Science.gov

Sample records for decelerator systems technology

  1. Low Density Supersonic Decelerator Parachute Decelerator System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallon, John C.; Clark, Ian G.; Rivellini, Tommaso P.; Adams, Douglas S.; Witkowski, Allen

    2013-01-01

    The Low Density Supersonic Decelerator Project has undertaken the task of developing and testing a large supersonic ringsail parachute. The parachute under development is intended to provide mission planners more options for parachutes larger than the Mars Science Laboratory's 21.5m parachute. During its development, this new parachute will be taken through a series of tests in order to bring the parachute to a TRL-6 readiness level and make the technology available for future Mars missions. This effort is primarily focused on two tests, a subsonic structural verification test done at sea level atmospheric conditions and a supersonic flight behind a blunt body in low-density atmospheric conditions. The preferred method of deploying a parachute behind a decelerating blunt body robotic spacecraft in a supersonic flow-field is via mortar deployment. Due to the configuration constraints in the design of the test vehicle used in the supersonic testing it is not possible to perform a mortar deployment. As a result of this limitation an alternative deployment process using a ballute as a pilot is being developed. The intent in this alternate approach is to preserve the requisite features of a mortar deployment during canopy extraction in a supersonic flow. Doing so will allow future Mars missions to either choose to mortar deploy or pilot deploy the parachute that is being developed.

  2. Technology development for deployable aerodynamic decelerators at Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masciarelli, James P.

    2002-01-01

    Parachutes used for Mars landing missions are only certified for deployment at Mars behind blunt bodies flying at low angles of attack, Mach numbers up to 2.2, and dynamic pressures of up to 800 Pa. NASA is currently studying entry vehicle concepts for future robotic missions to Mars that would require parachutes to be deployed at higher Mach numbers and dynamic pressures. This paper demonstrates the need for expanding the parachute deployment envelope, and describes a three-phase technology development activity that has been initiated to address the need. The end result of the technology development program will be a aerodynamic decelerator system that can be deployed at Mach numbers of up to 3.1 and dynamic pressures of up to 1400 Pa. .

  3. Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (HIAD) Technology Development Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Stephen J.; Cheatwood, F. McNeil; Calomino, Anthony M.; Wright, Henry S.; Wusk, Mary E.; Hughes, Monica F.

    2013-01-01

    The successful flight of the Inflatable Reentry Vehicle Experiment (IRVE)-3 has further demonstrated the potential value of Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (HIAD) technology. This technology development effort is funded by NASA's Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD) Game Changing Development Program (GCDP). This paper provides an overview of a multi-year HIAD technology development effort, detailing the projects completed to date and the additional testing planned for the future.

  4. 5.0 Aerodynamic and Propulsive Decelerator Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruz, Juan R.; Powell, Richard; Masciarelli, James; Brown, Glenn; Witkowski, Al; Guernsey, Carl

    2005-01-01

    Contents include the following: Introduction. Capability Breakdown Structure. Decelerator Functions. Candidate Solutions. Performance and Technology. Capability State-of-the-Art. Performance Needs. Candidate Configurations. Possible Technology Roadmaps. Capability Roadmaps.

  5. Modified hydraulic braking system limits angular deceleration to safe values

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, R. S.; Council, M.; Green, P. M.

    1966-01-01

    Conventional spring actuated, hydraulically released, fail-safe disk braking system is modified to control the angular deceleration of a massive antenna. The hydraulic system provides an immediate preset pressure to the spring-loaded brake shoes and holds it at this value to decelerate the antenna at the desired rate.

  6. Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (HIAD) Technology Development Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Stephen J.; Cheatwood, F. McNeil; Calomino, Anthony M.; Wright, Henry S.

    2013-01-01

    The successful flight of the Inflatable Reentry Vehicle Experiment (IRVE)-3 has further demonstrated the potential value of Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (HIAD) technology. This technology development effort is funded by NASA's Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD) Game Changing Development Program (GCDP). This paper provides an overview of a multi-year HIAD technology development effort, detailing the projects completed to date and the additional testing planned for the future. The effort was divided into three areas: Flexible Systems Development (FSD), Mission Advanced Entry Concepts (AEC), and Flight Validation. FSD consists of a Flexible Thermal Protection Systems (FTPS) element, which is investigating high temperature materials, coatings, and additives for use in the bladder, insulator, and heat shield layers; and an Inflatable Structures (IS) element which includes manufacture and testing (laboratory and wind tunnel) of inflatable structures and their associated structural elements. AEC consists of the Mission Applications element developing concepts (including payload interfaces) for missions at multiple destinations for the purpose of demonstrating the benefits and need for the HIAD technology as well as the Next Generation Subsystems element. Ground test development has been pursued in parallel with the Flight Validation IRVE-3 flight test. A larger scale (6m diameter) HIAD inflatable structure was constructed and aerodynamically tested in the National Full-scale Aerodynamics Complex (NFAC) 40ft by 80ft test section along with a duplicate of the IRVE-3 3m article. Both the 6m and 3m articles were tested with instrumented aerodynamic covers which incorporated an array of pressure taps to capture surface pressure distribution to validate Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model predictions of surface pressure distribution. The 3m article also had a duplicate IRVE-3 Thermal Protection System (TPS) to test in addition to testing with the

  7. Flexible Thermal Protection System Development for Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DelCorso, Joseph A.; Bruce, Walter E., III; Hughes, Stephen J.; Dec, John A.; Rezin, Marc D.; Meador, Mary Ann B.; Guo, Haiquan; Fletcher, Douglas G.; Calomino, Anthony M.; Cheatwood, McNeil

    2012-01-01

    The Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerators (HIAD) project has invested in development of multiple thermal protection system (TPS) candidates to be used in inflatable, high downmass, technology flight projects. Flexible TPS is one element of the HIAD project which is tasked with the research and development of the technology ranging from direct ground tests, modelling and simulation, characterization of TPS systems, manufacturing and handling, and standards and policy definition. The intent of flexible TPS is to enable large deployable aeroshell technologies, which increase the drag performance while significantly reducing the ballistic coefficient of high-mass entry vehicles. A HIAD requires a flexible TPS capable of surviving aerothermal loads, and durable enough to survive the rigors of construction, handling, high density packing, long duration exposure to extrinsic, in-situ environments, and deployment. This paper provides a comprehensive overview of key work being performed within the Flexible TPS element of the HIAD project. Included in this paper is an overview of, and results from, each Flexible TPS research and development activity, which includes ground testing, physics-based thermal modelling, age testing, margins policy, catalysis, materials characterization, and recent developments with new TPS materials.

  8. Review of NASA In-Space Propulsion Technology Program Inflatable Decelerator Investments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, E. H.; Mnk, M. M.; James, B. F.; Moon, S. A.

    2005-01-01

    The NASA In-Space Propulsion Technology (ISPT) Program is managed by the NASA Headquarters Science Mission Directorate and is implemented by the Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. The ISPT objective is to fund development of promising in-space propulsion technologies that can decrease flight times, decrease cost, or increase delivered payload mass for future science missions. Before ISPT will invest in a technology, the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of the concept must be estimated to be at TRL 3. A TRL 3 signifies that the technical community agrees that the feasibility of the concept has been proven through experiment or analysis. One of the highest priority technology investments for ISPT is Aerocapture. The aerocapture maneuver uses a planetary atmosphere to reduce or alter the speed of a vehicle allowing for quick, propellantless (or using very little propellant) orbit capture. The atmosphere is used as a brake, transferring the energy associated with the vehicle's high speed into thermal energy. The ISPT Aerocapture Technology Area (ATA) is currently investing in the development of advanced lightweight ablative thermal protection systems, high temperature composite structures, and heat-flux sensors for rigid aeroshells. The heritage of rigid aeroshells extends back to the Apollo era and this technology will most likely be used by the first generation aerocapture vehicle. As a second generation aerocapture technology, ISPT is investing in three inflatable aerodynamic decelerator concepts for planetary aerocapture. They are: trailing ballute (balloon-parachute), attached afterbody ballute, and an inflatable aeroshell. ISPT also leverages the NASA Small Business Innovative Research Program for additional inflatable decelerator technology development. In mid-2004 ISPT requested an independent review of the three inflatable decelerator technologies funded directly by ISPT to validate the TRL and to identify technology maturation concerns. An

  9. Review of NASA In-Space Propulsion Technology Program Inflatable Decelerator Investments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, Erin H.; Munk, Michelle M.; James, Bonnie F.; Moon, Steve A.

    2005-01-01

    The NASA In-Space Propulsion Technology (ISPT) Program is managed by the NASA Headquarters Science Mission Directorate and is implemented by the Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. The ISPT objective is to fund development of promising in- space propulsion technologies that can decrease flight times, decrease cost, or increase delivered payload mass for future science missions. Before ISPT will invest in a technology, the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of the concept must be estimated to be at TRL 3. A TRL 3 signifies that the technical community agrees that the feasibility of the concept has been proven through experiment or analysis. One of the highest priority technology investments for ISPT is Aerocapture. The aerocapture maneuver uses a planetary atmosphere to reduce or alter the speed of a vehicle allowing for quick, propellantless (or using very little propellant) orbit capture. The atmosphere is used as a brake, transferring the energy associated with the vehicle s high speed into thermal energy. The ISPT Aerocapture Technology Area (ATA) is currently investing in the development of advanced lightweight ablative thermal protection systems, high temperature composite structures, and heat-flux sensors for rigid aeroshells. The heritage of rigid aeroshells extends back to the Apollo era and this technology will most likely be used by the first generation aerocapture vehicle. As a second generation aerocapture technology, ISPT is investing in three inflatable aerodynamic decelerator concepts for planetary aerocapture. They are: trailing ballute (balloon-parachute), attached afterbody ballute, and an inflatable aeroshell. ISPT also leverages the NASA Small Business Innovative Research Program for additional inflatable decelerator technology development. In mid-2004 ISPT requested an independent review of the three inflatable decelerator technologies funded directly by ISPT to validate the TRL and to identify technology maturation concerns. An

  10. Ares I First Stage Booster Deceleration System: An Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Ron; Hengel, John E.; Wolf, Dean

    2009-01-01

    In 2005, the Congressional NASA Authorization Act enacted a new space exploration program, the "Vision for Space Exploratien". The Constellation Program was formed to oversee the implementation of this new mission. With an intent not simply to support the International Space Station, but to build a permanent outpost on the Moon and then travel on to explore ever more distant terrains, the Constellation Program is supervising the development of a brand new fleet of launch vehicles, the Ares. The Ares lineup will include two new launch vehicles: the Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle and the Ares V Cargo Launch Vehicle. A crew exploration vehicle, Orion, will be launched on the Ares I. It will be capable of docking with the Space Station, the lunar lander, Altair, and the Earth Departure Stage of Ares V. The Ares V will be capable of lifting both large-scale hardware and the Altair into space. The Ares First Stage Team is tasked with developing the propulsion system necessary to liftoff from the Earth and loft the entire Ares vehicle stack toward low Earth orbit. The Ares I First Stage booster is a 12-foot diameter, five-segment, reusable solid rocket booster derived from the Space Shuttle's four segment reusable solid rocket booster (SRB). It is separated from the Upper Stage through the use of a Deceleration Subsystem (DSS). Booster Tumble Motors are used to induce the pitch tumble following separation from the Upper Stage. The spent Ares I booster must be recoverable using a parachute deceleration system similar to that of the Shuttle SRB heritage system. Since Ares I is much heavier and reenters the Earth's atmosphere from a higher altitude at a much higher velocity than the SRB, all of the parachutes must be redesigned to reliably meet the operational requisites of the new launch vehicles. This paper presents an overview of this new booster deceleration system. It includes comprehensive detail of the parachute deceleration system, its design and deployment sequences

  11. Mechanically-Deployed Hypersonic Decelerator and Conformal Ablator Technologies for Mars Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatapathy, Ethiraj; Wercinski, Paul F.; Beck, Robin A. S.; Hamm, Kenneth R.; Yount, Bryan C.; Makino, A.; Smith, B.; Gage, P.; Prabhu, D.

    2012-01-01

    The concept of a mechanically deployable hypersonic decelerator, developed initially for high mass (40 MT) human Mars missions, is currently funded by OCT for technology maturation. The ADEPT (Adaptive, Deployable Entry and Placement Technology) project has broad, game-changing applicability to in situ science missions to Venus, Mars, and the Outer Planets. Combined with maturation of conformal ablator technology (another current OCT investment), the two technologies provide unique low mass mission enabling capabilities otherwise not achievable by current rigid aeroshell or by inflatables. If this abstract is accepted, we will present results that illustrate the mission enabling capabilities of the mechanically deployable architecture for: (1) robotic Mars (Discovery or New Frontiers class) in the near term; (2) alternate approaches to landing MSL-class payloads, without the need for supersonic parachute or lifting entry, in the mid-term; and (3) Heavy mass and human missions to Mars in the long term.

  12. Stabilization of an axially moving accelerated/decelerated system via an adaptive boundary control.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Zhao, Zhijia; He, Wei

    2016-09-01

    In this study, an adaptive boundary control is developed for vibration suppression of an axially moving accelerated/decelerated belt system. The dynamic model of the belt system is represented by partial-ordinary differential equations with consideration of the high acceleration/deceleration and unknown distributed disturbance. By utilizing adaptive technique and Lyapunov-based back stepping method, an adaptive boundary control is proposed for vibration suppression of the belt system, a disturbance observer is introduced to attenuate the effects of unknown boundary disturbance, the adaptive law is developed to handle parametric uncertainties and the S-curve acceleration/deceleration method is adopted to plan the belt׳s speed. With the proposed control scheme, the well-posedness and stability of the closed-loop system are mathematically demonstrated. Simulations are displayed to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed control.

  13. Developmental trajectories, transitions, and nonlinear dynamical systems: a model of crime deceleration and desistance.

    PubMed

    Walters, Glenn D

    2002-02-01

    Research on crime-related developmental trajectories is reviewed with outcomes revealing the existence of several trajectories rather than a single general pattern. Each trajectory is marked by transitions that define the pattern's path and direction over time. These anticipated transitions differ from the unanticipated transitions known to precipitate crime deceleration and desistance. Borrowing principles from nonlinear dynamical systems theory--sensitive dependence on initial conditions, chaotic attractors, and self-organization in particular--this article offers a model of crime deceleration and desistance in which belief systems congruent with crime are altered in phases--initiation, transition, maintenance--to create belief systems incongruent with crime. The practical implications of this model are discussed and suggestions for future research are outlined.

  14. Sensitivity analysis of helicopter IMC decelerating steep approach and landing performance to navigation system parameters. [Instrument Meteorological Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karmali, M. S.; Phatak, A. V.; Bull, J. S.; Peach, L. L.; Demko, P. S.

    1984-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with a sensitivity analysis of the Decelerated Steep Approach and Landing (DSAL) maneuver to on-board and ground-based navigation system parameters. The Instrument Meteorological Conditions (IMC) DSAL maneuver involves decelerating to zero range rate while tracking the localizer and glideslope. The considered study investigated the performance of the navigation systems using Constant Deceleration Profile (CDP) guidance and a six degrees glideslope trajectory. A closed-loop computer simulation of the UH1H helicopter DSAL system was developed for the sensitivity analysis. Conclusions on system performance parameter sensitivity are discussed.

  15. Sensitivity analysis of helicopter IMC decelerating steep approach and landing performance to navigation system parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karmali, M. S.; Phatak, A. V.

    1982-01-01

    Results of a study to investigate, by means of a computer simulation, the performance sensitivity of helicopter IMC DSAL operations as a function of navigation system parameters are presented. A mathematical model representing generically a navigation system is formulated. The scenario simulated consists of a straight in helicopter approach to landing along a 6 deg glideslope. The deceleration magnitude chosen is 03g. The navigation model parameters are varied and the statistics of the total system errors (TSE) computed. These statistics are used to determine the critical navigation system parameters that affect the performance of the closed-loop navigation, guidance and control system of a UH-1H helicopter.

  16. Passive Thermal Control for the Low Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD) Test Vehicle Spin Motors Sub-System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redmond, Matthew; Mastropietro, A. J.; Pauken, Michael; Mobley, Brandon

    2014-01-01

    Future missions to Mars will require improved entry, descent, and landing (EDL) technology over the Viking-heritage systems which recently landed the largest payload to date, the 900 kg Mars Science Laboratory. As a result, NASA's Low Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD) project is working to advance the state of the art in Mars EDL systems by developing and testing three key technologies which will enable heavier payloads and higher altitude landing sites on the red planet. These technologies consist of a large 33.5 m diameter Supersonic Disk Sail (SSDS) parachute and two different Supersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (SIAD) devices - a robotic class that inflates to a 6 m diameter torus (SIAD-R), and an exploration class that inflates to an 8 m diameter isotensoid (SIADE). All three technologies will be demonstrated on test vehicles at high earth altitudes in order to simulate the Mars EDL environment. Each vehicle will be carried to altitude by a large helium balloon, released, spun up using spin motors to stabilize the vehicle's trajectory, and accelerated to supersonic speeds using a large solid rocket motor. The vehicle will then be spun down using another set of spin motors, and will deploy either the SIAD-R or SIAD-E, followed by the SSDS parachute until the vehicle lands in the ocean. Component level testing and bounding analysis are used to ensure the survival of system components in extreme thermal environments and predict temperatures throughout the flight. This paper presents a general description of the thermal testing, model correlation, and analysis of the spin motor passive thermal control sub-system to maintain spin motor performance, prescribed vehicle trajectory, and structural integrity of the test vehicle. The spin motor subsystem is predicted to meet its requirements with margin.

  17. Aerocapture Inflatable Decelerator (AID)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reza, Sajjad

    2007-01-01

    Forward Attached Inflatable Decelerators, more commonly known as inflatable aeroshells, provide an effective, cost efficient means of decelerating spacecrafts by using atmospheric drag for aerocapture or planetary entry instead of conventional liquid propulsion deceleration systems. Entry into planetary atmospheres results in significant heating and aerodynamic pressures which stress aeroshell systems to their useful limits. Incorporation of lightweight inflatable decelerator surfaces with increased surface-area footprints provides the opportunity to reduce heat flux and induced temperatures, while increasing the payload mass fraction. Furthermore, inflatable aeroshell decelerators provide the needed deceleration at considerably higher altitudes and Mach numbers when compared with conventional rigid aeroshell entry systems. Inflatable aeroshells also provide for stowage in a compact space, with subsequent deployment of a large-area, lightweight heatshield to survive entry heating. Use of a deployable heatshield decelerator not only enables an increase in the spacecraft payload mass fraction and but may also eliminate the need for a spacecraft backshell and cruise stage. This document is the viewgraph slides for the paper's presentation.

  18. Structural Testing of a 6m Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, G. T.; Kazemba, C. D.; Johnson, R. K.; Hughes, S. J.; Calomino, A. M.

    2015-01-01

    NASA is developing low ballistic coefficient technologies to support the Nations long-term goal of landing humans on Mars. Current entry, decent, and landing technologies are not practical for this class of payloads due to geometric constraints dictated by current and future launch vehicle fairing limitations. Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerators (HIADs) are being developed to circumvent this limitation and are now considered a leading technology to enable landing of heavy payloads on Mars. At the beginning of 2014, a 6m diameter HIAD inflatable structure with an integrated flexible thermal protection system (TPS) was subjected to a static load test series to verify its structural performance under flight-relevant loads. The inflatable structure was constructed into a 60 degree sphere-cone configuration using nine inflatable torus segments composed of fiber-reinforced thin films. The inflatable tori were joined together using adhesives and high-strength textile woven structural straps. These straps help distribute the load throughout the inflatable structure. The 6m flexible TPS was constructed using multiple layers of high performance materials that are designed to protect the inflatable structure from heat loads that would be seen in flight during atmospheric entry. A custom test fixture was constructed to perform the static load test series. The fixture consisted of a round structural tub with enough height and width to allow for displacement of the HIAD test article as loads were applied. The bottom of the tub rim had an airtight seal with the floor. The rigid centerbody of the HIAD was mounted to a pedestal in the center of the structural tub. Using an impermeable membrane draped over the HIAD test article, an airtight seal was created with the top rim of the static load tub. This seal allowed partial vacuum to be pulled beneath the HIAD resulting in a uniform static pressure load applied to the outer surface. Using this technique, the test article

  19. Aerodynamic Decelerators for Planetary Exploration: Past, Present, and Future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruz, Juna R.; Lingard, J. Stephen

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, aerodynamic decelerators are defined as textile devices intended to be deployed at Mach numbers below five. Such aerodynamic decelerators include parachutes and inflatable aerodynamic decelerators (often known as ballutes). Aerodynamic decelerators play a key role in the Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) of planetary exploration vehicles. Among the functions performed by aerodynamic decelerators for such vehicles are deceleration (often from supersonic to subsonic speeds), minimization of descent rate, providing specific descent rates (so that scientific measurements can be obtained), providing stability (drogue function - either to prevent aeroshell tumbling or to meet instrumentation requirements), effecting further aerodynamic decelerator system deployment (pilot function), providing differences in ballistic coefficients of components to enable separation events, and providing height and timeline to allow for completion of the EDL sequence. Challenging aspects in the development of aerodynamic decelerators for planetary exploration missions include: deployment in the unusual combination of high Mach numbers and low dynamic pressures, deployment in the wake behind a blunt-body entry vehicle, stringent mass and volume constraints, and the requirement for high drag and stability. Furthermore, these aerodynamic decelerators must be qualified for flight without access to the exotic operating environment where they are expected to operate. This paper is an introduction to the development and application of aerodynamic decelerators for robotic planetary exploration missions (including Earth sample return missions) from the earliest work in the 1960s to new ideas and technologies with possible application to future missions. An extensive list of references is provided for additional study.

  20. HIAD-2 (Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator)

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (HIAD) project is a disruptive technology that will accommodate the atmospheric entry of heavy payloads to planetary bodies such as Mars. HIAD over...

  1. Aerocapture Inflatable Decelerator for Planetary Entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reza, Sajjad; Hund, Richard; Kustas, Frank; Willcockson, William; Songer, Jarvis; Brown, Glen

    2007-01-01

    Forward Attached Inflatable Decelerators, more commonly known as inflatable aeroshells, provide an effective, cost efficient means of decelerating spacecrafts by using atmospheric drag for aerocapture or planetary entry instead of conventional liquid propulsion deceleration systems. Entry into planetary atmospheres results in significant heating and aerodynamic pressures which stress aeroshell systems to their useful limits. Incorporation of lightweight inflatable decelerator surfaces with increased surface-area footprints provides the opportunity to reduce heat flux and induced temperatures, while increasing the payload mass fraction. Furthermore, inflatable aeroshell decelerators provide the needed deceleration at considerably higher altitudes and Mach numbers when compared with conventional rigid aeroshell entry systems. Inflatable aeroshells also provide for stowage in a compact space, with subsequent deployment of a large-area, lightweight heatshield to survive entry heating. Use of a deployable heatshield decelerator enables an increase in the spacecraft payload mass fraction and may eliminate the need for a spacecraft backshell.

  2. Combining Magnetic and Electric Sails for Interstellar Deceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perakis, Nikolaos; Hein, Andreas M.

    2016-07-01

    The main benefit of an interstellar mission is to carry out in-situ measurements within a target star system. To allow for extended in-situ measurements, the spacecraft needs to be decelerated. One of the currently most promising technologies for deceleration is the magnetic sail which uses the deflection of interstellar matter via a magnetic field to decelerate the spacecraft. However, while the magnetic sail is very efficient at high velocities, its performance decreases with lower speeds. This leads to deceleration durations of several decades depending on the spacecraft mass. Within the context of Project Dragonfly, initiated by the Initiative of Interstellar Studies (i4is), this paper proposes a novel concept for decelerating a spacecraft on an interstellar mission by combining a magnetic sail with an electric sail. Combining the sails compensates for each technologys shortcomings: A magnetic sail is more effective at higher velocities than the electric sail and vice versa. It is demonstrated that using both sails sequentially outperforms using only the magnetic or electric sail for various mission scenarios and velocity ranges, at a constant total spacecraft mass. For example, for decelerating from 5% c, to interplanetary velocities, a spacecraft with both sails needs about 29 years, whereas the electric sail alone would take 35 years and the magnetic sail about 40 years with a total spacecraft mass of 8250 kg. Furthermore, it is assessed how the combined deceleration system affects the optimal overall mission architecture for different spacecraft masses and cruising speeds. Future work would investigate how operating both systems in parallel instead of sequentially would affect its performance. Moreover, uncertainties in the density of interstellar matter and sail properties need to be explored.

  3. An Aeroelastic Evaluation of the Flexible Thermal Protection System for an Inatable Aerodynamic Decelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, Benjamin D.

    The purpose of this dissertation is to study the aeroelastic stability of a proposed flexible thermal protection system (FTPS) for the NASA Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (HIAD). A flat, square FTPS coupon exhibits violent oscillations during experimental aerothermal testing in NASA's 8 Foot High Temperature Tunnel, leading to catastrophic failure. The behavior of the structural response suggested that aeroelastic flutter may be the primary instability mechanism, prompting further experimental investigation and theoretical model development. Using Von Karman's plate theory for the panel-like structure and piston theory aerodynamics, a set of aeroelastic models were developed and limit cycle oscillations (LCOs) were calculated at the tunnel flow conditions. Similarities in frequency content of the theoretical and experimental responses indicated that the observed FTPS oscillations were likely aeroelastic in nature, specifically LCO/flutter. While the coupon models can be used for comparison with tunnel tests, they cannot predict accurately the aeroelastic behavior of the FTPS in atmospheric flight. This is because the geometry of the flight vehicle is no longer a flat plate, but rather (approximately) a conical shell. In the second phase of this work, linearized Donnell conical shell theory and piston theory aerodynamics are used to calculate natural modes of vibration and flutter dynamic pressures for various structural models composed of one or more conical shells resting on several circumferential elastic supports. When the flight vehicle is approximated as a single conical shell without elastic supports, asymmetric flutter in many circumferential waves is observed. When the elastic supports are included, the shell flutters symmetrically in zero circumferential waves. Structural damping is found to be important in this case, as "hump-mode" flutter is possible. Aeroelastic models that consider the individual FTPS layers as separate shells exhibit

  4. Deceleration-Limiting Roadway Barrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, William C. (Inventor); Locke, P. James (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Roadway barrier system and method are disclosed for decelerating a moving vehicle in a controlled manner and for retaining the decelerated vehicle. A net or mesh of the roadway barrier system receives and captures the moving vehicle. The net or mesh is secured to anchors by energy absorbing straps. The energy absorbing straps deploy under a tensional load to decelerate the moving vehicle, the straps providing a controlled resistance to the tensional load over a predefined displacement or stroke to bring the moving vehicle to rest. Additional features include a sacrificial panel or sheet in front of the net that holds up the net or mesh while deflecting vehicles that collide only tangentially with the roadway barrier system.

  5. Aero-Structural Assessment of an Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheta, Essam F.; Venugopalan, Vinod; Tan, X. G.; Liever, Peter A.; Habchi, Sami D.

    2010-01-01

    NASA is conducting an Entry, Descent and Landing Systems Analysis (EDL-SA) Study to determine the key technology development projects that should be undertaken for enabling the landing of large payloads on Mars for both human and robotic missions. Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerators (IADs) are one of the candidate technologies. A variety of EDL architectures are under consideration. The current effort is conducted for development and simulations of computational framework for inflatable structures.

  6. Earth's Decelerating Tectonic Plates

    SciTech Connect

    Forte, A M; Moucha, R; Rowley, D B; Quere, S; Mitrovica, J X; Simmons, N A; Grand, S P

    2008-08-22

    Space geodetic and oceanic magnetic anomaly constraints on tectonic plate motions are employed to determine a new global map of present-day rates of change of plate velocities. This map shows that Earth's largest plate, the Pacific, is presently decelerating along with several other plates in the Pacific and Indo-Atlantic hemispheres. These plate decelerations contribute to an overall, globally averaged slowdown in tectonic plate speeds. The map of plate decelerations provides new and unique constraints on the dynamics of time-dependent convection in Earth's mantle. We employ a recently developed convection model constrained by seismic, geodynamic and mineral physics data to show that time-dependent changes in mantle buoyancy forces can explain the deceleration of the major plates in the Pacific and Indo-Atlantic hemispheres.

  7. Development of a Parachute System for Deceleration of Flying Vehicles in Supersonic Regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilyugin, N. N.; Khlebnikov, V. S.

    2010-09-01

    Aerodynamic problems arising during design and development of braking systems for re-entry vehicles are analyzed. Aerodynamic phenomena and laws valid in a supersonic flow around a pair of bodies having different shapes are studied. Results of this research can be used in solving application problems (arrangement and optimization of experiments; design and development of various braking systems for re-entry vehicles moving with supersonic speeds in the atmosphere).

  8. Electric propulsion system technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brophy, John R.; Garner, Charles E.; Goodfellow, Keith D.; Pivirotto, Thomas J.; Polk, James E.

    1992-01-01

    The work performed in fiscal year (FY) 1991 under the Propulsion Technology Program RTOP (Research and Technology Objectives and Plans) No. (55) 506-42-31 for Low-Thrust Primary and Auxiliary Propulsion technology development is described. The objectives of this work fall under two broad categories. The first of these deals with the development of ion engines for primary propulsion in support of solar system exploration. The second with the advancement of steady-state magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thruster technology at 100 kW to multimegawatt input power levels. The major technology issues for ion propulsion are demonstration of adequate engine life at the 5 to 10 kW power level and scaling ion engines to power levels of tens to hundreds of kilowatts. Tests of a new technique in which the decelerator grid of a three-grid ion accelerator system is biased negative of neutralizer common potential in order to collect facility induced charge-exchange ions are described. These tests indicate that this SAND (Screen, Accelerator, Negative Decelerator) configuration may enable long duration ion engine endurance tests to be performed at vacuum chamber pressures an order of magnitude higher than previously possible. The corresponding reduction in pumping speed requirements enables endurance tests of 10 kW class ion engines to be performed within the resources of existing technology programs. The results of a successful 5,000-hr endurance of a xenon hollow cathode operating at an emission current of 25 A are described, as well as the initial tests of hollow cathodes operating on a mixture of argon and 3 percent nitrogen. Work performed on the development of carbon/carbon grids, a multi-orifice hollow cathode, and discharge chamber erosion reduction through the addition of nitrogen are also described. Critical applied-field MPD thruster technical issues remain to be resolved, including demonstration of reliable steady-state operation at input powers of hundreds to thousands of

  9. Electric propulsion system technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brophy, John R.; Garner, Charles E.; Goodfellow, Keith D.; Pivirotto, Thomas J.; Polk, James E.

    1992-11-01

    The work performed in fiscal year (FY) 1991 under the Propulsion Technology Program RTOP (Research and Technology Objectives and Plans) No. (55) 506-42-31 for Low-Thrust Primary and Auxiliary Propulsion technology development is described. The objectives of this work fall under two broad categories. The first of these deals with the development of ion engines for primary propulsion in support of solar system exploration. The second with the advancement of steady-state magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thruster technology at 100 kW to multimegawatt input power levels. The major technology issues for ion propulsion are demonstration of adequate engine life at the 5 to 10 kW power level and scaling ion engines to power levels of tens to hundreds of kilowatts. Tests of a new technique in which the decelerator grid of a three-grid ion accelerator system is biased negative of neutralizer common potential in order to collect facility induced charge-exchange ions are described. These tests indicate that this SAND (Screen, Accelerator, Negative Decelerator) configuration may enable long duration ion engine endurance tests to be performed at vacuum chamber pressures an order of magnitude higher than previously possible. The corresponding reduction in pumping speed requirements enables endurance tests of 10 kW class ion engines to be performed within the resources of existing technology programs. The results of a successful 5,000-hr endurance of a xenon hollow cathode operating at an emission current of 25 A are described, as well as the initial tests of hollow cathodes operating on a mixture of argon and 3 percent nitrogen. Work performed on the development of carbon/carbon grids, a multi-orifice hollow cathode, and discharge chamber erosion reduction through the addition of nitrogen are also described. Critical applied-field MPD thruster technical issues remain to be resolved, including demonstration of reliable steady-state operation at input powers of hundreds to thousands of

  10. Nonlinear stress waves in a perfectly flexible string. [for aerodynamic decelerating system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fan, D.-N.; Mcgarvey, J. F.

    1977-01-01

    This paper discusses nonlinear stress-wave propagation in a perfectly flexible string obeying a quasilinear (rate-dependent) constitutive equation. Wave speeds and compatibility relations valid along various families of characteristics were determined. It was shown that the compatibility relations associated with the transverse as well as the longitudinal waves readily yield a physical interpretation when they are expressed in suitable variables and in vector form. Coding based on the present information was completed for the machine solution of a class of mixed initial- and boundary-value problems of practical interest. Computer simulation of the stress-wave interaction in the 40-foot lanyard in the Arcas 'Rocoz' system during deployment was carried out using a stress-strain relation for nylon at the strain rate of 30/second. A method for estimating the maximum tension and strain in a string during the initial loading phase is proposed.

  11. Development and Testing of a New Family of Supersonic Decelerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Ian G.; Adler, Mark; Rivellini, Tommaso P.

    2013-01-01

    The state of the art in Entry, Descent, and Landing systems for Mars applications is largely based on technologies developed in the late 1960's and early 1970's for the Viking Lander program. Although the 2011 Mars Science Laboratory has made advances in EDL technology, these are predominantly in the areas of entry (new thermal protection systems and guided hypersonic flight) and landing (the sky crane architecture). Increases in entry mass, landed mass, and landed altitude beyond MSL capabilities will require advances predominantly in the field of supersonic decelerators. With this in mind, a multi-year program has been initiated to advance three new types of supersonic decelerators that would enable future large-robotic and human-precursor class missions to Mars.

  12. Stereoscopic camera and viewing systems with undistorted depth presentation and reduced or eliminated erroneous acceleration and deceleration perceptions, or with perceptions produced or enhanced for special effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diner, Daniel B. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Methods for providing stereoscopic image presentation and stereoscopic configurations using stereoscopic viewing systems having converged or parallel cameras may be set up to reduce or eliminate erroneously perceived accelerations and decelerations by proper selection of parameters, such as an image magnification factor, q, and intercamera distance, 2w. For converged cameras, q is selected to be equal to Ve - qwl = 0, where V is the camera distance, e is half the interocular distance of an observer, w is half the intercamera distance, and l is the actual distance from the first nodal point of each camera to the convergence point, and for parallel cameras, q is selected to be equal to e/w. While converged cameras cannot be set up to provide fully undistorted three-dimensional views, they can be set up to provide a linear relationship between real and apparent depth and thus minimize erroneously perceived accelerations and decelerations for three sagittal planes, x = -w, x = 0, and x = +w which are indicated to the observer. Parallel cameras can be set up to provide fully undistorted three-dimensional views by controlling the location of the observer and by magnification and shifting of left and right images. In addition, the teachings of this disclosure can be used to provide methods of stereoscopic image presentation and stereoscopic camera configurations to produce a nonlinear relation between perceived and real depth, and erroneously produce or enhance perceived accelerations and decelerations in order to provide special effects for entertainment, training, or educational purposes.

  13. Report on Operation of Antiproton Decelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Belochitskii, Pavel

    2006-03-20

    The Antiproton Decelerator (AD) at CERN operates for physics since 1999. The 3.5 GeV/c antiprotons produced in the target by a 26 GeV/c proton beam coming from CERN PS. Since the experiments need a low energy antiprotons, beam is decelerated in the AD down to an extraction momentum of 100 MeV/c. Due to significant emittance blow up during deceleration, as well as tight requirements from experiments on extracted beam sizes, efficient compression of beam phase space is indispensable. Two cooling systems, stochastic and electron are used in AD. The progress in machine performance is reviewed, along with plans for the future. Special emphasis is given to the proposed new extra low energy antiproton ring (ELENA) for deceleration of antiproton beam further down to an energy of 100 keV (momentum 13.7 MeV/c), which would allow much higher antiproton capture rate with significantly higher beam density.

  14. Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator Ground Test Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Del Corso, Jospeh A.; Hughes, Stephen; Cheatwood, Neil; Johnson, Keith; Calomino, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (HIAD) technology readiness levels have been incrementally matured by NASA over the last thirteen years, with most recent support from NASA's Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD) Game Changing Development Program (GCDP). Recently STMD GCDP has authorized funding and support through fiscal year 2015 (FY15) for continued HIAD ground developments which support a Mars Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) study. The Mars study will assess the viability of various EDL architectures to enable a Mars human architecture pathfinder mission planned for mid-2020. At its conclusion in November 2014, NASA's first HIAD ground development effort had demonstrated success with fabricating a 50 W/cm2 modular thermal protection system, a 400 C capable inflatable structure, a 10-meter scale aeroshell manufacturing capability, together with calibrated thermal and structural models. Despite the unquestionable success of the first HIAD ground development effort, it was recognized that additional investment was needed in order to realize the full potential of the HIAD technology capability to enable future flight opportunities. The second HIAD ground development effort will focus on extending performance capability in key technology areas that include thermal protection system, lifting-body structures, inflation systems, flight control, stage transitions, and 15-meter aeroshell scalability. This paper presents an overview of the accomplishments under the baseline HIAD development effort and current plans for a follow-on development effort focused on extending those critical technologies needed to enable a Mars Pathfinder mission.

  15. Zeeman-Sisyphus Deceleration of Molecular Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitch, Noah; Tarbutt, Mike

    2016-05-01

    Ultracold molecules are useful for testing fundamental physics and studying strongly-interacting quantum systems. One production method is via direct laser cooling in a magneto-optical trap (MOT). In this endeavor, one major challenge is to produce molecules below the MOT capture velocity. Established molecular beam deceleration techniques are poorly suited because they decelerate only a small fraction of a typical molecular pulse. Direct laser cooling is a natural choice, but is also problematic due to transverse heating and the associated molecule loss. I will present a new technique that we are developing, which we call Zeeman-Sisyphus deceleration and which shows great promise for preparing molecular beams for MOT loading. This technique decelerates molecules using a linear array of permanent magnets, along with lasers that periodically optically pump molecules between weak and strong-field seeking quantum states. Being time-independent, this method is well-suited for temporally extended molecular beams. Simultaneous deceleration and transverse guiding makes this approach attractive as an alternative to direct laser cooling. I will present our development of the Zeeman-Sisyphus decelerator and its application to a molecular MOT of CaF and an ultracold fountain of YbF.

  16. Rotary Wing Deceleration Use on Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Larry A.; Steiner, Ted J.

    2011-01-01

    Rotary wing decelerator (RWD) systems were compared against other methods of atmospheric deceleration and were determined to show significant potential for application to a system requiring controlled descent, low-velocity landing, and atmospheric research capability on Titan. Design space exploration and down-selection results in a system with a single rotor utilizing cyclic pitch control. Models were developed for selection of a RWD descent system for use on Titan and to determine the relationships between the key design parameters of such a system and the time of descent. The possibility of extracting power from the system during descent was also investigated.

  17. Deceleration Orbit Improvements

    SciTech Connect

    Church, M.

    1991-04-26

    During the accelerator studies period of 12/90-1/91 much study time was dedicated to improving the E760 deceleration ramps. 4 general goals were in mind: (1) Reduce the relative orbit deviations from the nominal reference orbit as much as possible. This reduces the potential error in the orbit length calculation - which is the primary source of error in the beam energy calculation. (2) Maximize the transverse apertures. This minimizes beam loss during deceleration and during accidental beam blow-ups. (3) Measure and correct lattice parameters. Knowledge of {gamma}{sub T}, {eta}, Q{sub h}, Q{sub v}, and the dispersion in the straight sections allows for a more accurate energy calculation and reliable SYNCH calculations. (4) Minimize the coupling. This allows one to discern between horizontal and vertical tunes.

  18. Balloon launched decelerator test program: Post-flight test report, BLDT vehicle AV-3, Viking 1975 project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickinson, D.; Hicks, F.; Schlemmer, J.; Michel, F.; Moog, R. D.

    1973-01-01

    The pertinent events concerned with the launch, float, and flight of balloon launched decelerator test vehicle AV-3 are discussed. The performance of the decelerator system is analyzed. Data on the flight trajectory and decelerator test points at the time of decelerator deployment are provided. A description of the time history of vehicle events and anaomalies encounters during the mission is included.

  19. Balloon launched decelerator test program: Post-flight test report, BLDT vehicle AV-2, Viking 1975 project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickinson, D.; Hicks, F.; Schlemmer, J.; Michel, F.; Moog, R. D.

    1972-01-01

    The pertinent events concerned with the launch, float, and flight of balloon launched decelerator test vehicle AV-2 are discussed. The performance of the decelerator system is analyzed. Data on the flight trajectory and decelerator test points at the time of decelerator deployment are provided. A description of the time history of vehicle events and anomalies encounters during the mission is included.

  20. Avionics systems integration technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stech, George; Williams, James R.

    1988-01-01

    A very dramatic and continuing explosion in digital electronics technology has been taking place in the last decade. The prudent and timely application of this technology will provide Army aviation the capability to prevail against a numerically superior enemy threat. The Army and NASA have exploited this technology explosion in the development and application of avionics systems integration technology for new and future aviation systems. A few selected Army avionics integration technology base efforts are discussed. Also discussed is the Avionics Integration Research Laboratory (AIRLAB) that NASA has established at Langley for research into the integration and validation of avionics systems, and evaluation of advanced technology in a total systems context.

  1. Naturalistic rapid deceleration data: Drivers aged 75 years and older.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, Anna; Chevalier, Aran John; Clarke, Elizabeth; Coxon, Kristy; Brown, Julie; Rogers, Kris; Boufous, Soufiane; Ivers, Rebecca; Keay, Lisa

    2016-12-01

    The data presented in this article are related to the research manuscript "Predictors of older drivers' involvement in rapid deceleration events", which investigates potential predictors of older drivers' involvement in rapid deceleration events including measures of vision, cognitive function and driving confidence (A. Chevalier et al., 2016) [1]. In naturalistic driving studies such as this, when sample size is not large enough to allow crashes to be used to investigate driver safety, rapid deceleration events may be used as a surrogate safety measure. Naturalistic driving data were collected for up to 52 weeks from 182 volunteer drivers aged 75-94 years (median 80 years, 52% male) living in the suburban outskirts of Sydney. Driving data were collected using an in-vehicle monitoring device. Accelerometer data were recorded 32 times per second and Global Positioning System (GPS) data each second. To measure rapid deceleration behavior, rapid deceleration events (RDEs) were defined as having at least one data point at or above the deceleration threshold of 750 milli-g (7.35 m/s(2)). All events were constrained to a maximum 5 s duration. The dataset provided with this article contains 473 events, with a row per RDE. This article also contains information about data processing, treatment and quality control. The methods and data presented here may assist with planning and analysis of future studies into rapid deceleration behaviour using in-vehicle monitoring.

  2. Player acceleration and deceleration profiles in professional Australian football.

    PubMed

    Johnston, R J; Watsford, M L; Austin, D; Pine, M J; Spurrs, R W

    2015-09-01

    This study aimed to determine the validity and reliability of global positioning system (GPS) units for measuring a standardized set of acceleration and deceleration zones and whether these standardized zones were capable of identifying differences between playing positions in professional Australian football. Eight well trained male participants were recruited to wear two 5 Hz or 10 Hz GPS units whilst completing a team sport simulation circuit to measure acceleration and deceleration movements. For the second part of this article 30 professional players were monitored between 1-29 times using 5 Hz and 10 Hz GPS units for the collection of acceleration and deceleration movements during the 2011 and 2012 Australian Football League seasons. Players were separated into four distinct positional groups - nomadic players, fixed defenders, fixed forwards and ruckman. The GPS units analysed had good to poor levels of error for measuring the distance covered (<19.7%), time spent (<17.2%) and number of efforts performed (<48.0%) at low, moderate and high acceleration and deceleration zones. The results demonstrated that nomadic players and fixed defenders perform more acceleration and deceleration efforts during a match than fixed forwards and ruckman. These studies established that these GPS units can be used for analysing the distance covered and time spent at the acceleration and deceleration zones used. Further, these standardized zones were proven to be capable of distinguishing between player positions, with nomadic players and fixed defenders required to complete more high acceleration and deceleration efforts during a match.

  3. High Altitude Supersonic Decelerator Test Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Brant T.; Blando, Guillermo; Kennett, Andrew; Von Der Heydt, Max; Wolff, John Luke; Yerdon, Mark

    2013-01-01

    The Low Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD) project is tasked by NASA's Office of the Chief Technologist (OCT) to advance the state of the art in Mars entry and descent technology in order to allow for larger payloads to be delivered to Mars at higher altitudes with better accuracy. The project will develop a 33.5 m Do Supersonic Ringsail (SSRS) parachute, 6m attached torus, robotic class Supersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (SIAD-R), and an 8 m attached isotensoid, exploration class Supersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (SIAD-E). The SSRS and SIAD-R should be brought to TRL-6, while the SIAD-E should be brought to TRL-5. As part of the qualification and development program, LDSD must perform a Mach-scaled Supersonic Flight Dynamics Test (SFDT) in order to demonstrate successful free flight dynamic deployments at Mars equivalent altitude, of all three technologies. In order to perform these tests, LDSD must design and build a test vehicle to deliver all technologies to approximately 180,000 ft and Mach 4, deploy a SIAD, free fly to approximately Mach 2, deploy the SSRS, record high-speed and high-resolution imagery of both deployments, as well as record data from an instrumentation suite capable of characterizing the technology induced vehicle dynamics. The vehicle must also be recoverable after splashdown into the ocean under a nominal flight, while guaranteeing forensic data protection in an off nominal catastrophic failure of a test article that could result in a terminal velocity, tumbling water impact.

  4. Technology reviews: Glazing systems

    SciTech Connect

    Schuman, J.; Rubinstein, F.; Papamichael, K.; Beltran, L.; Lee, E.S.; Selkowitz, S.

    1992-09-01

    We present a representative review of existing, emerging, and future technology options in each of five hardware and systems areas in envelope and lighting technologies: lighting systems, glazing systems, shading systems, daylighting optical systems, and dynamic curtain wall systems. The term technology is used here to describe any design choice for energy efficiency, ranging from individual components to more complex systems to general design strategies. The purpose of this task is to characterize the state of the art in envelope and lighting technologies in order to identify those with promise for advanced integrated systems, with an emphasis on California commercial buildings. For each technology category, the following activities have been attempted to the extent possible: Identify key performance characteristics and criteria for each technology; determine the performance range of available technologies; identify the most promising technologies and promising trends in technology advances; examine market forces and market trends; and develop a continuously growing in-house database to be used throughout the project. A variety of information sources have been used in these technology characterizations, including miscellaneous periodicals, manufacturer catalogs and cut sheets, other research documents, and data from previous computer simulations. We include these different sources in order to best show the type and variety of data available, however publication here does not imply our guarantee of these data. Within each category, several broad classes are identified, and within each class we examine the generic individual technologies that fag into that class.

  5. Technology reviews: Shading systems

    SciTech Connect

    Schuman, J.; Rubinstein, F.; Papamichael, K.; Beltran, L.; Lee, E.S.; Selkowitz, S.

    1992-09-01

    We present a representative review of existing, emerging, and future technology options in each of five hardware and systems areas in envelope and lighting technologies: lighting systems, glazing systems, shading systems, daylighting optical systems, and dynamic curtain wall systems. The term technology is used here to describe any design choice for energy efficiency, ranging from individual components to more complex systems to general design strategies. The purpose of this task is to characterize the state of the art in envelope and lighting technologies in order to identify those with promise for advanced integrated systems, with an emphasis on California commercial buildings. For each technology category, the following activities have been attempted to the extent possible: Identify key performance characteristics and criteria for each technology. Determine the performance range of available technologies. Identify the most promising technologies and promising trends in technology advances. Examine market forces and market trends. Develop a continuously growing in-house database to be used throughout the project. A variety of information sources have been used in these technology characterizations, including miscellaneous periodicals, manufacturer catalogs and cut sheets, other research documents, and data from previous computer simulations. We include these different sources in order to best show the type and variety of data available, however publication here does not imply our guarantee of these data. Within each category, several broad classes are identified, and within each class we examine the generic individual technologies that fall into that class.

  6. Manned systems technology discipline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bretoi, Remus

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on manned systems technology discipline for Space Station Freedom are presented. Topics covered include: crew-systems interfaces and interactions; crew training; on-board systems maintenance and support; habitability and environment; and computational human factors.

  7. Arkansas Technology Information System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanBiervliet, Alan; Parette, Howard P., Jr.

    The Arkansas Technology Information System (ARTIS) was developed to fill a significant void in existing systems of technical support to Arkansans with disabilities by creating and maintaining a consumer-responsive statewide system of data storage and retrieval regarding assistive technology and services. ARTIS goals also include establishment of a…

  8. Decelerating and Trapping Large Polar Molecules.

    PubMed

    Patterson, David

    2016-11-18

    Manipulating the motion of large polyatomic molecules, such as benzonitrile (C6 H5 CN), presents significant difficulties compared to the manipulation of diatomic molecules. Although recent impressive results have demonstrated manipulation, trapping, and cooling of molecules as large as CH3 F, no general technique for trapping such molecules has been demonstrated, and cold neutral molecules larger than 5 atoms have not been trapped (M. Zeppenfeld, B. G. U. Englert, R. Glöckner, A. Prehn, M. Mielenz, C. Sommer, L. D. van Buuren, M. Motsch, G. Rempe, Nature 2012, 491, 570-573). In particular, extending Stark deceleration and electrostatic trapping to such species remains challenging. Here, we propose to combine a novel "asymmetric doublet state" Stark decelerator with recently demonstrated slow, cold, buffer-gas-cooled beams of closed-shell volatile molecules to realize a general system for decelerating and trapping samples of a broad range of volatile neutral polar prolate asymmetric top molecules. The technique is applicable to most stable volatile molecules in the 100-500 AMU range, and would be capable of producing trapped samples in a single rotational state and at a motional temperature of hundreds of mK. Such samples would immediately allow for spectroscopy of unprecedented resolution, and extensions would allow for further cooling and direct observation of slow intramolecular processes such as vibrational relaxation and Hertz-level tunneling dynamics.

  9. Avionics technology - system concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bull, J. S.; Huntoon, R. B.

    1984-01-01

    Avionics System Concepts to meet technology needs of advanced helicopter integrated cockpit design are identified. Specific avionics system concepts which should be conducted and/or support by NASA to most effectively aid industry in advanced helicopter integrated cockpit design are also identified. Candidate Missions and Mission Requirements to meet technology needs are considered.

  10. Data management system technology discipline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benz, Harry F.

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on data management system technology discipline for Space Station Freedom are presented. Topics covered include: systems technology area needs; storage technology area needs; processor technology area needs; communications technology area needs; software system technology area needs; human interface technology area needs; software development and verification; and onboard communications.

  11. Technology Overview and Assessment for Small-Scale EDL Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidrich, Casey R.; Smith, Brandon P.; Braun, Robert D.

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by missions to land large rovers and humans at Mars and other bodies, high-mass EDL technologies are a prevalent trend in the research community. In contrast, EDL systems for low-mass payloads have attracted less attention. Significant potential in science and discovery exists in small-scale EDL systems. Payloads acting secondary to a flagship mission are a currently under-utilzed resource. Before taking advantage of these opportunities, further developed of scaled EDL technologies is required. The key limitations identified in this study are compact decelerators and deformable impact systems. Current technologies may enable rough landing of small payloads, with moderate restrictions in packaging volume. Utilization of passive descent and landing stages will greatly increase the applicability of small systems, allowing for vehicles robust to entry environment uncertainties. These architectures will provide an efficient means of achieving science and support objectives while reducing cost and risk margins of a parent mission.

  12. VENTILATION TECHNOLOGY SYSTEMS ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a project to develop a systems analysis of ventilation technology and provide a state-of-the-art assessment of ventilation and indoor air quality (IAQ) research needs. (NOTE: Ventilation technology is defined as the hardware necessary to bring outdoor ...

  13. Earth's Decelerating Tectonic Plates (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forte, A. M.; Moucha, R.; Rowley, D. B.; Quere, S.; Mitrovica, J. X.; Simmons, N. A.; Grand, S. P.

    2009-12-01

    We employ a recently developed convection model constrained by seismic, geodynamic and mineral physics data (Simmons et al., GJI 2009) to explore the impact of time-dependent changes in mantle buoyancy forces on tectonic plate accelerations. This plate-coupled mantle convection model incorporates a viscosity structure that reconciles both glacial isostatic adjustment and global convection-related data sets (Mitrovica & Forte, EPSL 2004) and it successfully reproduces present-day plate velocities, global surface gravity and topography data. This convection model predicts the recent deceleration of several major plates in the Pacific and Indo-Atlantic hemispheres. Independent verification of these predictions is a fundamental test of the plausibility of the buoyancy forces and rheological structure in the convection model. To this end, we consider marine magnetic anomaly and space geodetic constraints on tectonic plate motions to determine a new global map of present-day rates of change of plate velocities. This map shows that several major plates, such as the Pacific, Africa and Nazca plates are presently decelerating and that they contribute to a globally-averaged slowdown in tectonic plate speeds. These joint geologic-geodetic inferences of plate decelerations are consistent with those predicted by our tomography-based convection model.

  14. Inflatable Aerocapture Decelerators for Mars Orbiters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Glen J.; Lingard, J. Stephen; Darley, Matthew G.; Underwood, John C.

    2007-01-01

    A multi-disciplinary research program was recently completed, sponsored by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, on the subject of aerocapture of spacecraft weighing up to 5 metric tons at Mars. Heavier spacecraft will require deployable drag area beyond the dimensional limits of current and planned launch fairings. This research focuses on the approach of lightweight inflatable decelerators constructed with thin films, using fiber reinforcement and having a temperature limitation of 500 C. Trajectory analysis defines trajectories for a range of low ballistic coefficients for which convective heat flux is compatible with the material set. Fluid-Structure Interaction (FSI) tools are expanded to include the rarified flow regime. Several non-symmetrical configurations are evaluated for their capability to develop lift as part of the necessary trajectory control strategy. Manufacturing technology is developed for 3-D stretch forming of polyimide films and for tailored fiber reinforcement of thin films. Finally, the mass of the decelerator is estimated and compared to the mass of a traditional rigid aeroshell.

  15. Aerodynamic Models for the Low Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD) Test Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Norman, John W.; Dyakonov, Artem; Schoenenberger, Mark; Davis, Jody; Muppidi, Suman; Tang, Chun; Bose, Deepak; Mobley, Brandon; Clark, Ian

    2016-01-01

    An overview of aerodynamic models for the Low Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD) Supersonic Flight Dynamics Test (SFDT) campaign test vehicle is presented, with comparisons to reconstructed flight data and discussion of model updates. The SFDT campaign objective is to test Supersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (SIAD) and large supersonic parachute technologies at high altitude Earth conditions relevant to entry, descent, and landing (EDL) at Mars. Nominal SIAD test conditions are attained by lifting a test vehicle (TV) to 36 km altitude with a helium balloon, then accelerating the TV to Mach 4 and 53 km altitude with a solid rocket motor. Test flights conducted in June of 2014 (SFDT-1) and 2015 (SFDT-2) each successfully delivered a 6 meter diameter decelerator (SIAD-R) to test conditions and several seconds of flight, and were successful in demonstrating the SFDT flight system concept and SIAD-R technology. Aerodynamic models and uncertainties developed for the SFDT campaign are presented, including the methods used to generate them and their implementation within an aerodynamic database (ADB) routine for flight simulations. Pre- and post-flight aerodynamic models are compared against reconstructed flight data and model changes based upon knowledge gained from the flights are discussed. The pre-flight powered phase model is shown to have a significant contribution to off-nominal SFDT trajectory lofting, while coast and SIAD phase models behaved much as predicted.

  16. Bare Conductive Tether for Decelerating a Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Les; Vaughn, Jason; Welzyn, Ken; Ballance, Judy; Carroll, Joe; Lorenzini, Enrico; Estes, bob; Schuler, Pete; Mojazza, hamid; Lennhoff, John

    2007-01-01

    A document describes a prototype of electrically conductive tethers to be used primarily to decelerate spacecraft and/or generate electric power for the spacecraft. Like prior such tethers, this tether is designed so that when it is deployed from a spacecraft in orbit, its motion across the terrestrial magnetic field induces an electric current. The Lorentz force on the current decelerates the spacecraft. Optionally, the current can be exploited to convert some orbital kinetic energy to electric energy for spacecraft systems. Whereas the conductive portions of prior such tethers are covered with electrical insulation except for end electrodes that make contact with the ionosphere, this tether includes a conductive portion that is insulated along part of its length but deliberately left bare along a substantial remaining portion of its length to make contact with the ionosphere. The conductive portions of the tether are made of coated thin aluminum wires wrapped around strong, lightweight aromatic polyamide braids. The main advantages of the present partly-bare-tether design over the prior all-insulated-tether design include greater resistance to degradation by the impact of monatomic oxygen at orbital altitude and speed and greater efficiency in collecting electrons from the ionosphere.

  17. Delivery Ring Lattice Modifications for Transitionless Deceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Johnstone, J. A.; Syphers, M. J.

    2016-10-09

    A portion of the remnant Tevatron program infrastruc- ture at Fermilab is being reconfigured to be used for the generation and delivery of proton and muon beams for new high-precision particle physics experiments. With the 8 GeV Booster as its primary source, the Mu2e exper- iment will receive 8.9 GeV/c bunched beam on target, after being stored and slow spilled from the Delivery Ring (DR) -- a refurbished debuncher ring from Tevatron anti- proton production. For the Muon g-2 experiment, the DR will be tuned for 3.1 GeV/c to capture muons off of a target before sending them to this experiment's Storage Ring. The apertures in the beam transport systems are optimized for the large muon beams of this lower-energy experiment. In order to provide further flexibility in the operation of the DR for future possible low-energy, high- intensity particle physics experiments (REDTOP[1], for example) and detector development, investigations are underway into the feasibility of decelerating beams from its maximum kinetic energy of 8 GeV level to lower en- ergies, down to 1-2 GeV. In this paper we look at possi- ble lattice modifications to the DR to avoid a transition crossing during the deceleration process. Hardware re- quirements and other operational implications of this scheme will also be discussed.

  18. Transverse stability in a Stark decelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Meerakker, Sebastiaan Y. T. van de; Bethlem, Hendrick L.; Vanhaecke, Nicolas; Meijer, Gerard

    2006-02-15

    The concept of phase stability in a Stark decelerator ensures that polar molecules can be accelerated, guided, or decelerated without loss; molecules within a certain position and velocity interval are kept together throughout the deceleration process. In this paper the influence of the transverse motion on phase stability in a Stark decelerator is investigated. For typical deceleration experiments--i.e., for high values of the phase angle {phi}{sub 0}--the transverse motion considerably enhances the region in phase space for which phase stable deceleration occurs. For low values of {phi}{sub 0}, however, the transverse motion reduces the acceptance of a Stark decelerator and unstable regions in phase space appear. These effects are quantitatively explained in terms of a coupling between the longitudinal and transverse motion. The predicted longitudinal acceptance of a Stark decelerator is verified by measurements on a beam of OH (X {sup 2}{pi}{sub 3/2},J=3/2) radicals passing through a Stark decelerator.

  19. Phase stability in a multistage Zeeman decelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Wiederkehr, A. W.; Hogan, S. D.; Merkt, F.

    2010-10-15

    The phase stability of a multistage Zeeman decelerator is analyzed by numerical particle-trajectory simulations and experimental measurements. A one-dimensional model of the phase stability in multistage Stark deceleration [Bethlem et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 84, 5744 (2000)] has been adapted to multistage Zeeman deceleration and compared with one- and three-dimensional particle-trajectory simulations, including the analysis of the effect of finite switch-on and -off times of the deceleration pulses. The comparison reveals that transverse effects in the decelerator lead to a considerable reduction of the phase-space acceptance at low values of the phase angle and an enhancement at high values. The optimal combinations of phase angles and currents with which a preset amount of kinetic energy can be removed from atoms and molecules in a pulsed supersonic beam using a multistage decelerator are determined by simulation. Quantitative analysis of the phase-space acceptance within a given volume reveals that for our decelerator (8 {mu}s switch-off time) optimal conditions are achieved for values of the phase angle between 45 deg. and 55 deg. This conclusion is examined and confirmed by experimental measurements using deuterium atoms. Alternative approaches to generate optimal deceleration pulse sequences, such as the implementation of evolutionary algorithms or the use of higher-order modes of the decelerator, are discussed.

  20. Thermal Design and Analysis of the Supersonic Flight Dynamics Test Vehicle for the Low Density Supersonic Decelerator Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mastropietro, A. J.; Pauken, Michael; Sunada, Eric; Gray, Sandria

    2013-01-01

    The thermal design and analysis of the experimental Supersonic Flight Dynamics Test (SFDT) vehicle is presented. The SFDT vehicle is currently being designed as a platform to help demonstrate key technologies for NASA's Low Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD) project. The LDSD project is charged by NASA's Office of the Chief Technologist (OCT) with the task of advancing the state of the art in Mars Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) systems by developing and testing three new technologies required for landing heavier payloads on Mars. The enabling technologies under development consist of a large 33.5 meter diameter Supersonic Ringsail (SSRS) parachute and two different types of Supersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (SIAD) devices - a robotic class, SIAD-R, that inflates to a 6 meter diameter torus, and an exploration class, SIAD-E, that inflates to an 8 meter diameter isotensoid. As part of the technology development effort, the various elements of the new supersonic decelerator system must be tested in a Mars-like environment. This is currently planned to be accomplished by sending a series of SFDT vehicles into Earth's stratosphere. Each SFDT vehicle will be lifted to a stable float altitude by a large helium carrier balloon. Once at altitude, the SFDT vehicles will be released from their carrier balloon and spun up via spin motors to provide trajectory stability. An onboard third stage solid rocket motor will propel each test vehicle to supersonic flight in the upper atmosphere. After main engine burnout, each vehicle will be despun and testing of the deceleration system will begin: first an inflatable decelerator will be deployed around the aeroshell to increase the drag surface area, and then the large parachute will be deployed to continue the deceleration and return the vehicle back to the Earth's surface. The SFDT vehicle thermal system must passively protect the vehicle structure and its components from cold temperatures experienced during the

  1. Free electron laser using Rf coupled accelerating and decelerating structures

    DOEpatents

    Brau, Charles A.; Swenson, Donald A.; Boyd, Jr., Thomas J.

    1984-01-01

    A free electron laser and free electron laser amplifier using beam transport devices for guiding an electron beam to a wiggler of a free electron laser and returning the electron beam to decelerating cavities disposed adjacent to the accelerating cavities of the free electron laser. Rf energy is generated from the energy depleted electron beam after it emerges from the wiggler by means of the decelerating cavities which are closely coupled to the accelerating cavities, or by means of a second bore within a single set of cavities. Rf energy generated from the decelerated electron beam is used to supplement energy provided by an external source, such as a klystron, to thereby enhance overall efficiency of the system.

  2. Photogrammetry of a Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kushner, Laura Kathryn; Littell, Justin D.; Cassell, Alan M.

    2013-01-01

    In 2012, two large-scale models of a Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic decelerator were tested in the National Full-Scale Aerodynamic Complex at NASA Ames Research Center. One of the objectives of this test was to measure model deflections under aerodynamic loading that approximated expected flight conditions. The measurements were acquired using stereo photogrammetry. Four pairs of stereo cameras were mounted inside the NFAC test section, each imaging a particular section of the HIAD. The views were then stitched together post-test to create a surface deformation profile. The data from the photogram- metry system will largely be used for comparisons to and refinement of Fluid Structure Interaction models. This paper describes how a commercial photogrammetry system was adapted to make the measurements and presents some preliminary results.

  3. Deceleration of Antiprotons in Support of Antiproton Storage/Utilization Research

    SciTech Connect

    Howe, Steven D.; Jackson, Gerald P.; Pearson, J. Boise; Lewis, Raymond A.

    2005-02-06

    Antimatter has the highest energy density known to mankind. Many concepts have been studied that use antimatter for propulsion. All of these concepts require the development of high density storage. H-bar Technologies, under contract with the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, has undertaken the first step toward development of high density storage. Demonstration of the ability to store antiprotons in a Penning Trap provides the technology to pursue research in alternative storage methods that may lead to eventually to high density concepts. H-bar Technologies has undertaken research activity on the detailed design and operations required to decelerate and redirect the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) antiproton beam to lay the groundwork for a source of low energy antiprotons. We have performed a detailed assessment of an antiproton deceleration scheme using the FNAL Main Injector, outlining the requirements to significantly and efficiently lower the energy of antiprotons. This task shall require a combination of: theoretical/computation simulations, development of specialized accelerator controls programming, modification of specific Main Injector hardware, and experimental testing of the modified system. Testing shall be performed to characterize the system with a goal of reducing the beam momentum from 8.9 GeV/c to a level of 1 GeV/c or less. We have designed an antiproton degrader system that will integrate with the FNAL decelerated/transferred beam. The degrader shall be designed to maximize the number of low energy antiprotons with a beam spot sized for acceptance by the Mark I test hardware.

  4. Multistage Zeeman deceleration of metastable neon

    SciTech Connect

    Wiederkehr, Alex W.; Motsch, Michael; Hogan, Stephen D.; Andrist, Markus; Schmutz, Hansjuerg; Lambillotte, Bruno; Agner, Josef A.; Merkt, Frederic

    2011-12-07

    A supersonic beam of metastable neon atoms has been decelerated by exploiting the interaction between the magnetic moment of the atoms and time-dependent inhomogeneous magnetic fields in a multistage Zeeman decelerator. Using 91 deceleration solenoids, the atoms were decelerated from an initial velocity of 580 m/s to final velocities as low as 105 m/s, corresponding to a removal of more than 95% of their initial kinetic energy. The phase-space distribution of the cold, decelerated atoms was characterized by time-of-flight and imaging measurements, from which a temperature of 10 mK was obtained in the moving frame of the decelerated sample. In combination with particle-trajectory simulations, these measurements allowed the phase-space acceptance of the decelerator to be quantified. The degree of isotope separation that can be achieved by multistage Zeeman deceleration was also studied by performing experiments with pulse sequences generated for {sup 20}Ne and {sup 22}Ne.

  5. Expert system technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prince, Mary Ellen

    1987-01-01

    The expert system is a computer program which attempts to reproduce the problem-solving behavior of an expert, who is able to view problems from a broad perspective and arrive at conclusions rapidly, using intuition, shortcuts, and analogies to previous situations. Expert systems are a departure from the usual artificial intelligence approach to problem solving. Researchers have traditionally tried to develop general modes of human intelligence that could be applied to many different situations. Expert systems, on the other hand, tend to rely on large quantities of domain specific knowledge, much of it heuristic. The reasoning component of the system is relatively simple and straightforward. For this reason, expert systems are often called knowledge based systems. The report expands on the foregoing. Section 1 discusses the architecture of a typical expert system. Section 2 deals with the characteristics that make a problem a suitable candidate for expert system solution. Section 3 surveys current technology, describing some of the software aids available for expert system development. Section 4 discusses the limitations of the latter. The concluding section makes predictions of future trends.

  6. Tidal deceleration of the moon's mean motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, M. K.; Eanes, R. J.; Tapley, B. D.

    1992-01-01

    The secular change in the mean motion of the moon, n, caused by the tidal dissipation in the ocean and solid earth is due primarily to the effect of the diurnal and semidiurnal tides. The long-period ocean tides produce an increase in n, but the effects are only 1 percent of the diurnal and semidiurnal ocean tides. In this investigation, expressions for these effects are obtained by developing the tidal potential in the ecliptic reference system. The computation of the amplitude of equilibrium tide and the phase corrections is also discussed. The averaged tidal deceleration of the moon's mean motion, n, from the most recent satellite ocean tide solutions is -25.25 +/- 0.4 arcseconds/sq century. The value for n inferred from the satellite-determined ocean-tide solution is in good agreement with the value obtained from the analysis of 20 years of lunar laser-ranging observations.

  7. Space Transportation Systems Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laue, Jay H.

    2001-01-01

    This document is the final report by the Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) on contracted support provided to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) under Contract NAS8-99060, 'Space Transportation Systems Technologies'. This contract, initiated by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) on February 8, 1999, was focused on space systems technologies that directly support NASA's space flight goals. It was awarded as a Cost-Plus-Incentive-Fee (CPIF) contract to SAIC, following a competitive procurement via NASA Research Announcement, NRA 8-21. This NRA was specifically focused on tasks related to Reusable Launch Vehicles (RLVs). Through Task Area 3 (TA-3), "Other Related Technology" of this NRA contract, SAIC extensively supported the Space Transportation Directorate of MSFC in effectively directing, integrating, and setting its mission, operations, and safety priorities for future RLV-focused space flight. Following an initially contracted Base Year (February 8, 1999 through September 30, 1999), two option years were added to the contract. These were Option Year 1 (October 1, 1999 through September 30, 2000) and Option Year 2 (October 1, 2000 through September 30, 2001). This report overviews SAIC's accomplishments for the Base Year, Option Year 1, and Option Year 2, and summarizes the support provided by SAIC to the Space Transportation Directorate, NASA/MSFC.

  8. State-of-the-Art Study for High-speed Deceleration and Stabilization Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, W. C.; Lau, R. A.

    1966-01-01

    Documented aerodynamic deployable decelerator performance data above Mach 1. 0 is presented. The state of the art of drag and stability characteristics for reentry and recovery applications is defined for a wide range of decelerator configurations. Structural and material data and other design information also are presented. Emphasis is given to presentation of basic aero, thermal, and structural design data, which points out basic problem areas and voids in existing technology. The basic problems and voids include supersonic "buzzing" of towed porous decelerators in the wake of the forebody, the complete lack of dynamic stability data, and the general lack of aerothermal data at speeds above Mach 5.

  9. Advanced Operating System Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cittolin, Sergio; Riccardi, Fabio; Vascotto, Sandro

    . Our work started in the second half of 1994, with a research agreement between CERN and Chorus Systemes (France), world leader in the micro-kernel OS technology. The Chorus OS is targeted to distributed real-time applications, and it can very efficiently support different "OS personalities" in the same environment, like Posix, UNIX, and a CORBA compliant distributed object architecture. Projects are being set-up to verify the suitability of our work for LHC applications, we are building a scaled-down prototype of the DAQ system foreseen for the CMS experiment at LHC, where we will directly test our protocols and where we will be able to make measurements and benchmarks, guiding our development and allowing us to build an analytical model of the system, suitable for simulation and large scale verification.

  10. Structural System Identification Technology Verification

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-11-01

    USAAVRADCOM-TR-81-D-28Q V󈧄 ADA1091 81 LEI STRUCTURAL SYSTEM IDENTIFICATION TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION \\ N. Giansante, A. Berman, W. o. Flannelly, E...release; distribution unlimited. Prepared for APPLIED TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY U. S. ARMY RESEARCH AND TECHNOLOGY LABORATORIES (AVRADCOM) S Fort Eustis...Va. 23604 4-J" APPLI ED TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY POSITION STATEMENT The Applied Technology Laboratory has been involved in the development of the Struc

  11. Electric propulsion system technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brophy, John R.; Garner, Charles E.; Goodfellow, Keith D.

    1991-01-01

    The work performed on the Ion Propulsion System Technology Task in FY90 is described. The objectives of this work fall under two broad categories. The first of these deals with issues associated with the application of xenon ion thrusters for primary propulsion of planetary spacecraft, and the second with the investigation of technologies which will facilitate the development of larger, higher power ion thrusters to support more advanced mission applications. Most of the effort was devoted to investigation of the critical issues associated with the use of ion thrusters for planetary spacecraft. These issues may be succinctly referred to as life time, system integration, and throttling. Chief among these is the engine life time. If the engines do not have sufficient life to perform the missions of interest, then the other issues become unimportant. Ion engine life time was investigated through two experimental programs: an investigation into the reduction of ion engine internal sputter erosion through the addition of small quantities of nitrogen, and a long duration cathode life test. In addition, a literature review and analysis of accelerator grid erosion were performed. The nitrogen addition tests indicated that the addition of between 0.5 and 1.0 percent of nitrogen by mass to the xenon propellant results in a reduction in the sputter erosion of discharge chamber components by a factor of between 20 and 50, with negligible reduction in thruster performance. The long duration test of a 6.35-mm dia. xenon hollow cathode is still in progress, and has accumulated more than 4,000 hours of operation at an emission current of 25 A at the time of this writing. One of the major system integration issues concerns possible interactions of the ion thruster produced charge exchange plasma with the spacecraft. A computer model originally developed to describe the behavior of mercury ion thruster charge exchange plasmas was resurrected and modified for xenon propellant. This

  12. Fluid management system technology discipline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Symons, E. Patrick

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on fluid management system technology discipline for Space Station Freedom are presented. Topics covered include: subcritical cryogenic storage and transfer; fluid handling; and components and instrumentation.

  13. Effects of deceleration on the humoral antibody response in rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barone, R. P.; Caren, L. D.; Oyama, J.

    1985-01-01

    Effects of hypergravity, simulated by chronic centrifugation, followed by a return to normal G (deceleration) on the immune system of rats were investigated. Two groups of male rats (28 days at 2.1 G, and 3.1 G) were compared to the control group (1.0 G). The animals were immunized by i.p. injections of sheep red blood cells on days 29, 42, and 57, and bled on days 36, 47, and 62. While the centrifuged rats ate and gainedsignificantly less than the control rats, the antibody titers and the organ/body mass ratios for the adrenal glands, kidneys, lungs, heart, and thymus were unaffected by gravity exposures, as were the values of the hematocrit and the white blood cell counts. It is concluded that deceleration does not adversely affect these particular aspects of the immune system.

  14. A Method of Simulating Fluid Structure Interactions for Deformable Decelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gidzak, Vladimyr Mykhalo

    A method is developed for performing simulations that contain fluid-structure interactions between deployable decelerators and a high speed compressible flow. The problem of coupling together multiple physical systems is examined with discussion of the strength of coupling for various methods. A non-monolithic strongly coupled option is presented for fluid-structure systems based on grid deformation. A class of algebraic grid deformation methods is then presented with examples of increasing complexity. The strength of the fluid-structure coupling is validated against two analytic problems, chosen to test the time dependent behavior of structure on fluid interactions, and of fluid on structure interruptions. A one-dimentional material heating model is also validated against experimental data. Results are provided for simulations of a wind tunnel scale disk-gap-band parachute with comparison to experimental data. Finally, a simulation is performed on a flight scale tension cone decelerator, with examination of time-dependent material stress, and heating.

  15. Tragedy and delight: the ethics of decelerated ageing.

    PubMed

    Gems, David

    2011-01-12

    Biogerontology is sometimes viewed as similar to other forms of biomedical research in that it seeks to understand and treat a pathological process. Yet the prospect of treating ageing is extraordinary in terms of the profound changes to the human condition that would result. Recent advances in biogerontology allow a clearer view of the ethical issues and dilemmas that confront humanity with respect to treating ageing. For example, they imply that organismal senescence is a disease process with a broad spectrum of pathological consequences in late life (causing or exascerbating cardiovascular disease, cancer, neurodegenerative disease and many others). Moreover, in laboratory animals, it is possible to decelerate ageing, extend healthy adulthood and reduce the age-incidence of a broad spectrum of ageing-related diseases. This is accompanied by an overall extension of lifespan, sometimes of a large magnitude. Discussions of the ethics of treating ageing sometimes involve hand-wringing about detrimental consequences (e.g. to society) of marked life extension which, arguably, would be a form of enhancement technology. Yet given the great improvements in health that decelerated ageing could provide, it would seem that the only possible ethical course is to pursue it energetically. Thus, decelerated ageing has an element of tragic inevitability: its benefits to health compel us to pursue it, despite the transformation of human society, and even human nature, that this could entail.

  16. Deceleration of neutral molecules in macroscopic traveling traps

    SciTech Connect

    Osterwalder, Andreas; Meek, Samuel A.; Hammer, Georg; Haak, Henrik; Meijer, Gerard

    2010-05-15

    A decelerator is presented where polar neutral molecules are guided and decelerated using the principle of traveling electric potential wells, such that molecules are confined in stable three-dimensional traps throughout. We compare this decelerator with that of Scharfenberg et al. [Phys. Rev. A 79, 023410 (2009)] and we show that the current decelerator provides a substantially larger phase-space acceptance, even at higher acceleration. The mode of operation is described and experimentally demonstrated by guiding and decelerating CO molecules.

  17. Information technology equipment cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Mark D.

    2014-06-10

    According to one embodiment, a system for removing heat from a rack of information technology equipment may include a sidecar indoor air to liquid heat exchanger that cools warm air generated by the rack of information technology equipment. The system may also include a liquid to liquid heat exchanger and an outdoor heat exchanger. The system may further include configurable pathways to connect and control fluid flow through the sidecar heat exchanger, the liquid to liquid heat exchanger, the rack of information technology equipment, and the outdoor heat exchanger based upon ambient temperature and/or ambient humidity to remove heat from the rack of information technology equipment.

  18. Automated Fetal Heart Rate Analysis in Labor: Decelerations and Overshoots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgieva, A. E.; Payne, S. J.; Moulden, M.; Redman, C. W. G.

    2010-10-01

    Electronic fetal heart rate (FHR) recording is a standard way of monitoring fetal health in labor. Decelerations and accelerations usually indicate fetal distress and normality respectively. But one type of acceleration may differ, namely an overshoot that may atypically reflect fetal stress. Here we describe a new method for detecting decelerations, accelerations and overshoots as part of a novel system for computerized FHR analysis (OxSyS). There was poor agreement between clinicians when identifying these FHR features visually, which precluded setting a gold standard of interpretation. We therefore introduced `modified' Sensitivity (SE°) and `modified' Positive Predictive Value (PPV°) as appropriate performance measures with which the algorithm was optimized. The relation between overshoots and fetal compromise in labor was studied in 15 cases and 15 controls. Overshoots showed promise as an indicator of fetal compromise. Unlike ordinary accelerations, overshoots cannot be considered to be reassuring features of fetal health.

  19. Automated Fetal Heart Rate Analysis in Labor: Decelerations and Overshoots

    SciTech Connect

    Georgieva, A. E.; Payne, S. J.; Moulden, M.; Redman, C. W. G.

    2010-10-25

    Electronic fetal heart rate (FHR) recording is a standard way of monitoring fetal health in labor. Decelerations and accelerations usually indicate fetal distress and normality respectively. But one type of acceleration may differ, namely an overshoot that may atypically reflect fetal stress. Here we describe a new method for detecting decelerations, accelerations and overshoots as part of a novel system for computerized FHR analysis (OxSyS). There was poor agreement between clinicians when identifying these FHR features visually, which precluded setting a gold standard of interpretation. We therefore introduced 'modified' Sensitivity (SE deg.) and 'modified' Positive Predictive Value (PPV deg.) as appropriate performance measures with which the algorithm was optimized. The relation between overshoots and fetal compromise in labor was studied in 15 cases and 15 controls. Overshoots showed promise as an indicator of fetal compromise. Unlike ordinary accelerations, overshoots cannot be considered to be reassuring features of fetal health.

  20. Variable deceleration parameter and dark energy models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishi, Binaya K.

    2016-03-01

    This paper deals with the Bianchi type-III dark energy model and equation of state parameter in a first class of f(R,T) gravity. Here, R and T represents the Ricci scalar and trace of the energy momentum tensor, respectively. The exact solutions of the modified field equations are obtained by using (i) linear relation between expansion scalar and shear scalar, (ii) linear relation between state parameter and skewness parameter and (iii) variable deceleration parameter. To obtain the physically plausible cosmological models, the variable deceleration parameter with the suitable substitution leads to the scale factor of the form a(t) = [sinh(αt)] 1 n, where α and n > 0 are arbitrary constants. It is observed that our models are accelerating for 0 < n < 1 and for n > 1, transition phase from deceleration to acceleration. Further, we have discussed physical properties of the models.

  1. Asymmetry in the reconstructed deceleration parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernal, Carla; Cárdenas, Víctor H.; Motta, Veronica

    2017-02-01

    We study the orientation dependence of the reconstructed deceleration parameter as a function of redshift. We use the Union 2 and Loss datasets, and the well known preferred axis discussed in the literature, and find the best fit reconstructed deceleration parameter. Our results show that a low redshift transition of the reconstructed q (z) is clearly absent in one direction and amazingly sharp in the opposite one. We discuss the possibility that such behavior can be associated to large scale structures affecting the data.

  2. Summary of Attached Inflatable Decelerator (AID) Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    Summary of Attached Inflatable Decelerator (AID) Development. Attached inflatable decelerators (AID) were tested in an environmental chamber, a spin tunnel, and a wind tunnel. Deployment tests were conducted in environmental chamber to examine guided and unguided water alcohol vapor inflation. Subsonic performance tests were conducted in the spin tunnel. The full-scale wind tunnel was used for AID gust and supersonic performance tests. The supersonic tests were conducted at Mach number 3.0 with 12 ounces of fluid and Mach number 2.2 with six ounces of fluid. [Entire movie available on DVD from CASI as Doc ID 20070030992. Contact help@sti.nasa.gov

  3. The Challenges of Integrating Instrumentation with Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, Gregory T.; Cassell, Alan M.

    2013-01-01

    To realize the National Aeronautics and Space Administration s (NASA) goal of landing humans on Mars, development of technologies to facilitate the landing of heavy payloads are being explored. Current entry, decent, and landing technologies are not practical when utilizing these heavy payloads due to mass and volume constraints dictated by limitations imposed by current launch vehicle fairings. Therefore, past and present technologies are now being considered to provide a mass and volume efficient solution, including Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerators (IADs) [1]. IAD ground and flight tests are currently being conducted to develop and characterize their performance under flight-like conditions. The integrated instrumentation systems, which are key to the performance characterization in each of these tests, have proven to be a challenge compared to the instrumentation of traditional rigid aeroshells. To overcome these challenges, flexible and embedded sensing systems have been developed, along with improved instrumenting techniques. This development opportunity faces many difficult aspects specific to inflatable structures in extreme environments. These include but are not limited to: physical flexibility, packaging, temperature, structural integration and data acquisition [2]. To better define the instrumentation challenges posed by IAD technology development, a survey was conducted to identify valuable measurements for ground and flight testing. From this survey many sensing technologies were explored, resulting in a down-selection to the most viable prospects. These systems were then iterated upon in design to determine the best integration techniques specific to a 3m and 6m stacked torus IAD. Each sensing system was then integrated and employed to support the IAD testing in the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex 40 x 80 wind tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center in the summer of 2012. Another challenge that has been explored is the data acquisition of IAD

  4. Technology Systems. Laboratory Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brame, Ray; And Others

    This guide contains 43 modules of laboratory activities for technology education courses. Each module includes an instructor's resource sheet and the student laboratory activity. Instructor's resource sheets include some or all of the following elements: module number, course title, activity topic, estimated time, essential elements, objectives,…

  5. Technology and Value Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeCarlo, C. R.

    2010-01-01

    Everyone is living in a time in which science and technology have become pervasive and have caused the world of "nature" to be removed from one's direct senses. The rhythms of the world are beat to the cycle of machines rather than the circling of the sun. One feels the distance between old rituals grounded in myth and nature and the new and…

  6. Intelligent systems technology infrastructure for integrated systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lum, Henry, Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Significant advances have occurred during the last decade in intelligent systems technologies (a.k.a. knowledge-based systems, KBS) including research, feasibility demonstrations, and technology implementations in operational environments. Evaluation and simulation data obtained to date in real-time operational environments suggest that cost-effective utilization of intelligent systems technologies can be realized for Automated Rendezvous and Capture applications. The successful implementation of these technologies involve a complex system infrastructure integrating the requirements of transportation, vehicle checkout and health management, and communication systems without compromise to systems reliability and performance. The resources that must be invoked to accomplish these tasks include remote ground operations and control, built-in system fault management and control, and intelligent robotics. To ensure long-term evolution and integration of new validated technologies over the lifetime of the vehicle, system interfaces must also be addressed and integrated into the overall system interface requirements. An approach for defining and evaluating the system infrastructures including the testbed currently being used to support the on-going evaluations for the evolutionary Space Station Freedom Data Management System is presented and discussed. Intelligent system technologies discussed include artificial intelligence (real-time replanning and scheduling), high performance computational elements (parallel processors, photonic processors, and neural networks), real-time fault management and control, and system software development tools for rapid prototyping capabilities.

  7. Cyclist deceleration rate as surrogate safety measure in Montreal using smartphone GPS data.

    PubMed

    Strauss, Jillian; Zangenehpour, Sohail; Miranda-Moreno, Luis F; Saunier, Nicolas

    2017-02-01

    Urban areas in North American cities with positive trends in bicycle usage also witness a high number of cyclist injuries every year. Previous cyclist safety studies based on the traditional approach, which relies on historical crash data, are known to have some limitations such as the fact that crashes need to happen (a reactive approach). This paper explores the use of GPS deceleration events as a surrogate-proactive measure and investigates the relationship between reported cyclist road injuries and deceleration events. The surrogate safety measure is defined based on deceleration values representing hard breaking situations. This work uses a large sample of GPS cyclist trip data from a smartphone application to extract deceleration rates at intersections and along segments and to explore its relationship with the number of observed injuries and validate deceleration rate (DR) as a surrogate safety measure. Using Spearman's rank correlation coefficient, we compared the ranking of sites based on the expected number of injuries and based on DR. The ranks of expected injuries and dangerous decelerations were found to have a correlation of 0.60 at signalized intersections, 0.53 at non-signalized intersections and 0.57 at segments. Despite the promising results of this study, more granular data and validation work needs to be done to improve the reliability of the measures. The technological limitations and future work are discussed at the end of the paper.

  8. Instrumentation Development for Large Scale Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, Gregory T.; Cassell, Alan M.

    2011-01-01

    Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (HIAD) technology is currently being considered for multiple atmospheric entry applications as the limitations of traditional entry vehicles have been reached. The Inflatable Re-entry Vehicle Experiment (IRVE) has successfully demonstrated this technology as a viable candidate with a 3.0 m diameter vehicle sub-orbital flight. To further this technology, large scale HIADs (6.0 8.5 m) must be developed and tested. To characterize the performance of large scale HIAD technology new instrumentation concepts must be developed to accommodate the flexible nature inflatable aeroshell. Many of the concepts that are under consideration for the HIAD FY12 subsonic wind tunnel test series are discussed below.

  9. Space power systems technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coulman, George A.

    1994-01-01

    Reported here is a series of studies which examine several potential catalysts and electrodes for some fuel cell systems, some materials for space applications, and mathematical modeling and performance predictions for some solid oxide fuel cells and electrolyzers. The fuel cell systems have a potential for terrestrial applications in addition to solar energy conversion in space applications. Catalysts and electrodes for phosphoric acid fuel cell systems and for polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell and electrolyzer systems were examined.

  10. Space power systems technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulman, George A.

    1994-03-01

    Reported here is a series of studies which examine several potential catalysts and electrodes for some fuel cell systems, some materials for space applications, and mathematical modeling and performance predictions for some solid oxide fuel cells and electrolyzers. The fuel cell systems have a potential for terrestrial applications in addition to solar energy conversion in space applications. Catalysts and electrodes for phosphoric acid fuel cell systems and for polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell and electrolyzer systems were examined.

  11. Ion Accelerator With Negatively Biased Decelerator Grid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brophy, John R.

    1994-01-01

    Three-grid ion accelerator in which accelerator grid is biased at negative potential and decelerator grid downstream of accelerator grid biased at smaller negative potential. This grid and bias arrangement reduces frequency of impacts, upon accelerator grid, of charge-exchange ions produced downstream in collisions between accelerated ions and atoms and molecules of background gas. Sputter erosion of accelerator grid reduced.

  12. Analytic wave model of Stark deceleration dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Gubbels, Koos; Meijer, Gerard; Friedrich, Bretislav

    2006-06-15

    Stark deceleration relies on time-dependent inhomogeneous electric fields which repetitively exert a decelerating force on polar molecules. Fourier analysis reveals that such fields, generated by an array of field stages, consist of a superposition of partial waves with well-defined phase velocities. Molecules whose velocities come close to the phase velocity of a given wave get a ride from that wave. For a square-wave temporal dependence of the Stark field, the phase velocities of the waves are found to be odd-fraction multiples of a fundamental phase velocity {lambda}/{tau}, with {lambda} and {tau} the spatial and temporal periods of the field. Here we study explicitly the dynamics due to any of the waves as well as due to their mutual perturbations. We first solve the equations of motion for the case of single-wave interactions and exploit their isomorphism with those for the biased pendulum. Next we analyze the perturbations of the single-wave dynamics by other waves and find that these have no net effect on the phase stability of the acceleration or deceleration process. Finally, we find that a packet of molecules can also ride a wave which results from an interference of adjacent waves. In this case, small phase stability areas form around phase velocities that are even-fraction multiples of the fundamental velocity. A detailed comparison with classical trajectory simulations and with experiment demonstrates that the analytic 'wave model' encompasses all the longitudinal physics encountered in a Stark decelerator.

  13. Safer Roadside Crash Walls Would Limit Deceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, William C.; Locke, James P.

    2003-01-01

    The figure depicts the aspects of a proposed deceleration-limiting design for crash walls at the sides of racetracks and highways. The proposal is intended to overcome the disadvantages of both rigid barriers and kinetic-energy-absorbing barriers of prior design. Rigid barriers can keep high-speed crashing motor vehicles from leaving roadways and thereby prevent injury to nearby persons and objects, but they can also subject the occupants of the vehicles to deceleration levels high enough to cause injury or death. Kinetic-energy-absorbing barriers of prior design reduce deceleration levels somewhat, but are not designed to soften impacts optimally; moreover, some of them allow debris to bounce back onto roadways or onto roadside areas, and, in cases of glancingly incident vehicles, some of them can trap the vehicles in such a manner as to cause more injury than would occur if the vehicles were allowed to skid along the rigid barriers. The proposed crash walls would (1) allow tangentially impacting vehicles to continue sliding along the racetrack without catching them, (2) catch directly impacting vehicles to prevent them from injuring nearby persons and objects, and (3) absorb kinetic energy in a more nearly optimum way to limit decelerations to levels that human occupants could survive.

  14. Turbulent pipe flows subjected to temporal decelerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Wongwan; Lee, Jae Hwa

    2016-11-01

    Direct numerical simulations of temporally decelerating turbulent pipe flows were performed to examine effects of temporal decelerations on turbulence. The simulations were started with a fully developed turbulent pipe flow at a Reynolds number, ReD =24380, based on the pipe radius (R) and the laminar centerline velocity (Uc 0). Three different temporal decelerations were imposed to the initial flow with f= | d Ub / dt | =0.00127, 0.00625 and 0.025, where Ub is the bulk mean velocity. Comparison of Reynolds stresses and turbulent production terms with those for steady flow at a similar Reynolds number showed that turbulence is highly intensified with increasing f due to delay effects. Furthermore, inspection of the Reynolds shear stress profiles showed that strong second- and fourth-quadrant Reynolds shear stresses are greatly increased, while first- and third-quadrant components are also increased. Decomposition of streamwise Reynolds normal stress with streamwise cutoff wavelength (λx) 1 R revealed that the turbulence delay is dominantly originated from delay of strong large-scale turbulent structures in the outer layer, although small-scale motions throughout the wall layer adjusted more rapidly to the temporal decelerations. This research was supported by Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education (NRF-2014R1A1A2057031).

  15. Millimeter radiometer system technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, W. J.; Swanson, P. N.

    1989-01-01

    JPL has had a large amount of experience with spaceborne microwave/millimeter wave radiometers for remote sensing. All of the instruments use filled aperture antenna systems from 5 cm diameter for the microwave Sounder Units (MSU), 16 m for the microwave limb sounder (MLS) to 20 m for the large deployable reflector (LDR). The advantages of filled aperture antenna systems are presented. The requirements of the 10 m Geoplat antenna system, 10 m multified antenna, and the MLS are briefly discussed.

  16. Bantam System Technology Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moon, J. M.; Beveridge, J. R.

    1998-01-01

    This report focuses on determining a best value, low risk, low cost and highly reliable Data and Command System for support of the launch of low cost vehicles which are to carry small payloads into low earth orbit. The ground-based DCS is considered as a component of the overall ground and flight support system which includes the DCS, flight computer, mission planning system and simulator. Interfaces between the DCS and these other component systems are considered. Consideration is also given to the operational aspects of the mission and of the DCS selected. This project involved: defining requirements, defining an efficient operations concept, defining a DCS architecture which satisfies the requirements and concept, conducting a market survey of commercial and government off-the-shelf DCS candidate systems and rating the candidate systems against the requirements/concept. The primary conclusions are that several low cost, off-the-shelf DCS solutions exist and these can be employed to provide for very low cost operations and low recurring maintenance cost. The primary recommendation is that the DCS design/specification should be integrated within the ground and flight support system design as early as possible to ensure ease of interoperability and efficient allocation of automation functions among the component systems.

  17. Exoskeletal technology. [teleoperator arm system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vykukal, H. C.

    1974-01-01

    Possible applications are considered of a master-sleeve teleoperator arm system, developed in exoskeletal space suit technology, as therapeutic aid, orthotic device, or for therapy on patients with neurological disorders.

  18. Thermal control system technology discipline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, Wilbert E.

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on thermal control systems technology discipline for Space Station Freedom are presented. Topics covered include: heat rejection; heat acquisition and transport; monitoring and control; passive thermal control; and analysis and test verification.

  19. Measurement of ultra-low ion energy of decelerated ion beam using a deflecting electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thopan, P.; Suwannakachorn, D.; Tippawan, U.; Yu, L. D.

    2015-12-01

    In investigation on ultra-low-energy ion bombardment effect on DNA, an ion beam deceleration lens was developed for high-quality ultra-low-energy ion beam. Measurement of the ion energy after deceleration was necessary to confirm the ion beam really decelerated as theoretically predicted. In contrast to conventional methods, this work used a simple deflecting electrostatic field after the deceleration lens to bend the ion beam. The beam bending distance depended on the ion energy and was described and simulated. A system for the measurement of the ion beam energy was constructed. It consisted of a pair of parallel electrode plates to generate the deflecting electrical field, a copper rod measurement piece to detect ion beam current, a vernier caliper to mark the beam position, a stepping motor to translate the measurement rod, and a webcam-camera to read the beam bending distance. The entire system was installed after the ion-beam deceleration lens inside the large chamber of the bioengineering vertical ion beam line. Moving the measurement rod across the decelerated ion beam enabled to obtain beam profiles, from which the beam bending distance could be known and the ion beam energy could be calculated. The measurement results were in good agreement with theoretical and simulated results.

  20. Post-Flight Aerodynamic and Aerothermal Model Validation of a Supersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Chun; Muppidi, Suman; Bose, Deepak; Van Norman, John W.; Tanimoto, Rebekah; Clark, Ian

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Low Density Supersonic Decelerator Program is developing new technologies that will enable the landing of heavier payloads in low density environments, such as Mars. A recent flight experiment conducted high above the Hawaiian Islands has demonstrated the performance of several decelerator technologies. In particular, the deployment of the Robotic class Supersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (SIAD-R) was highly successful, and valuable data were collected during the test flight. This paper outlines the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis used to estimate the aerodynamic and aerothermal characteristics of the SIAD-R. Pre-flight and post-flight predictions are compared with the flight data, and a very good agreement in aerodynamic force and moment coefficients is observed between the CFD solutions and the reconstructed flight data.

  1. 30 CFR 56.19062 - Maximum acceleration and deceleration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Maximum acceleration and deceleration. 56.19062... Hoisting Hoisting Procedures § 56.19062 Maximum acceleration and deceleration. Maximum normal operating acceleration and deceleration shall not exceed 6 feet per second per second. During emergency braking,...

  2. 30 CFR 57.19062 - Maximum acceleration and deceleration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Maximum acceleration and deceleration. 57.19062... Hoisting Hoisting Procedures § 57.19062 Maximum acceleration and deceleration. Maximum normal operating acceleration and deceleration shall not exceed 6 feet per second per second. During emergency braking,...

  3. 30 CFR 57.19062 - Maximum acceleration and deceleration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Maximum acceleration and deceleration. 57.19062... Hoisting Hoisting Procedures § 57.19062 Maximum acceleration and deceleration. Maximum normal operating acceleration and deceleration shall not exceed 6 feet per second per second. During emergency braking,...

  4. 30 CFR 56.19062 - Maximum acceleration and deceleration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Maximum acceleration and deceleration. 56.19062... Hoisting Hoisting Procedures § 56.19062 Maximum acceleration and deceleration. Maximum normal operating acceleration and deceleration shall not exceed 6 feet per second per second. During emergency braking,...

  5. 30 CFR 57.19062 - Maximum acceleration and deceleration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Maximum acceleration and deceleration. 57.19062... Hoisting Hoisting Procedures § 57.19062 Maximum acceleration and deceleration. Maximum normal operating acceleration and deceleration shall not exceed 6 feet per second per second. During emergency braking,...

  6. 30 CFR 56.19062 - Maximum acceleration and deceleration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Maximum acceleration and deceleration. 56.19062... Hoisting Hoisting Procedures § 56.19062 Maximum acceleration and deceleration. Maximum normal operating acceleration and deceleration shall not exceed 6 feet per second per second. During emergency braking,...

  7. 30 CFR 57.19062 - Maximum acceleration and deceleration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Maximum acceleration and deceleration. 57.19062... Hoisting Hoisting Procedures § 57.19062 Maximum acceleration and deceleration. Maximum normal operating acceleration and deceleration shall not exceed 6 feet per second per second. During emergency braking,...

  8. 30 CFR 56.19062 - Maximum acceleration and deceleration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Maximum acceleration and deceleration. 56.19062... Hoisting Hoisting Procedures § 56.19062 Maximum acceleration and deceleration. Maximum normal operating acceleration and deceleration shall not exceed 6 feet per second per second. During emergency braking,...

  9. 30 CFR 56.19062 - Maximum acceleration and deceleration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Maximum acceleration and deceleration. 56.19062... Hoisting Hoisting Procedures § 56.19062 Maximum acceleration and deceleration. Maximum normal operating acceleration and deceleration shall not exceed 6 feet per second per second. During emergency braking,...

  10. 30 CFR 57.19062 - Maximum acceleration and deceleration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Maximum acceleration and deceleration. 57.19062... Hoisting Hoisting Procedures § 57.19062 Maximum acceleration and deceleration. Maximum normal operating acceleration and deceleration shall not exceed 6 feet per second per second. During emergency braking,...

  11. Large Space Antenna Systems Technology, 1984

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyer, W. J. (Compiler)

    1985-01-01

    Mission applications for large space antenna systems; large space antenna structural systems; materials and structures technology; structural dynamics and control technology, electromagnetics technology, large space antenna systems and the Space Station; and flight test and evaluation were examined.

  12. Distributed Systems Technology Survey.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-03-01

    Local mra netwoes are a ot- etlihe my of shing mane to more eupensive and Ame freqetl use resources we lasr ~eir an W"g d"sks a Ufa as a meons fo users...each directory entry, and can provide detailt acces contl through an Inheritance mechanism. Noe that an sams control mechanism presupposes some method ...use workstation disks most ofecdivey. One succeslul method , used in the Cedar file system (321, considers a shared flies to be imtiable (read-on

  13. Water Treatment Technology - Distribution Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross-Harrington, Melinda; Kincaid, G. David

    One of twelve water treatment technology units, this student manual on distribution systems provides instructional materials for six competencies. (The twelve units are designed for a continuing education training course for public water supply operators.) The competencies focus on the following areas: types of pipe for distribution systems, types…

  14. Nanowire systems: technology and design

    PubMed Central

    Gaillardon, Pierre-Emmanuel; Amarù, Luca Gaetano; Bobba, Shashikanth; De Marchi, Michele; Sacchetto, Davide; De Micheli, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Nanosystems are large-scale integrated systems exploiting nanoelectronic devices. In this study, we consider double independent gate, vertically stacked nanowire field effect transistors (FETs) with gate-all-around structures and typical diameter of 20 nm. These devices, which we have successfully fabricated and evaluated, control the ambipolar behaviour of the nanostructure by selectively enabling one type of carriers. These transistors work as switches with electrically programmable polarity and thus realize an exclusive or operation. The intrinsic higher expressive power of these FETs, when compared with standard complementary metal oxide semiconductor technology, enables us to realize more efficient logic gates, which we organize as tiles to realize nanowire systems by regular arrays. This article surveys both the technology for double independent gate FETs as well as physical and logic design tools to realize digital systems with this fabrication technology. PMID:24567471

  15. Project MX-981: John Paul Stapp and Deceleration Research.

    PubMed

    Chandler, R F

    2001-11-01

    Project MX-981, Effects of Deceleration Forces of High Magnitude on Man, was initiated in 1945 by the U.S. Army Air Force Aero Medical Laboratory at Wright Field, Ohio to confirm the feasibility of a "40 g" crash restraint system for pilots of military aircraft. Captain John Paul Stapp, MD, was selected to carry out this work. This paper provides historical background and perspective for that project, and summarizes Dr. Stapp's work on that Project at Edwards AFB, California, and his subsequent tests at Holloman AFB, New Mexico.

  16. Overview of the Mars Science Laboratory Parachute Decelerator Subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sengupta, Anita; Steltzner, Adam; Witkowski, Al; Rowan, Jerry; Cruz, Juan

    2007-01-01

    In 2010 the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission will deliver NASA's largest and most capable rover to the surface of Mars. MSL will explore previously unattainable landing sites due to the implementation of a high precision Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) system. The parachute decelerator subsystem (PDS) is an integral prat of the EDL system, providing a mass and volume efficient some of aerodynamic drag to decelerate the entry vehicle from Mach 2 to subsonic speeds prior to final propulsive descent to the sutface. The PDS for MSL is a mortar deployed 19.7m Viking type Disk-Gap-Band (DGB) parachute; chosen to meet the EDL timeline requirements and to utilize the heritage parachute systems from Viking, Mars Pathfinder, Mars Exploration Rover, and Phoenix NASA Mars Lander Programs. The preliminary design of the parachute soft goods including materials selection, stress analysis, fabrication approach, and development testing will be discussed. The preliminary design of mortar deployment system including mortar system sizing and performance predictions, gas generator design, and development mortar testing will also be presented.

  17. Advanced Technology Lifecycle Analysis System (ATLAS) Technology Tool Box (TTB)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doyle, Monica; ONeil, Daniel A.; Christensen, Carissa B.

    2005-01-01

    The Advanced Technology Lifecycle Analysis System (ATLAS) is a decision support tool designed to aid program managers and strategic planners in determining how to invest technology research and development dollars. It is an Excel-based modeling package that allows a user to build complex space architectures and evaluate the impact of various technology choices. ATLAS contains system models, cost and operations models, a campaign timeline and a centralized technology database. Technology data for all system models is drawn from a common database, the ATLAS Technology Tool Box (TTB). The TTB provides a comprehensive, architecture-independent technology database that is keyed to current and future timeframes.

  18. Hydrogen energy systems technology study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, J. H.

    1975-01-01

    The paper discusses the objectives of a hydrogen energy systems technology study directed toward determining future demand for hydrogen based on current trends and anticipated new uses and identifying the critical research and technology advancements required to meet this need with allowance for raw material limitations, economics, and environmental effects. Attention is focused on historic production and use of hydrogen, scenarios used as a basis for projections, projections of energy sources and uses, supply options, and technology requirements and needs. The study found more than a billion dollar annual usage of hydrogen, dominated by chemical-industry needs, supplied mostly from natural gas and petroleum feedstocks. Evaluation of the progress in developing nuclear fusion and solar energy sources relative to hydrogen production will be necessary to direct the pace and character of research and technology work in the advanced water-splitting areas.

  19. Static Trapping of Polar Molecules in a Traveling Wave Decelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quintero-Pérez, Marina; Jansen, Paul; Wall, Thomas E.; van den Berg, Joost E.; Hoekstra, Steven; Bethlem, Hendrick L.

    2013-03-01

    We present experiments on decelerating and trapping ammonia molecules using a combination of a Stark decelerator and a traveling wave decelerator. In the traveling wave decelerator, a moving potential is created by a series of ring-shaped electrodes to which oscillating high voltages (HV) are applied. By lowering the frequency of the applied voltages, the molecules confined in the moving trap are decelerated and brought to a standstill. As the molecules are confined in a true 3D well, this kind of deceleration has practically no losses, resulting in a great improvement on the usual Stark deceleration techniques. The necessary voltages are generated by amplifying the output of an arbitrary wave generator using fast HV amplifiers, giving us great control over the trapped molecules. We illustrate this by experiments in which we adiabatically cool trapped NH3 and ND3 molecules and resonantly excite their motion.

  20. Low Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD) Supersonic Flight Dynamics Test (SFDT) Plume Induced Environment Modelling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mobley, B. L.; Smith, S. D.; Van Norman, J. W.; Muppidi, S.; Clark, I

    2016-01-01

    Provide plume induced heating (radiation & convection) predictions in support of the LDSD thermal design (pre-flight SFDT-1) Predict plume induced aerodynamics in support of flight dynamics, to achieve targeted freestream conditions to test supersonic deceleration technologies (post-flight SFDT-1, pre-flight SFDT-2)

  1. Intelligent systems technology infrastructure for integrated systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lum, Henry

    1991-01-01

    A system infrastructure must be properly designed and integrated from the conceptual development phase to accommodate evolutionary intelligent technologies. Several technology development activities were identified that may have application to rendezvous and capture systems. Optical correlators in conjunction with fuzzy logic control might be used for the identification, tracking, and capture of either cooperative or non-cooperative targets without the intensive computational requirements associated with vision processing. A hybrid digital/analog system was developed and tested with a robotic arm. An aircraft refueling application demonstration is planned within two years. Initially this demonstration will be ground based with a follow-on air based demonstration. System dependability measurement and modeling techniques are being developed for fault management applications. This involves usage of incremental solution/evaluation techniques and modularized systems to facilitate reuse and to take advantage of natural partitions in system models. Though not yet commercially available and currently subject to accuracy limitations, technology is being developed to perform optical matrix operations to enhance computational speed. Optical terrain recognition using camera image sequencing processed with optical correlators is being developed to determine position and velocity in support of lander guidance. The system is planned for testing in conjunction with Dryden Flight Research Facility. Advanced architecture technology is defining open architecture design constraints, test bed concepts (processors, multiple hardware/software and multi-dimensional user support, knowledge/tool sharing infrastructure), and software engineering interface issues.

  2. Large Space Antenna Systems Technology, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lightner, E. B. (Compiler)

    1983-01-01

    A compilation of the unclassified papers presented at the NASA Conference on Large Space Antenna Systems Technology covers the following areas: systems, structures technology, control technology, electromagnetics, and space flight test and evaluation.

  3. Comparison of Analysis with Test for Static Loading of Two Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyle, Karen H.

    2015-01-01

    Acceptance of new spacecraft structural architectures and concepts requires validated design methods to minimize the expense involved with technology demonstration via flight-testing. Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (HIAD) architectures are attractive for spacecraft deceleration because they are lightweight, store compactly, and utilize the atmosphere to decelerate a spacecraft during entry. However, designers are hesitant to include these inflatable approaches for large payloads or spacecraft because of the lack of flight validation. This publication summarizes results comparing analytical results with test data for two concepts subjected to representative entry, static loading. The level of agreement and ability to predict the load distribution is considered sufficient to enable analytical predictions to be used in the design process.

  4. Preliminary Structural Sensitivity Study of Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator Using Probabilistic Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyle, Karen H.

    2014-01-01

    Acceptance of new spacecraft structural architectures and concepts requires validated design methods to minimize the expense involved with technology validation via flighttesting. This paper explores the implementation of probabilistic methods in the sensitivity analysis of the structural response of a Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (HIAD). HIAD architectures are attractive for spacecraft deceleration because they are lightweight, store compactly, and utilize the atmosphere to decelerate a spacecraft during re-entry. However, designers are hesitant to include these inflatable approaches for large payloads or spacecraft because of the lack of flight validation. In the example presented here, the structural parameters of an existing HIAD model have been varied to illustrate the design approach utilizing uncertainty-based methods. Surrogate models have been used to reduce computational expense several orders of magnitude. The suitability of the design is based on assessing variation in the resulting cone angle. The acceptable cone angle variation would rely on the aerodynamic requirements.

  5. Advanced High-Temperature Flexible TPS for Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DelCorso, Joseph A.; Cheatwood, F. McNeil; Bruce, Walter E., III; Hughes, Stephen J.; Calomino, Anthony M.

    2011-01-01

    Typical entry vehicle aeroshells are limited in size by the launch vehicle shroud. Inflatable aerodynamic decelerators allow larger aeroshell diameters for entry vehicles because they are not constrained to the launch vehicle shroud diameter. During launch, the hypersonic inflatable aerodynamic decelerator (HIAD) is packed in a stowed configuration. Prior to atmospheric entry, the HIAD is deployed to produce a drag device many times larger than the launch shroud diameter. The large surface area of the inflatable aeroshell provides deceleration of high-mass entry vehicles at relatively low ballistic coefficients. Even for these low ballistic coefficients there is still appreciable heating, requiring the HIAD to employ a thermal protection system (TPS). This TPS must be capable of surviving the heat pulse, and the rigors of fabrication handling, high density packing, deployment, and aerodynamic loading. This paper provides a comprehensive overview of flexible TPS tests and results, conducted over the last three years. This paper also includes an overview of each test facility, the general approach for testing flexible TPS, the thermal analysis methodology and results, and a comparison with 8-foot High Temperature Tunnel, Laser-Hardened Materials Evaluation Laboratory, and Panel Test Facility test data. Results are presented for a baseline TPS layup that can withstand a 20 W/cm2 heat flux, silicon carbide (SiC) based TPS layup, and polyimide insulator TPS layup. Recent work has focused on developing material layups expected to survive heat flux loads up to 50 W/cm2 (which is adequate for many potential applications), future work will consider concepts capable of withstanding more than 100 W/cm2 incident radiant heat flux. This paper provides an overview of the experimental setup, material layup configurations, facility conditions, and planned future flexible TPS activities.

  6. Large space systems technology, 1980, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopriver, F., III (Compiler)

    1981-01-01

    The technological and developmental efforts in support of the large space systems technology are described. Three major areas of interests are emphasized: (1) technology pertient to large antenna systems; (2) technology related to large space systems; and (3) activities that support both antenna and platform systems.

  7. Formation and nonlinear dynamics of the squeezed state of a helical electron beam with additional deceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Egorov, E. N. Koronovskii, A. A.; Kurkin, S. A.; Hramov, A. E.

    2013-11-15

    Results of numerical simulations and analysis of the formation and nonlinear dynamics of the squeezed state of a helical electron beam in a vircator with a magnetron injection gun as an electron source and with additional electron deceleration are presented. The ranges of control parameters where the squeezed state can form in such a system are revealed, and specific features of the system dynamics are analyzed. It is shown that the formation of a squeezed state of a nonrelativistic helical electron beam in a system with electron deceleration is accompanied by low-frequency longitudinal dynamics of the space charge.

  8. Evaluating geographic information systems technology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guptill, Stephen C.

    1989-01-01

    Computerized geographic information systems (GISs) are emerging as the spatial data handling tools of choice for solving complex geographical problems. However, few guidelines exist for assisting potential users in identifying suitable hardware and software. A process to be followed in evaluating the merits of GIS technology is presented. Related standards and guidelines, software functions, hardware components, and benchmarking are discussed. By making users aware of all aspects of adopting GIS technology, they can decide if GIS is an appropriate tool for their application and, if so, which GIS should be used.

  9. Stopping power: Effect of the projectile deceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Kompaneets, Roman Ivlev, Alexei V.; Morfill, Gregor E.

    2014-11-15

    The stopping force is the force exerted on the projectile by its wake. Since the wake does not instantly adjust to the projectile velocity, the stopping force should be affected by the projectile deceleration caused by the stopping force itself. We address this effect by deriving the corresponding correction to the stopping force in the cold plasma approximation. By using the derived expression, we estimate that if the projectile is an ion passing through an electron-proton plasma, the correction is small when the stopping force is due to the plasma electrons, but can be significant when the stopping force is due to the protons.

  10. Effects of 1980 technology on weight of a recovery system for a one million pound booster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckstrom, C. V.

    1975-01-01

    The effects were evaluated of 1980 technology on the weight of recovery systems capable of decelerating a one-million-pound booster to vertical velocities of 60 or 30 ft/sec at sea level impact. A nominal set of booster staging conditions were assumed and there were no constraints on parachute size, number or type. The effects of new materials that would be available by 1980, the effects of booster attitude during entry, various parachute staging methods, parachute reefing schemes, parachute-retro rocket hybrid systems, and the effects of dividing the booster into separate pieces for recovery were evaluated. It was determined that for the systems considered, a hybrid parachute-retro-rocket recovery system would have the minimum weight. New materials now becoming available for parachute fabrication should result in a 37-percent reduction in hybrid recovery system weight for an impact velocity of 30 fps.

  11. The Mars Exploration Rovers Entry Descent and Landing and the Use of Aerodynamic Decelerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steltzner, Adam; Desai, Prasun; Lee, Wayne; Bruno, Robin

    2003-01-01

    The Mars Exploration Rovers (MER) project, the next United States mission to the surface of Mars, uses aerodynamic decelerators in during its entry, descent and landing (EDL) phase. These two identical missions (MER-A and MER-B), which deliver NASA s largest mobile science suite to date to the surface of Mars, employ hypersonic entry with an ablative energy dissipating aeroshell, a supersonic/subsonic disk-gap-band parachute and an airbag landing system within EDL. This paper gives an overview of the MER EDL system and speaks to some of the challenges faced by the various aerodynamic decelerators.

  12. Threat expert system technology advisor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurrasch, E. R.; Tripp, L. R.

    1987-01-01

    A prototype expert system was developed to determine the feasibility of using expert system technology to enhance the performance and survivability of helicopter pilots in a combat threat environment while flying NOE (Nap of the Earth) missions. The basis for the concept is the potential of using an Expert System Advisor to reduce the extreme overloading of the pilot who flies NOE mission below treetop level at approximately 40 knots while performing several other functions. The ultimate goal is to develop a Threat Expert System Advisor which provides threat information and advice that are better than even a highly experienced copilot. The results clearly show that the NOE pilot needs all the help in decision aiding and threat situation awareness that he can get. It clearly shows that heuristics are important and that an expert system for combat NOE helicopter missions can be of great help to the pilot in complex threat situations and in making decisions.

  13. Periodic components of hand acceleration/deceleration impulses during telemanipulation

    SciTech Connect

    Draper, J.V.; Handel, S.

    1994-01-01

    Responsiveness is the ability of a telemanipulator to recreate user trajectories and impedance in time and space. For trajectory production, a key determinant of responsiveness is the ability of the system to accept user inputs, which are forces on the master handle generated by user hand acceleration/deceleration (a/d) impulses, and translate them into slave arm acceleration/deceleration. This paper presents observations of master controller a/d impulses during completion of a simple target acquisition task. Power spectral density functions (PSDF`s) calculated from hand controller a/d impulses were used to assess impulse waveform. The relative contributions of frequency intervals ranging up to 25 Hz for three spatially different versions of the task were used to determine which frequencies were most important. The highest relative power was observed in frequencies between 1 Hz and 6 Hz. The key frequencies related to task difficulty were in the range from 2 Hz to 8 Hz. the results provide clues to the source of the performance inhibition.

  14. Estimating Mass of Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerators Using Dimensionless Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samareh, Jamshid A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a technique for estimating mass for inflatable aerodynamic decelerators. The technique uses dimensional analysis to identify a set of dimensionless parameters for inflation pressure, mass of inflation gas, and mass of flexible material. The dimensionless parameters enable scaling of an inflatable concept with geometry parameters (e.g., diameter), environmental conditions (e.g., dynamic pressure), inflation gas properties (e.g., molecular mass), and mass growth allowance. This technique is applicable for attached (e.g., tension cone, hypercone, and stacked toroid) and trailing inflatable aerodynamic decelerators. The technique uses simple engineering approximations that were developed by NASA in the 1960s and 1970s, as well as some recent important developments. The NASA Mars Entry and Descent Landing System Analysis (EDL-SA) project used this technique to estimate the masses of the inflatable concepts that were used in the analysis. The EDL-SA results compared well with two independent sets of high-fidelity finite element analyses.

  15. Deceleration efficiencies of shrub windbreaks in a wind tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaoxu; Zou, Xueyong; Zhou, Na; Zhang, Chunlai; Shi, Sha

    2015-03-01

    Artemisia and Salix are dominant shrub species for windbreaks in arid areas of China, and they show similar features to shrubs in other arid areas of the world. We compared the mean velocity fields and shelter effects of two shrub windbreaks with different layouts. For a single plant of Artemisia, the higher the free airflow velocity is, the more the wind velocity around two sides of the plant increases. The velocity gradient around a single plant of Salix is smaller than that around an Artemisia plant due to the difference in the plant shapes. Seven new velocity zones in the horizontal direction appear when airflow passes through an Artemisia windbreak, including four deceleration zones and three acceleration zones. The mean velocity field that is affected by a Salix windbreak can be divided into a deceleration zone in the front, an acceleration zone above, a vortex zone behind and a restoration zone downwind of the vortex zone. Shelter effects of the shrub windbreaks vary with the wind velocity and are influenced by the construct of the windbreaks. Shrub windbreaks that have a complex construction have better shelter effects than simple ones. The shelter effects of plant windbreaks are also influenced by the growth features of the plants. Considering the plant characteristics and the shelter effects of Salix and Artemisia windbreaks, it is optimal to plant these two windbreaks together in a sand-control system. This research is intended to be useful for sand movement control in arid areas.

  16. Getting a grip on the transverse motion in a Zeeman decelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Dulitz, Katrin; Softley, Timothy P.; Motsch, Michael; Vanhaecke, Nicolas

    2014-03-14

    Zeeman deceleration is an experimental technique in which inhomogeneous, time-dependent magnetic fields generated inside an array of solenoid coils are used to manipulate the velocity of a supersonic beam. A 12-stage Zeeman decelerator has been built and characterized using hydrogen atoms as a test system. The instrument has several original features including the possibility to replace each deceleration coil individually. In this article, we give a detailed description of the experimental setup, and illustrate its performance. We demonstrate that the overall acceptance in a Zeeman decelerator can be significantly increased with only minor changes to the setup itself. This is achieved by applying a rather low, anti-parallel magnetic field in one of the solenoid coils that forms a temporally varying quadrupole field, and improves particle confinement in the transverse direction. The results are reproduced by three-dimensional numerical particle trajectory simulations thus allowing for a rigorous analysis of the experimental data. The findings suggest the use of a modified coil configuration to improve transverse focusing during the deceleration process.

  17. Intelligent Systems Technologies for Ops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Ernest E.; Korsmeyer, David J.

    2012-01-01

    As NASA supports International Space Station assembly complete operations through 2020 (or later) and prepares for future human exploration programs, there is additional emphasis in the manned spaceflight program to find more efficient and effective ways of providing the ground-based mission support. Since 2006 this search for improvement has led to a significant cross-fertilization between the NASA advanced software development community and the manned spaceflight operations community. A variety of mission operations systems and tools have been developed over the past decades as NASA has operated the Mars robotic missions, the Space Shuttle, and the International Space Station. NASA Ames Research Center has been developing and applying its advanced intelligent systems research to mission operations tools for both unmanned Mars missions operations since 2001 and to manned operations with NASA Johnson Space Center since 2006. In particular, the fundamental advanced software development work under the Exploration Technology Program, and the experience and capabilities developed for mission operations systems for the Mars surface missions, (Spirit/Opportunity, Phoenix Lander, and MSL) have enhanced the development and application of advanced mission operation systems for the International Space Station and future spacecraft. This paper provides an update on the status of the development and deployment of a variety of intelligent systems technologies adopted for manned mission operations, and some discussion of the planned work for Autonomous Mission Operations in future human exploration. We discuss several specific projects between the Ames Research Center and the Johnson Space Centers Mission Operations Directorate, and how these technologies and projects are enhancing the mission operations support for the International Space Station, and supporting the current Autonomous Mission Operations Project for the mission operation support of the future human exploration

  18. Supersonic Decelerator on 'Right Track' for Future Mars Missions

    NASA Video Gallery

    Project Manager, Mark Adler, and Principal Investigator, Ian Clark describe the innovative testing being conducted by the Low Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD) project. Combining very large sup...

  19. Aerodynamic Heating and Deceleration During Entry into Planetary Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    Aerodynamic Heating and Deceleration During Entry into Planetary Atmospheres. Dr. Chapman's lecture examines the physics behind spacecraft entry into planetary atmospheres. He explains how scientists determine if a planet has an atmosphere and how scientists can compute deceleration when the atmospheric conditions are unknown. Symbols and equations used for calculations for aerodynamic heating and deceleration are provided. He also explains heat transfer in bodies approaching an atmosphere, deceleration, and the use of ablation in protecting spacecraft from high temperatures during atmospheric entry. [Entire movie available on DVD from CASI as Doc ID 20070030962. Contact help@sti.nasa.gov

  20. Large Space Systems Technology, Part 2, 1981

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyer, W. J. (Compiler)

    1982-01-01

    Four major areas of interest are covered: technology pertinent to large antenna systems; technology related to the control of large space systems; basic technology concerning structures, materials, and analyses; and flight technology experiments. Large antenna systems and flight technology experiments are described. Design studies, structural testing results, and theoretical applications are presented with accompanying validation data. These research studies represent state-of-the art technology that is necessary for the development of large space systems. A total systems approach including structures, analyses, controls, and antennas is presented as a cohesive, programmatic plan for large space systems.

  1. Entry, Descent, and Landing With Propulsive Deceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaszewski, Bryan

    2012-01-01

    The future exploration of the Solar System will require innovations in transportation and the use of entry, descent, and landing (EDL) systems at many planetary landing sites. The cost of space missions has always been prohibitive, and using the natural planetary and planet s moons atmospheres for entry, descent, and landing can reduce the cost, mass, and complexity of these missions. This paper will describe some of the EDL ideas for planetary entry and survey the overall technologies for EDL that may be attractive for future Solar System missions.

  2. Quantum technologies with hybrid systems

    PubMed Central

    Kurizki, Gershon; Bertet, Patrice; Kubo, Yuimaru; Mølmer, Klaus; Petrosyan, David; Rabl, Peter; Schmiedmayer, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    An extensively pursued current direction of research in physics aims at the development of practical technologies that exploit the effects of quantum mechanics. As part of this ongoing effort, devices for quantum information processing, secure communication, and high-precision sensing are being implemented with diverse systems, ranging from photons, atoms, and spins to mesoscopic superconducting and nanomechanical structures. Their physical properties make some of these systems better suited than others for specific tasks; thus, photons are well suited for transmitting quantum information, weakly interacting spins can serve as long-lived quantum memories, and superconducting elements can rapidly process information encoded in their quantum states. A central goal of the envisaged quantum technologies is to develop devices that can simultaneously perform several of these tasks, namely, reliably store, process, and transmit quantum information. Hybrid quantum systems composed of different physical components with complementary functionalities may provide precisely such multitasking capabilities. This article reviews some of the driving theoretical ideas and first experimental realizations of hybrid quantum systems and the opportunities and challenges they present and offers a glance at the near- and long-term perspectives of this fascinating and rapidly expanding field. PMID:25737558

  3. Quantum technologies with hybrid systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurizki, Gershon; Bertet, Patrice; Kubo, Yuimaru; Mølmer, Klaus; Petrosyan, David; Rabl, Peter; Schmiedmayer, Jörg

    2015-03-01

    An extensively pursued current direction of research in physics aims at the development of practical technologies that exploit the effects of quantum mechanics. As part of this ongoing effort, devices for quantum information processing, secure communication, and high-precision sensing are being implemented with diverse systems, ranging from photons, atoms, and spins to mesoscopic superconducting and nanomechanical structures. Their physical properties make some of these systems better suited than others for specific tasks; thus, photons are well suited for transmitting quantum information, weakly interacting spins can serve as long-lived quantum memories, and superconducting elements can rapidly process information encoded in their quantum states. A central goal of the envisaged quantum technologies is to develop devices that can simultaneously perform several of these tasks, namely, reliably store, process, and transmit quantum information. Hybrid quantum systems composed of different physical components with complementary functionalities may provide precisely such multitasking capabilities. This article reviews some of the driving theoretical ideas and first experimental realizations of hybrid quantum systems and the opportunities and challenges they present and offers a glance at the near- and long-term perspectives of this fascinating and rapidly expanding field.

  4. Quantum technologies with hybrid systems.

    PubMed

    Kurizki, Gershon; Bertet, Patrice; Kubo, Yuimaru; Mølmer, Klaus; Petrosyan, David; Rabl, Peter; Schmiedmayer, Jörg

    2015-03-31

    An extensively pursued current direction of research in physics aims at the development of practical technologies that exploit the effects of quantum mechanics. As part of this ongoing effort, devices for quantum information processing, secure communication, and high-precision sensing are being implemented with diverse systems, ranging from photons, atoms, and spins to mesoscopic superconducting and nanomechanical structures. Their physical properties make some of these systems better suited than others for specific tasks; thus, photons are well suited for transmitting quantum information, weakly interacting spins can serve as long-lived quantum memories, and superconducting elements can rapidly process information encoded in their quantum states. A central goal of the envisaged quantum technologies is to develop devices that can simultaneously perform several of these tasks, namely, reliably store, process, and transmit quantum information. Hybrid quantum systems composed of different physical components with complementary functionalities may provide precisely such multitasking capabilities. This article reviews some of the driving theoretical ideas and first experimental realizations of hybrid quantum systems and the opportunities and challenges they present and offers a glance at the near- and long-term perspectives of this fascinating and rapidly expanding field.

  5. NASA Technology Area 1: Launch Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McConnaughey, Paul; Femminineo, Mark; Koelfgen, Syri; Lepsch, Roger; Ryan, Richard M.; Taylor, Steven A.

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the technology advancements plans for the NASA Technology Area 1, Launch Propulsion Systems Technology Area (LPSTA). The draft roadmap reviews various propulsion system technologies that will be developed during the next 25 + years. This roadmap will be reviewed by the National Research Council which will issue a final report, that will include findings and recommendations.

  6. Fluid management systems technology summaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stark, J. A.; Blatt, M. H.; Bennett, F. O., Jr.; Campbell, B. J.

    1974-01-01

    A summarization and categorization of the pertinent literature associated with fluid management systems technology having potential application to in-orbit fluid transfer and/or associated storage are presented. A literature search was conducted to obtain pertinent documents for review. Reports determined to be of primary significance were summarized in the following manner: (1) report identification, (2) objective(s) of the work, (3) description of pertinent work performed, (4) major results, and (5) comments of the reviewer. Pertinent figures are presented on a single facing page separate from the text. Specific areas covered are: fluid line dynamics and thermodynamics, low-g mass gauging, other instrumentation, stratification/pressurization, low-g vent systems, fluid mixing refrigeration and reliquefaction, and low-g interface control and liquid acquisition systems. Reports which were reviewed and not summarized, along with reasons for not summarizing, are also listed.

  7. Balloon launched decelerator test program: Post-test test report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickinson, D.; Schlemmer, J.; Hicks, F.; Michel, F.; Moog, R. D.

    1972-01-01

    Balloon Launched Decelerator Test (BLDT) flights were conducted during the summer of 1972 over the White Sands Missile Range. The purpose of these tests was to qualify the Viking disk-gap band parachute system behind a full-scale simulator of the Viking Entry Vehicle over the maximum range of entry conditions anticipated in the Viking '75 soft landing on Mars. Test concerns centered on the ability of a minimum weight parachute system to operate without structural damage in the turbulent wake of the blunt-body entry vehicle (140 deg, 11.5 diameter cone). This is the first known instance of parachute operation at supersonic speeds in the wake of such a large blunt body. The flight tests utilized the largest successful balloon-payload weight combination known to get to high altitude (120kft) where rocket engines were employed to boost the test vehicle to supersonic speeds and dynamic pressures simulating the range of conditions on Mars.

  8. Holocene deceleration of the Greenland Ice Sheet.

    PubMed

    MacGregor, Joseph A; Colgan, William T; Fahnestock, Mark A; Morlighem, Mathieu; Catania, Ginny A; Paden, John D; Gogineni, S Prasad

    2016-02-05

    Recent peripheral thinning of the Greenland Ice Sheet is partly offset by interior thickening and is overprinted on its poorly constrained Holocene evolution. On the basis of the ice sheet's radiostratigraphy, ice flow in its interior is slower now than the average speed over the past nine millennia. Generally higher Holocene accumulation rates relative to modern estimates can only partially explain this millennial-scale deceleration. The ice sheet's dynamic response to the decreasing proportion of softer ice from the last glacial period and the deglacial collapse of the ice bridge across Nares Strait also contributed to this pattern. Thus, recent interior thickening of the Greenland Ice Sheet is partly an ongoing dynamic response to the last deglaciation that is large enough to affect interpretation of its mass balance from altimetry.

  9. Collective Deceleration: Toward a Compact Beam Dump

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, H.-C.; Tajima, T.; Habs, D.; Chao, A.W.; Meyer-ter-Vehn, J.; /Munich, Max Planck Inst. Quantenopt.

    2011-11-28

    With the increasing development of laser accelerators, the electron energy is already beyond GeV and even higher in near future. Conventional beam dump based on ionization or radiation loss mechanism is cumbersome and costly, also has radiological hazards. We revisit the stopping power of high-energy charged particles in matter and discuss the associated problem of beam dump from the point of view of collective deceleration. The collective stopping length in an ionized gas can be several orders of magnitude shorter than the Bethe-Bloch and multiple electromagnetic cascades stopping length in solid. At the mean time, the tenuous density of the gas makes the radioactivation negligible. Such a compact and non-radioactivating beam dump works well for short and dense bunches, which is typically generated from laser wakefield accelerator.

  10. Holocene deceleration of the Greenland Ice Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacGregor, Joseph A.; Colgan, William T.; Fahnestock, Mark A.; Morlighem, Mathieu; Catania, Ginny A.; Paden, John D.; Gogineni, S. Prasad

    2016-02-01

    Recent peripheral thinning of the Greenland Ice Sheet is partly offset by interior thickening and is overprinted on its poorly constrained Holocene evolution. On the basis of the ice sheet’s radiostratigraphy, ice flow in its interior is slower now than the average speed over the past nine millennia. Generally higher Holocene accumulation rates relative to modern estimates can only partially explain this millennial-scale deceleration. The ice sheet’s dynamic response to the decreasing proportion of softer ice from the last glacial period and the deglacial collapse of the ice bridge across Nares Strait also contributed to this pattern. Thus, recent interior thickening of the Greenland Ice Sheet is partly an ongoing dynamic response to the last deglaciation that is large enough to affect interpretation of its mass balance from altimetry.

  11. Case of extreme growth deceleration after burns.

    PubMed

    Bline, Cheryl; Dylewski, Maggie L; Driscoll, Daniel N; Fuzaylov, Gennadiy

    2014-05-01

    Studies have demonstrated deceleration in both weight and height following burns in children. It is expected patients will display catch up growth and return to normal weight within three years but continued height deficiency may remain in cases of severe burns. We describe a case of severe growth retardation of 8 years old orphan child from Ukraine who suffered of burn less than 40% of total body surface area when he was a 3 years of life. His case was complicated by domestic abuse, neglect and limited medical care. He initially presented to the United States for surgical care of his contractures but his treatment quickly focused on his profound growth retardation. Despite aggressive nutritional supplementation and evaluation he did not demonstrate any weight gain.

  12. Large Space Antenna Systems Technology, 1984

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyer, W. J. (Compiler)

    1985-01-01

    Papers are presented which provide a comprehensive review of space missions requiring large antenna systems and of the status of key technologies required to enable these missions. Topic areas include mission applications for large space antenna systems, large space antenna structural systems, materials and structures technology, structural dynamics and control technology, electromagnetics technology, large space antenna systems and the space station, and flight test and evaluation.

  13. Changes in Acceleration and Deceleration Capacity Throughout Professional Soccer Match-Play.

    PubMed

    Russell, Mark; Sparkes, William; Northeast, Jonny; Cook, Christian J; Love, Tom D; Bracken, Richard M; Kilduff, Liam P

    2016-10-01

    Russell, M, Sparkes, W, Northeast, J, Cook, CJ, Love, TD, Bracken, RM, and Kilduff, LP. Changes in acceleration and deceleration capacity throughout professional soccer match-play. J Strength Cond Res 30(10): 2839-2844, 2016-As the acceleration and deceleration demands of soccer are currently not well understood, this study aimed to profile markers of acceleration and deceleration capacity during professional soccer match-play. This within-player observational study required reserve team players from a Premier League club to wear 10-Hz Global Positioning System units throughout competitive matches played in the 2013-14 competitive season. Data are presented for players who completed 4 or more games during the season (n = 11), and variables are presented according to six 15-minute intervals (I1-6: 00:00-14:59 minutes, 15:00-29:59 minutes, 30:00-44:59 minutes, 45:00-59:59 minutes, 60:00-74:59 minutes, and 75:00-89:59 minutes, respectively). During I6, the distance covered (total, per minute, and at high intensity), number of sprints, accelerations (total and high intensity), decelerations (total and high intensity), and impacts were reduced compared with I1 (all p ≤ 0.05). The number of high-intensity impacts remained unchanged throughout match-play (p > 0.05). These findings indicate that high-intensity actions and markers of acceleration and deceleration capacity are reduced in the last 15 minutes of the normal duration of match-play. Such information can be used to increase the specificity of training programs designed for soccer players while also giving further insight in to the effects of 90 minutes of soccer-specific exercise. Interventions that seek to maintain the acceleration and deceleration capacity of players throughout the full duration of a soccer match warrant investigation.

  14. 40 CFR 1066.265 - Acceleration and deceleration verification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Acceleration and deceleration...) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS VEHICLE-TESTING PROCEDURES Dynamometer Specifications § 1066.265 Acceleration... ability to achieve targeted acceleration and deceleration rates. Paragraph (c) of this section...

  15. 40 CFR 1066.265 - Acceleration and deceleration verification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Acceleration and deceleration...) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS VEHICLE-TESTING PROCEDURES Dynamometer Specifications § 1066.265 Acceleration... ability to achieve targeted acceleration and deceleration rates. Paragraph (c) of this section...

  16. 40 CFR 1066.265 - Acceleration and deceleration verification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Acceleration and deceleration...) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS VEHICLE-TESTING PROCEDURES Dynamometer Specifications § 1066.265 Acceleration... ability to achieve targeted acceleration and deceleration rates. Paragraph (c) of this section...

  17. Lightweight, variable solidity knitted parachute fabric. [for aerodynamic decelerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthews, F. R., Jr.; White, E. C. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A parachute fabric for aerodynamic decelerator applications is described. The fabric will permit deployment of the decelerator at high altitudes and low density conditions. The fabric consists of lightweight, highly open, circular knitted parachute fabric with ribbon-like yarns to assist in air deflection.

  18. Higher-order resonances in a Stark decelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Meerakker, Sebastiaan Y.T. van de; Bethlem, Hendrick L.; Vanhaecke, Nicolas; Meijer, Gerard

    2005-05-15

    The motion of polar molecules can be controlled by time-varying inhomogeneous electric fields. In a Stark decelerator, this is exploited to select a fraction of a molecular beam that is accelerated, transported, or decelerated. Phase stability ensures that the selected bunch of molecules is kept together throughout the deceleration process. In this paper an extended description of phase stability in a Stark decelerator is given, including higher-order effects. This analysis predicts a wide variety of resonances that originate from the spatial and temporal periodicity of the electric fields. These resonances are experimentally observed using a beam of OH ({sup 2}{pi}{sub 3/2},v=0,J=3/2) radicals passing through a Stark decelerator.

  19. Speed Profiles for Deceleration Guidance During Rollout and Turnoff (ROTO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, L. Keith; Hankins, Walter W., III; Hueschen, Richard M.

    1999-01-01

    Two NASA goals are to enhance airport safety and to improve capacity in all weather conditions. This paper contributes to these goals by examining speed guidance profiles to aid a pilot in decelerating along the runway to an exit. A speed profile essentially tells the pilot what the airplane's speed should be as a function of where the airplane is on the runway. While it is important to get off the runway as soon as possible (when striving to minimize runway occupancy time), the deceleration along a speed profile should be constrained by passenger comfort. Several speed profiles are examined with respect to their maximum decelerations and times to reach exit speed. One profile varies speed linearly with distance; another has constant deceleration; and two related nonlinear profiles delay maximum deceleration (braking) to reduce time spent on the runway.

  20. An Assessment of Integrated Flywheel System Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keckler, C. R. (Editor); Bechtel, R. T. (Editor); Groom, N. J. (Editor)

    1984-01-01

    The current state of the technology in flywheel storage systems and ancillary components, the technology in light of future requirements, and technology development needs to rectify these shortfalls were identified. Technology efforts conducted in Europe and in the United States were reviewed. Results of developments in composite material rotors, magnetic suspension systems, motor/generators and electronics, and system dynamics and control were presented. The technology issues for the various disciplines and technology enhancement scenarios are discussed. A summary of the workshop, and conclusions and recommendations are presented.

  1. NASA's Launch Propulsion Systems Technology Roadmap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McConnaughey, Paul K.; Femminineo, Mark G.; Koelfgen, Syri J.; Lepsch, Roger A; Ryan, Richard M.; Taylor, Steven A.

    2012-01-01

    Safe, reliable, and affordable access to low-Earth (LEO) orbit is necessary for all of the United States (US) space endeavors. In 2010, NASA s Office of the Chief Technologist commissioned 14 teams to develop technology roadmaps that could be used to guide the Agency s and US technology investment decisions for the next few decades. The Launch Propulsion Systems Technology Area (LPSTA) team was tasked to address the propulsion technology challenges for access to LEO. The developed LPSTA roadmap addresses technologies that enhance existing solid or liquid propulsion technologies and their related ancillary systems or significantly advance the technology readiness level (TRL) of less mature systems like airbreathing, unconventional, and other launch technologies. In developing this roadmap, the LPSTA team consulted previous NASA, military, and industry studies as well as subject matter experts to develop their assessment of this field, which has fundamental technological and strategic impacts for US space capabilities.

  2. Making Technology Ready: Integrated Systems Health Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malin, Jane T.; Oliver, Patrick J.

    2007-01-01

    This paper identifies work needed by developers to make integrated system health management (ISHM) technology ready and by programs to make mission infrastructure ready for this technology. This paper examines perceptions of ISHM technologies and experience in legacy programs. Study methods included literature review and interviews with representatives of stakeholder groups. Recommendations address 1) development of ISHM technology, 2) development of ISHM engineering processes and methods, and 3) program organization and infrastructure for ISHM technology evolution, infusion and migration.

  3. An Evaluation of Enhanced Geothermal Systems Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Jelacic, Allan; Fortuna, Raymond; LaSala, Raymond; Nathwani, Jay; Nix, Gerald; Visser, Charles; Green, Bruce; Renner, Joel; Blankenship, Douglas; Kennedy, Mack; Bruton, Carol

    2008-04-01

    This 2008 document presents the results of an eight-month study by the Department of Energy (DOE) and its support staff at the national laboratories concerning the technological requirements to commercialize a new geothermal technology, Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS).

  4. Micromachining technology for advanced weapon systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sniegowski, J.J.

    1996-12-31

    An overview of planned uses for polysilicon surface-micromachining technology in advanced weapon systems is presented. Specifically, this technology may allow consideration of fundamentally new architectures for realization of surety component functions.

  5. Structures Technology for Future Aerospace Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K.; Venneri, Samuel L.; Paul, Donald B.; Hopkins, Mark A.

    2000-01-01

    An overview of structures technology for future aerospace systems is given. Discussion focuses on developments in component technologies that will improve the vehicle performance, advance the technology exploitation process, and reduce system life-cycle costs. The component technologies described are smart materials and structures, multifunctional materials and structures, affordable composite structures, extreme environment structures, flexible load bearing structures, and computational methods and simulation-based design. The trends in each of the component technologies are discussed and the applicability of these technologies to future aerospace vehicles is described.

  6. Technology reviews: Dynamic curtain wall systems

    SciTech Connect

    Schuman, J.; Rubinstein, F.; Papamichael, K.; Beltran, L.; Lee, E.S.; Selkowitz, S.

    1992-09-01

    We present a representative review of existing, emerging, and future technology options in each of five hardware and systems areas in envelope and lighting technologies: lighting systems, glazing systems, shading systems, daylighting optical systems, and dynamic curtain wall systems. The term technology is used here to describe any design choice for energy efficiency, ranging from individual components to more complex systems to general design strategies. The purpose of this task is to characterize die state of the art in envelope and lighting technologies in order to identify those with promise for advanced integrated systems, with an emphasis on California commercial buildings. For each technology category, the following activities have been attempted to the extent possible: Identify key performance characteristics and criteria for each technology. Determine the performance range of available technologies. Identify the most promising technologies and promising trends in technology advances. Examine market forces and market trends. Develop a continuously growing in-house database to be used throughout the project. A variety of information sources have been used in these technology characterizations, including miscellaneous periodicals, manufacturer catalogs and cut sheets, other research documents, and data from previous computer simulations. We include these different sources in order to best show the type and variety of data available, however publication here does not imply our guarantee of these data. Within each category, several broad classes are identified, and within each class we examine the generic individual technologies that fall into that class.

  7. Design, manufacture, and testing of the Armstrong Hall drop tower decelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ocampo, Jaime Andres

    A decelerator was needed for the Armstrong Hall Microgravity tower. Three designs were considered as concepts and the one chosen was an airbag. The airbag is 5 feet tall and 4.5 feet in diameter due to floor constraints. The deceleration was controlled by designing the vent system to provide the needed vent area as a function of time. This dynamics vent area controls the rate at which volume is expelled from the airbag. The volume expelled depends on the pressure inside the airbag, thus, a direct relation between the vent area and the deceleration profile was determined. The airbag and associated infrastructure was designed, manufactured, and tested. This system includes an airbag with a cushion on top to prevent wear, cart and rails, a drop package, and a latch and release system. More than forty tests were done with different drop height and drop weight combinations culminating in three drops of 200 lbs from the third floor. The drop weight was varied by adjusting the water level in a plastic barrel in the drop package. Pressure measurements inside the bag and vent were taken using two pressure transducers. The pressure transducers sampled the pressure at one of the exit vents and at the center of the bottom of the airbag. The signals were low-pass filtered for noise and scaled for pressure. The pressure traces were processed to find the mean deceleration. The deceleration was found to be independent of drop weight, only depending on drop height. The traces were also integrated to find a momentum per unit area. This value was then compared to the momentum of the drop package. From these two results an effective impact area can be found. It was found that the cushion not only reduced wear but also increased the effective impact area substantially. This increase in area reduced the value of the mean deceleration by reducing the pressure inside the airbag. The airbag proved to work well for the drops, decelerating the package and preventing a direct hit with the

  8. The blast wave mitigation effects of a magnetogasdynamic decelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Baty, Roy S; Lundgren, Ronald G; Tucker, Don H

    2009-01-01

    This work computes shock wave jump functions for viscous blast waves propagating in a magnetogasdynamic decelerator. The decelerator is assumed to be a one-dimensional channel with sides that are perfect conductors. An electric field applied on the walls of the channel produces a magnetogasdynamic pump, which decelerates the flow field induced by a blast wave. The blast wave jump functions computed here are compared to magnetogasdynamic results for steady supersonic channel flow to quantify potential blast mitigation effects. Theoretical shock wave jump functions are also presented for inviscid blast waves propagating in a one-dimensional channel with an electromagnetic field.

  9. Evaluation of pump characteristic from measurement of fast deceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Himr, Daniel; Habán, Vladimír

    2015-05-01

    Article describes an experiment where a pump connected to the simple hydraulic circuit is decelerated. Since the deceleration is fast enough the operating point of the machine moves from the initial steady position to the breaking zone, turbine zone and back to the new steady position. A dependence of the specific energy and the torque on the flow rate was evaluated from the measurement of the input and output pressure, torque and rotational speed recorded during the deceleration. Obtained characteristic is much wider than curves obtained from regular measurement of steady state.

  10. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT, NOX CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES, CATALYTICA COMBUSTION SYSTEMS, INC., XONON FLAMELESS COMBUSTION SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Environmental Technology Verification report discusses the technology and performance of the Xonon Cool Combustion System manufactured by Catalytica Energy Systems, Inc., formerly Catalytica Combustion Systems, Inc., to control NOx emissions from gas turbines that operate wit...

  11. Dynamic response of a poroelastic half-space to accelerating or decelerating trains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Zhigang; Boström, Anders

    2013-05-01

    The dynamic response of a fully saturated poroelastic half-space due to accelerating or decelerating trains is investigated by a semi-analytical method. The ground is modeled as a saturated poroelastic half-space and Biot's theory is applied to characterize the soil medium, taking the coupling effects between the soil skeleton and the pore fluid into account. A detailed track system is considered incorporating rails, sleepers and embankment, which are modeled as Euler-Bernoulli beams, an anisotropic Kirchhoff plate, and an elastic layer, respectively. The acceleration or deceleration of the train is simulated by properly choosing the time history of the train speed using Fourier transforms combined with Fresnel integrals in the transformed domain. The time domain results are obtained by the fast Fourier transform (FFT). It is found that the deceleration of moving trains can cause a significant increase to the ground vibrations as well as the excess pore water pressure responses at the train speed 200 km/h. Furthermore, the single-phase elastic soil model would underestimate the vertical displacement responses caused by both the accelerating and decelerating trains at the speed 200 km/h.

  12. Information technology security system engineering methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Childs, D.

    2003-01-01

    A methodology is described for system engineering security into large information technology systems under development. The methodology is an integration of a risk management process and a generic system development life cycle process. The methodology is to be used by Security System Engineers to effectively engineer and integrate information technology security into a target system as it progresses through the development life cycle. The methodology can also be used to re-engineer security into a legacy system.

  13. Categorization of Fetal Heart Rate Decelerations in American and European Practice: Importance and Imperative of Avoiding Framing and Confirmation Biases.

    PubMed

    Sholapurkar, Shashikant L

    2015-09-01

    Interpretation of electronic fetal monitoring (EFM) remains controversial and unsatisfactory. Fetal heart rate (FHR) decelerations are the commonest aberrant feature on cardiotocographs and considered "center-stage" in the interpretation of EFM. A recent American study suggested that the lack of correlation of American three-tier system to neonatal acidemia may be due to the current peculiar nomenclature of FHR decelerations leading to loss of meaning. The pioneers like Hon and Caldeyro-Barcia classified decelerations based primarily on time relationship to contractions and not on etiology per se. This critical analysis debates pros and cons of significant anchoring/framing and confirmation biases in defining different types of decelerations based primarily on the shape (slope) or time of descent. It would be important to identify benign early decelerations correctly to avoid unnecessary intervention as well as to improve the positive predictive value of the other types of decelerations. Currently the vast majority of decelerations are classed as "variable". This review shows that the most common rapid decelerations during contractions with trough corresponding to peak of contraction cannot be explained by "cord-compression" hypothesis but by direct/pure (defined here as not mediated through baro-/chemoreceptors) or non-hypoxic vagal reflex. These decelerations are benign, most likely and mainly a result of head-compression and hence should be called "early" rather than "variable". Standardization is important but should be appropriate and withstand scientific scrutiny. Significant framing and confirmation biases are necessarily unscientific and the succeeding three-tier interpretation systems and structures embodying these biases would be dysfunctional and clinically unhelpful. Clinical/pathophysiological analysis and avoidance of flaws/biases suggest that a more physiological and scientific categorization of decelerations should be based on time relationship to

  14. Categorization of Fetal Heart Rate Decelerations in American and European Practice: Importance and Imperative of Avoiding Framing and Confirmation Biases

    PubMed Central

    Sholapurkar, Shashikant L.

    2015-01-01

    Interpretation of electronic fetal monitoring (EFM) remains controversial and unsatisfactory. Fetal heart rate (FHR) decelerations are the commonest aberrant feature on cardiotocographs and considered “center-stage” in the interpretation of EFM. A recent American study suggested that the lack of correlation of American three-tier system to neonatal acidemia may be due to the current peculiar nomenclature of FHR decelerations leading to loss of meaning. The pioneers like Hon and Caldeyro-Barcia classified decelerations based primarily on time relationship to contractions and not on etiology per se. This critical analysis debates pros and cons of significant anchoring/framing and confirmation biases in defining different types of decelerations based primarily on the shape (slope) or time of descent. It would be important to identify benign early decelerations correctly to avoid unnecessary intervention as well as to improve the positive predictive value of the other types of decelerations. Currently the vast majority of decelerations are classed as “variable”. This review shows that the most common rapid decelerations during contractions with trough corresponding to peak of contraction cannot be explained by “cord-compression” hypothesis but by direct/pure (defined here as not mediated through baro-/chemoreceptors) or non-hypoxic vagal reflex. These decelerations are benign, most likely and mainly a result of head-compression and hence should be called “early” rather than “variable”. Standardization is important but should be appropriate and withstand scientific scrutiny. Significant framing and confirmation biases are necessarily unscientific and the succeeding three-tier interpretation systems and structures embodying these biases would be dysfunctional and clinically unhelpful. Clinical/pathophysiological analysis and avoidance of flaws/biases suggest that a more physiological and scientific categorization of decelerations should be based on

  15. Passenger comfort technology for system decision making

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conner, D. W.

    1980-01-01

    Decisions requiring passenger comfort technology were shown to depend on: the relationship between comfort and other factors (e.g., cost, urgency, alternate modes) in traveler acceptance of the systems, serving a selected market require technology to quantify effects of comfort versus offsetting factors in system acceptance. Public predict the maximum percentage of travelers who willingly accept the overall comfort of any trip ride. One or the other of these technology requirements apply to decisions on system design, operation and maintenance.

  16. Physics at CERN’s Antiproton Decelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hori, M.; Walz, J.

    2013-09-01

    The Antiproton Decelerator (AD) facility of CERN began operation in 1999 to serve experiments for studies of CPT invariance by precision laser and microwave spectroscopy of antihydrogen (Hbar ) and antiprotonic helium (pbar He) atoms. The first 12 years of AD operation saw cold Hbar synthesized by overlapping clouds of positrons (e+) and antiprotons (pbar ) confined in magnetic Penning traps. Cold Hbar was also produced in collisions between Rydberg positronium (Ps) atoms and pbar . Ground-state Hbar was later trapped for up to ˜1000 s in a magnetic bottle trap, and microwave transitions excited between its hyperfine levels. In the pbar He atom, deep ultraviolet transitions were measured to a fractional precision of (2.3-5)×10-9 by sub-Doppler two-photon laser spectroscopy. From this the antiproton-to-electron mass ratio was determined as M/me=1836.1526736(23), which agrees with the p value known to a similar precision. Microwave spectroscopy of pbar He yielded a measurement of the pbar magnetic moment with a precision of 0.3%. More recently, the magnetic moment of a single pbar confined in a Penning trap was measured with a higher precision, as μ=-2.792845(12)μ in nuclear magnetons. Other results reviewed here include the first measurements of the energy loss (-dE/dx) of 1-100 keV pbar traversing conductor and insulator targets; the cross sections of low-energy (<10 keV) pbar ionizing atomic and molecular gas targets; and the cross sections of 5 MeV pbar annihilating on various target foils via nuclear collisions. The biological effectiveness of pbar beams destroying cancer cells was measured as a possible method for radiological therapy. New experiments under preparation attempt to measure the gravitational acceleration of Hbar or synthesize H. Several other future experiments will also be briefly described.

  17. ODIN system technology module library, 1972 - 1973

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hague, D. S.; Watson, D. A.; Glatt, C. R.; Jones, R. T.; Galipeau, J.; Phoa, Y. T.; White, R. J.

    1978-01-01

    ODIN/RLV is a digital computing system for the synthesis and optimization of reusable launch vehicle preliminary designs. The system consists of a library of technology modules in the form of independent computer programs and an executive program, ODINEX, which operates on the technology modules. The technology module library contains programs for estimating all major military flight vehicle system characteristics, for example, geometry, aerodynamics, economics, propulsion, inertia and volumetric properties, trajectories and missions, steady state aeroelasticity and flutter, and stability and control. A general system optimization module, a computer graphics module, and a program precompiler are available as user aids in the ODIN/RLV program technology module library.

  18. Advanced technologies for turbomachinery systems: An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, M. J.

    1982-01-01

    Turbomachinery system components and associated technologies are discussed. Specific technologies reviewed include the compressor, turbine, internal flow analysis methods, combustion, fuels, materials, structures, bearings, seals, and lubrication, dynamics and controls, and instrumentation. Analytical procedures as a path to improved performance are discussed. The strong interaction between the various technologies if turbomachinery performance gains are to be realized is reflected.

  19. Unfulfilled technology needs in space power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slifer, L. W., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Major power system technology development needs related to the solution of currently existing problems are defined. The identified problems were initially listed and categorized by technical area. They were then translated into terms of technology development requirements and consolidated where commonality was found. From these requirements, a set of ten specific recommendations for technology development was formulated.

  20. Cardiac Deceleration in Newborns: Habituation, Dishabituation, and Offset Responses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adkinson, Cheryl D.; Berg, W. Keith

    1976-01-01

    A total of 20 neonates were presented with mild intensity blue or blue-green light during presentation of habituation and dishabituation stimuli. Orienting and defensive responses were measured by monitoring heart rate deceleration. (GO)

  1. Advanced technologies to support earth orbiting systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, Robert; Johnston, Gordon I.

    1992-01-01

    Within NASA, the Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology (OAST) is conducting a major, ongoing engineering research and technology program directed toward the support of future programs, with a major focus on technology for future space science missions. OAST is conducting a substantial effort to identify the technologies required to support the evolution of Mission to Planet Earth. The effort consists of studies, workshops, and technology research programs to explore: (1) new concepts for multisatellite, earth-observing instrumentation and sensor sets; (2) information system advances for continuous and reliable processing of terabit per day data streams; and (3) infrastructure development, including spacecraft bus technology and operations for substantial performance, cost, and reliabiltiy gains. This paper discusses the technological needs of future earth science systems, reviews current and planned activities, and highlights significant achievements in the research and technology program.

  2. Commercial application of thermal protection system technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyer, Gordon L.

    1991-01-01

    The thermal protection system process technology is examined which is used in the manufacture of the External Tank for the Space Shuttle system and how that technology is applied by private business to create new products, new markets, and new American jobs. The term 'technology transfer' means different things to different people and has become one of the buzz words of the 1980s and 1990s. Herein, technology transfer is defined as a means of transferring technology developed by NASA's prime contractors to public and private sector industries.

  3. Drift-induced Deceleration of Solar Energetic Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalla, S.; Marsh, M. S.; Laitinen, T.

    2015-07-01

    We investigate the deceleration of solar energetic particles (SEPs) during their propagation from the Sun through interplanetary space, in the presence of weak to strong scattering in a Parker spiral configuration, using relativistic full orbit test particle simulations. The calculations retain all three spatial variables describing particles’ trajectories, allowing us to model any transport across the magnetic field. Large energy change is shown to occur for protons, due to the combined effect of standard adiabatic deceleration and a significant contribution from particle drift in the direction opposite to that of the solar wind electric field. The latter drift-induced deceleration is found to have a stronger effect for SEP energies than for galactic cosmic rays. The kinetic energy of protons injected at 1 MeV is found to be reduced by between 35% and 90% after four days, and for protons injected at 100 MeV by between 20% and 55%. The overall degree of deceleration is a weak function of the scattering mean free path, showing that, although adiabatic deceleration plays a role, a large contribution is due to particle drift. Current SEP transport models are found to account for drift-induced deceleration in an approximate way and their accuracy will need to be assessed in future work.

  4. Teaching Embedded System Concepts for Technological Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winzker, M.; Schwandt, A.

    2011-01-01

    A basic understanding of technology is recognized as important knowledge even for students not connected with engineering and computer science. This paper shows that embedded system concepts can be taught in a technological literacy course. An embedded system teaching block that has been used in an electronics module for non-engineers is…

  5. NASA helicopter transmission system technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaretsky, E. V.

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of the NASA Helicopter Transmission System Technology Program is to improve specific mechanical components and the technology for combining these into advanced drive systems to make helicopters more viable and cost competitive for commerical applications. The history, goals, and elements of the program are discussed.

  6. Systems Engineering Programmatic Estimation Using Technology Variance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mog, Robert A.

    2000-01-01

    Unique and innovative system programmatic estimation is conducted using the variance of the packaged technologies. Covariance analysis is performed on the subsystems and components comprising the system of interest. Technological "return" and "variation" parameters are estimated. These parameters are combined with the model error to arrive at a measure of system development stability. The resulting estimates provide valuable information concerning the potential cost growth of the system under development.

  7. Systems Engineering Programmatic Estimation Using Technology Variance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mog, Robert A.

    2000-01-01

    Unique and innovative system programmatic estimation is conducted using the variance of the packaged technologies. Covariance analysis is performed oil the subsystems and components comprising the system of interest. Technological "returns" and "variation" parameters, are estimated. These parameters are combined with the model error to arrive at a measure of system development stability. The resulting estimates provide valuable information concerning the potential cost growth of the system under development.

  8. Towards G2G: Systems of Technology Database Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maluf, David A.; Bell, David

    2005-01-01

    We present an approach and methodology for developing Government-to-Government (G2G) Systems of Technology Database Systems. G2G will deliver technologies for distributed and remote integration of technology data for internal use in analysis and planning as well as for external communications. G2G enables NASA managers, engineers, operational teams and information systems to "compose" technology roadmaps and plans by selecting, combining, extending, specializing and modifying components of technology database systems. G2G will interoperate information and knowledge that is distributed across organizational entities involved that is ideal for NASA future Exploration Enterprise. Key contributions of the G2G system will include the creation of an integrated approach to sustain effective management of technology investments that supports the ability of various technology database systems to be independently managed. The integration technology will comply with emerging open standards. Applications can thus be customized for local needs while enabling an integrated management of technology approach that serves the global needs of NASA. The G2G capabilities will use NASA s breakthrough in database "composition" and integration technology, will use and advance emerging open standards, and will use commercial information technologies to enable effective System of Technology Database systems.

  9. Entry, Descent, and Landing with Propulsive Deceleration: Supersonic Retropropulsion Wind Tunnel Testing and Shock Phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaszewski, Bryan

    2014-01-01

    The future exploration of the Solar System will require innovations in transportation and the use of entry, descent, and landing (EDL) systems at many planetary landing sites. The cost of space missions has always been prohibitive, and using the natural planetary and planet's moon atmospheres for entry, and descent can reduce the cost, mass, and complexity of these missions. This paper will describe some of the EDL ideas for planetary entry and survey the overall technologies for EDL that may be attractive for future Solar System missions. Future EDL systems may include an inflatable decelerator for the initial atmospheric entry and an additional supersonic retropropulsion (SRP) rocket system for the final soft landing. A three engine retropropulsion configuration with a 2.5 in. diameter sphere-cone aeroshell model was tested in the NASA Glenn Research Center's 1- by 1-ft (1×1) Supersonic Wind Tunnel (SWT). The testing was conducted to identify potential blockage issues in the tunnel, and visualize the rocket flow and shock interactions during supersonic and hypersonic entry conditions. Earlier experimental testing of a 70deg Viking-like (sphere-cone) aeroshell was conducted as a baseline for testing of a SRP system. This baseline testing defined the flow field around the aeroshell and from this comparative baseline data, retropropulsion options will be assessed. Images and analyses from the SWT testing with 300- and 500-psia rocket engine chamber pressures are presented here. In addition, special topics of electromagnetic interference with retropropulsion induced shock waves and retropropulsion for Earth launched booster recovery are also addressed.

  10. Entry, Descent, and Landing with Propulsive Deceleration: Supersonic Retropropulsion Wind Tunnel Testing and Shock Phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaszewski, Bryan

    2013-01-01

    The future exploration of the Solar System will require innovations in transportation and the use of entry, descent, and landing (EDL) systems at many planetary landing sites. The cost of space missions has always been prohibitive, and using the natural planetary and planet's moon atmospheres for entry, and descent can reduce the cost, mass, and complexity of these missions. This paper will describe some of the EDL ideas for planetary entry and survey the overall technologies for EDL that may be attractive for future Solar System missions. Future EDL systems may include an inflatable decelerator for the initial atmospheric entry and an additional supersonic retro-propulsion (SRP) rocket system for the final soft landing. A three engine retro-propulsion configuration with a 2.5 inch diameter sphere-cone aeroshell model was tested in the NASA Glenn 1x1 Supersonic Wind Tunnel (SWT). The testing was conducted to identify potential blockage issues in the tunnel, and visualize the rocket flow and shock interactions during supersonic and hypersonic entry conditions. Earlier experimental testing of a 70 degree Viking-like (sphere-cone) aeroshell was conducted as a baseline for testing of a supersonic retro-propulsion system. This baseline testing defined the flow field around the aeroshell and from this comparative baseline data, retro-propulsion options will be assessed. Images and analyses from the SWT testing with 300- and 500-psia rocket engine chamber pressures are presented here. In addition, special topics of electromagnetic interference with retro-propulsion induced shock waves and retro-propulsion for Earth launched booster recovery are also addressed.

  11. Entry, Descent, and Landing With Propulsive Deceleration: Supersonic Retropropulsion Wind Tunnel Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaszewski, Bryan

    2012-01-01

    The future exploration of the Solar System will require innovations in transportation and the use of entry, descent, and landing (EDL) systems at many planetary landing sites. The cost of space missions has always been prohibitive, and using the natural planetary and planet s moons atmosphere for entry, descent, and landing can reduce the cost, mass, and complexity of these missions. This paper will describe some of the EDL ideas for planetary entry and survey the overall technologies for EDL that may be attractive for future Solar System missions. Future EDL systems may include an inflatable decelerator for the initial atmospheric entry and an additional supersonic retro-propulsion (SRP) rocket system for the final soft landing. As part of those efforts, NASA began to conduct experiments to gather the experimental data to make informed decisions on the "best" EDL options. A model of a three engine retro-propulsion configuration with a 2.5 in. diameter sphere-cone aeroshell model was tested in the NASA Glenn 1- by 1-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel (SWT). The testing was conducted to identify potential blockage issues in the tunnel, and visualize the rocket flow and shock interactions during supersonic and hypersonic entry conditions. Earlier experimental testing of a 70 Viking-like (sphere-cone) aeroshell was conducted as a baseline for testing of a supersonic retro-propulsion system. This baseline testing defined the flow field around the aeroshell and from this comparative baseline data, retro-propulsion options will be assessed. Images and analyses from the SWT testing with 300- and 500-psia rocket engine chamber pressures are presented here. The rocket engine flow was simulated with a non-combusting flow of air.

  12. System Study: Technology Assessment and Prioritizing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this NASA funded project is to assess and prioritize advanced technologies required to achieve the goals for an "Intelligent Propulsion System" through collaboration among GEAE, NASA, and Georgia Tech. Key GEAE deliverables are parametric response surface equations (RSE's) relating technology features to system benefits (sfc, weight, fuel burn, design range, acoustics, emission, etc...) and listings of Technology Impact Matrix (TIM) with benefits, debits, and approximate readiness status. TIM has been completed for GEAE and NASA proposed technologies. The combined GEAE and NASA TIM input requirement is shown in Table.1. In the course of building the RSE's and TIM, significant parametric technology modeling and RSE accuracy improvements were accomplished. GEAE has also done preliminary ranking of the technologies using Georgia Tech/GEAE USA developed technology evaluation tools. System level impact was performed by combining beneficial technologies with minimum conflict among various system figures of merits to assess their overall benefits to the system. The shortfalls and issues with modeling the proposed technologies are identified, and recommendations for future work are also proposed.

  13. Wireless Technologies Implications for Power Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Fuhr, Peter L; Manges, Wayne W; Schweitzer, Patrick; Kagan, Hesh

    2010-01-01

    Wireless technologies have advanced well beyond simple SCADA radio systems and point-to-point links. The current applications supported by industrial-grade wireless sensors and systems range from field measurements (classic I/O) to voice, video, asset tracking, mobile operators, etc. Which such a wide array of supported applications, the belief that wireless technology will only impact power systems in terms of wireless sensors is shortsighted. This paper, coauthored by a group of individuals intimately involved in the general realm of industrial wireless , presents a simple snapshot of current radio technologies that are used (or seriously contemplated for use) in power systems.

  14. An investigation of accelerating mode and decelerating mode constant-momentum mass spectrometry and their application to a residual gas analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, Y. S.

    1977-01-01

    A theoretical analysis of constant momentum mass spectrometry was made. A maximum resolving power for the decelerating mode constant momentum mass spectrometer was shown theoretically to exist for a beam of ions of known energy. A vacuum system and an electron beam ionization source was constructed. Supporting electronics for a residual gas analyzer were built. Experimental investigations of various types of accelerating and decelerating impulsive modes of a constant momentum mass spectrometer as applied to a residual gas analyzer were made. The data indicate that the resolving power for the decelerating mode is comparable to that of the accelerating mode.

  15. Rigging Test Bed Development for Validation of Multi-Stage Decelerator Extractions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenig, Sivan J.; Gallon, John C.; Adams, Douglas S.; Rivellini, Tommaso P.

    2013-01-01

    The Low Density Supersonic Decelerator project is developing new decelerator systems for Mars entry which would include testing with a Supersonic Flight Dynamics Test Vehicle. One of the decelerator systems being developed is a large supersonic ringsail parachute. Due to the configuration of the vehicle it is not possible to deploy the parachute with a mortar which would be the preferred method for a spacecraft in a supersonic flow. Alternatively, a multi-stage extraction process using a ballute as a pilot is being developed for the test vehicle. The Rigging Test Bed is a test venue being constructed to perform verification and validation of this extraction process. The test bed consists of a long pneumatic piston device capable of providing a constant force simulating the ballute drag force during the extraction events. The extraction tests will take place both inside a high-bay for frequent tests of individual extraction stages and outdoors using a mobile hydraulic crane for complete deployment tests from initial pack pull out to canopy extraction. These tests will measure line tensions and use photogrammetry to track motion of the elements involved. The resulting data will be used to verify packing and rigging as well, as validate models and identify potential failure modes in order to finalize the design of the extraction system.

  16. Aviation System Capacity Program Terminal Area Productivity Project: Ground and Airborne Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giulianetti, Demo J.

    2001-01-01

    Ground and airborne technologies were developed in the Terminal Area Productivity (TAP) project for increasing throughput at major airports by safely maintaining good-weather operating capacity during bad weather. Methods were demonstrated for accurately predicting vortices to prevent wake-turbulence encounters and to reduce in-trail separation requirements for aircraft approaching the same runway for landing. Technology was demonstrated that safely enabled independent simultaneous approaches in poor weather conditions to parallel runways spaced less than 3,400 ft apart. Guidance, control, and situation-awareness systems were developed to reduce congestion in airport surface operations resulting from the increased throughput, particularly during night and instrument meteorological conditions (IMC). These systems decreased runway occupancy time by safely and smoothly decelerating the aircraft, increasing taxi speed, and safely steering the aircraft off the runway. Simulations were performed in which optimal trajectories were determined by air traffic control (ATC) and communicated to flight crews by means of Center TRACON Automation System/Flight Management System (CTASFMS) automation to reduce flight delays, increase throughput, and ensure flight safety.

  17. Electronic Devices and Systems. Energy Technology Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technical Education Research Centre-Southwest, Waco, TX.

    This course in electronic devices and systems is one of 16 courses in the Energy Technology Series developed for an Energy Conservation-and-Use Technology curriculum. Intended for use in two-year postsecondary technical institutions to prepare technicians for employment, the courses are also useful in industry for updating employees in…

  18. Optical Technology: Interacting with Traditional Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McConnell, Karen

    1987-01-01

    Reviews optical technology products currently on the market, including their storage capacities, formats and uses, and outlines the benefits of integrating optical storage devices with online databases. A description of the HAYSTACK system is offered as a model of optical technology for library applications. A suggested reading list is provided.…

  19. Energy Production Systems. Energy Technology Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This course in energy production systems is one of 15 courses in the Energy Technology Series developed for an Energy Conservation-and-Use Technology curriculum. Intended for use in two-year postsecondary technical institutions to prepare technicians for employment, the courses are also useful in industry for updating employees in…

  20. Fluid Power Systems. Energy Technology Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This course in fluid power systems is one of 16 courses in the Energy Technology Series developed for an Energy Conservation-and-Use Technology curriculum. Intended for use in two-year postsecondary technical institutions to prepare technicians for employment, the courses are also useful in industry for updating employees in company-sponsored…

  1. Mechanical Devices and Systems. Energy Technology Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This course in mechanical devices and systems is one of 16 courses in the Energy Technology Series developed for an Energy Conservation-and-Use Technology curriculum. Intended for use in two-year postsecondary technical institutions to prepare technicians for employment, the courses are also useful in industry for updating employees in…

  2. MMIC technology for advanced space communications systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downey, A. N.; Connolly, D. J.; Anzic, G.

    1984-01-01

    The current NASA program for 20 and 30 GHz monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) technology is reviewed. The advantages of MMIC are discussed. Millimeter wavelength MMIC applications and technology for communications systems are discussed. Passive and active MMIC compatible components for millimeter wavelength applications are investigated. The cost of a millimeter wavelength MMIC's is projected.

  3. Lunar Surface Systems Supportability Technology Development Roadmap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oeftering, Richard C.; Struk, Peter M.; Green, Jennifer L.; Chau, Savio N.; Curell, Philip C.; Dempsey, Cathy A.; Patterson, Linda P.; Robbins, William; Steele, Michael A.; DAnnunzio, Anthony; Meseroll, Robert; Quiter, John; Shannon, Russell; Easton, John W.; Madaras, Eric I.; BrownTaminger, Karen M.; Tabera, John T.; Tellado, Joseph; Williams, Marth K.; Zeitlin, Nancy P.

    2011-01-01

    The Lunar Surface Systems Supportability Technology Development Roadmap is a guide for developing the technologies needed to enable the supportable, sustainable, and affordable exploration of the Moon and other destinations beyond Earth. Supportability is defined in terms of space maintenance, repair, and related logistics. This report considers the supportability lessons learned from NASA and the Department of Defense. Lunar Outpost supportability needs are summarized, and a supportability technology strategy is established to make the transition from high logistics dependence to logistics independence. This strategy will enable flight crews to act effectively to respond to problems and exploit opportunities in an environment of extreme resource scarcity and isolation. The supportability roadmap defines the general technology selection criteria. Technologies are organized into three categories: diagnostics, test, and verification; maintenance and repair; and scavenge and recycle. Furthermore, "embedded technologies" and "process technologies" are used to designate distinct technology types with different development cycles. The roadmap examines the current technology readiness level and lays out a four-phase incremental development schedule with selection decision gates. The supportability technology roadmap is intended to develop technologies with the widest possible capability and utility while minimizing the impact on crew time and training and remaining within the time and cost constraints of the program.

  4. Biases in the perception of self-motion during whole-body acceleration and deceleration

    PubMed Central

    Tremblay, Luc; Kennedy, Andrew; Paleressompoulle, Dany; Borel, Liliane; Mouchnino, Laurence; Blouin, Jean

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have investigated whether vestibular signals can be processed to determine the magnitude of passive body motions. Many of them required subjects to report their perceived displacements offline, i.e., after being submitted to passive displacements. Here, we used a protocol that allowed us to complement these results by asking subjects to report their introspective estimation of their displacement continuously, i.e., during the ongoing body rotation. To this end, participants rotated the handle of a manipulandum around a vertical axis to indicate their perceived change of angular position in space at the same time as they were passively rotated in the dark. The rotation acceleration (Acc) and deceleration (Dec) lasted either 1.5 s (peak of 60°/s2, referred to as being “High”) or 3 s (peak of 33°/s2, referred to as being “Low”). The participants were rotated either counter-clockwise or clockwise, and all combinations of acceleration and deceleration were tested (i.e., AccLow-DecLow; AccLow-DecHigh; AccHigh-DecLow; AccHigh-DecHigh). The participants’ perception of body rotation was assessed by computing the gain, i.e., ratio between the amplitude of the perceived rotations (as measured by the rotating manipulandum’s handle) and the amplitude of the actual chair rotations. The gain was measured at the end of the rotations, and was also computed separately for the acceleration and deceleration phases. Three salient findings resulted from this experiment: (i) the gain was much greater during body acceleration than during body deceleration, (ii) the gain was greater during High compared to Low accelerations and (iii) the gain measured during the deceleration was influenced by the preceding acceleration (i.e., Low or High). These different effects of the angular stimuli on the perception of body motion can be interpreted in relation to the consequences of body acceleration and deceleration on the vestibular system and on higher-order cognitive

  5. Network operating system focus technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    An activity structured to provide specific design requirements and specifications for the Space Station Data Management System (DMS) Network Operating System (NOS) is outlined. Examples are given of the types of supporting studies and implementation tasks presently underway to realize a DMS test bed capability to develop hands-on understanding of NOS requirements as driven by actual subsystem test beds participating in the overall Johnson Space Center test bed program. Classical operating system elements and principal NOS functions are listed.

  6. Space station propulsion system technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Robert E.; Meng, Phillip R.; Schneider, Steven J.; Sovey, James S.; Tacina, Robert R.

    1987-01-01

    Two propulsion systems have been selected for the space station: O/H rockets for high thrust applications and the multipropellant resistojets for low thrust needs. These thruster systems integrate very well with the fluid systems on the station. Both thrusters will utilize waste fluids as their source of propellant. The O/H rocket will be fueled by electrolyzed water and the resistojets will use stored waste gases from the environmental control system and the various laboratories. This paper presents the results of experimental efforts with O/H and resistojet thrusters to determine their performance and life capability.

  7. Applying Sustainable Systems Development Approach to Educational Technology Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Albert

    2012-01-01

    Information technology (IT) is an essential part of modern education. The roles and contributions of technology to education have been thoroughly documented in academic and professional literature. Despite the benefits, the use of educational technology systems (ETS) also creates a significant impact on the environment, primarily due to energy…

  8. Drag Characteristics of Several Towed Decelerator Models at Mach 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    Drag Characteristics of Several Towed Decelerator Models at Mach 3. An investigation has been made to determine the possibility of using toroid-membrane and wide-angle conical shapes as towed decelerators. Parameter variations were investigated which might render toroid-membrane models and wide-angle- cone models stable without loss of the high drag coefficients obtainable with sting-mounted models. The parameters varied included location of center of gravity, location of the pivot between the towline and the model, and configuration modifications of the aft end as the addition of a corner radius and the addition of a skirt. The toroid membrane can be made into a stable towed decelerator with a suitable configuration modification of the aft end. [Entire movie available on DVD from CASI as Doc ID 20070031013. Contact help@sti.nasa.gov

  9. Future Orbital Power Systems Technology Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    NASA is actively involved in program planning for missions requiring several orders of magnitude, more energy than in the past. Therefore, a two-day symposium was held to review the technology requirements for future orbital power systems. The purpose of the meeting was to give leaders from government and industry a broad view of current government supported technology efforts and future program plans in space power. It provided a forum for discussion, through workshops, to comment on current and planned programs and to identify opportunities for technology investment. Several papers are presented to review the technology status and the planned programs.

  10. Game Changing Technology: Woven Thermal Protection Systems

    NASA Video Gallery

    New woven composite materials are an advanced space technology that mark a major milestone toward development of the space systems that will enable extending human and robotic presence throughout t...

  11. Control technology for future aircraft propulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeller, J. R.; Szuch, J. R.; Merrill, W. C.; Lehtinen, B.; Soeder, J. F.

    1984-01-01

    The need for a more sophisticated engine control system is discussed. The improvements in better thrust-to-weight ratios demand the manipulation of more control inputs. New technological solutions to the engine control problem are practiced. The digital electronic engine control (DEEC) system is a step in the evolution to digital electronic engine control. Technology issues are addressed to ensure a growth in confidence in sophisticated electronic controls for aircraft turbine engines. The need of a control system architecture which permits propulsion controls to be functionally integrated with other aircraft systems is established. Areas of technology studied include: (1) control design methodology; (2) improved modeling and simulation methods; and (3) implementation technologies. Objectives, results and future thrusts are summarized.

  12. Acceleration and deceleration of neutrons: From the phase modulation of a neutron wave to a neutron turbine with refracting prisms

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, A. I.

    2013-05-15

    The possibility of the acceleration and deceleration of neutrons undergoing diffraction at a moving grating is discussed. It is shown that, in contrast to phase {pi} gratings used at the present time, which form a discrete spectrum featuring a large number of lines, a grating that has a special profile may shift, under certain conditions, the entire spectrum of diffracted neutrons. A blazing grating of this type may be used in efficiently accelerating and decelerating neutrons. As the scale of the structure becomes larger, a description based on the idea of neutron-wave refraction at its elements becomes valid, a system of moving prims forming a 'neutron turbine,' which is also able to accelerate or decelerate neutrons, being a classical limit of this enlargement.

  13. Development of Inflatable Entry Systems Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Player, Charles J.; Cheatwood, F. McNeil; Corliss, James

    2005-01-01

    Achieving the objectives of NASA s Vision for Space Exploration will require the development of new technologies, which will in turn require higher fidelity modeling and analysis techniques, and innovative testing capabilities. Development of entry systems technologies can be especially difficult due to the lack of facilities and resources available to test these new technologies in mission relevant environments. This paper discusses the technology development process to bring inflatable aeroshell technology from Technology Readiness Level 2 (TRL-2) to TRL-7. This paper focuses mainly on two projects: Inflatable Reentry Vehicle Experiment (IRVE), and Inflatable Aeroshell and Thermal Protection System Development (IATD). The objectives of IRVE are to conduct an inflatable aeroshell flight test that demonstrates exoatmospheric deployment and inflation, reentry survivability and stability, and predictable drag performance. IATD will continue the development of the technology by conducting exploration specific trade studies and feeding forward those results into three more flight tests. Through an examination of these projects, and other potential projects, this paper discusses some of the risks, issues, and unexpected benefits associated with the development of inflatable entry systems technology.

  14. Deceleration of High-velocity Interstellar Photon Sails into Bound Orbits at α Centauri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heller, René; Hippke, Michael

    2017-02-01

    At a distance of about 4.22 ly, it would take about 100,000 years for humans to visit our closest stellar neighbor Proxima Centauri using modern chemical thrusters. New technologies are now being developed that involve high-power lasers firing at 1 gram solar sails in near-Earth orbits, accelerating them to 20% the speed of light (c) within minutes. Although such an interstellar probe could reach Proxima 20 years after launch, without propellant to slow it down it would traverse the system within hours. Here we demonstrate how the stellar photon pressures of the stellar triple α Cen A, B, and C (Proxima) can be used together with gravity assists to decelerate incoming solar sails from Earth. The maximum injection speed at α Cen A to park a sail with a mass-to-surface ratio (σ) similar to graphene (7.6 × 10‑4 gram m‑2) in orbit around Proxima is about 13,800 km s‑1 (4.6% c), implying travel times from Earth to α Cen A and B of about 95 years and another 46 years (with a residual velocity of 1280 km s‑1) to Proxima. The size of such a low-σ sail required to carry a payload of 10 grams is about 105 m2 = (316 m)2. Such a sail could use solar photons instead of an expensive laser system to gain interstellar velocities at departure. Photogravitational assists allow visits of three stellar systems and an Earth-sized potentially habitable planet in one shot, promising extremely high scientific yields.

  15. Systems Theory, Systems Technology, and Curriculum Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pratt, David

    1978-01-01

    John Goodlad (1958) stated that "Nowhere in education is there greater need for a conceptual system to guide decision-making than the field of curriculum." This research attempts to explore ways in which systems thinking can provide a conceptual system, to illuminate the study of curriculum and guide the design of curricula. (Author/RK)

  16. Network Speech Systems Technology Program.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-09-30

    utilized for the digital speech. As discussed in Ref . 8, the required control overhead for packet transmission can be reduced to a level comparable...multiplexer with fixed-channel capacity are discussed in Ref . 17. For the multi-node system considered here, the effects of both fixed- and variable...Phase IV and described in Ref . 2. We then ran a comparison among centrally controlled simplex broadcast and speaker/interrupter systems together with the

  17. System-of-Systems Technology-Portfolio-Analysis Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Neil, Daniel; Mankins, John; Feingold, Harvey; Johnson, Wayne

    2012-01-01

    Advanced Technology Life-cycle Analysis System (ATLAS) is a system-of-systems technology-portfolio-analysis software tool. ATLAS affords capabilities to (1) compare estimates of the mass and cost of an engineering system based on competing technological concepts; (2) estimate life-cycle costs of an outer-space-exploration architecture for a specified technology portfolio; (3) collect data on state-of-the-art and forecasted technology performance, and on operations and programs; and (4) calculate an index of the relative programmatic value of a technology portfolio. ATLAS facilitates analysis by providing a library of analytical spreadsheet models for a variety of systems. A single analyst can assemble a representation of a system of systems from the models and build a technology portfolio. Each system model estimates mass, and life-cycle costs are estimated by a common set of cost models. Other components of ATLAS include graphical-user-interface (GUI) software, algorithms for calculating the aforementioned index, a technology database, a report generator, and a form generator for creating the GUI for the system models. At the time of this reporting, ATLAS is a prototype, embodied in Microsoft Excel and several thousand lines of Visual Basic for Applications that run on both Windows and Macintosh computers.

  18. The United States Department of Energy Office of Industrial Technology`s Technology Benefits Recording System

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, K.R.; Moore, N.L.

    1994-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Industrial Technology`s (OIT`s) Technology Benefits Recording System (TBRS) was developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The TBRS is used to organize and maintain records of the benefits accrued from the use of technologies developed with the assistance of OIT. OIT has had a sustained emphasis on technology deployment. While individual program managers have specific technology deployment goals for each of their ongoing programs, the Office has also established a separate Technology Deployment Division whose mission is to assist program managers and research and development partners commercialize technologies. As part of this effort, the Technology Deployment Division developed an energy-tracking task which has been performed by PNL since 1977. The goal of the energy-tracking task is to accurately assess the energy savings impact of OIT-developed technologies. In previous years, information on OIT-sponsored technologies existed in a variety of forms--first as a hardcopy, then electronically in several spreadsheet formats that existed in multiple software programs. The TBRS was created in 1993 for OIT and was based on information collected in all previous years from numerous industrial contacts, vendors, and plants that have installed OIT-sponsored technologies. The TBRS contains information on technologies commercialized between 1977 and the present, as well as information on emerging technologies in the late development/early commercialization stage of the technology life cycle. For each technology, details on the number of units sold and the energy saved are available on a year-by-year basis. Information regarding environmental benefits, productivity and competitiveness benefits, or impact that the technology may have had on employment is also available.

  19. Systems Engineering and Integration for Technology Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, Kruss J.

    2006-01-01

    The Architecture, Habitability & Integration group (AH&I) is a system engineering and integration test team within the NASA Crew and Thermal Systems Division (CTSD) at Johnson Space Center. AH&I identifies and resolves system-level integration issues within the research and technology development community. The timely resolution of these integration issues is fundamental to the development of human system requirements and exploration capability. The integration of the many individual components necessary to construct an artificial environment is difficult. The necessary interactions between individual components and systems must be approached in a piece-wise fashion to achieve repeatable results. A formal systems engineering (SE) approach to define, develop, and integrate quality systems within the life support community has been developed. This approach will allow a Research & Technology Program to systematically approach the development, management, and quality of technology deliverables to the various exploration missions. A tiered system engineering structure has been proposed to implement best systems engineering practices across all development levels from basic research to working assemblies. These practices will be implemented through a management plan across all applicable programs, projects, elements and teams. While many of the engineering practices are common to other industries, the implementation is specific to technology development. An accounting of the systems engineering management philosophy will be discussed and the associated programmatic processes will be presented.

  20. Enabling kinetic micro-penetrator technology for Solar System research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gowen, R. A.

    2008-09-01

    Whilst the concept of high speed impacting penetrator probes is not new, recent highly successful ground test results have considerably improved the perception that these can be a viable and useful addition to the current toolbox of planetary probes. Previous developments only led to a single deployment (Deep Space-2 to Mars on the ill fated NASA Mars Polar Lander mission in 1999) where neither the soft lander nor penetrator was ever heard from, which is not a logical basis for dismissing penetrator technology. Other space penetrator programmes have included the Russian Mars'96 ~80m/s penetrators for which the whole mission was lost before the spacecraft left Earth orbit, and the Japanese Lunar-A program which was cancelled after a lengthy development program which however saw multiple successful ground trials. The Japanese penetrators were designed for ~300m/s impact. The current UK penetrator developments are actively working towards full space qualification for a Lunar penetrators (MoonLITE mission), which would also provide a significant technical demonstration towards the development of smaller, shorter lived penetrators for exploring other solar system objects. We are advocating delivered micro-penetrators in the mass range ~4-10Kg, (preceded by ~13Kg Lunar penetrator MoonLITE development program), impacting at around 100-500m/s and carrying a scientific payload of around 2Kg. Additional mass is required to deliver the probes from `orbit' to surface which is dependent upon the particular planetary body in question. The mass per descent module therefore involves and additional element which, for a descent through an atmosphere could be quite modest, while for a flyby deployment, can be substantial. For Europa we estimate a descent module mass of ~13 Kg, while for Enceladus the value is ~40Kg for Enceladus since a deceleration of ~3.8 kms-1 is needed from a Titan orbit. The delivery system could consist of a rocket deceleration motor and attitude control system

  1. The Hidden Technology: Dictation Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barton, Kathy; And Others

    This booklet provides business and office teachers with background information, supporting materials, recruiting techniques, and a suggested unit plan that integrates the concepts related to dictation systems into information processing curricula. An "Introduction" (Donna Everett) discusses the need for dictation skills. "Need for Dictation…

  2. Enhancing trappable antiproton populations through deceleration and frictional cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Zolotorev, M.; Sessler, A.; Penn, G.; Wurtele, J. S.; Charman, A. E.

    2012-03-01

    CERN currently delivers antiprotons for trapping experiments with the Antiproton Decelerator (AD), which slows the antiprotons down to about 5 MeV.This energy is currently too high for direct trapping, and thick foils are used to slow down the beam to energies which can be trapped.To allow further deceleration to $\\sim 100 \\;\\mbox{keV}$, CERN is initiating the construction of ELENA,consisting of a ring which will combine RF deceleration and electron cooling capabilities. We describe a simple frictionalcooling scheme that can serve to provide significantly improved trapping efficiency, either directly from the AD or first usinga standard deceleration mechanism (induction linac or RFQ). This scheme could be implemented in a short time.The device itself is short in length, uses accessible voltages, and at reasonable cost could serve in the interim beforeELENA becomes operational, or possibly in lieu of ELENA for some experiments. Simple theory and simulations provide a preliminary assessment of theconcept and its strengths and limitations, and highlight important areas for experimental studies, in particular to pin down the level of multiplescattering for low-energy antiprotons. We show that the frictional cooling scheme can provide a similar energy spectrum to that of ELENA,but with higher transverse emittances.

  3. System Study: Technology Assessment and Prioritizing Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    For the Intelligent Engine System (Propulsion 21) study, each technology was evaluated to determine the impact to fuel burn, acoustics, and NOx emissions. The optimum combination of technologies and their overall benefits to the system were also evaluated, resulting in noise improvement potential of 1.89 EPNdB cumulative margin,-1.34 percent fuel burn, and 50 percent NOx reduction from the 2015 UEET-QAT baseline. All the technology evaluations, except T18-20D, were based on newengines, where the engine was resized to obtain the maximum system benefit while maintaining the same cycle parameters as the 2015 UEET-QAT baseline. The impact of turbine clearance control on deteriorated engines, T18-20D, was also evaluated. Recommendations for future system study work include, but were not limited to, validation of a university-developed engine deterioration model and customer value analysis as figures of merit beside fuel burn, emissions, and acoustics.

  4. The Advanced Technology Operations System: ATOS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufeler, J.-F.; Laue, H. A.; Poulter, K.; Smith, H.

    1993-01-01

    Mission control systems supporting new space missions face ever-increasing requirements in terms of functionality, performance, reliability and efficiency. Modern data processing technology is providing the means to meet these requirements in new systems under development. During the past few years the European Space Operations Centre (ESOC) of the European Space Agency (ESA) has carried out a number of projects to demonstrate the feasibility of using advanced software technology, in particular, knowledge based systems, to support mission operations. A number of advances must be achieved before these techniques can be moved towards operational use in future missions, namely, integration of the applications into a single system framework and generalization of the applications so that they are mission independent. In order to achieve this goal, ESA initiated the Advanced Technology Operations System (ATOS) program, which will develop the infrastructure to support advanced software technology in mission operations, and provide applications modules to initially support: Mission Preparation, Mission Planning, Computer Assisted Operations, and Advanced Training. The first phase of the ATOS program is tasked with the goal of designing and prototyping the necessary system infrastructure to support the rest of the program. The major components of the ATOS architecture is presented. This architecture relies on the concept of a Mission Information Base (MIB) as the repository for all information and knowledge which will be used by the advanced application modules in future mission control systems. The MIB is being designed to exploit the latest in database and knowledge representation technology in an open and distributed system. In conclusion the technological and implementation challenges expected to be encountered, as well as the future plans and time scale of the project, are presented.

  5. Computational and theoretical investigation of Mars's atmospheric impact on the descent module "Exomars-2018" under aerodynamic deceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golomazov, M. M.; Ivankov, A. A.

    2016-12-01

    Methods for calculating the aerodynamic impact of the Martian atmosphere on the descent module "Exomars-2018" intended for solving the problem of heat protection of the descent module during aerodynamic deceleration are presented. The results of the investigation are also given. The flow field and radiative and convective heat exchange are calculated along the trajectory of the descent module until parachute system activation.

  6. Compact thermoelectric converter systems technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A schematic of the developed tubular thermoelectric module is shown. It consists of alternate washers of n- and p-type lead telluride, separated by thin natural mica washers. Electrical continuity within the circuit is accomplished by cylindrical conductor rings located at the I.D. and O.D. of the lead telluride washers. The conductor rings are also separated by the same mica which separate the lead telluride washers. The result is a radially serpentine current path along the length of the module. The circuit is isolated from the structural claddings by thin sleeves of boron nitride. Circuit containment and heat transfer surfaces are provided by the inner and outer cladding, heat being transferred from a heat source at the inner clad, conducted radially outward through the lead telluride to the outer clad where the waste heat is removed by a heat rejection system.

  7. NEMO: Advanced energy systems and technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lund, P.

    In this report, the contents and major results of the national research program on advanced energy system and technologies (NEMO) are presented. The NEMO-program was one of the energy research programs of the Ministry of Trade and Industry during 1988-1992. Helsinki University of Technology had the responsibility of the overall coordination of the program. NEMO has been the largest resource allocation into advanced energy systems in Finland so far. The total budget was 70 million FIM. The focus of the program has been in solar energy, wind power, and energy storage. Hydrogen and fuel cells have been included in smaller amount. On all major fields of the NEMO-program, useful and high quality results have been obtained. Results of international significance include among others arctic wind energy, new approaches for the energy storage problem in solar energy applications, and the development of a completely new storage battery. International collaboration has been given high priority. The NEMO-program has also been active in informing the industries of the various business and utilization possibilities that advanced energy technologies offer. For example, major demonstration plants of each technology group have been realized. It is recommended that the further R and D should be still more focused on commercial applications. Through research efforts at universities, a good technology base should be maintained, whereas the industries should take a stronger position in commercializing new technology. Parallel to technology R and D, more public resources should be allocated for market introduction.

  8. Antenna technology for advanced mobile communication systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rammos, Emmanuel; Roederer, Antoine; Rogard, Roger

    1988-01-01

    The onboard antenna front end is the key subsystem conditioning configuration and performance of mobile communication satellites. The objectives of this paper are to demonstrate this key role and to review L-band satellite antenna technology for earth coverage and regional applications. Multibeam arrays are first discussed, then unfurlable and inflatable reflector antennas are described. These technologies are now qualified in Europe for future mobile systems, for which the optimum choice of antenna technology has been found to be the key to efficient use of spectrum and power resources.

  9. Assurance Technology Challenges of Advanced Space Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chern, E. James

    2004-01-01

    The initiative to explore space and extend a human presence across our solar system to revisit the moon and Mars post enormous technological challenges to the nation's space agency and aerospace industry. Key areas of technology development needs to enable the endeavor include advanced materials, structures and mechanisms; micro/nano sensors and detectors; power generation, storage and management; advanced thermal and cryogenic control; guidance, navigation and control; command and data handling; advanced propulsion; advanced communication; on-board processing; advanced information technology systems; modular and reconfigurable systems; precision formation flying; solar sails; distributed observing systems; space robotics; and etc. Quality assurance concerns such as functional performance, structural integrity, radiation tolerance, health monitoring, diagnosis, maintenance, calibration, and initialization can affect the performance of systems and subsystems. It is thus imperative to employ innovative nondestructive evaluation methodologies to ensure quality and integrity of advanced space systems. Advancements in integrated multi-functional sensor systems, autonomous inspection approaches, distributed embedded sensors, roaming inspectors, and shape adaptive sensors are sought. Concepts in computational models for signal processing and data interpretation to establish quantitative characterization and event determination are also of interest. Prospective evaluation technologies include ultrasonics, laser ultrasonics, optics and fiber optics, shearography, video optics and metrology, thermography, electromagnetics, acoustic emission, x-ray, data management, biomimetics, and nano-scale sensing approaches for structural health monitoring.

  10. Rocket Sled Propelled Testing of a Supersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meacham, Michael B.; Kennett, Andrew; Townsend, Derik J.; Marti, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    Decelerators (IADs) have traditionally been tested in wind tunnels. As the limitations of these test facilities are reached, other avenues must be pursued. The IAD being tested is a Supersonic IAD (SIAD), which attaches just aft of the heatshield around the perimeter of an entry body. This 'attached torus' SIAD is meant to improve the accuracy of landing for robotic class missions to Mars and allow for potentially increased payloads. The SIAD Design Verification (SDV) test aims to qualify the SIAD by applying a targeted aerodynamic load to the vehicle. While many test architectures were researched, a rocket sled track was ultimately chosen to be the most cost effective way to achieve the desired dynamic pressures. The Supersonic Naval Ordnance Research Track (SNORT) at the Naval Air Warfare Center Weapons Division (NAWCWD) China Lake is a four mile test track, traditionally used for warhead and ejection seat testing. Prior to SDV, inflatable drag bodies have been tested on this particular track. Teams at Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and NAWCWD collaborate together to design and fabricate one of the largest sleds ever built. The SDV sled is comprised of three individual sleds: a Pusher Sled which holds the solid booster rockets, an Item Sled which supports the test vehicle, and a Camera Sled that is pushed in front for in-situ footage and measurements. The JPL-designed Test Vehicle has a full-scale heatshield shape and contains all instrumentation and inflation systems necessary to inflate and test a SIAD. The first campaign that is run at SNORT tested all hardware and instrumentation before the SIAD was ready to be tested. For each of the three tests in this campaign, the number of rockets and top speed was increased and the data analyzed to ensure the hardware is safe at the necessary accelerations and aerodynamic loads.

  11. Developmental systems biology flourishing on new technologies.

    PubMed

    Han, Jing-Dong J; Liu, Yi; Xue, Huiling; Xia, Kai; Yu, Hong; Zhu, Shanshan; Chen, Zhang; Zhang, Wei; Huang, Zheng; Jin, Chunyu; Xian, Bo; Li, Jing; Hou, Lei; Han, Yixing; Niu, Chaoqun; Alcon, Timothy C

    2008-10-01

    Organism development is a systems level process. It has benefited greatly from the recent technological advances in the field of systems biology. DNA microarray, phenome, interactome and transcriptome mapping, the new generation of deep sequencing technologies, and faster and better computational and modeling approaches have opened new frontiers for both systems biologists and developmental biologists to reexamine the old developmental biology questions, such as pattern formation, and to tackle new problems, such as stem cell reprogramming. As showcased in the International Developmental Systems Biology Symposium organized by Chinese Academy of Sciences, developmental systems biology is flourishing in many perspectives, from the evolution of developmental systems, to the underlying genetic and molecular pathways and networks, to the genomic, epigenomic and noncoding levels, to the computational analysis and modeling. We believe that the field will continue to reap rewards into the future with these new approaches.

  12. Enabling MEMS technologies for communications systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubecke, Victor M.; Barber, Bradley P.; Arney, Susanne

    2001-11-01

    Modern communications demands have been steadily growing not only in size, but sophistication. Phone calls over copper wires have evolved into high definition video conferencing over optical fibers, and wireless internet browsing. The technology used to meet these demands is under constant pressure to provide increased capacity, speed, and efficiency, all with reduced size and cost. Various MEMS technologies have shown great promise for meeting these challenges by extending the performance of conventional circuitry and introducing radical new systems approaches. A variety of strategic MEMS structures including various cost-effective free-space optics and high-Q RF components are described, along with related practical implementation issues. These components are rapidly becoming essential for enabling the development of progressive new communications systems technologies including all-optical networks, and low cost multi-system wireless terminals and basestations.

  13. Using WWW technology in a control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billè, Fulvio; Pugliese, Roberto

    1997-02-01

    The World Wide Web (WWW) technology, based on the hyper-text principles and highly focused on the man-machine interface, is an easy and intuitive way of accessing data. By integrating Web and distributed control system technologies, operators and specialists may supervise a process without having to install any specific software and without bothering about the type of computer to use. Nearly any computer, loaded with a little piece of world-wide available software, may have access to the status variables, archive files and documentation of the controlled process. The enhanced inter-active features of the new Java technology make this scenario even more appealing. The paper describes a WWW-based control system: the Beamline Access Control System (BACS) of ELETTRA, a third generation synchrotron radiation facility.

  14. Review of Current Nuclear Vacuum System Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, M.; McCracken, J.; Shope, T.

    2003-02-25

    Nearly all industrial operations generate unwanted dust, particulate matter, and/or liquid wastes. Waste dust and particulates can be readily tracked to other work locations, and airborne particulates can be spread through ventilation systems to all locations within a building, and even vented outside the building - a serious concern for processes involving hazardous, radioactive, or nuclear materials. Several varieties of vacuum systems have been proposed and/or are commercially available for clean up of both solid and liquid hazardous and nuclear materials. A review of current technologies highlights both the advantages and disadvantages of the various systems, and demonstrates the need for a system designed to address issues specific to hazardous and nuclear material cleanup. A review of previous and current hazardous/nuclear material cleanup technologies is presented. From simple conventional vacuums modified for use in industrial operations, to systems specifically engineered for such purposes, the advantages and disadvantages are examined in light of the following criteria: minimal worker exposure; minimal secondary waste generation;reduced equipment maintenance and consumable parts; simplicity of design, yet fully compatible with all waste types; and ease of use. The work effort reviews past, existing and proposed technologies in light of such considerations. Accomplishments of selected systems are presented, including identified areas where technological improvements could be suggested.

  15. Satellite communications systems and technology. Executive Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edelson, Burton I.; Pelton, Joseph N.; Bostian, Charles W.; Brandon, William T.; Chan, Vincent W. S.; Hager, E. Paul; Helm, Neil R.; Jennings, Raymond D.; Kwan, Robert; Mahle, Christoph E.

    1993-01-01

    NASA and the National Science Foundation (NSF) commissioned a panel of US experts to study the international status of satellite communications systems and technology. The study covers emerging systems concepts, applications, services, and the attendant technologies. The panel members travelled to Europe, Japan, and Russia to gather information first-hand. They visited 17 sites in Europe, 20 sites in Japan, and four in Russia. These included major manufacturers, government organizations, service providers, and associated R&D facilities. The panel's report was reviewed by the sites visited, by the panel, and by representatives of US industry. The report details the information collected and compares it to US activities.

  16. Space Biosensor Systems: Implications for Technology Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hines, J. W.; Somps, C. J.; Madou, M.; Imprescia, Clifford C. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    To meet the need for continuous, automated monitoring of animal subjects, including; humans, during space flight, NASA is developing advanced physiologic sensor and biotelemetry system technologies. The ability to continuously track basic physiological parameters, such as heart rate, blood pH, and body temperature, in untethered subjects in space is a challenging task. At NASA's Ames Research Center, where a key focus is gravitational biology research, engineers have teamed with life scientists to develop wireless sensor systems for automated physiologic monitoring of animal models as small as the rat. This technology is also being adapted, in collaboration with medical professionals, to meet human clinical monitoring needs both in space and on the ground. Thus, these advanced monitoring technologies have important dual-use functions; they meet space flight data collection requirements and constraints, while concurrently addressing a number of monitoring and data acquisition challenges on the ground in areas of clinical monitoring and biomedical research. Additional applications for these and related technologies are being sought and additional partnerships established that enhance development efforts, reduce costs and facilitate technology infusion between the public and private sectors. This paper describes technology transfer and co-development projects that have evolved out of NASA's miniaturized, implantable chemical sensor development efforts.

  17. Technology planning for flexible manufacturing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chudakov, A. D.; Falevich, B. Y.

    1984-12-01

    The machine building industry features a new type of equipment, the flexible technological systems for machining. These systems are based on the use of machine tools with CNC, linked to a central controlling computer and an automated transport and stockpiling system. To improve the effectiveness of integrated operation of the system's equipment, the software of the central computer includes an applied program package directed toward the performance of automated planning functions, which, together with the operating documentation, makes up a system of operational calendar planning.

  18. Intelligent LID systems in the multifiber technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loch, Manfred; Kossat, R.; Ruegenberg, G.; Boscher, G.

    1993-11-01

    The essential advantages of Light Injection and Detection (LID) Systems, which are a prerequisite to reliable low loss splicing technique and highly accurate loss measurement of single mode fibers, are transferred to multi-fiber/ribbon technology. In this paper we discuss in detail the main advantages of intelligent LID Systems and compare different techniques for the realization of fiber selective multi-fiber/ribbon LID Systems. The structure and technique of different systems are presented. Novel systems based on bend couplers have been developed and tested in the laboratory. Results of measurements are shown to illustrate the benefits of this technique.

  19. TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT ON THE DUPIC SAFEGUARDS SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    H. KIM; H. CHA; ET AL

    2001-02-01

    A safeguards system has been developed since 1993 in the course of supporting a fuel cycle process to fabricate CANDU fuel with spent PWR fuel (known as Direct Use of PWR spent fuel In CANDU, DUPIC). The major safeguards technology involved here was to design and fabricate a neutron coincidence counting system for process accountability, and also an unattended continuous monitoring system in association with independent verification by the IAEA. This combined technology was to produce information of nuclear material content and to maintain knowledge of the continuity of nuclear material flow. In addition to hardware development, diagnosis software is being developed to assist data acquisition, data review, and data evaluation based on a neural network system on the IAEA C/S system.

  20. Technology Maturation of Integrated System Health Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feather, Martin S.; Uckun, Serdar; Hicks, Kenneth A.

    2008-01-01

    Despite two decades of significant investments in R&D of Integrated System Health Management (ISHM), mission-critical applications of it in aerospace are few and far between. ISHM is subject to the general difficulty of transitioning technologies out of R&D labs and into practical applications. New and unproven methods such as ISHM introduce multiple mission risks (technology, schedule, cost), and may require a transition to unconventional and as-yet-unproven operations concepts in order to be effective. Laboratory and flight demonstrations are necessary but insufficient to adequately reduce those risks. What is needed is a solid business case before a new technology can be considered for fleetwide deployment. To address these problems, we recently applied a technology maturation assessment process developed at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory to study the challenges of ISHM technology maturation. This application resulted in identification of the technologies (and technology maturation activities) that would result in the greatest risk reduction per investment dollar. Our approach and its results are described herein.

  1. Acceleration and Deceleration Capacity of Fetal Heart Rate in an In-Vivo Sheep Model

    PubMed Central

    Rivolta, Massimo W.; Stampalija, Tamara; Casati, Daniela; Richardson, Bryan S.; Ross, Michael G.; Frasch, Martin G.; Bauer, Axel; Ferrazzi, Enrico; Sassi, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Background Fetal heart rate (FHR) variability is an indirect index of fetal autonomic nervous system (ANS) integrity. FHR variability analysis in labor fails to detect early hypoxia and acidemia. Phase-rectified signal averaging (PRSA) is a new method of complex biological signals analysis that is more resistant to non-stationarities, signal loss and artifacts. It quantifies the average cardiac acceleration and deceleration (AC/DC) capacity. Objective The aims of the study were: (1) to investigate AC/DC in ovine fetuses exposed to acute hypoxic-acidemic insult; (2) to explore the relation between AC/DC and acid-base balance; and (3) to evaluate the influence of FHR decelerations and specific PRSA parameters on AC/DC computation. Methods Repetitive umbilical cord occlusions (UCOs) were applied in 9 pregnant near-term sheep to obtain three phases of MILD, MODERATE, and SEVERE hypoxic-acidemic insult. Acid-base balance was sampled and fetal ECGs continuously recorded. AC/DC were calculated: (1) for a spectrum of T values (T = 1÷50 beats; the parameter limits the range of oscillations detected by PRSA); (2) on entire series of fetal RR intervals or on “stable” series that excluded FHR decelerations caused by UCOs. Results AC and DC progressively increased with UCOs phases (MILD vs. MODERATE and MODERATE vs. SEVERE, p<0.05 for DC  = 2–5, and AC  = 1–3). The time evolution of AC/DC correlated to acid-base balance (0.4<<0.9, p<0.05) with the highest for . PRSA was not independent from FHR decelerations caused by UCOs. Conclusions This is the first in-vivo evaluation of PRSA on FHR analysis. In the presence of acute hypoxic-acidemia we found increasing values of AC/DC suggesting an activation of ANS. This correlation was strongest on time scale dominated by parasympathetic modulations. We identified the best performing parameters (), and found that AC/DC computation is not independent from FHR decelerations. These findings establish the basis for

  2. Microelectromechanical systems technology to deliver insulin.

    PubMed

    Liepmann, D; Pisano, A P; Sage, B

    1999-01-01

    A new microfabrication technology, microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), is envisioned for improved insulin delivery in the context of a device currently being developed for the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA). The drug delivery system utilizes MEMS technology to move and control fluids at the microscale, making possible the reconstitution and delivery of extremely small amounts of drug with extreme precision. In this article, the required microscale components that are currently being developed for the system are described. MEMS are made using fabrication methods similar to that utilized in microelectronics. Consequently, MEMS technology can be used to fabricate devices that are extremely small. The fundamental difference is that MEMS devices can either move themselves or control the movement of other materials, such as fluids. Furthermore, this manufacturing method is intrinsically low-cost and therefore is ideal for drug delivery systems. The current development of a new drug delivery system for controlled drug reconstitution and delivery system for DARPA is described as are the MEMS-based components for the required fluidic control. The adaptation of the system for insulin delivery is addressed and is envisioned to be a fully self-contained parenteral drug delivery system about the size of a 4-mm thick credit card.

  3. The Space Technology 5 Power System Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Karen D.; Hernandez-Pellerano, Amri I.

    2005-01-01

    The Space Technology 5 (ST5) mission is a NASA New Millennium Program (NMP) project that was developed to validate new technologies for future missions and to demonstrate the feasibility of building and launching multiple, miniature spacecraft that can operate as science probes, collecting research quality measurements. The three satellites in the ST5 constellation will be launched into a sun synchronous LEO (Low Earth Orbit) in early 2006. ST5 fits in the 25 kilogram and 24 Watt class of miniature but fully capable spacecraft. The power system design features the use of new technology components and a low voltage power bus. In order to hold the mass and volume low and to qualify new technologies for future use in space, high efficiency triple junction solar cells and a lithium ion battery were baselined into the design. The Power System Electronics (PSE) was designed for a high radiation environment and uses hybrid microcircuits for power switching and over current protection. The ST5 power system architecture and technologies will be presented.

  4. Optimizing the Stark-decelerator beamline for the trapping of cold molecules using evolutionary strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Gilijamse, Joop J.; Kuepper, Jochen; Hoekstra, Steven; Vanhaecke, Nicolas; Meerakker, Sebastiaan Y. T. van de; Meijer, Gerard

    2006-06-15

    We demonstrate feedback control optimization for the Stark deceleration and trapping of neutral polar molecules using evolutionary strategies. In a Stark-decelerator beamline, pulsed electric fields are used to decelerate OH radicals and subsequently store them in an electrostatic trap. The efficiency of the deceleration and trapping process is determined by the exact timings of the applied electric field pulses. Automated optimization of these timings yields an increase of 40% of the number of trapped OH radicals.

  5. Experimental Study on the Control of the Supersonic Axisymmetric Intake under the Acceleration/Deceleration Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kojima, Takayuki; Sato, Tetsuya; Tanatsugu, Nobuhiro; Enomoto, Yoshinari

    A control system of variable geometry mixed compression axisymmetric intake is experimentally studied at ONERA S3 supersonic wind tunnel. The acceleration/deceleration of the space plane is simulated by changing the free stream velocity. The intake is successfully controlled with 90% of the maximum total pressure recovery and mass capture ratio. In this experiment, two subjects about control of axisymmetric intake are also cleared. First, the effect of the trapping of the terminal shock by bleed holes causes the disturbances in the terminal shock control system. Second, a special compression form change operation is necessary when the intake compression form change from all external compression to mixed compression.

  6. The internet based on presence system technology*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Styugin, M.; Kaygorodov, A.

    2016-04-01

    In our study we analyze how to create the systems based on “communication-resource-presence”- technology. We formulate functional and architectural requirements. It is shown some new features in this systems that pertain to communication and information search on the Internet. The Internet passed three infrastructure stages from the communication between two hosts to the resource intermediation and communication in real presence systems. The systems based on the presence technologies have just started to develop. Our study shows what criteria’s they must meet. One of this criteria is the division of site resources into the "rooms" logically separated from each other. The users can see and connect to each other. The contextual data of user presence in a particular "room" can be used when searching for them in the context of professional competence.

  7. A Systemic Plan of Technology Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsu, Pi-Sui; Sharma, Priya

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to suggest a research-based systemic plan for educational researchers, practitioners, and policymakers involved in the change process to implement successful technology integration in the context of teacher education. This article provides a background about reform efforts in science education in the United States in…

  8. SITE TECHNOLOGY CAPSULE: SONOTECH PULSE COMBUSTION SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sonotech has targeted waste incineration as a potential application for this technology. Based on bench-scale rotary-kiln simulator tests, Sonotech proposed a demonstration under the SITE program to evaluate the Sonotech pulse combustion system on a larger scale at EPA's IRF in J...

  9. Television broadcast from space systems: Technology, costs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuccia, C. L.

    1981-01-01

    Broadcast satellite systems are described. The technologies which are unique to both high power broadcast satellites and small TV receive-only earth terminals are also described. A cost assessment of both space and earth segments is included and appendices present both a computer model for satellite cost and the pertinent reported experience with the Japanese BSE.

  10. Balloon launched Viking decelerator test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moog, R. D.; Michel, F. C.

    1973-01-01

    Four BLDT flights were conducted during the summer of 1972. The purpose of these tests was to qualify the Viking parachute system behind the full-scale Viking entry vehicle over the maximum range of entry conditions anticipated in the Viking '75 soft landing on Mars. A summary of the test series is presented. Test conditions ranged from a Mach number of 2.0 to 0.5 and dynamic pressure from 11.7 to 4.4 psf. This range of conditions covers the uncertainty in entry conditions at Mars due to atmospheric and entry performance uncertainties. Emphasis is placed on parachute performance and simulated Mars entry vehicle motions as influenced by the parachute performance. Conclusions are presented regarding the ability of the parachute to perform within the operational parameters required for a successful soft Martian landing. A list of references which covers all reports in the qualification test program is included.

  11. Electrical System Technology Working Group (WG) Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silverman, S.; Ford, F. E.

    1984-01-01

    The technology needs for space power systems (military, public, commercial) were assessed for the period 1995 to 2005 in the area of power management and distribution, components, circuits, subsystems, controls and autonomy, modeling and simulation. There was general agreement that the military requirements for pulse power would be the dominant factor in the growth of power systems. However, the growth of conventional power to the 100 to 250kw range would be in the public sector, with low Earth orbit needs being the driver toward large 100kw systems. An overall philosophy for large power system development is also described.

  12. A Probabilistic System Analysis of Intelligent Propulsion System Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tong, Michael T.

    2007-01-01

    NASA s Intelligent Propulsion System Technology (Propulsion 21) project focuses on developing adaptive technologies that will enable commercial gas turbine engines to produce fewer emissions and less noise while increasing reliability. It features adaptive technologies that have included active tip-clearance control for turbine and compressor, active combustion control, turbine aero-thermal and flow control, and enabling technologies such as sensors which are reliable at high operating temperatures and are minimally intrusive. A probabilistic system analysis is performed to evaluate the impact of these technologies on aircraft CO2 (directly proportional to fuel burn) and LTO (landing and takeoff) NO(x) reductions. A 300-passenger aircraft, with two 396-kN thrust (85,000-pound) engines is chosen for the study. The results show that NASA s Intelligent Propulsion System technologies have the potential to significantly reduce the CO2 and NO(x) emissions. The results are used to support informed decisionmaking on the development of the intelligent propulsion system technology portfolio for CO2 and NO(x) reductions.

  13. Dissolution deceleration of calcium phosphate crystals at constant undersaturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jingwu; Nancollas, G. H.

    1992-09-01

    The dissolution of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (CaHPO 4·2H 2O) and octacalcium phosphate (Ca 8H 2(PO 4) 6·5H 2O) has been followed as a function of time at constant undersaturations. The rate, after correction for changes in crystal surface area, decreases with time in spite of the sustained driving force, suggesting a decrease in the density of active sites on the crystal surface. This deceleration becomes more pronounced as the undersaturation decreases, leading to an increase in the effective dissolution order. The results of experiments in both Ultrapure and Reagent grade electrolyte solutions suggest that gradual contamination of the crystal surface is unlikely to account for the rate deceleration which may be interpreted by a decrease in the dislocation density during dissolution.

  14. Optical Stark decelerator for molecules with a traveling potential well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Lianzhong; Hou, Shunyong; Yin, Jianping

    2017-03-01

    We propose a versatile scheme to slow supersonically cooled molecules using a decelerating potential well, obtained by steering a focusing laser beam onto a pair of spinning reflective mirrors under a high-speed brake. The longitudinal motion of molecules in the moving red-detuned light field is analyzed and their corresponding phase-space stability is investigated. Trajectories of C H4 molecules under the influence of the potential well are simulated using the Monte Carlo method. For instance, with a laser beam of power 20 kW focused onto a spot of waist radius 40-100 μm, corresponding to a peak laser intensity on the order of ˜108W /c m2 , a C H4 molecule of ˜250 m /s can be decelerated to ˜10 m /s over a distance of a few centimeters on a time scale of hundreds of microseconds.

  15. An electrostatic deceleration lens for highly charged ions.

    PubMed

    Rajput, J; Roy, A; Kanjilal, D; Ahuja, R; Safvan, C P

    2010-04-01

    The design and implementation of a purely electrostatic deceleration lens used to obtain beams of highly charged ions at very low energies is presented. The design of the lens is such that it can be used with parallel as well as diverging incoming beams and delivers a well focused low energy beam at the target. In addition, tuning of the final energy of the beam over a wide range (1 eV/q to several hundred eV/q, where q is the beam charge state) is possible without any change in hardware configuration. The deceleration lens was tested with Ar(8+), extracted from an electron cyclotron resonance ion source, having an initial energy of 30 keV/q and final energies as low as 70 eV/q have been achieved.

  16. Undulant Universe: Expansion with alternating eras of acceleration and deceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Barenboim, Gabriela; Requejo, Olga Mena; Quigg, Chris

    2005-03-15

    If the equation of state for 'dark energy' varies periodically, the expansion of the Universe may have undergone alternating eras of acceleration and deceleration. We examine a specific form that survives existing observational tests, does not single out the present state of the Universe as exceptional, and suggests a future much like the matter-dominated past: a smooth expansion without a final inflationary epoch.

  17. Measurement of the Decelerating Wake in a Plasma Wakefield Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Blumenfeld, I.; Decker, F. J.; Hogan, M. J.; Ischebeck, R.; Iverson, R. H.; Kirby, N.; Siemann, R. H.; Walz, D. R.; Clayton, C. E.; Huang, C.; Joshi, C.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K. A.; Mori, W. B.; Zhou, M.; Katsouleas, T.; Muggli, P.; Oz, E.

    2009-01-22

    Recent experiments at SLAC have shown that high gradient acceleration of electrons is achievable in meter scale plasmas. Results from these experiments show that the wakefield is sensitive to parameters in the electron beam which drives it. In the experiment the bunch lengths were varied systematically at constant charge. The effort to extract a measurement of the decelerating wake from the maximum energy loss of the electron beam is discussed.

  18. Physiological constraints on deceleration during the aerocapture of manned vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyne, J. E.

    1992-01-01

    The peak deceleration load allowed for aerobraking of manned vehicles is a critical parameter in planning future excursions to Mars. However, considerable variation exists in the limits used by various investigators. The goal of this study was to determine the most appropriate level for this limit. Methods: Since previous U.S. space flights have been limited to 84 days duration, Soviet flight results were examined. Published details of Soviet entry trajectories were not available. However, personal communication with Soviet cosmonauts suggested that peak entry loads of 5-6 G had been encountered upon return from 8 months in orbit. Soyuz entry capsule's characteristics were established and the capsule's entry trajectory was numerically calculated. The results confirm a peak load of 5 to 6 G. Results: Although the Soviet flights were of shorter duration than expected Mars missions, evidence exists that the deceleration experience is applicable. G tolerance has been shown to stabilize after 1 to 3 months in space if adequate countermeasures are used. The calculated Soyuz deceleration histories are graphically compared with those expected for Mars aerobraking. Conclusions: Previous spaceflight experience supports the use of a 5 G limit for the aerocapture of a manned vehicle at Mars.

  19. Hypervelocity Technology Escape System Concepts. Volume 1. Development and Evaluation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-07-01

    the areas of virtual instrument technology, helmet-mounted display technology, voice interface technology and tactile data input technology, and...Instrumentation. The voice interface technology allows the pilot to simply talk to the flight director system and avionics system and the craft can respond to

  20. The Dairy Technology System in Venezuela. Summary of Research 79.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nieto, Ruben D.; Henderson, Janet L.

    A study examined the agricultural technology system in Venezuela with emphasis on the dairy industry. An analytical framework was used to identify the strengths and weaknesses of the following components of Venezuela's agricultural technology system: policy, technology development, technology transfer, and technology use. Selected government…

  1. Utilizing Internet Technologies in Observatory Control Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cording, Dean

    2002-12-01

    The 'Internet boom' of the past few years has spurred the development of a number of technologies to provide services such as secure communications, reliable messaging, information publishing and application distribution for commercial applications. Over the same period, a new generation of computer languages have also developed to provide object oriented design and development, improved reliability, and cross platform compatibility. Whilst the business models of the 'dot.com' era proved to be largely unviable, the technologies that they were based upon have survived and have matured to the point were they can now be utilized to build secure, robust and complete observatory control control systems. This paper will describe how Electro Optic Systems has utilized these technologies in the development of its third generation Robotic Observatory Control System (ROCS). ROCS provides an extremely flexible configuration capability within a control system structure to provide truly autonomous robotic observatory operation including observation scheduling. ROCS was built using Internet technologies such as Java, Java Messaging Service (JMS), Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP), Secure Sockets Layer (SSL), eXtendible Markup Language (XML), Hypertext Transport Protocol (HTTP) and Java WebStart. ROCS was designed to be capable of controlling all aspects of an observatory and be able to be reconfigured to handle changing equipment configurations or user requirements without the need for an expert computer programmer. ROCS consists of many small components, each designed to perform a specific task, with the configuration of the system specified using a simple meta language. The use of small components facilitates testing and makes it possible to prove that the system is correct.

  2. Aviation system capacity improvements through technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, W. Don

    1995-01-01

    A study was conducted with the primary objective of determining the impact of technology on capacity improvements in the U.S. air transportation system and, consequently, to assess the areas where NASA's expertise and technical contributions would be the most beneficial. The outlook of the study is considered both near- and long-term (5 to 25 years). The approach was that of actively working with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Flight Transportation Laboratory and included interactions with 'users' outside of both agencies as well as with organizations within. This report includes an overall survey of what are believed to be the causes of the capacity problems, ongoing work with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to alleviate the problems, and identifies improvements in technology that would increase capacity and reduce delays.

  3. Methods to Determine the Deformation of the IRVE Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, William R.

    2011-01-01

    Small resonant targets used in conjunction with a microwave reflectometer to determine the deformation of the Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (HIAD) during reentry are investigated. The reflectometer measures the distance to the targets and from this the HIAD deformation is determined. The HIAD is used by the Inflatable Reentry Vehicle Experiment (IRVE) which investigates the use of inflatable heat shields for atmospheric reentry. After several different microwave reflectometer systems were analyzed and compared it was determined that the most desirable for this application is the Frequency Doubling Target method.

  4. 1s lamb shift in hydrogenlike uranium measured on cooled, decelerated ion beams.

    PubMed

    Stohlker, T; Mokler, P H; Bosch, F; Dunford, R W; Franzke, F; Klepper, O; Kozhuharov, C; Ludziejewski, T; Nolden, F; Reich, H; Rymuza, P; Stachura, Z; Steck, M; Swiat, P; Warczak, A

    2000-10-09

    The Lyman- alpha transitions of hydrogenlike uranium associated with electron capture were measured in collisions of stored bare U (92+) ions with gaseous targets at the storage ring ESR. By applying the deceleration technique, the experiment was performed at slow collision energies in order to reduce the uncertainties associated with Doppler corrections. From the measured centroid energies, a ground state Lamb shift of 468 eV+/-13 eV is deduced which gives the most precise test of quantum electrodynamics for a single electron system in the strong field regime. In particular, the technique applied paves the way towards the 1 eV precision regime.

  5. Particulate control system for biomass firing technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Easom, B.H.; Smolensky, L.A.; Wysk, S.R.

    1996-12-31

    The new particulate control equipment, the so-called Core Separator, overcomes most of the limitations inherent in conventional particulate control systems and can be effectively adapted for biomass applications. The Core Separator is a mechanical collector; however, this technology overcomes the performance limitation inherent in cyclones by performing the tasks of separation and collection in two separate components. The separation process is less affected by secondary flows and is much more efficient than the collection process. Also, the components of the system are arranged in such a way that the separation process determines the system efficiency. As a result, particulate emission rates downstream of this system are one fourth of those from the most efficient cyclones. This technology has been demonstrated through commercial unit installations in the U.S. and abroad. It has been used for industrial separations including coal fly ash, minerals, and chemical recovery applications. It is considered a lower-cost alternative to fabric filters and electrostatic precipitators, albeit one that can meet or exceed regulations for particulate emissions. Development of this technology has been funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Environmental Protection Agency, and Electric Power Research Institute.

  6. Satellite communications systems and technology. Executive summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edelson, Burton I.; Pelton, Joseph N.; Bostian, Charles W.; Brandon, William T.; Chan, Vincent W. S.; Hager, E. Paul; Helm, Neil R.; Jennings, Raymond D.; Kwan, Robert; Mahle, Christoph E.

    1993-07-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the National Science Foundation (NSF) commissioned a panel of U.S. experts to study the international status of satellite communications systems and technology. The study covers emerging systems concepts, applications, services, and the attendant technologies. The panel members travelled to Europe, Japan, and Russia to gather information first-hand; they visited 17 sites in Europe, 20 sites in Japan, and four in Russia. These included major manufacturers, government organizations, service providers, and associated R&D facilities. The panel's report was reviewed by the sites visited, by the panel, and by representatives of U.S. industry. The report details the information collected and compares it to U.S. activities.

  7. The Space Technology 5 Avionics System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Speer, Dave; Jackson, George; Stewart, Karen; Hernandez-Pellerano, Amri

    2004-01-01

    The Space Technology 5 (ST5) mission is a NASA New Millennium Program project that will validate new technologies for future space science missions and demonstrate the feasibility of building launching and operating multiple, miniature spacecraft that can collect research-quality in-situ science measurements. The three satellites in the ST5 constellation will be launched into a sun-synchronous Earth orbit in early 2006. ST5 fits into the 25-kilogram and 24-watt class of very small but fully capable spacecraft. The new technologies and design concepts for a compact power and command and data handling (C&DH) avionics system are presented. The 2-card ST5 avionics design incorporates new technology components while being tightly constrained in mass, power and volume. In order to hold down the mass and volume, and quali& new technologies for fUture use in space, high efficiency triple-junction solar cells and a lithium-ion battery were baselined into the power system design. The flight computer is co-located with the power system electronics in an integral spacecraft structural enclosure called the card cage assembly. The flight computer has a full set of uplink, downlink and solid-state recording capabilities, and it implements a new CMOS Ultra-Low Power Radiation Tolerant logic technology. There were a number of challenges imposed by the ST5 mission. Specifically, designing a micro-sat class spacecraft demanded that minimizing mass, volume and power dissipation would drive the overall design. The result is a very streamlined approach, while striving to maintain a high level of capability, The mission's radiation requirements, along with the low voltage DC power distribution, limited the selection of analog parts that can operate within these constraints. The challenge of qualifying new technology components for the space environment within a short development schedule was another hurdle. The mission requirements also demanded magnetic cleanliness in order to reduce

  8. Automated System Organizations Under Spatial Grasp Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    This mode of high-level system vision based on holistic and gestalt principles [6-8] rather than cooperating parts or agents [1] has psychological ...M. Wertheimer, “ Gestalt Theory“, Erlangen. Berlin, 1925. [7] P. Sapaty, “ Gestalt -Based Ideology and Technology for Spatial Control of Distributed...Dynamic Systems”, International Gestalt Theory Congress, 16th Scientific Convention of the GTA, University of Osnabrück, Germany, March 26 - 29

  9. Technology assessment of wind energy conversion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, B. W.; Merson, T. J.

    1980-09-01

    Environmental data for wind energy conversion systems (WECSs) have been generated in support of the Technology Assessment of Solar Energy (TASE) program. Two candidates have been chosen to characterize the WECS that might be deployed if this technology makes a significant contribution to the national energy requirements. One WECS is a large machine of 1.5-MW-rated capacity that can be used by utilities. The other WECS is a small machine that is characteristic of units that might be used to meet residential or small business energy requirements. Energy storage systems are discussed for each machine to address the intermittent nature of wind power. Many types of WECSs are being studied and a brief review of the technology is included to give background for choosing horizontal axis designs for this study. Cost estimates have been made for both large and small systems as required for input to the Strategic Environmental Assessment Simulation (SEAS) computer program. Material requirements, based on current generation WECSs, are discussed and a general discussion of environmental impacts associated with WECS deployment is presented.

  10. NASA Radioisotope Power System Program - Technology and Flight Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutliff, Thomas J.; Dudzinski, Leonard A.

    2009-01-01

    NASA sometimes conducts robotic science missions to solar system destinations for which the most appropriate power source is derived from thermal-to-electrical energy conversion of nuclear decay of radioactive isotopes. Typically the use of a radioisotope power system (RPS) has been limited to medium and large-scale missions, with 26 U,S, missions having used radioisotope power since 1961. A research portfolio of ten selected technologies selected in 2003 has progressed to a point of maturity, such that one particular technology may he considered for future mission use: the Advanced Stirling Converter. The Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator is a new power system in development based on this Stirling cycle dynamic power conversion technology. This system may be made available for smaller, Discovery-class NASA science missions. To assess possible uses of this new capability, NASA solicited and funded nine study teams to investigate unique opportunities for exploration of potential destinations for small Discovery-class missions. The influence of the results of these studies and the ongoing development of the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator system are discussed in the context of an integrated Radioisotope Power System program. Discussion of other and future technology investments and program opportunities are provided.

  11. Small Aircraft Transportation System Concept and Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Bruce J.; Durham, Michael H.; Tarry, Scott E.

    2005-01-01

    This paper summarizes both the vision and the early public-private collaborative research for the Small Aircraft Transportation System (SATS). The paper outlines an operational definition of SATS, describes how SATS conceptually differs from current air transportation capabilities, introduces four SATS operating capabilities, and explains the relation between the SATS operating capabilities and the potential for expanded air mobility. The SATS technology roadmap encompasses on-demand, widely distributed, point-to-point air mobility, through hired-pilot modes in the nearer-term, and through self-operated user modes in the farther-term. The nearer-term concept is based on aircraft and airspace technologies being developed to make the use of smaller, more widely distributed community reliever and general aviation airports and their runways more useful in more weather conditions, in commercial hired-pilot service modes. The farther-term vision is based on technical concepts that could be developed to simplify or automate many of the operational functions in the aircraft and the airspace for meeting future public transportation needs, in personally operated modes. NASA technology strategies form a roadmap between the nearer-term concept and the farther-term vision. This paper outlines a roadmap for scalable, on-demand, distributed air mobility technologies for vehicle and airspace systems. The audiences for the paper include General Aviation manufacturers, small aircraft transportation service providers, the flight training industry, airport and transportation authorities at the Federal, state and local levels, and organizations involved in planning for future National Airspace System advancements.

  12. Key technology issues for space robotic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schappell, Roger T.

    1987-01-01

    Robotics has become a key technology consideration for the Space Station project to enable enhanced crew productivity and to maximize safety. There are many robotic functions currently being studied, including Space Station assembly, repair, and maintenance as well as satellite refurbishment, repair, and retrieval. Another area of concern is that of providing ground based experimenters with a natural interface that they might directly interact with their hardware onboard the Space Station or ancillary spacecraft. The state of the technology is such that the above functions are feasible; however, considerable development work is required for operation in this gravity-free vacuum environment. Furthermore, a program plan is evolving within NASA that will capitalize on recent government, university, and industrial robotics research and development (R and D) accomplishments. A brief summary is presented of the primary technology issues and physical examples are provided of the state of the technology for the initial operational capability (IOC) system as well as for the eventual final operational capability (FOC) Space Station.

  13. Deep Space Systems Technology Program Future Deliveries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salvo, Christopher G.; Keuneke, Matthew S.

    2000-01-01

    NASA is in a period of frequent launches of low cost deep space missions with challenging performance needs. The modest budgets of these missions make it impossible for each to develop its own technology, therefore, efficient and effective development and insertion of technology for these missions must be approached at a higher level than has been done in the past. The Deep Space Systems Technology Program (DSST), often referred to as X2000, has been formed to address this need. The program is divided into a series of "Deliveries" that develop and demonstrate a set of spacecraft system capabilities with broad applicability for use by multiple missions. The First Delivery Project, to be completed in 2001, will provide a one MRAD-tolerant flight computer, power switching electronics, efficient radioisotope power source, and a transponder with services at 8.4 GHz and 32 GHz bands. Plans call for a Second Delivery in late 2003 to enable complete deep space systems in the 10 to 50 kg class, and a Third Delivery built around Systems on a Chip (extreme levels of electronic and microsystems integration) around 2006. Formulation of Future Deliveries (past the First Delivery) is ongoing and includes plans for such developments as highly miniaturized digital/analog/power electronics, optical communications, multifunctional structures, miniature lightweight propulsion, advanced thermal control techniques, highly efficient radioisotope power sources, and a unified flight ground software architecture to support the needs of future highly intelligent space systems. All developments are targeted at broad applicability and reuse, and will be commercialized within the US.

  14. Innovative technology summary report: Transportable vitrification system

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-01

    At the end of the cold war, many of the Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) major nuclear weapons facilities refocused their efforts on finding technically sound, economic, regulatory compliant, and stakeholder acceptable treatment solutions for the legacy of mixed wastes they had produced. In particular, an advanced stabilization process that could effectively treat the large volumes of settling pond and treatment sludges was needed. Based on this need, DOE and its contractors initiated in 1993 the EM-50 sponsored development effort required to produce a deployable mixed waste vitrification system. As a consequence, the Transportable Vitrification System (TVS) effort was undertaken with the primary requirement to develop and demonstrate the technology and associated facility to effectively vitrify, for compliant disposal, the applicable mixed waste sludges and solids across the various DOE complex sites. After 4 years of development testing with both crucible and pilot-scale melters, the TVS facility was constructed by Envitco, evaluated and demonstrated with surrogates, and then successfully transported to the ORNL ETTP site and demonstrated with actual mixed wastes in the fall of 1997. This paper describes the technology, its performance, the technology applicability and alternatives, cost, regulatory and policy issues, and lessons learned.

  15. Decelerating Flows in the TeV Blazars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazanas, Demosthenes

    2004-01-01

    TeV emission from a class of BL Lacertae (BL) objects is commonly modeled as radiation from relativistically moving homogeneous plasma blobs. In the context of these models, the blob Lorentz factors needed to reproduce the (corrected for absorption by the IR background) TeV emission are large ($\\delta \\gtrsim 50$) are required to reproduce via Synchrotron-Self Compton (SSC) the observed TeV emission. The main reason for this is that stronger beaming eases the problem of the lack of $\\sim$ IR-UV synchrotron seed photons needed to produce the de-absorbed $\\sim$ few TeV peak of the spectral energy distribution (SED). However, such high Doppler factors are in strong disagreement with the unified scheme, according to which BLs are FR I radio galaxies with their jets closely aligned to the line of sight. Here, motivated by the detection of sub-luminal velocities in the sub-pc scale jets of the best studied TeV blazars, MKN 421 and MKN 501. we examine the possibility that the relativistic flow in the TeV BLs is longitudinally decelerating. In this case, the problem of the missing seed photons is solved due to Upstream Compton (UC) scattering, a process in which the upstream energetic electrons from the fast base of the flow 'see' the synchrotron seed photons produced in the slow part of the flow relativistically beamed. Modest Lorentz factors ($\\Gamma kim 15s). decelerating down to values compatible with the recent radio interferometric observations, reproduce the $\\sim$ few TeV peak energy of these sources. Furthermore, such decelerating flows are shown to be in agreement with the BL - FR I unification.

  16. Predictors of older drivers' involvement in rapid deceleration events.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, A; Coxon, K; Chevalier, A J; Clarke, E; Rogers, K; Brown, J; Boufous, S; Ivers, R; Keay, L

    2017-01-01

    Rapid deceleration occurs when substantial force slows the speed of a vehicle. Rapid deceleration events (RDEs) have been proposed as a surrogate safety measure. As there is concern about crash involvement of older drivers and the effect of age-related declining visual and cognitive function on driving performance, we examined the relationship between RDEs and older driver's vision, cognitive function and driving confidence, using naturalistic driving measures. Participants aged 75 to 94 years had their vehicle instrumented for 12 months. To minimise the chance of identifying false positives, accelerometer data was processed to identify RDEs with a substantial deceleration of >750 milli-g (7.35m/s(2)). We examined the incidence of RDEs amongst older drivers, and how this behaviour is affected by differences in age; sex; visual function, cognitive function; driving confidence; and declines over the 12 months. Almost two-thirds (64%) of participants were involved in at least one RDE, and 22% of these participants experienced a meaningful decline in contrast sensitivity during the 12 months. We conducted regression modelling to examine associations between RDEs and predictive measures adjusted for (i) duration of monitoring and (ii) distance driven. We found the rate of RDEs per distance increased with age; although, this did not remain in the multivariate model. In the multivariate model, we found older drivers who experienced a decline in contrast sensitivity over the 12 months and those with lower baseline driving confidence were at increased risk of involvement in RDEs adjusted for distance driven. In other studies, contrast sensitivity has been associated with increased crash involvement for older drivers. These findings lend support for the use of RDEs as a surrogate safety measure, and demonstrate an association between a surrogate safety measure and a decline in contrast sensitivity of older drivers.

  17. Ablation and deceleration of mass-driver launched projectiles for space disposal of nuclear wastes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, C.; Bowen, S. W.

    1981-01-01

    The energy cost of launching a projectile containing nuclear waste is two orders of magnitude lower with a mass driver than with a typical rocket system. A mass driver scheme will be feasible, however, only if ablation and deceleration are within certain tolerable limits. It is shown that if a hemisphere-cylinder-shaped projectile protected thermally with a graphite nose is launched vertically to attain a velocity of 17 km/sec at an altitude of 40 km, the mass loss from ablation during atmospheric flight will be less than 0.1 ton, provided the radius of the projectile is under 20 cm and the projectile's mass is of the order of 1 ton. The velocity loss from drag will vary from 0.4 to 30 km/sec, depending on the mass and radius of the projectile, the smaller velocity loss corresponding to large mass and small radius. Ablation is always within a tolerable range for schemes using a mass driver launcher to dispose of nuclear wastes outside the solar system. Deceleration can also be held in the tolerable range if the mass and diameter of the projectile are properly chosen.

  18. Collective Deceleration of Laser-Driven Electron Bunches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, S.; Xu, J.; Khrennikov, K.; Cardenas, D. E.; Wenz, J.; Heigoldt, M.; Hofmann, L.; Veisz, L.; Karsch, S.

    2016-09-01

    Few-fs electron bunches from laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) can efficiently drive plasma wakefields (PWFs), as shown by their propagation through underdense plasma in two experiments. A strong and density-insensitive deceleration of the bunches has been observed in 2 mm of 1 018 cm-3 density plasma with 5.1 GV /m average gradient, which is attributed to a self-driven PWF. This observation implies that the physics of PWFs, usually relying on large-scale rf accelerators as drivers, can be studied by tabletop LWFA electron sources.

  19. Ubiquitous Robotic Technology for Smart Manufacturing System

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Liyu; Qiu, Qiang; Cao, Qixin

    2016-01-01

    As the manufacturing tasks become more individualized and more flexible, the machines in smart factory are required to do variable tasks collaboratively without reprogramming. This paper for the first time discusses the similarity between smart manufacturing systems and the ubiquitous robotic systems and makes an effort on deploying ubiquitous robotic technology to the smart factory. Specifically, a component based framework is proposed in order to enable the communication and cooperation of the heterogeneous robotic devices. Further, compared to the service robotic domain, the smart manufacturing systems are often in larger size. So a hierarchical planning method was implemented to improve the planning efficiency. A test bed of smart factory is developed. It demonstrates that the proposed framework is suitable for industrial domain, and the hierarchical planning method is able to solve large problems intractable with flat methods. PMID:27446206

  20. Ubiquitous Robotic Technology for Smart Manufacturing System.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenshan; Zhu, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Liyu; Qiu, Qiang; Cao, Qixin

    2016-01-01

    As the manufacturing tasks become more individualized and more flexible, the machines in smart factory are required to do variable tasks collaboratively without reprogramming. This paper for the first time discusses the similarity between smart manufacturing systems and the ubiquitous robotic systems and makes an effort on deploying ubiquitous robotic technology to the smart factory. Specifically, a component based framework is proposed in order to enable the communication and cooperation of the heterogeneous robotic devices. Further, compared to the service robotic domain, the smart manufacturing systems are often in larger size. So a hierarchical planning method was implemented to improve the planning efficiency. A test bed of smart factory is developed. It demonstrates that the proposed framework is suitable for industrial domain, and the hierarchical planning method is able to solve large problems intractable with flat methods.

  1. Advanced Technology System Scheduling Governance Model

    SciTech Connect

    Ang, Jim; Carnes, Brian; Hoang, Thuc; Vigil, Manuel

    2015-06-11

    In the fall of 2005, the Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Program appointed a team to formulate a governance model for allocating resources and scheduling the stockpile stewardship workload on ASC capability systems. This update to the original document takes into account the new technical challenges and roles for advanced technology (AT) systems and the new ASC Program workload categories that must be supported. The goal of this updated model is to effectively allocate and schedule AT computing resources among all three National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) laboratories for weapons deliverables that merit priority on this class of resource. The process outlined below describes how proposed work can be evaluated and approved for resource allocations while preserving high effective utilization of the systems. This approach will provide the broadest possible benefit to the Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP).

  2. Project plan hydrogen energy systems technology. Phase 1: Hydrogen energy systems technology study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    An overview of the potential need for hydrogen as a source of energy in the future was presented in order to identify and define the technology requirements for the most promising approaches to meet that need. The following study objectives were discussed: (1) determination of the future demand for hydrogen, based on current trends and anticipated new uses, (2) identification of the critical research and technology advances required to meet this need considering, to the extent possible, raw material limitations, economics, and environmental effects, and (3) definition and recommendation of the scope and space of a National Hydrogen Energy Systems Technology Program and outline of a Program Development Plan.

  3. Wearable smart systems: from technologies to integrated systems.

    PubMed

    Lymberis, A

    2011-01-01

    Wearable technology and integrated systems, so called Smart Wearable Systems (SWS) have demonstrated during the last 10-15 years significant advances in terms of, miniaturisation, seamless integration, data processing & communication, functionalisation and comfort. This is mainly due to the huge progress in sciences and technologies e.g. biomedical and micro & nano technologies, but also to a strong demand for new applications such as continuous personal health monitoring, healthy lifestyle support, human performance monitoring and support of professionals at risk. Development of wearable systems based of smart textile have, in addition, benefited from the eagerness of textile industry to develop new value-added apparel products like functionalized garments and smart clothing. Research and development in these areas has been strongly promoted worldwide. In Europe the major R&D activities were supported through the Information & Communication Technologies (ICT) priority of the R&D EU programs. The paper presents and discusses the main achievements towards integrated systems as well as future challenges to be met in order to reach a market with reliable and high value-added products.

  4. Space Launch System Upper Stage Technology Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holladay, Jon; Hampton, Bryan; Monk, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    The Space Launch System (SLS) is envisioned as a heavy-lift vehicle that will provide the foundation for future beyond low-Earth orbit (LEO) exploration missions. Previous studies have been performed to determine the optimal configuration for the SLS and the applicability of commercial off-the-shelf in-space stages for Earth departure. Currently NASA is analyzing the concept of a Dual Use Upper Stage (DUUS) that will provide LEO insertion and Earth departure burns. This paper will explore candidate in-space stages based on the DUUS design for a wide range of beyond LEO missions. Mission payloads will range from small robotic systems up to human systems with deep space habitats and landers. Mission destinations will include cislunar space, Mars, Jupiter, and Saturn. Given these wide-ranging mission objectives, a vehicle-sizing tool has been developed to determine the size of an Earth departure stage based on the mission objectives. The tool calculates masses for all the major subsystems of the vehicle including propellant loads, avionics, power, engines, main propulsion system components, tanks, pressurization system and gases, primary structural elements, and secondary structural elements. The tool uses an iterative sizing algorithm to determine the resulting mass of the stage. Any input into one of the subsystem sizing routines or the mission parameters can be treated as a parametric sweep or as a distribution for use in Monte Carlo analysis. Taking these factors together allows for multi-variable, coupled analysis runs. To increase confidence in the tool, the results have been verified against two point-of-departure designs of the DUUS. The tool has also been verified against Apollo moon mission elements and other manned space systems. This paper will focus on trading key propulsion technologies including chemical, Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP), and Solar Electric Propulsion (SEP). All of the key performance inputs and relationships will be presented and

  5. System Composer: Technology for rapid system integration and remote collaboration

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, B.R.; Palmquist, R.D.

    1996-03-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed an approach to the design, evaluation, deployment and operation of intelligent systems which is called System Composer. This toolkit provides an infrastructure and architecture for robot and automation system users to readily integrate system components and share mechatronic, sensor, and information resources over networks. The technology described in this paper provides a framework for real-time collaboration between researchers, manufacturing entities, design entities, and others without regard to relative location. An overview of the toolkit including its elements and architecture is provided along with examples of its use.

  6. 3D optical measuring technologies and systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chugui, Yuri V.

    2005-02-01

    The results of the R & D activity of TDI SIE SB RAS in the field of the 3D optical measuring technologies and systems for noncontact 3D optical dimensional inspection applied to atomic and railway industry safety problems are presented. This activity includes investigations of diffraction phenomena on some 3D objects, using the original constructive calculation method. The efficient algorithms for precise determining the transverse and longitudinal sizes of 3D objects of constant thickness by diffraction method, peculiarities on formation of the shadow and images of the typical elements of the extended objects were suggested. Ensuring the safety of nuclear reactors and running trains as well as their high exploitation reliability requires a 100% noncontact precise inspection of geometrical parameters of their components. To solve this problem we have developed methods and produced the technical vision measuring systems LMM, CONTROL, PROFIL, and technologies for noncontact 3D dimensional inspection of grid spacers and fuel elements for the nuclear reactor VVER-1000 and VVER-440, as well as automatic laser diagnostic COMPLEX for noncontact inspection of geometric parameters of running freight car wheel pairs. The performances of these systems and the results of industrial testing are presented and discussed. The created devices are in pilot operation at Atomic and Railway Companies.

  7. Aerocapture Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keys, Andrew S.

    2006-01-01

    Aeroassist technology development is a vital part of the NASA In-Space Propulsion Technology (ISPT) Program. One of the main focus areas of ISPT is aeroassist technologies through the Aerocapture Technology (AT) Activity. Within the ISPT, the current aeroassist technology development focus is aerocapture. Aerocapture relies on the exchange of momentum with an atmosphere to achieve thrust, in this case a decelerating thrust leading to orbit capture. Without aerocapture, a substantial propulsion system would be needed on the spacecraft to perform the same reduction of velocity. This could cause reductions in the science payload delivered to the destination, increases in the size of the launch vehicle (to carry the additional fuel required for planetary capture) or could simply make the mission impossible due to additional propulsion requirements. The AT is advancing each technology needed for the successful implementation of aerocapture in future missions. The technology development focuses on both rigid aeroshell systems as well as the development of inflatable aerocapture systems, advanced aeroshell performance sensors, lightweight structure and higher temperature adhesives. Inflatable systems such as tethered trailing ballutes ('balloon parachutes'), clamped ballutes, and inflatable aeroshells are also under development. Aerocapture-specific computational tools required to support future aerocapture missions are also an integral part of the ATP. Tools include: engineering reference atmosphere models, guidance and navigation, aerothermodynamic modeling, radiation modeling and flight simulation. Systems analysis plays a key role in the AT development process. The NASA in-house aerocapture systems analysis team has been taken with multiple systems definition and concept studies to complement the technology development tasks. The team derives science requirements, develops guidance and navigation algorithms, as well as engineering reference atmosphere models and

  8. NCDC mass storage systems and technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Dick

    1993-01-01

    National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) data management issues are discussed, such as nature of holdings, history of the site, popularity of data sets, media/technology used for storage, volume distributed per month, mode of distribution, most frequently encountered problems, type of media requested/used, and evolution of media. Current holdings at NCDC are 107.8 terabytes of digital data and about 0.3 terabytes of manuscript data. The nexrad radar system is expected to generate approximately 88 terabytes per year by 1996.

  9. Advanced Technology Lifecycle Analysis System (ATLAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Neil, Daniel A.; Mankins, John C.

    2004-01-01

    Developing credible mass and cost estimates for space exploration and development architectures require multidisciplinary analysis based on physics calculations, and parametric estimates derived from historical systems. Within the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), concurrent engineering environment (CEE) activities integrate discipline oriented analysis tools through a computer network and accumulate the results of a multidisciplinary analysis team via a centralized database or spreadsheet Each minute of a design and analysis study within a concurrent engineering environment is expensive due the size of the team and supporting equipment The Advanced Technology Lifecycle Analysis System (ATLAS) reduces the cost of architecture analysis by capturing the knowledge of discipline experts into system oriented spreadsheet models. A framework with a user interface presents a library of system models to an architecture analyst. The analyst selects models of launchers, in-space transportation systems, and excursion vehicles, as well as space and surface infrastructure such as propellant depots, habitats, and solar power satellites. After assembling the architecture from the selected models, the analyst can create a campaign comprised of missions spanning several years. The ATLAS controller passes analyst specified parameters to the models and data among the models. An integrator workbook calls a history based parametric analysis cost model to determine the costs. Also, the integrator estimates the flight rates, launched masses, and architecture benefits over the years of the campaign. An accumulator workbook presents the analytical results in a series of bar graphs. In no way does ATLAS compete with a CEE; instead, ATLAS complements a CEE by ensuring that the time of the experts is well spent Using ATLAS, an architecture analyst can perform technology sensitivity analysis, study many scenarios, and see the impact of design decisions. When the analyst is

  10. Memory System Technologies for Future High-End Computing Systems

    SciTech Connect

    McKee, S A; de Supinski, B R; Mueller, F; Tyson, G S

    2003-05-16

    Our ability to solve Grand Challenge Problems in computing hinges on the development of reliable and efficient High-End Computing systems. Unfortunately, the increasing gap between memory and processor speeds remains one of the major bottlenecks in modern architectures. Uniprocessor nodes still suffer, but symmetric multiprocessor nodes--where access to physical memory is shared among all processors--are among the hardest hit. In the latter case, the memory system must juggle multiple working sets and maintain memory coherence, on top of simply responding to access requests. To illustrate the severity of the current situation, consider two important examples: even the high-performance parallel supercomputers in use at Department of Energy National labs observe single-processor utilization rates as low as 5%, and transaction processing commercial workloads see utilizations of at most about 33%. A wealth of research demonstrates that traditional memory systems are incapable of bridging the processor/memory performance gap, and the problem continues to grow. The success of future High-End Computing platforms therefore depends on our developing hardware and software technologies to dramatically relieve the memory bottleneck. In order to take better advantage of the tremendous computing power of modern microprocessors and future High-End systems, we consider it crucial to develop the hardware for intelligent, adaptable memory systems; the middleware and OS modifications to manage them; and the compiler technology and performance tools to exploit them. Taken together, these will provide the foundations for meeting the requirements of future generations of performance-critical, parallel systems based on either uniprocessor or SMP nodes (including PIM organizations). We feel that such solutions should not be vendor-specific, but should be sufficiently general and adaptable such that the technologies could be leveraged by any commercial vendor of High-End Computing systems

  11. Leg joint function during walking acceleration and deceleration.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Mu; Jindrich, Devin L

    2016-01-04

    Although constant-average-velocity walking has been extensively studied, less is known about walking maneuvers that change speed. We investigated the function of individual leg joints when humans walked at a constant speed, accelerated or decelerated. We hypothesized that leg joints make different functional contributions to maneuvers. Specifically, we hypothesized that the hip generates positive mechanical work (acting like a "motor"), the knee generates little mechanical work (acting like a "strut"), and the ankle absorbs energy during the first half of stance and generates energy during the second half (consistent with "spring"-like function). We recorded full body kinematics and kinetics, used inverse dynamics to estimate net joint moments, and decomposed joint function into strut-, motor-, damper-, and spring-like components using indices based on net joint work. Although overall leg mechanics were primarily strut-like, individual joints did not act as struts during stance. The hip functioned as a power generating "motor," and ankle function was consistent with spring-like behavior. Even though net knee work was small, the knee did not behave solely as a strut but also showed motor-, and damper-like function. Acceleration involved increased motor-like function of the hip and ankle. Deceleration involved decreased hip motor-like function and ankle spring-like function and increased damping at the knee and ankle. Changes to joint mechanical work were primarily due to changes in joint angular displacements and not net moments. Overall, joints maintain different functional roles during unsteady locomotion.

  12. Principles and Design of a Zeeman–Sisyphus Decelerator for Molecular Beams

    PubMed Central

    Tarbutt, M. R.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We explore a technique for decelerating molecules using a static magnetic field and optical pumping. Molecules travel through a spatially varying magnetic field and are repeatedly pumped into a weak‐field seeking state as they move towards each strong field region, and into a strong‐field seeking state as they move towards weak field. The method is time‐independent and so is suitable for decelerating both pulsed and continuous molecular beams. By using guiding magnets at each weak field region, the beam can be simultaneously guided and decelerated. By tapering the magnetic field strength in the strong field regions, and exploiting the Doppler shift, the velocity distribution can be compressed during deceleration. We develop the principles of this deceleration technique, provide a realistic design, use numerical simulations to evaluate its performance for a beam of CaF, and compare this performance to other deceleration methods. PMID:27629547

  13. Player Load, Acceleration, and Deceleration During Forty-Five Competitive Matches of Elite Soccer.

    PubMed

    Dalen, Terje; Ingebrigtsen, Jørgen; Ettema, Gertjan; Hjelde, Geir Havard; Wisløff, Ulrik

    2016-02-01

    The use of time-motion analysis has advanced our understanding of position-specific work rate profiles and the physical requirements of soccer players. Still, many of the typical soccer activities can be neglected, as these systems only examine activities measured by distance and speed variables. This study used triaxial accelerometer and time-motion analysis to obtain new knowledge about elite soccer players' match load. Furthermore, we determined acceleration/deceleration profiles of elite soccer players and their contribution to the players' match load. The data set includes every domestic home game (n = 45) covering 3 full seasons (2009, 2010, and 2011) for the participating team (Rosenborg FC), and includes 8 central defenders (n = 68), 9 fullbacks (n = 83), 9 central midfielders (n = 70), 7 wide midfielders (n = 39), and 5 attackers (A, n = 50). A novel finding was that accelerations contributed to 7-10% of the total player load for all player positions, whereas decelerations contributed to 5-7%. Furthermore, the results indicate that other activities besides the high-intensity movements contribute significantly to the players' total match workload. Therefore, motion analysis alone may underestimate player load because many high-intensity actions are without a change in location at the pitch or they are classified as low-speed activity according to current standards. This new knowledge may help coaches to better understand the different ways players achieve match load and could be used in developing individualized programs that better meet the "positional physical demands" in elite soccer.

  14. Process for Selecting System Level Assessments for Human System Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, James; Park, John

    2006-01-01

    The integration of many life support systems necessary to construct a stable habitat is difficult. The correct identification of the appropriate technologies and corresponding interfaces is an exhaustive process. Once technologies are selected secondary issues such as mechanical and electrical interfaces must be addressed. The required analytical and testing work must be approached in a piecewise fashion to achieve timely results. A repeatable process has been developed to identify and prioritize system level assessments and testing needs. This Assessment Selection Process has been defined to assess cross cutting integration issues on topics at the system or component levels. Assessments are used to identify risks, encourage future actions to mitigate risks, or spur further studies.

  15. 2 CFR 200.58 - Information technology systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Information technology systems. 200.58..., AND AUDIT REQUIREMENTS FOR FEDERAL AWARDS Acronyms and Definitions Acronyms § 200.58 Information technology systems. Information technology systems means computing devices, ancillary equipment,...

  16. 75 FR 1446 - Future Systems Technology Advisory Panel Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-11

    ... ADMINISTRATION Future Systems Technology Advisory Panel Meeting AGENCY: Social Security Administration (SSA... independent advice and recommendations on the future of systems technology and electronic services at the... what future systems technologies may be developed to assist in carrying out its statutory...

  17. 75 FR 67804 - Future Systems Technology Advisory Panel Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-03

    ... ADMINISTRATION Future Systems Technology Advisory Panel Meeting AGENCY: Social Security Administration (SSA... Security independent advice and recommendations on the future of systems technology and electronic services... determining what future systems technologies may be developed to assist in carrying out its statutory...

  18. A Systems Model for Power Technology Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, David J.

    2002-01-01

    A computer model is under continuing development at NASA Glenn Research Center that enables first-order assessments of space power technology. The model, an evolution of NASA Glenn's Array Design Assessment Model (ADAM), is an Excel workbook that consists of numerous spreadsheets containing power technology performance data and sizing algorithms. Underlying the model is a number of databases that contain default values for various power generation, energy storage and power management and distribution component parameters. These databases are actively maintained by a team of systems analysts so that they contain state-of-art data as well as the most recent technology performance projections. Sizing of the power subsystems can be accomplished either by using an assumed mass specific power (W/kg) or energy (Wh/kg) or by a bottoms-up calculation that accounts for individual component performance and masses. The power generation, energy storage and power management and distribution subsystems are sized for given mission requirements for a baseline case and up to three alternatives. This allows four different power systems to be sized and compared using consistent assumptions and sizing algorithms. The component sizing models contained in the workbook are modular so that they can be easily maintained and updated. All significant input values have default values loaded from the databases that can be over-written by the user. The default data and sizing algorithms for each of the power subsystems are described in some detail. The user interface and workbook navigational features are also discussed. Finally, an example study case that illustrates the model's capability is presented.

  19. Miniature Heat Transport System for Nanosatellite Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglas, Donya M,

    1999-01-01

    The scientific understanding of key physical processes between the Sun and the Earth require simultaneous measurements from many vantage points in space. Nano-satellite technologies will enable a class of constellation missions for the NASA Space Science Sun-Earth Connections. This recent emphasis on the implementation of smaller satellites leads to a requirement for development of smaller subsystems in several areas. Key technologies under development include: advanced miniaturized chemical propulsion; miniaturized sensors; highly integrated, compact electronics; autonomous onboard and ground operations; miniatures low power tracking techniques for orbit determination; onboard RF communications capable of transmitting data to the ground from far distances; lightweight efficient solar array panels; lightweight, high output battery cells; lightweight yet strong composite materials for the nano-spacecraft and deployer-ship structures. These newer smaller systems may have higher power densities and higher thermal transport requirements than seen on previous small satellites. Furthermore, the small satellites may also have a requirement to maintain thermal control through extended earth shadows, possibly up to 8 hours long. Older thermal control technology, such as heaters, thermostats, and heat pipes, may not be sufficient to meet the requirements of these new systems. Conversely, a miniature two-phase heat transport system (Mini-HTS) such as a Capillary Pumped Loop (CPL) or Loop Heat Pipe (LBP) is a viable alternative. A Mini-HTS can provide fine temperature control, thermal diode action, and a highly efficient means of heat transfer. The Mini-HTS would have power capabilities in the range of tens of watts or less and provide thermal control over typical spacecraft ranges. The Mini-HTS would allow the internal portion of the spacecraft to be thermally isolated from the external radiator, thus protecting the internal components from extreme cold temperatures during an

  20. The PCAST Energy Technology Innovation System Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savitz, M.; Fri, R.

    2010-12-01

    The President's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST) recently made recommendations for strengthening the nation's energy innovation system. The PCAST report builds in part on earlier work at the National Research Council (NRC) and elsewhere. For example, PCAST largely adopted the description of the energy innovation system that appeared in the NRC report on 'Limiting the Magnitude of Future Climate Change'. Similarly, the 'Limiting' report provided examples of the importance of social science research in crafting energy policy, a recommendation of the PCAST report. And both the 'Limiting' report and an earlier report on 'America's Energy Future' recommended an aggressive commercial demonstration program for carbon capture and storage and new nuclear power plants. The PCAST report discusses the need for new approaches for federal demonstration projects. This session traces these relationships and suggests how similar synergies might be encouraged in the future.

  1. Advances in uncooled technology at BAE SYSTEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backer, Brian S.; Kohin, Margaret; Leary, Arthur R.; Blackwell, Richard J.; Rumbaugh, Roy N.

    2003-09-01

    BAE SYSTEMS has made tremendous progress in uncooled technology and systems in the last year. In this paper we present performance results and imagery from our latest 640x480 and 320x240 small pixel focal plane arrays. Both were produced using submicron lithography and have achieved our lowest NETDs to date. Testing of the 320x240 devices has shown TNETDs of 30mK at F/1. Video imagery from our 640 x 480 uncooled camera installed in a POINTER Unattended Aerial Vehicle is also shown. In addition, we introduce our newest commercial imaging camera core, the SCC500 and show its vastly improved characteristics. Lastly, plans for future advancements are outlined.

  2. Semantic technologies in a decision support system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasielewska, K.; Ganzha, M.; Paprzycki, M.; Bǎdicǎ, C.; Ivanovic, M.; Lirkov, I.

    2015-10-01

    The aim of our work is to design a decision support system based on ontological representation of domain(s) and semantic technologies. Specifically, we consider the case when Grid / Cloud user describes his/her requirements regarding a "resource" as a class expression from an ontology, while the instances of (the same) ontology represent available resources. The goal is to help the user to find the best option with respect to his/her requirements, while remembering that user's knowledge may be "limited." In this context, we discuss multiple approaches based on semantic data processing, which involve different "forms" of user interaction with the system. Specifically, we consider: (a) ontological matchmaking based on SPARQL queries and class expression, (b) graph-based semantic closeness of instances representing user requirements (constructed from the class expression) and available resources, and (c) multicriterial analysis based on the AHP method, which utilizes expert domain knowledge (also ontologically represented).

  3. Micro-system inertial sensing technology overview.

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, James Joe

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide an overview of Micro-System technology as it applies to inertial sensing. Transduction methods are reviewed with capacitance and piezoresistive being the most often used in COTS Micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) inertial sensors. Optical transduction is the most recent transduction method having significant impact on improving sensor resolution. A few other methods are motioned which are in a R&D status to hopefully allow MEMS inertial sensors to become viable as a navigation grade sensor. The accelerometer, gyroscope and gravity gradiometer are the type of inertial sensors which are reviewed in this report. Their method of operation and a sampling of COTS sensors and grade are reviewed as well.

  4. Airborne system for testing multispectral reconnaissance technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Dirk-Roger; Doergeloh, Heinrich; Keil, Heiko; Wetjen, Wilfried

    1999-07-01

    There is an increasing demand for future airborne reconnaissance systems to obtain aerial images for tactical or peacekeeping operations. Especially Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) equipped with multispectral sensor system and with real time jam resistant data transmission capabilities are of high interest. An airborne experimental platform has been developed as testbed to investigate different concepts of reconnaissance systems before their application in UAVs. It is based on a Dornier DO 228 aircraft, which is used as flying platform. Great care has been taken to achieve the possibility to test different kinds of multispectral sensors. Hence basically it is capable to be equipped with an IR sensor head, high resolution aerial cameras of the whole optical spectrum and radar systems. The onboard equipment further includes system for digital image processing, compression, coding, and storage. The data are RF transmitted to the ground station using technologies with high jam resistance. The images, after merging with enhanced vision components, are delivered to the observer who has an uplink data channel available to control flight and imaging parameters.

  5. Automation technology using Geographic Information System (GIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Cynthia L.

    1994-01-01

    Airport Surface Movement Area is but one of the actions taken to increase the capacity and safety of existing airport facilities. The System Integration Branch (SIB) has designed an integrated system consisting of an electronic moving display in the cockpit, and includes display of taxi routes which will warn controllers and pilots of the position of other traffic and warning information automatically. Although, this system has in test simulation proven to be accurate and helpful; the initial process of obtaining an airport layout of the taxi-routes and designing each of them is a very tedious and time-consuming process. Other methods of preparing the display maps are being researched. One such method is the use of the Geographical Information System (GIS). GIS is an integrated system of computer hardware and software linking topographical, demographic and other resource data that is being referenced. The software can support many areas of work with virtually unlimited information compatibility due to the system's open architecture. GIS will allow us to work faster with increased efficiency and accuracy while providing decision making capabilities. GIS is currently being used at the Langley Research Center with other applications and has been validated as an accurate system for that task. GIS usage for our task will involve digitizing aerial photographs of the topology for each taxi-runway and identifying each position according to its specific spatial coordinates. The information currently being used can be integrated with the GIS system, due to its ability to provide a wide variety of user interfaces. Much more research and data analysis will be needed before this technique will be used, however we are hopeful this will lead to better usage of man-power and technological capabilities for the future.

  6. On the deceleration of relativistic jets in active galactic nuclei- I. Radiation drag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beskin, V. S.; Chernoglazov, A. V.

    2016-12-01

    Deceleration of relativistic jets from active galactic nuclei (AGNs) detected recently by the Monitoring Of Jets in Active galactic nuclei with Very Long Baseline Array Experiments (MOJAVE) team is discussed in connection with the interaction of the jet material with an external photon field. The appropriate energy density of the isotropic photon field necessary to decelerate jets is determined. It is shown that disturbances of the electric potential and magnetic surfaces play an important role in the general dynamics of particle deceleration.

  7. New technology for food systems and security.

    PubMed

    Yau, N J Newton

    2009-01-01

    In addition to product trade, technology trade has become one of the alternatives for globalization action around the world. Although not all technologies employed on the technology trade platform are innovative technologies, the data base of international technology trade still is a good indicator for observing innovative technologies around world. The technology trade data base from Sinew Consulting Group (SCG) Ltd. was employed as an example to lead the discussion on security or safety issues that may be caused by these innovative technologies. More technologies related to processing, functional ingredients and quality control technology of food were found in the data base of international technology trade platform. The review was conducted by categorizing technologies into the following subcategories in terms of safety and security issues: (1) agricultural materials/ingredients, (2) processing/engineering, (3) additives, (4) packaging/logistics, (5) functional ingredients, (6) miscellaneous (include detection technology). The author discusses examples listed for each subcategory, including GMO technology, nanotechnology, Chinese medicine based functional ingredients, as well as several innovative technologies. Currently, generation of innovative technology advance at a greater pace due to cross-area research and development activities. At the same time, more attention needs to be placed on the employment of these innovative technologies.

  8. Drug Infusion Systems: Technologies, Performance, and Pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Kim, Uoo R; Peterfreund, Robert A; Lovich, Mark A

    2017-02-16

    This review aims to broadly describe drug infusion technologies and raise subtle but important issues arising from infusion therapy that can potentially lead to patient instability and morbidity. Advantages and disadvantages of gravity-dependent drug infusion are described and compared with electromechanical approaches for precise control of medication infusion, including large-volume peristaltic and syringe pumps. This review discusses how drugs and inert carriers interact within infusion systems and outlines several complexities and potential sources of drug error. Major topics are (1) the importance of the infusion system dead volume; (2) the quantities of coadministered fluid and the concept of microinfusion; and (3) future directions for drug infusion.The infusion system dead volume resides between the point where drug and inert carrier streams meet and the patient's blood. The dead volume is an often forgotten reservoir of drugs, especially when infusion flows slow or stop. Even with medications and carriers flowing, some mass of drug always resides within the dead volume. This reservoir of drug can be accidentally delivered into patients. When dose rate is changed, there can be a significant lag between intended and actual drug delivery. When a drug infusion is discontinued, drug delivery continues until the dead volume is fully cleared of residual drug by the carrier. When multiple drug infusions flow together, a change in any drug flow rate transiently affects the rate of delivery of all the others. For all of these reasons, the use of drug infusion systems with smaller dead volumes may be advantageous.For critically ill patients requiring multiple infusions, the obligate amount of administered fluid can contribute to volume overload. Recognition of the risk of overload has given rise to microinfusion strategies wherein drug solutions are highly concentrated and infused at low rates. However, potential risks associated with the dead volume may be magnified

  9. ISP Aerocapture Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, B.

    2004-11-01

    Aerocapture technology development is a vital part of the NASA In-Space Propulsion Program (ISP), which is managed by NASA Headquarters and implemented at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. Aerocapture is a flight maneuver designed to aerodynamically decelerate a spacecraft from hyperbolic approach to a captured orbit during one pass through the atmosphere. Small amounts of propulsive fuel are used for attitude control and periapsis raise only. This technique is very attractive since it permits spacecraft to be launched from Earth at higher verlocities, reducing trip times. The aerocapture technique also significantly reduces the overall mass of the propulsion systems. This allows for more science payload to be added to the mission. Alternatively, a smaller launch vehicle could be used, reducing overall mission cost. Aerocapture can be realized in various ways. It can be accomplished using rigid aeroshells, such as those used in previous mission efforts (like Apollo, the planned Aeroassist Flight Experiment and the Mars Exploration Rovers). Aerocapture can also be achieved with inflatable deceleration systems. This family includes the use of a potentially lighter, inflatable aeroshell or a large, trailing ballute - a combination parachute and balloon made of durable, thin material and stowed behind the vehicle for deployment. Aerocapture utilizing inflatable decelerators is also derived from previous efforts, but will necessitate further research to reach the technology readiness level (TRL) that the rigid aeroshell has achieved. Results of recent Aerocapture Systems analysis studies for small bodies and giant planets show that aerocapture can be enhancing for most missions and absolutely enabling for some mission scenarios. In this way, Aerocapture could open up exciting, new science mission opportunities.

  10. Applying Technology Ranking and Systems Engineering in Advanced Life Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Harry; Luna, Bernadette (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    According to the Advanced Life Support (ALS) Program Plan, the Systems Modeling and Analysis Project (SMAP) has two important tasks: 1) prioritizing investments in ALS Research and Technology Development (R&TD), and 2) guiding the evolution of ALS systems. Investments could be prioritized simply by independently ranking different technologies, but we should also consider a technology's impact on system design. Guiding future ALS systems will require SMAP to consider many aspects of systems engineering. R&TD investments can be prioritized using familiar methods for ranking technology. The first step is gathering data on technology performance, safety, readiness level, and cost. Then the technologies are ranked using metrics or by decision analysis using net present economic value. The R&TD portfolio can be optimized to provide the maximum expected payoff in the face of uncertain future events. But more is needed. The optimum ALS system can not be designed simply by selecting the best technology for each predefined subsystem. Incorporating a new technology, such as food plants, can change the specifications of other subsystems, such as air regeneration. Systems must be designed top-down starting from system objectives, not bottom-up from selected technologies. The familiar top-down systems engineering process includes defining mission objectives, mission design, system specification, technology analysis, preliminary design, and detail design. Technology selection is only one part of systems analysis and engineering, and it is strongly related to the subsystem definitions. ALS systems should be designed using top-down systems engineering. R&TD technology selection should consider how the technology affects ALS system design. Technology ranking is useful but it is only a small part of systems engineering.

  11. Advanced Electric Traction System Technology Development

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Iver

    2011-01-14

    As a subcontractor to General Motors (GM), Ames Laboratory provided the technical expertise and supplied experimental materials needed to assess the technology of high energy bonded permanent magnets that are injection or compression molded for use in the Advanced Electric Traction System motor. This support was a sustained (Phase 1: 6/07 to 3/08) engineering effort that builds on the research achievements of the primary FreedomCAR project at Ames Laboratory on development of high temperature magnet alloy particulate in both flake and spherical powder forms. Ames Lab also provide guidance and direction in selection of magnet materials and supported the fabrication of experimental magnet materials for development of injection molding and magnetization processes by Arnold Magnetics, another project partner. The work with Arnold Magnetics involved a close collaboration on particulate material design and processing to achieve enhanced particulate properties and magnetic performance in the resulting bonded magnets. The overall project direction was provided by GM Program Management and two design reviews were held at GM-ATC in Torrance, CA. Ames Lab utilized current expertise in magnet powder alloy design and processing, along with on-going research advances being achieved under the existing FreedomCAR Program project to help guide and direct work during Phase 1 for the Advanced Electric Traction System Technology Development Program. The technical tasks included review of previous GM and Arnold Magnets work and identification of improvements to the benchmark magnet material, Magnequench MQP-14-12. Other benchmark characteristics of the desired magnet material include 64% volumetric loading with PPS polymer and a recommended maximum use temperature of 200C. A collaborative relationship was maintained with Arnold Magnets on the specification and processing of the bonded magnet material required by GM-ATC.

  12. North Carolina Community College System Information Resources and Technology Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina Community Coll. System, Raleigh.

    The North Carolina Community College System engaged in a strategic planning process in 1998 that was the basis for the information resources and technology plans for the entire System. A focus of the planning was technology, and a technology environmental scanning team developed a set of planning assumptions, which led to the creation of 15 goals…

  13. A Systems Definition of Educational Technology in Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luppicini, Rocci

    2005-01-01

    Conceptual development in the field of Educational Technology provides crucial theoretical grounding for ongoing research and practice. This essay draws from theoretical developments both within and external to the field of Educational Technology to articulate a systems definition of Educational Technology in Society. A systems definition of…

  14. Production and all-optical deceleration of molecular beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Gary; Jayich, Andrew; Long, Xueping; Ransford, Anthony; Campbell, Wesley

    2015-05-01

    Ultracold molecules open up new opportunities in many areas of study, including many-body physics, quantum chemistry, quantum information, and precision measurements. Current methods cannot easily address the spontaneous decay of molecules into dark states without an amalgam of repump lasers. We present an alternative method to produce cold molecules. A cryogenic buffer gas beam (CBGB) is used to create an intense, slow, cold source of molecules. By using a CBGB for the production, we can quench vibrational modes that cannot be addressed with optical methods. This is then followed by an all-optical scheme using a single ultra-fast laser to decelerate the molecules and a continuous wave laser to cool the species. We have started experiments with strontium monohydride (SrH), but the proposed method should be applicable to a wide range of molecular species.

  15. Behaviour of the cosmological model with variable deceleration parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, R. K.; Beesham, A.; Shukla, B. K.

    2016-12-01

    We consider the Bianchi type-VI0 massive string universe with decaying cosmological constant Λ. To solve Einstein's field equations, we assume that the shear scalar is proportional to the expansion scalar and that the deceleration parameter q is a linear function of the Hubble parameter H, i.e., q=α +β H, which yields the scale factor a = e^{1/β√{2β t+k1}}. The model expands exponentially with cosmic time t. The value of the cosmological constant Λ is small and positive. Also, we discuss physical parameters as well as the jerk parameter j, which predict that the universe in this model originates as in the Λ CDM model.

  16. TIS (Technology Information System) A Focal Point for Technology Transfer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-09-01

    3 2.1 Stevenson-Wydler Technology Inovation Act of 1980 .................................... 3 2.2 Technical Information Centers...passwords is required since none were disclosed. The DIAL command provides an equally powerful , but user-controlled, method for accessing other...a local file from TIS to a remote machine. This has particular importance when downloaded and saved information is to be transferred to more powerful

  17. Large Space Systems Technology, 1979. [antenna and space platform systems conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, J. C., Jr. (Compiler)

    1980-01-01

    Items of technology and developmental efforts in support of the large space systems technology programs are described. The major areas of interest are large antennas systems, large space platform systems, and activities that support both antennas and platform systems.

  18. Analysis of fuel-conservative curved decelerating approach trajectories for powered-lift and CTOL jet aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neuman, F.

    1980-01-01

    A method for determining fuel conservative terminal approaches that include changes in altitude, speed, and heading are described. Three different guidance system concepts for STOL aircraft were evaluated in flight: (1) a fixed trajectory system; (2) a system that included a fixed path and a real time synthesized capture flight path; and (3) a trajectory synthesizing system. Simulation results for the augmentor wing jet STOL research aircraft and for the Boeing 727 aircraft are discussed. The results indicate that for minimum fuel consumption, two guidance deceleration segments are required.

  19. SITE TECHNOLOGY CAPSULE: SUBSURFACE VOLATILIZATION AND VENTILATION SYSTEM (SVVS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Subsurface Volatilization and Ventilation System is an integrated technology used for attacking all phases of volatile organic compound (VOC) contamination in soil and groundwater. The SVVS technology promotes insitu remediation of soil and groundwater contaminated with or-ga...

  20. SUBSURFACE VOLATIZATION AND VENTILATION SYSTEM (SVVS) - INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report summarizes the findings associated with a Demonstration Test of Environmental Improvement Technologies’ (EIT) Subsurface Volatilization and Ventilation System (SVVS) process. The technology was evaluated under the EPA Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) ...

  1. Conceptual design study: Forest Fire Advanced System Technology (FFAST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, J. D.; Warren, J. R.

    1986-01-01

    An integrated forest fire detection and mapping system that will be based upon technology available in the 1990s was defined. Uncertainties in emerging and advanced technologies related to the conceptual design were identified and recommended for inclusion as preferred system components. System component technologies identified for an end-to-end system include thermal infrared, linear array detectors, automatic georeferencing and signal processing, geosynchronous satellite communication links, and advanced data integration and display. Potential system configuration options were developed and examined for possible inclusion in the preferred system configuration. The preferred system configuration will provide increased performance and be cost effective over the system currently in use. Forest fire management user requirements and the system component emerging technologies were the basis for the system configuration design. A preferred system configuration was defined that warrants continued refinement and development, examined economic aspects of the current and preferred system, and provided preliminary cost estimates for follow-on system prototype development.

  2. The effects of enforced, rapid deceleration on performance in a multiple sprint test.

    PubMed

    Lakomy, Julie; Haydon, Daniel T

    2004-08-01

    The nature of multiple sprint sports such as soccer, hockey, and rugby is such that deceleration plays an important part in the movement patterns of players during a game and training. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of deceleration on fatigue during repeated sprint efforts. A group of 18 elite field hockey players (all men) performed a running repeated sprint ability test (6 x 40 m using maximal effort and departing every 30 seconds). In one condition, there was no deceleration zone, and in the second condition, the test had a deceleration component (rapid deceleration to a stop within 6 m of the end of each sprint). Sprint times under each condition were compared using a repeated-measures analysis of variance. No significant difference was seen between the 2 conditions for mean sprint times (p > 0.05) or for the mean fatigue index (p > 0.05). However, results showed a divergent trend, and further analysis extrapolating the data for an increased number of sprints showed that a significant difference (p < 0.05) would have been seen at the 11th sprint. Although this study found that the deceleration zone had little effect on the 6-sprint protocol, it was clear that the deceleration component would have shown an effect, giving rise to greater fatigue and slower sprint times, if the number of sprints had been increased. The implications are that deceleration training should be introduced into general fitness training programs for those competing in multiple sprint sports.

  3. Space station systems technology study (add-on task). Volume 2: Trade study and technology selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The current Space Station Systems Technology Study add on task was an outgrowth of the Advanced Platform Systems Technology Study (APSTS) that was completed in April 1983 and the subsequent Space Station System Technology Study completed in April 1984. The first APSTS proceeded from the identification of 106 technology topics to the selection of five for detailed trade studies. During the advanced platform study, the technical issues and options were evaluated through detailed trade processes, individual consideration was given to costs and benefits for the technologies identified for advancement, and advancement plans were developed. An approach similar to that was used in the subsequent study, with emphasis on system definition in four specific technology areas to facilitate a more in depth analysis of technology issues.

  4. Use of Ubiquitous Technologies in Military Logistic System in Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafari, P.; Sadeghi-Niaraki, A.

    2013-09-01

    This study is about integration and evaluation of RFID and ubiquitous technologies in military logistic system management. Firstly, supply chain management and the necessity of a revolution in logistic systems especially in military area, are explained. Secondly RFID and ubiquitous technologies and the advantages of their use in supply chain management are introduced. Lastly a system based on these technologies for controlling and increasing the speed and accuracy in military logistic system in Iran with its unique properties, is presented. The system is based on full control of military logistics (supplies) from the time of deployment to replenishment using sensor network, ubiquitous and RFID technologies.

  5. Design and Execution of the Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator Large-Article Wind Tunnel Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassell, Alan M.

    2013-01-01

    The testing of 3- and 6-meter diameter Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (HIAD) test articles was completed in the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex 40 ft x 80 ft Wind Tunnel test section. Both models were stacked tori, constructed as 60 degree half-angle sphere cones. The 3-meter HIAD was tested in two configurations. The first 3-meter configuration utilized an instrumented flexible aerodynamic skin covering the inflatable aeroshell surface, while the second configuration employed a flight-like flexible thermal protection system. The 6-meter HIAD was tested in two structural configurations (with and without an aft-mounted stiffening torus near the shoulder), both utilizing an instrumented aerodynamic skin.

  6. Deimination of the myelin basic protein decelerates its proteasome-mediated metabolism.

    PubMed

    Kuzina, E S; Kudriaeva, A A; Glagoleva, I S; Knorre, V D; Gabibov, A G; Belogurov, A A

    2016-07-01

    Deimination of myelin basic protein (MBP) by peptidylarginine deiminase (PAD) prevents its binding to the proteasome and decelerates its degradation by the proteasome in mammalian cells. Potential anticancer drug tetrazole analogue of chloramidine 2, at concentrations greater than 1 µM inhibits the enzymatic activity of PAD in vitro. The observed acceleration of proteasome hydrolysis of MBP to antigenic peptides in the presence of PAD inhibitor may increase the efficiency of lesion of the central nervous system by cytotoxic lymphocytes in multiple sclerosis. We therefore suggest that clinical trials and the introduction of PAD inhibitors in clinical practice for the treatment of malignant neoplasms should be performed only after a careful analysis of their potential effect on the induction of autoimmune neurodegeneration processes.

  7. The development of a ram air decelerator for the recovery of artillery shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behr, Vance L.; Cole, J. Kenneth; Croll, Robert H.

    A ram air decelerator (RAD) was investigated as a possible replacement for the present parachute recovery system for atomic artillery shells that are periodically tested by artillery firings. Tests included spin tests in a high altitude chamber, proof-of-concept tests on a truck towing rig, nonspinning airdrop tests and artillery fired projectile tests. A RAD is typically constructed of a top fabric panel and a bottom fabric panel that are fastened together along their outer edges to form a closed container. To improve the filament loading efficiency of the RAD design, a modification to a four-lobe design was made that offered a larger projected area of inflated fabric to the flow than did the original three-lobe design, thus giving the four-lobe design more drag for the same tip radius than the three-lobe design.

  8. Emerging Technologies for Software-Reliant Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-07

    response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing...Computing 3. Social Computing 4. Data Intelligence 5. Not Sure Polling Question 7 Emerging Technologies Webinar– February 2011 © 2011 Carnegie Mellon...Commoditization of technology • End-user empowerment • Large-scale data mining • Low energy consumption • Multi-core and parallelization 8 Emerging Technologies

  9. Configurable technology development for reusable control and monitor ground systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uhrlaub, David R.

    1994-01-01

    The control monitor unit (CMU) uses configurable software technology for real-time mission command and control, telemetry processing, simulation, data acquisition, data archiving, and ground operations automation. The base technology is currently planned for the following control and monitor systems: portable Space Station checkout systems; ecological life support systems; Space Station logistics carrier system; and the ground system of the Delta Clipper (SX-2) in the Single-Stage Rocket Technology program. The CMU makes extensive use of commercial technology to increase capability and reduce development and life-cycle costs. The concepts and technology are being developed by McDonnell Douglas Space and Defense Systems for the Real-Time Systems Laboratory at NASA's Kennedy Space Center under the Payload Ground Operations Contract. A second function of the Real-Time Systems Laboratory is development and utilization of advanced software development practices.

  10. Life prediction technologies for aeronautical propulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgaw, Michael A.

    1990-01-01

    Fatigue and fracture problems continue to occur in aeronautical gas turbine engines. Components whose useful life is limited by these failure modes include turbine hot-section blades, vanes, and disks. Safety considerations dictate that catastrophic failures be avoided, while economic considerations dictate that catastrophic failures be avoided, while economic considerations dictate that noncatastrophic failures occur as infrequently as possible. Therefore, the decision in design is making the tradeoff between engine performance and durability. LeRC has contributed to the aeropropulsion industry in the area of life prediction technology for over 30 years, developing creep and fatigue life prediction methodologies for hot-section materials. At the present time, emphasis is being placed on the development of methods capable of handling both thermal and mechanical fatigue under severe environments. Recent accomplishments include the development of more accurate creep-fatigue life prediction methods such as the total strain version of LeRC's strain-range partitioning (SRP) and the HOST-developed cyclic damage accumulation (CDA) model. Other examples include the development of a more accurate cumulative fatigue damage rule - the double damage curve approach (DDCA), which provides greatly improved accuracy in comparison with usual cumulative fatigue design rules. Other accomplishments in the area of high-temperature fatigue crack growth may also be mentioned. Finally, we are looking to the future and are beginning to do research on the advanced methods which will be required for development of advanced materials and propulsion systems over the next 10-20 years.

  11. Controlling Complex Systems and Developing Dynamic Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avizienis, Audrius Victor

    In complex systems, control and understanding become intertwined. Following Ilya Prigogine, we define complex systems as having control parameters which mediate transitions between distinct modes of dynamical behavior. From this perspective, determining the nature of control parameters and demonstrating the associated dynamical phase transitions are practically equivalent and fundamental to engaging with complexity. In the first part of this work, a control parameter is determined for a non-equilibrium electrochemical system by studying a transition in the morphology of structures produced by an electroless deposition reaction. Specifically, changing the size of copper posts used as the substrate for growing metallic silver structures by the reduction of Ag+ from solution under diffusion-limited reaction conditions causes a dynamical phase transition in the crystal growth process. For Cu posts with edge lengths on the order of one micron, local forces promoting anisotropic growth predominate, and the reaction produces interconnected networks of Ag nanowires. As the post size is increased above 10 microns, the local interfacial growth reaction dynamics couple with the macroscopic diffusion field, leading to spatially propagating instabilities in the electrochemical potential which induce periodic branching during crystal growth, producing dendritic deposits. This result is interesting both as an example of control and understanding in a complex system, and as a useful combination of top-down lithography with bottom-up electrochemical self-assembly. The second part of this work focuses on the technological development of devices fabricated using this non-equilibrium electrochemical process, towards a goal of integrating a complex network as a dynamic functional component in a neuromorphic computing device. Self-assembled networks of silver nanowires were reacted with sulfur to produce interfacial "atomic switches": silver-silver sulfide junctions, which exhibit

  12. Radionuclide Imaging Technologies for Biological Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, Calvin R.; Reid, Chantal D.; Weisenberger, Andrew G.

    2014-05-14

    The main objective of this project is to develop technologies and experimental techniques for studying the dynamics of physiological responses of plants to changes in their interface with the local environment and to educate a new generation of scientists in an interdisciplinary environment of biology, physics and engineering. Also an important goal is to perform measurements to demonstrate the new data that can be produced and made available to the plant-biology community using the imaging technologies and experimental techniques developed in this project. The study of the plant-environment interface includes a wide range of topics in plant physiology, e.g., the root-soil interface, resource availability, impact of herbivores, influence of microbes on root surface, and responses to toxins in the air and soil. The initial scientific motivation for our work is to improve understanding of the mechanisms for physiological responses to abrupt changes in the local environment, in particular, the responses that result in short-term adjustments in resource (e.g., sugars, nutrients and water) allocations. Data of time-dependent responses of plants to environmental changes are essential in developing mechanistic models for substance intake and resource allocation. Our approach is to use radioisotope tracing techniques to study whole-plant and plant organ (e.g., leaves, stems, roots) dynamical responses to abrupt changes in environmental conditions such as concentration of CO2 in the atmosphere, nutrient availability and lighting. To this aim we are collaborating with the Radiation Detector and Imaging Group at the Thomas Jefferson National Laboratory Facility (JLab) to develop gamma-ray and beta particle imaging systems optimized for plant studies. The radioisotope tracing measurements are conducted at the Phytotron facility at Duke University. The Phytotron is a controlled environment plant research facility with a variety of plant growth chambers. One chamber

  13. Flight-Path Characteristics for Decelerating From Supercircular Speed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luidens, Roger W.

    1961-01-01

    Characteristics of the following six flight paths for decelerating from a supercircular speed are developed in closed form: constant angle of attack, constant net acceleration, constant altitude" constant free-stream Reynolds number, and "modulated roll." The vehicles were required to remain in or near the atmosphere, and to stay within the aerodynamic capabilities of a vehicle with a maximum lift-drag ratio of 1.0 and within a maximum net acceleration G of 10 g's. The local Reynolds number for all the flight paths for a vehicle with a gross weight of 10,000 pounds and a 600 swept wing was found to be about 0.7 x 10(exp 6). With the assumption of a laminar boundary layer, the heating of the vehicle is studied as a function of type of flight path, initial G load, and initial velocity. The following heating parameters were considered: the distribution of the heating rate over the vehicle, the distribution of the heat per square foot over the vehicle, and the total heat input to the vehicle. The constant G load path at limiting G was found to give the lowest total heat input for a given initial velocity. For a vehicle with a maximum lift-drag ratio of 1.0 and a flight path with a maximum G of 10 g's, entry velocities of twice circular appear thermo- dynamically feasible, and entries at velocities of 2.8 times circular are aerodynamically possible. The predominant heating (about 85 percent) occurs at the leading edge of the vehicle. The total ablated weight for a 10,000-pound-gross-weight vehicle decelerating from an initial velocity of twice circular velocity is estimated to be 5 percent of gross weight. Modifying the constant G load flight path by a constant-angle-of-attack segment through a flight- to circular-velocity ratio of 1.0 gives essentially a "point landing" capability but also results in an increased total heat input to the vehicle.

  14. The Model Industrial Technology Systems Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowling Green State Univ., OH.

    This document contains materials used in a model industrial technology program that introduced technology into the curricula of elementary, middle, and high schools in three sites in Ohio: the Central site (coordinated through Ohio State University); the Northeast site (coordinated through Kent State University); and the Northwest site…

  15. [Toward a national system on science and technology].

    PubMed

    Cilento-Sarli, A

    1994-01-01

    This essay discuss the integration of a National System on Science and Technology (SINACYT), supported with resources arising from a National Found for Science and Technology (FONACYT), and whose leader entity should be the Institute of the National Found for Science and Technology (INFONACYT) to substitute CONICIT.

  16. ANAEROBIC COMPOST CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS SYSTEM TECHNOLOGY - SITE TECHNOLOGY CAPSULE

    EPA Science Inventory

    In fall 1994, anaerobic compost wetlands in both upflow and down flow configurations were constructed adjacent to and received drainage from the Burleigh tunnel, which forms part of the Clear Creek/Central City Superfund site. The systems were operated over a 3 year period. The ...

  17. Development of a new large balloon launch technique for the low density supersonic decelerator project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, Danny

    D. Ball1 and 2 E. Klein 1,2 Columbia Scientific Balloon Facility Danny.Ball@csbf.nasa.gov/Fax 903-723-8068 Erich.Klein@csbf.nasa.gov/Fax 903-723-8068 Scientific balloon flights have served for decades as a unique and cost effective platform for conducting world class space science and for developing and testing new technologies for exploration. These technologies have ranged from detector development to in situ testing of unique cutting edge space systems. The Earth’s stratosphere is an analog to Mars’s atmosphere and provides as close to an in situ environment to test a reentry system. Previous in situ tests for a Mars reentry system were a series of drop tests that were conducted from stratospheric balloon flights in 2004 to test a NASA Mars subsonic parachute entry design. In 2014 and 2015 a series of balloon flights to test a Mars prototype reentry system are planned. The JPL Mars Science Laboratory’s Low Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD) effort is intended to test the system by flying different new drag devices on three tests, at full scale and at supersonic speeds, high in Earth’s stratosphere, simulating entry into the atmosphere of Mars. To start the tests, the system must be first lofted to the stratosphere via a large high altitude balloon. NASA has been launching high altitude balloons to support science for many years, but with LDSD there are unique challenges with performing the test and lofting the test system to the stratosphere. The test involves launching a Star 48 Motor on a balloon to a set float altitude, orienting the payload, and then releasing the system from the balloon to start the test where the rocket motor is ignited to accelerate the test system to supersonic speeds. Safety is a significant driver in the development process for all phases of any balloon launch operation. Because a rocket motor is part of the payload to be launched, the balloon launching operations for the LDSD project have required a completely fresh look to

  18. The NASA technology push towards future space mission systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadin, Stanley R.; Povinelli, Frederick P.; Rosen, Robert

    1988-01-01

    As a result of the new Space Policy, the NASA technology program has been called upon to a provide a solid base of national capabilities and talent to serve NASA's civil space program, commercial, and other space sector interests. This paper describes the new technology program structure and its characteristics, traces its origin and evolution, and projects the likely near- and far-term strategic steps. It addresses the alternative 'push-pull' approaches to technology development, the readiness levels to which the technology needs to be developed for effective technology transfer, and the focused technology programs currently being implemented to satisfy the needs of future space systems.

  19. Deceleration of arginine kinase refolding by induced helical structures.

    PubMed

    Li, Hai-Long; Zhou, Sheng-Mei; Park, Daeui; Jeong, Hyoung Oh; Chung, Hae Young; Yang, Jun-Mo; Meng, Fan-Guo; Hu, Wei-Jiang

    2012-04-01

    Arginine kinase (AK) is a key metabolic enzyme for keeping energy balance in invertebrates. Therefore, regulation of the enzymatic activity and the folding studies of AK from the various invertebrates have been the focus of investigation. We studied the effects of helical structures by using hexafluoroisopropanol (HFIP) on AK folding. Folding kinetic studies showed that the folding rates of the urea-denatured AKs were significantly decelerated after being induced in various concentrations of HFIP. AK lost its activity completely at concentrations greater than 60%. The results indicated that the HFIP-induced helical structures in the denatured state play a negative role in protein folding, and the helical structures induced in 5% (v/v) HFIP act as the most effective barrier against AK taking its native structure. The computational docking simulations (binding energies for -2.19 kcal/mol for AutoDock4.2 and -20.47 kcal/mol for Dock6.3) suggested that HFIP interacts with the several important residues that are predicted by both programs. The excessively pre-organized helical structures not only hampered the folding process, but also ultimately brought about changes in the three-dimensional conformation and biological function of AK.

  20. High-Speed Schlieren Movies of Decelerators at Supersonic Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1960-01-01

    High-Speed Schlieren Movies of Decelerators at Supersonic Speeds. Tests were conducted on several types of porous parachutes, a paraglider, and a simulated retrorocket. Mach numbers ranged from 1.8-3.0, porosity from 20-80 percent, and camera speeds from 1680-3000 feet per second (fps) in trials with porous parachutes. Trials of reefed parachutes were conducted at Mach number 2.0 and reefing of 12-33 percent at camera speeds of 600 fps. A flexible parachute with an inflatable ring in the periphery of the canopy was tested at Reynolds number 750,000 per foot, Mach number 2.85, porosity of 28 percent, and camera speed of 36oo fps. A vortex-ring parachute was tested at Mach number 2.2 and camera speed of 3000 fps. The paraglider, with a sweepback of 45 degrees at an angle of attack of 45 degrees was tested at Mach number 2.65, drag coefficient of 0.200, and lift coefficient of 0.278 at a camera speed of 600 fps. A cold air jet exhausting upstream from the center of a bluff body was used to simulate a retrorocket. The free-stream Mach number was 2.0, free-stream dynamic pressure was 620 lb/sq ft, jet-exit static pressure ratio was 10.9, and camera speed was 600 fps. [Entire movie available on DVD from CASI as Doc ID 20070030973. Contact help@sti.nasa.gov

  1. Modal Test of Six-Meter Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abraham, Nijo; Buehrle, Ralph; Templeton, Justin; Lindell, Mike; Hancock, Sean M.

    2014-01-01

    A modal test was performed on the six-meter Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (HIAD) test article to gain a firm understanding of the dynamic characteristics of the unloaded structure within the low frequency range. The tests involved various configurations of the HIAD to understand the influence of the tri-torus, the varying pressure within the toroids and the influence of straps. The primary test was conducted utilizing an eletrodynamic shaker and the results were verified using a step relaxation technique. The analysis results show an increase in the structure's stiffness with respect to increasing pressure. The results also show the rise of coupled modes with the tri-torus configurations. During the testing activity, the attached straps exhibited a behavior that is similar to that described as fuzzy structures in the literature. Therefore extensive tests were also performed by utilizing foam to mitigate these effects as well as understand the modal parameters of these fuzzy sub structures. Results are being utilized to update the finite element model of the six-meter HIAD and to gain a better understanding of the modeling of complex inflatable structures.

  2. THE DECELERATION OF NEBULAR SHELLS IN EVOLVED PLANETARY NEBULAE

    SciTech Connect

    Pereyra, Margarita; Richer, Michael G.; Lopez, Jose Alberto E-mail: richer@astrosen.unam.mx

    2013-07-10

    We have selected a group of 100 evolved planetary nebulae (PNe) and study their kinematics based upon spatially-resolved, long-slit, echelle spectroscopy. The data have been drawn from the San Pedro Martir Kinematic Catalogue of PNe. The aim is to characterize in detail the global kinematics of PNe at advanced stages of evolution with the largest sample of homogenous data used to date for this purpose. The results reveal two groups that share kinematics, morphology, and photo-ionization characteristics of the nebular shell and central star luminosities at the different late stages under study. The typical flow velocities we measure are usually larger than seen in earlier evolutionary stages, with the largest velocities occurring in objects with very weak or absent [N II] {lambda}6584 line emission, by all indications the least evolved objects in our sample. The most evolved objects expand more slowly. This apparent deceleration during the final stage of PNe evolution is predicted by hydrodynamical models, but other explanations are also possible. These results provide a template for comparison with the predictions of theoretical models.

  3. Durability of organobentonite-amended liner for decelerating chloroform transport.

    PubMed

    He, Shichong; Zhu, Lizhong

    2016-04-01

    Chloroform is added to landfill for suppressing methane generation, which however may transport through landfill liners and lead to contamination of groundwater. To decelerate chloroform transport, the enhanced sorption ability of clay liners following organobentonite addition was tested. In this study, we used batch sorption to evaluate sorption capacity of chloroform to organobentonite, followed by column tests and model simulations for assessing durability of different liners. Results show that adding 10% CTMAB-bentonite (organobentonite synthesized using cetyltrimethylammonium bromide) increased the duration of a bentonite liner by 88.5%. CTMAB-bentonite consistently showed the highest sorption capacity (Qm) among six typical organobentonites under various environmental conditions. The removal rate of chloroform by CTMAB-bentonite was 3.6-23 times higher than that by natural soils. According to the results derived by model simulation, a 70-cm 10% CTMAB-bentonite liner exhibited much better durability than a 100-cm compact clay liner (CCL) and natural bentonite liner evidenced by the delayed and lower peak of eluent concentration. A minimum thickness of 65.8 cm of the 10% CTMAB-bentonite liner could completely sorb the chloroform in a 100-m-high landfill. The 10% CTMAB-bentonite liner exhibiting much better durability has the promise for reducing environmental risk of chloroform in landfill.

  4. Fuel Cavity Asymmetry at the Onset of Deceleration in ICF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Rahul C.; Wysocki, F. J.; Glebov, V.; Hakel, P.; Joshi, T.; Kagan, G.; Mancini, R. C.; Murphy, T. J.; Stoeckl, C.; Yaakobi, B.; Benage, J. F.

    2014-10-01

    In ICF, the impact on symmetry of low mode drive non-uniformity is amplified by high convergence. Measurements have shown low mode areal density variation, however, direct impact of low modes on fuel volume has remained undemonstrated. We suggest our images provide first evidence of symmetry loss at the fuel-shell interface. The experiments use direct-drive spherical implosions (Omega). The inner 100 nm layer of the plastic shell is doped with diagnostic Ti to obtain information about interface position, temperature and density. Measurement is made at onset of deceleration at which time nuclear yield rate (NTD) and time resolved (SSCA) spectrum both are in agreement with 1-D prediction. Spectrally resolved images are obtained using the Multiple Monochromatic Imager, which combines a pinhole array with x-ray dispersive mirror and gated detector. Angle averaging of the limb-brightened image data also shows agreement with the 1D calculation. However, the 2D image shows ~20% brightness variations over modes 2-10. These modulations are discussed in context of predicted variations of interface position.

  5. Estimating the Collapse Pressure of an Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baginski, Frank E.; Brakke, Kenneth A.; Cruz, Juan R.

    2013-01-01

    The collapse pressure of an inflatable membrane is the minimum differential pressure which will sustain a specific desired shape under an applied load. In this paper, we present a method for estimating the collapse pressure of a tension-cone inflatable aerodynamic decelerator (IAD) that is subject to a static aerodynamic load. The IAD surface is modeled as an elastic membrane. For a given aerodynamic load and sufficiently high torus differential pressure, the IAD assumes a stable axisymmetric equilibrium shape. When the torus pressure is reduced sufficiently, the symmetric equilibrium state becomes unstable and we define this instance to be the critical pressure Pcr. In this paper, we will compare our predicted critical torus pressure with the corresponding observed torus collapse pressure (OTCP) for fifteen tests that were conducted by the third author and his collaborators at the NASA Glenn Research Center 10x10 Supersonic Wind Tunnel in April 2008. One of the difficulties with these types of comparisons is establishing the instance of torus collapse and determining the OTCP from quantities measured during the experiment. In many cases, torus collapse is gradual and the OTCP is not well-defined. However, in eight of the fifteen wind tunnel tests where the OTCP is well-defined, we find that the average of the relative differences (Pcr - OTCP/Pcr) was 8.9%. For completeness, we will also discuss the seven tests where the observed torus collapse pressure is not well-defined.

  6. Mortality Deceleration and Mortality Selection: Three unexpected implications of a simple model

    PubMed Central

    Wrigley-Field, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Unobserved heterogeneity in mortality risk is pervasive and consequential. Mortality deceleration—the slowing of mortality’s rise with age—has been considered an important window into heterogeneity that otherwise might be impossible to explore. This paper argues that deceleration patterns may reveal surprisingly little about the heterogeneity that putatively produces them. I show that even in a very simple model—one composed of just two subpopulations with Gompertz mortality—(1) aggregate mortality can decelerate even while a majority of the cohort is frail; (2) multiple decelerations are possible; and (3) mortality selection can produce acceleration as well as deceleration. Simulations show that these patterns are plausible in model cohorts that in the aggregate resemble cohorts in the Human Mortality Database. I argue that these results: challenge some conventional heuristics for understanding the relationship between selection and deceleration; undermine certain inferences from deceleration timing to patterns of social inequality; and imply that standard parametric models, assumed to plateau at most once, may sometimes badly misestimate deceleration timing—even by decades. PMID:24385199

  7. Advanced-technology space station study: Summary of systems and pacing technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butterfield, A. J.; Garn, P. A.; King, C. B.; Queijo, M. J.

    1990-01-01

    The principal system features defined for the Advanced Technology Space Station are summarized and the 21 pacing technologies identified during the course of the study are described. The descriptions of system configurations were extracted from four previous study reports. The technological areas focus on those systems particular to all large spacecraft which generate artificial gravity by rotation. The summary includes a listing of the functions, crew requirements and electrical power demand that led to the studied configuration. The pacing technologies include the benefits of advanced materials, in-orbit assembly requirements, stationkeeping, evaluations of electrical power generation alternates, and life support systems. The descriptions of systems show the potential for synergies and identifies the beneficial interactions that can result from technological advances.

  8. Research and Development for Technology Evolution Potential Forecasting System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Changqing; Cao, Shukun; Wang, Yuzeng; Ai, Changsheng; Ze, Xiangbo

    Technology forecasting is a powerful weapon for many enterprises to gain an animate future. Evolutionary potential radar plot is a necessary step of some valuable methods to help the technology managers with right technical strategy. A software system for Technology Evolution Potential Forecasting (TEPF) with automatic radar plot drawing is introduced in this paper. The framework of the system and the date structure describing the concrete evolution pattern are illustrated in details. And the algorithm for radar plot drawing is researched. It is proved that the TEPF system is an effective tool during the technology strategy analyzing process with a referenced case study.

  9. Commercial phosphoric acid fuel cell system technology development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prokopius, P. R.; Warshay, M.; Simons, S. N.; King, R. B.

    1979-01-01

    A review of the current commercial phosphoric acid fuel cell system technology development efforts is presented. In both the electric utility and on-site integrated energy system applications, reducing cost and increasing reliability are the technology drivers at this time. The longstanding barrier to the attainment of these goals, which manifests itself in a number of ways, has been materials. The differences in approach among the three major participants (United Technologies Corporation (UTC), Westinghouse Electric Corporation/Energy Research Corporation (ERC), and Engelhard Industries) and their unique technological features, including electrodes, matrices, intercell cooling, bipolar/separator plates, electrolyte management, fuel selection and system design philosophy are discussed.

  10. Mobile technology and healthcare: the adoption issues and systemic problems.

    PubMed

    Standing, Susan; Standing, Craig

    2008-01-01

    Although the benefits that are associated with mobile technology have been recognised as offering great potential in the healthcare sector, its widespread adoption has been lagging. We propose that fundamental systemic issues are likely to be the main barriers to adoption. We explain that the fragmented nature of the conservative healthcare system, the contradictory incentives and improper outcome measures conspire to make the innovative adoption of mobile technology problematic. Researchers can only gain a limited understanding of a technology's potential success by using technology adoption frameworks and need to supplement this with a 'systems' perspective that takes a more strategic view.

  11. Environmental Sentinel Biomonitor (ESB) System Technology Assessment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-02-01

    the chemicals required within the MEG-HLC range. All chemicals except for nicotine were detected by at least one technology. Three chemicals were only...eliminated from consideration with the qualitative screening model, is the only technology known to detect nicotine at the appropriate sensitivity level. 4...Palabrica VS. 1991. Photobacterium phosphoreum toxicity data base. Water Pollution Research Journal Canada 26:361-431. U.S.Army Center for Health

  12. Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Systems Technologies Technical Program Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce Hallbert

    2012-09-01

    Reliable instrumentation, information, and control (II&C) systems technologies are essential to ensuring safe and efficient operation of the U.S. light water reactor (LWR) fleet. These technologies affect every aspect of nuclear power plant (NPP) and balance-of-plant operations. In 1997, the National Research Council conducted a study concerning the challenges involved in modernization of digital instrumentation and control systems in NPPs. Their findings identified the need for new II&C technology integration.

  13. Third Congress on Information System Science and Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1968-04-01

    formerly Military Air Service-MATS). t ( Civil Reserve Air Kleet. I ransport 111 112 Information System Science and Technology can do...SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY 1 ’ ’ \\/ I MOTES (Type of report and inclusive dates) N/A a i- ip -; • (First name, middle initial, last...System Science and Technology . The Congresses, established as biennial events, were formed to increase communication among scientists, engineers

  14. Systems Engineering: When Knowledge and Technology are the Product

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Larry A.

    2008-01-01

    The interdependence of technology development, conceptual design, and system analysis is examined in the context of an overall systems engineering set of processes. In particular, the role of technology portfolio management - from initial investment decision-making all the way through technology maturation and transfer to industry - is emphasized. Additionally, the role of state of the art assessments is considered in terms of planning and tracking progress towards the development of enhanced predictive capabilities.

  15. Distributed Space System Technology Demonstrations with the Emerald Nanosatellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Twiggs, Robert

    2002-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation of Distributed Space System Technologies utilizing the Emerald Nanosatellite is shown. The topics include: 1) Structure Assembly; 2) Emerald Mission; 3) Payload and Mission Operations; 4) System and Subsystem Description; and 5) Safety Integration and Testing.

  16. SSWR Water Systems Project 3: Transformative Approaches and Technologies

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project aims to develop approaches and evaluate technologies that will help transform water systems towards a more sustainable future. Water systems challenged by issues such as shrinking resources, aging infrastructure, shifting demographics, and climate change need transf...

  17. On Young People's Experience of Systems in Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Svensson, Maria; Zetterqvist, Ann; Ingerman, Ake

    2012-01-01

    Immersed in a technologically complex world, young people make sense of a multi-faceted set of events in everyday life. This article investigates the variation in how Swedish young people experience technological systems and is based on interviews focusing three systems concerning transport, energy and communication--contextualised in relation to…

  18. Design Languages, Notation Systems, and Instructional Technology: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waters, Sandie H.; Gibbons, Andrew S.

    2004-01-01

    Notational systems, used in mature fields of study, are closely related to design languages. The future of a technological field depends on the ability to communicate ideas and changes with others in the field. Instructional technology is one field that can benefit from a notation system enabling designers to duplicate, execute, and communicate…

  19. Advanced Control and Power System (ACAPS) technology program

    SciTech Connect

    Keckler, C.R.; Groom, N.J.

    1983-12-01

    The Advanced Control and Power System (ACAPS) program is to establish the technology necessary to satisfy space station and related large space structures requirements for efficient, reliable, and cost effective energy storage and attitude control. Technology advances in the area of integrated flywheel systems capable of performing the dual functions of energy storage and attitude control are outlined.

  20. Advanced Control and Power System (ACAPS) Technology Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keckler, C. R.; Groom, N. J.

    1983-01-01

    The advanced control and power system (ACAPS) program is to establish the technology necessary to satisfy space station and related large space structures requirements for efficient, reliable, and cost effective energy storage and attitude control. Technology advances in the area of integrated flywheel systems capable of performing the dual functions of energy storage and attitude control are outlined.

  1. Timing of Technology Upgrades: A Case of Enterprise Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Claybaugh, Craig C.

    2010-01-01

    Technology upgrades are an inevitable part of dealing with any man-made invention utilized for productive gain. One key technology used for productive gain within a firm is enterprise software, specifically a firm's Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) system. After the adoption of an ERP system, an organization is perpetually faced with the…

  2. Commercial phosphoric acid fuel cell system technology development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prokopius, P. R.; Warshay, M.; Simons, S. N.; King, R. B.

    1979-01-01

    Reducing cost and increasing reliability were the technology drivers in both the electric utility and on-site integrated energy system applications. The longstanding barrier to the attainment of these goals was materials. Differences in approaches and their technological features, including electrodes, matrices, intercell cooling, bipolar/separator plates, electrolyte management, fuel selection, and system design philosophy were discussed.

  3. Fission Technology for Exploring and Utilizing the Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houts, Mike; VanDyke, Melissa; Godfroy, Tom; Pedersen, Kevin; Martin, James; Dickens, Ricky; Salvail, Pat; Hrbub, Ivana; Schmidt, George R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Fission technology can enable rapid, affordable access to any point in the solar system. Potential fission-based transportation options include bimodal nuclear thermal rockets, high specific energy propulsion systems, and pulsed fission propulsion systems. In-space propellant re-supply enhances the effective performance of all systems, but requires significant infrastructure development. Safe, timely, affordable utilization of first-generation space fission propulsion systems will enable the development of more advanced systems. First generation space systems will build on over 45 years of US and international space fission system technology development to minimize cost,

  4. Technology for large space systems: A special bibliography with indexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    This bibliography lists 460 reports, articles, and other documents introduced into the NASA scientific and technical information system between January 1, 1968 and December 31, 1978. Its purpose is to provide helpful information to the researcher, manager, and designer in technology development and mission design in the area of the Large Space Systems Technology (LSST) Program. Subject matter is grouped according to systems, interactive analysis and design, structural concepts, control systems, electronics, advanced materials, assembly concepts, propulsion, and flight experiments.

  5. Second NASA Technical Interchange Meeting (TIM): Advanced Technology Lifecycle Analysis System (ATLAS) Technology Tool Box (TTB)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    ONeil, D. A.; Mankins, J. C.; Christensen, C. B.; Gresham, E. C.

    2005-01-01

    The Advanced Technology Lifecycle Analysis System (ATLAS), a spreadsheet analysis tool suite, applies parametric equations for sizing and lifecycle cost estimation. Performance, operation, and programmatic data used by the equations come from a Technology Tool Box (TTB) database. In this second TTB Technical Interchange Meeting (TIM), technologists, system model developers, and architecture analysts discussed methods for modeling technology decisions in spreadsheet models, identified specific technology parameters, and defined detailed development requirements. This Conference Publication captures the consensus of the discussions and provides narrative explanations of the tool suite, the database, and applications of ATLAS within NASA s changing environment.

  6. Advanced Microelectronics Technologies for Future Small Satellite Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alkalai, Leon

    1999-01-01

    Future small satellite systems for both Earth observation as well as deep-space exploration are greatly enabled by the technological advances in deep sub-micron microelectronics technologies. Whereas these technological advances are being fueled by the commercial (non-space) industries, more recently there has been an exciting new synergism evolving between the two otherwise disjointed markets. In other words, both the commercial and space industries are enabled by advances in low-power, highly integrated, miniaturized (low-volume), lightweight, and reliable real-time embedded systems. Recent announcements by commercial semiconductor manufacturers to introduce Silicon On Insulator (SOI) technology into their commercial product lines is driven by the need for high-performance low-power integrated devices. Moreover, SOI has been the technology of choice for many space semiconductor manufacturers where radiation requirements are critical. This technology has inherent radiation latch-up immunity built into the process, which makes it very attractive to space applications. In this paper, we describe the advanced microelectronics and avionics technologies under development by NASA's Deep Space Systems Technology Program (also known as X2000). These technologies are of significant benefit to both the commercial satellite as well as the deep-space and Earth orbiting science missions. Such a synergistic technology roadmap may truly enable quick turn-around, low-cost, and highly capable small satellite systems for both Earth observation as well as deep-space missions.

  7. System Architecture Modeling for Technology Portfolio Management using ATLAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Robert W.; O'Neil, Daniel A.

    2006-01-01

    Strategic planners and technology portfolio managers have traditionally relied on consensus-based tools, such as Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP) and Quality Function Deployment (QFD) in planning the funding of technology development. While useful to a certain extent, these tools are limited in the ability to fully quantify the impact of a technology choice on system mass, system reliability, project schedule, and lifecycle cost. The Advanced Technology Lifecycle Analysis System (ATLAS) aims to provide strategic planners a decision support tool for analyzing technology selections within a Space Exploration Architecture (SEA). Using ATLAS, strategic planners can select physics-based system models from a library, configure the systems with technologies and performance parameters, and plan the deployment of a SEA. Key parameters for current and future technologies have been collected from subject-matter experts and other documented sources in the Technology Tool Box (TTB). ATLAS can be used to compare the technical feasibility and economic viability of a set of technology choices for one SEA, and compare it against another set of technology choices or another SEA. System architecture modeling in ATLAS is a multi-step process. First, the modeler defines the system level requirements. Second, the modeler identifies technologies of interest whose impact on an SEA. Third, the system modeling team creates models of architecture elements (e.g. launch vehicles, in-space transfer vehicles, crew vehicles) if they are not already in the model library. Finally, the architecture modeler develops a script for the ATLAS tool to run, and the results for comparison are generated.

  8. Large space systems technology, 1981. [conferences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyer, W. J. (Compiler)

    1982-01-01

    A total systems approach including structures, analyses, controls, and antennas is presented as a cohesive, programmatic plan for large space systems. Specifically, program status, structures, materials, and analyses, and control of large space systems are addressed.

  9. Deceleration of arbitrarily magnetized GRB ejecta: the complete evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mimica, P.; Giannios, D.; Aloy, M. A.

    2009-02-01

    Context: The role of magnetic fields in gamma-ray burst (GRB) flows remains debated. If of sufficient strength, they can leave their signature on the initial phases of the afterglow by substantially changing the backreaction of the flow as a consequence of its interaction with the external medium. Aims: We attempt to understand quantitatively the dynamical effect and observational signatures of GRB ejecta magnetization on the onset of the afterglow. Methods: We perform ultrahigh-resolution, one-dimensional, relativistic MHD simulations of the interaction between a radially expanding, magnetized ejecta with the interstellar medium. We require ultrahigh numerical resolution because of the extreme jump conditions in the region of interaction between the ejecta and the circumburst medium. We study the complete evolution of an ultrarelativistic shell to the self-similar asymptotic phase. Results: Our simulations demonstrate that the complete evolution can be characterized in terms of two parameters, the ξ parameter introduced by Sari and Piran and the magnetization σ_0. We use this fact in producing numerical models in which the shell Lorentz factor γ0 is between 10 and 20 and rescaling the results to arbitrarily large values of γ_0. We find that the reverse shock is typically weak or absent for ejecta characterized by σ_0⪆ 1. The onset of the forward shock emission is strongly dependent on the magnetization. On the other hand, the magnetic energy of the shell is transferred into the external medium on a short timescale (of several times the duration of the burst). The later forward shock emission contains no information about the initial magnetization of the flow. The asymptotic evolution of strongly magnetized shells, after experiencing significant deceleration, resembles that of hydrodynamic shells, i.e. they enter fully into the Blandford-McKee self-similar regime.

  10. Decision Analysis System for Selection of Appropriate Decontamination Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Ebadian, M.A.; Boudreaux, J.F.; Chinta, S.; Zanakis, S.H.

    1998-01-01

    The principal objective for designing Decision Analysis System for Decontamination (DASD) is to support DOE-EM's endeavor to employ the most efficient and effective technologies for treating radiologically contaminated surfaces while minimizing personnel and environmental risks. DASD will provide a tool for environmental decision makers to improve the quality, consistency, and efficacy of their technology selection decisions. The system will facilitate methodical comparisons between innovative and baseline decontamination technologies and aid in identifying the most suitable technologies for performing surface decontamination at DOE environmental restoration sites.

  11. Tools and technologies for expert systems: A human factors perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rajaram, Navaratna S.

    1987-01-01

    It is widely recognized that technologies based on artificial intelligence (AI), especially expert systems, can make significant contributions to the productivity and effectiveness of operations of information and knowledge intensive organizations such as NASA. At the same time, these being relatively new technologies, there is the problem of transfering technology to key personnel of such organizations. The problems of examining the potential of expert systems and of technology transfer is addressed in the context of human factors applications. One of the topics of interest was the investigation of the potential use of expert system building tools, particularly NEXPERT as a technology transfer medium. Two basic conclusions were reached in this regard. First, NEXPERT is an excellent tool for rapid prototyping of experimental expert systems, but not ideal as a delivery vehicle. Therefore, it is not a substitute for general purpose system implementation languages such a LISP or C. This assertion probably holds for nearly all such tools on the market today. Second, an effective technology transfer mechanism is to formulate and implement expert systems for problems which members of the organization in question can relate to. For this purpose, the LIghting EnGineering Expert (LIEGE) was implemented using NEXPERT as the tool for technology transfer and to illustrate the value of expert systems to the activities of the Man-System Division.

  12. Using IoT Device Technology in Spacecraft Checkout Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plummer, Chris

    2015-09-01

    The Internet of Things (IoT) has become a common theme in both the technical and popular press in recent years because many of the enabling technologies that are required to make IoT a reality have now matured. Those technologies are revolutionising the way industrial systems and products are developed because they offer significant advantages over older technologies. This paper looks at how IoT device technology can be used in spacecraft checkout systems to achieve smaller, more capable, and more scalable solutions than are currently available. It covers the use of IoT device technology for classical spacecraft test systems as well as for hardware-in-the-loop simulation systems used to support spacecraft checkout.

  13. Towards Other Planetary Systems (TOPS): A technology needs identification workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, David C.; Nishioka, Kenji

    1991-01-01

    The workshop identified a strong commonality between the technology needs for NASA's TOPS program and the technology needs that were identified for NASA's astrophysics program through its Astrotech 21 survey. The workshop encourages NASA to have the Solar System Exploration and Astrophysics Div. work cooperatively to share in technology studies that are common to both programs, rather than to conduct independent studies. It was also clear, however, that there are technology needs specific to TOPS, and these should be pursued by the Solar System Exploration Div. There are two technology areas that appear to be particularly critical to realizing the ultimate performance that is being sought under the TOPS program, these areas are metrology and optics. The former is critical in calibration and verification of instrument performance, while the latter is needed to provide optical systems of sufficient quality to conduct a search for and characterization of other planetary systems at the more extreme levels of performance identified in TOPS program.

  14. Large Deployable Reflector Science and Technology Workshop. Volume 3: Systems and Technology Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leidich, C. A. (Editor); Pittman, R. B. (Editor)

    1984-01-01

    The results of five technology panels which convened to discuss the Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) are presented. The proposed LDR is a large, ambient-temperature, far infrared/submillimeter telescope designed for space. Panel topics included optics, materials and structures, sensing and control, science instruments, and systems and missions. The telescope requirements, the estimated technology levels, and the areas in which the generic technology work has to be augmented are enumerated.

  15. NASA Technical Interchange Meeting (TIM): Advanced Technology Lifecycle Analysis System (ATLAS) Technology Tool Box

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    ONeil, D. A.; Craig, D. A.; Christensen, C. B.; Gresham, E. C.

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this Technical Interchange Meeting was to increase the quantity and quality of technical, cost, and programmatic data used to model the impact of investing in different technologies. The focus of this meeting was the Technology Tool Box (TTB), a database of performance, operations, and programmatic parameters provided by technologists and used by systems engineers. The TTB is the data repository used by a system of models known as the Advanced Technology Lifecycle Analysis System (ATLAS). This report describes the result of the November meeting, and also provides background information on ATLAS and the TTB.

  16. Comparison of hamstring-to-quadriceps ratio between accelerating and decelerating sections during squat exercise.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Won-Gyu

    2016-09-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to compare hamstring-to-quadriceps ratio between the accelerating and decelerating sections for anterior cruciate ligament protection during squat exercise. [Subjects and Methods] Nine asymptomatic males were enrolled in this study. The hamstring (medial part) and quadriceps (rectus femoris) muscle activities during squat exercise were measured, and the squat exercises were classified into two sections (accelerating and decelerating) by using an accelerometer. [Results] The hamstring-to-quadriceps ratio was significantly higher in the decelerating section than in the accelerating section during the squat exercise. [Conclusion] Application of an increasing decelerating section strategy during the squat exercise can prevent damage in patients with a weakened anterior cruciate ligament due to sports activities.

  17. Active coatings technologies for tailorable military coating systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zunino, J. L., III

    2007-04-01

    The main objective of the U.S. Army's Active Coatings Technologies Program is to develop technologies that can be used in combination to tailor coatings for utilization on Army Materiel. The Active Coatings Technologies Program, ACT, is divided into several thrusts, including the Smart Coatings Materiel Program, Munitions Coatings Technologies, Active Sensor packages, Systems Health Monitoring, Novel Technology Development, as well as other advanced technologies. The goal of the ACT Program is to conduct research leading to the development of multiple coatings systems for use on various military platforms, incorporating unique properties such as self repair, selective removal, corrosion resistance, sensing, ability to modify coatings' physical properties, colorizing, and alerting logistics staff when tanks or weaponry require more extensive repair. A partnership between the U.S. Army Corrosion Office at Picatinny Arsenal, NJ along with researchers at the New Jersey Institute of Technology, NJ, Clemson University, SC, University of New Hampshire, NH, and University of Massachusetts (Lowell), MA, are developing the next generation of Smart Coatings Materiel via novel technologies such as nanotechnology, Micro-electromechanical Systems (MEMS), meta-materials, flexible electronics, electrochromics, electroluminescence, etc. This paper will provide the reader with an overview of the Active Coatings Technologies Program, including an update of the on-going Smart Coatings Materiel Program, its progress thus far, description of the prototype Smart Coatings Systems and research tasks as well as future nanotechnology concepts, and applications for the Department of Defense.

  18. Report of the Power Sub systems Panel. [spacecraft instrumentation technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Problems in spacecraft power system design, testing, integration, and operation are identified and solutions are defined. The specific technology development problems discussed include substorm and plasma design data, modeling of the power subsystem and components, power system monitoring and degraded system management, rotary joints for transmission of power and signals, nickel cadmium battery manufacturing and application, on-array power management, high voltage technology, and solar arrays.

  19. Technology requirements for a generic aerocapture system. [for atmospheric entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruz, M. I.

    1980-01-01

    The technology requirements for the design of a generic aerocapture vehicle system are summarized. These spacecraft have the capability of completely eliminating fuel-costly retropropulsion for planetary orbit capture through a single aerodynamically controlled atmospheric braking pass from a hyperbolic trajectory into a near circular orbit. This generic system has application at both the inner and outer planets. Spacecraft design integration, navigation, communications, and aerothermal protection system design problems were assessed in the technology requirements study and are discussed in this paper.

  20. Security Self-Assessment Guide for Information Technology Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-08-01

    Self-Assessment Guide for Information Technology Systems 5 . FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR(S) Marianne Swanson 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND...SENSITIVITY ASSESSMENT ............................................................................................................... 5 3...defines general support system or “system” in similar terms. Security Self-Assessment Guide For IT Systems 5 All components of a system need not be

  1. Deceleration in advance in the Nagel-Schreckenberg traffic flow model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin-Gang; Gao, Zi-You; Jia, Bin; Jiang, Rui

    2009-05-01

    Based on the Nagel-Schreckenberg model, we study the impact of deceleration in advance on the dynamics of traffic flow. In the process of deceleration in advance, the effect of reaction delay and the effect of expectation are considered respectively. The traffic flow properties are studied by analyzing the fundamental diagram, spatio-temporal patterns, distance headway distribution and car accidents. The simulation results show that reaction delay brings complex traffic flow patterns and expectation makes the serious car accidents rarely happen.

  2. EARTH’S ROTATIONAL DECELERATION: DETERMINATION OF TIDAL FRICTION INDEPENDENT OF TIMESCALES

    SciTech Connect

    Deines, Steven D.; Williams, Carol A. E-mail: cw@math.usf.edu

    2016-04-15

    This paper determines Earth's rotational deceleration without relying on atomic or ephemeris timescales. Earth's rotation defines the civil time standard called Universal Time (UT). Our previous paper did not examine tidal friction in depth when analyzing the timescale divergence between UT and International Atomic Time (TAI). We examine all available paleontological fossils and deposits for the direct measurements of Earth's past rotation rates, because that record includes all contributing effects. We examine paleontological reports that date Earth's rotation rate using corals, bivalves, brachiopods, rhythmites, and stromatolites. Contributions that vary Earth's moment of inertia, such as continental plate drifts, coastline changes, ice age formations, and viscous glacial rebounds, are superimposed with the secular deceleration. The average deceleration of Earth's rotation rate from all available fossil data is found to be (5.969 ± 1.762) × 10{sup −7} rad yr{sup −2}. Our value is 99.8% of the total rotational deceleration determined by Christodoulidis et al., who used artificial satellite data, and our value is 96.6% of the expected tidal friction value obtained by Stephenson and Morrison. Taking the derivative of conserved angular momentum, the predicted lunar orbital deceleration caused by the average rotational deceleration corresponds closely to lunar models. When evaluating the significant time gaps between UT and TAI, Earth's rotational deceleration is a minor contributing factor. Also, the secular deceleration rate is necessary to correctly date ancient astronomical events. We strongly encourage that more ocean paleontological evidence be found to supplement the record to separate the many periodic variations embedded in these data.

  3. Earth’s Rotational Deceleration: Determination of Tidal Friction Independent of Timescales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deines, Steven D.; Williams, Carol A.

    2016-04-01

    This paper determines Earth's rotational deceleration without relying on atomic or ephemeris timescales. Earth's rotation defines the civil time standard called Universal Time (UT). Our previous paper did not examine tidal friction in depth when analyzing the timescale divergence between UT and International Atomic Time (TAI). We examine all available paleontological fossils and deposits for the direct measurements of Earth's past rotation rates, because that record includes all contributing effects. We examine paleontological reports that date Earth's rotation rate using corals, bivalves, brachiopods, rhythmites, and stromatolites. Contributions that vary Earth's moment of inertia, such as continental plate drifts, coastline changes, ice age formations, and viscous glacial rebounds, are superimposed with the secular deceleration. The average deceleration of Earth's rotation rate from all available fossil data is found to be (5.969 ± 1.762) × 10-7 rad yr-2. Our value is 99.8% of the total rotational deceleration determined by Christodoulidis et al., who used artificial satellite data, and our value is 96.6% of the expected tidal friction value obtained by Stephenson and Morrison. Taking the derivative of conserved angular momentum, the predicted lunar orbital deceleration caused by the average rotational deceleration corresponds closely to lunar models. When evaluating the significant time gaps between UT and TAI, Earth's rotational deceleration is a minor contributing factor. Also, the secular deceleration rate is necessary to correctly date ancient astronomical events. We strongly encourage that more ocean paleontological evidence be found to supplement the record to separate the many periodic variations embedded in these data.

  4. Model for the overall phase-space acceptance in a Zeeman decelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dulitz, Katrin; Vanhaecke, Nicolas; Softley, Timothy P.

    2015-01-01

    We present a formalism to calculate phase-space acceptance in a Zeeman decelerator. Using parameters closely mimicking previous Zeeman deceleration experiments, this approach reveals a velocity dependence of the phase stability which we ascribe to the finite rise and fall times of the current pulses that generate the magnetic fields inside the deceleration coils. It is shown that changing the current switch-off times (characterized by the reduced position of the synchronous particle κ0) as the sequence progresses, so as to maintain a constant mean acceleration per pulse, can lead to a constant phase stability and hence a beam with well-defined characteristics. We also find that the time overlap between fields of adjacent coils has an influence on the phase-space acceptance. Previous theoretical and experimental results [A. W. Wiederkehr et al., Phys. Rev. A 82, 043428 (2010), 10.1103/PhysRevA.82.043428; J. Chem. Phys. 135, 214202 (2011)., 10.1063/1.3662141] suggested unfilled regions in phase space that influence particle transmission through the decelerator. Our model provides a means to directly identify the origin of these effects due to coupling between longitudinal and transverse dynamics. Since optimum phase stability is restricted to a rather small parameter range in terms of the reduced position of the synchronous particle κ0, only a limited range of final velocities can be attained using a given number of coils. We evaluate phase stability for different Zeeman deceleration sequences, and by comparison with numerical three-dimensional particle-trajectory simulations, we demonstrate that our model provides a valuable tool to find optimum parameter sets for improved Zeeman deceleration schemes. An acceleration-deceleration scheme is shown to be a useful approach to generating beams with well-defined properties for variable-energy collision experiments. More generally, the model provides significant physical insights that are applicable to other types of

  5. DOE technology information management system database study report

    SciTech Connect

    Widing, M.A.; Blodgett, D.W.; Braun, M.D.; Jusko, M.J.; Keisler, J.M.; Love, R.J.; Robinson, G.L.

    1994-11-01

    To support the missions of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Special Technologies Program, Argonne National Laboratory is defining the requirements for an automated software system that will search electronic databases on technology. This report examines the work done and results to date. Argonne studied existing commercial and government sources of technology databases in five general areas: on-line services, patent database sources, government sources, aerospace technology sources, and general technology sources. First, it conducted a preliminary investigation of these sources to obtain information on the content, cost, frequency of updates, and other aspects of their databases. The Laboratory then performed detailed examinations of at least one source in each area. On this basis, Argonne recommended which databases should be incorporated in DOE`s Technology Information Management System.

  6. Technology architecture guidelines for a health care system.

    PubMed

    Jones, D T; Duncan, R; Langberg, M L; Shabot, M M

    2000-01-01

    Although the demand for use of information technology within the healthcare industry is intensifying, relatively little has been written about guidelines to optimize IT investments. A technology architecture is a set of guidelines for technology integration within an enterprise. The architecture is a critical tool in the effort to control information technology (IT) operating costs by constraining the number of technologies supported. A well-designed architecture is also an important aid to integrating disparate applications, data stores and networks. The authors led the development of a thorough, carefully designed technology architecture for a large and rapidly growing health care system. The purpose and design criteria are described, as well as the process for gaining consensus and disseminating the architecture. In addition, the processes for using, maintaining, and handling exceptions are described. The technology architecture is extremely valuable to health care organizations both in controlling costs and promoting integration.

  7. Gas cooled fuel cell systems technology development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canton, M. H.; Chepanoske, W. A.; Feret, J. M.; France, L. L.; Haines, N. L.; Heberling, C. F.; Holman, R. R.; Kelly, J. L.; Kochka, E. L.

    1992-03-01

    The development is reported of a Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cell (PAFC) for electric utility or industrial power plant applications. Results of this effort include: (1) development of a baseline rolled electrode technology; (2) advancement of fuel cell technology through improvements in the areas of acid management, catalyst selection, electrode and plate materials and processes, components designs, and quality assurance programs; (3) demonstration of improved fuel cell and stack performance and endurance; (4) successful scaleup of cell and stack design features into fun height 100 kill stacks; and (5) demonstration of combining stacks into a 400 kill module that will be the building block for power plants, including the development of testing facilities and operating procedures applicable to plant operations.

  8. Gas cooled fuel cell systems technology development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1992-03-01

    This report documents in detail the work performed by Westinghouse Electric Corporation and the Energy Research Corporation during the fourth phase of a planned multiphase program to develop a Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cell (PAFC) for electric utility or industrial power plant applications. The results of this effort include (1) development of a baseline rolled electrode technology; (2) advancement of fuel cell technology through innovative improvements in the areas of acid management, catalyst selection, electrode and plate materials and processes, component designs, and quality assurance programs; (3) demonstration of improved fuel cell and stack performance and endurance; (4) successful scaleup of cell and stack design features into full height 100 kW stacks; and (5) demonstration of combining stacks into a 400 kW module that will be the building block for power plants, including the development of testing facilities and operating procedures applicable to plant operations.

  9. Robotic Technology Applied to Army Mobility Systems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-07-01

    side it necessary and Identify by block number) Robotics Sensors Microprocessor Control Control Theory Robotic Technology /. _ 2& ABSTRACT (Cae a...optical encoders mounted on the bucket, dipper, boom, and swing assembly of the backhoe. (See Figure 2.) 4 i side view top view Angle Encoderf 2 * 3 b...zero into these registers which are subsequently incremented within the actual data transmision portion of the code amid the multiple transfer portion

  10. Gas cooled fuel cell systems technology development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feret, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    The work performed during the Second Logical Unit of Work of a multi-year program designed to develop a phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) for electric utility power plant application is discussed. The Second Logical Unit of Work, which covers the period May 14, 1983 through May 13, 1984, was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Fossil Energy, Morgantown Energy Technology Center, and managed by the NASA Lewis Research Center.

  11. SDI Large-Scale System Technology Study.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Boost Phase Architecture Language Sensor Midcourse Producibility Algorithm Weapon Research Target BM C3 Technology Model Simulation AI Network SDI...problem is illustrated in Figures 7-3 through 7-7. The problem chosen for this example is the post-interceptor-launch midcourse - guidance problem, which...optimal interconnection of the blocks. The possible relevance to the post-interceptor-launch midcourse - guidance problem of the candidate architecture

  12. Heterodyne systems and technology, part 1. [conferences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Various aspects of optical heterodyning are considered. Topics covered heterodyning throughout the electromagnetic spectrum including detectors, local oscillators, tunable diode lasers, astronomical systems, and environmental sensors, with both active and passive systems represented.

  13. Deceleration and acceleration capacities of heart rate associated with heart failure with high discriminating performance.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wei; Jin, Xian; Zhang, Peng; Yu, Qiang; Yin, Guizhi; Lu, Yi; Xiao, Hongbing; Chen, Yueguang; Zhang, Dadong

    2016-03-23

    Accurate measurements of autonomic nerve regulation in heart failure (HF) were unresolved. The discriminating performance of deceleration and acceleration capacities of heart rate in HF was evaluated in 130 HF patients and 212 controls. Acceleration capacity and deceleration capacity were independent risk factors for HF in males, evaluated by multiple logistic regression analysis, with odds ratios (ORs) of 5.94 and 0.13, respectively. Acceleration capacity was also an independent risk factor for HF in females, with an OR of 8.58. Deceleration capacity was the best cardiac electrophysiological index to classify HF in males, with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.88. Deceleration capacity was the best classification factor of HF in females with an AUC of 0.97, significantly higher than even left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). Acceleration capacity also showed high performance in classifying HF in males (0.84) and females (0.92). The cut-off values of deceleration capacity for HF classification in males and females were 4.55 ms and 4.85 ms, respectively. The cut-off values of acceleration capacity for HF classification in males and females were -6.15 ms and -5.75 ms, respectively. Our study illustrates the role of acceleration and deceleration capacity measurements in the neuro-pathophysiology of HF.

  14. Deceleration and acceleration capacities of heart rate associated with heart failure with high discriminating performance

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Wei; Jin, Xian; Zhang, Peng; Yu, Qiang; Yin, Guizhi; Lu, Yi; Xiao, Hongbing; Chen, Yueguang; Zhang, Dadong

    2016-01-01

    Accurate measurements of autonomic nerve regulation in heart failure (HF) were unresolved. The discriminating performance of deceleration and acceleration capacities of heart rate in HF was evaluated in 130 HF patients and 212 controls. Acceleration capacity and deceleration capacity were independent risk factors for HF in males, evaluated by multiple logistic regression analysis, with odds ratios (ORs) of 5.94 and 0.13, respectively. Acceleration capacity was also an independent risk factor for HF in females, with an OR of 8.58. Deceleration capacity was the best cardiac electrophysiological index to classify HF in males, with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.88. Deceleration capacity was the best classification factor of HF in females with an AUC of 0.97, significantly higher than even left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). Acceleration capacity also showed high performance in classifying HF in males (0.84) and females (0.92). The cut-off values of deceleration capacity for HF classification in males and females were 4.55 ms and 4.85 ms, respectively. The cut-off values of acceleration capacity for HF classification in males and females were −6.15 ms and −5.75 ms, respectively. Our study illustrates the role of acceleration and deceleration capacity measurements in the neuro-pathophysiology of HF. PMID:27005970

  15. A Flight Investigation of Control, Display, and Guidance Requirements for Decelerating Descending VTOL Instrument Transitions using the X-22A Variable Stability Aircraft. Volume 1. Technical Discussion and Results

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-09-01

    airspeed/ground speed switching logic, configuration change command. 5.0 Selection of control system types , individual system characteristics...all five control system types in combination with the three most sophisticated display presentations is intended to provide some guidance in...deceleration profiles. 2. The required dynamic characteristics of the generic control system types investigated in this experiment should be

  16. Trends in C3 System Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-07-01

    lags in feedback. I 5.2.11 Artificial Inteligence /Expert Systems Effective command and control of military systems of increasing technical and...68 5.2.11 Artificial Intelligence/Expert System s ................................... 69 5.2.12 Data Com pression Techniques...Direct Military Interest AFCEA Armed Forces Communications and Electronics Association AFMC Air Force Material Command (US) Al Artificial Intelligence

  17. Preparation of drug delivery systems using supercritical fluid technology.

    PubMed

    Kompella, U B; Koushik, K

    2001-01-01

    Small changes in temperature and pressure near the critical region induce dramatic changes in the density and solubility of supercritical fluids, thereby facilitating the use of environmentally benign agents such as CO2 for their solvent and antisolvent properties in processing a wide variety of materials. While supercritical fluid technologies have been in commercial use in the food and chromatography industries for several years, only recently has this technology made inroads in the formulation of drug delivery systems. This review summarizes some of the recent applications of supercritical fluid technology in the preparation of drug delivery systems. Drugs containing polymeric particles, plain drug particles, solute-containing liposomes, and inclusion complexes of drug and carrier have been formulated using this technology. Also, polymer separation using this technology is enabling the selection of a pure fraction of a polymer, thereby allowing a more precise control of drug release from polymeric delivery systems.

  18. Progress in Technology Validation of the Next Ion Propulsion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, Scott W.; Patterson, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    The NASA's Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT) ion propulsion system has been in advanced technology development under the NASA In-Space Propulsion Technology project. The highest fidelity hardware planned has now been completed by the government/industry team, including a flight prototype model (PM) thruster, an engineering model (EM) power processing unit, EM propellant management assemblies, a breadboard gimbal, and control unit simulators. Subsystem and system level technology validation testing is in progress. To achieve the objective Technology Readiness Level 6, environmental testing is being conducted to qualification levels in ground facilities simulating the space environment. Additional tests have been conducted to characterize the performance range and life capability of the NEXT thruster. This paper presents the status and results of technology validation testing accomplished to date, the validated subsystem and system capabilities, and the plans for completion of this phase of NEXT development.

  19. Space station onboard propulsion system: Technology study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcallister, J. G.; Rudland, R. S.; Redd, L. R.; Beekman, D. H.; Cuffin, S. M.; Beer, C. M.; Mccarthy, K. K.

    1987-01-01

    The objective was to prepare for the design of the space station propulsion system. Propulsion system concepts were defined and schematics were developed for the most viable concepts. A dual model bipropellant system was found to deliver the largest amount of payload. However, when resupply is considered, an electrolysis system with 10 percent accumulators requires less resupply propellant, though it is penalized by the amount of time required to fill the accumulators and the power requirements for the electrolyzer. A computer simulation was prepared, which was originally intended to simulate the water electrolysis propulsion system but which was expanded to model other types of systems such as cold gas, monopropellant and bipropellant storable systems.

  20. Technology for Space Station Evolution. Volume 3: EVA/Manned Systems/Fluid Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    NASA's Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology (OAST) conducted a workshop on technology for space station evolution 16-19 Jan. 1990 in Dallas, Texas. The purpose of this workshop was to collect and clarify Space Station Freedom technology requirements for evolution and to describe technologies that can potentially fill those requirements. These proceedings are organized into an Executive Summary and Overview and five volumes containing the Technology Discipline Presentations. Volume 3 consists of the technology discipline sections for Extravehicular Activity/Manned Systems and the Fluid Management System. For each technology discipline, there is a Level 3 subsystem description, along with the papers.

  1. Technology, Systems and School Librarians: An Approach to Continuing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broadbent, Marianne; And Others

    This paper describes a continuing education course designed to introduce school librarians to computer and communications technology as applied to indexing, cataloging, and networks, and to the principles and techniques of systems analysis. It is based on the premise that although computer and communications technology presents school librarians…

  2. Virginia Western Community College's Health Technology Admissions Evaluation System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houston, Charles A.; Sellers, Harry

    Due to factors such as high enrollment demands, limited institutional space, and high program costs, certain admissions requirements in the guidance/selection of students for health technology programs at Virginia Western Community College (VWCC) have become necessary. A Health Technology Admissions Evaluation System was created to develop and…

  3. Mechanical Systems Technology Branch research summary, 1985 - 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krantz, Timothy L. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    A collection of significant accomplishments from the research of the Mechanical Systems Technology Branch at the NASA Lewis Research Center completed during the years 1985-1992 is included. The publication highlights and accomplishments made in bearing and gearing technology through in-house research, university grants, and industry contracted projects. The publication also includes a complete listing of branch publications for these years.

  4. Electrical Power and Illumination Systems. Energy Technology Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This course in electrical power and illumination systems is one of 16 courses in the Energy Technology Series developed for an Energy Conservation-and-Use Technology curriculum. Intended for use in two-year postsecondary technical institutions to prepare technicians for employment, the courses are also useful in industry for updating employees in…

  5. Energy and cost saving results for advanced technology systems from the Cogeneration Technology Alternatives Study (CTAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sagerman, G. D.; Barna, G. J.; Burns, R. K.

    1979-01-01

    An overview of the organization and methodology of the Cogeneration Technology Alternatives Study is presented. The objectives of the study were to identify the most attractive advanced energy conversion systems for industrial cogeneration applications in the future and to assess the advantages of advanced technology systems compared to those systems commercially available today. Advanced systems studied include steam turbines, open and closed cycle gas turbines, combined cycles, diesel engines, Stirling engines, phosphoric acid and molten carbonate fuel cells and thermionics. Steam turbines, open cycle gas turbines, combined cycles, and diesel engines were also analyzed in versions typical of today's commercially available technology to provide a base against which to measure the advanced systems. Cogeneration applications in the major energy consuming manufacturing industries were considered. Results of the study in terms of plant level energy savings, annual energy cost savings and economic attractiveness are presented for the various energy conversion systems considered.

  6. Future Seabasing Technology Analysis: Logistics Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    incorporates an AIT interface. The ASRS reads RFID tags and barcodes to identify and select cargo . In these tests, a scan - ner moves down a row of cargo ...facilitate the logging of cargo , they are a line-of-sight technology; in other words, the barcode scanner must have a direct, unobstructed view of the...form of AIT, but they require line-of-sight scanning . Therefore, personnel must scan each barcode using a hand-held barcode reader. The data in the

  7. Micropower radar systems for law enforcement technology

    SciTech Connect

    Azevedo, S.G.; Mast, J.; Brase, J.

    1994-11-15

    LLNL researchers have pioneered a unique compact low-power and inexpensive radar technology (microradar) that has enormous potential in various industries. Some licenses are currently in place for motion sensors and stud finders. The ultra-wideband characteristics of the microradar (4 to 10 GHz) make it difficult to detect, yet provide potential range resolution of 1 cm at ranges of greater than 20 meters. Real and synthetic apertures arrays of radar elements can address imaging applications behind walls at those distances. Personnel detection applications are currently being tested.

  8. Current Technology for Thermal Protection Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scotti, Stephen J. (Compiler)

    1992-01-01

    Interest in thermal protection systems for high-speed vehicles is increasing because of the stringent requirements of such new projects as the Space Exploration Initiative, the National Aero-Space Plane, and the High-Speed Civil Transport, as well as the needs for improved capabilities in existing thermal protection systems in the Space Shuttle and in turbojet engines. This selection of 13 papers from NASA and industry summarizes the history and operational experience of thermal protection systems utilized in the national space program to date, and also covers recent development efforts in thermal insulation, refractory materials and coatings, actively cooled structures, and two-phase thermal control systems.

  9. Space systems computer-aided design technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrett, L. B.

    1984-01-01

    The interactive Design and Evaluation of Advanced Spacecraft (IDEAS) system is described, together with planned capability increases in the IDEAS system. The system's disciplines consist of interactive graphics and interactive computing. A single user at an interactive terminal can create, design, analyze, and conduct parametric studies of earth-orbiting satellites, which represents a timely and cost-effective method during the conceptual design phase where various missions and spacecraft options require evaluation. Spacecraft concepts evaluated include microwave radiometer satellites, communication satellite systems, solar-powered lasers, power platforms, and orbiting space stations.

  10. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT - GROUNDWATER SAMPLING TECHNOLOGIES - QED ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS INC. WELL WIZARD DEDICATED SAMPLING SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has created the Environmental Technology Verification Program (ETV) to facilitate the deployment of innovative or improved environmental technologies through performance verification and dissemination of information. The goal of the ...

  11. Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) system concept and technology definition study. Volume 2: Technology assessment and technology development plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agnew, Donald L.; Jones, Peter A.

    1989-04-01

    A study was conducted to define reasonable and representative LDR system concepts for the purpose of defining a technology development program aimed at providing the requisite technological capability necessary to start LDR development by the end of 1991. This volume presents thirteen technology assessments and technology development plans, as well as an overview and summary of the LDR concepts. Twenty-two proposed augmentation projects are described (selected from more than 30 candidates). The five LDR technology areas most in need of supplementary support are: cryogenic cooling; astronaut assembly of the optically precise LDR in space; active segmented primary mirror; dynamic structural control; and primary mirror contamination control. Three broad, time-phased, five-year programs were synthesized from the 22 projects, scheduled, and funding requirements estimated.

  12. Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) system concept and technology definition study. Volume 2: Technology assessment and technology development plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agnew, Donald L.; Jones, Peter A.

    1989-01-01

    A study was conducted to define reasonable and representative LDR system concepts for the purpose of defining a technology development program aimed at providing the requisite technological capability necessary to start LDR development by the end of 1991. This volume presents thirteen technology assessments and technology development plans, as well as an overview and summary of the LDR concepts. Twenty-two proposed augmentation projects are described (selected from more than 30 candidates). The five LDR technology areas most in need of supplementary support are: cryogenic cooling; astronaut assembly of the optically precise LDR in space; active segmented primary mirror; dynamic structural control; and primary mirror contamination control. Three broad, time-phased, five-year programs were synthesized from the 22 projects, scheduled, and funding requirements estimated.

  13. EG G Mound Applied Technologies payroll system

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-02-07

    EG G Mound Applied Technologies, Inc., manages and operates the Mound Facility, Miamisburg, Ohio, under a cost-plus-award-fee contract administered by the Department of Energy's Albuquerque Field Office. The contractor's Payroll Department is responsible for prompt payment in the proper amount to all persons entitled to be paid, in compliance with applicable laws, regulations, and legal decisions. The objective was to determine whether controls were in place to avoid erroneous payroll payments. EG G Mound Applied Technologies, Inc., did not have all the internal controls required by General Accounting Office Title 6, Pay, Leave, and Allowances.'' Specifically, they did not have computerized edits, separation of duties and responsibilities, and restricted access to payroll data files. This condition occurred because its managers were not aware of Title 6 requirements. As a result, the contractor could not assure the Department of Energy that payroll costs were processes accurately; and fraud, waste, or abuse of Department of Energy funds could go undetected. Our sample of 212 payroll transactions from a population of 66,000 in FY 1991 disclosed only two minor processing errors and no instances of fraud, waste or abuse.

  14. Foreign technology summary of flight crucial flight control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rediess, H. A.

    1984-01-01

    A survey of foreign technology in flight crucial flight controls is being conducted to provide a data base for planning future research and technology programs. Only Free World countries were surveyed, and the primary emphasis was on Western Europe because that is where the most advanced technology resides. The survey includes major contemporary systems on operational aircraft, R&D flight programs, advanced aircraft developments, and major research and technology programs. The information was collected from open literature, personal communications, and a tour of several companies, government organizations, and research laboratories in the United Kingdom, France, and the Federal Republic of Germany. A summary of the survey results to date is presented.

  15. Advanced technology wind shear prediction system evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gering, Greg

    1992-01-01

    The program overviews: (1) American Airline (AA)/Turbulence Prediction Systems (TPS), which have installed forward looking infrared predictive windshear system on 3 MD-80 aircraft; (2) AA/TPS AWAS III evaluation, which is a joint effort and is installed in the noise landing gear (NLG) area and a data recorder installed in the E/E compartment.

  16. Control technology development. [distributed parameter systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, G.

    1981-01-01

    Static and dynamic control design approaches were developed for distributed parameter systems. A hardware flexible beam facility was constructed to demonstrate and verify the theoretical control concepts. Efforts were made in the area of model order estimation for control systems with uncertain or time varying parameters.

  17. Virtualization Technologies in Information Systems Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunsford, Dale L.

    2009-01-01

    Information systems educators must balance the need to protect the stability, availability, and security of computer laboratories with the learning objectives of various courses. In advanced courses where students need to install, configure, and otherwise manipulate application and operating system settings, this is especially problematic as these…

  18. "ATLAS" Advanced Technology Life-cycle Analysis System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lollar, Louis F.; Mankins, John C.; ONeil, Daniel A.

    2004-01-01

    Making good decisions concerning research and development portfolios-and concerning the best systems concepts to pursue - as early as possible in the life cycle of advanced technologies is a key goal of R&D management This goal depends upon the effective integration of information from a wide variety of sources as well as focused, high-level analyses intended to inform such decisions Life-cycle Analysis System (ATLAS) methodology and tool kit. ATLAS encompasses a wide range of methods and tools. A key foundation for ATLAS is the NASA-created Technology Readiness. The toolkit is largely spreadsheet based (as of August 2003). This product is being funded by the Human and Robotics The presentation provides a summary of the Advanced Technology Level (TRL) systems Technology Program Office, Office of Exploration Systems, NASA Headquarters, Washington D.C. and is being integrated by Dan O Neil of the Advanced Projects Office, NASA/MSFC, Huntsville, AL

  19. Recent GRC Aerospace Technologies Applicable to Terrestrial Energy Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kankam, David; Lyons, Valerie J.; Hoberecht, Mark A.; Tacina, Robert R.; Hepp, Aloysius F.

    2000-01-01

    This paper is an overview of a wide range of recent aerospace technologies under development at the NASA Glenn Research Center, in collaboration with other NASA centers, government agencies, industry and academia. The focused areas are space solar power, advanced power management and distribution systems, Stirling cycle conversion systems, fuel cells, advanced thin film photovoltaics and batteries, and combustion technologies. The aerospace-related objectives of the technologies are generation of space power, development of cost-effective and reliable, high performance power systems, cryogenic applications, energy storage, and reduction in gas-turbine emissions, with attendant clean jet engines. The terrestrial energy applications of the technologies include augmentation of bulk power in ground power distribution systems, and generation of residential, commercial and remote power, as well as promotion of pollution-free environment via reduction in combustion emissions.

  20. Compact Multimedia Systems in Multi-chip Module Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fang, Wai-Chi; Alkalaj, Leon

    1995-01-01

    This tutorial paper shows advanced multimedia system designs based on multi-chip module (MCM) technologies that provide essential computing, compression, communication, and storage capabilities for various large scale information highway applications.!.

  1. Advanced Technology Display House. Volume 2: Energy system design concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maund, D. H.

    1981-01-01

    The preliminary design concept for the energy systems in the Advanced Technology Display House is analyzed. Residential energy demand, energy conservation, and energy concepts are included. Photovoltaic arrays and REDOX (reduction oxidation) sizes are discussed.

  2. Instructional Systems. The Educational Technology Reviews Series. Number Eight.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educational Technology Publications, Englewood Cliffs, NJ.

    Composed of articles which appeared recently in "Educational Technology" magazine, this volume in the review series considers instructional systems. Topics covered include systems models for instructional design and management, the design of simulation systems, informal and vocational education, individualized instruction, operational learning…

  3. Large Space Systems/Low-Thrust Propulsion Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The potentially critical interactions that occur between propulsion, structures and materials, and controls for large spacecraft are considered, the technology impacts within these fields are defined and the net effect on large systems and the resulting missions is determined. Topical areas are systems/mission analysis, LSS static and dynamic characterization, and propulsion systems characterization.

  4. Food Systems: Modern Technology, Transnationalization, Regional and National Situations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Social Science Journal, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Topics discussed include: the emergence of biotechnology; modern food technology; strategies of transnational food companies; transnational agribusiness firms and Mexican agriculture; food production in Western Europe; the agro-industrial system of the USSR; food systems in India; food production systems of the Senegal River; and production modes…

  5. A Systemic Integration of Technology for New-Paradigm Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, William R.; Watson, Sunnie Lee; Reigeluth, Charles M.

    2012-01-01

    Educational reform efforts have failed to create widespread improvement. The authors argue that rather than trying to improve the existing system of education, a new learner-centered paradigm is needed that supports individualized learning. Such a significantly different system of education will require the systemic application of technology to…

  6. A Virtual Reality Dance Training System Using Motion Capture Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, J. C. P.; Leung, H.; Tang, J. K. T.; Komura, T.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a new dance training system based on the motion capture and virtual reality (VR) technologies is proposed. Our system is inspired by the traditional way to learn new movements-imitating the teacher's movements and listening to the teacher's feedback. A prototype of our proposed system is implemented, in which a student can imitate…

  7. Expert system technology as a data processing tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hennessy, John F.

    1988-01-01

    The expert system technology is focused on as a data processing tool. Several existing applications are analyzed. Their original definition as pure expert systems is contrasted with their current status as integrated systems. The architectural requirements needed to support such a heterogeneous environment are given.

  8. Reactor technology assessment and selection utilizing systems engineering approach

    SciTech Connect

    Zolkaffly, Muhammed Zulfakar; Han, Ki-In

    2014-02-12

    The first Nuclear power plant (NPP) deployment in a country is a complex process that needs to consider technical, economic and financial aspects along with other aspects like public acceptance. Increased interest in the deployment of new NPPs, both among newcomer countries and those with expanding programs, necessitates the selection of reactor technology among commercially available technologies. This paper reviews the Systems Decision Process (SDP) of Systems Engineering and applies it in selecting the most appropriate reactor technology for the deployment in Malaysia. The integrated qualitative and quantitative analyses employed in the SDP are explored to perform reactor technology assessment and to select the most feasible technology whose design has also to comply with the IAEA standard requirements and other relevant requirements that have been established in this study. A quick Malaysian case study result suggests that the country reside with PWR (pressurized water reactor) technologies with more detailed study to be performed in the future for the selection of the most appropriate reactor technology for Malaysia. The demonstrated technology assessment also proposes an alternative method to systematically and quantitatively select the most appropriate reactor technology.

  9. Reactor technology assessment and selection utilizing systems engineering approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolkaffly, Muhammed Zulfakar; Han, Ki-In

    2014-02-01

    The first Nuclear power plant (NPP) deployment in a country is a complex process that needs to consider technical, economic and financial aspects along with other aspects like public acceptance. Increased interest in the deployment of new NPPs, both among newcomer countries and those with expanding programs, necessitates the selection of reactor technology among commercially available technologies. This paper reviews the Systems Decision Process (SDP) of Systems Engineering and applies it in selecting the most appropriate reactor technology for the deployment in Malaysia. The integrated qualitative and quantitative analyses employed in the SDP are explored to perform reactor technology assessment and to select the most feasible technology whose design has also to comply with the IAEA standard requirements and other relevant requirements that have been established in this study. A quick Malaysian case study result suggests that the country reside with PWR (pressurized water reactor) technologies with more detailed study to be performed in the future for the selection of the most appropriate reactor technology for Malaysia. The demonstrated technology assessment also proposes an alternative method to systematically and quantitatively select the most appropriate reactor technology.

  10. Technology assessment of aquaculture systems for municipal waste water treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Hyde, H.C.; Ross, R.S.; Sturmer, L.

    1984-08-01

    The innovative and alternative technology provisions of the Clean Water Act of 1977 (PL 95-217) provide financial incentives to communities that use wastewater treatment alternatives to reduce costs or energy consumption over conventional systems. Some of these technologies have been only recently developed and are not in widespread use in the United States. This document discusses the applicability and technical and economic feasibility of using aquaculture systems for municipal wastewater treatment facilities.

  11. Uncooled infrared sensor technology for hostile fire indication systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadav, Shavit; Brodetzki, Guy; Danino, Meir; Zahler, Moti

    2011-06-01

    An evolving combat arena poses an ever-growing hostile fire threat for various ground and airborne targets. Protecting both static posts and moving military platforms against these threats require high performance and affordable solutions, favoring uncooled sensing alert technologies. By analyzing accumulated target and clutter data using new algorithmic and hardware building blocks we establish improved hostile fire indication system configurations. The paper will review new system demonstrations harnessing uncooled IR sensors technology alongside empirical field testing results.

  12. Outdoor airflow into HVAC systems: An evaluation of measurement technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Fisk, William J.; Faulkner, David; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Delp, Woody

    2003-09-01

    During the last few years, new technologies have been introduced for measuring the flow rates of outdoor air (OA) into HVAC systems; however, an evaluation of these measurement technologies has not previously been published. This document describes a test system and protocols developed for controlled evaluation of these measurement technologies. The results of tests of three measurement technologies are also summarized. The test system and protocol were judged practical and very useful. The test results indicate that one measurement technology can measure OA flow rates with errors of 20% or less without a field-based calibration, as long as the OA velocities are sufficient to provide an accurately measurable pressure signal. The test results for a second measurement technology are similar; however, a difficult field-based calibration relating the OA flow rate with the pressure signal would be required to reduce errors below approximately 30%. The errors in OA flow rates measured with the third measurement technology, that uses six electronic airspeed sensors downstream of the OA inlet louver, exceeded 100%; however, these errors could be substantially reduced through a difficult field based calibration. The effects of wind on the accuracy of these measurement technologies still needs to be evaluated.

  13. [Robotic and systems technology for advanced endoscopic procedures].

    PubMed

    Arezzo, A; Testa, T; Schurr, M O; Buess, G F; De Gregori, M

    2001-01-01

    The advent of endoscopic techniques changed surgery in many regards. This paper intends to describe an overview about technologies to facilitate endoscopic surgery. The systems described have been developed for the use in general surgery, but an easy application also in other fields of endoscopic surgery seems realistic. The introduction of system technology and robotic technology enables today to design a highly ergonomic solo-surgery platform. This consists of a system of devices for endoscopic surgery (HF, light source, etc...) with which the surgeon interacts directly, positioning systems for optic and instruments that the surgeon drives as the likes without assistance, and a chair to increase the comfort of the surgeon during surgery. The system of endoscopic devices named OREST (Dornier, München) designed already in 1992 opened the way to a number of systems available today that allow to the surgeon a direct control of the instrumentation. A considerable step ahead in endoscopic technology is the introduction of robotic technology to design assisting systems for solo-surgery and microsurgical instrument manipulators. Results of a number of experimental trials on combinations of different positioning devices are presented and commented. A further step in the employment of robotic technology is the design of "master-slave manipulators" to provide the surgeon with additional degrees of freedom of instrumentation. In 1996 a first prototype of an endoscopic manipulator system, named ARTEMIS, designed in cooperation with the Research Center in Karlsruhe, could be used in experimental applications. Clinical use of the system, however, will require further development of the arm mechanics and the control system. The combination with the implementation of telecommunication technology will open new frontiers, such as teleconsulting, teleassistance and telemanipulation.

  14. Solar parabolic dish thermal power systems - Technology and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucas, J. W.; Marriott, A. T.

    1979-01-01

    Activities of two projects at JPL in support of DOE's Small Power Systems Program are reported. These two projects are the Point-Focusing Distributed Receiver (PFDR) Technology Project and the Point-Focusing Thermal and Electric Applications (PFTEA) Project. The PFDR Technology Project's major activity is developing the technology of solar concentrators, receivers and power conversion subsystems suitable for parabolic dish or point-focusing distributed receiver power systems. Other PFDR activities include system integration and cost estimation under mass production, as well as the testing of the hardware. The PFTEA Project's first major activity is applications analysis, that is seeking ways to introduce PFDR systems into appropriate user sectors. The second activity is systems engineering and development wherein power plant systems are analyzed for specific applications. The third activity is the installation of a series of engineering experiments in various user environments to obtain actual operating experience

  15. Enabling technologies for Chinese Mars lander guidance system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xiuqiang; Li, Shuang

    2017-04-01

    Chinese first Mars exploration activity, orbiting landing and roaming collaborative mission, has been programmed and started. As a key technology, Mars lander guidance system is intended to serve atmospheric entry, descent and landing (EDL) phases. This paper is to report the formation process of enabling technology road map for Chinese Mars lander guidance system. First, two scenarios of the first-stage of the Chinese Mars exploration project are disclosed in detail. Second, mission challenges and engineering needs of EDL guidance, navigation, and control (GNC) are presented systematically for Chinese Mars exploration program. Third, some useful related technologies developed in China's current aerospace projects are pertinently summarized, especially on entry guidance, parachute descent, autonomous hazard avoidance and safe landing. Finally, an enabling technology road map of Chinese Mars lander guidance is given through technological inheriting and improving.

  16. Sensor technology for future atmospheric observation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvarado, U. R.; Keafer, L. S., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    The remote sensing instruments that will be needed for research in atmospheric environmental quality in the future are considered. The needs are determined on the basis of a model that incorporates scientific knowledge objectives, measurement needs, and potential space missions, spacecraft and instruments in order to discern the technology requirements. While emphasis is placed on global surveys that make full use of the synoptic observation capabilities of spaceborne sensors, the importance of airborne and ground-based sensors in this research is also recognized. Several of the instruments that are identified to fulfill the knowledge objectives are spectrometers and radiometers using such passive measurement techniques as interferometer correlation absorption radiometry, and heterodyne spectrometry. Lidar instruments are also seen as important future developments.

  17. NASA's new technology reporting system: A review and future prospects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, Richard L.

    1985-01-01

    A systematic effort is made to describe how NASA's new technology reporting system operates today, and how that system might be enhanced. The system is documented in terms of organization, operational practices, and other program benefits. Identified and assessed are incentives or disincentives to reporting, program management, program follow through, and the feasibility of various means for improving the general process. NASA has the only system in the Federal Government for capturing and disseminating new technology developed under its sponsorship of research and development. This system can be improved in many ways, some of which require additional resources and/or more senior management attention, but many of which can be instituted within the authority of the leadership of the Technology Utilization program. The suggested options and actions presented are mutually compatible. Any single action will contribute to improving the process. However, the first and most important step is undoubtedly to gain senior management's attention to the central role played by a vigorous new technology reporting system in the success and value of NASA's broader technology utilization and technology transfer activities.

  18. The Contextualized Technology Adaptation Process (CTAP): Optimizing Health Information Technology to Improve Mental Health Systems.

    PubMed

    Lyon, Aaron R; Wasse, Jessica Knaster; Ludwig, Kristy; Zachry, Mark; Bruns, Eric J; Unützer, Jürgen; McCauley, Elizabeth

    2016-05-01

    Health information technologies have become a central fixture in the mental healthcare landscape, but few frameworks exist to guide their adaptation to novel settings. This paper introduces the contextualized technology adaptation process (CTAP) and presents data collected during Phase 1 of its application to measurement feedback system development in school mental health. The CTAP is built on models of human-centered design and implementation science and incorporates repeated mixed methods assessments to guide the design of technologies to ensure high compatibility with a destination setting. CTAP phases include: (1) Contextual evaluation, (2) Evaluation of the unadapted technology, (3) Trialing and evaluation of the adapted technology, (4) Refinement and larger-scale implementation, and (5) Sustainment through ongoing evaluation and system revision. Qualitative findings from school-based practitioner focus groups are presented, which provided information for CTAP Phase 1, contextual evaluation, surrounding education sector clinicians' workflows, types of technologies currently available, and influences on technology use. Discussion focuses on how findings will inform subsequent CTAP phases, as well as their implications for future technology adaptation across content domains and service sectors.

  19. Current technology for thermal protection systems

    SciTech Connect

    Scotti, S.J.

    1992-10-01

    Interest in thermal protection systems for high-speed vehicles is increasing because of the stringent requirements of such new projects as the Space Exploration Initiative, the National Aero-Space Plane, and the High-Speed Civil Transport, as well as the needs for improved capabilities in existing thermal protection systems in the Space Shuttle and in turbojet engines. This selection of 13 papers from NASA and industry summarizes the history and operational experience of thermal protection systems utilized in the national space program to date, and also covers recent development efforts in thermal insulation, refractory materials and coatings, actively cooled structures, and two-phase thermal control systems. Separate abstracts were prepared for papers of this report.

  20. Transformative Approaches and Technologies for Water Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project will advance the transformation of water systems towards a more sustainable future. It will provide EPA with a sustainability assessment framework integrating drinking water, wastewater, and water reuse/resource recovery components, advances in real-time monitoring, ...

  1. Scientific method, adversarial system, and technology assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayo, L. H.

    1975-01-01

    A basic framework is provided for the consideration of the purposes and techniques of scientific method and adversarial systems. Similarities and differences in these two techniques of inquiry are considered with reference to their relevance in the performance of assessments.

  2. Recent Technology of the Protection System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagasawa, Takashi

    The protection relay changed from electromechanical or analog static type to digital type using the progress of microprocessor against the growth of power network. The digital relay improved protective performance and reliability based on establishment of various protection schemes and the embedded automatic supervising function using the development of the digital technique. Additionally, the recent protection system technique enable to make the configration and operation of power system efficient. Multi-terminal transmission lines can be realized by use of PCM current differential relay. The out-of-step protection, the voltage stability control and the over load failure extension protection can increase transmission capacity. In future, it will need to develop the protection system for the distributed power generation and decrease the cost of protection systems against the progress of deregulation.

  3. Aging Systems Sustainment and Enabling Technologies (ASSET)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-14

    requirements that include an active CAGE Code, an active JCP (DD 2345) and baseline audit of a Quality Management System (QMS). Site visits were conducted...CAGE Code, (2) apply/confirm JCP, (3) validate capabilities, (4) perform baseline audit o\\’ current QMS, (5) initiate/provide ISO 9001 -2008 template...6) perform ISO based overview . (7) perform follow up audits when QMS system is in place. Several firms were confirmed to be, ISO 9001 -2008

  4. Assessment of a satellite power system and six alternative technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Wolsko, T.; Whitfield, R.; Samsa, M.; Habegger, L.S.; Levine, E.; Tanzman, E.

    1981-04-01

    The satellite power system is assessed in comparison to six alternative technologies. The alternatives are: central-station terrestrial photovoltaic systems, conventional coal-fired power plants, coal-gasification/combined-cycle power plants, light water reactor power plants, liquid-metal fast-breeder reactors, and fusion. The comparison is made regarding issues of cost and performance, health and safety, environmental effects, resources, socio-economic factors, and insitutional issues. The criteria for selecting the issues and the alternative technologies are given, and the methodology of the comparison is discussed. Brief descriptions of each of the technologies considered are included. (LEW)

  5. Eight-cm mercury ion thruster system technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The technology status of 8 cm diameter electron bombardment ion thrusters is presented. Much of the technology resulting from the 5 cm diameter thruster has been adapted and improved upon to increase the reliability, durability, and efficiency of the 8 cm thruster. Technology discussed includes: dependence of neutralizer tip erosion upon neutralizer flow rate; impregnated and rolled-foil insert cathode performance and life testing; neutralizer position studies; thruster ion beam profile measurements; high voltage pulse ignition; high utilization ion machined accelerator grids; deposition internal and external to the thruster; thruster vectoring systems; thruster cycling life testing and thruster system weights for typical mission applications.

  6. Assessment of a satellite power system and six alternative technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolsko, T.; Whitfield, R.; Samsa, M.; Habegger, L. S.; Levine, E.; Tanzman, E.

    1981-04-01

    The satellite power system is assessed in comparison to six alternative technologies. The alternatives are: central-station terrestrial photovoltaic systems, conventional coal-fired power plants, coal-gasification/combined-cycle power plants, light water reactor power plants, liquid-metal fast-breeder reactors, and fusion. The comparison is made regarding issues of cost and performance, health and safety, environmental effects, resources, socio-economic factors, and institutional issues. The criteria for selecting the issues and the alternative technologies are given, and the methodology of the comparison is discussed. Brief descriptions of each of the technologies considered are included.

  7. Assessment of a satellite power system and six alternative technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolsko, T.; Whitfield, R.; Samsa, M.; Habegger, L. S.; Levine, E.; Tanzman, E.

    1981-01-01

    The satellite power system is assessed in comparison to six alternative technologies. The alternatives are: central-station terrestrial photovoltaic systems, conventional coal-fired power plants, coal-gasification/combined-cycle power plants, light water reactor power plants, liquid-metal fast-breeder reactors, and fusion. The comparison is made regarding issues of cost and performance, health and safety, environmental effects, resources, socio-economic factors, and institutional issues. The criteria for selecting the issues and the alternative technologies are given, and the methodology of the comparison is discussed. Brief descriptions of each of the technologies considered are included.

  8. Mobile technology in health information systems - a review.

    PubMed

    Zhang, X-Y; Zhang, P-Y

    2016-05-01

    Mobile technology is getting involved in every sphere of life including medical health care. There has been an immense upsurge in mobile phone-based health innovations these days. The expansion of mobile phone networks and the proliferation of inexpensive mobile handsets have made the digital information and communication technology capabilities very handy for the people to exploit if for any utility including health care. The mobile phone based innovations are able to transform weak and under performing health information system into more modern and efficient information system. The present review article will enlighten all these aspects of mobile technology in health care.

  9. Technology documentation for selected radwaste incineration systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ziegler, D.L.

    1982-12-01

    Several incineration systems have been developed and demonstrated on a production scale for combustion of radioactive waste from contractor operated Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. Demonstrated operating information and engineered design information is documented in this report on four of these systems; the Cyclone Incinerator (CI), Fluidized Bed Incinerator (FBI), Controlled-Air Incinerator (CAI) and Electric Controlled Air Incinerator (ECAI). The CI, FBI and CAI have been demonstrated with actual contaminated plant waste and the ECAI has been demonstrated with simulated waste using dysprosium oxide as a stand-in for plutonium oxide. The weight and volume reduction that can be obtained by each system processing typical solid plant transuranic (TRU) waste has been presented. Where a given system has been tested for other applications, such as combustion of resins, TBP-solvent mixtures, organic liquids, polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB), resuts of these experiments have been included. This document is a compilation of reports prepared by the operating contractor personnel responsible for development of each of the systems. In addition, as a part of the program management responsibility, the Transuranic Waste System Office (TWSO) has provided an overview of the contractor supplied information.

  10. Is the brain's inertia for motor movements different for acceleration and deceleration?

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Bhim M; Quinn, Kristen M; Dhamala, Mukesh

    2013-01-01

    The brain's ability to synchronize movements with external cues is used daily, yet neuroscience is far from a full understanding of the brain mechanisms that facilitate and set behavioral limits on these sequential performances. This functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study was designed to help understand the neural basis of behavioral performance differences on a synchronizing movement task during increasing (acceleration) and decreasing (deceleration) metronome rates. In the MRI scanner, subjects were instructed to tap their right index finger on a response box in synchrony to visual cues presented on a display screen. The tapping rate varied either continuously or in discrete steps ranging from 0.5 Hz to 3 Hz. Subjects were able to synchronize better during continuously accelerating rhythms than in continuously or discretely decelerating rhythms. The fMRI data revealed that the precuneus was activated more during continuous deceleration than during acceleration with the hysteresis effect significant at rhythm rates above 1 Hz. From the behavioral data, two performance measures, tapping rate and synchrony index, were derived to further analyze the relative brain activity during acceleration and deceleration of rhythms. Tapping rate was associated with a greater brain activity during deceleration in the cerebellum, superior temporal gyrus and parahippocampal gyrus. Synchrony index was associated with a greater activity during the continuous acceleration phase than during the continuous deceleration or discrete acceleration phases in a distributed network of regions including the prefrontal cortex and precuneus. These results indicate that the brain's inertia for movement is different for acceleration and deceleration, which may have implications in understanding the origin of our perceptual and behavioral limits.

  11. Technology Demonstration Summary: CF Systems Organics Extraction System, New Bedford Harbor, Massachusetts

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Site Program demonstration of CF Systems' organics extraction technology was conducted to obtain specific operating and cost information that could be used in evaluating the potential applicability of the technology to Superfund sites. The demonstration was conducted concurr...

  12. Advanced photovoltaic power system technology for lunar base applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinker, David J.; Flood, Dennis J.

    1988-01-01

    Advanced photovoltaic/electrochemical (batteries or regenerative fuel cells for storage) power system options for a lunar base are discussed and compared. Estimated system masses are compared with those projected for the SP-100 nuclear system. The results of the comparison are quantified in terms of the mass saved in a scenario which assembles the initial base elements in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and launches from there to the lunar surface. A brief summary is given of advances in photovoltaic/electrochemical power system technologies currently under development in the NASA/OAST program. A description of the planned focussed technology program for surface power in the new Pathfinder initiative is also provided.

  13. A Lunar Surface System Supportability Technology Development Roadmap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oeftering, Richard C.; Struk, Peter M.; Taleghani, barmac K.

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses the establishment of a Supportability Technology Development Roadmap as a guide for developing capabilities intended to allow NASA s Constellation program to enable a supportable, sustainable and affordable exploration of the Moon and Mars. Presented is a discussion of supportability, in terms of space facility maintenance, repair and related logistics and a comparison of how lunar outpost supportability differs from the International Space Station. Supportability lessons learned from NASA and Department of Defense experience and their impact on a future lunar outpost is discussed. A supportability concept for future missions to the Moon and Mars that involves a transition from a highly logistics dependent to a logistically independent operation is discussed. Lunar outpost supportability capability needs are summarized and a supportability technology development strategy is established. The resulting Lunar Surface Systems Supportability Strategy defines general criteria that will be used to select technologies that will enable future flight crews to act effectively to respond to problems and exploit opportunities in an environment of extreme resource scarcity and isolation. This strategy also introduces the concept of exploiting flight hardware as a supportability resource. The technology roadmap involves development of three mutually supporting technology categories, Diagnostics Test and Verification, Maintenance and Repair, and Scavenging and Recycling. The technology roadmap establishes two distinct technology types, "Embedded" and "Process" technologies, with different implementation and thus different criteria and development approaches. The supportability technology roadmap addresses the technology readiness level, and estimated development schedule for technology groups that includes down-selection decision gates that correlate with the lunar program milestones. The resulting supportability technology roadmap is intended to develop a set

  14. A Lunar Surface System Supportability Technology Development Roadmap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oeftering, Richard C.; Struk, Peter M.; Taleghani, Barmac K.

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the establishment of a Supportability Technology Development Roadmap as a guide for developing capabilities intended to allow NASA's Constellation program to enable a supportable, sustainable and affordable exploration of the Moon and Mars. Presented is a discussion of "supportability", in terms of space facility maintenance, repair and related logistics and a comparison of how lunar outpost supportability differs from the International Space Station. Supportability lessons learned from NASA and Department of Defense experience and their impact on a future lunar outpost is discussed. A supportability concept for future missions to the Moon and Mars that involves a transition from a highly logistics dependent to a logistically independent operation is discussed. Lunar outpost supportability capability needs are summarized and a supportability technology development strategy is established. The resulting Lunar Surface Systems Supportability Strategy defines general criteria that will be used to select technologies that will enable future flight crews to act effectively to respond to problems and exploit opportunities in a environment of extreme resource scarcity and isolation. This strategy also introduces the concept of exploiting flight hardware as a supportability resource. The technology roadmap involves development of three mutually supporting technology categories, Diagnostics Test & Verification, Maintenance & Repair, and Scavenging & Recycling. The technology roadmap establishes two distinct technology types, "Embedded" and "Process" technologies, with different implementation and thus different criteria and development approaches. The supportability technology roadmap addresses the technology readiness level, and estimated development schedule for technology groups that includes down-selection decision gates that correlate with the lunar program milestones. The resulting supportability technology roadmap is intended to develop a set of

  15. Urban Flood Warning Systems using Radar Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, N.; Bedient, P. B.

    2013-12-01

    There have been an increasing number of urban areas that rely on weather radars to provide accurate precipitation information for flood warning purposes. As non-structural tools, radar-based flood warning systems can provide accurate and timely warnings to the public and private entities in urban areas that are prone to flash floods. The wider spatial and temporal coverage from radar increases flood warning lead-time when compared to rain and stream gages alone. The Third Generation Rice and Texas Medical Center (TMC) Flood Alert System (FAS3) has been delivering warning information with 2 to 3 hours of lead time and a R2 value of 93% to facility personnel in a readily understood format for more than 50 events in the past 15 years. The current FAS utilizes NEXRAD Level II radar rainfall data coupled with a real-time hydrologic model (RTHEC-1) to deliver warning information. The system has a user-friendly dashboard to provide rainfall maps, Google Maps based inundation maps, hydrologic predictions, and real-time monitoring at the bayou. This paper will evaluate its reliable performance during the recent events occurring in 2012 and 2013 and the development of a similar radar-based flood warning system for the City of Sugar Land, Texas. Having a significant role in the communication of flood information, FAS marks an important step towards the establishment of an operational and reliable flood warning system for flood-prone urban areas.

  16. LNG fire and vapor control system technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Konzek, G.J.; Yasutake, K.M.; Franklin, A.L.

    1982-06-01

    This report provides a review of fire and vapor control practices used in the liquefied natural gas (LNG) industry. Specific objectives of this effort were to summarize the state-of-the-art of LNG fire and vapor control; define representative LNG facilities and their associated fire and vapor control systems; and develop an approach for a quantitative effectiveness evaluation of LNG fire and vapor control systems. In this report a brief summary of LNG physical properties is given. This is followed by a discussion of basic fire and vapor control design philosophy and detailed reviews of fire and vapor control practices. The operating characteristics and typical applications and application limitations of leak detectors, fire detectors, dikes, coatings, closed circuit television, communication systems, dry chemicals, water, high expansion foam, carbon dioxide and halogenated hydrocarbons are described. Summary descriptions of a representative LNG peakshaving facility and import terminal are included in this report together with typical fire and vapor control systems and their locations in these types of facilities. This state-of-the-art review identifies large differences in the application of fire and vapor control systems throughout the LNG industry.

  17. Structures and Mechanisms Design Concepts for Adaptive Deployable Entry Placement Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yount, Bryan C.; Arnold, James O.; Gage, Peter J.; Mockelman, Jeffrey; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj

    2012-01-01

    System studies have shown that large deployable aerodynamic decelerators such as the Adaptive Deployable Entry and Placement Technology (ADEPT) concept can revolutionize future robotic and human exploration missions involving atmospheric entry, descent and landing by significantly reducing the maximum heating rate, total heat load, and deceleration loads experienced by the spacecraft during entry [1-3]. ADEPT and the Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (HIAD) [4] share the approach of stowing the entry system in the shroud of the launch vehicle and deploying it to a much larger diameter prior to entry. The ADEPT concept provides a low ballistic coefficient for planetary entry by employing an umbrella-like deployable structure consisting of ribs, struts and a fabric cover that form an aerodynamic decelerator capable of undergoing hypersonic flight. The ADEPT "skin" is a 3-D woven carbon cloth that serves as a thermal protection system (TPS) and as a structural surface that transfers aerodynamic forces to the underlying ribs [5]. This paper focuses on design activities associated with integrating ADEPT components (cloth, ribs, struts and mechanisms) into a system that can function across all configurations and environments of a typical mission concept: stowed during launch, in-space deployment, entry, descent, parachute deployment and separation from the landing payload. The baseline structures and mechanisms were selected via trade studies conducted during the summer and fall of 2012. They are now being incorporated into the design of a ground test article (GTA) that will be fabricated in 2013. It will be used to evaluate retention of the stowed configuration in a launch environment, mechanism operation for release, deployment and locking, and static strength of the deployed decelerator. Of particular interest are the carbon cloth interfaces, underlying hot structure, (Advanced Carbon- Carbon ribs) and other structural components (nose cap, struts, and

  18. Future nano- and micro-systems using nanobonding technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Howlader, Matiar M. R. E-mail: jamal@mcmaster.ca; Deen, M. Jamal E-mail: jamal@mcmaster.ca

    2014-03-31

    In this paper, some of the recent achievements in surface-activation-based nanobonding technology are described. This bonding technology allows for the combination of electronic, photonic, fluidic and mechanical functionalities into small form-factor systems for emerging applications in health diagnostics and screening, for example. These nanobonding technologies provide void-free, strong, and nanoscale bonding at room temperature or at low temperatures (<200 °C), and they do not require chemicals, adhesives, or high external pressure. The interfaces of the nanobonded materials in ultra-high vacuum and in air correspond to the covalent bonds, and hydrogen and hydroxyl bonds, respectively, which gives rise to excellent bonding properties. Further, these nanobonding technologies are well-suited for the development of low-cost, high-performance miniaturized systems such as biophotonic imaging systems.

  19. The vacuum system for technological unit development and design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhukeshov, A. M.; Gabdullina, A. T.; Amrenova, A. U.; Giniyatova, Sh G.; Kaibar, A.; Sundetov, A.; Fermakhan, K.

    2015-11-01

    The paper shows results of development of plasma technological unit on the basis of accelerator of vacuum arc and automated system. During the previous years, the authors investigated the operation of pulsed plasma accelerator and developed unique technologies for hardening of materials. Principles of plasma formation in pulsed plasma accelerator were put into basis of the developed unit. Operation of the pulsed arc accelerator was investigated at different parameters of the charge. The developed vacuum system is designed for production of hi-tech plasma units in high technologies in fields of nanomaterials, mechanical and power engineering and production with high added value. Unlike integrated solutions, the system is a module one to allow its low cost, high reliability and simple maintenance. The problems of use of robots are discussed to modernize the technological process.

  20. Large spaceborne antenna technology: A system perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naderi, F.

    1983-05-01

    Land Mobile Satellite System (LMSS) is a communication system which provides radio communication to a large group of users within a vast geographical area (e.g. communications to and from mobile vehicles anywhere within the U.S.). Such radio communication may be in the form of radio telephone, paging, dispatch, or data transmission. The intended applications of LMSS range from emergency medical to disaster relief, from law enforcement to truck dispatch. By providing service to vast rural areas, LMSS compliments the current terrestrial service in the metropolitan areas and hence provides for a nationally ubiquitous coverage.

  1. Automation and robotics technology for intelligent mining systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welsh, Jeffrey H.

    1989-01-01

    The U.S. Bureau of Mines is approaching the problems of accidents and efficiency in the mining industry through the application of automation and robotics to mining systems. This technology can increase safety by removing workers from hazardous areas of the mines or from performing hazardous tasks. The short-term goal of the Automation and Robotics program is to develop technology that can be implemented in the form of an autonomous mining machine using current continuous mining machine equipment. In the longer term, the goal is to conduct research that will lead to new intelligent mining systems that capitalize on the capabilities of robotics. The Bureau of Mines Automation and Robotics program has been structured to produce the technology required for the short- and long-term goals. The short-term goal of application of automation and robotics to an existing mining machine, resulting in autonomous operation, is expected to be accomplished within five years. Key technology elements required for an autonomous continuous mining machine are well underway and include machine navigation systems, coal-rock interface detectors, machine condition monitoring, and intelligent computer systems. The Bureau of Mines program is described, including status of key technology elements for an autonomous continuous mining machine, the program schedule, and future work. Although the program is directed toward underground mining, much of the technology being developed may have applications for space systems or mining on the Moon or other planets.

  2. Technology review of flight crucial flight control systems (application of optical technology)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rediess, H. A.; Buckley, E. C.

    1984-01-01

    The survey covers the various optical elements that are considered in a fly-by-light flight control system including optical sensors and transducers, optical data links, so-called optical actuators, and optical/electro-optical processing. It also addresses airframe installation, maintenance, and repair issues. Rather than an in-depth treatment of optical technology, the survey concentrates on technology readiness and the potential advantages/disadvantages of applying the technology. The information was assembled from open literature, personal interviews, and responses to a questionnaire distributed specifically for this survey. Not all of the information obtained was consistent, particularly with respect to technology readiness. The synthesis of information into the perception of the state-of-technology is presented.

  3. Operability driven space system concept with high leverage technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Henry H.

    1997-01-01

    One of the common objectives of future launch and space transfer systems is to achieve low-cost and effective operational capability by automating processes from pre-launch to the end of mission. Hierarchical and integrated mission management, system management, autonomous GN&C, and integrated micro-nano avionics technologies are critical to extend or revitalize the exploitation of space. Essential to space transfer, orbital systems, Earth-To-Orbit (ETO), commercial and military aviation, and planetary systems are these high leverage hardware and software technologies. This paper covers the driving issues, goals, and requirements definition supported with typical concepts and utilization of multi-use technologies. The approach and method results in a practical system architecture and lower level design concepts.

  4. Results from Symposium on Future Orbital Power Systems Technology Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorland, S.

    1979-01-01

    Technology deficiencies, adequacy of current programs, and recommendations for reducing the testing and risks involved in future orbital energy systems made at the NASA Symposium are summarized. Photovoltaic space power system problems, including structural dynamics and attitude control problems due to solar array flexing; solar cell radiation resistance, manufacturing capability, and cost reduction; solar arrays including inflatable arrays, spectrum selection to increase efficiency, and polymer coatings for cells; battery technology; the endurance data base for fuel cell and electrolysis technology, and power management were discussed. Other topics considered were laser/microwave power transmission, thermal management, nuclear power systems, and environmental interactions. It was concluded that a 'front end' system study is needed in each area and current programs for multi-hundred-kW power systems are underscoped.

  5. Life prediction technologies for aeronautical propulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgaw, Michael A.

    1987-01-01

    Fatigue and fracture problems continue to occur in aeronautical gas turbine engines. Components whose useful life is limited by these failure modes include turbine hot-section blades, vanes and disks. Safety considerations dictate that catastrophic failures be avoided, while economic considerations dictate that noncatastrophic failures occur as infrequently as possible. The design decision is therefore in making the tradeoff between engine performance and durability. The NASA Lewis Research Center has contributed to the aeropropulsion industry in the areas of life prediction technology for 30 years, developing creep and fatigue life prediction methodologies for hot-section materials. Emphasis is placed on the development of methods capable of handling both thermal and mechanical fatigue under severe environments. Recent accomplishments include the development of more accurate creep-fatigue life prediction methods such as the total strain version of Lewis' Strainrange Partitioning (SRP) and the HOST-developed Cyclic Damage Accumulation (CDA) model. Other examples include the Double Damage Curve Approach (DDCA), which provides greatly improved accuracy for cumulative fatigue design rules.

  6. MOLECULAR BONDING SYSTEM - INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document presents an evaluation of the Molecular Bonding System (MBS) and its ability to chemically stabilize three metals-contaminated wstes/soils during a SITe demo. The MBS process treated approximately 500 tons each of soil/Fill, Slag, and Miscellaneous Smelter Waste wit...

  7. Transportation Systems. Curriculum Guide for Technology Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chastain, Gary K.

    This curriculum guide for a 1-semester or 1-year course in transportation provides activities that show and explain many of the occupations, devices, and systems that are related to transportation on land, water, air, and space. The guide contains competencies (task lists), student competency records, and management sheets. Management sheets,…

  8. Reliability achievement in high technology space systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindstrom, D. L.

    1981-01-01

    The production of failure-free hardware is discussed. The elements required to achieve such hardware are: technical expertise to design, analyze, and fully understand the design; use of high reliability parts and materials control in the manufacturing process; and testing to understand the system and weed out defects. The durability of the Hughes family of satellites is highlighted.

  9. Microsensor Technologies for Plant Growth System Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Chang-Soo

    2004-01-01

    This document covered the following: a) demonstration of feasibility of microsensor for tube and particulate growth systems; b) Dissolved oxygen; c)Wetness; d) Flexible microfluidic substrate with microfluidic channels and microsensor arrays; e)Dynamic root zone control/monitoring in microgravity; f)Rapid prototyping of phytoremediation; and g) A new tool for root physiology and pathology.

  10. Computer Science and Technology: Investigation of Technology-Based Improvement of the ERIC System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Treu, Siegfried

    The results of a one year study to identify potential technology-based improvements in the operation, access, and utilization of the Educational Resources Information Center (ERIC) are described. Both current problem areas and future possibilities are considered with respect to the dichotomy: system components and the total system. Emphasis is on…

  11. Safety System Design for Technology Education. A Safety Guide for Technology Education Courses K-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Instruction, Raleigh. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This manual is designed to involve both teachers and students in planning and controlling a safety system for technology education classrooms. The safety program involves students in the design and maintenance of the system by including them in the analysis of the classroom environment, job safety analysis, safety inspection, and machine safety…

  12. Contingency Planning Guide for Information Technology Systems: Recommendations of the National Institute of Standards and Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-06-01

    NIST Special Publication 800-34 Contingency Planning Guide for Information Technology Systems Recommendations of the National Institute of Standards...H-1 LIST OF FIGURES Figure 2-1 Contingency Planning as an Element of... Contingency Planning Considerations, describes contingency planning concerns specific to the IT systems listed in Section 1.3, Scope. The section

  13. Satellite communications systems and technology. Volume 1; Analytic Chapters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jennings, Raymond D.; Mahle, Christoph E.; Miller, Edward F.; Riley, Lance; Pelton, Joseph N.; Bostian, Charles W.; Brandon, William T.; Chan, Vincent W. S.; Hager, E. Paul; Edelson, Burton I.; Kwan, Robert K.; Helm, Neil R.

    1993-01-01

    Volume 1 (Analytical Chapters) of the final report of the NASA/NSF Panel Satellite Communications Systems and Technology is presented. The panel surveyed advanced technology being developed for commercial use in the satellite communications field in Europe, Japan, and Russia. All aspects of satellite communications were considered, including fixed, broadcast, mobile, personal communications, navigation, low earth orbit, and small satellites. The focus of the study was on experimental and advanced technology being developed in R&D and demonstration programs rather than on today's production capabilities. The report focuses on commercial satellite technology, and does not review defense-related or other confidential satellite communications capabilities. The NASA/NSF panel concluded that the United States has lost its leading position in many critical satellite communications technologies. Although U.S. industry retains a leading position in today's marketplace for satellite communications systems and services, this position is largely founded on technologies and capabilities developed in the 1960s and 1970s. Because the United States is losing ground with respect to a wide range of technologies and systems that will be key to future communications markets, the market share of the U.S. satellite communications industry is at risk.

  14. Satellite communications systems and technology. Volume 1: Analytical chapters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edelson, Burton I. (Editor); Pelton, Joseph N. (Editor); Bostian, Charles W.; Brandon, William T.; Chan, Vincent W. S.; Hager, E. Paul; Helm, Neil R.; Jennings, Raymond D.; Kwan, Robert K.; Mahle, Christoph E.

    1993-01-01

    This is Volume 1 (Analytical Chapters) of the final report of the NASA/NSF Panel Satellite Communications Systems and Technology. The panel surveyed advanced technology being developed for commercial use in the satellite communications field in Europe, Japan, and Russia. All aspects of satellite communications were considered, including fixed, broadcast, mobile, personal communications, navigation, low earth orbit, and small satellites. The focus was on experimental and advanced technology being developed in R&D and demonstration programs rather than on today's production capabilities. Focus was on commercial satellite technology, and does not review defense-related or other confidential satellite communications capabilities. The NASA/NSF panel concluded that the United States has lost its leading position in many critical satellite communications technologies. Although U.S. industry retains a leading position in today's marketplace for satellite communications systems and services, this position is largely founded on technologies and capabilities developed in the 1960's and 1970's. Because the United States is losing ground with respect to a wide range of technologies and systems that will be key to future communications markets, the market share of the U.S. satellite communications industry is at risk.

  15. Aircraft System Analysis of Technology Benefits to Civil Transport Rotorcraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkerson, Joseph B.; Smith, Roger L.

    2008-01-01

    An aircraft systems analysis was conducted to evaluate the net benefits of advanced technologies on two conceptual civil transport rotorcraft, to quantify the potential of future civil rotorcraft to become operationally viable and economically competitive, with the ultimate goal of alleviating congestion in our airways, runways and terminals. These questions are three of many that must be resolved for the successful introduction of civil transport rotorcraft: 1) Can civil transport rotorcraft actually relieve current airport congestion and improve overall air traffic and passenger throughput at busy hub airports? What is that operational scenario? 2) Can advanced technology make future civil rotorcraft economically competitive in scheduled passenger transport? What are those enabling technologies? 3) What level of investment is necessary to mature the key enabling technologies? This study addresses the first two questions, and several others, by applying a systems analysis approach to a broad spectrum of potential advanced technologies at a conceptual level of design. The method was to identify those advanced technologies that showed the most promise and to quantify their benefits to the design, development, production, and operation of future civil rotorcraft. Adjustments are made to sizing data by subject matter experts to reflect the introduction of new technologies that offer improved performance, reduced weight, reduced maintenance, or reduced cost. This study used projected benefits from new, advanced technologies, generally based on research results, analysis, or small-scale test data. The technologies are identified, categorized and quantified in the report. The net benefit of selected advanced technologies is quantified for two civil transport rotorcraft concepts, a Single Main Rotor Compound (SMRC) helicopter designed for 250 ktas cruise airspeed and a Civil Tilt Rotor (CTR) designed for 350 ktas cruise airspeed. A baseline design of each concept was

  16. Gas cooled fuel cell systems technology development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feret, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    The first phase of a planned multiphase program to develop a Phosphoric is addressed. This report describes the efforts performed that culminated in the: (1) Establishment of the preliminary design requirements and system conceptual design for the nominally rated 375 kW PAFC module and is interfacing power plant systems; (2) Establishment of PAFC component and stack performance, endurance, and design parameter data needed for design verification for power plant application; (3) Improvement of the existing PAFC materials data base and establishment of materials specifications and process procedes for the cell components; and (4) Testing of 122 subscale cell atmospheric test for 110,000 cumulative test hours, 12 subscale cell pressurized tests for 15,000 cumulative test hours, and 12 pressurized stack test for 10,000 cumulative test hours.

  17. Fly ash system technology improves opacity

    SciTech Connect

    2007-06-15

    Unit 3 of the Dave Johnston Power Plant east of Glenrock, WY, USA had problems staying at or below the opacity limits set by the state. The unit makes use of a Lodge Cottrell precipitator. When the plant changed to burning Power River Basin coal, ash buildup became a significant issue as the fly ash control system was unable to properly evacuate hoppers on the unit. To overcome the problem, the PLC on the unit was replaced with a software optimization package called SmartAsh for the precipitator fly ash control system, at a cost of $500,000. After the upgrade, there have been no plugged hoppers and the opacity has been reduced from around 20% to 3-5%. 2 figs.

  18. NASA's Advanced Information Systems Technology (AIST) Program: Advanced Concepts and Disruptive Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, M. M.; Moe, K.; Komar, G.

    2014-12-01

    NASA's Earth Science Technology Office (ESTO) manages a wide range of information technology projects under the Advanced Information Systems Technology (AIST) Program. The AIST Program aims to support all phases of NASA's Earth Science program with the goal of enabling new observations and information products, increasing the accessibility and use of Earth observations, and reducing the risk and cost of satellite and ground based information systems. Recent initiatives feature computational technologies to improve information extracted from data streams or model outputs and researchers' tools for Big Data analytics. Data-centric technologies enable research communities to facilitate collaboration and increase the speed with which results are produced and published. In the future NASA anticipates more small satellites (e.g., CubeSats), mobile drones and ground-based in-situ sensors will advance the state-of-the-art regarding how scientific observations are performed, given the flexibility, cost and deployment advantages of new operations technologies. This paper reviews the success of the program and the lessons learned. Infusion of these technologies is challenging and the paper discusses the obstacles and strategies to adoption by the earth science research and application efforts. It also describes alternative perspectives for the future program direction and for realizing the value in the steps to transform observations from sensors to data, to information, and to knowledge, namely: sensor measurement concepts development; data acquisition and management; data product generation; and data exploitation for science and applications.

  19. Trend of Autonomous Decentralized System Technologies and Their Application in IC Card Ticket System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Kinji; Shiibashi, Akio

    The advancement of technology is ensured by step-by-step innovation and its implementation into society. Autonomous Decentralized Systems (ADSs) have been growing since first proposed in 1977. Since then, the ADS technologies and their implementations have interacted with the evolving markets, sciences, and technologies. The ADS concept is proposed on biological analogy, and its technologies have been advanced according to changing and expanding requirements. These technologies are now categorized into six generations on the basis of requirements and system structures, but the ADS concept and its system architecture have not changed. The requirements for the system can be divided in operation-oriented, mass service-oriented, and personal service-oriented categories. Moreover, these technologies have been realized in homogeneous system structure and, as the next step, in heterogeneous system structure. These technologies have been widely applied in manufacturing, telecommunications, information provision/utilization, data centers, transportation, and so on. They have been operating successfully throughout the world. In particular, ADS technologies have been applied in Suica, the IC card ticket system (ICCTS) for fare collection and e-commerce. This system is not only expanding in size and functionality but also its components are being modified almost every day without stopping its operation. This system and its technologies are shown here. Finally, the future direction of ADS is discussed, and one of its technologies is presented.

  20. Software Technology for Adaptable, Reliable Systems (STARS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-11-02

    through the use of a single intermediate language. However, certain evolutionary paths, i.e., translators and funtional interfaces, must be established...Systems Ada compiler beginning in December 1984 and was presented at an Arcadia consortium meeting held in December 1984. Iris concepts and a grammar ...Page 11 2 November 1990 STARS-RC-01430/001/00 o An LALR parser generator and an Ada grammar , used to produce the parse phase of the Ada-to-DIANA

  1. Parachute systems technology: Fundamentals, concepts, and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.W.

    1987-01-01

    In this paper, many different types of tests, vehicles, and data acquisition systems will be discussed. The types of tests used by parachute designers are only limited by the designers' imaginations. Since the paper is of finite length, some designers' favorite methods of accomplishing a certain objective will not be discussed. Any omissions are unintentional and are left to future discussions either formally or informally.

  2. Technology Assessment Tool - An Application of Systems Engineering to USDOE Technology Proposals

    SciTech Connect

    Rynearson, Michael Ardel

    1999-06-01

    This paper discusses the system design for a Technology Assessment (TA) tool that can be used to quantitatively evaluate new and advanced technologies, products, or processes. Key features of the tool include organization of information in an indentured hierarchy; questions and categories derived from the decomposition of technology performance; segregation of life-cycle issues into six assessment categories; and scoring, relative impact, and sensitivity analysis capability. An advantage of the tool's use is its ability to provide decision analysis data, based on incomplete or complete data.

  3. Laser-assisted Stark deceleration of polar diatomic molecules in the Χ1Σ state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yunxia; Xu, Shuwu; Yang, Xiaohua

    2016-07-01

    The traditional Stark deceleration method is difficult to apply in chemically stable polar diatomic molecules in their ground (Χ1Σ) state because the Χ1Σ state normally experiences little Stark shift and the rovibronic ground level is mostly high-field-seeking. To solve this problem, we propose a laser-assisted Stark deceleration scheme to decelerate such molecules in the present paper. Our results show that, owing to the transverse bunching effect of the applied red-detuning laser beam, the molecules of the high-field-seeking level |J = 0, M = 0> in the Χ1Σ state can be effectively decelerated. Furthermore, the present scheme is more effective because the interaction between the molecules and the combined fields can produce the pseudo-first-order Stark effect, and thus increase the depth of the effective potential. Compared to those molecules in the low-field-seeking state |J = 1, MΩ = -1> in the usual electrostatic Stark deceleration, a higher molecular density and lower velocity can be achieved under an equivalent initial phase angle.

  4. Optimal three-dimensional reentry trajectories subject to deceleration and heating constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chern, J.-S.; Yang, C.-Y.; Vinh, N. X.; Hwang, G. R.

    1982-09-01

    The lateral maneuver of a lifting reentry vehicle, exemplified by the Shuttle entry, is severely restricted by deceleration and heating constraints. This paper investigates the decrease in the lateral reachable domain when different constraints are imposed on the optimal trajectories. A characteristic of hypersonic reentry trajectories is that the deceleration and heating rate pass through several maxima. The first peak is always higher than the following maxima so that it suffices to control the first maximum to the required level. Thermal constraint is encountered at higher altitude so that, in general, thermal control usually limits the deceleration to acceptable level. Using the equilibrium glide assumption, the optimal lift and bank control to maximize the lateral range is obtained in explicit form. Numerical results have been obtained for a typical value of maximum lift-to-drag ratio, and for several values of deceleration and thermal constraints imposed on the entry trajectories. It is found that the peak deceleration and the peak heating rate can be lowered significantly with only a slight penalty on the reachable domain.

  5. Hydrodynamic Scaling of the Deceleration-Phase Rayleigh-Taylor Instability for Inertial Confinement Fusion Implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, A.; Betti, R.; Woo, K.; Nora, R.

    2014-10-01

    Hydrodynamic equivalence and ignition theory allow for the extrapolation of OMEGA experiments to ignition-scale implosions. The yield-over-clean (YOC = measured yield/1-D yield) depicts the effect of hydro-instabilities on inertial confinement fusion implosions. A 2-D study of the deceleration-phase Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) is carried out to assess the YOC scaling with target size at varying nonuniformity levels. The deceleration-phase ablative RTI is mitigated by the hot-spot thermal and radiation transport, which do not scale hydro-equivalently. Scaling of the thermal conduction shows that hot-spot ablation velocity is higher on OMEGA than on the National Ignition Facility (NIF), resulting in higher RTI growth factors on the NIF. Radiation emitted in the hot-spot makes the implosion nearly hydro-equivalent by increasing the density gradient scale length on the NIF. Thermal conduction and radiation both are nonscalable physics in the deceleration phase, with complementary impacts the scaling of deceleration-phase RTI. Analytic and numerical study of the deceleration-phase RTI on OMEGA and NIF-scale targets show that YOCNIF ~ YOCΩ considering identical laser imprinting and normalized ice roughness levels. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944 and the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences Number DE-FG02-04ER54786.

  6. Subclinical decelerations during developing hypotension in preterm fetal sheep after acute on chronic lipopolysaccharide exposure

    PubMed Central

    Lear, Christopher A.; Davidson, Joanne O.; Galinsky, Robert; Yuill, Caroline A.; Wassink, Guido; Booth, Lindsea C.; Drury, Paul P.; Bennet, Laura; Gunn, Alistair J.

    2015-01-01

    Subclinical (shallow) heart rate decelerations occur during neonatal sepsis, but there is limited information on their relationship with hypotension or whether they occur before birth. We examined whether subclinical decelerations, a fall in fetal heart rate (FHR) that remained above 100 bpm, were associated with hypotension in preterm fetal sheep exposed to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Chronically-instrumented fetal sheep at 0.7 gestation received continuous low-dose LPS infusions (n = 15, 100 ng/kg over 24 h, followed by 250 ng/kg/24 h for 96 h) or saline (n = 8). Boluses of 1 μg LPS or saline were given at 48 and 72 h. FHR variability (FHRV) was calculated, and sample asymmetry was used to assess the severity and frequency of decelerations. Low-dose LPS infusion did not affect FHR. After the first LPS bolus, 7 fetuses remained normotensive, while 8 developed hypotension (a fall in mean arterial blood pressure of ≥5 mmHg). Developing hypotension was associated with subclinical decelerations, with a corresponding increase in sample asymmetry and FHRV (p < 0.05). The second LPS bolus was associated with similar but attenuated changes in FHR and blood pressure (p < 0.05). In conclusion, subclinical decelerations are not consistently seen during prenatal exposure to LPS, but may be a useful marker of developing inflammation-related hypotension before birth. PMID:26537688

  7. Development of Life Support System Technologies for Human Lunar Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barta, Daniel J.; Ewert, Michael K.

    2009-01-01

    With the Preliminary Design Review (PDR) for the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle planned to be completed in 2009, Exploration Life Support (ELS), a technology development project under the National Aeronautics and Space Administration s (NASA) Exploration Technology Development Program, is focusing its efforts on needs for human lunar missions. The ELS Project s goal is to develop and mature a suite of Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) technologies for potential use on human spacecraft under development in support of U.S. Space Exploration Policy. ELS technology development is directed at three major vehicle projects within NASA s Constellation Program (CxP): the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV), the Altair Lunar Lander and Lunar Surface Systems, including habitats and pressurized rovers. The ELS Project includes four technical elements: Atmosphere Revitalization Systems, Water Recovery Systems, Waste Management Systems and Habitation Engineering, and two cross cutting elements, Systems Integration, Modeling and Analysis, and Validation and Testing. This paper will provide an overview of the ELS Project, connectivity with its customers and an update to content within its technology development portfolio with focus on human lunar missions.

  8. A CCD Camera with Electron Decelerator for Intermediate Voltage Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Downing, Kenneth H; Downing, Kenneth H.; Mooney, Paul E.

    2008-03-17

    Electron microscopists are increasingly turning to Intermediate Voltage Electron Microscopes (IVEMs) operating at 300 - 400 kV for a wide range of studies. They are also increasingly taking advantage of slow-scan charge coupled device (CCD) cameras, which have become widely used on electron microscopes. Under some conditions CCDs provide an improvement in data quality over photographic film, as well as the many advantages of direct digital readout. However, CCD performance is seriously degraded on IVEMs compared to the more conventional 100 kV microscopes. In order to increase the efficiency and quality of data recording on IVEMs, we have developed a CCD camera system in which the electrons are decelerated to below 100 kV before impacting the camera, resulting in greatly improved performance in both signal quality and resolution compared to other CCDs used in electron microscopy. These improvements will allow high-quality image and diffraction data to be collected directly with the CCD, enabling improvements in data collection for applications including high-resolution electron crystallography, single-particle reconstruction of protein structures, tomographic studies of cell ultrastructure and remote microscope operation. This approach will enable us to use even larger format CCD chips that are being developed with smaller pixels.

  9. A charge coupled device camera with electron decelerator for intermediate voltage electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Downing, Kenneth H.; Mooney, Paul E.

    2008-01-01

    Electron microscopists are increasingly turning to intermediate voltage electron microscopes (IVEMs) operating at 300–400 kV for a wide range of studies. They are also increasingly taking advantage of slow-scan charge coupled device (CCD) cameras, which have become widely used on electron microscopes. Under some conditions, CCDs provide an improvement in data quality over photographic film, as well as the many advantages of direct digital readout. However, CCD performance is seriously degraded on IVEMs compared to the more conventional 100 kV microscopes. In order to increase the efficiency and quality of data recording on IVEMs, we have developed a CCD camera system in which the electrons are decelerated to below 100 kV before impacting the camera, resulting in greatly improved performance in both signal quality and resolution compared to other CCDs used in electron microscopy. These improvements will allow high-quality image and diffraction data to be collected directly with the CCD, enabling improvements in data collection for applications including high-resolution electron crystallography, single particle reconstruction of protein structures, tomographic studies of cell ultrastructure, and remote microscope operation. This approach will enable us to use even larger format CCD chips that are being developed with smaller pixels. PMID:18447528

  10. Concrete Dust Suppression System. Innovative Technology Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-01

    The improved technology is a water-based dust suppression system for controlling concrete dust generated by demolition equipment, in this case a demolition ram. This demonstration was performed to assess the effectiveness of this system to (1) minimize the amount of water used to suppress potentially contaminated dust, (2) focus the water spray on the dust-generating source and (3) minimize the dust cloud generated by the demolition activity. The technology successfully reduced the water required by a factor of eight compared to the traditional (baseline) method, controlled the dust generated, and permitted a reduction in the work force. The water spray can be focused at the ram point, but it is affected by wind. Prior to the use of this dust control system, dust generated by the demolition ram was controlled manually by spraying with fire hoses (the baseline technology). The improved technology is 18% less expensive than the baseline technology for the conditions and parameters of this demonstration, however, the automated system can save up to 80% versus the baseline whenever waste water treatment costs are considered. For demolishing one high-walled room and a long slab with a total of 413 m{sup 3} (14,580 ft{sup 3}) of concrete, the savings are $105,000 (waste water treatment included). The improved technology reduced the need for water consumption and treatment by about 88% which results in most of the savings.

  11. Technology Readiness of the NEXT Ion Propulsion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, Scott W.; Patterson, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    The NASA's Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT) ion propulsion system has been in advanced technology development under the NASA In-Space Propulsion Technology project. The highest fidelity hardware planned has now been completed by the government/industry team, including: a flight prototype model (PM) thruster, an engineering model (EM) power processing unit, EM propellant management assemblies, a breadboard gimbal, and control unit simulators. Subsystem and system level technology validation testing is in progress. To achieve the objective Technology Readiness Level 6, environmental testing is being conducted to qualification levels in ground facilities simulating the space environment. Additional tests have been conducted to characterize the performance range and life capability of the NEXT thruster. This paper presents the status and results of technology validation testing accomplished to date, the validated subsystem and system capabilities, and the plans for completion of this phase of NEXT development. The next round of competed planetary science mission announcements of opportunity, and directed mission decisions, are anticipated to occur in 2008 and 2009. Progress to date, and the success of on-going technology validation, indicate that the NEXT ion propulsion system will be a primary candidate for mission consideration in these upcoming opportunities.

  12. A Technology Roadmap for Strategic Development of Enhanced Geothermal Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ziagos, John; Phillips, Benjamin R.; Boyd, Lauren; Jelacic, Allan; Stillman, Greg; Hass, Eric

    2013-02-13

    Realization of EGS development would make geothermal a significant contender in the renewable energy portfolio, on the order of 100+ GWe in the United States alone. While up to 90% of the geothermal power resource in the United States is thought to reside in Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS), hurdles to commercial development still remain. The Geothermal Technologies Office, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), began in 2011 to outline opportunities for advancing EGS technologies on five- to 20-year timescales, with community input on the underlying technology needs that will guide research and ultimately determine commercial success for EGS. This report traces DOE's research investments, past and present, and ties them to these technology needs, forming the basis for an EGS Technology Roadmap to help guide future DOE research. This roadmap is currently open for public comment. Send your comments to geothermal@ee.doe.gov.

  13. Technology requirements for advanced earth-orbital transportation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haefeli, R. C.; Littler, E. G.; Hurley, J. B.; Winter, M. G.

    1977-01-01

    Areas of advanced technology that are either critical or offer significant benefits to the development of future Earth-orbit transportation systems were identified. Technology assessment was based on the application of these technologies to fully reusable, single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO) vehicle concepts with horizontal landing capability. Study guidelines included mission requirements similar to space shuttle, an operational capability begining in 1995, and main propulsion to be advanced hydrogen-fueled rocket engines. Also evaluated was the technical and economic feasibility of this class of SSTO concepts and the comparative features of three operational take-off modes, which were vertical boost, horizontal sled launch, and horizontal take-off with subsequent inflight fueling. Projections of both normal and accelerated technology growth were made. Figures of merit were derived to provide relative rankings of technology areas. The influence of selected accelerated areas on vehicle design and program costs was analyzed by developing near-optimum point designs.

  14. System Study for Axial Vane Engine Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badley, Patrick R.; Smith, Michael R.; Gould, Cedric O.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this engine feasibility study was to determine the benefits that can be achieved by incorporating positive displacement axial vane compression and expansion stages into high bypass turbofan engines. These positive-displacement stages would replace some or all of the conventional compressor and turbine stages in the turbine engine, but not the fan. The study considered combustion occurring internal to an axial vane component (i.e., Diesel engine replacing the standard turbine engine combustor, burner, and turbine); and external continuous flow combustion with an axial vane compressor and an axial vane turbine replacing conventional compressor and turbine systems.

  15. Manufacturing technology methodology for propulsion system parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McRae, M. M.

    1992-07-01

    A development history and a current status evaluation are presented for lost-wax casting of such gas turbine engine components as turbine vanes and blades. The most advanced such systems employ computer-integrated manufacturing methods for high process repeatability, reprogramming versatility, and feedback monitoring. Stereolithography-based plastic model 3D prototyping has also been incorporated for the wax part of the investment casting; it may ultimately be possible to produce the 3D prototype in wax directly, or even to create a ceramic mold directly. Nonintrusive inspections are conducted by X-radiography and neutron radiography.

  16. Advanced Technology Direction and Control Communications Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-07-16

    WORK UN4IT NUMBERS The MITRE Corporation ’ 1820 flolley Madison Blvd. Work Unit 2214G McLean, VJ rginia 22102 Ii. CONTROLLING OFFICE NAME AND ADDRESS...Satellite communications using low power technique. A spread spectrum system being developed by The MITRE Corporation for the Maritime Commission. vI I,: I...300-3000 MHz; SHF (super high frequency), 3-30 GHz; EHF (extra high frequency), 30-300 GHz. 3-3 The MITRE Corporation prepared a survey of

  17. Applying New Network Security Technologies to SCADA Systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Hurd, Steven A; Stamp, Jason Edwin; Duggan, David P; Chavez, Adrian R.

    2006-11-01

    Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems for automation are very important for critical infrastructure and manufacturing operations. They have been implemented to work in a number of physical environments using a variety of hardware, software, networking protocols, and communications technologies, often before security issues became of paramount concern. To offer solutions to security shortcomings in the short/medium term, this project was to identify technologies used to secure "traditional" IT networks and systems, and then assess their efficacy with respect to SCADA systems. These proposed solutions must be relatively simple to implement, reliable, and acceptable to SCADA owners and operators. 4This page intentionally left blank.

  18. A Guide Management System Based on RFID and Bluetooth Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Han-Sheng; Wang, Jun-Jun

    The most fundamental and important requirement of the tour guide in the tour process is to ensure the safety of tourists. In this paper, a portable guide management system is designed based on RFID technology, the Android software and blue-tooth communication technology. Through this system, the guide can get real-time information if some tourists are l behind, and send text message or dial to those tourists who are l behind immediately. The system reduces the roll-calling time on the tourists, improves the tour guide work efficiency and service quality.

  19. Goddard Conference on Mass Storage Systems and Technologies, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobler, Ben (Editor); Hariharan, P. C. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    Papers and viewgraphs from the conference are presented. Discussion topics include the IEEE Mass Storage System Reference Model, data archiving standards, high-performance storage devices, magnetic and magneto-optic storage systems, magnetic and optical recording technologies, high-performance helical scan recording systems, and low end helical scan tape drives. Additional discussion topics addressed the evolution of the identifiable unit for processing (file, granule, data set, or some similar object) as data ingestion rates increase dramatically, and the present state of the art in mass storage technology.

  20. UTILITY ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS(ATS) TECHNOLOGY READINESS TESTING

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth A. Yackly

    2001-06-01

    The following paper provides an overview of GE's H System{trademark} technology, and specifically, the design, development, and test activities associated with the DOE Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) program. There was intensive effort expended in bringing this revolutionary advanced technology program to commercial reality. In addition to describing the magnitude of performance improvement possible through use of H System{trademark} technology, this paper discusses the technological milestones during the development of the first 9H (50Hz) and 7H (60 Hz) gas turbines. To illustrate the methodical product development strategy used by GE, this paper discusses several technologies that were essential to the introduction of the H System{trademark}. Also included are analyses of the series of comprehensive tests of materials, components and subsystems that necessarily preceded full scale field testing of the H System{trademark}. This paper validates one of the basic premises with which GE started the H System{trademark} development program: exhaustive and elaborate testing programs minimized risk at every step of this process, and increase the probability of success when the H System{trademark} is introduced into commercial service. In 1995, GE, the world leader in gas turbine technology for over half a century, in conjunction with the DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory's ATS program, introduced its new generation of gas turbines. This H System{trademark} technology is the first gas turbine ever to achieve the milestone of 60% fuel efficiency. Because fuel represents the largest individual expense of running a power plant, an efficiency increase of even a single percentage point can substantially reduce operating costs over the life of a typical gas-fired, combined-cycle plant in the 400 to 500 megawatt range. The H System{trademark} is not simply a state-of-the-art gas turbine. It is an advanced, integrated, combined-cycle system in which every component is