; Zhang, Z

    2001-03-12

    The decay characteristics of three-dimensional (3D) islands formed on surfaces are investigated theoretically considering two types of interlayer mass transport mechanisms. If an adatom on a given layer can easily descend from any site along the periphery of the layer, an optimal island slope and a constant terrace width will be selected during the decay. In contrast, if the adatom can descend primarily through selective (such as kinked) sites, the decay will be accompanied by a gradual increase in the island slope. These generic conclusions provide the basis for a microscopic understanding of the decay of nanostructures in fcc(111) and fcc(100) metal homoepitaxy and are applicable to other systems as well.

  4. Time Characteristics and Odd-Even Effects in Nucleus Deexcitation Process

    SciTech Connect

    Fotina, O.V.; Drozdov, V.A.; Eremenko, D.O.; Platonov, S.Yu.; Yuminov, O.A.

    2004-10-01

    An approach based on the statistical theory of nuclear reactions and Monte Carlo method is used for evaluations of excited nuclear system characteristics like probability of decay channel (light particle, {gamma}-quanta emission, or fission), energy, emission angle of decay products, and time characteristics of deexcitation processes. This method permits the direct simulation of the experimental situation, in particular, nuclear-lifetime measurements by the crystal blocking technique. Decay times of compound nuclei formed in the fusion reactions {sup 12}C + {sup 28}Si {yields} {sup 40}Ca and {sup 19}F + {sup 28}Si {yields} {sup 47}V are estimated.

  5. A generalized voter model with time-decaying memory on a multilayer network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Li-Xin; Xu, Wen-Juan; Chen, Rong-Da; Zhong, Chen-Yang; Qiu, Tian; Shi, Yong-Dong; Wang, Li-Liang

    2016-09-01

    By incorporating a multilayer network and time-decaying memory into the original voter model, we investigate the coupled effects of spatial and temporal accumulation of peer pressure on the consensus. Heterogeneity in peer pressure and the time-decaying mechanism are both shown to be detrimental to the consensus. We find the transition points below which a consensus can always be reached and above which two opposed opinions are more likely to coexist. Our mean-field analysis indicates that the phase transitions in the present model are governed by the cumulative influence of peer pressure and the updating threshold. We find a functional relation between the consensus threshold and the decay rate of the influence of peer is found. As to the pressure. The time required to reach a consensus is governed by the coupling of the memory length and the decay rate. An intermediate decay rate may greatly reduce the time required to reach a consensus.

  6. Detection of the characteristic pion-decay signature in supernova remnants.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, M; Ajello, M; Allafort, A; Baldini, L; Ballet, J; Barbiellini, G; Baring, M G; Bastieri, D; Bechtol, K; Bellazzini, R; Blandford, R D; Bloom, E D; Bonamente, E; Borgland, A W; Bottacini, E; Brandt, T J; Bregeon, J; Brigida, M; Bruel, P; Buehler, R; Busetto, G; Buson, S; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caraveo, P A; Casandjian, J M; Cecchi, C; Celik, O; Charles, E; Chaty, S; Chaves, R C G; Chekhtman, A; Cheung, C C; Chiang, J; Chiaro, G; Cillis, A N; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Cominsky, L R; Conrad, J; Corbel, S; Cutini, S; D'Ammando, F; de Angelis, A; de Palma, F; Dermer, C D; do Couto e Silva, E; Drell, P S; Drlica-Wagner, A; Falletti, L; Favuzzi, C; Ferrara, E C; Franckowiak, A; Fukazawa, Y; Funk, S; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Germani, S; Giglietto, N; Giommi, P; Giordano, F; Giroletti, M; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G; Grenier, I A; Grondin, M-H; Grove, J E; Guiriec, S; Hadasch, D; Hanabata, Y; Harding, A K; Hayashida, M; Hayashi, K; Hays, E; Hewitt, J W; Hill, A B; Hughes, R E; Jackson, M S; Jogler, T; Jóhannesson, G; Johnson, A S; Kamae, T; Kataoka, J; Katsuta, J; Knödlseder, J; Kuss, M; Lande, J; Larsson, S; Latronico, L; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, P; Madejski, G M; Massaro, F; Mayer, M; Mazziotta, M N; McEnery, J E; Mehault, J; Michelson, P F; Mignani, R P; Mitthumsiri, W; Mizuno, T; Moiseev, A A; Monzani, M E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I V; Murgia, S; Nakamori, T; Nemmen, R; Nuss, E; Ohno, M; Ohsugi, T; Omodei, N; Orienti, M; Orlando, E; Ormes, J F; Paneque, D; Perkins, J S; Pesce-Rollins, M; Piron, F; Pivato, G; Rainò, S; Rando, R; Razzano, M; Razzaque, S; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Ritz, S; Romoli, C; Sánchez-Conde, M; Schulz, A; Sgrò, C; Simeon, P E; Siskind, E J; Smith, D A; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Stecker, F W; Strong, A W; Suson, D J; Tajima, H; Takahashi, H; Takahashi, T; Tanaka, T; Thayer, J G; Thayer, J B; Thompson, D J; Thorsett, S E; Tibaldo, L; Tibolla, O; Tinivella, M; Troja, E; Uchiyama, Y; Usher, T L; Vandenbroucke, J; Vasileiou, V; Vianello, G; Vitale, V; Waite, A P; Werner, M; Winer, B L; Wood, K S; Wood, M; Yamazaki, R; Yang, Z; Zimmer, S

    2013-02-15

    Cosmic rays are particles (mostly protons) accelerated to relativistic speeds. Despite wide agreement that supernova remnants (SNRs) are the sources of galactic cosmic rays, unequivocal evidence for the acceleration of protons in these objects is still lacking. When accelerated protons encounter interstellar material, they produce neutral pions, which in turn decay into gamma rays. This offers a compelling way to detect the acceleration sites of protons. The identification of pion-decay gamma rays has been difficult because high-energy electrons also produce gamma rays via bremsstrahlung and inverse Compton scattering. We detected the characteristic pion-decay feature in the gamma-ray spectra of two SNRs, IC 443 and W44, with the Fermi Large Area Telescope. This detection provides direct evidence that cosmic-ray protons are accelerated in SNRs.

  7. Tumor detection in mice by measurement of fluorescence decay time matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cubeddu, R.; Pifferi, A.; Taroni, P.; Valentini, G.; Canti, G.

    1995-12-01

    An intensified CCD video camera has been used to measure the spatial distribution of the fluorescence decay time in tumor-bearing mice sensitized with hematoporphyrin derivative. Mice were injected with five doses of sensitizer, ranging from 0.1 to 10 mg / kg body weight. For any drug dose the decay time of the exogenous fluorescence in the tumor is always significantly longer than in normal tissues. The image created by associating a gray-shade scale to the decay time matrix of each mouse permits a reliable and precise detection of the neoplasia.

  8. Summer SST anomalies in the Indian Ocean and the seasonal timing of ENSO decay phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Rongcai; Sun, Shuyue; Yang, Yang; Li, Qian

    2016-09-01

    ENSO affects the tropical Indian Ocean (TIO) SST in winter-spring in ENSO decay years through an ENSO-induced `atmospheric-bridge' and subsequent air-sea coupling processes. The interdecadal delay of El Niño decay phase has been related to a warming change in the summer TIO since 1970s. A physical linkage between the summer SST anomalies over the TIO and the timing of ENSO decay phase is however still unclear. This study uses multi-source data to distinguish `later-decay' from `normal-decay' El Niño/La Niña events, and performs diagnostic analysis of the changes in various thermodynamic and dynamic processes due to later-decay ENSO for quantifying the partial contribution by each of these processes to the summer SST changes over the TIO. The results show that, at both the interannual and interdecadal timescales, the significant warmer and colder SST anomalies in the spring TIO in later-decay El Niño and La Niña years respectively can persist into summer. Most of the ENSO-induced atmospheric-bridge-related processes contribute positively to the TIO SST changes in summer due to later-decay of ENSO, as they do in spring during normal-delay ENSO year. The exceptions are the surface wind-evaporation-mechanism and sensible heat-flux anomalies in summer, which always contribute negatively to the summer SST anomalies over most parts of the TIO. The negative contributions from these two processes in summer exist no matter whether there is a weakening or strengthening surface wind due to later-decay of ENSO events. Generally, the presence of five later-decay El Niño events after the 1970s is mainly responsible for the observed interdecadal summer TIO warming in recent decades.

  9. Backward location and travel time probabilities for a decaying contaminant in an aquifer.

    PubMed

    Neupauer, Roseanna M; Wilson, John L

    2003-10-01

    Backward location and travel time probabilities can be used to determine the prior position of contamination in an aquifer. These probabilities, which are related to adjoint states of concentration, can be used to improve characterization of known sources of groundwater contamination, to identify previously unknown contamination sources, and to delineate capture zones. The first contribution of this paper is to extend the adjoint model to the case of a decaying solute (first-order decay), and to describe two different interpretations of backward probabilities. The conventional interpretation accounts for the probability that a contaminant particle could decay before reaching the detection location. The other interpretation is conditioned on the fact that the detected contaminant particle actually reached the detection location, despite this possibility of decay. In either case, travel time probabilities are skewed toward earlier travel times, relative to a conservative solute. The second contribution of this paper is to verify the load term for a monitoring well observation. We provide examples using one-dimensional models and hypothetical aquifers. We employ an infinite domain in order to verify the monitoring well load. This new but simple one-dimensional adjoint solution can also be used to verify higher-dimensional numerical models of backward location and travel time probabilities. We employ a semi-infinite domain to illustrate the effect of decay on backward models of pumping well probabilistic capture zones. Decay causes the capture zones to fall closer to the well.

  10. Free-decay time-domain modal identification for large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Hyoung M.; Vanhorn, David A.; Doiron, Harold H.

    1992-01-01

    Concept definition studies for the Modal Identification Experiment (MIE), a proposed space flight experiment for the Space Station Freedom (SSF), have demonstrated advantages and compatibility of free-decay time-domain modal identification techniques with the on-orbit operational constraints of large space structures. Since practical experience with modal identification using actual free-decay responses of large space structures is very limited, several numerical and test data reduction studies were conducted. Major issues and solutions were addressed, including closely-spaced modes, wide frequency range of interest, data acquisition errors, sampling delay, excitation limitations, nonlinearities, and unknown disturbances during free-decay data acquisition. The data processing strategies developed in these studies were applied to numerical simulations of the MIE, test data from a deployable truss, and launch vehicle flight data. Results of these studies indicate free-decay time-domain modal identification methods can provide accurate modal parameters necessary to characterize the structural dynamics of large space structures.

  11. Corrections for the combined effects of decay and dead time in live-timed counting of short-lived radionuclides.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, R

    2016-03-01

    Studies and calibrations of short-lived radionuclides, for example (15)O, are of particular interest in nuclear medicine. Yet counting experiments on such species are vulnerable to an error due to the combined effect of decay and dead time. Separate decay corrections and dead-time corrections do not account for this issue. Usually counting data are decay-corrected to the start time of the count period, or else instead of correcting the count rate, the mid-time of the measurement is used as the reference time. Correction factors are derived for both those methods, considering both extending and non-extending dead time. Series approximations are derived here and the accuracy of those approximations are discussed.

  12. Two-space, two-time similarity solution for decaying homogeneous turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byers, Clayton P.; Hultmark, Marcus; George, William K.

    2017-02-01

    A two-point, two-time similarity solution is derived for homogeneous decaying turbulence. This is the first known solution which includes the temporal decay at two-different times. It assumes that the turbulence is homogeneous in all three space dimensions, and finds that homogeneity holds across time. The solutions show that time is logarithmically "stretched" while the homogeneous spatial scales grow. This solution reduces to the two point, single time equation when the two times are set equal. The turbulence initially decays exponentially, then asymptotically as t-n where n ≥1 and equality is possible only if the initial energy is infinite. The methodology should be applicable to other non-equilibrium homogeneous turbulent flows.

  13. Theoretical study of time-resolved luminescence in semiconductors. I. Decay from the steady state

    SciTech Connect

    Maiberg, Matthias Scheer, Roland

    2014-09-28

    Time-resolved luminescence (TRL) is a non-destructive, non-invasive, and contactless characterization method. We studied TRL decay on semiconductor layers and thin film homostructures after a steady state illumination by simulation with Synopsys TCAD{sup ®} and by analytical approximate solution of the appropriate equations. First, we show that the luminescence decay time in general equals the minority carrier lifetime only for a homogeneous and time-independent carrier lifetime. Then, we investigate the influence of photon recycling, injection level, charge carrier diffusion, defects in the bulk and at the surfaces, as well as space charge on the TRL decay separately by quasi one-dimensional simulations of semiconductor layers and semiconductor homostructures. We further study the influence of sample non-homogeneity as may be found in polycrystalline semiconductors. We show how carrier lifetime can be extracted from the TRL transients and how the samples can be characterized by excitation dependent measurements in the open circuit case. We can explain some effects found in luminescence experiments, like a decrease of the decay time with an increasing excitation, a maximum in the decay time due to saturated bulk-defects and curved luminescence transients due to high injections or sample inhomogeneities. Furthermore, we are focussing on the question, how single layers within a semiconductor stack can be characterized.

  14. Decay of surface nanostructures via long-time-scale dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Voter, A.F.; Stanciu, N.

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The authors have developed a new approach for extending the time scale of molecular dynamics simulations. For infrequent-event systems, the category that includes most diffusive events in the solid phase, this hyperdynamics method can extend the simulation time by a few orders of magnitude compared to direct molecular dynamics. The trajectory is run on a potential surface that has been biased to raise the energy in the potential basins without affecting the transition state region. The method is described and applied to surface and bulk diffusion processes, achieving microsecond and millisecond simulation times. The authors have also developed a new parallel computing method that is efficient for small system sizes. The combination of the hyperdynamics with this parallel replica dynamics looks promising as a general materials simulation tool.

  15. Late-time decay of coupled electromagnetic and gravitational perturbations outside an extremal charged black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sela, Orr

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we employ the results of a previous paper on the late-time decay of scalar-field perturbations of an extreme Reissner-Nordstrom black hole, in order to find the late-time decay of coupled electromagnetic and gravitational perturbations of this black hole. We explicitly write the late-time tails of Moncrief's gauge invariant variables and of the perturbations of the metric tensor and the electromagnetic field tensor in the Regge-Wheeler gauge. We discuss some of the consequences of the results and relations to previous works.

  16. A modified fast analog technique for determining luminescence decay times of scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, L.; Borst, W.; Palsule, C.; Gangopadhyay, S.

    1994-12-31

    The authors have modified their previous fast analog technique to determine the luminescence decay times of scintillators following an excitation with a Sr{sup 90} {beta}-source. In the original technique, the sample was excited with a nitrogen-pumped dye laser, and the fluorescence pulses (consisting of typically 50 to 1,000 photons) were detected by a multichannel plate photomultiplier tube (MCP-PMT). The output from the MCP-PMT was directed to a fast waveform digitizer triggered externally by the exciting laser. In the modified technique, the digitizer acquires the fluorescence decay in the internal trigger mode, as no corresponding external trigger pulse is available from the Sr{sup 90} source. For efficient light collection from scintillators, an ellipsoidal mirror assembly has been tested. The fluorescence decays are acquired as multi-photon pulses and are subsequently corrected for the temporal instrument response by using a deconvolution technique. The overall time resolution of the technique is about 100 ps. The fluorescence decay time obtained using this technique for a commercial scintillator (SCSN-81) agrees well with literature. The authors also discuss the results on new epoxy-polymer based scintillators prepared in their laboratory. The primary motivation for this work was development of new scintillators with shorter fluorescence decay times for high collision rate experiments.

  17. A reappraisal of postglacial decay times from Richmond Gulf and James Bay, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitrovica, J. X.; Forte, A. M.; Simons, M.

    2000-09-01

    Decay times inferred from relative sea-level (RSL) histories of previously glaciated regions provide a potentially important constraint on mantle rheology. We present a new compilation of RSL data from Richmond Gulf and James Bay, Canada. This recompilation reveals errors in previous compilations that led to inaccurate estimates for the Richmond Gulf decay time in a series of recently published articles. We derive updated estimates for the decay time at Richmond Gulf and James Bay using a methodology that incorporates errors in both the age and the height of the sea-level markers. This exercise is guided by a series of synthetic RSL calculations that show that decay time estimates in the region can be significantly biased if the RSL time-series are not corrected for global eustatic sea-level trends, or if the estimates are based on composite RSL histories derived by combining data from both the Richmond Gulf and the James Bay regions. Our decay time analysis for Richmond Gulf applies the pioneering approach of Walcott (1980) to a large database and we derive a value of 4.0-6.6kyr, where the range is defined by a misfit tolerance 10 per cent higher than the minimum. Our analysis for James Bay is based on the uplift curve derived by Hardy (1976), and we estimate a decay time of about 2.0-2.8kyr. The difference between our estimates for Richmond Gulf and James Bay may be due to errors in the observational record from these regions, but could also be influenced by lateral variations in lithospheric structure associated with the assembly of Laurentia.

  18. Characteristic Time Scales of Characteristic Magmatic Processes and Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, B. D.

    2004-05-01

    Every specific magmatic process, regardless of spatial scale, has an associated characteristic time scale. Time scales associated with crystals alone are rates of growth, dissolution, settling, aggregation, annealing, and nucleation, among others. At the other extreme are the time scales associated with the dynamics of the entire magmatic system. These can be separated into two groups: those associated with system genetics (e.g., the production and transport of magma, establishment of the magmatic system) and those due to physical characteristics of the established system (e.g., wall rock failure, solidification front propagation and instability, porous flow). The detailed geometry of a specific magmatic system is particularly important to appreciate; although generic systems are useful, care must be taken to make model systems as absolutely realistic as possible. Fuzzy models produce fuzzy science. Knowledge of specific time scales is not necessarily useful or meaningful unless the hierarchical context of the time scales for a realistic magmatic system is appreciated. The age of a specific phenocryst or ensemble of phenocrysts, as determined from isotopic or CSD studies, is not meaningful unless something can be ascertained of the provenance of the crystals. For example, crystal size multiplied by growth rate gives a meaningful crystal age only if it is from a part of the system that has experienced semi-monotonic cooling prior to chilling; crystals entrained from a long-standing cumulate bed that were mechanically sorted in ascending magma may not reveal this history. Ragged old crystals rolling about in the system for untold numbers of flushing times record specious process times, telling more about the noise in the system than the life of typical, first generation crystallization processes. The most helpful process-related time scales are those that are known well and that bound or define the temporal style of the system. Perhaps the most valuable of these

  19. Magnetars: Time Evolution, Superfluid Properties, and the Mechanism of Magnetic Field Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arras, P.; Cumming, A.; Thompson, C.

    2004-06-01

    We calculate the coupled thermal evolution and magnetic field decay in relativistic model neutron stars threaded by superstrong magnetic fields (B>1015 G). Our main goal is to evaluate how such ``magnetars'' evolve with time and how field decay modifies the transitions to core superfluidity and cooling dominated by surface X-ray emission. Observations of a thermal X-ray spectral component and fast timing noise place strong constraints on the presence of a superfluid core. We find that the transition to core superfluidity can be significantly delayed by magnetic field decay in the age range ~103-105 yr. The mechanism of Hall drift is related to the stability of the core magnetic field and to currents flowing outward through the crust. The heating effect is enhanced if it is continuous rather than spasmodic. Condensation of a heavy element layer at the surface is shown to cause only modest changes in the outward conduction of heat.

  20. Tristetraprolin-driven regulatory circuit controls quality and timing of mRNA decay in inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Kratochvill, Franz; Machacek, Christian; Vogl, Claus; Ebner, Florian; Sedlyarov, Vitaly; Gruber, Andreas R; Hartweger, Harald; Vielnascher, Raimund; Karaghiosoff, Marina; Rülicke, Thomas; Müller, Mathias; Hofacker, Ivo; Lang, Roland; Kovarik, Pavel

    2011-01-01

    For a successful yet controlled immune response, cells need to specifically destabilize inflammatory mRNAs but prevent premature removal of those still used. The regulatory circuits controlling quality and timing in the global inflammatory mRNA decay are not understood. Here, we show that the mRNA-destabilizing function of the AU-rich element-binding protein tristetraprolin (TTP) is inversely regulated by the p38 MAPK activity profile such that after inflammatory stimulus the TTP-dependent decay is initially limited to few mRNAs. With time, the TTP-dependent decay gradually spreads resulting in cumulative elimination of one third of inflammation-induced unstable mRNAs in macrophages in vitro. We confirmed this sequential decay model in vivo since LPS-treated mice with myeloid TTP ablation exhibited similar cytokine dysregulation profile as macrophages. The mice were hypersensitive to LPS but otherwise healthy with no signs of hyperinflammation seen in conventional TTP knockout mice demonstrating the requirement for myeloid TTP in re-installment but not maintenance of immune homeostasis. These findings reveal a TTP- and p38 MAPK-dominated regulatory mechanism that is vital for balancing acute inflammation by a temporally and qualitatively controlled mRNA decay. PMID:22186734

  1. Measurement of time-dependent CP asymmetries in B0-->D(*)+/-D+/- decays.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges, E; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Weinstein, A J R; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Macfarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Andreassen, R; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zeng, Q; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Spaan, B; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Dickopp, M; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Petzold, A; Schott, G; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Schrenk, S; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Won, E; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Taylor, G P; Charles, M J; Mader, W F; Mallik, U; Mohapatra, A K; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Yi, J; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Giroux, X; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Petersen, T C; Pierini, M; Plaszczynski, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Chavez, C A; Coleman, J P; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Cormack, C M; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Green, M G; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Hodgkinson, M C; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Chen, C; Farbin, A; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Viaud, B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Wilden, L; Jessop, C P; Losecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; Buono, L Del; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Pacetti, S; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Marco, E Di; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Gioi, L Li; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Tehrani, F Safai; Voena, C; Schröder, H; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P-F; Graziani, G; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Wilson, J R; Yumiceva, F X; Abe, T; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Claus, R; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Fan, S; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Strube, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, M; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Saleem, M; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vitale, L; Martinez-Vidal, F; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Flood, K T; Graham, M; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mellado, B; Mihalyi, A; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Tan, P; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Greene, M G; Neal, H

    2005-09-23

    We present a first measurement of CP asymmetries in neutral B decays to D+D-, and updated CP asymmetry measurements in decays to D(*+)D- and D(*-)D+. We use fully reconstructed decays collected in a data sample of (232+/-3) x 10(6) gamma(4S)-->BB events in the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory at SLAC. We determine the time-dependent asymmetry parameters to be SD(*+)(D-)=-0.54+/-0.35+/-0.07, CD(*+)(D-)=0.09+/-0.25+/-0.06, SD(*-)(D+)=-0.29+/-0.33+/-0.07, CD(*-)(D+)=0.17+/-0.24+/-0.04, SD+(D-)=-0.29+/-0.63+/-0.06, and CD+(D-)=0.11+/-0.35+/-0.06, where in each case the first error is statistical and the second error is systematic.

  2. Universal long-time behavior of nuclear spin decays in a solid.

    PubMed

    Morgan, S W; Fine, B V; Saam, B

    2008-08-08

    Magnetic resonance studies of nuclear spins in solids are exceptionally well suited to probe the limits of statistical physics. We report experimental results indicating that isolated macroscopic systems of interacting nuclear spins possess the following fundamental property: spin decays that start from different initial configurations quickly evolve towards the same long-time behavior. This long-time behavior is characterized by the shortest ballistic microscopic time scale of the system and therefore falls outside of the validity range for conventional approximations of statistical physics. We find that the nuclear free-induction decay and different solid echoes in hyperpolarized solid xenon all exhibit sinusoidally modulated exponential long-time behavior characterized by identical time constants. This universality was previously predicted on the basis of analogy with resonances in classical chaotic systems.

  3. Radiative transfer theory for the fractal structure and power-law decay characteristics of short-period seismograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Haruo; Fukushima, Rintaro

    2013-12-01

    For short period S-wave seismograms of an earthquake, the maximum amplitude decreases according to a power of traveltime, and the coda amplitude also decreases according to a power of lapse time measured from the earthquake origin time. The radiative transfer theory has been often used for the envelope synthesis of complex seismograms composed of scattered waves due to random heterogeneities in the Earth medium; however, the conventional theory, which supposes uniform distributions of scatterers (heterogeneities) and intrinsic absorbers, predicts that both the ballistic term amplitude and the coda wave amplitude exponentially decrease with time increasing in addition to the geometrical decay. In order to explain their power-law characteristics, this paper proposes the radiative transfer theory for a fractally random and homogeneous distribution of isotropic scatterers and intrinsic absorbers with fractal dimension D ≤ 3 in the 3-D space: the number density of scatterers/absorbers in a sphere of radius r is proportional to rD - 3 for distance r ≫ rc but constant for r ≪ rc, where the corner distance rc is introduced to avoid divergence at a small r. The case of D = 3 corresponds to the conventional uniform distribution. For the case of D = 2, the theory well predicts that the mean square (MS) amplitude of the ballistic-wave decreases according to a power of traveltime and the MS amplitude of coda waves decreases according to a power of lapse time measured from the origin time, where each power is controlled by the scattering coefficient, intrinsic absorption coefficient and corner distance. For the case of D = 1, the ballistic-wave MS amplitude decay is the inverse square of time and the coda decay is much faster. As a preliminary work, fixing D = 2 as a priori choice, we analyse S-seismogram envelopes of a local earthquake in Japan. The case study shows that the radiative transfer theory for a fractal scattering medium is useful for the study of the

  4. Theory of optimal balance predicts and explains the amplitude and decay time of synaptic inhibition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jaekyung K.; Fiorillo, Christopher D.

    2017-03-01

    Synaptic inhibition counterbalances excitation, but it is not known what constitutes optimal inhibition. We previously proposed that perfect balance is achieved when the peak of an excitatory postsynaptic potential (EPSP) is exactly at spike threshold, so that the slightest variation in excitation determines whether a spike is generated. Using simulations, we show that the optimal inhibitory postsynaptic conductance (IPSG) increases in amplitude and decay rate as synaptic excitation increases from 1 to 800 Hz. As further proposed by theory, we show that optimal IPSG parameters can be learned through anti-Hebbian rules. Finally, we compare our theoretical optima to published experimental data from 21 types of neurons, in which rates of synaptic excitation and IPSG decay times vary by factors of about 100 (5-600 Hz) and 50 (1-50 ms), respectively. From an infinite range of possible decay times, theory predicted experimental decay times within less than a factor of 2. Across a distinct set of 15 types of neuron recorded in vivo, theory predicted the amplitude of synaptic inhibition within a factor of 1.7. Thus, the theory can explain biophysical quantities from first principles.

  5. Theory of optimal balance predicts and explains the amplitude and decay time of synaptic inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jaekyung K.; Fiorillo, Christopher D.

    2017-01-01

    Synaptic inhibition counterbalances excitation, but it is not known what constitutes optimal inhibition. We previously proposed that perfect balance is achieved when the peak of an excitatory postsynaptic potential (EPSP) is exactly at spike threshold, so that the slightest variation in excitation determines whether a spike is generated. Using simulations, we show that the optimal inhibitory postsynaptic conductance (IPSG) increases in amplitude and decay rate as synaptic excitation increases from 1 to 800 Hz. As further proposed by theory, we show that optimal IPSG parameters can be learned through anti-Hebbian rules. Finally, we compare our theoretical optima to published experimental data from 21 types of neurons, in which rates of synaptic excitation and IPSG decay times vary by factors of about 100 (5–600 Hz) and 50 (1–50 ms), respectively. From an infinite range of possible decay times, theory predicted experimental decay times within less than a factor of 2. Across a distinct set of 15 types of neuron recorded in vivo, theory predicted the amplitude of synaptic inhibition within a factor of 1.7. Thus, the theory can explain biophysical quantities from first principles. PMID:28281523

  6. Real-time method and apparatus for measuring the decay-time constant of a fluorescing phosphor

    DOEpatents

    Britton, Jr., Charles L.; Beshears, David L.; Simpson, Marc L.; Cates, Michael R.; Allison, Steve W.

    1999-01-01

    A method for determining the decay-time constant of a fluorescing phosphor is provided, together with an apparatus for performing the method. The apparatus includes a photodetector for detecting light emitted by a phosphor irradiated with an excitation pulse and for converting the detected light into an electrical signal. The apparatus further includes a differentiator for differentiating the electrical signal and a zero-crossing discrimination circuit that outputs a pulse signal having a pulse width corresponding to the time period between the start of the excitation pulse and the time when the differentiated electrical signal reaches zero. The width of the output pulse signal is proportional to the decay-time constant of the phosphor.

  7. Resonant-state expansions and the long-time behavior of quantum decay

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Calderon, Gaston; Maldonado, Irene; Villavicencio, Jorge

    2007-07-15

    It is shown that a representation of the decaying wave function as a resonant sum plus a nonexponential integral term may be written as a purely discrete resonant sum by evaluating at long times the integral term by the steepest descents method, and then expanding the resulting expression in terms of resonant states. This leads to a representation that is valid along the exponential and the inverse power in time regimes. A model calculation using the {delta} potential allows us to make a comparison of the expansion with numerical integrations in terms of continuum wave functions and, in the long time regime, with an exact analytic expression of the integral term obtained using the steepest descents method. The results demonstrate that resonant states give a correct description of the long-time behavior of decay.

  8. Simulation of decay processes and radiation transport times in radioactivity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Toraño, E.; Peyres, V.; Bé, M.-M.; Dulieu, C.; Lépy, M.-C.; Salvat, F.

    2017-04-01

    The Fortran subroutine package PENNUC, which simulates random decay pathways of radioactive nuclides, is described. The decay scheme of the active nuclide is obtained from the NUCLEIDE database, whose web application has been complemented with the option of exporting nuclear decay data (possible nuclear transitions, branching ratios, type and energy of emitted particles) in a format that is readable by the simulation subroutines. In the case of beta emitters, the initial energy of the electron or positron is sampled from the theoretical Fermi spectrum. De-excitation of the atomic electron cloud following electron capture and internal conversion is described using transition probabilities from the LLNL Evaluated Atomic Data Library and empirical or calculated energies of released X rays and Auger electrons. The time evolution of radiation showers is determined by considering the lifetimes of nuclear and atomic levels, as well as radiation propagation times. Although PENNUC is designed to operate independently, here it is used in conjunction with the electron-photon transport code PENELOPE, and both together allow the simulation of experiments with radioactive sources in complex material structures consisting of homogeneous bodies limited by quadric surfaces. The reliability of these simulation tools is demonstrated through comparisons of simulated and measured energy spectra from radionuclides with complex multi-gamma spectra, nuclides with metastable levels in their decay pathways, nuclides with two daughters, and beta plus emitters.

  9. Power-law photoconductivity time decay in nanocrystalline TiO2 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comedi, D.; Heluani, S. P.; Villafuerte, M.; Arce, R. D.; Koropecki, R. R.

    2007-12-01

    The sub-band-gap excited photoconductivity (PC) time decay and the film structure of rf-sputter deposited nanocrystalline TiO2 thin films have been studied. Atomic force microscopy and x-ray diffraction measurements were used to assess roughness, crystalline structure and mean grain size of the films. Samples fabricated under different deposition conditions exhibit different microstructures and absolute PC, but similar persistent PC behaviour after switching off the light source. The very slow PC decay can be well represented by a function that is nearly constant for short times and decreases as a power law for times longer than about 100 s. This function is shown to be consistent with a rate equation characterized by a relaxation time that increases linearly with time. This behaviour, in turn, agrees with predictions of a previously reported model that assumes electron-hole recombination limited by carrier-density-dependent potential barriers associated with inhomogeneities. These results may have important implications on attempts to determine distributions of trap energies from PC decay curves in TiO2.

  10. Communication: Real time observation of unimolecular decay of Criegee intermediates to OH radical products

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Yi; Liu, Fang; Barber, Victoria P.; Klippenstein, Stephen J.; McCoy, Anne B.; Lester, Marsha I.

    2016-02-14

    In the atmosphere, a dominant loss process for carbonyl oxide intermediates produced from alkene ozonolysis is also an important source of hydroxyl radicals. The rate of appearance of OH radicals is revealed through direct time-domain measurements following vibrational activation of prototypical methyl-substituted Criegee intermediates under collision-free conditions. Complementary theoretical calculations predict the unimolecular decay rate for the Criegee intermediates in the vicinity of the barrier for 1,4 hydrogen transfer that leads to OH products. Both experiment and theory yield unimolecular decay rates of ca. 10(8) and 10(7) s(-1) for syn-CH3CHOO and (CH3)(2)COO, respectively, at energies near the barrier. Tunneling through the barrier, computed from high level electronic structure theory and experimentally validated, makes a significant contribution to the decay rate. Extension to thermally averaged unimolecular decay of stabilized Criegee intermediates under atmospheric conditions yields rates that are six orders of magnitude slower than those evaluated directly in the barrier region.

  11. Communication: Real time observation of unimolecular decay of Criegee intermediates to OH radical products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Yi; Liu, Fang; Barber, Victoria P.; Klippenstein, Stephen J.; McCoy, Anne B.; Lester, Marsha I.

    2016-02-01

    In the atmosphere, a dominant loss process for carbonyl oxide intermediates produced from alkene ozonolysis is also an important source of hydroxyl radicals. The rate of appearance of OH radicals is revealed through direct time-domain measurements following vibrational activation of prototypical methyl-substituted Criegee intermediates under collision-free conditions. Complementary theoretical calculations predict the unimolecular decay rate for the Criegee intermediates in the vicinity of the barrier for 1,4 hydrogen transfer that leads to OH products. Both experiment and theory yield unimolecular decay rates of ca. 108 and 107 s-1 for syn-CH3CHOO and (CH3)2COO, respectively, at energies near the barrier. Tunneling through the barrier, computed from high level electronic structure theory and experimentally validated, makes a significant contribution to the decay rate. Extension to thermally averaged unimolecular decay of stabilized Criegee intermediates under atmospheric conditions yields rates that are six orders of magnitude slower than those evaluated directly in the barrier region.

  12. Evidence of time-dependent CP violation in the decay B0→D*+D*-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vervink, K.; Aushev, T.; Schneider, O.; Arinstein, K.; Bakich, A. M.; Balagura, V.; Barberio, E.; Bay, A.; Bhardwaj, V.; Bitenc, U.; Bondar, A.; Bozek, A.; Bračko, M.; Brodzicka, J.; Browder, T. E.; Chao, Y.; Chen, A.; Cheon, B. G.; Chiang, C.-C.; Chistov, R.; Cho, I.-S.; Choi, Y.; Dalseno, J.; Danilov, M.; Dungel, W.; Eidelman, S.; Fratina, S.; Gabyshev, N.; Goldenzweig, P.; Golob, B.; Ha, H.; Hara, T.; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; Hazumi, M.; Heffernan, D.; Hoshi, Y.; Hou, W.-S.; Hyun, H. J.; Inami, K.; Ishikawa, A.; Ishino, H.; Iwasaki, Y.; Kah, D. H.; Kang, J. H.; Katayama, N.; Kawai, H.; Kawasaki, T.; Kichimi, H.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, H. O.; Kim, Y. I.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinoshita, K.; Ko, B. R.; Korpar, S.; Križan, P.; Krokovny, P.; Kuzmin, A.; Kwon, Y.-J.; Kyeong, S.-H.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, M. J.; Li, J.; Limosani, A.; Liu, C.; Liu, Y.; Liventsev, D.; Louvot, R.; Matyja, A.; McOnie, S.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyata, H.; Miyazaki, Y.; Mizuk, R.; Nakao, M.; Nakazawa, H.; Natkaniec, Z.; Nishida, S.; Nishimura, K.; Nitoh, O.; Ohshima, T.; Okuno, S.; Ozaki, H.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, G.; Park, C. W.; Park, H.; Park, H. K.; Pestotnik, R.; Piilonen, L. E.; Poluektov, A.; Sahoo, H.; Sakai, Y.; Schümann, J.; Schwartz, A. J.; Senyo, K.; Sevior, M. E.; Shapkin, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shiu, J.-G.; Shwartz, B.; Stanič, S.; Stypula, J.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tamura, N.; Teramoto, Y.; Trabelsi, K.; Tsuboyama, T.; Uehara, S.; Uglov, T.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Varner, G.; Wang, C. C.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, P.; Watanabe, Y.; Wicht, J.; Won, E.; Yabsley, B. D.; Yamashita, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zhulanov, V.; Zivko, T.; Zupanc, A.; Zwahlen, N.

    2009-12-01

    We report a measurement of the CP-odd fraction and the time-dependent CP violation in B0→D*+D*- decays, using 657×106 BB¯ events collected at the Υ(4S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e+e- collider. We measure a CP-odd fraction of R⊥=0.125±0.043(stat)±0.023(syst). From the distributions of the proper-time intervals between a B0→D*+D*- decay and the other B meson in the event, we obtain evidence of CP violation with measured parameters AD*+D*-=0.15±0.13(stat)±0.04(syst) and SD*+D*-=-0.96±0.25(stat)-0.16+0.13(syst).

  13. Time-dependent Dalitz Plot Analysis of B0 to D-K0Pi+ Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Polci, F

    2008-01-08

    We present for the first time a measurement of the weak phase 2{beta} + {gamma} obtained from a time-dependent Dalitz plot analysis of B{sup 0} {yields} D{sup {-+}}K{sup 0}{pi}{sup {+-}} decays. Using a sample of approximately 347 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy storage rings, we obtain 2{beta} + {gamma} = (83 {+-} 53 {+-} 20){sup 0} and (263 {+-} 53 {+-} 20){sup o} assuming the ratio r of the b {yields} u and b {yields} c decay amplitudes to be 0.3. The magnitudes and phases for the resonances associated with the b {yields} c transitions are also extracted from the fit.

  14. Time series diagnosis of tree hydraulic characteristics.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Nathan G; Oren, Ram; Licata, Julian; Linder, Sune

    2004-08-01

    An in vivo method for diagnosing hydraulic characteristics of branches and whole trees is described. The method imposes short-lived perturbations of transpiration and traces the propagation of the hydraulic response through trees. The water uptake response contains the integrated signature of hydraulic resistance and capacitance within trees. The method produces large signal to noise ratios for analysis, but does not cause damage or destruction to tree stems or branches. Based on results with two conifer tree species, we show that the method allows for the simple parameterization of bulk hydraulic resistance and capacitance of trees. Bulk tree parameterization of resistance and capacitance predicted the overall diel shape of water uptake, but did not predict the overshoot water uptake response in trees to shorter-term variations in transpiration, created by step changes in transpiration rate. Stomatal dynamics likely complicated the use of simple resistance-capacitance models of tree water transport on these short time scales. The results provide insight into dominant hydraulic and physiological factors controlling tree water flux on varying time scales, and allow for the practical assessment of necessary tree hydraulic model complexity in relation to the time step of soil- vegetation-atmosphere transport models.

  15. Evidence for CP violation in time-integrated D0→h(-)h(+) decay rates.

    PubMed

    Aaij, R; Abellan Beteta, C; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amhis, Y; Anderson, J; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Arrabito, L; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Bailey, D S; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bates, A; Bauer, C; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Benayoun, M; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blanks, C; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bobrov, A; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Büchler-Germann, A; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chiapolini, N; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Constantin, F; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Corti, G; Cowan, G A; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; De Bonis, I; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Lorenzi, F; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Degaudenzi, H; Del Buono, L; Deplano, C; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Dickens, J; Dijkstra, H; Diniz Batista, P; Domingo Bonal, F; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisele, F; Eisenhardt, S; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; Elsasser, Ch; Elsby, D; Esperante Pereira, D; Estève, L; Falabella, A; Fanchini, E; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Fave, V; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garnier, J-C; Garofoli, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gascon, D; Gaspar, C; Gauvin, N; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harji, R; Harnew, N; Harrison, J; Harrison, P F; Hartmann, T; He, J; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hicks, E; Holubyev, K; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Huston, R S; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Ilten, P; Imong, J; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jahjah Hussein, M; Jans, E; Jansen, F; Jaton, P; Jean-Marie, B; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Keaveney, J; Kenyon, I R; Kerzel, U; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kim, Y M; Knecht, M; Koopman, R; Koppenburg, P; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kruzelecki, K; Kucharczyk, M; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Li, L; Li Gioi, L; Lieng, M; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; von Loeben, J; Lopes, J H; Lopez Asamar, E; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Luisier, J; Mac Raighne, A; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Magnin, J; Malde, S; Mamunur, R M D; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Mangiafave, N; Marconi, U; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martin, L; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinez Santos, D; Massafferri, A; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Matveev, M; Maurice, E; Maynard, B; Mazurov, A; McGregor, G; McNulty, R; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Merkel, J; Messi, R; Miglioranzi, S; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Musy, M; Mylroie-Smith, J; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Nedos, M; Needham, M; Neufeld, N; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Nikitin, N; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Pal, K; Palacios, J; Palano, A; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Paterson, S K; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perego, D L; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pessina, G; Petrella, A; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pie Valls, B; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Plackett, R; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pugatch, V; Navarro, A Puig; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Rinnert, K; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, E; Rodrigues, F; Rodriguez Perez, P; Rogers, G J; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Rosello, M; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruiz, H; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salzmann, C; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santinelli, R; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schleich, S; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, A C; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Sobczak, K; Soler, F J P; Solomin, A; Soomro, F; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Swientek, S; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'jampens, S; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tran, M T; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Urquijo, P; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Viaud, B; Videau, I; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Visniakov, J; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Voss, H; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wishahi, J; Witek, M; Witzeling, W; Wotton, S A; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, F; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yushchenko, O; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhong, L; Zverev, E; Zvyagin, A

    2012-03-16

    A search for time-integrated CP violation in D(0)→h(-)h(+) (h=K, π) decays is presented using 0.62 fb(-1) of data collected by LHCb in 2011. The flavor of the charm meson is determined by the charge of the slow pion in the D(*+)→D(0)π(+) and D(*-)→D[over ¯](0)π(-) decay chains. The difference in CP asymmetry between D(0)→K(-)K(+) and D(0)→π(-)π(+), ΔA(CP)≡A(CP)(K(-)K(+))-A(CP)(π(-)π(+)), is measured to be [-0.82±0.21(stat)±0.11(syst)]%. This differs from the hypothesis of CP conservation by 3.5 standard deviations.

  16. Measurement of time-dependent CP violation in B 0 → η'K 0 decays

    DOE PAGES

    Šantelj, L.; Yusa, Y.; Abdesselam, A.; ...

    2014-10-29

    We present a measurement of the time-dependent CP violation parameters in B0 → η'K0 decays. The measurement is based on the full data sample containing 772×106 BB-bar pairs collected at the Υ(4S) resonance using the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e+e- collider. The measured values of the mixing-induced and direct CP violation parameters are: sin 2φ1eff = +0.68 ± 0.07 ± 0.03, Aη'K0 = +0.03 ± 0.05 ± 0.04, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. The values obtained are the most accurate to date. Furthermore, these results are consistent with our previous measurements andmore » with the world-average value of sin 2φ1 measured in B0 → J/ψK0 decays.« less

  17. Evidence for CP Violation in Time-Integrated D0→h-h+ Decay Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Abellan Beteta, C.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Adrover, C.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A., Jr.; Amato, S.; Amhis, Y.; Anderson, J.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; Arrabito, L.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Bailey, D. S.; Balagura, V.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Bates, A.; Bauer, C.; Bauer, Th.; Bay, A.; Bediaga, I.; Belogurov, S.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Benayoun, M.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Bernet, R.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjørnstad, P. M.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blanks, C.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bobrov, A.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bozzi, C.; Brambach, T.; van den Brand, J.; Bressieux, J.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brook, N. H.; Brown, H.; Büchler-Germann, A.; Burducea, I.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Callot, O.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Camboni, A.; Campana, P.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chiapolini, N.; Ciba, K.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coca, C.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Constantin, F.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Corti, G.; Cowan, G. A.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; David, P.; David, P. N. Y.; de Bonis, I.; de Capua, S.; de Cian, M.; de Lorenzi, F.; de Miranda, J. M.; de Paula, L.; de Simone, P.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Degaudenzi, H.; Del Buono, L.; Deplano, C.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dickens, J.; Dijkstra, H.; Diniz Batista, P.; Domingo Bonal, F.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dupertuis, F.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; van Eijk, D.; Eisele, F.; Eisenhardt, S.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; Elsasser, Ch.; Elsby, D.; Esperante Pereira, D.; Estève, L.; Falabella, A.; Fanchini, E.; Färber, C.; Fardell, G.; Farinelli, C.; Farry, S.; Fave, V.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Furcas, S.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Garnier, J.-C.; Garofoli, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gauvin, N.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gibson, V.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gordon, H.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hampson, T.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harji, R.; Harnew, N.; Harrison, J.; Harrison, P. F.; Hartmann, T.; He, J.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Hicks, E.; Holubyev, K.; Hopchev, P.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hunt, P.; Huse, T.; Huston, R. S.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Iakovenko, V.; Ilten, P.; Imong, J.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jahjah Hussein, M.; Jans, E.; Jansen, F.; Jaton, P.; Jean-Marie, B.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Jost, B.; Kaballo, M.; Kandybei, S.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Keaveney, J.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kerzel, U.; Ketel, T.; Keune, A.; Khanji, B.; Kim, Y. M.; Knecht, M.; Koopman, R.; Koppenburg, P.; Kozlinskiy, A.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kruzelecki, K.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanciotti, E.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Li, L.; Li Gioi, L.; Lieng, M.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Liu, B.; Liu, G.; von Loeben, J.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez Asamar, E.; Lopez-March, N.; Lu, H.; Luisier, J.; Mac Raighne, A.; Machefert, F.; Machikhiliyan, I. V.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Magnin, J.; Malde, S.; Mamunur, R. M. D.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Mangiafave, N.; Marconi, U.; Märki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martens, A.; Martin, L.; Martín Sánchez, A.; Martinez Santos, D.; Massafferri, A.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Matveev, M.; Maurice, E.; Maynard, B.; Mazurov, A.; McGregor, G.; McNulty, R.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Merkel, J.; Messi, R.; Miglioranzi, S.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monteil, S.; Moran, D.; Morawski, P.; Mountain, R.; Mous, I.; Muheim, F.; Müller, K.; Muresan, R.; Muryn, B.; Muster, B.; Musy, M.; Mylroie-Smith, J.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Nedos, M.; Needham, M.; Neufeld, N.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nicol, M.; Niess, V.; Nikitin, N.; Nomerotski, A.; Novoselov, A.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Oggero, S.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Orlandea, M.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Owen, P.; Pal, K.; Palacios, J.; Palano, A.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Parkes, C.; Parkinson, C. J.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Paterson, S. K.; Patrick, G. N.; Patrignani, C.; Pavel-Nicorescu, C.; Pazos Alvarez, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perego, D. L.; Perez Trigo, E.; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A.; Perret, P.; Perrin-Terrin, M.; Pessina, G.; Petrella, A.; Petrolini, A.; Phan, A.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pie Valls, B.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilař, T.; Pinci, D.; Plackett, R.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Polok, G.; Poluektov, A.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Powell, A.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pugatch, V.; Navarro, A. Puig; Qian, W.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Raven, G.; Redford, S.; Reid, M. M.; Dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Rinnert, K.; Roa Romero, D. A.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodrigues, F.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Rogers, G. J.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Rosello, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz, H.; Sabatino, G.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salzmann, C.; Sannino, M.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santinelli, R.; Santovetti, E.; Sapunov, M.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Savrie, M.; Savrina, D.; Schaack, P.; Schiller, M.; Schleich, S.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Seco, M.; Semennikov, A.; Senderowska, K.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shatalov, P.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, O.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, A. C.; Smith, N. A.; Smith, E.; Sobczak, K.; Soler, F. J. P.; Solomin, A.; Soomro, F.; Souza de Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Sparkes, A.; Spradlin, P.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Subbiah, V. K.; Swientek, S.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Teodorescu, E.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tran, M. T.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tuning, N.; Ubeda Garcia, M.; Ukleja, A.; Urquijo, P.; Uwer, U.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Viaud, B.; Videau, I.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Visniakov, J.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Voss, H.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Webber, A. D.; Websdale, D.; Whitehead, M.; Wiedner, D.; Wiggers, L.; Wilkinson, G.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Wilson, F. F.; Wishahi, J.; Witek, M.; Witzeling, W.; Wotton, S. A.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xing, F.; Xing, Z.; Yang, Z.; Young, R.; Yushchenko, O.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, W. C.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zverev, E.; Zvyagin, A.

    2012-03-01

    A search for time-integrated CP violation in D0→h-h+ (h=K, π) decays is presented using 0.62fb-1 of data collected by LHCb in 2011. The flavor of the charm meson is determined by the charge of the slow pion in the D*+→D0π+ and D*-→D¯0π- decay chains. The difference in CP asymmetry between D0→K-K+ and D0→π-π+, ΔACP≡ACP(K-K+)-ACP(π-π+), is measured to be [-0.82±0.21(stat)±0.11(syst)]%. This differs from the hypothesis of CP conservation by 3.5 standard deviations.

  18. Decay time of hollow argon atoms formed below metal and dielectric surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briand, J. P.; Phaneuf, R.; Aryal, N. B.; Baral, K. K.; Thomas, C. M.; Esteves, D. A.

    2013-09-01

    Slow highly charged ions penetrating surfaces quickly capture many electrons in highly excited states, leaving empty the innermost shells, forming hollow atoms. These hollow atoms then fill their innermost shells in a stepwise manner through a long cascade of Auger and x-ray transitions. We have measured the mean emission depths of the series of x rays emitted during the decay cascade of Ar hollow atoms formed below the surface of metal and dielectric materials. It has been found that the decay times of these hollow atoms are much longer in dielectrics than in metals, and at keV/q kinetic energies, at depths of the order of 10-20 nm, considerably deeper than any expected value. These findings have been tentatively explained by the different responses of metals and dielectrics to the slow penetration of a highly charged ion.

  19. Mesoscale Simulation Data for Initializing Fast-Time Wake Transport and Decay Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmad, Nashat N.; Proctor, Fred H.; Vanvalkenburg, Randal L.; Pruis, Mathew J.; LimonDuparcmeur, Fanny M.

    2012-01-01

    The fast-time wake transport and decay models require vertical profiles of crosswinds, potential temperature and the eddy dissipation rate as initial conditions. These inputs are normally obtained from various field sensors. In case of data-denied scenarios or operational use, these initial conditions can be provided by mesoscale model simulations. In this study, the vertical profiles of potential temperature from a mesoscale model were used as initial conditions for the fast-time wake models. The mesoscale model simulations were compared against available observations and the wake model predictions were compared with the Lidar measurements from three wake vortex field experiments.

  20. Measurement of Time-Dependent CP Asymmetries in B0 to D(*)D Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Prairie View A-M /Princeton U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Oregon U. /SLAC /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Stony Brook /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Vanderbilt U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Yale U.

    2005-06-24

    The authors present a first measurement of CP asymmetries in neutral B decays to D{sup +}D{sup -}, and updated CP asymmetry measurements in decays to D*{sup +}D{sup -} and D*{sup -}D{sup +}. They use fully-reconstructed decays collected in a data sample of (232 {+-} 3) x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} events in the BABAR detector at the PEp-II asymmetric-energy B Factory at SLAC. they determine the time-dependent asymmetry parameters to be S{sub D*{sup +}D{sup -}} = -0.54 {+-} 0.35 {+-} 0.07, C{sub D*{sup +}D{sup -}} = 0.09 {+-} 0.25 {+-} 0.06, S{sub D*{sup -}D{sup +}} = -0.29 {+-} 0.33 {+-} 0.07, C{sub D*{sup -}D{sup +}} = 0.17 {+-} 0.24 {+-} 0.04, S{sub D{sup +}D{sup -}} = -0.29 {+-} 0.63 {+-} 0.06, and C{sub D{sup +}D{sup -}} = 0.11 {+-} 0.35 {+-} 0.06, where in each case the first error is statistical and the second error is systematic.

  1. Two dimensional numerical simulations of carrier dynamics during time-resolved photoluminescence decays in two-photon microscopy measurements in semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Kanevce, Ana; Kuciauskas, Darius; Levi, Dean H.; Johnston, Steven W.; Allende Motz, Alyssa M.

    2015-07-28

    We use two-dimensional numerical simulations to analyze high spatial resolution time-resolved spectroscopy data. This analysis is applied to two-photon excitation time-resolved photoluminescence (2PE-TRPL) but is broadly applicable to all microscopic time-resolved techniques. By solving time-dependent drift-diffusion equations, we gain insight into carrier dynamics and transport characteristics. Accurate understanding of measurement results establishes the limits and potential of the measurement and enhances its value as a characterization method. Diffusion of carriers outside of the collection volume can have a significant impact on the measured decay but can also provide an estimate of carrier mobility as well as lifetime. In addition to material parameters, the experimental conditions, such as spot size and injection level, can impact the measurement results. Although small spot size provides better resolution, it also increases the impact of diffusion on the decay; if the spot size is much smaller than the diffusion length, it impacts the entire decay. By reproducing experimental 2PE-TRPL decays, the simulations determine the bulk carrier lifetime from the data. The analysis is applied to single-crystal and heteroepitaxial CdTe, material important for solar cells, but it is also applicable to other semiconductors where carrier diffusion from the excitation volume could affect experimental measurements.

  2. Time-Dependent CP-Violating Asymmetry in B0→ρ0γ Decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushiroda, Y.; Sumisawa, K.; Taniguchi, N.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Arinstein, K.; Aushev, T.; Bahinipati, S.; Bakich, A. M.; Balagura, V.; Barberio, E.; Belous, K.; Bitenc, U.; Bondar, A.; Bozek, A.; Bračko, M.; Browder, T. E.; Chang, P.; Chao, Y.; Chen, A.; Chen, W. T.; Cheon, B. G.; Chistov, R.; Cho, I.-S.; Choi, Y.; Dalseno, J.; Dash, M.; Eidelman, S.; Epifanov, D.; Gabyshev, N.; Golob, B.; Ha, H.; Haba, J.; Hara, K.; Hara, T.; Hayasaka, K.; Hazumi, M.; Heffernan, D.; Hokuue, T.; Hoshi, Y.; Hou, W.-S.; Hyun, H. J.; Inami, K.; Ishikawa, A.; Ishino, H.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, Y.; Kah, D. H.; Kang, J. H.; Kawai, H.; Kawasaki, T.; Kichimi, H.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinoshita, K.; Korpar, S.; Križan, P.; Krokovny, P.; Kumar, R.; Kuo, C. C.; Kuzmin, A.; Kwon, Y.-J.; Lee, M. J.; Lee, S. E.; Lesiak, T.; Lin, S.-W.; Liventsev, D.; Mandl, F.; McOnie, S.; Medvedeva, T.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyake, H.; Miyata, H.; Miyazaki, Y.; Mizuk, R.; Mohapatra, D.; Moloney, G. R.; Nagasaka, Y.; Nakao, M.; Nakazawa, H.; Nishida, S.; Nitoh, O.; Noguchi, S.; Nozaki, T.; Ogawa, S.; Ohshima, T.; Okuno, S.; Olsen, S. L.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, G.; Park, C. W.; Park, H.; Peak, L. S.; Piilonen, L. E.; Sahoo, H.; Sakai, Y.; Schneider, O.; Schümann, J.; Schwartz, A. J.; Senyo, K.; Sevior, M. E.; Shapkin, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shibuya, H.; Shiu, J.-G.; Shwartz, B.; Singh, J. B.; Sokolov, A.; Somov, A.; Stanič, S.; Starič, M.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tajima, O.; Takasaki, F.; Tamai, K.; Tanaka, M.; Teramoto, Y.; Tikhomirov, I.; Trabelsi, K.; Uehara, S.; Ueno, K.; Uglov, T.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Urquijo, P.; Usov, Y.; Varner, G.; Vervink, K.; Villa, S.; Wang, C. C.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, M.-Z.; Wang, P.; Wang, X. L.; Watanabe, Y.; Won, E.; Yabsley, B. D.; Yamaguchi, A.; Yamashita, Y.; Yamauchi, M.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zupanc, A.; Zyukova, O.

    2008-01-01

    We report the first measurement of CP-violation parameters in B0→ρ0γ decays based on a data sample of 657×106BB¯ pairs collected with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e+e- collider. We obtain the time-dependent and direct CP-violating parameters, Sρ0γ=-0.83±0.65(stat)±0.18(syst) and Aρ0γ=-0.44±0.49(stat)±0.14(syst), respectively.

  3. Time-dependent CP-violation Parameters in B0 to eta' K0 Decay

    SciTech Connect

    Ulmer, K

    2006-09-26

    The authors present measurements of time-dependent CP-violation asymmetries for the decays B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}'K{sup 0}. The data sample corresponds to 347 million B{bar B} pairs produced by e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance in the PEP-II collider, and collected with the BABAR detector. The preliminary results are S = 0.55 {+-} 0.11 {+-} 0.02, and C = -0.015 {+-} 0.07 {+-} 0.03, where the first error quoted is statistical, the second systematic.

  4. Measurements of Time-Dependent CP Asymmetries in b->s Penguin Dominated Hadronic B Decays at BABAR

    SciTech Connect

    Biassoni, Pietro

    2010-02-10

    We report measurements of Time-Dependent CP asymmetries in several b->s penguin dominated hadronic B decays, where New Physics contributions may appear. We find no significant discrepancies with respect to the Standard Model expectations.

  5. Excited-state decay of hydrocarbon radicals, investigated by femtosecond time-resolved photoionization: Ethyl, propargyl, and benzyl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zierhut, Matthias; Noller, Bastian; Schultz, Thomas; Fischer, Ingo

    2005-03-01

    The excited state decay of the hydrocarbon radicals ethyl, C2H5; propargyl, C3H3; and benzyl, C7H7 was investigated by femtosecond time-resolved photoionization. Radicals were generated by flash pyrolysis of n-propyl nitrite, propargyl bromide, and toluene, respectively. It is shown that the 2A'2(3s) Rydberg state of ethyl excited at 250nm decays with a time constant of 20fs. No residual signal was observed at longer delay times. For the 3B12 state of propargyl excited at 255nm a slower decay with a time constant 50±10fs was determined. The 4B22 state of benzyl excited at 255nm decays within 150±30fs.

  6. General formulation of characteristic time for persistent chemicals in a multimedia environment

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, D.H.; McKone, T.E. |; Kastenberg, W.E.

    1999-02-01

    A simple yet representative method for determining the characteristic time a persistent organic pollutant remains in a multimedia environment is presented. The characteristic time is an important attribute for assessing long-term health and ecological impacts of a chemical. Calculating the characteristic time requires information on decay rates in multiple environmental media as well as the proportion of mass in each environmental medium. The authors explore the premise that using a steady-state distribution of the mass in the environment provides a means to calculate a representative estimate of the characteristic time while maintaining a simple formulation. Calculating the steady-state mass distribution incorporates the effect of advective transport and nonequilibrium effects resulting from the source terms. Using several chemicals, they calculate and compare the characteristic time in a representative multimedia environment for dynamic, steady-state, and equilibrium multimedia models, and also for a single medium model. They demonstrate that formulating the characteristic time based on the steady-state mass distribution in the environment closely approximates the dynamic characteristic time for a range of chemicals and thus can be used in decisions regarding chemical use in the environment.

  7. Time Modulation of the {beta}{sup +}-Decay Rate of H-Like {sup 140}Pr{sup 58+} Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, A. N.; Kryshen, E. L.; Pitschmann, M.; Kienle, P.

    2008-10-31

    Recent experimental data at GSI on the rates of the number of daughter ions, produced by the nuclear K-shell electron capture (EC) decays of the H-like ions {sup 140}Pr{sup 58+} and {sup 142}Pm{sup 60+}, suggest that they are modulated in time with periods T{sub EC}{approx_equal}7 sec and amplitudes a{sub EC}{approx_equal}0.20. Since it is known that these ions are unstable also under the nuclear positron ({beta}{sup +}) decays, we study a possible time dependence of the nuclear {beta}{sup +}-decay rate of the H-like {sup 140}Pr{sup 58+} ion. We show that the time dependence of the {beta}{sup +}-decay rate of the H-like {sup 140}Pr{sup 58+} ion as well as any H-like heavy ions cannot be observed.

  8. The Measurement of Time-Dependent CP-Violating Asymmetries in Loop-Dominated B Decays with BABAR

    SciTech Connect

    Hoecker, A.

    2004-10-22

    We report on preliminary measurements of time-dependent CP asymmetries in neutral B decays to CP eigenstates with transition amplitudes that are dominated by penguin-type loops. The results are obtained from a data sample of up to 227 million {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B-meson Factory at SLAC. The amplitudes of the effective mixing-induced CP asymmetries, sin2{beta}{sub eff}, are derived from decay-time distributions of events in which one neutral B meson is fully reconstructed in a final state without charm and the other B meson is determined to be either a B{sup 0} or {bar B}{sup 0} from its decay products.

  9. Radioactive decay.

    PubMed

    Groch, M W

    1998-01-01

    When a parent radionuclide decays to its daughter radionuclide by means of alpha, beta, or isomeric transition, the decay follows an exponential form, which is characterized by the decay constant lambda. The decay constant represents the probability per unit time that a single radioatom will decay. The decay equation can be used to provide a useful expression for radionuclide decay, the half-life, the time when 50% of the radioatoms present will have decayed. Radiotracer half-life has direct implications in nuclear imaging, radiation therapy, and radiation safety because radionuclide half-life affects the ability to evaluate tracer kinetics and create appropriate nuclear images and also affects organ, tumor, and whole-body radiation dose. The number of radioatoms present in a sample is equal to the activity, defined as the number of transitions per unit time, divided by the decay constant; the mass of radioatoms present in a sample can be calculated to determine the specific activity (activity per unit mass). The dynamic relationship between the number of parent and daughter atoms present over time may lead to radioactive equilibrium, which takes two forms--secular and transient--and has direct relevance to generator-produced radionuclides.

  10. Decay resistance to Botrytis cinerea and quality characteristics during storage of raspberry genotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Raspberries are a delicate, high value crop with an extremely short shelf life exacerbated by postharvest decay caused by Botrytis cinerea Pers. European red raspberry (Rubus idaeus L.) is the most widely grown. Yellow (R. idaeus L.), black (R. occidentalis L.) and purple raspberries (R. ×neglectus ...

  11. Predicting river travel time from hydraulic characteristics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jobson, H.E.

    2001-01-01

    Predicting the effect of a pollutant spill on downstream water quality is primarily dependent on the water velocity, longitudinal mixing, and chemical/physical reactions. Of these, velocity is the most important and difficult to predict. This paper provides guidance on extrapolating travel-time information from one within bank discharge to another. In many cases, a time series of discharge (such as provided by a U.S. Geological Survey stream gauge) will provide an excellent basis for this extrapolation. Otherwise, the accuracy of a travel time extrapolation based on a resistance equation can be greatly improved by assuming the total flow area is composed of two parts, an active and an inactive area. For 60 reaches of 12 rivers with slopes greater than about 0.0002, travel times could be predicted to within about 10% by computing the active flow area using the Manning equation with n = 0.035 and assuming a constant inactive area for each reach. The predicted travel times were not very sensitive to the assumed values of bed slope or channel width.

  12. Timing Characteristics of Large Area Picosecond Photodetectors

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Bernhard W.; Elagin, Andrey L.; Frisch, H.; Obaid, Razib; Oberla, E; Vostrikov, Alexander; Wagner, Robert G.; Wang, Jingbo; Wetstein, Matthew J.; Northrop, R

    2015-09-21

    The LAPPD Collaboration was formed to develop ultralast large-area imaging photodetectors based on new methods for fabricating microchannel plates (MCPs). In this paper we characterize the time response using a pulsed, sub picosecond laser. We observe single photoelectron time resolutions of a 20 cm x 20 cm MCP consistently below 70 ps, spatial resolutions of roughly 500 pm, and median gains higher than 10(7). The RMS measured at one particular point on an LAPPD detector is 58 ps, with in of 47 ps. The differential time resolution between the signal reaching the two ends of the delay line anode is measured to be 5.1 ps for large signals, with an asymptotic limit falling below 2 ps as noise-over-signal approaches zero.

  13. Time resolved photo-luminescent decay characterization of mercury cadmium telluride focal plane arrays

    DOE PAGES

    Soehnel, Grant

    2015-01-20

    The minority carrier lifetime is a measurable material property that is an indication of infrared detector device performance. To study the utility of measuring the carrier lifetime, an experiment has been constructed that can time resolve the photo-luminescent decay of a detector or wafer sample housed inside a liquid nitrogen cooled Dewar. Motorized stages allow the measurement to be scanned over the sample surface, and spatial resolutions as low as 50µm have been demonstrated. A carrier recombination simulation was developed to analyze the experimental data. Results from measurements performed on 4 mercury cadmium telluride focal plane arrays show strong correlationmore » between spatial maps of the lifetime, dark current, and relative response.« less

  14. Time resolved photo-luminescent decay characterization of mercury cadmium telluride focal plane arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Soehnel, Grant

    2015-01-20

    The minority carrier lifetime is a measurable material property that is an indication of infrared detector device performance. To study the utility of measuring the carrier lifetime, an experiment has been constructed that can time resolve the photo-luminescent decay of a detector or wafer sample housed inside a liquid nitrogen cooled Dewar. Motorized stages allow the measurement to be scanned over the sample surface, and spatial resolutions as low as 50µm have been demonstrated. A carrier recombination simulation was developed to analyze the experimental data. Results from measurements performed on 4 mercury cadmium telluride focal plane arrays show strong correlation between spatial maps of the lifetime, dark current, and relative response.

  15. TREK: A Search for Time Reversal Symmetry Violation in Charged Kaon Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Kohl, Michael

    2010-08-04

    The Time Reversal Experiment with Kaons (TREK) at J-PARC aims to find New Physics beyond the Standard Model by measuring the T-violating transverse polarization P{sub T} of muons in the K{sub {mu}3}{sup +} decay of stopped kaons. TREK will use a high-intensity kaon beam and the upgraded apparatus of the E-246 experiment from KEK-PS. The sensitivity for P{sub T} of 10{sup -4} at J-PARC is improved by a factor of 20 compared to the current E-246 limit, well in the allowed range of various models involving New Physics from exotic scalar interactions. An overview of the planned experiment and the status of the detector upgrade will be presented.

  16. TREK: A Search for Time Reversal Symmetry Violation in Charged Kaon Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Kohl, Michael

    2010-08-01

    The Time Reversal Experiment with Kaons (TREK) at J-PARC aims to find New Physics beyond the Standard Model by measuring the T-violating transverse polarization PT of muons in the Kµ3+ decay of stopped kaons. TREK will use a high-intensity kaon beam and the upgraded apparatus of the E-246 experiment from KEK-PS. The sensitivity for PT of 10-4 at J-PARC is improved by a factor of 20 compared to the current E-246 limit, well in the allowed range of various models involving New Physics from exotic scalar interactions. An overview of the planned experiment and the status of the detector upgrade will be presented.

  17. Architecture of Polyglutamine-containing Fibrils from Time-resolved Fluorescence Decay

    PubMed Central

    Röthlein, Christoph; Miettinen, Markus S.; Borwankar, Tejas; Bürger, Jörg; Mielke, Thorsten; Kumke, Michael U.; Ignatova, Zoya

    2014-01-01

    The disease risk and age of onset of Huntington disease (HD) and nine other repeat disorders strongly depend on the expansion of CAG repeats encoding consecutive polyglutamines (polyQ) in the corresponding disease protein. PolyQ length-dependent misfolding and aggregation are the hallmarks of CAG pathologies. Despite intense effort, the overall structure of these aggregates remains poorly understood. Here, we used sensitive time-dependent fluorescent decay measurements to assess the architecture of mature fibrils of huntingtin (Htt) exon 1 implicated in HD pathology. Varying the position of the fluorescent labels in the Htt monomer with expanded 51Q (Htt51Q) and using structural models of putative fibril structures, we generated distance distributions between donors and acceptors covering all possible distances between the monomers or monomer dimensions within the polyQ amyloid fibril. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we systematically scanned all possible monomer conformations that fit the experimentally measured decay times. Monomers with four-stranded 51Q stretches organized into five-layered β-sheets with alternating N termini of the monomers perpendicular to the fibril axis gave the best fit to our data. Alternatively, the core structure of the polyQ fibrils might also be a zipper layer with antiparallel four-stranded stretches as this structure showed the next best fit. All other remaining arrangements are clearly excluded by the data. Furthermore, the assessed dimensions of the polyQ stretch of each monomer provide structural evidence for the observed polyQ length threshold in HD pathology. Our approach can be used to validate the effect of pharmacological substances that inhibit or alter amyloid growth and structure. PMID:25092288

  18. Architecture of polyglutamine-containing fibrils from time-resolved fluorescence decay.

    PubMed

    Röthlein, Christoph; Miettinen, Markus S; Borwankar, Tejas; Bürger, Jörg; Mielke, Thorsten; Kumke, Michael U; Ignatova, Zoya

    2014-09-26

    The disease risk and age of onset of Huntington disease (HD) and nine other repeat disorders strongly depend on the expansion of CAG repeats encoding consecutive polyglutamines (polyQ) in the corresponding disease protein. PolyQ length-dependent misfolding and aggregation are the hallmarks of CAG pathologies. Despite intense effort, the overall structure of these aggregates remains poorly understood. Here, we used sensitive time-dependent fluorescent decay measurements to assess the architecture of mature fibrils of huntingtin (Htt) exon 1 implicated in HD pathology. Varying the position of the fluorescent labels in the Htt monomer with expanded 51Q (Htt51Q) and using structural models of putative fibril structures, we generated distance distributions between donors and acceptors covering all possible distances between the monomers or monomer dimensions within the polyQ amyloid fibril. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we systematically scanned all possible monomer conformations that fit the experimentally measured decay times. Monomers with four-stranded 51Q stretches organized into five-layered β-sheets with alternating N termini of the monomers perpendicular to the fibril axis gave the best fit to our data. Alternatively, the core structure of the polyQ fibrils might also be a zipper layer with antiparallel four-stranded stretches as this structure showed the next best fit. All other remaining arrangements are clearly excluded by the data. Furthermore, the assessed dimensions of the polyQ stretch of each monomer provide structural evidence for the observed polyQ length threshold in HD pathology. Our approach can be used to validate the effect of pharmacological substances that inhibit or alter amyloid growth and structure.

  19. A Solution to Inductive Power Coupling in a Time-Cycled Atom Trap for Beta Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, Liam; Behr, John; Anholm, Melissa; McNeil, James

    2016-09-01

    The TRINAT group at TRIUMF uses lasers and magnetic fields to confine, cool, and polarize a cloud of beta-decaying neutral alkali atoms to test weak force asymmetry. To alternate between trapping and polarizing the atoms, the trapping magnetic field must be switched on and off. This time-changing magnetic field, created by a pair of co-axial coils, produces eddy currents-and consequentially resistive heating-in nearby conductors. This heating may cause undesirable effects, including damage to the delicate pellicle mirrors which are to be used in future experiments. Previously, the current waveform in the coils consisted of two periods of a sinusoid during the on time of the trapping field (this reduces leftover field from eddy currents during the polarization time). We have calculated the relative power coupled to the pellicle mirror mount for various waveforms, and determined that using half a period of a lower-frequency sinusoid couples an order of magnitude less power than the original waveform, and approximately 2 times less than a trapezoidal wave. We measured the lifetime of the trap subject to this new waveform and found it is possible to achieve a lifetime comparable to that of a continuous trap, our best result differing by less than 5 percent.

  20. Relativistic electron acceleration and decay time scales in the inner and outer radiation belts: SAMPEX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, D. N.; Blake, J. B.; Callis, L. B.; Cummings, J. R.; Hovestadt, D.; Kanekal, S.; Klecker, B.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Zwickl, R. D.

    1994-01-01

    High-energy electrons have been measured systematically in a low-altitude (520 x 675 km), nearly polar (inclination = 82 deg) orbit by sensitive instruments onboard the Solar, Anomalous, and Magnetospheric Particle Explorer (SAMPEX). Count rate channels with electron energy thresholds ranging from 0.4 MeV to 3.5 MeV in three different instruments have been used to examine relativistic electron variations as a function of L-shell parameter and time. A long run of essentially continuous data (July 1992 - July 1993) shows substantial acceleration of energetic electrons throughout much of the magnetosphere on rapid time scales. This acceleration appears to be due to solar wind velocity enhancements and is surprisingly large in that the radiation belt 'slot' region often is filled temporarily and electron fluxes are strongly enhanced even at very low L-values (L aprroximately 2). A superposed epoch analysis shows that electron fluxes rise rapidly for 2.5 is approximately less than L is approximately less than 5. These increases occur on a time scale of order 1-2 days and are most abrupt for L-values near 3. The temporal decay rate of the fluxes is dependent on energy and L-value and may be described by J = Ke-t/to with t(sub o) approximately equals 5-10 days. Thus, these results suggest that the Earth's magnetosphere is a cosmic electron accelerator of substantial strength and efficiency.

  1. Mechanisms of fluorescence decays of colloidal CdSe-CdS/ZnS quantum dots unraveled by time-resolved fluorescence measurement.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hao; Chmyrov, Volodymyr; Widengren, Jerker; Brismar, Hjalmar; Fu, Ying

    2015-11-07

    By narrowing the detection bandpass and increasing the signal-to-noise ratio in measuring the time-resolved fluorescence decay spectrum of colloidal CdSe-CdS/ZnS quantum dots (QDs), we show that directly after the photoexcitation, the fluorescence decay spectrum is characterized by a single exponential decay, which represents the energy relaxation of the photogenerated exciton from its initial high-energy state to the ground exciton state. The fluorescence decay spectrum of long decay time is in the form of β/t(2), where β is the radiative recombination time of the ground-state exciton and t is the decay time. Our findings provide us with a direct and quantitative link between fluorescence decay measurement data and fundamental photophysics of QD exciton, thereby leading to a novel way of applying colloidal QDs to study microscopic, physical and chemical processes in many fields including biomedicine.

  2. Precise discussion of time-reversal asymmetries in B-meson decays

    DOE PAGES

    Morozumi, Takuya; Okane, Hideaki; Umeeda, Hiroyuki

    2015-02-26

    BaBar collaboration announced that they observed time reversal (T) asymmetry through B meson system. In the experiment, time dependencies of two distinctive processes, B_ →B¯0 and B¯0 → B_ (– expresses CP value) are compared with each other. In our study, we examine event number difference of these two processes. In contrast to the BaBar asymmetry, the asymmetry of events number includes the overall normalization difference for rates. Time dependence of the asymmetry is more general and it includes terms absent in one used by BaBar collaboration. Both of the BaBar asymmetry and ours are naively thought to be T-oddmore » since two processes compared are related with flipping time direction. We investigate the time reversal transformation property of our asymmetry. Using our notation, one can see that the asymmetry is not precisely a T-odd quantity, taking into account indirect CP and CPT violation of K meson systems. The effect of ϵK is extracted and gives rise to O(10–3) contribution. The introduced parameters are invariant under rephasing of quarks so that the coefficients of our asymmetry are expressed as phase convention independent quantities. Some combinations of the asymmetry enable us to extract parameters for wrong sign decays of Bd meson, CPT violation, etc. As a result, we also study the reason why the T-even terms are allowed to contribute to the asymmetry, and find that several conditions are needed for the asymmetry to be a T-odd quantity.« less

  3. Precise discussion of time-reversal asymmetries in B-meson decays

    SciTech Connect

    Morozumi, Takuya; Okane, Hideaki; Umeeda, Hiroyuki

    2015-02-26

    BaBar collaboration announced that they observed time reversal (T) asymmetry through B meson system. In the experiment, time dependencies of two distinctive processes, B_ →B¯0 and B¯0 → B_ (– expresses CP value) are compared with each other. In our study, we examine event number difference of these two processes. In contrast to the BaBar asymmetry, the asymmetry of events number includes the overall normalization difference for rates. Time dependence of the asymmetry is more general and it includes terms absent in one used by BaBar collaboration. Both of the BaBar asymmetry and ours are naively thought to be T-odd since two processes compared are related with flipping time direction. We investigate the time reversal transformation property of our asymmetry. Using our notation, one can see that the asymmetry is not precisely a T-odd quantity, taking into account indirect CP and CPT violation of K meson systems. The effect of ϵK is extracted and gives rise to O(10–3) contribution. The introduced parameters are invariant under rephasing of quarks so that the coefficients of our asymmetry are expressed as phase convention independent quantities. Some combinations of the asymmetry enable us to extract parameters for wrong sign decays of Bd meson, CPT violation, etc. As a result, we also study the reason why the T-even terms are allowed to contribute to the asymmetry, and find that several conditions are needed for the asymmetry to be a T-odd quantity.

  4. First direct observation of two protons in the decay of 45Fe with a time-projection chamber.

    PubMed

    Giovinazzo, J; Blank, B; Borcea, C; Canchel, G; Dalouzy, J-C; Demonchy, C E; de Oliveira Santos, F; Dossat, C; Grévy, S; Hay, L; Huikari, J; Leblanc, S; Matea, I; Pedroza, J-L; Perrot, L; Pibernat, J; Serani, L; Stodel, C; Thomas, J-C

    2007-09-07

    The decay of the ground-state two-proton emitter 45Fe was studied with a time-projection chamber and the emission of two protons was unambiguously identified. The total decay energy and the half-life measured in this work agree with the results from previous experiments. The present result constitutes the first direct observation of the individual protons in the two-proton decay of a long-lived ground-state emitter. In parallel, we identified for the first time directly two-proton emission from 43Cr, a known beta-delayed two-proton emitter. The technique developed in the present work opens the way to a detailed study of the mechanism of ground state as well as beta-delayed two-proton radioactivity.

  5. Mesospheric temperature estimation from meteor decay times during Geminids meteor shower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlovsky, Alexander; Lukianova, Renata; Shalimov, Sergey; Lester, Mark

    2016-02-01

    Meteor radar observations at the Sodankylä Geophysical Observatory (67° 22'N, 26° 38'E, Finland) indicate that the mesospheric temperature derived from meteor decay times is systematically underestimated by 20-50 K during the Geminids meteor shower which has peak on 13 December. A very good coincidence of the minimum of routinely calculated temperature and maximum of meteor flux (the number of meteors detected per day) was observed regularly on that day in December 2008-2014. These observations are for a specific height-lifetime distribution of the Geminids meteor trails and indicate a larger percentage of overdense trails compared to that for sporadic meteors. A consequence of this is that the routine estimates of mesospheric temperature during the Geminids are in fact underestimates. The observations do, however, indicate unusual properties (e.g., mass, speed, or chemical composition) of the Geminids meteoroids. Similar properties were found also for Quadrantids in January 2009-2015, which like the Geminids has as a parent body an asteroid, but not for other meteor showers.

  6. Microtiterplate phosphate assay based on luminescence quenching of a terbium complex amenable to decay time detection.

    PubMed

    Turel, Matejka; Duerkop, Axel; Yegorova, Alla; Karasyov, Alexander; Scripinets, Yulia; Lobnik, Aleksandra

    2010-08-18

    We describe a terbium-ligand complex (TbL) for a microtiterplate assay for phosphate (P) in the 0.3-100 micromol L(-1) range based on luminescence quenching. As the pH optimum is at neutral pH (7.4) the probe is quenched by both, primary (H(2)PO(4)(-)) and secondary phosphate (HPO(4)(2-)). The LOD is 110 nmol L(-1). A Stern-Volmer study revealed that quenching is mostly static. Due to the ms-decay time of TbL, the first luminescence lifetime assay for phosphate could also be developed. The lifetime-based calibration plot is linear between 0.5 and 5 micromol L(-1) of P. The effect of various surfactants on assay performance and a study on interferents are presented. The probe was successfully applied to determination of P in commercial plant fertilizers and validated against the molybdenum blue test. The probe is the most sensitive lanthanide-based probe for phosphate.

  7. Measurement of Time-Dependent CP Asymmetry in B0 --> KS pi0 gamma Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, Bernard; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Lopez, L.; Palano, Antimo; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, Bjarne; Sun, L.; Abrams, G.S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Cahn, Robert N.; Jacobsen, R.G.; /LBL, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Karlsruhe U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /Consorzio Milano Ricerche /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Napoli Seconda U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /Banca di Roma /Frascati /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2008-10-20

    The authors measure the time-dependent CP asymmetry in B{sup 0} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma} decays for two regions of K{sub S}{sup 0}-{pi}{sup 0} invariant mass, m(K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}), using the final BABAR data set of 467 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs collected at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at SLAC. They find 339 {+-} 24 B{sup 0} {yields} K*{sup 0}{gamma} candidates and measure S{sub K*{gamma}} = -0.03 {+-} 0.29 {+-} 0.03 and C{sub K*{gamma}} = -0.14 {+-} 0.16 {+-} 0.03. In the range 1.1 < m(K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}) < 1.8 GeV/c{sup 2} they find 133 {+-} 20 B{sup 0} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma} candidates and measure S{sub K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma}} = -0.78 {+-} 0.59 {+-} 0.09 and C{sub K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma}} = -0.36 {+-} 0.33 {+-} 0.04. The uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively.

  8. Decay Of Bacterial Pathogen, Fecal Indicators, And Real-Time Quantitative PCR Genetic Markers In Manure Amended Soils

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study examined persistence and decay of bacterial pathogens, fecal indicator bacteria, and emerging real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) genetic markers for rapid detection of fecal pollution in manre-amended agricultural soils. Known concentrations of transformed green fluore...

  9. Decay Of Bacterial Pathogens, Fecal Indicators, And Real-Time Quantitative PCR Genetic Markers In Manure-Amended Soils

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study examined persistence and decay of bacterial pathogens, fecal indicator bacteria (FIB), and emerging real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) genetic markers for rapid detection of fecal pollution in manure-amended agricultural soils. Known concentrations of transformed green...

  10. Measurements of time-dependent CP asymmetries in B→D*∓π± decays using a partial reconstruction technique

    DOE PAGES

    Bahinipati, S.; Trabelsi, K.; Kinoshita, K.; ...

    2011-07-05

    We report results on time-dependent CP asymmetries in B→D*∓π± decays based on a data sample containing 657×10⁶ BB¯ pairs collected with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e⁺e⁻ collider at the Υ(4S) resonance. We use a partial reconstruction technique, wherein signal B→D*∓π± events are identified using information only from the fast pion from the B decay and the slow pion from the subsequent decay of the D*∓, where the former (latter) corresponds to D*⁺(D*⁻) final states. We obtain CP violation parameters S⁺=+0.061±0.018 (stat)±0.012 (syst) and S⁻=+0.031±0.019 (stat)±0.015 (syst).

  11. Temperature dependence of decay time and intensity of alpha pulses in pure and thallium-activated cesium iodide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senftle, F.E.; Martinez, P.; Alekna, V.P.

    1962-01-01

    The intensity and decay time of Po210 ?? particle scintillations produced in pure and thallium-activated cesium iodide have been measured with a fast electronic system as a function of temperature down to 77??K. Three modes of decay due to alpha excitation have been observed for CsI(Tl), and two for CsI. Other than the 7- and 0.55-??sec modes (at room temperature) reported in the literature for CsI(Tl), an additional temperature-independent mode of about 1.3 ??sec has been detected between 77 and 150??K. In CsI a fast temperature-dependent mode of decay (???100 nsec) was observed between 100-200??K in addition to the known principal mode. ?? 1962 The American Institute of Physics.

  12. Measurement of the Time-dependent CP Asymmetry inB to D(*)_CP h0 Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.

    2007-03-14

    The authors report a measurement of the time-dependent CP-asymmetry parameters S and C in color-suppressed B{sup 0} {yields} D{sup (*)0}h{sup 0} decays, where h{sup 0} is a {pi}{sup 0}, {eta}, or {omega} meson, and the D{sup 0} decays to one of the CP eigenstates K{sup +}K{sup -}, K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}, or K{sub S}{sup 0}{omega}. The data sample consists of 383 x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B-factory at SLAC. The results are S = -0.56 {+-} 0.23 {+-} 0.05 and C = -0.23 {+-} 0.16 {+-} 0.04, where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic.

  13. A real time approach for revising generation unit performance characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Viviani, G.L.; Lin, C.E.; Webb, M.G.

    1985-02-01

    This paper presents a unique method for representing the performance characteristics of generation units of electric utilities. The approach utilizes digitally sampled information in an on-line enviroment. The resulting accuracy is superior to conventional approaches, as the true time varying nature of performance characteristics is taken into account.

  14. Reappraisal of the Ångerman River decay time estimate and its application to determine uncertainty in Earth viscosity structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordman, Maaria; Milne, Glenn; Tarasov, Lev

    2015-05-01

    Relative sea level histories from previously glaciated areas have been used to study Earth rheology and ice sheet evolution during the last glacial cycle. The analysis of postglacial decay times has been used to place estimates on Earth viscosity structure that are relatively independent of uncertainty in the local ice history. Reconstructed sea levels from Ångermanland, Sweden have been commonly adopted for this purpose. We have assessed and compiled an updated relative sea level curve for this region, combining both varve-dated and radiocarbon dated index points. We fitted an exponential curve to the observations, taking into account estimates of eustatic sea level rise, elevation uncertainties as well as the geographical spread of the data sites to arrive at a decay time range (2σ) of 4.2-4.9 kyr for the whole record length (0-8 kyr) and 4.2-6.2 when 0-7 kyr fits are included. We computed model decay times using a large suite of over 900 ice and earth model combinations based on over 400 three-layer Earth viscosity models and more than 30 ice history reconstructions. Based on these extensive results, we confirm that decay time estimates are relatively independent of the regional ice model (at least within the range of ice chronology uncertainties) and so this data parametrization provides a relatively robust measure of Earth viscosity structure. We find that the observational constraints listed above are satisfied by 29 (8 kyr record) and 52 (7 and 8 kyr record) of the viscosity models considered. These subsets define uncertainty ranges in upper and lower mantle viscosity that are interdependent (Fig. 5). Consistent with previous analyses, we find that the observational decay time estimate does not provide useful constraints on model lithospheric thickness (within the range explored; 46-146 km).

  15. The effect of Ce3+ ions on the spectral and decay characteristics of luminescence phosphate-borate glasses doped with rare-earth ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valiev, D. T.; Polisadova, E. F.; Belikov, K. N.; Egorova, N. L.

    2014-05-01

    The luminescent characteristics of Li2O-B2O3-P2O5-CaF2 (LBPC) glasses doped with Gd3+ and Tb3+ ions and codoped with Ce3+ are studied by pulsed optical spectrometry under electron beam excitation. It is found that in glass with Ce3+ and Gd3+ ions a decrease in the decay time of gadolinium luminescence in the 312-nm band (6 P J → 8 S 7/2) was observed. It is shown that in the glass LBPC: Tb, Ce, an increase in the emission intensity in the main radiative transitions in terbium ion was observed. In the kinetics of luminescence band 545 nm of LBPC: Tb, Ce glasses, is present stage of buildup, the character of which changes with the doped of Ce3+ ions. The mechanism of energy transfer in LBP glasses doped with rare elements is discussed.

  16. Increase in the ozone decay time in acidic ozone water and its effects on sterilization of biological warfare agents.

    PubMed

    Uhm, Han S; Hong, Yi F; Lee, Han Y; Park, Yun H

    2009-09-15

    The sterilization properties of ozone in acidic water are investigated in this study. Acidification of water increases the ozone decay time by several times compared to the decay time in neutral water, thereby enhancing the sterilization strength of ozone in acidic water. A simple analytical model involving the viable microbial counts after contact with acidic ozone water was derived, and a sterilization experiment was conducted on bacterial cells using the acidic ozone water. The acidic ozone water was found to kill very effectively endospores of Bacillus atrophaeus ATCC 9372, thereby demonstrating the potential for disinfection of a large surface area in a very short time and for reinstating the contaminated environment as free from toxic biological agents.

  17. On the long time behavior of the doubly infinite toda lattice under initial data decaying at infinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamvissis, Spyridon

    1993-05-01

    We provide rigorous analysis of the long time behavior of the (doubly infinite) Toda lattice under initial data that decay at infinity, in the absence of solitions. We solve (approximately and for large times) the Riemann-Hilbert matrix factorization problem equivalent to the related inverse scattering problem with the help of the Beals-Coifman formula, by reducing it to a simpler one through a series of contour deformations in the spirit of the Deift-Zhou method.

  18. Very long decay time for electron velocity distribution in semiconductors, and consequent 1/f noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavalleri, G.; Tonni, E.; Bosi, L.

    2007-06-01

    The Boltzmann equation with electron-electron (e-e) interactions has been reduced to a Fokker-Planck equation (e-e FP) in a previous paper. In steady-state conditions, its solution q 0(v) (where v is the electron speed) depends on the square of the acceleration a = eE/m. If we introduce the nonrenormalized zero-point field (ZPF) of QED, i.e., the one considered in stochastic electrodynamics, so that = <(a D.C. + a ZPF)2> ~= a2 ZPF, then q 0(v) becomes similar to the Fermi-Dirac equation, and the two collision frequencies ν I(v) and ν II(v) appearing in the e-e FP become both proportional to 1/v in a small δv interval. The condition υ I(v) ~ υ II(v) ~ 1/v is at the threshold of the runaways. In the same δv range, the time-dependent solution q 0(v, τ) of the e - e FP decays no longer exponentially but according to a power law ~ τ -ɛ where 0.004 < ɛ < 0.006, until τ --> ∞. That extremely long memory of a fluctuation implies the same dependence τ -ɛ for the conductance correlation function, hence a corresponding power-spectral noise S(f)~ f ɛ-1 where f is the frequency. That behaviour is maintained even for a small sample because the back diffusion velocity of the electrons in the effective range δv, where they are in runaway conditions, is much larger than the drift velocity.

  19. Decay of bacterial pathogens, fecal indicators, and real-time quantitative PCR genetic markers in manure-amended soils.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Shane W; Donnelly, Matthew; Peed, Lindsay; Kelty, Catherine A; Mondal, Sumona; Zhong, Zirong; Shanks, Orin C

    2011-07-01

    This study examined persistence and decay of bacterial pathogens, fecal indicator bacteria (FIB), and emerging real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) genetic markers for rapid detection of fecal pollution in manure-amended agricultural soils. Known concentrations of transformed green fluorescent protein-expressing Escherichia coli O157:H7/pZs and red fluorescent protein-expressing Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium/pDs were added to laboratory-scale manure-amended soil microcosms with moisture contents of 60% or 80% field capacity and incubated at temperatures of -20°C, 10°C, or 25°C for 120 days. A two-stage first-order decay model was used to determine stage 1 and stage 2 first-order decay rate coefficients and transition times for each organism and qPCR genetic marker in each treatment. Genetic markers for FIB (Enterococcus spp., E. coli, and Bacteroidales) exhibited decay rate coefficients similar to that of E. coli O157:H7/pZs but not of S. enterica serovar Typhimurium/pDs and persisted at detectable levels longer than both pathogens. Concentrations of these two bacterial pathogens, their counterpart qPCR genetic markers (stx1 and ttrRSBCA, respectively), and FIB genetic markers were also correlated (r = 0.528 to 0.745). This suggests that these qPCR genetic markers may be reliable conservative surrogates for monitoring fecal pollution from manure-amended land. Host-associated qPCR genetic markers for microbial source tracking decayed rapidly to nondetectable concentrations, long before FIB, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium/pDs, and E. coli O157:H7/pZs. Although good indicators of point source or recent nonpoint source fecal contamination events, these host-associated qPCR genetic markers may not be reliable indicators of nonpoint source fecal contamination events that occur weeks following manure application on land.

  20. Correlation of conformational heterogeneity of the tryptophyl side chain and time-resolved fluorescence intensity decay kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laws, William R.; Ross, J. B. Alexander

    1992-04-01

    The time-resolved fluorescence properties of a tryptophan residue should be useful for probing protein structure, function, and dynamics. To date, however, the non-single exponential fluorescence intensity decay kinetics for numerous peptides and proteins having a single tryptophan residue have not been adequately explained. Many possibilities have been considered and include: (1) contributions from the 1La and 1Lb states of indole; (2) excited-state hydrogen exchange; and (3) environmental heterogeneity from (chi) 1 and (chi) 2 rotamers. In addition, it has been suggested that generally many factors contribute to the decay and a distribution of probabilities may be more appropriate. Two recent results support multiple species due to conformational heterogeneity as the major contributor to complex kinetics. First, a rotationally constrained tryptophan analogue has fluorescence intensity decay kinetics that can be described by the sum of two exponentials with amplitudes comparable to the relative populations of the two rotational isomers. Second, the multiple exponentials observed for tyrosine-containing model compounds and peptides correlate with the (chi) 1 rotamer populations independently determined by 1H NMR. We now report similar correlations between rotamer populations and fluorescence intensity decay kinetics for a tryptophan analogue of oxytocin. It appears for this compound that either (chi) 2 rotations do not appreciably alter the indole environment, (chi) 2 rotations are rapid enough to average the observed dependence, or only one of two possible (chi) 2 populations is associated with each (chi) 1 rotamer.

  1. Neutron decay of 15C resonances by measurements of neutron time-of-flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavallaro, M.; Agodi, C.; Assié, M.; Azaiez, F.; Cappuzzello, F.; Carbone, D.; de Séréville, N.; Foti, A.; Pandola, L.; Scarpaci, J. A.; Sgouros, O.; Soukeras, V.; Tropea, S.

    2016-06-01

    The neutron decay of the resonant states of light neutron-rich nuclei is an important and poorly explored property, useful to extract valuable nuclear structure information. In the present paper the neutron decay of the 15C resonances populated via the two-neutron transfer reaction 13C(18O,16On ) at 84-MeV incident energy is reported for the first time using an innovative technique which couples the MAGNEX magnetic spectrometer and the EDEN neutron detector array. Experimental data show that the resonances below the one-neutron emission threshold decay to the 14C ground state via one-neutron emission with an almost 100 % total branching ratio, whereas the recently observed 15C giant pairing vibration at 13.7 MeV mainly decays via two-neutron emission.

  2. Spectroscopy of element 115 decay chains

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolph, Dirk; Forsberg, U.; Golubev, P.; Sarmiento, L. G.; Yakushev, A.; Andersson, L.-L.; Di Nitto, A.; Duehllmann, Ch. E.; Gates, J. M.; Gregorich, K. E.; Gross, Carl J; Hessberger, F. P.; Herzberg, R.-D; Khuyagbaatar, J.; Kratz, J. V.; Rykaczewski, Krzysztof Piotr; Schaedel, M.; Aberg, S.; Ackermann, D.; Block, M.; Brand, H.; Carlsson, B. G.; Cox, D.; Derkx, X.; Eberhardt, K.; Even, J.; Fahlander, C.; Gerl, J.; Jaeger, E.; Kindler, B.; Krier, J.; Kojouharov, I.; Kurz, N.; Lommel, B.; Mistry, A.; Mokry, C.; Nitsche, H.; Omtvedt, J. P.; Papadakis, P.; Ragnarsson, I.; Runke, J.; Schaffner, H.; Schausten, B.; Thoerle-Pospiech, P.; Torres, T.; Traut, T.; Trautmann, N.; Tuerler, A.; Ward, A.; Ward, D. E.; Wiehl, N.

    2013-01-01

    A high-resolution a, X-ray and -ray coincidence spectroscopy experiment was conducted at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum fu r Schwerionenforschung. Thirty correlated a-decay chains were detected following the fusion-evaporation reaction 48Ca + 243Am. The observations are consistent with previous assignments of similar decay chains to originate from element Z = 115. The data includes first candidates of fingerprinting the decay step Mt --> Bh with characteristic X rays. For the first time, precise spectroscopy allows the derivation of excitation schemes of isotopes along the decay chains starting with elements Z > 112. Comprehensive Monte-Carlo simulations accompany the data analysis. Nuclear structure models provide a first level interpretation.

  3. Normalized linear variance decay dimension density and its application of dynamical complexity detection in physiological (fMRI) time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Xiaoping; Zhao, Xiaohu; Fang, Youtong; Cao, Zhitong; He, Guoguang

    2011-04-01

    The upper and lower bounds of the linear variance decay (LVD) dimension density are analytically deduced using multivariate series with uncorrelated and perfectly correlated component series. Then, the normalized LVD dimension density ( δ) is introduced. In order to measure the complexity of a scalar series with δ, a pseudo-multivariate series was constructed from the scalar time series using time-delay embedding. Thus, δ is used to characterize the complexity of the pseudo-multivariate series. The results from the model systems and fMRI data of anxiety subjects reveal that this method can be used to analyze short and noisy time series.

  4. Time Dependent CP Asymmetries and Branching RatioMeasurements in Charmless Three Body B Decays at BABAR

    SciTech Connect

    Di Marco, Emanuele

    2007-05-01

    In this work we presented measurements of CP violation and decay rates of B decays in final states not involving a charm quark in the final state. In particular, the time-dependent CP asymmetries of decays which proceed through b → s elementary transition is a particularly sensitive probe of physics beyond the Standard Model. In fact, even if the precise measurements of CP conserving and CP violating processes show the success of the CKM picture of the flavour physics, the sector of b → s transitions is still not strongly constrained and leaves room for new physics contributions. In particular, we considered the decays which have the cleanest theoretical prediction within the Standard Model: B0 → ΦK0 and B0 → K$0\\atop{s}$K$0\\atop{s}$K$0\\atop{s}$ β$eff\\atop{SM}$ = 0.379. We examined the former with a completely new approach with respect to the past: the study of CP violation in the whole K+K-K0phase space through a time-dependent Dalitz plot analysis. With this approach, we simultaneously measured the CP-violating asymmetries of the ΦKJ0, f0(980)K0 resonant and K+K-K0 non-resonant contributions, avoiding one of the largest uncertainties which affected the previous measurements of B0 → ΦK0. We find β eff(B0 → ΦK0) = 0.06 ± 0.16 ± 0.05, which is lower than the Standard Model expectation, but it is consistent with it within two standard deviations. Moreover, only a recently developed experimental technique, which allows the determination of the position of B decay vertex when no charged tracks are originating from it, has made possible the measurement of the time-dependent CP asymmetry in B0 → K$0\\atop{s}$K$0\\atop{s}$K$0\\atop{s}$ decays. The mixing-induced CP parameter S in the Standard Model should be equal to sin 2β parameter, which is

  5. Measurement of time-dependent CP asymmetries and constraints on sin(2beta+gamma) with partial reconstruction of B0-->D*-/+pi+/- decays.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Gaillard, J-M; Hicheur, A; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Robbe, P; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Palano, A; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; LeClerc, C; Levi, M E; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Romosan, A; Ronan, M T; Shelkov, V G; Telnov, A V; Wenzel, W A; Ford, K; Harrison, T J; Hawkes, C M; Knowles, D J; Morgan, S E; Penny, R C; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schmuecker, H; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Latham, T E; Mackay, C; Wilson, F F; Abe, K; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Kyberd, P; McKemey, A K; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Gary, J W; Layter, J; Shen, B C; Wang, K; del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, Sh; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Dahmes, B; Levy, S L; Long, O; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Beringer, J; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schmitz, R E; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Turri, M; Walkowiak, W; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Erwin, R J; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Abe, T; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Clark, P J; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Roy, J; Smith, J G; van Hoek, W C; Zhang, L; Harton, J L; Hu, T; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zhang, J; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Colberg, T; Dickopp, M; Dubitzky, R S; Hauke, A; Lacker, H M; Maly, E; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Spaan, B; Wilden, L; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Brochard, F; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Grenier, P; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Khan, A; Lavin, D; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Swain, J E; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Sarti, A; Treadwell, E; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Falciai, D; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Morii, M; Won, E; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Eschrich, I; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Taylor, G P; Grenier, G J; Lee, S-J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Yi, J; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Laplace, S; Diberder, F Le; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Tantot, L; Wormser, G; Brigljević, V; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Coleman, J P; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Kay, M; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Sloane, R J; Touramanis, C; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Shorthouse, H W; Vidal, P B; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flack, R L; Flaecher, H U; George, S; Green, M G; Kurup, A; Marker, C E; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Vaitsas, G; Winter, M A; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Hart, P A; Hodgkinson, M C; Jackson, F; Lafferty, G D; Lyon, A J; Weatherall, J H; Williams, J C; Farbin, A; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Flood, K T; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Mangeol, D J J; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Cote-Ahern, D; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Cartaro, C; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; LoSecco, J M; Gabriel, T A; Brau, B; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Wong, Q K; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Tiozzo, G; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; de la Vaissière, Ch; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Ocariz, J; Pivk, M; Roos, L; Stark, J; T'Jampens, S; Therin, G; Manfredi, P F; Re, V; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Anulli, F; Biasini, M; Peruzzi, I M; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Del Gamba, V; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Martinez-Vidal, F; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Sandrelli, F; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lu, C; Miftakov, V; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Tanaka, H A; Varnes, E W; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Pierini, M; Piredda, G; SafaiTehrani, F; Voena, C; Christ, S; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Geddes, N I; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Xella, S M; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P-F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Langer, M; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Schott, G; Vasseur, G; Yeche, Ch; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Yumiceva, F X; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Elsen, E E; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Grauges-Pous, E; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Jessop, C P; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Langenegger, U; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Petrak, S; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Simi, G; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Va'vra, J; Wagner, S R; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wright, D H; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Meyer, T I; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, M; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Saleem, M; Wappler, F R; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Kim, H; Ritchie, J L; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Borean, C; Bosisio, L; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vitale, L; Vuagnin, G; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Jackson, P D; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Band, H R; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Di Lodovico, F; Mihalyi, A; Mohapatra, A K; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Sekula, S J; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2004-06-25

    We present a measurement of time-dependent CP-violating asymmetries in decays of neutral B mesons to the final states D(*-/+)pi(+/-), using approximately 82x10(6) BBmacr; events recorded by the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II e(+)e(-) storage ring. Events containing these decays are selected with a partial reconstruction technique, in which only the high-momentum pi(+/-) from the B decay and the low-momentum pi(-/+) from the D(*-/+) decay are used. We measure the amplitude of the asymmetry to be -0.063+/-0.024(stat)+/-0.014(syst) and compute bounds on |sin((2beta+gamma)|.

  6. Characteristic times of biased random walks on complex networks.

    PubMed

    Bonaventura, Moreno; Nicosia, Vincenzo; Latora, Vito

    2014-01-01

    We consider degree-biased random walkers whose probability to move from a node to one of its neighbors of degree k is proportional to k(α), where α is a tuning parameter. We study both numerically and analytically three types of characteristic times, namely (i) the time the walker needs to come back to the starting node, (ii) the time it takes to visit a given node for the first time, and (iii) the time it takes to visit all the nodes of the network. We consider a large data set of real-world networks and we show that the value of α which minimizes the three characteristic times differs from the value α(min)=-1 analytically found for uncorrelated networks in the mean-field approximation. In addition to this, we found that assortative networks have preferentially a value of α(min) in the range [-1,-0.5], while disassortative networks have α(min) in the range [-0.5,0]. We derive an analytical relation between the degree correlation exponent ν and the optimal bias value α(min), which works well for real-world assortative networks. When only local information is available, degree-biased random walks can guarantee smaller characteristic times than the classical unbiased random walks by means of an appropriate tuning of the motion bias.

  7. The effect of varying Co layer thickness on the time-temperature characteristics of Co/Sb semimetal embedded magnetic nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Madden, M. R.; Alshammary, T.; Grove, B.; Phillips, J.; Reaz, K.; Hensley, S.; Kenning, G. G.

    2015-03-14

    We report the effect of varying cobalt thickness on the temperature-dependent time decay of the electrical resistance of Co/Sb multilayer samples. We find that for a given temperature, a five fold change in the Co thickness produces a 100 fold change in the characteristic decay time of the resistance. We find that the characteristic decay time, as a function of temperature, follows an Arrhenius law. During deposition, the Co evolves single domain magnetic nanoparticles, on the Sb, in either a Volmer-Weber or Stranski-Krastanov growth mode. This metastable state is then encased in 2.5 nm of Sb producing an embedded nanoparticle system. Scanning tunneling microscopy measurements taken before sample aging (annealing at a given temperature for enough time to complete the resistance decay) and after aging show that these nanoparticles undergo morphological transformations during aging. These transformations lead to well defined time dependent decays in both the magnetization and the electrical resistance, making this material an excellent candidate for an electronic time-temperature sensor.

  8. Optimal Time-decay Estimates for the Compressible Navier-Stokes Equations in the Critical L p Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danchin, Raphaël; Xu, Jiang

    2017-04-01

    The global existence issue for the isentropic compressible Navier-Stokes equations in the critical regularity framework was addressed in Danchin (Invent Math 141(3):579-614, 2000) more than 15 years ago. However, whether (optimal) time-decay rates could be shown in critical spaces has remained an open question. Here we give a positive answer to that issue not only in the L 2 critical framework of Danchin (Invent Math 141(3):579-614, 2000) but also in the general L p critical framework of Charve and Danchin (Arch Ration Mech Anal 198(1):233-271, 2010), Chen et al. (Commun Pure Appl Math 63(9):1173-1224, 2010), Haspot (Arch Ration Mech Anal 202(2):427-460, 2011): we show that under a mild additional decay assumption that is satisfied if, for example, the low frequencies of the initial data are in {L^{p/2}(Rd)}, the L p norm (the slightly stronger dot B^0_{p,1} norm in fact) of the critical global solutions decays like t^{-d(1/p - 1/4} for {tto+∞,} exactly as firstly observed by Matsumura and Nishida in (Proc Jpn Acad Ser A 55:337-342, 1979) in the case p = 2 and d = 3, for solutions with high Sobolev regularity. Our method relies on refined time weighted inequalities in the Fourier space, and is likely to be effective for other hyperbolic/parabolic systems that are encountered in fluid mechanics or mathematical physics.

  9. Measurement of the time-dependent CP asymmetry in the B0-->phiK0 decay.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Gaillard, J-M; Hicheur, A; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Palano, A; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; LeClerc, C; Lynch, G; Merchant, A M; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Shelkov, V G; Telnov, A V; Wenzel, W A; Ford, K; Harrison, T J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Latham, T E; Wilson, F F; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Kyberd, P; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Gary, J W; Shen, B C; Wang, K; del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, Sh; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Dahmes, B; Levy, S L; Long, O; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schmitz, R E; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Abe, T; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Clark, P J; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Smith, J G; Zhang, L; Chen, A; Harton, J L; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zeng, Q L; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Colberg, T; Dickopp, M; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Lacker, H M; Maly, E; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Petzold, A; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Spaan, B; Sundermann, J E; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Brochard, F; Grenier, P; Schrenk, S; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Khan, A; Lavin, D; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Sarti, A; Treadwell, E; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Brandenburg, G; Morii, M; Won, E; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Taylor, G P; Grenier, G J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Yi, J; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Laplace, S; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Tantot, L; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Coleman, J P; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Sloane, R J; Touramanis, C; Back, J J; Cormack, C M; Harrison, P F; Mohanty, G B; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flack, R L; Flaecher, H U; Green, M G; Marker, C E; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Vaitsas, G; Winter, M A; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Hart, P A; Hodgkinson, M C; Lafferty, G D; Lyon, A J; Williams, J C; Farbin, A; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Flood, K T; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Mangeol, D J J; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Wilden, L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Gabriel, T A; Allmendinger, T; Brau, B; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Tiozzo, G; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; de la Vaissière, Ch; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Ocariz, J; Pivk, M; Roos, L; T'Jampens, S; Therin, G; Manfredi, P F; Re, V; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Anulli, F; Biasini, M; Peruzzi, I M; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Del Gamba, V; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Martinez-Vidal, F; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Sandrelli, F; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lu, C; Miftakov, V; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Pierini, M; Piredda, G; Safai Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Christ, S; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Geddes, N I; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P-F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Langer, M; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Schott, G; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Yumiceva, F X; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; De Nardo, G; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Elsen, E E; Fan, S; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Petrak, S; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Simi, G; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Va'vra, J; Wagner, S R; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Meyer, T I; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Saleem, M; Wappler, F R; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Kim, H; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Borean, C; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vitale, L; Vuagnin, G; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Jackson, P D; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Band, H R; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Di Lodovico, F; Eichenbaum, A M; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mihalyi, A; Mohapatra, A K; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Sekula, S J; Tan, P; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2004-08-13

    We present a measurement of the time-dependent CP asymmetry for the neutral B-meson decay B0-->phiK0. We use a sample of approximately 114 x 10(6) B-meson pairs taken at the Upsilon(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B-meson factory at SLAC. We reconstruct the CP eigenstates phiK0S and phiK0L, where phi-->K+K-, K0S-->pi+pi-, and K0L is observed via its hadronic interactions. The other B meson in the event is tagged as either a B0 or Bbar0 from its decay products. The values of the CP-violation parameters are SphiK=0.47+/-0.34(stat)+0.08-0.06(syst) and CphiK=0.01+/-0.33(stat)+/-0.10(syst).

  10. Measurement of the time-integrated CP asymmetry in D 0 → K {S/0} K {S/0} decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassi, G.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; d'Argent, P.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Bel, L. J.; Bellee, V.; Belloli, N.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Billoir, P.; Bird, T.; Birnkraut, A.; Bizzeti, A.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Braun, S.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Buchanan, E.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dall'Occo, E.; Dalseno, J.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C.-T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Demmer, M.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruscio, F.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dufour, L.; Dujany, G.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferrari, F.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fohl, K.; Fol, P.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Gerick, D.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianì, S.; Gibson, V.; Girard, O. G.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadavizadeh, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kecke, M.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Kozeiha, M.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Krzemien, W.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kuonen, A. K.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Liu, X.; Loh, D.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucio Martinez, M.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Lusiani, A.; Machefert, F.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Maguire, K.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manning, P.; Mapelli, A.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martin, M.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathad, A.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mauri, A.; Maurin, B.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Melnychuk, D.; Merk, M.; Michielin, E.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Mitzel, D. S.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monroy, I. A.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A. B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Müller, D.; Müller, J.; Müller, K.; Müller, V.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nandi, A.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Ninci, D.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Osorio Rodrigues, B.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Otto, A.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Pappenheimer, C.; Parkes, C.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Pescatore, L.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Petruzzo, M.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilař, T.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Piucci, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Poikela, T.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Price, J. D.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Quagliani, R.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rama, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M. M.; dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Lopez, J. A.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Ronayne, J. W.; Rotondo, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santimaria, M.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmelzer, T.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schubiger, M.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Siddi, B. G.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Silva de Oliveira, L.; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skillicorn, I.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, I. T.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Stefkova, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Tayduganov, A.; Tekampe, T.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Todd, J.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Trabelsi, K.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Volkov, V.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Weiden, A.; Whitehead, M.; Wilkinson, G.; Wilkinson, M.; Williams, M.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Williams, T.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wright, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yu, J.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zucchelli, S.

    2015-10-01

    The time-integrated CP asymmetry in the decay D 0 → K S 0 K S 0 is measured using 3 fb-1 of proton-proton collision data collected by the LHCb experiment at centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV. The flavour of the D 0 meson is determined by use of the decay D *+ → D 0 π + and its charge conjugate mode. The result is {A}_{CP}=-0.029± 0.052± 0.022, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic. The result is consistent with Standard Model expectations and improves the uncertainty with respect to the only previous measurement of this quantity by more than a factor of three. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  11. Experimental limits for heavy neutrino admixture deduced from 177Lu β decay and constraints on the life time of a radiative neutrino decay mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schönert, S.; Oberauer, L.; Hagner, C.; Feilitzsch, F. v.; Schreckenbach, K.; Declais, Y.; Mayerhofer, U.

    1996-05-01

    From cosmological constraints, the requirement for stable neutrinos is to have masses less than 30 eV. In the case that neutrino masses exceed this bound, neutrinos must decay sufficiently fast in order to satisfy the presently observed energy density of the universe. The experiments presented in this contribution consist of the complementary search for heavy neutrino admixture in nuclear beta decay of 177Lu and of the search for a radiative neutrino decay mode at the nuclear power station in Bugey, France. The data obtained from the 177Lu beta decay restrict the mixing probability of a heavy neutrino to the electron | U eh| 2 < 0.2 - 0.3% (90% Cl) for neutrino masses between 10 and 95 keV. The radiative lifetime is constrained to exceed t/ m > 180 × | U eh| 2 sec/eV which is one order of magnitude more restrictive than previous laboratory limits.

  12. Decay of sperm obtained from epididymes of wild ruminants depending on postmortem time.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Pastor, F; Guerra, C; Kaabi, M; Diaz, A R; Anel, E; Herraez, P; de Paz, P; Anel, L

    2005-01-01

    We have carried out a study on the effect of postmortem time (PT) in some characteristics of epididymal sperm salvaged from hunted Iberian red deer and roe deer. Testis were collected, identified, refrigerated down to 5 degrees C, and sent to our laboratory by the wardens of the hunting reserves. This way, samples were delivered at different times postmortem. Sperm were extracted from the cauda epididymis by means of cuts. Analyzed parameters were: osmolality, pH, motility-both subjectively and with CASA, HOS test reactivity, acrosomal status and viability (assessed with propidium iodide). Osmolality and pH rose with prolonged postmortem time, possibly due to tissue decomposition. Most sperm quality parameters negatively correlated with PT. Besides, when comparing PT classes (groups of 24 h for red deer and 30 h for roe deer), we could appreciate that motility was more affected by PT than other quality variables. Progressive motility was especially impaired. We also classified the samples in high, medium and low quality for each PT group (considering progressive motility, intact acrosomes and reactivity to the HOS test), and it was clear that after 2 days the number of high quality samples was testimonial, and after several days, we almost found only low quality samples. In conclusion, epididymal sperm from Iberian red deer and roe deer undergo a decrease of quality with PT, but it could stay acceptable within many hours postmortem. There are implications for wildlife conservation programs, as epididymal sperm is a good source of germplasm. If valuable animals die and it is not possible to process their sperm immediately, it may still be possible to obtain viable spermatozoa many hours later.

  13. Deviation from the Forster theory for time-dependent donor decays for randomly distributed molecules in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakowicz, Joseph R.; Szmacinski, Henryk; Johnson, Michael L.

    1990-05-01

    We examined the time -dependent donor decays of 2 - amino purine (2 -APU) , in the presence of increasing amounts of acceptor 2-aminobenzophenine (2-ABP). As the concentration of 2-ABP increases, the frequency-responses diverge from that predicted by Forster. The data were found to be consistent with modified Forster equations, but at this time we do not state that these modified expressions provide a correct molecular description of this donor-acceptor system. To the best of our knowledge this is the first paper which reports a failure of the Forster theory for randomly distributed donors and acceptors.

  14. Late-time Photometry of Type Ia Supernova SN 2012cg Reveals the Radioactive Decay of 57 Co

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graur, Or; Zurek, David; Shara, Michael M.; Riess, Adam G.; Seitenzahl, Ivo R.; Rest, Armin

    2016-03-01

    Seitenzahl et al. have predicted that roughly three years after its explosion, the light we receive from a Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) will come mostly from reprocessing of electrons and X-rays emitted by the radioactive decay chain 57Co → 57Fe, instead of positrons from the decay chain 56Co → 56Fe that dominates the SN light at earlier times. Using the Hubble Space Telescope, we followed the light curve of the SN Ia SN 2012cg out to 1055 days after maximum light. Our measurements are consistent with the light curves predicted by the contribution of energy from the reprocessing of electrons and X-rays emitted by the decay of 57Co, offering evidence that 57Co is produced in SN Ia explosions. However, the data are also consistent with a light echo ∼14 mag fainter than SN 2012cg at peak. Assuming no light-echo contamination, the mass ratio of 57Ni and 56Ni produced by the explosion, a strong constraint on any SN Ia explosion models, is {0.043}-0.011+0.012, roughly twice Solar. In the context of current explosion models, this value favors a progenitor white dwarf with a mass near the Chandrasekhar limit.

  15. Time-dependent measurement of the γ angle in the B0s↦ Ds± K± decay at LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tellarini, G.

    2015-03-01

    This document describes the measurement of the weak phase γ in the B0sto Ds^{±} K^{∓} decay performed by the LHCb experiment. The γ angle is the worst measured among the CKM unitarity triangle angles. The B0sto Ds^{±} K^{∓} mode allows to measure γ in a very clean way since it decays through tree-level diagram avoiding the problem of the penguin pollution. The analysis is performed on the 2011 data sample collected by LHCb at the center of mass energy of 7TeV, which corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 1fb-1. The relevant observables to be measured through the decay time dependence are the CP -violating coefficients Cf , Sf , S_{bar{f}} , A^{Δ Γ}f , A^{Δ Γ}_{bar{f}} since they depend on the γ angle. We find the CP observables to be: Cf=0.53± 0.25± 0.04 , Sf=-1.09± 0.33± 0.08 , S_{bar{f}}=-0.36± 0.34± 0.08 , A^{Δ Γ}f=0.37± 0.42± 0.20 , A^{ΔΓ}_{bar{f}}=0.20± 0.41± 0.20 , where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively. We use these observables to perform the first measurement of γ in the B0sto Ds^{±} K^{∓} decay mode, finding γ=(115^{+28}_{-43})° modulo 180° at 68% CL where both the statistical and systematic uncertainties are included.

  16. Improving γ-ray energy resolution, non-proportionality, and decay time of NaI:Tl+ with Sr2+ and Ca2+ co-doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, K.; Menge, P. R.

    2015-12-01

    Commercially available thallium activated sodium iodide scintillators are typically characterized by a γ-ray energy resolution of 6.5% at 662 keV and a scintillation decay time constant of 230 ns. Energy resolution, non-proportionality, and scintillation decay time are improved when the crystal is co-doped with alkaline earth metals (Sr2+ and Ca2+). The energy resolution of NaI:Tl+ is improved to 5.3%, and the decay time is simultaneously reduced to 170 ns with Sr2+ and Ca2+ co-doping. The improvement in energy resolution, non-proportionality, and decay time are likely due to the suppression of the slow scintillation processes in NaI:Tl+.

  17. Measurements of Time-Dependent CP Asymmetries in b\\to s Penguin Dominated Hadronic B Decays at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Biassoni, Pietro; /Milan U. /INFN, Milan

    2009-12-09

    We report measurements of Time-Dependent CP asymmetries in several b {yields} s penguin dominated hadronic B decays, where New Physics contributions may appear. We find no significant discrepancies with respect to the Standard Model expectations.

  18. Luminescence and scintillation timing characteristics of (LuxGd2-x)SiO5:Ce single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yawai, Nattasuda; Chewpraditkul, Warut; Sakthong, Ongsa; Chewpraditkul, Weerapong; Wantong, Kriangkrai; Szczesniak, Tomasz; Swiderski, Lukasz; Moszynski, Marek; Sidletskiy, Oleg

    2017-02-01

    The luminescence and scintillation characteristics of cerium-doped lutetium-gadolinium orthosilicate (LuxGd2-xSiO5:Ce; x=0, 0.8, 1.8) single crystals were investigated. At 662 keV γ-rays, the light yield of 29,800±3000 ph MeV-1 obtained for Lu1.8Gd0.2SiO5:Ce is higher than that of 20,200±2000 and 11,800±1200 ph MeV-1 obtained for Lu0.8Gd1.2SiO5:Ce and Gd2SiO5:Ce, respectively. The fast component decay time of 32, 18 and 17 ns was measured in the scintillation decay of Gd2SiO5:Ce, Lu0.8Gd1.2SiO5:Ce and Lu1.8Gd0.2SiO5:Ce, respectively. The coincidence time spectra for 511 keV annihilation quanta were measured in reference to a fast BaF2 detector and time resolution was discussed in terms of a number of photoelectrons and decay time of the fast component. The mass attenuation coefficient for studied crystals at 60 and 662 keV γ-rays was also evaluated and discussed.

  19. Optimal Time-decay Estimates for the Compressible Navier-Stokes Equations in the Critical L p Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danchin, Raphaël; Xu, Jiang

    2016-11-01

    The global existence issue for the isentropic compressible Navier-Stokes equations in the critical regularity framework was addressed in Danchin (Invent Math 141(3):579-614, 2000) more than 15 years ago. However, whether (optimal) time-decay rates could be shown in critical spaces has remained an open question. Here we give a positive answer to that issue not only in the L 2 critical framework of Danchin (Invent Math 141(3):579-614, 2000) but also in the general L p critical framework of Charve and Danchin (Arch Ration Mech Anal 198(1):233-271, 2010), Chen et al. (Commun Pure Appl Math 63(9):1173-1224, 2010), Haspot (Arch Ration Mech Anal 202(2):427-460, 2011): we show that under a mild additional decay assumption that is satisfied if, for example, the low frequencies of the initial data are in {L^{p/2}({R}d)} , the L p norm (the slightly stronger {dot B^0_{p,1}} norm in fact) of the critical global solutions decays like {t^{-d(1/p-1/4)}} for {tto+∞,} exactly as firstly observed by Matsumura and Nishida in (Proc Jpn Acad Ser A 55:337-342, 1979) in the case p = 2 and d = 3, for solutions with high Sobolev regularity. Our method relies on refined time weighted inequalities in the Fourier space, and is likely to be effective for other hyperbolic/parabolic systems that are encountered in fluid mechanics or mathematical physics.

  20. Factors determining the time course of VO2(max) decay during bedrest: implications for VO2(max) limitation.

    PubMed

    Capelli, C; Antonutto, G; Kenfack, M Azabji; Cautero, M; Lador, F; Moia, C; Tam, E; Ferretti, G

    2006-09-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the time course of maximal oxygen consumption VO2(max) changes during bedrests longer than 30 days, on the hypothesis that the decrease in VO2(max) tends to asymptote. On a total of 26 subjects who participated in one of three bedrest campaigns without countermeasures, lasting 14, 42 and 90 days, respectively, VO2(max) maximal cardiac output (Qmax) and maximal systemic O2 delivery (QaO2max) were measured. After all periods of HDT, VO2max, Qmax, and QaO2max were significantly lower than before. The VO2max decreased less than qmax after the two shortest bedrests, but its per cent decay was about 10% larger than that of Qmax after 90-day bedrest. The VO2max decrease after 90-day bedrest was larger than after 42- and 14-day bedrests, where it was similar. The Qmax and QaO2max declines after 90-day bedrest was equal to those after 14- and 42-day bedrest. The average daily rates of the VO2max, Qmax, and QaO2max decay during bedrest were less if the bedrest duration were longer, with the exception of that of VO2max in the longest bedrest. The asymptotic VO2max decay demonstrates the possibility that humans could keep working effectively even after an extremely long time in microgravity. Two components in the VO2max decrease were identified, which we postulate were related to cardiovascular deconditioning and to impairment of peripheral gas exchanges due to a possible muscle function deterioration.

  1. Using time domain characteristics to discriminate physiologic and parkinsonian tremors.

    PubMed

    Edwards, R; Beuter, A

    2000-01-01

    Tremor amplitude and frequency do not always clearly differentiate subjects with particular pathologies from control subjects or from subjects with other pathologies, especially in early stages of a disease. For patients with early stages of Parkinson's disease (PD) the discriminative power of amplitude was compared with that of other time domain characteristics of tremor recordings that are probably not evident clinically. Postural tremor with and without visual feedback and rest tremor were recorded in both hands of a group of patients with Parkinson's disease (n = 21) and a group of healthy control subjects (n = 30) using displacement lasers. Velocity and acceleration data were derived from displacement data. Twelve time domain characteristics were calculated on each recording and the discriminating power of each was evaluated using the worse hand in each case. Postural tremor with no visual feedback separates the two groups of subjects most efficiently, especially in velocity and acceleration. Tremor in Parkinson's disease (in comparison to normal physiologic tremor) has a specific morphology, has a distinctive histogram, is more periodic, and contains indications of nonlinearity in the underlying dynamics. There may also be greater difference in amplitude between the two hands and time asymmetry in tremor of patients with PD. A series of finger flexions seems to enhance normal tremor but not tremor in PD and may thus aid in discrimination. Discrimination of tremor attributable to PD from normal physiologic tremor can be enhanced by measuring time domain characteristics subtler than amplitude, particularly when amplitude itself is not large. Tremor measurement should not be limited to acceleration data because some information is more visible in other variables.

  2. Time Modulation of the K-Shell Electron Capture Decay Rates of H-like Heavy Ions at GSI Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, A. N.; Kienle, P.

    2009-08-07

    According to experimental data at GSI, the rates of the number of daughter ions, produced by the nuclear K shell electron capture decays of the H-like heavy ions with one electron in the K shell, such as {sup 140}Pr{sup 58+}, {sup 142}Pm{sup 60+}, and {sup 122}I{sup 52+}, are modulated in time with periods T{sub EC} of the order of a few seconds, obeying an A scaling T{sub EC}=A/20 s, where A is the mass number of the mother nuclei, and with amplitudes a{sub d}{sup EC}approx0.21. We show that these data can be explained in terms of the interference of two massive neutrino mass eigenstates. The appearance of the interference term is due to overlap of massive neutrino mass eigenstate energies and of the wave functions of the daughter ions in two-body decay channels, caused by the energy and momentum uncertainties introduced by time differential detection of the daughter ions in GSI experiments.

  3. Search for time-dependent CPT violation in hadronic and semileptonic B decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higuchi, T.; Sumisawa, K.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Asner, D. M.; Aulchenko, V.; Aushev, T.; Bakich, A. M.; Bay, A.; Belous, K.; Bhardwaj, V.; Bhuyan, B.; Bischofberger, M.; Bondar, A.; Bozek, A.; Bračko, M.; Brovchenko, O.; Browder, T. E.; Chang, M.-C.; Chang, P.; Chen, A.; Chen, P.; Cheon, B. G.; Chilikin, K.; Chistov, R.; Cho, I.-S.; Cho, K.; Choi, S.-K.; Choi, Y.; Dalseno, J.; Danilov, M.; Doležal, Z.; Drásal, Z.; Eidelman, S.; Epifanov, D.; Fast, J. E.; Gaur, V.; Gabyshev, N.; Garmash, A.; Goh, Y. M.; Golob, B.; Haba, J.; Hara, K.; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; Horii, Y.; Hoshi, Y.; Hou, W.-S.; Hsiung, Y. B.; Hyun, H. J.; Iijima, T.; Inami, K.; Ishikawa, A.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, Y.; Iwashita, T.; Julius, T.; Kang, J. H.; Kapusta, P.; Kawasaki, T.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, H. O.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, K. T.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, Y. J.; Ko, B. R.; Koblitz, S.; Kodyš, P.; Korpar, S.; Križan, P.; Krokovny, P.; Kuhr, T.; Kumita, T.; Kuzmin, A.; Kwon, Y.-J.; Lange, J. S.; Lee, S.-H.; Li, J.; Li, Y.; Libby, J.; Liu, C.; Liu, Z. Q.; Liventsev, D.; Louvot, R.; Matvienko, D.; McOnie, S.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyata, H.; Miyazaki, Y.; Mohanty, G. B.; Moll, A.; Mori, T.; Muramatsu, N.; Nagasaka, Y.; Nakahama, Y.; Nakao, M.; Nakazawa, H.; Natkaniec, Z.; Ng, C.; Nishida, S.; Nishimura, K.; Nitoh, O.; Nozaki, T.; Ogawa, S.; Ohshima, T.; Okuno, S.; Olsen, S. L.; Onuki, Y.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, G.; Park, C. W.; Park, H. K.; Park, K. S.; Pestotnik, R.; Petrič, M.; Piilonen, L. E.; Prim, M.; Ritter, M.; Röhrken, M.; Ryu, S.; Sahoo, H.; Sakai, Y.; Sanuki, T.; Sato, Y.; Schneider, O.; Schwanda, C.; Schwartz, A. J.; Seidl, R.; Senyo, K.; Sevior, M. E.; Shapkin, M.; Shebalin, V.; Shen, C. P.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shiu, J.-G.; Shwartz, B.; Sibidanov, A.; Sinha, R.; Smerkol, P.; Sohn, Y.-S.; Sokolov, A.; Solovieva, E.; Stanič, S.; Starič, M.; Sumihama, M.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tanaka, S.; Tatishvili, G.; Teramoto, Y.; Trabelsi, K.; Tsuboyama, T.; Uchida, M.; Uehara, S.; Uglov, T.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Urquijo, P.; Usov, Y.; Varner, G.; Varvell, K. E.; Vinokurova, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, P.; Wang, X. L.; Watanabe, M.; Watanabe, Y.; Williams, K. M.; Won, E.; Yabsley, B. D.; Yamamoto, H.; Yamashita, Y.; Yuan, C. Z.; Yusa, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zhulanov, V.

    2012-04-01

    We report a new sensitive search for CPT violation, which includes improved measurements of the CPT-violating parameter z and the total decay-width difference normalized to the averaged width ΔΓd/Γd of the two Bd mass eigenstates. The results are based on a data sample of 535×106 BB¯ pairs collected at the Υ(4S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e+e- collider. We obtain Re(z)=[+1.9±3.7(stat)±3.3(syst)]×10-2, Im(z)=[-5.7±3.3(stat)±3.3(syst)]×10-3, and ΔΓd/Γd=[-1.7±1.8(stat)±1.1(syst)]×10-2, all of which are consistent with zero. This is the most precise single measurement of these parameters in the neutral B-meson system to date.

  4. A time-dependent neutron transport method of characteristics formulation with time derivative propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, Adam J.; Lee, John C.

    2016-02-01

    A new time-dependent Method of Characteristics (MOC) formulation for nuclear reactor kinetics was developed utilizing angular flux time-derivative propagation. This method avoids the requirement of storing the angular flux at previous points in time to represent a discretized time derivative; instead, an equation for the angular flux time derivative along 1D spatial characteristics is derived and solved concurrently with the 1D transport characteristic equation. This approach allows the angular flux time derivative to be recast principally in terms of the neutron source time derivatives, which are approximated to high-order accuracy using the backward differentiation formula (BDF). This approach, called Source Derivative Propagation (SDP), drastically reduces the memory requirements of time-dependent MOC relative to methods that require storing the angular flux. An SDP method was developed for 2D and 3D applications and implemented in the computer code DeCART in 2D. DeCART was used to model two reactor transient benchmarks: a modified TWIGL problem and a C5G7 transient. The SDP method accurately and efficiently replicated the solution of the conventional time-dependent MOC method using two orders of magnitude less memory.

  5. A time-dependent neutron transport method of characteristics formulation with time derivative propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, Adam J. Lee, John C.

    2016-02-15

    A new time-dependent Method of Characteristics (MOC) formulation for nuclear reactor kinetics was developed utilizing angular flux time-derivative propagation. This method avoids the requirement of storing the angular flux at previous points in time to represent a discretized time derivative; instead, an equation for the angular flux time derivative along 1D spatial characteristics is derived and solved concurrently with the 1D transport characteristic equation. This approach allows the angular flux time derivative to be recast principally in terms of the neutron source time derivatives, which are approximated to high-order accuracy using the backward differentiation formula (BDF). This approach, called Source Derivative Propagation (SDP), drastically reduces the memory requirements of time-dependent MOC relative to methods that require storing the angular flux. An SDP method was developed for 2D and 3D applications and implemented in the computer code DeCART in 2D. DeCART was used to model two reactor transient benchmarks: a modified TWIGL problem and a C5G7 transient. The SDP method accurately and efficiently replicated the solution of the conventional time-dependent MOC method using two orders of magnitude less memory.

  6. Continuous-Time Finance and the Waiting Time Distribution: Multiple Characteristic Times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fa, Kwok Sau

    2012-09-01

    In this paper, we model the tick-by-tick dynamics of markets by using the continuous-time random walk (CTRW) model. We employ a sum of products of power law and stretched exponential functions for the waiting time probability distribution function; this function can fit well the waiting time distribution for BUND futures traded at LIFFE in 1997.

  7. Fractional characteristic times and dissipated energy in fractional linear viscoelasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colinas-Armijo, Natalia; Di Paola, Mario; Pinnola, Francesco P.

    2016-08-01

    In fractional viscoelasticity the stress-strain relation is a differential equation with non-integer operators (derivative or integral). Such constitutive law is able to describe the mechanical behavior of several materials, but when fractional operators appear, the elastic and the viscous contribution are inseparable and the characteristic times (relaxation and retardation time) cannot be defined. This paper aims to provide an approach to separate the elastic and the viscous phase in the fractional stress-strain relation with the aid of an equivalent classical model (Kelvin-Voigt or Maxwell). For such equivalent model the parameters are selected by an optimization procedure. Once the parameters of the equivalent model are defined, characteristic times of fractional viscoelasticity are readily defined as ratio between viscosity and stiffness. In the numerical applications, three kinds of different excitations are considered, that is, harmonic, periodic, and pseudo-stochastic. It is shown that, for any periodic excitation, the equivalent models have some important features: (i) the dissipated energy per cycle at steady-state coincides with the Staverman-Schwarzl formulation of the fractional model, (ii) the elastic and the viscous coefficients of the equivalent model are strictly related to the storage and the loss modulus, respectively.

  8. Measurement of time-dependent CP-violating asymmetries in B0-->K*0gamma(K*0-->K(0)Spi0) decays.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Gaillard, J-M; Hicheur, A; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Palano, A; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Shelkov, V G; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Latham, T E; Wilson, F F; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Macfarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, Sh; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Dahmes, B; Levy, S L; Long, O; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schmitz, R E; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Abe, T; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Smith, J G; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Chen, A; Harton, J L; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zeng, Q L; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Dickopp, M; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Lacker, H M; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Petzold, A; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Spaan, B; Sundermann, J E; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Brochard, F; Grenier, P; Schrenk, S; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Lavin, D; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Sarti, A; Treadwell, E; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Brandenburg, G; Morii, M; Won, E; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Taylor, G P; Charles, M J; Grenier, G J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Yi, J; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Laplace, S; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Tantot, L; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Chavez, C A; Coleman, J P; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Sloane, R J; Touramanis, C; Back, J J; Cormack, C M; Harrison, P F; Di Lodovico, F; Mohanty, G B; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flack, R L; Flaecher, H U; Green, M G; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Winter, M A; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Hodgkinson, M C; Lafferty, G D; Lyon, A J; Williams, J C; Farbin, A; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Flood, K T; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Mangeol, D J J; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Wilden, L; Jessop, C P; Losecco, J M; Gabriel, T A; Allmendinger, T; Brau, B; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Tiozzo, G; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; de la Vaissière, Ch; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Malcles, J; Ocariz, J; Pivk, M; Roos, L; T'jampens, S; Therin, G; Manfredi, P F; Re, V; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Anulli, F; Biasini, M; Peruzzi, I M; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Martinez-Vidal, F; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Sandrelli, F; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Miftakov, V; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Pierini, M; Piredda, G; Safai Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Christ, S; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Geddes, N I; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P-F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Langer, M; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Schott, G; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Wilson, J R; Yumiceva, F X; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Claus, R; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; De Nardo, G; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Elsen, E E; Fan, S; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Petrak, S; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Simi, G; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Va'vra, J; Wagner, S R; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Meyer, T I; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Saleem, M; Wappler, F R; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Kim, H; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Borean, C; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vitale, L; Vuagnin, G; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Jackson, P D; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Band, H R; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Graham, M; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mihalyi, A; Mohapatra, A K; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Rubin, A E; Sekula, S J; Tan, P; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Greene, M G; Neal, H

    2004-11-12

    We present a measurement of the time-dependent CP-violating asymmetries in B0-->K(*0)gamma(K(*0)-->K(0)(S)pi(0)) decays based on 124 x 10(6) Upsilon(4S)-->BB decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. In a sample containing 105+/-14 signal decays, we measure S(K(*)gamma)=0.25+/-0.63+/-0.14 and C(K(*)gamma)=-0.57+/-0.32+/-0.09, where the first error is statistical and the second, systematic.

  9. Remaining time and opportunities at work: Relationships between age, work characteristics, and occupational future time perspective.

    PubMed

    Zacher, Hannes; Frese, Michael

    2009-06-01

    The authors adapted the concept of future time perspective (FTP) to the work context and examined its relationships with age and work characteristics (job complexity and control). Structural equation modeling of data from 176 employees of various occupations showed that age is negatively related to 2 distinct dimensions of occupational FTP: remaining time and remaining opportunities. Work characteristics (job complexity and control) were positively related to remaining opportunities and moderated the relationship between age and remaining opportunities, such that the relationship became weaker with increasing levels of job complexity and control.

  10. PsbS is required for systemic acquired acclimation and post-excess-light-stress optimization of chlorophyll fluorescence decay times in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Ciszak, Kamil; Kulasek, Milena; Barczak, Anna; Grzelak, Justyna; Maćkowski, Sebastian; Karpiński, Stanisław

    2015-01-01

    Systemic acquired acclimation (SAA) is an important light acclimatory mechanism that depends on the global adjustments of non-photochemical quenching and chloroplast retrograde signaling. As the exact regulation of these processes is not known, we measured time-resolved fluorescence of chlorophyll a in Arabidopsis thaliana leaves exposed to excess light, in leaves undergoing SAA, and in leaves after excess light episode. We compare the behavior induced in wild-type plants with null mutant of non-photochemical quenching (npq4-1). The wild type rosettes exhibit a small reduction of fluorescence decay times in leaves directly exposed to excess light and in leaves undergoing SAA in ambient low light. However in npq4-1 exposition to excess light results in much faster fluorescence decay, which is insensitive to excitation power. At the same time npq4-1 leaves undergoing SAA displayed intermediate fluorescence decay. The npq4-1 plants also lost the ability to optimize florescence decay, and thus chlorophyll a dynamics up to 2 h after excess light episode. The fluorescence decay dynamics in both WT and npq4-1 can be described by a set of 3 maximum decay times. Based on the results, we concluded that functional PsbS is required for optimization of absorbed photon fate and optimal light acclimatory responses such as SAA or after excess light stress.

  11. PsbS is required for systemic acquired acclimation and post-excess-light-stress optimization of chlorophyll fluorescence decay times in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Ciszak, Kamil; Kulasek, Milena; Barczak, Anna; Grzelak, Justyna; Maćkowski, Sebastian; Karpiński, Stanisław

    2015-01-01

    Systemic acquired acclimation (SAA) is an important light acclimatory mechanism that depends on the global adjustments of non-photochemical quenching and chloroplast retrograde signaling. As the exact regulation of these processes is not known, we measured time-resolved fluorescence of chlorophyll a in Arabidopsis thaliana leaves exposed to excess light, in leaves undergoing SAA, and in leaves after excess light episode. We compare the behavior induced in wild-type plants with null mutant of non-photochemical quenching (npq4–1). The wild type rosettes exhibit a small reduction of fluorescence decay times in leaves directly exposed to excess light and in leaves undergoing SAA in ambient low light. However in npq4–1 exposition to excess light results in much faster fluorescence decay, which is insensitive to excitation power. At the same time npq4–1 leaves undergoing SAA displayed intermediate fluorescence decay. The npq4–1 plants also lost the ability to optimize florescence decay, and thus chlorophyll a dynamics up to 2 h after excess light episode. The fluorescence decay dynamics in both WT and npq4–1 can be described by a set of 3 maximum decay times. Based on the results, we concluded that functional PsbS is required for optimization of absorbed photon fate and optimal light acclimatory responses such as SAA or after excess light stress. PMID:25654166

  12. Seasonal Variation in Meteor Decay Time Profiles Measured by a Meteor Radar at King Sejong Station (62°S, 58°W), Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.; Kim, J.; Lee, C.; Jee, G.

    2008-12-01

    A VHF meteor radar at King Sejong Station (62°S, 58°W), Antarctica has been detecting echoes from more than 20,000 meteors per day since March 2007. Meteor echoes are decayed typically within seconds as meteor trail plasma spread away or are neutralized. Assuming that diffusion is the only process for decay of meteor echo signals, the atmospheric temperatures and pressures have been inferred from the measured meteor decay times at the peak meteor altitudes around 90 km. In this study, we analyze altitude profiles of meteor decay times in each month, which clearly show a maximum at 80 ~ 85 km. The maximum appears at higher altitude during austral summer than winter. The fast decay of meteor signals below the maximum cannot be explained by atmospheric diffusion which decreases with increasing atmospheric densities. We find that the measured meteor decay time profiles can be fitted with a loss rate profile, in addition to diffusion, with a peak altitude of 55 ~ 73 km and a peak rate of 4 ~ 15 sec- 1. The additional loss of meteor plasma may be due to electron absorption by icy particles in the mesosphere, but the estimated peak altitudes are much lower than the layers of NLC or PME. The estimated peak loss rates seem to be too large to be accounted by absorption by icy or dust particles. We will discuss other processes to explain the fast meteor times and their variation over season.

  13. Demographic characteristics of full-time emergency physicians in Canada.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, S; Streiner, D; Shannon, S

    1993-07-01

    The objective of this study was to describe individual and practice characteristics of Canadian emergency physicians, and to determine if these characteristics varied with geographic region, type of certification, or method of reimbursement. The study took place in emergency departments across Canada, and all full-time physicians with certification in emergency medicine, and a random sample of Canadian Association of Emergency Physician members without certification were surveyed with a 23-item questionnaire. Descriptive statistics on individual and practice characteristics were outcome measures. Comparative statistics evaluating demographic characteristics by region, type of certification, and method of reimbursement were used. There were significant differences between responders and nonresponders based on certification (P < .001) and region of residence (P < .005). Most physicians are male (87.3%), married (83.3%), reimbursed on a fee for service basis (61%), work in teaching hospitals (65.8%), and participate in medical education (82.3%). On average physicians are 38 years of age, work of 14 shifts/month, 9 hours/shift, 11 nonclinical emergency related hours/week, and have 5 vacation weeks/year. More physicians with FRCP(EM) certification work in teaching hospitals (P < .00001), do nonclinical emergency related work (P < .0001), participate in medical education (P < .0001), and are involved in research (P < .001). There are significant differences by geographic region in gross annual salary (P < .00001), method of reimbursement (P < .00001), and independent hospital emergency department status (P < .00001). Fee-for-service reimbursement for clinical service provides a higher gross annual income than other methods (P = .028). Emergency medicine is an emerging clinical discipline with a strong academic focus.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Monitoring changes of cellular metabolism and microviscosity in vitro based on time-resolved endogenous fluorescence and its anisotropy decay dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Wei; Li, Dong; Qu, Jianan Y.

    2010-05-01

    Reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) is a well-known metabolic coenzyme and endogenous fluorophore. In this study, we develop a system that simultaneously measures time- and wavelength-resolved fluorescence to extract free and protein-bound NADH signals from total cellular fluorescence. We analyze temporal characteristics of NADH fluorescence in a mixture of NADH and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) as well as in living cell samples. The results show that in both the NADH/LDH mixture and cell samples, a fraction of free NADH and protein-bound components can be identified. The extracted free and bound NADH signals are confirmed by time-resolved measurement of anisotropy decay of NADH fluorescence, based on the fact that free NADH is a small fluorescent molecule with much shorter rotational diffusion time than bound NADH. The ratio of free NADH signal to bound NADH signal is very different between normal and cancer cervical epithelial cells. In addition, the ratio changes significantly when the cell samples are treated with a mitochondrial inhibitor or uncoupler, demonstrating that the method is sensitive to monitor cellular metabolic activity. Finally, we demonstrate that the microviscosity for relatively small molecules such as NADH in cells could be extracted from wavelength- and time-resolved NADH fluorescence of living cell samples.

  15. Identification of ultra-fine magnetic particles in weakly magnetic carbonates using time-decay of viscous remanence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadima, M.; Chadimova, L.

    2015-12-01

    In some geological and environmental processes, such as diagenesis, very low grade metamorphism, pedogenesis, anthropogenic pollution, new ultra-fine magnetic minerals may be formed. The variation in content of these minerals has been routinely investigated by frequency-dependent magnetic susceptibility. Although being quite reliable for most rocks, frequency-dependent susceptibility reaches its limit when applied to very weakly magnetic rock types, e.g. carbonates. Assuming a broad size distribution of the ultra-fine magnetic particles spanning across the SP/SSD boundary we suggest assessing their content by quantification of time-decay of viscous remanent magnetization. Using artificially-imparted magnetization we usually obtain much stronger signal compared to that of magnetic susceptibility. For that purpose we employed a LDA5/PAM1 Pulse Magnetizer coupled with a JR6 Spinner Magnetometer (both manufactured by Agico, Inc.). Both instruments are simultaneously controlled thus they work in the same time frame. Magnetic remanence is measured repeatedly as a function of time and exponential decay curves are fitted on the acquired data and the relative ratio of viscous and non-viscous particles is estimated. The proposed method is tested on two sets of samples representing biostratigraphically well-established sections across Silurian shallow-water limestone facies in the Prague Synform (Czech Republic). Sampling interval comprises so-called Lau Event which belongs to one of the major environmental and biological perturbances in the Phanerozoic Ocean. This level is also associated with very strong geochemical changes, so-called global Middle Ludfordian Carbon Isotope Excursion, recognized in numerous areas worldwide. Other geophysical methods applied include high-resolution magnetic susceptibility measurements and gamma-ray spectrometry, supplemented by rock magnetic measurements (ARM/IRM) and frequency-dependent magnetic susceptibility.

  16. Time since death and decay rate constants of Norway spruce and European larch deadwood in subalpine forests determined using dendrochronology and radiocarbon dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrillo, M.; Cherubini, P.; Fravolini, G.; Ascher, J.; Schärer, M.; Synal, H.-A.; Bertoldi, D.; Camin, F.; Larcher, R.; Egli, M.

    2015-09-01

    Due to the large size and highly heterogeneous spatial distribution of deadwood, the time scales involved in the coarse woody debris (CWD) decay of Picea abies (L.) Karst. and Larix decidua Mill. in Alpine forests have been poorly investigated and are largely unknown. We investigated the CWD decay dynamics in an Alpine valley in Italy using the five-decay class system commonly employed for forest surveys, based on a macromorphological and visual assessment. For the decay classes 1 to 3, most of the dendrochronological samples were cross-dated to assess the time that had elapsed since tree death, but for decay classes 4 and 5 (poorly preserved tree rings) and some others not having enough tree rings, radiocarbon dating was used. In addition, density, cellulose and lignin data were measured for the dated CWD. The decay rate constants for spruce and larch were estimated on the basis of the density loss using a single negative exponential model. In the decay classes 1 to 3, the ages of the CWD were similar varying between 1 and 54 years for spruce and 3 and 40 years for larch with no significant differences between the classes; classes 1-3 are therefore not indicative for deadwood age. We found, however, distinct tree species-specific differences in decay classes 4 and 5, with larch CWD reaching an average age of 210 years in class 5 and spruce only 77 years. The mean CWD rate constants were 0.012 to 0.018 yr-1 for spruce and 0.005 to 0.012 yr-1 for larch. Cellulose and lignin time trends half-lives (using a multiple-exponential model) could be derived on the basis of the ages of the CWD. The half-lives for cellulose were 21 yr for spruce and 50 yr for larch. The half-life of lignin is considerably higher and may be more than 100 years in larch CWD.

  17. Time-dependent Dalitz-Plot Analysis of the Charmless Decay B^0 -> K^0S Pi Pi- at BABAR

    SciTech Connect

    Ilic, J

    2009-10-17

    A time-dependent amplitude analysis of B{sup 0} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decays is performed in order to extract the CP violation parameters of f{sub 0}(980)K{sub S}{sup 0} and {rho}{sup 0}(770)K{sub S}{sup 0} and direct CP asymmetries of K*{sup +}(892){pi}{sup -}. The results are obtained from the final BABAR data sample of (465 {+-} 5)10{sup 6} B{bar B} decays, collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B factory at SLAC. The time dependent CP asymmetry for f{sub 0}(980)K{sub S}{sup 0} and {rho}{sup 0}(770)K{sub S}{sup 0} are measured to be S(f{sub 0}(980)K{sub S}{sup 0}) = -0.97 {+-} 0.09 {+-} 0.01 {+-} 0.01, and S({rho}{sup 0}(770)K{sub S}{sup 0}) = 0.67 {+-} 0.20 {+-} 0.06 {+-} 0.04, respectively. In decays to K*{sup +}(892){pi}{sup -} the direct CP asymmetry is found to be A{sub CP}(K*{sup {+-}}(892){pi}{sup {-+}}) = -0.18 {+-} 0.10 {+-} 0.04 {+-} 0.00. The relative phases between B{sup 0} {yields} K*{sup +}(892){pi}{sup -} and {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} K*{sup -}(892){pi}{sup +}, relevant for the extraction of the unitarity triangle angle {gamma}, is measured to be {Delta}{phi}(K*(892){pi}) = (34.9 {+-} 23.1 {+-} 7.5 {+-} 4.7){sup o}, where uncertainties are statistical, systematic and model-dependent, respectively. Fit fractions, direct CP asymmetries and the relative phases of different other resonant modes have also been measured. A new method for extracting longitudinal shower development information from longitudinally unsegmented calorimeters is also presented. This method has been implemented as a part of the BABAR final particle identification algorithm. A significant improvement in low momenta muon identification at BABAR is obtained.

  18. Study of Time-Dependent CP Asymmetry in Neutral B Decays to J/ψπ0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Gaillard, J.-M.; Hicheur, A.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Robbe, P.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Palano, A.; Pompili, A.; Chen, J. C.; Qi, N. D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y. S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B.; Abrams, G. S.; Borgland, A. W.; Breon, A. B.; Brown, D. N.; Button-Shafer, J.; Cahn, R. N.; Charles, E.; Gill, M. S.; Gritsan, A. V.; Groysman, Y.; Jacobsen, R. G.; Kadel, R. W.; Kadyk, J.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Kral, J. F.; Kukartsev, G.; Leclerc, C.; Levi, M. E.; Lynch, G.; Mir, L. M.; Oddone, P. J.; Orimoto, T. J.; Pripstein, M.; Roe, N. A.; Romosan, A.; Ronan, M. T.; Shelkov, V. G.; Telnov, A. V.; Wenzel, W. A.; Harrison, T. J.; Hawkes, C. M.; Knowles, D. J.; Penny, R. C.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, N. K.; Deppermann, T.; Goetzen, K.; Koch, H.; Lewandowski, B.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peters, K.; Schmuecker, H.; Steinke, M.; Barlow, N. R.; Bhimji, W.; Boyd, J. T.; Chevalier, N.; Clark, P. J.; Cottingham, W. N.; Mackay, C.; Wilson, F. F.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Thiessen, D.; Kyberd, P.; McKemey, A. K.; Blinov, V. E.; Bukin, A. D.; Golubev, V. B.; Ivanchenko, V. N.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Yushkov, A. N.; Best, D.; Chao, M.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; McMahon, S.; Mommsen, R. K.; Roethel, W.; Stoker, D. P.; Buchanan, C.; Hadavand, H. K.; Hill, E. J.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Paar, H. P.; Rahatlou, Sh.; Schwanke, U.; Sharma, V.; Berryhill, J. W.; Campagnari, C.; Dahmes, B.; Kuznetsova, N.; Levy, S. L.; Long, O.; Lu, A.; Mazur, M. A.; Richman, J. D.; Verkerke, W.; Beringer, J.; Eisner, A. M.; Heusch, C. A.; Lockman, W. S.; Schalk, T.; Schmitz, R. E.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Turri, M.; Walkowiak, W.; Williams, D. C.; Wilson, M. G.; Albert, J.; Chen, E.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dvoretskii, A.; Hitlin, D. G.; Narsky, I.; Porter, F. C.; Ryd, A.; Samuel, A.; Yang, S.; Jayatilleke, S.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Barillari, T.; Blanc, F.; Bloom, P.; Ford, W. T.; Nauenberg, U.; Olivas, A.; Rankin, P.; Roy, J.; Smith, J. G.; van Hoek, W. C.; Zhang, L.; Harton, J. L.; Hu, T.; Soffer, A.; Toki, W. H.; Wilson, R. J.; Zhang, J.; Altenburg, D.; Brandt, T.; Brose, J.; Colberg, T.; Dickopp, M.; Dubitzky, R. S.; Hauke, A.; Lacker, H. M.; Maly, E.; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R.; Nogowski, R.; Otto, S.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Spaan, B.; Wilden, L.; Bernard, D.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Brochard, F.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; T'jampens, S.; Thiebaux, Ch.; Vasileiadis, G.; Verderi, M.; Bernet, R.; Khan, A.; Lavin, D.; Muheim, F.; Playfer, S.; Swain, J. E.; Tinslay, J.; Borean, C.; Bozzi, C.; Piemontese, L.; Sarti, A.; Treadwell, E.; Anulli, F.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Falciai, D.; Finocchiaro, G.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Zallo, A.; Buzzo, A.; Contri, R.; Crosetti, G.; Lo Vetere, M.; Macri, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Pastore, F. C.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Santroni, A.; Tosi, S.; Bailey, S.; Morii, M.; Grenier, G. J.; Lee, S.-J.; Mallik, U.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Lamsa, J.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Yi, J.; Davier, M.; Grosdidier, G.; Höcker, A.; Laplace, S.; Le Diberder, F.; Lepeltier, V.; Lutz, A. M.; Petersen, T. C.; Plaszczynski, S.; Schune, M. H.; Tantot, L.; Wormser, G.; Bionta, R. M.; Brigljević, V.; Cheng, C. H.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Bevan, A. J.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; Kay, M.; Payne, D. J.; Sloane, R. J.; Touramanis, C.; Aspinwall, M. L.; Bowerman, D. A.; Dauncey, P. D.; Egede, U.; Eschrich, I.; Morton, G. W.; Nash, J. A.; Sanders, P.; Taylor, G. P.; Back, J. J.; Bellodi, G.; Harrison, P. F.; Shorthouse, H. W.; Strother, P.; Vidal, P. B.; Cowan, G.; Flaecher, H. U.; George, S.; Green, M. G.; Kurup, A.; Marker, C. E.; McMahon, T. R.; Ricciardi, S.; Salvatore, F.; Vaitsas, G.; Winter, M. A.; Brown, D.; Davis, C. L.; Allison, J.; Barlow, R. J.; Forti, A. C.; Hart, P. A.; Jackson, F.; Lafferty, G. D.; Lyon, A. J.; Weatherall, J. H.; Williams, J. C.; Farbin, A.; Jawahery, A.; Kovalskyi, D.; Lae, C. K.; Lillard, V.; Roberts, D. A.; Blaylock, G.; Dallapiccola, C.; Flood, K. T.; Hertzbach, S. S.; Kofler, R.; Koptchev, V. B.; Moore, T. B.; Staengle, H.; Willocq, S.; Cowan, R.; Sciolla, G.; Taylor, F.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Mangeol, D. J.; Milek, M.; Patel, P. M.; Palombo, F.; Bauer, J. M.; Cremaldi, L.; Eschenburg, V.; Kroeger, R.; Reidy, J.; Sanders, D. A.; Summers, D. J.; Zhao, H. W.; Hast, C.; Taras, P.; Nicholson, H.; Cartaro, C.; Cavallo, N.; De Nardo, G.; Fabozzi, F.; Gatto, C.; Lista, L.; Paolucci, P.; Piccolo, D.; Sciacca, C.; Baak, M. A.; Raven, G.; Losecco, J. M.; Gabriel, T. A.; Brau, B.; Pulliam, T.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Iwasaki, M.; Potter, C. T.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Torrence, E.; Colecchia, F.; Dorigo, A.; Galeazzi, F.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Tiozzo, G.; Voci, C.; Benayoun, M.; Briand, H.; Chauveau, J.; David, P.; de La Vaissière, Ch.; Del Buono, L.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Ocariz, J.; Pivk, M.; Roos, L.; Stark, J.; Manfredi, P. F.; Re, V.; Gladney, L.; Guo, Q. H.; Panetta, J.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bondioli, M.; Bucci, F.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Marchiori, G.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Morganti, M.; Neri, N.; Paoloni, E.; Rama, M.; Rizzo, G.; Sandrelli, F.; Triggiani, G.; Walsh, J.; Haire, M.; Judd, D.; Paick, K.; Wagoner, D. E.; Danielson, N.; Elmer, P.; Lu, C.; Miftakov, V.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J.; Varnes, E. W.; Bellini, F.; Cavoto, G.; del Re, D.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Leonardi, E.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Morganti, S.; Pierini, M.; Piredda, G.; Tehrani, F. Safai; Serra, M.; Voena, C.; Christ, S.; Wagner, G.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; De Groot, N.; Franek, B.; Geddes, N. I.; Gopal, G. P.; Olaiya, E. O.; Xella, S. M.; Aleksan, R.; Emery, S.; Gaidot, A.; Ganzhur, S. F.; Giraud, P.-F.; de Monchenault, G. Hamel; Kozanecki, W.; Langer, M.; London, G. W.; Mayer, B.; Schott, G.; Vasseur, G.; Yeche, Ch.; Zito, M.; Purohit, M. V.; Weidemann, A. W.; Yumiceva, F. X.; Aston, D.; Bartoldus, R.; Berger, N.; Boyarski, A. M.; Buchmueller, O. L.; Convery, M. R.; Coupal, D. P.; Dong, D.; Dorfan, J.; Dunwoodie, W.; Field, R. C.; Glanzman, T.; Gowdy, S. J.; Grauges-Pous, E.; Hadig, T.; Halyo, V.; Hryn'ova, T.; Innes, W. R.; Jessop, C. P.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Langenegger, U.; Leith, D. W.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; Marsiske, H.; Menke, S.; Messner, R.; Muller, D. R.; O'Grady, C. P.; Ozcan, V. E.; Perazzo, A.; Perl, M.; Petrak, S.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Robertson, S. H.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schietinger, T.; Schindler, R. H.; Schwiening, J.; Simi, G.; Snyder, A.; Soha, A.; Stelzer, J.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Tanaka, H. A.; Va'Vra, J.; Wagner, S. R.; Weaver, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wright, D. H.; Young, C. C.; Burchat, P. R.; Meyer, T. I.; Roat, C.; Ahmed, S.; Bugg, W.; Krishnamurthy, M.; Spanier, S. M.; Eckmann, R.; Kim, H.; Ritchie, J. L.; Schwitters, R. F.; Izen, J. M.; Kitayama, I.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; Bona, M.; Gamba, D.; Bosisio, L.; Della Ricca, G.; Dittongo, S.; Grancagnolo, S.; Lanceri, L.; Poropat, P.; Vitale, L.; Vuagnin, G.; Panvini, R. S.; Banerjee, Sw.; Brown, C. M.; Fortin, D.; Jackson, P. D.; Kowalewski, R.; Roney, J. M.; Band, H. R.; Dasu, S.; Datta, M.; Eichenbaum, A. M.; Hu, H.; Johnson, J. R.; Liu, R.; Di Lodovico, F.; Mohapatra, A. K.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Sekula, S. J.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Wu, J.; Wu, S. L.; Yu, Z.; Neal, H.

    2003-08-01

    We present the first study of the time-dependent CP-violating asymmetry in B0→J/ψπ0 decays using e+e- annihilation data collected with the BABAR detector at the ϒ(4S) resonance during the years 1999 2002 at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory at SLAC. Using approximately 88×106 BB¯ pairs, our results for the coefficients of the cosine and sine terms of the CP asymmetry are CJ/ψπ0=0.38±0.41(stat)±0.09(syst) and SJ/ψπ0=0.05±0.49(stat)±0.16(syst).

  19. Impact of Interface Recombination on Time Resolved Photoluminescence (TRPL) Decays in CdTe Solar Cells (Numerical Simulation Analysis): Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Kanevce, A.; Kuciauskas, D.; Gessert, T. A.; Levi, D. H.; Albin, D. S.

    2012-06-01

    Using Sentaurus Device Software, we analyze how bulk and interface recombination affect time-resolved photoluminescence (TRPL) decays in CdTe solar cells. This modeling analysis could improve the interpretation of TRPL data and increase the possibility of rapid defect characterization in thin-film solar cells. By illuminating the samples with photons of two different wavelengths, we try to deduce the spatial origin of the dominant recombination loss. Shorter-wavelength photons will be more affected by the interface recombination and drift compared to the longer ones. Using the two-wavelength TRPL characterization method, it may be possible to determine whether a specific change in deposition process has affected the properties of interface or the bulk of the absorber.

  20. Impact of Interface Recombination on Time Resolved Photoluminescence Decays (TRPL) in CdTe Solar Cells (Numerical Simulation Analysis) (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Kanevce, A.; Kuciauskas, D.; Gessert, T. A.; Levi, D. H.; Albin, D. S.

    2012-06-01

    Using Sentaurus Device Software, we analyze how bulk and interface recombination affect time-resolved photoluminescence (TRPL) decays in CdTe solar cells. This modeling analysis could improve the interpretation of TRPL data and increase the possibility of rapid defect characterization in thin-film solar cells. By illuminating the samples with photons of two different wavelengths, we try to deduce the spatial origin of the dominant recombination loss. Shorter-wavelength photons will be more affected by the interface recombination and drift compared to the longer ones. Using the two-wavelength TRPL characterization method, it may be possible to determine whether a specific change in deposition process has affected the properties of interface or the bulk of the absorber.

  1. Selective excitation of tryptophan fluorescence decay in proteins using a subnanosecond 295 nm light-emitting diode and time-correlated single-photon counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuinness, Colin D.; Sagoo, Kulwinder; McLoskey, David; Birch, David J. S.

    2005-06-01

    We demonstrate an AlGaN light-emitting diode (LED) giving pulses of ˜600ps full width half maximum, 0.35μW average power, 0.6mW peak power, and ˜12nm bandwidth at 295nm. This source is ideal for protein intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence decay research without the unwanted excitation of tyrosine and paves the way to lab-on-a-chip protein assays using fluorescence decay times. Fluorescence decay and anisotropy decay measurements of human serum albumin are reported and the usefulness of the 295nm LED demonstrated in comparisons with a nanosecond flashlamp and LEDs with nominal wavelength emission of 280nm.

  2. Measurement of Time-Dependent CP Asymmetries and Constraints on sin((2β+γ) with Partial Reconstruction of B0→D*∓π± Decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Gaillard, J.-M.; Hicheur, A.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Robbe, P.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Palano, A.; Pompili, A.; Chen, J. C.; Qi, N. D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y. S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B.; Abrams, G. S.; Borgland, A. W.; Breon, A. B.; Brown, D. N.; Button-Shafer, J.; Cahn, R. N.; Charles, E.; Day, C. T.; Gill, M. S.; Gritsan, A. V.; Groysman, Y.; Jacobsen, R. G.; Kadel, R. W.; Kadyk, J.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Kukartsev, G.; Leclerc, C.; Levi, M. E.; Lynch, G.; Mir, L. M.; Oddone, P. J.; Orimoto, T. J.; Pripstein, M.; Roe, N. A.; Romosan, A.; Ronan, M. T.; Shelkov, V. G.; Telnov, A. V.; Wenzel, W. A.; Ford, K.; Harrison, T. J.; Hawkes, C. M.; Knowles, D. J.; Morgan, S. E.; Penny, R. C.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, N. K.; Goetzen, K.; Held, T.; Koch, H.; Lewandowski, B.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peters, K.; Schmuecker, H.; Steinke, M.; Boyd, J. T.; Chevalier, N.; Cottingham, W. N.; Kelly, M. P.; Latham, T. E.; Mackay, C.; Wilson, F. F.; Abe, K.; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Thiessen, D.; Kyberd, P.; McKemey, A. K.; Teodorescu, L.; Blinov, V. E.; Bukin, A. D.; Golubev, V. B.; Ivanchenko, V. N.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Yushkov, A. N.; Best, D.; Bruinsma, M.; Chao, M.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Mommsen, R. K.; Roethel, W.; Stoker, D. P.; Buchanan, C.; Hartfiel, B. L.; Gary, J. W.; Layter, J.; Shen, B. C.; Wang, K.; del Re, D.; Hadavand, H. K.; Hill, E. J.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Paar, H. P.; Rahatlou, Sh.; Sharma, V.; Berryhill, J. W.; Campagnari, C.; Dahmes, B.; Levy, S. L.; Long, O.; Lu, A.; Mazur, M. A.; Richman, J. D.; Verkerke, W.; Beck, T. W.; Beringer, J.; Eisner, A. M.; Heusch, C. A.; Lockman, W. S.; Schalk, T.; Schmitz, R. E.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Spradlin, P.; Turri, M.; Walkowiak, W.; Williams, D. C.; Wilson, M. G.; Albert, J.; Chen, E.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dvoretskii, A.; Erwin, R. J.; Hitlin, D. G.; Narsky, I.; Piatenko, T.; Porter, F. C.; Ryd, A.; Samuel, A.; Yang, S.; Jayatilleke, S.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Abe, T.; Blanc, F.; Bloom, P.; Chen, S.; Clark, P. J.; Ford, W. T.; Nauenberg, U.; Olivas, A.; Rankin, P.; Roy, J.; Smith, J. G.; van Hoek, W. C.; Zhang, L.; Harton, J. L.; Hu, T.; Soffer, A.; Toki, W. H.; Wilson, R. J.; Zhang, J.; Altenburg, D.; Brandt, T.; Brose, J.; Colberg, T.; Dickopp, M.; Dubitzky, R. S.; Hauke, A.; Lacker, H. M.; Maly, E.; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R.; Nogowski, R.; Otto, S.; Schubert, J.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Spaan, B.; Wilden, L.; Bernard, D.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Brochard, F.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Grenier, P.; Thiebaux, Ch.; Vasileiadis, G.; Verderi, M.; Khan, A.; Lavin, D.; Muheim, F.; Playfer, S.; Swain, J. E.; Andreotti, M.; Azzolini, V.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Luppi, E.; Negrini, M.; Piemontese, L.; Sarti, A.; Treadwell, E.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Falciai, D.; Finocchiaro, G.; Patteri, P.; Piccolo, M.; Zallo, A.; Buzzo, A.; Capra, R.; Contri, R.; Crosetti, G.; Vetere, M. Lo; Macri, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Santroni, A.; Tosi, S.; Bailey, S.; Morii, M.; Won, E.; Bhimji, W.; Bowerman, D. A.; Dauncey, P. D.; Egede, U.; Eschrich, I.; Gaillard, J. R.; Morton, G. W.; Nash, J. A.; Taylor, G. P.; Grenier, G. J.; Lee, S.-J.; Mallik, U.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Lamsa, J.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Yi, J.; Davier, M.; Grosdidier, G.; Höcker, A.; Laplace, S.; Diberder, F. Le; Lepeltier, V.; Lutz, A. M.; Petersen, T. C.; Plaszczynski, S.; Schune, M. H.; Tantot, L.; Wormser, G.; Brigljević, V.; Cheng, C. H.; Lange, D. J.; Simani, M. C.; Wright, D. M.; Bevan, A. J.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; Kay, M.; Parry, R. J.; Payne, D. J.; Sloane, R. J.; Touramanis, C.; Back, J. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Shorthouse, H. W.; Vidal, P. B.; Brown, C. L.; Cowan, G.; Flack, R. L.; Flaecher, H. U.; George, S.; Green, M. G.; Kurup, A.; Marker, C. E.; McMahon, T. R.; Ricciardi, S.; Salvatore, F.; Vaitsas, G.; Winter, M. A.; Brown, D.; Davis, C. L.; Allison, J.; Barlow, N. R.; Barlow, R. J.; Hart, P. A.; Hodgkinson, M. C.; Jackson, F.; Lafferty, G. D.; Lyon, A. J.; Weatherall, J. H.; Williams, J. C.; Farbin, A.; Jawahery, A.; Kovalskyi, D.; Lae, C. K.; Lillard, V.; Roberts, D. A.; Blaylock, G.; Dallapiccola, C.; Flood, K. T.; Hertzbach, S. S.; Kofler, R.; Koptchev, V. B.; Moore, T. B.; Saremi, S.; Staengle, H.; Willocq, S.; Cowan, R.; Sciolla, G.; Taylor, F.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Mangeol, D. J.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Lazzaro, A.; Palombo, F.; Bauer, J. M.; Cremaldi, L.; Eschenburg, V.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Reidy, J.; Sanders, D. A.; Summers, D. J.; Zhao, H. W.; Brunet, S.; Cote-Ahern, D.; Taras, P.; Nicholson, H.; Cartaro, C.; Cavallo, N.; Nardo, G. De; Fabozzi, F.; Gatto, C.; Lista, L.; Paolucci, P.; Piccolo, D.; Sciacca, C.; Baak, M. A.; Raven, G.; Losecco, J. M.; Gabriel, T. A.; Brau, B.; Gan, K. K.; Honscheid, K.; Hufnagel, D.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Pulliam, T.; Wong, Q. K.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Igonkina, O.; Potter, C. T.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Torrence, E.; Colecchia, F.; Dorigo, A.; Galeazzi, F.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Tiozzo, G.; Voci, C.; Benayoun, M.; Briand, H.; Chauveau, J.; David, P.; de La Vaissière, Ch.; del Buono, L.; Hamon, O.; John, M. J.; Leruste, Ph.; Ocariz, J.; Pivk, M.; Roos, L.; Stark, J.; T'jampens, S.; Therin, G.; Manfredi, P. F.; Re, V.; Behera, P. K.; Gladney, L.; Guo, Q. H.; Panetta, J.; Anulli, F.; Biasini, M.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Pioppi, M.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bondioli, M.; Bucci, F.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; del Gamba, V.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Marchiori, G.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Morganti, M.; Neri, N.; Paoloni, E.; Rama, M.; Rizzo, G.; Sandrelli, F.; Walsh, J.; Haire, M.; Judd, D.; Paick, K.; Wagoner, D. E.; Danielson, N.; Elmer, P.; Lu, C.; Miftakov, V.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J.; Tanaka, H. A.; Varnes, E. W.; Bellini, F.; Cavoto, G.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Morganti, S.; Pierini, M.; Piredda, G.; Tehrani, F. Safai; Voena, C.; Christ, S.; Wagner, G.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; de Groot, N.; Franek, B.; Geddes, N. I.; Gopal, G. P.; Olaiya, E. O.; Xella, S. M.; Aleksan, R.; Emery, S.; Gaidot, A.; Ganzhur, S. F.; Giraud, P.-F.; de Monchenault, G. Hamel; Kozanecki, W.; Langer, M.; Legendre, M.; London, G. W.; Mayer, B.; Schott, G.; Vasseur, G.; Yeche, Ch.; Zito, M.; Purohit, M. V.; Weidemann, A. W.; Yumiceva, F. X.; Aston, D.; Bartoldus, R.; Berger, N.; Boyarski, A. M.; Buchmueller, O. L.; Convery, M. R.; Cristinziani, M.; Dong, D.; Dorfan, J.; Dujmic, D.; Dunwoodie, W.; Elsen, E. E.; Field, R. C.; Glanzman, T.; Gowdy, S. J.; Grauges-Pous, E.; Hadig, T.; Halyo, V.; Hryn'ova, T.; Innes, W. R.; Jessop, C. P.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Langenegger, U.; Leith, D. W.; Libby, J.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; Marsiske, H.; Messner, R.; Muller, D. R.; O'Grady, C. P.; Ozcan, V. E.; Perazzo, A.; Perl, M.; Petrak, S.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Schwiening, J.; Simi, G.; Snyder, A.; Soha, A.; Stelzer, J.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Va'Vra, J.; Wagner, S. R.; Weaver, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wright, D. H.; Young, C. C.; Burchat, P. R.; Edwards, A. J.; Meyer, T. I.; Petersen, B. A.; Roat, C.; Ahmed, M.; Ahmed, S.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Saeed, M. A.; Saleem, M.; Wappler, F. R.; Bugg, W.; Krishnamurthy, M.; Spanier, S. M.; Eckmann, R.; Kim, H.; Ritchie, J. L.; Schwitters, R. F.; Izen, J. M.; Kitayama, I.; Lou, X. C.; Ye, S.; Bianchi, F.; Bona, M.; Gallo, F.; Gamba, D.; Borean, C.; Bosisio, L.; della Ricca, G.; Dittongo, S.; Grancagnolo, S.; Lanceri, L.; Poropat, P.; Vitale, L.; Vuagnin, G.; Panvini, R. S.; Banerjee, Sw.; Brown, C. M.; Fortin, D.; Jackson, P. D.; Kowalewski, R.; Roney, J. M.; Band, H. R.; Dasu, S.; Datta, M.; Eichenbaum, A. M.; Johnson, J. R.; Kutter, P. E.; Li, H.; Liu, R.; di Lodovico, F.; Mihalyi, A.; Mohapatra, A. K.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Sekula, S. J.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Wu, J.; Wu, S. L.; Yu, Z.; Neal, H.

    2004-06-01

    We present a measurement of time-dependent CP-violating asymmetries in decays of neutral B mesons to the final states D*∓π±, using approximately 82×106 BB¯ events recorded by the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II e+e- storage ring. Events containing these decays are selected with a partial reconstruction technique, in which only the high-momentum π± from the B decay and the low-momentum π∓ from the D*∓ decay are used. We measure the amplitude of the asymmetry to be -0.063±0.024(stat)±0.014(syst) and compute bounds on |sin((2β+γ)|.

  3. Real-Time Mapping alert system; characteristics and capabilities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Torres, L.A.; Lambert, S.C.; Liebermann, T.D.

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey has an extensive hydrologic network that records and transmits precipitation, stage, discharge, and other water-related data on a real-time basis to an automated data processing system. Data values are recorded on electronic data collection platforms at field sampling sites. These values are transmitted by means of orbiting satellites to receiving ground stations, and by way of telecommunication lines to a U.S. Geological Survey office where they are processed on a computer system. Data that exceed predefined thresholds are identified as alert values. The current alert status at monitoring sites within a state or region is of critical importance during floods, hurricanes, and other extreme hydrologic events. This report describes the characteristics and capabilities of a series of computer programs for real-time mapping of hydrologic data. The software provides interactive graphics display and query of hydrologic information from the network in a real-time, map-based, menu-driven environment.

  4. Decay times of transitionally dense specularly reflecting meteor trails and potential chemical impact on trail lifetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hocking, Wayne K.; Silber, Reynold E.; Plane, John M. C.; Feng, Wuhu; Garbanzo-Salas, Marcial

    2016-12-01

    Studies of transitionally dense meteor trails using radars which employ specularly reflecting interferometric techniques are used to show that measurable high-temperature chemistry exists at timescales of a few tenths of a second after the formation of these trails. This is a process which is distinct from the ambient-temperature chemistry that is already known to exist at timescales of tens of seconds and longer in long-lived trails. As a consequence, these transitionally dense trails have smaller lifetimes than might be expected if diffusion were the only mechanism for reducing the mean trail electron density. The process has been studied with four SKiYMET radars at latitudes varying from 10 to 75° N, over a period of more than 10 years, 24 h per day. In this paper we present the best parameters to use to represent this behaviour and demonstrate the characteristics of the temporal and latitudinal variability in these parameters. The seasonal, day-night and latitudinal variations correlate reasonably closely with the corresponding variations of ozone in the upper mesosphere. Possible reasons for these effects are discussed, but further investigations of any causative relation are still the subject of ongoing studies.

  5. Time since death and decay rate constants of Norway spruce and European larch deadwood in subalpine forests determined using dendrochronology and radiocarbon dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrillo, Marta; Cherubini, Paolo; Fravolini, Giulia; Marchetti, Marco; Ascher-Jenull, Judith; Schärer, Michael; Synal, Hans-Arno; Bertoldi, Daniela; Camin, Federica; Larcher, Roberto; Egli, Markus

    2016-03-01

    Due to the large size (e.g. sections of tree trunks) and highly heterogeneous spatial distribution of deadwood, the timescales involved in the coarse woody debris (CWD) decay of Picea abies (L.) Karst. and Larix decidua Mill. in Alpine forests are largely unknown. We investigated the CWD decay dynamics in an Alpine valley in Italy using the chronosequence approach and the five-decay class system that is based on a macromorphological assessment. For the decay classes 1-3, most of the dendrochronological samples were cross-dated to assess the time that had elapsed since tree death, but for decay classes 4 and 5 (poorly preserved tree rings) radiocarbon dating was used. In addition, density, cellulose, and lignin data were measured for the dated CWD. The decay rate constants for spruce and larch were estimated on the basis of the density loss using a single negative exponential model, a regression approach, and the stage-based matrix model. In the decay classes 1-3, the ages of the CWD were similar and varied between 1 and 54 years for spruce and 3 and 40 years for larch, with no significant differences between the classes; classes 1-3 are therefore not indicative of deadwood age. This seems to be due to a time lag between the death of a standing tree and its contact with the soil. We found distinct tree-species-specific differences in decay classes 4 and 5, with larch CWD reaching an average age of 210 years in class 5 and spruce only 77 years. The mean CWD rate constants were estimated to be in the range 0.018 to 0.022 y-1 for spruce and to about 0.012 y-1 for larch. Snapshot sampling (chronosequences) may overestimate the age and mean residence time of CWD. No sampling bias was, however, detectable using the stage-based matrix model. Cellulose and lignin time trends could be derived on the basis of the ages of the CWD. The half-lives for cellulose were 21 years for spruce and 50 years for larch. The half-life of lignin is considerably higher and may be more than

  6. A New Neutron Time-of-Flight Array for β-Decay Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sénoville, M.; Delaunay, F.; Achouri, N. L.; Pârlog, M.; Orr, N. A.; Cano-Ott, D.; Carniol, B.; Étasse, D.; Fontbonne, C.; Fontbonne, J. M.; Gibelin, J.; Hommet, J.; Laurent, B.; Ledoux, X.; Marqués, F. M.; Martínez, T.; De Séréville, N.

    A new time-of-flight array for β-delayed neutron spectroscopy (En < 5 MeV) is being developed with the aim of improved performance compared to existing arrays. We report on the status of this development, in particular the study of the n-γ discrimination quality with digital electronics, a comparison of several organic scintillators, including new discriminating plastics, as well as the characterisation of detectors with monoenergetic neutrons to measure intrinsic efficiencies and cross-talk probabilities.

  7. Measurements of branching fractions and time-dependent CP violating asymmetries in B0→D(*)±D∓ decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Röhrken, M.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Asner, D. M.; Aulchenko, V.; Aushev, T.; Bakich, A. M.; Barrett, M.; Belous, K.; Bhardwaj, V.; Bhuyan, B.; Bischofberger, M.; Bondar, A.; Bonvicini, G.; Bozek, A.; Bračko, M.; Brovchenko, O.; Browder, T. E.; Chang, M.-C.; Chen, A.; Chen, P.; Cheon, B. G.; Chilikin, K.; Cho, I.-S.; Cho, K.; Choi, Y.; Dalseno, J.; Doležal, Z.; Drásal, Z.; Drutskoy, A.; Eidelman, S.; Fast, J. E.; Feindt, M.; Gaur, V.; Gabyshev, N.; Garmash, A.; Goh, Y. M.; Haba, J.; Hayashii, H.; Horii, Y.; Hoshi, Y.; Hou, W.-S.; Hsiung, Y. B.; Hyun, H. J.; Iijima, T.; Ishikawa, A.; Itoh, R.; Iwabuchi, M.; Iwasaki, Y.; Julius, T.; Kang, J. H.; Kawasaki, T.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, H. O.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, K. T.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinoshita, K.; Ko, B. R.; Koblitz, S.; Kodyš, P.; Korpar, S.; Kouzes, R. T.; Križan, P.; Krokovny, P.; Kronenbitter, B.; Kuhr, T.; Kumita, T.; Kwon, Y.-J.; Lee, S.-H.; Li, J.; Li, Y.; Libby, J.; Liu, C.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Z. Q.; Liventsev, D.; Louvot, R.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyata, H.; Mizuk, R.; Mohanty, G. B.; Moll, A.; Mori, T.; Muramatsu, N.; Nagasaka, Y.; Nakano, E.; Nakao, M.; Natkaniec, Z.; Nishida, S.; Nitoh, O.; Ogawa, S.; Ohshima, T.; Okuno, S.; Olsen, S. L.; Ozaki, H.; Pakhlova, G.; Park, C. W.; Park, H.; Park, H. K.; Park, K. S.; Pedlar, T. K.; Pestotnik, R.; Petrič, M.; Piilonen, L. E.; Poluektov, A.; Prim, M.; Prothmann, K.; Ritter, M.; Ryu, S.; Sahoo, H.; Sakai, Y.; Sanuki, T.; Sato, Y.; Schneider, O.; Schwanda, C.; Schwartz, A. J.; Senyo, K.; Seon, O.; Sevior, M. E.; Shapkin, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shiu, J.-G.; Shwartz, B.; Sibidanov, A.; Simon, F.; Singh, J. B.; Smerkol, P.; Sohn, Y.-S.; Sokolov, A.; Solovieva, E.; Stanič, S.; Starič, M.; Sumisawa, K.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Trabelsi, K.; Uchida, M.; Uehara, S.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Urquijo, P.; Vanhoefer, P.; Varner, G.; Varvell, K. E.; Vorobyev, V.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, M.-Z.; Wang, P.; Watanabe, M.; Watanabe, Y.; Williams, K. M.; Won, E.; Yamamoto, H.; Yamashita, Y.; Zander, D.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zhulanov, V.; Zupanc, A.

    2012-05-01

    We report measurements of branching fractions and time-dependent CP asymmetries in B0→D+D- and B0→D*±D∓ decays using a data sample that contains (772±11)×106BB¯ pairs collected at the Υ(4S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e+e- collider. We determine the branching fractions to be B(B0→D+D-)=(2.12±0.16±0.18)×10-4 and B(B0→D*±D∓)=(6.14±0.29±0.50)×10-4. We measure CP asymmetry parameters SD+D-=-1.06-0.14+0.21±0.08 and CD+D-=-0.43±0.16±0.05 in B0→D+D- and AD*D=+0.06±0.05±0.02, SD*D=-0.78±0.15±0.05, CD*D=-0.01±0.11±0.04, ΔSD*D=-0.13±0.15±0.04 and ΔCD*D=+0.12±0.11±0.03 in B0→D*±D∓, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. We exclude the conservation of CP symmetry in both decays at equal to or greater than 4σ significance.

  8. The Effect of Time on Word Learning: An Examination of Decay of the Memory Trace and Vocal Rehearsal in Children with and without Specific Language Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alt, Mary; Spaulding, Tammie

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to measure the effect of time to response in a fast-mapping word learning task for children with specific language impairment (SLI) and children with typically developing language skills (TD). Manipulating time to response allows us to examine decay of the memory trace, the use of vocal rehearsal, and their…

  9. Decay characteristics of once-through LWR and LMFBR spent fuels, high-level wastes, and fuel-assembly structural material wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Croff, A.G.; Alexander, C.W.

    1980-11-01

    The decay characteristics of spent fuel, high-level waste, and fuel-assembly structural material (cladding) waste are presented in the form of ORIGEN2 output tables for (1) a pressurized water reactor operating on a once-through cycle with low-enrichment uranium feed, (2) a boiling-water reactor operating on a once-through cycle with low-enrichment uranium feed, and (3) a liquid-metal fast breeder reactor being fueled with depleted uranium enriched with discharged light water reactor plutonium on a once-through basis. The decay characteristics given include the mass (g), radioactivity (Ci), thermal power (W), photon activity (photons/s and MeV/W-s in 18 energy groups), and neutron activity (neutrons/s) from (..cap alpha..,n) and spontaneous fission events. The first three characteristics are given for each element and for the principal nuclide contributors to the activation products, actinides, and fission products. Also included are a summary description of the ORIGEN2 reactor models that form the basis for the calculated results and a physical description of the fuel assemblies for the three reactors.

  10. Modification of a method-of-characteristics solute-transport model to incorporate decay and equilibrium-controlled sorption or ion exchange

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goode, D.J.; Konikow, L.F.

    1989-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey computer model of two-dimensional solute transport and dispersion in ground water (Konikow and Bredehoeft, 1978) has been modified to incorporate the following types of chemical reactions: (1) first-order irreversible rate-reaction, such as radioactive decay; (2) reversible equilibrium-controlled sorption with linear, Freundlich, or Langmuir isotherms; and (3) reversible equilibrium-controlled ion exchange for monovalent or divalent ions. Numerical procedures are developed to incorporate these processes in the general solution scheme that uses method-of- characteristics with particle tracking for advection and finite-difference methods for dispersion. The first type of reaction is accounted for by an exponential decay term applied directly to the particle concentration. The second and third types of reactions are incorporated through a retardation factor, which is a function of concentration for nonlinear cases. The model is evaluated and verified by comparison with analytical solutions for linear sorption and decay, and by comparison with other numerical solutions for nonlinear sorption and ion exchange.

  11. Luminescence and decay times of Eu(III) and Nd(III) in polymer electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Carlos, L.D.; Assuncao, M.

    1996-08-01

    Time resolved spectroscopy of poly(ethylene) oxide (PEO) and poly(propylene) oxide (PPO) electrolytes containing different concentrations of Eu{sup 3+} and Nd{sup 3+} ions is reported. A description of the main luminescence features of the Nd{sup 3+} electrolytes is also presented. Lifetimes regarding the main transitions of the luminescence spectra ({sup 5}D{sub 0}{r_arrow}{sup 7}F{sub 1,2} and {sup 4}D{sub 3/2}{r_arrow}{sup 4}I{sub 11/2} for Eu{sup 3+} and Nd{sup 3+}, respectively) are determined and are presented as a function of temperature in the range of 13 to 310 K. The order of magnitude of the values obtained at room temperature (0.2{endash}0.6 ms and {approx_equal}0.7 ms for Eu{sup 3+} and Nd{sup 3+}, respectively), is a further indication of the technological potential of these new polymeric materials. For the Eu{sup 3+} ion the thermally activated quenching of the {sup 5}D{sub 0}{r_arrow}{sup 7}F{sub 2} luminescence is discussed in terms of the observed energy superposition between the {sup 5}D{sub 0,1} levels and the ligands-to-metal charge-transfer states. {copyright} {ital 1996 Materials Research Society.}

  12. Measurement of Time-Dependent CP-Violating Asymmetries in B^0 Meson Decays to eta' K^0_L

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Prairie View A-M /Princeton U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Stony Brook /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Vanderbilt U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Yale U.

    2005-08-23

    The authors present a preliminary measurement of CP-violating parameters S and C from fits of the time-dependence of B{sup 0} meson decays to {eta}'K{sub L}{sup 0}. The data were recorded with the BABAR detector at PEP-II and correspond to 232 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs produced in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation through the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance. By fitting the time-dependent CP asymmetry of the reconstructed B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}'K{sub L}{sup 0} events, they find S = 0.60 {+-} 0.31 {+-} 0.04 and C = 0.10 {+-} 0.21 {+-} 0.03, where the first error quoted is statistical and the second is systematic. They also perform a combined fit using both {eta}'K{sub S}{sup 0} and {eta}'K{sub L}{sup 0} data, and find S = 0.36 {+-} 0.13 {+-} 0.03 and C = -0.16 {+-} 0.09 {+-} 0.02.

  13. Search for heavy, long-lived neutralinos that decay to photons at CDF II using photon timing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M. G.; González, B. Álvarez; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Ashmanskas, W.; Attal, A.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Azzurri, P.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Bartsch, V.; Bauer, G.; Beauchemin, P.-H.; Bedeschi, F.; Bednar, P.; Beecher, D.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Beringer, J.; Bhatti, A.; Binkley, M.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Blair, R. E.; Blocker, C.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Boisvert, V.; Bolla, G.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brau, B.; Bridgeman, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brubaker, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Budd, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Byrum, K. L.; Cabrera, S.; Calancha, C.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chang, S. H.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chou, J. P.; Choudalakis, G.; Chuang, S. H.; Chung, K.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Ciobanu, C. I.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clark, D.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Copic, K.; Cordelli, M.; Cortiana, G.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Almenar, C. Cuenca; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Cully, J. C.; Dagenhart, D.; Datta, M.; Davies, T.; de Barbaro, P.; de Cecco, S.; Deisher, A.; de Lorenzo, G.; Dell'Orso, M.; Deluca, C.; Demortier, L.; Deng, J.; Deninno, M.; Derwent, P. F.; di Giovanni, G. P.; Dionisi, C.; di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D'Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Donini, J.; Dorigo, T.; Dube, S.; Efron, J.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Eusebi, R.; Fang, H. C.; Farrington, S.; Fedorko, W. T.; Feild, R. G.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Ferrazza, C.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Frisch, H.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Galyardt, J.; Garberson, F.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Geffert, P.; Genser, K.; Gerberich, H.; Gerdes, D.; Gessler, A.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Gimmell, J. L.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M.; Giromini, P.; Giunta, M.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gresele, A.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Grundler, U.; da Costa, J. Guimaraes; Gunay-Unalan, Z.; Haber, C.; Hahn, K.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Han, B.-Y.; Han, J. Y.; Handler, R.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harper, S.; Harr, R. F.; Harris, R. M.; Hartz, M.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hauser, J.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heijboer, A.; Heinemann, B.; Heinrich, J.; Henderson, C.; Herndon, M.; Heuser, J.; Hewamanage, S.; Hidas, D.; Hill, C. S.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hocker, A.; Hou, S.; Houlden, M.; Hsu, S.-C.; Huffman, B. T.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Huston, J.; Incandela, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jha, M. K.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, W.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, J. E.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Kar, D.; Karchin, P. E.; Kato, Y.; Kephart, R.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirsch, L.; Klimenko, S.; Knuteson, B.; Ko, B. R.; Koay, S. A.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Krumnack, N.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kubo, T.; Kuhr, T.; Kulkarni, N. P.; Kurata, M.; Kusakabe, Y.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; Lecompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, S. W.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Lin, C. S.; Linacre, J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, T.; Lockyer, N. S.; Loginov, A.; Loreti, M.; Lovas, L.; Lu, R.-S.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Luci, C.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lyons, L.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Lytken, E.; Mack, P.; MacQueen, D.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Makhoul, K.; Maki, T.; Maksimovic, P.; Malde, S.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Marino, C. P.; Martin, A.; Martin, V.; Martínez, M.; Martínez-Ballarín, R.; Maruyama, T.; Mastrandrea, P.; Masubuchi, T.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Menzione, A.; Merkel, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Miladinovic, N.; Miller, R.; Mills, C.; Milnik, M.; Mitra, A.; Mitselmakher, G.; Miyake, H.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlok, J.; Fernandez, P. Movilla; Mülmenstädt, J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Mumford, R.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Nagano, A.; Naganoma, J.; Nakamura, K.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Necula, V.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Norman, M.; Norniella, O.; Nurse, E.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Griso, S. Pagan; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Papaikonomou, A.; Paramonov, A. A.; Parks, B.; Pashapour, S.; Patel, R.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pinera, L.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poukhov, O.; Pounder, N.; Prakoshyn, F.; Pronko, A.; Proudfoot, J.; Ptohos, F.; Pueschel, E.; Punzi, G.; Pursley, J.; Rademacker, J.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo, I.; Reisert, B.; Rekovic, V.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Richter, S.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Rossi, M.; Rossin, R.; Roy, P.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Saarikko, H.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Saltó, O.; Santi, L.; Sarkar, S.; Sartori, L.; Sato, K.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Scheidle, T.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schmidt, M. A.; Schmidt, M. P.; Schmitt, M.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scott, A. L.; Scribano, A.; Scuri, F.; Sedov, A.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sexton-Kennedy, L.; Sfyrla, A.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Sherman, D.; Shimojima, M.; Shiraishi, S.; Shochet, M.; Shon, Y.; Shreyber, I.; Sidoti, A.; Sinervo, P.; Sisakyan, A.; Slaughter, A. J.; Slaunwhite, J.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Snihur, R.; Soha, A.; Somalwar, S.; Sorin, V.; Spalding, J.; Spreitzer, T.; Squillacioti, P.; Stanitzki, M.; Denis, R. St.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Stuart, D.; Suh, J. S.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Suzuki, T.; Taffard, A.; Takashima, R.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, R.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Terashi, K.; Thom, J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thompson, G. A.; Thomson, E.; Tipton, P.; Tiwari, V.; Tkaczyk, S.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Tourneur, S.; Tu, Y.; Turini, N.; Ukegawa, F.; Vallecorsa, S.; van Remortel, N.; Varganov, A.; Vataga, E.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Veszpremi, V.; Vidal, M.; Vidal, R.; Vila, I.; Vilar, R.; Vine, T.; Vogel, M.; Volobouev, I.; Volpi, G.; Würthwein, F.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. G.; Wagner, R. L.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wagner, W.; Wakisaka, T.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Weinberger, M.; Wester, W. C., III; Whitehouse, B.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wicklund, E.; Williams, G.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, C.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wynne, S. M.; Yagil, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamaoka, J.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W. M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Yu, S. S.; Yun, J. C.; Zanello, L.; Zanetti, A.; Zaw, I.; Zhang, X.; Zheng, Y.; Zucchelli, S.

    2008-08-01

    We present the results of the first hadron collider search for heavy, long-lived neutralinos that decay via χ˜10→γ Gtilde in gauge-mediated supersymmetry breaking models. Using an integrated luminosity of 570±34pb-1 of p pmacr collisions at s=1.96TeV, we select γ+jet+missingtransverseenergy candidate events based on the arrival time of a high-energy photon at the electromagnetic calorimeter as measured with a timing system that was recently installed on the CDF II detector. We find 2 events, consistent with the background estimate of 1.3±0.7 events. While our search strategy does not rely on model-specific dynamics, we set cross section limits and place the world-best 95% C.L. lower limit on the χ˜10 mass of 101GeV/c2 at τχ˜10=5ns.

  14. Measurement of the Time-Dependent CP Asymmetry of Partially Reconstructed B0 to D*+D*- Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, J. P.

    2012-08-13

    We present a new measurement of the time-dependent CP asymmetry of B{sup 0} {yields}D*{sup +}D*{sup -} decays using (471 {+-} 5) million B{bar B} pairs collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B Factory at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. Using the technique of partial reconstruction, we measure the time-dependent CP asymmetry parameters S = -0.34 {+-} 0.12 {+-} 0.05 and C = +0:15 {+-} 0.09 {+-} 0.04. Using the value for the CP-odd fraction R{perpendicular} = 0.158 {+-} 0.028 {+-} 0.006, previously measured by BABAR with fully reconstructed B{sup 0} {yields} D{sup *+}D{sup *-} events, we extract the CP-even components S{sub +} = -0.49 {+-} 0.18 {+-} 0.07 {+-} 0.04 and C{sub +} = +0.15 {+-} 0.09 {+-} 0.04. In each case, the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic; the third uncertainty on S{sub +} is the contribution from the uncertainty on R{perpendicular}. The measured value of the CP-even component S{sub +} is consistent with the value of sin 2{beta} measured in b {yields} (c{bar c})s transitions, and with the Standard Model expectation of small penguin contributions.

  15. Numerical study of the impact of vegetation coverings on sound levels and time decays in a canyon street model.

    PubMed

    Guillaume, G; Gauvreau, B; L'Hermite, P

    2015-01-01

    Given a constantly increasing urban population, the mitigation of environmental impacts caused by urbanization has become a critical concern. Sprawling cities accelerate the phenomenon of soil sealing, whose impacts relative to climatology, water cycle and ecology are substantial. The "VegDUD" project, which provides the framework for the present paper, lays out a possible alternative for limiting these deleterious effects through focusing on the role of vegetation in promoting sustainable urban development. The study presented herein addresses the beneficial effect of greening building facades and rooftops in terms of both acoustic level and sound-decay time indicators at low frequency third-octave bands. This is carried out through numerical simulations in the time-domain of sound propagation in a canyon street of infinite length for various scenarios of surface vegetalization. Numerical predictions show a more significant effect in the upper part and outside the street, depending on the location of the vegetalized surfaces, frequency bands and number of reflections on the treated materials.

  16. Pulse saturation recovery, pulse ELDOR, and free induction decay electron paramagnetic resonance detection using time-locked subsampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froncisz, W.; Camenisch, Theodore G.; Ratke, Joseph J.; Hyde, James S.

    2001-03-01

    Time locked subsampling (TLSS) in electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) involves the steps of (i) translation of the signal from a microwave carrier to an intermediate frequency (IF) carrier where the (IF) offset between the signal oscillator and local oscillator frequencies is synthesized, (ii) sampling the IF carrier four times in an odd number of cycles, say 4 in 3, where the analog-to-digital (A/D) converter is driven by a frequency synthesizer that has the same clock input as the IF synthesizer, (iii) signal averaging as required for adequate signal to noise, (iv) separating the even and odd digitized words into two separate signal channels, which correspond to signals in phase and in quadrature with respect to the IF carrier, i.e., I and Q, and (v) detecting the envelope of I and also of Q by changing the signs of alternate words in each of the two channels. TLSS detection has been demonstrated in three forms of pulse EPR spectroscopy at X band: saturation recovery, pulse electron-electron double resonance, and free induction decay. The IF was 187.5 MHz, the A/D converter frequency was 250 MHz, the overall bandwidth was 125 MHz, and the bandwidths for the separate I and Q channels were each 62.5 MHz. Experiments were conducted on nitroxide radical spin labels. The work was directed towards development of methodology to monitor bimolecular collisions of oxygen with spin labels in a context of site-directed spin labeling.

  17. Power law time dependence of river flood decay and its relationship to long term discharge frequency distribution. [California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, G.; Lingenfelter, R. E.

    1973-01-01

    Investigations have continued into the possibility that significant information on stream flow rates can be obtained from aerial and satellite imagery of river meander patterns by seeking a correlation between the meander and discharge spectra of rivers. Such a correlation could provide the basis for a simple and inexpensive technique for remote sensing of the water resources of large geographical areas, eliminating the need for much hydrologic recording. The investigation of the nature of the meander and discharge spectra and their interrelationship can also contribute to a more fundamental understanding of the processes of both river meander formation and drainage of large basins. It has been found that floods decay with an inverse power law dependence on time. The exponent of this dependence varies from river to river and even from station to station along the same river. This power law time dependence makes possible the forecasting of river discharge with an uncertainty of about 5% for as long as a month following the flood peak.

  18. Relationship between force-time and velocity-time characteristics of dynamic and isometric muscle actions.

    PubMed

    Khamoui, Andy V; Brown, Lee E; Nguyen, Diamond; Uribe, Brandon P; Coburn, Jared W; Noffal, Guillermo J; Tran, Tai

    2011-01-01

    Previous research has investigated the force-time curve characteristics of isometric and dynamic muscle actions; however, few studies have addressed their relationship to dynamic exercise velocity-time variables. The purpose of this study was to investigate relationships between velocity-time characteristics (high pull and vertical jump peak velocity and rate of velocity development [HPPV, HPRVD, VJPV, VJRVD]), force-time characteristics (isometric peak force [IsoPF], body mass adjusted isometric peak force [IsoPF/BM], isometric rate of force development at different millisecond windows [IsoRFD50-250], dynamic peak force [HPPF], body mass adjusted dynamic peak force [HPPF/BM]), and vertical jump height (VJHeight). Nineteen recreationally trained men (age 23.89 ± 2.92 yr; height 176.32 ± 7.06 cm; mass 78.76 ± 16.50 kg) completed 2 testing sessions. The first session consisted of 3 isometric mid-thigh pulls on a force plate with each repetition held for 3 seconds. On the second testing session, subjects completed 3 dynamic mid-thigh high pulls with 30% IsoPF followed by 3 vertical jumps on a force plate. The HPRVD correlated with IsoRFD50 (r = 0.52) and IsoRFD100 (r = 0.49). The HPPV correlated with IsoPF/BM (r = -0.60), IsoRFD50 (r = 0.56), and IsoRFD100 (r = 0.56). The VJHeight correlated with IsoPF/BM (r = 0.61), whereas VJPV correlated with IsoPF/BM (r = 0.62). These correlations suggest that explosive isometric force production within 50 to 100 milliseconds may influence the ability to accelerate an implement or body and attain high velocity, albeit in a moderate fashion. In addition, body mass adjusted strength may positively influence vertical jump parameters.

  19. Gaseous time projection chambers for rare event detection: results from the T-REX project. I. Double beta decay

    SciTech Connect

    Irastorza, I.G.; Aznar, F.; Castel, J. E-mail: faznar@unizar.es [Grupo de Física Nuclear y Astropartículas, Departamento de Física Teórica, Universidad de Zaragoza, C and others

    2016-01-01

    As part of the T-REX project, a number of R and D and prototyping activities have been carried out during the last years to explore the applicability of gaseous Time Projection Chambers (TPCs) with Micromesh Gas Structures (Micromegas) in rare event searches like double beta decay, axion research and low-mass WIMP searches. In both this and its companion paper, we compile the main results of the project and give an outlook of application prospects for this detection technique. While in the companion paper we focus on axions and WIMPs, in this paper we focus on the results regarding the measurement of the double beta decay (DBD) of {sup 136}Xe in a high pressure Xe (HPXe) TPC. Micromegas of the microbulk type have been extensively studied in high pressure Xe and Xe mixtures. Particularly relevant are the results obtained in Xe + trimethylamine (TMA) mixtures, showing very promising results in terms of gain, stability of operation, and energy resolution at high pressures up to 10 bar. The addition of TMA at levels of ∼ 1% reduces electron diffusion by up to a factor of 10 with respect to pure Xe, improving the quality of the topological pattern, with a positive impact on the discrimination capability. Operation with a medium size prototype of 30 cm diameter and 38 cm of drift (holding about 1 kg of Xe at 10 bar in the fiducial volume, enough to contain high energy electron tracks in the detector volume) has allowed to test the detection concept in realistic experimental conditions. Microbulk Micromegas are able to image the DBD ionization signature with high quality while, at the same time, measuring its energy deposition with a resolution of at least a ∼ 3% FWHM @ Q{sub ββ}. This value was experimentally demonstrated for high-energy extended tracks at 10 bar, and is probably improvable down to the ∼ 1% FWHM levels as extrapolated from low energy events. In addition, first results on the topological signature information (one straggling track ending in two

  20. Amplitude Analysis and Measurement of the Time-dependent CP Asymmetry of B0 to KsKsKs Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, J.P.

    2012-04-11

    We present the first results on the Dalitz-plot structure and improved measurements of the time-dependent CP-violation parameters of the process B{sup 0} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sub S}{sup 0} obtained using 468 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B factory at SLAC. The Dalitz-plot structure is probed by a time-integrated amplitude analysis that does not distinguish between B{sup 0} and {bar B}{sup 0} decays. We measure the total inclusive branching fraction {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sub S}{sup 0}) = (6.19 {+-} 0.48 {+-} 0.15 {+-} 0.12) x 10{sup -6}, where the first uncertainty is statistical, the second is systematic, and the third represents the Dalitz-plot signal model dependence. We also observe evidence for the intermediate resonant states f{sub 0}(980), f{sub 0}(1710), and f{sub 2}(2010). Their respective product branching fractions are measured to be (2.70{sub -1.19}{sup +1.25} {+-} 0.36 {+-} 1.17) x 10{sup -6}, (0.50{sub -0.24}{sup +0.46} {+-} 0.04 {+-} 0.10) x 10{sup -6}, and (0.54{sub -0.20}{sup +0.21} {+-} 0.03 {+-} 0.52) x 10{sup -6}. Additionally, we determine the mixing-induced CP-violation parameters to be S = -0.94{sub -0.21}{sup +0.24} {+-} 0.06 and C = -0.17 {+-} 0.18 {+-} 0.04, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. These values are in agreement with the standard model expectation.

  1. Theory and use of GIRAFFE for analysis of decay characteristics of delayed-neutron precursors in an LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, K. C.

    1980-07-01

    The application of the computer code GIRAFFE (General Isotope Release Analysis For Failed Elements) written in FORTRAN IV is described. GIRAFFE was designed to provide parameter estimates of the nonlinear discrete-measurement models that govern the transport and decay of delayed-neutron precursors in a liquid-metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR). The code has been organized into a set of small, relatively independent and well-defined modules to facilitate modification and maintenance. The program logic, the numerical techniques, and the methods of solution used by the code are presented, and the functions of the MAIN program and of each subroutine are discussed.

  2. Measurements of Pilot Time Delay as Influenced by Controller Characteristics and Vehicles Time Delays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Privoznik, C. M.; Berry, D. T.; Bartoli, A. G.

    1984-01-01

    A study to measure and compare pilot time delay when using a space shuttle rotational hand controller and a more conventional control stick was conducted at NASA Ames Research Center's Dryden Flight Research Facility. The space shuttle controller has a palm pivot in the pitch axis. The more conventional controller used was a general-purpose engineering simulator stick that has a pivot length between that of a typical aircraft center stick and a sidestick. Measurements of the pilot's effective time delay were obtained through a first-order, closed-loop, compensatory tracking task in pitch. The tasks were implemented through a space shuttle cockpit simulator and a critical task tester device. The study consisted of 450 data runs with four test pilots and one nonpilot, and used three control stick configurations and two system delays. Results showed that the heavier conventional stick had the lowest pilot effective time delays associated with it, whereas the shuttle and light conventional sticks each had similar higher pilot time delay characteristics. It was also determined that each control stick showed an increase in pilot time delay when the total system delay was increased.

  3. Measurements of time-dependent CP asymmetries in B→D*∓π± decays using a partial reconstruction technique

    SciTech Connect

    Bahinipati, S.; Trabelsi, K.; Kinoshita, K.; Arinstein, K.; Aulchenko, V.; Aushev, T.; Bakich, A. M.; Balagura, V.; Barberio, E.; Belous, K.; Bhardwaj, V.; Bhuyan, B.; Bischofberger, M.; Bondar, A.; Bozek, A.; Bračko, M.; Chen, A.; Chen, P.; Cheon, B. G.; Chiang, C.-C.; Cho, I.-S.; Cho, K.; Choi, Y.; Dalseno, J.; Doležal, Z.; Drásal, Z.; Eidelman, S.; Gabyshev, N.; Golob, B.; Ha, H.; Horii, Y.; Hoshi, Y.; Hou, W.-S.; Hsiung, Y. B.; Hyun, H. J.; Ishikawa, A.; Iwabuchi, M.; Iwasaki, Y.; Iwashita, T.; Julius, T.; Kang, J. H.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, M. J.; Ko, B. R.; Kobayashi, N.; Kodyš, P.; Križan, P.; Kumita, T.; Kwon, Y.-J.; Kyeong, S.-H.; Lange, J. S.; Lee, M. J.; Lee, S.-H.; Li, J.; Liu, C.; Louvot, R.; Matyja, A.; McOnie, S.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyata, H.; Miyazaki, Y.; Mohanty, G. B.; Nakao, M.; Natkaniec, Z.; Neubauer, S.; Nishida, S.; Nitoh, O.; Ogawa, S.; Ohshima, T.; Pakhlov, P.; Park, C. W.; Petrič, M.; Piilonen, L. E.; Poluektov, A.; Röhrken, M.; Sahoo, H.; Sakai, Y.; Schneider, O.; Schwanda, C.; Schwartz, A. J.; Sevior, M. E.; Shapkin, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shiu, J.-G.; Smerkol, P.; Sohn, Y.-S.; Sokolov, A.; Solovieva, E.; Stanič, S.; Starič, M.; Sumisawa, K.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tanaka, S.; Teramoto, Y.; Uchida, M.; Uehara, S.; Uglov, T.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Varner, G.; Vinokurova, A.; Wang, C. H.; Won, E.; Yabsley, B. D.; Yamashita, Y.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhou, P.; Zivko, T.; Zupanc, A.

    2011-07-05

    We report results on time-dependent CP asymmetries in B→D*∓π± decays based on a data sample containing 657×10⁶ BB¯ pairs collected with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e⁺e⁻ collider at the Υ(4S) resonance. We use a partial reconstruction technique, wherein signal B→D*∓π± events are identified using information only from the fast pion from the B decay and the slow pion from the subsequent decay of the D*∓, where the former (latter) corresponds to D*⁺(D*⁻) final states. We obtain CP violation parameters S⁺=+0.061±0.018 (stat)±0.012 (syst) and S⁻=+0.031±0.019 (stat)±0.015 (syst).

  4. Measurement of the Difference of Time-Integrated CP Asymmetries in D^{0}→K^{-}K^{+} and D^{0}→π^{-}π^{+} Decays.

    PubMed

    Aaij, R; Abellán Beteta, C; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Akar, S; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; An, L; Anderlini, L; Andreassi, G; Andreotti, M; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; d'Argent, P; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Badalov, A; Baesso, C; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Batozskaya, V; Battista, V; Bay, A; Beaucourt, L; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Bel, L J; Bellee, V; Belloli, N; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bertolin, A; Betti, F; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bifani, S; Billoir, P; Bird, T; Birnkraut, A; Bizzeti, A; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borgheresi, A; Borghi, S; Borisyak, M; Borsato, M; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Braun, S; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brodzicka, J; Brook, N H; Buchanan, E; Burr, C; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Calabrese, R; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Capriotti, L; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carniti, P; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cassina, L; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cavallero, G; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chefdeville, M; Chen, S; Cheung, S-F; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Cogoni, V; Cojocariu, L; Collazuol, G; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Corvo, M; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Crocombe, A; Cruz Torres, M; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; Dall'Occo, E; Dalseno, J; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Aguiar Francisco, O; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Simone, P; Dean, C-T; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Demmer, M; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Dey, B; Di Canto, A; Di Ruscio, F; Dijkstra, H; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dorigo, M; Dosil Suárez, A; Dovbnya, A; Dreimanis, K; Dufour, L; Dujany, G; Dungs, K; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Ely, S; Esen, S; Evans, H M; Evans, T; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Farley, N; Farry, S; Fay, R; Fazzini, D; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferrari, F; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fiorini, M; Firlej, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fiutowski, T; Fleuret, F; Fohl, K; Fol, P; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forshaw, D C; Forty, R; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Fu, J; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gallorini, S; Gambetta, S; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; García Pardiñas, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gascon, D; Gaspar, C; Gavardi, L; Gazzoni, G; Gerick, D; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gianì, S; Gibson, V; Girard, O G; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gotti, C; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graverini, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Griffith, P; Grillo, L; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadavizadeh, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Han, X; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Heister, A; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Henry, L; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Heß, M; Hicheur, A; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hulsbergen, W; Humair, T; Hushchyn, M; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jalocha, J; Jans, E; Jawahery, A; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Jurik, N; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Karodia, S; Kecke, M; Kelsey, M; Kenyon, I R; Kenzie, M; Ketel, T; Khairullin, E; Khanji, B; Khurewathanakul, C; Kirn, T; Klaver, S; Klimaszewski, K; Kochebina, O; Kolpin, M; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Kozeiha, M; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Krzemien, W; Kucewicz, W; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kuonen, A K; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Langhans, B; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Lemos Cid, E; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Likhomanenko, T; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Lionetto, F; Liu, B; Liu, X; Loh, D; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lucchesi, D; Lucio Martinez, M; Luo, H; Lupato, A; Luppi, E; Lupton, O; Lusiani, A; Machefert, F; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Maguire, K; Malde, S; Malinin, A; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Manning, P; Mapelli, A; Maratas, J; Marchand, J F; Marconi, U; Marin Benito, C; Marino, P; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martin, M; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martinez Vidal, F; Martins Tostes, D; Massacrier, L M; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathad, A; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Mauri, A; Maurin, B; Mazurov, A; McCann, M; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Melnychuk, D; Merk, M; Merli, A; Michielin, E; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Mitzel, D S; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monroy, I A; Monteil, S; Morandin, M; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Moron, J; Morris, A B; Mountain, R; Muheim, F; Müller, D; Müller, J; Müller, K; Müller, V; Mussini, M; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nandi, A; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neri, N; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Neuner, M; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Novoselov, A; O'Hanlon, D P; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Onderwater, C J G; Osorio Rodrigues, B; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Otto, A; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Palano, A; Palombo, F; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Pappalardo, L L; Pappenheimer, C; Parker, W; Parkes, C; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrignani, C; Pearce, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perret, P; Pescatore, L; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Petruzzo, M; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pikies, M; Pinci, D; Pistone, A; Piucci, A; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Poikela, T; Polci, F; Poluektov, A; Polyakov, I; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Price, E; Price, J D; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Quagliani, R; Rachwal, B; Rademacker, J H; Rama, M; Ramos Pernas, M; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Raven, G; Redi, F; Reichert, S; Dos Reis, A C; Renaudin, V; Ricciardi, S; Richards, S; Rihl, M; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, A B; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Lopez, J A; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Ronayne, J W; Rotondo, M; Ruf, T; Ruiz Valls, P; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanchez Mayordomo, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santimaria, M; Santovetti, E; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Saunders, D M; Savrina, D; Schael, S; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmelzer, T; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schubiger, M; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Semennikov, A; Sergi, A; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Sestini, L; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Siddi, B G; Silva Coutinho, R; Silva de Oliveira, L; Simi, G; Sirendi, M; Skidmore, N; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, E; Smith, I T; Smith, J; Smith, M; Snoek, H; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Spradlin, P; Sridharan, S; Stagni, F; Stahl, M; Stahl, S; Stefkova, S; Steinkamp, O; Stenyakin, O; Stevenson, S; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Stracka, S; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Sun, L; Sutcliffe, W; Swientek, K; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Tayduganov, A; Tekampe, T; Tellarini, G; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Todd, J; Tolk, S; Tomassetti, L; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Trabelsi, K; Traill, M; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Trisovic, A; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ukleja, A; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vacca, C; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vázquez Sierra, C; Vecchi, S; van Veghel, M; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vieites Diaz, M; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Volkov, V; Vollhardt, A; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; de Vries, J A; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Walsh, J; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Websdale, D; Weiden, A; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wilkinson, G; Wilkinson, M; Williams, M; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Williams, T; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wormser, G; Wotton, S A; Wraight, K; Wright, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xu, Z; Yang, Z; Yu, J; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, L; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zhukov, V; Zucchelli, S

    2016-05-13

    A search for CP violation in D^{0}→K^{-}K^{+} and D^{0}→π^{-}π^{+} decays is performed using pp collision data, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3  fb^{-1}, collected using the LHCb detector at center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV. The flavor of the charm meson is inferred from the charge of the pion in D^{*+}→D^{0}π^{+} and D^{*-}→D[over ¯]^{0}π^{-} decays. The difference between the CP asymmetries in D^{0}→K^{-}K^{+} and D^{0}→π^{-}π^{+} decays, ΔA_{CP}≡A_{CP}(K^{-}K^{+})-A_{CP}(π^{-}π^{+}), is measured to be [-0.10±0.08(stat)±0.03(syst)]%. This is the most precise measurement of a time-integrated CP asymmetry in the charm sector from a single experiment.

  5. Measurement of the Difference of Time-Integrated C P Asymmetries in D0→K-K+ and D0→π-π+ Decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Abellán Beteta, C.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Andreassi, G.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; d'Argent, P.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Bel, L. J.; Bellee, V.; Belloli, N.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Betti, F.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bifani, S.; Billoir, P.; Bird, T.; Birnkraut, A.; Bizzeti, A.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borgheresi, A.; Borghi, S.; Borisyak, M.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Braun, S.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Buchanan, E.; Burr, C.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dall'Occo, E.; Dalseno, J.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Aguiar Francisco, O.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C.-T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Demmer, M.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruscio, F.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dufour, L.; Dujany, G.; Dungs, K.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Fazzini, D.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferrari, F.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fleuret, F.; Fohl, K.; Fol, P.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forshaw, D. C.; Forty, R.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Gerick, D.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianı, S.; Gibson, V.; Girard, O. G.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadavizadeh, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Heister, A.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hushchyn, M.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kecke, M.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T.; Khairullin, E.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Kirn, T.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Kozeiha, M.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Krzemien, W.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kuonen, A. K.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Lemos Cid, E.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Liu, X.; Loh, D.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucio Martinez, M.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Lusiani, A.; Machefert, F.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Maguire, K.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manning, P.; Mapelli, A.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martin, M.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massacrier, L. M.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathad, A.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mauri, A.; Maurin, B.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Melnychuk, D.; Merk, M.; Merli, A.; Michielin, E.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Mitzel, D. S.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monroy, I. A.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A. B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Müller, D.; Müller, J.; Müller, K.; Müller, V.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nandi, A.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Osorio Rodrigues, B.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Otto, A.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Pappenheimer, C.; Parker, W.; Parkes, C.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Pescatore, L.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Petruzzo, M.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pikies, M.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Piucci, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Poikela, T.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Price, J. D.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Quagliani, R.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rama, M.; Ramos Pernas, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Raven, G.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; dos Reis, A. C.; Renaudin, V.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Lopez, J. A.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Ronayne, J. W.; Rotondo, M.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santimaria, M.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schael, S.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmelzer, T.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schubiger, M.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Sergi, A.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Siddi, B. G.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Silva de Oliveira, L.; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, E.; Smith, I. T.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Stefkova, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Tayduganov, A.; Tekampe, T.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Todd, J.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Trabelsi, K.; Traill, M.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; van Veghel, M.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Volkov, V.; Vollhardt, A.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Weiden, A.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Wilkinson, M.; Williams, M.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Williams, T.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wraight, K.; Wright, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yu, J.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zhukov, V.; Zucchelli, S.; LHCb Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    A search for C P violation in D0→K-K+ and D0→π-π+ decays is performed using p p collision data, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3 fb-1, collected using the LHCb detector at center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV. The flavor of the charm meson is inferred from the charge of the pion in D*+→D0π+ and D*-→D¯ 0π- decays. The difference between the C P asymmetries in D0→K-K+ and D0→π-π+ decays, Δ AC P ≡AC P(K-K+)-AC P(π-π+), is measured to be [-0.10 ±0.08 (stat ) ±0.03 (syst ) ] %. This is the most precise measurement of a time-integrated C P asymmetry in the charm sector from a single experiment.

  6. Radioactive Decay

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Radioactive decay is the emission of energy in the form of ionizing radiation. Example decay chains illustrate how radioactive atoms can go through many transformations as they become stable and no longer radioactive.

  7. Student Part-Time Employment: Characteristics and Consequences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robotham, David

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the paper is to examine the consequences of students engaging in part-time employment during their studies. It reports the results of a survey of part-time employment among university students. The research examined the possible consequences of combining part-time employment with full-time study, with particular reference to…

  8. Tooth Decay

    MedlinePlus

    You call it a cavity. Your dentist calls it tooth decay or dental caries. They're all names for a hole in your tooth. The cause of tooth decay is plaque, a sticky substance in your mouth made up mostly of germs. Tooth decay starts in the outer layer, called the enamel. Without ...

  9. Low viscosity of the bottom of the Earth's mantle inferred from the decay time of Chandler wobble and tidal deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakada, M.; Karato, S.

    2011-12-01

    Viscosity of the D" layer of the Earth's mantle, the lowermost layer in the Earth's mantle, plays an important role in the dynamics and evolution of the Earth. That is, its rheological properties control a number of important geodynamic processes such as the mantle dynamics and the material exchange between the mantle and core. However, inferring the viscosity of this region is difficult because of the lack of relevant geodynamic observations. Two methods have been used to infer the rheological properties of Earth's mantle. One is to use the observed time-dependent deformation associated with the glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA), and another is to analyze gravity-related observations in terms of the density distributions inside of the mantle. The GIA observations for the relative sea level have little sensitivity to the viscosity of the mantle deeper than ~1200 km. The latter approach can be applied to Earth's deep interior because density variation driving mantle flow can occur in the deep interior of the Earth and resultant gravity signals can be measured at the Earth's surface. However, the gravity signals in terms of heterogeneity in seismic wave velocities suffer from major uncertainties in the velocity-to-density conversion factor, particularly in the deep mantle where the temperature sensitivity of seismic wave velocities decreases due to high pressure. In this paper, we show that the decay time of Chandler wobble and semi-diurnal to 18.6 years tidal deformation combined with the constraints from the GIA observations provide a strong constraint on the viscosity of this layer. In inferring the viscosity structure of the D" layer, we first examine the validity of the Maxwell model based on the microscopic models of rheological properties of Earth materials. That is, we confirm that the Maxwell model is a good approximation at least for the Chandler wobble and 18.6 years tide. The decay time of Chandler wobble (30-300 years) indicates the effective viscosity

  10. Study of time-dependent CP-violating asymmetries and flavor oscillations in neutral B decays at the Υ(4S)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubert, B.; Boutigny, D.; Gaillard, J.-M.; Hicheur, A.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Robbe, P.; Tisserand, V.; Palano, A.; Pompili, A.; Chen, G. P.; Chen, J. C.; Qi, N. D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y. S.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Abrams, G. S.; Borgland, A. W.; Breon, A. B.; Brown, D. N.; Button-Shafer, J.; Cahn, R. N.; Clark, A. R.; Gill, M. S.; Gritsan, A. V.; Groysman, Y.; Jacobsen, R. G.; Kadel, R. W.; Kadyk, J.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Kral, J. F.; Leclerc, C.; Levi, M. E.; Lynch, G.; Oddone, P. J.; Pripstein, M.; Roe, N. A.; Romosan, A.; Ronan, M. T.; Shelkov, V. G.; Telnov, A. V.; Wenzel, W. A.; Harrison, T. J.; Hawkes, C. M.; Knowles, D. J.; O'Neale, S. W.; Penny, R. C.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, N. K.; Deppermann, T.; Goetzen, K.; Koch, H.; Kunze, M.; Lewandowski, B.; Peters, K.; Schmuecker, H.; Steinke, M.; Barlow, N. R.; Bhimji, W.; Chevalier, N.; Clark, P. J.; Cottingham, W. N.; Foster, B.; Mackay, C.; Wilson, F. F.; Abe, K.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Thiessen, D.; Jolly, S.; McKemey, A. K.; Blinov, V. E.; Bukin, A. D.; Bukin, D. A.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Golubev, V. B.; Ivanchenko, V. N.; Korol, A. A.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Telnov, V. I.; Yushkov, A. N.; Best, D.; Chao, M.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; McMahon, S.; Stoker, D. P.; Arisaka, K.; Buchanan, C.; Chun, S.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Prell, S.; Rahatlou, Sh.; Raven, G.; Sharma, V.; Campagnari, C.; Dahmes, B.; Hart, P. A.; Kuznetsova, N.; Levy, S. L.; Long, O.; Lu, A.; Mazur, M. A.; Richman, J. D.; Verkerke, W.; Beringer, J.; Eisner, A. M.; Grothe, M.; Heusch, C. A.; Lockman, W. S.; Pulliam, T.; Schalk, T.; Schmitz, R. E.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Turri, M.; Walkowiak, W.; Williams, D. C.; Wilson, M. G.; Chen, E.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dvoretskii, A.; Hitlin, D. G.; Metzler, S.; Oyang, J.; Porter, F. C.; Ryd, A.; Samuel, A.; Weaver, M.; Yang, S.; Zhu, R. Y.; Devmal, S.; Geld, T. L.; Jayatilleke, S.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Barillari, T.; Bloom, P.; Dima, M. O.; Ford, W. T.; Nauenberg, U.; Olivas, A.; Rankin, P.; Roy, J.; Smith, J. G.; van Hoek, W. C.; Blouw, J.; Harton, J. L.; Krishnamurthy, M.; Soffer, A.; Toki, W. H.; Wilson, R. J.; Zhang, J.; Brandt, T.; Brose, J.; Colberg, T.; Dickopp, M.; Dubitzky, R. S.; Hauke, A.; Maly, E.; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R.; Otto, S.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Spaan, B.; Wilden, L.; Bernard, D.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Brochard, F.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Ferrag, S.; T'jampens, S.; Thiebaux, Ch.; Vasileiadis, G.; Verderi, M.; Anjomshoaa, A.; Bernet, R.; Khan, A.; Lavin, D.; Muheim, F.; Playfer, S.; Swain, J. E.; Tinslay, J.; Falbo, M.; Borean, C.; Bozzi, C.; Piemontese, L.; Treadwell, E.; Anulli, F.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Falciai, D.; Finocchiaro, G.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Xie, Y.; Zallo, A.; Bagnasco, S.; Buzzo, A.; Contri, R.; Crosetti, G.; Lo Vetere, M.; Macri, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Pastore, F. C.; Patrignani, C.; Pia, M. G.; Robutti, E.; Santroni, A.; Tosi, S.; Morii, M.; Bartoldus, R.; Hamilton, R.; Mallik, U.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Fischer, P.-A.; Lamsa, J.; Meyer, W. T.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Grosdidier, G.; Hast, C.; Höcker, A.; Lacker, H. M.; Laplace, S.; Lepeltier, V.; Lutz, A. M.; Plaszczynski, S.; Schune, M. H.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Wormser, G.; Bionta, R. M.; Brigljević, V.; Lange, D. J.; Mugge, M.; van Bibber, K.; Wright, D. M.; Bevan, A. J.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; George, M.; Kay, M.; Payne, D. J.; Sloane, R. J.; Touramanis, C.; Aspinwall, M. L.; Bowerman, D. A.; Dauncey, P. D.; Egede, U.; Eschrich, I.; Gunawardane, N. J.; Nash, J. A.; Sanders, P.; Smith, D.; Azzopardi, D. E.; Back, J. J.; Bellodi, G.; Dixon, P.; Harrison, P. F.; Potter, R. J.; Shorthouse, H. W.; Strother, P.; Vidal, P. B.; Cowan, G.; George, S.; Green, M. G.; Kurup, A.; Marker, C. E.; McGrath, P.; McMahon, T. R.; Ricciardi, S.; Salvatore, F.; Vaitsas, G.; Brown, D.; Davis, C. L.; Allison, J.; Barlow, R. J.; Boyd, J. T.; Forti, A. C.; Fullwood, J.; Jackson, F.; Lafferty, G. D.; Savvas, N.; Weatherall, J. H.; Williams, J. C.; Farbin, A.; Jawahery, A.; Lillard, V.; Olsen, J.; Roberts, D. A.; Schieck, J. R.; Blaylock, G.; Dallapiccola, C.; Flood, K. T.; Hertzbach, S. S.; Kofler, R.; Koptchev, V. B.; Moore, T. B.; Staengle, H.; Willocq, S.; Brau, B.; Cowan, R.; Sciolla, G.; Taylor, F.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Milek, M.; Patel, P. M.; Palombo, F.; Bauer, J. M.; Cremaldi, L.; Eschenburg, V.; Kroeger, R.; Reidy, J.; Sanders, D. A.; Summers, D. J.; Nief, J. Y.; Taras, P.; Nicholson, H.; Cartaro, C.; Cavallo, N.; de Nardo, G.; Fabozzi, F.; Gatto, C.; Lista, L.; Paolucci, P.; Piccolo, D.; Sciacca, C.; Losecco, J. M.; Alsmiller, J. R.; Gabriel, T. A.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Grauges, E.; Iwasaki, M.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Colecchia, F.; dal Corso, F.; Dorigo, A.; Galeazzi, F.; Margoni, M.; Michelon, G.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Torassa, E.; Voci, C.; Benayoun, M.; Briand, H.; Chauveau, J.; David, P.; de La Vaissière, Ch.; del Buono, L.; Hamon, O.; Le Diberder, F.; Leruste, Ph.; Ocariz, J.; Roos, L.; Stark, J.; Manfredi, P. F.; Re, V.; Speziali, V.; Frank, E. D.; Gladney, L.; Guo, Q. H.; Panetta, J.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bondioli, M.; Bucci, F.; Campagna, E.; Carpinelli, M.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Marchiori, G.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Morganti, M.; Neri, N.; Paoloni, E.; Rama, M.; Rizzo, G.; Sandrelli, F.; Simi, G.; Triggiani, G.; Walsh, J.; Haire, M.; Judd, D.; Paick, K.; Turnbull, L.; Wagoner, D. E.; Albert, J.; Elmer, P.; Lu, C.; Miftakov, V.; Schaffner, S. F.; Smith, A. J.; Tumanov, A.; Varnes, E. W.; Cavoto, G.; del Re, D.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Lamanna, E.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Morganti, S.; Piredda, G.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Serra, M.; Voena, C.; Faccini, R.; Christ, S.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; de Groot, N.; Franek, B.; Geddes, N. I.; Gopal, G. P.; Xella, S. M.; Aleksan, R.; Emery, S.; Gaidot, A.; Ganzhur, S. F.; Giraud, P.-F.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Kozanecki, W.; Langer, M.; London, G. W.; Mayer, B.; Serfass, B.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Zito, M.; Purohit, M. V.; Singh, H.; Weidemann, A. W.; Yumiceva, F. X.; Adam, I.; Aston, D.; Berger, N.; Boyarski, A. M.; Calderini, G.; Convery, M. R.; Coupal, D. P.; Dong, D.; Dorfan, J.; Dunwoodie, W.; Field, R. C.; Glanzman, T.; Gowdy, S. J.; Haas, T.; Halyo, V.; Himel, T.; Hryn'ova, T.; Huffer, M. E.; Innes, W. R.; Jessop, C. P.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Langenegger, U.; Leith, D. W.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; Marsiske, H.; Menke, S.; Messner, R.; Muller, D. R.; O'Grady, C. P.; Ozcan, V. E.; Perazzo, A.; Perl, M.; Petrak, S.; Quinn, H.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Robertson, S. H.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schietinger, T.; Schindler, R. H.; Schwiening, J.; Snyder, A.; Soha, A.; Spanier, S. M.; Stelzer, J.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Tanaka, H. A.; Va'Vra, J.; Wagner, S. R.; Weinstein, A. J.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wright, D. H.; Young, C. C.; Burchat, P. R.; Cheng, C. H.; Meyer, T. I.; Roat, C.; Henderson, R.; Bugg, W.; Cohn, H.; Izen, J. M.; Kitayama, I.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; Bona, M.; Gamba, D.; Bosisio, L.; della Ricca, G.; Dittongo, S.; Lanceri, L.; Poropat, P.; Vuagnin, G.; Panvini, R. S.; Brown, C. M.; Jackson, P. D.; Kowalewski, R.; Roney, J. M.; Band, H. R.; Charles, E.; Dasu, S.; Eichenbaum, A. M.; Hu, H.; Johnson, J. R.; Liu, R.; di Lodovico, F.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Scott, I. J.; Sekula, S. J.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Wu, S. L.; Yu, Z.; Kordich, T. M.; Neal, H.

    2002-08-01

    We present a measurement of time-dependent CP-violating asymmetries in neutral B meson decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e+e- collider at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The data sample consists of 29.7 fb-1 recorded at the Υ(4S) resonance and 3.9 fb-1 off resonance. One of the neutral B mesons, which are produced in pairs at the Υ(4S), is fully reconstructed in the CP decay modes J/ψK0S, ψ(2S)K0S, χc1K0S, J/ψK*0 (K*0-->K0Sπ0) and J/ψK0L, or in flavor-eigenstate modes involving D(*)π/ρ/a1 and J/ψK*0 (K*0-->K+π-). The flavor of the other neutral B meson is tagged at the time of its decay, mainly with the charge of identified leptons and kaons. A neural network tagging algorithm is used to recover events without a clear lepton or kaon tag. The proper time elapsed between the decays is determined by measuring the distance between the decay vertices. Wrong-tag probabilities, the time-difference resolution function, and the B0-B0 oscillation frequency Δmd are measured with a sample of about 6350 fully-reconstructed B0 decays in hadronic flavor-eigenstate modes. A maximum-likelihood fit to this flavor eigenstate sample finds Δmd=0.516+/-0.016(stat)+/-0.010(syst) ps-1. The value of the asymmetry amplitude sin 2β is determined from a simultaneous maximum-likelihood fit to the time-difference distribution of the flavor-eigenstate sample and about 642 tagged B0 decays in the CP-eigenstate modes. We find sin 2β=0.59+/-0.14(stat)+/-0.05(syst), demonstrating that CP violation exists in the neutral B meson system. We also determine the value of the CP violation parameter |λ|=0.93+/-0.09(stat)+/-0.03(syst), which is consistent with the expectation of |λ|=1 for no direct CP violation.

  11. A deconvolution procedure for determination of a fluorescence decay waveform applicable to a band-limited measurement system that has a time delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwata, Tetsuo; Shibata, Hironobu; Araki, Tsutomu

    2008-01-01

    We propose a deconvolution procedure used for deriving a true fluorescence decay waveform, which is applicable to a band-limited measurement system that has a time delay. In general, the fluorescence decay response has a time delay over the excitation light pulse mainly due to the wavelength dependence of the time delay of the response of a photomultiplier tube (PMT). Furthermore, the frequency band is limited instrumentally or often should be cut off purposely at a relatively low frequency to eliminate high frequency noise. In order to extrapolate such a band-limited response function and to perform a deconvolution procedure in a frequency domain, finally, we introduce a delay time parameter in the conventional Gerchberg-Papoulis (GP) algorithm. We also demonstrate that the Hilbert-transform (HT)-based extrapolation method that we have proposed quite recently is equivalent to the GP algorithm. Simulation and experimental results show that the new method is effective.

  12. The effect of the polymer relaxation time on the nonlinear energy cas- cade and dissipation of statistically steady and decaying homogeneous isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valente, Pedro C.; da Silva, Carlos B.; Pinho, Fernando T.

    2013-11-01

    We report a numerical study of statistically steady and decaying turbulence of FENE-P fluids for varying polymer relaxation times ranging from the Kolmogorov dissipation time-scale to the eddy turnover time. The total turbulent kinetic energy dissipation is shown to increase with the polymer relaxation time in both steady and decaying turbulence, implying a ``drag increase.'' If the total power input in the statistically steady case is kept equal in the Newtonian and the viscoelastic simulations the increase in the turbulence-polymer energy transfer naturally lead to the previously reported depletion of the Newtonian, but not the overall, kinetic energy dissipation. The modifications to the nonlinear energy cascade with varying Deborah/Weissenberg numbers are quantified and their origins investigated. The authors acknowledge the financial support from Fundação para a Ciência e a Tecnologia under grant PTDC/EME-MFE/113589/2009.

  13. Characteristic recovery times of Forbush-type decreases in the cosmic radiation. I - Observations at earth at different energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockwood, J. A.; Webber, W. R.; Jokipii, J. R.

    1986-01-01

    Data on 30 asymmetric Forbush decreases recorded by the IMP spacecraft at 1 AU and the Mt. Washington neutron monitor over the period 1972-84 are examined to characterize the recovery characteristics of cosmic rays after the events. The spacecraft data are concentrated at energies of 1.7 GV, while the terrestrial instruments recorded events at 5 GV. Attention is paid to the relative amplitudes of the recorded transient decreases, the characteristic recovery times, and the energy dependence of the amplitudes and recovery time. The recovery times were found to be equal at both energy levels, supporting a concept of energy independence for the recoveries. Also, no correlations were found between the recovery times and the occurrences of a solar magnetic field reversal or with phase in the solar modulation cycle. A time-dependent, two-dimensional model is defined, which expresses the cosmic ray particle distributions as a function of the decay of the disturbance, with a small dependence on the transport parameters of the cosmic rays.

  14. Maternal Mental Health, Neighborhood Characteristics, and Time Investments in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frech, Adrianne; Kimbro, Rachel Tolbert

    2011-01-01

    We use data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study (N = 3,572) to examine relationships between maternal depression and mothers' time investments with their 5-year-old children in outings, trips to playgrounds or parks, time spent reading with the child, and time spent playing indoors with the child. We also examine whether mothers'…

  15. Determination of rotational correlation times from deconvoluted fluorescence anisotropy decay curves. Demonstration with 6,7-dimethyl-8-ribityllumazine and lumazine protein from Photobacterium leiognathi as fluorescent indicators.

    PubMed

    Visser, A J; Ykema, T; van Hoek, A; O'Kane, D J; Lee, J

    1985-03-12

    The experimental and analytical protocols required for obtaining rotational correlation times of biological macromolecules from fluorescence anisotropy decay measurements are described. As an example, the lumazine protein from Photobacterium leiognathi was used. This stable protein (Mr 21 200) contains the noncovalently bound, natural fluorescent marker 6,7-dimethyl-8-ribityllumazine, which has in the bound state a long fluorescence lifetime (tau = 14 ns). Shortening of the fluorescence lifetime to 2.6 ns at room temperature was achieved by addition of the collisional fluorescence quencher potassium iodide. The shortening of tau had virtually no effect on the rotational correlation time of the lumazine protein (phi = 9.4 ns, 19 degrees C). The ability to measure biexponential anisotropy decay was tested by the addition of Photobacterium luciferase (Mr 80 000), which forms an equilibrium complex with lumazine protein. Under the experimental conditions used (2 degrees C) the biexponential anisotropy decay can best be described with correlation times of 20 and 60 ns, representing the uncomplexed and luciferase-associated lumazine proteins, respectively. The unbound 6,7-dimethyl-8-ribityllumazine itself (tau = 9 ns) was used as a model compound for determining correlation times in the picosecond time range. In the latter case rigorous deconvolution from the excitation profile was required to recover the correlation time, which was shorter (100-200 ps) than the measured laser excitation pulse width (500 ps).

  16. Spot evolution on the red giant star XX Triangulum. A starspot-decay analysis based on time-series Doppler imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Künstler, A.; Carroll, T. A.; Strassmeier, K. G.

    2015-06-01

    Context. Solar spots appear to decay linearly proportional to their size. The decay rate of solar spots is directly related to magnetic diffusivity, which itself is a key quantity for the length of a magnetic-activity cycle. Is a linear spot decay also seen on other stars, and is this in agreement with the large range of solar and stellar activity cycle lengths? Aims: We investigate the evolution of starspots on the rapidly-rotating (Prot≈24 d) K0 giant XX Tri, using consecutive time-series Doppler images. Our aim is to obtain a well-sampled movie of the stellar surface over many years, and thereby detect and quantify a starspot decay law for further comparison with the Sun. Methods: We obtained continuous high-resolution and phase-resolved spectroscopy with the 1.2-m robotic STELLA telescope on Tenerife over six years, and these observations are ongoing. For each observing season, we obtained between 5 to 7 independent Doppler images, one per stellar rotation, making up a total of 36 maps. All images were reconstructed with our line-profile inversion code iMap. A wavelet analysis was implemented for denoising the line profiles. To quantify starspot area decay and growth, we match the observed images with simplified spot models based on a Monte Carlo approach. Results: It is shown that the surface of XX Tri is covered with large high-latitude and even polar spots and with occasional small equatorial spots. Just over the course of six years, we see a systematically changing spot distribution with various timescales and morphology, such as spot fragmentation and spot merging as well as spot decay and formation. An average linear decay of D = -0.022 ± 0.002 SH/day is inferred. We found evidence of an active longitude in phase toward the (unseen) companion star. Furthermore, we detect a weak solar-like differential rotation with a surface shear of α = 0.016 ± 0.003. From the decay rate, we determine a turbulent diffusivity of ηT = (6.3 ± 0.5) × 1014 cm2/s and

  17. Decay of Bacterial Pathogens, Fecal Indicators, and Real-Time Quantitative PCR Genetic Markers in Manure-Amended Soils ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Shane W.; Donnelly, Matthew; Peed, Lindsay; Kelty, Catherine A.; Mondal, Sumona; Zhong, Zirong; Shanks, Orin C.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined persistence and decay of bacterial pathogens, fecal indicator bacteria (FIB), and emerging real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) genetic markers for rapid detection of fecal pollution in manure-amended agricultural soils. Known concentrations of transformed green fluorescent protein-expressing Escherichia coli O157:H7/pZs and red fluorescent protein-expressing Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium/pDs were added to laboratory-scale manure-amended soil microcosms with moisture contents of 60% or 80% field capacity and incubated at temperatures of −20°C, 10°C, or 25°C for 120 days. A two-stage first-order decay model was used to determine stage 1 and stage 2 first-order decay rate coefficients and transition times for each organism and qPCR genetic marker in each treatment. Genetic markers for FIB (Enterococcus spp., E. coli, and Bacteroidales) exhibited decay rate coefficients similar to that of E. coli O157:H7/pZs but not of S. enterica serovar Typhimurium/pDs and persisted at detectable levels longer than both pathogens. Concentrations of these two bacterial pathogens, their counterpart qPCR genetic markers (stx1 and ttrRSBCA, respectively), and FIB genetic markers were also correlated (r = 0.528 to 0.745). This suggests that these qPCR genetic markers may be reliable conservative surrogates for monitoring fecal pollution from manure-amended land. Host-associated qPCR genetic markers for microbial source tracking decayed rapidly to nondetectable concentrations, long before FIB, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium/pDs, and E. coli O157:H7/pZs. Although good indicators of point source or recent nonpoint source fecal contamination events, these host-associated qPCR genetic markers may not be reliable indicators of nonpoint source fecal contamination events that occur weeks following manure application on land. PMID:21642395

  18. Measurement of the Time-Dependent CP-Violating Asymmetry in $B^0 \\to K^{0}_s\\pi^0\\gamma$ Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Prairie View A-M /Princeton U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Stony Brook /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Vanderbilt U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Yale U.

    2005-07-12

    We present a measurement of the time-dependent CP-violating asymmetry in B{sup 0} {yields} K*{sup 0}{gamma} decays with K*{sup 0} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} based on 232 million {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at SLAC. In a sample containing 157 {+-} 16 signal decays, we measure S{sub K*{sup 0}{gamma}} = -0.21 {+-} 0.40 {+-} 0.05 and C{sub K*{sup 0}{gamma}} = -0.40 {+-} 0.23 {+-} 0.03, where the first error is statistical and the second systematic. We also explore B{sup 0} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma} decays with 1.1 < m{sub K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}} < 1.8 GeV/c{sup 2} and find 59 {+-} 13 signal events with S{sub K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma}} = 0.9 {+-} 1.0 {+-} 0.2 and C{sub K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma}} = -1.0 {+-} 0.5 {+-} 0.2.

  19. Effect of resistivity profile on current decay time of initial phase of current quench in neon-gas-puff inducing disruptions of JT-60U

    SciTech Connect

    Kawakami, S.; Ohno, N.; Shibata, Y.; Isayama, A.; Kawano, Y.; Watanabe, K. Y.; Takizuka, T.; Okamoto, M.

    2013-11-15

    According to an early work [Y. Shibata et al., Nucl. Fusion 50, 025015 (2010)] on the behavior of the plasma current decay in the JT-60U disruptive discharges caused by the radiative collapse with a massive neon-gas-puff, the increase of the internal inductance mainly determined the current decay time of plasma current during the initial phase of current quench. To investigate what determines the increase of the internal inductance, we focus attention on the relationship between the electron temperature (or the resistivity) profile and the time evolution of the current density profile and carry out numerical calculations. As a result, we find the reason of the increase of the internal inductance: The current density profile at the start of the current quench is broader than an expected current density profile in the steady state, which is determined by the temperature (or resistivity) profile. The current density profile evolves into peaked one and the internal inductance is increasing.

  20. Estimating Testing Time: The Effects of Item Characteristics on Response Latency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halkitis, Perry N.; And Others

    The relationship between test item characteristics and testing time was studied for a computer-administered licensing examination. One objective of the study was to develop a model to predict testing time on the basis of known item characteristics. Response latencies (i.e., the amount of time taken by examinees to read, review, and answer items)…

  1. Distribution of fluorescence decay times for 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonate in human oxyhemoglobin A1b solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drazdou, A. S.; Sobchuk, A. N.; Syakhovich, V. E.; Bokut, O. S.; Kvasyuk, E. I.; Bushuk, B. A.; Bokut, S. B.

    2012-07-01

    We have studied complex formation between molecules of the fluorescent probe 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonate (1,8-ANS) and the major form (A1) and a minor form (Ab) of hemoglobin. The contribution of the longlived component f3 to the kinetic curves for fluorescence decay in HbA1b solutions is 0.021-0.036, which indicates a dramatic decrease (compared with HbA1) in the accessibility of the central cavity of HbA1b for binding 1,8-ANS. Disappearance of the long-lived component f3 in the fluorescence decay kinetics of 1,8-ANS in HbA1b solutions in the presence of inositol hexaphosphate (IHP) suggests that the regulatory region of HbA1b is completely inaccessible for interaction both with the negatively charged molecules of the probe and with natural regulators of the transport function for this form of the heme protein.

  2. Spectral characteristics of time resolved magnonic spin Seebeck effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etesami, S. R.; Chotorlishvili, L.; Berakdar, J.

    2015-09-01

    Spin Seebeck effect (SSE) holds promise for new spintronic devices with low-energy consumption. The underlying physics, essential for a further progress, is yet to be fully clarified. This study of the time resolved longitudinal SSE in the magnetic insulator yttrium iron garnet concludes that a substantial contribution to the spin current stems from small wave-vector subthermal exchange magnons. Our finding is in line with the recent experiment by S. R. Boona and J. P. Heremans [Phys. Rev. B 90, 064421 (2014)]. Technically, the spin-current dynamics is treated based on the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation also including magnons back-action on thermal bath, while the formation of the time dependent thermal gradient is described self-consistently via the heat equation coupled to the magnetization dynamics.

  3. Spectral characteristics of time resolved magnonic spin Seebeck effect

    SciTech Connect

    Etesami, S. R.; Chotorlishvili, L.; Berakdar, J.

    2015-09-28

    Spin Seebeck effect (SSE) holds promise for new spintronic devices with low-energy consumption. The underlying physics, essential for a further progress, is yet to be fully clarified. This study of the time resolved longitudinal SSE in the magnetic insulator yttrium iron garnet concludes that a substantial contribution to the spin current stems from small wave-vector subthermal exchange magnons. Our finding is in line with the recent experiment by S. R. Boona and J. P. Heremans [Phys. Rev. B 90, 064421 (2014)]. Technically, the spin-current dynamics is treated based on the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation also including magnons back-action on thermal bath, while the formation of the time dependent thermal gradient is described self-consistently via the heat equation coupled to the magnetization dynamics.

  4. Characteristic Based Methods for the Time-Domain Maxwell Equations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-08-09

    2-D results on Cartesian frame demonstrated a potential for numerical efficiency improvement. 14. SUBJECT TERMS 15. NUMBER OF PAGES Time-domain...11 4 Discussion of Numerical Results ........................ 19 5 C onclusion...l ill tiit, pruIcIt a1lyis lder this’ Iranirwurk. Ilulilerical results it’lect tfi heIcst puss,’ibk 1)1(2pefon~lI liace of t he iiew aiiuiirical j

  5. Study of the dependence of direct soft photon production on the jet characteristics in hadronic Z 0 decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdallah, J.; Abreu, P.; Adam, W.; Adzic, P.; Albrecht, T.; Alemany-Fernandez, R.; Allmendinger, T.; Allport, P. P.; Amaldi, U.; Amapane, N.; Amato, S.; Anashkin, E.; Andreazza, A.; Andringa, S.; Anjos, N.; Antilogus, P.; Apel, W.-D.; Arnoud, Y.; Ask, S.; Asman, B.; Augustin, J. E.; Augustinus, A.; Baillon, P.; Ballestrero, A.; Bambade, P.; Barbier, R.; Bardin, D.; Barker, G. J.; Baroncelli, A.; Battaglia, M.; Baubillier, M.; Becks, K.-H.; Begalli, M.; Behrmann, A.; Ben-Haim, E.; Benekos, N.; Benvenuti, A.; Berat, C.; Berggren, M.; Bertrand, D.; Besancon, M.; Besson, N.; Bloch, D.; Blom, M.; Bluj, M.; Bonesini, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Booth, P. S. L.; Borisov, G.; Botner, O.; Bouquet, B.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Boyko, I.; Bracko, M.; Brenner, R.; Brodet, E.; Bruckman, P.; Brunet, J. M.; Buschbeck, B.; Buschmann, P.; Calvi, M.; Camporesi, T.; Canale, V.; Carena, F.; Castro, N.; Cavallo, F.; Chapkin, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Checchia, P.; Chierici, R.; Chliapnikov, P.; Chudoba, J.; Chung, S. U.; Cieslik, K.; Collins, P.; Contri, R.; Cosme, G.; Cossutti, F.; Costa, M. J.; Crennell, D.; Cuevas, J.; D'Hondt, J.; da Silva, T.; da Silva, W.; Della Ricca, G.; de Angelis, A.; de Boer, W.; de Clercq, C.; de Lotto, B.; de Maria, N.; de Min, A.; de Paula, L.; di Ciaccio, L.; di Simone, A.; Doroba, K.; Drees, J.; Eigen, G.; Ekelof, T.; Ellert, M.; Elsing, M.; Espirito Santo, M. C.; Fanourakis, G.; Fassouliotis, D.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J.; Ferrer, A.; Ferro, F.; Flagmeyer, U.; Foeth, H.; Fokitis, E.; Fulda-Quenzer, F.; Fuster, J.; Gandelman, M.; Garcia, C.; Gavillet, Ph.; Gazis, E.; Gokieli, R.; Golob, B.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncalves, P.; Graziani, E.; Grosdidier, G.; Grzelak, K.; Guy, J.; Haag, C.; Hallgren, A.; Hamacher, K.; Hamilton, K.; Haug, S.; Hauler, F.; Hedberg, V.; Hennecke, M.; Hoffman, J.; Holmgren, S.-O.; Holt, P. J.; Houlden, M. A.; Jackson, J. N.; Jarlskog, G.; Jarry, P.; Jeans, D.; Johansson, E. K.; Jonsson, P.; Joram, C.; Jungermann, L.; Kapusta, F.; Katsanevas, S.; Katsoufis, E.; Kernel, G.; Kersevan, B. P.; Kerzel, U.; King, B. T.; Kjaer, N. J.; Kluit, P.; Kokkinias, P.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Kouznetsov, O.; Krumstein, Z.; Kucharczyk, M.; Lamsa, J.; Leder, G.; Ledroit, F.; Leinonen, L.; Leitner, R.; Lemonne, J.; Lepeltier, V.; Lesiak, T.; Liebig, W.; Liko, D.; Lipniacka, A.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez, J. M.; Loukas, D.; Lutz, P.; Lyons, L.; MacNaughton, J.; Malek, A.; Maltezos, S.; Mandl, F.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Marechal, B.; Margoni, M.; Marin, J.-C.; Mariotti, C.; Markou, A.; Martinez-Rivero, C.; Masik, J.; Mastroyiannopoulos, N.; Matorras, F.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazzucato, F.; Mazzucato, M.; Mc Nulty, R.; Meroni, C.; Migliore, E.; Mitaroff, W.; Mjoernmark, U.; Moa, T.; Moch, M.; Moenig, K.; Monge, R.; Montenegro, J.; Moraes, D.; Moreno, S.; Morettini, P.; Mueller, U.; Muenich, K.; Mulders, M.; Mundim, L.; Murray, W.; Muryn, B.; Myatt, G.; Myklebust, T.; Nassiakou, M.; Navarria, F.; Nawrocki, K.; Nemecek, S.; Nicolaidou, R.; Nikolenko, M.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Olshevski, A.; Onofre, A.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Ouraou, A.; Oyanguren, A.; Paganoni, M.; Paiano, S.; Palacios, J. P.; Palka, H.; Papadopoulou, Th. D.; Pape, L.; Parkes, C.; Parodi, F.; Parzefall, U.; Passeri, A.; Passon, O.; Peralta, L.; Perepelitsa, V.; Perrotta, A.; Petrolini, A.; Piedra, J.; Pieri, L.; Pierre, F.; Pimenta, M.; Piotto, E.; Podobnik, T.; Poireau, V.; Pol, M. E.; Polok, G.; Pozdniakov, V.; Pukhaeva, N.; Pullia, A.; Radojicic, D.; Rebecchi, P.; Rehn, J.; Reid, D.; Reinhardt, R.; Renton, P.; Richard, F.; Ridky, J.; Rivero, M.; Rodriguez, D.; Romero, A.; Ronchese, P.; Roudeau, P.; Rovelli, T.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V.; Ryabtchikov, D.; Sadovsky, A.; Salmi, L.; Salt, J.; Sander, C.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schwickerath, U.; Sekulin, R.; Siebel, M.; Sisakian, A.; Smadja, G.; Smirnova, O.; Sokolov, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sosnowski, R.; Spassov, T.; Stanitzki, M.; Stocchi, A.; Strauss, J.; Stugu, B.; Szczekowski, M.; Szeptycka, M.; Szumlak, T.; Tabarelli, T.; Tegenfeldt, F.; Timmermans, J.; Tkatchev, L.; Tobin, M.; Todorovova, S.; Tome, B.; Tonazzo, A.; Tortosa, P.; Travnicek, P.; Treille, D.; Tristram, G.; Trochimczuk, M.; Troncon, C.; Turluer, M.-L.; Tyapkin, I. A.; Tyapkin, P.; Tzamarias, S.; Uvarov, V.; Valenti, G.; van Dam, P.; van Eldik, J.; van Remortel, N.; van Vulpen, I.; Vegni, G.; Veloso, F.; Venus, W.; Verdier, P.; Verzi, V.; Vilanova, D.; Vitale, L.; Vrba, V.; Wahlen, H.; Washbrook, A. J.; Weiser, C.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Winter, M.; Witek, M.; Yushchenko, O.; Zalewska, A.; Zalewski, P.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zimin, N. I.; Zintchenko, A.; Zupan, M.; DELPHI Collaboration

    2010-06-01

    An analysis of the direct soft photon production rate as a function of the parent jet characteristics is presented, based on hadronic events collected by the DELPHI experiment at LEP1. The dependences of the photon rates on the jet kinematic characteristics (momentum, mass, etc.) and on the jet charged, neutral and total hadron multiplicities are reported. Up to a scale factor of about four, which characterizes the overall value of the soft photon excess, a similarity of the observed soft photon behavior to that of the inner hadronic bremsstrahlung predictions is found for the momentum, mass, and jet charged multiplicity dependences. However for the dependence of the soft photon rate on the jet neutral and total hadron multiplicities a prominent difference is found for the observed soft photon signal as compared to the expected bremsstrahlung from final state hadrons. The observed linear increase of the soft photon production rate with the jet total hadron multiplicity and its strong dependence on the jet neutral multiplicity suggest that the rate is proportional to the number of quark pairs produced in the fragmentation process, with the neutral pairs being more effectively radiating than the charged ones.

  6. Measurements of the Branching Fraction and Time-Dependent CP Asymmetries of B0 to J/Psi pi0 Decays

    SciTech Connect

    George, K

    2006-03-10

    We present measurements of the branching fraction and time-dependent CP asymmetries in B{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}{pi}{sup 0} decays based on (231.8 {+-} 2.6) x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} decays collected with the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric-energy B factory. We obtain a branching fraction {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}{pi}{sup 0}) = (1.94 {+-} 0.22 (stat) {+-} 0.17 (syst)) x 10{sup -5}. We also measure the CP asymmetry parameters C = -0.21 {+-} 0.26 (stat) {+-} 0.06 (syst) and S = -0.68 {+-} 0.30 (stat) {+-} 0.04 (syst).

  7. Measurements of the Branching Fraction and Time-Dependent CP Asymmetries of B0 to J/Psi pi0 Decays.

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.

    2005-08-04

    The authors present measurements of the branching fraction and time-dependent CP asymmetries in B{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi} {pi}{sup 0} decays based on (231.8 {+-} 2.6) x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B factory at SLAC during the years 1999-2004. We obtain a branching fraction {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}{pi}{sup 0}) = (1.94 {+-} 0.22 (stat) {+-} 0.17 (syst)) x 10{sup -5}. They also measure the CP asymmetry parameters C = -0.21 {+-} 0.26 (stat) {+-} 0.09 (syst) and S = -0.68 {+-} 0.30 (stat) {+-} 0.04 (syst). All results presented in this paper are preliminary.

  8. Measurement of the neutral D meson mixing parameters in a time-dependent amplitude analysis of the D0→π+π-π0 decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Brown, D. N.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; So, R. Y.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Lankford, A. J.; Gary, J. W.; Long, O.; Eisner, A. M.; Lockman, W. S.; Panduro Vazquez, W.; Chao, D. S.; Cheng, C. H.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K. T.; Hitlin, D. G.; Kim, J.; Miyashita, T. S.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Röhrken, M.; Huard, Z.; Meadows, B. T.; Pushpawela, B. G.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Sun, L.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Santoro, V.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Martellotti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Zallo, A.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Bhuyan, B.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Prell, S.; Ahmed, H.; Gritsan, A. V.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Coleman, J. P.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Cowan, G.; Banerjee, Sw.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Griessinger, K.; Hafner, A.; Schubert, K. R.; Barlow, R. J.; Lafferty, G. D.; Cenci, R.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Cowan, R.; Cheaib, R.; Robertson, S. H.; Dey, B.; Neri, N.; Palombo, F.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Summers, D. J.; Taras, P.; De Nardo, G.; Sciacca, C.; Raven, G.; Jessop, C. P.; LoSecco, J. M.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Gaz, A.; Margoni, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simi, G.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Akar, S.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Rossi, A.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Rama, M.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Anulli, F.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Pilloni, A.; Piredda, G.; Bünger, C.; Dittrich, S.; Grünberg, O.; Heß, M.; Leddig, T.; Voß, C.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Vasseur, G.; Aston, D.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dunwoodie, W.; Ebert, M.; Field, R. C.; Fulsom, B. G.; Graham, M. T.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kim, P.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; MacFarlane, D. B.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Sullivan, M. K.; Va'vra, J.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Purohit, M. V.; Wilson, J. R.; Randle-Conde, A.; Sekula, S. J.; Bellis, M.; Burchat, P. R.; Puccio, E. M. T.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Gorodeisky, R.; Guttman, N.; Peimer, D. R.; Soffer, A.; Spanier, S. M.; Ritchie, J. L.; Schwitters, R. F.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; De Mori, F.; Filippi, A.; Gamba, D.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Oyanguren, A.; Albert, J.; Beaulieu, A.; Bernlochner, F. U.; King, G. J.; Kowalewski, R.; Lueck, T.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Tasneem, N.; Gershon, T. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Latham, T. E.; Prepost, R.; Wu, S. L.; BaBar Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    We perform the first measurement on the D0-D¯ 0 mixing parameters using a time-dependent amplitude analysis of the decay D0→π+π-π0 . The data were recorded with the BABAR detector at center-of-mass energies at and near the ϒ (4 S ) resonance, and correspond to an integrated luminosity of approximately 468.1 fb-1 . The neutral D meson candidates are selected from D*(2010 )+→D0πs+ decays where the flavor at the production is identified by the charge of the low-momentum pion, πs+ . The measured mixing parameters are x =(1.5 ±1.2 ±0.6 )% and y =(0.2 ±0.9 ±0.5 )% , where the quoted uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively.

  9. Publisher's Note: Evidence for CP Violation in Time-Integrated D0→h-h+ decay rates [Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 111602 (2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Abellan Beteta, C.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Adrover, C.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A., Jr.; Amato, S.; Amhis, Y.; Anderson, J.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; Arrabito, L.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Bailey, D. S.; Balagura, V.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Bates, A.; Bauer, C.; Bauer, Th.; Bay, A.; Bediaga, I.; Belogurov, S.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Benayoun, M.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Bernet, R.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjørnstad, P. M.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blanks, C.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bobrov, A.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bozzi, C.; Brambach, T.; van den Brand, J.; Bressieux, J.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brook, N. H.; Brown, H.; Büchler-Germann, A.; Burducea, I.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Callot, O.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Camboni, A.; Campana, P.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chiapolini, N.; Ciba, K.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coca, C.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Constantin, F.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Corti, G.; Cowan, G. A.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; David, P.; David, P. N. Y.; de Bonis, I.; de Capua, S.; de Cian, M.; de Lorenzi, F.; de Miranda, J. M.; de Paula, L.; de Simone, P.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Degaudenzi, H.; Del Buono, L.; Deplano, C.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dickens, J.; Dijkstra, H.; Diniz Batista, P.; Domingo Bonal, F.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dupertuis, F.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; van Eijk, D.; Eisele, F.; Eisenhardt, S.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; Elsasser, Ch.; Elsby, D.; Esperante Pereira, D.; Estève, L.; Falabella, A.; Fanchini, E.; Färber, C.; Fardell, G.; Farinelli, C.; Farry, S.; Fave, V.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Furcas, S.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Garnier, J.-C.; Garofoli, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gauvin, N.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gibson, V.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gordon, H.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hampson, T.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harji, R.; Harnew, N.; Harrison, J.; Harrison, P. F.; Hartmann, T.; He, J.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Hicks, E.; Holubyev, K.; Hopchev, P.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hunt, P.; Huse, T.; Huston, R. S.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Iakovenko, V.; Ilten, P.; Imong, J.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jahjah Hussein, M.; Jans, E.; Jansen, F.; Jaton, P.; Jean-Marie, B.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Jost, B.; Kaballo, M.; Kandybei, S.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Keaveney, J.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kerzel, U.; Ketel, T.; Keune, A.; Khanji, B.; Kim, Y. M.; Knecht, M.; Koopman, R.; Koppenburg, P.; Kozlinskiy, A.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kruzelecki, K.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanciotti, E.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Li, L.; Li Gioi, L.; Lieng, M.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Liu, B.; Liu, G.; von Loeben, J.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez Asamar, E.; Lopez-March, N.; Lu, H.; Luisier, J.; Mac Raighne, A.; Machefert, F.; Machikhiliyan, I. V.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Magnin, J.; Malde, S.; Mamunur, R. M. D.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Mangiafave, N.; Marconi, U.; Märki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martens, A.; Martin, L.; Martín Sánchez, A.; Martinez Santos, D.; Massafferri, A.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Matveev, M.; Maurice, E.; Maynard, B.; Mazurov, A.; McGregor, G.; McNulty, R.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Merkel, J.; Messi, R.; Miglioranzi, S.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monteil, S.; Moran, D.; Morawski, P.; Mountain, R.; Mous, I.; Muheim, F.; Müller, K.; Muresan, R.; Muryn, B.; Muster, B.; Musy, M.; Mylroie-Smith, J.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Nedos, M.; Needham, M.; Neufeld, N.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nicol, M.; Niess, V.; Nikitin, N.; Nomerotski, A.; Novoselov, A.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Oggero, S.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Orlandea, M.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Owen, P.; Pal, K.; Palacios, J.; Palano, A.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Parkes, C.; Parkinson, C. J.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Paterson, S. K.; Patrick, G. N.; Patrignani, C.; Pavel-Nicorescu, C.; Pazos Alvarez, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perego, D. L.; Perez Trigo, E.; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A.; Perret, P.; Perrin-Terrin, M.; Pessina, G.; Petrella, A.; Petrolini, A.; Phan, A.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pie Valls, B.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilař, T.; Pinci, D.; Plackett, R.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Polok, G.; Poluektov, A.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Powell, A.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pugatch, V.; Navarro, A. Puig; Qian, W.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Raven, G.; Redford, S.; Reid, M. M.; Dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Rinnert, K.; Roa Romero, D. A.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodrigues, F.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Rogers, G. J.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Rosello, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz, H.; Sabatino, G.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salzmann, C.; Sannino, M.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santinelli, R.; Santovetti, E.; Sapunov, M.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Savrie, M.; Savrina, D.; Schaack, P.; Schiller, M.; Schleich, S.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Seco, M.; Semennikov, A.; Senderowska, K.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shatalov, P.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, O.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, A. C.; Smith, N. A.; Smith, E.; Sobczak, K.; Soler, F. J. P.; Solomin, A.; Soomro, F.; Souza de Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Sparkes, A.; Spradlin, P.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Subbiah, V. K.; Swientek, S.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Teodorescu, E.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tran, M. T.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tuning, N.; Ubeda Garcia, M.; Ukleja, A.; Urquijo, P.; Uwer, U.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Viaud, B.; Videau, I.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Visniakov, J.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Voss, H.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Webber, A. D.; Websdale, D.; Whitehead, M.; Wiedner, D.; Wiggers, L.; Wilkinson, G.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Wilson, F. F.; Wishahi, J.; Witek, M.; Witzeling, W.; Wotton, S. A.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xing, F.; Xing, Z.; Yang, Z.; Young, R.; Yushchenko, O.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, W. C.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zverev, E.; Zvyagin, A.

    2012-03-01

    A search for time-integrated CP violation in D0 -> h-h+ (h=K, pi) decays is presented using 0.62 fb^-1 of data collected by LHCb in 2011. The flavor of the charm meson is determined by the charge of the slow pion in the D*+ -> D0 pi+ and D*- -> D0bar pi- decay chains. The difference in CP asymmetry between D0 -> K-K+ and D0 -> pi-pi+, Delta ACP = ACP(K-K+) - ACP(pi-pi+), is measured to be [-0.82 \\pm 0.21(stat.) \\pm 0.11(syst.)]%. This differs from the hypothesis of CP conservation by 3.5 standard deviations.

  10. Relaxation Characteristics of 828 DGEBA Epoxy Over Long Time Periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoo, Jasmine; Reprogle, Riley C.; Wisler, Brian; Arechederra, Gabriel K.; McCoy, John D.; Kropka, Jamie M.; Long, Kevin N.

    The mechanical relaxation response in uniaxial compression of a diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A epoxy was studied over long time periods. The epoxy, 828DEA, was Epon 828 cured with diethanolamine (DEA). A sample was compressed at constant strain rate and held at various strain levels for days to allow the sample to relax. The sample was then compressed further and held once more. The relaxation curves were fit with a stretched exponential function. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  11. Measurement of CP Content and Time-Dependent CP Violation in B0 → D*+D*- Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Jacob M.

    2008-12-01

    This dissertation presents the measurement of the Cp-odd fraction and time-dependent CP violation parameters for the B0 → D*+ D*- decay. These results are based on the full BABAR dataset of (467 ± 5) x 106 B$\\bar{B}$ pairs collected at the PEP-II B Factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. An angular analysis finds that the CP-odd fraction of the B0 →D*+ D*- decay is Rperpendicular = 0.158 ± 0.028 ± 0.006, where the first uncertainty is statistical, and the second is systematic. A fit to the flavor-tagged, time-dependent, angular decay rate yields C+ = 0.02 ± 0.12 ± 0.02; Cperpendicular = 0.41 ± 0.50 ± 0.08; S+ = -0.76 ± 0.16 ± 0.04; S perpendicular = -1.81 ± 0.71 ± 0.16, for the CP-odd (perpendicular) and CP-even (plus) contributions. Constraining these two contributions to be the same results in C = 0.047 ± 0.091 ± 0.019; S = -0.71 ± 0.16 ± 0.03. These measurements are consistent with the Standard Model and with measurements of sin2β from B0 → (c$\\bar{c}$)K0 decays.

  12. Inverting Source Time Functions to determine the fault kinematic characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toraldo Serra, E. M.; Orefice, A.; Emolo, A.; Zollo, A.

    2012-04-01

    In seismology, the analisys of source kinematic parameters (slip-rate and rupture velocity ecc.) is a fundamental way to study the time-history of the rupture process that occurs during a seismic event. To this end various method to reconstruct source kinematics models from the inversion of seismogram have been proposed during the time. In this work we present an alternative methodology to infer source models. We aim, indeed, at obtaining the slip and rupture velocity distribution on the fault plane inverting the apparent Source Time Functions (STFs). This kind of analysis, rather than a classical inversion based on a direct study of seismograms recorded at various stations, may have several advantages. A major advantage is related to the possibility to overcome in the forward modeling any problem related to the computation of the Green's function, as the choice of the correct and reliable propagation model. To retrieve reliable STF, we apply the stabilized deconvolution technique proposed by Vallée [2004]. Based on Empirical Green's Functions (EGF) approach, this technique integrates in the deconvolution process four physical constraints on the STFs, that are causality, positivity, limited duration, and equal area. In any case the EGF approach suffers from certain limitations related to the selection of valuable Empirical Green Function, especially for small events. The approach used to invert the STFs is based on the technique of Emolo and Zollo [2005] to invert strong-motion data. In particular, the slip and the rupture velocity values are specified only at a set of control-points on the fault plane and their distributions on the whole fault are then obtained by a bicubic interpolation. The final slip and rupture velocity values at the fault-grid nodes are then determined by searching for the maximum of a fitness function (based of comparison between real and synthetic STFs) by using the Genetic Algorithm. The number of control-points is progressively increased

  13. Characteristic time for halo current growth and rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Boozer, Allen H.

    2015-10-15

    A halo current flows for part of its path through the plasma edge and for part through the chamber walls and during tokamak disruptions can be as large as tenths of the plasma current. The primary interest in halo currents is the large force that they can exert on machine components particularly if the toriodal rotation of the halo current resonates with a natural oscillation frequency of the tokamak device. Halo currents arise when required to slow down the growth of a kink that is too unstable to be stabilized by the chamber walls. The width of the current channel in the halo plasma is comparable to the amplitude of the kink, and the halo current grows linearly, not exponentially, in time. The current density in the halo is comparable to that of the main plasma body. The rocket force due to plasma flowing out of the halo and recombining on the chamber walls can cause the non-axisymmetric magnetic structure produced by the kink to rotate toroidally at a speed comparable to the halo speed of sound. Gerhardt's observations of the halo current in NSTX shot 141 687 [Nucl. Fusion 53, 023005 (2013)] illustrate many features of the theory of halo currents and are discussed as a summary of the theory.

  14. Time-Resolved Measurement of Interatomic Coulombic Decay Induced by Two-Photon Double Excitation of Ne2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takanashi, T.; Golubev, N. V.; Callegari, C.; Fukuzawa, H.; Motomura, K.; Iablonskyi, D.; Kumagai, Y.; Mondal, S.; Tachibana, T.; Nagaya, K.; Nishiyama, T.; Matsunami, K.; Johnsson, P.; Piseri, P.; Sansone, G.; Dubrouil, A.; Reduzzi, M.; Carpeggiani, P.; Vozzi, C.; Devetta, M.; Negro, M.; Faccialà, D.; Calegari, F.; Trabattoni, A.; Castrovilli, M. C.; Ovcharenko, Y.; Mudrich, M.; Stienkemeier, F.; Coreno, M.; Alagia, M.; Schütte, B.; Berrah, N.; Plekan, O.; Finetti, P.; Spezzani, C.; Ferrari, E.; Allaria, E.; Penco, G.; Serpico, C.; De Ninno, G.; Diviacco, B.; Di Mitri, S.; Giannessi, L.; Jabbari, G.; Prince, K. C.; Cederbaum, L. S.; Demekhin, Ph. V.; Kuleff, A. I.; Ueda, K.

    2017-01-01

    The hitherto unexplored two-photon doubly excited states [Ne*(2 p-13 s )]2 were experimentally identified using the seeded, fully coherent, intense extreme ultraviolet free-electron laser FERMI. These states undergo ultrafast interatomic Coulombic decay (ICD), which predominantly produces singly ionized dimers. In order to obtain the rate of ICD, the resulting yield of Ne2+ ions was recorded as a function of delay between the extreme ultraviolet pump and UV probe laser pulses. The extracted lifetimes of the long-lived doubly excited states, 390 (-130 /+450 ) fs , and of the short-lived ones, less than 150 fs, are in good agreement with ab initio quantum mechanical calculations.

  15. Time-dependent analysis of B0→KS0π-π+γ decays and studies of the K+π-π+ system in B+→K+π-π+γ decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lee, M. J.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; So, R. Y.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Lankford, A. J.; Gary, J. W.; Long, O.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; West, C. A.; Eisner, A. M.; Lockman, W. S.; Panduro Vazquez, W.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Chao, D. S.; Cheng, C. H.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K. T.; Hitlin, D. G.; Kim, J.; Miyashita, T. S.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Röhrken, M.; Andreassen, R.; Huard, Z.; Meadows, B. T.; Pushpawela, B. G.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Sun, L.; Ford, W. T.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Spaan, B.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Playfer, S.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Santoro, V.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Martellotti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Adametz, A.; Uwer, U.; Lacker, H. M.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Prell, S.; Ahmed, H.; Gritsan, A. V.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Roudeau, P.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Cowan, G.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Griessinger, K.; Hafner, A.; Schubert, K. R.; Barlow, R. J.; Lafferty, G. D.; Cenci, R.; Hamilton, B.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Cowan, R.; Cheaib, R.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Dey, B.; Neri, N.; Palombo, F.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Summers, D. J.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; de Nardo, G.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Raven, G.; Jessop, C. P.; Losecco, J. M.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simi, G.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Akar, S.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Rama, M.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Anulli, F.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Pilloni, A.; Piredda, G.; Bünger, C.; Dittrich, S.; Grünberg, O.; Hess, M.; Leddig, T.; Voß, C.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Vasseur, G.; Aston, D.; Bard, D. J.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Ebert, M.; Field, R. C.; Fulsom, B. G.; Graham, M. T.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kim, P.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Schindler, R. H.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Va'Vra, J.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wulsin, H. W.; Purohit, M. V.; Wilson, J. R.; Randle-Conde, A.; Sekula, S. J.; Bellis, M.; Burchat, P. R.; Puccio, E. M. T.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Gorodeisky, R.; Guttman, N.; Peimer, D. R.; Soffer, A.; Spanier, S. M.; Ritchie, J. L.; Schwitters, R. F.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; de Mori, F.; Filippi, A.; Gamba, D.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Oyanguren, A.; Albert, J.; Banerjee, Sw.; Beaulieu, A.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Choi, H. H. F.; King, G. J.; Kowalewski, R.; Lewczuk, M. J.; Lueck, T.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Tasneem, N.; Gershon, T. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Latham, T. E.; Band, H. R.; Dasu, S.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Wu, S. L.; Babar Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    We measure the time-dependent C P asymmetry in the radiative-penguin decay B0→KS0π-π+γ , using a sample of 471 ×106 ϒ (4 S )→B B ¯ events recorded with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e+e- storage ring at SLAC. Using events with mK π π<1.8 GeV /c2 , we measure the branching fractions of B+→K+π-π+γ and B0→K0π-π+γ , the branching fractions of the kaonic resonances decaying to K+π-π+, as well as the overall branching fractions of the B+→ρ0K+γ , B+→K*0π+γ and S -wave B+→(K π )0*0π+γ components. For events from the ρ mass band, we measure the C P -violating parameters SKS0π+π-γ=0.14 ±0.25 ±0.03 and CKS0π+π-γ=-0.39 ±0.2 0-0.02+0.03, where the first uncertainties are statistical and the second are systematic. We extract from this measurement the time-dependent C P asymmetry related to the C P eigenstate ρ0KS0 and obtain SKS0ρ γ=-0.18 ±0.3 2-0.05+0.06, which provides information on the photon polarization in the underlying b →s γ transition.

  16. Measurement of the Branching Fraction and Time-Dependent CP Asymmetry in the Decay B0 to D*+D*-Ks

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.

    2006-09-26

    The authors study the decay B{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup +}D*{sup -} K{sub S}{sup 0} using (230 {+-} 2) x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B factory. They measure a branching fraction {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup +}D*{sup -} K{sub S}{sup 0}) = (4.4 {+-} 0.4 {+-} 0.7) x 10{sup -3} and find evidence for the decay B{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup -} D{sub s1}{sup +}(2536) with a statistical significance of 4.6 {sigma}. A time-dependent CP asymmetry analysis is also performed to study the possible resonant contributions to B{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup +}D*{sup -} K{sub S}{sup 0} and the sign of cos2{beta}. Their measurement indicates that there is a sizable resonant contribution to the decay B{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup +} D*{sup -} K{sub S}{sup 0} from a unknown D{sub s1}{sup +} state with large width, and that cos2{beta} is positive at the 94% confidence level under certain theoretical assumptions.

  17. First Observation of C P Violation in B¯ 0→DCP (*)h0 Decays by a Combined Time-Dependent Analysis of BABAR and Belle Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdesselam, A.; Adachi, I.; Adametz, A.; Adye, T.; Ahmed, H.; Aihara, H.; Akar, S.; Alam, M. S.; Albert, J.; Al Said, S.; Andreassen, R.; Angelini, C.; Anulli, F.; Arinstein, K.; Arnaud, N.; Asner, D. M.; Aston, D.; Aulchenko, V.; Aushev, T.; Ayad, R.; Babu, V.; Badhrees, I.; Bahinipati, S.; Bakich, A. M.; Band, H. R.; Banerjee, Sw.; Barberio, E.; Bard, D. J.; Barlow, R. J.; Batignani, G.; Beaulieu, A.; Bellis, M.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bernard, D.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Bettarini, S.; Bettoni, D.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhardwaj, V.; Bhuyan, B.; Bianchi, F.; Biasini, M.; Biswal, J.; Blinov, V. E.; Bloom, P. C.; Bobrov, A.; Bomben, M.; Bondar, A.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Bonvicini, G.; Bozek, A.; Bozzi, C.; Bračko, M.; Briand, H.; Browder, T. E.; Brown, D. N.; Brown, D. N.; Bünger, C.; Burchat, P. R.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Calabrese, R.; Calcaterra, A.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Cartaro, C.; Casarosa, G.; Cenci, R.; Červenkov, D.; Chang, P.; Chao, D. S.; Chauveau, J.; Cheaib, R.; Chekelian, V.; Chen, A.; Chen, C.; Cheng, C. H.; Cheon, B. G.; Chilikin, K.; Chistov, R.; Cho, K.; Chobanova, V.; Choi, H. H. F.; Choi, S.-K.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Cibinetto, G.; Cinabro, D.; Cochran, J.; Coleman, J. P.; Contri, R.; Convery, M. R.; Cowan, G.; Cowan, R.; Cremaldi, L.; Dalseno, J.; Dasu, S.; Davier, M.; Davis, C. L.; De Mori, F.; De Nardo, G.; Denig, A. G.; Derkach, D.; de Sangro, R.; Dey, B.; Di Lodovico, F.; Dingfelder, J.; Dittrich, S.; Doležal, Z.; Dorfan, J.; Drásal, Z.; Drutskoy, A.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Dutta, D.; Ebert, M.; Echenard, B.; Eidelman, S.; Eigen, G.; Eisner, A. M.; Emery, S.; Ernst, J. A.; Faccini, R.; Farhat, H.; Fast, J. E.; Feindt, M.; Ferber, T.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Field, R. C.; Filippi, A.; Finocchiaro, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Flood, K. T.; Ford, W. T.; Forti, F.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Fritsch, M.; Fry, J. R.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gabathuler, E.; Gabyshev, N.; Gamba, D.; Garmash, A.; Gary, J. W.; Garzia, I.; Gaspero, M.; Gaur, V.; Gaz, A.; Gershon, T. J.; Getzkow, D.; Gillard, R.; Li Gioi, L.; Giorgi, M. A.; Glattauer, R.; Godang, R.; Goh, Y. M.; Goldenzweig, P.; Golob, B.; Golubev, V. B.; Gorodeisky, R.; Gradl, W.; Graham, M. T.; Grauges, E.; Griessinger, K.; Gritsan, A. V.; Grosdidier, G.; Grünberg, O.; Guttman, N.; Haba, J.; Hafner, A.; Hamilton, B.; Hara, T.; Harrison, P. F.; Hast, C.; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; Hearty, C.; He, X. H.; Hess, M.; Hitlin, D. G.; Hong, T. M.; Honscheid, K.; Hou, W.-S.; Hsiung, Y. B.; Huard, Z.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Iijima, T.; Inguglia, G.; Innes, W. R.; Ishikawa, A.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, Y.; Izen, J. M.; Jaegle, I.; Jawahery, A.; Jessop, C. P.; Joffe, D.; Joo, K. K.; Julius, T.; Kang, K. H.; Kass, R.; Kawasaki, T.; Kerth, L. T.; Khan, A.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, D. Y.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, K. T.; Kim, P.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. J.; King, G. J.; Kinoshita, K.; Ko, B. R.; Koch, H.; Kodyš, P.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Korpar, S.; Kovalskyi, D.; Kowalewski, R.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Križan, P.; Krokovny, P.; Kuhr, T.; Kumar, R.; Kuzmin, A.; Kwon, Y.-J.; Lacker, H. M.; Lafferty, G. D.; Lanceri, L.; Lange, D. J.; Lankford, A. J.; Latham, T. E.; Leddig, T.; Le Diberder, F.; Lee, D. H.; Lee, I. S.; Lee, M. J.; Lees, J. P.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Leruste, Ph.; Lewczuk, M. J.; Lewis, P.; Libby, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Long, O.; Lopes Pegna, D.; LoSecco, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Lueck, T.; Luitz, S.; Lukin, P.; Luppi, E.; Lusiani, A.; Luth, V.; Lutz, A. M.; Lynch, G.; MacFarlane, D. B.; Malaescu, B.; Mallik, U.; Manoni, E.; Marchiori, G.; Margoni, M.; Martellotti, S.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Masuda, M.; Mattison, T. S.; Matvienko, D.; McKenna, J. A.; Meadows, B. T.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyashita, T. S.; Miyata, H.; Mizuk, R.; Mohanty, G. B.; Moll, A.; Monge, M. R.; Moon, H. K.; Morandin, M.; Muller, D. R.; Mussa, R.; Nakano, E.; Nakazawa, H.; Nakao, M.; Nanut, T.; Nayak, M.; Neal, H.; Neri, N.; Nisar, N. K.; Nishida, S.; Nugent, I. M.; Oberhof, B.; Ocariz, J.; Ogawa, S.; Okuno, S.; Olaiya, E. O.; Olsen, J.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Onorato, G.; Onuchin, A. P.; Onuki, Y.; Ostrowicz, W.; Oyanguren, A.; Pakhlova, G.; Pakhlov, P.; Palano, A.; Pal, B.; Palombo, F.; Pan, Y.; Panduro Vazquez, W.; Paoloni, E.; Park, C. W.; Park, H.; Passaggio, S.; Patel, P. M.; Patrignani, C.; Patteri, P.; Payne, D. J.; Pedlar, T. K.; Peimer, D. R.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Pesántez, L.; Pestotnik, R.; Petrič, M.; Piccolo, M.; Piemontese, L.; Piilonen, L. E.; Pilloni, A.; Piredda, G.; Playfer, S.; Poireau, V.; Porter, F. C.; Posocco, M.; Prasad, V.; Prell, S.; Prepost, R.; Puccio, E. M. T.; Pulliam, T.; Purohit, M. V.; Pushpawela, B. G.; Rama, M.; Randle-Conde, A.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Raven, G.; Ribežl, E.; Richman, J. D.; Ritchie, J. L.; Rizzo, G.; Roberts, D. A.; Robertson, S. H.; Röhrken, M.; Roney, J. M.; Roodman, A.; Rossi, A.; Rostomyan, A.; Rotondo, M.; Roudeau, P.; Sacco, R.; Sakai, Y.; Sandilya, S.; Santelj, L.; Santoro, V.; Sanuki, T.; Sato, Y.; Savinov, V.; Schindler, R. H.; Schneider, O.; Schnell, G.; Schroeder, T.; Schubert, K. R.; Schumm, B. A.; Schwanda, C.; Schwartz, A. J.; Schwitters, R. F.; Sciacca, C.; Seiden, A.; Sekula, S. J.; Senyo, K.; Seon, O.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Sevior, M. E.; Shapkin, M.; Shebalin, V.; Shen, C. P.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shiu, J.-G.; Simard, M.; Simi, G.; Simon, F.; Simonetto, F.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Smith, A. J. S.; Smith, J. G.; Snyder, A.; So, R. Y.; Sobie, R. J.; Soffer, A.; Sohn, Y.-S.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Sokolov, A.; Solodov, E. P.; Solovieva, E.; Spaan, B.; Spanier, S. M.; Starič, M.; Stocchi, A.; Stroili, R.; Stugu, B.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Sumihama, M.; Sumisawa, K.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Summers, D. J.; Sun, L.; Tamponi, U.; Taras, P.; Tasneem, N.; Teramoto, Y.; Tisserand, V.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Toki, W. H.; Touramanis, C.; Trabelsi, K.; Tsuboyama, T.; Uchida, M.; Uglov, T.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Usov, Y.; Uwer, U.; Vahsen, S. E.; Van Hulse, C.; Vanhoefer, P.; Varner, G.; Vasseur, G.; Va'vra, J.; Verderi, M.; Vinokurova, A.; Vitale, L.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; Wagner, M. N.; Wagner, S. R.; Waldi, R.; Walsh, J. J.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, M.-Z.; Wang, P.; Watanabe, Y.; West, C. A.; Williams, K. M.; Wilson, F. F.; Wilson, J. R.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Won, E.; Wormser, G.; Wright, D. M.; Wu, S. L.; Wulsin, H. W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yamaoka, J.; Yashchenko, S.; Yuan, C. Z.; Yusa, Y.; Zallo, A.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zhulanov, V.; Zupanc, A.; BaBar Collaboration

    2015-09-01

    We report a measurement of the time-dependent C P asymmetry of B¯0 →DCP (*)h0 decays, where the light neutral hadron h0 is a π0, η , or ω meson, and the neutral D meson is reconstructed in the C P eigenstates K+K-, KS0π0, or KS0ω . The measurement is performed combining the final data samples collected at the ϒ (4 S ) resonance by the BABAR and Belle experiments at the asymmetric-energy B factories PEP-II at SLAC and KEKB at KEK, respectively. The data samples contain (471 ±3 )×106 B B ¯ pairs recorded by the BABAR detector and (772 ±11 )×106 B B ¯ pairs recorded by the Belle detector. We measure the C P asymmetry parameters -ηfS =+0.66 ±0.10 (stat)±0.06 (syst) and C =-0.02 ±0.07 (stat)±0.03 (syst). These results correspond to the first observation of C P violation in B¯0 →DCP (*)h0 decays. The hypothesis of no mixing-induced C P violation is excluded in these decays at the level of 5.4 standard deviations.

  18. Measurement of Time-dependent CP-Violating Asymmetries in B0 --> KsKsKs Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Prairie View A-M /Princeton U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Stony Brook /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Vanderbilt U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Yale U.

    2005-08-24

    The authors present preliminary measurements of the CP asymmetry parameters in B{sup 0} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sub S}{sup 0} decays, reconstructing two of the K{sub S}{sup 0} into {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and one into {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}. In a sample of 227 M B{bar B} pairs collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B Factory at SLAC, they find the CP parameters to be S = -0.25{sub -0.61}{sup +0.68}(stat) {+-} 0.05(syst) and C = 0.56{sub -0.43}{sup +0.34}(stat) {+-} 004(syst). Combining this result with the previous BABAR measurement, obtained from events with three K{sub S}{sup 0} decaying into {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, they get S = -0.63{sub -0.28}{sup +0.32}(stat) {+-} 0.04(syst); C = -0.10 {+-} 0.25(stat) {+-} 0.05, (syst).

  19. Timescale of non-exponential decay for the nuclear β-decay process in a decoherence model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, A.; Sikdar, A. K.

    2016-11-01

    The quantum-mechanical time evolution of an isolated β-unstable nuclear state in the context of certain models predicts that the square of the amplitude of the initial undecayed state becomes an approximately exponential function of time on a timescale on the order of 10-22-10-21s . It was argued that a measurement process required to distinguish between the parent and the daughter nuclear states in such a short time would destroy the characteristics of the long-lived β-unstable nuclear state, thus fundamentally restricting the observability of β decay on a short timescale. Since the interaction of the nuclear state with the environment is almost inevitable, we have obtained the timescale of initial non-exponential decay for the nuclear β decay from an estimation of quantum decoherence time considering the atom of the decaying nucleus as a quantum detector. It has been found from such considerations that a decoherence timescale of β decay is on the order of 10-16-10-15s and the decay should remain reversible and non-exponential on this timescale. The possibilities of observing the effect of non-exponential decay in nuclear systems have been discussed.

  20. Comparing the stress change characteristics and aftershock decay rate of the 2011 Mineral, VA, earthquake with similar earthquakes from a variety of tectonic settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, L. S.; Montesi, L. G.; Sauber, J. M.; Watters, T. R.; Kim, W.; Martin, A. J.; Anderson, R.

    2011-12-01

    On August 23, 2011, the magnitude 5.8 Mineral, VA, earthquake rocked the U.S. national capital region (Washington, DC) drawing worldwide attention to the occurrence of intraplate earthquakes. Using regional Coulomb stress change, we evaluate to what extent slip on faults during the Mineral, VA, earthquake and its aftershocks may have increased stress on notable Cenozoic fault systems in the DC metropolitan area: the central Virginia seismic zone, the DC fault zone, and the Stafford fault system. Our Coulomb stress maps indicate that the transfer of stress from the Mineral, VA, mainshock was at least 500 times greater than that produced from the magnitude 3.4 Germantown, MD, earthquake that occurred northwest of DC on July 16, 2010. Overall, the Mineral, VA, earthquake appears to have loaded faults of optimum orientation in the DC metropolitan region, bringing them closer to failure. The distribution of aftershocks of the Mineral, VA, earthquake will be compared with Coulomb stress change maps. We further characterize the Mineral, VA, earthquake by comparing its aftershock decay rate with that of blind thrust earthquakes with similar magnitude, focal mechanism, and depth from a variety of tectonic settings. In particular, we compare aftershock decay relations of the Mineral, VA, earthquake with two well studied California reverse faulting events, the August 4, 1985 Kettleman Hills (Mw = 6.1) and October 1, 1987 Whittier Narrow (Mw = 5.9) earthquakes. Through these relations we test the hypothesis that aftershock duration is inversely proportional to fault stressing rate, suggesting that aftershocks in active tectonic margins may last only a few years while aftershocks in intraplate regions could endure for decades to a century.

  1. Classification of biosensor time series using dynamic time warping: applications in screening cancer cells with characteristic biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Rai, Shesh N; Trainor, Patrick J; Khosravi, Farhad; Kloecker, Goetz; Panchapakesan, Balaji

    2016-01-01

    The development of biosensors that produce time series data will facilitate improvements in biomedical diagnostics and in personalized medicine. The time series produced by these devices often contains characteristic features arising from biochemical interactions between the sample and the sensor. To use such characteristic features for determining sample class, similarity-based classifiers can be utilized. However, the construction of such classifiers is complicated by the variability in the time domains of such series that renders the traditional distance metrics such as Euclidean distance ineffective in distinguishing between biological variance and time domain variance. The dynamic time warping (DTW) algorithm is a sequence alignment algorithm that can be used to align two or more series to facilitate quantifying similarity. In this article, we evaluated the performance of DTW distance-based similarity classifiers for classifying time series that mimics electrical signals produced by nanotube biosensors. Simulation studies demonstrated the positive performance of such classifiers in discriminating between time series containing characteristic features that are obscured by noise in the intensity and time domains. We then applied a DTW distance-based k-nearest neighbors classifier to distinguish the presence/absence of mesenchymal biomarker in cancer cells in buffy coats in a blinded test. Using a train-test approach, we find that the classifier had high sensitivity (90.9%) and specificity (81.8%) in differentiating between EpCAM-positive MCF7 cells spiked in buffy coats and those in plain buffy coats.

  2. An Analysis of Institutional Characteristics That Contribute to Extended Time to Doctoral Degree

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frasier, Helen Schurke

    2013-01-01

    Many factors--individual, departmental and institutional--have been associated with longer time to degree and progress toward degree completion. Lengthy time to degree affects the availability of resources, advising, persistence, and degree completion. This research identified institutional characteristics that impacted extended time to degree,…

  3. Comment on 'Time modulation of K-shell electron capture decay rates of H-like heavy ions at GSI experiments.'

    SciTech Connect

    Lipkin, H. J.; Physics; Weizmann Inst. of Science; Tel Aviv Univ.

    2010-04-16

    A Comment on the Letter by A.N. Ivanov and P. Kienle, Physical Review Letters volume 103, Issue 6, 062502 (2009). The authors of the Letter offer a Reply to experimental data at GSI, the rates of the number of daughter ions, produced by the nuclear K shell electron capture decays of the H-like heavy ions with one electron in the K shell, such as {sup 140}Pr{sup 58+}, {sup 142}Pm{sup 60+}, and {sup 122}I{sup 52+}, are modulated in time with periods T{sub EC} of the order of a few seconds, obeying an A scaling T{sub EX}=A/20 s, where A is the mass number of the mother nuclei, and with amplitudes a{sub d {sup EC}}{approx}0.21. We show that these data can be explained in terms of the interference of two massive neutrino mass eigenstates. The appearance of the interference term is due to overlap of massive neutrino mass eigenstate energies and of the wave functions of the daughter ions in two-body decay channels, caused by the energy and momentum uncertainties introduced by time differential detection of the daughter ions in GSI experiments.

  4. Proton Decay Searches with DUNE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    The Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) will be comprised of a beam line and near detector complex at Fermilab, Illinois as well as a massive far detector located 1300 km away at Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF), South Dakota. To achieve its rich physics program, DUNE plans to construct a 40kt fiducial volume Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LArTPC) far detector almost a mile underground. The size, location, and technology of the proposed far detector make it an attractive tool to search for proton decay, which has yet to be observed. Observation of such a rare event requires high sensitivity to the signal and high background rejection rate. A particular background of interest arises from cosmic muons interacting with rock surrounding the detector and producing a variety of particles which can enter the detector and leave signatures similar to that of proton decay. In order to keep this background to a reasonable level without sacrificing signal acceptance efficiency, precise tracking, made possible by the LArTPC technology, is required. Precise 3D localization of proton decay events relies on the detector's ability to identify the prompt emission of scintillation light from proton decay events as the t0-defining signal. Therefore, low background rate and high detection efficiency of this light are the crucial to the search. This work examines these characteristics in a detailed Monte Carlo simulation using DUNE`s far detector reference design and demonstrates a high signal efficiency while keeping the expected number of cosmogenic background events sufficiently low.

  5. Measurement of Time-dependent CP-Violating Asymmetries in B0 -> K+K-K0L Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Prairie View A-M /Princeton U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Stony Brook /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Vanderbilt U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Yale U.

    2005-09-20

    The authors present preliminary measurements of the Cp asymmetry parameters and CP content in B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}K{sub L}{sup 0} decays, with B{sup 0} {yields} {phi}K{sub L}{sup 0} events excluded. In a sample of 227 M B{bar B} pairs collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B Factory at SLAC, they find the CP parameters to be S = 0.07 {+-} 0.28(stat){sub -0.12}{sup +0.11}(syst); C = 0.54 {+-} 0.22(stat){sub -0.09}{sup +0.08}(syst) where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic. Estimating the fraction of CP-odd final states from angular moments analysis in the K{sup +}K{sup -}K{sub S}{sup 0} CP-conjugate final state, f{sub odd}(K{sup +}K{sup -}K{sub L}{sup 0}) = 0.92 {+-} 0.07(stat) {+-} 0.06(syst), they determine sin2{beta}{sub eff} = 0.09 {+-} 0.33(stat){sub -0.14}{sup +0.13}(syst) {+-} 0.10(syst CP-cont) where the last error is due to uncertainty on the CP content.

  6. Experimental setup and commissioning baseline study in search of time-variations in beta-decay half-lives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goddard, Braden; Hitt, George W.; Solodov, Alexander A.; Bridi, Dorian; Isakovic, A. F.; El-Khazali, Reyad; Abulail, Ayman

    2016-03-01

    Recently there have been a number of investigations into whether the decay constant of a radioactive isotope can be influenced by external factors, such as the Earth-Sun distance or Solar flare activity. Positive claims suggest that annual oscillations of ~0.1% and accelerations of ~0.4% in the relative activity of beta-emitters coincide with the Earth-Sun distance and solar flare activity, respectively. Results from replication experiments have so far been conflicting. The main criticism of the measurements used to trace and quantify these effects is that the data is of poor quality or limited in scope. Data have often been collected as part of short duration weekly calibration measurements, measured with a single type of low precision detector, only using one isotope, and having no environmental conditions information (temperature, pressure, humidity) accompanying the radiation measurements. This paper describes the setup of a series of counting experiments commissioned for addressing these criticisms. Six dedicated detector systems (four different types) measuring six different isotopes (14C, 54Mn, 60Co, 90Sr, 204Tl, and 226Ra) have been continuously collecting source activity synchronously with environmental data for a period of one month (April 2014). The results of this baseline commissioning study show that there are correlations between activity and environmental conditions for some detector types which are then quantified. The results also show that the one sigma counting uncertainties in all the detectors are less than 0.024% for a given 24 h period. After accounting for propagated uncertainties from corrections against correlations with environmental data, the ability to resolve 0.1% activity changes varies, from 8 min to 1.6 days, depending on the specific detector. All six experiments therefore, will have sufficient precision over the upcoming year to scrutinize claims of both annual activity oscillations and solar flare activity changes.

  7. Measurement of Time-Dependent CP Asymmetries and the CP-Odd Fraction in the Decay B0->D*+D*-

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Prairie View A-M /Princeton U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Stony Brook /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Vanderbilt U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Yale U.

    2005-07-06

    We present an updated measurement of time-dependent CP asymmetries and the CP-odd fraction in the decay B{sup 0} D*{sup +}D*{sup -} using 232 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B factory. We determine the CP-odd fraction to be 0.125 {+-} 0.044(stat) {+-} 0.007(syst). The time-dependent CP asymmetry parameters C{sub +} and S{sub +} are determined to be 0.06 {+-} 0.17(stat) {+-} 0.03(syst) and -0.75 {+-} 0.25(stat) {+-} 0.03(syst), respectively. The Standard Model predicts these parameters to be 0 and -sin2{beta}, respectively, in the absence of penguin amplitude contributions.

  8. Measurement of time-dependent CP asymmetries and the CP-odd fraction in the decay B0-->D(*+)D(*-).

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Gaillard, J-M; Hicheur, A; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Robbe, P; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Palano, A; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kral, J F; Kukartsev, G; LeClerc, C; Levi, M E; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Romosan, A; Ronan, M T; Shelkov, V G; Telnov, A V; Wenzel, W A; Ford, K; Harrison, T J; Hawkes, C M; Knowles, D J; Morgan, S E; Penny, R C; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Deppermann, T; Goetzen, K; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schmuecker, H; Steinke, M; Barlow, N R; Boyd, J T; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Latham, T E; Mackay, C; Wilson, F F; Abe, K; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Kyberd, P; McKemey, A K; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Chao, M; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; McMahon, S; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, Sh; Schwanke, U; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Dahmes, B; Kuznetsova, N; Levy, S L; Long, O; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Beringer, J; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schmitz, R E; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Turri, M; Walkowiak, W; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Abe, T; Barillari, T; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Clark, P J; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Roy, J; Smith, J G; van Hoek, W C; Zhang, L; Harton, J L; Hu, T; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zhang, J; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Colberg, T; Dickopp, M; Dubitzky, R S; Hauke, A; Lacker, H M; Maly, E; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Spaan, B; Wilden, L; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Brochard, F; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Khan, A; Lavin, D; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Swain, J E; Tinslay, J; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Sarti, A; Treadwell, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Falciai, D; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Pastore, F C; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Morii, M; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Eschrich, I; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Sanders, P; Taylor, G P; Grenier, G J; Lee, S-J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Yi, J; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Laplace, S; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Tantot, L; Wormser, G; Brigljević, V; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Coleman, J P; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Kay, M; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Sloane, R J; Touramanis, C; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Shorthouse, H W; Strother, P; Vidal, P B; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flack, R L; Flaecher, H U; George, S; Green, M G; Kurup, A; Marker, C E; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Vaitsas, G; Winter, M A; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, R J; Hart, P A; Forti, A C; Jackson, F; Lafferty, G D; Lyon, A J; Weatherall, J H; Williams, J C; Farbin, A; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Flood, K T; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Mangeol, D J J; Milek, M; Patel, P M; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Hast, C; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Cartaro, C; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; LoSecco, J M; Gabriel, T A; Brau, B; Pulliam, T; Wong, Q K; Brau, J; Frey, R; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Tiozzo, G; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; de la Vaissière, Ch; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Ocariz, J; Pivk, M; Roos, L; Stark, J; T'Jampens, S; Therin, G; Manfredi, P F; Re, V; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Martinez-Vidal, F; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Sandrelli, F; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lu, C; Miftakov, V; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Tanaka, H A; Varnes, E W; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Pierini, M; Piredda, G; Safai Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Christ, S; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Geddes, N I; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Xella, S M; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P-F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Langer, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Schott, G; Vasseur, G; Yeche, Ch; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Yumiceva, F X; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Convery, M R; Coupal, D P; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Grauges-Pous, E; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Jessop, C P; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Langenegger, U; Leith, D W G S; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Menke, S; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Petrak, S; Ratcliff, B N; Robertson, S H; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Simi, G; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Va'vra, J; Wagner, S R; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wright, D H; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Meyer, T I; Roat, C; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saleem, M; Wappler, F R; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Kim, H; Ritchie, J L; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Borean, C; Bosisio, L; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vitale, L; Vuagnin, G; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Jackson, P D; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Band, H R; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Hu, H; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Di Lodovico, F; Mihalyi, A; Mohapatra, A K; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Sekula, S J; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2003-09-26

    We present a measurement of time-dependent CP asymmetries and an updated determination of the CP-odd fraction in the decay B0-->D(*+)D(*-) using a data sample of 88x10(6)BB pairs collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B Factory at SLAC. We determine the CP-odd fraction to be 0.063+/-0.055(stat)+/-0.009(syst). The time-dependent CP asymmetry parameters Im(lambda(+)) and /lambda(+)/ are determined to be 0.05+/-0.29(stat)+/-0.10(syst) and 0.75+/-0.19(stat)+/-0.02(syst), respectively. The standard model predicts these parameters to be -sin(2beta and 1, respectively, in the absence of penguin diagram contributions.

  9. Measurement of time-dependent CP asymmetries and the CP-odd fraction in the decay B0-->D*+D*-.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges, E; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Weinstein, A J R; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Macfarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Andreassen, R; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Dickopp, M; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Petzold, A; Schott, G; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Schrenk, S; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Won, E; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Taylor, G P; Vazquez, W P; Charles, M J; Mader, W F; Mallik, U; Mohapatra, A K; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Yi, J; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Giroux, X; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Petersen, T C; Pierini, M; Plaszczynski, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Chavez, C A; Coleman, J P; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Cormack, C M; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Green, M G; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Hodgkinson, M C; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Chen, C; Farbin, A; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Viaud, B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Wilden, L; Jessop, C P; Losecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Pacetti, S; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Tehrani, F Safai; Voena, C; Schröder, H; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P-F; Graziani, G; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Wilson, J R; Yumiceva, F X; Abe, T; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Claus, R; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Fan, S; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, M; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Martinez-Vidal, F; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Flood, K T; Graham, M; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mellado, B; Mihalyi, A; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Tan, P; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2005-10-07

    We present an updated measurement of time-dependent CP asymmetries and the CP-odd fraction in the decay B0-->D*+D*- using 232x10(6)BB pairs collected by the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II B factory. We determine the CP-odd fraction to be 0.125+/-0.044(stat)+/-0.007(syst). The time-dependent CP asymmetry parameters C+ and S+ are determined to be 0.06+/-0.17(stat)+/-0.03(syst) and -0.75+/-0.25(stat)+/-0.03(syst), respectively. The standard model predicts these parameters to be 0 and -sin2beta, respectively, in the absence of penguin amplitude contributions.

  10. Measurement of Time-Dependent CP Asymmetries and the CP-Odd Fraction in the Decay B0→D*+D*-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Gaillard, J.-M.; Hicheur, A.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Robbe, P.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Palano, A.; Pompili, A.; Chen, J. C.; Qi, N. D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y. S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B.; Abrams, G. S.; Borgland, A. W.; Breon, A. B.; Brown, D. N.; Button-Shafer, J.; Cahn, R. N.; Charles, E.; Day, C. T.; Gill, M. S.; Gritsan, A. V.; Groysman, Y.; Jacobsen, R. G.; Kadel, R. W.; Kadyk, J.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Kral, J. F.; Kukartsev, G.; Leclerc, C.; Levi, M. E.; Lynch, G.; Mir, L. M.; Oddone, P. J.; Orimoto, T. J.; Pripstein, M.; Roe, N. A.; Romosan, A.; Ronan, M. T.; Shelkov, V. G.; Telnov, A. V.; Wenzel, W. A.; Ford, K.; Harrison, T. J.; Hawkes, C. M.; Knowles, D. J.; Morgan, S. E.; Penny, R. C.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, N. K.; Deppermann, T.; Goetzen, K.; Koch, H.; Lewandowski, B.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peters, K.; Schmuecker, H.; Steinke, M.; Barlow, N. R.; Boyd, J. T.; Chevalier, N.; Cottingham, W. N.; Kelly, M. P.; Latham, T. E.; Mackay, C.; Wilson, F. F.; Abe, K.; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Thiessen, D.; Kyberd, P.; McKemey, A. K.; Blinov, V. E.; Bukin, A. D.; Golubev, V. B.; Ivanchenko, V. N.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Yushkov, A. N.; Best, D.; Chao, M.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; McMahon, S.; Mommsen, R. K.; Roethel, W.; Stoker, D. P.; Buchanan, C.; del Re, D.; Hadavand, H. K.; Hill, E. J.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Paar, H. P.; Rahatlou, Sh.; Schwanke, U.; Sharma, V.; Berryhill, J. W.; Campagnari, C.; Dahmes, B.; Kuznetsova, N.; Levy, S. L.; Long, O.; Lu, A.; Mazur, M. A.; Richman, J. D.; Verkerke, W.; Beck, T. W.; Beringer, J.; Eisner, A. M.; Heusch, C. A.; Lockman, W. S.; Schalk, T.; Schmitz, R. E.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Turri, M.; Walkowiak, W.; Williams, D. C.; Wilson, M. G.; Albert, J.; Chen, E.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dvoretskii, A.; Hitlin, D. G.; Narsky, I.; Porter, F. C.; Ryd, A.; Samuel, A.; Yang, S.; Jayatilleke, S.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Abe, T.; Barillari, T.; Blanc, F.; Bloom, P.; Chen, S.; Clark, P. J.; Ford, W. T.; Nauenberg, U.; Olivas, A.; Rankin, P.; Roy, J.; Smith, J. G.; van Hoek, W. C.; Zhang, L.; Harton, J. L.; Hu, T.; Soffer, A.; Toki, W. H.; Wilson, R. J.; Zhang, J.; Altenburg, D.; Brandt, T.; Brose, J.; Colberg, T.; Dickopp, M.; Dubitzky, R. S.; Hauke, A.; Lacker, H. M.; Maly, E.; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R.; Nogowski, R.; Otto, S.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Spaan, B.; Wilden, L.; Bernard, D.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Brochard, F.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Thiebaux, Ch.; Vasileiadis, G.; Verderi, M.; Khan, A.; Lavin, D.; Muheim, F.; Playfer, S.; Swain, J. E.; Tinslay, J.; Andreotti, M.; Azzolini, V.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Luppi, E.; Negrini, M.; Piemontese, L.; Sarti, A.; Treadwell, E.; Anulli, F.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Falciai, D.; Finocchiaro, G.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Zallo, A.; Buzzo, A.; Contri, R.; Crosetti, G.; Lo Vetere, M.; Macri, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Pastore, F. C.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Santroni, A.; Tosi, S.; Bailey, S.; Morii, M.; Bhimji, W.; Bowerman, D. A.; Dauncey, P. D.; Egede, U.; Eschrich, I.; Gaillard, J. R.; Morton, G. W.; Nash, J. A.; Sanders, P.; Taylor, G. P.; Grenier, G. J.; Lee, S.-J.; Mallik, U.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Lamsa, J.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Yi, J.; Davier, M.; Grosdidier, G.; Höcker, A.; Laplace, S.; Le Diberder, F.; Lepeltier, V.; Lutz, A. M.; Petersen, T. C.; Plaszczynski, S.; Schune, M. H.; Tantot, L.; Wormser, G.; Brigljević, V.; Cheng, C. H.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Bevan, A. J.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; Kay, M.; Parry, R. J.; Payne, D. J.; Sloane, R. J.; Touramanis, C.; Back, J. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Shorthouse, H. W.; Strother, P.; Vidal, P. B.; Brown, C. L.; Cowan, G.; Flack, R. L.; Flaecher, H. U.; George, S.; Green, M. G.; Kurup, A.; Marker, C. E.; McMahon, T. R.; Ricciardi, S.; Salvatore, F.; Vaitsas, G.; Winter, M. A.; Brown, D.; Davis, C. L.; Allison, J.; Barlow, R. J.; Hart, P. A.; Forti, A. C.; Jackson, F.; Lafferty, G. D.; Lyon, A. J.; Weatherall, J. H.; Williams, J. C.; Farbin, A.; Jawahery, A.; Kovalskyi, D.; Lae, C. K.; Lillard, V.; Roberts, D. A.; Blaylock, G.; Dallapiccola, C.; Flood, K. T.; Hertzbach, S. S.; Kofler, R.; Koptchev, V. B.; Moore, T. B.; Saremi, S.; Staengle, H.; Willocq, S.; Cowan, R.; Sciolla, G.; Taylor, F.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Mangeol, D. J.; Milek, M.; Patel, P. M.; Lazzaro, A.; Palombo, F.; Bauer, J. M.; Cremaldi, L.; Eschenburg, V.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Reidy, J.; Sanders, D. A.; Summers, D. J.; Zhao, H. W.; Hast, C.; Taras, P.; Nicholson, H.; Cartaro, C.; Cavallo, N.; de Nardo, G.; Fabozzi, F.; Gatto, C.; Lista, L.; Paolucci, P.; Piccolo, D.; Sciacca, C.; Baak, M. A.; Raven, G.; Losecco, J. M.; Gabriel, T. A.; Brau, B.; Pulliam, T.; Wong, Q. K.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Potter, C. T.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Torrence, E.; Colecchia, F.; Dorigo, A.; Galeazzi, F.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Tiozzo, G.; Voci, C.; Benayoun, M.; Briand, H.; Chauveau, J.; David, P.; de La Vaissière, Ch.; del Buono, L.; Hamon, O.; John, M. J.; Leruste, Ph.; Ocariz, J.; Pivk, M.; Roos, L.; Stark, J.; T'jampens, S.; Therin, G.; Manfredi, P. F.; Re, V.; Gladney, L.; Guo, Q. H.; Panetta, J.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bondioli, M.; Bucci, F.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Marchiori, G.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Morganti, M.; Neri, N.; Paoloni, E.; Rama, M.; Rizzo, G.; Sandrelli, F.; Walsh, J.; Haire, M.; Judd, D.; Paick, K.; Wagoner, D. E.; Danielson, N.; Elmer, P.; Lu, C.; Miftakov, V.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J.; Tanaka, H. A.; Varnes, E. W.; Bellini, F.; Cavoto, G.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Morganti, S.; Pierini, M.; Piredda, G.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Voena, C.; Christ, S.; Wagner, G.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; de Groot, N.; Franek, B.; Geddes, N. I.; Gopal, G. P.; Olaiya, E. O.; Xella, S. M.; Aleksan, R.; Emery, S.; Gaidot, A.; Ganzhur, S. F.; Giraud, P.-F.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Kozanecki, W.; Langer, M.; London, G. W.; Mayer, B.; Schott, G.; Vasseur, G.; Yeche, Ch.; Zito, M.; Purohit, M. V.; Weidemann, A. W.; Yumiceva, F. X.; Aston, D.; Bartoldus, R.; Berger, N.; Boyarski, A. M.; Buchmueller, O. L.; Convery, M. R.; Coupal, D. P.; Dong, D.; Dorfan, J.; Dujmic, D.; Dunwoodie, W.; Field, R. C.; Glanzman, T.; Gowdy, S. J.; Grauges-Pous, E.; Hadig, T.; Halyo, V.; Hryn'ova, T.; Innes, W. R.; Jessop, C. P.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Langenegger, U.; Leith, D. W.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; Marsiske, H.; Menke, S.; Messner, R.; Muller, D. R.; O'Grady, C. P.; Ozcan, V. E.; Perazzo, A.; Perl, M.; Petrak, S.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Robertson, S. H.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Schwiening, J.; Simi, G.; Snyder, A.; Soha, A.; Stelzer, J.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Va'Vra, J.; Wagner, S. R.; Weaver, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wright, D. H.; Young, C. C.; Burchat, P. R.; Edwards, A. J.; Meyer, T. I.; Roat, C.; Ahmed, S.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Saleem, M.; Wappler, F. R.; Bugg, W.; Krishnamurthy, M.; Spanier, S. M.; Eckmann, R.; Kim, H.; Ritchie, J. L.; Schwitters, R. F.; Izen, J. M.; Kitayama, I.; Lou, X. C.; Ye, S.; Bianchi, F.; Bona, M.; Gallo, F.; Gamba, D.; Borean, C.; Bosisio, L.; della Ricca, G.; Dittongo, S.; Grancagnolo, S.; Lanceri, L.; Poropat, P.; Vitale, L.; Vuagnin, G.; Panvini, R. S.; Banerjee, Sw.; Brown, C. M.; Fortin, D.; Jackson, P. D.; Kowalewski, R.; Roney, J. M.; Band, H. R.; Dasu, S.; Datta, M.; Eichenbaum, A. M.; Hu, H.; Johnson, J. R.; Kutter, P. E.; Li, H.; Liu, R.; di Lodovico, F.; Mihalyi, A.; Mohapatra, A. K.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Sekula, S. J.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Wu, J.; Wu, S. L.; Yu, Z.; Neal, H.

    2003-09-01

    We present a measurement of time-dependent CP asymmetries and an updated determination of the CP-odd fraction in the decay B0→D*+D*- using a data sample of 88×106BB¯ pairs collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B Factory at SLAC. We determine the CP-odd fraction to be 0.063±0.055(stat)±0.009(syst). The time-dependent CP asymmetry parameters Im(λ+) and |λ+| are determined to be 0.05±0.29(stat)±0.10(syst) and 0.75±0.19(stat)±0.02(syst), respectively. The standard model predicts these parameters to be -sin(2β and 1, respectively, in the absence of penguin diagram contributions.

  11. Measurement of time-dependent CP asymmetries in B0-->D(*)+/-pi-/+ decays and constraints on sin(2beta+gamma).

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Gaillard, J-M; Hicheur, A; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Robbe, P; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Palano, A; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; LeClerc, C; Levi, M E; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Romosan, A; Ronan, M T; Shelkov, V G; Telnov, A V; Wenzel, W A; Ford, K; Harrison, T J; Hawkes, C M; Knowles, D J; Morgan, S E; Penny, R C; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schmuecker, H; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Latham, T E; Mackay, C; Wilson, F F; Abe, K; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Kyberd, P; McKemey, A K; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Gary, J W; Layter, J; Shen, B C; Wang, K; del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, Sh; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Dahmes, B; Kuznetsova, N; Levy, S L; Long, O; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Beringer, J; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schmitz, R E; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Turri, M; Walkowiak, W; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Erwin, R J; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Abe, T; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Clark, P J; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Roy, J; Smith, J G; van Hoek, W C; Zhang, L; Harton, J L; Hu, T; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zhang, J; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Colberg, T; Dickopp, M; Dubitzky, R S; Hauke, A; Lacker, H M; Maly, E; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Spaan, B; Wilden, L; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Brochard, F; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Grenier, P; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Khan, A; Lavin, D; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Swain, J E; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Sarti, A; Treadwell, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Biasini, M; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Falciai, D; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Pioppi, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Morii, M; Won, E; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Eschrich, I; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Sanders, P; Taylor, G P; Grenier, G J; Lee, S-J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Yi, J; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Laplace, S; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Tantot, L; Wormser, G; Brigljević, V; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Coleman, J P; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Kay, M; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Sloane, R J; Touramanis, C; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Shorthouse, H W; Vidal, P B; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flack, R L; Flaecher, H U; George, S; Green, M G; Kurup, A; Marker, C E; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Vaitsas, G; Winter, M A; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Hart, P A; Hodgkinson, M C; Jackson, F; Lafferty, G D; Lyon, A J; Weatherall, J H; Williams, J C; Farbin, A; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Flood, K T; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Mangeol, D J J; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Cote-Ahern, D; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Cartaro, C; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; LoSecco, J M; Gabriel, T A; Brau, B; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Wong, Q K; Brau, J; Frey, R; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Tiozzo, G; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; de la Vaissière, Ch; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Ocariz, J; Pivk, M; Roos, L; Stark, J; T'Jampens, S; Therin, G; Manfredi, P F; Re, V; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Del Gamba, V; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Martinez-Vidal, F; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Sandrelli, F; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lu, C; Miftakov, V; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Tanaka, H A; Varnes, E W; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Pierini, M; Piredda, G; Tehrani, F Safai; Voena, C; Christ, S; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Geddes, N I; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Xella, S M; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P-F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Langer, M; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Schott, G; Vasseur, G; Yeche, Ch; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Yumiceva, F X; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Convery, M R; Coupal, D P; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Grauges-Pous, E; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Jessop, C P; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Langenegger, U; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Petrak, S; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Simi, G; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Va'vra, J; Wagner, S R; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wright, D H; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Meyer, T I; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, M; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Saleem, M; Wappler, F R; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Kim, H; Ritchie, J L; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Borean, C; Bosisio, L; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vitale, L; Vuagnin, G; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Jackson, P D; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Band, H R; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Di Lodovico, F; Mihalyi, A; Mohapatra, A K; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Sekula, S J; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2004-06-25

    We present a measurement of CP-violating asymmetries in fully reconstructed B0-->D(*)+/-pi-/+ decays in approximately 88 x 10(6) upsilon(4S)-->BBmacr; decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B factory at SLAC. From a time-dependent maximum-likelihood fit we obtain the following for the CP-violating parameters: a=-0.022+/-0.038 (stat)+/-0.020 (syst), a*=-0.068+/-0.038 (stat)+/-0.020 (syst), c(lep)=+0.025+/-0.068 (stat)+/-0.033 (syst), and c*(lep)=+0.031+/-0.070 (stat)+/-0.033 (syst). Using other measurements and theoretical assumptions we interpret the results in terms of the angles of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa unitarity triangle, and find |sin((2beta+gamma)|>0.69 at 68% confidence level. We exclude the hypothesis of no CP violation [sin(2beta+gamma)=0] at 83% confidence level.

  12. Measurement of Time-Dependent CP Asymmetries in B0→D(*)±π∓ Decays and Constraints on sin((2β+γ)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Gaillard, J.-M.; Hicheur, A.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Robbe, P.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Palano, A.; Pompili, A.; Chen, J. C.; Qi, N. D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y. S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B.; Abrams, G. S.; Borgland, A. W.; Breon, A. B.; Brown, D. N.; Button-Shafer, J.; Cahn, R. N.; Charles, E.; Day, C. T.; Gill, M. S.; Gritsan, A. V.; Groysman, Y.; Jacobsen, R. G.; Kadel, R. W.; Kadyk, J.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Kukartsev, G.; Leclerc, C.; Levi, M. E.; Lynch, G.; Mir, L. M.; Oddone, P. J.; Orimoto, T. J.; Pripstein, M.; Roe, N. A.; Romosan, A.; Ronan, M. T.; Shelkov, V. G.; Telnov, A. V.; Wenzel, W. A.; Ford, K.; Harrison, T. J.; Hawkes, C. M.; Knowles, D. J.; Morgan, S. E.; Penny, R. C.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, N. K.; Goetzen, K.; Held, T.; Koch, H.; Lewandowski, B.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peters, K.; Schmuecker, H.; Steinke, M.; Boyd, J. T.; Chevalier, N.; Cottingham, W. N.; Kelly, M. P.; Latham, T. E.; Mackay, C.; Wilson, F. F.; Abe, K.; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Thiessen, D.; Kyberd, P.; McKemey, A. K.; Teodorescu, L.; Blinov, V. E.; Bukin, A. D.; Golubev, V. B.; Ivanchenko, V. N.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Yushkov, A. N.; Best, D.; Bruinsma, M.; Chao, M.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Mommsen, R. K.; Roethel, W.; Stoker, D. P.; Buchanan, C.; Hartfiel, B. L.; Gary, J. W.; Layter, J.; Shen, B. C.; Wang, K.; del Re, D.; Hadavand, H. K.; Hill, E. J.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Paar, H. P.; Rahatlou, Sh.; Sharma, V.; Berryhill, J. W.; Campagnari, C.; Dahmes, B.; Kuznetsova, N.; Levy, S. L.; Long, O.; Lu, A.; Mazur, M. A.; Richman, J. D.; Verkerke, W.; Beck, T. W.; Beringer, J.; Eisner, A. M.; Heusch, C. A.; Lockman, W. S.; Schalk, T.; Schmitz, R. E.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Turri, M.; Walkowiak, W.; Williams, D. C.; Wilson, M. G.; Albert, J.; Chen, E.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dvoretskii, A.; Erwin, R. J.; Hitlin, D. G.; Narsky, I.; Piatenko, T.; Porter, F. C.; Ryd, A.; Samuel, A.; Yang, S.; Jayatilleke, S.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Abe, T.; Blanc, F.; Bloom, P.; Chen, S.; Clark, P. J.; Ford, W. T.; Nauenberg, U.; Olivas, A.; Rankin, P.; Roy, J.; Smith, J. G.; van Hoek, W. C.; Zhang, L.; Harton, J. L.; Hu, T.; Soffer, A.; Toki, W. H.; Wilson, R. J.; Zhang, J.; Altenburg, D.; Brandt, T.; Brose, J.; Colberg, T.; Dickopp, M.; Dubitzky, R. S.; Hauke, A.; Lacker, H. M.; Maly, E.; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R.; Nogowski, R.; Otto, S.; Schubert, J.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Spaan, B.; Wilden, L.; Bernard, D.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Brochard, F.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Grenier, P.; Thiebaux, Ch.; Vasileiadis, G.; Verderi, M.; Khan, A.; Lavin, D.; Muheim, F.; Playfer, S.; Swain, J. E.; Andreotti, M.; Azzolini, V.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Luppi, E.; Negrini, M.; Piemontese, L.; Sarti, A.; Treadwell, E.; Anulli, F.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Biasini, M.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Falciai, D.; Finocchiaro, G.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Pioppi, M.; Zallo, A.; Buzzo, A.; Capra, R.; Contri, R.; Crosetti, G.; Vetere, M. Lo; Macri, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Santroni, A.; Tosi, S.; Bailey, S.; Morii, M.; Won, E.; Bhimji, W.; Bowerman, D. A.; Dauncey, P. D.; Egede, U.; Eschrich, I.; Gaillard, J. R.; Morton, G. W.; Nash, J. A.; Sanders, P.; Taylor, G. P.; Grenier, G. J.; Lee, S.-J.; Mallik, U.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Lamsa, J.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Yi, J.; Davier, M.; Grosdidier, G.; Höcker, A.; Laplace, S.; Diberder, F. Le; Lepeltier, V.; Lutz, A. M.; Petersen, T. C.; Plaszczynski, S.; Schune, M. H.; Tantot, L.; Wormser, G.; Brigljević, V.; Cheng, C. H.; Lange, D. J.; Simani, M. C.; Wright, D. M.; Bevan, A. J.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; Kay, M.; Parry, R. J.; Payne, D. J.; Sloane, R. J.; Touramanis, C.; Back, J. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Shorthouse, H. W.; Vidal, P. B.; Brown, C. L.; Cowan, G.; Flack, R. L.; Flaecher, H. U.; George, S.; Green, M. G.; Kurup, A.; Marker, C. E.; McMahon, T. R.; Ricciardi, S.; Salvatore, F.; Vaitsas, G.; Winter, M. A.; Brown, D.; Davis, C. L.; Allison, J.; Barlow, N. R.; Barlow, R. J.; Hart, P. A.; Hodgkinson, M. C.; Jackson, F.; Lafferty, G. D.; Lyon, A. J.; Weatherall, J. H.; Williams, J. C.; Farbin, A.; Jawahery, A.; Kovalskyi, D.; Lae, C. K.; Lillard, V.; Roberts, D. A.; Blaylock, G.; Dallapiccola, C.; Flood, K. T.; Hertzbach, S. S.; Kofler, R.; Koptchev, V. B.; Moore, T. B.; Saremi, S.; Staengle, H.; Willocq, S.; Cowan, R.; Sciolla, G.; Taylor, F.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Mangeol, D. J.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Lazzaro, A.; Palombo, F.; Bauer, J. M.; Cremaldi, L.; Eschenburg, V.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Reidy, J.; Sanders, D. A.; Summers, D. J.; Zhao, H. W.; Brunet, S.; Cote-Ahern, D.; Taras, P.; Nicholson, H.; Cartaro, C.; Cavallo, N.; Nardo, G. De; Fabozzi, F.; Gatto, C.; Lista, L.; Paolucci, P.; Piccolo, D.; Sciacca, C.; Baak, M. A.; Raven, G.; Losecco, J. M.; Gabriel, T. A.; Brau, B.; Gan, K. K.; Honscheid, K.; Hufnagel, D.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Pulliam, T.; Wong, Q. K.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Potter, C. T.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Torrence, E.; Colecchia, F.; Dorigo, A.; Galeazzi, F.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Tiozzo, G.; Voci, C.; Benayoun, M.; Briand, H.; Chauveau, J.; David, P.; de La Vaissière, Ch.; del Buono, L.; Hamon, O.; John, M. J.; Leruste, Ph.; Ocariz, J.; Pivk, M.; Roos, L.; Stark, J.; T'jampens, S.; Therin, G.; Manfredi, P. F.; Re, V.; Behera, P. K.; Gladney, L.; Guo, Q. H.; Panetta, J.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bondioli, M.; Bucci, F.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; del Gamba, V.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Marchiori, G.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Morganti, M.; Neri, N.; Paoloni, E.; Rama, M.; Rizzo, G.; Sandrelli, F.; Walsh, J.; Haire, M.; Judd, D.; Paick, K.; Wagoner, D. E.; Danielson, N.; Elmer, P.; Lu, C.; Miftakov, V.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J.; Tanaka, H. A.; Varnes, E. W.; Bellini, F.; Cavoto, G.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Morganti, S.; Pierini, M.; Piredda, G.; Tehrani, F. Safai; Voena, C.; Christ, S.; Wagner, G.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; de Groot, N.; Franek, B.; Geddes, N. I.; Gopal, G. P.; Olaiya, E. O.; Xella, S. M.; Aleksan, R.; Emery, S.; Gaidot, A.; Ganzhur, S. F.; Giraud, P.-F.; de Monchenault, G. Hamel; Kozanecki, W.; Langer, M.; Legendre, M.; London, G. W.; Mayer, B.; Schott, G.; Vasseur, G.; Yeche, Ch.; Zito, M.; Purohit, M. V.; Weidemann, A. W.; Yumiceva, F. X.; Aston, D.; Bartoldus, R.; Berger, N.; Boyarski, A. M.; Buchmueller, O. L.; Convery, M. R.; Coupal, D. P.; Dong, D.; Dorfan, J.; Dujmic, D.; Dunwoodie, W.; Field, R. C.; Glanzman, T.; Gowdy, S. J.; Grauges-Pous, E.; Hadig, T.; Halyo, V.; Hryn'ova, T.; Innes, W. R.; Jessop, C. P.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Langenegger, U.; Leith, D. W.; Libby, J.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; Marsiske, H.; Messner, R.; Muller, D. R.; O'Grady, C. P.; Ozcan, V. E.; Perazzo, A.; Perl, M.; Petrak, S.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Schwiening, J.; Simi, G.; Snyder, A.; Soha, A.; Stelzer, J.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Va'Vra, J.; Wagner, S. R.; Weaver, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wright, D. H.; Young, C. C.; Burchat, P. R.; Edwards, A. J.; Meyer, T. I.; Petersen, B. A.; Roat, C.; Ahmed, M.; Ahmed, S.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Saeed, M. A.; Saleem, M.; Wappler, F. R.; Bugg, W.; Krishnamurthy, M.; Spanier, S. M.; Eckmann, R.; Kim, H.; Ritchie, J. L.; Schwitters, R. F.; Izen, J. M.; Kitayama, I.; Lou, X. C.; Ye, S.; Bianchi, F.; Bona, M.; Gallo, F.; Gamba, D.; Borean, C.; Bosisio, L.; della Ricca, G.; Dittongo, S.; Grancagnolo, S.; Lanceri, L.; Poropat, P.; Vitale, L.; Vuagnin, G.; Panvini, R. S.; Banerjee, Sw.; Brown, C. M.; Fortin, D.; Jackson, P. D.; Kowalewski, R.; Roney, J. M.; Band, H. R.; Dasu, S.; Datta, M.; Eichenbaum, A. M.; Johnson, J. R.; Kutter, P. E.; Li, H.; Liu, R.; di Lodovico, F.; Mihalyi, A.; Mohapatra, A. K.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Sekula, S. J.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Wu, J.; Wu, S. L.; Yu, Z.; Neal, H.

    2004-06-01

    We present a measurement of CP-violating asymmetries in fully reconstructed B0→D(*)±π∓ decays in approximately 88×106 υ(4S)→BB¯ decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B factory at SLAC. From a time-dependent maximum-likelihood fit we obtain the following for the CP-violating parameters: a=-0.022±0.038 (stat)±0.020 (syst), a*=-0.068±0.038 (stat)±0.020 (syst), clep=+0.025±0.068 (stat)±0.033 (syst), and c*lep=+0.031±0.070 (stat)±0.033 (syst). Using other measurements and theoretical assumptions we interpret the results in terms of the angles of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa unitarity triangle, and find |sin((2β+γ)|>0.69 at 68% confidence level. We exclude the hypothesis of no CP violation [sin((2β+γ)=0] at 83% confidence level.

  13. Measurement of time-dependent CP violation in B 0 → η'K 0 decays

    SciTech Connect

    Šantelj, L.; Yusa, Y.; Abdesselam, A.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Al Said, S.; Asner, D. M.; Aulchenko, V.; Aushev, T.; Ayad, R.; Bahinipati, S.

    2014-10-29

    We present a measurement of the time-dependent CP violation parameters in B0 → η'K0 decays. The measurement is based on the full data sample containing 772×106 BB-bar pairs collected at the Υ(4S) resonance using the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e+e- collider. The measured values of the mixing-induced and direct CP violation parameters are: sin 2φ1eff = +0.68 ± 0.07 ± 0.03, Aη'K0 = +0.03 ± 0.05 ± 0.04, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. The values obtained are the most accurate to date. Furthermore, these results are consistent with our previous measurements and with the world-average value of sin 2φ1 measured in B0 → J/ψK0 decays.

  14. Super-resolution infrared time measurement method based on target dynamic characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bin; Hu, Qiuping; Tang, Zili; Zhang, Sanxi; Zhang, Hua; Yue, Peng; Liu, Biao

    2016-10-01

    High precision time control in the use of weapons and equipment is an important part of product design and development. In order to satisfy the data acquisition requirement of high accuracy and reliability in the rapid flight process, the super-resolution time measurement method based on target dynamic characteristics was put forward and proved by the cabin opening time measurement experiment. First, the changes of explosion pressure wave and image in the cabin opening process were analyzed in detail. The change regulation of explosion flame shape was analyzed by the characteristics of typical pressure wave, and then the high frequency images of the explosion process were shot by high speed camera. The change regulation of the infrared image was obtained through the comparison of visible and infrared image mechanism. Then, combined with the target motion features, and the observed station parameters, the observation model of movement process was built. On the basis of the above research, the infrared characteristic and the movement characteristic were transformed, and the super resolution model was established. For test method, combined with the actual class time measuring process in experimental design, to obtain the special radar for measuring high precision open class time as the true value of the precision appraisal. Experimental results show that the infrared feature and motion feature can realize open class time super resolution measurement, can effectively improve the accuracy and reliability of the data, to achieve specific action of high accuracy measurement that plays an important role by making use of the target dynamic characteristics.

  15. The Impact of Item Format and Examinee Characteristics on Response Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, Brian J.; Johnston, Mary M.; Lipner, Rebecca S.

    2013-01-01

    Current research on examination response time has focused on tests comprised of traditional multiple-choice items. Consequently, the impact of other innovative or complex item formats on examinee response time is not understood. The present study used multilevel growth modeling to investigate examinee characteristics associated with response time…

  16. Time-Based Loss in Visual Short-Term Memory Is from Trace Decay, Not Temporal Distinctiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ricker, Timothy J.; Spiegel, Lauren R.; Cowan, Nelson

    2014-01-01

    There is no consensus as to why forgetting occurs in short-term memory tasks. In past work, we have shown that forgetting occurs with the passage of time, but there are 2 classes of theories that can explain this effect. In the present work, we investigate the reason for time-based forgetting by contrasting the predictions of temporal…

  17. Measurement of D{0}-D[-over]{0} mixing from a time-dependent amplitude analysis of D{0}-->K+pi{-}pi{0} decays.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Bona, M; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prencipe, E; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Tico, J Garra; Grauges, E; Lopez, L; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Cahn, R N; Jacobsen, R G; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Lynch, G; Osipenkov, I L; Ronan, M T; Tackmann, K; Tanabe, T; Hawkes, C M; Soni, N; Watson, A T; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Walker, D; Asgeirsson, D J; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Barrett, M; Khan, A; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Buzykaev, A R; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Shen, B C; Vitug, G M; Yasin, Z; Zhang, L; Sharma, V; Campagnari, C; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Wang, L; Wilson, M G; Winstrom, L O; Cheng, C H; Doll, D A; Echenard, B; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Bloom, P C; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; Hirschauer, J F; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Ayad, R; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Karbach, M; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Kobel, M J; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Thiebaux, Ch; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Playfer, S; Watson, J E; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Santoro, V; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Bard, D J; Dauncey, P D; Nash, J A; Vazquez, W Panduro; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gao, Y Y; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Lae, C K; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Béquilleux, J; D'Orazio, A; Davier, M; da Costa, J Firmino; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Lepeltier, V; Le Diberder, F; Lutz, A M; Pruvot, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Burke, J P; Chavez, C A; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Clarke, C K; George, K A; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Sigamani, M; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Hopkins, D A; Paramesvaran, S; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Alwyn, K E; Bailey, D; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Jackson, G; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Anderson, J; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Dallapiccola, C; Li, X; Salvati, E; Saremi, S; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Zhao, M; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; De Nardo, G; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Onorato, G; Sciacca, C; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K J; LoSecco, J M; Wang, W F; Benelli, G; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Sekula, S J; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Castelli, G; Gagliardi, N; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Sanchez, P del Amo; Ben-Haim, E; Briand, H; Calderini, G; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Ocariz, J; Perez, A; Prendki, J; Sitt, S; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Carpinelli, M; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Pegna, D Lopes; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Anulli, F; Baracchini, E; Cavoto, G; del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Jackson, P D; Gioi, L Li; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Renga, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Hartmann, T; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Escalier, M; Esteve, L; Ganzhur, S F; de Monchenault, G Hamel; Kozanecki, W; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; White, R M; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Benitez, J F; Cenci, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Gabareen, A M; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Innes, W R; Kaminski, J; Kelsey, M H; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Lindquist, B; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; Neal, H; Nelson, S; O'Grady, C P; Ofte, I; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; West, C A; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Wulsin, H W; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Ziegler, V; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Miyashita, T S; Petersen, B A; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Zain, S B; Spanier, S M; Wogsland, B J; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Drummond, B W; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Bianchi, F; Gamba, D; Pelliccioni, M; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Ricca, G Della; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Milanes, D A; Oyanguren, A; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Choi, H H F; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Lewczuk, M J; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Gershon, T J; Harrison, P F; Ilic, J; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Dasu, S; Flood, K T; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Vuosalo, C O; Wu, S L

    2009-11-20

    We present evidence of D{0}-D[-over ]{0} mixing using a time-dependent amplitude analysis of the decay D{0}-->K+pi{-}pi;{0} in a data sample of 384 fb{-1} collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e+e{-} collider at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. Assuming CP conservation, we measure the mixing parameters x{Kpipi{0}}{'}=[2.61{-0.68}{+0.57}(stat)+/-0.39(syst)]%, y{Kpipi;{0}}{'}=[-0.06{-0.64}{+0.55}(stat)+/-0.34(syst)]%. This result is inconsistent with the no-mixing hypothesis with a significance of 3.2 standard deviations. We find no evidence of CP violation in mixing.

  18. Short-time dynamics and decay mechanism of 2(1H)-pyridinone upon excitation to the light-absorbing S4(21𝝅 𝝅* ) state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Teng-Shuo; Xue, Jia-Dan; Zheng, Xuming; Xie, Bin-Bin; Fang, Wei-Hai

    2017-03-01

    The excited-state structural dynamics and the decay mechanism of 2(1H)-pyridinone (NHP) after excitation to the S4(21π π* ) light-absorbing state were studied using resonance Raman spectroscopy and complete-active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) calculations. The B-band absorption cross-section and the corresponding absolute resonance Raman cross-sections were simulated using a simple model based on time-dependent wave-packet theory. The geometric structures of the singlet electronic excited states and their curve-crossing points were optimized at the CASSCF level of theory. The obtained short-time structural dynamics in easy-to-visualize internal coordinates were then compared with the CASSCF-predicted structural-parameter changes of S4(21π π* ) /S3 (21nπ* ) -MIN , S4(21π π* ) /S1 (11nπ* ) -MIN , and S4(21π π* ) -MIN . Our results indicate that the initial population of NHP in the S4 state bifurcates in or near the Franck-Condon region, leading to two predominant (S4S3-MIN and S4S1-MIN) internal conversion pathways. The lowest-lying S2(11π π* ) excited state is finally formed via subsequent internal conversions S3(21nπ* ) /S2 (11π π* ) -MIN and S1(11nπ* ) /S2 (11π π* ) -MIN. The enol-keto tautomeric mechanism does not seem to play a role. The decay mechanism in the singlet realm is proposed.

  19. Characteristics of electricity generation with intermittent sources depending on the time resolution of the input data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, F.; Wertz, F.

    2016-08-01

    Data on the electricity supply with intermittent renewable sources are made public by the Transmission System Operators (TSO) and other sources. Data are typically provided in 1h increments. In this paper, we analyse wind and photo-voltaic data from the Czech Republic. The analysis concentrates on major characteristics of a supply situation where the annual demand is formally met by scaled-up wind and photovoltaic power. The original data are supplied in 1min increments and successively averaged up to 1h time resolution. This paper focuses on the dependence of the major supply characteristics on the time resolution of the available electricity data.

  20. Characteristic time scales in the American dollar-Mexican peso exchange currency market

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez-Ramirez, Jose

    2002-06-01

    Daily fluctuations of the American dollar-Mexican peso exchange currency market are studied using multifractal analysis methods. It is found evidence of multiaffinity of daily fluctuations in the sense that the qth-order (roughness) Hurst exponent Hq varies with changes in q. It is also found that there exist several characteristic time scales ranging from week to year. Accordingly, the market exhibits persistence in the sense that instabilities introduced by market events acting around the characteristic time scales (mainly, quarter and year) would propagate through the future market activity. Some implications of our results on the regulation of the dollar-mexpeso market activity are discussed.

  1. Time decay of object, place and temporal order memory in a paradigm assessing simultaneously episodic-like memory components in mice.

    PubMed

    Belblidia, Hassina; Abdelouadoud, Abdelmalek; Jozet-Alves, Christelle; Dumas, Hélène; Freret, Thomas; Leger, Marianne; Schumann-Bard, Pascale

    2015-06-01

    A common trait of numerous memory disorders is the impairment of episodic memory. Episodic memory is a delay-dependant memory, especially associating three components, the "what", "where" and "when" of a unique event. To investigate underlying mechanisms of such memory, several tests, mainly based on object exploration behaviour, have been set up in rodents. Recently, a three-trial object recognition task has been proposed to evaluate simultaneously the different components of episodic-like memory in rodents. However, to date, the time course of each memory component in this paradigm is not known. We characterised here the time course of memory decay in adult mice during the three-trial object recognition task, with inter-trial interval (ITI) ranging from 1h to 4h. We found that, with 1h and 2h, but not 4h ITI, mice spent more time to explore the displaced "old object" relative to the displaced "recent object", reflecting memory for "what and when". Concomitantly, animals exhibited more exploration time for the displaced "old object" relative to the stationary "old object", reflecting memory for "what and where". These results provide strong evidence that mice establish an integrated memory for unique experience consisting of the "what", "where" and "when" that can persist until 2h ITI.

  2. Measurements of branching fractions and time-dependent CP-violating asymmetries in B --> eta'K decays.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges-Pous, E; Palano, A; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Latham, T E; Wilson, F F; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Weinstein, A J R; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Macfarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, Sh; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Harton, J L; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zeng, Q; Spaan, B; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Dickopp, M; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Lacker, H M; Maly, E; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Petzold, A; Schott, G; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Schrenk, S; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Sarti, A; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Won, E; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Marks, J; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Taylor, G P; Charles, M J; Grenier, G J; Mallik, U; Mohapatra, A K; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Yi, J; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Giroux, X; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Pierini, M; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Chavez, C A; Coleman, J P; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Cormack, C M; Di Lodovico, F; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flack, R L; Flaecher, H U; Green, M G; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Winter, M A; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Hodgkinson, M C; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Chen, C; Farbin, A; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Cerizza, G; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Wilden, L; Jessop, C P; Losecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Simi, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Miftakov, V; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Safai Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Christ, S; Schröder, H; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P-F; de Monchenault, G Hamel; Kozanecki, W; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Wilson, J R; Yumiceva, F X; Abe, T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Claus, R; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; De Nardo, G; Dingfelder, J C; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Fan, S; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Stelzer, J; Strube, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Va'vra, J; Wagner, S R; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, M; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Saleem, M; Wappler, F R; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Kim, H; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vitale, L; Vuagnin, G; Martinez-Vidal, F; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Jackson, P D; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Flood, K T; Graham, M; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mihalyi, A; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Tan, P; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Greene, M G; Neal, H

    2005-05-20

    We present measurements of the B --> eta(')K branching fractions; for B(+) --> eta(')K(+) we measure also the time-integrated charge asymmetry Alpha(ch), and for B(0) --> eta(')K(0)(S) the time-dependent CP-violation parameters S and C. The data sample corresponds to 232 x 10(6) BB pairs produced by e(+)e(-) annihilation at the Upsilon (4S). The results are Beta(B --> eta(')K(+)) = (68.9 +/- 2.0 +/- 3.2) x 10(-6), Beta(B(0) --> eta(')K(0)) = (67.4 +/- 3.2) x 10(-6), Alpha(ch) = 0.033 +/- 0.028 +/- 0.005, S = 0.30 +/- 0.140 +/- 0.02, and C = -0.21 +/- 0.10 +/- 0.02, where the first error quoted is statistical and the second is systematic.

  3. Doubling Time for Nonexponential Families of Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Sheldon P.

    2010-01-01

    One special characteristic of any exponential growth or decay function f(t) = Ab[superscript t] is its unique doubling time or half-life, each of which depends only on the base "b". The half-life is used to characterize the rate of decay of any radioactive substance or the rate at which the level of a medication in the bloodstream decays as it is…

  4. The Galactic Black Hole Transient H1743-322 During Outburst Decay Connections Between Timing Noise, State Transitions, And Radio Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalemci, E.; Tomsick, J. A.; Corbel; Kaaret, P.; Rothschild, R. E.; Pottschmidt, K.

    2006-01-01

    Multiwavelength observations of Galactic black hole transients during outburst decay are instrumental for our understanding of the accretion geometry and the formation of outflows around black hole systems. H1743-322, a black hole transient observed intensely in X-rays and also covered in the radio band during its 2003 decay, provides clues about the changes in accretion geometry during state transitions and also the general properties of X-ray emission during the intermediate and low-hard states. In this work, we report on the evolution of spectral and temporal properties in X-rays and the flux in the radio band, with the goal of understanding the nature of state transitions observed in this source. We concentrate on the transition from the thermal dominant state to the intermediate state that occurs on a timescale of 1 day. We show that the state transition is associated with a sudden increase in power-law flux. We determine that the ratio of the power-law flux to the overall flux in the 3-25 keV band must exceed 0.6 for us to observe strong timing noise. Even after the state transition, once this ratio was below 0.6, the system transited back to the thermal dominant state for 1 day. We show that the emission from the compact radio core does not turn on during the transition from the thermal dominant state to the intermediate state but does turn on when the source reaches the low-hard state, as seen in 4U 1543-47 and GX 339-4. We find that the photon index correlates strongly with the QPO frequency and anticorrelates with the rms amplitude of variability. We also show that the variability is more likely to be associated with the power-law emission than the disk emission.

  5. The decay of turbulence in rotating flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teitelbaum, Tomas; Mininni, Pablo D.

    2011-06-01

    We present a parametric space study of the decay of turbulence in rotating flows combining direct numerical simulations, large eddy simulations, and phenomenological theory. Several cases are considered: (1) the effect of varying the characteristic scale of the initial conditions when compared with the size of the box, to mimic "bounded" and "unbounded" flows; (2) the effect of helicity (correlation between the velocity and vorticity); (3) the effect of Rossby and Reynolds numbers; and (4) the effect of anisotropy in the initial conditions. Initial conditions include the Taylor-Green vortex, the Arn'old-Beltrami-Childress flow, and random flows with large-scale energy spectrum proportional to k4. The decay laws obtained in the simulations for the energy, helicity, and enstrophy in each case can be explained with phenomenological arguments that consider separate decays for two-dimensional and three-dimensional modes and that take into account the role of helicity and rotation in slowing down the energy decay. The time evolution of the energy spectrum and development of anisotropies in the simulations are also discussed. Finally, the effect of rotation and helicity in the skewness and kurtosis of the flow is considered.

  6. Time to Degree: Students' Abilities, University Characteristics or Something Else? Evidence from Italy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aina, Carmen; Baici, Eliana; Casalone, Giorgia

    2011-01-01

    We use a representative sample of Italian graduates drawn from the Consorzio AlmaLaurea to assess the impact of individual and family characteristics, university inputs and the labour market on the time taken to attain a degree. Our estimates highlight that all these dimensions drive the outcome analysed. Weak labour market prospects contribute…

  7. Role of Text and Student Characteristics in Real-Time Reading Processes across the Primary Grades

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Leeuw, Linda; Segers, Eliane; Verhoeven, Ludo

    2016-01-01

    Although much is known about beginning readers using behavioural measures, real-time processes are still less clear. The present study examined eye movements (skipping rate, gaze, look back and second-pass duration) as a function of text-related (difficulty and word class) and student-related characteristics (word decoding, reading comprehension,…

  8. Curriculum Characteristics of Time-Compressed Course in a U.S. Higher Education Institution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyun, Eunsook; Kretovics, Mark; Crowe, Alicia

    2006-01-01

    The study explored characteristics of the curriculum practice of higher education faculty in the context of time-compressed (e.g., 5-6 weeks) courses as compared with regular term (15-16 weeks) courses. The researchers used open-ended questions on a web-based survey at a large doctoral-extensive university in a Midwestern state in the United…

  9. Force-Time Characteristics and Running Velocity of Male Sprinters During the Acceleration Phase of Sprinting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mero, Antti

    1988-01-01

    Investigation of the force-time characteristics of eight male sprinters during the acceleration phase of the sprint start suggested that the braking and propulsion phases occur immediately after the block phase and that muscle strength strongly affects running velocity in the sprint start. (Author/CB)

  10. Rotational and Translational Dynamics of Rhodamine 6G in a Pyrrolidinium Ionic Liquid: A Combined Time-Resolved Fluorescence Anisotropy Decay and NMR Study

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Jianchang; Han, Kee Sung; Mahurin, Shannon Mark; Baker, Gary A; Hillesheim, Patrick C; Dai, Sheng; Hagaman, Edward {Ed} W; Shaw, Robert W

    2012-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy and time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy decay (TRFAD) are two of the most commonly used methods to study solute-solvent interactions. However, only a few studies have been reported to date using a combined NMR and TRFAD approach to systematically investigate the overall picture of diffusional and rotational dynamics of both the solute and solvent. In this paper, we combined NMR and TRFAD to probe fluorescent rhodamine dyes in a pyrrolidinium-based room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL), an emergent environmentally-friendly solvent type used in several energy-related applications. A specific interaction of the R6G cation and [Tf2N]- anion was identified, resulting in near-stick boundary condition rotation of R6G in this RTIL. The diffusional rates of the R6G solute and [C4mpyr][Tf2N] solvent derived from 1H NMR suggest the rates are proportional to their corresponding hydrodynamic radii. The 1H and 13C NMR studies of self-rotational dynamics of [C4mpyr][Tf2N] showed that the self-rotational correlation time of [C4mpyr]+ is 47 2 ps at 300 K. At the same temperature, we find that the correlation time for N-CH3 rotation in [C4mpyr]+ is 77 2 ps, comparable to overall molecular reorientation. This slow motion is attributed to properties of the cation structure.

  11. Characteristics of the transmission of autoregressive sub-patterns in financial time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xiangyun; An, Haizhong; Fang, Wei; Huang, Xuan; Li, Huajiao; Zhong, Weiqiong

    2014-09-01

    There are many types of autoregressive patterns in financial time series, and they form a transmission process. Here, we define autoregressive patterns quantitatively through an econometrical regression model. We present a computational algorithm that sets the autoregressive patterns as nodes and transmissions between patterns as edges, and then converts the transmission process of autoregressive patterns in a time series into a network. We utilised daily Shanghai (securities) composite index time series to study the transmission characteristics of autoregressive patterns. We found statistically significant evidence that the financial market is not random and that there are similar characteristics between parts and whole time series. A few types of autoregressive sub-patterns and transmission patterns drive the oscillations of the financial market. A clustering effect on fluctuations appears in the transmission process, and certain non-major autoregressive sub-patterns have high media capabilities in the financial time series. Different stock indexes exhibit similar characteristics in the transmission of fluctuation information. This work not only proposes a distinctive perspective for analysing financial time series but also provides important information for investors.

  12. Characteristics of the transmission of autoregressive sub-patterns in financial time series.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiangyun; An, Haizhong; Fang, Wei; Huang, Xuan; Li, Huajiao; Zhong, Weiqiong

    2014-09-05

    There are many types of autoregressive patterns in financial time series, and they form a transmission process. Here, we define autoregressive patterns quantitatively through an econometrical regression model. We present a computational algorithm that sets the autoregressive patterns as nodes and transmissions between patterns as edges, and then converts the transmission process of autoregressive patterns in a time series into a network. We utilised daily Shanghai (securities) composite index time series to study the transmission characteristics of autoregressive patterns. We found statistically significant evidence that the financial market is not random and that there are similar characteristics between parts and whole time series. A few types of autoregressive sub-patterns and transmission patterns drive the oscillations of the financial market. A clustering effect on fluctuations appears in the transmission process, and certain non-major autoregressive sub-patterns have high media capabilities in the financial time series. Different stock indexes exhibit similar characteristics in the transmission of fluctuation information. This work not only proposes a distinctive perspective for analysing financial time series but also provides important information for investors.

  13. The Dependence of Characteristic Times of Gradual SEP Events on Their Associated CME Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Z. H.; Wang, C. B.; Xue, X. H.; Wang, Y. M.

    It is generally believed that coronal mass ejections CMEs are the drivers of shocks that accelerate gradual solar energetic particles SEPs One might expect that the characteristics of the SEP intensity time profiles observed at 1 AU are determined by properties of the associated CMEs such as the radial speed and the angular width Recently Kahler statistically investigated the characteristic times of gradual SEP events observed from 1998-2002 and their associated coronal mass ejection properties Astrophys J 628 1014--1022 2005 Three characteristic times of gradual SEP events are determined as functions of solar source longitude 1 T 0 the time from associated CME launch to SEP onset at 1 AU 2 T R the rise time from SEP onset to the time when the SEP intensity is a factor of 2 below peak intensity and 3 T D the duration over which the SEP intensity is within a factor of 2 of the peak intensity However in his study the CME speeds and angular widths are directly taken from the LASCO CME catalog In this study we analyze the radial speeds and the angular widths of CMEs by an ice-cream cone model and re-investigate their correlationships with the characteristic times of the corresponding SEP events We find T R and T D are significantly correlated with radial speed for SEP events in the best-connected longitude range and there is no correlation between T 0 and CME radial speed and angular width which is consistent with Kahler s results On the other hand it s found that T R and T D are also have

  14. Delay-correlation landscape reveals characteristic time delays of brain rhythms and heart interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Aijing; Liu, Kang K. L.; Bartsch, Ronny P.; Ivanov, Plamen Ch.

    2016-05-01

    Within the framework of `Network Physiology', we ask a fundamental question of how modulations in cardiac dynamics emerge from networked brain-heart interactions. We propose a generalized time-delay approach to identify and quantify dynamical interactions between physiologically relevant brain rhythms and the heart rate. We perform empirical analysis of synchronized continuous EEG and ECG recordings from 34 healthy subjects during night-time sleep. For each pair of brain rhythm and heart interaction, we construct a delay-correlation landscape (DCL) that characterizes how individual brain rhythms are coupled to the heart rate, and how modulations in brain and cardiac dynamics are coordinated in time. We uncover characteristic time delays and an ensemble of specific profiles for the probability distribution of time delays that underly brain-heart interactions. These profiles are consistently observed in all subjects, indicating a universal pattern. Tracking the evolution of DCL across different sleep stages, we find that the ensemble of time-delay profiles changes from one physiologic state to another, indicating a strong association with physiologic state and function. The reported observations provide new insights on neurophysiological regulation of cardiac dynamics, with potential for broad clinical applications. The presented approach allows one to simultaneously capture key elements of dynamic interactions, including characteristic time delays and their time evolution, and can be applied to a range of coupled dynamical systems.

  15. The influence of travel time on breast cancer characteristics, receipt of primary therapy, and surveillance mammography.

    PubMed

    Onega, Tracy; Cook, Andrea; Kirlin, Beth; Shi, Xun; Alford-Teaster, Jennifer; Tuzzio, Leah; Buist, Diana S M

    2011-08-01

    Travel time has been shown to influence some aspects of cancer characteristics at diagnosis and care for women with breast cancer, but important gaps remain in our understanding of its impact. We examined the influence of travel time to the nearest radiology facility on breast cancer characteristics, treatment, and surveillance for women with early-stage invasive breast cancer. We included 1,012 women with invasive breast cancer (stages I and II) who had access to care within an integrated health care delivery system in western Washington State. The travel times to the nearest radiology facility were calculated for all the U.S. Census blocks within the study area and assigned to women based on residence at diagnosis. We collected cancer characteristics, primary and adjuvant therapies, and surveillance mammography for at least 2.5 years post diagnosis and used multivariable analyses to test the associations of travel time. The majority of women (68.6%) lived within 20 min of the nearest radiology facility, had stage I disease (72.7%), received breast conserving therapy (68.7%), and had annual surveillance mammography the first 2 years after treatment (73.7%). The travel time was not significantly associated with the stage or surveillance mammography after adjusting for covariates. Primary therapy was significantly related to travel time, with greater travel time (>30 min vs. ≤ 10 min) associated with a higher likelihood of mastectomy compared to breast conserving surgery (RR = 1.53; 95% CI, 1.16-2.01). The travel time was not associated with the stage at diagnosis or surveillance mammography receipt. The travel time does seem to influence the type of primary therapy among women with breast cancer, suggesting that women may prefer low frequency services, such as mastectomy, if geographic access to a radiology facility is limited.

  16. Learning characteristics of a space-time neural network as a tether skiprope observer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lea, Robert N.; Villarreal, James A.; Jani, Yashvant; Copeland, Charles

    1992-01-01

    The Software Technology Laboratory at JSC is testing a Space Time Neural Network (STNN) for observing tether oscillations present during retrieval of a tethered satellite. Proper identification of tether oscillations, known as 'skiprope' motion, is vital to safe retrieval of the tethered satellite. Our studies indicate that STNN has certain learning characteristics that must be understood properly to utilize this type of neural network for the tethered satellite problem. We present our findings on the learning characteristics including a learning rate versus momentum performance table.

  17. Learning characteristics of a space-time neural network as a tether skiprope observer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lea, Robert N.; Villarreal, James A.; Jani, Yashvant; Copeland, Charles

    1993-01-01

    The Software Technology Laboratory at the Johnson Space Center is testing a Space Time Neural Network (STNN) for observing tether oscillations present during retrieval of a tethered satellite. Proper identification of tether oscillations, known as 'skiprope' motion, is vital to safe retrieval of the tethered satellite. Our studies indicate that STNN has certain learning characteristics that must be understood properly to utilize this type of neural network for the tethered satellite problem. We present our findings on the learning characteristics including a learning rate versus momentum performance table.

  18. Modified timing characteristic of a scintillation detection system with photonic crystal structures.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinliang; Liu, Bo; Zhu, Zhichao; Chen, Liang; Hu, Jing; Xu, Mengxuan; Cheng, Chuanwei; Ouyang, Xiaoping; Zhang, Zhongbing; Ruan, Jinlu; He, Shiyi; Liu, Linyue; Gu, Mu; Chen, Hong

    2017-03-01

    It is intuitively expected that an enhanced light extraction of a scintillator can be easily achieved by photonic crystal structures. Here, we demonstrate a modified timing characteristic for a detection system induced by enhanced light extraction with photonic crystal structures. Such improvement is due to the enhanced light extraction which can be clearly proven by the independent measurements of the light output and the timing resolution. The present investigation is advantageous to promote the development of a scintillation detection system performance based on the time-of-flight measurement.

  19. Dynamics of yeast populations recovered from decaying leaves in a nonpolluted stream: a 2-year study on the effects of leaf litter type and decomposition time.

    PubMed

    Sampaio, Ana; Sampaio, José Paulo; Leão, Cecília

    2007-06-01

    Here we report on the results of a survey of the yeast populations occurring on submerged leaves (alder, eucalyptus and oak) in a natural mountain stream, during different phases of their decomposition and through two consecutive years. Leaf litter mass loss, total yeast counts, Shannon-Weiner index (H'), yeast community structure and physiologic abilities were analyzed to evaluate the dynamics of yeast communities during decay. Seventy-two yeast taxa were recorded, and in all litter types, species of basidiomycetous affinity predominated over ascomycetous ones. Discriminant analysis of presence/absence data (yeast species) showed significant differences both among substrate types (P<0.0026) and with decomposition time (P<0.0001). Carbon and nitrogen source utilization by yeast strains also varied with the substrate (P<0.0001) and decomposition time (P<0.0001). Further conclusions were that: (1) all litter types have in common ubiquitous yeast species, such as Cryptococcus albidus, Debaryomyces hansenii and Rhodotorula glutinis, among the common 20 yeast species; (2) only a few species were dominant, and most species were rare, being recorded once or twice throughout decomposition; and (3) the order of yeast appearance, and their substrate assimilation patterns, strongly suggest a succession phenomenon. Finally, explanations for the distribution patterns and variations in yeast communities are discussed.

  20. Penguin and rare decays in BABAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akar, Simon; Babar Collaboration

    2014-11-01

    We present recent results from the BABAR Collaboration on radiative decays. These include searches for new physics via measurements of several observables such as the time- dependent CP asymmetry in B0 → K0Sπ-π+γ exclusive decays, as well as direct CP asymmetries and branching fractions in B → Xsγ and B → Xsl+l- inclusive decays.

  1. Acid-base equilibria involved in secondary reactions following the 4-carboxybenzophenone sensitized photooxidation of methionylglycine in aqueous solution. Spectral and time resolution of the decaying (S...N){sup +} radical cation

    SciTech Connect

    Hug, G.L.; Marciniak, B. |; Bobrowski, K. ||

    1996-09-05

    A radical cation with an intramolecular sulfur-nitrogen bond was formed in the photoinitiated transfer of an electron from the sulfur atom of the dipeptide Met-Gly to 4-carboxybenzophenone in its triplet state. The sulfur-nitrogen coupling involved two-center, three-electron bonds. The kinetics of the reactions of these radical cations, which were initiated by a laser flash, were followed over time. The principal method of implementing the spectral resolutions was accomplished through a multiple linear regression technique. This spectral analysis was repeated for numerous time windows during the lifetime of the transients` decays. The resulting concentrations of the transients were consistent with an independent factor analysis. It was found that the decay of the radical cations was multiexponential and that the decay varied with pH. A simplified reaction scheme was proposed whereby the absorbing radical cations can alternatively decay by an irreversible channel or react reversibly with OH{sup -}. Rate constants for the three elementary reactions of this scheme were determined from an analysis of the decay of the concentration of the radical cations. In addition, the equilibrium constant for the reversible reaction was determined by two separate procedures. 35 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Measurement of branching fraction and time-dependent CP asymmetry parameters in B0→D*+D*-KS0 decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalseno, J.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Aushev, T.; Bakich, A. M.; Balagura, V.; Bay, A.; Bitenc, U.; Bizjak, I.; Bozek, A.; Bračko, M.; Browder, T. E.; Chao, Y.; Chen, A.; Cheon, B. G.; Chistov, R.; Cho, I.-S.; Choi, Y.; Choi, Y. K.; Danilov, M.; Dash, M.; Drutskoy, A.; Eidelman, S.; Go, A.; Ha, H.; Hayasaka, K.; Hazumi, M.; Heffernan, D.; Hokuue, T.; Hyun, H. J.; Inami, K.; Ishikawa, A.; Ishino, H.; Iwasaki, M.; Iwasaki, Y.; Joshi, N. J.; Kah, D. H.; Kang, J. H.; Kapusta, P.; Katayama, N.; Kawai, H.; Kawasaki, T.; Kichimi, H.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinoshita, K.; Križan, P.; Krokovny, P.; Kumar, R.; Kuo, C. C.; Kuzmin, A.; Kwon, Y.-J.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. E.; Lesiak, T.; Li, J.; Limosani, A.; Lin, S.-W.; Liventsev, D.; Mandl, F.; Matsumoto, T.; McOnie, S.; Medvedeva, T.; Mitaroff, W.; Miyake, H.; Miyata, H.; Moloney, G. R.; Nakano, E.; Nakao, M.; Nishida, S.; Nitoh, O.; Ogawa, S.; Ohshima, T.; Okuno, S.; Onuki, Y.; Ostrowicz, W.; Ozaki, H.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, G.; Park, C. W.; Park, H.; Park, K. S.; Pestotnik, R.; Piilonen, L. E.; Sahoo, H.; Sakai, Y.; Schneider, O.; Schümann, J.; Seidl, R.; Sekiya, A.; Senyo, K.; Sevior, M. E.; Shapkin, M.; Shibuya, H.; Singh, J. B.; Sokolov, A.; Somov, A.; Stanič, S.; Starič, M.; Stoeck, H.; Sumisawa, K.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Takasaki, F.; Tanaka, M.; Taylor, G. N.; Teramoto, Y.; Tian, X. C.; Tsukamoto, T.; Uehara, S.; Ueno, K.; Uglov, T.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Urquijo, P.; Varner, G.; Villa, S.; Vinokurova, A.; Wang, C. C.; Wang, C. H.; Watanabe, Y.; Wedd, R.; Won, E.; Yabsley, B. D.; Yamaguchi, A.; Yamashita, Y.; Yamauchi, M.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zupanc, A.

    2007-10-01

    We present a measurement of the branching fraction and time-dependent CP violation parameters for B0→D*+D*-KS0 decays. These results are obtained from a 414fb-1 data sample that contains 449×106 BB¯ pairs collected at the Υ(4S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e+e- collider. We obtain the branching fraction, B(B0→D*+D*-KS0)=[3.4±0.4(stat)±0.7(syst)]×10-3, which is in agreement with the current world average. We also obtain an upper limit on the product branching fraction for a possible two-body decay, B(B0→Ds1+(2536)D*-)B(Ds1+(2536)→D*+KS0)<7.1×10-4 (90% CL). In the traditional 2-parameter time-dependent CP analysis, we measure the CP violation parameters, ACP=-0.01-0.28+0.28(stat)±0.09(syst), Dsin⁡2ϕ1=0.06-0.44+0.45(stat)±0.06(syst). No evidence for either mixing-induced or direct CP violation is found. In a 3-parameter fit sensitive to cos⁡2ϕ1 performed in the half-Dalitz spaces, s-≤s+ and s->s+, where s±≡m2(D*±KS0), we extract the CP violation parameters, Jc/J0=0.60-0.28+0.25(stat)±0.08(syst), 2Js1/J0sin⁡2ϕ1=-0.17-0.42+0.42(stat)±0.09(syst), 2Js2/J0cos⁡2ϕ1=-0.23-0.41+0.43(stat)±0.13(syst). A large value of Jc/J0 would indicate a significant resonant contribution from a broad unknown Ds**+ state. Although the sign of the factor, 2Js2/J0, can be deduced from theory, no conclusion can be drawn regarding the sign of cos⁡2ϕ1 given the errors.

  3. Time-Varying Multifractal Characteristics and Formation Mechanism of Loaded Coal Electromagnetic Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Shaobin; Wang, Enyuan; Li, Zhonghui; Shen, Rongxi; Liu, Jie

    2014-09-01

    Dynamic collapses of deeply mined coal rocks are severe threats to miners. To predict the collapses more accurately using electromagnetic radiation (EMR), we investigate the time-varying multifractal characteristics and formation mechanism of EMR induced by underground coal mining. A series of uniaxial compression and multi-stage loading experiments with coal samples of different mechanical properties were carried out. The EMR signals during their damage evolution were monitored in real-time; the inherent law of EMR time series was analyzed by fractal theory. The results show that the time-varying multifractal characteristics of EMR are determined by damage evolutions process, the dissipated energy caused by damage evolutions such as crack propagation, fractal sliding and shearing can be regard as the fingerprint of various EMR micro-mechanics. Based on the Irreversible thermodynamics and damage mechanics, we introduced the damage internal variable, constructed the dissipative potential function and established the coupled model of the EMR and the dissipative energy, which revealed the nature of dynamic nonlinear characteristics of EMR. Dynamic multifractal spectrum is the objective response of EMR signals, thus it can be used to evaluate the coal deformation and fracture process.

  4. Analysis of the kinetics of lipid peroxidation in terms of characteristic time-points.

    PubMed

    Pinchuk, Ilya; Lichtenberg, Dov

    2014-02-01

    Measuring peroxidation of aggregated lipids in model systems (liposomes, micelles, emulsions or microemulsions) as well as in samples of biological origin ex vivo (isolated lipoproteins, blood sera or plasma) is widely used in medical and biological investigations, to evaluate the oxidative stress, antioxidants' efficiency and lipid oxidizability in different pathophysiological states. To avoid possible artifacts, such investigations must be based on the time course of peroxidation (i.e. on kinetic studies). To be able to compare complex kinetic profiles, it is important to characterize them in terms of mechanistically meaningful and experimentally unequivocal parameters. In this review, we characterize the typically observed continuous kinetic profiles in terms of a limited number of characteristic time-points (both commonly used and additional time-points and their combinations) that can be derived from experimental time-dependencies. The meaning of each of the experimentally observed characteristic parameters is presented in terms of rate constants and concentrations, derived on the basis of mechanistic considerations. Theoretical expressions for these characteristic parameters are based on a model that includes both the inhibited peroxidation and the uninhibited peroxidation occurring after consumption of the antioxidant(s). Comparison between theoretically predicted dependencies and experimental data support our treatment considered with special emphasis on transition metals-induced peroxidation of lipoproteins.

  5. IR image quality assessment and real-time optimum seeking method based on dynamic visual characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bin; Liu, Gang; Gao, Yongmin; Lei, Hao; Wu, Haiying; Wang, Yu; Rong, Xiaolong

    2016-10-01

    Image quality is an important factor that influences the dynamic target information perception; it is the key factor of real-time target state analysis and judgment. In order to solve the multi-observation station comparison and video optimum seeking problem in the process of target information perception and recognition, an image quality assessment method based on visual characteristics is proposed for infrared target tracking. First, it analyses the basic infrared target image characteristics and application requirements, analyses the status and problems of the multi station optimum seeking technology. According to the expected research results, the processing flow of image processing is established. Then, the image quality objective assessment index is established, which reflects the basic characteristics of the target image, and the assessment index is integrated into the normalized assessment function. According to the quality assessment function, the infrared image quality assessment based on infrared target recognition and image analysis processing is realized, which is mainly characterized by the region of interest and dynamic visual characteristics. And on the basis of this technology, the real-time optimum seeking of multi station infrared target tracking image is completed. In order to verify the effectiveness of the method and the practical application effect, it designs the quality assessment and comparison of different station infrared images. Example shows that the method proposed in this paper can realize multi-observation station infrared image assessment comparison, image quality sorting, the optimum seeking of the infrared image based on the quality assessment. The results accord with the characteristics of infrared target image and dynamic visual characteristics.

  6. Application of characteristic time concepts for hydraulic fracture configuration design, control, and optimization. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Advani, S.H.; Lee, T.S.; Moon, H.

    1992-10-01

    The analysis of pertinent energy components or affiliated characteristic times for hydraulic stimulation processes serves as an effective tool for fracture configuration designs optimization, and control. This evaluation, in conjunction with parametric sensitivity studies, provides a rational base for quantifying dominant process mechanisms and the roles of specified reservoir properties relative to controllable hydraulic fracture variables for a wide spectrum of treatment scenarios. Results are detailed for the following multi-task effort: (a) Application of characteristic time concept and parametric sensitivity studies for specialized fracture geometries (rectangular, penny-shaped, elliptical) and three-layered elliptic crack models (in situ stress, elastic moduli, and fracture toughness contrasts). (b) Incorporation of leak-off effects for models investigated in (a). (c) Simulation of generalized hydraulic fracture models and investigation of the role of controllable vaxiables and uncontrollable system properties. (d) Development of guidelines for hydraulic fracture design and optimization.

  7. Application of characteristic time concepts for hydraulic fracture configuration design, control, and optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Advani, S.H.; Lee, T.S. ); Moon, H. )

    1992-10-01

    The analysis of pertinent energy components or affiliated characteristic times for hydraulic stimulation processes serves as an effective tool for fracture configuration designs optimization, and control. This evaluation, in conjunction with parametric sensitivity studies, provides a rational base for quantifying dominant process mechanisms and the roles of specified reservoir properties relative to controllable hydraulic fracture variables for a wide spectrum of treatment scenarios. Results are detailed for the following multi-task effort: (a) Application of characteristic time concept and parametric sensitivity studies for specialized fracture geometries (rectangular, penny-shaped, elliptical) and three-layered elliptic crack models (in situ stress, elastic moduli, and fracture toughness contrasts). (b) Incorporation of leak-off effects for models investigated in (a). (c) Simulation of generalized hydraulic fracture models and investigation of the role of controllable vaxiables and uncontrollable system properties. (d) Development of guidelines for hydraulic fracture design and optimization.

  8. Effect of mixing time on the structural characteristics of noodle dough under vacuum.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui; Xing, Yanan; Zhang, Yingquan; Zhang, Bo; Jiang, Xuju; Wei, Yimin

    2015-12-01

    The structural characteristics of noodle dough under different vacuum mixing times were investigated using three flour samples by texture profile analysis (TPA), SEM, FTIR micro-imaging, and by measuring the glutenin macropolymer and free -SH content. The sheeted dough mixed for 8 min presented better textural properties and a more compact and even microstructure. Insufficient mixing resulted in an uneven distribution and an inadequately developed gluten network, especially for weak-gluten flour (Jimai 22). Excessive mixing was detrimental to the developed dough network and decreased the uniformity of component spatial distribution. Furthermore, excessive mixing led to a decrease in GMP content as well as the increase in free -SH content. Flours with different protein characteristics behaved differently. The TPA, microstructure and free -SH content of dough of Zhengmai 366 was less affected by mixing time than that of Jimai 22, suggesting that strong-gluten flour has better noodle dough mixing tolerance.

  9. Sociodemographic Characteristics and Waking Activities and their Role in the Timing and Duration of Sleep

    PubMed Central

    Basner, Mathias; Spaeth, Andrea M.; Dinges, David F.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Chronic sleep restriction is prevalent in the U.S. population and associated with increased morbidity and mortality. The primary reasons for reduced sleep are unknown. Using population data on time use, we sought to identify individual characteristics and behaviors associated with short sleep that could be targeted for intervention programs. Design: Analysis of the American Time Use Survey (ATUS). Setting: Cross-sectional annual survey conducted by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Participants: Representative cohort (N = 124,517) of Americans 15 years and older surveyed between 2003 and 2011. Interventions: None. Measurements and Results: Telephone survey of activities over 24 hours. Relative to all other waking activities, paid work time was the primary waking activity exchanged for sleep. Time spent traveling, which included commuting to/from work, and immediate pre- and post-sleep activities (socializing, grooming, watching TV) were also reciprocally related to sleep duration. With every hour that work or educational training started later in the morning, sleep time increased by approximately 20 minutes. Working multiple jobs was associated with the highest odds for sleeping ≤ 6 hours on weekdays (adjusted OR 1.61, 95% CI 1.44; 1.81). Self-employed respondents were less likely to be short sleepers compared to private sector employees (OR 0.83, 95% CI 0.72; 0.95). Sociodemographic characteristics associated with paid work (age 25-64, male sex, high income, and employment per se) were consistently associated with short sleep. Conclusions: U.S. population time use survey findings suggest that interventions to increase sleep time should concentrate on delaying the morning start time of work and educational activities (or making them more flexible), increasing sleep opportunities, and shortening morning and evening commute times. Reducing the need for multiple jobs may increase sleep time, but economic disincentives from working fewer hours

  10. Investigation of time characteristics of photodetectors based on Ge/Si nanoheterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donchenko, V. A.; Yakimov, A. I.; Zemlyanov, A. A.; Kirienko, V. V.

    2010-10-01

    Results of investigations into the time characteristics of photosensitive layers based on Ge/Si nanoheterostructures excited by femtosecond laser pulses with a wavelength of 1.55 μm are given. It is demonstrated that the leading front duration of the photoresponse pulse for the examined specimens excited by laser pulses of 120 fs duration does not exceed 30-40 пs.

  11. Associated anisotropy decays of ethidium bromide interacting with DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chib, Rahul; Raut, Sangram; Sabnis, Sarika; Singhal, Preeti; Gryczynski, Zygmunt; Gryczynski, Ignacy

    2014-03-01

    Ethidium Bromide (EB) is a commonly used dye in a deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) study. Upon an intercalation, this dye significantly increases its brightness and fluorescence lifetime. In this report we have studied the time resolved fluorescence properties of EB existing simultaneously in free and DNA-bound forms in the solution. Fluorescence intensity decays were fitted globally to a double exponential model with lifetimes corresponding to free (1.6 ns) and bound (22 ns) forms, and molar fractions were determined for all used solutions. Anisotropy decays displayed characteristic time dependence with an initial rapid decline followed by recovery and slow decay. The short-lived fraction associated with free EB molecules decreases faster than long-lived fraction associated with EB bound to DNA. Consequently, contribution from fast rotation leads to initial rapid decay in anisotropy. On the other hand bound fraction, due to slow rotation helps recover anisotropy in time. This effect of associated anisotropy decays in systems such as EB free/EB-DNA is clearly visible in a wide range of concentrations, and should be taken into account in polarization assays and biomolecule dynamics studies.

  12. Modulated single-bubble sonoluminescence: Dependence of phase of flashes, their intensity and rise/decay times on viscosity, the modulation strength, and frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastikhin, Igor; Djurkovic, Borko

    2004-05-01

    The single-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) signal was studied for the case of driving frequency modulated by lower frequency with an offset. In our work, the driving frequency of 28 kHz and the modulation frequencies of 25-1000 Hz were used. The modulation strength of 0.2, 0.5, and 0.8 was defined as the difference of highest and lowest pressures over modulation period. The measurements were performed for water-glycerol mixtures of various viscosities. The measured SBSL signal appeared as a train of flashes for modulation frequencies below 250 Hz, and as a continuous modulated signal for higher frequencies. At the same frequency, the flashes covered similar phase intervals for different modulation strengths and, accordingly, pressure ranges. At higher glycerol concentrations (up to 24%) both the intensity and the stability of flashes increased, due to damped shape instabilities and reduced dancing; however, the phase interval of flashes remained about the same. Such phase-locked behavior can be explained by translational movements of the bubble due to modulated Bjerknes force and changes in the symmetry of the bubble collapse. The changes in intensities and rise/decay times can serve as a measure of the gas exchange between the bubble and its surroundings during silent and luminescent intervals.

  13. Measurement of D^0-\\bar{D^0} Mixing From a Time-Dependent Amplitude Analysis of D^0\\ -> K^+\\pi^-\\pi0 Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, Bernard; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Lopez, L.; Palano, Antimo; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, Bjarne; Sun, L.; Abrams, G.S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Cahn, Robert N.; Jacobsen, R.G.; /LBL, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Karlsruhe U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /Consorzio Milano Ricerche /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Napoli Seconda U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /Banca di Roma /Frascati /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2008-08-04

    The authors present evidence of D{sup 0}-{bar D}{sup 0} mixing using a time-dependent amplitude analysis of the decay D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} in a data sample of 384 fb{sup -1} collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at SLAC. Assuming CP conservation, they measure the mixing parameters x{prime}{sub K{pi}{pi}{sup 0}} = [2.61{sub -0.68}{sup +0.57}(stat.) {+-} 0.39(syst.)]%, y{prime}{sub K{pi}{pi}{sup 0}} = [-0.06{sub -0.64}{sup +0.55}(stat.) {+-} 0.34(syst.)]%. The confidence level for the data to be consistent with the no-mixing hypothesis is 0.1%, including systematic uncertainties. This result is inconsistent with the no-mixing hypothesis with a significance of 3.2 standard deviations. They find no evidence of CP violation in mixing.

  14. Associations of various family characteristics and time use with children's body mass index.

    PubMed

    Forshee, Richard A; Anderson, Patricia A; Storey, Maureen L

    2009-04-01

    This study used multiple regression models to estimate associations of various family characteristics and time use with the body mass index (BMI) z-scores of 734 boys and 725 girls aged 5-18y from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics Child Development Supplement 2003. The strongest relationship in the data was between the BMI of the head of household and a child's BMI z-score (p < 0.001). Time spent sleeping, performing sedentary behaviors, and participating in physical activities was not associated with a child's BMI z-score. This suggests that a family-oriented approach to prevent and treat childhood and adolescent overweight is required.

  15. A benchmark test of accuracy and precision in estimating dynamical systems characteristics from a time series.

    PubMed

    Rispens, S M; Pijnappels, M; van Dieën, J H; van Schooten, K S; Beek, P J; Daffertshofer, A

    2014-01-22

    Characteristics of dynamical systems are often estimated to describe physiological processes. For instance, Lyapunov exponents have been determined to assess the stability of the cardio-vascular system, respiration, and, more recently, human gait and posture. However, the systematic evaluation of the accuracy and precision of these estimates is problematic because the proper values of the characteristics are typically unknown. We fill this void with a set of standardized time series with well-defined dynamical characteristics that serve as a benchmark. Estimates ought to match these characteristics, at least to good approximation. We outline a procedure to employ this generic benchmark test and illustrate its capacity by examining methods for estimating the maximum Lyapunov exponent. In particular, we discuss algorithms by Wolf and co-workers and by Rosenstein and co-workers and evaluate their performances as a function of signal length and signal-to-noise ratio. In all scenarios, the precision of Rosenstein's algorithm was found to be equal to or greater than Wolf's algorithm. The latter, however, appeared more accurate if reasonably large signal lengths are available and noise levels are sufficiently low. Due to its modularity, the presented benchmark test can be used to evaluate and tune any estimation method to perform optimally for arbitrary experimental data.

  16. Predictors of race time in male Ironman triathletes: physical characteristics, training, or prerace experience?

    PubMed

    Knechtle, Beat; Wirth, Andrea; Rosemann, Thomas

    2010-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess whether physical characteristics, training, or prerace experience were related to performance in recreational male Ironman triathletes using bi- and multivariate analysis. 83 male recreational triathletes who volunteered to participate in the study (M age 41.5 yr., SD = 8.9) had a mean body height of 1.80 m (SD = 0.06), mean body mass of 77.3 kg (SD = 8.9), and mean Body Mass Index of 23.7 kg/m2 (SD = 2.1) at the 2009 IRONMAN SWITZERLAND competition. Speed in running during training, personal best marathon time, and personal best time in an Olympic distance triathlon were related to the Ironman race time. These three variables explained 64% of the variance in Ironman race time. Personal best marathon time was significantly and positively related to the run split time in the Ironman race. Faster running while training and both a fast personal best time in a marathon and in an Olympic distance triathlon were associated with a fast Ironman race time.

  17. Characteristic Times of Gradual Solar Energetic Particle Events and Their Dependence on Associated Coronal Mass Ejection Properties

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-01

    2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 01-08-2005 REPRINT 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Characteristic Times of Gradual Solar ...coronagraph on SOHO observed during 1998-2002 to statistically determine three characteristic times of gradual solar energetic particle (SEP) events as...functions of solar source longitude: (1) To, the time from associated CME launch to SEP onset at I AU, (2) TR, the rise time from SEO onset to the time when

  18. Semileptonic Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Luth, Vera G.; /SLAC

    2012-10-02

    The following is an overview of the measurements of the CKM matrix elements |V{sub cb}| and |V{sub ub}| that are based on detailed studies of semileptonic B decays by the BABAR and Belle Collaborations and major advances in QCD calculations. In addition, a new and improved measurement of the ratios R(D{sup (*)}) = {Beta}({bar B} {yields} D{sup (*)}{tau}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {tau}})/{Beta}({bar B} {yields} D{sup (*)}{ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {ell}}) is presented. Here D{sup (*)} refers to a D or a D* meson and {ell} is either e or {mu}. The results, R(D) = 0.440 {+-} 0.058 {+-} 0.042 and R(D*) = 0.332 {+-} 0.024 {+-} 0.018, exceed the Standard Model expectations by 2.0{sigma} and 2.7{sigma}, respectively. Taken together, they disagree with these expectations at the 3.4{sigma} level. The excess of events cannot be explained by a charged Higgs boson in the type II two-Higgs-doublet model.

  19. Photoproduction and Decay of Light Mesons in CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Amaryan, Moskov Jamalovich

    2013-08-01

    We present preliminary experimental results on photoproduction and decay of light mesons measured with CLAS setup at JLAB . This include Dalitz decay of pseudoscalar and vector mesons, radiative decay of pseudoscalar mesons as well hadronic decays of pseudoscalar and vector mesons. The collected high statistics in some of decay channels exceeds the world data by an order of magnitude and some other decay modes are observed for the first time. It is shown how the CLAS data will improve the world data on transition form factors of light mesons, Dalitz plot analyses, branching ratios of rare decay modes and other fundamental properties potentially accessible through the light meson decays.

  20. Program and Teacher Characteristics Predicting the Implementation of Banking Time with Preschoolers Who Display Disruptive Behaviors.

    PubMed

    Williford, Amanda P; Wolcott, Catherine Sanger; Whittaker, Jessica Vick; Locasale-Crouch, Jennifer

    2015-11-01

    This study examined the relationship among baseline program and teacher characteristics and subsequent implementation of Banking Time. Banking Time is a dyadic intervention intended to improve a teacher's interaction quality with a specific child. Banking Time implementation was examined in the current study using a sample of 59 teachers and preschool children displaying disruptive behaviors in the classroom (~three children per classroom). Predictors included preschool program type, teacher demographic characteristics (personal and professional), and teacher beliefs (self-efficacy, authoritarian beliefs, and negative attributions about child disruptive behavior). Multiple measures and methods (i.e., teacher report, consultant report, independent observations) were used to assess implementation. We created three implementation composite measures (dosage, quality, and generalized practice) that had high internal consistencies within each composite but were only modestly associated with one another, suggesting unique constructs of implementation. We found that type of preschool program was associated with dosage and quality. Aspects of teacher demographics related to all three implementation composites. Teacher beliefs predicted dosage and generalized practice. Results suggest that the factors that predict the implementation of Banking Time vary as a function of the type of implementation being assessed.

  1. Usefulness of precise time stamping for exposing network characteristics on high-speed links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitatsuji, Yoshinori; Tsuru, Masato; Katsuno, Satoshi; Oie, Yuji

    2004-09-01

    To expose network characteristics by active/passive measurements, measuring some timing issues such as one-way delay, one-way queuing delay, and inter-packet time is essential, and is conducted by time-stamping for packets passing through an observation point. However, emerging high-speed networks require very high precision of time-stamping, far beyond the precision of conventional software-based time-stamping systems such as 'tcpdump'. For example, the inter-packet time of two consecutive 64-byte length packets on a giga-bit link can be less than 0.001 msec. In this paper, to demonstrate the usefulness and strong necessity of precise time-stamping on high-speed links, experiments of network measurements over a nation-wide IPv6 testbed in Japan have been performed, using a hardware-based time-stamping system that can synchronize to GPS with a high resolution of 0.0001 msec and within a small error of 0.0003 msec. In our experiments, several interesting results are seen, e.g., i) the distribution of one-way queuing delay exhibits a considerable difference depending on the size and the type (UDP/ICMP) of packets; ii) the minimal one-way delays for various sizes of UDP/ICMP packets give an accurate estimate of the transmission delay and the propagation delay; iii) the correlation between interpacket times at the sender and the receiver sides in a sequence of TCP ACK packets clearly shows the degree of ACK compression; iv) the inter-packet time in a UDP stream generated by a DV streaming application shows three dominant sending rates and a very rare peak rate, which might provide crucial information to bandwidth dimensioning; all of which would indicate the usefulness of precise time-stamping.

  2. Acoustic signal characteristics of laser induced cavitation in DDFP droplet: Spectrum and time-frequency analysis.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yi; Qin, Dui; Zhang, Jun; Ma, Chenxiang; Wan, Mingxi

    2015-01-01

    Cavitation has great application potential in microvessel damage and targeted drug delivery. Concerning cavitation, droplet vaporization has been widely investigated in vitro and in vivo with plasmonic nanoparticles. Droplets with a liquid dodecafluoropentane (DDFP) core enclosed in an albumin shell have a stable and simple structure with good characteristics of laser absorbing; thus, DDFP droplets could be an effective aim for laser-induced cavitation. The DDPF droplet was prepared and perfused in a mimic microvessel in the optical microscopic system with a passive acoustic detection module. Three patterns of laser-induced cavitation in the droplets were observed. The emitted acoustic signals showed specific spectrum components at specific time points. It was suggested that a nanosecond laser pulse could induce cavitation in DDPF droplets, and specific acoustic signals would be emitted. Analyzing its characteristics could aid in monitoring the laser-induced cavitation process in droplets, which is meaningful to theranostic application.

  3. Adults’ reports of their earliest memories: Consistency in events, ages, and narrative characteristics over time

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Patricia J.; Tasdemir-Ozdes, Aylin; Larkina, Marina

    2014-01-01

    Earliest memories have been of interest since the late 1800s, when it was first noted that most adults do not have memories from the first years of life (so-called childhood amnesia). Several characteristics of adults’ earliest memories have been investigated, including emotional content, the perspective from which they are recalled, and vividness. The focus of the present research was a feature of early memories heretofore relatively neglected in the literature, namely, their consistency. Adults reported their earliest memories 2 to 4 times over a 4-year period. Reports of earliest memories were highly consistent in the events identified as the bases for earliest memories, the reported age at the time of the event, and in terms of qualities of the narrative descriptions. These findings imply stability in the boundary that marks the offset of childhood amnesia, as well as in the beginning of a continuous sense of self over time. PMID:24836979

  4. Scalar decay in a three-dimensional chaotic flow.

    PubMed

    Ngan, K; Vanneste, J

    2011-05-01

    The decay of a passive scalar in a three-dimensional chaotic flow is studied using high-resolution numerical simulations. The (volume-preserving) flow considered is a three-dimensional extension of the randomized alternating sine flow employed extensively in studies of mixing in two dimensions. It is used to show that theoretical predictions for two-dimensional flows with small diffusivity carry over to three dimensions even though the stretching properties differ significantly. The variance decay rate, scalar field structure, and time evolution of statistical moments confirm that there are two distinct regimes of scalar decay: a locally controlled regime, which applies when the domain size is comparable to the characteristic length scale of the velocity field, and a globally controlled regime, which applies when the domain is larger. Asymptotic predictions for the variance decay rate in both regimes show excellent agreement with the numerical results. Consideration of both the forward flow and its time reverse makes it possible to compare the scalar evolution in flows with one or two expanding directions; simulations confirm the theoretical prediction that the decay rate of the scalar is the same in both flows, despite the very different scalar field structures.

  5. [Atmospheric pollution characteristic during fireworks burning time in spring festival in Quanzhou suburb].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jin-ping; Xu, Ya; Zhang, Fu-wang; Chen, Jin-sheng

    2011-05-01

    Atmospheric pollution characteristics during fireworks burning time in 2009 Spring Festival in Quangzhou suburb were studied. Particulate aerosol has been monitored and collected using real-time monitor and middle-volume sampler during fireworks burning time. The objectives of this study were to identify the contents and distributing characteristics of particles, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAHs) and water-soluble ions and to discuss sources of these pollutants. The results showed that PM2.5 and PM10 were increased significantly during fireworks burning time. The highest concentration of particles presented time of 00:57-01:27 on New Year's Eve, which the average concentration of PM2.5 and PM10 were reached 1102.43 microm(-3) and 1610.22 microg x m(-3) in 30 min. The concentration of particle- and gas-PAHs were 54.18 ng x m(-1) and 47.10 ng x m(-3), respectively, during fireworks burning time in New Year's Eve, which were higher than that in the normal day. It can be judged by the diagnostic ratios that the primary source of PAHs in Quanzhou suburb were the combustion of coal, biomass and the exhaust emission from diesel vehicles in this region. Results of water-soluble ions indicated that fireworks burning were the main reason to lead to higher concentration of these ions during Spring Festival. Moreover, pollution gases of NOx and SO2 that were origined from fireworks burning, coal combustion and exhaust emission from motor vehicle were supplied precursors to form secondary pollutants, such as NO3- and SO4(2-).

  6. Separating double-beta decay events from solar neutrino interactions in a kiloton-scale liquid scintillator detector by fast timing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elagin, Andrey; Frisch, Henry J.; Naranjo, Brian; Ouellet, Jonathan; Winslow, Lindley; Wongjirad, Taritree

    2017-03-01

    We present a technique for separating nuclear double beta decay (ββ -decay) events from background neutrino interactions due to 8B decays in the sun. This background becomes dominant in a kiloton-scale liquid-scintillator detector deep underground and is usually considered as irreducible due to an overlap in deposited energy with the signal. However, electrons from 0 νββ -decay often exceed the Cherenkov threshold in liquid scintillator, producing photons that are prompt and correlated in direction with the initial electron direction. The use of large-area fast photodetectors allows some separation of these prompt photons from delayed isotropic scintillation light and, thus, the possibility of reconstructing the event topology. Using a simulation of a 6.5 m radius liquid scintillator detector with 100 ps resolution photodetectors, we show that a spherical harmonics analysis of early-arrival light can discriminate between 0 νββ -decay signal and 8B solar neutrino background events on a statistical basis. Good separation will require the development of a slow scintillator with a 5 ns risetime.

  7. Characteristic coupling time between axial and transverse energy modes for anti-hydrogen in magnetostatic traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Mike; Fajans, Joel

    2016-10-01

    For upcoming ALPHA collaboration laser spectroscopy and gravity experiments, the nature of the chaotic trajectories of individual antihydrogen atoms trapped in the octupole Ioffe magnetic trap is of importance. Of particular interest for experimental design is the coupling time between the axial and transverse modes of energy for the antihydrogen atoms. Using Monte Carlo simulations of semiclassical dynamics of antihydrogen trajectories, we quantify this characteristic coupling time between axial and transverse modes of energy. There appear to be two classes of trajectories: for orbits whose axial energy is higher than 10% of the total energy, the axial energy varies chaotically on the order of 1-10 seconds, whereas for orbits whose axial energy is around 10% of the total energy, the axial energy remains nearly constant on the order of 1000 seconds or longer. Furthermore, we search through parameter -space to find parameters of the magnetic trap that minimize and maximize this characteristic coupling time. This work was supported by the UC Berkeley Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship, the Berkeley Research Computing program, the Department of Energy contract DE-FG02-06ER54904, and the National Science Foundation Grant 1500538-PHY.

  8. Measurement of time dependent CP asymmetry parameters in B0 meson decays to omegaKs, etaprimeKz, and pi0Ks

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, : B.

    2008-09-10

    The authors present measurements of the time-dependent CP-violation parameters S and C in the decays B{sup 0} {yields} {omega}K{sub S}{sup 0}, B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{prime}K{sup 0}, reconstructed as {eta}{prime}K{sub S}{sup 0} and {eta}{prime}K{sub L}{sup 0}, and B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}K{sub S}{sup 0}. The data sample corresponds to the full BABAR dataset of 467 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs produced at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The results are S{sub {omega}K{sub S}{sup 0}} = 0.55{sub -0.29}{sup +0.26} {+-} 0.02, C{sub {omega}K{sub S}{sup 0}} = -0.52{sub -0.20}{sup +0.22} {+-} 0.03, S{sub {eta}{prime}K{sup 0}} = 0.57 {+-} 0.08 {+-} 0.02, C{sub {eta}{prime}K{sup 0}} = -0.08 {+-} 0.06 {+-} 0.02, S{sub {pi}{sup 0}K{sub S}{sup 0}} = 0.55 {+-} 0.20 {+-} 0.03, and C{sub {pi}{sup 0}K{sub S}{sup 0}} = 0.13 {+-} 0.13 {+-} 0.03, where the first errors are statistical and the second systematic. These results are consistent with the previous measurements and the world average of sin2{beta} measured in B{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}K{sub S}{sup 0}.

  9. Flow visualization of time-varying structural characteristics of dean vortices in a curved channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bella, David Wayne

    1988-12-01

    The time varying development and structure of Dean vortices were studied using flow visualization. Observations were made over a range of Dean numbers from 40 to 200 using a transparent channel with mild curvature, 40:1 aspect ratio, and an inner to outer radius ratio of 0.979. Seven flow visualization techniques were tried but only one, a wood burning smoke generator, produced usable results. Different vortex characteristics were observed and documented in sequences of photographs spaced one quarter of a second apart at locations ranging from 85 to 135 degrees from the start of curvature. Evidence is presented that supports the twisting/rocking nature of the flow.

  10. Characteristics of the boundary-layer equations of the minimum time-to-climb problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ardema, M. D.

    1976-01-01

    In many singular perturbation solutions of optimal control problems, the most difficult numerical task is to solve the boundary-layer equations. However, these equations have a special structure that may often be used to expedite their solution. This paper begins by noting the general nature of the boundary-layer equations for optimal control problems. These results are then applied to the aircraft minimum time-to-climb problem. A specific numerical example is considered to illustrate the characteristics of the solution of the boundary-layer equations for this problem.

  11. Study of distribution and characteristics of the time average of pressure of a water cushion pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Y. H.; Fu, J. F.

    2016-08-01

    When a dam discharges flood water, the plunging flow with greater kinetic energy, will scour the riverbed, resulting in erosion damage. In order to improve the anti-erosion capacity of a riverbed, the cushion pool created. This paper is based on turbulent jet theoryto deduce the semi-empirical formula of the time average of pressure in the impinging portion of the cushion pool. Additionally, MATLAB numerical is used to conduct a simulation analysis according to turbulent jet energy and watercushion depth when water floods into the water cushion pool, to determine the regularities of distribution and related characteristics.

  12. Graphical and tabular summaries of decay characteristics for once-through PWR, LMFBR, and FFTF fuel cycle materials. [Spent fuel, high-level waste fuel can scrap

    SciTech Connect

    Croff, A.G.; Liberman, M.S.; Morrison, G.W.

    1982-01-01

    Based on the results of ORIGEN2 and a newly developed code called ORMANG, graphical and summary tabular characteristics of spent fuel, high-level waste, and fuel assembly structural material (cladding) waste are presented for a generic pressurized-water reactor (PWR), a liquid-metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR), and the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). The characteristics include radioactivity, thermal power, and toxicity (water dilution volume). Given are graphs and summary tables containing characteristic totals and the principal nuclide contributors as well as graphs comparing the three reactors for a single material and the three materials for a single reactor.

  13. Data acquisition system for phase-2 KGF proton decay experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnaswamy, M. R.; Menon, M. G. K.; Mondal, N. K.; Narasimham, V. S.; Sreekantan, B. V.; Hayashi, Y.; Ito, N.; Kawakami, S.; Miyake, S.

    1985-01-01

    Phase-2 of KGF proton decay experiment using 4000 proportional counters will start operating from middle of 1985. The detection systems, in addition to measuring the time information to an accuracy of 200 n see, also records ionization in the hit counters. It also monitors different characteristics of the counters like pulse height spectrum, pulse width spectrum and counting rate. The acquisition system is discussed.

  14. Search for nucleon decay using the IMB-3 detector

    SciTech Connect

    McGrew, C.; Breault, J.L.; Gajewski, W.; Halverson, P.G.; Kropp, W.R.; Price, L.R.; Reines, F.; Schultz, J.; Sobel, H.W.; Becker-Szendy, R.; Dye, S.T.; Learned, J.G.; Matsuno, S.; McGrath, G.; Bratton, C.B.; Cady, D.R.; LoSecco, J.M.; Casper, D.; Stone, J.L.; Sulak, L.R.; Ganezer, K.S.; Goldhaber, M.; Haines, T.J.; Miller, R.; Kielczewska, D.; Matthews, J.; Sinclair, D.; van der Velde, J.C.; Svoboda, R.

    1999-03-01

    The IMB-3 experiment was a large water Cherenkov ring imaging detector with a fiducial mass of 3.3 kton. During a 7.6-kton-year exposure ({approximately}4.6{times}10{sup 33}thinspnucleonthinspyr) 935 contained events were observed. The observed rate and characteristics are consistent with the expected backgrounds from atmospheric neutrinos. Lower limits on the nucleon lifetime are set for a wide variety of proposed decay modes. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  15. Associations of Neighborhood Characteristics with Sleep Timing and Quality: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    DeSantis, Amy S.; Diez Roux, Ana V.; Moore, Kari; Baron, Kelly G.; Mujahid, Mahasin S.; Nieto, F. Javier

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: To investigate the associations of specific neighborhood features (disorder, safety, social cohesion, physical environment, and socioeconomic status) with sleep duration and quality. Design: Cross-sectional. One wave of a population-based study (Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis). Setting: Community-dwelling participants in New York, NY and Los Angeles, CA. Participants: There were 1,406 participants (636 males, 770 females). Interventions: NA. Measurements and Results: Sleep was assessed using reported hours of sleep, the Epworth Sleepiness Scale, and insomnia symptoms. Neighborhood characteristics were assessed via questionnaires administered to neighbors of study participants and were aggregated to the neighborhood (census tract) level using empirical Bayes estimation. An adverse social environment (characterized by high disorder, and low safety and social cohesion) was associated with shorter sleep duration after adjustment for the physical environment, neighborhood and individual-level socioeconomic status (SES), and other short sleep risk factors (mean difference per standard deviation increase in summary social environment scale 0.24 h 95% confidence interval 0.08, 0.43). Adverse neighborhood social and physical environments, and neighborhood SES were associated with greater sleepiness, but associations with physical environments were no longer statistically significant after adjustment for sociodemographic characteristics. Neighborhood SES was a weaker and less consistent predictor of specific measures of neighborhood social and physical environments. Neighborhood characteristics were not associated with insomnia. Conclusions: Shortened sleep related to adverse social environments represents one potential pathway through which neighborhoods may influence health. Citation: DeSantis AS; Diez Roux AV; Moore K; Baron KG; Mujahid MS; Nieto FJ. Associations of neighborhood characteristics with sleep timing and quality: the multi-ethnic study

  16. Exploring the Relationship Between Hydrograph Characteristics and the Time Evolution of Sand Bed Morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ockelford, A.; Parsons, D. R.; Hardy, R. J.; Ashworth, P. J.; Best, J.

    2015-12-01

    The development of sand bed morphology in response to steady flow is adequately described in most bedform phase diagrams. This includes the prediction of bedform wavelength, height and shape, all important parameters in estimating flow resistance. However, during time-varying flow, such as that experienced during the passage of a flood wave, the implicit assumption that bedform adjustment tracks changes in flow depth and velocity does not hold true due to bedform hysteresis. Consequently, there is a need to understand which characteristics of unsteady flow drive the disequilibrium dynamics between bedform geometry and hydraulic conditions. This paper describes a series of experiments designed to identify the impacts of hydrograph characteristics on the morphodynamic evolution of alluvial dunes. Mobile sand bed (D50 of 450μm) experiments were undertaken in a 16m long, 1.6m wide flume. Sediment was water worked under steady unidirectional flow until equilibrium bed conditions were achieved, after which a hydrograph was applied. At the end of the hydrograph, a period of steady flow was once again run until equilibrium conditions were attained. Hydrograph one consisted of steeply rising (80 minutes) and falling (65 minutes) limbs with hydrograph two characterised by longer rising (170 minutes) and falling (230 minutes) limbs. During the hydrograph discharge was changed in discrete steps. Bed morphology profiles were measured continuously along a 5m by 0.6m, centreline transect using twelve ultrasonic sensors. Three-dimensional flow was measured with a stack of Acoustic Doppler Velocimeters downstream of the transect. Suspended sediment was quantified using a three-frequency set of Acoustic Backscatter Sensors. The impact of these differing hydrograph characteristics are discussed in terms of differences between equilibrium bed morphologies, evolving flow field characteristics and the dynamics of suspended sediment concentrations through the hydrographs.

  17. Ion acoustic wave collapse via two-ion wave decay: 2D Vlasov simulation and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, Thomas; Berger, Richard; Banks, Jeffrey; Brunner, Stephan

    2015-11-01

    The decay of ion acoustic waves (IAWs) via two-ion wave decay may transfer energy from the electric field of the IAWs to the particles, resulting in a significant heating of resonant particles. This process has previously been shown in numerical simulations to decrease the plasma reflectivity due to stimulated Brillouin scattering. Two-ion wave decay is a fundamental property of ion acoustic waves that occurs over most if not all of the parameter space of relevance to inertial confinement fusion experiments, and can lead to a sudden collapse of IAWs. The treatment of all species kinetically, and in particular the electrons, is required to describe the decay process correctly. We present fully kinetic 2D+2V Vlasov simulations of IAWs undergoing decay to a highly nonlinear turbulent state using the code LOKI. The scaling of the decay rate with characteristic plasma parameters and wave amplitude is shown. A new theory describing two-ion wave decay in 2D, that incorporates key kinetic properties of the electrons, is presented and used to explain quantitatively for the first time the observed decay of IAWs. Work performed under auspices of U.S. DoE by LLNL, Contract DE-AC52-07NA2734. Funded by LDRD 15-ERD-038 and supported by LLNL Grand Challenge allocation.

  18. A New Characteristic Function for Fast Time-Reverse Seismic Event Location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendriyana, Andri; Bauer, Klaus; Weber, Michael; Jaya, Makky; Muksin, Muksin

    2015-04-01

    Microseismicity produced by natural activities is usually characterized by low signal-to-noise ratio and huge amount of data as recording is conducted for a long period of time. Locating microseismic events is preferably carried out using migration-based methods such as time-reverse modeling (TRM). The original TRM is based on backpropagating the wavefield from the receiver down to the source location. Alternatively, we are using a characteristic function (CF) derived from the measured wavefield as input for the TRM. The motivation for such a strategy is to avoid undesired contributions from secondary arrivals which may generate artifacts in the final images. In this presentation, we introduce a new CF as input for TRM method. To obtain this CF, initially we apply kurtosis-based automatic onset detection and convolution with a given wavelet. The convolution with low frequency wavelets allows us to conduct time-reverse modeling using coarser sampling hence it will reduce computing time. We apply the method to locate seismic events measured along an active part of the Sumatra Fault around the Tarutung pull-apart basin (North Sumatra, Indonesia). The results show that seismic events are well-determined since they are concentrated along the Sumatran fault. Internal details of the Tarutung basin structure could be derived. Our results are consistent with those obtained from inversion of manually picked travel time data.

  19. Dynamical instability in surface permeability characteristics of building sandstones in response to salt accumulation over time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCabe, S.; McKinley, J. M.; Gomez-Heras, M.; Smith, B. J.

    2011-07-01

    This paper explores how the surface permeability of sandstone blocks changes over time in response to repeated salt weathering cycles. Surface permeability controls the amount of moisture and dissolved salt that can penetrate in and facilitate decay. Connected pores permit the movement of moisture (and hence soluble salts) into the stone interior, and where areas are more or less permeable soluble salts may migrate along preferred pathways at differential rates. Previous research has shown that salts can accumulate in the near-surface zone and lead to partial pore blocking which influences subsequent moisture ingress and causes rapid salt accumulation in the near-surface zone. Two parallel salt weathering simulations were carried out on blocks of Peakmoor Sandstone of different volumes. Blocks were removed from simulations after 2, 5, 10, 20 and 60 cycles. Permeability measurements were taken for these blocks at a resolution of 20 mm, providing a grid of 100 permeability values for each surface. The geostatistical technique of ordinary kriging was applied to the data to produce a smoothed interpolation of permeability for these surfaces, and hence improve understanding of the evolution of permeability over time in response to repeated salt weathering cycles. Results illustrate the different responses of the sandstone blocks of different volumes to repeated salt weathering cycles. In both cases, after an initial subtle decline in the permeability (reflecting pore blocking), the permeability starts to increase — reflected in a rise in mean, maximum and minimum values. However, between 10 and 20 cycles, there is a jump in the mean and range permeability of the group A block surfaces coinciding with the onset of meaningful debris release. After 60 cycles, the range of permeability in the group A block surface had increased markedly, suggesting the development of a secondary permeability. The concept of dynamic instability and divergent behaviour is applied at the

  20. Numerical solution of the time dependent neutron transport equation by the method of the characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talamo, Alberto

    2013-05-01

    This study presents three numerical algorithms to solve the time dependent neutron transport equation by the method of the characteristics. The algorithms have been developed taking into account delayed neutrons and they have been implemented into the novel MCART code, which solves the neutron transport equation for two-dimensional geometry and an arbitrary number of energy groups. The MCART code uses regular mesh for the representation of the spatial domain, it models up-scattering, and takes advantage of OPENMP and OPENGL algorithms for parallel computing and plotting, respectively. The code has been benchmarked with the multiplication factor results of a Boiling Water Reactor, with the analytical results for a prompt jump transient in an infinite medium, and with PARTISN and TDTORT results for cross section and source transients. The numerical simulations have shown that only two numerical algorithms are stable for small time steps.

  1. Early-time plasma expansion characteristics of ionized clouds in the ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schunk, R. W.; Szuszczewicz, E. P.

    1988-01-01

    A series of Vlasov-Poisson simulations were conducted with barium and lithium gas mixtures expanding into an O(+) background plasma, with the values for the Ba(+)/Li(+) composition ratios and the cloud/background density ratios based on anticipated release values in the upcoming Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES) experiment. The results obtained on the early-time expansion of high-density Ba(+), Li(+), and Ba(+)-Li(+) plasma clouds into low-density O(+) background plasma complement the H(+)-O(+) expansions of Gurevich et al. (1973) and Singh and Schunk (1982, 1983), and the characteristic features observed apply to the very-early-time expansion phase of the CRRES releases.

  2. EFFECTS OF PLATING DENSITY AND CULTURE TIME ON BONE MARROW STROMAL CELL CHARACTERISTICS

    PubMed Central

    Neuhuber, Birgit; Swanger, Sharon A.; Howard, Linda; Mackay, Alastair; Fischer, Itzhak

    2008-01-01

    Objective Bone marrow stromal cells (MSC) are multipotent adult stem cells that have emerged as promising candidates for cell therapy in disorders including cardiac infarction, stroke and spinal cord injury. While harvesting methods used by different laboratories are relatively standard, MSC culturing protocols vary widely. This study is aimed at evaluating the effects of initial plating density and total time in culture on proliferation, cell morphology, and differentiation potential of heterogeneous MSC cultures and more homogeneous cloned subpopulations. Methods Rat MSC were plated at 20, 200 and 2000 cells/cm2 and grown to 50% confluency. The numbers of population doublings and doubling times were determined within and across multiple passages. Changes in cell morphology and differentiation potential to adipogenic, chondrogenic, and osteogenic lineages were evaluated and compared among early, intermediate and late passages, as well as between heterogeneous and cloned MSC populations. Results We found optimal cell growth at a plating density of 200 cells/cm2. Cultures derived from all plating densities developed increased proportions of flat cells over time. Assays for chondrogenesis, osteogenesis and adipogenesis showed that heterogeneous MSC plated at all densities sustained the potential for all three mesenchymal phenotypes through at least passage 5; the flat subpopulation lost adipogenic and chondrogenic potential. Conclusion Our findings suggest that the initial plating density is not critical for maintaining a well-defined, multipotent MSC population. Time in culture, however, affects cell characteristics, suggesting that cell expansion should be limited, especially until the specific characteristics of different MSC subpopulations are better understood. PMID:18495329

  3. Norm stability in Jirisan National Park: effects of time, existing conditions, and background characteristics.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang-Oh; Shelby, Bo

    2008-04-01

    Norm stability is an important issue to consider in using the normative approach as a component of resource management decision making. This study examines three major questions related to norm stability: (1) Do norms change over time? (2) Do existing conditions affect norms? (3) Do background characteristics and visitation patterns affect norms? Data used in this study were collected at a campground in the Jirisan National Park (JNP) of Korea in 1993, 1994, and 2003. A total of 396 subjects were used for the study (120 for 1993, 106 for 1994, and 170 for 2003). Changes in the standards for "quiet time" and "seeing others littering" were statistically significant, but there was no change in the standard for "number of other tents." There was little change in norm agreement or norm prevalence. Existing conditions were strongly correlated with standards for number of other tents but results were mixed for the other two indicators. Users' demographic characteristics and visitation patterns were not generally related to norms. Findings of the study are discussed.

  4. Preliminary measurement of time-dependent B{sub d}{sup 0}-B{sub d}{sup 0} mixing using topology and charge selected semi-leptonic B decays

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-01

    The time dependence of B{sub d}{sup 0}-B{sub d}{sup 0} mixing has been measured using a sample of 150,000 hadronic Z{sup 0} decays collected by the SLD experiment at the SLC between 1993 and 1995. The analysis identifies the semileptonic decays of B mesons with high (p, p{sub t}) leptons and reconstructs the B meson decay length and charge by vertexing the lepton with a partially reconstructed D meson. Vertex charge is used to enrich the selection of neutral over charged B mesons. This method results in a sample of 581 neutral decays with high charge purity. The B candidate is tagged at production with a combined tag that exploits the large polarized b forward-backward asymmetry in conjunction with the opposite hemisphere b jet charge. The final state is tagged by the sign of the high (p, p{sub t}) lepton. From their preliminary analysis the authors find a mass difference between the two B{sub d}{sup 0} mass eigenstates of, {Delta}m{sub d} = 0.452 {+-} 0.074(stat) {+-} 0.049(syst) ps{sup {minus}1}.

  5. Time domain characteristics of wave motion in dispersive and anisotropic continuum acoustic metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaojun; Zhou, Xiaoming

    2016-12-01

    The authors study the wave propagation in continuum acoustic metamaterials whose all or not all of the principal elements of the mass tensor or the scalar compressibility can be negative due to wave dispersion. Their time-domain wave characteristics are particularly investigated by the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method, in which algorithms for the Drude and Lorentz dispersion pertinent to acoustic metamaterials are provided necessarily. Wave propagation nature of anisotropic acoustic metamaterials with all admissible material parameters are analyzed in a general manner. It is found that anomalous negative refraction phenomena can appear in several dispersion regimes, and their unique time-domain signatures have been discovered by the FDTD modeling. It is further proposed that two different metamaterial layers with specially assigned dispersions could comprise a conjugate pair that permits wave propagation only at specific points in the wave vector space. The time-domain pulse simulation verifies that acoustic directive radiation capable of modulating radiation angle with the wave frequency can be realized with this conjugate pair. The study provides the detailed analysis of wave propagation in anisotropic and dispersive acoustic mediums, which makes a further step toward dispersion engineering and transient wave control through acoustic metamaterials.

  6. Lean burn limit and time to light characteristics of laser ignition in gas turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, J.; Riley, M.; Kirk, A.; Borman, A.; Lawrence, J.; Dowding, C.

    2014-04-01

    This work details a study of laser ignition in a low pressure combustion test rig, representative of an industrial gas turbine (SGT-400, Siemens Industrial Turbomachinery Ltd.) and for the first time investigates the effect of air mass flow rate on combustion characteristics at air/fuel ratios at the lean burn limit. Both the lean burn limit and time taken to light are essential in determining the suitability of a specified air/fuel ratio, especially in multi-chamber ignition applications. Through extension of the lean burn limit and reduction of the time taken to light, the operating window for ignition with regards to the air/fuel ratio can be increased, leading to greater reliability and repeatability of ignition. Ignition of a natural gas and air mixture at atmospheric pressure was conducted using both a standard high energy igniter and a laser ignition system utilizing a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser source operating at 1064 nm wavelength. A detailed comparison of the lean burn limit and time taken to light for standard ignition and laser ignition is presented.

  7. Characteristics of Yerevan High Transparency Scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Zorn, Carl; Asryan, Gegham; Egiyan, Kim; Tarverdyan, M.; Amaryan, Moscov; Amaryan, Moskov; Demirchyan, Raphael; Stepanyan, Stepan; Burkert, Volker; Sharabian, Youri

    1992-08-01

    Optical transmission, light output and time characteristics are given for long scintillator strips fabricated at the Yerevan Physics Institute using the extrusion method. It is shown that at 45% relative (to anthracene) light output, good transmission (2.5/2.9 m attenuation length with photomultiplier direct readout and 3/3.5 m attenuation length fiber readout) and time characteristics (average decay time 2.8 nsec) were obtained.

  8. Stratigraphy and Characteristic Time Scales of Northern Polar and Circumpolar Deposits on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreslavsky, M. A.; Head, J. W.

    2002-05-01

    The north polar region is dominated by the polar cap cut by troughs and Chasma Boreale, surrounded by the north polar erg and overlying the Vastitas Borealis Formation. A thin layer of mantle with characteristic "basketball" texture typical for high latitudes covers the surface of Vastitas Borealis Formation. Study of the high-resolution MGS MOC images showed that the dunes migrate over this mantle. The stratigraphic relationships of this mantle and icy deposits, as well as Chasma Boreale-related deposits are more complex. Chasma Boreale has been interpreted to be initiated as an outflow event (Fishbaugh and Head, JGR, JE001351, 2002). We estimate that the time scale of the meltwater accumulation at the base of the polar cap and the time scale of establishing the thermal equilibrium in the cap are on the order of 0.5 Myr or greater. We compare this time scale with the characteristic astronomically predicted time scales: the time scale of obliquity oscillations (0.05 Myr), the period of obliquity oscillations about 25 deg (3.5 Myr), and the time scale of chaotic obliquity variations (5 Myr). During the period 3.5 - 5 Myr ago the obliquity oscillated around 35 deg, which led to noticeably higher polar cap temperatures and a shallower depth of the melting isotherm than during the present epoch. Predictions of obliquity in the earlier epochs beyond 5 Myr are impossible. We conclude that the period of intensive reshaping of the polar cap and formation of Chasma Boreale occurred 3.5 Myr ago or earlier. During the last 3.5 Myr the cap was rather similar to present; minor erosion and deposition of the upper layers could occur, along with modest trough migration in the short epochs of the highest obliquity. The accumulation of the main mass of the finely layered deposits occurred at least 0.5 - 1 Myr (and may be much earlier) than the Chasma Boreale flood. The accumulation could occur in response to some obliquity-driven climate variation or due to some endogenic discharge

  9. Stick slip, charge separation and decay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lockner, D.A.; Byerlee, J.D.; Kuksenko, V.S.; Ponomarev, A.V.

    1986-01-01

    Measurements of charge separation in rock during stable and unstable deformation give unexpectedly large decay times of 50 sec. Time-domain induced polarization experiments on wet and dry rocks give similar decay times and suggest that the same decay mechanisms operate in the induced polarization response as in the relaxation of charge generated by mechanical deformation. These large decay times are attributed to electrochemical processes in the rocks, and they require low-frequency relative permittivity to be very large, in excess of 105. One consequence of large permittivity, and therefore long decay times, is that a significant portion of any electrical charge generated during an earthquake can persist for tens or hundreds of seconds. As a result, electrical disturbances associated with earthquakes should be observable for these lengths of time rather than for the milliseconds previously suggested. ?? 1986 Birka??user Verlag.

  10. Decay curve study in a standard electron capture decay

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, D.; Fukuda, M.; Kisamori, K.; Kuwada, Y.; Makisaka, K.; Matsumiya, R.; Matsuta, K.; Mihara, M.; Takagi, A.; Yokoyama, R.; Izumikawa, T.; Ohtsubo, T.; Suzuki, T.; Yamaguchi, T.

    2010-05-12

    We have searched for a time-modulated decay in a standard electron capture experiment for {sup 140}Pr, in order to confirm a report from GSI, where an oscillatory decay has been observed for hydrogen-like {sup 140}Pr and {sup 142}Pm ions in the cooler storage ring. {sup 140}Pr has been produced with the {sup 140}Ce(p, n) reaction by a pulsed proton beam accelerated from the Van de Graaff accelerator at Osaka University. Resultant time dependence of the K{sub a}lpha and K{sub b}eta X-ray intensities from the daughter shows no oscillatory behavior.

  11. Time-Frequency Characteristics of Tsunami Magnetic Signals from Four Pacific Ocean Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnepf, N. R.; Manoj, C.; An, C.; Sugioka, H.; Toh, H.

    2016-12-01

    The recent deployment of highly sensitive seafloor magnetometers coinciding with the deep solar minimum has provided excellent opportunities for observing tsunami electromagnetic signals. These fluctuating signals (periods ranging from 10-20 min) are generally found to be within ± ˜1 nT and coincide with the arrival of the tsunami waves. Previous studies focused on tsunami electromagnetic characteristics, as well as modeling the signal for individual events. This study instead aims to provide the time-frequency characteristics for a range of tsunami signals and a method to separate the data's noise using additional data from a remote observatory. We focus on four Pacific Ocean events of varying tsunami signal amplitude: (1) the 2011 Tohoku, Japan event (M9.0), (2) the 2010 Chile event (M8.8), (3) the 2009 Samoa event (M8.0) and, (4) the 2007 Kuril Islands event (M8.1). We find possible tsunami signals in high-pass filtered data and successfully isolate the signals from noise using a cross-wavelet analysis. The cross-wavelet analysis reveals that the longer period signals precede the stronger, shorter period signals. Our results are very encouraging for using tsunami magnetic signals in warning systems.

  12. Characteristic distribution of finite-time Lyapunov exponents for chimera states

    PubMed Central

    Botha, André E.

    2016-01-01

    Our fascination with chimera states stems partially from the somewhat paradoxical, yet fundamental trait of identical, and identically coupled, oscillators to split into spatially separated, coherently and incoherently oscillating groups. While the list of systems for which various types of chimeras have already been detected continues to grow, there is a corresponding increase in the number of mathematical analyses aimed at elucidating the fundamental reasons for this surprising behaviour. Based on the model systems, there are strong indications that chimera states may generally be ubiquitous in naturally occurring systems containing large numbers of coupled oscillators – certain biological systems and high-Tc superconducting materials, for example. In this work we suggest a new way of detecting and characterising chimera states. Specifically, it is shown that the probability densities of finite-time Lyapunov exponents, corresponding to chimera states, have a definite characteristic shape. Such distributions could be used as signatures of chimera states, particularly in systems for which the phases of all the oscillators cannot be measured directly. For such cases, we suggest that chimera states could perhaps be detected by reconstructing the characteristic distribution via standard embedding techniques, thus making it possible to detect chimera states in systems where they could otherwise exist unnoticed. PMID:27374473

  13. Impact of sludge retention time on sludge characteristics and microbial community in MBR.

    PubMed

    Su, Yuchun; Pan, Jill Ruhsing; Huang, Chihpin; Chang, Chialing

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the impact of sludge retention time (SRT) on sludge characteristics and microbial community and the effect on membrane fouling in membrane bioreactor (MBR) was investigated. The results show that MBR with longer SRT has less fouling propensity, in agreement with other studies, despite the fact that the MBR with longer SRT contained higher MLSS and smaller particle size. However, much more soluble microbial products (SMPs) were released in MBR with shorter SRT. More slime on the membrane surface was observed in MBR with shorter SRT while sludge cakes formed on the membrane surface in MBR with longer SRT. The results show that SMP contributes to the severe fouling observed in MBR with shorter SRT, which is in agreement with other studies showing that SMPs were the major foulants in MBR. Under different SRTs of operation, the bacterial community structures of the sludge obtained by use of polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) were almost identical, but those on the membrane surface differed substantially. It suggests that, although SRT has impact on sludge characteristics, it doesn't affect the microbial community in the suspension.

  14. Norm Stability in Jirisan National Park: Effects of Time, Existing Conditions, and Background Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang-Oh; Shelby, Bo

    2008-04-01

    Norm stability is an important issue to consider in using the normative approach as a component of resource management decision making. This study examines three major questions related to norm stability: (1) Do norms change over time? (2) Do existing conditions affect norms? (3) Do background characteristics and visitation patterns affect norms? Data used in this study were collected at a campground in the Jirisan National Park (JNP) of Korea in 1993, 1994, and 2003. A total of 396 subjects were used for the study (120 for 1993, 106 for 1994, and 170 for 2003). Changes in the standards for “quiet time” and “seeing others littering” were statistically significant, but there was no change in the standard for “number of other tents.” There was little change in norm agreement or norm prevalence. Existing conditions were strongly correlated with standards for number of other tents but results were mixed for the other two indicators. Users’ demographic characteristics and visitation patterns were not generally related to norms. Findings of the study are discussed.

  15. Characteristic distribution of finite-time Lyapunov exponents for chimera states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botha, André E.

    2016-07-01

    Our fascination with chimera states stems partially from the somewhat paradoxical, yet fundamental trait of identical, and identically coupled, oscillators to split into spatially separated, coherently and incoherently oscillating groups. While the list of systems for which various types of chimeras have already been detected continues to grow, there is a corresponding increase in the number of mathematical analyses aimed at elucidating the fundamental reasons for this surprising behaviour. Based on the model systems, there are strong indications that chimera states may generally be ubiquitous in naturally occurring systems containing large numbers of coupled oscillators – certain biological systems and high-Tc superconducting materials, for example. In this work we suggest a new way of detecting and characterising chimera states. Specifically, it is shown that the probability densities of finite-time Lyapunov exponents, corresponding to chimera states, have a definite characteristic shape. Such distributions could be used as signatures of chimera states, particularly in systems for which the phases of all the oscillators cannot be measured directly. For such cases, we suggest that chimera states could perhaps be detected by reconstructing the characteristic distribution via standard embedding techniques, thus making it possible to detect chimera states in systems where they could otherwise exist unnoticed.

  16. Characteristic distribution of finite-time Lyapunov exponents for chimera states.

    PubMed

    Botha, André E

    2016-07-04

    Our fascination with chimera states stems partially from the somewhat paradoxical, yet fundamental trait of identical, and identically coupled, oscillators to split into spatially separated, coherently and incoherently oscillating groups. While the list of systems for which various types of chimeras have already been detected continues to grow, there is a corresponding increase in the number of mathematical analyses aimed at elucidating the fundamental reasons for this surprising behaviour. Based on the model systems, there are strong indications that chimera states may generally be ubiquitous in naturally occurring systems containing large numbers of coupled oscillators - certain biological systems and high-Tc superconducting materials, for example. In this work we suggest a new way of detecting and characterising chimera states. Specifically, it is shown that the probability densities of finite-time Lyapunov exponents, corresponding to chimera states, have a definite characteristic shape. Such distributions could be used as signatures of chimera states, particularly in systems for which the phases of all the oscillators cannot be measured directly. For such cases, we suggest that chimera states could perhaps be detected by reconstructing the characteristic distribution via standard embedding techniques, thus making it possible to detect chimera states in systems where they could otherwise exist unnoticed.

  17. Time-averaged Turbulent Flow Characteristics over a Highly Spatially Heterogeneous Gravel-Bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Sankar

    2016-10-01

    The present study focuses on the time-averaged turbulence characteristics over a highly spatially-heterogeneous gravel-bed. The timeaveraged streamwise velocity, Reynolds shear and normal stresses, turbulent kinetic energy, higher-order moments of velocity fluctuations, length scales, and the turbulent bursting were measured over a gravel-bed with an array of larger gravels. It was observed that the turbulence characteristics do not vary significantly above the crest level of the array as compared to those below the array. The nondimensional streamwise velocity decreases considerably with a decrease in depth below the array. Below the array, the Reynolds shear stress (RSS) deviates from the gravity- law of RSS distributions. Turbulence intensities reduce below the crest level of the gravel-bed. The third-order moments of velocity fluctuations increase below the crest level of the gravel-bed and give a clear indication of sweeps as the predominating event which were further verified with the quadrant analysis plots. The turbulent length scales values change significantly below the crest level of the gravel-bed.

  18. Electronic decay through carbon chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuleff, Alexander I.

    2017-01-01

    Using the multielectron wave-packet propagation method the electronic decay of O2s vacancy in fluorinated cumulenones, OCnF2 , containing a chain of up to five carbons is traced in time and space. It is shown that in all studied cases this state decays non-locally by emitting an electron from the remote fluorines. Even in the pentatetraenone case, where the oxygen and the flourines are more than 7 Å apart, this non-local decay is extremely efficient, with a time constant of about 5 fs. The process can be viewed as an ultrafast energy transfer through the carbon chain and thus our systematic study allows to shed some light on the dependence of the time scale of the electron-correlation driven energy transfer through a medium.

  19. Time-variable Earth's albedo model characteristics and applications to satellite sampling errors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartman, F. L.

    1981-01-01

    Characteristics of the time variable Earth albedo model are described. With the cloud cover multiplying factor adjusted to produce a global annual average albedo of 30.3, the global annual average cloud cover is 45.5 percent. Global annual average sunlit cloud cover is 48.5 percent; nighttime cloud cover is 42.7 percent. Month-to-month global average albedo is almost sinusoidal with maxima in June and December and minima in April and October. Month-to-month variation of sunlit cloud cover is similar, but not in all details. The diurnal variation of global albedo is greatest from November to March; the corresponding variation of sunlit cloud cover is greatest from May to October. Annual average zonal albedos and monthly average zonal albedos are in good agreement with satellite-measured values, with notable differences in the polar regions in some months and at 15 S. The albedo of some 10 deg by 10 deg. areas of the Earth versus zenith angle are described. Satellite albedo measurement sampling effects are described in local time and in Greenwich mean time.

  20. Effects of subthalamic nucleus stimulation on characteristics of EMG activity underlying reaction time in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Kumru, Hatice; Summerfield, Christopher; Valldeoriola, Francesc; Valls-Solé, Josep

    2004-01-01

    We examined the effects of high-frequency deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS) on characteristics of electromyographic (EMG) activity of the agonist muscle in 8 patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Patients were examined during STN-DBS (ON), and 30 minutes after switching off both stimulators (OFF). They were asked to make a ballistic movement in paradigms of simple reaction time (SRT) and choice reaction time (CRT) tasks. Onset of movement (MOVonset) was measured as the latency of the initial displacement from baseline of the signal from an accelerometer attached to the dorsum of the hand. In the associated EMG activity, recorded from wrist extensor muscles, we measured onset latency (EMGonset), size of the first EMG burst (EMGsize), and number of EMG bursts (EMGbursts) counted between EMGonset and task execution. MOVonset and EMGonset were significantly shorter in ON than in OFF conditions in CRT. EMGsize was larger, EMGbursts were reduced, and peak of the acceleration profile was larger in ON compared with OFF conditions in both SRT and CRT. Our results indicate that STN-DBS induces a significant improvement in motor performance of reaction time tasks in PD patients. Such improvement is associated with a change in features of the EMG activity suggesting an increase in the excitability of the motor pathways engaged in ballistic movements.

  1. Thermal characteristics of time-periodic electroosmotic flow in a circular microchannel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghadam, Ali Jabari

    2015-10-01

    A theoretical analysis is performed to explore the thermal characteristics of electroosmotic flow in a circular microchannel under an alternating electric field. An analytical approach is presented to solve energy equation, and then, the exact solution of temperature profiles is obtained by using the Green's function method. This study reveals that the temperature field repeats itself for each half-period. Frequency has a strong influence on the thermal behavior of the flow field. For small values of the dimensionless frequency (small channel size, large kinematic viscosity, or small frequency), the advection mechanism is dominant in the whole domain and the resultant heating (Joule heating and wall heat flux) can be transferred by the complete flow field in the axial direction; while, the middle portion of the flow field at high dimensionless frequencies does not have sufficient time to transfer heat by advection, and the bulk fluid temperature, especially in heating, may consequently become greater than the wall temperature. In a particular instance of cooling mode, a constant surface temperature case is temporarily occurred in which the axial temperature gradient will be zero. For relatively high frequencies, the unsteady bulk fluid temperature in some radial positions at some moments may be equal to the wall temperature; hence instantaneous cylindrical surfaces with zero radial heat flux may occur over a period of time. Depending on the value and sign of the thermal scale ratio, the quasi-steady-state Nusselt number (time-averaged at one period) approaches a specific value as the electrokinetic radius becomes infinity.

  2. Gender, Parenthood and Wage Differences: The Importance of Time-Consuming Job Characteristics.

    PubMed

    Magnusson, Charlotta; Nermo, Magnus

    2017-01-01

    Using data from the Swedish Level of Living Survey (2000, 2010), we investigate how the gender wage gap varies with occupational prestige and family status and also examine the extent to which this gap is explained by time-consuming working conditions. In addition, we investigate whether there is an association between parenthood, job characteristics and wage (as differentiated by gender). The analyses indicate that there are gender differences regarding prestige-based pay-offs among parents that are partly explained by fathers' greater access to employment characterized by time-consuming conditions. Separate analyses for men and women demonstrate the presence of a marriage wage premium for both genders, although only men have a parenthood wage premium. This fatherhood premium is however only present in high-prestigious occupations. Compared with childless men, fathers are also more advantaged in terms of access to jobs with time-consuming working conditions, but the wage gap between fathers and childless men is not explained by differences in access to such working conditions.

  3. [Stormflow hydrochemical characteristics at different time scales in a typical karst catchment of northwest Guangxi, China].

    PubMed

    Liu, Chun; Yang, Jing; Nie, Yun-peng; Chen, Hong-song; Fu, Zhi-yong

    2015-09-01

    Through in situ observation and indoor tests, the hydrochemical characteristics of a typical karst watershed at three different time scales (diurnal, single storm, and seasonal scales) from June 2013 to March 2014 were investigated, and their influencing factors were analyzed. The results showed that the diurnal variations of the hydrochemistry exhibited a regular changing pattern resulting from the shifting of the main vegetation physiological activity from photosynthesis in the day to respiration in the night. At single storm scale, however, the hydrochemical processes were mainly determined by the number of consecutive rainless days and rainfall intensity, while the diurnal scale effect was weakened. As to the seasonal scale, the overall hydrochemical processes showed quick responses to rainfall events although they responded more quickly in the rainy season than in the dry season. The temperature and the yearly rainfall distribution regime were the two main influencing factors at this scale.

  4. Measurements of admittances and characteristic combustion times of reactive gaseous propellant coaxial injectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janardan, B. A.; Daniel, B. R.; Zinn, B. T.

    1979-01-01

    The results of an experimental investigation that was concerned with the quantitative determination of the capabilities of combustion processes associated with coaxial injectors to amplify and sustain combustor oscillations was described. The driving provided by the combustion process was determined by employing the modified standing-wave method utilizing coaxial injectors and air-acetylene mixtures. Analyses of the measured data indicate that the investigated injectors are capable of initiating and amplifying combustion instabilities under favorable conditions of injector-combustion coupling and over certain frequency ranges. These frequency ranges and the frequency at which an injector's driving capacity is maximum are observed to depend upon the equivalence ratio, the pressure drop across the injector orifices and the number of injector elements. The characteristic combustion times of coaxial injectors were determined from steady state temperature measurements.

  5. Nonlinear parametrically excited vibration and active control of gear pair system with time-varying characteristic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shuang; Wang, Jin-Jin; Liu, Jin-Jie; Li, Ya-Qian

    2015-10-01

    In the present work, we investigate the nonlinear parametrically excited vibration and active control of a gear pair system involving backlash, time-varying meshing stiffness and static transmission error. Firstly, a gear pair model is established in a strongly nonlinear form, and its nonlinear vibration characteristics are systematically investigated through different approaches. Several complicated phenomena such as period doubling bifurcation, anti period doubling bifurcation and chaos can be observed under the internal parametric excitation. Then, an active compensation controller is designed to suppress the vibration, including the chaos. Finally, the effectiveness of the proposed controller is verified numerically. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61104040), the Natural Science Foundation of Hebei Province, China (Grant No. E2012203090), and the University Innovation Team of Hebei Province Leading Talent Cultivation Project, China (Grant No. LJRC013).

  6. Discovering the Impact of Preceding Units' Characteristics on the Wait Time of Cardiac Surgery Unit from Statistic Data

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jiming; Tao, Li; Xiao, Bo

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Prior research shows that clinical demand and supplier capacity significantly affect the throughput and the wait time within an isolated unit. However, it is doubtful whether characteristics (i.e., demand, capacity, throughput, and wait time) of one unit would affect the wait time of subsequent units on the patient flow process. Focusing on cardiac care, this paper aims to examine the impact of characteristics of the catheterization unit (CU) on the wait time of cardiac surgery unit (SU). Methods This study integrates published data from several sources on characteristics of the CU and SU units in 11 hospitals in Ontario, Canada between 2005 and 2008. It proposes a two-layer wait time model (with each layer representing one unit) to examine the impact of CU's characteristics on the wait time of SU and test the hypotheses using the Partial Least Squares-based Structural Equation Modeling analysis tool. Results Results show that: (i) wait time of CU has a direct positive impact on wait time of SU (); (ii) capacity of CU has a direct positive impact on demand of SU (); (iii) within each unit, there exist significant relationships among different characteristics (except for the effect of throughput on wait time in SU). Conclusion Characteristics of CU have direct and indirect impacts on wait time of SU. Specifically, demand and wait time of preceding unit are good predictors for wait time of subsequent units. This suggests that considering such cross-unit effects is necessary when alleviating wait time in a health care system. Further, different patient risk profiles may affect wait time in different ways (e.g., positive or negative effects) within SU. This implies that the wait time management should carefully consider the relationship between priority triage and risk stratification, especially for cardiac surgery. PMID:21818282

  7. Summer-time thermal environment characteristics in central Korea using Landsat TM data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jin-Ki; Park, Jong-Hwa; Na, Sang-il

    2010-10-01

    Urban heat island(UHI) effect is the temperature increase in urban areas compared to that in surrounding rural areas and is caused by a number of factors, such as land use / land cover (LULC)change, increase fuel consumption and lack of vegetation in urban core areas. The replacement of natural surface types from soil and vegetation to impervious materials such as asphalt and concrete structures affects the albedo and runoff characteristics of the urban land surface. The impervious materials have a lower albedo than soil and vegetation and hold more solar energy, which increase land surface temperature (LST) during the summer season. UHI effects on the center region of South Korea were analyzed using remotely sensed data. The objectives of this study are to examine the summer-time thermal environment of the Cheongju city in Korea, review the satellite assessment of the thermal environment of LULC, and compare thermal environment in 1991 to 2006. Chang detection of thermal environment is performed to determine whether a significant change has occurred. The average of LST of study area has increased 2.7°C during 15years because of changed land cover from paddy field and forest to barren, factory, and concrete. This case study indicates that barren, factory, and residential apartment over on the Cheongju and Ochang increased in the late 1990s and that vegetation area are changing predominantly in the direction of decreased forest and paddy fields. Decreasing forest and paddy fields are an important result, as it suggests that directional changes are occurring on the Cheongju and Ochang that are consistent with experimental urban warming. The most influential factors for controlling the summer-time thermal environment are the distribution of surface cover characteristics (e.g. LULC) and urban morphology, such as urban consistence materials, geometry, development stage, and density.

  8. Characteristics of Real-Time, Non-Critical Incident Debriefing Practices in the Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Nadir, Nur-Ain; Bentley, Suzanne; Papanagnou, Dimitrios; Bajaj, Komal; Rinnert, Stephan; Sinert, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Benefits of post-simulation debriefings as an educational and feedback tool have been widely accepted for nearly a decade. Real-time, non-critical incident debriefing is similar to post-simulation debriefing; however, data on its practice in academic emergency departments (ED), is limited. Although tools such as TeamSTEPPS® (Team Strategies and Tools to Enhance Performance and Patient Safety) suggest debriefing after complicated medical situations, they do not teach debriefing skills suited to this purpose. Anecdotal evidence suggests that real-time debriefings (or non-critical incident debriefings) do in fact occur in academic EDs;, however, limited research has been performed on this subject. The objective of this study was to characterize real-time, non-critical incident debriefing practices in emergency medicine (EM). Methods We conducted this multicenter cross-sectional study of EM attendings and residents at four large, high-volume, academic EM residency programs in New York City. Questionnaire design was based on a Delphi panel and pilot testing with expert panel. We sought a convenience sample from a potential pool of approximately 300 physicians across the four sites with the goal of obtaining >100 responses. The survey was sent electronically to the four residency list-serves with a total of six monthly completion reminder emails. We collected all data electronically and anonymously using SurveyMonkey.com; the data were then entered into and analyzed with Microsoft Excel. Results The data elucidate various characteristics of current real-time debriefing trends in EM, including its definition, perceived benefits and barriers, as well as the variety of formats of debriefings currently being conducted. Conclusion This survey regarding the practice of real-time, non-critical incident debriefings in four major academic EM programs within New York City sheds light on three major, pertinent points: 1) real-time, non-critical incident debriefing

  9. Determinants of Timely Completion: The Impact of Bachelor's Degree Programme Characteristics and Student Motivation on Study Progress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suhre, Cor J. M.; Jansen, Ellen P. W. A.; Torenbeek, M.

    2013-01-01

    Timely completion of university degree programmes is a topic of growing concern to higher education institutions and their students. This paper reports on a study about the impact of degree programme characteristics and student motivation on study progress. The setting for the study is a Dutch law school. Data on degree programme characteristics,…

  10. Time-motion analysis, heart rate, and physiological characteristics of international canoe polo athletes.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Scott C; Kennedy, Michael D; Bell, Gordon J

    2013-10-01

    To evaluate the time international canoe polo players spend performing various game activities, measure heart rate (HR) responses during games, and describe the physiological profile of elite players. Eight national canoe polo players were videotaped and wore HR monitors during 3 games at a World Championship and underwent fitness testing. The mean age, height, and weight were 25 ± 1 years, 1.82 ± 0.04 m, and 81.9 ± 10.9 kg, respectively. Time-motion analysis of 3 games indicated that the players spent 29 ± 3% of the game slow and moderate forward paddling, 28 ± 5% contesting, 27 ± 5% resting and gliding, 7 ± 1% turning, 5 ± 1% backward paddling, 2 ± 1% sprinting, and 2 ± 1% dribbling. Sixty-nine (±20)% of the game time was played at an HR intensity above the HR that corresponded to the ventilatory threshold (VT) that was determined during the peak V[Combining Dot Above]O2 test. Peak oxygen uptake and VT were 3.3 ± 0.3 and 2.2 ± 0.3 L·min, respectively, on a modified Monark arm crank ergometer. Arm crank peak 5-second anaerobic power was 379 W. The majority of the time spent during international canoe polo games involved slow-to-moderate forward paddling, contesting for the ball, and resting and gliding. Canoe polo games are played at a high intensity indicated by the HR responses, and the physiological characteristics suggest that these athletes had high levels of upper body aerobic and anaerobic fitness levels.

  11. Studies of Ion Acoustic Decay

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, R.P.; Bauer, B.S.; Baker, K.L. |

    1994-03-07

    In this project, we advanced knowledge of Ion Acoustic Decay on several fronts. In this project, we have developed and demonstrated the capability to perform experimental and theoretical studies of the Ion Acoustic Decay Instability. We have at the same time demonstrated an improved capability to do multichannel spectroscopy and Thomson scattering. We made the first observations of the time-resolved second harmonic emission at several angles simultaneously, and the first observations of the emission both parallel and perpendicular to the electric field of the laser light. We used Thomson scattering to make the first observations of the plasma waves driven by acoustic decay in a warm plasma with long density scale lengths. We also advanced both the linear and the nonlinear theory of this instability. We are thus prepared to perform experiments to address this mechanism as needed for applications.

  12. Decay of capillary wave turbulence.

    PubMed

    Deike, Luc; Berhanu, Michael; Falcon, Eric

    2012-06-01

    We report on the observation of freely decaying capillary wave turbulence on the surface of a fluid. The capillary wave turbulence spectrum decay is found to be self-similar in time with the same power law exponent as the one found in the stationary regime, in agreement with weak turbulence predictions. The amplitude of all Fourier modes are found to decrease exponentially with time at the same damping rate. The longest wavelengths involved in the system are shown to be damped by a viscous surface boundary layer. These long waves play the role of an energy source during the decay that sustains nonlinear interactions to keep capillary waves in a wave turbulent state.

  13. Time-varying spectral characteristics of ENSO over the Last Millennium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hope, Pandora; Henley, Benjamin J.; Gergis, Joelle; Brown, Josephine; Ye, Hua

    2016-10-01

    The characteristics of El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) spectra over the Last Millennium are examined to characterise variability over past centuries. Seven published palaeo-ENSO reconstructions and Nino3.4 from six Coupled Model Intercomparison Project-Phase 5 and Paleoclimate Modelling Intercomparison Project-Phase 3 (CMIP5-PMIP3) Last Millennium simulations were analysed. The corresponding Historical and pre-industrial Control CMIP5-PMIP3 simulations were also considered. The post-1850 spectrum of each modelled or reconstructed ENSO series captures aspects of the observed spectrum to varying degrees. We note that no single model or ENSO reconstruction completely reproduces the instrumental spectral characteristics. The spectral power across the 2-3 years (near biennial), 3-8 years (classical ENSO) and 8-25 years (decadal) periodicity bands was calculated in a sliding 50 year window, revealing temporal variability in the spectra. There was strong temporal variability in the spectral power of each periodicity band in observed Nino3.4 and SOI and for all reconstructions and simulations of ENSO. Significant peaks in spectral power such as observed in recent decades also occur in some of the reconstructed palaeo-ENSO (around 1600, the early 1700s and 1900) and modelled series (around the major volcanic eruptions of 1258 and 1452). While the recent increase in spectral power might be in response to enhanced greenhouse gas levels, the increase lies within the range of variability across the suite of ENSO reconstructions and simulations examined here. This study demonstrates that the analysis of a suite of ENSO reconstructions and model simulations can build a broader understanding of the time-varying nature of ENSO spectra, and how the nature of the past spectra of ENSO is to some extent dependant on the climate model or palaeo-ENSO reconstruction chosen.

  14. Investigation of hydrological time series using copulas for detecting catchment characteristics and anthropogenic impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, Takayuki; Bárdossy, András; Pegram, Geoffrey G. S.; Cullmann, Johannes

    2016-07-01

    Global climate change can have impacts on characteristics of rainfall-runoff events and subsequently on the hydrological regime. Meanwhile, the catchment itself changes due to anthropogenic influences. However, it is not easy to prove the link between the hydrology and the forcings. In this context, it might be meaningful to detect the temporal changes of catchments independent from climate change by investigating existing long-term discharge records. For this purpose, a new stochastic system based on copulas for time series analysis is introduced in this study.A statistical tool like copula has the advantage to scrutinize the dependence structure of the data and, thus, can be used to attribute the catchment behavior by focusing on the following aspects of the statistics defined in the copula domain: (1) copula asymmetry, which can capture the nonsymmetric property of discharge data, differs from one catchment to another due to the intrinsic nature of both runoff and catchment; and (2) copula distances can assist in identifying catchment change by revealing the variability and interdependency of dependence structures.These measures were calculated for 100 years of daily discharges for the Rhine River and these analyses detected epochs of change in the flow sequences. In a follow-up study, we compared the results of copula asymmetry and copula distance applied to two flow models: (i) antecedent precipitation index (API) and (ii) simulated discharge time series generated by a hydrological model. The results of copula-based analysis of hydrological time series seem to support the assumption that the Neckar catchment had started to change around 1976 and stayed unusual until 1990.

  15. Baryonic B Decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chistov, R.

    2016-02-01

    In this talk the decays of B-mesons into baryons are discussed. Large mass of B-meson makes possible the decays of the type B → baryon (+mesons). Experimental observations and measurements of these decays at B-factories Belle and BaBar have stimulate the development of theoretical models in this field. We briefly review the experimental results together with the current theoretical models which describe baryonic B decays.

  16. Neighborhood contextual characteristics and leisure-time physical activity: Pró-Saúde Study

    PubMed Central

    Boclin, Karine de Lima Sírio; Faerstein, Eduardo; de Leon, Antônio Carlos Monteiro Ponce

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To estimate the association between neighborhood contextual variables and leisure-time physical activity. METHODS Data were analyzed for 2,674 adults from Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Southeastern Brazil, participating in the longitudinal study in 1999. Leisure-time physical activity in the two preceding weeks was assessed dichotomously. Sex, age, income, education and marital status were analyzed as individual variables. Neighborhood contextual characteristics were the social development index, the Theil index and the proportion of the area occupied by parks, squares and gardens, categorized in quintiles. The unadjusted and adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were estimated using multilevel logistic regression. RESULTS The prevalence of leisure-time physical activity was higher in residents in neighborhoods with higher indices of social development (between 32.3% and 53.1%) and a greater proportion of parks, squares and gardens (between 35.8% and 53.1%). Regarding the social development index, the adjusted odds ratios for physical activity were 1.22 (95%CI 0.93;1.61), 1.44 (95%CI 1.09;1.89), 1.75 (95%CI 1.31;2.34) and 2.25 (95%CI 1.70;3.00) for residents in neighborhoods in the second, third, fourth and fifth quintiles, respectively, compared with residents in neighborhoods in the first quintile. The odds ratios for the proportion of parks, squares and gardens were 0.90 (95%CI 0.69;1.19), 1.41 (95%CI 1.04;1.90), 1.63 (95%CI 1.24;2.14) and 1.05 (95%CI 0.80;1.38) for residents in neighborhoods in the second, third, fourth and fifth quintiles. After adjusting for the other variables, only the social development index continued to be associated with leisure-time physical activity, with odds ratios of 1.41 (95%CI 1.02;1.95); 1.54 (95%CI 1.12;2.12); 1.65 (95%CI 1.14;2.39) and 2.13 (95%CI 1.40;3.25) for residents in neighborhoods in the second, third, fourth and fifth quintiles. CONCLUSIONS Leisure-time physical activity was more common in residents in

  17. Evaluation of the amperex 56 TVP photomultiplier. [characteristics: photoelectron time spread, anode pulse amplitude and photocathode sensing area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, C. C.; Leskovar, B.

    1976-01-01

    Characteristics were measured for the Amperex 56 TVP 42 mm-diameter photomultiplier. Some typical photomultiplier characteristics-such as gain, dark current, transit and rise times-are compared with data provided. Photomultiplier characteristics generally not available such as the single photoelectron time spread, the relative collection efficiency, the relative anode pulse amplitude as a function of the voltage between the photocathode and focusing electrode, and the position of the photocathode sensing area were measured and are discussed for two 56 TVP's. The single photoelectron time spread, the relative collection efficiency, and the transit time difference as a function of the voltage between photocathode and focusing electrode were also measured and are discussed, particularly with respect to the optimization of photomultiplier operating conditions for timing applications.

  18. Searching for displaced Higgs boson decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csáki, Csaba; Kuflik, Eric; Lombardo, Salvator; Slone, Oren

    2015-10-01

    We study a simplified model of the Standard Model (SM) Higgs boson decaying to a degenerate pair of scalars which travel a macroscopic distance before decaying to SM particles. This is the leading signal for many well-motivated solutions to the hierarchy problem that do not propose additional light colored particles. Bounds for displaced Higgs boson decays below 10 cm are found by recasting existing tracker searches from Run I. New tracker search strategies, sensitive to the characteristics of these models and similar decays, are proposed with sensitivities projected for Run II at √{s }=13 TeV . With 20 fb-1 of data, we find that Higgs branching ratios down to 2 ×1 0-4 can be probed for centimeter decay lengths.

  19. As time goes by: reasons and characteristics of prolonged episodes of mechanical restraint in forensic psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Gildberg, Frederik A; Fristed, Peter; Makransky, Guido; Moeller, Elsebeth H; Nielsen, Lea D; Bradley, Stephen K

    2015-01-01

    Evidence suggests the prevalence and duration of mechanical restraint are particularly high among forensic psychiatric inpatients. However, only sparse knowledge exists regarding the reasons for, and characteristics of, prolonged use of mechanical restraint in forensic psychiatry. This study therefore aimed to investigate prolonged episodes of mechanical restraint on forensic psychiatric inpatients. Documentary data from medical records were thematically analyzed. Results show that the reasons for prolonged episodes of mechanical restraint on forensic psychiatric inpatients can be characterized by multiple factors: "confounding" (behaviors associated with psychiatric conditions, substance abuse, medical noncompliance, etc.), "risk" (behaviors posing a risk for violence), and "alliance parameters" (qualities of the staff-patient alliance and the patients' openness to alliance with staff), altogether woven into a mechanical restraint spiral that in itself becomes a reason for prolonged mechanical restraint. The study also shows lack of consistent clinical assessment during periods of restraint. Further investigation is indicated to develop an assessment tool with the capability to reduce time spent in mechanical restraint.

  20. Magnetic field decay in model SSC dipoles

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, W.S.; Althaus, R.F.; Barale, P.J.; Benjegerdes, R.W.; Green, M.A.; Green, M.I.; Scanlan, R.M.

    1988-08-01

    We have observed that some of our model SSC dipoles have long time constant decays of the magnetic field harmonics with amplitudes large enough to result in significant beam loss, if they are not corrected. The magnets were run at constant current at the SSC injection field level of 0.3 tesla for one to three hours and changes in the magnetic field were observed. One explanation for the observed field decay is time dependent superconductor magnetization. Another explanation involves flux creep or flux flow. Data are presented on how the decay changes with previous flux history. Similar magnets with different Nb-Ti filament spacings and matrix materials have different long time field decay. A theoretical model using proximity coupling and flux creep for the observed field decay is discussed. 10 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. First Observation of CP Violation in B[over ¯]^{0}→D_{CP}^{(*)}h^{0} Decays by a Combined Time-Dependent Analysis of BABAR and Belle Data.

    PubMed

    Abdesselam, A; Adachi, I; Adametz, A; Adye, T; Ahmed, H; Aihara, H; Akar, S; Alam, M S; Albert, J; Al Said, S; Andreassen, R; Angelini, C; Anulli, F; Arinstein, K; Arnaud, N; Asner, D M; Aston, D; Aulchenko, V; Aushev, T; Ayad, R; Babu, V; Badhrees, I; Bahinipati, S; Bakich, A M; Band, H R; Banerjee, Sw; Barberio, E; Bard, D J; Barlow, R J; Batignani, G; Beaulieu, A; Bellis, M; Ben-Haim, E; Bernard, D; Bernlochner, F U; Bettarini, S; Bettoni, D; Bevan, A J; Bhardwaj, V; Bhuyan, B; Bianchi, F; Biasini, M; Biswal, J; Blinov, V E; Bloom, P C; Bobrov, A; Bomben, M; Bondar, A; Bonneaud, G R; Bonvicini, G; Bozek, A; Bozzi, C; Bračko, M; Briand, H; Browder, T E; Brown, D N; Brown, D N; Bünger, C; Burchat, P R; Buzykaev, A R; Calabrese, R; Calcaterra, A; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cartaro, C; Casarosa, G; Cenci, R; Červenkov, D; Chang, P; Chao, D S; Chauveau, J; Cheaib, R; Chekelian, V; Chen, A; Chen, C; Cheng, C H; Cheon, B G; Chilikin, K; Chistov, R; Cho, K; Chobanova, V; Choi, H H F; Choi, S-K; Chrzaszcz, M; Cibinetto, G; Cinabro, D; Cochran, J; Coleman, J P; Contri, R; Convery, M R; Cowan, G; Cowan, R; Cremaldi, L; Dalseno, J; Dasu, S; Davier, M; Davis, C L; De Mori, F; De Nardo, G; Denig, A G; Derkach, D; de Sangro, R; Dey, B; Di Lodovico, F; Dingfelder, J; Dittrich, S; Doležal, Z; Dorfan, J; Drásal, Z; Drutskoy, A; Druzhinin, V P; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Dutta, D; Ebert, M; Echenard, B; Eidelman, S; Eigen, G; Eisner, A M; Emery, S; Ernst, J A; Faccini, R; Farhat, H; Fast, J E; Feindt, M; Ferber, T; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Field, R C; Filippi, A; Finocchiaro, G; Fioravanti, E; Flood, K T; Ford, W T; Forti, F; Franco Sevilla, M; Fritsch, M; Fry, J R; Fulsom, B G; Gabathuler, E; Gabyshev, N; Gamba, D; Garmash, A; Gary, J W; Garzia, I; Gaspero, M; Gaur, V; Gaz, A; Gershon, T J; Getzkow, D; Gillard, R; Li Gioi, L; Giorgi, M A; Glattauer, R; Godang, R; Goh, Y M; Goldenzweig, P; Golob, B; Golubev, V B; Gorodeisky, R; Gradl, W; Graham, M T; Grauges, E; Griessinger, K; Gritsan, A V; Grosdidier, G; Grünberg, O; Guttman, N; Haba, J; Hafner, A; Hamilton, B; Hara, T; Harrison, P F; Hast, C; Hayasaka, K; Hayashii, H; Hearty, C; He, X H; Hess, M; Hitlin, D G; Hong, T M; Honscheid, K; Hou, W-S; Hsiung, Y B; Huard, Z; Hutchcroft, D E; Iijima, T; Inguglia, G; Innes, W R; Ishikawa, A; Itoh, R; Iwasaki, Y; Izen, J M; Jaegle, I; Jawahery, A; Jessop, C P; Joffe, D; Joo, K K; Julius, T; Kang, K H; Kass, R; Kawasaki, T; Kerth, L T; Khan, A; Kiesling, C; Kim, D Y; Kim, J B; Kim, J H; Kim, K T; Kim, P; Kim, S H; Kim, Y J; King, G J; Kinoshita, K; Ko, B R; Koch, H; Kodyš, P; Kolomensky, Yu G; Korpar, S; Kovalskyi, D; Kowalewski, R; Kravchenko, E A; Križan, P; Krokovny, P; Kuhr, T; Kumar, R; Kuzmin, A; Kwon, Y-J; Lacker, H M; Lafferty, G D; Lanceri, L; Lange, D J; Lankford, A J; Latham, T E; Leddig, T; Le Diberder, F; Lee, D H; Lee, I S; Lee, M J; Lees, J P; Leith, D W G S; Leruste, Ph; Lewczuk, M J; Lewis, P; Libby, J; Lockman, W S; Long, O; Lopes Pegna, D; LoSecco, J M; Lou, X C; Lueck, T; Luitz, S; Lukin, P; Luppi, E; Lusiani, A; Luth, V; Lutz, A M; Lynch, G; MacFarlane, D B; Malaescu, B; Mallik, U; Manoni, E; Marchiori, G; Margoni, M; Martellotti, S; Martinez-Vidal, F; Masuda, M; Mattison, T S; Matvienko, D; McKenna, J A; Meadows, B T; Miyabayashi, K; Miyashita, T S; Miyata, H; Mizuk, R; Mohanty, G B; Moll, A; Monge, M R; Moon, H K; Morandin, M; Muller, D R; Mussa, R; Nakano, E; Nakazawa, H; Nakao, M; Nanut, T; Nayak, M; Neal, H; Neri, N; Nisar, N K; Nishida, S; Nugent, I M; Oberhof, B; Ocariz, J; Ogawa, S; Okuno, S; Olaiya, E O; Olsen, J; Ongmongkolkul, P; Onorato, G; Onuchin, A P; Onuki, Y; Ostrowicz, W; Oyanguren, A; Pakhlova, G; Pakhlov, P; Palano, A; Pal, B; Palombo, F; Pan, Y; Panduro Vazquez, W; Paoloni, E; Park, C W; Park, H; Passaggio, S; Patel, P M; Patrignani, C; Patteri, P; Payne, D J; Pedlar, T K; Peimer, D R; Peruzzi, I M; Pesántez, L; Pestotnik, R; Petrič, M; Piccolo, M; Piemontese, L; Piilonen, L E; Pilloni, A; Piredda, G; Playfer, S; Poireau, V; Porter, F C; Posocco, M; Prasad, V; Prell, S; Prepost, R; Puccio, E M T; Pulliam, T; Purohit, M V; Pushpawela, B G; Rama, M; Randle-Conde, A; Ratcliff, B N; Raven, G; Ribežl, E; Richman, J D; Ritchie, J L; Rizzo, G; Roberts, D A; Robertson, S H; Röhrken, M; Roney, J M; Roodman, A; Rossi, A; Rostomyan, A; Rotondo, M; Roudeau, P; Sacco, R; Sakai, Y; Sandilya, S; Santelj, L; Santoro, V; Sanuki, T; Sato, Y; Savinov, V; Schindler, R H; Schneider, O; Schnell, G; Schroeder, T; Schubert, K R; Schumm, B A; Schwanda, C; Schwartz, A J; Schwitters, R F; Sciacca, C; Seiden, A; Sekula, S J; Senyo, K; Seon, O; Serednyakov, S I; Sevior, M E; Shapkin, M; Shebalin, V; Shen, C P; Shibata, T-A; Shiu, J-G; Simard, M; Simi, G; Simon, F; Simonetto, F; Skovpen, Yu I; Smith, A J S; Smith, J G; Snyder, A; So, R Y; Sobie, R J; Soffer, A; Sohn, Y-S; Sokoloff, M D; Sokolov, A; Solodov, E P; Solovieva, E; Spaan, B; Spanier, S M; Starič, M; Stocchi, A; Stroili, R; Stugu, B; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Sumihama, M; Sumisawa, K; Sumiyoshi, T; Summers, D J; Sun, L; Tamponi, U; Taras, P; Tasneem, N; Teramoto, Y; Tisserand, V; Todyshev, K Yu; Toki, W H; Touramanis, C; Trabelsi, K; Tsuboyama, T; Uchida, M; Uglov, T; Unno, Y; Uno, S; Usov, Y; Uwer, U; Vahsen, S E; Van Hulse, C; Vanhoefer, P; Varner, G; Vasseur, G; Va'vra, J; Verderi, M; Vinokurova, A; Vitale, L; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Wagner, M N; Wagner, S R; Waldi, R; Walsh, J J; Wang, C H; Wang, M-Z; Wang, P; Watanabe, Y; West, C A; Williams, K M; Wilson, F F; Wilson, J R; Wisniewski, W J; Won, E; Wormser, G; Wright, D M; Wu, S L; Wulsin, H W; Yamamoto, H; Yamaoka, J; Yashchenko, S; Yuan, C Z; Yusa, Y; Zallo, A; Zhang, C C; Zhang, Z P; Zhilich, V; Zhulanov, V; Zupanc, A

    2015-09-18

    We report a measurement of the time-dependent CP asymmetry of B[over ¯]^{0}→D_{CP}^{(*)}h^{0} decays, where the light neutral hadron h^{0} is a π^{0}, η, or ω meson, and the neutral D meson is reconstructed in the CP eigenstates K^{+}K^{-}, K_{S}^{0}π^{0}, or K_{S}^{0}ω. The measurement is performed combining the final data samples collected at the ϒ(4S) resonance by the BABAR and Belle experiments at the asymmetric-energy B factories PEP-II at SLAC and KEKB at KEK, respectively. The data samples contain (471±3)×10^{6} BB[over ¯] pairs recorded by the BABAR detector and (772±11)×10^{6} BB[over ¯] pairs recorded by the Belle detector. We measure the CP asymmetry parameters -η_{f}S=+0.66±0.10(stat)±0.06(syst) and C=-0.02±0.07(stat)±0.03(syst). These results correspond to the first observation of CP violation in B[over ¯]^{0}→D_{CP}^{(*)}h^{0} decays. The hypothesis of no mixing-induced CP violation is excluded in these decays at the level of 5.4 standard deviations.

  2. Dark Matter Density from Heavy Neutrino Decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saadat, Hassan; Rostampour, Malihe

    2012-10-01

    As we know the heavy neutrino decays is a successful model for describing dark matter and also is origin of the universe entropy. In this paper we use heavy neutrino decays to calculate time-dependent dark matter density. In that case we use observational data to fixing our solutions.

  3. beta. -decay asymmetry of the free neutron

    SciTech Connect

    Bopp, P.; Dubbers, D.; Klemt, E.; Last, J.; Schuetze, H.; Weibler, W.; Freedman, S.J.; Schaerpf, O.

    1983-01-01

    The ..beta..-decay of polarized neutrons has been studied with the new superconducting spectrometer PERKEO at the ILL. The energy dependence of the ..beta..-decay asymmetry has been measured for the first time. From the measured ..beta..-asymmetry parameter we obtain a new value for the ratio of weak coupling constants g/sub A//g/sub V/. 11 references.

  4. Analytical expression for the α-decay half-life and understanding the data including very long life-times and superheavy nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Basudeb

    2008-10-01

    An analytically solvable composite potential that can closely reproduce the combined potential of an α+nucleus system consisting of attractive nuclear and repulsive electrostatic potentials is developed. The exact s-wave solution of the Schrödinger equation with this potential in the interior region and the outside Coulomb wave function are used to give a heuristic expression for the width or half-life of the quasibound state at the accurately determined resonance energy, called the Q value of the decaying system. By using the fact that for a relatively low resonance energy, the quasibound state wave function is quite similar to the bound state wave function where the amplitude of the wave function in the interaction region is very large as compared to the amplitude outside, the resonance energy could easily be calculated from the variation of relative probability densities of inside and outside waves as a function of energy. By considering recent α-decay systems, the applicability of the model is demonstrated with excellent explanations being found for the experimental data of Q values and half-lives of a vast range of masses including superheavy nuclei and nuclei with very long lifetimes (of order 1022 s). Throughout the application, by simply varying the value of a single potential parameter describing the flatness of the barrier, we obtain successful results in cases with as many as 70 pairs of α+daughter nucleus systems.

  5. Wood decay at sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charles, François; Coston-Guarini, Jennifer; Guarini, Jean-Marc; Fanfard, Sandrine

    2016-08-01

    The oceans and seas receive coarse woody debris since the Devonian, but the kinetics of wood degradation remains one of many unanswered questions about the fate of driftwood in the marine environment. A simple gravimetric experiment was carried out at a monitoring station located at the exit of a steep, forested Mediterranean watershed in the Eastern Pyrenees. The objective was to describe and quantify, with standardized logs (in shape, structure and constitution), natural degradation of wood in the sea. Results show that the mass decrease of wood logs over time can be described by a sigmoidal curve. The primary process of wood decay observed at the monitoring station was due to the arrival and installation of wood-boring species that consumed more than half of the total wood mass in six months. Surprisingly, in a region where there is little remaining wood marine infrastructure, "shipworms", i.e. xylophagous bivalves, are responsible for an important part of this wood decay. This suggests that these communities are maintained probably by a frequent supply of a large quantity of riparian wood entering the marine environment adjacent to the watershed. By exploring this direct link between terrestrial and marine ecosystems, our long term objective is to determine how these supplies of terrestrial organic carbon can sustain wood-based marine communities as it is observed in the Mediterranean Sea.

  6. Decay of oscillating universes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mithani, Audrey Todhunter

    2016-08-01

    It has been suggested by Ellis et al that the universe could be eternal in the past, without beginning. In their model, the "emergent universe'' exists forever in the past, in an "eternal'' phase before inflation begins. We will show that in general, such an "eternal'' phase is not possible, because of an instability due to quantum tunneling. One candidate model, the "simple harmonic universe'' has been shown by Graham et al to be perturbatively stable; we find that it is unstable with respect to quantum tunneling. We also investigate the stability of a distinct oscillating model in loop quantum cosmology with respect to small perturbations and to quantum collapse. We find that the model has perturbatively stable and unstable solutions, with both types of solutions occupying significant regions of the parameter space. All solutions are unstable with respect to collapse by quantum tunneling to zero size. In addition, we investigate the effect of vacuum corrections, due to the trace anomaly and the Casimir effect, on the stability of an oscillating universe with respect to decay by tunneling to the singularity. We find that these corrections do not generally stabilize an oscillating universe. Finally, we determine the decay rate of the oscillating universe. Although the wave function of the universe lacks explicit time dependence in canonical quantum cosmology, time evolution may be present implicitly through the semiclassical superspace variables, which themselves depend on time in classical dynamics. Here, we apply this approach to the simple harmonic universe, by extending the model to include a massless, minimally coupled scalar field φ which has little effect on the dynamics but can play the role of a "clock''.

  7. Incidence, clinical characteristics, and timing of objectively diagnosed venous thromboembolism during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Gherman; Goodwin; Leung; Byrne; Montoro

    1998-07-01

    Objective: To determine the incidence, timing, and associated clinical characteristics of objectively diagnosed pregnancy-associated venous thromboembolism (VTE).Methods: A retrospective review of VTE cases occurring between 1978 and 1996 was performed. Cases of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) were identified by ICD-9 discharge diagnosis code and review of antepartum and coagulation laboratory databases. Study inclusion criteria required the objective diagnosis of VTE with either Doppler ultrasound, impedance plethysmography, pulmonary angiography, ventilation-perfusion scanning, or CT/MRI.Results: Among 268,525 deliveries there were 165 (0.06%) episodes of VTE (1/1627 births). There were 127 cases of DVT and 38 cases of PE. Only 14% (23/165) had a prior history of DVT or PE. Most DVTs occurred in the left leg (104/127, 81.9%). Nearly three quarters of the DVTs (95/127, 74.8%) occurred in the antepartum period. Among the antepartum DVT cases, half were detected prior to 15 weeks of gestation (47/95, 49.5%), with only 28 cases occurring after 20 weeks (P <.0001). The majority of the PEs occurred in the postpartum period (23/38, 60.5%). There were only 3 maternal deaths due to PE, all associated with cesarean section. Only 1 patient developed PE while on heparin therapy for DVT while 11 others had complications attributable to heparin use.Conclusion: Most pregnancy-related VTE occurs in the antepartum period. The risk of deep venous thrombosis appears to begin early in pregnancy, even before the second trimester. The highest risk period for pulmonary embolism is after cesarean delivery. Maternal complications of heparin anticoagulation during pregnancy are rare.

  8. Spatial gravity wave characteristics obtained from multiple OH(3-1) airglow temperature time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wachter, Paul; Schmidt, Carsten; Wüst, Sabine; Bittner, Michael

    2015-12-01

    We present a new approach for the detection of gravity waves in OH-airglow observations at the measurement site Oberpfaffenhofen (11.27°E, 48.08°N), Germany. The measurements were performed at the German Remote Sensing Data Center (DFD) of the German Aerospace Center (DLR) during the period from February 4th, 2011 to July 6th, 2011. In this case study the observations were carried out by three identical Ground-based Infrared P-branch Spectrometers (GRIPS). These instruments provide OH(3-1) rotational temperature time series, which enable spatio-temporal investigations of gravity wave characteristics in the mesopause region. The instruments were aligned in such a way that their fields of view (FOV) formed an equilateral triangle in the OH-emission layer at a height of 87 km. The Harmonic Analysis is applied in order to identify joint temperature oscillations in the three individual datasets. Dependent on the specific gravity wave activity in a single night, it is possible to detect up to four different wave patterns with this method. The values obtained for the waves' periods and phases are then used to derive further parameters, such as horizontal wavelength, phase velocity and the direction of propagation. We identify systematic relationships between periods and amplitudes as well as between periods and horizontal wavelengths. A predominant propagation direction towards the East and North-North-East characterizes the waves during the observation period. There are also indications of seasonal effects in the temporal development of the horizontal wavelength and the phase velocity. During late winter and early spring the derived horizontal wavelengths and the phase velocities are smaller than in the subsequent period from early April to July 2011.

  9. A multipurpose test stand for scintillator decay lifetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangan, Tymothy; P-23, Neutron Science; Technology Team

    2016-09-01

    We built a prototype test stand in order to measure novel scintillator materials' decay lifetimes. Radiography and imaging are valuable diagnostic tools for studying dynamic experiments, thus new scintillator materials are needed to improve the resolution of the current observational systems. A collaborative effort by the neutron imaging and x-ray radiography teams is underway to study the novel scintillator materials developed at LANL and by outside collaborators. Decay lifetimes are an important characteristic of a scintillator material and so by developing this prototype we have provided an avenue to further scintillator development. We confirmed the effectiveness of this prototype by comparing known scintillator decay lifetimes of LYSO and polystyrene samples. In our proof-of-concept prototype we use an 80 Gs/s oscilloscope. With future implementation of a fully developed test stand, we will use a digital data acquisition system to record complete waveforms to conduct a post-processing analysis of the decay times. Results of the prototype test and potential improvements to final test stand design will be presented. LA-UR-16-25229 Los Alamos National Lab, Physics Division.

  10. Assessing the Value of Regulation Resources Based on Their Time Response Characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Makarov, Yuri V.; Lu, Shuai; Ma, Jian; Nguyen, Tony B.

    2008-06-01

    Fast responsive regulation resources are potentially more valuable as a power system regulation resource (more efficient) because they allow applying controls at the exact moment and in the exact amount as needed. Faster control is desirable because it facilitates more reliable compliance with the NERC Control Performance Standards at relatively lesser regulation capacity procurements. The current California ISO practices and markets do not provide a differentiation among the regulation resources based on their speed of response (with the exception of some minimum ramping capabilities). Some demand response technologies, including some generation and energy storage resources, can provide quicker control actions. California ISO practices and markets could be updated to welcome more fast regulation resources into the California ISO service area. The project work reported in this work was pursuing the following objectives: • Develop methodology to assess the relative value of generation resources used for regulation and load following California ISO functions • This assessment should be done based on physical characteristics including the ability to quickly change their output following California ISO signals • Evaluate what power is worth on different time scales • Analyze the benefits of new regulation resources to provide effective compliance with the mandatory NERC Control Performance Standards • Evaluate impacts of the newly proposed BAAL and FRR standards on the potential value of fast regulation and distributed regulation resources • Develop a scope for the follow-up projects to pave a road for the new efficient types of balancing resources in California. The work included the following studies: • Analysis of California ISO regulating units characteristics • California ISO automatic generation system (AGC) analysis • California ISO regulation procurement and market analysis • Fast regulation efficiency analysis • Projection of the

  11. Initial measurements of O-ion and He-ion decay rates observed from the Van Allen probes RBSPICE instrument

    PubMed Central

    Gerrard, Andrew; Lanzerotti, Louis; Gkioulidou, Matina; Mitchell, Donald; Manweiler, Jerry; Bortnik, Jacob; Keika, Kunihiro

    2014-01-01

    H-ion (∼45 keV to ∼600 keV), He-ion (∼65 keV to ∼520 keV), and O-ion (∼140 keV to ∼1130 keV) integral flux measurements, from the Radiation Belt Storm Probe Ion Composition Experiment (RBSPICE) instrument aboard the Van Allan Probes spacecraft B, are reported. These abundance data form a cohesive picture of ring current ions during the first 9 months of measurements. Furthermore, the data presented herein are used to show injection characteristics via the He-ion/H-ion abundance ratio and the O-ion/H-ion abundance ratio. Of unique interest to ring current dynamics are the spatial-temporal decay characteristics of the two injected populations. We observe that He-ions decay more quickly at lower L shells, on the order of ∼0.8 day at L shells of 3–4, and decay more slowly with higher L shell, on the order of ∼1.7 days at L shells of 5–6. Conversely, O-ions decay very rapidly (∼1.5 h) across all L shells. The He-ion decay time are consistent with previously measured and calculated lifetimes associated with charge exchange. The O-ion decay time is much faster than predicted and is attributed to the inclusion of higher-energy (> 500 keV) O-ions in our decay rate estimation. We note that these measurements demonstrate a compelling need for calculation of high-energy O-ion loss rates, which have not been adequately studied in the literature to date. Key Points We report initial observations of ring current ions We show that He-ion decay rates are consistent with theory We show that O-ions with energies greater than 500 keV decay very rapidly PMID:26167435

  12. Supergranule Diffusion and Active Region Decay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, David H.; Choudhary, Debi Prasad

    2004-01-01

    Models of the Sun's magnetic dynamo include turbulent diffusion to parameterize the effects of convective motions on the evolution of the Sun's magnetic field. Supergranules are known to dominate the evolution of the surface magnetic field structure as evidenced by the structure of both the active and quiet magnetic network. However, estimates for the dif hivity attributed to su perymules differ by an order of magnitude from about 100 km sup2/s to more than 1000 km sup2/s. We examine this question of the e i v i t y using three merent approaches. 1) We study the decay of more than 30,000 active regions by determining the rate of change in the sunspot area of each active region from day-to-day. 2) We study the decay of a single isolated active region near the time of solar minimum by examining the magnetic field evolution over five solar rotations fiom SOHOMDI magnetograms obtained at 96-minute intervals. 3) We study the characteristics of supergranules that influence the estimates of their diffusive properties - flow speeds and lifetimes as functions of size - fiom SOHO/MDI Dopplergrams.

  13. Evolution of novel wood decay mechanisms in Agaricales revealed by the genome sequences of Fistulina hepatica and Cylindrobasidium torrendii.

    PubMed

    Floudas, Dimitrios; Held, Benjamin W; Riley, Robert; Nagy, Laszlo G; Koehler, Gage; Ransdell, Anthony S; Younus, Hina; Chow, Julianna; Chiniquy, Jennifer; Lipzen, Anna; Tritt, Andrew; Sun, Hui; Haridas, Sajeet; LaButti, Kurt; Ohm, Robin A; Kües, Ursula; Blanchette, Robert A; Grigoriev, Igor V; Minto, Robert E; Hibbett, David S

    2015-03-01

    Wood decay mechanisms in Agaricomycotina have been traditionally separated in two categories termed white and brown rot. Recently the accuracy of such a dichotomy has been questioned. Here, we present the genome sequences of the white-rot fungus Cylindrobasidium torrendii and the brown-rot fungus Fistulina hepatica both members of Agaricales, combining comparative genomics and wood decay experiments. C. torrendii is closely related to the white-rot root pathogen Armillaria mellea, while F. hepatica is related to Schizophyllum commune, which has been reported to cause white rot. Our results suggest that C. torrendii and S. commune are intermediate between white-rot and brown-rot fungi, but at the same time they show characteristics of decay that resembles soft rot. Both species cause weak wood decay and degrade all wood components but leave the middle lamella intact. Their gene content related to lignin degradation is reduced, similar to brown-rot fungi, but both have maintained a rich array of genes related to carbohydrate degradation, similar to white-rot fungi. These characteristics appear to have evolved from white-rot ancestors with stronger ligninolytic ability. F. hepatica shows characteristics of brown rot both in terms of wood decay genes found in its genome and the decay that it causes. However, genes related to cellulose degradation are still present, which is a plesiomorphic characteristic shared with its white-rot ancestors. Four wood degradation-related genes, homologs of which are frequently lost in brown-rot fungi, show signs of pseudogenization in the genome of F. hepatica. These results suggest that transition toward a brown-rot lifestyle could be an ongoing process in F. hepatica. Our results reinforce the idea that wood decay mechanisms are more diverse than initially thought and that the dichotomous separation of wood decay mechanisms in Agaricomycotina into white rot and brown rot should be revisited.

  14. Evolution of novel wood decay mechanisms in Agaricales revealed by the genome sequences of Fistulina hepatica and Cylindrobasidium torrendii

    DOE PAGES

    Floudas, Dimitrios; Held, Benjamin W.; Riley, Robert; ...

    2015-02-12

    Wood decay mechanisms in Agaricomycotina have been traditionally separated in two categories termed white and brown rot. Recently the accuracy of such a dichotomy has been questioned. In this paper, we present the genome sequences of the white-rot fungus Cylindrobasidium torrendii and the brown-rot fungus Fistulina hepatica both members of Agaricales, combining comparative genomics and wood decay experiments. C. torrendii is closely related to the white-rot root pathogen Armillaria mellea, while F. hepatica is related to Schizophyllum commune, which has been reported to cause white rot. Our results suggest that C. torrendii and S. commune are intermediate between white-rot andmore » brown-rot fungi, but at the same time they show characteristics of decay that resembles soft rot. Both species cause weak wood decay and degrade all wood components but leave the middle lamella intact. Their gene content related to lignin degradation is reduced, similar to brown-rot fungi, but both have maintained a rich array of genes related to carbohydrate degradation, similar to white-rot fungi. These characteristics appear to have evolved from white-rot ancestors with stronger ligninolytic ability. F. hepatica shows characteristics of brown rot both in terms of wood decay genes found in its genome and the decay that it causes. However, genes related to cellulose degradation are still present, which is a plesiomorphic characteristic shared with its white-rot ancestors. Four wood degradation-related genes, homologs of which are frequently lost in brown-rot fungi, show signs of pseudogenization in the genome of F. hepatica. These results suggest that transition toward a brown-rot lifestyle could be an ongoing process in F. hepatica. Finally, our results reinforce the idea that wood decay mechanisms are more diverse than initially thought and that the dichotomous separation of wood decay mechanisms in Agaricomycotina into white rot and brown rot should be revisited.« less

  15. Evolution of novel wood decay mechanisms in Agaricales revealed by the genome sequences of Fistulina hepatica and Cylindrobasidium torrendii

    SciTech Connect

    Floudas, Dimitrios; Held, Benjamin W.; Riley, Robert; Nagy, Laszlo G.; Koehler, Gage; Ransdell, Anthony S.; Younus, Hina; Chow, Julianna; Chiniquy, Jennifer; Lipzen, Anna; Tritt, Andrew; Sun, Hui; Haridas, Sajeet; LaButti, Kurt; Ohm, Robin A.; Kües, Ursula; Blanchette, Robert A.; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Minto, Robert E.; Hibbett, David S.

    2015-02-12

    Wood decay mechanisms in Agaricomycotina have been traditionally separated in two categories termed white and brown rot. Recently the accuracy of such a dichotomy has been questioned. In this paper, we present the genome sequences of the white-rot fungus Cylindrobasidium torrendii and the brown-rot fungus Fistulina hepatica both members of Agaricales, combining comparative genomics and wood decay experiments. C. torrendii is closely related to the white-rot root pathogen Armillaria mellea, while F. hepatica is related to Schizophyllum commune, which has been reported to cause white rot. Our results suggest that C. torrendii and S. commune are intermediate between white-rot and brown-rot fungi, but at the same time they show characteristics of decay that resembles soft rot. Both species cause weak wood decay and degrade all wood components but leave the middle lamella intact. Their gene content related to lignin degradation is reduced, similar to brown-rot fungi, but both have maintained a rich array of genes related to carbohydrate degradation, similar to white-rot fungi. These characteristics appear to have evolved from white-rot ancestors with stronger ligninolytic ability. F. hepatica shows characteristics of brown rot both in terms of wood decay genes found in its genome and the decay that it causes. However, genes related to cellulose degradation are still present, which is a plesiomorphic characteristic shared with its white-rot ancestors. Four wood degradation-related genes, homologs of which are frequently lost in brown-rot fungi, show signs of pseudogenization in the genome of F. hepatica. These results suggest that transition toward a brown-rot lifestyle could be an ongoing process in F. hepatica. Finally, our results reinforce the idea that wood decay mechanisms are more diverse than initially thought and that the dichotomous separation of wood decay mechanisms in Agaricomycotina into white rot and brown rot should be revisited.

  16. Comparison of two experiments on radiative neutron decay

    SciTech Connect

    Khafizov, R. U.; Tolokonnikov, S. V.; Solovei, V. A.; Kolhidashvili, M. R.

    2009-12-15

    Over 10 years ago we proposed an experiment on measuring the characteristics of radiative neutron decay in papers [1, 2]. At the same time we had published the theoretical spectrum of radiative gamma quanta, calculated within the framework of the electroweak interactions, on the basis of which we proposed the methodology for the future experiment [3, 4]. However, because we were denied beam time on the intensive cold neutron beam at ILL (Grenoble, France) for a number of years, we could only conduct the experiment in 2005 on the newly opened FRMII reactor of Technical University of Muenchen. The main result of this experiment was the discovery of radiative neutron decay and the measurement of its relative intensity B.R. = (3.2 {+-} 1.6) x 10{sup -3} with C.L. = 99.7% for radiative gamma quanta with energy over 35 kev [5, 6]. Over a year after our first announcement about the results of the conducted experiment, 'Nature' [7] published a letter asserting that its authors have also measured the branching ratio of radiative neutron decay B.R. = (3.13 {+-} 0.34) x 10{sup -3} with c.l. = 68% and gamma quanta energy from 15 to 340 kev. This article aims to compare these two experiments. It is shown that the use of strong magnetic fields in the NIST (Washington, USA) experiment methodology not only prevents any exact measurement of the branching ratio and identification of radiative neutron decay events, but also makes registration of ordinary neutron decay events impossible.

  17. Characteristics and sensitivity analysis of multiple-time-resolved source patterns of PM2.5 with real time data using Multilinear Engine 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Xing; Shi, Guo-Liang; Gao, Jian; Liu, Jia-Yuan; HuangFu, Yan-Qi; Ma, Tong; Wang, Hai-Ting; Zhang, Yue-Chong; Wang, Han; Li, Hui; Ivey, Cesunica E.; Feng, Yin-Chang

    2016-08-01

    With real time resolved data of Particulate matter (PM) and chemical species, understanding the source patterns and chemical characteristics is critical to establish controlling of PM. In this work, PM2.5 and chemical species were measured by corresponding online instruments with 1-h time resolution in Beijing. Multilinear Engine 2 (ME2) model was applied to explore the sources, and four sources (vehicle emission, crustal dust, secondary formation and coal combustion) were identified. To investigate the sensitivity of time resolution on the source contributions and chemical characteristics, ME2 was conducted with four time resolution runs (1-h, 2-h, 4-h, and 8-h). Crustal dust and coal combustion display large variation in the four time resolutions runs, with their contributions ranging from 6.7 to 10.4 μg m-3 and from 6.4 to 12.2 μg m-3, respectively. The contributions of vehicle emission and secondary formation range from 7.5 to 10.5 and from 14.7 to 16.7 μg m-3, respectively. The sensitivity analyses were conducted by principal component analysis-plot (PCA-plot), coefficient of divergence (CD), average absolute error (AAE) and correlation coefficients. For the four time resolution runs, the source contributions and profiles of crustal dust and coal combustion were more unstable than other source categories, possibly due to the lack of key markers of crustal dust and coal combustion (e.g. Si, Al). On the other hand, vehicle emission and crustal dust were more sensitive to time series of source contributions at different time resolutions. Findings in this study can improve our knowledge of source contributions and chemical characteristics at different time solutions.

  18. A comparison of catch phase force-time characteristics during clean derivatives from the knee.

    PubMed

    Comfort, Paul; Williams, Robert; Suchomel, Timothy J; Lake, Jason P

    2016-09-27

    The aim of this study was to compare load-absorption force-time characteristics of the clean from the knee (CK), power clean from the knee (PCK) and clean pull from the knee (CPK). Ten collegiate athletes (age 27.5 ± 4.2 years; height 180.4 ± 6.7 cm; mass 84.4 ± 7.8 kg), performed three repetitions each of the CK, PCK and CPK with 90% of their 1RM power clean on a force platform. The CK load-absorption duration (0.95 ± 0.35 s) was significantly longer compared to the CPK (0.44 ± 0.15 s; p < 0.001, d = 2.53), but not compared to the PCK (0.56 ± 0.11 s; p > 0.05, d = 1.08), with no differences between PCK and CPK (p > 0.05, d = 0.91). The CPK demonstrated the greatest mean force (2039 ± 394 N), which was significantly greater than the PCK (1771 ± 325 N; p = 0.012, d = 0.83), but not significantly different to the CK (1830 ± 331 N; p > 0.05, d = 0.60); CK and PCK were not different (p > 0.05, d = 0.18). Significantly more load-absorption work was performed during the CK (655 ± 276 J) compared to the PCK (288 ± 109 J; d = 1.75, p < 0.001); but not compared to the CPK (518 ± 132 J; d = 0.80, p > 0.05). Additionally, more load-absorption work was performed during the CPK compared to the PCK (d = 1.90, p = 0.032). Inclusion of the catch phase during the CK does not provide any additional stimulus in terms of mean force or work during the load-absorption phase compared to the CPK, while the CPK may be beneficial in training rapid force absorption due to high force and a short duration.

  19. Radiative decays at LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giubega, L. E.

    2016-12-01

    Precise measurements on rare radiative B decays are performed with the LHCb experiment at LHC. The LHCb results regarding the ratio of branching fractions for two radiative decays, B 0 → K *0 γ and B s → ϕ γ, the direct CP asymmetry in B 0 → K *0 γ decay channel and the observation of the photon polarization in the B ± → K ±π∓π± γ decay, are included. The first two measurements were performed in 1 fb-1 of pp collisions data and the third one in 3 fb-1 of data, respectively.

  20. [Research on Time-frequency Characteristics of Magneto-acoustic Signal of Different Thickness Medium Based on Wave Summing Method].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shunqi; Yin, Tao; Ma, Ren; Liu, Zhipeng

    2015-08-01

    Functional imaging method of biological electrical characteristics based on magneto-acoustic effect gives valuable information of tissue in early tumor diagnosis, therein time and frequency characteristics analysis of magneto-acoustic signal is important in image reconstruction. This paper proposes wave summing method based on Green function solution for acoustic source of magneto-acoustic effect. Simulations and analysis under quasi 1D transmission condition are carried out to time and frequency characteristics of magneto-acoustic signal of models with different thickness. Simulation results of magneto-acoustic signal were verified through experiments. Results of the simulation with different thickness showed that time-frequency characteristics of magneto-acoustic signal reflected thickness of sample. Thin sample, which is less than one wavelength of pulse, and thick sample, which is larger than one wavelength, showed different summed waveform and frequency characteristics, due to difference of summing thickness. Experimental results verified theoretical analysis and simulation results. This research has laid a foundation for acoustic source and conductivity reconstruction to the medium with different thickness in magneto-acoustic imaging.

  1. In Search of Decay in Verbal Short-Term Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berman, Marc G.; Jonides, John; Lewis, Richard L.

    2009-01-01

    Is forgetting in the short term due to decay with the mere passage of time, interference from other memoranda, or both? Past research on short-term memory has revealed some evidence for decay and a plethora of evidence showing that short-term memory is worsened by interference. However, none of these studies has directly contrasted decay and…

  2. Electrical Analogs of Atomic Radiative Decay Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fontana, Peter R.; Srivastava, Rajendra P.

    1977-01-01

    Analyzes simple electrical circuits, showing that for high frequencies they have frequency and time responses identical to the spontaneous radiative decay of atoms. Compares a two-circuit electrical system with a two-level atom. (MLH)

  3. Quality characteristics of a dry-cured lamb leg as affected by tumbling after dry-salting and processing time.

    PubMed

    Villalobos-Delgado, Luz H; Caro, Irma; Blanco, Carolina; Morán, Lara; Prieto, Nuria; Bodas, Raul; Giráldez, Francisco J; Mateo, Javier

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate selected quality characteristics of a dry-cured lamb leg with different tumbling treatments after salting. The characteristics were measured at different processing times. Three batches of dry-cured lamb legs (nine legs per batch) were prepared with no-, short- and long-tumbling treatments, and microbial counts, NaCl, aw, proximate composition, pH, free fatty acids, water soluble nitrogen, volatile compounds, texture and colour were evaluated at days 1, 22 and 71 of processing. Furthermore, a descriptive sensory analysis (flavour and texture) was performed in the final product (day 71). Time-related changes were observed for most of the characteristics studied. The effect of tumbling was only observed for the sensory attribute pastiness that was higher in tumbled legs. Methyl-branched butanal was only detected in tumbled legs.

  4. Metrological characteristics of the flat voltammetric electrode in time domain with a reversible electrochemical reaction running on the surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suchocki, Krzysztof

    2016-11-01

    The study deals with metrological characteristics of the flat voltammetric electrode used for determination of ions concentration by the DC voltammetric method, where a reversible reaction of electrochemical oxidation/reduction takes place on the surface. The analysis shows that such voltammetric electrode acts as a transducer of the first order, where the input signal is a concentration of marked ions in tested solution and the output signal is the current associated with a reversible reaction of oxidation / reduction. Metrological characteristics of such electrode in the time domain are determined by its sensitivity and time constant. The values of these parameters are defined by measurements of characteristics of the voltammetric electrode, polarization voltage and marked ions. To determine the effect of a particular volume of each of these parameters several numerical simulations are presented.

  5. Decay of a coherent scalar disturbance in a turbulent flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerr, R. M.; Nakano, T.; Nelkin, M.

    1985-01-01

    The time evolution of an initially coherent, sinusoidal passive-scalar disturbance is considered when the wavelength q is less than the length scale of the surrounding isotropic turbulent flow. In 64 sup 3 direct numerical simulations a Gaussian prescription for the average scalar amplitude breaks down after a timescale associated with the wavenumber of the disturbance and there is a transition to a new characteristic decay. The Gaussian prescription is given by exp(-(1/2) q-squared w(t)), where a form for w(t), the Lagrangian mean square displacement of a single fluid particle, is proposed. After the transition the decay is given by exp(-t/tau), where tau is the new characteristic timescale. If q k(sub K), then 1/tau = 1/tau(sub D) + 1/tau(sub K), where k(sub K) is the Kolmogorov wavenumber, tau(sub D) is the diffusive timescale and tau(sub K) is the Kolmogorov timescale. An experiment originally proposed by de Gennesis considered in which the evolution of a coherent laser-induced pattern is read by a diffracting laser. The theory of this experiment involves the dispersion of particle pairs, but it is shown that in a certain limit it reduces to the single Fourier-mode problem and can be described in terms of single particle diffusion. The decay of a single mode after the transition in the simulation best describes the experiment.

  6. Stellar structures and the enigma of pulsars rotation frequency decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira, H. O.; Marinho, R. M., Jr.; Maglhaes, N. S.

    2015-07-01

    Pulsars are astrophysical objects normally modelled as compact neutron stars that originated from the collapse of another star. This model, that we name canonical, assumes that pulsars are described by spherical magnetized dipoles that rotate, usually with the magnetic axis misaligned to the rotation axis. This misalignment would be responsible for the observation of radiation emitted in well-defined time intervals in a certain direction (lighthouse effect), the typical observational characteristic of this kind of star. It has been noticed that the rotation frequency of pulsars is slowly decaying with time (spin down), implying a gradual decrease of the rotational angular velocity (Ω). Such decay can be quantified by a dimensionless parameter called “braking index” (“n”), given by n = ΩΩ/(Ω)2, where a dot indicates a time derivative. The canonical model predicts that this index has one only value for all pulsars, equal to three. However, observational data indicate that actual braking indices are less than three, representing an enigma. The main goal of this research is the exploration of a more precise model for pulsars’ rotation frequency decay.

  7. Short sound decay of ancient Chinese music bells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Jie; Li, Xiaodong; Tian, Jing; Lin, Tanran

    2002-12-01

    Ancient Chinese music bells, which have oval-like cross sections, possess the unique feature of a short sound-decay time that is especially suitable for music with fast tempo. Although recorded in the literature nearly 1000 years ago, this feature has never been truly understood. Recent damping measurement of oval pipes with different axial ratios suggested a challenging task for acousticians as the increase of the modal damping with the pipe's axial ratio is significant only when the pipe response is measured in air but not in vacuum. In this paper, the decrease of sound-decay time of oval pipes with the increased cross-section ovality is investigated. This is the first time that such short sound-decay feature is explained in terms of the rich sound radiation characteristics of the symmetric modes of music bells and the oval pipes. Finite element and boundary element methods are employed to explain how axial ratio significantly affects the normal velocity distribution, radiation efficiency, and directivity of acoustic modes.

  8. Nurse Staffing and Hospital Characteristics Predictive of Time to Diagnostic Evaluation for Patients in the Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Shindul-Rothschild, Judith; Read, Catherine Y; Stamp, Kelly D; Flanagan, Jane

    2016-10-20

    In the 2014 Emergency Department Benchmarking Alliance Summit, for the first time, participants recommended tracking nursing and advanced practice nurse hours. Performance data from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services provides an opportunity to analyze factors associated with delays in emergency care. The purpose of this study was to investigate hospital characteristics associated with time to a diagnostic evaluation in 67 Massachusetts emergency departments from 2013 to 2014.

  9. Radiative β decay of the free neutron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, R. L.; Chupp, T. E.; Dewey, M. S.; Gentile, T. R.; Mumm, H. P.; Nico, J. S.; Thompson, A. K.; Fisher, B. M.; Kremsky, I.; Wietfeldt, F. E.; Beise, E. J.; Kiriluk, K. G.; Byrne, J.; Coakley, K. J.; Fu, C.

    2010-03-01

    The theory of quantum electrodynamics predicts that the β decay of the neutron into a proton, electron, and antineutrino is accompanied by a continuous spectrum of emitted photons described as inner bremsstrahlung. While this phenomenon has been observed in nuclear β decay and electron-capture decay for many years, it has only been recently observed in free-neutron decay. We present a detailed discussion of an experiment in which the radiative decay mode of the free neutron was observed. In this experiment, the branching ratio for this rare decay was determined by recording photons that were correlated with both the electron and proton emitted in neutron decay. We determined the branching ratio for photons with energy between 15 and 340 keV to be (3.09±0.32)×10-3 (68% level of confidence), where the uncertainty is dominated by systematic effects. This value for the branching ratio is consistent with theoretical predictions. The characteristic energy spectrum of the radiated photons, which differs from the uncorrelated background spectrum, is also consistent with the theoretical spectrum.

  10. Do Participants Differ in Their Cognitive Abilities, Task Motivation, or Personality Characteristics as a Function of Time of Participation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robison, Matthew K.; Unsworth, Nash

    2016-01-01

    Four experiments tested the conventional wisdom in experimental psychology that participants who complete laboratory tasks systematically differ in their cognitive abilities, motivational levels, and personality characteristics as a function of the time at which they participate during an academic term. Across 4 experiments with over 2,900…

  11. English Learner Student Characteristics and Time to Reclassification: An Example from Washington State. REL 2016-128

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg Motamedi, Jason; Singh, Malkeet; Thompson, Karen D.

    2016-01-01

    How long does it typically take English learner students to develop English language proficiency? And how does this time vary by student characteristics such as English proficiency at entry to kindergarten, gender, and home language? The answers to these questions can provide valuable information to districts and schools. Regional Educational…

  12. Spectral and amplitude-time characteristics of radiation of plasma of a repetitively pulsed discharge initiated by runaway electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomaev, M. I.; Beloplotov, D. V.; Sorokin, D. A.; Tarasenko, V. F.

    2016-02-01

    Spectral and amplitude-time characteristics of radiation of plasma of a repetitively pulsed discharge initiated by runaway electrons were studied experimentally in nitrogen. Intense emission lines of copper atoms, nitrogen atoms, and ions, as well as the first and the second positive systems of nitrogen, NO, and CN, were observed in the regime of repetitively pulsed excitation.

  13. Are Middle Schools Harmful? The Role of Transition Timing, Classroom Quality and School Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holas, Igor; Huston, Aletha C.

    2012-01-01

    Are middle schools ill-suited for early adolescents, or can school characteristics account for any differences in student functioning? Achievement, school engagement, and perceived competence of children starting middle schools in 5th and 6th grades were compared to those of their same-grade peers in elementary schools in a national, longitudinal…

  14. First observation of CP violation in B¯0 → D(*)CP h0 decays by a combined time-dependent analysis of BaBar And Belle Data

    SciTech Connect

    Abdesselam, A.

    2015-09-16

    We report a measurement of the time-dependent CP asymmetry of B¯0 → D(*)CPh0 decays, where the light neutral hadron h0 is a π0, η, or ω meson, and the neutral D meson is reconstructed in the CP eigenstates K+K, K0Sπ0, or K0Sω. The measurement is performed combining the final data samples collected at the Υ(4S) resonance by the BABAR and Belle experiments at the asymmetric-energy B factories PEP-II at SLAC and KEKB at KEK, respectively. The data samples contain (471±3)×106 BB¯ pairs recorded by the BABAR detector and (772±11)×106 BB¯ pairs recorded by the Belle detector. We measure the CP asymmetry parameters –ηfS=+0.66±0.10(stat)±0.06(syst) and C=–0.02±0.07(stat)±0.03(syst). These results correspond to the first observation of CP violation in B¯0 → D(*)CPh0 decays. As a result, the hypothesis of no mixing-induced CP violation is excluded in these decays at the level of 5.4 standard deviations.

  15. Decay Studies of NEPTUNIUM-237.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, S. A.

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. The decay of ^{237}Np (T_{1over2} = 2.14 times 10^6 years) has been investigated from singles and coincidence gamma-ray spectra acquired using Ge detectors and also from internal conversion electron spectra acquired using an iron-free, pi/2 double-focusing, beta-ray spectrometer. Such a long-lived nucleus has a very low specific activity which has previously made the determination of the internal conversion following its decay extremely difficult. In order to overcome this problem, the luminosity of the beta -ray spectrometer has been increased by utilising the multistrip source technique of Bergkvist in conjunction with a sixteen-element proportional counter. Twenty-four gamma-rays have been observed in the singles studies, with four additional gamma -rays observed in the coincidence studies alone, all of which have been placed in the level scheme of ^{233}Pa. The coincidence data also indicates the presence of two unobserved transitions of low energy. The absolute conversion coefficients and multipolarity of five gamma-ray transitions following the decay of ^{237} Np, together with those of seven gamma -ray transitions following the decay of the daughter nucleus, ^{233}Pa, have been determined and the levels of ^{233 }Pa assigned within the framework of the Nilsson Model.

  16. Evaluation of 235U decay data.

    PubMed

    Xiaolong, Huang; Baosong, Wang

    2009-09-01

    Evaluation of the complete decay scheme and data for (235)U including new measurements are presented in this report; literature data available up to June 2008 are included. The half-life is determined to be (7.04+/-0.01) x 10(8) yr. All known measured gamma-ray absolute intensities have been examined; the gamma-ray emission probability of the reference gamma-ray line of 185.72 keV is recommended to be 57.0+/-0.3%. The calculated internal conversion coefficients and their uncertainties have been used to obtain the complete decay intensity balance. The other decay characteristics are calculated using the ENSDF analysis program. Finally the new decay scheme for (235)U is presented.

  17. Selective Influence of Circadian Modulation and Task Characteristics on Motor Imagery Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Debarnot, Ursula; Sahraoui, Djafar; Champely, Stephane; Collet, Christian; Guillot, Aymeric

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we examined the effect of circadian modulation on motor imagery (MI) time while also considering the effects of task complexity and duration. The ability to imagine in real time was influenced by circadian modulation in a simple walking condition, with longer MI times in the morning and evening sessions. By contrast, there was no…

  18. Radioactive Decay - An Analog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGeachy, Frank

    1988-01-01

    Presents an analog of radioactive decay that allows the student to grasp the concept of half life and the exponential nature of the decay process. The analog is devised to use small, colored, plastic poker chips or counters. Provides the typical data and a graph which supports the analog. (YP)

  19. Hawaii PTTI test bed. [characteristics and operation on time measurement facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, J. A.

    1972-01-01

    The development and installation of a test bed for a Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI). A prime goal in the effort is to develop a repertoire of techniques and equipment that will permit communications facilities to be served most effectively by their ties to a common time reference. The test bed provides guidance for the implementation of precise time and frequency discipline at other facilities. One product of the test-bed problem is an assessment of the accuracy of the time-discipline chain from the observatory to each level of use.

  20. Differentiating Blood, Lymph, and Primo Vessels by Residual Time Characteristic of Fluorescent Nanoparticles in a Tumor Model

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sungwoo; Lim, Jaekwan; Cha, Jinmyung; Lee, Jin-Kyu; Ryu, Yeon Hee; Kim, SungChul; Soh, Kwang-Sup

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescent nanoparticles (FNPs) which were injected into a tumor tissue flowed out through the blood and lymph vessels. The FNPs in blood vessels remained only in the order for few minutes while those in lymph vessels remained for a long time disappearing completely in 25 hours. We found a primo vessel inside a lymph vessel near a blood vessel, and FNPs remained in the primo vessel for longer than 25 hours. In addition, we examined in detail the residual time characteristics of lymph vessels because it could be useful in a future study of fluid dynamical comparison of the three conduits. These residual time characteristics of FNPs in the three kinds of vessels may have implications for the dynamics of nanoparticle drugs for cancer chemotherapy. PMID:23662147

  1. On a distinctive feature of problems of calculating time-average characteristics of nuclear reactor optimal control sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trifonenkov, A. V.; Trifonenkov, V. P.

    2017-01-01

    This article deals with a feature of problems of calculating time-average characteristics of nuclear reactor optimal control sets. The operation of a nuclear reactor during threatened period is considered. The optimal control search problem is analysed. The xenon poisoning causes limitations on the variety of statements of the problem of calculating time-average characteristics of a set of optimal reactor power off controls. The level of xenon poisoning is limited. There is a problem of choosing an appropriate segment of the time axis to ensure that optimal control problem is consistent. Two procedures of estimation of the duration of this segment are considered. Two estimations as functions of the xenon limitation were plot. Boundaries of the interval of averaging are defined more precisely.

  2. Characteristic time scales of coalescence of silver nanocomposite and nanoparticle films induced by continuous wave laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Paeng, Dongwoo; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.; Lee, Daeho

    2014-08-18

    In-situ optical probing has been performed to analyze and compare the characteristic coalescence time scales of silver ion-doped polyvinylalcohol nanocomposite (Ag-PVA NC) and polyvinylpyrrolidone-capped silver nanoparticle (Ag-PVP NP) films subjected to continuous wave laser irradiation. The Ag-PVA NC yielded conductive metallic patterns by photothermal reduction of PVA, formation of nanoparticles from silver ions and their subsequent coalescence. On the other hand, Ag-PVP NP thin films produced conductive patterns through only coalescence of nanoparticles. Upon laser irradiation, Ag-PVA NC and Ag-PVP NP films exhibited different coalescence characteristics.

  3. Are middle schools harmful? The role of transition timing, classroom quality and school characteristics.

    PubMed

    Holas, Igor; Huston, Aletha C

    2012-03-01

    Are middle schools ill-suited for early adolescents, or can school characteristics account for any differences in student functioning? Achievement, school engagement, and perceived competence of children starting middle schools in 5th and 6th grades were compared to those of their same-grade peers in elementary schools in a national, longitudinal sample (NICHD Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development, n = 855; 52% Female, 82% White). Classroom quality (observed and teacher-reported) and school characteristics (composition and size) were considered as explanations for any relationships between school-level and student functioning. Fifth grade middle school students did not differ from those in elementary school, but students entering middle school in 6th grade, compared to those in elementary school, experienced lower classroom quality, which in turn predicted slightly lower achievement. They also had lower school engagement, explained by larger school size. Classroom quality and school characteristics predicted youth functioning regardless of school type. We suggest reshaping the research and policy debate with renewed focus on classroom quality and school size instead of grade organization.

  4. Aftershock Decay Rates in the Iranian Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ommi, S.; Zafarani, H.; Zare, M.

    2016-07-01

    Motivated by the desire to have more information following the occurrence of damaging events, the main purpose of this article is to study aftershock sequence parameters in the Iranian plateau. To this end, the catalogue of the Iranian earthquakes between 2002 to the end of 2013 has been collected and homogenized among which 15 earthquakes have been selected to study their aftershock decay rates. For different tectonic provinces, the completeness magnitudes ( M c) of the earthquake catalogue have been calculated in different time intervals. Also, the M c variability in spatial and temporal windows has been determined for each selected event. For major Iranian earthquakes, catalogue of aftershocks has been collected thanks to three declustering methods: first, the classical windowing method of Gardner and Knopoff (Bull Seismol Soc Am 64:1363-1367, 1974); second, a modified version of this using spatial windowing based on the Wells and Coppersmith (Bull Seismol Soc Am 84:974-1002, 1994) relations; and third, the Burkhard and Grünthal (Swiss J Geosci 102:149-188, 2009) scheme. Effects of the temporal windows also have been investigated using the time periods of 1 month, 100 days, and 1 year in the declustering method of Gardner and Knopoff (Bull Seismol Soc Am 64:1363-1367, 1974). In the next step, the modified Omori law coefficients have been calculated for the 15 selected earthquakes. The calibrated regional generic model describing the temporal and magnitude distribution of aftershocks is of interest for time-dependent seismic hazard forecasts. The regional characteristics of the aftershock decay rates have been studied for the selected Iranian earthquakes in the Alborz, Zagros and Central Iran regions considering their different seismotectonics regimes. However, due to the lack of sufficient data, no results have been reported for the Kopeh-Dagh and Makran seismotectonic regions.

  5. Measurement of the CKM angle φ1 in B0→D¯ (*)0h0 , D¯ 0→KS0π+π- decays with time-dependent binned Dalitz plot analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorobyev, V.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Asner, D. M.; Aushev, T.; Ayad, R.; Badhrees, I.; Bahinipati, S.; Bakich, A. M.; Behera, P.; Bhardwaj, V.; Bhuyan, B.; Biswal, J.; Bobrov, A.; Bondar, A.; Bozek, A.; Bračko, M.; Browder, T. E.; Červenkov, D.; Chekelian, V.; Chen, A.; Cheon, B. G.; Chilikin, K.; Chistov, R.; Cho, K.; Chobanova, V.; Choi, Y.; Cinabro, D.; Danilov, M.; Dash, N.; Di Carlo, S.; Doležal, Z.; Drásal, Z.; Drutskoy, A.; Dutta, D.; Eidelman, S.; Epifanov, D.; Farhat, H.; Fast, J. E.; Ferber, T.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gaur, V.; Gabyshev, N.; Garmash, A.; Goldenzweig, P.; Greenwald, D.; Haba, J.; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; Hou, W.-S.; Inami, K.; Inguglia, G.; Ishikawa, A.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, Y.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jaegle, I.; Joffe, D.; Joo, K. K.; Julius, T.; Kang, K. H.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, D. Y.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, K. T.; Kim, S. H.; Kinoshita, K.; Kodyš, P.; Kotchetkov, D.; Križan, P.; Krokovny, P.; Kumar, R.; Kumita, T.; Kwon, Y.-J.; Lange, J. S.; Li, C. H.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Y.; Libby, J.; Liventsev, D.; Lubej, M.; Masuda, M.; Matsuda, T.; Matvienko, D.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyata, H.; Mizuk, R.; Mohanty, G. B.; Moll, A.; Moon, H. K.; Mussa, R.; Nakao, M.; Nanut, T.; Nath, K. J.; Nayak, M.; Negishi, K.; Nishida, S.; Ogawa, S.; Okuno, S.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, G.; Pal, B.; Park, C.-S.; Park, C. W.; Park, H.; Paul, S.; Pedlar, T. K.; Pestotnik, R.; Petrič, M.; Piilonen, L. E.; Rauch, J.; Ritter, M.; Sakai, Y.; Sandilya, S.; Sanuki, T.; Savinov, V.; Schlüter, T.; Schneider, O.; Schnell, G.; Schwanda, C.; Schwartz, A. J.; Seino, Y.; Senyo, K.; Sevior, M. E.; Shebalin, V.; Shen, C. P.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shiu, J.-G.; Shwartz, B.; Simon, F.; Sokolov, A.; Solovieva, E.; Starič, M.; Strube, J. F.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Takizawa, M.; Tenchini, F.; Trabelsi, K.; Uchida, M.; Uglov, T.; Uno, S.; Urquijo, P.; Usov, Y.; Van Hulse, C.; Vanhoefer, P.; Varner, G.; Varvell, K. E.; Vinokurova, A.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, M.-Z.; Wang, P.; Watanabe, Y.; Williams, K. M.; Won, E.; Yamaoka, J.; Yamashita, Y.; Yashchenko, S.; Yelton, J.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zhukova, V.; Zhulanov, V.; Zupanc, A.; Belle Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    We report a measurement of the C P -violation parameter φ1 obtained in a time-dependent analysis of B0→D¯ (*)0h0 decays followed by D¯ 0 →KS0π+π- decay. A model-independent measurement is performed using the binned Dalitz plot technique. The measured value is φ1=11.7 °±7.8 °(stat ) ±2.1 °(syst ) . Treating sin 2 φ1 and cos 2 φ1 as independent parameters, we obtain sin 2 φ1 =0.43 ±0.27 (stat ) ±0.08 (syst ) and cos 2 φ1 =1.06 ±0.33 (stat)-0.15 +0.21(syst ) . The results are obtained with a full data sample of 772 ×1 06B B ¯ pairs collected near the ϒ (4 S ) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e+e- collider.

  6. Ring current proton decay by charge exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, P. H.; Hoffman, R. A.; Fritz, T.

    1975-01-01

    Explorer 45 measurements during the recovery phase of a moderate magnetic storm have confirmed that the charge exchange decay mechanism can account for the decay of the storm-time proton ring current. Data from the moderate magnetic storm of 24 February 1972 was selected for study since a symmetrical ring current had developed and effects due to asymmetric ring current losses could be eliminated. It was found that after the initial rapid decay of the proton flux, the equatorially mirroring protons in the energy range 5 to 30 keV decayed throughout the L-value range of 3.5 to 5.0 at the charge exchange decay rate calculated by Liemohn. After several days of decay, the proton fluxes reached a lower limit where an apparent equilibrium was maintained, between weak particle source mechanisms and the loss mechanisms, until fresh protons were injected into the ring current region during substorms. While other proton loss mechanisms may also be operating, the results indicate that charge exchange can entirely account for the storm-time proton ring current decay, and that this mechanism must be considered in all studies involving the loss of proton ring current particles.

  7. The effect of quantity and timing of brine addition on water binding and textural characteristics of cooked beef rolls.

    PubMed

    Pietrasik, Z; Shand, P J

    2003-10-01

    The combined influence of quantity and timing of water/sodium chloride/phosphate addition on quality characteristics of beef rolls processed with 25 or 50% brine level was investigated. Properties of beef rolls were determined by measuring hydration and textural characteristics. The higher level of brine addition (50%) had detrimental effects on product water binding and textural characteristics. Late addition of brine/water during tumbling (i.e. during the last hour) resulted in rolls which were less hard, chewy and elastic, and had poorer water holding properties. Addition of brine in two parts favourably affected hydration properties and thermal stability, yielding lower cooking loss and purge and higher WHC, irrespective of level of brine addition. It also increased hardness and chewiness and improved springiness, cohesiveness and bind of cooked beef rolls.

  8. Sex and Racial/Ethnic Characteristics of Full-Time Vocational Education Instructional Staff.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Statistics Bulletin, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Men dominated the teaching positions in five of nine vocational program areas during 1979-80: industrial-arts (96.6 percent of full time positions), agriculture (93.5 percent), technical (92.8 percent), trade and industrial (91.4 percent), and distribution (69.5 percent) according to a survey of 282,292 full time instructional staff analyzed…

  9. Part Time Faculty: A Comparative Profile of Characteristics and Effectiveness at Corning Community College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turgeon, Mary L.

    A study was conducted at Corning Community College (CCC) to develop profiles of full- and part-time faculty based on survey data and student evaluations. All full- and part-time faculty who taught credit courses during the 1982-83 academic year were surveyed and requested to permit the use of their student evaluations as part of their aggregate…

  10. Characteristic time-stepping or local preconditioning of the Euler equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Leer, Bram; Lee, Wen-Tzong; Roe, Philip L.

    1991-01-01

    A derivation is presented of a local preconditioning matrix for multidimensional Euler equations, that reduces the spread of the characteristic speeds to the lowest attainable value. Numerical experiments with this preconditioning matrix are applied to an explicit upwind discretization of the two-dimensional Euler equations, showing that this matrix significantly increases the rate of convergence to a steady solution. It is predicted that local preconditioning will also simplify convergence-acceleration boundary procedures such as the Karni (1991) procedure for the far field and the Mazaheri and Roe (1991) procedure for a solid wall.

  11. Correlation Analyses Between the Characteristic Times of Gradual Solar Energetic Particle Events and the Properties of Associated Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Z. H.; Wang, C. B.; Wang, Yuming; Xue, X. H.

    2011-06-01

    It is generally believed that gradual solar energetic particles (SEPs) are accelerated by shocks associated with coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Using an ice-cream cone model, the radial speed and angular width of 95 CMEs associated with SEP events during 1998 - 2002 are calculated from SOHO/LASCO observations. Then, we investigate the relationships between the kinematic properties of these CMEs and the characteristic times of the intensity-time profile of their accompanied SEP events observed at 1 AU. These characteristic times of SEP are i) the onset time from the accompanying CME eruption at the Sun to the SEP arrival at 1 AU, ii) the rise time from the SEP onset to the time when the SEP intensity is one-half of peak intensity, and iii) the duration over which the SEP intensity is within a factor of two of the peak intensity. It is found that the onset time has neither significant correlation with the radial speed nor with the angular width of the accompanying CME. For events that are poorly connected to the Earth, the SEP rise time and duration have no significant correlation with the radial speed and angular width of the associated CMEs. However, for events that are magnetically well connected to the Earth, the SEP rise time and duration have significantly positive correlations with the radial speed and angular width of the associated CMEs. This indicates that a CME event with wider angular width and higher speed may more easily drive a strong and wide shock near to the Earth-connected interplanetary magnetic field lines, may trap and accelerate particles for a longer time, and may lead to longer rise time and duration of the ensuing SEP event.

  12. Spectroscopy of element 115 decay chains.

    PubMed

    Rudolph, D; Forsberg, U; Golubev, P; Sarmiento, L G; Yakushev, A; Andersson, L-L; Di Nitto, A; Düllmann, Ch E; Gates, J M; Gregorich, K E; Gross, C J; Heßberger, F P; Herzberg, R-D; Khuyagbaatar, J; Kratz, J V; Rykaczewski, K; Schädel, M; Åberg, S; Ackermann, D; Block, M; Brand, H; Carlsson, B G; Cox, D; Derkx, X; Eberhardt, K; Even, J; Fahlander, C; Gerl, J; Jäger, E; Kindler, B; Krier, J; Kojouharov, I; Kurz, N; Lommel, B; Mistry, A; Mokry, C; Nitsche, H; Omtvedt, J P; Papadakis, P; Ragnarsson, I; Runke, J; Schaffner, H; Schausten, B; Thörle-Pospiech, P; Torres, T; Traut, T; Trautmann, N; Türler, A; Ward, A; Ward, D E; Wiehl, N

    2013-09-13

    A high-resolution α, x-ray, and γ-ray coincidence spectroscopy experiment was conducted at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung. Thirty correlated α-decay chains were detected following the fusion-evaporation reaction 48Ca + 243Am. The observations are consistent with previous assignments of similar decay chains to originate from element Z=115. For the first time, precise spectroscopy allows the derivation of excitation schemes of isotopes along the decay chains starting with elements Z>112. Comprehensive Monte Carlo simulations accompany the data analysis. Nuclear structure models provide a first level interpretation.

  13. Selective influence of circadian modulation and task characteristics on motor imagery time.

    PubMed

    Debarnot, Ursula; Sahraoui, Djafar; Champely, Stéphane; Collet, Christian; Guillot, Aymeric

    2012-09-01

    In this study, we examined the effect of circadian modulation on motor imagery (MI) time while also considering the effects of task complexity and duration. The ability to imagine in real time was influenced by circadian modulation in a simple walking condition, with longer MI times in the morning and evening sessions. By contrast, there was no effect of circadian rhythm in the complex, short or long walking conditions. We concluded that motor imagery time is modulated during the course of the day, but the effect of task difficulty is stronger than circadian modulation in altering the temporal congruence between physical practice and MI performance. Practical applications in motor learning and rehabilitation are discussed.

  14. Operational characteristics of single-particle heat engines and refrigerators with time-asymmetric protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, P. S.; Saha, Arnab; Jayannavar, A. M.

    2016-09-01

    We have studied the single-particle heat engine and refrigerator driven by time-asymmetric protocol of finite duration. Our system consists of a particle in a harmonic trap with time-periodic strength that drives the particle cyclically between two baths. Each cycle consists of two isothermal steps at different temperatures and two adiabatic steps connecting them. The system works in irreversible mode of operation even in the quasistatic regime. This is indicated by finite entropy production even in the large cycle time limit. Consequently, Carnot efficiency for heat engine or Carnot coefficient of performance (COP) for refrigerators is not achievable. We further analyzed the phase diagram of heat engines and refrigerators. They are sensitive to time-asymmetry of the protocol. Phase diagram shows several interesting features, often counterintuitive. The distribution of stochastic efficiency and COP is broad and exhibits power-law tails.

  15. Muscle Activation Characteristics of the Front Leg During Baseball Swings with Timing Correction for Sudden Velocity Decrease

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Yoichi; Nakamoto, Hiroki; Ishii, Yasumitsu; Ikudome, Sachi; Takahashi, Kyohei; Shima, Norihiro

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to clarify the activation characteristics of the vastus lateralis muscle in the front leg during timing correction for a sudden decrease in the velocity of a target during baseball swings. Eleven male collegiate baseball players performed coincident timing tasks that comprised constant velocity of 8 m/s (unchanged) and a sudden decrease in velocity from 8 to 4 m/s (decreased velocity). Electromyography (EMG) revealed that the muscle activation was typically monophasic when responding unchanged conditions. The type of muscle activation during swings in response to decreased velocity condition was both monophasic and biphasic. When biphasic activation appeared in response to decreased velocity, the impact time and the time to peak EMG amplitude were significantly prolonged and the timing error was significantly smaller than that of monophasic activation. However, the EMG onset from the target start was consistent both monophasic and biphasic activation in response to conditions of decreased velocity. In addition, batters with small timing errors in response to decreased velocity were more likely to generate biphasic EMG activation. These findings indicated that timing correction for a sudden decrease in the velocity of an oncoming target is achieved by modifying the muscle activation characteristics of the vastus lateralis muscle of front leg from monophasic to biphasic to delay reaching peak muscle activation and thus prolong impact time. Therefore, the present findings suggests that the extent of timing errors in response to decreased velocity is influenced by the ability to correct muscle activation after its initiation rather than by delaying the initiation timing of muscle activation during baseball swings. PMID:25918848

  16. SU-E-T-755: Timing Characteristics of Proton and Carbon Ion Treatments Using a Synchrotron and Modulated Scanning

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, J; Li, Y; Huang, Z; Deng, Y; Sun, L; Moyers, M; Hsi, W; Wu, X

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The time required to deliver a treatment impacts not only the number of patients that can be treated each day but also the accuracy of delivery due to potential movements of patient tissues. Both macroscopic and microscopic timing characteristics of a beam delivery system were studied to examine their impacts on patient treatments. Methods: 35 patients were treated during a clinical trial to demonstrate safety and efficacy of a Siemens Iontris system prior to receiving approval from the Chinese Food and Drug Administration. The system has a variable cycle time and can provide proton beams from 48 to 221 MeV/n and carbon ions from 86 to 430 MeV/n. A modulated scanning beam delivery technique is used where the beam remains stationary at each spot aiming location and is not turned off while the spot quickly moves from one aiming location to the next. The treatment log files for 28 of the trial patients were analyzed to determine several timing characteristics. Results: The average portal time per target dose was 172.5 s/Gy for protons and 150.7 s/Gy for carbon ions. The maximum delivery time for any portal was less than 300 s. The average dwell time per spot was 12 ms for protons and 3.0 ms for carbon ions. The number of aiming positions per energy layer varied from 1 to 258 for protons and 1 to 621 for carbon ions. The average spill time and cycle time per energy layer were 1.20 and 2.68 s for protons and 0.95 and 4.73 s for carbon ions respectively. For 3 of the patients, the beam was gated on and off to reduce the effects of respiration. Conclusion: For a typical target volume of 153 cc as used in this clinical trial, the portal delivery times were acceptable.

  17. Leisure Time of Young Due to Some Socio-Demographic Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ðuranovic, Marina; Opic, Siniša

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to explore the prevalence of activities in leisure time of the young. A survey was conducted on 1062 students in 8 primary (n=505; 47,6%) and high schools (n=557; 52,4%) in Sisak - Moslavina County in the Republic of Croatia. The questionnaire of spending leisure time used was made up of 30 variables on a five-degree scale…

  18. Relationship between Emergency Restoration Time of Power Distribution Line after a Disaster and Geographical Characteristics of its Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagai, Shigeo; Terano, Takao

    The effect of an outage caused by a disaster is serious to the society, because the power distribution line is a common basic infrastructure for life support. And the time estimation of emergency restoration process of power distribution line after a disaster is an emerging problem for the safety and security of the society. But the time estimation is a difficult problem and the only practical method in use is a simple approximation method, which doesn't take account of geographical characteristics of the objective area. So, we developed a method which can take account of the influences caused by the geographical characteristics of the objective area on the estimation of the emergency restoration. In this article, we describe an experimental analysis by the method.

  19. Hydrological connectivity of hillslopes and streams: Characteristic time scales and nonlinearities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, Kevin J.; McDonnell, Jeffrey J.

    2010-10-01

    Subsurface flow from hillslopes is widely recognized as an important contributor to streamflow generation; however, processes that control how and when hillslopes connect to streams remain unclear. We investigated stream and hillslope runoff dynamics through a wet-up period in watershed 10 of the H. J. Andrews Experimental Forest in the western Cascades of Oregon where the riparian zone has been removed by debris flows. We examined the controls on hillslope-stream connectivity on the basis of observations of hydrometric, stable isotope, and applied tracer responses and computed transit times for multiple runoff components for a series of storms during the wet-up phase of the 2002-2003 winter rainy season. Hillslope discharge was distinctly threshold-like with a near linear response and average quick flow ratio of 0.58 when antecedent rainfall was greater than 20 mm. Hillslope and stream stormflow varied temporally and showed strong hysteretic relationships. Event water mean transit times (8-34 h) and rapid breakthrough from applied hillslope tracer additions demonstrated that subsurface contributing areas extend far upslope during events. Despite rapid hillslope transport processes during events, soil water and runoff mean transit times during nonstorm conditions were greater than the time scale of storm events. Soil water mean transit times ranged between 10 and 25 days. Hillslope seepage and catchment base flow mean transit times were between 1 and 2 years. We describe a conceptual model that captures variable physical flow pathways, their synchronicity, threshold activation, hysteresis, and transit times through changing antecedent wetness conditions that illustrate the different stages of hillslope and stream connectivity.

  20. Heart rate time series characteristics for early detection of infections in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Tambuyzer, T; Guiza, F; Boonen, E; Meersseman, P; Vervenne, H; Hansen, T K; Bjerre, M; Van den Berghe, G; Berckmans, D; Aerts, J M; Meyfroidt, G

    2017-04-01

    It is difficult to make a distinction between inflammation and infection. Therefore, new strategies are required to allow accurate detection of infection. Here, we hypothesize that we can distinguish infected from non-infected ICU patients based on dynamic features of serum cytokine concentrations and heart rate time series. Serum cytokine profiles and heart rate time series of 39 patients were available for this study. The serum concentration of ten cytokines were measured using blood sampled every 10 min between 2100 and 0600 hours. Heart rate was recorded every minute. Ten metrics were used to extract features from these time series to obtain an accurate classification of infected patients. The predictive power of the metrics derived from the heart rate time series was investigated using decision tree analysis. Finally, logistic regression methods were used to examine whether classification performance improved with inclusion of features derived from the cytokine time series. The AUC of a decision tree based on two heart rate features was 0.88. The model had good calibration with 0.09 Hosmer-Lemeshow p value. There was no significant additional value of adding static cytokine levels or cytokine time series information to the generated decision tree model. The results suggest that heart rate is a better marker for infection than information captured by cytokine time series when the exact stage of infection is not known. The predictive value of (expensive) biomarkers should always be weighed against the routinely monitored data, and such biomarkers have to demonstrate added value.

  1. Time-domain diffuse optical tomography using analytic statistical characteristics of photon trajectories

    SciTech Connect

    Konovalov, Aleksandr B; Vlasov, V V; Kalintsev, A G; Lyubimov, Vladimir V; Kravtsenyuk, Olga V

    2006-11-30

    The inverse problem of diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is reduced by the method of photon average trajectories (PAT) to the solution of the integral equation integrated along the conditional mean statistical photon trajectory. The PAT bending near the flat boundary of a scattering medium is estimated analytically. These estimates are used to determine the analytic statistical characteristics of photon trajectories for the flat layer geometry. The inverse DOT problem is solved by using the multiplicative algebraic algorithm modified to improve the convergence of the iteration reconstruction process. The numerical experiment shows that the modified PAT method permits the reconstruction of near-surface optical inhomogeneities virtually without distortions. (special issue devoted to multiple radiation scattering in random media)

  2. Correlation of Biological Characteristics of Smolts with Survival and Travel Time, 1987 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Rondorf, Dennis W.; Beeman, John W.; Free, Mary E.

    1988-06-01

    The biological characteristics of smolts were examined to determine their effect on estimates of survival in the Columbia and Snake rivers. Freeze branded groups of steelhead trout (Salmo gairdneri) from Lyons Ferry State Fish Hatchery (SFH) and Wells SFH and spring chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) from Winthrop National Fish Hatchery (NFH) were used to estimate survival. Past estimates of survival, using a ratio of test and control fish recaptured at McNary Dam, have resulted in estimates > 100%, presumably due to some unknown bias. Study objectives were to determine if stress and descaling, degree of smoltification, and prevalence of bacterial kidney disease (BKD) differed among test and control groups of fish, thereby biasing survival estimates. 19 refs., 20 figs., 10 tabs.

  3. Time course and characteristics of symptom distress and quality of life at the end of life.

    PubMed

    Kutner, Jean S; Bryant, Lucinda L; Beaty, Brenda L; Fairclough, Diane L

    2007-09-01

    This study sought to describe the characteristics and correlates of symptom distress and quality of life (QOL) among persons receiving hospice/palliative care. English-speaking adults (n=86), their nurses (n=86), and family caregivers (n=49) from 11 hospice/palliative care organizations completed the Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale (MSAS) and McGill Quality of Life Questionnaire (MQOL) at hospice/palliative care enrollment, at one week, two weeks, then monthly until death or discharge. Mixed effects modeling using proxy reports to impute missing patient-reported data were used to describe predictors of symptom distress and QOL. Given study population attrition due to death, analyses are limited to the first 17 days following hospice/palliative care admission. While lack of energy and pain were the most prevalent and distressing symptoms (prevalence 92% and 82%, respectively; mean MSAS scores 3.27 and 2.71, respectively), pain was identified as the most distressing symptom based on its contribution to MSAS summary scores and responses to a single-item "most distressing symptom" question. Pain, nonpain symptom distress, and MQOL scores remained fairly stable throughout the study period. Distress from all other physical symptoms was significantly associated with distress due to pain. There were no significant associations between patient characteristics and distress due to pain. While greater psychological symptom distress had a negative association with QOL, neither pain nor other physical symptom distress was associated with QOL. The persistence of significant symptom distress, particularly due to pain, argues for the need for enhanced evidence to guide care provided in the last days and weeks of life.

  4. Characteristics of zinc sulphide nanostructures grown onsilica modified-polyaniline with polymerization time-dependent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potestas, M.; Alguno, A.; Vequizo, R.; Sambo, B. R.; Odarve, M. K.

    2015-06-01

    Growth of zinc sulphide (ZnS) nanostructures on silica modified-polyaniline (SM- PAni) with polymerization time-dependent was prepared using chemical bath deposition (CBD) technique. The grown samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). SEM images revealed that polyaniline rod-like nanostructures and ZnS nanospheres were successfully grown. The average diameter of the grown ZnS nanospheres did not significantly change by changing the growth time of the polyaniline. However, ZnS nanospheres grown with longer polymerization time of PAni is less dense and loosely bound as compared to shorter polymerization time of PAni. The less density of ZnS nanostructures with longer polymerization time of PAni may be due to the presence of PAni agglomerates that hinders the growth of ZnS nanospheres. Furthermore, FTIR spectra confirmed that the grown polyaniline is of emeraldine salt oxidation state which is the most conductive state of PAni.

  5. Study of Electromagnetic Repulsion Switch to High Speed Reclosing and Recover Time Characteristics of Superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, Tomonori; Kaiho, Katsuyuki; Yamaguchi, Iwao; Yanabu, Satoru

    Using a high-temperature superconductor, we constructed and tested a model superconducting fault current limiter (SFCL). The superconductor and vacuum interrupter as the commutation switch were connected in parallel using a bypass coil. When the fault current flows in this equipment, the superconductor is quenched and the current is then transferred to the parallel coil due to the voltage drop in the superconductor. This large current in the parallel coil actuates the magnetic repulsion mechanism of the vacuum interrupter and the current in the superconductor is broken. Using this equipment, the current flow time in the superconductor can be easily minimized. On the other hand, the fault current is also easily limited by large reactance of the parallel coil. This system has many merits. So, we introduced to electromagnetic repulsion switch. There is duty of high speed re-closing after interrupting fault current in the electrical power system. So the SFCL should be recovered to superconducting state before high speed re-closing. But, superconductor generated heat at the time of quench. It takes time to recover superconducting state. Therefore it is a matter of recovery time. In this paper, we studied recovery time of superconductor. Also, we proposed electromagnetic repulsion switch with reclosing system.

  6. Review of Thawing Time Prediction Models Depending
on Process Conditions and Product Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Kluza, Franciszek; Spiess, Walter E. L.; Kozłowicz, Katarzyna

    2016-01-01

    Summary Determining thawing times of frozen foods is a challenging problem as the thermophysical properties of the product change during thawing. A number of calculation models and solutions have been developed. The proposed solutions range from relatively simple analytical equations based on a number of assumptions to a group of empirical approaches that sometimes require complex calculations. In this paper analytical, empirical and graphical models are presented and critically reviewed. The conditions of solution, limitations and possible applications of the models are discussed. The graphical and semi--graphical models are derived from numerical methods. Using the numerical methods is not always possible as running calculations takes time, whereas the specialized software and equipment are not always cheap. For these reasons, the application of analytical-empirical models is more useful for engineering. It is demonstrated that there is no simple, accurate and feasible analytical method for thawing time prediction. Consequently, simplified methods are needed for thawing time estimation of agricultural and food products. The review reveals the need for further improvement of the existing solutions or development of new ones that will enable accurate determination of thawing time within a wide range of practical conditions of heat transfer during processing. PMID:27904387

  7. Characteristics and control response of the TOPAZ II Reactor System Real-time Dynamic Simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Kwok, K.S.

    1993-11-12

    A dynamic simulator of the TOPAZ II reactor system has been developed for the Nuclear Electric Propulsion Space Test Program. The simulator combines first-principle modeling and empirical correlations in its algorithm to attain the modeling accuracy and computational through-put that are required for real-time execution. The overall execution time of the simulator for each time step is 15 ms when no data is written to the disk, and 18 ms when nine double precision data points are written to the disk once in every time step. The simulation program has been tested and it is able to handle a step decrease of $8 worth of reactivity. It also provides simulations of fuel, emitter, collector, stainless steel, and ZrH moderator failures. Presented in this paper are the models used in the calculations, a sample simulation session, and a discussion of the performance and limitations of the simulator. The simulator has been found to provide realistic real-time dynamic response of the TOPAZ II reactor system under both normal and casualty conditions.

  8. Review of Thawing Time Prediction Models Depending
on Process Conditions and Product Characteristics.

    PubMed

    Góral, Dariusz; Kluza, Franciszek; Spiess, Walter E L; Kozłowicz, Katarzyna

    2016-03-01

    Determining thawing times of frozen foods is a challenging problem as the thermophysical properties of the product change during thawing. A number of calculation models and solutions have been developed. The proposed solutions range from relatively simple analytical equations based on a number of assumptions to a group of empirical approaches that sometimes require complex calculations. In this paper analytical, empirical and graphical models are presented and critically reviewed. The conditions of solution, limitations and possible applications of the models are discussed. The graphical and semi--graphical models are derived from numerical methods. Using the numerical methods is not always possible as running calculations takes time, whereas the specialized software and equipment are not always cheap. For these reasons, the application of analytical-empirical models is more useful for engineering. It is demonstrated that there is no simple, accurate and feasible analytical method for thawing time prediction. Consequently, simplified methods are needed for thawing time estimation of agricultural and food products. The review reveals the need for further improvement of the existing solutions or development of new ones that will enable accurate determination of thawing time within a wide range of practical conditions of heat transfer during processing.

  9. Ultrafast excited state dynamics of 5,6-dihydroxyindole, a key eumelanin building block: nonradiative decay mechanism.

    PubMed

    Gauden, Magdalena; Pezzella, Alessandro; Panzella, Lucia; Napolitano, Alessandra; d'Ischia, Marco; Sundström, Villy

    2009-09-17

    As part of a program designed to elucidate the excited state properties of key eumelanin building blocks, we report herein a study of 5,6-dihydroxyindole (DHI) in phosphate buffer at pH 3 and pH 7 using femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy. The transient absorption changes following excitation at 266 nm were used to directly monitor relaxation of the excited states. It was found that the initially generated excited state of DHI, exhibiting two main absorption bands at approximately 450 and approximately 550 nm, decays with a time constant of 5-10 ps to the equilibrated singlet excited state characterized by a very similar spectrum. This latter state then decays to the ground state and the triplet state with a characteristic time of approximately 140-180 ps. Concomitant with the singlet excited state decay of DHI, spectral features characteristic of the DHI cation radical (band at approximately 575 nm) and the triplet state (band at 440-450 nm) are detected. These species do not decay further since geminate recombination of the solvated electron and the DHI radical cation, as well as deprotonation of the cation to form the neutral semiquinone radical, occur on a time scale longer than that covered by the present experiments. These results offer novel insights into the mechanisms of nonradiative decay of eumelanin building blocks of possible relevance to the putative photoprotective and phototoxic roles of these biopolymers.

  10. Characteristics of DUI recidivists: a 12-year follow-up study of first time DUI offenders.

    PubMed

    Cavaiola, Alan A; Strohmetz, David B; Abreo, Sandra D

    2007-04-01

    77 individuals convicted of a drinking and driving (DUI) offense were screened for recidivism approximately 12 years following their first offense. At the time of the initial DUI conviction, participants were administered the MAST and the MMPI-2. Participants' drinking history and driving history and arrest at the time of screening and at a 12-year follow-up were also reviewed. The results indicate that, among DUI recidivists, on average 6 years elapsed between their first and second DUI offenses. Driving history prior to the first DUI offense was predictive of later recidivism. The only significant finding from the MAST and MMPI results was that repeat offenders tended to have higher scores on the L and K validity scales of the MMPI. These results are discussed in the context of Jessor's Problem-Behavior Theory and as well their clinical implications for screening and treatment decisions involving first time DUI offenders.

  11. Taekwondo techniques and competition characteristics involved in time-loss injuries.

    PubMed

    Beis, Konstantinos; Pieter, Willy; Abatzides, George

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess time-loss injuries in young and adult taekwondo athletes. Participants were 2739 children (11-13 years), Junior (14-17 years) and adult males and females (18 years and older) competing in the national Greek championships. Injury data were collected by project staff with all diagnoses made by the tournament physician. Odds ratios were computed as well as 95% confidence intervals around the injury rates. The female Juniors had a higher time-loss injury rate (Fisher's Exact Test p = 0.033) than their adult counterparts. However, they were not at a higher risk of incurring a time-loss injury: OR = 0.143, 95% CI: 0.018-1.124. Collapsed over age, the females as a group recorded more time-loss injuries [11.36/1,000 A-E (95% CI: 6.25-16.47) versus 7.40/1,000 A-E (95% CI: 4.44-10.36)], but this was not significant (OR = 0.703, 95% CI: 0.383-1.293). In the Juniors, the boys only incurred time-loss injuries to the head and neck. There was no difference in the Junior girls in the distribution of time-loss injuries across body region, although they were at higher risk of sustaining an injury to the head and neck (OR = 1.510, 95% CI: 0.422-5.402) but this was not statistically significant. Although there were no statistical differences among age groups within gender, the Junior boys and girls (11-13 years) sustained more cerebral concussions. The Junior boys were at a higher risk of incurring a cerebral concussion than the boys (OR = 7.871, 95% CI: 0.917-67.583, Fisher's Exact Test p = 0.036). In the males, there was no difference between the men and Junior boys in injury rate for swing kicks compared to other techniques (OR = 2.000, 95% CI = 0.397-28.416). There also was no difference between the men and boys (OR = 4.800, 95% CI: 0.141-58.013). To help reduce the incidence of time-loss injuries in taekwondo, especially cerebral concussions, it is suggested for coaches to emphasize blocking skills. Educating referees, coaches and athletes

  12. Taekwondo Techniques and Competition Characteristics Involved in Time-Loss Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Beis, Konstantinos; Pieter, Willy; Abatzides, George

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess time-loss injuries in young and adult taekwondo athletes. Participants were 2739 children (11-13 years), Junior (14-17 years) and adult males and females (18 years and older) competing in the national Greek championships. Injury data were collected by project staff with all diagnoses made by the tournament physician. Odds ratios were computed as well as 95% confidence intervals around the injury rates. The female Juniors had a higher time-loss injury rate (Fisher’s Exact Test p = 0.033) than their adult counterparts. However, they were not at a higher risk of incurring a time-loss injury: OR = 0.143, 95% CI: 0.018-1.124. Collapsed over age, the females as a group recorded more time-loss injuries [11.36/1,000 A-E (95% CI: 6.25-16.47) versus 7.40/1,000 A-E (95% CI: 4.44-10.36)], but this was not significant (OR = 0.703, 95% CI: 0.383-1.293). In the Juniors, the boys only incurred time-loss injuries to the head and neck. There was no difference in the Junior girls in the distribution of time-loss injuries across body region, although they were at higher risk of sustaining an injury to the head and neck (OR = 1.510, 95% CI: 0.422-5.402) but this was not statistically significant. Although there were no statistical differences among age groups within gender, the Junior boys and girls (11-13 years) sustained more cerebral concussions. The Junior boys were at a higher risk of incurring a cerebral concussion than the boys (OR = 7.871, 95% CI: 0.917-67.583, Fisher’s Exact Test p = 0.036). In the males, there was no difference between the men and Junior boys in injury rate for swing kicks compared to other techniques (OR = 2.000, 95% CI = 0.397-28.416). There also was no difference between the men and boys (OR = 4.800, 95% CI: 0.141-58.013). To help reduce the incidence of time-loss injuries in taekwondo, especially cerebral concussions, it is suggested for coaches to emphasize blocking skills. Educating referees, coaches and

  13. Effect of reaction time on the characteristics of catalytically grown boron nitride nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Mohamed, Norani Muti E-mail: pervaiz-pas@yahoo.com E-mail: zainabh@petronas.com.my; Ahmad, Pervaiz E-mail: pervaiz-pas@yahoo.com E-mail: zainabh@petronas.com.my; Saheed, Mohamed Shuaib Mohamed E-mail: pervaiz-pas@yahoo.com E-mail: zainabh@petronas.com.my; Burhanudin, Zainal Arif E-mail: pervaiz-pas@yahoo.com E-mail: zainabh@petronas.com.my

    2014-10-24

    The paper reports on the growth of boron nitride nanotube (BNNTs) on Si substrate by catalytic chemical vapor deposition technique and the effect of reaction time and temperature on the size and purity were investigated. Scanning electron microscopy image revealed the bamboo-like BNNTs of multiwalled type with interlayer spacing of 0.34 nm. EDX analysis described the presence of a small percentage of Mg in the sample, indicating the combination of base-tip growth model for the sample synthesized at 1200°C. The reaction time has an effect of extending the length of the BNNTs until the catalyst is oxidized or covered by growth precursor.

  14. Effect of reaction time on the characteristics of catalytically grown boron nitride nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Norani Muti; Ahmad, Pervaiz; Saheed, Mohamed Shuaib Mohamed; Burhanudin, Zainal Arif

    2014-10-01

    The paper reports on the growth of boron nitride nanotube (BNNTs) on Si substrate by catalytic chemical vapor deposition technique and the effect of reaction time and temperature on the size and purity were investigated. Scanning electron microscopy image revealed the bamboo-like BNNTs of multiwalled type with interlayer spacing of 0.34 nm. EDX analysis described the presence of a small percentage of Mg in the sample, indicating the combination of base-tip growth model for the sample synthesized at 1200°C. The reaction time has an effect of extending the length of the BNNTs until the catalyst is oxidized or covered by growth precursor.

  15. RARE KAON DECAYS.

    SciTech Connect

    LITTENBERG, L.

    2005-07-19

    Lepton flavor violation (LFV) experiments have probed sensitivities corresponding to mass scales of well over 100 TeV, making life difficult for models predicting accessible LFV in kaon decay and discouraging new dedicated experiments of this type.

  16. Charmless B Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Gradl, Wolfgang; /Edinburgh U.

    2007-03-06

    Rare charmless hadronic B decays are a good testing ground for the standard model. The dominant amplitudes contributing to this class of B decays are CKM suppressed tree diagrams and b {yields} s or b {yields} d loop diagrams (''penguins''). These decays can be used to study interfering standard model (SM) amplitudes and CP violation. They are sensitive to the presence of new particles in the loops, and they provide valuable information to constrain theoretical models of B decays. The B factories BABAR at SLAC and Belle at KEK produce B mesons in the reaction e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B}. So far they have collected integrated luminosities of about 406 fb{sup -1} and 600 fb{sup -1}, respectively. The results presented here are based on subsets of about 200-500 fb{sup -1} and are preliminary unless a journal reference is given.

  17. Radiative B Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Bard, D.; /Imperial Coll., London

    2011-11-23

    I discuss recent results in radiative B decays from the Belle and BaBar collaborations. I report new measurements of the decay rate and CP asymmetries in b {yields} s{gamma} and b {yields} d{gamma} decays, and measurements of the photon spectrum in b {yields} s{gamma}. Radiative penguin decays are flavour changing neutral currents which do not occur at tree level in the standard model (SM), but must proceed via one loop or higher order diagrams. These transitions are therefore suppressed in the SM, but offer access to poorlyknown SM parameters and are also a sensitive probe of new physics. In the SM, the rate is dominated by the top quark contribution to the loop, but non-SM particles could also contribute with a size comparable to leading SM contributions. The new physics effects are potentially large which makes them theoretically very interesting, but due to their small branching fractions they are typically experimentally challenging.

  18. The impact of fragility fractures on work and characteristics associated with time to return to work.

    PubMed

    Rotondi, N K; Beaton, D E; Ilieff, M; Adhihetty, C; Linton, D; Bogoch, E; Sale, J; Hogg-Johnson, S; Jaglal, S; Jain, R; Weldon, J

    2017-01-01

    We examined the impact of fragility fractures on the work outcomes of employed patients. The majority successfully returned to their previous jobs in a short amount of time, and productivity loss at work was low. Our findings underscore the fast recovery rates of working fragility fracture patients.

  19. Temporal Characteristics of the Predictive Synchronous Firing Modeled by Spike-Timing-Dependent Plasticity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitano, Katsunori; Fukai, Tomoki

    2004-01-01

    When a sensory cue was repeatedly followed by a behavioral event with fixed delays, pairs of premotor and primary motor neurons showed significant increases of coincident spikes at times a monkey was expecting the event. These results provided evidence that neuronal firin